WorldWideScience

Sample records for caustic leach rate

  1. EFRT M-12 Issue Resolution: Caustic Leach Rate Constants from PEP and Laboratory-Scale Tests

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mahoney, Lenna A.; Rassat, Scot D.; Eslinger, Paul W.; Aaberg, Rosanne L.; Aker, Pamela M.; Golovich, Elizabeth C.; Hanson, Brady D.; Hausmann, Tom S.; Huckaby, James L.; Kurath, Dean E.; Minette, Michael J.; Sundaram, S. K.; Yokuda, Satoru T.

    2009-08-14

    concentrated to nominally 20 wt% solids using cross-flow ultrafiltration before adding caustic. The work described in this report addresses the kinetics of caustic leach under WTP conditions, based on tests performed with a Hanford waste simulant. The tests were completed at the lab-scale and in the PEP, which is a 1/4.5-scale mock-up of key PTF process equipment. The purpose of this report is to summarize the results from both scales that are related to caustic leach chemistry to support a scale-up factor for the submodels to be used in the G2 model, which predicts WTP operating performance. The scale-up factor will take the form of an adjustment factor for the rate constant in the boehmite leach kinetic equation in the G2 model.

  2. EFRT M-12 Issue Resolution: Caustic-Leach Rate Constants from PEP and Laboratory-Scale Tests

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mahoney, Lenna A.; Rassat, Scot D.; Eslinger, Paul W.; Aaberg, Rosanne L.; Aker, Pamela M.; Golovich, Elizabeth C.; Hanson, Brady D.; Hausmann, Tom S.; Huckaby, James L.; Kurath, Dean E.; Minette, Michael J.; Sundaram, S. K.; Yokuda, Satoru T.

    2010-01-01

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) has been tasked by Bechtel National Inc. (BNI) on the River Protection Project-Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (RPP-WTP) project to perform research and development activities to resolve technical issues identified for the Pretreatment Facility (PTF). The Pretreatment Engineering Platform (PEP) was designed, constructed and operated as part of a plan to respond to issue M12, “Undemonstrated Leaching Processes” of the External Flowsheet Review Team (EFRT) issue response plan.( ) The PEP is a 1/4.5-scale test platform designed to simulate the WTP pretreatment caustic leaching, oxidative leaching, ultrafiltration solids concentration, and slurry washing processes. The PEP replicates the WTP leaching processes using prototypic equipment and control strategies. The PEP also includes non-prototypic ancillary equipment to support the core processing. The work described in this report addresses caustic leaching under WTP conditions, based on tests performed with a Hanford waste simulant. Because gibbsite leaching kinetics are rapid (gibbsite is expected to be dissolved by the time the final leach temperature is reached), boehmite leach kinetics are the main focus of the caustic-leach tests. The tests were completed at the laboratory-scale and in the PEP, which is a 1/4.5-scale mock-up of key PTF process equipment. Two laboratory-scale caustic-leach tests were performed for each of the PEP runs. For each PEP run, unleached slurry was taken from the PEP caustic-leach vessel for one batch and used as feed for both of the corresponding laboratory-scale tests.

  3. Caustic Leaching of Hanford Tank S-110 Sludge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lumetta, Gregg J.; Carson, Katharine J.; Darnell, Lori P.; Greenwood, Lawrence R.; Hoopes, Francis V.; Sell, Richard L.; Sinkov, Sergey I.; Soderquist, Chuck Z.; Urie, Michael W.; Wagner, John J.

    2001-10-31

    This report describes the Hanford Tank S-110 sludge caustic leaching test conducted in FY 2001 at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. The data presented here can be used to develop the baseline and alternative flowsheets for pretreating Hanford tank sludge. The U.S. Department of Energy funded the work through the Efficient Separations and Processing Crosscutting Program (ESP; EM﷓50).

  4. The chemistry of sludge washing and caustic leaching processes for selected Hanford tank wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A broad-based study on washing and caustic leaching of Hanford tank sludges was performed in FY 1995 to gain a better understanding of the basic chemical processes that underlie this process. This approach involved testing of the baseline sludge washing and caustic leaching method on several Hanford tank sludges, and characterization of the solids both before and after testing by electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, and X-ray absorption spectroscopy. A thermodynamically based model was employed to help understand the factors involved in individual specie distribution in the various stages of the sludge washing and caustic leaching treatment. The behavior of the important chemical and radiochemical components throughout the testing is summarized and reviewed in this report

  5. Laboratory Demonstration of the Pretreatment Process with Caustic and Oxidative Leaching Using Actual Hanford Tank Waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fiskum, Sandra K.; Billing, Justin M.; Buck, Edgar C.; Daniel, Richard C.; Draper, Kathryn E.; Edwards, Matthew K.; Jenson, Evan D.; Kozelisky, Anne E.; MacFarlan, Paul J.; Peterson, Reid A.; Shimskey, Rick W.; Snow, Lanee A.

    2009-01-01

    This report describes the bench-scale pretreatment processing of actual tank waste materials through the entire baseline WTP pretreatment flowsheet in an effort to demonstrate the efficacy of the defined leaching processes on actual Hanford tank waste sludge and the potential impacts on downstream pretreatment processing. The test material was a combination of reduction oxidation (REDOX) tank waste composited materials containing aluminum primarily in the form of boehmite and dissolved S saltcake containing Cr(III)-rich entrained solids. The pretreatment processing steps tested included • caustic leaching for Al removal • solids crossflow filtration through the cell unit filter (CUF) • stepwise solids washing using decreasing concentrations of sodium hydroxide with filtration through the CUF • oxidative leaching using sodium permanganate for removing Cr • solids filtration with the CUF • follow-on solids washing and filtration through the CUF • ion exchange processing for Cs removal • evaporation processing of waste stream recycle for volume reduction • combination of the evaporated product with dissolved saltcake. The effectiveness of each process step was evaluated by following the mass balance of key components (such as Al, B, Cd, Cr, Pu, Ni, Mn, and Fe), demonstrating component (Al, Cr, Cs) removal, demonstrating filterability by evaluating filter flux rates under various processing conditions (transmembrane pressure, crossflow velocities, wt% undissolved solids, and PSD) and filter fouling, and identifying potential issues for WTP. The filterability was reported separately (Shimskey et al. 2008) and is not repeated herein.

  6. Laboratory Demonstration of the Pretreatment Process with Caustic and Oxidative Leaching Using Actual Hanford Tank Waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report describes the bench-scale pretreatment processing of actual tank waste materials through the entire baseline WTP pretreatment flowsheet in an effort to demonstrate the efficacy of the defined leaching processes on actual Hanford tank waste sludge and the potential impacts on downstream pretreatment processing. The test material was a combination of reduction oxidation (REDOX) tank waste composited materials containing aluminum primarily in the form of boehmite and dissolved S saltcake containing Cr(III)-rich entrained solids. The pretreatment processing steps tested included: caustic leaching for Al removal; solids crossflow filtration through the cell unit filter (CUF); stepwise solids washing using decreasing concentrations of sodium hydroxide with filtration through the CUF; oxidative leaching using sodium permanganate for removing Cr; solids filtration with the CUF; follow-on solids washing and filtration through the CUF; ion exchange processing for Cs removal; evaporation processing of waste stream recycle for volume reduction; and combination of the evaporated product with dissolved saltcake. The effectiveness of each process step was evaluated by following the mass balance of key components (such as Al, B, Cd, Cr, Pu, Ni, Mn, and Fe), demonstrating component (Al, Cr, Cs) removal, demonstrating filterability by evaluating filter flux rates under various processing conditions (transmembrane pressure, crossflow velocities, wt% undissolved solids, and PSD) and filter fouling, and identifying potential issues for WTP. The filterability was reported separately (Shimskey et al. 2008) and is not repeated herein

  7. Washing and Caustic Leaching of Hanford Tank Sludge: Results of FY 1998 Studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    GJ Lumetta; BM Rapko; J Liu; DJ Temer; RD Hunt

    1998-12-11

    Sludge washing and parametric caustic leaching tests were performed on sludge samples tiom five Hanford tanks: B-101, BX-1 10, BX-112, C-102, and S-101. These studies examined the effects of both dilute hydroxide washing and caustic leaching on the composition of the residual sludge solids. ` Dilute hydroxide washing removed from <1 to 25% of the Al, -20 to 45% of the Cr, -25 to 97% of the P, and 63 to 99% of the Na from the Hdord tank sludge samples examined. The partial removal of these elements was likely due to the presence of water-soluble sodium salts of aluminate, chromate, hydroxide, nitrate, nitrite, and phosphate, either in the interstitial liquid or as dried salts.

  8. Washing and caustic leaching of Hanford tank sludge: Results of FY 1997 studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The current plan for remediating the Hanford tank farms consists of waste retrieval, pretreatment, treatment (immobilization), and disposal. The tank wastes will be partitioned into high-level and low-level fractions. The HLW will be immobilized in a borosilicate glass matrix; the resulting glass canisters will then be disposed of in a geologic repository. Because of the expected high cost of HLW vitrification and geologic disposal, pretreatment processes will be implemented to reduce the volume of immobilized high-level waste (IHLW). Caustic leaching (sometimes referred to as enhanced sludge washing or ESW) represents the baseline method for pretreating Hanford tank sludges. Caustic leaching is expected to remove a large fraction of the Al, which is present in large quantities in Hanford tank sludges. A significant portion of the P is also expected to be removed from the sludge by metathesis of water-insoluble metal phosphates to insoluble hydroxides and soluble Na3PO4. Similar metathesis reactions can occur for insoluble sulfate salts, allowing the removal of sulfate from the HLW stream. This report describes the sludge washing and caustic leaching tests performed at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory in FY 1996. The sludges used in this study were taken from Hanford tanks AN-104, BY-108, S-101, and S-111

  9. Caustic leaching of high-level radioactive tank sludge: A critical literature review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Department of Energy (DOE) must treat and safely dispose of its radioactive tank contents, which can be separated into high-level waste (HLW) and low-level waste (LLW) fractions. Since the unit costs of treatment and disposal are much higher for HLW than for LLW, technologies to reduce the amount of HLW are being developed. A key process currently being studied to reduce the volume of HLW sludges is called enhanced sludge washing (ESW). This process removes, by water washes, soluble constituents such as sodium salts, and the washed sludge is then leached with 2--3 M NaOH at 60--100 C to remove nonradioactive metals such as aluminum. The remaining solids are considered to be HLW while the solutions are LLW after radionuclides such as 137Cs have been removed. Results of bench-scale tests have shown that the ESW will probably remove the required amounts of inert constituents. While both experimental and theoretical results have shown that leaching efficiency increases as the time and temperature of the leach are increased, increases in the caustic concentration above 2--3 M will only marginally improve the leach factors. However, these tests were not designed to validate the assumption that the caustic used in the ESW process will generate only a small increase (10 Mkg) in the amount of LLW; instead, the test conditions were selected to maximize leaching in a short period and used more water and caustic than is planned during full-scale operations. Even though calculations indicate that the estimate for the amount of LLW generated by the ESW process appears to be reasonable, a detailed study of the amount of LLW from the ESW process is still required. If the LLW analysis indicates that sodium management is critical, then a more comprehensive evaluation of the clean salt process or caustic recycle would be needed. Finally, experimental and theoretical studies have clearly demonstrated the need for the control of solids formation during and after leaching

  10. Mechanism of Phosphorus Removal from Hanford Tank Sludge by Caustic Leaching

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lumetta, Gregg J. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2008-03-05

    Two experiments were conducted to explore the mechanism by which phosphorus is removed from Hanford tank sludge by caustic leaching. In the first experiment, a series of phosphate salts were treated with 3 M NaOH under conditions prototypic of the actual leaching process to be performed in the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP). The phosphates used were aluminum phosphate, bismuth phosphate, chromium(III) phosphate, and β-tri-calcium phosphate; all of these phases have previously been determined to exist in Hanford tank sludge. The leachate solution was sampled at selected time intervals and analyzed for the specific metal ion involved (Al, Bi, Ca, or Cr) and for P (total and as phosphate). The solids remaining after completion of the caustic leaching step were analyzed to determine the reaction product. In the second experiment, the dependence of P removal from bismuth phosphate was examined as a function of the hydroxide ion concentration. It was anticipated that a plot of log[phosphate] versus log[hydroxide] would provide insight into the phosphorus-removal mechanism. This report describes the test activities outlined in Section 6.3.2.1, Preliminary Investigation of Phosphate Dissolution, in Test Plan TP-RPP-WTP-467, Rev.1. The objectives, success criteria, and test conditions of Section 6.3.2.1 are summarized here.

  11. PEP Integrated Test D Run Report Caustic and Oxidative Leaching in UFP-VSL-T02A

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sevigny, Gary J.; Bredt, Ofelia P.; Burns, Carolyn A.; Kurath, Dean E.; Geeting, John GH; Golovich, Elizabeth C.; Guzman-Leong, Consuelo E.; Josephson, Gary B.

    2009-12-11

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) has been tasked by Bechtel National Inc. (BNI) on the River Protection Project-Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (RPP-WTP) project to perform research and development activities to resolve technical issues identified for the Pretreatment Facility (PTF). The Pretreatment Engineering Platform (PEP) was designed, constructed and operated as part of a plan to respond to issue M12, "Undemonstrated Leaching Processes" of the External Flowsheet Review Team (EFRT) issue response plan. The PEP is a 1/4.5-scale test platform designed to simulate the WTP pretreatment caustic leaching, oxidative leaching, ultrafiltration solids concentration, and slurry washing processes. The PEP replicates the WTP leaching processes using prototypic equipment and control strategies. The PEP also includes non-prototypic ancillary equipment to support the core processing. Two operating scenarios are currently being evaluated for the ultrafiltration process (UFP) and leaching operations. The first scenario (Test B and D) has caustic leaching performed in the UFP-2 ultrafiltration feed vessels (i.e., vessel UFP-VSL-T02A in the PEP and vessels UFP-VSL-00002A and B in the WTP PTF). The second scenario (Test A) has caustic leaching conducted in the UFP-1 ultrafiltration feed preparation vessels (i.e., vessels UFP-VSL-T01A and B in the PEP and vessels UFP VSL-00001A and B in the WTP PTF). In Test D, 19M sodium hydroxide (NaOH, caustic) was added to the waste slurry in the UFP VSL T02 vessel after the solids were concentrated to ~20% undissolved solids. The NaOH was added to leach solid aluminum compounds (e.g., gibbsite, boehmite). Caustic addition is followed by heating to 85°C using direct injection of steam to accelerate the leach process. The main difference of Test D compared to Test B is that the leach temperature is 85°C for 24 hrs as compared to 100°C for 12 hours. The other difference is the Test D simulant had Cr in the

  12. A Simplified Gibbsite Solubility Equation for Modeling the Caustic Leaching of Aluminum-Bearing Sludge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Hanford Waste Treatment Plant (WTP) flowsheet includes an optional caustic leach step to remove gibbsite (Al(OH)3) from high-level waste sludge prior to vitrification. Aluminum leaching minimizes the mass that must be vitrified as high-level waste. The steady-state (time averaged) WTP flowsheet uses thermodynamic models that minimize Gibbs free energy to predict aluminum dissolution in the caustic leaching process, but these models are too computationally intensive to be solved in dynamic flowsheets. A gibbsite solubility model that is both accurate and rapidly solved by the.computer was needed and developed for a dynamic flowsheet. Available literature data on the solubility of gibbsite in aqueous sodium hydroxide solutions was compiled and the apparent equilibrium constant (Q) was calculated from the experimental data for each data point. The Q value is defined as the true equilibrium constant times the activity coefficients for the aluminate (Al(OH)4-) and hydroxide (OH-) ions in the reaction: Al(OH)4↔ Al(OH)3(s) + OH- The WTP dynamic flowsheet uses Q to determine the concentration of dissolved aluminate at equilibrium with gibbsite for a given hydroxide concentration. An empirical model to predict Q was developed by multi-linear regression of the experimentally determined Q values from the literature. Four statistically significant model coefficients (all P statistics were less than 10-25) were identified: temperature, solution ionic strength, ionic strength squared, and a regression constant. This model was found to fit a large database of aluminum solubility data with an R2 of 0.98, which is comparable to the accuracy of more computationally intensive thermodynamic models for this data set. (authors)

  13. Washing and caustic leaching of Hanford tank sludges: results of FY 1996 studies. Revision

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    During the past few years, the primary mission at the US Department of Energy's Hanford Site has changed from producing plutonium to restoring the environment. Large volumes of high-level radioactive wastes (HLW), generated during past Pu production and other operations, are stored in underground tanks on site. The current plan for remediating the Hanford tank farms consists of waste retrieval, pretreatment, treatment (immobilization), and disposal. The HLW will be immobilized in a borosilicate glass matrix and then disposed of in a geologic repository. Because of the expected high cost of HLW vitrification and geologic disposal, pretreatment processes will be implemented to reduce the volume of borosilicate glass produced in disposing of the tank wastes. On this basis, a pretreatment plan is being developed. This report describes the sludge washing and caustic leaching test conducted to create a Hanford tank sludge pretreatment flowsheet

  14. Caustic Leaching of SRS Tank 12H Sludge With and Without Chelating Agents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The primary objective of this study was to measure the effect of adding triethanolamine (TEA) to caustic leaching solutions to improve the solubility of aluminum in actual tank-waste sludge. High-level radioactive waste sludge that had a high aluminum assay was used for the tests. This waste, which originated with the processing of aluminum-clad/aluminum-alloy fuels, generates high levels of heat because of the high 90Sr concentration and contains hard-to-dissolve boehmite phases. In concept, a chelating agent, such as TEA, can both improve the dissolution rate and increase the concentration in the liquid phase. For this reason, TEA could also increase the solubility of other sludge components that are potentially problematic to downstream processing. Tests were conducted to determine if this were the case. Because of its relatively high vapor pressure, process design should include methods to minimize losses of the TEA. Sludge was retrieved from tank 12H at the Savannah River Site by on-site personnel, and then shipped to Oak Ridge National Laboratory for the study. The sludge contained a small quantity of rocky debris. One slate-like flat piece, which had approximate dimensions of 1 1/4 x 1/2 x 1/8 in., was recovered. Additional gravel-like fragments with approximate diameters ranging from 1/8 to 1/4 in. were also recovered by sieving the sludge slurry through a 1.4-mm square-pitch stainless steel mesh. These particles ranged from a yellow quartz-like material to grey-colored gravel. Of the 32.50 g of sludge received, the mass of the debris was only 0.89 g, and the finely divided sludge comprised ∼97% of the mass. The sludge was successfully subdivided into uniform aliquots during hot-cell operations. Analytical measurements confirmed the uniformity of the samples. The smaller sludge samples were then used as needed for leaching experiments conducted in a glove box. Six tests were performed with leachate concentrations ranging from 0.1 to 3.0 m NaOH, 0 to 3.0 m

  15. Extraction of Zinc from Electric Arc Furnace Dust by Alkaline Leaching Followed by Fusion of the Leaching Residue with Caustic Soda

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵由才; R.Stanforth

    2004-01-01

    Extractability of zinc from two types of electric arc furnace (EAF) dusts containing 24.8% and 16.8% of zinc respectively (denoted as Sample A and Sample B) were tested using direct alkaline leaching followed by fusion of the resulting leaching residues with caustic soda. The experimental results show that the extraction of zinc is heavily dependent on the contents of iron in the dusts. The higher iron content, the lower extraction of zinc is obtained. 53% and 38% of zinc can be extracted when both dusts were directly contacted with 5mol·L-1 NaOH solution for 42h. The remaining zinc left in the leaching residues, which supposed to be present as zinc ferrites, can be further leached when the residues were fused with caustic soda. Quantitative extraction of zinc can be obtained from the leaching residue of Sample A while only 85% from Sample B. The extractability of zinc from dusts wit hvarious contents of iron is compared. The production flowsheet for zinc from the dusts using the process proposed is discussed.

  16. PEP Run Report for Integrated Test A, Caustic Leaching in UFP-VSL-T01A, Oxidative Leaching in UFP-VSL-T02A

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guzman-Leong, Consuelo E.; Bredt, Ofelia P.; Burns, Carolyn A.; Daniel, Richard C.; Su, Yin-Fong; Geeting, John GH; Golovich, Elizabeth C.; Josephson, Gary B.; Kurath, Dean E.; Sevigny, Gary J.; Smith, Dennese M.; Valdez, Patrick LJ; Yokuda, Satoru T.; Young, Joan K.

    2009-12-04

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) was tasked by Bechtel National Inc. (BNI) on the River Protection Project-Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (RPP-WTP) project to perform research and development activities to resolve technical issues identified for the Pretreatment Facility (PTF). The Pretreatment Engineering Platform (PEP) was designed and constructed and operated as part of a plan to respond to issue M12, “Undemonstrated Leaching Processes.”(a) The PEP, located in the Process Engineering Laboratory-West (PDLW) located in Richland, Washington, is a 1/4.5-scale test platform designed to simulate the WTP pretreatment caustic leaching, oxidative leaching, ultrafiltration solids concentration, and slurry washing processes. The PEP replicates the WTP leaching processes using prototypic equipment and control strategies. The PEP also includes non-prototypic ancillary equipment to support the core processing.

  17. PEP Run Report for Integrated Test A, Caustic Leaching in UFP-VSL-T01A, Oxidative Leaching in UFP-VSL-T02A

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) was tasked by Bechtel National Inc. (BNI) on the River Protection Project-Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (RPP-WTP) project to perform research and development activities to resolve technical issues identified for the Pretreatment Facility (PTF). The Pretreatment Engineering Platform (PEP) was designed and constructed and operated as part of a plan to respond to issue M12, 'Undemonstrated Leaching Processes.'(a) The PEP, located in the Process Engineering Laboratory-West (PDLW) located in Richland, Washington, is a 1/4.5-scale test platform designed to simulate the WTP pretreatment caustic leaching, oxidative leaching, ultrafiltration solids concentration, and slurry washing processes. The PEP replicates the WTP leaching processes using prototypic equipment and control strategies. The PEP also includes non-prototypic ancillary equipment to support the core processing.

  18. Washing and caustic leaching of Hanford tank sludges: Results of FY 1995 studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    During the past few years, the primary mission at the US Department of Energy's Hanford Site has changed from producing plutonium to environmental restoration. Large volumes of high-level radioactive wastes (HLW), generated during past Pu production and other operations, are stored in underground tanks on site. The current plan for remediating the Hanford tank farms consists of waste retrieval, pretreatment, treatment (immobilization), and disposal. The HLW will be immobilized in a borosilicate glass matrix; the resulting glass canisters will then be disposed of in a geologic repository. Because of the expected high cost of HLW immobilization and disposal, pretreatment processes will be implemented to reduce the volume of borosilicate glass produced in processing the tank wastes. This document describes sludge washing and caustic leaching tests conducted in FY 1995 at the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) at the request of Westinghouse Hanford Company. These tests were performed using sludges from seven Hanford waste tanks -- B-111, BX-107, C-103, S-104, SY-103, T-104, and T-111. The primary and secondary types of waste stored in each of these tanks are given in Table 1. 1. The data collected in this effort will be used to support the March 1998 Tri-Party Agreement decision on the extent of pretreatment to be performed on the Hanford tank sludges (Ecology, EPA, and DOE 1994)

  19. Increasing silver leaching rate from leaching-resistant zinc residues by thiourea leaching method with pressurized preoxidation process

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    胡天觉; 曾光明; 黄国和; 袁兴中; 李建兵

    2003-01-01

    As for the leaching-resistant zinc residues, the silver leaching rate can be over 98% through the processof pressurized preoxidation and thiourea leaching. Compared with the method of extracting the silver directly fromthe leaching-resistant zinc residues, the silver leaching rate is greatly improved. The optimum preoxidation condi-tions are: particle size range 40 - 60 μm, oxygen partial pressure 106 Pa, temperature 80 - 90 ℃, pH= 1.0, andleaching time 5 h. After pretreatment, the time of thiourea leaching silver is shortened to 1.5 h, and the thioureaconsumption is reduced greatly. The oxidation mechanism and the thiourea leaching kinetics were also explored.

  20. Water washes and caustic leaches of sludge from Hanford Tank S-101 and water washes of sludge from Hanford Tank C-103

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In 1993, the Department of Energy (DOE) selected the enhanced sludge washing (ESW) process as the baseline for pretreatment of Hanford tank sludges. The ESW process uses a series of water washes and caustic leaches to separate nonradioactive components such as aluminum, chromium, and phosphate from the high-level waste sludges. If the ESW process is successful, the volume of immobilized high-level waste will be significantly reduced. The tests on the sludge from Hanford Tank S-101 focused on the effects of process variables such as sodium hydroxide concentration (1 and 3 M), temperature (70 and 95 C), and leaching time (5, 24, 72, and 168 h) on the efficacy of the ESW process with realistic liquid-to-solid ratios. Another goal of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of water washes on a sludge sample from hanford Tank C-103. The final objective of this study was to test potential process control monitors during the water washes and caustic leaches with actual sludge. Both 137Cs activity and conductance were measured for each of the water washes and caustic leaches. Experimental procedures, a discussion of results, conclusions and recommendations are included in this report

  1. Pretreatment Engineering Platform (PEP) Integrated Test B Run Report--Caustic and Oxidative Leaching in UFP-VSL-T02A

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geeting, John GH; Bredt, Ofelia P.; Burns, Carolyn A.; Golovich, Elizabeth C.; Guzman-Leong, Consuelo E.; Josephson, Gary B.; Kurath, Dean E.; Sevigny, Gary J.; Aaberg, Rosanne L.

    2009-12-10

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) has been tasked by Bechtel National Inc. (BNI) on the River Protection Project-Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (RPP-WTP) project to perform research and development activities to resolve technical issues identified for the Pretreatment Facility (PTF). The Pretreatment Engineering Platform (PEP) was designed, constructed and operated as part of a plan to respond to issue M12, “Undemonstrated Leaching Processes” of the External Flowsheet Review Team (EFRT) issue response plan.( ) The PEP is a 1/4.5-scale test platform designed to simulate the WTP pretreatment caustic leaching, oxidative leaching, ultrafiltration solids concentration, and slurry washing processes. The PEP replicates the WTP leaching processes using prototypic equipment and control strategies. The PEP also includes non-prototypic ancillary equipment to support the core processing.

  2. Pretreatment Engineering Platform (PEP) Integrated Test B Run Report--Caustic and Oxidative Leaching in UFP-VSL-T02A

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) has been tasked by Bechtel National Inc. (BNI) on the River Protection Project-Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (RPP-WTP) project to perform research and development activities to resolve technical issues identified for the Pretreatment Facility (PTF). The Pretreatment Engineering Platform (PEP) was designed, constructed and operated as part of a plan to respond to issue M12, 'Undemonstrated Leaching Processes' of the External Flowsheet Review Team (EFRT) issue response plan.( ) The PEP is a 1/4.5-scale test platform designed to simulate the WTP pretreatment caustic leaching, oxidative leaching, ultrafiltration solids concentration, and slurry washing processes. The PEP replicates the WTP leaching processes using prototypic equipment and control strategies. The PEP also includes non-prototypic ancillary equipment to support the core processing.

  3. AN ACCELERATED RATE CALORIMETRY STUDY OF CAUSTIC-SIDE SOLVENT EXTRACTION SOLVENT WITHOUT EXTRACTANT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study found that 4 - 48 part per thousand (ppth) of Caustic Side Solvent Extraction (CSSX) solvent without extractant in caustic salt solution at evaporator-relevant temperatures result in no process-significant energetic events. However, the data suggest a chemical reaction (possible decomposition) in the CSSX solvent near 140 C. This concentration of entrained solvent is believed to markedly exceed the amount of solvent that will pass from the Modular Caustic Side Solvent Unit (MCU) through the downstream Defense Waste Processing Facility and enter the evaporator through routine tank farm operations. The rate of pressure rise at 140 C differs appreciably - i.e., is reduced - for salt solution containing the organic from that of the same solution without solvent. This behavior is due to a reaction between the CSSX components and the salt solution simulant

  4. PEP Support: Laboratory Scale Leaching and Permeate Stability Tests

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Russell, Renee L.; Peterson, Reid A.; Rinehart, Donald E.; Buchmiller, William C.

    2010-05-21

    This report documents results from a variety of activities requested by the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP). The activities related to caustic leaching, oxidative leaching, permeate precipitation behavior of waste as well as chromium (Cr) leaching are: • Model Input Boehmite Leaching Tests • Pretreatment Engineering Platform (PEP) Support Leaching Tests • PEP Parallel Leaching Tests • Precipitation Study Results • Cr Caustic and Oxidative Leaching Tests. Leaching test activities using the PEP simulant provided input to a boehmite dissolution model and determined the effect of temperature on mass loss during caustic leaching, the reaction rate constant for the boehmite dissolution, and the effect of aeration in enhancing the chromium dissolution during caustic leaching. Other tests were performed in parallel with the PEP tests to support the development of scaling factors for caustic and oxidative leaching. Another study determined if precipitate formed in the wash solution after the caustic leach in the PEP. Finally, the leaching characteristics of different chromium compounds under different conditions were examined to determine the best one to use in further testing.

  5. Distribution of velocity gradients and rate of caustic formation in turbulent aerosols at finite Kubo numbers

    CERN Document Server

    Gustavsson, K

    2012-01-01

    In a one-dimensional model for a turbulent aerosol (inertial particles suspended in a random flow) we compute the distributions of particle-velocity gradients and the rate of caustic formation at finite but small Kubo numbers Ku, for arbitrary Stokes numbers St. Our results are consistent with those obtained earlier in the limit of small Ku and and large St, such that Ku^2 St remains constant. We show how finite-time correlations and non-ergodic effects influence the inertial-particle dynamics at finite but small Kubo numbers.

  6. Uranium dissolution rate from ores in carbonate leaching

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The experiments are performed on the determination of specific dissolution rates for isolated samples of such uranium mineral as pitchblende and its inclusions in ore slurries during autoclave carbonate leaching. The following conclusions are drawn: all types of pitchblende regardless of an oxygen coefficient exhibit close specific dissolution rates; the time of leaching is independent of an uranium content at the initial sample; on ore reducing down to particle size of 0.1 mm practically complete mechanical opening of uranium minerals takes place

  7. Low leach rate glasses for immobilization of nuclear wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Improved defense and commercial waste glass have about one order of magnitude lower leach rates at 900C in static deionized water than reference glasses. This durability difference diminishes as the leaching temperature is raised, but at repository temperature less than 1500C, the improved compositions would have considerable advantages over reference glases. At the melting temperatures necessary for most of the high-durability glasses, volatility was found to be higher than that experienced in processing current reference glases. Higher volatilities might be compensated for by specific design of the off-gas system for improved off-gas treatment and volatile materials recovery. 6 figures, 2 tables

  8. Assessment of weathering and leaching rates of Thule hot particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roos, P. (Technical Univ. of Denmark, Risoe National Laboratory for Sustainable Energy, Roskilde (Denmark)); Outola, I. (STUK-Radiation and Nuclear Safety Authority (Finland)); Nygren, U.; Ramebaeck, H. (FOI CBRN Defence and Security (Sweden)); Sidhu, R. (Institute of Energy Technology, Environmental Monitoring Section, Health and Safety Dept. (Norway))

    2010-03-15

    Within the current project a methodology for separating actinide particles originating from the Thule 1968 accident has been developed. Particles were completely isolated in water using visual and radiometric methods. The particles were attached electrostatic to a plastic support and could easily be moved to any container for leaching studies or other type of studies. Leaching and dissolution studies performed within the project indicate that some particles are relatively easily destroyed or leached while others are more refractory. The results shows that even though the oxide particles are hard to completely dissolve they release material even when exposed to weak solvents like water and salt solutions. Exposures to lung simulant fluids show relatively slow dissolution rates comparable to what is found using only water. Sequential extraction of particles shows that variation between particles is very large; some dissolve easily while some does not. Of radiological importance is the disruption of particles when exposed to dissolution. (author)

  9. Leaching of Natural Gravel and Concrete by CO2 - Experimental Design, Leaching Behaviour and Dissolution Rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuchs, Rita; Leis, Albrecht; Mittermayr, Florian; Harer, Gerhard; Wagner, Hanns; Reichl, Peter; Dietzel, Martin

    2015-04-01

    The durability of building material in aggressive aqueous environments is a key factor for evaluating the product quality and application as well as of high economic interest. Therefore, aspects of durability have been frequently investigated with different approaches such as monitoring, modelling and experimental work. In the present study an experimental approach based on leaching behaviour of natural calcite-containing siliceous gravel used as backfill material in tunnelling and sprayed concrete by CO2 was developed. CO2 was introduced to form carbonic acid, which is known as an important agent to induce chemical attack. The goals of this study were (i) to develop a proper experimental design to survey the leaching of building materials on-line, (ii) to decipher individual reaction mechanisms and kinetics and (iii) to estimate time-resolved chemical resistance of the used material throughout leaching. A combined flow through reactor unit was successfully installed, where both open and closed system conditions can be easily simulated by changing flow directions and rates. The chemical compositions of the experimental solutions were adjusted by CO2 addition at pHstat conditions and monitored in-situ by pH/SpC electrodes and by analysing the chemical composition of samples throughout an experimental run. From the obtained data e.g. dissolution rates with respect to calcite were obtained for the gravel material, which were dependent on the individual calcite content of the leached material. The rates were found to reflect the flow rate conditions, and the kinetic data lay within the range expected from dissolution experiments in the CaCO3-CO2-H2O system. In case of concrete the reactions throughout the leaching experiment were complex. Coupled dissolution and precipitation phenomena (e.g. portlandite dissolution, calcite formation) occurred. The coupled reactions can be followed by the evolution of the solution chemistry. The overall rates of elemental removal from

  10. Impurity leaching rates of 1000 liter growth tanks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burnham, A; Floyd, R; Robey, H F; Torres, R

    1999-02-19

    This memo reports on the analysis of some recent measurements of solution impurity levels in the three KDP and one DKDP Pilot Production 1000 liter growth tanks (Tanks B, C, D, & F). Solution samples were taken on a weekly basis during recent crystal growth runs in each tank and were analyzed by inductively coupled plasma emission spectroscopy (ICP-ES). The solution history for five specific elements, Si, B, Al, Fe and Ca will be analyzed in detail. The first four of these elements are input into solution via slow dissolution of the glass vessel at a rate which is strongly dependent on the solution temperature. Si and B continuously accumulate in solution, since they are not incorporated into the crystal. Al and Fe by comparison are incorporated into the crystal (primarily the prismatic sectors) and present problems to inclusion-free growth (Al) and 30 damage (Fe). The level of these impurities initially increases when the crystal size is small but later decreases when the rate of incorporation into the crystal exceeds the rate of dissolution of the glass tank. The last element, Ca is of interest since it has recently been observed to be one of the elements found at the location of 3cu damage. For Si and B, the dissolution or leach rate from the glass tank is easily obtained from the results of the chemical analysis. The temperature dependent leach rates are shown to be comparable (within a factor of two) for all four tanks, with Tank B (DKDP) having the lowest rate of Si accumulation. The glass leach rates of the two incorporating elements Al and Fe require substantially more analysis as the daily variation of the crystal dimensions, the solution concentration, and the mass of KDP remaining in solution must be taken into account in order to separate the rate of impurity incorporation from the rate of dissolution of the glass. The method for accomplishing this separation is described, and the result obtained is that the leach rates of all four tanks are within a

  11. Extraction of Zinc from Electric Arc Furnace Dust by Alkaline Leaching Followed by Fusion of the Leaching Residue with Caustic Soda%氢氧化钠浸取-浸取渣熔融法从炼钢厂烟尘中提取锌的研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵由才; R. Stanforth

    2004-01-01

    Extractability of zinc from two types of electric arc furnace (EAF) dusts containing 24.8% and 16.8%of zinc respectively (denoted as Sample A and Sample B) were tested using direct alkaline leaching followed by fusion of the resulting leaching residues with caustic soda. The experimental results show that the extraction of zinc is heavily dependent on the contents of iron in the dusts. The higher iron content, the lower extraction of zinc is obtained. 53% and 38% of zinc can be extracted when both dusts were directly contacted with 5 mol. L-1 NaOH solution for 42 h. The remaining zinc left in the leaching residues, which supposed to be present as zinc ferrites, can be further leached when the residues were fused with caustic soda. Quantitative extraction of zinc can be obtained from the leaching residue of Sample A while only 85% from Sample B. The extractability of zinc from dusts with various contents of iron is compared. The production flowsheet for zinc from the dusts using the process proposed is discussed.

  12. The effect of devitrification on leaching rate of glass containing simulated high level liquid waste (HLLW)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Effect of devitrification on leaching rate of glass named G1 and G2 each contains 20 wt% and 30wt% of waste has been studied. devitrification of waste - glass has been carried out by heating those specimens at 850oC for 10, 18, 26, 34, 42 and 50 hours respectively. The weight percentage of crystal in waste glass was determined by X-ray diffractometer and leaching rate was determined by soxhlet apparatus at 100oC for 24 hours. The longer heating time, the more weight percentage of crystal is formed. The results show that leaching rate of G2 specimens are higher than those of G1. For G1 the leaching rate at 850oC in 20 times than without heating, and for G2 leaching rate is 15.7 times than without heating. (author)

  13. Causticizing process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Engdal, H.

    1987-03-10

    This invention seeks to provide a method in which the soda lye obtained as a result of cellulose cooking process and unslaked lime are used for producing white liquor which can be re-used in the cooking process. In this method, the heat released by the slaking of lime with soda lye is recovered by a high pressure slaking process wherein the heat is transferred, either to the steam separating from the lye, which steam is then led to the desired application, or to some other medium to be heated. The invention is characterized in that the soda lye to be causticized is divided into two parts, one of which is used for the slaking of lime by adding to it all the unslaked lime needed for the causticizing process, and that, following slaking, the two volumes are brought together for the actual causticizing reaction involving the total amount of lye needed. This invention provides the advantage that the amount of lye needed is smaller, and so the temperature can be increased.

  14. Rate of consumption of dissolved oxygen during ammonium carbonate in situ leaching of uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leaching of uranium in situ from sandstone deposits with ammonium carbonate solution containing dissolved oxygen occurs rapidly compared with the leaching of the bulk of the sulfur present as FeS2. However, because of their high reducing capacity and their relative abundance, the FeS2 minerals consume the bulk of the oxidant. A pressure leach apparatus was constructed that permitted measuring oxygen consumption by FeS2, best described by a first-order reaction. The experimental rate constants for various cores are roughly proportional to their FeS2 contents

  15. The rate of caustic crossing microlensing events for Q2237+0305

    CERN Document Server

    Wyithe, J S B; Turner, E L

    2000-01-01

    Spectrophotometric observation of the gravitationally microlensed quasar Q2237+0305 during a High Magnification Event (HME) is potentially a very powerful tool for probing the structure of the quasars accretion disc on scales of less than 10^-8 arc seconds. How often we can expect to observe a HME is dependent on the lens system parameters of galactic transverse velocity, mean microlens mass and the size of the magnified continuum source. We have previously used published microlensed light-curves to obtain expressions for the likely-hood of the values for these parameters (Wyithe, Webster & Turner 1999b,c; Wyithe, Webster, Turner & Mortlock 1999). Here we use this information to investigate the expected rate of SHMEs. We find the average rate of SHMEs as well as the number that we can expect to observe over periods of a decade and of a single observing season. We find that the average SHME rate summed over all images in Q2237+0305 is 1.5\\pm0.6 - 6.3\\pm1.3 events per decade. During the period following...

  16. Sensitivity of radioactive nuclide leaching rate under the sub-surface disposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In order to dispose of radioactive wastes generated from and stored in JAEA in the sub-surface disposal facility, JAEA has studied the safety assessment of sub-surface disposal considering likely scenario and less-likely scenario. Leaching rate of radionuclide from radioactive wastes to permeation water in sub-surface disposal facility is important parameter in the safety assessment because radionuclides contained in activated metal are released to permeation water by the corrosion of metal. In this report, we studied sensitivity of radionuclide leaching rate from radioactive wastes in the safety assessment of sub-surface disposal. As a result, it is confirmed that the dose due to Cl-36 which is dominant nuclide at groundwater scenario in the safety assessment is sensitive to radionuclide leaching rate from radioactive wastes, but the dose due to Nb-94 which is dominant nuclide at tunnel excavation scenario in the assessment is not sensitive to radionuclide leaching rate but to distribution coefficients of engineered barrier. (author)

  17. Behavior of calcium silicate in leaching process

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘桂华; 李小斌; 彭志宏; 周秋生

    2003-01-01

    Based on the thermodynamic calculation, the mole ratio of CaO to SiO2, temperature and A/S of bauxitehave a profound influence on the mole ratio of 2CaO @ SiO2 to CaO @ SiO2 in sinter. CaO @ SiO2 and β-2CaO @ SiO2appear stable in caustic solution but unstable in soda solution, and CaO @ SiO2 is more stable than β-2CaO @ SiO2 un-der the same leaching condition. Compared with the conventional sinter, the rate of alumina extraction of the newsinter is large and the secondary reaction is restricted in the leaching, which might be mainly due to the more contentof CaO @ SiO2 in sinter and better stability of CaO @ SiO2 in leaching.

  18. Rates of leaching of radium from contaminated soils: an experimental investigation of radium bearing soils from Port Hope, Ontario

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The leachability of Ra-226 from soil at Port Hope, Ontario contaminated by waste from a long established U refinery is described here. A small-scale static leach test was devised to provide information to permit an assessment of hazard due to leaching in the environment. Two different leaching solutions were prepared to simulate a range of infiltrating water quality in disposal environments: one by bubbling CO2 into distilled water to pH 5.5, and another by bubbling SO2 into water to pH 3.5. Narrow-range size fractions of the soils (i.e. 0.250 to 0.105 mm) were leached for 30 to 45 days (equivalent rainfall of 2 to 3 yr). It was found that leaching is significantly affected by soil texture, total amounts leached and the maximum concentrations reached being much greater for coarser, and intermediate size fractions than for fine soil fractions. Also, leachant acidity significantly increased leaching rates and resulted in enhanced mobility in soils. A straight line for the plot of Q/Q0 (cumulative fraction released) vs. Tsup(1/2) (T is leaching time in days) indicated that leaching could be considered to be a diffusion phenomenon in accordance with Fick's law. Diffusion coefficients ranging from 5 X 10-11 to 2 X 10-13 cm2 day-1 were found. These coefficients provide a basis for estimating the fraction that would be leached over longer periods. (Auth.)

  19. Electron caustic lithography

    OpenAIRE

    S. M. KENNEDY; Zheng, C. X.; J. Fu; Tang, W. X.; Paganin, D. M.; Jesson, D. E.

    2012-01-01

    A maskless method of electron beam lithography is described which uses the reflection of an electron beam from an electrostatic mirror to produce caustics in the demagnified image projected onto a resist–coated wafer. By varying the electron optics, e.g. via objective lens defocus, both the morphology and dimensions of the caustic features may be controlled, producing a range of bright and tightly focused projected features. The method is illustrated for line and fold caustics and is compleme...

  20. Statistical evaluation of the analytical method involved in French nuclear glasses leaching rate determination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chemical durability studies of nuclear glasses involves a large number of water leaching experiments at different temperatures and pressures on both, glasses doped with fission products and actinides and non radioactive surrogates. The leaching rates of these glasses are evaluated through ICPAES analysis of the leachate over time. This work presents a statistical evaluation of the analysis method used to determine the concentrations of various vitreous matrix constituents: Si, B, Na, Al, Ca, Li as major elements and Ba, Cr, Fe, Mn, Mo, Ni, P, Sr, Zn, Zr as minor elements. Calibration characteristics, limits of detection, limits of quantification and uncertainties quantification are illustrated with different examples of analysis performed on surrogates and on radioactive leachates in glove box. (authors)

  1. Electron caustic lithography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. M. Kennedy

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available A maskless method of electron beam lithography is described which uses the reflection of an electron beam from an electrostatic mirror to produce caustics in the demagnified image projected onto a resist–coated wafer. By varying the electron optics, e.g. via objective lens defocus, both the morphology and dimensions of the caustic features may be controlled, producing a range of bright and tightly focused projected features. The method is illustrated for line and fold caustics and is complementary to other methods of reflective electron beam lithography.

  2. Effect of irrigation and winery waste compost rates in nitrate leaching in vulnerable zones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Requejo, Maria Isabel; Castellanos, Maria Teresa; Villena, Raquel; Ribas, Francisco; Jesús Cabello, Maria; Arce, Augusto; Cartagena, Maria Carmen

    2013-04-01

    The winery industry is widespread in Spain (3,610,000 tonnes of wine in 2010 (FAO, 2010)), and generates wastes characterized by a high content of organic matter, a notable content in macronutrients and low heavy-metals. These organic wastes could be used for agricultural purposes after a correct stabilization process (e.g. composting).The addition of these organic wastes requires a correct management, especially on semiarid cropped areas of central Spain where environmental degradation of water supplies with high N loads is observed. An integrated optimization of both applied compost dose and amount of irrigation is important to ensure optimum yields and minimum nitrate leaching losses. The purpose of this work was to study the effect of the application of winery waste compost as fertilizer in a melon crop cultivated with different drip irrigation rates. The field experiment was carried out in Ciudad Real, designated "vulnerable zone" by the "Nitrates Directive" 91/676/CEE. Melon crop has been traditionally cultivated in this area with high inputs of water and fertilizers, but no antecedents of application of winery wastes are known. Beside the control treatment (D0), three doses of compost were applied: 6.7 (D1), 13.3 (D2) and 20 T/ha(D3).Irrigation treatments consisted of applying a 100% ETc and an excess irrigation of 120% ETc. The soil was a shallow sandy-loam (Petrocalcic Palexeralfs), with 0.6 m depth and a discontinuous petrocalcic horizon between 0.6 and 0.7 m. Drainage and nitrate concentration on the soil solution were measured weekly to determine N leached during the crop period. Crop yield was also followed by harvesting plots when a significant number of fruits were fully matured. A comparison between nitrate leached and crop production among different treatments and irrigation rates are presented. Acknowledgements: This project has been supported by INIA-RTA2010-00110-C03-01.

  3. Mineralization of contaminant uranium and leach rates in sediments from Hanford, Washington

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Solid-phase characterization of several uranium contaminated sediments from the U.S. Department of Energy's Hanford Site was used in conjunction with semi-selective extraction analyses and batch and column leach tests to identify the form of uranium in the samples. Results of scanning electron microscopy analyses indicated that the majority of the uranium in the most contaminated sediment was present as discrete uranium phases and possibly co-precipitates with carbonate and iron- and/or aluminum-oxide/hydroxide phases. Molecular probe techniques confirmed the presence of the uranyl ion; structural model fits of the sample spectra were consistent with uranophane, liebigite, and in one case, with a uranium-carbonate adsorption complex on the surface of an iron-(hydr)oxide. Uranium effluent concentrations failed to reach steady-state conditions during long-term column leach tests, indicating that the release of uranium from the sediments was controlled by multi-rate kinetic processes that could be attributed to the different forms of uranium in the samples.

  4. Filtration and Leach Testing for PUREX Cladding Sludge and REDOX Cladding Sludge Actual Waste Sample Composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shimskey, Rick W.; Billing, Justin M.; Buck, Edgar C.; Casella, Amanda J.; Crum, Jarrod V.; Daniel, Richard C.; Draper, Kathryn E.; Edwards, Matthew K.; Hallen, Richard T.; Kozelisky, Anne E.; MacFarlan, Paul J.; Peterson, Reid A.; Swoboda, Robert G.

    2009-03-02

    of gibbsite, and its impact on filtration. The initial sample was diluted with a liquid simulant to simulate the receiving concentration of retrieved tank waste into the UFP2 vessel (< 10 wt% undissolved solids). Filtration testing was performed on the dilute waste sample and dewatered to a higher solids concentration. Filtration testing was then performed on the concentrated slurry. Afterwards, the slurry was caustic leached to remove aluminum present in the undissolved solid present in the waste. The leach was planned to simulate leaching conditions in the UFP2 vessel. During the leach, slurry supernate samples were collected to measure the dissolution rate of aluminum in the waste. After the slurry cooled down from the elevated leach temperature, the leach liquor was dewatered from the solids. The remaining slurry was rinsed and dewatered with caustic solutions to remove a majority of the dissolved aluminum from the leached slurry. The concentration of sodium hydroxide in the rinse solutions was high enough to maintain the solubility of the aluminum in the dewatered rinse solutions after dilution of the slurry supernate. Filtration tests were performed on the final slurry to compare to filtration performance before and after caustic leaching.

  5. Influence of N fertilization rates, rainfall, and temperature on nitrate leaching from a rainfed winter wheat field in Taihu watershed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Xin-Qiang; Xu, Lei; Li, Hua; He, Miao-Miao; Qian, Yi-Chao; Liu, Jin; Nie, Ze-Yu; Ye, Yu-Shi; Chen, Yingxu

    Cropland derived nitrate leaching was a major reason for groundwater pollution. The objective of this study was to on-farm investigate the behavior of nitrate leaching affected by N fertilization rates, rainfall, and temperature in a rainfed winter wheat field in Taihu watershed. The experiment had five urea-N rates (0-360 kg N ha -1 in 90-kg increments), and nitrate-N in leachate was daily collected by wedge-shaped fiberglass wick lysimeters during four stages (seeding stage, SS; tillering stage, TS; booting stage, BS; harvesting stage, HS). Results showed that: (1) higher potential of leachate would be engendered when the rainfall intensity was over 5.9 mm d -1; (2) variations of nitrate concentrations in leachate were well responsed to three split fertilizations, which increased with the increase of urea-N applied rates. A similar variation pattern of nitrate concentrations was observed in -0.3 m and -0.6 m soil leachate. Besides, the nitrate concentrations in leachate could be raised with the sharply increase of air temperature, especially in the SS and TS stages; (3) the fluxes of nitrate leaching were significantly affected by N rates ( P HS > BS > SS. The N application rate of 180 kg N ha -1 optimized wheat production, but N application over that rate greatly increased nitrate leaching potential. Therefore, options other than lowering the N application rate need to be considered to reduce environmental impacts while maintain winter wheat production.

  6. Evaluation of DSSAT Model for Nitrate Leaching under Different Water and Nitrogen Rates in Maize Field

    OpenAIRE

    Rabie, M; M. Gheysari; S. M. Mirlatifi

    2013-01-01

    Nitrate leaching from agricultural lands can pollute groundwater, and the degree of pollution caused significantly depends on agricultural practices implemented on farms. Field studies required to evaluate the effects of various agricultural management strategies on nitrate leaching are expensive and time consuming. As a result, it is suggested to use crop models to simulate the effects of management practices on nitrate leaching. Plant growth models such as DSSAT software package can simulat...

  7. Investigation of aeration rate on Uranium bio leaching in internal airlift bioreactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uranium is leached from the uranium ore of the second anomaly of Saghand by the Acidithiobacillus ferroxidans bacteria in an internal airlift bio-reactor. This study has been made to find the effect of aeration rate as well as its optimal value. The experiments have been carried out at 4 aeration rates to find the best recovery results in the least possible time duration. The results showed that the most percentage of the uranium recovery is in the superficial gas velocity of 0.010 m/s. The recovery at this aeration rate has an efficiency of more than 95percentin 11 days. Also, the best range for aeration study in the airlift bio-reactor is calculated with a minimum value of 0.0065 m/s which is the critical value of the uranium particle suspension as well as the maximum value of 0.015 m/s. The stress on the bacteria increases the recovery time process in velocities of more than 0.015 m/s.

  8. Rates of leaching of 137Cs and potassium from different plant litters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mature plants of Calluna vulgaris, Trifolium repens and Agrostis capillaris were labelled with 137Cs by uptake through the roots. Shoot material was allowed to dry to give plant litters adequately labelled for leaching experiments, using microcosms subjected to a number of applied treatments. Measurements were made of 137Cs activity, potassium content and pH on the leachates from each microcosm obtained every 2 weeks over a 3-month period. The respiration rate of the litter was also measured to give an index of microbial activity. At the end of the experiment, 137Cs and K contents of the residual litter were measured. Generally, the rate of release of 137Cs from Calluna litter was slower than that from Trifolium or Agrostis. After 3 months, the loss of 137Cs from Calluna litter had stabilised at about 30-40% of the original. Trifolium had lost 60% of the initial 137Cs over the same period, whilst Agrostis had lost about 70%. Repeated drying and rewetting treatment, compared to a continuous moistened state, resulted in the stabilisation of 137Cs within Trifolium and Agrostis litters. In Agrostis and Trifolium, the release of potassium was greater and more rapid than the release of 137Cs, with only 10% of the original K remaining in the litter after 2 months. In Calluna, the release of K resembled the release of 137Cs more closely. (author)

  9. Caustic Recycling Pilot Unit to Separate Sodium from LLW at Hanford Site - 12279

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pendleton, Justin; Bhavaraju, Sai; Priday, George; Desai, Aditya; Duffey, Kean; Balagopal, Shekar [Ceramatec Inc., Salt Lake City, UT 84119 (United States)

    2012-07-01

    As part of the Department of Energy (DOE) sponsored Advanced Remediation Technologies initiative, a scheme was developed to combine Continuous Sludge Leaching (CSL), Near-Tank Cesium Removal (NTCR), and Caustic Recycling Unit (CRU) using Ceramatec technology, into a single system known as the Pilot Near-Tank Treatment System (PNTTS). The Cesium (Cs) decontaminated effluent from the NTCR process will be sent to the caustic recycle process for recovery of the caustic which will be reused in another cycle of caustic leaching in the CSL process. Such an integrated mobile technology demonstration will give DOE the option to insert this process for sodium management at various sites in Hanford, and will minimize the addition of further sodium into the waste tanks. This allows for recycling of the caustic used to remove aluminum during sludge washing as a pretreatment step in the vitrification of radioactive waste which will decrease the Low Level Waste (LLW) volume by as much as 39%. The CRU pilot process was designed to recycle sodium in the form of pure sodium hydroxide. The basis for the design of the 1/4 scale pilot caustic recycling unit was to demonstrate the efficient operation of a larger scale system to recycle caustic from the NTCR effluent stream from the Parsons process. The CRU was designed to process 0.28 liter/minute of NTCR effluent, and generate 10 M concentration of 'usable' sodium hydroxide. The proposed process operates at 40 deg. C to provide additional aluminum solubility and then recover the sodium hydroxide to the point where the aluminum is saturated at 40 deg. C. A system was developed to safely separate and vent the gases generated during operation of the CRU with the production of 10 M sodium hydroxide. Caustic was produced at a rate between 1.9 to 9.3 kg/hr. The CRU was located inside an ISO container to allow for moving of the unit close to tank locations to process the LLW stream. Actual tests were conducted with the NTCR effluent

  10. Caustic Recycling Pilot Unit to Separate Sodium from LLW at Hanford Site - 12279

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As part of the Department of Energy (DOE) sponsored Advanced Remediation Technologies initiative, a scheme was developed to combine Continuous Sludge Leaching (CSL), Near-Tank Cesium Removal (NTCR), and Caustic Recycling Unit (CRU) using Ceramatec technology, into a single system known as the Pilot Near-Tank Treatment System (PNTTS). The Cesium (Cs) decontaminated effluent from the NTCR process will be sent to the caustic recycle process for recovery of the caustic which will be reused in another cycle of caustic leaching in the CSL process. Such an integrated mobile technology demonstration will give DOE the option to insert this process for sodium management at various sites in Hanford, and will minimize the addition of further sodium into the waste tanks. This allows for recycling of the caustic used to remove aluminum during sludge washing as a pretreatment step in the vitrification of radioactive waste which will decrease the Low Level Waste (LLW) volume by as much as 39%. The CRU pilot process was designed to recycle sodium in the form of pure sodium hydroxide. The basis for the design of the 1/4 scale pilot caustic recycling unit was to demonstrate the efficient operation of a larger scale system to recycle caustic from the NTCR effluent stream from the Parsons process. The CRU was designed to process 0.28 liter/minute of NTCR effluent, and generate 10 M concentration of 'usable' sodium hydroxide. The proposed process operates at 40 deg. C to provide additional aluminum solubility and then recover the sodium hydroxide to the point where the aluminum is saturated at 40 deg. C. A system was developed to safely separate and vent the gases generated during operation of the CRU with the production of 10 M sodium hydroxide. Caustic was produced at a rate between 1.9 to 9.3 kg/hr. The CRU was located inside an ISO container to allow for moving of the unit close to tank locations to process the LLW stream. Actual tests were conducted with the NTCR effluent simulant

  11. COMPILATION OF LABORATORY SCALE ALUMINUM WASH AND LEACH REPORT RESULTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    HARRINGTON SJ

    2011-01-06

    This report compiles and analyzes all known wash and caustic leach laboratory studies. As further data is produced, this report will be updated. Included are aluminum mineralogical analysis results as well as a summation of the wash and leach procedures and results. Of the 177 underground storage tanks at Hanford, information was only available for five individual double-shell tanks, forty-one individual single-shell tanks (e.g. thirty-nine 100 series and two 200 series tanks), and twelve grouped tank wastes. Seven of the individual single-shell tank studies provided data for the percent of aluminum removal as a function of time for various caustic concentrations and leaching temperatures. It was determined that in most cases increased leaching temperature, caustic concentration, and leaching time leads to increased dissolution of leachable aluminum solids.

  12. COMPILATION OF LABORATORY SCALE ALUMINUM WASH AND LEACH REPORT RESULTS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report compiles and analyzes all known wash and caustic leach laboratory studies. As further data is produced, this report will be updated. Included are aluminum mineralogical analysis results as well as a summation of the wash and leach procedures and results. Of the 177 underground storage tanks at Hanford, information was only available for five individual double-shell tanks, forty-one individual single-shell tanks (e.g. thirty-nine 100 series and two 200 series tanks), and twelve grouped tank wastes. Seven of the individual single-shell tank studies provided data for the percent of aluminum removal as a function of time for various caustic concentrations and leaching temperatures. It was determined that in most cases increased leaching temperature, caustic concentration, and leaching time leads to increased dissolution of leachable aluminum solids.

  13. Evaluation of Foaming and Antifoam Effectiveness During the WTP Oxidative Leaching Process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burket, P. R.; Jones, T. M.; White, T. L.; Crawford, C. L.; Calloway, T. B

    2005-10-11

    The River Protection Project-Waste Treatment Plant (RPP-WTP) requested Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) to conduct small-scale foaming and antifoam testing using a Hanford waste simulant subjected to air sparging during oxidative leaching. The foaminess of Hanford tank waste solutions was previously demonstrated by SRNL during WTP evaporator foaming studies and in small scale air sparger studies. The commercial antifoam, Dow Corning Q2-3183A was recommended to mitigate the foam in the evaporators and in vessel equipped with pulse jet mixers and air spargers. Currently, WTP is planning to use air spargers in the HLW Lag Storage Vessels (HLP-VSL-00027A/B), the Ultrafiltration Vessels (UFP-VSL-00002A&B), and the HLW Feed Blend Vessel (HLPVSL-00028) to assist the performance of the Pulse Jet Mixers (PJM). The previous air sparger antifoam studies conducted by SRNL researchers did not evaluate the hydrogen generation rate expected from antifoam additions or the effectiveness of the antifoam during caustic leaching or oxidative leaching. The fate of the various antifoam components and breakdown products in the WTP process under prototypic process conditions (temperature & radiation) was also not investigated. The effectiveness of the antifoam during caustic leaching, expected hydrogen generation rate associated with antifoam addition, and the fate of various antifoam components are being conducted under separate SRNL research tasks.

  14. Epidemiology and prevention of caustic ingestion in children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christesen, H B

    1994-01-01

    A total of 102 children less than 16 years of age admitted for caustic ingestion in the period 1976-1991 were registered. The annual incidence rate of hospitalization was 10.8:100,000 for the city of Aarhus, Denmark. Esophageal burns occurred with a frequency of 5.0:100,000 per year. Ninety...... toddlers is recommended. Information material should stress that caustics should always be inaccessible to children and stored separately, and should never be decanted....

  15. Characterization, Washing, Leaching, and Filtration of C-104 Sludge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    KP Brooks; PR Bredt; GR Golcar; SA Hartley; LK Jagoda; KG Rappe; MW Urie

    2000-06-09

    Approximately 1,400 g of wet Hanford Tank C-104 Sludge was evaluated by Battelle for the high-level waste (HLW) pretreatment processes of ultrafiltration, dilute caustic washing, and elevated-temperature caustic leaching. The filterability of diluted C-104 sludge was measured with a 0.1-{micro}m sintered metal Mott filter using a 24-inch-long, single-element, crossflow filtration system (cells unit filter [CUF]). While the filtrate was being recirculated prior to washing and leaching, a 6.9 wt% solids slurry was evaluated with a matrix of seven 1-hour conditions of varying trans-membrane pressure (30 to 70 psid) and axial velocity (9 to 15 ft/s). The filtrate flux and backpulse efficiency were determined for each condition. The slurry was concentrated to 23 wt% solids, a second matrix of six 1-hour conditions was performed, and data analogous to that recorded in the first matrix were obtained. The low-solids-concentration matrix produced filtrate flux rates that ranged from 0.038 to 0.083 gpm/ft{sup 2}. The high-solids-concentration matrix produced filtrate flux rates that ranged from 0.0095 to 0.0172 gpm/ft{sup 2}. In both cases, the optimum filtrate flux was at the highest axial velocity (15 ft/s) and transmembrane pressure had little effect. Nearly all of the measured filtrate fluxes were more than an order of magnitude greater than the required plant flux for C-104 of 0.00126 gpm/ft{sup 2}. In both matrices, the filtrate flux appeared to be proportional to axial velocity, and the permeability appeared to be inversely proportional to the trans-membrane pressure. The first test condition was repeated as the last test condition for each matrix. In both cases, there was a significant decrease in filtrate flux, indicating some filter fouling during the test matrix that could not be removed by backpulsing alone, although the backpulse number and duration were not optimized. Following testing of these two matrices, the material was washed within the CUF by

  16. Characterization, Washing, Leaching, and Filtration of C-104 Sludge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Approximately 1,400 g of wet Hanford Tank C-104 Sludge was evaluated by Battelle for the high-level waste (HLW) pretreatment processes of ultrafiltration, dilute caustic washing, and elevated-temperature caustic leaching. The filterability of diluted C-104 sludge was measured with a 0.1-microm sintered metal Mott filter using a 24-inch-long, single-element, crossflow filtration system (cells unit filter [CUF]). While the filtrate was being recirculated prior to washing and leaching, a 6.9 wt% solids slurry was evaluated with a matrix of seven 1-hour conditions of varying trans-membrane pressure (30 to 70 psid) and axial velocity (9 to 15 ft/s). The filtrate flux and backpulse efficiency were determined for each condition. The slurry was concentrated to 23 wt% solids, a second matrix of six 1-hour conditions was performed, and data analogous to that recorded in the first matrix were obtained. The low-solids-concentration matrix produced filtrate flux rates that ranged from 0.038 to 0.083 gpm/ft2. The high-solids-concentration matrix produced filtrate flux rates that ranged from 0.0095 to 0.0172 gpm/ft2. In both cases, the optimum filtrate flux was at the highest axial velocity (15 ft/s) and transmembrane pressure had little effect. Nearly all of the measured filtrate fluxes were more than an order of magnitude greater than the required plant flux for C-104 of 0.00126 gpm/ft2. In both matrices, the filtrate flux appeared to be proportional to axial velocity, and the permeability appeared to be inversely proportional to the trans-membrane pressure. The first test condition was repeated as the last test condition for each matrix. In both cases, there was a significant decrease in filtrate flux, indicating some filter fouling during the test matrix that could not be removed by backpulsing alone, although the backpulse number and duration were not optimized. Following testing of these two matrices, the material was washed within the CUF by continuously adding

  17. Microstructure and leach rates of apatite glass-ceramics as a host for Sr high-level liquid waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An apatite glass-ceramic wasteform with 21 wt% SrO loading was fabricated for immobilizing Sr high-level liquid waste. The normalized leach rates of Sr, K, Mo, Al, P, Si are 6.9x10-4, 1.09x10-1, 2.7x10-3, 3.22x10-2, 2.84x10-2, 3.26x10-2 g/m2 day, respectively. Component Fe in all leachates is not detectable in the 28-day static leaching test procedure in MCC-1. Instead of leaching, component Ca is adsorbed by testing samples. All the component Mo concentrates in the glass matrix of the well crystallized apatite glass-ceramics. For an apatite glass-ceramic wasteform, the optimum microstructure should be one in which poorly crystallized apatite crystallites distribute evenly in the glass phase. Perfect crystallization makes the crystal phase more stoichiometric and significantly changes the composition of the coexisting glass phase in the system, which, in our case, decreases the chemical stability of the apatite glass-ceramics

  18. Leaching of zinc sulfide by Thiobacillus ferrooxidans: bacterial oxidation of the sulfur product layer increases the rate of zinc sulfide dissolution at high concentrations of ferrous ions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fowler, T A; Crundwell, F K

    1999-12-01

    This paper reports the results of leaching experiments conducted with and without Thiobacillus ferrooxidans at the same conditions in solution. The extent of leaching of ZnS with bacteria is significantly higher than that without bacteria at high concentrations of ferrous ions. A porous layer of elemental sulfur is present on the surfaces of the chemically leached particles, while no sulfur is present on the surfaces of the bacterially leached particles. The analysis of the data using the shrinking-core model shows that the chemical leaching of ZnS is limited by the diffusion of ferrous ions through the sulfur product layer at high concentrations of ferrous ions. The analysis of the data shows that diffusion through the product layer does not limit the rate of dissolution when bacteria are present. This suggests that the action of T. ferrooxidans in oxidizing the sulfur formed on the particle surface is to remove the barrier to diffusion by ferrous ions. PMID:10583978

  19. Velocity peaks and caustic rings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The late infall of cold dark matter onto an isolated galaxy produces flows with definite velocity vectors at any physical point in the galactic halo. It also produces caustic rings, which are places in space where the dark matter density is very large. The self-similar model of galactic halo formation predicts that the caustic ring radii an follow the approximate law an ≅ 1/n. Bumps in the rotation curves of NGC 3198 and of our own galaxy are interpreted as due to caustic rings of dark matter

  20. The Influence of Zeolite Granular Size and Temperature for Waste Ceramicof Leached Rate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The experiment was conducted by mixing, zeolite, water and uranium wastefor the ceramic monolite block. The parameters to be investigated were theeffect of zeolite granular of size -10/+20 - -100/+200 mesh and temperatureof 800 - 1200 oC. The conclusions that could be drawn from the research withthe best zeolite granular size of -80/+100 mesh and temperature of 1200 oC.The compound was leached in aquadest 22.76x10-3 - 10.74x10-3 gram cm-2day-1. (author)

  1. Causticizing for Black Liquor Gasifiers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scott Sinquefeld; James Cantrell; Xiaoyan Zeng; Alan Ball; Jeff Empie

    2009-01-07

    The cost-benefit outlook of black liquor gasification (BLG) could be greatly improved if the smelt causticization step could be achieved in situ during the gasification step. Or, at a minimum, the increase in causticizing load associated with BLG could be mitigated. A number of chemistries have been proven successful during black liquor combustion. In this project, three in situ causticizing processes (titanate, manganate, and borate) were evaluated under conditions suitable for high temperature entrained flow BLG, and low temperature steam reforming of black liquor. The evaluation included both thermodynamic modeling and lab experimentation. Titanate and manganate were tested for complete direct causticizing (to thus eliminate the lime cycle), and borates were evaluated for partial causticizing (to mitigate the load increase associated with BLG). Criteria included high carbonate conversion, corresponding hydroxide recovery upon hydrolysis, non process element (NPE) removal, and economics. Of the six cases (three chemistries at two BLG conditions), only two were found to be industrially viable: titanates for complete causticizing during high temperature BLG, and borates for partial causticizing during high temperature BLG. These two cases were evaluated for integration into a gasification-based recovery island. The Larsen [28] BLG cost-benefit study was used as a reference case for economic forecasting (i.e. a 1500 tpd pulp mill using BLG and upgrading the lime cycle). By comparison, using the titanate direct causticizing process yielded a net present value (NPV) of $25M over the NPV of BLG with conventional lime cycle. Using the existing lime cycle plus borate autocausticizing for extra capacity yielded a NPV of $16M.

  2. PEP Support Laboratory Leaching and Permeate Stability Tests

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Russell, Renee L.; Peterson, Reid A.; Rinehart, Donald E.; Buchmiller, William C.

    2009-09-25

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) has been tasked by Bechtel National Inc. (BNI) on the River Protection Project-Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (RPP-WTP) project to perform research and development activities to resolve technical issues identified for the Pretreatment Facility (PTF). The Pretreatment Engineering Platform (PEP) was designed, constructed, and operated as part of a plan to respond to issue M12, "Undemonstrated Leaching Processes," of the External Flowsheet Review Team (EFRT) issue response plan.( ) The PEP is a 1/4.5-scale test platform designed to simulate the WTP pretreatment caustic leaching, oxidative leaching, ultrafiltration solids concentration, and slurry washing processes. The PEP replicates the WTP leaching processes using prototypic equipment and control strategies. A simplified flow diagram of the PEP system is shown in Figure 1.1. Two operating scenarios are currently being evaluated for the ultrafiltration process (UFP) and leaching operations. The first scenario has caustic leaching performed in the UFP-2 ultrafiltration feed vessels (i.e., vessel UFP-VSL-T02A in the PEP and vessels UFP-VSL-00002A and B in the WTP PTF). The second scenario has caustic leaching conducted in the UFP-1 ultrafiltration feed preparation vessels (i.e., vessels UFP-VSL-T01A and B in the PEP and vessels UFP-VSL-00001A and B in the WTP PTF). In both scenarios, 19-M sodium hydroxide solution (NaOH, caustic) is added to the waste slurry in the vessels to leach solid aluminum compounds (e.g., gibbsite, boehmite). Caustic addition is followed by a heating step that uses direct injection of steam to accelerate the leach process. Following the caustic leach, the vessel contents are cooled using vessel cooling jackets and/or external heat exchangers. The main difference between the two scenarios is that for leaching in UFP-VSL-T01A and B, the 19-M NaOH is added to un-concentrated waste slurry (3 to 8 wt% solids), while for leaching in

  3. Caustic stress corrosion cracking

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactors (LMFBRs) use sodium as a coolant for transfer of heat from the core to the steam generators. Maintenance and examination of the system require removal of sodium from components of the system. One process for removal reacts the sodium with water vapor and removes the residual sodium hydroxide from the components by rinsing with liquid water. This process exposes components such as pumps, heat exchangers, valves, and fuel-handling machines to contact with aqueous NaOH solutions in various concentrations over a range of temperatures and times. Since stress can be present in these components, as generated by fabrication, structural loads, deformation in service, and possible wedging action by corrosion products, conditions are potentially available for the mechanism of caustic stress corrosion cracking (CSCC). Since LMFBR components are fabricated from Types 304 and 316 stainless steels which have been found to be susceptible to CSCC, it was therefore considered necessary to establish the threshold of CSCC so that the components could be processed under conditions avoiding CSCC. The materials used in the testing program included heats of Types 304 and 316 stainless steel, Inconel 600 and 718, hardfacing deposits of Stellite 6 and 156, and three special wear-resistant, carbide-type materials. The analysis of these materials is tabulated

  4. Model simulation of solute leaching and its application for estimating the net rate of nitrate formation under field conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otoma, Suehiro; Kuboi, Toru

    1985-12-01

    A model of the discrete type was built to describe unsteady infiltrations and redistributions of water and solutes in soil. The model was evaluated by comparing the measurements of the changes in chloride concentration in the field soil amended with sewage sludge with those obtained by simulation. The simulations showed that the amount of chloride adsorbed in the field was as small as 60% of that measured in the flask of the batch test, and that most of the chloride leached quickly through the upper zone of soil (0-20 cm) but stagnated in the lower zone (20-100 cm). The model was applied for estimating the daily net rate of nitrate formation. The estimation results indicated that the rate was accelerated remarkably by rainfall and abruptly slowed down soon after.

  5. Quantum caustics in the Gaussian slit experiment

    OpenAIRE

    Horie, K.; Miyazaki, H.; Tsutsui, I.; Tanimura, S.

    1998-01-01

    We study classical and quantum caustics for system with quadratic Lagrangian. Gaussian slit experiment is examined and it is pointed out that the focusing around caustics is stabilized against initial momentum fluctuations by quantum effect.

  6. Spectral Caustics in Attosecond Science

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dudovich N.

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available A unique type of singularity common in wave phenomena, known as caustics, links processes observed in many different branches of physics [1]. We investigate the role of caustics in attosecond science and in particular the physical process behind high harmonic generation. By exploiting singularities of the three-step model that describes HHG, we can manipulate and enhance specific features in the emitted harmonic spectrum. This new level of control holds promises in both scientific and technological aspects of attosecond science, and provides a deeper insight into the basic mechanism underlying the high harmonic generation process.

  7. Immobilized waste leaching

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The main mechanism by which the immobilized radioactive materials can return to biosphere is the leaching due to the intrusion of water into the repositories. Some mathematical models and experiments utilized to evaluate the leaching rates in different immobilization matrices are described. (author)

  8. Caustic saving potentile in textile processing mills

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The textile processing industry of pakistan has great potential of improvement in resource consumption in various production processes. One major concern is the heavy usage of caustic soda (sodium hydroxide) especially during the mercerization process which incurs a significant cost to a textile processing mill. To reduce the unit fabric production cost and stay competitive, the industry need to minimize the caustic wastage and explore the caustic saving potential. This paper describe the detailed caustic consumption practices and saving potentials in woven textile sector based on the data base of 100 industries. Region wise caustic saving potential is also investigated . Three caustic conservation option including process improvement, reuse and recycling, and caustic recovery plants are discussed. Detailed technical and and financial requirements. saving potentials and paybacks of these options are provided. (author)

  9. Sensitivity analysis of the leaching rate parameter in assessing the environmental risk of phosphogypsum application in sanitary landfills

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marchesi, Marcos Vinicius A.; Hama, Naruhiko; Jacomino, Vanusa M.F.; Ladeira, Ana Claudia Q.; Cota, Stela D.S., E-mail: mvmarchesi@hotmail.com, E-mail: sdsc@cdtn.br, E-mail: vmfj@cdtn.br, E-mail: ana.ladeira@cdtn.br, E-mail: naruhikohama@hotmail.com [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN/CNEN-MG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)

    2013-07-01

    The attack with sulfuric acid to phosphate rock produces both phosphoric acid, basic raw material in the manufacture of fertilizers, as a by-product called phosphogypsum. Phosphogypsum is composed mostly of calcium sulfate dihydrated, but may have high levels of impurities from the phosphate rock matrix as a series of natural radionuclides, and heavy metals (e.g. Cd, Zn) and metalloids (e.g. , As and Se). Although it is used for agricultural purposes and more recently in construction, in Brazil the generation rate estimated at six million tons per year is much higher than the amount spent on existing alternatives, and therefore mostly deposited in piles in the same place production, causing thereby the risk of contamination of soil and water resources of the region and providing risk to human health. Taken into account the need to find alternative arrangements for phosphogypsum and reduce the impact generated by its contaminants, this study aims to analyze the sensitivity of the leaching rate parameter in the environmental risk evaluation of the application of phosphogypsum in landfills through mathematical modeling, where it is evaluated the concentration of heavy metals and radionuclides in the layer of the soil under the clay layer of the landfill.

  10. The Influence of Form and Rate on the Efficacy of Matrix-Based Fertilizers to Reduce Nutrient Leaching

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James A. Entry

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available We tested the efficacy of matrix-based fertilizers (MBFs to reduce NO3, NH4, and total phosphorus (TP leaching compared to Osmocote 14-14-14, a commercial slow release fertilizer (SRF in greenhouse column studies. The MBFs covered a range of inorganic N and P in compounds that are relatively loosely bound (MBF4 and more tightly bound compounds (MBF5 with A12(SO43⋅18H2O and/or Fe2(SO43⋅3H2O and with high ionic exchange compounds starch, chitosan, and lignin. When N and P are released, the chemicals containing these nutrients in the MBF bind N and P to an Al2(SO43⋅18H2O and/or Fe2(SO43⋅3H2O starch- chitosan- lignin matrix. SRF leachate contained a greater amount of NO3, NH4, DRP, and TP than leachate from MBF4 and MBF5 regardless of whether fertilizers were pellets, banded or broadcast, or fertilizer rate. St Augustine grass growing in soils receiving MBF4 and MBF5 had decreased shoot biomass by 49% to 56% and decreased total biomass by 33% to 46% respectively as grass receiving SRF. Although further greenhouse and field testing are necessary, results of this initial investigation are promising and with further development, testing, and rate calibration should be competitive with commercial fertilizers in environmentally sensitive markets.

  11. Sensitivity analysis of the leaching rate parameter in assessing the environmental risk of phosphogypsum application in sanitary landfills

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The attack with sulfuric acid to phosphate rock produces both phosphoric acid, basic raw material in the manufacture of fertilizers, as a by-product called phosphogypsum. Phosphogypsum is composed mostly of calcium sulfate dihydrated, but may have high levels of impurities from the phosphate rock matrix as a series of natural radionuclides, and heavy metals (e.g. Cd, Zn) and metalloids (e.g. , As and Se). Although it is used for agricultural purposes and more recently in construction, in Brazil the generation rate estimated at six million tons per year is much higher than the amount spent on existing alternatives, and therefore mostly deposited in piles in the same place production, causing thereby the risk of contamination of soil and water resources of the region and providing risk to human health. Taken into account the need to find alternative arrangements for phosphogypsum and reduce the impact generated by its contaminants, this study aims to analyze the sensitivity of the leaching rate parameter in the environmental risk evaluation of the application of phosphogypsum in landfills through mathematical modeling, where it is evaluated the concentration of heavy metals and radionuclides in the layer of the soil under the clay layer of the landfill

  12. The Influence of Form and Rate on the Efficacy of Matrix-Based Fertilizers to Reduce Nutrient Leaching

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We tested the efficacy of matrix-based fertilizers (MBFs) to reduce NO3, NH4, and total phosphorus (TP) leaching compared to Osmocote 14-14-14, a commercial slow release fertilizer (SRF) in greenhouse column studies. The MBFs covered a range of inorganic N and P in compounds that are relatively loosely bound (MBF4) and more tightly bound compounds (MBF5) with Al2(SO4)3 18H2O and/or Fe2(SO4)3 3H2O and with high ionic exchange compounds starch, chitosan, and lignin. When N and P are released, the chemicals containing these nutrients in the MBF bind N and P to an Al2(SO4)3 18H2O and/or Fe2(SO4)3 3H2O starch- chitosan- lignin matrix. SRF leachate contained a greater amount of NO3, NH4, DRP, and TP than leachate from MBF4 and MBF5 regardless of whether fertilizers were pellets, banded or broadcast, or fertilizer rate. St Augustine grass growing in soils receiving MBF4 and MBF5 had decreased shoot biomass by 49% to 56% and decreased total biomass by 33% to 46% respectively as grass receiving SRF. Although further greenhouse and field testing are necessary, results of this initial investigation are promising and with further development, testing, and rate calibration should be competitive with commercial fertilizers in environmentally sensitive markets.

  13. Modeling of Boehmite Leaching from Actual Hanford High-Level Waste Samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Department of Energy plans to vitrify approximately 60,000 metric tons of high level waste sludge from underground storage tanks at the Hanford Nuclear Reservation. To reduce the volume of high level waste requiring treatment, a goal has been set to remove about 90 percent of the aluminum, which comprises nearly 70 percent of the sludge. Aluminum in the form of gibbsite and sodium aluminate can be easily dissolved by washing the waste stream with caustic, but boehmite, which comprises nearly half of the total aluminum, is more resistant to caustic dissolution and requires higher treatment temperatures and hydroxide concentrations. In this work, the dissolution kinetics of aluminum species during caustic leaching of actual Hanford high level waste samples is examined. The experimental results are used to develop a shrinking core model that provides a basis for prediction of dissolution dynamics from known process temperature and hydroxide concentration. This model is further developed to include the effects of particle size polydispersity, which is found to strongly influence the rate of dissolution

  14. Increased stocking rate and associated strategic dry-off decision rules reduced the amount of nitrate-N leached under grazing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roche, J R; Ledgard, S F; Sprosen, M S; Lindsey, S B; Penno, J W; Horan, B; Macdonald, K A

    2016-07-01

    The effect of intensive agricultural systems on the environment is of increasing global concern, and recent review articles have highlighted the need for sustainable intensification of food production. In grazing dairy systems, the leaching of nitrate-N (NO3-N) to groundwater is a primary environmental concern. A herd-level factor considered by many to be a key contributor to the amount of NO3-N leached from dairy pastures is stocking rate (SR), and some countries have imposed limits to reduce the risk of NO3-N loss to groundwater. The objective of the current experiment was to determine the effect of dairy cow SR on NO3-N leached in a grazing system that did not import feed from off-farm and had the same N fertilizer input. Five SR were evaluated (2.2, 2.7, 3.1, 3.7, and 4.3 cows/ha) in a completely randomized design (i.e., 2 replicates of each SR as independent farmlets) over 2 y. Pasture utilization, milk production/hectare, and days in milk/hectare increased with SR, but days in milk/cow and milk production/cow declined. The concentration of NO3-N in drainage water and the quantity of NO3-N leached/ha per year declined linearly with increasing SR, and the operating profit/kg NO3-N leached per ha increased. Higher SR was associated with fewer days in milk/cow, resulting in a reduction in estimated urine N excretion/cow (the main source of N leaching) during the climatically sensitive period for NO3-N leaching (i.e., late summer to winter). We hypothesized that the reduction in estimated urine N excretion per cow led to an increase in urinary N spread and reduced losses from urine patches. The results presented indicate that lowering SR may not reduce nitrate leaching and highlight the need for a full farm system-level analysis of any management change to determine its effect on productivity and environmental outcomes. PMID:27157574

  15. Caustic stress corrosion cracking of austenitic stainless steels with thermal treatment(TT)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper dealt with the effects of TT(Thermal Treatment) and nitrogen content on caustic stress corrosion cracking of austenitic stainless steels. Nitrogen content and grain size had affected on the caustic SCC resistance. Increasing nitrogen content, SCC resistance was increased due to the enhanced repassivation rate, but at high nitrogen content, the resistance was decreased because of the dual effects between mechanical and repassivation behavior. Regardless of nitrogen content, TT improved the caustic SCC resistance and this behavior was reviewed on the points of residual stress, grain size, and dislocation array

  16. Effects of cropping system and rates of nitrogen in animal slurry and mineral fertilizer on nitrate leaching from a sandy loam

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Ingrid Kaag; Hansen, Jørgen Frederik; Kjellerup, Viggo K.;

    1993-01-01

    Leaching of nitrate from a sandy loam cropped with spring barley, winter wheat and grass was compared in a 4-year lysimeter study. Crops were grown continuously or in a sequence including sugarbeet. Lysimeters were unfertilized or supplied with equivalent amounts of inorganic nitrogen in calcium...... ammonium nitrate (CAN) or animal slurry according to recommended rates (1N) or 50% above recommended rates (1.5N). Compared with unfertilized crops, leaching of nitrate increased only slightly when 1N (CAN) was added. Successive annual additions of 1.5N (CAN) or IN and 1.5N (animal slurry) caused...... the four years were similar for the crops when grown in rotation or continuously. When crops received 1:5N (CAN) or animal slurry, nitrate losses from the crops grown continuously exceeded those from crops in rotation. Including a catch crop in the continuous cropping system eliminated the differences...

  17. EFRT M12 Issue Resolution: Comparison of PEP and Bench-Scale Oxidative Leaching Results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rapko, Brian M.; Brown, Christopher F.; Eslinger, Paul W.; Fountain, Matthew S.; Hausmann, Tom S.; Huckaby, James L.; Hanson, Brady D.; Kurath, Dean E.; Minette, Michael J.

    2009-08-14

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) has been tasked by Bechtel National Inc. (BNI) on the River Protection Project-Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (RPP-WTP) project to perform research and development activities to resolve technical issues identified for the Pretreatment Facility (PTF). The Pretreatment Engineering Platform (PEP) was designed and constructed and is to be operated as part of a plan to respond to issue M12, “Undemonstrated Leaching Processes.” The PEP is a 1/4.5-scale test platform designed to simulate the WTP pretreatment caustic leaching, oxidative leaching, ultrafiltration solids concentration, and slurry washing processes. The PEP replicates the WTP leaching processes using prototypic equipment and control strategies. The PEP also includes non-prototypic ancillary equipment to support the core processing. Two operating scenarios are currently being evaluated for the ultrafiltration process (UFP) and leaching operations. The first scenario has caustic leaching performed in the UFP-2 ultrafiltration feed vessels (i.e., vessel UFP-VSL-T02A in the PEP; and vessels UFP-VSL-00002A and B in the WTP PTF). The second scenario has caustic leaching conducted in the UFP-1 ultrafiltration feed preparation vessels (i.e., vessels UFP-VSL-T01A and B in the PEP; vessels UFP-VSL-00001A and B in the WTP PTF). In both scenarios, 19-M sodium hydroxide solution (NaOH, caustic) is added to the waste slurry in the vessels to dissolve solid aluminum compounds (e.g., gibbsite, boehmite). Caustic addition is followed by a heating step that uses direct steam injection to accelerate the leaching process. Following the caustic leach, the vessel contents are cooled using vessel cooling jackets and/or external heat exchangers. The main difference between the two scenarios is that for leaching in UFP1, the 19-M NaOH is added to un-concentrated waste slurry (3 to 8 wt% solids), while for leaching in UFP2, the slurry is concentrated to nominally

  18. On the degree of caustics of reflection

    CERN Document Server

    Josse, Alfrederic

    2012-01-01

    Given a point S and an irreducible algebraic curve C in P^2, we consider the caustic of reflection defined as the envelope of the reflected lines from the point S on the curve C. We identify this caustic with the Zariski closure of the image of C by a rational map. Thanks to a general fundamental lemma, we give a formula of the degree of the caustic of reflection in terms of multiplicity numbers of pro-branches of C. Our formula holds in the most general case. We also give some precisions about Pl\\"ucker formulas.

  19. Solution Leaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chun, Tiejun; Zhu, Deqing; Pan, Jian; He, Zhen

    2014-06-01

    Recovery of alumina from magnetic separation tailings of red mud has been investigated by Na2CO3 solution leaching. X-ray diffraction (XRD) results show that most of the alumina is present as 12CaO·7Al2O3 and CaO·Al2O3 in the magnetic separation tailings. The shrinking core model was employed to describe the leaching kinetics. The results show that the calculated activation energy of 8.31 kJ/mol is characteristic for an internal diffusion-controlled process. The kinetic equation can be used to describe the leaching process. The effects of Na2CO3 concentration, liquid-to-solid ratio, and particle size on recovery of Al2O3 were examined.

  20. Caustic graphene plasmons with Kelvin angle

    CERN Document Server

    Shi, Xihang; Gao, Fei; Xu, Hongyi; Yang, Zhaoju; Zhang, Baile

    2015-01-01

    A century-long argument made by Lord Kelvin that all swimming objects have an effective Mach number of 3, corresponding to the Kelvin angle of 19.5 degree for ship waves, has been recently challenged with the conclusion that the Kelvin angle should gradually transit to the Mach angle as the ship velocity increases. Here we show that a similar phenomenon can happen for graphene plasmons. By analyzing the caustic wave pattern of graphene plasmons stimulated by a swift charged particle moving uniformly above graphene, we show that at low velocities of the charged particle, the caustics of graphene plasmons form the Kelvin angle. At large velocities of the particle, the caustics disappear and the effective semi-angle of the wave pattern approaches the Mach angle. Our study introduces caustic wave theory to the field of graphene plasmonics, and reveals a novel physical picture of graphene plasmon excitation during electron energy-loss spectroscopy measurement.

  1. Caustic addition system operability test procedure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This test procedure provides instructions for performing operational testing of the major components of the 241-AN-107 Caustic Addition System by WHC and Kaiser personnel at the Rotating Equipment Shop run-in pit (Bldg. 272E)

  2. Tunable caustic phenomena in electron wavefields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tavabi, Amir Hossein, E-mail: a.tavabi@fz-juelich.de [Ernst Ruska-Centre for Microscopy and Spectroscopy with Electrons (ER-C) and Peter Grünberg Institute (PGI), Forschungszentrum Jülich, D-52425 Jülich (Germany); Migunov, Vadim; Dwyer, Christian; Dunin-Borkowski, Rafal E. [Ernst Ruska-Centre for Microscopy and Spectroscopy with Electrons (ER-C) and Peter Grünberg Institute (PGI), Forschungszentrum Jülich, D-52425 Jülich (Germany); Pozzi, Giulio [Ernst Ruska-Centre for Microscopy and Spectroscopy with Electrons (ER-C) and Peter Grünberg Institute (PGI), Forschungszentrum Jülich, D-52425 Jülich (Germany); Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Bologna, Viale B. Pichat 6/2, 40127 Bologna (Italy)

    2015-10-15

    Novel caustic phenomena, which contain fold, butterfly and elliptic umbilic catastrophes, are observed in defocused images of two approximately collinear oppositely biased metallic tips in a transmission electron microscope. The observed patterns depend sensitively on defocus, on the applied voltage between the tips and on their separation and lateral offset. Their main features are interpreted on the basis of a projected electrostatic potential model for the electron-optical phase shift. - Highlights: • Electron-optical caustics are observed in defocused images of biased metallic tips. • The caustics depend on defocus, on the bias between the tips and on their separation. • The setup offers the flexibility to study a wide variety of caustic phenomena.

  3. The Influence of Form and Rate on the Efficacy of Matrix-Based Fertilizers to Reduce Nutrient Leaching

    OpenAIRE

    James A. Entry; Sojka, R.E

    2009-01-01

    We tested the efficacy of matrix-based fertilizers (MBFs) to reduce N O 3 , N H 4 , and total phosphorus (TP) leaching compared to Osmocote 14-14-14, a commercial slow release fertilizer (SRF) in greenhouse column studies. The MBFs covered a range of inorganic N and P in compounds that are relatively loosely bound (MBF4) and more tightly bound compounds (MBF5) with A 1 2 ( S O 4 ) 3 ⋅ 1 8 H 2 O and/or F e 2 ( S O 4 ) 3 ⋅ 3 H 2 O and with high ionic exchange compounds starch, chitosan, and lig...

  4. A methodology for evaluating biocide release rate, surface roughness and leach layer formation in a TBT-free, self-polishing antifouling coating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howell, Dickon; Behrends, Brigitte

    2006-01-01

    Due to the forthcoming IMO ban on the use of tributyltin (TBT) antifouling paints, a new generation of TBT-free coatings has been developed that typically contain cuprous oxide and an organic co-biocide. Accurate and reproducible test methods are needed to evaluate the performance and environmental impact of these new coatings. This study investigated a methodology for evaluating TBT-free, AF coatings containing cuprous oxide. A commercially available AF coating underwent rotary immersion testing at 0, 0.51 and 2.05 m s-1. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive x-ray (EDX) analysis were used to assess leach layer formation, percentage cuprous oxide by weight and particle size distribution (PSD). Biocide release rates and surface roughness were also measured. An increase in rotary speed caused a spike in Cu2+ release rate after which the release rate stabilised to previous levels. An increase in leach layer thickness was also observed after the rotary speed increase. A model is suggested to account for the observations. PMID:17110354

  5. Bacteria heap leaching test of a uranium ore

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Column bioleaching test of a uranium ore was carried out. The optimum acidity, spraying intensity, spray-pause time ratio were determined. The potential, Fe and U concentrations in the leaching process were investigated. The effect of bacteria column leaching was compared with that of acid column leaching. The results show that bacteria column leaching can shorten leaching cycle, and the leaching rate of uranium increases by 9.7%. (authors)

  6. Leaching of Zinc Sulfide by Thiobacillus ferrooxidans: Bacterial Oxidation of the Sulfur Product Layer Increases the Rate of Zinc Sulfide Dissolution at High Concentrations of Ferrous Ions

    OpenAIRE

    Fowler, T. A.; Crundwell, F. K.

    1999-01-01

    This paper reports the results of leaching experiments conducted with and without Thiobacillus ferrooxidans at the same conditions in solution. The extent of leaching of ZnS with bacteria is significantly higher than that without bacteria at high concentrations of ferrous ions. A porous layer of elemental sulfur is present on the surfaces of the chemically leached particles, while no sulfur is present on the surfaces of the bacterially leached particles. The analysis of the data using the shr...

  7. Plutonium Speciation in Support of Oxidative-Leaching Demonstration Test

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sinkov, Sergey I.

    2007-10-31

    Bechtel National, Inc. (BNI) is evaluating the plutonium speciation in caustic solutions that reasonably represent the process streams from the oxidative-leaching demonstration test. Battelle—Pacific Northwest Division (PNWD) was contracted to develop a spectrophotometric method to measure plutonium speciation at submicromolar (< 10-6 M) concentrations in alkaline solutions in the presence of chromate and carbonate. Data obtained from the testing will be used to identify the oxidation state of Pu(IV), Pu(V), and Pu(VI) species, which potentially could exist in caustic leachates. Work was initially conducted under contract number 24590-101-TSA-W000-00004 satisfying the needs defined in Appendix C of the Research and Technology Plan TSS A-219 to evaluate the speciation of chromium, plutonium, and manganese before and after oxidative leaching. In February 2007, the contract mechanism was switched to Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) Operating Contract MOA: 24590-QL-HC9-WA49-00001.

  8. Long-term leaching of irradiated spent fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spent Light Water Reactor (LWR) fuel with burnups of 9, 28 and 54 MWd/kg U were leach tested at 250C in deionized water in a Paige apparatus. No discernible differences in leach rates were observed due to burnup. Additionally, the 28 MWd/kg U fuel was IAEA leach tested in five different leachants using the IAEA method. Deionized water gave the highest leach rates and a calcium chloride solution gave the lowest leach rates. An accelerated leaching period was observed during the Paige leach test of the 54 MWd/kg U spent fuel. Comparison between spent fuel and borosilicate waste glass leach rates was made. In sodium bicarbonate solution the leach rates are near equal and the glass becomes increasingly more durable with CaCl2 solution, followed by sodium chloride solution, WIPP B brine and deionized water where the glass is two to three orders of magnitude more leach resistant than spent fuel. 16 figures

  9. Modeling the effects of different N fertilizer rates on N2O emissions and nitrate leaching from arable soils in Korea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Y.; Berger, S.; Tenhunen, J. D.; Gebauer, G.; Kiese, R.

    2012-12-01

    Process-based biogeochemical models can be used to predict the impact of various agricultural management practices on plant nitrogen use efficiency and nitrogen losses to the environment such as greenhouse gas emissions and nitrate leaching by analyzing the interactions between management practices, primary drivers such as climate, soil properties, crop types, etc., and biogeochemical reactions. In this study we applied the Landscape-DNDC model, which combines and uniforms functions of the agricultural-DNDC and the Forest-DNDC for simulation of C and N turnover, GHG emissions, nitrate leaching, and plant growth for a Korean arable field cultivated with radish (Raphanus sativus L.). The annual average temperature is app. 8.5°C and the annual precipitation is app. 1,500 mm. According to farmers practice the study field received a basal fertilizer application of app. 200 kg N ha-1 before setting up four fertilizer treatments i.e. additionally 50, 150, 250 and 350 kg N ha-1. All N treatment plots were tilled a week after application of specific N fertilizer in order to make row and interrow. Just before radish seeding rows were covered with black plastic mulch which was removed after harvest. In spite the widespread usage of black mulch in Korea or even Asia; so far biogeochemical models do not consider impacts of mulch on soil environmental conditions and soil biogeochemistry. Based on field measurements we adjusted input information and used only half of the annual precipitation and the maximum temperature for simulation of row conditions, whereas the actual weather data were used for the interrow simulations. Simulated N2O emissions agreed well with measurements; however peak emissions after fertilization were slightly underestimated in row and interrow. Annual N2O emissions of the fertilizer treatments increased with increasing fertilization rates from around 1.5 to 3 kg N ha-1 in the row and lower emissions of app. 1.5 kg N ha-1 (for all N treatments) in the

  10. A crystal-structure refinement of synthetic brannerite, UTi2O6, and its bearing on rate of alkaline-carbonate leaching of brannerite in ore

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The crystal structure of synthetic, stoichiometric brannerite, UTi2O6, has been refined to R=2.23% from MoKα radiation. Monoclinic, with space group C2/m, a 9.8123(15), b 3.7697(6), c 6.9253(9) A, β 118.957(6)0, brannerite is isostructural with thoruitite, ThTi2O6 (Ruh β Wadsley 1966). The co-ordination of U by O is distorted octahedral, the bond distances being 2 x 2.252(2), 4 x 2.296(1) A. There is an additional pair of short nonbonded U-O contacts, 2 x 2.824(2) A. The co-ordination around Ti is also distorted octahedral, with the Ti-O distance between 1.854(3) and 2.104(3) A. The depth of penetration of an alkaline-carbonate leaching solution into natural brannerite from Eldorado, Saskatchewan, has been found to vary nonuniformly with both time and crystallographic direction of leaching attack. The rate of dissolution for a free crystal is 1.33 cubic micrometers per second or, using the density calculated from the cell data, 8.5 x 10-12 g/s

  11. Effects of soil amendments at a heavy loading rate associated with cover crops as green manures on the leaching of nutrients and heavy metals from a calcareous soil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Q.R.; Li, Y.C.; Klassen, W. [University of Florida, Homestead, FL (USA). Center of Tropical Research & Education

    2003-07-01

    The potential risk of groundwater contamination by the excessive leaching of N, P and heavy metals from soils amended at heavy loading rates of biosolids, coal ash, N-viro soil (1:1 mixture of coal ash and biosolids), yard waste compost and co-compost (3:7 mixture of biosolids to yard wastes), and by soil incorporation of green manures of sunn hemp (Crotalaria juncea) and sorghum sudangrass (Sorghum bicolorXS. bicolor var. sudanense) was studied by collecting and analyzing leachates from pots of Krome gravelly loam soil subjected to these treatments. A subtropical vegetable crop, okra (Abelmoschus esculentus L.), was grown after the soil amendments or cover crops had been incorporated into the soil. The results showed that the concentration of NO{sub 3}-N in leachate from biosolids was significantly higher than in leachate from other treatments. The levels of heavy metals found in the leachates from all amended soils were so low, as to suggest these amendments may be used without risk of leaching dangerous amounts of these toxic elements. Nevertheless the level of heavy metals in leachate from coal ash amended soil was substantially greater than in leachates from the other treatments.

  12. Zinc leaching from tire crumb rubber.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhodes, Emily P; Ren, Zhiyong; Mays, David C

    2012-12-01

    Because tires contain approximately 1-2% zinc by weight, zinc leaching is an environmental concern associated with civil engineering applications of tire crumb rubber. An assessment of zinc leaching data from 14 studies in the published literature indicates that increasing zinc leaching is associated with lower pH and longer leaching times, but the data display a wide range of zinc concentrations, and do not address the effect of crumb rubber size or the dynamics of zinc leaching during flow through porous crumb rubber. The present study was undertaken to investigate the effect of crumb rubber size using the synthetic precipitation leaching procedure (SPLP), the effect of exposure time using quiescent batch leaching tests, and the dynamics of zinc leaching using column tests. Results indicate that zinc leaching from tire crumb rubber increases with smaller crumb rubber and longer exposure time. Results from SPLP and quiescent batch leaching tests are interpreted with a single-parameter leaching model that predicts a constant rate of zinc leaching up to 96 h. Breakthrough curves from column tests displayed an initial pulse of elevated zinc concentration (~3 mg/L) before settling down to a steady-state value (~0.2 mg/L), and were modeled with the software package HYDRUS-1D. Washing crumb rubber reduces this initial pulse but does not change the steady-state value. No leaching experiment significantly reduced the reservoir of zinc in the crumb rubber. PMID:23145882

  13. Scintillation Caustics in Planetary Occultation Light Curves

    CERN Document Server

    Cooray, A R; Cooray, Asantha R.

    2003-01-01

    We revisit the GSC5249-01240 light curve obtained during its occultation by Saturn's North polar region. In addition to refractive scintillations, the power spectrum of intensity fluctuations shows an enhancement of power between refractive and diffractive regimes. We identify this excess power as due to high amplitude spikes in the light curve and suggest that these spikes are due to caustics associated with ray crossing situations. The flux variation in individual spikes follows the expected caustic behavior, including diffraction fringes which we have observed for the first time in a planetary occultation light curve. The presence of caustics in scintillation light curves require an inner scale cut off to the power spectrum of underlying density fluctuations associated with turbulence. Another possibility is the presence of gravity waves in the atmosphere. While occultation light curves previously showed the existence of refractive scintillations, a combination of small projected stellar size and a low rel...

  14. Influencing factors of pyrite leaching in germ-free system

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    OU Le-ming; HE Rong-quan; FENG Qi-ming

    2007-01-01

    The effect of mineral particle size,pulp potential and category of oxidant on pyrite leaching was studied.The results show that a smaller mineral particle size leads to a higher leaching rate of pyrite, and the optimum result with pyrite leaching rate of 2.92% is obtained when mineral particle size is less than 0.037 1/mm.The pulp potential reflects the leaching process. The increase of pulp potential can improve pyrite leaching. The leaching rate and velocity of pyrite can be enhanced rapidly by adding strong oxidant. The kind and the method of adding oxidant have important effect on the pyrite leaching. Appropriate concentration of Fe3+ can enhance pyrite leaching but the precipitation generated by high concentration of ferric ion covers the surface of pyrites and prevents the leaching process.The leaching rate increases with the constant addition of H2O2.

  15. Electrochemical generation of fentons reagent to treat spent caustic wastewater

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An important wastewater stream from oil refineries is the spent caustic. Caustic solutions are used as scrubbing agent during the desulphurization process to eliminate sulphur an mercaptans from oil and gasses. Spent caustic is classified as DOO3 (reactive sulphide) hazardous waste under the US Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). (Author)

  16. DRY CAUSTIC PEELING OF CLINGSTONE PEACHES. CAPSULE REPORT

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Capsule Report discusses the modified dry caustic process which uses rapidly rotating rubber discs to mechanically wipe the caustic treated peel from clingstone peaches. This report covers two-seasons of evaluation during which the dry caustic peeling system was operated in p...

  17. Experimental study on bio-leaching of high sulphuric acid consumption uranium ore by adding sulphide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In order to decrease acid consumption and increase leaching rate, an experiment on bio-leach-ing of low grade uranium ore by adding sulphide was done. Compared with conventional leaching method, the leaching rate of uranium is improved by 3% and the leaching period was reduced to 60 days from 90 days by bio-leaching method of adding sulphide. In order to decrease acid consumption with bio-leaching by adding sulphide obviously, robust bacteria to sulphide should be chosen. (authors)

  18. Rendering Caustics on Non-Lambertian Surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Henrik Wann

    1997-01-01

    This paper presents a new technique for rendering caustics on non-Lambertian surfaces. The method is based on an extension of the photon map which removes previous restrictions limiting the usage to Lambertian surfaces. We add information about the incoming direction to the photons and this allow...

  19. HYPERFILTRATION FOR TEXTILE PREPARATION CAUSTIC DISCHARGE REDUCTION

    Science.gov (United States)

    The report gives results of a study, joining a hyperfiltration (HF) system with an operating caustic scour and preparation range in an integrated textile dye and finishing plant. (HF is a membrane separation technique widely used in desalination of natural water and in some indus...

  20. K-Area Acid/Caustic Basin groundwater monitoring report. First quarter 1995

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    During first quarter 1995, samples from the KAC monitoring wells at the K-Area Acid/Caustic Basin were collected and analyzed for herbicides/pesticides, indicator parameters, metals, nitrate, radionuclide indicators, and other constituents. Monitoring results that exceeded the final Primary Drinking Water Standards (PDWS), other Savannah River Site (SRS) Flag 2 criteria, or the SRS turbidity standard are provided in this report. No constituents exceeded the final PDWS in the KAC wells. Aluminum and iron exceeded other SRS flagging criteria in one or more of the downgradient wells. Groundwater flow direction and rate in the water table beneath the K- Area Acid/Caustic Basin were similar to past quarters

  1. DEVELOPMENT OF A KINETIC MODEL OF BOEHMITE DISSOLUTION IN CAUSTIC SOLUTIONS APPLIED TO OPTIMIZE HANFORD WASTE PROCESSING

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boehmite (e.g., aluminum oxyhydroxide) is a major non-radioactive component in Hanford and Savannah River nuclear tank waste sludge. Boehmite dissolution from sludge using caustic at elevated temperatures is being planned at Hanford to minimize the mass of material disposed of as high-level waste (HLW) during operation of the Waste Treatment Plant (WTP). To more thoroughly understand the chemistry of this dissolution process, we have developed an empirical kinetic model for aluminate production due to boehmite dissolution. Application of this model to Hanford tank wastes would allow predictability and optimization of the caustic leaching of aluminum solids, potentially yielding significant improvements to overall processing time, disposal cost, and schedule. This report presents an empirical kinetic model that can be used to estimate the aluminate production from the leaching of boehmite in Hanford waste as a function of the following parameters: (1) hydroxide concentration; (2) temperature; (3) specific surface area of boehmite; (4) initial soluble aluminate plus gibbsite present in waste; (5) concentration of boehmite in the waste; and (6) (pre-fit) Arrhenius kinetic parameters. The model was fit to laboratory, non-radioactive (e.g. 'simulant boehmite') leaching results, providing best-fit values of the Arrhenius A-factor, A, and apparent activation energy, EA, of A = 5.0 x 1012 hour-1 and EA = 90 kJ/mole. These parameters were then used to predict boehmite leaching behavior observed in previously reported actual waste leaching studies. Acceptable aluminate versus leaching time profiles were predicted for waste leaching data from both Hanford and Savannah River site studies.

  2. DEVELOPMENT OF A KINETIC MODEL OF BOEHMITE DISSOLUTION IN CAUSTIC SOLUTIONS APPLIED TO OPTIMIZE HANFORD WASTE PROCESSING

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DISSELKAMP RS

    2011-01-06

    Boehmite (e.g., aluminum oxyhydroxide) is a major non-radioactive component in Hanford and Savannah River nuclear tank waste sludge. Boehmite dissolution from sludge using caustic at elevated temperatures is being planned at Hanford to minimize the mass of material disposed of as high-level waste (HLW) during operation of the Waste Treatment Plant (WTP). To more thoroughly understand the chemistry of this dissolution process, we have developed an empirical kinetic model for aluminate production due to boehmite dissolution. Application of this model to Hanford tank wastes would allow predictability and optimization of the caustic leaching of aluminum solids, potentially yielding significant improvements to overall processing time, disposal cost, and schedule. This report presents an empirical kinetic model that can be used to estimate the aluminate production from the leaching of boehmite in Hanford waste as a function of the following parameters: (1) hydroxide concentration; (2) temperature; (3) specific surface area of boehmite; (4) initial soluble aluminate plus gibbsite present in waste; (5) concentration of boehmite in the waste; and (6) (pre-fit) Arrhenius kinetic parameters. The model was fit to laboratory, non-radioactive (e.g. 'simulant boehmite') leaching results, providing best-fit values of the Arrhenius A-factor, A, and apparent activation energy, E{sub A}, of A = 5.0 x 10{sup 12} hour{sup -1} and E{sub A} = 90 kJ/mole. These parameters were then used to predict boehmite leaching behavior observed in previously reported actual waste leaching studies. Acceptable aluminate versus leaching time profiles were predicted for waste leaching data from both Hanford and Savannah River site studies.

  3. Leaching characteristics of a low grade uranium ore

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leaching characteristics of a low grade uranium ore in Jiangxi province are studied using agitating leaching and column leaching methods. The results of agitating leaching test show that leaching rate of uranium is above 85% under the conditions of sulphuric acid concentration of 10 g/L and stirring 12 h, and the ore is leachable. The results of column leaching test show that leaching rate of uranium is above 85.7% under the conditions of particle size of-5 mm, sulphuric acid dosage of 4.6% (w/w), and leaching time 40 d, and the permeability of ore heap is good (33 L/m2 h). The obtained leaching parameters can be used as the basis of industrial experiment design and adjusting the leaching parameters in production. (authors)

  4. Brazilian quartz purification by leaching technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    High purity quartz powder presents an increasing demand for the production of silica glass, widely used for semiconductor processing, particularly for photo-voltaic solar cells manufacturing. Motivated by the huge natural quartz potential of this country, the present paper studied the cleansing effect of acid leaching on Brazilian quartz powder, investigating the following parameters: type of solvent, temperature and leaching time. Still, aqueous leaching tests with ultrasound activation were also performed in order to verify its efficiency. The ideal conditions found for leaching,with a 74,2% purification degree, were achieved using a mixture of hydrofluoric acid with hydrochloric acid at 100 deg C for 6 hours. A leaching procedure longer than 6 hours is not necessary, since Fe, Ca, K and Mg amounts do not show significant variation after such time. Also, aqueous leaching caused purification rates higher than 30% for most of the impurities tested, proving itself as a effective leaching method (author)

  5. Analysis of factors affecting the effect of stope leaching

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The industrial test and industrial trial production of stope leaching were carried out at Taoshan orefield of Dabu deposit. The results of test and trial production showed obvious differences in leaching rate and leaching time. Compared with industrial trial production of stope leaching, the leaching rate of industrial test was higher, and leaching time was shorter. It was considered that the blasting method and liquid arrangement were the main factors affecting the leaching rate and leaching time according to analysis. So we put forward the following suggestions: the technique of deep hole slicing tight-face blasting was used to reduce the yield of lump ores, the effective liquid arrangement methods were adopted to make the lixiviant infiltrating throughout whole ore heap, and bacterial leaching was introduced. (authors)

  6. Results Of Routine Strip Effluent Hold Tank, Decontaminated Salt Solution Hold Tank, Caustic Wash Tank And Caustic Storage Tank Samples From Modular Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction Unit During Macrobatch 6 Operations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peters, T. B.

    2013-10-01

    Strip Effluent Hold Tank (SEHT), Decontaminated Salt Solution Hold Tank (DSSHT), Caustic Wash Tank (CWT) and Caustic Storage Tank (CST) samples from several of the ''microbatches'' of Integrated Salt Disposition Project (ISDP) Salt Batch (''Macrobatch'') 6 have been analyzed for {sup 238}Pu, {sup 90}Sr, {sup 137}Cs, and by Inductively Coupled Plasma Emission Spectroscopy (ICPES). The results from the current microbatch samples are similar to those from comparable samples in Macrobatch 5. From a bulk chemical point of view, the ICPES results do not vary considerably between this and the previous macrobatch. The titanium results in the DSSHT samples continue to indicate the presence of Ti, when the feed material does not have detectable levels. This most likely indicates that leaching of Ti from MST in ARP continues to occur. Both the CST and CWT samples indicate that the target Free OH value of 0.03 has been surpassed. While at this time there is no indication that this has caused an operational problem, the CST should be adjusted into specification. The {sup 137}Cs results from the SRNL as well as F/H lab data indicate a potential decline in cesium decontamination factor. Further samples will be carefully monitored to investigate this.

  7. Improved semiclassical density matrix taming caustics

    CERN Document Server

    Aragão de Carvalho, C; Fraga, E S; Jorás, S E

    2002-01-01

    We present a simple method to deal with caustics in the semiclassical approximation to the thermal density matrix of a particle moving on the line. For simplicity, only its diagonal elements are considered. The only ingredient we require is the knowledge of the extrema of the Euclidean action. The procedure makes use of complex trajectories, and is applied to the quartic double-well potential.

  8. Tunable caustic phenomena in electron wavefields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tavabi, Amir Hossein; Migunov, Vadim; Dwyer, Christian; Dunin-Borkowski, Rafal E; Pozzi, Giulio

    2015-10-01

    Novel caustic phenomena, which contain fold, butterfly and elliptic umbilic catastrophes, are observed in defocused images of two approximately collinear oppositely biased metallic tips in a transmission electron microscope. The observed patterns depend sensitively on defocus, on the applied voltage between the tips and on their separation and lateral offset. Their main features are interpreted on the basis of a projected electrostatic potential model for the electron-optical phase shift. PMID:26069930

  9. In Situ Causticizing for Black Liquor Gasification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scott Alan Sinquefield

    2005-10-01

    Black liquor gasification offers a number of attractive incentives to replace Tomlinson boilers but it also leads to an increase in the causticizing load. Reasons for this have been described in previous reports (FY04 ERC, et.al.). The chemistries have also been covered but will be reviewed here briefly. Experimental results of the causticizing reactions with black liquor are presented here. Results of the modeling work were presented in detail in the Phase 1 report. They are included in Table 2 for comparison but will not be discussed in detail. The causticizing agents were added to black liquor in the ratios shown in Table 1, mixed, and then spray-dried. The mixture ratios (doping levels) reflect amount calculated from the stoichiometry above to achieve specified conversions shown in the table. The solids were sieved to 63-90 microns for use in the entrained flow reactors. The firing conditions are shown in Table 2. Pictures and descriptions of the reactors can be found in the Phase 1 annual report. Following gasification, the solids (char) was collected and analyzed by coulometric titration (for carbonate and total carbon), and by inductively coupled plasma emission spectroscopy (ICP) for a wide array of metals.

  10. Spent LWR fuel leach tests: Waste Isolation Safety Assessment program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spent light-water-reactor (LWR) fuels with burnups of 54.5, 28 and 9 MWd/kgU were leach-tested in deionized water at 250C. Fuel burnup has no apparent effect on the calculated leach rates based upon the behavior of 137Cs and 239+240Pu. A leach test of 54.5 MWd/kgU spent fuel in synthetic sea brine showed that the cesium-based leach rate is lower in sea brine than in deionized water. A rise in the leach rate was observed after approximately 600 d of cumulative leaching. During the rise, the leach rate for all the measured radionuclides become nearly equal. Evidence suggests that exposure of new surfaces to the leachant may cause the increase. As a result, experimental work to study leaching mechanisms of spent fuel has been initiated. 22 figures

  11. Response of leaching from mire ecosystems to changing climate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The main objectives of this subproject of SUOSILMU are to determine the role of leaching and retention in the long-term mass balance of mires, the primary regulators in the leaching process and the manner in which climatic change affects the rates of leaching from peatlands. This report focuses on the leaching rates of organic carbon, nitrogen and sulphur from the research sites of Lakkasuo, one of the main research objects of SUOSILMU

  12. 4.2. Technological conditions and kinetics of leaching process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The optimal technological conditions of leaching process was defined. The rates of Al2O3 extraction at different technological conditions of leaching were considered. The kinetics of leaching process was studied under isothermal conditions at temperature intervals 20-80 deg C during 10-60 min. The dependence of rate extraction of Al2O3 on time at different leaching temperatures was studied.

  13. Effect of Heat Treatment on Corrosion and Stress Corrosion Cracking of S32205 Duplex Stainless Steel in Caustic Solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharya, Ananya; Singh, Preet M.

    2009-06-01

    Duplex stainless steels (DSSs) have generally performed very well in caustic environments. However, some corrosion and stress corrosion cracking (SCC) of DSSs have been reported in different pulp mill environments employing caustic solutions. Studies have shown that the corrosion and SCC susceptibility of DSSs depend on the alloy composition and microstructure of the steel. In this study, the effect of a sulfide-containing caustic environment (pulping liquor) and material properties (DSS alloy composition and microstructure) on the corrosion and SCC of DSSs was evaluated. During metal fabrication processes, localized areas of DSSs may be exposed to different temperatures and cooling rates, which may lead to changes in the microstructure in these regions. This change in microstructure, in turn, may affect the general and localized corrosion or SCC susceptibility of the affected area as compared to the rest of the metal. Hence, the effect of different annealing and aging temperatures as well as cooling rates on the microstructure and corrosion behavior of S32205 DSSs in caustic environment was evaluated. The results showed that changes in the microstructure of S32205 DSSs due to selected heat treatments did not have a significant effect on the general corrosion susceptibility of the steel in caustic environment, but its SCC susceptibility varied with changes in microstructures.

  14. 钒渣钙化焙烧参数对钒浸出率的影响%Effects of Vanadium-containing Slag Calcium Roasting Conditions on Leaching Rate of Vanadium

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李晓军; 张润平; 谢兵

    2012-01-01

    在分析钒渣(V2O3 8.07%)钙化焙烧过程反应机理的基础上,采用钙化焙烧-酸浸法研究了钙化焙烧过程中CaO/V2O3(质最比)、焙烧温度、焙烧时间对钒浸出率的影响.结果表明,焙烧温度在600~900℃之间时,V2O5等钒氧化物可与CaO发生反应,形成以CaV2O6,Ca3V2O8,CaV3O7为主的钒酸钙.当CaO/V2O3由0.48提高到约1.125时,钒浸出率由55.3%提高到69.2%,当CaO/V2O3>1.125时,钒浸出率开始下降.焙烧温度由750℃提高到825℃时,钒浸出率由56.3%提高到69.7%,温度进一步升高,物料开始烧结,浸出率逐渐下降.随焙烧时间延长,钒浸出率逐渐提高,2h后达最大;时间继续增加,钒浸出率会因物料间发生二次反应而下降.%Based on the analysis of reaction mechanism of vanadium-containing slag (V2O3 8.07%) calcium roasting process, the effects of various factors on vanadium leaching rate were investigated by means of calcium roasting coupled with acid leaching. The results showed that various calcium vanadates namely CaV2O6, Ca3V2O8, CaV3O7 would form between V2O5 and CaO at 600~900 ℃. The acid leaching of roasted slag indicated that the mass ratio of CaO to V2O3 in the roasted slag played an important role in the roasting process. Vanadium leaching rate increased from 55.3% to 69.2% when the ratio was from 0.48 to 1.125, while the rate decreased when the ratio exceeded 1.125. When the roasting temperature increased from 750 to 825 ℃, the leaching rate from 56.3% to 69.7%. However, the slag roasted the temperature higher than 825 ℃ lead to the decrease of leaching rate. Vanadium leaching rate increased with the roasting time. The maximum rate was achieved when the roasting time was 2 h. With longer roasting time, the slag reacted further, leading to the decrease of vanadium leaching rate.

  15. Test report - caustic addition system operability test procedure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This Operability Test Report documents the test results of test procedure WHC-SD-WM-OTP-167 ''Caustic Addition System Operability Test Procedure''. The Objective of the test was to verify the operability of the 241-AN-107 Caustic Addition System. The objective of the test was met

  16. In-Situ leaching of Crownpoint, New Mexico, Uranium Ore: Part 2--laboratory study of a mild leaching system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper describes laboratory leaching studies involving Crownpoint uranium ore samples and a mild leaching system. Batch leach tests with sodium bicarbonate solution and either high-pressure oxygen or low-pressure hydrogen peroxide gave qualitative data used to estimate leach rate and potential recovery. Using pseudo-firstorder rate constants derived from the batch test data, ore leachability was characterized as fast, intermediate, or slow. It was observed that leach rates varied by a factor of 50 for samples taken from different areas at Crownpoint; samples from the same ore trend often varied by a factor of 10. Packed-column and core-leach tests with oxygen at pressures up to 800 psig (5520 kPa) provided more quantitative estimates of leach rate and uranium recovery. Batch test results were correlatable with leach rates and uranium recoveries in packed-column or core tests. In ore samples where uraninite was the predominant uranium mineral, leach rates and recoveries were high. In samples containing coffinite, leach rates were generally lower than those with uraninite. Very low leach rates and recoveries were encountered where coffinite was intimately associated with carbonaceous material. However, the slow leaching rates are not caused by differences in reactivity of coffinite and uraninite. Mineralogical studies before and after leaching using electron microprobe analyses indicated that exposed coffinite crystals are dissolved easily, but finely disseminated coffinite crystallites persist after leaching if they are encapsulated in the carbonaceous matrix. Slow-leaching ores that did not respond to the mild oxidant system are called ''refractory.''

  17. Caustic Structures and Detectability of Circumbinary Planets in Microlensing

    CERN Document Server

    Luhn, Jacob K; Gaudi, B Scott

    2015-01-01

    Recent discoveries of circumbinary planets in Kepler data show that there is a viable channel of planet formation around binary main sequence stars. Motivated by these discoveries, we have investigated the caustic structures and detectability of circumbinary planets in microlensing events. We have produced a suite of animations of caustics as a function of the projected separation and angle of the binary host to efficiently explore caustic structures over the entire circumbinary parameter space. Aided by these animations, we have derived a semi-empirical analytic expression for the location of planetary caustics, which are displaced in circumbinary lenses relative to those of planets with a single host. We have used this expression to show that the dominant source of caustic motion will be due to the planet's orbital motion and not that of the binary star. Finally, we estimate the fraction of circumbinary microlensing events that are recognizable as such to be significant (5-50 percent) for binary projected s...

  18. Kinetic study on pressure leaching of high iron sphalerite concentrate

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIE Ke-qiang; YANG Xian-wan; WANG Ji-kun; YAN Jiang-feng; SHEN Qing-feng

    2007-01-01

    The kinetics of pressure leaching high iron sphalerite concentrate was studied. The effects of agitation rate, temperature, oxygen partial pressure, initial acid concentration, particle size, iron content in the concentrate and concentration of Fe2+ added into the solution on the leaching rate of zinc were examined. The experiment results indicate that if the agitation rate is greater than 600 r/min, its influence on Zn leaching rate is not substantial. A suitable rise in temperature can facilitate the leaching reaction, and the temperature should be controlled at 140-150 ℃. The increase trend of Zn leaching rate becomes slow when pressure is greater than 1.2 MPa, so the pressure is controlled at 1.2-1.4 MPa. Under the conditions of this study, Zn leaching rate decreases with a rise in the initial sulfuric acid concentration; and Zn leaching rate increases with a rise of iron content in the concentrate and Fe2+ concentration in the solution. Moreover, the experiment demonstrates that the leaching process follows the surface chemical reaction control kinetic law of "shrinking of unreacted core". The activation energy for pressure leaching high iron sphalerite concentrate is calculated, and a mathematical model for this pressure leaching is obtained. The model is promising to guide the practical operation of pressure leaching high iron sphalerite concentrate.

  19. Leaching of irradiated UO2 fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leaching tests over a period of 105 days have been performed on 20 mm long sections of an irradiated fuel rod. The sections - fuel with clad - were selected from axial locations along the rod corresponding to average linear heat ratings of 11.2 and 23.5 kW/m. For each fuel type, two leachant solutions were used: a synthetic Swedish groundwater and distilled water as reference. Leaching was performed at 60 deg C without mechanical stirring. All the leached species which were measured (U, Sr-90, Cs-137 and total alpha activity) showed large initial leaching rates - expressed as fractions of the total inventory leached per day - but the end of the leaching period, values were obtained of about 10-6/d for U, Sr-90 and Cs-137 and about 10-7/d for total alpha activity. Comparison of the cumulative amounts leached out during 105 days between the highly-rated and low-rated specimens showed the greatest difference in the case of Cs-137 where values of about 0,7 percent and 0,03 percent of the total Cs-137 inventory were obtained. These values demonstrate the sensitivity to heat rating of the movement of Cs-137 during reactor operation to the pellet-clad gap and pheripheral cracks

  20. Mill Integration-Pulping, Stream Reforming and Direct Causticization for Black Liquor Recovery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adriaan van Heiningen

    2007-06-30

    MTCI/StoneChem developed a steam reforming, fluidized bed gasification technology for biomass. DOE supported the demonstration of this technology for gasification of spent wood pulping liquor (or 'black liquor') at Georgia-Pacific's Big Island, Virginia mill. The present pre-commercial R&D project addressed the opportunities as well as identified negative aspects when the MTCI/StoneChem gasification technology is integrated in a pulp mill production facility. The opportunities arise because black liquor gasification produces sulfur (as H{sub 2}S) and sodium (as Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3}) in separate streams which may be used beneficially for improved pulp yield and properties. The negative aspect of kraft black liquor gasification is that the amount of Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3} which must be converted to NaOH (the so called causticizing requirement) is increased. This arises because sulfur is released as Na{sub 2}S during conventional kraft black liquor recovery, while during gasification the sodium associated Na{sub 2}S is partly or fully converted to Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3}. The causticizing requirement can be eliminated by including a TiO{sub 2} based cyclic process called direct causticization. In this process black liquor is gasified in the presence of (low sodium content) titanates which convert Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3} to (high sodium content) titanates. NaOH is formed when contacting the latter titanates with water, thereby eliminating the causticizing requirement entirely. The leached and low sodium titanates are returned to the gasification process. The project team comprised the University of Maine (UM), North Carolina State University (NCSU) and MTCI/ThermoChem. NCSU and MTCI are subcontractors to UM. The principal organization for the contract is UM. NCSU investigated the techno-economics of using advanced pulping techniques which fully utilize the unique cooking liquors produced by steam reforming of black liquor (Task 1). UM studied the kinetics and

  1. A study of extracting uranium by intensified alkaline heap leaching

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A new technique of extracting uranium by intensified alkaline heap leaching was presented to treat a uranium ore of high carbonate content. A lixiviant, high concentration of alkaline solution, reacts with the ore prior to heap making for some time at a certain temperature,reducing the leaching time remarkably. With this technique, the leaching rate of uranium increased from 50% to 90% or above and the leaching time decreased from 64 days to 12 days. (authors)

  2. Leaching of chromated copper arsenate wood preservatives: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hingston, J A; Collins, C D; Murphy, R J; Lester, J N

    2001-01-01

    Recent studies have generated conflicting data regarding the bioaccumulation and toxicity of leachates from preservative-treated wood. Due to the scale of the wood preserving industry, timber treated with the most common preservative, chromated copper arsenate (CCA), may form a significant source of metals in the aquatic environment. The existing literature on leaching of CCA is reviewed, and the numerous factors affecting leaching rates, including pH, salinity, treatment and leaching test protocols are discussed. It is concluded from the literature that insufficient data exists regarding these effects to allow accurate quantification of leaching rates, and also highlights the need for standardised leaching protocols. PMID:11202715

  3. Leaching behavior of solidified plastics radioactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It is highly needed to develope the solidification process to dispose safely the radioactive wastes increasing with the growth of the nuclear industry. The leaching mechanisms of the solidified plastic wastes were investigated and the leaching rates of the plastic wastes were also measured among the many solidification processes. In addition, the transport equation based on the diffusion or the diffusion-dissolution was compared with the empirical equation derived from the experimental data by graphical method. Consequently, leaching process of the solidified plastic wastes is quite well agreed with the mass transport theory, but it may be difficult to simulate leaching process by diffusion dissolution mechanism. But the theoretical equation could be applicable to the cumulative amount of radionuclides leached form the plastic wastes disposed into the environment. (Author)

  4. Process Development for Permanganate Addition During Oxidative Leaching of Hanford Tanks Sludges

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rapko, Brian M.; Lumetta, Gregg J.; Deschane, Jaquetta R.; Peterson, Reid A.; Blanchard, David L.

    2007-10-30

    Previous Bechtel National, Incorporated (BNI)-sponsored studies have targeted optimizing sodium permanganate for the selective oxidation of chromium from washed Hanford tank sludges (Rapko et al. 2004; Rapko et al. 2005). The recommendation from previous work was that contact with sodium permanganate in a minimally caustic solution, i.e., 0.1 to 0.25 M [OH-] initially, provided maximum Cr dissolution while minimizing concomitant Pu dissolution. At the request of BNI, further work on oxidative alkaline leaching was performed.

  5. Dynamic leaching test of personal computer components.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yadong; Richardson, Jay B; Niu, Xiaojun; Jackson, Ollie J; Laster, Jeremy D; Walker, Aaron K

    2009-11-15

    A dynamic leaching test (DLT) was developed and used to evaluate the leaching of toxic substances for electronic waste in the environment. The major components in personal computers (PCs) including motherboards, hard disc drives, floppy disc drives, and compact disc drives were tested. The tests lasted for 2 years for motherboards and 1.5 year for the disc drives. The extraction fluids for the standard toxicity characteristic leaching procedure (TCLP) and synthetic precipitation leaching procedure (SPLP) were used as the DLT leaching solutions. A total of 18 elements including Ag, Al, As, Au, Ba, Be, Cd, Cr, Cu, Fe, Ga, Ni, Pd, Pb, Sb, Se, Sn, and Zn were analyzed in the DLT leachates. Only Al, Cu, Fe, Ni, Pb, and Zn were commonly found in the DLT leachates of the PC components. Their leaching levels were much higher in TCLP extraction fluid than in SPLP extraction fluid. The toxic heavy metal Pb was found to continuously leach out of the components over the entire test periods. The cumulative amounts of Pb leached out of the motherboards in TCLP extraction fluid reached 2.0 g per motherboard over the 2-year test period, and that in SPLP extraction fluid were 75-90% less. The leaching rates or levels of Pb were largely affected by the content of galvanized steel in the PC components. The higher was the steel content, the lower the Pb leaching rate would be. The findings suggest that the obsolete PCs disposed of in landfills or discarded in the environment continuously release Pb for years when subjected to landfill leachate or rains. PMID:19616380

  6. Preconceptual Design Description for Caustic Recycle Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sevigny, Gary J.; Poloski, Adam P.; Fountain, Matthew S.; Kurath, Dean E.

    2008-04-12

    The U.S. Department of Energy plans to vitrify both high-level and low-activity waste at the Hanford Site in southeastern Washington State. One aspect of the planning includes a need for a caustic recycle process to separate sodium hydroxide for recycle. Sodium is already a major limitation to the waste-oxide loading in the low-activity waste glass to be vitrified at the Waste Treatment Plant, and additional sodium hydroxide will be added to remove aluminum and to control precipitation in the process equipment. Aluminum is being removed from the high level sludge to reduce the number of high level waste canisters produced. A sodium recycle process would reduce the volume of low-activity waste glass produced and minimize the need to purchase new sodium hydroxide, so there is a renewed interest in investigating sodium recycle. This document describes an electrochemical facility for recycling sodium for the WTP.

  7. Photon Differential Splatting for Rendering Caustics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frisvad, Jeppe Revall; Schjøth, Lars; Erleben, Kenny;

    2014-01-01

    We present a photon splatting technique which reduces noise and blur in the rendering of caustics. Blurring of illumination edges is an inherent problem in photon splatting, as each photon is unaware of its neighbours when being splatted. This means that the splat size is usually based on...... heuristics rather than knowledge of the local flux density. We use photon differentials to determine the size and shape of the splats such that we achieve adaptive anisotropic flux density estimation in photon splatting. As compared to previous work that uses photon differentials, we present the first method...... where no photons or beams or differentials need to be stored in a map. We also present improvements in the theory of photon differentials, which give more accurate results and a faster implementation. Our technique has good potential for GPU acceleration, and we limit the number of parameters requiring...

  8. Sever Gastrointestinal Caustic Injury and Surgical Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Bazrafshan

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Approximately 20% of caustic ingestions result in some degree of esophageal injury. Alkaline materials are the most frequent corrosive materials ingested.     The physical form and PH of ingested materials play a critical role in the site and type of gastrointestinal injury (PH > 12 or PH < 1.5, crystalline drain cleaners. Unlike Alkaline solutions, strong acids are bitter, burn on contact and usually produce vomiting but when swallowed pass rapidly through the esophagus and damage the antrum of the stomach. I will present the results of 5 cases of gastric out let obstruction after acid ingestion (subtotal gastrectomy and billroth 1 and 4 patients with extensive esophageal damage and perforation ( Total esophagectomy and gastric pull up.  

  9. Leaching of lead from zinc leach residue in acidic calcium chloride aqueous solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Le; Mu, Wen-ning; Shen, Hong-tao; Liu, Shao-ming; Zhai, Yu-chun

    2015-05-01

    A process with potentially reduced environmental impacts and occupational hazards of lead-bearing zinc plant residue was studied to achieve a higher recovery of lead via a cost-effective and environmentally friendly process. This paper describes an optimization study on the leaching of lead from zinc leach residue using acidic calcium chloride aqueous solution. Six main process conditions, i.e., the solution pH value, stirring rate, concentration of CaCl2 aqueous solution, liquid-to-solid (L/S) ratio, leaching temperature, and leaching time, were investigated. The microstructure and components of the residue and tailing were characterized using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). On the basis of experimental results, the optimum reaction conditions were determined to be a solution pH value of 1, a stirring rate of 500 r·min-1, a CaCl2 aqueous solution concentration of 400 g·L-1, a liquid-to-solid mass ratio of 7:1, a leaching temperature of 80°C, and a leaching time of 45 min. The leaching rate of lead under these conditions reached 93.79%, with an iron dissolution rate of 19.28%. Silica did not take part in the chemical reaction during the leaching process and was accumulated in the residue.

  10. C-104 high-level waste solids: Washing/leaching and solubility versus temperature studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    GJ Lumetta; DJ Bates; JP Bramson; LP Darnell; OT Farmer III; SK Fiskum; LR Greenwood; FV Hoopes; CZ Soderquist; MJ Steele; RT Steele; MW Urie; JJ Wagner

    2000-05-17

    This report describes the results of a test conducted by Battelle to assess the effects of inhibited water washing and caustic leaching on the composition of the C-104 HLW solids. The objective of this work was to determine the composition of the C-104 solids remaining after washing with 0.01 M NaOH or leaching with 3 M NaOH. Another objective of this test was to determine the solubility of the C-104 solids as a function of temperature. The work was conducted according to test plan BNFL-TP-29953-8, Rev. 0, ``Determination of the Solubility of HLW Sludge Solids.

  11. C-104 high-level waste solids: Washing/leaching and solubility versus temperature studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report describes the results of a test conducted by Battelle to assess the effects of inhibited water washing and caustic leaching on the composition of the C-104 HLW solids. The objective of this work was to determine the composition of the C-104 solids remaining after washing with 0.01 M NaOH or leaching with 3 M NaOH. Another objective of this test was to determine the solubility of the C-104 solids as a function of temperature. The work was conducted according to test plan BNFL-TP-29953-8, Rev. 0, ''Determination of the Solubility of HLW Sludge Solids

  12. P-Area Acid/Caustic Basin groundwater monitoring report: Third quarter 1994

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    During third quarter 1994, groundwater from the six PAC monitoring wells at the P-Area Acid/Caustic Basin was analyzed for herbicides/pesticides, indicator parameters, metals, nitrate, radionuclide indicators, and other constituents. Monitoring results that exceeded the final Primary Drinking Water Standards (PDWS) or the Savannah River Site (SRS) flagging criteria or turbidity standard during the quarter are discussed in this report. During third quarter 1994, no constituents exceeded the final PDWS. Aluminum exceeded its SRS Flag 2 criterion in all six PAC wells. Iron and manganese exceeded Flag 2 criteria in three wells, while turbidity was elevated in one well. Groundwater flow direction and rate in the water table beneath the P-Area Acid/Caustic Basin were similar to past quarters

  13. K-Area Acid/Caustic Basin groundwater monitoring report. Third quarter 1994

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    During third quarter 1994, samples from the KAC monitoring wells at the K-Area Acid/Caustic Basin were collected and analyzed for herbicides/pesticides, indicator parameters, metals, nitrate, radionuclide indicators, and other constituents. Monitoring results that exceeded the final Primary Drinking Water Standards (PDWS), other Savannah River Site (SRS) Flag 2 criteria, or the SRS turbidity standard are provided in this report. No constituents exceeded the final PDWS in the KAC wells. Aluminum and iron exceeded other SRS flagging criteria in one or more of the downgradient wells. Groundwater flow direction and rate in the water table beneath the K-Area Acid/Caustic Basin were similar to past quarters

  14. P-Area Acid/Caustic Basin groundwater monitoring report. First quarter 1995

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    During first quarter 1995, groundwater from the six PAC monitoring wells at the P-Area Acid/Caustic Basin was analyzed for herbicides/pesticides, indicator parameters, metals, nitrate, adionuclide indicators, and other constituents. Monitoring results that exceeded the final Primary Drinking Water Standards (PDWS) or the Savannah River Site (SRS) flagging criteria or turbidity standard during the quarter are discussed in this report. During first quarter 1995, no constituents exceeded the final PDWS. Aluminum exceeded its SRS Flag 2 criterion in all six PAC wells. Iron and manganese exceeded Flag 2 criteria in three wells, while turbidity was elevated in one well. Groundwater flow direction and rate in the water table beneath the P-Area Acid/Caustic Basin were similar to past quarters

  15. F-Area Acid/Caustic Basin groundwater monitoring report. Second quarter 1994

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    During second quarter 1994, samples from the FAC monitoring wells at the F-Area Acid/Caustic Basin were collected and analyzed for herbicides/pesticides, indicator parameters, metals, nitrate, radionuclide indicators, volatile organic compounds, and other constituents. Piezometer FAC 5P and monitoring well FAC 6 were dry and could not be sampled. Analytical results that exceeded final Primary Drinking Water Standards (PDWS), other Savannah River Site (SRS) Flag 2 criteria, or the SRS turbidity standard of 50 NTU during the quarter were as follows: gross alpha exceeded the final PDWS and aluminum, iron, manganese, and total organic halogens exceeded the SRS Flag 2 criteria in one or more of the FAC wells. Turbidity exceeded the SRS standard in well FAC 3. Groundwater flow direction and rate in the water table beneath the F-Area Acid/Caustic Basin were similar to past quarters

  16. Effect of caustic environment on intergranular attack and stress corrosion cracking of alloy 600

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Intergranular corrosion of alloy 600 tubes in PWR steam generators has been a continuing mode of degradation at many sites. The Steam Generator Owners Group has funded a program addressing the intergranular corrosion of commercial tubing materials for the past 6 years. In April 1987, the Mechanistic and Environmental Effects Program was reviewed at a contractors' workshop. Intergranular corrosion (IGC) of alloy 600 can occur in caustic, acid and neutral waters. This paper summarizes the work of EPRI contractors on caustic IGC and integrates different viewpoints and experimental techniques. The paper explores the postulated mechanisms of corrosion including: segregation of alloy impurities, formation of nickel sulfide, dealloying at grain boundaries, and the role of chromium oxide. The paper also focuses on the role of environment, microstructure, electrochemical potential and stress on the incidence and rate of intergranular corrosion

  17. Monitoring caustic injuries from emergency department databases using automatic keyword recognition software

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vignally, P.; Fondi, G.; Taggi, F.; Pitidis, A.; National Injury Database and National Information System on Accidents in the Home Surveillance Groups

    2011-01-01

    Summary In Italy the European Union Injury Database reports the involvement of chemical products in 0.9% of home and leisure accidents. The Emergency Department registry on domestic accidents in Italy and the Poison Control Centres record that 90% of cases of exposure to toxic substances occur in the home. It is not rare for the effects of chemical agents to be observed in hospitals, with a high potential risk of damage - the rate of this cause of hospital admission is double the domestic injury average. The aim of this study was to monitor the effects of injuries caused by caustic agents in Italy using automatic free-text recognition in Emergency Department medical databases. We created a Stata software program to automatically identify caustic or corrosive injury cases using an agent-specific list of keywords. We focused attention on the procedure’s sensitivity and specificity. Ten hospitals in six regions of Italy participated in the study. The program identified 112 cases of injury by caustic or corrosive agents. Checking the cases by quality controls (based on manual reading of ED reports), we assessed 99 cases as true positive, i.e. 88.4% of the patients were automatically recognized by the software as being affected by caustic substances (99% CI: 80.6%- 96.2%), that is to say 0.59% (99% CI: 0.45%-0.76%) of the whole sample of home injuries, a value almost three times as high as that expected (p < 0.0001) from European codified information. False positives were 11.6% of the recognized cases (99% CI: 5.1%- 21.5%). Our automatic procedure for caustic agent identification proved to have excellent product recognition capacity with an acceptable level of excess sensitivity. Contrary to our a priori hypothesis, the automatic recognition system provided a level of identification of agents possessing caustic effects that was significantly much greater than was predictable on the basis of the values from current codifications reported in the European Database. PMID

  18. EFRT M-12 Issue Resolution: Comparison of PEP and Bench-Scale Oxidative Leaching Results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rapko, Brian M.; Schonewill, Philip P.; Brown, Christopher F.; Eslinger, Paul W.; Fountain, Matthew S.; Hausmann, Tom S.; Huckaby, James L.; Hanson, Brady D.; Kurath, Dean E.; Minette, Michael J.

    2010-01-01

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) has been tasked by Bechtel National Inc. (BNI) on the River Protection Project-Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (RPP-WTP) project to perform research and development activities to resolve technical issues identified for the Pretreatment Facility (PTF). The Pretreatment Engineering Platform (PEP) was designed, constructed, and operated as part of a plan to respond to issue M12, “Undemonstrated Leaching Processes” of the External Flowsheet Review Team (EFRT) issue response plan.( ) The PEP is a 1/4.5-scale test platform designed to simulate the WTP pretreatment caustic leaching, oxidative leaching, ultrafiltration solids concentration, and slurry washing processes. The PEP replicates the WTP leaching processes using prototypic equipment and control strategies. The PEP also includes non-prototypic ancillary equipment to support the core processing.

  19. EFRT M-12 Issue Resolution: Comparison of PEP and Bench-Scale Oxidative Leaching Results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) has been tasked by Bechtel National Inc. (BNI) on the River Protection Project-Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (RPP-WTP) project to perform research and development activities to resolve technical issues identified for the Pretreatment Facility (PTF). The Pretreatment Engineering Platform (PEP) was designed, constructed, and operated as part of a plan to respond to issue M12, 'Undemonstrated Leaching Processes' of the External Flowsheet Review Team (EFRT) issue response plan. The PEP is a 1/4.5-scale test platform designed to simulate the WTP pretreatment caustic leaching, oxidative leaching, ultrafiltration solids concentration, and slurry washing processes. The PEP replicates the WTP leaching processes using prototypic equipment and control strategies. The PEP also includes non-prototypic ancillary equipment to support the core processing.

  20. Intergranular failures of Alloy 600 in high temperature caustic environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper describes the results of our investigation of two commonly observed modes of failure of Alloy 600 in high temperature caustic environment namely, intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC) and intergranular attack (IGA). Specimens are studied as C-rings under constant deflection, wires with and without any externally applied load, and as straining electrodes. The potential dependence of average crack propagation rate is established in a single test by using several C-rings held at different potentials, by using a modification of the static potential gradient method of Seys and Van Haute. SCC appears to be governed by a film rupture mechanism and its propagation rate is significantly influenced by the electrochemical potential and associated surface film formation. The maximum crack propagation rate for C-rings and constant load specimens is very similar but much smaller than that calculated for a straining electrode at the same potential. IGA occurs over a wide range of potential - starting from a few tens of millivolts cathodic to the corrosion potential up to the lower end of anodic potentials normally required for SCC. IGA seems to be rather independent of stress and is generally more pronounced in the crevice area under the nuts used in C-rings. Examination of several creviced coupons shows that outside the crevice, enrichment of iron and chromium occurs on the surface as the potential is raised anodically, whereas the Ni:Fe and Ni:Cr ratios remain relatively independent of potential within the crevice

  1. Formation of caustics in k-essence and Horndeski theory

    CERN Document Server

    Babichev, Eugeny

    2016-01-01

    We study propagation of waves and appearance of caustics in k-essence and galileon theories. First we show that previously known solutions for travelling waves in k-essence and galileon models correspond to very specific fine-tuned initial conditions. On the contrary, as we demonstrate by the method of characteristics, a generic wave in k-essence ends up with formation of caustics. Finally, we find that any wave solution in pure k-essence is also a solution for a galileon theory with the same k-essence term. Thus in the Horndeski theory formation of caustics is generic. We discuss physical consequences of the caustics formation and possible ways to cure the problem.

  2. Formation of caustics in k-essence and Horndeski theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babichev, Eugeny

    2016-04-01

    We study propagation of waves and appearance of caustics in k-essence and galileon theories. First we show that previously known solutions for travelling waves in k-essence and galileon models correspond to very specific fine-tuned initial conditions. On the contrary, as we demonstrate by the method of characteristics, generic initial conditions leads to a wave in k-essence which ends up with formation of caustics. Finally, we find that any wave solution in pure k-essence is also a solution for a galileon theory with the same k-essence term. Thus in the Horndeski theory with a k-essence term formation of caustics is generic. We discuss physical consequences of the caustics formation and possible ways to cure the problem.

  3. Test report - 241-AN-274 Caustic Pump Control Building

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paintner, G.P.

    1995-05-01

    This Acceptance Test Report documents the test results of test procedure WHC-SD-WM-ATP-135 `Acceptance Test Procedure for the 241-AN- 274 Caustic Pump Control Building.` The objective of the test was to verify that the 241-AN-274 Caustic Pump Control Building functions properly based on design specifications per applicable H-2-85573 drawings and associated ECN`s. The objective of the test was met.

  4. Test report - 241-AN-274 Caustic Pump Control Building

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This Acceptance Test Report documents the test results of test procedure WHC-SD-WM-ATP-135 'Acceptance Test Procedure for the 241-AN- 274 Caustic Pump Control Building.' The objective of the test was to verify that the 241-AN-274 Caustic Pump Control Building functions properly based on design specifications per applicable H-2-85573 drawings and associated ECN's. The objective of the test was met

  5. Leaching properties of solidified TRU waste forms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Safety analysis of waste forms requires an estimate of the ability of these forms to retain activity in the disposal environment. This program of leaching tests will determine the leaching properties of TRU contaminated incinerator ash waste forms using hydraulic cement, urea--formaldehyde, bitumen, and vinyl ester--styrene as solidification agents. Three types of leaching tests will be conducted, including both static and flow rate. Five generic groundwaters will be used. Equipment and procedures are described. Experiments have been conducted to determine plate out of 239Pu, counter efficiency, and stability of counting samples

  6. Electrochemical methods for leaching of spent fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Electrochemical methods were used to study the initial dissolution and leaching behavior of spent-fuel fragments. The initial dissolution rate and the nature of the surface film of the spent fuel was shown to be compatible with those of single-crystal UO/sub 2/ surfaces. Thus, studying the behavior of UO/sub 2/ may provide an understanding of spent-fuel leaching mechanisms. Also, the study showed that spent-fuel leach data and dissolution kinetics may be obtained from the electrochemical methods described

  7. Leaching of ceramics under simulated disposal conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leaching tests have been performed with specimens of LD-porcelain, corderite and borning material, in simulated ground water as well as in day. The weights of all the specimens except the borning material increased after 10-30 days of leaching in water. After leaching in clay the weights decreased for all the elements. Furthermore the rate of corrosion of the borning material was determined to be 11+-6 μ per year between the 40th and the 150th day. (E.R.)

  8. Radioactive Demonstration of Caustic Recovery from Low-Level Alkaline Nuclear Waste by an Electrochemical Separation Process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bench-scale radioactive tests successfully demonstrated an electrochemical process for the recovery of sodium hydroxide (caustic) from Decontaminated Salt Solution produced from the In-Tank Precipitation and Effluent Treatment Processes at the Savannah River Site (SRS). This testing evaluated two membranes: an organic-based membrane, Nafion Type 350, manufactured by E. I. duPont de Nemours ampersand Company, Inc. (DuPont) and an inorganic-based membrane, NAS D, being developed by Ceramatec. Both membranes successfully separated caustic from radioactive SRS waste.Key findings of the testing indicate the following attributes and disadvantages of each membrane. The commercially-available Nafion membrane proved highly conductive. Thus, the electrochemical cell can operate at high current density minimizing the number of cells at the desired volumetric processing rate. Testing indicated cesium transported across the Nafion membrane into the caustic product. Therefore, the caustic product will contain low-levels of radioactive cesium due to the presence of 134,137Cs in the waste feed. To meet customer requirements, a post treatment stage may prove necessary to remove radioactive cesium resulting in increased overall process costs and decreased cost savings. In contrast to the Nafion membrane, the NAS D membrane demonstrated the production of caustic with much lower levels of gamma radioactivity (137Cs activity was < 51 dpm/g). Therefore, the caustic product could possibly release for onsite/offsite use without further treatment. The NAS D membrane remains in the development stage and does not exist as a commercial product. Operating costs and long-term membrane durability remain unknown.Caustic recovery has been successfully demonstrated in a bench-scale, 2-compartment electrochemical reactor operated for brief periods of time with simulated and radioactive waste solutions and two different types of membranes. The next phase of testing should be directed at (1

  9. Predictability of outcome of caustic ingestion by esophagogastroduodenoscopy in children

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Abdulkerim Temiz; Pelin Oguzkurt; Semire Serin Ezer; Emine Ince; Akgun Hicsonmez

    2012-01-01

    AIM:To assess the necessity of esophagogastroduodenoscopy (EGD) to predict the outcome of caustic ingestion in children.METHODS:The study included 206 children who underwent EGD because of ingestion of caustic substances between January 2005 and August 2010.Retrospective analysis of data of the patients was performed.RESULTS:The male/female ratio was 1.6 and mean age was 38.1 ± 28.8 mo.The caustic substances were acidic in 72 (34.9%) cases,alkaline in 56 (27.2%),liquid household bleach in 62 (30.1%),and unknown in 16 (7.8%).Fifty-seven (27.7%) patients were symptom-free.Significant clinical findings were observed in 149 (72.3%) patients.Upper gastrointestinal endoscopy findings of esophageal injury were grade 0 in 86 (41.7%) patients,grade 1 in 49 (23.8%),grade 2a in 42 (20.4%),grade 2b in 28 (13.6%),and grade 3a in 1 (0.5%) patient.35 patients with grade 2a,2b,and 3a injuries underwent esophageal dilation at second week of ingestion.Esophageal stricture,which necessitated a regular dilation program developed in 13 of the aforementioned 35 patients.There is no statistically significant difference in the rate of development of esophageal stricture between the patients who ingested acidic (15.3%) and alkaline (8.9%) substances (P =0.32).Severe gastric injury was detected in 38 (18.5%)patients.The rate of development of gastric injury was significantly higher in the acidic group (14%) than in the alkaline group (2.9%) (P =0.001).Out of 149 patients with clinical findings,49 (32.9%) patients had no esophageal injury and 117 (78.5%) patients had no gastric lesion.Esophageal and severe gastric injuries were detected in 20 (35.1%) and 8 (14%) of patients with no clinical findings respectively.Pyloric stenosis developed in 6 patients.Pyloric obstruction improved with balloon dilation in 2 patients.Mean hospitalization time were 1.2±0.5 d for grade 0 and 2.3 ± 5 d for grade 1 and 6.3 ± 6.2 d for grade 2a and 15.8 ± 18.6d for

  10. In situ leaching of uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A process is described for the in-situ leaching of uranium-containing ores employing an acidic leach liquor containing peroxymonosulphuric acid. Preferably, additionally, sulphuric acid is present in the leach liquor. (author)

  11. Stranded Zostera marina L. vs wrack fauna community interactions on a Baltic sandy beach (Hel, Poland: a short-term pilot study. Part I. Driftline effects of fragmented detritivory, leaching and decay rates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcin F. Jêdrzejczak

    2002-06-01

    Full Text Available The effects of the beach community structure of macro- and meiofauna on the process of beach wrack decay were investigated by means of a simple field colonisation experiment in a temperate, fine quartz sediment, sandy beach at the end of the Hel Peninsula in Poland. 1260 replicate litterbags of three mesh sizes (12 mm, 0.5 mm, 48 µm containing fresh wrack were used to assess the role of faunal and non-faunal components in the breakdown of stranded Zostera marina. Wrack breakdown was determined during a three-year field study. This paper presents the first part of the results of this field experiment, which refer to the effects of fragmentation detritivory, leaching and decay rates. Material was lost from the bags at a rapid rate, with only 22-32% of the original dry mass remaining after 27 days in the field. This degradation was not directly related to the faunal succession of the eelgrass tissue, which proceeded in two distinct phases throughout the study period. Exclusion of macrofauna from the wrack by the use of finer-mesh litterbags (< 1 mm had no appreciable effect on the rate of dry matter loss. Microbial decay, and abiotic leaching and fragmentation are probably the major causes of seagrass weight loss from the litterbags.

  12. Continuous-flow leaching studies of crushed and cored SYNROC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Both crushed (150 to 300 μm) and cored (1.8 mm diameter) samples of SYNROC have been leached with the single-pass continuous-flow leaching equipment. Crushed samples of Cs-hollandite were also leached in a similar experiment. Temperatures used were 25 and 750C and leachates were 0.03 N NaHCO3 and distilled water. Leaching rates from SYNROC C were ranked Cs > Sr greater than or equal to Ca > Ba > Zr. A comparison of leaching rates is made between crushed SYNROC, cored SYNROC, and PNL 76-68 glass beads. This comparison depends on how the surface areas are determined for each sample. Based on geometric surface areas for SYNROC cores and glass beads Cs leach rates from SYNROC compare well with both Na and Np leached from the glass. The other elements leached from SYNROC are lower than Na and Np leached from glass. They also vary for each element while glass shows nearly the same leach rate for both Na and Np

  13. Illuminating Hot Jupiters in caustic crossing

    CERN Document Server

    Sajadian, Sedighe

    2010-01-01

    In recent years a large number of Hot Jupiters orbiting in a very close orbit around the parent stars have been explored with the transit and doppler effect methods. Here in this work we study the gravitational microlensing effect of a binary lens on a parent star with a Hot Jupiter revolving around it. Caustic crossing of the planet makes enhancements on the light curve of the parent star in which the signature of the planet can be detected by high precision photometric observations. We use the inverse ray shooting method with tree code algorithm to generate the combined light curve of the parent star and the planet. In order to investigate the probability of observing the planet signal, we do a Monte-Carlo simulation and obtain the observational optical depth of $\\tau \\sim 10^{-8}$. We show that about ten years observations of Galactic Bulge with a network of telescopes will enable us detecting about ten Hot Jupiter with this method. Finally we show that the observation of the microlensing event in infra-re...

  14. Kinetic process of oxidative leaching of chalcopyrite under low oxygen pressure and low temperature

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    QIU Ting-sheng; NIE Guang-hua; WANG Jun-feng; CUI Li-feng

    2007-01-01

    Kinetic process of oxidative leaching of chalcopyrite in chloride acid hydroxide medium under oxygen pressure and low temperature was investigated. The effect on leaching rate of chalcopyrite caused by these factors such as ore granularity, vitriol concentration, sodium chloride concentration, oxygen pressure and temperature was discussed. The results show that the leaching rate of chalcopyrite increases with decreasing the ore granularity. At the early stage of oxidative reaction, the copper leaching rate increases with increasing the oxygen pressure and dosage of vitriol concentration, while oxygen pressure affects leaching less at the later stage. At low temperature, the earlier oxidative leaching process of chalcopyrite is controlled by chemical reactions while the later one by diffusion. The chalcopyrite oxidative leaching rate has close relation with ion concentration in the leaching solution. The higher ion concentration is propitious for chalcopyrite leaching.

  15. Leaching and recycling of zinc from liquid waste sediments

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    PENG Bing; GAO Hui-mei; CHAI Li-yuan; SHU Yu-de

    2008-01-01

    The selective leaching and recovery of zinc in a zinciferous sediment from a synthetic wastewater treatment was investigated. The main composition of the sediment includes 6% zinc and other metal elements such as Ca, Fe, Cu, Mg. The effects of sulfuric acid concentration, temperature, leaching time and the liquid-to-solid ratio on the leaching rate of zinc were studied by single factor and orthogonal experiments. The maximum difference of leaching rate between zinc and iron, 89.85%, was obtained by leaching under 170 g/L H2SO4 in liquid-to-solid ratio 4.2 mL/g at 65 "C for 1 h, and the leaching rates of zinc and iron were 91.20% and 1.35%, respectively.

  16. CODCr leaching rules of municipal solid waste in Songtao Reservoir,Hainan Province,China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈大勇; 王里奥

    2009-01-01

    By the means of static leaching experiment and dynamic leaching experiment,CODCr leaching rules of dumped MSW(Municipal Solid Waste) in Songtao Reservoir,Hainan Province,China,were studied. And according to academic experience and fitted results of experiment data,the models of CODCr leaching rules in the leaching condition were deduced. The static leaching experiment indicates that,both in water-changing section and no-water-changing section,the ratio of liquid to solid has a remarkable influence on CODCr leaching concentration. The exponential model could be established to approximately describe CODCr leaching rules and the curve fits well. The dynamic leaching experiment indicates that,leaching rules of MSW can be approximately described by power model,which can well fit the leaching experiment data. By the contrast of the static leaching experiment and dynamic leaching experiment,the differences of CODCr leaching rules between the two experiments are significant. By the exponential model,the average static leaching rate of CODCr is calculated as 882.24 mg/(kg·d) for water-changing section and 320.39 mg/(kg·d) for no-water-changing section; by the power model,the average dynamic leaching rate of CODCr is 208.77 mg/(kg·d).

  17. Effect of asphericity in caustic mass estimates of galaxy clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Svensmark, Jacob; Hansen, Steen H

    2014-01-01

    The caustic technique of mass estimation of galaxy clusters relies on the assumption of spherical symmetry, which is not always a valid assumption. Here we demonstrate the effect of spatial anisotropy of galaxy clusters on the inferred caustic mass profiles by considering particle data from dark matter N-body simulations. We find a factor of ~3 discrepancy between major and minor axis mass estimates in ellipsoidal clusters within the virial radius Rv, and up to ~5 within 3 Rv. We also find filaments to influence caustic mass estimates at a comparable magnitude. By stacking halos to align their principal axes we find that a line of sight along the major axis overestimates the caustic mass of galaxy clusters, as well as a line of sight along the minor axis underestimates it. The mass discrepancy between the major and minor axis is a factor of 2.47, 2.97 and 3.95 at 1, 2 and 3 Rv for virial masses Mv = [1,2] x 10^{14} Msun/h, and $(30-35)\\%$ larger for Mv > 2 x 10^{14} Msun/h. Furthermore, the caustic mass is ov...

  18. Caustic Structures and Detectability of Circumbinary Planets in Microlensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luhn, Jacob K.; Penny, Matthew T.; Gaudi, B. Scott

    2016-08-01

    Recent discoveries of circumbinary planets in Kepler data show that there is a viable channel of planet formation around binary main-sequence stars. Motivated by these discoveries, we have investigated the caustic structures and detectability of circumbinary planets in microlensing events. We have produced a suite of animations of caustics as a function of the projected separation and angle of the binary host to efficiently explore caustic structures over the entire circumbinary parameter space. Aided by these animations, we have derived a semi-empirical analytic expression for the location of planetary caustics, which are displaced in circumbinary lenses relative to those of planets with a single host. We have used this expression to show that the dominant source of caustic motion will be due to the planet’s orbital motion and not that of the binary star. Finally, we estimate the fraction of circumbinary microlensing events that are recognizable as such to be significant (5%–50%) for binary projected separations in the range 0.1–0.5 in units of Einstein radii.

  19. Bicarbonate leaching of uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The alkaline leach process for extracting uranium from uranium ores is reviewed. This process is dependent on the chemistry of uranium and so is independent on the type of mining system (conventional, heap or in-situ) used. Particular reference is made to the geochemical conditions at Crownpoint. Some supporting data from studies using alkaline leach for remediation of uranium-contaminated sites is presented

  20. Leaching from irradiated nuclear fuel by direct disposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To evaluate the radiological hazards of storing irradiated fuel in geological formations the literature of leaching irradiated LWR fuel in water has been studied. There seems to have been made very few relevant experimental studies. Leach tests are being performed at Batelle-Northwest, Richland, US and some of the results have been published. These results and conclusions are summarized and discussed. The relative leachability of the elements decrease in the order of Cs gt Sb gt Sr + Y gt Pu gt Cm. The cesium based periodic leach rate for irradiated fuel fragments are similar to the based leach rate for borosilicate glass containing radioactive waste. (author)

  1. Uranium leaching by fungal metabolite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To explore new means of bioleaching, one strain of high-yielding fungi-Aspergillus niger which could produce organic acids was separated and purified from soil samples of uranium mine. The influence of cultural temperature, initial pH value, inoculum sizes on its growth characteristics were carried out. And the tests of uranium leaching of metabolin of Aspergillus niger were operated. On these tests, the effects of metabolin of Aspergillus niger with different pH value produced in the diverse culture temperature on uranium leaching were investigated. The results show that this strain of Aspergillus niger can grow best under the following conditions: the temperature is 37℃, the initial pH value is 7.0, the inoculum sizes is 2% (the OD value of the spores solution is 0.06). The uranium extraction effects relative to the final pH value of the cultures. and the maximum leaching rates is 83.05% when the pH value is 2.3. (authors)

  2. Leaching models of simulated and real paraffin wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Several leaching models were developed in order to analyze the results of leaching test for simulated and real paraffin wastes. In case of simulated paraffin wastes, the experimental results could be satisfactorily explained by shrinking core model (SCM) based on diffusion-controlled dissolution reaction. Real paraffin wastes generated from domestic nuclear power plants showed the leaching behaviors of asymmetric breakthrough curves (BTCs) which were characterized by initial very high leaching rates and subsequent very low leaching rates. For the analysis of real paraffin wastes, empirical model (EM), bulk diffusion model (BDM), modified shrinking core model (MSCM), and uniform reaction model (URM) were suggested and compared with one another. If real paraffin wastes could be more uniformly manufactured, their leaching behaviors would be expected to be similar to those of simulated paraffin wastes

  3. 18种袋泡茶型保健食品铅浸出率和人群摄入量研究%Study on leaching rate and intake on lead in 18 kinds of teabag-healthy foods

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孙鑫贵; 沙博郁; 王正; 沙怡梅; 罗仁才

    2013-01-01

    目的 了解袋泡茶型保健食品铅的浸出率和人群摄入量,为进一步评估其安全性提供基础数据.方法 从北京市商场、超市、药店购买18种袋泡茶型保健食品,按照GB5009.12-2010检测样品和浸提液中铅含量.用产品中铅含量与产品标识的食用量和铅的浸出率相乘计算铅的摄入量.采用联合国粮农组织和世界卫生组织食品添加剂联合专家委员会推荐的暂定每周耐受摄入量(PTWI)值评价铅摄入的安全性.结果 袋泡茶型保健食品浸泡后铅的浸出量为0.0036~0.5400 mg/kg,平均浸出率为5.49%.人群铅的摄入量为0.018~4.324μg,占暂定每周耐受摄入量(PTWI)的最高比例为2.0%,平均仅为0.8%.结论 18种袋泡茶型保健食品铅的摄入量是安全的,但个别产品较高的铅含量应引起监管部门关注.%OBJECTIVE To investigate leaching rate of lead from teabag-healthy foods and the intake amount of lead of per person from it and to provide scientific data used to further evaluate the safety of lead level in it. METHODS 18 products were purchased from markets in Beijing. The contents of lead both in samples and leaching liquid were determined according to the standard method of GB5008.12-2010. The intake level of lead was obtained by timing the lead content, leaching rate of lead in teabag-healthy foods and labeling dosage. The intake safety of lead was assessed by Provisional Tolerable Weekly Intake (PTWI) recommended by JECFA of WHO/FAO. RESULTS The content of lead leached from products was from 0.003 6 mg/kg to 0.540 0 mgAg, with the average leaching rate was 5.49%. The intake level of lead from teabag-healthy foods was 0.018-4.324μg. The average ratio of intake level of lead in PTWI was only 0.8%, while the maximum was 2.0%. CONCLUSION The intake of lead in 18 kinds of teabag-health foods is safe, but the higher lead content in individual products should be concerned by food hygiene supervision departments.

  4. Caustics and Rogue Waves in an Optical Sea

    CERN Document Server

    Mathis, Amaury; Toenger, Shanti; Dias, Frederic; Genty, Goery; Dudley, John M

    2015-01-01

    There are many examples in physics of systems showing rogue wave behaviour, the generation of high amplitude events at low probability. Although initially studied in oceanography, rogue waves have now been seen in many other domains, with particular recent interest in optics. Although most studies in optics have focussed on how nonlinearity can drive rogue wave emergence, purely linear effects have also been shown to induce extreme wave amplitudes. In this paper, we report a detailed experimental study of linear rogue waves in an optical system, using a spatial light modulator to impose random phase structure on a coherent optical field. After free space propagation, different random intensity patterns are generated, including partially-developed speckle, a broadband caustic network, and an intermediate pattern with characteristics of both speckle and caustic structures. Intensity peaks satisfying statistical criteria for rogue waves are seen especially in the case of the caustic network, and are associated w...

  5. Primary caustics and critical points behind a Kerr black hole

    CERN Document Server

    Sereno, M

    2007-01-01

    The primary optical caustic surface behind a Kerr black hole is a four-cusped tube displaced from the line of sight. We compute that in the near asymptotic region through a Taylor expansion of the lightlike geodesics up to and including fourth-order terms in m/b and a/b, where m is the black hole mass, a the spin and b the impact parameter. The corresponding critical locus is elliptical and a point-like source inside the caustics will be imaged as an Einstein cross. With regard to lensing near critical points, a Kerr lens is analogous to a circular lens perturbed by a dipole and a quadrupole potential. The caustic structure of the supermassive black hole in the Galactic center could be probed by lensing of low mass X-ray binaries in the Galactic inner regions or by hot spots in the accretion disk.

  6. Caustics of exotic ($1/r^n$) binary gravitational lenses

    CERN Document Server

    Bozza, V

    2015-01-01

    With some violation of the energy conditions, it is possible to combine scalar fields or other types of matter so as to build metrics that fall as $1/r^n$ asymptotically, one famous example being the Ellis wormhole. Gravitational lensing provides a natural arena to distinguish and identify such exotic objects in our Universe. In fact, these metrics predict the possibility to defocus light, which is impossible with ordinary matter. In this paper we continue the investigation of gravitational lensing in this new realm by providing a thorough study of critical curves and caustics produced by binary exotic lenses. We find that there are still three topologies as in the standard binary lens, with the main novelty coming from the secondary caustics of the close topology, which become huge at higher $n$. After drawing caustics by numerical methods, we derive a large amount of analytical formulae in all limits that are useful to provide deeper insight in the mathematics of the problem.

  7. Physics of Caustics and Protein Folding: Mathematical Parallels

    CERN Document Server

    Simmons, Walter

    2011-01-01

    The energy for protein folding arises from multiple sources and is not large in total. In spite of the many specific successes of energy landscape and other approaches, there still seems to be some missing guiding factor that explains how energy from diverse small sources can drive a complex molecule to a unique state. We explore the possibility that the missing factor is in the geometry. A comparison of folding with other physical phenomena, together with analytic modeling of a molecule, led us to analyze the physics of optical caustic formation and of folding behavior side-by-side. The physics of folding and caustics is ostensibly very different but there are several strong parallels. This comparison emphasizes the mathematical similarity and also identifies differences. Since the 1970's, the physics of optical caustics has been developed to a very high degree of mathematical sophistication using catastrophe theory. That kind of quantitative application of catastrophe theory has not previously been applied ...

  8. Main ways and suitable technologies of improving economic benefits for uranium ore heap leaching in China (to be continued)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Combining with practice of China's uranium ore heap leaching, the author proposes main ways and suitable technologies in the fields of emphasizing feasibility research, adopting strengthened technologies, improving equipment level, optimizing control technological factors and developing application range and so on, which include adopting acid-curry and ferric sulphate-trickle leaching process, bacteria heap leaching, countercurrent heap leaching, selecting advanced material of heap bottom, developing large mechanized heap construction equipment and methods, popularizing drip irrigation distributing solution, optimizing heap leaching process parameters, as well as developing recovery equipment suited to heap leaching, etc, in order to increase leaching rate, reduce heap leaching period and achieve more economic benefits

  9. Optimization of the factors that accelerate leaching

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The prediction of long-term leachability of low-level radioactive waste forms is an essential element of disposal-site performance assessment. This report describes experiments and modeling techniques used to develop an accelerated leach test that meets this need. The acceleration in leaching rates caused by the combinations of two or more factors were experimentally determined. These factors were identified earlier as being able to individually accelerate leaching. They are: elevated temperature, the size of the waste form, the ratio of the volume of leachant to the surface area of the waste form, and the frequency of replacement of the leachant. The solidification agents employed were ones that are currently used to treat low-level radioactive wastes, namely portland type I cement, bitumen, and vinyl ester-styrene. The simulated wastes, sodium sulfate, sodium tetraborate, and incinerator ash, are simplified representatives of typical low-level waste streams. Experiments determined the leaching behavior of the radionuclides of cesium (Cs-137), strontium (Sr-85), and cobalt (Co-60 or Co-57) from several different formulations of solidification agents and waste types. Leaching results were based upon radiochemical and elemental analyses of aliquots of the leachate, and on its total alkalinity and pH at various times during the experiment (up to 120 days). Solid phase analyses were carried out by Scanning/Electron Microscopy and Energy Dispersive Spectroscopy on the waste forms before and after some leaching experiments. 43 refs., 96 figs., 16 tabs

  10. Wavefield extrapolation in caustic-free normal ray coordinates

    KAUST Repository

    Ma, Xuxin

    2012-11-04

    Normal ray coordinates are conventionally constructed from ray tracing, which inherently requires smooth velocity profiles. To use rays as coordinates, the velocities have to be smoothed further to avoid caustics, which is detrimental to the mapping process. Solving the eikonal equation numerically for a line source at the surface provides a platform to map normal rays in complex unsmoothed velocity models and avoid caustics. We implement reverse-time migration (RTM) and downward continuation in the new ray coordinate system, which allows us to obtain efficient images and avoid some of the dip limitations of downward continuation.

  11. A systematic fitting scheme for caustic-crossing microlensing events

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kains ...[et al], N.; Jørgensen, Uffe Gråe

    2009-01-01

    We outline a method for fitting binary-lens caustic-crossing microlensing events based on the alternative model parametrization proposed and detailed by Cassan. As an illustration of our methodology, we present an analysis of OGLE-2007-BLG-472, a double-peaked Galactic microlensing event with a...... source crossing the whole caustic structure in less than three days. In order to identify all possible models we conduct an extensive search of the parameter space, followed by a refinement of the parameters with a Markov Chain Monte Carlo algorithm. We find a number of low-chi(2) regions in the...

  12. 21 CFR 2.110 - Definition of ammonia under Federal Caustic Poison Act.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Definition of ammonia under Federal Caustic Poison... SERVICES GENERAL GENERAL ADMINISTRATIVE RULINGS AND DECISIONS Caustic Poisons § 2.110 Definition of ammonia under Federal Caustic Poison Act. For the purpose of determining whether an article containing...

  13. Caustic cracking of 2 1/4 CrMo steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stress corrosion cracking tests performed on the 21/4 Cr Mo ferritic steel are described. The principal environments studied were strong, aqueous caustic soda, molten anhydrous caustic soda, and caustic soda with an addition of sodium. Emphasis has been placed on material in the quenched-hardened condition. (author)

  14. Electrochemical generation of Fenton's reagent to treat spent caustic wastewater

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hansen, H. K.; Nunez, P.; Rodriguez, N.; Guzman, J.

    2009-07-01

    An important wastewater stream from oil refineries is the spent caustic. Caustic solutions are used as scrubbing agent during the desulphurization process to eliminate sulphur an mercaptans from oil and gasses. Spent caustic is classified as DOO3 (reactive sulphide) hazardous waste under the US Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). (Author)

  15. Development of improved leaching techniques for vitrified radioactive waste products

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A critical review of the current techniques for evaluating the leach resistance of vitrified radioactive wastes has been made. Inadequacy of the available leaching techniques, with respect to their adoption as standard technique on an international scale, has been brought out for the three broad catagories of aqueous attack viz., (i) simple contact with leachant at a particular temperature, (ii) once-through or recirculatory flow of leachant at variable temperatures and flow rates, and (iii) contact with freshly distilled hot water in soxhelet type of extractor. In an effort to evolve a standard leaching technique in the latter two categories of aqueous attack, development of two leaching units viz., 'Dynamic Leaching Unit' and 'Modified Soxhlet Unit' is described. Both these units offer good control and wide flexibility on the important parameters affecting leaching such as leachant temperature, flow rate of residence time of leachant and ratio of leachant volume to sample surface area. The dynamic leaching units also offers a good control and flexibility on the two additional parameters viz., the composition and pH of the leachant. In the modified soxhlet unit the composition and pH of the leachant remains near to that of distilled water. The leach rate results have been found to be reproducible. A need for framing the set of standard conditions for adoption of these units in evolution of standard leaching techniques has been indicated. (auth.)

  16. Characterization of irregular seeds on gibbsites precipitated from caustic aluminate solutions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Guo-hui; CHEN Qi-yuan; YIN Zhou-lan; YIN Zhi-min

    2006-01-01

    The irregular surface of seeds on which gibbsites are precipitated from caustic aluminate solutions, was investigated according to the fractal theory. Two kinds of fractal dimensions were used to characterize these irregularity. Box-dimension and spectral dimension are based on the SEM images of seeds and diffusive dynamic equation ofthe precipitation respectively. Both these two dimensions are affected by the reaction temperature, evolved with different reaction conditions and can reflect the influence of irregularity of seeds on the precipitation rate. Box dimension is fit for the characterization of the irregular morphology of seeds, while spectral dimension can explain the fractal dynamic behavior.

  17. Stress-corrosion-cracking testing of INCONEL alloys 600 and 690 In high-temperature caustic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study determined the effects of composition, heat treatment, and microstructure on the resistance of INCONEL alloy 690 to stress-corrosion cracking in caustic. The results were compared with the effects of the same factors on INCONEL alloy 600. Both alloys were evaluated in the annealed condition and after a post-anneal exposure to 7040C (13000F) for 15 hours. Resistance to SCC was determined by constant-extension-rate tests (CERT) in deaerated 10% sodium hydroxide at 288 to 3160C (550 to 6000F)

  18. Leaching study of nuclear melt glass: Part I

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ground samples of three nuclear melt glasses from underground nuclear explosions at the Nevada Test Site (NTS) were leached at 250C with natural ground water from NTS. Using our dynamic single-pass flow-through leaching system we monitored the release of radionuclides from the glasses during 420 days of leaching. We continually flowed the ground water over the melt glass at flow rates of 185 ml/day for half of the samples and 34 ml/day for the rest. Leachate solutions were collected continuously, and composite samples, collected on days 1, 2, 3, 6, 11, 32, 38, 70, 120, 230 and 420, were analyzed using low-background Ge(Li) gamma spectrometers. For most of the radionuclides the leach rate decreased smoothly throughout the experiment. Except for 95Zr, 144Ce, and 155Eu, there was no difference between the fast (185 ml/day) and slow (34 ml/day) flow-rate leach rates. The measurable leach rates ranged from a high of 1 x 10-2 g-glass/m2 day for 22Na (slow flow-rate, day 1 in glass No. 2) to a low of 1 x 6-6 g-glass/m2 day for 54Mn (slow flow-rate, day 420 in glass No. 2). Most of the leach-rate values were about 5 x 10-4 g-glass/m2 day initially, decreasing to 5 x 10-6 g-glass/m2 day after 420 days of leaching. The leach rates had not leveled off by the end of the experiment and were, in general, continuing to decrease. From the activities in the leachate solutions, we determined the percent of the pre-leach activity leached from the melt glasses during the experiment. Only 124Sb, in one fast flow-rate channel of glass No. 2, exceeded 3% of the initial activity leached. The majority of the samples released less than 1% of the pre-leach activity for a given radionuclide. The percent activity released from the samples leached at the fast and slow flow rates were nearly equal

  19. Leaching of DOC, DN, and inorganic constituents from scrap tires.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selbes, Meric; Yilmaz, Ozge; Khan, Abdul A; Karanfil, Tanju

    2015-11-01

    One concern for recycle and reuse of scrap tires is the leaching of tire constituents (organic and inorganic) with time, and their subsequent potential harmful impacts in environment. The main objective of this study was to examine the leaching of dissolved organic carbon (DOC), dissolved nitrogen (DN), and selected inorganic constituents from scrap tires. Different sizes of tire chips and crumb rubber were exposed to leaching solutions with pH's ranging from 3.0 to 10.0 for 28days. The leaching of DOC and DN were found to be higher for smaller size tire chips; however, the leaching of inorganic constituents was independent of the size. In general, basic pH conditions increased the leaching of DOC and DN, whereas acidic pH conditions led to elevated concentrations of metals. Leaching was minimal around the neutral pH values for all the monitored parameters. Analysis of the leaching rates showed that components associated with the rubbery portion of the tires (DOC, DN, zinc, calcium, magnesium, etc.) exhibited an initial rapid followed by a slow release. On the other hand, a constant rate of leaching was observed for iron and manganese, which are attributed to the metal wires present inside the tires. Although the total amounts that leached varied, the observed leaching rates were similar for all tire chip sizes and leaching solutions. Operation under neutral pH conditions, use of larger size tire chips, prewashing of tires, and removal of metal wires prior to application will reduce the impact of tire recycle and reuse. PMID:25712610

  20. Uranium in situ leaching

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Despite the depressed situation that has affected the uranium industry during the past years, the second Technical Committee Meeting on Uranium In Situ Leaching, organized by the International Atomic Energy Agency and held in Vienna from 5 to 8 October 1992, has attracted a relatively large number of participants. A notable development since the first meeting was that the majority of the contributions came from the actual operators of in situ leaching uranium production. At the present meeting, presentations on operations in the USA were balanced by those of the eastern European and Asian countries. Contributions from Bulgaria, China, Czechoslovakia, Germany (from the operation in the former German Democratic Republic), the Russian Federation and Uzbekistan represent new information not commonly available. In situ leach mining is defined in one of the paper presented as a ''mining method where the ore mineral is preferentially leached from the host rock in place, or in situ, by the use of leach solutions, and the mineral value is recovered. Refs, figs and tabs

  1. Selective oxidation of uranium in situ leaching

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper reports on O2, NcC103, H2O2, NaOCl and Ce+4 which have been examined as oxidants in an alkaline carbonate system for uranium in in-situ leaching. The South Texas and New Mexico ores contained up to 2.6 meq/g of reducing compounds which consume oxidants in the leading operation. Leaching rates did not increase linearly with the oxidation potential of the oxidants. A mild oxidant can be used to maximize uranium oxidation selectively and oxidant efficiency. O2 can oxidize most of the uranium mineral with an adequate rate and high oxidant efficiency

  2. Kinetic model for simultaneous leaching of zinc sulfide and manganese dioxide in the presence of iron-oxidizing bacteria

    OpenAIRE

    KAI, Takami; Suenaga, Yo-ich; Migita, Atsuko; TAKAHASHI, Takeshige

    2000-01-01

    The effect of iron-oxidizing bacteria on the simultaneous leaching of zinc sulfide and manganese dioxide was studied. Some researchers have reported the enhancement of the leaching rate during the simultaneous leaching of metal oxides and metal sulfides. In the present study, we examined the effect of the presence of Thiobacillus ferrooxidans in the simultaneous leaching. We also examined the reaction rates during the simultaneous leaching in the presence of the bacteria in order to study the...

  3. Investigation of the use of ammonium acetate as an alternative lixiviant in the leaching of malachite ore

    OpenAIRE

    Künkül Asım; Gülezgin Abdulvahap; Demirkiran Nizamettin

    2013-01-01

    The solutions containing ammonia allow for selective leaching of the copper from a copper ore. In this study, the leaching and kinetics of malachite ore were examined using ammonium acetate solutions as an alternative lixiviant. The effects of some experimental parameters on the leaching of malachite ore were investigated. A kinetic model to represent the effects of these parameters on the leaching rate was developed. It was determined that the leaching rate increased with increasing so...

  4. Measurement of leached hulls

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leached hulls are the short lengths of fuel rod cladding and fuel element hardware which constitute a major waste product of a reprocessing plant employing a chop-and-leach head-end process. The small, undissolved fuel residue (0.1 to 1.0% of original fuel content) which is discarded with this waste must be measured for safeguards, material accountability, and process control reasons. This report gives a critical analysis of hull measurement techniques involving the analysis of fission product gamma rays, spontaneous fission neutrons from curium, and delayed neutron activation. Major emphasis is given to the measurement of 2186-keV gamma rays from 144Ce--144Pr. A detailed description of typical leached hull characteristics is presented at the beginning of the report. An extensive review of experience gained from existing hull measurement systems in the United Kingdom, France, Japan, Germany, Italy, and the United States is presented

  5. Life cycle assessment and residue leaching: The importance of parameter, scenario and leaching data selection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allegrini, E., E-mail: elia@env.dtu.dk [Technical University of Denmark, Department of Environmental Engineering, Building 115, 2800 Lyngby (Denmark); Butera, S. [Technical University of Denmark, Department of Environmental Engineering, Building 115, 2800 Lyngby (Denmark); Kosson, D.S. [Vanderbilt University, Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Box 1831 Station B, Nashville, TN 37235 (United States); Van Zomeren, A. [Energy Research Centre of the Netherlands (ECN), Department of Environmental Risk Assessment, P.O. Box 1, 1755 ZG Petten (Netherlands); Van der Sloot, H.A. [Hans van der Sloot Consultancy, Dorpsstraat 216, 1721 BV Langedijk (Netherlands); Astrup, T.F. [Technical University of Denmark, Department of Environmental Engineering, Building 115, 2800 Lyngby (Denmark)

    2015-04-15

    Highlights: • Relevance of metal leaching in waste management system LCAs was assessed. • Toxic impacts from leaching could not be disregarded. • Uncertainty of toxicity, due to background activities, determines LCA outcomes. • Parameters such as pH and L/S affect LCA results. • Data modelling consistency and coverage within an LCA are crucial. - Abstract: Residues from industrial processes and waste management systems (WMSs) have been increasingly reutilised, leading to landfilling rate reductions and the optimisation of mineral resource utilisation in society. Life cycle assessment (LCA) is a holistic methodology allowing for the analysis of systems and products and can be applied to waste management systems to identify environmental benefits and critical aspects thereof. From an LCA perspective, residue utilisation provides benefits such as avoiding the production and depletion of primary materials, but it can lead to environmental burdens, due to the potential leaching of toxic substances. In waste LCA studies where residue utilisation is included, leaching has generally been neglected. In this study, municipal solid waste incineration bottom ash (MSWI BA) was used as a case study into three LCA scenarios having different system boundaries. The importance of data quality and parameter selection in the overall LCA results was evaluated, and an innovative method to assess metal transport into the environment was applied, in order to determine emissions to the soil and water compartments for use in an LCA. It was found that toxic impacts as a result of leaching were dominant in systems including only MSWI BA utilisation, while leaching appeared negligible in larger scenarios including the entire waste system. However, leaching could not be disregarded a priori, due to large uncertainties characterising other activities in the scenario (e.g. electricity production). Based on the analysis of relevant parameters relative to leaching, and on general results

  6. Life cycle assessment and residue leaching: The importance of parameter, scenario and leaching data selection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Relevance of metal leaching in waste management system LCAs was assessed. • Toxic impacts from leaching could not be disregarded. • Uncertainty of toxicity, due to background activities, determines LCA outcomes. • Parameters such as pH and L/S affect LCA results. • Data modelling consistency and coverage within an LCA are crucial. - Abstract: Residues from industrial processes and waste management systems (WMSs) have been increasingly reutilised, leading to landfilling rate reductions and the optimisation of mineral resource utilisation in society. Life cycle assessment (LCA) is a holistic methodology allowing for the analysis of systems and products and can be applied to waste management systems to identify environmental benefits and critical aspects thereof. From an LCA perspective, residue utilisation provides benefits such as avoiding the production and depletion of primary materials, but it can lead to environmental burdens, due to the potential leaching of toxic substances. In waste LCA studies where residue utilisation is included, leaching has generally been neglected. In this study, municipal solid waste incineration bottom ash (MSWI BA) was used as a case study into three LCA scenarios having different system boundaries. The importance of data quality and parameter selection in the overall LCA results was evaluated, and an innovative method to assess metal transport into the environment was applied, in order to determine emissions to the soil and water compartments for use in an LCA. It was found that toxic impacts as a result of leaching were dominant in systems including only MSWI BA utilisation, while leaching appeared negligible in larger scenarios including the entire waste system. However, leaching could not be disregarded a priori, due to large uncertainties characterising other activities in the scenario (e.g. electricity production). Based on the analysis of relevant parameters relative to leaching, and on general results

  7. Laser Beam Caustic Measurement with Focal Spot Analyser

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Flemming Ove; Gong, Hui; Bagger, Claus

    2005-01-01

    In industrial applications of high power CO2-lasers the caustic characteristics of the laser beam have great effects on the performance of the lasers. A welldefined high intense focused spot is essential for reliable production results. This paper presents a focal spot analyser that is developed...

  8. Test Procedure - pumping system for caustic addition project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This test procedure provides the requirements for sub-system testing and integrated operational testing of the submersible mixer pump and caustic addition equipment by WHC and Kaiser personnel at the Rotating Equipment Shop run-in pit (Bldg. 272E)

  9. Selective Leaching of Chromium from Hanford Tank Sludge 241-U-108

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rapko, Brian M.; Vienna, John D.

    2002-09-09

    This study evaluated the oxidants permanganate, MnO4-, and peroxynitrite, ONOO-, as selective chromium-leaching agents from washed 241-U-108 tank sludge under varying conditions of hydroxide concentration, temperature, and time. The mass changes and final sludge compositions were evaluated using glass-property models to ascertain the relative impacts of the various oxidative alkaline leach conditions on the amount of borosilicate glass required to immobilize a given amount of washed 241-U-108 Hanford tank sludge. Only permanganate leaching removes sufficient chromium to make the chromium concentration in the oxidatively alkaline leached solids non-limiting. In the absence of added oxidants, continued washing or caustic leaching have no beneficial effects. Peroxynitrite addition reduces the amount of glass required to immobilize a given amount of washed 241-U-108 tank sludge by approximately a factor of two. Depending on the leach conditions and the exact chromium concentration limits, contact with alkaline permanganate solutions reduces the amount of immobilized high-level waste glass by a factor of 10 to 30.

  10. Characterization and Leach Testing for PUREX Cladding Waste Sludge (Group 3) and REDOX Cladding Waste Sludge (Group 4) Actual Waste Sample Composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Snow, Lanee A.; Buck, Edgar C.; Casella, Amanda J.; Crum, Jarrod V.; Daniel, Richard C.; Draper, Kathryn E.; Edwards, Matthew K.; Fiskum, Sandra K.; Jagoda, Lynette K.; Jenson, Evan D.; Kozelisky, Anne E.; MacFarlan, Paul J.; Peterson, Reid A.; Swoboda, Robert G.

    2009-02-13

    A testing program evaluating actual tank waste was developed in response to Task 4 from the M-12 External Flowsheet Review Team (EFRT) issue response plan.(a) The testing program was subdivided into logical increments. The bulk water-insoluble solid wastes that are anticipated to be delivered to the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) were identified according to type such that the actual waste testing could be targeted to the relevant categories. Eight broad waste groupings were defined. Samples available from the 222S archive were identified and obtained for testing. The actual wastetesting program included homogenizing the samples by group, characterizing the solids and aqueous phases, and performing parametric leaching tests. Two of the eight defined groups—plutonium-uranium extraction (PUREX) cladding waste sludge (Group 3, or CWP) and reduction-oxidation (REDOX) cladding waste sludge (Group 4, or CWR)—are the subjects of this report. Both the Group 3 and 4 waste composites were anticipated to be high in gibbsite, requiring caustic leaching. Characterization of the composite Group 3 and Group 4 waste samples confirmed them to be high in gibbsite. The focus of the Group 3 and 4 testing was on determining the behavior of gibbsite during caustic leaching. The waste-type definition, archived sample conditions, homogenization activities, characterization (physical, chemical, radioisotope, and crystal habit), and caustic leaching behavior as functions of time, temperature, and hydroxide concentration are discussed in this report. Testing was conducted according to TP-RPP-WTP-467.

  11. Leaching technology of uranium in some ore containing several kinds of metallic mineral

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The mineral components and chemical components of the metal mine containing uranium and other kinds of metallic elements are complicated with mineralogy research. The main zinc mineral is Calamine. The main lead mineral is cesarolite. The main manganese minerals are cesarolite and heterolite. The main iron minerals are limonite and hematite. And the main uranium mineral is PbUO4. The leaching technology tests of uranium of the ore are taken. Research shows that the leaching rate of uranium up to 90% with acidic agitation leaching, while it only about 10% with alkaline agitation leaching. And the leaching rate of uranium up to 91.5%, with acidic column leaching to the -5 mm ore sample. While the leaching rate up to 88.4% with the -10 mm ore sample. Therefore, uranium can be used with acid heap leaching technology in the mine. (authors)

  12. Mechanistic Understanding Of Caustic Cracking Of Carbon Steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    . Analysis of the CPP data was performed to compare the corrosion susceptibility of the samples under different environmental conditions. Test results indicated that the most important factors affecting corrosion of the steel are the solution temperature, hydroxide concentration, and the material used in constructing the tanks. Variables that did not significantly affect the corrosion susceptibility of the steel were the nitrate or nitrite concentration and the atmosphere in the tank. The passivation current of the coupons increased exponentially with temperature. Longer-term studies of the passivation current are suggested based on results from the literature for iron in highly caustic environments. Polarization resistance studies showed a significant increase in corrosion rate at 125 C and 12 M hydroxide concentration when compared with tests at lower temperatures and lower hydroxide concentrations. Within the temperature and pH range of these tests, iron oxide, Fe3O4, becomes unstable and could account for the increased corrosion susceptibility. The applicability of these conditions should be confirmed and detailed surface studies should be conducted to determine the corrosion resistance of A285 and A516 carbon steels under these conditions. Surface science studies should also be conducted to determine the role of the carbon steel composition in preventing corrosion under these conditions

  13. Sodium sulfide leaching of low-grade jamesonite concentrate in production of sodium pyroantimoniate

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Tian-zu; JIANG Ming-xi; LAI Qiong-lin; CHEN Jin-zhong

    2005-01-01

    Sodium sulfide leaching of a low-grade jamesonite concentrate in the production of sodium pyroantimoniate through the air oxidation process and the influencing factors on the leaching rate of antimony were investigated.In order to decrease the consumption of sodium sulfide and increase the concentration of antimony in the leaching solution, two-stage leaching of jamesonite concentrate and combination leaching of high-grade stibnite concentrate and jamesonite concentrate were used. The experimental results showthat the consumptions of sodium sulfide for the two-stage leaching process and the combination leaching process are decreased by 20% and 60% compared to those of one-stage leaching process respectively. The final concentrations of antimony in the leaching solutions of both processes are above 100 g/L.

  14. Leaching of used CANDU fuel: Results from a 19-year leach test under oxidizing conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A fuel leaching experiment has been in progress since 1977 to study the dissolution behavior of used CANDU fuel in aerated aqueous solution. The experiment involves exposure of 50-mm clad segments of an outer element of a Pickering fuel bundle (burnup 610 GJ/kg U; linear and peak power ratings 53 and 58 kW/m, respectively), to deionized distilled water (DDH2O, ∼2 mg/L carbonate) and tapwater (∼50 mg/L carbonate). In 1992, it was observed that the fuel in at least one of the leaching solutions showed some signs of deterioration and, therefore, in 1993, parts of the fuel samples were sacrificed for a detailed analysis of the physical state of the fuel, using SEM and optical microscopy. Leaching results to date show that even after >6900 days only 5 to 7.7% of the total calculated inventory of 137Cs has leached out preferentially and that leach rates suggest a development towards congruent dissolution. Total amounts of 137Cs and 90Sr leached are slightly larger in tapwater than in DDH2O. SEM examinations of leached fuel surface fragments indicate that the fuel surface exposed to DDH2O is covered in a needle-like precipitate. The fuel surface exposed to tapwater shows evidence of leaching but no precipitate, likely because uranium is kept in solution by carbonate. Detailed optical and SEM microscopy examinations on fuel cross sections suggest that grain-boundary dissolution in DDH2O is not prevalent, and in tapwater appears to be limited to the outer ∼0.5 mm (pellet/cladding) region of the fuel. Grain boundary attack seems to be limited to microcracks at or near the surface of the fuel. It thus appears that grain-boundary attack occurs only near the fuel pellet surface and is prevalent only in the presence of carbonate in solution

  15. Caustic cracking of 9Cr 1Mo steel at 3000C

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The stress corrosion cracking of correctly heat-treated 9Cr-1Mo in caustic solutions at 3000C has been examined using a bursting tube version of the slow strain rate technique. Some susceptibility was detected at all concentrations examined, the more concentrated solutions which favoured less protective oxide formation, producing the more severe cracking. The cracking in these strong solutions proceeded at velocities up to 0.1 mm h-1 and produced wide oxide filled cracks. This cracking is not strongly dependent on potential, although more anodic potentials promote thicker oxide formation while cathodic potentials favour general dissolution. Normalized and tempered, annealed, and a simulated heat-affected zone microstructure were all equally susceptible to cracking. Some constant pressure tests were performed which suggested cracking could occur at stresses below the yield stress. In more dilute solutions susceptibility was much less, and the crack velocity was about 0.01 mm h-1, i.e. ten times slower than in 8 M NaOH. The relationship between slow strain rate tests, conventional tests and practical experience are discussed. The behaviour of 9Cr 1Mo in caustic below 2 1/2 M places it in the low susceptibility category and failures under realistic conditions are unlikely. (author)

  16. Fractionation of iron isotopes during leaching of natural particles by acidic and circumneutral leaches and development of an optimal leach for marine particulate iron isotopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Revels, Brandi N.; Zhang, Ruifeng; Adkins, Jess F.; John, Seth G.

    2015-10-01

    during leaching of silicates and clays but only minimally fractionated during dissolution of Fe oxyhydroxides. Two different analytical models were developed to explain the relationship between amount of Fe leached and δ56Fe, one of which assumes mixing between two Fe phases with different δ56Fe and different dissolution rates, and the other of which assumes dissolution of a single phase with a kinetic isotope effect. We apply both models to fit results from the acidic leaches of MESS-3 and find that the fit for both models is very similar, suggesting that isotope data will never be sufficient to distinguish between these two processes for natural materials. Next, we utilize our data to choose an optimal leach for application to marine particles. The oxalate-EDTA leach is well-suited to this purpose because it does not greatly fractionate Fe isotopes for a diversity of particle types over a wide variety of leaching conditions, and because it approximates the conditions by which particulate Fe dissolves in the oceans. We recommend a 2 h leach at 90 °C with 0.1 M oxalate and 0.05 M EDTA at pH 8 to measure labile "ligand-leachable" particulate δ56Fe on natural marine materials with a range of compositions.

  17. Experimental factors in glass leaching at high temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Three factors which may influence the outcome of high temperature tests of glass leaching rates, temperature cycling, solution replacement, and glass drying between runs, have been examined. Solution replacement and glass drying have also been investigated in room temperature tests. An easily leached glass was used throughout. Temperature cycling has a small effect which may be compensated in calculating leach rates. The effect of solution replacement depends on the rate and extent of attack. Glass drying has no effect either at high temperature or at room temperature. (author)

  18. Experimental study of in situ leaching uranium mining for low permeable sandstone uranium deposits using some surfactant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In-situ leaching mining of low-permeable sandstone uranium deposit is difficult in technology now. The application of surfactant to in-situ leaching uranium mining of low permeable sandstone uranium deposit was studied using agitation leaching and column leaching for some uranium deposit in Xinjiang, China. The leaching solutions were adopted 10 g/L H2SO4 with different concentrations of the surfactant P. The results from agitation leaching experiments show that adding surfactant P can enhance the leaching rate, and the leaching rate of uranium reaches the highest which is 92.6% at 10 mg/L surfactant P. The results of column leaching show that the hydraulic conductivity of ore was increased by 28.8%, and the leaching rate of uranium was increased by 32% which reached 85.79%, when the leaching solutions were added 10 mg/L surfactant P. The surfactant decreases the surface tension of solution, which further increases the wetting capacity of solution to ore,so the adding of surfactant P could promote the leaching of uranium and increase the leaching rate. For low permeable sandstone uranium deposit, the in-situ leaching mining may be operated through adding suitable surfactant into leaching solutions. (authors)

  19. Study on the in-situ leaching of sandstone uranium ore by Alkali reagent with dissolved oxygen under pressure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It is indicated by experiment that under dissolved oxygen, the technique of in-situ leaching uranium from sandstone with alkali method is reliable. When oxygen pressure is 10kg/cm2 (0.98MPa, dissolved oxygen concentration is about 300ppm), leaching reagent NaHCO3 concentration is 5g/L, average flow rate is 0.34m/d, leaching 16 days with total liquid/solid ratio 4.08, uranium leaching rate is 86% and uranium content in the leached sludge is 0.011%. When leaching reagent NaHCO3 concentration is 1g/L, average flow rate is 0.13m/d, leaching 96 days with total liquid/solid ratio 9.42, uranium leaching rate is 76% and uranium content in the leached sludge is 0.019%

  20. In-situ uranium leaching

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This invention provides a method for improving the recovery of mineral values from ore bodies subjected to in-situ leaching by controlling the flow behaviour of the leaching solution. In particular, the invention relates to an in-situ leaching operation employing a foam for mobility control of the leaching solution. A foam bank is either introduced into the ore bed or developed in-situ in the ore bed. The foam then becomes a diverting agent forcing the leaching fluid through the previously non-contacted regions of the deposit

  1. Study of the relation between hydrated portland cement composition and leaching resistance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eijk, van R.J.; Brouwers, H.J.H.

    1998-01-01

    The present paper addresses cement compositions that have an optimal resistance against acid attack and hence, low leaching rates and optimal waste containment. To this end a shrinking core leaching model is used that describes the leaching of metals from a cement sample. This process is directly re

  2. Computer simulation of laboratory leaching and washing of tank waste sludges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The process simulator ESP (Environmental Simulation Program) was used to simulate laboratory caustic leaching and washing of core samples from Tanks B-110, C-109, and C-112. The results of the laboratory tests and the computer simulations are compared. The results from both, agreed reasonably well for elements contained in solid phases included in the ESP Public data bank. The use of the GEOCHEM data bank and/or a custom Hanford Data bank should improve the agreement, making ESP a useful process simulator for aqueous based processing

  3. Leaching Of Titanium From Monosodium Titanate And Modified MST

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Analysis of a fouled coalescer and pre-filters from Actinide Removal Process/Modular Caustic Side Solvent Extraction Unit (ARP/MCU) operations showed evidence of Ti containing solids. Based on these results a series of tests were planned to examine the extent of Ti leaching from monosodium titanate (MST) and modified monosodium titanate (mMST) in various solutions. The solutions tested included a series of salt solutions with varying free hydroxide concentrations, two sodium hydroxide concentrations, 9 wt % and 15 wt %, nitric and oxalic acid solutions. Overall, the amount of Ti leached from the MST and mMST was much greater in the acid solutions compared to the sodium hydroxide or salt solutions, which is consistent with the expected trend. The leaching data also showed that increasing hydroxide concentration, whether pure NaOH solution used for filter cleaning in ARP or the waste salt solution, increased the amount of Ti leached from both the MST and mMST. For the respective nominal contact times with the MST solids - for filter cleaning or the normal filter operation, the dissolved Ti concentrations are comparable suggesting either cause may contribute to the increased Ti fouling on the MCU coalescers. Tests showed that Ti containing solids could be precipitated from solution after the addition of scrub acid and a decrease in temperature similar to expected in MCU operations. FTIR analysis of these solids showed some similarity to the solids observed on the fouled coalescer and pre-filters. Although only a cursory study, this information suggests that the practice of increasing free hydroxide in feed solutions to MCU as a mitigation to aluminosilicate formation may be offset by the impact of formation of Ti solids in the overall process. Additional consideration of this finding from MCU and SWPF operation is warranted.

  4. Leaching Mechanisms Program. Annual report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The primary goal of this work is to determine the leaching mechanisms of a variety of matrix materials either in use or being considered for the solidification of low-level radioactive wastes by defense and commercial waste generators. Since this program is new and did not formally begin until May of FY 84, the results reported here are few and preliminary. Efforts were concentrated in the following activities: (1) The literature search for leaching data and proposed leaching models and mechanisms for low-level waste. (2) Data base development for leaching data being compiled from the literature and from the leaching experiments in this program. (3) The selection of solidification agents for the experimental part of the program. (4) Fabrication of leach samples and initiation of leach testing. 28 references, 9 figures, 4 tables

  5. F-Area Acid/Caustic Basin groundwater monitoring report. First quarter 1995

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    During first quarter 1995, samples from the FAC monitoring wells at the F-Area Acid/Caustic Basin were collected and analyzed for herbicides/pesticides, indicator parameters, metals, nitrate, radionuclide indicators, volatile organic compounds, and other constituents. Piezometer FAC 5P and monitoring well FAC 6 were dry and could not be sampled. New monitoring wells FAC 9C, 10C, 11C, and 12C were completed in the Barnwell/McBean aquifer and were sampled for the first time during third quarter 1994 (first quarter 1995 is the third of four quarters of data required to support the closure of the basin). Analytical results that exceeded final Primary Drinking Water Standards (PDWS), other Savannah River Site (SRS) Flag 2 criteria, or the SRS turbidity standard of 50 NTU during the quarter were as follows: gross alpha exceeded the final PDWS and aluminum, iron, manganese, and total alpha-emitting radium exceeded the SRS Flag 2 criteria in one or more of the FAC wells. Turbidity exceeded the SRS standard (50 NTU) in wells FAC 3 and 11C. Groundwater flow direction and rate in the water table beneath the F-Area Acid/Caustic Basin were similar to past quarters

  6. Predicting the Second Caustic Crossing in Binary Microlensing Events

    CERN Document Server

    Jaroszynski, M; Jaroszynski, Michal; Mao, Shude

    2001-01-01

    We fit binary lens models to the data covering the initial part of real microlensing events in an attempt to predict the time of the second caustic crossing. We use approximations during the initial search through the parameter space for light curves that roughly match the observed ones. Exact methods for calculating the lens magnification of an extended source are used when we refine our best initial models. Our calculations show that the reliable prediction of the second crossing can only be made very late, when the light curve has risen appreciably after the minimum between the two caustic-crossings. The best observational strategy is therefore to sample as frequently as possible once the light curve starts to rise after the minimum.

  7. Statistics of Caustics in Large-Scale Structure Formation

    CERN Document Server

    Feldbrugge, Job; van de Weygaert, Rien

    2014-01-01

    The cosmic web is a complex spatial pattern of walls, filaments, cluster nodes and underdense void regions. It emerged through gravitational amplification from the Gaussian primordial density field. Here we infer analytical expressions for the spatial statistics of caustics in the evolving large-scale mass distribution. In our analysis, following the quasi-linear Zeldovich formalism and confined to the 1D and 2D situation, we compute number density and correlation properties of caustics in cosmic density fields that evolve from Gaussian primordial conditions. The analysis can be straightforwardly extended to the 3D situation. We moreover, are currently extending the approach to the non-linear regime of structure formation by including higher order Lagrangian approximations and Lagrangian effective field theory.

  8. Practical procedure for coma-free alignment using caustic figure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The practical procedure for coma-free alignment using a single defocused transmission electron microscopy (TEM) image is presented. Caustic figures observed in the defocused TEM image of a focused probe are utilized. Coma-free alignment can be carried out by coinciding a bright-field spot with the center of a caustic curve as observed in an underfocus TEM image. With this method, beam tilt misalignment is reduced to the sub-mrad order (e.g. 0.3 mrad for 300 kV FEG-TEM). This can be done without intentional beam tilting, an amorphous specimen, high-resolution TEM images, or fast Fourier transform for diffractogram or cross-correlation, which are used in previous methods. Residual coma aberration is detected using the multiple Bragg images of a known crystal. Similarity between the present coma-free alignment and well-known STEM alignment using shadow image is discussed

  9. Status report on LWR spent fuel IAEA leach tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spent light-water-reactor (LWR) fuel with an average burnup of 28,000 MWd/MTU was leach-tested at 250C using a modified version of the International Atomic Energy Agency procedure. Leach rates were determined from tests conducted in five different solutions: deionized water, sodium chloride (NaCl), sodium bicarbonate (NaHCO3), calcium chloride (CaCl2) and Waste Isolation Pilot Plant B brine solutions. Elemental leach rates are reported based on the release of 90Sr + 90Y, 106Ru, 137Cs, 144Ce, 154Eu, /sup 239 + 240/Pu, 244Cm and total uranium. After 467 days of cumulative leaching, the elemental leach rates are highest in deionized water. The elemental leach rates uin the different solutions generally decreased from deionized water to the 0.03M NaCl solution to the WIPP B brine solution to the 0.03M NaHCO3 solution and was a factor of 20 lower in 0.015M CaCl2 solution than in deionized water. The leach rates of spent fuel and borosilicate waste-glass were also compared. In sodium bicarbonate solution, the leach rates of the two waste forms were nearly equal, but the glass was increasingly more resistant than spent fuel in calcium chloride solution, followed by sodium chloride solution, WIPP B brine solution and deionized water. In deionized water the glass, based on the elemental release of plutonium and curium, was 50 to 400 times more leach resistant than spent fuel

  10. On calculation of microlensing light curve by gravitational lens caustic

    OpenAIRE

    Bogdanov, M B

    2001-01-01

    For an analysis of microlensing observational data in case of binary gravitational lenses as well as for an interpretation of observations of high magnification events in multiple images of a lensed quasar it is necessary to calculate for a given source the microlensing light curve by a fold caustic. This problem comes to the numerical calculation of a singular integral. We formulated the sufficient condition of a convergence of the integral sum for this singular integral. The strictly approa...

  11. Dynamics of aluminum leaching from water purification sludge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Wen-Po; Fu, Chi-Hua; Chen, Ping-Hung; Yu, Ruey-Fang

    2012-05-30

    In this investigation, the shrinking core model is used to study the rate of aluminum salt leaching from water purification sludge (WPS). This model, which describes the aluminum leaching rate, can be developed to maximize the Al(III) recovering efficiency. Laboratory results indicate that when the mixing speed exceeds 80rpm, the effect of film diffusion control on the leaching process is greatly reduced, such that any further increase in the mixing speed does not affect the Al(III) leaching rate. Additionally, increasing the temperature or acid concentration improves Al(III) leaching rate. The laboratory data were verified by using the shrinking core model to confirm that the leaching of Al(III) from WPS is consistent with the inert-layer diffusion control model. This finding reveals that large amounts of SiO(2), Al(2)O(3) and other inert constituents will form an inter diffusion layer in the WPS and thus become the major limiting factors that control the Al(III) leaching process. The dynamic equation can be expressed as 1-3(1-x)(2/3)+2(1-x)=(2707.3 exp(-3887.6/T))t, in which the apparent activation energy and pre-exponential factors are 32.32 kJ/mol and 2707.3 min(-1), respectively, as determined by solving the Arrhenius equation. PMID:22459977

  12. Defense High-Level Waste Leaching Mechanisms Program. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mendel, J.E. (compiler)

    1984-08-01

    The Defense High-Level Waste Leaching Mechanisms Program brought six major US laboratories together for three years of cooperative research. The participants reached a consensus that solubility of the leached glass species, particularly solubility in the altered surface layer, is the dominant factor controlling the leaching behavior of defense waste glass in a system in which the flow of leachant is constrained, as it will be in a deep geologic repository. Also, once the surface of waste glass is contacted by ground water, the kinetics of establishing solubility control are relatively rapid. The concentrations of leached species reach saturation, or steady-state concentrations, within a few months to a year at 70 to 90/sup 0/C. Thus, reaction kinetics, which were the main subject of earlier leaching mechanisms studies, are now shown to assume much less importance. The dominance of solubility means that the leach rate is, in fact, directly proportional to ground water flow rate. Doubling the flow rate doubles the effective leach rate. This relationship is expected to obtain in most, if not all, repository situations.

  13. Defense High-Level Waste Leaching Mechanisms Program. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Defense High-Level Waste Leaching Mechanisms Program brought six major US laboratories together for three years of cooperative research. The participants reached a consensus that solubility of the leached glass species, particularly solubility in the altered surface layer, is the dominant factor controlling the leaching behavior of defense waste glass in a system in which the flow of leachant is constrained, as it will be in a deep geologic repository. Also, once the surface of waste glass is contacted by ground water, the kinetics of establishing solubility control are relatively rapid. The concentrations of leached species reach saturation, or steady-state concentrations, within a few months to a year at 70 to 900C. Thus, reaction kinetics, which were the main subject of earlier leaching mechanisms studies, are now shown to assume much less importance. The dominance of solubility means that the leach rate is, in fact, directly proportional to ground water flow rate. Doubling the flow rate doubles the effective leach rate. This relationship is expected to obtain in most, if not all, repository situations

  14. Leaching characteristics of trace elements in desulfurization gypsum from a coal-fired power plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Y.K.; Zhuo, Y.Q.; Zhu, Z.W.; Chen, C.H. [Tsinghua Univ., Beijing (China). Inst. of Thermal Engineering

    2013-07-01

    The contents and leaching characteristics of Cr, Cd, As, Pb and Se in FGD gypsum from a 200 MW coal-fired power plant were investigated in this study. Experimental results revealed that: the leaching characteristics of As and Se were similar, both leaching rates were not obviously affected by pH but increased with increase of the liquid-solid ratio. Pb and Cr had similar leaching characteristics, their leaching rates were closely related with the pH of leaching solution and increased with the lowering of pH and both increased with the increasing of solid-liquid ratio. Along with the increase of the liquid-solid ratio, the leaching gradually achieved balance, and the balanced liquid-solid ratio was bigger when pH of leaching solution was lower. Cd content of leaching solution was below detect limit, and thus failed to get its leaching characteristics. The order of trace element content in leaching solution is Pb < Cr < As < Se, and the order of leaching rates is Cr < As < Pb < Se. BCR extraction procedure revealed that trace elements in FGD gypsum were mainly existed as available fraction and migration ability was stronger than that of trace elements in fly ash from coal-fired power plants.

  15. Caustic ingestion injuries-at military hospital rawalpindi

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To study the pattern and endoscopic severity of caustic ingestion injuries presenting at Military Hospital Rawalpindi. Study Design: Descriptive study. Place and Duration of Study: The study was conducted at Medical and Gastroenterology Department Military Hospital Rawalpindi from August 2012 to April 2013. Material and Methods: Patients were selected from those who presented with caustic ingestion history in Medical OPD, ER and in medical wards. After informed consent the patient underwent upper gastrointestinal (GI) Endoscopy. Endoscopic findings were recorded. Results: Out of 50 patients, 21(42%) were males and 29 (58%) were females. Ingestion was accidental in 19 (38%) and was with intent of suicide or self-harm in 31(62%) patients. Mean age was 33.2 years (SD ± 13.2). All the patients were subjected to upper GI endoscopy and findings were recorded. Endoscopic findings were grade 0 in 4 (8%), Grade 1 in 6 (12%), grade 2a in 7 (14%), grade 2b in 10 (20%), grade 3a in 6 (12%) and grade 3b in 17 (34%) patients. Conclusion: Caustic ingestion injuries were seen more in younger females with predominant cause as suicidal intent. On endoscopic examination severe corrosive injuries were more frequent. (author)

  16. A middle age addicted man with caustic stomach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gholamreza Nouri Broujerdi

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: The term caustic generally refers to alkaline and the term corrosive generally refers to acidic agents' injury; however, in medical literature caustic is frequently a term applied to both substances. Ingested alkali typically damage the esophagus more than stomach or duodenum, whereas acids usually cause more severe gastric injury. Since esophagus has a slightly alkaline pH, its epithelium is more resistant to acids, so that only 6 to 20% of those who ingest these substances present lesions in this organ. Case : A middle-aged addicted man who drunk hydrochloric acid accidentally had extensive necrosis of the stomach with remarkable sparing of the esophagus on second look exploration. A total gastrectomy with a Roux-en-Y esophago-jejunostomy with feeding jejunostomy was performed. Conclusion : In caustic GI injury, patients who are operated on and found to have no evidence of extensive esophago-gastric necrosis, a biopsy of the posterior gastric wall should be performed to exclude occult injury. If histologically there is a question of viability, a second look operation should be performed within 36 hours.

  17. Caustics and Rogue Waves in an Optical Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathis, Amaury; Froehly, Luc; Toenger, Shanti; Dias, Frédéric; Genty, Goëry; Dudley, John M.

    2015-08-01

    There are many examples in physics of systems showing rogue wave behaviour, the generation of high amplitude events at low probability. Although initially studied in oceanography, rogue waves have now been seen in many other domains, with particular recent interest in optics. Although most studies in optics have focussed on how nonlinearity can drive rogue wave emergence, purely linear effects have also been shown to induce extreme wave amplitudes. In this paper, we report a detailed experimental study of linear rogue waves in an optical system, using a spatial light modulator to impose random phase structure on a coherent optical field. After free space propagation, different random intensity patterns are generated, including partially-developed speckle, a broadband caustic network, and an intermediate pattern with characteristics of both speckle and caustic structures. Intensity peaks satisfying statistical criteria for rogue waves are seen especially in the case of the caustic network, and are associated with broader spatial spectra. In addition, the electric field statistics of the intermediate pattern shows properties of an “optical sea” with near-Gaussian statistics in elevation amplitude, and trough-to-crest statistics that are near-Rayleigh distributed but with an extended tail where a number of rogue wave events are observed.

  18. Leaching from solidified waste forms under saturated and unsaturated conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The leaching behavior of nitrate ion from a cement based waste form containing low-level radioactive waste was shown to be identical under saturated and unsaturated soil conditions. Only in soils containing less than 2 wt %water did the leach rate decrease. The observation of identical leach rates under saturated and unsaturated conditions is explained by diffusion through the waste form being the limiting step. Diffusion through the soil decreases in very dry soil and the limiting step changes. These laboratory tests were verified by measurements on similar, Portland cement based waste form in a field lysimeter

  19. Modelling the Long Term Leaching Behaviour of 137CS from Different Stabilized Waste Matrices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leaching characteristics of ''1''3''7Cs from immobilized waste matrices in different cement-based grouts have been assessed to investigate the influence of the additives on the leaching behavior of the solid waste matrices. The International Atomic Energy's Agency (IAEA) standard leach method has been employed to study the leach pattern of 137Cs radionuclide from the immobilized waste form. The examination of the leaching data revealed that clay additives reduces the leach rate for the studied radionuclide. The controlling leaching mechanism has been studied and the transport parameters were calculated for all studied waste matrices. Simplified analytical models have been derived to predict the Cumulative Leach Fraction (CLF) of radionuclides over the studied experimental period. These simplified research models could be used as a screening tool to assess the performance of the waste matrix under repository conditions. (author)

  20. Leaching of Pyrites of Various Reactivities by Thiobacillus ferrooxidans

    OpenAIRE

    Baldi, Franco; Clark, Thomas; Pollack, S. S.; Olson, Gregory J.

    1992-01-01

    Wide variations were found in the rate of chemical and microbiological leaching of iron from pyritic materials from various sources. Thiobacillus ferrooxidans accelerated leaching of iron from all of the pyritic materials tested in shake flask suspensions at loadings of 0.4% (wt/vol) pulp density. The most chemically reactive pyrites exhibited the fastest bioleaching rates. However, at 2.0% pulp density, a delay in onset of bioleaching occurred with two of the pyrites derived from coal source...

  1. The laboratory study on a sandstone uranium ore in-situ leaching

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uranium mineral of a sandstone uranium ore and its composition were investigated, Based on the investigated , the leaching technology and parameters were selected through experiments, the U leaching rate to 92.81% use 15 g/L H2SO4, the U leaching rate to 84.24% use 10 g/LNa2CO3 + 5 g/LNaHCO3. Column leaching test using five test column, leaching rate respectively: 95.58%, 98.11%, 59.39%, 46.14%, 59.39%. After approximately 12 void volume laundering, the water quality in ore at or near background values of ore-bearing aquifer. The results from agitation leaching and column leaching experiments show that the sandstone uranium suitable for ISL mining methods. (authors)

  2. Stress corrosion cracking behaviour of alloys 600 and 690 in water and caustic solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For many industries, corrosion damages and particularly those due to Stress Corrosion Cracking (SCC) remain one of the most difficult problems to fight as well as to understand for the researcher. The Nuclear Energy Industry is no exception to that rule and the Commissariat a l'Energie Atomique has been studying the stress corrosion cracking phenomenon of nuclear alloys for more than 30 years, phenomenon which is still the subject of a great number of studies among the Nuclear Industrialists. The aim of the following paper is to briefly summarize some results obtained in a study of the SCC behaviour of Alloys 600 and 690 in mediums such as primary water and caustic solution (simulating local conditions of the secondary side) involving, in the case of the Constant Elongation Rate Tests in primary medium, the influence of the temperature, surface state, thermal treatment and strain rate

  3. Modeling of Boehmite Leaching from Actual Hanford High-Level Waste Samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The U.S. Department of Energy plans to vitrify approximately 60,000 metric tons of high-level waste (HLW) sludge from underground storage tanks at the Hanford Site in Southwest Washington State. To reduce the volume of HLW requiring treatment, a goal has been set to remove a significant quantity of the aluminum, which comprises nearly 70 percent of the sludge. Aluminum is found in the form of gibbsite and sodium aluminate, which can be easily dissolved by washing the waste stream with caustic, and boehmite, which comprises nearly half of the total aluminum, but is more resistant to caustic dissolution and requires higher treatment temperatures and hydroxide concentrations. Chromium, which makes up a much smaller amount (∼3%) of the sludge, must also be removed because there is a low tolerance for chromium in the HLW immobilization process. In this work, the coupled dissolution kinetics of aluminum and chromium species during caustic leaching of actual Hanford HLW samples is examined. The experimental results are used to develop a model that provides a basis for predicting dissolution dynamics from known process temperature and hydroxide concentration. (authors)

  4. Specific imaging of caustics upon refraction of structured laser radiation in stratified media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raskovskaya, I. L.

    2015-06-01

    Conditions for caustic formation upon longitudinal probing of stratified optically inhomogeneous media by structured laser beams that are visualized in the cross section as families of geometrical figures are studied. In the plane of observation at the exit from the medium, the projection of the caustic surface is imaged as an envelope of extrema of refractive deflection of beam-structure elements. This circumstance makes it possible to experimentally determine the caustic position in the absence of intensity measurements in the refraction image. The measured geometrical parameters of caustics are employed in the solution of the inverse problem of refraction to reconstruct physical parameters of the medium that control nonuniformity of refractive index.

  5. Study on caustic formation in Dirac-Born-Infeld type scalar field systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Formation of caustics in the Dirac-Born-Infeld type scalar field systems has been investigated for two generic of potentials, viz., exponentially decreasing and inverse power law potentials. The study reveals that in the case of exponentially decreasing rolling massive potential, there are multi-valued regions and regions of likely to be caustics in the field configuration. The formation of caustics is inevitable for the inverse power law potentials under consideration in Minkowski spacetime, whereas caustics do not form in this case in the Friedmann-Robertson-Walker Universe

  6. Leach testing of waste forms: interrelationship of ISO and MCC type tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leach testing experiments were conducted on SYNROC-D material to examine the parameters which affect leaching results and to measure the activation energy for leaching of elements from SYNROC-D. Measured leach rates were found to be controlled by precipitation of insoluble phases for those tests where the sample surface area to volume of leachant (SA/V) multiplied by leaching time (t) exceeded 0.3 cm-1d for leach tests at 900C. In these cases the apparent activation energy for leaching was approximately 10 kcal/mole based on Na and Si data. For leach tests at 900C with (Sa/V)(t) less than 0.2 cm-1d, the activation energy for Na and Si dissolution was 18.5 kcal/mole for sample S29 and 14.5 kcal/mole for sample LSO4. The effect of sample geometry was investigated by leaching a series of crushed samples of different grain size. The results support the view that geometric surface area should be used in leach rate calculations rather than gas adsorption BET surface area. Comparison of results on S29 leaching of crushed samples and monoliths show that data from MCC-1 and ISO type leach tests may be directly compared when the data are examined at constant (SA/V)(t). 5 figures, 13 tables

  7. C-106 High-Level Waste Solids: Washing/Leaching and Solubility Versus Temperature Studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report describes the results of a test conducted by Battelle to assess the effects of inhibited water washing and caustic leaching on the composition of the Hanford tank C-106 high-level waste (HLW) solids. The objective of this work was to determine the composition of the C-106 solids remaining after washing with 0.01M NaOH or leaching with 3M NaOH. Another objective of this test was to determine the solubility of various C-106 components as a function of temperature. The work was conducted according to test plan BNFL-TP-29953-8,Rev. 0, Determination of the Solubility of HLW Sludge Solids. The test went according to plan, with only minor deviations from the test plan. The deviations from the test plan are discussed in the experimental section

  8. C-106 High-Level Waste Solids: Washing/Leaching and Solubility Versus Temperature Studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    GJ Lumetta; DJ Bates; PK Berry; JP Bramson; LP Darnell; OT Farmer III; LR Greenwood; FV Hoopes; RC Lettau; GF Piepel; CZ Soderquist; MJ Steele; RT Steele; MW Urie; JJ Wagner

    2000-01-26

    This report describes the results of a test conducted by Battelle to assess the effects of inhibited water washing and caustic leaching on the composition of the Hanford tank C-106 high-level waste (HLW) solids. The objective of this work was to determine the composition of the C-106 solids remaining after washing with 0.01M NaOH or leaching with 3M NaOH. Another objective of this test was to determine the solubility of various C-106 components as a function of temperature. The work was conducted according to test plan BNFL-TP-29953-8,Rev. 0, Determination of the Solubility of HLW Sludge Solids. The test went according to plan, with only minor deviations from the test plan. The deviations from the test plan are discussed in the experimental section.

  9. Leaching behavior of microtektite glass compositions in sea water and the effect of precipitation on glass leaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-01-01

    The present study attempts to account for the slow corrosion rates of microtektite glass in nature by comparing the leach rates of synthetic microtektite glass samples in deionized water and in sea-water, respectively. In order to obtain systematic data about leachant composition effects, leach tests were also carried out with synthetic leachant compositions enriched with respect to silica or depleted with respect to certain major components of sea-water (Mg, Ca).

  10. Improving hydrolysis of food waste in a leach bed reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • This paper assesses leaching of food waste in a two phase digestion system. • Leaching is assessed with and without an upflow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB). • Without the UASB, low pH reduces hydrolysis, while increased flows increase leaching. • Inclusion of the UASB increases pH to optimal levels and greatly improves leaching. • The optimal conditions are suggested as low flow with connection to the UASB. - Abstract: This paper examines the rate of degradation of food waste in a leach bed reactor (LBR) under four different operating conditions. The effects of leachate recirculation at a low and high flow rate are examined with and without connection to an upflow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB). Two dilution rates of the effective volume of the leach bed reactors were investigated: 1 and 6 dilutions per LBR per day. The increase in dilution rate from 1 to 6 improved the destruction of volatile solids without connection to the UASB. However connection to the UASB greatly improved the destruction of volatile solids (by almost 60%) at the low recirculation rate of 1 dilution per day. The increase in volatile solids destruction with connection to the UASB was attributed to an increase in leachate pH and buffering capacity provided by recirculated effluent from the UASB to the leach beds. The destruction of volatile solids for both the low and high dilution rates was similar with connection to the UASB, giving 82% and 88% volatile solids destruction respectively. This suggests that the most efficient leaching condition is 1 dilution per day with connection to the UASB

  11. Leaching test of the radioactive glass waste form

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As a part of the safety evaluation tests of simulated radioactive glass waste forms, the leaching experiments were carried out at 1000C by using the Soxhlet leach test apparatus in hot cell of the Waste Safety Testing Facility(WASTEF). The composition of the glass waste form used for this study is typical of the latest composition. The leach rates of 137Cs and 90Sr were 4.28 x 10-4 g/cm2 day and 1.92 x 10-4 g/cm2 day, respectively. There was little difference between these values and the results of the previous cold tests. The leach rate of 238Pu was 1.82 x 10-6 g/cm2 day. The behavior of leached radionuclides was examined on the basis of the phenomena observed during the leaching experiment. The result implied that the concentration of Pu in the leaching solution was dependent upon the solubility of Pu. (author)

  12. Leaching Test Relationships, Laboratory-to-Field Comparisons and Recommendations for Leaching Evaluation using the Leaching Environmental Assessment Framework (LEAF)

    Science.gov (United States)

    This report presents examples of the relationships between the results of laboratory leaching tests, as defined by the Leaching Environmental Assessment Framework (LEAF) or analogous international test methods, and leaching of constituents from a broad range of materials under di...

  13. STATISTICS OF MICROLENSING CAUSTIC CROSSINGS IN Q 2237+0305: PECULIAR VELOCITY OF THE LENS GALAXY AND ACCRETION DISK SIZE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mediavilla, E. [Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias, Vía Láctea S/N, La Laguna E-38200 Tenerife (Spain); Jimenez-Vicente, J. [Departamento de Física Teórica y del Cosmos, Universidad de Granada, Campus de Fuentenueva E-18071 Granada (Spain); Muñoz, J. A. [Departamento de Astronomía y Astrofísica, Universidad de Valencia E-46100 Burjassot, Valencia (Spain); Mediavilla, T.; Ariza, O. [Departamento de Estadística e Investigación Operativa, Universidad de Cádiz, Avda Ramón Puyol s/n E-11202, Algeciras, Cádiz (Spain)

    2015-01-10

    We use the statistics of caustic crossings induced by microlensing in the lens system Q 2237+0305 to study the lens galaxy peculiar velocity. We calculate the caustic crossing rates for a comprehensive family of stellar mass functions and find a dependence of the average number of caustic crossings with the effective transverse velocity and the average mass, 〈n〉∝v{sub eff}/√(〈m〉), equivalent to the theoretical prediction for the case of microlenses with identical masses. We explore the possibilities of the method to measure v {sub eff} using the ∼12 yr of Optical Gravitational Lensing Experiment monitoring of the four images of Q 2237+0305. To determine a lower limit for v {sub eff}, we count, conservatively, a single caustic crossing for each one of the four high magnification events identified in the literature (plus one additional proposed by us) obtaining v{sub eff}≳240√(〈m〉/0.17 M{sub ⊙}) km s{sup −1} at 68% of confidence. From this value and the average FWHM of the four high magnification events, we obtain a lower limit of r{sub s}≳1.4√(〈m〉/0.17 M{sub ⊙}) light-days for the radius of the source (r{sub s} = FWHM/2.35). Tentative identification of three additional caustic crossing events leads to estimates of v{sub eff}≃(493±246)√(〈m〉/0.17 M{sub ⊙}) km s{sup −1} for the effective transverse velocity and of r{sub s}≃(2.7±1.3)√(〈m〉/0.17 M{sub ⊙}) light-days for the source size. The estimated transverse peculiar velocity of the galaxy is v{sub t}≃(429±246)√(〈m〉/0.17 M{sub ⊙}) km s{sup −1}.

  14. Leaching of French, English and Canadian glass with incorporated highly radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A survey has been made of typical leach rates for French and English glasses used for incorporating highly radioactive waste. For French glass, calculations have been made to find the time- and temperature tendencies of the leach rates of Cs and Sr in range 25 - 110 degreeC using published values for the diffusion coefficients up to 70 degree. For the higher temperature range, the diffusion coefficients have been calculated. According to the calculations, leach rates of French LWR glasses are significantly less temperaturedependent than English glass for Magnox waste. Canadian nepheline-syenite glasses have leach rates several orders of magnitude lower than other glasses. (author)

  15. Leach mechanisms of borosilicate glass Defense Waste Forms - effects of composition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The study described below concerns the mechanisms which control the leaching of two Defense Wasteforms, viz. SRL TDS-131 glass and MCC Defense Waste Reference Glass. It is shown that both the leach mechanisms and the structure of the leached surface are strongly dependent not only on the composition of the leachant and the contact time between the leachant and the glass but also on the exact composition of the glass. The relatively minor differences in composition between the two glasses investigated here were observed to give rise to large differences in leach behavior, in particular upon prolonged contact with water, rather than to limited changes in leach rate alone

  16. Inhibition of caustic induced stress corrosion cracking of Alloy 600 by inhibitors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effect of inhibitors on the electrochemical behavior and the stress corrosion cracking resistance of Alloy 600 was evaluated in 10% sodium hydroxide solution at 315.deg.C. The C-ring specimens for stress corrosion cracking test were polarized at 150 mV above the corrosion potential for 120 hours with and without inhibitors such as titanium oxide, titanium boride and cerium boride. The chemical compositions of the films formed on the crack tip in the C-ring specimens were analyzed using scanning Auger electron spectroscopy. The cerium boride, the most effective inhibitor, was observed to decrease the crack propagation rate by more than a factor of three compared with that obtained in a no inhibitor solution. It was found that the changes of the active-passive transition potentials and the film compositions were related to the resistance to stress corrosion cracking in high temperature caustic solutions

  17. Coupling leaching of sphalerite concentrate

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    彭鹏; 谢惠琴; 卢立柱

    2004-01-01

    Coupling process of sphalerite concentrate leaching in H2 SO4-HNO3 and tetrachloroethylene extracting of sulfur was investigated. Effects of leaching temperature, leaching time, mass ratio of liquid to solid and tetrachloroethylene addition on zinc leaching processes were examined separately. SEM images of sphalerite concentrate and residues were performed by using JEM-6700F field emission scanning electron microscope. The relationship between the number of recycling and extraction ratio of zinc was studied. The results indicate that 99.6 % zinc is obtained after leaching for 3 h at 85 ℃ and pressure of 0.1 MPa O2, with 20 g sphalerite concentrate in 200 mL leaching solution containing 2.0 mol/L H2SO4 and 0.2 mol/L HNO3, in the presence of 10 mL C2Cl4. The leaching time of zinc is 50% shorter than that in the common leaching. The coupling effect is distinct. The recycled C2Cl4 exerts little influence on extraction ratio of zinc.

  18. Eikonal waves, caustics and mode conversion in tokamak plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaun, A.; Tracy, E. R.; Kaufman, A. N.

    2007-01-01

    Ray optics is used to model the propagation of short electromagnetic plasma waves in toroidal geometry. The new RAYCON code evolves each ray independently in phase space, together with its amplitude, phase and focusing tensor to describe the transport of power along the ray. Particular emphasis is laid on caustics and mode conversion layers, where a linear phenomenon splits a single incoming ray into two. The complete mode conversion algorithm is described and tested for the first time, using the two space dimensions that are relevant in a tokamak. Applications are shown, using a cold plasma model to account for mode conversion at the ion-hybrid resonance in the Joint European Torus.

  19. Spectral caustics in laser assisted Breit-Wheeler process

    CERN Document Server

    Nousch, T; Kämpfer, B; Titov, A I

    2015-01-01

    Electron-positron pair production by the Breit-Wheeler process embedded in a strong laser pulse is analyzed. The transverse momentum spectrum displays prominent peaks which are interpreted as caustics, the positions of which are accessible by the stationary phases. Examples are given for the superposition of an XFEL beam with an optical high-intensity laser beam. Such a configuration is available, e.g., at LCLS at present and at European XFEL in near future. It requires a counter propagating probe photon beam with high energy which can be generated by synchronized inverse Compton backscattering.

  20. Spectral caustics in laser assisted Breit-Wheeler process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nousch, T.; Seipt, D.; Kämpfer, B.; Titov, A. I.

    2016-04-01

    Electron-positron pair production by the Breit-Wheeler process embedded in a strong laser pulse is analyzed. The transverse momentum spectrum displays prominent peaks which are interpreted as caustics, the positions of which are accessible by the stationary phases. Examples are given for the superposition of an XFEL beam with an optical high-intensity laser beam. Such a configuration is available, e.g., at LCLS at present and at European XFEL in near future. It requires a counter propagating probe photon beam with high energy which can be generated by synchronized inverse Compton backscattering.

  1. P-Area Acid/Caustic Basin Groundwater Monitoring Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    During fourth quarter 1993, samples from the six PAC monitoring wells at the P-Area Acid/Caustic Basin were collected and analyzed for indicator parameters, groundwater quality parameters, parameters characterizing suitability as a drinking water supply, and other constituents. Monitoring results that exceeded the final Primary Drinking Water Standards (PDWS) or the Savannah River Site (SRS) flagging criteria or turbidity standard during the quarter are discussed in this report. During fourth quarter 1993, no constituents exceeded the final PDWS. Aluminum and iron exceeded the SRS Flag 2 criteria in five wells. Manganese exceeded its Flag 2 criterion in three wells, while specific conductance exceeded its Flag 2 criterion in one well

  2. 3D simulation of the leaching of cement-based materials in order to compare different leaching tests

    OpenAIRE

    Aouad, G.; De Windt, Laurent; Damidot, Denis

    2010-01-01

    Leaching of cement-based materials is a complex process that depends on both the material intrinsic properties and the leaching test. The microstructure and cement-type of the material are typical examples of the former whereas the later consist of solution pH and composition, solution renewal rate and the liquid/solid volume ratio. As most of the tests are not normalized, this leads to a diversity of results in terms of alteration layer thicknesses and leaching kinetics. As a consequence, it...

  3. 16 CFR 1500.129 - Substances named in the Federal Caustic Poison Act.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... Poison Act. 1500.129 Section 1500.129 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION FEDERAL... REGULATIONS § 1500.129 Substances named in the Federal Caustic Poison Act. The Commission finds that for those substances covered by the Federal Caustic Poison Act (44 Stat. 1406), the requirements of section 2(p)(1)...

  4. Biological treatment of sulfidic spent caustics under haloalkaline conditions using soda lake bacteria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Graaff, de C.M.

    2012-01-01

    In this thesis, the development of a newbiotechnological process for the treatment of undiluted sulfidic spent caustics (SSC’s) using soda lake bacteria is described. SSC’s are waste solutions that are formed in the oil and gas industry due to the caustic (NaOH) scrubbing of hydrocarbon

  5. Defining Effective Salt Leaching Regions Between Drains

    OpenAIRE

    ANAPALI, Ömer; ŞAHİN, Üstün; Öztaş, Taşkın; Hanay, Abdurrahman

    2001-01-01

    The application of sufficient amounts of leaching water by means of an effective method is very important in the management and reclamation of saline and sodic soils. Reclamation cannot be achieved with insufficient leaching water application, while excess water application may cause severe problems in soil. Knowledge of the leaching regions and intensities may help to control the amounts of leaching water through effective leaching methods in areas of limited leaching. This study was und...

  6. Mathematical modelling in leaching studies of radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Transport phenomena involved in the leaching of a radioactive material from a composite matrix into surrounding water are investigated using three methods based on theoretical equations. These arc: diffusion equation derived for a plane source model, rate equation for diffusion coupled with a first-order reaction and an empirical method employing a polynomial equation. The obtained results are compared with respect to their applicability to the 60Co and 137Cs leaching data. (author)

  7. Kinetics of Uranium Extraction from Uranium Tailings by Oxidative Leaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Biao; Li, Mi; Zhang, Xiaowen; Huang, Jing

    2016-07-01

    Extraction of uranium from uranium tailings by oxidative leaching with hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) was studied. The effects of various extraction factors were investigated to optimize the dissolution conditions, as well as to determine the leaching kinetic parameters. The behavior of H2O2 in the leaching process was determined through scanning electron microscopy-energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy (SEM-EDX) and x-ray diffraction analysis of leaching residues. Results suggest that H2O2 can significantly improve uranium extraction by decomposing the complex gangue structures in uranium tailings and by enhancing the reaction rate between uranium phases and the leaching agent. The extraction kinetics expression was changed from 1 - 3(1 - α)2/3 + 2(1 - α) = K 0(H2SO4)-0.14903(S/L)-1.80435( R o)0.20023 e -1670.93/T t ( t ≥ 5) to 1 - 3(1 - α)2/3 + 2(1 - α) = K 0(H2SO4)0.01382(S/L)-1.83275( R o)0.25763 e -1654.59/T t ( t ≥ 5) by the addition of H2O2 in the leaching process. The use of H2O2 in uranium leaching may help in extracting uranium more efficiently and rapidly from low-uranium-containing ores or tailings.

  8. Kinetics of Uranium Extraction from Uranium Tailings by Oxidative Leaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Biao; Li, Mi; Zhang, Xiaowen; Huang, Jing

    2016-05-01

    Extraction of uranium from uranium tailings by oxidative leaching with hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) was studied. The effects of various extraction factors were investigated to optimize the dissolution conditions, as well as to determine the leaching kinetic parameters. The behavior of H2O2 in the leaching process was determined through scanning electron microscopy-energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy (SEM-EDX) and x-ray diffraction analysis of leaching residues. Results suggest that H2O2 can significantly improve uranium extraction by decomposing the complex gangue structures in uranium tailings and by enhancing the reaction rate between uranium phases and the leaching agent. The extraction kinetics expression was changed from 1 - 3(1 - α)2/3 + 2(1 - α) = K 0(H2SO4)-0.14903(S/L)-1.80435(R o)0.20023 e -1670.93/T t (t ≥ 5) to 1 - 3(1 - α)2/3 + 2(1 - α) = K 0(H2SO4)0.01382(S/L)-1.83275(R o)0.25763 e -1654.59/T t (t ≥ 5) by the addition of H2O2 in the leaching process. The use of H2O2 in uranium leaching may help in extracting uranium more efficiently and rapidly from low-uranium-containing ores or tailings.

  9. Effect of thermal treatment on caustic stress corrosion cracking an chloride SCC of super austenitic stainless steel-S32050

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper focused on the caustic SCC and chloride SCC of super austenitic stainless stee S32050. Thermal treatment (550 .deg. C 15hrs) and high temperature mill annealing (HTMA, 1,250 .deg. C 5min.) did enhance the SCC resistance than mill annealed specimen. It is considered that dislocation array is the most important factor on SCC resistance among some variables such as repassivation rate, residual stress, grain size, yield strength etc. Substituted Mn didn't affec the anodic polarization behavior of Mn-modified S32050, but cold working to the alloys reduced the SCC resistance because of the embrittlement by cold working

  10. Effect of thermal treatment on caustic stress corrosion cracking an chloride SCC of super austenitic stainless steel-S32050

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, S. K.; Park, Y. S. [Yonsei Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Y. S. [Andong Univ., Andong (Korea, Republic of); Ryu, W. S. [KAERI, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    2000-10-01

    This paper focused on the caustic SCC and chloride SCC of super austenitic stainless stee S32050. Thermal treatment (550 .deg. C 15hrs) and high temperature mill annealing (HTMA, 1,250 .deg. C 5min.) did enhance the SCC resistance than mill annealed specimen. It is considered that dislocation array is the most important factor on SCC resistance among some variables such as repassivation rate, residual stress, grain size, yield strength etc. Substituted Mn didn't affec the anodic polarization behavior of Mn-modified S32050, but cold working to the alloys reduced the SCC resistance because of the embrittlement by cold working.

  11. Strontium removal from caustic carbonate waste solutions using carrier coprecipitation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A carrier coprecipitation procedure has been developed for the radioactive strontium from caustic liquid low-level waste (LLLW) generated at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The from caustic liquid low-level waste (LLLW) generated at Oak two-step treatment process involves the addition of normal Sr (as SrCl2) to the waste matrix, which is composed primarily of 0.3 M NAOH and 0.6 M Na2CO3. The active Sr equilibrates with the normal Sr carrier and coprecipitates as SrCO3 at pH 13. A liquid/solid separation is made before the pH of the supernate is reduced to pH 8 with sulfuric acid. During the neutralization step, the aluminum in the waste precipitates as Al(OH)3 Further Sr decontamination is achieved as traces of active Sr sorb to the Al(OH)3 that precipitates during the neutralization step. A final liquid/solid separation is made at pH 8 to remove the sorbed active Sr

  12. Experimental research in leaching of copper-bearing tailings enhanced by ultrasonic treatment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Jie; WU Ai-xiang; WANG Yi-ming; CHEN Xue-song

    2008-01-01

    On the basis of an experiment in ultrasonic enhanced ammonia leaching of tailings, the effect of ultrasonic waves on copper dissolution was studied. The mechanism of ultrasonic enhanced tailing leaching was analyzed and a technique of ultrasonic enhanced pipe leaching of tailings was proposed. The results show that tailings with ultrasonic treatment can leach up to 89.5% of Cu, which is 13.5% more than those without the treatment. Ultrasonic technology is capable of improving leaching rates and the overall recovery of tailing leaching. Impact waves and micro jet streams can strip and erode affected surfaces of tailing particles to create new active surfaces and disturbances can intensify mass transfer processes in "dead zones". The technique of ultrasonic enhanced pipe leaching of tailings is a combination of existing agitation enhancement with ultrasonic enhancement and can im-prove mineral recovery.

  13. Leach test of cladding removal waste grout using Hanford groundwater

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Serne, R.J.; Martin, W.J.; Legore, V.L.

    1995-09-01

    This report describes laboratory experiments performed during 1986-1990 designed to produce empirical leach rate data for cladding removal waste (CRW) grout. At the completion of the laboratory work, funding was not available for report completion, and only now during final grout closeout activities is the report published. The leach rates serve as inputs to computer codes used in assessing the potential risk from the migration of waste species from disposed grout. This report discusses chemical analyses conducted on samples of CRW grout, and the results of geochemical computer code calculations that help identify mechanisms involved in the leaching process. The semi-infinite solid diffusion model was selected as the most representative model for describing leaching of grouts. The use of this model with empirically derived leach constants yields conservative predictions of waste release rates, provided no significant changes occur in the grout leach processes over long time periods. The test methods included three types of leach tests--the American Nuclear Society (ANS) 16.1 intermittent solution exchange test, a static leach test, and a once-through flow column test. The synthetic CRW used in the tests was prepared in five batches using simulated liquid waste spiked with several radionuclides: iodine ({sup 125}I), carbon ({sup 14}C), technetium ({sup 99}Tc), cesium ({sup 137}Cs), strontium ({sup 85}Sr), americium ({sup 241}Am), and plutonium ({sup 238}Pu). The grout was formed by mixing the simulated liquid waste with dry blend containing Type I and Type II Portland cement, class F fly ash, Indian Red Pottery clay, and calcium hydroxide. The mixture was allowed to set and cure at room temperature in closed containers for at least 46 days before it was tested.

  14. Leach test of cladding removal waste grout using Hanford groundwater

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report describes laboratory experiments performed during 1986-1990 designed to produce empirical leach rate data for cladding removal waste (CRW) grout. At the completion of the laboratory work, funding was not available for report completion, and only now during final grout closeout activities is the report published. The leach rates serve as inputs to computer codes used in assessing the potential risk from the migration of waste species from disposed grout. This report discusses chemical analyses conducted on samples of CRW grout, and the results of geochemical computer code calculations that help identify mechanisms involved in the leaching process. The semi-infinite solid diffusion model was selected as the most representative model for describing leaching of grouts. The use of this model with empirically derived leach constants yields conservative predictions of waste release rates, provided no significant changes occur in the grout leach processes over long time periods. The test methods included three types of leach tests--the American Nuclear Society (ANS) 16.1 intermittent solution exchange test, a static leach test, and a once-through flow column test. The synthetic CRW used in the tests was prepared in five batches using simulated liquid waste spiked with several radionuclides: iodine (125I), carbon (14C), technetium (99Tc), cesium (137Cs), strontium (85Sr), americium (241Am), and plutonium (238Pu). The grout was formed by mixing the simulated liquid waste with dry blend containing Type I and Type II Portland cement, class F fly ash, Indian Red Pottery clay, and calcium hydroxide. The mixture was allowed to set and cure at room temperature in closed containers for at least 46 days before it was tested

  15. The use of biochar to reduce nitrogen and potassium leaching from soil cultivated with maize

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W Widowati

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Nutrient leaching is often a problem especially in tropical areas with soil fertility constraints. This study aims to reveal the effect of biochars on leaching and uptake of nitrogen and potassium from degraded soils cultivated with maize. Each of three types of biochar originated from rice husk, wood, and coconut shell, was applied to the soil placed in PVC tube at four rates (0, 15, 30, and 45 t/ha. Maize was then planted in each pot. All pots received urea (135 kg N/ha, SP36 (36 kg P2O5/ha, and KCl (110 kg K2O/ha. Twelve treatments (three biochars and four application rates were arranged in a factorial randomized block design with three replicates. Results of the study showed interaction effects of biochar materials and biochar rates on nitrate leaching (except on day 1 to 30 and potassium, N uptake, and plant growth. On day 1-30, leaching of nitrate and potassium was reduced by biochar application. The lowest nitrate leaching was observed at rate of 45 t /ha of wood biochar, while application of 45 t coconut shell biochar / ha resulted in the highest K leaching. Beside, wood biochar resulted in a similar nitrate leaching with that of coconut shell biochar, but nitrate leaching increased with increasing rate of rice husk biochar on day 30-60. All biochar materials yielded similar potassium leaching at all rates. Application of 45 t rice husk biochar /ha resulted in the best maize growth.

  16. Leaching behavior of butanedionedioxime as gold ligand

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Butanedionedioxime, a small organic compound with low-toxicity and good chemical stability, has been proposed as an effective gold ligand in gold extraction. The result of experiment shows that: 1) highly effective gold lixiviantcan be composed of butanedionedioxime (BDM) with many oxidants, especially potassium permanganate; 2)in the leaching system of BD M- K M nO4 the suitable Ox/Lig(ratio of oxidants to gold ligands) tange is 0.20 ~ 0. 50, optimally 0.25 ~0.45 at the pH range of 7 ~ 11; 3) BDM-KMnO4 extraction of gold from an oxide ore is similar to cyanide(cyanide-O2)extraction, but the leaching rate of gold by BDM-KMnO4 is faster than that by cyanide-O2; 4) gold may readily be recov-ered by carbon adsorption and zinc precipitation

  17. Leaching of concrete : the leaching process : extrapolation of deterioration : effect on the structural stability

    OpenAIRE

    Fagerlund, Göran

    2000-01-01

    The leaching process when water attacks concrete, and the effect of leaching on the strength and durability of a concrete structure, is analysed theoretically. Technique for prediction of the future leaching and structural stability is outlined. The analysis is to a certain extent supported by data from literature. The leaching process is divided in five different types: 1: Pure surface leaching 2: Surface leaching involving erosion 3: Homogeneous leaching over the entire structure 4...

  18. Leaching of trace elements from coal solid waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the present work leaching of ash from coal-fired power plants is described and the elemental analysis of coal, ash and leachates has been performed by neutron activation analysis, atomic absorption spectrometry and ion chromatography. The research concerns precipitator ash from powder-coal fired utilities, desulfurization ash from a dry-scrubbing process and fabric filter ash from a fluidized-bed boiler. Reproducibility of shake tests and column leaching has been studied. In the shake tests a wide range of solid to liquid ratios is applied, which allows extrapolation to column conditions. Column experiments carried out in upflow at a fixed flow-rate of approximately 1 cm per day showed good column performance and proved that equilibrium is reached fairly rapidly. A classification of precipitator ashes with respect to leaching behaviour is given, which allows an estimate of leaching characteristics beforehand. In relation to this variability in coal and ash compositions has been studied. (Auth.)

  19. Sulfuric acid leaching kinetics of South African chromite

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qing Zhao; Cheng-jun Liu; Pei-yang Shi; Bo Zhang; Mao-fa Jiang; Qing-song Zhang; Ron Zevenhoven; Henrik Saxn

    2015-01-01

    The sulfuric acid leaching kinetics of South African chromite was investigated. The negative influence of a solid product layer constituted of a silicon-rich phase and chromium-rich sulfate was eliminated by crushing the chromite and by selecting proper leaching con-ditions. The dimensionless change in specific surface area and the conversion rate of the chromite were observed to exhibit a proportional re-lationship. A modified shrinking particle model was developed to account for the change in reactive surface area, and the model was fitted to experimental data. The resulting model was observed to describe experimental findings very well. Kinetics analysis revealed that the leach-ing process is controlled by a chemical reaction under the employed experimental conditions and the activation energy of the reaction is 48 kJ·mol–1.

  20. Characterization of solids deposited on the modular caustic-side solvent extraction unit (MCU) coalescer media removed in May and October 2014

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fondeur, F. F. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2015-10-01

    During routine maintenance, the coalescers utilized in the Modular Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction Unit (MCU) processing of Salt Batch 6 and a portion of Salt Batch 7 were sampled and submitted to the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) for characterization, for the purpose of identifying solid phase constituents that may be accumulating in these coalescers. Specifically, two samples were received and characterized: A decontaminated salt solution (DSS) coalescer sample and a strip effluent (SE) coalescer sample. Aliquots of the samples were analyzed by XRD, Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) Spectroscopy, SEM, and EDS. Other aliquots of the samples were leached in acid solution, and the leachates were analyzed by ICP-AES. In addition, modeling was performed to provide a basis for comparison of the analytical results.

  1. Cement based grouts - longevity laboratory studies: leaching behaviour

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report describes a series of laboratory tests carried out to determine the possible leaching behaviour of cement-based grouts in repository environments. A reference high-performance cement-based grout, comprised of Canadian Type 50 (U.S. Type V) Sulphate Resisting Portland Cement, silica fume, potable water and superplasticizer, and a commercially available cement grout were subjected to leaching in distilled water and three simulated groundwaters of different ionic strength. Hardened, monolithic specimens of the grout were leached in static, pulsed-flow and continuous flow conditions at temperatures from 10 degrees C to 150 degrees C for periods of up to 56 days. The changes in concentration of ions in the leachants with time were determined and the changes in the morphology of the surfaces of the grout specimens were examined using electron microscopy. After a review of possible mechanisms of degradation of cement-based materials, the data from these experiments are presented. The data show that the grouts will leach when in contact with water through dissolution of more soluble phases. Comparison of the leaching performance of the two grouts indicates that, while there are some minor differences, they behaved quite similarly. The rate of the leaching processes were found to tend to decrease with time and to be accompanied by precipitation and/or growth of an assemblage of secondary alteration phases (i.e., CaCO3, Mg(OH)2). The mechanisms of leaching depended on the environmental conditions of temperature, groundwater composition and water flow rate. Matrix dissolution occurred. However, in many of the tests leaching was shown to be limited by the precipitated/reaction layers which acted as protective surface coatings. (37 refs.) (au)

  2. Next Generation of Leaching Tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    A corresponding abstract has been cleared for this presentation. The four methods comprising the Leaching Environmental Assessment Framework are described along with the tools to support implementation of the more rigorous and accurate source terms that are developed using LEAF ...

  3. Studying the iodine leaching from the compositions based on epoxide resin and lead iodide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    When studying iodine leaching, the possibility to use solid compositions, produced by incorporation of dry powdered lead iodide and its aqueous suspension into epoxide resin for long-term immobilization of iodine-129 under conditions of monitored storage, is evaluated. Analysis of the results obtained has shown that leaching rate in the first 4 days has the maximum value and constitutes (4.2 - 2700.0) x 10-6 cm/day. Then the process of leaching is determined by diffusion mechanism. For samples, prepared by wet lead iodide incorporation the rate of leaching is higher than that of the corresponding samples prepared by dry compound incorporation

  4. Testing the Caustic Ring Dark Matter Halo Model Against Observations in the Milky Way

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumas, Julie; Newberg, Heidi Jo; Niedzielski, Bethany; Susser, Adam; Thompson, Jeffery M.; Weiss, Jake; Lewis, Kim M.

    2016-06-01

    One prediction of axion dark matter models is they can form Bose-Einstein condensates and rigid caustic rings as a halo collapses in the non-linear regime. In this thesis, we undertake the first study of a caustic ring model for the Milky Way halo (Duffy & Sikivie 2008), paying particular attention to observational consequences. We first present the formalism for calculating the gravitational acceleration of a caustic ring halo. The caustic ring dark matter theory reproduces a roughly logarithmic halo, with large perturbations near the rings. We show that this halo can reasonably match the known Galactic rotation curve. We are not able to confirm or rule out an association between the positions of the caustic rings and oscillations in the observed rotation curve, due to insufficient rotation curve data. We explore the effects of dark matter caustic rings on dwarf galaxy tidal disruption with N-body simulations. Simulations of the Sagittarius (Sgr) dwarf galaxy in a caustic ring halo potential, with disk and bulge parameters that are tuned to match the Galactic rotation curve, match observations of the Sgr trailing tidal tails as far as 90 kpc from the Galactic center. Like the Navarro-Frenk-White (NFW) halo, they are, however, unable to match the leading tidal tail. None of the caustic, NFW, or triaxial logarithmic halos are able to simultaneously match observations of the leading and trailing arms of the Sagittarius stream. We further show that simulations of dwarf galaxies that move through caustic rings are qualitatively similar to those moving in a logarithmic halo. This research was funded by NSF grant AST 10-09670, the NASA-NY Space Grant, and the American Fellowship from AAUW.

  5. In-situ leaching of south Texas uranium ores--part 1: laboratory studies of ore composition and leaching performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper presents data on mineralogy and laboratory chemical-leaching tests for ore samples from several areas of the south Texas tertiary Catahoula formation. Optical microscope, electron microprobe, spectroscopic, X-ray diffraction (XRD), and various chemical analyses were performed. Batch screening tests gave qualitative estimates of leach rate and potential recovery. Packed column tests using hydrogen peroxide or pressurized oxygen gave more quantitative recovery estimates. The frequently friable sandstones contained highly variable amounts of quartz, feldspar, calcite, and clay, and in some cases, zeolite or mica. Clays were mainly mixed layer illite/smectite type. High cation exchange capacities (CEC's) correlated with clay (and zeolite) content, while high reducing capacities were often associated with pyrite level. Coffinite, in various environments, was the main uranium mineral. With batch tests using pseudo-first-order rate constants, ore leach rates were generally characterized as ''fast'' on a scale of fast, intermediate, and slow. However, there was variability in leach rates, both in samples from different areas and in samples taken at different depths in the same well. Fast rates and recoveries greater than 80% were observed in most column pack tests, but there was variation with leachate composition and sample source. The chemistry and kinetics of leaching are also discussed

  6. In-situ leaching of south Texas uranium ores--Part 1: Laboratory studies of ore composition and leaching performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper presents data on mineralogy and laboratory chemical-leaching tests for ore samples from several areas of the south Texas tertiary Catahoula formation. Optical microscope, electron microprobe, spectroscopic, X-ray diffraction (XRD), and various chemical analyses were performed. Batch screening tests gave qualitative estimates of leach rate and potential recovery. Packed column tests using hydrogen peroxide or pressurized oxygen gave more quantitative recovery estimates. The frequently friable sandstones contained highly variable amounts of quartz, feldspar, calcite, and clay, and in some cases, zeolite or mica. Clays were mainly mixed layer illite/smectite type. High cation exchange capacities (CEC's) correlated with clay (and zeolite) content, while high reducing capacities were often associated with pyrite level. Coffinite, in various environments, was the main uranium mineral. With batch tests using pseudo-first-order rate constants, ore leach rates were generally characterized as ''fast'' on a scale of fast, intermediate, and slow. However, there was variability in leach rates, both in samples from different areas and in samples taken at different depths in the same well. Fast rates and recoveries greater than 80% were observed in most column pack tests, but there was variation with leachate composition and sample source. The chemistry and kinetics of leaching are also discussed

  7. Leaching mechanism of boric acid and cobalt from the paraffin waste form

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leach test with upper sections of the cylindrical paraffin waste forms was conducted to determine the leaching mechanism of boric acid and Cobalt. Using two specimens with different diameters, leaching rates of boric acid and Cobalt were measured in accordance with ANSI/ANS-16.1 standard leach test procedure for 30 days. After the leach test, the weight of the dried specimen was measured to confirm the leaching rates. The experiment result showed that the boric acid and Cobalt were congruently released by the diffusion-controlled dissolution, but Cobalt released a little bit more rapidly than the boric acid. One-dimensional shrinking core model based on the diffusion-controlled dissolution was derived to simulate the experiment result. The shrinking core model and experiment results showed a good agreement, and the model estimated the receding front of the boric acid accurately. Also, the earlier appearance of Cobalt can be explained with the shrinking core model

  8. Leaching of Silver from Boorchi Ag-Pb Ore in Mongolia with Acidic Thiourea Solution

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Nyamdelger Shirchinnamjil; 杨超; 方兆珩

    2008-01-01

    A hydrometalhirgical process to extract silver from the silver-lead ore in Boorchi, Mongolia by using thiourealeaching solution is studied in this work. Through the observation of optical and scanning electron microscopes, and energyspectral analysis, it is determined that 5 kinds of silver minerals exist in the ore, including argentite, Ag-tetrahedrite,Ag-Zn-Sb-tetrahedrite, freibergite and acanthite. The experimental results of direct thiourea leaching of the ore show that56%~60% of silver is leached. The main reason for the low leaching rate is due to silver minerals enveloped in galena andother minerals, even though the ore is ground to the particle size of 75 μm. When the ore is pretreated with ammoniumcarbonate solution under oxidation, the experimental results of thiourea leaching show that the leaching rate of silver increasesto near 75% with the pretreatment. Based on the leaching experiments, a principle hydrometallurgical technological route toextract silver from the Ag-Pb ore is proposed.

  9. The effects of pH and buffer materials on the leaching of simulated waste glass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Effects of pH, bentonite Portland cement on the leaching of the simulated waste glass were investigated. The simulated waste glass showed the low leach rate in the neutral pH region, which the leach rate in both acidic and alkaline regions increased. Addition of bentonite to the leachant enhanced the leaching of the waste glass. When the waste glass was leached at 72 deg c for 36 days in the ground water with gel state Na-bentonite, approximately 2.2 μm of the surface was corroded out and the large amount of Ti, Nd, and Zr was observed on the surface. The amount of B leached from the simulated waste glass in the presence of domestic bentonite was about three times higher than that in the presence of Aldrich bentonite as well as Portland cement. (author)

  10. Caustics, counting maps and semi-classical asymptotics

    CERN Document Server

    Ercolani, N M

    2009-01-01

    This paper develops a deeper understanding of the structure and combinatorial significance of the partition function for Hermitean random matrices. The coefficients of the large N expansion of the logarithm of this partition function, also known as the genus expansion, (and its derivatives) are generating functions for a variety of graphical enumeration problems. The main results are to prove that these generating functions are in fact specific rational functions of a distinguished irrational (algebraic) function of the generating function parameters. This distinguished function is itself the generating function for the Catalan numbers (or generalized Catalan numbers, depending on the choice of parameter). It is also a solution of the inviscid Burgers equation for certain initial data. The shock formation, or caustic, of the Burgers characteristic solution is directly related to the poles of the rational forms of the generating functions. These results in turn provide new information about the asymptotics of ...

  11. K-Area Acid/Caustic Basin groundwater monitoring report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    During fourth quarter 1992, samples from the KAC monitoring wells at the K-Area Acid/Caustic Basin were analyzed for indicator parameters, groundwater quality parameters, parameters indicating suitability as drinking water, and other constituents. New wells KAC 8 and 9 also were sampled for GC/MS VOA (gas chromatograph/mass spectrometer volatile organic analyses). Monitoring results that exceeded the final Primary Drinking Water Standards (PDWS) or the Savannah River Site (SRS) flagging criteria or turbidity standard during the quarter are discussed in this report. Iron exceeded the Flag 2 criterion in wells KAC 6 and 7, and specific conductance exceeded the Flag 2 criterion in new well KAC 9. No samples exceeded the SRS turbidity standard

  12. A Systematic Analysis of Caustic Methods for Galaxy Cluster Masses

    CERN Document Server

    Gifford, Daniel; Kern, Nicholas

    2013-01-01

    We quantify the expected observed statistical and systematic uncertainties of the escape velocity as a measure of the gravitational potential and total mass of galaxy clusters. We focus our attention on low redshift (z 25, the scatter in the escape velocity mass is dominated by projections along the line-of-sight. Algorithmic uncertainties from the determination of the projected escape velocity profile are negligible. We quantify how target selection based on magnitude, color, and projected radial separation can induce small additional biases into the escape velocity masses. Using N_gal = 150 (25), the caustic technique has a per cluster scatter in ln(M|M_200) of 0.3 (0.5) and bias 1+/-3% (16+/-5%) for clusters with masses > 10^14M_solar at z<0.15.

  13. F-Area Acid/Caustic Basin Groundwater Monitoring Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    During fourth quarter 1993, samples from the six FAC monitoring wells at the F-Area Acid/Caustic Basin were collected and analyzed for indicator parameters, groundwater quality parameters, parameters indicating suitability as drinking water, and other constituents. One of the FAC piezometers was scheduled for these analyses but was dry. Analytical results that exceeded the final Primary Drinking Water Standards (PDWS) or the Savannah River Site (SRS) flagging criteria or turbidity standard during the quarter are the focus of this report. Gross alpha exceeded the final PDWS in two wells. Aluminum exceeded its Flag 2 criterion in five wells. Iron exceeded standards in four wells, manganese exceeded standards in two wells, and total organic halogens exceeded standards in one well. Turbidity exceeded the SRS standard in well FAC 3

  14. H-Area Acid/Caustic Basin Groundwater Monitoring Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    During fourth quarter 1992, samples from the four HAC monitoring wells at the H-Area Acid/Caustic Basin received comprehensive analyses. Monitoring results that exceeded the final Primary Drinking Water Standards (PDWS) or the Savannah River Site (SRS) flagging criteria or turbidity standard during the quarter are the focus of this report. Tritium exceeded the final PDWS in wells HAC 1, 2, 3, and 4 during fourth quarter 1992. Tritium activities in upgradient well HAC 4 were similar to tritium levels in wells HAC 1, 2, and 3. Iron was elevated in well HAC 1, 2, and 3. Specific conductance and manganese were elevated in one downgradient well each. No well samples exceeded the SRS turbidity standard. During 1992, tritium was the only constituent that exceeded the final PDWS. It did so consistently in all four wells during all four quarters, with little variability in activity

  15. Biosorption of Copper Ions by Caustic Treated Waste Baker's Yeast Biomass

    OpenAIRE

    Göksungur, Yekta; ÜREN, Sibel; Güvenç, Ulgar

    2003-01-01

    Waste baker's yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) was used as a biosorbent for Cu+2 biosorption. The yeast cells were treated with caustic soda, ethanol and heat to increase their biosorption capacity. Among the treatment methods used, the highest copper uptake (21.1 mg g-1) was obtained with the caustic treatment of baker's yeast. The effect of initial copper concentration and pH on biosorption for caustic treated yeast was studied. The highest Cu+2 uptake (120.7 mg g-1) was obtained ...

  16. Studying the microlenses mass function from statistical analysis of the caustic concentration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mediavilla, T; Ariza, O [Departamento de Estadistica e Investigacion Operativa, Universidad de Cadiz, Avda de Ramon Puyol, s/n 11202 Algeciras (Spain); Mediavilla, E [Instituto de Astrofisica de Canarias, Avda Via Lactea s/n, La Laguna (Spain); Munoz, J A, E-mail: teresa.mediavilla@ca.uca.es, E-mail: octavio.ariza@uca.es, E-mail: emg@iac.es [Departamento de Astrofisica y Astronomia, Universidad de Valencia, Burjassot, Valencia (Spain)

    2011-09-22

    The statistical distribution of caustic crossings by the images of a lensed quasar depends on the properties of the distribution of microlenses in the lens galaxy. We use a procedure based in Inverse Polygon Mapping to easily identify the critical and caustic curves generated by a distribution of stars in the lens galaxy. We analyze the statistical distributions of the number of caustic crossings by a pixel size source for several projected mass densities and different mass distributions. We compare the results of simulations with theoretical binomial distributions. Finally we apply this method to the study of the stellar mass distribution in the lens galaxy of QSO 2237+0305.

  17. The current status of glass leaching studies in France

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glass has been selected in France as the material used to confine the activity of fission product solutions, and a continuous vitrification process has been developed at the Marcoule Vitrification Facility (AVM), the first industrial plant. Borosilicate glass was chosen in various compositions for its properties: it is a homogeneous, non-porous material that incorporates appreciable quantities of most of the fission product oxides, and is only alterable at the surface interface layer. Glass thus constitutes the primary radioactivity containment barrier, and it is essential to determine its long-term behavior. Water constitutes the principal hazard during temporary or definitive storage of the glass blocks. Two types of inherent material properties are studied from the standpoint of glass stability under leaching conditions: - chemical durability; - radioactive containability with regard to the various radionuclides, fission products and especially the actinides. Durability tests are carried out in SOXHLET devices and the alteration rates are measured by the weight loss. The containability is measured by the leach rate, i.e. by the rate of activity loss into the water. Leaching tests are conducted for several major objectives: - selection of glass compositions (leach rates); - leaching mechanism studies (hydrolyzed layer characteristics, effects of temperature, pressure, pH, etc.); - long-term behavior studies (glass specimens doped with alpha-emitters); - simulation of geological repository environments

  18. Kinetics of Aqueous Leaching and Carbonization of Steelmaking Slag

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lekakh, S. N.; Rawlins, C. H.; Robertson, D. G. C.; Richards, V. L.; Peaslee, K. D.

    2008-02-01

    Sequestration of carbon dioxide by steelmaking slag was studied in an atmospheric three-phase system containing industrial slag particles, water, and CO2 gas. Batch-type reactors were used to measure the rate of aqueous alkaline leaching and slag particle carbonization independently. Four sizes of slag particles were tested for the Ca leaching rate in deionized water at a constant 7.5 pH in an argon atmosphere and for carbonate conversion with CO2 bubbled through an aqueous suspension. Conversion data (fraction of Ca leached or converted to carbonate) were evaluated to determine the rate-limiting step based on the shrinking core model. For Ca leaching, the chemical reaction is the controlling mechanism during the initial period of time, which then switches to diffusion through the developed porous layer as the rate-limiting step. Carbonate conversion proceeded much slower than leaching conversion and was found to be limited by diffusion through the product calcium carbonate layer. The calculated value of diffusivity was found to be 5 × 10-9 cm2/s, which decreased by an order of magnitude with increasing carbonization conversion as a result of changing density of the product layer. The experimental data fit the shrinking core model well after correction for the particle specific surface area.

  19. Effects of Pb on the Stress Corrosion Cracking of Alloy 600 in Weak Caustic Water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effects of lead on the stress corrosion cracking of Alloy 600 were investigated in weak caustic water at high temperature by Slow Strain Rate Test (SSRT). The extent and morphology of cracking were analyzed by Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM). The chemical compositions on the fracture surface were analyzed by Wavelength Dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (WDX). Alloy 600 was cracked severely under the condition of 100 ppm Pb, 1 x 10-7sec-1. PbO acted as a role of oxidizer on the surface of Alloy 600, and IGA and SCC occurred at a low concentration of PbO, while SCC only occurred at a high concentration of PbO. The strain rate is a critical factor in this SCC test, no SCC occurred in the solution containing 1000 ppm Pb at strain rates of 5x10-7 and 1 x 10-6sec-1. The transgranular stress corrosion cracking of Alloy 600 in lead doped water may be closely associated with the carbide morphology at a grain boundary, the lead concentration and the strain rate. And the transgranular cracking mechanism of Alloy 600 was interpreted on the base of the anodic dissolution followed by active slip step dissolution

  20. Intragranular porosity in Hanford sand grains after reaction with caustic tank wastes: Quantification and implications for reactive transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crandell, L. E.; Peters, C. A.; Um, W.; Jones, K. W.; Lindquist, W. B.

    2011-12-01

    Reactions of caustic tank waste with sediments in the 200 East Area of the Hanford site cause quartz and primary aluminosilicate minerals to dissolve. Secondary minerals of sodalite and cancrinite have been shown to nucleate on, and cement together, quartz grains. These secondary precipitates have been found to uptake radionuclides in their network of channels and cages. In this work, thin sections from unreacted and reacted column experiments packed with Hanford sand grains were imaged using 2D Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM). SEM image analysis reveals large amounts of intragranular pore space in both the reacted and unreacted sands. Grayscale Backscattered Electron (BSE) images were thresholded to separate grain and pore pixels. To quantify the amount of intragranular pore space, a set of images were manually created with the intragranular pore space removed, or the grains filled-in. Porosity, and intragranular porosity, was determined by counting and comparing the number of pore pixels in each pair of images. Intragranular pore space accounts for up to 14% of total porosity. Quartz dissolution in intragranular regions increases the proportion of intragranular pore space in reacted samples. Diffusion of tank waste into these free silica rich areas provides a favorable environment for cancrinite precipitates to form and a potential significant trapping mechanism for radionuclides. Part of this work was to quantify where, within a single pore and a network of pores, precipitation occurred. While the bulk amount of cancrinite precipitation occurred on grain surfaces, cancrinite precipitates were also found in intragranular pore spaces. Up to 10% of total precipitation occurred in intragranular pore space. However, as the system recovers and clean water flow returns, radionuclides incorporated into precipitates in intragranular regions may act as a secondary long term leaching source for contaminants. To determine the trapping or leaching potential from

  1. Leaching characteristics of heavy metals and brominated flame retardants from waste printed circuit boards

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► Cu and Pb were the most leachable heavy metals in WPCBs according to TCLP and SPLP. ► Penta-BDE congeners were dominated in all extracts. ► High dissolved organic matter condition promoted the BFRs leaching rate. ► Leaching from WPCBs was a significant emission source of BFRs in landfill. -- Abstract: Leaching assessment on five heavy metals (copper, zinc, lead, nickel and cadmium) and two brominated flame retardants (BFRs), polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) and tetrabromobisphenol A (TBBPA), from waste printed circuit boards (WPCBs) were conducted using various leaching methods. The mean leaching concentrations of copper were the highest in both toxicity characteristic leaching procedures (TCLP) and synthetic precipitation leaching procedures (SPLP) tests at 8.6 mg/L and 1.1 mg/L, while only lead (6.2 mg/L) exceeded the TCLP criteria and Chinese EPA regulatory limit (both 5.0 mg/L). However, PBDEs and TBBPA were not detected in TCLP and SPLP tests. Then the BFRs leaching trends and potential leachabilities were further investigated in actual landfill leachates using a modified method. Leaching characteristics that fast-leaching initially followed by slow-desorption over time were generally observed. In landfill leachate tests, the highest leaching concentrations of PBDEs and TBBPA were determined at 30.39 and 12.27 μg/L. Meanwhile, the highest leaching rates were estimated to reach 0.08% and 1.00%, respectively, which were significantly influenced by the dissolved organic carbon contents of extracts, the hydrophobicities of target BFRs and the specific surface areas of WPCBs materials. These results proved that leaching from WPCBs was a significant emission source of BFRs in landfill and electronic waste recycling dumpsite

  2. Evaluation of glass leaching as nutrient source for microalgae growth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Three glasses with an elemental composition similar to the nutrient ratio required for Spirulina platensis growth and with different SiO2 content have been prepared. The glasses were crushed and sieved into 2 different fractions and the effect of the particle size has been studied in terms of the leaching kinetics of each element. The chemical analysis of the leaching water was used for obtaining the dissolution rate curves for each element taking part of the glass composition. From the calculation of the leaching rate constant and the exponential constant of the lixiviation reaction, it has been evaluated the Spirulina platensis growth in ambient normal conditions of light, temperature and pH of the growing media. It has been concluded that, either from the modification of the chemical composition of the glass or its particle size, it is possible to tune the delivery of the nutrients to match the growth rate of Spirulina platensis. (Author)

  3. Carbonate heap leach of uranium-contaminated soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A new approach to removal of uranium from soils based on existing heap leach mining technologies proved highly effective for remediation of soils from the Fernald Environmental Management Project (FEMP) near Cincinnati, Ohio. In laboratory tests, remediation of uranium-contaminated soils by heap leaching with carbonate salt solutions was demonstrated in column experiments. An understanding of the chemical processes that occur during carbonate leach of uranium from soils may lead to enhancement of uranium removal. Carbonate leaching requires the use of an integrated and closed circuit process, wherein the leach solutions are recycled and the reagents are reused, resulting in a minimum secondary waste stream. Carbonate salt leach solution has two important roles. Primarily, the formation of highly soluble anionic carbonate uranyl species, including uranyl dicarbonate (UO2CO32=) and uranyl tricarbonate (UO2CO334-), allows for high concentration of uranium in a leachate solution. Secondly, carbonate salts are nearly selective for dissolution of uranium from uranium contaminated soils. Other advantages of the carbonate leaching process include (1) the high solubility, (2) the selectivity, (3) the purity of the solution produced, (4) the relative ease with which a uranium product can be precipitated directly from the leachate solution, and (5) the relatively non-corrosive and safe handling characteristics of carbonate solutions. Experiments conducted in the laboratory have demonstrated the effectiveness of carbonate leach. Efficiencies of uranium removal from the soils have been as high as 92 percent. Higher molar strength carbonate solutions (∼0.5M) proved more effective than lower molar strength solutions (∼ 0.1M). Uranium removal is also a function of lixiviant loading rate. Furthermore, agglomeration of the soils with cement resulted in less effective uranium removal

  4. Computer simulation of the leaching and washing of waste in tanks C-106, AY-102, AZ-101, and AZ-102

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    MacLean, G.T.

    1997-05-01

    The waste in underground storage tanks C-106, AY-102, AZ-101, and AZ-102 will be used to prepare feed material for the proposed high level waste vitrification demonstration plant at Hanford. A chemical process simulation computer program called the Environment Simulation Program (ESP) was used to estimate the compositions and quantities of this waste and the products after pretreatment processing. The amount of precipitated material in Tank C-106 predicted to be dissolved by sluicing is 27 wt.%. The amount of precipitated material predicted to be dissolved by mild leaching is about 30% for the C-106 and AY-102 combined waste and about 50% for AZ-101, and 35% for AZ-102 wastes. The predicted caustic solution raw material requirements for leaching are 158 m{sup 3} for C-106 and AY-102, 60 m{sup 3} for AZ-101, and 146 m{sup 3} for AZ-102, all as 50 wt.% NAOH.

  5. Computer simulation of the leaching and washing of waste in tanks C-106, AY-102, AZ-101, and AZ-102

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The waste in underground storage tanks C-106, AY-102, AZ-101, and AZ-102 will be used to prepare feed material for the proposed high level waste vitrification demonstration plant at Hanford. A chemical process simulation computer program called the Environment Simulation Program (ESP) was used to estimate the compositions and quantities of this waste and the products after pretreatment processing. The amount of precipitated material in Tank C-106 predicted to be dissolved by sluicing is 27 wt.%. The amount of precipitated material predicted to be dissolved by mild leaching is about 30% for the C-106 and AY-102 combined waste and about 50% for AZ-101, and 35% for AZ-102 wastes. The predicted caustic solution raw material requirements for leaching are 158 m3 for C-106 and AY-102, 60 m3 for AZ-101, and 146 m3 for AZ-102, all as 50 wt.% NAOH

  6. Preparation of manganese sulfate from low-grade manganese carbonate ores by sulfuric acid leaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Qing-quan; Gu, Guo-hua; Wang, Hui; Zhu, Ren-feng; Liu, You-cai; Fu, Jian-gang

    2016-05-01

    In this study, a method for preparing pure manganese sulfate from low-grade ores with a granule mean size of 0.47 mm by direct acid leaching was developed. The effects of the types of leaching agents, sulfuric acid concentration, reaction temperature, and agitation rate on the leaching efficiency of manganese were investigated. We observed that sulfuric acid used as a leaching agent provides a similar leaching efficiency of manganese and superior selectivity against calcium compared to hydrochloric acid. The optimal leaching conditions in sulfuric acid media were determined; under the optimal conditions, the leaching efficiencies of Mn and Ca were 92.42% and 9.61%, respectively. Moreover, the kinetics of manganese leaching indicated that the leaching follows the diffusion-controlled model with an apparent activation energy of 12.28 kJ·mol-1. The purification conditions of the leaching solution were also discussed. The results show that manganese dioxide is a suitable oxidant of ferrous ions and sodium dimethyldithiocarbamate is an effective precipitant of heavy metals. Finally, through chemical analysis and X-ray diffraction analysis, the obtained product was determined to contain 98% of MnSO4·H2O.

  7. Identifying appropriate conditions for producing spindle-like causticizing precipitated calcium carbonate for paper filler applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin Wang

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Causticizing precipitated calcium carbonate (CPCC as a by-product of the green liquor causticizing process can be used as paper filler to save resources and reduce costs. In this study, CPCC was prepared with green liquor and quicklime, which were obtained from an alkali recovery line of a paper mill. The factors influencing crystal morphology of CPCC, such as slaking temperature, slaking time, and causticizing time were investigated. The morphology of CPCC was observed and analyzed for optimizing reaction conditions. The following were compared: properties of CPCC obtained in this study, conventional CPCC (white mud from a paper mill, and commercial PCC as fillers. The results showed that slaking time and causticizing time were important for morphology control. Spindle-like and rod-like CPCC obtained in this study had better drainability and retention, higher paper bulk, opacity, and physical strength compared to conventional CPCC, and had nearly the same performances as commercial PCC.

  8. Caustics of 1/rn binary gravitational lenses: from galactic haloes to exotic matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bozza, V.; Melchiorre, C.

    2016-03-01

    We investigate the caustic topologies for binary gravitational lenses made up of two objects whose gravitational potential declines as 1/rn. With n1 regime can be obtained with some violations of the energy conditions, one famous example being the Ellis wormhole. Gravitational lensing provides a natural arena to distinguish and identify such exotic objects in our Universe. We find that there are still three topologies for caustics as in the standard Schwarzschild binary lens, with the main novelty coming from the secondary caustics of the close topology, which become huge at higher n. After drawing caustics by numerical methods, we derive a large amount of analytical formulae in all limits that are useful to provide deeper insight in the mathematics of the problem. Our study is useful to better understand the phenomenology of galaxy lensing in clusters as well as the distinct signatures of exotic matter in complex systems.

  9. Industrial Experience on the Caustic Cracking of Stainless Steels and Nickel Alloys - A Review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rebak, R B

    2005-10-09

    Caustic environments are present in several industries, from nuclear power generation to the fabrication of alkalis and alumina. The most common material of construction is carbon steel but its application is limited to a maximum temperature of approximately 80 C. The use of Nickel (Ni) alloys is recommended at higher temperatures. Commercially pure Ni is the most resistant material for caustic applications both from the general corrosion and the stress corrosion cracking (SCC) perspectives. Nickel rich alloys also offer a good performance. The most important alloying elements are Ni and chromium (Cr). Molybdenum (Mo) is not a beneficial alloying element and it dissolves preferentially from the alloy in presence of caustic environments. Austenitic stainless steels such as type 304 and 316 seem less resistant to caustic conditions than even plain carbon steel. Experimental evidence shows that the most likely mechanism for SCC is anodic dissolution.

  10. From Pop-Up Cards to Coffee-Cup Caustics: The Knight's Visor

    OpenAIRE

    Jakus, Stephanie; O'Rourke, Joseph

    2012-01-01

    As a pedagogical exercise, we derive the shape of a particularly elegant pop-up card design, and show that it connects to a classically studied plane curve that is (among other interpretations) a caustic of a circle.

  11. On the behaviour of test matter in the neighbourhood of caustics of homogeneous cosmological models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Using power asymptotes for the metric of the BIANCHI types I, V, VII0, VIII and IX the intensity of geodesic focused scalar test matter is calculated in the neighbourhood of the caustic singularity of these space-time models. In all considered BIANCHI types there is a caustic diffraction with a diffraction field bounded by regions of extinction depending on the structure of the gravitational lense. (author)

  12. Exploration on trickle leaching of uranium ore by refreshed liquor of bacterial oxidation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The paper describes the adaptation of the domesticated thiobacillus ferroxidans to the trickle leaching conditions of uranium ore. When the bacterial leaching liquor through multiple cycles of oxidation and regeneration was used to return to the trickle leaching, the following results were obtained: the extraction rate was more than 95%, the acid consumption was saved by 30%, and the consumed 2.0% pyrolusite (MnO240%) was eliminated. The following problems are discussed: the basic principle, process and some factors influencing the process of the trickle leaching of uranium ore using regenerated liquor of bacterial oxidation, counter-current trickle leaching mode, oxidation and regeneration techniques of bacterial leaching liquor and other technological problems on the process of uranium extraction by thiobacillus ferroxidans

  13. Feasibility study for an additional HEPA filter leaching system in NWCF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report documents the feasibility of installing a second high-efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filter leaching system in the New Waste Calcining Facility at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP). A large spent filter backlog already exists at the ICPP, and it has been uncertain whether the existing HEPA filter leaching system will have a throughput rate sufficient to work off the existing backlog in a timely manner. Three areas within the New Waste Calcining Facility (NWCF) have been identified as possible locations for a second filter leaching system. This report examines the suitability of each location, identifies modifications that would be necessary-to install a filter leaching system at each location, examines the impact of modifying each location, and discusses recent efforts to estimate filter throughput using the existing filter leaching system. Based on all available information, installation of a second filter leaching system is not recommended at the present time

  14. Leaching studies of soda-lime-silica glass using deuterium- and 18O-enriched solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    With a glass of composition (in mol%) 74 SiO2,16 NaO, 10 CaO, various leaching experiments were conducted, in which besides solutions of normal isotopic composition deuterium- and 18O-enriched solutions were used. The concentration profiles of deuterium, hydrogen, and 18O in the sample were measured with nuclear analyzing techniques. A distinct H/D isotope effect was observed, showing that hydrogen takes part in the rate-determining step of leaching. The measured ratio of 18O uptake to hydrogen uptake during leaching gives evidence for exchange of oxygen between the glas network and water molecules contained in the leached layer. From measurements on the exchange of hydrogen and oxygen between solution and leached layer, a high mobility of water molecules in the leached layer and evidence for condensation of silanol groups was found. (orig.)

  15. Experiment and modeling for solvent leaching from paint matrix considering equilibrium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The leaching behavior of remaining solvent from an epoxy paint coating when it is submerged in water was experimentally studied. A leach kinetics model considering the equilibrium of the solvent concentration in the paint matrix and in water was developed. Three model parameters, equilibrium constant K, leaching rate kd, and initial concentration of the solvent in the paint Cp0, were evaluated based on the experimental results, and empirical correlation equations for them were obtained. The model showed good qualitative and quantitative agreement with the observed evolution of the leached solvent mass in the present experiment. Also, the model showed consistency with experimental data in a different configuration. (author)

  16. The influence of mechanical activation of chalcopyrite on the selective leaching of copper by sulphuric acid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Achimovičová, M.

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper chalcopyrite, CuFeS2, has been selective leached by H2SO4 as leaching agent (170 g/dm3 in procedure of hydrometallurgical production of copper. Mechanical activation of the chalcopyrite resulted in mechanochemical surface oxidation as well as in the mineral surface and bulk disordering. Furthermore, the formation of agglomerates during grinding was also occured. Surface changes of the samples using infrared spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy methods were investigated before and after leaching. The leaching rate, specific surface area, structural disorder as well as copper extraction increased with the mechanical activation of mineral.

  17. Stress corrosion cracking behaviour of two Ni-Cr-Mo-V steels in caustic solutions and pure oxygenated water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maday, M.F.; Mignone, A.; Borello, A.

    1987-01-01

    The purpose of this work is to evaluate the stress corrosion cracking (SCC) behaviour of two NiCrMoV alloys of Italian production, that are materials used for low pressure (LP) turbine discs in LWR nuclear plants. All the tests reported in this investigation have been performed using the slow strain rate technique (SSRT). A first set of experiments has been conducted in pure deaerated caustic solutions in a static NI autoclave system, in order to determine the effects of temperature and NaOH concentration on the SCC behaviour of these materials. In a second set of tests, the influence of the oxygen content on cracking was studied; for this purpose, specimens were strained to fracture at 200/sup 0/C in pure water with various amounts of oxygen; a refreshed autoclave system was used to permit a continuous monitoring of the chemical parameters. Both alloys showed a decreasing SCC susceptibility as NaOH concentration and temperature decreased. The alloy with lower Ni content seemed to behave slightly better in caustic solutions and somewhat worse in pure oxygenated water.

  18. Stress corrosion cracking behaviour of two Ni-Cr-Mo-V steels in caustic solutions and pure oxygenated water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this work is to evaluate the stress corrosion cracking (SCC) behaviour of two NiCrMoV alloys of Italian production, that are materials used for low pressure (LP) turbine discs in LWR nuclear plants. All the tests reported in this investigation have been performed using the slow strain rate technique (SSRT). A first set of experiments has been conducted in pure deaerated caustic solutions in a static NI autoclave system, in order to determine the effects of temperature and NaOH concentration on the SCC behaviour of these materials. In a second set of tests, the influence of the oxygen content on cracking was studied; for this purpose, specimens were strained to fracture at 2000C in pure water with various amounts of oxygen; a refreshed autoclave system was used to permit a continuous monitoring of the chemical parameters. Both alloys showed a decreasing SCC susceptibility as NaOH concentration and temperature decreased. The alloy with lower Ni content seemed to behave slightly better in caustic solutions and somewhat worse in pure oxygenated water

  19. Characterization, Leaching, and Filtration Testing for Tributyl Phosphate (TBP, Group 7) Actual Waste Sample Composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Edwards, Matthew K.; Billing, Justin M.; Blanchard, David L.; Buck, Edgar C.; Casella, Amanda J.; Casella, Andrew M.; Crum, J. V.; Daniel, Richard C.; Draper, Kathryn E.; Fiskum, Sandra K.; Jagoda, Lynette K.; Jenson, Evan D.; Kozelisky, Anne E.; MacFarlan, Paul J.; Peterson, Reid A.; Shimskey, Rick W.; Snow, Lanee A.; Swoboda, Robert G.

    2009-03-09

    .A testing program evaluating actual tank waste was developed in response to Task 4 from the M-12 External Flowsheet Review Team (EFRT) issue response plan. The bulk water-insoluble solid wastes that are anticipated to be delivered to the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) were identified according to type such that the actual waste testing could be targeted to the relevant categories. Eight broad waste groupings were defined. Samples available from the 222S archive were identified and obtained for testing. The actual waste-testing program included homogenizing the samples by group, characterizing the solids and aqueous phases, and performing parametric leaching tests. The tributyl phosphate sludge (TBP, Group 7) is the subject of this report. The Group 7 waste was anticipated to be high in phosphorus as well as aluminum in the form of gibbsite. Both are believed to exist in sufficient quantities in the Group 7 waste to address leaching behavior. Thus, the focus of the Group 7 testing was on the removal of both P and Al. The waste-type definition, archived sample conditions, homogenization activities, characterization (physical, chemical, radioisotope, and crystal habit), and caustic leaching behavior as functions of time, temperature, and hydroxide concentration are discussed in this report. Testing was conducted according to TP-RPP-WTP-467.

  20. Behavior of SiO2 in the leaching process of alumina clinker with high concentration

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Bin Chen; Xiaobin Li; Guihua Liu

    2008-01-01

    It is essential for alumina production by alkaline process to know the behavior of minerals containing Al and Si in basic solution, and the behavior of SiO2 in the process of clinker leaching is an important portion. To study the behavior of SiO2 in the process of high concentration clinker leaching, experiments were carried out in home-made reactors. The results indicate that factors,such as temperature, time, Al2O3 concentration, as well as SiO2 concentration, have profound impact on the SiO2 and Al2O3 concen-tration of pregnant liquor during the high concentration leaching. However, sodium carbonate and free caustic soda concentrations have no remarkable effect on it, thus they are the secondary factors compared with Al203 concentration. The concentration of SiO2 in the pregnant liquor could be reduced to a lower level when the major effect parameters of this process are controlled properly.

  1. Scaling-Free Electrochemical Production of Caustic and Oxygen for Sulfide Control in Sewers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Hui-Wen; Rabaey, Korneel; Keller, Jürg; Yuan, Zhiguo; Pikaar, Ilje

    2015-10-01

    Caustic shock-loading and oxygen injection are commonly used by the water industry for biofilm and sulfide control in sewers. Caustic can be produced onsite from wastewater using a two-compartment electrochemical cell. This avoids the need for import and storage of caustic soda, which typically represents a cost and a hazard. An issue limiting the practical implementation of this approach is the occurrence of membrane scaling due to the almost universal presence of Ca(2+) and Mg(2+) in wastewater. It results in a rapid increase in the cell voltage, thereby increasing the energy consumption of the system. Here, we propose and experimentally demonstrate an innovative solution for this problem involving the inclusion of a middle compartment between the anode and cathode compartments. Caustic was efficiently produced from wastewater over a period of 12 weeks and had an average Coulombic efficiency (CE) of 84.1 ± 1.1% at practically relevant caustic strengths (∼3 wt %). Neither membrane scaling nor an increase in the cell voltage was observed throughout the experiments. In addition, dissolved oxygen was produced in the anode, resulting in continuously oxygenated wastewater leaving the three-compartment cell. This membrane-scaling control strategy represents a major step forward toward practical implementation of on-site simultaneous electrochemical caustic and oxygen generation for sulfide control in sewers and also has the potential to be applied to other (bio)electrochemical systems receiving wastewater as source for product recovery. PMID:26377687

  2. Isochromatics and caustics around the tips of interface cracks observed by digital image processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Photoelasticity and the caustic method are two useful optical techniques for the investigation of mixed-mode crack problems and other stress concentration problems in the vicinity of holes and bores as well as for the evaluation of contact problems. The geometry of the caustics is proportional to the stress field gradient and therefore the caustic contour can be taken as a quantity for experimental measurements. In this paper, an overview about the numerical simulation and experimental modelling of cracks arising in plane disk-like models of two-phase composite structures will be given. Shadow optical and photoelastic data were collected from digitally sharpened isochromatic fringe patterns and caustics by using a digital image analysis system. By utilizing digital image processing and computergraphics techniques, a set of menu-driven software is developed for interactively implemented caustics and fringes processing. Stress intensity factors were also obtained by a special shadow optical-grid-method and the multi-point method of caustics and isochromatics, respectively. (orig.)

  3. Model for leaching of SRP waste glass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The leachability of glass has been studied by many different techniques. Most of the theoretical work has focused on only very simple glass systems. This work has lead to the identification of two main stages of glass corrosion - interdiffusion and matrix dissolution. These corrosion modes alone are inadequate to fully describe leaching of the more complicated waste glass systems. Recent work at Savannah River Laboratory (SRL) has identified a further stage of corrosion for waste glass compositions - surface layer formation. The formation and stability of protective surface layers are believed to be the most important factors affecting long-term performance of waste glass products during permanent storage. An SRL leachability model has been developed which assumes that glass corrodes congruently. The rate of corrosion is controlled by the rate of reaction of amorphous silica with water as well as the rate of diffusion of soluble silicates through the insoluble layer between the glass and the bulk solution. The thickness of the insoluble layer is proportional to the amount of glass that has dissolved from the start of the experiment. The silicate concentration gradient in the layer is equal to the difference between the silicate concentration at the glass layer interface and that in the bulk leachate divided by the layer thickness. A general equation for leaching of waste glass was derived from this model. 1 figure

  4. Simulation of in situ uraninite leaching

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In situ leaching of uraninite is relevant to both uranium production processes and environmental remediation. In situ leaching of uraninite and calcite by H2O2-NH4HCO3-(NH4)2CO3 solutions has been simulated using a partial equilibrium model which incorporates a one-parameter mixing cell model of solution flow. Rate laws for UO2 dissolution and for CaCO3 dissolution/precipitation were taken from the literature, as were equilibrium constants for solution phase reactions. Parameters of the model include the UO2 and CaCO3 ore grades, the concentrations of the H2O2, NH4HCO3, and (NH4)2CO3 components, porosity, exit solution flow rate, ore and mineral densities, and mineral rate constants and surface areas. Mineral conversions, component and species concentrations, and porosity are among the time-dependent quantities calculated using the model. For the conditions simulated, calcite dissolved somewhat faster than uraninite. The results emphasize the importance of the coupling between the mineral reactions and solution flow. Changes in the concentrations of the CO2-3 and HCO-3 species are particularly complicated and not predictable from the calcite kinetics alone or from a purely equilibrium model; although the simulations did not reveal any conditions under which the solution would become saturated with CaCO3, the pH continued to change throughout the calcite dissolution and is buffered only after calcite has been consumed

  5. Dephosphorization of Steelmaking Slag by Leaching with Acidic Aqueous Solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiao, Yong; Diao, Jiang; Liu, Xuan; Li, Xiaosa; Zhang, Tao; Xie, Bing

    2015-12-01

    In the present paper, dephosphorization of steelmaking slag by leaching with acidic aqueous solution composed of citric acid, sodium hydroxide, hydrochloric acid and ion-exchanged water was investigated. The buffer solution of C6H8O7-NaOH-HCl system prevented changes in the pH values. Kinetic parameters including leaching temperature, slag particle size and pH values of the solution were optimized. The results showed that temperature has no obvious effect on the dissolution ratio of phosphorus. However, it has a significant effect on the dissolution ratio of iron. The dephosphorization rate increases with the decrease of slag particle size and the pH value of the solution. Over 90% of the phosphorus can be dissolved in the solution while the corresponding leaching ratio of iron was only 30% below the optimal condition. Leaching kinetics of dephosphorization follow the unreacted shrinking core model with a rate controlled step by the solid diffusion layer, the corresponding apparent activation energy being 1.233 kJ mol-1. A semiempirical kinetic equation was established. After leaching, most of the nC2S-C3P solid solution in the steelmaking slag was selectively dissolved in the aqueous solution and the iron content in the solid residue was correspondingly enriched.

  6. Caustic stress corrosion cracking of NiCrMoV rotor steels—The effects of impurity segregation and variation in alloy composition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bandyopadhyay, N.; Briant, C. L.

    1983-10-01

    This paper reports a study of the effects of phosphorus, tin, and molybdenum on the caustic stress corrosion cracking susceptibility of NiCrMoV rotor steels. Constant load tests were performed on these steels in 9M NaOH at 98 ± 1 °C at a controlled potential of either -800 mVHg/Hgo or -400 mVHg/Hgo. Times to failure were measured. The results show that at a potential of -400 mVHg/Hgo the segregation of phosphorus to grain boundaries lowers the resistance of these steels to caustic stress corrosion cracking. When molybdenum is removed from a steel that has phosphorus segregated to the grain boundaries, the steel’s resistance to stress corrosion cracking is improved. High purity alloys, both with and without molybdenum, show very good resistance to caustic cracking at this potential. At-800 mVHg/Hgo segregated phophorus has no effect; only molybdenum additions lower the resistance of the steel to caustic stress corrosion cracking. Segregated tin has little effect at either potential. Metallographic examination shows that one explanation for these results is that molybdenum and phosphorus, probably as anions precipitated from solution, aid in passivating the sides of the crack and thus help keep the crack tip sharp. This sharpness will increase the speed with which the crack will propagate through the sample. Furthermore, removal of molybdenum greatly increases the number of cracks which nucleate. This higher crack density would increase the relative area of the anode to the cathode and thus act to decrease the crack growth rate.

  7. Single-pass continuous-flow leach test of PNL 76-68 glass: some selected Bead Leach I results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A single-pass continuous-flow leach test of PNL 76-68 glass beads (7 mm dia) was concluded after 420 days of uninterrupted operation. Variables included in the experimental matrix were flow-rate, leachant composition, and temperature. Analysis was conducted on all leachate samples for 237Np and 239Pu as well as a number of nonradioactive elements. Results indicated that flow-rate and leachant systematically affected the leach rate, but only slightly. Temperature effects were significant. Plutonium leach rate was lower at higher temperature suggesting that Pu sorption onto the beads was enhanced at the higher temperature. The range of leach rates for all analyzed elements (except Pu), at both temperatures, at all three flow rates, and with all three leachant compositions varied over only three orders of magnitude. The range of variables used in this experiment covered those expected in many proposed repository environments. The preliminary interpretation of the results aPPh3 also reacted with Mn2(CO)10 and Cp2Mo2(CO)6 to give a variety of products at room temperature. A radical mechanism was suggested

  8. The effects of types of media on uranium leaching using metabolite of Aspergillus niger

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To investigate the influences of different media to uranium leaching applying with metabolite of Aspergillus niger, PSA and glucose-steepwater medium were used for the culture of Aspergillus niger, and the metabolite of Aspergillus niger with different pH value produced in the diverse culture temperature were obtained which was applied on the tests of uranium leaching as leaching agent. The test results show that the maximum leaching rate is 83.05% when the leaching agent is the metabolite of Aspergillus niger produced by PSA, as for the glucose- steepwater medium, the maximum leaching rate is 68.20%. The pH value of the metabolite of Aspergillus niger of the two kinds of media has a significant effect on the leaching rate. When PSA is adopted, the best leaching rate appears at the pH value of metabolite ranging from 2.0 to 2.5, and as for the glucose-steepwater medium, the pH value is below 2.1. (authors)

  9. Study on pressure alkaline leaching and its application to uranium ores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The chemical processes and mechanism of pressure leaching of uranium ore and the factors affecting leaching rates are discussed in this paper. The results of bench scale experiments, the data from pilot plant operations and the data from industrial productions in a mill are also presented

  10. Hanford tank waste oxidative leach behavior analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper study develops a modeling assumption for oxidative leaching Hanford tank wastes based on observed behavior of a limited set of samples tested. Oxidative Leaching of solids from Hanford tank wastes can reduce chromium concentrations appreciably

  11. H-Area Acid/Caustic Basin Groundwater Monitoring Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The four monitoring wells at the H-Area Acid/Caustic Basin are sampled quarterly as part of the Savannah River Site (SRS) Groundwater Monitoring Program and to comply with a consent decree signed May 26, 1988, by the US District Court (District of South Carolina, Aiken Division). During fourth quarter 1993, samples from the monitoring wells received comprehensive analyses. Monitoring results that exceeded the final Primary Drinking Water Standards (PDWS), the SRS flagging criteria, or the SRS turbidity standard are the focus of this report. During fourth quarter 1993, tritium exceeded the final PDWS in all four HAC wells, with activities between 3.8E + 01 and 4.6E + 01 pCi/mL. Aluminum exceeded its Flag 2 criterion in wells HAC 2, 3, and 4. Iron exceeded its Flag 2 criterion in wells HAC 1, 2, and 3. Specific conductance was elevated in well HAC 2, total organic halogens exceeded its Flag 2 criterion in wells HAC 2 and 3, and manganese was elevated in wells HAC 3 and 4. No well samples exceeded the SRS turbidity standard

  12. Our experience with caustic oesophageal burn in South of Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyed M. V. Hosseini

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: The alkaline oesophageal burn (EB is a very debilitating injury and common in the southern rural area of Iran, where the air conditioning systems are cleaned with an alkaline liquid, which is accidentally ingested by children. Aims: The aim is to share our experiences with caustic injury in children. Settings and Design : A ′before′ and ′after′ clinical trial. Materials and Methods: From November 2006-2009, 35 cases of alkaline burns were referred to our center. All underwent flexible endoscopy and thereafter received steroid, antibiotic and H2 blocker. They subsequently underwent rigid oesophagoscopy, with grade IIb or higher burns, for inserting the two different kinds of stents. Results: Four out of 10 (GIIa < underwent dilatation occasionally. Fifteen (GIIb with early large stent (eight weeks developed complications (three antral contractures, one oesophagotracheal fistula, one tracheobronchial fistula, three perforations, three deaths, and the remaining cases had not undergone dilatation yet. Four out of 10 with (GIIb, who had small stents (Six months and early gastrostomy needed dilatation every four to six weeks and all recovered, with no significant complications. Conclusions: Early use of gastrostomy prevents malnutrition in patients. Small size stents are much more tolerable for a prolonged time are not obstructed by saliva that washes the wall of the damaged oesophagus continuously and promotes healing.

  13. Leaching of concrete : experiments and modelling

    OpenAIRE

    Ekström, Tomas

    2001-01-01

    Many concrete dams, and other concrete structures within the hydropower industry are old and in a more or less severe state of degradation. Leaching is, together with freeze-thaw, the most common degradation problem in Swedish hydraulic concrete structures. This report contains a literature survey of concrete leaching, and presents the results of an experimental determination of leaching.

  14. Leach and EP [extraction procedure] toxicity tests on grouted waste from Tank 106-AN

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pacific Northwest Laboratory is conducting laboratory experiments to produce leach rate data for various waste species that will be contained in grout at Hanford. In the work reported here, grout made from Tank 106-AN liquid waste was used to produce empirical leach rate data for several radionuclides (60Co, 90Sr, 99Tc, 129I, 137Cs, and 241Am), stable major components (NO3-, NO2-, F, Cl, and Na), and trace metals (Cr, Mo, and Ni). Two types of tests were used to produce leach rate data: an intermittent replacement leach test (ANS 16.1 leach test) and a static leach test. Measured effective diffusivities of key species are as follows: 4 to 6 x 10-8 cm2/sec for 99Tc, 3 to 7 x 10-8 cm2/sec for 129I, 4 to 6 x 10-9 cm2/sec for nitrate, and 6 to 7 x 10-9 cm2/sec for nitrite. The leach indices of all species studied are above (more favorable than) the waste form criteria. The leach indices for 99Tc and 129I are 7.4 ± 1.2 and 7.6 ± 0.4, respectively, and are being further investigated in continuing studies of double-shell slurry feed grouts. An Extraction Procedure (EP) toxicity test was also conducted and the grouted water is considered nontoxic per this test protocol. 19 refs., 9 figs., 8 tabs

  15. Probable leaching mechanisms for spent fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    At the Pacific Northwest Laboratory, researchers in the Waste/Rock Interaction Technology Program are studying spent fuel as a possible waste form for the Office of Nuclear Waste Isolation. This paper presents probable leaching mechanisms for spent fuel and discusses current progress in identifying and understanding the leaching process. During the past year, experiments were begun to study the complex leaching mechanism of spent fuel. The initial work in this investigation was done with UO2, which provided the most information possible on the behavior of the spent-fuel matrix without encountering the very high radiation levels associated with spent fuel. Both single-crystal and polycrystalline UO2 samples were used for this study, and techniques applicable to remote experimentation in a hot cell are being developed. The effects of radiation are being studied in terms of radiolysis of water and surface activation of the UO2. Dissolution behavior and kinetics of UO2 were also investigated by electrochemical measurement techniques. These data will be correlated with those acquired when spent fuel is tested in a hot cell. Oxidation effects represent a major area of concern in evaluating the stability of spent fuel. Dissolution of UO2 is greatly increased in an oxidizing solution because the dissolution is then controlled by the formation of hexavalent uranium. In solutions containing very low oxygen levels (i.e., reducing solutions), oxidation-induced dissolution may be possible via a previously oxidized surface, through exposure to air during storage, or by local oxidants such as O2 and H2O2 produced from radiolysis of water and radiation-activated UO2 surfaces. The effects of oxidation not only increase the dissolution rate, but could lead to the disintegration of spent fuel into fine fragments

  16. Leaching experiments with highly radioactive French glasses at Studsvik

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glasses with incorporated highly active radioactive waste is now leached at Studsvik with solutions approximating subsurface water from crystalline rocks. Results at embient temperature give leach rates somewhat higher than the values obtained by the French, but the values are still incomplete. For Pu, the values obtained are about 4 x 10-7 g cm-2 day-1 which is somewhat higher than the French values of approximately 2 x 10-7 g cm-2 day-1. The temperature factor seems to be approximately 10 for Sr and Cs and very small for Pu. The active glasses contain approximately 20 % waste oxides compared to 9 % contracted for waste from Swedish reactors

  17. Code Combining Based Cooperative LEACH Protocol for Wireless Sensor Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asaduzzaman; Kong, Hyung-Yun

    This letter proposes a simple modification of LEACH protocol to exploit its multi-hop scenario for user cooperation. Instead of a single cluster-head we propose M cluster-heads in each cluster to obtain the diversity of order M. All cluster-heads gather data from all sensor nodes within the cluster using the same technique as LEACH. Cluster-heads transmit gathered data cooperatively towards the destination or higher order cluster-head. We propose a code combining based cooperative protocol. We also develop the upper bounds on frame error rate (FER) for our proposal. Simulation and analysis show that our proposal can significantly prolong the system lifetime.

  18. A Kinetic Study of Indium Leaching from Indium-Bearing Zinc Ferrite Under Microwave Heating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Linye; Mo, Jiamei; Li, Xuanhai; Pan, Liuping; Liang, Xinyuan; Wei, Guangtao

    2013-12-01

    To obtain information about leaching reaction and kinetics of indium from indium-bearing materials under microwave heating (MH), leaching of indium from indium-bearing zinc ferrite (IBZF) has been investigated. IBZF samples under MH and under conventional heating (CH) were studied by X-ray diffraction and specific surface area. Compared with that of CH, the effect of MH and the effects of various control parameters on indium leaching were studied. The results showed that compared with CH, MH enhanced the indium leaching from IBZF and increased the leaching rate. The leaching behavior of indium from IBZF was analyzed by unreacted shrinking core model, and the regression of kinetic equations showed that leaching of indium from IBZF obeyed the model very well. The activation energies under MH and under CH were 77.374 kJ/mol and 53.555 kJ/mol, respectively; the ratio of frequency factor K 0(MH)/ K 0(CH) was 10,818.36. The activation mechanism involved in leaching of indium under MH was mainly the increase of reactant energy and effective collision, which caused by the thermal and nonthermal microwave effect. Compared with the activation energy, the effective collision played a more important role in the acceleration of leaching of indium.

  19. An active dealkalization of red mud with roasting and water leaching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Xiaobo; Li, Wang; Guan, Xuemao

    2015-04-01

    The research has focused on the dealkalization of red mud after active roasting and water leaching, which is obtained from bauxite during alumina production. The main factors such as roasting temperature, roasting time, water leaching stage, leaching temperature, leaching reaction time and liquid to solid ratio were investigated. The mechanism of dealkalization was in-depth studied by using ICP-AES, XRD, TG-DSC, SEM-EDS and leaching kinetic. The results show that the dealkalization rate reached 82% under the condition of roasting temperature of 700 °C, roasting time of 30 min, four stage water leaching, liquid to solid ratio of 7 mL/g, leaching temperature of 90 °C and reaction time of 60 min. The diffraction peak of Na6CaAl6Si6(CO3)O24 · 2H2O in red mud was decreased during the active roasting process, whereas the mineral phases of NaOH · H2O and Na2Ca(CO3)2 were appeared. The content of alkali obviously decreased and the grade of other elements increased during the process of active roasting and water leaching, which was in favor of next application process of red mud. The water leaching was controlled by internal diffusion of SCM and the apparent activation energy was 22.63 kJ/mol. PMID:25559862

  20. Life Extension Program for the Modular Caustic Side Solvent Extraction Unit at Savannah River Site - 13179

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caustic Side Solvent Extraction (CSSX) is currently used at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Savannah River Site (SRS) for removal of cesium from the high-level salt-wastes stored in underground tanks. Currently, the Actinide Removal Process (ARP) and the CSSX process are deployed in the (ARP)/Modular CSSX Unit (MCU), to process salt waste for permanent disposition. The CSSX technology utilizes a multi-component organic solvent and annular centrifugal contactors to extract cesium from alkaline salt waste. The original plant was permitted for a three year design life; however, given the successful operation of the plant, a life extension program was completed to continue operations. The program included detailed engineering analyses of the life-expectancy of passive and active components, resulting in component replacement and/or maintenance and monitoring program improvements. The program also included a review of the operations and resulted in a series of operational improvements. Since the improvements have been made, an accelerated processing rate has been demonstrated. In addition, plans for instituting a next-generation solvent are in place and will enhance the decontamination factors. (author)

  1. Free-fall accretion and emitting caustics in wind-fed X-ray sources

    CERN Document Server

    Illarionov, A F; Illarionov, Andrei F.; Beloborodov, Andrei M.

    2000-01-01

    In wind-fed X-ray binaries, the accreting matter is Compton cooled and falls freely onto the compact object. The matter has a modest angular momentum, $l$, and accretion is quasi-spherical at large distances from the compact object. Initially small non-radial velocities grow in the converging supersonic flow and become substantial in the vicinity of the accretor. The streamlines with $l>(GMR_*)^{1/2}$ (where $M$ and $R_*$ are the mass and radius of the compact object) intersect outside $R_*$ and form a two-dimensional caustic which emits X-rays. The streamlines with low angular momentum, $l<(GMR_*)^{1/2}$, run into the accretor. If the accretor is a neutron star, a large X-ray luminosity results. We show that the distribution of accretion rate/luminosity over the star surface is sensitive to the angular momentum distribution of the accreting matter. The apparent luminosity depends on the side from which the star is observed and can change periodically with the orbital phase of the binary. The accretor then...

  2. Alkaline in-situ leaching simulation test of a uranium deposit in Xinjiang under condition of diluting groundwater

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The reagents used in in-situ leaching of uranium include NH4HCO3 and dissolved oxygen after groundwater is diluted. The relation between the reagent concentration and leaching effect is studied under condition of diluting groundwater. The results show that uranium concentration in lixivium and leaching rate are closely related to HCO3- concentration. There are optimal value of HCO3- and liminal value of HCO3- during leaching uranium. The optimal technology parameter of HCO3- concentration can be decided according the values. The more dissolved oxygen in the leaching system, the better leaching effect of uranium. So, it is a key technology for improving leaching effect of uranium to increase dissolved oxygen concentration. But the HCO3- concentration is controlled by the condition which causes precipitation of CaCO3, and has connection with pH and Ca2+ concentration. (authors)

  3. Organic leaching and metal removal with Sargassum filipendula

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Márcia Teresinha Veit

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The biosorption process with algae is usually carried out with a concomitant alginate leaching process. Alginate is identified as the main functional group, responsible for generating the most active sites. Biomass chemical and thermal pretreatment is an alternative process for reducing organic leaching. Experiments with different pH rates were performed to analyze the leaching process of pretreated (contact time: 24, 48 and 72 hours and non-pretreated biomass of Sargassum filipendula. The concentrations of calcium, magnesium, sodium and potassium ions, as well as total organic carbon, were determined to evaluate the biomass sorption capacity. Capacities of native and pretreated biomass to remove the heavy metal ions Cr and/or Ni from solutions of different concentrations were compared. The ion competition effect on removal capacity was studied. The biosorbent had a higher affinity with chromium ion.

  4. Effect of Antifoam Agent on Oxidative Leaching of Hanford Tank Sludge Simulants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rapko, Brian M.; Jones, Susan A.; Lumetta, Gregg J.; Peterson, Reid A.

    2010-02-26

    Oxidative leaching of simulant tank waste containing an antifoam agent (AFA) to reduce the chromium content of the sludge was tested using permanganate as the oxidant in 0.25 M NaOH solutions. AFA is added to the waste treatment process to prevent foaming. The AFA, Dow Corning Q2-3183A, is a surface-active polymer that consists of polypropylene glycol, polydimethylsiloxane, octylphenoxy polyethoxy ethanol, treated silica, and polyether polyol. Some of the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) waste slurries contain high concentrations of undissolved solids that would exhibit undesirable behavior without AFA addition. These tests were conducted to determine the effect of the AFA on oxidative leaching of Cr(III) in waste by permanganate. It has not previously been determined what effect AFA has on the permanganate reaction. This study was conducted to determine the effect AFA has on the oxidation of the chromium, plus plutonium and other criticality-related elements, specifically Fe, Ni and Mn. During the oxidative leaching process, Mn is added as liquid permanganate solution and is converted to an insoluble solid that precipitates as MnO2 and becomes part of the solid waste. Caustic leaching was performed followed by an oxidative leach at either 25°C or 45°C. Samples of the leachate and solids were collected at each step of the process. Initially, Battelle-Pacific Northwest Division (PNWD) was contracted by Bechtel National, Inc. to perform these further scoping studies on oxidative alkaline leaching. The data obtained from the testing will be used by the WTP operations to develop procedures for permanganate dosing of Hanford tank sludge solids during oxidative leaching. Work was initially conducted under contract number 24590-101-TSA-W000-00004. In February 2007, the contract mechanism was switched to Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) operating Contract DE-AC05-76RL01830. In summary, this report describes work focused on

  5. Effect of Antifoam Agent on Oxidative Leaching of Hanford Tank Sludge Simulants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oxidative leaching of simulant tank waste containing an antifoam agent (AFA) to reduce the chromium content of the sludge was tested using permanganate as the oxidant in 0.25 M NaOH solutions. AFA is added to the waste treatment process to prevent foaming. The AFA, Dow Corning Q2-3183A, is a surface-active polymer that consists of polypropylene glycol, polydimethylsiloxane, octylphenoxy polyethoxy ethanol, treated silica, and polyether polyol. Some of the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) waste slurries contain high concentrations of undissolved solids that would exhibit undesirable behavior without AFA addition. These tests were conducted to determine the effect of the AFA on oxidative leaching of Cr(III) in waste by permanganate. It has not previously been determined what effect AFA has on the permanganate reaction. This study was conducted to determine the effect AFA has on the oxidation of the chromium, plus plutonium and other criticality-related elements, specifically Fe, Ni and Mn. During the oxidative leaching process, Mn is added as liquid permanganate solution and is converted to an insoluble solid that precipitates as MnO2 and becomes part of the solid waste. Caustic leaching was performed followed by an oxidative leach at either 25 C or 45 C. Samples of the leachate and solids were collected at each step of the process. Initially, Battelle-Pacific Northwest Division (PNWD) was contracted by Bechtel National, Inc. to perform these further scoping studies on oxidative alkaline leaching. The data obtained from the testing will be used by the WTP operations to develop procedures for permanganate dosing of Hanford tank sludge solids during oxidative leaching. Work was initially conducted under contract number 24590-101-TSA-W000-00004. In February 2007, the contract mechanism was switched to Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) operating Contract DE-AC05-76RL01830. In summary, this report describes work focused on determining

  6. Leaching of radionuclides out of some novelly formed products extracted from the reactor zone of the 4th unit of Chernobyl NPP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Data are presented on leaching of radionuclides from two samples of glass-like products (brown and gree glass) by 0.01 mol/l solution of sodium chloride. The level and rate of radionuclide leaching are determined. It is ascertained that green glass features a higher resistance to leaching

  7. Testing the Dark Matter Caustic Theory Against Observations in the Milky Way

    CERN Document Server

    Dumas, Julie; Niedzielski, Bethany; Susser, Adam; Thompson, Jeffery M; Weiss, Jake; Lewis, Kim M

    2015-01-01

    We test a particular theory of dark matter in which dark matter axions form ring "caustics" in the plane of the Milky Way against actual observations of Milky Way stars. According to this theory, cold, collisionless dark matter particles with angular momentum flow in and out of the Milky Way on sheets. These flows form caustic rings (at the positions of the rings, the density of the flow is formally infinite) at the locations of closest approach to the Galactic center. We show that the caustic ring dark matter theory reproduces a roughly logarithmic halo, with large perturbations near the rings. We show that the theory can reasonably match the observed rotation curve of the Milky Way. We explore the effects of the caustic rings on dwarf galaxy tidal disruption using N-body simulations. In particular, simulations of the Sagittarius dwarf galaxy tidal disruption in a caustic ring halo potential match observations of the trailing tidal tail as far as 90 kpc from the Galactic center; they do not, however, match t...

  8. Time Motion Study for Modular Caustic Solvent Extraction Unit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Defense Waste Processing Facilities (DWPF) at the Savannah River Site (SRS) is used to process high-level radioactive waste from the Tank Farm into borosilicate glass to reduce the mobility of the radionuclides and has processed and vitrified nuclear wastes into canisters for long-term disposal since FY96. All wastes vitrified to date in DWPF are ''sludge only'' wastes. The old salt waste processing technology, ITP, was suspended in FY98 due to benzene build-up inside the tank. The new selected technologies for treating the salt waste are Actinide Removal Process (ARP) and Caustic Side Solvent Extraction process (CSSX). The Modular CSSX Unit (MCU) is a cesium removal process that will be operated downstream of the ARP. The MCU is a short-term method for cesium removal, which uses the same technology as the Salt Waste Processing Facility (SWPF). Once the SWPF becomes operational, the MCU will be shut down. The modeling request is from the MCU project to verify the validity of its Concept Design Package. The modeling task is not typical because there are five different facilities/projects/processes involved, i.e., Tank Farm, ARP, MCU, Saltstone, and DWPF. Each facility, project, and process has their own management team and organization, with its own fiscal responsibility and performance accountability. In addition, from a task cost perspective, MCU desires to minimize modeling not directly associated with their facility. The balancing of comprehensive analysis with limited granularity is challenging. The customer expectation is the model should be small and delivered within weeks. Modeling a stand-alone MCU will not yield overall meaningful results because it can be expected that most problems will occur at interfaces with other facilities. This paper discusses how we set out our modeling strategy, overcame obstacles, avoided touchy issues, and delivered the modeling result on time and on budget

  9. PAHs leaching test for solidified waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Henzler, R.; Grathwohl, P. [Tuebingen Univ. (Germany). Center for Applied Geoscience

    2003-07-01

    The treatment of waste materials to allow recycling or safe disposal is a rapidly expanding business, but also subject to increasing public awareness of enviromental issues and tightening of the regularise governing in many countries. One of the most widely used treatment for wastes is stabilisation /solidification using a cement matrix to obtain a monolithic residue. The most common test procedure to assess the risks of contaminant release into water (seepage, surface and groundwater) is the so-called ''tank leaching test'' or ''diffusion test'' (NEN 7345, Mulder et al 2001, Hohberg et al 2000), in which a solidified specimen is leached with water during different periods of time. The tests are usually done at room temperatures between 20 C and 25 C. However, the temperature under natural conditions are lower resulting in lower contaminant release rates. (subsurface temperature: 5 C - 10 C). If the thermodynamics of the contaminant release, especially the activation energy of desorption and diffusion, is known, it is possible to estimate the contaminant release for lower temperatures, e.g. down to groundwater temperatures. In addition the test can be accelerated if performed at high temperatures.

  10. Phosphorus leaching in an acid tropical soil "recapitalized" with phosphate rock and triple superphosphate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gikonyo, Esther W; Zaharah, Abdul R; Hanafi, Mohamed M; Anuar, Rahim A

    2010-01-01

    With high rates of phosphorus applied to increase "capital P" as a stock for plant uptake over several years, the question of P leaching is inevitable. We conducted an intact soil column experiment in the field to evaluate P leached from soils treated with triple superphosphate (TSP) and Gafsa phosphate rock (GPR) at 300, 600, and 900 kg P ha-1 with and without integration of cattle manure. The lysimeters, made from PVC tubes of 30-cm length, were inserted into the soil up to the 25-cm depth. The tubes were fitted with a resin bag containing a mixture of cation and anion exchange resin (50:50) at the lower end of the tube inserted into the soil. The tubes, arranged in a completely randomized design, were sampled randomly at 10-week intervals for 12 months. Phosphorus extractable from the top- and subsoil at the end of experiment and leached P were determined. More P was leached out from TSP (threefold) compared to GPR, and the amount of P leached increased with increasing rates of P fertilizer applied. Application of manure intensified the amounts of P leached from TSP, particularly at the 6-month sampling time. There was hardly any substantial P leached from the soil treated with GPR. Thus, for effective and efficient long-term P fertilizer management strategies, choosing the right P fertilizer source and monitoring P losses through leaching has to be done for enhanced fertilizer use efficiency and thus reducing P pollution of ground waters. PMID:20694445

  11. Leaching characteristics of paraffin waste forms generated from Korean nuclear power plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, J Y; Kim, C L; Chung, C H

    2001-01-01

    Leaching tests of paraffin waste forms including boric acid, cobalt, strontium and cesium were performed to investigate the leaching characteristics of paraffin waste forms which had been generated in Korean nuclear power plants. The leaching tests were conducted according to ANSI/ANS-16.1 test procedure and the cumulative fractions leached (CFLs) of boric acid, cobalt, strontium and cesium were obtained. The compressive strength before and after the leaching test was measured for various waste forms with different mixing ratios of boric acid to paraffin. It was observed that boric acid and other nuclides immobilized within paraffin waste forms were congruently released and the leaching rates were influenced by reacted layer depth as the dissolution reaction progressed. A shrinking core model based on the diffusion-controlled dissolution kinetics was developed in order to simulate the test results. The CFLs and the leaching rates were well expressed by the shrinking core model and the cross-sectional view of specimen after the test demonstrated the applicability of this model with the shrinking dissolution front to the leaching analysis of paraffin waste forms. PMID:11300532

  12. Waste/Rock Interactions Technology Program. Status report on LWR spent-fuel leach tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spent fuels with burnups of 9000, 28,000 and 54,500 MWd/MTU have been leach tested at 250C. Three leach-test procedures (Paige, IAEA and static) were used. IAEA and static tests were conducted in five different solutions: deionized water, sodium bicarbonate, sodium chloride, calcium chloride and Waste Isolation Pilot Plant B brine solutions. Elemental leach data are reported based on the release of 90Sr+90Y, 106Ru, 137Cs, 144Ce, 154Eu, 239+240Pu, 125Sb, 244Cm, 129I, 99Tc, and total uranium. This is the first report on 129I and 99Tc from spent fuel. Termination of the Paige test showed that the plateout (radionuclide adsorption) on the test apparatus had negligible effect on the leach rate of cesium and plutonium, but a major (up to a factor of 50 times) effect on the curium leach rate. Three-hundred additional days of leach testing by the IAEA procedure, from 467 to 769 d, showed a continuation of the leaching trends observed during the first 467 d. Results from the first two static leach test series, 2 and 8 d, gave the 129I and 99Tc release numbers

  13. Leaching study of PNL 76-68 glass beads using the LLNL continuous-flow method and the PNL modified IAEA method. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A long-term single-pass continuous-flow (SPCF) leaching test was conducted on the glass waste form PNL 76-68. Leaching rates of Np, Pu and various stable elements were measured at 25 and 750C with three different solutions and three different flow rates. The SPCF leaching results were compared with results of a modified IAEA leach test performed by Pacific Northwest Laboratories (PNL). Elemental leach rates and their variation with temperature, flow rate and solution composition were established. The LLNL and PNL leach test results appear to agree within experimental uncertainties. The magnitude of the leach rates determined for Np and the glass matrix elements is 10-5 grams of glass/cm2 geometric solid surface area/day. The rates increase with temperature and with solution flow rate, and are similar in brine and distilled water but higher in a bicarbonate solution. Other cations exhibit somewhat different behavior, and Pu in particular yields a much lower apparent leach rate, probably because of sorption or precipitation effects after release from the glass matrix. After the initial few days, most elements are leached at a constant rate. Matrix dissolution appears to be the most probable rate controlling step for the leaching of most elements. 23 figures, 12 tables

  14. Results From Analysis Of The First And Second Strip Effluent Coalescer Elements From Radioactive Operations Of The Modular Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction Unit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The coalescer elements for the Strip Effluent (SE) acid within the Modular Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction Unit (MCU) experienced elevated differential pressure drop during radioactive operations. Following the end of operations for the first Macrobatch campaign and soon after start of the second Macrobatch campaign, personnel removed the coalescer media and provided to Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) for diagnostic investigation of the causes of reduced flow. This report summarizes those studies. Two Strip Effluent (SE) coalescers were delivered to the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL). One was removed from the Modular Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction Unit (MCU) between processing of Macrobatch 1 and 2 (coalescer 'Alpha'), and the second was removed from MCU after processing of ∼24,000 gallons of salt solution (coalescer 'Beta'). Both coalescers underwent the same general strip acid flush program to reduce the dose and were delivered to SRNL for analysis of potential occluding solids. Analysis of Coalescer Alpha indicates the presence of aluminum hydroxide solids and aluminosilicate solids, while analysis of Coalescer Beta indicates the presence of aluminum hydroxide solids, but no aluminosilicates. Leaching studies on sections of both coalescers were performed. The results indicate that the coalescers had different amounts of solids present on them at the time of removal. Finally, samples of free liquids retrieved from both coalescers indicate no excessive amounts of CSSX solvent present. Given the strip acid flushing that occurred in the SE coalescers, the solids we detected on the coalescers are probably indicative of a larger quantity of these solids present before the strip acid flushing. Under this scenario, the excessive pressure drops are due to the solids and not from organic fouling.

  15. Stress corrosion cracking behavior of two Ni-Cr-Mo-V steels in caustic solutions and pure oxygenated water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maday, M.F.; Mignone, A.; Borello, A. (ENEA, Rome (Italy))

    1989-04-01

    The purpose of this work is to evaluate the stress corrosion cracking (SCC) of two Ni-Cr-Mo-V Italian-made alloys that are materials used for low-pressure (LP) turbine discs in light water reactor (LWR) nuclear plants. All the tests reported in this investigation have been performed using the slow strain rate technique (SSRT). The first set of experiments was conducted in pure deaerated caustic solutions in a static Ni autoclave system in order to determine the effects of temperature on NaOH concentration on the SCC behavior of these materials. In the second set of tests, the influence of dissolved oxygen on cracking in water was studied. Results showed that the minimum value of oxygen to promote SCC was lower for the heat with the higher Ni content and the larger grain size.

  16. Stress corrosion cracking behavior of two Ni-Cr-Mo-V steels in caustic solutions and pure oxygenated water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this work is to evaluate the stress corrosion cracking (SCC) of two Ni-Cr-Mo-V Italian-made alloys that are materials used for low-pressure (LP) turbine discs in light water reactor (LWR) nuclear plants. All the tests reported in this investigation have been performed using the slow strain rate technique (SSRT). The first set of experiments was conducted in pure deaerated caustic solutions in a static Ni autoclave system in order to determine the effects of temperature on NaOH concentration on the SCC behavior of these materials. In the second set of tests, the influence of dissolved oxygen on cracking in water was studied. Results showed that the minimum value of oxygen to promote SCC was lower for the heat with the higher Ni content and the larger grain size

  17. FULL-SCALE TESTING OF A CAUSTIC SIDE SOLVENT EXTRACTION SYSTEM TO REMOVE CESIUM FROM SAVANNAH RIVER SITE RADIOACTIVE WASTE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Savannah River Site (SRS) personnel have completed construction and assembly of the Modular Caustic Side Solvent Extraction Unit (MCU) facility. Following assembly, they conducted testing to evaluate the ability of the process to remove non-radioactive cesium and to separate the aqueous and organic phases. They conducted tests at salt solution flow rates of 3.5, 6.0, and 8.5 gpm. During testing, the MCU Facility collected samples and submitted them to Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) personnel for analysis of cesium, Isopar(regsign) L, and Modifier [1-(2,2,3,3-tetrafluoropropoxy)-3-(4-sec-butylphenoxy)-2-propanol]. SRNL personnel analyzed the aqueous samples for cesium by Inductively-Coupled Plasma Mass Spectroscopy (ICP-MS) and the solvent samples for cesium using a Parr Bomb Digestion followed by ICP-MS. They analyzed aqueous samples for Isopar(regsign) L and Modifier by gas chromatography (GC)

  18. Uranium leaching from phosphate rock

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uranium in phosphate rock was removed by means of alkaline leach solutions. Ammonium carbonate/bicarbonate solution produced a very stable uranyl carbonate compound which was separated by centrifugation. Radiometric analysis showed that about 40% of uranium was solubilized and it can be recuperated. This process could be used before the manufacture of phosphatic fertilizers and the final products would contain smaller uranium quantities. (author). 8 refs., 4 figs

  19. Use of low-cost heat sources to improve the efficiency of heap leaching of uranium ores. Part of a coordinated programme on bacterial leaching of uranium ores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Basic technical parameters are given of two solar heaters designed for use in heap leaching of uranium ores. Inexpensive and easily available materials such as flat glass panes, glass tubing and corrugated metal sheets were used in the construction of the heaters. Under optimum conditions, the heaters can produce temperature differentials of 520C (500C) at the flow rate of 30ml/min. The dependence of percent recovery on the temperature of solutions in heap leaching of ore from 'El Nopal' was studied. Even though no precise correlation was found, an increase in the temperature of solutions seems to improve the efficiency of heap leaching

  20. Leaching from cementitious waste forms in belowground vaults

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Solidification and/or stabilization with cementitious materials prior to burial is one option for disposal of liquid hazardous and radioactive wastes. A common design for disposal of cementitious waste forms is to pour the material into large belowground vaults. The leaching performance of partially degraded monolithic vaults is examined quantitatively for facilities located in humid to semiarid climates. Development of perched water on the vault roof leading to fracture flow through the structure is predicted for a wide range of climate and design conditions. Leaching controlled by diffusion in matrix blocks out to fractures is examined parametrically in relation to water flux rate and crack spacing. Depending upon the parameters examined, release rate may be controlled by water flux rate or diffusion. Under some circumstances, contaminant release rates and exit concentrations are predicted to be inversely related. In this situation, minimization of release does not result in the lowest predicted groundwater concentrations below the vault

  1. Leaching of radionuclides from cementitious wasteform in laboratory and field conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Both real and simulated radioactive cementitious wasteform were tested to compare leaching rates in field and laboratory conditions. High leaching rates were found for sodium and nitrate for initial period of leaching in laboratory test. Cs137 leaching rates in the first 6-month period were on average by an order of magnitude lower compared those of Na+ and NO3-. However the average annual Cs137 leaching rate in the deionized water was about 35 times higher compared with the measured average value for the first year of the field test. Cumulative leached fraction of Cs137 for the first year of tests (3.74%) was close to values reported in literature however they were more than two orders of magnitude higher than leached fraction of Cs137 after the first year of repository test (0.01%). To compare field and laboratory test results, a scaling factor is required which aims to account for surface to volume factor, temperature and contacting water composition differences. (authors)

  2. New strategies for treatment and reuse of spent sulfidic caustic stream from petroleum industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jéssica Frontino Paulino

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This work examines traditional and new routes for removal of H2S and other sulfur compounds from spent sufidic caustic (SSC. SH- (hydrogenosulfide and S2- (sulfide ions were quantitatively oxidized at 25 ºC using H2O2, NaOCl or a spent sulfochromic mixture. SH-/S2- ions were also removed via reaction with freshly prepared iron or manganese hydroxides, or after passing the SSC through strong basic anion exchange resins (OH- form. The treated caustic solution, as well as iron/manganese hydroxides, removed H2S from diesel samples at 25 ºC. SSC treatment via strong basic anion-exchange resins produced the treated caustic solution with the highest free alkalinity.

  3. Saltstone Oxidation Study: Leaching Method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Langton, C. A.; Stefanko, D. B.; Burns, H. H.

    2013-02-24

    Cementitious waste forms can be designed to chemically stabilize selected contaminants, such as Tc{sup +7} and Cr{sup +6}, by chemically reduction to lower valance states, Tc{sup +4} and Cr{sup +3}, respectively, and precipitation of these species in alkaline media as low solubility solid phases. Data for oxidation of this type of cementitious waste form cured under field conditions as a function of time is required for predicting the performance of the waste form and disposal facility. The rate of oxidation (oxidation front advancement) is an important parameter for predicting performance because the solubilities of some radionuclide contaminants, e.g., technetium, are a function of the oxidation state. A non-radioactive experiment was designed for quantifying the oxidation front advancement using chromium, as an approximate redox-sensitive surrogate (Cr{sup +6} / Cr{sup +3}) for technetium (Tc{sup +7} / Tc{sup +4}). Nonradioactive cementitious waste forms were prepared in the laboratory and cured under both laboratory and ?field conditions.? Laboratory conditions were ambient temperature and sealed sample containers. Field conditions were approximated by curing samples in open containers which were placed inside a plastic container stored outdoors at SRS. The container had a lid and was instrumented with temperature and humidity probes. Subsamples as thin as 0.2 mm were taken as a function of distance from the exposed surface of the as-cast sample. The subsamples were leached and the leachates were analyzed for chromium, nitrate, nitrite and sodium. Nitrate, nitrite, and sodium concentrations were used to provide baseline data because these species are not chemically retained in the waste form matrix to any significant extent and are not redox sensitive. ?Effective? oxidation fronts for Cr were measured for samples containing 1000, 500 and 20 mg/kg Cr added as soluble sodium chromate, Na{sub 2}CrO{sub 4}. For a sample cured for 129 days under field conditions

  4. Effects of column dimensions on uranium mill tailings leach curves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Experiments were conducted using different sized columns filled with uranium mill tailings and leached with laboratory-prepared groundwater. The data generated were used to evaluate the effects of length-to-diameter ratios on leach curves. These different column sizes and flow rates provided: different solution/solid contact times, and different column volumes (scaling) and thus allowed us to address the question, Can laboratory results be scaled up to apply to real world disposal conditions. The results showed that the leach curves were similar for all the columns for all elements except chloride and calcium. The general shape of the leach curves for each constituent versus effluent volume was a rapidly decreasing curve from very high concentrations down to the groundwater concentration within about four to six pore volumes. Chloride elution was affected by mechanical dispersion, causing effluent concentrations to reach influent concentrations sooner for the columns with longer residence times. The calcium concentrations remained nearly constant or only slightly decreased over the duration of the experiments and were assumed to be controlled by the dissolution of gypsum. Aside from the chloride data, over the range of residence times and scaling factors studied, we conclude that laboratory data on uranium mill tailings leaching can be used to predict long-term movement of contaminants from actual tailings impoundments. The main reactions tha control contaminant leaching from tailings are the displacement of residual mill process liquor and the redissolution of readily soluble evaporites and moderately soluble gypsum. These processes occur quite rapidly and therefore laboratory experiments with relatively short residence times are still accurate; i.e., lab residence times are long enough to transcend any short-term kinetic effects that could lead to erroneous predictions. 8 references, 6 figures, 3 tables

  5. Effect of Harsh or Mild Extraction of Soil on Pesticide Leaching to Groundwater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boesten, Jos J T I

    2016-07-01

    Assessment of leaching to groundwater is an important aspect of pesticide risk assessment. The first leaching tier usually consists of simulations with leaching scenarios based on pesticide-soil properties derived from laboratory studies. Because the extractability of pesticide residues in such studies decreases with time, the harshness of the extraction method influences these pesticide-soil properties. This study investigates the effect of using a mild or harsh extraction method on simulated leaching to groundwater with consideration of substances with a range of half-lives and organic matter sorption coefficient values for selected leaching scenarios. The model for linking the concentrations of the mild and the harsh systems was based on laboratory studies with two pesticides and a Dutch sandy soil and was tested against Canadian field studies with atrazine (6-chloro-2-ethyl-4-isopropyl-1,3,5-triazine-2,4-diamine). The degradation rate and the aged-sorption parameters of each "mild" soil-substance system were derived from a hypothetical laboratory incubation study using prescribed parameter values for the corresponding "harsh" soil-substance system. Simulations were performed for three European leaching scenarios (United Kingdom, France, Portugal). For the best-guess parameter set, the leaching concentrations of the harsh system were approximately equal to those of the mild system at leaching concentrations greater than 1 μg L and were at most approximately a factor of two higher than those of the mild systems at mild leaching concentrations between 0.01 and 0.1 μg L. However, an extreme parameter set led to harsh leaching concentrations that were at most approximately 10 times higher than the mild leaching concentrations at levels between 0.01 and 0.1 μg L. PMID:27380081

  6. An active dealkalization of red mud with roasting and water leaching

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhu, Xiaobo, E-mail: zhuxiaobo0119@126.com [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Henan Polytechnic University, Jiaozuo, Henan 454000 (China); Henan Key Discipline Open Laboratory of Mining Engineering Materials, Henan 454000 (China); Li, Wang; Guan, Xuemao [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Henan Polytechnic University, Jiaozuo, Henan 454000 (China); Henan Key Discipline Open Laboratory of Mining Engineering Materials, Henan 454000 (China)

    2015-04-09

    Highlights: • The dealkalization of active roasting and water leaching from red mud was put forward. • The main factors on dealkalization during active roasting and water leaching were investigated. • The mechanism of dealkalization from red mud was in-depth studied in the process. - Abstract: The research has focused on the dealkalization of red mud after active roasting and water leaching, which is obtained from bauxite during alumina production. The main factors such as roasting temperature, roasting time, water leaching stage, leaching temperature, leaching reaction time and liquid to solid ratio were investigated. The mechanism of dealkalization was in-depth studied by using ICP–AES, XRD, TG-DSC, SEM–EDS and leaching kinetic. The results show that the dealkalization rate reached 82% under the condition of roasting temperature of 700 °C, roasting time of 30 min, four stage water leaching, liquid to solid ratio of 7 mL/g, leaching temperature of 90 °C and reaction time of 60 min. The diffraction peak of Na{sub 6}CaAl{sub 6}Si{sub 6}(CO{sub 3})O{sub 24}·2H{sub 2}O in red mud was decreased during the active roasting process, whereas the mineral phases of NaOH·H{sub 2}O and Na{sub 2}Ca(CO{sub 3}){sub 2} were appeared. The content of alkali obviously decreased and the grade of other elements increased during the process of active roasting and water leaching, which was in favor of next application process of red mud. The water leaching was controlled by internal diffusion of SCM and the apparent activation energy was 22.63 kJ/mol.

  7. An active dealkalization of red mud with roasting and water leaching

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • The dealkalization of active roasting and water leaching from red mud was put forward. • The main factors on dealkalization during active roasting and water leaching were investigated. • The mechanism of dealkalization from red mud was in-depth studied in the process. - Abstract: The research has focused on the dealkalization of red mud after active roasting and water leaching, which is obtained from bauxite during alumina production. The main factors such as roasting temperature, roasting time, water leaching stage, leaching temperature, leaching reaction time and liquid to solid ratio were investigated. The mechanism of dealkalization was in-depth studied by using ICP–AES, XRD, TG-DSC, SEM–EDS and leaching kinetic. The results show that the dealkalization rate reached 82% under the condition of roasting temperature of 700 °C, roasting time of 30 min, four stage water leaching, liquid to solid ratio of 7 mL/g, leaching temperature of 90 °C and reaction time of 60 min. The diffraction peak of Na6CaAl6Si6(CO3)O24·2H2O in red mud was decreased during the active roasting process, whereas the mineral phases of NaOH·H2O and Na2Ca(CO3)2 were appeared. The content of alkali obviously decreased and the grade of other elements increased during the process of active roasting and water leaching, which was in favor of next application process of red mud. The water leaching was controlled by internal diffusion of SCM and the apparent activation energy was 22.63 kJ/mol

  8. Diffraction and Dissipation of Atmospheric Waves in the Vicinity of Caustics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godin, O. A.

    2015-12-01

    A large and increasing number of ground-based and satellite-borne instruments has been demonstrated to reliably reveal ionospheric manifestations of natural hazards such as large earthquakes, strong tsunamis, and powerful tornadoes. To transition from detection of ionospheric manifestations of natural hazards to characterization of the hazards for the purposes of improving early warning systems and contributing to disaster recovery, it is necessary to relate quantitatively characteristics of the observed ionospheric disturbances and the underlying natural hazard and, in particular, accurately model propagation of atmospheric waves from the ground or ocean surface to the ionosphere. The ray theory has been used extensively to model propagation of atmospheric waves and proved to be very efficient in elucidating the effects of atmospheric variability on ionospheric signatures of natural hazards. However, the ray theory predicts unphysical, divergent values of the wave amplitude and needs to be modified in the vicinity of caustics. This paper presents an asymptotic theory that describes diffraction, focusing and increased dissipation of acoustic-gravity waves in the vicinity of caustics and turning points. Air temperature, viscosity, thermal conductivity, and wind velocity are assumed to vary gradually with height and horizontal coordinates, and slowness of these variations determines the large parameter of the problem. Uniform asymptotics of the wave field are expressed in terms of Airy functions and their derivatives. The geometrical, or Berry, phase, which arises in the consistent WKB approximation for acoustic-gravity waves, plays an important role in the caustic asymptotics. In addition to the wave field in the vicinity of the caustic, these asymptotics describe wave reflection from the caustic and the evanescent wave field beyond the caustic. The evanescent wave field is found to play an important role in ionospheric manifestations of tsunamis.

  9. Leaching of complex sulphide concentrate in acidic cupric chloride solutions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    M. TCHOUMOU; M. ROYNETTE

    2007-01-01

    The chemical analysis of a complex sulphide concentrate by emission spectrometry and X-ray diffraction shows that it contains essentially copper, lead, zinc and iron in the form of chalcopyrite, sphalerite and galena. A small amount of pyrite is also present in the ore but does not be detected with X-ray diffraction. The cupric chloride leaching of the sulphide concentrate at various durations and solid/liquid ratios at 100 ℃ shows that the rate of dissolution of the ore is the fastest in the first several hours, and after 12 h it does not evolve significantly. If oxygen is excluded from the aqueous cupric chloride solution during the leaching experiment at 100 ℃, the pyrite in the ore will not be leached. The determination of principal dissolved metals in the leaching liquor by flame atomic absorption spectrometry, and the chemical analysis of solid residues by emission spectrometry and X-ray diffraction allow to conclude that the rate of dissolution of the minerals contained in the complex sulphide concentrate are in the order of galena>sphalerite>chalcopyrite.

  10. Removal of radium-226 from radium-contaminated soil using humic acid by column leaching method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this study, evaluation of radium-226 removal from radium-contaminated soil using humic acid extracted from peat soil by column leaching method was carried out. Humic acid of concentration 100 ppm and pH 7 was leached through a column packed with radium-contaminated soil and leachates collected were analysed with gamma spectrometer to determine the leached radium-226. Results obtained indicated low removal of radium-226 between 1 - 4 %. Meanwhile, leaching profile revealed that radium-226 was bound to soil components with three different strength, thus resulting in three phases of radium-226 removal. It was estimated that the total removal of radium-226 from 10 g radium-contaminated soil sample studied could be achieved using approximately 31500 - 31850 ml HA solutions with leaching rate of 1 ml/ min. (author)

  11. Nitrate leaching from organic arable crop rotations is mostly determined by autumn field management

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Askegaard, M; Olesen, Jørgen E; Rasmussen, Ilse Ankjær;

    2011-01-01

    Two main challenges facing organic arable farming are the supply of nitrogen (N) to the crop and the control of perennial weeds. Nitrate leaching from different organic arable crop rotations was investigated over three consecutive four-year crop rotations in a field experiment at three locations...... in Denmark (12 years in total). The experimental treatments were: (i) crop rotation, (ii) catch crop and (iii) animal manure. Nitrate leaching was estimated from measured soil nitrate concentration in ceramic suction cells and modelled drainage. There were significant effects on annual N leaching of location...... in the manured treatments the application rate was lower than crop demand. The results identify management of crop and soil during autumn as the main determinant of N leaching. Nitrate leaching was lowest for a catch crop soil cover during autumn and winter (avg. 20 kg N ha−1), a soil cover of weeds...

  12. Leaching of irradiated light-water-reactor fuel in a simulated post-accident environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Personnel involved in cleanup operations following a light-water-reactor accident in which the fuel has been significantly damaged will have to consider the fission products that have leached from the fuel into the reactor water. Five samples of declad, irradiated fuel were leached in a borate solution that should approximate the post-accident conditions in a reactor. The resulting release of fission products was measured over the course of approx. 1 year. The radioactivity levels of the leaching solutions were converted into leach rates and fractional releases. Fractional releases are projected for 4 years following the start of leaching. These values can be used to estimate the radioactive content of the reactor water before cleanup operations begin. 25 figures, 4 tables

  13. Biological treatment of sulfidic spent caustics under haloalkaline conditions using soda lake bacteria

    OpenAIRE

    Graaff, de, R.J.

    2012-01-01

    In this thesis, the development of a newbiotechnological process for the treatment of undiluted sulfidic spent caustics (SSC’s) using soda lake bacteria is described. SSC’s are waste solutions that are formed in the oil and gas industry due to the caustic (NaOH) scrubbing of hydrocarbon streams for the removal of sulfur compounds.Without treatment, SSC’s may impose serious environmental problems because of their alkalinity (pH>12), salinity (Na+ 5-12 wt%) and high sulfide...

  14. Leaching kinetics of malachite in ammonium carbonate solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oudenne, Paul D.; Olson, Ferron A.

    1983-03-01

    Leaching of malachite was conducted with ammonium carbonate as lixiviant and with temperature, lixiviant concentration, and particle size as variables. Two stages of reaction were found. In Stage I, the initial dissolution of malachite proceeds rapidly, but after about 10 pct reaction the rate is reduced by surface blockage due to the presence of a needle-structured intermediate, presumably Cu(OH)2. Subsequently, malachite and the intermediate dissolve concurrently. In Stage II, after 90 pct reaction, essentially all of the malachite has dissolved and only the intermediate remains. It dissolves in Stage II. The activation energy is 64 kJ/mole (15.3 kcal/mole) for Stage I and 75 kJ/mole (18 kcal/mole) for Stage II. The rate of reaction in Stage I is proportional to the reciprocal of particle size and is 0.8 order with respect to the concentration of ammonium carbonate. The structures of leaching residues were studied using a scanning electron microscope. The kinetic data (activation energy and entropy), particle size and concentration dependence, residue morphology, and general leaching behavior evident from microscopic monitoring during leaching were used to develop the geometric equation for leaching in Stage I. The equation, based on a heterogeneous reaction with geometric rate control, is: 1 - (1 - α 1/3 = K01/r0/[(NH4)2C03]0.8 exp(-64,000/RT)t. It was deduced that initial steps in reaction were: (1) release of Cu2+ from malachite; (2) initial complexing with ammonia to form Cu(NH3)2+; and (3) subsequent complexing to produce Cu(NH3){4/2+} which is stable in solution at pH 8.8, the buffered pH of reaction. Stage II appears to be a similar reaction except that the reaction obeys cylindrical geometry instead of spherical geometry as in Stage I.

  15. Dynamics in simultaneous electro-generative leaching for sphalerite-MnO2

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    The principle for the electro-generative leaching was applied to simultaneous leaching of sphalerite-MnO2. A galvanic system for the bio-electro-generative leaching was set up. The effects of grain size and temperature on rate of zinc extraction from sphalerite under the conditions of presence and absence ofAcidithiobacillusferrooxidans (A.ferrooxidans) were studied, respectively.The results show that with bacteria, the maximum extraction of zinc from the ores with grain size of 16.6 μm can reach 32.01% after leaching for 12 h, while to obtain the same extraction ratio in the traditional bio-leaching route (i.e. not electro-generative one) 10 d is needed to ore granules with same size. The unreacted shrinking core model was used for describing the reaction-relative and diffusion-relative phenomena presented in the process of the electro-generative leaching with and without bacteria, which is considered to be diffusion controlled. The activation energies of the anodic reaction for leaching system in the presence and absence of bacteria are 11.97 and 14.39 kJ/mol, respectively, indicating that leaching rate can be decreased by A. ferrooxidans. SEM was used to study the effect of A. ferrooxidans on the ores in the simultaneous electro-generative leaching, which indicates that the produced sulfur on the surface of the sulfides can be oxidized by A. ferrooxidans after bio-electro-generative leaching for 24 h, and the transferred charge due to the bacterial oxidation is up to 17.86%, which is an important part of the output electric quantity.

  16. Passivation of chalcopyrite during the leaching with sulphuric acid solution in presence of sodium nitrate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sokić Miroslav D.

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available In this work, the process of the chalcopyrite leaching in sulphuric acid solution was investigated. Sodium nitrate was used as oxidant in the leaching process. Chemical reactions of leaching and their thermodynamic possibilities are predicted based on the calculated Gibbs energies and analysis of E−pH diagrams. The negative values of the Gibbs energy show that all chemical reactions are thermodynamically feasible at atmospheric pressure and in a temperature range 25-90°C. At high electrode potential and low pH values, Cu2+, Fe2+ and Fe3+ ions exist in water solutions. The increase of temperature reduces the probability of Fe3+ ion existence in the system. The chalcopyrite concentrate, enriched in the “Rudnik” flotation plant, with 27.08% Cu, 25.12% Fe, 4.15% Zn and 2.28% Pb was used in the work. XRD and DTA analysis of the concentrate reveals that the sample contains mainly the chalcopyrite with small amount of sphalerite. For the description of the reaction of leaching process the leach residuals, obtained at different conditions, were chosen for XRD, TG/DTA and SEM/EDX analyses. The elemental sulphur and chalcopyrite phases identified in leach residuals confirm our prediction that the elemental sulphur is formed during the leaching process. Accordingly, elemental sulphur is the main product of the reaction, while a minor amount of sulphide sulphur is oxidized to sulphate during the leaching. The sulphur formed during the reaction was precipitated at the particle surfaces, and slowed down the leaching rate in the final stage of leaching process. In the initial stage, the reaction rate was controlled by the surface reaction. The mechanism, latter has been changed into a diffusion controlled one.

  17. Leaching kinetics of bottom ash waste as a source of calcium ions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koech, Lawrence; Everson, Ray; Neomagus, Hein; Rutto, Hilary

    2015-02-01

    Bottom ash is a waste material from coal-fired power plants, and it is known to contain elements that are potentially toxic at high concentration levels when disposed in landfills. This study investigates the use of bottom ash as a partial substitute sorbent for wet flue gas desulfurization (FGD) processes by focusing on its leaching kinetics in adipic acid. This was studied basing on the shrinking core model that was applied to the experimental data obtained by the authors presented at the International Conference on Industrial, Manufacturing, Automation and Mechanical Engineering, Johannesburg, South Africa, November 27-28, 2013) on dissolution of bottom ash. The leaching rate constant was obtained from different reaction variables, namely, temperature, pH, acid concentration, and solid-to-liquid ratio, that could affect the leaching process. The solid sample of bottom ash was characterized at different leaching periods using X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). It was found that solid-to-liquid ratio had a significant effect on the leaching rate constant when compared with other variables. The leaching kinetics showed that diffusion through the product layer was the rate-controlling step during leaching, and the activation energy for the process was found to be 18.92 kJ/mol. PMID:25947048

  18. Underground leaching of uranium ores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Large amounts of low-grade U ore, not worth processing by conventional methods, are to be found at many sites in mine pillars, walls, and backfilling. Many proven deposits are not being mined because the geological conditions are difficult or the U ore is of relatively low grade. Factors such as radioactive emission, radon emanation, and the formation of radioactive dust give rise to health hazards. When U ores are treated above ground, enormous quantities of solid and liquid radioactive waste and mining spoil accumulate. The underground leaching of U is a fundamentally different kind of process. It is based on the selective dissolving of U at the place where it occurs by a chemical reagent; all that reaches the ground surface is a solution containing U, and after extraction of the U by sorption the reagent is used again. The main difficult and dangerous operations associated with conventional methods (excavation; extraction and crushing of the ore; storage of wastes) are avoided. Before underground leaching the ore formation has to be fractured and large ore bodies broken down into blocks by shrinkage stopping. These operations are carried out by advanced machinery and require the presence underground of only a few workers. If the ore is in seams, the only mining operation is the drilling of boreholes. The chemical reagent is introduced under pressure through one set of boreholes, while the U bearing solution is pumped out from another set. The process is monitored with the help of control boreholes. After extraction of the U by sorption, the reagent is ready to be used again. Very few operations are involved and insignificant amounts of dissolved U escape into the surrounding rock formations. Experience has shown that underground leaching reduces the final cost of the U metal, increases productivity, reduces capital expenditure, and radically improves working conditions

  19. Bacterial leaching of Pb -metallurgical wastes

    OpenAIRE

    Fečko, Peter; Janáková, Iva; Pertile, Eva; Kulová, Eliška

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this paper is verification of application of bacterial leaching and calcination to recover heavy metals from metallurgical wastes - matte from metallurgical plant Kovohute Pribram. For bacterial leaching a pure bacterial culture of Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans was used. For a verification test an original sample of matte and matte from 2004 year were used. This paper further shows changes in the samples after bacterial leaching and after calcination. The paper results...

  20. Nitrogen leaching in small agricultural catchments

    OpenAIRE

    Kyllmar, Katarina

    2004-01-01

    Nitrogen (N) leaching from arable land to the aquatic environment is considered a serious problem. Small agricultural monitoring catchments in Sweden were used for the application and testing of model-based methods for quantification of N leaching from arable fields, and for analysis of measured data. The physically-based modelling system SOILNDB was used in two different approaches for quantification of N leaching; by direct simulations using monitored field data and by producing field N lea...

  1. Mitigation of phosphorus leaching from agricultural soils

    OpenAIRE

    Svanbäck, Annika

    2014-01-01

    Phosphorus (P) is an essential element in crop production, but P losses from agricultural soils are a major contributor to surface water eutrophication. This thesis examined the effects of chemical soil properties and soil structure, as governed by agricultural management practices, on P leaching from agricultural soils and how this leaching can be reduced. An initial investigation on the effect of plant-available P concentration in the soil (P-AL) on topsoil P leaching from five soils clearl...

  2. Leaching From Biomass Gasification Residues

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Allegrini, Elisa; Boldrin, Alessio; Polletini, A.;

    2011-01-01

    composition, and DOC complexation and sorption mechanisms were found to have a great influence on their release. Like wood combustion residues, the analysed ashes could be relevant for recycling in agriculture or forestry because of the potential as liming agent and source of macroelements. However, the high...... geochemical modelling were carried out both on fresh and aged samples. The results showed that the material is comparable to residues from wood combustion and the leaching behaviour was dominated by Ca-containing minerals and solid solutions. Heavy metals were detected in very low concentrations in the bulk...

  3. Nitrate leaching from Silage Maize

    OpenAIRE

    Hansen, Elly Møller; Eriksen, Jørgen

    2009-01-01

    During the last 20 years the area with maize in Denmark has increased dramatically and reached 163,000 ha in 2008. Silage maize is easy to grow, is a suitable fodder for cows and goes well with grass-clover in the diet. This means that silage maize is often found in crop rotations with grass-clover on sandy soils in western Denmark. The ploughing in of grass-clover fields poses a serious risk of increased nitrate leaching on a coarse sandy soil, even when carried out in spring. With increased...

  4. A New Generation of Leaching Tests – The Leaching Environmental Assessment Framework

    Science.gov (United States)

    Provides an overview of newly released leaching tests that provide a more accurate source term when estimating environmental release of metals and other constituents of potential concern (COPCs). The Leaching Environmental Assessment Framework (LEAF) methods have been (1) develo...

  5. Methodology of leach testing of boro-silicate glasses in water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The leaching rate is the principal parameter to be taken into account in the optimization of the conditioning glasses. It is also important for the analysis of the possible release rate of radioactive elements. In this context leaching tests must provide an answer to the release rate of radioactive nuclides under three different conditions: radioactive leaks in cooling pools (when asked by the management scheme) during engineering storage; release of radioactive elements when, due to a possible (even if highly improbable) accident, a large amount of water leaches the glass up to its complete dissolution; long term degradation of the conditioning barrier in the repository. To find a single test which complies to these different requirements does not seem probable. The task is aggravated by the complexity of the leaching mechanism

  6. Use of flue gas desulfurization gypsum for leaching Cd and Pb in reclaimed tidal flat soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Ping; Li, Xian; Tong, Ze-Jun; Li, Qu-Sheng; He, Bao-Yan; Wang, Li-Li; Guo, Shi-Hong; Xu, Zhi-Min

    2016-04-01

    A soil column leaching experiment was conducted to eliminate heavy metals from reclaimed tidal flat soil. Flue gas desulfurization (FGD) gypsum was used for leaching. The highest removal rates of Cd and Pb in the upper soil layers (0-30 cm) were 52.7 and 30.5 %, respectively. Most of the exchangeable and carbonate-bound Cd and Pb were removed. The optimum FGD gypsum application rate was 7.05 kg·m(-2), and the optimum leaching water amount for the application was 217.74 L·m(-2). The application of FGD gypsum (two times) and the extension of the leaching interval time to 20 days increased the heavy metal removal rate in the upper soil layers. The heavy metals desorbed from the upper soil layers were re-adsorbed and fixed in the 30-70 cm soil layers. PMID:26758303

  7. Quasi-dynamic leaching characteristics of polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins and dibenzofurans from raw and solidified waste incineration residues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsi, Hsing-Cheng; Wang, Lin-Chi; Yu, Tsung-Hsien; Chang-Chien, Guo-Ping

    2008-03-01

    Quasi-dynamic leaching characteristics of polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins and dibenzofurans (PCDD/Fs) from raw and solidified air pollution control (APC) residues were examined via a nine-time multiple leaching test. The effect of injected activated carbon in the APC residues on the PCDD/F leachability was also evaluated. When humic acid solution was used as a leachant, the leaching concentrations of PCDD/Fs fluctuated between the first and the fifth leaching, followed by a gradual increase and then suddenly reached maximum values at the leaching sequences around seventh and eighth. This significant enhancement in PCDD/F leachability was mainly due to an increase in the release of highly chlorinated PCDD/Fs. Leaching of PCDD/Fs with n-hexane was, in contrast, primarily caused by the partitioning of hydrophobic PCDD/Fs between the APC residue surface and the liquid phase of n-hexane. Consequently, the largest leaching concentrations for n-hexane tests achieved at the first leaching, followed by a decrease and reached plateaus. Solidification/stabilization (S/S) decreased the PCDD/F leachability up to the fifth leaching by the use of humic acid solution. However, S/S increased the PCDD/F leaching concentrations and rates with n-hexane. The activated carbon in APC residues significantly inhibited the release of PCDD/F with n-hexane. The inhibiting effect provided by activated carbon was, however, less significant by the use of humic acid solution. PMID:18028984

  8. Method of continuous pressure leaching of ores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ore leaching, especially suspensions of ground ore or fine ore fractions from physical treatment was divided into two operations. The former, i.e., ore mixing with technical grade concentrated sulfuric acid proceeded in a separate mixer. The mixture was then transported into an autoclave where the actual leaching proceeded for 2 to 4 hours. The extracted mixture was discharged through the autoclave bottom. The leaching autoclave used can be without any inner structures. The separation of mixing from the actual leaching allows processing ores with high levels of clay components, increasing operating reliability of the facility, reducing consumption of special structural materials and energy, and increasing process efficiency. (E.S.)

  9. Reactive leaching of recovery boiler fly ash

    OpenAIRE

    Frigård, Antti

    2016-01-01

    This thesis studied a new CaO leaching method for chloride and potassium removal from recovery boiler fly ash. The concept of this method is to use calcium oxide (or calcium hydroxide) as an additive in the leaching stage in order to ease the subsequent solid-liquid separation. CaO leaching has several benefits over traditional leaching process which uses sulphuric acid as an additive: CaO does not include sulphur that would affect the mills sulphur sodium balance, CaO is readily available in...

  10. The development trends of shrinkage stope leaching

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The shrinkage stope leaching is a comprehensive method of mining and hydrometallurgy containing the mining technology (involve developing, cutting, drilling, blasting, caving ore and moving some ores to ground) and leaching ore (include distributing solution, percolation leaching, bottom collecting solution, recovering solution containing metal and processing). Due to integration process, the mining and hydrometallurgy processes are greatly shortened, and the economic profits are very remarkable. The development history of shrinkage stope leaching is presented, and the property of its subject is briefly described. Using several typical examples, its characteristics are summarized and several problems to be resolved are discussed. Finally its development prospect is made

  11. 从铜阳极泥中氧压浸出有价金属试验研究%Leaching of Valuable Metals From Copper Anode Slime by Oxygen Pressure-Acid Leaching Process

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    蔡创开; 庄荣传; 林鸿汉

    2015-01-01

    Leaching of valuable metals from copper anode slime by three oxygen pressure process was investigated .The distribution of copper ,tellurium ,selenium and silver in the processes were examined . The results show that by the direct oxygen pressure-acid leaching process ,selenium is partially leached out which is not conducive to enrich of selenium in leaching residues .The process of water leaching-oxygen pressure alkali leaching is lengthy and complex ,the silver is dispersed in the leaching solution . By water leaching-oxygen pressure acid leaching process ,under the conditions of temperature of 130℃ ,oxygen pressure of 0 .8 M Pa ,the leaching rate of copper ,tellurium and selenium are 98 .3% ,46 .8%and 0 .11% ,respectively ,and the silver is concentrated in leaching residues .So the water leaching-oxygen pressure acid leaching process is recommended to further research .%研究了采用3种加压氧化方式从铜阳极泥中浸出有价金属 ,考察了阳极泥中铜、碲、硒、银的走向.结果表明 :直接氧压酸浸 ,阳极泥中的硒被部分浸出 ,不利于集中回收 ;氧压碱浸工艺流程长 ,工艺复杂 ,银被分散 ;水浸—氧压酸浸过程中 ,控制体系温度130 ℃ ,氧压0 .8 M Pa ,铜浸出率达98 .3% ,碲浸出率为46 .8% ,硒浸出率仅0 .11% ,银集中在渣中 ,有利于下一步集中回收.3种工艺中 ,以水浸—氧压酸浸效果最佳.

  12. Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction: Chemical and Physical Properties of the Optimized Solvent

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Delmau, L.H.

    2002-10-08

    This work was undertaken to optimize the solvent used in the Caustic Side Solvent Extraction (CSSX) process and to measure key chemical and physical properties related to its performance in the removal of cesium from the alkaline high-level salt waste stored in tanks at the Savannah River Site. The need to adjust the solvent composition arose from the prior discovery that the previous baseline solvent was supersaturated with respect to the calixarene extractant. The following solvent-component concentrations in Isopar{reg_sign} L diluent are recommended: 0.007 M calix[4]arene-bis(tert-octylbenzo-crown-6) (BOBCalixC6) extractant, 0.75 M 1-(2,2,3,3-tetrafluoropropoxy)-3-(4-sec-butylphenoxy)-2-propanol (Cs-7SB) phase modifier, and 0.003 M tri-n-octylamine (TOA) stripping aid. Criteria for this selection included BOBCalixC6 solubility, batch cesium distribution ratios (D{sub Cs}), calculated flowsheet robustness, third-phase formation, coalescence rate (dispersion numbers), and solvent density. Although minor compromises within acceptable limits were made in flowsheet robustness and solvent density, significant benefits were gained in lower risk of third-phase formation and lower solvent cost. Data are also reported for the optimized solvent regarding the temperature dependence of D{sub Cs} in extraction, scrubbing, and stripping (ESS); ESS performance on recycle; partitioning of BOBCalixC6, Cs-7SB, and TOA to aqueous process solutions; partitioning of organic anions; distribution of metals; solvent phase separation at low temperatures; solvent stability to elevated temperatures; and solvent density and viscosity. Overall, the technical risk of the CSSX process has been reduced by resolving previously identified issues and raising no new issues.

  13. Study on indium leaching from mechanically activated hard zinc residue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yao J.H.

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study, changes in physicochemical properties and leachability of indium from mechanically activated hard zinc residue by planetary mill were investigated. The results showed that mechanical activation increased specific surface area, reaction activity of hard zinc residue, and decreased its particle size, which had a positive effect on indium extraction from hard zinc residue in hydrochloric acid solution. Kinetics of indium leaching from unmilled and activated hard zinc residue were also investigated, respectively. It was found that temperature had an obvious effect on indium leaching rate. Two different kinetic models corresponding to reactions which are diffusion controlled, [1-(1- x1/3]2=kt and (1-2x/3-(1-x2/3=kt were used to describe the kinetics of indium leaching from unmilled sample and activated sample, respectively. Their activation energies were determined to be 17.89 kJ/mol (umilled and 11.65 kJ/mol (activated within the temperature range of 30°C to 90°C, which is characteristic for a diffusion controlled process. The values of activation energy demonstrated that the leaching reaction of indium became less sensitive to temperature after hard zinc residue mechanically activated by planetary mill.

  14. Leaching Of Strontium From Cement-Based Matrices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cementation is a method used to immobilize radioactive waste in order to protect the environment from radionuclide release. Rice husk ash (RHA) has been used successfully as pozzolanic material for several years. The study was carried out to investigate the ability of RHA (10%, 15% and 25%) accompanied with kaolin (K) (5%, 10% and 15%) and cement at water-cement ratio (w/c) of 45% to improve their leachability resistance from a cement matrix. The study was subjected to the leaching procedure of ANSI (2003) for 120 days. The cumulative fractional release data suggested that there was a substantial decrease in strontium ions leachability from cement formulation containment with increase in its rice husk ash (RHA) at 25% and kaolin at 10% content. The improvement of strontium ions leach rates is mostly due to diffusion phenomena and selected additives which depend essentially on the degree of porosity of the cementitious products. The chemical performance of the matrices is acceptable and the decreased leachability was attributed to the progression in the formation of cement hydrated phases and the pozzolanic reaction between RHA, kaolin and lime in cement matrices. The mathematical analysis of the long term leaching results indicated that strontium leaching was resulted from a combination of first order reaction and diffusion mechanisms

  15. A Planetary lensing feature in caustic-crossing high-magnification microlensing events

    CERN Document Server

    Chung, Sun-Ju; Ryu, Yoon-Hyun; Lee, Chung-Uk

    2012-01-01

    Current microlensing follow-up observations focus on high-magnification events because of the high efficiency of planet detection. However, central perturbations of high-magnification events caused by a planet can also be produced by a very close or a very wide binary companion, and the two kinds of central perturbations are not generally distinguished without time consuming detailed modeling (a planet-binary degeneracy). Hence, it is important to resolve the planet-binary degeneracy that occurs in high-magnification events. In this paper, we investigate caustic-crossing high-magnification events caused by a planet and a wide binary companion. From this study, we find that because of the different magnification excess patterns inside the central caustics induced by the planet and the binary companion, the light curves of the caustic-crossing planetary-lensing events exhibit a feature that is discriminated from those of the caustic-crossing binary-lensing events, and the feature can be used to immediately dist...

  16. The Theory of Caustics and Wave Front Singularities with Physical Applications

    OpenAIRE

    Ehlers, J.; Newman, E.

    2000-01-01

    This is intended as an introduction to and review of the theory of Lagrangian and Legendrian submanifolds and their associated maps developed by Arnold and his collaborators. The theory is illustrated by applications to Hamilton–Jacobi theory and the eikonal equation, with an emphasis on null surfaces and wave fronts and their associated caustics and singularities.

  17. Safety basis for the 241-AN-107 mixer pump installation and caustic addition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This safety Basis was prepared to determine whether or not the proposed activities of installing a 76 HP jet mixer pump and the addition of approximately 50,000 gallons of 19 M (50:50 wt %) aqueous caustic are within the safety envelope as described by Tank Farms (chapter six of WHC-SD-WM-ISB-001, Rev. 0). The safety basis covers the components, structures and systems for the caustic addition and mixer pump installation. These include: installation of the mixer pump and monitoring equipment; operation of the mixer pump, process monitoring equipment and caustic addition; the pump stand, caustic addition skid, the electrical skid, the video camera system and the two densitometers. Also covered is the removal and decontamination of the mixer pump and process monitoring system. Authority for this safety basis is WHC-IP-0842 (Waste Tank Administration). Section 15.9, Rev. 2 (Unreviewed Safety Questions) of WHC-IP-0842 requires that an evaluation be performed for all physical modifications

  18. Complex stress intensity factors at cracks in birefringent plates by the method of reflected caustics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The optical method of reflected caustics was used for evaluating the stress intensity factors in cracked plates made of birefringent materials in the general case when the crack is submitted to a combined mode I and mode II deformations. It has been already shown that the reflected rays from the rear face of the transparent optically active material form a double caustic due to this optical anisotropy of the material and, on the other hand, it is also known that when a crack in an optically inert material is submitted to a combined mode I and mode II deformation the respective caustic is angularly displaced. In this paper the combined effect of the optical anisotropy of the material together with the general case of loading of the cracked plate defined by the ratio μ = Ksub(II)/Ksub(I), where Ksub(I,II) are the respective SIF's for either mode of deformation was studied. Nomograms for the exact evaluation of the respective stress intensity factors Ksub(I) and Ksub(II) from the geometric characteristics of both branches of the caustic for a series of birefringent materials and for different values of μ are given. A series of experiments with cracked birefringent plates made of polycarbonate with a coefficient of anisotropy xi sub(r) = 0.153 for different orientations of the crack have shown that the determination of Ksub(I) and Ksub(II) by these nomograms is accurate since there is a coincidence between theory and experiments. (orig.)

  19. Novel Electrochemical Treatment of Spent Caustic from the Hydrocarbon Industry Using Ti/BDD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alejandro Medel

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available During the crude oil refining process, NaOH solutions are used to remove H2S, H2Saq, and sulfur compounds from different hydrocarbon streams. The residues obtained are called “spent caustics.” These residues can be mixed with those obtained in other processes, adding to its chemical composition naphthenic acids and phenolic compounds, resulting in one of the most dangerous industrial residues. In this study, the use of electrochemical technology (ET, using BDD with Ti as substrate (Ti/BDD, is evaluated in electrolysis of spent caustic mixtures, obtained through individual samples from different refineries. In this way, the Ti/BDD’s capability of carrying out the electrochemical destruction of spent caustics in an acidic medium is evaluated having as key process a chemical pretreatment phase. The potential production of •OHs, as the main reactive oxygen species electrogenerated over Ti/BDD surface, was evaluated in HCl and H2SO4 through fluorescence spectroscopy, demonstrating the reaction medium’s influence on its production. The results show that the hydrocarbon industry spent caustics can be mineralized to CO2 and water, driving the use of ET and of the Ti/BDD to solve a real problem, whose potential and negative impact on the environment and on human health is and has been the environmental agencies’ main focus.

  20. Structural evaluation of mixer pump installed in Tank 241-AN-107 for caustic addition project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report documents the structural analysis and evaluation of a mixer pump and caustic addition system to be used in Tank 107-AN. This pump will be installed in the central pump pit of this double- shell tank for the purpose of bringing the hydroxide ion concentration into compliance with Tank Farm operating specifications

  1. Biological treatment of refinery spent caustics under halo-alkaline conditions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Graaff, de M.; Bijmans, M.F.M.; Abbas, B.; Euverink, G.J.W.; Muyzer, G.; Janssen, A.J.H.

    2011-01-01

    The present research demonstrates the biological treatment of refinery sulfidic spent caustics in a continuously fed system under halo-alkaline conditions (i.e. pH 9.5; Na(+)= 0.8M). Experiments were performed in identical gas-lift bioreactors operated under aerobic conditions (80-90% saturation) at

  2. Biological treatment of refinery spent caustics under halo-alkaline conditions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. de Graaff; M.F.M. Bijmans; B. Abbas; G.J.W. Euverink; G. Muijzer; A.J.H. Janssen

    2011-01-01

    The present research demonstrates the biological treatment of refinery sulfidic spent caustics in a continuously fed system under halo-alkaline conditions (i.e. pH 9.5; Na+ = 0.8 M). Experiments were performed in identical gas-lift bioreactors operated under aerobic conditions (80-90% saturation) at

  3. Biological treatment of refinery spent caustics under halo-alkaline conditions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Graaff, Marco de; Bijmans, Martijn F.M.; Abbas, Ben; Euverink, Gert-J.W.; Muyzer, Gerard; Janssen, Albert J.H.

    2011-01-01

    The present research demonstrates the biological treatment of refinery sulfidic spent caustics in a continuously fed system under halo-alkaline conditions (i.e. pH 9.5; Na+ = 0.8 M). Experiments were performed in identical gas-lift bioreactors operated under aerobic conditions (80–90% saturation) at

  4. Temperature effects on bacterial leaching of sulfide minerals in shake flask experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahonen, L; Tuovinen, O H

    1991-01-01

    The microbiological leaching of a sulfide ore sample was investigated in shake flask experiments. The ore sample contained pyrite, pyrrhotite, pentlandite, sphalerite, and chalcopyrite as the main sulfide minerals. The tests were performed at eight different temperatures in the range of 4 to 37 degrees C. The primary data were used for rate constant calculations, based on kinetic equations underlying two simplified models of leaching, i.e., a shrinking particle model and a shrinking core model. The rate constants thus derived were further used for the calculation of activation energy values for some of the sulfide minerals present in the ore sample. The chalcopyrite leaching rates were strongly influenced by the interaction of temperature, pH, and redox potential. Sphalerite leaching could be explained with the shrinking particle model. The data on pyrrhotite leaching displayed good fit with the shrinking core model. Pyrite leaching was found to agree with the shrinking particle model. Activation energies calculated from the rate of constants suggested that the rate-limiting steps were different for the sulfide minerals examined; they could be attributed to a chemical or biochemical reaction rather than to diffusion control. PMID:16348389

  5. Leach tests on grouts made with actual and trace metal-spiked synthetic phosphate/sulfate waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pacific Northwest Laboratory conducted experiments to produce empirical leach rate data for phosphate-sulfate waste (PSW) grout. Effective diffusivities were measured for various radionuclides (90Sr, 99Tc, 14C, 129I, 137Cs, 60Co, 54Mn, and U), stable major components (NO3-, SO42-, H3BO3, K and Na) and the trace constituents Ag, As, Cd, Hg, Pb, and Se. Two types of leach tests were used on samples of actual PSW grout and synthetic PSW grout: the American Nuclear Society (ANS) 16.1 intermittent replacement leach test and a static leach test. Grout produced from both synthetic and real PSW showed low leach rates for the trace metal constituents and most of the waste radionuclides. Many of the spiked trace metals and radionuclides were not detected in any leachates. None of the effluents contained measurable quantities of 137Cs, 60Co, 54Mn, 109Cd, 51Cr, 210Pb, 203Hg, or As. For those trace species with detectable leach rates, 125I appeared to have the greatest leach rate, followed by 99Tc, 75Se, and finally U, 14C, and 110mAg. Leach rates for nitrate are between those for I and Tc, but there is much scatter in the nitrate data because of the very low nitrate inventory. 32 refs., 6 figs., 15 tabs

  6. Kinetics and leaching behaviors of aluminum from pharmaceutical blisters in sodium hydroxide solution

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王重庆; 王晖; 顾帼华; 符剑刚; 刘又年

    2015-01-01

    A hydrometallurgical process was developed for recycling pharmaceutical blisters. Leaching aluminum from pharmaceutical blisters using sodium hydroxide (NaOH) solutions was investigated with respect to leaching behaviors and kinetics. A L9(34) orthogonal design of experiments suggests that the most significant factor is NaOH concentration followed by temperature and leaching time. Factorial experiments demonstrate that the leaching rate of aluminum increases with increasing of the factors. The optimum conditions are temperature of 70 °C, leaching time of 20 min, NaOH concentration of 1.25 mol/L, liquid-to-solid mass ratio of 15:1 and agitation speed of 400 r/min. Under optimum conditions, the leaching rate is up to 100%, implying that aluminum and polyvinyl chloride (PVC) plastic in pharmaceutical blisters are separated completely. Kinetics of leaching aluminum is best described by the product layer diffusion control model, and the activation energy is calculated to be 19.26 kJ/mol.

  7. Comparative Study on the Leaching Dynamic Properties of Five Kinds of Microparticulate forms of Vitamin B1

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    With an aim to reduce leaching of water-soluble vitamins, the leaching properties of five kinds of microparticulate forms of vitamin B1 are investigated by means of dynamic system. These microparticles include: alginate and alginate-CMC microcapsules prepared by emulsion coacervation process (ECP), alginate and gelatin microcapsules prepared by spray-drying process (SDP), and alginate microbound. The results show these five microparticulate forms of VB1 can reduce leaching significantly compared to crystalline form VB1, and the leaching rates at different intervals, diameters and encapsulation efficiencies (EE) are significantly different among all kinds of microparticles (ANOVA, P<0.05). The leaching properties of the five microparticles are in accord with Higuchi equation. Based on the regression equation, the half loss time (T50) is determined.In conclusion, the alginate-CMC microencapsule is a potential tool to reduce leaching of water-soluble vitamins.

  8. Hydrogen peroxide leaching of uranium in carbonate solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The kinetics of UO2 dissolution in ammoniacal carbonate solutions were investigated with hydrogen peroxide as an oxidant. The effects of hydrogen peroxide concentration, total carbonate concentration and pH were studied. For similar conditions, the rate of dissolution was considerably faster with hydrogen peroxide than with oxygen. The reaction was found to be of 0.5 order with respect to both hydrogen peroxide and total carbonate concentrations. At pH values below approximately 10, the rate was relatively insensitive to pH. These results are consistent with an electrochemical surface reaction similar to that developed for the oxygen-leaching system. Electrochemical interpretation adequately explain the enhanced rate of dissolution observed for hydrogen peroxide leaching. The decomposition of hydrogen peroxide in alkaline solutions is discussed. Surface-electrode potentials are used to explain the catalytic activity of various solids. Hydrogen peroxide was found to decompose rapidly in the presence of freshly precipitated ferric hydroxide. The effect of pH on the rate of hydrogen peroxide decomposition was investigated in the pH range 4.3 to 11.2. Problems associated with the use of hydrogen peroxide in the in-situ leaching of uranium are considered. (author)

  9. Simultaneous Pressure Oxidation Leaching of Zinc Sulfide Concentrate and Neutral Leaching Residue%闪锌矿与中性浸出渣合并氧压酸浸

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    梁铎强; 王吉坤; 周廷熙; 张怀伟

    2009-01-01

    硫化锌精矿和由传统流程得到的中浸渣混在一块,对其进行了浸出的小型试验.试验在不同的条件下进行,以考察影响浸出的各种因素,包括浸出温度、浸出时间、氧分压和搅拌速度.试验在一个两升的高压釜内进行.试验结果表明了硫化锌精矿和中浸渣能相到促进浸出,但只有在一定的浸出条件下这种耦合作用才表现得比较明显.研究过程中一些机理也得到了证实.最后为了后面的扩大试验提供了关键的浸出条件:浸出温度135℃;浸出时间2h;氧分压0.8MPa;初始酸度120g/L.%Lab-scale simultaneous leaching of zinc sulfide concentrate and neutral leaching residue obtained by traditional roast-leachelectrowin (RLE) were performed in various conditions to investigate leaching variables such as leaching temperature, leaching duration, oxygen partial pressure and stirring rate. Experiments were carried out in a 2-liter autoclave. Experimental results show that zinc sulfide concentrate and the neutral leaching residue help each other to leach in such simultaneous leaching experiments, but the coupling effect occurs obviously only in a given leaching conditions. In this work some mechanisms are proved in the experiments. For the sake of subsequent scaleup experiment,the reasonable condition of simultaneous leaching is given as follows,leaching temperature,135%;leaching duration,2hr;oxygen partial pressure,0.8MPa; initial acidity,120g/l.

  10. Leaching of biocides from building facades: Upscaling of a local two-region leaching model to the city scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coutu, S.; Rota, C.; Rossi, L.; Barry, D. A.

    2011-12-01

    Facades are protected by paints that contain biocides as protection against degradation. These biocides are leached by rainfall (albeit at low concentrations). At the city scale, however, the surface area of building facades is significant, and leached biocides are a potential environmental risk to receiving waters. A city-scale biocide-leaching model was developed based on two main steps. In the first step, laboratory experiments on a single facade were used to calibrate and validate a 1D, two-region phenomenological model of biocide leaching. The same data set was analyzed independently by another research group who found empirically that biocide leachate breakthrough curves were well represented by a sum of two exponentials. Interestingly, the two-region model was found analytically to reproduce this functional form as a special case. The second step in the method is site-specific, and involves upscaling the validated single facade model to a particular city. In this step, (i) GIS-based estimates of facade heights and areas are deduced using the city's cadastral data, (ii) facade flow is estimated using local meteorological data (rainfall, wind direction) and (iii) paint application rates are modeled as a stochastic process based on manufacturers' recommendations. The methodology was applied to Lausanne, Switzerland, a city of about 200,000 inhabitants. Approximately 30% of the annually applied mass of biocides was estimated to be released to the environment.

  11. Porous glass with high silica content for nuclear waste storage : preparation, characterization and leaching

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aqueous solutions simulating radioactive nuclear wastes (like Savanah River Laboratory) were incorporated in porous glass matrix with high silica content prepared by decomposition of borosilicate glass like Na2O - B2O3 - SiO2. After sintering, the samples were submitted, during 28 days, to standard leaching tests MCC1, MCC5 (Soxhlet) and stagnating. The total weight loss, ph, as well as the integral and differential leaching rates and the accumulated concentrations in the leach of Si, Na, B, Ca, Mn, Al, Fe and Ni. The results are compared with the results from reference borosilicate glass, made by fusion, ceramic, synroc, concrets, etc... (E.G.)

  12. Use of Polyphosphate to Decrease Uranium Leaching in Hanford 300 Area Smear Zone Sediments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Szecsody, James E.; Zhong, Lirong; Oostrom, Martinus; Vermeul, Vincent R.; Fruchter, Jonathan S.; Williams, Mark D.

    2012-09-30

    The primary objective of this study is to summarize the laboratory investigations performed to evaluate short- and long-term effects of phosphate treatment on uranium leaching from 300 area smear zone sediments. Column studies were used to compare uranium leaching in phosphate-treated to untreated sediments over a year with multiple stop flow events to evaluate longevity of the uranium leaching rate and mass. A secondary objective was to compare polyphosphate injection, polyphosphate/xanthan injection, and polyphosphate infiltration technologies that deliver phosphate to sediment.

  13. Experimental Study of the Rhizobium and Iron Oxide Thiobacillus for Heap Leaching of Zinc Leaching Slag%根瘤菌与氧化铁硫杆菌堆浸锌浸出渣的试验研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李勇; 邓兴; 金开胜; 杨光棣

    2012-01-01

    This paper adopts the rhizobium and thiobaeillus ferrooxidans respectively for heap leaching processing of hydrometallurgy of zinc leaching residue. Through the treatment of rhizobium with thiobacillus ferrooxidans, zinc leaching residue of zinc leaching rate is compared. The test results indicate that rhizobium treatment of zinc leaching residue of zinc leaching rate reaches 24.12 % and thiobacillus ferrooxidans treatment of zinc leaching residue of zinc leaching rate reaches 33.86 %. Treatment rate by thiobacillus ferrooxidans was significantly higher than that of rhizobium.%本文采用根瘤菌与氧化铁硫杆菌分别堆浸处理湿法冶金的锌浸出渣,通过比较根瘤菌与氧化铁硫杆菌处理的锌浸出渣的锌浸出率。试验结果表明,根瘤菌处理锌浸出渣锌浸出率达到了24.12%,而氧化铁硫杆菌处理的锌浸出渣锌浸出率达到了33.86%,氧化铁硫杆菌处理锌浸出渣的锌浸出率明显高于根瘤菌。

  14. Role of microstructure in caustic stress corrosion cracking of Alloy 690

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alloy 690 has been selected for nuclear heat transport system tubing application in recent commercial reactor plants due to its resistance to multiple types of corrosion attack. Typical corn final heat treatments for this material are a mill-anneal (MA, approximately 1,070 C) to completely dissolve the carbides and develop the final grain structure plus a thermal treatment (TT, approximately 700 C) to precipitate carbides at the grain boundaries. Tubing with grain boundary carbides and no or few intragranular carbides has been found resistant to intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC) in caustic environments. In this work, first, Alloy 690 plate was subjected to a variety of MA and MA-TT heat treatments to create microstructures of carbide-decorated grain boundaries and undecorated boundaries. Caustic IGSCC test results were consistent with tubing data. Second, experiments were conducted to understand the mechanism by which caustic-corrosion resistance is imparted to Alloy 690 by grain boundary carbides. Tubing with a fully-developed MA-TT carbide microstructure was strained and heat-treated to create a mixed microstructure of new grain boundaries with no carbide precipitate decoration, intermixed with intragranular carbide strings from prior grain boundaries. Caustic SCC performance of this material was identical to that of material with the MA-TT carbide-decorated grain boundaries. This work suggests that the fundamental cause of good IGSCC resistance of MA-TT Alloy 690 in caustic does not derive solely from grain boundary carbides. It is suggested that matrix strength, as measured by yield stress, could be a controlling factor

  15. A geochemical module for "AMDTreat" to compute caustic quantity, effluent quantity, and sludge volume

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cravotta, Charles A., III; Parkhurst, David L.; Means, Brent P; McKenzie, Bob; Morris, Harry; Arthur, Bill

    2010-01-01

    Treatment with caustic chemicals typically is used to increase pH and decrease concentrations of dissolved aluminum, iron, and/or manganese in largevolume, metal-laden discharges from active coal mines. Generally, aluminum and iron can be removed effectively at near-neutral pH (6 to 8), whereas active manganese removal requires treatment to alkaline pH (~10). The treatment cost depends on the specific chemical used (NaOH, CaO, Ca(OH)2, Na2CO3, or NH3) and increases with the quantities of chemical added and sludge produced. The pH and metals concentrations do not change linearly with the amount of chemical added. Consequently, the amount of caustic chemical needed to achieve a target pH and the corresponding effluent composition and sludge volume can not be accurately determined without empirical titration data or the application of geochemical models to simulate the titration of the discharge water with caustic chemical(s). The AMDTreat computer program (http://amd.osmre.gov/ ) is widely used to compute costs for treatment of coal-mine drainage. Although AMDTreat can use results of empirical titration with industrial grade caustic chemicals to compute chemical costs for treatment of net-acidic or net-alkaline mine drainage, such data are rarely available. To improve the capability of AMDTreat to estimate (1) the quantity and cost of caustic chemicals to attain a target pH, (2) the concentrations of dissolved metals in treated effluent, and (3) the volume of sludge produced by the treatment, a titration simulation is being developed using the geochemical program PHREEQC (wwwbrr.cr.usgs.gov/projects/GWC_coupled/phreeqc/) that will be coupled as a module to AMDTreat. The simulated titration results can be compared with or used in place of empirical titration data to estimate chemical quantities and costs. This paper describes the development, evaluation, and potential utilization of the PHREEQC titration module for AMDTreat.

  16. Leaching behavior of copper from waste printed circuit boards with Brønsted acidic ionic liquid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • A Brønsted acidic ILs was used to leach Cu from WPCBs for the first time. • The particle size of WPCBs has significant influence on Cu leaching rate. • Cu leaching rate was higher than 99% under the optimum leaching conditions. • The leaching process can be modeled with shrinking core model, and the Ea was 25.36 kJ/mol. - Abstract: In this work, a Brønsted acidic ionic liquid, 1-butyl-3-methyl-imidazolium hydrogen sulfate ([bmim]HSO4), was used to leach copper from waste printed circuit boards (WPCBs, mounted with electronic components) for the first time, and the leaching behavior of copper was discussed in detail. The results showed that after the pre-treatment, the metal distributions were different with the particle size: Cu, Zn and Al increased with the increasing particle size; while Ni, Sn and Pb were in the contrary. And the particle size has significant influence on copper leaching rate. Copper leaching rate was higher than 99%, almost 100%, when 1 g WPCBs powder was leached under the optimum conditions: particle size of 0.1–0.25 mm, 25 mL 80% (v/v) ionic liquid, 10 mL 30% hydrogen peroxide, solid/liquid ratio of 1/25, 70 °C and 2 h. Copper leaching by [bmim]HSO4 can be modeled with the shrinking core model, controlled by diffusion through a solid product layer, and the kinetic apparent activation energy has been calculated to be 25.36 kJ/mol

  17. 新型硫化物助剂强化浸出酸浸渣中铁的研究%Study on Intensified Leaching of Ferric Iron from Acid-leach Residues Using Sulfide as a Novel Leaching Agent

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    金程; 赵颖华; 李登新

    2011-01-01

    采用硫化物作助剂强化溶浸酸浸渣中的氧化铁.分别进行了助浸剂用量、硫酸用量、时间、温度、液固比等条件试验,考察其对酸溶效果的影响,结果表明:当助剂与渣质量比为0.69:1,硫酸过剩系数为1.4,起始液固比为2:1,搅拌速度为1 300 r/min时,在95℃下反应2h,铁的浸取率可以达到89.2%,助剂中锌的浸出率为90.2%,尾渣易于进一步提金.与现行技术条件相比,硫酸用量大大减少,工艺简单,能耗低.%Taking sulfide as a leaching agent, tests were conducted on the intensified-leaching of iron oxide from acid-leach residue. Influence of different factors, such as consumption of leaching agent, dosage of sulfuric acid, leaching time and temperature, as well as liquid-solid ratio, on the leaching effect was investigated. Results show that iron leaching rate reaches 89.2% and the leach rate of zinc from leaching agent is 90.2% under the following conditions of the initial liquid/solid ratio being 1'-1, the mass ratio of leaching agent to residue being 0. 69: 1, excess coefficient of sulfuric acid being 1.4, with a stirring rate at 1 300 r/min and reaction at the temperature of 95 X. For 2 h. The tailings obtained can also be used for further gold-extraction. This process is simple with low energy consumption compared with the existing technology, and sulfuric acid consumption is greatly reduced.

  18. COMPARE AND ANALYSES OF OPTIMIZED R-LEACH WITH LEACH ALGORITHM IN WSN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tarun Sharma

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Wireless sensor networks are composed of numerous small charge, little power devices with sensing, local processing and wireless communication capabilities. Minimizing energy consumption and maximizing network lifespan are significant issues in the design of routing protocols for sensor networks. In this paper, we analyses the efficiency of LEACH protocol in extending the existence for energy-constrained wireless sensor networks. Based on LEACH protocol, an enhanced protocol termed as R- LEACH is proposed which aims to diminish energy consumption within the wireless sensor networks. The simulation results suggest R-LEACH protocol could equilibrium network energy consumption and extend the network lifecycle more successfully as compared to LEACH.

  19. Study on Leaching of Hexavalent Chromium from Hardened Concretes Using Tank Leaching Test

    OpenAIRE

    Takahashi, Shigeru; Sakai, Etsuo; Sugiyama, Takafumi

    2007-01-01

    Tank leaching tests were carried out to investigate the behavior of leaching trace elements from monolith samples. This study consists of two series, and the trace element used was hexavalent chromium. In Series I, the influence of the leachant/surface area of the specimen (L/S ratio) on the leaching amount was investigated. The leaching amount was found to increase with the amount of worked water. This shows that any L/S ratio can be selected in the tank leaching test. In Series II, th...

  20. The use of natural zeolites for radioactive waste treatment. Studies on leaching from zeolite/cement composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Samples of the natural zeolites chabazite, clinoptilolite and a clinoptilolite-rich tuff, were loaded with the isotope 137Cs. Composites of these labeled materials were made with cement and blast furnace slag. Standard leaching experiments were carried out with synthetic sea, ground and 'pond' waters, as well as distilled water. Rates of leaching were calculated and compared to similar systems. (author)

  1. MODELLING CHALCOPYRITE LEACHING BY Fe+3 IONS WITH THE SHRINKING CORE MODEL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodrigo Rangel Porcaro

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Chalcopyrite leaching by ferric iron is considered a slow process with low copper recovery; a phenomenon ascribed to the passivation of the mineral surface during leaching. Thus, the current study investigated the leaching kinetics of a high purity chalcopyrite sample in the presence of ferric sulfate as oxidant. The effects of the stirring rate, temperature, Eh and Fe3+ concentration on copper extraction were assessed. The leaching data could be described by the shirking core model (SCM for particles of unchanging size and indicated diffusion in the ash layer as the rate-controlling step with a high activation energy (103.9±6.5kJ/mol; likely an outcome of neglecting the effect of particle size distribution (PSD on the kinetics equations. Both the application of the quasi-steady-state assumption to solid-liquid systems and the effect of the particle size distribution on the interpretation of kinetics data are also discussed.

  2. Pesticide sorption and leaching potential on three Hawaiian soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Kathleen E; Ray, Chittaranjan; Ki, Seo Jin; Spokas, Kurt A; Koskinen, William C

    2015-08-15

    On the Hawaiian Islands, groundwater is the principal source of potable water and contamination of this key resource by pesticides is of great concern. To evaluate the leaching potential of four weak acid herbicides [aminocyclopyrachlor, picloram, metsulfuron-methyl, biologically active diketonitrile degradate of isoxaflutole (DKN)] and two neutral non-ionizable herbicides [oxyfluorfen, alachlor], their sorption coefficients were determined on three prevalent soils from the island of Oahu. Metsulfuron-methyl, aminocylcopyrachlor, picloram, and DKN were relatively low sorbing herbicides (K(oc) = 3-53 mL g(-1)), alachlor was intermediate (K(oc) = 120-150 mL g(-1)), and oxyfluorfen sorbed very strongly to the three soils (K(oc) > 12,000 mL g(-1)). Following determination of K(oc) values, the groundwater ubiquity score (GUS) indices for these compounds were calculated to predicted their behavior with the Comprehensive Leaching Risk Assessment System (CLEARS; Tier-1 methodology for Hawaii). Metsulfuron-methyl, aminocyclopyrachlor, picloram, and DKN would be categorized as likely leachers in all three Hawaiian soils, indicating a high risk of groundwater contamination across the island of Oahu. In contrast, oxyfluorfen, regardless of the degradation rate, would possess a low and acceptable leaching risk due to its high sorption on all three soils. The leaching potential of alachlor was more difficult to classify, with a GUS value between 1.8 and 2.8. In addition, four different biochar amendments to these soils did not significantly alter their sorption capacities for aminocyclopyrachlor, indicating a relatively low impact of black carbon additions from geologic volcanic inputs of black carbon. Due to the fact that pesticide environmental risks are chiefly dependent on local soil characteristics, this work has demonstrated that once soil specific sorption parameters are known one can assess the potential pesticide leaching risks. PMID:26024994

  3. Quantifying nitrogen leaching response to fertilizer additions in China's cropland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Shuoshuo; Xu, Peng; Zhou, Feng; Yang, Hui; Zheng, Chunmiao; Cao, Wei; Tao, Shu; Piao, Shilong; Zhao, Yue; Ji, Xiaoyan; Shang, Ziyin; Chen, Minpeng

    2016-04-01

    Agricultural soils account for more than 50% of nitrogen leaching (LN) to groundwater in China. When excess levels of nitrogen accumulate in groundwater, it poses a risk of adverse health effects. Despite this recognition, estimation of LN from cropland soils in a broad spatial scale is still quite uncertain in China. The uncertainty of LN primarily stems from the shape of nitrogen leaching response to fertilizer additions (Nrate) and the role of environmental conditions. On the basis of 453 site-years at 51 sites across China, we explored the nonlinearity and variability of the response of LN to Nrate and developed an empirical statistical model to determine how environmental factors regulate the rate of N leaching (LR). The result shows that LN-Nrate relationship is convex for most crop types, and varies by local hydro-climates and soil organic carbon. Variability of air temperature explains a half (∼52%) of the spatial variation of LR. The results of model calibration and validation indicate that incorporating this empirical knowledge into a predictive model could accurately capture the variation in leaching and produce a reasonable upscaling from site to country. The fertilizer-induced LN in 2008 for China's cropland were 0.88 ± 0.23 TgN (1σ), significantly lower than the linear or uniform model, as assumed by Food and Agriculture Organization and MITERRA-EUROPE models. These results also imply that future policy to reduce N leaching from cropland needs to consider environmental variability rather than solely attempt to reduce Nrate. PMID:26774771

  4. Modify LEACH Algorithm for Wireless Sensor Network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mortaza

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Research on wireless sensor networks has recently received much attention as they offer an advantage of monitoring various kinds of environment by sensing physical phenomenon. Prolonged network lifetime, scalability, and load balancing are important requirement for many sensor network applications. Clustering sensor nodes is an effective technique for achieving these goals. In this work, we introduce an energy efficient clustering algorithm for sensor networks based on the LEACH protocol. LEACH (Low Energy Adaptive Clustering Hierarchy is one of popular cluster-based structures, which has been widely proposed in wireless sensor networks. LEACH uses a TDMA based MAC protocol, and In order to maintain a balanced energy consumption. The proposed protocol adds feature to LEACH to reduce the consumption of the network resource in each round. The proposed protocol is simulated and the results show a significant reduction in network energy consumption compared to LEACH.

  5. Phosphorus leaching in a soil textural gradient

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Glæsner, Nadia; Kjærgaard, Charlotte; Rubæk, Gitte Holton;

    2009-01-01

    P leaching. We propose diverse interactions between dominant flow pathways and cattle slurry: - Injection of slurry reduces P leaching compared to surface application in soils with preferential flow behaviour - Injection of slurry has less impact on P leaching compared to surface application in......Texture is a major factor influencing mobilization and transport of P in soil owing partly to differences in adsorptive properties, and partly to differences in pore-size distribution and pore organization. Slurry application strategies may be important mitigation measures for reducing agricultural...... soils with matrix dominated flow behaviour We tested these hypotheses on three textural soil classes (Olsen-P 1.6 mg P 100 g-1) on intact soil columns (20*20 cm) and compared them to in situ P leaching before slurry application. In a loamy sand P leaching with both slurry application techniques slightly...

  6. Leaching of tritium from a cement composite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leaching of tritium from cement composites into an aqueous phase has been studied to evaluate the safety of incorporation of the tritiated liquid waste into cement. Leaching tests were performed by the method recommended by the International Atomic Energy Agency. The Leaching fraction was measured as functions of waste-cement ratio (Wa/C), temperature of leachant and curing time. The tritium leachability of cement in the long term test follows the order: alumina cement portland cement slag cement. The fraction of tritium leached increases with increasing Wa/C and temperature and decreasing curing period. A deionized water as a leachant gives a slightly higher leachability than synthetic sea water. The amount leached of tritium from a 200 l drum size specimen was estimated on the basis of the above results. (author)

  7. LEACH Algorithm Based on Load Balancing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wangang Wang

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper discusses advantages of LEACH Algorithm and the existing improved model which takes the famous hierarchy clustering routing protocol LEACH Algorithm as researching object. Then the paper indicates the problem that in the algorithm capacity factor of cluster head node is not taken into account leading the structure of clusters to be not so reasonable. This research discusses an energy-uniform cluster and cluster head selecting mechanism in which “Pseudo cluster head” concept is introduced in order to coordinate with “Load Monitor” Mechanism and “Load Leisure” Mechanism to maintain load balancing of cluster head character and stability of network topology. On the basis of LEACH Protocol improving algorithm of LEACH-C, CEFL and DCHS. NS2 simulation instrument is applied to do simulation analysis on the improved algorithm. Simulation result shows that LEACH-P Protocol effectively increase energy utilization efficiency, lengthens network lifetime and balances network load.  

  8. The Danish Pesticide Leaching Assessment Programme

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosenbom, Annette Elisabeth; Brüsch, Walter Michael; Juhler, Rene K.;

    In 1998, the Danish Parliament initiated the Pesticide Leaching Assessment Programme (PLAP), an intensive monitoring programme aimed at evaluating the leaching risk of pesticides under field conditions. The objective of the PLAP is to improve the scientific foundation for decision-making in the...... Danish regulation of pesticides. The specific aim is to analyse whether pesticides applied in accordance with current regulations leach to groundwater in unacceptable concentrations. The programme currently evaluates the leaching risk of 41 pesticides and 40 degradation products at five agricultural...... report covers the period May 1999-June 2009 and presents the monitoring results from the five agricultural sites presently monitored. The main focus is on evaluating the leaching risk of the pesticides applied during 2007....

  9. Gold Recovery by Chloridization Leaching of Lead Anode Slime%氯化浸出铅阳极泥回收金的研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李怀仁; 陈家辉; 徐庆鑫; 和晓才; 翟中标

    2011-01-01

    The lead anode slime is treated by hydrometallurgy in order to recover gold. The results indicate that the leaching of copper is the main influencing factor in impurity -reduction acid. On the condition that the temperature is 65 ℃HC1 concentration is 2. 9 mol/L, NaCl concentration is 1. 3 mol/L and H2SO4 concentration is 0. 3 mol/L, the copper leaching rate is 92. 03 % , and the impurities are effectively removed. In the process of chloride leaching of gold, the temperature and the amount of NaC103 have obvious impact on the leaching rate of gold. With the increase of them, the gold leaching rate is improved notably. When the temperature is above 80 ℃, NaClO3 amount is greater than 12. 5% and H2SO4 concentration is 2.9 mol/L, the leaching rate of gold is higher than 98% .

  10. Microbial leaching of marmatite by Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans and Acidithiobacillus thiooxidans

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Jun; QIU Guan-zhou; QIN Wen-qing; ZHANG Yan-sheng

    2006-01-01

    The bioleaching of marmatite in shaken flasks was studied. After leaching for 29 days, the leaching ratio of zinc was 91%.Three kinds of bacteria, mixture-based bacteria, 9K-based bacteria and sulfur-based bacteria were used in marmatite leaching, of which the mixture-based bacteria have the best leaching result while the sulfur-based bacteria have the worst. By analyzing the leaching residue using SEM and EDXA, the marmatite leaching mechanism was discussed.

  11. Best Management Practices for Minimizing Nitrate Leaching from Container-Grown Nurseries

    OpenAIRE

    Jianjun Chen; Yingfeng Huang; Russell D. Caldwell

    2001-01-01

    Containerized plant production represents an extremely intensive agricultural practice; 40,000 to 300,000 containers may occupy one acre of surface area to which a large amount of chemical fertilizer is applied. Currently, recommended fertilizer application rates for the production of containerized nursery ornamental plants are in excess of plant requirements, and up to 50% of the applied fertilizers may run off or be leached from containers. Among the nutrients leached or allowed to runoff, ...

  12. Direct Causticizing for Black Liquor Gasification in a Circulating Fluidized Bed

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scott Sinquefield; Xiaoyan Zeng, Alan Ball

    2010-03-02

    Gasification of black liquor (BLG) has distinct advantages over direct combustion in Tomlinson recovery boilers. In this project we seek to resolve causticizing issues in order to make pressurized BLG even more efficient and cost-effective. One advantage of BLG is that the inherent partial separation of sulfur and sodium during gasification lends itself to the use of proven high yield variants to conventional kraft pulping which require just such a separation. Processes such as polysulfide, split sulfidity, ASAQ, and MSSAQ can increase pulp yield from 1% to 10% over conventional kraft but require varying degrees of sulfur/sodium separation, which requires additional [and costly] processing in a conventional Tomlinson recovery process. However during gasification, the sulfur is partitioned between the gas and smelt phases, while the sodium all leaves in the smelt; thus creating the opportunity to produce sulfur-rich and sulfur-lean white liquors for specialty pulping processes. A second major incentive of BLG is the production of a combustible product gas, rich in H2 and CO. This product gas (a.k.a. “syngas”) can be used in gas turbines for combined cycle power generation (which is twice as efficient as the steam cycle alone), or it can be used as a precursor to form liquid fuels, such as dimethyl ether or Fischer Tropsh diesel. There is drawback to BLG, which has the potential to become a third major incentive if this work is successful. The causticizing load is greater for gasification of black liquor than for combustion in a Tomlinson boiler. So implementing BLG in an existing mill would require costly increases to the causticizing capacity. In situ causticizing [within the gasifier] would handle the entire causticizing load and therefore eliminate the lime cycle entirely. Previous work by the author and others has shown that titanate direct causticizing (i.e. in situ) works quite well for high-temperature BLG (950°C), but was limited to pressures below

  13. Leaching of glass components and surrogate nuclides from glassy waste forms for radioactive incineration ash

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The applicability of vitrification technology to treat radioactive incineration ash was studied, especially in terms of leaching characteristics, by using several glassy waste forms which are fabricated with simulated incineration ash and base-glass at different mixing ratios. The ISO leaching test has been conducted for 820 days. Two semi-empirical models were applied to find out the dominant leaching mechanism of glass elements. Dissolution associated with diffusion was the dominant leaching mechanism and the elemental leaching characteristic depended upon its solubility in water. A theoretical leaching prediction model was applied to observe the long-term leaching behavior of major glass elements and surrogate nuclides. Diffusion coefficients and dissolution rate constants, the main parameters in the long-term prediction model, of glass elements and surrogates were obtained using short- and long-term experimental data. The model was found to be useful in predicting the long-term behavior of such elements in order to assess the stability of glassy waste forms. (author)

  14. Leaching heavy metals in municipal solid waste incinerator fly ash with chelator/biosurfactant mixed solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Ying; Chen, Yu

    2015-07-01

    The chelator [S,S]-ethylene diamine disuccinic acid, citric acid, and biosurfactant saponin are selected as leaching agents. In this study, the leaching effect of saponin mixed with either ethylene diamine disuccinic acid or citric acid on the levels of copper, zinc, lead, and cadmium in municipal solid waste incinerator fly ash is investigated. Results indicate that saponin separately mixed with ethylene diamine disuccinic acid and citric acid exhibits a synergistic solubilisation effect on copper, zinc, lead, and cadmium leaching from fly ash. However, saponin and ethylene diamine disuccinic acid mixed solution exhibits a synergistic solubilisation effect that is superior to that of a saponin and citric acid mixed solution. The extraction rate of heavy metal in fly ash leached with a saponin and chelator mixed solution is related to the pH of the leaching solution, and the optimal range of the pH is suggested to be approximately neutral. After leaching with a saponin and chelator mixed solution, copper, zinc, lead, and cadmium contents significantly decreased (p leaching concentrations of copper, zinc, lead, and cadmium in treated fly ash are in accordance with Standard for Pollution Control on the Security Landfill Site for Hazardous Wastes GB18598-2001. PMID:26185165

  15. LEACHING OF MALACHITE ORE IN AMMONIUM SULFATE SOLUTIONS AND PRODUCTION OF COPPER OXIDE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Ekmekyapar

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Malachite ore is one of the most important of oxidized copper ores. Copper production can be performed by using this ore. In this work, the leaching kinetics of malachite in ammonium sulfate solutions was investigated, and metallic copper was recovered by a cementation method from the resulting actual leach solution. Copper (II oxide was prepared by an isothermal oxidation method from the cement copper. In the leaching experiments, the effects of reaction temperature, particle size, and stirring speed on copper leaching from malachite ore were studied. In the cementation experiments, metallic zinc was used as the reductant metal to recover the copper from the solution. Thermal oxidation of cement copper was performed under isothermal conditions. It was found that the leaching rate increased with increasing stirring speed and temperature, and decreased with particle size. It was observed that the leaching reaction fit to diffusion through the product layer. The activation energy of the leaching process was determined to be 25.4 kJ/mol. It was determined that the copper content of the metallic product obtained by the cementation method increased up to 96%. It was found that copper oxide prepared from cement copper had a tenorite structure.

  16. ASSESSMENT OF INORGANIC POLLUTANTS LEACHING FROM WASTE IN THE PERCOLATION PROCESS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamila Mizerna

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The leaching of inorganic components from granular waste can be determined by up-flow column leaching test. The study allows researcher to assess the leaching behaviour of contaminants under specified percolation conditions (dynamic conditions. Dynamic tests simulate real conditions of the leaching of contaminants in the landfill aeration area. Percolation test also enables to perform observations on how the change of the liquid to solid (L/S ratio influences the obtained concentrations of particular components. Test conditions, including the flow rate of leachant, determine which components are quickly leached and which are released under the influence of contact with matrix. The paper presents the research results of heavy metals (Zn, Cd, Ni, Cu, Pb i Cr leaching from smelter waste using of column leaching test. The eluates with predetermined liquid to solid ratio (L/S = 0.1; 0.2; 0.5; 1.0; 2.0; 5.0; 10.0 were systematically collected. In eluates from each stage of the procedure the highest concentration of zinc and the lowest concentration of chromium were determined. The increase of heavy metals release from waste mass with increasing the L/S ratio was observed.

  17. An experimental study of pyrite bio-leaching as a way to control spontaneous combustion

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yin Shenghua; Wu Aixiang; Liu Jinzhi; Huang Mingqing; Wang Hongjiang

    2011-01-01

    Bio-leaching of pyrite by native strains of acidophilic bacteria was examined by laboratory scale tests.Three groups of batch trials in agitated flasks and three continuous column leaching tests were performed.The leaching ability and efficiency of native bacteria was greatly improved by adaptation of the bacteria to the test conditions.These cultivated bacteria were then used for the leaching process.The changes in solution pH,Eh,Fe2+ concentration,and sulfate ion concentration were monitored throughout the tests.A portion of the pyritic sulfur is transformed into soluble sulfate ion.The desulfurization ratio of 42.6% was obtained in a flask shaking test and a ratio of 39.4% was obtained during column leaching.A weight gain test was performed on leached and unleached samples by exposing the samples to humid air for several days.A smaller weight gain of the bio-leached samples indicates that removing sulfur from the sulphide ore helps reduce its oxidation rate and the potential for spontaneous combustion.

  18. Evaluation of six pesticides leaching indexes using field data of herbicide application in Casablanca Valley, Chile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kogan, M; Rojas, S; Gómez, P; Suárez, F; Muñoz, J F; Alister, C

    2007-01-01

    A field study was performed to evaluate the accuracy of six pesticide screening leaching indexes for herbicide movement. Adsorption, dissipation and soil movement were studied in a vineyard in a sandy loam soil during 2005 season. Simazine, diuron, pendimethalin, oxyfluorfen and flumioxazin were applied to bare soil at rates commonly used, and their soil concentrations throughout soil profile were determined at 0, 10, 20, 40 and 90 days after application (DAA). Herbicides were subjected to two pluviometric regimens, natural field condition and modified conditions (plus natural rainfall 180 mm). Leaching indexes utilized were: Briggs's Rf, Hamaker's Rf, LEACH, LPI, GUS and LIX. Simazine reached 120 cm, diuron 90 cm, flumioxazin 30 cm soil depth respectively. Pendimethalin and oxyfluorfen were retained up to 5 cm. None of the herbicides leaching was affected by rainfall regimen. Only flumioxazin field dissipation was clearly affected by pluviometric condition. The best representation of the herbicide soil depth movement and leaching below 15 cm soil depth were: Hamaker's Rf < Briggs's Rf < GUS < LPI, < LEACH < LIX. Field results showed a good correlation between herbicides K(d) and their soil depth movement and mass leached below 15 cm soil depth. PMID:17849992

  19. Leaching characteristics of calcium-based compounds in MSWI Residues: From the viewpoint of clogging risk

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xia, Yi [State Key Laboratory of Pollution Control & Resource Reuse, Tongji University, Shanghai 200092 (China); Institute of Waste Treatment and Reclamation, Tongji University, Shanghai 200092 (China); Zhang, Hua, E-mail: zhanghua_tj@tongji.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Pollution Control & Resource Reuse, Tongji University, Shanghai 200092 (China); Phoungthong, Khamphe [State Key Laboratory of Pollution Control & Resource Reuse, Tongji University, Shanghai 200092 (China); Institute of Waste Treatment and Reclamation, Tongji University, Shanghai 200092 (China); Shi, Dong-Xiao; Shen, Wen-Hui [Changzhou Domestic Waste Treatment Center, Changzhou 213000 (China); Shao, Li-Ming [Institute of Waste Treatment and Reclamation, Tongji University, Shanghai 200092 (China); Center for the Technology Research and Training on Household Waste in Small Towns & Rural Area, Ministry of Housing and Urban–Rural Development of PR China (MOHURD), Shanghai 200092 (China); He, Pin-Jing, E-mail: solidwaste@tongji.edu.cn [Institute of Waste Treatment and Reclamation, Tongji University, Shanghai 200092 (China); Center for the Technology Research and Training on Household Waste in Small Towns & Rural Area, Ministry of Housing and Urban–Rural Development of PR China (MOHURD), Shanghai 200092 (China)

    2015-08-15

    Highlights: • The leaching behavior of Ca-based compounds commonly in MSWI residues was studied. • pH is the crucial factor for calcium leaching process. • CaCO{sub 3} was the most sensitive to leaching temperature and Ca{sub 3}(PO{sub 4}){sub 2} was the least. • Ca leaching of MSWIBA and SAPCR attributed to CaCO{sub 3} and Ca{sub 3}(PO{sub 4}){sub 2} respectively. • Potential clogging ability of MSWI residues leachate in open air was calculated. - Abstract: Leachate collection system (LCS) clogging caused by calcium precipitation would be disadvantageous to landfill stability and operation. Meanwhile, calcium-based compounds are the main constituents in both municipal solid waste incineration bottom ash (MSWIBA) and stabilized air pollution control residues (SAPCR), which would increase the risk of LCS clogging once these calcium-rich residues were disposed in landfills. The leaching behaviors of calcium from the four compounds and municipal solid waste incineration (MSWI) residues were studied, and the influencing factors on leaching were discussed. The results showed that pH was the crucial factor in the calcium leaching process. CaCO{sub 3} and CaSiO{sub 3} began leaching when the leachate pH decreased to less than 7 and 10, respectively, while Ca{sub 3}(PO{sub 4}){sub 2} leached at pH < 12. CaSO{sub 4} could hardly dissolve in the experimental conditions. Moreover, the sequence of the leaching rate for the different calcium-based compounds is as follows: CaSiO{sub 3} > Ca{sub 3}(PO{sub 4}){sub 2} > CaCO{sub 3}. The calcium leaching from the MSWIBA and SAPCR separately started from pH < 7 and pH < 12, resulting from CaCO{sub 3} and Ca{sub 3}(PO{sub 4}){sub 2} leaching respectively, which was proven by the X-ray diffraction results. Based on the leaching characteristics of the different calcium compounds and the mineral phase of calcium in the incineration residues, simulated computation of their clogging potential was conducted, providing the

  20. Leaching characteristics of calcium-based compounds in MSWI Residues: From the viewpoint of clogging risk

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • The leaching behavior of Ca-based compounds commonly in MSWI residues was studied. • pH is the crucial factor for calcium leaching process. • CaCO3 was the most sensitive to leaching temperature and Ca3(PO4)2 was the least. • Ca leaching of MSWIBA and SAPCR attributed to CaCO3 and Ca3(PO4)2 respectively. • Potential clogging ability of MSWI residues leachate in open air was calculated. - Abstract: Leachate collection system (LCS) clogging caused by calcium precipitation would be disadvantageous to landfill stability and operation. Meanwhile, calcium-based compounds are the main constituents in both municipal solid waste incineration bottom ash (MSWIBA) and stabilized air pollution control residues (SAPCR), which would increase the risk of LCS clogging once these calcium-rich residues were disposed in landfills. The leaching behaviors of calcium from the four compounds and municipal solid waste incineration (MSWI) residues were studied, and the influencing factors on leaching were discussed. The results showed that pH was the crucial factor in the calcium leaching process. CaCO3 and CaSiO3 began leaching when the leachate pH decreased to less than 7 and 10, respectively, while Ca3(PO4)2 leached at pH < 12. CaSO4 could hardly dissolve in the experimental conditions. Moreover, the sequence of the leaching rate for the different calcium-based compounds is as follows: CaSiO3 > Ca3(PO4)2 > CaCO3. The calcium leaching from the MSWIBA and SAPCR separately started from pH < 7 and pH < 12, resulting from CaCO3 and Ca3(PO4)2 leaching respectively, which was proven by the X-ray diffraction results. Based on the leaching characteristics of the different calcium compounds and the mineral phase of calcium in the incineration residues, simulated computation of their clogging potential was conducted, providing the theoretical basis for the risk assessment pertaining to LCS clogging in landfills

  1. Intensified alkaline leaching pretreatment of refractory gold concentrates at common temperature and pressure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孟宇群; 吴敏杰; 宿少玲; 王隆保

    2003-01-01

    A new process for the hydrometallurgy of refractory gold concentrates was presented. The process comprises grinding-leaching, intensified alkaline leaching (IAL), cyanidation and adsorption. In a stirring-type pulverizing-leaching tower mill, the concentrate is ground to <35.6μm of 95.5 % while simultaneously leached by NaOH of 12kg/t, then carried out intensified alkaline leaching for 48h by NaOH of 108kg/t in enhanced agitation tanks with the pulp concentration of 40% solids at the environmental temperature of 9.5 ~ 13.5℃ and the environmental pressure of 105Pa. The oxidation rate of As is 94.9%, and 47.6% for S. The total consumption of NaOH is only 20% of that theoretically calculated under the conditions of full oxidation at the same oxidation rates of arsenic to arsenate and sulfur to sulfate. The gold leaching rate by NaCN in 24h is increased from 9.2% before pretreatment to 94.2%. The consumption of NaCN is 7.5kg/t, which is one times less than that before pretreatment. The extraction cost of gold is about 422Yuan/t.

  2. Identification of nitrate leaching loss indicators through regression methods based on a meta-analysis of lysimeter studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boy-Roura, M; Cameron, K C; Di, H J

    2016-02-01

    This study presents a meta-analysis of 12 experiments that quantify nitrate-N leaching losses from grazed pasture systems in alluvial sedimentary soils in Canterbury (New Zealand). Mean measured nitrate-N leached (kg N/ha × 100 mm drainage) losses were 2.7 when no urine was applied, 8.4 at the urine rate of 300 kg N/ha, 9.8 at 500 kg N/ha, 24.5 at 700 kg N/ha and 51.4 at 1000 kg N/ha. Lismore soils presented significantly higher nitrate-N losses compared to Templeton soils. Moreover, a multiple linear regression (MLR) model was developed to determine the key factors that influence nitrate-N leaching and to predict nitrate-N leaching losses. The MLR analyses was calibrated and validated using 82 average values of nitrate-N leached and 48 explanatory variables representative of nitrogen inputs and outputs, transport, attenuation of nitrogen and farm management practices. The MLR model (R (2) = 0.81) showed that nitrate-N leaching losses were greater at higher urine application rates and when there was more drainage from rainfall and irrigation. On the other hand, nitrate leaching decreased when nitrification inhibitors (e.g. dicyandiamide (DCD)) were applied. Predicted nitrate-N leaching losses at the paddock scale were calculated using the MLR equation, and they varied largely depending on the urine application rate and urine patch coverage. PMID:26498804

  3. Recycling of metal-organic chemical vapor deposition waste of GaN based power device and LED industry by acidic leaching: Process optimization and kinetics study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swain, Basudev; Mishra, Chinmayee; Kang, Leeseung; Park, Kyung-Soo; Lee, Chan Gi; Hong, Hyun Seon; Park, Jeung-Jin

    2015-05-01

    Recovery of metal values from GaN, a metal-organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) waste of GaN based power device and LED industry is investigated by acidic leaching. Leaching kinetics of gallium rich MOCVD waste is studied and the process is optimized. The gallium rich waste MOCVD dust is characterized by XRD and ICP-AES analysis followed by aqua regia digestion. Different mineral acids are used to find out the best lixiviant for selective leaching of the gallium and indium. Concentrated HCl is relatively better lixiviant having reasonably faster kinetic and better leaching efficiency. Various leaching process parameters like effect of acidity, pulp density, temperature and concentration of catalyst on the leaching efficiency of gallium and indium are investigated. Reasonably, 4 M HCl, a pulp density of 50 g/L, 100 °C and stirring rate of 400 rpm are the effective optimum condition for quantitative leaching of gallium and indium.

  4. Cu and Fe chalcopyrite leach activation energies and the effect of added Fe 3+

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaplun, K.; Li, J.; Kawashima, N.; Gerson, A. R.

    2011-10-01

    The leaching kinetics of chalcopyrite (CuFeS 2) concentrate in sulfuric acid leach media with and without the initial addition of Fe 3+ under carefully controlled solution conditions ( Eh 750 mV SHE, pH 1) at various temperatures from 55 to 85 °C were measured. Kinetic analyses by (i) apparent rate (not surface area normalised), and rate dependence using (ii) a shrinking core model and (iii) a shrinking core model in conjunction with Fe 3+ activity, were performed to estimate the activation energies ( Ea) for Cu and Fe dissolution. The Ea values determined for Cu and Fe leaching in the absence of added Fe 3+ are within experimental error, 80 ± 10 kJ mol -1 and 84 ± 10 kJ mol -1, respectively (type iii analyses Ea are quoted unless stated otherwise), and are indicative of a chemical reaction controlled process. On addition of Fe 3+ the initial Cu leach rate (up to 10 h) was increased and Cu was released to solution preferentially over Fe, with the Ea value of 21 ± 5 kJ mol -1 (type ii analysis) suggestive of a transport controlled rate determining process. However, the rate of leaching rapidly decreased until it was consistently slower than for the equivalent leaches where Fe 3+ was not added. The resulting Ea value for this leach regime of 83 ± 10 kJ mol -1 is within experimental error of that determined in the absence of added Fe 3+. In contrast to Cu release, Fe release to solution was consistent with a chemical reaction controlled leach rate throughout. The Fe release Ea of 76 ± 10 kJ mol -1 is also within experimental error of that determined in the absence of added Fe 3+. Where type (ii) and (iii) analyses were both successfully carried out (in all cases except for Cu leaching with added Fe 3+, 10 h), as compared to in the absence of added Fe 3+, returned a considerably smaller pre-exponential factors for both Cu and Fe leach analyses commensurate with the considerably slower leach rate, suggestive of a more applicable kinetic analysis. XPS examination

  5. Leach and EP (extraction procedure) toxicity tests on grouted waste from Tank 106-AN

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Serne, R.J.; Martin, W.J.; Lokken, R.O.; LeGore, V.L.; Lindenmeier, C.W.; Martin, P.F.C.

    1989-09-01

    Pacific Northwest Laboratory is conducting laboratory experiments to produce leach rate data for various waste species that will be contained in grout at Hanford. In the work reported here, grout made from Tank 106-AN liquid waste was used to produce empirical leach rate data for several radionuclides ({sup 60}Co, {sup 90}Sr, {99}Tc, {129}I, {137}Cs, and {sup 241}Am), stable major components (NO{sub 3}{sup {minus}}, NO{sub 2}{sup {minus}}, F, Cl, and Na), and trace metals (Cr, Mo, and Ni). Two types of tests were used to produce leach rate data: an intermittent replacement leach test (ANS 16.1 leach test) and a static leach test. Measured effective diffusivities of key species are as follows: 4 to 6 {times} 10{sup {minus}8} cm{sup 2}/sec for {sup 99}Tc, 3 to 7 {times} 10{sup {minus}8} cm{sup 2}/sec for {sup 129}I, 4 to 6 {times} 10{sup {minus}9} cm{sup 2}/sec for nitrate, and 6 to 7 {times} 10{sup {minus}9} cm{sup 2}/sec for nitrite. The leach indices of all species studied are above (more favorable than) the waste form criteria. The leach indices for {sup 99}Tc and {sup 129}I are 7.4 {plus minus} 1.2 and 7.6 {plus minus} 0.4, respectively, and are being further investigated in continuing studies of double-shell slurry feed grouts. An Extraction Procedure (EP) toxicity test was also conducted and the grouted water is considered nontoxic per this test protocol. 19 refs., 9 figs., 8 tabs.

  6. Solidification of radioactive wastes with sulphur. Investigation of the leaching mechanism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The possibilities were studied of using sulfur as an additive and as the matrix material in the solidification of low and medium level radioactive waste. The leaching mechanism in the various resulting solid materials was investigated. Concentrated boric acid, aqueous waste and loaded ion-exchange resins were used as models of the radioactive waste. This selection allowed us to compare our results with literature data. For the characterization of the solidification and comparison with literature data we measured the leaching rate of inactive cesium and cobalt, the stability in water and the compressive strength. To investigate the leaching mechanism, we measured porosity and the sulfide concentration in the leaching liquid. The cesium and cobalt concentrations were determined by absorption spectrometry, the sulfide concentrations with an ion-selective silver/sulfide electrode. In the first phase, we tried to improve cement solidification by either adding sulfur to the cement-waste mixture or by impregnating the cement in molten sulfur. The addition of sulfur to the cement-mixture produced worse characteristics, impregnation with 5 % sulfur lowered the leaching rate and increased the compressive strength by a factor of three. Sulfur as the matrix poses other problems. In the presence of alkaline earth metals and at high pH-values we observed a substantial production of sulfide ion. The formation of soluble sulfide complexes increased the leaching rate. This problem was solved by adding Clinoptilolite in H+-form to buffer the pH-value at acceptable values. The study shows that the mechanism of leaching for Cs and Co out of the cement or the sulfur matrix is diffusion controlled. With sulfur matrices at high sulfide concentrations erosion is the dominating mechanism for bringing cesium and cobalt into the leaching fluid

  7. Characterizing the Leaching Behavior of Coal Combustion Residues using the Leaching Environmental Assessment Framework (LEAF) to Inform Future Management Decisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abstract for presentation on Characterizing the Leaching Behavior of Coal Combustion Residues using the Leaching Environmental Assessment Framework (LEAF) to Inform Future Management Decisions. The abstract is attached.

  8. Electrowinning of lead powder from chloride leach liquor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Owais, Ashour [Suez Canal Univ., Suez (Egypt). Metallurgical and Materials Engineering Dept.

    2012-11-15

    Electrowinning of lead powder from chloride leach liquor obtained from secondary lead slag leached in hydrochloric acid is the main aim of this work. The resulted lead chloride solution (leachate) containing 2.2 wt.-% Pb and 1.24 wt.-% HCl was electrowon in an electrolytic cell containing one graphite plate as inert anode and two lead sheets as starting permanent cathodes. Different electrolysis parameters such as current density, electrolyte temperature and electrolyte stirring rate were studied. As indicated by SEM, EDX and XRD analyses, fine and pure (100 % Pb) powders with a dispersed and needle-like shape were formed with cathodic current efficiency up to 67.9 % and electrical energy demand ranges from 0.809 to 4.998 kWh/kg Pb with productivity up to 2.63 g/Ah. (orig.)

  9. An approximation method for diffusion based leaching models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In connection with the fixation of nuclear waste in a glassy matrix equations have been derived for leaching models based on a uniform concentration gradient approximation, and hence a uniform flux, therefore requiring the use of only Fick's first law. In this paper we improve on the uniform flux approximation, developing and justifying the approach. The resulting set of equations are solved to a satisfactory approximation for a matrix dissolving at a constant rate in a finite volume of leachant to give analytical expressions for the time dependence of the thickness of the leached layer, the diffusional and dissolutional contribution to the flux, and the leachant composition. Families of curves are presented which cover the full range of all the physical parameters for this system. The same procedure can be readily extended to more complex systems. (author)

  10. The rate of caustic crossing microlensing events for Q2237+0305

    OpenAIRE

    Wyithe, J. S. B.; Webster, R. L.; Turner, E. L.

    1999-01-01

    Spectrophotometric observation of the gravitationally microlensed quasar Q2237+0305 during a High Magnification Event (HME) is potentially a very powerful tool for probing the structure of the quasars accretion disc on scales of less than 10^-8 arc seconds. How often we can expect to observe a HME is dependent on the lens system parameters of galactic transverse velocity, mean microlens mass and the size of the magnified continuum source. We have previously used published microlensed light-cu...

  11. micro-chemo-mechanics of calcium leaching

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The dissolution of the solid matrix in a saturated porous changes the pore space, and modifies the macroscopic behavior. Without changing the macroscopic stress applied to a r.e.v., the dissolution induces a macroscopic strain rate. This phenomenon is generally referred to as chemo-mechanical coupling. In macroscopic models based on the Biot-Coussy theory, chemo-mechanical couplings have been considered through internal state variables, and phenomenological relations linking the macroscopic material properties (elasticity, plasticity, etc.) to the change in skeleton mass. While macroscopic models have proven their efficiency in specific engineering applications, the micromechanical consistency of the macroscopic models with the macroscopic dissolution and deformation kinetics has not been shown to our knowledge. This makes it difficult to evaluate the effects of the heterogeneity of the stress state at a micro-level on the dissolution rate, and vice versa the effects of the dissolution rate on the macroscopic strain rate, elasticity evolution, plastic hardening and cracking. The study of these phenomena through a micro-chemo-mechanics theory is in short the focus of this paper. To this end, we consider the moving boundary volume at the solid-fluid interphase first. Then, by means of volume averaging, we develop the macroscopic expressions of the dissipation and the state equations. Different solid material behaviors are considered: elasticity, plasticity and anisotropic damage. The macro-poro-mechanical constitutive equations and material properties are derived as functions of the appropriate micromechanical variables. By way of applications we evaluate the micro-to-macro chemo-mechanical effect for calcium leaching of cement-based materials, -- the critical design scenario for nuclear waste disposal structures. Refs. 1 (author)

  12. Leaching from municipal solid waste incineration residues

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hyks, J.

    2008-02-15

    Leaching of pollutants from Municipal Solid Waste Incineration (MSWI) residues has been investigated combining a range of laboratory leaching experiments with geochemical modeling. Special attention was paid to assessing the applicability of laboratory data for subsequent modeling with respect to presumed full-scale conditions; both sample pretreatment and actual influence of leaching conditions on the results of laboratory experiments were considered. It was shown that sample pretreatment may have large impact on leaching test data. In particular, a significant fraction of Pb was shown mobile during the washing of residues with water. In addition, drying of residues (i.e. slow oxidation) prior to leaching experiments increased the leaching of Cr significantly. Significant differences regarding the leaching behavior of individual elements with respect to (non)equilibrium conditions in column percolation experiments were observed in the study. As a result, three groups of elements were identified based on the predominant leaching control and the influence of (non)equilibrium on the results of the laboratory column experiments: I. Predominantly availability-controlled elements (e.g. Na, K, Cl) II. Solubility-controlled elements (e.g. Ca, S, Si, Al, Ba, and Zn) III. Complexation-controlled elements (e.g. Cu and Ni) With respect to the above groups it was suggested that results of laboratory column experiments can, with consideration, be used to estimate full-scale leaching of elements from Group I and II. However, in order to avoid large underestimations in the assessment of leaching from Group III, it is imperative to describe the time-dependent transport of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) in the tested system or to minimize the physical non-equilibrium during laboratory experiments (e.g. bigger column, slower flow velocity). Forward geochemical modeling was applied to simulate long-term release of elements from a MSWI air-pollution-control residue. Leaching of a

  13. ALKALINE CARBONATE LEACHING PROCESS FOR URANIUM EXTRACTION

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thunaes, A.; Brown, E.A.; Rabbitts, A.T.

    1957-11-12

    A process for the leaching of uranium from high carbonate ores is presented. According to the process, the ore is leached at a temperature of about 200 deg C and a pressure of about 200 p.s.i.g. with a solution containing alkali carbonate, alkali permanganate, and bicarbonate ion, the bicarbonate ion functionlng to prevent premature formation of alkali hydroxide and consequent precipitation of a diuranate. After the leaching is complete, the uranium present is recovered by precipitation with NaOH.

  14. Column leaching from biomass combustion ashes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maresca, Alberto; Astrup, Thomas Fruergaard

    2015-01-01

    this study, a fly ash sample from an operating Danish power plant based on wood biomass was collected, chemically characterized and investigated for its leaching release of nutrients and heavy metals. A column leaching test was employed. The strongly alkaline pH of all the collected eluates suggested...... the potential suitability of the ash as a liming material. Although high contents of nutrients were detected, differences in their leaching release were found. Heavy metals were detected within typical literature contents for Nordic countries ashes....

  15. An experimental study of the dynamic features of shadow areas of caustics in response to loading/unloading fracture

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    许昭永; 杨润海; 赵晋明; 王赟赟; 熊秉衡; 王正荣; 梅世蓉

    2002-01-01

    Using a plexiglass sample and by means of real-time holographic interferometry and shadow optical method of caustics, the different features of dynamic variation in stress (strain) field, plastic area and nucleation zone (shadow area) when the sample fractures during loading (loading-fracture) and unloading (unloading-fracture) are studied visually. The results show that the strain nuclei (zones with dense fringes) appear first at the tips of prefabricated cracks at low stress, and then the shadow areas of caustics form with the increase of load. These nuclei and shadow areas can become larger, or smaller, when the process of loading, or unloading, goes on. When the stress is kept within a certain range, the shadow areas of caustics can become larger and smaller alternatively with repeated loading and unloading (cyclic loading). However, when loading and unloading at high stress, in particular when the macrofracture is about to appear, the variations of the shadow areas of caustics are irreversible and quite different. The shadow areas of caustics expand rapidly at an increasing speed when loading-fracture appears. In contrast, the shadow areas of caustics expand at a lower speed when unloading-fracture appears; besides, there is a circular shadow in front of the sharp-angle shaped area.

  16. Development of mathematic model for coffee decaffeination with leaching method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sukrisno Widyotomo

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available A simple mathematic model for caffeine kinetic description during the extraction process (leaching of coffee bean was developed. A non­steady diffusion equation coupled with a macroscopic mass transfer equation for solvent was developed and them solved analytically. The kinetic of caffeine extraction from coffee bean is depend on initial caffeine content, final caffeine content, caffeine content at certain time, mass­transfer coefficient, solvent volume, surface area of coffee beans, process time, radius of coffee bean, leaching rate of caffeine, caffeine diffusivity and a are constan, solvent concentration, activation energy, temperature absolute and gas constant. Caffeine internal mass diffusivity was estimated by fitting the model to an experiment using acetic acid and liquid waste of cocoa beans fermentation. The prediction equation for leaching rate of caffeine in coffee beans has been found. It was found that Dk (m2/sec=1.345x10­7—4.1638x10­7, and kL (m/sec=2.445x10­5—5.551x10­5 by acetic acid as solvent depended on temperature and solvent concentration. The prediction equation for length of time to reduce initial caffeine content to certain concentration in coffee beans has been developed, Caffeine diffusivity (Dk and mass­transfer coefficient (kL was found respectively 1.591x 10­7—2.122x10­7 m2/sec and 4.897x10­5—6.529x10­5 m/sec using liquid waste of cocoa bean fermentation as solvent which depend on temperature and solvent concentration. Key words: Coffee, caffeine, decaffeination, leaching, mathematic model.

  17. Uranium recovery from acid leach liquors: Ix or Sx?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Various technologies for uranium recovery from sulphuric acid leach solutions were compared. Although the main consideration was the economics (Capex, recovery and Opex) of the various technologies and associated unit operations, other factors, such as flexibility, reliability, ease of operation, fire risk, stability with regards to feed flow variations, and feed solids content, would also need to be considered in the overall analysis. The design basis used for the comparison was a production rate or 200 kg/h U3O8 over a solution concentration range of 40 to 1500 mg/L U3O8. The technologies to be compared included Resin-in-pulp (RIP), Fixed-bed Ion Exchange (FBIX), Continuous Countercurrent Ion Exchange (CCIX, e.g. NIMCIX), and Solvent Extraction (Sx) using Bateman Pulsed Columns (BPC) and Bateman Settlers. Countercurrent Decantation (CCD) and clarification would be required for the Sx and FBIX technologies. The preliminary economic evaluation indicated that a flowsheet, comprising RIP for bulk uranium extraction and upgrade, followed by Sx, employing the BPC for purification of the RIP eluate stream, was the most economic option at leach liquor concentrations below 900 mg/L. Above 900 mg/L the economic evaluation suggested that CCDs followed by Sx in the BPC was the most economical processing option. For applications where the ore is abrasive and not amenable to RIP, due to the rate of resin consumption, Paste Thickeners to remove the bulk of the solids, followed by RIP, was found to be the most economic processing option at leach liquor concentrations below 200 mg/L. However, for leach liquor concentrations above 200 mg/L, a CCD-circuit followed by Sx using BPC was again the most economic favourable route

  18. 热酸浸出锌浸渣中镓锗的研究%Extracting Gallium and Germanium from Zinc-leaching Residues by Hot-acid Leaching Process

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    马喜红; 覃文庆; 吴雪兰; 任浏祎

    2012-01-01

    研究了锌浸渣热酸浸出过程的工艺条件,分析了浸出热力学和动力学机理,并用于指导回收稀有金属镓和锗.实验结果表明,锌浸渣中镓和锗浸出的最佳工艺条件为:硫酸初始质量浓度为188 g/L,反应温度为95℃,反应时间为3h,液固比为5∶1,搅拌速度为300 r/min,该条件下多组综合实验的酸浸出液中Ga和Ge的浸出率均高于86%和62%.锌浸渣中金属镓锗的浸出过程在动力学上属于“未反应核减缩”模型,浸出过程主要受反应温度、始酸浓度、反应时间的影响,反应由界面化学反应控制.%Extraction of gallium and germanium from zinc leaching residue was carried out by hot-acid leaching. The effects of leaching agent ( sulfuric acid) , leaching temperature, leaching time, L/S ratio and agitation speed on the leaching rate of Ga and Ge were examined, while the thermodynamics and dynamic mechanism for the leaching were, also analyzed. Results showed that the optimal leaching conditions were as follows: the initial mass concentration of sulfuric acid was 188 g/L, leaching temperature was 95 ℃ , leaching time was 3 h, L/S ratio was 5:1, and agitation speed was 300 r/min. Under these conditions, the leaching rates of Ga and Ge in acid leaching solution from multi-group comprehensive tests were averagely above 86% and 62% , respectively. Furthermore, the leaching process of Ga and Ge follows the kinetic law of "shrinking of unreacted core" , mainly influenced by leaching temperature, concentration of sulfuric acid and leaching time, also being controlled by interface chemical reaction.

  19. Galaxy And Mass Assembly: Estimating galaxy group masses via caustic analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Alpaslan, Mehmet; Driver, Simon; Norberg, Peder; Peacock, John A; Baldry, Ivan; Bland-Hawthorn, Joss; Brough, Sarah; Hopkins, Andrew M; Kelvin, Lee S; Liske, Jochen; Loveday, Jon; Merson, Alexander; Nichol, Robert C; Pimbblet, Kevin

    2012-01-01

    We have generated complementary halo mass estimates for all groups in the Galaxy And Mass Assembly Galaxy Group Catalogue (GAMA G3Cv1) using a modified caustic mass estimation algorithm, originally developed by Diaferio & Geller (1997). We calibrate the algorithm by applying it on a series of 9 GAMA mock galaxy light cones and investigate the effects of using different definitions for group centre and size. We select the set of parameters that provide median-unbiased mass estimates when tested on mocks, and generate mass estimates for the real group catalogue. We find that on average, the caustic mass estimates agree with dynamical mass estimates within a factor of 2 in 90.8 +/- 6.1% groups and compares equally well to velocity dispersion based mass estimates for both high and low multiplicity groups over the full range of masses probed by the G3Cv1.

  20. Influence of thermal treatment on the caustic SCC of super austenitic stainless steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoo, Y.R.; Park, Y.B.; Chung, T.J.; Kim, Y.S. [School of Advanced Materials Engineering, Andong National Univ. (Korea); Chang, H.Y. [Korea Power Engineering Co. (Korea); Park, Y.S. [Dept. of Metallurgical Engineering, Yonsei Univ. (Korea)

    2005-07-01

    In general, thermal treatment at 500 C {proportional_to} 900 C ranges depending upon alloy composition of stainless steels can sensitize the steels and promote the intergranular cracking, and their intergranular corrosion resistance is decreased. These behaviors seem to be related to the change of microstructures. So, heat treatment at that temperature range should be avoided in fabrication, especially welding of stainless steels. In this work, it is focused on the effect of thermal treatment on caustic stress corrosion cracking of super austenitic stainless steel - S32050 The low temperature thermal treatment increased greatly the resistance to caustic SCC than those of annealed specimen. This enhancement might be closely related to the reduction of residual stress and slightly large grain, but its resistance was not affected by the anodic polarization behavior. (orig.)

  1. High-Zinc Recovery from Residues by Sulfate Roasting and Water Leaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Ming; Peng, Bing; Chai, Li-yuan; Li, Yan-chun; Peng, Ning; Yuan, Ying-zhen; Chen, Dong

    2015-09-01

    An integrated process for the recovery of zinc that is generated from zinc hydrometallurgy in residues was developed. A mixture of residue and ferric sulfate was first roasted to transform the various forms of zinc in the residue, such as ferrite, oxide, sulfide, and silicate, into zinc sulfate. Next, water leaching was conducted to extract the zinc while the iron remained in the residue as ferric oxide. The effects of the roasting and leaching parameters on zinc recovery were investigated. A maximum zinc recovery rate of 90.9% was achieved for a mixture with a ferric sulfate/residue weight ratio of 0.05 when roasting at 640°C for 30 min before leaching with water at room temperature for 20 min using a liquid/solid ratio of 10. Only 0.13% of the iron was dissolved in the water. Thus, the leaching liquor could be directly returned for zinc smelting.

  2. Bacterial oxidation of sulfide minerals in column leaching experiments at suboptimal temperatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahonen, L; Tuovinen, O H

    1992-02-01

    The purpose of the work was to quantitatively characterize temperature effects on the bacterial leaching of sulfide ore material containing several sulfide minerals. The leaching was tested at eight different temperatures in the range of 4 to 37 degrees C. The experimental technique was based on column leaching of a coarsely ground (particle diameter, 0.59 to 5 mm) ore sample. The experimental data were used for kinetic analysis of chalcopyrite, sphalerite, and pyrrhotite oxidation. Chalcopyrite yielded the highest (73 kJ/mol) and pyrrhotite yielded the lowest (25 kJ/mol) activation energies. Especially with pyrrhotite, diffusion contributed to rate limitation. Arrhenius plots were also linear for the reciprocals of lag periods and for increases of redox potentials (dmV/dt). Mass balance analysis based on total S in leach residue was in agreement with the highest rate of leaching at 37 and 28 degrees C. The presence of elemental S in leach residues was attributed to pyrrhotite oxidation. PMID:16348648

  3. Using tank 107-AN caustic addition for confirmation of mixing scale relationship

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A subscale jet mixing program was carried out in two scale tanks to extend the basis of previous subscale tests to include in-tank geometry associated with tank AN-107. The laboratory data will be correlated with the data to be collected in the upcoming tank AN-107 mixing and caustic addition test. The objective is to verify the scaling relationship used in the MWTF mixer design

  4. F-Area Acid/Caustic Basin groundwater monitoring report: Second quarter 1992

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    During second quarter 1992, samples from the six FAC monitoring wells at the F-Area Acid/Caustic Basin were analyzed for herbicides, indicator parameters, major ions, pesticides, radionuclides, turbidity, volatile organic compounds, and other constituents. Monitoring results that exceeded the US Environmental Protection Agency's Primary Drinking Water Standards (PDWS) or the Savannah River Site flagging criteria or turbidity standards during the quarter are the focus of this report

  5. F-Area Acid/Caustic Basin groundwater monitoring report: Second quarter 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thompson, C.Y.

    1992-09-01

    During second quarter 1992, samples from the six FAC monitoring wells at the F-Area Acid/Caustic Basin were analyzed for herbicides, indicator parameters, major ions, pesticides, radionuclides, turbidity, volatile organic compounds, and other constituents. Monitoring results that exceeded the US Environmental Protection Agency's Primary Drinking Water Standards (PDWS) or the Savannah River Site flagging criteria or turbidity standards during the quarter are the focus of this report.

  6. F-Area Acid/Caustic Basin groundwater monitoring report: Second quarter 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thompson, C.Y.

    1992-09-01

    During second quarter 1992, samples from the six FAC monitoring wells at the F-Area Acid/Caustic Basin were analyzed for herbicides, indicator parameters, major ions, pesticides, radionuclides, turbidity, volatile organic compounds, and other constituents. Monitoring results that exceeded the US Environmental Protection Agency`s Primary Drinking Water Standards (PDWS) or the Savannah River Site flagging criteria or turbidity standards during the quarter are the focus of this report.

  7. Caustic ingestion management: world society of emergency surgery preliminary survey of expert opinion

    OpenAIRE

    Kluger, Yoram; Ishay, Ofir Ben; Sartelli, Massimo; Katz, Amit; Ansaloni, Luca; Gomez, Carlos Augusto; Biffl, Walter; Catena, Fausto; Fraga, Gustavo P; Di Saverio, Salomone; Goran, Augustin; Ghnnam, Wagih; Kashuk, Jeffry; Leppäniemi, Ari; Marwah, Sanjay

    2015-01-01

    Caustic material ingestion injuries (CMI) are uncommon. Only 5,000 cases are reported in the United States each year and most acute care healthcare facilities admit only a few cases annually. Accordingly, no single institution can claim extensive experience, and management protocols are most probably based on either expert opinion or literature reports. In this study, we will attempt to review opinions and practices of representatives of the board members of the World Society of Emergency Sur...

  8. F-Area Acid/Caustic Basin Groundwater Monitoring Report. Fourth Quarter 1994, Groundwater Monitoring Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    During fourth quarter 1994, samples from the FAC monitoring wells at the F-Area Acid/Caustic Basin were collected and analyzed for herbicides/pesticides, indicator parameters, metals, nitrate, radionuclide indicators, volatile organic compounds, and other constituents. Piezometer FAC 5P was dry and could not be sampled. New monitoring wells FAC 9C, 10C, 11C, and 12C were sampled for the first time during third quarter

  9. K-Area Acid/Caustic Basin Groundwater Monitoring Report. Fourth Quarter 1994

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    During fourth quarter 1994, samples from the KAC monitoring wells at the K-Area Acid/Caustic Basin were collected and analyzed for herbicides/pesticides, indicator parameters, metals, nitrate, radionuclide indicators, and other constituents. Monitoring results that exceeded the final Primary Drinking Water Standards (PDWS), other Savannah River Site (SRS) Flag 2 criteria, or the SRS turbidity standard are provided in this report

  10. Watchdog-LEACH: A new method based on LEACH protocol to Secure Clustered Wireless Sensor Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Reza Rohbanian

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Wireless sensor network comprises of small sensor nodes with limited resources. Clustered networks have been proposed in many researches to reduce the power consumption in sensor networks. LEACH is one of the most interested techniques that offer an efficient way to minimize the power consumption in sensor networks. However, due to the characteristics of restricted resources and operation in a hostile environment, WSNs are subjected to numerous threats and are vulnerable to attacks. This research proposes a solution that can be applied on LEACH to increase the level of security. In Watchdog-LEACH, some nodes are considered as watchdogs and some changes are applied on LEACH protocol for intrusion detection. Watchdog-LEACH is able to protect against a wide range of attacks and it provides security, energy efficiency and memory efficiency. The result of simulation shows that in comparison to LEACH, the energy overhead is about 2% so this method is practical and can be applied to WSNs.

  11. Corrosion Study of Super Ferritic Stainless Steel UNS S44660 (26Cr-3Ni-3Mo) and Several Other Stainless Steel Grades (UNS S31603, S32101, and S32205) in Caustic Solution Containing Sodium Sulfide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chasse, Kevin R.; Singh, Preet M.

    2013-11-01

    Electrochemical techniques, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) were used in this study to show how the corrosion mechanism of several commercial grades of stainless steel in hot caustic solution is strongly influenced by the presence of sodium sulfide. Experimental results from super ferritic stainless steel UNS S44660 (26Cr-3Ni-3Mo) were compared to austenitic stainless steel UNS S31603, lean duplex stainless steel (DSS) UNS S32101, and standard DSS UNS S32205 in caustic solution, with and without sodium sulfide, at 443 K (170 °C). Weight loss measurements indicated that corrosion rates of UNS44660 were much lower than the other grades of stainless steel in the presence of the sodium sulfide. Potentiodynamic polarization and linear polarization resistance measurements showed that the electrochemical behavior was altered by the adhesion of sulfur species, which reduced the polarization resistances and increased the anodic current densities. SEM and XPS results imply that the surface films that formed in caustic solution containing sodium sulfide were defective due to the adsorption of sulfide, which destabilized the passive film and led to the formation of insoluble metal sulfide compounds.

  12. Caustic effects due to sunlight reflections from skyscrapers: simulations and experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vollmer, M.; Möllmann, K.-P.

    2012-09-01

    Reflections from glass fronts of curved shape buildings are discussed. Irradiance within the respective caustics can become quite large with regard to regular sun irradiance and can lead to thermal effects. These may cause problems as has been reported for some existing buildings. The phenomena are theoretically discussed for a variety of systems made of segments of cylindrical mirrors using ray tracing models. In particular, six parameters are varied which have an influence on the caustic: building height, building width, radius of curvature, building orientation as well as sun elevation and azimuth angles. In addition, experiments have been performed for various curved shape mirrors and small-scale models of an existing building, for which problems are known to exist. In particular, we investigated the resulting caustic forms visually as well as with infrared cameras to visualize respective thermal effects. Results can explain all features of reported problems. Providing a link to everyday life and modern architecture, the topic is suitable for introducing mirror optics experimentally at school and undergraduate as well as theoretically at undergraduate and graduate level.

  13. Phosphorus Leaching in an Acid Tropical Soil “Recapitalized” with Phosphate Rock and Triple Superphosphate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Gikonyo

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available With high rates of phosphorus applied to increase “capital P” as a stock for plant uptake over several years, the question of P leaching is inevitable. We conducted an intact soil column experiment in the field to evaluate P leached from soils treated with triple superphosphate (TSP and Gafsa phosphate rock (GPR at 300, 600, and 900 kg P ha-1 with and without integration of cattle manure. The lysimeters, made from PVC tubes of 30-cm length, were inserted into the soil up to the 25-cm depth. The tubes were fitted with a resin bag containing a mixture of cation and anion exchange resin (50:50 at the lower end of the tube inserted into the soil. The tubes, arranged in a completely randomized design, were sampled randomly at 10-week intervals for 12 months. Phosphorus extractable from the top- and subsoil at the end of experiment and leached P were determined. More P was leached out from TSP (threefold compared to GPR, and the amount of P leached increased with increasing rates of P fertilizer applied. Application of manure intensified the amounts of P leached from TSP, particularly at the 6-month sampling time. There was hardly any substantial P leached from the soil treated with GPR. Thus, for effective and efficient long-term P fertilizer management strategies, choosing the right P fertilizer source and monitoring P losses through leaching has to be done for enhanced fertilizer use efficiency and thus reducing P pollution of ground waters.

  14. Characterization, Leaching, and Filtration Testing for Bismuth Phosphate Sludge (Group 1) and Bismuth Phosphate Saltcake (Group 2) Actual Waste Sample Composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lumetta, Gregg J.; Buck, Edgar C.; Daniel, Richard C.; Draper, Kathryn; Edwards, Matthew K.; Fiskum, Sandra K.; Hallen, Richard T.; Jagoda, Lynette K.; Jenson, Evan D.; Kozelisky, Anne E.; MacFarlan, Paul J.; Peterson, Reid A.; Shimskey, Rick W.; Sinkov, Sergey I.; Snow, Lanee A.

    2009-02-19

    A testing program evaluating actual tank waste was developed in response to Task 4 from the M-12 External Flowsheet Review Team (EFRT) issue response plan.() The test program was subdivided into logical increments. The bulk water-insoluble solid wastes that are anticipated to be delivered to the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) were identified according to type such that the actual waste testing could be targeted to the relevant categories. Eight broad waste groupings were defined. Samples available from the 222S archive were identified and obtained for testing. The actual waste-testing program included homogenizing the samples by group, characterizing the solids and aqueous phases, and performing parametric leaching tests. Two of the eight defined groups—bismuth phosphate sludge (Group 1) and bismuth phosphate saltcake (Group 2)—are the subjects of this report. The Group 1 waste was anticipated to be high in phosphorus and was implicitly assumed to be present as BiPO4 (however, results presented here indicate that the phosphate in Group 1 is actually present as amorphous iron(III) phosphate). The Group 2 waste was also anticipated to be high in phosphorus, but because of the relatively low bismuth content and higher aluminum content, it was anticipated that the Group 2 waste would contain a mixture of gibbsite, sodium phosphate, and aluminum phosphate. Thus, the focus of the Group 1 testing was on determining the behavior of P removal during caustic leaching, and the focus of the Group 2 testing was on the removal of both P and Al. The waste-type definition, archived sample conditions, homogenization activities, characterization (physical, chemical, radioisotope, and crystal habit), and caustic leaching behavior as functions of time, temperature, and hydroxide concentration are discussed in this report. Testing was conducted according to TP-RPP-WTP-467.

  15. Alternative leaching processes for uranium ores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laboratory studies have been carried out to compare the extraction of uranium from Australian ores by conventional leaching in sulphuric acid with that obtained using hydrochloric acid and acidified ferric sulphate solutions. Leaching with hydrochloric acid achieved higher extractions of radium-226 but the extraction of uranium was reduced considerably. The use of acidified ferric sulphate solution reduced acid consumption by 20-40% without any detrimental effect on uranium extraction. The ferric ion, which is reduced during leaching, can be reoxidized and recycled after the addition of acid makeup. Hydrogen peroxide was found to be an effective oxidant in conventional sulphuric acid leaching. It is more expensive than alternative oxidants, but it is non-polluting, lesser quantities are required and acid consumption is reduced

  16. Cyclic stress effect on stress corrosion cracking of duplex stainless steel in chloride and caustic solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Di

    Duplex stainless steel (DSS) is a dual-phase material with approximately equal volume amount of austenite and ferrite. It has both great mechanical properties (good ductility and high tensile/fatigue strength) and excellent corrosion resistance due to the mixture of the two phases. Cyclic loadings with high stress level and low frequency are experienced by many structures. However, the existing study on corrosion fatigue (CF) study of various metallic materials has mainly concentrated on relatively high frequency range. No systematic study has been done to understand the ultra-low frequency (˜10-5 Hz) cyclic loading effect on stress corrosion cracking (SCC) of DSSs. In this study, the ultra-low frequency cyclic loading effect on SCC of DSS 2205 was studied in acidified sodium chloride and caustic white liquor (WL) solutions. The research work focused on the environmental effect on SCC of DSS 2205, the cyclic stress effect on strain accumulation behavior of DSS 2205, and the combined environmental and cyclic stress effect on the stress corrosion crack initiation of DSS 2205 in the above environments. Potentiodynamic polarization tests were performed to investigate the electrochemical behavior of DSS 2205 in acidic NaCl solution. Series of slow strain rate tests (SSRTs) at different applied potential values were conducted to reveal the optimum applied potential value for SCC to happen. Room temperature static and cyclic creep tests were performed in air to illustrate the strain accumulation effect of cyclic stresses. Test results showed that cyclic loading could enhance strain accumulation in DSS 2205 compared to static loading. Moreover, the strain accumulation behavior of DSS 2205 was found to be controlled by the two phases of DSS 2205 with different crystal structures. The B.C.C. ferrite phase enhanced strain accumulation due to extensive cross-slips of the dislocations, whereas the F.C.C. austenite phase resisted strain accumulation due to cyclic strain

  17. Bacterial oxidation activity in heap leaching

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    柳建设; 夏海波; 王兆慧; 胡岳华

    2004-01-01

    Bioleaching of sulfide minerals by bacteria, mainly Thiobacillus ferrooxidans (T. f. ) and Thiobacillus thiooxidans, plays an important role in hydrometallurgy because of its economic and environmental attractions. The surveys of production process and the bacterial oxidation activity in the heap bioleaching were investigated. The results show that pH value is high, bacteria biomass and ferric concentration are low, generation time (above 7.13 h)is long in leachate, and less bacteria are adsorbed on the ores. The bacteria in the leachate exposing on the surface and connecting with mineral, have much faster oxidation rate of Fe( Ⅱ ) and shorter generation time, compared with those which are in the reservoir for a long time. There is diversity for oxidation activity of Fe( Ⅱ ), while there is no diversity for oxidation of sulfur. So it is advisable to add sulfuric acid to degrade pH value to 2.0, add nutrients and shorten recycling time of leachate, so as to enhance bacteria concentration of leachate and the leaching efficiency.

  18. Mesophilic leaching of copper sulphide sludge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    VLADIMIR B. CVETKOVSKI

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Copper was precipitated using a sodium sulphide solution as the precipitation agent from an acid solution containing 17 g/l copper and 350 g/l sulphuric acid. The particle size of nearly 1 µm in the sulphide sludge sample was detected by optical microscopy. Based on chemical and X-ray diffraction analyses, covellite was detected as the major sulphide mineral. The batch bioleach amenability test was performed at 32 °C on the Tk31 mine mesophilic mixed culture using a residence time of 28 days. The dissolution of copper sulphide by direct catalytic leaching of the sulphides with bacteria attached to the particles was found to be worthy, although a small quantity of ferrous ions had to be added to raise the activity of the bacteria and the redox potential of the culture medium. Throughout the 22-day period of the bioleach test, copper recovery based on residue analysis indicated a copper extraction of 95 %, with copper concentration in the bioleach solution of 15 g/l. The slope of the straight line tangential to the exponential part of the extraction curve gave a copper solubilisation rate of 1.1 g/l per day. This suggests that a copper extraction of 95 % for the period of bioleach test of 13.6 days may be attained in a three-stage bioreactor system.

  19. YACON INULIN LEACHING DURING HOT WATER BLANCHING

    OpenAIRE

    Caroline Fenner Scher; Adriano Brandelli; Caciano Zapata Noreña

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACTYacon roots contain inulin, which has prebiotic properties and it may be used as sucrose or fat substitutes. However, inulin is very soluble in water. The loss of this important nutrient during blanching is caused mainly by diffusion or leaching, which might be diminished if blanching temperature - time conditions are correctly employed. The aim of this study was to determine the leaching of the sugars inulin, glucose and fructose, present in yacon roots, during hot water blanching un...

  20. Leaching of nuclear power reactor wastes forms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The leaching tests for power reactor wastes carried out at IPEN/CNEN-SP are described. These waste forms consist mainly of spent resins and boric acid concentrates solidified in ordinary Portland cement. All tests were conducted according to the ISO and IAEA recommendations. 3 years leaching results are reported, determining cesium and strontium diffusivity coefficients for boric acid waste form and ion-exchange resins. (Author)

  1. Room temperature leaching of labile radioactivity from irradiated PWR fuel according to the burnup

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Three PWR UO2 spent fuel specimens with average burnup of 22, 37 and 47 GWd tU-1 were submitted to sequential mode leaching in granitic groundwater for 62 cumulative days. The leaching rate decreased versus increasing contact time from 10-3 d-1 to 10-5 d-1. The 90Sr release appeared to be independent of the burnup with rates 2 orders of magnitude lower than for Cs but higher than the U and Pu release rates; both of the latter elements reached saturation rapidly, giving concentration values of 50-800 ppb and 0.1-10 ppb respectively, irrespective of the burnup. (authors)

  2. Zinc Leaching from Tire Crumb Rubber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhodes, E. P.; Ren, J.; Mays, D. C.

    2010-12-01

    Recent estimates indicate that more than 2 billion scrap tires are currently stockpiled in the United States and approximately 280 million more tires are added annually. Various engineering applications utilize recycled tires in the form of shredded tire crumb rubber. However, the use of tire crumb rubber may have negative environmental impacts, especially when the rubber comes into contact with water. A review of the literature indicates that leaching of zinc from tire crumb rubber is the most significant water quality concern associated with using this material. Zinc is generally used in tire manufacturing, representing approximately 1.3% of the final product by mass. This study will report results from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s (EPA’s) Synthetic Precipitation Leaching Procedure, batch leaching tests, and column leaching tests performed to quantify the process by which zinc leaches from tire crumb rubber into water. Results are interpreted with a first-order kinetic attachment/detachment model, implemented with the U.S. Agricultural Research Service software HYDRUS-1D, in order to determine the circumstances when zinc leaching from tire crumb rubber would be expected to comply with the applicable discharge limits. One potential application for recycled tires is replacing sand with tire crumb rubber in granular media filters used for stormwater pollution control. For this to be a viable application, the total zinc in the stormwater discharge must be below the EPA’s benchmark value of 0.117 mg/L.

  3. Heat transfer law in leaching dump

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WU Ai-xiang; WANG Hong-jiang; XI Yong; YANG Bao-hua; LI Jian-feng; YIN Sheng-hua; ZHA Ke-bing

    2005-01-01

    Based on the law of temperature changes in the leaching dump and the forming process of heat flux, the basic balance equation of heat flow in dump was established, the dissipated heat flow from dump to the atmosphere was analyzed to estimate the surface temperature of the ore particle in dump and discover the law of forced heat convection of heat flow transfer in dump. And the lixiviate flow formula taking a certain heat flow out of dump was deduced by using the inversion method. Through theoretic analysis, combining Dexing copper mine heap leaching production practice, the results show that the heat flow of chalcopyrite leaching emitted is not so great, but the heat flow of pyrite leaching and sulphur oxidation produced take up a higher proportion of total heat flow; the dissipated heat flow takes up a lower proportion, and most of heat flow is absorbed by itself, thus the inside temperature rises gradually; and the saturation flow form for leaching is adopted, which makes the lixiviate seepage in the transitional flow or even in the turbulent flow, so as to accelerate the heat flow diffusing and keep the leaching dump temperature suitable for bacteria living.

  4. Treatment of cadmium dust with two-stage leaching process

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    The treatment of cadmium dust with a two-stage leaching process was investigated to replace the existing sulphation roast-leaching processes. The process parameters in the first stage leaching were basically similar to the neutralleaching in zinc hydrometallurgy. The effects of process parameters in the second stage leaching on the extraction of zincand cadmium were mainly studied. The experimental results indicated that zinc and cadmium could be efficiently recoveredfrom the cadmium dust by two-stage leaching process. The extraction percentages of zinc and cadmium in two stage leach-ing reached 95% and 88% respectively under the optimum conditions. The total extraction percentage of Zn and Cdreached 94%.

  5. Fractal kinetic model for heap leaching of uranium ore

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    By using fractal dimensions of the full particle size distribution instead of average particle size, the analytical models describing heap leaching of uranium ore which were presented by Mellado et al, were improved. Meanwhile, the relationships between the model parameters of the fractal kinetic model for heap leaching of uranium ore and the fractal dimension of uranium ore were determined by column leaching experiments, and then a fractal kinetic model for heap leaching of uranium ore was established, and was further verified by column leaching experiments. The result shows that the fractal kinetic model can well reflect the law of uranium metal leaching of heap leaching of uranium ore. (authors)

  6. Quantification of nitrate leaching from German forest ecosystems by use of a process oriented biogeochemical model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simulations with the process oriented Forest-DNDC model showed reasonable to good agreement with observations of soil water contents of different soil layers, annual amounts of seepage water and approximated rates of nitrate leaching at 79 sites across Germany. Following site evaluation, Forest-DNDC was coupled to a GIS to assess nitrate leaching from German forest ecosystems for the year 2000. At national scale leaching rates varied in a range of 0->80 kg NO3-N ha-1 yr-1 (mean 5.5 kg NO3-N ha-1 yr-1). A comparison of regional simulations with the results of a nitrate inventory study for Bavaria showed that measured and simulated percentages for different nitrate leaching classes (0-5 kg N ha-1 yr-1:66% vs. 74%, 5-15 kg N ha-1 yr-1:20% vs. 20%, >15 kg N ha-1 yr-1:14% vs. 6%) were in good agreement. Mean nitrate concentrations in seepage water ranged between 0 and 23 mg NO3-N l-1. - Highlights: → Forest-DNDC was successfully tested for prediction of annual NO3 leaching rates. → Coupled to GIS it generated regional estimates of NO3 leaching for German forests. → At national scale rates varied in a range of 0->80 (mean 5.5) kg NO3-N ha-1 yr-1. → Mean NO3 concentrations in seepage water were between 0 and 23 mg NO3-N l-1. → Indication of potential risk for groundwater pollution and plant biodiversity. - The Forest-DNDC model is tested on observations at nearly 80 sites and then used to quantify nitrate leaching from German forest ecosystems

  7. Leaching of nano-ZnO in municipal solid waste.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakallioglu, T; Bakirdoven, M; Temizel, I; Demirel, B; Copty, N K; Onay, T T; Uyguner Demirel, C S; Karanfil, T

    2016-11-01

    Despite widespread use of engineered nanomaterials (ENMs) in commercial products and their potential disposal in landfills, the fate of ENMs in solid waste environments are still not well understood. In this study, the leaching behavior of nano ZnO -one of the most used ENMs- in fresh municipal solid waste (MSW) was investigated. Batch reactors containing municipal solid waste samples were spiked with three different types of nano ZnO having different surface stabilization. The leaching of ZnO was examined under acidic, basic and elevated ionic strength (IS) conditions. The results of the 3-day batch tests showed that the percent of the added nano-ZnO mass retained within the solid waste matrix ranged between 80% and 93% on average for the three types of nano-ZnO tested. The pH and IS conditions did not significantly influence the leaching behavior of ZnO. To further analyze the behavior of ZnO in the MSW matrix, a kinetic particle deposition/detachment model was developed. The model was able to reproduce the main trends of the batch experiments. Reaction rate constants for the batch tests ranged from 0.01 to 0.4 1/hr, reflecting the rapid deposition of nano-ZnO within the MSW matrix. PMID:27318728

  8. Suppressing Heavy Metal Leaching through Ball Milling of Fly Ash

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhiliang Chen

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Ball milling is investigated as a method of reducing the leaching concentration (often termed stablilization of heavy metals in municipal solid waste incineration (MSWI fly ash. Three heavy metals (Cu, Cr, Pb loose much of their solubility in leachate by treating fly ash in a planetary ball mill, in which collisions between balls and fly ash drive various physical processes, as well as chemical reactions. The efficiency of stabilization is evaluated by analysing heavy metals in the leachable fraction from treated fly ash. Ball milling reduces the leaching concentration of Cu, Cr, and Pb, and water washing effectively promotes stabilization efficiency by removing soluble salts. Size distribution and morphology of particles were analysed by laser particle diameter analysis and scanning electron microscopy. X-ray diffraction analysis reveals significant reduction of the crystallinity of fly ash by milling. Fly ash particles can be activated through this ball milling, leading to a significant decrease in particle size, a rise in its BET-surface, and turning basic crystals therein into amorphous structures. The dissolution rate of acid buffering materials present in activated particles is enhanced, resulting in a rising pH value of the leachate, reducing the leaching out of some heavy metals.

  9. Phosphorus leaching as influenced by animal manure and catch crops

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Jian

    2013-01-01

    Leaching of phosphorus (P) constitutes an important part of P losses from Swedish agricultural soils. Phosphorus leaching is complex and is influenced by many factors, from source and mobilisation to transport pathways, as well as agricultural management practices. In order to design appropriate mitigation strategies to reduce P leaching, it is urgent to understand how different factors influence P leaching and to understand the methods for assessing P leaching. This thesis investigat...

  10. F-Area Acid/Caustic Basin groundwater monitoring report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This progress report for fourth quarter 1991 and 1992 summary from the Savannah River Plant includes discussion on the following topics: groundwater monitoring data; analytical results exceeding standards; upgradient versus downgradient results; turbidity results exceeding standards; water elevations, flow directions, and flow rates

  11. The future impact of nitrogen in the acidification of surface waters : Modelling, empirical and experimental studies of changes in nitrogen leaching

    OpenAIRE

    2008-01-01

    High nitrate (NO3) leaching rates have been observed in mountain and heathland areas in Europe at sites receiving high levels of nitrogen (N) deposition. These areas are characterised by sparse vegetation on thin, patchy acidic soils and steep slopes and with relatively short growing season; they are therefore highly susceptible to NO3 leaching. The main objective of this study was to contribute to increased knowledge about processes controlling N leaching in Norwegian mountain and heathland...

  12. Kinetics and mechanism of sphalerite leaching by sodium nitrate in sulphuric acid solution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sokić M.

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Interest for application of hydrometallurgical processes in a processing of complex sulphide ores and concentrates has increased in recent years. Their application provides better metal recoveries and reduced emission of gaseous and toxic ageneses in the environment. The kinetics and mechanism of sphalerite leaching from complex sulphide concentrate with sulphuric acid and sodium nitrate solution at standard conditions was presented in this paper. The influences of temperature and time on the leaching degree of zinc were investigated and kinetic analysis of the process was accomplished. With temperature increasing from 60 to 90°C, the zinc leaching increased from 25.23% to 71.66% after 2 hours, i.e. from 59.40% to 99.83% after 4 hours. The selected kinetic model indicated that the diffusion through the product layer was the rate-controlling step during the sphalerite leaching. The activation energy was determined to be 55 kJ/mol in the temperature range 60-90°C. XRD, light microscopy and SEM/EDX analyses of the complex concentrate and leach residue confirmed formation of elemental sulphur and diffusion-controlled leaching mechanism.

  13. Leaching of iodide (I(-)) and iodate (IO3(-)) anions from synthetic layered double hydroxide materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theiss, Frederick L; Ayoko, Godwin A; Frost, Ray L

    2016-09-15

    Several studies have previously demonstrated that layered double hydroxides (LDHs) show considerable potential for the adsorption of radioiodine from aqueous solution; however, few studies have demonstrated that these materials are able to store radioactive (131)I for an acceptable period. The leaching of iodide (I(-)) and iodate (IO3(-)) form Mg/Al LDHs has been carried out. Contact time appeared to be a more significant variable for the leaching of iodate (IO3(-)) compared to that of iodide (I(-)). Experimental results are fitted to the pseudo second order model, suggesting that diffusion is likely to be the rate-limiting step. The presence of carbonate in the leaching solution appeared to significantly increase the leaching of iodide (I(-)) as did the presence of chloride to a lesser extent. The maximum amount of iodate (IO3(-)) leached using ultrapure water as the leaching solution was 21% of the iodate (IO3(-)) originally present. The corresponding result for iodide (I(-)) was even lower at 3%. PMID:27309951

  14. Near-surface leaching studies of Pb-implanted Savannah River waste glass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arnold, G.W.; Northrup, C.J.M.; Bibler, N.E.

    1982-01-01

    The present experiments with Savannah River Plant simulated nuclear waste glass implanted with Pb ions, used Rutherford backscattering spectrometry and elastic recoil detection to follow in detail the changes in composition which occur in the near-surface region upon leaching in deionized water at 90/sup 0/C. Analyses of the leach solutions were made in an attempt to correlate the actual leach rates with the observed near-surface compositional changes. These experiments show that radiation damage can cause changes in the composition of the near-surface of the leached glass. We also find that a critical fluence is reached where abrupt changes of the surface elemental composition occur as a result of leaching. This fluence is near the value observed by both Dran, et al. and Primak. Solution analyses were not made for all the leaching experiments. However, those analyses which were made indicate that the amount of material actually leaving the glass is not significantly increased as a result of the radiation damage.

  15. Leaching of seven pesticides currently used in cotton crop in Mato Grosso State-Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martins, Eucarlos L; Weber, Oscarlina L S; Dores, Eliana F G C; Spadotto, Cláudio A

    2007-11-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the leaching of pesticides and the applicability of the Attenuation Factor (AF) Model to predict their leaching. The leaching of carbofuran, carbendazim, diuron, metolachlor, alpha and beta endosulfan and chlorpyrifos was studied in an Oxisol using a field experiment lysimeter located in Dom Aquino-Mato Grosso. The samples of percolated water were collected by rain event and analyzed. Chemical and physical soil attributes were determined before pesticide application to the plots. The results showed that carbofuran was the pesticide that presented a higher leaching rate in the studied soil, so was the one representing the highest contamination potential. From the total carbofuran applied in the soil surface, around 6% leached below 50 cm. The other pesticides showed lower mobility in the studied soil. The calculated values to AF were 7.06E-12 (carbendazim), 5.08E-03 (carbofuran), 3.12E-17 (diuron), 6.66E-345 (alpha-endosulfan), 1.47E-162 (beta-endosulfan), 1.50E-06 (metolachlor), 3.51E-155 (chlorpyrifos). AF Model was useful to classify the pesticides' potential for contamination; however, that model underestimated pesticide leaching. PMID:17978955

  16. Comparative characterization of sewage sludge compost and soil: Heavy metal leaching characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Wen; Wei, Yonghong; Liu, Jianguo

    2016-06-01

    The leaching and accumulation of heavy metals are major concerns following the land application of sewage sludge compost (SSC). We comparatively characterized SSC, the reference soil, and the SSC amended soil to investigate their similarities and differences regarding heavy metal leaching behavior and then to evaluate the effect of SSC land application on the leaching behavior of soil. Results showed that organic matter, including both of particulate organic matter (POM) and dissolved organic matter (DOM), were critical factors influencing heavy metal leaching from both of SSC and the soil. When SSC was applied to soil at the application rate of 48t/ha, the increase of DOM content slightly enhanced heavy metal leaching from the amended soil over the applicable pH domain (6alkaline pH, and led to more DOM-bound species in the liquid phases. However, the increase of POM content with the SSC application had less influence on the leaching behavior of heavy metals. The geochemical speciation modeling revealed that heavy metal speciation in the solid phase were similar between the reference soil and the amended soil. PMID:26897569

  17. Gamma radiolysis effects on leaching behavior of ceramic materials for nuclear fuel waste immobilization containers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The leaching behavior of ceramic materials for nuclear fuel waste immobilization containers, under the influence of a moderate gamma dose rate (4 Gy/h), has been investigated. Samples of Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/, stabilized ZrO/sub 2/, TiO/sub 2/, cermet (70% Al/sub 2/O-30% TiC), porcelain (with high Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/ content), and concrete (with sulfate-resisting portland cement plus silica fume) have been leached in Standard Canadian Shield Saline Solution (SCSSS), and SCSSS plus clay and sand (components of the disposal system), at 1000 and 1500C for 231 and 987 days, respectively. Leaching solutions were analyzed and the surfaces of the leached samples were investigated by scanning electron microscopy in conjunction with energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy and secondary ion mass spectrometry. Radiolysis did not appear to enhance the leaching, with or without bentonite and sand in the system. Analysis of the gas phase from sealed capsules showed O/sub 2/ depletion and production of CO/sub 2/ in all experiments containing bentonite. The decrease in O/sub 2/ is attributed to the leaching from the clay of Fe(II) species, which can participate in redox reactions with radicals generated by radiolysis. The CO/sub 2/ is produced from either the organic or inorganic fraction in the bentonite

  18. An experimental study on the leaching of borate waste and spent resin waste forms in a simulated sea water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In general, leaching test is performed and mostly employed in the acceptance criteria for radioactive waste disposal and is considered very important because the rate of release of radionuclides from a waste form is one of the most important parameter in defining and evaluating the radionuclide source term in the disposal environment. NRC strongly recommended that the chosen leachant should be the most aggressive one. Therefore it is considered that the certain results of the leaching test should supply the information to evaluate the radionuclide source term and the basis to determine the most aggressive leachant in the leaching test. In this study, leaching test of borate waste and spent resin waste forms is performed in order to compare the leaching characteristics of the waste forms in a simulated sea-water with those in a distilled water. In addition, the sea-water with different quantities of NaCl is used as a leachant to evaluate the effect of NaCl concentration. The IAEA test method (standard leaching test) and apparent dissolution model are applied to analyze the leaching characteristics. The representative radionuclides are Cs137,: Co60 and Sr90. According to this experimental results, the amounts of leached radionuclides in the sea-water is more than that in the distilled water for borate waste and resin waste forms

  19. Microfluidic Leaching of Soil Minerals: Release of K+ from K Feldspar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciceri, Davide; Allanore, Antoine

    2015-01-01

    The rate of K+ leaching from soil minerals such as K-feldspar is believed to be too slow to provide agronomic benefit. Currently, theories and methods available to interpret kinetics of mineral processes in soil fail to consider its microfluidic nature. In this study, we measure the leaching rate of K+ ions from a K-feldspar-bearing rock (syenite) in a microfluidic environment, and demonstrate that at the spatial and temporal scales experienced by crop roots, K+ is available at a faster rate than that measured with conventional apparatuses. We present a device to investigate kinetics of mineral leaching at an unprecedented simultaneous resolution of space (~101-102 μm), time (~101-102 min) and fluid volume (~100-101 mL). Results obtained from such a device challenge the notion that silicate minerals cannot be used as alternative fertilizers for tropical soils. PMID:26485160

  20. Chemical characterization, leach, and adsorption studies of solidified low-level wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laboratory and field leaching experiments are beig conducted by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) to investigate the performance of solidified low-level nuclear waste in a typical, arid, near-surface disposal site. Under PNL's Special Waste Form Lysimeters-Arid Program, a field test facility was constructed to monitor the leaching of commercial solidified waste. Laboratory experiments were conducted to investigate the leaching and adsorption characteristics of the waste forms in contact with soil. Liquid radioactive wastes solidified in cement, vinyl ester-styrene, and bitumen were obtained from commercial boiling water and pressurized water reactors, and buried in a field leaching facility on the Hanford site in southeastern Washington State. Batch leaching, soil column adsorption, and soil/waste form column experiments were conducted in the laboratory, using small-scale cement waste forms and Hanford site ground water. The purpose of these experiments is to evaluate the ability of laboratory leaching tests to predict leaching under actual field conditions and to determine which mechanisms (i.e., diffusion, solubility, adsorption) actually control the concentration of radionuclides in the soil surrounding the waste form. Chemical and radionuclide analyses performed on samples collected from the field and laboratory experiments indicate strong adsorption of /sup 134,137/Cs and 85Sr onto the Hanford site sediment. Small amounts of 60Co are leached from the waste forms as very mobile species. Some 60Co migrated through the soil at the same rate as water. Chemical constituents present in the reactor waste streams also found at elevated levels in the field and laboratory leachates include sodium, sulfate, magnesium, and nitrate. Plausible solid phases that could be controlling some of the chemical and radionuclide concentrations in the leachate were identified using the MINTEQ geochemical computer code

  1. Chemical characterization, leach, and adsorption studies of solidified low-level wastes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walter, M.B.; Serne, R.J.; Jones, T.L.; McLaurine, S.B.

    1986-12-01

    Laboratory and field leaching experiments are beig conducted by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) to investigate the performance of solidified low-level nuclear waste in a typical, arid, near-surface disposal site. Under PNL's Special Waste Form Lysimeters-Arid Program, a field test facility was constructed to monitor the leaching of commercial solidified waste. Laboratory experiments were conducted to investigate the leaching and adsorption characteristics of the waste forms in contact with soil. Liquid radioactive wastes solidified in cement, vinyl ester-styrene, and bitumen were obtained from commercial boiling water and pressurized water reactors, and buried in a field leaching facility on the Hanford site in southeastern Washington State. Batch leaching, soil column adsorption, and soil/waste form column experiments were conducted in the laboratory, using small-scale cement waste forms and Hanford site ground water. The purpose of these experiments is to evaluate the ability of laboratory leaching tests to predict leaching under actual field conditions and to determine which mechanisms (i.e., diffusion, solubility, adsorption) actually control the concentration of radionuclides in the soil surrounding the waste form. Chemical and radionuclide analyses performed on samples collected from the field and laboratory experiments indicate strong adsorption of /sup 134,137/Cs and /sup 85/Sr onto the Hanford site sediment. Small amounts of /sup 60/Co are leached from the waste forms as very mobile species. Some /sup 60/Co migrated through the soil at the same rate as water. Chemical constituents present in the reactor waste streams also found at elevated levels in the field and laboratory leachates include sodium, sulfate, magnesium, and nitrate. Plausible solid phases that could be controlling some of the chemical and radionuclide concentrations in the leachate were identified using the MINTEQ geochemical computer code.

  2. Role of minerals properties on leaching process of weathered crust elution-deposited rare earth ore

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    肖燕飞; 刘向生; 冯宗玉; 黄小卫; 黄莉; 陈迎迎; 吴文远

    2015-01-01

    Granite belonged to intrusive rock and volcanic was extrusive rock. There may be many differences in their degree of weathering and mineral chemical composition. The present study investigated the minerals properties and the leaching mechanism of the granitic weathered crust elution-deposited rare earth ore from Longnan Rare Earth Mine area (LN ores) and volcanic weathered crust elution-deposited rare earth ore from Liutang Rare Earth Mine area (LT ores). The X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) were used to characterize the phase of rare earth ores. The particle size distributions and main composition of the ore were also presented in this paper. The leaching mechanisms of two kinds of rare earth ores were analyzed with different kinetics models and could be described by the shrinking-core model. They were all inner diffusion-controlled leaching processes. The leaching equation of the kinetics of the LN ores could be expressed as:4 LN LN 1.096 10 2/3 0.377 8.314 0 2 3=0.1061 (1 ) Tr e tη η×−−− − −, leaching equation of kinetics of LT ores was 3 LT LT 4.640 10 2/3 0.411 8.314 0 32 3=8.33 101 (1 ) Tr e tη η×−− −×− − −. The rare earth leaching rate of LT ores was always lower in the same condition, and it would need more time and more (NH4)2SO4 consump-tion to achieve the same rare earth leaching efficiency, which would lead to more serious ammonia-nitrogen pollution. Therefore, magnesium salt was proposed as the leaching agent to eliminate ammonia-nitrogen pollution and further studies would be taken in the future.

  3. Modeling Nitrogen Leaching With A Biogeochemical Model Coupled With Soil Hydrology Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barman, R.; Yang, X.; Jain, A.; Post, W. M.; Sivapalan, M.

    2008-12-01

    Land use changes for cropland, excessive application of fertilizers in agriculture, and increase in anthropogenic activities such as fossil fuel burning have lead to widespread increases in anthropogenic production of reactive N and NH3 emissions, and N deposition rates. An important consequence of these processes is intensification of soil nutrient leaching activities, leading to serious ground water contamination problems. The current study focuses on the issue of nitrogen (nitrate and ammonium) leaching due to land cover changes for cropland, excess N fertilizer application, and atmospheric nitrogen deposition on nitrogen leaching at a global scale. Simulations of nitrogen leaching require integration of processes involving soil hydrology and biogeochemical cycles. An existing terrestrial coupled carbon-nitrogen cycle model, Integrated Science Assessment Model (ISAM), was used to estimate nitrogen leaching. The N-cycle in ISAM includes the major processes associated with nitrogen (immobilization, mineralization, nitrification, denitrification, leaching, nitrogen fixation, and vegetation nitrogen uptake). ISAM also considers how carbon and nitrogen dynamics are influenced by the effects of human perturbations to the N cycle including atmospheric deposition and fertilizer application, and the fate of N in land use activities, i.e., deforestation and agricultural harvest. In this study, the ISAM soil hydrology was extended and improved with CLM 3.5 hydrology processes and algorithms, which extended the modeling capabilities to consider the prediction of nitrogen leaching. The model performance was evaluated with flow and nutrient data at several locations within the Upper Sangamon River Basin in Illinois, and flow data in contrasting watersheds in Oklahoma. This talk will focus on describing the results of a series of modeling experiments examining the influence of land management changes for cropland and nitrogen deposition on nitrogen leaching at a global scale

  4. Electro chemical studies on stress corrosion cracking of Incoloy-800 in caustic solution, part I: As received samples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dinu Alice

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Many non-volatile impurities accidentally introduced into the steam generator tend to Concentrate on its surface in restricted flow areas. In this way these impurities can lead to stress corrosion cracking (SCC on stressed tubes of the steam generator. Such impurities can be strong alkaline or acid solutions. To evaluate the effect of alkaline concentrated environments on SCC of steam generator tubes, the tests were con ducted on stressed samples of Incoloy-800 in 10% NaOH solution. To accelerate the SCC process, stressed specimens were anodically polarised in a caustic solution in an electro chemical cell. The method of stressing of Incoloy-800 tubes used in our experiments was the C-ring. Using the cathodic zone of the potentiodynamic curves it was possible to calculate the most important electrochemical parameters: the corrosion current, the corrosion rate, and the polarization resistance. We found that the value of the corrosion potential to initiate the SCC microcracks was -100 mV. The tested samples were examined using the metallographic method. The main experimental results showed that the in crease of the stress state promoted the in crease of the SCC susceptibility of Incoloy-800 samples tested under the same conditions, and that the length of the SCC-type microcracks in creased with the growth of the stress value.

  5. Electrochemical studies on stress corrosion cracking of Incoloy-800 in caustic solution Part I: As received samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Many non-volatile impurities accidentally introduced into the steam generator tend to concentrate on its surface in restricted flow areas. In this way these impurities can lead to stress corrosion cracking (SCC) on stressed tubes of the steam generator. Such impurities can be strong alkaline or acid solutions. To evaluate the effect of alkaline concentrated environments on SCC of steam generator tubes, the tests were conducted on stressed samples of Incoloy-800 in 10% NaOH solution. To accelerate the SCC process, stressed specimens were anodically polarised in a caustic solution in an electrochemical cell. The method of stressing of Incoloy-800 tubes used in our experiments was the C-ring. Using the cathodic zone of the potentiodynamic curves it was possible to calculate the most important electrochemical parameters: the corrosion current, the corrosion rate, and the polarisation resistance. We found that the value of the corrosion potential to initiate the SCC microcracks was -100 mV. The tested samples were examined using the metallographic method. The main experimental results showed that the increase of the stress state promoted the increase of the SCC susceptibility of Incoloy-800 samples tested under the same conditions, and that the length of the SCC-type microcracks increased with the growth of the stress value. (author)

  6. Laboratory leach tests of phosphate/sulfate waste grout and leachate adsorption tests using Hanford sediment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Serne, R.J.; Martin, W.J.; McLaurine, S.B.; Airhart, S.P.; LeGore, V.L.; Treat, R.L.

    1987-12-01

    An assessment of the long-term risks posed by grout disposal at Hanford requires data on the ability of grout to resist leaching of waste species contained in the grout via contact with water that percolates through the ground. Additionally, data are needed on the ability of Hanford sediment (soil) surrounding the grout and concrete vault to retard migration of any wastes released from the grout. This report describes specific laboratory experiments that are producing empirical leach rate data and leachate-sediment adsorption data for Phosphate-Sulfate Waste (PSW) grout. The leach rate and adsorption values serve as inputs to computer codes used to forecast potential risk resulting from the use of ground water containing leached species. In addition, the report discusses other chemical analyses and geochemical computer code calculations that were used to identify mechanisms that control leach rates and adsorption potential. Knowledge of the controlling chemical and physical processes provides technical defensibility for using the empirical laboratory data to extrapolate the performance of the actual grout disposal system to the long time periods of interest. 59 refs., 83 figs., 18 tabs.

  7. Laboratory leach tests of phosphate/sulfate waste grout and leachate adsorption tests using Hanford sediment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An assessment of the long-term risks posed by grout disposal at Hanford requires data on the ability of grout to resist leaching of waste species contained in the grout via contact with water that percolates through the ground. Additionally, data are needed on the ability of Hanford sediment (soil) surrounding the grout and concrete vault to retard migration of any wastes released from the grout. This report describes specific laboratory experiments that are producing empirical leach rate data and leachate-sediment adsorption data for Phosphate-Sulfate Waste (PSW) grout. The leach rate and adsorption values serve as inputs to computer codes used to forecast potential risk resulting from the use of ground water containing leached species. In addition, the report discusses other chemical analyses and geochemical computer code calculations that were used to identify mechanisms that control leach rates and adsorption potential. Knowledge of the controlling chemical and physical processes provides technical defensibility for using the empirical laboratory data to extrapolate the performance of the actual grout disposal system to the long time periods of interest. 59 refs., 83 figs., 18 tabs

  8. Leaching of actinides and technetium from simulated high-level waste glass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leach tests were conducted using a modified version of the IAEA procedure to study the behavior of glass waste-solution interactions. Release rates were determined for Tc, U, Np, Pu, Am, Cm, and Si in the following solutions: WIPP B salt brine, NaCl (287 g/l), NaCl (1.76 g/1), CaCl2 (1.66 g/l), NaHCO3 (2.52 g/l), and deionized water. The leach rates for all elements decreased an order of magnitude from their initial values during the first 20 to 30 days leaching time. The sodium bicarbonate solution produced the highest elemental release rates, while the saturated salt brine and deionized water in general gave the lowest release. Technetium has the highest initial release of all elements studied. The technetium release rates, however, decreased by over four orders of magnitude in 150 days of leaching time. In the prepared glass, technetium was phase separated, concentrating on internal pore surfaces. Neptunium, in all cases except CaCl2 solution, shows the highest actinide release rate. In general, curium and uranium have the lowest release rates. The range of actinide release rates is from 10-5 to 10-8 g/cm2/day. 25 figures, 7 tables

  9. Investigation of Copper Ammonia Leaching from Smelter Slags: Characterization, Leaching and Kinetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bidari, Ehsan; Aghazadeh, Valeh

    2015-10-01

    Although ammonia leaching of copper from slags has been reported generally as a part of copper slag utilization methods, but no detailed studies have been reported in the literature. In this research, we tried to investigate the effect of different parameters on ammonia leaching of copper from copper smelting slag by identifying different copper-bearing phases and following them during leaching time. Mineralogical characterization of the smelting slag (1.7 pct Cu) was done using X-ray fluorescence, X-ray diffraction, optical microscopy, diagnostic leaching tests, and scanning electron microscopy. The characterization studies indicated that main copper-bearing species are soluble copper oxides and chalcocite along with minor amount of covellite, bornite, blister copper particles, and chalcopyrite. It was also found that only approximately 0.2 pct Cu was present in the insoluble bulk silicate phases. These results suggest that approximately 88 pct of the total copper of slag could be extracted by ammonia sulfide leaching. Leaching tests were carried out and the effects of various parameters, namely pH, ammonia concentration, temperature, presence of oxygen, stirring speed, and pulp density were examined on copper leaching. The temperature and stirring speed had the most pronounced effect on the copper leaching, whereas ammonia affected the leaching yield at low concentrations of ammonia. It was found that 78 pct of Cu could be extracted within 4 hours and under optimum conditions: T = 343 K (70 °C), 2M ammonia, pH 10.5, stirring speed = 900 rpm, pulp density = 10 pct ( w s/ v). The kinetic data were analyzed with the shrinking core models, and it was found that the leaching process is controlled by both the interfacial transfer and diffusion across the product layer and the activation energy is calculated to be 49.4 kJ mol-1.

  10. Extraction of copper from bacterial leach solution using LIX98

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    柳建设; 邱冠周; 葛玉卿; 徐竞

    2002-01-01

    Extraction of copper from bacterial leach solution using Lix984 had been performed.It was found that the main factors influencing extraction yield of copper are the phase ratio and the concentration of extractant,following the pH of solution and extraction time and the order of factors influencing the separation rate is the pH of solution,the concentration of extractant,the extraction time and the phase ratio.The best conditions obtained by the orthogonal tests are as follows: the extractant concentration 4%,extraction time 3 min,phase ratio 1∶1,pH of solution 2.

  11. Leaching properties and chemical compositions of calcines produced at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    No significant chemical differences were determined between retrieved and fresh calcine based on chemical and spectrochemical analyses. Little can be derived from the amounts of the radioisotopes present in the retrieved calcine samples other than the ratios of strontium-90 to cesium-137 are typical of aged fission product. The variations in concentrations of radionuclides within the composite samples of each bin also reflect the differences in compositions of waste solutions calcined. In general the leaching characteristics of both calcines by distilled water are similar. In both materials the radionuclides of cesium and strontium were selectively leached at significant rates, although cesium leached much more completely from the alumina calcine than from the zirconia calcine. Cesium and strontium are probably contained in both calcines as nitrate salts and also as fluoride salts in zirconia calcine, all of which are at least slightly soluble in water. Radionuclides of cerium, ruthenium, and plutonium in both calcines were highly resistant to leaching and leached at rates similar to or less than those of the matrix elements. These elements exist as polyvalent metal ions in the waste solutions before calcination and they probably form insoluble oxides and fluorides in the calcine. The relatively slow leaching of nitrate ion from zirconia calcine and radiocesium from both calcines suggests that the calcine matrix in some manner prevents complete or immediate contact of the soluble ions with water. Whether radiostrontium forms slightly fluoride salts or forms nitrate salts which are protected in the same manner as radiocesium is unknown. Nevertheless, selective leaching of cesium and strontim is retarded in some manner by the calcine matrix

  12. Effects of increased deposition of atmospheric nitrogen on an upland moor: leaching of N species and soil solution chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study was designed to investigate the leaching response of an upland moorland to long-term (10 yr) ammonium nitrate additions of 40, 80 and 120 kg N ha-1 yr-1 and to relate this response to other indications of potential system damage, such as acidification and cation displacement. Results showed increases in nitrate leaching only in response to high rates of N input, in excess of 96 and 136 kg total N input ha-1 yr-1 for the organic Oh horizon and mineral Eag horizon, respectively. Individual N additions did not alter ammonium leaching from either horizon and ammonium was completely retained by the mineral horizon. Leaching of dissolved organic nitrogen (DON) from the Oh horizon was increased by the addition of 40 kg N ha-1 yr-1, but in spite of increases, retention of total dissolved nitrogen reached a maximum of 92% and 95% of 80 kg added N ha-1 yr-1 in the Oh and Eag horizons, respectively. Calcium concentrations and calcium/aluminium ratios were decreased in the Eag horizon solution with significant acidification mainly in the Oh horizon leachate. Nitrate leaching is currently regarded as an early indication of N saturation in forest systems. Litter C:N ratios were significantly lowered but values remained above a threshold predicted to increase leaching of N in forests. - Nitrate leaching from an upland moor podsol was significantly increased only in response to rates of N deposition in excess of 96 kg N ha-1 yr-1

  13. Arbuscular mycorrhizas reduce nitrogen loss via leaching.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamid R Asghari

    Full Text Available The capacity of mycorrhizal and non-mycorrhizal root systems to reduce nitrate (NO₃⁻ and ammonium (NH₄⁺ loss from soils via leaching was investigated in a microcosm-based study. A mycorrhiza defective tomato mutant and its mycorrhizal wildtype progenitor were used in this experiment in order to avoid the indirect effects of establishing non-mycorrhizal control treatments on soil nitrogen cycling and the wider soil biota. Mycorrhizal root systems dramatically reduced nitrate loss (almost 40 times less via leaching, compared to their non-mycorrhizal counterparts, following a pulse application of ammonium nitrate to experimental microcosms. The capacity of AM to reduce nutrient loss via leaching has received relatively little attention, but as demonstrated here, can be significant. Taken together, these data highlight the need to consider the potential benefits of AM beyond improvements in plant nutrition alone.

  14. Synthetic gas production from dry black liquor gasification process using direct causticization with CO2 capture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► We study synthetic gas production from dry black liquor gasification system. ► Direct causticization eliminates energy intensive lime kiln reducing biomass use. ► Results show large SNG production potential at significant energy efficiency (58%). ► Substantial CO2 capture potential plus CO2 reductions from natural gas replacement. ► Significant transport fuel replacement especially in Sweden and Europe. -- Abstract: Synthetic natural gas (SNG) production from dry black liquor gasification (DBLG) system is an attractive option to reduce CO2 emissions replacing natural gas. This article evaluates the energy conversion performance of SNG production from oxygen blown circulating fluidized bed (CFB) black liquor gasification process with direct causticization by investigating system integration with a reference pulp mill producing 1000 air dried tonnes (ADt) of pulp per day. The direct causticization process eliminates use of energy intensive lime kiln that is a main component required in the conventional black liquor recovery cycle with the recovery boiler. The paper has estimated SNG production potential, the process energy ratio of black liquor (BL) conversion to SNG, and quantified the potential CO2 abatement. Based on reference pulp mill capacity, the results indicate a large potential of SNG production (about 162 MW) from black liquor but at a cost of additional biomass import (36.7 MW) to compensate the total energy deficit. The process shows cold gas energy efficiency of about 58% considering black liquor and biomass import as major energy inputs. About 700 ktonnes per year of CO2 abatement i.e. both possible CO2 capture and CO2 offset from bio-fuel use replacing natural gas, is estimated. Moreover, the SNG production offers a significant fuel replacement in transport sector especially in countries with large pulp and paper industry e.g. in Sweden, about 72% of motor gasoline and 40% of total motor fuel could be replaced.

  15. Leaching of vanadium from stone coal with sulfuric acid

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Mingyu; XIAO Liansheng; LI Qinggang; WANG Xuewen; XIANG Xiaoyan

    2009-01-01

    The effects of roasting, mass ratio of H2SO4 to stone coal, leaching temperature, liquid-to-solid ratio, grinding fineness of stone coal, and two-stage counter-current leaching on the vanadium leaching ratio were studied. The results show that the vanadium leaching ratio of roasted stone coal through two-stage counter-current leaching can reach 65.1% at the mass ratio of H2SO4 to stone coal of 20%, leaching temperature for the production of vanadium from stone coal.

  16. Leaching experiment of alkali-activated cementitious materials solidified forms of radioactive incineration ash

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In order to solidify safely radioactive incineration ash, the alkali-activated cementitious materials were prepared with slag, fly ash, cement and zeolite, with water glass or sodium silicate (sulfate) as the activator. The recommended formulation of solidification matrix is 65% (mass fraction, the same below) slag, 10% fly ash, 20% zeolite, 2% cement, 3% Ca (OH)2. Adding quantity of water glass is 5%, when addition of 30% radioactive incineration ash, with 0.34-0.35 of the ratio of water and ash, the mechanical property of solidification forms performs well. The leaching rate of U for the cement wastes forms is 6.0 x 10-6 cm/d in 35 d, and the long time leaching rate is very low. The results of diffusion coefficient of U in the solidification forms indicate that retention capability about U of alkali-activated cementitious materials si good. The leaching mechanisms of solidification forms are discussed. (authors)

  17. Prediction of complications following unintentional caustic ingestion in children. Is endoscopy always necessary?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christesen, H B

    1995-01-01

    The records of 115 children hospitalized following caustic ingestion over an 18.5-year period from 1976 to 1994 were reviewed. The relationship between types of product ingested, signs and symptoms, degree of esophageal injury and complications was analyzed. All complications were the result of...... respiratory complications, in symptomatic ingestions of lye or ammonia water, in children with respiratory symptoms, and in rare cases of severe symptoms following ADD or strong acid ingestion. It is suggested that children who are non-symptomatic following unintentional ingestions are not at risk of...

  18. Hierarchical Phase Space Structure of Dark Matter Haloes: Tidal debris, Caustics, and Dark Matter annihilation

    OpenAIRE

    Afshordi, Niayesh; Mohayaee, Roya; Bertschinger, Edmund

    2008-01-01

    Most of the mass content of dark matter haloes is expected to be in the form of tidal debris. The density of debris is not constant, but rather can grow due to formation of caustics at the apocenters and pericenters of the orbit, or decay as a result of phase mixing. In the phase space, the debris assemble in a hierarchy which is truncated by the primordial temperature of dark matter. Understanding this phase structure can be of significant importance for the interpretation of many astrophysi...

  19. Comparison of Leaching Rates of Glass-Ceramic and Glass

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    <正>With the increase of the burn-up of the nuclear fuel, the amounts of the long-lived radionuclides increase. The solubility of actinides such as plutonium in glass is very limited. Glass-ceramic as the new

  20. Leaching Rate Test of Nuclei Cs and Sr

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    A novel material-resemble verifiable cement for disposal of spent nuclear fuel reprocessing mediate-level waste has been developed. Waste form has been characterized for their compressive strength, phase composition. The cement formulation has been patented. In this experiment, the cement was mixed with simulated wastes for each composition 5 min at least. Ratio of waste to the cement is 0.45-0.55. After being packed into cylindrical molds, the grouts were cured for a period 28 days in a room temperature curing chamber at atmospheric pressure. The wasteform then