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Sample records for caustic leach rate

  1. EFRT M-12 Issue Resolution: Caustic Leach Rate Constants from PEP and Laboratory-Scale Tests

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mahoney, Lenna A.; Rassat, Scot D.; Eslinger, Paul W.; Aaberg, Rosanne L.; Aker, Pamela M.; Golovich, Elizabeth C.; Hanson, Brady D.; Hausmann, Tom S.; Huckaby, James L.; Kurath, Dean E.; Minette, Michael J.; Sundaram, S. K.; Yokuda, Satoru T.

    2009-08-14

    concentrated to nominally 20 wt% solids using cross-flow ultrafiltration before adding caustic. The work described in this report addresses the kinetics of caustic leach under WTP conditions, based on tests performed with a Hanford waste simulant. The tests were completed at the lab-scale and in the PEP, which is a 1/4.5-scale mock-up of key PTF process equipment. The purpose of this report is to summarize the results from both scales that are related to caustic leach chemistry to support a scale-up factor for the submodels to be used in the G2 model, which predicts WTP operating performance. The scale-up factor will take the form of an adjustment factor for the rate constant in the boehmite leach kinetic equation in the G2 model.

  2. EFRT M-12 Issue Resolution: Caustic-Leach Rate Constants from PEP and Laboratory-Scale Tests

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mahoney, Lenna A.; Rassat, Scot D.; Eslinger, Paul W.; Aaberg, Rosanne L.; Aker, Pamela M.; Golovich, Elizabeth C.; Hanson, Brady D.; Hausmann, Tom S.; Huckaby, James L.; Kurath, Dean E.; Minette, Michael J.; Sundaram, S. K.; Yokuda, Satoru T.

    2010-01-01

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) has been tasked by Bechtel National Inc. (BNI) on the River Protection Project-Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (RPP-WTP) project to perform research and development activities to resolve technical issues identified for the Pretreatment Facility (PTF). The Pretreatment Engineering Platform (PEP) was designed, constructed and operated as part of a plan to respond to issue M12, “Undemonstrated Leaching Processes” of the External Flowsheet Review Team (EFRT) issue response plan.( ) The PEP is a 1/4.5-scale test platform designed to simulate the WTP pretreatment caustic leaching, oxidative leaching, ultrafiltration solids concentration, and slurry washing processes. The PEP replicates the WTP leaching processes using prototypic equipment and control strategies. The PEP also includes non-prototypic ancillary equipment to support the core processing. The work described in this report addresses caustic leaching under WTP conditions, based on tests performed with a Hanford waste simulant. Because gibbsite leaching kinetics are rapid (gibbsite is expected to be dissolved by the time the final leach temperature is reached), boehmite leach kinetics are the main focus of the caustic-leach tests. The tests were completed at the laboratory-scale and in the PEP, which is a 1/4.5-scale mock-up of key PTF process equipment. Two laboratory-scale caustic-leach tests were performed for each of the PEP runs. For each PEP run, unleached slurry was taken from the PEP caustic-leach vessel for one batch and used as feed for both of the corresponding laboratory-scale tests.

  3. Caustic Leaching of Sludges from Selected Hanford Tanks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chase, C.W.; Egan, B.Z.; Spencer, B.B.

    1998-08-01

    The objective of this project was to measure the caustic dissolution behavior of sludge components from selected Hanford waste tank sludge samples under different conditions. The dissolution of aluminum, chromium, and other constituents of actual sludge samples in aqueous sodium hydroxide solution was evaluated using various values of temperature, sodium hydroxide concentration, volume of caustic solution per unit mass of sludge (liquid:solids ratio), and leaching time.

  4. Comparison of ultrasound-assisted and traditional caustic leaching of spent cathode carbon (SCC) from aluminum electrolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Jin; Yuan, Jie; Tian, Zhongliang; Yang, Kai; Yao, Zhen; Yu, Bailie; Zhang, Liuyun

    2018-01-01

    The spent cathode carbon (SCC) from aluminum electrolysis was subjected to caustic leaching to investigate the different effects of ultrasound-assisted and traditional methods on element fluorine (F) leaching rate and leaching residue carbon content. Sodium hydroxide (NaOH) dissolved in deionized water was used as the reaction system. Through single-factor experiments and a comparison of two leaching techniques, the optimum F leaching rate and residue carbon content for ultrasound-assisted leaching process were obtained at a temperature of 70°C, residue time of 40min, initial mass ratio of alkali to SCC (initial alkali-to-material ratio) of 0.6, liquid-to-solid ratio of 10mL/g, and ultrasonic power of 400W, respectively. Under the optimal conditions, the leaching residue carbon content was 94.72%, 2.19% larger than the carbon content of traditional leaching residue. Leaching wastewater was treated with calcium chloride (CaCl 2 ) and bleaching powder and the treated wastewater was recycled caustic solution. All in all, benefiting from advantage of the ultrasonication effects, ultrasound-assisted caustic leaching on spent cathode carbon had 55.6% shorter residue time than the traditional process with a higher impurity removal rate. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Washing and caustic leaching of Hanford tank sludges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lumetta, G.J.; Rapko, B.M.; Colton, N.G.

    1994-01-01

    Methods are being developed to treat and dispose of large volumes of radioactive wastes stored in underground tanks at the U.S. Department of Energy's Hanford Site. The wastes will be partitioned into high-level waste (HLW) and low-level waste (LLW) fractions. The HLW will be vitrified into borosilicate glass and disposed of in a geologic repository, while the LLW will be immobilized in a glass matrix and will likely be disposed of by shallow burial at the Hanford Site. The wastes must be pretreated to reduce the volume of the HLW fraction, so that vitrification and disposal costs can be minimized. The current baseline process for pretreating Hanford tank sludges is to leach the sludge under caustic conditions, then remove the solubilized components of the sludge by water washing. Tests of this method have been performed with samples taken from several different tanks at Hanford. The results of these tests are presented in terms of the composition of the sludge before and after leaching. X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy coupled with electron dispersive x-ray techniques have been used to identify the phases in the untreated and treated sludges

  6. Caustic leaching of composite AZ-101/AZ-102 Hanford tank sludge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rapko, B.M.; Wagner, M.J.

    1997-07-01

    To reduce the quantity (and hence the cost) of glass canisters needed for disposing of high-level radioactive wastes from the Hanford tank farms, pretreatment processes are needed to remove as much nonradioactive material as possible. This report describes the results of a laboratory-scale caustic leaching test performed on a composite derived from a combination of 241-AZ-101 and 241-AZ-102 Hanford Tank sludges. The goals of this FY 1996 test were to evaluate the effectiveness of caustic leaching on removing key components from the sludge and to evaluate the effectiveness of varying the free-hydroxide concentrations by incrementally increasing the free hydroxide concentration of the leach steps up to 3 M free hydroxide. Particle-size analysis of the treated and untreated sludge indicated that the size and range of the sludge particles remained essentially unchanged by the caustic leaching treatment. Both before and after caustic leaching, a particle range of 0.2 microm to 50 microm was observed, with mean particle diameters of 8.5 to 9 microm based on the volume distribution and mean particle diameters of 0.3 to 0.4 microm based on the number distribution

  7. Laboratory Demonstration of the Pretreatment Process with Caustic and Oxidative Leaching Using Actual Hanford Tank Waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fiskum, Sandra K.; Billing, Justin M.; Buck, Edgar C.; Daniel, Richard C.; Draper, Kathryn E.; Edwards, Matthew K.; Jenson, Evan D.; Kozelisky, Anne E.; MacFarlan, Paul J.; Peterson, Reid A.; Shimskey, Rick W.; Snow, Lanee A.

    2009-01-01

    This report describes the bench-scale pretreatment processing of actual tank waste materials through the entire baseline WTP pretreatment flowsheet in an effort to demonstrate the efficacy of the defined leaching processes on actual Hanford tank waste sludge and the potential impacts on downstream pretreatment processing. The test material was a combination of reduction oxidation (REDOX) tank waste composited materials containing aluminum primarily in the form of boehmite and dissolved S saltcake containing Cr(III)-rich entrained solids. The pretreatment processing steps tested included • caustic leaching for Al removal • solids crossflow filtration through the cell unit filter (CUF) • stepwise solids washing using decreasing concentrations of sodium hydroxide with filtration through the CUF • oxidative leaching using sodium permanganate for removing Cr • solids filtration with the CUF • follow-on solids washing and filtration through the CUF • ion exchange processing for Cs removal • evaporation processing of waste stream recycle for volume reduction • combination of the evaporated product with dissolved saltcake. The effectiveness of each process step was evaluated by following the mass balance of key components (such as Al, B, Cd, Cr, Pu, Ni, Mn, and Fe), demonstrating component (Al, Cr, Cs) removal, demonstrating filterability by evaluating filter flux rates under various processing conditions (transmembrane pressure, crossflow velocities, wt% undissolved solids, and PSD) and filter fouling, and identifying potential issues for WTP. The filterability was reported separately (Shimskey et al. 2008) and is not repeated herein.

  8. Molten-Caustic-Leaching (Gravimelt) system integration project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1990-03-01

    The objectives of the tasks covered in this document are to design, construct, and shakedown a 20 pounds of coal per hour integrated MCL test circuit to demonstrate the feasibility of the technology for producing a demineralized and desulfurized coal that meets New Source Performance Standards (NSPS). These objectives were met with the construction and shakedown of the integrated test circuit. Although mild kiln conditions (340{degree}C and 2 hours residence time) and a low caustic to coal ratio (1 to 1) were used, the combination of continuous operation and rigorous exclusion of air from the system allowed the production of MCL coal, from high sulfur, high ash coal, which has virtually no carbonate and volatiles loss, which does not form excessively wet cakes in during washing, and which has low alkali retention by the product MCL coal. Equipment performance was generally consistent with design requirements.

  9. Washing and Caustic Leaching of Hanford Tank Sludge: Results of FY 1998 Studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    GJ Lumetta; BM Rapko; J Liu; DJ Temer; RD Hunt

    1998-12-11

    Sludge washing and parametric caustic leaching tests were performed on sludge samples tiom five Hanford tanks: B-101, BX-1 10, BX-112, C-102, and S-101. These studies examined the effects of both dilute hydroxide washing and caustic leaching on the composition of the residual sludge solids. ` Dilute hydroxide washing removed from <1 to 25% of the Al, -20 to 45% of the Cr, -25 to 97% of the P, and 63 to 99% of the Na from the Hdord tank sludge samples examined. The partial removal of these elements was likely due to the presence of water-soluble sodium salts of aluminate, chromate, hydroxide, nitrate, nitrite, and phosphate, either in the interstitial liquid or as dried salts.

  10. Washing and caustic leaching of Hanford tank sludge: Results of FY 1997 studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lumetta, G.J.; Burgeson, I.E.; Wagner, M.J.; Liu, J.; Chen, Y.L.

    1997-08-01

    The current plan for remediating the Hanford tank farms consists of waste retrieval, pretreatment, treatment (immobilization), and disposal. The tank wastes will be partitioned into high-level and low-level fractions. The HLW will be immobilized in a borosilicate glass matrix; the resulting glass canisters will then be disposed of in a geologic repository. Because of the expected high cost of HLW vitrification and geologic disposal, pretreatment processes will be implemented to reduce the volume of immobilized high-level waste (IHLW). Caustic leaching (sometimes referred to as enhanced sludge washing or ESW) represents the baseline method for pretreating Hanford tank sludges. Caustic leaching is expected to remove a large fraction of the Al, which is present in large quantities in Hanford tank sludges. A significant portion of the P is also expected to be removed from the sludge by metathesis of water-insoluble metal phosphates to insoluble hydroxides and soluble Na{sub 3}PO{sub 4}. Similar metathesis reactions can occur for insoluble sulfate salts, allowing the removal of sulfate from the HLW stream. This report describes the sludge washing and caustic leaching tests performed at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory in FY 1996. The sludges used in this study were taken from Hanford tanks AN-104, BY-108, S-101, and S-111.

  11. Molten-Caustic-Leaching (Gravimelt) system integration project. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-03-01

    The objectives of this program were to design, construct, shakedown and operate an integrated MCL test circuit to demonstrate the technical capability of the process for producing a demineralized and desulfurized coal that meets New Source Performance Standards (NSPS), to test process conditions aimed at lower costs, and to deliver product coal. These objectives were met by the procurement, construction, and operation of the integrated test circuit. Shakedown and a 63-test process matrix resulted in the production of about 3,700 pounds of treated coal. Product MCL coal may be used to displace oil in some turbine and diesel engines and may be used in the retrofit of oil-fired boilers. Two high sulfur, high ash coals and one medium sulfur, high ash coal representative of the Eastern United States coal production were processed: Pittsburgh No. 8 (Powhatan No. 6 mine), Kentucky No. 9, and Pittsburgh No. 8 (Blacksville No. 2 mine). Although mild kiln operating conditions (325 to 415{degree}C and 1 to 2.3 hours residence time) and low caustic to coal ratios (1:1 to 3:1) were used, the combination of continuous operation and rigorous exclusion of air from the system allowed the production of MCL coal that had product sulfur content was well below NSPS standards, very low carbonate production, very little volatile losses, and low alkali retention by the product MCL coal. Optimization testing resulted in a product coal containing 0.2 to 0.4 percent sulfur (0.26 to 0.6 lbs SO{sub 2}/million Btu) and 0.15 to 0.5 percent ash with more than 90 percent organic sulfur removal, {approximately}95 percent SO{sub 2} reduction from run-of-mine coal, {approximately}91 percent SO{sub 2} reduction from precleaned process feed coal, and with heat content of about 14,000 Btu per pound.

  12. Mechanism of Phosphorus Removal from Hanford Tank Sludge by Caustic Leaching

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lumetta, Gregg J.

    2008-01-01

    Two experiments were conducted to explore the mechanism by which phosphorus is removed from Hanford tank sludge by caustic leaching. In the first experiment, a series of phosphate salts were treated with 3 M NaOH under conditions prototypic of the actual leaching process to be performed in the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP). The phosphates used were aluminum phosphate, bismuth phosphate, chromium(III) phosphate, and β-tri-calcium phosphate; all of these phases have previously been determined to exist in Hanford tank sludge. The leachate solution was sampled at selected time intervals and analyzed for the specific metal ion involved (Al, Bi, Ca, or Cr) and for P (total and as phosphate). The solids remaining after completion of the caustic leaching step were analyzed to determine the reaction product. In the second experiment, the dependence of P removal from bismuth phosphate was examined as a function of the hydroxide ion concentration. It was anticipated that a plot of log[phosphate] versus log[hydroxide] would provide insight into the phosphorus-removal mechanism. This report describes the test activities outlined in Section 6.3.2.1, Preliminary Investigation of Phosphate Dissolution, in Test Plan TP-RPP-WTP-467, Rev.1. The objectives, success criteria, and test conditions of Section 6.3.2.1 are summarized here

  13. Mechanism of Phosphorus Removal from Hanford Tank Sludge by Caustic Leaching

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lumetta, Gregg J. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2008-03-05

    Two experiments were conducted to explore the mechanism by which phosphorus is removed from Hanford tank sludge by caustic leaching. In the first experiment, a series of phosphate salts were treated with 3 M NaOH under conditions prototypic of the actual leaching process to be performed in the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP). The phosphates used were aluminum phosphate, bismuth phosphate, chromium(III) phosphate, and β-tri-calcium phosphate; all of these phases have previously been determined to exist in Hanford tank sludge. The leachate solution was sampled at selected time intervals and analyzed for the specific metal ion involved (Al, Bi, Ca, or Cr) and for P (total and as phosphate). The solids remaining after completion of the caustic leaching step were analyzed to determine the reaction product. In the second experiment, the dependence of P removal from bismuth phosphate was examined as a function of the hydroxide ion concentration. It was anticipated that a plot of log[phosphate] versus log[hydroxide] would provide insight into the phosphorus-removal mechanism. This report describes the test activities outlined in Section 6.3.2.1, Preliminary Investigation of Phosphate Dissolution, in Test Plan TP-RPP-WTP-467, Rev.1. The objectives, success criteria, and test conditions of Section 6.3.2.1 are summarized here.

  14. PEP Integrated Test D Run Report Caustic and Oxidative Leaching in UFP-VSL-T02A

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sevigny, Gary J.; Bredt, Ofelia P.; Burns, Carolyn A.; Kurath, Dean E.; Geeting, John GH; Golovich, Elizabeth C.; Guzman-Leong, Consuelo E.; Josephson, Gary B.

    2009-12-11

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) has been tasked by Bechtel National Inc. (BNI) on the River Protection Project-Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (RPP-WTP) project to perform research and development activities to resolve technical issues identified for the Pretreatment Facility (PTF). The Pretreatment Engineering Platform (PEP) was designed, constructed and operated as part of a plan to respond to issue M12, "Undemonstrated Leaching Processes" of the External Flowsheet Review Team (EFRT) issue response plan. The PEP is a 1/4.5-scale test platform designed to simulate the WTP pretreatment caustic leaching, oxidative leaching, ultrafiltration solids concentration, and slurry washing processes. The PEP replicates the WTP leaching processes using prototypic equipment and control strategies. The PEP also includes non-prototypic ancillary equipment to support the core processing. Two operating scenarios are currently being evaluated for the ultrafiltration process (UFP) and leaching operations. The first scenario (Test B and D) has caustic leaching performed in the UFP-2 ultrafiltration feed vessels (i.e., vessel UFP-VSL-T02A in the PEP and vessels UFP-VSL-00002A and B in the WTP PTF). The second scenario (Test A) has caustic leaching conducted in the UFP-1 ultrafiltration feed preparation vessels (i.e., vessels UFP-VSL-T01A and B in the PEP and vessels UFP VSL-00001A and B in the WTP PTF). In Test D, 19M sodium hydroxide (NaOH, caustic) was added to the waste slurry in the UFP VSL T02 vessel after the solids were concentrated to ~20% undissolved solids. The NaOH was added to leach solid aluminum compounds (e.g., gibbsite, boehmite). Caustic addition is followed by heating to 85°C using direct injection of steam to accelerate the leach process. The main difference of Test D compared to Test B is that the leach temperature is 85°C for 24 hrs as compared to 100°C for 12 hours. The other difference is the Test D simulant had Cr in the

  15. Caustic Leaching of SRS Tank 12H Sludge With and Without Chelating Agents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spencer, B.B.

    2003-01-01

    The primary objective of this study was to measure the effect of adding triethanolamine (TEA) to caustic leaching solutions to improve the solubility of aluminum in actual tank-waste sludge. High-level radioactive waste sludge that had a high aluminum assay was used for the tests. This waste, which originated with the processing of aluminum-clad/aluminum-alloy fuels, generates high levels of heat because of the high 90 Sr concentration and contains hard-to-dissolve boehmite phases. In concept, a chelating agent, such as TEA, can both improve the dissolution rate and increase the concentration in the liquid phase. For this reason, TEA could also increase the solubility of other sludge components that are potentially problematic to downstream processing. Tests were conducted to determine if this were the case. Because of its relatively high vapor pressure, process design should include methods to minimize losses of the TEA. Sludge was retrieved from tank 12H at the Savannah River Site by on-site personnel, and then shipped to Oak Ridge National Laboratory for the study. The sludge contained a small quantity of rocky debris. One slate-like flat piece, which had approximate dimensions of 1 1/4 x 1/2 x 1/8 in., was recovered. Additional gravel-like fragments with approximate diameters ranging from 1/8 to 1/4 in. were also recovered by sieving the sludge slurry through a 1.4-mm square-pitch stainless steel mesh. These particles ranged from a yellow quartz-like material to grey-colored gravel. Of the 32.50 g of sludge received, the mass of the debris was only 0.89 g, and the finely divided sludge comprised ∼97% of the mass. The sludge was successfully subdivided into uniform aliquots during hot-cell operations. Analytical measurements confirmed the uniformity of the samples. The smaller sludge samples were then used as needed for leaching experiments conducted in a glove box. Six tests were performed with leachate concentrations ranging from 0.1 to 3.0 m NaOH, 0 to 3

  16. Caustic Leaching of SRS Tank 12H Sludge With and Without Chelating Agents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spencer, B.B.

    2003-04-30

    The primary objective of this study was to measure the effect of adding triethanolamine (TEA) to caustic leaching solutions to improve the solubility of aluminum in actual tank-waste sludge. High-level radioactive waste sludge that had a high aluminum assay was used for the tests. This waste, which originated with the processing of aluminum-clad/aluminum-alloy fuels, generates high levels of heat because of the high {sup 90}Sr concentration and contains hard-to-dissolve boehmite phases. In concept, a chelating agent, such as TEA, can both improve the dissolution rate and increase the concentration in the liquid phase. For this reason, TEA could also increase the solubility of other sludge components that are potentially problematic to downstream processing. Tests were conducted to determine if this were the case. Because of its relatively high vapor pressure, process design should include methods to minimize losses of the TEA. Sludge was retrieved from tank 12H at the Savannah River Site by on-site personnel, and then shipped to Oak Ridge National Laboratory for the study. The sludge contained a small quantity of rocky debris. One slate-like flat piece, which had approximate dimensions of 1 1/4 x 1/2 x 1/8 in., was recovered. Additional gravel-like fragments with approximate diameters ranging from 1/8 to 1/4 in. were also recovered by sieving the sludge slurry through a 1.4-mm square-pitch stainless steel mesh. These particles ranged from a yellow quartz-like material to grey-colored gravel. Of the 32.50 g of sludge received, the mass of the debris was only 0.89 g, and the finely divided sludge comprised {approx}97% of the mass. The sludge was successfully subdivided into uniform aliquots during hot-cell operations. Analytical measurements confirmed the uniformity of the samples. The smaller sludge samples were then used as needed for leaching experiments conducted in a glove box. Six tests were performed with leachate concentrations ranging from 0.1 to 3.0 m Na

  17. PEP Run Report for Integrated Test A, Caustic Leaching in UFP-VSL-T01A, Oxidative Leaching in UFP-VSL-T02A

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guzman-Leong, Consuelo E.; Bredt, Ofelia P.; Burns, Carolyn A.; Daniel, Richard C.; Su, Yin-Fong; Geeting, John GH; Golovich, Elizabeth C.; Josephson, Gary B.; Kurath, Dean E.; Sevigny, Gary J.; Smith, Dennese M.; Valdez, Patrick LJ; Yokuda, Satoru T.; Young, Joan K.

    2009-12-04

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) was tasked by Bechtel National Inc. (BNI) on the River Protection Project-Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (RPP-WTP) project to perform research and development activities to resolve technical issues identified for the Pretreatment Facility (PTF). The Pretreatment Engineering Platform (PEP) was designed and constructed and operated as part of a plan to respond to issue M12, “Undemonstrated Leaching Processes.”(a) The PEP, located in the Process Engineering Laboratory-West (PDLW) located in Richland, Washington, is a 1/4.5-scale test platform designed to simulate the WTP pretreatment caustic leaching, oxidative leaching, ultrafiltration solids concentration, and slurry washing processes. The PEP replicates the WTP leaching processes using prototypic equipment and control strategies. The PEP also includes non-prototypic ancillary equipment to support the core processing.

  18. Exploration on means and ways about increasing heap leaching rate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhong Yongming

    2001-01-01

    The means and ways about increasing heap leaching (stope leaching and surface leaching) rate in the heap leaching process such as heap construction, lixiviant sprinkling, pregnant solution collecting and strengthened leaching etc. are explored

  19. Co-treatment of spent cathode carbon in caustic and acid leaching process under ultrasonic assisted for preparation of SiC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Jie; Xiao, Jin; Li, Fachuang; Wang, Bingjie; Yao, Zhen; Yu, Bailie; Zhang, Liuyun

    2018-03-01

    Spent cathode carbon (SCC) from aluminum electrolysis has been treated in ultrasonic-assisted caustic leaching and acid leaching process, and purified SCC used as carbon source to synthesize silicon carbide (SiC) was investigated. Chemical and mineralogical properties have been characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray fluorescence (XRF), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and thermogravimetry and differential scanning calorimetry (TGA-DSC). Various experimental factors temperature, time, liquid-solid ratio, ultrasonic power, and initial concentration of alkali or acid affecting on SCC leaching result were studied. After co-treatment with ultrasonic-assisted caustic leaching and acid leaching, carbon content of leaching residue was 97.53%. SiC power was synthesized by carbothermal reduction at 1600 °C, as a result of yield of 76.43%, and specific surface area of 4378 cm 2 /g. This is the first report of using purified SCC and gangue to prepare SiC. The two industrial wastes have been used newly as secondary sources. Furthermore, ultrasonic showed significant effect in SCC leaching process. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Water washes and caustic leaches of sludge from Hanford Tank S-101 and water washes of sludge from Hanford Tank C-103

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hunt, R.D.; Collins, J.L.; Chase, C.W.

    1998-07-01

    In 1993, the Department of Energy (DOE) selected the enhanced sludge washing (ESW) process as the baseline for pretreatment of Hanford tank sludges. The ESW process uses a series of water washes and caustic leaches to separate nonradioactive components such as aluminum, chromium, and phosphate from the high-level waste sludges. If the ESW process is successful, the volume of immobilized high-level waste will be significantly reduced. The tests on the sludge from Hanford Tank S-101 focused on the effects of process variables such as sodium hydroxide concentration (1 and 3 M), temperature (70 and 95 C), and leaching time (5, 24, 72, and 168 h) on the efficacy of the ESW process with realistic liquid-to-solid ratios. Another goal of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of water washes on a sludge sample from hanford Tank C-103. The final objective of this study was to test potential process control monitors during the water washes and caustic leaches with actual sludge. Both 137 Cs activity and conductance were measured for each of the water washes and caustic leaches. Experimental procedures, a discussion of results, conclusions and recommendations are included in this report

  1. Pretreatment Engineering Platform (PEP) Integrated Test B Run Report--Caustic and Oxidative Leaching in UFP-VSL-T02A

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geeting, John GH; Bredt, Ofelia P.; Burns, Carolyn A.; Golovich, Elizabeth C.; Guzman-Leong, Consuelo E.; Josephson, Gary B.; Kurath, Dean E.; Sevigny, Gary J.; Aaberg, Rosanne L.

    2009-12-10

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) has been tasked by Bechtel National Inc. (BNI) on the River Protection Project-Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (RPP-WTP) project to perform research and development activities to resolve technical issues identified for the Pretreatment Facility (PTF). The Pretreatment Engineering Platform (PEP) was designed, constructed and operated as part of a plan to respond to issue M12, “Undemonstrated Leaching Processes” of the External Flowsheet Review Team (EFRT) issue response plan.( ) The PEP is a 1/4.5-scale test platform designed to simulate the WTP pretreatment caustic leaching, oxidative leaching, ultrafiltration solids concentration, and slurry washing processes. The PEP replicates the WTP leaching processes using prototypic equipment and control strategies. The PEP also includes non-prototypic ancillary equipment to support the core processing.

  2. Long-term leach rates of glasses containing actual waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wiley, J.R.; LeRoy, J.H.

    1979-01-01

    Leach rates of borosilicate glasses that contained actual Savannah River Plant waste were measured. Leaching was done by water and by buffer solutions of pH 4, 7, and 9. Leach rates were then determined from the amount of 137 Cs, 90 Sr, and Pu released into the leach solutions. The cumulative fractions leached were fit to a mathematical model that included leaching by diffusion and glass dissolution

  3. PEP Support: Laboratory Scale Leaching and Permeate Stability Tests

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Russell, Renee L.; Peterson, Reid A.; Rinehart, Donald E.; Buchmiller, William C.

    2010-05-21

    This report documents results from a variety of activities requested by the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP). The activities related to caustic leaching, oxidative leaching, permeate precipitation behavior of waste as well as chromium (Cr) leaching are: • Model Input Boehmite Leaching Tests • Pretreatment Engineering Platform (PEP) Support Leaching Tests • PEP Parallel Leaching Tests • Precipitation Study Results • Cr Caustic and Oxidative Leaching Tests. Leaching test activities using the PEP simulant provided input to a boehmite dissolution model and determined the effect of temperature on mass loss during caustic leaching, the reaction rate constant for the boehmite dissolution, and the effect of aeration in enhancing the chromium dissolution during caustic leaching. Other tests were performed in parallel with the PEP tests to support the development of scaling factors for caustic and oxidative leaching. Another study determined if precipitate formed in the wash solution after the caustic leach in the PEP. Finally, the leaching characteristics of different chromium compounds under different conditions were examined to determine the best one to use in further testing.

  4. Influence of Age on the Survival and Mortality Rate in Acute Caustic Poisonings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chibishev, Andon; Glasnovic, Marija; Miletic, Milena; Smokovski, Ivica; Chitkushev, Lou

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Acute poisonings with caustic substances can cause severe chemical injuries to the upper gastrointestinal tract, which can be localized from the mouth to the small intestines. They are seen very often among young people in their most productive years. The aim of this study is to examine the influence of patient’s age on the mortality rate and survival of patients with acute caustic poisonings, and also to analyze their correlation. Material and Methods: We studied medical records from 415 patients, aged between 14 and 90 years, who were hospitalized and treated at the University Clinic for toxicology and urgent internal medicine, Skopje, Republic of Macedonia, in the period between 2007 and 2011. Results: In the survey we included 415 patients with acute corrosive poisonings, from which 295 (71.08%) were females and 120 (28. 92%) were males. 388 (93.49%) from the total number of patients ingested the corrosive agent with suicidal attempt and 27 (6.5%) ingested it accidentally. Conclusion: Unregulated production, import, packing and labeling of various caustic agents, due to inappropriate legislative, made them one of the most often abused substances in everyday life, especially in developing countries where the number of caustic poisonings rises. PMID:25395893

  5. Determining leach rates of monolithic waste forms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gilliam, T.M.; Dole, L.R.

    1986-01-01

    The ANS 16.1 Leach Procedure provides a conservative means of predicting long-term release from monolithic waste forms, offering a simple and relatively quick means of determining effective solid diffusion coefficients. As presented here, these coefficients can be used in a simple model to predict maximum release rates or be used in more complex site-specific models to predict actual site performance. For waste forms that pass the structural integrity test, this model also allows the prediction of EP-Tox leachate concentrations from these coefficients. Thus, the results of the ANS 16.1 Leach Procedure provide a powerful tool that can be used to predict the waste concentration limits in order to comply with the EP-Toxicity criteria for characteristically nonhazardous waste. 12 refs., 3 figs

  6. Caustic Ingestions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Rafeey

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Prevention has a main role in reducing the occurrence of corrosive ingestion especially in children, yet this goal is far from being reached in developing countries, where such injuries are largely unreported and their true prevalence simply cannot be extrapolated from random articles or personal experience. Because of the accidental nature of the ingestions, the case fatality rate for pediatric patients is significantly less than that of adolescents and adults.  Currently, esophagoscopy is recommended for all patients with a history of caustic substance ingestion because clinical criteria have not proved to be reliable predictors of esophageal injury. The presence or absence of three serious signs and symptoms-vomiting, drooling, and stridor—as well as the presence and location of oropharyngeal burns could be  compared with the findings on subsequent esophagoscopy. Medical or endoscopic prevention of stricture is debatable, yet esophageal stents, absorbable or not, show promising data. The purpose of this lecture is to outline the current epidemiology, mechanism of injury, clinical manifestations, management and long-term complications of caustic ingestions in pediatric patients.   Key Words: Caustic, Children, Ingestions.

  7. Leach rate studies on glass containing actual radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walker, D.D.; Wiley, J.R.; Dukes, M.D.; LeRoy, J.H.

    1980-01-01

    Borosilicate glass containing radioactive wastes from the Savannah River Plant have been leached for 900 days. The International Standards Organization's (ISO) static leach test procedure was used on glass buttons in various leachants. Leach rates based on 90 Sr and 137 Cs analyses were similar: 2 x 10 -8 to 3 x 10 -8 g/(cm 2 )(d) in distilled water, 1 x 10 -8 to 3 x 10 -7 g/(cm 2 )(d) in pH 7 buffer, 3 x 10 -7 to 7 x 10 -7 g/(cm 2 )(d) in pH 9 buffer, and 7 x 10 -6 to 8 x 10 -5 g/(cm 2 )(d) in pH 4 buffer. Rates based on Pu analyses were the same as above in distilled water and pH 9 buffer, but were lower by an order of magnitude in pH 4 and pH 7 buffers. Almost all leach rates remained constant between 200 and 900 days of leaching. Increasing the concentration of the buffering agents had no effect on the leach rates at pH 7 (phosphate) and pH 9 (carbonate), but dramatically increased the rates at pH 4 (acetate). Leach rates did not differ significantly between high aluminum and high iron waste glasses

  8. Low leach rate glasses for immobilization of nuclear wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chick, L.A.; Buckwalter, C.Q.

    1980-10-01

    Improved defense and commercial waste glass have about one order of magnitude lower leach rates at 90 0 C in static deionized water than reference glasses. This durability difference diminishes as the leaching temperature is raised, but at repository temperature less than 150 0 C, the improved compositions would have considerable advantages over reference glases. At the melting temperatures necessary for most of the high-durability glasses, volatility was found to be higher than that experienced in processing current reference glases. Higher volatilities might be compensated for by specific design of the off-gas system for improved off-gas treatment and volatile materials recovery. 6 figures, 2 tables

  9. Assessment of weathering and leaching rates of Thule hot particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roos, P.; Outola, I.; Nygren, U.; Ramebaeck, H.; Sidhu, R.

    2010-03-01

    Within the current project a methodology for separating actinide particles originating from the Thule 1968 accident has been developed. Particles were completely isolated in water using visual and radiometric methods. The particles were attached electrostatic to a plastic support and could easily be moved to any container for leaching studies or other type of studies. Leaching and dissolution studies performed within the project indicate that some particles are relatively easily destroyed or leached while others are more refractory. The results shows that even though the oxide particles are hard to completely dissolve they release material even when exposed to weak solvents like water and salt solutions. Exposures to lung simulant fluids show relatively slow dissolution rates comparable to what is found using only water. Sequential extraction of particles shows that variation between particles is very large; some dissolve easily while some does not. Of radiological importance is the disruption of particles when exposed to dissolution. (author)

  10. Research on the effect of alkali roasting of copper dross on leaching rate of indium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dafang, Liu; Fan, Xingxiang; Shi, Yifeng; Yang, Kunbin

    2017-11-01

    The byproduct copper dross produced during refining crude lead was characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscope (SEM) and fluorescence spectrometer (XRF), which showed that copper dross mainly contained lead, copper, zinc, arsenic, antimony, bismuth, sulfur and a small amount of indium and silver etc. The mineralogical phase change of oxidation roasting of copper dross by adding sodium hydroxide was analyzed with the help of XRD and SEM. The effects of water leaching, ratio of sodium hydroxide, roasting time, and roasting temperature on leaching rate of indium were investigated mainly. The experimental results showed that phase of lead metal and sulfides of lead, copper and zinc disappeared after oxidation roasting of copper dross by adding sodium hydroxide, new phase of oxides of lead, copper, zinc and sodium salt of arsenic and antimony appeared. Water leaching could remove arsenic, and acid leaching residue obtained was then leached with acid. The leaching rate of indium was higher 6.98% compared with alkali roasting of copper dross-acid leaching. It showed that removing arsenic by water leaching and acid leaching could increase the leaching rate of indium and be beneficial to reducing subsequent acid consumption of extracting indium by acid leaching. The roasting temperature had a significant effect on the leaching rate of indium, and leaching rate of indium increased with the rise of roasting temperature. When roasting temperature ranged from 450°C to 600°C, leaching rate of indium increased significantly with the rise of roasting temperature. When roasting temperature rose from 450°C to 600°C, leaching rate of indium increased by 60.29%. The amount of sodium hydroxide had an significant effect on the leaching rate of indium, and the leaching of indium increased with the increase of the amount of sodium hydroxide, and the leaching rate of indium was obviously higher than that of copper dross blank roasting and acid leaching.

  11. Reducing uranium and thorium level in Zircon: effect of heat treatment on rate of leaching

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meor Yusoff Meor Sulaiman

    2002-01-01

    Considerable amount of uranium and thorium are found in Malaysian zircon and the level is much higher than the minimum value adopted by many importing countries. Selective leaching had been applied as an important technique to reduce these elements. An initial study was carried out using hydrochloric acid leaching system but the result was not favourable. The rate of uranium and thorium leached can be further improved by introducing a heat pretreatment process prior to leaching (Author)

  12. Dark Matter Caustics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Natarajan, Aravind

    2010-01-01

    The continuous infall of dark matter with low velocity dispersion in galactic halos leads to the formation of high density structures called caustics. Dark matter caustics are of two kinds : outer and inner. Outer caustics are thin spherical shells surrounding galaxies while inner caustics have a more complicated structure that depends on the dark matter angular momentum distribution. The presence of a dark matter caustic in the plane of the galaxy modifies the gas density in its neighborhood which may lead to observable effects. Caustics are also relevant to direct and indirect dark matter searches.

  13. Concentrating on caustic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Collins, Richard

    2010-01-01

    organics in the chosen medium (wastewater) and passes electrons freed up in the process around a circuit from the anode side to the cathode, generating electricity. The protons diffuse through the liquid and a membrane to the cathode, where they re-bond with the electrons and oxygen to create water, keeping the entire system neutral. Use wastewater as the medium though, and the high levels of sodium means that rather than the protons, sodium is preferentially transferred to the cathode, preventing the full reduction of oxygen to water. Instead, hydroxyl (OH) is created, which then bonds with the sodium to create sodium hydroxide (NaOH) in a continuous process. Unlike with the electricity generation trials, the theoretical capacity of the bioelectrochemical system to produce sodium hydroxide is compelling and cost-effective. “The process is pretty successful thus far. Per kilogram of organics we remove in an anode, we can think about 5kg of caustic soda on the cathode side,” said Dr Rabeay. “You need a very small number of electrons to make sodium hydroxide and the organic matter contains a lot of electrons, it is very electron-rich.” While recovery rates will vary case by case, depending on factors such as the water parameters and how companies drive their production processes, a model wastewater containing 3kg of organics and 2kg of sodium per m 3 could remove about 0.5kg of the organics, producing 2.5kg of sodium hydroxide and removing 1.44kg of sodium from the waste stream. For a pulp and paper plant, Dr Rabaey reckons 5-10 per cent of the typical organic load could provide all the site's sodium hydroxide demand. Most industries he's studied have more than enough wastewater organics to become self-sufficient in sodium hydroxide. In 2008, he co-founded Bilexys, a spin-off company from the University of Queensland aiming to commercialise the technology for recovery of caustic and, down the track, hydrogen peroxide. Early next year, Bilexys will be

  14. Analytical caustic surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, R. F.

    1987-01-01

    This document discusses the determination of caustic surfaces in terms of rays, reflectors, and wavefronts. Analytical caustics are obtained as a family of lines, a set of points, and several types of equations for geometries encountered in optics and microwave applications. Standard methods of differential geometry are applied under different approaches: directly to reflector surfaces, and alternatively, to wavefronts, to obtain analytical caustics of two sheets or branches. Gauss/Seidel aberrations are introduced into the wavefront approach, forcing the retention of all three coefficients of both the first- and the second-fundamental forms of differential geometry. An existing method for obtaining caustic surfaces through exploitation of the singularities in flux density is examined, and several constant-intensity contour maps are developed using only the intrinsic Gaussian, mean, and normal curvatures of the reflector. Numerous references are provided for extending the material of the present document to the morphologies of caustics and their associated diffraction patterns.

  15. Caustics of atmospheric waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godin, Oleg A.

    2015-04-01

    Much like light and sound, acoustic-gravity waves in inhomogeneous atmosphere often have a caustic or caustics, where the ray theory predicts unphysical, divergent values of the wave amplitude and needs to be modified. Increase of the wave magnitude in the vicinity of a caustic makes such vicinities of primary interest in a number of problems, where a signal needs to be separated from a background noise. The value of wave focusing near caustics should be carefully quantified in order to evaluate possible nonlinearities promoted by the focusing. Physical understanding of the wave field in the vicinity of a caustic is also important for understanding of the wave reflection from and transmission (tunneling) through the caustic. To our knowledge, in contrast to caustics of acoustic, electromagnetic, and seismic waves as well as gravity waves in incompressible fluids, asymptotics of acoustic-gravity waves in the vicinity of a caustic have never been studied systematically. In this paper, we fill this gap. Atmospheric waves are considered as linear acoustic-gravity waves in a neutral, horizontally stratified, moving ideal gas of variable composition. Air temperature and wind velocity are assumed to be gradually varying functions of height, and slowness of these variations determines the large parameter of the problem. The scale height of the atmosphere can be large or small compared to the vertical wavelength. It is found that the uniform asymptotics of the wave field in the presence of a simple caustic can be expressed in terms of the Airy function and its derivative. As for the acoustic waves, the argument of the Airy function is expressed in terms of the eikonal calculated in the ray, or WKB, approximation. The geometrical, or Berry, phase, which arises in the consistent WKB approximation for acoustic-gravity waves, plays an important role in the caustic asymptotics. In the uniform asymptotics, the terms with the Airy function and its derivative are weighted by cosine

  16. Caustic rings of dark matter

    OpenAIRE

    Sikivie, Pierre

    1997-01-01

    It is shown that the infall of collisionless dark matter onto isolated galaxies produces a series of caustic rings in the halo dark matter distribution. The properties of these caustics are investigated. The density profile of the caustic is derived for a specific case. Bumps in the rotation curve of NGC 3198 are interpreted as due to caustic rings of dark matter.

  17. Electron caustic lithography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. M. Kennedy

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available A maskless method of electron beam lithography is described which uses the reflection of an electron beam from an electrostatic mirror to produce caustics in the demagnified image projected onto a resist–coated wafer. By varying the electron optics, e.g. via objective lens defocus, both the morphology and dimensions of the caustic features may be controlled, producing a range of bright and tightly focused projected features. The method is illustrated for line and fold caustics and is complementary to other methods of reflective electron beam lithography.

  18. Space-time caustics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arthur D. Gorman

    1986-01-01

    Full Text Available The Lagrange manifold (WKB formalism enables the determination of the asymptotic series solution of linear differential equations modelling wave propagation in spatially inhomogeneous media at caustic (turning points. Here the formalism is adapted to determine a class of asymptotic solutions at caustic points for those equations modelling wave propagation in media with both spatial and temporal inhomogeneities. The analogous Schrodinger equation is also considered.

  19. Catastrophe Theory and Caustics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gravesen, Jens

    1983-01-01

    It is shown by elementary methods that in codimension two and under the assumption that light rays are straight lines, a caustic is the catastrophe set for a time function. The general case is also discussed.......It is shown by elementary methods that in codimension two and under the assumption that light rays are straight lines, a caustic is the catastrophe set for a time function. The general case is also discussed....

  20. Leaching of radionuclides from decaying blueberry leaves: Relative rate independent of concentration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sheppard, S.C.; Evenden, W.G.

    1990-01-01

    Leaching of radionuclides from decaying vegetation has not been extensively investigated, especially for radionuclides other than 137 Cs. The authors obtained leaves of blueberry (Vaccinium angustifolium x V. corymbosum) that contained over 25-fold ranges in Se, Cs, and I concentrations, as well as a small quantity of leaves containing detectable U. All were contaminated by way of root uptake. Leaching took place for a period of 1 yr in the laboratory, using leach water from forest litter. Monthly, measurements were made of the radionuclide contents and decaying leaf dry weights. The data conformed to an exponential decay model with two first-order components. In no case did the relative loss rates vary systematically with the initial tissue radionuclide concentrations. Loss rates decreased in the order Cs > I > U > dry wt. > Se. Because of the low leaching rate of Se relative to the loss of dry weight, decaying litter may actually accumulate elements such as Se. Accumulation of radionuclides in litter could have important implications for lateral transport, recycling, and direct incorporation into edible mushrooms

  1. [Dynamic change of phosphorus leaching of neutral purple soil at different re-wetting rate].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Si-Lan; Shi, Xiao-Jun; Guo, Tao

    2014-03-01

    Re-wetting was one of the most common forms of abiotic stresses experienced by soils. To investigate the effects of soil re-wetting rate on phosphorus (P) leaching and the relationship between soil microbial biomass carbon (MBC) and forms of P in leachate; five kinds of neutral purple soils of different fertilizer treatments were analyzed using simulating lab test at re-wetting rate of 0 h, 2 h, 4 h, 24 h and 48 h. The results showed that: (1) The lowest content of MBC appeared at the rate of 2 h during the soil re-wetting process, and the content of MBC increased with the reducing re-wetting rate. (2) Slower re-wetting helped to enhance soil microbial activity and the enhancement effect of organic fertilizer with NPK fertilizer (MNPK) was more significant. (3) The P leaching events of all fertilizer treatments occurred mainly at rapid re-wetting rates such as 0 h, 2 h, 4 h. Slower re-wetting was an important measure to prevent P leaching especially for the soils applied with chemical fertilizers, and it was of great significance in the field management of P. (4) Dissolved organic phosphorus (DOP) was the primary leaching part in leachate, and the variation range of ratio of total dissolved phosphorus (TDP) to total phosphorus (TP) and DOP to TP was 35.42%-85.99% and 29.74%-78.58% respectively. (5) With the reducing of re-wetting rate, significant negative correlation was observed between MBC and TP, TDP as well as DOP in the leachate (P soil leachate mainly came from soil microorganisms.

  2. Caustic rings of dark matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sikivie, P.

    1997-01-01

    It is shown that the infall of collisionless dark matter onto isolated galaxies produce a series of caustic rings in the halo dark matter distribution. The properties of these caustics are investigated. It is found in particular that the density profile of the caustic behaves as the inverse distance to the ring. Bumps in the rotation curve of NGC 3198 are interpreted as due to caustic rings of dark matter

  3. Bacterial Leaching

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    alarming rate due to the rapid increase in the demand for metals. However there exist large ... sulphuric acid, leads to leaching of metals from their oxide and sulphide ores. GENERAL I ARTICLE ered by man as early as 1000 BC from metal laden waters which .... Another method in use for uranium extraction is vat leaching.

  4. Thermophilic archaeal community succession and function change associated with the leaching rate in bioleaching of chalcopyrite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Wei; Xia, Jin-lan; Yang, Yi; Nie, Zhen-yuan; Peng, An-an; Liu, Hong-chang; Qiu, Guan-zhou

    2013-04-01

    The community succession and function change of thermophilic archaea Acidianus brierleyi, Metallosphaera sedula, Acidianus manzaensis and Sulfolobus metallicus were studied by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) analysis of amplifying 16S rRNA genes fragments and real-time qPCR analysis of amplifying sulfur-oxidizing soxB gene associated with chalcopyrite bioleaching rate at different temperatures and initial pH values. The analysis results of the community succession indicated that temperature and initial pH value had a significant effect on the consortium, and S. metallicus was most sensitive to the environmental change, A. brierleyi showed the best adaptability and sulfur oxidation ability and predominated in various leaching systems. Meanwhile, the leaching rate of chalcopyrite closely related to the consortium function embodied by soxB gene, which could prove a desirable way for revealing microbial sulfur oxidation difference and tracking the function change of the consortium, and for optimizing the leaching parameters and improving the recovery of valuable metals. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. The mineralogical phase transformation of invisible gold-concentrate by microwave heating, and enhancement of their gold leaching rate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bak, Geonyoung; Kim, Bongju; Choi, Nagchoul; Park*, Cheonyoung

    2015-04-01

    In this study, in order to obtain the maximum Au leaching rate, an invisible gold concentrate sample was microwave-treated and a thiourea leaching experiment was performed. It is found that gold exists as invisible as a result of observation with an optical microscope and an electron microscope. As the invisible gold concentrate sample was exposed to microwave longer, its temperature and weight loss were increased together and its S content was decreased. The conditions for the maximum Au leaching rate and the fast leaching effect were a particle size of -325×400 mesh, exposure to microwave for 70 minutes, 1.0 g of thiourea, 0.0504 g of sodium sulfite and 0.425 g of ferric sulfate. However, the condition under which Au was leached out to the maximum was applied to the control sample, but its Au leaching rate was just in a range of 78% to 88%. Such results suggest that the effect of sodium sulfite and ferric sulfate was more effective in the microwave-treated sample than in the control sample. Therefore, it was confirmed that the complete and very fast Au leaching can be achieved by means of the microwave pretreatment of invisible gold concentrate.

  6. Filtration and Leach Testing for PUREX Cladding Sludge and REDOX Cladding Sludge Actual Waste Sample Composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shimskey, Rick W.; Billing, Justin M.; Buck, Edgar C.; Casella, Amanda J.; Crum, Jarrod V.; Daniel, Richard C.; Draper, Kathryn E.; Edwards, Matthew K.; Hallen, Richard T.; Kozelisky, Anne E.; MacFarlan, Paul J.; Peterson, Reid A.; Swoboda, Robert G.

    2009-03-02

    of gibbsite, and its impact on filtration. The initial sample was diluted with a liquid simulant to simulate the receiving concentration of retrieved tank waste into the UFP2 vessel (< 10 wt% undissolved solids). Filtration testing was performed on the dilute waste sample and dewatered to a higher solids concentration. Filtration testing was then performed on the concentrated slurry. Afterwards, the slurry was caustic leached to remove aluminum present in the undissolved solid present in the waste. The leach was planned to simulate leaching conditions in the UFP2 vessel. During the leach, slurry supernate samples were collected to measure the dissolution rate of aluminum in the waste. After the slurry cooled down from the elevated leach temperature, the leach liquor was dewatered from the solids. The remaining slurry was rinsed and dewatered with caustic solutions to remove a majority of the dissolved aluminum from the leached slurry. The concentration of sodium hydroxide in the rinse solutions was high enough to maintain the solubility of the aluminum in the dewatered rinse solutions after dilution of the slurry supernate. Filtration tests were performed on the final slurry to compare to filtration performance before and after caustic leaching.

  7. Effect of manure application rate and rainfall timing on the leaching of antibiotic-resistant bacteria and their associated genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    In this study we investigate the effect of application rate and timing of liquid swine slurry on leaching of antibiotic-resistant bacteria (ARB) and their antibiotic-resistance genes (ARG) through soil columns. Swine slurry was added to laboratory soil columns at rates of 5,000 or 30,000 gallons acr...

  8. Identifying critical nitrogen application rate for maize yield and nitrate leaching in a Haplic Luvisol soil using the DNDC model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yitao; Wang, Hongyuan; Liu, Shen; Lei, Qiuliang; Liu, Jian; He, Jianqiang; Zhai, Limei; Ren, Tianzhi; Liu, Hongbin

    2015-05-01

    Identification of critical nitrogen (N) application rate can provide management supports for ensuring grain yield and reducing amount of nitrate leaching to ground water. A five-year (2008-2012) field lysimeter (1 m × 2 m × 1.2 m) experiment with three N treatments (0, 180 and 240 kg Nha(-1)) was conducted to quantify maize yields and amount of nitrate leaching from a Haplic Luvisol soil in the North China Plain. The experimental data were used to calibrate and validate the process-based model of Denitrification-Decomposition (DNDC). After this, the model was used to simulate maize yield production and amount of nitrate leaching under a series of N application rates and to identify critical N application rate based on acceptable yield and amount of nitrate leaching for this cropping system. The results of model calibration and validation indicated that the model could correctly simulate maize yield and amount of nitrate leaching, with satisfactory values of RMSE-observation standard deviation ratio, model efficiency and determination coefficient. The model simulations confirmed the measurements that N application increased maize yield compared with the control, but the high N rate (240 kg Nha(-1)) did not produce more yield than the low one (120 kg Nha(-1)), and that the amount of nitrate leaching increased with increasing N application rate. The simulation results suggested that the optimal N application rate was in a range between 150 and 240 kg ha(-1), which would keep the amount of nitrate leaching below 18.4 kg NO₃(-)-Nha(-1) and meanwhile maintain acceptable maize yield above 9410 kg ha(-1). Furthermore, 180 kg Nha(-1) produced the highest yields (9837 kg ha(-1)) and comparatively lower amount of nitrate leaching (10.0 kg NO₃(-)-Nha(-1)). This study will provide a valuable reference for determining optimal N application rate (or range) in other crop systems and regions in China. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. COMPILATION OF LABORATORY SCALE ALUMINUM WASH AND LEACH REPORT RESULTS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harrington, S.J.

    2011-01-01

    This report compiles and analyzes all known wash and caustic leach laboratory studies. As further data is produced, this report will be updated. Included are aluminum mineralogical analysis results as well as a summation of the wash and leach procedures and results. Of the 177 underground storage tanks at Hanford, information was only available for five individual double-shell tanks, forty-one individual single-shell tanks (e.g. thirty-nine 100 series and two 200 series tanks), and twelve grouped tank wastes. Seven of the individual single-shell tank studies provided data for the percent of aluminum removal as a function of time for various caustic concentrations and leaching temperatures. It was determined that in most cases increased leaching temperature, caustic concentration, and leaching time leads to increased dissolution of leachable aluminum solids.

  10. COMPILATION OF LABORATORY SCALE ALUMINUM WASH AND LEACH REPORT RESULTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    HARRINGTON SJ

    2011-01-06

    This report compiles and analyzes all known wash and caustic leach laboratory studies. As further data is produced, this report will be updated. Included are aluminum mineralogical analysis results as well as a summation of the wash and leach procedures and results. Of the 177 underground storage tanks at Hanford, information was only available for five individual double-shell tanks, forty-one individual single-shell tanks (e.g. thirty-nine 100 series and two 200 series tanks), and twelve grouped tank wastes. Seven of the individual single-shell tank studies provided data for the percent of aluminum removal as a function of time for various caustic concentrations and leaching temperatures. It was determined that in most cases increased leaching temperature, caustic concentration, and leaching time leads to increased dissolution of leachable aluminum solids.

  11. Leaching of two fungicides in spent mushroom substrate amended soil: Influence of amendment rate, fungicide ageing and flow condition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Álvarez-Martín, Alba; Sánchez-Martín, María J; Ordax, José M; Marín-Benito, Jesús M; Sonia Rodríguez-Cruz, M

    2017-04-15

    A study has been conducted on the leaching of two fungicides, tebuconazole and cymoxanil, in a soil amended with spent mushroom substrate (SMS), with an evaluation of how different factors influence this process. The objective was based on the potential use of SMS as a biosorbent for immobilizing pesticides in vulnerable soils, and the need to know how it could affect the subsequent transport of these retained compounds. Breakthrough curves (BTCs) for 14 C-fungicides, non-incubated and incubated over 30days, were obtained in columns packed with an unamended soil (S), and this soil amended with SMS at rates of 5% (S+SMS5) and 50% (S+SMS50) under saturated and saturated-unsaturated flows. The highest leaching of tebuconazole (>50% of the total 14 C added) was found in S when a saturated water flow was applied to the column, but the percentage of leached fungicide decreased when a saturated-unsaturated flow was applied in both SMS-amended soils. Also a significant decrease in leaching was observed for tebuconazole after incubation in the column, especially in S+SMS50 when both flows were applied. Furthermore, cymoxanil leaching was complete in S and S+SMS when a saturated flow was applied, and maximum peak concentrations were reached at 1pore volume (PV), although BTCs showed peaks with lower concentrations in S+SMS. The amounts of cymoxanil retained only increased in S+SMS when a saturated-unsaturated flow was applied. A more relevant effect of SMS for reducing the leaching of fungicide was observed when cymoxanil was previously incubated in the column, although mineralization was enhanced in this case. These results are of interest for extending SMS application on the control of the leaching of fungicides with different physicochemical characteristics after different ageing times in the soil and water flow conditions applied. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Reduced rates of controlled-release fertilizer lower potential nitrogen leaching from a Wisconsin bare-root tree nursery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryosuke Fujinuma; Nick J. Balster; Hyung-Kyung. Lee

    2011-01-01

    Controlled-release fertilizer (CRF) typically increases nitrogen (N) fertilizer uptake and lowers N lost from the rooting zone via leaching. However, questions remain as to whether lower rates of CRF could further increase this efficiency, especially in sandy bare-root nurseries in Wisconsin. We hypothesized that: 1) a reduced CRF application at 60 percent of the...

  13. Applying a statewide geospatial leaching tool for assessing soil vulnerability ratings for agrochemicals across the contiguous United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ki, Seo Jin; Ray, Chittaranjan; Hantush, Mohamed M

    2015-06-15

    A large-scale leaching assessment tool not only illustrates soil (or groundwater) vulnerability in unmonitored areas, but also can identify areas of potential concern for agrochemical contamination. This study describes the methodology of how the statewide leaching tool in Hawaii modified recently for use with pesticides and volatile organic compounds can be extended to the national assessment of soil vulnerability ratings. For this study, the tool was updated by extending the soil and recharge maps to cover the lower 48 states in the United States (US). In addition, digital maps of annual pesticide use (at a national scale) as well as detailed soil properties and monthly recharge rates (at high spatial and temporal resolutions) were used to examine variations in the leaching (loads) of pesticides for the upper soil horizons. Results showed that the extended tool successfully delineated areas of high to low vulnerability to selected pesticides. The leaching potential was high for picloram, medium for simazine, and low to negligible for 2,4-D and glyphosate. The mass loadings of picloram moving below 0.5 m depth increased greatly in northwestern and central US that recorded its extensive use in agricultural crops. However, in addition to the amount of pesticide used, annual leaching load of atrazine was also affected by other factors that determined the intrinsic aquifer vulnerability such as soil and recharge properties. Spatial and temporal resolutions of digital maps had a great effect on the leaching potential of pesticides, requiring a trade-off between data availability and accuracy. Potential applications of this tool include the rapid, large-scale vulnerability assessments for emerging contaminants which are hard to quantify directly through vadose zone models due to lack of full environmental data. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Characterization, Washing, Leaching, and Filtration of C-104 Sludge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    KP Brooks; PR Bredt; GR Golcar; SA Hartley; LK Jagoda; KG Rappe; MW Urie

    2000-06-09

    Approximately 1,400 g of wet Hanford Tank C-104 Sludge was evaluated by Battelle for the high-level waste (HLW) pretreatment processes of ultrafiltration, dilute caustic washing, and elevated-temperature caustic leaching. The filterability of diluted C-104 sludge was measured with a 0.1-{micro}m sintered metal Mott filter using a 24-inch-long, single-element, crossflow filtration system (cells unit filter [CUF]). While the filtrate was being recirculated prior to washing and leaching, a 6.9 wt% solids slurry was evaluated with a matrix of seven 1-hour conditions of varying trans-membrane pressure (30 to 70 psid) and axial velocity (9 to 15 ft/s). The filtrate flux and backpulse efficiency were determined for each condition. The slurry was concentrated to 23 wt% solids, a second matrix of six 1-hour conditions was performed, and data analogous to that recorded in the first matrix were obtained. The low-solids-concentration matrix produced filtrate flux rates that ranged from 0.038 to 0.083 gpm/ft{sup 2}. The high-solids-concentration matrix produced filtrate flux rates that ranged from 0.0095 to 0.0172 gpm/ft{sup 2}. In both cases, the optimum filtrate flux was at the highest axial velocity (15 ft/s) and transmembrane pressure had little effect. Nearly all of the measured filtrate fluxes were more than an order of magnitude greater than the required plant flux for C-104 of 0.00126 gpm/ft{sup 2}. In both matrices, the filtrate flux appeared to be proportional to axial velocity, and the permeability appeared to be inversely proportional to the trans-membrane pressure. The first test condition was repeated as the last test condition for each matrix. In both cases, there was a significant decrease in filtrate flux, indicating some filter fouling during the test matrix that could not be removed by backpulsing alone, although the backpulse number and duration were not optimized. Following testing of these two matrices, the material was washed within the CUF by

  15. Characterization, Washing, Leaching, and Filtration of C-104 Sludge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brooks, K.P.; Bredt, P.R.; Golcar, G.R.; Hartley, S.A.; Jagoda, L.K.; Rappe, K.G.; Urie, M.W.

    2000-01-01

    Approximately 1,400 g of wet Hanford Tank C-104 Sludge was evaluated by Battelle for the high-level waste (HLW) pretreatment processes of ultrafiltration, dilute caustic washing, and elevated-temperature caustic leaching. The filterability of diluted C-104 sludge was measured with a 0.1-microm sintered metal Mott filter using a 24-inch-long, single-element, crossflow filtration system (cells unit filter [CUF]). While the filtrate was being recirculated prior to washing and leaching, a 6.9 wt% solids slurry was evaluated with a matrix of seven 1-hour conditions of varying trans-membrane pressure (30 to 70 psid) and axial velocity (9 to 15 ft/s). The filtrate flux and backpulse efficiency were determined for each condition. The slurry was concentrated to 23 wt% solids, a second matrix of six 1-hour conditions was performed, and data analogous to that recorded in the first matrix were obtained. The low-solids-concentration matrix produced filtrate flux rates that ranged from 0.038 to 0.083 gpm/ft 2 . The high-solids-concentration matrix produced filtrate flux rates that ranged from 0.0095 to 0.0172 gpm/ft 2 . In both cases, the optimum filtrate flux was at the highest axial velocity (15 ft/s) and transmembrane pressure had little effect. Nearly all of the measured filtrate fluxes were more than an order of magnitude greater than the required plant flux for C-104 of 0.00126 gpm/ft 2 . In both matrices, the filtrate flux appeared to be proportional to axial velocity, and the permeability appeared to be inversely proportional to the trans-membrane pressure. The first test condition was repeated as the last test condition for each matrix. In both cases, there was a significant decrease in filtrate flux, indicating some filter fouling during the test matrix that could not be removed by backpulsing alone, although the backpulse number and duration were not optimized. Following testing of these two matrices, the material was washed within the CUF by continuously adding

  16. Causticizing for Black Liquor Gasifiers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scott Sinquefeld; James Cantrell; Xiaoyan Zeng; Alan Ball; Jeff Empie

    2009-01-07

    The cost-benefit outlook of black liquor gasification (BLG) could be greatly improved if the smelt causticization step could be achieved in situ during the gasification step. Or, at a minimum, the increase in causticizing load associated with BLG could be mitigated. A number of chemistries have been proven successful during black liquor combustion. In this project, three in situ causticizing processes (titanate, manganate, and borate) were evaluated under conditions suitable for high temperature entrained flow BLG, and low temperature steam reforming of black liquor. The evaluation included both thermodynamic modeling and lab experimentation. Titanate and manganate were tested for complete direct causticizing (to thus eliminate the lime cycle), and borates were evaluated for partial causticizing (to mitigate the load increase associated with BLG). Criteria included high carbonate conversion, corresponding hydroxide recovery upon hydrolysis, non process element (NPE) removal, and economics. Of the six cases (three chemistries at two BLG conditions), only two were found to be industrially viable: titanates for complete causticizing during high temperature BLG, and borates for partial causticizing during high temperature BLG. These two cases were evaluated for integration into a gasification-based recovery island. The Larsen [28] BLG cost-benefit study was used as a reference case for economic forecasting (i.e. a 1500 tpd pulp mill using BLG and upgrading the lime cycle). By comparison, using the titanate direct causticizing process yielded a net present value (NPV) of $25M over the NPV of BLG with conventional lime cycle. Using the existing lime cycle plus borate autocausticizing for extra capacity yielded a NPV of $16M.

  17. Process for converting sodium nitrate-containing, caustic liquid radioactive wastes to solid insoluble products

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barney, G.S.; Brownell, L.E.

    1977-01-01

    A method for solidifying sodium nitrate-containing, caustic, radioactive wastes comprises the steps of reacting powdered aluminum silicate clay, with the wastes which have a caustic concentration of about 3 to 7 M at 30 to 100 0 C to entrap the dissolved radioactive salts in the aluminosilicate matrix. In one embodiment, neutralized Purex-type waste, or salts or oxide produced by evaporation or calcination of these liquid wastes is converted to a formcancrinite having a composition 2(NaAlSiO 4 ) . xSalt . y H 2 O with x = 0.52 and y = 0.68 when the entrapped salt is NaNO 3 . In another embodiment, the liquid is reacted with the powdered aluminum silicate clay, the resulting reaction product is air dried either as loose powder or molded shapes (e.g., bricks) and then fired at a temperature of at least 600 0 C to form the solid mineral nepheline. The leach rate of the entrapped radioactive salts with distilled water is reduced essentially to that of the aluminosilicate lattice which is very low, e.g., in the range of 10 -2 to 10 -4 g/cm 2 /day for cancrinite and 10 -3 to 10 -5 g/cm 2 /day for nepheline. 7 claims

  18. Application of Aeration Rate for Ammonia Leaching of Ni and Co at Preliminary Industrial Scale

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ing. María Elena Magaña-Haynes

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The ammonia-ammonium carbonate leaching was studied applying several aeration speed to diminish the nickel losses and fundamentally, of cobalt. The system is composed by 5 reactors in series. The Redox Potential (ORP was measured to indicate the course of the leaching with a pHmV of combined electrodes Pt-calomel. The aeration speed was calculated applying a computer program, for a time of retention calculated between 100 y 128 min. The content of nickel, cobalt and iron in the mineral was 1,09 %, 0,120 % and 44,96 % respectively. The modification of theaeration speed exercised a valuable change in the leaching of the metals, while that for the nickel the losses reached a maximum of 1,7 %, for the cobalt it was 7,4 %.

  19. Spectral Caustics in Attosecond Science

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dudovich N.

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available A unique type of singularity common in wave phenomena, known as caustics, links processes observed in many different branches of physics [1]. We investigate the role of caustics in attosecond science and in particular the physical process behind high harmonic generation. By exploiting singularities of the three-step model that describes HHG, we can manipulate and enhance specific features in the emitted harmonic spectrum. This new level of control holds promises in both scientific and technological aspects of attosecond science, and provides a deeper insight into the basic mechanism underlying the high harmonic generation process.

  20. PEP Support Laboratory Leaching and Permeate Stability Tests

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Russell, Renee L.; Peterson, Reid A.; Rinehart, Donald E.; Buchmiller, William C.

    2009-09-25

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) has been tasked by Bechtel National Inc. (BNI) on the River Protection Project-Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (RPP-WTP) project to perform research and development activities to resolve technical issues identified for the Pretreatment Facility (PTF). The Pretreatment Engineering Platform (PEP) was designed, constructed, and operated as part of a plan to respond to issue M12, "Undemonstrated Leaching Processes," of the External Flowsheet Review Team (EFRT) issue response plan.( ) The PEP is a 1/4.5-scale test platform designed to simulate the WTP pretreatment caustic leaching, oxidative leaching, ultrafiltration solids concentration, and slurry washing processes. The PEP replicates the WTP leaching processes using prototypic equipment and control strategies. A simplified flow diagram of the PEP system is shown in Figure 1.1. Two operating scenarios are currently being evaluated for the ultrafiltration process (UFP) and leaching operations. The first scenario has caustic leaching performed in the UFP-2 ultrafiltration feed vessels (i.e., vessel UFP-VSL-T02A in the PEP and vessels UFP-VSL-00002A and B in the WTP PTF). The second scenario has caustic leaching conducted in the UFP-1 ultrafiltration feed preparation vessels (i.e., vessels UFP-VSL-T01A and B in the PEP and vessels UFP-VSL-00001A and B in the WTP PTF). In both scenarios, 19-M sodium hydroxide solution (NaOH, caustic) is added to the waste slurry in the vessels to leach solid aluminum compounds (e.g., gibbsite, boehmite). Caustic addition is followed by a heating step that uses direct injection of steam to accelerate the leach process. Following the caustic leach, the vessel contents are cooled using vessel cooling jackets and/or external heat exchangers. The main difference between the two scenarios is that for leaching in UFP-VSL-T01A and B, the 19-M NaOH is added to un-concentrated waste slurry (3 to 8 wt% solids), while for leaching in

  1. Process for converting sodium nitrate-containing, caustic liquid radioactive wastes to solid insoluble products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barney, Gary S.; Brownell, Lloyd E.

    1977-01-01

    A method for converting sodium nitrate-containing, caustic, radioactive wastes to a solid, relatively insoluble, thermally stable form is provided and comprises the steps of reacting powdered aluminum silicate clay, e.g., kaolin, bentonite, dickite, halloysite, pyrophyllite, etc., with the sodium nitrate-containing radioactive wastes which have a caustic concentration of about 3 to 7 M at a temperature of 30.degree. C to 100.degree. C to thereby entrap the dissolved radioactive salts in the aluminosilicate matrix. In one embodiment the sodium nitrate-containing, caustic, radioactive liquid waste, such as neutralized Purex-type waste, or salts or oxide produced by evaporation or calcination of these liquid wastes (e.g., anhydrous salt cake) is converted at a temperature within the range of 30.degree. C to 100.degree. C to the solid mineral form-cancrinite having an approximate chemical formula 2(NaAlSiO.sub.4) .sup.. xSalt.sup.. y H.sub.2 O with x = 0.52 and y = 0.68 when the entrapped salt is NaNO.sub.3. In another embodiment the sodium nitrate-containing, caustic, radioactive liquid is reacted with the powdered aluminum silicate clay at a temperature within the range of 30.degree. C to 100.degree. C, the resulting reaction product is air dried eitheras loose powder or molded shapes (e.g., bricks) and then fired at a temperature of at least 600.degree. C to form the solid mineral form-nepheline which has the approximate chemical formula of NaAlSiO.sub.4. The leach rate of the entrapped radioactive salts with distilled water is reduced essentially to that of the aluminosilicate lattice which is very low, e.g., in the range of 10.sup.-.sup.2 to 10.sup.-.sup.4 g/cm.sup.2 -- day for cancrinite and 10.sup.-.sup.3 to 10.sup.-.sup.5 g/cm.sup.2 -- day for nepheline.

  2. Phosphorus vertical migration in aquic brown soil and light chernozem under different phosphorous application rate: a soil column leaching experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Muqiu; Chen, Xin; Shi, Yi; Zhou, Quanlai; Lu, Caiyan

    2009-01-01

    A soil column leaching experiment was conducted to study the vertical migration of phosphorus in aquic brown soil and light chernozem under different phosphorus fertilization rates. The results showed that total dissolved phosphorus concentration in the leachates from the two soils was nearly the same, but dissolved inorganic phosphorus concentration was obviously different. In all fertilization treatments, aquic brown soil had a higher content of phosphorus in calcium chloride extracts compared with light chernozem. But Olsen phosphorus content was higher at the soil depth beneath 0-20 cm, and increased with increasing phosphorus application rate.

  3. Determination of the leaching rate of radionuclide 134Cs from the solidified radioactive wastes in Syrian Portland cement and cement-microsilica matrixes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ismail Shaaban; Nasim Assi

    2010-01-01

    The suitability of Syrian Portland cement for disposal of solidified low-level radioactive waste was assessed by measuring the leaching rate of 134 Cs. In ordinary cement concrete, a leaching rate of 1.309 x 10 -3 g/cm 2 per day was measured. Mixing this concrete with microsilica reduced significantly the leaching rate to 3.106 x 10 -4 g/cm 2 per day for 1% mixing, and to 9.645 x 10 -5 g/cm 2 per day for 3% mixing. It was also found that the application of a latex paint reduced these leaching rates by about 10%. These results, along with mechanical strength tests (under radiation exposure, high temperature, long water immersion and freeze-thaw cycling) indicate that Syrian Portland cement is suited for the disposal of low-level radioactive waste. (author)

  4. Caustic saving potentile in textile processing mills

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Latif, M.; Rehman, A.; Ghafar, A.; Hafeez, N.M.

    2010-01-01

    The textile processing industry of pakistan has great potential of improvement in resource consumption in various production processes. One major concern is the heavy usage of caustic soda (sodium hydroxide) especially during the mercerization process which incurs a significant cost to a textile processing mill. To reduce the unit fabric production cost and stay competitive, the industry need to minimize the caustic wastage and explore the caustic saving potential. This paper describe the detailed caustic consumption practices and saving potentials in woven textile sector based on the data base of 100 industries. Region wise caustic saving potential is also investigated . Three caustic conservation option including process improvement, reuse and recycling, and caustic recovery plants are discussed. Detailed technical and and financial requirements. saving potentials and paybacks of these options are provided. (author)

  5. Immobilized waste leaching

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suarez, A.A.

    1989-01-01

    The main mechanism by which the immobilized radioactive materials can return to biosphere is the leaching due to the intrusion of water into the repositories. Some mathematical models and experiments utilized to evaluate the leaching rates in different immobilization matrices are described. (author) [pt

  6. Stress corrosion cracking of duplex stainless steels in caustic solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharya, Ananya

    susceptibility. Annealed and water quenched specimens were found to be immune to SCC in caustic environment. Aging treatment at 800°C gave rise to sigma and chi precipitates in the DSS. However, these sigma and chi precipitates, known to initiate cracking in DSS in chloride environment did not cause any cracking of DSS in caustic solutions. Aging of DSS at 475°C had resulted in '475°C embrittlement' and caused cracks to initiate in the ferrite phase. This was in contrast to the cracks initiating in the austenite phase in the as-received DSS. Alloy composition and microstructure of DSS as well as solution composition (dissolved ionic species) was also found to affect the electrochemical behavior and passivation of DSS which in turn plays a major role in stress corrosion crack initiation and propagation. Corrosion rates and SCC susceptibility of DSS was found to increase with addition of sulfide to caustic solutions. Corrosion films on DSS, characterized using XRD and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, indicated that the metal sulfide compounds were formed along with oxides at the metal surface in the presence of sulfide containing caustic environments. These metal sulfide containing passive films are unstable and hence breaks down under mechanical straining, leading to SCC initiations. The overall results from this study helped in understanding the mechanism of SCC in caustic solutions. Favorable slip systems in the austenite phase of DSS favors slip-induced local film damage thereby initiating a stress corrosion crack. Repeated film repassivation and breaking, followed by crack tip dissolution results in crack propagation in the austenite phase of DSS alloys. Result from this study will have a significant impact in terms of identifying the alloy compositions, fabrication processes, microstructures, and environmental conditions that may be avoided to mitigate corrosion and stress corrosion cracking of DSS in caustic solutions.

  7. 27 CFR 21.102 - Caustic soda, liquid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Caustic soda, liquid. 21....102 Caustic soda, liquid. (a) The liquid caustic soda may consist of either 50 percent or 73 percent...: Accurately weigh 2 grams of liquid caustic soda into a 100 ml volumetric flask, dissolve, and dilute to the...

  8. EFRT M12 Issue Resolution: Comparison of PEP and Bench-Scale Oxidative Leaching Results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rapko, Brian M.; Brown, Christopher F.; Eslinger, Paul W.; Fountain, Matthew S.; Hausmann, Tom S.; Huckaby, James L.; Hanson, Brady D.; Kurath, Dean E.; Minette, Michael J.

    2009-08-14

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) has been tasked by Bechtel National Inc. (BNI) on the River Protection Project-Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (RPP-WTP) project to perform research and development activities to resolve technical issues identified for the Pretreatment Facility (PTF). The Pretreatment Engineering Platform (PEP) was designed and constructed and is to be operated as part of a plan to respond to issue M12, “Undemonstrated Leaching Processes.” The PEP is a 1/4.5-scale test platform designed to simulate the WTP pretreatment caustic leaching, oxidative leaching, ultrafiltration solids concentration, and slurry washing processes. The PEP replicates the WTP leaching processes using prototypic equipment and control strategies. The PEP also includes non-prototypic ancillary equipment to support the core processing. Two operating scenarios are currently being evaluated for the ultrafiltration process (UFP) and leaching operations. The first scenario has caustic leaching performed in the UFP-2 ultrafiltration feed vessels (i.e., vessel UFP-VSL-T02A in the PEP; and vessels UFP-VSL-00002A and B in the WTP PTF). The second scenario has caustic leaching conducted in the UFP-1 ultrafiltration feed preparation vessels (i.e., vessels UFP-VSL-T01A and B in the PEP; vessels UFP-VSL-00001A and B in the WTP PTF). In both scenarios, 19-M sodium hydroxide solution (NaOH, caustic) is added to the waste slurry in the vessels to dissolve solid aluminum compounds (e.g., gibbsite, boehmite). Caustic addition is followed by a heating step that uses direct steam injection to accelerate the leaching process. Following the caustic leach, the vessel contents are cooled using vessel cooling jackets and/or external heat exchangers. The main difference between the two scenarios is that for leaching in UFP1, the 19-M NaOH is added to un-concentrated waste slurry (3 to 8 wt% solids), while for leaching in UFP2, the slurry is concentrated to nominally

  9. Sensitivity analysis of the leaching rate parameter in assessing the environmental risk of phosphogypsum application in sanitary landfills

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marchesi, Marcos Vinicius A.; Hama, Naruhiko; Jacomino, Vanusa M.F.; Ladeira, Ana Claudia Q.; Cota, Stela D.S., E-mail: mvmarchesi@hotmail.com, E-mail: sdsc@cdtn.br, E-mail: vmfj@cdtn.br, E-mail: ana.ladeira@cdtn.br, E-mail: naruhikohama@hotmail.com [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN/CNEN-MG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)

    2013-07-01

    The attack with sulfuric acid to phosphate rock produces both phosphoric acid, basic raw material in the manufacture of fertilizers, as a by-product called phosphogypsum. Phosphogypsum is composed mostly of calcium sulfate dihydrated, but may have high levels of impurities from the phosphate rock matrix as a series of natural radionuclides, and heavy metals (e.g. Cd, Zn) and metalloids (e.g. , As and Se). Although it is used for agricultural purposes and more recently in construction, in Brazil the generation rate estimated at six million tons per year is much higher than the amount spent on existing alternatives, and therefore mostly deposited in piles in the same place production, causing thereby the risk of contamination of soil and water resources of the region and providing risk to human health. Taken into account the need to find alternative arrangements for phosphogypsum and reduce the impact generated by its contaminants, this study aims to analyze the sensitivity of the leaching rate parameter in the environmental risk evaluation of the application of phosphogypsum in landfills through mathematical modeling, where it is evaluated the concentration of heavy metals and radionuclides in the layer of the soil under the clay layer of the landfill.

  10. Sensitivity analysis of the leaching rate parameter in assessing the environmental risk of phosphogypsum application in sanitary landfills

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marchesi, Marcos Vinicius A.; Hama, Naruhiko; Jacomino, Vanusa M.F.; Ladeira, Ana Claudia Q.; Cota, Stela D.S.

    2013-01-01

    The attack with sulfuric acid to phosphate rock produces both phosphoric acid, basic raw material in the manufacture of fertilizers, as a by-product called phosphogypsum. Phosphogypsum is composed mostly of calcium sulfate dihydrated, but may have high levels of impurities from the phosphate rock matrix as a series of natural radionuclides, and heavy metals (e.g. Cd, Zn) and metalloids (e.g. , As and Se). Although it is used for agricultural purposes and more recently in construction, in Brazil the generation rate estimated at six million tons per year is much higher than the amount spent on existing alternatives, and therefore mostly deposited in piles in the same place production, causing thereby the risk of contamination of soil and water resources of the region and providing risk to human health. Taken into account the need to find alternative arrangements for phosphogypsum and reduce the impact generated by its contaminants, this study aims to analyze the sensitivity of the leaching rate parameter in the environmental risk evaluation of the application of phosphogypsum in landfills through mathematical modeling, where it is evaluated the concentration of heavy metals and radionuclides in the layer of the soil under the clay layer of the landfill

  11. Glass leaching performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chick, L.A.; Turcotte, R.P.

    1983-05-01

    Current understanding of the leaching performance of high-level nuclear waste (HLW) glass is summarized. The empirical model of waste glass leaching behavior developed shows that at high water flow rates the glass leach rate is kinetically limited to a maximum value. At intermediate water flow rates, leaching is limited by the solution concentration of silica and decreases with decreasing water flow rates. Release of soluble elements is controlled by silica dissolution because silica forms the binding network of the glass. At low water flow rates, mass loss rates reach values controlled by formation rates of alteration minerals, or by diffusion of dissolution products through essentially stagnant water. The parameters reviewed with respect to their quantifiable influence on leaching behavior include temperature, pH, leachant composition, glass composition, thermal history, and radiation. Of these, temperature is most important since the rate of mass loss approximately doubles with each 10 0 C increase in dilute solutions. The pH has small effects within the 4 to 10 range. The chemical composition of the leachant is most important with regard to its influence on alteration product formation. Glass composition exhibits the largest effects at high flow rates where improved glasses leach from ten to thirty times slower than glass 76 to 68. The effects of the thermal history (devitrification) of the glass are not likely to be significant. Radiation effects are important primarily in that radiolysis can potentially drive pH values to less than 4. Radiation damage to the glass causes insignificant changes in leaching performance

  12. Measurement of the leaching rate of radionuclide 134Cs from the solidified radioactive sources in Portland cement mixed with microsilica and barite matrixes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shaaban, Ismail; Assi, Nasim

    2011-01-01

    Portland cement was mixed with radionuclide 134 Cs to produce low-level radioactive sources. These sources were surrounded with cement mixed with different materials like microsilica and barite. The leaching rate of 134 Cs from the solidified radioactive source in Portland cement alone was found to be 4.481 x 10 -4 g/cm 2 per day. Mixing this Portland cement with microsilica and with barite reduced significantly the leaching rate to 1.091 x 10 -4 g/cm 2 per day and 3.153 x 10 -4 g/cm 2 per day for 1 wt.% mixing, and to 1.401 x 10 -5 g/cm 2 per day and 1.703 x 10 -4 g/cm 2 per day for 3 wt.% mixing, respectively. It was also found that the application of a latex paint reduced these leaching rates by about 6.5%, 20.3% and 13.3% for Portland cement, cement mixed with microsilica and with barite, respectively. The leaching data were also analyzed using the polynomial method. The obtained results showed that cement mixed with microsilica and with barite can be effectively used for radioactive sources solidification.

  13. Dark matter axions and caustic rings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sikivie, P.

    1997-01-01

    This report contains discussions on the following topics: the strong CP problem; dark matter axions; the cavity detector of galactic halo axions; and caustic rings in the density distribution of cold dark matter halos

  14. Caustic addition system operability test procedure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parazin, R.E.

    1994-11-01

    This test procedure provides instructions for performing operational testing of the major components of the 241-AN-107 Caustic Addition System by WHC and Kaiser personnel at the Rotating Equipment Shop run-in pit (Bldg. 272E)

  15. Basic and Acidic Leaching of Sludge from Melton Valley Storage Tank W-25

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Collins, J.L., Egan, B.Z., Beahm, E.C., Chase, C.W., Anderson, K.K.

    1997-10-01

    Bench-scale leaching tests were conducted with samples of tank waste sludge from the Melton Valley Storage Tank (MVST) Facility at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to evaluate separation technology processes for use in concentrating the radionuclides and reducing the volume of waste for final disposal. This paper discusses the hot cell apparatus, the characterization of the sludge, the leaching methodology, and the results obtained from a variety of basic and acidic leaching tests of samples of sludge at ambient temperature. Basic leaching tests were also conducted at 75 and 95 deg C. The major alpha-,gamma., and beta-emitting radionuclides in the centrifuged, wet sludge solids were {sup 137}Cs, {sup 60}Co, {sup 154}Eu, {sup 241}Am, {sup 244}Cm {sup 90}Sr, Pu, U, and Th. The other major metals (in addition to the U and Th) and anions were Na, Ca, Al, K, Mg, NO{sub 3}{sup -},CO{sub 3}{sup 2-}, OH{sup -}, and O{sup 2-} organic carbon content was 3.0 +/- 1.0%. The pH was 13. A surprising result was that about 93% of the {sup 137}Cs in the centrifuged, wet sludge solids was bound in the solids and could not be solubilized by basic leaching at ambient temperature and 75 deg C. However, the solubility of the {sup 137}Cs was enhanced by heating the sludge to 95 deg C. In one of the tests,about 42% of the {sup 137}Cs was removed by leaching with 6.3 M NaOH at 95 deg C.Removing {sup 137}Cs from the W-25 sludge with nitric acid was a slow process. About 13% of the {sup 137}Cs was removed in 16 h with 3.0 M HNO{sub 3}. Only 22% of the {sup 137}Cs was removed in 117 h usi 6.0 M HNO{sub 3}. Successive leaching of sludge solids with 0.5 M, 3.0 M, 3.0 M; and 6.0 M HNO{sub 3} for a total mixing time of 558 h removed 84% of the {sup 137}Cs. The use of caustic leaching prior to HNO{sub 3} leaching, and the use of HF with HNO{sub 3} in acidic leaching, increased the rate of {sup 137}Cs dissolution. Gel formation proved to be one of the biggest problems associated with HNO{sub 3

  16. Basic and Acidic Leaching of Sludge from Melton Valley Storage Tank W-25

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Collins, J.L.; Egan, B.Z.; Beahm, E.C.; Chase, C.W.; Anderson, K.K.

    1997-10-01

    Bench-scale leaching tests were conducted with samples of tank waste sludge from the Melton Valley Storage Tank (MVST) Facility at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to evaluate separation technology processes for use in concentrating the radionuclides and reducing the volume of waste for final disposal. This paper discusses the hot cell apparatus, the characterization of the sludge, the leaching methodology, and the results obtained from a variety of basic and acidic leaching tests of samples of sludge at ambient temperature. Basic leaching tests were also conducted at 75 and 95 deg C. The major alpha-,gamma., and beta-emitting radionuclides in the centrifuged, wet sludge solids were 137 Cs, 60 Co, 154 Eu, 241 Am, 244 Cm 90 Sr, Pu, U, and Th. The other major metals (in addition to the U and Th) and anions were Na, Ca, Al, K, Mg, NO 3 - ,CO 3 2- , OH - , and O 2- organic carbon content was 3.0 +/- 1.0%. The pH was 13. A surprising result was that about 93% of the 137 Cs in the centrifuged, wet sludge solids was bound in the solids and could not be solubilized by basic leaching at ambient temperature and 75 deg C. However, the solubility of the 137 Cs was enhanced by heating the sludge to 95 deg C. In one of the tests,about 42% of the 137 Cs was removed by leaching with 6.3 M NaOH at 95 deg C.Removing 137 Cs from the W-25 sludge with nitric acid was a slow process. About 13% of the 137 Cs was removed in 16 h with 3.0 M HNO 3 . Only 22% of the 137 Cs was removed in 117 h usi 6.0 M HNO 3 . Successive leaching of sludge solids with 0.5 M, 3.0 M, 3.0 M; and 6.0 M HNO 3 for a total mixing time of 558 h removed 84% of the 137 Cs. The use of caustic leaching prior to HNO 3 leaching, and the use of HF with HNO 3 in acidic leaching, increased the rate of 137 Cs dissolution. Gel formation proved to be one of the biggest problems associated with HNO 3 leaching of the W-25 sludge

  17. A lysimeter study of nitrate leaching, optimum fertilisation rate and growth responses of corn (Zea mays L.) following soil amendment with water-saving super-absorbent polymer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Islam, M Robiul; Mao, Sishuai; Xue, Xuzhang; Eneji, A Egrinya; Zhao, Xingbao; Hu, Yuegao

    2011-08-30

    Nitrate leaching and the resulting groundwater contamination from intensive cereal production has become a major concern for long-term farmland efficiency and environmental sustainability in northern China. The aim of this study was to evaluate a water-saving super-absorbent polymer (SAP) for minimising NO(3)(-) leaching from soil and optimising corn growth and yield. Thirty-six undisturbed soil lysimeters were installed in a field lysimeter facility in drought-affected northern China to study the growth and yield characteristics of summer corn (Zea mays L.) as well as the amount of NO(3)-leaching losses under different fertiliser (standard, medium or 75% and low, or 50% of conventional fertilisation rate) and SAP (control, 0; level-1, 15 kg ha(-1) and level-2, 30 kg ha(-1)) treatments. Corn yield fell by 19.7% under medium and 37.7% under low fertilisation; the application of SAP increased yield significantly by 44.4% on level-1 and 80.3% on level-2. Similarly, plant height, leaf area, number of grains as well as protein, soluble sugar and starch contents in the grain also increased with SAP treatment. Application of SAP at 30 kg ha(-1) plus half of conventional fertilisation can reduce maximum (64.1%) nitrate leaching losses from soil. Application of SAP at 30 kg ha(-1) plus only half the amount of conventional fertiliser rate (150 kg urea, and 50 kg each of superphosphate and potassium sulfate) would be a more appropriate practice both for minimising nitrate leaching and sustainable corn production under the arid and semiarid conditions of northern China. Copyright © 2011 Society of Chemical Industry.

  18. Leaching mechanisms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dougherty, D.R.; Colombo, P.

    1984-01-01

    Sufficient data are lacking to provide a basis for adequately assessing the long term leaching behavior of solidified low level radioactive waste forms in their disposal environment. Although the release of radioactivity from a waste form to an aqueous environment is recognized to be due to one or more mechanisms such as diffusion, dissolution, corrosion or ion exchange, the leaching mechanisms and the factors which control the leaching behavior of waste forms are not fully understood. This study will determine the prevailing mechanisms for a variety of selected LLW solidification agents which are being considered for use by defense and commercial generators and which will cover the broadest possible number of mechanisms. The investigation will proceed by the postulation of mathematical models representative of the prevailing mechanism(s) and the use of statistically designed experiments to test the actual leaching behavior of laborattory samples against the postulated representations. Maximum use of existing leach data in the literature will be made by incorporating literature results into a computerized data base along with the experimental results generated in this task

  19. Leaching process of nuclear fuel in leaching solution at sub-boiling temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Qinfen; Chen Yongqing; Liao Yuanzong; Sun Shuyun

    1990-03-01

    Effects of the leaching temperature and concentration of the nitric acid on the solubility of nuclear fuel have been investigated. Fuels were fed into the solution in simulation of continuous and batch mode and the effects of leaching temperature, nitric acid concentration and soluble neutron poison on the leaching rate were studied. The results showed that the increase of nitric acid concentration and leaching temperature can accelerate the fuel leaching rate. The releasing off-gas increased with the increase of feeding fuels. There was no effect of concentration Gd up to 3g/L in the nitric acid on the fuel leaching. It also demonstrated that the simulation of continuous leaching process at the Sub-boiling temperature of leaching solution was a suitable process beacause it could keep the leaching rate and off-gas flow not only rapidly but also smoothly and no gas peak appeared. The total volume of off-gas after the leaching process was calculated

  20. Solution Leaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chun, Tiejun; Zhu, Deqing; Pan, Jian; He, Zhen

    2014-06-01

    Recovery of alumina from magnetic separation tailings of red mud has been investigated by Na2CO3 solution leaching. X-ray diffraction (XRD) results show that most of the alumina is present as 12CaO·7Al2O3 and CaO·Al2O3 in the magnetic separation tailings. The shrinking core model was employed to describe the leaching kinetics. The results show that the calculated activation energy of 8.31 kJ/mol is characteristic for an internal diffusion-controlled process. The kinetic equation can be used to describe the leaching process. The effects of Na2CO3 concentration, liquid-to-solid ratio, and particle size on recovery of Al2O3 were examined.

  1. Leaching process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heinen, H.J.; McClelland, G.E.; Lindstrom, R.E.

    1982-01-01

    A gold and uranium ore is heap leached in accordance with the process comprising initial agglomeration of fines in the feed by means of a binding agent and cyanide solution. The lixiviant comprises a compatible mixture of sodium cyanide and sodium bicarbonate

  2. Electrochemical generation of fentons reagent to treat spent caustic wastewater

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hansen, H. K.; Nunez, P.; Rodriguez, N.; Guzman, J.

    2009-01-01

    An important wastewater stream from oil refineries is the spent caustic. Caustic solutions are used as scrubbing agent during the desulphurization process to eliminate sulphur an mercaptans from oil and gasses. Spent caustic is classified as DOO3 (reactive sulphide) hazardous waste under the US Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). (Author)

  3. Plutonium Speciation in Support of Oxidative-Leaching Demonstration Test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sinkov, Sergey I.

    2007-01-01

    Bechtel National, Inc. (BNI) is evaluating the plutonium speciation in caustic solutions that reasonably represent the process streams from the oxidative-leaching demonstration test. Battelle-Pacific Northwest Division (PNWD) was contracted to develop a spectrophotometric method to measure plutonium speciation at submicromolar (< 10-6 M) concentrations in alkaline solutions in the presence of chromate and carbonate. Data obtained from the testing will be used to identify the oxidation state of Pu(IV), Pu(V), and Pu(VI) species, which potentially could exist in caustic leachates. Work was initially conducted under contract number 24590-101-TSA-W000-00004 satisfying the needs defined in Appendix C of the Research and Technology Plan TSS A-219 to evaluate the speciation of chromium, plutonium, and manganese before and after oxidative leaching. In February 2007, the contract mechanism was switched to Pacific Northwest National Laboratory PNNL Operating Contract MOA: 24590-QL-HC9-WA49-00001

  4. Interactive Dynamic Volume Illumination with Refraction and Caustics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magnus, Jens G; Bruckner, Stefan

    2018-01-01

    In recent years, significant progress has been made in developing high-quality interactive methods for realistic volume illumination. However, refraction - despite being an important aspect of light propagation in participating media - has so far only received little attention. In this paper, we present a novel approach for refractive volume illumination including caustics capable of interactive frame rates. By interleaving light and viewing ray propagation, our technique avoids memory-intensive storage of illumination information and does not require any precomputation. It is fully dynamic and all parameters such as light position and transfer function can be modified interactively without a performance penalty.

  5. Wavefronts and caustics associated with Mathieu beams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Julián-Macías, Israel; Rickenstorff-Parrao, Carolina; Cabrera-Rosas, Omar de Jesús; Espíndola-Ramos, Ernesto; Juárez-Reyes, Salvador Alejandro; Ortega-Vidals, Paula; Silva-Ortigoza, Gilberto; Sosa-Sánchez, Citlalli Teresa

    2018-02-01

    In this work we compute the wavefronts and the caustics associated with the solutions to the scalar wave equation introduced by Durnin in elliptical cylindrical coordinates generated by the function A(ϕ)=ce ν (ϕ,q)+ise ν (ϕ,q), with ν being an integral or nonintegral number. We show that the wavefronts and the caustic are invariant under translations along the direction of evolution of the beam. We remark that the wavefronts of the separable Mathieu beams generated by A(ϕ)=ce ν (ϕ,q) and A(ϕ)=se ν (ϕ,q) are cones and their caustic is the z axis; thus, they are not structurally stable. However, in general, the Mathieu beam generated by A(ϕ)=ce ν (ϕ,q)+ise ν (ϕ,q) is stable because locally its caustic has singularities of the fold and cusp types. To show this property, we present the wavefronts and the caustics for the Mathieu beams with characteristic value a ν =0 and q=0,0.2,0.3,0.5. For q=0, we obtain the Bessel beam of order zero; in this case, the wavefronts are cones and the caustic coincides with the z axis. For q≠0, the wavefronts are deformations of conical ones, and the caustic surface, for some values of q, has singularities of the cusp ridge type. Furthermore, we remark that the set of Mathieu beams with characteristic value a ν =0 and 0≤qMathieu beam is more stable than plane waves, Bessel beams, parabolic beams, and those generated by A(ϕ)=ce ν (ϕ,q) and A(ϕ)=se ν (ϕ,q). To support this conclusion, we present experimental results showing the pattern obtained after obstructing a plane wave, the Bessel beam of order m=5, and the Mathieu beam of order m=5 and q=50 with complex transversal amplitude given by Ce 5 (ξ,50)ce 5 (η,50)+iSe 5 (ξ,50)se 5 (η,50), where (ξ, η) are the elliptical coordinates on the plane.

  6. K-Area Acid/Caustic Basin groundwater monitoring report. First quarter 1995

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-06-01

    During first quarter 1995, samples from the KAC monitoring wells at the K-Area Acid/Caustic Basin were collected and analyzed for herbicides/pesticides, indicator parameters, metals, nitrate, radionuclide indicators, and other constituents. Monitoring results that exceeded the final Primary Drinking Water Standards (PDWS), other Savannah River Site (SRS) Flag 2 criteria, or the SRS turbidity standard are provided in this report. No constituents exceeded the final PDWS in the KAC wells. Aluminum and iron exceeded other SRS flagging criteria in one or more of the downgradient wells. Groundwater flow direction and rate in the water table beneath the K- Area Acid/Caustic Basin were similar to past quarters

  7. DEVELOPMENT OF A KINETIC MODEL OF BOEHMITE DISSOLUTION IN CAUSTIC SOLUTIONS APPLIED TO OPTIMIZE HANFORD WASTE PROCESSING

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DISSELKAMP RS

    2011-01-06

    Boehmite (e.g., aluminum oxyhydroxide) is a major non-radioactive component in Hanford and Savannah River nuclear tank waste sludge. Boehmite dissolution from sludge using caustic at elevated temperatures is being planned at Hanford to minimize the mass of material disposed of as high-level waste (HLW) during operation of the Waste Treatment Plant (WTP). To more thoroughly understand the chemistry of this dissolution process, we have developed an empirical kinetic model for aluminate production due to boehmite dissolution. Application of this model to Hanford tank wastes would allow predictability and optimization of the caustic leaching of aluminum solids, potentially yielding significant improvements to overall processing time, disposal cost, and schedule. This report presents an empirical kinetic model that can be used to estimate the aluminate production from the leaching of boehmite in Hanford waste as a function of the following parameters: (1) hydroxide concentration; (2) temperature; (3) specific surface area of boehmite; (4) initial soluble aluminate plus gibbsite present in waste; (5) concentration of boehmite in the waste; and (6) (pre-fit) Arrhenius kinetic parameters. The model was fit to laboratory, non-radioactive (e.g. 'simulant boehmite') leaching results, providing best-fit values of the Arrhenius A-factor, A, and apparent activation energy, E{sub A}, of A = 5.0 x 10{sup 12} hour{sup -1} and E{sub A} = 90 kJ/mole. These parameters were then used to predict boehmite leaching behavior observed in previously reported actual waste leaching studies. Acceptable aluminate versus leaching time profiles were predicted for waste leaching data from both Hanford and Savannah River site studies.

  8. DEVELOPMENT OF A KINETIC MODEL OF BOEHMITE DISSOLUTION IN CAUSTIC SOLUTIONS APPLIED TO OPTIMIZE HANFORD WASTE PROCESSING

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Disselkamp, R.S.

    2011-01-01

    Boehmite (e.g., aluminum oxyhydroxide) is a major non-radioactive component in Hanford and Savannah River nuclear tank waste sludge. Boehmite dissolution from sludge using caustic at elevated temperatures is being planned at Hanford to minimize the mass of material disposed of as high-level waste (HLW) during operation of the Waste Treatment Plant (WTP). To more thoroughly understand the chemistry of this dissolution process, we have developed an empirical kinetic model for aluminate production due to boehmite dissolution. Application of this model to Hanford tank wastes would allow predictability and optimization of the caustic leaching of aluminum solids, potentially yielding significant improvements to overall processing time, disposal cost, and schedule. This report presents an empirical kinetic model that can be used to estimate the aluminate production from the leaching of boehmite in Hanford waste as a function of the following parameters: (1) hydroxide concentration; (2) temperature; (3) specific surface area of boehmite; (4) initial soluble aluminate plus gibbsite present in waste; (5) concentration of boehmite in the waste; and (6) (pre-fit) Arrhenius kinetic parameters. The model was fit to laboratory, non-radioactive (e.g. 'simulant boehmite') leaching results, providing best-fit values of the Arrhenius A-factor, A, and apparent activation energy, E A , of A = 5.0 x 10 12 hour -1 and E A = 90 kJ/mole. These parameters were then used to predict boehmite leaching behavior observed in previously reported actual waste leaching studies. Acceptable aluminate versus leaching time profiles were predicted for waste leaching data from both Hanford and Savannah River site studies.

  9. Acid/Caustic Basins: Environmental information document

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ward, J.W.; Johnson, W.F.; Marine, I.W.

    1986-12-01

    There are six Acid/Caustic Basins at SRP, all of which are located in the reactor and separations areas. These basins are unlined earthen depressions with nominal dimensions of 15.2 m in length x 15.2 m in width x 2.1 m in depth. They were used to provide mixing and partial neutralization of dilute sulfuric acid and sodium hydroxide solutions from water treatment facilities before these solutions were discharged to tributaries of local streams. Closure options considered for the Acid/Caustic Basins are waste removal and closure, no waste removal and closure, and no action. The predominant pathways for human exposure to chemical contaminants are through surface, subsurface, and atmospheric transport. Modeling calculations were made to determine the risks to human population via general pathways for the three postulated closure options. A cost estimate for each closure was also made

  10. Results Of Routine Strip Effluent Hold Tank, Decontaminated Salt Solution Hold Tank, Caustic Wash Tank And Caustic Storage Tank Samples From Modular Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction Unit During Macrobatch 6 Operations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peters, T. B.

    2013-10-01

    Strip Effluent Hold Tank (SEHT), Decontaminated Salt Solution Hold Tank (DSSHT), Caustic Wash Tank (CWT) and Caustic Storage Tank (CST) samples from several of the ''microbatches'' of Integrated Salt Disposition Project (ISDP) Salt Batch (''Macrobatch'') 6 have been analyzed for {sup 238}Pu, {sup 90}Sr, {sup 137}Cs, and by Inductively Coupled Plasma Emission Spectroscopy (ICPES). The results from the current microbatch samples are similar to those from comparable samples in Macrobatch 5. From a bulk chemical point of view, the ICPES results do not vary considerably between this and the previous macrobatch. The titanium results in the DSSHT samples continue to indicate the presence of Ti, when the feed material does not have detectable levels. This most likely indicates that leaching of Ti from MST in ARP continues to occur. Both the CST and CWT samples indicate that the target Free OH value of 0.03 has been surpassed. While at this time there is no indication that this has caused an operational problem, the CST should be adjusted into specification. The {sup 137}Cs results from the SRNL as well as F/H lab data indicate a potential decline in cesium decontamination factor. Further samples will be carefully monitored to investigate this.

  11. Survey of Caustic Ingestion Symptoms in Children

    OpenAIRE

    H Yarmohammadi; N Yarmohammadi; M Mohammadpur

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Complications of caustic ingestion swallowing in children of singe to gullet severe  stricture and andoscopic actions and multiple surgeries Is different that increase the risk of gastrointestinal perforation and gastrointestinal malignancies ..... Because Acid substances have  bad taste and these are tissue coalescence in location of contact thus attribute alkali make lose of injury. In other words,alkalis substance are weak and attribute to acids make a more severe tiss...

  12. Extraction of caustic potash from spent tea for biodiesel Production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sulaiman, Sarina; Faiz Che Fisol, Ahmad; Sharikh, Atikah Mohamed; Noraini Jimat, Dzun; Jamal, Parveen

    2018-01-01

    Biodiesel is an alternative to non-renewable fossil fuels due to its low gas emission and economical value. This study aims to extract caustic potash (KOH) from spent tea and to optimize the transesterfication process based on parameters such as amount of catalyst, reaction temperature and methanol to oil ratio. The spent tea was first dried at 60°C prior to calcination at 600°C for two hours. Caustic Potash were extracted from the calcined spent tea. The transesterification process was done based on Design of Experiments (DOE) to study the effects of amount of catalyst ranging from 0.5 wt % to 2.5 wt %, reaction temperature from 55°C to 65°C and methanol to oil ratio from 6:1 to 12:1 at a constant agitation rate of 300 rpm for three hours. The calcined spent tea produced was recorded the highest at 54.3 wt % and the extracted catalyst was 2.4 wt %. The optimized biodiesel yield recorded was 56.95% at the optimal conditions of 2.5 wt % amount of catalyst, 65°C reaction temperature and 9:1 methanol to oil ratio.

  13. Sulfuric acid leaching of high iron-bearing zinc calcine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jin-lin; Liu, Ji-guang; Xiao, Han-xin; Ma, Shao-jian

    2017-11-01

    Sulfuric acid leaching of high iron-bearing zinc calcine was investigated to assess the effects of sulfuric acid concentration, liquid- to-solid ratio, leaching time, leaching temperature, and the stirring speed on the leaching rates of zinc and iron. The results showed that the sulfuric acid concentration, liquid-to-solid ratio, leaching time, and leaching temperature strongly influenced the leaching of zinc and iron, whereas stirring speed had little influence. Zinc was mainly leached and the leaching rate of iron was low when the sulfuric acid concentration was less than 100 g/L. At sulfuric acid concentrations higher than 100 g/L, the leaching rate of iron increased quickly with increasing sulfuric acid concentration. This behavior is attributed to iron-bearing minerals such as zinc ferrite in zinc calcine dissolving at high temperatures and high sulfuric acid concentrations but not at low temperatures and low sulfuric acid concentrations.

  14. Comparison of toxicity and release rates of Cu and Zn from anti-fouling paints leached in natural and artificial brackish seawater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ytreberg, Erik; Karlsson, Jenny; Eklund, Britta

    2010-05-15

    Biocide-containing anti-fouling paints are regulated and approved according to the added active ingredients, such as Cu. Biocide-free paints are considered to be less environmentally damaging and do not need an approval. Zn, a common ingredient in paints with the potential of causing adverse effects has received only minor attention. Laboratory experiments were conducted in artificial brackish seawater (ASW) and natural brackish seawater (NSW) to quantify release rates of Cu and Zn from biocide-containing and biocide-free labeled eroding anti-fouling paints used on commercial vessels as well as leisure boats. In addition, organisms from three trophic levels, the crustacean Nitocra spinipes, the macroalga Ceramium tenuicorne and the bacteria Vibrio fischeri, were exposed to Cu and Zn to determine the toxicity of these metals. The release rate of Cu in NSW was higher from the paints for professional use (3.2-3.6 microg cm(-)(2)d(-1)) than from the biocide leaching leisure boat paint (1.1 microg cm(-)(2)d(-1)). Biocide-free paints did leach considerably more Zn (4.4-8.2 microg cm(-)(2)d(-1)) than biocide-containing leisure boat paint (3.0 microg cm(-)(2)d(-1)) and ship paints (0.7-2.0 microg cm(-)(2)d(-1)). In ASW the release rates of both metals were notably higher than in NSW for most tested paints. The macroalga was the most sensitive species to both Cu (EC(50)=6.4 microg l(-1)) and Zn (EC(50)=25 microg l(-1)) compared to the crustacean (Cu, LC(50)=2000 microg l(-1) Zn, LC(50)=890 microg l(-1)), and the bacteria (Cu, EC(50)=800 microg l(-1) and Zn, EC(50)=2000 microg l(-1)). The results suggest that the amounts of Zn and Cu leached from anti-fouling paints may attain toxic concentrations in areas with high boat density. To fully account for potential ecological risk associated with anti-fouling paints, Zn as well as active ingredients should be considered in the regulatory process. Copyright 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Comparison of leaching tests and study of leaching mechanisms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amarantos, S.G.; Papadokostaki, K.G.; Petropoulos, J.H.

    1985-10-01

    The present work is concerned first with the study of certain aspects of the leaching kinetics of Cs + and Sr ++ embedded in cement, as Cs 2 SO 4 and SrSO 4 , and in particular: (a) the comparative evaluation of leaching in (i) stagnant, (ii) stirred and (iii) continuously flowing (modified Soxhlet) water, (b) the effect of atmospheric CO 2 on elution, (c) the effect of temperature changes during leaching. Secondly, model kinetic studies were carried out using cellulose acetate incorporating SrSO 4 , CaSO 4 or NaCl. The main results obtained were: (1) Cs leaching rates were not significantly affected by the leaching method or by the presence of atmospheric CO 2 . The embedded Cs exists in relatively easily leachable and less rapidly leachable (most probably located within the gel regions) forms. (2) Elution of Sr is retarded by stagnant and infrequently renewed leachant (method (i)) and by the presence of atmospheric CO 2 ; leaching method (iii), which tends to minimize both of these effects, gave the highest elution rates. (3) The observed elution kinetics in the case of cellulose acetate-CaSO 4 or SrSO 4 conform to the Higuchi model, but a more elaborate theory is needed for the cellulose acetate-NaCl system. (author)

  16. Epidemiologic Features and Outcomes of Caustic Ingestions; a 10-Year Cross-Sectional Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Athena Alipour Faz

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Caustic ingestions are among the most prevalent causes of toxic exposure. The present 10-year survey aimed to evaluate the epidemiologic features and outcomes of caustic ingestion cases presenting to emergency department.Methods: This is a retrospective cross-sectional study on patients who were admitted to a referral toxicology center during 2004 to 2014, following caustic ingestion. Baseline characteristics, presenting chief complaint, severity of mucosal injury, complications, imaging and laboratory findings as well as outcomes (need for ICU admission, need for surgery, mortality were recorded, reviewing patients’ medical profile, and analyzed using SPSS 22.Results: 348 patients with mean age of 37.76 ± 17.62 years were studied (55.6% male. The mean amount of ingested caustic agent was 106.69 ± 100.24 mL (59.2 % intentional. Intentional ingestions (p < 0.0001, acidic substance (p = 0.054, and higher volume of ingestion (p = 0.021 were significantly associated with higher severity of mucosal damage. 28 (8% cases had died, 53 (15.2% were admitted to ICU, and 115 (33% cases underwent surgery.Conclusion: It seems that, suicidal intention, higher grade of mucosal injury, higher volume of ingestion, lower level of consciousness, lower serum pH, and higher respiratory rate are among the most important predictors of need for ICU admission, need for surgery, and mortality.

  17. Generation of Caustics and Rogue Waves from Nonlinear Instability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safari, Akbar; Fickler, Robert; Padgett, Miles J; Boyd, Robert W

    2017-11-17

    Caustics are phenomena in which nature concentrates the energy of waves and may exhibit rogue-type behavior. Although they are known mostly in optics, caustics are intrinsic to all wave phenomena. As we demonstrate in this Letter, the formation of caustics and consequently rogue events in linear systems requires strong phase fluctuations. We show that nonlinear phase shifts can generate sharp caustics from even small fluctuations. Moreover, in that the wave amplitude increases dramatically in caustics, nonlinearity is usually inevitable. We perform an experiment in an optical system with Kerr nonlinearity, simulate the results based on the nonlinear Schrödinger equation, and achieve perfect agreement. As the same theoretical framework is used to describe other wave systems such as large-scale water waves, our results may also aid the understanding of ocean phenomena.

  18. Leaching behavior of polyethylene encapsulated nitrate waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fuhrmann, M.; Kalb, P.D.

    1996-01-01

    The leaching behavior of sodium nitrate salts (simulating wastes from the Hanford single-shell tanks) encapsulated in polyethylene was investigated. These wastes are sufficiently radioactive that they may be self-heating. Laboratory scale waste forms prepared for leach tests were mixtures of NaNO 3 and low-density polyethylene, with nominal salt loadings of 50, 60 and 70 wt%. In this study the authors determined: (1) leach rates of NaNO 3 /polyethylene waste forms at several waste loadings; (2) leach rates at temperatures as high as 70 C which is the maximum projected temperature of this self-heating waste; and (3) leaching mechanism of NaNO 3 /polyethylene waste forms and predicted releases. The Accelerated Leach Test (ALT) used for this study was recently developed at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL). It is particularly well suited for this application since it was designed to be run at elevated temperatures

  19. The deportment of uranium decay chain radionuclides during processing of an Australian monazite concentrate using a caustic conversion route

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mellodee Anvia; Brown, S.A.; McOrist, G.D.

    2015-01-01

    Monazite is conventionally processed using caustic conversion and hydrochloric acid leaching in industry, to recover the rare earth elements (REE). Understanding the deportment of uranium decay chain radionuclides is of particular importance for product quality and occupational health and safety (OH and S) purposes. Here, the deportment of uranium decay chain radionuclides during the alkaline treatment route was investigated for the first time, using analytical techniques. Significant quantities of 226 Ra, 210 Pb and 227 Ac were found to report to the rare earth chloride liquor. Subsequent impurity removal treatment generally resulted in the elimination of more than 85 % of radionuclides contained in the chloride liquor. (author)

  20. Mill Integration-Pulping, Stream Reforming and Direct Causticization for Black Liquor Recovery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adriaan van Heiningen

    2007-06-30

    MTCI/StoneChem developed a steam reforming, fluidized bed gasification technology for biomass. DOE supported the demonstration of this technology for gasification of spent wood pulping liquor (or 'black liquor') at Georgia-Pacific's Big Island, Virginia mill. The present pre-commercial R&D project addressed the opportunities as well as identified negative aspects when the MTCI/StoneChem gasification technology is integrated in a pulp mill production facility. The opportunities arise because black liquor gasification produces sulfur (as H{sub 2}S) and sodium (as Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3}) in separate streams which may be used beneficially for improved pulp yield and properties. The negative aspect of kraft black liquor gasification is that the amount of Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3} which must be converted to NaOH (the so called causticizing requirement) is increased. This arises because sulfur is released as Na{sub 2}S during conventional kraft black liquor recovery, while during gasification the sodium associated Na{sub 2}S is partly or fully converted to Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3}. The causticizing requirement can be eliminated by including a TiO{sub 2} based cyclic process called direct causticization. In this process black liquor is gasified in the presence of (low sodium content) titanates which convert Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3} to (high sodium content) titanates. NaOH is formed when contacting the latter titanates with water, thereby eliminating the causticizing requirement entirely. The leached and low sodium titanates are returned to the gasification process. The project team comprised the University of Maine (UM), North Carolina State University (NCSU) and MTCI/ThermoChem. NCSU and MTCI are subcontractors to UM. The principal organization for the contract is UM. NCSU investigated the techno-economics of using advanced pulping techniques which fully utilize the unique cooking liquors produced by steam reforming of black liquor (Task 1). UM studied the kinetics and

  1. Spent LWR fuel leach tests: Waste Isolation Safety Assessment program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Katayama, Y.B.

    1979-04-01

    Spent light-water-reactor (LWR) fuels with burnups of 54.5, 28 and 9 MWd/kgU were leach-tested in deionized water at 25 0 C. Fuel burnup has no apparent effect on the calculated leach rates based upon the behavior of 137 Cs and 239+240 Pu. A leach test of 54.5 MWd/kgU spent fuel in synthetic sea brine showed that the cesium-based leach rate is lower in sea brine than in deionized water. A rise in the leach rate was observed after approximately 600 d of cumulative leaching. During the rise, the leach rate for all the measured radionuclides become nearly equal. Evidence suggests that exposure of new surfaces to the leachant may cause the increase. As a result, experimental work to study leaching mechanisms of spent fuel has been initiated. 22 figures

  2. Sever Gastrointestinal Caustic Injury and Surgical Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Bazrafshan

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Approximately 20% of caustic ingestions result in some degree of esophageal injury. Alkaline materials are the most frequent corrosive materials ingested.     The physical form and PH of ingested materials play a critical role in the site and type of gastrointestinal injury (PH > 12 or PH < 1.5, crystalline drain cleaners. Unlike Alkaline solutions, strong acids are bitter, burn on contact and usually produce vomiting but when swallowed pass rapidly through the esophagus and damage the antrum of the stomach. I will present the results of 5 cases of gastric out let obstruction after acid ingestion (subtotal gastrectomy and billroth 1 and 4 patients with extensive esophageal damage and perforation ( Total esophagectomy and gastric pull up.  

  3. Vat leaching test in Ningyo pass mine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sugihara, Kozo; Sugitsue, Yozo

    1981-01-01

    Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corp. has tested inplace and heap leaching methods considered to be the means to efficiently and economically recover useful metals from low grade ores in developing uranium mines. It has once considered to try heap leaching test in Ningyo pass mines, but re-arranged the plan in which it will first develop the vast leaching to use leaching vats to accumulate the data and experience, then the heap leaching, from the viewpoint of environmental preservation and extraction maximum. Until December, 1980, approximately 6,000 t of crude ores were tested. The leaching test process is composed of five sub-processes of filling, leaching, washing, neutralization and carrying-out. Then the summary of the vast leaching facility is described, following the process flow. In the test results in the fiscal year of 1980, the first circulation days in leaching process are considered as 8 to 10 days, and in the following circulation, 5 days, and the amount of sulfuric acid required was estimated as 20 to 35 kg/t-ore. The relation of the change of uranium concentration expressed logarithmically to the amount of water in washing process was approximately linear. Though the recovery rate was about 95% in the ion exchange process test because the result includes the test run data, it will be 99% or more in steady operation. (Wakatsuki, Y.)

  4. P-Area Acid/Caustic Basin groundwater monitoring report: Third quarter 1994

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-12-01

    During third quarter 1994, groundwater from the six PAC monitoring wells at the P-Area Acid/Caustic Basin was analyzed for herbicides/pesticides, indicator parameters, metals, nitrate, radionuclide indicators, and other constituents. Monitoring results that exceeded the final Primary Drinking Water Standards (PDWS) or the Savannah River Site (SRS) flagging criteria or turbidity standard during the quarter are discussed in this report. During third quarter 1994, no constituents exceeded the final PDWS. Aluminum exceeded its SRS Flag 2 criterion in all six PAC wells. Iron and manganese exceeded Flag 2 criteria in three wells, while turbidity was elevated in one well. Groundwater flow direction and rate in the water table beneath the P-Area Acid/Caustic Basin were similar to past quarters

  5. P-Area Acid/Caustic Basin groundwater monitoring report. First quarter 1995

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chase, J.A.

    1995-06-01

    During first quarter 1995, groundwater from the six PAC monitoring wells at the P-Area Acid/Caustic Basin was analyzed for herbicides/pesticides, indicator parameters, metals, nitrate, adionuclide indicators, and other constituents. Monitoring results that exceeded the final Primary Drinking Water Standards (PDWS) or the Savannah River Site (SRS) flagging criteria or turbidity standard during the quarter are discussed in this report. During first quarter 1995, no constituents exceeded the final PDWS. Aluminum exceeded its SRS Flag 2 criterion in all six PAC wells. Iron and manganese exceeded Flag 2 criteria in three wells, while turbidity was elevated in one well. Groundwater flow direction and rate in the water table beneath the P-Area Acid/Caustic Basin were similar to past quarters

  6. F-Area Acid/Caustic Basin groundwater monitoring report. Second quarter 1994

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-09-01

    During second quarter 1994, samples from the FAC monitoring wells at the F-Area Acid/Caustic Basin were collected and analyzed for herbicides/pesticides, indicator parameters, metals, nitrate, radionuclide indicators, volatile organic compounds, and other constituents. Piezometer FAC 5P and monitoring well FAC 6 were dry and could not be sampled. Analytical results that exceeded final Primary Drinking Water Standards (PDWS), other Savannah River Site (SRS) Flag 2 criteria, or the SRS turbidity standard of 50 NTU during the quarter were as follows: gross alpha exceeded the final PDWS and aluminum, iron, manganese, and total organic halogens exceeded the SRS Flag 2 criteria in one or more of the FAC wells. Turbidity exceeded the SRS standard in well FAC 3. Groundwater flow direction and rate in the water table beneath the F-Area Acid/Caustic Basin were similar to past quarters

  7. P-Area Acid/Caustic Basin groundwater monitoring report, second quarter 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-09-01

    During second quarter 1994, groundwater from the six PAC monitoring wells at the P-Area Acid/Caustic Basin was analyzed for herbicides/pesticides, radium-226, radium-228, turbidity, and comprehensive constituents. Monitoring results that exceeded the final Primary Drinking Water Standards (PDWS) or the Savannah River Site (SRS) flagging criteria or turbidity standard during the quarter are discussed in this report. During second quarter 1994, no constituents exceeded the final PDWS. Aluminum exceeded its SRS Flag 2 criterion in five PAC wells. Iron and manganese exceeded Flag 2 criteria in three wells, while specific conductance was elevated in one well. Groundwater flow direction and rate in the water table beneath the P-Area Acid/Caustic Basin were similar to past quarters.

  8. F-Area Acid/Caustic Basin groundwater monitoring report. Second quarter 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-09-01

    During second quarter 1994, samples from the FAC monitoring wells at the F-Area Acid/Caustic Basin were collected and analyzed for herbicides/pesticides, indicator parameters, metals, nitrate, radionuclide indicators, volatile organic compounds, and other constituents. Piezometer FAC 5P and monitoring well FAC 6 were dry and could not be sampled. Analytical results that exceeded final Primary Drinking Water Standards (PDWS), other Savannah River Site (SRS) Flag 2 criteria, or the SRS turbidity standard of 50 NTU during the quarter were as follows: gross alpha exceeded the final PDWS and aluminum, iron, manganese, and total organic halogens exceeded the SRS Flag 2 criteria in one or more of the FAC wells. Turbidity exceeded the SRS standard in well FAC 3. Groundwater flow direction and rate in the water table beneath the F-Area Acid/Caustic Basin were similar to past quarters.

  9. K-Area Acid/Caustic Basin groundwater monitoring report. Third quarter 1994

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-12-01

    During third quarter 1994, samples from the KAC monitoring wells at the K-Area Acid/Caustic Basin were collected and analyzed for herbicides/pesticides, indicator parameters, metals, nitrate, radionuclide indicators, and other constituents. Monitoring results that exceeded the final Primary Drinking Water Standards (PDWS), other Savannah River Site (SRS) Flag 2 criteria, or the SRS turbidity standard are provided in this report. No constituents exceeded the final PDWS in the KAC wells. Aluminum and iron exceeded other SRS flagging criteria in one or more of the downgradient wells. Groundwater flow direction and rate in the water table beneath the K-Area Acid/Caustic Basin were similar to past quarters

  10. Optimizing conditions for an accelerated leach test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pietrzak, R.F.; Fuhrmann, M.; Heiser, J.; Franz, E.M.; Colombo, P.

    1988-01-01

    An accelerated leach test for low-level radioactive waste forms is being developed to provide, in a short time, data that can be extrapolated to long time periods. The approach is to provide experimental conditions that will accelerate leaching without changing the dominant release mechanism. Experimental efforts have focused on combining individual factors that have been observed to accelerate leaching. These include elevated temperature, increased leachant volume, and reduced specimen size. The response of diffusion coefficients to various acceleration factors have been evaluated and provide information on experimental parameters that need to be optimized to increase leach rates. Preliminary modeling using a diffusion mechanism (allowing for depletion) of a finite cylinder geometry indicates that during early portions of experiments (daily sampling intervals), leaching is diffusion controlled and more rapid than later in the same experiments (weekly or greater sampling intervals). For cement waste forms, this reduction in rate may be partially controlled by changes in physical structure and chemistry (sometimes related to environmental influences such as CO 2 ), but it is more likely associated with the duration of the sampling interval. By using a combination of mathematical modeling and by experimentally investigating various leach rate controlling factors, a more complete understanding of leaching processes is being developed. This, in turn, is leading to optimized accelerating conditions for a leach test

  11. Tracking nanoparticles in an optical microscope using caustics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patterson, Eann A; Whelan, Maurice P

    2008-01-01

    An elegant method is proposed and demonstrated for tracking the location and movement of nanoparticles in an optical microscope using the optical phenomenon of caustics. A simple and reversible adjustment to the microscope generates caustics several orders of magnitude larger than the particles. The method offers a simple and relatively inexpensive method for visualizing such phenomena as the formation of self-assembled monolayers and the interaction of nanoparticles with chemically functionalized surfaces

  12. Tracking nanoparticles in an optical microscope using caustics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Patterson, Eann A [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824 (United States); Whelan, Maurice P [Nanotechnology and Molecular Imaging Unit, Institute for Health and Consumer Protection, European Commission DG Joint Research Center, 21021 Ispra (Vatican City State, Holy See,) (Italy)

    2008-03-12

    An elegant method is proposed and demonstrated for tracking the location and movement of nanoparticles in an optical microscope using the optical phenomenon of caustics. A simple and reversible adjustment to the microscope generates caustics several orders of magnitude larger than the particles. The method offers a simple and relatively inexpensive method for visualizing such phenomena as the formation of self-assembled monolayers and the interaction of nanoparticles with chemically functionalized surfaces.

  13. Test report - 241-AN-274 Caustic Pump Control Building

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paintner, G.P.

    1995-05-01

    This Acceptance Test Report documents the test results of test procedure WHC-SD-WM-ATP-135 'Acceptance Test Procedure for the 241-AN- 274 Caustic Pump Control Building.' The objective of the test was to verify that the 241-AN-274 Caustic Pump Control Building functions properly based on design specifications per applicable H-2-85573 drawings and associated ECN's. The objective of the test was met

  14. Caustic Ingestion in the Elderly: Influence of Age on Clinical Outcome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Blazena Caganova

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Caustic poisonings are still associated with many fatalities. Studies focusing on the elderly are rare. The purpose of the present study was to compare the clinical outcomes of caustic ingestion injury in elderly and non-elderly adults with regard to gender, intent of exposure, substance ingested, severity of mucosal injury, complications, and mortality. Caustic substance exposures reported to the National Toxicological Information Centre in Slovakia during 1998–2015 were reviewed retrospectively. The patients were divided into two groups: the non-elderly (<60 years and elderly adults (≥60 years. The mortality rate in the elderly was significantly higher (elderly 23.0% vs. non-elderly 11.3%; p = 0.041. The risk of fatal outcome in the elderly was increased by acid ingestion (OR = 7.822; p = 0.002, particularly hydrochloric acid (OR = 5.714, p = 0.006. The incidence of respiratory complications was almost two times higher in the elderly was 31.1% vs. 17.4% for the non-elderly (p = 0.037. Respiratory complications significantly correlated with an increased mortality rate (p = 0.001 in the elderly whereas there was no association between GI complications and mortality in the elderly (p = 0.480. Elderly patients with respiratory complications had the poorest clinical outcomes. The highest risk of complications and fatalities was observed in patients after hydrochloric acid ingestion.

  15. Optimizing conditions for an accelerated leach test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pietrzak, R.F.; Fuhrmann, M.; Heiser, J.; Franz, E.M.; Colombo, P.

    1988-01-01

    An accelerated leach test for low-level radioactive waste forms is being developed to provide, in a short time, data that can be extrapolated to long time periods. The approach is to provide experimental conditions that will accelerate leaching without changing the dominant release mechanism. Experimental efforts have focused on combining individual factors that have been observed to accelerate leaching. These include elevated temperature, increased leachant volume, and reduced specimen size. The response of diffusion coefficients to various acceleration factors have been evaluated and provide information on experimental parameters that need to be optimized to increase leach rates. For example, these data show that large volumes of leachant are required when leaching portland cement waste forms at elevated temperatures because of high concentrations of dissolved species. Sr-85 leaching is particularly susceptible to suppression due to concentration effects while Cs-137 leaching is less so. Preliminary modeling using a diffusion mechanism (allowing for depletion) of a finite cylinder geometry indicates that during early portions of experiments (daily sampling intervals), leaching is diffusion controlled and more rapid than later in the same experiments (weekly or greater sampling intervals). For cement waste forms, this reduction in rate may be partially controlled by changes in physical structure and chemistry (sometimes related to environmental influences such as CO 2 ), but it is more likely associated with the duration of the sampling interval. 9 refs., 6 figs

  16. Radioactive Demonstration of Caustic Recovery from Low-Level Alkaline Nuclear Waste by an Electrochemical Separation Process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hobbs, D.T. [Westinghouse Savannah River Company, AIKEN, SC (United States)

    1998-04-01

    Bench-scale radioactive tests successfully demonstrated an electrochemical process for the recovery of sodium hydroxide (caustic) from Decontaminated Salt Solution produced from the In-Tank Precipitation and Effluent Treatment Processes at the Savannah River Site (SRS). This testing evaluated two membranes: an organic-based membrane, Nafion Type 350, manufactured by E. I. duPont de Nemours {ampersand} Company, Inc. (DuPont) and an inorganic-based membrane, NAS D, being developed by Ceramatec. Both membranes successfully separated caustic from radioactive SRS waste.Key findings of the testing indicate the following attributes and disadvantages of each membrane. The commercially-available Nafion membrane proved highly conductive. Thus, the electrochemical cell can operate at high current density minimizing the number of cells at the desired volumetric processing rate. Testing indicated cesium transported across the Nafion membrane into the caustic product. Therefore, the caustic product will contain low-levels of radioactive cesium due to the presence of {sup 134,137}Cs in the waste feed. To meet customer requirements, a post treatment stage may prove necessary to remove radioactive cesium resulting in increased overall process costs and decreased cost savings. In contrast to the Nafion membrane, the NAS D membrane demonstrated the production of caustic with much lower levels of gamma radioactivity ({sup 137}Cs activity was {lt} 51 dpm/g). Therefore, the caustic product could possibly release for onsite/offsite use without further treatment. The NAS D membrane remains in the development stage and does not exist as a commercial product. Operating costs and long-term membrane durability remain unknown.Caustic recovery has been successfully demonstrated in a bench-scale, 2-compartment electrochemical reactor operated for brief periods of time with simulated and radioactive waste solutions and two different types of membranes. The next phase of testing should be directed

  17. What does the difference in the terbuthylazine degradation rate in selected soils of Apace Valley catchment means for the pesticide leaching potential?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suhadolc, Marjetka; Sibanc, Natasa; Lobnik, Franc

    2010-05-01

    The degradation of the selected pesticide terbuthylazine was investigated in the three different soil samples, which occurs frequently in agricultural area of Apace valley (53 km2), Slovenia. Selected soil samples were similar in organic matter content (1.9-2.1 %), pH (4.5-5.3), and in C/N ratio (7-9); whereas differed in texture (silty loam and loam) and in pesticide usage history (»integrated« and intensive soil management). Triazine herbicides were intensively used for several years in high rates in soil sample S9+, which consisted of 9 % of sand, 65 % of silt, and 26 % of clay. The other two soil samples, S8 (8 % sand, 72 % silt, 20 % clay) and S45 (45 % sand, 44% slit, 11 % clay), were not treated with triazine herbicide for 2 years before experiment. The degradation experiment was conducted under constant laboratory conditions using 14C-ring labelled terbuthylazine. Volatile 14C-compounds, including 14CO2 released after 14C-terbuthylazine mineralization, have been measured three times a week. Two months after terbuthylazine application, the total amount of 14C in soil samples, bound residues as well as extracted terbuthylazine and its metabolites were determined. Cumulative mineralization was from 5 to16 % of applied terbuthylazine. The highest cumulative mineralization was in soil sample S9+, soil sample with the most intensive pesticide usage; hence the lag phase was the shortest. Interestingly, the cumulative mineralization was similar also in soil sample S45 (14% of applied terbuthylazine), however the lag phase in this soil was much longer and comparable to soil S8. Leaching potential of terbuthylazine in Apace Valley catchment was assessed with model PELMO 3.22, using soil and long-term climate data of the Apace Valley. Results will be presented in the conference.

  18. EFRT M-12 Issue Resolution: Comparison of PEP and Bench-Scale Oxidative Leaching Results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rapko, Brian M.; Schonewill, Philip P.; Brown, Christopher F.; Eslinger, Paul W.; Fountain, Matthew S.; Hausmann, Tom S.; Huckaby, James L.; Hanson, Brady D.; Kurath, Dean E.; Minette, Michael J.

    2010-01-01

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) has been tasked by Bechtel National Inc. (BNI) on the River Protection Project-Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (RPP-WTP) project to perform research and development activities to resolve technical issues identified for the Pretreatment Facility (PTF). The Pretreatment Engineering Platform (PEP) was designed, constructed, and operated as part of a plan to respond to issue M12, “Undemonstrated Leaching Processes” of the External Flowsheet Review Team (EFRT) issue response plan.( ) The PEP is a 1/4.5-scale test platform designed to simulate the WTP pretreatment caustic leaching, oxidative leaching, ultrafiltration solids concentration, and slurry washing processes. The PEP replicates the WTP leaching processes using prototypic equipment and control strategies. The PEP also includes non-prototypic ancillary equipment to support the core processing.

  19. CRITICAL CURVES AND CAUSTICS OF TRIPLE-LENS MODELS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Daněk, Kamil; Heyrovský, David

    2015-01-01

    Among the 25 planetary systems detected up to now by gravitational microlensing, there are two cases of a star with two planets, and two cases of a binary star with a planet. Other, yet undetected types of triple lenses include triple stars or stars with a planet with a moon. The analysis and interpretation of such events is hindered by the lack of understanding of essential characteristics of triple lenses, such as their critical curves and caustics. We present here analytical and numerical methods for mapping the critical-curve topology and caustic cusp number in the parameter space of n-point-mass lenses. We apply the methods to the analysis of four symmetric triple-lens models, and obtain altogether 9 different critical-curve topologies and 32 caustic structures. While these results include various generic types, they represent just a subset of all possible triple-lens critical curves and caustics. Using the analyzed models, we demonstrate interesting features of triple lenses that do not occur in two-point-mass lenses. We show an example of a lens that cannot be described by the Chang–Refsdal model in the wide limit. In the close limit we demonstrate unusual structures of primary and secondary caustic loops, and explain the conditions for their occurrence. In the planetary limit we find that the presence of a planet may lead to a whole sequence of additional caustic metamorphoses. We show that a pair of planets may change the structure of the primary caustic even when placed far from their resonant position at the Einstein radius

  20. Dynamic leaching test of personal computer components.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yadong; Richardson, Jay B; Niu, Xiaojun; Jackson, Ollie J; Laster, Jeremy D; Walker, Aaron K

    2009-11-15

    A dynamic leaching test (DLT) was developed and used to evaluate the leaching of toxic substances for electronic waste in the environment. The major components in personal computers (PCs) including motherboards, hard disc drives, floppy disc drives, and compact disc drives were tested. The tests lasted for 2 years for motherboards and 1.5 year for the disc drives. The extraction fluids for the standard toxicity characteristic leaching procedure (TCLP) and synthetic precipitation leaching procedure (SPLP) were used as the DLT leaching solutions. A total of 18 elements including Ag, Al, As, Au, Ba, Be, Cd, Cr, Cu, Fe, Ga, Ni, Pd, Pb, Sb, Se, Sn, and Zn were analyzed in the DLT leachates. Only Al, Cu, Fe, Ni, Pb, and Zn were commonly found in the DLT leachates of the PC components. Their leaching levels were much higher in TCLP extraction fluid than in SPLP extraction fluid. The toxic heavy metal Pb was found to continuously leach out of the components over the entire test periods. The cumulative amounts of Pb leached out of the motherboards in TCLP extraction fluid reached 2.0 g per motherboard over the 2-year test period, and that in SPLP extraction fluid were 75-90% less. The leaching rates or levels of Pb were largely affected by the content of galvanized steel in the PC components. The higher was the steel content, the lower the Pb leaching rate would be. The findings suggest that the obsolete PCs disposed of in landfills or discarded in the environment continuously release Pb for years when subjected to landfill leachate or rains.

  1. Effects of cropping system and rates of nitrogen in animal slurry and mineral fertilizer on nitrate leaching from a sandy loam

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Ingrid Kaag; Hansen, Jørgen Frederik; Kjellerup, Viggo K.

    1993-01-01

    Leaching of nitrate from a sandy loam cropped with spring barley, winter wheat and grass was compared in a 4-year lysimeter study. Crops were grown continuously or in a sequence including sugarbeet. Lysimeters were unfertilized or supplied with equivalent amounts of inorganic nitrogen in calcium...

  2. Nitrate leaching index

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Nitrate Leaching Index is a rapid assessment tool that evaluates nitrate (NO3) leaching potential based on basic soil and climate information. It is the basis for many nutrient management planning efforts, but it has considerable limitations because of : 1) an oversimplification of the processes...

  3. Nitrate Leaching Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nitrate (NO3) leaching is a significant nitrogen (N) loss process for agriculture that must be managed to minimize NO3 enrichment of groundwater and surface waters. Managing NO3 leaching should involve the application of basic principles of understanding the site’s hydrologic cycle, avoiding excess ...

  4. Bacterial leaching of uranium ores - a review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lowson, R.T.

    1975-11-01

    The bacterial leaching of uranium ores involves the bacterially catalysed oxidation of associated pyrite to sulphuric acid and Fe 3+ by autotrophic bacteria and the leaching of the uranium by the resulting acidic, oxidising solution. Industrial application has been limited to Thiobacillus thiooxidans and Thiobacillus ferrooxidans at pH 2 to 3, and examples of these are described. The bacterial catalysis can be improved with nutrients or prevented with poisons. The kinetics of leaching are controlled by the bed depth, particle size, percolation rate, mineralogy and temperature. Current work is aimed at quantitatively defining the parameters controlling the kinetics and extending the method to alkaline conditions with other autotrophic bacteria. (author)

  5. Wavefield extrapolation in caustic-free normal ray coordinates

    KAUST Repository

    Ma, Xuxin

    2012-11-04

    Normal ray coordinates are conventionally constructed from ray tracing, which inherently requires smooth velocity profiles. To use rays as coordinates, the velocities have to be smoothed further to avoid caustics, which is detrimental to the mapping process. Solving the eikonal equation numerically for a line source at the surface provides a platform to map normal rays in complex unsmoothed velocity models and avoid caustics. We implement reverse-time migration (RTM) and downward continuation in the new ray coordinate system, which allows us to obtain efficient images and avoid some of the dip limitations of downward continuation.

  6. 16 CFR 1500.129 - Substances named in the Federal Caustic Poison Act.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... preparation containing free or chemically unneutralized potassium hydroxide (KOH), including caustic potash... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Substances named in the Federal Caustic... REGULATIONS § 1500.129 Substances named in the Federal Caustic Poison Act. The Commission finds that for those...

  7. 21 CFR 2.110 - Definition of ammonia under Federal Caustic Poison Act.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Definition of ammonia under Federal Caustic Poison... SERVICES GENERAL GENERAL ADMINISTRATIVE RULINGS AND DECISIONS Caustic Poisons § 2.110 Definition of ammonia under Federal Caustic Poison Act. For the purpose of determining whether an article containing ammonia...

  8. Ingestion of Caustic Substances in Adults: A Review Article

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andon Chibishev

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Ingestion of caustic agents can cause serious damages of the upper gastrointestinal tract and in some cases this kind of poisoning may have fatal outcomes. Acute caustic intoxications are one of the main problems in the modern clinical toxicology since they mainly affect young people with psychic disorders, suicidal intent, and alcohol addiction. Text: In diagnostic evaluation of this kind of poisoning, different procedures are used. Today’s golden standard for determination of the grade and extent of the lesion is esophagogastroduodenoscopy (EGD performed in the first 12-24 hours following corrosive ingestion. In some patients, some late complications, such as esophageal stenosis and gastric stenosis, which are the most common, as well as carcinoma of the upper gastrointestinal tract, which is rarely seen, can be detected. Acute caustic poisonings are treated with specific kinds of protocols. According to them, first, an attempt is made to neutralize the poison. Combinations of antibiotics, anti-secretory drugs, and collagen synthesis inhibitors are used. As a support therapy, nutritional liquids can be utilized, and in the most unmanageable cases, esophageal dilatation, stent placement and surgery are used. Conclusion: In the future, caustic poisonings will remain a serious socio-medical issue, due to the difficult clinical presentation, expensive diagnostic protocol, extended hospitalization, and possible permanent disability.

  9. Our experience with caustic oesophageal burn in South of Iran ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Context: The alkaline oesophageal burn (EB) is a very debilitating injury and common in the southern rural area of Iran, where the air conditioning systems are cleaned with an alkaline liquid, which is accidentally ingested by children. Aims: The aim is to share our experiences with caustic injury in children. Settings and ...

  10. Laser Beam Caustic Measurement with Focal Spot Analyser

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Flemming Ove; Gong, Hui; Bagger, Claus

    2005-01-01

    In industrial applications of high power CO2-lasers the caustic characteristics of the laser beam have great effects on the performance of the lasers. A welldefined high intense focused spot is essential for reliable production results. This paper presents a focal spot analyser that is developed...... for measuring the beam profiles of focused high power CO2-lasers....

  11. VT Nitrate Leaching Index

    Data.gov (United States)

    Vermont Center for Geographic Information — (Link to Metadata) Nitrate Leaching Index data for the state of Vermont. This is a derivative product based on the SSURGO soils data for all counties except Essex...

  12. Column leaching experiments of a uranium ore by atomizing irrigation technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zeng Yingying; Lei Zeyong; Chen Haihui

    2007-01-01

    Column leaching experiments ora uranium ore were made by atomizing irrigation technique. The leaching results are compared with the results obtained by spray irrigation and drip irrigation techniques respectively under the same conditions of column leaching experiments. The results show that the atomizing irrigation technique has more uniform solution distribution, higher leaching rate, shorter leaching period, and less ratio of liquid to solid. Consequently, the atomizing irrigation technique is suitable to the ore. (authors)

  13. Comparison of leach results from field and laboratory prepared samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oblath, S.B.; Langton, C.A.

    1985-01-01

    The leach behavior of saltstone prepared in the laboratory agrees well with that from samples mixed in the field using the Littleford mixer. Leach rates of nitrates and cesium from the current reference formulation saltstone were compared. The laboratory samples were prepared using simulated salt solution; those in the field used Tank 50 decontaminated supernate. For both nitrate and cesium, the field and laboratory samples showed nearly identical leach rates for the first 30 to 50 days. For the remaining period of the test, the field samples showed higher leach rates with the maximum difference being less than a factor of three. Ruthenium and antimony were present in the Tank 50 supernate in known amounts. Antimony-125 was observed in the leachate and a fractional leach rate was calculated to be at least a factor of ten less than that of 137 Cs. No 106 Ru was observed in the leachate, and the release rate was not calculated. However, based on the detection limits for the analysis, the ruthenium leach rate must also be at least a factor of ten less than cesium. These data are the first measurements of the leach rates of Ru and Sb from saltstone. The nitrate leach rates for these samples were 5 x 10 -5 grams of nitrate per square cm per day after 100 days for the laboratory samples and after 200 days for the field samples. These values are consistent with the previously measured leach rates for reference formulation saltstone. The relative standard deviation in the leach rate is about 15% for the field samples, which all were produced from one batch of saltstone, and about 35% for the laboratory samples, which came from different batches. These are the first recorded estimates of the error in leach rates for saltstone

  14. Stranded Zostera marina L. vs wrack fauna community interactions on a Baltic sandy beach (Hel, Poland: a short-term pilot study. Part I. Driftline effects of fragmented detritivory, leaching and decay rates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcin F. Jêdrzejczak

    2002-06-01

    Full Text Available The effects of the beach community structure of macro- and meiofauna on the process of beach wrack decay were investigated by means of a simple field colonisation experiment in a temperate, fine quartz sediment, sandy beach at the end of the Hel Peninsula in Poland. 1260 replicate litterbags of three mesh sizes (12 mm, 0.5 mm, 48 µm containing fresh wrack were used to assess the role of faunal and non-faunal components in the breakdown of stranded Zostera marina. Wrack breakdown was determined during a three-year field study. This paper presents the first part of the results of this field experiment, which refer to the effects of fragmentation detritivory, leaching and decay rates. Material was lost from the bags at a rapid rate, with only 22-32% of the original dry mass remaining after 27 days in the field. This degradation was not directly related to the faunal succession of the eelgrass tissue, which proceeded in two distinct phases throughout the study period. Exclusion of macrofauna from the wrack by the use of finer-mesh litterbags (< 1 mm had no appreciable effect on the rate of dry matter loss. Microbial decay, and abiotic leaching and fragmentation are probably the major causes of seagrass weight loss from the litterbags.

  15. Uranium leaching by fungal metabolite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Yongdong; Li Guangyue; Ding Dexin; Hu Nan

    2012-01-01

    To explore new means of bioleaching, one strain of high-yielding fungi-Aspergillus niger which could produce organic acids was separated and purified from soil samples of uranium mine. The influence of cultural temperature, initial pH value, inoculum sizes on its growth characteristics were carried out. And the tests of uranium leaching of metabolin of Aspergillus niger were operated. On these tests, the effects of metabolin of Aspergillus niger with different pH value produced in the diverse culture temperature on uranium leaching were investigated. The results show that this strain of Aspergillus niger can grow best under the following conditions: the temperature is 37℃, the initial pH value is 7.0, the inoculum sizes is 2% (the OD value of the spores solution is 0.06). The uranium extraction effects relative to the final pH value of the cultures. and the maximum leaching rates is 83.05% when the pH value is 2.3. (authors)

  16. Ultrasound augmented leaching of nickel sulfate in sulfuric acid and hydrogen peroxide media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Haoyu; Li, Shiwei; Peng, Jinhui; Srinivasakannan, Chandrasekar; Zhang, Libo; Yin, Shaohua

    2018-01-01

    A new method of preparation high purity nickel sulfate assisted by ultrasonic was studied. The process mechanism was analyzed by Inductively Coupled Plasma (ICP), X-ray diffraction (XRD), Scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and Energy dispersive X-ray spectrometry (EDS).The reaction mechanisms of oxidizing leaching and ultrasonic leaching were explored, respectively. Results showed that ultrasonic treatment peel off the oxide film on the surface of nickel. The leachate under strongly agitated, the yield rate of nickel sulfate was accelerate. And the reaction area was increased by the cavitation effect, the liquid-solid reaction was promoted, and the activation energy was reduced. The leaching rate of nickel reached 46.29% by conventional leaching, which takes about 5h. Under the same conditions, the ultrasonic leaching rate reached 40%, only half of the conventional leaching time. Concentration of leaching agent, reaction temperature, ultrasonic power, leaching time had significant effect on the enhancement of the leaching reaction with ultrasonic radiation. The leaching rate of 60.41% under the optimum experiment conditions as follows: sulfuric acid concentration 30%, hydrogen peroxide 10%, leaching temperature 333K, ultrasonic power 200W and leaching time 4h. The kinetic study of the system was investigated, and the reaction rates of conventional leaching and ultrasonic leaching were controlled by diffusion, and the apparent activation energies were 16.2kJ/mol and 11.83kJ/mol. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  17. Optimization of the factors that accelerate leaching

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fuhrmann, M.; Pietrzak, R.F.; Franz, E.M.; Heiser, J.H. III; Colombo, P.

    1989-03-01

    The prediction of long-term leachability of low-level radioactive waste forms is an essential element of disposal-site performance assessment. This report describes experiments and modeling techniques used to develop an accelerated leach test that meets this need. The acceleration in leaching rates caused by the combinations of two or more factors were experimentally determined. These factors were identified earlier as being able to individually accelerate leaching. They are: elevated temperature, the size of the waste form, the ratio of the volume of leachant to the surface area of the waste form, and the frequency of replacement of the leachant. The solidification agents employed were ones that are currently used to treat low-level radioactive wastes, namely portland type I cement, bitumen, and vinyl ester-styrene. The simulated wastes, sodium sulfate, sodium tetraborate, and incinerator ash, are simplified representatives of typical low-level waste streams. Experiments determined the leaching behavior of the radionuclides of cesium (Cs-137), strontium (Sr-85), and cobalt (Co-60 or Co-57) from several different formulations of solidification agents and waste types. Leaching results were based upon radiochemical and elemental analyses of aliquots of the leachate, and on its total alkalinity and pH at various times during the experiment (up to 120 days). Solid phase analyses were carried out by Scanning/Electron Microscopy and Energy Dispersive Spectroscopy on the waste forms before and after some leaching experiments. 43 refs., 96 figs., 16 tabs

  18. Uranium in situ leaching

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-09-01

    Despite the depressed situation that has affected the uranium industry during the past years, the second Technical Committee Meeting on Uranium In Situ Leaching, organized by the International Atomic Energy Agency and held in Vienna from 5 to 8 October 1992, has attracted a relatively large number of participants. A notable development since the first meeting was that the majority of the contributions came from the actual operators of in situ leaching uranium production. At the present meeting, presentations on operations in the USA were balanced by those of the eastern European and Asian countries. Contributions from Bulgaria, China, Czechoslovakia, Germany (from the operation in the former German Democratic Republic), the Russian Federation and Uzbekistan represent new information not commonly available. In situ leach mining is defined in one of the paper presented as a ''mining method where the ore mineral is preferentially leached from the host rock in place, or in situ, by the use of leach solutions, and the mineral value is recovered. Refs, figs and tabs

  19. Oxidants for uranium leaching

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ho, E.; Ring, B.

    2007-01-01

    Most uranium ores are leached with sulfuric acid under oxidising conditions. This paper reviews the oxidants that have been traditionally used in uranium leaching and discusses their merits in the context of overall flow sheet considerations. Options for alternative oxidants are also discussed. In acid leaching, ferric ion in solution oxidises insoluble uranium(IV) to soluble uranium (VI). Though ferric ion may be added directly, usually an oxidant is added to the circuit to convert ferrous ion to ferric ion in the liquor so that leaching can continue. The most common oxidants are pyrolusite and sodium chlorate. Pyrolusite is relatively cheap but introduces manganese ions into the liquor and consumes twice as much acid as sodium chlorate. Sodium chlorate is a slow reacting oxidant at low temperatures and acidities, and introduces chloride into the leach liquor. Caro's acid, is a non-polluting reagent that was used successfully at the Nabarlek uranium mine, and provided very good control of oxidising conditions. Other oxidants that are now being considered to overcome the disadvantages of pyrolusite and sodium chlorate are oxygen, hydrogen peroxide and SO 2 /O 2 . Some performance data for these oxidants are presented

  20. Determination Of Caustic Drain Out Period Of Glass Bottle Washerand Impact Of Total And Effective Caustic Strengths For Glass Bottle Washing In Soft Drink Plant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B.M.MJ. Harshani

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available One of the most important processes in soft drink production is bottle washing high quality of the product depends on that. A main objective of the present study is to determine the impact of total caustic and effective caustic strength on the washing performance of glass bottles. Total and effective caustic strength in samples were measured based on titration results. Four parameters were considered on the washing performance of glass bottles such as Microbiological Tests APC and Yeast amp Molds Methylene blue test Phenolphthalein test and Physical inspection. Ten samples were tested for every test per each time and three times were considered for a day and conduct for 43 days within two caustic drains out periods. Negative correlations in between total effective caustic strengths with time Days indicate from 29 days onward in tanks. There is a Positive correlation P 0.05 in between Carbonates gml and time Days onward. Positive correlations P 0.05 indicate from 35 days onward for the number of algae present bottles number of dirty bottles and APC too. Twenty nine days from the initial charge of caustic soda can be taken as the most suitable day for the caustic discharge. Under the practical scenario mean differences of total and effective caustic strengths are negligible compared to the standard value and not significantly difference P 0.05.

  1. Characterization and Leach Testing for PUREX Cladding Waste Sludge (Group 3) and REDOX Cladding Waste Sludge (Group 4) Actual Waste Sample Composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Snow, Lanee A.; Buck, Edgar C.; Casella, Amanda J.; Crum, Jarrod V.; Daniel, Richard C.; Draper, Kathryn E.; Edwards, Matthew K.; Fiskum, Sandra K.; Jagoda, Lynette K.; Jenson, Evan D.; Kozelisky, Anne E.; MacFarlan, Paul J.; Peterson, Reid A.; Swoboda, Robert G.

    2009-02-13

    A testing program evaluating actual tank waste was developed in response to Task 4 from the M-12 External Flowsheet Review Team (EFRT) issue response plan.(a) The testing program was subdivided into logical increments. The bulk water-insoluble solid wastes that are anticipated to be delivered to the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) were identified according to type such that the actual waste testing could be targeted to the relevant categories. Eight broad waste groupings were defined. Samples available from the 222S archive were identified and obtained for testing. The actual wastetesting program included homogenizing the samples by group, characterizing the solids and aqueous phases, and performing parametric leaching tests. Two of the eight defined groups—plutonium-uranium extraction (PUREX) cladding waste sludge (Group 3, or CWP) and reduction-oxidation (REDOX) cladding waste sludge (Group 4, or CWR)—are the subjects of this report. Both the Group 3 and 4 waste composites were anticipated to be high in gibbsite, requiring caustic leaching. Characterization of the composite Group 3 and Group 4 waste samples confirmed them to be high in gibbsite. The focus of the Group 3 and 4 testing was on determining the behavior of gibbsite during caustic leaching. The waste-type definition, archived sample conditions, homogenization activities, characterization (physical, chemical, radioisotope, and crystal habit), and caustic leaching behavior as functions of time, temperature, and hydroxide concentration are discussed in this report. Testing was conducted according to TP-RPP-WTP-467.

  2. Development of improved leaching techniques for vitrified radioactive waste products

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vaswani, G.A.; Yeotikar, R.G.; Rastogi, R.C.; Sunder Rajan, N.S.

    1979-01-01

    A critical review of the current techniques for evaluating the leach resistance of vitrified radioactive wastes has been made. Inadequacy of the available leaching techniques, with respect to their adoption as standard technique on an international scale, has been brought out for the three broad catagories of aqueous attack viz., (i) simple contact with leachant at a particular temperature, (ii) once-through or recirculatory flow of leachant at variable temperatures and flow rates, and (iii) contact with freshly distilled hot water in soxhelet type of extractor. In an effort to evolve a standard leaching technique in the latter two categories of aqueous attack, development of two leaching units viz., 'Dynamic Leaching Unit' and 'Modified Soxhlet Unit' is described. Both these units offer good control and wide flexibility on the important parameters affecting leaching such as leachant temperature, flow rate of residence time of leachant and ratio of leachant volume to sample surface area. The dynamic leaching units also offers a good control and flexibility on the two additional parameters viz., the composition and pH of the leachant. In the modified soxhlet unit the composition and pH of the leachant remains near to that of distilled water. The leach rate results have been found to be reproducible. A need for framing the set of standard conditions for adoption of these units in evolution of standard leaching techniques has been indicated. (auth.)

  3. Selective Leaching of Chromium from Hanford Tank Sludge 241-U-108

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rapko, Brian M.; Vienna, John D.

    2002-09-09

    This study evaluated the oxidants permanganate, MnO4-, and peroxynitrite, ONOO-, as selective chromium-leaching agents from washed 241-U-108 tank sludge under varying conditions of hydroxide concentration, temperature, and time. The mass changes and final sludge compositions were evaluated using glass-property models to ascertain the relative impacts of the various oxidative alkaline leach conditions on the amount of borosilicate glass required to immobilize a given amount of washed 241-U-108 Hanford tank sludge. Only permanganate leaching removes sufficient chromium to make the chromium concentration in the oxidatively alkaline leached solids non-limiting. In the absence of added oxidants, continued washing or caustic leaching have no beneficial effects. Peroxynitrite addition reduces the amount of glass required to immobilize a given amount of washed 241-U-108 tank sludge by approximately a factor of two. Depending on the leach conditions and the exact chromium concentration limits, contact with alkaline permanganate solutions reduces the amount of immobilized high-level waste glass by a factor of 10 to 30.

  4. A systematic fitting scheme for caustic-crossing microlensing events

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kains ...[et al], N.; Jørgensen, Uffe Gråe

    2009-01-01

    We outline a method for fitting binary-lens caustic-crossing microlensing events based on the alternative model parametrization proposed and detailed by Cassan. As an illustration of our methodology, we present an analysis of OGLE-2007-BLG-472, a double-peaked Galactic microlensing event...... with a source crossing the whole caustic structure in less than three days. In order to identify all possible models we conduct an extensive search of the parameter space, followed by a refinement of the parameters with a Markov Chain Monte Carlo algorithm. We find a number of low-chi(2) regions...... in the parameter space, which lead to several distinct competitive best models. We examine the parameters for each of them, and estimate their physical properties. We find that our fitting strategy locates several minima that are difficult to find with other modelling strategies and is therefore a more appropriate...

  5. Leaching of DOC, DN, and inorganic constituents from scrap tires.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selbes, Meric; Yilmaz, Ozge; Khan, Abdul A; Karanfil, Tanju

    2015-11-01

    One concern for recycle and reuse of scrap tires is the leaching of tire constituents (organic and inorganic) with time, and their subsequent potential harmful impacts in environment. The main objective of this study was to examine the leaching of dissolved organic carbon (DOC), dissolved nitrogen (DN), and selected inorganic constituents from scrap tires. Different sizes of tire chips and crumb rubber were exposed to leaching solutions with pH's ranging from 3.0 to 10.0 for 28days. The leaching of DOC and DN were found to be higher for smaller size tire chips; however, the leaching of inorganic constituents was independent of the size. In general, basic pH conditions increased the leaching of DOC and DN, whereas acidic pH conditions led to elevated concentrations of metals. Leaching was minimal around the neutral pH values for all the monitored parameters. Analysis of the leaching rates showed that components associated with the rubbery portion of the tires (DOC, DN, zinc, calcium, magnesium, etc.) exhibited an initial rapid followed by a slow release. On the other hand, a constant rate of leaching was observed for iron and manganese, which are attributed to the metal wires present inside the tires. Although the total amounts that leached varied, the observed leaching rates were similar for all tire chip sizes and leaching solutions. Operation under neutral pH conditions, use of larger size tire chips, prewashing of tires, and removal of metal wires prior to application will reduce the impact of tire recycle and reuse. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Epidemiology and prevention of caustic ingestion in children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christesen, H B

    1994-01-01

    significantly during the period studied. The cause of this decrease is not clear, but a change in the spectrum of household products and the gradual introduction of child-proof caps are possible explanations. To minimize the frequency of accidents, an information campaign directed specifically at parents...... of toddlers is recommended. Information material should stress that caustics should always be inaccessible to children and stored separately, and should never be decanted....

  7. Ultrasound-assisted HCl-NaCl leaching of lead-rich and antimony-rich oxidizing slag.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Rong Liang; Zhang, Xiao Fei; Tang, Shu Zhen; Huang, Ai Dong

    2015-11-01

    Lead-rich and antimony-rich oxidizing slag was subjected to regular HCl-NaCl leaching, with the experimental conditions optimized under which ultrasound was introduced. After only 15 min of ultrasound-assisted leaching, the leaching rate of Sb resembled that after 45 min of regular leaching. Ultrasonic treatment considerably elevated the leaching rates of Sb and Pb, and shortened the leaching time. With the decrease of particle size, the leaching rate of Sb and Pb increased gradually. Especially, as the particle size of the slag was greater than 0.217 mm, the ultrasonic leaching effects of Sb and Pb were significantly higher than that of regular leaching effects. The temperature exhibited great effect on ultrasonic leaching performance. As the temperature increased, the leaching rates of Sb and Pb increased step by step. In case the temperature was higher than 85°C, the increasing speed of the leaching rates for Sb and Pb tended to be slow. Increasing ultrasonic power could augment the leaching rate or accelerate the procedure till the same leaching rate. However, since ultrasound failed to energize the formation of new reaction pathways, the maximum leaching rates of Sb and Pb were determined by their phase compositions rather than by ultrasonic field. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. A middle age addicted man with caustic stomach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gholamreza Nouri Broujerdi

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: The term caustic generally refers to alkaline and the term corrosive generally refers to acidic agents' injury; however, in medical literature caustic is frequently a term applied to both substances. Ingested alkali typically damage the esophagus more than stomach or duodenum, whereas acids usually cause more severe gastric injury. Since esophagus has a slightly alkaline pH, its epithelium is more resistant to acids, so that only 6 to 20% of those who ingest these substances present lesions in this organ. Case : A middle-aged addicted man who drunk hydrochloric acid accidentally had extensive necrosis of the stomach with remarkable sparing of the esophagus on second look exploration. A total gastrectomy with a Roux-en-Y esophago-jejunostomy with feeding jejunostomy was performed. Conclusion : In caustic GI injury, patients who are operated on and found to have no evidence of extensive esophago-gastric necrosis, a biopsy of the posterior gastric wall should be performed to exclude occult injury. If histologically there is a question of viability, a second look operation should be performed within 36 hours.

  9. Caustic ingestion injuries-at military hospital rawalpindi

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahsan, O.; Razzaq, K.; Abbas, W.; Zarrin, F.

    2015-01-01

    To study the pattern and endoscopic severity of caustic ingestion injuries presenting at Military Hospital Rawalpindi. Study Design: Descriptive study. Place and Duration of Study: The study was conducted at Medical and Gastroenterology Department Military Hospital Rawalpindi from August 2012 to April 2013. Material and Methods: Patients were selected from those who presented with caustic ingestion history in Medical OPD, ER and in medical wards. After informed consent the patient underwent upper gastrointestinal (GI) Endoscopy. Endoscopic findings were recorded. Results: Out of 50 patients, 21(42%) were males and 29 (58%) were females. Ingestion was accidental in 19 (38%) and was with intent of suicide or self-harm in 31(62%) patients. Mean age was 33.2 years (SD ± 13.2). All the patients were subjected to upper GI endoscopy and findings were recorded. Endoscopic findings were grade 0 in 4 (8%), Grade 1 in 6 (12%), grade 2a in 7 (14%), grade 2b in 10 (20%), grade 3a in 6 (12%) and grade 3b in 17 (34%) patients. Conclusion: Caustic ingestion injuries were seen more in younger females with predominant cause as suicidal intent. On endoscopic examination severe corrosive injuries were more frequent. (author)

  10. On the structure of space-time caustics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosquist, K.

    1983-01-01

    Caustics formed by timelike and null geodesics in a space-time M are investigated. Care is taken to distinguish the conjugate points in the tangent space (T-conjugate points) from conjugate points in the manifold (M-conjugate points). It is shown that most nonspacelike conjugate points are regular, i.e. with all neighbouring conjugate points having the same degree of degeneracy. The regular timelike T-conjugate locus is shown to be a smooth 3-dimensional submanifold of the tangent space. Analogously, the regular null T-conjugate locus is shown to be a smooth 2-dimensional submanifold of the light cone in the tangent space. The smoothness properties of the null caustic are used to show that if an observer sees focusing in all directions, then there will necessarily be a cusp in the caustic. If, in addition, all the null conjugate points have maximal degree of degeneracy (as in the closed Friedmann-Robertson-Walker universes), then the space-time is closed. (orig.)

  11. Heap leaching process of high-grade uranium ore

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin Sirong; Gao Xizheng; Guo Erhua; Lu Shijie

    1994-08-01

    A heap leaching process for high-grade primary uranium ore has been studied. The minerals mainly are uraninite. In the process the manganese dioxide is used as oxidant and ferric sulphate solution as leaching agent. The two-stage counter current heap leach method is used in the process. The leached liquor which contains dissolved uranium and iron returns to the neutralizing stage and the iron in the leached liquor is precipitated in the stage. The acid is added to the main stage and the precipitated iron is dissolved as Fe 2 (SO 4 ) 3 in the stage. Comparing with conventional agitation acid leaching method, this process decreases the consumption of acid by 21% and manganese dioxide by 29%. The extraction rate of uranium reduces 1.86%. (3 figs., 12 tabs.)

  12. Accelerated Leach Test(s) Program. Annual report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dougherty, D.R.; Fuhrmann, M.; Colombo, P.

    1985-09-01

    This report summarizes the work performed for the Accelerated Leach Test(s) Program at Brookhaven National Laboratory in Fiscal Year 1985 under the sponsorship of the US Department of Energy's Low-Level Waste Management Program (LLWMP). Programmatic activities were concentrated in three areas, as listed and described in the following paragraphs. (1) A literature survey of reported leaching mechanisms, available mathematical models and factors that affect leaching of LLW forms has been compiled. Mechanisms which have been identified include diffusion, dissolution, ion exchange, corrosion and surface effects. Available mathematical models are based on diffusion as the predominant mechanism. Although numerous factors that affect leaching have been identified, they have been conveniently categorized as factors related to the entire leaching system, to the leachant or to the waste form. A report has been published on the results of this literature survey. (2) A computerized data base of LLW leaching data and mathematical models is being developed. The data are being used for model evaluation by curve fitting and statistical analysis according to standard procedures of statistical quality control. (3) Long-term tests on portland cement, bitumen and vinyl ester-styrene (VES) polymer waste forms are underway which are designed to identify and evaluate factors that accelerate leaching without changing the mechanisms. Results on the effect of temperature on leachability indicate that the leach rates of cement and VES waste forms increase with increasing temperature, whereas, the leach rate of bitumen is little affected

  13. Urananite leaching: literature survey

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grisham, G.F.; Bryant, E.A.; Williams, K.E.

    1979-04-01

    A literature survey was undertaken to provide background materials for a series of experiments involving the interaction of spent uranium dioxide fuel with various environments. Notes and references pertaining to the basic properties of UO 2 as produced and after reactor exposure are presented. The use of computerized literature searches is illustrated with specific topics related to leaching experiments. 57 references

  14. Urananite leaching: literature survey

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grisham, G.F.; Bryant, E.A.; Williams, K.E.

    1979-04-01

    A literature survey was undertaken to provide background materials for a series of experiments involving the interaction of spent uranium dioxide fuel with various environments. Notes and references pertaining to the basic properties of UO/sub 2/ as produced and after reactor exposure are presented. The use of computerized literature searches is illustrated with specific topics related to leaching experiments. 57 references.

  15. Analysis of Caustic Soda of Different Manufacturers in Pakistan for Mercerization of Cotton Textiles

    OpenAIRE

    Zahid, Bilal; Faisal, Saira; Siddique, Hussain

    2017-01-01

    International audience; Pakistan has sufficient production capacity of caustic soda to cater the needs of the local industry. Presently, Pakistan has four major plants with production capacity around 435,000 mega ton per year of caustic soda of various grades. Textile industry of Pakistan is the major consumer of produced high grade caustic soda; as the presence of any impurities especially dissolved salts and metals is unfavorable for wet processing of cotton. This study investigates the per...

  16. Predicting radionuclide leaching from root zone soil for assessment applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baes, C.F. III.; Sharp, R.D.

    1981-01-01

    A simple leaching model is given for estimation of leaching rates of thirteen radioisotopes. A literature search with radionuclide migration data is presented in tabular form. This data must be considered in any model for predicting radiation doses from agricultural products or drinking water obtained from contaminated soils

  17. Water flow and nitrate leaching in a layered silt loam

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vos, J.A.; Hesterberg, D.L.R.; Raats, P.A.C.

    2000-01-01

    Nitrate (NO3) leaching was studied for a winter leaching period in a layered calcareous silt loam with tile-drains at about 1-m depth and 12-m spacing. Groundwater levels, drain discharge rates, and NO3 concentrations in the drainage water were monitored, and the soil hydraulic characteristics were

  18. Computer simulation of laboratory leaching and washing of tank waste sludges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meng, C.D.; MacLean, G.T.; Landeene, B.C.

    1994-01-01

    The process simulator ESP (Environmental Simulation Program) was used to simulate laboratory caustic leaching and washing of core samples from Tanks B-110, C-109, and C-112. The results of the laboratory tests and the computer simulations are compared. The results from both, agreed reasonably well for elements contained in solid phases included in the ESP Public data bank. The use of the GEOCHEM data bank and/or a custom Hanford Data bank should improve the agreement, making ESP a useful process simulator for aqueous based processing

  19. Influence of chalcopyrite structure on their leaching by sodium nitrate in sulphuric acid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miroslav Sokić

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available During the chalcopyrite leaching by sodium nitrate and sulfuric acid solution, leaching rate decreases with increasing the time and a part of chalcopyrite mineral grains remains in the leach residue. In chalcopyrite concentrate, 95.5 % of chalcopyrite mineral occurs as in liberated grains, and the rest is in association with gangue minerals, which is very favorably from the aspect of hydrometallurgical treatment. Complex forms, like impregnations and complex intergrowths, do not exist. After experiments carried out, leaching of copper achieved 84 % at temperature 80 o C and time 240 min. In the all leach residues, 97 % chalcopyrite mineral grains occur as liberated with highly corroded surfaces. Therefore, the structural assembly of chalcopyrite grains is favorable and no reason to reduce the leaching rate in the final stage of reaction. Reason for this is elemental sulfur, which was formed during the reaction, precipitated at the particle surfaces, and slowed down the leaching rate in the final stage of leaching process.

  20. Treatability of chromite ore processing waste by leaching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unlü, K; Haskök, S

    2001-06-01

    Developing treatment and disposal strategies and health-based clean-up standards for chromium containing wastes continues to be an important environmental regulatory issue because of the opposing solubility and toxicity characteristics of chromium species under diverse environmental conditions. In this study, leaching characteristics of total Cr and Cr(VI) were investigated using laboratory column studies. The data obtained from the experimental studies were analysed to assess the treatability of chromite ore processing waste (COPW) by leaching and to identify the leaching strategies that enhance mass removal rates of chromium species. COPW used for laboratory soil column studies was obtained from an industrial plant producing sodium chromate in Mersin, Turkey. Laboratory investigations involved chemical characterisation of waste material and column studies. For waste characterisation, U.S. EPA toxicity characterisation leaching procedure (TCLP) was performed on COPW to determine the concentrations of metal species in the TCLP extract. For column studies, various laboratory columns containing plain COPW material, 1:1 COPW/reducing agent (elemental iron or manure) mixture and different type soils (sand, loam and clay) overlain by COPW were subjected to leaching tests using acidic, neutral and alkaline influent water to determine Cr mass leaching efficiencies. Based on the TCLP analyses, COPW is classified as hazardous waste. As a result of comparing the leaching efficiency data from twelve leaching columns, the maximum removal of total Cr was achieved by leaching COPW/manure mixture using acidic (pH 4.78) influent water. The highest Cr(VI) leaching efficiency was achieved in the columns of plain COPW and COPW/manure mixture using highly alkaline (pH 12.0) influent water. The least effective leaching efficiency for both total Cr and Cr (VI) was obtained by leaching plain COPW with neutral (pH 7.0) influent water. Land-disposal of the treated COPW material by mixing

  1. Leaching Mechanisms Program. Annual report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dougherty, D.; Colombo, P.; Doty, R.; Fuhrmann, M.

    1984-09-01

    The primary goal of this work is to determine the leaching mechanisms of a variety of matrix materials either in use or being considered for the solidification of low-level radioactive wastes by defense and commercial waste generators. Since this program is new and did not formally begin until May of FY 84, the results reported here are few and preliminary. Efforts were concentrated in the following activities: (1) The literature search for leaching data and proposed leaching models and mechanisms for low-level waste. (2) Data base development for leaching data being compiled from the literature and from the leaching experiments in this program. (3) The selection of solidification agents for the experimental part of the program. (4) Fabrication of leach samples and initiation of leach testing. 28 references, 9 figures, 4 tables

  2. Study on the law of heavy metal leaching in municipal solid waste landfill.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hui-Hu; Sang, Shu-Xun

    2010-06-01

    Comparative leaching experiments were carried out using leaching medium with different pH to municipal solid waste in the landfill columns in order to investigate the mobility of heavy metals. The leachate pH and oxidation-reduction potential were measured by oxidation-reduction potential analyzer; the contents of heavy metals were measured by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. It is very different in leaching concentrations of heavy metals; the dynamic leaching of heavy metals decreased with the rise of the leaching amount on the whole. Acid leaching medium had definite influence on the leaching of heavy metals in the early landfill, but it had the obvious inhibition effect on the leaching in the middle and late period of landfill; the neutral and alkaline leaching medium are more beneficial to the leaching of heavy metals. Due to the influence of the environment of landfill, the differences of the results in cumulative leaching amount, leaching rate, and leaching intensity of heavy metals are very big. The calculation results of the release rates of heavy metals prove that the orders of the release rates are not identical under different leaching conditions. Acid rain made heavy metals migrate from municipal solid waste to soil and detain in soil more easily; approached neutral and alkaline leaching mediums are more beneficial to leaching of heavy metals in the municipal solid waste and soil with leachate. The field verification of experimental data showed that the law of heavy metal leaching in municipal solid waste revealed by the experiment has a good consistency with the data obtained by municipal solid waste landfill.

  3. Fertilizers in Leaching Test

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomasz Ciesielczuk

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Organic matter contained in the waste of food industry or occurring in the households, in the absence of contamination with other kind of waste, may be used to create a “fertiliser”, which could be even reused in the organic production of arable crops. Particular attention is drawn to the fertilisers which may be applied in the case of amateur cultivation of pot plants and in the allotment gardens. The paper presents the results of research regarding the dynamics of the release of nutrients from tablets created with the help of encapsulation of the mixture manufactured from solvent extraction waste of coffee (SCG, modified by the ash obtained from low temperature burning of biomass. In this study, the mixture was determined as a fertilizer. Collagen, polyvinyl acetate, polyvinyl alcohol, shellac as well as sodium water glass have been applied as testing membranes in order to slow down the elution of the components from a fertilizer into solution. The durability tests have been carried out according to PN-EN-13266 standard over 118 days at the temperature of 25°C. The obtained results indicate significant differentiation with regard to the leaching of nutrients and organic matter from the tablets depending on the applied membrane. Strong inhibition concerning leaching of the components through membranes and from shellac and polyvinyl acetate has been observed. The remaining membranes did not inhibit the leaching of nutrients in the long-lasting manner; however, even they may be applied in the agricultural practice.

  4. TeVeS gets caught on caustics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Contaldi, Carlo R.; Wiseman, Toby; Withers, Benjamin

    2008-01-01

    TeVeS uses a dynamical vector field with timelike unit-norm constraint to specify a preferred local frame. When matter moves slowly in this frame--the so-called quasistatic regime--modified Newtonian dynamics results. Theories with such vectors (such as Einstein-Aether) are prone to the vector dynamics forming singularities that render their classical evolution problematic. Here, we analyze the dynamics of the vector in TeVeS in various situations. We begin by analytically showing that the vacuum solution of TeVeS forms caustic singularities under a large class of physically reasonably initial perturbations. This shows the classical evolution of TeVeS appears problematic in the absence of matter. We then consider matter by investigating black hole solutions. We find large classes of new black hole solutions with static geometries, where the curves generated by the vector field are attracted to the black hole and may form caustics. We go on to consider the full dynamics with matter by numerically simulating, assuming spherical symmetry, the gravitational collapse of a scalar, and the evolution of an initially nearly static boson star. We find that in both cases our initial data evolves so that the vector field develops caustic singularities on a time scale of order the gravitational in-fall time. Having shown singularity formation is generic with or without matter, Bekenstein's original formulation of TeVeS appears dynamically problematic. We argue that by modifying the vector field kinetic terms to the more general form used by Einstein-Aether, this problem may be avoided.

  5. STATISTICS OF MICROLENSING CAUSTIC CROSSINGS IN Q 2237+0305: PECULIAR VELOCITY OF THE LENS GALAXY AND ACCRETION DISK SIZE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mediavilla, E. [Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias, Vía Láctea S/N, La Laguna E-38200 Tenerife (Spain); Jimenez-Vicente, J. [Departamento de Física Teórica y del Cosmos, Universidad de Granada, Campus de Fuentenueva E-18071 Granada (Spain); Muñoz, J. A. [Departamento de Astronomía y Astrofísica, Universidad de Valencia E-46100 Burjassot, Valencia (Spain); Mediavilla, T.; Ariza, O. [Departamento de Estadística e Investigación Operativa, Universidad de Cádiz, Avda Ramón Puyol s/n E-11202, Algeciras, Cádiz (Spain)

    2015-01-10

    We use the statistics of caustic crossings induced by microlensing in the lens system Q 2237+0305 to study the lens galaxy peculiar velocity. We calculate the caustic crossing rates for a comprehensive family of stellar mass functions and find a dependence of the average number of caustic crossings with the effective transverse velocity and the average mass, 〈n〉∝v{sub eff}/√(〈m〉), equivalent to the theoretical prediction for the case of microlenses with identical masses. We explore the possibilities of the method to measure v {sub eff} using the ∼12 yr of Optical Gravitational Lensing Experiment monitoring of the four images of Q 2237+0305. To determine a lower limit for v {sub eff}, we count, conservatively, a single caustic crossing for each one of the four high magnification events identified in the literature (plus one additional proposed by us) obtaining v{sub eff}≳240√(〈m〉/0.17 M{sub ⊙}) km s{sup −1} at 68% of confidence. From this value and the average FWHM of the four high magnification events, we obtain a lower limit of r{sub s}≳1.4√(〈m〉/0.17 M{sub ⊙}) light-days for the radius of the source (r{sub s} = FWHM/2.35). Tentative identification of three additional caustic crossing events leads to estimates of v{sub eff}≃(493±246)√(〈m〉/0.17 M{sub ⊙}) km s{sup −1} for the effective transverse velocity and of r{sub s}≃(2.7±1.3)√(〈m〉/0.17 M{sub ⊙}) light-days for the source size. The estimated transverse peculiar velocity of the galaxy is v{sub t}≃(429±246)√(〈m〉/0.17 M{sub ⊙}) km s{sup −1}.

  6. Leaching behavior of heavy metals from municipal solid wastes incineration (MSWI) fly ash used in concrete

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shi Huisheng; Kan Lili

    2009-01-01

    The characteristics of municipal solid waste incineration (MSWI) fly ash, surface leaching toxicity and successive leaching concentration of heavy metals from MSWI fly ash-cement hardened pastes were studied. And, the relationships between leaching concentrations of heavy metals and leaching time were also discussed. Experimental results showed that immobilization effect of cement on MSWI fly ash is good. Even if MSWI fly ash-cement hardened pastes were damaged, the leaching toxicity is still in a safety range. In early leaching stage, the surface leaching rate is relatively a little high, up to 10 -5 -10 -4 cm d -1 order of magnitude, in the later time of leaching, its rate rapidly declined, down to 10 -7 . Most of leached heavy metals are produced at early ages. The leaching concentration of heavy metals and leaching time has strong positive relationships. In factual utilizing circumstances, heavy metals' leaching from MSWI fly ash-cement hardened pastes is a very slow and gradually diluting process. The leaching toxicity of heavy metals is far lower than that of the National Standard of China, and minimum harmful matters can be contained and released in the environment. Reusing of MSWI fly ash as partial replacement for cement in concrete mixes is potentially feasible.

  7. P-Area Acid/Caustic Basin Groundwater Monitoring Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-03-01

    During fourth quarter 1993, samples from the six PAC monitoring wells at the P-Area Acid/Caustic Basin were collected and analyzed for indicator parameters, groundwater quality parameters, parameters characterizing suitability as a drinking water supply, and other constituents. Monitoring results that exceeded the final Primary Drinking Water Standards (PDWS) or the Savannah River Site (SRS) flagging criteria or turbidity standard during the quarter are discussed in this report. During fourth quarter 1993, no constituents exceeded the final PDWS. Aluminum and iron exceeded the SRS Flag 2 criteria in five wells. Manganese exceeded its Flag 2 criterion in three wells, while specific conductance exceeded its Flag 2 criterion in one well

  8. K-Area Acid/Caustic Basin groundwater monitoring report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thompson, C.Y.

    1992-09-01

    During second quarter 1992, samples from the seven older KAC monitoring wells at the K-Area Acid/Caustic Basin were analyzed for herbicides, indicator parameters, major ions, pesticides, radionuclides, turbidity, and other constituents. New wells FAC 8 and 9 received the first of four quarters of comprehensive analyses and GC/MS VOA (gas chromatograph/ mass spectrometer volatile organic analyses). Monitoring results that exceeded the US Environmental Protection Agency's Primary Drinking Water Standards (PDWS) or the Savannah River Site (SRS) flagging criteria or turbidity standards during the quarter are discussed in this report

  9. Spectral caustics in laser assisted Breit–Wheeler process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Nousch

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Electron–positron pair production by the Breit–Wheeler process embedded in a strong laser pulse is analyzed. The transverse momentum spectrum displays prominent peaks which are interpreted as caustics, the positions of which are accessible by the stationary phases. Examples are given for the superposition of an XFEL beam with an optical high-intensity laser beam. Such a configuration is available, e.g., at LCLS at present and at European XFEL in near future. It requires a counter propagating probe photon beam with high energy which can be generated by synchronized inverse Compton backscattering.

  10. Chapter 14: Evaluating the Leaching of Biocides from Preservative-Treated Wood Products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stan T. Lebow

    2014-01-01

    Leaching of biocides is an important consideration in the long term durability and any potential for environmental impact of treated wood products. This chapter discusses factors affecting biocide leaching, as well as methods of evaluating rate and quantity of biocide released. The extent of leaching is a function of preservative formulation, treatment methods, wood...

  11. Study of the relation between hydrated portland cement composition and leaching resistance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Eijk, R.J.; Brouwers, Jos

    1998-01-01

    The present paper addresses cement compositions that have an optimal resistance against acid attack and hence, low leaching rates and optimal waste containment. To this end a shrinking core leaching model is used that describes the leaching of metals from a cement sample. This process is directly

  12. Biological treatment of sulfidic spent caustics under haloalkaline conditions using soda lake bacteria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Graaff, de C.M.

    2012-01-01

    In this thesis, the development of a newbiotechnological process for the treatment of undiluted sulfidic spent caustics (SSC’s) using soda lake bacteria is described. SSC’s are waste solutions that are formed in the oil and gas industry due to the caustic (NaOH) scrubbing of hydrocarbon streams

  13. Hydrogen peroxide and caustic soda: Dancing with a dragon while bleaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peter W. Hart; Carl Houtman; Kolby Hirth

    2013-01-01

    When hydrogen peroxide is mixed with caustic soda, an auto-accelerating reaction can lead to generation of significant amounts of heat and oxygen. On the basis of experiments using typical pulp mill process concentration and temperatures, a relatively simple kinetic model has been developed. Evaluation of these model results reveals that hydrogen peroxide-caustic soda...

  14. Biological treatment of sulfidic spent caustics under haloalkaline conditions using soda lake bacteria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Graaff, de C.M.

    2012-01-01

    In this thesis, the development of a newbiotechnological process for the treatment of undiluted sulfidic spent caustics (SSC’s) using soda lake bacteria is described. SSC’s are waste solutions that are formed in the oil and gas industry due to the caustic (NaOH) scrubbing of hydrocarbon

  15. Caustic-based approach to understanding bunching dynamics and current spike formation in particle bunches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. K. Charles

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Current modulations, current spikes, and current horns, are observed in a range of accelerator physics applications including strong bunch compression in Free Electron Lasers and linear colliders, trains of microbunching for terahertz radiation, microbunching instability and many others. This paper considers the fundamental mechanism that drives intense current modulations in dispersive regions, beyond the common explanation of nonlinear and higher-order effects. Under certain conditions, neighboring electron trajectories merge to form caustics, and often result in characteristic current spikes. Caustic lines and surfaces are regions of maximum electron density, and are witnessed in accelerator physics as folds in phase space of accelerated bunches. We identify the caustic phenomenon resulting in cusplike current profiles and derive an expression which describes the conditions needed for particle-bunch caustic formation in dispersive regions. The caustic expression not only reveals the conditions necessary for caustics to form but also where in longitudinal space the caustics will form. Particle-tracking simulations are used to verify these findings. We discuss the broader implications of this work including how to utilize the caustic expression for manipulation of the longitudinal phase space to achieve a desired current profile shape.

  16. C-106 High-Level Waste Solids: Washing/Leaching and Solubility Versus Temperature Studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    GJ Lumetta; DJ Bates; PK Berry; JP Bramson; LP Darnell; OT Farmer III; LR Greenwood; FV Hoopes; RC Lettau; GF Piepel; CZ Soderquist; MJ Steele; RT Steele; MW Urie; JJ Wagner

    2000-01-26

    This report describes the results of a test conducted by Battelle to assess the effects of inhibited water washing and caustic leaching on the composition of the Hanford tank C-106 high-level waste (HLW) solids. The objective of this work was to determine the composition of the C-106 solids remaining after washing with 0.01M NaOH or leaching with 3M NaOH. Another objective of this test was to determine the solubility of various C-106 components as a function of temperature. The work was conducted according to test plan BNFL-TP-29953-8,Rev. 0, Determination of the Solubility of HLW Sludge Solids. The test went according to plan, with only minor deviations from the test plan. The deviations from the test plan are discussed in the experimental section.

  17. Defense High-Level Waste Leaching Mechanisms Program. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mendel, J.E.

    1984-08-01

    The Defense High-Level Waste Leaching Mechanisms Program brought six major US laboratories together for three years of cooperative research. The participants reached a consensus that solubility of the leached glass species, particularly solubility in the altered surface layer, is the dominant factor controlling the leaching behavior of defense waste glass in a system in which the flow of leachant is constrained, as it will be in a deep geologic repository. Also, once the surface of waste glass is contacted by ground water, the kinetics of establishing solubility control are relatively rapid. The concentrations of leached species reach saturation, or steady-state concentrations, within a few months to a year at 70 to 90 0 C. Thus, reaction kinetics, which were the main subject of earlier leaching mechanisms studies, are now shown to assume much less importance. The dominance of solubility means that the leach rate is, in fact, directly proportional to ground water flow rate. Doubling the flow rate doubles the effective leach rate. This relationship is expected to obtain in most, if not all, repository situations

  18. Defense High-Level Waste Leaching Mechanisms Program. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mendel, J.E. (compiler)

    1984-08-01

    The Defense High-Level Waste Leaching Mechanisms Program brought six major US laboratories together for three years of cooperative research. The participants reached a consensus that solubility of the leached glass species, particularly solubility in the altered surface layer, is the dominant factor controlling the leaching behavior of defense waste glass in a system in which the flow of leachant is constrained, as it will be in a deep geologic repository. Also, once the surface of waste glass is contacted by ground water, the kinetics of establishing solubility control are relatively rapid. The concentrations of leached species reach saturation, or steady-state concentrations, within a few months to a year at 70 to 90/sup 0/C. Thus, reaction kinetics, which were the main subject of earlier leaching mechanisms studies, are now shown to assume much less importance. The dominance of solubility means that the leach rate is, in fact, directly proportional to ground water flow rate. Doubling the flow rate doubles the effective leach rate. This relationship is expected to obtain in most, if not all, repository situations.

  19. [Accidental caustic ingestion in Tunisian child. Study of 330 cases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chemli, Jalel; Bouguila, Jihen; Harbi, Abdelaziz; Essoussi, Ahmed Sahloul; Himida, Ridha Bel; Bouzouita, Hichem

    2004-05-01

    We studied retrospectively 330 cases of caustic product ingestion at the child collected in the pediatric department of Sousse (CHU Sahloul and CHU Farhat Hached) during eight years (1993-2000). It is about 194 boys and 136 girls (sex-ratio to 1.42/1) aged of 4 months at 14 years (middle age at 3 years and 5 months). Concerned products are dominated by the water of bleach (55.7%) dilute essentially (49%), caustic soda (27.9%), diluent of painting (8.5%), potash (2.7%) and the acidic products (2.2%). Endoscopy showed oeso-gastric lesions in 89% of cases: oesophagitis stage I (73.5%), stage IIa (11%), stage IIb (4%), stage III (11.2%) and an inflammatory sténose case of straightaway. The associated gastric lesions have been found in 15.1% of the cases. The recovery was the rule for all patient presenting a benign oesophagitis. The 46 cases of severe oesophogitis have been treated according two protocols: --A group (n=1 ), treated by parenteral food with treatment by antibiotics (1993-1994). --B group (n=35), treated by high dose of corticosteroids (Méthyl-prednisolone) aiming to warn esophageal sténosis (1995-2000). Three patients of the A group and five of the B group developed stenosis with statistically meaningful difference (p=0.44). Among these eight patients, six required oesophagoplasty and two had a good evolution after esophageal dilation.

  20. Aluminous Minerals for Caustic Processing of Scheelite Concentrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Min; Li, Zhao; Li, Xuewei; Qu, Jun; Zhang, Qiwu

    2017-06-01

    Dry milling of the mixture of scheelite concentrate and solid NaOH is conducted to develop a caustic process for tungsten (W) extraction. Aluminum hydroxide (Al(OH)3) is further added to the milling to control the calcium dissolution of one reaction product, calcium hydroxide, in the next aqueous extraction of soluble tungstate to form an insoluble substance. For practical application, several aluminous minerals of kaolin, gibbsite, and diaspore with different alumina concentrations and water percentages are used to replace the pure chemical Al(OH)3, and the feasibility of using these minerals as calcium immobilization additives is confirmed to give rise to the formation of Na2WO4 and water-insoluble katoite (Ca3Al2(SiO4)3- x (OH)4 x ) in the form of powders. Tungsten recovery is found to depend on the compositions of the used mineral, and the conditions for improving W recovery are studied with respect to the compositions of aluminum hydroxide and water inside the minerals. The developed process allows the caustic extraction of W by applying the nearby available aluminous minerals.

  1. Nitrate leaching under Wheat-Corn double cropping systems in North China Plain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, C.; Li, X.; Zhang, Y.

    2009-04-01

    The losses of leaching are increased with nitrogen fertilizer application rate increased. Under wheat-corn double cropping system, the average amount of the nitrate leaching through 180 cm soil depth were 6、58、150 kg/ha in one year from year 2002 to 2004 with N 200, 400, 800 kg/ ha treatments, and the leaching rate were 3%, 5%, 19.0%. During wheat season the irrigation before planting and the first irrigation in the next year can cause lots of nitrate leached, and the period of corn season during which nitrate were leaching is the time after corn emergence to twelve leaves.

  2. Leaching From Biomass Gasification Residues

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Allegrini, Elisa; Boldrin, Alessio; Polletini, A.

    2011-01-01

    The aim of the present work is to attain an overall characterization of solid residues from biomass gasification. Besides the determination of chemical and physical properties, the work was focused on the study of leaching behaviour. Compliance and pH-dependence leaching tests coupled with geoche......The aim of the present work is to attain an overall characterization of solid residues from biomass gasification. Besides the determination of chemical and physical properties, the work was focused on the study of leaching behaviour. Compliance and pH-dependence leaching tests coupled...

  3. Uranium Extraction by stope leaching

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quan Aiguo; Li Yu; Li Congkui; Ouyang Jiangong

    1996-01-01

    The stope leaching is an effective way to extract uranium from hard rock deposit. On the basis of test results of uranium extracting by stope leaching at ore body number 30 in deposit 101 with combination of technological features of stope leaching, the analysis and comprehensive summary are emphasized on three key techniques-ore stacking in-place after blasting in stope, sprinkling of lixiviant and uranium recovery as well. These techniques will play an active role in developing stope leaching in China

  4. Comprehensive evaluation on effective leaching of critical metals from spent lithium-ion batteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Wenfang; Liu, Chenming; Cao, Hongbin; Zheng, Xiaohong; Lin, Xiao; Wang, Haijuan; Zhang, Yi; Sun, Zhi

    2018-02-16

    Recovery of metals from spent lithium-ion batteries (LIBs) has attracted worldwide attention because of issues from both environmental impacts and resource supply. Leaching, for instance using an acidic solution, is a critical step for effective recovery of metals from spent LIBs. To achieve both high leaching efficiency and selectivity of the targeted metals, improved understanding on the interactive features of the materials and leaching solutions is highly required. However, such understanding is still limited at least caused by the variation on physiochemical properties of different leaching solutions. In this research, a comprehensive investigation and evaluation on the leaching process using acidic solutions to recycle spent LIBs is carried out. Through analyzing two important parameters, i.e. leaching speed and recovery rate of the corresponding metals, the effects of hydrogen ion concentration, acid species and concentration on these two parameters were evaluated. It was found that a leachant with organic acids may leach Co and Li from the cathode scrap and leave Al foil as metallic form with high leaching selectivity, while that with inorganic acids typically leach all metals into the solution. Inconsistency between the leaching selectivity and efficiency during spent LIBs recycling is frequently noticed. In order to achieve an optimal status with both high leaching selectivity and efficiency (especially at high solid-to-liquid ratios), it is important to manipulate the average leaching speed and recovery rate of metals to optimize the leaching conditions. Subsequently, it is found that the leaching speed is significantly dependent on the hydrogen ion concentration and the capability of releasing hydrogen ions of the acidic leachant during leaching. With this research, it is expected to improve understanding on controlling the physiochemical properties of a leaching solution and to potentially design processes for spent LIBs recycling with high industrial

  5. Life cycle assessment and residue leaching: the importance of parameter, scenario and leaching data selection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allegrini, E; Butera, S; Kosson, D S; Van Zomeren, A; Van der Sloot, H A; Astrup, T F

    2015-04-01

    Residues from industrial processes and waste management systems (WMSs) have been increasingly reutilised, leading to landfilling rate reductions and the optimisation of mineral resource utilisation in society. Life cycle assessment (LCA) is a holistic methodology allowing for the analysis of systems and products and can be applied to waste management systems to identify environmental benefits and critical aspects thereof. From an LCA perspective, residue utilisation provides benefits such as avoiding the production and depletion of primary materials, but it can lead to environmental burdens, due to the potential leaching of toxic substances. In waste LCA studies where residue utilisation is included, leaching has generally been neglected. In this study, municipal solid waste incineration bottom ash (MSWI BA) was used as a case study into three LCA scenarios having different system boundaries. The importance of data quality and parameter selection in the overall LCA results was evaluated, and an innovative method to assess metal transport into the environment was applied, in order to determine emissions to the soil and water compartments for use in an LCA. It was found that toxic impacts as a result of leaching were dominant in systems including only MSWI BA utilisation, while leaching appeared negligible in larger scenarios including the entire waste system. However, leaching could not be disregarded a priori, due to large uncertainties characterising other activities in the scenario (e.g. electricity production). Based on the analysis of relevant parameters relative to leaching, and on general results of the study, recommendations are provided regarding the use of leaching data in LCA studies. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Leaching behavior of microtektite glass compositions in sea water and the effect of precipitation on glass leaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-01-01

    The present study attempts to account for the slow corrosion rates of microtektite glass in nature by comparing the leach rates of synthetic microtektite glass samples in deionized water and in sea-water, respectively. In order to obtain systematic data about leachant composition effects, leach tests were also carried out with synthetic leachant compositions enriched with respect to silica or depleted with respect to certain major components of sea-water (Mg, Ca).

  7. Characterization of solids deposited on the modular caustic-side solvent extraction unit (MCU) coalescer media removed in May and October 2014

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fondeur, F. F. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2015-10-01

    During routine maintenance, the coalescers utilized in the Modular Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction Unit (MCU) processing of Salt Batch 6 and a portion of Salt Batch 7 were sampled and submitted to the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) for characterization, for the purpose of identifying solid phase constituents that may be accumulating in these coalescers. Specifically, two samples were received and characterized: A decontaminated salt solution (DSS) coalescer sample and a strip effluent (SE) coalescer sample. Aliquots of the samples were analyzed by XRD, Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) Spectroscopy, SEM, and EDS. Other aliquots of the samples were leached in acid solution, and the leachates were analyzed by ICP-AES. In addition, modeling was performed to provide a basis for comparison of the analytical results.

  8. Using microbiological leaching method to remove heavy metals from sludge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhuyu Gu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Microbial leaching is one of the most effective methods to remove heavy metals from sludge. In the conducted researches, the sludge samples were processed with Thiobacillus ferrooxidans and Thiobacillus thiooxidans obtained via cultivation, extraction and purification processes. Heavy metals such as Pb, Cd, Cu and Ni were leached from sludge by Thiobacillus ferrooxidans and Thiobacillus thiooxidans within different substrate concentration and pH value conditions. It is defined that from the point of view of economy and efficiency the optimal concentration of FeSO4.7H2O and sulfur for bio-leaching process was 0.2 g. The leaching rates of heavy metals such as Pb, Cd, Cu and Ni of the same concentration were 74.72%, 81.54%, 70.46% and 77.35% respectively. However, no significant differences depending on the pH value among the leaching rates were defined, even for the pH value of 1.5. Along with the removal of heavy metals from sludge, the organic matter, N, P, K were also leached to some extent. The losing rate of phosphorus was the highest and reached 38.44%. However, the content of organic matter, N, P, K in the processed sludge were higher in comparison with level I of the National Soil Quality Standards of China. Ecological risk of heavy metals in sludge before and after leaching was assessed by Index of Geo-accumulation (Igeo and comprehensive potential risk (RI. The results of research defined that the content of heavy metals in sludge meets the level of low ecological risk after leaching and their contents is lower in comparison with the National Agricultural Sludge Standard of China. Sludge leached by biological methods is possible to use for treatment for increasing soil fertility.

  9. Improving hydrolysis of food waste in a leach bed reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Browne, James D.; Allen, Eoin; Murphy, Jerry D.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: • This paper assesses leaching of food waste in a two phase digestion system. • Leaching is assessed with and without an upflow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB). • Without the UASB, low pH reduces hydrolysis, while increased flows increase leaching. • Inclusion of the UASB increases pH to optimal levels and greatly improves leaching. • The optimal conditions are suggested as low flow with connection to the UASB. - Abstract: This paper examines the rate of degradation of food waste in a leach bed reactor (LBR) under four different operating conditions. The effects of leachate recirculation at a low and high flow rate are examined with and without connection to an upflow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB). Two dilution rates of the effective volume of the leach bed reactors were investigated: 1 and 6 dilutions per LBR per day. The increase in dilution rate from 1 to 6 improved the destruction of volatile solids without connection to the UASB. However connection to the UASB greatly improved the destruction of volatile solids (by almost 60%) at the low recirculation rate of 1 dilution per day. The increase in volatile solids destruction with connection to the UASB was attributed to an increase in leachate pH and buffering capacity provided by recirculated effluent from the UASB to the leach beds. The destruction of volatile solids for both the low and high dilution rates was similar with connection to the UASB, giving 82% and 88% volatile solids destruction respectively. This suggests that the most efficient leaching condition is 1 dilution per day with connection to the UASB

  10. Improving hydrolysis of food waste in a leach bed reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Browne, James D.; Allen, Eoin; Murphy, Jerry D., E-mail: jerry.murphy@ucc.ie

    2013-11-15

    Highlights: • This paper assesses leaching of food waste in a two phase digestion system. • Leaching is assessed with and without an upflow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB). • Without the UASB, low pH reduces hydrolysis, while increased flows increase leaching. • Inclusion of the UASB increases pH to optimal levels and greatly improves leaching. • The optimal conditions are suggested as low flow with connection to the UASB. - Abstract: This paper examines the rate of degradation of food waste in a leach bed reactor (LBR) under four different operating conditions. The effects of leachate recirculation at a low and high flow rate are examined with and without connection to an upflow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB). Two dilution rates of the effective volume of the leach bed reactors were investigated: 1 and 6 dilutions per LBR per day. The increase in dilution rate from 1 to 6 improved the destruction of volatile solids without connection to the UASB. However connection to the UASB greatly improved the destruction of volatile solids (by almost 60%) at the low recirculation rate of 1 dilution per day. The increase in volatile solids destruction with connection to the UASB was attributed to an increase in leachate pH and buffering capacity provided by recirculated effluent from the UASB to the leach beds. The destruction of volatile solids for both the low and high dilution rates was similar with connection to the UASB, giving 82% and 88% volatile solids destruction respectively. This suggests that the most efficient leaching condition is 1 dilution per day with connection to the UASB.

  11. H-Area Acid/Caustic Basin Groundwater Monitoring Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thompson, C.Y.

    1993-03-01

    During fourth quarter 1992, samples from the four HAC monitoring wells at the H-Area Acid/Caustic Basin received comprehensive analyses. Monitoring results that exceeded the final Primary Drinking Water Standards (PDWS) or the Savannah River Site (SRS) flagging criteria or turbidity standard during the quarter are the focus of this report. Tritium exceeded the final PDWS in wells HAC 1, 2, 3, and 4 during fourth quarter 1992. Tritium activities in upgradient well HAC 4 were similar to tritium levels in wells HAC 1, 2, and 3. Iron was elevated in well HAC 1, 2, and 3. Specific conductance and manganese were elevated in one downgradient well each. No well samples exceeded the SRS turbidity standard. During 1992, tritium was the only constituent that exceeded the final PDWS. It did so consistently in all four wells during all four quarters, with little variability in activity

  12. Prediction of complications following caustic ingestion in adults

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christesen, H B

    1995-01-01

    The records of 86 adults admitted to hospital following caustic ingestion were reviewed. Eighteen patients (21%) developed complications; of these, six were fatal. Patients without symptoms or signs did not develop complications. Complications occurred only following lye ingestion, or intentional...... ingestion of hydrochloric acid or ammonia water. Of patients with such ingestion, and two signs or symptoms or more, 70% developed complications. Oesophagoscopy did not significantly improve the prediction of complications. There was a strong trend, however, for more severe complications with more severe...... submucosal, circumferential oesophageal injuries (P = 0.003). The study suggests that only adults with symptoms or signs following strong alkali or strong acid ingestion are at risk of complications. In adults who are symptomatic following ingestion of strong acid or alkali, oesophagoscopy is important...

  13. Studying the microlenses mass function from statistical analysis of the caustic concentration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mediavilla, T; Ariza, O [Departamento de Estadistica e Investigacion Operativa, Universidad de Cadiz, Avda de Ramon Puyol, s/n 11202 Algeciras (Spain); Mediavilla, E [Instituto de Astrofisica de Canarias, Avda Via Lactea s/n, La Laguna (Spain); Munoz, J A, E-mail: teresa.mediavilla@ca.uca.es, E-mail: octavio.ariza@uca.es, E-mail: emg@iac.es [Departamento de Astrofisica y Astronomia, Universidad de Valencia, Burjassot, Valencia (Spain)

    2011-09-22

    The statistical distribution of caustic crossings by the images of a lensed quasar depends on the properties of the distribution of microlenses in the lens galaxy. We use a procedure based in Inverse Polygon Mapping to easily identify the critical and caustic curves generated by a distribution of stars in the lens galaxy. We analyze the statistical distributions of the number of caustic crossings by a pixel size source for several projected mass densities and different mass distributions. We compare the results of simulations with theoretical binomial distributions. Finally we apply this method to the study of the stellar mass distribution in the lens galaxy of QSO 2237+0305.

  14. Present and future: heap leaching of uranium ore in China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Jianhua

    2010-01-01

    Based on small and disperse uranium deposits, and low grade ores, heap leaching has been developed as the dominating technique in the uranium production of China. It is indicated that heap leaching technique has such advantages as less capital, low cost, low power consumption and water consumption. At the meanwhile, heap leaching technique presents shortcomings of poor adaptability and low recovery rate. In order to meet the oncoming enormous demand of nuclear power, great effort shall be put on research of new technology, new equipment, new material. (authors)

  15. Caustic burns of rectum and colon in emergencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diarra, Brahima; Roudie, Jean; Ehua Somian, Francis; Coulibaly, Adama

    2004-06-01

    Because of their rarity, chemical burns of rectum and colon have been poorly studied. This clinical report studies the epidemiologic, diagnostic, and therapeutic features of rectal and colonic burns after enema with caustics. This is a retrospective clinical report of a personal series of 21 patients admitted in our hospital from January 1990 to January 2000 for an acute chemical colitis after enema. Inpatient prevalence: 0.04%. Mean age: 29.7 +/- 12 years (range 17 to 19). Sex ratio: 16 female and 5 male. Circumstances: suicide (n = 14), abortion (n = 3), murder (n = 3), mistake (n = 1). Responsible caustic: sulphuric acid (n = 12), chlorhydric acid (n = 5), potash (n = 2), unknown acid (n = 1), plant decoction (n = 1). Injected quantity: 50 to 250 mL. Ten patients suffered light damage and had an early favorable course under medical treatment, 8 of them had a secondary rectal-sigmoid stenosis. Eleven patients presented with severe necrotic damage, of difficult and often delayed diagnosis based on an enduring symptomatology without clear peritoneal syndrome. Upon surgery, necrotic damage spread on rectum and sigmoid colon (n = 2), up to the transverse colon (n = 4), to the right colonic angle (n = 3), to the right colon (n = 2); once a 10 cm long necrosis of the ileum was associated (n = 1); only 1 patient had a colonic perforation. Performed surgery: 11 resections of necrotic colon and proximal colostomy (Hartman operation). Mortality: 6 patients. Morbidity: 3 of 5 patients. Chemical burns of rectum and colon produced by strong acid or basic products are necrotizing lesions whose gravity is often hidden by the absence of peritoneal inflammation signs, thus mortality is high. Only early surgery is likely to improve the poor prognosis of severe chemical damage of the rectum and colon.

  16. Experiment research on heap leaching of low content uranium ore with new solution distribution technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zeng Yingying; Lei Zeyong

    2007-01-01

    This article introduces the advantage of new spray sprinkling technology. Solution is distributed by spray sprinkling, a uranium ore is simulated into mine heap, and small typed column leaching experiment in room is done, in order to exam the solution distribution uniformity of spray sprinkling and the ore leaching rule. After experiment, liquid leaching rate is 70.67%. The experiment results show that solution distribution uniformity of spray sprinkling is fine, and the uranium ore leaching character is good. Technology parameters on spray sprinkling solution distribution for heap leaching of the uranium ore are recommended. (authors)

  17. Defining Effective Salt Leaching Regions Between Drains

    OpenAIRE

    ANAPALI, Ömer; ŞAHİN, Üstün; ÖZTAŞ, Taşkın; HANAY, Abdurrahman

    2001-01-01

    The application of sufficient amounts of leaching water by means of an effective method is very important in the management and reclamation of saline and sodic soils. Reclamation cannot be achieved with insufficient leaching water application, while excess water application may cause severe problems in soil. Knowledge of the leaching regions and intensities may help to control the amounts of leaching water through effective leaching methods in areas of limited leaching. This study was und...

  18. AMDTreat 5.0+ with PHREEQC titration module to compute caustic chemical quantity, effluent quality, and sludge volume

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cravotta, Charles A.; Means, Brent P; Arthur, Willam; McKenzie, Robert M; Parkhurst, David L.

    2015-01-01

    Alkaline chemicals are commonly added to discharges from coal mines to increase pH and decrease concentrations of acidity and dissolved aluminum, iron, manganese, and associated metals. The annual cost of chemical treatment depends on the type and quantities of chemicals added and sludge produced. The AMDTreat computer program, initially developed in 2003, is widely used to compute such costs on the basis of the user-specified flow rate and water quality data for the untreated AMD. Although AMDTreat can use results of empirical titration of net-acidic or net-alkaline effluent with caustic chemicals to accurately estimate costs for treatment, such empirical data are rarely available. A titration simulation module using the geochemical program PHREEQC has been incorporated with AMDTreat 5.0+ to improve the capability of AMDTreat to estimate: (1) the quantity and cost of caustic chemicals to attain a target pH, (2) the chemical composition of the treated effluent, and (3) the volume of sludge produced by the treatment. The simulated titration results for selected caustic chemicals (NaOH, CaO, Ca(OH)2, Na2CO3, or NH3) without aeration or with pre-aeration can be compared with or used in place of empirical titration data to estimate chemical quantities, treated effluent composition, sludge volume (precipitated metals plus unreacted chemical), and associated treatment costs. This paper describes the development, evaluation, and potential utilization of the PHREEQC titration module with the new AMDTreat 5.0+ computer program available at http://www.amd.osmre.gov/.

  19. Kinetics of acid leaching of ilmenite decomposed by KOH part 1: decomposition by KOH and leaching by HCl

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nayl, A.A; Aly, H.F.

    2010-01-01

    Decomposition of ilmenite by KOH solutions, to convert titanium to potassium titanate, was first studied . This was followed by leaching titanium from the ilmenite paste using HCl solutions in the temperature range 50-150 degree C for different periods up to 3 hr. The significant factors affecting the leaching process were studied. The experimental data of the decomposition rate of ilmenite by KOH and of the formed KOH paste by HCl under the relevant operating variables were interpreted with the shrinking core model under chemically controlled process. The apparent activation energy for leaching of titanium in both cases bas been evaluated and discussed.

  20. Long-term leach testing of solidified radioactive waste forms (International Standard Publication ISO 6961:1982)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stefanik, J.

    2001-01-01

    Processes are developed for the immobilization of radionuclides by solidification of radioactive wastes. The resulting solidification products are characterized by strong resistance to leaching aimed at low release rates of the radionuclides to the environment. To measure this resistance to leaching of the solidified materials: glass, glass-ceramics, bitumen, cement, concrete, plastics, a long-term leach test is presented. The long-term leach test is aimed at: a) the comparison of different kinds or compositions of solidified waste forms; b) the intercomparison between leach test results from different laboratories on one product; c) the intercomparison between leach test results on products from different processes

  1. Process for the in-situ leaching of uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Habib, E.T.; Vogt, T.C.

    1982-01-01

    Process for the in-situ leaching of uranium employing an alkaline lixiviant and an alkali metal or alkaline earth metal hypochlorite as an oxidizing agent. The use of the hypochlorite oxidant results in significantly higher uranium recoveries and leaching rates than those attained by the use of conventional oxidants. The invention is particularly suitable for use in subterranean deposits in which the uranium mineral is associated with carbonaceous material which retards access to the uranium by the lixiviant

  2. Study of matrix crack-tilted fiber bundle interaction using caustics and finite element method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Wenfeng; Zhu, Jianguo; Zhu, Qi; Yuan, Yanan

    2016-02-01

    In this work, the interaction between the matrix crack and a tilted fiber bundle was investigated via caustics and the finite element method (FEM). First, the caustic patterns at the crack tip with different distances from the tilted fiber were obtained and the stress intensity factors were extracted from the geometry of the caustic patterns. Subsequently, the shielding effect of the fiber bundle in front of the crack tip was analyzed. Furthermore, the interaction between the matrix crack and the broken fiber bundle was discussed. Finally, a finite element simulation was carried out using ABAQUS to verify the experimental results. The results demonstrate that the stress intensity factors extracted from caustic experiments are in excellent agreement with the data calculated by FEM.

  3. Leaching of saltstones containing fly ash

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barnes, M.W.; Roy, D.M.; Langton, C.A.

    1985-01-01

    Two types of fly ash were incorporated in saltstones designed for potential encapsulation of Savannah River Plant low level defense waste. These fly ashes have some cementitious properties while at the same time their presence in substitution for cement slows early hydration. Class C fly ash has a high calcium content and is considered cementitious; Class F fly ash has a low calcium content and is not classified as cementitious. Leach tests were performed and physical properties were measured for saltstones containing each class, to see the differences in the effect of the fly ashes. The four waste ions nitrate, nitrite, sodium and sulfate were shown to leach by diffusion. Effective diffusivities were determined for these ions. Data for nitrate, the most important species from the environmental point of view, are shown in Table A. Saltstones made with Class C fly ash have substantially lower leach rates than those made with Class F fly ash. The leach rates, and therefore the square roots of the effective diffusivities, have been found to be proportional to the pore surface area per unit volume (or the ratio of pore volume to pore radius), to the fraction of waste containing solution, and to the inverse of the fraction of calcium in the saltstone. Rates and diffusivities are not proportional to the water to cement ratio, because this number depends on whether the fly ash is counted as cementitious, as in Class C cement, or not cementitious, as in Class F cement. In fact the relatively small amount of calcium in Class F cement contributes to the cementitious properties overall, though not so much as Class C cement. 4 refs., 2 figs., 6 tabs

  4. Microbial fuel cell-driven caustic potash production from wastewater for carbon sequestration

    OpenAIRE

    Gajda, I.; Greenman, J.; Melhuish, C.; Santoro, C.; Ieropoulos, I.

    2016-01-01

    This work reports on the novel formation of caustic potash (KOH) directly on the MFC cathode locking carbon dioxide into potassium bicarbonate salt (kalicinite) while producing, instead of consuming electrical power. Using potassium-rich wastewater as a fuel for microorganisms to generate electricity in the anode chamber, has resulted in the formation of caustic catholyte directly on the surface of the cathode electrode. Analysis of this liquid has shown to be highly alkaline (pH>13) and act ...

  5. Leaching of concrete : the leaching process : extrapolation of deterioration : effect on the structural stability

    OpenAIRE

    Fagerlund, Göran

    2000-01-01

    The leaching process when water attacks concrete, and the effect of leaching on the strength and durability of a concrete structure, is analysed theoretically. Technique for prediction of the future leaching and structural stability is outlined. The analysis is to a certain extent supported by data from literature. The leaching process is divided in five different types: 1: Pure surface leaching 2: Surface leaching involving erosion 3: Homogeneous leaching over the entire structure 4...

  6. LEACH-A: An Adaptive Method for Improving LEACH Protocol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianli ZHAO

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Energy has become one of the most important constraints on wireless sensor networks. Hence, many researchers in this field focus on how to design a routing protocol to prolong the lifetime of the network. The classical hierarchical protocols such as LEACH and LEACH-C have better performance in saving the energy consumption. However, the choosing strategy only based on the largest residue energy or shortest distance will still consume more energy. In this paper an adaptive routing protocol named “LEACH-A” which has an energy threshold E0 is proposed. If there are cluster nodes whose residual energy are greater than E0, the node of largest residual energy is selected to communicated with the base station; When all the cluster nodes energy are less than E0, the node nearest to the base station is select to communication with the base station. Simulations show that our improved protocol LEACH-A performs better than the LEACH and the LEACH-C.

  7. Leach test of cladding removal waste grout using Hanford groundwater

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Serne, R.J.; Martin, W.J.; Legore, V.L.

    1995-09-01

    This report describes laboratory experiments performed during 1986-1990 designed to produce empirical leach rate data for cladding removal waste (CRW) grout. At the completion of the laboratory work, funding was not available for report completion, and only now during final grout closeout activities is the report published. The leach rates serve as inputs to computer codes used in assessing the potential risk from the migration of waste species from disposed grout. This report discusses chemical analyses conducted on samples of CRW grout, and the results of geochemical computer code calculations that help identify mechanisms involved in the leaching process. The semi-infinite solid diffusion model was selected as the most representative model for describing leaching of grouts. The use of this model with empirically derived leach constants yields conservative predictions of waste release rates, provided no significant changes occur in the grout leach processes over long time periods. The test methods included three types of leach tests--the American Nuclear Society (ANS) 16.1 intermittent solution exchange test, a static leach test, and a once-through flow column test. The synthetic CRW used in the tests was prepared in five batches using simulated liquid waste spiked with several radionuclides: iodine ({sup 125}I), carbon ({sup 14}C), technetium ({sup 99}Tc), cesium ({sup 137}Cs), strontium ({sup 85}Sr), americium ({sup 241}Am), and plutonium ({sup 238}Pu). The grout was formed by mixing the simulated liquid waste with dry blend containing Type I and Type II Portland cement, class F fly ash, Indian Red Pottery clay, and calcium hydroxide. The mixture was allowed to set and cure at room temperature in closed containers for at least 46 days before it was tested.

  8. Structured caustic vector vortex optical field: manipulating optical angular momentum flux and polarization rotation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Rui-Pin; Chen, Zhaozhong; Chew, Khian-Hooi; Li, Pei-Gang; Yu, Zhongliang; Ding, Jianping; He, Sailing

    2015-05-29

    A caustic vector vortex optical field is experimentally generated and demonstrated by a caustic-based approach. The desired caustic with arbitrary acceleration trajectories, as well as the structured states of polarization (SoP) and vortex orders located in different positions in the field cross-section, is generated by imposing the corresponding spatial phase function in a vector vortex optical field. Our study reveals that different spin and orbital angular momentum flux distributions (including opposite directions) in different positions in the cross-section of a caustic vector vortex optical field can be dynamically managed during propagation by intentionally choosing the initial polarization and vortex topological charges, as a result of the modulation of the caustic phase. We find that the SoP in the field cross-section rotates during propagation due to the existence of the vortex. The unique structured feature of the caustic vector vortex optical field opens the possibility of multi-manipulation of optical angular momentum fluxes and SoP, leading to more complex manipulation of the optical field scenarios. Thus this approach further expands the functionality of an optical system.

  9. Investigation of the use of ammonium acetate as an alternative lixiviant in the leaching of malachite ore

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Künkül Asım

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The solutions containing ammonia allow for selective leaching of the copper from a copper ore. In this study, the leaching and kinetics of malachite ore were examined using ammonium acetate solutions as an alternative lixiviant. The effects of some experimental parameters on the leaching of malachite ore were investigated. A kinetic model to represent the effects of these parameters on the leaching rate was developed. It was determined that the leaching rate increased with increasing solution concentration, temperature and stirring speed, and decreasing particle size and solid-to-liquid ratio. It was found that the leaching reaction followed the mixed kinetic control model. The activation energy of this leaching process was determined to be 59.6 kJmol-1. Consequently, it was determined that ammonium acetate solutions could be used as an effective leaching agent for the copper extraction form malachite ore.

  10. Anaerobic Digesters Change the Phosphorus Leaching Behavior of Dairy Manure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marjerison, R.; Gooch, C.; Pronto, J.; Walter, M. T.

    2009-12-01

    This study analyzed how anaerobic digestion of dairy manure might change the amount, form, and rate of phosphorus (P) leached by rainfall. Anaerobic digestion has become an increasingly popular manure management option because it generates methane that can be used to make energy, but little is known about the behavior of P when digested manure is applied to fields. Leaching experiments were performed using simulated rainfall on digester influent (undigested manure) and effluent (digested manure) collected from a dairy farm near Ithaca, NY. A previously published manure-P model was applied to the experimental data to quantify rates of P leaching. Dissolved P-leaching from digested and undigested manures were similar to each other, although digested manures appear to generally leach more dissolved P. Interestingly, both digester influent and effluent leached dissolved P more rapidly and in greater quantities than fresh manure, i.e., manure from a dairy barn floor. It is suggested that the key difference between the liquid manures in this study and “fresh” manure is that fresh manure has a higher solids content, i.e., it is less liquid than the manure used in anaerobic digesters. The findings of this study suggest that it is important to avoid field spreading of liquid manures when rainfall is imminent or fields are wet in order to prevent nonpoint P loading to streams and lakes.

  11. H-Area Acid/Caustic Basin Groundwater Monitoring Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-03-01

    The four monitoring wells at the H-Area Acid/Caustic Basin are sampled quarterly as part of the Savannah River Site (SRS) Groundwater Monitoring Program and to comply with a consent decree signed May 26, 1988, by the US District Court (District of South Carolina, Aiken Division). During fourth quarter 1993, samples from the monitoring wells received comprehensive analyses. Monitoring results that exceeded the final Primary Drinking Water Standards (PDWS), the SRS flagging criteria, or the SRS turbidity standard are the focus of this report. During fourth quarter 1993, tritium exceeded the final PDWS in all four HAC wells, with activities between 3.8E + 01 and 4.6E + 01 pCi/mL. Aluminum exceeded its Flag 2 criterion in wells HAC 2, 3, and 4. Iron exceeded its Flag 2 criterion in wells HAC 1, 2, and 3. Specific conductance was elevated in well HAC 2, total organic halogens exceeded its Flag 2 criterion in wells HAC 2 and 3, and manganese was elevated in wells HAC 3 and 4. No well samples exceeded the SRS turbidity standard

  12. Transhiatal esophagectomy and colonic interposition for caustic esophageal stricture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bassiouny, I E; Bahnassy, A F

    1992-08-01

    From January 1986 through 1990, 70 children (42 boys, 28 girls) with esophageal stricture resulting from ingestion of caustic potash underwent simultaneous esophagectomy and colonic interposition utilizing the transhiatal esophageal approach. At the time of the procedure, their ages ranged from 14 months to 6 years (mean, 3.2 years). Thoracotomy was needed in one patient due to accidental injury to the tracheal during esophageal mobilization. There were 3 deaths from respiratory failure. Otherwise, morbidity was low, and there were satisfactory long-term functional results. The use of isoperistaltic left colon based on both ascending and descending branches of the left colic vessels resulted in survival of all grafts. End-to-side esophagocolic anastomosis decreased the incidence of both postoperative leak (2 instances) and late stenosis (1 case needed surgical revision). Construction of a length of colonic graft equal to the gap between the esophagus above the stricture and the stomach and fixation of the graft to the edge of the esophageal hiatus reduced the incidence of late colonic redundancy in the chest; this did occur in 4 cases but was not associated with dysphagia. Routine pyloroplasty and anterior cologastric anastomosis to the gastric antrum contributed to the absence of gastrocolic reflux and peptic ulceration in this series.

  13. Thiosulfate leaching of gold from sulfide wastes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Block-Bolten, A.; Torma, A.E.

    1986-07-01

    The kinetics of gold extraction from lead-zinc sulfide flotation tailings by thiosulfate leachants has been investigated. The order of reaction as well as the overall reaction rate constant were, with respect to thiosulfate concentration, calculated to be n=0.75 and k=1.05 x 10/sup -6/ mol/sup 1/4/ dm/sup 5/4/ min/sup -1/. The apparent activation energy was found to be ..delta..E/sub a/=48.53 kJ and the frequency factor A=7.5 x 10/sup 2/ mol dm/sup -3/ min/sup -1/. This activation energy value suggests chemical control of the reaction mechanism. Optimum leach temperature of 50/sup 0/C was established. Gold extractions as high as 99% have been realized in two step countercurrent leachings. Change in pH throughout the leaching process was found to be an excellent indicator for the progress of the extraction. A preliminary economic evaluation of the process is given.

  14. Leaching of radioactive nuclides from cement grouts. Part II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stanley, W.T.; Avgerinos, G.F.; Gonzalez, B.; Hemley, P.J.

    1974-01-01

    The determination of the leaching rate of radioactive 137 Cs from a cement grout should the grout be contacted by water is necessary for environmental protection. The effect of the leachant turnover rate on 137 Cs leaching rates was evaluated with batch and continuous (modified Soxhlet extractor) modes of experimentation. Three additives (Grundite, potter's clay, and Conasauga shale) were compared in terms of capability of radioactive isotope retention, while two leachants (tap and distilled water) were investigated. The Soxhlet extractor experiment resulted in the highest rate of leaching, and Conasauga shale was found the best additive for 137 Cs immobilization. Tap water used as leachant was more effective than distilled water. Data were analyzed using models involving isotopic diffusion in the grout and involving diffusion plus a time dependent boundary condition at the interface of grout specimen and leachant

  15. In-situ leaching of south Texas uranium ores--part 1: laboratory studies of ore composition and leaching performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paul, J.M.; Edwards, J.T.; Holmes, B.G.; Tsui, T.F.; Venuto, P.B.

    1983-01-01

    This paper presents data on mineralogy and laboratory chemical-leaching tests for ore samples from several areas of the south Texas tertiary Catahoula formation. Optical microscope, electron microprobe, spectroscopic, X-ray diffraction (XRD), and various chemical analyses were performed. Batch screening tests gave qualitative estimates of leach rate and potential recovery. Packed column tests using hydrogen peroxide or pressurized oxygen gave more quantitative recovery estimates. The frequently friable sandstones contained highly variable amounts of quartz, feldspar, calcite, and clay, and in some cases, zeolite or mica. Clays were mainly mixed layer illite/smectite type. High cation exchange capacities (CEC's) correlated with clay (and zeolite) content, while high reducing capacities were often associated with pyrite level. Coffinite, in various environments, was the main uranium mineral. With batch tests using pseudo-first-order rate constants, ore leach rates were generally characterized as ''fast'' on a scale of fast, intermediate, and slow. However, there was variability in leach rates, both in samples from different areas and in samples taken at different depths in the same well. Fast rates and recoveries greater than 80% were observed in most column pack tests, but there was variation with leachate composition and sample source. The chemistry and kinetics of leaching are also discussed

  16. The current status of glass leaching studies in France

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laude, F.

    1983-11-01

    Glass has been selected in France as the material used to confine the activity of fission product solutions, and a continuous vitrification process has been developed at the Marcoule Vitrification Facility (AVM), the first industrial plant. Borosilicate glass was chosen in various compositions for its properties: it is a homogeneous, non-porous material that incorporates appreciable quantities of most of the fission product oxides, and is only alterable at the surface interface layer. Glass thus constitutes the primary radioactivity containment barrier, and it is essential to determine its long-term behavior. Water constitutes the principal hazard during temporary or definitive storage of the glass blocks. Two types of inherent material properties are studied from the standpoint of glass stability under leaching conditions: - chemical durability; - radioactive containability with regard to the various radionuclides, fission products and especially the actinides. Durability tests are carried out in SOXHLET devices and the alteration rates are measured by the weight loss. The containability is measured by the leach rate, i.e. by the rate of activity loss into the water. Leaching tests are conducted for several major objectives: - selection of glass compositions (leach rates); - leaching mechanism studies (hydrolyzed layer characteristics, effects of temperature, pressure, pH, etc.); - long-term behavior studies (glass specimens doped with alpha-emitters); - simulation of geological repository environments [fr

  17. Leaching characteristics of heavy metals and brominated flame retardants from waste printed circuit boards

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, Xiaoyu [State Environmental Protection Key Laboratory of Environmental Risk Assessment and Control on Chemical Process, East China University of Science and Technology, Shanghai 200237 (China); Guo, Jie, E-mail: guojie@ecust.edu.cn [State Environmental Protection Key Laboratory of Environmental Risk Assessment and Control on Chemical Process, East China University of Science and Technology, Shanghai 200237 (China); Lin, Kuangfei [State Environmental Protection Key Laboratory of Environmental Risk Assessment and Control on Chemical Process, East China University of Science and Technology, Shanghai 200237 (China); Shanghai Key Laboratory of Functional Materials Chemistry, East China University of Science and Technology, Shanghai 200237 (China); Huang, Kai; Deng, Jingjing [State Environmental Protection Key Laboratory of Environmental Risk Assessment and Control on Chemical Process, East China University of Science and Technology, Shanghai 200237 (China)

    2013-02-15

    Highlights: ► Cu and Pb were the most leachable heavy metals in WPCBs according to TCLP and SPLP. ► Penta-BDE congeners were dominated in all extracts. ► High dissolved organic matter condition promoted the BFRs leaching rate. ► Leaching from WPCBs was a significant emission source of BFRs in landfill. -- Abstract: Leaching assessment on five heavy metals (copper, zinc, lead, nickel and cadmium) and two brominated flame retardants (BFRs), polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) and tetrabromobisphenol A (TBBPA), from waste printed circuit boards (WPCBs) were conducted using various leaching methods. The mean leaching concentrations of copper were the highest in both toxicity characteristic leaching procedures (TCLP) and synthetic precipitation leaching procedures (SPLP) tests at 8.6 mg/L and 1.1 mg/L, while only lead (6.2 mg/L) exceeded the TCLP criteria and Chinese EPA regulatory limit (both 5.0 mg/L). However, PBDEs and TBBPA were not detected in TCLP and SPLP tests. Then the BFRs leaching trends and potential leachabilities were further investigated in actual landfill leachates using a modified method. Leaching characteristics that fast-leaching initially followed by slow-desorption over time were generally observed. In landfill leachate tests, the highest leaching concentrations of PBDEs and TBBPA were determined at 30.39 and 12.27 μg/L. Meanwhile, the highest leaching rates were estimated to reach 0.08% and 1.00%, respectively, which were significantly influenced by the dissolved organic carbon contents of extracts, the hydrophobicities of target BFRs and the specific surface areas of WPCBs materials. These results proved that leaching from WPCBs was a significant emission source of BFRs in landfill and electronic waste recycling dumpsite.

  18. Characterization, Leaching, and Filtration Testing for Tributyl Phosphate (TBP, Group 7) Actual Waste Sample Composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Edwards, Matthew K.; Billing, Justin M.; Blanchard, David L.; Buck, Edgar C.; Casella, Amanda J.; Casella, Andrew M.; Crum, J. V.; Daniel, Richard C.; Draper, Kathryn E.; Fiskum, Sandra K.; Jagoda, Lynette K.; Jenson, Evan D.; Kozelisky, Anne E.; MacFarlan, Paul J.; Peterson, Reid A.; Shimskey, Rick W.; Snow, Lanee A.; Swoboda, Robert G.

    2009-03-09

    .A testing program evaluating actual tank waste was developed in response to Task 4 from the M-12 External Flowsheet Review Team (EFRT) issue response plan. The bulk water-insoluble solid wastes that are anticipated to be delivered to the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) were identified according to type such that the actual waste testing could be targeted to the relevant categories. Eight broad waste groupings were defined. Samples available from the 222S archive were identified and obtained for testing. The actual waste-testing program included homogenizing the samples by group, characterizing the solids and aqueous phases, and performing parametric leaching tests. The tributyl phosphate sludge (TBP, Group 7) is the subject of this report. The Group 7 waste was anticipated to be high in phosphorus as well as aluminum in the form of gibbsite. Both are believed to exist in sufficient quantities in the Group 7 waste to address leaching behavior. Thus, the focus of the Group 7 testing was on the removal of both P and Al. The waste-type definition, archived sample conditions, homogenization activities, characterization (physical, chemical, radioisotope, and crystal habit), and caustic leaching behavior as functions of time, temperature, and hydroxide concentration are discussed in this report. Testing was conducted according to TP-RPP-WTP-467.

  19. [Caustic diaper dermatitis and encephalitis secondary to the application of talcum contaminated with hexachlorophene].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larrègue, M; Laidet, B; Ramdene, P; Djeridi, A

    1984-01-01

    Five observations of infants with transcutaneous intoxication by 6,3 p. 100 hexachlorophene contaminated talcum powder are reported. The diaper dermatitis is particular because of its topography (red pants shape), of its sudden occurring, of its papyraceous aspect evoking caustic origin, and of its association with severe encephalopathy. The neurological signs start with epileptic fits leading rapidly to coma. Prognosis is serious leading either to death or to paraplegia. Enquiry on that epidemic shows that mortality raised up to 18 p. 100. The neurological signs with oedematous degeneration of myelin are characteristic of hexachlorophene toxicity. Plasma levels of toxics range up to 15,94 mg/ml i.e. 30 times more than the rates observed by Curley in a premature washed with a commercial solution containing 3 p. 100 hexachlorophene. During a toxic neurological syndrome, the existence of diaper dermatitis with red plants shape must lead to an aetiological diagnosis of the possibility of transcutaneous intoxication even if the product seems as harmless as talcum powder.

  20. Life Extension Program for the Modular Caustic Side Solvent Extraction Unit at Savannah River Site - 13179

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Samadi, Azadeh

    2013-01-01

    Caustic Side Solvent Extraction (CSSX) is currently used at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Savannah River Site (SRS) for removal of cesium from the high-level salt-wastes stored in underground tanks. Currently, the Actinide Removal Process (ARP) and the CSSX process are deployed in the (ARP)/Modular CSSX Unit (MCU), to process salt waste for permanent disposition. The CSSX technology utilizes a multi-component organic solvent and annular centrifugal contactors to extract cesium from alkaline salt waste. The original plant was permitted for a three year design life; however, given the successful operation of the plant, a life extension program was completed to continue operations. The program included detailed engineering analyses of the life-expectancy of passive and active components, resulting in component replacement and/or maintenance and monitoring program improvements. The program also included a review of the operations and resulted in a series of operational improvements. Since the improvements have been made, an accelerated processing rate has been demonstrated. In addition, plans for instituting a next-generation solvent are in place and will enhance the decontamination factors. (author)

  1. Analysis of Caustic Soda of Different Manufacturers in Pakistan for Mercerization of Cotton Textiles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    BILAL ZAHID

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Pakistan has sufficient production capacity of caustic soda to cater the needs of the local industry. Presently, Pakistan has four major plants with production capacity around 435,000 mega ton per year of caustic soda of various grades. Textile industry of Pakistan is the major consumer of produced high grade caustic soda; as the presence of any impurities especially dissolved salts and metals is unfavorable for wet processing of cotton. This study investigates the performance of three different local brands of caustic soda intended for use in textile wet processing of cotton fabric specifically for mercerization process. The brands were selected based on their purity grades. The selected caustic soda samples were chemically analyzed for the presence of impurities. Twenty seven cotton fabric samples (nine samples of each brand were prepared by mercerization in slack state. The cotton fabric samples were tested for changes in surface morphology, tensile strength (warp and weft, tear strength, air permeability and K/S (Colour Strength. The results were analyzed using one-way ANOVA (Analysis of Variance to ascertain the statistical equivalence within and between the tested brands. The results showed no significant differences across the tested brands at a 95% confidence level except for air permeability and K/S in blue shade.

  2. Analysis of caustic soda of different manufacturers in pakistan for mercerization of cotton textiles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zahid, B.; Faisal, S.; Siddique, S.H.

    2017-01-01

    Pakistan has sufficient production capacity of caustic soda to cater the needs of the local industry. Presently, Pakistan has four major plants with production capacity around 435,000 mega ton per year of caustic soda of various grades. Textile industry of Pakistan is the major consumer of produced high grade caustic soda; as the presence of any impurities especially dissolved salts and metals is unfavorable for wet processing of cotton. This study investigates the performance of three different local brands of caustic soda intended for use in textile wet processing of cotton fabric specifically for mercerization process. The brands were selected based on their purity grades. The selected caustic soda samples were chemically analyzed for the presence of impurities. Twenty seven cotton fabric samples (nine samples of each brand) were prepared by mercerization in slack state. The cotton fabric samples were tested for changes in surface morphology, tensile strength (warp and weft), tear strength, air permeability and K/S (Colour Strength). The results were analyzed using one-way ANOVA (Analysis of Variance) to ascertain the statistical equivalence within and between the tested brands. The results showed no significant differences across the tested brands at a 95% confidence level except for air permeability and K/S in blue shade. (author)

  3. A shrinking particle model at leaching of titanium in ilmenite use HCl

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MV Purwani; Suyanti

    2016-01-01

    The research of ilmenite leaching has conducted. Ilmenite was tailings of zircon sand processing. Zircon sand processing tailings containing Zr, Ti, Nb and Fe. This research will be conducted to determine the kinetic leaching of Ti in HCl based shrinking core models. From the research results ilmenite leaching of Ti in HCl wear, it can be concluded that the 50 grams of ilmenite leaching wear 11 M HCl leaching, the higher temperature was conducted the greater of the Ti conversion. The mechanism of the leaching process was controlled by Sphere Reaction with formula equation 1- (1-α)1/3 = k.C/r o ρ t = klt, the relationship between temperature (T) with the reaction rate constant (k), k = 61.744.e- 4553.3 / T or ln k = - 4553.3 / T + 4.123, the frequency factor A = 61.744, the activation energy E = 37.856 kJ/mol. (author)

  4. Transformation of Selenium-Containing Phases in Copper Anode Slimes During Leaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xue Jiao; Yang, Hong Ying; Jin, Zhe Nan; Chen, Guo Bao; Tong, Lin Lin

    2017-10-01

    The transformation of selenium-containing phases in copper anode slimes during the leaching process was investigated based on the Eh-pH diagram, leaching efficiencies of metals, and characterization of the residues produced during leaching. The leaching efficiency of selenium increases slowly to 17.7% in the first 50 min and then more rapidly to 98.3% in the next 110 min. The Eh-pH diagram indicates that elemental selenium is an intermediate product of the oxidation of selenide to selenite. The x-ray powder diffraction data and scanning electron microscopy-energy-dispersive x-ray spectroscopy data demonstrate that selenium leaching can be divided into three stages. Ag-Cu selenide first transforms into silver selenide and then converts to elemental selenium. Finally, elemental selenium is dissolved as selenite. The intermediate product, elemental selenium, is the main reason for the slow initial leaching rate of selenium.

  5. Feasibility study for an additional HEPA filter leaching system in NWCF

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Willis, W.D.

    1992-11-01

    This report documents the feasibility of installing a second high-efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filter leaching system in the New Waste Calcining Facility at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP). A large spent filter backlog already exists at the ICPP, and it has been uncertain whether the existing HEPA filter leaching system will have a throughput rate sufficient to work off the existing backlog in a timely manner. Three areas within the New Waste Calcining Facility (NWCF) have been identified as possible locations for a second filter leaching system. This report examines the suitability of each location, identifies modifications that would be necessary-to install a filter leaching system at each location, examines the impact of modifying each location, and discusses recent efforts to estimate filter throughput using the existing filter leaching system. Based on all available information, installation of a second filter leaching system is not recommended at the present time.

  6. The influence of mechanical activation of chalcopyrite on the selective leaching of copper by sulphuric acid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Achimovičová, M.

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper chalcopyrite, CuFeS2, has been selective leached by H2SO4 as leaching agent (170 g/dm3 in procedure of hydrometallurgical production of copper. Mechanical activation of the chalcopyrite resulted in mechanochemical surface oxidation as well as in the mineral surface and bulk disordering. Furthermore, the formation of agglomerates during grinding was also occured. Surface changes of the samples using infrared spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy methods were investigated before and after leaching. The leaching rate, specific surface area, structural disorder as well as copper extraction increased with the mechanical activation of mineral.

  7. New strategies for treatment and reuse of spent sulfidic caustic stream from petroleum industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jéssica Frontino Paulino

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This work examines traditional and new routes for removal of H2S and other sulfur compounds from spent sufidic caustic (SSC. SH- (hydrogenosulfide and S2- (sulfide ions were quantitatively oxidized at 25 ºC using H2O2, NaOCl or a spent sulfochromic mixture. SH-/S2- ions were also removed via reaction with freshly prepared iron or manganese hydroxides, or after passing the SSC through strong basic anion exchange resins (OH- form. The treated caustic solution, as well as iron/manganese hydroxides, removed H2S from diesel samples at 25 ºC. SSC treatment via strong basic anion-exchange resins produced the treated caustic solution with the highest free alkalinity.

  8. Robustness of discrete flows and caustics in cold dark matter cosmology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Natarajan, Aravind; Sikivie, Pierre

    2005-01-01

    Although a simple argument implies that the distribution of dark matter in galactic halos is characterized by discrete flows and caustics, their presence is often ignored in discussions of galactic dynamics and of dark matter detection strategies. Discrete flows and caustics can in fact be irrelevant if the number of flows is very large. We estimate the number of dark matter flows as a function of galactocentric distance and consider the various ways in which that number can be increased, in particular, by the presence of structure on small scales (dark matter clumps) and the scattering of the flows by inhomogeneities in the matter distribution. We find that, when all complicating factors are taken into account, discrete flows and caustics in galactic halos remain a robust prediction of cold dark matter cosmology with extensive implications for observation and experiment

  9. Results From Analysis Of The First And Second Strip Effluent Coalescer Elements From Radioactive Operations Of The Modular Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction Unit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peters, T.; Fondeur, F.; Fink, S.

    2011-01-01

    The coalescer elements for the Strip Effluent (SE) acid within the Modular Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction Unit (MCU) experienced elevated differential pressure drop during radioactive operations. Following the end of operations for the first Macrobatch campaign and soon after start of the second Macrobatch campaign, personnel removed the coalescer media and provided to Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) for diagnostic investigation of the causes of reduced flow. This report summarizes those studies. Two Strip Effluent (SE) coalescers were delivered to the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL). One was removed from the Modular Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction Unit (MCU) between processing of Macrobatch 1 and 2 (coalescer 'Alpha'), and the second was removed from MCU after processing of ∼24,000 gallons of salt solution (coalescer 'Beta'). Both coalescers underwent the same general strip acid flush program to reduce the dose and were delivered to SRNL for analysis of potential occluding solids. Analysis of Coalescer Alpha indicates the presence of aluminum hydroxide solids and aluminosilicate solids, while analysis of Coalescer Beta indicates the presence of aluminum hydroxide solids, but no aluminosilicates. Leaching studies on sections of both coalescers were performed. The results indicate that the coalescers had different amounts of solids present on them at the time of removal. Finally, samples of free liquids retrieved from both coalescers indicate no excessive amounts of CSSX solvent present. Given the strip acid flushing that occurred in the SE coalescers, the solids we detected on the coalescers are probably indicative of a larger quantity of these solids present before the strip acid flushing. Under this scenario, the excessive pressure drops are due to the solids and not from organic fouling.

  10. Leaching kinetics of gibbsitic bauxite with sodium hydroxide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdel-Aal El-Sayed A.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper the results of a leaching kinetics study of bauxite ore with sodium hydroxide are presented. The effect of ore particle size, sodium hydroxide concentration and reaction temperature on the Al2O3 extraction rate was determined. The results obtained showed that 99% of Al2O3 was leached out using −200+270 mesh ore particle size at a reaction temperature of 105 °C for 60 min reaction time with 250 g/L NaOH. The solid-to-liquid ratio was maintained constant at 1:20. The results indicated that leaching of bauxite is the rate controlling process. The activation energy was determined to be 46.04 kJ/mole, which was characteristic for a chemically controlled process.

  11. Comparative study on copper leaching from waste printed circuit boards by typical ionic liquid acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Mengjun; Huang, Jinxiu; Ogunseitan, Oladele A; Zhu, Nengming; Wang, Yan-min

    2015-07-01

    Waste printed circuit boards (WPCBs) are attracting increasing concerns because the recovery of its content of valuable metallic resources is hampered by the presence of hazardous substances. In this study, we used ionic liquids (IL) to leach copper from WPCBs. [BSO3HPy]OTf, [BSO3HMIm]OTf, [BSO4HPy]HSO4, [BSO4HMim]HSO4 and [MIm]HSO4 were selected. Factors that affect copper leaching rate were investigated in detail and their leaching kinetics were also examined with the comparison of [Bmim]HSO4. The results showed that all six IL acids could successfully leach copper out, with near 100% recovery. WPCB particle size and leaching time had similar influences on copper leaching performance, while IL acid concentration, hydrogen peroxide addition, solid to liquid ratio, temperature, showed different influences. Moreover, IL acid with HSO4(-) was more efficient than IL acid with CF3SO3(-). These six IL acids indicate a similar behavior with common inorganic acids, except temperature since copper leaching rate of some IL acids decreases with its increase. The results of leaching kinetics studies showed that diffusion plays a more important role than surface reaction, whereas copper leaching by inorganic acids is usually controlled by surface reaction. This innovation provides a new option for recovering valuable materials such as copper from WPCBs. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Caustic meso-optical confocal microscope for vertical particle tracks. Proposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soroko, L.M.

    1995-01-01

    The principal of the proposed caustic meso-optical microscope for vertical particle tracks in the nuclear photoemulsion is explained. The results of the experiments performed to illustrate the main features of this new meso-optical microscope are given. The proposed caustic meso-optical microscope for vertical particle tracks in the nuclear photoemulsion can be effectively used in the experimental investigation of such rare processes as ν μ - ν τ oscillations and of the Pb-Pb interactions. 2 refs., 7 figs

  13. Spatial distribution of solute leaching with snowmelt and irrigation: measurements and simulations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schotanus, D.; Ploeg, van der M.J.; Zee, van der S.E.A.T.M.

    2013-01-01

    Transport of a tracer and a degradable solute in a heterogeneous soil was measured in the field, and simulated with several transient and steady state infiltration rates. Leaching surfaces were used to investigate the solute leaching in space and time simultaneously. In the simulations, a random

  14. Effect of precipitation pattern on leaching of preservative from treated wood and implications for accelerated testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stan Lebow

    2014-01-01

    There is a need to develop improved accelerated test methods for evaluating the leaching of wood preservatives from treated wood exposed to precipitation. In this study the effects of rate of rainfall and length of intervals between rainfall events on leaching was evaluated by exposing specimens to varying patterns of simulated rainfall under controlled laboratory...

  15. The effects of types of media on uranium leaching using metabolite of Aspergillus niger

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Guangyue; Ding Dexin; Wang Yongdong; Hu Nan

    2012-01-01

    To investigate the influences of different media to uranium leaching applying with metabolite of Aspergillus niger, PSA and glucose-steepwater medium were used for the culture of Aspergillus niger, and the metabolite of Aspergillus niger with different pH value produced in the diverse culture temperature were obtained which was applied on the tests of uranium leaching as leaching agent. The test results show that the maximum leaching rate is 83.05% when the leaching agent is the metabolite of Aspergillus niger produced by PSA, as for the glucose- steepwater medium, the maximum leaching rate is 68.20%. The pH value of the metabolite of Aspergillus niger of the two kinds of media has a significant effect on the leaching rate. When PSA is adopted, the best leaching rate appears at the pH value of metabolite ranging from 2.0 to 2.5, and as for the glucose-steepwater medium, the pH value is below 2.1. (authors)

  16. Standard leach tests for nuclear waste materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strachan, D.M.; Barnes, B.O.; Turcotte, R.P.

    1980-01-01

    Five leach tests were conducted to study time-dependent leaching of waste forms (glass). The first four tests include temperature as a variable and the use of three standard leachants. Three of the tests are static and two are dynamic (flow). This paper discusses the waste-form leach tests and presents some representative data. 4 figures

  17. Effect of Antifoam Agent on Oxidative Leaching of Hanford Tank Sludge Simulants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rapko, Brian M.; Jones, Susan A.; Lumetta, Gregg J.; Peterson, Reid A.

    2010-02-26

    Oxidative leaching of simulant tank waste containing an antifoam agent (AFA) to reduce the chromium content of the sludge was tested using permanganate as the oxidant in 0.25 M NaOH solutions. AFA is added to the waste treatment process to prevent foaming. The AFA, Dow Corning Q2-3183A, is a surface-active polymer that consists of polypropylene glycol, polydimethylsiloxane, octylphenoxy polyethoxy ethanol, treated silica, and polyether polyol. Some of the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) waste slurries contain high concentrations of undissolved solids that would exhibit undesirable behavior without AFA addition. These tests were conducted to determine the effect of the AFA on oxidative leaching of Cr(III) in waste by permanganate. It has not previously been determined what effect AFA has on the permanganate reaction. This study was conducted to determine the effect AFA has on the oxidation of the chromium, plus plutonium and other criticality-related elements, specifically Fe, Ni and Mn. During the oxidative leaching process, Mn is added as liquid permanganate solution and is converted to an insoluble solid that precipitates as MnO2 and becomes part of the solid waste. Caustic leaching was performed followed by an oxidative leach at either 25°C or 45°C. Samples of the leachate and solids were collected at each step of the process. Initially, Battelle-Pacific Northwest Division (PNWD) was contracted by Bechtel National, Inc. to perform these further scoping studies on oxidative alkaline leaching. The data obtained from the testing will be used by the WTP operations to develop procedures for permanganate dosing of Hanford tank sludge solids during oxidative leaching. Work was initially conducted under contract number 24590-101-TSA-W000-00004. In February 2007, the contract mechanism was switched to Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) operating Contract DE-AC05-76RL01830. In summary, this report describes work focused on

  18. Comparison of Ultrasound-Assisted and Regular Leaching of Vanadium and Chromium from Roasted High Chromium Vanadium Slag

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Jing; Jiang, Tao; Gao, Huiyang; Liu, Yajing; Zheng, Xiaole; Xue, Xiangxin

    2018-02-01

    Ultrasound-assisted leaching (UAL) was used for vanadium and chromium leaching from roasted material obtained by the calcification roasting of high-chromium-vanadium slag. UAL was compared with regular leaching. The effect of the leaching time and temperature, acid concentration, and liquid-solid ratio on the vanadium and chromium leaching behaviors was investigated. The UAL mechanism was determined from particle-size-distribution and microstructure analyses. UAL decreased the reaction time and leaching temperature significantly. Furthermore, 96.67% vanadium and less than 1% chromium were leached at 60°C for 60 min with 20% H2SO4 at a liquid-solid ratio of 8, which was higher than the maximum vanadium leaching rate of 90.89% obtained using regular leaching at 80°C for 120 min. Ultrasonic waves broke and dispersed the solid sample because of ultrasonic cavitation, which increased the contact area of the roasted sample and the leaching medium, the solid-liquid mass transfer, and the vanadium leaching rate.

  19. An active dealkalization of red mud with roasting and water leaching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Xiaobo; Li, Wang; Guan, Xuemao

    2015-04-09

    The research has focused on the dealkalization of red mud after active roasting and water leaching, which is obtained from bauxite during alumina production. The main factors such as roasting temperature, roasting time, water leaching stage, leaching temperature, leaching reaction time and liquid to solid ratio were investigated. The mechanism of dealkalization was in-depth studied by using ICP-AES, XRD, TG-DSC, SEM-EDS and leaching kinetic. The results show that the dealkalization rate reached 82% under the condition of roasting temperature of 700 °C, roasting time of 30 min, four stage water leaching, liquid to solid ratio of 7 mL/g, leaching temperature of 90 °C and reaction time of 60 min. The diffraction peak of Na6CaAl6Si6(CO3)O24 · 2H2O in red mud was decreased during the active roasting process, whereas the mineral phases of NaOH · H2O and Na2Ca(CO3)2 were appeared. The content of alkali obviously decreased and the grade of other elements increased during the process of active roasting and water leaching, which was in favor of next application process of red mud. The water leaching was controlled by internal diffusion of SCM and the apparent activation energy was 22.63 kJ/mol. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Salt as a mitigation option for decreasing nitrogen leaching losses from grazed pastures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ledgard, Stewart F; Welten, Brendon; Betteridge, Keith

    2015-12-01

    The main source of nitrogen (N) leaching from grazed pastures is animal urine with a high N deposition rate (i.e. per urine patch), particularly between late summer and early winter. Salt is a potential mitigation option as a diuretic to induce greater drinking-water intake, increase urination frequency, decrease urine N concentration and urine N deposition rate, and thereby potentially decrease N leaching. This hypothesis was tested in three phases: a cattle metabolism stall study to examine effects of salt supplementation rate on water consumption, urination frequency and urine N concentration; a grazing trial to assess effects of salt (150 g per heifer per day) on urination frequency; and a lysimeter study on effects of urine N rate on N leaching. Salt supplementation increased cattle water intake. Urination frequency increased by up to 69%, with a similar decrease in urine N deposition rate and no change in individual urination volume. Under field grazing, sensors showed increased urination frequency by 17%. Lysimeter studies showed a proportionally greater decrease in N leaching with decreased urine N rate. Modelling revealed that this could decrease per-hectare N leaching by 10-22%. Salt supplementation increases cattle water intake and urination frequency, resulting in a lower urine N deposition rate and proportionally greater decrease in urine N leaching. Strategic salt supplementation in autumn/early winter with feed is a practical mitigation option to decrease N leaching in grazed pastures. © 2015 Society of Chemical Industry.

  1. Intensification Behavior of Mercury Ions on Gold Cyanide Leaching

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiang Zhong

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Cyanidation is the main method used to extract gold from gold raw materials; however, a serious problem with this method is the low leaching rate. In order to improve gold leaching, the intensification behavior of mercury ions on gold cyanide leaching, for two types of materials, sulphide gold concentrate and oxide gold ore, was investigated. The results showed that mercury ions, with only a 10−5 M dosage, could significantly intensify leaching and gold recovery. The dissolution behavior of gold plate was also intensified by 10−5 M mercury ions. Microstructure analysis showed that mercury ions intensified the cyanidation corrosion of the gold surface, resulting in a loose structure, where a large number of deep ravines and raised particles were evident across the whole gold surface. The loose structure added contact surface between the gold and cyanide, and accelerated gold dissolution. Moreover, mercury ions obstructed the formation of insoluble products, such as AuCN, Au(OHCN, and Au(OHx, that lead to a passivation membrane on the gold surface, reducing contact between the gold and cyanide. These effects, brought about by mercury ions, change the structure and product of the gold surface during gold cyanidation and promote gold leaching.

  2. Leaching of saltstone: Laboratory and field testing and mathematical modeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grant, M.W.; Langton, C.A.; Oblath, S.B.; Pepper, D.W.; Wallace, R.M.; Wilhite, E.L.; Yau, W.W.F.

    1987-01-01

    A low-level alkaline salt solution will be a byproduct in the processing of high-level waste at the Savannah River Plant (SRP). This solution will be incorporated into a wasteform, saltstone, and disposed of in surface vaults. Laboratory and field leach testing and mathematical modeling have demonstrated the predictability of contaminant release from cement wasteforms. Saltstone disposal in surface vaults will meet the design objective, which is to meet drinking water standards in shallow groundwater at the disposal area boundary. Diffusion is the predominant mechanism for release of contaminants to the environment. Leach testing in unsaturated soil, at soil moisture levels above 1 wt %, has shown no difference in leach rate compared to leaching in distilled water. Field leach testing of three thirty-ton blocks of saltstone in lysimeters has been underway since January 1984. Mathematical models were applied to assess design features for saltstone disposal. One dimensional infinite-composite and semi-infinite analytical models were developed for assessing diffusion of nitrate from saltstone through a cement barrier. Numerical models, both finite element and finite difference, were validated by comparison of model predictions with the saltstone lysimeter results. Validated models were used to assess the long-term performance of the saltstone stored in surface vaults. The maximum concentrations of all contaminants released from saltstone to shallow groundwater are predicted to be below drinking water standards at the disposal area boundary. 5 refs., 11 figs., 5 tabs

  3. Gold Leaching Characteristics and Intensification of a High S and As-Bearing Gold Concentrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yong-bin; Liu, Xiao-liang; Jiang, Tao; Li, Qian; Xu, Bin; Zhang, Yan

    Some high sulfur and arsenic-bearing gold concentrate has a gold leaching rate less than 80% by oxidation roasting-pickling-cyanidation process. The characteristics and intensification of gold leaching were studied systemically. By combining chemical composition and phase analysis, the low gold leaching rate was found to lie in the capsulation of gold by iron-containing phases including iron oxides, arsenopyrite and pyrite. 96.66% of gold in the industrial leaching residue was capsulated and 95.88% of the capsulated turned out to be in the iron-containing phases. The results of laboratory pickling-cyanidation experiments on the calcine and industrial leaching residue presented further demonstration for the fact that gold capsulated in the iron-containing phases was hard to be leached. However, the gold cyanide leaching rate of calcine could be raised over 95% by a reduction roasting-pickling pretreatment which played such a significant role in exposing the capsulated gold that gold leaching was intensified remarkably.

  4. Leach and EP [extraction procedure] toxicity tests on grouted waste from Tank 106-AN

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Serne, R.J.; Martin, W.J.; Lokken, R.O.; LeGore, V.L.; Lindenmeier, C.W.; Martin, P.F.C.

    1989-09-01

    Pacific Northwest Laboratory is conducting laboratory experiments to produce leach rate data for various waste species that will be contained in grout at Hanford. In the work reported here, grout made from Tank 106-AN liquid waste was used to produce empirical leach rate data for several radionuclides ( 60 Co, 90 Sr, 99Tc, 129I, 137Cs, and 241 Am), stable major components (NO 3 - , NO 2 - , F, Cl, and Na), and trace metals (Cr, Mo, and Ni). Two types of tests were used to produce leach rate data: an intermittent replacement leach test (ANS 16.1 leach test) and a static leach test. Measured effective diffusivities of key species are as follows: 4 to 6 x 10 -8 cm 2 /sec for 99 Tc, 3 to 7 x 10 -8 cm 2 /sec for 129 I, 4 to 6 x 10 -9 cm 2 /sec for nitrate, and 6 to 7 x 10 -9 cm 2 /sec for nitrite. The leach indices of all species studied are above (more favorable than) the waste form criteria. The leach indices for 99 Tc and 129 I are 7.4 ± 1.2 and 7.6 ± 0.4, respectively, and are being further investigated in continuing studies of double-shell slurry feed grouts. An Extraction Procedure (EP) toxicity test was also conducted and the grouted water is considered nontoxic per this test protocol. 19 refs., 9 figs., 8 tabs

  5. Investigation of Chemical and Microbial Leaching of Iron ore in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Investigations on the chemical and microbial leaching of a Nigerian Iron-ore in sulphuric acid have been carried out. The influence of physico-chemical parameters such as acid concentration, temperature, particle size and stirring speed on the chemical dissolution of the ore was investigated. The dissolution rates are ...

  6. Caustic Cement Burn in a Nigerian Male: A Surrogate for the State of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Implementation of sickness absence policies and other occupational health legislation especially in small and medium-scale construction companies in Nigeria should be enforced to secure the health and safety of the workers who may not be aware of risk and hazards associated with the jobs. Keywords Caustic Cement ...

  7. ST-segment elevation mimicking myocardial infarction after hydrochloric acid ingestion: Acute caustic myocarditis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    San Antonio, Rodolfo; Pujol López, Margarida; Perea, Rosario Jesús; Sabaté, Manel

    ST-segment elevation after hydrochloric acid ingestion has barely been described in the literature, without identification of its causal mechanism. We hypothesize that acute caustic myocarditis, by direct contact between necrotic upper gastrointestinal tract and pericardium may induce the ECG findings. Copyright © 2016 Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Novel Electrochemical Treatment of Spent Caustic from the Hydrocarbon Industry Using Ti/BDD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alejandro Medel

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available During the crude oil refining process, NaOH solutions are used to remove H2S, H2Saq, and sulfur compounds from different hydrocarbon streams. The residues obtained are called “spent caustics.” These residues can be mixed with those obtained in other processes, adding to its chemical composition naphthenic acids and phenolic compounds, resulting in one of the most dangerous industrial residues. In this study, the use of electrochemical technology (ET, using BDD with Ti as substrate (Ti/BDD, is evaluated in electrolysis of spent caustic mixtures, obtained through individual samples from different refineries. In this way, the Ti/BDD’s capability of carrying out the electrochemical destruction of spent caustics in an acidic medium is evaluated having as key process a chemical pretreatment phase. The potential production of •OHs, as the main reactive oxygen species electrogenerated over Ti/BDD surface, was evaluated in HCl and H2SO4 through fluorescence spectroscopy, demonstrating the reaction medium’s influence on its production. The results show that the hydrocarbon industry spent caustics can be mineralized to CO2 and water, driving the use of ET and of the Ti/BDD to solve a real problem, whose potential and negative impact on the environment and on human health is and has been the environmental agencies’ main focus.

  9. Prediction of complications following unintentional caustic ingestion in children. Is endoscopy always necessary?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christesen, H B

    1995-01-01

    The records of 115 children hospitalized following caustic ingestion over an 18.5-year period from 1976 to 1994 were reviewed. The relationship between types of product ingested, signs and symptoms, degree of esophageal injury and complications was analyzed. All complications were the result...

  10. Wavefronts, light rays and caustic of a circular wave reflected by an arbitrary smooth curve

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marciano-Melchor, Magdalena; Silva-Ortigoza, Ramón; Montiel-Piña, Enrique; Román-Hernández, Edwin; Santiago-Santiago, José Guadalupe; Silva-Ortigoza, Gilberto; Rosado, Alfonso; Suárez-Xique, Román

    2011-01-01

    The aim of the present work is to obtain expressions for both the wavefront train and the caustic associated with the light rays reflected by an arbitrary smooth curve after being emitted by a point light source located at an arbitrary position in the two-dimensional free space. To this end, we obtain an expression for the k-function associated with the general integral of Stavroudis to the eikonal equation that describes the evolution of the reflected light rays. The caustic is computed by using the definitions of the critical and caustic sets of the two-dimensional map that describes the evolution of an arbitrary wavefront associated with the general integral. The general results are applied to circular and parabolic mirrors. The main motivation to carry out this research is to establish, in future work, the caustic touching theorem in a two-dimensional optical medium and to study the diffraction problem by using the k-function concept. Both problems are important in the computation of the image of an arbitrary object under reflection and refraction

  11. Caustics of 1/r{sup n} binary gravitational lenses: from galactic haloes to exotic matter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bozza, V.; Melchiorre, C., E-mail: valboz@physics.unisa.it, E-mail: cmelchiorre@unisa.it [Dipartimento di Fisica ' E.R. Caianiello' , Università di Salerno, Via Giovanni Paolo II 132, I-84084 Fisciano (Italy)

    2016-03-01

    We investigate the caustic topologies for binary gravitational lenses made up of two objects whose gravitational potential declines as 1/r{sup n}. With n<1 this corresponds to power-law dust distributions like the singular isothermal sphere. The n>1 regime can be obtained with some violations of the energy conditions, one famous example being the Ellis wormhole. Gravitational lensing provides a natural arena to distinguish and identify such exotic objects in our Universe. We find that there are still three topologies for caustics as in the standard Schwarzschild binary lens, with the main novelty coming from the secondary caustics of the close topology, which become huge at higher n. After drawing caustics by numerical methods, we derive a large amount of analytical formulae in all limits that are useful to provide deeper insight in the mathematics of the problem. Our study is useful to better understand the phenomenology of galaxy lensing in clusters as well as the distinct signatures of exotic matter in complex systems.

  12. Biological treatment of refinery spent caustics under halo-alkaline conditions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Graaff, de M.; Bijmans, M.F.M.; Abbas, B.; Euverink, G.J.W.; Muyzer, G.; Janssen, A.J.H.

    2011-01-01

    The present research demonstrates the biological treatment of refinery sulfidic spent caustics in a continuously fed system under halo-alkaline conditions (i.e. pH 9.5; Na(+)= 0.8M). Experiments were performed in identical gas-lift bioreactors operated under aerobic conditions (80-90% saturation) at

  13. Caustic Agent Ingestion by a 1.5-Year-Old Boy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Behdad Gharib

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available We present a case of caustic ingestion by a 1.5-year-old boy. The caustic agent was drain opener which is a strong alkaline substance. Children in Iran and many other countries are still exposed to not “child proof” (child resistant packaging toxic substance containers. Ingestion of caustic agents may lead to necrosis, perforation, and strictures. Substances that are ingested more frequently are liquid alkali material which causes severe, deep liquefaction necrosis. Common signs and symptoms of caustic agents are vomiting, drooling, refusal to drink, oral burns, stridor, hematemesis, dyspnea, dysphagia and abdominal pain. Even if no oropharyngeal lesion is seen, a significant esophageal injury which can lead to perforation and stricture cannot be ruled out. If abdominal pain or rigidity, substernal, chest or back pain exists, visceral perforation should be considered. The first thing to be checked is airway assessment. A lot of patients should be admitted to intensive care unit, and endoscopic evaluation, surgical intervention, long-term hospitalization, and worsening quality of life or among the complications. Preventive measures especially at the country level and approving proper legislation for obligating the related industries to produce child proof containers for house hold toxic products are the urgent measures to be followed by all of us.

  14. Preliminary study of efficacy of hyaluronic acid on caustic esophageal burns in an experimental rat model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cevik, Muazez; Demir, Tuncer; Karadag, Cetin Ali; Ketani, Muzaffer Aydin; Celik, Hakim; Kaplan, Davut Sinan; Boleken, Mehmet Emin

    2013-04-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effectiveness of hyaluronic acid on the prevention of esophageal damage and stricture formation after experimental caustic (alkaline) esophageal injury in rats. Twenty-one Wistar albino rats were randomly divided into three groups. A caustic esophageal burn was created following the Gehanno model: Group l (n=7) underwent operation, but no injury; Group 2 (n=7) was injured and left untreated; and Group 3 (n=7) was injured and treated with hyaluronic acid, first topically and then orally by gavage (2×0.3mL; 12.5mg/mL for 7days). The caustic esophageal burn was created by instilling 25% NaOH into the distal esophagus. All rats were euthanized on day 22 for evaluation. The efficacy of hyaluronic acid treatment was assessed histopathologically and biochemically via blood determination of the total antioxidant status (TAS), total oxidant status (TOS), oxidative stress index (OSI), and sulfhydryl group (SH) and lipid hydroperoxidase (LOOH) levels. Statistical analyses were performed. Weight gain was significantly lower in Group 2 than in the other two groups (POSI, and SH and LOOH levels were higher in Group 2 than in the other two groups. The mean stenosis index, inflammation, TAS, SH and OSI in Group 2 were significantly different than those in the other two groups (P<0.05). Hyaluronic acid treatment is effective in treating damage and preventing strictures after caustic esophageal burn in rats. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Trend towards reverse leach process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1975-01-01

    The South African gold mining industry is making notable strides in improving recovery methods for both gold and uranium with significant additions to profits because of higher efficiencies and reductions in costs in the recovery processes. The most notable step on the gold side recently is the adoption of the reverse leach process at Buffelsfontein and Western Deep Levels. This process was pioneered at Hartebeesfontein as far back as 1975 and when introduced there resulted in a two and a half per cent improvement in recovery efficiencies. The essence of reverse leaching under which the uranium is recovered before the gold is the fact that the gold partly coated with iron oxide or locked in uranite, is exposed to be recovered later by cyanidation

  16. Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction: Chemical and Physical Properties of the Optimized Solvent

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Delmau, L.H.

    2002-10-08

    This work was undertaken to optimize the solvent used in the Caustic Side Solvent Extraction (CSSX) process and to measure key chemical and physical properties related to its performance in the removal of cesium from the alkaline high-level salt waste stored in tanks at the Savannah River Site. The need to adjust the solvent composition arose from the prior discovery that the previous baseline solvent was supersaturated with respect to the calixarene extractant. The following solvent-component concentrations in Isopar{reg_sign} L diluent are recommended: 0.007 M calix[4]arene-bis(tert-octylbenzo-crown-6) (BOBCalixC6) extractant, 0.75 M 1-(2,2,3,3-tetrafluoropropoxy)-3-(4-sec-butylphenoxy)-2-propanol (Cs-7SB) phase modifier, and 0.003 M tri-n-octylamine (TOA) stripping aid. Criteria for this selection included BOBCalixC6 solubility, batch cesium distribution ratios (D{sub Cs}), calculated flowsheet robustness, third-phase formation, coalescence rate (dispersion numbers), and solvent density. Although minor compromises within acceptable limits were made in flowsheet robustness and solvent density, significant benefits were gained in lower risk of third-phase formation and lower solvent cost. Data are also reported for the optimized solvent regarding the temperature dependence of D{sub Cs} in extraction, scrubbing, and stripping (ESS); ESS performance on recycle; partitioning of BOBCalixC6, Cs-7SB, and TOA to aqueous process solutions; partitioning of organic anions; distribution of metals; solvent phase separation at low temperatures; solvent stability to elevated temperatures; and solvent density and viscosity. Overall, the technical risk of the CSSX process has been reduced by resolving previously identified issues and raising no new issues.

  17. A geochemical module for "AMDTreat" to compute caustic quantity, effluent quantity, and sludge volume

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cravotta,, Charles A.; Parkhurst, David L.; Means, Brent P; McKenzie, Bob; Morris, Harry; Arthur, Bill

    2010-01-01

    Treatment with caustic chemicals typically is used to increase pH and decrease concentrations of dissolved aluminum, iron, and/or manganese in largevolume, metal-laden discharges from active coal mines. Generally, aluminum and iron can be removed effectively at near-neutral pH (6 to 8), whereas active manganese removal requires treatment to alkaline pH (~10). The treatment cost depends on the specific chemical used (NaOH, CaO, Ca(OH)2, Na2CO3, or NH3) and increases with the quantities of chemical added and sludge produced. The pH and metals concentrations do not change linearly with the amount of chemical added. Consequently, the amount of caustic chemical needed to achieve a target pH and the corresponding effluent composition and sludge volume can not be accurately determined without empirical titration data or the application of geochemical models to simulate the titration of the discharge water with caustic chemical(s). The AMDTreat computer program (http://amd.osmre.gov/ ) is widely used to compute costs for treatment of coal-mine drainage. Although AMDTreat can use results of empirical titration with industrial grade caustic chemicals to compute chemical costs for treatment of net-acidic or net-alkaline mine drainage, such data are rarely available. To improve the capability of AMDTreat to estimate (1) the quantity and cost of caustic chemicals to attain a target pH, (2) the concentrations of dissolved metals in treated effluent, and (3) the volume of sludge produced by the treatment, a titration simulation is being developed using the geochemical program PHREEQC (wwwbrr.cr.usgs.gov/projects/GWC_coupled/phreeqc/) that will be coupled as a module to AMDTreat. The simulated titration results can be compared with or used in place of empirical titration data to estimate chemical quantities and costs. This paper describes the development, evaluation, and potential utilization of the PHREEQC titration module for AMDTreat.

  18. Quantifying nitrogen leaching response to fertilizer additions in China's cropland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Shuoshuo; Xu, Peng; Zhou, Feng; Yang, Hui; Zheng, Chunmiao; Cao, Wei; Tao, Shu; Piao, Shilong; Zhao, Yue; Ji, Xiaoyan; Shang, Ziyin; Chen, Minpeng

    2016-04-01

    Agricultural soils account for more than 50% of nitrogen leaching (LN) to groundwater in China. When excess levels of nitrogen accumulate in groundwater, it poses a risk of adverse health effects. Despite this recognition, estimation of LN from cropland soils in a broad spatial scale is still quite uncertain in China. The uncertainty of LN primarily stems from the shape of nitrogen leaching response to fertilizer additions (N rate) and the role of environmental conditions. On the basis of 453 site-years at 51 sites across China, we explored the nonlinearity and variability of the response of LN to N rate and developed an empirical statistical model to determine how environmental factors regulate the rate of N leaching (LR). The result shows that LN-N rate relationship is convex for most crop types, and varies by local hydro-climates and soil organic carbon. Variability of air temperature explains a half (∼ 52%) of the spatial variation of LR. The results of model calibration and validation indicate that incorporating this empirical knowledge into a predictive model could accurately capture the variation in leaching and produce a reasonable upscaling from site to country. The fertilizer-induced LN in 2008 for China's cropland were 0.88 ± 0.23 TgN (1σ), significantly lower than the linear or uniform model, as assumed by Food and Agriculture Organization and MITERRA-EUROPE models. These results also imply that future policy to reduce N leaching from cropland needs to consider environmental variability rather than solely attempt to reduce N rate. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Waste and Solvent Composition Limits for Modular Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction Unit (MCU)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adu-Wusu, Kofi; Waler, Douglas D.; Edwards, Thomas B

    2005-01-01

    This study examined waste feed and solvent limits for the Modular Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction Unit (MCU) currently being designed and built at the Savannah River Site (SRS) to remove cesium from highly alkaline radioactive waste. The study involved proposing ranges for 12 waste feed components (i.e., Na + , K + , Cs + , OH - , NO 3 - , NO 2 - , Cl - , F - , SO 4 2- , PO 4 3- , and CO 3 2- , and AlO 2 - ) through a compilation of SRS waste data. Statistical design methods were used to generate numerous wastes with varying compositions from the proposed ranges. An Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) model called SXFIT was used to predict the cesium extraction distribution coefficients (D-values) between the organic (solvent) phase and the aqueous waste phase using the waste component concentrations as inputs. The D-values from the SXFIT model were used as input along with MCU base case process parameters to a SASSE (Spreadsheet Algorithm for Stagewise Solvent Extraction) model to calculate final cesium concentrations for the MCU. The SASSE model was developed at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL). The SXFIT D-value and the waste component concentration data were used to develop a handier alternative model (neural network model) to the SXFIT model that predicts D-values within 15% of the SXFIT D-values. Both the SXFIT and the neural network model revealed the following. The solvent extractant concentration ratios are approximately equal to the corresponding D-value ratios; a useful feature that could be used to predict extraction D-values when the extractant concentration in the solvent changes in the MCU operation. Also, potassium is the only waste component out of the 12 that shows a distinct relationship with the cesium extraction D-values; an indication of potassium's competition with cesium in the Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction (CSSX) process. A waste feed acceptance model suitable for assessing wastes within relatively wide ranges of D-values (0.6-40) and

  20. Influence of soil structure on contaminant leaching from injected slurry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amin, M G Mostofa; Pedersen, Christina Østerballe; Forslund, Anita; Veith, Tamie L; Laegdsmand, Mette

    2016-12-15

    Animal manure application to agricultural land provides beneficial organic matter and nutrients but can spread harmful contaminants to the environment. Contamination of fresh produce, surface water and shallow groundwater with the manure-borne pollutants can be a critical concern. Leaching and persistence of nitrogen, microorganisms (bacteriophage, E. coli, and Enterococcus) and a group of steroid hormone (estrogens) were investigated after injection of swine slurry into either intact (structured) or disturbed (homogeneous repacked) soil. The slurry was injected into hexaplicate soil columns at a rate of 50 t ha -1 and followed with four irrigation events: 3.5-h period at 10 mm h -1 after 1, 2, 3, and 4 weeks. The disturbed columns delayed the leaching of a conservative tracer and microorganisms in the first irrigation event compared to the intact columns due to the effect of disturbed macropore flow paths. The slurry constituents that ended up in or near the macropore flow paths of the intact soil were presumably washed out relatively quickly in the first event. For the last three events the intact soil leached fewer microorganisms than the disturbed soil due to the bypassing effect of water through the macropore flow path in the intact soil. Estrogen leached from the intact soil in the first event only, but for the disturbed soil it was detected in the leachates of last two events also. Leaching from the later events was attributed to higher colloid transport from the disturbed soils. In contrast, NO 3 -N leaching from the intact soil was higher for all events except the first event, probably due to a lower nitrification rate in the disturbed soil. A week after the last irrigation event, the redistribution of all slurry constituents except NO 3 -N in most of the sections of the soil column was higher for the disturbed soil. Total recovery of E. coli was significantly higher from the disturbed soil and total leaching of mineral nitrogen was significantly

  1. Leaching kinetic of Nd. Y, Pr and Sm in rare earth hydroxide (REOH) use nitric acid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purwani, MV; Suyanti

    2018-02-01

    The purpose of this study were to determine the order of reaction, rate reaction constant and activation energy of reaction Y(OH)3, Nd(OH)3, Pr(OH)3 and Sm(OH)3 with HNO3. The rate reaction constant is necessary to determine the residence time in the design of continuously stirred tank reactor (CSTR). The studied parameters were leaching temperature (60 - 90 °C) and leaching time (0-15 minutes). From the resulting data can be concluded that the leaching process were strongly influenced by the time and temperature process. Leaching rare earth hydroxide (REOH) using nitric acid follows second order. At leaching 10 grams of REOH using 40 ml HNO3 0.0576 mol were obtained maximum conversion at 90 °C and leaching time 15 minutes for Y was 0.95 (leaching efficiency was 95%), for Nd was 0.97 ( leaching efficiency was 97%), for Pr was 0.94 (leaching efficiency was 94%) and for Sm was 0.94 (leaching efficiency was 94%). The largest activation energy was Y of 23.34 kJ/mol followed by Pr of 20.00 kJ/mol, Sm of 17.94 kJ/mol and the smallest was Nd of 16.39 kJ/mol. The relationship between the rate constant of the reaction with T for Y was kY = 338.26 e-23,34/RT, for Nd was kNd = 33.69 e -16,39 / RT, for Pr was kPr = 102.04 e-20 / RT and for Sm adalah was kSm = 50.16 e-17,94/RT

  2. An active dealkalization of red mud with roasting and water leaching

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhu, Xiaobo, E-mail: zhuxiaobo0119@126.com [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Henan Polytechnic University, Jiaozuo, Henan 454000 (China); Henan Key Discipline Open Laboratory of Mining Engineering Materials, Henan 454000 (China); Li, Wang; Guan, Xuemao [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Henan Polytechnic University, Jiaozuo, Henan 454000 (China); Henan Key Discipline Open Laboratory of Mining Engineering Materials, Henan 454000 (China)

    2015-04-09

    Highlights: • The dealkalization of active roasting and water leaching from red mud was put forward. • The main factors on dealkalization during active roasting and water leaching were investigated. • The mechanism of dealkalization from red mud was in-depth studied in the process. - Abstract: The research has focused on the dealkalization of red mud after active roasting and water leaching, which is obtained from bauxite during alumina production. The main factors such as roasting temperature, roasting time, water leaching stage, leaching temperature, leaching reaction time and liquid to solid ratio were investigated. The mechanism of dealkalization was in-depth studied by using ICP–AES, XRD, TG-DSC, SEM–EDS and leaching kinetic. The results show that the dealkalization rate reached 82% under the condition of roasting temperature of 700 °C, roasting time of 30 min, four stage water leaching, liquid to solid ratio of 7 mL/g, leaching temperature of 90 °C and reaction time of 60 min. The diffraction peak of Na{sub 6}CaAl{sub 6}Si{sub 6}(CO{sub 3})O{sub 24}·2H{sub 2}O in red mud was decreased during the active roasting process, whereas the mineral phases of NaOH·H{sub 2}O and Na{sub 2}Ca(CO{sub 3}){sub 2} were appeared. The content of alkali obviously decreased and the grade of other elements increased during the process of active roasting and water leaching, which was in favor of next application process of red mud. The water leaching was controlled by internal diffusion of SCM and the apparent activation energy was 22.63 kJ/mol.

  3. An active dealkalization of red mud with roasting and water leaching

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu, Xiaobo; Li, Wang; Guan, Xuemao

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • The dealkalization of active roasting and water leaching from red mud was put forward. • The main factors on dealkalization during active roasting and water leaching were investigated. • The mechanism of dealkalization from red mud was in-depth studied in the process. - Abstract: The research has focused on the dealkalization of red mud after active roasting and water leaching, which is obtained from bauxite during alumina production. The main factors such as roasting temperature, roasting time, water leaching stage, leaching temperature, leaching reaction time and liquid to solid ratio were investigated. The mechanism of dealkalization was in-depth studied by using ICP–AES, XRD, TG-DSC, SEM–EDS and leaching kinetic. The results show that the dealkalization rate reached 82% under the condition of roasting temperature of 700 °C, roasting time of 30 min, four stage water leaching, liquid to solid ratio of 7 mL/g, leaching temperature of 90 °C and reaction time of 60 min. The diffraction peak of Na 6 CaAl 6 Si 6 (CO 3 )O 24 ·2H 2 O in red mud was decreased during the active roasting process, whereas the mineral phases of NaOH·H 2 O and Na 2 Ca(CO 3 ) 2 were appeared. The content of alkali obviously decreased and the grade of other elements increased during the process of active roasting and water leaching, which was in favor of next application process of red mud. The water leaching was controlled by internal diffusion of SCM and the apparent activation energy was 22.63 kJ/mol

  4. Direct Causticizing for Black Liquor Gasification in a Circulating Fluidized Bed

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scott Sinquefield; Xiaoyan Zeng, Alan Ball

    2010-03-02

    Gasification of black liquor (BLG) has distinct advantages over direct combustion in Tomlinson recovery boilers. In this project we seek to resolve causticizing issues in order to make pressurized BLG even more efficient and cost-effective. One advantage of BLG is that the inherent partial separation of sulfur and sodium during gasification lends itself to the use of proven high yield variants to conventional kraft pulping which require just such a separation. Processes such as polysulfide, split sulfidity, ASAQ, and MSSAQ can increase pulp yield from 1% to 10% over conventional kraft but require varying degrees of sulfur/sodium separation, which requires additional [and costly] processing in a conventional Tomlinson recovery process. However during gasification, the sulfur is partitioned between the gas and smelt phases, while the sodium all leaves in the smelt; thus creating the opportunity to produce sulfur-rich and sulfur-lean white liquors for specialty pulping processes. A second major incentive of BLG is the production of a combustible product gas, rich in H2 and CO. This product gas (a.k.a. “syngas”) can be used in gas turbines for combined cycle power generation (which is twice as efficient as the steam cycle alone), or it can be used as a precursor to form liquid fuels, such as dimethyl ether or Fischer Tropsh diesel. There is drawback to BLG, which has the potential to become a third major incentive if this work is successful. The causticizing load is greater for gasification of black liquor than for combustion in a Tomlinson boiler. So implementing BLG in an existing mill would require costly increases to the causticizing capacity. In situ causticizing [within the gasifier] would handle the entire causticizing load and therefore eliminate the lime cycle entirely. Previous work by the author and others has shown that titanate direct causticizing (i.e. in situ) works quite well for high-temperature BLG (950°C), but was limited to pressures below

  5. Leaching of wood ash - Laboratory and field studies; Lakning av vedaska - Laboratorie- och faeltstudier

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Larsson, Per-Erik

    2012-02-15

    High forest production leads to diminishing amounts of base cations and micro nutrients in forest soils. This is due to uptake in, and harvest of, the trees. Losses can be compensated for by spreading stabilized wood ash on the forest ground, which means recycling of base cations and micro nutrients. Chemical composition of wood ash can easily be described by standard methods in the laboratory. However, this does not include the process of leaching in nature, such as which components and leaching rate for different compounds. During field conditions several factors are added, which are not available in the laboratory. After almost 10 years in the forest soils there still remains large quantities of the original product. Only 10-30 % of the wood ash products and 5 % of the lime product has been leached. In the laboratory study the leached amount was slightly larger, at the most 35 % for wood ash and 20 % for lime. Both studies indicate long time for weathering of the products in forest soils. Slower leaching rate from pellets of wood ash compared to leaching rate from crushed wood ash in the laboratory study is not verified by the field study. This indicates limited possibilities to control rates of leaching in the environment

  6. Study on trickle leaching of a high-grade uranium ore

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin Sirong; Gao Xizhen; Guo Erhua; Lu Shijie

    1996-01-01

    The trickle leaching process for a high-grade silicate uranium ore existing mainly as uraninite form has been studied. Two-stage counter-current trickle leaching with manganese dioxide as oxidant and ferric sulphate solution as leaching agent is used in the process. The leached solution which contains dissolved uranium and iron is carried back to the neutralizing stage and the iron is precipitated in this stage. The acid is added to the main stage and the precipitated iron is dissolved into Fe 2 (SO 4 ) 3 serving as lixiviant in the stage. Compared with conventional agitation acid leaching method, this process decreases the acid consumption by 21% and manganese dioxide by 29%, the extraction rate of uranium reduces by 1.86%

  7. Influencing factors and kinetics analysis on the leaching of iron from boron carbide waste-scrap with ultrasound-assisted method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xin; Xing, Pengfei; Du, Xinghong; Gao, Shuaibo; Chen, Chen

    2017-09-01

    In this paper, the ultrasound-assisted leaching of iron from boron carbide waste-scrap was investigated and the optimization of different influencing factors had also been performed. The factors investigated were acid concentration, liquid-solid ratio, leaching temperature, ultrasonic power and frequency. The leaching of iron with conventional method at various temperatures was also performed. The results show the maximum iron leaching ratios are 87.4%, 94.5% for 80min-leaching with conventional method and 50min-leaching with ultrasound assistance, respectively. The leaching of waste-scrap with conventional method fits the chemical reaction-controlled model. The leaching with ultrasound assistance fits chemical reaction-controlled model, diffusion-controlled model for the first stage and second stage, respectively. The assistance of ultrasound can greatly improve the iron leaching ratio, accelerate the leaching rate, shorten leaching time and lower the residual iron, comparing with conventional method. The advantages of ultrasound-assisted leaching were also confirmed by the SEM-EDS analysis and elemental analysis of the raw material and leached solid samples. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. The structure of leached sodium borosilicate glass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bunker, B.C.; Tallant, D.R.; Headley, T.J.; Turner, G.L.; Kirkpatrick, R.J.

    1988-01-01

    Raman spectroscopy, solid state 29 Si, 11 B, 17 O, and 23 Na nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, and transmission electron microscopy have been used to investigate how the structures of sodium borosilicate glasses change during leaching in water at pH 1, 9, and 12. Results show that the random network structure present prior to leaching is transformed into a network of small condensed ring structures and/or colloidal silica particles. The restructuring of leached glass can be rationalised on the basis of simple hydrolysis (depolymerisation) and condensation (repolymerisation) reactions involving Si-O-Si and Si-O-B bonds. The structural changes that occur during leaching influence the properties of the leached layer, including leaching kinetics, crazing and spalling, and slow crack growth. (author)

  9. Lead removal via soil washing and leaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, H. K.; Man, X. D.; Walsh, D. E.

    2001-12-01

    A soil washing and leaching process was tested for removing lead from soils. A soil-washing circuit, including size and gravity separations, was employed to remove the coarse metallic lead particles, while the leaching was applied to remove fine metallic lead particles and other lead species. The soil-washing tests proved that the metallic lead particles larger than 0.15 mm (100 mesh) could be effectively removed. The sodium-chloride-based leaching solution with ferric chloride or sodium hypochlorite as oxidants was adopted in the leaching. The leaching experimental results indicated that under the pH of 2 and Eh of 1,300 mV, the metallic lead particles smaller than 0.15 mm and other lead species can be dissolved in the leaching solution within 60 minutes.

  10. Ferric sulphate leaching process for uranium ore

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cai Ximin

    1990-09-01

    A process using the ferric sulphate solution as a leaching agent to the uranium ore which was exploited in the south part of Hunan province was studied. The ore mainly contains uraninite. Comparing with the conventional sulphuric acid leching method, this process reduced the acid consumption about 30∼40%, and dissolved solids 15∼20%. The ferric leaching agent can cyclically be used by the ferrous oxidant bacteria. From the results of six cycles, it indicated that the ferric leaching ageng does not interfere the leaching results of uranium

  11. A new Leaching System, Sheta Extractor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sheta, M.E.

    2008-01-01

    Moving of crushed solid ores against leaching solution in a continuous countercurrent arises a true technical problem. This invented system introduces a practical solution for such problem. Inside the system, the crushed ore is driving against gravity, whereas the leaching solution moves in the opposite direction. Contact between the two phases occurs with gentle stirring. After contact, discharging of the processed phases takes place automatically out the system. The system was investigated for uranium leaching from a coarse grained fraction (+2 --- -- -30 mm) of uranium mineralized granite sample. Uranium leaching percent reached to nearly 50% using sulfuric acid

  12. Heap leaching procedure for the Uranium extraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shishahbore, M. R.

    2002-01-01

    Heap leaching of Uranium ores is currently in use in several countries. Before taking any decision for construction of heap in industrial scale, it is necessary to obtain the main factors that influence the heap leaching process, such as acid construction, acid solution flowrate, temperature of reaction, or size, ration of liquid to solid, permeability and suitable oxidant. To achieve the above parameters, small scale column leaching is usually recommended. In this project column leaching were carried out in 6 plexiglass column with 43.5 cm an height and 7.4 cm inner diameter. In each column closely 2.00 kg Uranium ore were leached by sulfuric acid. Leaching operation on Iranian ores from two different anomalies from the same area were investigated. In this project, six column were leached at different flowrate of eluent and effect of oxidant were investigated. Acid consumption were in the range of 60 - 144 kg per ton ore and recovery between 73.07% - 99.97%. Finally according to the results obtained, investigated that over are suitable to heap leaching technique. Al tough, to enforce of heap leaching project need to more experiments

  13. Leaching kinetics of bottom ash waste as a source of calcium ions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koech, Lawrence; Everson, Ray; Neomagus, Hein; Rutto, Hilary

    2015-02-01

    Bottom ash is a waste material from coal-fired power plants, and it is known to contain elements that are potentially toxic at high concentration levels when disposed in landfills. This study investigates the use of bottom ash as a partial substitute sorbent for wet flue gas desulfurization (FGD) processes by focusing on its leaching kinetics in adipic acid. This was studied basing on the shrinking core model that was applied to the experimental data obtained by the authors presented at the International Conference on Industrial, Manufacturing, Automation and Mechanical Engineering, Johannesburg, South Africa, November 27-28, 2013) on dissolution of bottom ash. The leaching rate constant was obtained from different reaction variables, namely, temperature, pH, acid concentration, and solid-to-liquid ratio, that could affect the leaching process. The solid sample of bottom ash was characterized at different leaching periods using X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). It was found that solid-to-liquid ratio had a significant effect on the leaching rate constant when compared with other variables. The leaching kinetics showed that diffusion through the product layer was the rate-controlling step during leaching, and the activation energy for the process was found to be 18.92 kJ/mol.

  14. Estimated water requirements for gold heap-leach operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bleiwas, Donald I.

    2012-01-01

    This report provides a perspective on the amount of water necessary for conventional gold heap-leach operations. Water is required for drilling and dust suppression during mining, for agglomeration and as leachate during ore processing, to support the workforce (requires water in potable form and for sanitation), for minesite reclamation, and to compensate for water lost to evaporation and leakage. Maintaining an adequate water balance is especially critical in areas where surface and groundwater are difficult to acquire because of unfavorable climatic conditions [arid conditions and (or) a high evaporation rate]; where there is competition with other uses, such as for agriculture, industry, and use by municipalities; and where compliance with regulatory requirements may restrict water usage. Estimating the water consumption of heap-leach operations requires an understanding of the heap-leach process itself. The task is fairly complex because, although they all share some common features, each gold heap-leach operation is unique. Also, estimating the water consumption requires a synthesis of several fields of science, including chemistry, ecology, geology, hydrology, and meteorology, as well as consideration of economic factors.

  15. Comparative studies on acid leaching of zinc waste materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudnik, Ewa; Włoch, Grzegorz; Szatan, Leszek

    2017-11-01

    Three industrial waste materials were characterized in terms of their elemental and phase compositions, leaching behaviour in 10% sulfuric acid solution as well as leaching thermal effects. Slag from melting of mixed metallic scrap contained about 50% Zn and 10% Pb. It consisted mainly of various oxides and oxy-chlorides of metals. Zinc spray metallizing dust contained about 77% Zn in form of zinc and/or zinc-iron oxides, zinc metal and Zn-Fe intermetallic. Zinc ash from hot dip galvanizing was a mixture of zinc oxide, metallic zinc and zinc hydroxide chloride and contained about 80% Zn. Dissolution efficiency of zinc from the first material was 80% (independently on the solid to liquid ratio, 50–150 kg/m3), while decrease of the efficacy from 80% to 60% with increased solid to liquid ratio for the two remaining materials was observed. Both increase in the temperature (20 °C to 35 °C) and agitation rate (300 rpm to 900 rpm) did not improve seriously the leaching results. In all cases, transfer of zinc ions to the leachate was accompanied by different levels of solution contamination, depending on the type of the waste. Leaching of the materials was exothermic with the similar reaction heats for two high oxide-type products (slag, zinc ash) and higher values for the spray metallizing dust.

  16. K-Area Acid/Caustic Basin Groundwater Monitoring Report. Fourth Quarter 1994

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chase, J.A.

    1995-03-01

    During fourth quarter 1994, samples from the KAC monitoring wells at the K-Area Acid/Caustic Basin were collected and analyzed for herbicides/pesticides, indicator parameters, metals, nitrate, radionuclide indicators, and other constituents. Monitoring results that exceeded the final Primary Drinking Water Standards (PDWS), other Savannah River Site (SRS) Flag 2 criteria, or the SRS turbidity standard are provided in this report

  17. IMAGE-PLANE ANALYSIS OF n-POINT-MASS LENS CRITICAL CURVES AND CAUSTICS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Danek, Kamil; Heyrovský, David

    2015-01-01

    The interpretation of gravitational microlensing events caused by planetary systems or multiple stars is based on the n-point-mass lens model. The first planets detected by microlensing were well described by the two-point-mass model of a star with one planet. By the end of 2014, four events involving three-point-mass lenses had been announced. Two of the lenses were stars with two planetary companions each; two were binary stars with a planet orbiting one component. While the two-point-mass model is well understood, the same cannot be said for lenses with three or more components. Even the range of possible critical-curve topologies and caustic geometries of the three-point-mass lens remains unknown. In this paper we provide new tools for mapping the critical-curve topology and caustic cusp number in the parameter space of n-point-mass lenses. We perform our analysis in the image plane of the lens. We show that all contours of the Jacobian are critical curves of re-scaled versions of the lens configuration. Utilizing this property further, we introduce the cusp curve to identify cusp-image positions on all contours simultaneously. In order to track cusp-number changes in caustic metamorphoses, we define the morph curve, which pinpoints the positions of metamorphosis-point images along the cusp curve. We demonstrate the usage of both curves on simple two- and three-point-mass lens examples. For the three simplest caustic metamorphoses we illustrate the local structure of the image and source planes

  18. A multipoint analysis method of caustics adapted to digital image processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sohier, L.; Cottron, M.; Lagarde, A.

    1992-01-01

    The multipoint analysis method developed by Zachary and his coworkers for the determination of stress intensity factors in opaque or transparent (optically isotropic) cracked plates, is extended to the study of birefringent specimens. The coupling of this numerical technique with the use of a digital image processing, allows an accurate, quick and quasi-automatic analysis of the caustics. It is shown that this developed method provides good results obtained from simulated and experimental studies. (orig.)

  19. Can microlensing fold caustics reveal a second stellar limb-darkening coefficient?

    OpenAIRE

    Dominik, M.

    2004-01-01

    Dense high-precision photometry of microlensed stars during a fold-caustic passage can be used to reveal their intensity profiles from which the temperature of the stellar atmosphere as function of fractional radius can be derived. While the capabilities of current microlensing follow-up campaigns such as PLANET allow a precise measurement of linear limb-darkening coefficients, the residual signal of a second coefficient characterizing square-root limb darkening is ~ 25 times smaller which pr...

  20. Spatial Variation Scales of Rainfall Characteristics and Bromide Leaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wendroth, O. O.; Vasquez, V.; Matocha, C.

    2010-12-01

    Amount and intensity of rainfall are known as important characteristics that affect the leaching of surface-applied agri-chemicals. Besides these, the effect of the time interval between a fertilizer, pesticide or tracer application and subsequent rainfall on solute leaching is not well understood. Moreover, little is known about the spatial representativity of the solute concentration based on a relatively small soil sample in field-scale transport studies. To know the spatial representativity of a solute concentration sample at a time is crucial for analyzing solute leaching behavior over time as well as over space. The objectives of this study were to identify the impact of rainfall intensity and amount as well as the application time delay on solute transport in a well-drained Maury silt loam soil. Moreover, an experimental design and protocol had to be developed that exhibited spatial variability structure and representativity of bromide concentration. For this purpose, the variation scale of each of the factors investigated was chosen differently to apply frequency domain statistics. The study was conducted in a Maury silt loam soil at the University of Kentucky, College of Agriculture Experimental Farm Spindletop. Along a 64-m transect, 32 plots each 2-m long and 4-m wide were established. The three different treatments were spatially laid out in sinusoidal patterns at three respective wavelengths. Two different rainfall amounts were applied in blocks of eight consecutive plots, hence a wavelength of 32 m. These two different rainfall amounts were applied at four rates, spatially distributed in two waves each of 16 m length. Individual plots received the irrigation at specific times after the tracer had been applied. Four application delay times were chosen, hence the wavelength for this treatment was 8 m. Bromide concentration was measured for soil samples that were taken with a percussion auger at every 50 cm distance along the 64-m-transect. Auger cores

  1. The Efficacy of Mesenchymal Stem Cell Transplantation in Caustic Esophagus Injury: An Experimental Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Murat Kantarcioglu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Ingestion of corrosive substances may lead to stricture formation in esophagus as a late complication. Full thickness injury seems to exterminate tissue stem cells of esophagus. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs can differentiate into specific cell lineages and have the capacity of homing in sites of injury. Aim and Methods. We aimed to investigate the efficacy of MSC transplantation, on prevention of esophageal damage and stricture formation after caustic esophagus injury in rats. 54 rats were allocated into four groups; 4 rats were sacrificed for MSC production. Group 1, untreated controls (n: 10. Group 2, membrane labeled MSCs-treated rats (n: 20. Group 3, biodistribution of fluorodeoxyglucose labeled MSCs via positron emission tomography (PET imaging (n: 10. Group 4, sham operated (n: 10. Standard caustic esophageal burns were created and MSCs were transplanted 24 hours after. All rats were sacrificed at the 21st days. Results. PET scan images revealed the homing behavior of MSCs to the injury site. The histopathology damage score was not significantly different from controls. However, we demonstrated Dil labeled epithelial and muscle cells which were originating from transplanted MSCs. Conclusion. MSC transplantation after caustic esophageal injury may be a helpful treatment modality; however, probably repeated infusions are needed.

  2. Gravitational microlensing - Powerful combination of ray-shooting and parametric representation of caustics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wambsganss, J.; Witt, H. J.; Schneider, P.

    1992-01-01

    We present a combination of two very different methods for numerically calculating the effects of gravitational microlensing: the backward-ray-tracing that results in two-dimensional magnification patterns, and the parametric representation of caustic lines; they are in a way complementary to each other. The combination of these methods is much more powerful than the sum of its parts. It allows to determine the total magnification and the number of microimages as a function of source position. The mean number of microimages is calculated analytically and compared to the numerical results. The peaks in the lightcurves, as obtained from one-dimensional tracks through the magnification pattern, can now be divided into two groups: those which correspond to a source crossing a caustic, and those which are due to sources passing outside cusps. We determine the frequencies of those two types of events as a function of the surface mass density, and the probability distributions of their magnitudes. We find that for low surface mass density as many as 40 percent of all events in a lightcurve are not due to caustic crossings, but rather due to passings outside cusps.

  3. The economic pre-treatment of coal mine drainage water with caustic and ozone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyden, B H; Nador, L; Addleman, S; Jeston, L

    2017-09-01

    Coal mine drainage waters are low in pH with varying amounts of iron and manganese and are generally brackish. The Austar Coal Mine in NSW, Australia, sought alternatives to their current lime dosing as the pre-treatment before the downstream reverse osmosis plant. Undesirable operating aspects of the current system include manganese and gypsum scaling/fouling, the need for anti-scalants and reduced water recovery. Thirteen processes for acid mine drainage were initially considered. The preferred process of caustic and ozone for Mn(II) oxidation was pilot tested at up to 0.74 kL/hr at the mine site. Under proper conditions and no aeration, about 81 per cent of the Fe could be removed (initially at 156 mg/L) as green rust. Supplemental aeration followed first-order kinetics and allowed 99.9 per cent Fe(II) oxidation and removal but only with a hydraulic residence time of about 47 minutes. The addition of supplemental Cu catalyst improved Fe removal. Ozone applied after caustic was effective in stoichiometrically oxidising recalcitrant Mn(II) and any remaining Fe(II). Control of the ozonation was achieved using the oxidation reduction potential during oxidation of the Mn(II) species. The use of caustic, followed by ozone, proved economically comparable to the current lime pre-treatment.

  4. Cost benefit of caustic recycle for tank waste remediation at the Hanford and Savannah River Sites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DeMuth, S.

    1998-01-01

    The potential cost savings due to the use of caustic recycle used in conjunction with remediation of radioactive underground storage tank waste, is shown in a figure for the Hanford and Savannah River sites. Two cost savings estimates for each case have been made for Hanford, and one cost savings estimate for each case have been made for Hanford, and one cost savings estimate for each case has been made for the Savannah River site. This is due to the Hanford site remediation effort being less mature than that of Savannah River; and consequently, a range of cost savings being more appropriate for Hanford. This range of cost savings (rather than a ingle value) for each case at Hanford is due to cost uncertainties related to the LAW immobilization operation. Caustic recycle Case-1 has been defined as the sodium required to meet al identified caustic needs for the entire Site. Case-2 has been defined as the maximum sodium which can be separated from the low activity waste without precipitation of Al(OH) 3 . It has been determined that the potential cost savings at Hanford ranges from $194 M to $215 M for Case-1, and $293 M to $324 M for Case-2. The potential cost savings at Savannah River are $186 M for Case-1 and $281 M for Case-2. A discussion of the uncertainty associated with these cost savings estimates can be found in the Discussion and Conclusions section

  5. Study on copper kinetics in processing sulphide ore mixed with copper and zinc with sulfuric acid leaching under pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen-bo, LUO; Ji-kun, WANG; Yin, GAN

    2018-01-01

    Sulphide ore mixed with copper and zinc is processed with pressure acid leaching. Research is conducted on the copper kinetic. The stirring rate is set at 600 rpm which could eliminate the influence of external diffusions. Research is conducted on the factors affecting the copper leaching kinetic are temperature, pressure, concentration of sulfuric acid, particle size. The result shows that the apparent activity energy is 50.7 KJ/mol. We could determine that the copper leaching process is shrinking core model of chemical reaction control and work out the leaching equation.

  6. Study on Leaching of Hexavalent Chromium from Hardened Concretes Using Tank Leaching Test

    OpenAIRE

    Takahashi, Shigeru; Sakai, Etsuo; Sugiyama, Takafumi

    2007-01-01

    Tank leaching tests were carried out to investigate the behavior of leaching trace elements from monolith samples. This study consists of two series, and the trace element used was hexavalent chromium. In Series I, the influence of the leachant/surface area of the specimen (L/S ratio) on the leaching amount was investigated. The leaching amount was found to increase with the amount of worked water. This shows that any L/S ratio can be selected in the tank leaching test. In Series II, th...

  7. Vat leaching of gold ores and utilization of the tailings; Kinkoseki no vat leaching to koshi no yuko riyo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hosooka, T. [Nippon Clay Mining Co. Ltd., Tokyo (Japan); Miyagawa, H. [Mitsui Mining and Smelting Co. Ltd., Tokyo (Japan)

    1996-01-25

    Mitsui Kushikino Mine previously processed two gold ores from Kushikino and Iwato ore deposits by the all slime cyanidation method, where the ores were ground to fine size smaller than 75 {mu}m and leached with sodium, cyanide. A large amount of slimes were produced as waste and discarded in tailings ponds. To save the costs of grinding and waste treatment it is desirable to process coarse sized ores. The Iwato ore is gold and silver bearing silicified porous rock. As most gold and silver in the Iwato ore are concentrated in the pores, leaching of coarse sized ore is expected to be possible. Laboratory tests and pilot plant tests of vat leaching for the Iwato ore were carried out using 0.15-8.0 mm feed. These results showed that the gold dissolution rate was similar to that by the all slime cyanidation and the decrease in gold recovery was a few %. The properties of these tailings can be used in fine aggregate of concrete. Based on the results vat leaching of the Iwato ore was adopted in the plant. The tailings are sold and used as fine aggregate. Utilization of slime tailings from the other ores was also developed and they are used as flux in copper smelters. Now, there is no tailings pond at Mitsui Kushikino Mine. 9 refs., 10 figs., 5 tabs.

  8. Leaching of biocides from building facades: Upscaling of a local two-region leaching model to the city scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coutu, S.; Rota, C.; Rossi, L.; Barry, D. A.

    2011-12-01

    Facades are protected by paints that contain biocides as protection against degradation. These biocides are leached by rainfall (albeit at low concentrations). At the city scale, however, the surface area of building facades is significant, and leached biocides are a potential environmental risk to receiving waters. A city-scale biocide-leaching model was developed based on two main steps. In the first step, laboratory experiments on a single facade were used to calibrate and validate a 1D, two-region phenomenological model of biocide leaching. The same data set was analyzed independently by another research group who found empirically that biocide leachate breakthrough curves were well represented by a sum of two exponentials. Interestingly, the two-region model was found analytically to reproduce this functional form as a special case. The second step in the method is site-specific, and involves upscaling the validated single facade model to a particular city. In this step, (i) GIS-based estimates of facade heights and areas are deduced using the city's cadastral data, (ii) facade flow is estimated using local meteorological data (rainfall, wind direction) and (iii) paint application rates are modeled as a stochastic process based on manufacturers' recommendations. The methodology was applied to Lausanne, Switzerland, a city of about 200,000 inhabitants. Approximately 30% of the annually applied mass of biocides was estimated to be released to the environment.

  9. Successful trials on pressure leaching of uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pendreigh, R.

    1978-01-01

    High pressure leaching can increase uranium extraction from some low grade ores by ten per cent, and Anglo American Corporation's eighteen months of pilot plant tests point the way to commercial application. Interest in pressure leaching of uranium has been renewed with the recent increase in uranium and gold prices and costs of reagents

  10. Leach tests on grouts made with actual and trace metal-spiked synthetic phosphate/sulfate waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Serne, R.J.; Martin, W.J.; LeGore, V.L.; Lindenmeier, C.W.; McLaurine, S.B.; Martin, P.F.C.; Lokken, R.O.

    1989-10-01

    Pacific Northwest Laboratory conducted experiments to produce empirical leach rate data for phosphate-sulfate waste (PSW) grout. Effective diffusivities were measured for various radionuclides ( 90 Sr, 99 Tc, 14 C, 129 I, 137 Cs, 60 Co, 54 Mn, and U), stable major components (NO 3 - , SO 4 2- , H 3 BO 3 , K and Na) and the trace constituents Ag, As, Cd, Hg, Pb, and Se. Two types of leach tests were used on samples of actual PSW grout and synthetic PSW grout: the American Nuclear Society (ANS) 16.1 intermittent replacement leach test and a static leach test. Grout produced from both synthetic and real PSW showed low leach rates for the trace metal constituents and most of the waste radionuclides. Many of the spiked trace metals and radionuclides were not detected in any leachates. None of the effluents contained measurable quantities of 137 Cs, 60 Co, 54 Mn, 109 Cd, 51 Cr, 210 Pb, 203 Hg, or As. For those trace species with detectable leach rates, 125 I appeared to have the greatest leach rate, followed by 99 Tc, 75 Se, and finally U, 14 C, and 110m Ag. Leach rates for nitrate are between those for I and Tc, but there is much scatter in the nitrate data because of the very low nitrate inventory. 32 refs., 6 figs., 15 tabs

  11. Use of Polyphosphate to Decrease Uranium Leaching in Hanford 300 Area Smear Zone Sediments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Szecsody, James E.; Zhong, Lirong; Oostrom, Martinus; Vermeul, Vincent R.; Fruchter, Jonathan S.; Williams, Mark D.

    2012-09-30

    The primary objective of this study is to summarize the laboratory investigations performed to evaluate short- and long-term effects of phosphate treatment on uranium leaching from 300 area smear zone sediments. Column studies were used to compare uranium leaching in phosphate-treated to untreated sediments over a year with multiple stop flow events to evaluate longevity of the uranium leaching rate and mass. A secondary objective was to compare polyphosphate injection, polyphosphate/xanthan injection, and polyphosphate infiltration technologies that deliver phosphate to sediment.

  12. Porous glass with high silica content for nuclear waste storage : preparation, characterization and leaching

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aegerter, M.A.; Santos, D.I. dos; Ventura, P.C.S.

    1984-01-01

    Aqueous solutions simulating radioactive nuclear wastes (like Savanah River Laboratory) were incorporated in porous glass matrix with high silica content prepared by decomposition of borosilicate glass like Na 2 O - B 2 O 3 - SiO 2 . After sintering, the samples were submitted, during 28 days, to standard leaching tests MCC1, MCC5 (Soxhlet) and stagnating. The total weight loss, ph, as well as the integral and differential leaching rates and the accumulated concentrations in the leach of Si, Na, B, Ca, Mn, Al, Fe and Ni. The results are compared with the results from reference borosilicate glass, made by fusion, ceramic, synroc, concrets, etc... (E.G.) [pt

  13. Corrosion Study of Super Ferritic Stainless Steel UNS S44660 (26Cr-3Ni-3Mo) and Several Other Stainless Steel Grades (UNS S31603, S32101, and S32205) in Caustic Solution Containing Sodium Sulfide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chasse, Kevin R.; Singh, Preet M.

    2013-11-01

    Electrochemical techniques, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) were used in this study to show how the corrosion mechanism of several commercial grades of stainless steel in hot caustic solution is strongly influenced by the presence of sodium sulfide. Experimental results from super ferritic stainless steel UNS S44660 (26Cr-3Ni-3Mo) were compared to austenitic stainless steel UNS S31603, lean duplex stainless steel (DSS) UNS S32101, and standard DSS UNS S32205 in caustic solution, with and without sodium sulfide, at 443 K (170 °C). Weight loss measurements indicated that corrosion rates of UNS44660 were much lower than the other grades of stainless steel in the presence of the sodium sulfide. Potentiodynamic polarization and linear polarization resistance measurements showed that the electrochemical behavior was altered by the adhesion of sulfur species, which reduced the polarization resistances and increased the anodic current densities. SEM and XPS results imply that the surface films that formed in caustic solution containing sodium sulfide were defective due to the adsorption of sulfide, which destabilized the passive film and led to the formation of insoluble metal sulfide compounds.

  14. Leaching of nano-ZnO in municipal solid waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sakallioglu, T.; Bakirdoven, M.; Temizel, I. [Institute of Environmental Sciences, Bogazici University, 34342 Istanbul (Turkey); Demirel, B., E-mail: burak.demirel@boun.edu.tr [Institute of Environmental Sciences, Bogazici University, 34342 Istanbul (Turkey); Copty, N.K.; Onay, T.T.; Uyguner Demirel, C.S. [Institute of Environmental Sciences, Bogazici University, 34342 Istanbul (Turkey); Karanfil, T. [Environmental Engineering and Earth Science, Clemson University, Clemson, SC 29634 (United States)

    2016-11-05

    Highlights: • Leaching potential of 3 different types of nano-ZnO in real fresh MSW was investigated. • Batch tests were conducted at different pH, ionic strength and ZnO concentrations. • Most of the added nano-ZnO mass was retained within the solid waste matrix. • The pH and IS conditions did not significantly influence the leaching behavior of ZnO. • A kinetic particle deposition/detachment model was developed to analyze ZnO behavior. - Abstract: Despite widespread use of engineered nanomaterials (ENMs) in commercial products and their potential disposal in landfills, the fate of ENMs in solid waste environments are still not well understood. In this study, the leaching behavior of nano ZnO -one of the most used ENMs- in fresh municipal solid waste (MSW) was investigated. Batch reactors containing municipal solid waste samples were spiked with three different types of nano ZnO having different surface stabilization. The leaching of ZnO was examined under acidic, basic and elevated ionic strength (IS) conditions. The results of the 3-day batch tests showed that the percent of the added nano-ZnO mass retained within the solid waste matrix ranged between 80% and 93% on average for the three types of nano-ZnO tested. The pH and IS conditions did not significantly influence the leaching behavior of ZnO. To further analyze the behavior of ZnO in the MSW matrix, a kinetic particle deposition/detachment model was developed. The model was able to reproduce the main trends of the batch experiments. Reaction rate constants for the batch tests ranged from 0.01 to 0.4 1/hr, reflecting the rapid deposition of nano-ZnO within the MSW matrix.

  15. Pesticide sorption and leaching potential on three Hawaiian soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Kathleen E; Ray, Chittaranjan; Ki, Seo Jin; Spokas, Kurt A; Koskinen, William C

    2015-08-15

    On the Hawaiian Islands, groundwater is the principal source of potable water and contamination of this key resource by pesticides is of great concern. To evaluate the leaching potential of four weak acid herbicides [aminocyclopyrachlor, picloram, metsulfuron-methyl, biologically active diketonitrile degradate of isoxaflutole (DKN)] and two neutral non-ionizable herbicides [oxyfluorfen, alachlor], their sorption coefficients were determined on three prevalent soils from the island of Oahu. Metsulfuron-methyl, aminocylcopyrachlor, picloram, and DKN were relatively low sorbing herbicides (K(oc) = 3-53 mL g(-1)), alachlor was intermediate (K(oc) = 120-150 mL g(-1)), and oxyfluorfen sorbed very strongly to the three soils (K(oc) > 12,000 mL g(-1)). Following determination of K(oc) values, the groundwater ubiquity score (GUS) indices for these compounds were calculated to predicted their behavior with the Comprehensive Leaching Risk Assessment System (CLEARS; Tier-1 methodology for Hawaii). Metsulfuron-methyl, aminocyclopyrachlor, picloram, and DKN would be categorized as likely leachers in all three Hawaiian soils, indicating a high risk of groundwater contamination across the island of Oahu. In contrast, oxyfluorfen, regardless of the degradation rate, would possess a low and acceptable leaching risk due to its high sorption on all three soils. The leaching potential of alachlor was more difficult to classify, with a GUS value between 1.8 and 2.8. In addition, four different biochar amendments to these soils did not significantly alter their sorption capacities for aminocyclopyrachlor, indicating a relatively low impact of black carbon additions from geologic volcanic inputs of black carbon. Due to the fact that pesticide environmental risks are chiefly dependent on local soil characteristics, this work has demonstrated that once soil specific sorption parameters are known one can assess the potential pesticide leaching risks. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  16. Leaching behavior of copper from waste printed circuit boards with Brønsted acidic ionic liquid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Jinxiu; Chen, Mengjun, E-mail: kyling@swust.edu.cn; Chen, Haiyan; Chen, Shu; Sun, Quan

    2014-02-15

    Highlights: • A Brønsted acidic ILs was used to leach Cu from WPCBs for the first time. • The particle size of WPCBs has significant influence on Cu leaching rate. • Cu leaching rate was higher than 99% under the optimum leaching conditions. • The leaching process can be modeled with shrinking core model, and the E{sub a} was 25.36 kJ/mol. - Abstract: In this work, a Brønsted acidic ionic liquid, 1-butyl-3-methyl-imidazolium hydrogen sulfate ([bmim]HSO{sub 4}), was used to leach copper from waste printed circuit boards (WPCBs, mounted with electronic components) for the first time, and the leaching behavior of copper was discussed in detail. The results showed that after the pre-treatment, the metal distributions were different with the particle size: Cu, Zn and Al increased with the increasing particle size; while Ni, Sn and Pb were in the contrary. And the particle size has significant influence on copper leaching rate. Copper leaching rate was higher than 99%, almost 100%, when 1 g WPCBs powder was leached under the optimum conditions: particle size of 0.1–0.25 mm, 25 mL 80% (v/v) ionic liquid, 10 mL 30% hydrogen peroxide, solid/liquid ratio of 1/25, 70 °C and 2 h. Copper leaching by [bmim]HSO{sub 4} can be modeled with the shrinking core model, controlled by diffusion through a solid product layer, and the kinetic apparent activation energy has been calculated to be 25.36 kJ/mol.

  17. Leach test methodology for the Waste/Rock Interactions Technology Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bradley, D.J.; McVay, G.L.; Coles, D.G.

    1980-05-01

    Experimental leach studies in the WRIT Program have two primary functions. The first is to determine radionuclide release from waste forms in laboratory environments which attempt to simulate repository conditions. The second is to elucidate leach mechanisms which can ultimately be incorporated into nearfield transport models. The tests have been utilized to generate rates of removal of elements from various waste forms and to provide specimens for surface analysis. Correlation between constituents released to the solution and corresponding solid state profiles is invaluable in the development of a leach mechanism. Several tests methods are employed in our studies which simulate various proposed leach incident scenarios. Static tests include low temperature (below 100 0 C) and high temperature (above 100 0 C) hydrothermal tests. These tests reproduce nonflow or low-flow repository conditions and can be used to compare materials and leach solution effects. The dynamic tests include single-pass, continuous-flow(SPCF) and solution-change (IAA)-type tests in which the leach solutions are changed at specific time intervals. These tests simulate repository conditions of higher flow rates and can also be used to compare materials and leach solution effects under dynamic conditions. The modified IAEA test is somewhat simpler to use than the one-pass flow and gives adequate results for comparative purposes. The static leach test models the condition of near-zero flow in a repository and provides information on element readsorption and solubility limits. The SPCF test is used to study the effects of flowing solutions at velocities that may be anticipated for geologic groundwaters within breached repositories. These two testing methods, coupled with the use of autoclaves, constitute the current thrust of WRIT leach testing

  18. The wire optical test: a thorough analytical study in and out of caustic surface, and advantages of a dynamical adaptation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alejandro Juárez-Reyes, Salvador; Sosa-Sánchez, Citlalli Teresa; Silva-Ortigoza, Gilberto; de Jesús Cabrera-Rosas, Omar; Espíndola-Ramos, Ernesto; Ortega-Vidals, Paula

    2018-03-01

    Among the best known non-interferometric optical tests are the wire test, the Foucault test and Ronchi test with a low frequency grating. Since the wire test is the seed to understand the other ones, the aim of the present work is to do a thorough study of this test for a lens with symmetry of revolution and to do this study for any configuration of the object and detection planes where both planes could intersect: two, one or no branches of the caustic region (including the marginal and paraxial foci). To this end, we calculated the vectorial representation for the caustic region, and we found the analytical expression for the pattern; we report that the analytical pattern explicitly depends on the magnitude of a branch of the caustic. With the analytical pattern we computed a set of simulations of a dynamical adaptation of the optical wire test. From those simulations, we have done a thorough analysis of the topological structure of the pattern; so we explain how the multiple image formation process and the image collapse process take place for each configuration, in particular, when both the wire and the detection planes are placed inside the caustic region, which has not been studied before. For the first time, we remark that not only the intersections of the object and detection planes with the caustic are important in the change of pattern topology; but also the projection of the intersection between the caustic and the object plane mapped onto the detection plane; and the virtual projection of the intersection between the caustic and the detection plane mapped onto the object plane. We present that for the new configurations of the optical system, the wire image is curves of the Tschirnhausen’s cubic, the piriform and the deformed eight-curve types.

  19. Corrosion of carbon steel in oxidizing caustic solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Divine, J.R.; Bowen, W.M.

    1984-01-01

    A series of tests have been completed on a range of proposed waste compositions at temperatures up to 100 0 C. These tests have sought data on uniform corrosion, pitting, and stress corrosion cracking. No indication of the latter two types of corrosion was observed within the test matrix. Corrosion rates after four months were generally below 25μm/y. By the end of twelve months all results, except for very concentrated mixtures, were below 13 μm/y. Prediction equations were generated from a model fitted to the data. The equations provide a rapid means of estimating the corrosion rate for waste compositions and temperatures within the test limits

  20. Leaching characteristics of calcium-based compounds in MSWI Residues: From the viewpoint of clogging risk

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xia, Yi; Zhang, Hua; Phoungthong, Khamphe; Shi, Dong-Xiao; Shen, Wen-Hui; Shao, Li-Ming; He, Pin-Jing

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • The leaching behavior of Ca-based compounds commonly in MSWI residues was studied. • pH is the crucial factor for calcium leaching process. • CaCO 3 was the most sensitive to leaching temperature and Ca 3 (PO 4 ) 2 was the least. • Ca leaching of MSWIBA and SAPCR attributed to CaCO 3 and Ca 3 (PO 4 ) 2 respectively. • Potential clogging ability of MSWI residues leachate in open air was calculated. - Abstract: Leachate collection system (LCS) clogging caused by calcium precipitation would be disadvantageous to landfill stability and operation. Meanwhile, calcium-based compounds are the main constituents in both municipal solid waste incineration bottom ash (MSWIBA) and stabilized air pollution control residues (SAPCR), which would increase the risk of LCS clogging once these calcium-rich residues were disposed in landfills. The leaching behaviors of calcium from the four compounds and municipal solid waste incineration (MSWI) residues were studied, and the influencing factors on leaching were discussed. The results showed that pH was the crucial factor in the calcium leaching process. CaCO 3 and CaSiO 3 began leaching when the leachate pH decreased to less than 7 and 10, respectively, while Ca 3 (PO 4 ) 2 leached at pH < 12. CaSO 4 could hardly dissolve in the experimental conditions. Moreover, the sequence of the leaching rate for the different calcium-based compounds is as follows: CaSiO 3 > Ca 3 (PO 4 ) 2 > CaCO 3 . The calcium leaching from the MSWIBA and SAPCR separately started from pH < 7 and pH < 12, resulting from CaCO 3 and Ca 3 (PO 4 ) 2 leaching respectively, which was proven by the X-ray diffraction results. Based on the leaching characteristics of the different calcium compounds and the mineral phase of calcium in the incineration residues, simulated computation of their clogging potential was conducted, providing the theoretical basis for the risk assessment pertaining to LCS clogging in landfills

  1. Leaching characteristics of calcium-based compounds in MSWI Residues: From the viewpoint of clogging risk

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xia, Yi [State Key Laboratory of Pollution Control & Resource Reuse, Tongji University, Shanghai 200092 (China); Institute of Waste Treatment and Reclamation, Tongji University, Shanghai 200092 (China); Zhang, Hua, E-mail: zhanghua_tj@tongji.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Pollution Control & Resource Reuse, Tongji University, Shanghai 200092 (China); Phoungthong, Khamphe [State Key Laboratory of Pollution Control & Resource Reuse, Tongji University, Shanghai 200092 (China); Institute of Waste Treatment and Reclamation, Tongji University, Shanghai 200092 (China); Shi, Dong-Xiao; Shen, Wen-Hui [Changzhou Domestic Waste Treatment Center, Changzhou 213000 (China); Shao, Li-Ming [Institute of Waste Treatment and Reclamation, Tongji University, Shanghai 200092 (China); Center for the Technology Research and Training on Household Waste in Small Towns & Rural Area, Ministry of Housing and Urban–Rural Development of PR China (MOHURD), Shanghai 200092 (China); He, Pin-Jing, E-mail: solidwaste@tongji.edu.cn [Institute of Waste Treatment and Reclamation, Tongji University, Shanghai 200092 (China); Center for the Technology Research and Training on Household Waste in Small Towns & Rural Area, Ministry of Housing and Urban–Rural Development of PR China (MOHURD), Shanghai 200092 (China)

    2015-08-15

    Highlights: • The leaching behavior of Ca-based compounds commonly in MSWI residues was studied. • pH is the crucial factor for calcium leaching process. • CaCO{sub 3} was the most sensitive to leaching temperature and Ca{sub 3}(PO{sub 4}){sub 2} was the least. • Ca leaching of MSWIBA and SAPCR attributed to CaCO{sub 3} and Ca{sub 3}(PO{sub 4}){sub 2} respectively. • Potential clogging ability of MSWI residues leachate in open air was calculated. - Abstract: Leachate collection system (LCS) clogging caused by calcium precipitation would be disadvantageous to landfill stability and operation. Meanwhile, calcium-based compounds are the main constituents in both municipal solid waste incineration bottom ash (MSWIBA) and stabilized air pollution control residues (SAPCR), which would increase the risk of LCS clogging once these calcium-rich residues were disposed in landfills. The leaching behaviors of calcium from the four compounds and municipal solid waste incineration (MSWI) residues were studied, and the influencing factors on leaching were discussed. The results showed that pH was the crucial factor in the calcium leaching process. CaCO{sub 3} and CaSiO{sub 3} began leaching when the leachate pH decreased to less than 7 and 10, respectively, while Ca{sub 3}(PO{sub 4}){sub 2} leached at pH < 12. CaSO{sub 4} could hardly dissolve in the experimental conditions. Moreover, the sequence of the leaching rate for the different calcium-based compounds is as follows: CaSiO{sub 3} > Ca{sub 3}(PO{sub 4}){sub 2} > CaCO{sub 3}. The calcium leaching from the MSWIBA and SAPCR separately started from pH < 7 and pH < 12, resulting from CaCO{sub 3} and Ca{sub 3}(PO{sub 4}){sub 2} leaching respectively, which was proven by the X-ray diffraction results. Based on the leaching characteristics of the different calcium compounds and the mineral phase of calcium in the incineration residues, simulated computation of their clogging potential was conducted, providing the

  2. Leaching characteristics of calcium-based compounds in MSWI Residues: From the viewpoint of clogging risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Yi; Zhang, Hua; Phoungthong, Khamphe; Shi, Dong-Xiao; Shen, Wen-Hui; Shao, Li-Ming; He, Pin-Jing

    2015-08-01

    Leachate collection system (LCS) clogging caused by calcium precipitation would be disadvantageous to landfill stability and operation. Meanwhile, calcium-based compounds are the main constituents in both municipal solid waste incineration bottom ash (MSWIBA) and stabilized air pollution control residues (SAPCR), which would increase the risk of LCS clogging once these calcium-rich residues were disposed in landfills. The leaching behaviors of calcium from the four compounds and municipal solid waste incineration (MSWI) residues were studied, and the influencing factors on leaching were discussed. The results showed that pH was the crucial factor in the calcium leaching process. CaCO3 and CaSiO3 began leaching when the leachate pH decreased to less than 7 and 10, respectively, while Ca3(PO4)2 leached at pHleaching rate for the different calcium-based compounds is as follows: CaSiO3>Ca3(PO4)2>CaCO3. The calcium leaching from the MSWIBA and SAPCR separately started from pHleaching respectively, which was proven by the X-ray diffraction results. Based on the leaching characteristics of the different calcium compounds and the mineral phase of calcium in the incineration residues, simulated computation of their clogging potential was conducted, providing the theoretical basis for the risk assessment pertaining to LCS clogging in landfills. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Evaluation of six pesticides leaching indexes using field data of herbicide application in Casablanca Valley, Chile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kogan, M; Rojas, S; Gómez, P; Suárez, F; Muñoz, J F; Alister, C

    2007-01-01

    A field study was performed to evaluate the accuracy of six pesticide screening leaching indexes for herbicide movement. Adsorption, dissipation and soil movement were studied in a vineyard in a sandy loam soil during 2005 season. Simazine, diuron, pendimethalin, oxyfluorfen and flumioxazin were applied to bare soil at rates commonly used, and their soil concentrations throughout soil profile were determined at 0, 10, 20, 40 and 90 days after application (DAA). Herbicides were subjected to two pluviometric regimens, natural field condition and modified conditions (plus natural rainfall 180 mm). Leaching indexes utilized were: Briggs's Rf, Hamaker's Rf, LEACH, LPI, GUS and LIX. Simazine reached 120 cm, diuron 90 cm, flumioxazin 30 cm soil depth respectively. Pendimethalin and oxyfluorfen were retained up to 5 cm. None of the herbicides leaching was affected by rainfall regimen. Only flumioxazin field dissipation was clearly affected by pluviometric condition. The best representation of the herbicide soil depth movement and leaching below 15 cm soil depth were: Hamaker's Rf < Briggs's Rf < GUS < LPI, < LEACH < LIX. Field results showed a good correlation between herbicides K(d) and their soil depth movement and mass leached below 15 cm soil depth.

  4. LEACHING OF MALACHITE ORE IN AMMONIUM SULFATE SOLUTIONS AND PRODUCTION OF COPPER OXIDE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Ekmekyapar

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Malachite ore is one of the most important of oxidized copper ores. Copper production can be performed by using this ore. In this work, the leaching kinetics of malachite in ammonium sulfate solutions was investigated, and metallic copper was recovered by a cementation method from the resulting actual leach solution. Copper (II oxide was prepared by an isothermal oxidation method from the cement copper. In the leaching experiments, the effects of reaction temperature, particle size, and stirring speed on copper leaching from malachite ore were studied. In the cementation experiments, metallic zinc was used as the reductant metal to recover the copper from the solution. Thermal oxidation of cement copper was performed under isothermal conditions. It was found that the leaching rate increased with increasing stirring speed and temperature, and decreased with particle size. It was observed that the leaching reaction fit to diffusion through the product layer. The activation energy of the leaching process was determined to be 25.4 kJ/mol. It was determined that the copper content of the metallic product obtained by the cementation method increased up to 96%. It was found that copper oxide prepared from cement copper had a tenorite structure.

  5. F-Area Acid/Caustic Basin groundwater monitoring report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thompson, C.Y.

    1992-03-01

    This progress report for fourth quarter 1991 and 1992 summary from the Savannah River Plant includes discussion on the following topics: groundwater monitoring data; analytical results exceeding standards; upgradient versus downgradient results; turbidity results exceeding standards; water elevations, flow directions, and flow rates

  6. Erratum: Erratum to: Evaluation of Caustic Embrittlement Susceptibility of Steels by Slow Strain Rate Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh Raman, R. K.

    2017-11-01

    Due to an error by the author, the reference R.K. Singh Raman, A. Kouklan, and G.P. Simon: Proceedings (CDROM) Corrosion and Protection Conf., Perth, Australia, Paper no. 25, Australian Corrosion Association, 2004, pp. 1-6 should have been included in the list of references as well as cited as a source of the data in Figures 2-7 and Table I.

  7. Recovery of Iron from Pyrolusite Leaching Slag by a Lab-Scale Circulation Process of Oxalic Acid Leaching and Ultraviolet Irradiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Biao Deng

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Pyrolusite leaching slag is a Fe-containing slag generated from pyrolusite leaching process with SO2. Recovery of iron from the slag not only has economic benefit, but also prevents the secondary pollution to the environment. A novel lab-scale cyclic process for recovering iron from pyrolusite leaching slag was introduced. The process contains two steps: (1 iron was leached with oxalic acid and [Fe(C2O4n](3−2n+ solution was generated; (2 the [Fe(C2O4n](3−2n+ solution was irradiated by ultraviolet and ferrous oxalate precipitation were obtained. The effect of operation parameter on leaching and irradiation process were studied separately. In the leaching process, the optimal solid/liquid ratio, oxalic acid concentration, leaching temperature, stirring rate, and leaching time are 1:50, 0.40 mol/L, 95 °C, 300 r/min, and 3 h, respectively. In the irradiation process, the best irradiation wavelength, Fe/oxalic acid molar ratio and irradiation time are 254 nm, 1:4, and 30 min. Besides, a test of 9 continuous cycles was carried out and the performance and material balance of the combined process were investigated. The results showed that the cyclic process is entirely feasible and prove to be stable producing, and ferrous oxalate of 99.32% purity. Material balance indicated that 95.17% of iron was recovered in the form of FeC2O4·2H2O, and the recovery efficiency of oxalic acid was 58.52%.

  8. Characterization, Leaching, and Filtration Testing for Bismuth Phosphate Sludge (Group 1) and Bismuth Phosphate Saltcake (Group 2) Actual Waste Sample Composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lumetta, Gregg J.; Buck, Edgar C.; Daniel, Richard C.; Draper, Kathryn; Edwards, Matthew K.; Fiskum, Sandra K.; Hallen, Richard T.; Jagoda, Lynette K.; Jenson, Evan D.; Kozelisky, Anne E.; MacFarlan, Paul J.; Peterson, Reid A.; Shimskey, Rick W.; Sinkov, Sergey I.; Snow, Lanee A.

    2009-01-01

    A testing program evaluating actual tank waste was developed in response to Task 4 from the M-12 External Flowsheet Review Team (EFRT) issue response plan.() The test program was subdivided into logical increments. The bulk water-insoluble solid wastes that are anticipated to be delivered to the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) were identified according to type such that the actual waste testing could be targeted to the relevant categories. Eight broad waste groupings were defined. Samples available from the 222S archive were identified and obtained for testing. The actual waste-testing program included homogenizing the samples by group, characterizing the solids and aqueous phases, and performing parametric leaching tests. Two of the eight defined groups - bismuth phosphate sludge (Group 1) and bismuth phosphate saltcake (Group 2) - are the subjects of this report. The Group 1 waste was anticipated to be high in phosphorus and was implicitly assumed to be present as BiPO4 (however, results presented here indicate that the phosphate in Group 1 is actually present as amorphous iron(III) phosphate). The Group 2 waste was also anticipated to be high in phosphorus, but because of the relatively low bismuth content and higher aluminum content, it was anticipated that the Group 2 waste would contain a mixture of gibbsite, sodium phosphate, and aluminum phosphate. Thus, the focus of the Group 1 testing was on determining the behavior of P removal during caustic leaching, and the focus of the Group 2 testing was on the removal of both P and Al. The waste-type definition, archived sample conditions, homogenization activities, characterization (physical, chemical, radioisotope, and crystal habit), and caustic leaching behavior as functions of time, temperature, and hydroxide concentration are discussed in this report. Testing was conducted according to TP-RPP-WTP-467

  9. Characterization, Leaching, and Filtration Testing for Bismuth Phosphate Sludge (Group 1) and Bismuth Phosphate Saltcake (Group 2) Actual Waste Sample Composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lumetta, Gregg J.; Buck, Edgar C.; Daniel, Richard C.; Draper, Kathryn; Edwards, Matthew K.; Fiskum, Sandra K.; Hallen, Richard T.; Jagoda, Lynette K.; Jenson, Evan D.; Kozelisky, Anne E.; MacFarlan, Paul J.; Peterson, Reid A.; Shimskey, Rick W.; Sinkov, Sergey I.; Snow, Lanee A.

    2009-02-19

    A testing program evaluating actual tank waste was developed in response to Task 4 from the M-12 External Flowsheet Review Team (EFRT) issue response plan.() The test program was subdivided into logical increments. The bulk water-insoluble solid wastes that are anticipated to be delivered to the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) were identified according to type such that the actual waste testing could be targeted to the relevant categories. Eight broad waste groupings were defined. Samples available from the 222S archive were identified and obtained for testing. The actual waste-testing program included homogenizing the samples by group, characterizing the solids and aqueous phases, and performing parametric leaching tests. Two of the eight defined groups—bismuth phosphate sludge (Group 1) and bismuth phosphate saltcake (Group 2)—are the subjects of this report. The Group 1 waste was anticipated to be high in phosphorus and was implicitly assumed to be present as BiPO4 (however, results presented here indicate that the phosphate in Group 1 is actually present as amorphous iron(III) phosphate). The Group 2 waste was also anticipated to be high in phosphorus, but because of the relatively low bismuth content and higher aluminum content, it was anticipated that the Group 2 waste would contain a mixture of gibbsite, sodium phosphate, and aluminum phosphate. Thus, the focus of the Group 1 testing was on determining the behavior of P removal during caustic leaching, and the focus of the Group 2 testing was on the removal of both P and Al. The waste-type definition, archived sample conditions, homogenization activities, characterization (physical, chemical, radioisotope, and crystal habit), and caustic leaching behavior as functions of time, temperature, and hydroxide concentration are discussed in this report. Testing was conducted according to TP-RPP-WTP-467.

  10. Electro chemical studies on stress corrosion cracking of Incoloy-800 in caustic solution, part I: As received samples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dinu Alice

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Many non-volatile impurities accidentally introduced into the steam generator tend to Concentrate on its surface in restricted flow areas. In this way these impurities can lead to stress corrosion cracking (SCC on stressed tubes of the steam generator. Such impurities can be strong alkaline or acid solutions. To evaluate the effect of alkaline concentrated environments on SCC of steam generator tubes, the tests were con ducted on stressed samples of Incoloy-800 in 10% NaOH solution. To accelerate the SCC process, stressed specimens were anodically polarised in a caustic solution in an electro chemical cell. The method of stressing of Incoloy-800 tubes used in our experiments was the C-ring. Using the cathodic zone of the potentiodynamic curves it was possible to calculate the most important electrochemical parameters: the corrosion current, the corrosion rate, and the polarization resistance. We found that the value of the corrosion potential to initiate the SCC microcracks was -100 mV. The tested samples were examined using the metallographic method. The main experimental results showed that the in crease of the stress state promoted the in crease of the SCC susceptibility of Incoloy-800 samples tested under the same conditions, and that the length of the SCC-type microcracks in creased with the growth of the stress value.

  11. Leaching from municipal solid waste incineration residues

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hyks, J.

    2008-02-15

    Leaching of pollutants from Municipal Solid Waste Incineration (MSWI) residues has been investigated combining a range of laboratory leaching experiments with geochemical modeling. Special attention was paid to assessing the applicability of laboratory data for subsequent modeling with respect to presumed full-scale conditions; both sample pretreatment and actual influence of leaching conditions on the results of laboratory experiments were considered. It was shown that sample pretreatment may have large impact on leaching test data. In particular, a significant fraction of Pb was shown mobile during the washing of residues with water. In addition, drying of residues (i.e. slow oxidation) prior to leaching experiments increased the leaching of Cr significantly. Significant differences regarding the leaching behavior of individual elements with respect to (non)equilibrium conditions in column percolation experiments were observed in the study. As a result, three groups of elements were identified based on the predominant leaching control and the influence of (non)equilibrium on the results of the laboratory column experiments: I. Predominantly availability-controlled elements (e.g. Na, K, Cl) II. Solubility-controlled elements (e.g. Ca, S, Si, Al, Ba, and Zn) III. Complexation-controlled elements (e.g. Cu and Ni) With respect to the above groups it was suggested that results of laboratory column experiments can, with consideration, be used to estimate full-scale leaching of elements from Group I and II. However, in order to avoid large underestimations in the assessment of leaching from Group III, it is imperative to describe the time-dependent transport of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) in the tested system or to minimize the physical non-equilibrium during laboratory experiments (e.g. bigger column, slower flow velocity). Forward geochemical modeling was applied to simulate long-term release of elements from a MSWI air-pollution-control residue. Leaching of a

  12. Identification of nitrate leaching loss indicators through regression methods based on a meta-analysis of lysimeter studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boy-Roura, M; Cameron, K C; Di, H J

    2016-02-01

    This study presents a meta-analysis of 12 experiments that quantify nitrate-N leaching losses from grazed pasture systems in alluvial sedimentary soils in Canterbury (New Zealand). Mean measured nitrate-N leached (kg N/ha × 100 mm drainage) losses were 2.7 when no urine was applied, 8.4 at the urine rate of 300 kg N/ha, 9.8 at 500 kg N/ha, 24.5 at 700 kg N/ha and 51.4 at 1000 kg N/ha. Lismore soils presented significantly higher nitrate-N losses compared to Templeton soils. Moreover, a multiple linear regression (MLR) model was developed to determine the key factors that influence nitrate-N leaching and to predict nitrate-N leaching losses. The MLR analyses was calibrated and validated using 82 average values of nitrate-N leached and 48 explanatory variables representative of nitrogen inputs and outputs, transport, attenuation of nitrogen and farm management practices. The MLR model (R (2) = 0.81) showed that nitrate-N leaching losses were greater at higher urine application rates and when there was more drainage from rainfall and irrigation. On the other hand, nitrate leaching decreased when nitrification inhibitors (e.g. dicyandiamide (DCD)) were applied. Predicted nitrate-N leaching losses at the paddock scale were calculated using the MLR equation, and they varied largely depending on the urine application rate and urine patch coverage.

  13. Recycling of metal-organic chemical vapor deposition waste of GaN based power device and LED industry by acidic leaching: Process optimization and kinetics study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swain, Basudev; Mishra, Chinmayee; Kang, Leeseung; Park, Kyung-Soo; Lee, Chan Gi; Hong, Hyun Seon; Park, Jeung-Jin

    2015-05-01

    Recovery of metal values from GaN, a metal-organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) waste of GaN based power device and LED industry is investigated by acidic leaching. Leaching kinetics of gallium rich MOCVD waste is studied and the process is optimized. The gallium rich waste MOCVD dust is characterized by XRD and ICP-AES analysis followed by aqua regia digestion. Different mineral acids are used to find out the best lixiviant for selective leaching of the gallium and indium. Concentrated HCl is relatively better lixiviant having reasonably faster kinetic and better leaching efficiency. Various leaching process parameters like effect of acidity, pulp density, temperature and concentration of catalyst on the leaching efficiency of gallium and indium are investigated. Reasonably, 4 M HCl, a pulp density of 50 g/L, 100 °C and stirring rate of 400 rpm are the effective optimum condition for quantitative leaching of gallium and indium.

  14. Effect of different glass and zeolite A compositions on the leach resistance of ceramic waste forms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lewis, M.A.; Hash, M.; Glandorf, D.

    1996-01-01

    A ceramic waste form is being developed for waste generated during electrometallurgical treatment of spent nuclear fuel. The waste is generated when fission products are removed from the electrolyte, LiCl-KCl eutectic. The waste form is a composite fabricated by hot isostatic pressing a mixture of glass frit and zeolite occluded with fission products and salt. Normalized release rate is less than 1 g/m 2 d for all elements in MCC-1 leach test run for 28 days in deionized water at 90 C. This leach resistance is comparable to that of early Savannah River glasses. We are investigating how leach resistance is affected by changes in cationic form of zeolite and in glass composition. Composites were made with 3 forms of zeolite A and 6 glasses. We used 3-day ASTM C1220-92 (formerly MCC-1) leach tests to screen samples for development purposes only. The leach test results show that the glass composites of zeolites 5A and 4A retain fission products equally well. Loss of Cs is small (0.1-0.5 wt%), while the loss of divalent and trivalent fission products is one or more orders of magnitude smaller. Composites of 5A retain chloride ion better in these short-term screens than 4A and 3A. The more leach resistant composites were made with durable glasses rich in silica and poor in alkaline earth oxides. XRD show that a salt phase was absent in the leach resistant composites of 5A and the better glasses but was present in the other composites with poorer leach performance. Thus, absence of salt phase corresponds to improved leach resistance. Interactions between zeolite and glass depend on composition of both

  15. Test Results for Caustic Demand Measurements on Tank 241-AX-101 and Tank 241-AX-103 Archive Samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doll, Stephanie R.; Bolling, Stacie D.

    2016-01-01

    Caustic demand testing is used to determine the necessary amount of caustic required to neutralize species present in the Hanford tank waste and obtain a target molarity of free hydroxide for tank corrosion control. The presence and quantity of hydroxide-consuming analytes are just as important in determining the caustic demand as is the amount of free hydroxide present. No single data point can accurately predict whether a satisfactory hydroxide level is being met, as it is dependent on multiple factors (e.g., free hydroxide, buffers, amphoteric metal hydroxides, bicarbonate, etc.). This enclosure contains the caustic demand, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), polarized light microscopy (PLM), and X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis for the tank 241-AX-101 (AX-101) and 241-AX-103 (AX-103) samples. The work was completed to fulfill a customer request outlined in the test plan, WRPS-1505529, ''Test Plan and Procedure for Caustic Demand Testing on Tank 241-AX-101 and Tank 241-AX-103 Archive Samples.'' The work results will provide a baseline to support planned retrieval of AX-101 and AX-103.

  16. Test Results for Caustic Demand Measurements on Tank 241-AX-101 and Tank 241-AX-103 Archive Samples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doll, Stephanie R. [Washington River Protection Solutions, Richland, WA (United States); Bolling, Stacie D. [Washington River Protection Solutions, Richland, WA (United States)

    2016-07-14

    Caustic demand testing is used to determine the necessary amount of caustic required to neutralize species present in the Hanford tank waste and obtain a target molarity of free hydroxide for tank corrosion control. The presence and quantity of hydroxide-consuming analytes are just as important in determining the caustic demand as is the amount of free hydroxide present. No single data point can accurately predict whether a satisfactory hydroxide level is being met, as it is dependent on multiple factors (e.g., free hydroxide, buffers, amphoteric metal hydroxides, bicarbonate, etc.). This enclosure contains the caustic demand, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), polarized light microscopy (PLM), and X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis for the tank 241-AX-101 (AX-101) and 241-AX-103 (AX-103) samples. The work was completed to fulfill a customer request outlined in the test plan, WRPS-1505529, “Test Plan and Procedure for Caustic Demand Testing on Tank 241-AX-101 and Tank 241-AX-103 Archive Samples.” The work results will provide a baseline to support planned retrieval of AX-101 and AX-103.

  17. Respiratory agents: irritant gases, riot control agents, incapacitants, and caustics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warden, Craig R

    2005-10-01

    There are many chemical respiratory agents suitable for use by terrorists. They are the oldest chemical agents used and have caused the most casualties throughout the 20th century. Many are available in large quantities for industrial use and are susceptible to potential sabotage. This paper will concentrate on respiratory agents that are readily available and have the potential to cause a large number of casualties and panic. These agents have a lower rate of lethality when compared to other chemical agents but could produce many casualties that may overwhelm the emergency medical system.

  18. Rating

    OpenAIRE

    Karas, Vladimír

    2006-01-01

    Charakteristika ratingu. Dělení a druhy ratingu (rating emise × rating emitenta; dlouhodobý rating × krátkodobý rating; mezinárodní rating × lokální rating). Obecné požadavky kladené na rating. Proces tvorby ratingu. Vyžádaný rating. Nevyžádaný rating. Ratingový proces na bázi volně přístupných informací. Uplatňované ratingové systémy. Ratingová kriteria. Využití a interpretace ratingové známky. Funkce ratingu. Rating v souvislosti s BASEL II. Rating v souvislosti s hospodářskými krizemi....

  19. Reduction of metal leaching in brown coal fly ash using geopolymers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bankowski, P.; Zou, L.; Hodges, R.

    2004-01-01

    Current regulations classify fly ash as a prescribed waste and prohibit its disposal in regular landfill. Treatment of the fly ash can reduce the leach rate of metals, and allow it to be disposed in less prescribed landfill. A geopolymer matrix was investigated as a potential stabilisation method for brown coal fly ash. Precipitator fly ash was obtained from electrostatic precipitators and leached fly ash was collected from ash disposal ponds, and leaching tests were conducted on both types of geopolymer stabilised fly ashes. The ratio of fly ash to geopolymer was varied to determine the effects of different compositions on leaching rates. Fourteen metals and heavy metals were targeted during the leaching tests and the results indicate that a geopolymer is effective at reducing the leach rates of many metals from the fly ash, such as calcium, arsenic, selenium, strontium and barium. The major element leachate concentrations obtained from leached fly ash were in general lower than that of precipitator fly ash. Conversely, heavy metal leachate concentrations were lower in precipitator fly ash than leached pond fly ash. The maximum addition of fly ash to this geopolymer was found to be 60 wt% for fly ash obtained from the electrostatic precipitators and 70 wt% for fly ash obtained from ash disposal ponds. The formation of geopolymer in the presence of fly ash was studied using 29Si MAS-NMR and showed that a geopolymer matrix was formed. X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) imaging showed the interaction of the fly ash with the geopolymer, which was related to the leachate data and also the maximum percentage fly ash addition

  20. Leach and EP (extraction procedure) toxicity tests on grouted waste from Tank 106-AN

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Serne, R.J.; Martin, W.J.; Lokken, R.O.; LeGore, V.L.; Lindenmeier, C.W.; Martin, P.F.C.

    1989-09-01

    Pacific Northwest Laboratory is conducting laboratory experiments to produce leach rate data for various waste species that will be contained in grout at Hanford. In the work reported here, grout made from Tank 106-AN liquid waste was used to produce empirical leach rate data for several radionuclides ({sup 60}Co, {sup 90}Sr, {99}Tc, {129}I, {137}Cs, and {sup 241}Am), stable major components (NO{sub 3}{sup {minus}}, NO{sub 2}{sup {minus}}, F, Cl, and Na), and trace metals (Cr, Mo, and Ni). Two types of tests were used to produce leach rate data: an intermittent replacement leach test (ANS 16.1 leach test) and a static leach test. Measured effective diffusivities of key species are as follows: 4 to 6 {times} 10{sup {minus}8} cm{sup 2}/sec for {sup 99}Tc, 3 to 7 {times} 10{sup {minus}8} cm{sup 2}/sec for {sup 129}I, 4 to 6 {times} 10{sup {minus}9} cm{sup 2}/sec for nitrate, and 6 to 7 {times} 10{sup {minus}9} cm{sup 2}/sec for nitrite. The leach indices of all species studied are above (more favorable than) the waste form criteria. The leach indices for {sup 99}Tc and {sup 129}I are 7.4 {plus minus} 1.2 and 7.6 {plus minus} 0.4, respectively, and are being further investigated in continuing studies of double-shell slurry feed grouts. An Extraction Procedure (EP) toxicity test was also conducted and the grouted water is considered nontoxic per this test protocol. 19 refs., 9 figs., 8 tabs.

  1. Leaching of solidified TRU-contaminated incinerator ash

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fuhrmann, M.; Colombo, P.

    1984-01-01

    Leach rate and cumulative fractional releases of plutonium were determined for a series of laboratory-scale waste forms containing transuranic (TRU) contaminated incinerator ash. The solidification agents from which these waste forms were produced are commercially available materials for radioactive waste disposal. The leachants simulate groundwaters with chemical compositions that are indiginous to different geological media proposed for repositories. In this study TRU-contaminated ash was incorporated into waste forms fabricated with portland type I cement, urea-formaldehyde, polyester-styrene or Pioneer 221 bitumen. The ash was generated at the dual-chamber incinerator at the Rocky Flats Plant. These waste forms contained between 1.25 x 10 -2 and 4.4 x 10 -2 Ci (depending on the solidification agent) of mixed TRU isotopes comprised primarily of 239 Pu and 240 Pu. Five leachant solutions were prepared consisting of: (1) demineralized water, (2) simulated brine, (3) simplified sodium-dominated groundwater (30 meq NaCl/liter), (4) simplified calcium-dominated groundwater (30 meq CaCl 2 /liter), and (5) simplified bicarbonate-dominated groundwater (30 meq NaHCO 3 /liter). Cumulative fractional releases were found to vary significantly with different leachants and solidification agents. In all cases waste forms leached in brine gave the lowest leach rates. Urea-formaldehyde had the greatest release of radionuclides while polyester-styrene and portland cement had approximately equivalent fractional releases. Cement cured for 210 days retained radionuclides three times more effectively than cement cured only 30 days

  2. Development of mathematic model for coffee decaffeination with leaching method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sukrisno Widyotomo

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available A simple mathematic model for caffeine kinetic description during the extraction process (leaching of coffee bean was developed. A non­steady diffusion equation coupled with a macroscopic mass transfer equation for solvent was developed and them solved analytically. The kinetic of caffeine extraction from coffee bean is depend on initial caffeine content, final caffeine content, caffeine content at certain time, mass­transfer coefficient, solvent volume, surface area of coffee beans, process time, radius of coffee bean, leaching rate of caffeine, caffeine diffusivity and a are constan, solvent concentration, activation energy, temperature absolute and gas constant. Caffeine internal mass diffusivity was estimated by fitting the model to an experiment using acetic acid and liquid waste of cocoa beans fermentation. The prediction equation for leaching rate of caffeine in coffee beans has been found. It was found that Dk (m2/sec=1.345x10­7—4.1638x10­7, and kL (m/sec=2.445x10­5—5.551x10­5 by acetic acid as solvent depended on temperature and solvent concentration. The prediction equation for length of time to reduce initial caffeine content to certain concentration in coffee beans has been developed, Caffeine diffusivity (Dk and mass­transfer coefficient (kL was found respectively 1.591x 10­7—2.122x10­7 m2/sec and 4.897x10­5—6.529x10­5 m/sec using liquid waste of cocoa bean fermentation as solvent which depend on temperature and solvent concentration. Key words: Coffee, caffeine, decaffeination, leaching, mathematic model.

  3. Effects of polymer-coated urea on nitrate leaching and nitrogen uptake by potato.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Melissa L; Rosen, Carl J; Moncrief, John F

    2010-01-01

    Increasing groundwater nitrate concentrations in potato (Solanum tuberosum L.) production regions have prompted the need to identify alternative nitrogen management practices. A new type of polymer-coated urea (PCU) called Environmentally Smart Nitrogen (Agrium, Inc., Calgary, AB) is significantly lower in cost than comparable PCUs, but its potential to reduce nitrate leaching and improve fertilizer recovery has not been extensively studied in potato. In 2006 and 2007, four rates of PCU applied at emergence were compared with equivalent rates of soluble N split-applied at emergence and post-hilling. Additional treatments included a 0 N control, two PCU timing treatments (applied at preplant or planting), and a soluble N fertigation simulation. Nitrate leaching, fertilizer N recovery, N use efficiency (NUE), and residual soil inorganic N were measured. Both 2006 and 2007 were low leaching years. Nitrate leaching with PCU (21.3 kg NO(3)-N ha(-1) averaged over N rates) was significantly lower than with split-applied soluble N (26.9 kg NO(3)-N ha(-1)). The soluble N fertigation treatment resulted in similar leaching as PCU at equivalent N rates. Apparent fertilizer N recovery with PCU (65% averaged over four rates) tended to be higher than split-applied soluble N (55%) at equivalent rates (p = 0.059). Residual soil N and NUE were not significantly affected by N source. Under the conditions of this study, PCU significantly reduced leaching and tended to improved N recovery over soluble N applied in two applications and resulted in similar N recovery and nitrate leaching as soluble N applied in six applications.

  4. Phosphorus leaching in a soil textural gradient

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Glæsner, Nadia; Kjærgaard, Charlotte; Rubæk, Gitte Holton

    2009-01-01

    Texture is a major factor influencing mobilization and transport of P in soil owing partly to differences in adsorptive properties, and partly to differences in pore-size distribution and pore organization. Slurry application strategies may be important mitigation measures for reducing agricultural...... in soils with matrix dominated flow behaviour We tested these hypotheses on three textural soil classes (Olsen-P 1.6 mg P 100 g-1) on intact soil columns (20*20 cm) and compared them to in situ P leaching before slurry application. In a loamy sand P leaching with both slurry application techniques slightly...... exceeded the in situ leaching. However, the two application techniques did not vary significantly. In a sandy and a clay loam preferential flow paths within the soil columns caused high P leaching when slurry was applied at the soil surface. The effect increased with increasing clay content. Injection...

  5. Alternative leaching processes for uranium ores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ring, R.J.

    1979-01-01

    Laboratory studies have been carried out to compare the extraction of uranium from Australian ores by conventional leaching in sulphuric acid with that obtained using hydrochloric acid and acidified ferric sulphate solutions. Leaching with hydrochloric acid achieved higher extractions of radium-226 but the extraction of uranium was reduced considerably. The use of acidified ferric sulphate solution reduced acid consumption by 20-40% without any detrimental effect on uranium extraction. The ferric ion, which is reduced during leaching, can be reoxidized and recycled after the addition of acid makeup. Hydrogen peroxide was found to be an effective oxidant in conventional sulphuric acid leaching. It is more expensive than alternative oxidants, but it is non-polluting, lesser quantities are required and acid consumption is reduced

  6. The Danish Pesticide Leaching Assessment Programme

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosenbom, Annette Elisabeth; Brüsch, Walter Michael; Juhler, Rene K.

    In 1998, the Danish Parliament initiated the Pesticide Leaching Assessment Programme (PLAP), an intensive monitoring programme aimed at evaluating the leaching risk of pesticides under field conditions. The objective of the PLAP is to improve the scientific foundation for decision......-making in the Danish regulation of pesticides. The specific aim is to analyse whether pesticides applied in accordance with current regulations leach to groundwater in unacceptable concentrations. The programme currently evaluates the leaching risk of 41 pesticides and 40 degradation products at five agricultural...... of the period 1999-2009 show that regarding: Yearly average concentration 1 m b.g.s. Of the 41 pesticides applied, 12 pesticides and/or their degradation product(-s) (clopyralid, chlormequat, desmedipham, fenpropimorph, florasulam, iodosulfuron-methyl-sodium, linuron, mancozeb, metsulfuron-methyl, phenmedipham...

  7. Effect of temperature on copper, iron and lead leaching from e-waste using citrate solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres, Robinson; Segura-Bailón, Brenda; Lapidus, Gretchen T

    2018-01-01

    E-waste is a potential source of large quantities of metals. The ability of citrate solutions to recover base metals from these materials has been demonstrated. In the present study, the effect of the temperature on base metal leaching capacity by the citrate solutions is determined. The material employed consisted of a mechanically prepared, gravity concentrated e-waste, with a metallic content greater than 90%. The leaching conditions were selected based on previous research performed by the authors (0.5 M sodium citrate, pH 4.5 and 20 g per liter e-waste concentrate). Leaching tests were performed at temperatures between 0° and 70 °C. The initial leaching rates for the three metals increased with temperature. However, these tapered off with time for temperatures above 30 °C, which can be associated to citrate destruction. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Direct anodic hydrochloric acid and cathodic caustic production during water electrolysis

    OpenAIRE

    Lin, Hui-Wen; Cejudo-Mar?n, Roc?o; Jeremiasse, Adriaan W.; Rabaey, Korneel; Yuan, Zhiguo; Pikaar, Ilje

    2016-01-01

    Hydrochloric acid (HCl) and caustic (NaOH) are among the most widely used chemicals by the water industry. Direct anodic electrochemical HCl production by water electrolysis has not been successful as current commercially available electrodes are prone to chlorine formation. This study presents an innovative technology simultaneously generating HCl and NaOH from NaCl using a Mn0.84Mo0.16O2.23 oxygen evolution electrode during water electrolysis. The results showed that protons could be anodic...

  9. Management of Esophageal Burns Caused by Caustic Ingestion: A Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahbazzadegan, Bita; Samadzadeh, Mehdi; Feizi, Iraj; Shafaiee, Yousef

    2016-11-01

    Domestic and industrial swallowing of caustic substances can cause acute and chronic injuries. In the acute phase of care, focus is on the immediate control of tissue damage and perforation, and in the chronic phase, the focus is on the treatment of pharyngeal narrowing and impaired swallowing. The patients of this report were an 18-year-old man and a 20-year-old woman, who had esophageal burns after ingesting chemicals, and for solving their nutritional problems, such as difficulty in swallowing, they had underwent surgery. Patients had continued follow-up after surgery. Treatment of esophageal burn lesions is by immediate and delayed removing of damage outcomes.

  10. Synthesis of ZnS thin films from aqueous caustic of trisodium citrate and their properties

    OpenAIRE

    Martyn A. Sozanskyi; Pavlo I. Shapoval; Iosip I. Yatchyshyn; Vitaliy E. Stadnik; Roman E. Gladyshevskii

    2015-01-01

    Zinc sulfide (ZnS) thin films due to their properties are widely used in various electronic optical devices. They are produced by several methods, among which – vacuum sublimation, high frequency sputtering method, quasiclosed volume method, sol-gel method, electrodeposition. These methods have high energy consumption which increases the price of ZnS thin films. Aim: The aim of this work is to establish the optimal parameters of the synthesis of ZnS thin films of the aqueous caustic and the c...

  11. [Intensive care and diet in cases of caustic esophageal stenosis after the first eight days].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jehanno, C; Kaswin, D; Bourrier, C; Celerier, M; Echter, E; Dubost, C

    1977-01-01

    On the basis of 12 cases of caustic burns of the oesophagus, the authors describe the technique of alimentation, once the acute phase of the first eight days has passed. From the 8th to the 15th days, calories and provided parenterally. An upper GI series is carried out on the 15th day: if the stomach is healthy, the authors fashion an alimentation gastrostomy, if the stomach is damaged, they carry out gastrectomy with alimentation gastrostomy or jejunostomy. In all cases, continuity is re-established by coloplasty two months later.

  12. Leaching of nuclear power reactor wastes forms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Endo, L.S.; Villalobos, J.P.; Miyamoto, H.

    1986-01-01

    The leaching tests for power reactor wastes carried out at IPEN/CNEN-SP are described. These waste forms consist mainly of spent resins and boric acid concentrates solidified in ordinary Portland cement. All tests were conducted according to the ISO and IAEA recommendations. 3 years leaching results are reported, determining cesium and strontium diffusivity coefficients for boric acid waste form and ion-exchange resins. (Author) [pt

  13. A Mineralogical Assessment on Residues after Acidic Leaching of Bauxite Residue (Red Mud for Titanium Recovery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gözde Alkan

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Due to its alkalinity, red mud produced by the Bayer process may affect both the environment and human health. For this reason, its further utilization instead of disposal is of great importance. Numerous methods have already been studied for hydrometallurgical treatment of red mud, especially for the recovery of various metallic components such as iron, aluminum, titanium or rare earth elements. This study focuses on the extraction of titanium from red mud and in particular the mineralogical changes, induced by leaching. Sulfuric acid, hydrochloric acid and their combination have been utilized as leaching agents with the same leaching parameters. It has been determined that sulfuric acid is the best candidate for the red mud treatment in terms of titanium leaching efficiency at the end of 2 h with a value of 67.3%. Moreover, samples from intermediate times of reaction revealed that leaching of Ti exhibit various reaction rates at different times of reaction depending on acid type. In order to explain differences, X-ray Diffraction (XRD, scanning electron microscope (SEM and QEMSCAN techniques were utilized. Beside titanium oxide (TiO2 with available free surface area, a certain amount of the TiO2 was detected as entrapped in Fe dominating oxide. These associations between Ti and Fe phases were used to explain different leaching reaction rates and a reaction mechanism was proposed to open a process window.

  14. Zinc Leaching from Tire Crumb Rubber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhodes, E. P.; Ren, J.; Mays, D. C.

    2010-12-01

    Recent estimates indicate that more than 2 billion scrap tires are currently stockpiled in the United States and approximately 280 million more tires are added annually. Various engineering applications utilize recycled tires in the form of shredded tire crumb rubber. However, the use of tire crumb rubber may have negative environmental impacts, especially when the rubber comes into contact with water. A review of the literature indicates that leaching of zinc from tire crumb rubber is the most significant water quality concern associated with using this material. Zinc is generally used in tire manufacturing, representing approximately 1.3% of the final product by mass. This study will report results from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s (EPA’s) Synthetic Precipitation Leaching Procedure, batch leaching tests, and column leaching tests performed to quantify the process by which zinc leaches from tire crumb rubber into water. Results are interpreted with a first-order kinetic attachment/detachment model, implemented with the U.S. Agricultural Research Service software HYDRUS-1D, in order to determine the circumstances when zinc leaching from tire crumb rubber would be expected to comply with the applicable discharge limits. One potential application for recycled tires is replacing sand with tire crumb rubber in granular media filters used for stormwater pollution control. For this to be a viable application, the total zinc in the stormwater discharge must be below the EPA’s benchmark value of 0.117 mg/L.

  15. Leaching characteristics of actinides from simulated reactor waste glass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weed, H.C.; Coles, D.G.; Bradley, D.J.; Mensing, R.W.; Schweiger, J.S.

    1979-01-18

    Two methods for measuring the leach rates of simulated high level waste glass are compared. One is a modification of the standard IAEA method and the other is a one-pass method in which fresh leachant solution is pumped over the sample at a controlled flow rate and temperature. For times up to 3 days, there is close agreement between results from the two methods at 25.0/sup 0/C. Leach rates from the one-pass method show a correlation with flow rate only on day 1 at 25.0/sup 0/C, whereas they show a correlation with flow rate for all three days at 75.0/sup 0/C. /sup 237/Np rates at 75.0/sup 0/C are greater than those at 25.0/sup 0/C, but /sup 239/Pu rates at 75.0/sup 0/C are less than or equal to those at 25.0/sup 0/C.

  16. Phosphorus Leaching in an Acid Tropical Soil “Recapitalized” with Phosphate Rock and Triple Superphosphate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Gikonyo

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available With high rates of phosphorus applied to increase “capital P” as a stock for plant uptake over several years, the question of P leaching is inevitable. We conducted an intact soil column experiment in the field to evaluate P leached from soils treated with triple superphosphate (TSP and Gafsa phosphate rock (GPR at 300, 600, and 900 kg P ha-1 with and without integration of cattle manure. The lysimeters, made from PVC tubes of 30-cm length, were inserted into the soil up to the 25-cm depth. The tubes were fitted with a resin bag containing a mixture of cation and anion exchange resin (50:50 at the lower end of the tube inserted into the soil. The tubes, arranged in a completely randomized design, were sampled randomly at 10-week intervals for 12 months. Phosphorus extractable from the top- and subsoil at the end of experiment and leached P were determined. More P was leached out from TSP (threefold compared to GPR, and the amount of P leached increased with increasing rates of P fertilizer applied. Application of manure intensified the amounts of P leached from TSP, particularly at the 6-month sampling time. There was hardly any substantial P leached from the soil treated with GPR. Thus, for effective and efficient long-term P fertilizer management strategies, choosing the right P fertilizer source and monitoring P losses through leaching has to be done for enhanced fertilizer use efficiency and thus reducing P pollution of ground waters.

  17. Leaching of radioactive waste forms under saturated and unsaturated flow conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petelka, M.F.

    1987-01-01

    To predict the environmental impact of shallow land burial sites for radioactive waste, the mobilization and migration of waste nuclides must be estimated. The theoretical understanding that in potential leaching mechanisms leach-rate variations may arise from changes in both moisture content and volumetric flow rate was tested in column flow leach experiments using labeled vermiculite particles as a simulated waste form. As far as possible, conditions of flow rate and solution ion concentration were chosen to roughly approximate expected field conditions. A modified pressure-plate apparatus was developed, tested, and found suitable for the production of steady-state unsaturated conditions with leachate flow. Water content was determined using the gamma-ray attenuation method. The effects of several parameters on leaching were studied, including moisture content and pore velocity. Pore velocity effects were found to be negligible. It was found that the leach rate depends on the fraction of the exposed waste surface that is wetted and varies with the mobile water content in a non-linear fashion. The experimental results indicate that the release rate of radionuclides placed within a properly sited low-level waste disposal site may be two to three times smaller than that predicted assuming saturated conditions. This study was performed using a homogeneous fine-grained synthetic waste form, at room temperature, with a near neutral pH leachant and oxidizing conditions

  18. Suppressing Heavy Metal Leaching through Ball Milling of Fly Ash

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhiliang Chen

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Ball milling is investigated as a method of reducing the leaching concentration (often termed stablilization of heavy metals in municipal solid waste incineration (MSWI fly ash. Three heavy metals (Cu, Cr, Pb loose much of their solubility in leachate by treating fly ash in a planetary ball mill, in which collisions between balls and fly ash drive various physical processes, as well as chemical reactions. The efficiency of stabilization is evaluated by analysing heavy metals in the leachable fraction from treated fly ash. Ball milling reduces the leaching concentration of Cu, Cr, and Pb, and water washing effectively promotes stabilization efficiency by removing soluble salts. Size distribution and morphology of particles were analysed by laser particle diameter analysis and scanning electron microscopy. X-ray diffraction analysis reveals significant reduction of the crystallinity of fly ash by milling. Fly ash particles can be activated through this ball milling, leading to a significant decrease in particle size, a rise in its BET-surface, and turning basic crystals therein into amorphous structures. The dissolution rate of acid buffering materials present in activated particles is enhanced, resulting in a rising pH value of the leachate, reducing the leaching out of some heavy metals.

  19. A comparison of ultrasound-augmented and conventional leaching of silver from sintering dust using acidic thiourea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Jun; Zhang, Er-Dong; Zhang, Li-Bo; Peng, Jin-Hui; Zhou, Jun-Wen; Srinivasakannan, C; Yang, Chang-Jiang

    2017-01-01

    In the process of steel manufacture, up to ten millions of tons of sintering dust (SD) are produced annually in China, which contain noble metals such as Ag. Therefore, recovery of silver (Ag) from SD could be a potential economic and environmental activity. The purpose of this article is to generate information about reaction kinetics of silver leaching with thiourea from SD, comparing the conventional and ultrasonic-augment leaching. The effects of various control parameters such as the ultrasound power, particle size, leaching temperature and thiourea concentration on leaching rate of silver were studied. The results showed 89% silver recovery for conventional process against 95% for ultrasound assisted leaching. The ultrasonic wave increased the leaching rate and shorten the reaction time. The rate controlling step was analyzed using shrinking core model and the rate controlling step is identified to be the diffusion through the product layer in both conventional and ultrasonic-augment leaching processes. The activation energies were estimated to be 28.01kJ/mol and 18.19kJ/mol, and the reaction order were 0.89 and 0.71, respectively. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Direct anodic hydrochloric acid and cathodic caustic production during water electrolysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Hui-Wen; Cejudo-Marín, Rocío; Jeremiasse, Adriaan W.; Rabaey, Korneel; Yuan, Zhiguo; Pikaar, Ilje

    2016-02-01

    Hydrochloric acid (HCl) and caustic (NaOH) are among the most widely used chemicals by the water industry. Direct anodic electrochemical HCl production by water electrolysis has not been successful as current commercially available electrodes are prone to chlorine formation. This study presents an innovative technology simultaneously generating HCl and NaOH from NaCl using a Mn0.84Mo0.16O2.23 oxygen evolution electrode during water electrolysis. The results showed that protons could be anodically generated at a high Coulombic efficiency (i.e. ≥ 95%) with chlorine formation accounting for 3 ~ 5% of the charge supplied. HCl was anodically produced at moderate strengths at a CE of 65 ± 4% together with a CE of 89 ± 1% for cathodic caustic production. The reduction in CE for HCl generation was caused by proton cross-over from the anode to the middle compartment. Overall, this study showed the potential of simultaneous HCl and NaOH generation from NaCl and represents a major step forward for the water industry towards on-site production of HCl and NaOH. In this study, artificial brine was used as a source of sodium and chloride ions. In theory, artificial brine could be replaced by saline waste streams such as Reverse Osmosis Concentrate (ROC), turning ROC into a valuable resource.

  1. H-Area Acid/Caustic Basin groundwater monitoring report. Second quarter 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-09-01

    During second quarter 1994, samples collected from the four HAC monitoring wells at the H-Area Acid/Caustic Basin received comprehensive analyses (exclusive of boron and lithium) and turbidity measurements. Monitoring results that exceeded the final Primary Drinking Water Standards (PDWS) or the Savannah River Site (SRS) flagging criteria or turbidity standard during the quarter are the focus of this report. Tritium exceeded the final PDWS in all four HAC wells during second quarter 1994. Carbon tetrachloride exceeded the final PDWS in well HAC 4. Aluminum exceeded its Flag 2 criterion in wells HAC 2, 3, and 4. Iron was elevated in wells HAC 1, 2, and 3. Manganese exceeded its Flag 2 criterion in well HAC 3. Specific conductance and total organic halogens were elevated in well HAC 2. No well samples exceeded the SRS turbidity standard. Groundwater flow direction in the water stable beneath the H-Area Acid/Caustic Basin was to the west during second quarter 1994. During previous quarters, the groundwater flow direction has been consistently to the northwest or the north-northwest. This apparent change in flow direction may be attributed to the lack of water elevations for wells HTF 16 and 17 and the anomalous water elevations for well HAC 2 during second quarter.

  2. H-Area Acid/Caustic Basin groundwater monitoring report. Second quarter 1994

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-09-01

    During second quarter 1994, samples collected from the four HAC monitoring wells at the H-Area Acid/Caustic Basin received comprehensive analyses (exclusive of boron and lithium) and turbidity measurements. Monitoring results that exceeded the final Primary Drinking Water Standards (PDWS) or the Savannah River Site (SRS) flagging criteria or turbidity standard during the quarter are the focus of this report. Tritium exceeded the final PDWS in all four HAC wells during second quarter 1994. Carbon tetrachloride exceeded the final PDWS in well HAC 4. Aluminum exceeded its Flag 2 criterion in wells HAC 2, 3, and 4. Iron was elevated in wells HAC 1, 2, and 3. Manganese exceeded its Flag 2 criterion in well HAC 3. Specific conductance and total organic halogens were elevated in well HAC 2. No well samples exceeded the SRS turbidity standard. Groundwater flow direction in the water stable beneath the H-Area Acid/Caustic Basin was to the west during second quarter 1994. During previous quarters, the groundwater flow direction has been consistently to the northwest or the north-northwest. This apparent change in flow direction may be attributed to the lack of water elevations for wells HTF 16 and 17 and the anomalous water elevations for well HAC 2 during second quarter

  3. Microbial Fuel Cell-driven caustic potash production from wastewater for carbon sequestration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gajda, Iwona; Greenman, John; Melhuish, Chris; Santoro, Carlo; Ieropoulos, Ioannis

    2016-09-01

    This work reports on the novel formation of caustic potash (KOH) directly on the MFC cathode locking carbon dioxide into potassium bicarbonate salt (kalicinite) while producing, instead of consuming electrical power. Using potassium-rich wastewater as a fuel for microorganisms to generate electricity in the anode chamber, has resulted in the formation of caustic catholyte directly on the surface of the cathode electrode. Analysis of this liquid has shown to be highly alkaline (pH>13) and act as a CO2 sorbent. It has been later mineralised to kalicinite thus locking carbon dioxide into potassium bicarbonate salt. This work demonstrates an electricity generation method as a simple, cost-effective and environmentally friendly route towards CO2 sequestration that perhaps leads to a carbon negative economy. Moreover, it shows a potential application for both electricity production and nutrient recovery in the form of minerals from nutrient-rich wastewater streams such as urine for use as fertiliser in the future. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  4. Measurement of nonlinear fracture parameter T integral under impact loading using laser caustic method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishioka, T.; Sakai, K.; Murakami, T.; Matsuo, S.; Sakakura, K.

    1991-01-01

    In order to establish a sound design methodology assuring the integrity of nuclear structures against nonlinear static and dynamic fractures, a unified crack tip parameter is essential due to the existence of various aspects of material behavior in such structures. However, so-called J integral loses its theoretical validity when a crack grows dynamically or elastoplastically, or when a material is subjected to dynamic loading or elastic-plastic unloading. Dynamic J integral has been derived, which has the same features as those of static J integral. Later, a more general path-independent integral which is valid for any material-constitutive model under quasi-static and dynamic conditions was derived. This integral has the great potential as a unified crack tip parameter. Nonlinear dynamic fracture parameter T integral, the hybrid numerical-experimental method for T measurement, and the measurement of the T integral in dynamic tear test are described. The high speed photographs of the caustic pattern in dynamic tear test specimens were taken by a laser caustic method. (K.I.)

  5. The kinetics of titanium leaching of ilmenite using HCl

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MV Purwani; Herry Poernomo

    2015-01-01

    The research of ilmenite leaching of tailings processing zircon sand has been done. Tailings of processing zircon sand contain Zr, Ti, Nb and Fe. Determination of leaching kinetics of Ti on ilmenite using HCl was done on this research. Determination of reaction rate consist the influence of weight ratio of HCl to ilmenite, HCl molarity and temperature reaction. The experiment of kinetics was done by varying the temperature reaction from 70°C to 108°C and time parameter range 0 to 200 minutes. From data of research can be concluded that the greater of weight ratio of HCl with ilmenite, M HCl and reaction temperature, the faster rate of reaction. On weight ratio of HCl with ilmenite varied 4 - 20, average reaction rate along 50 minutes and instantaneous reaction rate in the first 50 minutes ranged from 0.0021 to 0.0032 gmol/(l.minute). Average reaction rate along 250 minutes ranged from 0.0005 to 0.0007 gmol/(l.minute) and instantaneous reaction rate at 50 minutes latest ranged from 0.0000 to 0.0001 gmol/(l.minute). For M HCl = 8 to 12.23 M, average reaction rate and instantaneous reaction rate in the first 50 minutes ranged from 0.0012 to 0.0026 gmol/(l.minute). Average reaction rate along 250 minutes ranged from 0.0004 to 0.0006 gmol/(l.minute) and instantaneous reaction rate at 50 minutes latest ranged from 0.0000 to 0.0001 gmol/(l.minute). On reaction temperature = 70 - 108°C, average reaction rate along 50 minutes and instantaneous reaction rate in the first 50 minutes ranged from 0.0012 to 0.0032 gmol/(l.minute). Average reaction rate along 250 minutes ranged from 0.0002 to 0.0006 gmol/(l.minute) and instantaneous reaction rate at 50 minutes latest ranged from 0.0000 to 0.0001 gmol/(l.minute). The leaching reaction of Ti in ilmenite was second order reaction. The relationship between temperature (T) with the reaction rate constant (k) are - ln k = 3333.2/T - 1.3685 or k = 1.3685. e-3333,2/T , frequency factor A = 1446 and activation energy E = 27.712 k

  6. [Newly leaching method of copper from waste print circuit board using hydrochloric acid/n-butylamine/copper sulfate].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hong-Yan; Cui, Zhao-Jie; Yao, Ya-Wei

    2010-12-01

    A newly leaching method of copper from waste print circuit board was established by using hydrochloric acid-n-butylamine-copper sulfate mixed solution. The conditions of leaching were optimized by changing the hydrochloric acid, n-butylamine, copper sulfate,temperature and other conditions using copper as target mimics. The results indicated that copper could be leached completely after 8 h at 50 degrees C, hydrochloric acid concentration of 1.75 mol/L, n-butylamine concentration of 0.25 mol/L, and copper sulfate mass of 0.96 g. Under the conditions, copper leaching rates in waste print circuit board samples was up to 95.31% after 9 h. It has many advantages such as better effects, low cost, mild reaction conditions, leaching solution recycling.

  7. Leaching of FGD Byproducts Using a CSTX

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kairies, C.L.; Schroeder, K.T.; Cardone, C.R.

    2005-09-01

    Leaching studies of coal utilization byproducts (CUB) are often performed to determine the compatibility of the material in a particular end-use or disposal environment. Typically, these studies are conducted using either a batch or a fixed-bed column technique. Fixed-bed columns offer the advantage of a continuous flow of effluent that provides elution profiles with changing elution volume and pH. Unfortunately, clogs can form in fixed-bed leaching columns, either because of cementitious properties of the material itself, such as is seen for fluidized bed combustion (FBC) fly ash, or because of precipitate formation, such as can occur when a high-calcium ash is subjected to sulfate-containing leachates. Also, very fine-grained materials, such as gypsum, do not provide sufficient permeability for study in a fixed-bed column. A continuous, stirred-tank extractor (CSTX) is being used as an alternative technique that can provide the elution profile of column leaching but without the low permeability problems. The CSTX has been successfully employed in the leaching of flue gas desulfurization products that would not be sufficiently permeable under traditional column leaching conditions. The results indicate that the leaching behavior depends on a number of factors, including (but not limited to) solubility and neutralization capacity of the mineral phases present, sorption properties of these phases, behavior of the solubilized material in the tank, and the type of species in solution. In addition, leaching to near-exhaustion of a wallboard produced from FGD gypsum has allowed the isolation of a highly adsorptive phase. This phase appears to be present in at least some FGD gypsums and accounts for the immobilization of trace metals such as arsenic, cobalt, lead, and mercury.

  8. Kinetics and mechanism of sphalerite leaching by sodium nitrate in sulphuric acid solution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sokić M.

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Interest for application of hydrometallurgical processes in a processing of complex sulphide ores and concentrates has increased in recent years. Their application provides better metal recoveries and reduced emission of gaseous and toxic ageneses in the environment. The kinetics and mechanism of sphalerite leaching from complex sulphide concentrate with sulphuric acid and sodium nitrate solution at standard conditions was presented in this paper. The influences of temperature and time on the leaching degree of zinc were investigated and kinetic analysis of the process was accomplished. With temperature increasing from 60 to 90°C, the zinc leaching increased from 25.23% to 71.66% after 2 hours, i.e. from 59.40% to 99.83% after 4 hours. The selected kinetic model indicated that the diffusion through the product layer was the rate-controlling step during the sphalerite leaching. The activation energy was determined to be 55 kJ/mol in the temperature range 60-90°C. XRD, light microscopy and SEM/EDX analyses of the complex concentrate and leach residue confirmed formation of elemental sulphur and diffusion-controlled leaching mechanism.

  9. Recovery of valuable metals from waste diamond cutters through ammonia-ammonium sulfate leaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Ping; Li, Guang-qiang; Yang, Yong-xiang; Qin, Qin-wei; Wei, Ming-xing

    2017-12-01

    Copper and zinc were recovered from waste diamond cutters through leaching with an ammonia-ammonium sulfate system and air as an oxidant. The effects of experimental parameters on the leaching process were investigated, and the potential-pH ( E-pH) diagrams of Cu-NH3-SO4 2--H2O and Zn-NH3-SO4 2--H2O at 25°C were drawn. Results showed that the optimal parameters for the leaching reaction are as follows: reaction temperature, 45°C; leaching duration, 3 h; liquid-to-solid ratio, 50:1 (mL/g); stirring speed, 200 r/min; ammonia concentration, 4.0 mol/L; ammonium sulfate concentration, 1.0 mol/L; and air flow rate, 0.2 L/min. The results of the kinetics study indicated that the leaching is controlled by the surface chemical reaction at temperatures below 35°C, and the leaching is controlled by diffusion through the product layer at temperatures above 35°C.

  10. [Effects of biochar on soil nutrients leaching and potential mechanisms: A review].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yu-xue; Lyu, Hao-hao; Shi, Yan; Wang, Yao-feng; Zhong, Zhe-ke; Yang, Sheng-mao

    2015-01-01

    Controlling soil nutrient leaching in farmland ecosystems has been a hotspot in the research field of agricultural environment. Biochar has its unique physical and chemical properties, playing a significant role in enhancing soil carbon storage, improving soil quality and increasing crop yield. As a kind of new exogenous material, biochar has the potential in impacting soil nutrient cycling directly or indirectly, and has profound influences on soil nutrient leaching. This paper analyzed the intrinsic factors affecting how biochar affects soil nutrient leaching, such as the physical and chemical properties of biochar, and the interaction between biochar and soil organisms. Then the latest literatures regarding the external factors, including biochar application rates, soil types, depth of soil layer, fertilization conditions and temporal dynamics, through which biochar influences soil nutrient (especially nitrogen and phosphorus) leaching were reviewed. On that basis, four related action mechanisms were clarified, including direct adsorption of nutrients by biochar due to its micropore structure or surface charge, influencing nutrient leaching through increasing soil water- holding capacity, influencing nutrient cycling through the interaction with soil microbes, and preferential transport of absorbed nutrients by fine biochar particles. At last future research directions for better understanding the interactions between biochar and nutrient leaching in the soil were proposed.

  11. Extraction of Vanadium from Vanadium Slag Via Non-salt Roasting and Ammonium Oxalate Leaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Meng; Du, Hao; Zheng, Shili; Wang, Shaona; Zhang, Yang; Liu, Biao; Dreisinger, David Bruce; Zhang, Yi

    2017-10-01

    A clean method featuring non-salt roasting followed by (NH4)2C2O4 leaching to recover vanadium from vanadium slag was proposed. The carcinogenic Cr6+ compounds and exhaust gases were avoided, and the water generated from vanadate precipitation may be recycled and reused in this new leaching process. The leaching residues may be easily used by a blast furnace. Moreover, (NH4)2C2O4 solution was used as a leaching medium to avoid expensive and complicated ammonium controlling operations as a result of the stability of (NH4)2C2O4 at a high temperature. The transformation mechanisms of vanadium- and chromium-bearing phases were systematically investigated by x-ray diffraction analysis and scanning electron microscopy with energy-disperse x-ray spectrometry, respectively. In addition, the effects of oxygen concentration, roasting temperature, and holding time on vanadium recovery were investigated. Finally, the effects of leaching variables on the vanadium leaching rate were also examined.

  12. A kinetics study of acetic acid on cobalt leaching of spent LIBs: Shrinking Core Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Setiawan Hendrik

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Lithium-ion batteries (LIBs are secondary rechargeable power sources which increasing production also leads to large amount of waste. In order to environmentally friendly reduce the waste, this work aimed to use acetic acid as a substitute leaching agent to leach Co metals which constitutes about 72.39% wt of the battery cathode. The leaching process was done in a three-necked-flask where calcined LIB cathode powder was mixed with acetic acid solution. The variables of the leaching process under investigation were solution pH, concentration of H2O2 in the solution, S/L ratio, temperature and reaction time. Experimental results showed that only temperature significantly influenced the leaching rate of Co. Since the process was exothermic, the maximum recovery decreased as temperature increased. Conventional shrinking core model that considers diffusion and irreversible surface reaction resistances was found not sufficient to predict the kinetics of the Co leaching with acetic acid. A more representative kinetics model that considers a reversible reaction of Co complex formation needs to be further developed.

  13. Chemical characterization, leach, and adsorption studies of solidified low-level wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walter, M.B.; Serne, R.J.; Jones, T.L.; McLaurine, S.B.

    1986-12-01

    Laboratory and field leaching experiments are beig conducted by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) to investigate the performance of solidified low-level nuclear waste in a typical, arid, near-surface disposal site. Under PNL's Special Waste Form Lysimeters-Arid Program, a field test facility was constructed to monitor the leaching of commercial solidified waste. Laboratory experiments were conducted to investigate the leaching and adsorption characteristics of the waste forms in contact with soil. Liquid radioactive wastes solidified in cement, vinyl ester-styrene, and bitumen were obtained from commercial boiling water and pressurized water reactors, and buried in a field leaching facility on the Hanford site in southeastern Washington State. Batch leaching, soil column adsorption, and soil/waste form column experiments were conducted in the laboratory, using small-scale cement waste forms and Hanford site ground water. The purpose of these experiments is to evaluate the ability of laboratory leaching tests to predict leaching under actual field conditions and to determine which mechanisms (i.e., diffusion, solubility, adsorption) actually control the concentration of radionuclides in the soil surrounding the waste form. Chemical and radionuclide analyses performed on samples collected from the field and laboratory experiments indicate strong adsorption of /sup 134,137/Cs and 85 Sr onto the Hanford site sediment. Small amounts of 60 Co are leached from the waste forms as very mobile species. Some 60 Co migrated through the soil at the same rate as water. Chemical constituents present in the reactor waste streams also found at elevated levels in the field and laboratory leachates include sodium, sulfate, magnesium, and nitrate. Plausible solid phases that could be controlling some of the chemical and radionuclide concentrations in the leachate were identified using the MINTEQ geochemical computer code

  14. Life cycle assessment and residue leaching: The importance of parameter, scenario and leaching data selection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Allegrini, Elisa; Butera, Stefania; Kosson, D.S.

    2015-01-01

    , due to the potential leaching of toxic substances. In waste LCA studies where residue utilisation is included, leaching has generally been neglected. In this study, municipal solid waste incineration bottom ash (MSWI BA) was used as a case study into three LCA scenarios having different system...... of systems and products and can be applied to waste management systems to identify environmental benefits and critical aspects thereof. From an LCA perspective, residue utilisation provides benefits such as avoiding the production and depletion of primary materials, but it can lead to environmental burdens...... impacts as a result of leaching were dominant in systems including only MSWI BA utilisation, while leaching appeared negligible in larger scenarios including the entire waste system. However, leaching could not be disregarded a priori, due to large uncertainties characterising other activities...

  15. Leaching Behavior of Heavy Metals from Cement Pastes Using a Modified Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Minrui; Feng, Huajun; Shen, Dongsheng; Li, Na; Chen, Yingqiang; Shentu, Jiali

    2016-03-01

    As the standard toxicity characteristic leaching procedure (TCLP) can not exhaust the acid neutralizing capacity of the cement rotary kiln co-processing solid wastes products which is particularly important for the assessment of the leaching concentrations of heavy metals. A modified TCLP was proposed. The extent of leaching of heavy metals is low using the TCLP and the leaching performance of the different metals can not be differentiated. Using the modified TCLP, however, Zn leaching was negligible during the first 180 h and then sharply increased (2.86 ± 0.18 to 3.54 ± 0.26 mg/L) as the acidity increased (pH cement rotary kiln co-processing products.

  16. Nitrate role in basic cation leaching under no-till

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Alexandre Costa Crusciol

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Especially under no-tillage, subsuface soil acidity has been a problem, because it depends on base leaching, which has been associated with the presence of low molecular weigth organic acids and companion anions. The objective of this study was to evaluate exchangeable base cation leaching as affected by surface liming along with annual urea side-dressing of maize and upland rice. Treatments consisted of four lime rates (0, 1500, 3000, and 6000 kg ha-1 combined with four nitrogen rates (0, 50, 100, and 150 kg ha-1 applied to maize (Zea mays and upland rice (Oryza sativa, in two consecutive years. Maize was planted in December, three months after liming. In September of the following year, pearl millet (Pennisetum glaucum was planted without fertilization and desiccated 86 days after plant emergence. Afterwards, upland rice was grown. Immediately after upland rice harvest, 18 months after surface liming, pH and N-NO3-, N-NH4+, K, Ca, and Mg levels were evaluated in soil samples taken from the layers 0-5, 5-10, 10-20 and 20-40 cm. Higher maize yields were obtained at higher N rates and 3000 kg ha-1 lime. Better results for upland rice and pearl millet yields were also obtained with this lime rate, irrespective of N levels. The vertical mobility of K, Ca and Mg was higher in the soil profiles with N fertilization. Surface liming increased pH in the upper soil layers causing intense nitrate production, which was leached along with the base cations.

  17. Investigation of Copper Ammonia Leaching from Smelter Slags: Characterization, Leaching and Kinetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bidari, Ehsan; Aghazadeh, Valeh

    2015-10-01

    Although ammonia leaching of copper from slags has been reported generally as a part of copper slag utilization methods, but no detailed studies have been reported in the literature. In this research, we tried to investigate the effect of different parameters on ammonia leaching of copper from copper smelting slag by identifying different copper-bearing phases and following them during leaching time. Mineralogical characterization of the smelting slag (1.7 pct Cu) was done using X-ray fluorescence, X-ray diffraction, optical microscopy, diagnostic leaching tests, and scanning electron microscopy. The characterization studies indicated that main copper-bearing species are soluble copper oxides and chalcocite along with minor amount of covellite, bornite, blister copper particles, and chalcopyrite. It was also found that only approximately 0.2 pct Cu was present in the insoluble bulk silicate phases. These results suggest that approximately 88 pct of the total copper of slag could be extracted by ammonia sulfide leaching. Leaching tests were carried out and the effects of various parameters, namely pH, ammonia concentration, temperature, presence of oxygen, stirring speed, and pulp density were examined on copper leaching. The temperature and stirring speed had the most pronounced effect on the copper leaching, whereas ammonia affected the leaching yield at low concentrations of ammonia. It was found that 78 pct of Cu could be extracted within 4 hours and under optimum conditions: T = 343 K (70 °C), 2M ammonia, pH 10.5, stirring speed = 900 rpm, pulp density = 10 pct ( w s/ v). The kinetic data were analyzed with the shrinking core models, and it was found that the leaching process is controlled by both the interfacial transfer and diffusion across the product layer and the activation energy is calculated to be 49.4 kJ mol-1.

  18. Microfluidic Leaching of Soil Minerals: Release of K+ from K Feldspar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciceri, Davide; Allanore, Antoine

    2015-01-01

    The rate of K+ leaching from soil minerals such as K-feldspar is believed to be too slow to provide agronomic benefit. Currently, theories and methods available to interpret kinetics of mineral processes in soil fail to consider its microfluidic nature. In this study, we measure the leaching rate of K+ ions from a K-feldspar-bearing rock (syenite) in a microfluidic environment, and demonstrate that at the spatial and temporal scales experienced by crop roots, K+ is available at a faster rate than that measured with conventional apparatuses. We present a device to investigate kinetics of mineral leaching at an unprecedented simultaneous resolution of space (~101-102 μm), time (~101-102 min) and fluid volume (~100-101 mL). Results obtained from such a device challenge the notion that silicate minerals cannot be used as alternative fertilizers for tropical soils. PMID:26485160

  19. Feasibility Study of an Optical Caustic Plasmonic Light Scattering Sensor for Human Serum Anti-Dengue Protein E Antibody Detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García, Antonio A; Franco, Lina S; Pirez-Gomez, Miguel A; Pech-Pacheco, José L; Mendez-Galvan, Jorge F; Machain-Williams, Carlos; Talavera-Aguilar, Lourdes; Espinosa-Carrillo, José H; Duarte-Villaseñor, Miriam M; Be-Ortiz, Christian; Espinosa-de Los Monteros, Luz E; Castillo-Pacheco, Ariel; Garcina-Rejon, Julian E

    2017-08-17

    Antibody detection and accurate diagnosis of tropical diseases is essential to help prevent the spread of disease. However, most detection methods lack cost-effectiveness and field portability, which are essential features for achieving diagnosis in a timely manner. To address this, 3D-printed oblate spheroid sample chambers were fabricated to measure green light scattering of gold nanoparticles using an optical caustic focus to detect antibodies. Scattering signals of 20-200 nm gold nanoparticles using a green laser were compared to green light emitting diode (LED) light source signals and to Mie theory. The change in signal from 60 to 120 nm decreased in the order of Mie Theory > optical caustic scattering > 90° scattering. These results suggested that conjugating 60 nm gold nanoparticles and using an optical caustic system to detect plasmonic light scattering, would result in a sensitive test for detecting human antibodies in serum. Therefore, we studied the light scattering response of conjugated gold nanoparticles exposed to different concentrations of anti-protein E antibody, and a feasibility study of 10 human serum samples using dot blot and a handheld optical caustic-based sensor device. The overall agreement between detection methods suggests that the new sensor concept shows promise to detect gold nanoparticle aggregation in a homogeneous assay. Further testing and protocol optimization is needed to draw conclusions on the positive and negative predictive values for this new testing system.

  20. Laboratory leach tests of phosphate/sulfate waste grout and leachate adsorption tests using Hanford sediment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Serne, R.J.; Martin, W.J.; McLaurine, S.B.; Airhart, S.P.; LeGore, V.L.; Treat, R.L.

    1987-12-01

    An assessment of the long-term risks posed by grout disposal at Hanford requires data on the ability of grout to resist leaching of waste species contained in the grout via contact with water that percolates through the ground. Additionally, data are needed on the ability of Hanford sediment (soil) surrounding the grout and concrete vault to retard migration of any wastes released from the grout. This report describes specific laboratory experiments that are producing empirical leach rate data and leachate-sediment adsorption data for Phosphate-Sulfate Waste (PSW) grout. The leach rate and adsorption values serve as inputs to computer codes used to forecast potential risk resulting from the use of ground water containing leached species. In addition, the report discusses other chemical analyses and geochemical computer code calculations that were used to identify mechanisms that control leach rates and adsorption potential. Knowledge of the controlling chemical and physical processes provides technical defensibility for using the empirical laboratory data to extrapolate the performance of the actual grout disposal system to the long time periods of interest. 59 refs., 83 figs., 18 tabs

  1. Laboratory leach tests of phosphate/sulfate waste grout and leachate adsorption tests using Hanford sediment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Serne, R.J.; Martin, W.J.; McLaurine, S.B.; Airhart, S.P.; LeGore, V.L.; Treat, R.L.

    1987-12-01

    An assessment of the long-term risks posed by grout disposal at Hanford requires data on the ability of grout to resist leaching of waste species contained in the grout via contact with water that percolates through the ground. Additionally, data are needed on the ability of Hanford sediment (soil) surrounding the grout and concrete vault to retard migration of any wastes released from the grout. This report describes specific laboratory experiments that are producing empirical leach rate data and leachate-sediment adsorption data for Phosphate-Sulfate Waste (PSW) grout. The leach rate and adsorption values serve as inputs to computer codes used to forecast potential risk resulting from the use of ground water containing leached species. In addition, the report discusses other chemical analyses and geochemical computer code calculations that were used to identify mechanisms that control leach rates and adsorption potential. Knowledge of the controlling chemical and physical processes provides technical defensibility for using the empirical laboratory data to extrapolate the performance of the actual grout disposal system to the long time periods of interest. 59 refs., 83 figs., 18 tabs.

  2. Nitrogen leaching from natural ecosystems under global change: a modelling study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braakhekke, Maarten C.; Rebel, Karin T.; Dekker, Stefan C.; Smith, Benjamin; Beusen, Arthur H. W.; Wassen, Martin J.

    2017-12-01

    To study global nitrogen (N) leaching from natural ecosystems under changing N deposition, climate, and atmospheric CO2, we performed a factorial model experiment for the period 1901-2006 with the N-enabled global terrestrial ecosystem model LPJ-GUESS (Lund-Potsdam-Jena General Ecosystem Simulator). In eight global simulations, we used either the true transient time series of N deposition, climate, and atmospheric CO2 as input or kept combinations of these drivers constant at initial values. The results show that N deposition is globally the strongest driver of simulated N leaching, individually causing an increase of 88 % by 1997-2006 relative to pre-industrial conditions. Climate change led globally to a 31 % increase in N leaching, but the size and direction of change varied among global regions: leaching generally increased in regions with high soil organic carbon storage and high initial N status, and decreased in regions with a positive trend in vegetation productivity or decreasing precipitation. Rising atmospheric CO2 generally caused decreased N leaching (33 % globally), with strongest effects in regions with high productivity and N availability. All drivers combined resulted in a rise of N leaching by 73 % with strongest increases in Europe, eastern North America and South-East Asia, where N deposition rates are highest. Decreases in N leaching were predicted for the Amazon and northern India. We further found that N loss by fire regionally is a large term in the N budget, associated with lower N leaching, particularly in semi-arid biomes. Predicted global N leaching from natural lands rose from 13.6 Tg N yr-1 in 1901-1911 to 18.5 Tg N yr-1 in 1997-2006, accounting for reductions of natural land cover. Ecosystem N status (quantified as the reduction of vegetation productivity due to N limitation) shows a similar positive temporal trend but large spatial variability. Interestingly, this variability is more strongly related to vegetation type than N input

  3. Stress corrosion cracking of Ni base alloys in Pb-contaminated caustic solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Mi Ae; Kim, Dong Jin; Kim, Joung Soo; Kim, Hong Pyo

    2009-01-01

    Steam generator tubes in pressurized water reactors(PWRs) form a pressure boundary between the primary and secondary sides. Austenitic stainless steel was used initially for the tubing, but it was changed to Alloy 600 as the results of corrosion problems. Experiences with Alloy 600 in the late 1960s and early 1970s, in the early high temperature large PWRs, identified numerous corrosion problems. Efforts for the development of a new made and the result was Alloy 690. Since the mid-1980s new and replacement steam generators have used Alloy 690. However, PWRs with Alloy 600 steam generators are still being operated. A lot of problems related to corrosion have been reported in Alloy 600 steam generator tubes of operating nuclear power plants(NPPs), and the outer diameter stress corrosion cracking (ODSCC) and intergranular attack(IGA) which have been occurring in Alloy 600 tubes are known to be the leading causes of PWR steam generator tube plugging in the USA and worldwide. According to Smith and Stratton, Alloy 690 is also reported to be susceptible to stress corrosion cracking and intergranular attack in deaerated (with argon) caustic solutions. It has been reported that contaminated lead in the secondary side cooling water is accumulated in the sludge piled on top of the tube sheet thus accelerating stress corrosion cracking in the SG tubes of NPPs. The detailed mechanism of accelerated stress corrosion cracking of Alloy 600 and 690 by Pb, however, has yet to be completely understood. It was observed that Pb dissolved in water can produce PbSCC at a Pb concentration as low as 0.1 ppm in these alloys. Lead is known to be one of the most aggressive environmental species that can accumulate in the crevice between the tubes and sludge piled on TTS in steam generators. Many laboratory experiments indicate that the stress corrosion cracking of steam generator tubing materials is accelerated in the presence of lead species in a caustic environment. In order to observe the

  4. Leaching of nuclear power reactor waste forms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Endo, L.S.; Villalobos, J.P.; Miyamoto, H.

    1987-01-01

    The leaching tests for immobilized power reactor wastes carried out at IPEN are described. These wastes forms consist mainly of spent resins and boric acid concentrates solidified in ordinary Portland cement. All tests were conducted according to the ISO and IAEA recommendations. Three years leaching results are reported. The cesium diffuvity coefficients determined out of these results are about 1 x 10 -8 cm 2 /s for boric acid waste form and 9 x 10 -9 cm 2 /s for ion-exchange resin waste. Strontium diffusivity coefficients found are about 3 x 10 -11 cm 2 /s and 9 x 10 -11 cm 2 /s respectively. (Author) [pt

  5. Heap Leaching of Caliche Ore. Modeling of a Multicomponent System with Particle Size Distribution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javier I. Ordóñez

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Caliche is a mineral exploited in northern Chile, from which iodine and Nitrate salts (saltpeter are obtained. This ore is the most important source of iodine in the world and is processed mainly by heap leaching using water as a leaching agent. Heap leaching of caliche ore is carried out by the stacking of ROM (Run-Of-Mine material, where the particle size distribution covers a wide range, from a few millimeters up to several decimeters, even diameters about 1 m. During the leaching, the multiple soluble species of caliche, which can reach total fractions larger than 40%, are dissolved at different rates, mainly controlled by their solubilities. When it occurs and unlike most other leachable ores, the particle size diminishes. The leaching modeling of several soluble species of caliche has been recently addressed; however, one of the main assumptions is the idealization that the heap is composed of particles of the same size. The present work aims to complement the previously formulated phenomenological models for caliche ore leaching, through a model that considers the simultaneous dissolution of two species from caliche with three different particle sizes. These two water-soluble species have different solubilities and dissolution rates and the conceptual model considers that both species are dissolved at the particle surface. When the most soluble species is being depleted, the particle collapses, leaving a remaining fraction of the less soluble species together with insoluble material. The less soluble species is now being dissolved from the collapsed material. This article also includes the experimental verification of the conceptual model using data obtained from column leaching tests conducted for this purpose, focusing on the dissolution of two soluble species: Nitrate and Magnesium.

  6. Physical and chemical mechanism underlying ultrasonically enhanced hydrochloric acid leaching of non-oxidative roasting of bastnaesite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Dongliang; Li, Mei; Gao, Kai; Li, Jianfei; Yan, Yujun; Liu, Xingyu

    2017-11-01

    In this study, we investigated an alternative to the conventional hydrochloric acid leaching of roasted bastnaesite. The studies suggested that the rare earth oxyfluorides in non-oxidatively roasted bastnaesite can be selectively leached only at elevated temperatures Further, the Ce(IV) in oxidatively roasted bastnaesite does not leach readily at low temperatures, and it is difficult to induce it to form a complex with F - ions in order to increase the leaching efficiency. Moreover, it is inevitably reduced to Ce(III) at elevated temperatures. Thus, the ultrasonically-assisted hydrochloric acid leaching of non-oxidatively roasted bastnaesite was studied in detail, including, the effects of several process factors and the, physical and chemical mechanisms underlying the leaching process. The results show that the leaching rate for the ultrasonically assisted process at 55°C (65% rare earth oxides) is almost the same as that for the conventional leaching process at 85°C. Based on the obtained results, it is concluded that ultrasonic cavitation plays a key role in the proposed process, resulting not only in a high shear stress, which damages the solid surface, but also in the formation of hydroxyl radicals (OH) and hydrogen peroxide (H 2 O 2 ). Standard electrode potential analysis and experimental results indicate that Ce(III) isoxidized by the hydroxyl radicals to Ce(IV), which can be leached with F - ions in the form of a complex, and that the Ce(IV) can subsequently be reduced to Ce(III) by the H 2 O 2. This prevents the Cl - ions in the solution from being oxidized to form chlorine. These results imply that the ultrasonically-assisted process can be used for the leaching of non-oxidatively roasted bastnaesite at low temperatures in the absence of a reductant. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Leaching of low-grade copper ores: A case study for 'Kraku Bugaresku-Cementacija' deposits (Eastern Serbia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bogdanović Grozdanka D.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with the investigation of column leaching of low-grade ores from the copper mine Cerovo, Serbia (the approximate Cu content in the ore ranges from 0.2 - 0.3 % with >10 % copper in the form of oxide minerals. The leaching experiments were performed using sulphuric acid solutions, whereby the kinetics of copper leaching was investigated with respect to acid concentration and solid to liquid ratio. The copper concentration in the leach solution ranged from 0.80 to 1.75 g dm-3. The total Cu recovery rate ranged from 30 to 56 %, whereas the recovery rate of copper oxide minerals ranged from 67 to 100 %. Furthermore, with increasing the amount of liquid phase, copper recovery increases as well, and copper oxide minerals were completely leached out. Besides copper ions, considerably high ferrous/ferric ion concentrations were achieved in the leach solution. This concentration was sufficiently high for the use of either solvent extraction or ion exchange techniques or both for further treatment of the leach solution.

  8. Ultrasound rays in droplets: The role of viscosity and caustics in acoustic streaming

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bruus, Henrik

    2017-01-01

    When an acoustic wave propagates through a viscous fluid, it progressively transfers momentum to the fluid through viscous dissipation, which results in the formation of a steady vortical flow called acoustic streaming. Although spawned by viscous effects, the magnitude of the streaming does...... not depend on the viscosity in most simple geometries. However, viscosity has a profound influence on the acoustic streaming as demonstrated by Riaud et al. (J. Fluid Mech., vol. 821, 2017, pp. 384-420) in their study of sessile mm-sized water-glycerol droplets placed on a piezoelectric substrate with a 20......-MHz ultrasound surface acoustic wave propagating along its surface. A detailed experimental and numerical analysis reveals that streaming dynamics is driven by a few ultrasound ray caustics inside the droplet....

  9. Predictive Factors of Gastrointestinal Caustic Injury According to Clinical and Endoscopic Findings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cherie Quingking

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Ingestion of caustic substances is the main reason for referral to Philippines National Poison Management and Control Center among other causes of acute poisoning. Rapid assessment of severity of injury is important for treatment and prognosis of these cases. This study was aimed to investigate the correlation of clinical factors with severity of gastrointestinal (GI mucosal injury. Methods: In this retrospective study, a total of 105 patients were included. Patients were categorized into two groups including 35 patients with low grade and 70 patients with high grade GI injury to compare the predictive value of clinical findings. Results: Mean (SD age of patients was 27 (10 and 47% of patients were male. Oral burns (P

  10. Kinetics and mechanism of hemicelluloses removal from cellulosic fibers during the cold caustic extraction process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jianguo; Hu, Huichao; Li, Hailong; Huang, Liulian; Chen, Lihui; Ni, Yonghao

    2017-06-01

    The effective separation of hemicelluloses and cellulose is desirable for the production of high-purity cellulose, which is a sustainable raw material for many value-added applications. For this purpose, the kinetics and mechanism of hemicelluloses removal from the cold caustic extraction (CCE) were investigated in the present study. The hemicelluloses removal process consists of: 1) the bulk phase, characteristic of significant hemicelluloses removal; 2) the transition phase, hemicelluloses transferring from the inner to the outer region of the fiber wall, with negligible overall hemicelluloses removal; 3) the residual phase, presenting a weak but continuing hemicelluloses removal. Furthermore, the enzymatic peeling method was adopted to study the fundamentals of hemicelluloses removal. The results showed that the molecular weight of hemicelluloses is the main parameter governing their diffusion/dissolution processes, and that the low molecular weight hemicelluloses are preferentially removed. Crown Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Probe of Multielectron Dynamics in Xenon by Caustics in High-Order Harmonic Generation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faccialà, D; Pabst, S; Bruner, B D; Ciriolo, A G; De Silvestri, S; Devetta, M; Negro, M; Soifer, H; Stagira, S; Dudovich, N; Vozzi, C

    2016-08-26

    We investigated the giant resonance in xenon by high-order harmonic generation spectroscopy driven by a two-color field. The addition of a nonperturbative second harmonic component parallel to the driving field breaks the symmetry between neighboring subcycles resulting in the appearance of spectral caustics at two distinct cutoff energies. By controlling the phase delay between the two color components it is possible to tailor the harmonic emission in order to amplify and isolate the spectral feature of interest. In this Letter we demonstrate how this control scheme can be used to investigate the role of electron correlations that give birth to the giant resonance in xenon. The collective excitations of the giant dipole resonance in xenon combined with the spectral manipulation associated with the two-color driving field allow us to see features that are normally not accessible and to obtain a good agreement between the experimental results and the theoretical predictions.

  12. Communication: Systematic elimination of Stokes divergences emanating from complex phase space caustics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koch, Werner; Tannor, David J.

    2018-03-01

    Stokes phenomenon refers to the fact that an asymptotic expansion of complex functions can differ in different regions of the complex plane, and that beyond the so-called Stokes lines the expansion has an unphysical divergence. An important special case is when the Stokes lines emanate from phase space caustics of a complex trajectory manifold. In this case, symmetry determines that to second order there is a double coverage of the space, one portion of which is unphysical. Building on the seminal but laconic findings of Adachi, we show that the deviation from second order can be used to rigorously determine the Stokes lines and therefore the region of the space that should be removed. The method has applications to wavepacket reconstruction from complex valued classical trajectories. With a rigorous method in hand for removing unphysical divergences, we demonstrate excellent wavepacket reconstruction for the Morse, Quartic, Coulomb, and Eckart systems.

  13. Field Sampling Plan for the HWMA/RCRA Closure Certification of the TRA-731 Caustic and Acid Storage Tank System - 1997 Notice of Violation Consent Order

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evans, S.K.

    2002-01-01

    This Field Sampling Plan for the HWMA/RCRA Closure Certification of the TRA-731 Caustic and Acid Storage Tank System is one of two documents that comprise the Sampling and Analysis Plan for the HWMA/RCRA closure certification of the TRA-731 caustic and acid storage tank system at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory. This plan, which provides information about sampling design, required analyses, and sample collection and handling procedures, is to be used in conjunction with the Quality Assurance Project Plan for the HWMA/RCRA Closure Certification of the TRA-731 Caustic and Acid Storage Tank System

  14. Synthesis of ZnS thin films from aqueous caustic of trisodium citrate and their properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martyn A. Sozanskyi

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Zinc sulfide (ZnS thin films due to their properties are widely used in various electronic optical devices. They are produced by several methods, among which – vacuum sublimation, high frequency sputtering method, quasiclosed volume method, sol-gel method, electrodeposition. These methods have high energy consumption which increases the price of ZnS thin films. Aim: The aim of this work is to establish the optimal parameters of the synthesis of ZnS thin films of the aqueous caustic and the correlation between content of zinc in the synthesized films determined by the method of stripping voltammetry and thickness, structural, morphological and optical parameters. Materials and Methods: The ZnS thin films were obtained from aqueous caustics of zinc-containing salt using chemical deposition. Fresh solution of zinc-containing salt, trisodium citrate (Na3C6H5O7 as a complexing agent, thiourea ((NH22CS and ammonium hydroxide (NH4OH was used for the synthesis of ZnS films by chemical deposition. The deposition was performed on prepared glass substrates with the area of 5,76 cm2. Results: The phase mixture of the films has been determined. It showed the presence of ZnS compounds in the cubic modification (sphalerite. Stripping voltammetry was used to determine the mass of zinc in the ZnS films on various conditions of synthesis, namely on the concentration of the initial zinc-containing salt, trisodium citrate, thiourea, deposition time and temperature. The surface morphology, optical properties, the thickness of the ZnS resulting films have been studied. Conclusions: The optimal conditions for the synthesis of ZnS films were found based on these data. Three-dimensional surface morphology of ZnS film studies showed its smoothness, uniformity, integrity and confirmed the correctness of determining the optimal synthesis parameters.

  15. Next Generation Solvent Development for Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction of Cesium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moyer, Bruce A. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Birdwell, Joseph F. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Bonnesen, Peter V. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Bruffey, Stephanie [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2014-03-01

    This report summarizes the FY 2010 and 2011 accomplishments at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) in developing the Next Generation Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction (NG-CSSX) process, referred to commonly as the Next Generation Solvent (NGS), under funding from the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Environmental Management (DOE-EM), Office of Technology Innovation and Development. The primary product of this effort is a process solvent and preliminary flowsheet capable of meeting a target decontamination factor (DF) of 40,000 for worst-case Savannah River Site (SRS) waste with a concentration factor of 15 or higher in the 18-stage equipment configuration of the SRS Modular Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction Unit (MCU). In addition, the NG-CSSX process may be readily adapted for use in the SRS Salt Waste Processing Facility (SWPF) or in supplemental tank-waste treatment at Hanford upon appropriate solvent or flowsheet modifications. Efforts in FY 2010 focused on developing a solvent composition and process flowsheet for MCU implementation. In FY 2011 accomplishments at ORNL involved a wide array of chemical-development activities and testing up through single-stage hydraulic and mass-transfer tests in 5-cm centrifugal contactors. Under subcontract from ORNL, Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) designed a preliminary flowsheet using ORNL cesium distribution data, and Tennessee Technological University confirmed a chemical model for cesium distribution ratios (DCs) as a function of feed composition. Inter laboratory efforts were coordinated with complementary engineering tests carried out (and reported separately) by personnel at Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) and Savannah River Remediation (SRR) with helpful advice by Parsons Engineering and General Atomics on aspects of possible SWPF implementation.

  16. Next Generation Solvent Performance in the Modular Caustic Side Solvent Extraction Process - 15495

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, Tara E. [Savannah River Remediation, LLC., Aiken, SC (United States); Scherman, Carl [Savannah River Remediation, LLC., Aiken, SC (United States); Martin, David [Savannah River Remediation, LLC., Aiken, SC (United States); Suggs, Patricia [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States)

    2015-01-14

    Changes to the Modular Caustic Side Solvent Extraction Unit (MCU) flow-sheet were implemented in the facility. Implementation included changing the scrub and strip chemicals and concentrations, modifying the O/A ratios for the strip, scrub, and extraction contactor banks, and blending the current BoBCalixC6 extractant-based solvent in MCU with clean MaxCalix extractant-based solvent. During the successful demonstration period, the MCU process was subject to rigorous oversight to ensure hydraulic stability and chemical/radionuclide analysis of the key process tanks (caustic wash tank, solvent hold tank, strip effluent hold tank, and decontaminated salt solution hold tank) to evaluate solvent carryover to downstream facilities and the effectiveness of cesium removal from the liquid salt waste. Results indicated the extraction of cesium was significantly more effective with an average Decontamination Factor (DF) of 1,129 (range was 107 to 1,824) and that stripping was effective. The contactor hydraulic performance was stable and satisfactory, as indicated by contactor vibration, contactor rotational speed, and flow stability; all of which remained at or near target values. Furthermore, the Solvent Hold Tank (SHT) level and specific gravity was as expected, indicating that solvent integrity and organic hydraulic stability were maintained. The coalescer performances were in the range of processing results under the BOBCalixC6 flow sheet, indicating negligible adverse impact of NGS deployment. After the Demonstration period, MCU began processing via routine operations. Results to date reiterate the enhanced cesium extraction and stripping capability of the Next Generation Solvent (NGS) flow sheet. This paper presents process performance results of the NGS Demonstration and continued operations of MCU utilizing the blended BobCalixC6-MaxCalix solvent under the NGS flowsheet.

  17. Next Generation Solvent (NGS): Development for Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction of Cesium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moyer, Bruce A. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Birdwell, Jr, Joseph F. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Bonnesen, Peter V. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Bruffey, Stephanie H. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Delmau, Laetitia Helene [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Duncan, Nathan C. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Ensor, Dale [Tennessee Technological Univ., Cookeville, TN (United States); Hill, Talon G. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Lee, Denise L. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Rajbanshi, Arbin [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Roach, Benjamin D. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Szczygiel, Patricia L. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Sloop, Jr., Frederick V. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Stoner, Erica L. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Williams, Neil J. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2014-03-01

    This report summarizes the FY 2010 and 2011 accomplishments at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) in developing the Next Generation Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction (NG-CSSX) process, referred to commonly as the Next Generation Solvent (NGS), under funding from the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Environmental Management (DOE-EM), Office of Technology Innovation and Development. The primary product of this effort is a process solvent and preliminary flowsheet capable of meeting a target decontamination factor (DF) of 40,000 for worst-case Savannah River Site (SRS) waste with a concentration factor of 15 or higher in the 18-stage equipment configuration of the SRS Modular Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction Unit (MCU). In addition, the NG-CSSX process may be readily adapted for use in the SRS Salt Waste Processing Facility (SWPF) or in supplemental tank-waste treatment at Hanford upon appropriate solvent or flowsheet modifications. Efforts in FY 2010 focused on developing a solvent composition and process flowsheet for MCU implementation. In FY 2011 accomplishments at ORNL involved a wide array of chemical-development activities and testing up through single-stage hydraulic and mass-transfer tests in 5-cm centrifugal contactors. Under subcontract from ORNL, Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) designed a preliminary flowsheet using ORNL cesium distribution data, and Tennessee Technological University confirmed a chemical model for cesium distribution ratios (DCs) as a function of feed composition. Interlaboratory efforts were coordinated with complementary engineering tests carried out (and reported separately) by personnel at Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) and Savannah River Remediation (SRR) with helpful advice by Parsons Engineering and General Atomics on aspects of possible SWPF implementation.

  18. Investigation of leaching of an antifouling agent from marine paint formulations using radiotracer technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pant, H.J.; Sharma, V.K.; Gursharan Singh; Kalgutkar, D.B.; Patil, S.P.; Jayachandran, N.; Unni, V.K.P.

    2012-01-01

    A radiotracer technique was used to investigate the leaching of an antifouling agent from different marine paint formulations with an objective to select the best paint formulation for bulk production. The antifouling agent (Diuron) itself was labeled with carbon-14 (half-life: 5,730 years, β-energy: 156 keV) and used as a radiotracer. The different paint formulations added with radiolabeled Diuron were applied onto suitably selected substrates and measured for initial intensity of β-radiation using a Geiger-Muller detector connected to a ratemeter. The painted substrates were subjected to shower tests for a pre-decided time and subsequently measured for β-radiations. The comparison of intensity of β-radiations in substrates prior and post shower tests provides information about leaching of antifouling agent Diuron from the paint formulation. The high leaching percentage of antifouling agent Diuron post shower tests indicates non-suitability of paint formulation for marine and civil structures. However, low leaching rate of Diuron will make a paint formulation more efficient and suitable. Based on the results of investigation, a paint formulation with minimum leaching rate was identified and selected for bulk production by a paint company. (author)

  19. Nutrient leaching from extensive green roofs with different substrate compositions: a laboratory study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wei; Zhong, Xing; Che, Wu

    2018-02-01

    To investigate nutrient leaching from extensive green roofs, green roof platforms were established to investigate the effluent quantity and quality during artificial rainfall. When the influent volume reached three times the empty bed volume, for which the cumulative rainfall was around 300 mm, the effluent TP and COD concentrations of green roof platforms filled with peat soil did not tend to stabilize. For a long-term operation, the substrate depths had little significant influence on TN, TP and COD concentrations of the green roof effluents. A normalized cumulative emission process method was proposed to discuss the difference in various pollutant leaching processes. Obvious differences in the leaching process of different contaminants for green roof platforms filled with various substrates were observed. For the green roof filled with modified substrates, the nitrogen and phosphorus pollutant leaching rates were relatively high in the initial stage of green roof operation and the phosphorus leaching rate was higher than that of nitrogen. The green roof is a sink for TN, but not for TP and COD in this study. The outcomes are critical for the selection of green roof substrates and also contribute to green roof maintenance.

  20. Study on Leaching of Copper Nanoparticles in Combined Impregnation- Densification Treatments of wood after Accelerated Aging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aisona Talaei

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available This study was performed to evaluate the leaching rate of copper nanoparticles in combined impregnation-densification treated poplar and spruce wood after accelerated aging. Specimens were prepared by impregnation with 200 and 400 ppm nano-copper suspensions, followed by pre-steam treatment and densification. Impregnation was done in a sealed vessel with 4 bar pressure in 20 minutes. Half of the specimens were oven-dried and steamed at 150°C for 2 hours and immediately densified under the hot press at 170°C for 3 hours to reach to the 33% compression rate. All specimens were exposed to the 6 steps accelerated aging procedure according to ASTM D-1037. Leaching test was performed according to EN84 standard (1997 for a period of 14 days. The leached residues were investigated in the Mineral Exploration and Geological Center by atomic absorption method. Results showed that nano-copper particles in impregnated specimens had no leaching; but the pre-steaming and densification treatments led to leaching the nano-copper particles from the treated wood.

  1. Analytical evaluation on the leaching of radionuclides from waste solids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moriyama, Noboru; Matsuzuru, Hideo; Dojiri, Shigeru; Wadachi, Yoshiki

    1975-11-01

    The leaching data are applied to several theoretical and empirical formulas to evaluate the amount of radionuclides leaching out after disposal of the solidified radioactive waste. Diffusion equation, equation for diffusion with other simultaneous first-order reaction, and polynomial expressions were examined as to whether they agree with the leaching data to find the mechanism taking place in the leaching process. From these study, the followings were revealed. (1) The polynomial expressions give the best approximation to the leaching data, even though each term has no physical significance, and the leaching mechanism is not clarified. (2) Equation for diffusion with other simultaneous first-order reaction provides a good approximation and the leaching mechanism is largely clarified. This method, however, requires a laborious numerical calculation. (3) The diffusion equation does not always express a leaching process accurately, though the treatment is both easy and simple. (auth.)

  2. Chlorine-assisted leaching of Rabbit Lake uranium ore

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haque, K.E.

    1981-05-01

    Bench-scale chlorine-assisted leaching tests were conducted on the Rabbit Lake uranium ore. Maximum extractions of uranium (97%), and radium-226 (90%) were obtained from leach tests conducted on slurries containing 60% solids at 40 degree C for 18 hours of leaching. Chlorine requirement was found to be 25.0 kg/tonne of ore to maintain the acidity level of the leach slurry at pH 1.0. Hydrochloric acid leaches were conducted on the chlorine-assisted leach residue to reduce the radium level to 25 pCi/g from 140 pCi/g of solids, but the radium level of the second-stage leach residue was found to be 90 pCi/g of solids. Therefore multistage (3 or 4 stages) acid chloride leaching have been recommended to obtain tailings almost free of radionuclides

  3. Leaching of Plastic Additives to Marine Organisms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koelmans, A.A.; Besseling, E.; Foekema, E.M.

    2014-01-01

    It is often assumed that ingestion of microplastics by aquatic species leads to increased exposure to plastic additives. However, experimental data or model based evidence is lacking. Here we assess the potential of leaching of nonylphenol (NP) and bisphenol A (BPA) in the intestinal tracts of

  4. Study of ground and unground leached vermiculite

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Maqueda, C.; Perez-Rodriguez, J. L.; Šubrt, Jan; Murafa, Nataliya

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 44, 1-2 (2009), s. 178-184 ISSN 0169-1317 Grant - others:CICYT(ES) AGL-2005-0164 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40320502 Keywords : vermiculite * amorphous silica * acid leaching Subject RIV: CA - Inorganic Chemistry Impact factor: 2.784, year: 2009

  5. Implementation of the Leaching Environmental Assessment ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    LEAF provides a uniform and integrated approach for evaluating leaching from solid materials (e.g., waste, treated wastes such as by solidification/stabilization, secondary materials such as blast furnace slags, energy residuals such as coal fly ash, soil, sediments, mining and mineral processing wastes). Assessment using LEAF applies a stepwise approach that considers the leaching behavior of COPCs in response to chemical and physical factors that control and material properties across a range of plausible field conditions (US EPA, 2010). The framework provides the flexibility to tailor testing to site conditions and select the extent of testing based on assessment objectives and the level of detailed information needed to support decision-making. The main focus will be to discuss the implementation of LEAF in the US and the How to Guide that has recently been completed. To present the How To Guide for the implementation of the leaching environmental assessment framework to an international audience already familiar with comparable leaching tests in use in Europe. Will be meeting with European colleagues on their interest in expanding methods to include organics.

  6. Duality properties of Gorringe Leach equations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grandati, Yves; Bérard, Alain; Mohrbach, Hervé

    2009-02-01

    In the category of motions preserving the angular momentum direction, Gorringe and Leach exhibited two classes of differential equations having elliptical orbits. After enlarging slightly these classes, we show that they are related by a duality correspondence of the Arnold Vassiliev type. The specific associated conserved quantities (Laplace Runge Lenz vector and Fradkin Jauch Hill tensor) are then dual reflections of each other.

  7. Gold and Silver Extraction from Leach Solutions

    OpenAIRE

    Bagdaulet K. Kenzhaliyev; Renata R. Iskhakova; Zamzagul D. Dosymbaeva; Esen N. Sulejmenov

    2014-01-01

    There has been carried out an investigation on the extraction of gold and silver from thiosulfate solutions: standard test and technological solutions of chemical and electrochemical leaching. The influence of related metals on the process of extracting gold from solution was studied. There has been conducted a comparative study of the IR spectra of solutions after the sorption of gold, silver and related metals.

  8. Characterization and leaching of coal fly ash

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gutierrez, B.; Pazos, C.; Coca, J. (University of Oviedo, Oviedo (Spain). Dept. of Chemical Engineering)

    1993-08-01

    Physical characteristics, chemical composition and leaching behaviour of a waste fly ash from a coal-fired power station are reported. Particle size distribution was studied by the following techniques; sedimentation in a liquid medium; sedimentation in an air flow; and Fraunhofer diffraction of a laser beam. Results obtained by the different methods are in good agreement. Mineralogical content and chemical composition were determined by X-ray diffraction, electronic microprobe and X-ray fluorescence. Acid leaching of the samples was investigated, using the following strong acids in sequence: HCl+HNO[sub 3], H[sub 2]F[sub 2], HClO[sub 4]. Analysis of leachat by atomic absorption shows trace metals In, Tl, Ge, Cu, Ga, Pb, Ni, Co, Mn, Cd, Zn, Cr. In this work, fly ashes from a Spanish power plant are characterized according to the type of particles, size distribution and chemical composition by means of physical methods. Three particle size fractions are leached by acids and analysis of trace elements in the leaching liquor is carried out. The concentration of trace metals is somewhat higher in the particles of smallest size. 12 refs., 4 figs.

  9. Column leaching from biomass combustion ashes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maresca, Alberto; Astrup, Thomas Fruergaard

    2015-01-01

    The utilization of biomass combustion ashes for forest soil liming and fertilizing has been addressed in literature. Though, a deep understanding of the ash chemical composition and leaching behavior is necessary to predict potential benefits and environmental risks related to this practice...

  10. Heap leaching of clay ish uranium ores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gonzalez, E.; Sedano, A.

    1973-01-01

    This paper describes an experimental facility, built near El Lobo mine. In it we study the beneficiation of low-grade uranium ore. The mineral has a great amount of clay and fines. The flow-sheet used has four steps: head leaching, ph-ajustement, ion-exchange and participation. We show, also, the most interesting results. (Author)

  11. Leach tests on grouts made with actual and trace metal-spiked synthetic phosphate/sulfate waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Serne, R.J.; Martin, W.J.; LeGore, V.L.; Lindenmeier, C.W.; McLaurine, S.B.; Martin, P.F.C.; Lokken, R.O.

    1989-10-01

    Pacific Northwest Laboratory conducted experiments to produce empirical leach rate data for phosphate-sulfate waste (PSW) grout. Effective diffusivities were measured for various radionuclides ({sup 90}Sr, {sup 99}Tc, {sup 14}C, {sup 129}I, {sup 137}Cs, {sup 60}Co, {sup 54}Mn, and U), stable major components (NO{sub 3}{sup {minus}}, SO{sub 4}{sup 2{minus}}, H{sub 3}BO{sub 3}, K and Na) and the trace constituents Ag, As, Cd, Hg, Pb, and Se. Two types of leach tests were used on samples of actual PSW grout and synthetic PSW grout: the American Nuclear Society (ANS) 16.1 intermittent replacement leach test and a static leach test. Grout produced from both synthetic and real PSW showed low leach rates for the trace metal constituents and most of the waste radionuclides. Many of the spiked trace metals and radionuclides were not detected in any leachates. None of the effluents contained measurable quantities of {sup 137}Cs, {sup 60}Co, {sup 54}Mn, {sup 109}Cd, {sup 51}Cr, {sup 210}Pb, {sup 203}Hg, or As. For those trace species with detectable leach rates, {sup 125}I appeared to have the greatest leach rate, followed by {sup 99}Tc, {sup 75}Se, and finally U, {sup 14}C, and {sup 110m}Ag. Leach rates for nitrate are between those for I and Tc, but there is much scatter in the nitrate data because of the very low nitrate inventory. 32 refs., 6 figs., 15 tabs.

  12. Acid agglomeration heap leaching: present status, principle and applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zeng Yijun

    2004-01-01

    For extracting valuable metal from clay-bearing acidic ores of poor permeability, agglomerated acid heap leaching appears to be the most effective method, whereas conventional leaching and general heap leaching bring about unsatisfactory recovery and poor economic returns. The present state of research work on acid agglomeration worldwide and its basic principle are discussed. The first commercial application employing acid agglomeration-heap leaching in China is also introduced

  13. Stability and leaching of cobalt smelter fly ash

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vítková, Martina; Hyks, Jiri; Ettler, Vojtěch

    2013-01-01

    The leaching behaviour of fly ash from a Co smelter situated in the Zambian Copperbelt was studied as a function of pH (5–12) using the pH-static leaching test (CEN/TS 14997). Various experimental time intervals (48h and 168h) were evaluated. The leaching results were combined with the ORCHESTRA ...

  14. Pesticide leaching through sandy and loamy fields - long-term lessons learnt from the Danish Pesticide Leaching Assessment Programme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenbom, Annette E; Olsen, Preben; Plauborg, Finn; Grant, Ruth; Juhler, René K; Brüsch, Walter; Kjær, Jeanne

    2015-06-01

    The European Union authorization procedure for pesticides includes an assessment of the leaching risk posed by pesticides and their degradation products (DP) with the aim of avoiding any unacceptable influence on groundwater. Twelve-year's results of the Danish Pesticide Leaching Assessment Programme reveal shortcomings to the procedure by having assessed leaching into groundwater of 43 pesticides applied in accordance with current regulations on agricultural fields, and 47 of their DP. Three types of leaching scenario were not fully captured by the procedure: long-term leaching of DP of pesticides applied on potato crops cultivated in sand, leaching of strongly sorbing pesticides after autumn application on loam, and leaching of various pesticides and their DP following early summer application on loam. Rapid preferential transport that bypasses the retardation of the plow layer primarily in autumn, but also during early summer, seems to dominate leaching in a number of those scenarios. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Embryotoxicity assays for leached components from dental restorative materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mummolo Stefano

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Currently, there are no suitable assays available to evaluate the embryotoxicity of leached components from restorative dental materials. Methods The effect of the medium conditioned by composites and amalgam on mouse blastocysts in vitro was tested. The materials were also subcutaneously implanted, and the effect of the medium supplemented with serum from the host blood was evaluated in the embryotoxicity assay. The embryo implantation rate in the material-transplanted mothers was also evaluated. Results The results show that while the culture in media conditioned by amalgams did not affect blastocyst development, the medium conditioned by composites caused blastocyst degeneration and apoptosis. The development of blastocysts in a medium containing serum obtained from animals after transplantation was, however, without effect. Finally, inconsistent reduction in the implantation rate in transplanted mothers was observed. Conclusions In this study, we provide examples of in vitro and in vivo tests that may be used to evaluate embryotoxicity for dental materials. Our results show that leached components from our composite-material induced embryotoxicity in vitro, however, no toxicity was observed when subcutaneously implanted in vivo. This highlights the necessity of integrated in vitro and in vivo tests for valuable predictive estimation of embryotoxicity for complex materials.

  16. Quality Assurance Project Plan for the HWMA/RCRA Closure Certification of the TRA-731 Caustic and Acid Storage Tank System - 1997 Notice of Violation Consent Order; TOPICAL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evans, S.K.

    2002-01-01

    This Quality Assurance Project Plan for the HWMA/RCRA Closure Certification of the TRA- 731 Caustic and Acid Storage Tank System is one of two documents that comprise the Sampling and Analysis Plan for the HWMA/RCRA closure certification of the TRA-731 caustic and acid storage tank system at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory. This plan, which provides information about the project description, project organization, and quality assurance and quality control procedures, is to be used in conjunction with the Field Sampling Plan for the HWMA/RCRA Closure Certification of the TRA-731 Caustic and Acid Storage Tank System. This Quality Assurance Project Plan specifies the procedures for obtaining the data of known quality required by the closure activities for the TRA-731 caustic and acid storage tank system

  17. Quality Assurance Project Plan for the HWMA/RCRA Closure Certification of the TRA-731 Caustic and Acid Storage Tank System - 1997 Notice of Violation Consent Order

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Evans, Susan Kay; Orchard, B. J.

    2002-01-01

    This Quality Assurance Project Plan for the HWMA/RCRA Closure Certification of the TRA-731 Caustic and Acid Storage Tank System is one of two documents that comprise the Sampling and Analysis Plan for the HWMA/RCRA closure certification of the TRA-731 caustic and acid storage tank system at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory. This plan, which provides information about the project description, project organization, and quality assurance and quality control procedures, is to be used in conjunction with the Field Sampling Plan for the HWMA/RCRA Closure Certification of the TRA-731 Caustic and Acid Storage Tank System. This Quality Assurance Project Plan specifies the procedures for obtaining the data of known quality required by the closure activities for the TRA-731 caustic and acid storage tank system.

  18. Quality Assurance Project Plan for the HWMA/RCRA Closure Certification of the TRA-731 Caustic and Acid Storage Tank System - 1997 Notice of Violation Consent Order

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Evans, S.K.

    2002-01-31

    This Quality Assurance Project Plan for the HWMA/RCRA Closure Certification of the TRA- 731 Caustic and Acid Storage Tank System is one of two documents that comprise the Sampling and Analysis Plan for the HWMA/RCRA closure certification of the TRA-731 caustic and acid storage tank system at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory. This plan, which provides information about the project description, project organization, and quality assurance and quality control procedures, is to be used in conjunction with the Field Sampling Plan for the HWMA/RCRA Closure Certification of the TRA-731 Caustic and Acid Storage Tank System. This Quality Assurance Project Plan specifies the procedures for obtaining the data of known quality required by the closure activities for the TRA-731 caustic and acid storage tank system.

  19. Leaching and mechanical properties of cabal glasses developed as matrices for immobilization high-level wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ezz-Eldin, F.M.

    2001-01-01

    This paper discusses the leaching behavior of simulated high-level-waste cabal glass (CaO-B 2 O 3 -Al 2 O 3 ) as a bulk specimen. During leach tests, the glass is immersed in either deionized water or in groundwater for up to 57 days at 70 deg. C. Based on the results, mechanisms observed with the leaching of the glass in deionized water or groundwater are discussed. Three factors, i.e., time of immersion, type of leaching solution and irradiation effect, are extensively studied. The corrosion was found to be linear with time in the limit of investigation (1-57 days) but with different rates depending on the type of solution and glass composition. Effects of γ-irradiation on the glass together with groundwater were found to decrease the glass durability. The evolution of the damage on mechanical and physical properties of the glass before and after leaching or irradiation was also discussed. The addition of waste oxide changes the properties of the glass matrix, so the influence of the guest oxides on the properties of host materials is also discussed

  20. Bio-leaching of toxic metals from geothermal waste. A preliminary engineering analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dobryn, D.G.; Brisson, A.L.; Lee, C.M.; Roll, S.M.

    1986-02-01

    The feasibility of a biological facility to treat geothermal sludge from a base case 50-MW double-flash geothermal power plant in the Imperial Valley, California was evaluated. The effect of sludge and nutrient concentration, agitation air bubbling and sterility on the rate of metal solubilization by the bacteria Thiobacillus thiooxidans and ferrooxidans was examined. All experiments were performed in batch flasks and monitored daily for bacterial growth. T. Thiooxidans leached 36% of the zinc in the sludge after 288 hr but leached little chromium. T. ferrooxidans removed 60% of the chromium in the sludge after 250 hr but did not leach zinc. Sludge to medium ratios of greater than 10% were toxic to the microorganisms studied. the experimental results were used to design a biological solid-waste treatment plant. The design basis used was 5 wt % sludge in the leaching vessel with a residence time of 10 days. The non-regulated waste resulting from the treatment plant could be used for land fill or construction materials. The total capital cost for the bio-leaching plant is $3.3 million with an annual operating cost of $690,000. The total cost of this plant is about 0.2 cents/kWh of electricity produced, which is essentially the same cost as hauling the solid waste to a hazardous disposal site. This cost accounts for about 5% of the cost of producing electricity from geothermal power (4 cent/kWh).

  1. Leaching of 137Cs from the ion-exchange resin incorporated in polyethylene or cement composite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mariyama, N.; Dojiri, S.; Matsuzuru, H.

    1977-01-01

    The results of an evaporation of a composite, which has been developed by incorporation of spent ion-exchange resin in polyethylene for the solidification of radioactive wastes, are reported. Transport phenomena involved in the leaching of 137 Cs from the composite matrix into surrounding water were investigated using two methods based on theoretical equations, a diffusion equation derived for a plane source model, and a rate equation for diffusion coupled with a first-order reaction. The leaching data were also analyzed by an empirical method employing a polynomial equation. Comparative results are presented. (U.K.)

  2. Calculated leaching of certain fission products from a cylinder of French glass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blomqvist, G.

    1977-07-01

    The probable total leaching of the most important fission products and actinides have been tabulated for a cylinder of French HLW glass with approximately 9 percent fission products. The calculations cover the period between 30 and 10000 years after removal from the reactor. The cylinder is of the type planned for the introduction of the HLW into Swedish crystalline rocks. All the components are supposed to have the same leach rate. The calculations also include the probable thickness of eroded glass layer/year. (author)

  3. Radiological investigation of phosphate fertilizers: Leaching studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hegedűs, Miklós; Tóth-Bodrogi, Edit; Németh, Szabolcs; Somlai, János; Kovács, Tibor

    2017-07-01

    The raw materials of the phosphate fertilizer industry are the various apatite minerals. Some of these have high levels of natural radionuclides, and thus phosphate fertilizers contain significant amounts of U-238, K-40 and Ra-226. These can leach out of the fertilizers used in large quantities for resupplying essential nutrients in the soil and can then enter the food chain through plants, thereby increasing the internal dose of the affected population. In the current study, the radiological risk of eight commercially available phosphate fertilizers (superphosphate, NPK, PK) and their leaching behaviours were investigated using different techniques (gamma and alpha spectrometry), and the dose contributions of using these fertilizers were estimated. To characterize the leaching behaviour, two leaching procedures were applied and compared -the MSZ 21470-50 (Hungarian standard) and the Tessier five-step sequential extraction method. Based on the evaluation of the gamma-spectra, it is found that the level of Th-232 in the samples was low (max.7 ± 6 Bq kg -1 ), the average Ra-226 activity concentration was 309 ± 39 Bq kg -1 (min. 10 ± 8 Bq kg -1 , max. 570 ± 46 Bq kg -1 ), while the K-40 concentrations (average 3139 ± 188 Bq kg -1 , min. 51 ± 36 Bq kg -1 ) could be as high as 7057 ± 427 Bq kg -1 . The high K-40 can be explained by reference to the composition of the investigated fertilizers (NPK, PK). U concentrations were between 15 and 361 Bq kg -1 , with the average of 254 Bq kg -1 , measured using alpha spectrometry. The good correlation between P 2 O 5 content and radioactivity reported previously is not found in our data. The leaching studies reveal that the mobility of the fertilizer's uranium content is greatly influenced by the parameters of the leaching methods. The availability of U to water ranged between 3 and 28 m/m%, while the Lakanen-Erviö solution mobilized between 10 and 100% of the U content. Copyright © 2016

  4. Nitrate leaching from a potato field using fuzzy inference system combined with genetic algorithm

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shekofteh, Hosein; Afyuni, Majid M; Hajabbasi, Mohammad-Ali

    2012-01-01

    The conventional application of nitrogen fertilizers via irrigation is likely to be responsible for the increased nitrate concentration in groundwater of areas dominated by irrigated agriculture. This requires appropriate water and nutrient management to minimize groundwater pollution...... and to maximize nutrient use efficiency. To fulfill these requirements, drip fertigation is an important alternative. This study deals with fuzzy modeling of nitrate leaching from a potato field under a drip fertigation system. In the first part of the study, a two-dimensional model (HYDRUS-2D) was used...... to simulate nitrate leaching from a sandy soil with varying emitter discharge rates and various amounts of fertilizer. The results from the modeling were used to train and validate a Mamdani fuzzy inference system (MFIS) in order to estimate nitrate leaching. The centers of triangular membership functions...

  5. An influence of mechanical activation on the selectivity of tetrahedrite acid leaching

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaroslav Briančin

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available Sulphidic mineral - tetrahedrite Cu12Sb4S13 was subjected to leaching in a H2SO4 medium. Physico-chemical changes of a mechanically activated mineral were investigated before and after leaching using the infrared spectroscopy and the scanning electron microscopy. The mechanical activation of the mineral resulted in the mechanochemical surface oxidation and the formation of sulphates and iron carbonate. Further, the specific surface area and the crystal structure disordering of the mineral increased. These aspects influence the kinetics and the selectivity of acid leaching of tetrahedrite. The effect of the reaction surface decreases due to the agglomeration during the milling and the formation of iron hydroxyoxides or iron hydroxysulphates from admixed pyrite and adversely affects the extraction rate of metals from tetrahedrite.

  6. Colorimetric detection of trace copper ions based on catalytic leaching of silver-coated gold nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lou, Tingting; Chen, Lingxin; Chen, Zhaopeng; Wang, Yunqing; Chen, Ling; Li, Jinhua

    2011-11-01

    A colorimetric, label-free, and nonaggregation-based silver coated gold nanoparticles (Ag/Au NPs) probe has been developed for detection of trace Cu(2+) in aqueous solution, based on the fact that Cu(2+) can accelerate the leaching rate of Ag/Au NPs by thiosulfate (S(2)O(3)(2-)). The leaching of Ag/Au NPs would lead to dramatic decrease in the surface plasmon resonance (SPR) absorption as the size of Ag/Au NPs decreased. This colorimetric strategy based on size-dependence of nanoparticles during their leaching process provided a highly sensitive (1.0 nM) and selective detection toward Cu(2+), with a wide linear detection range (5-800 nM) over nearly 3 orders of magnitude. The cost-effective probe allows rapid and sensitive detection of trace Cu(2+) ions in water samples, indicating its potential applicability for the determination of copper in real samples.

  7. Microbial leaching of iron from pyrite by moderate thermophile chemolithotropic bacteria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ilyas, S.; Niazi, S.B.

    2007-01-01

    The present work was aimed at studying the bioleachability of iron from pyrite by the selected moderately thermophilic strains of acidophilic chemolithotrophic and acidophilic heterotrophic bacteria. These included Sulfobacillus thermosulfidooxidans (chemolithotroph) and an un-identified strain of acidophilic heterotroph (code 6A1TSB) isolated from local environments. As compared to inoculated flasks, dissolution of metal (due to acid leaching) was significantly low in the un-inoculated control flasks in all the experiments in ore. A decrease in the bioleaching activity was observed at the later stages of bioleaching of metal from ore. Among the strategies adopted to enhance the metal leaching rates, a mixed consortium of the metal adapted cultures of the above-mentioned bacteria was found to exhibit the maximum metal leaching efficiency. In all the flasks where high metal leaching rates were observed, concomitantly biomass production rates were also high indicating high growth rates. It showed that the metal bioleaching capability of the bacteria was associated with their growth. Pyrite contained 42% iron. (author)

  8. Leaching of 60 Co and 137 Cs from spent ion exchange resins in ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Cement; radioactive waste; composite; waste management. Abstract. The leaching rate of 60Co and 137Cs from the spent cation exchange resins in cement–bentonite matrix has been studied. The solidification matrix was a standard Portland cement mixed with 290–350 (kg/m3) spent cation exchange resins, with or ...

  9. Barn swallows nesting near radioactive leaching ponds in southeastern Idaho

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Millard, J.B.; Whicker, F.W.; Markham, O.D.

    1978-01-01

    Seasonally occurring populations of barn swallows nest near the Test Reactor Area (TRA) radioactive leaching ponds on the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) Site. These birds utilize leaching pond arthropods and are therefore capable of accumulating radioactive materials and exporting them from the INEL Site during migration. The breeding biology is discussed for these swallows and a control group located 100 km away. Total nestling mortality for the controls and a 1977 TRA population was found to be statistically identical. Over 20 fission and activation products have been detected in immature and adult TRA birds. Mean concentrations of detectable radionuclides were used to calculate internal dose rates, and results showed that Na-24 contributed about 72% of the total average of 21.9 mrad/d for adult birds. Concentration factors were also calculated for predominant radionuclides in swallows relative to filtered pond water. Data from LiF dosimeters in swallow nests constructed with contaminated mud indicated average dose rates were 84 mrad/d for eggs and 220 mrad/d for nestlings. Growth curves were constructed for the immature TRA birds and controls. The first clutch of TRA swallows was found to have a significantly lower mean growth rate constant than the first clutch of controls. The statistical difference in growth rate between the control and TRA first clutch populations may have resulted from differences in climate, nesting site habitat, or available food sources, and cannot be solely attributed to radiation exposure as a causative factor. Growth rate parameters for TRA birds were within the range of values reported in the literature

  10. Extensive caustic esophageal stricture in children can be treated by serial dilatations interspersed with silicone-covered nitinol stenting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veronica Alonso

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Recurrent esophageal stenosis secondary to caustic ingestion may be challenging to treat. Self-expandable esophageal stents may be an alternative to repetitive endoscopic esophageal dilatation. We report a case of a 2-year-old male child with an extensive esophageal caustic stricture successfully treated using a combination of endoscopic dilatation and stenting. After 5 months of serial balloon dilatations, three nitinol internal silicone covered self-expandable stents were placed through the patient′s gastrostomy spanning the entire esophagus. The stents were positioned using a combination of both endoscopic and fluoroscopic guidance. The procedure was repeated with only one stent 3 months later. A new stricture in the proximal esophagus needed surgical resection and anastomosis, followed by two pneumatic dilatations with progressively longer asymptomatic intervals. The results are promising with the patient able to use his own esophagus; however, this is a single case and optimal stent standing time is still to be determined.

  11. Standard test method for accelerated leach test for diffusive releases from solidified waste and a computer program to model diffusive, fractional leaching from cylindrical waste forms

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2008-01-01

    1.1 This test method provides procedures for measuring the leach rates of elements from a solidified matrix material, determining if the releases are controlled by mass diffusion, computing values of diffusion constants based on models, and verifying projected long-term diffusive releases. This test method is applicable to any material that does not degrade or deform during the test. 1.1.1 If mass diffusion is the dominant step in the leaching mechanism, then the results of this test can be used to calculate diffusion coefficients using mathematical diffusion models. A computer program developed for that purpose is available as a companion to this test method (Note 1). 1.1.2 It should be verified that leaching is controlled by diffusion by a means other than analysis of the leach test solution data. Analysis of concentration profiles of species of interest near the surface of the solid waste form after the test is recommended for this purpose. 1.1.3 Potential effects of partitioning on the test results can...

  12. Gold and Silver Extraction from Leach Solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bagdaulet K. Kenzhaliyev

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available There has been carried out an investigation on the extraction of gold and silver from thiosulfate solutions: standard test and technological solutions of chemical and electrochemical leaching. The influence of related metals on the process of extracting gold from solution was studied. There has been conducted a comparative study of the IR spectra of solutions after the sorption of gold, silver and related metals.

  13. Leaching kinetics of synthetic heazlewoodite / Y. Zaayman

    OpenAIRE

    Zaayman, Yolande

    2004-01-01

    The sources of base metals are mainly in the form of oxides or sulphides, of which the sulphides are predominantly present in South Africa. These metals are intergrown platinum group and base metals in the form of alloys and sulphides. In order to produce high grade saleable metals, it is necessary to effectively separate the base metals from the precious metals. By means of a hydrometallurgical process, that is leaching, metals can selectively be extracted from ores. The me...

  14. Concentration-Purification of Uranium from an Acid Leaching Solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guettaf, H.; Becis, A.; Ferhat, K.; Hanou, K.; Bouchiha, D.; Yakoubi, K.; Ferrad, F.

    2009-11-01

    Chemical processes for the elaboration of uranium concentrate from uranium ore have been studied. This process is composed of successive units operations: crushing, milling, acid conventional leaching, filtration-washing, purification-concentration by ion exchange resins and uranium precipitation. The acid leaching operating conditions allow us to obtain a recovery uranium rate of 93%. The uranium concentration of the pregnant solution is approximately of 1.2 g/l. This value justifies the use of ion exchange resins to the concentration-purification of our pregnant solution. We have noticed that the pregnant solution contains a relatively high phosphate concentration which causes a premature uranium precipitation at pH=1.8. This pH value is in general, considered optimal to obtain the highest amount of fixed uranium by the anionic resin. To avoid the precipitation of uranium, the pH=1.5 has been fixed. We have obtained at this condition a good adsorption capacity. A 75% uranium concentrate have been elaborated, but the filtration of this concentrate has been very difficult. We have also noticed an excessive sulphate concentration. In order to improve this process, we have tested nitrates as eluant at different operating conditions.

  15. Modeling of facade leaching in urban catchments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coutu, S.; Del Giudice, D.; Rossi, L.; Barry, D. A.

    2012-12-01

    Building facades are protected from microbial attack by incorporation of biocides within them. Flow over facades leaches these biocides and transports them to the urban environment. A parsimonious water quantity/quality model applicable for engineered urban watersheds was developed to compute biocide release from facades and their transport at the urban basin scale. The model couples two lumped submodels applicable at the basin scale, and a local model of biocide leaching at the facade scale. For the facade leaching, an existing model applicable at the individual wall scale was utilized. The two lumped models describe urban hydrodynamics and leachate transport. The integrated model allows prediction of biocide concentrations in urban rivers. It was applied to a 15 km2urban hydrosystem in western Switzerland, the Vuachère river basin, to study three facade biocides (terbutryn, carbendazim, diuron). The water quality simulated by the model matched well most of the pollutographs at the outlet of the Vuachère watershed. The model was then used to estimate possible ecotoxicological impacts of facade leachates. To this end, exceedance probabilities and cumulative pollutant loads from the catchment were estimated. Results showed that the considered biocides rarely exceeded the relevant predicted no-effect concentrations for the riverine system. Despite the heterogeneities and complexity of (engineered) urban catchments, the model application demonstrated that a computationally "light" model can be employed to simulate the hydrograph and pollutograph response within them. It thus allows catchment-scale assessment of the potential ecotoxicological impact of biocides on receiving waters.

  16. Economic leaching at Roessing Uranium Limited

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, C.C.

    1990-01-01

    In the fourteen years that Roessing Uranium Limited has been in production, the metallurgical operations and controls on the leaching plant have envolved through four basic stages. Initially, the emphasis was placed on the achievement of consistent plant operation by overcoming severe start-up difficulties. The second stage involved the attainment of the design operating targets and also the commissioning of the ferric-leaching reactors in order to achieve a ferric ion concentration of more than 3.0 g/l. Improvements in control then became the priority, with the emphasis on consistently achieving the target concentrations of ferric ions, total iron, and terminal acidity. The latest phase has concentrated on the optimization of costs by means of adjustments to the historically established operating parameters in order to achieve large savings on consumables while maintaining the leaching efficiencies. Apart from the obvious incentive of reducing costs in an inflationary economy and a depressed uranium market, impetus for this work was given by a change in the type of ore from the open pit, which has the effect of reducing the extraction efficiency while increasing the consumption of consumable materials. These problems and their solutions are discussed in detail, and the importance to cost-effective optimization of an accurate up-to-date cost-reporting structure is stressed. 9 figs., 2 tabs

  17. Influence of microstructure on stress corrosion cracking of mild steel in synthetic caustic-nitrate nuclear waste solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sarafian, P.G.

    1975-12-01

    The influence of alloy microstructure on stress corrosion cracking of mild steel in caustic-nitrate synthetic nuclear waste solutions was studied. An evaluation was made of the effect of heat treatment on a representative material (ASTM A 516 Grade 70) used in the construction of high activity radioactive waste storage tanks at Savannah River Plant. Several different microstructures were tested for susceptibility to stress corrosion cracking. Precracked fracture specimens loaded in either constant load or constant crack opening displacement were exposed to a variety of caustic-nitrate and nitrate solutions. Results were correlated with the mechanical and corrosion properties of the microstructures. Crack velocity and crack arrest stress intensity were found to be related to the yield strength of the steel microstructures. Fractographic evidence indicated pH depletion and corrosive crack tip chemistry conditions even in highly caustic solutions. Experimental results were compatible with crack growth by a strain-assisted anodic dissolution mechanism; however, hydrogen embrittlement also was considered possible

  18. Simulations of sonic boom ray tube area fluctuations for propagation through atmospheric turbulence including caustics via a Monte Carlo method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sparrow, Victor W.; Pierce, Allan D.

    1992-01-01

    A theory which gives statistical predictions for how often sonic booms propagating through the earth's turbulent boundary layer will encounter caustics, given the spectral properties of the atmospheric turbulence, is outlined. The theory is simple but approximately accounts for the variation of ray tube areas along ray paths. This theory predicts that the variation of ray tube areas is determined by the product of two similar area factors, psi (x) and phi (x), each satisfying a generic harmonic oscillator equation. If an area factor increases the peak acoustic pressure decreases, and if the factor decreases the peak acoustic pressure increases. Additionally, if an area factor decreases to zero and becomes negative, the ray has propagated through a caustic, which contributes a phase change of 90 degrees to the wave. Thus, it is clear that the number of times that a sonic boom wave passes through a caustic should be related to the distorted boom waveform received on the ground. Examples are given based on a characterization of atmospheric turbulence due to the structure function of Tatarski as modified by Crow.

  19. Effect of competing ions and causticization on the ammonia adsorption by a novel poly ligand exchanger (PLE) ammonia adsorption reagent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Quanzhou; Zhou, Kanggen; Hu, Yuanjuan; Liu, Fang; Wang, Aihe

    2017-03-01

    In this paper, a poly ligand exchanger, Cu(II)-loaded chelating resin named ammonia adsorption reagent (AMAR), bearing the functional group of weak iminodiacetate acid, was prepared to efficiently remove ammonia from solutions. Batch adsorption equilibrium experiments were conducted under a range of conditions. The effects of pH on the removal of ammonia by AMAR were investigated at 25 °C. The copper loaded on the resin forms a complex with NH 3 in solution under alkaline condition. The effect of alkaline dosage (AD) on the ammonia adsorption was investigated. The maximum breakthrough bed volumes were obtained when the AD was set as 0.75 mmol OH - /mL. The higher AD did not guarantee the better ammonia removal efficiency due to the forming of Cu(OH) 2 precipitate between OH - in solutions and Cu(II) on the resin. The effect of competing ions on the adsorption breakthrough curve of virgin AMAR and causticized AMAR was also investigated. The results demonstrated that the existence of competing ions had a negative impact on the adsorption capacity for both virgin AMAR and causticized AMAR. After causticization, the AMAR was more resistant to the competing ions comparing with virgin AMAR. The bivalent Ca 2+ affects the ammonia adsorption more than does the monovalent Na + .

  20. Pesticide leaching through sandy and loamy fields – Long-term lessons learnt from the Danish Pesticide Leaching Assessment Programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosenbom, Annette E.; Olsen, Preben; Plauborg, Finn; Grant, Ruth; Juhler, René K.; Brüsch, Walter; Kjær, Jeanne

    2015-01-01

    The European Union authorization procedure for pesticides includes an assessment of the leaching risk posed by pesticides and their degradation products (DP) with the aim of avoiding any unacceptable influence on groundwater. Twelve-year's results of the Danish Pesticide Leaching Assessment Programme reveal shortcomings to the procedure by having assessed leaching into groundwater of 43 pesticides applied in accordance with current regulations on agricultural fields, and 47 of their DP. Three types of leaching scenario were not fully captured by the procedure: long-term leaching of DP of pesticides applied on potato crops cultivated in sand, leaching of strongly sorbing pesticides after autumn application on loam, and leaching of various pesticides and their DP following early summer application on loam. Rapid preferential transport that bypasses the retardation of the plow layer primarily in autumn, but also during early summer, seems to dominate leaching in a number of those scenarios. - Highlights: • Field-results reveal shortcomings in the EU authorization procedure for pesticides. • The plough layer can be bypassed via preferential transport in e.g. wormholes. • Pesticides properties are decisive for leaching pattern on the sandy fields. • The hydrogeological settings control the leaching patterns on the loamy fields. • Pesticide detection frequency seems to be independent of the month of the year. - Long-term lessons learnt from the Danish Pesticide Leaching Assessment Programme reveals shortcomings in the European Union authorization procedure for pesticides

  1. Evolution of the local environment of lanthanum during simplified SON68 glass leaching

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jollivet, P.; Delaye, J.M.; Den Auwer, C.; Simoni, E.

    2007-01-01

    The evolution of the short- and medium-range local environment of lanthanum was determined by L-III-edge X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) during leaching of simplified SON68-type glasses. In glass without phosphorus, lanthanum is found in a silicate environment, and its first coordination sphere comprises eight oxygen atoms at a mean distance of 2.51 angstrom. When this glass was leached at a high renewal rate, the lanthanum local environment was significantly modified: it was present at hydroxy-carbonate and silicate sites with a mean La-O distance of 2.56 angstrom, and the second neighbors consisted of La atoms instead of Si for the glass. Conversely, in the gel formed at low renewal rates, lanthanum was found in a silicate environment similar to that of the glass. In phosphorus-doped glass, lanthanum is found in a phosphate environment, although the Si/P atomic ratio is 20:1. Lanthanum is surrounded by seven oxygen atoms at a mean distance of 2.37 angstrom. When phosphorus-doped glass is leached, regardless of the leaching solution flow rate, the short- and medium-range lanthanum local environment remains almost constant; the most significant change is a 0.05 angstrom increase in the La-O distance. (authors)

  2. Leaching of heavy metals from steelmaking slags

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gomes, J. F. P

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Leaching tests with EAF and Ladle slags were performed, using a flow through test and the standard batch test DIN 38414-S4. The previous method was used to simulate the leaching behaviour of steel slags under landfill. The chemical analysis of the leachates during this period shows, in general, for both types of slag, an increase of heavy metal releases with ageing. Standard test method DIN 38414-S4 was used to evaluate leachability of heavy metals by water in unprocessed slags. After more than one year of trials, slag samples submitted to these trials presented very low total leaching levels. The most extracted elements are calcium and magnesium. Nevertheless, in flow-through test, calcium and magnesium leached from solid slags are below 0.5% and all other metals below 0.1%. Leachates obtained with DIN 38414-S4 present, as expected, higher leaching values; however, these are inferior to 5 % (Ca and 1% (other elements.

    Este articulo contiene los resultados obtenidos en ensayos de lixiviación de escorias de acero (horno electrico y cuchara ejecutados siguiendo la metodologia de flujo dinámico así como el ensayo normalizado DIN 38414-S4. El primer ensayo intenta simular el comportamiento de lixiviación de las escorias en vertedero. Para las escorias ensayadas se han complementado los ensayos con el análisis químico de los lixiviados y se ha verificado un aumento de la liberación de metales pesados. El ensayo DIN 38414-S4 se ha utilizado para evaluar la lixiviación por agua de metales pesados, en muestras de escorias originales. Despues de un año de ensayos, se han observado niveles muy bajos de lixiviación. Los elementos mas lixiviados han sido calcio y magnesio. No obstante, en los ensayos de flujo dinámico, el calcio y el magnesio lixiviados de las escorias sólidas era menor de 0,5% y el resto de los otros metales era inferior a 0,1%. Los lixiviados obtenidos con el ensayo DIN 38414-S4 presentan, como era de esperar, valores

  3. Impact of peatland restoration on nutrient and carbon leaching from contrasting sites in southern Finland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasander, Harri; Sallantaus, Tapani; Koskinen, Markku

    2010-05-01

    Impacts of peatland restoration on nutrient and carbon leaching from contrasting sites in southern Finland Tapani Sallantaus1, Markku Koskinen2, Harri Vasander2 1)Finnish Environment Institute, Biodiversity unit, Box 140, FIN-00251 Helsinki, Finland, tapani.sallantaus@ymparisto.fi 2)Department of Forest Sciences, University of Helsinki, Box 27, FIN-00014 University of Helsinki, Finland, markku.koskinen@helsinki.fi, harri.vasander@helsinki.fi Less than 20 % of the original mire area of southern Finland is still in natural state. Even many peatlands in today's nature conservation areas had been partly or totally drained before conservation. Until now, about 15000 ha of peatlands have been restored in conservation areas. Here we present data concerning changes in leaching due to restoration in two contrasting areas in southern Finland. The peatlands in Seitseminen have originally been fairly open, growing stunted pine, and unfertile, either bogs or poor fens. The responses of tree stand to drainage in the 1960s were moderate, and the tree stand before restoration was about 50 m3/ha, on average. The trees were partly harvested before filling in the ditches mainly in the years 1997-1999 . The peatlands of Nuuksio are much more fertile than those in Seitseminen, and had greatly responded to drainage, which took place already in the 1930s and 1950s. The tree stand consisted mainly of spruce and exceeded 300 m3/ha in large part of the area. The ditches were dammed in the autumn 2001 and the tree stand was left standing. Runoff water quality was monitored in three basins in both areas. To obtain the leaching rates, we used simulated runoff data obtained from the Finnish Environment Institute, Hydrological Services Division. The responses in leaching were in the same direction in both cases. However, especially when calculated per restored hectare (Table 1), the responses were much stronger in the more fertile areas of Nuuksio for organic carbon and nitrogen, but not so much

  4. Use of adjuvants to minimize leaching of herbicides in soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alva, Ashok K.; Singh, Megh

    1991-03-01

    Excessive leaching of herbicides affects their efficacy against target weeds and results in contamination of groundwater. Use of adjuvants that can weakly bind herbicides and in turn release them slowly is a valuable technique to prolong the efficacy of herbicides and to minimize their leaching into groundwater. Effects of activated charcoal, three humic substances (Enersol SP 85%, Enersol 12%, and Agroliz), or a synthetic polymer (Hydrosorb) on the leaching of bromacil, dicamba, and simazine were investigated in leaching columns using a Candler fine sand (Typic Quartzipsamment). The addition of adjuvants had no harmful effects on physical properties of the soil as evident from lack of its affects on water percolation. When no adjuvants were used, 69%, 37%, and 4% of applied dicamba, bromacil, and simazine, respectively, were leached in the first pore volume of leachate (⋍3.2 cm rainfall). With five pore volumes of leachate (⋍16 cm rainfall), bromacil and dicamba were leached completely and only 80% of simazine was leached. Using Enersol 12% adjuvant resulted in a 13%-18% reduction in leaching of dicamba and bromacil in five pore volumes of leachate. The leaching of simazine was significantly decreased when any of the five adjuvants mentioned above were used. However, the decrease in leaching was significantly greater when using Enersol SP 85% or Enersol 12% (24%-28%) than when using the other adjuvants (12%-16%).

  5. Process for controlling calcium in a leach operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Habib, E.J.

    1982-01-01

    A method for controlling calcium, e.g. calcite, build-up in the leach solution of a uranium and/or related values recovery operation wherein the leach solution is flowed through a value bearing ore to dissolve the desired values. A soluble fluoride, e.g. sodium fluoride, is added to the leach solution after it has passed through the ore to thereby precipitate calcium fluoride from the leach solution and lower the calcium content of the leach solution. The soluble fluoride may be added to the leach solution before the leach solution passes through the process equipment which is used to remove the values from the leach solution or the soluble fluoride may be added after the leach solution passes through the process equipment. If added before, it is preferable to also add a carbonate/bicarbonate solution along with the soluble fluoride to prevent coprecipitation of uranyl/desired value fluoride or to redissolve coprecipitated fluoride back into the leach solution

  6. Numerical simulation of shock wave focusing at fold caustics, with application to sonic boom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchiano, Régis; Coulouvrat, François; Grenon, Richard

    2003-10-01

    Weak shock wave focusing at fold caustics is described by the mixed type elliptic/hyperbolic nonlinear Tricomi equation. This paper presents a new and original numerical method for solving this equation, using a potential formulation and an "exact" numerical solver for handling nonlinearities. Validation tests demonstrate quantitatively the efficiency of the algorithm, which is able to handle complex waveforms as may come out from "optimized" aircraft designed to minimize sonic booms. It provides a real alternative to the approximate method of the hodograph transform. This motivated the application to evaluate the ground track focusing of sonic boom for an accelerating aircraft, by coupling CFD Euler simulations performed around the mock-up on an adaptated mesh grid, atmospheric propagation modeling, and the Tricomi algorithm. The chosen configuration is the European Eurosup mock-up. Convergence of the focused boom at the ground level as a function of the matching distance is investigated to demonstrate the efficiency of the numerical process. As a conclusion, it is indicated how the present work may pave the way towards a study on sonic superboom (focused boom) mitigation.

  7. K-Area Acid/Caustic Basin groundwater monitoring report: Fourth quarterly 1993 and 1993 summary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-03-01

    During fourth quarter 1993, samples from the KAC monitoring wells at the K-Area Acid/Caustic Basin were collected and analyzed for indicator parameters, groundwater quality parameters, parameters indicating suitability as drinking water, and other constituents. Monitoring results that exceeded the final Primary Drinking Water Standards (PDWS) or the Savannah River Site (SRS) flagging criteria or turbidity standard during the quarter are discussed in this report. Tritium exceeded its final PDWS in well KAC 7 during fourth quarter 1993. The tritium value reported by the laboratory was approximately fifty times the concentration of any previous sample from that well. The well was resampled and yielded a low, historically-consistent tritium concentration. Therefore, the high tritium value reported this quarter is believed to be the result of a laboratory error. Aluminum exceeded its Flag 2 criterion in wells KAC 6, 7, and 9. Iron exceeded the Flag 2 criterion in well KAC 6, and specific conductance exceeded the Flag 2 criterion in well KAC 9. Total organic halogens exceeded standards in wells KAC 4 and 6. No samples exceeded the SRS turbidity standard

  8. Caustic Injury In Adults – A Study For 3 Year Period

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radenkova-Saeva J.

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study is to present the results of a 3-year clinico-epidemiological investigation of caustic injury in adults. The study includes 43 patients with acute corrosive ingestion, hospitalized in the Toxicology Clinic, University Hospital “N. I. Pirogov”, Sofia, Bulgaria, for the period 01.01. 2010-31.12.2012. The methods used include: clinical observation and examination, clinical laboratory, imaging, and psychiatric methods and tests. 43 patients between the ages of 22 and 82 with acute corrosive ingestions have been observed. Eleven were male (25.6% and 32 female (74.4%. All ingestions were intentional. Alkaline agents were used by all of the patients. The severity of poisonings varied from moderate to extremely severe. Different complications were seen in 82% of the cases - severe bleeding, perforation, fistula or/and stricture formation. Two of the patients have undergone surgical intervention - coloesophagoplastic - and have recovered completely. The motivation in different age groups was also studied. Psychiatric comorbidity occurred in patients as depressive and schizoaffective disorder, as well as existential crises. Acute corrosive ingestions by alkaline agents cause severe pathology. The severity and complex character of the injuries require good coordination between different medical specialists.

  9. Adiabatic theory of strong-field photoelectron momentum distributions near a backward rescattering caustic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morishita, Toru; Tolstikhin, Oleg I.

    2017-11-01

    We present a comprehensive treatise on the derivation of the factorization formula describing strong-field photoelectron momentum distributions near the outermost backward rescattering caustic within the adiabatic theory and its validation by calculations. The formula derived holds for ionization by linearly polarized laser pulses of sufficiently low frequency and becomes exact as the frequency tends to zero for a fixed pulse amplitude. The convergence of the results obtained from the formula to accurate photoelectron momentum distributions obtained by solving the time-dependent Schrödinger equation is demonstrated. The formula is shown to work quantitatively in both tunneling and over-the-barrier regimes of ionization for finite-range potentials as well as potentials with a Coulomb tail. This paves the way for future applications of the present theory in strong-field physics. In particular, the explicit analytical form of the returning photoelectron wave packet given here enables one to extract differential cross sections for elastic scattering of a photoelectron on the parent ion from experimental photoelectron momentum distributions.

  10. Electrochemical studies on stress corrosion cracking of incoloy-800 in caustic solution. Part II: Precracking samples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dinu Alice

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Stress corrosion cracking (SCC in a caustic medium may affect the secondary circuit tubing of a CANDU NPP cooled with river water, due to an accidental formation of a concentrated alkaline environment in the areas with restricted circulation, as a result of a leakage of cooling water from the condenser. To evaluate the susceptibility of Incoloy-800 (used to manufacture steam generator tubes for CANDU NPP to SCC, some accelerated corrosion tests were conducted in an alkaline solution (10% NaOH, pH = 13. These experiments were performed at ambient temperature and 85 °C. We used the potentiodynamic method and the potentiostatic method, simultaneously monitoring the variation of the open circuit potential during a time period (E corr/time curve. The C-ring method was used to stress the samples. In order to create stress concentrations, mechanical precracks with a depth of 100 or 250 μm were made on the outer side of the C-rings. Experimental results showed that the stressed samples were more susceptible to SCC than the unstressed samples whereas the increase in temperature and crack depth lead to an increase in SCC susceptibility. Incipient micro cracks of a depth of 30 μm were detected in the area of the highest peak of the mechanical precrack.

  11. Role of RDW in Prediction of Burn after Caustic Substance Ingestion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emrah Aydin

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available A quantifiable, quick, inexpensive and reproducible predictor is needed to decide if caustic substance ingestion results in burn regardless of the symptoms. A multicenter cohort study was conducted to investigate the predictive value of red cell distribution width (RDW in detecting the esophageal burns. The data of 174 patients were retrospectively analyzed. Eleven patients were excluded due to inability to define the substance ingested. Complete blood count (CBC was taken at admission, and an esophagogastroduodenoscopy was performed within the first 12–24 h in all patients, regardless of their symptoms. The age and gender of the patients, the types of substances ingested, the parameters in the CBC and the severity of the esophageal injury were correlated. Esophageal burns were diagnosed in 38 of 163 patients (23.3%. The risk of esophageal burn with RDW values below 12.20 was significantly lower. Multivariate analysis showed that RDW was the most significant predictor of esophageal burn (p = 0.000, odds ratio (OR 7.74 (95% confidence interval (CI, 3.02–19.9. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC curve analysis demonstrated 84.2% sensitivity at a cut-off value of 12.20 for RDW. The results showed that CBC parameters could avoid unnecessary esophagogastroduodenoscopy. The RDW values regardless of the symptomatology is a good predictor of esophageal burns, and an RDW value over 12.20 shows the increased risk of esophageal burn.

  12. Development of an accelerated leaching method for incineration bottom ash correlated to toxicity characteristic leaching protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Shengxuan; Zhou, Xuedong; Ge, Liya; Ng, Sum Huan; Zhou, Xiaodong; Chang, Victor Wei-Chung

    2016-10-01

    Heavy metals and some metalloids are the most significant inorganic contaminants specified in toxicity characteristic leaching procedure (TCLP) in determining the safety of landfills or further utilization. As a consequence, a great deal of efforts had been made on the development of miniaturized analytical devices, such as Microchip Electrophoresis (ME) and μTAS for on-site testing of heavy metals and metalloids to prevent spreading of those pollutants or decrease the reutilization period of waste materials such as incineration bottom ash. However, the bottleneck lied in the long and tedious conventional TCLP that requires 18 h of leaching. Without accelerating the TCLP process, the on-site testing of the waste material leachates was impossible. In this study, therefore, a new accelerated leaching method (ALM) combining ultrasonic assisted leaching with tumbling was developed to reduce the total leaching time from 18 h to 30 min. After leaching, the concentrations of heavy metals and metalloids were determined with ICP-MS or ICP-optical emission spectroscopy. No statistical significance between ALM and TCLP was observed for most heavy metals (i.e., cobalt, manganese, mercury, molybdenum, nickel, silver, strontium, and tin) and metalloids (i.e., arsenic and selenium). For the heavy metals with statistical significance, correlation factors derived between ALM and TCLP were 0.56, 0.20, 0.037, and 0.019 for barium, cadmium, chromium, and lead, respectively. Combined with appropriate analytical techniques (e.g., ME), the ALM can be applied to rapidly prepare the incineration bottom ash samples as well as other environmental samples for on-site determination of heavy metals and metalloids. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  13. Using PHREEQC for modelling and simulation of dynamic leaching tests and scenarios.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiruta-Barna, L

    2008-09-15

    This paper presents an extension of the application field of PHREEQC geochemical software for modelling the dynamic leaching tests (and scenarios) by taking into account the leachant compartment as complex reactive/transport system and the coupling of many reactive compartments linked by substance fluxes. This study focuses on the specific case of dynamic leaching of monolithic porous materials (particularly the case of continuous monolithic leaching test, CMLT) where reaction/diffusion occurs in the porous matrix and where the leachant is a complex reactor in which chemistry coupled with inter-phase mass transfer and convection processes take place. It is demonstrated here that the modelling of open reactors (convection) is possible with PHREEQC by using RATES and KINETICS keyword data blocks. The PHREEQC model was validated by results comparison with analytical solutions of the system equations. Coupling a diffusion compartment with an open reactor (complex boundary conditions for the diffusion equation) requires the introduction of a stagnant cell on the first grid cell of the diffusion compartment in TRANSPORT data block and the use of MIX function for model the monolith/leachant interface transfer. The proposed model was validated by comparison with numerical solutions obtained with MATLAB and by a numerical sensibility study. Finally, the model equations are given for a complex dynamic leaching process of a porous monolith involving beside reaction/diffusion in the monolith, reactions, interface mass transfers, gas absorption and convection in the leachant. Examples of PHREEQC modelling are presented: (1) the case of continuous leaching of a cement based material using carbonated water and (2) a field scale water storage pool constructed with a solidified/stabilised material. The comparison with the experimental leaching data shows the simulation results are very satisfying.

  14. Effects of aged sorption on pesticide leaching to groundwater simulated with PEARL.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boesten, Jos J T I

    2017-01-15

    Leaching to groundwater is an important element of the regulatory risk assessment of pesticides in western countries. Including aged sorption in this assessment is relevant because there is ample evidence of this process and because it leads to a decrease in simulated leaching. This work assesses the likely magnitude of this decrease for four groundwater scenarios used for regulatory purpose in the EU (from the UK, Portugal, Austria and Greece) and for ranges of aged-sorption parameters and substance properties using the PEARL model. Three aged-sorption parameters sets were derived from literature, representing approximately 5th, 50th and 95th percentile cases for the magnitude of the effect of aged sorption on leaching concentrations (called S, M and L, respectively). The selection of these percentile cases was based only on the f NE parameter (i.e. the ratio of the aged sorption and the equilibrium sorption coefficients) because leaching was much more affected by the uncertainty in this parameter than by the uncertainty in the desorption rate coefficient of these sites (k d ). For the UK scenario, the annual flux concentration of pesticide leaching at 1m depth decreased by typically a factor of 5, 30 and >1000 for the S, M and L parameter sets, respectively. This decrease by a factor of 30 for the M parameter set appeared to be approximately valid also for the other three scenarios. Decreasing the Freundlich exponent N from 0.9 into 0.7 for the M parameter set, increased this factor of 30 into a factor of typically 1000, considering all four scenarios. The aged-sorption sites were close to their equilibrium conditions during the leaching simulations for two of the four scenarios (for all substances considered and the M parameter set), but this was not the case for the other two scenarios. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Identification and testing of early indicators for N leaching from urine patches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogeler, Iris; Cichota, Rogerio; Snow, Val

    2013-11-30

    Nitrogen leaching from urine patches has been identified as a major source of nitrogen loss under intensive grazing dairy farming. Leaching is notoriously variable, influenced by management, soil type, year-to-year variation in climate and timing and rate of urine depositions. To identify early indicators for the risk of N leaching from urine patches for potential usage in a precision management system, we used the simulation model APSIM (Agricultural Production Systems SIMulator) to produce an extensive N leaching dataset for the Waikato region of New Zealand. In total, nearly forty thousand simulation runs with different combinations of soil type and urine deposition times, in 33 different years, were done. The risk forecasting indicators were chosen based on their practicality: being readily measured on farm (soil water content, temperature and pasture growth) or that could be centrally supplied to farms (such as actual and forecast weather data). The thresholds of the early indicators that are used to forecast a period for high risk of N leaching were determined via classification and regression tree analysis. The most informative factors were soil temperature, pasture dry matter production, and average soil water content in the top soil over the two weeks prior to the urine N application event. Rainfall and air temperature for the two weeks following urine deposition were also important to fine-tune the predictions. The identified early indicators were then tested for their potential to predict the risk of N leaching in two typical soils from the Waikato region in New Zealand. The accuracy of the predictions varied with the number of indicators, the soil type and the risk level, and the number of correct predictions ranged from about 45 to over 90%. Further expansion and fine-tuning of the indicators and the development of a practical N risk tool based on these indicators is needed. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. The Effect of Initial Irrigation Conditions on Heap Leaching Efficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briseño Arellano, A. D.; Milczarek, M.; Yao, M.; Brusseau, M. L. L.

    2017-12-01

    Heap leaching is an unsaturated flow metal recovery process, in which mined ore is irrigated with a lixiviant to dissolve metal contained in the ore. The metal is then extracted from solution. Large scale operations involve stacking ore to depths of 6 to 18 meters on pads that may be hundreds of hectares in area. Heterogeneities within the stacked ore can lead to uneven wetting and the formation of preferential flow pathways, which reduces solution contact and lowers metal recovery. Furthermore, mineral dissolution can cause alteration of the porous media structure and loss of ore permeability. Many mine operators believe that slow initial irrigation rates help minimize permeability loss and increase metal recovery rates. However, this phenomenon has not been studied in detail. Experiments were conducted to investigate the effect of varying initial irrigation rates on leach ore stability. These were conducted with large columns (1.5 m high, 0.5 m in diameter) packed with crushed ore samples that are known to have permeability constraints. The columns were highly instrumented to assess potential changes in material properties both spatially and temporally. Water content was measured with three different methods: capacitance soil moisture sensors placed at 20-cm intervals; a neutron probe to periodically log every 30 cm from four different directions; and electrical resistivity sensors to create a 2-dimensional tomography profile of water content over time. Tensiometers were paired with the soil moisture sensors to measure matric suction and characterize moisture retention characteristics. A non-reactive tracer was used to characterize advective-dispersive transport under unsaturated conditions. A dye solution was introduced at the end of each experiment to map preferential pathways. Continuous monitoring of settling at the surface assisted in measuring consolidation and loss in permeability.

  17. Best Management Practices for Minimizing Nitrate Leaching from Container-Grown Nurseries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianjun Chen

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Containerized plant production represents an extremely intensive agricultural practice; 40,000 to 300,000 containers may occupy one acre of surface area to which a large amount of chemical fertilizer is applied. Currently, recommended fertilizer application rates for the production of containerized nursery ornamental plants are in excess of plant requirements, and up to 50% of the applied fertilizers may run off or be leached from containers. Among the nutrients leached or allowed to runoff, nitrogen (N is the most abundant and is of major concern as the source of ground and surface water pollution. In this report, current N fertilizer application rates for different container-grown nursery ornamental plants, the amount of nitrate leaching or runoff from containers, and the potential for nitrate contamination of ground and surface water are discussed. In contrast, our best N management practices include: (1 applying fertilizers based on plant species need; (2 improving potting medium�s nutrient holding capacity using obscure mineral additives; (3 using controlled-release fertilizers; and (4 implementing zero runoff irrigation or fertigation delivery systems that significantly reduce nitrate leaching or runoff in containerized plant production and encourage dramatic changes in N management.

  18. Effect of irradiation on the evolution of alteration layer formed during nuclear glass leaching

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mougnaud, Sarah

    2016-01-01

    High-level radioactive waste (HLW) remaining after spent nuclear fuel reprocessing is immobilized within a glass matrix, eventually destined for geological disposal. Water intrusion into the repository is expected after several thousand years. The alteration of a non-radioactive surrogate for nuclear glass has been extensively studied and it has been determined that successive leaching mechanisms lead to the formation of a 'passivating' alteration layer and to the establishment of a residual rate regime in the long term. However, glass packages are submitted to the radioactivity of confined radioelements. This work focuses on the influence of irradiation on the alteration layer formed during the residual rate regime, in a structural and mechanistic point of view. Three focal areas have been selected. Non-radioactive simple glasses have been leached and externally irradiated in order to determine modifications induced by electronic effects (irradiations with electrons and alpha particles). The same type of glass samples have been previously irradiated with heavy ions and their leaching behavior have been studied in order to assess the impact of ballistic dose cumulated by the glass before water intrusion. Leaching behavior of a complex radioactive glass, doped with an alpha-emitter, has been studied to consider a more realistic situation. (author) [fr

  19. Leaching of 210Po in human saliva from smokeless tobacco

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Syed, U.F.; Bari, A.; Husain, L.; Husain, L.

    2009-01-01

    Use of smokeless tobacco (SLT) is associated with cancer of the oral cavity. 210 Po, a known carcinogen present in SLT may leach into the saliva when the snuff is held in the mouth. Alpha emission from leached 210 Po can cause oral tissue damage, especially in the presence of non healing ulcers seen frequently in snuff users' mouth. Leaching of 210 Po from SLT in human saliva was determined for six popular US snuff brands. 210 Po was leached into human saliva for 30 min, separated radiochemically and its activity was determined by α-counting. Approximately 2-10% of 210 Po present in SLT was observed to leach. Annual exposure from leached 210 Po, based on average daily consumption of 15 g of SLT, was calculated to range from 1.1 to 3.8 Bq year -1 . (author)

  20. Chlorine-assisted leaching of Key Lake uranium ore

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haque, K.E.

    1981-04-01

    Bench-scale chlorine-assisted leach tests were conducted on the Key Lake uranium ore. Leach tests conducted at 80 0 C on a slurry containing 50% solids during 10 hours of agitation gave the maximum extraction of uranium - 96% and radium-226 - 91%. Chlorine was added at 23.0 Kg Cl 2 /tonne of ore to maintain the leach slurry pH in the range of 1.5-1.0. To obtain residue almost free of radionuclides, hydrochloric acid leaches were conducted on the first stage leach residues. The second stage leach residue still was found to contain uranium - 0.0076% and radium-226 - 200 pCi/g of solids

  1. Lysimeter study of commercial reactor waste forms: waste form acquisition characterization and full-scale leaching

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1983-02-01

    This report describes work conducted at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) as part of a joint program with Savannah River Laboratory. Typical full-scale (55-gallon drum size) waste forms were acquired by BNL from a boiling water reactor (BWR) and a pressurized water reactor (PWR). Liquid waste stream activity concentrations were analyzed by gamma spectroscopy. This information was used to determine the waste from activity inventory, providing the necessary source term for lysimeter and leaching experiments. Predominant radionuclides of interest include 60 Co, 137 Cs, 134 Cs, and 54 Mn. A full-scale leaching experiment was initiated by BNL encompassing four representative waste stream-solidification agent combinations. Waste streams tested include PWR evaporator concentrate (boric acid waste), BWR evaporator concentrate (sodium sulfate waste) and BWR evaporator concentrate plus ion exchange resins. Solidification agents include masonry cement, portland type III cement, and vinyl ester-styrene (Dow polymer). Analyses of leachates indicate measurable leach rates of 137 Cs, 134 Cs, and 60 Co from both BWR and PWR cement waste forms. The leach rates for both cesium isotopes in cement are at least two orders of magnitude greater than those for cobalt. Leachates from the BWR Dow polymer waste form include the same isotopes present in cement leachates, with the addition of 54 Mn. Cesium leach rates from the Dow polymer waste form are approximately one order of magnitude lower than from an equivalent cement waste form. The 60 Co cumulative fraction release, however, is approximately three times greater for the Dow polymer waste form

  2. RMDF leach-field decontamination. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carroll, J.W.; Marzec, J.M.; Stelle, A.M.

    1982-01-01

    The objective of the decontamination effort was to place the Radioactive Materials Disposal Facility (RMDF) leach field in a condition suitable for release for unrestricted use. Radioactively contaminated soil was excavated from the leach field to produce a condition of contamination as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA). The contaminated soil was boxed and shipped to an NRC-licensed burial site at Beatty, Nevada, and to the DOE burial site at Hanford, Washington. The soil excavation project successfully reduced the contamination level in the leach field to background levels, except for less than 0.6 mCi of Sr-90 and trace amounts of Cs-137 that are isolated in cracks in the bedrock. The cracks are greater than 10 ft below the surface and have been sealed with a bituminous asphalt mastic. A pathways analysis for radiation exposure to humans from the remaining radionuclides was performed, assuming intensive home gardening, and the results show that the total first year whole body dose equivalent would be about 0.1 mrem/year. This dose equivalent is a projection for the hypothetical ingestion of vegetables grown on the site. Assuming that an average adult consumes 64 kg of green leafy vegetables per year and that the entire yearly supply could be grown on the site, the amount of ingested Sr-90 and Cs-137 is calculated to be 1100 pCi/year and 200 pCi/year. This ingested quantity would produce a total first year whole body dose equivalent of 0.10 mrem, using the accepted soil-to-plant transfer factors of 0.0172 and 0.010 for Sr-90 and Cs-137, respectively. The whole body dose equivalent exposure value of 0.1 mrem/year is far below the tentative limit established by NRC of 5 mrem/year for areas released for unrestricted use

  3. Radiotracer investigation in gold leaching tanks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dagadu, C.P.K.; Akaho, E.H.K.; Danso, K.A.; Stegowski, Z.; Furman, L.

    2012-01-01

    Measurement and analysis of residence time distribution (RTD) is a classical method to investigate performance of chemical reactors. In the present investigation, the radioactive tracer technique was used to measure the RTD of aqueous phase in a series of gold leaching tanks at the Damang gold processing plant in Ghana. The objective of the investigation was to measure the effective volume of each tank and validate the design data after recent process intensification or revamping of the plant. I-131 was used as a radioactive tracer and was instantaneously injected into the feed stream of the first tank and monitored at the outlet of different tanks. Both sampling and online measurement methods were used to monitor the tracer concentration. The results of measurements indicated that both the methods provided identical RTD curves. The mean residence time (MRT) and effective volume of each tank was estimated. The tanks-in-series model with exchange between active and stagnant volume was used and found suitable to describe the flow structure of aqueous phase in the tanks. The estimated effective volume of the tanks and high degree of mixing in tanks could validate the design data and confirmed the expectation of the plant engineer after intensification of the process. - Highlights: ► I-131 radioactive tracer is suitable for tracing the aqueous phase in gold ore slurry. ► Online data collection is more convenient method for tracer monitoring in industrial process systems. ► The tanks-in-series model with exchange between active and stagnant zones is suitable to describe the flow behavior of leaching tanks. ► The radiotracer RTD technique could be used to validate design data after process intensification in gold leaching tanks.

  4. Radiotracer investigation in gold leaching tanks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dagadu, C.P.K., E-mail: dagadukofi@yahoo.co.uk [Ghana Atomic Energy Commission, P.O. Box LG 80, Legon, Accra (Ghana); Akaho, E.H.K.; Danso, K.A. [Ghana Atomic Energy Commission, P.O. Box LG 80, Legon, Accra (Ghana); Stegowski, Z.; Furman, L. [Faculty of Physics and Applied Computer Science, AGH-UST, 30-059 Krakow (Poland)

    2012-01-15

    Measurement and analysis of residence time distribution (RTD) is a classical method to investigate performance of chemical reactors. In the present investigation, the radioactive tracer technique was used to measure the RTD of aqueous phase in a series of gold leaching tanks at the Damang gold processing plant in Ghana. The objective of the investigation was to measure the effective volume of each tank and validate the design data after recent process intensification or revamping of the plant. I-131 was used as a radioactive tracer and was instantaneously injected into the feed stream of the first tank and monitored at the outlet of different tanks. Both sampling and online measurement methods were used to monitor the tracer concentration. The results of measurements indicated that both the methods provided identical RTD curves. The mean residence time (MRT) and effective volume of each tank was estimated. The tanks-in-series model with exchange between active and stagnant volume was used and found suitable to describe the flow structure of aqueous phase in the tanks. The estimated effective volume of the tanks and high degree of mixing in tanks could validate the design data and confirmed the expectation of the plant engineer after intensification of the process. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer I-131 radioactive tracer is suitable for tracing the aqueous phase in gold ore slurry. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Online data collection is more convenient method for tracer monitoring in industrial process systems. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The tanks-in-series model with exchange between active and stagnant zones is suitable to describe the flow behavior of leaching tanks. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The radiotracer RTD technique could be used to validate design data after process intensification in gold leaching tanks.

  5. Impact of weather variability on nitrate leaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richards, Karl; Premrov, Alina; Hackett, Richard; Coxon, Catherine

    2016-04-01

    The loss of nitrate (NO3 - N) to water via leaching and overland flow contributes to eutrophication of freshwaters, transitional and near coastal waters with agriculture contributing significantly to nitrogen (N) loading to these water. Environmental regulations, such as the Nitrates and Water Framework Directives, have increased constraints on farmers to improve N management in regions at risk of NO3--N loss to water. In addition, farmers also have to manage their systems within a changing climate as the imapcts of climate change begin to impact resulting in more frequent extreme events such as floods and droughts. The objective of this study was to investigate the link between weather volatility and the concentration of leached NO3--N spring barley. Leaching was quantified under spring barley grown on a well-drained, gravelly sandy soil using ceramic cup samplers over 6 drainage years under the same farming practices and treatments. Soil solution NO3--N concentrations under spring barley grown by conventional inversion ploughing and reduced tillage were compared to weather parameters over the period. Weather was recorded at a national Met Eireann weather station on site. Soil solution NO3--N varied significantly between years. Within individual years NO3--N concentrations varied over the drainage season, with peak concentrations generally observed in the autumn time, decreasing thereafter. Under both treatments there was a three-fold difference in mean annual soil solution NO3--N concentration over the 6 years with no change in the agronomic practices (crop type, tillage type and fertiliser input). Soil solution nitrate concentrations were significantly influenced by weather parameters such as rainfall, effective drainage and soil moisture deficit. The impact of climate change in Ireland could lead to increased NO3--N loss to water further exacerbating eutrophication of sensitive estuaries. The increased impact on eutrophication of waters, related to climatic

  6. Nitrate leaching in a winter wheat-summer maize rotation on a calcareous soil as affected by nitrogen and straw management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Tao; Ju, Xiaotang; Yang, Hao

    2017-02-08

    Nitrate leaching is one of the most important pathways of nitrogen (N) loss which leads to groundwater contamination or surface water eutrophication. Clarifying the rates, controlling factors and characteristics of nitrate leaching is the pre-requisite for proposing effective mitigation strategies. We investigated the effects of interactions among chemical N fertilizer, straw and manure applications on nitrogen leaching in an intensively managed calcareous Fluvo-aquic soil with winter wheat-summer maize cropping rotations on the North China Plain from October 2010 to September 2013 using ceramic suction cups and seepage water calculations based on a long-term field experiment. Annual nitrate leaching reached 38-60 kg N ha -1 from conventional N managements, but declined by 32-71% due to optimum N, compost manure or municipal waste treatments, respectively. Nitrate leaching concentrated in the summer maize season, and fewer leaching events with high amounts are the characteristics of nitrate leaching in this region. Overuse of chemical N fertilizers, high net mineralization and nitrification, together with predominance of rainfall in the summer season with light soil texture are the main controlling factors responsible for the high nitrate leaching loss in this soil-crop-climatic system.

  7. Nitrate leaching in a winter wheat-summer maize rotation on a calcareous soil as affected by nitrogen and straw management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Tao; Ju, Xiaotang; Yang, Hao

    2017-02-01

    Nitrate leaching is one of the most important pathways of nitrogen (N) loss which leads to groundwater contamination or surface water eutrophication. Clarifying the rates, controlling factors and characteristics of nitrate leaching is the pre-requisite for proposing effective mitigation strategies. We investigated the effects of interactions among chemical N fertilizer, straw and manure applications on nitrogen leaching in an intensively managed calcareous Fluvo-aquic soil with winter wheat-summer maize cropping rotations on the North China Plain from October 2010 to September 2013 using ceramic suction cups and seepage water calculations based on a long-term field experiment. Annual nitrate leaching reached 38-60 kg N ha-1 from conventional N managements, but declined by 32-71% due to optimum N, compost manure or municipal waste treatments, respectively. Nitrate leaching concentrated in the summer maize season, and fewer leaching events with high amounts are the characteristics of nitrate leaching in this region. Overuse of chemical N fertilizers, high net mineralization and nitrification, together with predominance of rainfall in the summer season with light soil texture are the main controlling factors responsible for the high nitrate leaching loss in this soil-crop-climatic system.

  8. Leaching refuse after sphalerite mineral for extraction zinc and cobalt

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Brožová

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The paper deals with a possibility of zinc and cobalt extraction from refuse after sphalerite mineral leaching. It contains theoretic analysis of hydrometallurgical processes. Practical part describes samples and their leaching in 10 % and 20 % sulphuric acid. In the end of the paper it is evaluated under which conditions the highest yield of zinc and cobalt from refuse after sulphide ore leaching is reached.

  9. Commercial application of bacterial heap leaching in Ganzhou uranium mine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Jian; Fan Baotuan; Meng Yunsheng; Xiao Jinfeng; Chen Sencai; Wu Jinjing; Liu Chengwu; Wu Yichang; Zeng Ruilong

    2003-01-01

    In this paper the situation of commercial application on bacterial heap leaching in Ganzhou Uranium Mine is introduced, and the construction of biomembrane oxidizing tank, regeneration and recycled utilization of barren solution are summarized. Total five heaps, 18436 t, uranium ore are leached by bacteria during the half of a year. The result is consistent with that of commercial experiment. The technology of bacterial heap leaching is more perfected

  10. Extended Leach Testing of Simulated LAW Cast Stone Monoliths

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Serne, R. Jeffrey [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Lanigan, David C. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Westsik, Joseph H. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Williams, Benjamin D. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Jung, H. B. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Wang, Guohui [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2016-08-12

    This revision to the original report adds two longer term leach sets of data to the report and provides more discussion and graphics on how to interpret the results from long-term laboratory leach tests. The leach tests were performed at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for Washington River Protection Solutions (WRPS) to evaluate the release of key constituents from monoliths of Cast Stone prepared with four simulated low-activity waste (LAW) liquid waste streams.

  11. Leaching of spent fuel in the presence of environmental material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Le Lous, Karine

    1997-01-01

    The aim of this work is the study of the alteration kinetics of spent fuels and the making of a status of the radioactivity released by spent fuels in conditions of direct disposal in deep underground. A system has been fitted inside a shielded cell to study the leaching by synthetic groundwater of fuel powder irradiated at 60 GWJ.tU -1 in the presence of environmental material (clay or granite) at 40 bars and 90 deg. C. This system allows to reach and keep reductive conditions characteristic of the redox conditions of a deep geological repository. The preparation of calibrated spent fuel powders and the recovery of the activity fixed by the environmental materials has required the implementation of specific procedures. Similar experiments have been performed in parallel with Simfuel in a controlled area. A first series of experiments has been carried out in 4 environments for each fuel. Important sorption phenomena take place in the environmental materials and the actinide concentrations stabilize rapidly at low values: 10 -8 mol/l for U, 10 -12 mol/l for Pu and 10 -13 -10 -14 mol/l for Cm. The activity released by 90 Sr at the end of each experiment is about two times higher in the presence of clay than in the presence of granite. The average alteration rates are of about 0.2 mg.m -2 /day in the presence of granite and 0.4 to 0.6 mg.m -2 /day in the presence of clay. They are comparable to those reported in the literature for reducing conditions. Such tests are necessary to determine the leaching rate of spent fuels in reducing conditions and in the absence of environmental materials in order to show the possible effects of these materials. (J.S.)

  12. Long-term leaching from MSWI air-pollution-control residues: Leaching characterization and modeling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hyks, Jiri; Astrup, Thomas; Christensen, Thomas Højlund

    2009-01-01

    Long-term leaching of Ca, Fe, Mg, K, Na, S, Al, As, Ba, Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Hg, Mn, Ni, Pb, Zn, Mo, Sb, Si, Sri, Sr, Ti, V, P, Cl, and dissolved organic carbon from two different municipal solid waste incineration (MSWI) air-pollution-control residues was monitored during 24 months of column...

  13. Long-term lessons on pesticide leaching obtained via the Danish Pesticide Leaching Assessment Programme

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosenbom, Anette E.; Olsen, Preben; Plauborg, Finn

    To avoid any unacceptable influence on the environment posed by pesticides and their degradation products, all pesticides used in the European Union needs authorization. The authorization procedure includes assessing the leaching risk of both pesticides and their degradation products to the groun...

  14. Uranium leaching from phosphatic sandstone and shale of Qatrani using citrate as a new leaching reagent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hussein, E.M.

    1997-01-01

    Uranium is found in Qatrani area (Southwest of Cairo and North of lake Qarun) in various forms in sedimentary rocks. Two important ore materials have been chosen for studying the recovery of their uranium contents namely; the phosphatic sandstone and the carbonaceous shale. The main emphasis in this thesis is the choice of an acid that would selectively leach uranium from thesis ores while leaving calcium phosphate and carbonate minerals minerals almost completely intact. Citric acid was indeed found advantageous due primarily to its strong ability to form stable complexes with uranium over a wide range of PH values beside the possibility of controlling thr solubility of calcium-bearing compounds by adding calcium citrate. The latter is actually characterized by its ability to exist in an unionized or associated from in citric acid solutions. From the general leaching characteristics of both uranium and P 2 O 5 from Qatrani phosphatic sandstone by citric acid, it was found that uranium could be completely leached beside the possibility of realizing a differential leaching percent values vs P 2 O 5 which is generally of limited solubility. Such a low solubility of P 2 O 5 has even been completely inhibited by providing calcium citrate to the citric acid solutions in amounts sufficient to exist in an optimum ionized non-associated state. Such a provision would render the solution unable to carry any further calcium ions thus the breakdown of the phosphate mineral was hindered while uranium has completely been selectively

  15. Study on accelerated leaching of polyethylene incorporation in simulated waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva, Tania Valeria da; Pacheco, Graziella Rajao C.; Pacheco, Raquel Janot; Senne Junior, Murillo; Cota, Stela

    2005-01-01

    Leaching performance is one of the more important parameters to evaluate the efficiency of the radioactive and hazardous waste immobilization processes using different matrices, and to verify the quality of the final waste product. There are several mechanisms that control the leaching of waste products, and the most frequent is the diffusion. By the implementation of leaching tests under determinate conditions and using adequate mathematical models, it is possible to identify the predominant leaching mechanisms involved and to use it to predict the behavior of the leaching process for larger periods of time. This paper presents the results of a preliminary leaching study of waste products of sodium chloride in a low density polyethylene matrix, produced by extrusion. It was used an accelerated leaching test according to C1308 ASTM standard - Standard Test Method for Accelerated Leach Test for Diffusive Releases from Solidified Waste and a Computer Program to Model Diffusive, Fractional Leaching from Cylindrical Waste Forms. The main characteristics of this test are sampling times, leachate volume and sample dimensions. If diffusion is identified as the governing mechanisms, the test results can be used for obtaining extrapolated data for long periods. (author)

  16. Cadmium leaching from thermal treated and gamma irradiated Mexican aluminosilicates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davila-Rangel, J.I. [Departamento de Quimica, Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares, Apdo. Postal 18-1027, Mexico 11801, D.F. (Mexico); Unidad Academica Centro Regional de Estudios Nucleares, Universidad Autonoma de Zacatecas Cipres 10, Frac. La Penuela, Zacatecas, Zacatecas 98068 (Mexico); Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad Autonoma del Estado de Mexico, Instituto Literario No. 100 Col. Centro C.P. 50000, Toluca, Edo. de Mexico (Mexico); Solache-Rios, M. [Departamento de Quimica, Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares, Apdo. Postal 18-1027, Mexico 11801, D.F. (Mexico)], E-mail: msr@nuclear.inin.mx

    2008-10-15

    Thermal and radiation effects on the leaching of cadmium from two cadmium exchanged zeolitic tuffs and one clay were determined. The cadmium exchanged aluminosilicates were heated at different temperatures (500, 700, 900 and 1100 {sup o}C), and the materials were then treated with NaCl (1 M and 5 M) and HNO{sub 3} (0.001 M and 1 M) solutions to determine the leaching behaviour of cadmium from the materials. The stability of cadmium in the materials increased as the heating temperature was increased. Cadmium leaching from gamma irradiated and heated materials at 1100 {sup o}C was higher than leaching from non-irradiated samples.

  17. THERMAL AND SPECTROSCOPIC ANALYSES OF NEXT GENERATION CAUSTIC SIDE SOLVENT EXTRACTION SOLVENT CONTACTED WITH 3, 8, AND 16 MOLAR NITRIC ACID

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fondeur, F.; Fink, S.

    2011-09-30

    A new solvent system referred to as Next Generation Solvent or NGS, has been developed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory for the removal of cesium from alkaline solutions in the Caustic Side Solvent Extraction process. NGS is proposed for deployment at MCU and at the Salt Waste Processing Facility. This work investigated the chemical compatibility between NGS and 16 M, 8 M, and 3 M nitric acid from contact that may occur in handling of analytical samples from MCU or, for 3 M acid, which may occur during contactor cleaning operations at MCU. This work shows that reactions occurred between NGS components and the high molarity nitric acid. In the case of 16 M and 8 M nitric acid, initially organo-nitrate groups are generated and attach to the modifier and that with time oxidation reactions convert the modifier into a tarry substance with gases (NO{sub x} and possibly CO) evolving. Calorimetric analysis of the organonitrate revealed the reaction products are not explosive nor will they deflagrate. NGS exposure to 3 M nitric acid resulted in much slower reaction kinetics and that the generated products were not energetic. We recommended conducting Accelerated Rate calorimetry on the materials generated in the 16 M and 8 M nitric acid test. Also, we recommend continue monitoring of the samples contacting NGS with 3 M nitric acid.

  18. Thermal And Spectroscopic Analyses Of Next Generation Caustic Side Solvent Extraction Solvent Contacted With 3, 8, And 16 Molar Nitric Acid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fondeur, F. F.; Fink, S. D.

    2011-12-07

    A new solvent system referred to as Next Generation Solvent or NGS, has been developed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory for the removal of cesium from alkaline solutions in the Caustic Side Solvent Extraction process. The NGS is proposed for deployment at MCU{sup a} and at the Salt Waste Processing Facility. This work investigated the chemical compatibility between NGS and 16 M, 8 M, and 3 M nitric acid from contact that may occur in handling of analytical samples from MCU or, for 3 M acid, which may occur during contactor cleaning operations at MCU. This work shows that reactions occurred between NGS components and the high molarity nitric acid. Reaction rates are much faster in 8 M and 16 M nitric acid than in 3 M nitric acid. In the case of 16 M and 8 M nitric acid, the nitric acid reacts with the extractant to produce initially organo-nitrate species. The reaction also releases soluble fluorinated alcohols such as tetrafluoropropanol. With longer contact time, the modifier reacts to produce a tarry substance with evolved gases (NO{sub x} and possibly CO). Calorimetric analysis of the reaction product mixtures revealed that the organo-nitrates reaction products are not explosive and will not deflagrate.

  19. Pesticide leaching through sandy and loamy fields e Long-term lessons learnt from the Danish Pesticide Leaching Assessment Programme

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosenbom, Annette Elisabeth; Olsen, Preben; Plauborg, Finn

    2015-01-01

    The European Union authorization procedure for pesticides includes assessment of the leaching risk posed by pesticides and their degradation products aimed at avoiding any unacceptable influence on the environment, in particular contamination of water, including drinking water and groundwater...... regulations on sandy and loamy agricultural fields, as well as 47 of their degradation products. Three types of leaching scenario were not fully captured by the authorization procedure: i) long-term leaching of degradation products of pesticides applied to potatoes crops cultivated on sandy soils; ii......) leaching of strongly sorbing pesticides after autumn application on loamy soils; and iii) leaching of various pesticides and their degradation products following early summer application on loamy soils. The monitoring data revealed that the authorization procedure was unable to predict leaching scenarios...

  20. Evaluation of glass leaching as nutrient source for microalgae growth; Evaluacion del comportamiento de vidrios lixiviados como nutrientes de algas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grabska, N.; Tamayo, A.; Mazo, M. A.; Pascual, L.; Rubio, J.

    2015-10-01

    Three glasses with an elemental composition similar to the nutrient ratio required for Spirulina platensis growth and with different SiO{sub 2} content have been prepared. The glasses were crushed and sieved into 2 different fractions and the effect of the particle size has been studied in terms of the leaching kinetics of each element. The chemical analysis of the leaching water was used for obtaining the dissolution rate curves for each element taking part of the glass composition. From the calculation of the leaching rate constant and the exponential constant of the lixiviation reaction, it has been evaluated the Spirulina platensis growth in ambient normal conditions of light, temperature and pH of the growing media. It has been concluded that, either from the modification of the chemical composition of the glass or its particle size, it is possible to tune the delivery of the nutrients to match the growth rate of Spirulina platensis. (Author)

  1. A comparative study between the use of artificial neural networks and multiple linear regression for caustic concentration prediction in a stage of alumina production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giovanni Leopoldo Rozza

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available With world becoming each day a global village, enterprises continuously seek to optimize their internal processes to hold or improve their competitiveness and make better use of natural resources. In this context, decision support tools are an underlying requirement. Such tools are helpful on predicting operational issues, avoiding cost risings, loss of productivity, work-related accident leaves or environmental disasters. This paper has its focus on the prediction of spent liquor caustic concentration of Bayer process for alumina production. Caustic concentration measuring is essential to keep it at expected levels, otherwise quality issues might arise. The organization requests caustic concentration by chemical analysis laboratory once a day, such information is not enough to issue preventive actions to handle process inefficiencies that will be known only after new measurement on the next day. Thereby, this paper proposes using Multiple Linear Regression and Artificial Neural Networks techniques a mathematical model to predict the spent liquor´s caustic concentration. Hence preventive actions will occur in real time. Such models were built using software tool for numerical computation (MATLAB and a statistical analysis software package (SPSS. The models output (predicted caustic concentration were compared with the real lab data. We found evidence suggesting superior results with use of Artificial Neural Networks over Multiple Linear Regression model. The results demonstrate that replacing laboratorial analysis by the forecasting model to support technical staff on decision making could be feasible.

  2. Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction Chemical and Physical Properties Progress in FY 2000 and FY 2001.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moyer, BA

    2002-04-17

    The purpose of this work was to provide chemical- and physical-property data addressing the technical risks of the Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction (CSSX) process as applied specifically to the removal of cesium from alkaline high-level salt waste stored at the US Department of Energy Savannah River Site. As part of the overall Salt Processing Project, this effort supported decision-making in regards to selecting a preferred technology among three alternatives: (1) CSSX, (2) nonelutable ion-exchange with an inorganic silicotitanate material and (3) precipitation with tetraphenylborate. High risks, innate to CSSX, that needed specific attention included: (1) chemical stability of the solvent matrix, (2) radiolytic stability of the solvent matrix, (3) proof-of-concept performance of the proposed process flowsheet with simulated waste, and (4) performance of the CSSX flowsheet with actual SRS high-level waste. This body of work directly addressed the chemical-stability risk and additionally provided supporting information that served to plan, carry out, and evaluate experiments conducted by other CSSX investigators addressing the other high risks. Information on cesium distribution in extraction, scrubbing, and stripping served as input for flowsheet design, provided a baseline for evaluating solvent performance under numerous stresses, and contributed to a broad understanding of the effects of expected process variables. In parallel, other measurements were directed toward learning how other system components distribute in the flowsheet. Such components include the solvent components themselves, constituents of the waste, and solvent-degradation products. Upon understanding which components influence flowsheet performance, it was then possible to address in a rational fashion how to clean up the solvent and maintain its stable function.

  3. Nitrate Leaching From Grain Maize After Different Tillage Methods and Long/Short Term Cover Cropping

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Elly Møller

    trial initiated in 1968 on a coarse sandy soil. The previous trial included spring sown crops undersown (with or without) perennial ryegrass (Lolium perenne L.) as cover crop, two N-rates (90 and 120 kg N ha-1) and different tillage methods (shallow tillage and ploughing autumn or spring). With maize......) previous history of long-term cover cropping, ii) soil tillage methods, iii) N rates and iv) present short-term use of cover cropping in maize. Preliminary results from 2009 – 2011 suggest that leaching after a history of cover cropping tended to be higher than after no history of cover cropping......, but the effect was insignificant. The effect of tillage and previous N rates were also insignificant but the present use of cover crops had a small but significant decreasing effect on leaching compared to no cover cropping. The cover crop was well established in both years but grew less vigorously during autumn...

  4. YACON INULIN LEACHING DURING HOT WATER BLANCHING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caroline Fenner Scher

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACTYacon roots contain inulin, which has prebiotic properties and it may be used as sucrose or fat substitutes. However, inulin is very soluble in water. The loss of this important nutrient during blanching is caused mainly by diffusion or leaching, which might be diminished if blanching temperature - time conditions are correctly employed. The aim of this study was to determine the leaching of the sugars inulin, glucose and fructose, present in yacon roots, during hot water blanching under different time/temperature conditions. The samples were cleaned and peeled and cut into geometric forms of 1.75 ± 0.35 mm thick disks. A complete factorial experimental design was used, and the treatments of the samples were compared using the Tukey test. The results indicated that the time and temperature were significant in the dissolution of the sugars. The lowest inulin losses occurred at temperatures and times lower than 60 ºC and 3 minutes. For all temperatures, the lowest glucose and fructose losses were obtained at time lower than 3 and 5 minutes, respectively.

  5. Water balance and nitrate leaching in a irrigated maize crop in SW Spain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moreno, F.; Cayuela, J.A.; Fernandez, J.E.; Fernandez-Boy, E.; Murillo, J.M.; Cabrera, F.

    1995-01-01

    During three consecutive years (1991- 1993) a field experiment was conducted in an intensive irrigated agricultural soil in S W Spain. The main objective of this study was to determinate the water flow and nitrate leaching, below the root zone, under an irrigated maize crop and after the growing season( bare soil and rainy period). The experiment was carried out on a furrow irrigated maize crop using one of the highest nitrogen fertilization rates traditionally used by farmers in the region ( about 500 kg N ha sup -1 yr sup -1) and on other that represents one third of the former ( 170 kg N ha sup -1 yr sup -1), to provide data that can be used to propose modifications of the environment. The terms of water balance ( crop evapotranspiration, drainage and soil water storage ), and the nitrate leaching were determined by an intensive field monitoring of the soil water content, soil water potential and extracting the soil solution by the combination of a neutron probe, tensiometers and ceramic suction cups. Nitrogen uptake by the plant and NO sub 3 - N produced by mineralization were also determined. The results showed that, in terms of water balance, crop evapotranspiration was similar with both N - fertilization rates used. During the irrigation period drainage below the root zone was limited. Only in 1992 the occurrence of rainfalls during the early growing period, when the soil was wet from previous irrigation, caused a considerable drainage. Nitrate leaching during the whole experimental period amounted to 150 and 43 kg ha sup -1 in the treatments with high and low N - fertilization respectively. This mainly occurred during the bare soil and rainy periods, except in 1992 when a considerable nitrate leaching was not so high during the bare soil period as could be expected because of the drought during the experimental period. A reduction of N - fertilization decreased nitrate leaching strongly without decreasing yield. 10 refs., 4 tabs. (author)

  6. Recovery of iron from cyanide tailings with reduction roasting–water leaching followed by magnetic separation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Yali; Li, Huaimei; Yu, Xianjin

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Using reduction roasting–water leaching–magnetic separation method, the recovery of iron from cyanide tailings was optimized. ► The recovery of iron was highly depended on the water-leaching process after reduction roasting. ► The results suggest that the method can be effectively used for iron recovery, and the grade of magnetic concentrate and recovery rate can reach 59.11% and 75.12%, respectively. - Abstract: Cyanide tailing is a kind of solid waste produced in the process of gold extraction from gold ore. In this paper, recovery of iron from cyanide tailings was studied with reduction roasting–water leaching process followed by magnetic separation. After analysis of chemical composition and crystalline phase, the effects of different parameters on recovery of iron were chiefly introduced. Systematic studies indicate that the high recovery rate and grade of magnetic concentrate of iron can be achieved under the following conditions: weight ratios of cyanide tailings/activated carbon/sodium carbonate/sodium sulfate, 100:10:3:10; temperature, 50 °C; time, 60 min at the reduction roasting stage; the liquid to solid ratio is 15:1 (ml/g), leaching at 60 °C for 5 min and stirring speed at 20 r/min at water-leaching; exciting current is 2 A at magnetic separation. The iron grade of magnetic concentrate was 59.11% and the recovery ratio was 75.12%. The mineralography of cyanide tailings, roasted product, water-leached sample, magnetic concentrate and magnetic tailings were studied by X-ray powder diffraction (XRD) technique. The microstructures of above products except magnetic tailings were also analyzed by scanning electron microscope (SEM) and energy disperse spectroscopy (EDS) to help understand the mechanism.

  7. Risk of Leaching in Soils Amended by Compost and Digestate from Municipal Solid Waste

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta García-Albacete

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available New European directives have proposed the direct application of compost and digestate produced from municipal solid wastes as organic matter sources in agricultural soils. Therefore information about phosphorus leaching from these residues when they are applied to the soil is increasingly important. Leaching experiments were conducted to determine the P mobility in compost and digestate mixtures, supplying equivalent amounts to 100 kg P ha−1 to three different types of soils. The tests were performed in accordance with CEN/TS 14405:2004 analyzing the maximum dissolved reactive P and the kinetic rate in the leachate. P biowaste fractionation indicated that digestate has a higher level of available P than compost has. In contrast, P losses in leaching experiments with soil-compost mixtures were higher than in soil-digestate mixtures. For both wastes, there was no correlation between dissolved reactive P lost and the water soluble P. The interaction between soil and biowaste, the long experimentation time, and the volume of leachate obtained caused the waste’s wettability to become an influential parameter in P leaching behavior. The overall conclusion is that kinetic data analysis provides valuable information concerning the sorption mechanism that can be used for predicting the large-scale behavior of soil systems.

  8. Risk of Leaching in Soils Amended by Compost and Digestate from Municipal Solid Waste

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarquis, Ana M.; Cartagena, M. Carmen

    2014-01-01

    New European directives have proposed the direct application of compost and digestate produced from municipal solid wastes as organic matter sources in agricultural soils. Therefore information about phosphorus leaching from these residues when they are applied to the soil is increasingly important. Leaching experiments were conducted to determine the P mobility in compost and digestate mixtures, supplying equivalent amounts to 100 kg P ha−1 to three different types of soils. The tests were performed in accordance with CEN/TS 14405:2004 analyzing the maximum dissolved reactive P and the kinetic rate in the leachate. P biowaste fractionation indicated that digestate has a higher level of available P than compost has. In contrast, P losses in leaching experiments with soil-compost mixtures were higher than in soil-digestate mixtures. For both wastes, there was no correlation between dissolved reactive P lost and the water soluble P. The interaction between soil and biowaste, the long experimentation time, and the volume of leachate obtained caused the waste's wettability to become an influential parameter in P leaching behavior. The overall conclusion is that kinetic data analysis provides valuable information concerning the sorption mechanism that can be used for predicting the large-scale behavior of soil systems. PMID:25003139

  9. The leaching of base minerals from the calcines produced by the roasting of pyrite concentrates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nicol, M.J.; Filmer, A.O.

    1985-01-01

    A number of gold and uranium plants in South Africa concentrate the pyrite in the ore residue by flotation and roast the concentrate for the production of sulphuric acid. The calcine produced, which is predominantly hematite, is generally subjected to cyanidation for the recovery of gold and silver. The calcines often contain economically significant quantities of copper, nickel , cobalt and uranium. Prior treatment of the calcine for the recovery of these metals would be desirable in terms of the value of the products. Several processes for the leaching of the base metals from plant calcines have been investigated, and an important general conclusion is that an adequate recovery of the base metals requires that a large proportion of the iron should also be extracted. This observation led to a more extensive investigation of the kinetics of leaching of various iron oxides. The application of electrochemical theory and techniques resulted in a fuller understanding of the various factors that govern the rate of leaching of iron oxides. As a result of this fundamental work, alternative treatment schemes that should yield more efficient extraction from calcines were suggested. Several of these possibilities were investigated, and the most promising were found to require reducing conditions during the leach, or prior partial reduction of the calcine to magnetite or wustite

  10. Certain aspects of leaching kinetics of solidified ''radioactive wastes'' - Laboratory studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amarantos, S.G.; Petropoulos, J.H.

    1981-01-01

    A laboratory study of the kinetics of leaching of Cs + and Sr ++ incorporated as sulphates in cement (Portland type) or base asphalt with distilled water as leachant is reported. The comparison of different leaching methods (including stagnant or stirred leachant with periodic renewal and a new method of ''continuous leachant renewal'') and the study of the effect of temperature were among the particular objectives of this work. The results for the cemented salts indicate that the new method of ''continuous leachant renewal'' is more efficient than the others. Is has been also found that the other leaching methods, including the widely used stagnant, periodically renewed leachant, can be seriously affected in certain circumstances by factors which have hitherto been left uncontrolled. An observed sharp diminution in the elution rate of Sr ++ from cement samples appears to be attributable to the action of atmospheric CO 2 . It has been observed that temperature affects the acceleration in the earlier and later stages of cement-Cs 2 SO 4 leaching. (T.A.)

  11. Nutritional management in an elderly man with esophageal and gastric necrosis after caustic soda ingestion: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rondanelli M

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Mariangela Rondanelli,1 Gabriella Peroni,1 Alessandra Miccono,2 Fabio Guerriero,3 Davide Guido,3,4 Simone Perna1 1Department of Public Health, Neuroscience, Experimental and Forensic Medicine, Endocrinology and Nutrition Unit, University of Pavia, Azienda di Servizi alla Persona di Pavia, Pavia, 2Department of Clinical Sciences, Faculty of Medicine and Surgery, University of Milano-Bicocca, Milan, 3Azienda di Servizi alla Persona di Pavia, 4Department of Public Health, Neuroscience, Experimental and Forensic Medicine, Biostatistics and Clinical Epidemiology Unit, University of Pavia, Pavia, Italy Abstract: The ingestion of corrosive industrial chemical agents, such as caustic soda, that are mostly used for household cleaning, usually occurs accidentally or for suicidal purposes. Multiple protocols are based on documented success in preventing impending complications. In this study, we present a case of a 70-year-old man who swallowed caustic soda in a suicide attempt, causing a development of strong esophageal and gastric necrosis with subsequent gastrectomy and digiunostomy. Initially, the recommended nutritional approach was via percutaneous endoscopic jejunostomy by a polymer and high-caloric formula, with an elevated content of soluble fiber. After 5 months, the medical team removed the percutaneous endoscopic jejunostomy and the patient switched from enteral to oral nutrition. In this step, it was decided to introduce two oral, high-caloric supplements: an energy supplement in powder, based on maltodextrin, immediately soluble in foods or in hot/cold drinks and a high-energy and protein drink, enriched with arginine, vitamin C, zinc, and antioxidants. Oral administration (per os was well tolerated by consuming homogenized food mixed in water. After 1 month, the patient was discharged from the hospital and was able to eat a regular meal. Keywords: nutritional management, enteral nutrition, gastric necrosis, esophageal necrosis, nutritional

  12. Accuracy of Endoscopy in Predicting the Depth of Mucosal Injury Following Caustic Ingestion; a Cross-Sectional Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Athena Alipour-Faz

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Esophagogastroduodenoscopy (EGD is currently considered as the primary method of determining the degree of mucosal injury following caustic ingestion. The present study aimed to evaluate the screening performance characteristics of EGD in predicting the depth of gastrointestinal mucosal injuries following caustic ingestion.Methods: Adult patients who were referred to emergency department due to ingestion of corrosive materials, over a 7-year period, were enrolled to this diagnostic accuracy study. Sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive values as well as negative and positive likelihood ratios of EGD in predicting the depth of mucosal injury was calculated using pathologic findings as the gold standard.Results: 54 cases with the mean age of 35 ± 11.2 years were enrolled (59.25% male. Primary endoscopic results defined 28 (51.85% cases as second grade and 26 (48.14% as third grade of mucosal injury. On the other hand, pathologic findings reported 21 (38.88% patients as first grade, 14 (25.92% as second, and 19 patients (35.18% as third grade. Sensitivity and specificity of endoscopy for determining grade II tissue injury were 50.00 (23.04-76.96 and 47.50 (31.51-63.87, respectively. These measures were 100.00 (82.35-100 and 80.00 (63.06-91.56, respectively for grade III. Accuracy of EGD was 87.03% for grade III and 48.14% for grade II.Conclusion: Based on the findings of the present study, endoscopic grading of caustic related mucosal injury based on the Zargar’s classification has good accuracy in predicting grade III (87% and fail accuracy in grade II injuries (48%. It seems that we should be cautious in planning treatment for these patients solely based on endoscopic results. 

  13. Effect of Vermicompost on Nitrate Leaching and Strawberry Growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broz, A. P.; Verma, P.; Appel, C.; Stubler, C.; Yost, J.; Hurley, S.

    2016-12-01

    The use of vermicompost is suggested as a method to reduce nitrogen losses in crop production; however, it is unclear whether and how vermicompost can affect water quality after a significant irrigation or rainfall event. The objectives of this experiment were to: a) determine the concentration of nitrate-nitrogen in drainage water from vermicompost-amended media planted with strawberry in a greenhouse setting and b) determine vegetative biomass of strawberry grown in vermicompost-amended media. Bare-root strawberry plugs were grown in one-gallon plastic pots. The treatments consisted of two media: 1) a peat:perlite soil-less mix and 2) a fine sand soil with three levels of dairy manure vermicompost addition: 0%, 10%, 25% by weight, and a biweekly synthetic fertilizer treatment of 150 mg N-P-K L-1 evaluated in a full factorial randomized block design. Drainage water from each plant was collected for 18 weeks and analyzed for NO3- concentration. High (1000-5000 mg l-1) amounts of NO3- leaching in vermicompost -amended media were observed during the first two weeks of drainage collection relative to non vermicompost-amended media. Plants grown with vermicompost at 25% with synthetic fertilizer had the highest above-ground vegetative biomass (15.3 g) relative to plants with synthetic fertilizer alone (5.3 g). These data suggest vermicompost addition rates of 10% and 25% by weight promote high vegetative biomass in greenhouse strawberry but may facilitate high nitrate leaching, which can negatively affect water quality and environmental health.

  14. Nitrate leaching and pesticide use in energy crops

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Uffe

    2006-01-01

    Nitrate leaching measured below willow and miscanthus is very low from the established crops. Pesticide use in energy crops is low as well.......Nitrate leaching measured below willow and miscanthus is very low from the established crops. Pesticide use in energy crops is low as well....

  15. Accelerated Leach Test(s) Program: Annual report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dougherty, D.R.; Pietrzak, R.F.; Fuhrmann, M.; Colombo, P.

    1986-09-01

    A computerized data base of LLW leaching data has been developed. Long-term tests on portland cement, bitumen and vinyl ester-styrene (VES) polymer waste forms containing simulated wastes are underway which are designed to identify and evaluate factors that accelerate leaching without changing the mechanisms

  16. Oxidative leaching of chromium from layered double hydroxides ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    Abstract. The layered double hydroxide (LDH) of Zn with Cr on treatment with a hypochlorite solution releases chromate ions as a result of oxidative leaching by a dissolution–reprecipitation mechanism. The resi- due is found to be ε-Zn(OH)2. The LDH of Mg with Cr on the other hand is resistant to oxidative leaching. In.

  17. Siltation of Ore Particles in Leaching Tanks: Causative Factors and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Siltation involves the accumulation of sediment over a considerable period of time and this may occur in closed systems like leaching tanks. Most mining companies in Ghana experience siltation problems during leaching of gold ore. This paper examines the potential causes and possible mitigation measures of siltation.

  18. Oxidative leaching of chromium from layered double hydroxides ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The layered double hydroxide (LDH) of Zn with Cr on treatment with a hypochlorite solution releases chromate ions as a result of oxidative leaching by a dissolution–reprecipitation mechanism. The residue is found to be -Zn(OH)2. The LDH of Mg with Cr on the other hand is resistant to oxidative leaching. In contrast, a ...

  19. Static leaching of uraniferous shales on open areas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hernandez Nieto, J.; Cordero, G.; Villarrubia, M.

    1973-01-01

    This report describes the tests on acid heap leaching with conventional (1.400 ppm U 3 O 8 ) crushed uranium ores. We use open circuits with low internal recycled. Using starving acidity in the leaching solutions we obtain a smooth solubilization of uranium and, at the same time, the pregnant liquors are good for the solvent extraction recovery. (Author)

  20. Developments of uranium and gold ores heap leaching technologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tian Yuan; Guan Zibin; Gao Renxi

    1998-01-01

    The author reviews developments in heap leaching of uranium and gold ores at home and abroad, summarises condition of application. The author also presents problems having to be studied and settled urgently in heap leaching of uranium and gold ores in China

  1. Manual of acid in situ leach uranium mining technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-08-01

    In situ leaching (ISL) technology recovers uranium using two alternative chemical leaching systems - acid and alkaline. This report brings together information from several technical disciplines that are an essential part of ISL technology. They include uranium geology, geohydrology, chemistry as well as reservoir engineering and process engineering. This report provides an extensive description of acid ISL uranium mining technology

  2. Phylogeography of Buthus Leach , 1815 (Scorpiones: Buthidae): a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Phylogeography of Buthus Leach , 1815 (Scorpiones: Buthidae): a multigene molecular approach reveals a further complex evolutionary history in the Maghreb. ... The distribution of the scorpion genus Buthus Leach, 1815 includes southwestern Europe, North and Central Africa and extends east towards the Arabian ...

  3. Siltation of Ore Particles in Leaching Tanks: Causative Factors and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Michael

    2016-12-02

    Dec 2, 2016 ... Siltation involves the accumulation of sediment over a considerable period of time and this may occur in closed systems like leaching tanks. Most mining companies in Ghana experience siltation problems during leaching of gold ore. This paper examines the potential causes and possible mitigation ...

  4. Package characterization by laboratory leaching and diffusion experiments using radionuclides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Das, H.A.

    1989-01-01

    The leaching of solid inorganic waste from loaded concrete or cement by incoming water can be described in terms of a steady-state outward diffusion of the saturated solution, formed inside the pores. In this paper, the derived equations permit the prediction of long-term leaching behavior. Radiotracer experiments enable the determination of the parameters involved

  5. An experimental study on gold precipitation from leach solutions of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper presents the results of the study dedicated to the determination of the optimum parameters for the electrolytic gold precipitation from thiourea leach solutions. The leaching was carried out using technogenic gold-bearing raw materials (gold-bearing sands) of the Far East of the Russian Federation. The study ...

  6. Leaching of Added Selenium in Soils Low in Native Selenium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Gunnar Gissel; Hamdy, A. A.

    1977-01-01

    A soil column experiment was performed to evaluate the influence of organic matter and lime on the leaching and distribution of added selenite. 75Se-labeled Na2SeO3 was added to water-saturated soil columns with a diameter of 4.25 cm and a length of 16-20 cm. Leaching started immediately, one l...

  7. Quantitative leaching of galena | Olanipekun | Bulletin of the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    1999-09-25

    Abstract. (Received September 25, 1999; revised January 19, 2000) Experiments on the quantitative leaching of lead from galena in hydrochloric acid solutions are reported. The effects of contact time, acid concentration, number of leaching stages, solid to liquid ratio, particle size, temperature, and stirring speed, on the ...

  8. Aqueous-chlorine leaching of typical Canadian uranium ores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haque, K.E.

    1982-01-01

    Laboratory-scale aqueous-chlorine leaches were conducted on quartz-pebble conglomerates, pegmatite and vein-type ores. Optimum leach temperatures, pulp density and retention times were determined. Uranium extraction of 98 per cent was obtained from the Elliot Lake, Madawaska Mines of Bancroft and Rabbit Lake ores, 96 per cent from the Key Lake ore and 86 per cent from the Agnew Lake ore. However, tailings containing 15-20 pCi g -1 of radium-226 were obtained only from the Elliot Lake and Agnew lake quartz-pebble conglomerates and Bancroft pegmatite-type ores by second-stage leaches with HCl. The second-stage leach results indicate that multistage (3 or 4) acid-chloride or salt-chloride leaches might be effective to obtain tailings containing 15-20 pCi 226 Ra g -1 from the high-grade vein-type ores. Comparative reagent-cost estimates show that the sulphuric-acid leach process is far less expensive than aqueous chlorine leaching. Nevertheless, only the aqueous chlorine and acid-chloride leaches in stages are effective in producing tailings containing 15-20 pCi 226 Ra g -1 from the typical Canadian uranium ores. (Auth.)

  9. Study on the leach mechanism of 90-19/U glass form in underground water of disposal site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sheng Jiawei; Luo Shanggeng; Tang Baolong

    1996-01-01

    The leach behavior of 90-19/U glass form in underground water (UW) of disposal site and in the deionized water (DIW) is studied. The total mass losses of glass form and the normalized element mass losses of B, Li and Si in UW are presented and compared to DIW. It is found that the ions in UW affect the leach behavior of 90-19/U glass. At the beginning of the reaction the reaction rate of the glass is smaller in UW than in DIW due to the low glass dissolution affinity in UW which is defined as (1-c/K). The rate determining step of leach reaction of 90-19/U glass in UW during the entire reaction period is the ion-exchange reaction. The apparent activation energy of glass reaction in UW is 51.6 kJ/mol

  10. Building a Uranium Heap Leach Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schnell, Henry

    2014-01-01

    Despite all these we have seen many HL successes and many interesting projects coming down the pipe. • Previous experience in Uranium with previous ROM projects in France (Bessines, Langone), Niger (Somair), Canada (Agnew Lake) and other locations had provided some basic background. • Heap leach based on copper experience with crushed ore has operated for many years in Brazil (Caetite). • Many gold operations for many decades in all climates and continents. • Copper at +20% of production, many in Chile, but also now in many other countries. • Uranium with agglomerated crushed ores is now becoming more prominent – Somair, Imouraren, Trekkopje. • Work also ongoing for Ranger, Rossing, and in consideration for other projects. • Other notable work in Nickel, and multi-metal such as Talvivaara

  11. Pesticide leaching in a changing climate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Signe Bonde

    There is a widespread consensus among scientists that the climate will change in the future, and that this change has already begun. These climatic changes will undoubtedly challenge the use of pesticides, which has been proposed to increase in the future. Accordingly, the primary aim of this Ph......D-project was to contribute to the knowledge of how climate change will effect pesticide leaching in the future, which was done by use of mathematical modelling. The agro-ecological model Daisy, was used in all simulations, as well as the 2 model soils: a coarse sand and a subsurface drained sandy loam containing......, resulting in 3000-year long weather series of statistically stationary climate. Effects of pesticide properties (sorption and degradation), pesticide application dates, and soil properties were included. The synthetic weather series produced in relation to objective (II) were used to simulate future changes...

  12. Reduced nitrogen leaching by intercropping maize with red fescue on sandy soils in North Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Manevski, Kiril; Børgesen, Christen Duus; Andersen, Mathias Neumann

    2015-01-01

    Aim To study maize (Zea mays L.) growth and soil nitrogen (N) dynamics in monocrop and intercropped systems in a North European climate and soil conditions with the support of a simulation model. Methods Field data for 3 years at two sites/soil types in Denmark and three main factors: (i) cropping...... history (maize or grass-clover), (ii) maize monocrop or intercropped with red fescue (Festuca rubra L.) and (iii) three fertilizer N rates, were used to calibrate and validate the DAISY model for simulation of crop growth and soil N dynamics. Field and model results were used to study the treatment...... N, thereby greatly reducing the N leaching. Conclusions The hypothesis that maize intercropping with fertilizer N rates applicable to monocrop maize decreases N leaching without significant yield loss was largely supported given the effect of cropping history and soil type. The applicability...

  13. Essays of leaching in cemented products containing simulated waste from evaporator concentrated of PWR reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haucz, Maria Judite A.; Calabria, Jaqueline A. Almeida; Tello, Cledola Cassia O.; Candido, Francisco Donizete; Seles, Sandro Rogerio Novaes

    2011-01-01

    This paper evaluated the results from leaching resistance essays of cemented products, prepared from three distinct formulations, containing simulated waste of concentrated from the PWR reactor evaporator. The leaching rate is a parameter of qualification of solidified products containing radioactive waste and is determined in accordance with regulation ISO 6961. This procedure evaluates the capacity of transfer organic and inorganic substances presents in the waste through dissolution in the extractor medium. For the case of radioactive waste it is reached the more retention of contaminants in the cemented product, i.e.the lesser value of lixiviation rate. Therefore, this work evaluated among the proposed formulation that one which attend the criterion established in the regulation CNEN-NN-6.09

  14. Heavy metal recovery from electric arc furnace steel slag by using hydrochloric acid leaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Lim Jin; Haan, Ong Teng; Shean Yaw, Thomas Choong; Chuah Abdullah, Luqman; Razak, Mus'ab Abdul; Cionita, Tezara; Toudehdehghan, Abdolreza

    2018-03-01

    Electric Arc Furnace steel slag (EAFS) is the waste produced in steelmaking industry. Environmental problem such as pollution will occur when dumping the steel slag waste into the landfill. These steel slags have properties that are suitable for various applications such as water treatment and wastewater. The objective of this study is to develop efficient and economical chlorination route for EAFS extraction by using leaching process. Various parameters such as concentration of hydrochloric acid, particle size of steel slag, reaction time and reaction temperature are investigated to determine the optimum conditions. As a result, the dissolution rate can be determined by changing the parameters, such as concentration of hydrochloric acid, particle size of steel slag, reaction time and reaction temperature. The optimum conditions for dissolution rates for the leaching process is at 3.0 M hydrochloric acid, particle size of 1.18 mm, reaction time of 2.5 hour and the temperature of 90°C.

  15. Radiocesium leaching from contaminated litter in forest streams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakai, Masaru; Gomi, Takashi; Naito, Risa S.; Negishi, Junjiro N.; Sasaki, Michiko; Toda, Hiroto; Nunokawa, Masanori; Murase, Kaori

    2015-01-01

    In Japanese forests suffering from the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant accident, litter fall provides a large amount of radiocesium from forests to streams. Submerged litter is processed to become a vital food resource for various stream organisms through initial leaching and subsequent decomposition. Although leaching from litter can detach radiocesium similarly to potassium, radiocesium leaching and its migration are poorly understood. We examined both radiocesium and potassium leaching to the water column and radiocesium allocation to minerals (glass beads, silica sand, and vermiculite) in the laboratory using soaked litter with and without minerals on a water column. The mineral types did not affect radiocesium leaching from litter, but soaking in water for 1, 7, and 30 days decreased the radiocesium concentration in litter by ×0.71, ×0.66, and ×0.56, respectively. Meanwhile, the 1-, 7-, and 30-day experiments decreased potassium concentration in litter by ×0.17, ×0.11, and ×0.09, respectively. Leached radiocesium remained in a dissolved form when there was no mineral phases present in the water, whereas there was sorption onto the minerals when they were present. In particular, vermiculite adsorbed radiocesium by two to three orders of magnitude more effectively than the other minerals. Because radiocesium forms (such as that dissolved or adsorbed to organic matter or minerals) can further mobilize to ecosystems, our findings will increase our understanding regarding the dynamics of radiocesium in stream ecosystems. - Highlights: • Radiocesium in contaminated litter was leached when soaked in water. • Radiocesium in litter leached slowly compared to potassium. • Minerals adsorbed dissolved radiocesium that was leached from litter. • Vermiculite effectively adsorbed radiocesium leached from litter

  16. [Soil Phosphorus Forms and Leaching Risk in a Typically Agricultural Catchment of Hefei Suburban].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Hui-hui; Li, Ru-zhong; Pei, Ting-ting; Zhang, Rui-gang

    2016-01-15

    To investigate the soil phosphorus forms and leaching risk in a typically agricultural catchment of Ershibu River in Hefei Suburban, Chaohu Lake basin, 132 surface soil samples were collected from the catchment area. The spatial distribution of total phosphorus (TP) and bio-available phosphorus (Bio-P), and the spatial variability of soil available phosphorus (Olsen-P) and easy desorption phosphorus (CaCl2-P) were analyzed using the Kriging technology of AreGIS after speciation analysis of soil phosphorus. Moreover, the enrichment level of soil phosphorus was studied, and the phosphorus leaching risk was evaluated through determining the leaching threshold value of soil phosphorus. The results showed that the samples with high contents of TP and Bio-P mainly located in the upstream of the left tributary and on the right side of local area where two tributaries converged. The enrichment rates of soil phosphorus forms were arranged as follows: Ca-P (15.01) > OP (4.16) > TP (3. 42) > IP (2.94) > Ex-P (2.76) > Fe/Al-P (2.43) > Olsen-P (2.34). The critical value of Olsen-P leaching was 18.388 mg x kg(-1), and the leaching samples with values higher than the threshold value accounted for 16.6% of total samples. Generally, the high-risk areas mainly occurred in the upstream of the left tributary, the middle of the right tributary and the local area of the downstream of the area where two tributaries converged.

  17. Leaching of heavy metals and alkylphenolic compounds from fresh and dried sewage sludge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milinovic, Jelena; Vidal, Miquel; Lacorte, Silvia; Rigol, Anna

    2014-02-01

    Reusing sewage sludge as a soil fertiliser has become a common alternative to disposal. Although this practice has a few benefits, it may contribute to the medium- and long-term contamination of the trophic chain because sewage sludge may contain heavy metals and organic contaminants. As the leaching of contaminants may depend on the sludge pre-treatment, the leaching of heavy metals (Cu, Ni, Pb, Zn and Cr) and alkylphenolic compounds (APCs) (octylphenol (OP), nonylphenol (NP), nonylphenol-mono-ethoxylate (NP1EO)) was investigated in five fresh and 40 °C dried sewage sludge samples from north-eastern Spain. FT-IR analyses and full-scan GC-MS chromatograms showed that sludge drying changed the nature of organic compounds leading to changes in their solubility. Moreover, sludge drying led to a higher relative contribution of dissolved organic carbon than the particulate organic carbon in the leachates. Leaching of Pb, Zn and Cr was below 5 % in both fresh and dried sludge samples, whereas Cu and Ni leached at rates up to 12 and 43 %, respectively, in some of the dried sludge samples. The leaching yields of OP, NP and NP1EO ranged from 1.3 to 35 % for fresh samples, but they decreased from 0.8 to 3.4 % in dried samples. The decrease in the leachability of APCs observed in dried sludge samples might be attributed to the fact that these compounds are associated with particulate organic matter, with significantly lower concentration or even absent in dried sludge than in fresh sludge samples. Therefore, it is recommended to dry the sludge before its disposal.

  18. MODULAR CAUSTIC SIDE SOLVENT EXTRACTION UNIT (MCU) GAMMA MONITORS SYSTEM FINAL REPORT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Casella, V

    2005-12-15

    The Department of Energy (DOE) selected Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction (CSSX) as the preferred technology for the removal of radioactive cesium from High-Level Waste (HLW) at the Savannah River Site (SRS). Before the full-scale Salt Waste Processing Facility (SWPF) becomes operational, the Closure Business Unit (CBU) plans to process a portion of dissolved saltcake waste through a Modular CSSX Unit (MCU). This work was derived from Technical Task Request SP-TTR-2004-00013, ''Gamma Monitor for MCU''. The deliverables for this task are the hardware and software for the gamma monitors and a report summarizing the testing and acceptance of this equipment for use in the MCU. Gamma-ray monitors are required to: (1) Measure the Cs-137 concentration in the decontaminated salt solution before entering the DSS (Decontaminated Salt Solution) Hold Tank, (2) Measure the Cs-137 concentration in the strip effluent before entering the Strip Effluent Hold Tank, (3) Verify proper operation of the solvent extraction system by verifying material balance within the process (The DSS Hold Tank Cs-137 concentration will be very low and the Cs-137 concentration in the Strip Effluent Hold Tank will be fifteen times higher than the Cs-137 concentration in the Feed Tank.) Sodium iodide monitors are used to measure the Cs-137 concentration in the piping before the DSS Hold tank, while GM monitors are used for Cs-137 measurements before the Strip Effluent Hold Tank. Tungsten shields were designed using Monte Carlo calculations and fabricated to reduce the process background radiation at the detector positions. These monitors were calibrated with NIST traceable standards that were specially made to be the same as the piping being monitored. Since this gamma ray monitoring system is unique, specially designed software was written and acceptance tested by Savannah River National Laboratory personnel. The software is a LabView-based application that serves as a unified

  19. MODULAR CAUSTIC SIDE SOLVENT EXTRACTION UNIT (MCU) GAMMA MONITORS SYSTEM FINAL REPORT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Casella, V

    2005-01-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) selected Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction (CSSX) as the preferred technology for the removal of radioactive cesium from High-Level Waste (HLW) at the Savannah River Site (SRS). Before the full-scale Salt Waste Processing Facility (SWPF) becomes operational, the Closure Business Unit (CBU) plans to process a portion of dissolved saltcake waste through a Modular CSSX Unit (MCU). This work was derived from Technical Task Request SP-TTR-2004-00013, ''Gamma Monitor for MCU''. The deliverables for this task are the hardware and software for the gamma monitors and a report summarizing the testing and acceptance of this equipment for use in the MCU. Gamma-ray monitors are required to: (1) Measure the Cs-137 concentration in the decontaminated salt solution before entering the DSS (Decontaminated Salt Solution) Hold Tank, (2) Measure the Cs-137 concentration in the strip effluent before entering the Strip Effluent Hold Tank, (3) Verify proper operation of the solvent extraction system by verifying material balance within the process (The DSS Hold Tank Cs-137 concentration will be very low and the Cs-137 concentration in the Strip Effluent Hold Tank will be fifteen times higher than the Cs-137 concentration in the Feed Tank.) Sodium iodide monitors are used to measure the Cs-137 concentration in the piping before the DSS Hold tank, while GM monitors are used for Cs-137 measurements before the Strip Effluent Hold Tank. Tungsten shields were designed using Monte Carlo calculations and fabricated to reduce the process background radiation at the detector positions. These monitors were calibrated with NIST traceable standards that were specially made to be the same as the piping being monitored. Since this gamma ray monitoring system is unique, specially designed software was written and acceptance tested by Savannah River National Laboratory personnel. The software is a LabView-based application that serves as a unified interface for controlling

  20. Caustic-Side Solvent-Extraction Modeling for Hanford Interim Pretreatment System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moyer, B.A.; Birdwell, J.F.; Delmau, L. H.; McFarlane, J.

    2008-06-01

    The purpose of this work is to examine the applicability of the Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction (CSSX) process for the removal of cesium from Hanford tank-waste supernatant solutions in support of the Hanford Interim Pretreatment System (IPS). The Hanford waste types are more challenging than those at the Savannah River Site (SRS) in that they contain significantly higher levels of potassium, the chief competing ion in the extraction of cesium. It was confirmed by use of the CSSX model that the higher levels of potassium depress the cesium distribution ratio (DCs), as validated by measurement of DCs values for four of eight specified Hanford waste-simulant compositions. The model predictions were good to an apparent standard error of ±11%. It is concluded from batch distribution experiments, physical-property measurements, equilibrium modeling, flowsheet calculations, and contactor sizing that the CSSX process as currently employed for cesium removal from alkaline salt waste at the SRS is capable of treating similar Hanford tank feeds. For the most challenging waste composition, 41 stages would be required to provide a cesium decontamination factor (DF) of 5000 and a concentration factor (CF) of 5. Commercial contacting equipment with rotor diameters of 10 in. for extraction and 5 in. for stripping should have the capacity to meet throughput requirements, but testing will be required to confirm that the needed efficiency and hydraulic performance are actually obtainable. Markedly improved flowsheet performance was calculated for a new solvent formulation employing the more soluble cesium extractant BEHBCalixC6 used with alternative scrub and strip solutions, respectively 0.1 M NaOH and 10 mM boric acid. The improved system can meet minimum requirements (DF = 5000 and CF = 5) with 17 stages or more ambitious goals (DF = 40,000 and CF = 15) with 19 stages. Potential benefits of further research and development are identified that would lead to reduced costs, greater