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Sample records for caustic side solvent

  1. Next Generation Solvent Performance in the Modular Caustic Side Solvent Extraction Process - 15495

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, Tara E. [Savannah River Remediation, LLC., Aiken, SC (United States); Scherman, Carl [Savannah River Remediation, LLC., Aiken, SC (United States); Martin, David [Savannah River Remediation, LLC., Aiken, SC (United States); Suggs, Patricia [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States)

    2015-01-14

    Changes to the Modular Caustic Side Solvent Extraction Unit (MCU) flow-sheet were implemented in the facility. Implementation included changing the scrub and strip chemicals and concentrations, modifying the O/A ratios for the strip, scrub, and extraction contactor banks, and blending the current BoBCalixC6 extractant-based solvent in MCU with clean MaxCalix extractant-based solvent. During the successful demonstration period, the MCU process was subject to rigorous oversight to ensure hydraulic stability and chemical/radionuclide analysis of the key process tanks (caustic wash tank, solvent hold tank, strip effluent hold tank, and decontaminated salt solution hold tank) to evaluate solvent carryover to downstream facilities and the effectiveness of cesium removal from the liquid salt waste. Results indicated the extraction of cesium was significantly more effective with an average Decontamination Factor (DF) of 1,129 (range was 107 to 1,824) and that stripping was effective. The contactor hydraulic performance was stable and satisfactory, as indicated by contactor vibration, contactor rotational speed, and flow stability; all of which remained at or near target values. Furthermore, the Solvent Hold Tank (SHT) level and specific gravity was as expected, indicating that solvent integrity and organic hydraulic stability were maintained. The coalescer performances were in the range of processing results under the BOBCalixC6 flow sheet, indicating negligible adverse impact of NGS deployment. After the Demonstration period, MCU began processing via routine operations. Results to date reiterate the enhanced cesium extraction and stripping capability of the Next Generation Solvent (NGS) flow sheet. This paper presents process performance results of the NGS Demonstration and continued operations of MCU utilizing the blended BobCalixC6-MaxCalix solvent under the NGS flowsheet.

  2. CHEMICAL STABILITY OF POLYPHENYLENE SULFIDE IN THE NEXT GENERATION SOLVENT FOR CAUSTIC-SIDE SOLVENT EXTRACTION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fondeur, F.; Fink, S.

    2011-12-08

    The Office of Waste Processing, within the Office of Technology Innovation and Development, is funding the development of an enhanced solvent for deployment at the Savannah River Site for removal of cesium from High Level Waste. For simplicity, this solvent is referred to as the Next Generation Solvent (NGS). The technical effort is collaboration between Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL), and Argonne National Laboratory. The initial deployment target envisioned for the technology was within the Modular Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction Unit (MCU). Deployment of a new chemical within an existing facility requires verification that the chemical components are compatible with the installed equipment. In the instance of a new organic solvent, the primary focus is on compatibility of the solvent with polyphenylene sulfide (PPS), the polymer used in the coalescers within MCU. This report provides the data from exposing PPS polymer to NGS. The test was conducted over a three month period. PPS is remarkably stable in the presence of the next generation solvent. Testing showed no indication of swelling or significant leaching. Preferential sorption of the Modifier on PPS was observed but the same behavior occurs with the baseline solvent. Therefore, PPS coalescers exposed to the NGS are expected to perform comparably to those in contact with the baseline solvent.

  3. Next Generation Solvent (NGS): Development for Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction of Cesium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report summarizes the FY 2010 and 2011 accomplishments at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) in developing the Next Generation Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction (NG-CSSX) process, referred to commonly as the Next Generation Solvent (NGS), under funding from the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Environmental Management (DOE-EM), Office of Technology Innovation and Development. The primary product of this effort is a process solvent and preliminary flowsheet capable of meeting a target decontamination factor (DF) of 40,000 for worst-case Savannah River Site (SRS) waste with a concentration factor of 15 or higher in the 18-stage equipment configuration of the SRS Modular Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction Unit (MCU). In addition, the NG-CSSX process may be readily adapted for use in the SRS Salt Waste Processing Facility (SWPF) or in supplemental tank-waste treatment at Hanford upon appropriate solvent or flowsheet modifications. Efforts in FY 2010 focused on developing a solvent composition and process flowsheet for MCU implementation. In FY 2011 accomplishments at ORNL involved a wide array of chemical-development activities and testing up through single-stage hydraulic and mass-transfer tests in 5-cm centrifugal contactors. Under subcontract from ORNL, Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) designed a preliminary flowsheet using ORNL cesium distribution data, and Tennessee Technological University confirmed a chemical model for cesium distribution ratios (DCs) as a function of feed composition. Interlaboratory efforts were coordinated with complementary engineering tests carried out (and reported separately) by personnel at Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) and Savannah River Remediation (SRR) with helpful advice by Parsons Engineering and General Atomics on aspects of possible SWPF implementation.

  4. Next Generation Solvent Development for Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction of Cesium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moyer, Bruce A. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Birdwell, Joseph F. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Bonnesen, Peter V. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Bruffey, Stephanie [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2014-03-01

    This report summarizes the FY 2010 and 2011 accomplishments at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) in developing the Next Generation Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction (NG-CSSX) process, referred to commonly as the Next Generation Solvent (NGS), under funding from the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Environmental Management (DOE-EM), Office of Technology Innovation and Development. The primary product of this effort is a process solvent and preliminary flowsheet capable of meeting a target decontamination factor (DF) of 40,000 for worst-case Savannah River Site (SRS) waste with a concentration factor of 15 or higher in the 18-stage equipment configuration of the SRS Modular Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction Unit (MCU). In addition, the NG-CSSX process may be readily adapted for use in the SRS Salt Waste Processing Facility (SWPF) or in supplemental tank-waste treatment at Hanford upon appropriate solvent or flowsheet modifications. Efforts in FY 2010 focused on developing a solvent composition and process flowsheet for MCU implementation. In FY 2011 accomplishments at ORNL involved a wide array of chemical-development activities and testing up through single-stage hydraulic and mass-transfer tests in 5-cm centrifugal contactors. Under subcontract from ORNL, Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) designed a preliminary flowsheet using ORNL cesium distribution data, and Tennessee Technological University confirmed a chemical model for cesium distribution ratios (DCs) as a function of feed composition. Inter laboratory efforts were coordinated with complementary engineering tests carried out (and reported separately) by personnel at Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) and Savannah River Remediation (SRR) with helpful advice by Parsons Engineering and General Atomics on aspects of possible SWPF implementation.

  5. Next Generation Solvent (NGS): Development for Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction of Cesium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moyer, Bruce A. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Birdwell, Jr, Joseph F. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Bonnesen, Peter V. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Bruffey, Stephanie H. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Delmau, Laetitia Helene [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Duncan, Nathan C. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Ensor, Dale [Tennessee Technological Univ., Cookeville, TN (United States); Hill, Talon G. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Lee, Denise L. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Rajbanshi, Arbin [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Roach, Benjamin D. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Szczygiel, Patricia L. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Sloop, Jr., Frederick V. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Stoner, Erica L. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Williams, Neil J. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2014-03-01

    This report summarizes the FY 2010 and 2011 accomplishments at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) in developing the Next Generation Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction (NG-CSSX) process, referred to commonly as the Next Generation Solvent (NGS), under funding from the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Environmental Management (DOE-EM), Office of Technology Innovation and Development. The primary product of this effort is a process solvent and preliminary flowsheet capable of meeting a target decontamination factor (DF) of 40,000 for worst-case Savannah River Site (SRS) waste with a concentration factor of 15 or higher in the 18-stage equipment configuration of the SRS Modular Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction Unit (MCU). In addition, the NG-CSSX process may be readily adapted for use in the SRS Salt Waste Processing Facility (SWPF) or in supplemental tank-waste treatment at Hanford upon appropriate solvent or flowsheet modifications. Efforts in FY 2010 focused on developing a solvent composition and process flowsheet for MCU implementation. In FY 2011 accomplishments at ORNL involved a wide array of chemical-development activities and testing up through single-stage hydraulic and mass-transfer tests in 5-cm centrifugal contactors. Under subcontract from ORNL, Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) designed a preliminary flowsheet using ORNL cesium distribution data, and Tennessee Technological University confirmed a chemical model for cesium distribution ratios (DCs) as a function of feed composition. Interlaboratory efforts were coordinated with complementary engineering tests carried out (and reported separately) by personnel at Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) and Savannah River Remediation (SRR) with helpful advice by Parsons Engineering and General Atomics on aspects of possible SWPF implementation.

  6. Demonstration of Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction with Savannah River Site High Level Waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walker, D.D.

    2001-08-27

    Researchers successfully demonstrated the chemistry and process equipment of the Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction (CSSX) flowsheet for the decontamination of high level waste using a 33-stage, 2-cm centrifugal contactor apparatus at the Savannah River Technology Center. This represents the first CSSX process demonstration using Savannah River Site (SRS) high level waste. Three tests lasting 6, 12, and 48 hours processed simulated average SRS waste, simulated Tank 37H/44F composite waste, and Tank 37H/44F high level waste, respectively.

  7. Stability of the Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction (CSSX) Process Solvent: Effect of High Nitrite on Solvent Nitration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bonnesen, P.V.

    2002-06-26

    The purpose of this investigation was to determine whether nitrated organic compounds could be formed during operation of the Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction (CSSX) process, and whether such compounds would present a safety concern. The CSSX process was developed to remove cesium from alkaline high-level salt waste stored at the US Department of Energy Savannah River Site (SRS). The solvent is composed of the cesium extractant calix[4]arene-bis-(4-tert-octylbenzo-crown-6) (BOBCalixC6), a fluorinated alcohol phase modifier, tri-n-octylamine (TOA), and an isoparaffinic diluent (Iospar{reg_sign}). During the CSSX process, the solvent is expected to be exposed to high concentrations of nitrate and nitrite dissolved in the alkaline waste feed. The solvent will also be exposed to dilute (50 mM) nitric acid solutions containing low concentrations of nitrite during scrubbing, followed by stripping with 1 mM nitric acid. The solvent is expected to last for one year of plant operation, and the temperatures the solvent may experience during the process could range from as low as 15 C to as high as 35 C. Excursions from standard process conditions could result in the solvent experiencing higher temperatures, as well as concentrations of nitrate, nitrite, and most importantly nitric acid, that exceed normal operating conditions. Accordingly, conditions may exist where nitration reactions involving the solvent components, possibly leading to other chemical reactions stemming from nitration reactions, could occur. To model such nitration reactions, the solvent was exposed to the types of nitrate- and nitrite-containing solutions that might be expected to be encountered during the process (even under off-normal conditions), as a function of time, temperature, and concentration of nitrate, nitrite, and nitric acid. The experiments conducted as part of this report were designed to examine the more specific effect that high nitrite concentrations could have on forming nitrated

  8. Recommended Guanidine Suppressor for the Next-Generation Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction Process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moyer, Bruce A [ORNL; Delmau, Laetitia Helene [ORNL; Duncan, Nathan C [ORNL; Ensor, Dale [Tennessee Technological University; Hill, Talon G [ORNL; Lee, Denise L [ORNL; Roach, Benjamin D [ORNL; Sloop Jr, Frederick {Fred} V [ORNL; Williams, Neil J [ORNL

    2013-01-01

    The guanidine recommended for the Next-Generation Caustic-Side is N,N ,N -tris(3,7-dimethyloctyl)guanidine (TiDG). Systematic testing has shown that it is significantly more lipophilic than the previously recommended guanidine DCiTG, the active extractant in the commercial guanidine product LIX -79, while not otherwise changing the solvent performance. Previous testing indicated that the extent of partitioning of the DCiTG suppressor to the aqueous strip solution is significantly greater than expected, potentially leading to rapid depletion of the suppressor from the solvent and unwanted organic concentrations in process effluents. Five candidate guanidines were tested as potential replacements for DCiTG. The tests included batch extraction with simulated waste and flowsheet solutions, third-phase formation, emulsion formation, and partition ratios of the guanidine between the solvent and aqueous strip solution. Preliminary results of a thermal stability test of the TiDG solvent at one month duration indicated performance approximately equivalent to DCiTG. Two of the guanidines proved adequate in all respects, and the choice of TiDG was deemed slightly preferable vs the next best guanidine BiTABG.

  9. Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction Chemical and Physical Properties Progress in FY 2000 and FY 2001.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moyer, BA

    2002-04-17

    The purpose of this work was to provide chemical- and physical-property data addressing the technical risks of the Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction (CSSX) process as applied specifically to the removal of cesium from alkaline high-level salt waste stored at the US Department of Energy Savannah River Site. As part of the overall Salt Processing Project, this effort supported decision-making in regards to selecting a preferred technology among three alternatives: (1) CSSX, (2) nonelutable ion-exchange with an inorganic silicotitanate material and (3) precipitation with tetraphenylborate. High risks, innate to CSSX, that needed specific attention included: (1) chemical stability of the solvent matrix, (2) radiolytic stability of the solvent matrix, (3) proof-of-concept performance of the proposed process flowsheet with simulated waste, and (4) performance of the CSSX flowsheet with actual SRS high-level waste. This body of work directly addressed the chemical-stability risk and additionally provided supporting information that served to plan, carry out, and evaluate experiments conducted by other CSSX investigators addressing the other high risks. Information on cesium distribution in extraction, scrubbing, and stripping served as input for flowsheet design, provided a baseline for evaluating solvent performance under numerous stresses, and contributed to a broad understanding of the effects of expected process variables. In parallel, other measurements were directed toward learning how other system components distribute in the flowsheet. Such components include the solvent components themselves, constituents of the waste, and solvent-degradation products. Upon understanding which components influence flowsheet performance, it was then possible to address in a rational fashion how to clean up the solvent and maintain its stable function.

  10. MODULAR CAUSTIC SIDE SOLVENT EXTRACTION UNIT GAMMA MONITORS SYSTEM FINAL REPORT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Casella, V

    2007-06-25

    The Department of Energy (DOE) selected Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction (CSSX) as the preferred technology for the removal of radioactive cesium from High-Level Waste (HLW) at the Savannah River Site (SRS). Before the full-scale Salt Waste Processing Facility (SWPF) becomes operational, the liquid Waste Organization (LWO) plans to process a portion of dissolved saltcake waste through a Modular CSSX Unit (MCU). This work was derived from Technical Task Request SP-TTR-2004-00013, ''Gamma Monitor for MCU.'' The deliverables for this task are the hardware and software for the gamma monitors and a report summarizing the testing and acceptance of this equipment for use in the MCU. Revision of this report is a deliverable in Technical Task Report SP-TTR-2006-00010, ''NaI Shield Box Testing.'' Gamma-ray monitors were developed to: {lg_bullet} Measure the Cs-137 concentration in the decontaminated salt solution before entering the DSS (Decontaminated Salt Solution) Hold Tank, {lg_bullet} Measure the Cs-137 concentration in the strip effluent before entering the Strip Effluent Hold Tank, {lg_bullet} Verify proper operation of the solvent extraction system by verifying material balance within the process (The DSS Hold Tank Cs-137 concentration will be very low and the Cs-137 concentration in the Strip Effluent Hold Tank will be approximately fifteen times higher than the Cs-137 concentration in the Feed Tank.)

  11. Life extension program for the modular caustic side solvent extraction unit at Savannah River Site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Samadi-Dezfouli, Azadeh

    2012-11-14

    Caustic Side Solvent Extraction (CSSX) is currently used at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Savannah River Site (SRS) for removal of cesium from the high-level salt-wastes stored in underground tanks. At SRS, the CSSX process is deployed in the Modular CSSX Unit (MCU). The CSSX technology utilizes a multi-component organic solvent and annular centrifugal contactors to extract cesium from alkaline salt waste. Coalescers and decanters process the Decontaminated Salt Solution (DSS) and Strip Effluent (SE) streams to allow recovery and reuse of the organic solvent and to limit the quantity of solvent transferred to the downstream facilities. MCU is operated in series with the Actinide Removal Process (ARP) which removes strontium and actinides from salt waste utilizing monosodium titanate. ARP and MCU were developed and implemented as interim salt processing until future processing technology, the CSSX-based Salt Waste Processing Facility (SWPF), is operational. SWPF is slated to come on-line in October 2014. The three year design life of the ARP/MCU process, however, was reached in April 2011. Nevertheless, most of the individual process components are capable of operating longer. An evaluation determined ARP/MCU can operate until 2015 before major equipment failure is expected. The three year design life of the ARP/MCU Life Extension (ARP/MCU LE) program will bridge the gap between current ARP/MCU operations and the start of SWPF operation. The ARP/MCU LE program introduces no new technologies. As a portion of this program, a Next Generation Solvent (NGS) and corresponding flowsheet are being developed to provide a major performance enhancement at MCU. This paper discusses all the modifications performed in the facility to support the ARP/MCU Life Extension. It will also discuss the next generation chemistry, including NGS and new stripping chemistry, which will increase cesium removal efficiency in MCU. Possible implementation of the NGS chemistry in MCU

  12. Caustic-Side Solvent-Extraction Modeling for Hanford Interim Pretreatment System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moyer, B.A.; Birdwell, J.F.; Delmau, L. H.; McFarlane, J.

    2008-06-01

    The purpose of this work is to examine the applicability of the Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction (CSSX) process for the removal of cesium from Hanford tank-waste supernatant solutions in support of the Hanford Interim Pretreatment System (IPS). The Hanford waste types are more challenging than those at the Savannah River Site (SRS) in that they contain significantly higher levels of potassium, the chief competing ion in the extraction of cesium. It was confirmed by use of the CSSX model that the higher levels of potassium depress the cesium distribution ratio (DCs), as validated by measurement of DCs values for four of eight specified Hanford waste-simulant compositions. The model predictions were good to an apparent standard error of ±11%. It is concluded from batch distribution experiments, physical-property measurements, equilibrium modeling, flowsheet calculations, and contactor sizing that the CSSX process as currently employed for cesium removal from alkaline salt waste at the SRS is capable of treating similar Hanford tank feeds. For the most challenging waste composition, 41 stages would be required to provide a cesium decontamination factor (DF) of 5000 and a concentration factor (CF) of 5. Commercial contacting equipment with rotor diameters of 10 in. for extraction and 5 in. for stripping should have the capacity to meet throughput requirements, but testing will be required to confirm that the needed efficiency and hydraulic performance are actually obtainable. Markedly improved flowsheet performance was calculated for a new solvent formulation employing the more soluble cesium extractant BEHBCalixC6 used with alternative scrub and strip solutions, respectively 0.1 M NaOH and 10 mM boric acid. The improved system can meet minimum requirements (DF = 5000 and CF = 5) with 17 stages or more ambitious goals (DF = 40,000 and CF = 15) with 19 stages. Potential benefits of further research and development are identified that would lead to reduced costs, greater

  13. Caustic-Side Solvent-Extraction Modeling for Hanford Interim Pretreatment System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this work is to examine the applicability of the Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction (CSSX) process for the removal of cesium from Hanford tank-waste supernatant solutions in support of the Hanford Interim Pretreatment System (IPS). The Hanford waste types are more challenging than those at the Savannah River Site (SRS) in that they contain significantly higher levels of potassium, the chief competing ion in the extraction of cesium. It was confirmed by use of the CSSX model that the higher levels of potassium depress the cesium distribution ratio (DCs), as validated by measurement of DCs values for four of eight specified Hanford waste-simulant compositions. The model predictions were good to an apparent standard error of ±11%. It is concluded from batch distribution experiments, physical-property measurements, equilibrium modeling, flowsheet calculations, and contactor sizing that the CSSX process as currently employed for cesium removal from alkaline salt waste at the SRS is capable of treating similar Hanford tank feeds. For the most challenging waste composition, 41 stages would be required to provide a cesium decontamination factor (DF) of 5000 and a concentration factor (CF) of 5. Commercial contacting equipment with rotor diameters of 10 in. for extraction and 5 in. for stripping should have the capacity to meet throughput requirements, but testing will be required to confirm that the needed efficiency and hydraulic performance are actually obtainable. Markedly improved flowsheet performance was calculated for a new solvent formulation employing the more soluble cesium extractant BEHBCalixC6 used with alternative scrub and strip solutions, respectively 0.1 M NaOH and 10 mM boric acid. The improved system can meet minimum requirements (DF = 5000 and CF = 5) with 17 stages or more ambitious goals (DF = 40,000 and CF = 15) with 19 stages. Potential benefits of further research and development are identified that would lead to reduced costs, greater

  14. Demonstration of Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction with Optimized Solvent in the 2-cm Centrifugal Contactor Apparatus Using Dissolved Salt Cake from Tank 37H

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Norato, M.A.

    2003-01-06

    Researchers successfully demonstrated the chemistry of the Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction (CSSX) flow sheet with optimized solvent. This represents the third such process demonstration using actual Savannah River Site (SRS) high level waste (HLW). The present test differed from previous studies in the use of radioactive waste derived from Tank 37H dissolved salt cake, as opposed to supernate solutions used in previous demonstrations.

  15. THE CHEMICAL AND RADIATION RESISTANCE OF POLYPHENYLENE SULFIIDE AS ENCOUNTERED IN THE MODULAR CAUSTIC SIDE SOLVENT EXTRACTION PROCESSES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fondeur, F.; Herman, D.; Poirier, M.; Fink, S.

    2011-06-30

    Polyphenylene sulfide (PPS) is a semicrystalline polymer with excellent engineering plastic properties and suitable processing temperatures. PPS can also be made containing branches (using a trifunctional monomer) and with crosslinked microstructure (when curing the monomer at high temperature in the presence of oxygen). PPS is made from the condensation reaction between para-dichlorobenzene and sodium sulfide with the assistance of a catalyst (to lower the activation barrier). The synthesis conditions for making PPS has evolved since its invention in the 1960's to the optimal conditions developed by the Philips Corporation in the 1970's. The resulting polymer consists of chemically stable molecular moieties such as benzene rings and ether like sulfur linkages between the aromatic rings. Polyphenylene sulfide (PPS) is extremely resistant to gamma irradiation, caustic solution, and dilute nitric acid. PPS is the material of construction for the coalescers used in the Modular Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction Unit (MCU). After applying the equivalent of 3.3 E8 rad (330 Mrad), or the equivalent of 11 years of gamma irradiation (assuming a stripping solution concentration of 7.5 Ci/gal), and several months of exposures to 3M caustic solution and caustic salt simulant, no dimensional changes nor chemical changes were detected in PPS whether the PPS was in fiber form or in a composite with E-glass fibers. However, PPS acts as a media for heterogeneous nucleation. In particular, PPS appears to favor aluminosilicate formation in saturated solutions of aluminum and silicon in caustic environments. Parallel testing, in progress, is examining the stability of PPS when exposed to the new solvent formulation under development for MCU. Preliminary data, after two months of exposure, demonstrates PPS is stable to the new solvent.

  16. MODULAR CAUSTIC SIDE SOLVENT EXTRACTION UNIT (MCU) GAMMA MONITORS SYSTEM FINAL REPORT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Casella, V

    2005-12-15

    The Department of Energy (DOE) selected Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction (CSSX) as the preferred technology for the removal of radioactive cesium from High-Level Waste (HLW) at the Savannah River Site (SRS). Before the full-scale Salt Waste Processing Facility (SWPF) becomes operational, the Closure Business Unit (CBU) plans to process a portion of dissolved saltcake waste through a Modular CSSX Unit (MCU). This work was derived from Technical Task Request SP-TTR-2004-00013, ''Gamma Monitor for MCU''. The deliverables for this task are the hardware and software for the gamma monitors and a report summarizing the testing and acceptance of this equipment for use in the MCU. Gamma-ray monitors are required to: (1) Measure the Cs-137 concentration in the decontaminated salt solution before entering the DSS (Decontaminated Salt Solution) Hold Tank, (2) Measure the Cs-137 concentration in the strip effluent before entering the Strip Effluent Hold Tank, (3) Verify proper operation of the solvent extraction system by verifying material balance within the process (The DSS Hold Tank Cs-137 concentration will be very low and the Cs-137 concentration in the Strip Effluent Hold Tank will be fifteen times higher than the Cs-137 concentration in the Feed Tank.) Sodium iodide monitors are used to measure the Cs-137 concentration in the piping before the DSS Hold tank, while GM monitors are used for Cs-137 measurements before the Strip Effluent Hold Tank. Tungsten shields were designed using Monte Carlo calculations and fabricated to reduce the process background radiation at the detector positions. These monitors were calibrated with NIST traceable standards that were specially made to be the same as the piping being monitored. Since this gamma ray monitoring system is unique, specially designed software was written and acceptance tested by Savannah River National Laboratory personnel. The software is a LabView-based application that serves as a unified

  17. NEXT GENERATION SOLVENT-MATERIALS COMPATIBILITY WITH POLYMER COMPONENTS WITHIN MODULAR CAUSTIC-SIDE SOLVENT EXTRACTION UNIT (FINAL REPORT)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fondeur, F.; Peters, T.; Fink, S.

    2012-01-17

    The Office of Waste Processing, within the Office of Technology Innovation and Development, is funding the development of an enhanced solvent for deployment at the Savannah River Site for removal of cesium from High Level Waste. The technical effort is collaboration between Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL), and Argonne National Laboratory. The first deployment target for the technology is within the Modular Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction Unit (MCU). Deployment of a new chemical within an existing facility requires verification that the chemical components are compatible with the installed equipment. In the instance of a new organic solvent, the primary focus is on compatibility of the solvent with organic polymers used in the facility. This report provides the data from exposing these polymers to the Next Generation Solvent (NGS). The test was conducted over six months. An assessment of the dimensional stability of polymers present in MCU (i.e., PEEK, Grafoil, Tefzel and Isolast) in the modified NGS (where the concentration of LIX{reg_sign}79 and MaxCalix was varied systematically) showed that LIX{reg_sign}79 selectively affected Tefzel and its different grades (by an increase in size and lowering its density). The copolymer structure of Tefzel and possibly its porosity allows for the easier diffusion of LIX{reg_sign}79. Tefzel is used as the seat material in some of the valves at MCU. Long term exposure to LIX{reg_sign}79, may make the valves hard to operate over time due to the seat material (Tefzel) increasing in size. However, since the physical changes of Tefzel in the improved solvent are comparable to the changes in the CSSX baseline solvent, no design changes are needed with respect to the Tefzel seating material. PEEK, Grafoil and Isolast were not affected by LIX{reg_sign}79 and MaxCalix within six months of exposure. The initial rapid weight gain observed in every polymer is assigned to the finite and

  18. Thermal And Spectroscopic Analyses Of Next Generation Caustic Side Solvent Extraction Solvent Contacted With 3, 8, And 16 Molar Nitric Acid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fondeur, F. F.; Fink, S. D.

    2011-12-07

    A new solvent system referred to as Next Generation Solvent or NGS, has been developed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory for the removal of cesium from alkaline solutions in the Caustic Side Solvent Extraction process. The NGS is proposed for deployment at MCU{sup a} and at the Salt Waste Processing Facility. This work investigated the chemical compatibility between NGS and 16 M, 8 M, and 3 M nitric acid from contact that may occur in handling of analytical samples from MCU or, for 3 M acid, which may occur during contactor cleaning operations at MCU. This work shows that reactions occurred between NGS components and the high molarity nitric acid. Reaction rates are much faster in 8 M and 16 M nitric acid than in 3 M nitric acid. In the case of 16 M and 8 M nitric acid, the nitric acid reacts with the extractant to produce initially organo-nitrate species. The reaction also releases soluble fluorinated alcohols such as tetrafluoropropanol. With longer contact time, the modifier reacts to produce a tarry substance with evolved gases (NO{sub x} and possibly CO). Calorimetric analysis of the reaction product mixtures revealed that the organo-nitrates reaction products are not explosive and will not deflagrate.

  19. Characterization of solids deposited on the modular caustic-side solvent extraction unit (MCU) coalescer media removed in May and October 2014

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fondeur, F. F. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2015-10-01

    During routine maintenance, the coalescers utilized in the Modular Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction Unit (MCU) processing of Salt Batch 6 and a portion of Salt Batch 7 were sampled and submitted to the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) for characterization, for the purpose of identifying solid phase constituents that may be accumulating in these coalescers. Specifically, two samples were received and characterized: A decontaminated salt solution (DSS) coalescer sample and a strip effluent (SE) coalescer sample. Aliquots of the samples were analyzed by XRD, Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) Spectroscopy, SEM, and EDS. Other aliquots of the samples were leached in acid solution, and the leachates were analyzed by ICP-AES. In addition, modeling was performed to provide a basis for comparison of the analytical results.

  20. Development of the Next-Generation Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction (NG-CSSX) Process for Cesium Removal from High-Level Tank Waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper describes the chemical performance of the Next-Generation Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction (NG-CSSX) process in its current state of development for removal of cesium from the alkaline high-level tank wastes at the Savannah River Site (SRS) in the US Department of Energy (USDOE) complex. Overall, motivation for seeking a major enhancement in performance for the currently deployed CSSX process stems from needs for accelerating the cleanup schedule and reducing the cost of salt-waste disposition. The primary target of the NG-CSSX development campaign in the past year has been to formulate a solvent system and to design a corresponding flowsheet that boosts the performance of the SRS Modular CSSX Unit (MCU) from a current minimum decontamination factor of 12 to 40,000. The chemical approach entails use of a more soluble calixarene-crown ether, called MaxCalix, allowing the attainment of much higher cesium distribution ratios (DCs) on extraction. Concurrently decreasing the Cs-7SB modifier concentration is anticipated to promote better hydraulics. A new stripping chemistry has been devised using a vitrification-friendly aqueous boric acid strip solution and a guanidine suppressor in the solvent, resulting in sharply decreased DCs on stripping. Results are reported herein on solvent phase behavior and batch Cs distribution for waste simulants and real waste together with a preliminary flowsheet applicable for implementation in the MCU. The new solvent will enable MCU to process a much wider range of salt feeds and thereby extend its service lifetime beyond its design life of three years. Other potential benefits of NG-CSSX include increased throughput of the SRS Salt Waste Processing Facility (SWPF), currently under construction, and an alternative modular near-tank application at Hanford.

  1. Conceptual Design of a Simplified Skid-Mounted Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction Process for Removal of Cesium from Savannah Rive Site High-Level Waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Birdwell, JR.J.F.

    2004-05-12

    This report presents the results of a conceptual design of a solvent extraction process for the selective removal of {sup 137}Cs from high-level radioactive waste currently stored in underground tanks at the U.S. Department of Energy's Savannah River Site (SRS). This study establishes the need for and feasibility of deploying a simplified version of the Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction (CSSX) process; cost/benefit ratios ranging from 33 to 55 strongly support the considered deployment. Based on projected compositions, 18 million gallons of dissolved salt cake waste has been identified as having {sup 137}Cs concentrations that are substantially lower than the worst-case design basis for the CSSX system that is to be deployed as part of the Salt Waste Processing Facility (SWPF) but that does not meet the waste acceptance criteria for immobilization as grout in the Saltstone Manufacturing and Disposal Facility at SRS. Absent deployment of an alternative cesium removal process, this material will require treatment in the SWPF CSSX system, even though the cesium decontamination factor required is far less than that provided by that system. A conceptual design of a CSSX processing system designed for rapid deployment and having reduced cesium decontamination factor capability has been performed. The proposed accelerated-deployment CSSX system (CSSX-A) has been designed to have a processing rate of 3 million gallons per year, assuming 90% availability. At a more conservative availability of 75% (reflecting the novelty of the process), the annual processing capacity is 2.5 million gallons. The primary component of the process is a 20-stage cascade of centrifugal solvent extraction contactors. The decontamination and concentration factors are 40 and 15, respectively. The solvent, scrub, strip, and wash solutions are to have the same compositions as those planned for the SWPF CSSX system. As in the SWPF CSSX system, the solvent and scrub flow rates are equal. The system

  2. Demonstration of Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction with Optimized Solvent in the 2-cm Centrifugal Contactor Apparatus Using Dissolved Salt Cake from Tank 37H

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Norato, M.A.

    2002-10-21

    A solvent extraction process for removal of cesium from alkaline solutions has been developed utilizing a novel solvent invented at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). This solvent consists of a calix[4]arene-crown-6 extractant (BOBCalix) dissolved in an inert hydrocarbon matrix (Isopar(R) L). An alkylphenoxy alcohol modifier added to the solvent enhances the extraction power of the calixarene and prevents the formation of a third phase. An additional additive, trioctylamine (TOA), improves stripping performance and mitigates the effects of any surfactants present in the feed stream. The solvent extraction process was successfully demonstrated with actual SRS HLW supernate during testing performed at SRTC in FY-2001. However, the solvent system has recently been optimized to enhance extractant solubility in the diluent and increase suppressor concentration. The results of the optimized solvent performance in tests using the same SRS composite waste supernate as was used FY-20 01 are described in another report.

  3. Characterization of Solids Deposited on the Modular Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction Unit (MCU) Strip Effluent (SE) Coalescer Media Removed in April 2015

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fondeur, F. F. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2016-06-13

    entrance discs of the coalescer. A solvent trim (a cocktail of solvent components with a high concentration of modifier) was added to the solvent on 2/22/2015. It is believed that the trim did not mix completely with the solvent and that it was subsequently spread around the MCU components including the coalescers, where it may have deposited. Chronologically, the modifier, the TiDG’s decomposition products and silicates deposited on the entrance discs first and after the pressure drop increased significantly, parts of the coalescer media detached itself from the central porous steel mandrel and a significant amount of steel debris, mercury, titanium, and additional aluminum and silicates deposited on the coalescer.

  4. Time Motion Study for Modular Caustic Solvent Extraction Unit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Defense Waste Processing Facilities (DWPF) at the Savannah River Site (SRS) is used to process high-level radioactive waste from the Tank Farm into borosilicate glass to reduce the mobility of the radionuclides and has processed and vitrified nuclear wastes into canisters for long-term disposal since FY96. All wastes vitrified to date in DWPF are ''sludge only'' wastes. The old salt waste processing technology, ITP, was suspended in FY98 due to benzene build-up inside the tank. The new selected technologies for treating the salt waste are Actinide Removal Process (ARP) and Caustic Side Solvent Extraction process (CSSX). The Modular CSSX Unit (MCU) is a cesium removal process that will be operated downstream of the ARP. The MCU is a short-term method for cesium removal, which uses the same technology as the Salt Waste Processing Facility (SWPF). Once the SWPF becomes operational, the MCU will be shut down. The modeling request is from the MCU project to verify the validity of its Concept Design Package. The modeling task is not typical because there are five different facilities/projects/processes involved, i.e., Tank Farm, ARP, MCU, Saltstone, and DWPF. Each facility, project, and process has their own management team and organization, with its own fiscal responsibility and performance accountability. In addition, from a task cost perspective, MCU desires to minimize modeling not directly associated with their facility. The balancing of comprehensive analysis with limited granularity is challenging. The customer expectation is the model should be small and delivered within weeks. Modeling a stand-alone MCU will not yield overall meaningful results because it can be expected that most problems will occur at interfaces with other facilities. This paper discusses how we set out our modeling strategy, overcame obstacles, avoided touchy issues, and delivered the modeling result on time and on budget

  5. CHARACTERIZATION AND EVALUATION OF CAUSTIC WASH TANK AND SOLVENT HOLD TANK SAMPLES FROM MCU FROM AUGUST TO SEPTEMBER 2011

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fondeur, F.; Fink, S.

    2012-08-01

    During processing of Salt Batches 3 and 4 in the Modular Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction Unit (MCU), the decontamination efficiency for cesium declined from historical values and from expectations based on laboratory testing. This report documents efforts to analyze samples of solvent and process solutions from MCU in an attempt to understand the cause of the reduced performance and to recommend mitigations. CWT Solutions from MCU from the time period of variable decontamination factor (DF) performance which covers from April 2011 to September 2011 (during processing of Salt Batch 4) were examined for impurities using chromatography and spectroscopy. The results indicate that impurities were found to be of two types: aromatic containing impurities most likely from Modifier degradation and aliphatic type impurities most likely from Isopar{reg_sign} L and tri-n-octylamine (TOA) degradation. Caustic washing the Solvent Hold Tank (SHT) solution with 1M NaOH improved its extraction ability as determined from {sup 22}Na uptake tests. Evidence from this work showed that pH variance in the aqueous solutions within the range of 1M nitric acid to 1.91M NaOH that contacted the solvent samples does not influence the analytical determination of the TOA concentration by GC-MS.

  6. Effect of solvent addition sequence on lycopene extraction efficiency from membrane neutralized caustic peeled tomato waste.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phinney, David M; Frelka, John C; Cooperstone, Jessica L; Schwartz, Steven J; Heldman, Dennis R

    2017-01-15

    Lycopene is a high value nutraceutical and its isolation from waste streams is often desirable to maximize profits. This research investigated solvent addition order and composition on lycopene extraction efficiency from a commercial tomato waste stream (pH 12.5, solids ∼5%) that was neutralized using membrane filtration. Constant volume dilution (CVD) was used to desalinate the caustic salt to neutralize the waste. Acetone, ethanol and hexane were used as direct or blended additions. Extraction efficiency was defined as the amount of lycopene extracted divided by the total lycopene in the sample. The CVD operation reduced the active alkali of the waste from 0.66 to Extraction efficiency varied from 32.5% to 94.5%. This study demonstrates a lab scale feasibility to extract lycopene efficiently from tomato processing byproducts. PMID:27542486

  7. [Caustic ingestions].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adukauskiene, Dalia; Mazeikiene, Sandra; Rumba, Arvydas; Vizgirdaite, Venta

    2009-01-01

    Caustic ingestions (alkalis, acids) may cause severe chemical burns and lifelong complications, which worsen life quality. Approximately 80% of caustic ingestions occur in children. They mostly intoxicate because of chemical substances kept insecurely or in inappropriate containers. Until now, there is no general opinion about diagnostics and management of caustic ingestions. Therefore, the main aim of this article is accurately represent diagnostic and treatment options believing that this information would help physicians to diagnose caustic ingestions easier and faster, to provide emergency management correctly, and to avoid acute and chronic complications.

  8. Causticizing process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Engdal, H.

    1987-03-10

    This invention seeks to provide a method in which the soda lye obtained as a result of cellulose cooking process and unslaked lime are used for producing white liquor which can be re-used in the cooking process. In this method, the heat released by the slaking of lime with soda lye is recovered by a high pressure slaking process wherein the heat is transferred, either to the steam separating from the lye, which steam is then led to the desired application, or to some other medium to be heated. The invention is characterized in that the soda lye to be causticized is divided into two parts, one of which is used for the slaking of lime by adding to it all the unslaked lime needed for the causticizing process, and that, following slaking, the two volumes are brought together for the actual causticizing reaction involving the total amount of lye needed. This invention provides the advantage that the amount of lye needed is smaller, and so the temperature can be increased.

  9. Characterization of solids deposited on the modular caustic-side solvent extraction unit (MCU) coalescer media removed in October 2014

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fondeur, F. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2016-03-01

    In February 2015, Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) received a Strip Effluent (SE) coalescer (FLT-304) from MCU. That coalescer was first installed at MCU in July 2014 and removed in October 2014. While processing approximately 31,400 gallons of strip solution, the pressure drop steadily increased from 1 psi to beyond the administrative limit of 20 psi. The physical and chemical analysis was conducted on this coalescer to determine the mechanism that led to the plugging of this coalescer. Characterization of this coalescer revealed the adsorption of organic containing amines as well as MCU modifier. The amines are probably from the decomposition of the suppressor (TiDG) as well as from bacteria. This adsorption may have changed the surface energetics (characteristics) of the coalescer fibers and therefore, their wetting behavior. A very small amount of inorganic solids were found to have deposited on this coalescer (possibly an artifact of cleaning the coalescer with Boric acid. However, we believe that inorganic precipitation, as has been seen in the past, did not play a role in the high pressure drop rise of this coalescer. With regards to the current practice of reducing the radioactive content of the SE coalescer, it is recommended that future SE coalescer should be flushed with 10 mM boric acid which is currently used at MCU. Plugging of the SE coalescer was most likely due to the formation and accumulation of a water-in-oil emulsion that reduced the overall porosity of the coalescer. There is also evidence that a bimodal oil particle distribution may have entered and deposited in the coalescer and caused the initial increase in pressure drop.

  10. Saltstone Vault Classification Samples Modular Caustic Side Solvent Extraction Unit/Actinide Removal Process Waste Stream April 2011

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) was asked to prepare saltstone from samples of Tank 50H obtained by SRNL on April 5, 2011 (Tank 50H sampling occurred on April 4, 2011) during 2QCY11 to determine the non-hazardous nature of the grout and for additional vault classification analyses. The samples were cured and shipped to Babcock and Wilcox Technical Services Group-Radioisotope and Analytical Chemistry Laboratory (B and W TSG-RACL) to perform the Toxic Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP) and subsequent extract analysis on saltstone samples for the analytes required for the quarterly analysis saltstone sample. In addition to the eight toxic metals - arsenic, barium, cadmium, chromium, mercury, lead, selenium and silver - analytes included the underlying hazardous constituents (UHC) antimony, beryllium, nickel, and thallium which could not be eliminated from analysis by process knowledge. Additional inorganic species determined by B and W TSG-RACL include aluminum, boron, chloride, cobalt, copper, fluoride, iron, lithium, manganese, molybdenum, nitrate/nitrite as Nitrogen, strontium, sulfate, uranium, and zinc and the following radionuclides: gross alpha, gross beta/gamma, 3H, 60Co, 90Sr, 99Tc, 106Ru, 106Rh, 125Sb, 137Cs, 137mBa, 154Eu, 238Pu, 239/240Pu, 241Pu, 241Am, 242Cm, and 243/244Cm. B and W TSG-RACL provided subsamples to GEL Laboratories, LLC for analysis for the VOCs benzene, toluene, and 1-butanol. GEL also determines phenol (total) and the following radionuclides: 147Pm, 226Ra and 228Ra. Preparation of the 2QCY11 saltstone samples for the quarterly analysis and for vault classification purposes and the subsequent TCLP analyses of these samples showed that: (1) The saltstone waste form disposed of in the Saltstone Disposal Facility in 2QCY11 was not characteristically hazardous for toxicity. (2) The concentrations of the eight RCRA metals and UHCs identified as possible in the saltstone waste form were present at levels below the UTS. (3) Most of the inorganic species measured in the leachate do not exceed the MCL, SMCL or TW limits. (4) The inorganic waste species that exceeded the MCL by more than a factor of 10 were nitrate, nitrite and the sum of nitrate and nitrite. (5) Analyses met all quality assurance specifications of US EPA SW-846. (6) The organic species (benzene, toluene, 1-butanol, phenol) were either not detected or were less than reportable for the vault classification samples. (7) The gross alpha and radium isotopes could not be determined to the MCL because of the elevated background which raised the detection limits. (8) Most of the beta/gamma activity was from 137Cs and its daughter 137mBa. (9) The concentration of 137Cs and 90Sr were present in the leachate at concentrations 1/40th and 1/8th respectively than in the 2003 vault classification samples. The saltstone waste form placed in the Saltstone Disposal Facility in 2QCY11 met the SCHWMR R.61-79.261.24(b) RCRA metals requirements for a nonhazardous waste form. The TCLP leachate concentrations for nitrate, nitrite and the sum of nitrate and nitrite were greater than 10x the MCLs in SCDHEC Regulations R.61-107.19, Part I A, which confirms the Saltstone Disposal Facility classification as a Class 3 Landfill. The saltstone waste form placed in the Saltstone Disposal Facility in 2QCY11 met the R.61-79.268.48(a) non wastewater treatment standards.

  11. SALTSTONE VAULT CLASSIFICATION SAMPLES MODULAR CAUSTIC SIDE SOLVENT EXTRACTION UNIT/ACTINIDE REMOVAL PROCESS WASTE STREAM APRIL 2011

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eibling, R.

    2011-09-28

    Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) was asked to prepare saltstone from samples of Tank 50H obtained by SRNL on April 5, 2011 (Tank 50H sampling occurred on April 4, 2011) during 2QCY11 to determine the non-hazardous nature of the grout and for additional vault classification analyses. The samples were cured and shipped to Babcock & Wilcox Technical Services Group-Radioisotope and Analytical Chemistry Laboratory (B&W TSG-RACL) to perform the Toxic Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP) and subsequent extract analysis on saltstone samples for the analytes required for the quarterly analysis saltstone sample. In addition to the eight toxic metals - arsenic, barium, cadmium, chromium, mercury, lead, selenium and silver - analytes included the underlying hazardous constituents (UHC) antimony, beryllium, nickel, and thallium which could not be eliminated from analysis by process knowledge. Additional inorganic species determined by B&W TSG-RACL include aluminum, boron, chloride, cobalt, copper, fluoride, iron, lithium, manganese, molybdenum, nitrate/nitrite as Nitrogen, strontium, sulfate, uranium, and zinc and the following radionuclides: gross alpha, gross beta/gamma, 3H, 60Co, 90Sr, 99Tc, 106Ru, 106Rh, 125Sb, 137Cs, 137mBa, 154Eu, 238Pu, 239/240Pu, 241Pu, 241Am, 242Cm, and 243/244Cm. B&W TSG-RACL provided subsamples to GEL Laboratories, LLC for analysis for the VOCs benzene, toluene, and 1-butanol. GEL also determines phenol (total) and the following radionuclides: 147Pm, 226Ra and 228Ra. Preparation of the 2QCY11 saltstone samples for the quarterly analysis and for vault classification purposes and the subsequent TCLP analyses of these samples showed that: (1) The saltstone waste form disposed of in the Saltstone Disposal Facility in 2QCY11 was not characteristically hazardous for toxicity. (2) The concentrations of the eight RCRA metals and UHCs identified as possible in the saltstone waste form were present at levels below the UTS. (3) Most of the inorganic species measured in the leachate do not exceed the MCL, SMCL or TW limits. (4) The inorganic waste species that exceeded the MCL by more than a factor of 10 were nitrate, nitrite and the sum of nitrate and nitrite. (5) Analyses met all quality assurance specifications of US EPA SW-846. (6) The organic species (benzene, toluene, 1-butanol, phenol) were either not detected or were less than reportable for the vault classification samples. (7) The gross alpha and radium isotopes could not be determined to the MCL because of the elevated background which raised the detection limits. (8) Most of the beta/gamma activity was from 137Cs and its daughter 137mBa. (9) The concentration of 137Cs and 90Sr were present in the leachate at concentrations 1/40th and 1/8th respectively than in the 2003 vault classification samples. The saltstone waste form placed in the Saltstone Disposal Facility in 2QCY11 met the SCHWMR R.61-79.261.24(b) RCRA metals requirements for a nonhazardous waste form. The TCLP leachate concentrations for nitrate, nitrite and the sum of nitrate and nitrite were greater than 10x the MCLs in SCDHEC Regulations R.61-107.19, Part I A, which confirms the Saltstone Disposal Facility classification as a Class 3 Landfill. The saltstone waste form placed in the Saltstone Disposal Facility in 2QCY11 met the R.61-79.268.48(a) non wastewater treatment standards.

  12. Using GC-FID to Quantify the Removal of 4-sec-Butylphenol from NGS Solvent by NaOH

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sloop, Jr., Frederick V. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Moyer, Bruce A. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2014-12-01

    A caustic wash of the solvent used in the Next-Generation Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction (NG-CSSX) process was found to remove the modifier breakdown product 4-sec-butylphenol (SBP) with varying efficiency depending on the aqueous NaOH concentration. Recent efforts at ORNL have aimed at characterizing the flowsheet chemistry and reducing the technical uncertainties of the NG-CSSX process. One technical uncertainty has been the efficacy of caustic washing of the solvent for the removal of lipophilic anions, in particular, the efficient removal of SBP, an important degradation product of the solvent modifier, Cs-7SB. In order to make this determination, it was necessary to develop a sensitive and reliable analytical technique for the detection and quantitation of SBP. This report recounts the development of a GC-FID-based (Gas Chromatography Flame Ionization Detection) technique for analyzing SBP and the utilization of the technique to subsequently confirm the ability of the caustic wash to efficiently remove SBP from the Next Generation Solvent (NGS) used in NG-CSSX. In particular, the developed technique was used to monitor the amount of SBP removed from a simple solvent and the full NGS by contact with sodium hydroxide wash solutions over a range of concentrations. The results show that caustic washing removes SBP with effectively the same efficiency as it did in the original Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction (CSSX) process.

  13. Experimental Study of UDS Solvents for Purifying Highly Sour Natural Gas at Industrial Side-stream Plant

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ke Yuan; Shen Benxian; Sun Hui; Liu Jichang; Liu Lu; Xu Shenyan

    2016-01-01

    The desulfurization performance of the UDS solvents was investigated at an industrial side-stream plant and was compared with that of MDEA solvent. A mass transfer performance model was employed for explaining the COS absorp-tion into different solvents. Meanwhile, the regeneration performance of the UDS solvents was evaluated in side-stream tests. Results indicate that under the conditions covering an absorption temperature of 40℃, a pressure of 8.0 MPa, and a gas to liquid volume ratio (V/L) of around 230, the H2S content in puriifed gas can be reduced to 4.2 mg/m3 and 0 by using solvents UDS-II and UDS-III, respectively. Moreover, the total sulfur content in both puriifed gases is less than 80 mg/m3. As a result, the UDS-III solvent shows by 30 percentage points higher in COS removal efifciency than MDEA. In addition, the total volume mass transfer coefifcient of UDS solvent is found to be twice higher than that of MDEA. Furthermore, the UDS solvents exhibit satisfactory thermal stability and regeneration performance.

  14. Characterization of Solids Deposited on the Modular Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction Unit (MCU) Strip Effluent (SE) Coalescer Media Removed in April 2015

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fondeur, F. F. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2016-06-13

    On June 2015, Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) received a Strip Effluent (SE) coalescer (FLT-304) from MCU. That coalescer was first installed at MCU in late October 2014 and removed in April 2015. While processing approximately 48,700 gallons of strip solution, the pressure drop steadily increased linearly from 1 psi to near 16 psi (the administrative limit is 17 psi) with the total filtrate volume (2.1E-4 psi/gal of filtrate). The linear behavior is due to the combined effect of a constant deposition of material that starts from the closed-end to the mid-section of the coalescer reducing the available surface area of the coalescer for fluid passage (linearly with filtrate volume) and the formation of a secondary emulsion (water in NG-CSSX) on the fibers of the coalescer media. Both effects reduced the coalescer porosity by at least 13% (after processing 48,700 gallons). Before the coalescer was removed, it was flushed with a 10 mM boric acid solution to reduce the dose level. To determine the nature of the deposited material, a physical and chemical analysis of the coalescer was conducted.

  15. Caustics in dark matter haloes

    CERN Document Server

    Mohayaee, R; Mohayaee, Roya; Colombi, Stephane; Fort, Bernard; Gavazzi, Raphael; Shandarin, Sergei; Touma, Jihad

    2005-01-01

    Cold dark matter haloes are populated by high-density structures with sharply-peaked profiles known as caustics which have not yet been resolved by 3-dimensional numerical simulations. Here, we derive semi-analytic expressions for the density profiles near caustics in haloes which form by self-similar accretions of dark matter with infinitesimal velocity dispersion. A simple rescaling shows that these profiles are universal: they are valid for all caustics and irrespective of physical parameters of the halo. We derive the maximum density of the caustics and show that it depends on the velocity dispersion and the caustic location. Finally, we demonstrate that there can be a significant contribution to the emission measure from dark matter particle annihilation in the caustics.

  16. Detection of nanosecond time scale side-chain jumps in a protein dissolved in water/glycerol solvent

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu Jun; Xue, Yi; Skrynnikov, Nikolai R. [Purdue University, Department of Chemistry (United States)], E-mail: nikolai@purdue.edu

    2009-09-15

    In solution, the correlation time of the overall protein tumbling, {tau}{sub R}, plays a role of a natural dynamics cutoff-internal motions with correlation times on the order of {tau}{sub R} or longer cannot be reliably identified on the basis of spin relaxation data. It has been proposed some time ago that the 'observation window' of solution experiments can be expanded by changing the viscosity of solvent to raise the value of {tau}{sub R}. To further explore this concept, we prepared a series of samples of {alpha}-spectrin SH3 domain in solvent with increasing concentration of glycerol. In addition to the conventional {sup 15}N labeling, the protein was labeled in the Val, Leu methyl positions ({sup 13}CHD{sub 2} on a deuterated background). The collected relaxation data were used in asymmetric fashion: backbone {sup 15}N relaxation rates were used to determine {tau}{sub R} across the series of samples, while methyl {sup 13}C data were used to probe local dynamics (side-chain motions). In interpreting the results, it has been initially suggested that addition of glycerol leads only to increases in {tau}{sub R}, whereas local motional parameters remain unchanged. Thus the data from multiple samples can be analyzed jointly, with {tau}{sub R} playing the role of experimentally controlled variable. Based on this concept, the extended model-free model was constructed with the intent to capture the effect of ns time-scale rotameric jumps in valine and leucine side chains. Using this model, we made a positive identification of nanosecond dynamics in Val-23 where ns motions were already observed earlier. In several other cases, however, only tentative identification was possible. The lack of definitive results was due to the approximate character of the model-contrary to what has been assumed, addition of glycerol led to a gradual 'stiffening' of the protein. This and other observations also shed light on the interaction of the protein with glycerol

  17. Velocity peaks and caustic rings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The late infall of cold dark matter onto an isolated galaxy produces flows with definite velocity vectors at any physical point in the galactic halo. It also produces caustic rings, which are places in space where the dark matter density is very large. The self-similar model of galactic halo formation predicts that the caustic ring radii an follow the approximate law an ≅ 1/n. Bumps in the rotation curves of NGC 3198 and of our own galaxy are interpreted as due to caustic rings of dark matter

  18. Causticizing for Black Liquor Gasifiers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scott Sinquefeld; James Cantrell; Xiaoyan Zeng; Alan Ball; Jeff Empie

    2009-01-07

    The cost-benefit outlook of black liquor gasification (BLG) could be greatly improved if the smelt causticization step could be achieved in situ during the gasification step. Or, at a minimum, the increase in causticizing load associated with BLG could be mitigated. A number of chemistries have been proven successful during black liquor combustion. In this project, three in situ causticizing processes (titanate, manganate, and borate) were evaluated under conditions suitable for high temperature entrained flow BLG, and low temperature steam reforming of black liquor. The evaluation included both thermodynamic modeling and lab experimentation. Titanate and manganate were tested for complete direct causticizing (to thus eliminate the lime cycle), and borates were evaluated for partial causticizing (to mitigate the load increase associated with BLG). Criteria included high carbonate conversion, corresponding hydroxide recovery upon hydrolysis, non process element (NPE) removal, and economics. Of the six cases (three chemistries at two BLG conditions), only two were found to be industrially viable: titanates for complete causticizing during high temperature BLG, and borates for partial causticizing during high temperature BLG. These two cases were evaluated for integration into a gasification-based recovery island. The Larsen [28] BLG cost-benefit study was used as a reference case for economic forecasting (i.e. a 1500 tpd pulp mill using BLG and upgrading the lime cycle). By comparison, using the titanate direct causticizing process yielded a net present value (NPV) of $25M over the NPV of BLG with conventional lime cycle. Using the existing lime cycle plus borate autocausticizing for extra capacity yielded a NPV of $16M.

  19. Dynamic properties of the native free antithrombin from molecular dynamics simulations: computational evidence for solvent- exposed Arg393 side chain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tóth, László; Fekete, Attila; Balogh, Gábor; Bereczky, Zsuzsanna; Komáromi, István

    2015-09-01

    While antithrombin (AT) has small basal inhibitory activity, it reaches its full inhibitory potential against activated blood coagulation factors, FXa, FIXa, and FIIa (thrombin), via an allosteric and/or template (bridging) mechanism by the action of heparin, heparan sulfate, or heparin-mimetic pentasaccharides (PS). From the numerous X-ray structures available for different conformational states of AT, only indirect and incomplete conclusions can be drawn on the inherently dynamic properties of AT. As a typical example, the basal inhibitory activity of AT cannot be interpreted on the basis of "non-activated" free antithrombin X-ray structures since the Arg393 side chain, playing crucial role in antithrombin-proteinase interaction, is not exposed. In order to reveal the intrinsic dynamic properties and the reason of basal inhibitory activity of antithrombin, 2 μs molecular dynamics simulations were carried out on its native free-forms. It was shown from the simulation trajectories that the reactive center loop which is functioning as "bait" for proteases, even without any biasing potential can populate conformational state in which the Arg393 side chain is solvent exposed. It is revealed from the trajectory analysis that the peptide sequences correspond to the helix D extension, and new helix P formation can be featured with especially large root-mean-square fluctuations. Mutual information analyses of the trajectory showed remarkable (generalized) correlation between those regions of antithrombin which changed their conformations as the consequence of AT-PS complex formation. This suggests that allosteric information propagation pathways are present even in the non-activated native form of AT. PMID:25483839

  20. Evaluation of an alkaline-side solvent extraction process for cesium removal from SRS tank waste using laboratory-scale centrifugal contactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An alkaline-side solvent extraction process for cesium removal from Savannah River Site (SRS) tank waste was evaluated experimentally using a laboratory-scale centrifugal contactor. Single-stage and multistage tests were conducted with this contactor to determine hydraulic performance, stage efficiency, and general operability of the process flowsheet. The results and conclusions of these tests are reported along with those from various supporting tests. Also discussed is the ability to scale-up from laboratory- to plant-scale operation when centrifugal contractors are used to carry out the solvent extraction process. While some problems were encountered, a promising solution for each problem has been identified. Overall, this alkaline-side cesium extraction process appears to be an excellent candidate for removing cesium from SRS tank waste

  1. Single Stage Contactor Testing Of The Next Generation Solvent Blend

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herman, D. T.; Peters, T. B.; Duignan, M. R.; Williams, M. R.; Poirier, M. R.; Brass, E. A.; Garrison, A. G.; Ketusky, E. T.

    2014-01-06

    The Modular Caustic Side Solvent Extraction (CSSX) Unit (MCU) facility at the Savannah River Site (SRS) is actively pursuing the transition from the current BOBCalixC6 based solvent to the Next Generation Solvent (NGS)-MCU solvent to increase the cesium decontamination factor. To support this integration of NGS into the MCU facility the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) performed testing of a blend of the NGS (MaxCalix based solvent) with the current solvent (BOBCalixC6 based solvent) for the removal of cesium (Cs) from the liquid salt waste stream. This testing utilized a blend of BOBCalixC6 based solvent and the NGS with the new extractant, MaxCalix, as well as a new suppressor, tris(3,7dimethyloctyl) guanidine. Single stage tests were conducted using the full size V-05 and V-10 liquid-to-liquid centrifugal contactors installed at SRNL. These tests were designed to determine the mass transfer and hydraulic characteristics with the NGS solvent blended with the projected heel of the BOBCalixC6 based solvent that will exist in MCU at time of transition. The test program evaluated the amount of organic carryover and the droplet size of the organic carryover phases using several analytical methods. The results indicate that hydraulically, the NGS solvent performed hydraulically similar to the current solvent which was expected. For the organic carryover 93% of the solvent is predicted to be recovered from the stripping operation and 96% from the extraction operation. As for the mass transfer, the NGS solvent significantly improved the cesium DF by at least an order of magnitude when extrapolating the One-stage results to actual Seven-stage extraction operation with a stage efficiency of 95%.

  2. New insights into side effect of solvents on the aggregation of human islet amyloid polypeptide 11-20.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Yexuan; Yu, Lanlan; Yang, Ran; Ma, Chuanguo; Qu, Ling-bo; Harrington, Peter de B

    2016-02-01

    The formation of highly ordered fibrils for the human islet amyloid polypeptide (hIAPP) is considered as one of the precipitating factors of type 2 diabetes mellitus. In this study, an emerging new approach microscale thermophoresis and conventional ThT fluorescence assay were utilized to investigate the aggregation behavior of hIAPP(11-20), giving a new insight of the solvent effect on the aggregation of hIAPP(11-20). hIAPP(11-20) displayed different aggregation behaviors in various buffers, revealing that hIAPP(11-20) not only self-aggregates but also binds to solvent components. hIAPP(11-20) had a higher binding affinity for Tris than other selected buffers because multiple hydrogen bonds form, resulting in weaker self-aggregation of hIAPP(11-20) at the early stage of aggregation and prolonging the fibril formation process. hIAPP(11-20) displayed similar self-aggregation in both HEPES and pure water. Negatively charged phosphate ions in the PBS solution 'neutralize' the charges carried by hIAPP(11-20) itself to some extent, causing rapid aggregation of hIAPP(11-20), and leading to a shorter fibrillation process of hIAPP(11-20). These results revealed that solvents contribute to the aggregation of hIAPP(11-20) and demonstrated the affect of solvents on the activity of biomolecules. Additionally, as a new technique, microscale thermophoresis offers a powerful and promising approach to study the early stages of aggregation of peptides or proteins. PMID:26653463

  3. SOLVENT HOLD TANK SAMPLE RESULTS FOR MCU-12-488, MCU-12-489, MCU-12-490, MCU-12-491, MCU-12-492 AND MCU-12-493: QUARTERLY SAMPLE FROM OCTOBER 2012

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fondeur, F. F.; Peters, T. B.; Fink, S. D.

    2013-01-16

    Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) analyzed solvent samples from Modular Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction Unit (MCU) in support of continuing operations. A quarterly analysis of the solvent is required to maintain solvent composition within specifications. Analytical results of the analyses of Solvent Hold Tank (SHT) samples MCU-12-488, MCU-12-489, MCU-12-490, MCU-12-491, MCU-12-492 and MCU-12-493 received 24 October 2012 are reported. The results show that the solvent at MCU does not require an Isopar® L addition, but it will require addition of trioctylamine. SRNL also analyzed the SHT sample for {sup 137}Cs content and determined the measured value is within tolerance but is trending upward compared to the {sup 137}Cs measurement made last year.

  4. 27 CFR 21.102 - Caustic soda, liquid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Caustic soda, liquid. 21....102 Caustic soda, liquid. (a) The liquid caustic soda may consist of either 50 percent or 73 percent...: Accurately weigh 2 grams of liquid caustic soda into a 100 ml volumetric flask, dissolve, and dilute to...

  5. Labelling of the solvent DMSO as side reaction of methylations with n.c.a. [11C]CH3I

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Competing labelling of solvent dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) can occur during the 11C-methylation of amine precursors. A kinetic analysis of the methylation reaction of DMSO with n.c.a. [11C]CH3I was performed at 120 deg. C resulting in rate constants. The rate constant for the formation of the intermediate, methylated DMSO ([11C]DMSO-M), is compared to the reaction of [11C]CH3I with two tertiary amines, namely Dexetimide and Desmethyloxotremorine-M. The specific activity of the labelled product is reduced due to partial 12C-methylation of the precursor amines by [11C]DMSO-M in cases of significant DMSO labelling as side reaction

  6. On the degree of caustics of reflection

    CERN Document Server

    Josse, Alfrederic

    2012-01-01

    Given a point S and an irreducible algebraic curve C in P^2, we consider the caustic of reflection defined as the envelope of the reflected lines from the point S on the curve C. We identify this caustic with the Zariski closure of the image of C by a rational map. Thanks to a general fundamental lemma, we give a formula of the degree of the caustic of reflection in terms of multiplicity numbers of pro-branches of C. Our formula holds in the most general case. We also give some precisions about Pl\\"ucker formulas.

  7. Poly(quinoxaline-2,3-diyl)s bearing (S)-3-octyloxymethyl side chains as an efficient amplifier of alkane solvent effect leading to switch of main-chain helical chirality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagata, Yuuya; Nishikawa, Tsuyoshi; Suginome, Michinori

    2014-11-12

    Poly(quinoxaline-2,3-diyl) containing (S)-3-octyloxymethyl side chains was synthesized to investigate the induction of a single-handed helical sense to the main chain in various alkane solvents. The polymer showed an efficient solvent dependent helix inversion between n-octane (M-helix) and cyclooctane (P-helix). After a screening of alkane solvents, it was found that linear alkanes having large molecular aspect ratios induced M-helical structure, and branched or cyclic alkanes having small molecular aspect ratios induced P-helical structure. A polymer ligand containing (S)-3-octyloxymethyl side chains and diphenylphosphino pendants also exhibited solvent-dependent helical inversion between n-octane and cyclooctane, leading to the highly enantioselective production of the both enantiomeric product in a palladium-catalyzed asymmetric hydrosilylation reaction of styrene (R-product 94% ee in n-octane and S-product 90% ee in cyclooctane). PMID:25343492

  8. Dependence of Excited-State Properties of a Low-Bandgap Photovoltaic Copolymer on Side-Chain Substitution and Solvent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Ning-Jiu; Zhang, Mao-Jie; Liang, Ran; Fu, Li-Min; Zhang, Wei; Ai, Xi-Cheng; Hou, Jian-Hui; Zhang, Jian-Ping

    2016-07-01

    The excited-state properties and chain conformations of a new low-bandgap copolymer based on benzo[1,2-b:4,5-b']dithiophene (BDT) and thieno[3,4-b]thiophene with meta-alkoxyphenyl-substituted side chains in solution were investigated comprehensively. Time-resolved spectroscopy suggested that the excited-state properties were sensitive to the conformations of the copolymer in solution. In addition, excited-state dynamics analyses revealed the photogeneration of triplet excited states by intersystem crossing (ISC) at a rate constant of ∼0.4×10(9)  s(-1) as a result of direct meta-alkoxyphenyl connection to the donor unit BDT irrespective to the macromolecular conformations. According to El-Sayed's rule, the fast ISC herein is correlated with the change of orbital types between singlet and triplet excited states as also shown by quantum chemical calculations. Our studies may shed light on the structure-property relationships of photovoltaic materials. PMID:27226175

  9. Caustic addition system operability test procedure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This test procedure provides instructions for performing operational testing of the major components of the 241-AN-107 Caustic Addition System by WHC and Kaiser personnel at the Rotating Equipment Shop run-in pit (Bldg. 272E)

  10. Caustic graphene plasmons with Kelvin angle

    CERN Document Server

    Shi, Xihang; Gao, Fei; Xu, Hongyi; Yang, Zhaoju; Zhang, Baile

    2015-01-01

    A century-long argument made by Lord Kelvin that all swimming objects have an effective Mach number of 3, corresponding to the Kelvin angle of 19.5 degree for ship waves, has been recently challenged with the conclusion that the Kelvin angle should gradually transit to the Mach angle as the ship velocity increases. Here we show that a similar phenomenon can happen for graphene plasmons. By analyzing the caustic wave pattern of graphene plasmons stimulated by a swift charged particle moving uniformly above graphene, we show that at low velocities of the charged particle, the caustics of graphene plasmons form the Kelvin angle. At large velocities of the particle, the caustics disappear and the effective semi-angle of the wave pattern approaches the Mach angle. Our study introduces caustic wave theory to the field of graphene plasmonics, and reveals a novel physical picture of graphene plasmon excitation during electron energy-loss spectroscopy measurement.

  11. Tunable caustic phenomena in electron wavefields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tavabi, Amir Hossein, E-mail: a.tavabi@fz-juelich.de [Ernst Ruska-Centre for Microscopy and Spectroscopy with Electrons (ER-C) and Peter Grünberg Institute (PGI), Forschungszentrum Jülich, D-52425 Jülich (Germany); Migunov, Vadim; Dwyer, Christian; Dunin-Borkowski, Rafal E. [Ernst Ruska-Centre for Microscopy and Spectroscopy with Electrons (ER-C) and Peter Grünberg Institute (PGI), Forschungszentrum Jülich, D-52425 Jülich (Germany); Pozzi, Giulio [Ernst Ruska-Centre for Microscopy and Spectroscopy with Electrons (ER-C) and Peter Grünberg Institute (PGI), Forschungszentrum Jülich, D-52425 Jülich (Germany); Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Bologna, Viale B. Pichat 6/2, 40127 Bologna (Italy)

    2015-10-15

    Novel caustic phenomena, which contain fold, butterfly and elliptic umbilic catastrophes, are observed in defocused images of two approximately collinear oppositely biased metallic tips in a transmission electron microscope. The observed patterns depend sensitively on defocus, on the applied voltage between the tips and on their separation and lateral offset. Their main features are interpreted on the basis of a projected electrostatic potential model for the electron-optical phase shift. - Highlights: • Electron-optical caustics are observed in defocused images of biased metallic tips. • The caustics depend on defocus, on the bias between the tips and on their separation. • The setup offers the flexibility to study a wide variety of caustic phenomena.

  12. Probing dark matter caustics with weak lensing

    CERN Document Server

    Gavazzi, R; Fort, B; Gavazzi, Raphael; Mohayaee, Roya; Fort, Bernard

    2006-01-01

    Caustics are high-density structures that form frequently in collisionless media. Under self-gravity, cold dark matter flows focus onto caustics which are yet to be resolved in numerical simulations and or observed in the real world. If detected, caustics would provide a strong evidence for dark matter and would rule out alternative models such as those with modified dynamics. Here, we demonstrate how they might be observed in the weak lensing data. We evaluate the shear distortion and show that its radial profile is marked by a characteristic sawtooth pattern due to the caustics in dark matter haloes that form by selfsimilar accretion. We discuss the observational complications, mainly due to the poor knowledge of the virial radii of the haloes and demonstrate that a superposition of about 600 cluster-size haloes would give a signal-to-noise ratio which is sufficiently large for the detection of caustics with ground-based observations. This number is reduced to 200 for space-based observations. These bounds ...

  13. Line Caustic Microlensing and Limb Darkening

    CERN Document Server

    Rhie, S H; Rhie, Sun Hong; Bennett, David P.

    1999-01-01

    In a line caustic crossing microlensing event, the caustic line moving across the surface of the source star provides a direct method to measure the integrated luminosity profile of the star. Combined with the enormous brightening at the caustic crossings, microlensing offers a promising tool for studying stellar luminosity profiles. We derive the amplification behavior of the two extra images that become partial images conjoined across the critical curve at a line caustic crossing. We identify the multiplicative factors that depend on the caustic crossing point and the relative size of the star, and the shape function that depends on the stellar luminosity profile. We examine the analytic limb-darkening models -- linear, square root, and square -- using the analytic form of the shape function. We find that the microlensing lightcurves must be determined to an accuracy of better than 0.3-0.8% in order to be able to determine the linear limb-darkening parameter $c_1$ with precision of binaries as reported by P...

  14. Scintillation Caustics in Planetary Occultation Light Curves

    CERN Document Server

    Cooray, A R; Cooray, Asantha R.

    2003-01-01

    We revisit the GSC5249-01240 light curve obtained during its occultation by Saturn's North polar region. In addition to refractive scintillations, the power spectrum of intensity fluctuations shows an enhancement of power between refractive and diffractive regimes. We identify this excess power as due to high amplitude spikes in the light curve and suggest that these spikes are due to caustics associated with ray crossing situations. The flux variation in individual spikes follows the expected caustic behavior, including diffraction fringes which we have observed for the first time in a planetary occultation light curve. The presence of caustics in scintillation light curves require an inner scale cut off to the power spectrum of underlying density fluctuations associated with turbulence. Another possibility is the presence of gravity waves in the atmosphere. While occultation light curves previously showed the existence of refractive scintillations, a combination of small projected stellar size and a low rel...

  15. SUPPLEMENTAL ANALYSES FOR SOLVENT HOLD TANK SAMPLES MCU-11-314, MCU-11-315, MCU-11-316, MCU-11-317, MCU-11-318 AND MCU-11-319

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peters, T.; Washington, A; . Fondeur, F.; Fink, S.

    2011-09-29

    Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) periodically analyses solvent samples from Modular Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction Unit (MCU) in support of continuing operations. A quarterly analysis of the solvent is required to maintain solvent composition within specifications. Analytical results of the analyses of Solvent Hold Tank (SHT) samples MCU-11-314, MCU-11-315, MCU-11-316, MCU-11-317, MCU-11-318 and MCU-11-319 have been previously reported. MCU has experienced a modest decline in cesium removal efficiency while processing the current feed, 'Macrobatch 3'. While the target decontamination factor (DF) is 200, the fiscal year 2011 DF average is 161. The results of the prior solvent analysis report did not identify a specific factor that would correlate with the poor cesium decontamination beyond a low concentration of the suppressor, trioctylamine. New analyses of the quarterly sample are reported in this document, as well as a cross-check of {sup 137}Cs measurements for SRNL and F/H lab. Furthermore, in an attempt to discover the reason for the decline in DF at MCU, SRNL was tasked with analyzing numerous Caustic Wash Tank (CWT) and chemical feed samples.

  16. Electrochemical generation of fentons reagent to treat spent caustic wastewater

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An important wastewater stream from oil refineries is the spent caustic. Caustic solutions are used as scrubbing agent during the desulphurization process to eliminate sulphur an mercaptans from oil and gasses. Spent caustic is classified as DOO3 (reactive sulphide) hazardous waste under the US Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). (Author)

  17. SOLVENT HOLD TANK SAMPLE RESULTS FOR MCU-13-189, MCU-13-190, AND MCU-13-191: QUARTERLY SAMPLE FROM SEPTEMBER 2013

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fondeur, F.; Taylor-Pashow, K.

    2013-10-31

    Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) analyzed solvent samples from Modular Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction Unit (MCU) in support of continuing operations. A quarterly analysis of the solvent is required to maintain solvent composition within specifications. Analytical results of the analyses of Solvent Hold Tank (SHT) samples MCU-13-189, MCU-13-190, and MCU-13-191 received on September 4, 2013 are reported. The results show that the solvent (remaining heel in the SHT tank) at MCU contains excess Isopar L and a deficit concentration of modifier and trioctylamine when compared to the standard MCU solvent. As with the previous solvent sample results, these analyses indicate that the solvent does not require Isopar L trimming at this time. Since MCU is switching to NGS, there is no need to add TOA nor modifier. SRNL also analyzed the SHT sample for {{sup 137}Cs content and determined the measured value is within tolerance and the value has returned to levels observed in 2011.

  18. Rendering Caustics on Non-Lambertian Surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Henrik Wann

    1997-01-01

    This paper presents a new technique for rendering caustics on non-Lambertian surfaces. The method is based on an extension of the photon map which removes previous restrictions limiting the usage to Lambertian surfaces. We add information about the incoming direction to the photons and this allow...

  19. Sample Results From The Extraction, Scrub, And Strip Test For The Blended NGS Solvent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report summarizes the results of the extraction, scrub, and strip testing for the September 2013 sampling of the Next Generation Solvent (NGS) Blended solvent from the Modular Caustic Side-Solvent Extraction Unit (MCU) Solvent Hold Tank. MCU is in the process of transitioning from the BOBCalixC6 solvent to the NGS Blend solvent. As part of that transition, MCU has intentionally created a blended solvent to be processed using the Salt Batch program. This sample represents the first sample received from that blended solvent. There were two ESS tests performed where NGS blended solvent performance was assessed using either the Tank 21 material utilized in the Salt Batch 7 analyses or a simulant waste material used in the V-5/V-10 contactor testing. This report tabulates the temperature corrected cesium distribution, or DCs values, step recovery percentage, and actual temperatures recorded during the experiment. This report also identifies the sample receipt date, preparation method, and analysis performed in the accumulation of the listed values. The calculated extraction DCs values using the Tank 21H material and simulant are 59.4 and 53.8, respectively. The DCs values for two scrub and three strip processes for the Tank 21 material are 4.58, 2.91, 0.00184, 0.0252, and 0.00575, respectively. The D-values for two scrub and three strip processes for the simulant are 3.47, 2.18, 0.00468, 0.00057, and 0.00572, respectively. These values are similar to previous measurements of Salt Batch 7 feed with lab-prepared blended solvent. These numbers are considered compatible to allow simulant testing to be completed in place of actual waste due to the limited availability of feed material

  20. Sample Results From The Extraction, Scrub, And Strip Test For The Blended NGS Solvent

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Washington, A. L. II; Peters, T. B.

    2014-03-03

    This report summarizes the results of the extraction, scrub, and strip testing for the September 2013 sampling of the Next Generation Solvent (NGS) Blended solvent from the Modular Caustic Side-Solvent Extraction Unit (MCU) Solvent Hold Tank. MCU is in the process of transitioning from the BOBCalixC6 solvent to the NGS Blend solvent. As part of that transition, MCU has intentionally created a blended solvent to be processed using the Salt Batch program. This sample represents the first sample received from that blended solvent. There were two ESS tests performed where NGS blended solvent performance was assessed using either the Tank 21 material utilized in the Salt Batch 7 analyses or a simulant waste material used in the V-5/V-10 contactor testing. This report tabulates the temperature corrected cesium distribution, or DCs values, step recovery percentage, and actual temperatures recorded during the experiment. This report also identifies the sample receipt date, preparation method, and analysis performed in the accumulation of the listed values. The calculated extraction DCs values using the Tank 21H material and simulant are 59.4 and 53.8, respectively. The DCs values for two scrub and three strip processes for the Tank 21 material are 4.58, 2.91, 0.00184, 0.0252, and 0.00575, respectively. The D-values for two scrub and three strip processes for the simulant are 3.47, 2.18, 0.00468, 0.00057, and 0.00572, respectively. These values are similar to previous measurements of Salt Batch 7 feed with lab-prepared blended solvent. These numbers are considered compatible to allow simulant testing to be completed in place of actual waste due to the limited availability of feed material.

  1. Interaction of aqueous caustic with acidic oils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chiwetelu, C.I.; Hornof, V.; Neale, G.H. (Univ. of Ottawa, Ottawa, ON (Canada))

    High content of native carboxylic acids make heavy oils acidic. It is generally accepted that these acids react with caustic reagents present in floodwater, resulting in the in-situ formation of surface active soap anions. When these adsorb at the oil-water interface, they can drastically lower the interfacial tension to the point where residual oil is mobilized. The most intriguing aspect of these acid/caustic interactions is the dynamic nature of the interfacial tension. Given a sufficiently long time, the dynamic tension would attain an equilibrium state. Measurements were made of the equilibrium interfacial tensions of acidified oleic phases contacted with a wide range of caustic concentrations in the aqueous phase. A novel measurement technique (photomicropendography) was used, and data analysis was carried out by nonlinear regression. The present approach utilizes pre-selected fatty acids in a defined oleic phase, enabling quantification of relevant model parameters and facilitating evaluation of key variables influencing interfacial activity. The acid ionization constant and the equilibrium constant governing the formation of inactive soap species were found to be the most important parameters for systems of oleic and lauric acids dissolved in hexadecane. Regression analysis showed that the acid dissociation constant (pKa) of oleic acid ranged from 6.2 to 6.9 and was dependent on the working acid concentration. For lauric acid, the pKa values were in the range of 9 to 11 depending on the caustic concentration of the aqueous phase. Species aggregation in both the oleic and aqueous phases is mostly responsible for the variations in pKa values. 30 refs., 10 figs., 4 tabs.

  2. In Situ Causticizing for Black Liquor Gasification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scott Alan Sinquefield

    2005-10-01

    Black liquor gasification offers a number of attractive incentives to replace Tomlinson boilers but it also leads to an increase in the causticizing load. Reasons for this have been described in previous reports (FY04 ERC, et.al.). The chemistries have also been covered but will be reviewed here briefly. Experimental results of the causticizing reactions with black liquor are presented here. Results of the modeling work were presented in detail in the Phase 1 report. They are included in Table 2 for comparison but will not be discussed in detail. The causticizing agents were added to black liquor in the ratios shown in Table 1, mixed, and then spray-dried. The mixture ratios (doping levels) reflect amount calculated from the stoichiometry above to achieve specified conversions shown in the table. The solids were sieved to 63-90 microns for use in the entrained flow reactors. The firing conditions are shown in Table 2. Pictures and descriptions of the reactors can be found in the Phase 1 annual report. Following gasification, the solids (char) was collected and analyzed by coulometric titration (for carbonate and total carbon), and by inductively coupled plasma emission spectroscopy (ICP) for a wide array of metals.

  3. DWPF FLOWSHEET STUDIES WITH SIMULANT TO DETERMINE THE IMPACT OF NEXT GENERATION SOLVENT ON THE CPC PROCESS AND GLASS FORMULATION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Newell, J.; Peeler, D.; Edwards, T.; Hay, M.; Stone, M.

    2011-06-29

    As a part of the Actinide Removal Process (ARP)/Modular Caustic Side Solvent Extraction Unit (MCU) Life Extension Project, a next generation solvent (NGS), a new strip acid, and modified monosodium titanate (mMST) will be deployed. The NGS is comprised of four components: 0.050 M MaxCalix (extractant), 0.50 M Cs-7SB (modifier), 0.003 M guanidine-LIX-79, with the balance ({approx}74 wt%) being Isopar{reg_sign} L. The strip acid will be changed from dilute nitric acid to dilute boric acid (0.01 M). Because of these changes, experimental testing with the next generation solvent and mMST was required to determine the impact of these changes in 512-S and Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) operations, as well as Chemical Process Cell (CPC), glass formulation activities, and melter operations. Because of these changes, experimental testing with the next generation solvent and mMST is required to determine the impact of these changes. A Technical Task Request (TTR) was issued to support the assessments of the impact of the next generation solvent and mMST on the downstream DWPF flowsheet unit. The TTR identified five tasks to be investigated: (1) CPC Flowsheet Demonstration for NGS; (2) Solvent Stability for DWPF CPC Conditions; (3) Glass Formulation Studies; (4) Boron Volatility and Melt Rate; and (5) CPC Flowsheet Demonstration for mMST.

  4. Test report - caustic addition system operability test procedure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This Operability Test Report documents the test results of test procedure WHC-SD-WM-OTP-167 ''Caustic Addition System Operability Test Procedure''. The Objective of the test was to verify the operability of the 241-AN-107 Caustic Addition System. The objective of the test was met

  5. Solvent Extraction Batch Distribution Coefficients with Savannah River Site Dissolved Salt Cake

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walker, D.D.

    2002-03-07

    Researchers characterized high-level waste derived from dissolved salt cake from the Savannah River Site (SRS) tank farm and measured the cesium distribution coefficients (DCs) for extraction, scrub, and stripping steps of the caustic-side solvent extraction (CSSX) flowsheet. The measurements used two SRS high-level waste samples derived entirely or in part from salt cake. The chemical compositions of both samples are reported. Dissolved salt cake waste contained less Cs-137 and more dianions than is typical of supernate samples. Extraction and scrub DCs values for both samples exceeded process requirements and agreed well with model predictions. Strip DCs values for the Tank 46F sample also met process requirements. However, strip DCs values could not be calculated for the Tank 38H sample due to the poor material balance for Cs-137. Potential explanations for the poor material balance are discussed and additional work to determine the cause is described.

  6. Solvent Extraction Batch Distribution Coefficients with Savannah River Site Dissolved Salt Cake

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walker, D.D.

    2002-05-22

    Researchers characterized high-level waste derived from dissolved salt cake from the Savannah River Site (SRS) tank farm and measured the cesium distribution coefficients (DCs) for extraction, scrub, and stripping steps of the caustic-side solvent extraction (CSSX) flowsheet. The measurements used two SRS high-level waste samples derived entirely or in part from salt cake. The chemical compositions of both samples are reported. Dissolved salt cake waste contained less Cs-137 and more dianions than is typical of supernate samples. Extraction, scrub, and strip DCs values for both samples exceeded process requirements and agreed well with model predictions. The results indicate no significant problems processing dissolved salt cake compared to supernate. During the course of testing, researchers observed sorption of cesium on glass sample vials containing strip solutions. The problem was detected in the material balance calculated for each organic/aqueous contact. Methods and recommendations for avoiding this problem are discussed.

  7. Pressure-dependent helix inversion of poly(quinoxaline-2,3-diyl)s containing chiral side chains in non-aqueous solvents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagata, Yuuya; Takeda, Ryohei; Suginome, Michinori

    2015-06-30

    Poly(quinoxaline-2,3-diyl)s with chiral (S)-2-butoxymethyl side chains dissolved in 1,2-dichloroethane experience a reversible pressure-dependent helix inversion from P- to M-helical structures between 0.1 MPa and 200 MPa.

  8. Preconceptual Design Description for Caustic Recycle Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sevigny, Gary J.; Poloski, Adam P.; Fountain, Matthew S.; Kurath, Dean E.

    2008-04-12

    The U.S. Department of Energy plans to vitrify both high-level and low-activity waste at the Hanford Site in southeastern Washington State. One aspect of the planning includes a need for a caustic recycle process to separate sodium hydroxide for recycle. Sodium is already a major limitation to the waste-oxide loading in the low-activity waste glass to be vitrified at the Waste Treatment Plant, and additional sodium hydroxide will be added to remove aluminum and to control precipitation in the process equipment. Aluminum is being removed from the high level sludge to reduce the number of high level waste canisters produced. A sodium recycle process would reduce the volume of low-activity waste glass produced and minimize the need to purchase new sodium hydroxide, so there is a renewed interest in investigating sodium recycle. This document describes an electrochemical facility for recycling sodium for the WTP.

  9. Sever Gastrointestinal Caustic Injury and Surgical Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Bazrafshan

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Approximately 20% of caustic ingestions result in some degree of esophageal injury. Alkaline materials are the most frequent corrosive materials ingested.     The physical form and PH of ingested materials play a critical role in the site and type of gastrointestinal injury (PH > 12 or PH < 1.5, crystalline drain cleaners. Unlike Alkaline solutions, strong acids are bitter, burn on contact and usually produce vomiting but when swallowed pass rapidly through the esophagus and damage the antrum of the stomach. I will present the results of 5 cases of gastric out let obstruction after acid ingestion (subtotal gastrectomy and billroth 1 and 4 patients with extensive esophageal damage and perforation ( Total esophagectomy and gastric pull up.  

  10. Test report - 241-AN-274 Caustic Pump Control Building

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paintner, G.P.

    1995-05-01

    This Acceptance Test Report documents the test results of test procedure WHC-SD-WM-ATP-135 `Acceptance Test Procedure for the 241-AN- 274 Caustic Pump Control Building.` The objective of the test was to verify that the 241-AN-274 Caustic Pump Control Building functions properly based on design specifications per applicable H-2-85573 drawings and associated ECN`s. The objective of the test was met.

  11. Additives effects on crystallization and morphology in a novel caustic aluminate solution decomposition process

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ying ZHANG; Sbili ZHENG; Yifei ZHANG; Hongbin XU; Yi ZHANG

    2009-01-01

    A novel process of caustic aluminate solution decomposition by alcohol medium was developed by the Institute of Process Engineering, Chinese Academy of Sciences in order to solve the problem of low decomposi-tion ratio in the traditional Bayer seeded hydrolysis process. In this research, effects of additives on the crystallization ratio, secondary particle size and morphol-ogy of aluminum hydroxide in the new process were studied to obtain high-quality products. On the basis of primary selection of additives, an orthogonal design L9(34)was used as a chemometric method to investigate the effects of additives. The studied parameters include the reaction style, quantity of additives, caustic soda concen-tration, as well as the combination manner. The crystal-lization ratios of sodium aluminate solution and crystal size of aluminum hydroxide, determined by ICP-OES, SEM and MLPSA (Malvern Laser Particle Size Analyzer), were used to evaluate the effects of the additives. The results showed that different combination manners could promote agglomeration or dispersion. An additive composed by Tween 80 and PEG 200 could promote agglomeration,while a spot of PEG species had a relatively strong dispersion effect. However, the additives had little effects on the crystallization ratios. According to the Raman spectra result, the added alcohol medium might serve as a kind of solvent.

  12. Illuminating Hot Jupiters in caustic crossing

    CERN Document Server

    Sajadian, Sedighe

    2010-01-01

    In recent years a large number of Hot Jupiters orbiting in a very close orbit around the parent stars have been explored with the transit and doppler effect methods. Here in this work we study the gravitational microlensing effect of a binary lens on a parent star with a Hot Jupiter revolving around it. Caustic crossing of the planet makes enhancements on the light curve of the parent star in which the signature of the planet can be detected by high precision photometric observations. We use the inverse ray shooting method with tree code algorithm to generate the combined light curve of the parent star and the planet. In order to investigate the probability of observing the planet signal, we do a Monte-Carlo simulation and obtain the observational optical depth of $\\tau \\sim 10^{-8}$. We show that about ten years observations of Galactic Bulge with a network of telescopes will enable us detecting about ten Hot Jupiter with this method. Finally we show that the observation of the microlensing event in infra-re...

  13. Caustic Structures and Detectability of Circumbinary Planets in Microlensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luhn, Jacob K.; Penny, Matthew T.; Gaudi, B. Scott

    2016-08-01

    Recent discoveries of circumbinary planets in Kepler data show that there is a viable channel of planet formation around binary main-sequence stars. Motivated by these discoveries, we have investigated the caustic structures and detectability of circumbinary planets in microlensing events. We have produced a suite of animations of caustics as a function of the projected separation and angle of the binary host to efficiently explore caustic structures over the entire circumbinary parameter space. Aided by these animations, we have derived a semi-empirical analytic expression for the location of planetary caustics, which are displaced in circumbinary lenses relative to those of planets with a single host. We have used this expression to show that the dominant source of caustic motion will be due to the planet’s orbital motion and not that of the binary star. Finally, we estimate the fraction of circumbinary microlensing events that are recognizable as such to be significant (5%–50%) for binary projected separations in the range 0.1–0.5 in units of Einstein radii.

  14. Caustics and Rogue Waves in an Optical Sea

    CERN Document Server

    Mathis, Amaury; Toenger, Shanti; Dias, Frederic; Genty, Goery; Dudley, John M

    2015-01-01

    There are many examples in physics of systems showing rogue wave behaviour, the generation of high amplitude events at low probability. Although initially studied in oceanography, rogue waves have now been seen in many other domains, with particular recent interest in optics. Although most studies in optics have focussed on how nonlinearity can drive rogue wave emergence, purely linear effects have also been shown to induce extreme wave amplitudes. In this paper, we report a detailed experimental study of linear rogue waves in an optical system, using a spatial light modulator to impose random phase structure on a coherent optical field. After free space propagation, different random intensity patterns are generated, including partially-developed speckle, a broadband caustic network, and an intermediate pattern with characteristics of both speckle and caustic structures. Intensity peaks satisfying statistical criteria for rogue waves are seen especially in the case of the caustic network, and are associated w...

  15. Caustics of exotic ($1/r^n$) binary gravitational lenses

    CERN Document Server

    Bozza, V

    2015-01-01

    With some violation of the energy conditions, it is possible to combine scalar fields or other types of matter so as to build metrics that fall as $1/r^n$ asymptotically, one famous example being the Ellis wormhole. Gravitational lensing provides a natural arena to distinguish and identify such exotic objects in our Universe. In fact, these metrics predict the possibility to defocus light, which is impossible with ordinary matter. In this paper we continue the investigation of gravitational lensing in this new realm by providing a thorough study of critical curves and caustics produced by binary exotic lenses. We find that there are still three topologies as in the standard binary lens, with the main novelty coming from the secondary caustics of the close topology, which become huge at higher $n$. After drawing caustics by numerical methods, we derive a large amount of analytical formulae in all limits that are useful to provide deeper insight in the mathematics of the problem.

  16. A systematic fitting scheme for caustic-crossing microlensing events

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kains ...[et al], N.; Jørgensen, Uffe Gråe

    2009-01-01

    We outline a method for fitting binary-lens caustic-crossing microlensing events based on the alternative model parametrization proposed and detailed by Cassan. As an illustration of our methodology, we present an analysis of OGLE-2007-BLG-472, a double-peaked Galactic microlensing event with a...... source crossing the whole caustic structure in less than three days. In order to identify all possible models we conduct an extensive search of the parameter space, followed by a refinement of the parameters with a Markov Chain Monte Carlo algorithm. We find a number of low-chi(2) regions in the...

  17. Wavefield extrapolation in caustic-free normal ray coordinates

    KAUST Repository

    Ma, Xuxin

    2012-11-04

    Normal ray coordinates are conventionally constructed from ray tracing, which inherently requires smooth velocity profiles. To use rays as coordinates, the velocities have to be smoothed further to avoid caustics, which is detrimental to the mapping process. Solving the eikonal equation numerically for a line source at the surface provides a platform to map normal rays in complex unsmoothed velocity models and avoid caustics. We implement reverse-time migration (RTM) and downward continuation in the new ray coordinate system, which allows us to obtain efficient images and avoid some of the dip limitations of downward continuation.

  18. 21 CFR 2.110 - Definition of ammonia under Federal Caustic Poison Act.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Definition of ammonia under Federal Caustic Poison... SERVICES GENERAL GENERAL ADMINISTRATIVE RULINGS AND DECISIONS Caustic Poisons § 2.110 Definition of ammonia under Federal Caustic Poison Act. For the purpose of determining whether an article containing...

  19. Electrochemical generation of Fenton's reagent to treat spent caustic wastewater

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hansen, H. K.; Nunez, P.; Rodriguez, N.; Guzman, J.

    2009-07-01

    An important wastewater stream from oil refineries is the spent caustic. Caustic solutions are used as scrubbing agent during the desulphurization process to eliminate sulphur an mercaptans from oil and gasses. Spent caustic is classified as DOO3 (reactive sulphide) hazardous waste under the US Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). (Author)

  20. Stress corrosion cracking of duplex stainless steels in caustic solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharya, Ananya

    Duplex stainless steels (DSS) with roughly equal amount of austenite and ferrite phases are being used in industries such as petrochemical, nuclear, pulp and paper mills, de-salination plants, marine environments, and others. However, many DSS grades have been reported to undergo corrosion and stress corrosion cracking in some aggressive environments such as chlorides and sulfide-containing caustic solutions. Although stress corrosion cracking of duplex stainless steels in chloride solution has been investigated and well documented in the literature but the SCC mechanisms for DSS in caustic solutions were not known. Microstructural changes during fabrication processes affect the overall SCC susceptibility of these steels in caustic solutions. Other environmental factors, like pH of the solution, temperature, and resulting electrochemical potential also influence the SCC susceptibility of duplex stainless steels. In this study, the role of material and environmental parameters on corrosion and stress corrosion cracking of duplex stainless steels in caustic solutions were investigated. Changes in the DSS microstructure by different annealing and aging treatments were characterized in terms of changes in the ratio of austenite and ferrite phases, phase morphology and intermetallic precipitation using optical micrography, SEM, EDS, XRD, nano-indentation and microhardness methods. These samples were then tested for general and localized corrosion susceptibility and SCC to understand the underlying mechanisms of crack initiation and propagation in DSS in the above-mentioned environments. Results showed that the austenite phase in the DSS is more susceptible to crack initiation and propagation in caustic solutions, which is different from that in the low pH chloride environment where the ferrite phase is the more susceptible phase. This study also showed that microstructural changes in duplex stainless steels due to different heat treatments could affect their SCC

  1. Laser Beam Caustic Measurement with Focal Spot Analyser

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Flemming Ove; Gong, Hui; Bagger, Claus

    2005-01-01

    In industrial applications of high power CO2-lasers the caustic characteristics of the laser beam have great effects on the performance of the lasers. A welldefined high intense focused spot is essential for reliable production results. This paper presents a focal spot analyser that is developed...... for measuring the beam profiles of focused high power CO2-lasers....

  2. Test Procedure - pumping system for caustic addition project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This test procedure provides the requirements for sub-system testing and integrated operational testing of the submersible mixer pump and caustic addition equipment by WHC and Kaiser personnel at the Rotating Equipment Shop run-in pit (Bldg. 272E)

  3. Caustic Leaching of Hanford Tank S-110 Sludge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lumetta, Gregg J.; Carson, Katharine J.; Darnell, Lori P.; Greenwood, Lawrence R.; Hoopes, Francis V.; Sell, Richard L.; Sinkov, Sergey I.; Soderquist, Chuck Z.; Urie, Michael W.; Wagner, John J.

    2001-10-31

    This report describes the Hanford Tank S-110 sludge caustic leaching test conducted in FY 2001 at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. The data presented here can be used to develop the baseline and alternative flowsheets for pretreating Hanford tank sludge. The U.S. Department of Energy funded the work through the Efficient Separations and Processing Crosscutting Program (ESP; EM﷓50).

  4. Solvent substitution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1990-01-01

    The DOE Environmental Restoration and Waste Management Office of Technology Development and the Air Force Engineering and Services Center convened the First Annual International Workshop on Solvent Substitution on December 4--7, 1990. The primary objectives of this joint effort were to share information and ideas among attendees in order to enhance the development and implementation of required new technologies for the elimination of pollutants associated with industrial use of hazardous and toxic solvents; and to aid in accelerating collaborative efforts and technology transfer between government and industry for solvent substitution. There were workshop sessions focusing on Alternative Technologies, Alternative Solvents, Recovery/Recycling, Low VOC Materials and Treatment for Environmentally Safe Disposal. The 35 invited papers presented covered a wide range of solvent substitution activities including: hardware and weapons production and maintenance, paint stripping, coating applications, printed circuit boards, metal cleaning, metal finishing, manufacturing, compliance monitoring and process control monitoring. This publication includes the majority of these presentations. In addition, in order to further facilitate information exchange and technology transfer, the US Air Force and DOE solicited additional papers under a general Call for Papers.'' These papers, which underwent review and final selection by a peer review committee, are also included in this combined Proceedings/Compendium. For those involved in handling, using or managing hazardous and toxic solvents, this document should prove to be a valuable resource, providing the most up-to-date information on current technologies and practices in solvent substitution. Individual papers are abstracted separated.

  5. Solvent substitution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The DOE Environmental Restoration and Waste Management Office of Technology Development and the Air Force Engineering and Services Center convened the First Annual International Workshop on Solvent Substitution on December 4--7, 1990. The primary objectives of this joint effort were to share information and ideas among attendees in order to enhance the development and implementation of required new technologies for the elimination of pollutants associated with industrial use of hazardous and toxic solvents; and to aid in accelerating collaborative efforts and technology transfer between government and industry for solvent substitution. There were workshop sessions focusing on Alternative Technologies, Alternative Solvents, Recovery/Recycling, Low VOC Materials and Treatment for Environmentally Safe Disposal. The 35 invited papers presented covered a wide range of solvent substitution activities including: hardware and weapons production and maintenance, paint stripping, coating applications, printed circuit boards, metal cleaning, metal finishing, manufacturing, compliance monitoring and process control monitoring. This publication includes the majority of these presentations. In addition, in order to further facilitate information exchange and technology transfer, the US Air Force and DOE solicited additional papers under a general ''Call for Papers.'' These papers, which underwent review and final selection by a peer review committee, are also included in this combined Proceedings/Compendium. For those involved in handling, using or managing hazardous and toxic solvents, this document should prove to be a valuable resource, providing the most up-to-date information on current technologies and practices in solvent substitution. Individual papers are abstracted separated

  6. Statistics of Caustics in Large-Scale Structure Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feldbrugge, Job L.; Hidding, Johan; van de Weygaert, Rien

    2016-10-01

    The cosmic web is a complex spatial pattern of walls, filaments, cluster nodes and underdense void regions. It emerged through gravitational amplification from the Gaussian primordial density field. Here we infer analytical expressions for the spatial statistics of caustics in the evolving large-scale mass distribution. In our analysis, following the quasi-linear Zel'dovich formalism and confined to the 1D and 2D situation, we compute number density and correlation properties of caustics in cosmic density fields that evolve from Gaussian primordial conditions. The analysis can be straightforwardly extended to the 3D situation. We moreover, are currently extending the approach to the non-linear regime of structure formation by including higher order Lagrangian approximations and Lagrangian effective field theory.

  7. Statistics of Caustics in Large-Scale Structure Formation

    CERN Document Server

    Feldbrugge, Job; van de Weygaert, Rien

    2014-01-01

    The cosmic web is a complex spatial pattern of walls, filaments, cluster nodes and underdense void regions. It emerged through gravitational amplification from the Gaussian primordial density field. Here we infer analytical expressions for the spatial statistics of caustics in the evolving large-scale mass distribution. In our analysis, following the quasi-linear Zeldovich formalism and confined to the 1D and 2D situation, we compute number density and correlation properties of caustics in cosmic density fields that evolve from Gaussian primordial conditions. The analysis can be straightforwardly extended to the 3D situation. We moreover, are currently extending the approach to the non-linear regime of structure formation by including higher order Lagrangian approximations and Lagrangian effective field theory.

  8. Practical procedure for coma-free alignment using caustic figure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The practical procedure for coma-free alignment using a single defocused transmission electron microscopy (TEM) image is presented. Caustic figures observed in the defocused TEM image of a focused probe are utilized. Coma-free alignment can be carried out by coinciding a bright-field spot with the center of a caustic curve as observed in an underfocus TEM image. With this method, beam tilt misalignment is reduced to the sub-mrad order (e.g. 0.3 mrad for 300 kV FEG-TEM). This can be done without intentional beam tilting, an amorphous specimen, high-resolution TEM images, or fast Fourier transform for diffractogram or cross-correlation, which are used in previous methods. Residual coma aberration is detected using the multiple Bragg images of a known crystal. Similarity between the present coma-free alignment and well-known STEM alignment using shadow image is discussed

  9. Caustics and Intermittency in Turbulent Suspensions of Heavy Particles

    CERN Document Server

    Bec, J; Cencini, M; Lanotte, A S; Toschi, F

    2009-01-01

    The statistics of velocity differences between very heavy inertial particles suspended in an incompressible turbulent flow is found to be extremely intermittent. When particles are separated by distances within the viscous subrange, the competition between quiet regular regions and multi-valued caustics leads to a quasi bi-fractal behavior of the particle velocity structure functions, with high-order moments bringing the statistical signature of caustics. Contrastingly, for particles separated by inertial-range distances, the velocity-difference statistics is characterized in terms of a local H\\"{o}lder exponent, which is a function of the scale-dependent particle Stokes number only. Results are supported by high-resolution direct numerical simulations. It is argued that these findings might have implications in the early stage of rain droplets formation in warm clouds.

  10. Dynamic caustics test of blast load impact on neighboring different cross-section roadways

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Guo Dongming; Zhou Baowei; Liu Kang; Yang Renshu; Yan Pengyang

    2016-01-01

    Using digital laser dynamic caustics experimental system and conducting simulation experiment researched the influence rule of blasting excavation of a new roadway on neighboring existed different cross-section roadways. The experimental results show that the influence of blast load on adjacent road-way has a good relationship with the cross-section of roadway. The expansion distance of precrack existed in circular, arch-wall, rectangular roadway is respectively 1.76, 1.61 and 0 cm under blast load. At the same time, the direct-blast side of rectangular roadway has more obvious damage compared with circular and arch-wall roadway. It explains that plane reflects more stress wave than arc, so that it exerts more tensile failure in the direct-blast side, which leads to less stress wave diffracting to the precrack in the back-blast side. When the precrack extends, higher value dynamic stress intensity factor in circular roadway works longer than that of arch-wall roadway. Indirectly, it explains that plane’s weakening func-tion on stress wave is significantly stronger than arc. Stress wave brings about self-evident influence on the upper and bottom endpoints of the rectangular roadway, and it respectively extends 1.03, 2.06 cm along the line link direction of the center of the blasthole and the upper and bottom endpoints on the right wall.

  11. Caustic ingestion injuries-at military hospital rawalpindi

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To study the pattern and endoscopic severity of caustic ingestion injuries presenting at Military Hospital Rawalpindi. Study Design: Descriptive study. Place and Duration of Study: The study was conducted at Medical and Gastroenterology Department Military Hospital Rawalpindi from August 2012 to April 2013. Material and Methods: Patients were selected from those who presented with caustic ingestion history in Medical OPD, ER and in medical wards. After informed consent the patient underwent upper gastrointestinal (GI) Endoscopy. Endoscopic findings were recorded. Results: Out of 50 patients, 21(42%) were males and 29 (58%) were females. Ingestion was accidental in 19 (38%) and was with intent of suicide or self-harm in 31(62%) patients. Mean age was 33.2 years (SD ± 13.2). All the patients were subjected to upper GI endoscopy and findings were recorded. Endoscopic findings were grade 0 in 4 (8%), Grade 1 in 6 (12%), grade 2a in 7 (14%), grade 2b in 10 (20%), grade 3a in 6 (12%) and grade 3b in 17 (34%) patients. Conclusion: Caustic ingestion injuries were seen more in younger females with predominant cause as suicidal intent. On endoscopic examination severe corrosive injuries were more frequent. (author)

  12. A middle age addicted man with caustic stomach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gholamreza Nouri Broujerdi

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: The term caustic generally refers to alkaline and the term corrosive generally refers to acidic agents' injury; however, in medical literature caustic is frequently a term applied to both substances. Ingested alkali typically damage the esophagus more than stomach or duodenum, whereas acids usually cause more severe gastric injury. Since esophagus has a slightly alkaline pH, its epithelium is more resistant to acids, so that only 6 to 20% of those who ingest these substances present lesions in this organ. Case : A middle-aged addicted man who drunk hydrochloric acid accidentally had extensive necrosis of the stomach with remarkable sparing of the esophagus on second look exploration. A total gastrectomy with a Roux-en-Y esophago-jejunostomy with feeding jejunostomy was performed. Conclusion : In caustic GI injury, patients who are operated on and found to have no evidence of extensive esophago-gastric necrosis, a biopsy of the posterior gastric wall should be performed to exclude occult injury. If histologically there is a question of viability, a second look operation should be performed within 36 hours.

  13. Analysis of ray stability and caustic formation in a layered moving fluid medium

    CERN Document Server

    Bergman, David R

    2015-01-01

    Caustic formation occurs within a ray skeleton as optical or acoustic fields propagate in a medium with variable refractive properties and are unphysical, their presence being an artifact of the ray approximation of the field, and methods of correcting the field near a caustic are well known. Differential geometry provides a novel approach to calculating acoustic intensity, assessing ray stability and locating caustics in acoustic ray traces when the properties of medium are completely arbitrary by identifying points on the caustic with conjugate points along various rays. The method of geodesic deviation is applied to the problem of determining ray stability and locating caustics in 2-dimensional acoustic ray traces in a layered moving medium. Specifically, a general treatment of caustic formation in sound ducts and in piecewise continuous media is presented and applied to various idealized and realistic scenarios.

  14. Solvent substitutes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The environmental and industrial hygiene regulations promulgated since 1980, most notably the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA), the Hazardous and Solid Waste Amendments to the Resources Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA), and the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990, have brought about an increased emphasis on user exposure, hazardous waste generation, and air emissions. As a result, industry is performing a fundamental reassessment of cleaning solvents, processes, and procedures. The more progressive organizations have made their goal the elimination of solvents that may pose significant potential human health and environmental hazards. This chapter discusses solvent cleaning in metal-finishing, metal-manufacturing, and industrial maintenance applications; precision cleaning; and electronics manufacturing. Nonmetallic cleaning, adhesives, coatings, inks, and aerosols also will be addressed, but in a more cursory manner

  15. Spectral caustics in laser assisted Breit-Wheeler process

    CERN Document Server

    Nousch, T; Kämpfer, B; Titov, A I

    2015-01-01

    Electron-positron pair production by the Breit-Wheeler process embedded in a strong laser pulse is analyzed. The transverse momentum spectrum displays prominent peaks which are interpreted as caustics, the positions of which are accessible by the stationary phases. Examples are given for the superposition of an XFEL beam with an optical high-intensity laser beam. Such a configuration is available, e.g., at LCLS at present and at European XFEL in near future. It requires a counter propagating probe photon beam with high energy which can be generated by synchronized inverse Compton backscattering.

  16. Spectral caustics in laser assisted Breit-Wheeler process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nousch, T.; Seipt, D.; Kämpfer, B.; Titov, A. I.

    2016-04-01

    Electron-positron pair production by the Breit-Wheeler process embedded in a strong laser pulse is analyzed. The transverse momentum spectrum displays prominent peaks which are interpreted as caustics, the positions of which are accessible by the stationary phases. Examples are given for the superposition of an XFEL beam with an optical high-intensity laser beam. Such a configuration is available, e.g., at LCLS at present and at European XFEL in near future. It requires a counter propagating probe photon beam with high energy which can be generated by synchronized inverse Compton backscattering.

  17. Eikonal waves, caustics and mode conversion in tokamak plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaun, A.; Tracy, E. R.; Kaufman, A. N.

    2007-01-01

    Ray optics is used to model the propagation of short electromagnetic plasma waves in toroidal geometry. The new RAYCON code evolves each ray independently in phase space, together with its amplitude, phase and focusing tensor to describe the transport of power along the ray. Particular emphasis is laid on caustics and mode conversion layers, where a linear phenomenon splits a single incoming ray into two. The complete mode conversion algorithm is described and tested for the first time, using the two space dimensions that are relevant in a tokamak. Applications are shown, using a cold plasma model to account for mode conversion at the ion-hybrid resonance in the Joint European Torus.

  18. Spectral caustics in laser assisted Breit–Wheeler process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Nousch

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Electron–positron pair production by the Breit–Wheeler process embedded in a strong laser pulse is analyzed. The transverse momentum spectrum displays prominent peaks which are interpreted as caustics, the positions of which are accessible by the stationary phases. Examples are given for the superposition of an XFEL beam with an optical high-intensity laser beam. Such a configuration is available, e.g., at LCLS at present and at European XFEL in near future. It requires a counter propagating probe photon beam with high energy which can be generated by synchronized inverse Compton backscattering.

  19. 16 CFR 1500.129 - Substances named in the Federal Caustic Poison Act.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... Poison Act. 1500.129 Section 1500.129 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION FEDERAL... REGULATIONS § 1500.129 Substances named in the Federal Caustic Poison Act. The Commission finds that for those substances covered by the Federal Caustic Poison Act (44 Stat. 1406), the requirements of section 2(p)(1)...

  20. Biological treatment of sulfidic spent caustics under haloalkaline conditions using soda lake bacteria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Graaff, de C.M.

    2012-01-01

    In this thesis, the development of a newbiotechnological process for the treatment of undiluted sulfidic spent caustics (SSC’s) using soda lake bacteria is described. SSC’s are waste solutions that are formed in the oil and gas industry due to the caustic (NaOH) scrubbing of hydrocarbon

  1. Biases and caustics in long-range acoustic tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munk, Walter; Wunsch, Carl

    1985-11-01

    We consider the travel time perturbation δt of acoustic rays in an ocean sound channel. The perturbations arom a straining e(x,z) of the water column. An expansion to second order gives δt ≈ τ + ατ , where and are suitably weighted strain wverages, α is a number of order 1 (except near caustics), and τ is the phase integral (the 'reduced travel time' in the seismic literature); τ is a function of ray steepness and range, and varies from zero for axial rays to order 10 s for steep rays at 1000 km range. The quadratic bais ατ changes sign at the caustics; generally it is negative (warm bias) for a range-dependent ocean as compared to a range-independent ocean with the same average properties. We consider two separate problems: (a) linear inversions for the range-averaged profile in soundspeed (temperature) introduces 0.5 m s -1 (0.1 °C) systematic errors arising from horizontal ocean variability (mesoscal activity), but these errors can be reduced by making corrections for . (b) In the problem of monitoring for climatic changes of large-scale ocean features, the quadratic bias is negligible compared to the sample variability, and there is an inherent advantage to the long-range horizontal integration in acoustic tomography over the traditional local measurements.

  2. Miscibility Evaluation Of The Next Generation Solvent With Polymers Currently Used At DWPF, MCU, And Saltstone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fondeur, F. F.

    2013-04-17

    The Office of Waste Processing, within the Office of Technology Innovation and Development, funded the development of an enhanced Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction (CSSX) solvent for deployment at the Savannah River Site for removal of cesium from High Level Waste. This effort lead to the development of the Next Generation Solvent (NGS) with Tris (3,7-dimethyl octyl) guanidine (TiDG). The first deployment target for the NGS solvent is within the Modular CSSX Unit (MCU). Deployment of a new chemical within an existing facility requires verification that the new chemical components are compatible with the installed equipment. In the instance of a new organic solvent, the primary focus is on compatibility of the solvent with organic polymers used in the affected facility. This report provides the calculated data from exposing these polymers to the Next Generation Solvent. An assessment of the dimensional stability of polymers known to be used or present in the MCU, Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF), and Saltstone facilities that will be exposed to the NGS showed that TiDG could selectively affect the elastomers and some thermoplastics to varying extents, but the typical use of these polymers in a confined geometry will likely prevent the NGS from impacting component performance. The polymers identified as of primary concern include Grafoil® (flexible graphite), Tefzel®, Isolast®, ethylene-propylene-diene monomer (EPDM) rubber, nitrile-butadiene rubber (NBR), styrene-butadiene rubber (SBR), ultra high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE), and fluorocarbon rubber (FKM). Certain polymers like NBR and EPDM were found to interact mildly with NGS but their calculated swelling and the confined geometry will impede interaction with NGS. In addition, it was found that Vellumoid (cellulose fibers-reinforced glycerin and protein) may leach protein and Polyvinyl Chloride (PVC) may leach plasticizer (such as Bis-Ethylhexyl-Phthalates) into the NGS solvent. Either case

  3. The Impact Of The MCU Life Extension Solvent On Sludge Batch 8 Projected Operating Windows

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As a part of the Actinide Removal Process (ARP)/Modular Caustic Side Solvent Extraction Unit (MCU) Life Extension Project, a next generation solvent (NGS) and a new strip acid will be deployed. The strip acid will be changed from dilute nitric acid to dilute boric acid (0.01 M). Because of these changes, experimental testing or evaluations with the next generation solvent are required to determine the impact of these changes (if any) to Chemical Process Cell (CPC) activities, glass formulation strategies, and melter operations at the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF). The introduction of the dilute (0.01M) boric acid stream into the DWPF flowsheet has a potential impact on glass formulation and frit development efforts since B2O3 is a major oxide in frits developed for DWPF. Prior knowledge of this stream can be accounted for during frit development efforts but that was not the case for Sludge Batch 8 (SB8). Frit 803 has already been recommended and procured for SB8 processing; altering the frit to account for the incoming boron from the strip effluent (SE) is not an option for SB8. Therefore, the operational robustness of Frit 803 to the introduction of SE including its compositional tolerances (i.e., up to 0.0125M boric acid) is of interest and was the focus of this study. The primary question to be addressed in the current study was: What is the impact (if any) on the projected operating windows for the Frit 803 - SB8 flowsheet to additions of B2O3 from the SE in the Sludge Receipt and Adjustment Tank (SRAT)? More specifically, will Frit 803 be robust to the potential compositional changes occurring in the SRAT due to sludge variation, varying additions of ARP and/or the introduction of SE by providing access to waste loadings (WLs) of interest to DWPF? The Measurement Acceptability Region (MAR) results indicate there is very little, if any, impact on the projected operating windows for the Frit 803 - SB8 system regardless of the presence or absence of

  4. The Impact Of The MCU Life Extension Solvent On Sludge Batch 8 Projected Operating Windows

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peeler, D. K.; Edwards, T. B.; Stone, M. E.

    2013-08-14

    As a part of the Actinide Removal Process (ARP)/Modular Caustic Side Solvent Extraction Unit (MCU) Life Extension Project, a next generation solvent (NGS) and a new strip acid will be deployed. The strip acid will be changed from dilute nitric acid to dilute boric acid (0.01 M). Because of these changes, experimental testing or evaluations with the next generation solvent are required to determine the impact of these changes (if any) to Chemical Process Cell (CPC) activities, glass formulation strategies, and melter operations at the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF). The introduction of the dilute (0.01M) boric acid stream into the DWPF flowsheet has a potential impact on glass formulation and frit development efforts since B2O3 is a major oxide in frits developed for DWPF. Prior knowledge of this stream can be accounted for during frit development efforts but that was not the case for Sludge Batch 8 (SB8). Frit 803 has already been recommended and procured for SB8 processing; altering the frit to account for the incoming boron from the strip effluent (SE) is not an option for SB8. Therefore, the operational robustness of Frit 803 to the introduction of SE including its compositional tolerances (i.e., up to 0.0125M boric acid) is of interest and was the focus of this study. The primary question to be addressed in the current study was: What is the impact (if any) on the projected operating windows for the Frit 803 – SB8 flowsheet to additions of B2O3 from the SE in the Sludge Receipt and Adjustment Tank (SRAT)? More specifically, will Frit 803 be robust to the potential compositional changes occurring in the SRAT due to sludge variation, varying additions of ARP and/or the introduction of SE by providing access to waste loadings (WLs) of interest to DWPF? The Measurement Acceptability Region (MAR) results indicate there is very little, if any, impact on the projected operating windows for the Frit 803 – SB8 system regardless of the presence or absence

  5. Electrochemical studies on stress corrosion cracking of incoloy-800 in caustic solution. Part II: Precracking samples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dinu Alice

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Stress corrosion cracking (SCC in a caustic medium may affect the secondary circuit tubing of a CANDU NPP cooled with river water, due to an accidental formation of a concentrated alkaline environment in the areas with restricted circulation, as a result of a leakage of cooling water from the condenser. To evaluate the susceptibility of Incoloy-800 (used to manufacture steam generator tubes for CANDU NPP to SCC, some accelerated corrosion tests were conducted in an alkaline solution (10% NaOH, pH = 13. These experiments were performed at ambient temperature and 85 °C. We used the potentiodynamic method and the potentiostatic method, simultaneously monitoring the variation of the open circuit potential during a time period (E corr/time curve. The C-ring method was used to stress the samples. In order to create stress concentrations, mechanical precracks with a depth of 100 or 250 μm were made on the outer side of the C-rings. Experimental results showed that the stressed samples were more susceptible to SCC than the unstressed samples whereas the increase in temperature and crack depth lead to an increase in SCC susceptibility. Incipient micro cracks of a depth of 30 μm were detected in the area of the highest peak of the mechanical precrack.

  6. Testing the Caustic Ring Dark Matter Halo Model Against Observations in the Milky Way

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumas, Julie; Newberg, Heidi Jo; Niedzielski, Bethany; Susser, Adam; Thompson, Jeffery M.; Weiss, Jake; Lewis, Kim M.

    2016-06-01

    One prediction of axion dark matter models is they can form Bose-Einstein condensates and rigid caustic rings as a halo collapses in the non-linear regime. In this thesis, we undertake the first study of a caustic ring model for the Milky Way halo (Duffy & Sikivie 2008), paying particular attention to observational consequences. We first present the formalism for calculating the gravitational acceleration of a caustic ring halo. The caustic ring dark matter theory reproduces a roughly logarithmic halo, with large perturbations near the rings. We show that this halo can reasonably match the known Galactic rotation curve. We are not able to confirm or rule out an association between the positions of the caustic rings and oscillations in the observed rotation curve, due to insufficient rotation curve data. We explore the effects of dark matter caustic rings on dwarf galaxy tidal disruption with N-body simulations. Simulations of the Sagittarius (Sgr) dwarf galaxy in a caustic ring halo potential, with disk and bulge parameters that are tuned to match the Galactic rotation curve, match observations of the Sgr trailing tidal tails as far as 90 kpc from the Galactic center. Like the Navarro-Frenk-White (NFW) halo, they are, however, unable to match the leading tidal tail. None of the caustic, NFW, or triaxial logarithmic halos are able to simultaneously match observations of the leading and trailing arms of the Sagittarius stream. We further show that simulations of dwarf galaxies that move through caustic rings are qualitatively similar to those moving in a logarithmic halo. This research was funded by NSF grant AST 10-09670, the NASA-NY Space Grant, and the American Fellowship from AAUW.

  7. Biosorption of Copper Ions by Caustic Treated Waste Baker's Yeast Biomass

    OpenAIRE

    Göksungur, Yekta; ÜREN, Sibel; Güvenç, Ulgar

    2003-01-01

    Waste baker's yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) was used as a biosorbent for Cu+2 biosorption. The yeast cells were treated with caustic soda, ethanol and heat to increase their biosorption capacity. Among the treatment methods used, the highest copper uptake (21.1 mg g-1) was obtained with the caustic treatment of baker's yeast. The effect of initial copper concentration and pH on biosorption for caustic treated yeast was studied. The highest Cu+2 uptake (120.7 mg g-1) was obtained ...

  8. Caustic stress corrosion cracking of austenitic stainless steels with thermal treatment(TT)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper dealt with the effects of TT(Thermal Treatment) and nitrogen content on caustic stress corrosion cracking of austenitic stainless steels. Nitrogen content and grain size had affected on the caustic SCC resistance. Increasing nitrogen content, SCC resistance was increased due to the enhanced repassivation rate, but at high nitrogen content, the resistance was decreased because of the dual effects between mechanical and repassivation behavior. Regardless of nitrogen content, TT improved the caustic SCC resistance and this behavior was reviewed on the points of residual stress, grain size, and dislocation array

  9. Studying the microlenses mass function from statistical analysis of the caustic concentration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mediavilla, T; Ariza, O [Departamento de Estadistica e Investigacion Operativa, Universidad de Cadiz, Avda de Ramon Puyol, s/n 11202 Algeciras (Spain); Mediavilla, E [Instituto de Astrofisica de Canarias, Avda Via Lactea s/n, La Laguna (Spain); Munoz, J A, E-mail: teresa.mediavilla@ca.uca.es, E-mail: octavio.ariza@uca.es, E-mail: emg@iac.es [Departamento de Astrofisica y Astronomia, Universidad de Valencia, Burjassot, Valencia (Spain)

    2011-09-22

    The statistical distribution of caustic crossings by the images of a lensed quasar depends on the properties of the distribution of microlenses in the lens galaxy. We use a procedure based in Inverse Polygon Mapping to easily identify the critical and caustic curves generated by a distribution of stars in the lens galaxy. We analyze the statistical distributions of the number of caustic crossings by a pixel size source for several projected mass densities and different mass distributions. We compare the results of simulations with theoretical binomial distributions. Finally we apply this method to the study of the stellar mass distribution in the lens galaxy of QSO 2237+0305.

  10. A Systematic Analysis of Caustic Methods for Galaxy Cluster Masses

    CERN Document Server

    Gifford, Daniel; Kern, Nicholas

    2013-01-01

    We quantify the expected observed statistical and systematic uncertainties of the escape velocity as a measure of the gravitational potential and total mass of galaxy clusters. We focus our attention on low redshift (z 25, the scatter in the escape velocity mass is dominated by projections along the line-of-sight. Algorithmic uncertainties from the determination of the projected escape velocity profile are negligible. We quantify how target selection based on magnitude, color, and projected radial separation can induce small additional biases into the escape velocity masses. Using N_gal = 150 (25), the caustic technique has a per cluster scatter in ln(M|M_200) of 0.3 (0.5) and bias 1+/-3% (16+/-5%) for clusters with masses > 10^14M_solar at z<0.15.

  11. Epidemiology and prevention of caustic ingestion in children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christesen, H B

    1994-01-01

    A total of 102 children less than 16 years of age admitted for caustic ingestion in the period 1976-1991 were registered. The annual incidence rate of hospitalization was 10.8:100,000 for the city of Aarhus, Denmark. Esophageal burns occurred with a frequency of 5.0:100,000 per year. Ninety......-four percent of the children were less than 5 years old. For this age group, the incidence rates of admission and esophageal burns were 34.6:100,000 and 15.8:100,000, respectively. All ingestions were accidental. The incidence rates of esophageal burns in children 0-4 years old (p = 0.019) decreased...

  12. Caustics of 1/rn binary gravitational lenses: from galactic haloes to exotic matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bozza, V.; Melchiorre, C.

    2016-03-01

    We investigate the caustic topologies for binary gravitational lenses made up of two objects whose gravitational potential declines as 1/rn. With n1 regime can be obtained with some violations of the energy conditions, one famous example being the Ellis wormhole. Gravitational lensing provides a natural arena to distinguish and identify such exotic objects in our Universe. We find that there are still three topologies for caustics as in the standard Schwarzschild binary lens, with the main novelty coming from the secondary caustics of the close topology, which become huge at higher n. After drawing caustics by numerical methods, we derive a large amount of analytical formulae in all limits that are useful to provide deeper insight in the mathematics of the problem. Our study is useful to better understand the phenomenology of galaxy lensing in clusters as well as the distinct signatures of exotic matter in complex systems.

  13. Identifying appropriate conditions for producing spindle-like causticizing precipitated calcium carbonate for paper filler applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin Wang

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Causticizing precipitated calcium carbonate (CPCC as a by-product of the green liquor causticizing process can be used as paper filler to save resources and reduce costs. In this study, CPCC was prepared with green liquor and quicklime, which were obtained from an alkali recovery line of a paper mill. The factors influencing crystal morphology of CPCC, such as slaking temperature, slaking time, and causticizing time were investigated. The morphology of CPCC was observed and analyzed for optimizing reaction conditions. The following were compared: properties of CPCC obtained in this study, conventional CPCC (white mud from a paper mill, and commercial PCC as fillers. The results showed that slaking time and causticizing time were important for morphology control. Spindle-like and rod-like CPCC obtained in this study had better drainability and retention, higher paper bulk, opacity, and physical strength compared to conventional CPCC, and had nearly the same performances as commercial PCC.

  14. From Pop-Up Cards to Coffee-Cup Caustics: The Knight's Visor

    OpenAIRE

    Jakus, Stephanie; O'Rourke, Joseph

    2012-01-01

    As a pedagogical exercise, we derive the shape of a particularly elegant pop-up card design, and show that it connects to a classically studied plane curve that is (among other interpretations) a caustic of a circle.

  15. Industrial Experience on the Caustic Cracking of Stainless Steels and Nickel Alloys - A Review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rebak, R B

    2005-10-09

    Caustic environments are present in several industries, from nuclear power generation to the fabrication of alkalis and alumina. The most common material of construction is carbon steel but its application is limited to a maximum temperature of approximately 80 C. The use of Nickel (Ni) alloys is recommended at higher temperatures. Commercially pure Ni is the most resistant material for caustic applications both from the general corrosion and the stress corrosion cracking (SCC) perspectives. Nickel rich alloys also offer a good performance. The most important alloying elements are Ni and chromium (Cr). Molybdenum (Mo) is not a beneficial alloying element and it dissolves preferentially from the alloy in presence of caustic environments. Austenitic stainless steels such as type 304 and 316 seem less resistant to caustic conditions than even plain carbon steel. Experimental evidence shows that the most likely mechanism for SCC is anodic dissolution.

  16. Study of matrix crack-tilted fiber bundle interaction using caustics and finite element method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Wenfeng; Zhu, Jianguo; Zhu, Qi; Yuan, Yanan

    2016-02-01

    In this work, the interaction between the matrix crack and a tilted fiber bundle was investigated via caustics and the finite element method (FEM). First, the caustic patterns at the crack tip with different distances from the tilted fiber were obtained and the stress intensity factors were extracted from the geometry of the caustic patterns. Subsequently, the shielding effect of the fiber bundle in front of the crack tip was analyzed. Furthermore, the interaction between the matrix crack and the broken fiber bundle was discussed. Finally, a finite element simulation was carried out using ABAQUS to verify the experimental results. The results demonstrate that the stress intensity factors extracted from caustic experiments are in excellent agreement with the data calculated by FEM.

  17. Scaling-Free Electrochemical Production of Caustic and Oxygen for Sulfide Control in Sewers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Hui-Wen; Rabaey, Korneel; Keller, Jürg; Yuan, Zhiguo; Pikaar, Ilje

    2015-10-01

    Caustic shock-loading and oxygen injection are commonly used by the water industry for biofilm and sulfide control in sewers. Caustic can be produced onsite from wastewater using a two-compartment electrochemical cell. This avoids the need for import and storage of caustic soda, which typically represents a cost and a hazard. An issue limiting the practical implementation of this approach is the occurrence of membrane scaling due to the almost universal presence of Ca(2+) and Mg(2+) in wastewater. It results in a rapid increase in the cell voltage, thereby increasing the energy consumption of the system. Here, we propose and experimentally demonstrate an innovative solution for this problem involving the inclusion of a middle compartment between the anode and cathode compartments. Caustic was efficiently produced from wastewater over a period of 12 weeks and had an average Coulombic efficiency (CE) of 84.1 ± 1.1% at practically relevant caustic strengths (∼3 wt %). Neither membrane scaling nor an increase in the cell voltage was observed throughout the experiments. In addition, dissolved oxygen was produced in the anode, resulting in continuously oxygenated wastewater leaving the three-compartment cell. This membrane-scaling control strategy represents a major step forward toward practical implementation of on-site simultaneous electrochemical caustic and oxygen generation for sulfide control in sewers and also has the potential to be applied to other (bio)electrochemical systems receiving wastewater as source for product recovery. PMID:26377687

  18. Structured caustic vector vortex optical field: manipulating optical angular momentum flux and polarization rotation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Rui-Pin; Chen, Zhaozhong; Chew, Khian-Hooi; Li, Pei-Gang; Yu, Zhongliang; Ding, Jianping; He, Sailing

    2015-05-29

    A caustic vector vortex optical field is experimentally generated and demonstrated by a caustic-based approach. The desired caustic with arbitrary acceleration trajectories, as well as the structured states of polarization (SoP) and vortex orders located in different positions in the field cross-section, is generated by imposing the corresponding spatial phase function in a vector vortex optical field. Our study reveals that different spin and orbital angular momentum flux distributions (including opposite directions) in different positions in the cross-section of a caustic vector vortex optical field can be dynamically managed during propagation by intentionally choosing the initial polarization and vortex topological charges, as a result of the modulation of the caustic phase. We find that the SoP in the field cross-section rotates during propagation due to the existence of the vortex. The unique structured feature of the caustic vector vortex optical field opens the possibility of multi-manipulation of optical angular momentum fluxes and SoP, leading to more complex manipulation of the optical field scenarios. Thus this approach further expands the functionality of an optical system.

  19. Predictability of outcome of caustic ingestion by esophagogastroduodenoscopy in children

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Abdulkerim Temiz; Pelin Oguzkurt; Semire Serin Ezer; Emine Ince; Akgun Hicsonmez

    2012-01-01

    AIM:To assess the necessity of esophagogastroduodenoscopy (EGD) to predict the outcome of caustic ingestion in children.METHODS:The study included 206 children who underwent EGD because of ingestion of caustic substances between January 2005 and August 2010.Retrospective analysis of data of the patients was performed.RESULTS:The male/female ratio was 1.6 and mean age was 38.1 ± 28.8 mo.The caustic substances were acidic in 72 (34.9%) cases,alkaline in 56 (27.2%),liquid household bleach in 62 (30.1%),and unknown in 16 (7.8%).Fifty-seven (27.7%) patients were symptom-free.Significant clinical findings were observed in 149 (72.3%) patients.Upper gastrointestinal endoscopy findings of esophageal injury were grade 0 in 86 (41.7%) patients,grade 1 in 49 (23.8%),grade 2a in 42 (20.4%),grade 2b in 28 (13.6%),and grade 3a in 1 (0.5%) patient.35 patients with grade 2a,2b,and 3a injuries underwent esophageal dilation at second week of ingestion.Esophageal stricture,which necessitated a regular dilation program developed in 13 of the aforementioned 35 patients.There is no statistically significant difference in the rate of development of esophageal stricture between the patients who ingested acidic (15.3%) and alkaline (8.9%) substances (P =0.32).Severe gastric injury was detected in 38 (18.5%)patients.The rate of development of gastric injury was significantly higher in the acidic group (14%) than in the alkaline group (2.9%) (P =0.001).Out of 149 patients with clinical findings,49 (32.9%) patients had no esophageal injury and 117 (78.5%) patients had no gastric lesion.Esophageal and severe gastric injuries were detected in 20 (35.1%) and 8 (14%) of patients with no clinical findings respectively.Pyloric stenosis developed in 6 patients.Pyloric obstruction improved with balloon dilation in 2 patients.Mean hospitalization time were 1.2±0.5 d for grade 0 and 2.3 ± 5 d for grade 1 and 6.3 ± 6.2 d for grade 2a and 15.8 ± 18.6d for

  20. H-Area Acid/Caustic Basin Groundwater Monitoring Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The four monitoring wells at the H-Area Acid/Caustic Basin are sampled quarterly as part of the Savannah River Site (SRS) Groundwater Monitoring Program and to comply with a consent decree signed May 26, 1988, by the US District Court (District of South Carolina, Aiken Division). During fourth quarter 1993, samples from the monitoring wells received comprehensive analyses. Monitoring results that exceeded the final Primary Drinking Water Standards (PDWS), the SRS flagging criteria, or the SRS turbidity standard are the focus of this report. During fourth quarter 1993, tritium exceeded the final PDWS in all four HAC wells, with activities between 3.8E + 01 and 4.6E + 01 pCi/mL. Aluminum exceeded its Flag 2 criterion in wells HAC 2, 3, and 4. Iron exceeded its Flag 2 criterion in wells HAC 1, 2, and 3. Specific conductance was elevated in well HAC 2, total organic halogens exceeded its Flag 2 criterion in wells HAC 2 and 3, and manganese was elevated in wells HAC 3 and 4. No well samples exceeded the SRS turbidity standard

  1. Our experience with caustic oesophageal burn in South of Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyed M. V. Hosseini

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: The alkaline oesophageal burn (EB is a very debilitating injury and common in the southern rural area of Iran, where the air conditioning systems are cleaned with an alkaline liquid, which is accidentally ingested by children. Aims: The aim is to share our experiences with caustic injury in children. Settings and Design : A ′before′ and ′after′ clinical trial. Materials and Methods: From November 2006-2009, 35 cases of alkaline burns were referred to our center. All underwent flexible endoscopy and thereafter received steroid, antibiotic and H2 blocker. They subsequently underwent rigid oesophagoscopy, with grade IIb or higher burns, for inserting the two different kinds of stents. Results: Four out of 10 (GIIa < underwent dilatation occasionally. Fifteen (GIIb with early large stent (eight weeks developed complications (three antral contractures, one oesophagotracheal fistula, one tracheobronchial fistula, three perforations, three deaths, and the remaining cases had not undergone dilatation yet. Four out of 10 with (GIIb, who had small stents (Six months and early gastrostomy needed dilatation every four to six weeks and all recovered, with no significant complications. Conclusions: Early use of gastrostomy prevents malnutrition in patients. Small size stents are much more tolerable for a prolonged time are not obstructed by saliva that washes the wall of the damaged oesophagus continuously and promotes healing.

  2. Solvent wash solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neace, James C.

    1986-01-01

    Process for removing diluent degradation products from a solvent extraction solution, which has been used to recover uranium and plutonium from spent nuclear fuel. A wash solution and the solvent extraction solution are combined. The wash solution contains (a) water and (b) up to about, and including, 50 volume percent of at least one-polar water-miscible organic solvent based on the total volume of the water and the highly-polar organic solvent. The wash solution also preferably contains at least one inorganic salt. The diluent degradation products dissolve in the highly-polar organic solvent and the organic solvent extraction solvent do not dissolve in the highly-polar organic solvent. The highly-polar organic solvent and the extraction solvent are separated.

  3. Mass Transfer And Hydraulic Testing Of The V-05 And V-10 Contactors With The Next Generation Solvent

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herman, D. T.; Duignan, M. R.; Williams, M. R.; Peters, T. B.; Poirier, M. R.; Fondeur, F. F.

    2013-07-31

    The Modular Caustic Side Solvent Extraction (CSSX) Unit (MCU) facility is actively pursuing the transition from the current BOBCalixC6 based solvent to the Next Generation Solvent (NGS)-MCU solvent. To support this integration of NGS into the MCU facilities, Savannah River Remediation (SRR) requested that Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) perform testing of a blend of the NGS (MaxCalix based solvent) with the current solvent (BOBCalixC6 based solvent) for the removal of cesium (Cs) from the liquid salt waste stream. This testing differs from prior testing by utilizing a blend of BOBCalixC6 based solvent and the NGS with the full (0.05 M) concentration of the MaxCalix as well as a new suppressor, tris(3,7dimethyloctyl) guanidine. Single stage tests were conducted using the full size V-05 and V-10 centrifugal contactors installed at SRNL. These tests were designed to determine the mass transfer and hydraulic characteristics with the NGS solvent blended with the projected heel of the BOBCalixC6 based solvent that will exist in MCU at time of transition. The test program evaluated the amount of organic carryover and the droplet size of the organic carryover phases using several analytical methods. Stage efficiency and mass distribution ratios were determined by measuring Cs concentration in the aqueous and organic phases during single contactor testing. The nominal cesium distribution ratio, D(Cs) measured for extraction ranged from 37-60. The data showed greater than 96% stage efficiency for extraction. No significant differences were noted for operations at 4, 8 or 12 gpm aqueous salt simulant feed flow rates. The first scrub test (contact with weak caustic solution) yielded average scrub D(Cs) values of 3.3 to 5.2 and the second scrub test produced an average value of 1.8 to 2.3. For stripping behavior, the “first stage” D Cs) values ranged from 0.04 to 0.08. The efficiency of the low flow (0.27 gpm aqueous) was calculated to be 82.7%. The Spreadsheet

  4. The Impact Of The MCU Life Extension Solvent On Sludge Batch 8 Projected Operating Windows

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peeler, D. K.; Edwards, T. B.

    2013-06-26

    As a part of the Actinide Removal Process (ARP)/Modular Caustic Side Solvent Extraction Unit (MCU) Life Extension Project, a next generation solvent (NGS) and a new strip acid will be deployed. The strip acid will be changed from dilute nitric acid to dilute boric acid (0.01 M). Because of these changes, experimental testing or evaluations with the next generation solvent are required to determine the impact of these changes (if any) to Chemical Process Cell (CPC) activities, glass formulation strategies, and melter operations at the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF). The introduction of the dilute (0.01 M) boric acid stream into the DWPF flowsheet has a potential impact on glass formulation and frit development efforts since B203 is a major oxide in frits developed for DWPF. Prior knowledge of this stream can be accounted for during frit development efforts but that was not the case for Sludge Batch 8 (SB8). Frit 803 has already been recommended and procured for SB8 processing; altering the frit to account for the incoming boron from the strip effluent (SE) is not an option for SB8. Therefore, the operational robustness of Frit 803 to the introduction of SE including its compositional tolerances (i.e., up to 0.0125M boric acid) is of interest and was the focus of this study. The primary question to be addressed in the current study was: What is the impact (if any) on the projected operating windows for the Frit 803 - SB8 flowsheet to additions of B203 from the SE in the Sludge Receipt and Adjustment Tank (SRAT)? More specifically, will Frit 803 be robust to the potential compositional changes occurring in the SRAT due to sludge variation, varying additions of ARP and/or the introduction of SE by providing access to waste loadings (WLs) of interest to DWPF? The Measurement Acceptability Region (MAR) results indicate there is very little, if any, impact on the projected operating windows for the Frit 803 - SB8 system regardless of the presence or absence of

  5. Testing the Dark Matter Caustic Theory Against Observations in the Milky Way

    CERN Document Server

    Dumas, Julie; Niedzielski, Bethany; Susser, Adam; Thompson, Jeffery M; Weiss, Jake; Lewis, Kim M

    2015-01-01

    We test a particular theory of dark matter in which dark matter axions form ring "caustics" in the plane of the Milky Way against actual observations of Milky Way stars. According to this theory, cold, collisionless dark matter particles with angular momentum flow in and out of the Milky Way on sheets. These flows form caustic rings (at the positions of the rings, the density of the flow is formally infinite) at the locations of closest approach to the Galactic center. We show that the caustic ring dark matter theory reproduces a roughly logarithmic halo, with large perturbations near the rings. We show that the theory can reasonably match the observed rotation curve of the Milky Way. We explore the effects of the caustic rings on dwarf galaxy tidal disruption using N-body simulations. In particular, simulations of the Sagittarius dwarf galaxy tidal disruption in a caustic ring halo potential match observations of the trailing tidal tail as far as 90 kpc from the Galactic center; they do not, however, match t...

  6. Caustic Ingestion in Children: a Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rafeey, Mandana; Ghojazadeh, Morteza; Sheikhi, Saeede; Vahedi, Leila

    2016-01-01

    Introduction:Caustic ingestion that occurs accidently is one of the most common problems in children. Methods: This systematic review has been performed by searching the databases including Science Direct, ProQuest, Google Scholar, and PubMed. A strategic search was performed with keywords including caustic, corrosive, ingestion, and children, and was limited to articles in English and Persian. Data were analyzed using Comprehensive Meta-Analysis2 and PASW Statistics 18. Results: We selected 64 articles regarding caustic ingestion with a total sample of 11,345 cases. The data analysis indicated a higher consumption in young boys (age range 2.78 (2.02) years (OR=0.53 with a 95% confidence interval of 0.49-0.57 (P=0.08)). The most common caustic substances were household cleaning agents, particularly bleaches and cleaners. Esophageal cancer and death were reported as well as digestive and respiratory complications. Invasive and expensive techniques are frequently used for diagnosis, treatment and follow up. Conclusion: The results demonstrated that although caustic ingestion is a serious problem among children, it is a preventable and manageable issue. Therefore, appropriate efforts by families, government, factories, health team and media should be made to handle adequately this matter.

  7. MECHANISTIC UNDERSTANDING OF CAUSTIC CRACKING OF CARBON STEELS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia-Diaz, B.; Roy, A.

    2009-10-19

    Liquid waste generated by the PUREX process for separation of nuclear materials is concentrated and stored in Type IV single-shell carbon steel tanks at the Savannah River Site (SRS). The Type IV tanks for this waste do not have cooling coils and have not undergone heat treatment to stress-relieve the tanks. After the waste is concentrated by evaporation, it becomes very alkaline and can cause stress corrosion cracking (SCC) and pitting corrosion of the tank materials. SRS has experienced leakage from non-stress-relieved waste tanks constructed of A285 carbon steel and pitting of A212 carbon steel tanks in the vapor space. An investigation of tank materials has been undertaken at SRS to develop a basic understanding of caustic SCC of A285 and A212 grade carbon steels exposed to aqueous solutions, primarily containing sodium hydroxide (NaOH), sodium nitrate (NaNO{sub 3}), and sodium nitrite (NaNO{sub 2}) at temperatures relevant to the operating conditions of both the F and H area plants. This report presents the results of this corrosion testing program. Electrochemical tests were designed using unstressed coupons in a simulated tank environment. The purpose of this testing was to determine the corrosion susceptibility of the tank materials as a function of chemical concentration, pH, and temperature. A285 and A516 (simulates A212 carbon steel) coupons were used to investigate differences in the corrosion of these carbon steels. Electrochemical testing included measurement of the corrosion potential and polarization resistance as well as cyclic potentiodynamic polarization (CPP) testing of coupons. From the CPP experiments, corrosion characteristics were determined including: corrosion potential (E{sub corr}), pitting or breakdown potential (E{sub pit}), and repassivation potential (E{sub prot}). CPP results showed no indications of localized corrosion, such as pitting, and all samples showed the formation of a stable passive layer as evidenced by the positive

  8. Side Effects of Chemotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Men Living with Prostate Cancer Side Effects of Chemotherapy Side Effects Urinary Dysfunction Bowel Dysfunction Erectile Dysfunction ... Side Effects of Hormone Therapy Side Effects of Chemotherapy Side Effects: When to Seek Help PSA Rising ...

  9. New strategies for treatment and reuse of spent sulfidic caustic stream from petroleum industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jéssica Frontino Paulino

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This work examines traditional and new routes for removal of H2S and other sulfur compounds from spent sufidic caustic (SSC. SH- (hydrogenosulfide and S2- (sulfide ions were quantitatively oxidized at 25 ºC using H2O2, NaOCl or a spent sulfochromic mixture. SH-/S2- ions were also removed via reaction with freshly prepared iron or manganese hydroxides, or after passing the SSC through strong basic anion exchange resins (OH- form. The treated caustic solution, as well as iron/manganese hydroxides, removed H2S from diesel samples at 25 ºC. SSC treatment via strong basic anion-exchange resins produced the treated caustic solution with the highest free alkalinity.

  10. INTER-CONTACT FORCE ANALYSIS OF IMPACTED DISK ASSEMBLY BY DYNAMIC CAUSTICS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Ming(李明); ZHANG Jue; FANG Jing(方竞)

    2003-01-01

    The caustic method was utilized to study the contact force transmission in disk assemblies under impact load. The mapping equations were obtained based on the first invariant of the stress components in the disk subject to a normal concentrated force, and a characteristic dimension of the maximum size in the caustic curve was proposed to evaluate the contact force between the disks.Transient patterns of the caustic shadows were recorded by means of a high-speed camera of off-focus imaging, then the histories of the inter-contact forces among the disks were obtained with respect to the conditions of different masses and heights of the falling hammers. The influence of the impact loading and impulsive velocity was analyzed with respect to the force responses of the disk assembly,the double-peak phenomenon with comparison to the initial masses, and the energy dissipation of the systems under impact of different momentums.

  11. Diffraction and Dissipation of Atmospheric Waves in the Vicinity of Caustics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godin, O. A.

    2015-12-01

    A large and increasing number of ground-based and satellite-borne instruments has been demonstrated to reliably reveal ionospheric manifestations of natural hazards such as large earthquakes, strong tsunamis, and powerful tornadoes. To transition from detection of ionospheric manifestations of natural hazards to characterization of the hazards for the purposes of improving early warning systems and contributing to disaster recovery, it is necessary to relate quantitatively characteristics of the observed ionospheric disturbances and the underlying natural hazard and, in particular, accurately model propagation of atmospheric waves from the ground or ocean surface to the ionosphere. The ray theory has been used extensively to model propagation of atmospheric waves and proved to be very efficient in elucidating the effects of atmospheric variability on ionospheric signatures of natural hazards. However, the ray theory predicts unphysical, divergent values of the wave amplitude and needs to be modified in the vicinity of caustics. This paper presents an asymptotic theory that describes diffraction, focusing and increased dissipation of acoustic-gravity waves in the vicinity of caustics and turning points. Air temperature, viscosity, thermal conductivity, and wind velocity are assumed to vary gradually with height and horizontal coordinates, and slowness of these variations determines the large parameter of the problem. Uniform asymptotics of the wave field are expressed in terms of Airy functions and their derivatives. The geometrical, or Berry, phase, which arises in the consistent WKB approximation for acoustic-gravity waves, plays an important role in the caustic asymptotics. In addition to the wave field in the vicinity of the caustic, these asymptotics describe wave reflection from the caustic and the evanescent wave field beyond the caustic. The evanescent wave field is found to play an important role in ionospheric manifestations of tsunamis.

  12. Solvent resistant nanofiltration membranes

    OpenAIRE

    Dutczak, Szymon Maria

    2011-01-01

    This thesis describes preparation and characterization of membranes for organic solvent filtration (OSF). The main aim was developing membranes for solvent resistant nanofiltration (SRNF) with molecular weight cut-off below 500 g mol-1.

  13. Organic Solvent Tropical Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report provides the basis for closing the organic solvent safety issue. Sufficient information is presented to conclude that risk posed by an unmitigated organic solvent fire is within risk evaluation guidelines

  14. Biological treatment of sulfidic spent caustics under haloalkaline conditions using soda lake bacteria

    OpenAIRE

    Graaff, de, R.J.

    2012-01-01

    In this thesis, the development of a newbiotechnological process for the treatment of undiluted sulfidic spent caustics (SSC’s) using soda lake bacteria is described. SSC’s are waste solutions that are formed in the oil and gas industry due to the caustic (NaOH) scrubbing of hydrocarbon streams for the removal of sulfur compounds.Without treatment, SSC’s may impose serious environmental problems because of their alkalinity (pH>12), salinity (Na+ 5-12 wt%) and high sulfide...

  15. Predispersed solvent extraction

    OpenAIRE

    Rodarte, Alma Isabel Marín

    1988-01-01

    A new solvent extraction method has been developed for the extraction of metal and organic ions from very dilute aqueous solutions. The new method, which has been named Predispersed Solvent Extraction (POSE), is based on the principle that 1 there is no need to comminute both phases. All that is necessary is to comminute the solvent phase prior to contacting it with the feed. This is done by converting the solvent into aphrons, which are micron-sized globules encapsulated in a ...

  16. Solvent recycle/recovery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paffhausen, M.W.; Smith, D.L.; Ugaki, S.N.

    1990-09-01

    This report describes Phase I of the Solvent Recycle/Recovery Task of the DOE Chlorinated Solvent Substitution Program for the US Air Force by the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, EG G Idaho, Inc., through the US Department of Energy, Idaho Operations Office. The purpose of the task is to identify and test recovery and recycling technologies for proposed substitution solvents identified by the Biodegradable Solvent Substitution Program and the Alternative Solvents/Technologies for Paint Stripping Program with the overall objective of minimizing hazardous wastes. A literature search to identify recycle/recovery technologies and initial distillation studies has been conducted. 4 refs.

  17. The Theory of Caustics and Wave Front Singularities with Physical Applications

    OpenAIRE

    Ehlers, J.; Newman, E.

    2000-01-01

    This is intended as an introduction to and review of the theory of Lagrangian and Legendrian submanifolds and their associated maps developed by Arnold and his collaborators. The theory is illustrated by applications to Hamilton–Jacobi theory and the eikonal equation, with an emphasis on null surfaces and wave fronts and their associated caustics and singularities.

  18. Biological treatment of refinery spent caustics under halo-alkaline conditions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Graaff, de M.; Bijmans, M.F.M.; Abbas, B.; Euverink, G.J.W.; Muyzer, G.; Janssen, A.J.H.

    2011-01-01

    The present research demonstrates the biological treatment of refinery sulfidic spent caustics in a continuously fed system under halo-alkaline conditions (i.e. pH 9.5; Na(+)= 0.8M). Experiments were performed in identical gas-lift bioreactors operated under aerobic conditions (80-90% saturation) at

  19. Structural evaluation of mixer pump installed in Tank 241-AN-107 for caustic addition project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report documents the structural analysis and evaluation of a mixer pump and caustic addition system to be used in Tank 107-AN. This pump will be installed in the central pump pit of this double- shell tank for the purpose of bringing the hydroxide ion concentration into compliance with Tank Farm operating specifications

  20. Caustic Agent Ingestion by a 1.5-Year-Old Boy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gharib, Behdad; Mohammadpour, Masoud; Yaghmaie, Bahareh; Sharifzadeh, Meisam; Mehdizadeh, Mehrzad; Zamani, Fatemeh; Edalatkhah, Rouhollah; Mohsenipour, Reihaneh

    2016-07-01

    We present a case of caustic ingestion by a 1.5-year-old boy. The caustic agent was drain opener which is a strong alkaline substance. Children in Iran and many other countries are still exposed to not "child proof" (child resistant packaging) toxic substance containers. Ingestion of caustic agents may lead to necrosis, perforation, and strictures. Substances that are ingested more frequently are liquid alkali material which causes severe, deep liquefaction necrosis. Common signs and symptoms of caustic agents are vomiting, drooling, refusal to drink, oral burns, stridor, hematemesis, dyspnea, dysphagia and abdominal pain. Even if no oropharyngeal lesion is seen, a significant esophageal injury which can lead to perforation and stricture cannot be ruled out. If abdominal pain or rigidity, substernal, chest or back pain exists, visceral perforation should be considered. The first thing to be checked is airway assessment. A lot of patients should be admitted to intensive care unit, and endoscopic evaluation, surgical intervention, long-term hospitalization, and worsening quality of life or among the complications. Preventive measures especially at the country level and approving proper legislation for obligating the related industries to produce child proof containers for house hold toxic products are the urgent measures to be followed by all of us. PMID:27424019

  1. Biological treatment of refinery spent caustics under halo-alkaline conditions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. de Graaff; M.F.M. Bijmans; B. Abbas; G.J.W. Euverink; G. Muijzer; A.J.H. Janssen

    2011-01-01

    The present research demonstrates the biological treatment of refinery sulfidic spent caustics in a continuously fed system under halo-alkaline conditions (i.e. pH 9.5; Na+ = 0.8 M). Experiments were performed in identical gas-lift bioreactors operated under aerobic conditions (80-90% saturation) at

  2. Biological treatment of refinery spent caustics under halo-alkaline conditions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Graaff, Marco de; Bijmans, Martijn F.M.; Abbas, Ben; Euverink, Gert-J.W.; Muyzer, Gerard; Janssen, Albert J.H.

    2011-01-01

    The present research demonstrates the biological treatment of refinery sulfidic spent caustics in a continuously fed system under halo-alkaline conditions (i.e. pH 9.5; Na+ = 0.8 M). Experiments were performed in identical gas-lift bioreactors operated under aerobic conditions (80–90% saturation) at

  3. Novel Electrochemical Treatment of Spent Caustic from the Hydrocarbon Industry Using Ti/BDD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alejandro Medel

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available During the crude oil refining process, NaOH solutions are used to remove H2S, H2Saq, and sulfur compounds from different hydrocarbon streams. The residues obtained are called “spent caustics.” These residues can be mixed with those obtained in other processes, adding to its chemical composition naphthenic acids and phenolic compounds, resulting in one of the most dangerous industrial residues. In this study, the use of electrochemical technology (ET, using BDD with Ti as substrate (Ti/BDD, is evaluated in electrolysis of spent caustic mixtures, obtained through individual samples from different refineries. In this way, the Ti/BDD’s capability of carrying out the electrochemical destruction of spent caustics in an acidic medium is evaluated having as key process a chemical pretreatment phase. The potential production of •OHs, as the main reactive oxygen species electrogenerated over Ti/BDD surface, was evaluated in HCl and H2SO4 through fluorescence spectroscopy, demonstrating the reaction medium’s influence on its production. The results show that the hydrocarbon industry spent caustics can be mineralized to CO2 and water, driving the use of ET and of the Ti/BDD to solve a real problem, whose potential and negative impact on the environment and on human health is and has been the environmental agencies’ main focus.

  4. Mass Transfer And Hydraulic Testing Of The V-05 And V-10 Contactors With The Next Generation Solvent

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herman, D. T.; Duignan, M. R.; Williams, M. R.; Peters, T. B.; Poirier, M. R.; Fondeur, F. F.

    2013-07-31

    The Modular Caustic Side Solvent Extraction (CSSX) Unit (MCU) facility is actively pursuing the transition from the current BOBCalixC6 based solvent to the Next Generation Solvent (NGS)-MCU solvent. To support this integration of NGS into the MCU facilities, Savannah River Remediation (SRR) requested that Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) perform testing of a blend of the NGS (MaxCalix based solvent) with the current solvent (BOBCalixC6 based solvent) for the removal of cesium (Cs) from the liquid salt waste stream. This testing differs from prior testing by utilizing a blend of BOBCalixC6 based solvent and the NGS with the full (0.05 M) concentration of the MaxCalix as well as a new suppressor, tris(3,7dimethyloctyl) guanidine. Single stage tests were conducted using the full size V-05 and V-10 centrifugal contactors installed at SRNL. These tests were designed to determine the mass transfer and hydraulic characteristics with the NGS solvent blended with the projected heel of the BOBCalixC6 based solvent that will exist in MCU at time of transition. The test program evaluated the amount of organic carryover and the droplet size of the organic carryover phases using several analytical methods. Stage efficiency and mass distribution ratios were determined by measuring Cs concentration in the aqueous and organic phases during single contactor testing. The nominal cesium distribution ratio, D(Cs) measured for extraction ranged from 37-60. The data showed greater than 96% stage efficiency for extraction. No significant differences were noted for operations at 4, 8 or 12 gpm aqueous salt simulant feed flow rates. The first scrub test (contact with weak caustic solution) yielded average scrub D(Cs) values of 3.3 to 5.2 and the second scrub test produced an average value of 1.8 to 2.3. For stripping behavior, the “first stage” D Cs) values ranged from 0.04 to 0.08. The efficiency of the low flow (0.27 gpm aqueous) was calculated to be 82.7%. The Spreadsheet

  5. Mass Transfer And Hydraulic Testing Of The V-05 And V-10 Contactors With The Next Generation Solvent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Modular Caustic Side Solvent Extraction (CSSX) Unit (MCU) facility is actively pursuing the transition from the current BOBCalixC6 based solvent to the Next Generation Solvent (NGS)-MCU solvent. To support this integration of NGS into the MCU facilities, Savannah River Remediation (SRR) requested that Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) perform testing of a blend of the NGS (MaxCalix based solvent) with the current solvent (BOBCalixC6 based solvent) for the removal of cesium (Cs) from the liquid salt waste stream. This testing differs from prior testing by utilizing a blend of BOBCalixC6 based solvent and the NGS with the full (0.05 M) concentration of the MaxCalix as well as a new suppressor, tris(3,7 dimethyloctyl) guanidine. Single stage tests were conducted using the full size V-05 and V-10 centrifugal contactors installed at SRNL. These tests were designed to determine the mass transfer and hydraulic characteristics with the NGS solvent blended with the projected heel of the BOBCalixC6 based solvent that will exist in MCU at time of transition. The test program evaluated the amount of organic carryover and the droplet size of the organic carryover phases using several analytical methods. Stage efficiency and mass distribution ratios were determined by measuring Cs concentration in the aqueous and organic phases during single contactor testing. The nominal cesium distribution ratio, D(Cs) measured for extraction ranged from 37-60. The data showed greater than 96% stage efficiency for extraction. No significant differences were noted for operations at 4, 8 or 12 gpm aqueous salt simulant feed flow rates. The first scrub test (contact with weak caustic solution) yielded average scrub D(Cs) values of 3.3 to 5.2 and the second scrub test produced an average value of 1.8 to 2.3. For stripping behavior, the ''first stage'' D Cs) values ranged from 0.04 to 0.08. The efficiency of the low flow (0.27 gpm aqueous) was calculated to be 82.7%. The Spreadsheet

  6. A geochemical module for "AMDTreat" to compute caustic quantity, effluent quantity, and sludge volume

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cravotta, Charles A., III; Parkhurst, David L.; Means, Brent P; McKenzie, Bob; Morris, Harry; Arthur, Bill

    2010-01-01

    Treatment with caustic chemicals typically is used to increase pH and decrease concentrations of dissolved aluminum, iron, and/or manganese in largevolume, metal-laden discharges from active coal mines. Generally, aluminum and iron can be removed effectively at near-neutral pH (6 to 8), whereas active manganese removal requires treatment to alkaline pH (~10). The treatment cost depends on the specific chemical used (NaOH, CaO, Ca(OH)2, Na2CO3, or NH3) and increases with the quantities of chemical added and sludge produced. The pH and metals concentrations do not change linearly with the amount of chemical added. Consequently, the amount of caustic chemical needed to achieve a target pH and the corresponding effluent composition and sludge volume can not be accurately determined without empirical titration data or the application of geochemical models to simulate the titration of the discharge water with caustic chemical(s). The AMDTreat computer program (http://amd.osmre.gov/ ) is widely used to compute costs for treatment of coal-mine drainage. Although AMDTreat can use results of empirical titration with industrial grade caustic chemicals to compute chemical costs for treatment of net-acidic or net-alkaline mine drainage, such data are rarely available. To improve the capability of AMDTreat to estimate (1) the quantity and cost of caustic chemicals to attain a target pH, (2) the concentrations of dissolved metals in treated effluent, and (3) the volume of sludge produced by the treatment, a titration simulation is being developed using the geochemical program PHREEQC (wwwbrr.cr.usgs.gov/projects/GWC_coupled/phreeqc/) that will be coupled as a module to AMDTreat. The simulated titration results can be compared with or used in place of empirical titration data to estimate chemical quantities and costs. This paper describes the development, evaluation, and potential utilization of the PHREEQC titration module for AMDTreat.

  7. Role of microstructure in caustic stress corrosion cracking of Alloy 690

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alloy 690 has been selected for nuclear heat transport system tubing application in recent commercial reactor plants due to its resistance to multiple types of corrosion attack. Typical corn final heat treatments for this material are a mill-anneal (MA, approximately 1,070 C) to completely dissolve the carbides and develop the final grain structure plus a thermal treatment (TT, approximately 700 C) to precipitate carbides at the grain boundaries. Tubing with grain boundary carbides and no or few intragranular carbides has been found resistant to intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC) in caustic environments. In this work, first, Alloy 690 plate was subjected to a variety of MA and MA-TT heat treatments to create microstructures of carbide-decorated grain boundaries and undecorated boundaries. Caustic IGSCC test results were consistent with tubing data. Second, experiments were conducted to understand the mechanism by which caustic-corrosion resistance is imparted to Alloy 690 by grain boundary carbides. Tubing with a fully-developed MA-TT carbide microstructure was strained and heat-treated to create a mixed microstructure of new grain boundaries with no carbide precipitate decoration, intermixed with intragranular carbide strings from prior grain boundaries. Caustic SCC performance of this material was identical to that of material with the MA-TT carbide-decorated grain boundaries. This work suggests that the fundamental cause of good IGSCC resistance of MA-TT Alloy 690 in caustic does not derive solely from grain boundary carbides. It is suggested that matrix strength, as measured by yield stress, could be a controlling factor

  8. Influence of Solvent-Solvent and Solute-Solvent Interaction Properties on Solvent-Mediated Potential

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOU Shi-Qi

    2005-01-01

    A recently proposed universal calculational recipe for solvent-mediated potential is applied to calculate excess potential of mean force between two large Lennard-Jones (LJ) or hard core attractive Yukawa particles immersed in small LJ solvent bath at supercritical state. Comparison between the present prediction with a hypernetted chain approximation adopted for solute-solute correlation at infinitely dilute limit and existing simulation data shows high accuracy for the region with large separation, and qualitative reliability for the solute particle contact region. The calculational simplicity of the present recipe allows for a detailed investigation on the effect of the solute-solvent and solvent-solvent interaction details on the excess potential of mean force. The resultant conclusion is that gathering of solvent particles near a solute particle leads to repulsive excess PMF, while depletion of solvent particles away from the solute particle leads to attractive excess PMF, and minor change of the solvent-solvent interaction range has large influence on the excess PMF.

  9. EFRT M-12 Issue Resolution: Caustic Leach Rate Constants from PEP and Laboratory-Scale Tests

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mahoney, Lenna A.; Rassat, Scot D.; Eslinger, Paul W.; Aaberg, Rosanne L.; Aker, Pamela M.; Golovich, Elizabeth C.; Hanson, Brady D.; Hausmann, Tom S.; Huckaby, James L.; Kurath, Dean E.; Minette, Michael J.; Sundaram, S. K.; Yokuda, Satoru T.

    2009-08-14

    Testing Summary Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) has been tasked by Bechtel National Inc. (BNI) on the River Protection Project-Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (RPP-WTP) project to perform research and development activities to resolve technical issues identified for the Pretreatment Facility (PTF). The Pretreatment Engineering Platform (PEP) was designed and constructed and is to be operated as part of a plan to respond to issue M12, “Undemonstrated Leaching Processes.” The PEP is a 1/4.5-scale test platform designed to simulate the WTP pretreatment caustic leaching, oxidative leaching, ultrafiltration solids concentration, and slurry washing processes. The PEP replicates the WTP leaching processes using prototypic equipment and control strategies. The PEP also includes non-prototypic ancillary equipment to support the core processing. Two operating scenarios are currently being evaluated for the ultrafiltration process (UFP) and leaching operations. The first scenario has caustic leaching performed in the UFP-2 ultrafiltration feed vessels (i.e., vessel UFP-VSL-T02A in the PEP and vessels UFP-VSL-00002A and B in the WTP PTF). The second scenario has caustic leaching conducted in the UFP-1 ultrafiltration feed preparation vessels (i.e., vessels UFP-VSL-T01A and B in the PEP; vessels UFP-VSL-00001A and B in the WTP PTF). In both scenarios, 19-M sodium hydroxide solution (NaOH, caustic) is added to the waste slurry in the vessels to leach solid aluminum compounds (e.g., gibbsite, boehmite). Caustic addition is followed by a heating step that uses direct injection of steam to accelerate the leaching process. Following the caustic leach, the vessel contents are cooled using vessel cooling jackets and/or external heat exchangers. The main difference between the two scenarios is that for leaching in UFP-1, the 19-M NaOH is added to un-concentrated waste slurry (3 to 8 wt% solids), while for leaching in UFP-2, the slurry is

  10. Direct Causticizing for Black Liquor Gasification in a Circulating Fluidized Bed

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scott Sinquefield; Xiaoyan Zeng, Alan Ball

    2010-03-02

    Gasification of black liquor (BLG) has distinct advantages over direct combustion in Tomlinson recovery boilers. In this project we seek to resolve causticizing issues in order to make pressurized BLG even more efficient and cost-effective. One advantage of BLG is that the inherent partial separation of sulfur and sodium during gasification lends itself to the use of proven high yield variants to conventional kraft pulping which require just such a separation. Processes such as polysulfide, split sulfidity, ASAQ, and MSSAQ can increase pulp yield from 1% to 10% over conventional kraft but require varying degrees of sulfur/sodium separation, which requires additional [and costly] processing in a conventional Tomlinson recovery process. However during gasification, the sulfur is partitioned between the gas and smelt phases, while the sodium all leaves in the smelt; thus creating the opportunity to produce sulfur-rich and sulfur-lean white liquors for specialty pulping processes. A second major incentive of BLG is the production of a combustible product gas, rich in H2 and CO. This product gas (a.k.a. “syngas”) can be used in gas turbines for combined cycle power generation (which is twice as efficient as the steam cycle alone), or it can be used as a precursor to form liquid fuels, such as dimethyl ether or Fischer Tropsh diesel. There is drawback to BLG, which has the potential to become a third major incentive if this work is successful. The causticizing load is greater for gasification of black liquor than for combustion in a Tomlinson boiler. So implementing BLG in an existing mill would require costly increases to the causticizing capacity. In situ causticizing [within the gasifier] would handle the entire causticizing load and therefore eliminate the lime cycle entirely. Previous work by the author and others has shown that titanate direct causticizing (i.e. in situ) works quite well for high-temperature BLG (950°C), but was limited to pressures below

  11. Alternative Green Solvents Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maloney, Phillip R.

    2012-01-01

    Necessary for safe and proper functioning of equipment. Mainly halogenated solvents. Tetrachloride, Trichloroethylene (TCE), CFC-113. No longer used due to regulatory/safety concerns. Precision Cleaning at KSC: Small % of total parts. Used for liquid oxygen (LOX) systems. Dual solvent process. Vertrel MCA (decafluoropentane (DFP) and trons-dichloroethylene) HFE-7100. DFP has long term environmental concerns. Project Goals: a) Identify potential replacements. b) 22 wet chemical processes. c) 3 alternative processes. d) Develop test procedures. e) Contamination and cleaning. f) Analysis. g) Use results to recommend alternative processes. Conclusions: a) No alternative matched Vertrel in this study. b) No clear second place solvent. c) Hydrocarbons- easy; Fluorinated greases- difficult. d) Fluorinated component may be needed in replacement solvent. e) Process may need to make up for shortcoming of the solvent. f) Plasma and SCC02 warrant further testing.

  12. Translocation of Single Polymer Chain from Nanopore on a Membrane: Solvent Effect

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GU Fang; WANG Hai-Jun

    2005-01-01

    @@ We investigate the translocation of single polymer chain through a nanopore located on a membrane with different solvents in the two sides of the membrane. For the case under study, the effect of solvents on the translocation dynamics is significant, and as a result, the mean first passage time shortens remarkably compared with that calculated in the case of good solvents on both the sides of the membrane. In addition, we also discuss the condition such that the present result holds true.

  13. Graphene Side Gate Engineering

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Ching-Tzu; Low, Tony; Chiu, Hsin-Ying; Zhu, Wenjuan

    2014-01-01

    Various mesoscopic devices exploit electrostatic side gates for their operation. In this paper, we investigate how voltage-biasing of graphene side gates modulates the electrical transport characteristics of graphene channel. We explore myriads of typical side gated devices such as symmetric dual side gates and asymmetric single side gate biasing, in monolayer and bilayer graphene. The side gates modulate the electrostatic doping in the graphene channel whose effect is reflected in transport ...

  14. An experimental study of the dynamic features of shadow areas of caustics in response to loading/unloading fracture

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    许昭永; 杨润海; 赵晋明; 王赟赟; 熊秉衡; 王正荣; 梅世蓉

    2002-01-01

    Using a plexiglass sample and by means of real-time holographic interferometry and shadow optical method of caustics, the different features of dynamic variation in stress (strain) field, plastic area and nucleation zone (shadow area) when the sample fractures during loading (loading-fracture) and unloading (unloading-fracture) are studied visually. The results show that the strain nuclei (zones with dense fringes) appear first at the tips of prefabricated cracks at low stress, and then the shadow areas of caustics form with the increase of load. These nuclei and shadow areas can become larger, or smaller, when the process of loading, or unloading, goes on. When the stress is kept within a certain range, the shadow areas of caustics can become larger and smaller alternatively with repeated loading and unloading (cyclic loading). However, when loading and unloading at high stress, in particular when the macrofracture is about to appear, the variations of the shadow areas of caustics are irreversible and quite different. The shadow areas of caustics expand rapidly at an increasing speed when loading-fracture appears. In contrast, the shadow areas of caustics expand at a lower speed when unloading-fracture appears; besides, there is a circular shadow in front of the sharp-angle shaped area.

  15. P-Area Acid/Caustic Basin groundwater monitoring report: Third quarter 1994

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    During third quarter 1994, groundwater from the six PAC monitoring wells at the P-Area Acid/Caustic Basin was analyzed for herbicides/pesticides, indicator parameters, metals, nitrate, radionuclide indicators, and other constituents. Monitoring results that exceeded the final Primary Drinking Water Standards (PDWS) or the Savannah River Site (SRS) flagging criteria or turbidity standard during the quarter are discussed in this report. During third quarter 1994, no constituents exceeded the final PDWS. Aluminum exceeded its SRS Flag 2 criterion in all six PAC wells. Iron and manganese exceeded Flag 2 criteria in three wells, while turbidity was elevated in one well. Groundwater flow direction and rate in the water table beneath the P-Area Acid/Caustic Basin were similar to past quarters

  16. K-Area Acid/Caustic Basin groundwater monitoring report. Third quarter 1994

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    During third quarter 1994, samples from the KAC monitoring wells at the K-Area Acid/Caustic Basin were collected and analyzed for herbicides/pesticides, indicator parameters, metals, nitrate, radionuclide indicators, and other constituents. Monitoring results that exceeded the final Primary Drinking Water Standards (PDWS), other Savannah River Site (SRS) Flag 2 criteria, or the SRS turbidity standard are provided in this report. No constituents exceeded the final PDWS in the KAC wells. Aluminum and iron exceeded other SRS flagging criteria in one or more of the downgradient wells. Groundwater flow direction and rate in the water table beneath the K-Area Acid/Caustic Basin were similar to past quarters

  17. Washing and Caustic Leaching of Hanford Tank Sludge: Results of FY 1998 Studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    GJ Lumetta; BM Rapko; J Liu; DJ Temer; RD Hunt

    1998-12-11

    Sludge washing and parametric caustic leaching tests were performed on sludge samples tiom five Hanford tanks: B-101, BX-1 10, BX-112, C-102, and S-101. These studies examined the effects of both dilute hydroxide washing and caustic leaching on the composition of the residual sludge solids. ` Dilute hydroxide washing removed from <1 to 25% of the Al, -20 to 45% of the Cr, -25 to 97% of the P, and 63 to 99% of the Na from the Hdord tank sludge samples examined. The partial removal of these elements was likely due to the presence of water-soluble sodium salts of aluminate, chromate, hydroxide, nitrate, nitrite, and phosphate, either in the interstitial liquid or as dried salts.

  18. Influence of thermal treatment on the caustic SCC of super austenitic stainless steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoo, Y.R.; Park, Y.B.; Chung, T.J.; Kim, Y.S. [School of Advanced Materials Engineering, Andong National Univ. (Korea); Chang, H.Y. [Korea Power Engineering Co. (Korea); Park, Y.S. [Dept. of Metallurgical Engineering, Yonsei Univ. (Korea)

    2005-07-01

    In general, thermal treatment at 500 C {proportional_to} 900 C ranges depending upon alloy composition of stainless steels can sensitize the steels and promote the intergranular cracking, and their intergranular corrosion resistance is decreased. These behaviors seem to be related to the change of microstructures. So, heat treatment at that temperature range should be avoided in fabrication, especially welding of stainless steels. In this work, it is focused on the effect of thermal treatment on caustic stress corrosion cracking of super austenitic stainless steel - S32050 The low temperature thermal treatment increased greatly the resistance to caustic SCC than those of annealed specimen. This enhancement might be closely related to the reduction of residual stress and slightly large grain, but its resistance was not affected by the anodic polarization behavior. (orig.)

  19. Caustic ingestion management: world society of emergency surgery preliminary survey of expert opinion

    OpenAIRE

    Kluger, Yoram; Ishay, Ofir Ben; Sartelli, Massimo; Katz, Amit; Ansaloni, Luca; Gomez, Carlos Augusto; Biffl, Walter; Catena, Fausto; Fraga, Gustavo P; Di Saverio, Salomone; Goran, Augustin; Ghnnam, Wagih; Kashuk, Jeffry; Leppäniemi, Ari; Marwah, Sanjay

    2015-01-01

    Caustic material ingestion injuries (CMI) are uncommon. Only 5,000 cases are reported in the United States each year and most acute care healthcare facilities admit only a few cases annually. Accordingly, no single institution can claim extensive experience, and management protocols are most probably based on either expert opinion or literature reports. In this study, we will attempt to review opinions and practices of representatives of the board members of the World Society of Emergency Sur...

  20. F-Area Acid/Caustic Basin groundwater monitoring report: Second quarter 1992

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    During second quarter 1992, samples from the six FAC monitoring wells at the F-Area Acid/Caustic Basin were analyzed for herbicides, indicator parameters, major ions, pesticides, radionuclides, turbidity, volatile organic compounds, and other constituents. Monitoring results that exceeded the US Environmental Protection Agency's Primary Drinking Water Standards (PDWS) or the Savannah River Site flagging criteria or turbidity standards during the quarter are the focus of this report

  1. F-Area Acid/Caustic Basin groundwater monitoring report: Second quarter 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thompson, C.Y.

    1992-09-01

    During second quarter 1992, samples from the six FAC monitoring wells at the F-Area Acid/Caustic Basin were analyzed for herbicides, indicator parameters, major ions, pesticides, radionuclides, turbidity, volatile organic compounds, and other constituents. Monitoring results that exceeded the US Environmental Protection Agency's Primary Drinking Water Standards (PDWS) or the Savannah River Site flagging criteria or turbidity standards during the quarter are the focus of this report.

  2. F-Area Acid/Caustic Basin groundwater monitoring report: Second quarter 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thompson, C.Y.

    1992-09-01

    During second quarter 1992, samples from the six FAC monitoring wells at the F-Area Acid/Caustic Basin were analyzed for herbicides, indicator parameters, major ions, pesticides, radionuclides, turbidity, volatile organic compounds, and other constituents. Monitoring results that exceeded the US Environmental Protection Agency`s Primary Drinking Water Standards (PDWS) or the Savannah River Site flagging criteria or turbidity standards during the quarter are the focus of this report.

  3. An unconventional method for the recovery of caustic soda from spent Al-rich pickling solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aprea, Paolo; de Gennaro, Bruno; Colella, Carmine

    2011-07-01

    This work presents an unconventional procedure for the recovery of spent Al-rich caustic soda solutions from the pickling of dies for the production of aluminium extrusions. Caustic soda was regenerated at roughly 70%, by precipitating aluminate, after addition of a silica source, in the form of zeolite A, a microporous material that is widely used in many technological sectors. It was shown that the process is reliable and can be repeated for several cycles, provided the concentration of the caustic soda solution is suitably restored. The by-product obtained, zeolite A, proved to be a high-grade material with performance as a cation exchanger and physical sorbent that is certainly comparable to that reported in literature (e.g., cation exchange capacity equal to 5.14 meq g(-1) vs. 5.48 meq g(-1) and water vapour adsorption capacity of 26.5% vs. 27.6% at 16 torr and 298 K). The economics of the process, although not examined yet, would appear generally favourable, considering that zeolite A is a valuable by-product which widely covers the costs for the recovery of the spent solutions. There are, therefore, significant prospects for the use of zeolite A, particularly as a builder in detergent formulation. PMID:21458911

  4. The Efficacy of Mesenchymal Stem Cell Transplantation in Caustic Esophagus Injury: An Experimental Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Murat Kantarcioglu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Ingestion of corrosive substances may lead to stricture formation in esophagus as a late complication. Full thickness injury seems to exterminate tissue stem cells of esophagus. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs can differentiate into specific cell lineages and have the capacity of homing in sites of injury. Aim and Methods. We aimed to investigate the efficacy of MSC transplantation, on prevention of esophageal damage and stricture formation after caustic esophagus injury in rats. 54 rats were allocated into four groups; 4 rats were sacrificed for MSC production. Group 1, untreated controls (n: 10. Group 2, membrane labeled MSCs-treated rats (n: 20. Group 3, biodistribution of fluorodeoxyglucose labeled MSCs via positron emission tomography (PET imaging (n: 10. Group 4, sham operated (n: 10. Standard caustic esophageal burns were created and MSCs were transplanted 24 hours after. All rats were sacrificed at the 21st days. Results. PET scan images revealed the homing behavior of MSCs to the injury site. The histopathology damage score was not significantly different from controls. However, we demonstrated Dil labeled epithelial and muscle cells which were originating from transplanted MSCs. Conclusion. MSC transplantation after caustic esophageal injury may be a helpful treatment modality; however, probably repeated infusions are needed.

  5. Supercritical solvent coal extraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Compton, L. E. (Inventor)

    1984-01-01

    Yields of soluble organic extract are increased up to about 50% by the supercritical extraction of particulate coal at a temperature below the polymerization temperature for coal extract fragments (450 C.) and a pressure from 500 psig to 5,000 psig by the conjoint use of a solvent mixture containing a low volatility, high critical temperature coal dissolution catalyst such as phenanthrene and a high volatility, low critical temperature solvent such as toluene.

  6. SOLVENT EXTRACTION OF RUTHENIUM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyman, H.H.; Leader, G.R.

    1959-07-14

    The separation of rathenium from aqueous solutions by solvent extraction is described. According to the invention, a nitrite selected from the group consisting of alkali nitrite and alkaline earth nitrite in an equimolecular quantity with regard to the quantity of rathenium present is added to an aqueous solution containing ruthenium tetrantrate to form a ruthenium complex. Adding an organic solvent such as ethyl ether to the resulting mixture selectively extracts the rathenium complex.

  7. Mill Integration-Pulping, Stream Reforming and Direct Causticization for Black Liquor Recovery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adriaan van Heiningen

    2007-06-30

    MTCI/StoneChem developed a steam reforming, fluidized bed gasification technology for biomass. DOE supported the demonstration of this technology for gasification of spent wood pulping liquor (or 'black liquor') at Georgia-Pacific's Big Island, Virginia mill. The present pre-commercial R&D project addressed the opportunities as well as identified negative aspects when the MTCI/StoneChem gasification technology is integrated in a pulp mill production facility. The opportunities arise because black liquor gasification produces sulfur (as H{sub 2}S) and sodium (as Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3}) in separate streams which may be used beneficially for improved pulp yield and properties. The negative aspect of kraft black liquor gasification is that the amount of Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3} which must be converted to NaOH (the so called causticizing requirement) is increased. This arises because sulfur is released as Na{sub 2}S during conventional kraft black liquor recovery, while during gasification the sodium associated Na{sub 2}S is partly or fully converted to Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3}. The causticizing requirement can be eliminated by including a TiO{sub 2} based cyclic process called direct causticization. In this process black liquor is gasified in the presence of (low sodium content) titanates which convert Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3} to (high sodium content) titanates. NaOH is formed when contacting the latter titanates with water, thereby eliminating the causticizing requirement entirely. The leached and low sodium titanates are returned to the gasification process. The project team comprised the University of Maine (UM), North Carolina State University (NCSU) and MTCI/ThermoChem. NCSU and MTCI are subcontractors to UM. The principal organization for the contract is UM. NCSU investigated the techno-economics of using advanced pulping techniques which fully utilize the unique cooking liquors produced by steam reforming of black liquor (Task 1). UM studied the kinetics and

  8. Intoxicación por cáusticos Poisoning by caustic substances

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Mencías

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available A la hora de valorar a un paciente que ha ingerido un cáustico existen guías o protocolos de tratamiento discordantes. Diversas ideas o tendencias hablan a favor de diluir, neutralizar, provocar el vómito, realizar lavado gástrico, etc., dependiendo del medio en que se haga la encuesta: domicilio, centro de salud, servicio de urgencias u hospital. Lo mismo sucede con el tipo de diluyente o neutralizante a usar, cómo y cuándo iniciar pauta de tratamiento con corticoides y/o antibióticos y antisecretores, y eso si es que hay que hacerlo. Se ha realizado una revisión bibliográfica exhaustiva, un trabajo experimental y el estudio de diversas guías o protocolos de diagnóstico y tratamiento que se siguen en diversos hospitales españoles. A escala experimental se evidencia que existen marcadores histopatológicos que desaconsejan la utilización de sustancias diluyentes tras la ingestión de álcalis cáusticos. Salvo en los casos de ingesta de sustancias cáusticas sólidas -cristalinas o granulosas- se contraindica, de forma absoluta, la dilución. Los corticoides no son eficaces cuando se ingiere un ácido cáustico; su uso es más que cuestionable tras la ingesta de álcalis cáusticos. El diagnóstico y calidad de tratamiento se apoya en la endoscopia. No existe un criterio único que defina en qué momento (tiempo post-ingesta es más conveniente llevarla a cabo, aunque el periodo comprendido entre las primeras 6-12 horas es el más adecuado. Se presenta un protocolo independiente de diagnóstico y tratamiento -en forma de algoritmos- que debe seguirse tras la ingesta de ácidos cáusticos o álcalis cáusticos.There are discordant guides and protocols when it comes to treating a patient who has ingested a caustic substance. Different ideas or tendencies speak in favour of dilution, neutralization, provoking vomiting, carrying out stomach washes, etc., depending on the milieu where the problem arises: at home, at the health centre

  9. Purex process solvent: literature review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This document summarizes the data on Purex process solvent presently published in a variety of sources. Extracts from these various sources are presented herein and contain the work done, the salient results obtained, and the original, unaltered conclusions of the author of each paper. Three major areas are addressed: solvent stability, solvent quality testing, and solvent treatment processes. 34 references, 44 tables

  10. Effect of Heat Treatment on Corrosion and Stress Corrosion Cracking of S32205 Duplex Stainless Steel in Caustic Solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharya, Ananya; Singh, Preet M.

    2009-06-01

    Duplex stainless steels (DSSs) have generally performed very well in caustic environments. However, some corrosion and stress corrosion cracking (SCC) of DSSs have been reported in different pulp mill environments employing caustic solutions. Studies have shown that the corrosion and SCC susceptibility of DSSs depend on the alloy composition and microstructure of the steel. In this study, the effect of a sulfide-containing caustic environment (pulping liquor) and material properties (DSS alloy composition and microstructure) on the corrosion and SCC of DSSs was evaluated. During metal fabrication processes, localized areas of DSSs may be exposed to different temperatures and cooling rates, which may lead to changes in the microstructure in these regions. This change in microstructure, in turn, may affect the general and localized corrosion or SCC susceptibility of the affected area as compared to the rest of the metal. Hence, the effect of different annealing and aging temperatures as well as cooling rates on the microstructure and corrosion behavior of S32205 DSSs in caustic environment was evaluated. The results showed that changes in the microstructure of S32205 DSSs due to selected heat treatments did not have a significant effect on the general corrosion susceptibility of the steel in caustic environment, but its SCC susceptibility varied with changes in microstructures.

  11. Test Results for Caustic Demand Measurements on Tank 241-AX-101 and Tank 241-AX-103 Archive Samples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doll, Stephanie R. [Washington River Protection Solutions, Richland, WA (United States); Bolling, Stacie D. [Washington River Protection Solutions, Richland, WA (United States)

    2016-07-14

    Caustic demand testing is used to determine the necessary amount of caustic required to neutralize species present in the Hanford tank waste and obtain a target molarity of free hydroxide for tank corrosion control. The presence and quantity of hydroxide-consuming analytes are just as important in determining the caustic demand as is the amount of free hydroxide present. No single data point can accurately predict whether a satisfactory hydroxide level is being met as it is dependent on multiple factors (e.g., free hydroxide, buffers, amphoteric metal hydroxides, bicarbonate, etc.). This enclosure contains the caustic demand, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), polarized light microscopy (PLM), and X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis for the tank 241-AX-101 (AX-101) and 241-AX-103 (AX-103) samples. The work was completed to fulfill a customer request outlined in the test plan, WRPS-1505529, “Test Plan and Procedure for Caustic Demand Testing on Tank 241-AX-101 and Tank 241-AX-103 Archive Samples.” The work results will provide a baseline to support planned retrieval of AX-101 and AX-103.

  12. 'Side-by-side'

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anon.

    2010-07-01

    France is a nuclear power nation. And this is not going to change. However, at the same time, the country is also pursuing massive investments in the expansion of renewable energies. According to France's President Nicolas Sarkozy, the motto should be: 'side-by-side' rather than 'one or the other'. For the PV sector, whose success was unbroken during the crisis in 2009, the signal is positive and could mean sustained growth. (orig.)

  13. Side Effects (Management)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... cancer care is relieving side effects, called symptom management, palliative care, or supportive care. It is important ... treat them. To learn about the symptoms and management of the long-term side effects of cancer ...

  14. Safe battery solvents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrup, Mason K.; Delmastro, Joseph R.; Stewart, Frederick F.; Luther, Thomas A.

    2007-10-23

    An ion transporting solvent maintains very low vapor pressure, contains flame retarding elements, and is nontoxic. The solvent in combination with common battery electrolyte salts can be used to replace the current carbonate electrolyte solution, creating a safer battery. It can also be used in combination with polymer gels or solid polymer electrolytes to produce polymer batteries with enhanced conductivity characteristics. The solvents may comprise a class of cyclic and acyclic low molecular weight phosphazenes compounds, comprising repeating phosphorus and nitrogen units forming a core backbone and ion-carrying pendent groups bound to the phosphorus. In preferred embodiments, the cyclic phosphazene comprises at least 3 phosphorus and nitrogen units, and the pendent groups are polyethers, polythioethers, polyether/polythioethers or any combination thereof, and/or other groups preferably comprising other atoms from Group 6B of the periodic table of elements.

  15. Characterization of irregular seeds on gibbsites precipitated from caustic aluminate solutions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Guo-hui; CHEN Qi-yuan; YIN Zhou-lan; YIN Zhi-min

    2006-01-01

    The irregular surface of seeds on which gibbsites are precipitated from caustic aluminate solutions, was investigated according to the fractal theory. Two kinds of fractal dimensions were used to characterize these irregularity. Box-dimension and spectral dimension are based on the SEM images of seeds and diffusive dynamic equation ofthe precipitation respectively. Both these two dimensions are affected by the reaction temperature, evolved with different reaction conditions and can reflect the influence of irregularity of seeds on the precipitation rate. Box dimension is fit for the characterization of the irregular morphology of seeds, while spectral dimension can explain the fractal dynamic behavior.

  16. Distribution of velocity gradients and rate of caustic formation in turbulent aerosols at finite Kubo numbers

    CERN Document Server

    Gustavsson, K

    2012-01-01

    In a one-dimensional model for a turbulent aerosol (inertial particles suspended in a random flow) we compute the distributions of particle-velocity gradients and the rate of caustic formation at finite but small Kubo numbers Ku, for arbitrary Stokes numbers St. Our results are consistent with those obtained earlier in the limit of small Ku and and large St, such that Ku^2 St remains constant. We show how finite-time correlations and non-ergodic effects influence the inertial-particle dynamics at finite but small Kubo numbers.

  17. Process for converting sodium nitrate-containing, caustic liquid radioactive wastes to solid insoluble products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barney, Gary S.; Brownell, Lloyd E.

    1977-01-01

    A method for converting sodium nitrate-containing, caustic, radioactive wastes to a solid, relatively insoluble, thermally stable form is provided and comprises the steps of reacting powdered aluminum silicate clay, e.g., kaolin, bentonite, dickite, halloysite, pyrophyllite, etc., with the sodium nitrate-containing radioactive wastes which have a caustic concentration of about 3 to 7 M at a temperature of 30.degree. C to 100.degree. C to thereby entrap the dissolved radioactive salts in the aluminosilicate matrix. In one embodiment the sodium nitrate-containing, caustic, radioactive liquid waste, such as neutralized Purex-type waste, or salts or oxide produced by evaporation or calcination of these liquid wastes (e.g., anhydrous salt cake) is converted at a temperature within the range of 30.degree. C to 100.degree. C to the solid mineral form-cancrinite having an approximate chemical formula 2(NaAlSiO.sub.4) .sup.. xSalt.sup.. y H.sub.2 O with x = 0.52 and y = 0.68 when the entrapped salt is NaNO.sub.3. In another embodiment the sodium nitrate-containing, caustic, radioactive liquid is reacted with the powdered aluminum silicate clay at a temperature within the range of 30.degree. C to 100.degree. C, the resulting reaction product is air dried eitheras loose powder or molded shapes (e.g., bricks) and then fired at a temperature of at least 600.degree. C to form the solid mineral form-nepheline which has the approximate chemical formula of NaAlSiO.sub.4. The leach rate of the entrapped radioactive salts with distilled water is reduced essentially to that of the aluminosilicate lattice which is very low, e.g., in the range of 10.sup.-.sup.2 to 10.sup.-.sup.4 g/cm.sup.2 -- day for cancrinite and 10.sup.-.sup.3 to 10.sup.-.sup.5 g/cm.sup.2 -- day for nepheline.

  18. Caustic leaching of high-level radioactive tank sludge: A critical literature review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McGinnis, C.P.; Welch, T.D.; Hunt, R.D.

    1998-08-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) must treat and safely dispose of its radioactive tank contents, which can be separated into high-level waste (HLW) and low-level waste (LLW) fractions. Since the unit costs of treatment and disposal are much higher for HLW than for LLW, technologies to reduce the amount of HLW are being developed. A key process currently being studied to reduce the volume of HLW sludges is called enhanced sludge washing (ESW). This process removes, by water washes, soluble constituents such as sodium salts, and the washed sludge is then leached with 2--3 M NaOH at 60--100 C to remove nonradioactive metals such as aluminum. The remaining solids are considered to be HLW while the solutions are LLW after radionuclides such as {sup 137}Cs have been removed. Results of bench-scale tests have shown that the ESW will probably remove the required amounts of inert constituents. While both experimental and theoretical results have shown that leaching efficiency increases as the time and temperature of the leach are increased, increases in the caustic concentration above 2--3 M will only marginally improve the leach factors. However, these tests were not designed to validate the assumption that the caustic used in the ESW process will generate only a small increase (10 Mkg) in the amount of LLW; instead the test conditions were selected to maximize leaching in a short period and used more water and caustic than is planned during full-scale operations. Even though calculations indicate that the estimate for the amount of LLW generated by the ESW process appears to be reasonable, a detailed study of the amount of LLW from the ESW process is still required. If the LLW analysis indicates that sodium management is critical, then a more comprehensive evaluation of the clean salt process or caustic recycle would be needed. Finally, experimental and theoretical studies have clearly demonstrated the need for the control of solids formation during and after leaching.

  19. THE IMPACT OF THE MCU LIFE EXTENSION SOLVENT ON DWPF GLASS FORMULATION EFFORTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peeler, D; Edwards, T

    2011-03-24

    As a part of the Actinide Removal Process (ARP)/Modular Caustic Side Solvent Extraction Unit (MCU) Life Extension Project, a next generation solvent (NG-CSSX), a new strip acid, and modified monosodium titanate (mMST) will be deployed. The strip acid will be changed from dilute nitric acid to dilute boric acid (0.01 M). Because of these changes, experimental testing with the next generation solvent and mMST is required to determine the impact of these changes in 512-S operations as well as Chemical Process Cell (CPC), Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) glass formulation activities, and melter operations at DWPF. To support programmatic objectives, the downstream impacts of the boric acid strip effluent (SE) to the glass formulation activities and melter operations are considered in this study. More specifically, the impacts of boric acid additions to the projected SB7b operating windows, potential impacts to frit production temperatures, and the potential impact of boron volatility are evaluated. Although various boric acid molarities have been reported and discussed, the baseline flowsheet used to support this assessment was 0.01M boric acid. The results of the paper study assessment indicate that Frit 418 and Frit 418-7D are robust to the implementation of the 0.01M boric acid SE into the SB7b flowsheet (sludge-only or ARP-added). More specifically, the projected operating windows for the nominal SB7b projections remain essentially constant (i.e., 25-43 or 25-44% waste loading (WL)) regardless of the flowsheet options (sludge-only, ARP added, and/or the presence of the new SE). These results indicate that even if SE is not transferred to the Sludge Receipt and Adjustment Tank (SRAT), there would be no need to add boric acid (from a trim tank) to compositionally compensate for the absence of the boric acid SE in either a sludge-only or ARP-added SB7b flowsheet. With respect to boron volatility, the Measurement Acceptability Region (MAR) assessments also

  20. Automated solvent concentrator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffith, J. S.; Stuart, J. L.

    1976-01-01

    Designed for automated drug identification system (AUDRI), device increases concentration by 100. Sample is first filtered, removing particulate contaminants and reducing water content of sample. Sample is extracted from filtered residue by specific solvent. Concentrator provides input material to analysis subsystem.

  1. Organic solvent topical report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cowley, W.L.

    1998-04-30

    This report is the technical basis for the accident and consequence analyses used in the Hanford Tank Farms Basis for Interim Operation. The report also contains the scientific and engineering information and reference material needed to understand the organic solvent safety issue. This report includes comments received from the Chemical Reactions Subcommittee of the Tank Advisory Panel.

  2. Organic solvent topical report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    COWLEY, W.L.

    1999-05-13

    This report provides the basis for closing the organic solvent safety issue. Sufficient information is presented to conclude that risk posed by an organic solvent fire is within risk evaluation guidelines. This report updates information contained in Analysis of Consequences of Postulated Solvent Fires in Hanford Site Waste Tanks. WHC-SD-WM-CN-032. Rev. 0A (Cowley et al. 1996). However, this document will not replace Cowley et al (1996) as the primary reference for the Basis for Interim Operation (BIO) until the recently submitted BIO amendment (Hanson 1999) is approved by the US Department of Energy. This conclusion depends on the use of controls for preventing vehicle fuel fires and for limiting the use of flame cutting in areas where hot metal can fall on the waste surface.The required controls are given in the Tank Waste Remediation System Technical Safety Requirements (Noorani 1997b). This is a significant change from the conclusions presented in Revision 0 of this report. Revision 0 of this calcnote concluded that some organic solvent fire scenarios exceeded risk evaluation guidelines, even with controls imposed.

  3. Organic solvent topical report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report provides the basis for closing the organic solvent safety issue. Sufficient information is presented to conclude that risk posed by an organic solvent fire is within risk evaluation guidelines. This report updates information contained in Analysis of Consequences of Postulated Solvent Fires in Hanford Site Waste Tanks. WHC-SD-WM-CN-032. Rev. 0A (Cowley et al. 1996). However, this document will not replace Cowley et al (1996) as the primary reference for the Basis for Interim Operation (BIO) until the recently submitted BIO amendment (Hanson 1999) is approved by the US Department of Energy. This conclusion depends on the use of controls for preventing vehicle fuel fires and for limiting the use of flame cutting in areas where hot metal can fall on the waste surface.The required controls are given in the Tank Waste Remediation System Technical Safety Requirements (Noorani 1997b). This is a significant change from the conclusions presented in Revision 0 of this report. Revision 0 of this calcnote concluded that some organic solvent fire scenarios exceeded risk evaluation guidelines, even with controls imposed

  4. Organic solvent topical report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report is the technical basis for the accident and consequence analyses used in the Hanford Tank Farms Basis for Interim Operation. The report also contains the scientific and engineering information and reference material needed to understand the organic solvent safety issue. This report includes comments received from the Chemical Reactions Subcommittee of the Tank Advisory Panel

  5. Stress corrosion cracking susceptibility of steam generator tubing on secondary side in restricted flow areas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nuclear steam generator tubes operate in high temperature water and on the secondary side in restricted flow areas many nonvolatile impurities accidentally introduced into circuit tend to concentrate. The concentration process leads to the formation of highly aggressive alkaline or acid solutions in crevices, and these solutions can cause stress corrosion cracking (SCC) on stressed tube materials. Even though alloy 800 has shown to be highly resistant to general corrosion in high temperature water, it has been found that the steam generator tubes may crack during service from the primary and/or secondary side. Stress corrosion cracking is still a serious problem occurring on outside tubes in operating steam generators. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the environmental factors affecting the stress corrosion cracking of steam generators tubing. The main test method was the exposure for 1000 hours into static autoclaves of plastically stressed C-rings of Incoloy 800 in caustic solutions (10% NaOH) and acidic chloride solutions because such environments may sometimes form accidentally in crevices on secondary side of tubes. Because the kinetics of corrosion of metals is indicated by anodic polarization curves, in this study, some stressed specimens were anodically polarized in caustic solutions in electrochemical cell, and other in chloride acidic solutions. The results presented as micrographs, potentiokinetic curves, and electrochemical parameters have been compared to establish the SCC behavior of Incoloy 800 in such concentrated environments. (authors)

  6. A functional study of caustic strictures of the esophagus in children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E.A.L. Da-Costa-Pinto

    2004-11-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the present study was to assess esophageal motor function in 21 children (7.5 ± 2.9 years with caustic strictures. Esophageal manometry was performed using a water-infusion system interfaced with a polygraph and displayed on a computer screen. The data were compared with those obtained from 9 healthy children. Radionuclide transit was determined by studying deglutition of a single bolus of 99mTc pertechnetate in 10 ml of water. Non-peristaltic low-amplitude and long-duration waves were the most common findings detected in patients with strictures longer than 20% of esophageal length (N = 11. Compared with the control group, these patients presented lower mean amplitude and longer mean duration of waves (24.4 ± 11.2 vs 97.9 ± 23.7 mmHg, P < 0.05, and 6.7 ± 2.4 vs 1.6 ± 0.1 s, P < 0.05, respectively. Six patients presented low-amplitude waves just below the constricted site. Ten children presented delayed esophageal transit. There was an association between dysphagia and abnormalities on manometry (P = 0.02 and between symptoms and scintigraphy data (P = 0.01. Dysphagia in caustic strictures is due to esophageal motility abnormalities, which are closely related to the scarred segment.

  7. H-Area Acid/Caustic Basin groundwater monitoring report. Second quarter 1994

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    During second quarter 1994, samples collected from the four HAC monitoring wells at the H-Area Acid/Caustic Basin received comprehensive analyses (exclusive of boron and lithium) and turbidity measurements. Monitoring results that exceeded the final Primary Drinking Water Standards (PDWS) or the Savannah River Site (SRS) flagging criteria or turbidity standard during the quarter are the focus of this report. Tritium exceeded the final PDWS in all four HAC wells during second quarter 1994. Carbon tetrachloride exceeded the final PDWS in well HAC 4. Aluminum exceeded its Flag 2 criterion in wells HAC 2, 3, and 4. Iron was elevated in wells HAC 1, 2, and 3. Manganese exceeded its Flag 2 criterion in well HAC 3. Specific conductance and total organic halogens were elevated in well HAC 2. No well samples exceeded the SRS turbidity standard. Groundwater flow direction in the water stable beneath the H-Area Acid/Caustic Basin was to the west during second quarter 1994. During previous quarters, the groundwater flow direction has been consistently to the northwest or the north-northwest. This apparent change in flow direction may be attributed to the lack of water elevations for wells HTF 16 and 17 and the anomalous water elevations for well HAC 2 during second quarter

  8. Caustic cracking of 9Cr 1Mo steel at 3000C

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The stress corrosion cracking of correctly heat-treated 9Cr-1Mo in caustic solutions at 3000C has been examined using a bursting tube version of the slow strain rate technique. Some susceptibility was detected at all concentrations examined, the more concentrated solutions which favoured less protective oxide formation, producing the more severe cracking. The cracking in these strong solutions proceeded at velocities up to 0.1 mm h-1 and produced wide oxide filled cracks. This cracking is not strongly dependent on potential, although more anodic potentials promote thicker oxide formation while cathodic potentials favour general dissolution. Normalized and tempered, annealed, and a simulated heat-affected zone microstructure were all equally susceptible to cracking. Some constant pressure tests were performed which suggested cracking could occur at stresses below the yield stress. In more dilute solutions susceptibility was much less, and the crack velocity was about 0.01 mm h-1, i.e. ten times slower than in 8 M NaOH. The relationship between slow strain rate tests, conventional tests and practical experience are discussed. The behaviour of 9Cr 1Mo in caustic below 2 1/2 M places it in the low susceptibility category and failures under realistic conditions are unlikely. (author)

  9. Direct anodic hydrochloric acid and cathodic caustic production during water electrolysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Hui-Wen; Cejudo-Marín, Rocío; Jeremiasse, Adriaan W.; Rabaey, Korneel; Yuan, Zhiguo; Pikaar, Ilje

    2016-02-01

    Hydrochloric acid (HCl) and caustic (NaOH) are among the most widely used chemicals by the water industry. Direct anodic electrochemical HCl production by water electrolysis has not been successful as current commercially available electrodes are prone to chlorine formation. This study presents an innovative technology simultaneously generating HCl and NaOH from NaCl using a Mn0.84Mo0.16O2.23 oxygen evolution electrode during water electrolysis. The results showed that protons could be anodically generated at a high Coulombic efficiency (i.e. ≥ 95%) with chlorine formation accounting for 3 ~ 5% of the charge supplied. HCl was anodically produced at moderate strengths at a CE of 65 ± 4% together with a CE of 89 ± 1% for cathodic caustic production. The reduction in CE for HCl generation was caused by proton cross-over from the anode to the middle compartment. Overall, this study showed the potential of simultaneous HCl and NaOH generation from NaCl and represents a major step forward for the water industry towards on-site production of HCl and NaOH. In this study, artificial brine was used as a source of sodium and chloride ions. In theory, artificial brine could be replaced by saline waste streams such as Reverse Osmosis Concentrate (ROC), turning ROC into a valuable resource.

  10. Mechanism of Phosphorus Removal from Hanford Tank Sludge by Caustic Leaching

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lumetta, Gregg J. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2008-03-05

    Two experiments were conducted to explore the mechanism by which phosphorus is removed from Hanford tank sludge by caustic leaching. In the first experiment, a series of phosphate salts were treated with 3 M NaOH under conditions prototypic of the actual leaching process to be performed in the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP). The phosphates used were aluminum phosphate, bismuth phosphate, chromium(III) phosphate, and β-tri-calcium phosphate; all of these phases have previously been determined to exist in Hanford tank sludge. The leachate solution was sampled at selected time intervals and analyzed for the specific metal ion involved (Al, Bi, Ca, or Cr) and for P (total and as phosphate). The solids remaining after completion of the caustic leaching step were analyzed to determine the reaction product. In the second experiment, the dependence of P removal from bismuth phosphate was examined as a function of the hydroxide ion concentration. It was anticipated that a plot of log[phosphate] versus log[hydroxide] would provide insight into the phosphorus-removal mechanism. This report describes the test activities outlined in Section 6.3.2.1, Preliminary Investigation of Phosphate Dissolution, in Test Plan TP-RPP-WTP-467, Rev.1. The objectives, success criteria, and test conditions of Section 6.3.2.1 are summarized here.

  11. Microbial Fuel Cell-driven caustic potash production from wastewater for carbon sequestration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gajda, Iwona; Greenman, John; Melhuish, Chris; Santoro, Carlo; Ieropoulos, Ioannis

    2016-09-01

    This work reports on the novel formation of caustic potash (KOH) directly on the MFC cathode locking carbon dioxide into potassium bicarbonate salt (kalicinite) while producing, instead of consuming electrical power. Using potassium-rich wastewater as a fuel for microorganisms to generate electricity in the anode chamber, has resulted in the formation of caustic catholyte directly on the surface of the cathode electrode. Analysis of this liquid has shown to be highly alkaline (pH>13) and act as a CO2 sorbent. It has been later mineralised to kalicinite thus locking carbon dioxide into potassium bicarbonate salt. This work demonstrates an electricity generation method as a simple, cost-effective and environmentally friendly route towards CO2 sequestration that perhaps leads to a carbon negative economy. Moreover, it shows a potential application for both electricity production and nutrient recovery in the form of minerals from nutrient-rich wastewater streams such as urine for use as fertiliser in the future. PMID:27133363

  12. Solvent Immersion Imprint Lithography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vasdekis, Andreas E.; Wilkins, Michael J.; Grate, Jay W.; Kelly, Ryan T.; Konopka, Allan; Xantheas, Sotiris S.; Chang, M. T.

    2014-06-21

    The mechanism of polymer disolution was explored for polymer microsystem prototyping, including microfluidics and optofluidics. Polymer films are immersed in a solvent, imprinted and finally brought into contact with a non-modified surface to permanently bond. The underlying polymer-solvent interactions were experimentally and theoretically investigated, and enabled rapid polymer microsystem prototyping. During imprinting, small molecule integration in the molded surfaces was feasible, a principle applied to oxygen sensing. Polystyrene (PS) was employed for microbiological studies at extreme environmental conditions. The thermophile anaerobe Clostridium Thermocellum was grown in PS pore-scale micromodels, revealing a double mean generation lifetime than under ideal culture conditions. Microsystem prototyping through directed polymer dissolution is simple and accessible, while simultaneous patterning, bonding, and surface/volume functionalization are possible in less than one minute.

  13. Poor-solvent polyelectrolytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Using extensive molecular dynamics simulations we study the behaviour of polyelectrolytes (PEs) in poor solvents, explicitly taking the counterions into account. The resulting pearl-necklace structures are subject to strong conformational fluctuations. These lead to small signatures in the form factor and the force-extension relation, which is a severe obstacle to experimental observations. In addition, we study how the necklace collapses as a function of the Bjerrum length. Finally, we demonstrate that the position of the first peak in the inter-chain structure factor varies with the monomer density as ∼ ρm0.35 for all densities, which shows a pertinent different behaviour as compared to that of PE solutions in good solvent

  14. V5 AND V10 CONTACTOR TESTING WITH THE NEXT GENERATION (CSSX) SOLVENT FOR THE SAVANNAH RIVER SITE INTEGRATED SALT DISPOSITION PROCESS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Restivo, M.; Peters, T.; Pierce, R.; Fondeur, F.; Steeper, T.; Williams, M.; Giddings, B.; Hickman, B.; Fink, S.

    2012-01-17

    A solvent extraction system for removal of cesium (Cs) from alkaline solutions was developed utilizing a novel solvent invented at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). This solvent consists of a calix[4]arene-crown-6 extractant dissolved in an inert hydrocarbon matrix. A Modifier is added to the solvent to enhance the extraction power of the calixarene and to prevent the formation of a third phase. An additional additive, called a suppressor, is used to improve stripping performance. The process that deploys this solvent system is known as Caustic Side Solvent Extraction (CSSX). The solvent system has been deployed at the Savannah River Site (SRS) in the Modular CSSX Unit (MCU) since 2008. Subsequent development efforts by ORNL identified an improved solvent system that can raise the expected decontamination factor (DF) in MCU from {approx}200 to more than 40,000. The improved DF is attributed to an improved distribution ratio for cesium [D(Cs)] in extraction from {approx}15 to {approx}60, an increased solubility of the calixarene in the solvent from 0.007 M to >0.050 M, and use of boric acid (H{sub 3}BO{sub 3}) stripping that also yields improved D(Cs) values. Additionally, the changes incorporated into the Next Generation CSSX Solvent (NGS) are intended to reduce solvent entrainment by virtue of more favorable physical properties. The MCU and Salt Waste Processing Facility (SWPF) facilities are actively pursuing the changeover from the current CSSX solvent to the NGS solvent. To support this integration of the NGS into the MCU and SWPF facilities, the Savannah River Remediation (SRR)/ARP/MCU Life Extension Project requested that the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) perform testing of the new solvent for the removal of Cs from the liquid salt waste stream. Additionally, SRNL was tasked with characterizing both strip (20-in long, 10 micron pore size) and extraction (40-in long, 20 micron pore size) coalescers. SRNL designed a pilot-scale experimental

  15. V5 AND V10 CONTACTOR TESTING WITH THE NEXT GENERATION (CSSX) SOLVENT FOR THE SAVANNAH RIVER SITE INTEGRATED SALT DISPOSITION PROCESS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Restivo, M.; Peters, T.; Pierce, R.; Fondeur, F.; Steeper, T.; Williams, M.; Giddings, B.; Hickman, B.; Fink, S.

    2012-01-17

    A solvent extraction system for removal of cesium (Cs) from alkaline solutions was developed utilizing a novel solvent invented at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). This solvent consists of a calix[4]arene-crown-6 extractant dissolved in an inert hydrocarbon matrix. A Modifier is added to the solvent to enhance the extraction power of the calixarene and to prevent the formation of a third phase. An additional additive, called a suppressor, is used to improve stripping performance. The process that deploys this solvent system is known as Caustic Side Solvent Extraction (CSSX). The solvent system has been deployed at the Savannah River Site (SRS) in the Modular CSSX Unit (MCU) since 2008. Subsequent development efforts by ORNL identified an improved solvent system that can raise the expected decontamination factor (DF) in MCU from {approx}200 to more than 40,000. The improved DF is attributed to an improved distribution ratio for cesium [D(Cs)] in extraction from {approx}15 to {approx}60, an increased solubility of the calixarene in the solvent from 0.007 M to >0.050 M, and use of boric acid (H{sub 3}BO{sub 3}) stripping that also yields improved D(Cs) values. Additionally, the changes incorporated into the Next Generation CSSX Solvent (NGS) are intended to reduce solvent entrainment by virtue of more favorable physical properties. The MCU and Salt Waste Processing Facility (SWPF) facilities are actively pursuing the changeover from the current CSSX solvent to the NGS solvent. To support this integration of the NGS into the MCU and SWPF facilities, the Savannah River Remediation (SRR)/ARP/MCU Life Extension Project requested that the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) perform testing of the new solvent for the removal of Cs from the liquid salt waste stream. Additionally, SRNL was tasked with characterizing both strip (20-in long, 10 micron pore size) and extraction (40-in long, 20 micron pore size) coalescers. SRNL designed a pilot-scale experimental

  16. Hazardous solvent substitution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eliminating hazardous solvents is good for the environment, worker safety, and the bottom line. However, even though we are motivated to find replacements, the big question is 'What can we use as replacements for hazardous solvents?'You, too, can find replacements for your hazardous solvents. All you have to do is search for them. Search through the vendor literature of hundreds of companies with thousands of products. Ponder the associated material safety data sheets, assuming of course that you can obtain them and, having obtained them, that you can read them. You will want to search the trade magazines and other sources for product reviews. You will want to talk to users about how well the product actually works. You may also want to check US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and other government reports for toxicity and other safety information. And, of course, you will want to compare the product's constituent chemicals with the many hazardous constituency lists to ensure the safe and legal use of the product in your workplace

  17. Cuspidal caustic and focusing of acoustical waves generated by a parametric array onto a concave reflecting surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castagnède, Bernard; Sahraoui, Sohbi; Tournat, Vincent; Tahani, Najat

    2009-09-01

    The present Note is devoted to the study of the so-called cuspidal caustic at the surface of a hemi-cylindrical reflector illuminated with plane waves. In order to generate low frequency (e.g. in the range of 4 kHz) acoustical plane waves, a commercially available parametric array has been used. It produces powerful ultrasonic carrier waves at 40 kHz which can be electronically modulated between 200 Hz and 10 kHz. Further self-demodulation process during propagation in air generates an ultra-directive acoustical field (i.e. quasi-planar wavefronts) enabling to accurately study the focusing process occurring along the cuspidal caustic. The focusing coefficient can be computed locally by using two numerical tools, on one hand by computing the density of tangent rays to the caustic, and on the other hand by using some numerical results provided by a ray tracing algorithm. Some preliminary experimental data are then provided in order to validate the numerical predictions (spatial position of the caustic and focusing coefficient). To cite this article: B. Castagnède et al., C. R. Mecanique 337 (2009).

  18. Side chain and backbone ordering in a polypeptide

    CERN Document Server

    Wei, Y; Hansmann, U H E

    2006-01-01

    We report results from multicanonical simulations of polyglutamic acid chains of length of ten residues. For this simple polypeptide we observe a decoupling of backbone and side-chain ordering in the folding process. While the details of the two transitions vary between the peptide in gas phase and in an implicit solvent, our results indicate that, independent of the specific surroundings, upon continuously lowering the temperature side-chain ordering occurs only after the backbone topology is completely formed.

  19. One-sided arguments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Laar, J.A.

    2007-01-01

    When is an argument to be called one-sided? When is putting forward such an argument fallacious? How can we develop a model for critical discussion, such that a fallaciously one-sided argument corresponds to a violation of a discussion rule? These issues are dealt with within 'the limits of the dial

  20. Discovery and Characterization of a Caustic Crossing Microlensing Event in the Small Magellanic Cloud

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present photometric observations and analysis of the second microlensing event detected toward the Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC), MACHO Alert 98-SMC-1. This event was detected early enough to allow intensive observation of the light curve. These observations revealed 98-SMC-1 to be the first caustic crossing binary microlensing event toward the Magellanic Clouds to be discovered in progress. Frequent coverage of the evolving light curve allowed an accurate prediction for the date of the source crossing out of the lens caustic structure. The caustic crossing temporal width, along with the angular size of the source star, measures the proper motion of the lens with respect to the source and thus allows an estimate of the location of the lens. Lenses located in the Galactic halo would have a velocity projected to the SMC of v∼1500 kms-1, while an SMC lens would typically have v∼60 kms-1. The event light curve allows us to obtain a unique fit to the parameters of the binary lens and to estimate the proper motion of the lensing system. We have performed a joint fit to the MACHO/GMAN data presented here, including recent EROS data of this event from Afonso and collaborators. These joint data are sufficient to constrain the time t* for the lens to move an angle equal to the source angular radius: t* =0.116±0.010 days. We estimate a radius for the lensed source of R* =1.1±0.1 Rcircle-dot from its unblended color and magnitude. This yields a projected velocity of v=76±10 kms-1. Only 0.12% of halo lenses would be expected to have a v value at least as small as this, while 38% of SMC lenses would be expected to have v as large as this. This implies that the lensing system is more likely to reside in the SMC than in the Galactic halo. Similar observations of future Magellanic Cloud microlensing events will help to determine the contribution of MACHOS to the Galaxy's dark halo. copyright copyright 1999. The American Astronomical Society

  1. EFRT M-12 Issue Resolution: Caustic-Leach Rate Constants from PEP and Laboratory-Scale Tests

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mahoney, Lenna A.; Rassat, Scot D.; Eslinger, Paul W.; Aaberg, Rosanne L.; Aker, Pamela M.; Golovich, Elizabeth C.; Hanson, Brady D.; Hausmann, Tom S.; Huckaby, James L.; Kurath, Dean E.; Minette, Michael J.; Sundaram, S. K.; Yokuda, Satoru T.

    2010-01-01

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) has been tasked by Bechtel National Inc. (BNI) on the River Protection Project-Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (RPP-WTP) project to perform research and development activities to resolve technical issues identified for the Pretreatment Facility (PTF). The Pretreatment Engineering Platform (PEP) was designed, constructed and operated as part of a plan to respond to issue M12, “Undemonstrated Leaching Processes” of the External Flowsheet Review Team (EFRT) issue response plan.( ) The PEP is a 1/4.5-scale test platform designed to simulate the WTP pretreatment caustic leaching, oxidative leaching, ultrafiltration solids concentration, and slurry washing processes. The PEP replicates the WTP leaching processes using prototypic equipment and control strategies. The PEP also includes non-prototypic ancillary equipment to support the core processing. The work described in this report addresses caustic leaching under WTP conditions, based on tests performed with a Hanford waste simulant. Because gibbsite leaching kinetics are rapid (gibbsite is expected to be dissolved by the time the final leach temperature is reached), boehmite leach kinetics are the main focus of the caustic-leach tests. The tests were completed at the laboratory-scale and in the PEP, which is a 1/4.5-scale mock-up of key PTF process equipment. Two laboratory-scale caustic-leach tests were performed for each of the PEP runs. For each PEP run, unleached slurry was taken from the PEP caustic-leach vessel for one batch and used as feed for both of the corresponding laboratory-scale tests.

  2. Solvents and supporting electrolytes for vanadium acetylacetonate flow batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shinkle, Aaron A.; Pomaville, Timothy J.; Sleightholme, Alice E. S.; Thompson, Levi T.; Monroe, Charles W.

    2014-02-01

    Properties of supporting electrolytes and solvents were examined for use with vanadium acetylacetonate - a member of the class of metal(β-diketonate) active species - in non-aqueous redox flow batteries. Twenty supporting-electrolyte/solvent combinations were screened for ionic conductivity and supporting-electrolyte solubility. Hexane, tetrahydrofuran, and dimethylcarbonate solvents did not meet minimal conductivity and solubility criteria for any of the electrolytes used, which included tetraethylammonium tetrafluoroborate, tetrabutylammonium tetrafluoroborate, tetrabutylammonium hexafluorophosphate, and (1-butyl, 3-methyl)imidazolium bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)imide. Ionic conductivities and solubilities for solutions of these electrolytes passed screening criteria in acetonitrile and dimethylformamide solvents, in which maximum supporting-electrolyte and active-species solubilities were determined. Active-species electrochemistry was found to be reversible in several solvent/support systems; for some systems the voltammetric signatures of unwanted side reactions were suppressed. Correlations between supporting-solution properties and performance metrics suggest that an optimal solvent for a vanadium acetylacetonate RFB should have a low solvent molar volume for active-species solubility, and a high Hansen polarity for conductivity.

  3. Occupational solvent exposure and cognition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabbath, E.L.; Glymour, M.M.; Berr, C.; Singh-Manoux, A.; Zins, M.; Goldberg, M.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: Chronic occupational solvent exposure is associated with long-term cognitive deficits. Cognitive reserve may protect solvent-exposed workers from cognitive impairment. We tested whether the association between chronic solvent exposure and cognition varied by educational attainment, a proxy for cognitive reserve. Methods: Data were drawn from a prospective cohort of French national gas and electricity (GAZEL) employees (n = 4,134). Lifetime exposure to 4 solvent types (chlorinated solvents, petroleum solvents, benzene, and nonbenzene aromatic solvents) was assessed using a validated job-exposure matrix. Education was dichotomized at less than secondary school or below. Cognitive impairment was defined as scoring below the 25th percentile on the Digit Symbol Substitution Test at mean age 59 (SD 2.8; 88% of participants were retired at testing). Log-binomial regression was used to model risk ratios (RRs) for poor cognition as predicted by solvent exposure, stratified by education and adjusted for sociodemographic and behavioral factors. Results: Solvent exposure rates were higher among less-educated patients. Within this group, there was a dose-response relationship between lifetime exposure to each solvent type and RR for poor cognition (e.g., for high exposure to benzene, RR = 1.24, 95% confidence interval 1.09–1.41), with significant linear trends (p < 0.05) in 3 out of 4 solvent types. Recency of solvent exposure also predicted worse cognition among less-educated patients. Among those with secondary education or higher, there was no significant or near-significant relationship between any quantification of solvent exposure and cognition. Conclusions: Solvent exposure is associated with poor cognition only among less-educated individuals. Higher cognitive reserve in the more-educated group may explain this finding. PMID:22641403

  4. Predictive Factors of Gastrointestinal Caustic Injury According to Clinical and Endoscopic Findings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cherie Quingking

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Ingestion of caustic substances is the main reason for referral to Philippines National Poison Management and Control Center among other causes of acute poisoning. Rapid assessment of severity of injury is important for treatment and prognosis of these cases. This study was aimed to investigate the correlation of clinical factors with severity of gastrointestinal (GI mucosal injury. Methods: In this retrospective study, a total of 105 patients were included. Patients were categorized into two groups including 35 patients with low grade and 70 patients with high grade GI injury to compare the predictive value of clinical findings. Results: Mean (SD age of patients was 27 (10 and 47% of patients were male. Oral burns (P

  5. Probe of Multi-electron Dynamics in Xenon by Caustics in High Order Harmonic Generation

    CERN Document Server

    Faccialà, Davide; Bruner, Barry D; Ciriolo, Anna G; De Silvestri, Sandro; Devetta, Michele; Negro, Matteo; Soifer, Hadas; Stagira, Salvatore; Dudovich, Nirit; Vozzi, Caterina

    2016-01-01

    We investigated the giant resonance in Xenon by high-order harmonic generation spectroscopy driven by a two-color field. The addition of a non-perturbative second harmonic component parallel to the driving field breaks the symmetry between neighboring sub-cycles resulting in the appearance of spectral caustics at two distinct cut-off energies. By controlling the phase delay between the two color components it is possible to tailor the harmonic emission in order to amplify and isolate the spectral feature of interest. In this paper we demonstrate how this control scheme can be used to investigate the role of electron correlations that give birth to the giant resonance in Xenon. The collective excitations of the giant dipole resonance in Xenon combined with the spectral manipulation associated with the two color driving field allow to see features that are normally not accessible and to obtain a quantitative good agreement between the experimental results and the theoretical predictions.

  6. Washing and caustic leaching of Hanford tank sludges: results of FY 1996 studies. Revision

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    During the past few years, the primary mission at the US Department of Energy's Hanford Site has changed from producing plutonium to restoring the environment. Large volumes of high-level radioactive wastes (HLW), generated during past Pu production and other operations, are stored in underground tanks on site. The current plan for remediating the Hanford tank farms consists of waste retrieval, pretreatment, treatment (immobilization), and disposal. The HLW will be immobilized in a borosilicate glass matrix and then disposed of in a geologic repository. Because of the expected high cost of HLW vitrification and geologic disposal, pretreatment processes will be implemented to reduce the volume of borosilicate glass produced in disposing of the tank wastes. On this basis, a pretreatment plan is being developed. This report describes the sludge washing and caustic leaching test conducted to create a Hanford tank sludge pretreatment flowsheet

  7. The Caustic Alkali-free Water Extraction Agents for Treating Inner Mongolia Oil Sands

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shen Zhibing; Zhang Juntao; Zhang Jie; Liang Shengrong

    2014-01-01

    The caustic alkali-free water extraction agents were studied for treating the oil sands excavated from Inner Mon-golia, China. Several kinds of chemical reagents were evaluated, among which sodium carbonate (SC), sodium dodecyl benzene sulfonate (SD) and sodium chloride were conifrmed as composite solutes. Their proportion was optimized by an orthogonal test. The optimum proportion of the composite agent covered 0.03%of SD, 0.50%of sodium chloride, 3.00%of SC, with the rest composed of water. The optimal operating condition was also conifrmed. The oil sands were extracted at the following optimized conditions:a treating time of 15 min, a temperature of 80℃and an extraction agent/feed ratio of 1:1, with the bitumen yield reaching more than 96%. The extraction agent after separation from the bitumen product can be recycled for reuse to carve out a good environmentally friendly route.

  8. Side-wall sampler

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morrison, B.

    1969-11-01

    A side-wall sampler which is capable of taking samples from the walls of test holes to a depth of 1,000 ft or more is described. Samples have been extracted from till, clay, silt, and fine- to coarse-grained sands in drift and nonindurated bedrock from more than 1,000 test holes in S. Saskatchewan. Side-hole sampling is faster and cheaper than conventional sampling methods and is ideally suited for geological investigations. Mineralogical paleonto- locical and radiocarbon analyses have been determined on side-hole cores.

  9. Solvent effects in chemistry

    CERN Document Server

    Buncel, Erwin

    2015-01-01

    This book introduces the concepts, theory and experimental knowledge concerning solvent effects on the rate and equilibrium of chemical reactions of all kinds.  It begins with basic thermodynamics and kinetics, building on this foundation to demonstrate how a more detailed understanding of these effects may be used to aid in determination of reaction mechanisms, and to aid in planning syntheses. Consideration is given to theoretical calculations (quantum chemistry, molecular dynamics, etc.), to statistical methods (chemometrics), and to modern day concerns such as ""green"" chemistry, where ut

  10. Synthesis of ZnS thin films from aqueous caustic of trisodium citrate and their properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martyn A. Sozanskyi

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Zinc sulfide (ZnS thin films due to their properties are widely used in various electronic optical devices. They are produced by several methods, among which – vacuum sublimation, high frequency sputtering method, quasiclosed volume method, sol-gel method, electrodeposition. These methods have high energy consumption which increases the price of ZnS thin films. Aim: The aim of this work is to establish the optimal parameters of the synthesis of ZnS thin films of the aqueous caustic and the correlation between content of zinc in the synthesized films determined by the method of stripping voltammetry and thickness, structural, morphological and optical parameters. Materials and Methods: The ZnS thin films were obtained from aqueous caustics of zinc-containing salt using chemical deposition. Fresh solution of zinc-containing salt, trisodium citrate (Na3C6H5O7 as a complexing agent, thiourea ((NH22CS and ammonium hydroxide (NH4OH was used for the synthesis of ZnS films by chemical deposition. The deposition was performed on prepared glass substrates with the area of 5,76 cm2. Results: The phase mixture of the films has been determined. It showed the presence of ZnS compounds in the cubic modification (sphalerite. Stripping voltammetry was used to determine the mass of zinc in the ZnS films on various conditions of synthesis, namely on the concentration of the initial zinc-containing salt, trisodium citrate, thiourea, deposition time and temperature. The surface morphology, optical properties, the thickness of the ZnS resulting films have been studied. Conclusions: The optimal conditions for the synthesis of ZnS films were found based on these data. Three-dimensional surface morphology of ZnS film studies showed its smoothness, uniformity, integrity and confirmed the correctness of determining the optimal synthesis parameters.

  11. Side Payments in Marketing

    OpenAIRE

    John R. Hauser; Duncan I. Simester; Birger Wernerfelt

    1997-01-01

    Side payments, known politely as gainsharing and pejoratively as bribery, are prevalent in marketing. Indeed, many management schools have added ethics modules to their basic marketing courses to discuss these issues and there is much discussion of side payments in the literature (e.g., Adams 1995, Borrus [Borrus, Amy. 1995. A world of greased palms. (November 6) 36–38.], Mauro [Mauro, Paolo. 1997. Why worry about corruption? . Washington, D.C.], Mohl [Mohl, Bruce. 1996. Auto dealers color su...

  12. PEP Integrated Test D Run Report Caustic and Oxidative Leaching in UFP-VSL-T02A

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sevigny, Gary J.; Bredt, Ofelia P.; Burns, Carolyn A.; Kurath, Dean E.; Geeting, John GH; Golovich, Elizabeth C.; Guzman-Leong, Consuelo E.; Josephson, Gary B.

    2009-12-11

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) has been tasked by Bechtel National Inc. (BNI) on the River Protection Project-Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (RPP-WTP) project to perform research and development activities to resolve technical issues identified for the Pretreatment Facility (PTF). The Pretreatment Engineering Platform (PEP) was designed, constructed and operated as part of a plan to respond to issue M12, "Undemonstrated Leaching Processes" of the External Flowsheet Review Team (EFRT) issue response plan. The PEP is a 1/4.5-scale test platform designed to simulate the WTP pretreatment caustic leaching, oxidative leaching, ultrafiltration solids concentration, and slurry washing processes. The PEP replicates the WTP leaching processes using prototypic equipment and control strategies. The PEP also includes non-prototypic ancillary equipment to support the core processing. Two operating scenarios are currently being evaluated for the ultrafiltration process (UFP) and leaching operations. The first scenario (Test B and D) has caustic leaching performed in the UFP-2 ultrafiltration feed vessels (i.e., vessel UFP-VSL-T02A in the PEP and vessels UFP-VSL-00002A and B in the WTP PTF). The second scenario (Test A) has caustic leaching conducted in the UFP-1 ultrafiltration feed preparation vessels (i.e., vessels UFP-VSL-T01A and B in the PEP and vessels UFP VSL-00001A and B in the WTP PTF). In Test D, 19M sodium hydroxide (NaOH, caustic) was added to the waste slurry in the UFP VSL T02 vessel after the solids were concentrated to ~20% undissolved solids. The NaOH was added to leach solid aluminum compounds (e.g., gibbsite, boehmite). Caustic addition is followed by heating to 85°C using direct injection of steam to accelerate the leach process. The main difference of Test D compared to Test B is that the leach temperature is 85°C for 24 hrs as compared to 100°C for 12 hours. The other difference is the Test D simulant had Cr in the

  13. [Psychoanalysis and Side Effect].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shirahase, Joichiro

    2015-01-01

    A study of psychoanalysis from the perspective of side effects reveals that its history was a succession of measures to deal with its own side effects. This, however, does not merely suggest that, as a treatment method, psychoanalysis is incomplete and weak: rather, its history is a record of the growth and development of psychoanalysis that discovered therapeutic significance from phenomena that were initially regarded as side effects, made use of these discoveries, and elaborated them as a treatment method. The approach of research seen during the course of these developments is linked to the basic therapeutic approach of psychoanalysis. A therapist therefore does not draw conclusions about a patient's words and behaviors from a single aspect, but continues to make efforts to actively discover a variety of meanings and values from them, and to make the patient's life richer and more productive. This therapeutic approach is undoubtedly one of the unique aspects of psychoanalysis. I discuss the issue of psychoanalysis and side effects with the aim of clarifying this unique characteristic of psychoanalysis. The phenomenon called resistance inevitably emerges during the process of psychoanalytic treatment. Resistance can not only obstruct the progress of therapy; it also carries the risk of causing a variety of disadvantages to the patient. It can therefore be seen as an adverse effect. However, if we re-examine this phenomenon from the perspective of transference, we find that resistance is in fact a crucial tool in psychoanalysis, and included in its main effect, rather than a side effect. From the perspective of minimizing the character of resistance as a side effect and maximizing its character as a main effect, I have reviewed logical organization, dynamic evaluation, the structuring of treatment, the therapist's attitudes, and the training of therapists. I conclude by stating that psychoanalysis has aspects that do not match the perspective known as a side

  14. Solvent Blending Strategy to Upgrade MCU CSSX Solvent to Equivalent Next-Generation CSSX Solvent

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Delmau, Laetitia Helene [ORNL; Moyer, Bruce A [ORNL

    2012-12-01

    The results of the present study have validated an equal-volume blending strategy for upgrading freshly prepared CSSX solvent to a blended solvent functionally equivalent to NG-CSSX solvent. It is shown that blending fresh CSSX solvent as currently used in MCU with an equal volume of an NG-CSSX solvent concentrate of appropriate composition yields a blended solvent composition (46.5 mM of MaxCalix, 3.5 mM of BOBCalixC6, 0.5 M of Cs-7SB, 3 mM of guanidine suppressor, and 1.5 mM of TOA in Isopar L) that exhibits equivalent batch ESS performance to that of the NG-CSSX solvent containing 50 mM of MaxCalix, 0.5 M of Cs-7SB, and 3 mM of guanidine suppressor in Isopar L. The solvent blend composition is robust to third-phase formation. Results also show that a blend containing up to 60% v/v of CSSX solvent could be accommodated with minimal risk. Extraction and density data for the effect of solvent concentration mimicking diluent evaporation or over-dilution of the equal-volume blended solvent are also given, providing input for setting operational limits. Given that the experiments employed all pristine chemicals, the results do not qualify a blended solvent starting with actual used MCU solvent, which can be expected to have undergone some degree of degradation. Consequently, further work should be considered to evaluate this risk and implement appropriate remediation if needed.

  15. Quality Assurance Project Plan for the HWMA/RCRA Closure Certification of the TRA-731 Caustic and Acid Storage Tank System - 1997 Notice of Violation Consent Order

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Evans, Susan Kay; Orchard, B. J.

    2002-01-01

    This Quality Assurance Project Plan for the HWMA/RCRA Closure Certification of the TRA-731 Caustic and Acid Storage Tank System is one of two documents that comprise the Sampling and Analysis Plan for the HWMA/RCRA closure certification of the TRA-731 caustic and acid storage tank system at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory. This plan, which provides information about the project description, project organization, and quality assurance and quality control procedures, is to be used in conjunction with the Field Sampling Plan for the HWMA/RCRA Closure Certification of the TRA-731 Caustic and Acid Storage Tank System. This Quality Assurance Project Plan specifies the procedures for obtaining the data of known quality required by the closure activities for the TRA-731 caustic and acid storage tank system.

  16. Quality Assurance Project Plan for the HWMA/RCRA Closure Certification of the TRA-731 Caustic and Acid Storage Tank System - 1997 Notice of Violation Consent Order

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Evans, S.K.

    2002-01-31

    This Quality Assurance Project Plan for the HWMA/RCRA Closure Certification of the TRA- 731 Caustic and Acid Storage Tank System is one of two documents that comprise the Sampling and Analysis Plan for the HWMA/RCRA closure certification of the TRA-731 caustic and acid storage tank system at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory. This plan, which provides information about the project description, project organization, and quality assurance and quality control procedures, is to be used in conjunction with the Field Sampling Plan for the HWMA/RCRA Closure Certification of the TRA-731 Caustic and Acid Storage Tank System. This Quality Assurance Project Plan specifies the procedures for obtaining the data of known quality required by the closure activities for the TRA-731 caustic and acid storage tank system.

  17. Discussion of prolong service life of solid caustic soda pots%延长固碱锅使用寿命的探讨

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李文超

    2012-01-01

    The service condition of the solid caustic soda pots were introduced,and the damage reasons were analyzed.The measures of prolong the service life of solid caustic soda pots were put forward.%介绍了天津渤天化工有限责任公司固碱锅的使用情况,分析了损坏原因,提出了延长固碱锅使用寿命的措施。

  18. Working the Dark Side

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjering, Jens Christian Borrebye

    half—dark side—documents the making and nature of the dark side by analyzing a series of legal memos from the Department of Justice's Office of Legal Council and from the White House and concludes by relating its findings to traditional ideas about emergency action, national security, and torture....... By analyzing official reports and testimonies from soldiers partaking in the War On Terror, the dissertation's second part—dark arts—focuses on the transformation of the dark side into a productive space in which “information” and the hunt for said information overshadowed all legal, ethical, or political...

  19. Supercritical multicomponent solvent coal extraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corcoran, W. H.; Fong, W. S.; Pichaichanarong, P.; Chan, P. C. F.; Lawson, D. D. (Inventor)

    1983-01-01

    The yield of organic extract from the supercritical extraction of coal with larger diameter organic solvents such as toluene is increased by use of a minor amount of from 0.1 to 10% by weight of a second solvent such as methanol having a molecular diameter significantly smaller than the average pore diameter of the coal.

  20. Laboratory solvent reuse -- Liquid chromatography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Quinlin, W.T.; Schaffer, C.L.

    1992-11-01

    The objective of this work was to develop a method for reduction of waste solvent in the Process Engineering Chemistry Laboratory. The liquid chromatographs are the largest generators of explosive-contaminated waste in the laboratory. We developed a successful process for the reuse of solvents from the liquid chromatographs and demonstrated the utility of the process in the assay of hexanitrostilbene.

  1. SOLVENT EXTRACTION OF URANIUM VALUES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feder, H.M.; Ader, M.; Ross, L.E.

    1959-02-01

    A process is presented for extracting uranium salt from aqueous acidic solutions by organic solvent extraction. It consists in contacting the uranium bearing solution with a water immiscible dialkylacetamide having at least 8 carbon atoms in the molecule. Mentioned as a preferred extractant is dibutylacetamide. The organic solvent is usually used with a diluent such as kerosene or CCl/sub 4/.

  2. Influence of microstructure on stress corrosion cracking of mild steel in synthetic caustic-nitrate nuclear waste solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The influence of alloy microstructure on stress corrosion cracking of mild steel in caustic-nitrate synthetic nuclear waste solutions was studied. An evaluation was made of the effect of heat treatment on a representative material (ASTM A 516 Grade 70) used in the construction of high activity radioactive waste storage tanks at Savannah River Plant. Several different microstructures were tested for susceptibility to stress corrosion cracking. Precracked fracture specimens loaded in either constant load or constant crack opening displacement were exposed to a variety of caustic-nitrate and nitrate solutions. Results were correlated with the mechanical and corrosion properties of the microstructures. Crack velocity and crack arrest stress intensity were found to be related to the yield strength of the steel microstructures. Fractographic evidence indicated pH depletion and corrosive crack tip chemistry conditions even in highly caustic solutions. Experimental results were compatible with crack growth by a strain-assisted anodic dissolution mechanism; however, hydrogen embrittlement also was considered possible

  3. Colorectal cancers choosing sides

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Albuquerque, Cristina; Bakker, Elvira R. M.; van Veelen, Wendy; Smits, Ron

    2011-01-01

    In contrast to the majority of sporadic colorectal cancer which predominantly occur in the distal colon, most mismatch repair deficient tumours arise at the proximal side. At present, these regional preferences have not been explained properly. Recently, we have screened colorectal tumours for mutat

  4. Side effects of ergotamine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meyler, WJ

    1996-01-01

    Ergotamine has been used for many years in the treatment of migraine, although there is Little formal clinical evidence that it is significantly more efficacious than placebo. A number of side effects associated with ergotamine have been reported in the literature, including myocardial infarction, i

  5. Solvent degradation products in nuclear fuel processing solvents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shook, H.E. Jr.

    1988-06-01

    The Savannah River Plant uses a modified Purex process to recover enriched uranium and separate fission products. This process uses 7.5% tri-n-butyl phosphate (TBP) dissolved in normal paraffin hydrocarbons for the solvent extraction of a nitric acid solution containing the materials to be separated. Periodic problems in product decontamination result from solvent degradation. A study to improve process efficiency has identified certain solvent degradation products and suggested mitigation measures. Undecanoic acid, lauric acid, and tridecanoic acid were tentatively identified as diluent degradation products in recycle solvent. These long-chain organic acids affect phase separation and lead to low decontamination factors. Solid phase extraction (SPE) was used to concentrate the organic acids in solvent prior to analysis by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). SPE and HPLC methods were optimized in this work for analysis of decanoic acid, undecanoic acid, and lauric acid in solvent. Accelerated solvent degradation studies with 7.5% TBP in normal paraffin hydrocarbons showed that long-chain organic acids and long-chain alkyl butyl phosphoric acids are formed by reactions with nitric acid. Degradation of both tributyl phosphate and hydrocarbon can be minimized with purified normal paraffin replacing the standard grade presently used. 12 refs., 1 fig., 3 tabs.

  6. COMPUTER AIDED SOLVENT DESIGN FOR THE ENVIRONMENT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solvent substitution is an effective and useful means of eliminating the use of harmful solvents, but finding substitute solvents which are less harmful and as effective as currently used solvents presents significant difficulties. Solvent substitution is a form of reverse engin...

  7. STATISTICS OF MICROLENSING CAUSTIC CROSSINGS IN Q 2237+0305: PECULIAR VELOCITY OF THE LENS GALAXY AND ACCRETION DISK SIZE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mediavilla, E. [Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias, Vía Láctea S/N, La Laguna E-38200 Tenerife (Spain); Jimenez-Vicente, J. [Departamento de Física Teórica y del Cosmos, Universidad de Granada, Campus de Fuentenueva E-18071 Granada (Spain); Muñoz, J. A. [Departamento de Astronomía y Astrofísica, Universidad de Valencia E-46100 Burjassot, Valencia (Spain); Mediavilla, T.; Ariza, O. [Departamento de Estadística e Investigación Operativa, Universidad de Cádiz, Avda Ramón Puyol s/n E-11202, Algeciras, Cádiz (Spain)

    2015-01-10

    We use the statistics of caustic crossings induced by microlensing in the lens system Q 2237+0305 to study the lens galaxy peculiar velocity. We calculate the caustic crossing rates for a comprehensive family of stellar mass functions and find a dependence of the average number of caustic crossings with the effective transverse velocity and the average mass, 〈n〉∝v{sub eff}/√(〈m〉), equivalent to the theoretical prediction for the case of microlenses with identical masses. We explore the possibilities of the method to measure v {sub eff} using the ∼12 yr of Optical Gravitational Lensing Experiment monitoring of the four images of Q 2237+0305. To determine a lower limit for v {sub eff}, we count, conservatively, a single caustic crossing for each one of the four high magnification events identified in the literature (plus one additional proposed by us) obtaining v{sub eff}≳240√(〈m〉/0.17 M{sub ⊙}) km s{sup −1} at 68% of confidence. From this value and the average FWHM of the four high magnification events, we obtain a lower limit of r{sub s}≳1.4√(〈m〉/0.17 M{sub ⊙}) light-days for the radius of the source (r{sub s} = FWHM/2.35). Tentative identification of three additional caustic crossing events leads to estimates of v{sub eff}≃(493±246)√(〈m〉/0.17 M{sub ⊙}) km s{sup −1} for the effective transverse velocity and of r{sub s}≃(2.7±1.3)√(〈m〉/0.17 M{sub ⊙}) light-days for the source size. The estimated transverse peculiar velocity of the galaxy is v{sub t}≃(429±246)√(〈m〉/0.17 M{sub ⊙}) km s{sup −1}.

  8. Laboratory Demonstration of the Pretreatment Process with Caustic and Oxidative Leaching Using Actual Hanford Tank Waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fiskum, Sandra K.; Billing, Justin M.; Buck, Edgar C.; Daniel, Richard C.; Draper, Kathryn E.; Edwards, Matthew K.; Jenson, Evan D.; Kozelisky, Anne E.; MacFarlan, Paul J.; Peterson, Reid A.; Shimskey, Rick W.; Snow, Lanee A.

    2009-01-01

    This report describes the bench-scale pretreatment processing of actual tank waste materials through the entire baseline WTP pretreatment flowsheet in an effort to demonstrate the efficacy of the defined leaching processes on actual Hanford tank waste sludge and the potential impacts on downstream pretreatment processing. The test material was a combination of reduction oxidation (REDOX) tank waste composited materials containing aluminum primarily in the form of boehmite and dissolved S saltcake containing Cr(III)-rich entrained solids. The pretreatment processing steps tested included • caustic leaching for Al removal • solids crossflow filtration through the cell unit filter (CUF) • stepwise solids washing using decreasing concentrations of sodium hydroxide with filtration through the CUF • oxidative leaching using sodium permanganate for removing Cr • solids filtration with the CUF • follow-on solids washing and filtration through the CUF • ion exchange processing for Cs removal • evaporation processing of waste stream recycle for volume reduction • combination of the evaporated product with dissolved saltcake. The effectiveness of each process step was evaluated by following the mass balance of key components (such as Al, B, Cd, Cr, Pu, Ni, Mn, and Fe), demonstrating component (Al, Cr, Cs) removal, demonstrating filterability by evaluating filter flux rates under various processing conditions (transmembrane pressure, crossflow velocities, wt% undissolved solids, and PSD) and filter fouling, and identifying potential issues for WTP. The filterability was reported separately (Shimskey et al. 2008) and is not repeated herein.

  9. Elimination of the calcium cycle: direct electrolytic causticizing of Kraft smelt. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pfromm, P.; Winnick, J.

    1999-01-19

    An electrochemical molten salt alternative to the classic Kraft causticizing process has been investigated and the feasibility of the process was successfully shown. The experiments include (A) the determination of background thermal decomposition gases, (B) the electrolysis of a sodium carbonate only smelt to show that sodium oxide can be electrochemically produced, and (C) electrolysis of a synthetic smelt containing 80 mole % Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3} and 20 mole % Na{sub 2}S. The experiments show, that sodium hydroxide (NaOH) was produced by the electrochemical reduction of sodium carbonate to sodium oxide in the molten state. In the experiment containing sodium sulfide, there was formation of less than 5 mole % of polysulfide. Energy savings on the order of 500,000 BTU per ton of kraft pulp produced are estimated, based on the energy used by the mill. Operating costs are estimated to be currently similar to conventional processing. However, price increases of fossil fuels and increased co-generation of electricity in the mill will give the electrolytical process significant cost advantages.

  10. Elimination of the Calcium Cycle: Direct Electrolytic Causticizing of Kraft Smelt, Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    P. Pfromm, J. Winnick

    1999-01-31

    An electrochemical molten salt alternative to the classic kraft causticizing process has been investigated and the feasibility of the process was successfully shown. The experiments included (a) determination of background thermal decomposition gases, (b) the electrolysis of a sodium-carbonate-only smelt to show that sodium oxide can be electrochemically produced, and (c) electrolysis of a synthetic smelt containing 80 mole% Na2-CO3 and 20 mole% Na2-S. The experiments show that sodium hydroxide (NaOH) was produced by the electrochemical reduction of sodium carbonate to sodium oxide in the molten state. In the experiment containing sodium sulfide, there was formation of less than 5 mole% of polysulfide. Energy savings on the order of 500,000 BTU per ton of kraft pulp produced are estimated, based on the energy used by the mill. Operating costs are estimated to be currently similar to conventional processing. However, price increases of fossil fuels and increased co-generation of electricity in the mill will give the electrolytical process significant cost advantages.

  11. Sub-grain scale mineralogy of Hanford sand after reaction with caustic tank wastes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crandell, L. E.; Peters, C. A.; Um, W.; Lindquist, W.

    2010-12-01

    Reactions of caustic tank waste with vadose-zone sediments at the DOE Hanford, WA site cause dissolution of quartz and aluminosilicate minerals and precipitation of secondary minerals, sodalite and cancrinite. In this study, Hanford sediments from reactive column experiments were examined using 2-D imaging technologies. Mineralogy was examined at the sub-grain scale through image analysis of SEM backscattered electron (BSE) images supplemented with elemental mapping from energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS). The thin sections were made from cross-sections of epoxied sediments in the experimental columns, before and after reaction with simulated tank waste leachate. The image analysis method developed for this work identifies the important minerals and quantifies their accessibility to pore fluids, information that may be used to improve reactive transport modeling of water-rock reactions. Current reactive transport models use mineralogical information obtained through X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis of crushed samples. Such analysis provides reliable information on the relative quantities of minerals present in macroscopic samples. However, the absence of information on sub-grain scale mineralogy may lead to erroneous interpretation in the context of reactive transport. Preliminary findings indicate the presence of grain inclusions and secondary mineral coatings which may significantly impact the accessibility of minerals to pore waters and thus alter the predicted water -rock reactions.

  12. Washing and caustic leaching of Hanford tank sludges: Results of FY 1995 studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    During the past few years, the primary mission at the US Department of Energy's Hanford Site has changed from producing plutonium to environmental restoration. Large volumes of high-level radioactive wastes (HLW), generated during past Pu production and other operations, are stored in underground tanks on site. The current plan for remediating the Hanford tank farms consists of waste retrieval, pretreatment, treatment (immobilization), and disposal. The HLW will be immobilized in a borosilicate glass matrix; the resulting glass canisters will then be disposed of in a geologic repository. Because of the expected high cost of HLW immobilization and disposal, pretreatment processes will be implemented to reduce the volume of borosilicate glass produced in processing the tank wastes. This document describes sludge washing and caustic leaching tests conducted in FY 1995 at the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) at the request of Westinghouse Hanford Company. These tests were performed using sludges from seven Hanford waste tanks -- B-111, BX-107, C-103, S-104, SY-103, T-104, and T-111. The primary and secondary types of waste stored in each of these tanks are given in Table 1. 1. The data collected in this effort will be used to support the March 1998 Tri-Party Agreement decision on the extent of pretreatment to be performed on the Hanford tank sludges (Ecology, EPA, and DOE 1994)

  13. UV-catalytic treatment of spent caustic from ethene plant with hydrogen peroxide and ozone oxidation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YU Zheng-zhe; SUN De-zhi; LI Chang-hai; SHI Peng-fei; DUAN Xiao-dong; SUN Guo-rong; LIU Jun-xin

    2004-01-01

    The performance of UV/H2O2, UV/O3 and UV/H2O2/O3 oxidation systems for treating spent caustic froman ethylene plant was investigated. In UV/H2O2 system, with the increase of H2O2 dosage, removal efficiencies ofCOD and the ratio of biochemical oxygen demand(BOD) to chemical oxygen demand(COD) of the effluent wereincreased and a better performance was obtained than the H2O2 system alone. In UV/H2O2 system, removalefficiency of COD reach 68% under the optimum condition, and BOD/COD ratio was significantly increased from0.22 to 0.52. In UV/O3 system, with the increase of O3 dosage, removal efficiency of COD and BOD/COD ratiowere increased, and a better performance was obtained than the O3 system alone. Under the optimum condition,removal efficiency of COD was 54%, and BOD/COD ratio was significantly increased from 0.22 to 0.48. In UV/H2O2/O3 system, COD removal efficiency was found to be 22.0% higher than UV/O3 system.

  14. Engineered Ionizable Side Chains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cymes, Gisela D; Grosman, Claudio

    2015-01-01

    One of the great challenges of mechanistic ion-channel biology is to obtain structural information from well-defined functional states. In the case of neurotransmitter-gated ion channels, the open-channel conformation is particularly elusive owing to its transient nature and brief mean lifetime. In this Chapter, we show how the analysis of single-channel currents recorded from mutants engineered to contain single ionizable side chains in the transmembrane region can provide specific information about the open-channel conformation without any interference from the closed or desensitized conformations. The method takes advantage of the fact that the alternate binding and unbinding of protons to and from an ionizable side chain causes the charge of the protein to fluctuate by 1 unit. We show that, in mutant muscle acetylcholine nicotinic receptors (AChRs), this fluctuating charge affects the rate of ion conduction in such a way that individual proton-transfer events can be identified in a most straightforward manner. From the extent to which the single-channel current amplitude is reduced every time a proton binds, we can learn about the proximity of the engineered side chain to the lumen of the pore. And from the kinetics of proton binding and unbinding, we can calculate the side-chain's affinity for protons (pK a), and hence, we can learn about the electrostatic properties of the microenvironment around the introduced ionizable group. The application of this method to systematically mutated AChRs allowed us to identify unambiguously the stripes of the M1, M2 and M3 transmembrane α-helices that face the pore's lumen in the open-channel conformation in the context of a native membrane. PMID:26381938

  15. Pen-side testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pen-side diagnostic testing is often required to provide real time information about the health status of an animal or herd. The rapid results are generally needed in the face of a disease outbreak where the diagnostician/clinician is presented with dead or dying animals. Another use of pen-side tests is as part of a preventive medicine/herd health programme, where the information can be used for determining pathogen incidence and prevalence in the herd, identifying potential carrier animals or evaluating subtle changes in overall herd health as a result of management changes. Still another area is as a part of health certification before sale or stocking, or during processing following slaughter. Advanced testing methods, which in the past were only appropriate for use in a laboratory setting, have now been formatted for use in the field. Enzyme immunoassays (EIAs) and immunochromatorgraphy have greatly enhanced diagnostic pen-side capabilities. These test systems allow for the rapid, sensitive and specific detection of target antigen or antibody and require little or no scientific equipment. Because of the wide format flexibility these immunochemical technologies allow, they have come to dominate the diagnostic industry, both in the laboratory and in the field. Using liquid phase or precipitating chromogens, the tests can be visually interpreted and do not need instrumentation. Immunochromatography, a simplified assay system, has found widespread application as a field or pen-side test. The entire assay takes only one or two steps, and the results appear within 5-10 minutes. In the future, DNA based diagnostics will become more adaptable for use in the field. The DNA hybridization systems are at present cumbersome and require elevated temperatures. Companies are currently working to develop fast formulas that provide results in less than an hour, have a limited number of steps and can be performed at lower temperatures. (author)

  16. Selection and design of solvents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gani, Rafiqul

    and design of solvents will be presented together with application examples. The selection problem is defined as finding known chemicals that match the desired functions of a solvent for a specified set of applications. The design problem is defined as finding the molecular structure (or mixture of molecules....... With increasing interest on issues such as waste, sustainability, environmental impact and green chemistry, the selection and design of solvents have become important problems that need to be addressed during chemical product-process design and development. Systematic methods and tools suitable for selection...

  17. Handbook of organic solvent properties

    CERN Document Server

    Smallwood, Ian

    2012-01-01

    The properties of 72 of the most commonly used solvents are given, tabulated in the most convenient way, making this book a joy for industrial chemists to use as a desk reference. The properties covered are those which answer the basic questions of: Will it do the job? Will it harm the user? Will it pollute the air? Is it easy to handle? Will it pollute the water? Can it be recovered or incinerated? These are all factors that need to be considered at the early stages of choosing a solvent for a new product or process.A collection of the physical properties of most commonly used solvents, their

  18. The Solvent Selection framework: solvents for organic synthesis, separation processes and ionic-organic synthesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mitrofanov, Igor; Sansonetti, Sascha; Abildskov, Jens;

    2012-01-01

    problems are presented: 1) solvent selection and design for organic synthesis, 2) solvent screening and design of solvent mixtures for pharmaceutical applications and 3) ionic liquids selection and design as solvents. The application of the framework is highlighted successfully through case studies...... focusing on solvent replacement problem in organic synthesis and solvent mixture design for ibuprofen respectively....

  19. Hansen Cleaning Solvent Research Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Environmental regulation will force current baseline  precision cleaning solvent (AK-225) to be phased out starting 2015. We plan to develop  a new...

  20. Putting the Side first

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-02-01

    SIDE Minerals is a relative newcomer to the South African mining industry. It combines coal and anthracite mining and has base and precious metal interests. Side Minerals has offices in Boksburg from where its mining operations in Delmas, Witbank and Carolina in the Eastern Transvaal, and Newcastle in Natal are controlled. Lakeside Colliery at Witbank -a mine with a life expectancy of 15 years - is both an underground and opencast operation with an annual production capacity of 1,2 Mt of high, medium and low grade coal. Opencast extraction there is by the strip mining method. This is done on contract by Concor Mining Opencast Division, a member of the Concor Holding Group. A high wall face provides entry to the underground operations. Eastside Colliery at Carolina, which has the capacity to produce 480 000 tons of coal a year, is currently an opencast operation with underground mining scheduled to begin during 1994. Westside Colliery near Delmas is on a care and maintenance basis, but it has the capacity to produce 600 000 tons of low grade phosphorous coal which is required by the ferro-alloy and steel industries. 2 figs.

  1. Solvent/Non-Solvent Sintering To Make Microsphere Scaffolds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laurencin, Cato T.; Brown, Justin L.; Nair, Lakshmi

    2011-01-01

    A solvent/non-solvent sintering technique has been devised for joining polymeric microspheres to make porous matrices for use as drug-delivery devices or scaffolds that could be seeded with cells for growing tissues. Unlike traditional sintering at elevated temperature and pressure, this technique is practiced at room temperature and pressure and, therefore, does not cause thermal degradation of any drug, protein, or other biochemical with which the microspheres might be loaded to impart properties desired in a specific application. Also, properties of scaffolds made by this technique are more reproducible than are properties of comparable scaffolds made by traditional sintering. The technique involves the use of two miscible organic liquids: one that is and one that is not a solvent for the affected polymer. The polymeric microspheres are placed in a mold having the size and shape of the desired scaffold, then the solvent/non-solvent mixture is poured into the mold to fill the void volume between the microspheres, then the liquid mixture is allowed to evaporate. Some of the properties of the resulting scaffold can be tailored through choice of the proportions of the liquids and the diameter of the microspheres.

  2. Rheological study of structural transitions in triblock copolymers in a liquid crystal solvent

    OpenAIRE

    Kempe, Michael D.; Verduzco, Rafael; Scruggs, Neal R.; Kornfield, Julia A.

    2006-01-01

    Rheological properties of triblock copolymers dissolved in a nematic liquid crystal (LC) solvent demonstrate that their microphase separated structure is heavily influenced by changes in LC order. Nematic gels were created by swelling a well-defined, high molecular weight ABA block copolymer with the small-molecule nematic LC solvent 4-pentyl-4-cyanobiphenyl (5CB). The B midblock is a side-group liquid crystal polymer (SGLCP) designed to be soluble in 5CB and the A endblocks are polystyrene, ...

  3. Nutritional management in an elderly man with esophageal and gastric necrosis after caustic soda ingestion: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rondanelli M

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Mariangela Rondanelli,1 Gabriella Peroni,1 Alessandra Miccono,2 Fabio Guerriero,3 Davide Guido,3,4 Simone Perna1 1Department of Public Health, Neuroscience, Experimental and Forensic Medicine, Endocrinology and Nutrition Unit, University of Pavia, Azienda di Servizi alla Persona di Pavia, Pavia, 2Department of Clinical Sciences, Faculty of Medicine and Surgery, University of Milano-Bicocca, Milan, 3Azienda di Servizi alla Persona di Pavia, 4Department of Public Health, Neuroscience, Experimental and Forensic Medicine, Biostatistics and Clinical Epidemiology Unit, University of Pavia, Pavia, Italy Abstract: The ingestion of corrosive industrial chemical agents, such as caustic soda, that are mostly used for household cleaning, usually occurs accidentally or for suicidal purposes. Multiple protocols are based on documented success in preventing impending complications. In this study, we present a case of a 70-year-old man who swallowed caustic soda in a suicide attempt, causing a development of strong esophageal and gastric necrosis with subsequent gastrectomy and digiunostomy. Initially, the recommended nutritional approach was via percutaneous endoscopic jejunostomy by a polymer and high-caloric formula, with an elevated content of soluble fiber. After 5 months, the medical team removed the percutaneous endoscopic jejunostomy and the patient switched from enteral to oral nutrition. In this step, it was decided to introduce two oral, high-caloric supplements: an energy supplement in powder, based on maltodextrin, immediately soluble in foods or in hot/cold drinks and a high-energy and protein drink, enriched with arginine, vitamin C, zinc, and antioxidants. Oral administration (per os was well tolerated by consuming homogenized food mixed in water. After 1 month, the patient was discharged from the hospital and was able to eat a regular meal. Keywords: nutritional management, enteral nutrition, gastric necrosis, esophageal necrosis, nutritional

  4. Effect of thermal treatment on caustic stress corrosion cracking an chloride SCC of super austenitic stainless steel-S32050

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper focused on the caustic SCC and chloride SCC of super austenitic stainless stee S32050. Thermal treatment (550 .deg. C 15hrs) and high temperature mill annealing (HTMA, 1,250 .deg. C 5min.) did enhance the SCC resistance than mill annealed specimen. It is considered that dislocation array is the most important factor on SCC resistance among some variables such as repassivation rate, residual stress, grain size, yield strength etc. Substituted Mn didn't affec the anodic polarization behavior of Mn-modified S32050, but cold working to the alloys reduced the SCC resistance because of the embrittlement by cold working

  5. Effect of thermal treatment on caustic stress corrosion cracking an chloride SCC of super austenitic stainless steel-S32050

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, S. K.; Park, Y. S. [Yonsei Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Y. S. [Andong Univ., Andong (Korea, Republic of); Ryu, W. S. [KAERI, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    2000-10-01

    This paper focused on the caustic SCC and chloride SCC of super austenitic stainless stee S32050. Thermal treatment (550 .deg. C 15hrs) and high temperature mill annealing (HTMA, 1,250 .deg. C 5min.) did enhance the SCC resistance than mill annealed specimen. It is considered that dislocation array is the most important factor on SCC resistance among some variables such as repassivation rate, residual stress, grain size, yield strength etc. Substituted Mn didn't affec the anodic polarization behavior of Mn-modified S32050, but cold working to the alloys reduced the SCC resistance because of the embrittlement by cold working.

  6. 离子膜法烧碱工艺改进%Process improvement of exchange membrane caustic soda production

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    许琼武

    2012-01-01

    Through addition of titanium heat exchanger, the steam condensed water recovery and utilization, vacuum dechlorination pipe renovation measures,the ionic membrane caustic soda device stable operation. Reduces energy consumption, improves the economic benefit.%通过新增钛换热器、蒸汽冷凝水回收利用、真空脱氯氯水管改造等措施,保证了离子膜烧碱生产装置的平稳运行,降低了能耗,提高了经济效益。

  7. DFT-based simulations of amide I' IR spectra of a small protein in solution using empirical electrostatic map with a continuum solvent model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welch, William R W; Kubelka, Jan

    2012-09-01

    A continuum solvent model was tested for simulations of amide I' IR spectra for a 40-residue subdomain of P22 viral coat protein in aqueous solution. Spectra obtained using DFT (BPW91/6-31G**) parameters for a reduced all-Ala representation of the protein were corrected by an electrostatic potential map obtained from the solvent cavity surface and AMBER99 side-chain atom partial charges. Various cavity sizes derived from van der Waals atomic radii with an added effective solvent radius up to 2.0 Å were tested. The interplay of the side-chain and solvent electrostatic effects was investigated by considering the side chains and solvent separately as well as together. The sensitivity to side-chain conformational fluctuations and to the parametrization of C(β) group partial charges was also tested. Simulation results were compared to the experimental amide I' spectra of P22 subdomain, including two (13)C isotopically edited variants, as well as to the previous simulations based on the molecular dynamics trajectory in explicit solvent. For small cavity sizes, between van der Waals and that with added solvent radius of 0.5 Å, better qualitative agreement with experiment was obtained than with the explicit solvent representation, in particular for the (13)C-labeled spectra. Larger protein cavities led to progressively worse predictions due to increasingly stronger electrostatic effects of side chains, which could no longer be well compensated for by the solvent potential. Balance between side-chain and solvent electrostatic effects is important in determining the width and shape of the simulated amide I', which is also virtually unaffected by side-chain-geometry fluctuations. The continuum solvent model combined with the electrostatic map is a computationally efficient and potentially robust approach for the simulations of IR spectra of proteins in solution.

  8. Handbook of green chemistry, green solvents, supercritical solvents

    CERN Document Server

    Anastas, Paul T; Jessop, Philip G

    2014-01-01

    Green Chemistry is a vitally important subject area in a world where being as green and environmentally sound as possible is no longer a luxury but a necessity. Its applications include the design of chemical products and processes that help to reduce or eliminate the use and generation of hazardous substances. The Handbook of Green Chemistry comprises 12 volumes, split into subject-specific sets as follows: Set I: Green Catalysis Set II: Green Solvents Volume 4: Supercritical Solvents Volume 5: Reactions in Water Volume 6: Ionic Liquids

  9. Probiotics: Safety and Side Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of this page please turn JavaScript on. Feature: Probiotics Safety and Side Effects Past Issues / Winter 2016 ... Says About the Safety and Side Effects of Probiotics Whether probiotics are likely to be safe for ...

  10. Driven polymer translocation in good and bad solvent: effects of hydrodynamics and tension propagation

    CERN Document Server

    Moisio, Jaakko E; Linna, Riku P

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the driven polymer translocation through a nanometer-scale pore in the presence and absence of hydrodynamics both in good and bad solvent. We measure tension of the polymer segment on the {\\it cis} side of the pore in the course of translocations simulated using stochastic rotation dynamics, also called multi-particle collision dynamics. We find that in the good solvent the tension propagates similarly whether hydrodynamics is included or not. Only the tensed segment is by a constant factor shorter in the presence of hydrodynamics. The shorter tensed segment and the hydrodynamic interactions contribute to a smaller friction for the translocating polymer when hydrodynamics is included, which shows as smaller waiting times and a smaller exponent in the scaling of the translocation time with the polymer length. Hydrodynamics speeds up translocation in the good solvent, whereas it has a minimal effect on polymer translocation in the bad solvent. Under bad-solvent conditions tension does not spread ...

  11. HIV Medicines and Side Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Side Effects of HIV Medicines HIV Medicines and Side Effects (Last updated 1/7/2016; last reviewed 1/7/2016) Key Points HIV medicines help people with ... will depend on a person’s individual needs. Can HIV medicines cause side effects? HIV medicines help people ...

  12. Multiple sclerosis and organic solvents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, J T; Brønnum-Hansen, Henrik; Rasmussen, K

    1998-01-01

    We investigated a possible causal relation between exposure to organic solvents in Danish workers (housepainters, typographers/printers, carpenters/cabinetmakers) and onset of multiple sclerosis. Data on men included in the Danish Multiple Sclerosis Register (3,241 men) were linked with data from......, and butchers. Over a follow-up period of 20 years, we observed no increase in the incidence of multiple sclerosis among men presumed to be exposed to organic solvents. It was not possible to obtain data on potential confounders, and the study design has some potential for selection bias. Nevertheless......, the study does not support existing hypotheses regarding an association between occupational exposure to organic solvents and multiple sclerosis....

  13. Design of Hartmann type null screens for testing a plano-convex aspheric lens with a CCD sensor inside the caustic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castillo-Santiago, Gabriel; Castán-Ricaño, Diana; Avendaño-Alejo, Maximino; Castañeda, Luis; Díaz-Uribe, Rufino

    2016-08-22

    A new method to design Hartmann type null screens to test either qualitatively or quantitatively fast plano-convex aspherical lenses is presented. We design both radial and square null screens that produce arrays of circular spots uniformly distributed at predefined planes, considering that the CCD sensor is solely placed inside the caustic region. The designs of these null screens are based on knowledge of the caustic by refraction and on exact ray tracing. The null screens also serve to improve the alignment in optical systems. PMID:27557218

  14. Cyclic stress effect on stress corrosion cracking of duplex stainless steel in chloride and caustic solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Di

    Duplex stainless steel (DSS) is a dual-phase material with approximately equal volume amount of austenite and ferrite. It has both great mechanical properties (good ductility and high tensile/fatigue strength) and excellent corrosion resistance due to the mixture of the two phases. Cyclic loadings with high stress level and low frequency are experienced by many structures. However, the existing study on corrosion fatigue (CF) study of various metallic materials has mainly concentrated on relatively high frequency range. No systematic study has been done to understand the ultra-low frequency (˜10-5 Hz) cyclic loading effect on stress corrosion cracking (SCC) of DSSs. In this study, the ultra-low frequency cyclic loading effect on SCC of DSS 2205 was studied in acidified sodium chloride and caustic white liquor (WL) solutions. The research work focused on the environmental effect on SCC of DSS 2205, the cyclic stress effect on strain accumulation behavior of DSS 2205, and the combined environmental and cyclic stress effect on the stress corrosion crack initiation of DSS 2205 in the above environments. Potentiodynamic polarization tests were performed to investigate the electrochemical behavior of DSS 2205 in acidic NaCl solution. Series of slow strain rate tests (SSRTs) at different applied potential values were conducted to reveal the optimum applied potential value for SCC to happen. Room temperature static and cyclic creep tests were performed in air to illustrate the strain accumulation effect of cyclic stresses. Test results showed that cyclic loading could enhance strain accumulation in DSS 2205 compared to static loading. Moreover, the strain accumulation behavior of DSS 2205 was found to be controlled by the two phases of DSS 2205 with different crystal structures. The B.C.C. ferrite phase enhanced strain accumulation due to extensive cross-slips of the dislocations, whereas the F.C.C. austenite phase resisted strain accumulation due to cyclic strain

  15. Nutritional management in an elderly man with esophageal and gastric necrosis after caustic soda ingestion: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rondanelli, Mariangela; Peroni, Gabriella; Miccono, Alessandra; Guerriero, Fabio; Guido, Davide; Perna, Simone

    2016-01-01

    The ingestion of corrosive industrial chemical agents, such as caustic soda, that are mostly used for household cleaning, usually occurs accidentally or for suicidal purposes. Multiple protocols are based on documented success in preventing impending complications. In this study, we present a case of a 70-year-old man who swallowed caustic soda in a suicide attempt, causing a development of strong esophageal and gastric necrosis with subsequent gastrectomy and digiunostomy. Initially, the recommended nutritional approach was via percutaneous endoscopic jejunostomy by a polymer and high-caloric formula, with an elevated content of soluble fiber. After 5 months, the medical team removed the percutaneous endoscopic jejunostomy and the patient switched from enteral to oral nutrition. In this step, it was decided to introduce two oral, high-caloric supplements: an energy supplement in powder, based on maltodextrin, immediately soluble in foods or in hot/cold drinks and a high-energy and protein drink, enriched with arginine, vitamin C, zinc, and antioxidants. Oral administration (per os) was well tolerated by consuming homogenized food mixed in water. After 1 month, the patient was discharged from the hospital and was able to eat a regular meal. PMID:26917962

  16. Improved Purex solvent scrubbing methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mailen, J.C.; Tallent, O.K.

    1984-01-01

    Studies of hydrazine and hydroxylamine salts as solvent scrubbing agents that can be decomposed into gases are summarized. Results from testing of countercurrent scrubbers and solid sorber columns that produce lesser amounts of permanent salts are reported. The status of studies of the acid-degradation of paraffin diluent and the options for removal of long-chain organic acids is given.

  17. Which solvent for olfactory testing?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Philpott, C M; Goodenough, P C; Wolstenholme, C R; Murty, G E

    2004-12-01

    The physical properties of any carrier can deteriorate over time and thus alter the results in any olfactory test. The aim of this study was to evaluate clinically potential solvents as a clean odourless carrier for olfactory testing. Sweet almond oil, pure coconut oil, pure peach kernel oil, dipropylene glycol, monopropylene glycol, mineral oil and silicone oil were studied. The experimentation was conducted in two parts. First, an olfactory device was used to conduct air through the solvents on a weekly basis using a cohort of six volunteers to assess the perceived odour of each solvent at weekly intervals. Secondly a cross-reference test was performed using small bottled solutions of phenylethyl-alcohol and 1-butanol in 10-fold dilutions to compare any perceived difference in concentrations over a period of 8 weeks. We concluded that mineral oil is the most suitable carrier for the purpose of olfactory testing, possessing many desirable characteristics of an olfactory solvent, and that silicone oil may provide a suitable alternative for odorants with which it is miscible.

  18. Nanopapers for organic solvent nanofiltration.

    OpenAIRE

    Mautner, A.; Lee, K Y; P. Lahtinen; Hakalahti, M.; Tammelin, T. (Tuija); Li, K.; Bismarck, A.

    2014-01-01

    Would it not be nice to have an organic solvent nanofiltration membrane made from renewable resources that can be manufactured as simply as producing paper? Here the production of nanofiltration membranes made from nanocellulose by applying a papermaking process is demonstrated. Manufacture of the nanopapers was enabled by inducing flocculation of nanofibrils upon addition of trivalent ions.

  19. Mechanisms of solvent evaporation encapsulation processes: prediction of solvent evaporation rate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, J; Schwendeman, S P

    1999-10-01

    The mechanism of organic solvent evaporation during microencapsulation and its role during microsphere hardening has been investigated. Evaporation and encapsulation studies were carried out in a jacketed beaker, filled with aqueous hardening solution, which was maintained at constant temperature and constant stirring rate in the turbulent regime. Evaporation of dissolved methylene chloride (MC), ethyl acetate (EA), and acetonitrile (ACN) was examined by the decline in organic solvent concentration in the hardening bath, which was monitored by gas chromatography. The evaporation from the bath followed first-order kinetics under dilute conditions (e.g., MC hardening bath, V(-1/4), and the product of kinematic viscosity and diffusion coefficient, nu(-5/12)D (2/3)), and (2) illustrating that at constant temperature, the tendency of the evaporation system to obey liquid-side transport control follows the same order of increasing Henry's law constant (i.e., MC > EA > ACN). To establish the relationship of evaporation with microsphere hardening, the decline in MC concentration was determined in both the continuous and dispersed polymer phases during microencapsulation. By applying a mass balance with respect to MC in the hardening bath, the cumulative hardening profile of the microspheres was accurately predicted from the interpolating functions of the kinetics of MC loss from the bath with and without polymer added. These results have potential use for microsphere formulation, design of encapsulation apparatus, and scale up of microsphere production. PMID:10514360

  20. Results From The Salt Disposition Project Next Generation Solvent Demonstration Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peters, T. B.; Fondeur, F. F.; Taylor-Pashow, K. M.L.

    2014-04-02

    Strip Effluent Hold Tank (SEHT), Decontaminated Salt Solution Hold Tank (DSSHT), Caustic Wash Tank (CWT) and Solvent Hold Tank (SHT) samples were taken throughout the Next Generation Solvent (NGS) Demonstration Plan. These samples were analyzed and the results are reported. SHT: The solvent behaved as expected, with no bulk changes in the composition over time, with the exception of the TOA and TiDG. The TiDG depletion is higher than expected, and consideration must be taken on the required rate of replenishment. Monthly sampling of the SHT is warranted. If possible, additional SHT samples for TiDG analysis (only) would help SRNL refine the TiDG degradation model. CWT: The CWT samples show the expected behavior in terms of bulk chemistry. The 137Cs deposited into the CWT varies somewhat, but generally appears to be lower than during operations with the BOBCalix solvent. While a few minor organic components were noted to be present in the Preliminary sample, at this time these are thought to be artifacts of the sample preparation or may be due to the preceding solvent superwash. DSSHT: The DSSHT samples show the predicted bulk chemistry, although they point towards significant dilution at the front end of the Demonstration. The 137Cs levels in the DSSHT are much lower than during the BOBCalix operations, which is the expected observation. SEHT: The SEHT samples represent the most different output of all four of the outputs from MCU. While the bulk chemistry is as expected, something is causing the pH of the SEHT to be higher than what would be predicted from a pure stream of 0.01 M boric acid. There are several possible different reasons for this, and SRNL is in the process of investigating. Other than the pH issue, the SEHT is as predicted. In summary, the NGS Demonstration Plan samples indicate that the MCU system, with the Blend Solvent, is operating as expected. The only issue of concern regards the pH of the SEHT, and SRNL is in the process of investigating

  1. Application of injection of spent caustic sludge into sour water stripper%酸性水汽提塔注废碱渣工艺技术应用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘静翔; 黄占修; 耿庆光; 孙宁飞

    2013-01-01

    中国石油化工股份有限公司洛阳分公司液态烃脱硫醇装置废碱渣年产量超过1 kt,原采用碱渣湿式氧化装置脱硫、浓硫酸中和、酸性水限流排放至炼油污水处理场处理工艺.该工艺存在浓硫酸中和碱渣作业风险大、酸性水低温盐结晶堵塞管线,作业过程恶臭气体环境污染大等问题.通过实施酸性水汽提塔注废碱渣技术改造,停用了碱渣湿式氧化装置,不再进行碱渣酸化处理.工业实践表明:废碱渣注入汽提塔后,净化水中约70%的固定铵可去除,酸性水汽提塔蒸汽单耗下降约10 kg/t,对总外排水水质几乎没有影响,取得了良好的经济效益和社会效益.%The liquid hydrocarbon sweetening unit in Sinopec Luoyang Company produced more than 1000 tons of caustic sludge each year.In the original design,the process of wet oxidation desulfurization,sulfuric acid neutralization and controlled sour water drainage to refinery waste water plant for treatment was applied to treat the caustic sludge.This process had the problems of higher operating risk in neutralization of caustic sludge by sulfuric acid and easy plugging of pipelines by low-temperature salt crystallization of sour water and air pollution by foul gas from operation,etc.To solve these problems,the injection of spent caustic sludge was implemented,caustic sludge wet oxidation unit was shutdown and caustic sludge acidification operation was stopped.The above practices in commercial operation show that,after injection of spent caustic sludge into the sour water stripper,70% of fixed ammonium is removed,steam consumption of sour water stripper is reduced by 10 kg/t,there is no impact on the quality of discharge water,and good economic and social benefits have been achieved.

  2. Dipolar correlations in structured solvents under nanoconfinement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buyukdagli, Sahin; Blossey, Ralf

    2014-06-21

    We study electrostatic correlations in structured solvents confined to nanoscale systems. We derive variational equations of Netz-Orland type for a model liquid composed of finite size dipoles. These equations are solved for both dilute solvents and solvents at physiological concentrations in a slit nanopore geometry. Correlation effects are of major importance for the dielectric reduction and anisotropy of the solvent resulting from dipole image interactions and also lead to a reduction of van der Waals attractions between low dielectric bodies. Finally, by comparison with other recently developed self-consistent theories and experiments, we scrutinize the effect of solvent-membrane interactions on the differential capacitance of the charged liquid in contact with low dielectric substrates. The interfacial solvent depletion driven by solvent-image interactions plays the major role in the observed low values of the experimental capacitance data, while non-locality associated with the extended charge structure of solvent molecules only brings a minor contribution. PMID:24952564

  3. POTENTIAL FOR STRESS CORROSION CRACKING OF A537 CARBON STEEL NUCLEAR WASTE TANKS CONTAINING HIGHLY CAUSTIC SOLUTIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lam, P.; Stripling, C.; Fisher, D.; Elder, J.

    2010-04-26

    The evaporator recycle streams of nuclear waste tanks may contain waste in a chemistry and temperature regime that exceeds the current corrosion control program, which imposes temperature limits to mitigate caustic stress corrosion cracking (CSCC). A review of the recent service history found that two of these A537 carbon steel tanks were operated in highly concentrated hydroxide solution at high temperature. Visual inspections, experimental testing, and a review of the tank service history have shown that CSCC has occurred in uncooled/un-stress relieved tanks of similar construction. Therefore, it appears that the efficacy of stress relief of welding residual stress is the primary corrosion-limiting mechanism. The objective of this experimental program is to test A537 carbon steel small scale welded U-bend specimens and large welded plates (30.48 x 30.38 x 2.54 cm) in a caustic solution with upper bound chemistry (12 M hydroxide and 1 M each of nitrate, nitrite, and aluminate) and temperature (125 C). These conditions simulate worst-case situations in these nuclear waste tanks. Both as-welded and stress-relieved specimens have been tested. No evidence of stress corrosion cracking was found in the U-bend specimens after 21 days of testing. The large plate test was completed after 12 weeks of immersion in a similar solution at 125 C except that the aluminate concentration was reduced to 0.3 M. Visual inspection of the plate revealed that stress corrosion cracking had not initiated from the machined crack tips in the weld or in the heat affected zone. NDE ultrasonic testing also confirmed subsurface cracking did not occur. Based on these results, it can be concluded that the environmental condition of these tests was unable to develop stress corrosion cracking within the test periods for the small welded U-bends and for the large plates, which were welded with an identical procedure as used in the construction of the actual nuclear waste tanks in the 1960s. The

  4. Dipolar correlations in structured solvents under nanoconfinement

    OpenAIRE

    Buyukdagli, Sahin; Blossey, Ralf

    2014-01-01

    We study electrostatic correlations in structured solvents confined to nanoscale systems. We derive variational equations of Netz-Orland type for a model liquid composed of finite size dipoles. These equations are solved for both dilute solvents and solvents at physiological concentrations in a slit nanopore geometry. Correlation effects are of major importance for the dielectric reduction and anisotropy of the solvent resulting from dipole image interactions and also lead to a reduction of v...

  5. Solvent Extraction of Furfural From Biomass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Humphrey, M. F.

    1984-01-01

    Solvent-extraction method reduces energy required to remove furfural produced during acid hydrolysis of biomass. Acid hydrolysis performed in vessel containing both solvents and reacting ingredients. With intimate contact between solvents and aqueous hydrolyis liqour, furfural removed form liquor almost as fast as it forms.

  6. The hype with ionic liquids as solvents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunz, Werner; Häckl, Katharina

    2016-09-01

    In this mini review, we give our personal opinion about the present state of the art concerning Ionic Liquids, proposed as alternative solvents. In particular, we consider their different drawbacks and disadvantages and discuss the critical aspects of the research of Ionic Liquids as solvents. Finally, we point out some aspects on potentially promising Ionic Liquid solvents.

  7. The solvent component of macromolecular crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weichenberger, Christian X. [European Academy of Bozen/Bolzano (EURAC), Viale Druso 1, Bozen/Bolzano, I-39100 Südtirol/Alto Adige (Italy); Afonine, Pavel V. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL), 1 Cyclotron Road, Mail Stop 64R0121, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Kantardjieff, Katherine [California State University, San Marcos, CA 92078 (United States); Rupp, Bernhard, E-mail: br@hofkristallamt.org [k.-k. Hofkristallamt, 991 Audrey Place, Vista, CA 92084 (United States); Medical University of Innsbruck, Schöpfstrasse 41, A-6020 Innsbruck (Austria)

    2015-04-30

    On average, the mother liquor or solvent and its constituents occupy about 50% of a macromolecular crystal. Ordered as well as disordered solvent components need to be accurately accounted for in modelling and refinement, often with considerable complexity. The mother liquor from which a biomolecular crystal is grown will contain water, buffer molecules, native ligands and cofactors, crystallization precipitants and additives, various metal ions, and often small-molecule ligands or inhibitors. On average, about half the volume of a biomolecular crystal consists of this mother liquor, whose components form the disordered bulk solvent. Its scattering contributions can be exploited in initial phasing and must be included in crystal structure refinement as a bulk-solvent model. Concomitantly, distinct electron density originating from ordered solvent components must be correctly identified and represented as part of the atomic crystal structure model. Herein, are reviewed (i) probabilistic bulk-solvent content estimates, (ii) the use of bulk-solvent density modification in phase improvement, (iii) bulk-solvent models and refinement of bulk-solvent contributions and (iv) modelling and validation of ordered solvent constituents. A brief summary is provided of current tools for bulk-solvent analysis and refinement, as well as of modelling, refinement and analysis of ordered solvent components, including small-molecule ligands.

  8. Reactions and Separations in Green Solvents

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Spronsen, J.

    2010-01-01

    Most chemical processes involve solvents in the reaction and the separation step. These solvents give rise to a heavy environmental and economical burden. Moreover, these solvents are based on non-sustainable resources like petroleum. The aim of this thesis has been to develop a number of alternativ

  9. Facile Synthesis of Symmetrical Triindolylmethanes Catalyzed by Iodine under Solvent-free Condition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZENG Xiao-Fei; JI Shun-Jun; SU Xiao-Ming

    2008-01-01

    The reaction of various indoles (1a-1k, 3 equiv.) with triethyl orthoformate (1.2 equiv.) catalyzed by I2 (5mol%) at room temperature in 2-15 min under a solvent-free condition afforded the respective symmetrical triindolylmethanes (3a-3k) in good to excellent yields without any side products.

  10. Solvent cleaning system and method for removing contaminants from solvent used in resin recycling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohnert, George W.; Hand, Thomas E.; DeLaurentiis, Gary M.

    2009-01-06

    A two step solvent and carbon dioxide based system that produces essentially contaminant-free synthetic resin material and which further includes a solvent cleaning system for periodically removing the contaminants from the solvent so that the solvent can be reused and the contaminants can be collected and safely discarded in an environmentally safe manner.

  11. INVESTIGATION OF THE POTENTIAL FOR CAUSTIC STRESS CORROSION CRACKING OF A537 CARBON STEEL NUCLEAR WASTE TANKS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lam, P.

    2009-10-15

    The evaporator recycle streams contain waste in a chemistry and temperature regime that may be outside of the current waste tank corrosion control program, which imposes temperature limits to mitigate caustic stress corrosion cracking (CSCC). A review of the recent service history (1998-2008) of Tanks 30 and 32 showed that these tanks were operated in highly concentrated hydroxide solution at high temperature. Visual inspections, experimental testing, and a review of the tank service history have shown that CSCC has occurred in uncooled/un-stress relieved F-Area tanks. Therefore, for the Type III/IIIA waste tanks the efficacy of the stress relief of welding residual stress is the only corrosion-limiting mechanism. The objective of this experimental program is to test carbon steel small scale welded U-bend specimens and large welded plates (12 x 12 x 1 in.) in a caustic solution with upper bound chemistry (12 M hydroxide and 1 M each of nitrate, nitrite, and aluminate) and temperature (125 C). These conditions simulate worst-case situations in Tanks 30 and 32. Both as-welded and stress-relieved specimens have been tested. No evidence of stress corrosion cracking was found in the U-bend specimens after 21 days of testing. The large plate test is currently in progress, but no cracking has been observed after 9 weeks of immersion. Based on the preliminary results, it appears that the environmental conditions of the tests are unable to develop stress corrosion cracking within the duration of these tests.

  12. DEVELOPMENT OF A KINETIC MODEL OF BOEHMITE DISSOLUTION IN CAUSTIC SOLUTIONS APPLIED TO OPTIMIZE HANFORD WASTE PROCESSING

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DISSELKAMP RS

    2011-01-06

    Boehmite (e.g., aluminum oxyhydroxide) is a major non-radioactive component in Hanford and Savannah River nuclear tank waste sludge. Boehmite dissolution from sludge using caustic at elevated temperatures is being planned at Hanford to minimize the mass of material disposed of as high-level waste (HLW) during operation of the Waste Treatment Plant (WTP). To more thoroughly understand the chemistry of this dissolution process, we have developed an empirical kinetic model for aluminate production due to boehmite dissolution. Application of this model to Hanford tank wastes would allow predictability and optimization of the caustic leaching of aluminum solids, potentially yielding significant improvements to overall processing time, disposal cost, and schedule. This report presents an empirical kinetic model that can be used to estimate the aluminate production from the leaching of boehmite in Hanford waste as a function of the following parameters: (1) hydroxide concentration; (2) temperature; (3) specific surface area of boehmite; (4) initial soluble aluminate plus gibbsite present in waste; (5) concentration of boehmite in the waste; and (6) (pre-fit) Arrhenius kinetic parameters. The model was fit to laboratory, non-radioactive (e.g. 'simulant boehmite') leaching results, providing best-fit values of the Arrhenius A-factor, A, and apparent activation energy, E{sub A}, of A = 5.0 x 10{sup 12} hour{sup -1} and E{sub A} = 90 kJ/mole. These parameters were then used to predict boehmite leaching behavior observed in previously reported actual waste leaching studies. Acceptable aluminate versus leaching time profiles were predicted for waste leaching data from both Hanford and Savannah River site studies.

  13. DEVELOPMENT OF A KINETIC MODEL OF BOEHMITE DISSOLUTION IN CAUSTIC SOLUTIONS APPLIED TO OPTIMIZE HANFORD WASTE PROCESSING

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boehmite (e.g., aluminum oxyhydroxide) is a major non-radioactive component in Hanford and Savannah River nuclear tank waste sludge. Boehmite dissolution from sludge using caustic at elevated temperatures is being planned at Hanford to minimize the mass of material disposed of as high-level waste (HLW) during operation of the Waste Treatment Plant (WTP). To more thoroughly understand the chemistry of this dissolution process, we have developed an empirical kinetic model for aluminate production due to boehmite dissolution. Application of this model to Hanford tank wastes would allow predictability and optimization of the caustic leaching of aluminum solids, potentially yielding significant improvements to overall processing time, disposal cost, and schedule. This report presents an empirical kinetic model that can be used to estimate the aluminate production from the leaching of boehmite in Hanford waste as a function of the following parameters: (1) hydroxide concentration; (2) temperature; (3) specific surface area of boehmite; (4) initial soluble aluminate plus gibbsite present in waste; (5) concentration of boehmite in the waste; and (6) (pre-fit) Arrhenius kinetic parameters. The model was fit to laboratory, non-radioactive (e.g. 'simulant boehmite') leaching results, providing best-fit values of the Arrhenius A-factor, A, and apparent activation energy, EA, of A = 5.0 x 1012 hour-1 and EA = 90 kJ/mole. These parameters were then used to predict boehmite leaching behavior observed in previously reported actual waste leaching studies. Acceptable aluminate versus leaching time profiles were predicted for waste leaching data from both Hanford and Savannah River site studies.

  14. Insecticide solvents: interference with insecticidal action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brattsten, L B; Wilkinson, C F

    1977-06-10

    Several commercial solvent mixtures commonly used as insecticide carriers in spray formulations increase by more than threefold the microsomal N-demethylation of p-chloro N-methylaniline in midgut preparations of southern army-worm (Spodoptera eridania) larvae exposed orally to the test solvents. Under laboratory conditions, the same solvent mixtures exhibit a protective action against the in vivo toxicity of the insecticide carbaryl to the larvae. The data are discussed with respect to possible solvent-insecticide interactions occurring under field conditions and, more broadly, to potential toxicological hazards of these solvents to humans. PMID:860135

  15. Blind loop perforation after side-to-side ileocolonic anastomosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valle, Raffaele Dalla; Zinicola, Roberto; Iaria, Maurizio

    2014-08-27

    Blind loop syndrome after side-to-side ileocolonic anastomosis is a well-recognized entity even though its incidence and complication rates are not clearly defined. The inevitable dilation of the ileal cul-de-sac leads to stasis and bacterial overgrowth which eventually leads to mucosal ulceration and even full-thickness perforation. Blind loop syndrome may be an underestimated complication in the setting of digestive surgery. It should always be taken into account in cases of acute abdomen in patients who previously underwent right hemicolectomy. We herein report 3 patients who were diagnosed with perforative blind loop syndrome a few years after standard right hemicolectomy followed by a side-to-side ileocolonic anastomosis.

  16. Blind loop perforation after side-to-side ileocolonic anastomosis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Raffaele; Dalla; Valle; Roberto; Zinicola; Maurizio; Iaria

    2014-01-01

    Blind loop syndrome after side-to-side ileocolonic anas-tomosis is a well-recognized entity even though its in-cidence and complication rates are not clearly defined. The inevitable dilation of the ileal cul-de-sac leads to stasis and bacterial overgrowth which eventually leads to mucosal ulceration and even full-thickness perfora-tion. Blind loop syndrome may be an underestimated complication in the setting of digestive surgery. It should always be taken into account in cases of acute abdomen in patients who previously underwent right hemicolectomy. We herein report 3 patients who were diagnosed with perforative blind loop syndrome a few years after standard right hemicolectomy followed by a side-to-side ileocolonic anastomosis.

  17. Side Effects in Steering Fragments

    CERN Document Server

    Wortel, Lars

    2011-01-01

    In this thesis I will give a formal definition of side effects. I will do so by modifying a system for modelling program instructions and program states, Quantified Dynamic Logic, to a system called DLAf (for Dynamic Logic with Assignments as Formulas), which in contrast to QDL allows assignments in formulas and makes use of short-circuit evaluation. I will show the underlying logic in those formulas to be a variant of short-circuit logic called repetition-proof short-circuit logic. Using DLAf I will define the actual and the expected evaluation of a single instruction. The side effects are then defined to be the difference between the two. I will give rules for composing those side effects in single instructions, thus scaling up our definition of side effects to a definition of side effects in deterministic \\dlaf-programs. Using this definition I will give a classification of side effects, introducing as most important class that of marginal side effects. Finally, I will show how to use our system for calcul...

  18. Computer Aided Solvent Selection and Design Framework

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mitrofanov, Igor; Conte, Elisa; Abildskov, Jens;

    Solvents are widely used as a reaction medium, as a reactant or as carrier at some stages of the manufacturing chain in products from the chemical, fine chemical, pharmaceutical, food, and agrochemical industries. Solvent are either required for processing after which they are removed...... is to develop a systematic framework and implement it as software for selection and design of solvents for many applications including organic synthesis, complex reaction systems and solvent-based separations. The solvent selection framework is based on a combination of knowledge from industrial practice...... for each reaction: 1. Problem identification. Finding an objective for given system, identifying actual functions of the solvent. 2. Search criteria definition. The solvent functions that satisfy the operational needs of the process are defined in terms of a set of search criteria (R-indices), defined...

  19. Side-View Face Recognition

    OpenAIRE

    Santemiz, Pinar; Spreeuwers, Luuk J.; Veldhuis, Raymond N. J.

    2010-01-01

    Side-view face recognition is a challenging problem with many applications. Especially in real-life scenarios where the environment is uncontrolled, coping with pose variations up to side-view positions is an important task for face recognition. In this paper we discuss the use of side view face recognition techniques to be used in house safety applications. Our aim is to recognize people as they pass through a door, and estimate their location in the house. Here, we compare available databas...

  20. Economic analysis of thermal solvent processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vapour extraction (VAPEX) uses horizontal well pairs and a gaseous solvent to mobilize the oil. Hybrid solvent processes inject a light hydrocarbon solvent in addition to sufficient amounts of steam to vaporize the solvent. This paper reviewed various laboratory model experiments that evaluated VAPEX and solvent-based processes for the recovery of heavy oil or bitumen. The project compared a VAPEX process, a thermal solvent reflux process and a hybrid-solvent SAGD process using scaled laboratory models. Several experimental models were used. The first high-pressure thermal solvent experiment was conducted with a laboratory model designed to scale a 20 m thick Burnt Lake reservoir. Propane was used as the solvent. The second sequence of experiments scaled a range of processes from VAPEX to hybrid solvents for an Athabasca bitumen reservoir using a sealed can type of model confined by a gaseous overburden with propane as the solvent. The third experiment was a hybrid solvent experiment in which propane and steam were injected simultaneously into the injector well. The final experiment was a propane-steam hybrid experiment at a higher steam injection rate. The aim of the study was to evaluate the processes, build a database of experimental performance and to determine whether any single process had a significant economic advantage. It was concluded that the lowest cost process for Athabasca bitumen was the thermal solvent hybrid process followed by low pressure SAGD. The thermal solvent experiment using hot propane injection recovered heavy oil at costs competitive to SAGD. Many of the experiments suggested a process life longer than 15 years, as the high viscosity of Athabasca bitumen and the resulting low diffusivity resulted in a slower oil recovery process. 5 refs., 3 tabs., 16 figs

  1. Solvent cavitation under solvophobic confinement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashbaugh, Henry S

    2013-08-14

    The stability of liquids under solvophobic confinement can tip in favor of the vapor phase, nucleating a liquid-to-vapor phase transition that induces attractive forces between confining surfaces. In the case of water adjacent to hydrophobic surfaces, experimental and theoretical evidence support confinement-mediated evaporation stabilization of biomolecular and colloidal assemblies. The macroscopic thermodynamic theory of cavitation under confinement establishes the connection between the size of the confining surfaces, interfacial free energies, and bulk solvent pressure with the critical evaporation separation and interfacial forces. While molecular simulations have confirmed the broad theoretical trends, a quantitative comparison based on independent measurements of the interfacial free energies and liquid-vapor coexistence properties has, to the best of our knowledge, not yet been performed. To overcome the challenges of simulating a large number of systems to validate scaling predictions for a three-dimensional fluid, we simulate both the forces and liquid-vapor coexistence properties of a two-dimensional Lennard-Jones fluid confined between solvophobic plates over a range of plate sizes and reservoir pressures. Our simulations quantitatively agree with theoretical predictions for solvent-mediated forces and critical evaporation separations once the length dependence of the solvation free energy of an individual confining plate is taken into account. The effective solid-liquid line tension length dependence results from molecular scale correlations for solvating microscopic plates and asymptotically decays to the macroscopic value for plates longer than 150 solvent diameters. The success of the macroscopic thermodynamic theory at describing two-dimensional liquids suggests application to surfactant monolayers to experimentally confirm confinement-mediated cavitation. PMID:23947875

  2. Advanced integrated solvent extraction systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Horwitz, E.P.; Dietz, M.L.; Leonard, R.A. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)

    1997-10-01

    Advanced integrated solvent extraction systems are a series of novel solvent extraction (SX) processes that will remove and recover all of the major radioisotopes from acidic-dissolved sludge or other acidic high-level wastes. The major focus of this effort during the last 2 years has been the development of a combined cesium-strontium extraction/recovery process, the Combined CSEX-SREX Process. The Combined CSEX-SREX Process relies on a mixture of a strontium-selective macrocyclic polyether and a novel cesium-selective extractant based on dibenzo 18-crown-6. The process offers several potential advantages over possible alternatives in a chemical processing scheme for high-level waste treatment. First, if the process is applied as the first step in chemical pretreatment, the radiation level for all subsequent processing steps (e.g., transuranic extraction/recovery, or TRUEX) will be significantly reduced. Thus, less costly shielding would be required. The second advantage of the Combined CSEX-SREX Process is that the recovered Cs-Sr fraction is non-transuranic, and therefore will decay to low-level waste after only a few hundred years. Finally, combining individual processes into a single process will reduce the amount of equipment required to pretreat the waste and therefore reduce the size and cost of the waste processing facility. In an ongoing collaboration with Lockheed Martin Idaho Technology Company (LMITCO), the authors have successfully tested various segments of the Advanced Integrated Solvent Extraction Systems. Eichrom Industries, Inc. (Darien, IL) synthesizes and markets the Sr extractant and can supply the Cs extractant on a limited basis. Plans are under way to perform a test of the Combined CSEX-SREX Process with real waste at LMITCO in the near future.

  3. STUDY ON SIDE REACTION IN THE SYNTHESIS OF HYPERCROSSLINKED POLYMERS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Bo; LI Aimin; TAO Weihua; YANG Weiben

    2008-01-01

    The systematical study about side reactions have revealed the formation mechanism of oxygen-containing groups of hypercrosslinked polymers.Surface chemistry and functionality of the polymers are characterized by Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), solid state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and contact angle.The results showed that the ether groups were from chioromethylated reaction, and the alcohol groups arose from partial hydrolysis of chloromethyl groups during the post-crosslinking reaction, and the carbonyl functionality was formed by further oxidation of the alcohol groups.Catalyst and solvent used in the postcrosslinking reaction would greatly influence the surface chemistry of the polymer.

  4. STUDY ON SIDE REACTION IN THE SYNTHESIS OF HYPERCROSSLINKED POLYMERS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    The systematical study about side reactions have revealed the formation mechanism of oxygen-containing groups of hypercrosslinked polymers. Surface chemistry and functionality of the polymers are characterized by Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), solid state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and contact angle. The results showed that the ether groups were from chloromethylated reaction, and the alcohol groups arose from partial hydrolysis of chloromethyl groups during the post-crosslinking reaction, and the carbonyl functionality was formed by further oxidation of the alcohol groups. Catalyst and solvent used in the postcrosslinking reaction would greatly influence the surface chemistry of the polymer.

  5. Efficient organic solar cells processed from hydrocarbon solvents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Jingbo; Li, Yunke; Yang, Guofang; Jiang, Kui; Lin, Haoran; Ade, Harald; Ma, Wei; Yan, He

    2016-02-01

    Organic solar cells have desirable properties, including low cost of materials, high-throughput roll-to-roll production, mechanical flexibility and light weight. However, all top-performance devices are at present processed using halogenated solvents, which are environmentally hazardous and would thus require expensive mitigation to contain the hazards. Attempts to process organic solar cells from non-halogenated solvents lead to inferior performance. Overcoming this hurdle, here we present a hydrocarbon-based processing system that is not only more environmentally friendly but also yields cells with power conversion efficiencies of up to 11.7%. Our processing system incorporates the synergistic effects of a hydrocarbon solvent, a novel additive, a suitable choice of polymer side chain, and strong temperature-dependent aggregation of the donor polymer. Our results not only demonstrate a method of producing active layers of organic solar cells in an environmentally friendly way, but also provide important scientific insights that will facilitate further improvement of the morphology and performance of organic solar cells.

  6. Green Solvents for Precision Cleaning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grandelli, Heather; Maloney, Phillip; DeVor, Robert; Surma, Jan; Hintze, Paul

    2013-01-01

    Aerospace machinery used in liquid oxygen (LOX) fuel systems must be precision cleaned to achieve a very low level of non-volatile residue (solvent-replacement is non-flammable, environmentally benign, non-corrosive, inexpensive, effective and evaporates completely, leaving no residue. Highlighted is a green precision cleaning process, which is contaminant removal using supercritical carbon dioxide as the environmentally benign solvent. In this process, the contaminant is dissolved in carbon dioxide, and the parts are recovered at the end of the cleaning process completely dry and ready for use. Typical contaminants of aerospace components include hydrocarbon greases, hydraulic fluids, silicone fluids and greases, fluorocarbon fluids and greases and fingerprint oil. Metallic aerospace components range from small nuts and bolts to much larger parts, such as butterfly valves 18 in diameter. A fluorinated grease, Krytox, is investigated as a model contaminant in these preliminary studies, and aluminum coupons are employed as a model aerospace component. Preliminary studies are presented in which the experimental parameters are optimized for removal of Krytox from aluminum coupons in a stirred-batch process. The experimental conditions investigated are temperature, pressure, exposure time and impeller speed. Temperatures of 308 - 423 K, pressures in the range of 8.3 - 41.4 MPa, exposure times between 5 - 60 min and impeller speeds of 0 - 1000 rpm were investigated. Preliminary results showed up to 86 cleaning efficiency with the moderate processing conditions of 323 K, 13.8 MPa, 30 min and 750 rpm.

  7. The Moon's near side megabasin and far side bulge

    CERN Document Server

    Byrne, Charles

    2013-01-01

    Since Luna and Lunar Orbiter photographed the far side of the Moon, the mysterious dichotomy between the face of the Moon as we see it from Earth and the side of the Moon that is hidden has puzzled lunar scientists. As we learned more from the Apollo sample return missions and later robotic satellites, the puzzle literally deepened, showing asymmetry of the crust and mantle, all the way to the core of the Moon. This book summarizes the author’s successful search for an ancient impact feature, the Near Side Megabasin of the Moon and the extensions to impact theory needed to find it. The implications of this ancient event are developed to answer many of the questions about the history of the Moon.

  8. Recovery of isopropyl alcohol from waste solvent of a semiconductor plant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Sheng H; Wang, Chuen S

    2004-01-30

    An important waste solvent generated in the semiconductor manufacturing process was characterized by high isopropyl alcohol (IPA) concentration over 65%, other organic pollutants and strong color. Because of these characteristics, IPA recovery was deemed as a logic choice for tackling this waste solvent. In the present work, an integrated method consisting of air stripping in conjunction with condensation and packed activated carbon fiber (ACF) adsorption for dealing with this waste solvent. The air stripping with proper stripping temperature control was employed to remove IPA from the waste solvent and the IPA vapor in the gas mixture was condensed out in a side condenser. The residual IPA remaining in the gas mixture exiting the side condenser was efficiently removed in a packed ACF column. The air stripping with condensation was able to recover up to 93% of total IPA in the initial waste solvent. The residual IPA in the gas mixture, representing less than 3% of the initial IPA, was efficiently captured in the packed ACF column. Experimental tests were conducted to examine the performances of each unit and to identify the optimum operating conditions. Theoretical modeling of the experimental IPA breakthrough curves was also undertaken using a macroscopic model. The verified breakthrough model significantly facilitates the adsorption column design. The recovered IPA was found to be of high purity and could be considered for reuse. PMID:15177106

  9. Interaction between two side-by-side inverted flags

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huertas-Cerdeira, Cecilia; Fan, Boyu; Barizien, Antoine; Gharib, Morteza

    2015-11-01

    The inverted flag instability occurs when an elastic plate that is free at its leading edge and clamped at its trailing edge is subjected to an axial wind. The oscillating motion that follows has received recent attention. However, previous studies have focused on the dynamics of a single flag even though these are rarely found isolated in natural phenomena, such as the fluttering of leaves in the wind. The interaction between two side-by-side inverted flags has been investigated, analyzing the effects of the distance between flags and the wind speed. Both in-phase and anti-phase coupling have been observed for different ranges of these parameters.

  10. Remediation of Contaminated Soils by Solvent Flushing

    OpenAIRE

    Augustijn, Denie C.M.; Jessup, Ron E.; Rao, P. Suresh C.; Wood, A. Lynn

    1994-01-01

    Solvent flushing is a potential technique for remediating a waste disposal/spill site contaminated with organic chemicals. This technique involves the injection of a solvent mixture (e.g., water plus alcohols) that enhances contaminant solubility, reduces the retardation factor, and increases the release rates of the contaminants. A simulation model is developed to predict contaminant elution curves during solvent flushing for the case of one‐dimensional, steady flow through a contaminated me...

  11. Thermally activated solvent bonding of polymers

    OpenAIRE

    Ng, S H; Tjeung, R. T.; Z. F. Wang; Lu, A. C. W.; Rodriguez, I.; de Rooij, Nicolaas F.

    2010-01-01

    We present a thermally activated solvent bonding technique for the formation of embedded microstructures in polymer. It is based on the temperature dependent solubility of polymer in a liquid that is not a solvent at room temperature. With thermal activation, the liquid is transformed into a solvent of the polymer, creating a bonding capability through segmental or chain interdiffusion at the bonding interface. The technique has advantages over the more commonly used thermal bonding due to it...

  12. Modeling of salt solubilities in mixed solvents

    OpenAIRE

    Chiavone Filho O.; Rasmussen P.

    2000-01-01

    A method to correlate and predict salt solubilities in mixed solvents using a UNIQUAC+Debye-Hückel model is developed. The UNIQUAC equation is applied in a form with temperature-dependent parameters. The Debye-Hückel model is extended to mixed solvents by properly evaluating the dielectric constants and the liquid densities of the solvent media. To normalize the activity coefficients, the symmetric convention is adopted. Thermochemical properties of the salt are used to estimate the solubilit...

  13. OCCUPATIONAL SOLVENT EXPOSURE ASSOCIATED WITH DEVELOPMENTAL TOXICITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alina-Costina LUCA

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Organic solvent is a broad term that applies to many classes of chemicals. The solvent (benzene, toluene etc. aspects of occupational exposure are reviewed via the examination of the use, occurrence, and disposition as well as population’s potential of risk. The general public can be exposed to solvent in ambient air as a result of its occurrence in paint process. Solvents are primarily irritants to the skin and mucous membranes and have narcotic properties at high concentrations. Published epidemiological data identified various types of birth defects in certain occupations.

  14. Extractive Distillation with Salt in Solvent

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1999-01-01

    Extractive distillation with salt in solvent is a new process for producing anhydrous ethanol by combining the principle of "salt effect" and some traditional extractive distillation methods. Compared with the common extractive distillation the performance of solvent is improved, the recycling amount of solvent is reduced to 1/4-1/5, and the number of theoretical plates is reduced to 1/3. Energy consumption and cost of equipment are also reduced and continuous production is realized. High efficiency and low solvent wastage make this technique feasible.

  15. Modeling of salt solubilities in mixed solvents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. Chiavone Filho

    2000-06-01

    Full Text Available A method to correlate and predict salt solubilities in mixed solvents using a UNIQUAC+Debye-Hückel model is developed. The UNIQUAC equation is applied in a form with temperature-dependent parameters. The Debye-Hückel model is extended to mixed solvents by properly evaluating the dielectric constants and the liquid densities of the solvent media. To normalize the activity coefficients, the symmetric convention is adopted. Thermochemical properties of the salt are used to estimate the solubility product. It is shown that the proposed procedure can describe with good accuracy a series of salt solubility measurements in aqueous organic solvent mixtures.

  16. Water washes and caustic leaches of sludge from Hanford Tank S-101 and water washes of sludge from Hanford Tank C-103

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In 1993, the Department of Energy (DOE) selected the enhanced sludge washing (ESW) process as the baseline for pretreatment of Hanford tank sludges. The ESW process uses a series of water washes and caustic leaches to separate nonradioactive components such as aluminum, chromium, and phosphate from the high-level waste sludges. If the ESW process is successful, the volume of immobilized high-level waste will be significantly reduced. The tests on the sludge from Hanford Tank S-101 focused on the effects of process variables such as sodium hydroxide concentration (1 and 3 M), temperature (70 and 95 C), and leaching time (5, 24, 72, and 168 h) on the efficacy of the ESW process with realistic liquid-to-solid ratios. Another goal of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of water washes on a sludge sample from hanford Tank C-103. The final objective of this study was to test potential process control monitors during the water washes and caustic leaches with actual sludge. Both 137Cs activity and conductance were measured for each of the water washes and caustic leaches. Experimental procedures, a discussion of results, conclusions and recommendations are included in this report

  17. Water washes and caustic leaches of sludge from Hanford Tank S-101 and water washes of sludge from Hanford Tank C-103

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hunt, R.D.; Collins, J.L.; Chase, C.W.

    1998-07-01

    In 1993, the Department of Energy (DOE) selected the enhanced sludge washing (ESW) process as the baseline for pretreatment of Hanford tank sludges. The ESW process uses a series of water washes and caustic leaches to separate nonradioactive components such as aluminum, chromium, and phosphate from the high-level waste sludges. If the ESW process is successful, the volume of immobilized high-level waste will be significantly reduced. The tests on the sludge from Hanford Tank S-101 focused on the effects of process variables such as sodium hydroxide concentration (1 and 3 M), temperature (70 and 95 C), and leaching time (5, 24, 72, and 168 h) on the efficacy of the ESW process with realistic liquid-to-solid ratios. Another goal of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of water washes on a sludge sample from hanford Tank C-103. The final objective of this study was to test potential process control monitors during the water washes and caustic leaches with actual sludge. Both {sup 137}Cs activity and conductance were measured for each of the water washes and caustic leaches. Experimental procedures, a discussion of results, conclusions and recommendations are included in this report.

  18. Running away from side effects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Casla, S; Hojman, P; Márquez-Rodas, I;

    2015-01-01

    The number of breast cancer survivors increases every year, thanks to the development of new treatments and screening techniques. However, patients present with numerous side effects that may affect their quality of life. Exercise has been demonstrated to reduce some of these side effects...... be an integrative complementary intervention to improve physiological, physical and psychological factors that affect survival and quality of life of these patients. For that reason, the main objective of this review is to provide a general overview of exercise benefits in breast cancer patients and recommendations......, but in spite of this, few breast cancer patients know and follow the exercise recommendations needed to remain healthy. In this review, we describe the different breast cancer treatments and the related side effects and implications of exercise in relation to these. We propose that exercise could...

  19. Side Effects of Side Effects Information in Drug Information Leaflets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maat, H. Pander; Klaassen, R.

    1994-01-01

    Describes a study in which drug information leaflets given to patients were improved in two ways, first by adding a short introductory paragraph on the nature of side effects generally, and second by adjusting frequency descriptors to more accurately reflect pretesting of the drug. Explains that participants in the study were less likely to…

  20. Peptide nanotube aligning side chains onto one side.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabata, Yuki; Mitani, Shota; Kimura, Shunsaku

    2016-06-01

    A novel pseudo cyclic penta-β-peptide composed of a β-naphthylalanine, two β-alanines, and a sequence of ethylenediamine-succinic acid (CP5ES) is synthesized and investigated on peptide nanotube (PNT) formation. When the PNT is formed with the maximum number of intermolecular hydrogen bonds between the cyclic peptides, the sequence enables the alignment of the side chains, naphthyl groups, on one side of the PNT. Microscopic and spectroscopic observations of CP5ES crystals reveal that CP5ES forms rod- or needle-shaped molecular assemblies showing exciton coupling of the Cotton effect and predominant monomer emission, which are different from a reference cyclic tri-β-peptide composed of a β-naphthylalanine and two β-alanines. Insertion of a sequence of ethylenediamine-succinic acid into β-amino acids in the cyclic skeleton is therefore suggested to be effective to make the side chains aligning on one side of the PNT. Copyright © 2016 European Peptide Society and John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:27282135

  1. Single polymer chains in poor solvent: using the bond fluctuation method with explicit solvent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jentzsch, Christoph; Werner, Marco; Sommer, Jens-Uwe

    2013-03-01

    We use the bond fluctuation model with explicit solvent to study single polymer chains under poor solvent conditions. Static and dynamic properties of the bond fluctuation model with explicit solvent are compared with the implicit solvent model, and the Θ-temperatures are determined for both solvent models. We show that even in the very poor solvent regime, dynamics is not frozen for the explicit solvent model. We investigate some aspects of the structure of a single collapsed globule and show that rather large chain lengths are necessary to reach the scaling regime of a dense sphere. The force-extension curve of a single polymer chain under poor solvent conditions in the fixed end-to-end distance ensemble is analyzed. We find that the transition of the tadpole conformation to the stretched chain conformation is rather smooth because of fluctuation effects, which is in agreement with recent experimental results. PMID:23485321

  2. Dark Side of the Universe

    CERN Document Server

    2016-01-01

    The Dark Side of the Universe (DSU) workshops bring together a wide range of theorists and experimentalists to discuss current ideas on models of the dark side, and relate them to current and future experiments. This year's DSU will take place in the colorful Norwegian city of Bergen. Topics include dark matter, dark energy, cosmology, and physics beyond the standard model. One of the goals of the workshop is to expose in particular students and young researchers to the fascinating topics of dark matter and dark energy, and to provide them with the opportunity to meet some of the best researchers in these areas .

  3. Side-View Face Recognition

    OpenAIRE

    Santemiz, Pinar; Spreeuwers, Luuk J.; Veldhuis, Raymond N. J.; Biggelaar, van den, M.

    2011-01-01

    As a widely used biometrics, face recognition has many advantages such as being non-intrusive, natural and passive. On the other hand, in real-life scenarios with uncontrolled environment, pose variation up to side-view positions makes face recognition a challenging work. In this paper we discuss the use of side-view face recognition in house safety applications. Our goal is to recognize people as they pass through doors in order to estimate their location in the house. In order to preserve p...

  4. THE CHEMICAL AND RADIATION RESISTANCE OF POLYPHENYLENE SULFIDE AS ENCOUNTERED IN THE NUCLEAR WASTE CLEANING PROCESSES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fondeur, F.

    2011-10-20

    Polyphenylene sulfide (PPS) is extremely resistant to gamma irradiation, caustic solution, and dilute nitric acid. PPS is the material of construction for the coalescers used in the Modular Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction Unit (MCU). After applying the equivalent of 16 years of gamma irradiation and several months of exposures to caustic solution, no dimensional changes nor chemical changes were detected in PPS whether the PPS was in fiber form or in a composite with E-glass fibers. However, PPS acts as a media for heterogeneous nucleation. In particular, PPS appears to favor aluminosilicate formation in saturated solutions of aluminum and silicon in caustic environments. Parallel testing, in progress, is examining the stability of PPS when exposed to the new solvent formulation under development for MCU. Preliminary data, after two months of exposure, PPS is remarkably stable to the new solvent.

  5. The Chemical And Radiation Resistance Of Polyphenylene Sulfide As Encountered In The Nuclear Waste Cleaning Processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Polyphenylene sulfide (PPS) is extremely resistant to gamma irradiation, caustic solution, and dilute nitric acid. PPS is the material of construction for the coalescers used in the Modular Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction Unit (MCU). After applying the equivalent of 16 years of gamma irradiation and several months of exposures to caustic solution, no dimensional changes nor chemical changes were detected in PPS whether the PPS was in fiber form or in a composite with E-glass fibers. However, PPS acts as a media for heterogeneous nucleation. In particular, PPS appears to favor aluminosilicate formation in saturated solutions of aluminum and silicon in caustic environments. Parallel testing, in progress, is examining the stability of PPS when exposed to the new solvent formulation under development for MCU. Preliminary data, after two months of exposure, PPS is remarkably stable to the new solvent.

  6. Identifying Two-Sided Markets

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Filistrucchi, L.; Geradin, D.A.A.G.; van Damme, E.E.C.

    2012-01-01

    Abstract: We review the burgeoning literature on two-sided markets focusing on the different definitions that have been proposed. In particular, we show that the well-known definition given by Evans is a particular case of the more general definition proposed by Rochet and Tirole. We then identify t

  7. The DarkSide Program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rossi B.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available DarkSide-50 at Gran Sasso underground laboratory (LNGS, Italy, is a direct dark matter search experiment based on a liquid argon TPC. DS-50 has completed its first dark matter run using atmospheric argon as target. The detector performances and the results of the first physics run are presented in this proceeding.

  8. Gel-like properties of MCM-41 material and its transformation to MCM-50 in a caustic alkaline surround

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► MCM-41 material transforms gradually into MCM-50 lamellar gel upon controlled exposure to 6 M KOH. ► The formation of MCM-50 ordered gel structure occurs at KOH weight content of 40–70 wt. %. ► MCM gel phase shows pseudoplastic behavior and possesses homogeneous matrix texture. -- Abstract: MCM-41 material, prepared by sol–gel method, reveals gel-like properties in a caustic alkaline environment, i.e., 6 M potassium hydroxide (KOH) electrolyte. The gellation of MCM-41 starts at a KOH weight ratio of 40 wt.%. The structural change of the material is verified with X-Ray diffractograms and supported by observation using Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM). As the KOH weight ratio increases, the MCM-41 hexagonal arrays structure gradually transforms into MCM-50 lamellar structure before disappearing completely at 80 wt.% KOH. The MCM gel phase is further characterized by rotational viscometry and texture analysis. The gel phase shows shear thinning or pseudoplastic behavior and possesses homogeneous matrix structure.

  9. Electro chemical studies on stress corrosion cracking of Incoloy-800 in caustic solution, part I: As received samples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dinu Alice

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Many non-volatile impurities accidentally introduced into the steam generator tend to Concentrate on its surface in restricted flow areas. In this way these impurities can lead to stress corrosion cracking (SCC on stressed tubes of the steam generator. Such impurities can be strong alkaline or acid solutions. To evaluate the effect of alkaline concentrated environments on SCC of steam generator tubes, the tests were con ducted on stressed samples of Incoloy-800 in 10% NaOH solution. To accelerate the SCC process, stressed specimens were anodically polarised in a caustic solution in an electro chemical cell. The method of stressing of Incoloy-800 tubes used in our experiments was the C-ring. Using the cathodic zone of the potentiodynamic curves it was possible to calculate the most important electrochemical parameters: the corrosion current, the corrosion rate, and the polarization resistance. We found that the value of the corrosion potential to initiate the SCC microcracks was -100 mV. The tested samples were examined using the metallographic method. The main experimental results showed that the in crease of the stress state promoted the in crease of the SCC susceptibility of Incoloy-800 samples tested under the same conditions, and that the length of the SCC-type microcracks in creased with the growth of the stress value.

  10. A study of the electrochemical behavior in tungsten and caustic solutions and platinum/iridium in chloride solutions, informal report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vitus, C.M.; Isaacs, H.S. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States); Schroeder, V. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). College of Engineering

    1994-11-22

    Platinum/iridium and tungsten wires were electronically etched in chloride and caustic solution, respectively, to produce tips with high aspect ratio. A direct relationship between the meniscus and the aspect ratio of etched tips was established. Scanning electron micrographs indicated that higher aspect ratios were obtained by changing the geometry of the meniscus during the etch either by an increase in the applied a.c. voltage or with the addition of a nonpolar layer above the electrolytic solution during the etching process. Above the breakdown voltage, two possible mechanisms appeared to control the etching process by expediting chemical dissolution: cavitation and sparking. Cavitation caused erosion due to the force of evolved gases against the electrode and sparking attacked the surface by vaporizing the metal. Sparking commenced on both wires near 24V. This voltage corresponded to a minimum in the plot of total etch time versus voltage. From light emission studies, sparking on Pt/Ir was associated with the ionization of Pt, Ir, Ca, and Cl. A compositional analysis of insoluble black particles produced during a.c. and d.c. etching of Pt/Ir revealed Pt and Ir as the major constituents of the product. The sparking process was shown to have a potential use in micromachining.

  11. Characterizing Low-Mass Binaries From Observation of Long Time-scale Caustic-crossing Gravitational Microlensing Events

    CERN Document Server

    Shin, I -G; Choi, J -Y; Udalski, A; Sumi, T; Gould, A; Bozza, V; Dominik, M; Fouqué, P; Horne, K; \\, M; Szymański, K; Kubiak, M; Soszyński, I; Pietrzyński, G; Poleski, R; Ulaczyk, K; Pietrukowicz, P; Kozłowski, S; Skowron, J; Wyrzykowski, Ł; Abe, F; Bennett, D P; Bond, I A; Botzler, C S; Chote, P; Freeman, M; Fukui, A; Furusawa, K; Itow, Y; Kobara, S; Ling, C H; Masuda, K; Matsubara, Y; Miyake, N; Muraki, Y; Ohmori, K; Ohnishi, K; Rattenbury, N J; Saito, To; Sullivan, D J; Suzuki, D; Suzuki, K; Sweatman, W L; Takino, S; Tristram, P J; Wada, K; Yock, P C M; Bramich, D M; Snodgrass, C; Steele, I A; Street, R A; Tsapras, Y; Alsubai, K A; Browne, P; Burgdorf, M J; Novati, S Calchi; Dodds, P; Dreizler, S; Fang, X -S; Grundahl, F; Gu, C -H; Hardis, S; Harpsøe, K; Hinse, T C; Hornstrup, A; Hundertmark, M; Jessen-Hansen, J; Jørgensen, U G; Kains, N; Kerins, E; Liebig, C; Lund, M; Lunkkvist, M; Mancini, L; Mathiasen, M; Penny, M T; Rahvar, S; Ricci, D; Scarpetta, G; Skottfelt, J; Southworth, J; Surdej, J; Tregloan-Reed, J; Wambsganss, J; Wertz, O; Almeida, L A; Batista, V; Christie, G; DePoy, D L; Dong, Subo; Gaudi, B S; Henderson, C; Jablonski, F; Lee, C -U; McCormick, J; McGregor, D; Moorhouse, D; Natusch, T; Ngan, H; Park, S -Y; Pogge, R W; Tan, T -G; Thornley, G; Yee, J C; Albrow, M D; Bachelet, E; Beaulieu, J -P; Brillant, S; Cassan, A; Cole, A A; Corrales, E; Coutures, C; Dieters, S; Prester, D Dominis; Donatowicz, J; Greenhill, J; Kubas, D; Marquette, J -B; Menzies, J W; Sahu, K C; Zub, M

    2012-01-01

    Despite astrophysical importance of binary star systems, detections are limited to those located in small ranges of separations, distances, and masses and thus it is necessary to use a variety of observational techniques for a complete view of stellar multiplicity across a broad range of physical parameters. In this paper, we report the detections and measurements of 2 binaries discovered from observations of microlensing events MOA-2011-BLG-090 and OGLE-2011-BLG-0417. Determinations of the binary masses are possible by simultaneously measuring the Einstein radius and the lens parallax from analyses of the well-resolved caustic-crossing parts of the light curve and the long-term deviation induced by the orbital motion of the Earth around the Sun, respectively. The measured masses of the binary components are 0.43 $M_{\\odot}$ and 0.39 $M_{\\odot}$ for MOA-2011-BLG-090 and 0.57 $M_{\\odot}$ and 0.17 $M_{\\odot}$ for OGLE-2011-BLG-0417 and thus both lens components of MOA-2011-BLG-090 and one component of OGLE-2011...

  12. Experimental Study on Wing Crack Behaviours in Dynamic-Static Superimposed Stress Field Using Caustics and High-Speed Photography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L.Y. Yang

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available During the drill-and-blast progress in rock tunnel excavation of great deep mine, rock fracture is evaluated by both blasting load and pre-exiting earth stress (pre-compression. Many pre-existing flaws in the rock mass, like micro-crack, also seriously affect the rock fracture pattern. Under blasting load with pre-compression, micro-cracks initiate, propagate and grow to be wing cracks. With an autonomous design of static-dynamic loading system, dynamic and static loads were applied on some PMMA plate specimen with pre-existing crack, and the behaviour of the wing crack was tested by caustics corroding with a high-speed photography. Four programs with different static loading modes that generate different pre-compression fields were executed, and the length, velocity of the blasting wing crack and dynamic stress intensity factor (SIF at the wing crack tip were analyzed and discussed. It is found that the behaviour of blasting-induced wing crack is affected obviously by blasting and pre-compression. And pre-compression, which is vertical to the direction of the wing crack propagation, hinders the crack propagation. Furthermore, the boundary constraint condition plays an important role on the behaviour of blasting induced crack during the experiment.

  13. Electrochemical studies on stress corrosion cracking of Incoloy-800 in caustic solution Part I: As received samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Many non-volatile impurities accidentally introduced into the steam generator tend to concentrate on its surface in restricted flow areas. In this way these impurities can lead to stress corrosion cracking (SCC) on stressed tubes of the steam generator. Such impurities can be strong alkaline or acid solutions. To evaluate the effect of alkaline concentrated environments on SCC of steam generator tubes, the tests were conducted on stressed samples of Incoloy-800 in 10% NaOH solution. To accelerate the SCC process, stressed specimens were anodically polarised in a caustic solution in an electrochemical cell. The method of stressing of Incoloy-800 tubes used in our experiments was the C-ring. Using the cathodic zone of the potentiodynamic curves it was possible to calculate the most important electrochemical parameters: the corrosion current, the corrosion rate, and the polarisation resistance. We found that the value of the corrosion potential to initiate the SCC microcracks was -100 mV. The tested samples were examined using the metallographic method. The main experimental results showed that the increase of the stress state promoted the increase of the SCC susceptibility of Incoloy-800 samples tested under the same conditions, and that the length of the SCC-type microcracks increased with the growth of the stress value. (author)

  14. REMEDIATION OF CONTAMINATED SOILS BY SOLVENT FLUSHING

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solvent flushing is a potential technique for remediating a waste disposal/spill site contaminated with organic chemicals. This technique involves the injection of a solvent mixture (e.g., water plus alcohols) that enhances contaminant solubility, reduces the retardation factor, ...

  15. REMEDIATING PESTICIDE CONTAMINATED SOILS USING SOLVENT EXTRACTION

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bench-scale solvent extraction studies were performed on soil samples obtained from a Superfund site contaminated with high levels of p,p'-DDT, p,p'-DDD,, p,p'-DDE and toxaphene. The effectiveness of the solvent extraction process was assessed using methanol and 2-propanol as sol...

  16. Modeling of Salt Solubilities in Mixed Solvents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chiavone-Filho, O.; Rasmussen, Peter

    2000-01-01

    A method to correlate and predict salt solubilities in mixed solvents using a UNIQUAC+Debye-Huckel model is developed. The UNIQUAC equation is applied in a form with temperature-dependent parameters. The Debye-Huckel model is extended to mixed solvents by properly evaluating the dielectric consta...

  17. Structuring of polymer solutions upon solvent evaporation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schaefer, C.; van der Schoot, P.; Michels, J. J.

    2015-01-01

    The morphology of solution-cast, phase-separated polymers becomes finer with increasing solvent evaporation rate. We address this observation theoretically for a model polymer where demixing is induced by steady solvent evaporation. In contrast to what is the case for a classical, thermal quench inv

  18. Improved Supercritical-Solvent Extraction of Coal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Compton, L.

    1982-01-01

    Raw coal upgraded by supercritical-solvent extraction system that uses two materials instead of one. System achieved extraction yields of 20 to 49 weight percent. Single-solvent yields are about 25 weight percent. Experimental results show extraction yields may be timedependent. Observed decreases in weight of coal agreed well with increases in ash content of residue.

  19. Supercritical-Multiple-Solvent Extraction From Coal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corcoran, W.; Fong, W.; Pichaichanarong, P.; Chan, P.; Lawson, D.

    1983-01-01

    Large and small molecules dissolve different constituents. Experimental apparatus used to test supercritical extraction of hydrogen rich compounds from coal in various organic solvents. In decreasing order of importance, relevant process parameters were found to be temperature, solvent type, pressure, and residence time.

  20. Molecular Thermodynamic Modeling of Mixed Solvent Solubility

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ellegaard, Martin Dela; Abildskov, Jens; O’Connell, John P.

    2010-01-01

    A method based on statistical mechanical fluctuation solution theory for composition derivatives of activity coefficients is employed for estimating dilute solubilities of 11 solid pharmaceutical solutes in nearly 70 mixed aqueous and nonaqueous solvent systems. The solvent mixtures range from ne...

  1. Organic solvent regeneration of granular activated carbon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cross, W. H.; Suidan, M. T.; Roller, M. A.; Kim, B. R.; Gould, J. P.

    1982-09-01

    The use of activated carbon for the treatment of industrial waste-streams was shown to be an effective treatment. The high costs associated with the replacement or thermal regeneration of the carbon have prohibited the economic feasibility of this process. The in situ solvent regeneration of activated carbon by means of organic solvent extraction was suggested as an economically alternative to thermal regeneration. The important aspects of the solvent regeneration process include: the physical and chemical characteristics of the adsorbent, the pore size distribution and energy of adsorption associated with the activated carbon; the degree of solubility of the adsorbate in the organic solvent; the miscibility of the organic solvent in water; and the temperature at which the generation is performed.

  2. The chemistry of nonaqueous solvents v.4 solution phenomena and aprotic solvents

    CERN Document Server

    Lagowski, J J

    1976-01-01

    The Chemistry of Nonaqueous Solvents, Volume IV: Solution Phenomena and Aprotic Solvents focuses on the chemistry of nonaqueous solvents, with emphasis on solution phenomena and aprotic solvents such as tetramethylurea, inorganic acid chlorides, cyclic carbonates, and sulfolane. This book is organized into seven chapters and begins with an overview of the theory of electrical conductivity and elementary experimental considerations, along with some of the interesting research on nonaqueous solvents. It then turns to a discussion on hydrogen bonding phenomena in nonaqueous systems as probed

  3. Searching for low percolation thresholds within amphiphilic polymer membranes: The effect of side chain branching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorenbos, G.

    2015-06-01

    Percolation thresholds for solvent diffusion within hydrated model polymeric membranes are derived from dissipative particle dynamics in combination with Monte Carlo (MC) tracer diffusion calculations. The polymer backbones are composed of hydrophobic A beads to which at regular intervals Y-shaped side chains are attached. Each side chain is composed of eight A beads and contains two identical branches that are each terminated with a pendant hydrophilic C bead. Four types of side chains are considered for which the two branches (each represented as [C], [AC], [AAC], or [AAAC]) are splitting off from the 8th, 6th, 4th, or 2nd A bead, respectively. Water diffusion through the phase separated water containing pore networks is deduced from MC tracer diffusion calculations. The percolation threshold for the architectures containing the [C] and [AC] branches is at a water volume fraction of ˜0.07 and 0.08, respectively. These are much lower than those derived earlier for linear architectures of various side chain length and side chain distributions. Control of side chain architecture is thus a very interesting design parameter to decrease the percolation threshold for solvent and proton transports within flexible amphiphilic polymer membranes.

  4. Searching for low percolation thresholds within amphiphilic polymer membranes: The effect of side chain branching

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dorenbos, G., E-mail: dorenbos@ny.thn.ne.jp [Sano 1107-2, Belle Crea 502, Susono 410-1118 (Japan)

    2015-06-14

    Percolation thresholds for solvent diffusion within hydrated model polymeric membranes are derived from dissipative particle dynamics in combination with Monte Carlo (MC) tracer diffusion calculations. The polymer backbones are composed of hydrophobic A beads to which at regular intervals Y-shaped side chains are attached. Each side chain is composed of eight A beads and contains two identical branches that are each terminated with a pendant hydrophilic C bead. Four types of side chains are considered for which the two branches (each represented as [C], [AC], [AAC], or [AAAC]) are splitting off from the 8th, 6th, 4th, or 2nd A bead, respectively. Water diffusion through the phase separated water containing pore networks is deduced from MC tracer diffusion calculations. The percolation threshold for the architectures containing the [C] and [AC] branches is at a water volume fraction of ∼0.07 and 0.08, respectively. These are much lower than those derived earlier for linear architectures of various side chain length and side chain distributions. Control of side chain architecture is thus a very interesting design parameter to decrease the percolation threshold for solvent and proton transports within flexible amphiphilic polymer membranes.

  5. PARIS II: Computer Aided Solvent Design for Pollution Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    This product is a summary of U.S. EPA researchers' work developing the solvent substitution software tool PARIS II (Program for Assisting the Replacement of Industrial Solvents, version 2.0). PARIS II finds less toxic solvents or solvent mixtures to replace more toxic solvents co...

  6. Predicting the Solubility of Pharmaceutical Cocrystals in Solvent/Anti-Solvent Mixtures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lange, Linda; Heisel, Stefan; Sadowski, Gabriele

    2016-01-01

    In this work, the solubilities of pharmaceutical cocrystals in solvent/anti-solvent systems were predicted using PC-SAFT in order to increase the efficiency of cocrystal formation processes. Modeling results and experimental data were compared for the cocrystal system nicotinamide/succinic acid (2:1) in the solvent/anti-solvent mixtures ethanol/water, ethanol/acetonitrile and ethanol/ethyl acetate at 298.15 K and in the ethanol/ethyl acetate mixture also at 310.15 K. The solubility of the investigated cocrystal slightly increased when adding small amounts of anti-solvent to the solvent, but drastically decreased for high anti-solvent amounts. Furthermore, the solubilities of nicotinamide, succinic acid and the cocrystal in the considered solvent/anti-solvent mixtures showed strong deviations from ideal-solution behavior. However, by accounting for the thermodynamic non-ideality of the components, PC-SAFT is able to predict the solubilities in all above-mentioned solvent/anti-solvent systems in good agreement with the experimental data. PMID:27164075

  7. Predicting the Solubility of Pharmaceutical Cocrystals in Solvent/Anti-Solvent Mixtures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linda Lange

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available In this work, the solubilities of pharmaceutical cocrystals in solvent/anti-solvent systems were predicted using PC-SAFT in order to increase the efficiency of cocrystal formation processes. Modeling results and experimental data were compared for the cocrystal system nicotinamide/succinic acid (2:1 in the solvent/anti-solvent mixtures ethanol/water, ethanol/acetonitrile and ethanol/ethyl acetate at 298.15 K and in the ethanol/ethyl acetate mixture also at 310.15 K. The solubility of the investigated cocrystal slightly increased when adding small amounts of anti-solvent to the solvent, but drastically decreased for high anti-solvent amounts. Furthermore, the solubilities of nicotinamide, succinic acid and the cocrystal in the considered solvent/anti-solvent mixtures showed strong deviations from ideal-solution behavior. However, by accounting for the thermodynamic non-ideality of the components, PC-SAFT is able to predict the solubilities in all above-mentioned solvent/anti-solvent systems in good agreement with the experimental data.

  8. PSE For Solvent Applications: A Generic Computer-aided Solvent Selection and Design Framework

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mitrofanov, Igor; Sin, Gürkan; Gani, Rafiqul

    industry (API solubility), solvents i! ! n formulations and as cleaning agents. The template is expected to guide the average user through the essential and desirable steps in solvent selection and design. The expert may also use the general interface and create their own template for the types of solvent......Solvents are widely used across a number of industries in many applications such as separation agents, reaction mediums, cleaning agents and product carriers. Selection of optimal solvents in these applications is mostly based on previous experiences and experimental trial and error. A process...... related problems they usually solve. The solvents database currently contains information about more than 1000 organic solvents and their properties -including environmental and transportation - and about 1000 ionic liquids useful for extraction-based separation processes. Property models library include...

  9. Computer-aided tool for solvent selection in pharmaceutical processes: Solvent swap

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Papadakis, Emmanouil; K. Tula, Anjan; Gernaey, Krist V.;

    swap solvents is developed and is used to retrieve information for the most commonly used solvent candidates typically found in the pharmaceutical industry. The selection is verified by simulation. The framework for the solvent selection and solvent swap is part of an integrated computer......-aided framework with the objective to assist the pharmaceutical industry in gaining better process understanding. A software interface to improve the usability of the tool has been created also.......In the pharmaceutical processes, solvents have a multipurpose role since different solvents can be used in different stages (such as chemical reactions, separations and purification) in the multistage active pharmaceutical ingredients (APIs) production process. The solvent swap and selection tasks...

  10. The electrostatic response of water to neutral polar solutes: Implications for continuum solvent modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muddana, Hari S.; Sapra, Neil V.; Fenley, Andrew T.; Gilson, Michael K.

    2013-06-01

    Continuum solvation models are widely used to estimate the hydration free energies of small molecules and proteins, in applications ranging from drug design to protein engineering, and most such models are based on the approximation of a linear dielectric response by the solvent. We used explicit-water molecular dynamics simulations with the TIP3P water model to probe this linear response approximation in the case of neutral polar molecules, using miniature cucurbituril and cyclodextrin receptors and protein side-chain analogs as model systems. We observe supralinear electrostatic solvent responses, and this nonlinearity is found to result primarily from waters' being drawn closer and closer to the solutes with increased solute-solvent electrostatic interactions; i.e., from solute electrostriction. Dielectric saturation and changes in the water-water hydrogen bonding network, on the other hand, play little role. Thus, accounting for solute electrostriction may be a productive approach to improving the accuracy of continuum solvation models.

  11. Nonprescription ibuprofen: side effect profile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furey, S A; Waksman, J A; Dash, B H

    1992-01-01

    Single doses of nonprescription analgesics are commonly used to treat self-diagnosed conditions. To evaluate the safety of single doses of nonprescription-strength ibuprofen, we examined reported side effects from 15 double-blind, randomized, controlled trials we conducted of the drug to treat various common painful conditions (e.g., headache, sore throat). All studies included placebo and another nonprescription analgesic, acetaminophen. A total of 878 subjects received ibuprofen 200 or 400 mg, 849 acetaminophen 650 or 1000 mg, and 852 placebo. The overall frequency of side effects was comparable: ibuprofen 2.4%, acetaminophen 3.2%, and placebo 2.1%. The frequency of central nervous system symptoms was 0.8%, 2.1%, and 0.9%, respectively. Upper gastro-intestinal upset ranged from 0.8-0.9% of subjects in all groups. We conclude that single doses of nonprescription ibuprofen are well tolerated and demonstrate a side effect profile indistinguishable from that of acetaminophen and placebo. PMID:1437701

  12. Environmental Impacts on Nuclear Reprocessing Solvents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillens, A. R.; Fessenden, J. E.

    2009-12-01

    Nuclear tests have been employed ever since the first nuclear explosion in Alamogordo, NM during the mid-1940s. Nuclear weapons pose a threat to civil society and result in extensive biological (medical) damages. For this reason, treaties banning nuclear tests and weapons have been employed since the 1960s to cease proliferation of weapons. However, as nuclear tests continue in secrecy and actinides, such as plutonium and uranium, are eligible for theft, nuclear forensics is needed to prevent weapons proliferation. In this study, solvents [tributyl phosphate (TBP), dodecane, decanol] used in reprocessing spent nuclear fuel are analyzed using an isotope ratio mass spectrometer, which provides indisputable evidence in identifying the operation in which solvents were used. Solvent samples are observed under variable conditions in the laboratory for different time periods. It is assumed that their carbon isotope values (δ13C) will become more positive (shift heavy) with time. It is found that the solvents are hygroscopic. TBP leaves the most robust signature compared to the other solvents studied and the isotope values for all solvents under all conditions become more positive with time. This study serves as primary research in understanding how solvents behave under variable conditions in the laboratory and how this could be translated to the environment in fate and transport studies.

  13. Organic Solvent Tolerant Lipases and Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shivika Sharma

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Lipases are a group of enzymes naturally endowed with the property of performing reactions in aqueous as well as organic solvents. The esterification reactions using lipase(s could be performed in water-restricted organic media as organic solvent(s not only improve(s the solubility of substrate and reactant in reaction mixture but also permit(s the reaction in the reverse direction, and often it is easy to recover the product in organic phase in two-phase equilibrium systems. The use of organic solvent tolerant lipase in organic media has exhibited many advantages: increased activity and stability, regiospecificity and stereoselectivity, higher solubility of substrate, ease of products recovery, and ability to shift the reaction equilibrium toward synthetic direction. Therefore the search for organic solvent tolerant enzymes has been an extensive area of research. A variety of fatty acid esters are now being produced commercially using immobilized lipase in nonaqueous solvents. This review describes the organic tolerance and industrial application of lipases. The main emphasis is to study the nature of organic solvent tolerant lipases. Also, the potential industrial applications that make lipases the biocatalysts of choice for the present and future have been presented.

  14. 49 CFR 229.69 - Side bearings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Side bearings. 229.69 Section 229.69....69 Side bearings. (a) Friction side bearings with springs designed to carry weight may not have more than 25 percent of the springs in any one nest broken. (b) Friction side bearings may not be run...

  15. TRUEX process solvent cleanup with solid sorbents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tse, Pui-Kwan; Reichley-Yinger, L.; Vandegrift, G.F.

    1989-01-01

    Solid sorbents, alumina, silica gel, and Amberlyst A-26 have been tested for the cleanup of degraded TRUEX-NPH solvent. A sodium carbonate scrub alone does not completely remove acidic degradation products from highly degraded solvent and cannot restore the stripping performance of the solvent. By following the carbonate scrub with either neutral alumina or Amberlyst A-26 anion exchange resin, the performance of the TRUEX-NPH is substantially restored. The degraded TRUEX-NPH was characterized before and after treatment by supercritical fluid chromatography. Its performance was evaluated by americium distribution ratios, phase-separation times, and lauric acid distribution coefficients. 17 refs., 2 figs., 5 tabs.

  16. Genomic and Genetic Approaches to Solvent Tolerance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eleftherios T. Papoutsakis

    2005-06-10

    The proposed research is to understand and exploit the molecular basis that determines tolerance of the industrially important anaerobic clostridia to solvents. Furthermore, we aim to develop general genomic and metabolic engineering strategies for understanding the molecular basis of tolerance to chemicals and for developing tolerant strains. Our hypothesis is that the molecular basis of what makes bacterial cells able to withstand high solvent concentrations can be used to metabolically engineer cells so that they can tolerate higher concentrations of solvents and related chemicals.

  17. Chemical reactions in solvents and melts

    CERN Document Server

    Charlot, G

    1969-01-01

    Chemical Reactions in Solvents and Melts discusses the use of organic and inorganic compounds as well as of melts as solvents. This book examines the applications in organic and inorganic chemistry as well as in electrochemistry. Organized into two parts encompassing 15 chapters, this book begins with an overview of the general properties and the different types of reactions, including acid-base reactions, complex formation reactions, and oxidation-reduction reactions. This text then describes the properties of inert and active solvents. Other chapters consider the proton transfer reactions in

  18. Solvent Handbook Database System user's manual

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Industrial solvents and cleaners are used in maintenance facilities to remove wax, grease, oil, carbon, machining fluids, solder fluxes, mold release, and various other contaminants from parts, and to prepare the surface of various metals. However, because of growing environmental and worker-safety concerns, government regulations have already excluded the use of some chemicals and have restricted the use of halogenated hydrocarbons because they affect the ozone layer and may cause cancer. The Solvent Handbook Database System lets you view information on solvents and cleaners, including test results on cleaning performance, air emissions, recycling and recovery, corrosion, and non-metals compatibility. Company and product safety information is also available

  19. Intragranular porosity in Hanford sand grains after reaction with caustic tank wastes: Quantification and implications for reactive transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crandell, L. E.; Peters, C. A.; Um, W.; Jones, K. W.; Lindquist, W. B.

    2011-12-01

    Reactions of caustic tank waste with sediments in the 200 East Area of the Hanford site cause quartz and primary aluminosilicate minerals to dissolve. Secondary minerals of sodalite and cancrinite have been shown to nucleate on, and cement together, quartz grains. These secondary precipitates have been found to uptake radionuclides in their network of channels and cages. In this work, thin sections from unreacted and reacted column experiments packed with Hanford sand grains were imaged using 2D Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM). SEM image analysis reveals large amounts of intragranular pore space in both the reacted and unreacted sands. Grayscale Backscattered Electron (BSE) images were thresholded to separate grain and pore pixels. To quantify the amount of intragranular pore space, a set of images were manually created with the intragranular pore space removed, or the grains filled-in. Porosity, and intragranular porosity, was determined by counting and comparing the number of pore pixels in each pair of images. Intragranular pore space accounts for up to 14% of total porosity. Quartz dissolution in intragranular regions increases the proportion of intragranular pore space in reacted samples. Diffusion of tank waste into these free silica rich areas provides a favorable environment for cancrinite precipitates to form and a potential significant trapping mechanism for radionuclides. Part of this work was to quantify where, within a single pore and a network of pores, precipitation occurred. While the bulk amount of cancrinite precipitation occurred on grain surfaces, cancrinite precipitates were also found in intragranular pore spaces. Up to 10% of total precipitation occurred in intragranular pore space. However, as the system recovers and clean water flow returns, radionuclides incorporated into precipitates in intragranular regions may act as a secondary long term leaching source for contaminants. To determine the trapping or leaching potential from

  20. Terapia nutricional en pacientes adultos con quemaduras del tracto gastrointestinal por cáusticos Nutrition therapy for adult patients with caustic injuries to gastrointestinal tract

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. A. Muñoz Botero

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Objetivos: Presentar la experiencia del Grupo de Terapia Nutricional del Hospital El Tunal, en el manejo nutricional de pacientes adultos con quemaduras por cáusticos del tracto gastrointestinal. Materiales y métodos: Es un estudio retrospectivo, descriptivo de pacientes manejados por el Grupo de Terapia Nutricional por quemaduras por cáusticos del tracto gastrointestinal en un periodo comprendido entre Enero de 2000 y Diciembre de 2007. Se revisaron las historias clínicas de los pacientes que tenían diagnóstico de quemaduras por cáusticos. Se analizaron los datos pertinentes al manejo nutricional, la evolución y el resultado final dedichos pacientes. Resultados: Se atendieron 30 pacientes, 17 hombres y 13 mujeres con edad promedio 34,4 ± 17,2 años. La ingesta del cáustico fue por intento de suicidio en 22 (73,3% pacientes y accidental en 8 (26,7%. La mortalidad global fue alta (43,3%. El 46,9% de los pacientes mostró perdida de peso y balance nitrogenado negativo el 62,5%. Diez y siete pacientes (53,12% recibieron nutrición mixta (enteral y/o parenteral por un tiempo promedio de 24 ± 22 días. Al comparar dos grupos clasificados como quemadura del TGI Grave vs Moderada se encontró que fue significativamente diferente la mortalidad, la estancia hospitalaria y el valor final de albúmina. Conclusiones: La quemadura del tracto gastrointestinal por cáusticos es una entidad poco frecuente, sucede principalmente en jóvenes por intento de suicidio y se asocia a alta mortalidad, sobre todo en quemaduras graves. Esta agresión lleva a catabolismo importante que produce balance nitrogenado negativo y perdida de peso. Estos pacientes requieren intervención nutricional temprana que puede extenderse por varios meses.Objectives: To present here the experience of our Nutrition Therapy Team of the Hospital El Tunal, for the nutritional management of adult patients with caustic injuries to gastrointestinal tract. Materials and methods: This is

  1. Full scale solvent extraction remedial results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sevenson Extraction Technology, Inc. has completed the development of the Soil Restoration Unit (initially developed by Terra-Kleen Corporation), a mobile, totally enclosed solvent extraction treatment facility for the removal of organic contaminated media is greater by a closed loop, counter current process that recycles all solvents. The solvents used are selected for the individual site dependant upon the contaminants, such as PCB's, oil, etc. and the soil conditions. A mixture of up to fourteen non-toxic solvents can be used for complicated sites. The full scale unit has been used to treat one superfund site, the Traband Site in Tulsa, Oklahoma, and is currently treating another superfund site, the Pinette's Salvage Yard Site in Washburn, Maine. The full scale Soil Restoration Unit has also been used at a non-superfund site, as part of a TSCA Research and Development permit. The results from these sites will be discussed in brief herein, and in more detail in the full paper

  2. Solvent-Free Synthesis of New Coumarins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Redah I. Al-Bayati

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A solvent-free synthesis of five series of coumarin derivatives using microwave assistant is presented herein. The synthesized compounds are fully characterized by UV-VIS, FT-IR, and NMR spectroscopy.

  3. Solvent Extraction Developments in Southern Africa

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    The largest solvent-extraction plant in the world at the time, the Nchanga Copper Operation, was in Zambia. The first commercial process using solvent extraction for the refining of the platinum-group metals was in South Africa. More recently, the Southern African region has seen the implementation of solvent extraction for other base metals, precious metals, and specialty metals. These include the world firsts of primary production of zinc at Skorpion Zinc in Namibia and the large-scale refining of gold by Harmony Gold in South Africa. Several other flowsheets that use solvent-extraction technology are currently under commissioning, development, or feasibility study for implementation in this part of the world, including those for the recovery of copper, cobalt, nickel, tantalum, and niobium.

  4. Computer-Aided Solvent Screening for Biocatalysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abildskov, Jens; Leeuwen, M.B. van; Boeriu, C.G.;

    2013-01-01

    constrained properties related to chemical reaction equilibrium, substrate and product solubility, water solubility, boiling points, toxicity and others. Two examples are provided, covering the screening of solvents for lipase-catalyzed transesterification of octanol and inulin with vinyl laurate...

  5. [Shoe factory workers, solvents and health].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foà, Vito; Martinotti, Irene

    2012-01-01

    Exposure to organic solvents in footwear manufacturing industry came from the glues used adhering the shoe parts to each other. Benzene was the first solvent used in shoe factories until the evidence of its capacity to cause leukaemia. Then, the demonstration that exposure to n-hexane was related to distal polyneuropathy limited the use of this substance. After that, results of neurotoxicological studies conducted on workers exposed to different mixtures of organic solvents make necessary prevention measure directed to a progressive reduction of air dispersion of these chemicals. Today exposure to solvents in workplaces is regulated by health based exposure limit values that should warranty absence of central nervous system effects. One of the most important rules of occupational medicine is verify that these exposure levels are really health protective also for workers with increased susceptibility. PMID:22697025

  6. Implicit solvent methods for free energy estimation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Decherchi, Sergio; Masetti, Matteo; Vyalov, Ivan; Rocchia, Walter

    2015-02-16

    Solvation is a fundamental contribution in many biological processes and especially in molecular binding. Its estimation can be performed by means of several computational approaches. The aim of this review is to give an overview of existing theories and methods to estimate solvent effects giving a specific focus on the category of implicit solvent models and their use in Molecular Dynamics. In many of these models, the solvent is considered as a continuum homogenous medium, while the solute can be represented at the atomic detail and at different levels of theory. Despite their degree of approximation, implicit methods are still widely employed due to their trade-off between accuracy and efficiency. Their derivation is rooted in the statistical mechanics and integral equations disciplines, some of the related details being provided here. Finally, methods that combine implicit solvent models and molecular dynamics simulation, are briefly described. PMID:25193298

  7. Toluene promotes lid 2 interfacial activation of cold active solvent tolerant lipase from Pseudomonas fluorescens strain AMS8.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yaacob, Norhayati; Mohamad Ali, Mohd Shukuri; Salleh, Abu Bakar; Rahman, Raja Noor Zaliha Raja Abdul; Leow, Adam Thean Chor

    2016-07-01

    The utilization of cold active lipases in organic solvents proves an excellent approach for chiral synthesis and modification of fats and oil due to the inherent flexibility of lipases under low water conditions. In order to verify whether this lipase can function as a valuable synthetic catalyst, the mechanism concerning activation of the lid and interacting solvent residues in the presence of organic solvent must be well understood. A new alkaline cold-adapted lipase, AMS8, from Pseudomonas fluorescens was studied for its structural adaptation and flexibility prior to its exposure to non-polar, polar aprotic and protic solvents. Solvents such as ethanol, toluene, DMSO and 2-propanol showed to have good interactions with active sites. Asparagine (Asn) and tyrosine (Tyr) were key residues attracted to solvents because they could form hydrogen bonds. Unlike in other solvents, Phe-18, Tyr-236 and Tyr-318 were predicted to have aromatic-aromatic side-chain interactions with toluene. Non-polar solvent also was found to possess highest energy binding compared to polar solvents. Due to this circumstance, the interaction of toluene and AMS8 lipase was primarily based on hydrophobicity and molecular recognition. The molecular dynamic simulation showed that lid 2 (residues 148-167) was very flexible in toluene and Ca(2+). As a result, lid 2 moves away from the catalytic areas, leaving an opening for better substrate accessibility which promotes protein activation. Only a single lid (lid 2) showed the movement following interactions with toluene, although AMS8 lipase displayed double lids. The secondary conformation of AMS8 lipase that was affected by toluene observed a reduction of helical strands and increased coil structure. Overall, this work shows that cold active lipase, AMS8 exhibits distinguish interfacial activation and stability in the presence of polar and non-polar solvents. PMID:27474867

  8. Method of stripping metals from organic solvents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Todd, Terry A.; Law, Jack D.; Herbst, R. Scott; Romanovskiy, Valeriy N.; Smirnov, Igor V.; Babain, Vasily A.; Esimantovski, Vyatcheslav M.

    2009-02-24

    A new method to strip metals from organic solvents in a manner that allows for the recycle of the stripping agent. The method utilizes carbonate solutions of organic amines with complexants, in low concentrations, to strip metals from organic solvents. The method allows for the distillation and reuse of organic amines. The concentrated metal/complexant fraction from distillation is more amenable to immobilization than solutions resulting from current practice.

  9. Hydrogen recovery by novel solvent systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shinnar, R.; Ludmer, Z.; Ullmann, A.

    1991-08-01

    The objective of this work is to develop a novel method for purification of hydrogen from coal-derived synthesis gas. The study involved a search for suitable mixtures of solvents for their ability to separate hydrogen from the coal derived gas stream in significant concentration near their critical point of miscibility. The properties of solvent pairs identified were investigated in more detail to provide data necessary for economic evaluation and process development.

  10. Solvent management in a reprocessing plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Solvent management in large capacity reprocessing plant is studied to limit production of organic wastes. Chemical processing increases life time of solvent. Low pressure distillation allows the recycling of TBP and diluent at a low activity level. Besides heavy degradation products are eliminated. For the safety the flash point of distillated diluent increases slightly. Tests on an industrial scale started in 1985 and since more than 500 cubic meters were treated

  11. Hazardous Solvent Substitution Data System reference manual

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Concern for the environment, in addition to Federal regulation, mandate the replacement of hazardous solvents with safer cleaning agents. Manufacturers are working to produce these replacement solvents. As these products are developed, potential users need to be informed of their availability. To promote the use of these new products instead of traditional solvents, the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) has developed the Hazardous Solvent Substitution Data System (HSSDS). The HSSDS provides a comprehensive system of information on alternatives to hazardous solvents and related subjects, and it makes that information available to solvent users, industrial hygienists, and process engineers. The HSSDS uses TOPIC reg-sign, a text retrieval system produced by Verity, Inc., to allow a user to search for information on a particular subject. TOPIC reg-sign produces a listing of the retrieved documents and allows the use to examine the documents individually and to use the information contained in them. This reference manual does not replace the comprehensive TOPIC reg-sign user documentation (available from Verity, Inc.), or the HSSDS Tutorial (available from the INEL). The purpose of this reference manual is to provide enough instruction on TOPIC reg-sign so the user may begin accessing the data contained in the HSSDS

  12. Solvent dependent photophysical properties of dimethoxy curcumin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barik, Atanu; Indira Priyadarsini, K.

    2013-03-01

    Dimethoxy curcumin (DMC) is a methylated derivative of curcumin. In order to know the effect of ring substitution on photophysical properties of curcumin, steady state absorption and fluorescence spectra of DMC were recorded in organic solvents with different polarity and compared with those of curcumin. The absorption and fluorescence spectra of DMC, like curcumin, are strongly dependent on solvent polarity and the maxima of DMC showed red shift with increase in solvent polarity function (Δf), but the above effect is prominently observed in case of fluorescence maxima. From the dependence of Stokes' shift on solvent polarity function the difference between the excited state and ground state dipole moment was estimated as 4.9 D. Fluorescence quantum yield (ϕf) and fluorescence lifetime (τf) of DMC were also measured in different solvents at room temperature. The results indicated that with increasing solvent polarity, ϕf increased linearly, which has been accounted for the decrease in non-radiative rate by intersystem crossing (ISC) processes.

  13. Naphthalene Tetracarboxydiimide-Based n-Type Polymers with Removable Solubility via Thermally Cleavable Side Chains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hillebrandt, Sabina; Adermann, Torben; Alt, Milan; Schinke, Janusz; Glaser, Tobias; Mankel, Eric; Hernandez-Sosa, Gerardo; Jaegermann, Wolfram; Lemmer, Uli; Pucci, Annemarie; Kowalsky, Wolfgang; Müllen, Klaus; Lovrincic, Robert; Hamburger, Manuel

    2016-02-01

    Multilayer solution-processed devices in organic electronics show the tendency of intermixing of subsequently deposited layers. Here, we synthesize naphthalene tetracarboxydiimide (NDI)-based n-type semiconducting polymers with thermally cleavable side chains which upon removal render the polymer insoluble. Infrared and photoelectron spectroscopy were performed to investigate the pyrolysis process. Characterization of organic field-effect transistors provides insight into charge transport. After the pyrolysis homogeneous films could be produced which are insoluble in the primary solvent. By varying curing temperature and time we show that these process parameters govern the amount of side chains in the film and influence the device performance. PMID:26829619

  14. Pengaruh Konsentrasi Total Titratable Alkali Terhadap Persen Causticizing Efficiency Dan Persen Sulfidity Di Dalam Whiteliquor Storage Pada Proses Recausticizing Di PT. Toba Pulp Lestari, Tbk

    OpenAIRE

    Parhusip, Arrye Genap

    2014-01-01

    White liquor is a liquor obtained from the reaction of green liquor with calcium oxide (CaO), through a process that occurs in causticizer recausticizing. The content is primarily Sodium hydroxide (NaOH), Sodium sulphide (Na2S), and Sodium Carbonate (Na2CO3) bit, where the total of the amount of the compound represented by the Total Titratable Alkali. White liquor is to be used as the main ingredient in the cooking wood in digester unit. Before the white liquor, should be used to control the ...

  15. [Evaluating risk of health disorders in workers engaged into polyvinyl chloride, vinyl chloride and caustic soda production (according to data collected by polls)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'iakovich, O A

    2014-01-01

    The authors represent data of automated system for quantitative risk evaluation of main pathologic syndromes in workers engaged into polyvinyl chloride, vinyl chloride and caustic soda production. Vinyl chloride and mercury levels at the investigation time corresponded with MAC. Relationship was seen between value of arterial hypertension risk and duration of contact with both vinyl chloride and mercury. Risk values for functional disorders of liver, endocrine system and nervous system were in weak correlation with length of exposure to mercury at work. Workers exposed to mercury appeared to have lower self-estimation of health state and higher dissatisfaction with the work.

  16. Recycling of solvent used in a solvent extraction of petroleum hydrocarbons contaminated soil.

    OpenAIRE

    Wu, Guozhong; Li, XinGang; Coulon, Frederic; LI Hong; Lian, Jingyan; Sui, Hong

    2011-01-01

    The application of water washing technology for recycling an organic composite solvent consisting of hexane and pentane (4:1; TU-A solvent) was investigated for extracting total petroleum hydrocarbons (TPH) from contaminated soil. The effects of water volume, water temperature, washing time and initial concentration of solvent were evaluated using orthogonal experiments followed by single factor experiments. Our results showed that the water volume was a statistically signif...

  17. Influence of solute-solvent coordination on the orientational relaxation of ion assemblies in polar solvents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Minbiao; Hartsock, Robert W.; Sung, Zheng; Gaffney, Kelly J.

    2012-01-01

    We have investigated the rotational dynamics of lithium thiocyanate (LiNCS) dissolved in various polar solvents with time and polarization resolved vibrational spectroscopy. LiNCS forms multiple distinct ionic structures in solution that can be distinguished with the CN stretch vibrational frequency of the different ionic assemblies. By varying the solvent and the LiNCS concentration, the number and type of ionic structures present in solution can be controlled. Control of the ionic structure provides control over the volume, shape, and dipole moment of the solute, critical parameters for hydrodynamic and dielectric continuum models of friction. The use of solutes with sizes comparable to or smaller than the solvent molecules also helps amplify the sensitivity of the measurement to the short-ranged solute-solvent interaction. The measured orientational relaxation dynamics show many clear and distinct deviations from simple hydrodynamic behavior. All ionic structures in all solvents exhibit multi-exponential relaxation dynamics that do not scale with the solute volume. For Lewis base solvents such as benzonitrile, dimethyl carbonate, and ethyl acetate, the observed dynamics strongly show the effect of solute-solvent complex formation. For the weak Lewis base solvent nitromethane, we see no evidence for solute-solvent complex formation, but still see strong deviation from the predictions of simple hydrodynamic theory.

  18. The use of environmentally sustainable bio-derived solvents in solvent extraction applications-A review

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zheng Li; Kathryn H. Smith; Geoffrey W. Stevens

    2016-01-01

    Replacement of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) by greener or more environmental y sustainable solvents is becoming increasingly important due to the increasing health and environmental concerns as wel as economic pressures associated with VOCs. Solvents that are derived from biomass, namely bio-derived solvents, are a type of green solvent that have attracted intensive investigations in recent years because of their advantages over con-ventional VOCs, such as low toxicity, biodegradability and renewability. This review aims to summarize the use of bio-derived solvents in solvent extraction applications, with special emphasis given to utilization of biodiesels and terpenes. Compared with the conventional VOCs, the overall performance of these bio-derived solvents is comparable in terms of extraction yields and selectivity for natural product extraction and no difference was found for metal extraction. To date most researchers have focused on laboratory scale thermodynamics studies. Future work is required to develop and test new bio-derived solvents and understand the kinetic performance as well as solvent extraction pilot plant studies.

  19. Influence of Energy on Solvent Diffusion in Polymer/Solvent Systems

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HUHuijun; JIANGWenhua; 等

    2002-01-01

    The Vrentas-Duda free-volume theory has been extensively used to correlate or predict the solvent diffusion coefficient of a polymer/solvent system.The energy term in the free volume diffusion equation is difficult to estimate,so the energy term was usually neglected in previous predictive versions of the free volume diffusion coefficient equation.Recent studies show that the energy effect is very important even above the glass transition temperature of the system. In this paper, a new evaluation method of the energy term is proposed,that is the diffusion energy at different solvent concentrations is assumed to be a linear function of the solvent diffusion energy in pure solvents and that in polymers under the condition that the solvent in infinite dilution.By taking consideration of the influence of energy on the solvent diffustion,the prediction of solvent diffusion coefficient was preformed for three polymer/solvent systems over a wide range of concentrations and temperatures.The results show an improvement on the predictive capability of the free volume diffusion theory.

  20. Aromatic polyesters with photosensitive side chains: Synthesis, characterization and properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nechifor Marioara

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available New aromatic polyesters with photosensitive groups in their pendant chains were prepared from a diphenol carrying as substituent a cinnamoyl group extended with a flexible oxyethyleneoxy spacer and different aromatic dicarboxylic acids via direct polyesterification reaction in the presence of tosyl chloride/pyridine/dimethylformamide system as condensing agent. The resulting polyesters were characterized using Fourier-transform IR, proton and carbon nuclear magnetic resonance and ultraviolet spectroscopy, differential scanning calorimetry, thermogravimetric analysis, wide-angle X-ray diffractometry, gel permeation chromatography, viscosity measurement and solubility test. These polyarylates had moderate inherent viscosities ranging from 0.37 to 0.54 dL g-1, good solubility in polar aprotic solvents, and afforded transparent, colorless and apparently tough films by casting from their solutions. Their glass-transition temperatures ranged from 136 to 154°C. All of them did not show significant decomposition below 320°C and retained 38-47 % weight at 700°C in nitrogen atmosphere. The presence of cinnamoyl chromophore endowed these polymers with the ability to react to ultraviolet light which resulted in photodimerization between cinnamoyl side groups upon irradiation at l = 365 nm and cross-linking the polymers chains in the absence of photo-initiators or photo-sensitizers. As a consequence, the polymer films became insoluble in organic solvents.

  1. Shortest Paths With Side Sensors

    CERN Document Server

    Salaris, Paolo; Bicchi, Antonio

    2011-01-01

    We present a complete characterization of shortest paths to a goal position for a vehicle with unicycle kinematics and a limited range sensor, constantly keeping a given landmark in sight. Previous work on this subject studied the optimal paths in case of a frontal, symmetrically limited Field--Of--View (FOV). In this paper we provide a generalization to the case of arbitrary FOVs, including the case that the direction of motion is not an axis of symmetry for the FOV, and even that it is not contained in the FOV. The provided solution is of particular relevance to applications using side-scanning, such as e.g. in underwater sonar-based surveying and navigation.

  2. Extraction of Zinc from Electric Arc Furnace Dust by Alkaline Leaching Followed by Fusion of the Leaching Residue with Caustic Soda

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵由才; R.Stanforth

    2004-01-01

    Extractability of zinc from two types of electric arc furnace (EAF) dusts containing 24.8% and 16.8% of zinc respectively (denoted as Sample A and Sample B) were tested using direct alkaline leaching followed by fusion of the resulting leaching residues with caustic soda. The experimental results show that the extraction of zinc is heavily dependent on the contents of iron in the dusts. The higher iron content, the lower extraction of zinc is obtained. 53% and 38% of zinc can be extracted when both dusts were directly contacted with 5mol·L-1 NaOH solution for 42h. The remaining zinc left in the leaching residues, which supposed to be present as zinc ferrites, can be further leached when the residues were fused with caustic soda. Quantitative extraction of zinc can be obtained from the leaching residue of Sample A while only 85% from Sample B. The extractability of zinc from dusts wit hvarious contents of iron is compared. The production flowsheet for zinc from the dusts using the process proposed is discussed.

  3. The orientation of solvent-dipoles at the surface of the pure solvent

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nedermeijer-Denessen, H.J.M.; Ligny, C.L. de

    1975-01-01

    A method is described for the assessment of the preferential orientation of solvent-dipoles at the surface of the solvent from the surface potential χ and its temperature coefficient, dχ/dT. The method is based on the model of Levine et al. of the Stern inner region at the mercury-water interface in

  4. 49 CFR 238.217 - Side structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Side structure. 238.217 Section 238.217 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD ADMINISTRATION... Equipment § 238.217 Side structure. Each passenger car shall comply with the following: (a) Side posts...

  5. Chlorinated solvent replacements recycle/recovery review report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beal, M.; Hsu, D.; McAtee, R.E.; Weidner, J.R. (EG and G Idaho, Inc., Idaho Falls, ID (United States)); Berg, L.; McCandless, F.P.; Waltari, S.; Peterson, C. (Montana State Univ., Bozeman, MT (United States). Dept. of Chemical Engineering)

    1992-08-01

    This report is a literature review of waste solvents recycle/recovery methods and shows the results of solvent separations using membrane and distillation technologies. The experimental solvent recovery methods were conducted on solvent replacements for chlorinated solvents at Montana State University. The literature review covers waste solvents separation using distillation, membranes decantation, filtration, carbon adsorption, solvent extraction, and other vapor-phase separation techniques. The results of this study identify solvent distillation methods as the most common separation technique. The alternative separation methods typically supplement distillation. The study shows the need for industries to identify waste solvent disposal methods and investigate the economics of waste solvent recycling as a possible waste reduction method.

  6. Engineering an improved crystal contact across a solvent-mediated interface of human fibroblast growth factor 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A solvent-mediated crystal contact in fibroblast growth factor-1 was subjected to mutagenesis to improve crystal growth. The results indicate that improved growth was achieved upon elimination of the solvent-mediated interface and introduction of direct crystal contacts. Large-volume protein crystals are a prerequisite for neutron diffraction studies and their production represents a bottleneck in obtaining neutron structures. Many protein crystals that permit the collection of high-resolution X-ray diffraction data are inappropriate for neutron diffraction owing to a plate-type morphology that limits the crystal volume. Human fibroblast growth factor 1 crystallizes in a plate morphology that yields atomic resolution X-ray diffraction data but has insufficient volume for neutron diffraction. The thin physical dimension has been identified as corresponding to the b cell edge and the X-ray structure identified a solvent-mediated crystal contact adjacent to position Glu81 that was hypothesized to limit efficient crystal growth in this dimension. In this report, a series of mutations at this crystal contact designed to both reduce side-chain entropy and replace the solvent-mediated interface with direct side-chain contacts are reported. The results suggest that improved crystal growth is achieved upon the introduction of direct crystal contacts, while little improvement is observed with side-chain entropy-reducing mutations alone

  7. Too packed to change: side-chain packing and site-specific substitution rates in protein evolution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Laura Marcos

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available In protein evolution, due to functional and biophysical constraints, the rates of amino acid substitution differ from site to site. Among the best predictors of site-specific rates are solvent accessibility and packing density. The packing density measure that best correlates with rates is the weighted contact number (WCN, the sum of inverse square distances between a site’s Cα and the Cα of the other sites. According to a mechanistic stress model proposed recently, rates are determined by packing because mutating packed sites stresses and destabilizes the protein’s active conformation. While WCN is a measure of Cα packing, mutations replace side chains. Here, we consider whether a site’s evolutionary divergence is constrained by main-chain packing or side-chain packing. To address this issue, we extended the stress theory to model side chains explicitly. The theory predicts that rates should depend solely on side-chain contact density. We tested this prediction on a data set of structurally and functionally diverse monomeric enzymes. We compared side-chain contact density with main-chain contact density measures and with relative solvent accessibility (RSA. We found that side-chain contact density is the best predictor of rate variation among sites (it explains 39.2% of the variation. Moreover, the independent contribution of main-chain contact density measures and RSA are negligible. Thus, as predicted by the stress theory, site-specific evolutionary rates are determined by side-chain packing.

  8. Too packed to change: side-chain packing and site-specific substitution rates in protein evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcos, María Laura; Echave, Julian

    2015-01-01

    In protein evolution, due to functional and biophysical constraints, the rates of amino acid substitution differ from site to site. Among the best predictors of site-specific rates are solvent accessibility and packing density. The packing density measure that best correlates with rates is the weighted contact number (WCN), the sum of inverse square distances between a site's C α and the C α of the other sites. According to a mechanistic stress model proposed recently, rates are determined by packing because mutating packed sites stresses and destabilizes the protein's active conformation. While WCN is a measure of C α packing, mutations replace side chains. Here, we consider whether a site's evolutionary divergence is constrained by main-chain packing or side-chain packing. To address this issue, we extended the stress theory to model side chains explicitly. The theory predicts that rates should depend solely on side-chain contact density. We tested this prediction on a data set of structurally and functionally diverse monomeric enzymes. We compared side-chain contact density with main-chain contact density measures and with relative solvent accessibility (RSA). We found that side-chain contact density is the best predictor of rate variation among sites (it explains 39.2% of the variation). Moreover, the independent contribution of main-chain contact density measures and RSA are negligible. Thus, as predicted by the stress theory, site-specific evolutionary rates are determined by side-chain packing.

  9. Recommended methods for purification of solvents and tests for impurities

    CERN Document Server

    Coetzee, J F

    1982-01-01

    Recommended Methods for Purification of Solvents and Tests for Impurities is a compilation of recommended procedures for purification of solvents and tests for solvent impurities. Ten solvents are covered: acetonitrile, sulfolane, propylene carbonate, dimethyl sulfoxide, dimethylformamide, hexamethylphosphoramide, pyridine, ethylenediamine, N-methylacetamide, and N-methylpropionamide. This book is comprised of 12 chapters and opens with an introduction to general aspects of impurity effects. The rationale for the selection of solvent is explained, and the relative reactivities of solutes in di

  10. Alternative Solvents through Green Chemistry Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hintze, Paul E.; Quinn, Jacqueline

    2014-01-01

    Components in the aerospace industry must perform with accuracy and precision under extreme conditions, and surface contamination can be detrimental to the desired performance, especially in cases when the components come into contact with strong oxidizers such as liquid oxygen. Therefore, precision cleaning is an important part of a components preparation prior to utilization in aerospace applications. Current cleaning technologies employ a variety of cleaning agents, many of which are halogenated solvents that are either toxic or cause environmental damage. Thus, this project seeks to identify alternative precision cleaning solvents and technologies, including use of less harmful cleaning solvents, ultrasonic and megasonic agitation, low-pressure plasma cleaning techniques, and supercritical carbon dioxide extraction. Please review all data content found in the Public Data tab located at: https:techport.nasa.govview11697public

  11. Hazardous Solvent Substitution Data System tutorial

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This manual is the tutorial for the Hazardous Solvent Substitution Data System (HSSDS), an online, comprehensive system of information on alternatives to hazardous solvents and related subjects. The HSSDS data base contains product information, material safety data sheets, toxicity reports, usage reports, biodegradable data, product chemical element lists, and background information on solvents. HSSDS use TOPIC reg-sign to search for information based on a query defined by the user. TOPIC provides a full text retrieval of unstructured source documents. In this tutorial, a series of lessons is provided that guides the user through basic steps common to most queries performed with HSSDS. Instructions are provided for both window-based and character-based applications

  12. Thermal Characterization of Nanofluids with Different Solvents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiménez-Pérez, J. L.; Cruz-Orea, A.; Sánchez-Ramírez, J. F.; Sánchez-Sinencio, F.; Martínez-Pérez, L.; López Muñoz, G. A.

    2009-08-01

    Thermal lens spectrometry (TLS) and photopyroelectric (PPE) techniques were used to obtain the thermal diffusivity and effusivity of different nanofluid samples. The thermal effusivity of these samples was obtained by the PPE technique in a front detection configuration. In the case of the determination of the thermal diffusivity, TLS was used for the different solvents in the presence of gold nanoparticles (nanofluids). In this technique, an Ar+ laser and intensity stabilized He-Ne laser were used as the heating source and probe beam, respectively. The experimental results showed that thermal diffusivity values of the studied solvents (water, ethanol, and ethylene glycol) were enhanced by the presence of gold nanoparticles. Comparisons with literature values show good agreement with pure solvents. These techniques are applicable for all kind of liquid samples, including semitransparent ones.

  13. 300 Area solvent evaporator closure plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This document describes activities for the closure of a dangerous waste treatment tank facility, owned and operated by the US Department of Energy-Richland Operations Office (DOE-RL) and co-operated by the Westinghouse Hanford Company (Westinghouse Hanford). This tank treatment facility is the 300 Area Solvent Evaporator (300 ASE), which was located in the 300 Area of the Hanford Site from 1975 to 1986, and was managed for the DOE-RL by UNC Nuclear Industries, Incorporated. The 300 ASE evaporator unit was a modified load lugger (dumpster) in which solvent wastes were evaporated, and the adjacent 333 East Concrete Pad, where 55-gallon barrels of waste solvents were temporarily stored while awaiting liquid transfers into the evaporator. 26 refs., 14 figs., 6 tabs

  14. A fully operational pilot plant for eliminating radioactive oils mixed with chlorinated solvents - 59044

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Disposal of organic liquid waste has become an increasing issue for many nuclear sites. Existing disposal solutions such as incineration or super critical water techniques are not compatible with wastes containing chlorinated solvents or fluorine owing to corrosion problems. As an example several hundred cubic meters of lubricating oils mixed with trichloroethylene (TCE) or perchloroethylene (PCE) are stockpiled on several French nuclear sites. For several years Dewdrops has been developing an original combination of mineralization processes for waste oils and solvents particularly well suited to the nuclear field. The patented technology relies on the alternation of chemical and biological oxidation mechanisms. The oxidized organic material predominately forms carbon dioxide, water and inorganic salts. This paper details the procedure and the results obtained for a particular case at the Tricastin nuclear site of Areva NC (South France). The organic waste used in this study was a 85/15 v/v ratio mix of lubricating oil and TCE. The pilot plant build upon the technology has a daily treatment capacity of approximately 10 liters. In the first step the TCE is mineralized by the photo Fenton reaction. Using hydrogen peroxide with an ultraviolet regenerated iron catalyst, TCE is transformed to carbon dioxide, water and hydrochloric acid. After neutralizing with caustic soda, the next step is a multi-stage biodegradation process to eliminate the remaining lubricating oil. Carefully selected microorganisms use the organic waste as an energy source for their metabolism. During oil biodegradation over 75% of the carbon is released as carbon dioxide while the remaining is incorporated into the biomass. The aqueous phase is continuously separated from the biomass using cross flow filters. The output aqueous phase is treated with ozone and ultraviolet light to eliminate the remaining organic compounds. The final effluent obtained is in conformance with European water standards

  15. The Lighter Side of Gravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narlikar, Jayant Vishnu

    1996-10-01

    From the drop of an apple to the stately dance of the galaxies, gravity is omnipresent in the Cosmos. Even with its high profile, gravity is the most enigmatic of all the known basic forces in nature. The Lighter Side of Gravity presents a beautifully clear and completely nontechnical introduction to the phenomenon of this force in all its manifestations. Astrophysicist Jayant Narlikar begins with an historical background to the discovery of the law of gravitation by Isaac Newton in the seventeenth century. Using familiar analogies, interesting anecdotes, and numerous illustrations to get across subtle effects and difficult points to readers, he goes on to describe the general theory of relativity and some of its strange and unfamiliar ideas such as curved spacetime, the bending of light, and black holes. Since first publication in 1982 (W.H. Freeman), Dr. Narlikar has brought his book completely up to date and expanded it to include the discovery of gigantic gravitational lenses in space, the findings of the Cosmic Background Explorer (COBE) satellite, the detection of dark matter in galaxies, the investigation of the very early Universe, and other new ideas in cosmology. This lucid and stimulating book presents a clear approach to the intriguing phenomenon of gravity for everyone who has ever felt caught in its grip. Jayant Narlikar is the winner of many astronomical prizes and the author of Introduction to Cosmology (Cambridge University Press, 1993).

  16. Solvent-resistant microporous polymide membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Warren K.; McCray, Scott B.; Friesen, Dwayne T.

    1998-01-01

    An asymmetric microporous membrane with exceptional solvent resistance and highly desirable permeability is disclosed. The membrane is made by a solution-casting or solution-spinning process from a copolyamic acid comprising the condensation reaction product in a solvent of at least three reactants selected from certain diamines and dianhydrides and post-treated to imidize and in some cases cross-link the copolyamic acid. The membrane is useful as an uncoated membrane for ultrafiltration, microfiltration, and membrane contactor applications, or may be used as a support for a permselective coating to form a composite membrane useful in gas separations, reverse osmosis, nanofiltration, pervaporation, or vapor permeation.

  17. Thermal extraction of bamboo with various solvents

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Junghee

    2010-01-01

    This thesis is to describe the potential of improvement by liquefaction with various solvents in pyrolysis in terms of conversion of bamboo to gas and liquid and quality of the bio-oils and residues produced. Fluidised sand bath and pressure gauge reactor were used for pyrolysis. The reactor was coupled with bamboo and a solvent and after 1 hour of pyrolysis and liquefaction at 410°C, the gas produced was collected in gas bag. To extract compounds uniformly from the chemically decomposed...

  18. Distributed video coding with multiple side information

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Huang, Xin; Brites, C.; Ascenso, J.;

    2009-01-01

    Distributed Video Coding (DVC) is a new video coding paradigm which mainly exploits the source statistics at the decoder based on the availability of some decoder side information. The quality of the side information has a major impact on the DVC rate-distortion (RD) performance in the same way...... the quality of the predictions had a major impact in predictive video coding. In this paper, a DVC solution exploiting multiple side information is proposed; the multiple side information is generated by frame interpolation and frame extrapolation targeting to improve the side information of a single...... estimation mode. Compared with the best available single side information solutions, the proposed DVC solution with multiple side information robustly improves the RD performance for the set of test sequences....

  19. Car Side Structure Crashworthiness in Pole and Moving Deformable Barrier Side Impacts

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Dazhi; DONG Guang; ZHANG Jinhuan; HUANG Shilin

    2006-01-01

    To clearly understand passenger car structure's crashworthiness in typical side impacts of pole and moving deformable barrier (MDB) impact modes, which could assist the establishment of Chinese vehicle side impact safety regulations, a full midsized car finite element model, calibrated by pole side impact test, was built and the pole side impact according to European New Car Assessment Program (EuroNCAP) and the MDB side impact according to ECE R95 regulations were simulated with LS-DYNA. The accelerations and the structure deformations from simulations were compared. It can be concluded that the pole side impact focuses primarily on side structure crashworthiness as a result of large intrusions, while the MDB side impact focuses primarily on full side structure crashworthiness. Accordingly, occupant protection strategies focus on different aspects to improve side impact safety. In the pole side impact the objective is to maintain the passenger compartment and protect the passenger's head from impacting the pole, while in the MDB side impact the objective is to protect the full human body. In the design of the car side structures, at least these two tests should be considered for assessing their side impact crashworthiness. Conducting these two side impact tests as certified tests provides insights into car safety during side impacts.

  20. Right-side and left-side colon cancer follow different pathways to relapse

    OpenAIRE

    Bauer, Kerry M.; Hummon, Amanda B.; Buechler, Steven

    2011-01-01

    There is growing evidence that cancer of the ascending (right-side) colon is different from cancer of the descending (left-side) colon at the molecular level. Using microarray data from 102 right-side colon carcinomas and 95 left-side colon carcinomas we show that different pathways dominate progression to relapse in right-side and left-side colon cancer. Right-side tumors at a high risk for relapse exhibit elevated expression of cell cycle control genes and elevated Wnt signaling. On the oth...

  1. Entropy and enthalpy of interaction between amino acid side chains in nanopores

    CERN Document Server

    Vaitheeswaran, S

    2014-01-01

    Understanding the stabilities of proteins in nanopores requires a quantitative description of confinement induced interactions between amino acid side chains. We use molecular dynamics simulations to study the nature of interactions between the side chain pairs ALA-PHE, SER-ASN and LYS-GLU in bulk water and in water-filled nanopores. The temperature dependence of the bulk solvent potentials of mean force and the interaction free energies in cylindrical and spherical nanopores is used to identify the corresponding entropic and enthalpic components. The entropically stabilized hydrophobic interaction between ALA and PHE in bulk water is enthalpically dominated upon confinement depending on the relative orientations between the side chains. In the case of SER-ASN, hydrogen bonded configurations that are similar in bulk water are thermodynamically distinct in a cylindrical pore, thus making rotamer distributions different from those in the bulk. Remarkably, salt bridge formation between LYS-GLU is stabilized by e...

  2. Self-assembling dipeptides: conformational sampling in solvent-free coarse-grained simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villa, Alessandra; Peter, Christine; van der Vegt, Nico F A

    2009-03-28

    We discuss the development of a coarse-grained (CG) model for molecular dynamics (MD) simulation of a hydrophobic dipeptide, diphenylalanine, in aqueous solution. The peptide backbone is described with two CG beads per amino acid, the side groups and charged end groups are each described with one CG bead. In the derivation of interaction functions between CG beads we follow a bottom-up strategy where we devise potentials such that the resulting CG simulation reproduces the conformational sampling and the intermolecular interactions observed in an atomistic simulation of the same peptide. In the CG model, conformational flexibility of the peptide is accounted for through a set of intra-molecular (bonded) potentials. The approach followed to obtain the bonded potentials is discussed in detail. The CG potentials for nonbonded interactions are based on potentials of mean force obtained by atomistic simulations in aqueous solution. Following this approach, solvent mediation effects are included in the effective bead-bead nonbonded interactions and computationally very efficient (solvent-free) simulations of self-assembly processes can be performed. We show that the conformational properties of the all-atom dipeptide in explicit solvent can be accurately reproduced with the CG model. Moreover, preliminary simulations of peptide self-assembly performed with the CG model illustrate good agreement with results obtained from all-atom, explicit solvent simulations. PMID:19280018

  3. Organic solvent nanofiltration: prospects and application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The key lines of research in a new field of the membrane science and technology, viz., organic solvent nanofiltration, are considered. The prospects for its use in chemical, petrochemical and food industries are discussed. Attention is focused on membranes developed for this method.

  4. Organic solvent nanofiltration: prospects and application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Volkov, A V; Korneeva, G A; Tereshchenko, Gennadii F [A. V. Topchiev Institute of Petrochemical Synthesis, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2008-11-30

    The key lines of research in a new field of the membrane science and technology, viz., organic solvent nanofiltration, are considered. The prospects for its use in chemical, petrochemical and food industries are discussed. Attention is focused on membranes developed for this method.

  5. Mixed Solvent Reactive Recrystallization of Sodium Carbonate

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gaertner, R.S.

    2005-01-01

    Investigation of the reactive recrystallization of trona (sodium sesquicarbonate) and sodium bicarbonate to sodium carbonate (soda) in a mixed solvent led to the design of several alternative, less energy consumptive, economically very attractive process routes for the production of soda from all pr

  6. Ferrier reaction in a deep eutectic solvent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rokade, Sunil M; Bhate, Prakash M

    2015-10-13

    A mild and efficient synthesis of 2,3-unsaturated sugar derivatives has been achieved by conducting the Ferrier reaction in a deep eutectic solvent (DES). A wide range of alcohols including primary, secondary, benzylic, and sugar-derived primary alcohols can be used. Advantages include good yields, shorter reaction times and recyclability of DES. PMID:26279523

  7. Structure and Solvent Properties of Microemulsions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katz, Civia A.; Calzola, Zachary J.; Mbindyo, Jeremiah K. N.

    2008-01-01

    A microscale laboratory experiment to investigate the formation and utility of microemulsions is described. Microemulsions are technologically important fluids that can reduce the use of toxic organic solvents. In the experiment, students prepare a microemulsion and compare the solubility of sudan III dye in the microemulsion and in dodecane. They…

  8. Solvent-Free Synthesis of Chalcones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palleros, Daniel R.

    2004-01-01

    The synthesis of twenty different chalcones in the absence of solvent is presented. The results indicated that out of the twenty different chalcones investigated seventeen can be obtained in a matter of minutes by mixing the corresponding benzaldehyde and acetophenone in the presence of solid NaOH in a mortar with pestle.

  9. Effect of solvent structure on election reactivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The reactivity of solvated electrons (es-) with efficient (nitrobenzene, acetone) and inefficient (phenol, toluene) scavengers is affected greatly by the solvent composition in 2-propanol/water mixed solvents. 2-Propanol is the only secondary alcohol that is completely miscible with water. The variation of the nitrobenzene rate constant k2 with solvent composition displays four viscosity zones, as in primary and tertiary alcohol/water mixtures. In zone (c), where the Stokes-Smoluchowski equation applies, the nitrobenzene k2 values in the secondary alcohol/water mixtures are situated between those in the primary and tertiary alcohols, due to the relative values of the dielectric permittivity ε. The charge-dipole attraction energy varies at ε-1. The two water-rich zones (c) and (d) are characterized by a large change of viscosity η and a small change in es- solvation energy (trap depth) Er; here k2 for all the scavengers correlates with the inverse of the viscosity. In the two alcohol-rich zones (a) and (b) the change of η is small but that of Er is large; here k2 of inefficient scavengers correlates with the inverse of Er, due to the difficulty of electron transfer out of deeper traps. Activation energies E2 and entropies ΔS2(double dagger) also show composition zone behaviour. The value of ΔS2(double dagger) is more negative for less efficient scavengers; E2 varies less and does not correlate with reactivity of Er. Electron transfer from solvent to inefficient scavenger is driven by solvent rearrangement around the reaction center, reflected in ΔS2(double dagger)

  10. Solvent density mode instability in non-polar solutions

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Susmita Kar; Ranjit Biswas; J Chakrabarti

    2008-08-01

    We analyse the origin of the multiple long time scales associated with the long time decay observed in non-polar solvation dynamics by linear stability analysis of solvent density modes where the effects of compressibility and solvent structure are systematically incorporated. The coupling of the solute–solvent interactions at both ground and excited states of the solute with the compressibility and solvent structure is found to have important effects on the time scales. The present theory suggests that the relatively longer time constant is controlled by the solvent compressibility, while the solvent structure at the nearest-neighbour length scale dominates the shorter time constant.

  11. Interference Channels with Correlated Receiver Side Information

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Nan; Gunduz, Deniz; Goldsmith, Andrea J.; Poor, H. Vincent

    2008-01-01

    The problem of joint source-channel coding in transmitting independent sources over interference channels with correlated receiver side information is studied. When each receiver has side information correlated with its own desired source, it is shown that source-channel code separation is optimal. When each receiver has side information correlated with the interfering source, sufficient conditions for reliable transmission are provided based on a joint source-channel coding scheme using the ...

  12. Constrained Source Coding with Side Information

    OpenAIRE

    Lapidoth, Amos; Malär, Andreas; Wigger, Michèle

    2013-01-01

    The source-coding problem with side information at the decoder is studied subject to a constraint that the encoder---to whom the side information is unavailable---be able to compute the decoder's reconstruction sequence to within some distortion. For discrete memoryless sources and finite single-letter distortion measures, an expression is given for the minimal description rate as a function of the joint law of the source and side information and of the allowed distortions at the encoder and ...

  13. Discriminatory Lossy Source Coding: Side Information Privacy

    OpenAIRE

    Tandon, Ravi; Sankar, Lalitha; Poor, H. Vincent

    2011-01-01

    A lossy source coding problem is studied in which a source encoder communicates with two decoders, one with and one without correlated side information with an additional constraint on the privacy of the side information at the uninformed decoder. Two cases of this problem arise depending on the availability of the side information at the encoder. The set of all feasible rate-distortion-equivocation tuples are characterized for both cases. The difference between the informed and uninformed ca...

  14. Nonparametric Analysis of Two-Sided Markets

    OpenAIRE

    Senay Sokullu

    2012-01-01

    This paper considers an empirical semiparametric model for two-sided markets. Contrary to existing empirical literature on two-sided markets, we do not rely on linear network effects. Instead, network effects and probability distribution functions of net benefits of two sides are specified nonparametrically. The demand functions and the network effect functions of readers and advertisers are estimated by nonparametric IV estimation using a data set from German magazine industry. The ill-posed...

  15. Stability Improvement of the Huadian Shale Diesel by Composite Solvent%复合溶剂改善桦甸页岩柴油安定性的研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    侯丹丹; 李丹东; 石薇薇; 张国伟

    2011-01-01

    Solvent extraction showed its high efficiency for separation of nitrogenous compounds from Huadian shale diesel, especially for the basic nitrogenous compounds. The results showed that the colourity of HuaDian shale diesel oil decreased with using solvent A-inorganic acid composite solvent and the ratio of solvent to oil was 0.5. And the stability was improved greatly. And after the caustic wash, most of the nitrogen compounds and acidic components were removed which had effects on the stability, thereby the colourity of the refined diesel oil was improved. The yield of the refined diesel oil was 91.55%, the colourity was 16, and the solvent A could be recovered by distillation.%采用萃取分离方法从桦甸页岩柴油中分离氮化物特别是碱洗氮化物具有高效性,实验结果表明,用溶剂A-无机酸的复合试剂以剂油比为0.5时精制桦甸页岩柴油,明显的降低了桦甸页岩柴油的色度,与此同时大大提高了桦甸页岩柴油的安定性,将桦甸页岩柴油经复合溶剂处理后再经碱洗,可有效的除去影响安定性的酸性组分和氮化物,使油品的颜色得到明显的改善,油品的收率可达91.55%,油品色度降低到16,溶剂A经蒸馏回收可再利用.

  16. Physiological and skill demands of 'on-side' and 'off-side' games.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabbett, Tim J; Jenkins, David G; Abernethy, Bruce

    2010-11-01

    This study investigated the physiological and skill demands of 'on-side' and 'off-side' games in elite rugby league players. Sixteen male rugby league players participated in 'on-side' and 'off-side' games. Both small-sided games were played in a 40- × 40-m playing area. The 'off-side' game permitted players to have 3 'plays' while in possession of the ball. Players were permitted to pass backward or forward (to an 'off-side' player). The 'on-side' game also permitted players to have 3 'plays' while in possession of the ball. However, players were only permitted to pass backward to players in an 'on-side' position. Heart rate and movement patterns (via global positioning system) were recorded continuously throughout both games. Data were collected on the distance covered, number of high-acceleration and velocity efforts, and recovery between efforts. Video footage was also taken to track the performance of the players. Post hoc inspection of the footage was undertaken to count the number of possessions and the number and quality of disposals. In comparison to 'on-side' games, 'off-side' games had a greater number of involvements ("touches"), passes, and effective passes. However, the cognitive demands of 'on-side' games were greater than 'off-side' games. 'Off-side' games resulted in a greater total distance covered, greater distance covered in mild and moderate accelerations, and greater distance covered in low, moderate, and high-velocity efforts. There were also a greater number of short duration recovery periods between efforts in 'off-side' games. The results of this study demonstrate that 'off-side' games provide greater physiological and skill demands than 'on-side' games. 'Off-side' games may provide a practical alternative to 'on-side' games for the development of skill and fitness in elite rugby league players.

  17. Source Coding With Encoder Side Information

    OpenAIRE

    Martinian, Emin; Wornell, Gregory W.; Zamir, Ram

    2004-01-01

    We introduce the idea of distortion side information, which does not directly depend on the source but instead affects the distortion measure. We show that such distortion side information is not only useful at the encoder, but that under certain conditions, knowing it at only the encoder is as good as knowing it at both encoder and decoder, and knowing it at only the decoder is useless. Thus distortion side information is a natural complement to the signal side information studied by Wyner a...

  18. Sexual side effects induced by psychotropic drugs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Ellids

    2002-01-01

    The majority of psychotropic drugs entail sexual side effects. The sexual side effects may reduce quality of life and may give rise to non-compliance. For example, 30-60 per cent of patients treated with antidepressants are known to develop a sexual dysfunction. However, some psychotropic drugs...... with no or very few sexual side effects have begun to emerge. The treatment of sexual side effects induced by psychotropic drugs may consist of: modified sexual habits, reduction in dosage, switching to another medication, possibly in combination with different psychotropic agents, other varieties...

  19. Solvent/Non-Solvent Sintering: A Novel Route to Create Porous Microsphere Scaffolds For Tissue Regeneration

    OpenAIRE

    Justin L Brown; Nair, Lakshmi S.; Laurencin, Cato T.

    2008-01-01

    Solvent/non-solvent sintering creates porous polymeric microsphere scaffolds suitable for tissue engineering purposes with control over the resulting porosity, average pore diameter and mechanical properties. Five different biodegradable biocompatible polyphosphazenes exhibiting glass transition temperatures from −8°C to 41oC and poly(lactide-co-glycolide), (PLAGA) a degradable polymer used in a number of biomedical settings, were examined to study the versatility of the process and benchmark...

  20. PEP Run Report for Integrated Test A, Caustic Leaching in UFP-VSL-T01A, Oxidative Leaching in UFP-VSL-T02A

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guzman-Leong, Consuelo E.; Bredt, Ofelia P.; Burns, Carolyn A.; Daniel, Richard C.; Su, Yin-Fong; Geeting, John GH; Golovich, Elizabeth C.; Josephson, Gary B.; Kurath, Dean E.; Sevigny, Gary J.; Smith, Dennese M.; Valdez, Patrick LJ; Yokuda, Satoru T.; Young, Joan K.

    2009-12-04

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) was tasked by Bechtel National Inc. (BNI) on the River Protection Project-Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (RPP-WTP) project to perform research and development activities to resolve technical issues identified for the Pretreatment Facility (PTF). The Pretreatment Engineering Platform (PEP) was designed and constructed and operated as part of a plan to respond to issue M12, “Undemonstrated Leaching Processes.”(a) The PEP, located in the Process Engineering Laboratory-West (PDLW) located in Richland, Washington, is a 1/4.5-scale test platform designed to simulate the WTP pretreatment caustic leaching, oxidative leaching, ultrafiltration solids concentration, and slurry washing processes. The PEP replicates the WTP leaching processes using prototypic equipment and control strategies. The PEP also includes non-prototypic ancillary equipment to support the core processing.

  1. Pretreatment Engineering Platform (PEP) Integrated Test B Run Report--Caustic and Oxidative Leaching in UFP-VSL-T02A

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geeting, John GH; Bredt, Ofelia P.; Burns, Carolyn A.; Golovich, Elizabeth C.; Guzman-Leong, Consuelo E.; Josephson, Gary B.; Kurath, Dean E.; Sevigny, Gary J.; Aaberg, Rosanne L.

    2009-12-10

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) has been tasked by Bechtel National Inc. (BNI) on the River Protection Project-Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (RPP-WTP) project to perform research and development activities to resolve technical issues identified for the Pretreatment Facility (PTF). The Pretreatment Engineering Platform (PEP) was designed, constructed and operated as part of a plan to respond to issue M12, “Undemonstrated Leaching Processes” of the External Flowsheet Review Team (EFRT) issue response plan.( ) The PEP is a 1/4.5-scale test platform designed to simulate the WTP pretreatment caustic leaching, oxidative leaching, ultrafiltration solids concentration, and slurry washing processes. The PEP replicates the WTP leaching processes using prototypic equipment and control strategies. The PEP also includes non-prototypic ancillary equipment to support the core processing.

  2. Determination of sodium chloride in ion - exchange membrane caustic soda%离子膜碱中氯化钠的测定

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    宋昕; 孙士娟; 邱雪松

    2000-01-01

    The determination of sodium chloride in ion- exchange membrane caustic soda by potentiometry and by spectrophotometry are introduced, and the results obtained by the above two methods are compared. It is concluded that potentiometry is suitable to macro analysis with characteristics of simple operation, rapid analysis and accurate measurement.%介绍了用电位滴定法和分光光度法测定离子膜碱中氯化钠含量的方法,并对这2种方法的测试结果进行了比较。电位滴定法适用于常量分析,具有操作简便、分析速度快、测量结果准确等特点。

  3. Field demonstration of in situ treatment of buried low-level radioactive solid waste with caustic soda and soda ash to immobilize 90Sr

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A low-level radioactive solid waste disposal trench was injected on four occasions with solutions of caustic soda, soda ash, caustic soda, and lime/soda ash, respectively. Because investigations had indicated that 90Sr could be coprecipitated with soil calcium carbonate by treatment with soda ash, this demonstration was undertaken as a test of its technical feasibility. After concentrations of 90Sr and water hardness decreased within the intratrench monitoring wells; one well at the foot of the trench decreased from over 100 to a persistent level of less than 10 kBq of 90Sr per liter. Recharge of 90Sr from the trench to a sump immediately below was reduced by about 90%. Water hardness and 90Sr concentrations were strongly correlated through time within each monitoring well, indicating that 90Sr behaved as a tracer for soil calcium and magnesium. The disappearance of 90Sr from the trench water, therefore, was an in situ water softening. Soil samples retrieved from the trench indicated that as much as 98% of the total 90Sr was present as a coprecipitate with calcium carbonate. The hydrologic characterization of this trench indicated an average void space of 41% and an average trench-wall hydraulic conductivity of 3.4 x 10-7 m/s. Sampling of the trench's discharge contamination plume indicated that it had resulted from a combination of subsurface seepage and bathtub overflow during infrequent periods of intense precipitation. A generic assessment of soda ash treatment indicated that treatment would be most effective for soils of high cation exchange capacity with either low ( 80%) basic cation saturation of that cation exchange capacity

  4. Fístula esôfago-traqueal após ingestão cáustica Tracheoesophageal fistula after caustic ingestion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo Crema

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available As fístulas esôfago-traqueais são incomuns e apresentam diversas etiologias, entre elas, a queimadura química esofágica devida à ingestão cáustica. Relatamos o caso de um paciente de 27 anos com história de ingestão cáustica havia catorze dias, com dor retroesternal em queimação, fraqueza, tosse com escarro purulento e dispnéia associada à rouquidão no último dia. A endoscopia digestiva alta e a broncofibroscopia revelaram fístula esôfago-traqueal. O tratamento consistiu no suporte clínico, drenagem torácica bilateral, exclusão do transito esofágico com esofagostomia cervical terminal e gastrostomia. Houve cicatrização espontânea da fístula esôfago traqueal em seis semanas. Posteriormente, realizou-se a reconstrução do trânsito alimentar através de faringocoloplastia. A evolução pós-operatória foi satisfatória.Tracheoesophageal fistulas are uncommon and present diverse etiologies, among which is burning of the esophagus due to caustic ingestion. Herein, we report the case of a 27-year-old male patient having ingested a caustic substance 14 days prior and presenting burning retrosternal pain, weakness, productive cough with purulent sputum and dyspnea accompanied by hoarseness for the preceding 24 h. Endoscopy of the upper digestive tract revealed a tracheoesophageal fistula. Treatment consisted of cervical exclusion of the esophageal transit, together with gastrostomy. Subsequently, the nutrient transit was reconstructed through pharyngocoloplasty. The postoperative evolution was favorable.

  5. 离子膜烧碱装置设计浅析%Design of ion-exchange membrane caustic soda production plants

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    韩士壁

    2015-01-01

    Ion-exchange membrane caustic soda production has replaced the conventional diaphragm and mercury cel method for its time and energy saving and high yield, while it asks for re-designing the configuration of equipment and pipelines of old plants. The location and safety distance need to be rearranged according to the rules of Alkali industry and field situation as wel . The whole properties of ingredients used are also taken into consideration in this paper to make a perfect design to keep the Ion-exchange membrane caustic soda production plants operating in good condition for long term.%烧碱工业大多采用隔膜法和水银法制碱,但是这两种方法耗时、耗能且收率较低,目前已逐渐被离子膜法取代,对原有装置的设备布置和管道布置因此需要进行全新的设计。此外,还需要根据烧碱工业的规范要求及实际场地状况对装置相对位置及安全距离进行合理安排。设计中还要将所用的化学制剂的所有性质考虑在内,进行较为完善的综合性设计,以保证离子膜法烧碱装置能够安全稳定、长期有效地运转。

  6. Selection and evaluation of alternative solvents for caprolactam extraction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Delden, van Mathijs L.; Kuipers, Norbert J.M.; Haan, de André B.

    2006-01-01

    Because of the strict legislation for currently applied solvents in the industrial extraction of caprolactam, being benzene, toluene and chlorinated hydrocarbons, a need exists for alternative, environmentally benign solvents. An experimental screening procedure consisting of several steps was used

  7. Method for Predicting Solubilities of Solids in Mixed Solvents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ellegaard, Martin Dela; Abildskov, Jens; O'Connell, J. P.

    2009-01-01

    A method is presented for predicting solubilities of solid solutes in mixed solvents, based on excess Henry's law constants. The basis is statistical mechanical fluctuation solution theory for composition derivatives of solute/solvent infinite dilution activity coefficients. Suitable approximations...

  8. Organic Solvent Tropical Report [SEC 1 and 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    COWLEY, W.L.

    2000-06-21

    This report provides the basis for closing the organic solvent safety issue. Sufficient information is presented to conclude that risk posed by an unmitigated organic solvent fire is within risk evaluation guidelines.

  9. Effect of solvents on propylene epoxidation over TS-1 catalyst

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yulong WU; Qingshan LIU; Xueli SU; Zhentao MI

    2008-01-01

    Solvents have an important effect on the epoxidation of propylene catalyzed by TS-1. The experimental results show that, in different solvents, the catalytic activity of epoxidation is in the following order: methanol > 2-propanol > 2-butanol > acetoni-trile > acetone > tetrahydrofuran. Based on the reaction mechanism, the effects of solvents on the epoxidation were studied from eight aspects, which included the electronic effect, the steric effect, the polarity of solvent, the effect of solvent on sorption and diffusion of reactant, the oxidation of alcohol, the etherification of PO, the deactivation of TS-1 and the solubility of propylene in the solvents. The electronic effect, steric effect and the polarity of solvent were considered to be the main aspects. This work may provide theoretical guidance for choosing solvents for these kinds of reactions and also may serve as basis for further industrialization.

  10. Occupational exposure to chlorinated and petroleum solvents and mycosis fungoides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Morales-Suárez-Varela, Maria M; Olsen, Jørn; Villeneuve, Sara;

    2013-01-01

    To evaluate the potential association between occupational exposure to chlorinated and petroleum solvents and mycosis fungoides (MF).......To evaluate the potential association between occupational exposure to chlorinated and petroleum solvents and mycosis fungoides (MF)....

  11. A solvent/non-solvent system for achieving solution-processed multilayer organic light-emitting devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, Yue; Wu, Zhaoxin, E-mail: zhaoxinwu@mail.xjtu.edu.cn; He, Lin; Jiao, Bo; Hou, Xun

    2015-08-31

    We developed a solvent/non-solvent system to fabricate the multilayer organic light-emitting devices (OLEDs) based on poly(N-vinylcarbazole) (PVK) by solution-process. This solvent system consists of both the solvent and non-solvent of PVK, in which fluorescent small molecules could be fully dissolved and directly spin-coated on top of the PVK layer; it could effectively avoid the redissolution of PVK during the spin-coating process of small molecules emitting layer. In the further investigation of this system, we also demonstrated the three-component solvent system, and found out that the third component, a less volatile solvent of PVK, was crucial for preparing a smoother interface between PVK and emitting layer. Compared with OLEDs through the vacuum deposition, the devices fabricated by solution-process from the solvent/non-solvent system showed comparable efficiency, which indicate that the solvent/non-solvent system can be used as an alternative process to prepare the polymer and small molecule multilayer devices through all-solution-process. - Highlights: • We fabricate the multilayer OLEDs by solution-process using a novel system. • We develop a solvent/non-solvent system of polymer (PVK) to avoid redissolution. • Small molecules could be fully dissolved and directly spin-coated on PVK layer. • The devices fabricated by the system and vacuum deposition show comparable efficiency.

  12. A solvent/non-solvent system for achieving solution-processed multilayer organic light-emitting devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We developed a solvent/non-solvent system to fabricate the multilayer organic light-emitting devices (OLEDs) based on poly(N-vinylcarbazole) (PVK) by solution-process. This solvent system consists of both the solvent and non-solvent of PVK, in which fluorescent small molecules could be fully dissolved and directly spin-coated on top of the PVK layer; it could effectively avoid the redissolution of PVK during the spin-coating process of small molecules emitting layer. In the further investigation of this system, we also demonstrated the three-component solvent system, and found out that the third component, a less volatile solvent of PVK, was crucial for preparing a smoother interface between PVK and emitting layer. Compared with OLEDs through the vacuum deposition, the devices fabricated by solution-process from the solvent/non-solvent system showed comparable efficiency, which indicate that the solvent/non-solvent system can be used as an alternative process to prepare the polymer and small molecule multilayer devices through all-solution-process. - Highlights: • We fabricate the multilayer OLEDs by solution-process using a novel system. • We develop a solvent/non-solvent system of polymer (PVK) to avoid redissolution. • Small molecules could be fully dissolved and directly spin-coated on PVK layer. • The devices fabricated by the system and vacuum deposition show comparable efficiency

  13. Re-Refining of Waste Lubricating Oil by Solvent Extraction

    OpenAIRE

    Hassan Ali Durrani; Muhammed Ibrahim Panhwar; Rafique Akthar Kazi

    2011-01-01

    Re-refining of waste lubricating oil by solvent extraction is one of the potential techniques. The advantages of solvent extraction technique practically offers from environmental and economic points of view have received due attention. In this paper selection of composite solvent and technique to upgrade the used lubricant oil into base oil has been made. The composite solvent 2-propanol, 1-butanol and butanone have two alcohols that make a binary system reasonably effective. ...

  14. Method for Predicting Solubilities of Solids in Mixed Solvents

    OpenAIRE

    Ellegaard, Martin Dela; Abildskov, Jens; O'Connell, J P

    2009-01-01

    A method is presented for predicting solubilities of solid solutes in mixed solvents, based on excess Henry's law constants. The basis is statistical mechanical fluctuation solution theory for composition derivatives of solute/solvent infinite dilution activity coefficients. Suitable approximations are made for a single parameter characterizing solute/solvent interactions. Comparisons with available data show that the method is successful in describing a variety of observed mixed solvent solu...

  15. Identifying Cross-Sided Liquidity Externalities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.A. Skjeltorp (Johannes); E. Sojli (Elvira); W.W. Tham (Wing Wah)

    2013-01-01

    markdownabstract__Abstract__ We study the relevance of the cross-sided externality between liquidity makers and takers from the two-sided market perspective. We use exogenous changes in the make/take fee structure, minimum tick-size and technological shocks for liquidity takers and makers, as exper

  16. Classical data compression with quantum side information

    OpenAIRE

    Devetak, I.; Winter, A.

    2002-01-01

    The problem of classical data compression when the decoder has quantum side information at his disposal is considered. This is a quantum generalization of the classical Slepian-Wolf theorem. The optimal compression rate is found to be reduced from the Shannon entropy of the source by the Holevo information between the source and side information.

  17. Metabolic Network Prediction of Drug Side Effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaked, Itay; Oberhardt, Matthew A; Atias, Nir; Sharan, Roded; Ruppin, Eytan

    2016-03-23

    Drug side effects levy a massive cost on society through drug failures, morbidity, and mortality cases every year, and their early detection is critically important. Here, we describe the array of model-based phenotype predictors (AMPP), an approach that leverages medical informatics resources and a human genome-scale metabolic model (GSMM) to predict drug side effects. AMPP is substantially predictive (AUC > 0.7) for >70 drug side effects, including very serious ones such as interstitial nephritis and extrapyramidal disorders. We evaluate AMPP's predictive signal through cross-validation, comparison across multiple versions of a side effects database, and co-occurrence analysis of drug side effect associations in scientific abstracts (hypergeometric p value = 2.2e-40). AMPP outperforms a previous biochemical structure-based method in predicting metabolically based side effects (aggregate AUC = 0.65 versus 0.59). Importantly, AMPP enables the identification of key metabolic reactions and biomarkers that are predictive of specific side effects. Taken together, this work lays a foundation for future detection of metabolically grounded side effects during early stages of drug development. PMID:27135366

  18. Side-emitting fiber optic position sensor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weiss, Jonathan D. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2008-02-12

    A side-emitting fiber optic position sensor and method of determining an unknown position of an object by using the sensor. In one embodiment, a concentrated beam of light source illuminates the side of a side-emitting fiber optic at an unknown axial position along the fiber's length. Some of this side-illuminated light is in-scattered into the fiber and captured. As the captured light is guided down the fiber, its intensity decreases due to loss from side-emission away from the fiber and from bulk absorption within the fiber. By measuring the intensity of light emitted from one (or both) ends of the fiber with a photodetector(s), the axial position of the light source is determined by comparing the photodetector's signal to a calibrated response curve, look-up table, or by using a mathematical model. Alternatively, the side-emitting fiber is illuminated at one end, while a photodetector measures the intensity of light emitted from the side of the fiber, at an unknown position. As the photodetector moves further away from the illuminated end, the detector's signal strength decreases due to loss from side-emission and/or bulk absorption. As before, the detector's signal is correlated to a unique position along the fiber.

  19. Study of turbine with side channel runner

    OpenAIRE

    Jandourek, Pavel

    2012-01-01

    This thesis deals with proposal of constructional solving turbine with side channel. Basis for the design is lossy characteristics of the valve. The intention is to replace hydraulic closures by turbine with side channel runner. Hydraulic losses in the flow restriction in turn replaced by the electricity generation in the comparable characteristics of valve and turbine.

  20. European side markers effect on traffic safety

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roelfsema, A.; Theeuwes, J.; Alferdinck, J.W.A.M

    1999-01-01

    In 1993 new European legislation regarding side-markers for passenger cars became effective. Volvo requested the TNO-Human Factors Research Institute (HFRI) to investigate the possible safety benefit of this European side-markers configuration. A test panel at TNO- HFRI was used to determine the dif

  1. Alternative solvents for post combustion carbon capture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Udara S. P. R. Arachchige, Morten C. Melaaen

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The process model of post combustion chemical absorption is developed in Aspen Plus for both coal and gas fired power plant flue gas treating. The re-boiler energy requirement is considered as the most important factor to be optimized. Two types of solvents, mono-ethylamine (MEA and di-ethylamine (DEA, are used to implement the model for three different efficiencies. The re-boiler energy requirement for regeneration process is calculated. Temperature and concentration profiles in absorption column are analyzed to understand the model behavior. Re-boiler energy requirement is considerably lower for DEA than MEA as well as impact of corrosion also less in DEA. Therefore, DEA can be recommended as a better solvent for post combustion process for carbon capture plants in fossil fuel fired power industries.

  2. Alternative solvents for post combustion carbon capture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arachchige, Udara S.P.R. [Telemark University College, Porsgrunn (Norway); Melaaen, Morten C. [Telemark University College, Porsgrunn (Norway); Tel-Tek, Porsgrunn (Norway)

    2013-07-01

    The process model of post combustion chemical absorption is developed in Aspen Plus for both coal and gas fired power plant flue gas treating. The re-boiler energy requirement is considered as the most important factor to be optimized. Two types of solvents, mono-ethylamine (MEA) and di-ethylamine (DEA), are used to implement the model for three different efficiencies. The re-boiler energy requirement for regeneration process is calculated. Temperature and concentration profiles in absorption column are analyzed to understand the model behavior. Re-boiler energy requirement is considerably lower for DEA than MEA as well as impact of corrosion also less in DEA. Therefore, DEA can be recommended as a better solvent for post combustion process for carbon capture plants in fossil fuel fired power industries.

  3. Critical bubble radius in solvent sublation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    The complex compound of dithizone-Co(Ⅱ) was separated and concentrated from the aqueous phase to n-octanol by solvent sublation. From the analysis of the coalescence behavior of bubbles on water-organic interface, the conception of critical bubble radius was proposed, and the value of the critical bubble radius in the water-octanol system was obtained: 1.196 × 10-3 m. The simulation of the mathematical model using CBR and experimental data is completed with perfect results, and the simulation of the mathematical model using CBR is very different with the classic one. The analytical results proved that the critical bubble radius should be adequately considered in mathematical model of solvent sublation.

  4. Gamma Ray Radiolysis of the FPEX Solvent

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    B. J. Mincher; S. P. Mezyk; D. R. Peterman

    2006-09-01

    Slide presentation. FPEX contains a calixarene for Cs extraction, a crown ether for Sr extraction, Cs7SB modifier, and TOA to aid in stripping, in Isopar L diluent. The radiation stability FPEX must be evaluated prior to process use. Radiolytic degradation of species in solution are due to reaction with the direct radiolysis products of the diluent. In Isopar L, the reactive species produced include e-, •H and alkane radicals, resulting in a reducing environment. However, in nitric acid, oxidizing hydroxyl (•OH) and nitro (•NO2) radicals dominate system chemistry. Thus, the nature of diluent and the presence of radical scavengers affect the results of irradiation. We report the preliminary results of a new program to investigate the radiolysis of FPEX using the 60Co irradiation of FPEX neat solvent, acid pre-equilibrated solvent and mixed aerated phases. The Cs and Sr distribution ratios were used as metrics.

  5. Structuring of polymer solutions upon solvent evaporation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaefer, C.; van der Schoot, P.; Michels, J. J.

    2015-02-01

    The morphology of solution-cast, phase-separated polymers becomes finer with increasing solvent evaporation rate. We address this observation theoretically for a model polymer where demixing is induced by steady solvent evaporation. In contrast to what is the case for a classical, thermal quench involving immiscible blends, the spinodal instability initially develops slowly and the associated length scale is not time invariant but decreases with time as t-1 /2. After a time lag, phase separation accelerates. Time lag and characteristic length exhibit power-law behavior as a function of the evaporation rate with exponents of -2 /3 and -1 /6 . Interestingly, at later stages the spinodal structure disappears completely while a second length scale develops. The associated structure coarsens but does not follow the usual Lifshitz-Slyozov-Wagner kinetics.

  6. GREENER REACTIONS UNDER SOLVENT FREE CONDITIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiren M. Marvaniya

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available The toxicity and volatile nature of many organic solvents, particularly chlorinated hydrocarbons that are widely used in huge amounts for organic reactions have posed a serious threat to the environment. Thus, design of solventless catalytic reaction has received tremendous attention in recent times in the area of green synthesis. A solvent-free or solid state reaction may be carried out using the reactants alone or incorporating them in clays, zeolites, silica, alumina or other matrices to achieve high degree of stereoselectivity in the products, to reduce byproducts, to maximize rate of reaction. We illustrate the environmentally benign approach to 1,2-Oxazine-2- oxides, Michael addition, Wohl–Ziegler reaction, Acylation, Heck reaction, Tishchenko reaction, Diels– Alder reaction, Reformatsky and Luche Reaction, Oxidative coupling Reaction, Synthesis of chalcones, Synthesis of Dihydropyrimidinones

  7. Simulation of annealed polyelectrolytes in poor solvents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present (semi-)grand canonical Monte Carlo simulations on annealed polyelectrolytes in poor solvent. Increasing the chemical potential of the charges, which is equal to the pH of the solution except for a trivial additive constant, in rather poor solvents, we find the first-order phase transition between a weakly charged globule and a highly charged extended chain predicted by theory. In the close-to-Q -point regime, we investigate under which conditions pearl-necklace structures are stable. Most of the pearl-necklace parameters are found to obey the scaling relations predicted for quenched polyelectrolytes. However, similarly to the behavior known for this class of polyelectrolytes we obtain large fluctuations in pearl number and size. In agreement with theoretical predictions we find a non-uniform charge distribution between pearls and strings

  8. Effect of water droplet in solvent sublation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Peng Yu Bi; Hui Ru Dong; Nan Nan Wang

    2008-01-01

    Aqueous phase layer around bubble and water droplet are two additional processes in solvent sublation. In the dynamic processof mass transfer, they are always neglected, but they are very important in the investigation of thermodynamic equilibrium. In thispaper, the effect of water droplet in solvent sublation was discussed in detail, and the previous mathematical model of solventsubaltion was improved. Matlab 6.5 was used to simulate the process of water droplets, and the comparison between the previoushypothesis and the improvement in this paper showed the superiority, especially in the investigation of thermodynamic equilibrium.Moreover, the separation and concentration of the complex compound dithizone-Co(Ⅱ) from aqueous phase to n-octanol by solventsublation also proved the improved mathematical model was reasonable.2008 Hui Ru Dong. Published by Elsevier B.V. on behalf of Chinese Chemical Society. All rights reserved.

  9. Functionalization of graphene using deep eutectic solvents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayyan, Maan; Abo-Hamad, Ali; AlSaadi, Mohammed AbdulHakim; Hashim, Mohd Ali

    2015-08-01

    Deep eutectic solvents (DESs) have received attention in various applications because of their distinctive properties. In this work, DESs were used as functionalizing agents for graphene due to their potential to introduce new functional groups and cause other surface modifications. Eighteen different types of ammonium- and phosphonium-salt-based DESs were prepared and characterized by FTIR. The graphene was characterized by FTIR, STA, Raman spectroscopy, XRD, SEM, and TEM. Additional experiments were performed to study the dispersion behavior of the functionalized graphene in different solvents. The DESs exhibited both reduction and functionalization effects on DES-treated graphene. Dispersion stability was investigated and then characterized by UV-vis spectroscopy and zeta potential. DES-modified graphene can be used in many applications, such as drug delivery, wastewater treatment, catalysts, composite materials, nanofluids, and biosensors. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first investigation on the use of DESs for graphene functionalization.

  10. Myoglobin solvent structure at different temperatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daniels, B.V.; Korszun, Z.R. [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY (United States); Schoenborn, B.P. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, NM (United States)

    1994-12-31

    The structure of the solvent surrounding myoglobin crystals has been analyzed using neutron diffraction data, and the results indicate that the water around the protein is not disordered, but rather lies in well-defined hydration shells. We have analyzed the structure of the solvent surrounding the protein by collecting neutron diffraction data at four different temperatures, namely, 80, 130, 180, and 240K. Relative Wilson Statistics applied to low resolution data showed evidence of a phase transition in the region of 180K. A plot of the liquidity factor, B{sub sn}, versus distance from the protein surface begins with a high plateau near the surface of the protein and drops to two minima at distances from the protein surface of about 2.35{Angstrom} and 3.85{Angstrom}. Two distinct hydration shells are observed. Both hydration shells are observed to expand as the temperature is increased.

  11. Savannah River Site Salt Processing Project: FY2002 Research and Development Program Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harmon, Harry D.; Leugemors, Robert K.; Schlahta, Stephan N.; Fink, Samuel D.; Thompson, Major C.; Walker, Darrell D.

    2001-10-31

    This Plan describes the technology development program for alpha/strontium removal and Caustic Side Solvent Extraction cesium removal in FY2002. Crystalline Silicotitanate and Small Tank Tetratphenylborate Precipitation are discussed as possible backup technologies. Previous results are summarized in the Savannah River Site Salt Processing Project Research and Development Summary Report

  12. Savannah River Site Salt Processing Project: FY2002 Research and Development Program Plan, Rev. 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harmon, Harry D.; Leugemors, Robert K.; Schlahta, Stephan N.; Fink, Samuel D.; Thompson, Major C.; Walker, Darrell D.

    2001-12-10

    This Plan describes the technology development program for alpha/strontium removal and Caustic Side Solvent Extraction cesium removal in FY2002. Crystalline Silicotitanate and Small Tank Tetratphenylborate Precipitation are discussed as possible backup technologies. Previous results are summarized in the Savannah River Site Salt Processing Project Research and Development Summary Report.

  13. Indentation of polydimethylsiloxane submerged in organic solvents

    OpenAIRE

    Hu, Yuhang; Chen, Xin; Whitesides, George McClelland; Vlassak, Joost J.; Suo, Zhigang

    2011-01-01

    This work uses a method based on indentation to characterize a polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) elastomer submerged in an organic solvent (decane, heptane, pentane, or cyclohexane). An indenter is pressed into a disk of a swollen elastomer to a fixed depth, and the force on the indenter is recorded as a function of time. By examining how the relaxation time scales with the radius of contact, one can differentiate the poroelastic behavior from the viscoelastic behavior. By matching the relaxation c...

  14. Solvent extraction of Southern US tar sands

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Penney, W.R.

    1990-01-01

    The Department of Chemical Engineering at the University of Arkansas, in association with Diversified Petroleum Recovery, Inc. (DPR) of Little Rock, Arkansas, has been developing a solvent extraction process for the recovery of bitumen from tar sands for the past five years. The unique feature of the process is that the bitumen is recovered from the solvent by contacting with a co-solvent, which causes the bitumen to precipitate. The overall purpose of this project is to study both the technical and economic feasibility of applying this technology for recovery of bitumen from tar sands by (1) investigating the socioeconmic factors which affect (a) plant siting and (b) the market value of recovered bitumen; (2) operating a process demonstration unit at the rate of 1 lb/hr recovered bitumen while producing clean sand and recyclable solvents; and (3) determine the economic conditions which will make a bitumen recovery project economical. DPR has analyzed the historical trends of domestic production, consumption, discoveries and reserves of crude oil. They have started an investigation of the volatility in the price of crude oil and of gasoline prices and of the differential between gasoline and crude oil. DPR continues to analyze the geographical movement and demand for asphalt products. Utah does not appear economically attractive as a site for a bitumen from tar sands asphalt plant. Oklahoma sites are now being studied. This report also contains the quarterly progress report from a University of Nevada study to determine bitumen composition, oxygen uptake rates, and viscosities of Alabama and Utah bitumens. Both reports have been indexed separately for inclusion on the data base.

  15. Solvent enhanced bioremediation of weathered oil contamination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper describes a novel bioremediation process for the treatment of oil spills on land. The method was developed specifically to deal with long term oil contamination where the volatile fractions have evaporated leaving the more recalcitrant fractions. A model system of sand and Kuwaiti crude oil was used to test the system. A combined treatment which introduced an additional solvent component was found to enhance mobility and availability of oil, enhancing bioremediation. (author)

  16. Mycosis fungoides progression and chronic solvent exposure

    OpenAIRE

    Nikkels, Arjen; Quatresooz, Pascale; Delvenne, Philippe; Balsat, A.; Pierard, Gérald

    2004-01-01

    The effect of repeated exposure to specific chemicals on the initiation or progression of mycosis fungoides (MF) remains unsettled. A patient with low-grade patch stage MF progressively developed MF plaques restricted to his arms, and a tumour on his right thigh. These areas were subject to repeated exposure to solvents. His thigh was indeed in close contact with his trousers pocket where he used to store a wiping rag drenched into white spirit and cellulosic thinner. Immunophenotyping these ...

  17. Mixed Solvent Reactive Recrystallization of Sodium Carbonate

    OpenAIRE

    Gaertner, R.S.

    2005-01-01

    Investigation of the reactive recrystallization of trona (sodium sesquicarbonate) and sodium bicarbonate to sodium carbonate (soda) in a mixed solvent led to the design of several alternative, less energy consumptive, economically very attractive process routes for the production of soda from all principal sodium carbonate sources. The kinetics of the recrystallization as well as of the superimposed chemical reaction, the decomposition of the bicarbonate ion, have been measured, a thermodynam...

  18. Functionalization of graphene using deep eutectic solvents

    OpenAIRE

    Hayyan, Maan; Abo-Hamad, Ali; AlSaadi, Mohammed AbdulHakim; Hashim, Mohd Ali

    2015-01-01

    Deep eutectic solvents (DESs) have received attention in various applications because of their distinctive properties. In this work, DESs were used as functionalizing agents for graphene due to their potential to introduce new functional groups and cause other surface modifications. Eighteen different types of ammonium- and phosphonium-salt-based DESs were prepared and characterized by FTIR. The graphene was characterized by FTIR, STA, Raman spectroscopy, XRD, SEM, and TEM. Additional experim...

  19. Shrinkage in propellant Manufactured by Solvent Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K.M. Agrawal

    1991-04-01

    Full Text Available The propellant manufacturers select the dimensions of die-pin for extrusion of dough by trial and error method based on their experience. This paper presents a general equation applicable for any propellant composition processed by solvent process, in any shape, i.e., cord, monotubular or the multitubular. To illustrate the relationship, calculation for outer radius for a few typical single-base propellants is given.

  20. Back-side readout semiconductor photomultiplier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choong, Woon-Seng; Holland, Stephen E

    2014-05-20

    This disclosure provides systems, methods, and apparatus related to semiconductor photomultipliers. In one aspect, a device includes a p-type semiconductor substrate, the p-type semiconductor substrate having a first side and a second side, the first side of the p-type semiconductor substrate defining a recess, and the second side of the p-type semiconductor substrate being doped with n-type ions. A conductive material is disposed in the recess. A p-type epitaxial layer is disposed on the second side of the p-type semiconductor substrate. The p-type epitaxial layer includes a first region proximate the p-type semiconductor substrate, the first region being implanted with p-type ions at a higher doping level than the p-type epitaxial layer, and a second region disposed on the first region, the second region being doped with p-type ions at a higher doping level than the first region.

  1. Physiology of solvent tolerance in Pseudomonas putida S12

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Isken, S.

    2000-01-01

    Hydrophobic organic solvents, like toluene, are toxic for living organisms. This toxicity is an important drawback in the environmental biotechnology as well as in the application of solvents in the production of fine chemicals by whole-cell biotransformations. The effects of organic solvents on mic

  2. Catalytic coal liquefaction with treated solvent and SRC recycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garg, Diwakar; Givens, Edwin N.; Schweighardt, Frank K.

    1986-01-01

    A process for the solvent refining of coal to distillable, pentane soluble products using a dephenolated and denitrogenated recycle solvent and a recycled, pentane-insoluble, solvent-refined coal material, which process provides enhanced oil-make in the conversion of coal.

  3. Solvent-assisted polymer micro-molding

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HAN LuLu; ZHOU Jing; GONG Xiao; GAO ChangYou

    2009-01-01

    The micro-molding technology has played an important role in fabrication of polymer micro-patterns and development of functional devices.In such a process,suitable solvent can swell or dissolve the polymer films to decrease their glass transition temperature (Tg) and viscosity and thereby improve flowing ability.Consequently,it is easy to obtain the 2D and 3D patterns with high fidelity by the solvent-assisted micro-molding.Compared with the high temperature molding,this technology overcomes some shortcomings such as shrinking after cooling,degradation at high temperature,difficulty in processing some functional materials having high Tg,etc.It can be applied to making patterns not only on polymer monolayers but also on polyelectrolyte multilayers.Moreover,the compressioninduced patterns on the multilayers are chemically homogenous but physically heterogeneous.In this review,the controlling factors on the pattern quality are also discussed,including materials of the mold,solvent,pressure,temperature and pattern density.

  4. Dynamics of solvent-free grafted nanoparticles

    KAUST Repository

    Chremos, Alexandros

    2012-01-01

    The diffusivity and structural relaxation characteristics of oligomer-grafted nanoparticles have been investigated with simulations of a previously proposed coarse-grained model at atmospheric pressure. Solvent-free, polymer-grafted nanoparticles as well as grafted nanoparticles in a melt were compared to a reference system of bare (ungrafted) particles in a melt. Whereas longer chains lead to a larger hydrodynamic radius and lower relative diffusivity for grafted particles in a melt, bulk solvent-free nanoparticles with longer chains have higher relative diffusivities than their short chain counterparts. Solvent-free nanoparticles with short chains undergo a glass transition as indicated by a vanishing diffusivity, diverging structural relaxation time and the formation of body-centered-cubic-like order. Nanoparticles with longer chains exhibit a more gradual increase in the structural relaxation time with decreasing temperature and concomitantly increasing particle volume fraction. The diffusivity of the long chain nanoparticles exhibits a minimum at an intermediate temperature and volume fraction where the polymer brushes of neighboring particles overlap, but must stretch to fill the interparticle space. © 2012 American Institute of Physics.

  5. Molecular Design of Crown Ethers.22.Synthesis of Benzocrown Ether Derivatives and Their Solvent Extraction with Univalent/Bivalent Metal Picrates

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG,Ying-Wei(杨英威); LI,Chun-Ju(李春举); ZHANG,Heng-Yi(张衡益); LIU,Yu(刘育)

    2004-01-01

    Three novel benzocrown ether derivatives have been synthesized and their cation binding behavior with uniand bi-valent metal ions was evaluated by the solvent extraction of aqueous metal picrates. The obtained results indicate that the size-fit of crown ether and metal cation, and electron effect of the side arm attached to benzocrown ethers affect their cation binding ability and selectivity.

  6. Sequential accelerated solvent extraction of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons with different solvents: performance and implication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Xiaoxuan; Ran, Yong; Gong, Jian; Chen, Diyun

    2010-01-01

    Sixteen USEPA priority polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) extracted by Soxhlet extraction (S-PAHs) with dichloromethane and routine accelerated solvent extraction (A-PAHs) with 1:1 toluene/methanol, respectively, were investigated in 24 soil samples from two cities in the center of the Pearl River Delta, South China. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, methylphenanthrene and perylene, in two soils, two sediments, and an immature oil shale were also sequentially extracted by accelerated solvent extraction (ASE) with each of four different organic solvents for three times. The A-PAHs' concentrations are 2.41 times the S-PAHs' concentrations. For sequential three ASEs, PAHs in the first extract account for 56 to 67% of their total concentrations in the sequential three extractions and toluene displays the best extraction performance among the four solvents. Diagnostic ratios of PAHs in Soxhlet extraction, routine ASE, and sequential ASE with each solvent for a given sample are very similar, suggesting their identical petrogenic and pyrogenic sources in the soils and sediments. But the PAH ratios for the shale have an obvious petrogenic origin. The perylene/5-ring PAH ratios indicate a diagenetic source, especially in the shale and sediments. The correlation analysis shows that A-PAHs/S-PAHs is better associated with the contents of total organic carbon (TOC) than those of black carbon (BC). The above results indicate the significant petrogenic origin of PAHs and the important effect of organic matter on their extraction and distribution in the investigated field soils/sediments. PMID:21284305

  7. Diluent effects in solvent extraction. The Effects of Diluents in Solvent Extraction - a literature study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The fact that the choice of organic diluent is important for a solvent extraction process goes without saying. Several factors, such as e.g. price, flash point, viscosity, polarity etc. each have their place in the planning of a solvent extraction system. This high number of variables makes the lack of compilations concerning diluent effects to an interesting topic. Often the interest for the research concerning a specific extraction system focuses on the extractant used and the complexes built up during an extraction. The diluents used are often classical ones, even if it has been shown that choice of diluent can affect extraction as well as separation in an extraction system. An attempt to point out important steps in the understanding of diluent effects in solvent extraction is here presented. This large field is, of course, not summarized in this article, but an attempt is made to present important steps in the understanding of diluents effects in solvent extraction. Trying to make the information concerning diluent effects and applications more easily accessible this review offers a selected summarizing of literature concerning diluents effects in solvent extraction. (authors)

  8. Pyrolysates of raw vitrinites and their residues after CS2-NMP solvent extraction and its significance for petroleum geology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, D.Y.; Peng, P.A. [Chinese Academy of Sciences, Guangzhou (China)

    2006-09-15

    Binary solvent (CS2-NMP) has extreme high extraction ability to coals, and it can extract most bitumens out of coals and vitrinites. And large amount of messages on side chains and their distribution character in vitrinites should be acquired through flash pyrolysis before and after binary solvent (CS2-NMP) extraction. A few low maturated coals have been selected and vitrinites are handpicked from coals. Then vitrinites have been extracted using different solvents in the order of polarity. Flash pyrolysis-Gas Chromatography/Mass spectrum has been applied to samples. The result shows that CS2-NMP is efficient for the extraction of vitrinites, giving much higher extraction yield than common solvents. Production ratio of liquid hydrocarbons in pyrolysates of vitrinites extracted with CS2-NMP is lower than that of raw vitrinites. And relative ratio of each component in pyrolysates has changed apparently. Production ratio of aliphatic hydrocarbons, especially those long chain aliphatics have decreased much after mixed solvent extraction. It shows that bitumens extracted with CS2-NMP have largely contributed to pyrolysates, especially those aliphatics in pyrolysates.

  9. Pyrolysates of raw vitrinites and their residues after CS2-NMP solvent extraction and its significance for petroleum geology

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Dayong; PENG Ping'an

    2006-01-01

    Binary solvent (CS2-NMP) has extreme high extraction ability to coals, and it can extract most bitumens out of coals and vitrinites. And large amount of messages on side chains and their distribution character in vitrinites should be acquired through flash pyrolysis before and after binary solvent (CS2-NMP) extraction. A few low maturated coals have been selected and vitrinites are handpicked from coals. Then vitrinites have been extracted using different solvents in the order of polarity. Flash pyrolysis-Gas Chromatography/Mass spectrum has been applied to samples. The result shows that CS2-NMP is efficient for the extraction of vitirnites, giving much higher extraction yield than common solvents. Production ratio of liquid hydrocarbons in pyrolysates of vitrinites extracted with CS2-NMP is lower than that of raw vitrinites. And relative ratio of each component in pyrolysates has changed apparently. Production ratio of aliphatic hydrocarbons, especially those long chain aliphatics have decreased much after mixed solvent extraction. It shows that bitumens extracted with CS2-NMP have largely contributed to pyrolysates, especially those aliphatics in pyrolysates.

  10. Effect of knee joint angle on side-to-side strength ratios.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnan, Chandramouli; Williams, Glenn N

    2014-10-01

    Isometric knee extensor and flexor strength are typically tested at different joint angles due to the differences in length-tension relationships of the quadriceps and hamstring muscles. The efficiency of strength testing can be improved if the same angle can be used to test both the knee extensor and flexor muscle groups. The aim of this study was to determine an optimal angle for isometric knee strength testing by examining the effect of knee angle on side-to-side peak torque ratios. Eighteen active young people (9 males and 9 females) participated in this study. Knee extensor and knee flexor strength were tested on both sides at 30°, 60°, and 90° of knee flexion. The effect of knee flexion angle on side-to-side peak torque ratios, raw torque values, and side-to-side flexor-to-extensor torque ratios were assessed. Side-to-side knee extensor peak torque ratios and knee flexor-to-extensor torque ratios differed significantly by knee flexion angle (p = 0.024 and p = 0.011, respectively), but side-to-side knee flexor peak torque ratios did not differ significantly (p = 0.311). When considering both side-to-side peak torque ratios and flexor-to-extensor torque ratios, the values were more symmetrical (i.e., closer to 100%) only at 60° of knee flexion. Our results indicate that both the knee flexors and the knee extensors can be tested clinically at 60° of knee flexion. Our results also indicate that the hamstrings can be tested at any of the 3 angles if the examiner is interested in side-to-side ratios rather than raw torque values. These results may facilitate more efficient and flexible clinical knee strength testing.

  11. Nonhazardous solvent composition and method for cleaning metal surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A solvent composition for displacing greasy and oily contaminants as well as water and/or aqueous residue from metallic surfaces, especially surfaces of radioactive materials so that such surfaces can be wiped clean of the displaced contaminants, water and/or aqueous residue. The solvent composition consists essentially of a blend of nonpolar aliphatic hydrocarbon solvent having a minimum flash point of about 140 F and 2 to 25 volume percent of a polar solvent having a flash point sufficiently high so as to provide the solvent composition with a minimum flash point of at least 140 F. The solvent composition is nonhazardous so that when it is used to clean the surfaces of radioactive materials the waste in the form of paper or cloth wipes, lab coats and the like used in the cleaning operation is not considered to be mixed waste composed of a hazardous solvent and a radioactive material

  12. The Effect of Dissolved Side-Group Polymers on Pattern Dynamics in Nematic Liquid Crystals in a Rotating Magnetic Field

    OpenAIRE

    Pashkovsky, E.; Stille, W; Strobl, G.; Talebi, D.

    1997-01-01

    Patterns formed by inversion walls in nematic layers exposed to a rotating magnetic field were studied. Dilute solutions of a mesogenic side group polymethacrylate in a low molecular weight liquid crystal (5CB) were used in comparison with the pure solvent. As found in a previous work, in this system the intensity of backflow (fluid flow induced by director rotation) can be controlled by the polymer concentration due to a specific increase of shear viscosity coefficients. In the synchronous r...

  13. O esôfago de Barrett associado à estenose cáustica do esôfago Barrett's esophagus associated to caustic stenosis of the esophagus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nelson Adami Andreollo

    2003-09-01

    Full Text Available RACIONAL: A estenose esofágica secundária à ingestão de produtos cáusticos é freqüente no Brasil, principalmente como tentativa de suicídio. O esôfago de Barrett surge como conseqüência do refluxo gastroesofágico crônico. A literatura pesquisada mostrou que esta associação é muito rara. CASUÍSTICA E MÉTODOS: De 1981 a 2000 foram admitidos e tratados no Gastrocentro-UNICAMP (Universidade Estadual de Campinas, SP. 120 doentes com estenose cáustica do esôfago e durante o seguimento destes, foram encontrados 9 casos associados com o esôfago de Barrett (7,5%. O tempo de ingestão do cáustico variou de 4 a 54 anos (média de 29 anos e eram quatro homens e cinco mulheres, oito brancos e um negro, com idade média de 57,7 anos (43 a 72 anos. RESULTADOS: Todos os casos apresentavam disfagia e a endoscopia digestiva alta flexível mostrou áreas de estenose e seqüelas de esofagite cáustica. Três pacientes referiram sintomas de refluxo gastroesofágico, mas hérnia de hiato foi encontrada em apenas um caso. O esôfago de Barrett foi encontrado no terço médio do esôfago em três casos, acima das áreas de estenose, e nos demais, no terço distal. A disfagia foi tratada com dilatações esofágicas periódicas. Dois pacientes apresentando sintomas de refluxo grave foram submetidos a fundoplicatura à Nissen modificado através de videolaparoscopia, com bons resultados. CONCLUSÕES: O esôfago de Barrett nesses doentes poderia estar associado com a ingestão de cáustico, porque nem sempre esteve associado à esofagite por refluxo. É muito importante o seguimento desses doentes e realização periódica de endoscopias digestivas com biopsias do esôfago de Barrett, devido à possibilidade de malignização.BACKGROUND: The esophageal stenosis secondary to the ingestion of caustic products is frequent in Brazil, mainly due to an attempt suicide. The Barrett's esophagus is consequence of the chronic gastroesophageal reflux. The

  14. Managing Chemotherapy Side Effects: Hair Loss (Alopecia)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... C ancer I nstitute Managing Chemotherapy Side Effects Hair Loss (Alopecia) “Losing my hair was hard at first. Then ... and anywhere on your body may fall out. Hair loss is called alopecia. When will my hair start ...

  15. Radiation Therapy: Preventing and Managing Side Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... yourself during radiation therapy Radiation therapy can damage healthy body tissues in or near the area being treated, which can cause side effects. Many people worry about this part of their cancer treatment. Before ...

  16. Side- ja turvanguamet / Indrek Süld

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Süld, Indrek

    2004-01-01

    Ilmunud ka: 2003 : annual report : [Eesti Raudtee]. - Tallinn, 2004, lk. 34-35; 2003 : godovoi ottshjot : [Eesti Raudtee]. - Tallinn, 2004, lk. 34-35. Ülevaade AS-i Eesti Raudtee side- ja turvanguameti tegevusest 2003. aastal. Skeem

  17. Compound forming extractants, solvating solvents and inert solvents IUPAC chemical data series

    CERN Document Server

    Marcus, Y; Kertes, A S

    2013-01-01

    Equilibrium Constants of Liquid-Liquid Distribution Reactions, Part III: Compound Forming Extractants, Solvating Solvents, and Inert Solvents focuses on the compilation of equilibrium constants of various compounds, such as acids, ions, salts, and aqueous solutions. The manuscript presents tables that show the distribution reactions of carboxylic and sulfonic acid extractants and their dimerization and other reactions in the organic phase and extraction reactions of metal ions from aqueous solutions. The book also states that the inorganic anions in these solutions are irrelevant, since they d

  18. Two-sided Heterogeneity and Trade

    OpenAIRE

    Andrew B. Bernard; Moxnes, Andreas; Ulltveit-Moe, Karen Helene

    2013-01-01

    Empirical studies of firms within industries consistently report substantial heterogeneity in measures of performance such as size and productivity. This paper explores the consequences of joint heterogeneity on the supply side (sellers) and the demand side (buyers) in international trade using a novel transaction-level dataset from Norway. Domestic exporters as well as foreign importers are explicitly identified in each transaction to every destination. The buyer-seller linked data reveal a ...

  19. Reliability in Source Coding with Side Information

    OpenAIRE

    Kelly, Benjamin G.; Wagner, Aaron B.

    2011-01-01

    We study error exponents for source coding with side information. Both achievable exponents and converse bounds are obtained for the following two cases: lossless source coding with coded information (SCCSI) and lossy source coding with full side information (Wyner-Ziv). These results recover and extend several existing results on source-coding error exponents and are tight in some circumstances. Our bounds have a natural interpretation as a two-player game between nature and the code designe...

  20. Source Coding with Fixed Lag Side Information

    OpenAIRE

    Martinian, Emin; Wornell, Gregory W.

    2004-01-01

    We consider source coding with fixed lag side information at the decoder. We focus on the special case of perfect side information with unit lag corresponding to source coding with feedforward (the dual of channel coding with feedback) introduced by Pradhan. We use this duality to develop a linear complexity algorithm which achieves the rate-distortion bound for any memoryless finite alphabet source and distortion measure.

  1. The Two Sides of Money Laundering

    OpenAIRE

    Corina – Maria ENE

    2014-01-01

    The mainly goal of money laundering is to carry out more and more illegal economic transactions or activities to produce individual or groups gains and then to legitimate them. Money laundering converts illicit source of money generated by criminal activities in order to hide the connection between money and their original illegal activities. This is one of money laundering side. The second side implies corruption. While money laundering is a passing channel for illicit funds due to its crimi...

  2. Side Stream Filtration for Cooling Towers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2012-10-20

    This technology evaluation assesses side stream filtration options for cooling towers, with an objective to assess key attributes that optimize energy and water savings along with providing information on specific technology and implementation options. This information can be used to assist Federal sites to determine which options may be most appropriate for their applications. This evaluation provides an overview of the characterization of side stream filtration technology, describes typical applications, and details specific types of filtration technology.

  3. Scenarios Evaluation Tool for Chlorinated Solvent MNA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vangelas, Karen; Michael J. Truex; Charles J. Newell; Brian Looney

    2007-02-28

    Over the past three decades, much progress has been made in the remediation of chlorinated solvents from the subsurface. Yet these pervasive contaminants continue to present a significant challenge to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), other federal agencies, and other public and private organizations. The physical and chemical properties of chlorinated solvents make it difficult to rapidly reach the low concentrations typically set as regulatory limits. These technical challenges often result in high costs and long remediation time frames. In 2003, the DOE through the Office of Environmental Management funded a science-based technical project that uses the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's technical protocol (EPA, 1998) and directives (EPA, 1999) on Monitored Natural Attenuation (MNA) as the foundation on which to introduce supporting concepts and new scientific developments that will support remediation of chlorinated solvents based on natural attenuation processes. This project supports the direction in which many site owners want to move to complete the remediation of their site(s), that being to complete the active treatment portion of the remedial effort and transition into MNA. The overarching objective of the effort was to examine environmental remedies that are based on natural processes--remedies such as Monitored Natural Attenuation (MNA) or Enhanced Attenuation (EA). The research program did identify several specific opportunities for advances based on: (1) mass balance as the central framework for attenuation based remedies, (2) scientific advancements and achievements during the past ten years, (3) regulatory and policy development and real-world experience using MNA, and (4) exploration of various ideas for integrating attenuation remedies into a systematic set of ''combined remedies'' for contaminated sites. These opportunities are summarized herein and are addressed in more detail in referenced project documents and

  4. Understanding ion and solvent transport in anion exchange membranes under humidified conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarode, Himanshu

    Anion exchange membranes (AEM) have been studied for more than a decade for potential applications in low temperature fuel cells and other electrochemical devices. They offer the advantage of faster reaction kinetics under alkaline conditions and ability to perform without costly platinum catalyst. Inherently slow diffusion of hydroxide ions compared to protons is a primary reason for synthesizing and studying the ion transport properties in AEMs. The aim of this thesis is to understand ion transport in novel AEMs using Pulse Gradient stimulated Spin Echo Nuclear Magnetic Resonance technique (PGSE NMR), water uptake, ionic conductivity, Small Angle X-ray Scattering (SAXS) etc. All experiments were performed under humidified conditions (80--95% relative humidity) and fuel cell operating temperatures of 30--90°C. In this work, the NMR tube design was modified for humidifying the entire NMR tube evenly from our previous design. We have developed a new protocol for replacing caustic hydroxide with harmless fluoride or bicarbonate ions for 19F and 13 C NMR diffusion experiments. After performing these NMR experiments, we have obtained in-depth understanding of the morphology linked ion transport in AEMs. We have obtained the highest fluoride self-diffusion coefficient of > 1 x 10-5 cm2/sec ( 55°C) for ETFE-g-PVBTMA membrane which is a result of low tortuosity of 1 obtained for the membrane. This faster fluoride transport combined with low tortuosity of the membrane resulted in > 100mS/cm hydroxide conductivity for the membrane. Polycyclooctene (PCOE) based triblock copolymers are also studied for in-depth understanding of molecular weight, IEC, mechanical and transport properties. Effect of melting temperature of PCOE has favorable effect on increasing ion conductivity and lowering activation energy. Mechanical properties of these types of membranes were studied showing detrimental effect of water plasticization which results in unsuitable mechanical properties

  5. PULSED MIXER-SETTLER SOLVENT EXTRACTION CONTACTORS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Figg, W.S.

    1958-08-12

    A mixer-settler extractor is described for contacting immiscible liquids having different specific gravities in order to withdraw one or more components from one liquid with the aid of the other liquid. The extractor consists of a hollow column, a rotary drive shafi extending : through the column with a number of impellers spaced thereon, an equal nunnber of separator plate sets each consisting of one fluorothene and one stainless steel plate with peripheral recesses and flow slots mounted on the column, and a pulse generator. This apparatus is particularly useful in solvent extraction processes for recovering plutonium from aqueous acidic solutions of irradiated uranium.

  6. Cleaning with solvents methods and machinery

    CERN Document Server

    Durkee, John

    2014-01-01

    High-precision cleaning is required across many sectors, including aerospace, defense, medical device manufacturing, pharmaceutical processing, semiconductor/electronics, and more. In this comprehensive reference work, solvent cleaning equipment is thoroughly covered with a focus on the engineering details of its operation and selection. Key data is provided alongside practical guidance, giving scientists and engineers in multiple sectors the information they need not only to choose the correct machine in the first place, but also how to operate it effectively and efficiently. Low emission

  7. 卧式燃氢蒸汽锅炉在烧碱生产中的应用%Applications of horizontal steam boiler burning hydrogen in the production of caustic soda

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王荣欣; 王凯

    2015-01-01

    Introduced 8 t/h horizontal steam boiler burning hydrogen successfully applied in caustic soda production, the boiler designed, safe and stable operation, low capital investment costs.%介绍了8t/h卧式燃氢蒸汽锅炉在烧碱生产中的成功应用,该锅炉设计完善、运行安全平稳、建设投资费用低。

  8. Nonlinear time series analysis of knee and ankle kinematics during side by side treadmill walking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nessler, Jeff A.; De Leone, Charles J.; Gilliland, Sara

    2009-06-01

    Nonlinear time series analysis was used to estimate maximal Lyapunov exponents of select ankle and knee kinematics during three different conditions of treadmill walking: independent, side by side, and side by side with forced synchronization of stepping. Stride to stride variability was significantly increased for the condition in which individuals walked side by side and synchronized unintentionally when compared to the conditions of forced synchronization and independent walking. In addition, standard deviations of three kinematic variables of lower extremity movement were significantly increased during the condition in which unintentional synchronization occurred. No relationship was found between standard deviation and estimates of maximal Lyapunov exponents. An increase in kinematic variability during side by side walking for nonimpaired individuals who are not at risk of falling suggests that variability in certain aspects of performance might be indicative of a healthy system. Modeling this variability for an impaired individual to imitate may have beneficial effects on locomotor function. These results may therefore have implications for the rehabilitation of gait in humans by suggesting that a different functional outcome might be achieved by practicing side by side walking as opposed to more commonly used strategies involving independent walking.

  9. Swelling behaviour of amphiphilic poly (methacryloxyethl dimethylalkane ammonium bromide) gels in alcohol/water solvent systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Three kinds of amphiphilic PMADAB gels were prepared through radiation-induced polymerization and crosslinking of methacryloxyethyl dimethylalkane ammonium bromide (MADAB) with different alkyl side chains (butyl, octyl and dodecyl). The length of alkyl side chains had significant influence on swelling behavior of the PMADAB gels in alcohol/water solvent. Equilibrium swelling degree (EDS) of PMBDAB (butyl) gel in water was ca. 160 and decreased with increasing alcohol content (x), whereas EDS of PMODAB (octyl) and PMDDDAB (dodecyl) gels showed a convex-upward function of x, i.e., these two gels barely swelled in pure water and swelled with increasing x and then shrank gradually. This phenomenon was explained by the hydrophobic association of long alkyl chains and a cosolvency effect of PMADAB in alcohol and water. The swelling behavior of PMADAB gels in methanol, ethanol and isopropanol were similar, and their EDS are related with the dielectric constant of alcohol solvents. The results suggest that PMADAB gels may be potential absorbents for various kinds of alcohols. (authors)

  10. SYNTHESIS AND PROPERTIES OF A NEW AZOBENZENE SIDE-CHAIN POLYMER CONTAINING A TEMPO RADICAL

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yong Zhang; Ze-da Xu; Xing-he Fan; Xiao-fang Chen; Xin-hua Wan; Qi-feng Zhou

    2002-01-01

    To allow anisotropies of optical properties in a magnetic field, nitroxide radical is introduced into the ortho-position of the phenylene ring in the side chain. A new azobenzene side-chain polymer (TEMPO-PAZ) containing TEMPOradical was synthesized. The polymer has a good solubility in organic solvents. The ESR spectrum of the polymer indicatedthree absorption lines characteristic of TEMPO radical. The optical phase conjugated responses (I4) of the polymer filmswere investigated by degenerate four-wave mixing (DFWM). The experimental results showed that optical phase conjugatedresponse of the TEMPO-PAZ could be easily controlled by choosing the appropriate direction of magnetic field presumablydue to the nitroxide radical in the TEMPO-PAZ molecular structure. For the polymer investigated here, the nitroxide radicalwas introduced to increase optical phase conjugated response intensity in a magnetic field, aiming originally at searching fora new photo-active organic magnetic multifunctional materials.

  11. Corrosion Study of Super Ferritic Stainless Steel UNS S44660 (26Cr-3Ni-3Mo) and Several Other Stainless Steel Grades (UNS S31603, S32101, and S32205) in Caustic Solution Containing Sodium Sulfide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chasse, Kevin R.; Singh, Preet M.

    2013-11-01

    Electrochemical techniques, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) were used in this study to show how the corrosion mechanism of several commercial grades of stainless steel in hot caustic solution is strongly influenced by the presence of sodium sulfide. Experimental results from super ferritic stainless steel UNS S44660 (26Cr-3Ni-3Mo) were compared to austenitic stainless steel UNS S31603, lean duplex stainless steel (DSS) UNS S32101, and standard DSS UNS S32205 in caustic solution, with and without sodium sulfide, at 443 K (170 °C). Weight loss measurements indicated that corrosion rates of UNS44660 were much lower than the other grades of stainless steel in the presence of the sodium sulfide. Potentiodynamic polarization and linear polarization resistance measurements showed that the electrochemical behavior was altered by the adhesion of sulfur species, which reduced the polarization resistances and increased the anodic current densities. SEM and XPS results imply that the surface films that formed in caustic solution containing sodium sulfide were defective due to the adsorption of sulfide, which destabilized the passive film and led to the formation of insoluble metal sulfide compounds.

  12. Phase behaviour of two-component bottle-brush polymers with flexible backbones under poor solvent conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The phase behaviour of two-component bottle-brush polymers with fully flexible backbones under poor solvent conditions is studied via molecular-dynamics simulations, using a coarse-grained bead-spring model and side chains of up to N = 40 effective monomers. We consider a symmetric model where side chains of type A and B are grafted alternately onto a flexible backbone. The aim of this study is to explore the phase behaviour of two-component bottle-brushes depending on parameters, such as as the grafting density σ, the backbone length Nb, the side-chain length N, and the temperature T. Based on a cluster analysis, we identify for our range of parameters the regimes of fully phase separated systems, i.e., A-type side chains form one cluster and B-type chains another, while the interface that separates these two clusters contains the backbone monomers. We find that pearl-necklace or Janus-like structures, which normally occur for bottle-brush polymers with rigid backbones under poor solvent conditions, are fully attributed to the backbone rigidity, and, therefore, such structures are unlikely in the case of bottle brushes with fully flexible backbones. Also, a comparative discussion with earlier work on the phase behaviour of single-component bottle-brush polymers with flexible backbones is performed. (paper)

  13. Recovery of plutonium from solvent wash solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A number of potential alternatives to the acid hydrolysis recovery of Pu were investigated. The most promising alternative for short-term use appears to be an anion exchange process that would eliminate the long boiling times and the multiple-pass concentration steps needed with the solvent extraction process because it separates the Pu from the dibutyl phosphate (DBP) while at the same time concentrating the Pu. However, restart of the Primary Recovery Column (PRC) to process this solution would require significant administrative effort. The original boiling recovery by acid hydrolysis followed by solvent extraction is probably the most expedient way to process the Pu-DBP-carbonate solution currently stored in tank 13.5 even with its long processing times and dilute product concentration. Anion exchange of a heat stabilized acidified solution is a more efficient process, but requires restart of the PRC. Extended-boiling acid hydrolysis or anion exchange of a heat stabilized acidified solution provide two well developed alternatives for recovery of the Pu from the tank 13.5 carbonate. Further work defining additional recovery processes is not planned at this time

  14. Natural deep eutectic solvents: cytotoxic profile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayyan, Maan; Mbous, Yves Paul; Looi, Chung Yeng; Wong, Won Fen; Hayyan, Adeeb; Salleh, Zulhaziman; Mohd-Ali, Ozair

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the cytotoxic profiles of different ternary natural deep eutectic solvents (NADESs) containing water. For this purpose, five different NADESs were prepared using choline chloride as a salt, alongside five hydrogen bond donors (HBD) namely glucose, fructose, sucrose, glycerol, and malonic acid. Water was added as a tertiary component during the eutectics preparation, except for the malonic acid-based mixture. Coincidentally, the latter was found to be more toxic than any of the water-based NADESs. A trend was observed between the cellular requirements of cancer cells, the viscosity of the NADESs, and their cytotoxicity. This study also highlights the first time application of the conductor-like screening model for real solvent (COSMO-RS) software for the analysis of the cytotoxic mechanism of NADESs. COSMO-RS simulation of the interactions between NADESs and cellular membranes' phospholipids suggested that NADESs strongly interacted with cell surfaces and that their accumulation and aggregation possibly defined their cytotoxicity. This reinforced the idea that careful selection of NADESs components is necessary, as it becomes evident that organic acids as HBD highly contribute to the increasing toxicity of these neoteric mixtures. Nevertheless, NADESs in general seem to possess relatively less acute toxicity profiles than their DESs parents. This opens the door for future large scale utilization of these mixtures. PMID:27386357

  15. Solvent viscosity dependence for enzymatic reactions

    CERN Document Server

    Sitnitsky, A E

    2008-01-01

    A mechanism for relationship of solvent viscosity with reaction rate constant at enzyme action is suggested. It is based on fluctuations of electric field in enzyme active site produced by thermally equilibrium rocking (cranckshaft motion) of the rigid plane (in which the dipole moment $\\approx 3.6 D$ lies) of a favourably located and oriented peptide group (or may be a few of them). Thus the rocking of the plane leads to fluctuations of the electric field of the dipole moment. These fluctuations can interact with the reaction coordinate because the latter in its turn has transition dipole moment due to separation of charges at movement of the reacting system along it. The rocking of the plane of the peptide group is sensitive to the microviscosity of its environment in protein interior and the latter is a function of the solvent viscosity. Thus we obtain an additional factor of interrelationship for these characteristics with the reaction rate constant. We argue that due to the properties of the cranckshaft ...

  16. Solvent induced track sensitization. Extraction of oligomers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apel, P.; Angert, N.; Brüchle, W.; Hermann, H.; Kampschulte, U.; Klein, P.; Kravets, L. I.; Oganessian, Yu. Ts.; Remmert, G.; Spohr, R.; Steckenreiter, T.; Trautmann, C.; Vetter, J.

    1994-04-01

    Oligomer extraction from polyethylene terephthalate (PET) irradiated by xenon ions of 11.4 MeV/u is investigated using UV spectrophotometry and gel permeation chromatography (GPC). The cyclic trimer is identified as the predominant diffusing species removed during extraction by dimethyl formamide (DMF). Extraction dynamics is modeled by a rapid (time constant ≈ 2 min) and a slow (time constant ≈ 100 min) diffusion process attributed to the latent ion tracks and to the virgin material, respectively. Thereby latent tracks act simultaneously as irrigation and drainage pipes for the transfer of the solvent into and the extraction of oligomers from the polymer matrix. Thus tracks help to release osmotic pressure differences and to avoid blistering of the unirradiated polymer during solvent exchange. The total extracted mass per track shows a characteristic decrease with increasing ion fluence interpreted as oxygen effect, due to the decreasing supply of oxygen in the sample during irradiation. The extractable mass corresponds to an equivalent track diameter of initially around 10 nm contracting with increasing ion fluence to an asymptotic value around 3 nm.

  17. Non-Ideal Behavior in Solvent Extraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peter Zalupski

    2011-09-01

    This report presents a summary of the work performed to meet FCR&D level 3 milestone M31SW050801, 'Complete the year-end report summarizing FY11 experimental and modeling activities.' This work was carried out under the auspices of the Non-Ideality in Solvent Extraction Systems FCR&D work package. The report summarizes our initial considerations of potential influences that non-ideal chemistry may impose on computational prediction of outcomes in solvent extraction systems. The report is packaged into three separate test cases where a robustness of the prediction by SXFIT program is under scrutiny. The computational exercises presented here emphasize the importance of accurate representation of both an aqueous and organic mixtures when modeling liquid-liquid distribution systems. Case No.1 demonstrates that non-ideal behavior of HDEHP in aliphatic diluents, such as n-dodecane, interferes with the computation. Cases No.2 and No.3 focus on the chemical complexity of aqueous electrolyte mixtures. Both exercises stress the need for an improved thermodynamic model of an aqueous environment present in the europium distribution experiments. Our efforts for year 2 of this project will focus on the improvements of aqueous and non-aqueous solution models using fundamental physical properties of mixtures acquired experimentally in our laboratories.

  18. Solvents, Ethanol, Car Crashes and Tolerance: How Risky is Inhalation of Organic Solvents?

    Science.gov (United States)

    A research program in the National Health and Environmental Effects Research Laboratory of the U.S. EPA has led to some surprising considerations regarding the potential hazard of exposure to low concentrations of solvent vapors. This program involved conducting experiments to ch...

  19. Solvent sorting in (mixed solvent + electrolyte) systems: Time-resolved fluorescence measurements and theory

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Harun Al Rasidgazi; Hemant K Kashyap; Ranjit Biswas

    2015-01-01

    In this manuscriptwe explore electrolyte-induced modification of preferential solvation of a dipolar solute dissolved in a binary mixture of polar solvents. Composition dependence of solvation characteristics at a fixed electrolyte concentration has been followed. Binary mixtures of two different polarities have been employed to understand the competition between solute-ion and solute-solvent interactions. Time-resolved fluorescence Stokes shift and anisotropy have been measured for coumarin 153 (C153) in moderately polar (ethyl acetate + 1-propanol) and strongly polar (acetonitrile + propylene carbonate) binary mixtures at various mixture compositions, and in the corresponding 1.0M solutions of LiClO4. Both the mixtures show red shifts in C153 absorption and fluorescence emission upon increase of mole fraction of the less polar solvent component in presence of the electrolyte. In addition, measured average solvation times become slower and rotation times faster for the above change in the mixture composition. A semi-molecular theory based on solution density fluctuations has been developed and found to successfully capture the essential features of the measured Stokes shift dynamics of these complex multi-component mixtures. Dynamic anisotropy results have been analyzed by using both Stokes-Einstein-Debye (SED) and Dote-Kivelson-Schwartz (DKS) theories. The importance of local solvent structure around the dissolved solute has been stressed.

  20. Hematological Side Effects of Atypical Antipsychotic Drugs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Serap Erdogan

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Atypical antipsychotics cause less frequently extrapyramidal system symptoms, neuroleptic malignant syndrome and hyperprolactinemia than typical antipsychotics. However hematological side effects such as leukopenia and neutropenia could occur during treatment with atypical antipsychotics. These side effects could lead to life threatening situations and the mortality rate due to drug related agranulocytosis is about 5-10%. There are several hypothesis describing the mechanisms underlying drug induced leukopenia and/or neutropenia such as direct toxic effects of these drugs upon the bone marrow or myeloid precursors, immunologic destruction of the granulocytes or supression of the granulopoiesis. Clozapine is the antipsychotic agent which has been most commonly associated with agranulocytosis. A nitrenium ion which is formed by the bioactivation of clozapine is thought to have an important role in the pathophysiogy of this adverse effect. Aside from clozapine, there are several case reports reporting an association between olanzapine, quetiapine, risperidone, ziprasidone, aripiprazole and leukopenia. We did not find any study or case report presenting amisulpride or sulpride related hematological side effects in our literature search. Patients who had hematological side effects during their previous antipsychotic drug treatments and who had lower baseline blood leukocyte counts, have higher risk to develop leukopenia or neutropenia during their current antipsychotic treatment. Once leukopenia and neutropenia develops, drugs thought to be responsible for this side effect should be discontinued or dosages should be lowered. In some cases iniatition of lithium or G-CSF (granulocyte colony-stimulating factor therapy may be helpful in normalizing blood cell counts. Clinicans should avoid any combination of drugs known to cause hematological side effects. Besides during antipsychotic treatment, infection symptoms such as fever, cough, sore throat or

  1. Temporomandibular disorders: the habitual chewing side syndrome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Urbano Santana-Mora

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Temporomandibular disorders are the most common cause of chronic orofacial pain, but, except where they occur subsequent to trauma, their cause remains unknown. This cross-sectional study assessed chewing function (habitual chewing side and the differences of the chewing side and condylar path and lateral anterior guidance angles in participants with chronic unilateral temporomandibular disorder. This is the preliminary report of a randomized trial that aimed to test the effect of a new occlusal adjustment therapy. METHODS: The masticatory function of 21 randomly selected completely dentate participants with chronic temporomandibular disorders (all but one with unilateral symptoms was assessed by observing them eat almonds, inspecting the lateral horizontal movement of the jaw, with kinesiography, and by means of interview. The condylar path in the sagittal plane and the lateral anterior guidance angles with respect to the Frankfort horizontal plane in the frontal plane were measured on both sides in each individual. RESULTS: Sixteen of 20 participants with unilateral symptoms chewed on the affected side; the concordance (Fisher's exact test, P = .003 and the concordance-symmetry level (Kappa coefficient κ = 0.689; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.38 to 0.99; P = .002 were significant. The mean condylar path angle was steeper (53.47(10.88 degrees versus 46.16(7.25 degrees; P = .001, and the mean lateral anterior guidance angle was flatter (41.63(13.35 degrees versus 48.32(9.53 degrees P = .036 on the symptomatic side. DISCUSSION: The results of this study support the use of a new term based on etiology, "habitual chewing side syndrome", instead of the nonspecific symptom-based "temporomandibular joint disorders"; this denomination is characterized in adults by a steeper condylar path, flatter lateral anterior guidance, and habitual chewing on the symptomatic side.

  2. Stochastic level-set variational implicit-solvent approach to solute-solvent interfacial fluctuations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Shenggao; Sun, Hui; Cheng, Li-Tien; Dzubiella, Joachim; Li, Bo; McCammon, J. Andrew

    2016-08-01

    Recent years have seen the initial success of a variational implicit-solvent model (VISM), implemented with a robust level-set method, in capturing efficiently different hydration states and providing quantitatively good estimation of solvation free energies of biomolecules. The level-set minimization of the VISM solvation free-energy functional of all possible solute-solvent interfaces or dielectric boundaries predicts an equilibrium biomolecular conformation that is often close to an initial guess. In this work, we develop a theory in the form of Langevin geometrical flow to incorporate solute-solvent interfacial fluctuations into the VISM. Such fluctuations are crucial to biomolecular conformational changes and binding process. We also develop a stochastic level-set method to numerically implement such a theory. We describe the interfacial fluctuation through the "normal velocity" that is the solute-solvent interfacial force, derive the corresponding stochastic level-set equation in the sense of Stratonovich so that the surface representation is independent of the choice of implicit function, and develop numerical techniques for solving such an equation and processing the numerical data. We apply our computational method to study the dewetting transition in the system of two hydrophobic plates and a hydrophobic cavity of a synthetic host molecule cucurbit[7]uril. Numerical simulations demonstrate that our approach can describe an underlying system jumping out of a local minimum of the free-energy functional and can capture dewetting transitions of hydrophobic systems. In the case of two hydrophobic plates, we find that the wavelength of interfacial fluctuations has a strong influence to the dewetting transition. In addition, we find that the estimated energy barrier of the dewetting transition scales quadratically with the inter-plate distance, agreeing well with existing studies of molecular dynamics simulations. Our work is a first step toward the inclusion of

  3. Stochastic level-set variational implicit-solvent approach to solute-solvent interfacial fluctuations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Shenggao; Sun, Hui; Cheng, Li-Tien; Dzubiella, Joachim; Li, Bo; McCammon, J Andrew

    2016-08-01

    Recent years have seen the initial success of a variational implicit-solvent model (VISM), implemented with a robust level-set method, in capturing efficiently different hydration states and providing quantitatively good estimation of solvation free energies of biomolecules. The level-set minimization of the VISM solvation free-energy functional of all possible solute-solvent interfaces or dielectric boundaries predicts an equilibrium biomolecular conformation that is often close to an initial guess. In this work, we develop a theory in the form of Langevin geometrical flow to incorporate solute-solvent interfacial fluctuations into the VISM. Such fluctuations are crucial to biomolecular conformational changes and binding process. We also develop a stochastic level-set method to numerically implement such a theory. We describe the interfacial fluctuation through the "normal velocity" that is the solute-solvent interfacial force, derive the corresponding stochastic level-set equation in the sense of Stratonovich so that the surface representation is independent of the choice of implicit function, and develop numerical techniques for solving such an equation and processing the numerical data. We apply our computational method to study the dewetting transition in the system of two hydrophobic plates and a hydrophobic cavity of a synthetic host molecule cucurbit[7]uril. Numerical simulations demonstrate that our approach can describe an underlying system jumping out of a local minimum of the free-energy functional and can capture dewetting transitions of hydrophobic systems. In the case of two hydrophobic plates, we find that the wavelength of interfacial fluctuations has a strong influence to the dewetting transition. In addition, we find that the estimated energy barrier of the dewetting transition scales quadratically with the inter-plate distance, agreeing well with existing studies of molecular dynamics simulations. Our work is a first step toward the inclusion of

  4. Stochastic level-set variational implicit-solvent approach to solute-solvent interfacial fluctuations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Shenggao; Sun, Hui; Cheng, Li-Tien; Dzubiella, Joachim; Li, Bo; McCammon, J Andrew

    2016-08-01

    Recent years have seen the initial success of a variational implicit-solvent model (VISM), implemented with a robust level-set method, in capturing efficiently different hydration states and providing quantitatively good estimation of solvation free energies of biomolecules. The level-set minimization of the VISM solvation free-energy functional of all possible solute-solvent interfaces or dielectric boundaries predicts an equilibrium biomolecular conformation that is often close to an initial guess. In this work, we develop a theory in the form of Langevin geometrical flow to incorporate solute-solvent interfacial fluctuations into the VISM. Such fluctuations are crucial to biomolecular conformational changes and binding process. We also develop a stochastic level-set method to numerically implement such a theory. We describe the interfacial fluctuation through the "normal velocity" that is the solute-solvent interfacial force, derive the corresponding stochastic level-set equation in the sense of Stratonovich so that the surface representation is independent of the choice of implicit function, and develop numerical techniques for solving such an equation and processing the numerical data. We apply our computational method to study the dewetting transition in the system of two hydrophobic plates and a hydrophobic cavity of a synthetic host molecule cucurbit[7]uril. Numerical simulations demonstrate that our approach can describe an underlying system jumping out of a local minimum of the free-energy functional and can capture dewetting transitions of hydrophobic systems. In the case of two hydrophobic plates, we find that the wavelength of interfacial fluctuations has a strong influence to the dewetting transition. In addition, we find that the estimated energy barrier of the dewetting transition scales quadratically with the inter-plate distance, agreeing well with existing studies of molecular dynamics simulations. Our work is a first step toward the inclusion of

  5. Effects of solvent and structure on the reactivity of 6-substituted nicotinic acids with diazodiphenylmethane in aprotic solvents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    BRATISLAV Ž. JOVANOVIĆ

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available The rate constants for the reactions of diazodiphenylmethane (DDM with 6-substituted nicotinic acids in aprotic solvents at 30 °C were determined. The obtained second order rate constants in aprotic solvents, together with literature data for benzoic and nicotinic acids in protic solvents, were used for the calculation of solvent effects, employing the Kamlet-Taft solvatochromic equation (linear solvation energy relationship – LSER in the form: log k = log k0 + s* + a + b. The correlations of the kinetic data were performed by means of multiple linear regression analysis taking appropriate solvent parameters. The sign of the equation coefficients (s, a and b were in agreement with the postulated reaction mechanism, and the mode of the solvent influences on the reaction rate is discussed based on the correlation results. A similar contribution of the non-specific solvent effect and electrophilic solvation was observed for all acids, while the highest contribution of nucleophilic solvation was influenced by their high acidity. Correlation analysis of the rate data with substituent p parameters in an appropriate solvent using the Hammett equation was also performed. The substituent effect on the acid reactivity was higher in aprotic solvents of higher dipolarity/polarizability. The mode of the transmission of the substituent effect is discussed in light of the contribution of solute–solvent interaction on the acid reactivity.

  6. DFT-based simulations of IR amide I' spectra for a small protein in solution. Comparison of explicit and empirical solvent models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grahnen, Johan A; Amunson, Krista E; Kubelka, Jan

    2010-10-14

    Infrared (IR) amide I' spectra are widely used for investigations of the structural properties of proteins in aqueous solution. For analysis of the experimental data, it is necessary to separate the spectral features due to the backbone conformation from those arising from other factors, in particular the interaction with solvent. We investigate the effects of solvation on amide I' spectra for a small 40-residue helix-turn-helix protein by theoretical simulations based on density functional theory (DFT). The vibrational force fields and intensity parameters for the protein amide backbone are constructed by transfer from smaller heptaamide fragments; the side chains are neglected in the DFT calculations. Solvent is modeled at two different levels: first as explicit water hydrogen bonded to the surface amide groups, treated at the same DFT level, and, second, using the electrostatic map approach combined with molecular dynamics (MD) simulation. Motional narrowing of the spectral band shapes due to averaging over the fast solvent fluctuation is introduced by use of the time-averaging approximation (TAA). The simulations are compared with the experimental amide I', including two (13)C isotopically edited spectra, corrected for the side-chain signals. Both solvent models are consistent with the asymmetric experimental band shape, which arises from the differential solvation of the amide backbone. However, the effects of (13)C isotopic labeling are best captured by the gas-phase calculations. The limitations of the solvent models and implications for the theoretical simulations of protein amide vibrational spectra are discussed.

  7. [Selected aspects of oral contraception side effects].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolski, Hubert

    2014-12-01

    The first hormonal pill was approved in the 60s of the twentieth century Since that time, oral contraception has been used worldwide by dozens of women due to its high availability as well as relative ease and safety of taking. The main side effects of oral contraception include elevated risk for venous thromboembolism (VTE). Estrogens increase the probability of VTE development, depending on the dose in medication, and third-generation progestins increase the risk of VTE development more than older-generation progestins. Also, the coexistence of hereditary thrombophilia increases the risk of VTE development in women using oral contraceptives. Other side effects include changes in the carbohydrate and lipid economy Progestins in oral contraceptives decrease HDL cholesterol levels but increase LDL cholesterol and total cholesterol levels. Additionally estrogens are a recognized mitogenic factor for the epithelium of the mammary gland, acting proliferative on the glandular tissue and in the same way influence on the increased risk of breast cancer development. Patients sometimes complain about some subjective side symptoms such as headache, mood changes, nausea, back pain, breast pain and swelling, as well as decreased libido. Some patients discontinue oral contraception due to fear of side effects or temporary ailments before con- sulting their doctor what may result in unintended pregnancy The aim of the following paper was to present most frequent side effects of oral contraception, ways of their moni- toring and diagnosis. PMID:25669065

  8. Method for Selection of Solvents for Promotion of Organic Reactions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gani, Rafiqul; Jiménez-González, Concepción; Constable, David J.C.

    2005-01-01

    A method to select appropriate green solvents for the promotion of a class of organic reactions has been developed. The method combines knowledge from industrial practice and physical insights with computer-aided property estimation tools for selection/design of solvents. In particular, it employs...... estimates of thermodynamic properties to generate a knowledge base of reaction, solvent and environment related properties that directly or indirectly influence the rate and/or conversion of a given reaction. Solvents are selected using a rules-based procedure where the estimated reaction-solvent properties...... and the solvent-environmental properties guide the decision making process. The current method is applicable only to organic reactions occurring in the liquid phase. Another gas or solid phase, which may or may not be at equilibrium with the reacting liquid phase, may also be present. The objective of this method...

  9. The effect of solvent choice on plutonium extraction with TTA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper reports the relative plutonium extraction rate from 1M nitric acid with thenoyltrifluoroacetone (TTA) dissolved in several different solvents. The marked differences in extraction rate are discussed in terms of the extraction mechanism. Experiments with varied phase mixing conditions, and with varied TTA or nitrate concentrations, have been performed to help clarify the mechanisms and explain the differences in extraction rate. The results show that in several solvents, plutonium is extracted as a mixed nitrate-TTA complex. The suitability of the various solvents for differing applications was also examined. Methyl benzoate is an ideal solvent when preparing counting sources from the solvent phase. Chloroform is preferable as solvent when the plutonium is to be backwashed into nitric acid. (author)

  10. A new solvent suppression method via radiation damping effect

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Cui Xiao-Hong; Peng Ling; Zhang Zhen-Min; Cai Shu-Hui; Chen Zhong

    2011-01-01

    Radiation damping effects induced by the dominated solvent in a solution sample can be applied to suppress the solvent signal.The precession pathway and rate back to equilibrium state between solute and solvent spins are different under radiation damping.In this paper,a series of pulse sequences using radiation damping were designed for the solvent suppression in nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy.Compared to the WATERGATE method,the solute signals adjacent to the solvent would not be influenced by using the radiation damping method.The one-dimensional (1D) 1H NMR,two-dimensional (2D) gCOSY,and J-resolved experimental results show the practicability of solvent suppression via radiation damping effects in 1D and 2D NMR spectroscopy.

  11. Automated spray cleaning using flammable solvents in a glovebox

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia, P.; Meirans, L.

    1998-05-01

    The phase-out of the ozone-depleting solvents has forced industry to look to solvents such as alcohol, terpenes and other flammable solvents to perform the critical cleaning processes. These solvents are not as efficient as the ozone-depleting solvents in terms of soil loading, cleaning time and drying when used in standard cleaning processes such as manual sprays or ultrasonic baths. They also require special equipment designs to meet part cleaning specifications and operator safety requirements. This paper describes a cleaning system that incorporates the automated spraying of flammable solvents to effectively perform precision cleaning processes. Key to the project`s success was the development of software that controls the robotic system and automatically generates robotic cleaning paths from three dimensional CAD models of the items to be cleaned.

  12. Trace elements retained in washed nuclear fuel reprocessing solvents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Analysis of purified TBP extractant from solvent extraction processes at Savannah River Plant showed several stable elements and several long-lived radioisotopes. Stable elements Al, Na, Br, Ce, Hg, and Sm are found in trace quantities in the solvent. The only stable metallic element consistently found in the solvent was Al, with a concentration which varies from about 30 ppM to about 10 ppM. The halogens Br and Cl appear to be found in the solvent systems as organo halides. Radionuclides found were principally 106Ru, 129I, 3H, 235U, and 239Pu. The 129I concentration was about 1 ppM in the first solvent extraction cycle of each facility. In the other cycles, 129I concentration varied from about 0.1 to 0.5 ppM. Both 129I and 3H appear to be in the organic solvent as a result of exchange with hydrogen

  13. Solvent degradation and cleanup: a survey and recent ORNL studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mailen, J.C.; Tallent, O.K.

    1984-01-01

    This paper surveys the mechanisms for degradation of the tributyl phosphate and diluent components of Purex solvent by acid and radiation, reviews the problems encountered in plant operations resulting from the presence of these degradation products, and discusses methods for minimizing the formation of degradation products and accomplishing their removal. Scrubbing solutions containing sodium carbonate or hydroxylamine salts and secondary cleanup of solvents using solid sorbents are evaluated. Finally, recommendations for improved solvent cleanup are presented. 50 references, 4 figures, 3 tables.

  14. Solvent degradation and cleanup: a survey and recent ORNL studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper surveys the mechanisms for degradation of the tributyl phosphate and diluent components of Purex solvent by acid and radiation, reviews the problems encountered in plant operations resulting from the presence of these degradation products, and discusses methods for minimizing the formation of degradation products and accomplishing their removal. Scrubbing solutions containing sodium carbonate or hydroxylamine salts and secondary cleanup of solvents using solid sorbents are evaluated. Finally, recommendations for improved solvent cleanup are presented. 50 references, 4 figures, 3 tables

  15. Challenges in subsurface in situ remediation of chlorinated solvents

    OpenAIRE

    Broholm, Mette Martina; Fjordbøge, Annika Sidelmann; Christiansen, Camilla Maymann; Hønning, J.; B. H. Hansen; Nedergaard, L. W.; Kern, Kristina; Uthuppu, Basil; Jakobsen, Mogens Havsteen; Kjeldsen, Peter; Bjerg, Poul Løgstrup; Ottesen, L.

    2014-01-01

    Chlorinated solvent source zones in the subsurface pose a continuous threat to groundwater quality at many sites worldwide. In situ remediation of these sites is particularly challenging in heterogeneous fractured media and where the solvents are present as DNAPL. In situ remediation by chemical as well as biological degradation of chlorinated solvents is a contact sport and requires direct contact between the contaminant and the reactants and/or degrading microorganisms. In fractured geologi...

  16. Properties and thermal behavior of natural deep eutectic solvents

    OpenAIRE

    Craveiro, R.; Aroso, Ivo Manuel Ascensão; Flammia, V.; Carvalho, T.; Viciosa, M. T.; Dionísio, M.; Barreiros, S.; Reis, R. L.; Duarte, Ana Rita C.; Paiva, A.

    2016-01-01

    Natural deep eutectic solvents (NADES) have shown to be promising sustainable media for a wide range of applications. Nonetheless, very limited data is available on the properties of these solvents. A more comprehensive body of data on NADES is required for a deeper understanding of these solvents at molecular level, which will undoubtedly foster the development of new applications. NADES based on choline chloride, organic acids, amino acids and sugars were prepared, and their density, therma...

  17. Alcohols as hydrogen-donor solvents for treatment of coal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, David S.; Blessing, James E.

    1981-01-01

    A method for the hydroconversion of coal by solvent treatment at elevated temperatures and pressure wherein an alcohol having an .alpha.-hydrogen atom, particularly a secondary alcohol such as isopropanol, is utilized as a hydrogen donor solvent. In a particular embodiment, a base capable of providing a catalytically effective amount of the corresponding alcoholate anion under the solvent treatment conditions is added to catalyze the alcohol-coal reaction.

  18. Solvent mediated self-assembly of solids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Yoreo, J.; Wilson, W.D.; Palmore, T.

    1997-12-12

    Solvent-mediated crystallization represents a robust approach to self-assembly of nanostructures and microstructures. In organic systems, the relative ease with which the structure of hydrogen- bonded molecules can be manipulated allows for generation of a wide variety of nanoscale crystal structures. In living organisms, control over the micron-to-millimeter form of inorganic crystals is achieved through introduction of bio-organic molecules. The purpose of this proposal is to understand the interplay between solution chemistry, molecular structure, surface chemistry, and the processes of nucleation and crystal growth in solvent-mediated systems, with the goal of developing the atomic and molecular basis of a solvent-mediated self-assembly technology. We will achieve this purpose by: (1) utilizing an atomic force microscopy (AFM) approach that provides in situ, real time imaging during growth from solutions, (2) by modifying kinetic Monte Carlo (KMC) models to include solution-surface kinetics, (3) by introducing quantum chemistry (QC) calculations of the potentials of the relevant chemical species and the near-surface structure of the solution, and (4) by utilizing molecular dynamics (MD) simulations to identify the minimum energy pathways to the solid state. Our work will focus on two systems chosen to address both the manometer and micron-to-millimeter length scales of assembly, the family of 2,5- diketopiperazines (X-DKPs) and the system of CaCO{sub 3} with amino acids. Using AFM, we will record the evolution of surface morphology, critical lengths, step speeds, and step-step interactions as a function of supersaturation and temperature. In the case of the X-DKPs, these measurements will be repeated as the molecular structure of the growth unit is varied. In the case of CaCO{sub 3}, they will be performed as a function of solution chemistry including pH, ionic strength, and amino acid content. In addition, we will measure nucleation rates and orientations of

  19. The DarkSide-50 outer detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westerdale, S.; Agnes, P.; Agostino, L.; Albuquerque, I. F. M.; Alexander, T.; Alton, A. K.; Arisaka, K.; Back, H. O.; Baldin, B.; Biery, K.; Bonfini, G.; Bossa, M.; Bottino, B.; Brigatti, A.; Brodsky, J.; Budano, F.; Bussino, S.; Cadeddu, M.; Cadonati, L.; Cadoni, M.; Calaprice, F.; Canci, N.; Candela, A.; Cao, H.; Cariello, M.; Carlini, M.; Catalanotti, S.; Cavalcante, P.; Chepurnov, A.; Cocco, A. G.; Covone, G.; D’Angelo, D.; D’Incecco, M.; Davini, S.; De Cecco, S.; De Deo, M.; De Vincenzi, M.; Derbin, A.; Devoto, A.; Di Eusanio, F.; Di Pietro, G.; Edkins, E.; Empl, A.; Fan, A.; Fiorillo, G.; Fomenko, K.; Foster, G.; Franco, D.; Gabriele, F.; Galbiati, C.; Giganti, C.; Goretti, A. M.; Granato, F.; Grandi, L.; Gromov, M.; Guan, M.; Guardincerri, Y.; Hackett, B. R.; Herner, K. R.; Hungerford, E. V.; Aldo, Ianni; Andrea, Ianni; James, I.; Jollet, C.; Keeter, K.; Kendziora, C. L.; Kobychev, V.; Koh, G.; Korablev, D.; Korga, G.; Kubankin, A.; Li, X.; Lissia, M.; Lombardi, P.; Luitz, S.; Ma, Y.; Machulin, I. N.; Mandarano, A.; Mari, S. M.; Maricic, J.; Marini, L.; Martoff, C. J.; Meregaglia, A.; Meyers, P. D.; Miletic, T.; Milincic, R.; Montanari, D.; Monte, A.; Montuschi, M.; Monzani, M. E.; Mosteiro, P.; Mount, B. J.; Muratova, V. N.; Musico, P.; Napolitano, J.; Orsini, M.; Ortica, F.; Pagani, L.; Pallavicini, M.; Pantic, E.; Parmeggiano, S.; Pelczar, K.; Pelliccia, N.; Perasso, S.; Pocar, A.; Pordes, S.; Pugachev, D. A.; Qian, H.; Randle, K.; Ranucci, G.; Razeto, A.; Reinhold, B.; Renshaw, A. L.; Romani, A.; Rossi, B.; Rossi, N.; Rountree, S. D.; Sablone, D.; Saggese, P.; Saldanha, R.; Sands, W.; Sangiorgio, S.; Savarese, C.; Segreto, E.; Semenov, D. A.; Shields, E.; Singh, P. N.; DSkorokhvatov, M.; Smirnov, O.; Sotnikov, A.; Stanford, C.; Suvorov, Y.; Tartaglia, R.; Tatarowicz, J.; Testera, G.; Tonazzo, A.; Trinchese, P.; Unzhakov, E. V.; Vishneva, A.; Vogelaar, B.; Wada, M.; Walker, S.; Wang, H.; Wang, Y.; Watson, A. W.; Wilhelmi, J.; Wojcik, M. M.; Xiang, X.; Xu, J.; Yang, C.; Yoo, J.; Zavatarelli, S.; Zec, A.; Zhong, W.; Zhu, C.; Zuzel, G.; The DarkSide Collaboration

    2016-05-01

    DarkSide-50 is a dark matter detection experiment searching for Weakly Interacting Massive Particles (WIMPs), in Gran Sasso National Laboratory. For experiments like DarkSide-50, neutrons are one of the primary backgrounds that can mimic WIMP signals. The experiment consists of three nested detectors: a liquid argon time projection chamber surrounded by two outer detectors. The outermost detector is a 10 m by 11 m cylindrical water Cherenkov detector with 80 PMTs, designed to provide shielding and muon vetoing. Inside the water Cherenkov detector is the 4 m diameter spherical boron-loaded liquid scintillator veto, with a cocktail of pseudocumene, trimethyl borate, and PPO wavelength shifter, designed to provide shielding, neutron vetoing, and in situ measurements of the TPC backgrounds. We present design and performance details of the DarkSide-50 outer detectors.

  20. Communication technologies for demand side management

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uuspaeae, P. [VTT Energy, Espoo (Finland)

    1998-08-01

    The scope of this research is data communications for electric utilities, specifically for the purposes of Demand Side Management (DSM). Demand Side Management has the objective to change the customer`s end use of energy in a manner that benefits both the customer and the utility. For example, peak demand may be reduced, and the peak demand may be relocated to off peak periods. Thus additional investments in generation and network may be avoided. A number of Demand Side Management functions can be implemented if a communication system is available between the Electric Utility and the Customer. The total communication capacity that is needed, will depend on several factors, such as the functions that are chosen for DSM, and on the number and type of customers. Some functions may be handled with one-way communications, while some other functions need to have two-way communication