WorldWideScience

Sample records for caustic stress corrosion

  1. Stress corrosion cracking of duplex stainless steels in caustic solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharya, Ananya

    Duplex stainless steels (DSS) with roughly equal amount of austenite and ferrite phases are being used in industries such as petrochemical, nuclear, pulp and paper mills, de-salination plants, marine environments, and others. However, many DSS grades have been reported to undergo corrosion and stress corrosion cracking in some aggressive environments such as chlorides and sulfide-containing caustic solutions. Although stress corrosion cracking of duplex stainless steels in chloride solution has been investigated and well documented in the literature but the SCC mechanisms for DSS in caustic solutions were not known. Microstructural changes during fabrication processes affect the overall SCC susceptibility of these steels in caustic solutions. Other environmental factors, like pH of the solution, temperature, and resulting electrochemical potential also influence the SCC susceptibility of duplex stainless steels. In this study, the role of material and environmental parameters on corrosion and stress corrosion cracking of duplex stainless steels in caustic solutions were investigated. Changes in the DSS microstructure by different annealing and aging treatments were characterized in terms of changes in the ratio of austenite and ferrite phases, phase morphology and intermetallic precipitation using optical micrography, SEM, EDS, XRD, nano-indentation and microhardness methods. These samples were then tested for general and localized corrosion susceptibility and SCC to understand the underlying mechanisms of crack initiation and propagation in DSS in the above-mentioned environments. Results showed that the austenite phase in the DSS is more susceptible to crack initiation and propagation in caustic solutions, which is different from that in the low pH chloride environment where the ferrite phase is the more susceptible phase. This study also showed that microstructural changes in duplex stainless steels due to different heat treatments could affect their SCC

  2. Caustic stress corrosion cracking of austenitic stainless steels with thermal treatment(TT)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper dealt with the effects of TT(Thermal Treatment) and nitrogen content on caustic stress corrosion cracking of austenitic stainless steels. Nitrogen content and grain size had affected on the caustic SCC resistance. Increasing nitrogen content, SCC resistance was increased due to the enhanced repassivation rate, but at high nitrogen content, the resistance was decreased because of the dual effects between mechanical and repassivation behavior. Regardless of nitrogen content, TT improved the caustic SCC resistance and this behavior was reviewed on the points of residual stress, grain size, and dislocation array

  3. Effect of Heat Treatment on Corrosion and Stress Corrosion Cracking of S32205 Duplex Stainless Steel in Caustic Solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharya, Ananya; Singh, Preet M.

    2009-06-01

    Duplex stainless steels (DSSs) have generally performed very well in caustic environments. However, some corrosion and stress corrosion cracking (SCC) of DSSs have been reported in different pulp mill environments employing caustic solutions. Studies have shown that the corrosion and SCC susceptibility of DSSs depend on the alloy composition and microstructure of the steel. In this study, the effect of a sulfide-containing caustic environment (pulping liquor) and material properties (DSS alloy composition and microstructure) on the corrosion and SCC of DSSs was evaluated. During metal fabrication processes, localized areas of DSSs may be exposed to different temperatures and cooling rates, which may lead to changes in the microstructure in these regions. This change in microstructure, in turn, may affect the general and localized corrosion or SCC susceptibility of the affected area as compared to the rest of the metal. Hence, the effect of different annealing and aging temperatures as well as cooling rates on the microstructure and corrosion behavior of S32205 DSSs in caustic environment was evaluated. The results showed that changes in the microstructure of S32205 DSSs due to selected heat treatments did not have a significant effect on the general corrosion susceptibility of the steel in caustic environment, but its SCC susceptibility varied with changes in microstructures.

  4. Role of microstructure in caustic stress corrosion cracking of Alloy 690

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alloy 690 has been selected for nuclear heat transport system tubing application in recent commercial reactor plants due to its resistance to multiple types of corrosion attack. Typical corn final heat treatments for this material are a mill-anneal (MA, approximately 1,070 C) to completely dissolve the carbides and develop the final grain structure plus a thermal treatment (TT, approximately 700 C) to precipitate carbides at the grain boundaries. Tubing with grain boundary carbides and no or few intragranular carbides has been found resistant to intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC) in caustic environments. In this work, first, Alloy 690 plate was subjected to a variety of MA and MA-TT heat treatments to create microstructures of carbide-decorated grain boundaries and undecorated boundaries. Caustic IGSCC test results were consistent with tubing data. Second, experiments were conducted to understand the mechanism by which caustic-corrosion resistance is imparted to Alloy 690 by grain boundary carbides. Tubing with a fully-developed MA-TT carbide microstructure was strained and heat-treated to create a mixed microstructure of new grain boundaries with no carbide precipitate decoration, intermixed with intragranular carbide strings from prior grain boundaries. Caustic SCC performance of this material was identical to that of material with the MA-TT carbide-decorated grain boundaries. This work suggests that the fundamental cause of good IGSCC resistance of MA-TT Alloy 690 in caustic does not derive solely from grain boundary carbides. It is suggested that matrix strength, as measured by yield stress, could be a controlling factor

  5. Cyclic stress effect on stress corrosion cracking of duplex stainless steel in chloride and caustic solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Di

    Duplex stainless steel (DSS) is a dual-phase material with approximately equal volume amount of austenite and ferrite. It has both great mechanical properties (good ductility and high tensile/fatigue strength) and excellent corrosion resistance due to the mixture of the two phases. Cyclic loadings with high stress level and low frequency are experienced by many structures. However, the existing study on corrosion fatigue (CF) study of various metallic materials has mainly concentrated on relatively high frequency range. No systematic study has been done to understand the ultra-low frequency (˜10-5 Hz) cyclic loading effect on stress corrosion cracking (SCC) of DSSs. In this study, the ultra-low frequency cyclic loading effect on SCC of DSS 2205 was studied in acidified sodium chloride and caustic white liquor (WL) solutions. The research work focused on the environmental effect on SCC of DSS 2205, the cyclic stress effect on strain accumulation behavior of DSS 2205, and the combined environmental and cyclic stress effect on the stress corrosion crack initiation of DSS 2205 in the above environments. Potentiodynamic polarization tests were performed to investigate the electrochemical behavior of DSS 2205 in acidic NaCl solution. Series of slow strain rate tests (SSRTs) at different applied potential values were conducted to reveal the optimum applied potential value for SCC to happen. Room temperature static and cyclic creep tests were performed in air to illustrate the strain accumulation effect of cyclic stresses. Test results showed that cyclic loading could enhance strain accumulation in DSS 2205 compared to static loading. Moreover, the strain accumulation behavior of DSS 2205 was found to be controlled by the two phases of DSS 2205 with different crystal structures. The B.C.C. ferrite phase enhanced strain accumulation due to extensive cross-slips of the dislocations, whereas the F.C.C. austenite phase resisted strain accumulation due to cyclic strain

  6. Electrochemical studies on stress corrosion cracking of incoloy-800 in caustic solution. Part II: Precracking samples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dinu Alice

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Stress corrosion cracking (SCC in a caustic medium may affect the secondary circuit tubing of a CANDU NPP cooled with river water, due to an accidental formation of a concentrated alkaline environment in the areas with restricted circulation, as a result of a leakage of cooling water from the condenser. To evaluate the susceptibility of Incoloy-800 (used to manufacture steam generator tubes for CANDU NPP to SCC, some accelerated corrosion tests were conducted in an alkaline solution (10% NaOH, pH = 13. These experiments were performed at ambient temperature and 85 °C. We used the potentiodynamic method and the potentiostatic method, simultaneously monitoring the variation of the open circuit potential during a time period (E corr/time curve. The C-ring method was used to stress the samples. In order to create stress concentrations, mechanical precracks with a depth of 100 or 250 μm were made on the outer side of the C-rings. Experimental results showed that the stressed samples were more susceptible to SCC than the unstressed samples whereas the increase in temperature and crack depth lead to an increase in SCC susceptibility. Incipient micro cracks of a depth of 30 μm were detected in the area of the highest peak of the mechanical precrack.

  7. Influence of microstructure on stress corrosion cracking of mild steel in synthetic caustic-nitrate nuclear waste solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The influence of alloy microstructure on stress corrosion cracking of mild steel in caustic-nitrate synthetic nuclear waste solutions was studied. An evaluation was made of the effect of heat treatment on a representative material (ASTM A 516 Grade 70) used in the construction of high activity radioactive waste storage tanks at Savannah River Plant. Several different microstructures were tested for susceptibility to stress corrosion cracking. Precracked fracture specimens loaded in either constant load or constant crack opening displacement were exposed to a variety of caustic-nitrate and nitrate solutions. Results were correlated with the mechanical and corrosion properties of the microstructures. Crack velocity and crack arrest stress intensity were found to be related to the yield strength of the steel microstructures. Fractographic evidence indicated pH depletion and corrosive crack tip chemistry conditions even in highly caustic solutions. Experimental results were compatible with crack growth by a strain-assisted anodic dissolution mechanism; however, hydrogen embrittlement also was considered possible

  8. POTENTIAL FOR STRESS CORROSION CRACKING OF A537 CARBON STEEL NUCLEAR WASTE TANKS CONTAINING HIGHLY CAUSTIC SOLUTIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lam, P.; Stripling, C.; Fisher, D.; Elder, J.

    2010-04-26

    The evaporator recycle streams of nuclear waste tanks may contain waste in a chemistry and temperature regime that exceeds the current corrosion control program, which imposes temperature limits to mitigate caustic stress corrosion cracking (CSCC). A review of the recent service history found that two of these A537 carbon steel tanks were operated in highly concentrated hydroxide solution at high temperature. Visual inspections, experimental testing, and a review of the tank service history have shown that CSCC has occurred in uncooled/un-stress relieved tanks of similar construction. Therefore, it appears that the efficacy of stress relief of welding residual stress is the primary corrosion-limiting mechanism. The objective of this experimental program is to test A537 carbon steel small scale welded U-bend specimens and large welded plates (30.48 x 30.38 x 2.54 cm) in a caustic solution with upper bound chemistry (12 M hydroxide and 1 M each of nitrate, nitrite, and aluminate) and temperature (125 C). These conditions simulate worst-case situations in these nuclear waste tanks. Both as-welded and stress-relieved specimens have been tested. No evidence of stress corrosion cracking was found in the U-bend specimens after 21 days of testing. The large plate test was completed after 12 weeks of immersion in a similar solution at 125 C except that the aluminate concentration was reduced to 0.3 M. Visual inspection of the plate revealed that stress corrosion cracking had not initiated from the machined crack tips in the weld or in the heat affected zone. NDE ultrasonic testing also confirmed subsurface cracking did not occur. Based on these results, it can be concluded that the environmental condition of these tests was unable to develop stress corrosion cracking within the test periods for the small welded U-bends and for the large plates, which were welded with an identical procedure as used in the construction of the actual nuclear waste tanks in the 1960s. The

  9. INVESTIGATION OF THE POTENTIAL FOR CAUSTIC STRESS CORROSION CRACKING OF A537 CARBON STEEL NUCLEAR WASTE TANKS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lam, P.

    2009-10-15

    The evaporator recycle streams contain waste in a chemistry and temperature regime that may be outside of the current waste tank corrosion control program, which imposes temperature limits to mitigate caustic stress corrosion cracking (CSCC). A review of the recent service history (1998-2008) of Tanks 30 and 32 showed that these tanks were operated in highly concentrated hydroxide solution at high temperature. Visual inspections, experimental testing, and a review of the tank service history have shown that CSCC has occurred in uncooled/un-stress relieved F-Area tanks. Therefore, for the Type III/IIIA waste tanks the efficacy of the stress relief of welding residual stress is the only corrosion-limiting mechanism. The objective of this experimental program is to test carbon steel small scale welded U-bend specimens and large welded plates (12 x 12 x 1 in.) in a caustic solution with upper bound chemistry (12 M hydroxide and 1 M each of nitrate, nitrite, and aluminate) and temperature (125 C). These conditions simulate worst-case situations in Tanks 30 and 32. Both as-welded and stress-relieved specimens have been tested. No evidence of stress corrosion cracking was found in the U-bend specimens after 21 days of testing. The large plate test is currently in progress, but no cracking has been observed after 9 weeks of immersion. Based on the preliminary results, it appears that the environmental conditions of the tests are unable to develop stress corrosion cracking within the duration of these tests.

  10. Electro chemical studies on stress corrosion cracking of Incoloy-800 in caustic solution, part I: As received samples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dinu Alice

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Many non-volatile impurities accidentally introduced into the steam generator tend to Concentrate on its surface in restricted flow areas. In this way these impurities can lead to stress corrosion cracking (SCC on stressed tubes of the steam generator. Such impurities can be strong alkaline or acid solutions. To evaluate the effect of alkaline concentrated environments on SCC of steam generator tubes, the tests were con ducted on stressed samples of Incoloy-800 in 10% NaOH solution. To accelerate the SCC process, stressed specimens were anodically polarised in a caustic solution in an electro chemical cell. The method of stressing of Incoloy-800 tubes used in our experiments was the C-ring. Using the cathodic zone of the potentiodynamic curves it was possible to calculate the most important electrochemical parameters: the corrosion current, the corrosion rate, and the polarization resistance. We found that the value of the corrosion potential to initiate the SCC microcracks was -100 mV. The tested samples were examined using the metallographic method. The main experimental results showed that the in crease of the stress state promoted the in crease of the SCC susceptibility of Incoloy-800 samples tested under the same conditions, and that the length of the SCC-type microcracks in creased with the growth of the stress value.

  11. Electrochemical studies on stress corrosion cracking of Incoloy-800 in caustic solution Part I: As received samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Many non-volatile impurities accidentally introduced into the steam generator tend to concentrate on its surface in restricted flow areas. In this way these impurities can lead to stress corrosion cracking (SCC) on stressed tubes of the steam generator. Such impurities can be strong alkaline or acid solutions. To evaluate the effect of alkaline concentrated environments on SCC of steam generator tubes, the tests were conducted on stressed samples of Incoloy-800 in 10% NaOH solution. To accelerate the SCC process, stressed specimens were anodically polarised in a caustic solution in an electrochemical cell. The method of stressing of Incoloy-800 tubes used in our experiments was the C-ring. Using the cathodic zone of the potentiodynamic curves it was possible to calculate the most important electrochemical parameters: the corrosion current, the corrosion rate, and the polarisation resistance. We found that the value of the corrosion potential to initiate the SCC microcracks was -100 mV. The tested samples were examined using the metallographic method. The main experimental results showed that the increase of the stress state promoted the increase of the SCC susceptibility of Incoloy-800 samples tested under the same conditions, and that the length of the SCC-type microcracks increased with the growth of the stress value. (author)

  12. Effect of thermal treatment on caustic stress corrosion cracking an chloride SCC of super austenitic stainless steel-S32050

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper focused on the caustic SCC and chloride SCC of super austenitic stainless stee S32050. Thermal treatment (550 .deg. C 15hrs) and high temperature mill annealing (HTMA, 1,250 .deg. C 5min.) did enhance the SCC resistance than mill annealed specimen. It is considered that dislocation array is the most important factor on SCC resistance among some variables such as repassivation rate, residual stress, grain size, yield strength etc. Substituted Mn didn't affec the anodic polarization behavior of Mn-modified S32050, but cold working to the alloys reduced the SCC resistance because of the embrittlement by cold working

  13. Effect of thermal treatment on caustic stress corrosion cracking an chloride SCC of super austenitic stainless steel-S32050

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, S. K.; Park, Y. S. [Yonsei Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Y. S. [Andong Univ., Andong (Korea, Republic of); Ryu, W. S. [KAERI, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    2000-10-01

    This paper focused on the caustic SCC and chloride SCC of super austenitic stainless stee S32050. Thermal treatment (550 .deg. C 15hrs) and high temperature mill annealing (HTMA, 1,250 .deg. C 5min.) did enhance the SCC resistance than mill annealed specimen. It is considered that dislocation array is the most important factor on SCC resistance among some variables such as repassivation rate, residual stress, grain size, yield strength etc. Substituted Mn didn't affec the anodic polarization behavior of Mn-modified S32050, but cold working to the alloys reduced the SCC resistance because of the embrittlement by cold working.

  14. Effects of Surface State and Applied Stress on Stress Corrosion Cracking of Alloy 690TT in Lead-containing Caustic Solution

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhiming Zhang; Jianqiu Wang; En-Hou Han; Wei Ke

    2012-01-01

    The effects of surface state and applied stress on the stress corrosion cracking (SCC) behaviors of thermally treated (TT) Alloy 690 in 10 wt% NaOH solution with 100 mg/L litharge at 330 ℃ were investigated using C-ring samples with four kinds of surface states and two different stress levels. Sample outer surfaces of the first three kinds were ground to 400 grit (ground), shot-peened (SP) and electro-polished (EP) and the last one was used as the as-received state. Two samples of every kind were stressed to 100% and 200% yield stress of Alloy 690TT, respectively. The results showed that the oxide film consisted of three layers whereas continuous layer rich in Cr was not found. The poor adhesive ability indicated that the oxide film could not protect the matrix from further corrosion. Lead was found in the oxide film and the oxides at the crack paths and accelerated the dissolution of thermodynamically unstable Cr in these locations and also in the matrix. The crack initiation and propagation on Alloy 690TT were effectively retarded by SP and EP treatments but were enhanced by grinding treatment, compared with the cracks on the as-received surface. The cracking severity was also enhanced by increasing the externally applied stress. The accelerated dissolution of Cr and the local tensile stress concentration in the near-surface layer caused by cold-working and higher applied stress reduced the SCC-resistance of Alloy 690TT in the studied solution.

  15. Alloy SCR-3 resistant to stress corrosion cracking

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Austenitic stainless steel is used widely because the corrosion resistance, workability and weldability are excellent, but the main fault is the occurrence of stress corrosion cracking in the environment containing chlorides. Inconel 600, most resistant to stress corrosion cracking, is not necessarily safe under some severe condition. In the heat-affected zone of SUS 304 tubes for BWRs, the cases of stress corrosion cracking have occurred. The conventional testing method of stress corrosion cracking using boiling magnesium chloride solution has been problematical because it is widely different from actual environment. The effects of alloying elements on stress corrosion cracking are remarkably different according to the environment. These effects were investigated systematically in high temperature, high pressure water, and as the result, Alloy SCR-3 with excellent stress corrosion cracking resistance was found. The physical constants and the mechanical properties of the SCR-3 are shown. The states of stress corrosion cracking in high temperature, high pressure water containing chlorides and pure water, polythionic acid, sodium phosphate solution and caustic soda of the SCR-3, SUS 304, Inconel 600 and Incoloy 800 are compared and reported. (Kako, I.)

  16. Stress corrosion in gaseous environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The combined influences of a stress and a gaseous environment on materials can lead to brittleness and to unexpected delayed failure by stress corrosion cracking, fatigue cracking and creep. The most important parameters affering the material, the environment, the chemical reaction and the stress are emphasized and experimental works are described. Some trends for further research are given

  17. Stress corrosion cracking susceptibility of steam generator tubing on secondary side in restricted flow areas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nuclear steam generator tubes operate in high temperature water and on the secondary side in restricted flow areas many nonvolatile impurities accidentally introduced into circuit tend to concentrate. The concentration process leads to the formation of highly aggressive alkaline or acid solutions in crevices, and these solutions can cause stress corrosion cracking (SCC) on stressed tube materials. Even though alloy 800 has shown to be highly resistant to general corrosion in high temperature water, it has been found that the steam generator tubes may crack during service from the primary and/or secondary side. Stress corrosion cracking is still a serious problem occurring on outside tubes in operating steam generators. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the environmental factors affecting the stress corrosion cracking of steam generators tubing. The main test method was the exposure for 1000 hours into static autoclaves of plastically stressed C-rings of Incoloy 800 in caustic solutions (10% NaOH) and acidic chloride solutions because such environments may sometimes form accidentally in crevices on secondary side of tubes. Because the kinetics of corrosion of metals is indicated by anodic polarization curves, in this study, some stressed specimens were anodically polarized in caustic solutions in electrochemical cell, and other in chloride acidic solutions. The results presented as micrographs, potentiokinetic curves, and electrochemical parameters have been compared to establish the SCC behavior of Incoloy 800 in such concentrated environments. (authors)

  18. Review on Stress Corrosion and Corrosion Fatigue Failure of Centrifugal Compressor Impeller

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SUN Jiao; CHEN Songying; QU Yanpeng; LI Jianfeng

    2015-01-01

    Corrosion failure, especially stress corrosion cracking and corrosion fatigue, is the main cause of centrifugal compressor impeller failure. And it is concealed and destructive. This paper summarizes the main theories of stress corrosion cracking and corrosion fatigue and its latest developments, and it also points out that existing stress corrosion cracking theories can be reduced to the anodic dissolution (AD), the hydrogen-induced cracking (HIC), and the combined AD and HIC mechanisms. The corrosion behavior and the mechanism of corrosion fatigue in the crack propagation stage are similar to stress corrosion cracking. The effects of stress ratio, loading frequency, and corrosive medium on the corrosion fatigue crack propagation rate are analyzed and summarized. The corrosion behavior and the mechanism of stress corrosion cracking and corrosion fatigue in corrosive environments, which contain sulfide, chlorides, and carbonate, are analyzed. The working environments of the centrifugal compressor impeller show the behavior and the mechanism of stress corrosion cracking and corrosion fatigue in different corrosive environments. The current research methods for centrifugal compressor impeller corrosion failure are analyzed. Physical analysis, numerical simulation, and the fluid-structure interaction method play an increasingly important role in the research on impeller deformation and stress distribution caused by the joint action of aerodynamic load and centrifugal load.

  19. Review on stress corrosion and corrosion fatigue failure of centrifugal compressor impeller

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Jiao; Chen, Songying; Qu, Yanpeng; Li, Jianfeng

    2015-03-01

    Corrosion failure, especially stress corrosion cracking and corrosion fatigue, is the main cause of centrifugal compressor impeller failure. And it is concealed and destructive. This paper summarizes the main theories of stress corrosion cracking and corrosion fatigue and its latest developments, and it also points out that existing stress corrosion cracking theories can be reduced to the anodic dissolution (AD), the hydrogen-induced cracking (HIC), and the combined AD and HIC mechanisms. The corrosion behavior and the mechanism of corrosion fatigue in the crack propagation stage are similar to stress corrosion cracking. The effects of stress ratio, loading frequency, and corrosive medium on the corrosion fatigue crack propagation rate are analyzed and summarized. The corrosion behavior and the mechanism of stress corrosion cracking and corrosion fatigue in corrosive environments, which contain sulfide, chlorides, and carbonate, are analyzed. The working environments of the centrifugal compressor impeller show the behavior and the mechanism of stress corrosion cracking and corrosion fatigue in different corrosive environments. The current research methods for centrifugal compressor impeller corrosion failure are analyzed. Physical analysis, numerical simulation, and the fluid-structure interaction method play an increasingly important role in the research on impeller deformation and stress distribution caused by the joint action of aerodynamic load and centrifugal load.

  20. Service experience and stress corrosion of Inconel 600 bellows expansion joints in turbine-steam environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Over 100 Inconel 600 single and 2-ply expansion joints exposed to less than 3800C high purity water for times up to 12 years at 100 to 250 psig have experienced failures in only 7 cases. Mill annealed sheets are gas tungsten welded and may or may not be stress relieved. Design and structural details are given; statistics on number of joints and service times are listed. Details of 7 failures include pressures, boiler type, water treatment, turbine inlet conditions, temperatures and other parameters. Steam was greater than 3150C and 140 psig. Deposits from failed joints showed magnetite, various carbonates, calcium, silicates, and sodium orthophosphate. The sulfate anion was found also in some locations. Microscopic examination of failed zones showed carbide aggregations. Hydroxide and sodium ions were found in cracks. Failures were attributed to caustic stress corrosion cracking resulting from excursions of water treatment chemicals. Laboratory tests were made of stressed samples in high purity, low oxygen water, boiling ferric sulfate, inhibited sulfuric acid, potassium-sodium hydroxide; in 2700C air with fused caustic-steam environments was 25 ksi. Silicon dioxide promoted cracking in K-NaOH. Annealed specimens did not crack in 3300C high purity water even after pickling in nitric-hydrofluoric acid. Caustic concentrations over 50 percent were necessary for cracking

  1. State of the art review of degradation processes in LMFBR materials. Volume I. Mechanical properties. Volume II. Corrosion behavior. Revision 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A revision to Volume I and Volume II of the LMFBR materials degradation summary is presented. Information is included on NaOH corrosive effects, effects of metal cleaning procedures, and caustic stress corrosion cracking of reactor materials. (JRD)

  2. STRESS CORROSION CRACKING SUSCEPTIBILITY OF HIGH LEVEL WASTE TANKS DURING SLUDGE MASS REDUCTION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Subramanian, K

    2007-10-18

    Aluminum is a principal element in alkaline nuclear sludge waste stored in high level waste (HLW) tanks at the Savannah River Site. The mass of sludge in a HLW tank can be reduced through the caustic leaching of aluminum, i.e. converting aluminum oxides (gibbsite) and oxide-hydroxides (boehmite) into soluble hydroxides through reaction with a hot caustic solution. The temperature limits outlined by the chemistry control program for HLW tanks to prevent caustic stress corrosion cracking (CSCC) in concentrated hydroxide solutions will potentially be exceeded during the sludge mass reduction (SMR) campaign. Corrosion testing was performed to determine the potential for CSCC under expected conditions. The experimental test program, developed based upon previous test results and expected conditions during the current SMR campaign, consisted of electrochemical and mechanical testing to determine the susceptibility of ASTM A516 carbon steel to CSCC in the relevant environment. Anodic polarization test results indicated that anodic inhibition at the temperatures and concentrations of interest for SMR is not a viable, consistent technical basis for preventing CSCC. However, the mechanical testing concluded that CSCC will not occur under conditions expected during SMR for a minimum of 35 days. In addition, the stress relief for the Type III/IIIA tanks adds a level of conservatism to the estimates. The envelope for corrosion control is recommended during the SMR campaign is shown in Table 1. The underlying assumption is that solution time-in-tank is limited to the SMR campaign. The envelope recommends nitrate/aluminate intervals for discrete intervals of hydroxide concentrations, although it is recognized that a continuous interval may be developed. The limits also sets temperature limits.

  3. Industrial Experience on the Caustic Cracking of Stainless Steels and Nickel Alloys - A Review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rebak, R B

    2005-10-09

    Caustic environments are present in several industries, from nuclear power generation to the fabrication of alkalis and alumina. The most common material of construction is carbon steel but its application is limited to a maximum temperature of approximately 80 C. The use of Nickel (Ni) alloys is recommended at higher temperatures. Commercially pure Ni is the most resistant material for caustic applications both from the general corrosion and the stress corrosion cracking (SCC) perspectives. Nickel rich alloys also offer a good performance. The most important alloying elements are Ni and chromium (Cr). Molybdenum (Mo) is not a beneficial alloying element and it dissolves preferentially from the alloy in presence of caustic environments. Austenitic stainless steels such as type 304 and 316 seem less resistant to caustic conditions than even plain carbon steel. Experimental evidence shows that the most likely mechanism for SCC is anodic dissolution.

  4. Stress corrosion of very high purity stainless steels in alkaline media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This research thesis reports the study of stress corrosion resistance of stainless steels in caustic environments. It notably concerns the electronuclear industrial sector, the production of soda by electrolysis, and the preparation of hydrogen as energy vector. After a presentation of the experimental conditions, the author highlights the influence of purity on stress corrosion cracking of 20Cr-25Ni-type austenitic alloys. The specific action of a high number of addition metallic and non-metallic elements has been studied. Stress corrosion tests have been also performed in autoclave on austeno-ferritic (21 to 25 pc Cr - 6 to 10 pc Ni) as well as ferritic (26 pc Cr) grades. The author reports the study of electrochemical properties of stainless steel in soda by means of potentiostatic techniques with an application of Pourbaix thermodynamic equilibrium diagrams, and the study of the chemical composition of passivation thin layers by Auger spectroscopy. He more particularly studies the influence of electrode potential and of some addition elements on the chemical characteristics of oxides developed at the surface of austenite. Then, the author tries to establish correlations between strain hardening microstructure of the various steels and their sensitivity to stress corrosion

  5. Stress Corrosion Cracking of Pipeline Steels

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    This paper provides a review of the differences between high pH and near-neutral pH stress corrosion cracking ofpipeline steels, influencing factors, and mechanisms. The characteristics and historical information on both forms ofSCC are discussed. The prospect for research in the future is also presented.

  6. Kinetic studies of stress-corrosion cracking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noronha, P. J.

    1977-01-01

    Use of time-to-failure curves for stress-corrosion cracking processes may lead to incorrect estimates of structural life, if material is strongly dependent upon prestress levels. Technique characterizes kinetics of crackgrowth rates and intermediate arrest times by load-level changes.

  7. [Caustic ingestions].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adukauskiene, Dalia; Mazeikiene, Sandra; Rumba, Arvydas; Vizgirdaite, Venta

    2009-01-01

    Caustic ingestions (alkalis, acids) may cause severe chemical burns and lifelong complications, which worsen life quality. Approximately 80% of caustic ingestions occur in children. They mostly intoxicate because of chemical substances kept insecurely or in inappropriate containers. Until now, there is no general opinion about diagnostics and management of caustic ingestions. Therefore, the main aim of this article is accurately represent diagnostic and treatment options believing that this information would help physicians to diagnose caustic ingestions easier and faster, to provide emergency management correctly, and to avoid acute and chronic complications.

  8. Stress-corrosion cracking of titanium alloys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blackburn, M. J.; Feeney, J. A.; Beck, T. R.

    1973-01-01

    In the light of research material published up to May 1970, the current understanding of the experimental variables involved in the stress-corrosion cracking (SCC) behavior of titanium and its alloys is reviewed. Following a brief summary of the metallurgy and electrochemistry of titanium alloys, the mechanical, electrochemical, and metallurgical parameters influencing SCC behavior are explored with emphasis on crack growth kinetics. Macro- and microfeatures of fractures are examined, and it is shown that many transgranular SCC failures exhibit morphological and crystallographic features similar to mechanical cleavage failures. Current SCC models are reviewed with respect to their ability to explain the observed SCC behavior of titanium and its alloys. Possible methods for eliminating or minimizing stress corrosion hazards in titanium or titanium alloy components are described.

  9. Stress corrosion testing of irradiated cladding tubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Samples from two fuel rods with different cladding have been stress corrosion tested by closed-end argon-iodine pressurization at 3200C. The fuel rods with stress relieved and recrystallized Zircaloy-2 had received burnups of 10.000 and 20.000 MWd/ton UO2, respectively. It was found that the SCC failure stress was unchanged or slightly higher for the irradiated than for the unirradiated control tubes. The tubes failed consistently in the end with the lowest irradiation dose. The diameter increase of the irradiated cladding during the test was 1.1% for the stress-relieved samples and 0.24% for the recrystallized samples. SEM examination revealed no major differences between irradiated and unirradiated cladding. A ''semi-ductile'' fracture zone in recrystallized material is described in some detail. (author)

  10. Stress-Assisted Corrosion in Boiler Tubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Preet M Singh; Steven J Pawel

    2006-05-27

    A number of industrial boilers, including in the pulp and paper industry, needed to replace their lower furnace tubes or decommission many recovery boilers due to stress-assisted corrosion (SAC) on the waterside of boiler tubes. More than half of the power and recovery boilers that have been inspected reveal SAC damage, which portends significant energy and economic impacts. The goal of this project was to clarify the mechanism of stress-assisted corrosion (SAC) of boiler tubes for the purpose of determining key parameters in its mitigation and control. To accomplish this in-situ strain measurements on boiler tubes were made. Boiler water environment was simulated in the laboratory and effects of water chemistry on SAC initiation and growth were evaluated in terms of industrial operations. Results from this project have shown that the dissolved oxygen is single most important factor in SAC initiation on carbon steel samples. Control of dissolved oxygen can be used to mitigate SAC in industrial boilers. Results have also shown that sharp corrosion fatigue and bulbous SAC cracks have similar mechanism but the morphology is different due to availability of oxygen during boiler shutdown conditions. Results are described in the final technical report.

  11. A stress corrosion cracking experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dicic, Z.

    1999-07-01

    Severe cracking was found on two discs when a steam turbine was inspected during the outage to replace the last stage blades (LSB). The cracks were on the inlet side in the form of star burst around balance holes, and in the form of long circumferential cracks in the region of the fillet radius between the disc and the shaft. In order to return the turbine to service, the turbine was modified by removing the disc that was damaged more severely, and by machining of the other to remove the cracks. The basis for the modifications was established after having performed metallurgical and deposit examination, and reviews of stress calculations and design features. Additional modifications were performed in order to improve the internal environment at location where the cracking had occurred. The turbine is a non-reheat, 3,600 RPM, single shaft, monoblock unit used in a combined cycle plant. The steam cycle is a two pressure system; The high pressure (HP) steam parameters are: 1,450 psig, and 950 F, and the low pressure (LP) induction steam: 60 psig, saturated. The first eight stages are action type. The induction steam inlet is followed by five reaction stages. There are no extractions. The source of steam is a two pressure, unfired Heat Recovery Steam Generator (HRSG). The boiler feed water is treated with phosphates.

  12. Stress corrosion cracking of titanium alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Statler, G. R.; Spretnak, J. W.; Beck, F. H.; Fontana, M. G.

    1974-01-01

    The effect of hydrogen on the properties of metals, including titanium and its alloys, was investigated. The basic theories of stress corrosion of titanium alloys are reviewed along with the literature concerned with the effect of absorbed hydrogen on the mechanical properties of metals. Finally, the basic modes of metal fracture and their importance to this study is considered. The experimental work was designed to determine the effects of hydrogen concentration on the critical strain at which plastic instability along pure shear directions occurs. The materials used were titanium alloys Ti-8Al-lMo-lV and Ti-5Al-2.5Sn.

  13. Stress corrosion cracking of steam turbine rotors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the wake of the catastrophic failure of a low-pressure (LP) turbine disk at the Hinkley Point Nuclear Station in 1969, considerable research and development has been devoted to the problem of stress corrosion cracking (SCC) in steam turbine rotors. Principle factors affecting the susceptibility of rotors to SCC have been identified as disk yield strength, applied stress level, and surface film/crevice chemistry. Microstructure and cleanliness of the steel have been found to have relatively little effect. Advances in steel making and forging over the last 20 years have provided manufacturers with additional design and material options to mitigate the problem. Increases in forging size capabilities of steel companies and the welded construction of rotors now permit designing with integral and partial integral rotors that use materials with lower yield strength (more SCC resistant) as well as eliminating the SCC problem in bores and keyways. However, a recent survey of US utilities has shown that SCC in the blade attachment legion of LP rotors is an increasing concern. This problem has led to development of repair and refurbishment methods for rim attachments, especially weld buildup of rims with corrosion-resistant alloys. Life prediction of rotors under SCC conditions currently involves estimating crack growth time from assumed defects to critical size. Factors that govern the location and time of crack initiation are not understood adequately. 50 refs., 23 figs., 1 tab

  14. An overview of materials degradation by stress corrosion in PWRs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scott, P. M. [Framatome ANP, Tour Areva, 92084 Paris La Defense Cedex (France)

    2004-07-01

    The aging of water cooled and moderated nuclear steam supply systems has given rise to many material corrosion problems of which stress corrosion cracking has proved to be one of the most serious. The aim of this paper is to review some examples of corrosion and particularly stress corrosion problems from the author's experience of interpreting and modelling these phenomena in PWR systems. Examples of stress corrosion cracking in PWR systems described include the major issue of Alloy 600 intergranular cracking in primary PWR coolants, for which it is generally perceived that both adequate life prediction models and remedial measures now exist. Intergranular corrosion and stress corrosion cracking of Alloy 600 steam generator tubes that occur in occluded superheated crevices on the secondary side of steam generators due to hide-out and concentration of water borne impurities are also addressed. Rather less extensive or well known examples are discussed such as the stress corrosion cracking of carbon and low alloy steels and of stainless steels in occluded dead-leg situations where it is sometimes difficult to guarantee adequate control of water chemistry, particularly at plant start-up. Reference is also be made to the use of high strength fastener materials in PWR systems as well as to the emerging issue of the effect of high neutron doses on the stress corrosion resistance of core structural components fabricated from austenitic stainless steels. (authors)

  15. Relationship among Parameters Evaluating Stress Corrosion Cracking

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    @@The threshold stress, σc, for sulfide stress corrosion cracking (SCC) of seven pipeline steels and five other steels, the critical stress, SC, for seven pipeline steels and two drill rod steels with various strengths and the susceptibility to SCC, IRA or σf(SCC)/σf, for four pipeline steels, two drill rod steels and five other steels were measured. The results showed that there are no definite elationships among σc, SC and IRA or σf(SCC)/σf. The threshold stress for hydrogen induced cracking (HIC) during charging with loading in the H2SO4 solution, σc(H), decreased linearly with logarithm of the concentration of diffusible hydrogen c0, i.e., σC(H)=A-B Inc0 for four pipeline steels. σc(H) obtained with a special cathodic current ic, which was corresponding to the diffusible hydrogen concentration during immersing in the H2S solution, were consistent with σc for sulfide SCC for four pipeline steels.Therefore, σc for sulfide SCC can be measured using dynamically charging in the H2SO4 solution with the special cathodic current ic.

  16. Sizing stress corrosion cracks using laser ultrasonics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rehman, Hamood; McNealy, Rick; Fingerhut, Martin [Applus-RTD. Houston, TX (United States); Klein, Marvin; Ansari, Homayoon [Intelligent Optical Systems, Inc. Los Angeles, CA (United States); Kania Richard [TransCanada. Calgary, AB (Canada); Rapp, Steve [Spectra Energy, Houston, TX (United States)

    2010-07-01

    Despite various efforts, no reliable tools and techniques are available to enable an operator to quantify the impact of an SCC (Stress Corrosion Cracking) colony on the safety and integrity of a pipeline. Reliable non-destructive detection and measurement tools are not available either. There is therefore a large gap between current technology and the needs of the pipeline industry. Recent developments promise that with a concentrated effort, a comprehensive solution can be devised. This paper describes technical work performed to develop and validate both the inspection tool and the time of flight diffraction (TOFD) technique for sizing the depth of SCC. It also presents preliminary results of work on a closely related project that provides, on the basis of this technology, an integrated approach and tool for mapping, sizing, and evaluating SCC, through which significant cracks are filtered from more benign cracks within an SCC colony.

  17. Stress corrosion cracking of Zircaloys. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The overall aim has been to develop an improved understanding of the stress corrosion cracking (SCC) mechanism considered to be responsible for pellet-cladding interaction (PCI) failures of nuclear fuel rods. The objective of the present phase of the project was to investigate the potential for improving the resistance of Zircaloy to iodine-induced SCC by modifying the manufacturing techniques used in the commercial production of fuel cladding. Several aspects of iodine SCC behavior of potential relevance to cladding performance were experimentally investigated. It was found that the SCC susceptibility of Zircaloy tubing is sensitive to crystallographic texture, surface condition, and residual stress distribution and that current specifications for Zircaloy tubing provide no assurance of an optimum resistance to SCC. Additional evidence was found that iodine-induced cracks initiate at local chemical inhomogeneities in the Zircaloy surface, but laser melting to produce a homogenized surface layer did not improve the SCC resistance. Several results were obtained that should be considered in models of PCI failure. The ratio of axial to hoop stress and the temperature were both shown to affect the SCC resistance whereas the difference in composition between Zircaloy-2 and Zircaloy-4 had no detectable effect. Damage accumulation during iodine SCC was found to be nonlinear: generally, a given life fraction at low stress was more damaging than the same life fraction at higher stress. Studies of the thermochemistry of the zirconium-iodine system (performed under US Department of Energy sponsorship) revealed many errors in the literature and provided important new insights into the mechanism of iodine SCC of Zircaloys

  18. Causticizing process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Engdal, H.

    1987-03-10

    This invention seeks to provide a method in which the soda lye obtained as a result of cellulose cooking process and unslaked lime are used for producing white liquor which can be re-used in the cooking process. In this method, the heat released by the slaking of lime with soda lye is recovered by a high pressure slaking process wherein the heat is transferred, either to the steam separating from the lye, which steam is then led to the desired application, or to some other medium to be heated. The invention is characterized in that the soda lye to be causticized is divided into two parts, one of which is used for the slaking of lime by adding to it all the unslaked lime needed for the causticizing process, and that, following slaking, the two volumes are brought together for the actual causticizing reaction involving the total amount of lye needed. This invention provides the advantage that the amount of lye needed is smaller, and so the temperature can be increased.

  19. Effects of Stress on Corrosion in a Molten Salt Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girdzis, Samuel; Manos, Dennis; Cooke, William

    Molten salt is often used as a heat transfer and energy storage fluid in concentrating solar power plants. Despite its suitable thermal properties, molten salt can present challenges in terms of corrosion. Previous studies have focused extensively on mass loss due to molten salt-induced corrosion. In contrast, we have investigated how corrosion begins and how it changes the surface of stainless steel. Samples of alloys including 304 and 316 stainless steel were exposed to the industry-standard NaNO3-KNO3 (60%-40% by weight) mixture at temperatures over 500°C and then analyzed using Hirox, SEM, and TOF-SIMS. We compare the corrosion at grain boundaries to that within single grain surfaces, showing the effect of the increased internal stresses and the weakened passivation layer. Also, we have examined the enhanced corrosion of samples under mechanical stress, simulating the effects of thermal stresses in a power plant.

  20. Corrosion Study of Super Ferritic Stainless Steel UNS S44660 (26Cr-3Ni-3Mo) and Several Other Stainless Steel Grades (UNS S31603, S32101, and S32205) in Caustic Solution Containing Sodium Sulfide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chasse, Kevin R.; Singh, Preet M.

    2013-11-01

    Electrochemical techniques, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) were used in this study to show how the corrosion mechanism of several commercial grades of stainless steel in hot caustic solution is strongly influenced by the presence of sodium sulfide. Experimental results from super ferritic stainless steel UNS S44660 (26Cr-3Ni-3Mo) were compared to austenitic stainless steel UNS S31603, lean duplex stainless steel (DSS) UNS S32101, and standard DSS UNS S32205 in caustic solution, with and without sodium sulfide, at 443 K (170 °C). Weight loss measurements indicated that corrosion rates of UNS44660 were much lower than the other grades of stainless steel in the presence of the sodium sulfide. Potentiodynamic polarization and linear polarization resistance measurements showed that the electrochemical behavior was altered by the adhesion of sulfur species, which reduced the polarization resistances and increased the anodic current densities. SEM and XPS results imply that the surface films that formed in caustic solution containing sodium sulfide were defective due to the adsorption of sulfide, which destabilized the passive film and led to the formation of insoluble metal sulfide compounds.

  1. Experimental Study on Wing Crack Behaviours in Dynamic-Static Superimposed Stress Field Using Caustics and High-Speed Photography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L.Y. Yang

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available During the drill-and-blast progress in rock tunnel excavation of great deep mine, rock fracture is evaluated by both blasting load and pre-exiting earth stress (pre-compression. Many pre-existing flaws in the rock mass, like micro-crack, also seriously affect the rock fracture pattern. Under blasting load with pre-compression, micro-cracks initiate, propagate and grow to be wing cracks. With an autonomous design of static-dynamic loading system, dynamic and static loads were applied on some PMMA plate specimen with pre-existing crack, and the behaviour of the wing crack was tested by caustics corroding with a high-speed photography. Four programs with different static loading modes that generate different pre-compression fields were executed, and the length, velocity of the blasting wing crack and dynamic stress intensity factor (SIF at the wing crack tip were analyzed and discussed. It is found that the behaviour of blasting-induced wing crack is affected obviously by blasting and pre-compression. And pre-compression, which is vertical to the direction of the wing crack propagation, hinders the crack propagation. Furthermore, the boundary constraint condition plays an important role on the behaviour of blasting induced crack during the experiment.

  2. Pitting corrosion and stress corrosion of Zircaloy 4 in neutral chloride environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In a first part, this research thesis describes the electrochemical methods which are generally used to characterize sensitivity to pitting corrosion of metallic materials, presents the method used for the statistical analysis of pitting initiation as well as results obtained in the case of Zircaloy 4 in a neutral chloride environment. This reveals that passivity film thickness is a critical parameter for the understanding of observed behaviours, and therefore required the study of passivity film formation kinetics. Thus established passivity rules are then used to study the influence of passive film evolution on behaviour in terms of pitting corrosion. Experimental results are then compared with published results. The second part addresses the determination of sensitivity to stress corrosion of the same alloy in the same environment. It aims at trying to identify correlations between sensitivity to this type of corrosion and sensitivity to pitting corrosion

  3. Stress corrosion cracking of copper canisters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    King, Fraser (Integrity Corrosion Consulting Limited (Canada)); Newman, Roger (Univ. of Toronto (Canada))

    2010-12-15

    A critical review is presented of the possibility of stress corrosion cracking (SCC) of copper canisters in a deep geological repository in the Fennoscandian Shield. Each of the four main mechanisms proposed for the SCC of pure copper are reviewed and the required conditions for cracking compared with the expected environmental and mechanical loading conditions within the repository. Other possible mechanisms are also considered, as are recent studies specifically directed towards the SCC of copper canisters. The aim of the review is to determine if and when during the evolution of the repository environment copper canisters might be susceptible to SCC. Mechanisms that require a degree of oxidation or dissolution are only possible whilst oxidant is present in the repository and then only if other environmental and mechanical loading conditions are satisfied. These constraints are found to limit the period during which the canisters could be susceptible to cracking via film rupture (slip dissolution) or tarnish rupture mechanisms to the first few years after deposition of the canisters, at which time there will be insufficient SCC agent (ammonia, acetate, or nitrite) to support cracking. During the anaerobic phase, the supply of sulphide ions to the free surface will be transport limited by diffusion through the highly compacted bentonite. Therefore, no HS. will enter the crack and cracking by either of these mechanisms during the long term anaerobic phase is not feasible. Cracking via the film-induced cleavage mechanism requires a surface film of specific properties, most often associated with a nano porous structure. Slow rates of dissolution characteristic of processes in the repository will tend to coarsen any nano porous layer. Under some circumstances, a cuprous oxide film could support film-induced cleavage, but there is no evidence that this mechanism would operate in the presence of sulphide during the long-term anaerobic period because copper sulphide

  4. Influence of thermal treatment on the caustic SCC of super austenitic stainless steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoo, Y.R.; Park, Y.B.; Chung, T.J.; Kim, Y.S. [School of Advanced Materials Engineering, Andong National Univ. (Korea); Chang, H.Y. [Korea Power Engineering Co. (Korea); Park, Y.S. [Dept. of Metallurgical Engineering, Yonsei Univ. (Korea)

    2005-07-01

    In general, thermal treatment at 500 C {proportional_to} 900 C ranges depending upon alloy composition of stainless steels can sensitize the steels and promote the intergranular cracking, and their intergranular corrosion resistance is decreased. These behaviors seem to be related to the change of microstructures. So, heat treatment at that temperature range should be avoided in fabrication, especially welding of stainless steels. In this work, it is focused on the effect of thermal treatment on caustic stress corrosion cracking of super austenitic stainless steel - S32050 The low temperature thermal treatment increased greatly the resistance to caustic SCC than those of annealed specimen. This enhancement might be closely related to the reduction of residual stress and slightly large grain, but its resistance was not affected by the anodic polarization behavior. (orig.)

  5. Axial stress corrosion cracking forming method to metal tube

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Generally, it is more difficult in a metal tube, to intentionally cause a stress corrosion cracking in axial direction than in circumferential direction. In the present invention, a bevel is formed on a metal tube and welding is conducted in circumferential direction along the bevel, and welding is conducted in axial direction partially to the portion welded in circumferential direction. Namely, a bevel is formed in circumferential direction to an abutting portion of thick-walled metal tubes with each other, welding is conducted in circumferential direction along the bevel, and welding is conducted in axial direction partially to a portion welded in circumferential direction. With such procedures, since tensile stress in the circumferential direction is increased partially at a portion welded in axial direction, stress corrosion cracking is caused in axial direction at the portion. Then, stress corrosion cracking in axial direction can thus be formed on the thick-walled metal tube. (N.H.)

  6. The effect of deformation on stress corrosion of brass

    OpenAIRE

    A. Kadłuczka; Mazur, M.

    2010-01-01

    Brass are some of the most common copper alloys, both due to its characteristics and utility technology. Corrosion fracture after stress corrosion are the most common form of destruction of brass.This is particularly dangerous because of the lack of early, visible signal of decohesion of the material. It is therefore important to know exactly this phenomenon to design and manufacture heavy loaded industrial constructions exposed to aggressive environments, as wellas minimize the danger of des...

  7. Study on mitigation of stress corrosion cracking by peening

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In order to verify stability of residual stress improvement effect of peeing for mitigation of stress corrosion cracking in components of PWR plant, relaxation behavior of residual stress induced by water jet peening (WJP) and ultrasonic shot peening (USP) on surface of alloy 600 and its weld metal was investigated under various thermal aging and stress condition considered for actual plant operation. In the case of thermal aging at 320-380degC, surface residual stress relaxation was observed at the early stage of thermal aging, but no significant stress relaxation was observed after that. Applied stress below yield stress does not significantly affect stress relaxation behavior of surface residual stress. Furthermore, it was confirmed that cyclic stress does not accelerate stress relaxation. (author)

  8. Stress corrosion cracking susceptibility of 7A52 aluminum alloy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO Jun-jun; WANG Wei-xin; CAI Zhi-hai; ZHANG Ping

    2006-01-01

    The stress corrosion sensitivity of 7A52 aluminum alloy was investigated in the artificial sea water through slow stain rate test(SSRT). The stress corrosion cracking(SCC) susceptibility was estimated with the loss of elongation and stress corrosion sensitivity index. The results show that the susceptibility of 7A52 aluminum alloy is always high when the strain rate is in the range of 10-5-10-7s-1. It reaches the maximum at the strain rate of 8.7×10-7s-1, and the sensitivity index reaches 0.346. The characteristics of stress corrosion can be observed clearly on the fracture of tensile specimen. The process of SCC is depicted according to the fracture morphology. The SCC initiates at the edge of the specimen. Then the SCC grows rapidly because of the anode dissolving and stress concentration. When the area of specimen cannot support the tensile stress, it ruptures suddenly. The secondary cracks and quasi-cleavage surface can be found on the fracture morphology.susceptibility

  9. The effects of radiolysis on the corrosion and stress corrosion behavior of 316 stainless steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duquette, D.J.; Steiner, D.

    1993-09-01

    This program is focused on the corrosion, stress corrosion and corrosion fatigue behavior of Type 316 stainless steel (316SS) at 50, 90, and 130 C in high-purity water. Irradiated solution tests are performed using high-energy photon radiation. Purpose of this work is to determine the effects of radiolysis products on the environmental stability of 316SS in support of the ITER first wall/shield/blanket design. Preliminary results suggest that irradiation of pure water at 50 C results in a shift in the electrochemical potential for 316SS of approximately 100mV in the active direction and nearly an order of magnitude increase in the passive current density as compared to non-irradiated conditions. This proposal outlines a three-year program to develop corrosion design criteria for the use of 316SS in an ITER environment.

  10. Three-dimensional characterization of stress corrosion cracks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lozano-Perez, S.; Rodrigo, P.; Gontard, Lionel Cervera

    2011-01-01

    Understanding crack propagation and initiation is fundamental if stress corrosion cracking (SCC) mechanisms are to be understood. However, cracking is a three-dimensional (3D) phenomenon and most characterization techniques are restricted to two-dimensional (2D) observations. In order to overcome...... the best spatial resolution. To illustrate the power of these techniques, different parts of dominant stress corrosion cracks in Ni-alloys and stainless steels have been reconstructed in 3D. All relevant microstructural features can now be studied in detail and its relative orientation respect...

  11. Effect of hydrogen on stress corrosion cracking of copper

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li-jie QIAO

    2008-01-01

    The effects of hydrogen on electrochemical behavior and susceptibility of stress corrosion cracking (SCC) of pure copper were studied. SCC susceptibility of pure copper in a 1 M NaNO2 solution was increased by pre-charged hydrogen. The effect of hydrogen on the sus-ceptibility is more obvious in the low stress region due to the longer fracture time, which resulted in a longer time for more hydrogen to diffuse toward the crack tip. Synergistic effects of hydrogen and stress on corrosion and SCC pro-cesses were discussed. The results showed that an inter-action between stress and hydrogen at the crack tip could increase the anodic dissolution rate remarkably.

  12. Compressive residual stresses as a preventive measure against stress corrosion cracking on turbine components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Disk type low pressure turbine rotors have been designed for a large variety of power plant applications. Developing disk type rotors required a concerted effort to design a shaft/disk shrink fit with a minimum of tensile stress concentrations in order to aim for the lowest possible susceptibility to corrosive attack, i.e. stress corrosion cracking. As a result of stresses, the regions of greatest concern are the shrink fit boundaries and the keyways of turbine disks. These stresses are caused by service loading, i.e. centrifugal and shrinkage stresses and by manufacturing procedure, i.e. residual stresses. The compressive residual stresses partly compensate the tensile service stresses so that an increase of compressive residual stresses decreases the whole stress state of the component. Special manufacturing procedures, e.g. accelerated cooling after tempering can induce compressive residual stresses up to about 400 MPa in the hub bore region of turbine disk

  13. Role of secondary austenite on corrosion and stress corrosion cracking of sensitized duplex stainless steel weldments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The role of secondary austenite on corrosion and stress corrosion cracking in high temperature water for sensitized duplex stainless steel weldment was investigated using transmission electron microscopy and fractography. Pitting potential measurements, 10% oxalic acid tests (ASTM A262A), Strauss tests (ASTM A262E) and Huey tests (ASTM A262C) were carried out for the corrosion assessment. For stress corrosion cracking, the slow strain rate testing (SSRT) was carried out at 562K with 8 ppm dissolved oxygen under 8 MPa at a strain rate of 4.17x10-6s-1. Volume fraction of γphase decreased with increasing peak temperature and the grain size of the γphase increased with increasing peak temperature. The amount of precipitation of Cr2N at the grain boundary and in the grain increased with increasing peak temperature. The region around Cr2N showed intergranular corrosion. For the sensitization at 923K for 72ks, σphase precipitated and secondary γphases (named γ* phase) appeared between primary γphase and σphase. The γ* phases were predominantly corroded and the pitting potentials were low. Stress corrosion cracking in high temperature water hardly occurred for the solution-treated specimen. The reduction in area of the specimen sensitized at 923K for 72ks was much lower than that of the solution-treated specimens and decreased with decreasing peak temperature, because the γ* phases near the M23C6 and σphase were predominantly corroded and dissolved. (author)

  14. Effect of Wall Shear Stress on Corrosion Inhibitor Film Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canto Maya, Christian M.

    In oil and gas production, internal corrosion of pipelines causes the highest incidence of recurring failures. Ensuring the integrity of ageing pipeline infrastructure is an increasingly important requirement. One of the most widely applied methods to reduce internal corrosion rates is the continuous injection of chemicals in very small quantities, called corrosion inhibitors. These chemical substances form thin films at the pipeline internal surface that reduce the magnitude of the cathodic and/or anodic reactions. However, the efficacy of such corrosion inhibitor films can be reduced by different factors such as multiphase flow, due to enhanced shear stress and mass transfer effects, loss of inhibitor due to adsorption on other interfaces such as solid particles, bubbles and droplets entrained by the bulk phase, and due to chemical interaction with other incompatible substances present in the stream. The first part of the present project investigated the electrochemical behavior of two organic corrosion inhibitors (a TOFA/DETA imidazolinium, and an alkylbenzyl dimethyl ammonium chloride), with and without an inorganic salt (sodium thiosulfate), and the resulting enhancement. The second part of the work explored the performance of corrosion inhibitor under multiphase (gas/liquid, solid/liquid) flow. The effect of gas/liquid multiphase flow was investigated using small and large scale apparatus. The small scale tests were conducted using a glass cell and a submersed jet impingement attachment with three different hydrodynamic patterns (water jet, CO 2 bubbles impact, and water vapor cavitation). The large scale experiments were conducted applying different flow loops (hilly terrain and standing slug systems). Measurements of weight loss, linear polarization resistance (LPR), and adsorption mass (using an electrochemical quartz crystal microbalance, EQCM) were used to quantify the effect of wall shear stress on the performance and integrity of corrosion inhibitor

  15. Alkaline stress corrosion of iron-nickel-chromium austenitic alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This research thesis reports the study of the behaviour in stress corrosion of austenitic iron-nickel-chromium alloys by means of tensile tests at imposed strain rate, in a soda solution at 50 pc in water and 350 degrees C. The author shows that the mechanical-chemical model allows the experimental curves to be found again, provided the adjustment of characteristic parameters, on the one hand, of corrosion kinetics, and on the other hand, of deformation kinetics. A classification of the studied alloys is proposed

  16. Stress corrosion cracking experience in steam generators at Bruce NGS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In late 1990 and through 1991, units 1 and 2 at the Bruce A Nuclear Generating Station (BNGS-A) experienced a number of steam generator tube leaks. Tube failures were identified by eddy current to be circumferential cracks at U-bend supports on the hot-leg side of the boilers. In late 1991, tubes were removed from these units for failure characterization. Two active failure modes were found: corrosion fatigue in both units 1 and 2 and stress corrosion cracking (SCC) in unit 2. In unit 2, lead was found in deposits, on tubes, and in cracks, and the cracking was mixed-mode: transgranular and intergranular. This convincingly indicated the involvement of lead in the stress corrosion cracking failures. A program of inspection and tube removals was carried out to investigate more fully the extent of the problem. This program found significant cracking only in lead-affected boilers in unit 2, and also revealed a limited extent of non-lead-related intergranular stress corrosion cracking in other boilers and units. Various aspects of the failures and tube examinations are presented in this paper. Included is discussion of the cracking morphology, measured crack size distributions, and chemical analysis of tube surfaces, crack faces, and deposits -- with particular emphasis on lead

  17. Preventative measures to limit stress corrosion cracking in prestressed concrete

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oneil, E. F.

    1983-09-01

    In the past decade, the most significant advances in the area of protection of prestressing steel from stress corrosion cracking have come in the fields of metallurgy and concrete materials. These efforts have developed from a more precise understanding of the mechanisms that cause stress corrosion cracking in prestressing steel, and development of concreting materials that provide greater protection for these steels. This report deals with two aspects of steel protection. First, with respect to the steel itself, new insights into the structure of the prestressing steels have shown metallurgists the conditions under which stress cracks form and advance, as well as ways in which to modify the physical properties of the steel to minimize the possibility of crack formation and advancement. Secondly, in the field of concrete materials, the emphasis on prevention of corrosion to steel has been in the area of durability of the concrete that protects the steel. Lower water-cement ratios and concretes with lower permeability exclude deleterious materials from the surface of the steel. New materials and procedures are discussed that have been designed to limit the penetration of corrosive elements that may attack the steel at the grain boundaries and initiate brittle failure.

  18. MECHANISTIC UNDERSTANDING OF CAUSTIC CRACKING OF CARBON STEELS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia-Diaz, B.; Roy, A.

    2009-10-19

    Liquid waste generated by the PUREX process for separation of nuclear materials is concentrated and stored in Type IV single-shell carbon steel tanks at the Savannah River Site (SRS). The Type IV tanks for this waste do not have cooling coils and have not undergone heat treatment to stress-relieve the tanks. After the waste is concentrated by evaporation, it becomes very alkaline and can cause stress corrosion cracking (SCC) and pitting corrosion of the tank materials. SRS has experienced leakage from non-stress-relieved waste tanks constructed of A285 carbon steel and pitting of A212 carbon steel tanks in the vapor space. An investigation of tank materials has been undertaken at SRS to develop a basic understanding of caustic SCC of A285 and A212 grade carbon steels exposed to aqueous solutions, primarily containing sodium hydroxide (NaOH), sodium nitrate (NaNO{sub 3}), and sodium nitrite (NaNO{sub 2}) at temperatures relevant to the operating conditions of both the F and H area plants. This report presents the results of this corrosion testing program. Electrochemical tests were designed using unstressed coupons in a simulated tank environment. The purpose of this testing was to determine the corrosion susceptibility of the tank materials as a function of chemical concentration, pH, and temperature. A285 and A516 (simulates A212 carbon steel) coupons were used to investigate differences in the corrosion of these carbon steels. Electrochemical testing included measurement of the corrosion potential and polarization resistance as well as cyclic potentiodynamic polarization (CPP) testing of coupons. From the CPP experiments, corrosion characteristics were determined including: corrosion potential (E{sub corr}), pitting or breakdown potential (E{sub pit}), and repassivation potential (E{sub prot}). CPP results showed no indications of localized corrosion, such as pitting, and all samples showed the formation of a stable passive layer as evidenced by the positive

  19. Effects of hot-salt stress corrosion on titanium alloys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, H. R.

    1972-01-01

    Susceptibility of titanium alloys to hot-salt stress-corrosion cracking increased as follows: Ti-2Al-11Sn-5Zr-1Mo-0.2Si (679), Ti-6Al-2Sn-4Zr-2Mo (6242), Ti-6Al-4V (64), Ti-6Al-4V-3Co (643), Ti-8Al-1Mo-1V (811), and Ti-13V-11Cr-3Al (13-11-3). The Ti-5Al-6Sn-2Zr-1Mo-0.25Si (5621S) alloy was both the least and most susceptible, depending on heat treatment. Such rankings can be drastically altered by heat-to-heat variations and processing conditions. Residual compressive stresses reduce susceptibility to stress-corrosion. Detection of substantial concentrations of hydrogen in all corroded alloys confirmed the generality of a previously proposed hydrogen embrittlement mechanism.

  20. Stress corrosion cracking susceptibility of dissimilar stainless steels welded joints

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Łabanowski

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The aim of the current study is to reveal the influence of welding conditions on structure and stresscorrosion cracking resistance of dissimilar stainless steels butt welded joints.Design/methodology/approach: Butt joints between duplex 2205 and austenitic 316L steels were performedwith the use of submerged arc welding (SAW method. The plates 15 mm in thickness were welded with heatinput in the range of 1.15 – 3.2 kJ/mm using duplex steel filler metal. Microstructure examinations and corrosiontests were carried out. Slow strain rate tests (SSRT were performed in inert (glycerin and aggressive (boiling35% MgCl2 solution environments.Findings: It was shown that place of the lowest resistance to stress corrosion cracking is heat affected zone atduplex steel side of dissimilar joins. That phenomenon was connected with undesirable structure of that zoneconsisted of great amount of coarse ferrite grains and acicular austenite precipitates. High welding inputs do notdeteriorate stress corrosion cracking resistance of welds.Research limitations/implications: High welding heat inputs should enhance the precipitation process ofintermetallic phases in the HAZ. It is necessary to continue the research to determine the relationship betweenwelding parameters, obtained structures, and corrosion resistance of dissimilar stainless steels welded joints.Practical implications: Application of more productive joining process for dissimilar welds like submerged arcwelding instead of currently employed gas metal arc welding (GMAW method will be profitable in terms ofreduction the welding costs.Originality/value: The stress corrosion cracking resistance of dissimilar stainless steel welded joints wasdetermined. The zone of the weaker resistance to stress corrosion cracking was pointed out.

  1. Hydrogen-increased dezincification layer-induced stress and susceptibility to stress corrosion cracking of brass

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李会录; 高克玮; 褚武扬; 刘亚萍; 乔利杰

    2003-01-01

    Dezincification layer formed during corrosion or stress corrosion cracking (SCC) of brass in an ammonia solution could induce an additive stress. The effect of hydrogen on the dezincification layer-induced stress and the susceptibility to SCC were studied. The dezincification layer-induced stress was measured using the deflection method and the flowing stress differential method, respectively. The latter measures the difference between the flowing stress of a specimen before unloading and the yield stress of the same specimen after unloading and forming a dezincification layer. The susceptibility to SCC was measured using slow strain rate test. Results show that both the dezincification layer-induced stress and the susceptibility to SCC increase with increasing hydrogen concentration in a specimen. This implies that hydrogen-enhanced dezincification layer-induced stress is consistence with the hydrogen-increased susceptibility to SCC of brass in the ammonia solution.

  2. Effect of cold working and applied stress on the stress corrosion cracking resistance of nickel-chromium-iron alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In order to grasp the stress corrosion cracking quantitative resistance of Alloys 600 and 690 in PWR primary water, the authors have studied the effect of cold working and applied stress on the stress corrosion cracking resistance of Alloys 600 and 690, in high temperature water. Stress corrosion cracking tests were conducted at 360 degrees C (633K) in a simulated PWR primary water for about 12,000 hours or 24,000 hours. From the test results, it is concluded that the stress corrosion cracking resistance in the cold worked Alloy 600 at the same applied stress level increases with an increase in cold working ratio, and the cold worked Alloys of thermally treated 690 have the excellent stress corrosion cracking resistance. Further, in this paper, the planning of stress corrosion cracking test for weld joints and weld metal of Alloy 600 is described

  3. Stress corrosion cracking of candidate waste container materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Six alloys have been selected as candidate container materials for the storage of high-level nuclear waste at the proposed Yucca Mountain site in Nevada. These materials are Type 304L stainless steel (SS), Type 316L SS, Incology 825, P-deoxidized Cu, Cu-30%Ni, and Cu-7% Al. The present program has been initiated to determine whether any of these materials can survive for 300 years in the site environment without developing through-wall stress corrosion cracks, and to assess the relative resistance of these materials to stress corrosion cracking (SCC). A series of slow-strain-rate tests (SSRTs) in simulated Well J-13 water which is representative of the groundwater present at the Yucca Mountain site has been completed, and crack-growth-rate (CGR) tests are also being conducted under the same environmental conditions. 13 refs., 60 figs., 22 tabs

  4. Ultrasonic inspection of turbine rotor discs for stress corrosion cracking

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stress corrosion cracking in turbine discs and keyways has been recognised for a number of years as a problem. Magnox Electric has devised and implemented a strategy to manage the threat from SCC, based on a probabilistic risk assessment technique. An important input to the risk assessment is a knowledge of existing defects and Magnox Electric has undertaken a major programme of work to develop ultrasonic inspection techniques and equipment for SCC detection and sizing in the relevant disc geometries. (author)

  5. Stress corrosion cracking of austenitic stainless steel core internal welds.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chung, H. M.; Park, J.-H.; Ruther, W. E.; Sanecki, J. E.; Strain, R. V.; Zaluzec, N. J.

    1999-04-14

    Microstructural analyses by several advanced metallographic techniques were conducted on austenitic stainless steel mockup and core shroud welds that had cracked in boiling water reactors. Contrary to previous beliefs, heat-affected zones of the cracked Type 304L, as well as 304 SS core shroud welds and mockup shielded-metal-arc welds, were free of grain-boundary carbides, which shows that core shroud failure cannot be explained by classical intergranular stress corrosion cracking. Neither martensite nor delta-ferrite films were present on the grain boundaries. However, as a result of exposure to welding fumes, the heat-affected zones of the core shroud welds were significantly contaminated by oxygen and fluorine, which migrate to grain boundaries. Significant oxygen contamination seems to promote fluorine contamination and suppress thermal sensitization. Results of slow-strain-rate tensile tests also indicate that fluorine exacerbates the susceptibility of irradiated steels to intergranular stress corrosion cracking. These observations, combined with previous reports on the strong influence of weld flux, indicate that oxygen and fluorine contamination and fluorine-catalyzed stress corrosion play a major role in cracking of core shroud welds.

  6. Comparison of Stress Corrosion Cracking Susceptibility of Laser Machined and Milled 304 L Stainless Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, R. K.; Kumar, Aniruddha; Nagpure, D. C.; Rai, S. K.; Singh, M. K.; Khooha, Ajay; Singh, A. K.; Singh, Amrendra; Tiwari, M. K.; Ganesh, P.; Kaul, R.; Singh, B.

    2016-07-01

    Machining of austenitic stainless steel components is known to introduce significant enhancement in their susceptibility to stress corrosion cracking. The paper compares stress corrosion cracking susceptibility of laser machined 304 L stainless steel specimens with conventionally milled counterpart in chloride environment. With respect to conventionally milled specimens, laser machined specimens displayed more than 12 times longer crack initiation time in accelerated stress corrosion cracking test in boiling magnesium chloride as per ASTM G36. Reduced stress corrosion cracking susceptibility of laser machined surface is attributed to its predominantly ferritic duplex microstructure in which anodic ferrite phase was under compressive stress with respect to cathodic austenite.

  7. Environmental behavior and stress corrosion characteristics of nano/sub-micron E950 aluminum alloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aghion, Eli; Guinguis, Inbar [Department of Materials Engineering, Ben-Gurion University of the Negev Beer-Sheva (Israel)

    2009-11-15

    The corrosion performance and stress corrosion resistance of E950 Aluminum alloy with nano/sub-micron structure were evaluated in 3.5% NaCl solution. The results obtained indicated that the corrosion and stress corrosion resistance of E950 alloy were relatively reduced compared to that of the conventional coarse-grained alloy (Al-4.65%Mg). In particular, the inherently improved ultimate tensile strength of E950 alloy was significantly decreased under stress corrosion conditions. (Abstract Copyright [2009], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  8. Investigation of corrosion and stress corrosion cracking in bolting materials on light water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laboratory experiments performed at BNL have shown that the concentration of boric acid to a moist paste at approximately the boiling point of water can produce corrosion rates of the order of several tenths of an inch per year on bolting and piping materials, which values are consistent with service experience. Other failure evaluation experience has shown that primary coolant/lubricant interaction may lead to stress corrosion cracking (SCC) of steam generator manway studs. An investigation was also performed on eleven lubricants and their effects on A193 B7 and A540 B24 bolting materials. H2S generation by the lubricants, coefficient of friction results and transgranular SCC of the bolting materials in steam are discussed. 13 refs

  9. Addressing stress corrosion cracking on multi layer pipeline coating systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hardy, Scott B.; Marr, James E. [Tuboscope Pipeline Services, Houston, TX (United States); Willmot, Martyn [Jotun Group (Norway); Norman, David [David Norman Corrosion Control, Cornwall (United Kingdom); Khera, Ashish [Allied Engineering, Portland, ME (United States)

    2005-07-01

    Stress corrosion cracking (SCC) is now recognized by operators worldwide as a significant threat to the safe operation of their pipeline systems. Gas, oil, and refined products lines have all been susceptible to this form of environmentally assisted cracking. As a result, operators and regulators have been incorporating data related to the development and prevalence of SCC into their risk management systems in order that they may effectively address this time-dependant threat. The National Association of Corrosion Engineers (NACE) published the first structured methodology for stress corrosion cracking direct assessment (SCCDA) in 2004 (RP0204-2004). Operators are now beginning to apply the methods outlined in the standard to assess their systems. Research and industry experience have shown that various pipeline coating systems can be more or less effective in preventing the formation and growth of SCC. Newer pipeline coatings, such as multi layer epoxy/extruded polyolefin systems have been widely regarded as effective coating systems to address the threat posed by SCC when they are properly applied. New field studies performed on a pipeline coated with a three layer epoxy/polyethylene system have raised the possibility that operators utilizing these types of coatings may need to reassess how they manage the SCC threat. (author)

  10. Sensitization, intergranular attack, stress corrosion cracking, and irradiation effects on the corrosion of iron--chromium--nickel alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, P.C.S.

    1978-04-01

    A literature review is presented on the sensitization, intergranular attack, and stress corrosion cracking of austenitic stainless steels with emphasis on dilute solutions at temperatures below the boiling point of water. An attempt is made to list the possible sources of contaminants during manufacture, shipping, construction and all phases of operation of the sodium containing components. The susceptibility of the different materials to stress corrosion cracking in the various contaminants is discussed and suggestions to prevent serious problems are made. (GHT)

  11. Residual stresses and stress corrosion cracking in pipe fittings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Residual stresses can play a key role in the SCC performance of susceptible materials in PWR primary water applications. Residual stresses are stresses stored within the metal that develop during deformation and persist in the absence of external forces or temperature gradients. Sources of residual stresses in pipe fittings include fabrication processes, installation and welding. There are a number of methods to characterize the magnitude and orientation of residual stresses. These include numerical analysis, chemical cracking tests, and measurement (e.g., X-ray diffraction, neutron diffraction, strain gage/hole drilling, strain gage/trepanning, strain gage/section and layer removal, and acoustics). This paper presents 400 C steam SCC test results demonstrating that residual stresses in as-fabricated Alloy 600 pipe fittings are sufficient to induce SCC. Residual stresses present in as-fabricated pipe fittings are characterized by chemical cracking tests (stainless steel fittings tested in boiling magnesium chloride solution) and by the sectioning and layer removal (SLR) technique

  12. Micromechanical testing of stress corrosion cracking of individual grain boundaries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grain boundaries of different misorientation and chemistry have differing susceptibilities to stress corrosion cracking but carrying out mechanical tests on individual grain boundaries of known character has until now been very difficult. We present a method for manufacturing specimens containing a single grain boundary (in 304 stainless steel) using focused ion beam machining. A nanoindenter/atomic force microscope was used to drive controlled grain boundary crack growth under load in an active solution. Scanning electron microscopy examination confirmed the growth of the crack along the grain boundary.

  13. Stress corrosion cracking of zirconium in nitric acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The susceptibility of zirconium and its common alloys to stress corrosion cracking (SCC) in nitric acid was investigated by slow strain-rate and constant deflection techniques. Cracking occurred at 250C over a wide range of acid concentrations and electrochemical potentials. The crack velocity increased slightly with increasing temperature. The failure mode was transgranular and the morphology was similar to SCC failures of zirconium alloys in other environments. The fracture was very orientation-dependent suggesting that it occurs on a single crystallographic plane in the material. The results of the study are not consistent with a hydrogen mechanism for cracking

  14. Environmental Cracking of Corrosion Resistant Alloys in the Chemical Process Industry - A Review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rebak, R B

    2006-12-04

    A large variety of corrosion resistant alloys are used regularly in the chemical process industry (CPI). The most common family of alloys include the iron (Fe)-based stainless steels, nickel (Ni) alloys and titanium (Ti) alloys. There also other corrosion resistant alloys but their family of alloys is not as large as for the three groups mentioned above. All ranges of corrosive environments can be found in the CPI, from caustic solutions to hot acidic environments, from highly reducing to highly oxidizing. Stainless steels are ubiquitous since numerous types of stainless steels exist, each type tailored for specific applications. In general, stainless steels suffer stress corrosion cracking (SCC) in hot chloride environments while high Ni alloys are practically immune to this type of attack. High nickel alloys are also resistant to caustic cracking. Ti alloys find application in highly oxidizing solutions. Solutions containing fluoride ions, especially acid, seem to be aggressive to almost all corrosion resistant alloys.

  15. Corrosion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slabaugh, W. H.

    1974-01-01

    Presents some materials for use in demonstration and experimentation of corrosion processes, including corrosion stimulation and inhibition. Indicates that basic concepts of electrochemistry, crystal structure, and kinetics can be extended to practical chemistry through corrosion explanation. (CC)

  16. Effect of cold working on the stress corrosion cracking resistance of nickel-chromium-iron alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In order to grasp the stress corrosion cracking resistance of cold worked nickel base alloys in PWR primary water, the effect of cold working on the stress corrosion cracking resistance of alloys 600, X-750 and 690, in high temperature water, have been studied. Stress corrosion cracking tests were conducted at 3600C (633K) in a simulated PWR primary water for about 12,000 hours (43.2Ms). From the test results, it is concluded that the stress corrosion cracking resistance in the cold worked Alloy 600 at the same applied stress level increases with an increase in cold working ratio, and the cold worked alloys of thermally treated 690 and X-750 have excellent stress corrosion cracking resistance. (Author)

  17. Advances in research of stress-assisted corrosion fatigue problem

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TANG Zhi-bo; LI Qiang

    2007-01-01

    Ceramic materials are notable for their rigidity, insulation and resistance to hostile environment. Nevertheless, if a stressed ceramic component is exposed to chemical attack, it may suffer from a form of delayed fracture known as static fatigue.From the point of view of a designer, it is clearly desirable to determine the behavior of sub-critical crack growth; the crack path and crack growth rate, as a function of material properties and loading conditions are of particular interest. This paper presents a review of advances in stress assisted corrosion problem in history and its corresponding numerical approaches in the last decades,and finally, comes up with consideration and crucial suggestions for future work.

  18. Examination of stress corrosion crack tip microstructures in stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Intergranular Stress Corrosion Cracking of austenitic stainless steel components is one of the major materials degradation processes in Boiling Water Reactors (BWRs) and its dependence on the plant water chemistry has been found to be an important factor. Of the contaminants found in BWR water, sulphate ions have been identified as the most aggressive species and their effect has been studied in previous SKI funded work. Sample preparation techniques developed recently allow the examination of stress corrosion microstructures with analysis on the nanometer scale. A sample has been prepared from material tested earlier and studied using advanced electron microscope techniques. Compositional analyses of the crack-wall oxide indicated that it is (Fe,Cr)2O3 and that this oxide incorporates up to 10 % sulphur and some nickel. However, much more sulphur is stored in a nickel sulphide phase that was found precipitated within the crack. The Fe:Cr ratio in the oxide does vary significantly from area to area. In the crack tip region, the crack was found to be following a grain boundary free of carbide precipitates. A single grain boundary precipitate some 60 nm ahead of the visible crack-tip was found and analysed. This precipitate was enriched in nickel and sulphur. Sulphur was also found within a few nanometers of the visible crack tip. The oxides in the crack-tip region were a mixture of Fe2O3 and (Fe,Cr)2O3 and incorporated nickel metal particles up to 100 nm in diameter

  19. Stress corrosion cracking behaviour of gas tungsten arc welded super austenitic stainless steel joints

    OpenAIRE

    M. Vinoth Kumar; Balasubramanian, V.; S. RAJAKUMAR; Shaju K. Albert

    2015-01-01

    Super 304H austenitic stainless steel with 3% of copper posses excellent creep strength and corrosion resistance, which is mainly used in heat exchanger tubing of the boiler. Heat exchangers are used in nuclear power plants and marine vehicles which are intended to operate in chloride rich offshore environment. Chloride stress corrosion cracking is the most likely life limiting failure with austenitic stainless steel tubing. Welding may worsen the stress corrosion cracking susceptibility of t...

  20. Stress corrosion cracking and hydrogen embrittlement of thick section high strength low alloy steel.

    OpenAIRE

    Needham, William Donald

    1986-01-01

    An experimental study was conducted to evaluate the corrosion performance of weldments of a high strength low alloy(HSLA) steel in a simulated seawater environment. This steel, designated HSLA80, was developed by the United States Navy for use in ship structural applications. Stress corrosion CRACKING(SCC) and hydrogen embrittlement(HEM) were investigated by conducting 42 Wedge-Opening load(WOL) tests as a function of stress intensity and corrosion potential and 33 Slow Strain Rate(SSR) tests...

  1. EFFECTS OF CHEMISTRY AND OTHER VARIABLES ON CORROSION AND STRESS CORROSION CRACKING IN HANFORD DOUBLE SHELL TANKS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    BROWN MH

    2008-11-13

    Laboratory testing was performed to develop a comprehensive understanding of the corrosivity of the tank wastes stored in Double-Shell Tanks using simulants primarily from Tanks 241-AP-105, 241-SY-103 and 241-AW-105. Additional tests were conducted using simulants of the waste stored in 241-AZ-102, 241-SY-101, 241-AN-107, and 241-AY-101. This test program placed particular emphasis on defining the range of tank waste chemistries that do not induce the onset of localized forms of corrosion, particularly pitting and stress corrosion cracking. This document summarizes the key findings of the research program.

  2. Influence of burnishing on stress corrosion cracking susceptibility of duplex steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Łabanowski

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: of the current study was to investigate the usability of burnishing-inducted surface enhancement method for improve the stress corrosion cracking resistance of duplex stainless steel.Design/methodology/approach: The surface layers upon round in cross section specimens were performed through burnishing treatment. Corrosion tests were performed with the use of Slow Strain Rate Test technique in inert (glycerin and aggressive (boiling 35% MgCl2 solution environments.Findings: It was shown that burnishing treatment increases corrosion resistance of the steel. Stress corrosion cracking resistance depends on the magnitude of cold work at surface layers. High level of cold work decreases corrosion resistance.Research limitations/implications: This study does not indicate the optimum stress level and stress distribution in surface layers for the best corrosion resistance. It is necessary to continue the research to determine burnishing parameters for demanded properties of duplex steel surface layers.Practical implications: The burnishing treatment can significantly improve stress corrosion resistance of specified parts of chemical installations working in the contact with aggressive media. Such parts as valve parts or propeller shafts can be successfully protected against corrosion attack.Originality/value: Burnishing surface enhancement for constructional parts made of duplex stainless steels exposed to corrosive environments has not been reported in literature. Application of this technology can increase life-time of chemical installation devices and improve their reliability.

  3. Stress corrosion evaluation of powder metallurgy aluminum alloy 7091 with the breaking load test method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domack, Marcia S.

    1987-01-01

    The stress corrosion behavior of the P/M aluminum alloy 7091 is evaluated in two overaged heat treatment conditions, T7E69 and T7E70, using an accelerated test technique known as the breaking load test method. The breaking load data obtained in this study indicate that P/M 7091 alloy is highly resistant to stress corrosion in both longitudinal and transverse orientations at stress levels up to 90 percent of the material yield strength. The reduction in mean breaking stress as a result of corrosive attack is smallest for the more overaged T7E70 condition. Details of the test procedure are included.

  4. Two-phase flow experiments through intergranular stress corrosion cracks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Experimental studies of critical two-phase water flow, through simulated and actual intergranular stress corrosion cracks, were performed to obtain data to evaluate a leak flow rate model and investigate acoustic transducer effectiveness in detecting and sizing leaks. The experimental program included a parametric study of the effects of crack geometry, fluid stagnation pressure and temperature, and crack surface roughness on leak flow rate. In addition, leak detection, location, and leak size estimation capabilities of several different acoustic transducers were evaluated as functions of leak rate and transducer position. This paper presents flow rate data for several different cracks and fluid conditions. It also presents the minimum flows rate detected with the acoustic sensors and a relationship between acoustic signal strength and leak flow rate

  5. Metallurgical evaluation of stress corrosion cracking in large diameter piping

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ultrasonic testing (UT) of stainless-steel piping in the primary coolant water system of Savannah River Site (SRS) reactors indicates the presence of short, partly through-wall stress corrosion cracks in the heat-affected zone of approximately 7% of the circumferential pipe welds. These cracks are thought to develop by intergranular nucleation and mixed mode propagation. Metallographic evaluations have confirmed the UT indications of crack size and provided evidence that crack growth involved the accumulation of chloride ions inside the growing crack. It is postulated that the development of an oxygen depletion cell inside the crack results in the migration of chloride ions to the crack tip to balance the accumulation of positively charged metallic ions. The results of this metallurgical evaluation, combined with structural assessments of system integrity, support the existence of leak-before-break conditions in the SRS reactor piping system

  6. Interplay of microbiological corrosion and alloy microstructure in stress corrosion cracking of weldments of advanced stainless steels

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    R K Singh Raman

    2003-06-01

    This paper presents an overview of the phenomenon of stress corrosion cracking (SCC) of duplex stainless steels and their weldments in marine environments and the potential role of microbial activity in inducing SCC susceptibility. As a precursor to the topic the paper also reviews the performance of the traditional corrosion-resistant alloys and their weldments and the necessity of using duplex stainless steels (DSS), in order to alleviate corrosion problems in marine environments. Given that the performance of weldments of such steels is often unsatisfactory, this review also assesses the research needs in this area. In this context the paper also discusses the recent reports on the role of microorganisms in inducing hydrogen embrittlements and corrosion fatigue.

  7. Development of a Stress Corrosion Cracking Test Methodology Using Tube-shaped Specimens

    OpenAIRE

    SATO Yasumoto; He, Xue; Takeda, Yoichi; Shoji, Tetsuo

    2007-01-01

    Stress corrosion cracking (SCC) is one of the greatest concerns in nuclear aging and degradation, and studies on the measurement of stress corrosion crack growth rates (CGR) and the effects of environmental, material, and mechanical parameters on the CGR have been performed using mainly fracture mechanics specimens. However, the stress states for the fracture mechanics specimens are different from that of real field components and there is concern about the applicability of the data obtained...

  8. Ultrasonic Impact Treatment to Improve Stress Corrosion Cracking Resistance of Welded Joints of Aluminum Alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, J.; Gou, G.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, W.; Chen, H.; Yang, Y. P.

    2016-07-01

    Stress corrosion cracking is one of the major issues for welded joints of 6005A-T6 aluminum alloy in high-speed trains. High residual stress in the welded joints under corrosion results in stress corrosion cracking. Ultrasonic impact treatment was used to control the residual stress of the welded joints of 6005A-T6 aluminum alloy. Experimental tests show that ultrasonic impact treatment can induce compressive longitudinal and transverse residual stress in the welded joint, harden the surface, and increase the tensile strength of welded joints. Salt-fog corrosion tests were conducted for both an as-welded sample and an ultrasonic impact-treated sample. The surface of the treated sample had far fewer corrosion pits than that of the untreated sample. The treated sample has higher strength and lower tensile residual stress than the untreated sample during corrosion. Therefore, ultrasonic impact treatment is an effective technique to improve the stress corrosion cracking resistance of the welded joints of 6005A-T6 aluminum alloy.

  9. Stress-Corrosion Interactions in Zr-Based Bulk Metallic Glasses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petre Flaviu Gostin

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Stress-corrosion interactions in materials may lead to early unpredictable catastrophic failure of structural parts, which can have dramatic effects. In Zr-based bulk metallic glasses, such interactions are particularly important as these have very high yield strength, limited ductility, and are relatively susceptible to localized corrosion in halide-containing aqueous environments. Relevant features of the mechanical and corrosion behavior of Zr-based bulk metallic glasses are described, and an account of knowledge regarding corrosion-deformation interactions gathered from ex situ experimental procedures is provided. Subsequently the literature on key phenomena including hydrogen damage, stress corrosion cracking, and corrosion fatigue is reviewed. Critical factors for such phenomena will be highlighted. The review also presents an outlook for the topic.

  10. Demonstration through EPR tests of the sensitivity of austeno-ferritic steels to intergranular corrosion and stress corrosion cracking

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duplex stainless steels can be sensitised to intergranular corrosion and stress corrosion cracking (SCC) under some conditions (heat treatments, welding). The aim of this work is to contribute to the validation of the EPR (Electrochemical Potentiodynamic Reactivation) test in order to determine conditions for normalisation. This method, based on the dissolution of chromium depleted areas due to precipitation of σ-phase, provides a degree of sensitisation to intergranular corrosion. The test is broaden considering the mechanical stress by the way of slow strain rate tests, performed in chloride magnesium and in a solution similar to the EPR solution. A metallurgical study puts on the precipitates and the structural modifications due to welding and heat treatments, in order to make a critical analysis of the EPR test. (author)

  11. Influence of hydrogen on corrosion and stress induced cracking of stainless steel

    OpenAIRE

    Kivisäkk, Ulf

    2010-01-01

    Hydrogen is the smallest element in the periodical table. It has been shown in several studies that hydrogen has a large influence on the corrosion and cracking behaviour of stainless steels. Hydrogen is involved in several of the most common cathode reactions during corrosion and can also cause embrittlement in many stainless steels. Some aspects of the effect of hydrogen on corrosion and hydrogen-induced stress cracking, HISC, of stainless steels were studied in this work. These aspects rel...

  12. A Fracture Probability Competition Mechanism of Stress Corrosion Cracking

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yanliang HUANG

    2001-01-01

    The stress corrosion cracking (SCC) of austenitic stainless steel was studied via polarization,slow strain rate and scanning electron microscope (SEM) techniques. Many SCC mechanisms have been proposed in which hydrogen embrittlement and passive film rupture-repassivation theories are generally accepted, but they can hardly explain the SCC mechanism of austenitic stainless steel in acidic chloride solution adequately, because the steel is in active dissolution state and cathodic polarization can prevent it from occurring. Our experiment shows that the anodic current increases the creep rate and decreases the plastic strength of the material on single smooth specimen as well as at the SCC crack tip. The fractured surface was characterized as brittle cleavage, while the surface crack of smooth specimen was almost vertical to the tensile strength, which can confirm that the cracks were caused by tensile stresses. A fracture probability competition mechanism of SCC was proposed on the basis of the experimental results combined with the viewpoint of ductile-brittle fracture competition. When the anodic dissolution current is increased to a certain degree, the probability of fracture by tensile stress will exceed that by shear stress, and the brittle fracture will occur. The proposed SCC mechanism can not only explain the propagation of SCC cracks but can explain the crack initiation as well. The strain on the surface distributes unevenly when a smooth specimen is deformed, so does the anodic current distribution. The crack will initiate at a point where the anodic current density is large enough to cause the material at a specific point to fracture in brittle manner.

  13. Stress Corrosion Cracking of High-strength Drill Pipe in Sour Gas Well

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Zhi; LI Jing; ZENG Dezhi; HU Junying; HOU Duo; ZHANG Liehui; SHI Taihe

    2014-01-01

    In high sour gas reservoir drilling process, it happens occasionally that high-strength drill pipe suffers brittle fracture failure due to stress corrosion cracking, and poses serious hazard to drilling safety. To solve this problem, this paper studied the stress corrosion cracking mechanism and influencing factors of high-strength drill pipe in sour environment with hydrogen permeation experiments and tensile tests. We simulated practical conditions in laboratory and evaluated the stress corrosion cracking performance of the high-strength drill pipe under conditions of high stress level. For the problems occurring in use of high-strength drill pipe on site, the paper proposed a technical measure for slower stress corrosion cracking.

  14. Hydrogen embrittlement and stress corrosion cracking in metals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Young Suk; Cheong, Yong Mu; Im, Kyung Soo

    2004-10-15

    The objective of this report is to elucidate the mechanism for hydrogen embrittlement (HE) and stress corrosion cracking (SCC) in metals. To this end, we investigate the common features between delayed hydride cracking (DHC) in zirconium alloys and HE in metals with no precipitation of hydrides including Fe base alloys, Nickel base alloys, Cu alloys and Al alloys. Surprisingly, as with the crack growth pattern for the DHC in zirconium alloy, the metals mentioned above show a discontinuous crack growth, striation lines and a strong dependence of yield strength when exposed to hydrogen internally and externally. This study, for the first time, analyzes the driving force for the HE in metals in viewpoints of Kim's DHC model that a driving force for the DHC in zirconium alloys is a supersaturated hydrogen concentration coming from a hysteresis of the terminal solid solubility of hydrogen, not by the stress gradient, As with the crack growing only along the hydride habit plane during the DHC in zirconium alloys, the metals exposed to hydrogen seem to have the crack growing by invoking the dislocation slip along the preferential planes as a result of some interactions of the dislocations with hydrogen. Therefore, it seems that the hydrogen plays a role in inducing the slip only on the preferential planes so as to cause a strain localization at the crack tip. Sulfur in metals is detrimental in causing a intergranular cracking due to a segregation of the hydrogens at the grain boundaries. In contrast, boron in excess of 500 ppm added to the Ni3Al intermetallic compound is found to be beneficial in suppressing the HE even though further details of the mechanism for the roles of boron and sulfur are required. Carbon, carbides precipitating semi-continuously along the grain boundaries and the CSL (coherent site lattice) boundaries is found to suppress the intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC) in Alloy 600. The higher the volume fraction of twin boundaries, the

  15. Hydrogen embrittlement and stress corrosion cracking in metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objective of this report is to elucidate the mechanism for hydrogen embrittlement (HE) and stress corrosion cracking (SCC) in metals. To this end, we investigate the common features between delayed hydride cracking (DHC) in zirconium alloys and HE in metals with no precipitation of hydrides including Fe base alloys, Nickel base alloys, Cu alloys and Al alloys. Surprisingly, as with the crack growth pattern for the DHC in zirconium alloy, the metals mentioned above show a discontinuous crack growth, striation lines and a strong dependence of yield strength when exposed to hydrogen internally and externally. This study, for the first time, analyzes the driving force for the HE in metals in viewpoints of Kim's DHC model that a driving force for the DHC in zirconium alloys is a supersaturated hydrogen concentration coming from a hysteresis of the terminal solid solubility of hydrogen, not by the stress gradient, As with the crack growing only along the hydride habit plane during the DHC in zirconium alloys, the metals exposed to hydrogen seem to have the crack growing by invoking the dislocation slip along the preferential planes as a result of some interactions of the dislocations with hydrogen. Therefore, it seems that the hydrogen plays a role in inducing the slip only on the preferential planes so as to cause a strain localization at the crack tip. Sulfur in metals is detrimental in causing a intergranular cracking due to a segregation of the hydrogens at the grain boundaries. In contrast, boron in excess of 500 ppm added to the Ni3Al intermetallic compound is found to be beneficial in suppressing the HE even though further details of the mechanism for the roles of boron and sulfur are required. Carbon, carbides precipitating semi-continuously along the grain boundaries and the CSL (coherent site lattice) boundaries is found to suppress the intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC) in Alloy 600. The higher the volume fraction of twin boundaries, the more

  16. Stress corrosion cracking of stainless steels in NaCl solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Speidel, Markus O.

    1981-05-01

    The metallurgical influences on the stress corrosion resistance of many commercial stainless steels have been studied using the fracture mechanics approach. The straight-chromium ferritic stainless steels, two-phase ferritic-austenitic stainless steels and high-nickel solid solutions (like alloys 800 and 600) investigated are all fully resistant to stress corrosion cracking at stress intensity (K1) levels ≤ MN • m-3/2 in 22 pct NaCl solutions at 105 °C. Martensitic stainless steels, austenitic stainless steels and precipitation hardened superalloys, all with about 18 pct chromium, may be highly susceptible to stress corrosion cracking, depending on heat treatment and other alloying elements. Molybdenum additions improve the stress corrosion cracking resistance of austenitic stainless steels significantly. The fracture mechanics approach to stress corrosion testing of stainless steels yields results which are consistent with both the service experience and the results from testing with smooth specimens. In particular, the well known “Copson curve” is reproduced by plotting the stress corrosion threshold stress intensity (ATISCC) vs the nickel content of stainless steels with about 18 pct chromium.

  17. Acoustic emission reviling and danger level evaluation of stress corrosion cracking in stainless steel pipes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Breakdowns and catastrophic damage occurring during the operation of nuclear power stations pipelines cause substantial economic and social loss annually throughout the world. Stress corrosion, vibration, fatigue, erosion, water shock, dynamic load, construction defects/errors are the main causes of pipes failures. For these reasons and in view of the age of nuclear power station pipes, there is an increased interest in finding means to prevent potential pipe failures. Nevertheless, statistical data of pipe failures continues to show significant numbers of accidents mainly due to stress corrosion cracking (about 65-80% of total number). To this end, a complex of investigations was carried out for the reliable AE diagnosis of pipes undergone stress corrosion cracking. These include: finding AE indications (fingerprints) of flaws developing in the metal in original condition as well as in metal subjected to stress corrosion; preparing AE criteria for evaluating the danger level of defects. (author)

  18. Effect of Surface Stress Mitigation on the Corrosion Behavior of Alloy 22

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fix, D V; Yilmaz, A; Wong, L L; Estill, J C; Rebak, R B

    2004-11-10

    When metallic plates are welded, for example using the Gas Tungsten Arc Welding (GTAW) process, residual tensile stresses may develop in the vicinity of the weld seam. Processes such as Low Plasticity Burnishing (LPB) and Laser Shock Peening (LSP) could be applied locally to eliminate the residual stresses produced by welding. In this study, Alloy 22 (N06022) plates were welded and then the above-mentioned surface treatments were applied to eliminate the residual tensile stresses. The aim of the current study was to comparatively test the corrosion behavior of as-welded (ASW) plates with the corrosion behavior of plates with stress mitigated surfaces. Immersion and electrochemical tests were performed. Results from both general and localized corrosion tests show that the corrosion resistance of the mitigated plates was not affected by the surface treatments applied.

  19. Stress corrosion cracking of an aluminum alloy used in external fixation devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cartner, Jacob L; Haggard, Warren O; Ong, Joo L; Bumgardner, Joel D

    2008-08-01

    Treatment for compound and/or comminuted fractures is frequently accomplished via external fixation. To achieve stability, the compositions of external fixators generally include aluminum alloy components due to their high strength-to-weight ratios. These alloys are particularly susceptible to corrosion in chloride environments. There have been several clinical cases of fixator failure in which corrosion was cited as a potential mechanism. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of physiological environments on the corrosion susceptibility of aluminum 7075-T6, since it is used in orthopedic external fixation devices. Electrochemical corrosion curves and alternate immersion stress corrosion cracking tests indicated aluminum 7075-T6 is susceptible to corrosive attack when placed in physiological environments. Pit initiated stress corrosion cracking was the primary form of alloy corrosion, and subsequent fracture, in this study. Anodization of the alloy provided a protective layer, but also caused a decrease in passivity ranges. These data suggest that once the anodization layer is disrupted, accelerated corrosion processes occur. PMID:18257055

  20. Stress Corrosion Cracking of Steel and Aluminum in Sodium Hydroxide: Field Failure and Laboratory Test

    OpenAIRE

    Prawoto, Y.; Sumeru, K.; W.B. WAN NIK

    2012-01-01

    Through an investigation of the field failure analysis and laboratory experiment, a study on (stress corrosion cracking) SCC behavior of steel and aluminum was performed. All samples were extracted from known operating conditions from the field failures. Similar but accelerated laboratory test was subsequently conducted in such a way as to mimic the field failures. The crack depth and behavior of the SCC were then analyzed after the laboratory test and the mechanism of stress corrosion cracki...

  1. OBSERVATIONS OF STRESS CORROSION CRACKING BEHAVIOUR IN SUPER DUPLEX STAINLESS STEEL

    OpenAIRE

    Al-Rabie, Mohammed

    2011-01-01

    The new generation of highly alloyed super duplex stainless steels such as Zeron 100 are preferable materials for industrial applications demanding high strength, toughness and superior corrosion resistance, especially against stress corrosion cracking (SCC). SCC is an environmentally assisted failure mechanism that occurs due to exposure to an aggressive environment while under a tensile stress. The mechanism by which SCC of duplex stainless steel is expected to suffer depends on the combina...

  2. Corrosion evaluation of alternate nuclear steam generator tubing materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Several materials were evaluated for use in nuclear steam generators (NSG). These materials were exposed to corrosive conditions representative of those found in nuclear steam generators. The materials evaluated were gold, titanium, tantalum, niobium, Hastelloy C-276, Hastelloy G. Nickel 200, nickel-base Alloy 625, and heat-tracked nickel-base Alloy 600. The test environments simulated acid pitting attack, caustic stress corrosion cracking and reduced sulfur attack. In the pitting environment, the monolithic materials did well, however Nickel 200, nickel-base Alloy 600 and Hastelloy G3 did poorly. The remaining alloys, nickel-base Alloy 625 and Hastelloy C-276 were relatively unaffected in the pitting environment. Tantalum, titanium, niobium, nickel-base Alloy 625 performed poorly in the environment designed to evaluate resistance to caustic cracking. Nickel-base Alloy 600 (stress-relieved), Hastelloy C-276, Hasteloy G-3 and Nickel 200 compared fair to good in the caustic sodium. The gold was unaffected in the hot caustic solution. In the environment selected to represent a reduced sulfur environment, nickel-base Alloy 625 and Hastelloy C-276 exhibited considerable resistance. The nickel-base Alloy 600 was attacked within a relatively short period of time

  3. Stress corrosion cracking on irradiated 316 stainless steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furutani, Gen; Nakajima, Nobuo; Konishi, Takao; Kodama, Mitsuhiro

    2001-02-01

    Tests on irradiation-assisted stress corrosion cracking (IASCC) were carried out by using cold-worked (CW) 316 stainless steel (SS) in-core flux thimble tubes which were irradiated up to 5×10 26 n/m 2 ( E>0.1 MeV) at 310°C in a Japanese PWR. Unirradiated thimble tube was also tested for comparison with irradiated tubes. Mechanical tests such as the tensile, hardness tests and metallographic observations were performed. The susceptibility to SCC was examined by the slow strain rate test (SSRT) under PWR primary water chemistry condition and compositional analysis on the grain boundary segregation was made. Significant changes in the mechanical properties due to irradiation such as a remarkable increase of strength and hardness, and a considerable reduction of elongation were seen. SSRT results revealed that the intergranular fracture ratio (%IGSCC) increased as dissolved hydrogen (DH) increased. In addition, SSRT results in argon gas atmosphere showed a small amount of intergranular cracking. The depletion of Fe, Cr, Mo and the enrichment of Ni and Si were observed in microchemical analyses on the grain boundary.

  4. Study on corrosion characteristics and stress corrosion cracking of the weldment for HT-60 steel in synthetic seawater

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The contents of this paper include the evaluation of corrosion characteristics and the behaviour of Stress Corrosion Cracking (SCC) for the weldment and Post Weld Heat Treatment(PWHT) specimen and parent of HT-60 steel using a Slow Strain Rate Test(SSRT) in synthetic seawater. Corrosion characteristics were obtained from the polarization curves by potentiostat, and SCC phenomena were evaluated through the parameters such as reduction of area and time to failure by comparing the experimental results in corrosive environment with those obtained in air. Corrosion rate of the weldment was the fastest, followed by parent and PWHT specimen. SCC phenomena between the weldment of HT-60 steel and synthetic seawater were shown. Besides, SCC was dependent upon the pulling speed greatly. Maximum severity of SCC was obtained at a speed of 10-6mm/min, whereas SCC could not be seen almost at 10-4mm/min. The resistance to SCC for PWHT specimen was improved considerably compared that of the weldment at 10-6mm/min. In case of SCC failure, it was verified from SEM examination that brittle mode and lots of pits could be seen at the fractured region near the surface of the specimen

  5. Determination of Stress-Corrosion Cracking in Aluminum-Lithium Alloy ML377

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valek, Bryan C.

    1995-01-01

    The use of aluminum-lithium alloys for aerospace applications is currently being studied at NASA Langley Research Center's Metallic Materials Branch. The alloys in question will operate under stress in a corrosive environment. These conditions are ideal for the phenomena of Stress-Corrosion Cracking (SCC) to occur. The test procedure for SCC calls for alternate immersion and breaking load tests. These tests were optimized for the lab equipment and materials available in the Light Alloy lab. Al-Li alloy ML377 specimens were then subjected to alternate immersion and breaking load tests to determine residual strength and resistance to SCC. Corrosion morphology and microstructure were examined under magnification. Data shows that ML377 is highly resistant to stress-corrosion cracking.

  6. Computational modeling of the mechanism of hydrogen embrittlement (HE) and stress corrosion cracking (SCC) in metals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cendales, E. D.; Orjuela, F. A.; Chamarraví, O.

    2016-02-01

    In this article theoretical models and some existing data sets were examined in order to model the two main causes (hydrogen embrittlement and corrosion-cracking under stress) of the called environmentally assisted cracking phenomenon (EAC). Additionally, a computer simulation of flat metal plate subject to mechanical stress and cracking due both to hydrogen embrittlement and corrosion was developed. The computational simulation was oriented to evaluate the effect on the stress-strain behavior, elongation percent and the crack growth rate of AISI SAE 1040 steel due to three corrosive enviroments (H2 @ 0.06MPa; HCl, pH=1.0; HCl, pH=2.5). From the computer simulation we conclude that cracking due to internal corrosion of the material near to the crack tip limits affects more the residual strength of the flat plate than hydrogen embrittlement and generates a failure condition almost imminent of the mechanical structural element.

  7. Corrosion leaking of preheater weldment in alumina factories

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Li; CHEN Wen-mi; GONG Zhu-qing; LIU Hong-zhao

    2005-01-01

    Stress corrosion cracking (SCC) and anticorrosion measures of TU42C weld-joint were studied by constant load experiments and pickling experiments. The results show that in 40%(mass fraction) NaOH solution at 110 ℃, caustic SCC occurs in TU42C weld-joints at the applied potential of -1 020 mV(vs SCE) for 3 d while at the potential of -950 mV(vs SCE) for 10 d. All the cracks are intergranular. In the 10% sulfuric acid, the cracks have the most negative self-corrosion potential -432.5 mV(vs SCE) and are active to be further corroded by the acid. Because of the same corrosion behaviour as the lab weldment, preheater's cracking in alumina factories is attributed to the combining actions of previous caustic SCC in Bayer solutions and continuous acid corrosion by pickling with the addition of RD. The following measures are effective to prevent the corrosion failure of preheater, such as postweld heat treatment at 620 ℃ to relax the residual weld stress, addition of CC3 and L826 as the corrosion inhibitors to improve the pickling and cleaning by the high pressure water instead of by pickling.

  8. Stress-corrosion crack initiation process for Alloy 182 weld metal in simulated BWR environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For preventing SCC from occurring in the internal structure of materials of the BWR plant, the injection of hydrogen into the core-water so as to reduce the free corrosion potential of the materials were proposed. Because of the lack of basic data of stress-corrosion cracking susceptibility in BWR environment on Ni-based alloys in comparison with stainless steels, the slow strain-rate tensile (SSRT) tests and the creviced bent-beam (CBB) test were conducted for a sensitized Alloy 182 weld metal in high-purity water environments containing dissolved oxygen (DO) and hydrogen (DH) to varied concentrations at 288 C, and the SCC initiation process were examined. The susceptibility of a material to SCC was discussed in terms of the electrode potential effect, and the effects of impurities of the testing water were examined by adding slightly Na2, SO4. In high purity waters and in the electrode potential region higher than - 0.2 V vs. SHE, the interdendritic stress-corrosion cracks were observed both in the slow strain-rate test and the creviced bent-beam test. SEM observations of sub-cracks at the specimen surfaces revealed that stress-corrosion cracks were initiated when the oxide film had cracked to under-hundred microm wide, that no such individual cracks could grow per se, but that those micro-cracks which happened to be formed in each other's vicinity would coalesce into large cracks, one of which made propagated as stress-corrosion cracking, and that the stress-corrosion cracking sensitivity became more acute on addition of impurity. In the electrode potential region lower than 0 V, on the other hand, the stress-corrosion cracks were observed to be initiated at bottoms of corrosion pits formed on the specimen surfaces in the former, whereas both type of stress-corrosion cracks were observed between 0 to -0.2V. No stress-corrosion crack was observed even though much the same corrosion pits in the CBB test at -0.4 V

  9. Test and research on stress corrosion crack of austenitic stainless steel in ocean environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The applicability of stress corrosion test performance on wedge opened self-loaded samples to study stress corrosion property of austenitic stainless steels in ocean environment including Cl-. The studied materials were 0Cr18Ni10Ti(321) austenitic stainless steel, using NaCl solution with concentration of 3.5%, 15% and 26.5% to simulate ocean and condensable ocean situation. The average stress corrosion crack propagating rate existed in 3.34 X 10-9 mm/s∼1.31 X 10-8 mm/s and incubation time were 792∼1752 h or even more when stress intensity factor K1 in scope of 35 MPa √m∼60 MPa √m. Stress corrosion crack propagating rate was immune to differing concentration of NaCl, crack incubation got shorter along with stress intensity factor K1 was higher. That was showed prefabricated fatigue crack area, stress corrosion crack propagation area and toughness fracture area connected with each other on fracture surface. (authors)

  10. A study on the mechanism of stress corrosion cracking of duplex stainless steels in hot alkaline-sulfide solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chasse, Kevin Robert

    Duplex stainless steels (DSS) generally have superior strength and corrosion resistance as compared to most standard austenitic and ferritic stainless grades owing to a balanced microstructure of austenite and ferrite. As a result of having favorable properties, DSS have been selected for the construction of equipment in pulp and paper, chemical processing, nuclear, oil and gas as well as other industries. The use of DSS has been restricted in some cases because of stress corrosion cracking (SCC), which can initiate and grow in either the ferrite or austenite phase depending on the environment. Thorough understanding of SCC mechanisms of DSS in chloride- and hydrogen sulfide-containing solutions has been useful for material selection in many environments. However, understanding of SCC mechanisms of DSS in sulfide-containing caustic solutions is limited, which has restricted the capacity to optimize process and equipment design in pulp and paper environments. Process environments may contain different concentrations of hydroxide, sulfide, and chloride, altering corrosion and SCC susceptibility of each phase. Crack initiation and growth behavior will also change depending on the relative phase distribution and properties of austenite and ferrite. The role of microstructure and environment on the SCC of standard grade UNS S32205 and lean grade UNS S32101 in hot alkaline-sulfide solution were evaluated in this work using electrochemical, film characterization, mechanical testing, X-ray diffraction, and microscopy techniques. Microstructural aspects, which included residual stress state, phase distribution, phase ratio, and microhardness, were related to the propensity for SCC crack initiation in different simulated alkaline pulping liquors at 170 °C. Other grades of DSS and reference austenitic and superferritic grades of stainless steel were studied using exposure coupons for comparison to understand compositional effects and individual phase susceptibility

  11. Residual strain change resulting from stress corrosion in Carrara marble

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voigtlaender, Anne; Leith, Kerry; Krautblatter, Michael

    2016-04-01

    Residual stresses and strains have been shown to play a fundamental role in determining the elastic behavior of engineering materials, yet the effect of these strains on brittle and elastic behavior of rocks remains unclear. In order to evaluate the impact of stored elastic strains on fracture propagation in rock, we undertook a four-month-long three-point bending test on three large 1100 x 100 x 100 mm Carrara Marble samples. This test induced stable low stress conditions in which strains were concentrated at the tip of a saw cut and pre-cracked notch. A corrosive environment was created at the tip of the notch on two samples (M2 and M4) by dripping calcite saturated water (pH ~ 7.5-8). Sample M5 was loaded in the same way, but kept dry. Samples were unloaded prior to failure, and along with an additional non-loaded reference sample (M0), cored into cylindrical subsamples (ø = 50 mm, h = 100 mm) before being tested for changes in residual elastic strains at the SALSA neutron diffractometer at the Institute Laue-Langevin (ILL), Grenoble, France. Three diffraction peaks corresponding to crystallographic planes hkl (110), (104) and (006) were measured in all three spatial directions relative to the notch. Shifts in the diffraction peak position (d) with respect to a strain free state are indicative of intergranular strain, while changes in the width of the peak (FWHM) reflect changes in intragranular strain. We observe distinctly different patterns in residual and volumetric strains in hkℓ (104) and (006) for the dry M5 and wet tested samples (M2 and M4) indicating the presence of water changes the deformation mechanism, while (110) is strained in compression around 200 μstrain in all samples. A broadening of the diffraction peaks (006) and (110) in front of the crack tip is observed in M2 and M4, while M5 shows no changes in the peak width throughout the depth of the sample. We suggest water present at the crack tip increased the rate of corrosion, allowing a

  12. Standard practice for preparation and use of Bent-Beam stress-corrosion test specimens

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2011-01-01

    1.1 This practice covers procedures for designing, preparing, and using bent-beam stress-corrosion specimens. 1.2 Different specimen configurations are given for use with different product forms, such as sheet or plate. This practice applicable to specimens of any metal that are stressed to levels less than the elastic limit of the material, and therefore, the applied stress can be accurately calculated or measured (see Note 1). Stress calculations by this practice are not applicable to plastically stressed specimens. Note 1—It is the nature of these practices that only the applied stress can be calculated. Since stress-corrosion cracking is a function of the total stress, for critical applications and proper interpretation of results, the residual stress (before applying external stress) or the total elastic stress (after applying external stress) should be determined by appropriate nondestructive methods, such as X-ray diffraction (1). 1.3 Test procedures are given for stress-corrosion testing by ex...

  13. Propagation of stress corrosion cracks in alpha-brasses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beggs, Dennis Vinton

    1981-01-01

    Transgranular and intergranular stress corrosion cracks were investigated in alpha-brasses in a tarnishing ammoniacal solution. Surface observation indicated that the transgranular cracks propagated discontinuously by the sudden appearance of a fine crack extending several microns ahead of the previous crack tip, often associated with the detection of a discrete acoustic emission (AE). By periodically increasing the deflection, crack front markings were produced on the resulting fracture surfaces, showing that the discontinuous propagation of the crack trace was representative of the subsurface cracking. The intergranular crack trace appeared to propagate continuously at a relatively blunt crack tip and was not associated with discrete AE. Under load pulsing tests with a time between pulses, ..delta..t greater than or equal to 3 s, the transgranular fracture surfaces always exhibited crack front markings which corresponded with the applied pulses. The spacing between crack front markings, ..delta..x, decreased linearly with ..delta..t. With ..delta..t less than or equal to 1.5 s, the crack front markings were in a one-to-one correspondence with applied pulses only at relatively long crack lengths. In this case, ..delta..x = ..delta..x* which approached a limiting value of 1 ..mu..m. No crack front markings were observed on intergranular fracture surfaces produced during these tests. It is concluded that transgranular cracking occurs by discontinuous mechanical fracture of an embrittled region around the crack tip, while intergranular cracking results from a different mechanism with cracking occurring via the film-rupture mechanism.

  14. Ultrasonic inspection reliability for intergranular stress corrosion cracks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heasler, P G; Taylor, T T; Spanner, J C; Doctor, S R; Deffenbaugh, J D [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (USA)

    1990-07-01

    A pipe inspection round robin entitled Mini-Round Robin'' was conducted at Pacific Northwest Laboratory from May 1985 through October 1985. The research was sponsored by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research under a program entitled Evaluation and Improvement of NDE Reliability for Inservice Inspection of Light Water Reactors.'' The Mini-Round Robin (MRR) measured the intergranular stress corrosion (GSC) crack detection and sizing capabilities of inservice inspection (ISI) inspectors that had passed the requirements of IEB 83-02 and the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) sizing training course. The MRR data base was compared with an earlier Pipe Inspection Round Robin (PIRR) that had measured the performance of inservice inspection prior to 1982. Comparison of the MRR and PIRR data bases indicates no significant change in the inspection capability for detecting IGSCC. Also, when comparing detection of long and short cracks, no difference in detection capability was measured. An improvement in the ability to differentiate between shallow and deeper IGSCC was found when the MRR sizing capability was compared with an earlier sizing round robin conducted by the EPRI. In addition to the pipe inspection round robin, a human factors study was conducted in conjunction with the Mini-Round Robin. The most important result of the human factors study is that the Relative Operating Characteristics (ROC) curves provide a better methodology for describing inspector performance than only probability of detection (POD) or single-point crack/no crack data. 6 refs., 55 figs., 18 tabs.

  15. Effects of laser heat treatment on the fracture morphologies of X80 pipeline steel welded joints by stress corrosion

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    De-jun Kong; Cun-dong Ye

    2014-01-01

    The surfaces of X80 pipeline steel welded joints were processed with a CO2 laser, and the effects of laser heat treatment (LHT) on H2S stress corrosion in the National Association of Corrosion Engineers (NACE) solution were analyzed by a slow strain rate test. The frac-ture morphologies and chemical components of corrosive products before and after LHT were analyzed by scanning electron microscopy and energy-dispersive spectroscopy, respectively, and the mechanism of LHT on stress corrosion cracking was discussed. Results showed that the fracture for welded joints was brittle in its original state, while it was transformed to a ductile fracture after LHT. The tendencies of hydro-gen-induced corrosion were reduced, and the stress corrosion sensitivity index decreased from 35.2%to 25.3%, indicating that the stress corrosion resistance of X80 pipeline steel welded joints has been improved by LHT.

  16. Stress corrosion cracking of Zircaloy-4 in non-aqueous iodine solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the present work the susceptibility to intergranular attack and stress corrosion cracking of Zircaloy-4 in different iodine alcoholic solutions was studied. The influence of different variables such as the molecular weight of the alcohols, the water content of the solutions, the alcohol type (primary, secondary or tertiary) and the temperature was evaluated. To determine the susceptibility to stress corrosion cracking the slow strain rate technique was used. Specimens of Zircaloy-4 were also exposed between 0.5 and 300 hours to the solutions without applied stress to evaluate the susceptibility to intergranular attack. The electrochemical behavior of the material in the corrosive media was studied by potentiodynamic polarization tests. It was determined that the active species responsible for the stress corrosion cracking of Zircaloy-4 in iodine alcoholic solutions is a molecular complex between the alcohol and iodine. The intergranular attack precedes the 'true' stress corrosion cracking phenomenon (which is associated to the transgranular propagation of the crack) and it is controlled by the diffusion of the active specie to the tip of the crack. Water acts as inhibitor to intergranular attack. Except for methanolic solutions, the minimum water content necessary to inhibit stress corrosion cracking was determined. This critical water content decreases when increasing the molecular weight of the alcohol. An explanation for this behavior is proposed. The susceptibility to stress corrosion cracking also depends on the type of the alcohol used as solvent. The temperature dependence of the crack propagation rate is in agreement with a thermal activated process, and the activation energy is consistent with a process controlled by the volume diffusion of the active species. (author)

  17. Effect of stress and strain on corrosion resistance of duplex stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The interplay of the mechanical and electrochemical phenomena has been a subject of active research. In this paper, corrosion resistance studies about SAF2205 and SAF2507 duplex stainless steel were carried out under elastic stress applied (100 MPa, 300 MPa, 500 MPa) and pre-strain (5%, 10%, 15%) in 3.5% NaCl and 2 mol/L HCl solution. Potentiodynamic anodic polarization study revealed that corrosion resistance of SAF2205 duplex stainless steel decreases slightly with increasing of elastic stress level and noticeably with increasing of pre-strained level. Scanning electron microscopy investigation on surface of the electrochemical tested SAF2205 duplex stainless steel samples indicated that pitting is always located in austenite grains when pre-strain level is below 5% (including different elastic stress level) and located on intersection of ferrite and austenite grain when pre-strain level is above 5%. For SAF2507 duplex stainless steel, elastic stress and pre-strain have no effect on general corrosion and pitting corrosion. Based on deformation mechanism of duplex structure and the relationship of mechanical load and corrosion potential, Pitting corrosion behavior of duplex stainless steel is explained and discussed

  18. Influence of texture on iodine-induced stress corrosion cracking of Zircaloy-4 cladding tubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuster, I.; Lemaignan, C.

    1992-07-01

    A specific study was carried out to measure the influence of texture on the behaviour of Zircaloy-4 under iodine-induced stress corrosion cracking. The aim was to determine the relative effects of various metallurgical parameters involved in fuel rod fracture by pellet-clad interaction (PCI). Cladding tubes of different geometries were manufactured from a given Zircaloy-4 ingot. In this way tubes with different textures were obtained. Rings from these tubes were then subjected to slow tensile tests in an inert atmosphere and in an iodine vapour atmosphere. The sensitivity of the tubes to stress corrosion cracking is quantified by the loss of ductility on fracture between the tests in each atmosphere. Combined with the findings of other studies, the results showed that: (a) texture has a strong effect on the stress corrosion cracking behaviour of Zircaloy-4, (b) the mechanical properties do not have any bearing on the material behaviour under stress corrosion cracking, and that the better behaviour of a recrystallized material — compared to the same material in a stress-relieved state — can be explained solely by the texture effect, (c) texture is a more important parameter than chemical composition of Zircaloy-4, on condition that this composition remains within the ASTM specification. The conflict between the various mechanisms involved in stress corrosion crack propagation may explain these observations. Preliminary extrapolation of these conclusions to the irradiated material shows that a more specific study is needed using appropriate parameters.

  19. Mitigation of Stress Corrosion Cracking Susceptibility of Machined 304L Stainless Steel Through Laser Peening

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sundar, R.; Ganesh, P.; Kumar, B. Sunil; Gupta, R. K.; Nagpure, D. C.; Kaul, R.; Ranganathan, K.; Bindra, K. S.; Kain, V.; Oak, S. M.; Singh, Bijendra

    2016-09-01

    The paper describes an experimental study aimed at suppressing stress corrosion cracking susceptibility of machined 304L stainless steel specimens through laser shock peening. The study also evaluates a new approach of oblique laser shock peening to suppress stress corrosion cracking susceptibility of internal surface of type 304L stainless steel tube. The results of the study, performed with an indigenously developed 2.5 J/7 ns Nd:YAG laser, demonstrated that laser shock peening effectively suppresses chloride stress corrosion cracking susceptibility of machined surface of type 304L stainless steel. In the investigated range of incident laser power density (3.2-6.4 GW/cm2), machined specimens peened with power density of 4.5 and 6.4 GW/cm2 displayed lower stress corrosion cracking susceptibility considerably than those treated with 3.2 and 3.6 GW/cm2 in boiling magnesium chloride test. Oblique laser shock peening, performed on machined internal surface of a type 304L stainless steel tube (OD = 111 mm; ID = 101 mm), was successful in introducing residual compressive surface stresses which brought about significant suppression of its stress corrosion cracking susceptibility. The technique of oblique laser shock peening, in spite of its inherent limitations on the length of peened region being limited by tube internal diameter and the need for access from both the sides, presents a simplified approach for peening internal surface of small tubular components.

  20. Caustics in dark matter haloes

    CERN Document Server

    Mohayaee, R; Mohayaee, Roya; Colombi, Stephane; Fort, Bernard; Gavazzi, Raphael; Shandarin, Sergei; Touma, Jihad

    2005-01-01

    Cold dark matter haloes are populated by high-density structures with sharply-peaked profiles known as caustics which have not yet been resolved by 3-dimensional numerical simulations. Here, we derive semi-analytic expressions for the density profiles near caustics in haloes which form by self-similar accretions of dark matter with infinitesimal velocity dispersion. A simple rescaling shows that these profiles are universal: they are valid for all caustics and irrespective of physical parameters of the halo. We derive the maximum density of the caustics and show that it depends on the velocity dispersion and the caustic location. Finally, we demonstrate that there can be a significant contribution to the emission measure from dark matter particle annihilation in the caustics.

  1. Caustic cracking of 9Cr 1Mo steel at 3000C

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The stress corrosion cracking of correctly heat-treated 9Cr-1Mo in caustic solutions at 3000C has been examined using a bursting tube version of the slow strain rate technique. Some susceptibility was detected at all concentrations examined, the more concentrated solutions which favoured less protective oxide formation, producing the more severe cracking. The cracking in these strong solutions proceeded at velocities up to 0.1 mm h-1 and produced wide oxide filled cracks. This cracking is not strongly dependent on potential, although more anodic potentials promote thicker oxide formation while cathodic potentials favour general dissolution. Normalized and tempered, annealed, and a simulated heat-affected zone microstructure were all equally susceptible to cracking. Some constant pressure tests were performed which suggested cracking could occur at stresses below the yield stress. In more dilute solutions susceptibility was much less, and the crack velocity was about 0.01 mm h-1, i.e. ten times slower than in 8 M NaOH. The relationship between slow strain rate tests, conventional tests and practical experience are discussed. The behaviour of 9Cr 1Mo in caustic below 2 1/2 M places it in the low susceptibility category and failures under realistic conditions are unlikely. (author)

  2. Contribution to the study of stress corrosion crack initiation in zirconium and in Zircaloy-4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In pressurized water reactors, fuel rods are made of a sheath of Zircaloy-4 containing uranium pellets. This sheath may fail by stress corrosion which comprises two main stages: crack initiation, and crack propagation until failure. In this research thesis, the author recalls the knowledge on this failure mechanism, proposes a synthesis of mechanisms generally proposed in the literature, presents experimental means used in this study, addresses the phenomenological aspect of stress corrosion crack initiation, analyses the role of grain crystallographic orientation and its possible impact on location of crack initiation, and shows how chemical environment and mechanical stress intervene in the initiation process

  3. Stress concentrator effect on corrosion resistance of welded joints of zirconium - 2.5% niobium alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Considered is the effect of notches and poor penetrations of 10 and 20% pipeline wall thickness made of Zr - 2.5% Nb alloy on corrosion resistance. Stress concentrator effects have been estimated on the basis of results of cyclic tests in 3% NaCl and pressure tests in water-vapor medium at 300 deg C and 85 atm during 1200 h. Estimated are critical strains and corresponding stresses for basic and a weldmetals. Stress concentrators are shown to low the level of critical stresses of corrosion-mechanical fracture initiation. In water-vapor mixture there found is a corrosion in some zones of welded joint heated in a process of welding over 600 deg C. For such zones registered is the effect of structural-chemical changes, caused by welding

  4. Elastic and plastic strains and the stress corrosion cracking of austenitic stainless steels. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The influence of elastic (stress) and plastic (cold work) strains on the stress corrosion cracking of a transformable austenitic stainless steel was studied in several aqueous chloride environments. Initial polarization behavior was active for all deformation conditions as well as for the annealed state. Visual observation, potential-time, and current-time curves indicated the development of a pseudo-passive (flawed) film leading to localized corrosion, occluded cells and SCC. SCC did not initiate during active corrosion regardless of the state of strain unless severe low temperature deformation produced a high percentage of martensite. Both elastic and plastic deformation increased the sensitivity to SCC when examined on the basis of percent yield strength. The corrosion potential, the critical cracking potential, and the potential at which the current changes from anodic to cathodic were essentially unaffected by deformation. It is apparent that the basic electrochemical parameters are independent of the bulk properties of the alloy and totally controlled by surface phenomena

  5. The influence of molybdenum on stress corrosion in Ultra Low Carbon Steels with copper addition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Mazur

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available The influence of molybdenum content on the process of stress corrosion of ultra-low carbon structural steels with the addition of copper HSLA (High Strength Low Alloy was analyzed. The study was conducted for steels after heat treatment consisting of quenching andfollowing tempering at 600°C and it was obtained microstructure of the tempered martensite laths with copper precipitates and the phaseLaves Fe2Mo type. It was found strong influence of Laves phase precipitate on the grain boundaries of retained austenite on rate anddevelopment of stress corrosion processes. The lowest corrosion resistance was obtained for W3 steel characterized by high contents ofmolybdenum (2.94% Mo which should be connected with the intensity precipitate processes of Fe2Mo phase. For steels W1 and W2which contents molybdenum equals 1.02% and 1.88%, respectively were obtained similar courses of corrosive cracking.

  6. Contribution to surface physicochemical factors to stress corrosion resistance in stainless steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The author of this research thesis first presents and discusses the various aspects of stress corrosion cracking of Fe-Cr-Ni alloys of high purity: experimental conditions (alloy elaboration, sample preparation), corrosion results (Schaeffer diagram, crack morphology, intergranular corrosion), influence of addition elements in ferritic alloys. He reports an electrochemical study of stainless steels in magnesium chloride (experimental conditions, influence of metallurgic and environmental parameters on polarization resistance, current-voltage curves), and an analytical study of layers formed in the magnesium chloride

  7. Influence of burnishing on stress corrosion cracking susceptibility of duplex steel

    OpenAIRE

    J. Łabanowski; A. Ossowska

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: of the current study was to investigate the usability of burnishing-inducted surface enhancement method for improve the stress corrosion cracking resistance of duplex stainless steel.Design/methodology/approach: The surface layers upon round in cross section specimens were performed through burnishing treatment. Corrosion tests were performed with the use of Slow Strain Rate Test technique in inert (glycerin) and aggressive (boiling 35% MgCl2 solution) environments.Findings: It was s...

  8. Stress corrosion cracking behaviour of gas tungsten arc welded super austenitic stainless steel joints

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Vinoth Kumar

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Super 304H austenitic stainless steel with 3% of copper posses excellent creep strength and corrosion resistance, which is mainly used in heat exchanger tubing of the boiler. Heat exchangers are used in nuclear power plants and marine vehicles which are intended to operate in chloride rich offshore environment. Chloride stress corrosion cracking is the most likely life limiting failure with austenitic stainless steel tubing. Welding may worsen the stress corrosion cracking susceptibility of the material. Stress corrosion cracking susceptibility of Super 304H parent metal and gas tungsten arc (GTA welded joints were studied by constant load tests in 45% boiling MgCl2 solution. Stress corrosion cracking resistance of Super 304H stainless steel was deteriorated by GTA welding due to the formation of susceptible microstructure in the HAZ of the weld joint and the residual stresses. The mechanism of cracking was found to be anodic path cracking, with transgranular nature of crack propagation. Linear relationships were derived to predict the time to failure by extrapolating the rate of steady state elongation.

  9. Stress corrosion cracking of turbine disc steels: a study of mechanism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stress corrosion cracking was found to affect shrunk-on discs of 900 MW-EDF turbines. Investigations revealed that intergranular cracking occurred in high-stress confined locations, where concentrations of pollutants resulting from some assembling operations could take place (MoS2 sometimes used as a lubricant, carbonated compounds with chloride as in paint marks). Laboratory tests allowed to assess the chemical conditions (pH, electrochemical potential, pollutants) responsible for the stress corrosion cracking of NiCrMo V-steels. Three main E-pH fields were found to favour stress corrosion cracking, whose boundaries may be dependant on the anionic species. The crack growth rates in these conditions were measured at 95 and 130 deg C, and compared to the observed average measurements from service. The most likely mechanism seems to involve molybdic acid, as a result of thermal decomposition of MoS2 or generated by general corrosion of Mo-containing steel. Cracks might also have been initiated by carbonated compounds. The relevance of classical models to stress corrosion cracking of disc steel was discussed with respect to electrochemical behaviour. (authors). 15 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab

  10. An accurately controllable imitative stress corrosion cracking for electromagnetic nondestructive testing and evaluations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► We propose a method to simulate stress corrosion cracking. ► The method offers nondestructive signals similar to those of actual cracking. ► Visual and eddy current examinations validate the method. - Abstract: This study proposes a simple and cost-effective approach to fabricate an artificial flaw that is identical to stress corrosion cracking especially from the viewpoint of electromagnetic nondestructive evaluations. The key idea of the approach is to embed a partially-bonded region inside a material by bonding together surfaces that have grooves. The region is regarded as an area of uniform non-zero conductivity from an electromagnetic nondestructive point of view, and thus simulates the characteristics of stress corrosion cracking. Since the grooves are introduced using electro-discharge machining, one can control the profile of the imitative stress corrosion cracking accurately. After numerical simulation to evaluate the spatial resolution of conventional eddy current testing, six specimens made of type 316L austenitic stainless steel were fabricated on the basis of the results of the simulations. Visual and eddy current examinations were carried out to demonstrate that the artificial flaws well simulated the characteristics of actual stress corrosion cracking. Subsequent destructive test confirmed that the bonding did not change the depth profiles of the artificial flaw.

  11. Localized corrosion and stress-corrosion cracking behavior of stainless steel weldments. Annual progress report, June 1, 1980-February 28, 1981

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pitting corrosion experiments were conducted on 308L stainless steel as a function of alloy microstructure (% delta ferrite) in acidified water-methanol solutions. Slow strain rate stress corrosion cracking studies were performed on single-phase and duplex 304 stainless steels as functions of solution chemistry, temperature, and sensitization

  12. On the stress corrosion cracking of lean duplex steel in chloride environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tayyaba, Qanita; Farooq, Hina; Shahid, Muhammad; Jadoon, Ammer Khan; Shahzad, M.; Qureshi, A. H.

    2014-06-01

    Duplex stainless steel having attractive combination of austenitic and ferritic properties is being used in industry such as petrochemical, pulp and paper mills. In this study, the corrosion and stress corrosion behavior of duplex stainless steel in 3.5% sodium chloride environment was investigated by weight loss measurements, electrochemical DC testing and slow strain rate test (SSRT). Weight loss data showed no significant corrosion after 1700 hours. Electrochemical polarization test in 3.5% NaCl solution exhibited a uniform corrosion rate of 0.008 mpy (calculated using Tafel analysis) showing passivity in the range of 735-950 mV. A comparison of the slow strain rate test in 3.5% NaCl solution with air shows almost a similar stress strain curve for duplex stainless steel. In comparison, the stress strain curves for 0.15% carbon steel show a loss of about 25% tensile elongation for the same comparison. The excellent corrosion and especially resistance to localized corrosion (pitting) is responsible for no loss of ductility in duplex stainless steel.

  13. On the stress corrosion cracking of lean duplex steel in chloride environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duplex stainless steel having attractive combination of austenitic and ferritic properties is being used in industry such as petrochemical, pulp and paper mills. In this study, the corrosion and stress corrosion behavior of duplex stainless steel in 3.5% sodium chloride environment was investigated by weight loss measurements, electrochemical DC testing and slow strain rate test (SSRT). Weight loss data showed no significant corrosion after 1700 hours. Electrochemical polarization test in 3.5% NaCl solution exhibited a uniform corrosion rate of 0.008 mpy (calculated using Tafel analysis) showing passivity in the range of 735-950 mV. A comparison of the slow strain rate test in 3.5% NaCl solution with air shows almost a similar stress strain curve for duplex stainless steel. In comparison, the stress strain curves for 0.15% carbon steel show a loss of about 25% tensile elongation for the same comparison. The excellent corrosion and especially resistance to localized corrosion (pitting) is responsible for no loss of ductility in duplex stainless steel

  14. On the stress corrosion cracking of lean duplex steel in chloride environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duplex stainless steel having attractive combination of austenitic and ferritic properties is being used in industry such as petrochemical, pulp and paper mills. In this study, the corrosion and stress corrosion behavior of duplex stainless steel in 3.5 percentage sodium chloride environment was investigated by weight loss measurements, electrochemical DC testing and slow strain rate test (SSRT). Weight loss data showed no significant corrosion after 1700 hours. Electrochemical polarization test in 3.5 percentage NaCl solution exhibited a uniform corrosion rate of 0.008 mpy (calculated using Tafel analysis) showing passivity in the range of 735-950 mV. A comparison of the slow strain rate test in 3.5 percentage NaCl solution with air shows almost a similar stress strain curve for duplex stainless steel. In comparison, the stress strain curves for 0.15percentage carbon steel show a loss of about 25 percentage tensile elongation for the same comparison. The excellent corrosion and especially resistance to localized corrosion (pitting) is responsible for no loss of ductility in duplex stainless steel. (author)

  15. Effect of exposure cycle on hot salt stress corrosion of a titanium alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, H. R.; Johnston, J. R.

    1974-01-01

    The influence of exposure cycle on the hot-salt stress-corrosion cracking resistance of the Ti-8Al-1Mo-1V alloy was determined. Both temperature and stress were cycled simultaneously to simulate turbine-powered aircraft service cycles. Temperature and stress were also cycled independently to determine their individual effects. Substantial increases in crack threshold stresses were observed for cycles in which both temperature and stress or temperature alone were applied for 1 hour and removed for 3 hours. The crack threshold stresses for these cyclic exposures were twice those determined for continuous exposure for the same total time of 96 hours.

  16. Assessing corrosion problems in photovoltaic cells via electrochemical stress testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shalaby, H.

    1985-01-01

    A series of accelerated electrochemical experiments to study the degradation properties of polyvinylbutyral-encapsulated silicon solar cells has been carried out. The cells' electrical performance with silk screen-silver and nickel-solder contacts was evaluated. The degradation mechanism was shown to be electrochemical corrosion of the cell contacts; metallization elements migrate into the encapsulating material, which acts as an ionic conducting medium. The corrosion products form a conductive path which results in a gradual loss of the insulation characteristics of the encapsulant. The precipitation of corrosion products in the encapsulant also contributes to its discoloration which in turn leads to a reduction in its transparency and the consequent optical loss. Delamination of the encapsulating layers could be attributed to electrochemical gas evolution reactions. The usefulness of the testing technique in qualitatively establishing a reliability difference between metallizations and antireflection coating types is demonstrated.

  17. Effect of initial hydrogen content of a titanium alloy on susceptibility to hot salt stress corrosion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, H. R.

    1972-01-01

    The influence of the initial hydrogen content of a titanium alloy on subsequent resistance to hot salt stress corrosion embrittlement and cracking was investigated. A Ti-8Al-1Mo-1V alloy was tested in four conditions: mill annealed (70 ppm H), duplex annealed (70 ppm H), vacuum annealed to an intermediate (36 ppm H) and a low (9 ppm H) hydrogen level. Material annealed at 650 C (duplex condition) exhibited resistance to hot salt stress corrosion superior to that exhibited by material in the mill annealed condition. Reduction of the alloy hydrogen content from 70 to as low as 9 ppm did not influence resistance to hot salt stress corrosion embrittlement or cracking.

  18. Effect of residual stress induced by pulsed-laser irradiation on initiation of chloride stress corrosion cracking in stainless steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eto, Shuzo, E-mail: eto@criepi.denken.or.jp; Miura, Yasufumi; Tani, Junichi; Fujii, Takashi

    2014-01-10

    The atmospheric corrosion test and residual stress measurement were performed to evaluate the effect of laser irradiation on stress corrosion cracking (SCC) initiation. Second-harmonic Nd:YAG laser pulses (pulse width: 10 ns) were irradiated on a type-304L stainless-steel plate. The specimens were placed in a chamber at 353 K with RH=35% for the corrosion test. When laser energies were 30 and 300 mJ, cracks caused by SCC or pitting were observed on the surface of the specimens. The cracks were classified into two types on the basis of cumulative probability distribution; one of the types is related to the laser irradiation condition. The mean maximum crack depths were about 27 and 52 μm when laser energies were 30 and 300 mJ, respectively. These values were the same as the depth at which the tensile residual stress was induced from the surface of the specimen by laser irradiation. These results suggest that the maximum stress corrosion crack depth was caused by the tensile residual stress induced by laser irradiation, and that the crack stopped propagating when the crack depth was larger than several dozen μm in this test set. When laser pulses of 300 mJ energy were irradiated on the surface of the specimen by shot peening, the tensile stress was induced up to 20 μm from the surface, and the compressive stress was observed at a larger depth. These results show that the laser irradiation is less effective in obtaining tensile residual stress of the specimen compared to when laser pulses are irradiated on the specimen treated by shot peening. The depth of tensile stress obtained by laser irradiation is much shorter than that of compressive stress obtained by shot peening.

  19. Control of stress corrosion cracking in storage tanks containing radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stress corrosion of carbon steel storage tanks containing alkaline nitrate radioactive waste, at the Savannah River Plant is controlled by specification of limits on waste composition and temperature. Cases of cracking have been observed in the primary steel shell of tanks designed and built before 1960 that were attributed to a combination of high residual stresses from fabrication welding and aggressiveness of fresh wastes from the reactor fuel reprocessing plants. The fresh wastes have the highest concentration of nitrate, which has been shown to be the cracking agent. Also as the waste solutions age and are reduced in volume by evaporation of water, nitrite and hydroxide ions become more concentrated and inhibit stress corrosion. Thus, by providing a heel of aged evaporated waste in tanks that receive fresh waste, concentrations of the inhibitor ions are maintained within specified ranges to protect against nitrate cracking. Tanks designed and built since 1960 have been made of steels with greater resistance to stress corrosion; these tanks have also been heat treated after fabrication to relieve residual stresses from construction operations. Temperature limits are also specified to protect against stress corrosion at elevated temperatures

  20. AE characteristics during stress corrosion cracking of sensitized type 304 stainless steel pipes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objective of this study was to get a better understanding on acoustic emission (AE) characteristics during stress corrosion cracking (SCC) processes of Type 304 stainless steel, to apply AE techniques to detection and monitoring of SCC of the type experienced with stainless steel boiling water reactor piping. SCC tests were performed on pipe specimens with 20 mm inner diameter. Before testing, all pipe specimens were solution-treated and then sensitized. The SCC tests were conducted in the circulating corrosion test equipment containing the pipe specimen under three kinds of bi-axial stresses, of which Mises equivalent stresses were kept at 172 MNm (17.5 kg/mm2). The test conditions were: the test temperature: 2250C; the concentration of chloride ion: approximately 50 ppm; the concentration of dissolved oxygen: approximately 10 ppm; the flow rate of water: 10 l/hr. Main results were: (1) the failure was caused mainly by intergranular stress corrosion cracking; (2) AE characteristics during the SCC test may be divided into three stages; (3) the most probable AE sources in the 3rd stage may be the phenomena due to the propagation of intergranular stress corrosion cracks; (4) the propagation velocity of intergranular stress corrosion cracks seems to become higher, as the hoop stress applied to the pipe specimens increases, even in the cases of the same value of Mises' equivalent stress; and (5) at the leakage due to SCC, cumulative counts, signal waveforms and peak-amplitude distributions shows a great change and the leakage is readily detectable by standard AE techniques. (author)

  1. Stress corrosion cracking of stainless-steel canister for concrete cask storage of spent fuel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tani, Jun-ichi; Mayuzumi, Masami; Hara, Nobuyoshi

    2008-09-01

    Resistance to external stress corrosion cracking (ESCC) and crevice corrosion were examined for various candidate canister materials in the spent fuel dry storage condition using concrete casks. A constant load ESCC test was conducted on the candidate materials in air after deposition of simulated sea salt particles on the specimen gage section. Highly corrosion resistant stainless steels (SS), S31260 and S31254, did not fail for more than 46 000 h at 353 K with relative humidity of 35%, although the normal stainless steel, S30403 SS failed within 500 h by ESCC. Crevice corrosion potentials of S31260 and S31254 SS became larger than 0.9 V (SCE) in synthetic sea water at temperatures below 298 K, while those of S30403 and S31603 SS were less than 0 V (SCE) at the same temperature range. No rust was found on S31260 and S31254 SS specimens at temperatures below 298 K in the atmospheric corrosion test, which is consistent with the temperature dependency of crevice corrosion potential. From the test result, the critical temperature of atmospheric corrosion was estimated to be 293 K for both S31260 and S31254 SS. Utilizing the ESCC test result and the critical temperature, together with the weather station data and the estimated canister wall temperature, the integrity of canister was assessed from the view point of ESCC.

  2. 49 CFR 192.929 - What are the requirements for using Direct Assessment for Stress Corrosion Cracking (SCCDA)?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... requirements for using Direct Assessment for Stress Corrosion Cracking (SCCDA)? (a) Definition. Stress..., appendix A3, and remediate the threat in accordance with ASME/ANSI B31.8S, appendix A3, section A3.4....

  3. Standard Practice for Making and Using U-Bend Stress-Corrosion Test Specimens

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2009-01-01

    1.1 This practice covers procedures for making and using U-bend specimens for the evaluation of stress-corrosion cracking in metals. The U-bend specimen is generally a rectangular strip which is bent 180° around a predetermined radius and maintained in this constant strain condition during the stress-corrosion test. Bends slightly less than or greater than 180° are sometimes used. Typical U-bend configurations showing several different methods of maintaining the applied stress are shown in Fig. 1. 1.2 U-bend specimens usually contain both elastic and plastic strain. In some cases (for example, very thin sheet or small diameter wire) it is possible to form a U-bend and produce only elastic strain. However, bent-beam (Practice G 39 or direct tension (Practice G 49)) specimens are normally used to study stress-corrosion cracking of strip or sheet under elastic strain only. 1.3 This practice is concerned only with the test specimen and not the environmental aspects of stress-corrosion testing which are discus...

  4. Corrosion Behavior of the Stressed Sensitized Austenitic Stainless Steels of High Nitrogen Content in Seawater

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Almubarak

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this paper is to study the effect of high nitrogen content on corrosion behavior of austenitic stainless steels in seawater under severe conditions such as tensile stresses and existence of sensitization in the structure. A constant tensile stress has been applied to sensitized specimens types 304, 316L, 304LN, 304NH, and 316NH stainless steels. Microstructure investigation revealed various degrees of stress corrosion cracking. SCC was severe in type 304, moderate in types 316L and 304LN, and very slight in types 304NH and 316NH. The electrochemical polarization curves showed an obvious second current peak for the sensitized alloys which indicated the existence of second phase in the structure and the presence of intergranular stress corrosion cracking. EPR test provided a rapid and efficient nondestructive testing method for showing passivity, degree of sensitization and determining IGSCC for stainless steels in seawater. A significant conclusion was obtained that austenitic stainless steels of high nitrogen content corrode at a much slower rate increase pitting resistance and offer an excellent resistance to stress corrosion cracking in seawater.

  5. Stress corrosion cracking in high-temperature pure water and selective corrosion of nickel-bearing 13Cr martensitic stainless steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mechanical and corrosion properties of 13 mass% Cr martensitic stainless steels containing 2∼5 mass% nickel were studied in various tempered states. Effects of metallurgical variable were examined by the following tests: (a) Conventional mechanical and metallurgical tests, (b) selective corrosion test in 0.88 kmol/m3 HNO3 at 293 K, and (c) slow strain rate stress corrosion cracking test in high purity water at 561 K. The following results are obtained: (1) The 13 % Cr martensitic stainless steels containing 3.5∼5 mass% nickel shows superior mechanical properties and machinability to those with 0∼2 mass% nickel. (2) However, a higher nickel addition lowers the Ac1 point to the actual tempering temperature range. This makes it difficult to choose the tempering condition which satisfies the mechanical properties needed for hydraulic machinery. (3) The susceptibility to selective corrosion increases with increasing nickel content and selective corrosion occurs in a wide temperature range and consequently the selection of the tempering temperature range is limited. (4) Active path type stress corrosion cracking behavior is closely related to the selective corrosion behavior. In conclusion, it is desirable to lower the nickel and carbon contents in the steel and to carefully select the tempering temperature yielding good mechanical properties without giving rise to susceptibility to selective corrosion. (author)

  6. Stress Corrosion Cracking of Steel and Aluminum in Sodium Hydroxide: Field Failure and Laboratory Test

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Prawoto

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Through an investigation of the field failure analysis and laboratory experiment, a study on (stress corrosion cracking SCC behavior of steel and aluminum was performed. All samples were extracted from known operating conditions from the field failures. Similar but accelerated laboratory test was subsequently conducted in such a way as to mimic the field failures. The crack depth and behavior of the SCC were then analyzed after the laboratory test and the mechanism of stress corrosion cracking was studied. The results show that for the same given stress relative to ultimate tensile strength, the susceptibility to SCC is greatly influenced by heat treatment. Furthermore, it was also concluded that when expressed relative to the (ultimate tensile strength UTS, aluminum has similar level of SCC susceptibility to that of steel, although with respect to the same absolute value of applied stress, aluminum is more susceptible to SCC in sodium hydroxide environment than steel.

  7. Effect of cold work on the growth rates of stress corrosion cracks in structural materials of nuclear systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The growth rates of stress corrosion cracks in austenitic stainless steels and nickel base alloy 600 exposed to simulated boiling water reactor coolant were measured by fracture mechanics testing techniques. Cold work may increase the crack growth rates up to one hundred times. In both, the annealed condition and the cold worked condition, the stress corrosion crack growth rates are independent of stress intensity over a wide K-range and crack growth rates correlate well with yield strength and hardness. In the annealed condition the fracture path is intergranular, but higher degrees of cold work introduce higher proportions of transgranular stress corrosion cracking

  8. Corrosion considerations for life management of Hanford high-level waste tanks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The potential for corrosion-related aging mechanisms to be active in the Hanford Site waste tanks is frequently questioned and there are related uncertainties. This paper considers surveillance and analyses for evaluating the potential influence of corrosion processes such as stress corrosion cracking, pitting, crevice corrosion of the reinforced concrete steel on the useful life of Hanford radioactive waste tanks. There are two types of Hanford Site underground reinforced concrete, carbon steel lined waste tank structures. They primarily store caustic nitrate wastes, some at elevated temperatures, from defense reprocessing of spent nuclear fuels. Some of the Hanford waste tanks have leaked radioactive liquid waste to the soil. These leaks are possibly due to nitrate-induced stress corrosion cracking. Major efforts prescribed to avoid nitrate-induced stress corrosion cracking in newer tank designs appear successful. A potential for pitting and crevice corrosion cracking in the carbon steel liners exists. There has been no evidence of significant uniform corrosion of the carbon steel liners and there has been no evidence of waste tank degradation caused by corrosion of the concrete reinforcing steel. A waste tank life management program is being developed to qualify the Hanford waste tanks for continued safe storage of these wastes. Corrosion evaluations, structural analyses, and surveillance are required to qualify the tanks and to promptly detect evidence of possible distress

  9. Stress corrosion of the pressure vessel steel A-533-B in high-temperature water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stress corrosion of the pressure vessel steel A-533-B can be induced by accelerated laboratory tests in oxygenous water at high temperature. Cracking has occurred in water with 8 ppm O2 but not in water with less than 10 ppb O2. High load during deformation also introduces cracks. (G.B.)

  10. Velocity peaks and caustic rings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The late infall of cold dark matter onto an isolated galaxy produces flows with definite velocity vectors at any physical point in the galactic halo. It also produces caustic rings, which are places in space where the dark matter density is very large. The self-similar model of galactic halo formation predicts that the caustic ring radii an follow the approximate law an ≅ 1/n. Bumps in the rotation curves of NGC 3198 and of our own galaxy are interpreted as due to caustic rings of dark matter

  11. Microstructure, microchemistry and stress corrosion crack characteristics in a BWR 316LSS core shroud weld

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Material, corrosion and cracking characteristics have been examined in a 316LSS core shroud weld (total neutron fluence of ∼1.8x1024 n/m2, E>1 MeV) removed from boiling-water reactor service. The weld metal showed a duplex phase structure with austenite dendrites surrounded by narrower regions of interdendritic Cr-Mo-rich ferrite. The austenite-ferrite phase boundaries were locally depleted in Fe and enriched in Mo and P. Stress corrosion cracks propagated along phase boundaries within the duplex weld microstructure, preferentially corroding the lower Cr austenite versus the higher-Cr, ferrite. Compositional mapping revealed differences between the two-phase alloy regions, weld inclusions and oxide corrosion products that filled the cracks. The crack tips were always corrosion-product filled and suggested corrosive attack more than IGSCC. Although significant Mo and P enrichment was identified at the phase boundaries, no direct linkage to the corrosion/SCC susceptibility could be made. (author)

  12. Stress corrosion cracking susceptibility of stainless and duplex steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Costa, S.; Dias, C.; Pimenta, G. [Materials Laboratory, ISQ, Taguspark, Porto Salvo (Portugal); Costa, S.; Fonseca, I. [Centre for Molecular Sciences and Materials, FCUL, Lisboa (Portugal)

    2009-07-01

    Full text of publication follows: A comparative study of the influence of chloride concentration, temperature and metal crevice formation on SCC susceptibility of DIN 1.4404, 14410, 14410-CW, 1.4318 and 1.4462 steels has been performed. Single U-bend and double U-bend coupons were exposed to aqueous NaCl and MgCl{sub 2} solutions for 10 days, or until fracture, if sooner, at different temperatures. After exposure, samples were visually and dye penetrant inspected for crack or pitting determination. Results allowed producing corrosion maps accounting for the influence of [Cl{sup -}], T and crevice formation on the SCC susceptibility.

  13. Stress corrosion cracking of zirconium and its alloys in halogenide solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A doctoral thesis developed at the corrosion labs in CNEA a few years ago showed that zirconium and Zircaloy-4 were susceptible to stress corrosion cracking (SCC) in chloride aqueous solutions at potentials above the pitting potential. However, the nature of the phenomenon was not elucidated. On the other hand, references about the subject were scarce and contradictory. The development of new SCC models, in particular, the surface mobility SCC mechanism suggested a review of zirconium and Zircaloy-4 SCC in halogenide aqueous solutions. This mechanism predicts that zirconium should be susceptible to SCC not only in chloride solutions but also in bromide and iodide solutions due to the low melting point of the surface compounds formed by the interaction between the metal and the environment. The present work was aimed to determine the conditions under which SCC takes place and the mechanism operating during this process. For that purpose, the effect of electrochemical potential, strain rate and temperature on the SCC susceptibility of both, zirconium and Zircaloy-4 in chloride, bromide and iodide solutions was investigated. It was observed that those materials undergo stress corrosion cracking only at potentials higher than the breakdown potential. The crack velocity increased slightly with the applied potential, and the strain rate had an accelerating effect on the crack propagation rate. In both materials two steps were found during cracking. The first one was characterized as intergranular attack assisted by stress due to an anodic dissolution process. This step is followed by a transition to a transgranular mode of propagation, which was considered as the 'true' stress corrosion cracking step. The intergranular attack is the rate-determining step due to the fact that the transgranular propagation rate is higher than the intergranular propagation rate. Several stress corrosion cracking mechanisms were analyzed to explain the transgranular cracking. The predictions

  14. Stress Corrosion Cracking of an Austenitic Stainless Steel in Nitrite-Containing Chloride Solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. K. Singh Raman

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available This article describes the susceptibility of 316L stainless steel to stress corrosion cracking (SCC in a nitrite-containing chloride solution. Slow strain rate testing (SSRT in 30 wt. % MgCl2 solution established SCC susceptibility, as evidenced by post-SSRT fractography. Addition of nitrite to the chloride solution, which is reported to have inhibitive influence on corrosion of stainless steels, was found to increase SCC susceptibility. The susceptibility was also found to increase with nitrite concentration. This behaviour is explained on the basis of the passivation and pitting characteristics of 316L steel in chloride solution.

  15. Proceedings: Primary water stress corrosion cracking: 1989 EPRI remedial measures workshop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A meeting on ''PWSCC Remedial Measures'' was organized to give those working in this area an opportunity to share their results, ideas and plans with regard to development and application of remedial measures directed against the primary water stress corrosion cracking (PWSCC) phenomenon affecting alloy 600 steam generator tubes. Topics discussed included: utility experience and strategies; nondestructive examination (NDE) methods for PWSCC; technical topics ranging from predictive methods for occurrence of PWSCC to results of corrosion tests; and services provided by vendors that can help prevent the occurrence of PWSCC or can help address problems caused by PWSCC once it occurs

  16. Effect of Superficial Atmospheric Corrosion Upon the Internal Stresses in Structural Steel Elements

    OpenAIRE

    Monel Leiba; Budescu, M.; Elena Axinte; Elena-Carmen Teleman

    2006-01-01

    A research program is presented showing the stress status determined by the corrosion phenomenon inside a specimen of a structural steel element. Several stains are studied their diameters ranging from 1~mm to 6~mm and thickness of the corroded layer under 0.5~mm. The physical modeling is the result of testing in laboratory the phenomenon of superficial atmospheric corrosion and the numerical modeling was developed under a FEM program, ALGOR. A number of 3,200 finite elements of BRICK type we...

  17. Causticizing for Black Liquor Gasifiers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scott Sinquefeld; James Cantrell; Xiaoyan Zeng; Alan Ball; Jeff Empie

    2009-01-07

    The cost-benefit outlook of black liquor gasification (BLG) could be greatly improved if the smelt causticization step could be achieved in situ during the gasification step. Or, at a minimum, the increase in causticizing load associated with BLG could be mitigated. A number of chemistries have been proven successful during black liquor combustion. In this project, three in situ causticizing processes (titanate, manganate, and borate) were evaluated under conditions suitable for high temperature entrained flow BLG, and low temperature steam reforming of black liquor. The evaluation included both thermodynamic modeling and lab experimentation. Titanate and manganate were tested for complete direct causticizing (to thus eliminate the lime cycle), and borates were evaluated for partial causticizing (to mitigate the load increase associated with BLG). Criteria included high carbonate conversion, corresponding hydroxide recovery upon hydrolysis, non process element (NPE) removal, and economics. Of the six cases (three chemistries at two BLG conditions), only two were found to be industrially viable: titanates for complete causticizing during high temperature BLG, and borates for partial causticizing during high temperature BLG. These two cases were evaluated for integration into a gasification-based recovery island. The Larsen [28] BLG cost-benefit study was used as a reference case for economic forecasting (i.e. a 1500 tpd pulp mill using BLG and upgrading the lime cycle). By comparison, using the titanate direct causticizing process yielded a net present value (NPV) of $25M over the NPV of BLG with conventional lime cycle. Using the existing lime cycle plus borate autocausticizing for extra capacity yielded a NPV of $16M.

  18. The Sulfide Stress Corrosion Cracking Characteristics of the Pipe Weld in the Petrochemical Plant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Gyu Young; Bae, Dong Ho

    Sulfide stress corrosion cracking (SSCC) in crude oil field environment including hydrogen sulfide (H2S) has been recognized as a materials failure mechanism. Welding residual stress generation and metallurgical change by fusion welding process increase the cracking driving force and reduce the resistance of brittle fracture as well as environmental fracture. On the base of this understanding, firstly, we analyzed welding residual stresses of welded ASTM A106 Gr B steel pipe using in the petrochemical plant. And next, SSCC tests were conducted to assess SSCC resistance of the weld with smooth specimens. From the result, influence of temperature on corrosion rate was sensitive in order of HAZ, base metal and weld metal. Therefore, the most sensitive region in the weld is HAZ, and its corrosion rate increases with the temperature of corrosion environment increase. And failure positions of the most cases among failed specimens were at HAZ of the weld. Low limit (σSSCC) of A106 Gr B steel pipe was assessed as 0.6 σy (7271.6N)

  19. Sever Gastrointestinal Caustic Injury and Surgical Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Bazrafshan

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Approximately 20% of caustic ingestions result in some degree of esophageal injury. Alkaline materials are the most frequent corrosive materials ingested.     The physical form and PH of ingested materials play a critical role in the site and type of gastrointestinal injury (PH > 12 or PH < 1.5, crystalline drain cleaners. Unlike Alkaline solutions, strong acids are bitter, burn on contact and usually produce vomiting but when swallowed pass rapidly through the esophagus and damage the antrum of the stomach. I will present the results of 5 cases of gastric out let obstruction after acid ingestion (subtotal gastrectomy and billroth 1 and 4 patients with extensive esophageal damage and perforation ( Total esophagectomy and gastric pull up.  

  20. Effect of induction heating stress improvement on ultrasonic response from intergranular stress corrosion cracking

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Induction heating stress improvement (IHSI) is often performed for the BWR piping weldments in order to reduce the susceptibility of intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC). Recently, in an US BWR plant, IGSCC was detected where it was not expected because the plant had implemented IGSCC countermeasures, IHSI. The objective of this work is to experimentally document the effect of IHSI on IGSCC detectability. Two IGSCC pipe samples containing a range of circumferential and axial cracks were fabricated from two 12-inch Type 304 stainless steel pipe weldments by the Creviced Pipe Test. Each sample was documented in detail by UT and PT to establish its IGSCC characteristics prior to application of IHSI and I-(Inverse)IHSI. For each sample two separate UT methods were used. One pipe sample was subjected to normal IHSI, in which the pipe OD surface was heated while the ID surface was kept cool by circulating water. The other pipe was subjected to I-IHSI, in which the pipe was heated from the ID surface followed by rapid cooling from the OD surface with water jet spray. After IHSI treatments, the two IGSCC pipe samples were ultrasonically characterized in the exact manner that was done in the initial characterization to determine if there were any noticeable changes in the UT response of the cracks as indicated by their sizes and signal amplitudes. All of the maximum echo height data from the two samples were compared in terms of the effect of the IHSI treatments. There was no statistically significant difference in the echo height due to the treatments. For both cases, the crack sizes measured after the treatments were reported to be larger than those measured before the treatments. Ultrasonic imaging of cracks was carried out by a laboratory immersion technique coupled with an automated scan probe system. The results are expressed by imaging areas of different echo height levels and of depth

  1. Effect of induction heating stress improvement on ultrasonic response from intergranular stress corrosion cracking

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1991-03-01

    Induction heating stress improvement (IHSI) is often performed for the BWR piping weldments in order to reduce the susceptibility of intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC). Recently, in an US BWR plant, IGSCC was detected where it was not expected because the plant had implemented IGSCC countermeasures, IHSI. The objective of this work is to experimentally document the effect of IHSI on IGSCC detectability. Two IGSCC pipe samples containing a range of circumferential and axial cracks were fabricated from two 12-inch Type 304 stainless steel pipe weldments by the Creviced Pipe Test. Each sample was documented in detail by UT and PT to establish its IGSCC characteristics prior to application of IHSI and I-(Inverse)IHSI. For each sample two separate UT methods were used. One pipe sample was subjected to normal IHSI, in which the pipe OD surface was heated while the ID surface was kept cool by circulating water. The other pipe was subjected to I-IHSI, in which the pipe was heated from the ID surface followed by rapid cooling from the OD surface with water jet spray. After IHSI treatments, the two IGSCC pipe samples were ultrasonically characterized in the exact manner that was done in the initial characterization to determine if there were any noticeable changes in the UT response of the cracks as indicated by their sizes and signal amplitudes. All of the maximum echo height data from the two samples were compared in terms of the effect of the IHSI treatments. There was no statistically significant difference in the echo height due to the treatments. For both cases, the crack sizes measured after the treatments were reported to be larger than those measured before the treatments. Ultrasonic imaging of cracks was carried out by a laboratory immersion technique coupled with an automated scan probe system. The results are expressed by imaging areas of different echo height levels and of depth.

  2. Standard practice for making and using precracked double beam stress corrosion specimens

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2000-01-01

    1.1 This practice covers procedures for fabricating, preparing, and using precracked double beam stress corrosion test specimens. This specimen configuration was formerly designated the double cantilever beam (DCB) specimen. Guidelines are given for methods of exposure and inspection. 1.2 The precracked double beam specimen, as described in this practice, is applicable for evaluation of a wide variety of metals exposed to corrosive environments. It is particularly suited to evaluation of products having a highly directional grain structure, such as rolled plate, forgings, and extrusions, when stressed in the short transverse direction. 1.3 The precracked double beam specimen may be stressed in constant displacement by bolt or wedge loading or in constant load by use of proof rings or dead weight loading. The precracked double beam specimen is amenable to exposure to aqueous or other liquid solutions by specimen immersion or by periodic dropwise addition of solution to the crack tip, or exposure to the atmos...

  3. Pitting Corrosion of 316L Stainless Steel under Low Stress below Yield Strength

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    L(U) Shengjie; CHENG Xuequn; LI Xiaogang

    2012-01-01

    Pitting corrosion of 316L stainless steel (316L SS) under various stress was studied by potentiodynamic polarization,electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and Mott-Schottky (M-S) analysis in 3.5% NaCl solution.The results of polarization curves show that,with the increase of the stress,the pitting potentials and the passive current density markedly decrease firstly (180 MPa),and then increase greatly (200 MPa).The corresponding surface morphologies of the samples after the polarization test well correspond to the results.Mott-Schottky analysis proved the least Cl- adsorbed to the surface of passive film with more positive flat potential,indicating that a moderate stress could increase the pitting corrosion resistance of 316L SS in 3.5% NaCl solution.

  4. Stress corrosion cracking of AISI 321 stainless steel in acidic chloride solution

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Yanliang Huang

    2002-02-01

    The stress corrosion cracking (SCC) of AISI 321 stainless steel in acidic chloride solution was studied by slow strain rate (SSR) technique and fracture mechanics method. The fractured surface was characterized by cleavage fracture. In order to clarify the SCC mechanism, the effects of inhibitor KI on SCC behaviour were also included in this paper. A study showed that the inhibition effects of KI on SCC were mainly attributed to the anodic reaction of the corrosion process. The results of strain distribution in front of the crack tip of the fatigue pre-cracked plate specimens in air, in the blank solution (acidic chloride solution without inhibitor KI) and in the solution added with KI measured by speckle interferometry (SPI) support the unified mechanism of SCC and corrosion fatigue cracking (CFC).

  5. Role of pH on the stress corrosion cracking of titanium alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khokhar, M. I.; Beck, F. H.; Fontana, M. G.

    1973-01-01

    Stress corrosion cracking (SCC) experiments were conducted on Ti-8-1-1 wire specimens in hydrochloric and sulfuric acids of variable pH in order to determine the effect of pH on the susceptibility to cracking. The alloy exhibited increasing susceptibility with decreasing pH. By varying the applied potential, it was observed that susceptibility zones exist both in the cathodic and the anodic ranges. In the cathodic range, susceptibility also increased with decreasing applied potential. Corrosion potential-time data in hydrochloric acid (pH 1.7) and sulfuric acid (pH 1.7) indicate that chloride ions lower the corrosion potential of the specimen which, in turn, increases the susceptibility.

  6. Effect of Stress on Corrosion at Crack Tip on Pipeline Steel in a Near-Neutral pH Solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yao; Cheng, Y. Frank

    2016-10-01

    In this work, the local corrosion at crack tip on an API 5L X46 pipeline steel specimens was investigated under various applied loads in a near-neutral pH solution. Electrochemical measurements, including potentiodynamic polarization and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy, combined with micro-electrochemical technique and surface characterization, were conducted to investigate the effect of stress on local anodic solution of the steel at the crack tip. The stress corrosion cracking of the steel was dominated by an anodic dissolution mechanism, while the effect of hydrogen was negligible. The applied load (stress) increased the corrosion rate at the crack tip, contributing to crack propagation. The deposit of corrosion products at the crack tip could protect somewhat from further corrosion. At sufficiently large applied loads such as 740 N in the work, it was possible to generate separated cathode and anode, further accelerating the crack growth.

  7. High-Performance Laser Peening for Effective Mitigation of Stress Corrosion Cracking

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hackel, L; Hao-Lin, C; Wong, F; Hill, M

    2002-10-02

    Stress corrosion cracking (SCC) in the Yucca Mountain waste package closure welds is believed to be the greatest threat to long-term containment. Use of stress mitigation to eliminate tensile stresses resulting from welding can prevent SCC. A laser technology with sufficient average power to achieve high throughput has been developed and commercially deployed with high peak power and sufficiently high average power to be an effective laser peening system. An appropriately applied version of this process could be applied to eliminate SCC in the waste package closure welds.

  8. 'EMAGTRONIC', a portable tool to locate LP turbine blades endangered by stress corrosion cracking

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    L.P. turbine last stage blades (material X 20 Cr 13) operating well within the moisture region require protection against water droplet erosion. To increase the resistance of the leading edge to droplet erosion, a flame hardening process at about 10000C is employed. In order to preclude stress corrosion cracking in this area, residual tensile surface stresses must be avoided. The new electromagnetic equipment gives quantifiable information regarding the residual stress state of the blades vane surface and can be used to check the blade manufacturing quality control and also for in-service inspection in power plants. (orig.)

  9. Detection of stress corrosion cracks and wastage in reactor pressure vessels and primary coolant system studs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Over the last few years, nuclear plants have experienced stud bolt failures due to stress corrosion cracking and corrosion wastage. Many of these stud bolts were over 1 m long and had no heater hole. The use of conventional longitudinal wave inspection for bolts longer than 1 m has shown inconsistent results. A nondestructive testing technique was needed to inspect the stud bolts in place. The cylindrically guided wave technique was developed to inspect stud bolts of various lengths (up to 3 m) and various diameters. This technique is based on the fact that an ultrasonic wave traveling in a long cylinder becomes guided by the geometry of the cylinder. The wave begins to spread in the cylinder as interaction with the outer wall produces mode conversions. A large number of model stud bolts were tested to verify that the cylindrically guided wave technique could be used to detect crack-like defects and simulated corrosion wastage. This work shows that the cylindrically guided wave technique can be used on a wide variety of stud bolt configurations, and that the technique can be used to effectively detect the two most common modes of stud bolt failure (corrosion cracking and corrosion wastage) at early stages of development

  10. Mitigating the Risk of Stress Corrosion of Austenitic Stainless Steels in Advanced Gas Cooled Reactor Boilers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Advanced Gas-Cooled Reactors (AGRs) operated in the UK by EDF Energy have once-through boilers, which deliver superheated steam at high temperature (∼500 deg. C) and pressure (∼150 bar) to the HP turbine. The boilers have either a serpentine or helical geometry for the tubing of the main heat transfer sections of the boiler and each individual tube is fabricated from mild steel, 9%Cr1%Mo and Type 316 austenitic stainless steel tubing. Type 316 austenitic stainless steel is used for the secondary (final) superheater and steam tailpipe sections of the boiler, which, during normal operation, should operate under dry, superheated steam conditions. This is achieved by maintaining a specified margin of superheat at the upper transition joint (UTJ) between the 9%Cr1%Mo primary superheater and the Type 316 secondary superheater sections of the boiler. Operating in this mode should eliminate the possibility of stress corrosion cracking of the Type 316 tube material on-load. In recent years, however, AGRs have suffered a variety of operational problems with their boilers that have made it difficult to maintain the specified superheat margin at the UTJ. In the case of helical boilers, the combined effects of carbon deposition on the gas side and oxide deposition on the waterside of the tubing have resulted in an increasing number of austenitic tubes operating with less than the specified superheat margin at the UTJ and hence the possibility of wetting the austenitic section of the boiler. Some units with serpentine boilers have suffered creep-fatigue damage of the high temperature sections of the boiler, which currently necessitates capping the steam outlet temperature to prevent further damage. The reduction in steam outlet temperature has meant that there is an increased risk of operation with less than the specified superheat margin at the UTJ and hence stress corrosion cracking of the austenitic sections of the boiler. In order to establish the risk of stress

  11. Localized corrosion and stress corrosion cracking of candidate materials for high-level radioactive waste disposal containers in the US: A literature review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Container materials may undergo any of several modes of degradation in this environment, including: undesirable phase transformations due to lack of phase stability; atmospheric oxidation; general aqueous corrosion; pitting; crevice corrosion; intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC); and transgranular stress corrosion cracking (TGSCC). This paper is an analysis of data from the literature relevant to the pitting, crevice corrosion, and stress corrosion cracking (SCC) of these alloys. Though all three austenitic candidates have demonstrated pitting and crevice corrosion in chloride-containing environments, Alloy 825 has the greatest resistance to these forms of localized attack. Both types 304L and 316L stainless steels are susceptible to SCC in acidic chloride media. In contrast, SCC has not been documented for Alloy 825 under comparable conditions. Gamma irradiation has been found to enhance SCC of Types 304 and 304L stainless steels, but it has no detectable effect on the resistance of Alloy 825 to SCC. Furthermore, while microbiologically induced corrosion effects have been observed for 300-series stainless steels, nickel-based alloys such as Alloy 825 seem to be immune to such problems. Of the copper-based alloys, CDA 715 has the best overall resistance to localized attack. Its resistance to pitting is comparable to that of CDA 613 and superior to that of CDA 102. Observed rates of dealloying in CDA 715 are less than those observed in CDA 613 by orders of magnitude. The resistance of CDA 715 to SCC in tarnishing ammonical environments is comparable to that of CDA 102 and superior to that of CDA 613. Its resistance to SCC in nontarnishing ammonical environments is comparable to that of CDA 613 and superior to that of CDA 102. 22 refs., 8 figs., 4 tabs

  12. Stress corrosion cracking in low-pressure steam turbine rotors: from experiment to simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Stress Corrosion Cracking ( SCC ) has appeared on the LP shrunk-on disks of the 900 MW CP0/CP1 turbines. The temperature at which this occurs is between 90 deg.C and 130 deg.C. Although conventional power stations use the same materials, the temperature of the wet steam does not rise above 70 deg.C, therefore they are not affected by stress corrosion. It becomes quickly apparent that temperature plays an important role. This has been confirmed by crack growth rate analysis using water in autoclaves. In these tests the influence of the proof stress or the material has been also monitored. The conditions that cause these cracks have also been the subject of testing. For temperatures around 95 deg.C, it has been noted that cracks appear quicker in steam than in pure water. GEC ALSTHOM has also conducted a large number of tests in pure steam at 95 deg.C. In order to progress in the study of stress corrosion, it has been decided to design and build a test loop, which allows a steam flow, at a constant temperature and wetness, to be circulated around the test samples. The test program will concern materials for LP rotors, with a coefficient charge of K = σapplied/RP0.2 between 1 and 0.2 and a maximum test duration of 50000 hours. (authors)

  13. Effect of Superficial Atmospheric Corrosion Upon the Internal Stresses in Structural Steel Elements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monel Leiba

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available A research program is presented showing the stress status determined by the corrosion phenomenon inside a specimen of a structural steel element. Several stains are studied their diameters ranging from 1~mm to 6~mm and thickness of the corroded layer under 0.5~mm. The physical modeling is the result of testing in laboratory the phenomenon of superficial atmospheric corrosion and the numerical modeling was developed under a FEM program, ALGOR. A number of 3,200 finite elements of BRICK type were created and the evolution of normal and tangential stresses was scrutinized under the process of loosing elementary material transformed into scrap. Stresses in the damaged sphere were graphically put into evidence and determined with accuracy due to the performances of the program, showing the local perturbations and the pattern of stress concentrators. The studies showed the importance of reproducing with both physical and mathematical methods the intricate mechanism and sometimes unpredictable effects of corrosion phenomenon upon the structural steel elements.

  14. Evaluation of the cracking by stress corrosion in nuclear reactor environments type BWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The stress corrosion cracking susceptibility was studied in sensitized, solution annealed 304 steel, and in 304-L welded with a heat treatment that simulated the radiation induced segregation, by the slow strain rate test technique, in a similar environment of a boiling water reactor (BWR), 288 C, 8 MPa, low conductivity and a electrochemical corrosion potential near 200 mV. vs. standard hydrogen electrode (She). The electrochemical noise technique was used for the detection of the initiation and propagation of the cracking. The steels were characterized by metallographic studies with optical and scanning electronic microscopy and by the electrochemical potentiodynamic reactivation of single loop and double loop. In all the cases, the steels present delta ferrite. The slow strain rate tests showed that the 304 steel in the solution annealed condition is susceptible to transgranular stress corrosion cracking (TGSCC), such as in a normalized condition showed granulated. In the sensitized condition the steel showed intergranular stress corrosion cracking, followed by a transition to TGSCC. The electrochemical noise time series showed that is possible associated different time sequences to different modes of cracking and that is possible detect sequentially cracking events, it is means, one after other, supported by the fractographic studies by scanning electron microscopy. The parameter that can distinguish between the different modes of cracking is the re passivation rate, obtained by the current decay rate -n- in the current transients. This is due that the re passivation rate is a function of the microstructure and the sensitization. Other statistic parameters like the localized index, Kurtosis, Skew, produce results that are related with mixed corrosion. (Author)

  15. Effect of surface stress states on the corrosion behavior of alloy 690

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Myung Mo; Shim, Hee Sang; Seo, Myung Ji; Hur, Do Haeng [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-05-15

    The test environment simulated the primary water chemistry in PWRs. Dissolved oxygen (DO), dissolved hydrogen (DH), pH and conductivity were monitored at room temperature using sensors manufactured by Orbisphere and Mettler Toledo. The temperature and pressure were maintained at 330 .deg. C and 150 bars during the corrosion test. The condition of the test solution was lithium (LiOH) 2 ppm and boron (H3BO4) 1,200 ppm, DH 35 cc/kg (STP) and less than 5 ppb DO. The flow rate of the loop system was 3.8 L/hour. Corrosion tests were conducted for 500 hours. The corrosion release rate was evaluated by a gravimetric analysis method using a two-step alkaline permanganate-ammonium citrate (AP/AC) descaling process. Compressive residual stress is induced by shot peening treatment but its value reveals some different trend between the shot peening intensity on the surface of Alloy 690 TT. A higher shot peening intensity causes a reduction in the corrosion rate and it is considered that the compressive residual stress beneath the surface layer suppresses the metal ion transfer in an alloy matrix.

  16. Phenomena of the ionic transport in the stress corrosion of metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For the study of electrochemical conditions of propagation, a model which calculates the concentrations and potential profiles inside cracks or localized corrosion cavities, was developed. Considering transport by difussion and migration it was applied to pure metals (Zn, Fe) in solutions where pitting occurs (NaCl or Na2SO4, with borate buffer), and also extended to systems where stress corrosion cracking is present, such as Cu and yellow brass in NaNO2. Physical bases of the 'constant intermediate elongation rate technique' to predict stress corrosion cracking susceptibility was analized, studying by mathematical models: 1) dissolution current, that should be the result of superposition of repassivation transients on the fresh metal, exposed to corrosive medium by strain, with the same rate of that of a static specimen; 2) ohmic drop, that in some systems could be quite important and it must be considered in the overpotential evaluation; and 3) metallic ion concentration that, instead of what happens in a crack, never attains saturation in the analized cases. For repassivation transient according to the crak propagation models proposed by Scully and Ford it was found that, at the tip of the crack, it is unlikely that the same repassivation transients occur as in the constant intermediate elongation rate experiments. (M.E.L.)

  17. Laboratory results of stress corrosion cracking of steam generator tubes in a complex environment - An update

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Horner, Olivier; Pavageau, Ellen-Mary; Vaillant, Francois [EDF R and D, Materials and Mechanics of Components Department, 77818 Moret-sur-Loing (France); Bouvier, Odile de [EDF Nuclear Engineering Division, Centre d' Expertise et d' Inspection dans les Domaines de la Realisation et de l' Exploitation, 93206 Saint Denis (France)

    2004-07-01

    Stress corrosion cracking occurs in the flow-restricted areas on the secondary side of steam generator tubes of Pressured Water Reactors (PWR), where water pollutants are likely to concentrate. Chemical analyses carried out during the shutdowns gave some insight into the chemical composition of these areas, which has evolved during these last years (i.e. less sodium as pollutants). It has been modeled in laboratory by tests in two different typical environments: the sodium hydroxide and the sulfate environments. These models satisfactorily describe the secondary side corrosion of steam generator tubes for old plant units. Furthermore, a third typical environment - the complex environment - which corresponds to an All Volatile Treatment (AVT) environment containing alumina, silica, phosphate and acetic acid has been recently studied. This particular environment satisfactorily reproduces the composition of the deposits observed on the surface of the steam generator tubes as well as the degradation of the tubes. A review of the recent laboratory results obtained by considering the complex environment are presented here. Several tests have been carried out in order to study initiation and propagation of secondary side corrosion cracking for some selected materials in such an environment. 600 Thermally Treated (TT) alloy reveals to be less sensitive to secondary side corrosion cracking than 600 Mill Annealed (MA) alloy. Finally, the influence of some related factors like stress, temperature and environmental factors are discussed. (authors)

  18. Intergranular stress corrosion in soldered joints of stainless steel 304

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The intergranular stress cracking of welded joints of austenitic stainless steel, AISI 304, is a serious problem in BWR type reactors. It is associated with the simultaneous presence of three factors; stress, a critical media and sensibilization (DOS). EPR technique was used in order to verify the sensibilization degree in the base metal, and the zone affected by heat and welding material. The characterization of material was done. The objective of this work is the study of microstructure and the evaluation of EPR technique used for the determination of DOS in a welded plate of austenitic stainless steel AISI 304. (Author)

  19. Stress corrosion cracking resistance of aluminum alloy 7000 series after two-step aging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jegdić Bore V.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The effect of one step-and a new (short two-step aging on the resistance to stress corrosion cracking of an aluminum alloy 7000 series was investigated, using slow strain rate test and fracture mechanics method. Aging level in the tested alloy was evaluated by means of scanning electron microscopy and measurements of electrical resistivity. It was shown that the alloy after the new two-step aging is significantly more resistant to stress corrosion cracking. Values of tensile properties and fracture toughness are similar for both thermal states. Processes that take place at the crack tip have been considered. The effect of the testing solution temperature on the crack growth rate on the plateau was determined. Two values of the apparent activation energy were obtained. These values correspond to different processes that control crack growth rate on the plateau at higher and lower temperatures. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. TR 34028 i br. TR 34016

  20. The stress corrosion susceptibility of a quenched and tempered 12 pct crmov martensitic stainless steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doig, P.; Chastell, D. J.; Flewitt, P. E. J.

    1982-05-01

    The stress corrosion susceptibility of a martensitic 12 pct Cr 1 pct MoV stainless steel in alkaline chloride solution has been measured as a function of tempering heat treatment. The microstructures produced during tempering have been characterized by transmission electron microscopy and related to measured hardness values. In addition, scanning transmission electron microscopy combined with energy dispersive X-ray microanalysis has allowed the distribution of alloying elements within the microstructure to be examined. Electron energy loss spectroscopy was used to establish fully precipitate compositions, and the microanalysis results have been explained in terms of a diffusion controlled growth of grain boundary precipitates. The overall stress corrosion cracking susceptibility has been correlated with the development of chromium solute depletion profiles about prior austenite grain boundaries.

  1. Heat treatment of NiCrFe alloy 600 to optimize resistance to intergranular stress corrosion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steeves, A.F.; Bibb, A.E.

    A process of producing a NiCrFe alloy having a high resistance to stress corrosion cracking comprises heating a NiCrFe alloy to a temperature sufficient to enable the carbon present in the alloy body in the form of carbide deposits to enter into solution, rapidly cooling the alloy body, and heating the cooled body to a temperature between 1100 to 1500/sup 0/F for about 1 to 30 hours.

  2. Evaluation of stress corrosion cracking in aqueous solution neutron shield of transport/storage cask for spent fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Experimental evaluation proved that no chloride induced stress corrosion cracking will occur on the metal cask which utilizes propylene glycol aqueous solution as neutron shield. Crevice corrosion, precursor of cracking, occurs at about 0.4V vs. 0.1M-KCl silver silver-chloride reference electrode in aqueous solution with chloride concentration of more than 5 times higher than limit value. On the other hand, the electrochemical potential (ECP) of cask material was 0.08V in air saturated aqueous solution. Since ECP is much smaller than the crevice corrosion potential below which no crevice corrosion is expected, the possibility is very small for chloride induced stress corrosion cracking to occur on the cask. (author)

  3. Hydrogen-related stress corrosion cracking in line pipe steel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Lars Vendelbo

    1997-01-01

    A correlation between hydrogen concentration (C0) and the critical stress intensity factor for propagation of hydrogen-related cracks has been established by fracture mechanical testing of CT-specimens for the heat affected zone of an X-70 pipeline steel. This has been compared with field...... measurements of the hydrogen uptake by cathodically protected steel exposed in heavy clay and peat type soils....

  4. Nonlinear ultrasonic assessment of stress corrosion cracking damage in sensitized 304 stainless steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morlock, Florian, E-mail: fmorlock3@gatech.edu; Jacobs, Laurence J., E-mail: fmorlock3@gatech.edu; Kim, Jin-Yeon, E-mail: fmorlock3@gatech.edu [School of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA (United States); Singh, Preet [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA (United States); Wall, James J. [The George W. Woodruff School of Mechanical Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA and Electric Power Research Institute, Charlotte, NC (United States)

    2015-03-31

    This research uses nonlinear Rayleigh surface waves to characterize stress corrosion cracking (SCC) damage in welded 304 Stainless Steel (304 SS). 304 SS is widely used in reactor pressure vessels, where a corrosive environment in combination with applied stress due to high internal pressures can cause SCC. Welds and the nearby heat affected zones (HAZ) in the vessel material are especially sensitive to SCC damage. SCC damage results in microstructural changes such as dislocation formation and microcrack initiation that in the long term lead to reduced structural integrity and material failure. Therefore, the early detection of SCC is crucial to ensure safe operation. It has been shown that the microstructural changes caused by SCC can generate higher harmonic waves when excited harmonically. This research considers different levels of SCC damage induced in samples of welded 304 SS by applying stress to a specimen held in a corrosive medium (Sodium Thiosulfate). A nonlinear Rayleigh surface wave is introduced in the material and the fundamental and the second harmonic waves are measured using wedge detection. The nonlinearity parameter that relates the fundamental and the second harmonic amplitudes, is computed to quantify the SCC damage in each sample. These results are used to demonstrate the feasibility of using nonlinear Rayleigh waves to characterize SCC damage.

  5. Nonlinear ultrasonic assessment of stress corrosion cracking damage in sensitized 304 stainless steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morlock, Florian; Jacobs, Laurence J.; Kim, Jin-Yeon; Singh, Preet; Wall, James J.

    2015-03-01

    This research uses nonlinear Rayleigh surface waves to characterize stress corrosion cracking (SCC) damage in welded 304 Stainless Steel (304 SS). 304 SS is widely used in reactor pressure vessels, where a corrosive environment in combination with applied stress due to high internal pressures can cause SCC. Welds and the nearby heat affected zones (HAZ) in the vessel material are especially sensitive to SCC damage. SCC damage results in microstructural changes such as dislocation formation and microcrack initiation that in the long term lead to reduced structural integrity and material failure. Therefore, the early detection of SCC is crucial to ensure safe operation. It has been shown that the microstructural changes caused by SCC can generate higher harmonic waves when excited harmonically. This research considers different levels of SCC damage induced in samples of welded 304 SS by applying stress to a specimen held in a corrosive medium (Sodium Thiosulfate). A nonlinear Rayleigh surface wave is introduced in the material and the fundamental and the second harmonic waves are measured using wedge detection. The nonlinearity parameter that relates the fundamental and the second harmonic amplitudes, is computed to quantify the SCC damage in each sample. These results are used to demonstrate the feasibility of using nonlinear Rayleigh waves to characterize SCC damage.

  6. Effect of Aging on Fracture Toughness and Stress Corrosion Cracking Resistance of Forged 7475 Aluminum Alloy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Hongying; GENG Jinfeng; DONG Xianjuan; WANG Changjian; ZHENG Feng

    2007-01-01

    The effects of two-stage aging and retrogression and reaging heat treatment on the fracture toughness and stress corrosion cracking resistance of 7475 alloy were studied. The fracture toughness, conductivity and strength of samples of nine groups under duplex aging conditions and three retrogression and reaging heat treatments were also measured. Incorporating the microstructure and property, we found that when the condition of the first order aging kept identical, the fracture toughness and stress corrosion cracking resistance increase with aging time and the second aging temperature. The optimal treatment conditions are (115℃×7h+185℃×13h) among all tested two-stage aging treatments.Although the 7475 alloy treated by RRA method shows the highest strength and its stress corrosion cracking resistance after twenty minutes retrogression can also reach the same level as those by the optimal treatment of (115℃×7h+185℃×13h),the fracture toughness is even low.

  7. Analysis of stress corrosion cracking in alloy 718 following commercial reactor exposure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leonard, Keith J.; Gussev, Maxim N.; Stevens, Jacqueline N.; Busby, Jeremy T.

    2015-11-01

    Alloy 718 is generally considered a highly corrosion-resistant material but can still be susceptible to stress corrosion cracking (SCC). The combination of factors leading to SCC susceptibility in the alloy is not always clear enough. In the present work, alloy 718 leaf spring (LS) materials that suffered stress corrosion damage during two 24-month cycles in pressurized water reactor service, operated to >45 MWd/mtU burn-up, was investigated. Compared to archival samples fabricated through the same processing conditions, little microstructural and property changes occurred in the material with in-service irradiation, contrary to high dose rate laboratory-based experiments reported in literature. Though the lack of delta phase formation along grain boundaries would suggest a more SCC resistant microstructure, grain boundary cracking in the material was extensive. Crack propagation routes were explored through focused ion beam milling of specimens near the crack tip for transmission electron microscopy as well as in polished plan view and cross-sectional samples for electron backscatter diffraction analysis. It has been shown in this study that cracks propagated mainly along random high-angle grain boundaries, with the material around cracks displaying a high local density of dislocations. The slip lines were produced through the local deformation of the leaf spring material above their yield strength. The cause for local SCC appears to be related to oxidation of both slip lines and grain boundaries, which under the high in-service stresses resulted in crack development in the material.

  8. Fundamental aspects of stress corrosion cracking of copper relevant to the Swedish deep geologic repository concept

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bhaskaran, Ganesh; Carcea, Anatolie; Ulaganathan, Jagan; Wang, Shengchun; Huang, Yin; Newman, Roger C. [Dept. of Chemical Engineering and Applied Chemistry, Univ. of Toronto, Toronto (Canada)

    2013-03-15

    Phosphorus-doped oxygen-free copper will be used as the outer barrier in canisters that will contain spent nuclear fuel in the proposed Swedish underground repository. The possibility of stress corrosion cracking (SCC) is a concern, in view of isolated reports of cracking or intergranular corrosion of pure copper in sulfide solutions. This concern was addressed in the present work using copper tensile specimens provided by SKB. Methods included slow strain rate testing, constant strain tensile testing, electrochemical and surface analytical studies of corrosion products, and electron backscatter diffraction analysis of grain orientation effects on corrosion. The base solutions were prepared from NaCl or synthetic sea water with addition of varying amounts of sodium sulfide at room temperature and 80 degree Celsius. No SCC was found in any of the testing, for a range of sulfide concentrations from 5-50 mM at room temperature or 8 C, including tests where small anodic or cathodic potential displacements were applied from the open-circuit (corrosion) potential. Neither was SCC found in constant-strain immersion testing with very large strain. The Cu2S corrosion product is generally very coarse, fragile, and easily spalled off in severe corrosion environments, i.e. high sulfide concentration, high temperature, less perfect de aeration, etc. But it could also consist of very fine grains, relatively compact and adherent, on particular grain orientations when it was formed on an electro polished surface in a very well-deaerated solution. These orientations have not yet been identified statistically, although some preference for thin, adherent films was noted on orientations close to (100). The notion that the corrosion reaction is always controlled by inward aqueous-phase diffusion of sulfide may thus not be unconditionally correct for this range of sulfide concentrations; however it is hard to distinguish the role of diffusion within pores in the film. In the actual

  9. Influence of the mechanical condition of the surface of an austenitic stainless steel on its susceptibility to stress corrosion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This research thesis reports the analysis of the relationships between cold working, stresses and susceptibility to stress corrosion (under applied or residual stresses) of a steady austenitic stainless steel (Z2 CND 17-12 or 316L) in a boiling solution of MgCl2 at 44 pc. The mechanical condition of sample surface is precisely defined by X ray diffraction. Corrosion tests are performed under uniaxial applied tensile stress. They reveal a very low cracking critical threshold which is sensitive to the level of initial residual stresses, but not much sensitive to initial cold working by tension. However, in the case of corrosion tests under residual stresses obtained by elastoplastic bending on specimens previously deformed under tension, the threshold is notably higher, and cold working rate is then an extremely important factor. Depending on the reached level, the effect can be beneficial or detrimental

  10. Stress-Corrosion Cracking Property of Aluminum-Magnesium Alloy Processed by Equal-Channel Angular Pressing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroaki Nakano

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Stress-corrosion cracking property of an aluminum-magnesium alloy processed by equal-channel angular pressing (ECAP was investigated by a slow strain-rate tensile technique in a 3% NaCl solution of pH 4.2 at 303 K. The maximum stress and elongation of the Al-Mg alloy were lower in the NaCl solution than in air. The stress-corrosion cracking property was evaluated by the decrease ratio of maximum stress and elongation of the Al-Mg alloy with NaCl solution, (max and (, respectively. (max and ( were lower with ECAP than without it, showing that the susceptibility of stress-corrosion cracking decreased with ECAP. The polarization curve and time dependence of the anodic current density at constant potential of the Al-Mg alloy in the NaCl solution revealed that the anodic current density was lower with ECAP than without it, or the corrosion resistance of the Al-Mg alloy was improved by ECAP. The decrease in stress-corrosion crack susceptibility of the Al-Mg alloy with ECAP is attributed to an improvement in corrosion resistance afforded by ECAP.

  11. SRNL SHELF LIFE STUDIES - SCC STUDIES AT ROOM TEMPERTURE [stress corrosion cracking

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mickalonis, J.; Duffey, J.

    2014-11-12

    Phase II, Series 2 corrosion testing performed by the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) for the Department of Energy 3013 container has been completed. The corrosion tests are part of an integrated plan conducted jointly by Los Alamos National Laboratory and the Savannah River Site. SRNL was responsible for conducting corrosion studies in small-scale vessels to address the influence of salt composition, water loading, and type of oxide/salt contact on the relative humidity inside a 3013 container and on the resulting corrosion of Type 304L and 316L stainless steel (304L and 316L). This testing was conducted in two phases: Phase I evaluated a broad spectrum of salt compositions and initial water loadings on the salt mixtures exposed to 304L and 316L and the resulting corrosion; Phase II evaluated the corrosion of 304L at specific water loadings and a single salt composition. During Phase I testing at high initial moisture levels (0.35 to 1.24 wt%)a, the roomtemperature corrosion of 304L exposed to a series of plutonium oxide/chloride salt mixtures ranged from superficial staining to pitting and stress corrosion cracking (SCC). 304L teardrop coupons that exhibited SCC were directly exposed to a mixture composed of 98 wt % PuO2, 0.9 wt % NaCl, 0.9 wt % KCl, and 0.2 wt % CaCl2. Cracking was not observed in a 316L teardrop coupon. Pitting was also observed in this environment for both 304L and 316L with depths ranging from 20 to 100 μm. Neither pitting nor SCC was observed in mixtures with a greater chloride salt concentration (5 and 28 wt%). These results demonstrated that for a corrosive solution to form a balance existed between the water loading and the salt chloride concentration. This chloride solution results from the interaction of loaded water with the hydrating CaCl2 salt. In Phase II, Series 1 tests, the SCC results were shown to be reproducible with cracking occurring in as little as 85 days. The approximate 0.5 wt% moisture level was found to

  12. 1987 EPRI workshop on mechanisms of primary water intergranular stress corrosion cracking: Proceedings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A meeting on ''Mechanisms of Primary Water IGSCC'' (PWSCC) was organized to give those working in this area an opportunity to share their results, ideas, and plans in regard to investigations of fundamental aspects of the PWSCC phenomenon affecting alloy 600 steam generator tubes. Topics discussed included: (1) General reviews of hydrogen embrittlement and film rupture - anodic dissolution mechanisms of stress corrosion cracking, (2) environmental factors involved in PWSCC, (3) the influence of microstructure on PWSCC, and (4) the influence of stress and plastic strain on PWSCC. A significant portion of the discussions of all of these topics was devoted to the subject of modelling of crack initiation and crack growth

  13. Stress Corrosion Cracking—Crevice Interaction in Austenitic Stainless Steels Characterized By Acoustic Emission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leinonen, H.; Schildt, T.; Hänninen, H.

    2011-02-01

    Stress corrosion cracking (SCC) susceptibility of austenitic EN1.4301 (AISI 304) and EN1.4404 (AISI 316L) stainless steels was studied using the constant load method and polymer (PTFE) crevice former in order to study the effects of crevice on SCC susceptibility. The uniaxial active loading tests were performed in 50 pct CaCl2 at 373 K (100 °C) and in 0.1 M NaCl at 353 K (80 °C) under open-circuit corrosion potential (OCP) and electrochemical polarization. Pitting, crevice, and SCC corrosion were characterized and identified by acoustic emission (AE) analysis using ∆ t filtering and the linear locationing technique. The correlation of AE parameters including amplitude, duration, rise time, counts, and energy were used to identify the different types of corrosion. The stages of crevice corrosion and SCC induced by constant active load/crevice former were monitored by AE. In the early phase of the tests, some low amplitude AE activity was detected. In the steady-state phase, the AE activity was low, and toward the end of the test, it increased with the increasing amplitude of the impulses. AE allowed a good correlation between AE signals and corrosion damage. Although crevice corrosion and SCC induced AE signals overlapped slightly, a good correlation between them and microscopical characterization and stress-strain data was found. Especially, the activity of AE signals increased in the early and final stages of the SCC experiment under constant active load conditions corresponding to the changes in the measured steady-state creep strain rate of the specimen. The results of the constant active load/crevice former test indicate that a crevice can initiate SCC even in the mild chloride solution at low temperatures. Based on the mechanistic model of SCC, the rate determining step in SCC is thought to be the generation of vacancies by selective dissolution, which is supported by the low activity phase of AE during the steady-state creep strain rate region.

  14. Effect of titanium nitride/titanium coatings on the stress corrosion of nickel-titanium orthodontic archwires in artificial saliva

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jia-Kuang; Liu, I.-Hua; Liu, Cheng; Chang, Chen-Jung; Kung, Kuan-Chen; Liu, Yen-Ting; Lee, Tzer-Min; Jou, Jin-Long

    2014-10-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to develop titanium nitride (TiN)/titanium (Ti) coating on orthodontic nickel-titanium (NiTi) wires and to study the stress corrosion of specimens in vitro, simulating the intra-oral environment in as realistic a manner as possible. TiN/Ti coatings were formed on orthodontic NiTi wires by physical vapor deposition (PVD). The characteristics of untreated and TiN/Ti-coated NiTi wires were evaluated by measurement of corrosion potential (Ecorr), corrosion current densities (Icorr), breakdown potential (Eb), and surface morphology in artificial saliva with different pH and three-point bending conditions. From the potentiodynamic polarization and SEM results, the untreated NiTi wires showed localized corrosion compared with the uniform corrosion observed in the TiN/Ti-coated specimen under both unstressed and stressed conditions. The bending stress influenced the corrosion current density and breakdown potential of untreated specimens at both pH 2 and pH 5.3. Although the bending stress influenced the corrosion current of the TiN/Ti-coated specimens, stable and passive corrosion behavior of the stressed specimen was observed even at 2.0 V (Ag/AgCl). It should be noted that the surface properties of the NiTi alloy could determine clinical performance. For orthodontic application, the mechanical damage destroys the protective oxide film of NiTi; however, the self-repairing capacity of the passive film of NiTi alloys is inferior to Ti in chloride-containing solutions. In this study, the TiN coating was found able to provide protection against mechanical damage, while the Ti interlayer improved the corrosion properties in an aggressive environment.

  15. Primary water stress corrosion cracking of alloy 600

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As United States nuclear reactors have aged, a number of problems have arisen. Among these are primary water cracking (PWSCC) of Alloy 600 in PWRs. Since 1989, when PWSCC was identified to the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) as an emerging issue, it has been reported in several components, including control rod drive mechanism (CRDM) penetrations. To address PWSCC of CRDM penetrations at U.S. plants, the industry developed a comprehensive inspection, evaluation, repair and mitigation program. Recent pilot inspections that revealed cracking at two of the three U.S. plants inspected indicate the problem is generic. Further, results of stress analyses indicate that an area of high stress exists that could cause cracking that would follow the J-groove weld. Such cracking was identified in a foreign reactor that had a resin intrusion. PWSCC of CRDMs remains an open issue. Proactive NRC/Industry programs for inspection and repair or replacement of affected components are essential for continued operation of nuclear reactors and for license extensions. (author)

  16. Kinetic studies of the stress corrosion cracking of D6AC steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noronha, P. J.

    1975-01-01

    The effect of load interactions on the crack growth velocity of D6AC steel under stress corrosion cracking conditions was determined. The environment was a 3.5 percent salt solution. The modified-wedge opening load specimens were fatigue precracked and subjected to a deadweight loading in creep machines. The effects of load shedding on incubation times and crack growth rates were measured using high-sensitivity compliance measurement techniques. Load shedding results in an incubation time, the length of which depends on the amount of load shed and the baseline stress intensity. The sequence of unloading the specimen also controls the subsequent incubation period. The incubation period is shorter when load shedding passes through zero load than when it does not if the specimen initially had the same baseline stress intensity. The crack growth rates following the incubation period are also different from the steady-state crack growth rate at the operating stress intensity. These data show that the susceptibility of this alloy system to stress corrosion cracking depends on the plane-strain fracture toughness and on the yield strength of the material.

  17. Stress-Corrosion Cracking Property of Aluminum-Magnesium Alloy Processed by Equal-Channel Angular Pressing

    OpenAIRE

    Hiroaki Nakano; Satoshi Oue; Seiji Taguchi; Shigeo Kobayashi; Zenji Horita

    2012-01-01

    Stress-corrosion cracking property of an aluminum-magnesium alloy processed by equal-channel angular pressing (ECAP) was investigated by a slow strain-rate tensile technique in a 3% NaCl solution of pH 4.2 at 303 K. The maximum stress and elongation of the Al-Mg alloy were lower in the NaCl solution than in air. The stress-corrosion cracking property was evaluated by the decrease ratio of maximum stress and elongation of the Al-Mg alloy with NaCl solution, ( m a x ) and ( ) , respecti...

  18. Irradiation-Assisted Stress Corrosion Cracking of Austenitic Stainless Steels in BWR Environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Y. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Chopra, O. K. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Gruber, Eugene E. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Shack, William J. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)

    2010-06-01

    The internal components of light water reactors are exposed to high-energy neutron irradiation and high-temperature reactor coolant. The exposure to neutron irradiation increases the susceptibility of austenitic stainless steels (SSs) to stress corrosion cracking (SCC) because of the elevated corrosion potential of the reactor coolant and the introduction of new embrittlement mechanisms through radiation damage. Various nonsensitized SSs and nickel alloys have been found to be prone to intergranular cracking after extended neutron exposure. Such cracks have been seen in a number of internal components in boiling water reactors (BWRs). The elevated susceptibility to SCC in irradiated materials, commonly referred to as irradiation-assisted stress corrosion cracking (IASCC), is a complex phenomenon that involves simultaneous actions of irradiation, stress, and corrosion. In recent years, as nuclear power plants have aged and irradiation dose increased, IASCC has become an increasingly important issue. Post-irradiation crack growth rate and fracture toughness tests have been performed to provide data and technical support for the NRC to address various issues related to aging degradation of reactor-core internal structures and components. This report summarizes the results of the last group of tests on compact tension specimens from the Halden-II irradiation. The IASCC susceptibility of austenitic SSs and heat-affected-zone (HAZ) materials sectioned from submerged arc and shielded metal arc welds was evaluated by conducting crack growth rate and fracture toughness tests in a simulated BWR environment. The fracture and cracking behavior of HAZ materials, thermally sensitized SSs and grain-boundary engineered SSs was investigated at several doses (≤3 dpa). These latest results were combined with previous results from Halden-I and II irradiations to analyze the effects of neutron dose, water chemistry, alloy compositions, and welding and processing conditions on IASCC

  19. Assessment of Initial Test Conditions for Experiments to Assess Irradiation Assisted Stress Corrosion Cracking Mechanisms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Busby, Jeremy T [ORNL; Gussev, Maxim N [ORNL

    2011-04-01

    Irradiation-assisted stress corrosion cracking is a key materials degradation issue in today s nuclear power reactor fleet and affects critical structural components within the reactor core. The effects of increased exposure to irradiation, stress, and/or coolant can substantially increase susceptibility to stress-corrosion cracking of austenitic steels in high-temperature water environments. . Despite 30 years of experience, the underlying mechanisms of IASCC are unknown. Extended service conditions will increase the exposure to irradiation, stress, and corrosive environment for all core internal components. The objective of this effort within the Light Water Reactor Sustainability program is to evaluate the response and mechanisms of IASCC in austenitic stainless steels with single variable experiments. A series of high-value irradiated specimens has been acquired from the past international research programs, providing a valuable opportunity to examine the mechanisms of IASCC. This batch of irradiated specimens has been received and inventoried. In addition, visual examination and sample cleaning has been completed. Microhardness testing has been performed on these specimens. All samples show evidence of hardening, as expected, although the degree of hardening has saturated and no trend with dose is observed. Further, the change in hardening can be converted to changes in mechanical properties. The calculated yield stress is consistent with previous data from light water reactor conditions. In addition, some evidence of changes in deformation mode was identified via examination of the microhardness indents. This analysis may provide further insights into the deformation mode under larger scale tests. Finally, swelling analysis was performed using immersion density methods. Most alloys showed some evidence of swelling, consistent with the expected trends for this class of alloy. The Hf-doped alloy showed densification rather than swelling. This observation may be

  20. Monte Carlo simulation of micro crack propagation behavior for stress corrosion cracking

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A calculation code of Monte Carlo simulation for micro crack propagation behavior of stress corrosion cracking has been developed. Improvements for micro crack growth rate treatments and stress distributions have been made. Calculated crack depth distributions were compared with the CBB test results for sensitized stainless steels and low carbon stainless steels with hardened layer. For sensitized stainless steels, the calculated crack depth distribution could well reproduce the CBB test results by taking into account crack growth rates obtained from experiments. For low carbon stainless steels, although considering stress distributions improved the overestimation of crack depths, the calculated crack depth distribution could not well reproduce the CBB test result. The results revealed that the effects of the crack growth rate and the stress distribution on micro crack propagation behaviors. (author)

  1. Stress corrosion of Zircaloy-4. Fracture mechanics study of the intergranular - transgranular transition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stress corrosion cracking susceptibility of Zircaloy-4 wires was studied in 1M NaCl, 1M KBr and 1M KI aqueous solutions, and in iodine alcoholic solutions. In all cases, intergranular attack preceded transgranular propagation. It is generally accepted that the intergranular-transgranular transition occurs when a critical value of the stress intensity factor is reached. In the present work it was confirmed that the transition from intergranular to transgranular propagation cracking in Zircaloy-4 wires also occurs when a critical value of the stress intensity factor is reached. This critical stress intensity factor in wire samples is independent of the solution tested and close to 10 MPa.m-1/2. This value is in good agreement with those reported in the literature measured by different techniques. (author)

  2. Effect of Stress Ratio and Loading Frequency on the Corrosion Fatigue Behavior of Smooth Steel Wire in Different Solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Songquan Wang

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available In this work, the effects of loading condition and corrosion solution on the corrosion fatigue behavior of smooth steel wire were discussed. The results of polarization curves and weight loss curves showed that the corrosion of steel wire in acid solution was more severe than that in neutral and alkaline solutions. With the extension of immersion time in acid solution, the cathodic reaction of steel wire gradually changed from the reduction of hydrogen ion to the reduction of oxygen, but was always the reduction of hydrogen ion in neutral and alkaline solutions. The corrosion kinetic parameters and equivalent circuits of steel wires were also obtained by simulating the Nyquist diagrams. In corrosion fatigue test, the effect of stress ratio and loading frequency on the crack initiation mechanism was emphasized. The strong corrosivity of acid solution could accelerate the nucleation of crack tip. The initiation mechanism of crack under different conditions was summarized according to the side and fracture surface morphologies. For the crack initiation mechanism of anodic dissolution, the stronger the corrosivity of solution was, the more easily the fatigue crack source formed, while, for the crack initiation mechanism of deformation activation, the lower stress ratio and higher frequency would accelerate the generation of corrosion fatigue crack source.

  3. Study on H2S stress corrosion test of welded joint for X65 pipeline steel and numerical analysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    金晓军; 霍立兴; 张玉凤; 白秉仁; 李晓巍; 曹军

    2004-01-01

    The susceptibility of welded joint for the X65 pipeline steel to H2S stress corrosion cracking (SCC) is investigated. SCC tests on the steel are carried out in the environment based on NACE TM-01-77 solution with saturated gaseous H2S. The threshold stress intensity factor and crack propagation velocity are calculated according to wedge-opening loading (WOL) specimens. The three-dimensional elastic-plastic finite element analysis of WOL specimens is performed by using the FEM programming package ANSYS. Stress field and concentration of hydrogen distribution property ahead of the crack tip are obtained. This paper surveyed the microstructure of welded joint and studied on the mechanical properties of X65 pipeline steel. It provides experimental basis for studying stress corrosion. The results of numerical analysis are consistent with conclusions of stress corrosion test.

  4. Stress corrosion crack initiation of alloy 182 weld metal in primary coolant - Influence of chemical composition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Calonne, O.; Foucault, M.; Steltzlen, F. [AREVA (France); Amzallag, C. [EDF SEPTEN (France)

    2011-07-01

    Nickel-base alloys 182 and 82 have been used extensively for dissimilar metal welds. Typical applications are the J-groove welds of alloy 600 vessel head penetrations, pressurizer penetrations, heater sleeves and bottom mounted instrumented nozzles as well as some safe end butt welds. While the overall performance of these weld metals has been good, during the last decade, an increasing number of cases of stress corrosion cracking of Alloy 182 weld metal have been reported in PWRs. In this context, the role of weld defects has to be examined. Their contribution in the crack initiation mechanism requires laboratory investigations with small scale characterizations. In this study, the influence of both alloy composition and weld defects on PWSCC (Stress Corrosion Cracking in Primary Water) initiation was investigated using U-bend specimens in simulated primary water at 320 C. The main results are the following: -) the chemical compositions of the weld deposits leading to a large propensity to hot cracking are not the most susceptible to PWSCC initiation, -) macroscopically, superficial defects did not evolve during successive exposures. They can be included in large corrosion cracks but their role as 'precursors' is not yet established. (authors)

  5. Hierarchical Petascale Simulation Framework For Stress Corrosion Cracking

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grama, Ananth

    2013-12-18

    A number of major accomplishments resulted from the project. These include: • Data Structures, Algorithms, and Numerical Methods for Reactive Molecular Dynamics. We have developed a range of novel data structures, algorithms, and solvers (amortized ILU, Spike) for use with ReaxFF and charge equilibration. • Parallel Formulations of ReactiveMD (Purdue ReactiveMolecular Dynamics Package, PuReMD, PuReMD-GPU, and PG-PuReMD) for Messaging, GPU, and GPU Cluster Platforms. We have developed efficient serial, parallel (MPI), GPU (Cuda), and GPU Cluster (MPI/Cuda) implementations. Our implementations have been demonstrated to be significantly better than the state of the art, both in terms of performance and scalability. • Comprehensive Validation in the Context of Diverse Applications. We have demonstrated the use of our software in diverse systems, including silica-water, silicon-germanium nanorods, and as part of other projects, extended it to applications ranging from explosives (RDX) to lipid bilayers (biomembranes under oxidative stress). • Open Source Software Packages for Reactive Molecular Dynamics. All versions of our soft- ware have been released over the public domain. There are over 100 major research groups worldwide using our software. • Implementation into the Department of Energy LAMMPS Software Package. We have also integrated our software into the Department of Energy LAMMPS software package.

  6. The hydrogen role on the stress corrosion of the alloy 600 in PWR; Le role de l'hydrogene sur la corrosion sous contrainte de l'alliage 600 en milieu REP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laghoutaris, P.; Chene, J.; Guerre, C.; Raquet, O. [CEA Saclay, 91 - Gif sur Yvette (France); Molins, R. [Ecole Nationale Superieure des Mines de Paris, 75 - Paris (France); Vaillant, F. [Electricite de France (EDF), Les Renardieres, 92 - Clamart (France); Scott, P. [Areva La Defense, 92 (France)

    2007-07-01

    In the PWR type reactors, stress corrosion cracks appear in the alloy 600. To explain this phenomenon some corrosion cracking model, based on the hydrogen embrittlement, have been developed. Meanwhile it remains some uncertainties on the following points: the hydrogen source, the hydrogen concentration in the material, the fleetingness which controls the hydrogen solubility and the deformation at the crack end. The aim of this study is to bring new information on the alloy 600 stress corrosion mechanisms. (A.L.B.)

  7. Corrosion Fatigue of High-Strength Titanium Alloys Under Different Stress Gradients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baragetti, Sergio; Villa, Francesco

    2015-05-01

    Ti-6Al-4V is the most widely used high strength-to-mass ratio titanium alloy for advanced engineering components. Its adoption in the aerospace, maritime, automotive, and biomedical sectors is encouraged when highly stressed components with severe fatigue loading are designed. The extents of its applications expose the alloy to several aggressive environments, which can compromise its brilliant mechanical characteristics, leading to potentially catastrophic failures. Ti-6Al-4V stress-corrosion cracking and corrosion-fatigue sensitivity has been known since the material testing for pressurized tanks for Apollo missions, although detailed investigations on the effects of harsh environment in terms of maximum stress reduction have been not carried out until recent times. In the current work, recent experimental results from the authors' research group are presented, quantifying the effects of aggressive environments on Ti-6Al-4V under fatigue loading in terms of maximum stress reduction. R = 0.1 axial fatigue results in laboratory air, 3.5 wt.% NaCl solution, and CH3OH methanol solution at different concentrations are obtained for mild notched specimens ( K t = 1.18) at 2e5 cycles. R = 0.1 tests are also conducted in laboratory air, inert environment, 3.5 wt.% NaCl solution for smooth, mild and sharp notched specimens, with K t ranging from 1 to 18.65, highlighting the environmental effects for the different load conditions induced by the specimen geometry.

  8. Study on irradiation assisted stress corrosion cracking of austenitic stainless steels in nuclear energy environments (Thesis)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Irradiation assisted stress corrosion cracking (IASCC) is known as a degradation phenomenon that is caused by synergistic effects of neutron /gamma irradiation, stress/strain and high temperature water on structural materials. It is important to investigate stress corrosion cracking (SCC) and IASCC mechanisms from the viewpoint of the safety and reliability improvement in the nuclear energy system. To evaluate the influence of minor additional elements, heat treatment, cold working and neutron fluence on IASCC behavior, a slow strain rate technique (SSRT) facility for irradiated specimens has been developed and post irradiation examinations have been conducted. Based on results obtained from the IASCC studies, discussion regarding IASCC susceptibility, crack initiation and growth behaviors are described comprehensively in this paper. The followings are summarized typical findings. (1) 1 or 2 cracks of IASCC are introduced at 98-99 % of maximum stress. (2) The increase and decrease in crack growth rate are repeated alternately in the process of crack growth. (3) Although suppression of radiation hardening can be introduced with Si or Mo addition, the suppression disappear with increasing in neutron fluence. (4) Fracture mode changes from intergranular (IG) SCC to transgranular (TG) SCC with increasing in hardness which is introduced with neutron radiation and /or cold working. (author)

  9. Literature Survey on the Stress Corrosion Cracking of Low-Alloy Steels in High Temperature Water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seifert, H.P

    2002-02-01

    The present report is a summary of a literature survey on the stress corrosion cracking (SCC) behaviour/ mechanisms in low-alloy steels (LAS) in high-temperature water with special emphasis to primary-pressure-boundary components of boiling water reactors (BWR). A brief overview on the current state of knowledge concerning SCC of low-alloy reactor pressure vessel and piping steels under BWR conditions is given. After a short introduction on general aspects of SCC, the main influence parameter and available quantitative literature data concerning SCC of LAS in high-temperature water are discussed on a phenomenological basis followed by a summary of the most popular SCC models for this corrosion system. The BWR operating experience and service cracking incidents are discussed with respect to the existing laboratory data and background knowledge. Finally, the most important open questions and topics for further experimental investigations are outlined. (author)

  10. Microstructural investigation of vintage pipeline steels highly susceptible to stress corrosion cracking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres, Monica

    The use of pipelines for the transmission of gas offers not only efficiency, but a number of economic advantages. Nevertheless, pipelines are subject to aggressive operating conditions and environments which can lead to in-service degradation [1] and thus to failures. These failures can have catastrophic consequences, such as environmental damage and loss of life [2]. One of the most dangerous threats to pipeline integrity is stress corrosion cracking (SCC). Despite the substantial progress that has been achieved in the field, due to the complex nature of this phenomenon there is still not a complete understanding of this form of external corrosion. This makes its detection and prevention a challenge and therefore a risk to pipeline integrity, and most importantly, to the safety of the population. SCC cracks are the result of the interaction between a corrosive environment, applied stresses, and a susceptible microstructure. To date, what defines a susceptible microstructure remains ambiguous, as SCC has been observed in a range of steel grades, microstructures, chemical composition, and grain sizes. Therefore, in order to be able to accurately predict and prevent this hazardous form of corrosion, it is imperative to advance our knowledge on the subject and gain a better understanding on the microstructural features of highly susceptible pipeline materials, especially in the subsurface zone where crack nucleation must take place. Therefore, a microstructural characterization of the region near the surface layer was carried-out utilizing TEM. TEM analysis revealed the dislocation character, ferrite morphology, and apparent carbide precipitation in some grain boundaries. Furthermore, light microscopy, SEM, and hardness testing were performed to expand our knowledge on the microscopical features of highly SCC susceptible service components. This investigation presents a new approach to SCC characterization, which exposed the sub-surface region microscopical

  11. Effect of Secondary Phase Precipitation on the Corrosion Behavior of Duplex Stainless Steels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kai Wang Chan

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Duplex stainless steels (DSSs with austenitic and ferritic phases have been increasingly used for many industrial applications due to their good mechanical properties and corrosion resistance in acidic, caustic and marine environments. However, DSSs are susceptible to intergranular, pitting and stress corrosion in corrosive environments due to the formation of secondary phases. Such phases are induced in DSSs during the fabrication, improper heat treatment, welding process and prolonged exposure to high temperatures during their service lives. These include the precipitation of sigma and chi phases at 700–900 °C and spinodal decomposition of ferritic grains into Cr-rich and Cr-poor phases at 350–550 °C, respectively. This article gives the state-of the-art review on the microstructural evolution of secondary phase formation and their effects on the corrosion behavior of DSSs.

  12. Stress corrosion cracking and its anisotropy of a PZT ferroelectric ceramics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    Stress corrosion cracking (SCC) of a PZT ferroelectric ceramics in various media, such as moist atmosphere, silicon oil, methanol, water and formamide, and its anisotropy have been investigated at constant load test using a single-edge notched tensile specimen. The results showed that SCC could occur in all media, and the threshold stress intensity factor of SCC in water and formamide, KISCC, revealed anisotropy. The KISCC for poling direction parallel to the crack plane, was greater than that perpendicular to the crack plane, similar to the anisotropy of fracture toughness KIC; however, the anisotropy factor of KISCC, which was =1.8 (in formamide) and 2.1 (in water), was larger than that of KIC, which is =1.4. The stress-induced 90° domain switching causes the anisotropy of KIC and KISCC, besides, the resistance of SCC also has anisotropy.

  13. PIE technologies for the study of stress corrosion cracking of reactor structural materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Irradiation assisted stress corrosion cracking (IASCC) is one of the critical concerns when stainless steel components have been in service in the light water reactors (LWRs) for a long period. In general, IASCC can be reproduced on the materials irradiated over a certain threshold fluence level of fast neutron by the post-irradiation examinations (PIEs) at hot laboratories. On the other hand, recently in the Japanese boiling water reactor (BWR) power plants, many incidents of stress corrosion cracking (SCC) of structural material such as the reactor core shrouds and primary loop recirculation (PLR) system piping were reported. In order to investigate the cause of SCC, PIEs at hot laboratories were carried out on the sample material extracted from BWR power plants. SCC studies require various kind of PIE techniques, because the SCC is caused by a complicated synergistic effects of stress and chemical environment on material that suffered degradations by irradiation and/or thermal aging. In this paper, we describe the PIE techniques adopted recently for our SCC studies, especially the crack growth measurement, uniaxial constant load (UCL) tensile test method, in-situ observation during slow strain rate test (SSRT) and several metallurgical test technique using the field-emission type transmission electron microscopy (FE-TEM), focused ion beam (FIB) processing technique, three Dimensional Atom Probe (3DAP) analysis and atomic force microscopy (AFM). (author)

  14. Stress corrosion cracking of CRD stub tube joint and repair at Hamaoka Unit 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    On November 9, 2001, after the pipe rupture incident of the Residual Heat Removal system (RHR), plant personnel found the leak from the bottom of the Reactor Pressure Vessel (RPV). Afterwards, with underwater visual inspection, plant personnel found an axial cracking on one of the stub tube's weldments. In order to join the Nickel base material (Alloy 600) stub tube, a similar weld material (Alloy 182) is deposited to the low-alloy metal (LAS) vessel. From the examination of a boat sample it was found that the cracking in the Alloy 182 weld metal was due to interdendric (intergranular) stress corrosion cracking, which had progressed into the Alloy 600. Residual and applied stress during an in-service analysis explained that the location could have high tensile stress (330MPa and over). In order to repair cracking, a replacement method was applied. The stub tube and weld joint including the crack area was completely removed, and a new stub tube consisting of high corrosion resisted material was installed and welded. Remote automatic equipment was applied during the replacement process because of the high radiation environment. After inspecting the rest of the 88 stub tube's joints, there were no indications of any further problems. For higher reliability, the application of laser-peening technique is being examined. (author)

  15. Relationship between localized strain and irradiation assisted stress corrosion cracking in an austenitic alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Research highlights: → Austenitic steel is more susceptible to intergranular corrosion after irradiation. → Simulation and experiment used to study cracking in irradiated austentic steel. → Cracking occurs at random high angle boundaries normal to the tensile stress. → Cracking at boundaries with high normal stress and inability to accommodate strain. → Boundary type, angle, and Taylor and Schmid factors affect strain accommodation. - Abstract: Irradiation assisted stress corrosion cracking may be linked to the local slip behavior near grain boundaries that exhibit high susceptibility to cracking. Fe-13Cr-15Ni austenitic steel was irradiated with 2 MeV protons at 360 deg. C to 5 dpa and strained in 288 deg. C simulated BWR conditions. Clusters of grains from the experiment were created in an atomistic simulation and then virtually strained using molecular dynamic simulation techniques. Cracking and grain orientation data were characterized in both the experiment and the simulation. Random high angle boundaries with high surface trace angles with respect to the tensile direction were found to be the most susceptible to cracking. Grain boundary cracking susceptibility was also found to correlate strongly with slip continuity, indicating that the strain accommodation at the boundary is related to cracking resistance. Higher cracking susceptibility was also found at grain boundaries adjacent to grains with low Schmid factor or high Taylor factor. The basic trends reported here are supported by both the experiments and the simulations.

  16. Relationship between localized strain and irradiation assisted stress corrosion cracking in an austenitic alloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McMurtrey, M.D., E-mail: mdmcm@umich.edu [Department of Nuclear Engineering and Radiological Sciences, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Was, G.S. [Department of Nuclear Engineering and Radiological Sciences, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Patrick, L.; Farkas, D. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, VA 24061 (United States)

    2011-04-25

    Research highlights: {yields} Austenitic steel is more susceptible to intergranular corrosion after irradiation. {yields} Simulation and experiment used to study cracking in irradiated austentic steel. {yields} Cracking occurs at random high angle boundaries normal to the tensile stress. {yields} Cracking at boundaries with high normal stress and inability to accommodate strain. {yields} Boundary type, angle, and Taylor and Schmid factors affect strain accommodation. - Abstract: Irradiation assisted stress corrosion cracking may be linked to the local slip behavior near grain boundaries that exhibit high susceptibility to cracking. Fe-13Cr-15Ni austenitic steel was irradiated with 2 MeV protons at 360 deg. C to 5 dpa and strained in 288 deg. C simulated BWR conditions. Clusters of grains from the experiment were created in an atomistic simulation and then virtually strained using molecular dynamic simulation techniques. Cracking and grain orientation data were characterized in both the experiment and the simulation. Random high angle boundaries with high surface trace angles with respect to the tensile direction were found to be the most susceptible to cracking. Grain boundary cracking susceptibility was also found to correlate strongly with slip continuity, indicating that the strain accommodation at the boundary is related to cracking resistance. Higher cracking susceptibility was also found at grain boundaries adjacent to grains with low Schmid factor or high Taylor factor. The basic trends reported here are supported by both the experiments and the simulations.

  17. Effect of layerwise structural inhomogeneity on stress- corrosion cracking of steel tubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perlovich, Yu A.; Krymskaya, O. A.; Isaenkova, M. G.; Morozov, N. S.; Fesenko, V. A.; Ryakhovskikh, I. V.; Esiev, T. S.

    2016-04-01

    Based on X-ray texture and structure analysis data of the material of main gas pipelines it was shown that the layerwise inhomogeneity of tubes is formed during their manufacturing. The degree of this inhomogeneity affects on the tendency of tubes to stress- corrosion cracking under exploitation. Samples of tubes were cut out from gas pipelines located under various operating conditions. Herewith the study was conducted both for sections with detected stress-corrosion defects and without them. Distributions along tube wall thickness for lattice parameters and half-width of X-ray lines were constructed. Crystallographic texture analysis of external and internal tube layers was also carried out. Obtained data testifies about considerable layerwise inhomogeneity of all samples. Despite the different nature of the texture inhomogeneity of gas pipeline tubes, the more inhomogeneous distribution of texture or structure features causes the increasing of resistance to stress- corrosion. The observed effect can be explained by saturation with interstitial impurities of the surface layer of the hot-rolled sheet and obtained therefrom tube. This results in rising of lattice parameters in the external layer of tube as compared to those in underlying metal. Thus, internal layers have a compressive effect on external layers in the rolling plane that prevents cracks opening at the tube surface. Moreover, the high mutual misorientation of grains within external and internal layers of tube results in the necessity to change the moving crack plane, so that the crack growth can be inhibited when reaching the layer with a modified texture.

  18. Study of matrix crack-tilted fiber bundle interaction using caustics and finite element method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Wenfeng; Zhu, Jianguo; Zhu, Qi; Yuan, Yanan

    2016-02-01

    In this work, the interaction between the matrix crack and a tilted fiber bundle was investigated via caustics and the finite element method (FEM). First, the caustic patterns at the crack tip with different distances from the tilted fiber were obtained and the stress intensity factors were extracted from the geometry of the caustic patterns. Subsequently, the shielding effect of the fiber bundle in front of the crack tip was analyzed. Furthermore, the interaction between the matrix crack and the broken fiber bundle was discussed. Finally, a finite element simulation was carried out using ABAQUS to verify the experimental results. The results demonstrate that the stress intensity factors extracted from caustic experiments are in excellent agreement with the data calculated by FEM.

  19. Statistical model of stress corrosion cracking based on extended form of Dirichlet energy

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Harry Yosh

    2013-12-01

    The mechanism of stress corrosion cracking (SCC) has been discussed for decades. Here I propose a model of SCC reflecting the feature of fracture in brittle manner based on the variational principle under approximately supposed thermal equilibrium. In that model the functionals are expressed with extended forms of Dirichlet energy, and Dirichlet principle is applied to them to solve the variational problem that represents SCC and normal extension on pipe surface. Based on the model and the maximum entropy principle, the statistical nature of SCC colony is discussed and it is indicated that the crack has discrete energy and length under ideal isotropy of materials and thermal equilibrium.

  20. Macroscopic Segregation and Stress Corrosion Cracking in 7xxx Series Aluminum Alloy Arc Welds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borchers, Tyler E.; McAllister, Donald P.; Zhang, Wei

    2015-05-01

    Arc welds of Al-Zn-Mg alloy with Al-Mg filler wire have shown a preferential macroscopic segregation of Mg and Zn to the weld toes. Islands of large precipitates, which are observed in those solute-enriched weld toes, are identified as T phase (Mg32(Al,Zn)49) using diffraction pattern analysis. The location of T precipitates consistently coincides with the initiation site for stress corrosion cracking. Therefore, it is hypothesized that they induce the crack initiation due to preferential dissolution.

  1. Stress corrosion crack growth rate measurement in high temperature water using small precracked bend specimens

    OpenAIRE

    Toivonen, Aki

    2004-01-01

    The applicability of elastic-plastic fracture mechanics to stress corrosion crack growth rate measurements was studied. Several test series were performed on small elastic-plastically loaded SEN(B) specimens in high temperature water. One test was performed on a 25 mm C(T) specimen under linear-elastic loading. The tests on the SEN(B) specimens were performed using either rising displacement or a combination of rising and constant displacement loading. The test on the 25 mm C(T) specimen was ...

  2. Statistical model of stress corrosion cracking based on extended form of Dirichlet energy: Part 2

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    HARRY YOSH

    2016-10-01

    In the previous paper ({\\it Pramana – J. Phys.} 81(6), 1009 (2013)), the mechanism of stress corrosion cracking (SCC) based on non-quadratic form of Dirichlet energy was proposed and its statistical features were discussed. Following those results, we discuss here how SCC propagates on pipe wall statistically. It reveals that SCC growth distribution is described with Cauchy problem of time-dependent first-order partial differential equation characterized by the convolution of the initial distribution of SCC over time. We also discuss the extension of the above results to the SCC in two-dimensional space and its statistical features with a simple example.

  3. The influence of molybdenum on stress corrosion in Ultra Low Carbon Steels with copper addition

    OpenAIRE

    Mazur, M.; R. Bogucki; Pytel, S.

    2010-01-01

    The influence of molybdenum content on the process of stress corrosion of ultra-low carbon structural steels with the addition of copper HSLA (High Strength Low Alloy) was analyzed. The study was conducted for steels after heat treatment consisting of quenching andfollowing tempering at 600°C and it was obtained microstructure of the tempered martensite laths with copper precipitates and the phaseLaves Fe2Mo type. It was found strong influence of Laves phase precipitate on the grain boundarie...

  4. INHIBITION OF STRESS CORROSION CRACKING OF CARBON STEEL STORAGE TANKS AT HANFORD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    BOOMER, K.D.

    2007-01-31

    The stress corrosion cracking (SCC) behavior of A537 tank steel was investigated in a series of environments designed to simulate the chemistry of legacy nuclear weapons production waste. Tests consisted of both slow strain rate tests using tensile specimens and constant load tests using compact tension specimens. Based on the tests conducted, nitrite was found to be a strong SCC inhibitor. Based on the test performed and the tank waste chemistry changes that are predicted to occur over time, the risk for SCC appears to be decreasing since the concentration of nitrate will decrease and nitrite will increase.

  5. Intergranular stress corrosion cracking of welded ferritic stainless steels in high temperature aqueous environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fukuzuka, Toshio; Shimogori, Kazutoshi; Fujiwara, Kazuo; Tomari, Haruo (Kobe Steel Ltd. (Japan). Central Research and Development Lab.); Kanda, Masao

    1982-07-01

    In considering the application of ferritic stainless steels to heat exchanger tubing materials for moisture separator-reheaters in LWRs, the effects of environmental conditions (temperature, chloride, dissolved oxygen, pH), thermal history, and steel composition (content of C, N, Cr and Ti) on the Inter-Granular Stress Corrosion Cracking (IGSCC) in high temperature aqueous environments, were studied. The IGSCC was proved to depend on steel composition and thermal history rather than environment. From these results, a steel was designed to prevent IGSCC of the welding HAZ for 18Cr and 13Cr steels.

  6. Stress corrosion cracking susceptibility of candidate structural materials in supercritical pressurized water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Je, Hwanil, E-mail: hwanil.je@gmail.com; Kimura, Akihiko

    2014-12-15

    The stress corrosion cracking (SCC) susceptibility in supercritical pressurized water (SCPW) was investigated for the candidate structural steels of advanced fusion and fission nuclear system, which are SUS316L austenitic steel, F82H ferritic–martensitic steel and SOC-16 oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) ferritic steel. In order to evaluate the susceptibility to SCC with those materials, slow strain rate test (SSRT) was carried out at 773 K, under a pressure of 25 MPa of SCPW with deaerated condition. High temperature tensile test in vacuum at 773 K was also performed to compare the deformation and fracture behavior between corrosive environment of SCPW and non-corrosive environment. Although SUS316L showed a change in the fracture mode in the deaerated SCPW from an entire ductile fracture at higher strain rate to a mixed mode of ductile and brittle fracture at lower one, the fracture mode of ODS steel and F82H was not changed in the tested strain rate range. Both the IGSCC and TGSCC were observed in SUS316L. And F82H steel suffered from much severer oxidation than SUS316L and SOC-16.

  7. Sulfide Stress Cracking and Electrochemical Corrosion of Precipitation Hardening Steel After Plasma Oxy-Nitriding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granda-Gutiérrez, E. E.; Díaz-Guillén, J. C.; Díaz-Guillén, J. A.; González, M. A.; García-Vázquez, F.; Muñóz, R.

    2014-11-01

    In this paper, we present the results of a duplex plasma nitriding followed by an oxidizing stage process (which is also referred as oxy-nitriding) on the corrosion behavior of a 17-4PH precipitation hardening stainless steel. The formation of both, expanded martensite (b.c.t. α'N-phase) and chromium oxide (type Cr2O3) in the subsurface of oxy-nitrided samples at specific controlled conditions, leads in a noticeable increasing in the time-to-rupture during the sulfide stress cracking test, in comparison with an untreated reference sample. Oxy-nitriding improves the corrosion performance of the alloy when it is immersed in solutions saturated by sour gas, which extends the application potential of this type of steel in the oil and gas extraction and processing industry. The presence of the oxy-nitrided layer inhibits the corrosion process that occurs in the near-surface region, where hydrogen is liberated after the formation of iron sulfides, which finally produces a fragile fracture by micro-crack propagation; the obtained results suggest that oxy-nitriding slows this process, thus delaying the rupture of the specimen. Moreover, oxy-nitriding produces a hard, sour gas-resistant surface, but do not significantly affect the original chloride ion solution resistance of the material.

  8. A Study on the Residual Stress Improvement of PWSCC(Primary Water Stress Corrosion Cracking) in DMW(Dissimilar Metal Weld)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Sung Sik; Kim, Seok Hun; Lee, Seung Gun [Korea Institute of Nuclear Safety, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Park, Heung Bae [KEPCO Engineering and Construction Company, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-10-15

    Since 2000s, most of the cracks are found in welds, especially in (DMW) dissimilar metal welds such as pressurizer safety relief nozzle, reactor head penetration, reactor bottom mounted instrumentation (BMI), and reactor nozzles. Even the cracks are revealed as a primary water stress corrosion cracking (PWSCC), it is difficult to find the cracks by current non destructive examination. The PWSCC is occurred by three incident factors, such as susceptible material, environmental corrosive condition, and welding residual stress. If one of the three factors can be erased or decreased, the PWSCC could be prevented. In this study, we performed residual stress analysis for DMW and several residual stress improvement methods. As the preventive methods of PWSCC, we used laser peening(IP) method, inlay weld(IW) method, and induction heating stress improvement(IHSI) method. The effect of residual stress improvement for preventive methods was compared and discussed by finite element modeling and residual stress of repaired DMW

  9. Caustic ingestion injuries-at military hospital rawalpindi

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To study the pattern and endoscopic severity of caustic ingestion injuries presenting at Military Hospital Rawalpindi. Study Design: Descriptive study. Place and Duration of Study: The study was conducted at Medical and Gastroenterology Department Military Hospital Rawalpindi from August 2012 to April 2013. Material and Methods: Patients were selected from those who presented with caustic ingestion history in Medical OPD, ER and in medical wards. After informed consent the patient underwent upper gastrointestinal (GI) Endoscopy. Endoscopic findings were recorded. Results: Out of 50 patients, 21(42%) were males and 29 (58%) were females. Ingestion was accidental in 19 (38%) and was with intent of suicide or self-harm in 31(62%) patients. Mean age was 33.2 years (SD ± 13.2). All the patients were subjected to upper GI endoscopy and findings were recorded. Endoscopic findings were grade 0 in 4 (8%), Grade 1 in 6 (12%), grade 2a in 7 (14%), grade 2b in 10 (20%), grade 3a in 6 (12%) and grade 3b in 17 (34%) patients. Conclusion: Caustic ingestion injuries were seen more in younger females with predominant cause as suicidal intent. On endoscopic examination severe corrosive injuries were more frequent. (author)

  10. A middle age addicted man with caustic stomach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gholamreza Nouri Broujerdi

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: The term caustic generally refers to alkaline and the term corrosive generally refers to acidic agents' injury; however, in medical literature caustic is frequently a term applied to both substances. Ingested alkali typically damage the esophagus more than stomach or duodenum, whereas acids usually cause more severe gastric injury. Since esophagus has a slightly alkaline pH, its epithelium is more resistant to acids, so that only 6 to 20% of those who ingest these substances present lesions in this organ. Case : A middle-aged addicted man who drunk hydrochloric acid accidentally had extensive necrosis of the stomach with remarkable sparing of the esophagus on second look exploration. A total gastrectomy with a Roux-en-Y esophago-jejunostomy with feeding jejunostomy was performed. Conclusion : In caustic GI injury, patients who are operated on and found to have no evidence of extensive esophago-gastric necrosis, a biopsy of the posterior gastric wall should be performed to exclude occult injury. If histologically there is a question of viability, a second look operation should be performed within 36 hours.

  11. Stress Corrosion Cracking of the Drip Shield, the Waste Package Outer Barrier, and the Stainless Steel Structural Material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stress corrosion cracking is one of the most common corrosion-related causes for premature breach of metal structural components. Stress corrosion cracking is the initiation and propagation of cracks in structural components due to three factors that must be present simultaneously: metallurgical susceptibility, critical environment, and static (or sustained) tensile stresses. This report was prepared according to ''Technical Work Plan for: Regulatory Integration Modeling and Analysis of the Waste Form and Waste Package'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 171583]). The purpose of this report is to provide an evaluation of the potential for stress corrosion cracking of the engineered barrier system components (i.e., the drip shield, waste package outer barrier, and waste package stainless steel inner structural cylinder) under exposure conditions consistent with the repository during the regulatory period of 10,000 years after permanent closure. For the drip shield and waste package outer barrier, the critical environment is conservatively taken as any aqueous environment contacting the metal surfaces. Appendix B of this report describes the development of the SCC-relevant seismic crack density model (SCDM). The consequence of a stress corrosion cracking breach of the drip shield, the waste package outer barrier, or the stainless steel inner structural cylinder material is the initiation and propagation of tight, sometimes branching, cracks that might be induced by the combination of an aggressive environment and various tensile stresses that can develop in the drip shields or the waste packages. The Stainless Steel Type 316 inner structural cylinder of the waste package is excluded from the stress corrosion cracking evaluation because the Total System Performance Assessment for License Application (TSPA-LA) does not take credit for the inner cylinder. This document provides a detailed description of the process-level models that can be applied to assess the performance of Alloy 22

  12. Stress Corrosion Cracking of the Drip Shield, the Waste Package Outer Barrier, and the Stainless Steel Structural Material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    G. Gordon

    2004-10-13

    Stress corrosion cracking is one of the most common corrosion-related causes for premature breach of metal structural components. Stress corrosion cracking is the initiation and propagation of cracks in structural components due to three factors that must be present simultaneously: metallurgical susceptibility, critical environment, and static (or sustained) tensile stresses. This report was prepared according to ''Technical Work Plan for: Regulatory Integration Modeling and Analysis of the Waste Form and Waste Package'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 171583]). The purpose of this report is to provide an evaluation of the potential for stress corrosion cracking of the engineered barrier system components (i.e., the drip shield, waste package outer barrier, and waste package stainless steel inner structural cylinder) under exposure conditions consistent with the repository during the regulatory period of 10,000 years after permanent closure. For the drip shield and waste package outer barrier, the critical environment is conservatively taken as any aqueous environment contacting the metal surfaces. Appendix B of this report describes the development of the SCC-relevant seismic crack density model (SCDM). The consequence of a stress corrosion cracking breach of the drip shield, the waste package outer barrier, or the stainless steel inner structural cylinder material is the initiation and propagation of tight, sometimes branching, cracks that might be induced by the combination of an aggressive environment and various tensile stresses that can develop in the drip shields or the waste packages. The Stainless Steel Type 316 inner structural cylinder of the waste package is excluded from the stress corrosion cracking evaluation because the Total System Performance Assessment for License Application (TSPA-LA) does not take credit for the inner cylinder. This document provides a detailed description of the process-level models that can be applied to assess the

  13. Effect of applied potential on stress corrosion cracking of steam generator tubings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Effects of applied potential on stress corrosion cracking(SCC) of alloy 600 and alloy 690 used as steam generator tubing materials have been studied in deaerated 40% NaOH at 315 deg C using C-ring specimen. Corrosion oxides formed at the potentials where SCC tests had been performed were analyzed with X-ray diffraction. Current transient at various potential and polarization curves of alloy 600, alloy 690 and Pure Ni were obtained. Polarization curves on alloy 600 and alloy 690 showed second peak at 270mV above OCP, while polarization curve on pure Ni had no second peak at that potential. X-ray diffraction patterns of corrosion oxides of alloy 600 which had been formed at 150 and 200mV above OCP coincided with NiO, while those formed at 250mV and 330mV showed slight shift in 2 of NiO, meaning change in lattice parameter of NiO. Corrosion oxide of alloy 690 which had been formed at 150mV above OCP were NiO while those at 200, 250 and 330mV above OCP were mixed oxides of NiO and spinel structure(M3O4) of Ni, Cr and Ni. Almost through wall cracks were observed for alloy 600 held at 150 and 200mV above OCP while no cracks were observed for alloy 600 held at 250 and 330mV. These results imply that SCC of alloy 600 might proceed in the range of potential from passivation potential to second peak where NiO were produced. Alloy 690 were more resistant to SCC than alloy 600

  14. Imaging and size analysis of stress corrosion cracks in austenitic components using the synthetic aperture focus technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Riss formation and growth by intercrystalline stress corrosion cracking occurs especially in nickel alloys in case of mixed steels and also in the heat-affected zone in some austenitic Cr-Ni steels. In view of the strong branching of these cracks, amplitude-based ultrasonic methods of measurement may fail. The contribution describes the detection and size analysis of stress corrosion cracks. The synthetic aperture focus technique (SAFT) was used to improve the signal-noise ratio of the ultrasonic inspection data, especially for crack tip identification. several test bodies with intercrystalline stress corrosion cracks with depths ranging from 2.5 mm to 16 mm were analyzed successfully by a combination of conventional techniques for acquisition of B-scan data, followed by SAFT processing.

  15. Fabrication of imitative stress corrosion cracking using diffusion bonding for the development of nondestructive testing and evaluations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study reports a method to fabricate imitative stress corrosion cracking suitable for the development of nondestructive testing and evaluation methods. The method is to embed a partially-bonded region, which simulates the characteristics of stress corrosion cracking, inside a material by bonding together surfaces having artificial grooves. Since the sizes of the grooves are smaller than the spatial resolution of nondestructive testing method applied, the material property realized can be regarded as uniform as the actual stress corrosion cracking. The grooves are introduced using mechanical machining, which enables one to control the characteristics of the simulated flaw. Four specimens made of type 316L austenitic stainless steel are fabricated. The method is demonstrated by visual and eddy current examinations. (author)

  16. Avoidance of stress corrosion susceptibility in high strength aluminum alloys by control of grain boundary and matrix microstructure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adler, P.; Deiasi, R.

    1974-01-01

    The relation of microstructure to the mechanical strength and stress corrosion resistance of highest strength and overaged tempers of BAR and 7050 aluminum alloys was investigated. Comparison is made with previously studied 7075 aluminum alloy. Optical microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and differential scanning calorimetry were used to characterize the grain morphology, matrix microstructure, and grain boundary microstructure of these tempers. Grain boundary interparticle spacing was significant to stress corrosion crack propagation for all three alloys; increasing interparticle spacing led to increased resistance to crack propagation. In addition, the fire grain size in Bar and 7050 appears to enhance crack propagation. The highest strength temper of 7050 has a comparatively high resistance to crack initiation. Overall stress corrosion behavior is dependent on environment pH, and evaluation over a range of pH is recommended.

  17. The role of microstructure and environment on the stress corrosion cracking behavior of structural materials in nuclear power plant environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Structural materials such as austenitic stainless steel and nickel base alloys can be susceptible to intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC) in high temperature, high purity water environments found in nuclear power plants. Both wrought and weld metal materials have been susceptible depending on the alloy composition and the microstructure present if conducive environmental conditions exist. This work focuses on the behavior of austenitic stainless steel in oxygenated high purity high temperature water environments. The susceptibility of both wrought and weld metals to the initiation of IGSCC is discussed. The recent efforts to quantify crack growth behavior of these materials is reviewed. Weld Metal toughness issues are discussed, as they pertain to continued operation with components containing stress corrosion cracks. The background behind materials and environmental solutions to stress corrosion cracking of power plant piping is presented

  18. Investigation of Stress Corrosion Cracking Initiation of 7A52 Aluminum Alloy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Qi; ZHAO Junjun; ZHANG Ping

    2012-01-01

    The stress corrosion cracking(SCC) behaviour of 7A52 aluminum alloy in air and in 3.5%NaCl solution was researched by slow strain rate test(SSRT) and SEM-EDS.The SCC susceptibility was estimated with the loss of the reduction in area.The experimental results indicate that the SCC susceptibility of 7A52 aluminum alloy in 3.5% chloride solution is the highest at strain rate of 1 × 10-6 s-1.The lowest one is under the condition of 1 × 10-5 s-1.Stress concentration and anode dissolving around Al-Fe-Mn intermetallics initiate micropores which will result in microcracks.The existence of intermetallics in the microstructure may play an important role in understanding the SCC initiation mechanisms of 7A52 aluminum alloy.

  19. Stress corrosion cracking susceptibility of the earthquake resistant NOM B457 Mexican steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Mexican construction code was modified after the Mexico city 1985 earthquake, substituted the medium carbon reinforced steel NOM B6 by the new micro alloyed steel NOM B457 in 42 Kg/mm2 grade. The present study reports the evaluation of the NOM B457 steel behavior in mortar with and without 2% wt. in chlorides and in Ca(OH)2 saturated solutions. The results are compared with the NOM B6 steel behavior in the same conditions. The Stress Corrosion Cracking (SCC) is not present in all the conditions used in this study and there are not susceptibility potential range to SCC when the material is evaluated by electrochemical Tests, Constant Extension Rate Tests (CERT) and Constant Load Test at 80 % of yield stress. A susceptibility potential range to Hydrogen Induced Cracking (HIC) is detected, below -900 mV. vs Standard Calomel Electrode (SCE) by CERT at constant potential

  20. Characteristics of acoustic emission during stress corrosion cracking of nickel base alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The acoustic emission(AE) method has been utilized to study the detectability of crack initiation and growth during intergranular stress corrosion cracking(IGSCC) of Inconel 600 alloy and to evaluate its applicability as a non-destructive testing method by comparing the crack behavior with AE parameters and measuring the minimum detectable crack size. Variously heat-treated specimens were tensioned by use of a constant extension rate tester at various extension rates to yield different stress corrosion cracking behaviors of Inconel specimens. Significant AE responses were observed during IGSCC, ductile fracture and plastic deformation. The magnitude of AE peak amplitudes was in the decreasing order for IGSCC, ductile fracture and plastic deformation. AE also was effective means to identify the transition from small crack initiation and growth to dominant crack growth. Close correlation was found to exist between AE behaviors and electrochemical current changes, suggesting that the formation and breakdown of passive film is involved in IGSCC of Inconel 600. The minimum crack size detectable with AE was approximately 200 to 400μm in length and below 100μm in depth, indicating the possibility of detecting small IGSC cracks prior to the growth of single dominant cracks

  1. Effect of pre-deformation on the stress corrosion cracking susceptibility of aluminum alloy 2519

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Huizhong; ZHANG Xinming; CHEN Mingan; LI Yanfang; LIANG Xiaopeng

    2007-01-01

    The effects of pre-deformation and strain rate on the stress corrosion cracking (SCC) behavior of aluminum alloy 2519 in air and in 3.5% NaCl water solution were investigated by means of slow strain rate tension (SSRT), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The results indicate that the alloy is susceptible to SCC in 3.5% NaCl water solution and not in air. At the same pre-deformation, the alloy is more susceptible to SCC at 1.33 × 10-5 s-1 than at 6.66 × 10-5 s-1. Moreover, it is more susceptible to SCC at free pre-deformation than at 10% pre-deformation at the same strain rate. The number of θ precipitated along the grain boundaries is reduced and distributed discontinuously, at the same time, the precipitate-free zones (PFZ) become narrow and the susceptibility to stress corrosion cracking is reduced after 10% pre-deformation.

  2. Atom probe tomography of stress corrosion crack tips in SUS316 stainless steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Quantitative study of 3D features such as grain boundary oxides and Ni enrichment. • Features can be related to their distance from the crack tip. • Local measurement of compositions in very small volumes and specific regions. • Complementary analytical TEM data was recorded to correlate to APT results. • Both matrix elements (Fe, Cr, Ni) and oxygen diffuse along the grain boundary. - Abstract: Novel atom probe tomography (APT) data of an intergranular stress corrosion crack tip has been acquired. Using APT for stress corrosion cracking research, very small, localized features and their distribution around the crack tip can be studied in 3D. This work details the development of a technique for the preparation of atom probe needles. Initial characterization via analytical transmission electron microscopy provides with a complementary analysis and accurately locates features that can be correlated with the reconstructed APT data. Ni enrichment and intergranular oxidation ahead of the crack tip have been studied with APT in 3D and with near-atomic resolution

  3. Aqueous chloride stress corrosion cracking of titanium: A comparison with environmental hydrogen embrittlement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, H. G.

    1973-01-01

    The physical characteristics of stress corrosion cracking of titanium in an aqueous chloride environment are compared with those of embrittlement of titanium by a gaseous hydrogen environment in an effort to help contribute to the understanding of the possible role of hydrogen in the complex stress corrosion cracking process. Based on previous studies, the two forms of embrittlement are shown to be similar at low hydrogen pressures (100 N/sqm) but dissimilar at higher hydrogen pressures. In an effort to quantify this comparison, tests were conducted in an aqueous chloride solution using the same material and test techniques as had previously been employed in a gaseous hydrogen environment. The results of these tests strongly support models based on hydrogen as the embrittling species in an aqueous chloride environment. Further, it is shown that if hydrogen is the causal species, the effective hydrogen fugacity at the surface of titanium exposed to an aqueous chloride environment is equivalent to a molecular hydrogen pressure of approximately 10 N/sqm.

  4. Relationship between turbine rotor and disk metallurgical characteristics and stress corrosion cracking behavior. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report describes stress corrosion test results in which several heats of turbine rotor steels specially prepared to achieve different degrees of segregation to the grain boundaries were tested in concentrated laboratory and actual steam turbine environments. Grain boundary characteristics are considered important because turbine rotor failures in field service have been of an intergranular nature and because grain boundary segregation is known to affect the impact toughness of rotor steels (''temper embrittlement''). The laboratory stress corrosion testing results showed no differences between heavily and lightly segregated test pieces which differed greatly in impact toughness. All test specimens cracked, indicating the laboratory environments may have been too severe to allow differentiation between the various metallurgical conditions, if any differences exist. Test loops and autoclaves for chemical analysis and mechanical testing were designed, installed and are operating in the field testing portion of this program. No intergranular cracking has occurred to date; hence, no differentiation between heavily and lightly segregated test pieces has been possible in field testing. Instrumented crack propagation specimens, which permit measurement of cracking as it occurs, have been installed for the continuing field testing program. Correlation of such cracking with the continuously monitored chemical composition of the environment will increase understanding of the cracking process and may give the possibility of providing an early warning of the existence of conditions which might cause turbine rotor cracking

  5. Relationship between turbine rotor and disk metallurgical characteristics and stress corrosion cracking behavior. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gayley, H.B.

    1986-09-01

    This report describes stress corrosion test results in which several heats of turbine rotor steels specially prepared to achieve different degrees of segregation to the grain boundaries were tested in concentrated laboratory and actual steam turbine environments. Grain boundary characteristics are considered important because turbine rotor failures in field service have been of an intergranular nature and because grain boundary segregation is known to affect the impact toughness of rotor steels (''temper embrittlement''). The laboratory stress corrosion testing results showed no differences between heavily and lightly segregated test pieces which differed greatly in impact toughness. All test specimens cracked, indicating the laboratory environments may have been too severe to allow differentiation between the various metallurgical conditions, if any differences exist. Test loops and autoclaves for chemical analysis and mechanical testing were designed, installed and are operating in the field testing portion of this program. No intergranular cracking has occurred to date; hence, no differentiation between heavily and lightly segregated test pieces has been possible in field testing. Instrumented crack propagation specimens, which permit measurement of cracking as it occurs, have been installed for the continuing field testing program. Correlation of such cracking with the continuously monitored chemical composition of the environment will increase understanding of the cracking process and may give the possibility of providing an early warning of the existence of conditions which might cause turbine rotor cracking.

  6. Stress corrosion cracking in steam turbine disks: analysis of field and laboratory data. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eason, E.D.

    1985-05-01

    The field data and related laboratory data from many investigators were analyzed to identify the key variables and quantify their effects on stress corrosion cracking of turbine disks. Beginning with over 35 potential variables, pattern recognition and transformation analysis techniques were used to find and characterize the most important variables. The transformation analysis technique was also used to identify laboratory environments that are comparable to the field and to check for lab-to-lab differences in measured crack growth rate. Field data were also analyzed separately, using transformation analysis and order statistics to determine the effects of variables and produce statistical distributions of crack growth rate and failure rate with time. Models were constructed for the field and laboratory data to combine data from many sources and test conditions and to quantify the key variable effects. Two, three, and four variable models were calibrated to the available data. The four variable model is capable of correlating stress corrosion data for 19 low alloy steels with negligible increase in scatter compared to NiCrMoV data. The three variable model describes the behavior of disk steels in the field and comparable laboratory environments. 42 refs., 39 figs., 10 tabs.

  7. Corrosion behavior of 2195 and 1420 Al-Li alloys in neutral 3.5% NaCl solution under tensile stress

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Jin-feng; CHEN Wen-jing; ZHAO Xu-shan; REN Wen-da; ZHENG Zi-qiao

    2006-01-01

    The corrosion behaviors of 1420 and 2195 Al-Li alloys under 308 and 490 MPa tensile stress respectively in neutral 3.5% NaCl solution were investigated using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy(EIS) and scanning electron microscope(SEM). It is found that the unstressed 1420 alloy is featured with large and discrete pits, while general corrosion and localized corrosion including intergranular corrosion and pitting corrosion occur on the unstressed 2195 alloy. As stress is applied to 1420 alloy, the pit becomes denser and its size is decreased. While, for the stressed 2195 alloy, intergranular corrosion is greatly aggravated and severe general corrosion is developed from connected pits. The EIS analysis shows that more severe general corrosion and localized corrosion occur on the stressed 2195 Al-Li alloy than on 1420 Al-Li alloy. It is suggested that tensile stress has greater effect on the corrosion of 2195 Al-Li alloy than on 1420 Al-Li alloy.

  8. Stress corrosion cracking tests on electron beam welded carbon steel specimens in carbonate-bicarbonate solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stress corrosion cracking tests have been performed on tapered carbon steel test pieces containing electron beam welds with a view to defining susceptibility to such cracking in a carbonate-bicarbonate solution at 90 C and an appropriate electrode potential. The tests involved applying cyclic loads to the specimens and it is shown that the threshold stress for cracking reduces linearly with increase in the magnitude of the cyclic load component. Extrapolation of these trends to zero fluctuating stress indicates static load threshold stresses in the vicinity of the yield stress (i.e. about 300 N/mm2 for parent plate without a weld, 400 N/mm2 for specimens with welds on one side only and 600 N/mm2 for specimens having welds penetrating through the thickness of the specimen). The averages of the maximum crack velocities observed were least for parent plate material and greatest for weld metal, the former being essentially intergranular in morphology and the latter mostly transgranular, with heat affected zone material being intermediate between these extremes. (author)

  9. Stress corrosion of alloy 600 tubes for steam generators: influence of surface cold working and of metallurgical structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The alloy 600 is used in the primary circuit of the PWR type reactors especially for the steam generator tubes (heat transfer between primary and secondary circuit). In the primary atmosphere, this alloy is sensitive to the stress corrosion cracking. It is an intergranular brittle cracking the mechanism of which is not well understood. This article describes the surface cold working influence and that of the metallurgical structure of the alloy 600 tubes used in steam generators and their cracking kinetics by stress corrosion. 2 figs

  10. Effect of initial hydrogen content of a titanium alloy on susceptibility to hot-salt stress-corrosion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, H. R.

    1971-01-01

    The Ti-8Al-1Mo-1V alloy was tested in four conditions: mill annealed (70 ppM H), duplex annealed (70 ppM H), vacuum annealed to an intermediate (36 ppM) and a low (9 ppM H) hydrogen level. Material annealed at 650 C (duplex condition) exhibited resistance to hot-salt stress corrosion superior to that exhibited by material in the mill-annealed condition. Reduction of the alloy hydrogen content from 70 to as low as 9 ppM did not influence resistance to hot-salt stress corrosion embrittlement or cracking.

  11. Detection of stress corrosion cracking of high-strength steel used in prestressed concrete structures by acoustic emission technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramadan, S.; Gaillet, L.; Tessier, C.; Idrissi, H.

    2008-02-01

    The stress corrosion cracking (SCC) of high-strength steel used in prestressed concrete structures was studied by acoustic emission technique (AE). A simulated concrete pore (SCP) solution at high-alkaline (pH ≈ 12) contaminated by sulphate, chloride, and thiocyanate ions was used. The evolution of the acoustic activity recorded during the tests shows the presence of several stages related respectively to cracks initiation due to the local corrosion imposed by corrosives species, cracks propagation and steel failure. Microscopic examinations pointed out that the wires exhibited a brittle fracture mode. The cracking was found to propagate in the transgranular mode. The role of corrosives species and hydrogen in the rupture mechanism of high-strength steel was also investigated. This study shows promising results for an potential use in situ of AE for real-time health monitoring of eutectoid steel cables used in prestressed concrete structures.

  12. Improved stress corrosion cracking resistance of a novel biodegradable EW62 magnesium alloy by rapid solidification, in simulated electrolytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hakimi, O.; Aghion, E. [Department of Materials Engineering, Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, P.O. Box 653, Beer-Sheva 84105 (Israel); Goldman, J., E-mail: jgoldman@mtu.edu [Biomedical Engineering Department, Michigan Technological University, Houghton, MI, 49931 (United States)

    2015-06-01

    The high corrosion rate of magnesium (Mg) and Mg-alloys precludes their widespread acceptance as implantable biomaterials. Here, we investigated the potential for rapid solidification (RS) to increase the stress corrosion cracking (SCC) resistance of a novel Mg alloy, Mg–6%Nd–2%Y–0.5%Zr (EW62), in comparison to its conventionally cast (CC) counterpart. RS ribbons were extrusion consolidated in order to generate bioimplant-relevant geometries for testing and practical use. Microstructural characteristics were examined by SEM. Corrosion rates were calculated based upon hydrogen evolution during immersion testing. The surface layer of the tested alloys was analyzed by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Stress corrosion resistance was assessed by slow strain rate testing and fractography. The results indicate that the corrosion resistance of the RS alloy is significantly improved relative to the CC alloy due to a supersaturated Nd enrichment that increases the Nd{sub 2}O{sub 3} content in the external oxide layer, as well as a more homogeneous structure and reduced grain size. These improvements contributed to the reduced formation of hydrogen gas and hydrogen embrittlement, which reduced the SCC sensitivity relative to the CC alloy. Therefore, EW62 in the form of a rapidly solidified extruded structure may serve as a biodegradable implant for biomedical applications. - Highlights: • Here we have evaluated the corrosion resistance of a novel Mg alloy (EW62). • Rapid solidification reduces the hydrogen gas evolution and hydrogen embrittlement. • Rapid solidification increases the stress corrosion cracking resistance of EW62. • Improvement is due to enrichment with supersaturated Nd in the external oxide film. • Rapidly solidified and extruded EW62 may serve as a biodegradable medical implant.

  13. Influence of Oxide Film to Stress Corrosion Cracking of Zirconium in Boiling Nitric Acid Solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nuclear fuel reprocessing process acts an important role of nuclear energy cycle. In Japan, a commercial reprocessing plant has been operating at the Rokkasho reprocessing plant. Purex process that is used nitric acid and dodecane with tributyl phosphate for solvent has been adopted in the plant. Boiling nitric acid is applied to dissolve oxide spent nuclear fuel. In the boiling nitric acid solution, plant material corrodes severely and intergranular corrosion is observed in stainless steels. In order to avoid corrosion in such severe environment, some equipment in the plants has been made of zirconium, which has excellent corrosion resistance in nitric acid solutions. However, it has been known that zirconium has stress corrosion cracking (SCC) susceptibility in concentrated HNO3 with nobler corrosion potential. Nobler corrosion potential causes breakdowns of passive film having excellent protective performance and raises SCC susceptibility of zirconium in nitric acid solutions. Therefore, it is important to clarify the relationship among potential, growth and the breakdown of oxide film for the SCC initiation mechanism. In this study, we investigated the oxide film growth of zirconium with various potentials in boiling nitric acid solutions. Electrochemical tests and immersion tests with various applied potentials conducted in boiling 3. 6 and 9 mol.dm-3 HNO3. The potentials in the immersion tests were set at 1.3, 1.4 and 1.5 V vs. sat. KCl-Ag/AgCl electrode (SSE). These were in the region of trans-passive state of zirconium in boiling nitric acid solution. The test durations were 10, 100 and 500 h. After the corrosion tests, cross-sectional observations of oxide films were conducted. From the results of anodic polarization curves of zirconium in boiling nitric acid, passivity region was observed through rest potential to about 1.5 V in boiling 6 mol.dm-3 HNO3. Rapid increase of current density was observed at the potential attributed to transition from passivity

  14. Mitigation of intergranular stress corrosion cracking in RBMK reactors. Final report of the programme's steering committee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In 2000 the IAEA initiated an Extrabudgetary Programme on Mitigation of Intergranular Stress Corrosion Cracking in RBMK Reactors to assist countries operating RBMK reactors in addressing the issue in austenitic stainless steel 300 mm diameter piping. Intergranular stress corrosion cracking of austenitic stainless steel piping in BWRs has been a major safety concern since the early seventies. Similar degradation was found in RBMK reactor piping in 1997. Early in 1998 the IAEA responded to requests for assistance from RBMK operating countries on this issue through activities organized in the framework of Technical Co-operation Department regional projects and the Extrabudgetary Programme on the Safety of WWER and RBMK Nuclear Power Plants. Results of these activities were a basis for the formulation of the objective and scope of the Extrabudgetary Programme on Mitigation of Intergranular Stress Corrosion Cracking in RBMK reactors ('the Programme'). The scope of the Programme included in-service inspection, assessment, repair and mitigation, and water chemistry and decontamination. The Programme was pursued by means of exchange of experience, formulation of guidance, transfer of technology, and training, which will assist the RBMK operators to address related safety concerns. The Programme implementation relied on voluntary extrabudgetary financial contributions from Japan, Spain, the United Kingdom and the USA, and on in kind contributions from Finland, Germany and Sweden. The Programme was implemented in close co-ordination with ongoing national and bilateral activities and major inputs to the Programme were provided through the activities of the Swedish International Project Nuclear Safety and of the US DOE International Nuclear Safety Program. The RBMK nuclear power plants in Lithuania, Russian Federation and Ukraine hosted most of the Programme activities. Support of these Member States involved in the Programme was instrumental for its successful completion in

  15. Growth and stability of stress corrosion cracks in large-diameter BWR piping. Volume 1: summary. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report presents the results of a research program conducted to evaluate the behavior of hypothetical stress corrosion cracks in large diameter austenitic piping. The program included major tasks, a design margin assessment, an evaluation of crack growth and crack arrest, and development of a predictive model. As part of the margin assessment, the program developed diagrams which predicted net section collapse as a function of crack size. In addition, plasticity and dynamic load effects were also considered in evaluating collapse. Analytical methods for evaluating these effects were developed and were benchmarked by dynamic tests of 4-in.-diameter piping. The task of evaluating the growth behavior of stress corrosion cracks focused on developing constant load and cyclic growth rate data that could be used with the predictive model. Secondly, laboratory tests were performed to evaluate the conditions under which growing stress corrosion cracks would arrest when they intersected stress corrosion resistant weld metal. The third task successfully developed a model to predict the behavior of cracks in austenitic piping. This model relies on crack growth data and the critical crack size predicted by the net section collapse approach

  16. Growth and stability of stress corrosion cracks in large-diameter BWR piping. Volume 2: appendixes. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report presents the results of a research program conducted to evaluate the behavior of hypothetical stress corrosion cracks in large diameter austenitic piping. The program included major tasks, a design margin assessment, an evaluation of crack growth and crack arrest, and development of a predictive model. As part of the margin assessment, the program developed diagrams which predicted net section collapse as a function of crack size. In addition, plasticity and dynamic load effects were also considered in evaluating collapse. Analytical methods for evaluating these effects were developed and were benchmarked by dynamic tests of 4-in.-diameter piping. The task of evaluating the growth behavior of stress corrosion cracks focused on developing constant load and cyclic growth rate data that could be used with the predictive model. Secondly, laboratory tests were performed to evaluate the conditions under which growing stress corrosion cracks would arrest when they intersected stress corrosion resistant weld metal. The third task successfully developed a model to predict the behavior of cracks in austenitic piping

  17. Growth and stability of stress corrosion cracks in large-diameter BWR piping. Volume 2: appendixes. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hale, D A; Heald, J D; Horn, R M; Jewett, C W; Kass, J N; Mehta, H S; Ranganath, S; Sharma, S R

    1982-07-01

    This report presents the results of a research program conducted to evaluate the behavior of hypothetical stress corrosion cracks in large diameter austenitic piping. The program included major tasks, a design margin assessment, an evaluation of crack growth and crack arrest, and development of a predictive model. As part of the margin assessment, the program developed diagrams which predicted net section collapse as a function of crack size. In addition, plasticity and dynamic load effects were also considered in evaluating collapse. Analytical methods for evaluating these effects were developed and were benchmarked by dynamic tests of 4-in.-diameter piping. The task of evaluating the growth behavior of stress corrosion cracks focused on developing constant load and cyclic growth rate data that could be used with the predictive model. Secondly, laboratory tests were performed to evaluate the conditions under which growing stress corrosion cracks would arrest when they intersected stress corrosion resistant weld metal. The third task successfully developed a model to predict the behavior of cracks in austenitic piping.

  18. Caustic Ingestion in Children: a Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rafeey, Mandana; Ghojazadeh, Morteza; Sheikhi, Saeede; Vahedi, Leila

    2016-01-01

    Introduction:Caustic ingestion that occurs accidently is one of the most common problems in children. Methods: This systematic review has been performed by searching the databases including Science Direct, ProQuest, Google Scholar, and PubMed. A strategic search was performed with keywords including caustic, corrosive, ingestion, and children, and was limited to articles in English and Persian. Data were analyzed using Comprehensive Meta-Analysis2 and PASW Statistics 18. Results: We selected 64 articles regarding caustic ingestion with a total sample of 11,345 cases. The data analysis indicated a higher consumption in young boys (age range 2.78 (2.02) years (OR=0.53 with a 95% confidence interval of 0.49-0.57 (P=0.08)). The most common caustic substances were household cleaning agents, particularly bleaches and cleaners. Esophageal cancer and death were reported as well as digestive and respiratory complications. Invasive and expensive techniques are frequently used for diagnosis, treatment and follow up. Conclusion: The results demonstrated that although caustic ingestion is a serious problem among children, it is a preventable and manageable issue. Therefore, appropriate efforts by families, government, factories, health team and media should be made to handle adequately this matter.

  19. Hydrogen Cracking and Stress Corrosion of Pressure Vessel Steel ASTM A543

    Science.gov (United States)

    AlShawaf, Ali Hamad

    with the previously used plain carbon steel and other currently used pressure vessel steels was successfully completed. The experimental and computational results of the Q&T HSLA steel agreed well with each other. The susceptibility of the Q&T A543 steel to stress corrosion cracking was investigated using the slow strain rate testing under different environments and conditions. Also, advanced corrosion study using the electrochemical impedance spectroscopy was done at different conditions. The corrosion study revealed that this A543 steel is prone to form pits in most of the conditions. The model results in the corrosion study were validated with the Gamry Echem Analyst software that A543 steel tends to form pits in the tested environment.

  20. Diffraction contrast tomography for the study of polycrystalline stainless steel microstructures and stress corrosion cracking

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    X-ray diffraction contrast tomography is a non-destructive technique for the 3D characterisation of polycrystalline microstructures containing up to a few 1000 grains. The sample is illuminated with a monochromatic beam of high energy synchrotron radiation. As the sample is rotated, and as grains pass through alignments for Bragg diffraction, diffraction spots are recorded on a 2D detector placed close behind the sample. The diffraction geometry is used to assign spots to the grains from which they arise, and to determine the crystallographic orientations of grains. The spots are used as projections of the grains to reconstruct the grain shapes. The technique has been applied to several materials science investigations in stainless steels, including the 3D characterisation of grain boundary networks, and in-situ studies of intergranular stress corrosion cracking. (authors)

  1. Modelling of iodine-induced stress corrosion cracking in CANDU fuel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, B. J.; Thompson, W. T.; Kleczek, M. R.; Shaheen, K.; Juhas, M.; Iglesias, F. C.

    2011-01-01

    Iodine-induced stress corrosion cracking (I-SCC) is a recognized factor for fuel-element failure in the operation of nuclear reactors requiring the implementation of mitigation measures. I-SCC is believed to depend on certain factors such as iodine concentration, oxide layer type and thickness on the fuel sheath, irradiation history, metallurgical parameters related to sheath like texture and microstructure, and the mechanical properties of zirconium alloys. This work details the development of a thermodynamics and mechanistic treatment accounting for the iodine chemistry and kinetics in the fuel-to-sheath gap and its influence on I-SCC phenomena. The governing transport equations for the model are solved with a finite-element technique using the COMSOL Multiphysics® commercial software platform. Based on this analysis, this study also proposes potential remedies for I-SCC.

  2. Localized Deformation as a Primary Cause of Irradiation Assisted Stress Corrosion Cracking

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gary S. Was

    2009-03-31

    The objective of this project is to determine whether deformation mode is a primary factor in the mechanism of irradiation assisted intergranular stress corrosion cracking of austenitic alloys in light watert reactor core components. Deformation mode will be controlled by both the stacking fault energy of the alloy and the degree of irradiation. In order to establish that localized deformation is a major factor in IASCC, the stacking fault energies of the alloys selected for study must be measured. Second, it is completely unknown how dose and SFE trade-off in terms of promoting localized deformation. Finally, it must be established that it is the localized deformation, and not some other factor that drives IASCC.

  3. Stress Corrosion Cracking and Fatigue Crack Growth Studies Pertinent to Spacecraft and Booster Pressure Vessels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, L. R.; Finger, R. W.

    1972-01-01

    This experimental program was divided into two parts. The first part evaluated stress corrosion cracking in 2219-T87 aluminum and 5Al-2.5Sn (ELI) titanium alloy plate and weld metal. Both uniform height double cantilever beam and surface flawed specimens were tested in environments normally encountered during the fabrication and operation of pressure vessels in spacecraft and booster systems. The second part studied compatibility of material-environment combinations suitable for high energy upper stage propulsion systems. Surface flawed specimens having thicknesses representative of minimum gage fuel and oxidizer tanks were tested. Titanium alloys 5Al-2.5Sn (ELI), 6Al-4V annealed, and 6Al-4V STA were tested in both liquid and gaseous methane. Aluminum alloy 2219 in the T87 and T6E46 condition was tested in fluorine, a fluorine-oxygen mixture, and methane. Results were evaluated using modified linear elastic fracture mechanics parameters.

  4. Stress corrosion cracking behavior of quenched and tempered 2.25Cr 1Mo steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For stress corrosion cracking (SCC) study of 2.25Cr-1Mo steel, speciemens were initially austenitized at 925 degree C for 2 hours and quenched in ice brine solution. With this process of heat treatment martensite was formed and banded morphology in the microstructure developed during previous processing was also removed. Tempering at 575 Degree C for 1h was employed to introduce ductility in the quenched martensite of the specimens. The effects of temperature variations on SCC behavior showed a successive decrease in strength and ductility of the steel. These variations in tensile properties were correlated with scanning electron microscopic (SEM) examinations. The SEM results clearly revealed that mostly transgranular cracks initiated at the edges of the tensile specimens grown perpendicular to loading axes, and their intensity is increased with the testing temperatures. (author)

  5. Chloride stress corrosion cracking of Alloy 600 in boric acid solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berge, Ph. [Electricite de France, 92 - Paris la Defense (France); Noel, D.; Gras, J.M.; Prieux, B. [Electricite de France, 77 - Moret-sur-Loing (France). Direction des Etudes et Recherches

    1997-10-01

    The high nickel austenitic alloys are generally considered to have good resistance to chloride stress corrosion cracking. In the standard boiling magnesium chloride solution tests, alloys with more than 40% nickel are immune. Nevertheless, more recent data show that cracking can occur in both Alloys 600 and 690 if the solution is acidified. In other low pH media, such as boric acid solution at 100 deg C, transgranular and intergranular cracking are observed in Alloy 600 in the presence of minor concentrations of sodium chloride (2g/I). In concentrated boric acid at higher temperatures (250 and 290 deg C), intergranular cracking also occurs, either when the chloride concentration is high, or at low chloride contents and high oxygen levels. The role of pH and a possible specific action of boric acid are discussed, together with the influence of electrochemical potential. (author) 21 refs.

  6. Chloride stress corrosion cracking of Alloy 600 in boric acid solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The high nickel austenitic alloys are generally considered to have good resistance to chloride stress corrosion cracking. In the standard boiling magnesium chloride solution tests, alloys with more than 40% nickel are immune. Nevertheless, more recent data show that cracking can occur in both Alloys 600 and 690 if the solution is acidified. In other low pH media, such as boric acid solution at 100 deg C, transgranular and intergranular cracking are observed in Alloy 600 in the presence of minor concentrations of sodium chloride (2g/I). In concentrated boric acid at higher temperatures (250 and 290 deg C), intergranular cracking also occurs, either when the chloride concentration is high, or at low chloride contents and high oxygen levels. The role of pH and a possible specific action of boric acid are discussed, together with the influence of electrochemical potential. (author)

  7. Stress-corrosion cracking of sensitized stainless steel by sulfur-containing compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The stress corrosion cracking (SCC) of sensitized Type 304 stainless steel in thiosulfate solutions has been studied using constant extension rate tests. Very low concentrations of about 6.10-7M Na2S2O3 (0.1ppm) gave cracking. With boric acid added, higher concentrations (1ppm) were required. The SCC was shown to be electrochemically controlled. Below -0.5v/sub SCE/ (-0.75/sub SHE/) no SCC took place; above this potential the rate of SCC increased with potential. An induction period was required before SCC continued above -0.5v if the potential was held at or below this value for extended times. This period was associated with the build up of an aggressive solution of thiosulfate decomposition products within the crack. The cracking process has been considered to be controlled by rupture of a salt layer and not a passivating oxide

  8. Fundamental understanding and life prediction of stress corrosion cracking in BWRs and energy systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andresen, P.L.; Ford, F.P. [General Electric, Schenectady, NY (United States). Corporate Research and Development Center

    1998-03-01

    The objective of this paper is to present an approach for design and lifetime evaluation of environmental cracking based on experimental and fundamental modeling of the underlying processes operative in crack advance. In detailed this approach and its development and quantification for energy (hot water) systems, the requirements for a life prediction methodology will be highlighted and the shortcomings of the existing design and lifetime evaluation codes reviewed. Examples are identified of its use in a variety of cracking systems, such as stainless steels, low alloy steels, nickel base alloys, and irradiation assisted stress corrosion cracking in boiling water reactor (BWR) water, as well as preliminary use for low alloy steel and Alloy 600 in pressurized water reactors (PWRs) and turbine steels in steam turbines. Identification of the common aspects with environmental cracking in other hot water systems provides a secure basis for its extension to related energy systems. 166 refs., 49 figs.

  9. Stress corrosion cracking behavior of quenched and tempered 2.25Cr 1Mo steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manzoor, T.; Ahmad, E.; Sarwar, M.; Iqbal, M.

    2014-06-01

    For stress corrosion cracking (SCC) study of 2.25Cr-1Mo steel, specimens were initially austenitized at 925°C for 2 hours and quenched in ice brine solution. With this process of heat treatment martensite was formed and banded morphology in the microstructure developed during previous processing was also removed. Tempering at 575°C for 1h was employed to introduce ductility in the quenched martensite of the specimens. The effects of temperature variations on SCC behavior showed a successive decrease in strength and ductility of the steel. Theses variations in tensile properties were correlated with scanning electron microscopic (SEM) examinations. The SEM results clearly revealed that mostly transgranular cracks initiated at the edges of the tensile specimens grown perpendicular to loading axes, and their intensity is increased with the testing temperatures.

  10. Standard Test Method for Stress-Corrosion of Titanium Alloys by Aircraft Engine Cleaning Materials

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2006-01-01

    1.1 This test method establishes a test procedure for determining the propensity of aircraft turbine engine cleaning and maintenance materials for causing stress corrosion cracking of titanium alloy parts. 1.2 The evaluation is conducted on representative titanium alloys by determining the effect of contact with cleaning and maintenance materials on tendency of prestressed titanium alloys to crack when subsequently heated to elevated temperatures. 1.3 Test conditions are based upon manufacturer's maximum recommended operating solution concentration. This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its use. It is the responsibility of the user of this standard to establish appropriate safety and health practices and determine the applicability of regulatory limitations prior to use. For specific precautionary statements, see and .

  11. The studies of irradiation assisted stress corrosion cracking on reactor internals stainless steel under Xe irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Rong-shan [Suzhou Nuclear Power Research Institute, Suzhou, Jiangsu Province 215004 (China); Xu, Chao-liang, E-mail: xuchaoliang@cgnpc.com.cn [Suzhou Nuclear Power Research Institute, Suzhou, Jiangsu Province 215004 (China); Liu, Xiang-bing; Huang, Ping [Suzhou Nuclear Power Research Institute, Suzhou, Jiangsu Province 215004 (China); Chen, Yu [Beijing Synchrotron Radiation Facility, Institute of High Energy Physics, Beijing 100049 (China)

    2015-02-15

    Specimens of Chinese domestic reactor internals stainless steel were irradiated with 6 MeV Xe ions for three peak displacement damage of 2, 7 and 15 dpa at room temperature. The slow strain rate tests (SSRT), grazing incidence X-ray diffraction (GIXRD) and nano-indentation tests were carried out to study the IASCC properties, phase transition and nano-hardness variations. The SSRT results indicate that the IASCC susceptibility increases with irradiation damage. Ion irradiation accelerates the stress corrosion cracking (SCC). A new ferrite phase diffraction peak of α(1 1 0) after irradiated to 7 dpa and another two α phase of α(2 0 0) and α(2 1 1) after irradiated to 15 dpa were observed by GIXRD, which may be due to localized deformation. A similar trend of irradiation hardening and IASCC susceptibility was observed, which suggests an essential connection between them.

  12. Elucidating the iodine stress corrosion cracking (SCC) process for zircaloy tubing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Several experimental investigations were made to enhance understanding of the iodine stress corrosion cracking (SCC) process for Zircaloy: (1) oxide penetration process, (2) crack initiation process, and (3) crack propagation process. Concerning the effect of the oxide layer produced by conventional steam-autoclaving, no significant difference was found between results for autoclaved and as-pickled samples. Tests with 15 species of metal iodides revealed that only those metal iodides which react thermodynamically with zirconium to produce zirconium tetraiodide (ZrI4) caused SCC of Zircaloy. Detailed SEM examinations were made on the SCC fracture surface of irradiated specimens. The crack propagation rate was expressed with a da/dt=C Ksup(n) type equation by combining results of tests and calculations with a finite element method. (author)

  13. Susceptibility of 17-4PH stainless steel to stress corrosion cracking in aqueous environments by electrochemical techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The susceptibility of a 17-4PH type steel to Stress Corrosion Cracking (SCC) in low pressure steam turbine environments was assessed using slow strain rate test at 90 Centigrade and at 1.35x10-6 seg-1. Environments tested included different concentrated solutions of NaCl, NaOH and Na2SO4. It was concluded that this steel is susceptible to SCC in 20 % NaCl and pH=3 and in 20 % NaCl pH=neutral but under cathodic polarisation. The electrochemical potential noise of the specimen was monitored during the test. The naturally fluctuations in potential were arise due to spontaneous brake protective film and were characteristics of the kind of corrosion like pit or stress corrosion cracking. After that using Fast Fourier Transformer (FFT) the noise data set were analyzed to obtain power spectral density plots which showed differences between general corrosion and localized corrosion. Polarization curves were carry out at two different rates and them showed the general behavior of the systems. (Author)

  14. Improved stress corrosion cracking resistance of a novel biodegradable EW62 magnesium alloy by rapid solidification, in simulated electrolytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hakimi, O; Aghion, E; Goldman, J

    2015-06-01

    The high corrosion rate of magnesium (Mg) and Mg-alloys precludes their widespread acceptance as implantable biomaterials. Here, we investigated the potential for rapid solidification (RS) to increase the stress corrosion cracking (SCC) resistance of a novel Mg alloy, Mg-6%Nd-2%Y-0.5%Zr (EW62), in comparison to its conventionally cast (CC) counterpart. RS ribbons were extrusion consolidated in order to generate bioimplant-relevant geometries for testing and practical use. Microstructural characteristics were examined by SEM. Corrosion rates were calculated based upon hydrogen evolution during immersion testing. The surface layer of the tested alloys was analyzed by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Stress corrosion resistance was assessed by slow strain rate testing and fractography. The results indicate that the corrosion resistance of the RS alloy is significantly improved relative to the CC alloy due to a supersaturated Nd enrichment that increases the Nd2O3 content in the external oxide layer, as well as a more homogeneous structure and reduced grain size. These improvements contributed to the reduced formation of hydrogen gas and hydrogen embrittlement, which reduced the SCC sensitivity relative to the CC alloy. Therefore, EW62 in the form of a rapidly solidified extruded structure may serve as a biodegradable implant for biomedical applications.

  15. Effects of temperature and pressure on stress corrosion cracking behavior of 310S stainless steel in chloride solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Yunpan; Zhou, Cheng; Chen, Songying; Wang, Ruiyan

    2016-06-01

    310S is an austenitic stainless steel for high temperature applications, having strong resistance of oxidation, hydrogen embrittlement and corrosion. Stress corrosion cracking(SCC) is the main corrosion failure mode for 310S stainless steel. Past researched about SCC of 310S primarily focus on the corrosion mechanism and influence of temperature and corrosive media, but few studies concern the combined influence of temperature, pressure and chloride. For a better understanding of temperature and pressure's effects on SCC of 310S stainless steel, prepared samples are investigated via slow strain rate tensile test(SSRT) in different temperature and pressure in NACE A solution. The result shows that the SCC sensibility indexes of 310S stainless steel increase with the rise of temperature and reach maximum at 10MPa and 160°C, increasing by 22.3% compared with that at 10 MPa and 80 °C. Instead, the sensibility decreases with the pressure up. Besides, the fractures begin to transform from the ductile fracture to the brittle fracture with the increase of temperature. 310S stainless steel has an obvious tendency of stress corrosion at 10MPa and 160°C and the fracture surface exists cleavage steps, river patterns and some local secondary cracks, having obvious brittle fracture characteristics. The SCC cracks initiate from inclusions and tiny pits in the matrix and propagate into the matrix along the cross section gradually until rupture. In particular, the oxygen and chloride play an important role on the SCC of 310S stainless steel in NACE A solution. The chloride damages passivating film, causing pitting corrosion, concentrating in the cracks and accelerated SSC ultimately. The research reveals the combined influence of temperature, pressure and chloride on the SCC of 310S, which can be a guide to the application of 310S stainless steel in super-heater tube.

  16. Stress corrosion cracking of alloys 690, 800, and 600 in acid environments containing copper oxides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Secondary side stress corrosion cracking (SCC) of steam generator (SG) tubes may be due to the formation of an acid environment in crevices, as demonstrated for several Belgian PWR plants. The susceptibility of alloys 600 and 800 in this type of environment, which had been partially evidenced by several laboratory works, has been confirmed by capsule tests performed at Laborelec, whereas the SCC resistance of alloy 690 always appeared excellent. Capsule tests have been recently conducted at 320 C with the same heats of tubings in the same acid solutions (cationic resins + magnetite + sodium silicate, with or without lead, and sodium sulfate + iron sulfate, with or without lead oxide) containing CuO and Cu2O. It appeared that the SCC resistance of the three alloys was generally reduced by the addition of copper oxides, at least when the cover gas did not contain hydrogen. The situation was particularly dramatic for the capsules made of alloy 690 tubing: most of them developed deep cracks, sometimes throughwall (the shortest time to failure being less than 50 h) whereas the same solutions without copper oxides had produced no cracking at all in alloy 690 capsules exposed during more than 2,000 h. Although the corrosion is reduced in presence of hydrazine or at lower concentration, copper oxides probably contribute significantly to the degradation of the tubes in alloy 600, at least in SG's forming acid sulfate crevice environments. This is also an issue for the new SG's, especially for those equipped with tubes in alloy 690 TT, particularly for the top of the tubesheet which is a critical deposit area since the high stresses and strains resulting from the expansion of the tube in the tubesheet lead to a risk of circumferential cracking at the transition

  17. Experimental determination of stress corrosion crack rates and service lives in a buried ERW pipeline

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Threshold stresses and crack growth rates for in-service stress corrosion cracking (SCC) of two electrical resistance weld (ERW) seam welded pipes from two 45-year-old oil pipelines were experimentally assessed. Seventeen high-pH SCC tests were carried out, in both base and ERW weld metals, at two temperatures (73 and 45 deg. C). Tapered specimens were used for base metal, and constant section specimens were developed for ERW tests, in which original surface conditions were preserved. It was found that susceptibility of the ERW seam welds is much higher than for base materials, so that the welds define the length of the pipe that is susceptible to SCC. Threshold pressure estimates for SCC initiation were defined from tests at elevated temperature, service temperature, and literature correlations. Fabrication residual stresses were also measured and taken into consideration. SCC threshold pressures for these lines are controlled by the ERW welds; the pipe tracts that are considered to be susceptible to SCC are those that undergo a service pressure of at least 2.4 MPa. For the case under study, this represents about 70% of the length of the pipeline

  18. Factors affecting stress assisted corrosion cracking of carbon steel under industrial boiler conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Dong

    Failure of carbon steel boiler tubes from waterside has been reported in the utility boilers and industrial boilers for a long time. In industrial boilers, most waterside tube cracks are found near heavy attachment welds on the outer surface and are typically blunt, with multiple bulbous features indicating a discontinuous growth. These types of tube failures are typically referred to as stress assisted corrosion (SAC). For recovery boilers in the pulp and paper industry, these failures are particularly important as any water leak inside the furnace can potentially lead to smelt-water explosion. Metal properties, environmental variables, and stress conditions are the major factors influencing SAC crack initation and propagation in carbon steel boiler tubes. Slow strain rate tests (SSRT) were conducted under boiler water conditions to study the effect of temperature, oxygen level, and stress conditions on crack initation and propagation on SA-210 carbon steel samples machined out of boiler tubes. Heat treatments were also performed to develop various grain size and carbon content on carbon steel samples, and SSRTs were conducted on these samples to examine the effect of microstructure features on SAC cracking. Mechanisms of SAC crack initation and propagation were proposed and validated based on interrupted slow strain tests (ISSRT). Water chemistry guidelines are provided to prevent SAC and fracture mechanics model is developed to predict SAC failure on industrial boiler tubes.

  19. Effect of Microstructure on the Localized Corrosion and Stress Corrosion Behaviours of Plasma-Electrolytic-Oxidation-Treated AA7075 Aluminum Alloy Forging in 3.5 wt. % NaCl Solution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Venugopal

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The influence of metallurgical heterogeneities such as coring and intermetallic phases on the corrosion and stress corrosion cracking behaviours of AA7075 aluminium alloy forging was examined in 3.5 wt. % NaCl solution with and without plasma electrolytic oxidation coating. Electrochemical test results demonstrated significant improvement in the corrosion resistance of the alloy after PEO coating. Stress corrosion results show that the metallurgical heterogeneities resulted in a loss in elongation of the uncoated sample in NaCl (11.5% when compared to the one tested in air (12.9%. The loss in elongation of the uncoated sample was shown to be due to localized corrosion-assisted mechanical cracking rather than true stress corrosion based on preexposure tensile tests followed by posttest metallographic observation of the stress corrosion tested samples. This was further confirmed by the fractographic examination of the failed samples, which exhibited a typical ductile cracking morphology for all the coated and uncoated specimens.

  20. Influence of some parameters on the stress corrosion of a ABNT 304 stainless steel in MgCl2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The susceptibility to stress corrosion cracking of the austenitic stainless steel AISI 304 in MgCl, solution was studied. When changes on the surface film were produced like a prepassivation of the steel in HNO3 solution or chromate solution or even a previous cathodic reduction. A mixture of MgCl2 + NaCl was also used in such a way that the cation influence on the scc process could be analised. Results show that the surface film seems to have great importance in the see mechanism and that addition of Na+ ions inhibit cracks at the corrosion potencial. (Author)

  1. Stress Corrosion Crack Growth Behavior of Titanium Alloy/Bioactive Glasses Sandwiches in Simulated Human Physiological Environment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    Based on a series of newly developed bioactive glasses having suitable thermo-mechanical properties to allow application as fixation agents between bone and titanium alloy biomedical implants, the stress corrosion crack growth(SCCG) behavior of their interfaces with Ti6Al4V was investigated in simulated body fluid (SBF) with the objectiveof discerning the salient mechanisms of crack advance and to assess the reliability of the bonds. Results indicatedthat crack growth rates in Ti6Al4V/glass/Ti6Al4V sandwich specimens were nearly the same as or slightly lowerthan those in the bulk glasses at comparable stress intensities; indeed, cracks would prefer to propagate off theinterface, suggesting that the Ti6Al4V/glass interface has relatively good crack-growth resistance. Mechanistically,interfacial crack growth appears to be controlled by the classic stress corrosion mechanisms for silicate glasses, withno discernible effect of bioactivity on the SCCG behavior being observed.

  2. Stress corrosion cracking behavior in gaseous oxygen of a U-7.5 Nb-2.5 Zr alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stress corrosion of the alloy U90Nb7.5Zr2.5 in oxygen is studied for temperature between -200C and 1000C under pressure varying from 0.3 x 10-6 MPa to 0.15 MPa. The domain of stress corrosion and cracking kinetics are determined in function of stress intensity, temperature and pressure. Under 0.15 MPa of oxygen embrittlement is observed for the all range of temperature studied and the phenomenon is thermally activated. At room temperature cracks are produced for all tested pressures, influence of pressure on cracking kinetics is low. Auger spectrometry analysis on the surface of cracks shows a surface mechanism to explain alloy embrittlement in gaseous oxygen

  3. Stress corrosion of unalloyed steels in geological storage conditions; Corrosion sous contrainte des aciers non allies dans les conditions du stockage geologique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Didot, A.; Herms, E.; Bataillon, C.; Chene, J. [CEA Saclay, Dept. de Physico-Chimie (DEN/DANS/DPC/SCCME/LECA), 91 - Gif sur Yvette (France); Crusset, D. [Agence Nationale pour la Gestion des Dechets Radioactifs (ANDRA), 92 - Chatenay Malabry (France)

    2007-07-01

    The concept retained for high level and years living radioactive waste disposal is the underground storage. It is then necessary to know the behaviour in time (about 10000 years) of the different constituent elements of the containment. The storage site chosen is the Bures' ones, presenting a clay formation at 600 m of depth. Each compartment is separated of a sufficient distance in order to profit of the thermal dispersion effect in the rock for optimizing the cooling of the package. In this work, has been used an unalloyed steel sur-container. The aim is to understand the resistance of the material under corrosion and loading, and particularly the stress corrosion which is a particular case of cracking assisted by environment. The material studied is a weld of two unalloyed steels obtained by electron beam. Slow traction tests have been carried out in an autoclave in the following experimental conditions: interstitial water in equilibrium with a helium-CO{sub 2} mixture 5.4 per thousand under 50 bar and at a temperature of 90 C. The results show an influence of the hydrogen corrosion on the mechanical behaviour of the material and particularly a decrease of the size of the reduction in area, which is practically unexisting in the case of the melted zone. These results are explained into details. (O.M.)

  4. 27 CFR 21.102 - Caustic soda, liquid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Caustic soda, liquid. 21....102 Caustic soda, liquid. (a) The liquid caustic soda may consist of either 50 percent or 73 percent...: Accurately weigh 2 grams of liquid caustic soda into a 100 ml volumetric flask, dissolve, and dilute to...

  5. Iodine-oxygen and cadmium-induced stress corrosion cracking of Zr-4 cladding tube

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    On the basis of iodine-induced stress corrosion cracking (SCC) experiments the authors did before, iodine-oxygen and cadmium-induced SCC was studied on Zr-4 cladding tube. Specimens used in experiments are cladding tubes of a reactor fuel element made by Institute of Nonferrous Metal of China. The tube which has a length of 145 mm and an outside diameter of 15.3 mm and an inside diameter of 14.9 mm was annealed at 620 K for two hours, and then it had a fine, stress-relieved microstructure. Two end-caps were welded on the cladding tube. There was a hole of 0.8 mm diameter in a protruding melting-welding platform on one end-cap of the specimen. Before welding the end-caps, a glass ampoule filled with a certain amount of oxygen and a piece of Zr-4 material which can dash the glass ampoule were put into the cladding tube. After plug-hole welding in high pressure argon, the cladding tube was shaken in order to make the piece of Zr-4 material dash the ampoule and the oxygen fill up the space inside the cladding tube. A certain amount of iodine was charged into the cladding tube from the hole before the plug-hole welding. The plug-hole welding in high pressure argon was performed on a specially prepared equipment within 0.1-0.5 second. At a certain temperature, the pressure of argon determines the mechanical load (stress). The SCC experiments were controlled within +-3 degree C by a thermocouple welded on the specimen. The cracking of the specimen or the leak of gas was sensitively supervised and timed by vacuum alarm system. Under various conditions of stress, the experiments for 28 specimens of iodine-oxygen agent and 5 specimens of cadmium agent were undertaken

  6. Environmental and Material Influences on the Stress-Corrosion Cracking of Steel in H2O–CO–CO2 Solutions

    OpenAIRE

    Merwe, J. W. van der

    2012-01-01

    The stress-corrosion cracking of A516 pressure vessel steel was investigated by the use of slow strain-rate tests. The orientation of samples to the rolling direction was investigated, and it was found that samples machined longitudinal to the rolling direction showed a slightly increased sensitivity to stress corrosion. The temperature variation showed that for different gas mixtures, the maximum sensitivity to stress corrosion was in the region of 45° to 55°C for the 25% CO gas mixture, whe...

  7. Electrochemical Behavior and Stress Corrosion Sensitivity of X70 Steel Under Disbonded Coatings in Korla Soil Solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Hongchang; Wang, Luntao; Wang, Huiru; Zheng, Wenru; Zhang, Dawei; Du, Cuiwei

    2016-09-01

    The corrosion of X70 pipeline steel under a model disbonded coating was studied in a simulated solution of Korla soil by combining in situ electrochemical measurements at different locations in the crevice and stress corrosion cracking (SCC) sensitivity analyses in the corresponding simulated environments. The results from electrochemical impedance spectroscopy showed that the corrosion product resistance R t and charge transfer resistance R ct of X70 steel first increased and then decreased with increasing distance from the opening of the crevice in the disbonded coating. Scanning electron micrographs showed that pitting in the crevice became more severe at deeper locations in the crevice. Slow strain rate tests showed that the lowest SCC sensitivity of X70 steel was found at 15 cm away from the opening, and the highest SCC sensitivity was at the end of the crevice.

  8. Simulated Service and Stress Corrosion Cracking Testing for Friction Stir Welded Spun Form Domes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Thomas J.; Torres, Pablo D.; Caratus, Andrei A.; Curreri, Peter A.

    2010-01-01

    Damage tolerance testing development was required to help qualify a new spin forming dome fabrication process for the Ares 1 program at Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC). One challenge of the testing was due to the compound curvature of the dome. The testing was developed on a sub-scale dome with a diameter of approximately 40 inches. The simulated service testing performed was based on the EQTP1102 Rev L 2195 Aluminum Lot Acceptance Simulated Service Test and Analysis Procedure generated by Lockheed Martin for the Space Shuttle External Fuel Tank. This testing is performed on a specimen with an induced flaw of elliptical shape generated by Electrical Discharge Machining (EDM) and subsequent fatigue cycling for crack propagation to a predetermined length and depth. The specimen is then loaded in tension at a constant rate of displacement at room temperature until fracture occurs while recording load and strain. An identical specimen with a similar flaw is then proof tested at room temperature to imminent failure based on the critical offset strain achieved by the previous fracture test. If the specimen survives the proof, it is then subjected to cryogenic cycling with loads that are a percentage of the proof load performed at room temperature. If all cryogenic cycles are successful, the specimen is loaded in tension to failure at the end of the test. This standard was generated for flat plate, so a method of translating this to a specimen of compound curvature was required. This was accomplished by fabricating a fixture that maintained the curvature of the specimen rigidly with the exception of approximately one-half inch in the center of the specimen containing the induced flaw. This in conjunction with placing the center of the specimen in the center of the load train allowed for successful testing with a minimal amount of bending introduced into the system. Stress corrosion cracking (SCC) tests were performed using the typical double beam assembly and with 4

  9. Prevention of stress-corrosion cracking in nuclear waste storage tanks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ondrejcin, R S

    1984-01-01

    Stress corrosion cracking (SCC) has occurred in the early versions of carbon steel primaries of nuclear waste tanks at the Savannah River Plant. (Secondary containment was provided by a vessel surrounding the lower portion of the primary tank.) Evaporated alkaline nitrate wastes in the form of crystallized salts are being dissolved from some of these tanks for transfer to new tanks of a different design. To prevent the SCC sequence from occurring during salt dissolution, the levels of inhibitors required to prevent cracking at yield stresses were determined. Special statistically designed experiments were performed to evaluate the probability of cracking under the combined influences of nitrate, nitrite, hydroxide, and temperature. Experimentlly, samples were tested by a potentially controlled constant extension rate test and by wedge opening loaded samples. Two equations were derived by multivariable regression analyses that correlated probability of cracking as the dependent variable to nitrate, nitrite, and hydroxide concentrations and temperature as the independent variables. From these equations, simple operating standards were developed by setting the probability of cracking equal to zero and solving for the four independent variables. 15 references, 15 figures, 8 tables.

  10. Numerical investigation on stress corrosion cracking behavior of dissimilar weld joints in pressurized water reactor plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lingyan Zhao

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available There have been incidents recently where stress corrosion cracking (SCC observed in the dissimilar metal weld (DMW joints connecting the reactor pressure vessel (RPV nozzle with the hot leg pipe. Due to the complex microstructure and mechanical heterogeneity in the weld region, dissimilar metal weld joints are more susceptible to SCC than the bulk steels in the simulated high temperature water environment of pressurized water reactor (PWR. Tensile residual stress (RS, in addition to operating loads, has a great contribution to SCC crack growth. Limited experimental conditions, varied influence factors and diverging experimental data make it difficult to accurately predict the SCC behavior of DMW joints with complex geometry, material configuration, operating loads and crack shape. Based on the film slip/dissolution oxidation model and elastic-plastic finite element method (EPFEM, an approach is developed to quantitatively predict the SCC growth rate of a RPV outlet nozzle DMW joint. Moreover, this approach is expected to be a pre-analytical tool for SCC experiment of DMW joints in PWR primary water environment.

  11. Irradiation-Assisted Stress-Corrosion Cracking of Nitinol During eBeam Sterilization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Stuart A.; Gause, Brock; Plumley, David; Drexel, Masao J.

    2012-12-01

    Medical device fractures during gamma and electron beam (eBeam) sterilization have been reported. Two common factors in these device fractures were a constraining force and the presence of fluorinated ethylene propylene (FEP). This study investigated the effects of eBeam sterilization on constrained light-oxide nitinol wires in FEP. The goal was to recreate these fractures and determine their root cause. Superelastic nitinol wires were placed inside FEP tubes and constrained with nominal outer fiber strains of 10, 15, and 20%. These samples were then subjected to a range of eBeam sterilization doses up to 400 kGy and compared with unconstrained wires also subjected to sterilization. Fractures were observed at doses of >100 kGy. Analysis of the fracture surfaces indicated that the samples failed due to irradiation-assisted stress-corrosion cracking (IASCC). This same effect was also observed to occur with PTFE at 400 kGy. These results suggest that nitinol is susceptible to IASCC when in the presence of a constraining stress, fluorinated polymers, and irradiation.

  12. Stainless steel corrosion in French LMFBR - Feedback and prevention against risks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper deals with the mechanisms and the conditions leading to the most threatening corrosion risks specific to the use of sodium at high temperature as coolant in FBR (Fast Breeder Reactors) - apart from wastage (rapid erosion-corrosion of the steam generator tubes by sodium hydroxide due to steam-water leaks in sodium): Stress Corrosion Cracking (SCC) induced in sodium polluted by sodium hydroxide (following sodium-water reaction or incomplete cleaning of component), SCC induced by caustic solution during maintenance operations (cleaning of component or repair on drained sodium circuit inducing moist air ingress), and Intergranular Attack (IGA) induced on sensitized stainless steels by acid solutions used during maintenance operations (decontamination of component, chemical cleaning). These risks are illustrated by some examples of corrosion encountered through Phenix experience or in CEA sodium loops. The paper also describes the solutions and the preventive measures that have been put in place against these corrosion risks, in the form of design rules and operating procedures. Generally the plant operator cannot control the material parameters (metal composition, aging, stress) during the lifetime of the facility. Thus most of the time preventive measures consist in excluding at least one of the two other factors related to the chemical environment and/or to the operating conditions. Moreover corrosion of the primary components during cleaning and decontamination operations before repairing should be carefully examined to authorize their reuse in the reactor

  13. On the degree of caustics of reflection

    CERN Document Server

    Josse, Alfrederic

    2012-01-01

    Given a point S and an irreducible algebraic curve C in P^2, we consider the caustic of reflection defined as the envelope of the reflected lines from the point S on the curve C. We identify this caustic with the Zariski closure of the image of C by a rational map. Thanks to a general fundamental lemma, we give a formula of the degree of the caustic of reflection in terms of multiplicity numbers of pro-branches of C. Our formula holds in the most general case. We also give some precisions about Pl\\"ucker formulas.

  14. Electrochemical and Sulfide Stress Corrosion Cracking Behaviors of Tubing Steels in a H2S/CO2 Annular Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Z. Y.; Wang, X. Z.; Liu, R. K.; Du, C. W.; Li, X. G.

    2014-04-01

    The electrochemical and sulfide stress corrosion cracking (SSCC) behaviors of 13Cr stainless steel and P110 steel were investigated in a simulated acidic annular environment with low-temperature and high-pressure H2S/CO2 using electrochemical methods, U-bend immersion tests, and scanning electron microscopy. In the solution containing high pressure CO2, 13Cr, and P110 steels exhibited general corrosion and severe pitting, respectively. Compared with sweet corrosion, additional H2S in the solution enhanced the corrosion of 13Cr steel but inhibited the corrosion of P110 steel. By contrast, in a solution containing 4 MPa CO2 and different (0-0.3 MPa), the susceptibility of both 13Cr stainless steel and P110 steel toward SSCC was significantly promoted by increases in H2S partial pressure. The 13Cr stainless steel exhibited higher susceptibility toward SSCC than P110 steel under a H2S/CO2 environment but lower susceptibility under a pure CO2 environment.

  15. Stress corrosion cracks initiation of recrystallized Zircaloy-4 in iodine-methanol solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    During the pellet-cladding interaction, Zirconium-alloy fuel claddings might fail when subjected to incidental power transient in nuclear Pressurized Water Reactors, by Iodine-induced Stress Corrosion Cracking (I-SCC). This study deals with the intergranular initiation of I-SCC cracks in fully recrystallized Zircaloy-4, in methyl alcohol solution of iodine at room temperature, with the focus on critical mechanical parameters and iodine concentration. It was carried out with an approach mixing experiments and numerical simulations. An anisotropic and viscoplastic mechanical behavior model was established and validated over a wide range of loadings. With numerous constant elongation rate tensile tests and four points bending creep tests, the existence of a threshold iodine concentration I0 close to 10-6 g.g-1 was highlighted, necessary to the occurrence of I-SCC damage, along with a transition concentration I1 close to 2.10-4 g.g-1. Above I1 the mechanism changes, leading to a sped up crack initiation and a loss of sensitivity towards mechanical parameters. The importance of concentration on parameters such as crack density, crack average length and intergranular and transgranular crack velocities was evidenced. Experimental results show that plastic strain is not required for I-SCC crack initiation, if the test time is long enough in the presence of stress. Its main influence is to rush the occurrence of cracking by creating initiation sites, by way of breaking the oxide layer and building up intergranular stress. Below I1, the critical strains at initiation show a substantial strain rate sensitivity. In this domain, a threshold stress of 100 MPa was found, well below the yield stress. Thanks to the combined use of notched specimens and numerical simulations, a strong protective effect of an increasing stress bi-axiality ratio was found, both in the elastic and plastic domains. Proton-irradiated samples, up to a dose of 2 dpa, were tested in the same conditions as

  16. Standard test method for determining susceptibility to stress-corrosion cracking of 2XXX and 7XXX Aluminum alloy products

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    1998-01-01

    1.1 This test method covers a uniform procedure for characterizing the resistance to stress-corrosion cracking (SCC) of high-strength aluminum alloy wrought products for the guidance of those who perform stress-corrosion tests, for those who prepare stress-corrosion specifications, and for materials engineers. 1.2 This test method covers method of sampling, type of specimen, specimen preparation, test environment, and method of exposure for determining the susceptibility to SCC of 2XXX (with 1.8 to 7.0 % copper) and 7XXX (with 0.4 to 2.8 % copper) aluminum alloy products, particularly when stressed in the short-transverse direction relative to the grain structure. 1.3 The values stated in SI units are to be regarded as standard. The inch-pound units in parentheses are provided for information. This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its use. It is the responsibility of the user of this standard to establish appropriate safety and health practices and de...

  17. The Effect of Nitrite on Pitting and Stress Corrosion Cracking of Corrosion Resistant Alloys (CRA) under Oil Field Conditions

    OpenAIRE

    Okeremi, Akinyemi

    2011-01-01

    The need to inject treated seawater to enhance reservoir pressure and secondary oil recovery is increasing in the oil field, so also is the reservoir souring potential caused by the activities of Sulphate Reducing Bacteria (SRB) generating H2S in the reservoir. The total cost of SRB mediated corrosion in the United States alone is estimated to be 1-2 billion US dollars per year. In the last few years, a number of potential souring mitigation and prevention tools have been studied. These inclu...

  18. Irradiation-assisted stress corrosion cracking behavior of austenitic stainless steels applicable to LWR core internals.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chung, H. M.; Shack, W. J.; Energy Technology

    2006-01-31

    This report summarizes work performed at Argonne National Laboratory on irradiation-assisted stress corrosion cracking (IASCC) of austenitic stainless steels that were irradiated in the Halden reactor in simulation of irradiation-induced degradation of boiling water reactor (BWR) core internal components. Slow-strain-rate tensile tests in BWR-like oxidizing water were conducted on 27 austenitic stainless steel alloys that were irradiated at 288 C in helium to 0.4, 1.3, and 3.0 dpa. Fractographic analysis was conducted to determine the fracture surface morphology. Microchemical analysis by Auger electron spectroscopy was performed on BWR neutron absorber tubes to characterize grain-boundary segregation of important elements under BWR conditions. At 0.4 and 1.4 dpa, transgranular fracture was mixed with intergranular fracture. At 3 dpa, transgranular cracking was negligible, and fracture surface was either dominantly intergranular, as in field-cracked core internals, or dominantly ductile or mixed. This behavior indicates that percent intergranular stress corrosion cracking determined at {approx}3 dpa is a good measure of IASCC susceptibility. At {approx}1.4 dpa, a beneficial effect of a high concentration of Si (0.8-1.5 wt.%) was observed. At {approx}3 dpa, however, such effect was obscured by a deleterious effect of S. Excellent resistance to IASCC was observed up to {approx}3 dpa for eight heats of Types 304, 316, and 348 steel that contain very low concentrations of S. Susceptibility of Types 304 and 316 steels that contain >0.003 wt.% S increased drastically. This indicates that a sulfur related critical phenomenon plays an important role in IASCC. A sulfur content of <0.002 wt.% is the primary material factor necessary to ensure good resistance to IASCC. However, for Types 304L and 316L steel and their high-purity counterparts, a sulfur content of <0.002 wt.% alone is not a sufficient condition to ensure good resistance to IASCC. This is in distinct contrast to

  19. An experimental study of the dynamic features of shadow areas of caustics in response to loading/unloading fracture

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    许昭永; 杨润海; 赵晋明; 王赟赟; 熊秉衡; 王正荣; 梅世蓉

    2002-01-01

    Using a plexiglass sample and by means of real-time holographic interferometry and shadow optical method of caustics, the different features of dynamic variation in stress (strain) field, plastic area and nucleation zone (shadow area) when the sample fractures during loading (loading-fracture) and unloading (unloading-fracture) are studied visually. The results show that the strain nuclei (zones with dense fringes) appear first at the tips of prefabricated cracks at low stress, and then the shadow areas of caustics form with the increase of load. These nuclei and shadow areas can become larger, or smaller, when the process of loading, or unloading, goes on. When the stress is kept within a certain range, the shadow areas of caustics can become larger and smaller alternatively with repeated loading and unloading (cyclic loading). However, when loading and unloading at high stress, in particular when the macrofracture is about to appear, the variations of the shadow areas of caustics are irreversible and quite different. The shadow areas of caustics expand rapidly at an increasing speed when loading-fracture appears. In contrast, the shadow areas of caustics expand at a lower speed when unloading-fracture appears; besides, there is a circular shadow in front of the sharp-angle shaped area.

  20. Cracks propagation by stress corrosion cracking in conditions of Boiling Water Reactor (BWR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This work presents the results of the assays carried out in the Laboratory of Hot Cells of the National Institute of Nuclear Research (ININ) to a type test tube Compact Tension (CT), built in steel austenitic stainless type 304L, simulating those conditions those that it operates a Boiling Water Reactor (BWR), at temperature 288 C and pressure of 8 MPa, to determine the speed to which the cracks spread in this material that is of the one that different components of a reactor are made, among those that it highlights the reactor core vessel. The application of the Hydrogen Chemistry of the Water is presented (HWC) that is one alternative to diminish the corrosion effect low stress in the component, this is gets controlling the quantity of oxygen and of hydrogen as well as the conductivity of the water. The rehearsal is made following the principles of the Mechanics of Elastic Lineal Fracture (LEFM) that considers a crack of defined size with little plastic deformation in the tip of this; the measurement of crack advance is continued with the technique of potential drop of direct current of alternating signal, this is contained inside the standard Astm E-647 (Method of Test Standard for the Measurement of Speed of Growth of Crack by fatigue) that is the one that indicates us as carrying out this test. The specifications that should complete the test tubes that are rehearsed as for their dimensions, it forms, finish and determination of mechanical properties (tenacity to the fracture mainly) they are contained inside the norm Astm E-399, the one which it is also based on the principles of the fracture mechanics. The obtained results were part of a database to be compared with those of other rehearsals under different conditions, Normal Chemistry of the Water (NWC) and it dilutes with high content of O2; to determine the conditions that slow more the phenomena of stress corrosion cracking, as well as the effectiveness of the used chemistry and of the method of

  1. Remote Field Eddy Current Probes for the Detection of Stress Corrosion in Transmission Pipelines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Plamen Alexandroz Ivanov

    2002-08-27

    Magnetic flux leakage (MFL) is a technique used widely in non-destructive testing (NDT) of natural gas and petroleum transmission pipelines. This inspection method relies on magnetizing the pipe-wall in axial direction. The MFL inspection tool is equipped with an array of Hall sensors located around the circumference of the pipe, which registers the flux leakage caused by any defects present in the pipe-wall. Currently, the tool magnetizes the pipewall in axial direction making it largely insensitive to axially oriented defects. One type of defect, which is of a growing concern in the gas and petroleum industry is the stress corrosion crack (SCC). The SCCs are a result of aging, corrosion, fatigue and thermal stresses. SCCs are predominantly axially oriented and are extremely tight, which makes them impossible to be detected using current inspection technology. A possible solution to this problem is to utilize the remote field eddy current (RFEC) effect to detect axially oriented defects. The RFEC method has been widely used in industry in the inspection of tubular products. The method uses a pair of excitation and pick-up coils. The pick-up coil located in the remote field region, usually two, three pipe-diameters away from the excitation coil. With RFEC the presence of defects is detected by the disturbance in the phase of the signal measured by the pick-up coil relative to that of the excitation coil. Unlike conventional eddy current testing the RFEC method is sensitive to defects on the exterior of the inspected product, which makes it a good candidate for the development of in-line inspection technology. This work focuses on the development of non-destructive testing technique, which uses remote field eddy currents induced by rotating magnetic field (RMF). A major advantage of the RMF is that it makes possible to not only detect a defect but also localize its position in circumferential direction. Also, it could potentially allow detection of defects

  2. Caustic addition system operability test procedure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This test procedure provides instructions for performing operational testing of the major components of the 241-AN-107 Caustic Addition System by WHC and Kaiser personnel at the Rotating Equipment Shop run-in pit (Bldg. 272E)

  3. Caustic graphene plasmons with Kelvin angle

    CERN Document Server

    Shi, Xihang; Gao, Fei; Xu, Hongyi; Yang, Zhaoju; Zhang, Baile

    2015-01-01

    A century-long argument made by Lord Kelvin that all swimming objects have an effective Mach number of 3, corresponding to the Kelvin angle of 19.5 degree for ship waves, has been recently challenged with the conclusion that the Kelvin angle should gradually transit to the Mach angle as the ship velocity increases. Here we show that a similar phenomenon can happen for graphene plasmons. By analyzing the caustic wave pattern of graphene plasmons stimulated by a swift charged particle moving uniformly above graphene, we show that at low velocities of the charged particle, the caustics of graphene plasmons form the Kelvin angle. At large velocities of the particle, the caustics disappear and the effective semi-angle of the wave pattern approaches the Mach angle. Our study introduces caustic wave theory to the field of graphene plasmonics, and reveals a novel physical picture of graphene plasmon excitation during electron energy-loss spectroscopy measurement.

  4. Tunable caustic phenomena in electron wavefields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tavabi, Amir Hossein, E-mail: a.tavabi@fz-juelich.de [Ernst Ruska-Centre for Microscopy and Spectroscopy with Electrons (ER-C) and Peter Grünberg Institute (PGI), Forschungszentrum Jülich, D-52425 Jülich (Germany); Migunov, Vadim; Dwyer, Christian; Dunin-Borkowski, Rafal E. [Ernst Ruska-Centre for Microscopy and Spectroscopy with Electrons (ER-C) and Peter Grünberg Institute (PGI), Forschungszentrum Jülich, D-52425 Jülich (Germany); Pozzi, Giulio [Ernst Ruska-Centre for Microscopy and Spectroscopy with Electrons (ER-C) and Peter Grünberg Institute (PGI), Forschungszentrum Jülich, D-52425 Jülich (Germany); Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Bologna, Viale B. Pichat 6/2, 40127 Bologna (Italy)

    2015-10-15

    Novel caustic phenomena, which contain fold, butterfly and elliptic umbilic catastrophes, are observed in defocused images of two approximately collinear oppositely biased metallic tips in a transmission electron microscope. The observed patterns depend sensitively on defocus, on the applied voltage between the tips and on their separation and lateral offset. Their main features are interpreted on the basis of a projected electrostatic potential model for the electron-optical phase shift. - Highlights: • Electron-optical caustics are observed in defocused images of biased metallic tips. • The caustics depend on defocus, on the bias between the tips and on their separation. • The setup offers the flexibility to study a wide variety of caustic phenomena.

  5. Effects of Cr and Nb contents on the susceptibility of Alloy 600 type Ni-base alloys to stress-corrosion cracking in a simulated BWR environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In order to discuss the effects of chromium and niobium contents on the susceptibility of Alloy 600 type nickel-base alloys to stress-corrosion cracking in the BWR primary coolant environment, a series of creviced bent-beam (CBB) tests were conducted in a high-temperature, high-purity water environment. Chromium, niobium, and titanium as alloying elements improved the resistivity to stress-corrosion cracking, whereas carbon enhanced the susceptibility to it. Alloy-chemistry-based correlations have been defined to predict the relative resistances of alloys to stress-corrosion cracking. A strong correlation was found, for several heats of alloys, between grain-boundary chromium depletion and the susceptibility to stress-corrosion cracking

  6. Report on Status of Shipment of High Fluence Austenitic Steel Samples for Characterization and Stress Corrosion Crack Testing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clark, Scarlett R. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Leonard, Keith J. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2016-09-01

    The goal of the Mechanisms of Irradiation Assisted Stress Corrosion Cracking (IASCC) task in the LWRS Program is to conduct experimental research into understanding how multiple variables influence the crack initiation and crack growth in materials subjected to stress under corrosive conditions. This includes understanding the influences of alloy composition, radiation condition, water chemistry and metallurgical starting condition (i.e., previous cold work or heat treatments and the resulting microstructure) has on the behavior of materials. Testing involves crack initiation and growth testing on irradiated specimens of single-variable alloys in simulated Light Water Reactor (LWR) environments, tensile testing, hardness testing, microstructural and microchemical analysis, and detailed efforts to characterize localized deformation. Combined, these single-variable experiments will provide mechanistic understanding that can be used to identify key operational variables to mitigate or control IASCC, optimize inspection and maintenance schedules to the most susceptible materials/locations, and, in the long-term, design IASCC-resistant materials.

  7. Investigation of the stress corrosion cracking susceptibility of annealed and heat treated alloy 625 castings and forgings in sea water

    OpenAIRE

    Jones, Eric Merwin

    1987-01-01

    The author hereby grants to the United States Navy, Wyman Gordon, and M.I.T. permission to reproduce and distribute copies of this thesis document in Whole or in part. Alloy 625, the nickel based superalloy commonly called Inconel* 625, was investigated for its susceptibility to stress corrosion cracking in sea water using the slow strain rate tensile test method. Four microstructures of the alloy commonly found in end products were investigated. Bimetallic couplings w...

  8. Effects of hydrogen assisted stress corrosion on damage tolerance of a high-strength duplex stainless steel wire for prestressing concrete

    OpenAIRE

    Abreu Rodrigues, Maricely de; Iordachescu, Mihaela; Valiente Cancho, Andrés

    2014-01-01

    The study brings new insights on the hydrogen assisted stress corrosion on damage tolerance of a high-strength duplex stainless steel wire which concerns its potential use as active reinforcement for concrete prestressing. The adopted procedure was to experimentally state the effect of hydrogen on the damage tolerance of cylindrical smooth and precracked wire specimens exposed to stress corrosion cracking using the aggressive medium of the standard test developed by FIP (International Prestre...

  9. MICROSTRUCTURE NEAR SCRATCH ON ALLOY 690TT AND STRESS CORROSION INDUCED BY SCRATCHING%690TT合金划痕显微组织及划伤诱发的应力腐蚀

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孟凡江; 王俭秋; 韩恩厚; 庄子哲雄; 柯伟

    2011-01-01

    测试表明,690TT合金划痕周围形成了加工硬化区,范围可达100 μm.TEM及EBSD-OIM组织观察发现,划痕沟槽处的基体组织出现了一定程度的纳米化.在330℃碱溶液中的浸泡实验表明,划伤诱发了690TT合金应力腐蚀裂纹的萌生和扩展,划伤过程中形成的变形晶界、孪晶界以及产生的微观裂纹成为应力腐蚀裂纹优先萌生的位置.Pb的存在使氧化膜变得疏松,加速了基体的溶解和氧化.随着溶液中Pb含量的增加,划伤诱发的应力腐蚀裂纹长度随之增加.690TT合金表面划伤严重降低了材料抵抗应力腐蚀开裂的能力.%The microstructure and stress corrosion cracking (SCC) behavior of scratched zone on alloy 690TT were studied by using microhardness, TEM, EBSD-OIM and immersion experiment in caustic solution. It was found that a deformed hardening layer with a dimension range of 100 /xm was produced near the scratch. TEM and EBSD-OIM observations showed that the grains at shallow surface of scratch groove were refined to nano-size. SCC tests for scratched alloy 690TT were performed in caustic solution at high temperature with or without addition of lead oxides. The results showed that SCC cracks initiated and propagated at scratch banks and scratch grooves. Grain boundaries, twin boundaries deformed and microcracks produced during scratching process are preferential sites for SCC. The oxide films formed on scratch groove were loosed by lead. The SCC crack length increased with increase of lead content. Scratched alloy 690TT is susceptible to SCC.

  10. Research of stress corrosion cracking of T225NG titanium alloy in loop water of high temperature and high pressure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xu Jijin; Yan Keng; Chen Ligong; Jiang Chengyu

    2006-01-01

    Double cantilever beam (DCB) specimens were used to research the stress corrosion cracking of T225NG titanium alloy in loop water of high temperature and high pressure. DCB specimens were forced pre-stress, put into high pressure autoclave, and the stress corrosion and crack expansion of specimens were observed and measured in 500 h, 1 000 h and 2 000h respectively. The results show that small expansion occurred along the direction of pre-cracking. According to calculation,the speed of cracking expansion is lower than 10 -9 m/s in 500 h and the value of KIscc/KI is higher than 0. 75, which proves that T225NG has an excellent corrosion resistance in loop water. The main reason is that there is an oxide film on the surface of specimens. According to the analysis of energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) and X-ray diffraction (XRD), the oxide film consists of TiO2. Therefore, the oxide film at the crack tip impedes the hydrogen separating out from the cathode to penetrate into titanium alloy and resists hydrogen embrittlement.

  11. A proton irradiation facility for studying radiation damage and irradiation assisted stress corrosion cracking

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A proton irradiation facility has been constructed for the study of irradiation assisted stress corrosion cracking and irradiation damage in austenitic stainless steels. The facility has many proton irradiation. The facility uses a specially designed irradiation stage mounted onto the target chamber of a 1.7 MV tandetron accelerator. Samples are mounted on a heated and cooled copper block in the stage and irradiated with a raster-scanned proton beam of 1.0μA/cm2 (3.4 MeV) though a 1.6 cm2 target aperture. The proton range is approximately 45 μm with the energy loss varying only a factor of two over the first 35 μm. Sample temperature is monitored using a carefully calibrated infrared pyrometer. Experiments thus far have concentrated on inducing 1 dpa of damage at a sample temperature of 400 degrees C. Long-lived residual radioactivity is minimal after a 3-6 day cooling period and samples can be readily examined in TEM, SAM and tested in a high temperature water loop. Experiments have shown that the irradiated microstructure and grain boundary segregation is similar to that produced by neutron irradiation at the same temperature and dose, but at a dose rate 100 to 1000 times lower. This paper focuses on the feature of the technique and the resulting microstructural and microchemical changes

  12. Status report: Intergranular stress corrosion cracking of BWR core shrouds and other internal components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    On July 25, 1994, the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) issued Generic Letter (GL) 94-03 to obtain information needed to assess compliance with regulatory requirements regarding the structural integrity of core shrouds in domestic boiling water reactors (BWRs). This report begins with a brief description of the safety significance of intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC) as it relates to the design and function of BWR core shrouds and other internal components. It then presents a brief history of shroud cracking events both in the US and abroad, followed by an indepth summary of the industry actions to address the issue of IGSCC in BWR core shrouds and other internal components. This report summarizes the staff's basis for issuing GL 94-03, as well as the staff's assessment of plant-specific responses to GL 94-03. The staff is continually evaluating the licensee inspection programs and the results from examinations of BWR core shrouds and other internal components. This report is representative of submittals to and evaluations by the staff as of September 30, 1995. An update of this report will be issued at a later date

  13. Status report: Intergranular stress corrosion cracking of BWR core shrouds and other internal components

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-03-01

    On July 25, 1994, the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) issued Generic Letter (GL) 94-03 to obtain information needed to assess compliance with regulatory requirements regarding the structural integrity of core shrouds in domestic boiling water reactors (BWRs). This report begins with a brief description of the safety significance of intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC) as it relates to the design and function of BWR core shrouds and other internal components. It then presents a brief history of shroud cracking events both in the US and abroad, followed by an indepth summary of the industry actions to address the issue of IGSCC in BWR core shrouds and other internal components. This report summarizes the staff`s basis for issuing GL 94-03, as well as the staff`s assessment of plant-specific responses to GL 94-03. The staff is continually evaluating the licensee inspection programs and the results from examinations of BWR core shrouds and other internal components. This report is representative of submittals to and evaluations by the staff as of September 30, 1995. An update of this report will be issued at a later date.

  14. Microstructural characterization on intergranular stress corrosion cracking of Alloy 600 in PWR primary water environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • We examine PWSCC cracks of Alloy 600 through microscopic equipment. • Oxygen diffuses into the grain boundaries from the external primary water. • Cr oxides are precipitated on the crack tips and the attacked grain boundaries. • The oxide structure inside a crack consists of double (inner and outer) layers. • The penetrated oxygen strongly affects the PWSCC behaviors of Alloy 600. -- Abstract: Stress corrosion cracks in Alloy 600 compact tension specimens tested at 325 °C in a simulated primary water environment of a pressurized water reactor were analyzed using microscopic equipment. Oxygen diffused into the grain boundaries just ahead of the crack tips from the external primary water. As a result of oxygen penetration, Cr oxides were precipitated on the crack tips and the attacked grain boundaries. The oxide layer in the crack interior was revealed to consist of double (inner and outer) layers. Cr oxides were found in the inner layer, with NiO and (Ni,Cr) spinels in the outer layer. Cr depletion (or Ni enrichment) zones were created in the attacked grain boundary, the crack tip, and the interface between the crack and matrix, which means that the formation of Cr oxides was due to the Cr diffusion from the surrounding matrix. The oxygen penetration and resultant metallurgical changes around the crack tip are believed to be significant factors affecting the PWSCC initiation and growth behaviors of Alloy 600

  15. Mechanism of intergranular stress corrosion cracking in HAZ for super-martensitic stainless steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miyata, Yukio; Kimura, Mitsuo [Tubular Products and Casting Research Dept., JFE Steel Corporation, 1-1, Kawasaki-cho, Handa (Japan); Nakamichi, Haruo; Sato, Kaoru [Analysis and Characterization Research Dept., JFE Steel Corporation, 1-1, Minamiwatarida-cho, Kawasaki-ku, Kawasaki (Japan); Itakura, Noritsugu [Products Service and Development Dept., Chita Works, JFE Steel Corporation. 1-1, Kawasaki-cho, Handa (Japan); Masamura, Katsumi [Tubular Products Business Planning Dept., JFE Steel Corporation, 2-2-3, Uchisaiwai-sho, Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo (Japan)

    2004-07-01

    Mechanism of intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC) for heat affected zone (HAZ) of super-martensitic stainless steel was studied using two types of the steel. One was a lean grade, which was Mo free and low Ni, and the other was a high grade, which was Mo added and high Ni. Specimens received heat treatments simulating welding thermal cycles were applied to SCC tests. Cracks were observed in some specimens after U-bend SCC test under low pH environments. Thermal cycle conditions with sensitization were verified from the results. No crack was observed in the specimen with the thermal cycle simulating post welding heat treatment (PWHT) after sensitizing conditions. Therefore, PWHT was clarified to be effective to prevent the cracking. Cr carbides were observed along prior austenite grain boundary intermittently, and Cr depleted zone was confirmed on the grain boundary adjacent to carbides that precipitated on the grain boundary. It is, therefore, concluded that the cracking results from Cr depletion on prior austenite grain boundary accompanied by precipitation of Cr carbides under specific welding conditions. (authors)

  16. Metallurgical and mechanical parameters controlling alloy 718 stress corrosion cracking resistance in PWR primary water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Improving the performance and reliability of the fuel assemblies of the pressurized water reactors requires having a perfect knowledge of the operating margins of both the components and the materials. The choice of alloy 718 as reference material for this study is justified by the industrial will to identify the first order parameters controlling the excellent resistance of this alloy to Stress Corrosion Cracking (SCC). For this purpose, a specific slow strain rate (SSR) crack initiation test using tensile specimen with a V-shaped hump in the middle of the gauge length was developed and modeled. The selectivity of such SSR tests in simulated PWR primary water at 350 C was clearly established by characterizing the SCC resistance of nine alloy 718 thin strip heats. Regardless of their origin and in spite of a similar thermo-mechanical history, they did not exhibit the same susceptibility to SCC crack initiation. All the characterized alloy 718 heats develop oxide scale of similar nature for various exposure times to PWR primary medium in the temperature range [320 C - 360 C]. δ phase precipitation has no impact on alloy 718 SCC initiation behavior when exposed to PWR primary water, contrary to interstitial contents and the triggering of plastic instabilities (PLC phenomenon). (author)

  17. Reconstruction of stress corrosion cracks using signals of pulsed eddy current testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Li; Xie, Shejuan; Chen, Zhenmao; Li, Yong; Wang, Xiaowei; Takagi, Toshiyuki

    2013-06-01

    A scheme to apply signals of pulsed eddy current testing (PECT) to reconstruct a deep stress corrosion crack (SCC) is proposed on the basis of a multi-layer and multi-frequency reconstruction strategy. First, a numerical method is introduced to extract conventional eddy current testing (ECT) signals of different frequencies from the PECT responses at different scanning points, which are necessary for multi-frequency ECT inversion. Second, the conventional fast forward solver for ECT signal simulation is upgraded to calculate the single-frequency pickup signal of a magnetic field by introducing a strategy that employs a tiny search coil. Using the multiple-frequency ECT signals and the upgraded fast signal simulator, we reconstructed the shape profiles and conductivity of an SCC at different depths layer-by-layer with a hybrid inversion scheme of the conjugate gradient and particle swarm optimisation. Several modelled SCCs of rectangular or stepwise shape in an SUS304 plate are reconstructed from simulated PECT signals with artificial noise. The reconstruction results show better precision in crack depth than the conventional ECT inversion method, which demonstrates the validity and efficiency of the proposed PECT inversion scheme.

  18. Susceptibility to stress corrosion cracking of zirconium and titanium alloy in nitric acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The susceptibility to stress corrosion cracking (SCC) of zirconium and titanium alloys used in nuclear fuel reprocessing plants was examined by the slow strain rate tensile test (SSRT) in nitric acid solutions by referencing those results obtained in silicone oil. Titanium alloys like Zr-39%Ti, Zr-15%Ti and Zr-5%Ti, Ti-5%Ta were used. Titanium alloys have not the susceptibility to SCC in nitric acid solutions. On the other hand zirconium have the susceptibility to SCC in the same solutions. In comparison with SSRT results of zirconium specimens with a notch in oil, the reduction ratio of time to failure in nitric acid solutions decreased with increasing temperature. The quasi-cleavage type SCC fracture morphology was observed on the fracture surface of specimens tested in nitric acid. In order to evaluate the effect of crystal anisotropy on SCC, L type specimens and C type specimens, which were machined out parallel and perpendicular to the rolling direction respectively were examined. The susceptibility to SCC of C type notched specimens was higher than that of L type notched specimens, because of the preferential texture of quasi-cleavage planes oriented along the cracking path. (author)

  19. Stress corrosion cracking of austenitic weld deposits in a salt spray environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, J. B.; Yu, C.; Shiue, R. K.; Tsay, L. W.

    2015-10-01

    ER 308L and 309LMo were utilized as the filler metals for the groove and overlay welds of a 304L stainless steel substrate, which was prepared via a gas tungsten arc-welding process in multiple passes. U-bend and weight-loss tests were conducted by testing the welds in a salt spray containing 10 wt% NaCl at 120 °C. The dissolution of the skeletal structure in the fusion zone (FZ) caused the stress corrosion cracking (SCC) of the weld. The FZ in the cold-rolled condition showed the longest single crack length in the U-bend tests. Moreover, sensitization treatment at 650 °C for 10 h promoted the formation of numerous fine cracks, which resulted in a high SCC susceptibility. The weight loss of the deposits was consistent with the SCC susceptibility of the welds in a salt spray. The 309LMo deposit was superior to the 308L deposit in the salt spray.

  20. Temperature, stress, and corrosive sensing apparatus utilizing harmonic response of magnetically soft sensor element (s)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grimes, Craig A. (Inventor); Ong, Keat Ghee (Inventor)

    2003-01-01

    A temperature sensing apparatus including a sensor element made of a magnetically soft material operatively arranged within a first and second time-varying interrogation magnetic field, the first time-varying magnetic field being generated at a frequency higher than that for the second magnetic field. A receiver, remote from the sensor element, is engaged to measure intensity of electromagnetic emissions from the sensor element to identify a relative maximum amplitude value for each of a plurality of higher-order harmonic frequency amplitudes so measured. A unit then determines a value for temperature (or other parameter of interst) using the relative maximum harmonic amplitude values identified. In other aspects of the invention, the focus is on an apparatus and technique for determining a value for of stress condition of a solid analyte and for determining a value for corrosion, using the relative maximum harmonic amplitude values identified. A magnetically hard element supporting a biasing field adjacent the magnetically soft sensor element can be included.

  1. Experimental investigation and mechanical modelling of zircaloy-4 stress corrosion cracking

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In Pressurised Water Reactor fuel assemblies, cladding tubes constitute the first safety barriers against the fission product dissemination. It is therefore essential to ensure their integrity under all the reactor operating conditions. During an important loading, resulting from severe reactor power transients, clad failures can be induced by a Stress Corrosion Cracking phenomenon (SCC) due to the combined action of mechanical loading and gaseous fission products generated by the fuel pellets. The aim of our work is to study the role played by different parameters on the SCC phenomenon of Zircaloy-4 claddings. It is made up of three complementary parts: - the modelling of local mechanical fields applied during laboratory tests; - the design of specific SCC experiments to investigate the influence of several mechanical parameters; - the observation of the damage mechanisms occurring during these different experiments. Coupling mechanical modelling and laboratory tests allowed to obtain some local information which cannot be obtained experimentally. A hierarchical approach was then used to develop accurate constitutive laws of the stress-relieved Zircaloy-4 alloy. The constitutive equations derived from this approach were fitted to the mechanical loading applied during the experiments. The specific SCC tests results and SEM observations proved the existence of a time incubation period, which lasts for an important part of the lifetime measured in the SCC pressurization tests. This incubation period is closely related to the experimental conditions of the laboratory tests. However the incubation period must be distinguished from the actual SCC mechanisms and corresponds to the time required for the metal surface to strip of its oxide layer by mechanical cracking and/or attack of zircon. First results obtained on pre-cracked samples showed that this stage, which introduces an artefact in the experimental test analysis, can be suppressed. Moreover, we have borne out

  2. Development of Modified 304 Stainless Steel Resistant to Stress Corrosion Cracking in Chloride Environment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    This was a feasibility study for a modified 304 steel resistant to stress corrosion cracking (SCC) in aqueous environment containing chloride. SCC tests were conducted potentiostaticaly with spot-welded specimens, which had both crevice and residual stress, mainly in 3 % NaCl solution at various temperatures to determine the critical temperature for SCC at and below which the steel would not suffer from SCC. The effects of individual alloying element of silicon, manganese and copper on SCC of 18Cr-14Ni steels which phosphor content is 0.002 % and molybdenum content is 0.01 % were examined. Addition of 1 or 2 % of copper has beneficial effect on resistance to SCC, while increasing silicon or manganese content has no significant effect. Critical temperature of the steel with 0.002 % of phosphor and 2 % of copper is 150 ℃, which is markedly higher than 50 ℃ of 304L steel. However, the beneficial effect of copper is reduced with increasing phosphor content. From practical viewpoint, the modified steel with good SCC resistance should have 0.01 %-0.015 % of phosphor and 0.3 % or more of molybdenum, because it is very difficult to reduce phosphor content below 0.008 % industrially and such molybdenum content is inevitably introduced through cost-saving melting process using return steel. Aluminium is to be added as another alloying element and 3 % of aluminium combined with 2 % of copper has been found to negate the deleterious effects of increased phosphor and molybdenum content. As a candidate steel at this stage, 14Cr-16Ni-0.013P-2Cu-1Al-(0.3-1)Mo steel has critical temperature of 110 ℃.

  3. Fabrication and loading of long-term stress corrosion cracking surveillance specimens for the Dresden 1 decontamination program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walker, W.L.

    1979-10-01

    Stress-corrosion cracking test specimens were prepared for Dow Nuclear Services for insertion in the Dresden 1 reactor during the chemical decontamination of the primary system, and for subsequent exposure under operating conditions when the station returns to service. The specimens consist of pressurized tubes fabricated from Type-304 and -304L stainless steel, Inconel 600, Incoloy 800, and Zircaloy 2. In addition, constant radius bent-beam specimens of 3/4 hard Type-410 stainless steel were also included. All specimens were stressed to, or slightly above, their respective 0.2% offset yield strengths at the temperatures of interest.

  4. Fabrication and loading of long-term stress corrosion cracking surveillance specimens for the Dresden 1 decontamination program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stress-corrosion cracking test specimens were prepared for Dow Nuclear Services for insertion in the Dresden 1 reactor during the chemical decontamination of the primary system, and for subsequent exposure under operating conditions when the station returns to service. The specimens consist of pressurized tubes fabricated from Type-304 and -304L stainless steel, Inconel 600, Incoloy 800, and Zircaloy 2. In addition, constant radius bent-beam specimens of 3/4 hard Type-410 stainless steel were also included. All specimens were stressed to, or slightly above, their respective 0.2% offset yield strengths at the temperatures of interest

  5. Stress corrosion cracking behavior of newer iron--chromium--nickel alloys at 5500F in high purity water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As part of a long range materials development program, new commercial plant materials were evaluated for future BWR applications. These materials include ferritic, martensitic, austenitic, and austeno-ferritic stainless steels. Each alloy was characterized for chemical composition, microstructure, and mechanical properties. Stress corrosion cracking screening tests were performed in 5500F, high-purity water containing 36 ppM oxygen on uniaxial tensile specimens stressed at 75 percent of the 5500F ultimate tensile strength. Tests were continued to 5000 hours or failure which ever occurred first. Post-test metallographic examinations were performed on the failed specimen. Results of the evaluation program are presented. 12 fig, 3 tables

  6. Initiation of stress corrosion cracking in pre-stained austenitic stainless steels exposed to primary water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Austenitic stainless steels are widely used in primary circuits of Pressurized Water Reactors (PWR) plants. However, a limited number of cases of Intergranular Stress Corrosion Cracking (IGSCC) has been detected in cold-worked (CW) areas of non-sensitized austenitic stainless steel components in French PWRs. A previous program launched in the early 2000's identified the required conditions for SCC of cold-worked stainless steels. It was found that a high strain hardening coupled with a cyclic loading favoured SCC. The present study aims at better understanding the role of pre-straining on crack initiation and at developing an engineering model for IGSCC initiation of 304L and 316L stainless steels in primary water. Such model will be based on SCC initiation tests on notched (not pre-cracked) specimens under 'trapezoidal' cyclic loading. The effects of pre-straining (tensile versus cold rolling), cold-work level and strain path on the SCC mechanisms are investigated. Experimental results demonstrate the dominating effect of strain path on SCC susceptibility for all pre-straining levels. Initiation can be understood as crack density and crack depth. A global criterion has been proposed to integrate both aspects of initiation. Maps of SCC initiation susceptibility have been proposed. A critical crack depth between 10 and 20 μm has been demonstrated to define transition between slow propagation and fast propagation for rolled materials. For tensile pre-straining, the critical crack depth is in the range 20 - 50 μm. Experimental evidences support the notion of a KISCC threshold, whose value depends on materials, pre-straining ant load applied. The initiation time has been found to depend on the applied loading as a function of (σmaxmax/YV)11,5. The effect of both strain path and surface hardening is indirectly taken into account via the yield stress. In this study, material differences rely on strain path effect on mechanical properties. As a result, a stress high

  7. Irradiation Programs and Test Plans to Assess High-Fluence Irradiation Assisted Stress Corrosion Cracking Susceptibility.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Teysseyre, Sebastien [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2015-03-01

    . Irradiation assisted stress corrosion cracking (IASCC) is a known issue in current reactors. In a 60 year lifetime, reactor core internals may experience fluence levels up to 15 dpa for boiling water reactors (BWR) and 100+ dpa for pressurized water reactors (PWR). To support a safe operation of our fleet of reactors and maintain their economic viability it is important to be able to predict any evolution of material behaviors as reactors age and therefore fluence accumulated by reactor core component increases. For PWR reactors, the difficulty to predict high fluence behavior comes from the fact that there is not a consensus of the mechanism of IASCC and that little data is available. It is however possible to use the current state of knowledge on the evolution of irradiated microstructure and on the processes that influences IASCC to emit hypotheses. This report identifies several potential changes in microstructure and proposes to identify their potential impact of IASCC. The susceptibility of a component to high fluence IASCC is considered to not only depends on the intrinsic IASCC susceptibility of the component due to radiation effects on the material but to also be related to the evolution of the loading history of the material and interaction with the environment as total fluence increases. Single variation type experiments are proposed to be performed with materials that are representative of PWR condition and with materials irradiated in other conditions. To address the lack of IASCC propagation and initiation data generated with material irradiated in PWR condition, it is proposed to investigate the effect of spectrum and flux rate on the evolution of microstructure. A long term irradiation, aimed to generate a well-controlled irradiation history on a set on selected materials is also proposed for consideration. For BWR, the study of available data permitted to identify an area of concern for long term performance of component. The efficiency of

  8. H2S Stress Corrosion Tests of Welded Joint for X65 Pipeline Steel and Finite Element Numerical Analysis of Crack Tip

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    金晓军; 霍立兴; 张玉凤; 白秉仁; 李小巍; 曹军

    2003-01-01

    The microstructure of welded joint is surveyed and the mechanical properties of X65 pipeline steel are studied in this paper, which provides experimental basis of performance effect on stress corrosion. H2S stress corrosion cracking (SCC) tests on the steel are carried out in the environment based on NACE TM-01-77 solution. The threshold stress intensity factor and crack propagation velocity for base metal and HAZ are obtained. The susceptibility of welded joint for X65 pipeline steel to H2S stress corrosion cracking is investigated. The programming package ANSYS of finite element model (FEM) is used to perform the three-dimensional elastic-plastic finite element analysis of WOL specimens. Stress field and concentration of hydrogen distribution property of the crack tip are obtained.

  9. Stress corrosion study of PH13-8Mo stainless steel using the Slow Strain Rate Technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres, Pablo D.

    1989-01-01

    The need for a fast and reliable method to study stress corrosion in metals has caused increased interest in the Slow Strain Rate Technique (SSRT) during the last few decades. PH13-8MoH950 and H1000 round tensile specimens were studied by this method. Percent reduction-in-area, time-to-failure, elongation at fracture, and fracture energy were used to express the loss in ductility, which has been used to indicate susceptibility to stress corrosion cracking (SCC). Results from a 3.5 percent salt solution (corrosive medium) were compared to those in air (inert medium). A tendency to early failure was found when testing in the vicinity of 1.0 x 10(-6) mm/mm/sec in the 3.5 percent salt solution. PH13-8Mo H1000 was found to be less likely to suffer SCC than PH13-8Mo H950. This program showed that the SSRT is promising for the SCC characterization of metals and results can be obtained in much shorter times (18 hr for PH steels) than those required using conventional techniques.

  10. INTER-CONTACT FORCE ANALYSIS OF IMPACTED DISK ASSEMBLY BY DYNAMIC CAUSTICS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Ming(李明); ZHANG Jue; FANG Jing(方竞)

    2003-01-01

    The caustic method was utilized to study the contact force transmission in disk assemblies under impact load. The mapping equations were obtained based on the first invariant of the stress components in the disk subject to a normal concentrated force, and a characteristic dimension of the maximum size in the caustic curve was proposed to evaluate the contact force between the disks.Transient patterns of the caustic shadows were recorded by means of a high-speed camera of off-focus imaging, then the histories of the inter-contact forces among the disks were obtained with respect to the conditions of different masses and heights of the falling hammers. The influence of the impact loading and impulsive velocity was analyzed with respect to the force responses of the disk assembly,the double-peak phenomenon with comparison to the initial masses, and the energy dissipation of the systems under impact of different momentums.

  11. Probing dark matter caustics with weak lensing

    CERN Document Server

    Gavazzi, R; Fort, B; Gavazzi, Raphael; Mohayaee, Roya; Fort, Bernard

    2006-01-01

    Caustics are high-density structures that form frequently in collisionless media. Under self-gravity, cold dark matter flows focus onto caustics which are yet to be resolved in numerical simulations and or observed in the real world. If detected, caustics would provide a strong evidence for dark matter and would rule out alternative models such as those with modified dynamics. Here, we demonstrate how they might be observed in the weak lensing data. We evaluate the shear distortion and show that its radial profile is marked by a characteristic sawtooth pattern due to the caustics in dark matter haloes that form by selfsimilar accretion. We discuss the observational complications, mainly due to the poor knowledge of the virial radii of the haloes and demonstrate that a superposition of about 600 cluster-size haloes would give a signal-to-noise ratio which is sufficiently large for the detection of caustics with ground-based observations. This number is reduced to 200 for space-based observations. These bounds ...

  12. Line Caustic Microlensing and Limb Darkening

    CERN Document Server

    Rhie, S H; Rhie, Sun Hong; Bennett, David P.

    1999-01-01

    In a line caustic crossing microlensing event, the caustic line moving across the surface of the source star provides a direct method to measure the integrated luminosity profile of the star. Combined with the enormous brightening at the caustic crossings, microlensing offers a promising tool for studying stellar luminosity profiles. We derive the amplification behavior of the two extra images that become partial images conjoined across the critical curve at a line caustic crossing. We identify the multiplicative factors that depend on the caustic crossing point and the relative size of the star, and the shape function that depends on the stellar luminosity profile. We examine the analytic limb-darkening models -- linear, square root, and square -- using the analytic form of the shape function. We find that the microlensing lightcurves must be determined to an accuracy of better than 0.3-0.8% in order to be able to determine the linear limb-darkening parameter $c_1$ with precision of binaries as reported by P...

  13. Mechano-electrochemical study of stress corrosion crack tip area: Case of Zircaloy-4 in halide solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stress corrosion cracking (SCC) is a damage phenomenon which results from the synergy between corrosion process (dissolution, adsorption) and mechanical fracture (crack propagation). Although this phenomenon is well known, its modelling is still a challenging issue, especially concerning mechano-electrochemical coupling mechanisms at crack tip, because it depends on model system (metal/aggressive media) and large number of mechanical and electrochemical factors. In this thesis, mutual interactions between dissolution and the stress state around the crack tip (stress intensity factor) are studied in the case of Zircaloy-4 in aqueous halide solution. Samples are first pre-cracked in air by using fatigue load-shedding procedure to control the stress intensity factor. Then, pre-oxidation is used to produce a thin protective passive layer on their surface. The electro-chemical reactions are thus concentrated at the crack tip which also induces a concentration of the mechanical effect. During the test, digital images of the sample surface are acquired. Digital Image Correlation is performed a posteriori in order to obtain the evolution of the crack length and the stress intensity factors. Further, a specific procedure is developed in order to perform the DIC analysis while the test is running. This allows to control the load so that a given value of the stress intensity factor is prescribed. With this innovative experimental technique, we perform experimental tests that allow to discriminate the effects between different stress corrosion cracking mechanisms. It is suggested that once a critical anodic polarization is exceeded, the crack growth rate depends on the stress intensity factor but also on its time derivative. Indeed, a threshold effect is obtained on the stress intensity factor, meaning that plasticity must increase for the dissolution reaction to occur, but also on its rate meaning that time for plasticity to produce new dislocations must not exceed the

  14. Investigation with slow traction conditions of the stress corrosion of carbon steels in alkaline media. Role of passivating inhibitors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The stress corrosion cracking (S.C.C.) sensitivity of carbon steels in basic media, such as carbonates, is well known. A constant strain-rate test have allowed to observe two steels (A42 [E26] and XC38) behaviour in such conditions at pH 9. The S.C.C. potentials susceptibility range has been found. Inter and Trans-granular cracking have been revealed and measured with micrographic methods. A crack growth rate has been studied as a function of strain rate: an experimental rate has been compared to calculated values from methods which have proposed previously, and methods which have been elaborated in this work. These last permit a best approach of cracking in our case. The chromates use, as inhibitor ions, has permit to decrease the corrosive attack and to cancel the crack growth rate. (author)

  15. The stress corrosion cracking of copper containers for the disposal of high-level nuclear waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stress corrosion cracking (SCC) is a possible failure mode for Cu containers in an underground nuclear waste disposal vault. It is difficult to guarantee that SCC will never initiate on Cu containers based only on the results of relatively short-term experiments. Therefore, the extent of SCC is being predicted based on the argument that the rate of crack propagation will be limited. Several environmental factors will limit the rate of cracking, including: the general absence of aggressive SCC agents in the vault, the limited time of rapid strain of the container shell and the limited supply rate of oxidants (principally dissolved O2) to the container surface through the compacted clay-based material in which the containers will be placed. In the first part of this study, the effect of oxidant flux on the crack velocity is being determined. The SCC behavior of two high-copper alloys has been determined in nitrite-containing environments over a range of oxidant fluxes. In NO2- solutions, transgranular SCC is observed. There is evidence for discontinuous crack advance, including crack arrest markings on fracture surfaces and correlated noise events in the electrochemical potential and applied load signals. Crack velocities of 4--8 nm/s are observed in constant extension rate tests in 0.1 mol·dm-3 sodium nitrite (NaNO2) with applied current densities of 0.1--1.0 micro·cm-2. The maximum crack length for a Cu container has been estimated based on the observed dependence of the crack velocity on the oxidant flux and the predicted time dependence of the oxidant flux to the containers in a disposal vault

  16. Scintillation Caustics in Planetary Occultation Light Curves

    CERN Document Server

    Cooray, A R; Cooray, Asantha R.

    2003-01-01

    We revisit the GSC5249-01240 light curve obtained during its occultation by Saturn's North polar region. In addition to refractive scintillations, the power spectrum of intensity fluctuations shows an enhancement of power between refractive and diffractive regimes. We identify this excess power as due to high amplitude spikes in the light curve and suggest that these spikes are due to caustics associated with ray crossing situations. The flux variation in individual spikes follows the expected caustic behavior, including diffraction fringes which we have observed for the first time in a planetary occultation light curve. The presence of caustics in scintillation light curves require an inner scale cut off to the power spectrum of underlying density fluctuations associated with turbulence. Another possibility is the presence of gravity waves in the atmosphere. While occultation light curves previously showed the existence of refractive scintillations, a combination of small projected stellar size and a low rel...

  17. Test Results for Caustic Demand Measurements on Tank 241-AX-101 and Tank 241-AX-103 Archive Samples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doll, Stephanie R. [Washington River Protection Solutions, Richland, WA (United States); Bolling, Stacie D. [Washington River Protection Solutions, Richland, WA (United States)

    2016-07-14

    Caustic demand testing is used to determine the necessary amount of caustic required to neutralize species present in the Hanford tank waste and obtain a target molarity of free hydroxide for tank corrosion control. The presence and quantity of hydroxide-consuming analytes are just as important in determining the caustic demand as is the amount of free hydroxide present. No single data point can accurately predict whether a satisfactory hydroxide level is being met as it is dependent on multiple factors (e.g., free hydroxide, buffers, amphoteric metal hydroxides, bicarbonate, etc.). This enclosure contains the caustic demand, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), polarized light microscopy (PLM), and X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis for the tank 241-AX-101 (AX-101) and 241-AX-103 (AX-103) samples. The work was completed to fulfill a customer request outlined in the test plan, WRPS-1505529, “Test Plan and Procedure for Caustic Demand Testing on Tank 241-AX-101 and Tank 241-AX-103 Archive Samples.” The work results will provide a baseline to support planned retrieval of AX-101 and AX-103.

  18. Modeling of primary water stress corrosion cracking at control rod drive mechanism nozzles of pressurized water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    One of the main failure mechanisms that cause risks to pressurized water reactors is the primary water stress corrosion cracking (PWSCC) occurring in alloys. It can occurs, besides another places, at the control reactor displacement mechanism nozzles. It is caused by the joint effect of tensile stress, temperature, susceptible metallurgical microstructure and environmental conditions of the primary water. These cracks can cause accidents that reduce nuclear safety by blocking the rod's displacement and may cause leakage of primary water, reducing the reactor's life. In this work it is proposed a study of the existing models and a modeling proposal to primary water stress corrosion cracking in these nozzles in a nickel based Alloy 600. It is been superposed electrochemical and fracture mechanics models, and validated using experimental and literature data. The experimental data were obtained at CDTN-Brazilian Nuclear Technology Development Center, in a recent installed slow strain rate testing equipment. In the literature it is found a diagram that indicates a thermodynamic condition for the occurrence of some PWSCC sub modes in Alloy 600: it was used potential x pH diagrams (Pourbaix diagrams), for Alloy 600 in high temperature primary water (300 deg C till 350 deg C). Over it, were located the PWSCC sub modes, using experimental data. It was added a third parameter called 'stress corrosion strength fraction'. However, it is possible to superpose to this diagram, other parameters expressing PWSCC initiation or growth kinetics from other models. Here is the proposition of the original contribution of this work: from an original experimental condition of potential versus pH, it was superposed, an empiric-comparative, a semi-empiric-probabilistic, an initiation time, and a strain rate damage models, to quantify respectively the PWSCC susceptibility, the failure time, and in the two lasts, the initiation time of stress corrosion cracking. It was modeling from our

  19. Evaluation of stress corrosion cracking of austenitic stainless steel in MgCl2 solution added with NaNO3, with the slow strain rate test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evaluation of stress corrosion cracking of austenitic stainless steel in Mg Cl2 solution added with Na NO3, with the slow strain rate test. AISI 304 type stainless steel has been tested by the slow strain-rate stress corrosion test, in boiling Mg Cl2 solution at 1250C. A critical potential between -140 and -160 mV sub(H) (below the corrosion potential in the deaerated solution) has been found which agress very well with published data obtained with other kinds of tests. As 2,5% Na NO3 was added to the MgCl2 solution, the critical potential changed to -90 mV sub(H), which was noble to the respective corrosion potential showing an inhibittory effect of sodium nitrate. (Author)

  20. Electrochemical generation of fentons reagent to treat spent caustic wastewater

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An important wastewater stream from oil refineries is the spent caustic. Caustic solutions are used as scrubbing agent during the desulphurization process to eliminate sulphur an mercaptans from oil and gasses. Spent caustic is classified as DOO3 (reactive sulphide) hazardous waste under the US Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). (Author)

  1. Contribution to the study to the stress corrosion susceptibility of austenitic stainless steel AISI 304 in aqueous solutions containing chlorides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The anodic behaviour of type 304 austenitic stainless steel, stressed in aqueous neutral and acid NaCl solutions, was studied. The experimental technique of the straining electrode, with constant speed and high strain rate, was applied at room temperature and at 900C. The current density on the bare metal, which is exposed to the medium during the straining the specimen, was determined at various potentials for 1N; 0,1N and 0,001N NaCl, at both temperatures, and for 1N H2SO4 + 0,1N NaCl at room temperature. In the 1N NaCl solution, tests were also carried with slightly sensitizes material at 250C and 900C. The possible crack propagation rates were estimated from these data, and parameters related with stress corrosion cracking susceptibility were analised. Potentiodynamic polarization curves were done at several potential scanning rates with and without simultaneous straining of the electrode at the same temperature, in some of the NaCl concentrations, with the aim of comparing the current values with those found in the method described above. These curves were also performed in boiling MgCl2 solutions with and without addition of NaNO3 with the purpose of compare its stress corrosion prognostic capacity in relation of that other types of tests reported. (Author)

  2. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Investigation of the Stress Corrosion Cracking in Nickel-Base Alloys, Volume 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bruemmer, Stephen M.; Toloczko, Mychailo B.; Olszta, Matthew J.

    2012-03-01

    The objective of this program is to evaluate the primary water stress corrosion cracking (PWSCC) susceptibility of high chromium alloy 690 and its weld metals, establish quantitative measurements of crack-growth rates and determine relationships among cracking susceptibility, environmental conditions and metallurgical characteristics. Stress-corrosion, crack-growth rates have been determined for 12 alloy 690 specimens, 11 alloy 152/52/52M weld metal specimens, 4 alloy 52M/182 overlay specimens and 2 alloy 52M/82 inlay specimens in simulated PWR primary water environments. The alloy 690 test materials included three different heats of extruded control-rod-drive mechanism (CRDM) tubing with variations in the initial material condition and degree of cold work for one heat. Two cold-rolled (CR) alloy 690 plate heats were also obtained and evaluated enabling comparisons to the CR CRDM materials. Weld metal, overlay and inlay specimens were machined from industry mock ups to provide plant-representative materials for testing. Specimens have been tested for one alloy 152 weld, two alloy 52 welds and three alloy 52M welds. The overlay and inlay specimens were prepared to propagate stress-corrosion cracks from the alloy 182 or 82 material into the more resistant alloy 52M. In all cases, crack extension was monitored in situ by direct current potential drop (DCPD) with length resolution of about +1 µm making it possible to measure extremely low growth rates approaching 5x10-10 mm/s. Most SCC tests were performed at 325-360°C with hydrogen concentrations from 11-29 cc/kg; however, environmental conditions were modified during a few experiments to evaluate the influence of temperature, water chemistry or electrochemical potential on propagation rates. In addition, low-temperature (~50°C) cracking behavior was examined for selected alloy 690 and weld metal specimens. Extensive characterizations have been performed on material microstructures and stress-corrosion cracks by

  3. Sulfide Stress Corrosion Cracking Resistance of Modified ASTM A694 F60 Low Alloy Steel for Subsea Applications

    OpenAIRE

    Stridsklev, Camilla A

    2013-01-01

    The resistance to sulfide stress corrosion cracking (SSC) of modified ASTM A694 F60 low alloy steel, produced by two different manufacturers, was studied by four-point bend-testing. The two materials are named material A and material B in this report. Both materials were tested in two different environments with different severity, one ?sweet-transition region? test and one ?sour service? test. The test conditions were controlled by the H2S partial pressure (pH2S) and pH. These parameters wer...

  4. Potential mechanisms for corrosion and stress corrosion cracking failure of 3013 storage containers composed of 316 stainless steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kolman, D.G.; Butt, D.P.

    1998-03-01

    The degradation of 316 stainless steel (SS) storage container materials is a potential problem for radioactive waste disposition. Container materials will be exposed to significant ionizing radiation, elevated temperatures, embrittling and/or alloying agents (e.g., gallium), chloride-containing compounds (as much as 20 wt% Cl or Cl{sup {minus}}), oxidizing compounds, and a limited quantity of moisture. Additionally, containers will contain welds that have heterogeneous composition due to solute segregation and that may retain significant residual stress. All of the above-listed environmental and material conditions have been shown to be deleterious to material integrity under certain conditions. Unfortunately, the precise conditions within each container and environment is unknown and may vary widely from container to container. Thus, no single test or set of tests will be able mimic the broad range of storage container conditions. Additionally, material behavior cannot be predicted because the synergistic effects of temperature, time, chloride, moisture, sensitization, weldments, salt formation, etc., have not been fully studied. The complexity and uncertainty of storage conditions precludes any detailed recommendations. This document attempts to detail selected previous studies and to suggest some general guidelines for storage of radioactive waste. Because of the voluminous research in this area, this review cannot be considered to be comprehensive. Readers are directed to references that contain detailed reviews of particular processes for more information. Note that the effect of gallium on the degradation of SS storage containers has been discussed elsewhere and will not be discussed here.

  5. Potential mechanisms for corrosion and stress corrosion cracking failure of 3013 storage containers composed of 316 stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The degradation of 316 stainless steel (SS) storage container materials is a potential problem for radioactive waste disposition. Container materials will be exposed to significant ionizing radiation, elevated temperatures, embrittling and/or alloying agents (e.g., gallium), chloride-containing compounds (as much as 20 wt% Cl or Cl-), oxidizing compounds, and a limited quantity of moisture. Additionally, containers will contain welds that have heterogeneous composition due to solute segregation and that may retain significant residual stress. All of the above-listed environmental and material conditions have been shown to be deleterious to material integrity under certain conditions. Unfortunately, the precise conditions within each container and environment is unknown and may vary widely from container to container. Thus, no single test or set of tests will be able mimic the broad range of storage container conditions. Additionally, material behavior cannot be predicted because the synergistic effects of temperature, time, chloride, moisture, sensitization, weldments, salt formation, etc., have not been fully studied. The complexity and uncertainty of storage conditions precludes any detailed recommendations. This document attempts to detail selected previous studies and to suggest some general guidelines for storage of radioactive waste. Because of the voluminous research in this area, this review cannot be considered to be comprehensive. Readers are directed to references that contain detailed reviews of particular processes for more information. Note that the effect of gallium on the degradation of SS storage containers has been discussed elsewhere and will not be discussed here

  6. The influence of environmental variables and irradiation on iodine stress corrosion crack initiation and growth in Zircaloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Variables in the SCC testing technique and the effect of the fast neutron dose appear to explain most of the controversy about the effect of irradiation damage on the SCC behaviour of Zircaloy. On the basis of extensive laboratory testing functions expressing the time for stress corrosion crack (SCC) initiation and the rate of crack propagation at different stresses and temperatures have been worked out. The environmental variables in the SCC test can have a much larger influence on the life-time for autoclaved material than for pickled and sandblasted metal. For irradiated (oxidized) material a ten times increase in the iodine concentration reduced the failure stress from 500 to 250 MPa. By comparing our results with published data it is concluded that the failure stress (after 1-3 hours) is very dependent upon the neutron dose. Neutron damage will raise the stress threshold for doses up to 1020 n/cm2 and thereafter the failure stress is gradually decreased to low values with increasing neutron doses up to 5.1021 n/cm2. (author)

  7. Rendering Caustics on Non-Lambertian Surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Henrik Wann

    1997-01-01

    This paper presents a new technique for rendering caustics on non-Lambertian surfaces. The method is based on an extension of the photon map which removes previous restrictions limiting the usage to Lambertian surfaces. We add information about the incoming direction to the photons and this allow...

  8. Cracks propagation by stress corrosion cracking in conditions of Boiling Water Reactor (BWR); Propagacion de grietas por corrosion bajo esfuerzo en condiciones de reactor de agua hirviente (BWR)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fuentes C, P

    2003-07-01

    This work presents the results of the assays carried out in the Laboratory of Hot Cells of the National Institute of Nuclear Research (ININ) to a type test tube Compact Tension (CT), built in steel austenitic stainless type 304L, simulating those conditions those that it operates a Boiling Water Reactor (BWR), at temperature 288 C and pressure of 8 MPa, to determine the speed to which the cracks spread in this material that is of the one that different components of a reactor are made, among those that it highlights the reactor core vessel. The application of the Hydrogen Chemistry of the Water is presented (HWC) that is one alternative to diminish the corrosion effect low stress in the component, this is gets controlling the quantity of oxygen and of hydrogen as well as the conductivity of the water. The rehearsal is made following the principles of the Mechanics of Elastic Lineal Fracture (LEFM) that considers a crack of defined size with little plastic deformation in the tip of this; the measurement of crack advance is continued with the technique of potential drop of direct current of alternating signal, this is contained inside the standard Astm E-647 (Method of Test Standard for the Measurement of Speed of Growth of Crack by fatigue) that is the one that indicates us as carrying out this test. The specifications that should complete the test tubes that are rehearsed as for their dimensions, it forms, finish and determination of mechanical properties (tenacity to the fracture mainly) they are contained inside the norm Astm E-399, the one which it is also based on the principles of the fracture mechanics. The obtained results were part of a database to be compared with those of other rehearsals under different conditions, Normal Chemistry of the Water (NWC) and it dilutes with high content of O{sub 2}; to determine the conditions that slow more the phenomena of stress corrosion cracking, as well as the effectiveness of the used chemistry and of the method of

  9. Influence of nitrogen on the stress corrosion cracking resistance of austenitic stainless steels in chloride environment; Influence de l'azote sur la resistance a la corrosion sous contrainte d'aciers inoxydables austenitiques en milieu chlorure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Teysseyre, S

    2001-11-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate the influence of nitrogen additions on the Stress Corrosion Cracking (SSC) resistance of austenitic stainless steel in chloride environment. The investigation was carried out in two part: first, an experimental investigation with model industrial steels was carried out and secondly, numerical simulations based on the Corrosion Enhanced Plasticity Model were developed. Both slow strain rate tensile tests and constant load test of the different steels in boiling MgCl{sub 2} (153 deg C) at free potential show that, for a given plastic strain rate, nitrogen addition increases the critical stress for crack initiation without influencing the crack propagation rate. We observed that the creep rate under constant load was affected by the nitrogen content. As a consequence, the SCC behaviour (cracks density and propagation rate) depends on the nitrogen content. We thus confirm that the nitrogen content influences the corrosion - deformation interaction mechanisms via its positive contribution to the flow stress. These experimental results are reproduced semi-quantitatively by means of numerical simulations at the scale of crack. - dislocation interactions. The presence of nitrogen is modelled by an increased lattice friction stress, which in turn affects the dynamics of crack tip shielding by dislocation pile-ups. We conclude that nitrogen addition in austenitic stainless steels increases the SC crack initiation stress in proportion of the increased flow stress, without penalty in terms of SC crack propagation rate. (author)

  10. Effect of high-temperature pre-precipitation on mechanical properties and stress corrosion cracking of Al-Zn-Mg alloys

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李松; 陈康华; 刘红卫; 黄兰萍; 张茁

    2003-01-01

    In order to improve the stress corrosion cracking resistance of the weldable Al-Zn-Mg alloys with medium strength, the near-solvus pre-precipitation following high-temperature solution treatment was performed on LC52 and 7039 aluminum alloys. The effect of the pre-precipitation on the microstructure, age hardening and stress corrosion cracking of LC52 and 7039 alloy was investigated. The results show that the near-solvus pre-precipitation can be limited on grain boundary and can enhance the discontinuity of grain boundary precipitates. The stress corrosion cracking resistance of aged Al-Zn-Mg alloys can be improved with non-deteriorated strength and plasticity via pre-precipitation.

  11. Corrosion Failures in Marine Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Krishnan

    1985-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper gives a brief description of typical marine environments and the most common form of corrosion of materials used in this environment. Some typical case histories of failures pertaining to pitting, bimetallic corrosion, dealloying, cavitation and stress corrosion cracking are illustrated as typical examples of corrosion failures.

  12. Zircaloy-4 stress corrosion by iodine: crack kinetics and influence of irradiation on the crack initiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    During the PWR power transients, iodine-induced stress corrosion cracking (I-SCC) is one of the potential failure modes of Zircaloy-4 fuel claddings under Pellet-Cladding Interaction conditions. The primary objective of this study is to distinguish the parameters that contribute to the I-SCC phenomenon in iodized methanol solutions at ambient temperature, on notched tensile specimens, using crack growth rate measurements provided by Direct Current Potential Drop. The results show that for a KI lower than 20 MPa.m1/2, the IG and mixed IG/TG velocity of propagation is a linear function of KI, regardless of the propagation mode. Between 20 and 25 MPa.m1/2, the TG crack growth rate also depends linearly on KI, but increases at a faster rate with respect to KI than during the IG and mixed IG/TG propagation steps. The crack propagation direction and plane (LT and TL) have an impact on the propagation modes, but no impact on the kinetics. The increase of iodine content induces an increase of the crack growth rate for a given KI, and a decrease of the KI, threshold, allowing the crack propagation. This work enables us to quantify the effect of iodine content and of KI on the crack propagation step, propose a propagation law taking into accounts these parameters, and improve the I-SCC description for models. During operation, a zirconium cladding is neutron-irradiated, modifying its microstructure and deformation modes. The second objective of the study is therefore to investigate the impact of these modifications on I-SCC. For that purpose, smooth specimens in recrystallized Zircaloy-4 are proton-irradiated to 2 dpa at 305 C, the microstructure and deformation modes of unirradiated and irradiated Zircaloy-4 are characterized by TEM and SEM, and the influence of these radiation-induced modifications on the I-SCC susceptibility is studied. The Laves phases precipitates are slightly modified by irradiation. The formation of P-type dislocation loops correlated with radiation

  13. 应力作用下混凝土胀裂前钢筋锈蚀率预测模型%Prediction model for corrosion of steel bars in concrete under stress before corrosion cracking

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    曾严红

    2012-01-01

    It was supposed that steel bars in concrete begin to corrode when concrete cover is entirely carbonized, and the time of corrosion initiation was calculated by carbonation model of concrete under stress proposed through test study. Diffusion coefficient of O2 was educed with diffusion coefficient of CO2 in concrete under stress. The effect of stress on corrosion rate of the steel bar was confirmed by experiment study. Based on the theory of corrosion electrochemistry, prediction model for corrosion of steel bars in concrete under stress before corrosion cracking was presented. The computation model was well verified by a practical engineering project. Significantly severer reinforcement was observed in higher stress concrete zone. It can be contributed to earlier corrosion initiation time and higher corrosion rate for steel bars in concrete under stress.%假设混凝土保护层完全碳化时钢筋开始锈蚀,利用应力状态下混凝土碳化模型,获得应力状态下混凝土中钢筋开始锈蚀时间的计算模型.根据应力状态下混凝土中CO2有效扩散系数得到相应的O2有效扩散系数,并通过外加电流加速锈蚀试验研究了应力状态对钢筋锈蚀速率的影响.最终基于法拉第定律建立了应力状态下混凝土中钢筋锈蚀率的预测模型,并用预测模型计算工程实例.计算结果与实测结果符合较好,同时证明随着应力水平的提高,钢筋开始锈蚀时间提前,锈蚀率加快,最终导致高应力区域锈蚀率明显高于低应力区域.

  14. Stress corrosion cracking of an uranium-6 weight per cent niobium in gaseous oxygen, nitrogen and hydrogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stress corrosion cracking (SCC) of uranium-6 weight per cent niobium alloy is studied in gaseous oxygen at room temperature (for pressures between 4.10-7 and 0.15MPa) and 1000C (pressure of 0.15 MPa) and in gaseous hydrogen (for pressures between 10-6 and 0.15 MPa). SCC map and cracking kinetics are determined as fonctions of stress-intensity factor, pressure and temperature. For oxygen, temperature seems to have no effect on the alloy embrittlement within the range of this study but the pressure influence is more complex. At room temperature, hydrogen pressure less than 0.15 MPa has no influence on the cracking kinetics. For a pressure of 0.15 MPa, fracture occurs by hydriding reaction. Complementary analyses on fracture surfaces lead to propose different mechanics responsible for cracking kinetics in these environments

  15. Effects of heat treatment process on stress corrosion cracking and microstructures of 7A05 Al alloy plate

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CAI Gang-yi; L(U) Guang-shu; MA Zhuang

    2006-01-01

    In order to improve the stress corrosion cracking(SCC) resistance of 7A05Al alloy, four different heat treatment processes were performed. After the heat treatments, the stress corrosion cracking resistance, mechanical properties and microstructures of 7A05Al alloys were studied. The results show that the retrogression and reaging(RRA) treated specimens possess the highest SCC resistance with slightly reduced strength compared with the other specimens. Thus RRA is the best process in terms of the optimal combination of SCC resistance and strength. Further TEM observation reveals that the RRA treated specimens are characterized by the fine equiaxed grains, dispersed second phase and wide PFZ. The pre-aging treated specimens show lower SCC resistance but higher strength as compared with the RRA treated ones. Equiaxed grains are also observed in the pre-aging treated samples by TEM, indicating that the anisotropy is eliminated. However, the dual aging and deformation plus aging treated specimens are demonstrated by large anisotropy.

  16. Preparation Femtosecond Laser Prevention for the Cold-Worked Stress Corrosion Crackings on Reactor Grade Low Carbon Stainless Steel

    CERN Document Server

    John Minehara, Eisuke

    2004-01-01

    We report here that the femtosecond lasers like low average power Ti:Sapphire lasers, the JAERI high average power free-electron laser and others could peel off and remove two stress corrosion cracking (SCC) origins of the cold-worked and the cracking susceptible material, and residual tensile stress in hardened and stretched surface of low-carbon stainless steel cubic samples for nuclear reactor internals as a proof of principle experiment except for the third origin of corrosive environment. Because a 143 °C and 43% MgCl2 hot solution SCC test was performed for the samples to simulate the cold-worked SCC phenomena of the internals to show no crack at the laser-peered off strip on the cold-worked side and ten-thousands of cracks at the non-peeled off on the same side, it has been successfully demonstrated that the femtosecond lasers could clearly remove the two SCC origins and could resultantly prevent the cold-worked SCC.

  17. Study of alloy 600`S stress corrosion cracking mechanisms in high temperature water; Etude des mecanismes de corrosion sous contrainte de l`alliage 600 dans l`eau a haute temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rios, R.

    1994-06-01

    In order to better understand the mechanisms involved in Alloy 600`s stress corrosion cracking in PWR environment, laboratory tests were performed. The influence of parameters pertinent to the mechanisms was studies : hydrogen and oxygen overpressures, local chemical composition, microstructure. The results show that neither hydrogen nor dissolution/oxidation, despite their respective roles in the process, are sufficient to account for experimental facts. SEM observation of micro-cleavage facets on specimens` fracture surfaces leads to pay attention to a new mechanism of corrosion/plasticity interactions. (author). 113 refs., 73 figs., 15 tabs., 4 annexes.

  18. Stress corrosion behavior of T91 steel in static lead-bismuth eutectic at 480 °C

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jing; Jiang, Zhizhong; Tian, Shujian; Huang, Qunying; Liu, Yuejing

    2016-01-01

    The corrosion behavior of stressed C-rings made of martensitic steel T91 was investigated through constant strain tests. The specimens with different initial hoop stresses (0 MPa, 150 MPa and 300 MPa) were exposed to static oxygen saturated lead-bismuth eutectic (LBE) at 480 °C for 500 h, 1000 h and 1500 h, respectively. The results showed that no crack was found on the outer surface of all the specimens after exposure; and the microscopic analysis showed that the specimens were covered with two oxide layers, which included a magnetite outer layer and a Fe-Cr spinel inner layer. The transformation of spinel into magnetite at the spinel/magnetite interface might be promoted by stress, which increased the difference between the thickness of the inner and outer layers. Moreover, the steel loss was estimated by the observed oxide layers; it increased rapidly when the stress was above 300 MPa, and was about 1.3 times of when the stress was absent.

  19. Characterization of microstructure, local deformation and microchemistry in Alloy 690 heat-affected zone and stress corrosion cracking in high temperature water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Zhanpeng; Chen, Junjie; Shoji, Tetsuo; Takeda, Yoichi; Yamazaki, Seiya

    2015-10-01

    With increasing the distance from the weld fusion line in an Alloy 690 heat-affected zone, micro-hardness decreases, kernel average misorientation decreases and the fraction of Σ3 boundaries increases. Chromium depletion at grain boundaries in the Alloy 690 heat-affected zone is less significant than that in an Alloy 600 heat-affected zone. Alloy 690 heat-affected zone exhibits much higher IGSCC resistance than Alloy 600 heat-affected zone in simulated pressurized water reactor primary water. Heavily cold worked Alloy 690 exhibits localized intergranular stress corrosion cracking. The effects of metallurgical and mechanical properties on stress corrosion cracking in Alloy 690 are discussed.

  20. Susceptibility to stress corrosion in stainless steels type AISI 321 and 12X18H10T used in PWR type reactors (WWER)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Titanium stabilized stainless steels have been utilized in sovietic pressurized water reactors (VVER) for avoid the susceptibility to Intergranular Corrosion (IGC) present in other austenitic stainless steels. However the Intergranular Corrosion resistance of this kind of materials has been questioned because of Intergranular Stress Corrosion Cracking failures (IGSCC) have been reported. This paper study the electrochemical behavior of the AISI 321 stainless steel in a H3BO3 Solution contaminated with chlorides and its susceptibility to Intergranular Corrosion.Electrochemical prediction diagrams of the stainless steels AISI 321 and 12X18H10T (sovietic) sensitized (600 Centigrade, 3 h.) were compared. Cylindrical and conical samples were used in Slow Strain Rate Tests (SSRT), to determine the susceptibility to Stress Corrosion Cracking (SCC) in AISI 321 and 12X18H10T stainless steels. The results obtained showed that the temperature of the solution is a very important factor to detect this susceptibility. Fractography studies on the fracture surfaces of the samples obtained in the SSRT at high temperature were realized. Corrosion velocities of both AISI 321 and 12X18H10T stainless steels were determined using conical samples in the CERT system at high temperature. E.D.A.X. analysis was employed in both AISI 321 and 12X18H10T stainless steels in order to explain the degree of sensitization. (Author)

  1. The Efficacy of Mesenchymal Stem Cell Transplantation in Caustic Esophagus Injury: An Experimental Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Murat Kantarcioglu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Ingestion of corrosive substances may lead to stricture formation in esophagus as a late complication. Full thickness injury seems to exterminate tissue stem cells of esophagus. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs can differentiate into specific cell lineages and have the capacity of homing in sites of injury. Aim and Methods. We aimed to investigate the efficacy of MSC transplantation, on prevention of esophageal damage and stricture formation after caustic esophagus injury in rats. 54 rats were allocated into four groups; 4 rats were sacrificed for MSC production. Group 1, untreated controls (n: 10. Group 2, membrane labeled MSCs-treated rats (n: 20. Group 3, biodistribution of fluorodeoxyglucose labeled MSCs via positron emission tomography (PET imaging (n: 10. Group 4, sham operated (n: 10. Standard caustic esophageal burns were created and MSCs were transplanted 24 hours after. All rats were sacrificed at the 21st days. Results. PET scan images revealed the homing behavior of MSCs to the injury site. The histopathology damage score was not significantly different from controls. However, we demonstrated Dil labeled epithelial and muscle cells which were originating from transplanted MSCs. Conclusion. MSC transplantation after caustic esophageal injury may be a helpful treatment modality; however, probably repeated infusions are needed.

  2. Influence of grinding operations on surface integrity and chloride induced stress corrosion cracking of stainless steels

    OpenAIRE

    Zhou, Nian

    2016-01-01

    Stainless steels were developed in the early 20th century and are used where both the mechanical properties of steels and corrosion resistance are required. There is continuous research to allow stainless steel components to be produced in a more economical way and be used in more harsh environments. A necessary component in this effort is to correlate the service performance with the production processes. The central theme of this thesis is the mechanical grinding process.  This is commonly ...

  3. Effect of strain-path on stress corrosion cracking of AISI 304L stainless steel in PWR primary environment at 360 deg. C

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Couvant, T.; Vaillant, F.; Boursier, JM. [EDF R and D - MMC, Route de Sens, 77818 Moret-sur-Loing (France); Delafosse, D. [Ecole des Mines de St-Etienne, 157 Cours Fauriel, 42023 St-Etienne cedex 2 (France)

    2004-07-01

    Austenitic stainless steels (ASS) are widespread in primary and auxiliary circuits of PWR. Moreover, some components suffer stress corrosion cracking (SCC) under neutron irradiation. This degradation could be the result of the increase of hardness or the modification of chemical composition at the grain boundary by irradiation. In order to avoid complex and costly corrosion facilities, the effects of irradiation on the material are commonly simulated by applying a cold work on non-irradiated material prior to stress corrosion cracking tests. Slow strain rate tests were conducted on an austenitic stainless steel (SS) AISI 304L in PWR environment (360 deg. C). Particular attention was directed towards pre-straining effects on crack growth rate (CGR) and crack growth path (CGP). Results have demonstrated that the susceptibility of 304L to SCC in high-temperature hydrogenated water was enhanced by pre-straining. It seemed that IGSCC was enhanced by complex strain paths. (authors)

  4. Stress corrosion cracking of welded joints of super-martensitic stainless steel in H{sub 2}S free environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoerner, Bertrand; Bayle, Bernard; Delafosse, David [Centre Science des Materiaux et des Structures - URA CNRS 5146, ENS Mines de Saint-Etienne, 158 Cours Fauriel, 42023 Saint-Etienne cedex 02 (France); Ligier, Vincent [CRMC, INDUSTEEL Creusot, 56, rue Clemenceau, BP 56 - 71 202 Le Creusot Cedex (France)

    2004-07-01

    Due to their combination of good weldability and good mechanical properties, low carbon super-martensitic stainless steels are good candidates for oil and gas flow line applications. These alloys have already been used in slightly sour environments containing chlorides, CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2}S. The properties of a welded joint whose composition is matching or superduplex that of the base metal are investigated. The base material is the super-martensitic stainless steels medium alloy: 13Cr-4.5Ni-1.5Mo. The Heat Affected Zone (HAZ) of girth welds may be sensitive to stress corrosion cracking and presents distinct features intergranular cracking when tested in four-point bending in a sour deaerated environment at temperatures around 100 deg. C. The electrochemical properties of the medium alloy and the matching welded joint + HAZ were determined in a chloride-containing environment without H{sub 2}S. A passive film is formed on polished samples. This film is less protective for the welded joint + HAZ samples than in the base metal. Moreover, the pitting corrosion resistance is strongly decreased in the HAZ. Slow strain rate tensile tests were conducted in a de-aerated solution without H{sub 2}S. They reproduce the same type of cracking as was observed in four point bending tests in a sour environment: initiation in the HAZ and an intergranular crack with a very brittle aspect and no significant trace of corrosion. The presence H{sub 2}S is not the prevailing factor for the occurrence of cracking. Furthermore, it is not necessary to have a specific surface condition for crack initiation to occur in slow strain rate tension, as it is the case four point bend tests where initiation appears to be controlled by the surface condition (chemical and / or geometrical). Finally, a simulated PWHT strongly increase the resistance to SSC. (authors)

  5. Hydrogen embrittlement and hydrogen induced stress corrosion cracking of high alloyed austenitic materials; Wasserstoffversproedung und wasserstoffinduzierte Spannungsrisskorrosion hochlegierter austenitischer Werkstoffe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mummert, K.; Uhlemann, M.; Engelmann, H.J. [Institut fuer Festkoerper- und Werkstofforschung Dresden e.V. (Germany)

    1998-11-01

    The susceptiblity of high alloyed austenitic steels and nickel base alloys to hydrogen-induced cracking is particularly determined by 1. the distribution of hydrogen in the material, and 2. the microstructural deformation behaviour, which last process is determined by the effects of hydrogen with respect to the formation of dislocations and the stacking fault energy. The hydrogen has an influence on the process of slip localization in slip bands, which in turn affects the microstructural deformation behaviour. Slip localization increases with growing Ni contents of the alloys and clearly reduces the ductility of the Ni-base alloy. Although there is a local hydrogen source involved in stress corrosion cracking, emanating from the corrosion process at the cathode, crack growth is observed only in those cases when the hydrogen concentration in a small zone ahead of the crack tip reaches a critical value with respect to the stress conditions. Probability of onset of this process gets lower with growing Ni content of the alloy, due to increasing diffusion velocity of the hydrogen in the austenitic lattice. This is why particularly austenitic steels with low Ni contents are susceptible to transcrystalline stress corrosion cracking. In this case, the microstructural deformation process at the crack tip is also influenced by analogous processes, as could be observed in hydrogen-loaded specimens. (orig./CB) [Deutsch] Die Empfindlichkeit von hochlegierten austentischen Staehlen und Nickelbasislegierungen gegen wasserstoffinduziertes Risswachstum wird im wesentlichen bestimmt durch 1. die Verteilung von Wasserstoff im Werkstoff und 2. das mikrostrukturelle Verformungsverhalten. Das mikrostrukturelle Deformationsverhalten ist wiederum durch den Einfluss von Wasserstoff auf die Versetzungsbildung und die Stapelfehlerenergie charakterisiert. Das mikrostrukturelle Verformungsverhalten wird durch wasserstoffbeeinflusste Gleitlokalisierung in Gleitbaendern bestimmt. Diese nimmt mit

  6. Interaction of aqueous caustic with acidic oils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chiwetelu, C.I.; Hornof, V.; Neale, G.H. (Univ. of Ottawa, Ottawa, ON (Canada))

    High content of native carboxylic acids make heavy oils acidic. It is generally accepted that these acids react with caustic reagents present in floodwater, resulting in the in-situ formation of surface active soap anions. When these adsorb at the oil-water interface, they can drastically lower the interfacial tension to the point where residual oil is mobilized. The most intriguing aspect of these acid/caustic interactions is the dynamic nature of the interfacial tension. Given a sufficiently long time, the dynamic tension would attain an equilibrium state. Measurements were made of the equilibrium interfacial tensions of acidified oleic phases contacted with a wide range of caustic concentrations in the aqueous phase. A novel measurement technique (photomicropendography) was used, and data analysis was carried out by nonlinear regression. The present approach utilizes pre-selected fatty acids in a defined oleic phase, enabling quantification of relevant model parameters and facilitating evaluation of key variables influencing interfacial activity. The acid ionization constant and the equilibrium constant governing the formation of inactive soap species were found to be the most important parameters for systems of oleic and lauric acids dissolved in hexadecane. Regression analysis showed that the acid dissociation constant (pKa) of oleic acid ranged from 6.2 to 6.9 and was dependent on the working acid concentration. For lauric acid, the pKa values were in the range of 9 to 11 depending on the caustic concentration of the aqueous phase. Species aggregation in both the oleic and aqueous phases is mostly responsible for the variations in pKa values. 30 refs., 10 figs., 4 tabs.

  7. In Situ Causticizing for Black Liquor Gasification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scott Alan Sinquefield

    2005-10-01

    Black liquor gasification offers a number of attractive incentives to replace Tomlinson boilers but it also leads to an increase in the causticizing load. Reasons for this have been described in previous reports (FY04 ERC, et.al.). The chemistries have also been covered but will be reviewed here briefly. Experimental results of the causticizing reactions with black liquor are presented here. Results of the modeling work were presented in detail in the Phase 1 report. They are included in Table 2 for comparison but will not be discussed in detail. The causticizing agents were added to black liquor in the ratios shown in Table 1, mixed, and then spray-dried. The mixture ratios (doping levels) reflect amount calculated from the stoichiometry above to achieve specified conversions shown in the table. The solids were sieved to 63-90 microns for use in the entrained flow reactors. The firing conditions are shown in Table 2. Pictures and descriptions of the reactors can be found in the Phase 1 annual report. Following gasification, the solids (char) was collected and analyzed by coulometric titration (for carbonate and total carbon), and by inductively coupled plasma emission spectroscopy (ICP) for a wide array of metals.

  8. Effect of pH Value on Stress Corrosion Cracking of X70 Pipeline Steel in Acidic Soil Environment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhiyong LIU; Cuiwei DU; Xin ZHANG; Fuming WANG; Xiaogang LI

    2013-01-01

    The effect of pH value on the stress corrosion cracking (SCC) of API X70 pipeline steel in simulated acidic soil solutions was investigated by using slow strain rate test,electrochemical polarization curves,electrochemical impedance spectroscopy,and scanning electron microscopy.pH plays an important role in the susceptibility and electrochemical mechanism of SCC.The pH higher than 5 has no significant effect on electrochemical processes.By contrast,the pH lower than 5 intensifies cathodic hydrogen evolution reactions,thus increasing the cathodic current and corrosion potential.Under different pH values,the SCC mechanism of X70 pipeline steel varies among anodic dissolution (AD),hydrogen embrittlement (HE),and the combination of AD and HE (AD + HE) with variations of applied potential.At-850 mVSCE,the SCC mechanism is HE if pH is less than 4 or AD + HE if pH value is more positive.

  9. Microstructure Characterization and Stress Corrosion Evaluation of Autogenous and Hybrid Friction Stir Welded Al-Cu-Li 2195 Alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhixian; Arbegast, William J.; Meletis, Efstathios I.

    1997-01-01

    Friction stir welding process is being evaluated for application on the Al-Cu-Li 2195 Super-Light Weight External Tank of the Space Transportation System. In the present investigation Al-Cu-Li 2195 plates were joined by autogenous friction stir welding (FSW) and hybrid FSW (friction stir welding over existing variable polarity plasma arc weld). Optical microscopy and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) were utilized to characterize microstructures of the weldments processed by both welding methods. TEM observations of autogenous FSW coupons in the center section of the dynamically-recrystallized zone showed an equiaxed recrystallized microstructure with an average grain size of approx. 3.8 microns. No T(sub 1), precipitates were present in the above-mentioned zone. Instead, T(sub B) and alpha precipitates were found in this zone with a lower population. Alternate immersion, anodic polarization, constant load, and slow strain tests were carried out to evaluate the general corrosion and stress-corrosion properties of autogenous and hybrid FSW prepared coupons. The experimental results will be discussed.

  10. Effect of water purity on intergranular stress corrosion cracking of stainless steel and nickel alloys in BWRs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gordon, B. [Structural Integrity Associates (United States); Garcia, S. [Electric Power Research Institute (United States)

    2011-07-01

    Boiling water reactors (BWRs) operate with very high purity water. While even the utilization of a very low conductivity water (e.g., 0.06 {mu}S/cm) coolant cannot prevent intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC) of sensitized stainless steel and nickel alloys under oxygenated conditions, the presence of certain impurities in the coolant can dramatically increase the probability of this most insidious form of corrosion. The goal of this paper is to present the effect of effect of only a few ionic impurities plus zinc on the IGSCC propensities of BWR stainless steel piping and reactor internals under both oxygenated, i.e., normal water chemistry (NWC) and deoxygenated, i.e., hydrogen water chemistry (HWC) conditions. More specifically, of the numerous impurities identified in the BWR coolant (e.g., lithium, sodium, potassium, silica, borate, chromate, phosphate, sulphate, chloride, nitrate, cuprous, cupric, ferrous, etc.) only strong acid anions sulfate and chloride that are stable in the highly reducing crack tip environment rather than the bulk water conductivity will be discussed in detail. Nitrate will be briefly discussed as representing a species that is not thermodynamically stable in the crack while the effects of zinc is discussed as a deliberate additive to the BWR environment. (authors)

  11. Atmospheric-Induced Stress Corrosion Cracking of Grade 2205 Duplex Stainless Steel—Effects of 475 °C Embrittlement and Process Orientation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cem Örnek

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The effect of 475 °C embrittlement and microstructure process orientation on atmospheric-induced stress corrosion cracking (AISCC of grade 2205 duplex stainless steel has been investigated. AISCC tests were carried out under salt-laden, chloride-containing deposits, on U-bend samples manufactured in rolling (RD and transverse directions (TD. The occurrence of selective corrosion and stress corrosion cracking was observed, with samples in TD displaying higher propensity towards AISCC. Strains and tensile stresses were observed in both ferrite and austenite, with similar magnitudes in TD, whereas, larger strains and stresses in austenite in RD. The occurrence of 475 °C embrittlement was related to microstructural changes in the ferrite. Exposure to 475 °C heat treatment for 5 to 10 h resulted in better AISCC resistance, with spinodal decomposition believed to enhance the corrosion properties of the ferrite. The austenite was more susceptible to ageing treatments up to 50 h, with the ferrite becoming more susceptible with ageing in excess of 50 h. Increased susceptibility of the ferrite may be related to the formation of additional precipitates, such as R-phase. The implications of heat treatment at 475 °C and the effect of process orientation are discussed in light of microstructure development and propensity to AISCC.

  12. Effect of high energy shot peening pressure on the stress corrosion cracking of the weld joint of 304 austenitic stainless steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhiming, Lu, E-mail: lzm@zjut.edu.cn; Laimin, Shi, E-mail: 810050107@qq.com; Shenjin, Zhu, E-mail: 523469865@qq.com; Zhidong, Tang, E-mail: 466054569@qq.com; Yazhou, Jiang, E-mail: 191268219@qq.com

    2015-06-18

    The weld joint of 304 stainless steel is treated using high energy shot peening(HESP) with various shot peening pressures. The grain size and metallographic microstructure of the specimen surface layer are analyzed using the X-ray diffraction method, and the surface hardness is measured. Slow strain rate tension tests are then performed to investigate the effect of shot peening pressure on the stress corrosion sensitivity. The results show that in the surface layer of the specimen, the grain refinement, hardness and the strain-induced plastic deformation all increase with the increasing shot peening pressure. Martensitic transformation is observed in the surface layer after being treated with HESP. The martensite phase ratio is found to increase with increasing shot peening pressure. The result also shows that the effects of the shot peening treatment on the stress corrosion sensitivity index depend on the shot peening pressure. When the shot peening pressure is less than 0.4 MPa, the grain refinement effect plays the main role, and the stress corrosion sensitivity index decreases with the increasing shot peening pressure. In contrast, when the shot peening pressure is higher than 0.4 MPa, the martensite transformation effect plays the main role, the stress corrosion sensitivity index increases with increasing shot peening pressure.

  13. Assessment of the stress corrosion cracking in a chloride medium of cables used in prestressed concrete structures by the acoustic emission technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramadan, S.; Gaillet, L.; Tessier, C.; Idrissi, H.

    2008-11-01

    In this paper, two main types of corrosion, localized corrosion and stress corrosion cracking (SCC) of cables used in prestressed concrete structures, were characterized and identified by acoustic emission (AE) analysis using extracted AE parameters. A novel analysis of the AE parameters using the principal component analysis (PCA) was done to discriminate localized corrosion from SCC. First, K-mean was used as an unsupervised method, and then to validate the clustering analysis k-nearest neighbour was used as a supervised method. The correlations of the AE parameters including amplitude, counts, hits and time were also used to identify corrosion mechanisms. In addition, the corrosion process characteristics of each type were explained by applying the AE signal analysis (time-frequency). Experimental results show the ability of AE to evaluate a crack propagation rate of 10-7 m s-1 in a chloride medium. Microscopic examinations revealed a mixed mode of crack propagation, modes I (shear-like mechanism) and II (cleavage-like mechanism), characterized by a multi-terrace appearance on the fractured steel surface.

  14. Embrittlement and anodic process in stress corrosion cracking: study of the influent micro-mechanical parameters; Fragilisation et processus anodiques en corrosion sous contrainte: etude des parametres micro-mecaniques influents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tinnes, J.Ph

    2006-11-15

    We study the influence of local mechanical parameters on crack propagation in Stress Corrosion Cracking, at the scale of the microstructure. Two systems are compared: the CuAl{sub 9}Ni{sub 3}Fe{sub 2} copper-aluminium alloy in synthetic sea water under cathodic polarization, where the crack propagation mechanism is related to strain-assisted anodic dissolution, and the 316L austenitic stainless steel in MgCl{sub 2} solution, where embrittlement mechanisms related to hydrogen effects prevail. We use micro-notched tensile specimen that allow to study isolated short cracks. These experiments are modelled by means of finite elements calculations, and further characterized by Electron Back scattered Diffraction (EBSD) in the case of the 316L alloy. In terms of the local mechanical parameters that control propagation, fundamental differences are outlined between the two systems. They are discussed from the viewpoint of the available models of Stress Corrosion Cracking. (author)

  15. Effect of cyclic loadings on the stress corrosion crack growth rate in Alloy 600 in PWR primary water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fatigue air pre-cracked Compact Tensile (CT) specimens in Alloy 600 were tested in primary water (325 deg. C) of Pressurized Water Reactors (PWR). In order to assess the effect of cyclic loading on crack growth, CT specimens are tested under constant loadings and low frequencies cyclic loadings: triangular and saw-tooth. Two Alloy 600 materials, with different intrinsic susceptibility to Stress Corrosion Cracking (SCC), are studied. Crack growth rates are monitored in-situ by the direct current potential drop method and are validated by postmortem observations. Fracture surfaces are characterized by macroscopic and microscopic observations. Comparison of the crack growth rate and of the fracture features demonstrated that they depend on the characteristics of the mechanical loading (constant, triangular or sawtooth) and on the material intrinsic sensibility to SCC. (authors)

  16. Finite Element Modeling of Perturbation Fields due to Colonies of Stress Corrosion Cracks(SCCs) in a Gas Transmission Pipeline

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The detection of axial cracks using conventional MFL pig is a significant challenge in the gas pipeline inspection. In this study, a technique using interaction of circumferentially induced torrents with axial stress corrosion crack is presented. The feasibility of this technique is investigated using finite element modeling. Finite element analysis of such interaction is a difficult problem in terms of both computation time and memory requirements. The challenges arise due to the nonlinearity of material properties, the small sire of tight cracks relative to that of the magnetizer, and also time stepping involved in modeling velocity effects. This paper presents an approach based on perturbation methods. The overall analysis procedure is divided into 4 simple steps that can be performed sequentially. Modeling results show that this technique can effectively detect colonies of SCC as well as single SCC

  17. Modeling the initiation of Primary Water Stress Corrosion Cracking in nickel base alloys 182 and 82 of Pressurized Water Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nickel base welds are widely used to assemble components of the primary circuit of Pressurized Water Reactors (PWR) plants. International experience shows an increasing number of Stress Corrosion Cracks (SCC) in nickel base welds 182 and 82 which motivates the development of models predicting the time to SCC initiation for these materials. SCC involves several parameters such as materials, mechanics or environment interacting together. The goal of this study is to have a better understanding of the physical mechanisms occurring at grains boundaries involved in SCC. In-situ tensile test carried out on oxidized alloy 182 evidenced dispersion in the susceptibility to corrosion of grain boundaries. Moreover, the correlation between oxidation and cracking coupled with micro-mechanical simulations on synthetic polycrystalline aggregate, allowed to propose a cracking criterion of oxidized grain boundaries which is defined by both critical oxidation depth and local stress level. Due to the key role of intergranular oxidation in SCC and since significant dispersion is observed between grain boundaries, oxidation tests were performed on alloys 182 and 82 in order to model the intergranular oxidation kinetics as a function of chromium carbides precipitation, temperature and dissolved hydrogen content. The model allows statistical analyses and is embedded in a local initiation model. In this model, SCC initiation is defined by the cracking of the intergranular oxide and is followed by slow and fast crack growth until the crack depth reaches a given value. Simplifying assumptions were necessary to identify laws used in the SCC model. However, these laws will be useful to determine experimental conditions of future investigations carried out to improve the calibration used parameters. (author)

  18. Time exposure studies on stress corrosion cracking of aluminum 2014-T6, 2219-T87, 2014-T651, 7075-T651, and titanium 6Al-4V

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terrell, J.

    1973-01-01

    The effect of a constant applied stress in crack initiation of aluminum 2014-T6, 2219-T87, 2014-T651, 7075-T651 and titanium 6Al-4V has been investigated. Aluminum c-ring specimens (1-inch diameter) and u-band titanium samples were exposed continuously to a 3.5% NaCl solution (pH 7) and organic fluids of ethyl, methyl, and iso-propyl alcohol (reagent purity), and demineralized distilled water. Corrosive action was observed to begin during the first and second day of constant exposure as evidenced by accumulation of hydrogen bubbles on the surface of stressed aluminum samples. However, titanium stressed specimens showed no reactions to its environment. Results of this investigation seems to suggest that aluminum 2014-T6, aluminum 7075-T651 and aluminum 2014-T651 are susceptible to stress corrosion cracking in chloride solution (NaCl), while aluminum 2219-T87 seem to resist stress corrosion cracking in sodium chloride at three levels of stress (25%, 50%, and 75% Y.S.). In organic fluids of methyl, ethyl, and iso-propyl alcohol, 2014-T6 and 7075-T651 did not fail by SCC; but 2014-T651 was susceptible to SCC in methly alcohol, but resistant in ethyl alcohol, iso-propyl alcohol and demineralized distilled water.

  19. Benefits of thread rolling process to the stress corrosion cracking and fatigue resistance of high strength fasteners

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kephart, A.R.; Hayden, S.Z.

    1993-05-01

    Stress corrosion cracking (SCC) behavior of cut (machined) vice thread rolled Alloy X-750 and Alloy 625 fasteners in a simulated high temperature primary water environment has been evaluated. SCC testing at 360 and 338C included 157 small and 40 large 60{degree} Vee thread studs. Thread rolled fasteners had improved resistance relative to cut fasteners. Tests of fatigue resistance in air at room temperature and both air and primary water at 315C were conducted on smaller studs with both cut and rolled threads. Results showed rolled threads can have significantly improved fatigue lives over those of cut threads in both air and primary water. Fasteners produced by two different thread rolling methods, in-feed (radial) and through-feed (axial), revealed similar SCC initiation test results. Testing of thread rolled fasteners revealed no significant SCC or fatigue growth of rolling induced thread crest laps typical of the thread rolling process. While fatigue resistance differed between the two rolled thread supplier`s studs, neither of the suppliers studs showed SCC initiation at exposure times beyond that of cut threads with SCC. In contrast to rolling at room temperature, warm rolled (427C) threads showed no improvement over cut threads in terms of fatigue resistance. The observed improved SCC and fatigue performance of rolled threads is postulated to be due to interactive factors, including beneficial residual stresses in critically stressed thread root region, reduction of plastic strains during loading and formation of favorable microstructure.

  20. Stress Corrosion Cracking of SA-543 High-Strength Steel in All-Volatile Treatment Boiler Feed Water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rihan, R.; Basha, M.; Al-Meshari, A.; Bayramov, A.; van Zyl, G.; Dafalla, H.; Mohamed, A. I.

    2015-10-01

    Susceptibility of SA-543 steel, its welds (with and without stress relief treatment), and the heat-affected zone (HAZ) to stress corrosion cracking (SCC) was investigated in de-aerated and aerated boiler feed water subjected to the all-volatile treatment (AVT-BFW), and distilled water at 275 °C using the slow strain rate testing (SSRT) technique. The SSRT specimens were tested at three extension rates (3.50 × 10-6, 9.00 × 10-6, and 7.50 × 10-5 mm/s) using a novel SCC testing rig capable of testing at high temperatures and pressures. There are no significant differences in the time-to-failure among the four tested specimens. The elongation of the specimens at the time of failure is in the range of 10-23%. The reduction of the cross-sectional area of the failed specimens is large (45-77%) and the absence of any signs of intergranular propagation in fractured specimens, determined by scanning electron microscopy, indicates that the failure is due to mechanical load and not due to SCC. Dissolved oxygen does not affect the susceptibility of the specimens to SCC, which could be due to the inhibition effect of the test solution. SA-543 steel as the base metal, its welds (with and without stress relief treatment), and the HAZ are suitable for use in hot AVT-BFW and distilled water.

  1. Finite element model for expansive stress due to corrosion of reinforced concrete structures; Analisis con elemento finito de los esfuerzos expansivos por corrosion en las estructuras de concreto reforzado

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Castorena Gonzalez, J.H.; Calderon Guillen, J.A. [Universidad Autonoma de Sinaloa, Los Mochis, Sinaloa (Mexico)]. E-mail: kstor28@yahoo.com.mx; cajoel_99@yahoo.com; Almeraya Calderon, F.; Gaona Tiburcio, C. [Centro de Investigacion en Materiales Avanzados, S.C., Chihuahua, Chihuahua (Mexico)]. E-mail: facundo.almeraya@cimav.edu.mx; citlalli.gaona@cimav.edu.mx; Almaral Sanchez, J.L. [Universidad Autonoma de Sinaloa, Los Mochis, Sinaloa (Mexico)]. E-mail: jalmaral@gmail.com; Martinez Villafane, A. [Centro de Investigacion en Materiales Avanzados, S.C., Chihuahua, Chihuahua (Mexico)]. E-mail: martinez.villafane@cimav.edu.mx

    2011-01-15

    The corrosion in the reinforcement steel is a problem that diminishes the useful life of reinforced concrete structures, reside committing its structural security. In the available models to estimate the mechanical effect of the corrosion, it is assumed that the corroded steel, through the oxides that grow to its surroundings, exercises a pressure on the surrounding concrete supposing a problem of plane stress or plane strain. In this work, the problem is modeled with three-dimensional finite element starting from an experiment on a subjected cylinder to accelerated corrosion, with strain gage to measure the pressure indirectly in the interface steel-concrete. From the results obtained it can be concluded that the effect of the length of corroded steel, anodic length, has a significant effect on the magnitude of the pressure in the interface steel-concrete, fact that can be used to improve the existing models. [Spanish] La corrosion en el acero de refuerzo es un problema que disminuye la vida util en las estructuras de concreto reforzado, ademas de comprometer su seguridad estructural. En los modelos disponibles para estimar el efecto mecanico de la corrosion, se supone que el acero corroido, a traves de los oxidos que crecen a su alrededor, ejercen una presion sobre el concreto circundante suponiendo un problema de esfuerzos o deformaciones planas, En el presente trabajo, se modela el problema con elemento finito tridimensional a partir de un experimento sobre un cilindro de concreto reforzado sometido a corrosion acelerada, instrumentado para medir indirectamente la presion en la interfase acero-concreto. De los resultados obtenidos se concluye que el efecto de la longitud de acero corroido, longitud anodica, tiene un efecto significativo sobre la magnitud de la presion en la interfase acero-concreto, hecho que puede ser utilizado para mejorar los modelos existentes.

  2. The influence of modified water chemistries on metal oxide films, activity build-up and stress corrosion cracking of structural materials in nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The primary coolant oxidises the surfaces of construction materials in nuclear power plants. The properties of the oxide films influence significantly the extent of incorporation of actuated corrosion products into the primary circuit surfaces, which may cause additional occupational doses for the maintenance personnel. The physical and chemical properties of the oxide films play also an important role in different forms of corrosion observed in power plants. This report gives a short overview of the factors influencing activity build-up and corrosion phenomena in nuclear power plants. Furthermore, the most recent modifications in the water chemistry to decrease these risks are discussed. A special focus is put on zinc water chemistry, and a preliminary discussion on the mechanism via which zinc influences activity build-up is presented. Even though the exact mechanisms by which zinc acts are not yet known, it is assumed that Zn may block the diffusion paths within the oxide film. This reduces ion transport through the oxide films leading to a reduced rate of oxide growth. Simultaneously the number of available adsorption sites for 60Co is also reduced. The current models for stress corrosion cracking assume that the anodic and the respective cathodic reactions contributing to crack growth occur partly on or in the oxide films. The rates of these reactions may control the crack propagation rate and therefore, the properties of the oxide films play a crucial role in determining the susceptibility of the material to stress corrosion cracking. Finally, attention is paid also on the novel techniques which can be used to mitigate the susceptibility of construction materials to stress corrosion cracking. (orig.)

  3. Detection of stress corrosion cracks in reactor pressure vessel and primary coolant system anchor studs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Under Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) contract No. 2179-2, southwest Research Institute is continuing work on the use of the cylindrically guided wave technique (CGWT) for inspecting stud bolts. Also being evaluated is the application of the CGWT to the inspection of reactor coolant pump shafts. Data have been collected for stud bolts ranging from 16 to 112 inches (40.6 to 285 cm) in length, and from 1 to 4.5 inches (2.54 to 11.4 cm) in diameter. For each bolt size, tests were conducted to determine the smallest detectable notch, the effect of thread noise, and the amount of detectable simulated corrosion. The ratio of reflected longitudinal signals to mode-converted signals was analyzed with respect to bolt diameter, bolt length, and frequency parameters. The results of these test showed the following: (1) The minimum detectable notch in the threaded region was approximately 0.05 inch (1.3 mm) for all stud bolts evaluated. (2) Thread noise could easily be detected, but the level of noise was below the minimum detectable notch signal. (3) For carbon steel, optimum transducer frequency was 5 MHz, using a transducer whose face had an impedance that matched the steel surface. (4) Simulated corrosion of 15% reduced diameter could be detected

  4. Time exposure studies on stress corrosion cracking of aluminum 2014-T6, aluminum 7075-T651, and titanium 6Al-4V

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terrell, J.

    1972-01-01

    The effect of a constant applied stress in crack initiation of aluminum 2014-T6, 7075-T651 and titanium 6A1-4V has been investigated. Aluminum c-ring specimens (1-inch diameter) and u-band titanium samples were exposed continuously to a 3.5% NaCl solution (pH 6) and organic fluids of ethyl, methyl, and iso-propyl alcohol (reagent purity). Corrosive action was observed to begin during the first and second day of constant exposure as evidenced by accumulation of hydrogen bubbles on the surface of stressed aluminum samples. However, a similar observation was not noted for titanium stressed specimens. Results of this investigation seems to suggest that aluminum 2014-T6, aluminum 7075-T651 are susceptible to stress corrosion cracking in chloride solution (NaCl); while they (both alloys) seem to resist stress corrosion cracking in methyl alcohol, ethyl alcohol, iso-propyl alcohol, and demineralized distilled water. Titanium 6A1-4V showed some evidence of susceptibility to SCC in methanol, while no such susceptibility was exhibited in ethanol, iso-propyl alcohol and demineralized distilled water.

  5. Detection of stress corrosion cracks in reactor pressure vessel and primary coolant system anchor studs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This chapter describes a new technique for the detection of cracks in long studs without heater holes. The cylindrically guided wave technique (CGWT) can be used for the detection of small cracks occurring at the far end of long studs and corrosion wastage along the length of the studs. The CGWT is based on the fact that an ultrasonic wave traveling in a long cylinder becomes guided by the geometry of the cylinder. Two conventional techniques used in nuclear power plants to inspect studs with heater holes are discussed. It is determined that for short studs with relatively large critical crack sizes, conventional 0-degree longitudinal inspection is adequate. For long studs with heater holes, the shear wave angle beam inspection technique in which the search unit is inserted into the heater hole is adequate. The CGWT should be used for flaws smaller than critical size located at the end of these studs

  6. H2S Stress Corrosion Test Research of the Spiral Welded Pipe%螺旋焊管H2S应力腐蚀的试验研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王树人

    2001-01-01

    Through the spiral welded pipe H2S stress corrosion testresearch, the article gives out H2S stress corrosion resistance methods of the spiral welded pipe, and proposes some suggestion on the development of China H2S stress corrosion.%通过对螺旋焊管H2S应力腐蚀试验研究,提出了螺旋焊管抗H2S应力腐蚀的几种途径,并对我国H2S应力腐蚀的发展提出了一些建议。

  7. Radiation induced microstructure, strain localization and iodine-induced stress corrosion cracking in proton-irradiated zircaloy-4

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Serres, A.; Fournier, L. [CEA Saclay, DEN/DMN/SEMI/LCMI, Gif-Sur-Yvette Cedex (France); Was, G.S. [Univ. of Michigan, Dept. of Nuclear Engineering and Radiological Sciences, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States)

    2007-07-01

    The radiation-induced microstructure, strain localization, and iodine-induced stress corrosion cracking (I-SCC) behaviour of Zircaloy-4 proton-irradiated to 2 dpa at 305{sup o}C was examined. type dislocation loops having 1/3<1120> Burgers vector and a mean diameter and density of respectively 10 nm and 17x10{sup 21} m{sup -3} were observed while no Zr(Fe,Cr){sub 2} precipitates amorphization and Fe redistribution were detected after irradiation. Basal channels were almost exclusively imaged after transverse tensile testing to 0.5% plastic strain at a strain rate of 10{sup -5} s{sup -1} and room temperature. Statistical Schmid factor analysis suggests that irradiation leads to a change in slip system activation from prismatic to basal due to a higher increase of critical resolved shear stresses for prismatic and pyramidal slip systems than for basal slip system. Comparative constant elongation rate tensile tests performed at a strain rate of 10{sup -5} s{sup -1} in iodized methanol solutions at room temperature on specimens both unirradiated and proton-irradiated to 2 dpa demonstrated a detrimental effect of irradiation on I-SCC. (author)

  8. Radiation induced microstructure, strain localization and iodine-induced stress corrosion cracking in proton-irradiated zircaloy-4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The radiation-induced microstructure, strain localization, and iodine-induced stress corrosion cracking (I-SCC) behaviour of Zircaloy-4 proton-irradiated to 2 dpa at 305oC was examined. type dislocation loops having 1/3 Burgers vector and a mean diameter and density of respectively 10 nm and 17x1021 m-3 were observed while no Zr(Fe,Cr)2 precipitates amorphization and Fe redistribution were detected after irradiation. Basal channels were almost exclusively imaged after transverse tensile testing to 0.5% plastic strain at a strain rate of 10-5 s-1 and room temperature. Statistical Schmid factor analysis suggests that irradiation leads to a change in slip system activation from prismatic to basal due to a higher increase of critical resolved shear stresses for prismatic and pyramidal slip systems than for basal slip system. Comparative constant elongation rate tensile tests performed at a strain rate of 10-5 s-1 in iodized methanol solutions at room temperature on specimens both unirradiated and proton-irradiated to 2 dpa demonstrated a detrimental effect of irradiation on I-SCC. (author)

  9. Arrhenius-Type Constitutive Model for High Temperature Flow Stress in a Nickel-Based Corrosion-Resistant Alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, L.; Liu, F.; Cheng, J. J.; Zuo, Q.; Chen, C. F.

    2016-04-01

    Hot deformation behavior of Nickel-based corrosion-resistant alloy (N08028) was studied in compression tests conducted in the temperature range of 1050-1200 °C and the strain rate range of 0.001-1 s-1. The flow stress behavior and microstructural evolution were observed during the hot deformation process. The results show that the flow stress increases with deformation temperature decreasing and strain rate increasing, and that the deformation activation energy ( Q) is not a constant but increases with strain rate increasing at a given strain, which is closely related with dislocation movement. On this basis, a revised strain-dependent hyperbolic sine constitutive model was established, which considered that the "material constants" in the original model vary as functions of the strain and strain rate. The flow curves of N08028 alloy predicted by the proposed model are in good agreement with the experimental results, which indicates that the revised constitutive model can estimate precisely the flow curves of N08028 alloy.

  10. AN ASSESSMENT OF THE SERVICE HISTORY AND CORROSION SUSCEPTIBILITY OF TYPE IV WASTE TANKS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiersma, B

    2008-09-18

    Type IV waste tanks were designed and built to store waste that does not require auxiliary cooling. Each Type IV tank is a single-shell tank constructed of a steel-lined pre-stressed concrete tank in the form of a vertical cylinder with a concrete domed roof. There are four such tanks in F-area, Tanks 17-20F, and four in H-Area, Tanks 21-24H. Leak sites were discovered in the liners for Tanks 19 and 20F in the 1980's. Although these leaks were visually observed, the investigation to determine the mechanism by which the leaks had occurred was not completed at that time. Therefore, a concern was raised that the same mechanism which caused the leak sites in the Tanks in F-area may also be operable in the H-Area tanks. Data from the construction of the tanks (i.e., certified mill test reports for the steel, no stress-relief), the service history (i.e., waste sample data, temperature data), laboratory tests on actual wastes and simulants (i.e., electrochemical testing), and the results of the visual inspections were reviewed. The following observations and conclusions were made: (1) Comparison of the compositional and microstructural features indicate that the A212 material utilized for construction of the H-Area tanks are far more resistant to SCC than the A285 materials used for construction of the F-Area tanks. (2) A review of the materials of construction, temperature history, service histories concluded that F-Area tanks likely failed by caustic stress corrosion cracking. (3) The environment in the F-Area tanks was more aggressive than that experienced by the H-Area tanks. (4) Based on a review of the service history, the H-Area tanks have not been exposed to an environment that would render the tanks susceptible to either nitrate stress corrosion cracking (i.e., the cause of failures in the Type I and II tanks) or caustic stress corrosion cracking. (5) Due to the very dilute and uninhibited solutions that have been stored in Tank 23H, vapor space corrosion

  11. Test report - caustic addition system operability test procedure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This Operability Test Report documents the test results of test procedure WHC-SD-WM-OTP-167 ''Caustic Addition System Operability Test Procedure''. The Objective of the test was to verify the operability of the 241-AN-107 Caustic Addition System. The objective of the test was met

  12. Effect Mo Addition on Corrosion Property and Sulfide Stress Cracking Susceptibility of High Strength Low Alloy Steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Woo Yong; Koh, Seong Ung; Kim, Kyoo Young [Pohang University of Science and Technology, Pohang (Korea, Republic of)

    2005-04-15

    The purpose of this work is to understand the effect of Mo addition on SSC susceptibility of high strength low alloy steels in terms of microstructure and corrosion property. Materials used in this study are high strength low alloy (HSLA) steels with carbon content of 0.04wt% and Mo content varying from 0.1 to 0.3wt%. The corrosion property of steels was evaluated by immersion test in NACE-TM01-77 solution A and by analyzing the growth behavior of surface corrosion products. SSC resistance of steels was evaluated using constant load test. Electrochemical test was performed to investigate initial corrosion rate. Addition of Mo increased corrosion rate of steels by enhancing the porosity of surface corrosion products. however, corrosion rate was not directly related to SSC susceptibility of steels

  13. Stress corrosion cracking of 13% Cr martensitic steels in sodium chloride solutions in the presence of thiosulphate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The stress corrosion cracking (SCC) susceptibility of 13% Cr martensitic (UNS S42000) and supermartensitic (UNS S41125) steels in sodium chloride solutions in the presence of thiosulphate was evaluated by slow strain rate tests (SSRT). The tests were performed in 5% sodium chloride solutions buffered at pH 2.7, 3.5, 4.5 and 6.0 in the absence and presence of thiosulphate in a concentration range between 10-6 and 10-3 M, at 25 ± 0.1 C. The electrochemical behaviour of the two steels in the different solutions was determined by recording the anodic and cathodic polarisation curves. 13% Cr martensitic steel showed SCC in 5% sodium chloride solutions with pH ≤ 4.5 in the presence of 3 x 10-6 thiosulphate. Decreasing the chloride ion concentration from 50 to 10 g/l, the critical concentration of thiosulphate to provoke SCC susceptibility increased from 3 x 10-6 to 1 x 10-5 M. The resistance to SCC of the supermartensitic steel was higher than that of the martensitic steel. The critical concentration of thiosulphate to induce SCC on the supermartensitic steel were 1 x 10-5 M at pH 2.7 and 1 x 10-4 M at pH 3.5. At pH ≥ 4.5 the supermartensitic steel did not crack. The anodic and cathodic polarisation curves evidenced the influence of the thiosulphate on the corrosion and the activation effect on the steels. The SCC of the two steels was attributed to hydrogen embrittlement produced by sulphur and hydrogen sulphide formed by dismutation and reduction of thiosulphate. (orig.)

  14. Mitigation of stress corrosion cracking in pressurized water reactor (PWR) piping systems using the mechanical stress improvement process (MSIP{sup R)} or underwater laser beam welding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rick, Grendys; Marc, Piccolino; Cunthia, Pezze [Westinghouse Electric Company, LLC, New York (United States); Badlani, Manu [Nu Vision Engineering, New York (United States)

    2009-04-15

    A current issue facing pressurized water reactors (PWRs) is primary water stress corrosion cracking (PWSCC) of bi metallic welds. PWSCC in a PWR requires the presence of a susceptible material, an aggressive environment and a tensile stress of significant magnitude. Reducing the potential for SCC can be accomplished by eliminating any of these three elements. In the U.S., mitigation of susceptible material in the pressurizer nozzle locations has largely been completed via the structural weld overlay (SWOL) process or NuVision Engineering's Mechanical Stress Improvement Process (MSIP{sup R)}, depending on inspectability. The next most susceptible locations in Westinghouse designed power plants are the Reactor Vessel (RV) hot leg nozzle welds. However, a full SWOL Process for RV nozzles is time consuming and has a high likelihood of in process weld repairs. Therefore, Westinghouse provides two distinctive methods to mitigate susceptible material for the RV nozzle locations depending on nozzle access and utility preference. These methods are the MSIP and the Underwater Laser Beam Welding (ULBW) process. MSIP applies a load to the outside diameter of the pipe adjacent to the weld, imposing plastic strains during compression that are not reversed after unloading, thus eliminating the tensile stress component of SCC. Recently, Westinghouse and NuVision successfully applied MSIP on all eight RV nozzles at the Salem Unit 1 power plant. Another option to mitigate SCC in RV nozzles is to place a barrier between the susceptible material and the aggressive environment. The ULBW process applies a weld inlay onto the inside pipe diameter. The deposited weld metal (Alloy 52M) is resistant to PWSCC and acts as a barrier to prevent primary water from contacting the susceptible material. This paper provides information on the approval and acceptance bases for MSIP, its recent application on RV nozzles and an update on ULBW development.

  15. Standard Practice for Use of Mattsson's Solution of pH 7.2 to Evaluate the Stress- Corrosion Cracking Susceptibility of Copper-Zinc Alloys

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2011-01-01

    1.1 This practice covers the preparation and use of Mattsson's solution of pH 7.2 as an accelerated stress-corrosion cracking test environment for brasses (copper-zinc base alloys). The variables (to the extent that these are known at present) that require control are described together with possible means for controlling and standardizing these variables. 1.2 This practice is recommended only for brasses (copper-zinc base alloys). The use of this test environment is not recommended for other copper alloys since the results may be erroneous, providing completely misleading rankings. This is particularly true of alloys containing aluminum or nickel as deliberate alloying additions. 1.3 This practice is intended primarily where the test objective is to determine the relative stress-corrosion cracking susceptibility of different brasses under the same or different stress conditions or to determine the absolute degree of stress corrosion cracking susceptibility, if any, of a particular brass or brass component ...

  16. The evaluation of tribo-corrosion synergy for WC-Co hardmetals in low stress abrasion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gant, A.J.; Gee, M.G.; May, A.T. [National Physics Lab., Teddington (United Kingdom)

    2004-03-01

    WC-based hardmetals are materials that are widely used in applications where abrasion resistance is required. This paper describes the results of tests that were performed using a modified ASTM G65 rubber wheel test system incorporating an abrasive (silica sand) and media (sulphuric acid, deionised water, and calcium hydroxide solution). The first of these media was used in order to simulate conditions found in ash disposal equipment found in coal-fired power stations. The calcium hydroxide solution was intended to simulate conditions found in forming tools used in the manufacture of ceramic roofing tiles. Under very acidic conditions (pH 1.1), undermining of WC grains by binder dissolution appeared to be the rate-governing step in determining volume loss. Under mildly acidic conditions (pH 2.6 and 6.3) there was more evidence of WC grain fracture and correspondingly less of binder dissolution. Exposure to the alkali (pH 13 Ca(OH){sub 2} solution) caused the least wear. Results were correlated with physical and microstructural and parameters commonly used for quality assurance in the hardmetal industry. Corrosion-abrasion synergies were also evaluated using the same test rig in conjunction with the respective acidic solutions, but omitting the silica sand. These results are complemented by SEM examination of wear surfaces and of metallographically polished cross-sections of wear surfaces, and by bend strength evaluation of samples after simultaneous exposure to the various media and silica sand and the media in isolation.

  17. Effect of heat treatment on the stress corrosion resistance of a microalloyed pipeline steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Albarran, J.L. [UNAM, Inst. de Fisica, Cuernavaca (Mexico); Martinez, L. [UNAM, Inst. de Fisica, Cuernavaca (Mexico)]|[U.A.C., Programa de Corrosion del Golfo de Mexico (Mexico); Lopez, H.F. [Wisconsin Univ., Materials Dept., Milwaukee, WI (United States)

    1999-11-01

    In this work, the effect of heat treating on a pipeline steel exposed to a sulfide stress cracking (SSC) environment was investigated using LEFM compact specimens. In the as-received condition, specimens with crack orientations parallel and normal to the rolling direction were exposed to H{sub 2}S saturated synthetic sea water at an applied stress intensity (K{sub 1}) of 30 MPa{center_dot}m{sup 1/2}. In both cases, crack propagation rates were very close to each other (da/dt = 8.77 x 10{sup -9}m/s). as the microstructure was modified by heat treating, the rates of crack growth exhibited appreciable differences under similar applied stress intensities. In the martensitic (as-quenched) condition, crack growth was relatively fast (da/dt = 4.72 x 10{sup -7}m/s) indicating severe hydrogen embrittlement. In the water sprayed, and in the quenched and tempered conditions, the LEFM specimens exhibited crack arrest events. This, in turn, enabled the determination of threshold stress intensity values (K{sub issc}) for the water sprayed, and for the quenched and tempered conditions of 26 and 32 MPa{center_dot}m{sup 1/2}, respectively. In addition, favourable paths for microcrack growth were found to be provided by globular inclusions and grain boundary precipitates. (Author)

  18. The stress corrosion cracking behaviour of heat-treated Al-Zn-Mg-Cu alloy in modified salt spray fog testing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Onoro, J. [Ingenieria y Ciencia de los Materiales, Universidad Politecnica de Madrid, ETS Ingenieros Industriales, Madrid (Spain)

    2010-02-15

    The stress corrosion cracking behaviour of 7075 (Al-Zn-Mg-Cu) alloy have been studied in a salt spray fog chamber with two vapourised aqueous solutions (0 and 5% NaCl). The paper analyses the stress corrosion resistance of 7075 aluminium alloy with several precipitation-ageing heat treatments. The results are compared with that obtained in 3.5% NaCl aqueous solution at 20 C. The salt spray fog testing has permitted a good evaluation of SCC susceptibility in 7075 alloy. All temper conditions studied were susceptible to SCC in the different environments tested. 7075-T6 temper was the most susceptible, while in all the cases studied 7075-T73 temper was the least susceptible. Compared to 7075-T6, 7075-RRA temper improved the resistance against the SCC process, but the mechanical properties obtained were lower. (Abstract Copyright [2010], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  19. The study of stress application and corrosion cracking on Ni–16 Cr–9 Fe (Alloy 600) C-ring samples by polychromatic X-ray microdiffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Microscopic strains associated with stress corrosion cracks have been investigated in stressed C-rings of Ni–16 Cr–9 Fe (Alloy 600) boiler tubing. Polychromatic X-ray microdiffraction was used to measure deviatoric strain tensors and the distribution of dislocations near cracks that had been propagated in electrochemically accelerated corrosion tests. An associated investigation of the C-ring-induced strains prior to corrosion showed significant tensile strain in the stress axis direction by the torsional closure of the alloy tube section in the C-ring test. Significant grain lattice rotation and pronounced plastic strain at some grain boundaries were noted. Stress-corrosion-cracking-generated intergranular cracks were produced in two Alloy 600 specimens after 6 h and 18 h tests. The diffraction patterns and resultant strain tensors were mapped around the cracked area to a 1 μm spatial resolution. The strain tensor transverse to the crack growth direction showed tensile strain at the intergranular region just ahead of the crack tip for both specimens. Both cracks were found to follow grain boundary pathways that had the lowest angle of misorientation. Dislocation distributions within each grain were qualitatively obtained from the shapes of the diffraction spots and the effect of “hard” and “soft” grains on the crack pathway was explored for both 6 h and 18 h specimens. The Schmid factor of one of the grains adjacent to the crack at the 6 h and 18 h initiation sites was found to be the lowest, compared to Schmid factors calculated for surface grains away from the initiation site, and also along the crack path into the bulk.

  20. The Influence of Composition upon Surface Degradation and Stress Corrosion Cracking of the Ni-Cr-Mo Alloys in Wet Hydrofluoric Acid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crook, P; Meck, N S; Rebak, R B

    2006-12-04

    At concentrations below 60%, wet hydrofluoric acid (HF) is extremely corrosive to steels, stainless steels and reactive metals, such as titanium, zirconium, and tantalum. In fact, only a few metallic materials will withstand wet HF at temperatures above ambient. Among these are the nickel-copper (Ni-Cu) and nickel-chromium-molybdenum (Ni-Cr-Mo) alloys. Previous work has shown that, even with these materials, there are complicating factors. For example, under certain conditions, internal attack and stress corrosion cracking (SCC) are possible with the Ni-Cr-Mo alloys, and the Ni-Cu materials can suffer intergranular attack when exposed to wet HF vapors. The purpose of this work was to study further the response of the Ni-Cr-Mo alloys to HF, in particular their external corrosion rates, susceptibility to internal attack and susceptibility to HF-induced SCC, as a function of alloy composition. As a side experiment, one of the alloys was tested in two microstructural conditions, i.e. solution annealed (the usual condition for materials of this type) and long-range ordered (this being a means of strengthening the alloy in question). The study of external corrosion rates over wide ranges of concentration and temperature revealed a strong beneficial influence of molybdenum content. However, tungsten, which is used as a partial replacement for molybdenum in some Ni-Cr-Mo alloys, appears to render the alloys more prone to internal attack. With regard to HF-induced SCC of the Ni-Cr-Mo alloys, this study suggests that only certain alloys (i.e., those containing tungsten) exhibit classical SCC. It was also discovered that high external corrosion rates inhibit HF-induced SCC, presumably due to rapid progression of the external attack front. With regard to the effects of long-range ordering, these were only evident at the highest test temperatures, where the ordered structure exhibited much higher external corrosion rates than the annealed structure.

  1. Corrosion of two kinds of cast steels containing chromium in hot concentrated alkaline

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Wei; LIU Jun-quan; TU Xiao-hui

    2007-01-01

    A typical hot concentrated alkaline corrosion environment exists in alumina metallurgical industry, so that steel materials with outstanding alkaline corrosion resistance are strongly demanded for its processing equipment. In this paper, the corrosion resistance of two kinds of martensitic cast steels containing chromium in static 303 g/L NaOH alkaline solution at 85℃ was studied through polarization and potential-time curves, corrosion weight loss and corrosion morphology analysis. Experimental results showed that protection effect by passive film of cast steel containing Cr was temporary. The low carbon steel without Cr content also exhibited chemical passivity in the same solution. The corrosion mode of the tested Cr-containing cast steel was composed of active dissolving corrosion and caustic embrittlement cracking. Dissolving corrosion was the primary mechanism for the induced weight loss, while severe caustic embrittlement cracking was secondary. With the increase of chromium content in the cast steel, the tendency of the caustic embrittlement cracking decreased, while the active dissolving corrosion increased.

  2. Corrosion of two kinds of cast steels containing chromium in hot concentrated alkaline

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LI Wei

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available A typical hot concentrated alkaline corrosion environment exists in alumina metallurgical industry, so that steel materials with outstanding alkaline corrosion resistance are strongly demanded for its processing equipment. In this paper, the corrosion resistance of two kinds of martensitic cast steels containing chromium in static 303g/L NaOH alkaline solution at 85℃ was studied through polarization and potential-time curves, corrosion weight loss and corrosion morphology analysis. Experimental results showed that protection effect by passive film of cast steel containing Cr was temporary. The low carbon steel without Cr content also exhibited chemical passivity in the same solution. The corrosion mode of the tested Cr-containing cast steel was composed of active dissolving corrosion and caustic embrittlement cracking. Dissolving corrosion was the primary mechanism for the induced weight loss, while severe caustic embrittlement cracking was secondary. With the increase of chromium content in the cast steel, the tendency of the caustic embrittlement cracking decreased, while the active dissolving corrosion increased.

  3. Corrosion evaluation technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Uh Chul; Han, Jeong Ho; Nho, Kye Ho; Lee, Eun Hee; Kim, Hong Pyo; Hwang, Seong Sik; Lee, Deok Hyun; Hur, Do Haeng; Kim, Kyung Mo

    1997-09-01

    A multifrequency ACPD system was assembled which can measure very small crack. Stress corrosion cracking test system with SSRT operating high temperature was installed. Stress corrosion cracking test of newly developed alloy 600 and existing alloy 600 was carried out in steam atmosphere of 400 deg C. No crack was observed in both materials within a test period of 2,000 hrs. Corrosion fatigue test system operating at high temperature was installed in which fatigue crack was measured by CDPD. Lead enhanced the SCC of the Alloy 600 in high temperature water, had a tendency to modify a cracking morphology from intergranular to transgranular. Pit initiation preferentially occurred at Ti-rich carbide. Resistance to pit initiation decreased with increasing temperature up to 300 deg C. Test loop for erosion corrosion was designed and fabricated. Thin layer activation technique was very effective in measuring erosion corrosion. Erosion corrosion of a part of secondary side pipe was evaluated by the Check Family Codes of EPRI. Calculated values of pipe thickness by Check Family Codes coincided with the pipe thickness measured by UT with an error of {+-} 20%. Literature review on turbine failure showed that failure usually occurred in low pressure turbine rotor disc and causes of failure are stress corrosion cracking and corrosion fatigue. (author). 12 refs., 20 tabs., 77 figs.

  4. 铝合金结构件应力腐蚀裂纹机理分析%Analysis on Stress Corrosion Crack Mechanisms of Aluminum Alloy Structure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王雁涛; 杨钿

    2013-01-01

    There exist large amount of residual stresses when aluminum alloy structures of electronic equipments are welded and installed.Furthermore,stress corrosion cracks on the structures may emerge due to long period of working under serious corrosion environment,which makes the structure strength and impermeability severely drop.The causes for stress corrosion cracks of the aluminum alloy structures were analyzed.Some process control and improvement measures were put forward.%舰船电子装备铝合金结构件在焊接加工、安装中余留了大量应力,并且长期工作于恶劣的腐蚀环境,导致出现应力腐蚀裂纹,使结构件强度或密闭性严重降低.分析了应力腐蚀裂纹发生的原因,提出了工艺控制及改进的措施.

  5. Stress Corrosion of Carbon Steel in Three Different Atmospheric Environments%碳钢在三种大气环境中的应力腐蚀

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    曹公望; 王振尧; 刘雨薇; 汪川

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT:Objective To research the stress corrosion failure of No.45 and Q235 carbon steels in different kinds of atmospheric environments. Methods No.45 and Q235 carbon steels were used to prepare U-shape samples and tensile samples. The corrosion test in atmospheric exposure for three years was conducted in atmospheric environment in Wanning, Jiangjin and Xishuangbanna. The rust layer depth analysis and the tensile failure analysis were performed to investigate the stress corrosion of carbon steel in different atmospheric environments. Results The u-shaped sample under the influence of the tensile stress in the three kinds of atmospheric environment had different depth of corrosion pits. Strength of extension had declined in a short period of time and failured in Wanning atmospheric environment, while it declined slowly in xishuangbanna and Jiangjin atmospheric environment. Conclusion Due to difference inatmospheric contaminants, the corrosion degree varied for U-shape samples under the influence of tensile stress. The tensile strength of tensile samples was periodically decreased during the process of corrosion.%目的:研究45#碳钢和Q235碳钢在不同大气环境中的应力腐蚀失效。方法将45#碳钢和Q235碳钢制备成U型样和拉伸试样,分别在万宁、江津和西双版纳三种大气环境下进行为期3年的暴露试验,利用截面锈层深度分析和拉伸断裂分析两种手段,分析两种碳钢在不同大气环境下的应力腐蚀行为。结果拉应力影响下的U型样在三种大气环境中出现了不同深度的腐蚀坑。拉伸试样在万宁大气环境下短时间内抗拉强度急剧下降并失效,在西双版纳和江津大气环境下抗拉强度缓慢下降。结论在拉应力影响下U型样的腐蚀进程随大气污染物的不同,腐蚀程度不同,拉伸试样的抗拉强度随腐蚀进程的发展而呈周期性衰减。

  6. The influence of Zn nanoparticle treatment on the stress corrosion cracking resistance of the 304 stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this study, Zn nanoparticles as protective agent of PWSCC were synthesized by the method of plasma discharge in aqueous solution. The superior properties of this method are the high rate of reaction and no requirements of thermal and pressure owing to the high active species generated during discharge. Also, this method does not employ any chemical agent when nanoparticle was synthesized in solution. The synthesized Zn nanoparticles in solution were applied for the treatment of 304 stainless steel at simulated pressurized water reactor (PWR) environment (300 .deg. C, 150 bar). The Zn nanoparticles were successfully synthesized using the method of plasma discharge in aqueous solution. After the Zn nanoparticles treatment, the spinel structure was formed at the surface of the 304 stainless steel specimens, which contained the ZnCr2O4. SCC generation time was delayed after the Zn nanoparticles treatment under residual stress and corrosive environment, and this method could be applicable for the prevention of SCC in the PWR in nuclear power plants

  7. STRESS CORROSION CRACK GROWTH RESPONSE FOR ALLOY 152/52 DISSIMILAR METAL WELDS IN PWR PRIMARY WATER

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toloczko, Mychailo B.; Olszta, Matthew J.; Overman, Nicole R.; Bruemmer, Stephen M.

    2015-08-15

    As part of ongoing research into primary water stress corrosion cracking (PWSCC) susceptibility of alloy 690 and its welds, SCC tests have been conducted on alloy 152/52 dissimilar metal (DM) welds with cracks positioned with the goal to assess weld dilution and fusion line effects on SCC susceptibility. No increased crack growth rate was found when evaluating a 20% Cr dilution zone in alloy 152M joined to carbon steel (CS) that had not undergone a post-weld heat treatment (PWHT). However, high SCC crack growth rates were observed when the crack reached the fusion line of that material where it propagated both on the fusion line and in the heat affected zone (HAZ) of the carbon steel. Crack surface and crack profile examinations of the specimen revealed that cracking in the weld region was transgranular (TG) with weld grain boundaries not aligned with the geometric crack growth plane of the specimen. The application of a typical pressure vessel PWHT on a second set of alloy 152/52 – carbon steel DM weld specimens was found to eliminate the high SCC susceptibility in the fusion line and carbon steel HAZ regions. PWSCC tests were also performed on alloy 152-304SS DM weld specimens. Constant K crack growth rates did not exceed 5x10-9 mm/s in this material with post-test examinations revealing cracking primarily on the fusion line and slightly into the 304SS HAZ.

  8. Influence of localized deformation on A-286 austenitic stainless steel stress corrosion cracking in PWR primary water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Irradiation-assisted stress corrosion cracking (IASCC) of austenitic stainless steels is known to be a critical issue for structural components of nuclear reactor cores. The deformation of irradiated austenitic stainless steels is extremely heterogeneous and localized in deformation bands that may play a significant role in IASCC. In this study, an original approach is proposed to determine the influence of localized deformation on austenitic stainless steels SCC in simulated PWR primary water. The approach consists in (i) performing low cycle fatigue tests on austenitic stainless steel A-286 strengthened by γ' precipitates Ni3(Ti,Al) in order to shear and dissolve the precipitates in intense slip bands, leading to a localization of the deformation within and in (ii) assessing the influence of these γ'-free localized deformation bands on A-286 SCC by means of comparative CERT tests performed on specimens with similar yield strength, containing or not γ'-free localized deformation bands. Results show that strain localization significantly promotes A-286 SCC in simulated PWR primary water at 320 and 360 C. Moreover, A-286 is a precipitation-hardening austenitic stainless steel used for applications in light water reactors. The second objective of this work is to gain insights into the influence of heat treatment and metallurgical structure on A-286 SCC susceptibility in PWR primary water. The results obtained demonstrate a strong correlation between yield strength and SCC susceptibility of A-286 in PWR primary water at 320 and 360 C. (author)

  9. Gravity-driven instabilities: interplay between state-and-velocity dependent frictional sliding and stress corrosion damage cracking

    CERN Document Server

    Faillettaz, Jerome; Funk, Martin

    2009-01-01

    We model the progressive maturation of a heterogeneous mass towards a gravity-driven instability, characterized by the competition between frictional sliding and tension cracking, using array of slider blocks on an inclined basal surface, which interact via elastic-brittle springs. A realistic state- and rate-dependent friction law describes the block-surface interaction. The inner material damage occurs via stress corrosion. Three regimes, controlling the mass instability and its precursory behavior, are classified as a function of the ratio $T_c/T_f$ of two characteristic time scales associated with internal damage/creep and with frictional sliding. For $T_c/T_f \\gg 1$, the whole mass undergoes a series of internal stick and slip events, associated with an initial slow average downward motion of the whole mass, and progressively accelerates until a global coherent runaway is observed. For $T_c/T_f \\ll 1$, creep/damage occurs sufficiently fast compared with nucleation of sliding, causing bonds to break, and ...

  10. Effect of Travel Speed on the Stress Corrosion Behavior of Friction Stir Welded 2024-T4 Aluminum Alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wen; Li, Tianqi; Wang, Kuaishe; Cai, Jun; Qiao, Ke

    2016-05-01

    The effect of travel speed on stress corrosion cracking (SCC) behavior of friction stir welded 2024-T4 aluminum alloy was investigated by slow strain rate tensile test. Microstructure and microhardness of the welded joint were studied. The results showed that the size of second phase particles increased with increasing travel speed, and the distribution of second phase particles was much more homogeneous at lower travel speed. The minimum microhardness was located at the boundary of nugget zone and thermomechanically affected zone. In addition, the SCC susceptibility of the friction stir welded joint increased with the increase of travel speed, owing to the size and distribution of second phase particles in the welds. The anodic applied potentials of -700, -650, -600 mV, and cathodic applied potential of -1200 mV facilitated SCC while the cathodic applied potential of -1000 mV improved the SCC resistance. The SCC behavior was mainly controlled by the metal anodic dissolution at the open circuit potential, and hydrogen accelerated metal embrittlement.

  11. Effects of applied potential on the stress corrosion cracking behavior of 7003 aluminum alloy in acid and alkaline chloride solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiao-yan; Song, Ren-guo; Sun, Bin; Lu, Hai; Wang, Chao

    2016-07-01

    Potentiodynamic polarization tests and slow strain rate test (SSRT) in combination with fracture morphology observations were conducted to investigate the stress corrosion cracking (SCC) behavior of 7003 aluminum alloy (AA7003) in acid and alkaline chloride solutions under various applied potentials ( E a). The results show that AA7003 is to a certain extent susceptible to SCC via anodic dissolution (AD) at open-circuit potential (OCP) and is highly susceptible to hydrogen embrittlement (HE) at high negative E a in the solutions with pH levels of 4 and 11. The susceptibility increases with negative shift in the potential when E a is less than -1000 mV vs. SCE. However, the susceptibility distinctly decreases because of the inhibition of AD when E a is equal to -1000 mV vs. SCE. In addition, the SCC susceptibility of AA7003 in the acid chloride solution is higher than that in the alkaline solution at each potential. Moreover, the effect of hydrogen on SCC increases with increasing hydrogen ion concentration.

  12. US NRC-Sponsored Research on Stress Corrosion Cracking Susceptibility of Dry Storage Canister Materials in Marine Environments - 13344

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    At a number of locations in the U.S., spent nuclear fuel (SNF) is maintained at independent spent fuel storage installations (ISFSIs). These ISFSIs, which include operating and decommissioned reactor sites, Department of Energy facilities in Idaho, and others, are licensed by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) under Title 10 of the Code of Federal Regulations, Part 72. The SNF is stored in dry cask storage systems, which most commonly consist of a welded austenitic stainless steel canister within a larger concrete vault or overpack vented to the external atmosphere to allow airflow for cooling. Some ISFSIs are located in marine environments where there may be high concentrations of airborne chloride salts. If salts were to deposit on the canisters via the external vents, a chloride-rich brine could form by deliquescence. Austenitic stainless steels are susceptible to chloride-induced stress corrosion cracking (SCC), particularly in the presence of residual tensile stresses from welding or other fabrication processes. SCC could allow helium to leak out of a canister if the wall is breached or otherwise compromise its structural integrity. There is currently limited understanding of the conditions that will affect the SCC susceptibility of austenitic stainless steel exposed to marine salts. NRC previously conducted a scoping study of this phenomenon, reported in NUREG/CR-7030 in 2010. Given apparent conservatisms and limitations in this study, NRC has sponsored a follow-on research program to more systematically investigate various factors that may affect SCC including temperature, humidity, salt concentration, and stress level. The activities within this research program include: (1) measurement of relative humidity (RH) for deliquescence of sea salt, (2) SCC testing within the range of natural absolute humidity, (3) SCC testing at elevated temperatures, (4) SCC testing at high humidity conditions, and (5) SCC testing with various applied stresses. Results

  13. Assessment of ultrasonic techniques for characterization of stress corrosion cracks in SG partition stubs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sartre, B.; Banchet, J. [AREVA NP, Saint-Marcel (France); Moras, D.; Bastin, P. [Intercontrole, Rungis (France); Beroni, C. [EDF/CEIDRE, Saint-Denis (France)

    2006-07-01

    Studies by EDF and AREVA NP on Inconel zones have identified the Inconel 600 partition stubs of steam generators as potential areas of SCC, on the hot leg side. Decision was made to perform an expert assessment using ultrasonic testing (UT) techniques to be applied on the whole area of the stub showing penetrant testing (PT) techniques indications. UT techniques, probes and tools were then developed for that purpose. The aim is to size shallow defects, sizing capacity being maintained for defects propagated to a half-thickness. Although no formal qualification was required, the development was performed in view of a performance demonstration. Three mock-ups were manufactured by AREVA NP: two welded mock-ups with machined defects, surface condition and geometry representative of the ''envelope'' of situations likely to be found on the SG; one mock-up, with representative corrosion cracks Development was carried out in two phases: development of techniques and specification of probes and tooling, then development of tools, industrialization of probes, development of procedures, personnel training and performance demonstration. The basic inspection relied on TOFDT, with a contact probe; frequencies, PCS and dimensions were optimised using the results from the mock-ups. Three sets of transducers were defined: a HF transducer for flaw sizes close to the critical size, another HF transducer, with lower PCS for smaller defects, both transducers for material whose permeability was equivalent to that of the mock-ups; anticipating less permeable materials, a MF probe was added. Tests having shown that these transducers did not cover the whole plate thickness, a back-up phased-array probe was selected to scan the plate beyond halfthickness. For a better access under the TSP, a focused transducer was also added to complete the previous set. All of these transducers were operated in immersion, with the same tool: a COBRA type arm which positioned the probes

  14. Preconceptual Design Description for Caustic Recycle Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sevigny, Gary J.; Poloski, Adam P.; Fountain, Matthew S.; Kurath, Dean E.

    2008-04-12

    The U.S. Department of Energy plans to vitrify both high-level and low-activity waste at the Hanford Site in southeastern Washington State. One aspect of the planning includes a need for a caustic recycle process to separate sodium hydroxide for recycle. Sodium is already a major limitation to the waste-oxide loading in the low-activity waste glass to be vitrified at the Waste Treatment Plant, and additional sodium hydroxide will be added to remove aluminum and to control precipitation in the process equipment. Aluminum is being removed from the high level sludge to reduce the number of high level waste canisters produced. A sodium recycle process would reduce the volume of low-activity waste glass produced and minimize the need to purchase new sodium hydroxide, so there is a renewed interest in investigating sodium recycle. This document describes an electrochemical facility for recycling sodium for the WTP.

  15. ERG review of salt constitutive law, salt stress determinations, and salt corrosion and modeling studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Engineering Review Group (ERG) was established by the Office of Nuclear Waste Isolation (ONWI) to help evaluate engineering-related issues in the US Department of Energy's nuclear waste repository program. The August 1983 meeting of the ERG reviewed a RE/SPEC technical report containing a review of eight constitutive laws that have been proposed to model the creep of salt over the ranges of stress and temperature anticipated in a nuclear repository. This report documents the ERG's comments and recommendations on this subject and the ONWI responses to the specific points raised by the ERG

  16. Environmental Degradation of Materials: Surface Chemistry Related to Stress Corrosion Cracking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwarz, J. A.

    1985-01-01

    Parallel experiments have been performed in order to develop a comprehensive model for stress cracking (SCC) in structural materials. The central objective is to determine the relationship between the activity and selectivity of the microstructure of structural materials to their dissolution kinetics and experimentally measured SCC kinetics. Zinc was chosen as a prototype metal system. The SCC behavior of two oriented single-crystal disks of zinc in a chromic oxide/sodium sulfate solution (Palmerton solution) were determined. It was found that: (1) the dissolution rate is strongly (hkil)-dependent and proportional to the exposure time in the aggressive environment; and (2) a specific slip system is selectively active to dissolution under applied stress and this slip line controls crack initiation and propagation. As a precursor to potential microgrvity experiments, electrophoretic mobility measurements of zinc particles were obtained in solutions of sodium sulfate (0.0033 M) with concentrations of dissolved oxygen from 2 to 8 ppm. The equilibrium distribution of exposed oriented planes as well as their correlation will determine the particle mobility.

  17. Corrosion and cleaning aspects of sodium side crevices in components of LMFBR's

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Although the presence of crevices is excluded in critical areas of sodium components by design, their occurrence in other areas cannot be eliminated completely. During the lifetime of a component high concentrations of sodium compounds, such as caustics, may be formed in crevices. These compounds can remain within the crevices for some time. In this respect the following situations are recognized: - Reaction products from initial contaminants such as oxide scales. The component with crevices containing oxide scale either from the manufacturing process or insufficient cleaning after water pressure testing is exposed to sodium during actual operation. - Reaction products formed during or after cleaning. Sodium in the crevices of a drained component reacts with water vapour or water during cleaning or during subsequent storing or handling under non-perfect conditions. Before refilling with sodium the component is heated to preheat temperature. Same situation as above, however the component is exposed to sodium at operating temperature. These cycles can be repeated several times. - Products from a small sodium-water reaction. Caustic products from a small sodium-water reaction may be present in crevices or dead ends of a component which is exposed to high temperature during sodium operation or during vacuum distillation. The aims of the investigations are: determination of the corrosive aspects of high concentration of caustic reaction products of sodium in crevices on the structural materials of the component; comparison of the effectiveness of different cleaning procedures in respect to removal of sodium from crevices, e.g. water, steam, alcohol cleaning, vacuum distillation. Concerning the first item, in particular the possibility of the occurrence of intercrystalline corrosion and stress corrosion cracking is investigated. Materials investigated are the Cr-Mo steels 2 1/4Cr1Mo stabilized with Nb, 9Cr1Mo, 12Cr1Mo and the austenitic stainless steal AISI 304. The

  18. Recommendations for analysis of stress corrosion in pipe systems exposed to thermohydraulic transients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Transient thermohydraulic events often control the design of piping systems in nuclear power plants. Water hammers due to valve closure, pressure transients caused by steam collapse and pipe break all result in structural loads that are characterised by a high frequency content. What also characterises these pressures/forces is the specific spatial and time dependence that is acting on the piping system and found in the wave propagation in the contained fluid. The aim with this project has been to develop recommendations for analysis of the stress response in piping systems subjected to thermohydraulic transients. Basis for this work is that the so called two-step-method is applied and that the structural response is calculated with modal superposition. Derived analysis criteria are based on the assumption that the associated volume strain energy in the wave propagation for the contained fluid may be well defined by a parameter, here called εPN. The stress response in the piping system is assumed to be completely determined with certain accuracy for that part of the volume strain energy in the wave propagation associated with this parameter. A comprehensive work has been done to determine the accuracy in loadings calculated with RELAP5. Properties such as period elongation and associated spurious oscillations in the pressure wave transient have been investigated. Furthermore, has the characteristics of the artificial numerical damping in RELAP5 been identified. Based on desired accuracy of the thermohydraulic analysis together with knowledge about the duration of the thermohydraulic perturbation, the lowest upper frequency limit fPipe, in the modal base that is required for the structure model is calculated. With perturbation is meant such as a valve closure. According to suggested criteria and with the upper frequency limit set, the essential parameters i) largest size of the elements in the structure model and ii) the largest applicable time step in the

  19. Report of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission Piping Review Committee. Volume 1. Investigation and evaluation of stress corrosion cracking in piping of boiling water reactor plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1984-08-01

    IGSCC in BWR piping is occurring owing to a combination of material, environment, and stress factors, each of which can affect both the initiation of a stress-corrosion crack and the rate of its subsequent propagation. In evaluating long-term solutions to the problem, one needs to consider the effects of each of the proposed remedial actions. Mitigating actions to control IGSCC in BWR piping must be designed to alleviate one or more of the three synergistic factors: sensitized material, the convention BWR environment, and high tensile stresses. Because mitigating actions addressing each of these factors may not be fully effective under all anticipated operating conditions, mitigating actions should address two and preferably all three of the causative factors; e.g., material plus some control of water chemistry, or stress reversal plus controlled water chemistry.

  20. Report of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission Piping Review Committee. Volume 1. Investigation and evaluation of stress corrosion cracking in piping of boiling water reactor plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    IGSCC in BWR piping is occurring owing to a combination of material, environment, and stress factors, each of which can affect both the initiation of a stress-corrosion crack and the rate of its subsequent propagation. In evaluating long-term solutions to the problem, one needs to consider the effects of each of the proposed remedial actions. Mitigating actions to control IGSCC in BWR piping must be designed to alleviate one or more of the three synergistic factors: sensitized material, the convention BWR environment, and high tensile stresses. Because mitigating actions addressing each of these factors may not be fully effective under all anticipated operating conditions, mitigating actions should address two and preferably all three of the causative factors; e.g., material plus some control of water chemistry, or stress reversal plus controlled water chemistry

  1. 起落架用300M超高强度钢应力腐蚀分析与防护%Analysis and Protection of Stress Corrosion of 300M Ultra-high Strength Steel for Landing Gear

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨永; 张宏明; 吴朝华; 张敏; 蔚海清

    2016-01-01

    Objective To study the protection measures against stress corrosion of 300M ultra-high strength steel for landing gear. Methods The mechanism of stress corrosion cracking of 300M ultra-high strength steel for landing gear was analyzed. Results According to the effects of the source of stress and the stress corrosion environment on the landing gear, optimization was conducted from aspects of the manufacturing process, the surface stress state and the surface treatment methods of the material. Conclusion The stress corrosion resistance of landing gear was improved, and the prevention measures against stress corrosion of landing gear were summarized.%目的 研究起落架用300M超高强度钢的应力腐蚀防护措施.方法 分析起落架用300M超高强度钢应力腐蚀开裂的机理.结果 针对应力源和应力腐蚀环境对起落架的影响,从材料的制造工艺、表面应力状态和表面处理方法 方面进行优化.结论 提高了起落架的抗应力腐蚀能力,并对起落架的防应力腐蚀措施进行总结.

  2. Corrosion fatigue in high-alloy steels. Investigations for better dimensioning of components under corrosion fatigue stress in aqueous media; Schwingungsrisskorrosion hochlegierter Staehle. Untersuchungen zur verbesserten Dimensionierung von Bauteilen unter Schwingungsrisskorrosionsbelastung (SwRK) in waessrigen Medien

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ellermeier, J.; Depmeier, L.

    2002-07-01

    A comparative analysis was made of five high-alloy steels under corrosion fatigue stress, i.e. a superaustenite (1.3974), an austenite (1.4404), a duplex steel (1.4462), a superduplex steel (1.4501), and a martensitic chromium steel (1.4548). The investigations comprised mechanical-technological analyses, electrochemical analyses without mechanical stress, and investigations of corrosion fatigue resistance and fatigue-induced cavitation resistance. The analyses were carried out in passivating 20 percent nitric acid, activating 3 percent solution of sodium thiosulfate, and in passivity-maintaining artificial sea water according to DIN 50905. Reference experiments were made in acid-free spindle oil to show the fatigue behaviour without corrosion. Their results will serve as reference data for assessing the chemical and electrochemical damage component. (orig.) [German] Im Rahmen des Forschungsprojektes wurden fuenf hochlegierte Staehle fuer zyklisch hochbeanspruchte Bauteile auf ihre Schwingungsrisskorrosionsbestaendigkeit vergleichend untersucht. Als Staehle wurden ein Superaustenit (1.3974), ein Austenit (1.4404), ein Duplexstahl (1.4462), ein Superduplexstahl (1.4501) und ein martensitischer Chromstahl (1.4548) ausgewaehlt. An diesen fuenf Staehlen wurden zuerst mechanisch-technologische Untersuchungen, elektrochemische Untersuchungen ohne mechanische Beanspruchung und Untersuchungen hinsichtlich der Schwingungsrisskorrosionsbestaendigkeit sowie der Schwingungskavitationsbestaendigkeit untersucht. Die elektrochemischen Untersuchungen sowie die Untersuchungen zur Schwingungsrisskorrosionsbestaendigkeit und zur Schwingungskavitationsbestaendigkeit wurden in passivierender 10% Salpetersaeure, aktivierender 3% Natriumthiosulfatloesung und in passivitaetserhaltendem kuenstlichem Meerwasser nach DIN 50905 geprueft. Als Referenzmedium wurden die gleichen Versuche in saeurefreiem Spindeloel durchgefuehrt. Die Versuche in saeurefreiem Spindeloel beschreiben das

  3. Effect of heating and cooling rate of test solution on stress corrosion cracking of austenitic stainless steels in high temperature water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effect of the heating and cooling rate of test solutions on stress corrosion cracking of austenitic stainless steels in high temperature water was studied in a static autoclave by using U-bended specimens. The results obtained are summarized as follows. (1) Slow heating to a test temperature of 1500C to 3000C made stainless steels more liable to cause cracking during the heating process than rapid heating to this temperature. Increasing the susceptibility of alloys to cracking and/or corrosivity of the test medium increased the critical rate of heating to cause cracking during the heating process. (2) The cooling rate, on the other hand, showed no effect on cracking. (3) No crack was caused during heating to 2300C not only by rapid heating (1400C/hr) but also by slow heating (700C/hr). However, the time to cracking at a test temperature of 2300C was also affected by heating rate of the solution. A slower heating rate resulted in a shorter time to cracking. (4) Cracking was caused by repeating heating and cooling cycles even though the heating rate was rapid enough not to cause cracks during one cycle of heating and cooling. (5) The effect of the heating rate on cracking was only observed at the temperature higher than 1800C. (6) The heating rate of the test solution must be controlled precisely to obtain accurate stress corrosion data. (author)

  4. Test report - 241-AN-274 Caustic Pump Control Building

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paintner, G.P.

    1995-05-01

    This Acceptance Test Report documents the test results of test procedure WHC-SD-WM-ATP-135 `Acceptance Test Procedure for the 241-AN- 274 Caustic Pump Control Building.` The objective of the test was to verify that the 241-AN-274 Caustic Pump Control Building functions properly based on design specifications per applicable H-2-85573 drawings and associated ECN`s. The objective of the test was met.

  5. Corrosion of Metal-Matrix Composites with Aluminium Alloy Substrate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Bobic

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available The corrosion behaviour of MMCs with aluminium alloy matrix was presented. The corrosion characteristics of boron-, graphite-, silicon carbide-, alumina- and mica- reinforced aluminium MMCs were reviewed. The reinforcing phase influence on MMCs corrosion rate as well as on various corrosion forms (galvanic, pitting, stress corrosion cracking, corrosion fatique, tribocorrosion was discussed. Some corrosion protection methods of aluminium based MMCs were described

  6. Dynamic study of passive layers formed on stainless steels in chloride environment. Correlation with stress corrosion behaviour - influence of some alloying elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This research thesis reports the study of the nature and stability of passive films formed on stainless steels in chloride solutions in order to predict the conditions under which some forms of localized corrosion may occur. It aims at understanding the influence of surface preparation, of temperature, of strain rate, and, above all, of alloying elements on the reconstruction kinetics of the passive film after a disturbance induced by a mechanical action. After a discussion of the various techniques used to study passive films, and of their results, the author presents the experimental method (potentiostatic test and mechanical de-passivation test) and the obtained results which are then interpreted, more particularly in terms of influence of alloying elements (nickel, molybdenum, copper, titanium, austeno-ferritic steel). Correlations are established between the dynamic behaviour of passive films formed on the studied steels, and their sensitivity to stress corrosion cracking

  7. Origins of Negative Strain Rate Dependence of Stress Corrosion Cracking Initiation in Alloy 690, and Intergranular Crack Formation in Thermally Treated Alloy 690

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Young Suk; Kim, Sung Soo

    2016-07-01

    We show that enhanced stress corrosion cracking (SCC) initiation in cold-rolled Alloy 690 with decreasing strain rate is related to the rate of short-range ordering (SRO) but not to the time-dependent corrosion process. Evidence for SRO is provided by aging tests on cold-rolled Alloy 690 at 623 K and 693 K (350 °C and 420 °C), respectively, which demonstrate its enhanced lattice contraction and hardness increase with aging temperature and time, respectively. Secondary intergranular cracks formed only in thermally treated and cold-rolled Alloy 690 during SCC tests, which are not SCC cracks, are caused by its lattice contraction by SRO before SCC tests but not by the orientation effect.

  8. Origins of Negative Strain Rate Dependence of Stress Corrosion Cracking Initiation in Alloy 690, and Intergranular Crack Formation in Thermally Treated Alloy 690

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Young Suk; Kim, Sung Soo

    2016-09-01

    We show that enhanced stress corrosion cracking (SCC) initiation in cold-rolled Alloy 690 with decreasing strain rate is related to the rate of short-range ordering (SRO) but not to the time-dependent corrosion process. Evidence for SRO is provided by aging tests on cold-rolled Alloy 690 at 623 K and 693 K (350 °C and 420 °C), respectively, which demonstrate its enhanced lattice contraction and hardness increase with aging temperature and time, respectively. Secondary intergranular cracks formed only in thermally treated and cold-rolled Alloy 690 during SCC tests, which are not SCC cracks, are caused by its lattice contraction by SRO before SCC tests but not by the orientation effect.

  9. A comparing study of alloy 600 and alloy 690 on resistance to intergranular stress corrosion cracking(IGSCC)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In order to compare the effect of senitization on the intergranular stress corrosion cracking(IGSCC) between Alloy 600 and Alloy 690, these alloys have been sensitized for 1 to 100 hours at 700 .deg. C. The degree of sensitization(DOS) has evaluated by the ratio of Ir(the maximum current density at anodic scan) to Ia(the maximum current density at reverse scan) in the modified double loop EPR(electrochemical potentiokinetic reactivation) test in 0.01M H2SO4 + 0.0001M KSCN at 25 .deg. C and at scan rate of 0.5mV/sec. The susceptibility to IGSCC has been measured in 0.01M Na2S4O6 solution using CERT(constant extension rate tester) at strain rate of 1.0 x 10-6S-1. With increasing sensitization time the DOS of Alloy 600 increases to the maximum value at 5 hours and decreases gradually due to the replenishment of Cr to the Cr-depleted grain boundaries. For Alloy 600 samples except those sensitized for less than 1 hour, the DOS measured by the modified EPR test parallel to susceptibility to IGSCC revealed by the ratio of strain to failure (εf, Na2S4O6/εf, Air). It appears that the susceptibility to IGSCC is closely associated with the depth in Cr-depleted concentration profile across grain boundary. For the sensitized Alloy 690 samples exhibited extremely low value of Ir/Ia less than 0.074% and also were immune to IGSCC. The good resistance of Alloy 690 to IGSCC is considered to be attributed to the higher Cr concentration to avoid serious Cr-depletion problems adjacent to grain boundary

  10. Assessment of susceptibility of Type 304 stainless steel to intergranular stress corrosion cracking in simulated Savannah River Reactor environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC) of Type 304 stainless steel rate tests (CERT) of specimens machined was evaluated by constant extension from Savannah River Plant (SRP) decontaminated process water piping. Results from 12 preliminary CERT tests verified that IGSCC occurred over a wide range of simulated SRP envirorments. 73 specimens were tested in two statistical experimental designs of the central composite class. In one design, testing was done in environments containing hydrogen peroxide; in the other design, hydrogen peroxide was omitted but oxygen was added to the environment. Prediction equations relating IGSCC to temperature and environmental variables were formulated. Temperature was the most important independent variable. IGSCC was severe at 100 to 120C and a threshold temperature between 40C and 55C was identified below which IGSCC did not occur. In environments containing hydrogen peroxide, as in SRP operation, a reduction in chloride concentration from 30 to 2 ppB also significantly reduced IGSCC. Reduction in sulfate concentration from 50 to 7 ppB was effective in reducing IGSCC provided the chloride concentration was 30 ppB or less and temperature was 95C or higher. Presence of hydrogen peroxide in the environment increased IGSCC except when chloride concentration was 11 ppB or less. Actual concentrations of hydrogen peroxide, oxygen and carbon dioxide did not affect IGSCC. Large positive ECP values (+450 to +750 mV Standard Hydrogen Electrode (SHE)) in simulated SRP environments containing hydrogen peroxide and were good agreement with ECP measurements made in SRP reactors, indicating that the simulated environments are representative of SRP reactor environments. Overall CERT results suggest that the most effective method to reduce IGSCC is to reduce chloride and sulfate concentrations

  11. Effect of two impurities and zinc on stress corrosion cracking of stainless steel and nickel alloys in BWR environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boiling water reactors (BWRs) operate with very high purity water with only small additions of dissolved hydrogen and, most recently, noble metals. However, even operation with very low conductivity water (e.g., 0.07 μS/cm) coolant will not prevent intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC) of sensitized stainless steel and nickel alloys under atypical oxygenated conditions. The presence of certain impurities dissolved in the coolant can dramatically increase the propensity of this most insidious form of environmentally-assisted cracking. The goal of this paper is to present the effect of effect of chloride and sulfate plus zinc on the IGSCC propensities of BWR piping and reactor internals under both oxygenated, i.e., normal water chemistry (NWC) and deoxygenated, i.e., hydrogen water chemistry (HWC) conditions. While it is well documented the sulfate and chloride are particularly aggressive in promoting IGSCC of BWR structural materials, several anions such as chromate and nitrate have little impact while of zinc added as zinc oxide appears to be beneficial. To emphasize the effect of impurities on the structural integrity of BWR components in perspective, the BWR fleet's most severe documented water chemistry transient, where the conductivity reached on 232 μS/cm with 21.2 ppm chloride and 93.8 ppm sulfate, will be presented. For example, on-line real-time crack growth rate measurements using the highly accurate reversing DC potential drop technique revealed a crack growth rate increase by almost a factor of 300 for an Alloy 182 weld metal compact tension fracture mechanics specimen during this raw water transient. The recommendations for subsequent plant inspection and start up after this transient will also be discussed where the value of real time crack growth rate monitoring cannot be overemphasized. (author)

  12. A comparison of constant-load and constant-deflection stress-corrosion tests on precracked DCB specimens. [Double Cantilever Beam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorward, R. C.; Hasse, K. R.

    1978-01-01

    A comparison is made between measurements of stress-corrosion crack propagation made by a constant-load procedure and by a constant-deflection procedure. Precracked double cantilever beam specimens from 7075 aluminum alloy plate were used. The specimens were oriented in such a way that cracking would begin in the short-transverse plane and would propagate in the rolling direction. The specimens were subjected to a buffered salt-chromate solution and a 3.6% synthetic sea salt solution. The measurements were made optically with a binocular microscope. Stress intensities and crack lengths were calculated and crack velocities were obtained. Velocity was plotted against the average calculated stress intensity. Good agreement between the two methods was found for the salt-chromate solution, although some descrepancies were noted for the artificial sea salt solution.

  13. Stress Corrosion Cracking Susceptibility of 22Cr5Ni2Mo Duplex Stainless Steel by Means of Constant Strain Rate and Constant Load Methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The stress corrosion cracking behaviors in 22Cr5Ni2Mo duplex stainless steel have been investigated. The SCC has been examined by means of constant strain rate and constant load methods in terms of relevant electrochemical parameters in boiling 40% MgCl2 solution. The SCC susceptibility of the steel increased reversely proportional to strain rate and the critical strain rate was about 2.4 x 10-7/sec at open circuit. The steel had threshold stress of 29kg/mm2 and the critical cracking potential(ECC) of -410mV w.r.t. Ag/AgCl electrode immune to the SCC, and possessed superior SCC resistance compared to the austenite stainless steel. Cracks were initiated and propagated transgranularly without retarding effect by the austenite phase in high stress region

  14. Stress corrosion cracking of Inconel 600 tubing: Influence of thermal treatment, NaOH concentration and temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A study has been performed concerning the role of thermal treatments on the SCC behaviour of Inconel 600 tubing in NaOH solutions in the temperature range 315-3600C. An additional investigation was undertaken to establish the effect of the NaOH concentration built-up under magnetite deposits. The changes in the microstructural variables in the four metallurgical conditions studied were identified by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). C-ring and slow strain rate tests (10-6 s-1) yielded identical results. SEM fractographs were additionally taken to reveal the cracking mode. It has been found that thermal treatment improves the SCC resistance in hot caustic solutions; particularly annealing at 6500C for 50 h appeared to impart the maximum improvement of SCC resistance. (orig.)

  15. Illuminating Hot Jupiters in caustic crossing

    CERN Document Server

    Sajadian, Sedighe

    2010-01-01

    In recent years a large number of Hot Jupiters orbiting in a very close orbit around the parent stars have been explored with the transit and doppler effect methods. Here in this work we study the gravitational microlensing effect of a binary lens on a parent star with a Hot Jupiter revolving around it. Caustic crossing of the planet makes enhancements on the light curve of the parent star in which the signature of the planet can be detected by high precision photometric observations. We use the inverse ray shooting method with tree code algorithm to generate the combined light curve of the parent star and the planet. In order to investigate the probability of observing the planet signal, we do a Monte-Carlo simulation and obtain the observational optical depth of $\\tau \\sim 10^{-8}$. We show that about ten years observations of Galactic Bulge with a network of telescopes will enable us detecting about ten Hot Jupiter with this method. Finally we show that the observation of the microlensing event in infra-re...

  16. Influence of localized plasticity on Stress Corrosion Cracking of austenitic stainless steel. Application to IASCC of internals reactor core vessels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The surface conditions of the 316L screw connecting vessel internals of the primary circuit of PWR (pressurized water reactor) corresponds to a grinding condition. These screws are affected by the IASCC (Irradiation Assisted Stress Corrosion Cracking). Initiation of cracking depends on the surface condition but also on the external oxidation and interactions of oxide layer with the deformation bands. The first objective of this study is to point the influence of surface condition on the growth kinetic of oxide layer, and the surface reactivity of 304, 316 stainless steel grade exposed to PWR primary water at 340 C. The second objective is to determine influence of strain localization on the SCC of austenitic stainless steels in PWR primary water. Indeed, the microstructure of irradiated 304, 316 grades correspond to a localized deformation in deformation bands free of radiation defects. In order to reproduce that microstructure without conducting irradiations, low cycle fatigue tests at controlled stain amplitude are implemented for the model material of the study (A286 austenitic stainless steel hardened by the precipitation of phase γ'Ni3(Ti, Al)). During the mechanical cycling (after the first hardening cycles), the precipitates are dissolved in slip bands leading to the localization of the deformation. Once the right experimental conditions in low cycle fatigue obtained (for localized microstructure), interactions oxidation / deformation bands are studied by oxidizing pre deformed samples containing deformation bands and non deformed samples. The tensile tests at a slow strain rate of 8 x 10-8 /s are also carried out on pre deformed samples and undeformed samples. The results showed that surface treatment induces microstructural modifications of the metal just under the oxide layer, leading to slower growth kinetics of the oxide layer. However, surface treatment accelerates development of oxides penetrations in metal under the oxide layer. As example, for

  17. A mechanical property and stress corrosion evaluation of VIM-ESR-VAR work strengthened and direct double aged Inconel 718 bar material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montano, J. W.

    1986-01-01

    Presented are the mechanical properties and the stress corrosion resistance of triple melted vacuum induction melted (VIM), electro-slag remelted (ESR), and vacuum arc remelted (VAR), solution treated, work strengthened and direct double aged Inconel 718 alloy bars 4.00 in. (10.16) and 5.75 in. (14.60 cm) diameter. Tensile, charpy v-notched impact, and compact tension specimens were tested at ambient temperature in both the longitudinal and transverse directions. Longitudinal tensile and yield strengths in excess of 220 ksi (1516.85 MPa) and 200 ksi (1378.00 MPa) respectively, were realized at ambient temperature. Additional charpy impact and compact tension tests were performed at -100 F (-73 C). Longitudinal charpy impact strength equalled or exceeded 12.0 ft-lbs (16.3 Joules) at ambient and at -100 F(-73 C) while longitudinal compact (LC) tension fracture toughness strength remained above 79 ksi (86.80 MPa) at ambient and at -100 F(-73 C) temperatures. No failures occurred in the longitudinal or transverse tensile specimens stressed to 75 and 100 percent of their respective yield strengths and exposed to a salt fog environment for 180 days. Tensile tests performed after the stress corrosion test indicated no mechanical property degradation.

  18. Standard practice for determining the susceptibility of stainless steels and related Nickel-Chromium-Iron Alloys to stress-corrosion cracking in polythionic acids

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2010-01-01

    1.1 This practice covers procedures for preparing and conducting the polythionic acid test at room temperature, 22 to 25°C (72 to 77°F), to determine the relative susceptibility of stainless steels or other related materials (nickel-chromiumiron alloys) to intergranular stress corrosion cracking. 1.2 This practice can be used to evaluate stainless steels or other materials in the “as received” condition or after being subjected to high-temperature service, 482 to 815°C (900 to 1500°F), for prolonged periods of time. 1.3 This practice can be applied to wrought products, castings, and weld metal of stainless steels or other related materials to be used in environments containing sulfur or sulfides. Other materials capable of being sensitized can also be tested in accordance with this test. 1.4 This practice may be used with a variety of stress corrosion test specimens, surface finishes, and methods of applying stress. 1.5 This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, ...

  19. Effect of surface machining and cold working on the ambient temperature chloride stress corrosion cracking susceptibility of AISI 304L stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Effect of plastic deformation induced by cold rolling or surface machining on the susceptibility to chloride-induced stress corrosion cracking at ambient temperature of 304L austenitic stainless steel was investigated in this study. The test material was subjected to three treatments: (a) solution annealed, (b) cold rolled and (c) surface machined to induce different levels of strain/stresses in the material. Subsequently constant strained samples were produced as per ASTM G30 for each condition and these were exposed to 1 M HCl at ambient temperature until cracking occurred. Subsequently the cracked samples were characterized using stereo microscopy, optical microscopy and atomic force microscopy to understand the effect of microstructural changes produced by straining on the susceptibility to stress corrosion cracking at ambient temperature. Strained surface produced by machining accelerated the process of crack initiation resulting in densely distributed shallow surface cracks in a very short period of time as compared to solution annealed and cold worked sample. Crack propagation in cold worked sample was along the slip lines and cracking occurred much earlier than in the solution annealed sample.

  20. Stress Corrosion Cracking of X80 Pipeline Steel in Near-Neutral pH Environment under Constant Load Tests with and without Preload

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Y.Z. Jia; J.Q. Wang; E.H. Han; W. Ke1

    2011-01-01

    Constant load tests in NS4 solution purged with N2-5%CO2 gas mixture were conducted on American Petroleum Institute (API) X80 pipeline steel applied in the 2nd West-East (;as Pipeline project with and without preload. The results show that cracks could initiate and propagate in X80 pipeline steel in near-neutral pH environment under a constant load condition. The life of crack initiation and propagation increased with decreasing applied stress. Preload did not change its corrosion behavior obviously. However, preload reduced the time for crack initiation.

  1. Online stress corrosion crack and fatigue usages factor monitoring and prognostics in light water reactor components: Probabilistic modeling, system identification and data fusion based big data analytics approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mohanty, Subhasish M. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Jagielo, Bryan J. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Oakland Univ., Rochester, MI (United States); Iverson, William I. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Univ. of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Champaign, IL (United States); Bhan, Chi Bum [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Pusan National Univ., Busan (Korea, Republic of); Soppet, William S. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Majumdar, Saurin M. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Natesan, Ken N. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)

    2014-12-10

    Nuclear reactors in the United States account for roughly 20% of the nation's total electric energy generation, and maintaining their safety in regards to key component structural integrity is critical not only for long term use of such plants but also for the safety of personnel and the public living around the plant. Early detection of damage signature such as of stress corrosion cracking, thermal-mechanical loading related material degradation in safety-critical components is a necessary requirement for long-term and safe operation of nuclear power plant systems.

  2. The use of slow strain rate technique for studying stress corrosion cracking of an advanced silver-bearing aluminum-lithium alloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frefer, Abdulbaset Ali; Raddad, Bashir S. [Department of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering/Tripoli University, Tripoli (Libya); Abosdell, Alajale M. [Department of Mechanical Engineering/Mergeb University, Garaboli (Libya)

    2013-12-16

    In the present study, stress corrosion cracking (SCC) behavior of naturally aged advanced silver-bearing Al-Li alloy in NaCl solution was investigated using slow strain rate test (SSRT) method. The SSRT’s were conducted at different strain rates and applied potentials at room temperature. The results were discussed based on percent reductions in tensile elongation in a SCC-causing environment over those in air tended to express the SCC susceptbility of the alloy under study at T3. The SCC behavior of the alloy was also discussed based on the microstructural and fractographic examinations.

  3. Factors influencing stress corrosion cracking of gas transmission pipelines: Detailed studies following a pipeline failure. Part 2: Pipe metallurgy and mechanical testing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilmott, M.J.; Diakow, D.A.

    1996-12-31

    Following a failure caused by stress corrosion cracking (SCC) on an NPS 8 pipeline in the Nova Gas Transmission (NGTL) system, a detailed investigation was undertaken to understand the contributing factors resulting in the failure. Studies included site characterization using the NOVAProbe, followed by a detailed excavation, sampling, pipe replacement and subsequent metallurgical analysis. In total, 1.1 km of pipe was inspected and replaced. This paper will detail the results of pipe inspection, mechanical testing and metallurgical results of pipe inspection, mechanical testing and metallurgical analysis following excavation. Possible correlation of the results with potential SCC severity is discussed.

  4. Materials Reliability Program Resistance to Primary Water Stress Corrosion Cracking of Alloys 690, 52, and 152 in Pressurized Water Reactors (MRP-111)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, H. [Framatome ANP, Inc., Lynchburg, VA (United States); Fyfitch, S. [Framatome ANP, Inc., Lynchburg, VA (United States); Scott, P. [Framatome ANP, SAS, Paris (France); Foucault, M. [Framatome ANP, SAS, Le Creusot (France); Kilian, R. [Framatome ANP, GmbH, Erlangen (Germany); Winters, M. [Framatome ANP, GmbH, Erlangen (Germany)

    2004-03-01

    Over the last thirty years, stress corrosion cracking in PWR primary water (PWSCC) has been observed in numerous Alloy 600 component items and associated welds, sometimes after relatively long incubation times. Repairs and replacements have generally utilized wrought Alloy 690 material and its compatible weld metals (Alloy 152 and Alloy 52), which have been shown to be very highly resistant to PWSCC in laboratory experiments and have been free from cracking in operating reactors over periods already up to nearly 15 years. It is nevertheless prudent for the PWR industry to attempt to quantify the longevity of these materials with respect to aging degradation by corrosion in order to provide a sound technical basis for the development of future inspection requirements for repaired or replaced component items. This document first reviews numerous laboratory tests, conducted over the last two decades, that were performed with wrought Alloy 690 and Alloy 52 or Alloy 152 weld materials under various test conditions pertinent to corrosion resistance in PWR environments. The main focus of the present review is on PWSCC, but secondary-side conditions are also briefly considered.

  5. Effect of ETA treatment on corrosion fatigue in rotors and blades and stress corrosion cracking in 3.5 NiCrMoV steel low-pressure turbine discs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In recent years, to increase the reliability and reduce the amount of feed water iron to prevent of fouling of steam generator tubes, ethanolamine (ETA) treatment has been adopted into the secondary system. In this investigation, the authors verified that ethanolamine treatment does not adversely affect the susceptibility of either stress corrosion cracking (SCC) in the turbine discs that are the principal units in the secondary system or corrosion fatigue (CF) in rotors and blades. In the first stage, a laboratory investigation was made of (1) SCC initiation and propagation in 3,5 NiCrMoV steel and (2) CF in 3,5 NiCrMoV steel and blade steels, in both cases using deaerated water to which had been added ethanolamine with few organic acids that is 10 times the estimated concentration. It was confirmed that the ethanolamine treatment had almost no effect. In the second stage, test pieces (removed from the disc steel inserted into the turbine extraction chamber before the ethanolamine treatment was started) were used to observe the initiation and propagation of SCC. Even after long-term observation, ethanolamine treatment into the secondary system was found to have almost no effect on the susceptibility of SCC in discs. (author)

  6. DEVELOPMENT OF AN EMAT IN-LINE INSPECTION SYSTEM FOR DETECTION, DISCRIMINATION, AND GRADING OF STRESS CORROSION CRACKING IN PIPELINES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeff Aron; Jeff Jia; Bruce Vance; Wen Chang; Raymond Pohler; Jon Gore; Stuart Eaton; Adrian Bowles; Tim Jarman

    2005-02-01

    This report describes prototypes, measurements, and results for a project to develop a prototype pipeline in-line inspection (ILI) tool that uses electromagnetic acoustic transducers (EMATs) to detect and grade stress corrosion cracking (SCC). The introduction briefly provides motivation and describes SCC, gives some background on EMATs and guided ultrasonic waves, and reviews promising results of a previous project using EMATs for SCC. The experimental section then describes lab measurement techniques and equipment, the lab mouse and prototypes for a mule, and scan measurements made on SCC. The mouse was a moveable and compact EMAT setup. The prototypes were even more compact circuits intended to be pulled or used in an ILI tool. The purpose of the measurements was to determine the best modes, transduction, and processing to use, to characterize the transducers, and to prove EMATs and mule components could produce useful results. Next, the results section summarizes the measurements and describes the mouse scans, processing, prototype circuit operating parameters, and performance for SH0 scans. Results are given in terms of specifications--like SNR, power, insertion loss--and parametric curves--such as signal amplitude versus magnetic bias or standoff, reflection or transmission coefficients versus crack depth. Initially, lab results indicated magnetostrictive transducers using both SH0 and SV1 modes would be worthwhile to pursue in a practical ILI system. However, work with mule components showed that SV1 would be too dispersive, so SV1 was abandoned. The results showed that reflection measurements, when normalized by the direct arrival are sensitive to and correlated with SCC. This was not true for transmission measurements. Processing yields a high data reduction, almost 60 to 1, and permits A and C scan display techniques and software already in use for pipeline inspection. An analysis of actual SH0 scan results for SCC of known dimensions showed that length

  7. Physics-Based Stress Corrosion Cracking Component Reliability Model cast in an R7-Compatible Cumulative Damage Framework

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    is being designed to incorporate. Primary water stress corrosion cracking (SCC) of reactor coolant system Alloy 82/182 dissimilar metal welds has been selected as the initial application for examining the feasibility of R7-compatible physics-based cumulative damage models. This is a potentially risk-significant degradation mechanism in Class 1 piping because of its relevance to loss of coolant accidents. In this report a physics-based multi-state model is defined (Figure ES-1), which describes progressive degradations of dissimilar metal welds from micro-crack initiation to component rupture, while accounting for the possibility of interventions and repair. The cumulative damage representation of the multi-state model and its solutions are described, along with the conceptual means of integration into the R7 environment.

  8. Corrosion fatigue properties of thermally insulated pipeline

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The corrosion fatigue properties of thermally insulated pipeline were investigated in synthetic groundwater by electrochemical test, corrosion fatigue test and SEM analysis. Since the potential difference between the weldment and the base metal was small, the pipeline steel was not susceptible to galvanic corrosion. No fatigue limit was apparent for corrosion fatigue testing with remarkable reduction of fatigue lifetime. The effects of insulation and stress on the corrosion fatigue resistance of pipeline steel were studied through Linear Polarization Resistance (LPR) and Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy (EIS) during corrosion fatigue testing. The result of LPR measurement indicated that the corrosion rate was determined not by the water content of PUR foam but by the magnitude of applied stress. The better corrosion fatigue property of the insulated steel was attributable to the formation of a protective rust layer under the insulation, which reduced the acceleration of corrosion process and the propagation of fatigue crack. This was confirmed by the results of EIS measurements and SEM observation

  9. Caustic Structures and Detectability of Circumbinary Planets in Microlensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luhn, Jacob K.; Penny, Matthew T.; Gaudi, B. Scott

    2016-08-01

    Recent discoveries of circumbinary planets in Kepler data show that there is a viable channel of planet formation around binary main-sequence stars. Motivated by these discoveries, we have investigated the caustic structures and detectability of circumbinary planets in microlensing events. We have produced a suite of animations of caustics as a function of the projected separation and angle of the binary host to efficiently explore caustic structures over the entire circumbinary parameter space. Aided by these animations, we have derived a semi-empirical analytic expression for the location of planetary caustics, which are displaced in circumbinary lenses relative to those of planets with a single host. We have used this expression to show that the dominant source of caustic motion will be due to the planet’s orbital motion and not that of the binary star. Finally, we estimate the fraction of circumbinary microlensing events that are recognizable as such to be significant (5%–50%) for binary projected separations in the range 0.1–0.5 in units of Einstein radii.

  10. Stress Corrosion Analysis and Control for Equipment in Wet Sulfide Hydrogen Environment%湿硫化氢环境中设备应力腐蚀分析及控制

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    邵昀启

    2012-01-01

      文章阐述了硫化氢应力腐蚀机理,分析和探讨了在湿硫化氢环境中影响应力腐蚀的相关因素,并针对这些影响因素提出了相应的防止硫化氢应力腐蚀的技术和工艺措施。%  The article discusses the mechanism of sulfide hydrogen stress corrosion, analysis and discussion of the influencing factors of sulfide hydrogen stress corrosion in wet sulfide hydrogen environment, and in view of these factors put forward a number of technology and process measures to prevent sulfide hydrogen stress corrosion.

  11. Caustics and Rogue Waves in an Optical Sea

    CERN Document Server

    Mathis, Amaury; Toenger, Shanti; Dias, Frederic; Genty, Goery; Dudley, John M

    2015-01-01

    There are many examples in physics of systems showing rogue wave behaviour, the generation of high amplitude events at low probability. Although initially studied in oceanography, rogue waves have now been seen in many other domains, with particular recent interest in optics. Although most studies in optics have focussed on how nonlinearity can drive rogue wave emergence, purely linear effects have also been shown to induce extreme wave amplitudes. In this paper, we report a detailed experimental study of linear rogue waves in an optical system, using a spatial light modulator to impose random phase structure on a coherent optical field. After free space propagation, different random intensity patterns are generated, including partially-developed speckle, a broadband caustic network, and an intermediate pattern with characteristics of both speckle and caustic structures. Intensity peaks satisfying statistical criteria for rogue waves are seen especially in the case of the caustic network, and are associated w...

  12. Caustics of exotic ($1/r^n$) binary gravitational lenses

    CERN Document Server

    Bozza, V

    2015-01-01

    With some violation of the energy conditions, it is possible to combine scalar fields or other types of matter so as to build metrics that fall as $1/r^n$ asymptotically, one famous example being the Ellis wormhole. Gravitational lensing provides a natural arena to distinguish and identify such exotic objects in our Universe. In fact, these metrics predict the possibility to defocus light, which is impossible with ordinary matter. In this paper we continue the investigation of gravitational lensing in this new realm by providing a thorough study of critical curves and caustics produced by binary exotic lenses. We find that there are still three topologies as in the standard binary lens, with the main novelty coming from the secondary caustics of the close topology, which become huge at higher $n$. After drawing caustics by numerical methods, we derive a large amount of analytical formulae in all limits that are useful to provide deeper insight in the mathematics of the problem.

  13. CORROSION ISSUES ASSOCIATED WITH AUSTENITIC STAINLESS STEEL COMPONENTS USED IN NUCLEAR MATERIALS EXTRACTION AND SEPARATION PROCESSES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mickalonis, J.; Louthan, M.; Sindelar, R.

    2012-12-17

    This paper illustrated the magnitude of the systems, structures and components used at the Savannah River Site for nuclear materials extraction and separation processes. Corrosion issues, including stress corrosion cracking, pitting, crevice corrosion and other corrosion induced degradation processes are discussed and corrosion mitigation strategies such as a chloride exclusion program and corrosion release testing are also discussed.

  14. Effect of heating and cooling rate of test solutions on stress corrosion cracking of austenitic stainless steels in high temperature water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effect of heating and cooling rate of test solutions on stress corrosion cracking of austenitic stainless steels in high temperature water was studied in static autoclave by using U-bended specimens. The results obtained are summerized as follows. (1) Slow heating to the test temperature of 2500C -- 3000C made stainless steels more liable to cause cracking during heating process than quick heating to the temperature. Increasing the susceptibility of alloys to cracking and/or concentration of chloride ion increased the critical rate of heating to cause cracking during heating process. (2) Cooling rate, on the other hand, showed no effect on cracking. (3) No crack was caused during heating to 2300C by not only quick heating (1400C/hr) but also slow heating (700C/he). However, the time to cracking at test temperature of 2300C was also affected by heating rate of the solution. The slower heating rate resulted the shorter time to cracking. (4) The cracking was caused by repeating heating and cooling down cycles even though the heating rate was quick enough not to cause crack during one cycle of heating and cooling. (5) The effect of heating rate on cracking was only observed at the temperature higher than 1800C. (6) Heating rate of the test solution must be precisely controlled to obtain accurate stress corrosion data. (auth.)

  15. An analysis of corrosive substance ingestion of children in eastern Turkey

    OpenAIRE

    Melek, Mehmet; Edirne, Yeşim; Çobanoğlu, Ufuk; CEYLAN, Abdullah; Can, Muhammet

    2013-01-01

    Abstract. In this study, we aimed at describing corrosive substance  ingestion and related problems in Eastern Turkey. This type of injury is still a serious problem to be given a careful attention in our country like the other developing countries. The charts of children managed in our hospital with corrosive substance ingestion in the period of 1996- 2008 were evaluated retrospectively. Gender, age, ingested substance and the volume, symptoms, morbidity of caustic injury were considered in ...

  16. Utilization of the molecular dynamic to study the effect of hydrogen in the stress corrosion; Utilisation de la dynamique moleculaire pour etudier l'effet de l'hydrogene lors de la fissuration par CSC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arnoux, P. [CEA Saclay, Dept. de Physico-Chimie (DEN/DANS/DPC/SCCME/LECA), 91 - Gif sur Yvette (France)

    2007-07-01

    Many microscopic and theoretical models of stress corrosion have been proposed, in particularly to explain the grain boundary cracking of stainless steels and nickel base. In this work calculus of molecular dynamic have been used to propose a mechanism of stress corrosion at the atomic scale. The author aims to reproduce, by molecular dynamic, the mechanism of an open crack in irradiated stainless steel in PWR reactor and show that the growth of the oxide at the crack back produce hydrogen. (A.L.B.)

  17. Duplex stainless steels for applications in power plants. Stress corrosion tests in high temperature water containing oxygen and chloride. Duplexa rostfria staal foer kraftverkstillaempningar. Spaenningskorrosionsprovning i syre- och kloridhaltigt hoegtemperaturvatten

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Molander, A.

    1987-09-15

    The work presented in this report forms the first experimental part of the project 'Duplex stainless steels for applications in power plants' started to investigate how duplex stainless steels can favourably replace conventional materials in power generating equipment. The corrosion resistance of duplex stainless steels are often better than for austenitic stainless steels, but background documentation for power plant applications is limited. The stress corrosion test presented in this report has been performed in the light of these facts. The test environment was water at 250 deg C with addition of oxygen to a nominal concentration of 10 ppb and sodium chloride to a chloride concentration of 1 000 ppm. Slow strain rate testing and exposure of corrosion coupons were performed. The following materials were tested: Type 439 (ferritic), Sandvik 3RE60, SAF 2304 and SAF 2205 (duplex), and Type 304, Type 304L, Type 316L and Alloy 800 (austenitic stainless alloys). Corrosion coupons from these alloys and the following steels were also included: St 35 (carbon steel), Type 409 and Type 444 (ferritic), and Sanicro 28 (austenitic stainless steel). Alloy 800 and SAF 2205 were not attacked by stress corrosion cracking during these conditions. Concerning general corrosion the duplex and the austenitic materials were superior to the ferritic steels.

  18. A systematic fitting scheme for caustic-crossing microlensing events

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kains ...[et al], N.; Jørgensen, Uffe Gråe

    2009-01-01

    We outline a method for fitting binary-lens caustic-crossing microlensing events based on the alternative model parametrization proposed and detailed by Cassan. As an illustration of our methodology, we present an analysis of OGLE-2007-BLG-472, a double-peaked Galactic microlensing event with a...... source crossing the whole caustic structure in less than three days. In order to identify all possible models we conduct an extensive search of the parameter space, followed by a refinement of the parameters with a Markov Chain Monte Carlo algorithm. We find a number of low-chi(2) regions in the...

  19. Wavefield extrapolation in caustic-free normal ray coordinates

    KAUST Repository

    Ma, Xuxin

    2012-11-04

    Normal ray coordinates are conventionally constructed from ray tracing, which inherently requires smooth velocity profiles. To use rays as coordinates, the velocities have to be smoothed further to avoid caustics, which is detrimental to the mapping process. Solving the eikonal equation numerically for a line source at the surface provides a platform to map normal rays in complex unsmoothed velocity models and avoid caustics. We implement reverse-time migration (RTM) and downward continuation in the new ray coordinate system, which allows us to obtain efficient images and avoid some of the dip limitations of downward continuation.

  20. Recognition and Analysis of Corrosion Failure Mechanisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steven Suess

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available Corrosion has a vast impact on the global and domestic economy, and currently incurs losses of nearly $300 billion annually to the U.S. economy alone. Because of the huge impact of corrosion, it is imperative to have a systematic approach to recognizing and mitigating corrosion problems as soon as possible after they become apparent. A proper failure analysis includes collection of pertinent background data and service history, followed by visual inspection, photographic documentation, material evaluation, data review and conclusion procurement. In analyzing corrosion failures, one must recognize the wide range of common corrosion mechanisms. The features of any corrosion failure give strong clues as to the most likely cause of the corrosion. This article details a proven approach to properly determining the root cause of a failure, and includes pictographic illustrations of the most common corrosion mechanisms, including general corrosion, pitting, galvanic corrosion, dealloying, crevice corrosion, microbiologically-influenced corrosion (MIC, corrosion fatigue, stress corrosion cracking (SCC, intergranular corrosion, fretting, erosion corrosion and hydrogen damage.

  1. 21 CFR 2.110 - Definition of ammonia under Federal Caustic Poison Act.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Definition of ammonia under Federal Caustic Poison... SERVICES GENERAL GENERAL ADMINISTRATIVE RULINGS AND DECISIONS Caustic Poisons § 2.110 Definition of ammonia under Federal Caustic Poison Act. For the purpose of determining whether an article containing...

  2. Electrochemical generation of Fenton's reagent to treat spent caustic wastewater

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hansen, H. K.; Nunez, P.; Rodriguez, N.; Guzman, J.

    2009-07-01

    An important wastewater stream from oil refineries is the spent caustic. Caustic solutions are used as scrubbing agent during the desulphurization process to eliminate sulphur an mercaptans from oil and gasses. Spent caustic is classified as DOO3 (reactive sulphide) hazardous waste under the US Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). (Author)

  3. Stress corrosion of austenitic steels mono and polycrystals in Mg Cl{sub 2} medium: micro fractography and study of behaviour improvements; Corrosion sous contrainte de mono et polycristaux d`aciers inoxydables austenitiques en milieu MgCI{sub 2}: analyse microfractographique et recherche d`ameliorations du comportement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chambreuil-Paret, A

    1997-09-19

    The austenitic steels in a hot chlorinated medium present a rupture which is macroscopically fragile, discontinuous and formed with crystallographic facets. The interpretation of these facies crystallographic character is a key for the understanding of the stress corrosion damages. The first aim of this work is then to study into details the micro fractography of 316 L steels mono and polycrystals. Two types of rupture are observed: a very fragile rupture which stresses on the possibility of the interatomic bonds weakening by the corrosive medium Mg Cl{sub 2} and a discontinuous rupture (at the micron scale) on the sliding planes which is in good agreement with the corrosion enhanced plasticity model. The second aim of this work is to search for controlling the stress corrosion by the mean of a pre-strain hardening. Two types of pre-strain hardening have been tested. A pre-strain hardening with a monotonic strain is negative. Indeed, the first cracks starts very early and the cracks propagation velocity is increased. This is explained by the corrosion enhanced plasticity model through the intensifying of the local corrosion-deformation interactions. On the other hand, a cyclic pre-strain hardening is particularly favourable. The first micro strains starts later and the strain on breaking point levels are increased. The delay of the starting of the first strains is explained by a surface distortion structure which is very homogeneous. At last, the dislocations structure created in fatigue at saturation is a planar structure of low energy which reduces the corrosion-deformation interactions, source of micro strains. (O.M.) 139 refs.

  4. Secondary side cracking at Saint-Laurent unit B1: investigations, operating chemistry and corrosion tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Among the similar steam generators (SG) in EDF plants (equipped with mill annealed Alloy 600, drilled tube-support plates TSP), one of the SG of SAINT-LAURENT B1 was found particularly affected by cracking at TSP level. Eddy current indications lead to pull one tube after 30 000 h of operation: investigations revealed that corrosion was involved. In 1991, after 58 000 h, numerous indications with axial probe were beyond the recording threshold. A few heats were concerned, the examination of 11 pulled tubes evidenced an important axial intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC), with bands of intergranular attack (IGA) in front of the edge of TSPs. This investigation has qualified a new probe (STL 10). A new plugging criterion was also defined. In the same time, the results from hideout return tests and the operating chemistry were examined. They did not provide a satisfactory explanation of the observed damage. The degradations have affected only one out of three SG and the pH-calculations using MULTEQ code have shown that the environment in restricted-flow areas has not always been strongly alkaline (pH270: 5.7 to 10.2). Moreover, pH-values were decreasing after successive hideout return shutdowns. Corrosion tests were then performed in laboratory conditions (sodium hydroxide, 350 deg C) in order to study the sensitivity of the pulled tubes. They demonstrated the greatest sensitivity to cracking of these tubes, among various mill-annealed tubes in Alloy 600. The worst behaviour in caustic environment of SAINT-LAURENT tubes is apparently not connected with their metallurgical structure; moreover, they are not sensitized (no intergranular chromium depletion). The sensitivity in caustic environment seems to be in accordance with a low value of the yield stress. Studies are still in progress in order to examine if it is the right explanation for the sensitivity of Saint-Laurent tubes (the composition at the grain boundaries is also investigated...). The knowledge

  5. Development and validation of an experimental procedure for studying the biaxial stress corrosion. Application to the systems: alloy-600/air and 316L/MgCl{sub 2}; Developpement et validation d'une procedure experimentale pour l'etude de la corrosion sous contrainte biaxiale. Application aux couples alliage 600 / air et 316L / MgCl{sub 2}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farre, M.Th

    1998-07-15

    One of the main preoccupation for maintaining EdF's nuclear pressurised water reactors is intergranular stress corrosion cracking of steam generator tubing (alloy 600: NC 15Fe). The most affected areas (first row U-bend and roll transition zone) are in biaxial stress state. The crack propagation is often axial and sometimes circumferential. The actual life prediction criterion for these structures depends on the maximal principal stress. The purpose of this study is to determine whether it is safe to use such a criterion in a case of biaxial stress state. A procedure is proposed and experimentally validated for designing specimen in a controlled biaxial stress state when submitted to traction. Quadrants I an IV of the stress space are the only ones explored. The aim is to use these specimens in order to realize stress corrosion tests in primary water with alloy 600. The procedure involves studying the biaxial behavior of the material. This shows the effect of hardening on the shape of the yield stress surface. The hardening of alloy 600 is mainly kinematic. The yield stress surface becomes concave in the hardening stress direction and flat in the opposite direction. The geometry of the specimen stems from parameterized shape optimisation. An elasto-viscoplastic behavior law is identified for alloy 600. Use of the law for calculating the strain state of one specimen is experimentally validated. This entire procedure has been successfully validated with biaxial stress corrosion cracking tests, using 316L and MgCl{sub 2} boiling at 154 deg C. In this case it is difficult to determine a life time criterion. It is shown that the criterion of the maximal principal stress is invalid in case of a biaxial stress state. (author)

  6. Stress corrosion mechanisms of alloy-600 polycrystals and monocrystals in primary water: effect of hydrogen; Mecanismes de corrosion sous contrainte de l'alliage 600 polycristallin et monocristallin en milieu primaire: role de l'hydrogene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Foct, F

    1999-01-08

    The aim of this study is to identify the mechanisms involved in Alloy 600 primary water stress corrosion cracking. Therefore, this work is mainly focussed on the two following points. The first one is to understand the influence of hydrogen on SCC of industrial Alloy 600 and the second one is to study the crack initiation and propagation on polycrystals and single crystals. A cathodic potential applied during slow strain rate tests does not affect crack initiation but increases the slow crack growth rate by a factor 2 to 5. Cathodic polarisation, cold work and 25 cm{sup 3} STP/kg hydrogen content increase the slow CGR so that the K{sub ISCC} (and therefore fast CGR) is reached. The influence of hydrogenated primary water has been studied for the first time on Alloy 600 single crystals. Cracks cannot initiate on tensile specimens but they can propagate on pre-cracked specimens. Transgranular cracks present a precise crystallographic aspect which is similar to that of 316 alloy in MgCl{sub 2} solutions. Moreover, the following results improve the description of the cracking conditions. Firstly, the higher the hydrogen partial pressure, the lower the Alloy 600 passivation current transients. Since this result is not correlated with the effect of hydrogen on SCC, cracking is not caused by a direct effect of dissolved hydrogen on dissolution. Secondly, hydrogen embrittlement of Alloy 600 disappears at temperatures above 200 deg.C. Thirdly, grain boundary sliding (GBS) does not directly act on SCC but shows the mechanical weakness of grain boundaries. Regarding the proposed models for Alloy 600 SCC, it is possible to draw the following conclusions. Internal oxidation or absorbed hydrogen effects are the most probable mechanisms for initiation. Dissolution, internal oxidation and global hydrogen embrittlement models cannot explain crack propagation. On the other hand, the Corrosion Enhanced Plasticity Model gives a good description of the SCC propagation. (author)

  7. Microbial corrosion and cracking in steel. A concept for evaluation of hydrogen-assisted stress corrosion cracking in cathodically protected high-pressure gas transmission pipelines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Lars Vendelbo

    of high-strength pipeline steel and the concentration of hydrogen present in the steel. B. Determine the degree hydrogen absorption by cathodically protected steel exposed in natural soil sediment, which include activity of sulphate-reducing bacteria (SRB). C. Compare the above points with fracture......An effort has been undertaken in order to develop a concept for evaluation of the risk of hydrogen-assisted cracking in cathodically protected gas transmission pipelines. The effort was divided into the following subtasks: A. Establish a correlation between the fracture mechanical properties...... mechanical considerations on the level of stress intensity actually present in pipelines during normal operational conditions. The results were used for a discussion - based on well established fracture mechanical relations - on which set of conditions (CP-level and operating pipeline pressure) could give...

  8. Hydrogen influence on metal behavior. Pt. 5. Hydrogen embrittlement and stress corrosion cracking of 0,2 wt % vanadium uranium alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Internal hydrogen embrittlement (IHE) has been investigated by means of an improved sensitivity mechanical test involving multiaxial stresses. Embedded disks clamped at their edge are submitted to an increasing gaseous pressure on one side. Modelling with the finite elements methode has demonstrated that the disk pole is plane stressed and the anchorage plane strained. It is shown that thermally H-charged, α-structured, U-0.2V alloy has an IHE threshold lower than 0,02 ppm. A systematic study of the stressing rate influence shows that this alloy is affected by two main kinds of IHE, one due to hydrides at high rates and, one due to dissolved H at low rates. Finally Stress Corrosion Cracking has been studied in aqueous media as a function of pH and the role of HE is indicated. H can form by a chemical reaction with the metal and enter the metal. In pH zones without cracking, H either is not formed or cannot enter the metal. Similar conclusions are proposed for U 0.2 wt%Cr alloy

  9. Corrosion Evaluation and Corrosion Control of Steam Generators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Corrosion damage significantly influences the integrity and efficiency of steam generator. Corrosion problems of steam generator are unsolved issues until now even though much effort is made around world. Especially the stress corrosion cracking of heat exchange materials is the first issue to be solved. The corrosion protection method of steam generator is important and urgent for the guarantee of nuclear plant's integrity. The objectives of this study are 1) to evaluate the corrosion properties of steam generator materials, 2) to optimize the water chemistry of steam generator and 3) to develop the corrosion protection method of primary and secondary sides of steam generator. The results will be reflected to the water chemistry guideline for improving the integrity and efficiency of steam generator in domestic power plants

  10. Corrosion Evaluation and Corrosion Control of Steam Generators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maeng, W. Y.; Kim, U. C.; Sung, K. W.; Na, J. W.; Lee, Y. H.; Lee, D. H.; Kim, K. M

    2008-06-15

    Corrosion damage significantly influences the integrity and efficiency of steam generator. Corrosion problems of steam generator are unsolved issues until now even though much effort is made around world. Especially the stress corrosion cracking of heat exchange materials is the first issue to be solved. The corrosion protection method of steam generator is important and urgent for the guarantee of nuclear plant's integrity. The objectives of this study are 1) to evaluate the corrosion properties of steam generator materials, 2) to optimize the water chemistry of steam generator and 3) to develop the corrosion protection method of primary and secondary sides of steam generator. The results will be reflected to the water chemistry guideline for improving the integrity and efficiency of steam generator in domestic power plants.

  11. Laser Beam Caustic Measurement with Focal Spot Analyser

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Flemming Ove; Gong, Hui; Bagger, Claus

    2005-01-01

    In industrial applications of high power CO2-lasers the caustic characteristics of the laser beam have great effects on the performance of the lasers. A welldefined high intense focused spot is essential for reliable production results. This paper presents a focal spot analyser that is developed...... for measuring the beam profiles of focused high power CO2-lasers....

  12. Test Procedure - pumping system for caustic addition project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This test procedure provides the requirements for sub-system testing and integrated operational testing of the submersible mixer pump and caustic addition equipment by WHC and Kaiser personnel at the Rotating Equipment Shop run-in pit (Bldg. 272E)

  13. Caustic Leaching of Hanford Tank S-110 Sludge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lumetta, Gregg J.; Carson, Katharine J.; Darnell, Lori P.; Greenwood, Lawrence R.; Hoopes, Francis V.; Sell, Richard L.; Sinkov, Sergey I.; Soderquist, Chuck Z.; Urie, Michael W.; Wagner, John J.

    2001-10-31

    This report describes the Hanford Tank S-110 sludge caustic leaching test conducted in FY 2001 at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. The data presented here can be used to develop the baseline and alternative flowsheets for pretreating Hanford tank sludge. The U.S. Department of Energy funded the work through the Efficient Separations and Processing Crosscutting Program (ESP; EM﷓50).

  14. Microbial corrosion and cracking in steel. A concept for evaluation of hydrogen-assisted stress corrosion cracking in cathodically protected high-pressure gas transmission pipelines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vendelbo Nielsen, L.

    1998-08-01

    An effort has been undertaken in order to develop a concept for evaluation of the risk of hydrogen-assisted cracking in cathodically protected gas transmission pipelines. The effort was divided into the following subtasks: A. Establish a correlation between the fracture mechanical properties of high-strength pipeline steel and the concentration of hydrogen present in the steel. B. Determine the degree hydrogen absorption by cathodically protected steel exposed in natural soil sediment, which include activity of sulphate-reducing bacteria (SRB). C. Compare the above points with fracture mechanical considerations on the level of stress intensity actually present in pipelines during normal operational conditions. The results were used for a discussion - based on well established fracture mechanical relations - on which set of conditions (CP-level and operating pipeline pressure) could give crack propagation. This resulted in threshold curves that can be used for assessment of the risk of hydrogen-assisted cracking as a function of operating pressure and hydrogen content - having the flaw size as discrete parameter. The results are to be used mainly on a conceptual basis, but it was indicated that the requirements for crack propagation include an overprotective CP-condition, a severe sulphate-reducing environment, as well as a large flaw (8 mm or a leak in the present case). A 1 mm flaw (which may be the maximum realistic flaw size) is believed to be unable to provoke crack propagation in this steel. (EG) EFP-95. 16 refs.

  15. Evolution of Microstructure and Stress Corrosion Cracking Behavior of AA2219 Plate to Ring Weld Joints in 3.5 Wt Pct NaCl Solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venugopal, A.; Narayanan, P. Ramesh; Sharma, S. C.

    2016-04-01

    AA2219 aluminum alloy plate (T87) and ring (T851) were joined by tungsten inert gas (TIG) welding using multi-pass welding. The mechanical properties and stress corrosion cracking (SCC) resistance of the above base metals (BMs) in different directions (L, LT, and ST) were examined. Similarly, the weld metal joined by plate to plate and plate to ring (PR) joints was evaluated. The results revealed that the mechanical properties of the ring were comparatively lower than the plate. This was found to be due to the extremely coarse grain size of the ring along with severe Cu-rich segregation along the grain boundaries when compared to the plate material. The SCC resistance of the base and weldments were found to be good and not susceptible to SCC. This was shown to be due to high values of SCC index (>0.9) and the typical ductile cracking morphology of the BM and the weld joints after SCC test in the environment (3.5 wt pct NaCl) when compared to test performed in the control environment (air). However, the corrosion resistance of the weld interface between the FZ and ring was inferior to the FZ-plate interface.

  16. Nutritional management in an elderly man with esophageal and gastric necrosis after caustic soda ingestion: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rondanelli M

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Mariangela Rondanelli,1 Gabriella Peroni,1 Alessandra Miccono,2 Fabio Guerriero,3 Davide Guido,3,4 Simone Perna1 1Department of Public Health, Neuroscience, Experimental and Forensic Medicine, Endocrinology and Nutrition Unit, University of Pavia, Azienda di Servizi alla Persona di Pavia, Pavia, 2Department of Clinical Sciences, Faculty of Medicine and Surgery, University of Milano-Bicocca, Milan, 3Azienda di Servizi alla Persona di Pavia, 4Department of Public Health, Neuroscience, Experimental and Forensic Medicine, Biostatistics and Clinical Epidemiology Unit, University of Pavia, Pavia, Italy Abstract: The ingestion of corrosive industrial chemical agents, such as caustic soda, that are mostly used for household cleaning, usually occurs accidentally or for suicidal purposes. Multiple protocols are based on documented success in preventing impending complications. In this study, we present a case of a 70-year-old man who swallowed caustic soda in a suicide attempt, causing a development of strong esophageal and gastric necrosis with subsequent gastrectomy and digiunostomy. Initially, the recommended nutritional approach was via percutaneous endoscopic jejunostomy by a polymer and high-caloric formula, with an elevated content of soluble fiber. After 5 months, the medical team removed the percutaneous endoscopic jejunostomy and the patient switched from enteral to oral nutrition. In this step, it was decided to introduce two oral, high-caloric supplements: an energy supplement in powder, based on maltodextrin, immediately soluble in foods or in hot/cold drinks and a high-energy and protein drink, enriched with arginine, vitamin C, zinc, and antioxidants. Oral administration (per os was well tolerated by consuming homogenized food mixed in water. After 1 month, the patient was discharged from the hospital and was able to eat a regular meal. Keywords: nutritional management, enteral nutrition, gastric necrosis, esophageal necrosis, nutritional

  17. Influence of alloyed Sc and Zr, and heat treatment on microstructures and stress corrosion cracking of Al–Zn–Mg–Cu alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stress corrosion cracking (SCC) behavior of Al–Zn–Mg–Cu alloys with different Sc, Zr contents and heat treatments was studied using slow strain rate test. Grain boundary microstructures were identified by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and statistical analysis. It was found that the SCC resistance of alloys is improved by increasing Sc, Zr contents and aging degree. Grain boundary precipitates (GBPs) area fraction was found to be an important parameter to evaluate the SCC susceptibility. The results reveal that for Al–Zn–Mg–Cu–0.25Sc–0.10Zr (wt%) alloy with different aging degrees, hydrogen induced cracking dominates the SCC when the area fraction of GBPs is relatively low. For peak-aged Al–Zn–Mg–Cu alloy and Al–Zn–Mg–Cu–0.10Sc–0.10Zr (wt%) alloy, anodic dissolution dominates the SCC when the area fraction of GBPs is sufficiently high

  18. Slow strain rate stress corrosion cracking behaviour of as-welded and plasma electrolytic oxidation treated AZ31HP magnesium alloy autogenous laser beam weldment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The joining of a thin section AZ31HP magnesium alloy was accomplished by laser beam welding in the autogenous mode using a Nd-YAG laser system. Micro hardness evaluation and slow strain rate tensile (SSRT) tests in air revealed that the weld metal had near-matching mechanical properties corresponding to that of the parent alloy. However, in terms of stress corrosion cracking (SCC) resistance as assessed by SSRT tests in ASTM D1384 solution, the weldment was found to have higher susceptibility compared to the parent alloy. The fracture in the weld metal/fusion boundary/HAZ interface suggested that the failure was due to the grain coarsening at the very narrow heat affected zone. The resistance to SCC of the parent alloy and the weldment specimens was found to improve slightly by the application of plasma electrolytic oxidation (PEO) coating from a silicate based electrolyte.

  19. Stress corrosion cracking of alloy 600 in water at high temperature: contribution to a phenomenological approach to the understanding of mechanisms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This research thesis aims at being a contribution to the understanding of mechanisms of stress corrosion cracking of an alloy 600 in water at high temperature. More precisely, it aimed at determining, by using quantitative data characterizing cracking phenomenology, which mechanism(s) is (are) able to explain crack initiation and crack growth. These data concern quantitative characterization of crack initiation, of crack growth and of the influence of two cracking parameters (strain rate, medium hydrogen content). They have been obtained by quantifying cracking through the application of a morphological model. More precisely, these data are: evolution of crack density during a tensile test at slow rate, value of initial crack width with respect to grain boundary length, and relationship between crack density and medium hydrogen content. It appears that hydrogen absorption seems to be involved in the crack initiation mechanism. Crack growth mechanisms and crack growth rates are also discussed

  20. Influence of alloyed Sc and Zr, and heat treatment on microstructures and stress corrosion cracking of Al–Zn–Mg–Cu alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shi, Yunjia [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Central South University, Hunan, Changsha 410083 (China); Pan, Qinglin, E-mail: csupql@163.com [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Central South University, Hunan, Changsha 410083 (China); Key Laboratory of Nonferrous Materials Science and Engineering of Ministry of Education, Hunan, Changsha 410083 (China); Li, Mengjia; Huang, Xing; Li, Bo [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Central South University, Hunan, Changsha 410083 (China)

    2015-01-05

    Stress corrosion cracking (SCC) behavior of Al–Zn–Mg–Cu alloys with different Sc, Zr contents and heat treatments was studied using slow strain rate test. Grain boundary microstructures were identified by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and statistical analysis. It was found that the SCC resistance of alloys is improved by increasing Sc, Zr contents and aging degree. Grain boundary precipitates (GBPs) area fraction was found to be an important parameter to evaluate the SCC susceptibility. The results reveal that for Al–Zn–Mg–Cu–0.25Sc–0.10Zr (wt%) alloy with different aging degrees, hydrogen induced cracking dominates the SCC when the area fraction of GBPs is relatively low. For peak-aged Al–Zn–Mg–Cu alloy and Al–Zn–Mg–Cu–0.10Sc–0.10Zr (wt%) alloy, anodic dissolution dominates the SCC when the area fraction of GBPs is sufficiently high.

  1. Application of nano-sized TiO2 as an inhibitor of stress corrosion cracking in the steam generator tube materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kyung Mo; Lee, Eun Hee; Kim, Uh Chul; Choi, Byung Seon

    2010-01-01

    Several chemicals were studied to suppress the damage due to a stress corrosion cracking (SCC) of the steam generator (SG) tubes in nuclear power plants. SCC tests were carried out to investigate the performance of TiO2 on several types of SG tube materials. The SCC tests were conducted by using an m-RUB specimen in a 10% NaOH solution at a temperature of 315 degrees C. The test with the addition of TiO2 showed a decrease in the SCC rate for the SG tubing materials. In order to improve the inhibition property in a crevice of TiO2, a sonochemical technique was applied to reduce the size of the TiO2 particle. From the SCC tests with the RUB specimen, the SG tube materials showed an enhanced cracking resistance with the addition of nano-sized TiO2 and the surface property was also changed. PMID:20352829

  2. Optimized chemical composition, working and heat treatment condition for resistance to irradiation assisted stress corrosion cracking of cold worked 316 and high-chromium austenitic stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The authors have reported that the primary water stress corrosion cracking (PWSCC) in baffle former bolts made of austenitic stainless steels for PWR after long-term operation is caused by irradiation-induced grain boundary segregation. The resistance to PWSCC of simulated austenitic stainless steels whose chemical compositions are simulated to the grain boundary chemical composition of 316 stainless steel after irradiation increased with decrease of the silicon content, increases of the chromium content, and precipitation of M23C6 carbides at the grain boundaries. In order to develop resistance to irradiation assisted stress corrosion cracking in austenitic stainless steels, optimized chemical compositions and heat treatment conditions for 316CW and high-chromium austenitic stainless steels for PWR baffle former bolts were investigated. For 316CW stainless steel, ultra-low-impurities and high-chromium content are beneficial. About 20% cold working before aging and after solution treatment has also been recommended to recover sensitization and make M23C6 carbides coherent with the matrix at the grain boundaries. Heating at 700 to 725degC for 20 to 50 h was selected as a suitable aging procedure. Cold working of 5 to 10% after aging produced the required mechanical properties. The optimized composition of the high-chromium austenitic stainless steel contents 30% chromium, 30% nickel, and ultra-low impurity levels. This composition also reduces the difference between its thermal expansion coefficient and that of 304 stainless steel for baffle plates. Aging at 700 to 725degC for longer than 40 h and cold working of 10 to 15% after aging were selected to meet mechanical property specifications. (author)

  3. Nutritional management in an elderly man with esophageal and gastric necrosis after caustic soda ingestion: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rondanelli, Mariangela; Peroni, Gabriella; Miccono, Alessandra; Guerriero, Fabio; Guido, Davide; Perna, Simone

    2016-01-01

    The ingestion of corrosive industrial chemical agents, such as caustic soda, that are mostly used for household cleaning, usually occurs accidentally or for suicidal purposes. Multiple protocols are based on documented success in preventing impending complications. In this study, we present a case of a 70-year-old man who swallowed caustic soda in a suicide attempt, causing a development of strong esophageal and gastric necrosis with subsequent gastrectomy and digiunostomy. Initially, the recommended nutritional approach was via percutaneous endoscopic jejunostomy by a polymer and high-caloric formula, with an elevated content of soluble fiber. After 5 months, the medical team removed the percutaneous endoscopic jejunostomy and the patient switched from enteral to oral nutrition. In this step, it was decided to introduce two oral, high-caloric supplements: an energy supplement in powder, based on maltodextrin, immediately soluble in foods or in hot/cold drinks and a high-energy and protein drink, enriched with arginine, vitamin C, zinc, and antioxidants. Oral administration (per os) was well tolerated by consuming homogenized food mixed in water. After 1 month, the patient was discharged from the hospital and was able to eat a regular meal. PMID:26917962

  4. Influence of plastic strain localization on the stress corrosion cracking of austenitic stainless steels; Influence de la localisation de la deformation plastique sur la CSC d'aciers austenitiques inoxydables

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cisse, S.; Tanguy, B. [CEA Saclay, DEN, SEMI, 91 - Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Andrieu, E.; Laffont, L.; Lafont, M.Ch. [Universite de Toulouse. CIRIMAT, UPS/INPT/CNRS, 31 - Toulous (France)

    2010-03-15

    The authors present a research study of the role of strain localization on the irradiation-assisted stress corrosion cracking (IASCC) of vessel steel in PWR-type (pressurized water reactor) environment. They study the interaction between plasticity and intergranular corrosion and/or oxidation mechanisms in austenitic stainless steels with respect to sublayer microstructure transformations. The study is performed on three austenitic stainless grades which have not been sensitized by any specific thermal treatment: the A286 structurally hardened steel, and the 304L and 316L austenitic stainless steels

  5. The Mechanism and Influencing Factors of Corrosion in a Gas Heating-Furnace

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Zhi-gang; ZHANG Ning-sheng; WU Xin-min

    2005-01-01

    Natural gas should be heated and throttled for the purpose of purification and transportation at the first gas production factory of the Changqing field. The safe use and heat-transfer efficiency of a heating-furnace affect the safe and smooth production of natural gas directly. At gas collecting stations now, no measures of anticorrosion have been adopted in heating furnaces which erode and scale badly.In order to solve the corrosive problem of heating-furnaces, prolong operating life of heating-furnaces,assure safe and smooth production of natural gas, the mechanism and influencing factors of corrosion of the heating-furnace were analyzed and some corresponding measures were brought forward based on a field investigation of usage behavior and present operational status of heating-furnaces at the first gas production factory. The results show that the corrosive ion and soluble CO2 and O2 in water erode metal badly at the condition of being heated. Corrosion of a heating-furnace are mostly oxygen corrosion, corrosive ion corrosion, acid corrosion, iron encrustation corrosion, dry and wet interface corrosion, caustic corrosion, etc; The influencing factors of corrosion mainly include soluble O2 and CO2 in water, pH value, heat loading, corrosive ion, soluble solid (salinity) and non-flowing character of water, etc.

  6. Corrosion protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This invention describes a corrosion protection device for long-term storage containers of radioactive matter, in particular of irradiated fuel elements stored in geological formations apt for the purpose. This device prevents corrosion of the containers even if water emerges unexpectedly, or, in any case, inhibits and minimizes corrosion. The device comprehends reactive anodes that are connected to the containers by means of conductive connections. (orig.)

  7. Corrosion protection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Donald W.; Wagh, Arun S.

    2003-05-27

    There has been invented a chemically bonded phosphate corrosion protection material and process for application of the corrosion protection material for corrosion prevention. A slurry of iron oxide and phosphoric acid is used to contact a warm surface of iron, steel or other metal to be treated. In the presence of ferrous ions from the iron, steel or other metal, the slurry reacts to form iron phosphates which form grains chemically bonded onto the surface of the steel.

  8. An experimental and finite element modeling study of cladding strain and localized stresses under simulated iodine-induced stress corrosion cracking

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper presents an assessment of local cladding strain and stress under simulated PCI using an expanding mandrel test technique. Increased local stresses in the vicinity of a pellet crack are simulated by ceramic inserts with varied number of notches (simulated pellet cracks). Experimental results are presented for non-irradiated cold work stress relieved Zry-4 and irradiated recrystallized annealed Zry-2. The tests are performed in a controlled environment of argon and iodine at temperatures and strain rates aimed to simulate ramp tests. The evolution of cladding strain and stress distribution are analyzed by two- and three-dimensional finite element models, in particular increased localized stresses in the vicinity of a notch. The calculated stresses showed a weak dependence on the number of notches, a dependence on the friction coefficient between ceramic and cladding, and a strong dependency on cladding irradiation. An intensification of the local stresses and strains of the cladding inner wall was observed at positions in front of notches. This stress and strain intensification was overestimated in 2D calculations compared to 3D calculations, in 3D the strain intensification factor varied from 1.2 to 1.4 depending on the number of notches. The calculated hoop stresses of the cladding inner wall were 400 to 550 MPa and 220 to 400 MPa for irradiated and non-irradiated cladding, respectively. (author)

  9. Statistics of Caustics in Large-Scale Structure Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feldbrugge, Job L.; Hidding, Johan; van de Weygaert, Rien

    2016-10-01

    The cosmic web is a complex spatial pattern of walls, filaments, cluster nodes and underdense void regions. It emerged through gravitational amplification from the Gaussian primordial density field. Here we infer analytical expressions for the spatial statistics of caustics in the evolving large-scale mass distribution. In our analysis, following the quasi-linear Zel'dovich formalism and confined to the 1D and 2D situation, we compute number density and correlation properties of caustics in cosmic density fields that evolve from Gaussian primordial conditions. The analysis can be straightforwardly extended to the 3D situation. We moreover, are currently extending the approach to the non-linear regime of structure formation by including higher order Lagrangian approximations and Lagrangian effective field theory.

  10. Statistics of Caustics in Large-Scale Structure Formation

    CERN Document Server

    Feldbrugge, Job; van de Weygaert, Rien

    2014-01-01

    The cosmic web is a complex spatial pattern of walls, filaments, cluster nodes and underdense void regions. It emerged through gravitational amplification from the Gaussian primordial density field. Here we infer analytical expressions for the spatial statistics of caustics in the evolving large-scale mass distribution. In our analysis, following the quasi-linear Zeldovich formalism and confined to the 1D and 2D situation, we compute number density and correlation properties of caustics in cosmic density fields that evolve from Gaussian primordial conditions. The analysis can be straightforwardly extended to the 3D situation. We moreover, are currently extending the approach to the non-linear regime of structure formation by including higher order Lagrangian approximations and Lagrangian effective field theory.

  11. Practical procedure for coma-free alignment using caustic figure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The practical procedure for coma-free alignment using a single defocused transmission electron microscopy (TEM) image is presented. Caustic figures observed in the defocused TEM image of a focused probe are utilized. Coma-free alignment can be carried out by coinciding a bright-field spot with the center of a caustic curve as observed in an underfocus TEM image. With this method, beam tilt misalignment is reduced to the sub-mrad order (e.g. 0.3 mrad for 300 kV FEG-TEM). This can be done without intentional beam tilting, an amorphous specimen, high-resolution TEM images, or fast Fourier transform for diffractogram or cross-correlation, which are used in previous methods. Residual coma aberration is detected using the multiple Bragg images of a known crystal. Similarity between the present coma-free alignment and well-known STEM alignment using shadow image is discussed

  12. Caustics and Intermittency in Turbulent Suspensions of Heavy Particles

    CERN Document Server

    Bec, J; Cencini, M; Lanotte, A S; Toschi, F

    2009-01-01

    The statistics of velocity differences between very heavy inertial particles suspended in an incompressible turbulent flow is found to be extremely intermittent. When particles are separated by distances within the viscous subrange, the competition between quiet regular regions and multi-valued caustics leads to a quasi bi-fractal behavior of the particle velocity structure functions, with high-order moments bringing the statistical signature of caustics. Contrastingly, for particles separated by inertial-range distances, the velocity-difference statistics is characterized in terms of a local H\\"{o}lder exponent, which is a function of the scale-dependent particle Stokes number only. Results are supported by high-resolution direct numerical simulations. It is argued that these findings might have implications in the early stage of rain droplets formation in warm clouds.

  13. Dynamic caustics test of blast load impact on neighboring different cross-section roadways

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Guo Dongming; Zhou Baowei; Liu Kang; Yang Renshu; Yan Pengyang

    2016-01-01

    Using digital laser dynamic caustics experimental system and conducting simulation experiment researched the influence rule of blasting excavation of a new roadway on neighboring existed different cross-section roadways. The experimental results show that the influence of blast load on adjacent road-way has a good relationship with the cross-section of roadway. The expansion distance of precrack existed in circular, arch-wall, rectangular roadway is respectively 1.76, 1.61 and 0 cm under blast load. At the same time, the direct-blast side of rectangular roadway has more obvious damage compared with circular and arch-wall roadway. It explains that plane reflects more stress wave than arc, so that it exerts more tensile failure in the direct-blast side, which leads to less stress wave diffracting to the precrack in the back-blast side. When the precrack extends, higher value dynamic stress intensity factor in circular roadway works longer than that of arch-wall roadway. Indirectly, it explains that plane’s weakening func-tion on stress wave is significantly stronger than arc. Stress wave brings about self-evident influence on the upper and bottom endpoints of the rectangular roadway, and it respectively extends 1.03, 2.06 cm along the line link direction of the center of the blasthole and the upper and bottom endpoints on the right wall.

  14. A comparison of the stress corrosion cracking susceptibility of commercially pure titanium grade 4 in Ringer's solution and in distilled water: a fracture mechanics approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roach, Michael D; Williamson, R Scott; Thomas, Joseph A; Griggs, Jason A; Zardiackas, Lyle D

    2014-01-01

    From the results of laboratory investigations reported in the literature, it has been suggested that stress corrosion cracking (SCC) mechanisms may contribute to early failures in titanium alloys that have elevated oxygen concentrations. However, the susceptibility of titanium alloys to SCC in physiological environments remains unclear. In this study, a fracture mechanics approach was used to examine the SCC susceptibility of CP titanium grade 4 in Ringer's solution and distilled de-ionized (DI) water, at 37°C. The study duration was 26 weeks, simulating the non-union declaration of a plated fracture. Four wedge loads were used corresponding to 86-95% of the alloy's ligament yield load. The longest cracks were measured to be 0.18 mm and 0.10 mm in Ringer's solution and DI water, respectively. SEM analysis revealed no evidence of extensive fluting and quasi-cleavage fracture features which, in literature reports, were attributed to SCC. We thus postulate that the Ringer's solution accelerated the wedge-loaded crack growth without producing the critical stresses needed to change the fracture mechanism. Regression analysis of the crack length results led to a significant best-fit relationship between crack growth velocity (independent variable) and test electrolyte, initial wedge load, and time of immersion of specimen in electrolyte (dependent variables).

  15. Analysis of ray stability and caustic formation in a layered moving fluid medium

    CERN Document Server

    Bergman, David R

    2015-01-01

    Caustic formation occurs within a ray skeleton as optical or acoustic fields propagate in a medium with variable refractive properties and are unphysical, their presence being an artifact of the ray approximation of the field, and methods of correcting the field near a caustic are well known. Differential geometry provides a novel approach to calculating acoustic intensity, assessing ray stability and locating caustics in acoustic ray traces when the properties of medium are completely arbitrary by identifying points on the caustic with conjugate points along various rays. The method of geodesic deviation is applied to the problem of determining ray stability and locating caustics in 2-dimensional acoustic ray traces in a layered moving medium. Specifically, a general treatment of caustic formation in sound ducts and in piecewise continuous media is presented and applied to various idealized and realistic scenarios.

  16. Corrosion Engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Charles V.

    A description is provided for a Corrosion and Corrosion Control course offered in the Continuing Engineering Education Program at the General Motors Institute (GMI). GMI is a small cooperative engineering school of approximately 2,000 students who alternate between six-week periods of academic study and six weeks of related work experience in…

  17. Review of studies on corrosion of magnesium alloys

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZENG Rong-chang; ZHANG jin; HUANG Wei-jiu; W. DIETZEL; K. U. KAINER; C. BLAWERT; KE Wei

    2006-01-01

    This review provided some recent progress of the research on corrosion mechanisms of magnesium and its alloys and a basis for follow-on research. Galvanic corrosion,pitting corrosion,intergranular corrosion (IGC),filiform corrosion,crevice corrosion,stress corrosion cracking (SCC),and corrosion fatigue (CF) were discussed. The influence of metallurgical factors such as alloying elements,microstructure and secondary phases,processing factors such as heat treatment and weld,and environmental factors including temperature,relative humidity,solution pH values and concentration on corrosion were discussed. In particular,a mechanism of pitting corrosion caused by AlMn particles was proposed. The corrosion properties of AZ91D weld material were investigated.

  18. General Corrosion and Localized Corrosion of Waste Package Outer Barrier

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    K.G. Mon

    2004-10-01

    The waste package design for the License Application is a double-wall waste package underneath a protective drip shield (BSC 2004 [DIRS 168489]; BSC 2004 [DIRS 169480]). The purpose and scope of this model report is to document models for general and localized corrosion of the waste package outer barrier (WPOB) to be used in evaluating waste package performance. The WPOB is constructed of Alloy 22 (UNS N06022), a highly corrosion-resistant nickel-based alloy. The inner vessel of the waste package is constructed of Stainless Steel Type 316 (UNS S31600). Before it fails, the Alloy 22 WPOB protects the Stainless Steel Type 316 inner vessel from exposure to the external environment and any significant degradation. The Stainless Steel Type 316 inner vessel provides structural stability to the thinner Alloy 22 WPOB. Although the waste package inner vessel would also provide some performance for waste containment and potentially decrease the rate of radionuclide transport after WPOB breach before it fails, the potential performance of the inner vessel is far less than that of the more corrosion-resistant Alloy 22 WPOB. For this reason, the corrosion performance of the waste package inner vessel is conservatively ignored in this report and the total system performance assessment for the license application (TSPA-LA). Treatment of seismic and igneous events and their consequences on waste package outer barrier performance are not specifically discussed in this report, although the general and localized corrosion models developed in this report are suitable for use in these scenarios. The localized corrosion processes considered in this report are pitting corrosion and crevice corrosion. Stress corrosion cracking is discussed in ''Stress Corrosion Cracking of the Drip Shield, the Waste Package Outer Barrier, and the Stainless Steel Structural Material'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 169985]).

  19. Corrosion sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glass, Robert S.; Clarke, Jr., Willis L.; Ciarlo, Dino R.

    1994-01-01

    A corrosion sensor array incorporating individual elements for measuring various elements and ions, such as chloride, sulfide, copper, hydrogen (pH), etc. and elements for evaluating the instantaneous corrosion properties of structural materials. The exact combination and number of elements measured or monitored would depend upon the environmental conditions and materials used which are subject to corrosive effects. Such a corrosion monitoring system embedded in or mounted on a structure exposed to the environment would serve as an early warning system for the onset of severe corrosion problems for the structure, thus providing a safety factor as well as economic factors. The sensor array is accessed to an electronics/computational system, which provides a means for data collection and analysis.

  20. Fatigue and Corrosion in Metals

    CERN Document Server

    Milella, Pietro Paolo

    2013-01-01

    This textbook, suitable for students, researchers and engineers, gathers the experience of more than 20 years of teaching fracture mechanics, fatigue and corrosion to professional engineers and running experimental tests and verifications to solve practical problems in engineering applications. As such, it is a comprehensive blend of fundamental knowledge and technical tools to address the issues of fatigue and corrosion. The book initiates with a systematic description of fatigue from a phenomenological point of view, since the early signs of submicroscopic damage in few surface grains and continues describing, step by step, how these precursors develop to become mechanically small cracks and, eventually, macrocracks whose growth is governed by fracture mechanics. But fracture mechanics is also introduced to analyze stress corrosion and corrosion assisted fatigue in a rather advanced fashion. The author dedicates a particular attention to corrosion starting with an electrochemical treatment that mechanical e...