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Sample records for causing turbulent high-velocity

  1. Dogs with hearth diseases causing turbulent high-velocity blood flow have changes in patelet function and von Willebrand factor multimer distribution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tarnow, Inge; Kristensen, Annemarie Thuri; Olsen, Lisbeth Høier;

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this prospective study was to investigate platelet function using in vitro tests based on both high and low shear rates and von Willebrand factor (vWf) multimeric composition in dogs with cardiac disease and turbulent high-velocity blood flow. Client-owned asymptomatic, untreated...... dogs were divided into 4 groups: 14 Cavalier King Charles Spaniels (Cavaliers) with mitral valve prolapse (MVP) and no or minimal mitral regurgitation (MR), 17 Cavaliers with MVP and moderate to severe MR, 14 control dogs, and 10 dogs with subaortic stenosis (SAS). Clinical examinations...

  2. Si iv Column Densities Predicted from Non-Equilibrium Ionization Simulations of Turbulent Mixing Layers and High-Velocity Clouds

    CERN Document Server

    Kwak, Kyujin; Henley, David B

    2015-01-01

    We present predictions of the Si iv ions in turbulent mixing layers (TMLs) between hot and cool gas and in cool high-velocity clouds (HVCs) that travel through a hot halo, complementing the C iv, N v, and O vi predictions in Kwak & Shelton, Kwak et al., and Henley et al. We find that the Si iv ions are most abundant in regions where the hot and cool gases first begin to mix or where the mixed gas has cooled significantly. The predicted column densities of high velocity Si iv and the predicted ratios of Si iv to C iv and O vi found on individual sightlines in our HVC simulations are in good agreement with observations of high velocity gas. Low velocity Si iv is also seen in the simulations, as a result of decelerated gas in the case of the HVC simulations and when looking along directions that pass perpendicular to the direction of motion in the TML simulations. The ratios of low velocity Si iv to C iv and O vi in the TML simulations are in good agreement with those recorded for Milky Way halo gas, while t...

  3. Treatment of open tibial fracture with bone defect caused by high velocity missiles: A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Golubović Zoran

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction .Tibia fracture caused by high velocity missiles is mostly comminuted and followed by bone defect which makes their healing process extremely difficult and prone to numerous complications. Case Outline. A 34-year-old male was wounded at close range by a semi-automatic gun missile. He was wounded in the distal area of the left tibia and suffered a massive defect of the bone and soft tissue. After the primary treatment of the wound, the fracture was stabilized with an external fixator type Mitkovic, with convergent orientation of the pins. The wound in the medial region of the tibia was closed with the secondary stitch, whereas the wound in the lateral area was closed with the skin transplant after Thiersch. Due to massive bone defect in the area of the rifle-missile wound six months after injury, a medical team placed a reconstructive external skeletal fixator type Mitkovic and performed corticotomy in the proximal metaphyseal area of the tibia. By the method of bone transport (distractive osteogenesis, the bone defect of the tibia was replaced. After the fracture healing seven months from the secondary surgery, the fixator was removed and the patient was referred to physical therapy. Conclusion. Surgical treatment of wounds, external fixation, performing necessary debridement, adequate antibiotic treatment and soft and bone tissue reconstruction are essential in achieving good results in patients with the open tibial fracture with bone defect caused by high velocity missiles. Reconstruction of bone defect can be successfully treated by reconstructive external fixator Mitkovic. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. III 41017 i br. III 41004

  4. High Velocity Gas Gun

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-01-01

    A video tape related to orbital debris research is presented. The video tape covers the process of loading a High Velocity Gas Gun and firing it into a mounted metal plate. The process is then repeated in slow motion.

  5. High-Velocity Clouds

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wakker, Bart P.; Woerden, Hugo van; Oswalt, Terry D.; Gilmore, Gerard

    2013-01-01

    The high-velocity clouds (HVCs) are gaseous objects that do not partake in differential galactic rotation, but instead have anomalous velocities. They trace energetic processes on the interface between the interstellar material in the Galactic disk and intergalactic space. Three different processes

  6. Drag reduction caused by the injection of polymer thread into a turbulent pipe flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Usui, Hiromoto; Maeguchi, Katsuhiro; Sano, Yuji

    1988-09-01

    Drag reduction caused by the injection of concentrated polymer solutions into a turbulent pipe flow was studied. Measurements were made of the radial distribution of fluctuating velocities by means of video image analysis. The results showed that a higher velocity was observed for injected polymer threads and both the radial fluctuation and the Reynolds stress were significantly suppressed. It was suggested that the wall turbulence structure might be controlled by suppressing the large scale turbulent motion in the turbulent core region.

  7. High velocity impact experiment (HVIE)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toor, A.; Donich, T.; Carter, P.

    1998-02-01

    The HVIE space project was conceived as a way to measure the absolute EOS for approximately 10 materials at pressures up to {approximately}30 Mb with order-of-magnitude higher accuracy than obtainable in any comparable experiment conducted on earth. The experiment configuration is such that each of the 10 materials interacts with all of the others thereby producing one-hundred independent, simultaneous EOS experiments The materials will be selected to provide critical information to weapons designers, National Ignition Facility target designers and planetary and geophysical scientists. In addition, HVIE will provide important scientific information to other communities, including the Ballistic Missile Defense Organization and the lethality and vulnerability community. The basic HVIE concept is to place two probes in counter rotating, highly elliptical orbits and collide them at high velocity (20 km/s) at 100 km altitude above the earth. The low altitude of the experiment will provide quick debris strip-out of orbit due to atmospheric drag. The preliminary conceptual evaluation of the HVIE has found no show stoppers. The design has been very easy to keep within the lift capabilities of commonly available rides to low earth orbit including the space shuttle. The cost of approximately 69 million dollars for 100 EOS experiment that will yield the much needed high accuracy, absolute measurement data is a bargain!

  8. Causes of non-Kolmogorov turbulence in the atmosphere.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lukin, V P; Nosov, E V; Nosov, V V; Torgaev, A V

    2016-04-20

    In the present work, we briefly describe a model for atmospheric turbulence energy on the basis of experimental data obtained in Siberia. A series of new studies is considered and the results of our long-term experimental observations are summarized. The results of these studies form the basis for an explanation of some effects in interactions between optical waves and atmospheric turbulence. Our numerous experimental results point to the possible generation of so-called coherent turbulence in the atmosphere. When analyzing the problem, we proceeded based on our own experimental data and comprehension that the coherent turbulence is a result of the action of self-organizing nonlinear processes, which run in continuous media, including atmospheric air. The experimental data confirmed the effect of attenuation of light fluctuations in coherent turbulence.

  9. Turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Bailly, Christophe

    2015-01-01

    This book covers the major problems of turbulence and turbulent processes, including  physical phenomena, their modeling and their simulation. After a general introduction in Chapter 1 illustrating many aspects dealing with turbulent flows, averaged equations and kinetic energy budgets are provided in Chapter 2. The concept of turbulent viscosity as a closure of the Reynolds stress is also introduced. Wall-bounded flows are presented in Chapter 3, and aspects specific to boundary layers and channel or pipe flows are also pointed out. Free shear flows, namely free jets and wakes, are considered in Chapter 4. Chapter 5 deals with vortex dynamics. Homogeneous turbulence, isotropy, and dynamics of isotropic turbulence are presented in Chapters 6 and 7. Turbulence is then described both in the physical space and in the wave number space. Time dependent numerical simulations are presented in Chapter 8, where an introduction to large eddy simulation is offered. The last three chapters of the book summarize remarka...

  10. Turbulence

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Z. Lin; R.E. Waltz

    2007-01-01

    @@ Turbulent transport driven by plasma pressure gradients [Tangl978] is one of the most important scientific challenges in burning plasma experiments since the balance between turbulent transport and the self-heating by the fusion products (a-particles) determines the performance of a fusion reactor like ITER.

  11. Gouge initiation in high-velocity rocket sled testing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tachau, R.D.M.; Trucano, T.G. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Yew, C.H. [Texas Univ., Austin, TX (United States)

    1994-07-01

    A model is presented which describes the formation of surface damage ``gouging`` on the rails that guide rocket sleds. An unbalanced sled can randomly cause a very shallow-angle, oblique impact between the sled shoe and the rail. This damage phenomenon has also been observed in high-velocity guns where the projectile is analogous to the moving sled shoe and the gun barrel is analogous to the stationary rail. At sufficiently high velocity, the oblique impact will produce a thin hot layer of soft material on the contact surfaces. Under the action of a normal moving load, the soft layer lends itself to an anti-symmetric deformation and the formation of a ``hump`` in front of the moving load. A gouge is formed when this hump is overrun by the sled shoe. The phenomenon is simulated numerically using the CTH strong shock physics code, and the results are in good agreement with experimental observation.

  12. A High-Velocity Collision With Our Galaxy's Disk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-08-01

    What caused the newly discovered supershell in the outskirts of our galaxy? A new study finds evidence that a high-velocity cloud may have smashed into the Milky Ways disk millions of years ago.Mysterious Gas ShellsA single velocity-channel map of the supershell GS040.2+00.670, with red contours marking the high-velocity cloud at its center. [Adapted from Park et al. 2016]The neutral hydrogen gas that fills interstellar space is organized into structures like filaments, loops, and shells. Supershells are enormous shells of hydrogen gas that can have radii of a thousand light-years or more; weve spotted about 20 of these in our own galaxy, and more in nearby dwarfs and spiral galaxies.How do these structures form? One theory is that they result from several supernovae explosions occurring in the same area. But the energy needed to create a supershell is more than 3 x 1052 erg, which corresponds to over 30 supernovae quite a lot to have exploding in the same region.Theres an interesting alternative scenario: the supershells might instead be caused by the impacts of high-velocity clouds that fall into the galactic disk.Velocity data for the compact high-velocity cloud CHVC040. The cloud is moving fast enough to create the supershell observed. [Adapted from Park et al. 2016]The Milky Ways Speeding CloudsHigh-velocity clouds are clouds of mostly hydrogen that speed through the Milky Way with radial velocities that are very different from the material in the galactic disk. The origins of these clouds are unknown, but its proposed that they come from outside the galaxy they might be fragments of a nearby, disrupting galaxy, or they might have originated from flows of accreting gas in the space in between galaxies.Though high-velocity clouds have long been on the list of things that might cause supershells, weve yet to find conclusive evidence of this. But that might have just changed, with a recent discovery by a team of scientists led by Geumsook Park (Seoul National

  13. MECHANISM AND PREDICTION OF MATERIAL ABRASION IN HIGH-VELOCITY SEDIMENT-LADEN FLOW

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HUANG Xi-bin; YUAN Yin-zhong

    2006-01-01

    The wall surface of material is prone to silt abrasion by high-velocity sediment-laden flow. The silt abrasion is different form cavitation erosion. In this article, the characteristics of silt abrasion were discussed. The mechanism of silt abrasion was analyzed and the formation and development of ripple shape on wall surface of material were explained thereafter. Based on turbulence theory and test data, some formulas were derived for predicting the abrasion rate of concrete wall surface in high-velocity sediment-laden flow. The calculated results show good agreement with the experimental data.

  14. Consideration of wear rates at high velocity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hale, Chad S.

    The development of the research presented here is one in which high velocity relative sliding motion between two bodies in contact has been considered. Overall, the wear environment is truly three-dimensional. The attempt to characterize three-dimensional wear was not economically feasible because it must be analyzed at the micro-mechanical level to get results. Thus, an engineering approximation was carried out. This approximation was based on a metallographic study identifying the need to include viscoplasticity constitutive material models, coefficient of friction, relationships between the normal load and velocity, and the need to understand wave propagation. A sled test run at the Holloman High Speed Test Track (HHSTT) was considered for the determination of high velocity wear rates. In order to adequately characterize high velocity wear, it was necessary to formulate a numerical model that contained all of the physical events present. The experimental results of a VascoMax 300 maraging steel slipper sliding on an AISI 1080 steel rail during a January 2008 sled test mission were analyzed. During this rocket sled test, the slipper traveled 5,816 meters in 8.14 seconds and reached a maximum velocity of 1,530 m/s. This type of environment was never considered previously in terms of wear evaluation. Each of the features of the metallography were obtained through micro-mechanical experimental techniques. The byproduct of this analysis is that it is now possible to formulate a model that contains viscoplasticity, asperity collisions, temperature and frictional features. Based on the observations of the metallographic analysis, these necessary features have been included in the numerical model, which makes use of a time-dynamic program which follows the movement of a slipper during its experimental test run. The resulting velocity and pressure functions of time have been implemented in the explicit finite element code, ABAQUS. Two-dimensional, plane strain models

  15. Analysis of high velocity impact on hybrid composite fan blades

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chamis, C. C.; Sinclair, J. H.

    1979-01-01

    This paper describes recent developments in the analysis of high velocity impact of composite blades using a computerized capability which consists of coupling a composites mechanics code with the direct-time integration features of NASTRAN. The application of the capability to determine the linear dynamic response of an intraply hybrid composite aircraft engine fan blade is described in detail. The predicted results agree with measured data. The results also show that the impact stresses reach sufficiently high magnitudes to cause failures in the impact region at early times of the impact event.

  16. Strong intensity variations of laser feedback interferometer caused by atmospheric turbulence

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yiyi Sun(孙毅义); Zhiping Li(李治平)

    2003-01-01

    The significant variation of the laser output can be caused by feedback of a small part of laser beam, whichis reflected or backscattered by a target at a long distance from laser source, into the laser cavity. Thispaper describes and analyzes theoretically and experimentally the influence of atmospheric turbulence oninterference caused by laser feedback. The influence depends upon both the energy of feedback into thelaser cavity and the strength of turbulence over a laser propagation path in the atmosphere. In the caseof stronger energy of feedback and weak turbulence variance of fluctuation of the laser output can beenhanced by hundreds to thousands times. From our measurements and theoretical analysis it shows thatthese significant enhancements can result from the change of laser-cavity-modes which can be stimulatedsimultaneously and from beat oscillations between a variety of frequencies of laser modes. This also canresult from optical chaos inside the laser resonator because a non-separable distorted external cavity canbecome a prerequisite for optical chaos.

  17. Real gas flows with high velocities

    CERN Document Server

    Lunev, Vladimir V

    2009-01-01

    Gasdynamic Model and Equations Outline of the Gasdynamic Model Basic Equations and Postulates Equations of State Kinetic Theory Second Law of Thermodynamics Speed of Sound Integral Equations of Motion Kinematics of Fluid Media Differential Equations of Gasdynamics Rheological Model Initial and Boundary Conditions Similarity and Modeling in Gasdynamics Euler Equations Navier-Stokes Equations Turbulent Flows Viscous and Inviscid Flow Models Inviscid Gasdynamics Stream Function, Potential,

  18. Flow rate estimation using acoustic field distortions caused by turbulent flows: time-reversal approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmermann, A. L.; Pérez, N.; Adamowski, J. C.

    2011-05-01

    A new acoustic technique for flow rate estimation is proposed here. This technique is based on the traditional ultrasonic cross-correlation flow meter, but instead of using a continuous wave or pulse trains in each transmitter-receiver pair, the acoustic time-reversal technique is applied. The system relies on the principle that a turbulent flow with multiple vortices will cause random distortions in a given acoustic field; hence, analyzing this noise caused in the ultrasound signal by the turbulence over time allows a "signature" or "tag" of the flow to be defined. In other words, the vortices modify the frequency response function of the flowing system uniquely, since the distortion is assumed to be random. The use of the time-reversal procedure in the cross-correlation flow meter provides improvements in several aspects: it simplifies the signal processing needed after the reception of the signals, avoiding the use of a demodulator to obtain the signature of the vortex; the signal is focused at the position of the reception transducer and; the sensitivity is also increased because the wave travels twice in the acoustic channel. The method is theoretically discussed showing its limitations and improvements. Experimental results in a laboratory water tank are also presented.

  19. The origin of the high-velocity cloud complex C

    CERN Document Server

    Fraternali, F; Armillotta, L; Marinacci, F

    2014-01-01

    High-velocity clouds consist of cold gas that appears to be raining down from the halo to the disc of the Milky Way. Over the past fifty years, two competing scenarios have attributed their origin either to gas accretion from outside the Galaxy or to circulation of gas from the Galactic disc powered by supernova feedback (galactic fountain). Here we show that both mechanisms are simultaneously at work. We use a new galactic fountain model combined with high-resolution hydrodynamical simulations. We focus on the prototypical cloud complex C and show that it was produced by an explosion that occurred in the Cygnus-Outer spiral arm about 150 million years ago. The ejected material has triggered the condensation of a large portion of the circumgalactic medium and caused its subsequent accretion onto the disc. This fountain-driven cooling of the lower Galactic corona provides the low-metallicity gas required by chemical evolution models of the Milky Way's disc.

  20. Turbulent flow as a cause for underestimating coronary flow reserve measured by Doppler guide wire

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richartz Barbara M

    2006-03-01

    velocity below a critical Reynolds number of 500. Reaching a coronary flow velocity above the velocity of the critical Reynolds number may result in an underestimation of the CFVR caused by turbulent flow. This underestimation of the flow velocity may reach up to 22.5 % compared to the actual volumetric flow. Cardiologists should consider this phenomena in at least 20 % of patients when measuring CFVR for clinical decision making.

  1. 46 CFR 153.353 - High velocity vents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false High velocity vents. 153.353 Section 153.353 Shipping... Systems § 153.353 High velocity vents. The discharge point of a B/3 or 4m venting system must be located... velocity vent has been approved by Commandant (CG-522)....

  2. A HIGH VELOCITY FEED UNIT DRIVEN BY LINEAR MOTOR

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhang Bolin; Chen Yanji; Li Zhiying

    2000-01-01

    In order to realize high speed machining,the special requirements for feed transmission system of the CNC machine tool have to be satisfied.A high velocity feed unit driven by a induction linear motor is developed.The compositions of the high velocity CNC feed unit and main problems in the unit design are discussed.

  3. Cryogenic Testing of High-Velocity Spoke Cavities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hopper, Christopher S. [Old Dominion University; Delayen, Jean R. [Old Dominion University; Park, HyeKyoung [JLAB

    2014-12-01

    Spoke-loaded cavities are being investigated for the high-velocity regime. The relative compactness at low-frequency makes them attractive for applications requiring, or benefiting from, 4 K operation. Additionally, the large velocity acceptance makes them good candidates for the acceleration of high-velocity protons and ions. Here we present the results of cryogenic testing of a 325 MHz, β0= 0.82 single-spoke cavity and a 500 MHz, β0 = 1 double-spoke cavity.

  4. Low-level jets and above canopy drainage as causes for turbulent exchange in the nocturnal boundary layer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T.-S. El-Madany

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available SODAR (SOund Detection And Ranging, eddy-covariance, and tower profile measurements of wind speed and carbon dioxide were performed during 17 consecutive nights in complex terrain in northern Taiwan. The scope of the study was to identify the causes for intermittent turbulence events and to analyse their importance in nocturnal atmosphere–biosphere exchange as quantified with eddy-covariance measurements. If intermittency occurs frequently at a measurement site this process needs to be quantified in order to achieve reliable values for ecosystem characteristics such as net ecosystem exchange or net primary production. Fourteen events of intermittent turbulence were identified and classified into above canopy drainage flows (ACDF and low-level jets (LLJ according to the height of the wind speed maximum. Intermittent turbulence periods lasted between 30 min and 110 min. Towards the end of LLJ or ACDF events, positive vertical wind velocities and, in some cases upslope flows occurred, counteracting the general flow regime at night time. The observations suggest that the LLJ and ACDF penetrate deep into the cold air pool in the valley, where they experience strong buoyancy due to density differences, resulting in either upslope flows or upward vertical winds. Turbulence was found to be stronger and better developed during LLJs and ACDFs, with eddy-covariance data presenting higher quality. This was particularly indicated by spectral analysis and stationary tests. Significantly higher fluxes of sensible heat, latent heat and shear stress occurred during these periods. During LLJ and ACDF, fluxes of sensible heat, latent heat, and CO2 were mostly one-directional. For example, exclusively negative sensible heat fluxes occurred while intermittent turbulence was present. Latent heat fluxes were mostly positive during LLJ and ACDF with a median value of 34 W m−2, while outside these periods the median was 2 W m−2. In conclusion, intermittent

  5. Pierce Prize Lecture: High Velocity Clouds: Cosmological and Galactic Weather

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sembach, K.

    2001-12-01

    The Milky Way and its surrounding environs contain gas moving at high velocities with respect to the Sun. For the past half century, most of the information available for these high velocity clouds (HVCs) has come from H I 21cm surveys. Improvements in these surveys have recently led to the idea that some of the high velocity H I clouds may be located outside the Milky Way within the Local Group. Such a hypothesis is testable by various means, but the neutral gas content of the clouds tells only half of a much more complex story. In this talk I will present new information about the ionized gas within HVCs, their impact on the gaseous atmosphere of the Galaxy, and their relevance to the cosmic web of hot gas that may contain a significant fraction of the baryonic material in the low-redshift universe.

  6. High-Velocity Clouds Related to the Magellanic System

    OpenAIRE

    Putman, M. E.

    1999-01-01

    The results of the interaction between the Milky Way and the Magellanic Clouds are revealed through several high velocity complexes which are connected to the Clouds. The exact mechanism of their formation is under some debate, but they remain the only group of high-velocity clouds (HVCs) for which we have an origin and roughly a distance. Given that, the Magellanic HVCs can be used as a calibrator for other HVCs, while also providing an opportunity to closely investigate the remnants of an i...

  7. HIGH VELOCITY THERMAL GUN FOR SURFACE PREPARATION AND TREATMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I.A. Gorlach

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Many surface preparation and treatment processes utilise compressed air to propel particles against surfaces in order to clean and treat them. The effectiveness of the processes depends on the velocity of the particles, which in turn depends on the pressure of the compressed air. This paper describes a thermal gun built on the principles of High Velocity Air Fuel (HVAF and High Velocity Oxy Fuel (HVOF processes. The designed apparatus can be used for abrasive blasting, coating of surfaces, cutting of rocks, removing rubber from mining equipment, cleaning of contaminations etc.

  8. Superconducting spoke cavities for high-velocity applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hopper, Christopher S. [Old Dominion U.; Delayen, Jean R. [Old Dominion U., JLAB

    2013-10-01

    To date, superconducting spoke cavities have been designed, developed, and tested for particle velocities up to {beta}{sub 0}~0.6, but there is a growing interest in possible applications of multispoke cavities for high-velocity applications. We have explored the design parameter space for low-frequency, high-velocity, double-spoke superconducting cavities in order to determine how each design parameter affects the electromagnetic properties, in particular the surface electromagnetic fields and the shunt impedance. We present detailed design for cavities operating at 325 and 352 MHz and optimized for {beta}{sub 0}~=0.82 and 1.

  9. Certain optimal parameters of high-velocity Venturi ejection tubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stark, S. B.; Reznichenko, I. G.; Pavlenko, Y. P.

    1984-11-01

    The influence of the geometrical characteristics of centrifugal nozzles in high velocity Venturi ejection tubes for atomizing liquid in gas cleaning plant is analyzed. An optimal value of the nozzle geometrical characteristic, which is a function of the degree of filling of the nozzle outlet opening by the liquid, is given, at which the throat length is independent of water pressure before the nozzle.

  10. Distances to galactic high-velocity clouds : Complex C

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wakker, B. P.; York, D. G.; Howk, J. C.; Barentine, J. C.; Wilhelm, R.; Peletier, R. F.; van Woerden, H.; Beers, T. C.; Ivezic, Z.; Richter, P.; Schwarz, U. J.

    2007-01-01

    We report the first determination of a distance bracket for the high- velocity cloud (HVC) complex C. Combined with previous measurements showing that this cloud has a metallicity of 0.15 times solar, these results provide ample evidence that complex C traces the continuing accretion of intergalacti

  11. WESTERBORK OBSERVATIONS OF HIGH-VELOCITY CLOUDS - DISCUSSION

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    WAKKER, BP; SCHWARZ, UJ

    1991-01-01

    Six high-velocity cloud fields were observed with 1' and 1 km s-1 resolution, using the Westerbork Synthesis Radio Telescope. The structures seen in earlier observations at 10' resolution break up into a disorderly collection of concentrations. The presence of much substructure has important implica

  12. WESTERBORK OBSERVATIONS OF HIGH-VELOCITY CLOUDS - THE DATA

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    WAKKER, BP

    1991-01-01

    The results of Westerbork * observations of small-scale structure in high-velocity clouds (HVCs) at 1' angular and 1 km s-1 velocity resolution are presented in the form of a table of observational parameters, maps of hydrogen column density, velocity-right ascension cuts, and histograms of the line

  13. A data-driven method to characterize turbulence-caused uncertainty in wind power generation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Jie; Jain, Rishabh; Hodge, Bri-Mathias

    2016-10-01

    A data-driven methodology is developed to analyze how ambient and wake turbulence affect the power generation of wind turbine(s). Using supervisory control and data acquisition (SCADA) data from a wind plant, we select two sets of wind velocity and power data for turbines on the edge of the plant that resemble (i) an out-of-wake scenario and (ii) an in-wake scenario. For each set of data, two surrogate models are developed to represent the turbine(s) power generation as a function of (i) the wind speed and (ii) the wind speed and turbulence intensity. Three types of uncertainties in turbine(s) power generation are investigated: (i) the uncertainty in power generation with respect to the reported power curve; (ii) the uncertainty in power generation with respect to the estimated power response that accounts for only mean wind speed; and (iii) the uncertainty in power generation with respect to the estimated power response that accounts for both mean wind speed and turbulence intensity. Results show that (i) the turbine(s) generally produce more power under the in-wake scenario than under the out-of-wake scenario with the same wind speed; and (ii) there is relatively more uncertainty in the power generation under the in-wake scenario than under the out-of-wake scenario.

  14. Three-Dimensional Orientation of Compact High Velocity Clouds

    CERN Document Server

    Heitsch, F; Clark, S E; Peek, J E G; Cheng, D; Putman, M

    2016-01-01

    We present a proof-of-concept study of a method to estimate the inclination angle of compact high velocity clouds (CHVCs), i.e. the angle between a CHVC's trajectory and the line-of-sight. The inclination angle is derived from the CHVC's morphology and kinematics. We calibrate the method with numerical simulations, and we apply it to a sample of CHVCs drawn from HIPASS. Implications for CHVC distances are discussed.

  15. The feedback effect caused by bed load on a turbulent liquid flow

    CERN Document Server

    Franklin, Erick de Moraes; Rosa, Eugênio Spanó

    2016-01-01

    Experiments on the effects due solely to a mobile granular layer on a liquid flow are presented (feedback effect). Nonintrusive measurements were performed in a closed conduit channel of rectangular cross section where grains were transported as bed load by a turbulent water flow. The water velocity profiles were measured over fixed and mobile granular beds of same granulometry by Particle Image Velocimetry. The spatial resolution of the measurements allowed the experimental quantification of the feedback effect. The present findings are of importance for predicting the bed-load transport rate and the pressure drop in activities related to the conveyance of grains.

  16. The Collisions Of High-Velocity Clouds With A Magnetized Gaseous Galactic Disk

    CERN Document Server

    Santillan, A; Martos, M A; Kim, J; Santillan, Alfredo; Franco, Jose; Martos, Marco; Kim, Jongsoo

    1999-01-01

    We present two-dimensional MHD numerical simulations for the interaction of high-velocity clouds with both magnetic and non-magnetic Galactic thick gaseous disks. For the magnetic models, the initial magnetic field is oriented parallel to the disk, and we consider two different field topologies (with and without tension effects): parallel and perpendicular to the plane of motion of the clouds. The impinging clouds move in oblique trajectories and fall toward the central disk with different initial velocities. The $B$-field lines are distorted and compressed during the collision, increasing the field pressure and tension. This prevents the cloud material from penetrating into the disk, and can even transform a high-velocity inflow into an outflow, moving away from the disk. The perturbation creates a complex, turbulent, pattern of MHD waves that are able to traverse the disk of the Galaxy, and induce oscillations on both sides of the plane. Thus, the magnetic field efficiently transmits the perturbation over a...

  17. Pseudo-invariants causing inverse energy cascades in three-dimensional turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Rathmann, Nicholas M

    2016-01-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) turbulence is characterized by a dual forward cascade of both kinetic energy and helicity, a second inviscid flow invariant, from the integral scale of motion to the viscous dissipative scale. In helical flows, however, such as strongly rotating flows with broken mirror symmetry, an inverse energy cascade can be observed analogous to that of two-dimensional turbulence (2D) where a second positive-definite flow invariant, enstrophy, unlike helicity in 3D, effectively blocks the forward cascade of energy. In the spectral-helical decomposition of the Navier-Stokes equation it has previously been show that a subset of three-wave (triad) interactions conserve helicity in 3D in a fashion similar to enstrophy in 2D, thus leading to a 2D-like inverse energy cascade in 3D. In this work, we show both theoretically and numerically that an additional subset of interactions exist conserving a new pseudo-invariant in addition to energy and helicity, which contributes either to a forward or inverse en...

  18. A Unified Fluid Model for Low-latitude Ionosphere Turbulence Causes Radiowave Scintillations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassan, E.; Horton, W.

    2012-12-01

    Nonlinear dynamics of the low latitudes E-layer simulated with a systems of differential equations describing the neutral wind driven Farley-Buneman instability and the density-gradient-drift instability as rising bubbles and falling higher electron density spikes. The simulations extent earlier nonlinear studies by using empirical models for the atmosphere and ionosphere backgrounds to give realistic local time-altitude parameters within a Python wrapped F90 simulations. New equations that keep both the compressional and rotational ion flows that apply in the lower F layer are analyzed to describe plumes extending to the peak of the F layer. A ray-tracing technique is used to describe the small angle scattering at high frequency [Gigahertz] GNSS signals treated as rays in the turbulent ionospheric plasma.

  19. SPATIAL DISTRIBUTION OF THE HIGH-VELOCITY CLOUDS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. A. Olano

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available I developed a method to determine theoretical distances to the High-Velocity Clouds (HVCs, based on the idea that the HVCs were ejected from the Magellanic Clouds in a relatively short period of time as a consequence of the collision between the Large (LMC and Small Magellanic Clouds (SMC. The present spatial position of each HVCs was obtained by calculating its orbit with the initial condition that the each HVCs was simultaneously launched from the LMC at the time and position of the LMC-SMC encounter.

  20. Internal Ballistics of High Velocity Special Purpose Guns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. K. Gupta

    1976-07-01

    Full Text Available More and more conventional guns are being utilized as special purpose guns to achieve very high velocity by using unconventionally high C/W ratios. The existing methods of internal ballistics give satisfactory results only for low (less than one C/W ratios. In the present paper the basic internal ballistic equations have been modified to cater for non-linear rate of burning, cubical form function and a realistic pressure gradient between breech face and the projectile base. The equations have been numerically solved. The results for low and high C/W ratios have been compared with those obtained by using conventional methods.

  1. High Velocity Impact Response of Composite Lattice Core Sandwich Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Bing; Zhang, Guoqi; Wang, Shixun; Ma, Li; Wu, Linzhi

    2014-04-01

    In this research, carbon fiber reinforced polymer (CFRP) composite sandwich structures with pyramidal lattice core subjected to high velocity impact ranging from 180 to 2,000 m/s have been investigated by experimental and numerical methods. Experiments using a two-stage light gas gun are conducted to investigate the impact process and to validate the finite element (FE) model. The energy absorption efficiency (EAE) in carbon fiber composite sandwich panels is compared with that of 304 stainless-steel and aluminum alloy lattice core sandwich structures. In a specific impact energy range, energy absorption efficiency in carbon fiber composite sandwich panels is higher than that of 304 stainless-steel sandwich panels and aluminum alloy sandwich panels owing to the big density of metal materials. Therefore, in addition to the multi-functional applications, carbon fiber composite sandwich panels have a potential advantage to substitute the metal sandwich panels as high velocity impact resistance structures under a specific impact energy range.

  2. Resonant Orbits and the High Velocity Peaks Towards the Bulge

    CERN Document Server

    Molloy, Matthew; Evans, N Wyn; Shen, Juntai

    2015-01-01

    We extract the resonant orbits from an N-body bar that is a good representation of the Milky Way, using the method recently introduced by Molloy et al. (2015). By decomposing the bar into its constituent orbit families, we show that they are intimately connected to the boxy-peanut shape of the density. We highlight the imprint due solely to resonant orbits on the kinematic landscape towards the Galactic centre. The resonant orbits are shown to have distinct kinematic features and may be used to explain the cold velocity peak seen in the APOGEE commissioning data (Nidever et al. 2012). We show that high velocity peaks are a natural consequence of the motions of stars in the 2:1 orbit family. The locations of the peaks vary with bar angle and, with the tacit assumption that the observed peaks are due to the 2:1 family, we find that the locations of the high velocity peaks correspond to bar angles in the range 10 < theta_bar < 25 (deg). However, some important questions about the nature of the peaks remain...

  3. High-velocity molecular outflows hear massive young stellar objects

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴月芳; 李月兴; 杨传义; 雷成明; 孙金江; 吕静; 韩溥

    1999-01-01

    By mapping the 12CO J=1—0 lines in IRAS 05391-0217, 06114+1745 and 06291+0421, three new high-velocity bipolar molecular outflows are found. Parameters of these outflows are derived, which suggest that they are massive and energetic outflows with total kinetic energies of about 1038 J and mass loss rates about 10-5 M⊙/a. The driving sources are identified by analyzing the positions, intensities and color temperatures of the associated infrared sources. These outflows are most likely driven by single sources which correspond to massive young stellar objects. In these regions H2O masers have been detected located near the embedded infrared sources, which indicates that their exciting mechanism may be correlated with that of the CO outflows. The relationship between the parameters of outflows and central sources shows that high-velocity outflow and thermal radiation of a star are two basic correlated but different features in the evolution of young stars.

  4. Decision making in high-velocity environments: implications for healthcare.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stepanovich, P L; Uhrig, J D

    1999-01-01

    Healthcare can be considered a high-velocity environment and, as such, can benefit from research conducted in other industries regarding strategic decision making. Strategic planning is not only relevant to firms in high-velocity environments, but is also important for high performance and survival. Specifically, decision-making speed seems to be instrumental in differentiating between high and low performers; fast decision makers outperform slow decision makers. This article outlines the differences between fast and slow decision makers, identifies five paralyses that can slow decision making in healthcare, and outlines the role of a planning department in circumventing these paralyses. Executives can use the proposed planning structure to improve both the speed and quality of strategic decisions. The structure uses planning facilitators to avoid the following five paralyses: 1. Analysis. Decision makers can no longer afford the luxury of lengthy, detailed analysis but must develop real-time systems that provide appropriate, timely information. 2. Alternatives. Many alternatives (beyond the traditional two or three) need to be considered and the alternatives must be evaluated simultaneously. 3. Group Think. Decision makers must avoid limited mind-sets and autocratic leadership styles by seeking out independent, knowledgeable counselors. 4. Process. Decision makers need to resolve conflicts through "consensus with qualification," as opposed to waiting for everyone to come on board. 5. Separation. Successful implementation requires a structured process that cuts across disciplines and levels. PMID:10537497

  5. High Velocity Compact Clouds in the Sagittarius C Region

    CERN Document Server

    Tanaka, Kunihiko; Matsumura, Shinji; Nagai, Makoto; Kamegai, Kazuhisa

    2014-01-01

    We report the detection of extremely broad emission toward two molecular clumps in the Galactic central molecular zone. We have mapped the Sagittarius C complex ($-0^\\circ.61 < l < -0^\\circ.27$, $-0^\\circ.29 < b < 0^\\circ.04$) in the HCN $J$ = 4--3, $\\mathrm{^{13}CO}$ $J$ = 3--2, and $\\mathrm{H^{13}CN}$ $J$ = 1--0 lines with the ASTE 10 m and NRO 45 m telescopes, detecting bright emission with $80\\mbox{--}120$\\ $\\mathrm{km\\,s^{-1}}$ velocity width (in full-width at zero intensity) toward CO$-0.30$$-0.07$ and CO$-0.40$$-0.22$, which are high velocity compact clouds (HVCCs) identified with our previous CO $J$ = 3--2 survey. Our data reveal an interesting internal structure of CO$-0.30$$-0.07$ comprising a pair of high velocity lobes. The spatial-velocity structure of CO$-0.40$$-0.22$ can be also understood as multiple velocity component, or a velocity gradient across the cloud. They are both located on the rims of two molecular shells of about 10 pc in radius. Kinetic energies of CO$-0.30$$-0.07$ an...

  6. Solar wind collimation of the Jupiter high velocity dust streams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flandes, A.; Krueger, H.

    2006-12-01

    The dust bursts discovered by the Ulysses dust sensor when approaching Jupiter in 1992 were later confirmed as collimated streams of high velocity (~200 km/s) charged (~5V) dust grains escaping from Jupiter and dominated by the interplanetary Magnetic field (IMF). With Cassini, a similar phenomenon was observed in Saturn. It was demonstrated that the Jovian dust streams are closely related to the solar wind compressed regions, either Corotating interaction regions (CIRs) or Coronal mass ejections (CMEs) ¨Cto a minor extent-. Actually the dust streams seem ultimately to be generated by such events. This can be explained considering that dust grains are accelerated as they gain substantial energy while compressed at the forward and reverse shocks that bound or precede these solar wind regions.

  7. Resonant Orbits and the High Velocity Peaks toward the Bulge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molloy, Matthew; Smith, Martin C.; Evans, N. Wyn; Shen, Juntai

    2015-10-01

    We extract the resonant orbits from an N-body bar that is a good representation of the Milky Way, using the method recently introduced by Molloy et al. By decomposing the bar into its constituent orbit families, we show that they are intimately connected to the boxy-peanut shape of the density. We highlight the imprint due solely to resonant orbits on the kinematic landscape toward the Galactic center. The resonant orbits are shown to have distinct kinematic features and may be used to explain the cold velocity peak seen in the Apache Point Observatory Galactic Evolution Experiment commissioning data. We show that high velocity peaks are a natural consequence of the motions of stars in the 2:1 orbit family and that stars on other higher order resonances can contribute to the peaks. The locations of the peaks vary with bar angle and, with the tacit assumption that the observed peaks are due to the 2:1 family, we find that the locations of the high velocity peaks correspond to bar angles in the range {10}\\circ ≲ {θ }{bar}≲ 25^\\circ . However, some important questions about the nature of the peaks remain, such as their apparent absence in other surveys of the Bulge and the deviations from symmetry between equivalent fields in the north and south. We show that the absence of a peak in surveys at higher latitudes is likely due to the combination of a less prominent peak and a lower number density of bar supporting orbits at these latitudes.

  8. High velocity compact clouds in the sagittarius C region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report the detection of extremely broad emission toward two molecular clumps in the Galactic central molecular zone. We have mapped the Sagittarius C complex (–0.°61 < l < –0.°27, –0.°29 < b < 0.°04) in the HCN J = 4-3, 13CO J = 3-2, and H13CN J = 1-0 lines with the ASTE 10 m and NRO 45 m telescopes, detecting bright emission with 80-120 km s–1 velocity width (in full-width at zero intensity) toward CO–0.30–0.07 and CO–0.40–0.22, which are high velocity compact clouds (HVCCs) identified with our previous CO J = 3-2 survey. Our data reveal an interesting internal structure of CO–0.30–0.07 comprising a pair of high velocity lobes. The spatial-velocity structure of CO–0.40–0.22 can be also understood as a multiple velocity component, or a velocity gradient across the cloud. They are both located on the rims of two molecular shells of about 10 pc in radius. Kinetic energies of CO–0.30–0.07 and CO–0.40–0.22 are (0.8-2) × 1049 erg and (1-4) × 1049 erg, respectively. We propose several interpretations of their broad emission: collision between clouds associated with the shells, bipolar outflow, expansion driven by supernovae (SNe), and rotation around a dark massive object. These scenarios cannot be discriminated because of the insufficient angular resolution of our data, though the absence of a visible energy source associated with the HVCCs seems to favor the cloud-cloud collision scenario. Kinetic energies of the two molecular shells are 1 × 1051 erg and 0.7 × 1051 erg, which can be furnished by multiple SN or hypernova explosions in 2 × 105 yr. These shells are candidates of molecular superbubbles created after past active star formation.

  9. Intermediate- and High-Velocity Ionized Gas toward zeta Orionis

    CERN Document Server

    Welty, D E; Raymond, J C; Mallouris, C; York, D G

    2002-01-01

    We combine UV spectra obtained with the HST/GHRS echelle, IMAPS, and Copernicus to study the abundances and physical conditions in the predominantly ionized gas seen at high (-105 to -65 km/s) and intermediate velocities (-60 to -10 km/s) toward zeta Ori. We have high resolution (FWHM ~ 3.3-4.5 km/s) and/or high S/N spectra for at least two significant ions of C, N, Al, Si, S, and Fe -- enabling accurate estimates for both the total N(H II) and the elemental depletions. C, N, and S have essentially solar relative abundances; Al, Si, and Fe appear to be depleted by about 0.8, 0.3-0.4, and 0.95 dex, respectively. While various ion ratios would be consistent with collisional ionization equilibrium (CIE) for T ~ 25,000-80,000 K, the widths of individual high-velocity absorption components indicate that T ~ 9000 K -- so the gas is not in CIE. Analysis of the C II fine-structure excitation equilibrium yields estimated densities (n_e ~ n_H ~ 0.1-0.2 cm^{-3}), thermal pressures (2 n_H T ~ 2000-4000 cm^{-3}K), and thi...

  10. The HYPERMUCHFUSS Campaign -- an undiscovered high velocity population

    CERN Document Server

    Tillich, Alfred; Heber, Uli; Hirsch, Heiko; Maxted, Pierre; Gaensicke, Boris; Marsh, Tom; Napiwotzki, Ralf; Østensen, Roy; Copperwheat, Chris

    2009-01-01

    We present an overview and a status report of HYPERMUCHFUSS (HYPER velocity or Massive Unseen Companions of Hot Faint Underluminious Stars Survey) aiming at the detection of a population of high velocity subluminous B stars and white dwarfs. The first class of targets consists of hot subdwarf binaries with massive compact companions, which are expected to show huge radial velocity variations. The second class is formed by the recently discovered hyper-velocity stars, which are moving so fast that the dynamical ejection by a supermassive black hole seems to be the only explanation for their origin. Until now only one old hyper-velocity star has been found, but we expect a larger population. We applied an efficient selection technique for hot subdwarfs and white dwarfs with high galactic restframe velocities from the \\emph{SDSS} spectral data base, which serve as first epoch observations for our campaign with the ESO VLT and NTT in Chile, the 3.5 m telescope at DSAZ observatory (Calar Alto) in Spain and the WHT...

  11. Improvement of a High Velocity Compaction Technique for Iron Powder

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Dil Faraz KHAN; Haiqing YIN; Zahid USMAN; Matiullah KHAN; Xianjie YUAN; Wenhao WANG; Xuanhui QU

    2013-01-01

    Water atomized pure iron powder was compacted by high velocity compaction (HVC) with and without upper relaxation assist (URA) device.The influence of URA device on green density,spring back,green strength and hardness was studied.Morphological characteristics of the samples were observed by scanning electron microscope (SEM).Green strength of the samples was measured by computer controlled universal testing machine.The results show that as stroke length increases,the green density,green strength and hardness of the compacts increase gradually.At the identical stroke length,the green density of the compacts pressed with URA devise was 2% higher than the compacts pressed without URA device.The green strength and hardness of the compacts pressed with URA device were higher than the compacts pressed without URA device.Furthermore,the radial spring back of the compacts decreased gradually with the increment in stroke length,whilst that of compacts prepared with URA device was lower.

  12. Ionized Gas in the Smith High Velocity Cloud

    CERN Document Server

    Hill, Alex S; Benjamin, Robert A; Lockman, Felix J; McClure-Griffiths, Naomi M

    2013-01-01

    We report the first detection of magnetic fields associated with the Smith High Velocity Cloud. We use a catalog of Faraday rotation measures towards extragalactic radio sources behind the Smith Cloud, new HI observations from the Green Bank Telescope, and a spectroscopic map of H{\\alpha} from the Wisconsin H-Alpha Mapper Northern Sky Survey. There are enhancements in rotation measure of approximately 100 rad m^(-2) which are generally well correlated with decelerated H{\\alpha} emission. We estimate a lower limit on the line-of-sight component of the field of approximately 8 {\\mu}G along a decelerated filament; this is a lower limit due to our assumptions about the geometry. No RM excess is evident in sightlines dominated by HI or H{\\alpha} at the velocity of the Smith Cloud. The smooth H{\\alpha} morphology of the emission at the Smith Cloud velocity suggests photoionization by the Galactic ionizing radiation field as the dominant ionization mechanism, while the filamentary morphology and high (approximately ...

  13. Low and high velocity clouds produced by young stellar clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Rodríguez-Gónzalez, A; Canto, J

    2009-01-01

    Intermediate and high velocity HI clouds rain onto the plane of our Galaxy. They are observed at heights of between 500 and 1500 pc, falling onto the Galactic plane at velocities from 50 to 140 km s$^{-1}$. To explain the origin of these clouds, we present a galactic fountain model, driven by the wind from a super stellar cluster (SSC). We solve the equations for a steady, radiative de Laval nozzle flow. We consider two effects not considered previously in astrophysical nozzle flow models: cooling functions for different metallicities, and the direct action of the galactic gravitational field on the gas flowing along the nozzle. For an adiabatic nozzle flow, the gravity acting directly on the gas within the nozzle "stalls" the nozzle flow for initial wind velocities lower than the escape velocity from the Galaxy. For the same wind velocity, a radiative nozzle flow stalls at lower altitudes above the galactic plane. We find that SSC winds with velocities of $v_w=500 - 800$ km s$^{-1}$ produce nozzles stall at ...

  14. Configuration optimization of high velocity arc spraying gun

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Yong-xiong; ZHU Zi-xin; LIU Yan; XU Bin-shi

    2004-01-01

    In order to improve the in-flight characteristics of the atomizing droplets during high velocity wire arc spraying (HVAS), some changes have been operated on the original design of the HVAS gun configuration. A comparative study was carried out to investigate the microstructure and properties of the coatings produced by the original design spraying gun and the modified one, using 3Cr13 wires of 3 mm in diameter. The characteristics of their jets were examined during spraying. The results indicate that, the included angle between the two wires and the distance from the nozzle to the meeting point of the two vires may have a strong influence on the characteristics of the in-flight droplets and then the coatings. The jet divergence is found to be lower than that of the original one (about 12° against 25°). By modified gun, the adhesion strength, the microhardness and porosity of the coating deposited by modified gun are increased by 39% and 9% respectively. And the porosity of the coatings is decreased by 57%.

  15. Energy loss of heavy ions at high velocity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The slowing down of heavy ions by electronic stopping at high velocity is discussed. The ions are nearly fully stripped and have a well defined charge with relatively small fluctuations. Owing to the large charge of the ions, the classical Bohr formula applies instead of the Bethe formula, which is based on a quantum perturbation calculation. It is essential to include the Barkas effect in the description since it becomes quite large for heavy ions, especially in high-Z materials. In Lindhard's treatment the Barkas correction is viewed as an effect of dynamic screening of the ion potential in the initial phase of a collision with an electron, which reduces the relative velocity and therefore enhances the cross section. With inclusion of this enhancement factor for all impact parameters, as evaluated by Jackson and McCarthy for distant collisions, the description reproduces within a few percent measurements for ∼ 15 MeV/u Br on Si, Ni, and Au and for 10 MeV/u Kr on Al, Ni, and Au. The procedure is shown also to apply at lower velocities near the stopping maximum, albeit with less accuracy. The straggling in energy loss has been analyzed for a measurement on Si and it is well described by a combination of about equal contributions from fluctuations in the number of violent collisions with single electrons (Bohr straggling) and from fluctuations in ion charge state. (orig.)

  16. Experimental and numerical studies of high-velocity impact fragmentation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kipp, M.E.; Grady, D.E.; Swegle, J.W.

    1993-08-01

    Developments are reported in both experimental and numerical capabilities for characterizing the debris spray produced in penetration events. We have performed a series of high-velocity experiments specifically designed to examine the fragmentation of the projectile during impact. High-strength, well-characterized steel spheres (6.35 mm diameter) were launched with a two-stage light-gas gun to velocities in the range of 3 to 5 km/s. Normal impact with PMMA plates, thicknesses of 0.6 to 11 mm, applied impulsive loads of various amplitudes and durations to the steel sphere. Multiple flash radiography diagnostics and recovery techniques were used to assess size, velocity, trajectory and statistics of the impact-induced fragment debris. Damage modes to the primary target plate (plastic) and to a secondary target plate (aluminum) were also evaluated. Dynamic fragmentation theories, based on energy-balance principles, were used to evaluate local material deformation and fracture state information from CTH, a three-dimensional Eulerian solid dynamics shock wave propagation code. The local fragment characterization of the material defines a weighted fragment size distribution, and the sum of these distributions provides a composite particle size distribution for the steel sphere. The calculated axial and radial velocity changes agree well with experimental data, and the calculated fragment sizes are in qualitative agreement with the radiographic data. A secondary effort involved the experimental and computational analyses of normal and oblique copper ball impacts on steel target plates. High-resolution radiography and witness plate diagnostics provided impact motion and statistical fragment size data. CTH simulations were performed to test computational models and numerical methods.

  17. Fault gouge rheology under confined, high-velocity conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reches, Z.; Madden, A. S.; Chen, X.

    2012-12-01

    We recently developed the experimental capability to investigate the shear properties of fine-grain gouge under confined conditions and high-velocity. The experimental system includes a rotary apparatus that can apply large displacements of tens of meters, slip velocity of 0.001- 2.0 m/s, and normal stress of 35 MPa (Reches and Lockner, 2010). The key new component is a Confined ROtary Cell (CROC) that can shear a gouge layer either dry or under pore-pressure. The pore pressure is controlled by two syringe pumps. CROC includes a ring-shape gouge chamber of 62.5 mm inner diameter, 81.25 mm outer diameter, and up to 3 mm thick gouge sample. The lower, rotating part of CROC contains the sample chamber, and the upper, stationary part includes the loading, hollow cylinder and setting for temperature, and dilation measurements, and pore-pressure control. Each side of the gouge chamber has two pairs of industrial, spring-energized, self-lubricating, teflon-graphite seals, built for particle media and can work at temperature up to 250 ded C. The space between each of the two sets of seals is pressurized by nitrogen. This design generates 'zero-differential pressure' on the inner seal (which is in contact with the gouge powder), and prevents gouge leaks. For the preliminary dry experiments, we used ~2.0 mm thick layers of room-dry kaolinite powder. Total displacements were on the order of meters and normal stress up to 4 MPa. The initial shear was accommodated by multiple internal slip surfaces within the kaolinite layer accommodated as oriented Riedel shear structures. Later, the shear was localized within a thin, plate-parallel Y-surface. The kaolinite layer was compacted at a quasi-asymptotic rate, and displayed a steady-state friction coefficient of ~ 0.5 with no clear dependence on slip velocity up to 0.15 m/s. Further experiments with loose quartz sand (grain size ~ 125 micron) included both dry runs and pore-pressure (distilled water) controlled runs. The sand was

  18. Friction and Wear of Carbonate Rocks Under High Velocity Sliding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boneh, Y.; Sagy, A.; Reches, Z.

    2012-12-01

    We experimentally investigated the relations between friction and wear-rate during steady-state, high-velocity slip along carbonate faults. Our observations demonstrate a systematic reduction of both friction coefficient and wear-rate with increase of both slip-velocity and normal stress. The experiments were conducted with a rotary shear apparatus on solid, ring-shaped rock samples that slipped for displacements up to tens of meters, with continuous monitoring of stresses, wear and temperature. We performed 107 experiments on experimental faults made of Kasota dolomite, Dover limestone and a fault made of rock-pair Kasota dolomite and Blue quartzite. The friction/wear analysis is focused on the steady-state stage under slip velocity range of 0.002 to 0.96 m/s, and normal stress from 0.25 to 6.9 MPa. The experiments reveal a combined effect of slip-velocity and normal stress on the wear-rate. Under relatively low velocities (V wear-rate is proportional to the normal stress, in agreement with Archard (1953) model. On the other hand, in the higher velocity range of V ~ 0.5 - 1 m/s, the wear-rate is not proportional to the normal stress and it reduces with increasing slip-velocity. Further, the velocity effect on the wear-rate becomes stronger with increasing normal stress approaching negligible wear production. The experiments indicate that the steady-state frictional strength of these carbonate samples is best correlated with the power-density (= shear stress * slip-velocity, MW/m2). The observed friction/power-density relation show three regimes: (1) high (μ ~ 0.9), quasi-constant friction coefficient under low power-density of 0.4 MW/m2; and (3) transition zone of friction coefficient dropping from ~ 0.9 to ~ 0.3 for intermediated power density ranging 0.05 - 0.4 MW/m2. During experiments with high power-density, the carbonate fault surface underwent thermal decomposition of the carbonate (Han et al., 2007; Green et al., 2010) that generate a smooth, shiny

  19. High-Velocity H I Gas in Supernova Remnants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koo, Bon-Chul

    1993-05-01

    Using the Hat Creek 85 foot telescope, we had carried out a survey of H I 21 cm emission lines toward all 103 known northern supernova remnants (SNRs) in order to find rapidly expanding SNR shells (Koo & Heiles 1991). We detected 15 SNRs that have associated high-velocity (HV) H I gas, most of which are quite likely the gas accelerated by the SN blast wave. Although the large beam-size (FWHM~ 30') of the 85 foot telescope prevented us to see the structure of the HV H I gas, the H I mass distribution in line-of-sight velocity suggested clumpy shell structures in several SNRs. In order to resolve the structure of the HV H I gas, we have been carrying out high-resolution H I 21 cm line observations using the Arecibo telescope and the VLA. We report preliminary results on two SNRs, CTB 80 and W51. In CTB 80, the VLA observations revealed fast moving H I clumps, which have a dense (n_H ~ 100 cm(-3) ) core surrounded by a relatively diffuse envelope. The clumps are small, 3 pc to 5 pc, and have velocities between +40 km s(-1) and +80 km s(-1) with respect to the systematic velocity of CTB 80. The clumps have relatively large momentum per unit volume, which implies that they have been swept-up at an early stage of the SNR evolution. By analyzing the Arecibo data, we found that the interstellar medium around CTB 80 is far from being uniform and homogeneous, which explains the peculiar morphology of CTB 80 in infrared and radio continuum. In W51, HV H I gas moving up to v_LSR>+150 km s(-1) has been detected. The H I distribution is elongated along the northwest-southeast direction, and the peak is very close to an X-ray bright region. We discuss the implications of our results in relation to the X-ray and the radio continuum morphology of W51. This work was supported in part by NON DIRECTED RESEARCH FUND, Korea Research Foundation, 1992.

  20. Simulation of High Velocity Impact on Composite Structures - Model Implementation and Validation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schueler, Dominik; Toso-Pentecôte, Nathalie; Voggenreiter, Heinz

    2016-08-01

    High velocity impact on composite aircraft structures leads to the formation of flexural waves that can cause severe damage to the structure. Damage and failure can occur within the plies and/or in the resin rich interface layers between adjacent plies. In the present paper a modelling methodology is documented that captures intra- and inter-laminar damage and their interrelations by use of shell element layers representing sub-laminates that are connected with cohesive interface layers to simulate delamination. This approach allows the simulation of large structures while still capturing the governing damage mechanisms and their interactions. The paper describes numerical algorithms for the implementation of a Ladevèze continuum damage model for the ply and methods to derive input parameters for the cohesive zone model. By comparison with experimental results from gas gun impact tests the potential and limitations of the modelling approach are discussed.

  1. Analysis of the flux and polarization spectra of the type Ia supernova SN 2001el: Exploring the geometry of the high-velocity Ejecta

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kasen, Daniel; Nugent, Peter; Wang, Lifan; Howell, D.A.; Wheeler, J. Craig; Hoeflich, Peter; Baade, Dietrich; Baron, E.; Hauschildt, P.H.

    2003-01-15

    SN 2001el is the first normal Type Ia supernova to show a strong, intrinsic polarization signal. In addition, during the epochs prior to maximum light, the CaII IR triplet absorption is seen distinctly and separately at both normal photospheric velocities and at very high velocities. The unusual, high-velocity triplet absorption is highly polarized, with a different polarization angle than the rest of the spectrum. The unique observation allows us to construct a relatively detailed picture of the layered geometrical structure of the supernova ejecta: in our interpretation, the ejecta layers near the photosphere (v approximately 10,000 km/s) obey a near axial symmetry, while a detached, high-velocity structure (v approximately 18,000-25,000 $ km/s) of CaII line opacity deviates from the photospheric axisymmetry. By partially obscuring the underlying photosphere, the high-velocity structure causes a more incomplete cancellation of the polarization of the photospheric light, and so gives rise to the polarization peak of the high-velocity IR triplet feature. In an effort to constrain the ejecta geometry, we develop a technique for calculating 3-D synthetic polarization spectra and use it to generate polarization profiles for several parameterized configurations. In particular, we examine the case where the inner ejecta layers are ellipsoidal and the outer, high-velocity structure is one of four possibilities: a spherical shell, an ellipsoidal shell, a clumped shell, or a toroid. The synthetic spectra rule out the clearly discriminated if observations are obtained from several different lines of sight. Thus, assuming the high velocity structure observed for SN 2001el is a consistent feature of at least known subset of type Ia supernovae, future observations and analyses such as these may allow one to put strong constraints on the ejecta geometry and hence on supernova progenitors and explosion mechanisms.

  2. Dynamic Strengthening During High Velocity Shear Experiments with Siliceous Rocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Z.; Chang, J. C.; Boneh, Y.; Chen, X.; Reches, Z.

    2011-12-01

    -weakening fault in a perfect elastic medium is on the order of 30 m/s, and this velocity drops by a factor of ~4 if the host medium is elastic-plastic. He further showed that velocity drop may also occur if the fault strength is velocity-toughening due to the additional energy loss. We suggest that a fault segment that is composed of siliceous rocks may undergo velocity strengthening when the local slip velocity exceeds the critical strengthening velocity of the local lithology (0.008-0.16 m/s), and suppress further acceleration. Such lithological dependency of the strength-velocity relations is expected to cause frequent, intense variations of slip velocity during earthquakes.

  3. Aviation turbulence processes, detection, prediction

    CERN Document Server

    Lane, Todd

    2016-01-01

    Anyone who has experienced turbulence in flight knows that it is usually not pleasant, and may wonder why this is so difficult to avoid. The book includes papers by various aviation turbulence researchers and provides background into the nature and causes of atmospheric turbulence that affect aircraft motion, and contains surveys of the latest techniques for remote and in situ sensing and forecasting of the turbulence phenomenon. It provides updates on the state-of-the-art research since earlier studies in the 1960s on clear-air turbulence, explains recent new understanding into turbulence generation by thunderstorms, and summarizes future challenges in turbulence prediction and avoidance.

  4. Turbulent thermal diffusion in strongly stratified turbulence: theory and experiments

    CERN Document Server

    Amir, G; Eidelman, A; Elperin, T; Kleeorin, N; Rogachevskii, I

    2016-01-01

    Turbulent thermal diffusion is a combined effect of the temperature stratified turbulence and inertia of small particles. It causes the appearance of a non-diffusive turbulent flux of particles in the direction of the turbulent heat flux. This non-diffusive turbulent flux of particles is proportional to the product of the mean particle number density and the effective velocity of inertial particles. The theory of this effect has been previously developed only for small temperature gradients and small Stokes numbers (Phys. Rev. Lett. {\\bf 76}, 224, 1996). In this study a generalized theory of turbulent thermal diffusion for arbitrary temperature gradients and Stokes numbers has been developed. The laboratory experiments in the oscillating grid turbulence and in the multi-fan produced turbulence have been performed to validate the theory of turbulent thermal diffusion in strongly stratified turbulent flows. It has been shown that the ratio of the effective velocity of inertial particles to the characteristic ve...

  5. Evaluation of fish-injury mechanisms during exposure to a high-velocity jet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guensch, Gregory R. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Mueller, Robert P. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); McKinstry, Craig A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Dauble, Dennis D. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2002-11-01

    As part of the research supported by U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Advanced Hydropower Turbine System (AHTS) Program, the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) conducted a study where age-0 and age-1 Chinook salmon, as well as several other types of fish, were released into a submerged water jet to quantify injuries caused by shear stresses and turbulence (Neitzel et al. 2000). The fish releases were videotaped. These videotape records were digitized and analyzed using new methods to identify the injury mechanisms and the stresses involved. Visible external injuries sustained by fish in this study generally occurred during the initial contact with the jet and not during the tumbling that occurred after the fish fully entered the turbulent flow. The inertial stresses of tumbling, however, may cause temporary or even permanent vestibular and neurological injuries. Such injuries can result in disorientation and loss of equilibrium, which are life threatening in the “natural” environment. Operculum injuries predominated at moderate water jet speeds (12 and 15 m/s). At the highest speed, eye, operculum, isthmus, and gill injuries were equally common, and disorientation was most common. Bruising and descaling were relatively rare, especially for age-0 fish. Age-0 fish were less susceptible than the larger age-1 fish to all visible injury types, especially at lower speeds.

  6. The cause of oscillations of the large-scale circulation of turbulent Rayleigh-B{\\'e}nard convection

    CERN Document Server

    Brown, Eric

    2009-01-01

    In agreement with a recent experimental discovery by Xia et. al. (2009), we also find a sloshing mode in experiments on the large-scale circulation (LSC) of turbulent Rayleigh-Benard convection in a cylindrical sample of aspect ratio one. The sloshing mode has the same frequency as the torsional oscillation discovered by Funfschilling and Ahlers (2004). We show that both modes can be described by an extension of a model developed previously [Brown and Ahlers (2008)] which consists of permitting a lateral displacement of the LSC circulation plane away from the vertical center line of the sample as well as a variation in displacements with height (such displacements had been excluded in the original model). Pressure gradients produced by the side wall of the container on average center the plane of the LSC so that it prefers to reach its longest diameter. If the LSC is displaced away from this diameter, the walls provide a restoring force. Turbulent fluctuations drive the LSC away from the central alignment, an...

  7. Histologic Analysis of Pig Muscle Tissue after Wounding with a High-Velocity Projectile - Preliminary Report

    OpenAIRE

    Korać, Želimir; Crnica, Suad; Demarin, Vida

    2006-01-01

    Terminal ballistics of high-velocity projectiles is focused primarily on evaluation of the effects of penetrating projectiles on tissue simulants, but there is always a question of their similarity with live tissue. Ethical problems related to using live animals in terminal ballistic researches have resulted in a reduced number of these experiments. The aim of this study was to analyze histologic effects of high-velocity missiles in swine muscle tissue. The hypothesis was that a penetrating p...

  8. Removal of interproximal dental biofilms by high-velocity water microdrops.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rmaile, A; Carugo, D; Capretto, L; Aspiras, M; De Jager, M; Ward, M; Stoodley, P

    2014-01-01

    The influence of the impact of a high-velocity water microdrop on the detachment of Streptococcus mutans UA159 biofilms from the interproximal (IP) space of teeth in a training typodont was studied experimentally and computationally. Twelve-day-old S. mutans biofilms in the IP space were exposed to a prototype AirFloss delivering 115 µL water at a maximum exit velocity of 60 m/sec in a 30-msec burst. Using confocal microscopy and image analysis, we obtained quantitative measurements of the percentage removal of biofilms from different locations in the IP space. The 3D geometry of the typodont and the IP spaces was obtained by micro-computed tomography (µ-CT) imaging. We performed computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations to calculate the wall shear stress (τw ) distribution caused by the drops on the tooth surface. A qualitative agreement and a quantitative relationship between experiments and simulations were achieved. The wall shear stress (τw ) generated by the prototype AirFloss and its spatial distribution on the teeth surface played a key role in dictating the efficacy of biofilm removal in the IP space.

  9. Numerical study and modeling of turbulence modulation in a sheet flow burdened with particulates; Etude numerique et modelisation de la modulation de la turbulence dans un ecoulement de nappe chargee en particules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vermorel, O.

    2003-11-15

    This work is devoted to the numerical and theoretical study of turbulence modulation by particles using direct numerical simulation for the continuous phase coupled with a Lagrangian prediction of trajectories of discrete particles. The configuration corresponds to a slab of particles injected at high velocity into an isotropic decaying turbulence. The motion of a particle is supposed to be governed only by the drag force. The particle mass loading is large so that momentum exchange between particles and fluid results in a significant modulation of the turbulence. Collisions are neglected. The momentum transfer between particles and gas causes a strong acceleration of the gas in the slab. In the periphery of the slab, the turbulence is enhanced due to the production by the mean gas velocity gradients. The analysis of the interphase transfer terms in the gas turbulent kinetic energy equation shows that the direct effect of the particles is to damp the turbulence in the core of the slab but to enhance it in the periphery. This last effect is due to a strong correlation between the particle distribution and the instantaneous gas velocity. Another issue concerns the k-{epsilon} model and the validity of its closure assumptions in two phase flows. A new eddy viscosity expression, function of particle parameters, is used to model the Reynolds stress tensor. The modelling of the gas turbulent dissipation rate is questioned. A two-phase Langevin equation is also tested to model drift velocity and fluid-particles velocity covariance equations. (author)

  10. Triggering filamentation using turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Eeltink, D; Marchiando, N; Hermelin, S; Gateau, J; Brunetti, M; Wolf, J P; Kasparian, J

    2016-01-01

    We study the triggering of single filaments due to turbulence in the beam path for a laser of power below the filamenting threshold. Turbulence can act as a switch between the beam not filamenting and producing single filaments. This 'positive' effect of turbulence on the filament probability, combined with our observation of off-axis filaments suggests the underlying mechanism is modulation instability caused by transverse perturbations. We hereby experimentally explore the interaction of modulation instability and turbulence, commonly associated with multiple-filaments, in the single-filament regime.

  11. One-dimensional turbulence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kerstein, A.R. [Sandia National Lab., Livermore, CA (United States)

    1996-12-31

    One-Dimensional Turbulence is a new turbulence modeling strategy involving an unsteady simulation implemented in one spatial dimension. In one dimension, fine scale viscous and molecular-diffusive processes can be resolved affordably in simulations at high turbulence intensity. The mechanistic distinction between advective and molecular processes is thereby preserved, in contrast to turbulence models presently employed. A stochastic process consisting of mapping {open_quote}events{close_quote} applied to a one-dimensional velocity profile represents turbulent advection. The local event rate for given eddy size is proportional to the velocity difference across the eddy. These properties cause an imposed shear to induce an eddy cascade analogous in many respects to the eddy cascade in turbulent flow. Many scaling and fluctuation properties of self-preserving flows, and of passive scalars introduced into these flows, are reproduced.

  12. Turbulence generation by waves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaftori, D.; Nan, X.S.; Banerjee, S. [Univ. of California, Santa Barbara, CA (United States)

    1995-12-31

    The interaction between two-dimensional mechanically generated waves, and a turbulent stream was investigated experimentally in a horizontal channel, using a 3-D LDA synchronized with a surface position measuring device and a micro-bubble tracers flow visualization with high speed video. Results show that although the wave induced orbital motion reached all the way to the wall, the characteristics of the turbulence wall structures and the turbulence intensity close to the wall were not altered. Nor was the streaky nature of the wall layer. On the other hand, the mean velocity profile became more uniform and the mean friction velocity was increased. Close to the free surface, the turbulence intensity was substantially increased as well. Even in predominantly laminar flows, the introduction of 2-D waves causes three dimensional turbulence. The turbulence enhancement is found to be proportional to the wave strength.

  13. Star Clusters and Super Massive Black Holes: High Velocity Stars Production

    CERN Document Server

    Fragione, Giacomo

    2016-01-01

    One possible origin of high velocity stars in the Galaxy is that they are the product of the interaction of binary systems and supermassive black holes. We investigate a new production channel of high velocity stars as due to the close interaction between a star cluster and supermassive black holes in galactic centres. The high velocity acquired by some stars of the cluster comes from combined effect of extraction of their gravitational binding energy and from the slingshot due to the interaction with the black holes. Stars could reach a velocity sufficient to travel in the halo and even overcome the galactic potential well, while some of them are just stripped from the cluster and start orbiting around the galactic centre.

  14. SONIC SPEED AND SHOCK WAVE IN HIGH VELOCITY AERATED FLOWS FROM HIGH HEAD DISCHARGE STRUCTURES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Dong Zhi-yong

    2003-01-01

    The compressible characteristics in aerated flows at the high velocity of about 50m/s were analyzed. Based on the theory of compressible the relations between the sonic speed and shock wave in high-velocity aerated flow were theoretically deduced. And comparisons with measured data were made. The theoretical and experimental results show the sonic speed in aerated flow is merely of the order of several-dozen meters per second, and its minimum value is only 20m/s, which is far much less than that in water or air alone. So high subsonic flow, supersonic flow and transonic flow as well as compression wave, shock wave and expansion wave similarly to aerodnamics may be produced in high velocity aerated flow at the speed of the order of 50m/s. Hence the influences of these compressible characteristics on high head discharge structures can not be neglected, especially on super high dams over 200m high.

  15. Theoretical Research Progress in High-Velocity/Hypervelocity Impact on Semi-Infinite Targets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yunhou Sun

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available With the hypervelocity kinetic weapon and hypersonic cruise missiles research projects being carried out, the damage mechanism for high-velocity/hypervelocity projectile impact on semi-infinite targets has become the research keystone in impact dynamics. Theoretical research progress in high-velocity/hypervelocity impact on semi-infinite targets was reviewed in this paper. The evaluation methods for critical velocity of high-velocity and hypervelocity impact were summarized. The crater shape, crater scaling laws and empirical formulae, and simplified analysis models of crater parameters for spherical projectiles impact on semi-infinite targets were reviewed, so were the long rod penetration state differentiation, penetration depth calculation models for the semifluid, and deformed long rod projectiles. Finally, some research proposals were given for further study.

  16. Accurate Solution of Navigation Equations in GPS Receivers for Very High Velocities Using Pseudorange Measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Rahemi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available GPS is a satellite-based navigation system that is able to determine the exact position of objects on the Earth, sky, or space. By increasing the velocity of a moving object, the accuracy of positioning decreases; meanwhile, the calculation of the exact position in the movement by high velocities like airplane movement or very high velocities like satellite movement is so important. In this paper, seven methods for solving navigation equations in very high velocities using least squares method and its combination with the variance estimation methods for weighting observations based on their qualities are studied. Simulations on different data with different velocities from 100 m/s to 7000 m/s show that proposed method can improve the accuracy of positioning more than 50%.

  17. Petrophysical models of high velocity lower crust on the South Atlantic rifted margins: whence the asymmetry?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trumbull, Robert B.; Franke, Dieter; Bauer, Klaus; Sobolev, Stephan V.

    2015-04-01

    Lower crustal bodies with high seismic velocity (Vp > 7km/s) underlie seaward-dipping reflector wedges on both margins of the South Atlantic, as on many other volcanic rifted margins worldwide. A comprehensive geophysical study of the South Atlantic margins by Becker et al. (Solid Earth, 5: 1011-1026, 2014) showed a strong asymmetry in the development of high-velocity lower crust (HVLC), with about 4 times larger volumes of HVLC on the African margin. That study also found interesting variations in the vertical position of HVLC relative to seaward-dipping reflectors which question a simple intrusive vs. extrusive relationship between these lower- and upper crustal features. The asymmetry of HVLC volumes on the conjugate margins is paradoxically exactly the opposite to that of surface lavas in the Paraná-Etendeka flood basalt province, which are much more voluminous on the South American margin. This contribution highlights the asymmetric features of magma distribution on the South Atlantic margins and explores their geodynamic significance. Petrophysical models of the HVLC are presented in the context of mantle melt generation, based on thickness-velocity (H-Vp) relations. These suggest that the greater volumes and average Vp values of HVLC on the African margin are due to active upwelling and high temperature, whereas passive upwelling under a thick lithospheric lid suppressed magma generation on the South American margin. The contrast in mantle upwelling rate and lithospheric thickness on the two margins predictably causes differential uplift, and this may help explain the greater accomodation space for surface lavas on the South American side although melt generation was strongest under the African margin.

  18. An overview of turbulence compensation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schutte, K.; Eekeren, A.W.M. van; Dijk, J.; Schwering, P.B.W.; Iersel, M. van; Doelman, N.J.

    2012-01-01

    In general, long range visual detection, recognition and identification are hampered by turbulence caused by atmospheric conditions. Much research has been devoted to the field of turbulence compensation. One of the main advantages of turbulence compensation is that it enables visual identification

  19. High-Velocity H2O Masers Associated Massive Star Formation Regions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐烨; 蒋栋荣; 郑兴武; 顾敏峰; 俞志尧; 裴春传

    2001-01-01

    We report on the results of 12 CO (1-0) emission associated with H2O masers and massive star formation regions to identify high-velocity H2O masers. Several masers have a large blueshift, even up to 120 km.s-1, with respect to the CO peak, but no large redshifted maser appears. This result suggests that high-velocity H2O masers can most probably occur in high mass star-forming regions and quite a number of masers stem from the amplifications of a background source, which may enable those undetectable weak masers to come to an observable level.

  20. Severe lung contusion and death after high-velocity behind-armor blunt trauma: relation to protection level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gryth, Dan; Rocksén, David; Persson, Jonas K E; Arborelius, Ulf P; Drobin, Dan; Bursell, Jenny; Olsson, Lars-Gunnar; Kjellström, Thomas B

    2007-10-01

    The most-used safety recommendation for protective vests is that the impact should not cause more than a 44-mm impression in plasticine. The aim of this study was to investigate whether this criterion was sufficient if the vest was exposed to a high-velocity projectile. We tested the hypothesis with pigs divided into a 40-mm group (n = 10) and a 34-mm group (n = 8) protected by a vest allowing a 40-mm or 34-mm impression in plasticine, respectively. Five (50%) of 10 animals in the 40-mm group and 2 (25%) of 8 in the 34-mm group died due to the trauma. We observed severe lung hematoma, impaired circulation, desaturation, and electroencephalogram changes. These effects were more aggravated in the 40-mm group compared to the 34-mm group. Based on our results, the overall judgment is that the safety criterion of 44-mm impression is insufficient when a vest is exposed to a high-velocity projectile. PMID:17985777

  1. DISTRIBUTION AND ORIGIN OF HIGH-VELOCITY CLOUDS .3. CLOUDS, COMPLEXES AND POPULATIONS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    WAKKER, BP; VANWOERDEN, H

    1991-01-01

    We present the first complete catalogue of high-velocity clouds (HVCs), followed by a classification of these clouds into complexes and populations. The catalogue will form the basis for comparisons with theoretical models. The study described here yields the following conclusions: (1) Differential

  2. Turbulence compensation: an overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Eekeren, Adam W. M.; Schutte, Klamer; Dijk, Judith; Schwering, Piet B. W.; van Iersel, Miranda; Doelman, Niek J.

    2012-06-01

    In general, long range visual detection, recognition and identification are hampered by turbulence caused by atmospheric conditions. Much research has been devoted to the field of turbulence compensation. One of the main advantages of turbulence compensation is that it enables visual identification over larger distances. In many (military) scenarios this is of crucial importance. In this paper we give an overview of several software and hardware approaches to compensate for the visual artifacts caused by turbulence. These approaches are very diverse and range from the use of dedicated hardware, such as adaptive optics, to the use of software methods, such as deconvolution and lucky imaging. For each approach the pros and cons are given and it is indicated for which scenario this approach is useful. In more detail we describe the turbulence compensation methods TNO has developed in the last years and place them in the context of the different turbulence compensation approaches and TNO's turbulence compensation roadmap. Furthermore we look forward and indicate the upcoming challenges in the field of turbulence compensation.

  3. Properties of Ejecta Generated at High-Velocity Perforation of Thin Bumpers made from Different Constructional Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myagkov, N. N.; Shumikhin, T. A.; Bezrukov, L. N.

    2013-08-01

    The series of impact experiments were performed to study the properties of ejecta generated at high-velocity perforation of thin bumpers. The bumpers were aluminum plates, fiber-glass plastic plates, and meshes weaved of steel wire. The projectiles were 6.35 mm diameter aluminum spheres. The impact velocities ranged from 1.95 to 3.52 km/s. In the experiments the ejecta particles were captured with low-density foam collectors or registered with the use of aluminum foils. The processing of the experimental results allowed us to estimate the total masses, spatial and size distributions, and perforating abilities of the ejecta produced from these different bumpers. As applied to the problem of reducing the near-Earth space pollution caused by the ejecta, the results obtained argue against the use of aluminum plates as first (outer) bumper in spacecraft shield protection.

  4. Force Criterion Prediction of Damage for Carbon/Epoxy Composite Panels Impacted by High Velocity Ice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhymer, Jennifer D.

    The use of advanced fiber-reinforced polymer matrix composites in load-bearing aircraft structures is increasing, as evident by the various composites-intensive transport aircraft presently under development. A major impact source of concern for these structures is hail ice, which affects design and skin-sizing (skin thickness determination) at various locations of the aircraft. Impacts onto composite structures often cause internal damage that is not visually detectable due to the high strength and resiliency of the composite material (unlike impacts onto metallic structures). This internal damage and its effect on the performance of the structure are of great concern to the aircraft industry. The prediction of damage in composite structures due to SHI impact has been accomplished via experimental work, explicit dynamic nonlinear finite element analysis (FEA) and the definition of design oriented relationships. Experiments established the critical threshold and corresponding analysis provided contact force results not readily measurable in high velocity SHI impact experiments. The design oriented relationships summarize the FEA results and experimental database into contact force estimation curves that can be easily applied for damage prediction. Failure thresholds were established for the experimental conditions (panel thickness ranging from 1.56 to 4.66 mm and ice diameters from 38.1 to 61.0 mm). Additionally, the observations made by high-speed video during the impact event, and ultrasonic C-scan post-impact, showed how the ice failed during impact and the overall shape and location of the panel damage. Through analysis, the critical force, the force level where damage occurs above but not below, of a SHI impact onto the panel was found to be dependent only on the target structure. However, the peak force generated during impact was dependent on both the projectile and target. Design-oriented curves were generated allowing the prediction of the allowable

  5. Magnetohydrodynamic turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Biskamp, Dieter

    2003-01-01

    This book presents an introduction to, and modern account of, magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) turbulence, an active field both in general turbulence theory and in various areas of astrophysics. The book starts by introducing the MHD equations, certain useful approximations and the transition to turbulence. The second part of the book covers incompressible MHD turbulence, the macroscopic aspects connected with the different self-organization processes, the phenomenology of the turbulence spectra, two-point closure theory, and intermittency. The third considers two-dimensional turbulence and compressi

  6. WHAM Observations of H-alpha from High-Velocity Clouds Are They Galactic or Extragalactic?

    CERN Document Server

    Tufte, S L; Madsen, G J; Haffner, L M; Reynolds, R J

    2002-01-01

    It has been suggested that high velocity clouds may be distributed throughout the Local Group and are therefore not in general associated with the Milky Way galaxy. With the aim of testing this hypothesis, we have made observations in the H-alpha line of high velocity clouds selected as the most likely candidates for being at larger than average distances. We have found H-alpha emission from 4 out of 5 of the observed clouds, suggesting that the clouds under study are being illuminated by a Lyman continuum flux greater than that of the metagalactic ionizing radiation. Therefore, it appears likely that these clouds are in the Galactic halo and not distributed throughout the Local Group.

  7. High Velocity Impact Interaction of Metal Particles with Porous Heterogeneous Materials with an Inorganic Matrix

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glazunov, A. A.; Ishchenko, A. N.; Afanasyeva, S. A.; Belov, N. N.; Burkin, V. V.; Rogaev, K. S.; Tabachenko, A. N.; Khabibulin, M. V.; Yugov, N. T.

    2016-03-01

    A computational-experimental investigation of stress-strain state and fracture of a porous heterogeneous material with an inorganic matrix, used as a thermal barrier coating of flying vehicles, under conditions of a high-velocity impact by a spherical steel projectile imitating a meteorite particle is discussed. Ballistic tests are performed at the velocities about 2.5 km/s. Numerical modeling of the high-velocity impact is described within the framework of a porous elastoplastic model including fracture and different phase states of the materials. The calculations are performed using the Euler and Lagrange numerical techniques for the velocities up to 10 km/s in a complete-space problem statement.

  8. Mapping Metal-Enriched High Velocity Clouds to Very Low HI Column Densities

    CERN Document Server

    Churchill, C W; Masiero, J R; Churchill, Chris; Charlton, Jane

    2001-01-01

    Our galaxy is the nearest known quasar absorption line system, and it uniquely provides us with an opportunity to probe multiple lines of sight through the same galaxy. This is essential for our interpretations of the complex kinematic profiles seen in the MgII absorption due to lines of sight through intermediate redshift galaxies. The Milky Way halo has never been probed for high velocity clouds below the 21-cm detection threshold of N(HI)~10^18 cm-2. Through a survey of MgII absorption looking toward the brightest AGNs and quasars, it will be possible to reach down a few orders of magnitude in HI column density. The analogs to the high velocity components of the MgII absorption profiles due to intermediate redshift galaxies should be seen. We describe a program we are undertaking, and present some preliminary findings.

  9. Double and single ionization of helium by high velocity N7+ ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beams of fully stripped nitrogen ions have been used to investigate the behavior of the double-to-single ionization cross-section ratio of helium in the 10--30-MeV/amu velocity region. The measured ratio was found to remain nearly constant over this velocity range at a value of 0.01, which is about 4.5 times higher than the high-velocity limit established previously for q=1 projectiles

  10. Chronic symptoms after vestibular neuritis and the high velocity vestibulo-ocular reflex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Mitesh; Arshad, Qadeer; Roberts, R Edward; Ahmad, Hena; Bronstein, Adolfo M.

    2015-01-01

    Hypothesis As the anterior and posterior semicircular canals are vital to the regulation of gaze stability, particularly during locomotion or vehicular travel, we tested whether the high velocity vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR) of the three ipsilesional semicircular canals elicited by the modified Head Impulse Test would correlate with subjective dizziness or vertigo scores after vestibular neuritis (VN). Background Recovery following acute VN varies with around half reporting persistent symptoms long after the acute episode. However, an unanswered question is whether chronic symptoms are associated with impairment of the high velocity VOR of the anterior or posterior canals. Methods Twenty patients who had experienced an acute episode of VN at least three months earlier were included in this study. Participants were assessed with the video head impulse test (vHIT) of all six canals, bithermal caloric irrigation, the Dizziness Handicap Inventory (DHI) and the Vertigo Symptoms Scale short-form (VSS). Results Of these 20 patients, 12 felt that they had recovered from the initial episode whereas 8 did not and reported elevated DHI and VSS scores. However, we found no correlation between DHI or VSS scores and the ipsilesional single or combined vHIT gain, vHIT gain asymmetry or caloric paresis. The high velocity VOR was not different between patients who felt they had recovered and patients who felt they had not. Conclusions Our findings suggest that chronic symptoms of dizziness following VN are not associated with the high velocity VOR of the single or combined ipsilesional horizontal, anterior or posterior semicircular canals. PMID:26719963

  11. Computational fluid dynamic modeling of gas flow characteristics in a high-velocity oxy-fuel thermal spray system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, S.; Eastwick, C. N.; Simmons, K. A.; McCartney, D. G.

    2001-09-01

    A computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model is developed to predict gas dynamic behavior in a high-velocity oxy-fuel (HVOF) thermal spray gun in which premixed oxygen and propylene are burnt in a 12 mm combustion chamber linked to a parallel-sided nozzle. The CFD analysis is applied to investigate axisymmetric, steady-state, turbulent, compressible, and chemically combusting flow both within the gun and in a free jet region between the gun and the substrate to be coated. The combustion of oxygen and propylene is modeled using a single-step, finite-rate chemistry model that also allows for dissociation of the reaction products. Results are presented to show the effect of (1) fuel-to-oxygen gas ratio and (2) total gas flow rate on the gas dynamic behavior. Along the centerline, the maximum temperature reached is insensitive to the gas ratio but depends on the total flow. However, the value attained (˜2500 K) is significantly lower than the maximum temperature (˜3200 K) of the annular flame in the combustion chamber. By contrast, the centerline gas velocity depends on both total flow and gas ratio, the highest axial gas velocity being attained with the higher flow and most fuel-rich mixture. The gas Mach number increases through the gun and reaches a maximum value of approximately 1.6 around 5 mm downstream from the nozzle exit. The numerical calculations also show that the residual oxygen level is principally dependent on the fuel-to-oxygen ratio and decreases by approximately fivefold as the ratio is varied from 90 to 69% of the stoichiometric requirement. The CFD model is also used to investigate the effect of changes in combustion chamber size and geometry on gas dynamics, and the results are compared with the nominal 12 mm chamber baseline calculations.

  12. The influence of slip velocity and temperature on permeability during and after high-velocity fault slip

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanikawa, W.; Mukoyoshi, H.; Tadai, O.; Hirose, T.; Lin, W.

    2011-12-01

    Fluid transport properties in fault zones play an important role in dynamic processes during large earthquakes. If the permeability in a fault zone is low, high pore-fluid pressures caused by thermal pressurization (Sibson, 1973) or shear-induced compaction (Blanpied et al., 1992) can lead to an apparent reduction of fault strength. Changes in porosity and permeability of fault rocks within a fault zone during earthquakes and the subsequent progressive recovery of these properties may have a large influence on earthquake recurrence (Sleep and Blanpied, 1992). A rotary shear apparatus was used to investigate changes of fluid transport properties in a fault zone by real-time measurement of gas flow rates during and after shearing of hollow sandstone and granite cylinders at various slip rates. Our apparatus measures permeability parallel to the slip plane in both the slip zone and wall rocks. In all cases, permeability decreased rapidly with an increase of friction, but recovered soon after slip, reaching a steady state within several tens of minutes. The rate of reduction of permeability increased with increasing slip velocity. Permeability did not recover to pre-slip levels after low-velocity tests but recovered to exceed them after high-velocity tests. Frictional heating of gases at the slip surface increased gas viscosity, which increased gas flow rate to produce an apparent permeability increase. The irreversible permeability changes of the low-velocity tests were caused by gouge formation due to wearing and smoothing of the slip surface. The increase of permeability after high-velocity tests was caused by mesoscale fracturing in response to rapid temperature rise. Changes of pore fluid viscosity contributed more to changes of flow rate than did permeability changes caused by shear deformation, although test results from different rocks and pore fluids might be different. References Blanpied, M.L., Lockner, D.A., Byerlee, J.D., 1992. An earthquake mechanism

  13. Simulations of High-Velocity Clouds. II. Ablation from High-Velocity Clouds as a Source of Low-Velocity High Ions

    CERN Document Server

    Henley, David B; Shelton, Robin L

    2012-01-01

    In order to determine if the material ablated from high-velocity clouds (HVCs) is a significant source of low-velocity high ions (C IV, N V, and O VI) such as those found in the Galactic halo, we simulate the hydrodynamics of the gas and the time-dependent ionization evolution of its carbon, nitrogen, and oxygen ions. Our suite of simulations examines the ablation of warm material from clouds of various sizes, densities, and velocities as they pass through the hot Galactic halo. The ablated material mixes with the environmental gas, producing an intermediate-temperature mixture that is rich in high ions and that slows to the speed of the surrounding gas. We find that the slow mixed material is a significant source of the low-velocity O VI that is observed in the halo, as it can account for at least ~1/3 of the observed O VI column density. Hence, any complete model of the high ions in the halo should include the contribution to the O VI from ablated HVC material. However, such material is unlikely to be a maj...

  14. A GRAVITATIONAL DOUBLE-SCATTERING MECHANISM FOR GENERATING HIGH-VELOCITY OBJECTS DURING HALO MERGERS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Samsing, Johan [Dark Cosmology Centre, Niels Bohr Institute, University of Copenhagen, Juliane Maries Vej 30, DK-2100 Copenhagen (Denmark); Department of Astrophysical Sciences, Princeton University, Peyton Hall, Princeton, NJ 08544 (United States)

    2015-02-01

    We present a dynamical model that describes how halo particles can receive a significant energy kick from the merger between their own host halo and a target halo. This could provide a possible explanation for some high-velocity objects, including extended systems like globular clusters (GCs). In the model we especially introduce a double-scattering mechanism, where a halo particle receives a significant part of its total energy kick by first undergoing a gravitational deflection by the target halo and subsequently by its original host halo. This generates an energy kick that is due to the relative velocity between the halos during the deflections. We derive analytically the total kick energy of the particle, which is composed of energy from the double-scattering mechanism and tidal fields, as a function of its position in its original host halo just before merger. In the case of a 1:10 merger, we find that the presented mechanisms can easily generate particles with a velocity approximately two times the virial velocity of the target halo. This motivates us to suggest that the high velocity of the recently discovered GC HVGC-1 can be explained by a head-on halo merger. Finally, we illustrate the orbital evolution of high-velocity particles outside the virial sphere of the target halo by solving the equation of motion in an expanding universe. We find a sweet spot around a scale factor of 0.3-0.5 for ejecting particles into large orbits, which can easily reach beyond approximately five virial radii.

  15. Supernova 2010ev: A reddened high velocity gradient type Ia supernova

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutiérrez, Claudia P.; González-Gaitán, Santiago; Folatelli, Gastón; Pignata, Giuliano; Anderson, Joseph P.; Hamuy, Mario; Morrell, Nidia; Stritzinger, Maximilian; Taubenberger, Stefan; Bufano, Filomena; Olivares E., Felipe; Haislip, Joshua B.; Reichart, Daniel E.

    2016-05-01

    Aims: We present and study the spectroscopic and photometric evolution of the type Ia supernova (SN Ia) 2010ev. Methods: We obtain and analyze multiband optical light curves and optical/near-infrared spectroscopy at low and medium resolution spanning -7 days to +300 days from the B-band maximum. Results: A photometric analysis shows that SN 2010ev is a SN Ia of normal brightness with a light-curve shape of Δm15(B) = 1.12 ± 0.02 and a stretch s = 0.94 ± 0.01 suffering significant reddening. From photometric and spectroscopic analysis, we deduce a color excess of E(B - V) = 0.25 ± 0.05 and a reddening law of Rv = 1.54 ± 0.65. Spectroscopically, SN 2010ev belongs to the broad-line SN Ia group, showing stronger than average Si iiλ6355 absorption features. We also find that SN 2010ev is a high velocity gradient SN with v˙Si = 164 ± 7 km s-1 d-1. The photometric and spectral comparison with other supernovae shows that SN 2010ev has similar colors and velocities to SN 2002bo and SN 2002dj. The analysis of the nebular spectra indicates that the [Fe ii]λ7155 and [Ni ii]λ7378 lines are redshifted, as expected for a high velocity gradient supernova. All these common intrinsic and extrinsic properties of the high velocity gradient (HVG) group are different from the low velocity gradient (LVG) normal SN Ia population and suggest significant variety in SN Ia explosions. This paper includes data gathered with the Du Pont Telescope at Las Campanas Observatory, Chile; and the Gemini Observatory, Cerro Pachon, Chile (Gemini Program GS-2010A-Q-14). Based on observations collected at the European Organisation for Astronomical Research in the Southern Hemisphere, Chile (ESO Programme 085.D-0577).

  16. PROCESSING AND CHARACTERISATION OF HIGH-VELOCITY SUSPENSION FLAME SPRAYED (HVSFS) BIOACTIVE GLASS COATINGS

    OpenAIRE

    GIOVANNI BOLELLI; VALERIA CANNILLO; RAINER GADOW; ANDREAS KILLINGER; LUCA LUSVARGHI; JOHANNES RAUCH

    2010-01-01

    The High-Velocity Suspension Flame Spraying (HVSFS) technique was employed in order to deposit bioactive glass coatings onto titanium substrates. Two different glass compositions were examined: the classical 45S5 Bioglass and a newly-developed SiO2–CaO–K2O–P2O5 glass, labelled as “Bio-K”. Suitable raw materials were melted in a furnace and fritted by casting into water. The frit was dry-milled in a porcelain jar and subsequently attrition-milled in isopropanol. The resulting micronsized powde...

  17. High velocity continuous-flow reactor for the production of solar grade silicon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woerner, L.

    1977-01-01

    The feasibility of a high volume, high velocity continuous reduction reactor as an economical means of producing solar grade silicon was tested. Bromosilanes and hydrogen were used as the feedstocks for the reactor along with preheated silicon particles which function both as nucleation and deposition sites. A complete reactor system was designed and fabricated. Initial preheating studies have shown the stability of tetrabromosilane to being heated as well as the ability to preheat hydrogen to the desired temperature range. Several test runs were made and some silicon was obtained from runs carried out at temperatures in excess of 1180 K.

  18. Removal of Interproximal Dental Biofilms by High-velocity Water Microdrops

    OpenAIRE

    Rmaile, A.; Carugo, D; Capretto, L.; Aspiras, M.; de Jager, M.; Ward, M; Stoodley, P

    2014-01-01

    The influence of the impact of a high-velocity water microdrop on the detachment of Streptococcus mutans UA159 biofilms from the interproximal (IP) space of teeth in a training typodont was studied experimentally and computationally. Twelve-day-old S. mutans biofilms in the IP space were exposed to a prototype AirFloss delivering 115 µL water at a maximum exit velocity of 60 m/sec in a 30-msec burst. Using confocal microscopy and image analysis, we obtained quantitative measurements of the pe...

  19. Variables Affecting Smooth Particle Hydrodynamics Simulation of High-Velocity Flyer Plate Impact Experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Somasundaram, Deepak S [UNLV; Trabia, Mohamed [UNLV; O' Toole, Brendan [UNLV; Hixson, Robert S [NSTec

    2014-01-23

    This paper describes our work to characterize the variables affecting the smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) method in the LS-DYNA package for simulating high-velocity flyer plate impact experiments. LS-DYNA simulations are compared with one-dimensional experimental data of an oxygen-free high-conductivity (OFHC) copper flyer plate impacting another plate of the same material. The comparison is made by measuring the velocity of a point on the back surface of the impact plate using the velocity interferometer system for any reflector (VISAR) technique.

  20. Deposition of magnetite particles from high velocity water onto isothermal tubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The deposition rate of magnetite particles from a high velocity water slurry onto isothermal metal tubes was measured. The effects of velocity (5 to 100 m/s), slurry concentration (200 to 1000 mg Fe/kg H2O), temperature (250 to 900C), pH (4 to 10 at 250C), and tube material (nickel, Zircaloy-4) on deposition rate were studied. The data are interpreted in terms of two steps in series for deposition: a mass transfer step followed by a deposition or inertial coasting step. Mass transfer of particles through the bulk water phase apparently limits the deposition of particles at high Reynolds number

  1. Negative ion productions in high velocity collision between small carbon clusters and Helium atom target

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We measured absolute double capture cross section of Cn+ ions (n=1,5) colliding, at 2.3 and 2.6 a.u velocities, with an Helium target atom and the branching ratios of fragmentation of the so formed electronically excited anions Cn−*. We also measured absolute cross section for the electronic attachment on neutral Cn clusters colliding at same velocities with He atom. This is to our knowledge the first measurement of neutral-neutral charge exchange in high velocity collision.

  2. A DAMAGE ACCUMULATING MODELING OF FAILURE WAVES IN GLASS UNDER HIGH VELOCITY IMPACT

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘占芳; 姚国文; 詹先义

    2001-01-01

    The failure wave phenomenon was interpreted in glass media under the high velocity impact with the stress levels below the Hugoniot elastic limit. In view of the plate impact experimental observations a damage-accumulating model predominated by the deviatoric stress impulse was proposed while Heaviside function was adopted in the damageaccumulating model to describe the failure delay in the interior of materials. Features of the failure layer and propagation mechanism as well as their dynamic characteristics were further presented. The reduction in failure wave propagation speed is pointed out as the reflected rarefaction waves reflect again from the failure layer boundary.

  3. High-velocity OH megamasers in IRAS 20100-4156: Evidence for a Supermassive Black Hole

    OpenAIRE

    Harvey-Smith, L.; Allison, J. R.; Green, J. A.; Bannister, K. W.; Chippendale, A.; Edwards, P. G.; Heywood, I.; Hotan, A. W.; Lenc, E.; Marvil, J.; McConnell, D.; Phillips, C. P.; Sault, R. J.; P. Serra; Stevens, J.

    2016-01-01

    We report the discovery of new, high-velocity narrow-line components of the OH megamaser in IRAS 20100-4156. Results from the Australian Square Kilometre Array Pathfinder (ASKAP)'s Boolardy Engineering Test Array (BETA) and the Australia Telescope Compact Array (ATCA) provide two independent measurements of the OH megamaser spectrum. We found evidence for OH megamaser clumps at $-$409 and $-$562 km/s (blue-shifted) from the systemic velocity of the galaxy, in addition to the lines previously ...

  4. Shells, holes, worms, high-velocity gas and the z-distribution of gas in galaxies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rand, R. J.

    The author gives an overview of the current observational understanding of vertically extended gas components in spiral galaxies and the various phenomena which come under such names as shells, holes, worms, and high-velocity gas. For the most part, the focus is on recent high-resolution interferometric studies. The author concentrates on cold gas, and briefly on warm ionized gas, in the Milky Way and a few nearby spirals. Along the way, it is seen how phenomena such as worms and shells may be related to the formation and maintenance of the vertically extended components.

  5. Analysis of Temporary Cavity Produced by High Velocity Missile in Gelatin Blocks

    OpenAIRE

    Korać, Želimir; Kelenc, Dubravko; Mikulić, Danko; Hančević, Janko

    2000-01-01

    The effects of high velocity missiles (a Russian AK-74 assault rifle, 5.45 mm) in a tissue simulant • gelatin block were analyzed. The characteristics of temporary cavity were studied by the analysis of calibrated images of the missile path. The missile path through the block was visualized using a TV camera with an ultra-speed shutter. TV picture was calibrated before the shooting. Cross-section of the temporary cavity was measured as a function of distance from the missile entry point. The ...

  6. On projectile fragmentation at high-velocity perforation of a thin bumper

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myagkov, N. N.; Stepanov, V. V.

    2014-09-01

    By means of 3D numerical simulations, we study the statistical properties of the fragments cloud formed during high-velocity impact of a spherical projectile on a mesh bumper. We present a quantitative description of the projectile fragmentation, and study the nature of the transition from the damage to the fragmentation of the projectile when the impact velocity varies. A distinctive feature of the present work is that the calculations are carried out by smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) method applied to the equations of mechanics of deformable solids (MDS). We describe the materials behavior by the Mie-Grüneisen equation of state and the Johnson-Cook model for the yield strength. The maximum principal stress spall model is used as the fracture model. It is shown that the simulation results of fragmentation based on the MDS equations by the SPH method are qualitatively consistent with the results obtained earlier on the basis of the molecular dynamics and discrete element models. It is found that the power-law distribution exponent does not depend on energy imparted to the projectile during the high-velocity impact. At the same time, our calculations show that the critical impact velocity, the power-law exponent and other critical exponents depend on the fracture criterion.

  7. High-velocity gas towards the LMC resides in the Milky Way halo

    CERN Document Server

    Richter, P; Werner, K; Rauch, T

    2015-01-01

    To explore the origin of high-velocity gas in the direction of the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) we analyze absorption lines in the ultraviolet spectrum of a Galactic halo star that is located in front of the LMC at d=9.2 kpc distance. We study the velocity-component structure of low and intermediate metal ions in the spectrum of RXJ0439.8-6809, as obtained with the Cosmic Origins Spectrograph (COS) onboard HST, and measure equivalent widths and column densities for these ions. We supplement our COS data with a Far-Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer spectrum of the nearby LMC star Sk-69 59 and with HI 21cm data from the Leiden-Argentina-Bonn (LAB) survey. Metal absorption towards RXJ0439.8-6809 is unambiguously detected in three different velocity components near v_LSR=0,+60, and +150 km/s. The presence of absorption proves that all three gas components are situated in front of the star, thus being located in the disk and inner halo of the Milky Way. For the high-velocity cloud (HVC) at v_LSR=+150 km/s we deri...

  8. GASS High Velocity Clouds in the Region of the Magellanic Leading Arm

    CERN Document Server

    For, Bi-Qing; McClure-Griffiths, Naomi M

    2012-01-01

    We present a new catalog of high-velocity clouds in the region of the Magellanic Leading Arm. The catalog is based on neutral hydrogen (HI) from the Parkes Galactic All-Sky Survey (GASS). Excellent spectral resolution allows clouds with narrow-line components to be resolved. The total number of detected clouds is 407. We describe the method of cataloging and present the basic parameters of the clouds. We discuss the general distribution of the high-velocity clouds and classify the clouds based on their morphological type. The presence of a significant number of head-tail clouds and their distribution in the region is compared with simulations. We suggest that ram-pressure stripping is a more important factor than tidal forces for the morphology and formation of the Magellanic Leading Arm and that different environmental conditions might explain the morphological difference between the Magellanic Leading Arm and Magellanic Stream. Using the velocity structure of the Leading Arm we derive the distance for the c...

  9. High-velocity OH megamasers in IRAS 20100-4156: Evidence for a Supermassive Black Hole

    CERN Document Server

    Harvey-Smith, L; Green, J A; Bannister, K W; Chippendale, A; Edwards, P G; Heywood, I; Hotan, A W; Lenc, E; Marvil, J; McConnell, D; Phillips, C P; Sault, R J; Serra, P; Stevens, J; Voronkov, M; Whiting, M

    2016-01-01

    We report the discovery of new, high-velocity narrow-line components of the OH megamaser in IRAS 20100-4156. Results from the Australian Square Kilometre Array Pathfinder (ASKAP)'s Boolardy Engineering Test Array (BETA) and the Australia Telescope Compact Array (ATCA) provide two independent measurements of the OH megamaser spectrum. We found evidence for OH megamaser clumps at $-$409 and $-$562 km/s (blue-shifted) from the systemic velocity of the galaxy, in addition to the lines previously known. The presence of such high velocities in the molecular emission from IRAS 20100$-$4156 could be explained by a ~50 pc molecular ring enclosing an approximately 3.8 billion solar mass black hole. We also discuss two alternatives, i.e. that the narrow-line masers are dynamically coupled to the wind driven by the active galactic nucleus or they are associated with two separate galactic nuclei. The comparison between the BETA and ATCA spectra provides another scientific verification of ASKAP's BETA. Our data, combined w...

  10. Characterization of High-Velocity Single Particle Impacts on Plasma-Sprayed Ceramic Coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiilakoski, Jarkko; Lindroos, Matti; Apostol, Marian; Koivuluoto, Heli; Kuokkala, Veli-Tapani; Vuoristo, Petri

    2016-06-01

    High-velocity impact wear can have a significant effect on the lifetime of thermally sprayed coatings in multiple applications, e.g., in the process and paper industries. Plasma-sprayed oxide coatings, such as Cr2O3- and TiO2-based coatings, are often used in these industries in wear and corrosion applications. An experimental impact study was performed on thermally sprayed ceramic coatings using the High-Velocity Particle Impactor (HVPI) at oblique angles to investigate the damage, failure, and deformation of the coated structures. The impact site was characterized by profilometry, optical microscopy, and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Furthermore, the connection between the microstructural details and impact behavior was studied in order to reveal the damage and failure characteristics at a more comprehensive level. Differences in the fracture behavior were found between the thermally sprayed Cr2O3 and TiO2 coatings, and a concept of critical impact energy is presented here. The superior cohesion of the TiO2 coating inhibited interlamellar cracking while the Cr2O3 coating suffered greater damage at high impact energies. The HVPI experiment has proven to be able to produce valuable information about the deformation behavior of coatings under high strain rates and could be utilized further in the development of wear-resistant coatings.

  11. The StEllar Counterparts of COmpact high velocity clouds (SECCO) survey. I. Photos of ghosts

    CERN Document Server

    Bellazzini, M; Battaglia, G; Martin, N; Testa, V; Ibata, R; Correnti, M; Cusano, F; Sani, E

    2014-01-01

    We present an imaging survey aimed at searching for the stellar counterparts of recently discovered ultra-compact high-velocity HI clouds (UCHVC). Adams et al. (2013) proposed these clouds to be candidate mini-haloes in the Local Group and/or its surroundings, within a distance range of 0.25-2.0 Mpc. Using the Large Binocular Telescope we obtain wide-field (~ 23' X 23') g- and r-band images of the twenty-five most promising and most compact clouds among the fifty-nine identified by Adams et al. Careful visual inspection of all the images does not reveal any stellar counterpart even slightly resembling LeoP, the only local dwarf galaxy that was found as a counterpart to a previously detected high velocity cloud. Only a possible distant (D>3.0 Mpc) counterpart to HVC274.68+74.70-123 has been identified on our images. The point source photometry in the central 17.3' X 7.7' chips reaches r30 sigma significance level. Only HVC352.45+59.06+263 may be associated with a weak over-density, whose nature cannot be ascer...

  12. Characterization of High-Velocity Single Particle Impacts on Plasma-Sprayed Ceramic Coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiilakoski, Jarkko; Lindroos, Matti; Apostol, Marian; Koivuluoto, Heli; Kuokkala, Veli-Tapani; Vuoristo, Petri

    2016-08-01

    High-velocity impact wear can have a significant effect on the lifetime of thermally sprayed coatings in multiple applications, e.g., in the process and paper industries. Plasma-sprayed oxide coatings, such as Cr2O3- and TiO2-based coatings, are often used in these industries in wear and corrosion applications. An experimental impact study was performed on thermally sprayed ceramic coatings using the High-Velocity Particle Impactor (HVPI) at oblique angles to investigate the damage, failure, and deformation of the coated structures. The impact site was characterized by profilometry, optical microscopy, and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Furthermore, the connection between the microstructural details and impact behavior was studied in order to reveal the damage and failure characteristics at a more comprehensive level. Differences in the fracture behavior were found between the thermally sprayed Cr2O3 and TiO2 coatings, and a concept of critical impact energy is presented here. The superior cohesion of the TiO2 coating inhibited interlamellar cracking while the Cr2O3 coating suffered greater damage at high impact energies. The HVPI experiment has proven to be able to produce valuable information about the deformation behavior of coatings under high strain rates and could be utilized further in the development of wear-resistant coatings.

  13. High velocity stars from close interaction of a globular cluster and a super massive black hole

    CERN Document Server

    Capuzzo-Dolcetta, R

    2015-01-01

    Observations show the presence, in the halo of our Galaxy, of stars moving at velocities so high to require an acceleration mechanism involving the presence of a massive central black hole. Thus, in the frame of a galaxy hosting a supermassive black hole ($10^8$ $M_{\\odot}$) we investigated a mechanism for the production of high velocity stars, which was suggested by the results of N-body simulations of the close interaction between a massive, orbitally decayed, globular cluster and the super massive black hole. The high velocity acquired by some stars of the cluster comes from the transfer of gravitational binding energy into kinetic energy of the escaping star originally orbiting around the cluster. After the close interaction with the massive black hole, stars could reach a velocity sufficient to travel in the halo and even overcome the galactic gravitational well, while some of them are just stripped from the globular cluster and start orbiting on precessing loops around the galactic centre.

  14. Oxidation performance of Fe-Al/WC composite coatings produced by high velocity arc spraying

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MENG Fan-jun; XU Bin-shi; ZHU Sheng; MA Shi-ning; ZHANG wei

    2005-01-01

    Fe-Al intermetallics with remarkable high-temperature intensity and excellent erosion, high-temperature oxidation and sulfuration resistance are potential low cost high-temperature structural materials. But the room tem perature brittleness induces shape difficult and limits its industrial application. The Fe-Al intermetallic coatings were prepared by high velocity arc spraying technology with cored wire on 20G steel, which will not only obviate the problems faced in fabrication of these alloys into useful shapes, but also allow the effective use of their outstanding high-temperature performance. The Fe-Al/WC intermetallic composite coatings were prepared by high velocity arc spraying technology on 20G steel and the oxidation performance of Fe-Al/WC composite coatings was studied by means of thermogrativmetic analyzer at 450, 650 and 800 ℃. The results demonstrate that the kinetics curve of oxidation at three temperatures approximately follows the logarithmic law. The composition of the oxidized coating is mainly composed of Al2 O3, Fe2 O3, Fe3 O4 and FeO. These phases distribute unevenly. The protective Al2 O3 film firstly forms and preserves the coatings from further oxidation.

  15. An investigation of constant pressure gas well testing influenced by high velocity flow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berumen, S. [PEMEX Exploracion-Produccion, Mexico City (Mexico); Samaniego, F. [Universidad de Mexico, Mexico City (Mexico). Facultad de Ingeniera; Cinco-Ley, H. [Universidad de Mexico, Mexico City (Mexico). Facultad de Ingeniera; Bouhroum, A.

    1997-03-01

    This paper presents the results of a study of transient pressure analysis of gas flow under either constant bottom-hole conditions or the constant wellhead pressure conditions. The effect of formation damage, wellbore storage and high velocity flow are included in the model. The analysis of simulated well tests showed that the interpretation methods used for liquid flow are generally accurate when the p{sub p}(p) is used. For these conditions, a graph of 1/q{sub D} vs log t{sub D} presents gradually lower values of 1.1513 as the value of p{sub wf} decreases: For pressure buildup conditions a graph of p{sub pD}(1, {Delta}t{sub aD})/q{sub D}({Delta}t{sub aD}=0) vs (t{sub aD}+{Delta}t{sub aD})/{Delta}t{sub aD} shows values of this slope within 1% of the 1.1513 value. The maximum error was in the rate performance simulated cases that included high-velocity flows; being less than 13%. This upper limit occurs when the formation has a relatively `high` permeability (around 1 mD) and the rate performance test is affected by high-velocity flow. It was found that pressure buildup tests are superior to rate performance tests because high-velocity flow does not affect the slope of the straight line portion of the buildup curve. However, it was also found, through derivative analysis of simulated buildup tests, that the skin factor is sensibly miscalculated when the high-velocity flow effect is singificant. This problem could lead to errors in the calculation of the skin factor, s, up to 300%. (orig.) [Deutsch] Vorgestellt werden instationaere Testergebnisse an Gas-Sonden unter konstanten Bohrlochsohlenbedingungen bzw. konstantem Bohrlochkopfdruck. Folgende Stoereffekte: Sondennahe Tragerschaedigung, Speicherkapazitaet des Bohrloches und die bei der Gasstroemung eintretende hohe Fliessgeschwindigkeit werden beruecksichtigt. Die Auswertung von simulierten Testergebnissen zeigt, dass die zur Interpretation von Erdoelsonden bewaehrten Verfahren in der Darstellung p{sub p}(p) gute

  16. Seismic Technology Adapted to Analyzing and Developing Geothermal Systems Below Surface-Exposed High-Velocity Rocks Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hardage, Bob A. [Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (United States). Bureau of Economic Geology; DeAngelo, Michael V. [Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (United States). Bureau of Economic Geology; Ermolaeva, Elena [Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (United States). Bureau of Economic Geology; Hardage, Bob A. [Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (United States). Bureau of Economic Geology; Remington, Randy [Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (United States). Bureau of Economic Geology; Sava, Diana [Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (United States). Bureau of Economic Geology; Wagner, Donald [Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (United States). Bureau of Economic Geology; Wei, Shuijion [Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (United States). Bureau of Economic Geology

    2013-02-01

    The objective of our research was to develop and demonstrate seismic data-acquisition and data-processing technologies that allow geothermal prospects below high-velocity rock outcrops to be evaluated. To do this, we acquired a 3-component seismic test line across an area of exposed high-velocity rocks in Brewster County, Texas, where there is high heat flow and surface conditions mimic those found at numerous geothermal prospects. Seismic contractors have not succeeded in creating good-quality seismic data in this area for companies who have acquired data for oil and gas exploitation purposes. Our test profile traversed an area where high-velocity rocks and low-velocity sediment were exposed on the surface in alternating patterns that repeated along the test line. We verified that these surface conditions cause non-ending reverberations of Love waves, Rayleigh waves, and shallow critical refractions to travel across the earth surface between the boundaries of the fast-velocity and slow-velocity material exposed on the surface. These reverberating surface waves form the high level of noise in this area that does not allow reflections from deep interfaces to be seen and utilized. Our data-acquisition method of deploying a box array of closely spaced geophones allowed us to recognize and evaluate these surface-wave noise modes regardless of the azimuth direction to the surface anomaly that backscattered the waves and caused them to return to the test-line profile. With this knowledge of the surface-wave noise, we were able to process these test-line data to create P-P and SH-SH images that were superior to those produced by a skilled seismic data-processing contractor. Compared to the P-P data acquired along the test line, the SH-SH data provided a better detection of faults and could be used to trace these faults upward to the boundaries of exposed surface rocks. We expanded our comparison of the relative value of S-wave and P-wave seismic data for geothermal

  17. High velocity anomaly beneath the Deccan volcanic province: Evidence from seismic tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iyer, H.M.; Gaur, V.K.; Rai, S.S.; Ramesh, D.S.; Rao, C.V.R.; Srinagesh, D.; Suryaprakasam, K.

    1989-01-01

    Analysis of teleseismic P-wave residuals observed at 15 seismograph stations operated in the Deccan volcanic province (DVP) in west central India points to the existence of a large, deep anomalous region in the upper mantle where the velocity is a few per cent higher than in the surrounding region. The seismic stations were operated in three deployments together with a reference station on precambrian granite at Hyderabad and another common station at Poona. The first group of stations lay along a west-northwesterly profile from Hyderabad through Poona to Bhatsa. The second group roughly formed an L-shaped profile from Poona to Hyderabad through Dharwar and Hospet. The third group of stations lay along a northwesterly profile from Hyderabad to Dhule through Aurangabad and Latur. Relative residuals computed with respect to Hyderabad at all the stations showed two basic features: a large almost linear variation from approximately +1s for teleseisms from the north to-1s for those from the southeast at the western stations, and persistance of the pattern with diminishing magnitudes towards the east. Preliminary ray-plotting and three-dimensional inversion of the P-wave residual data delineate the presence of a 600 km long approximately N-S trending anomalous region of high velocity (1-4% contrast) from a depth of about 100 km in the upper mantle encompassing almost the whole width of the DVP. Inversion of P-wave relative residuals reveal the existence of two prominent features beneath the DVP. The first is a thick high velocity zone (1-4% faster) extending from a depth of about 100 km directly beneath most of the DVP. The second feature is a prominent low velocity region which coincides with the westernmost part of the DVP. A possible explanation for the observed coherent high velocity anomaly is that it forms the root of the lithosphere which coherently translates with the continents during plate motions, an architecture characteristic of precambrian shields. The low

  18. High Turbulence

    CERN Multimedia

    EuHIT, Collaboration

    2015-01-01

    As a member of the EuHIT (European High-Performance Infrastructures in Turbulence - see here) consortium, CERN is participating in fundamental research on turbulence phenomena. To this end, the Laboratory provides European researchers with a cryogenic research infrastructure (see here), where the first tests have just been performed.

  19. Plasma turbulence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Horton, W. [Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (United States). Inst. for Fusion Studies; Hu, G. [Globalstar LP, San Jose, CA (United States)

    1998-07-01

    The origin of plasma turbulence from currents and spatial gradients in plasmas is described and shown to lead to the dominant transport mechanism in many plasma regimes. A wide variety of turbulent transport mechanism exists in plasmas. In this survey the authors summarize some of the universally observed plasma transport rates.

  20. Wave turbulence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nazarenko, Sergey [Warwick Univ., Coventry (United Kingdom). Mathematics Inst.

    2011-07-01

    Wave Turbulence refers to the statistical theory of weakly nonlinear dispersive waves. There is a wide and growing spectrum of physical applications, ranging from sea waves, to plasma waves, to superfluid turbulence, to nonlinear optics and Bose-Einstein condensates. Beyond the fundamentals the book thus also covers new developments such as the interaction of random waves with coherent structures (vortices, solitons, wave breaks), inverse cascades leading to condensation and the transitions between weak and strong turbulence, turbulence intermittency as well as finite system size effects, such as ''frozen'' turbulence, discrete wave resonances and avalanche-type energy cascades. This book is an outgrow of several lectures courses held by the author and, as a result, written and structured rather as a graduate text than a monograph, with many exercises and solutions offered along the way. The present compact description primarily addresses students and non-specialist researchers wishing to enter and work in this field. (orig.)

  1. High Velocity Penetration/Perforation Using Coupled Smooth Particle Hydrodynamics-Finite Element Method

    CERN Document Server

    Swaddiwudhipong, S; Liu, Z S

    2012-01-01

    Finite element method (FEM) suffers from a serious mesh distortion problem when used for high velocity impact analyses. The smooth particle hydrodynamics (SPH) method is appropriate for this class of problems involving severe damages but at considerable computational cost. It is beneficial if the latter is adopted only in severely distorted regions and FEM further away. The coupled smooth particle hydrodynamics - finite element method (SFM) has been adopted in a commercial hydrocode LS-DYNA to study the perforation of Weldox 460E steel and AA5083-H116 aluminum plates with varying thicknesses and various projectile nose geometries including blunt, conical and ogival noses. Effects of the SPH domain size and particle density are studied considering the friction effect between the projectile and the target materials. The simulated residual velocities and the ballistic limit velocities from the SFM agree well with the published experimental data. The study shows that SFM is able to emulate the same failure mechan...

  2. Draco Nebula, a molecular cloud associated with a high velocity cloud

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mebold, U.; Kalberla, P.W.M.

    1984-11-01

    Extended and very faint bright nebulae are found in high galactic latitudes at the Palomar Observatory Sky Survey. Such a nebula, located in the constellation Draco and called Draco Nebula or Dracula, was found to be in detailed positional coincidence with a 21 cm emission line feature. Estimates of the minimum visual extinction from star counts ON and OFF Dracula and an estimated visual surface brightness indicate that Dracula fits the relation SBV 24.2 - 2.5 log AV for dust clouds located above the galactic plane and reflecting the integrated starlight of the galactic disk. Hence Dracula is probably a reflection nebula. Indicators of molecular hydrogen in Dracula, molecules such as CO, were searched for by using a 2.5-m mm-telescope. Molecular hydrogen column densities were estimated. The dynamics of CO clumps was studied. Dracula has a close positional and possibly even astrophysical relationship to the high velocity cloud phenomenon.

  3. DYNAMIC ANALYSIS OF PARTICLE FLYING VELOCITY IN HIGH VELOCITY OXYGEN FUEL SPRAY

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Zhiping; Dong Zujue; Huo Shubin

    2000-01-01

    Based on gas dynamics,thermodynamics,fluid dynamics of multiphase systems and other theories,the dynamic analyses of the particle flying velocity in a high velocity oxygen fuel spray (HVOF) is accomplished.The relationships between the flying velocity of a particle and the flying time or flying length,particle size,hot gas velocity,and pressure or density of the gas are proposed.Meanwhile,the influences of the velocity and mass rate of flow of the flame gas of a HVOF gun,and particle size on the particle flying velocity are discussed in detail.The dynamic pressure concept is introduced to express the flow capacity of hot gas of a HVOF gun,and the relationship between the dynamic pressure of a HVOF gun and the velocity of a particle for depositing is presented.

  4. Heat transfer analysis of atomized droplets during high velocity arc spraying

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHU Zi-xin; LIU Yan; CHEN Yong-xiong; XU Bin-shi; ZHANG Wei

    2004-01-01

    The heat transfer problem of the atomized droplets during high velocity arc spraying (HVAS) was modeled and solved by a numerical method using a Fe-Al alloy, and the influences of several important process parameters on the heat transfer behaviors of the atomized droplets were analyzed. The results show that the initial cooling rates of different size droplets range from 105 to 107 K/s, thus producing the coating microstructure with the features of rapid solidification. The droplet size, atomization gas pressure and droplet superheat have great influences on the heat transfer behavior of the droplet. The droplet temperature and cooling rate are much sensitive to the droplet sizes, but insensitive to the atomization gas pressure and droplet superheat. It can be predicted that the properties of HVAS coatings will be improved by decreasing droplet size as well as increasing atomization gas pressure and droplet superheat in certain extents.

  5. Minimally-invasive treatment of high velocity intra-articular fractures of the distal tibia.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Leonard, M

    2012-02-01

    The pilon fracture is a complex injury. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the outcome of minimally invasive techniques in management of these injuries. This was a prospective study of closed AO type C2 and C3 fractures managed by early (<36 hours) minimally invasive surgical intervention and physiotherapist led rehabilitation. Thirty patients with 32 intra-articular distal tibial fractures were treated by the senior surgeon (GK). Our aim was to record the outcome and all complications with a minimum two year follow-up. There were two superficial wound infections. One patient developed a non-union which required a formal open procedure. Another patient was symptomatic from a palpable plate inferiorly. An excellent AOFAS result was obtained in 83% (20\\/24) of the patients. Early minimally invasive reduction and fixation of complex high velocity pilon fractures gave very satisfactory results at a minimum of two years follow-up.

  6. The structural and dynamical aspects of boron nitride nanotubes under high velocity impacts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machado, Leonardo D; Ozden, Sehmus; Tiwary, ChandraSekhar; Autreto, Pedro A S; Vajtai, Robert; Barrera, Enrique V; Galvao, Douglas S; Ajayan, Pulickel M

    2016-06-01

    This communication report is a study on the structural and dynamical aspects of boron nitride nanotubes (BNNTs) shot at high velocities (∼5 km s(-1)) against solid targets. The experimental results show unzipping of BNNTs and the formation of hBN nanoribbons. Fully atomistic reactive molecular dynamics simulations were also carried out to gain insights into the BNNT fracture patterns and deformation mechanisms. Our results show that longitudinal and axial tube fractures occur, but the formation of BN nanoribbons from fractured tubes was only observed for some impact angles. Although some structural and dynamical features of the impacts are similar to the ones reported for CNTs, because BNNTs are more brittle than CNTs this results in a larger number of fractured tubes but with fewer formed nanoribbons. PMID:27189765

  7. The quest for TPa Hugoniot data: using the DEMG in high velocity pulsed power experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peterson, Jeff H [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Rousculp, Christopher L [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Holtkamp, David B [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Oro, David M [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Griego, Jeffrey R [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Atchison, Walter L [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Reinovsky, Robert E [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2010-12-20

    ALT-3 is an experiment being designed in collaboration between Russian VNIIEF scientists and LANL that aims to conduct high velocity material experiments to measure shock velocities at pressures near 1 TPa. The DEMG (Disk Explosive Magnetic Generator) is used to drive >60MA currents to accelerate an aluminum liner to speeds in excess of 20 km/s. The 1-D model of the DEMG has been refined from a given current profile to a time-varying inductance. Various techniques are used to model the FOS (Foil Opening Switch) on the DEMG and a refined DEMG model is then used to drive a liner into various targets to determine the optimum design for the experiment and analyze the possible conditions and complications.

  8. Wear behavior of high velocity arc sprayed 3Cr13 steel coating in oil containing sand

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DU Ling-zhong; XU Bin-shi; DONG Shi-yun; YANG Hua; WU Yi-xiong

    2004-01-01

    To improve the wear resistance of the machine components serving in desert areas, the 3Cr13 stainless steel coating was produced by the high velocity arc spraying technique. The microstructure and phase constitute of the coating were analyzed by SEM and XRD. The effects of sand content on the friction and wear behaviors of the coating under the lubrication of oil containing sand were investigated on a ball-on-disk tester. SEM was used to reveal the wear mechanisms of the coating. The results show that the wear volume increases with increasing the sand content in the oil, and the sprayed coating exhibits better triobological properties compared with the 1045 steel. The predominant wear mechanisms of the sprayed coating are micro-cutting, brittle fracture and delamination.

  9. High-Velocity Impact Behaviour of Prestressed Composite Plates under Bird Strike Loading

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebastian Heimbs

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available An experimental and numerical analysis of the response of laminated composite plates under high-velocity impact loads of soft body gelatine projectiles (artificial birds is presented. The plates are exposed to tensile and compressive preloads before impact in order to cover realistic loading conditions of representative aeronautic structures under foreign object impact. The modelling methodology for the composite material, delamination interfaces, impact projectile, and preload using the commercial finite element code Abaqus are presented in detail. Finally, the influence of prestress and of different delamination modelling approaches on the impact response is discussed and a comparison to experimental test data is given. Tensile and compressive preloading was found to have an influence on the damage pattern. Although this general behaviour could be predicted well by the simulations, further numerical challenges for improved bird strike simulation accuracy are highlighted.

  10. Microstructure Characterization of WCCo-Mo Based Coatings Produced Using High Velocity Oxygen Fuel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Serkan Islak

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The present study has been carried out in order to investigate the microstructural properties of WCCo-Mo composite coatings deposited onto a SAE 4140 steel substrate by high velocity oxygen fuel (HVOF thermal spray. For this purpose, the Mo quantity added to the WCCo was changed as 10, 20, 30 and 40 wt. % percents. The coatings are compared in terms of their phase composition, microstructure and hardness. Phase compound and microstructure of coating layers were examined using X-ray diffractometer (XRD and scanning electron microscope (SEM. XRD results showed that WCCo-Mo composite coatings were mainly composed of WC, W2C, Co3W3C, Mo2C, MoO2, Mo and Co phases. The average hardness of the coatings increased with increasing Mo content.

  11. Inferring the high velocity of landslides in Valles Marineris on Mars from morphological analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazzanti, Paolo; De Blasio, Fabio Vittorio; Di Bastiano, Camilla; Bozzano, Francesca

    2016-01-01

    The flow characteristics and velocities of three landslides in Valles Marineris on Mars are investigated using detailed morphological analyses of high-resolution images and dynamical calculations based on the run-up and curvature of the landslide deposits. The morphologies of the landslides are described, especially concerning those characteristics that can provide information on the dynamics and velocity. The long runout and estimated high velocities, often exceeding 100 m/s, confirm a low basal friction experienced by these landslides. Because subaqueous landslides on Earth exhibit reduced friction, we explore the scenario of sub-lacustrine failures, but find little support to this hypothesis. The environmental conditions that better explain the low friction and the presence of longitudinal furrows suggest an aerial environment with a basal soft and naturally lubricating medium on which friction diminished gradually; in this perspective, ice is the most promising candidate.

  12. A Compact Circumstellar Shell as the Source of High--velocity Features in SN 2011fe

    CERN Document Server

    Mulligan, Brian W

    2015-01-01

    High--velocity features (HVF), especially of Ca II, are frequently seen in Type Ia supernovae observed prior to B-band maximum (Bmax). These HVF start at more than 25,000 km/s in the days after first light, and slow to about 18,000 km/s near Bmax. To recreate the Ca II near-infrared triplet (CaNIR) HVF in SN 2011fe, we consider the interaction between a Type Ia supernova and a compact circumstellar shell, employing a hydrodynamic 1-D simulation using FLASH. We generate synthetic spectra from the hydrodynamic results using syn++. We show that the CaNIR HVF and its velocity evolution is better explained by a supernova model interacting with a shell than a model without a shell, and briefly discuss the implications for progenitor models.

  13. Design and Construction of a One-Stage Gas Gun for High Velocity Impact Tests

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gamboa-Castellanos Ricardo Alberto

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available High impact tests are characterized by a projectile traveling at high speed as well as complex events such as flying fragments due to the velocity at which the impact occurs; however, these tests have become increasingly popular due to the need for more stringent protective material requirements nowadays. In this paper, the design and construction of a one-stage light gas gun for ballistic testing is presented. This particular design is characterized by its simplicity, excellent performance at low cost and compact dimensions, when compared to commercial systems, presenting an affordable option for materials characterization for high velocity impact tests. The results are completed with the characterization of an armor grade material, obtaining the ballistic limit of the material, as well as demonstrating the effectiveness and versatility of the equipment.

  14. A best practice method to maximize pigging results in high velocity pipelines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freeman, Eric; Strong, Robert; Drysdale, Colin [T.D. Williamson Inc. (United States)

    2009-07-01

    Many pipelines run at high product velocities which inhibits the results of maintenance pigging. In order to compensate for this, some operators temporarily slow flow rates or run pigs at the higher velocities. Each of these approaches yields different costs and effectiveness. T.D. Williamson (TDW) has developed a patent-pending speed reducing venturi pig (or SR-21 Raptor{sup TM}-Pig), which utilizes high bypass flow through the pig body designed to reduce pig travel speed, while incorporating an inertia/flow actuated valve to minimize stalling and surging. The aim of this paper is to summarize performance characteristics and field testing results for this patent-pending venturi pig, and how it may deliver better results in high-velocity pipeline conditions. (author)

  15. Numerical Simulation on Supersonic Flow in High-Velocity Oxy-Fuel Thermal Spray Gun

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hiroshi KATANODA; Hideki YAMAMOTO; Kazuyasu MATSUO

    2006-01-01

    This paper analyzes the behaviour of coating particles as well as the gas flow both inside and outside of the High-Velocity Oxy-Fuel (HVOF) thermal spray gun by using a quasi-one-dimensional analysis and a numerical simulation. The HVOF gun in the present analysis is an axially symmetric convergent-divergent nozzle with the design Mach number of 2.0. From the present analysis, the distributions of velocity and temperature of the coating particles flying inside and outside of the HVOF gun are predicted. The velocity and temperature of the coating particles at the exit of the gun calculated by the present method agree well with the previous experimental results. Therefore, the present method of calculation is considered to be useful for predicting the HVOF gas and particle flows.

  16. Aerodynamic Study on Supersonic Flows in High-Velocity Oxy-Fuel Thermal Spray Process

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hiroshi KATANODA; Takeshi MATSUOKA; Seiji KURODA; Jin KAWAKITA; Hirotaka FUKANUMA; Kazuyasu MATSUO

    2005-01-01

    @@ To clarify the characteristics of gas flow in high velocity oxy-fuel (HVOF) thermal spray gun, aerodynamic research is performed using a special gun. The gun has rectangular cross-sectional area and sidewalls of optical glass to visualize the internal flow. The gun consists of a supersonic nozzle with the design Mach number of 2.0 followed by a straight passage called barrel. Compressed dry air up to 0.78 MPa is used as a process gas instead of combustion gas which is used in a commercial HVOF gun. The high-speed gas flows with shock waves in the gun and jets are visualized by schlieren technique. Complicated internal and external flow-fields containing various types of shock wave as well as expansion wave are visualized.

  17. Sliding wear behavior of high velocity arc sprayed Fe-Al coating

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    朱子新; 徐滨士; 马世宁; 张伟

    2003-01-01

    The friction and wear behavior of Fe-Al intermetallics based coating produced by high velocity arc spraying technique under dry sliding at room temperature were investigated using a ball-on-disc tribotester. The effect of sliding speed on friction coefficient and wear of the coating was studied. The worn surface of the coating was analyzed by scanning electron microscope (SEM) to explore sliding friction and wear mechanism. The results show that the variations of friction coefficient can be divided into three distinct steps during the trail. Both the friction coefficient and the wear of the coating increase with increased sliding speed due to accelerated crack propagation rate and lamellar structure with poor ductility of the coating. The coating surface is subjected to alternately tensile stress and compression stress during sliding wear process, and the predominant wear mechanism of the coatings appears to be brittle fracture and delamination.

  18. The Effects of Drag and Tidal Forces on the Orbits of High-Velocity Clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandes, Alexandre; Benjamin, R. A.

    2013-06-01

    Over the past several years, orbital constraints have been obtained for several high velocity cloud complexes surrounding the Milky Way: Complex GCP (Smith Cloud), Complex A, Complex H, Complex GCN, and the Magellanic Stream. We summarize what is known about the orbits of these clouds and and discuss how well each of these complexes fits a balistic trajectory, and discuss how the length of a complex across the sky is related to the inital "fragmentation" and velocity dispersion of the clouds. We then introduce gas drag into the simulation of the orbits of these complexes. We present analytical tests of our numerical method and characterize the departure of the clouds from the ballistic trajectory as a function of drag parameters (ambient gas density and velocity and cloud column density). Using the results of these simulations we comment on the survivability and ultimate fate of HVC in the context of the different models of drag forces.

  19. Changes of balance between proteinase and their inhibitors in blood of pigs with high-velocity missile wounds

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周元国; 朱佩芳; 周继红; 李晓炎

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To study the effect of imbalance between lysosomal enzymes and their inhibitors in blood on disturbance of the local and whole body after trauma. Methods: The dynamic changes of lysosomal enzymes and proteinase inhibitors were studied in 12 pigs with femoral comminuted fractures in both hind limbs caused by high velocity missiles. Four normal pigs served as controls. Results: After injury, the activity of Cathepsin D in arterial plasma increased gradually and reached the highest level at 8 hours, acid phosphatase in serum began to increase at 12 hours and the value of serum elastase did not change significantly. The level of α1-antitrypsin, a proteinase inhibitor in plasma, decreased significantly in the early stage after injury [73.5%±6.4% and 81.0%±5.1% of the baseline value (1.67 μmol*ml-1*min-1± 0.29 μmol*ml-1*min-1) at l and 2 hours after injury, respectively, P<0.05], then increased gradually and was higher than the baseline value at 12 hours after injury. Conclusions: Imbalance between lysosomal enzymes and proteinase inhibitors occurs soon after injury, which might result in continuous tissue damage and play an important role in the disturbance of general reaction after injury.

  20. Study of the fragmentation of astrophysical interest molecules (CnHm) induced by high velocity collision

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This work shows the study of atom-molecule collision processes in the high velocity domain (v=4,5 a.u). The molecules concerned by this work are small unsaturated hydrocarbons C1-4H and C3H2. Molecules are accelerated with the Tandem accelerator in Orsay and their fragmentation is analyzed by the 4π, 100% efficient detector, AGAT. Thanks to a shape analysis of the current signal from the silicon detectors in association with the well known grid method, we are able to measure all the fragmentation channels of the incident molecule. These dissociation measurements have been introduced in the modelization of two objects of the interstellar medium in which a lot of hydrocarbon molecules have been observed (TMC1, horse-head nebula). We have extended our branching ratios obtained by high velocity collision to other electronic processes included in the chemical database like photodissociation and dissociative recombination. This procedure is feasible under an assumption of the statistical point of view of the molecular fragmentation. The deviations following our modification are very small in the modelization of TMC1 but significant in the photodissociation region. The first part is dedicated to the description of the experimental setting that has enabled us to study the fragmentation of CnHm molecules: the Orsay's Tandem accelerator and the Agat detector. The second part deals with negative ion sources and particularly with the Sahat source that is based on electronic impact and has shown good features for the production of anions and correct stability for its use with accelerators. The third part is dedicated to the experimental results in terms of cross-sections, number of fragments and branching ratios, associated to the various collisional processes. The last part presents an application of our measurement of fragmentation data to astro-chemistry. In this field, the simulation codes of the inter-stellar medium require databases of chemical reactions that depend on

  1. PROPERTIES AND ORIGIN OF THE HIGH-VELOCITY GAS TOWARD THE LARGE MAGELLANIC CLOUD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the spectra of 139 early-type Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) stars observed with Far Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer and with deep radio Parkes H I 21 cm observations along with those stars, we search for and analyze the absorption and emission from high-velocity gas at +90 ≤ v LSR ≤ +175 km s-1. The H I column density of the high-velocity clouds (HVCs) along these sightlines ranges from 18.4 to 1019.2 cm-2. The incidence of the HVC metal absorption is 70%, significantly higher than the H I emission occurrence of 32%. We find that the mean metallicity of the HVC is [O I/H I] = -0.51 ± 0.120.16. There is no strong evidence for a large variation in the HVC metallicity, implying that these HVCs have a similar origin and are part of the same complex. The mean and scatter of the HVC metallicities are more consistent with the present-day LMC oxygen abundance than that of the Small Magellanic Cloud or the MW. We find that on average [Si II/O I] = +0.48 ± 0.150.25 and [Fe II/O I] = +0.33 ± 0.140.21, implying that the HVC complex is dominantly ionized. The HVC complex has a multiphase structure with neutral (O I, Fe II), weakly ionized (Fe II, N II), and highly ionized (O VI) components, and has evidence of dust but no molecules. All the observed properties of the HVC can be explained by an energetic outflow from the LMC. This is the first example of a large (>106 Msun) HVC complex that is linked to stellar feedback occurring in a dwarf spiral galaxy.

  2. High-velocity OH megamasers in IRAS 20100-4156: evidence for a supermassive black hole

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harvey-Smith, L.; Allison, J. R.; Green, J. A.; Bannister, K. W.; Chippendale, A.; Edwards, P. G.; Heywood, I.; Hotan, A. W.; Lenc, E.; Marvil, J.; McConnell, D.; Phillips, C. J.; Sault, R. J.; Serra, P.; Stevens, J.; Voronkov, M.; Whiting, M.

    2016-08-01

    We report the discovery of new, high-velocity narrow-line components of the OH megamaser in IRAS 20100-4156. Results from the Australian Square Kilometre Array Pathfinder (ASKAP)'s Boolardy Engineering Test Array (BETA) and the Australia Telescope Compact Array (ATCA) provide two independent measurements of the OH megamaser spectrum. We found evidence for OH megamaser clumps at -409 and -562 km s-1 (blue-shifted) from the systemic velocity of the galaxy, in addition to the lines previously known. The presence of such high velocities in the molecular emission from IRAS 20100-4156 could be explained by a ˜50 pc molecular ring enclosing a ˜3.8 billion solar mass black hole. We also discuss two alternatives, i.e. that the narrow-line masers are dynamically coupled to the wind driven by the active galactic nucleus or they are associated with two separate galactic nuclei. The comparison between the BETA and ATCA spectra provides another scientific verification of ASKAP's BETA. Our data, combined with previous measurements of the source enabled us to study the variability of the source over a 26 yr period. The flux density of the brightest OH maser components has reduced by more than a factor of 2 between 1988 and 2015, whereas a secondary narrow-line component has more than doubled in the same time. Plans for high-resolution very long baseline interferometry follow-up of this source are discussed, as are prospects for discovering new OH megamasers during the ASKAP early science programme.

  3. Turbulence, bubbles and drops

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veen, van der Roeland Cornelis Adriaan

    2016-01-01

    In this thesis, several questions related to drop impact and Taylor-Couette turbulence are answered. The deformation of a drop just before impact can cause a bubble to be entrapped. For many applications, such as inkjet printing, it is crucial to control the size of this entrapped bubble. To study t

  4. WHAM Observations of Ionized Gas in High-Velocity Interstellar Clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynolds, J. L.; Tufte, S. L.

    2003-12-01

    We have used the Wisconsin Hα Mapper (WHAM) spectrometer to study the C complex of high-velocity interstellar clouds. High-velocity clouds (HVCs) have been well-studied in the 21-cm line of neutral hydrogen and are thought to be located in the galactic halo, but their origins and role in galactic evolution are unknown. We study Hα emission, which gives us information about the ionized hydrogen content of the clouds, and other emission lines that allow us to investigate the temperature, density and other conditions in the clouds. The C complex has been studied extensively using ultraviolet absorption spectra from the FUSE and STIS instruments. By combining this information with our emission line data from the same sightlines, we can gain insight into the metallicity and other physical properties of the clouds. Our sightlines include PG1259+593, Mrk 817, Mrk 279, and PG1351+640. We measured Hα emission between 0.051 and 0.106 R in these directions. We placed 3σ upper limits on our nondetections of emission from [SII] λ 6716, [NII] λ 6583, and [OIII] λ 5007 for all of the sightlines. We find a hydrogen ionizing flux of 1.1 x 105 to 2.2 x 105 photons cm-2. Our observations imply a hydrogen ionization fraction of 0.40 to 0.72, an electron density of 0.006 to 0.25 cm-3, and temperature upper limits of 10,000 to 20,000 K, with Mrk 817 possibly as low as 6,000 K. Our results are consistent with previous metallicity calculations of 0.10 to 0.26 solar. Such a small amount of heavy elements suggests an extragalactic origin for the C complex. We acknowledge funding from the National Science Foundation through grant AST 02-06349, from a Research Corporation Cottrell College Science Award, and from the John S. Rogers Science Research Program at Lewis & Clark College.

  5. A dynamic study of fragmentation and energy loss during high velocity impact

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zee, Ralph H.

    1992-01-01

    Research conducted under this contract can be divided into two main areas: hypervelocity (in the range up to 7 km/s) and high velocity (less than 1 km/s). Work in the former was performed at NASA-MSFC using the Light Gas Gun Facility. The lower velocity studies were conducted at Auburn University using the ballistic gun. The emphasis of the project was on the hypervelocity phenomenon especially in the characterization of the debris cloud formed by the primary impact events. Special devices were made to determine the angular distributions of momentum and energy of the debris cloud as a function of impact conditions. After several iteration processes, it was decided to concentrate on the momentum effort. Prototype devices were designed, fabricated, and tested. These devices were based on the conservation of momentum. Distributions of the debris cloud formed were measured by determining the amount of momentum transferred from the debris cloud to strategically placed pendulum measurement devices. The motion of the pendula was monitored using itegrated opto-interrupters. The distribution of momentum in the debris cloud was found to be a strong function of the impact condition. Small projectiles at high velocities were observed to produce finely dispersed debris whereas large projectiles generated discrete particles in the debris. Results also show that the momentum in the forward direction was enhanced due to the impact. This phenomenon of momentum multiplication was also observed in other studies and in computer simulations. It was initially planned to determine the energy distribution using deformation energy in a rod with strain gauges. Results from preliminary studies show that this technique is acceptable but too tedious. A new technique was explored based on measuring the heating effect of the debris cloud using an IR camera. The feasibility and sensitivity was established at Auburn University. This type of energy distribution measurement method can easily be

  6. High-velocity, high-excitation neutral carbon in a cloud in the Vela supernova remnant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenkins, Edward B.; Wallerstein, George

    1995-01-01

    HD 72089 is situated behind the Vela supernova remnant, and the interstellar absorption lines in the spectrum of this star are remarkable for two reasons. First, there are six distinct velocity components that span the (heliocentric) velocity range -60 to +121 km/s in the lines of Na I and Ca II. Second, two of the components at high velocity, one at +85 km/s and another at +121.5 km/s, have densities that are large enough to produce observable lines from neutral carbon. The gas moving at +121.5 km/s has such a large pressure that the excited fine-structure levels of the ground electronic state of C I are collisionally populated nearly in proportion to their level degeneracies. This high-velocity gas exhibits unusually low column densities of Mg I and Na I, compared to that of C I. We propose that the +121.5 km/s component represents gas that has cooled and recombined in a zone that follows a shock driven into a cloud by the very recent passage of a supernova blast wave. A representative preshock density of n(sub H) approximately = 13/cc and velocity v(sub s) = 100 km/s is indicated by the strength of diffuse (O III) emission lines seen in directions very near HD 72089. The strong collisional population of excited C I and apparent absence of excited levels of O I give a most favorable fit to the conditions 1000 less than n(sub H) less than 2900/cc over a temperature range 300 less than T less than 1000 K. The fact that the compression is not substantially more than this indicates that the preshock gas may have had an embedded, transverse magnetic field with a strength B greater than or approximately = 1 micro-G. The large dynamical pressure of the supernova blast wave that would be needed to create the cloud shock that we describe implies that the energy of the supernova was 8 x 10(exp 51) ergs, if the Vela remnant is 500 pc away. We can bring this value much closer to typical supernova energies E less than or approximately = 10(exp 51) ergs if the distance to the

  7. INTERSTELLAR TURBULENCE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Falceta-Gonçalves

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The Interstellar Medium (ISM is a complex, multi-phase system, where the history of the stars occurs. The processes of birth and death of stars are strongly coupled to the dynamics of the ISM. The observed chaotic and diffusive motions of the gas characterize its turbulent nature. Understanding turbulence is crucial for understanding the star-formation process and the energy-mass feedback from evolved stars. Magnetic fields, threading the ISM, are also observed, making this effort even more difficult. In this work, I briefly review the main observations and the characterization of turbulence from these observable quantities. Following on, I provide a review of the physics of magnetized turbulence. Finally, I will show the main results from theoretical and numerical simulations, which can be used to reconstruct observable quantities, and compare these predictions to the observations.

  8. Wave turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nazarenko, Sergey

    2015-07-01

    Wave turbulence is the statistical mechanics of random waves with a broadband spectrum interacting via non-linearity. To understand its difference from non-random well-tuned coherent waves, one could compare the sound of thunder to a piece of classical music. Wave turbulence is surprisingly common and important in a great variety of physical settings, starting with the most familiar ocean waves to waves at quantum scales or to much longer waves in astrophysics. We will provide a basic overview of the wave turbulence ideas, approaches and main results emphasising the physics of the phenomena and using qualitative descriptions avoiding, whenever possible, involved mathematical derivations. In particular, dimensional analysis will be used for obtaining the key scaling solutions in wave turbulence - Kolmogorov-Zakharov (KZ) spectra.

  9. Turbulent mixing

    OpenAIRE

    Dimotakis, Paul E.

    2005-01-01

    The ability of turbulent flows to effectively mix entrained fluids to a molecular scale is a vital part of the dynamics of such flows, with wide-ranging consequences in nature and engineering. It is a considerable experimental, theoretical, modeling, and computational challenge to capture and represent turbulent mixing which, for high Reynolds number (Re) flows, occurs across a spectrum of scales of considerable span. This consideration alone places high-Re mixing phenomena beyond the reach o...

  10. Turbulent mixing layers in supersonic protostellar outflows, with application to DG Tauri

    CERN Document Server

    White, Marc C; Sutherland, Ralph S; Salmeron, Raquel; McGregor, Peter J

    2015-01-01

    Turbulent entrainment processes may play an important role in the outflows from young stellar objects at all stages of their evolution. In particular, lateral entrainment of ambient material by high-velocity, well-collimated protostellar jets may be the cause of the multiple emission-line velocity components observed in the microjet-scale outflows driven by classical T Tauri stars. Intermediate-velocity outflow components may be emitted by a turbulent, shock- excited mixing layer along the boundaries of the jet. We present a formalism for describing such a mixing layer based on Reynolds decomposition of quantities measuring fundamental properties of the gas. In this model, the molecular wind from large disc radii provides a continual supply of material for entrainment. We calculate the total stress profile in the mixing layer, which allows us to estimate the dissipation of turbulent energy, and hence the luminosity of the layer. We utilize MAPPINGS IV shock models to determine the fraction of total emission t...

  11. Phase mixing vs. nonlinear advection in drift-kinetic plasma turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Schekochihin, A A; Highcock, E G; Dellar, P J; Dorland, W; Hammett, G W

    2015-01-01

    A scaling theory of long-wavelength electrostatic turbulence in a magnetised, weakly collisional plasma (e.g., drift-wave turbulence driven by temperature gradients) is proposed, with account taken both of the nonlinear advection of the perturbed particle distribution by fluctuating ExB flows and of its phase mixing, which is caused by the streaming of the particles along the mean magnetic field and, in a linear problem, would lead to Landau damping. A consistent theory is constructed in which very little free energy leaks into high velocity moments of the distribution, rendering the turbulent cascade in the energetically relevant part of the wave-number space essentially fluid-like. The velocity-space spectra of free energy expressed in terms of Hermite-moment orders are steep power laws and so the free-energy content of the phase space does not diverge at infinitesimal collisionality (while it does for a linear problem); collisional heating due to long-wavelength perturbations vanishes in this limit (also i...

  12. An overview of turbulence compensation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schutte, Klamer; van Eekeren, Adam W. M.; Dijk, Judith; Schwering, Piet B. W.; van Iersel, Miranda; Doelman, Niek J.

    2012-09-01

    In general, long range visual detection, recognition and identification are hampered by turbulence caused by atmospheric conditions. Much research has been devoted to the field of turbulence compensation. One of the main advantages of turbulence compensation is that it enables visual identification over larger distances. In many (military) scenarios this is of crucial importance. In this paper we give an overview of several software and hardware approaches to compensate for the visual artifacts caused by turbulence. These approaches are very diverse and range from the use of dedicated hardware, such as adaptive optics, to the use of software methods, such as deconvolution and lucky imaging. For each approach the pros and cons are given and it is indicated for which type of scenario this approach is useful. In more detail we describe the turbulence compensation methods TNO has developed in the last years and place them in the context of the different turbulence compensation approaches and TNO's turbulence compensation roadmap. Furthermore we look forward and indicate the upcoming challenges in the field of turbulence compensation.

  13. Turbulent Phenomena in the Aerobreakup of Liquid Droplets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andras Horvath

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available This work presents the computational simulation results of turbulent phenomena in a high velocity multiphase flow, where the predominantly turbulent phase is the gaseous phase. For reliable simulation results the code is validated by comparing results of a single phase supersonic turbulent flow to other simulation and experimental results and good agreement is found. This is a precondition for the simulation of the initial stages of the breakup of a liquid droplet in a high Weber number flow. The role of the subgrid-scale turbulence is investigated and two distinct regions are identified. In the second region turbulence phenomena seem to be the predominant factors for the characteristic shape. Simulation results are compared to experiments of the droplet breakup at high Weber number.

  14. MATTER MIXING IN ASPHERICAL CORE-COLLAPSE SUPERNOVAE: A SEARCH FOR POSSIBLE CONDITIONS FOR CONVEYING {sup 56}Ni INTO HIGH VELOCITY REGIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ono, Masaomi; Nagataki, Shigehiro; Ito, Hirotaka; Lee, Shiu-Hang; Mao, Jirong; Tolstov, Alexey [Astrophysical Big Bang Laboratory, RIKEN, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Hashimoto, Masa-aki, E-mail: masaomi.ono@riken.jp [Department of Physics, Kyushu University, Fukuoka 812-8581 (Japan)

    2013-08-20

    We perform two-dimensional axisymmetric hydrodynamic simulations of matter mixing in aspherical core-collapse supernova explosions of a 16.3 M{sub Sun} star with a compact hydrogen envelope. Observations of SN 1987A have provided evidence that {sup 56}Ni synthesized by explosive nucleosynthesis is mixed into fast moving matter ({approx}>3500 km s{sup -1}) in the exploding star. In order to clarify the key conditions for reproducing such high velocity of {sup 56}Ni, we revisit matter mixing in aspherical core-collapse supernova explosions. Explosions are initiated artificially by injecting thermal and kinetic energies around the interface between the iron core and the silicon-rich layer. Perturbations of 5% or 30% amplitude in the radial velocities are introduced at several points in time. We find that no high velocity {sup 56}Ni can be obtained if we consider bipolar explosions with perturbations (5% amplitude) of pre-supernova origins. If large perturbations (30% amplitude) are introduced or exist due to some unknown mechanism in a later phase just before the shock wave reaches the hydrogen envelope, {sup 56}Ni with a velocity of 3000 km s{sup -1} can be obtained. Aspherical explosions that are asymmetric across the equatorial plane with clumpy structures in the initial shock waves are investigated. We find that the clump sizes affect the penetration of {sup 56}Ni. Finally, we report that an aspherical explosion model that is asymmetric across the equatorial plane with multiple perturbations of pre-supernova origins can cause the penetration of {sup 56}Ni clumps into fast moving matter of 3000 km s{sup -1}. We show that both aspherical explosions with clumpy structures and perturbations of pre-supernova origins may be necessary to reproduce the observed high velocity of {sup 56}Ni. To confirm this, more robust three-dimensional simulations are required.

  15. Surface-to-borehole illumination of a high-velocity layer using marine VSP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    MacBeth, C.; Liu, E. [British Geological Survey, Edinburgh (United Kingdom); Boyd, M.; Sweeney, K. [Conoco UK Ltd., Aberdeen (United Kingdom)

    1994-12-31

    Two marine walkaway VSP lines are recorded by three-component receivers positioned in a dolomite layer. The layer has a high seismic velocity relative to the surrounding rocks and may be fracture. The recorded wavefield is analyzed to determine whether this acquisition is suitable to image details of the internal structure of the layer. The principal arrivals in the wavefield are a dominant horizontally refracted compressional wave with a smooth unbroken moveout, converted shear-waves from shallow reflectors, and reverberation of these converted shear-waves within the high velocity layer. Anisotropic analyses of the converted shear-waves estimate an overburden birefringence of 3% and a polarization direction consistent with the known NW-SE maximum compressive stress. Full-wave modeling of the recorded wavefield aids identification of the various arrivals and constrains the attenuation and anisotropic properties of the layer, which appears laterally uniform with the most satisfactory model possessing low attenuation but a birefringence of no more than 5%. If the layer is cracked, these results are diagnostic of evenly distributed cracks with a scalelength smaller than a fraction of a wavelength.

  16. H ii REGIONS WITHIN A COMPACT HIGH VELOCITY CLOUD. A NEARLY STARLESS DWARF GALAXY?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bellazzini, M. [INAF—Osservatorio Astronomico di Bologna, Via Ranzani 1, I-40127 Bologna (Italy); Magrini, L. [INAF—Osservatorio Astrofisico di Arcetri, Largo E. Fermi 5, I-50125 Firenze (Italy); Mucciarelli, A.; Fraternali, F. [Dipartimento di Fisica and Astronomia, Università degli Studi di Bologna, Viale Berti Pichat, 6/2, I-40127 Bologna (Italy); Beccari, G. [European Southern Observatory, Alonso de Cordova 3107, Vitacura Santiago (Chile); Ibata, R.; Martin, N. [Obs. astronomique de Strasbourg, Université de Strasbourg, CNRS, UMR 7550, 11 rue de l’Université, F-67000 Strasbourg (France); Battaglia, G. [Instituto de Astrofisica de Canarias, E-38205 La Laguna, Tenerife (Spain); Testa, V. [INAF—Osservatorio Astronomico di Roma, via Frascati 33, I-00040 Monteporzio (Italy); Fumana, M.; Marchetti, A. [INAF—IASF, via E. Bassini 15, I-20133, Milano (Italy); Correnti, M., E-mail: michele.bellazzini@oabo.inaf.it [Space Telescope Science Institute, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States)

    2015-02-10

    Within the SECCO survey we identified a candidate stellar counterpart to the Ultra Compact High Velocity Cloud (UCHVC) HVC274.68+74.70-123 that was suggested by Adams et al. to be a possible mini halo within the Local Group of galaxies. The spectroscopic follow-up of the brightest sources within the candidate reveals the presence of two H ii regions whose radial velocity is compatible with a physical association with the UVHVC. The available data do not allow us to give a definite answer on the nature of the newly identified system. A few alternative hypotheses are discussed. However, the most likely possibility is that we have found a new faint dwarf galaxy residing in the Virgo cluster of galaxies, which we name SECCO 1. Independently of its actual distance, SECCO 1 displays a ratio of neutral hydrogen mass to V luminosity of M{sub H} {sub I}/L{sub V}≳20, by far the largest among local dwarfs. Hence, it appears to be a nearly starless galaxy and it may be an example of the missing links between normal dwarfs and the dark mini halos that are predicted to exist in large numbers according to the currently accepted cosmological model.

  17. Collisions between Dark Matter Confined High Velocity Clouds and Magnetized Galactic Disks: The Smith Cloud

    CERN Document Server

    Galyardt, Jason

    2015-01-01

    The Galaxy's population of High Velocity Clouds (HVCs) may include a subpopulation that is confined by dark matter minihalos and falling toward the Galactic disk. We present the first magnetohydrodynamic simulational study of dark matter-dominated HVCs colliding with a weakly magnetized galactic disk. Our HVCs have baryonic masses of $5 \\times 10^6\\,$M$_{\\odot}$ and dark matter minihalo masses of 0, $3 \\times 10^8$, or $1 \\times 10^9\\,$M$_{\\odot}$. They are modeled on the Smith Cloud, which is said to have collided with the disk 70 Myr ago. We find that, in all cases, the cloud's collision with the galactic disk creates a hole in the disk, completely disperses the cloud, and forms a bubble-shaped structure on the far side of the disk. In contrast, when present, the dark matter minihalo continues unimpeded along its trajectory. Later, as the minihalo passes through the bubble structure and galactic halo, it accretes up to $6.0 \\times 10^5\\,$M$_{\\odot}$ in baryonic material, depending on the strengths of the ma...

  18. Searching for Dark Matter Annihilation in the Smith High-Velocity Cloud

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drlica-Wagner, Alex; Gomez-Vargas, German A.; Hewitt, John W.; Linden, Tim; Tibaldo, Luigi

    2014-01-01

    Recent observations suggest that some high-velocity clouds may be confined by massive dark matter halos. In particular, the proximity and proposed dark matter content of the Smith Cloud make it a tempting target for the indirect detection of dark matter annihilation. We argue that the Smith Cloud may be a better target than some Milky Way dwarf spheroidal satellite galaxies and use gamma-ray observations from the Fermi Large Area Telescope to search for a dark matter annihilation signal. No significant gamma-ray excess is found coincident with the Smith Cloud, and we set strong limits on the dark matter annihilation cross section assuming a spatially extended dark matter profile consistent with dynamical modeling of the Smith Cloud. Notably, these limits exclude the canonical thermal relic cross section (approximately 3 x 10 (sup -26) cubic centimeters per second) for dark matter masses less than or approximately 30 gigaelectronvolts annihilating via the B/B- bar oscillation or tau/antitau channels for certain assumptions of the dark matter density profile; however, uncertainties in the dark matter content of the Smith Cloud may significantly weaken these constraints.

  19. A High-velocity Cloud Impact Forming a Supershell in the Milky Way

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Geumsook; Koo, Bon-Chul; Kang, Ji-hyun; Gibson, Steven J.; Peek, J. E. G.; Douglas, Kevin A.; Korpela, Eric J.; Heiles, Carl E.

    2016-08-01

    Neutral atomic hydrogen (H i) gas in interstellar space is largely organized into filaments, loops, and shells, the most prominent of which are “supershells.” These gigantic structures, which require ≳ 3× {10}52 erg to form, are generally thought to be produced by either the explosion of multiple supernovae (SNe) in OB associations or, alternatively, by the impact of high-velocity clouds (HVCs) falling into the Galactic disk. Here, we report the detection of a kiloparsec (kpc)-size supershell in the outskirts of the Milky Way with the compact HVC 040 + 01-282 (hereafter, CHVC040) at its geometrical center using the “Inner-Galaxy Arecibo L-band Feed Array” H i 21 cm survey data. The morphological and physical properties of both objects suggest that CHVC040, which is either a fragment of a nearby disrupted galaxy or a cloud that originated from an intergalactic accreting flow, collided with the disk ˜5 Myr ago to form the supershell. Our results show that some compact HVCs can survive their trip through the Galactic halo and inject energy and momentum into the Milky Way disk.

  20. A High-Velocity Cloud Impact Forming a Supershell in the Milky Way

    CERN Document Server

    Park, Geumsook; Kang, Ji-hyun; Gibson, Steven J; Peek, J E G; Douglas, Kevin A; Korpela, Eric J; Heiles, Carl E

    2016-01-01

    Neutral atomic hydrogen (HI) gas in interstellar space is largely organized into filaments, loops, and shells, the most prominent of which are "supershells". These gigantic structures requiring $\\gtrsim 3 \\times 10^{52}$ erg to form are generally thought to be produced by either the explosion of multiple supernovae (SNe) in OB associations or alternatively by the impact of high-velocity clouds (HVCs) falling to the Galactic disk. Here we report the detection of a kiloparsec (kpc)-size supershell in the outskirts of the Milky Way with the compact HVC 040+01$-$282 (hereafter CHVC040) at its geometrical center using the "Inner-Galaxy Arecibo L-band Feed Array" HI 21-cm survey data. The morphological and physical properties of both objects suggest that CHVC040, which is either a fragment of a nearby disrupted galaxy or a cloud originated from an intergalactic accreting flow, collided with the disk $\\sim 5$ Myrs ago to form the supershell. Our result shows that some compact HVCs can survive their trip through the ...

  1. On the Metallicity and Origin of the Smith High-Velocity Cloud

    CERN Document Server

    Fox, Andrew J; Lockman, Felix J; Wakker, Bart P; Hill, Alex S; Heitsch, Fabian; Stark, David V; Barger, Kathleen A; Sembach, Kenneth R; Rahman, Mubdi

    2015-01-01

    The Smith Cloud is a gaseous high-velocity cloud (HVC) in an advanced state of accretion, only 2.9 kpc below the Galactic plane and due to impact the disk in 27 Myr. It is unique among HVCs in having a known distance (12.4+/-1.3 kpc) and a well-constrained 3D velocity (296 km/s), but its origin has long remained a mystery. Here we present the first absorption-line measurements of its metallicity, using HST/COS UV spectra of three AGN lying behind the Cloud together with Green Bank Telescope 21 cm spectra of the same directions. Using Voigt-profile fitting of the S II 1250, 1253, 1259 triplet together with ionization corrections derived from photoionization modeling, we derive the sulfur abundance in each direction; a weighted average of the three measurements gives [S/H]=-0.28+/-0.14, or 0.53+0.21-0.15 solar metallicity. The finding that the Smith Cloud is metal-enriched lends support to scenarios where it represents recycled Galactic material rather than the remnant of a dwarf galaxy or accreting intergalact...

  2. HI Imaging of LGS 3 and an Apparently Interacting High-Velocity Cloud

    CERN Document Server

    Robishaw, T; Blitz, L; Robishaw, Timothy; Simon, Joshua D.; Blitz, Leo

    2002-01-01

    We present a 93' by 93' map of the area near the Local Group dwarf galaxy LGS 3, centered on an HI cloud 30' away from the galaxy. Previous authors associated this cloud with LGS 3 but relied on observations made with a 36' beam. Our high-resolution (3.4'), wide-field Arecibo observations of the region reveal that the HI cloud is distinct from the galaxy and suggest an interaction between the two. We point out faint emission features in the map that may be gas that has been tidally removed from the HI cloud by LGS 3. We also derive the rotation curve of the cloud and find that it is in solid-body rotation out to a radius of 10', beyond which the rotation velocity begins to decline. Assuming a spherical geometry for the cloud, the implied mass is 2.8 x 10^7 (d/Mpc) M_{Sun}, where d is the distance in Mpc. The observed HI mass is 5.5 x 10^6 (d/Mpc)^2 M_{Sun}, implying that the cloud is dark-matter dominated unless its distance is at least 1.9 Mpc. We propose that the cloud is a high-velocity cloud that is under...

  3. The Extreme High-Velocity Outflow in Quasar PG0935+417

    CERN Document Server

    Hidalgo, Paola Rodríguez; Hall, Patrick

    2010-01-01

    We report the detection of OVI 1031,1037 and NV 1238,1242 absorption in a system of "mini-broad" absorption lines (mini-BALs) previously reported to have variable CIV 1548,1550 in the quasar PG0935+417. The formation of these lines in an extreme high-velocity quasar outflow (with v ~ -50000 km/s) is confirmed by the line variability, broad smooth absorption profiles, and partial covering of the background light source. HI and lower ionization metals are not clearly present. The resolved OVI doublet indicates that these lines are moderately saturated, with the absorber covering ~80% of the quasar continuum source (C_f~0.8). We derive ionic column densities of order 1015 cm^(-2) in CIV and several times larger in OVI, indicating an ionization parameter of log U >~ -0.5. Assuming solar abundances, we estimate a total column density of N(H) ~5 x 10^(19) cm^(-2). This outflow emerged sometime between 1982 and 1993. Our examination of the CIV data from 1993 to 2007 shows that there is variable complex absorption ac...

  4. Episodic High Velocity Outflows from V899 Mon: A Constraint On The Outflow Mechanisms

    CERN Document Server

    Ninan, J P; Philip, N S

    2016-01-01

    We report the detection of large variations in the outflow wind velocity from a young eruptive star, V899 Mon during its ongoing high accretion outburst phase. Such large variations in the outflow velocity (from -722 km s$^{-1}$ to -425 km s$^{-1}$) have never been reported previously in this family of objects. Our continuous monitoring of this source shows that the multi-component, clumpy, and episodic high velocity outflows are stable in the time scale of a few days, and vary over the time scale of a few weeks to months. We detect significant decoupling in the instantaneous outflow strength to accretion rate. From the comparison of various possible outflow mechanisms in magnetospheric accretion of young stellar objects, we conclude magnetically driven polar winds to be the most consistent mechanism for the outflows seen in V899 Mon. The large scale fluctuations in outflow over the short period makes V899 Mon the most ideal source to constrain various magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) simulations of magnetospheric ...

  5. Episodic High-velocity Outflows from V899 Mon: A Constraint On The Outflow Mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ninan, J. P.; Ojha, D. K.; Philip, N. S.

    2016-07-01

    We report the detection of large variations in the outflow wind velocity from a young eruptive star, V899 Mon, during its ongoing high accretion outburst phase. Such large variations in the outflow velocity (from ‑722 to ‑425 km s‑1) have never been reported previously in this family of objects. Our continuous monitoring of this source shows that the multi-component, clumpy, and episodic high velocity outflows are stable in the timescale of a few days, and vary over the timescale of a few weeks to months. We detect significant decoupling in the instantaneous outflow strength to accretion rate. From the comparison of various possible outflow mechanisms in magnetospheric accretion of young stellar objects, we conclude magnetically driven polar winds to be the most consistent mechanism for the outflows seen in V899 Mon. The large scale fluctuations in outflow over the short period makes V899 Mon the most ideal source to constrain various magnetohydrodynamics simulations of magnetospheric accretion. Based on observations made with the Southern African Large Telescope (SALT).

  6. THE NEAREST HIGH-VELOCITY STARS REVEALED BY LAMOST DATA RELEASE 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhong, Jing; Chen, Li; Hou, Jinliang; Shen, Shiyin; Shao, Zhengyi; Li, Jing [Key Laboratory for Research in Galaxies and Cosmology, Shanghai Astronomical Observatory, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 80 Nandan Road, Shanghai 200030 (China); Liu, Chao; Luo, Ali; Shi, Jianrong; Zhang, Haotong; Yang, Ming; Deng, Licai [Key Laboratory of Optical Astronomy, National Astronomical Observatories, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Datun Road 20A, Beijing 100012 (China); De Grijs, Richard [Kavli Institute for Astronomy and Astrophysics and Department of Astronomy, Peking University, Yi He Yuan Lu 5, Hai Dian District, Beijing 100871 (China); Jin, Ge [University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei 230026 (China); Zhang, Yong; Hou, Yonghui; Zhang, Zhenchao, E-mail: jzhong@shao.ac.cn [Nanjing Institute of Astronomical Optics and Technology, National Astronomical Observatories, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Nanjing 210042 (China)

    2014-07-01

    We report the discovery of 28 candidate high-velocity stars (HVSs) at heliocentric distances of less than 3 kpc, based on the Large Sky Area Multi-Object Fiber Spectroscopic Telescope (LAMOST) Data Release 1. Our sample of HVS candidates covers a much broader color range than the equivalent ranges discussed in previous studies and comprises the first and largest sample of HVSs in the immediate solar neighborhood, at heliocentric distances less than 1-3 kpc. The observed as well as the derived parameters for all candidates are sufficiently accurate to allow us to ascertain their nature as genuine HVSs, of which a subset of 12 objects represents the most promising candidates. Our results also highlight the great potential of discovering statistically large numbers of HVSs of different spectral types in LAMOST survey data. This will ultimately enable us to achieve a better understanding of the nature of Galactic HVSs and their ejection mechanisms, and to constrain the structure of the Galaxy.

  7. Analysis of Particle Behavior in High-Velocity Oxy-Fuel Thermal Spraying Process

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hiroshi Katanoda; Kazuyasu Matsuo

    2003-01-01

    This paper analyzes the behavior of coating particle as well as the gas flow both of inside and outside the High-Velocity Oxy-Fuel (HVOF) thermal spraying gun by using quasi-one-dimensional analysis and numerical simulation. The HVOF gun in the present analysis is an axisymmetric convergent-divergent nozzle with the design Mach number of 2.0 followed by a straight passage called barrel. In the present analysis it is assumed that the influence of the particles injected in the gas flow is neglected, and the interaction between the particles is also neglected. The gas flow in the gun is assumed to be quasi-one-dimensional adiabatic flow. The velocity, temperature and density of gas in the jet discharged from the barrel exit are predicted by solving Navier-Stokes equations numerically. The particle equation of motion is numerically integrated using three-step Runge-Kutta method. The drag coefficient of the particle is calculated by linear interpolation of the experimental data obtained in the past. Particle mean temperature is calculated by using Ranz and Marchalls' correlation for spherical particles. From the present analysis, the distributions of velocity and temperature of the coating particles flying inside and outside the HVOF gun are predicted.

  8. High-Velocity Features of Calcium and Silicon in the Spectra of Type Ia Supernovae

    CERN Document Server

    Silverman, Jeffrey M; Marion, G H; Wheeler, J Craig; Barna, Barnabas; Szalai, Tamas; Mulligan, Brian; Filippenko, Alexei V

    2015-01-01

    "High-velocity features" (HVFs) are spectral features in Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) that have minima indicating significantly higher (by greater than about 6000 km/s) velocities than typical "photospheric-velocity features" (PVFs). The PVFs are absorption features with minima indicating typical photospheric (i.e., bulk ejecta) velocities (usually ~9000-15,000 km/s near B-band maximum brightness). In this work we undertake the most in-depth study of HVFs ever performed. The dataset used herein consists of 445 low-resolution optical and near-infrared (NIR) spectra (at epochs up to 5 d past maximum brightness) of 210 low-redshift SNe Ia that follow the "Phillips relation." A series of Gaussian functions is fit to the data in order to characterise possible HVFs of Ca II H&K, Si II {\\lambda}6355, and the Ca II NIR triplet. The temporal evolution of the velocities and strengths of the PVFs and HVFs of these three spectral features is investigated, as are possible correlations with other SN Ia observables. We f...

  9. THE NEAREST HIGH-VELOCITY STARS REVEALED BY LAMOST DATA RELEASE 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report the discovery of 28 candidate high-velocity stars (HVSs) at heliocentric distances of less than 3 kpc, based on the Large Sky Area Multi-Object Fiber Spectroscopic Telescope (LAMOST) Data Release 1. Our sample of HVS candidates covers a much broader color range than the equivalent ranges discussed in previous studies and comprises the first and largest sample of HVSs in the immediate solar neighborhood, at heliocentric distances less than 1-3 kpc. The observed as well as the derived parameters for all candidates are sufficiently accurate to allow us to ascertain their nature as genuine HVSs, of which a subset of 12 objects represents the most promising candidates. Our results also highlight the great potential of discovering statistically large numbers of HVSs of different spectral types in LAMOST survey data. This will ultimately enable us to achieve a better understanding of the nature of Galactic HVSs and their ejection mechanisms, and to constrain the structure of the Galaxy

  10. Direct collapse black hole formation via high-velocity collisions of protogalaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Inayoshi, Kohei; Kashiyama, Kazumi

    2015-01-01

    We propose high-velocity collisions of protogalaxies as a new pathway to form supermassive stars (SMSs) with masses of ~ 10^5 Msun at high redshift (z > 10). When protogalaxies hosted by dark matter halos with a virial temperature of ~ 10^4 K collide with a relative velocity > 200 km/s, the gas is shock-heated to ~ 10^6 K and subsequently cools isobarically via free-free emission and He^+, He, and H line emission. Since the gas density (> 10^4 cm^{-3}) is high enough to destroy H_2 molecules by collisional dissociation, the shocked gas never cools below ~ 10^4 K. Once a gas cloud of ~ 10^5 Msun reaches this temperature, it becomes gravitationally unstable and forms a SMS which will rapidly collapse into a super massive black hole (SMBH) via general relativistic instability. We perform a simple analytic estimate of the number density of direct-collapse black holes (DCBHs) formed through this scenario (calibrated with cosmological N-body simulations) and find n_{DCBH} ~ 10^{-9} Mpc^{-3} (comoving) by z = 10. Th...

  11. Experimental and analytical study of high velocity impact on Kevlar/Epoxy composite plates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sikarwar, Rahul; Velmurugan, Raman; Madhu, Velmuri

    2012-12-01

    In the present study, impact behavior of Kevlar/Epoxy composite plates has been carried out experimentally by considering different thicknesses and lay-up sequences and compared with analytical results. The effect of thickness, lay-up sequence on energy absorbing capacity has been studied for high velocity impact. Four lay-up sequences and four thickness values have been considered. Initial velocities and residual velocities are measured experimentally to calculate the energy absorbing capacity of laminates. Residual velocity of projectile and energy absorbed by laminates are calculated analytically. The results obtained from analytical study are found to be in good agreement with experimental results. It is observed from the study that 0/90 lay-up sequence is most effective for impact resistance. Delamination area is maximum on the back side of the plate for all thickness values and lay-up sequences. The delamination area on the back is maximum for 0/90/45/-45 laminates compared to other lay-up sequences.

  12. Identifying galaxy candidates in WSRT HI imaging of ultra-compact high velocity clouds

    CERN Document Server

    Adams, Elizabeth A K; Cannon, John M; Giovanelli, Riccardo; Haynes, Martha P

    2016-01-01

    Ultra-compact high velocity clouds (UCHVCs) were identified in the ALFALFA HI survey as potential gas-bearing dark matter halos. Here we present higher resolution neutral hydrogen (HI) observations of twelve UCHVCS with the Westerbork Synthesis Radio Telescope (WSRT). The UCHVCs were selected based on a combination of size, isolation, large recessional velocity and high column density as the best candidate dark matter halos. The WSRT data were tapered to image the UCHVCs at 210" (comparable to Arecibo) and 105" angular resolution. In a comparison of the single-dish to interferometer data, we find that the line flux recovered in the WSRT observations is comparable to that from the single-dish ALFALFA data. In addition, any structure seen in the ALFALFA data is reproduced in the WSRT maps at the same angular resolution. At 210'" resolution all the sources are generally compact with a smooth HI morphology, as expected from their identification as UCHVCs. At the higher angular resolution, a majority of the source...

  13. Jets or high velocity flows revealed in high-cadence spectrometer and imager co-observations?

    CERN Document Server

    Madjarska, M S; Innes, D; Curdt, W

    2007-01-01

    We report on active region EUV dynamic events observed simultaneously at high-cadence with SUMER/SoHO and TRACE. Although the features appear in the TRACE Fe ix/x 171A images as jets seen in projection on the solar disk, the SUMER spectral line profiles suggest that the plasma has been driven along a curved large scale magnetic structure, a pre-existing loop. The SUMER observations were carried out in spectral lines covering a large temperature range from 10^4 K to 10^6 K. The spectral analysis revealed that a sudden heating from an energy deposition is followed by a high velocity plasma flow. The Doppler velocities were found to be in the range from 90 to 160 km/s. The heating process has a duration which is below the SUMER exposure time of 25 s while the lifetime of the events is from 5 to 15 min. The additional check on soft X-ray Yohkoh images shows that the features most probably reach 3 MK (X-ray) temperatures. The spectroscopic analysis showed no existence of cold material during the events.

  14. The collision of high-velocity clouds with a galactic disk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tenorio-Tagle, G.; Bodenheimer, P.; Rozyczka, M.; Franco, J.

    1986-01-01

    Two-dimensional hydrodynamic simulations for the interaction of high-velocity clouds with a galactic disk are presented. The impinging clouds are assumed to be spherical and the target disk is represented by a constant density slab, n(g) = 1/cu cm, with a total width W(g) = 200 pc. The numerical experiments cover a wide range of cloud densities, between 0.1 and 100/cu cm, and velocities between 100 and 300 km/s. At a time approximately 10 to the 7th yr after impact, two types of final configurations are found. In the first case, the infalling cloud is completely shocked in a time short compared with the crossing time of the disk. Then, the generated cavity has time to grow sideways and large scale structures with a round shape, and in some cases nearly spherical, are produced. In the second case, which occurs for high density clouds, the cloud is shocked on a time scale longer than or comparable to the crossing time. The resultant cylindrical holes drilled across the entire disk have the dimensions of the impinging cloud. Cloud-galaxy interactions are compared with other energy sources and the morphologies of the resultant structures are suggested to resemble the large scale structures observed in H I.

  15. Ultra-Compact High Velocity Clouds as Minihalos and Dwarf Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Faerman, Yakov; McKee, Christopher F

    2013-01-01

    We present dark-matter minihalo models for the Ultra-Compact High Velocity HI Clouds (UCHVCs) recently discovered in the 21 cm ALFALFA survey. We assume gravitational confinement of 10^4 K HI gas by flat-cored dark-matter subhalos within the Local Group. We show that for flat cores, typical (median) tidally-stripped cosmological subhalos at redshift z=0 have dark-matter masses of ~10^7 M_{sun} within the central 300 pc (independent of total halo mass), consistent with the "Strigari mass scale" observed in low-luminosity dwarf galaxies. Flat-cored subhalos also resolve the mass-discrepancy between simulated and observed satellites around the Milky Way. For the UCHVCs we calculate the photoionization-limited hydrostatic gas profiles for any distance-dependent total observed HI mass and predict the associated (projected) HI half-mass radii, assuming the clouds are embedded in distant (d > 300 kpc) and unstripped subhalos. For a typical UCHVC (0.9 Jy km/s) we predict physical HI half-mass radii of 0.18 to 0.35 kp...

  16. Are Newly Discovered HI High Velocity Clouds Minihalos in the Local Group?

    CERN Document Server

    Giovanelli, Riccardo; Kent, Brian R; Adams, Elizabeth K

    2009-01-01

    A set of HI sources extracted from the north Galactic polar region by the ongoing ALFALFA survey has properties that are consistent with the interpretation that they are associated with isolated minihalos in the outskirts of the Local Group (LG). Unlike objects detected by previous surveys, such as the Compact High Velocity Clouds of Braun & Burton (1999), the HI clouds found by ALFALFA do not violate any structural requirements or halo scaling laws of the LambdaCDM structure paradigm, nor would they have been detected by extant HI surveys of nearby galaxy groups other than the LG. At a distance of d Mpc, their HI masses range between $5 x 10^4 d^2 and 10^6 d^2 solar and their HI radii between <0.4d and 1.6 d kpc. If they are parts of gravitationally bound halos, the total masses would be on order of 10^8--10^9 solar, their baryonic content would be signifcantly smaller than the cosmic fraction of 0.16 and present in a ionized gas phase of mass well exceeding that of the neutral phase. This study does ...

  17. Variability of the High Velocity Outflow in the Quasar PDS 456

    CERN Document Server

    Reeves, J N; Gofford, J; Sim, S A; Behar, E; Costa, M; Kaspi, S; Matzeu, G; Miller, L; O'Brien, P; Turner, T J; Ward, M

    2013-01-01

    We present a comparison of two Suzaku X-ray observations of the nearby (z=0.184), luminous ($L_{bol} \\sim 10^{47}$ erg s$^{-1}$) type I quasar, PDS456. A new 125ks Suzaku observation in 2011 caught the quasar during a period of low X-ray flux and with a hard X-ray spectrum, in contrast to a previous 190ks Suzaku observation in 2007 when the quasar appeared brighter and had a steep ($\\Gamma>2$) X-ray spectrum. The 2011 X-ray spectrum contains a pronounced trough near 9\\,keV in the quasar rest frame, which can be modeled with blue-shifted iron K-shell absorption, most likely from the He and H-like transitions of iron. The absorption trough is observed at a similar rest-frame energy as in the earlier 2007 observation, which appears to confirm the existence of a persistent high velocity wind in PDS 456, at an outflow velocity of $0.25-0.30$c. The spectral variability between 2007 and 2011 can be accounted for by variations in a partial covering absorber, increasing in covering fraction from the brighter 2007 obse...

  18. The First Distance Constraint on the Renegade High Velocity Cloud Complex WD

    CERN Document Server

    Peek, J E G; Sana, Hugues; Roman-Duval, Julia; Tumlinson, Jason; Zheng, Yong

    2016-01-01

    We present medium-resolution, near-ultraviolet VLT/FLAMES observations of the star USNO-A0600-15865535. We adapt a standard method of stellar typing to our measurement of the shape of the Balmer epsilon absorption line to demonstrates that USNO-A0600-15865535 is a blue horizontal branch star, residing in the lower stellar halo at a distance of 4.4 kpc from the Sun. We measure the H & K lines of singly-ionized calcium and find two isolated velocity components, one originating in the disk, and one associated with high-velocity cloud complex WD. This detection demonstrated that complex WD is closer than ~4.4 kpc and is the first distance constraint on the +100 km/s Galactic complex of clouds. We find that Complex WD is not in corotation with the Galactic disk as has been assumed for decades. We examine a number of scenarios, and find that the most likely is that Complex WD was ejected from the solar neighborhood and is only a few kpc from the Sun.

  19. A High-velocity Cloud Impact Forming a Supershell in the Milky Way

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Geumsook; Koo, Bon-Chul; Kang, Ji-hyun; Gibson, Steven J.; Peek, J. E. G.; Douglas, Kevin A.; Korpela, Eric J.; Heiles, Carl E.

    2016-08-01

    Neutral atomic hydrogen (H i) gas in interstellar space is largely organized into filaments, loops, and shells, the most prominent of which are “supershells.” These gigantic structures, which require ≳ 3× {10}52 erg to form, are generally thought to be produced by either the explosion of multiple supernovae (SNe) in OB associations or, alternatively, by the impact of high-velocity clouds (HVCs) falling into the Galactic disk. Here, we report the detection of a kiloparsec (kpc)-size supershell in the outskirts of the Milky Way with the compact HVC 040 + 01‑282 (hereafter, CHVC040) at its geometrical center using the “Inner-Galaxy Arecibo L-band Feed Array” H i 21 cm survey data. The morphological and physical properties of both objects suggest that CHVC040, which is either a fragment of a nearby disrupted galaxy or a cloud that originated from an intergalactic accreting flow, collided with the disk ˜5 Myr ago to form the supershell. Our results show that some compact HVCs can survive their trip through the Galactic halo and inject energy and momentum into the Milky Way disk.

  20. The High Velocity Galaxy Problem of $\\Lambda$CDM in the Local Group $-$ Including External Perturbers

    CERN Document Server

    Banik, Indranil

    2016-01-01

    We recently used an axisymmetric model of the Local Group (LG) to show that the observed positions and velocities of galaxies inside it are difficult to reconcile with the standard cosmological model, $\\Lambda$CDM (MNRAS, 459, 2237). We now extend this investigation using a 3D model of the LG. This makes it feasible to directly include several other mass concentrations within and just outside the LG e.g. M33 and IC 342, respectively. As before, LG dwarf galaxies are treated as test particles. Although our best-fitting 3D model yields different velocity predictions for individual galaxies, the overall picture remains unchanged. In particular, observed radial velocities (RVs) tend to exceed $\\Lambda$CDM model predictions. The typical mismatch is slightly higher than in our earlier axisymmetric analysis, with a root mean square value of $\\sim$50 km/s. \\emph{Our main finding is that including the 3D distribution of massive perturbing dark matter halos is unlikely to help greatly with the high velocity galaxy prob...

  1. Searching for dark matter annihilation in the Smith high-velocity cloud

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recent observations suggest that some high-velocity clouds may be confined by massive dark matter halos. In particular, the proximity and proposed dark matter content of the Smith Cloud make it a tempting target for the indirect detection of dark matter annihilation. We argue that the Smith Cloud may be a better target than some Milky Way dwarf spheroidal satellite galaxies and use γ-ray observations from the Fermi Large Area Telescope to search for a dark matter annihilation signal. No significant γ-ray excess is found coincident with the Smith Cloud, and we set strong limits on the dark matter annihilation cross section assuming a spatially extended dark matter profile consistent with dynamical modeling of the Smith Cloud. Notably, these limits exclude the canonical thermal relic cross section (∼ 3 × 10–26 cm3 s–1) for dark matter masses ≲ 30 GeV annihilating via the b b-bar or τ+τ– channels for certain assumptions of the dark matter density profile; however, uncertainties in the dark matter content of the Smith Cloud may significantly weaken these constraints.

  2. H_alpha Emission from High-Velocity Clouds and their Distances

    CERN Document Server

    Putman, M E; Veilleux, S; Gibson, B K; Freeman, K C; Maloney, P R

    2003-01-01

    We present deep Halpha spectroscopy towards several high-velocity clouds (HVCs) which vary in structure from compact (CHVCs) to the Magellanic Stream. The clouds range from being bright (~640 mR) to having upper limits on the order of 30 to 70 mR. The Halpha measurements are discussed in relation to their HI properties and distance constraints are given to each of the complexes based on f_esc = 6% of the ionizing photons escaping normal to the Galactic disk (f_escs = 1 - 2% when averaged over solid angle). The results suggest that many HVCs and CHVCs are within a ~40 kpc radius from the Galaxy and are not members of the Local Group at megaparsec distances. However, the Magellanic Stream is inconsistent with this model and needs to be explained. It has bright Halpha emission and little [NII] emission and appears to fall into a different category than the currently detected HVCs. This may reflect the lower metallicities of the Magellanic Clouds compared to the Galaxy, but the strength of the Halpha emission can...

  3. Chemical abundances in a high velocity RR Lyrae star near the bulge

    CERN Document Server

    Hansen, Camilla Juul; Koch, Andreas; Xu, Siyi; Kunder, Andrea; Ludwig, Hans-Guenter

    2016-01-01

    Low-mass, variable, high-velocity stars are interesting study cases for many aspects of Galactic structure and evolution. Until recently, the only known high- or hyper-velocity stars were young stars thought to originate from the Galactic centre. Wide-area surveys like APOGEE and BRAVA have found several low-mass stars in the bulge with Galactic rest-frame velocities larger than 350 km/s. In this study we present the first abundance analysis of a low-mass, RR Lyrae star, located close to the Galactic bulge, with a space motion of ~ -400 km/s. Using medium-resolution spectra, we derive abundances (including upper limits) of 11 elements. These allow us to chemically tag the star and discuss its origin, although our derived abundances and metallicity, at [Fe/H] =-0.9 dex, do not point toward one unambiguous answer. Based on the chemical tagging, we cannot exclude that it originated in the bulge. However, combining its retrograde orbit and the derived abundances suggests that the star was accelerated from the out...

  4. The Fate of High-Velocity Clouds: Warm or Cold Cosmic Rain?

    CERN Document Server

    Heitsch, Fabian

    2009-01-01

    We present two sets of grid-based hydrodynamical simulations of high-velocity clouds (HVCs) traveling through the diffuse, hot Galactic halo. These HI clouds have been suggested to provide fuel for ongoing star formation in the Galactic disk. The first set of models is best described as a wind-tunnel experiment in which the HVC is exposed to a wind of constant density and velocity. In the second set of models we follow the trajectory of the HVC on its way through an isothermal hydrostatic halo towards the disk. Thus, we cover the two extremes of possible HVC trajectories. The resulting cloud morphologies exhibit a pronounced head-tail structure, with a leading dense cold core and a warm diffuse tail. Morphologies and velocity differences between head and tail are consistent with observations. For typical cloud velocities and halo densities, clouds with H{\\small{I}} masses $< 10^{4.5}$ M$_\\odot$ will lose their H{\\small{I}} content within 10 kpc or less. Their remnants may contribute to a population of warm...

  5. The First Distance Constraint on the Renegade High-velocity Cloud Complex WD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peek, J. E. G.; Bordoloi, Rongmon; Sana, Hugues; Roman-Duval, Julia; Tumlinson, Jason; Zheng, Yong

    2016-09-01

    We present medium-resolution, near-ultraviolet Very Large Telescope/FLAMES observations of the star USNO-A0600-15865535. We adapt a standard method of stellar typing to our measurement of the shape of the Balmer ɛ absorption line to demonstrate that USNO-A0600-15865535 is a blue horizontal branch star, residing in the lower stellar halo at a distance of 4.4 kpc from the Sun. We measure the H & K lines of singly ionized calcium and find two isolated velocity components, one originating in the disk, and one associated with the high-velocity cloud complex WD. This detection demonstrated that complex WD is closer than ∼4.4 kpc and is the first distance constraint on the +100 km s‑1 Galactic complex of clouds. We find that complex WD is not in corotation with the Galactic disk, which has been assumed for decades. We examine a number of scenarios and find that the most likely scenario is that complex WD was ejected from the solar neighborhood and is only a few kiloparsecs from the Sun.

  6. Search for high velocities in the disk counterpart of type II spicules

    CERN Document Server

    Langangen, Ø; Carlsson, M; Hansteen, V H; Cauzzi, G; Reardon, K

    2008-01-01

    Recently, De Pontieu et al. (2007b) discovered a class of spicules that evolves more rapidly than previously known spicules, with rapid apparent motions of 50--150 km s${}^{-1}$, thickness of a few 100 km, and lifetimes of order 10--60 seconds. These so-called type II spicules have been difficult to study because of limited spatio-temporal and thermal resolution. Here we use the IBIS instrument to search for the high velocities in the disk counterpart of type II spicules. We have detected rapidly evolving events, with lifetimes that are less than a minute and often equal to the cadence of the instrument (19 secs). These events are characterized by a Doppler shift that only appears in the blue wing of the Ca II IR line. Furthermore the spatial extent, lifetime, and location near network, all suggest a link to type II spicules. However, the magnitude of the measured Doppler velocity is significantly lower than the apparent motions seen at the limb. We use Monte Carlo simulations to show that this discrepancy ca...

  7. Smith's Cloud: A High-velocity Cloud Colliding with the Milky Way

    CERN Document Server

    Lockman, Felix J; Heroux, A J; Langston, Glen I

    2008-01-01

    New 21cm HI observations made with the Green Bank Telescope show that the high-velocity cloud known as Smith's Cloud has a striking cometary appearance and many indications of interaction with the Galactic ISM. The velocities of interaction give a kinematic distance of 12.4 +/-1.3 kpc, consistent with the distance derived from other methods. The Cloud is >3 x 1 kpc in size and its tip at (l,b)=(39 deg,-13 deg) is 7.6 kpc from the Galactic center and 2.9 kpc below the Galactic plane. It has greater than 10^6 M solar masses in HI. Its leading section has a total space velocity near 300 km/s, is moving toward the Galactic plane with a velocity of 73+/-26 km/s, and is shedding material to the Galaxy. In the absence of drag the Cloud will cross the plane in about 27 Myr. Smith's Cloud may be an example of the accretion of gas by the Milky Way needed to explain certain persistent anomalies in Galactic chemical evolution.

  8. Asymmetry in the Spectrum of High-Velocity H2O Maser Emission Features in Active Galactic Nuclei

    CERN Document Server

    Nesterenok, A V; 10.1134/S1063773710010019

    2010-01-01

    We suggest a mechanism for the amplification of high-velocity water-vapor maser emission features from the central regions of active galactic nuclei. The model of an emitting accretion disk is considered. The high-velocity emission features originate in the right and left wings of the Keplerian disk. The hyperfine splitting of the signal levels leads to an asymmetry in the spectral profile of the water vapor maser line at a frequency of 22.235 GHz. We show that the gain profile asymmetry must lead to an enhanced brightness of the blueshifted high-velocity emission features compared to the redshifted ones. Such a situation is observed in the source UGC 3789.

  9. A Stress-Induced Martensitic Transformation in Aged Ti49Ni51 Alloy after High-Velocity Impact

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yingying Zhu

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The effects of a high-velocity impact on the microstructure, phase transformation and mechanical property of aged Ti49Ni51 alloy are investigated. The transformation behavior and microstructure along the impact direction after impact emerge with regionalization characteristics, including a deformed region near the crater (0–4 mm and an un-deformed region of the distal crater (5–6 mm. Stress-induced martensite is the main deformation mechanism in the deforming region of aged Ti49Ni51 alloy under high-velocity impact.

  10. PROCESSING AND CHARACTERISATION OF HIGH-VELOCITY SUSPENSION FLAME SPRAYED (HVSFS BIOACTIVE GLASS COATINGS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    GIOVANNI BOLELLI

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available The High-Velocity Suspension Flame Spraying (HVSFS technique was employed in order to deposit bioactive glass coatings onto titanium substrates. Two different glass compositions were examined: the classical 45S5 Bioglass and a newly-developed SiO2–CaO–K2O–P2O5 glass, labelled as “Bio-K”. Suitable raw materials were melted in a furnace and fritted by casting into water. The frit was dry-milled in a porcelain jar and subsequently attrition-milled in isopropanol. The resulting micronsized powders were dispersed in a water+isopropanol mixture, in order to prepare suitable suspensions for the HVSFS process. The deposition parameters were varied; however, all coatings were obtained by performing three consecutive torch cycles in front of the substrate. The thickness and porosity of the coatings were significantly affected by the chosen set of deposition parameters; however, in all cases, the layer produced during the third torch cycle was thicker and denser than the one produced during the first cycle. As the system temperature increases during the spraying process, the particles sprayed during the last torch cycle remain at T > Tg while they spread, so that interlamellar viscous flow sintering takes place, favouring the formation of such denser microstructure. Both coatings are entirely glassy; however, micro-Raman spectroscopy reveals that, whereas the 45S5 coating is structurally identical to the corresponding bulk glass, the “Bio-K” coating is somewhat different from the bulk one.

  11. Cognate xenoliths in Mt. Etna lavas: witnesses of the high-velocity body beneath the volcano

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corsaro, Rosa Anna; Rotolo, Silvio Giuseppe; Cocina, Ornella; Tumbarello, Gianvito

    2014-01-01

    Various xenoliths have been found in lavas of the 1763 ("La Montagnola"), 2001, and 2002-03 eruptions at Mt. Etna whose petrographic evidence and mineral chemistry exclude a mantle origin and clearly point to a cognate nature. Consequently, cognate xenoliths might represent a proxy to infer the nature of the high-velocity body (HVB) imaged beneath the volcano by seismic tomography. Petrography allows us to group the cognate xenoliths as follows: i) gabbros with amphibole and amphibole-bearing mela-gabbros, ii) olivine-bearing leuco-gabbros, iii) leuco-gabbros with amphibole, and iv) Plg-rich leuco gabbros. Geobarometry estimates the crystallization pressure of the cognate xenoliths between 1.9 and 4.1 kbar. The bulk density of the cognate xenoliths varies from 2.6 to 3.0 g/cm3. P wave velocities (V P ), calculated in relation to xenolith density, range from 4.9 to 6.1 km/s. The integration of mineralogical, compositional, geobarometric data, and density-dependent V P with recent literature data on 3D V P seismic tomography enabled us to formulate the first hypothesis about the nature of the HVB which, in the depth range of 3-13 km b.s.l., is likely made of intrusive gabbroic rocks. These are believed to have formed at the "solidification front", a marginal zone that encompasses a deep region (>5 km b.s.l.) of Mt. Etna's plumbing system, within which magma crystallization takes place. The intrusive rocks were afterwards fragmented and transported as cognate xenoliths by the volatile-rich and fast-ascending magmas of the 1763 "La Montagnola", 2001 and 2002-03 eruptions.

  12. The effects of varying resistance-training loads on intermediate- and high-velocity-specific adaptations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, K; Bishop, P; Hunter, G; Fleisig, G

    2001-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare changes in velocity-specific adaptations in moderately resistance-trained athletes who trained with either low or high resistances. The study used tests of sport-specific skills across an intermediate- to high-velocity spectrum. Thirty NCAA Division I baseball players were randomly assigned to either a low-resistance (40-60% 1 repetition maximum [1RM]) training group or a high-resistance (70-90% 1RM) training group. Both of the training groups intended to maximallv accelerate each repetition during the concentric phase (IMCA). The 10 weeks of training consisted of 4 training sessions a week using basic core exercises. Peak force, velocity, and power were evaluated during set angle and depth jumps as well as weighted jumps using 30 and 50% 1RM. Squat 1RMs were also tested. Although no interactions for any of the jump tests were found, trends supported the hypothesis of velocity-specific training. Percentage gains suggest that the combined use of heavier training loads (70-90% 1RM) and IMCA tend to increase peak force in the lower-body leg and hip extensors. Trends also show that the combined use of lighter training loads (40-60% 1RM) and IMCA tend to increase peak power and peak velocity in the lower-body leg and hip extensors. The high-resistance group improved squats more than the low-resistance group (p IMCA to increase 1RM strength in the lower bodies of resistance-trained athletes.

  13. COLLISIONS BETWEEN DARK MATTER CONFINED HIGH VELOCITY CLOUDS AND MAGNETIZED GALACTIC DISKS: THE SMITH CLOUD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Galyardt, Jason; Shelton, Robin L., E-mail: jeg@uga.edu, E-mail: rls@physast.uga.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Georgia, Athens, GA 30602 (United States)

    2016-01-01

    The Galaxy’s population of High Velocity Clouds (HVCs) may include a subpopulation that is confined by dark matter minihalos and falling toward the Galactic disk. We present the first magnetohydrodynamic simulational study of dark-matter-dominated HVCs colliding with a weakly magnetized galactic disk. Our HVCs have baryonic masses of 5 × 10{sup 6}M{sub ⊙} and dark matter minihalo masses of 0, 3 × 10{sup 8}, or 1 × 10{sup 9} M{sub ⊙}. They are modeled on the Smith Cloud, which is said to have collided with the disk 70 Myr ago. We find that, in all cases, the cloud’s collision with the galactic disk creates a hole in the disk, completely disperses the cloud, and forms a bubble-shaped structure on the far side of the disk. In contrast, when present, the dark matter minihalo continues unimpeded along its trajectory. Later, as the minihalo passes through the bubble structure and galactic halo, it accretes up to 6.0 × 10{sup 5} M{sub ⊙} in baryonic material, depending on the strengths of the magnetic field and minihalo gravity. These simulations suggest that if the Smith Cloud is associated with a dark matter minihalo and collided with the Galactic disk, the minihalo has accreted the observed gas. However, if the Smith Cloud is dark-matter-free, it is on its first approach toward the disk. These simulations also suggest that the dark matter is most concentrated either at the head of the cloud or near the cloud, depending upon the strength of the magnetic field, a point that could inform indirect dark matter searches.

  14. Study of the damage produced by high velocity pellets on graphite first wall elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the RFX experiment the first wall is completely covered by graphite tiles and a multishot pellet injector for hydrogen (H) and deuterium (D) pellets with masses of 1.5--5 · 1020 atoms at velocity of 500--1,500 m/s has been installed. Some concern existed about the possibility of seriously damaging the graphite with non-ablated hydrogen pellets. The paper presents a study performed by launching plastic and metal pellets at various velocities to evaluate the damage induced on graphite samples. The use of non-hydrogen pellet avoided the necessity of working in a vacuum environment and allowed to explore a wider parameter range than it would be possible with a single hydrogen pellet injector. The results obtained show that the amount of graphite dug out from the sample depends linearly on the kinetic energy only of the incoming pellet, with a threshold value of ≥0.1--0.2 J. Tests performed with hydrogen pellets confirmed that, at low and medium velocity, little or no damage is done to the graphite and indicated that the threshold value for hydrogen is ≥0.7 J. Hence in RFX, while H pellets fired at low velocity have an energy below threshold, the largest size pellets fired at high velocity, are expected to produce significant damage, i.e., removal of graphite masses comparable to the pellet size. Tests performed on Inconel elements of the vacuum vessel show that even the largest RFX pellet fired at 1,500 m/s is not able to punch through a 1 mm thick Inconel sheet

  15. Energy Productivity of the High Velocity Algae Raceway Integrated Design (ARID-HV)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Attalah, Said; Waller, Peter M.; Khawam, George; Ryan, Randy D.; Huesemann, Michael H.

    2015-06-03

    The original Algae Raceway Integrated Design (ARID) raceway was an effective method to increase algae culture temperature in open raceways. However, the energy input was high and flow mixing was poor. Thus, the High Velocity Algae Raceway Integrated Design (ARID-HV) raceway was developed to reduce energy input requirements and improve flow mixing in a serpentine flow path. A prototype ARID-HV system was installed in Tucson, Arizona. Based on algae growth simulation and hydraulic analysis, an optimal ARID-HV raceway was designed, and the electrical energy input requirement (kWh ha-1 d-1) was calculated. An algae growth model was used to compare the productivity of ARIDHV and conventional raceways. The model uses a pond surface energy balance to calculate water temperature as a function of environmental parameters. Algae growth and biomass loss are calculated based on rate constants during day and night, respectively. A 10 year simulation of DOE strain 1412 (Chlorella sorokiniana) showed that the ARID-HV raceway had significantly higher production than a conventional raceway for all months of the year in Tucson, Arizona. It should be noted that this difference is species and climate specific and is not observed in other climates and with other algae species. The algae growth model results and electrical energy input evaluation were used to compare the energy productivity (algae production rate/energy input) of the ARID-HV and conventional raceways for Chlorella sorokiniana in Tucson, Arizona. The energy productivity of the ARID-HV raceway was significantly greater than the energy productivity of a conventional raceway for all months of the year.

  16. Shear instability of plastically-deforming metals in high-velocity impact welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nassiri, Ali; Kinsey, Brad; Chini, Greg

    2016-10-01

    High-speed oblique impact of two metal plates results in the development of an intense shear region at their interface leading to interfacial profile distortion and interatomic bonding. If the relative velocity is sufficient, a distinct wavy morphology with a well-defined amplitude and wavelength is observed. Emergence of this morphology below the melting point of the metal plates is usually taken as evidence of a successful weld. Amongvarious proposed mechanisms, instability owing to large tangential velocity variations near the interface has received significant attention. With one exception, the few quantitative stability analyses of this proposed mechanism have treated an anti-symmetric/shear-layer base profile (i.e., a Kelvin-Helmholtz configuration) and employed an inviscid or Newtonian viscous fluid constitutive relation. The former stipulation implies the energy source for the instability is the presumed relative shearing motion of the two plates, while the latter is appropriate only if melting occurs locally near the interface. In this study, these restrictions, which are at odds with the conditions realized in high-velocity impact welding, are relaxed. A quantitative temporal linear stability analysis is performed to investigate whether the interfacial wave morphology could be the signature of a shear-driven high strain-rate instability of a perfectly plastic material undergoing a jet-like deformation near the interface. The resulting partial differential eigenvalue problem is solved numerically using a spectral collocation method in which customized boundary conditions near the interface are implemented to properly treat the singularity arising from the vanishing of the base flow strain-rate at the symmetry plane of the jet. The solution of the eigenvalue problem yields the wavelength and growth rate of the dominant wave-like disturbances along the interface and confirms that a shear instability of a plastically-deforming material is compatible with the

  17. Chemical abundances in a high-velocity RR Lyrae star near the bulge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, C. J.; Rich, R. M.; Koch, A.; Xu, S.; Kunder, A.; Ludwig, H.-G.

    2016-05-01

    Low-mass variable high-velocity stars are interesting study cases for many aspects of Galactic structure and evolution. Until recently, the only known high- or hyper-velocity stars were young stars thought to originate from the Galactic center. Wide-area surveys such as APOGEE and BRAVA have found several low-mass stars in the bulge with Galactic rest-frame velocities higher than 350 km s-1. In this study we present the first abundance analysis of a low-mass RR Lyrae star that is located close to the Galactic bulge, with a space motion of ~-400 km s-1. Using medium-resolution spectra, we derived abundances (including upper limits) of 11 elements. These allowed us to chemically tag the star and discuss its origin, although our derived abundances and metallicity, at [Fe/H] =-0.9 dex, do not point toward one unambiguous answer. Based on the chemical tagging, we cannot exclude that it originated in the bulge. However, its retrograde orbit and the derived abundances combined suggest that the star was accelerated from the outskirts of the inner (or even outer) halo during many-body interactions. Other possible origins include the bulge itself, or the star might have been stripped from a stellar cluster or the Sagittarius dwarf galaxy when it merged with the Milky Way. The data presented herein were obtained at the W. M. Keck Observatory, which is operated as a scientific partnership among the California Institute of Technology, the University of California and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration. The Observatory was made possible by the generous financial support of the W. M. Keck Foundation.

  18. Turbulence modelling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper is an introduction course in modelling turbulent thermohydraulics, aimed at computational fluid dynamics users. No specific knowledge other than the Navier Stokes equations is required beforehand. Chapter I (which those who are not beginners can skip) provides basic ideas on turbulence physics and is taken up in a textbook prepared by the teaching team of the ENPC (Benque, Viollet). Chapter II describes turbulent viscosity type modelling and the 2k-ε two equations model. It provides details of the channel flow case and the boundary conditions. Chapter III describes the 'standard' (Rij-ε) Reynolds tensions transport model and introduces more recent models called 'feasible'. A second paper deals with heat transfer and the effects of gravity, and returns to the Reynolds stress transport model. (author)

  19. Theorem of turbulent intensity and macroscopic mechanism of the turbulence development

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Turbulence is one of the most common nature phenomena in everyday experience, but that is not adequately understood yet. This article reviews the history and present state of development of the turbulence theory and indicates the necessity to probe into the turbulent features and mechanism with the different methods at different levels. Therefore this article proves a theorem of turbulent transpor- tation and a theorem of turbulent intensity by using the theory of the nonequilibrium thermodynamics, and that the Reynolds turbulence and the Rayleigh-Bénard turbulence are united in the theorems of the turbulent intensity and the turbulent transportation. The macroscopic cause of the development of fluid turbulence is a result from shearing effect of the velocity together with the temperature, which is also the macroscopic cause of the stretch and fold of trajectory in the phase space of turbulent field. And it is proved by the observed data of atmosphere that the phenomenological coefficient of turbulent in- tensity is not only a function of the velocity shear but also a function of temperature shear, viz the sta- bility of temperature stratification, in the atmosphere. Accordingly, authenticity of the theorem, which is proved by the theory of nonequilibrium thermodynamics, of turbulent intensity is testified by the facts of observational experiment.

  20. Numerical Simulation of Air Staged Mechanism Effect in a High Velocity Burner

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bernardo A. Herrera-Múnera

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available In this work, staged air combustion in a high speed burner was analyzed by mean of numerical simulation in order to determine its effects on temperature distribution and pollutant chemical species formation such as CO and NOx. The simulations were achieved using the commercial software ANSYS FLUENT as a design tool to predict the behavior of the thermal system and to establish operation conditions with or without staged air. Eddy Dissipation model was used for combustion simulation, while k - ε Realizable and Discrete Ordinates models were utilized for turbulence and radiation simulation, respectively. Results show that staged air mechanism allows better flame stabilization, combustion reactions initiation and fuel-air mixing. The CO formation was different in reaction zone and NOx emissions were not significantly influenced by the staged air.

  1. Cosmic turbulence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A generalization of a transformation due to Kurskov and Ozernoi is used to rewrite the usual equations governing subsonic turbulence in Robertson-Walker cosmological models as Navier-Stokes equations with a time-dependent viscosity. This paper first rederives some well-known results in a very simple way by means of this transformation. The main result however is that the establishment of a Kolmogorov spectrum at recombination appears to be incompatible with subsonic turbulence. The conditions after recombination are also discussed briefly. (author)

  2. Semi-automated structural characterisation of high velocity oxy fuel thermally sprayed WC-Co based coatings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fay, M W [Nottingham Nanotechnology and Nanoscience Centre, University of Nottingham, Nottingham, NG7 2RD (United Kingdom); Han, Y; McCartney, G; Brown, P D [School of Mechanical, Materials and Manufacturing Engineering, University of Nottingham, Nottingham, NG7 2RD (United Kingdom); Korpiola, K [Helsinki University of Technology (Finland)], E-mail: michael.fay@nottingham.ac.uk

    2008-08-15

    The application of an automated procedure for the rapid assessment of selected area electron diffraction patterns is described. Comparison with complementary EDX spectra has enabled the thermal decomposition reactions within high velocity oxy-fuel thermally sprayed WC-Co coatings to be investigated.

  3. Semi-automated structural characterisation of high velocity oxy fuel thermally sprayed WC-Co based coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fay, M. W.; Han, Y.; McCartney, G.; Korpiola, K.; Brown, P. D.

    2008-08-01

    The application of an automated procedure for the rapid assessment of selected area electron diffraction patterns is described. Comparison with complementary EDX spectra has enabled the thermal decomposition reactions within high velocity oxy-fuel thermally sprayed WC-Co coatings to be investigated.

  4. DISTRIBUTION AND ORIGIN OF HIGH-VELOCITY CLOUDS .2. STATISTICAL-ANALYSIS OF THE WHOLE-SKY SURVEY

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    WAKKER, BP

    1991-01-01

    A sensitive, almost complete, whole-sky survey of high-velocity clouds (HVCs) has been made available by Bajaja et al. (1985) and Hulsbosch & Wakker (1988, Paper I). This paper (Paper II in a series on HVCs) is dedicated to the analysis of the statistical properties of these surveys. The main conclu

  5. Hyperfine interactions in soybean and lupin oxy-leghemoglobins studied using Mössbauer spectroscopy with a high velocity resolution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumar, A. [University of Delhi South Campus, Department of Biochemistry (India); Alenkina, I. V. [Ural Federal University, Department of Physical Techniques and Devices for Quality Control, Institute of Physics and Technology (Russian Federation); Zakharova, A. P. [Ural Federal University, Department of Experimental Physics, Institute of Physics and Technology (Russian Federation); Oshtrakh, M. I., E-mail: oshtrakh@gmail.com; Semionkin, V. A. [Ural Federal University, Department of Physical Techniques and Devices for Quality Control, Institute of Physics and Technology (Russian Federation)

    2015-04-15

    A comparative study of monomeric soybean and lupin leghemoglobins in the oxy-form was carried out using Mössbauer spectroscopy with a high velocity resolution at 90 K. The {sup 57}Fe hyperfine parameters of measured spectra were evaluated and compared with possible structural differences in the heme Fe(II)–O {sub 2} bond.

  6. The space density of primordial gas clouds near galaxies and groups and their relation to galactic high-velocity clouds

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zwaan, MA; Briggs, FH

    2000-01-01

    The Arecibo H I Strip Survey probed the halos of similar to 300 cataloged galaxies and the environments of similar to 14 groups with sensitivity to neutral hydrogen masses greater than or equal to 10(7) M-circle dot. The survey detected no objects with properties resembling the high-velocity clouds

  7. High- and low-temperature-stable thermite composition for producing high-pressure, high-velocity gases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halcomb, Danny L.; Mohler, Jonathan H.

    1990-10-16

    A high- and low-temperature-stable thermite composition for producing high-pressure and high-velocity gases comprises an oxidizable metal, an oxidizing reagent, and a high-temperature-stable gas-producing additive selected from the group consisting of metal carbides and metal nitrides.

  8. Moessbauer spectroscopy with high velocity resolution. New possibilities of chemical analysis in material science and biomedical research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An improvement in velocity resolution of Moessbauer spectroscopy permitted us to carry out a more detailed study of iron chemical state in various iron-containing compounds in a wide range of research. New possibilities of Moessbauer spectroscopy with high velocity resolution were shown in the studies of meteorites, nanocomposites, pharmaceuticals and biological subjects. (author)

  9. TOPICAL REVIEW Warm spraying—a novel coating process based on high-velocity impact of solid particles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seiji Kuroda et al

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, coating processes based on the impact of high-velocity solid particles such as cold spraying and aerosol deposition have been developed and attracting much industrial attention. A novel coating process called 'warm spraying' has been developed, in which coatings are formed by the high-velocity impact of solid powder particles heated to appropriate temperatures below the melting point of the powder material. The advantages of such process are as follows: (1 the critical velocity needed to form a coating can be significantly lowered by heating, (2 the degradation of feedstock powder such as oxidation can be significantly controlled compared with conventional thermal spraying where powder is molten, and (3 various coating structures can be realized from porous to dense ones by controlling the temperature and velocity of the particles. The principles and characteristics of this new process are discussed in light of other existing spray processes such as high-velocity oxy-fuel spraying and cold spraying. The gas dynamics of particle heating and acceleration by the spraying apparatus as well as the high-velocity impact phenomena of powder particles are discussed in detail. Several examples of depositing heat sensitive materials such as titanium, metallic glass, WC–Co cermet and polymers are described with potential industrial applications.

  10. HIGH-VELOCITY LINE FORMING REGIONS IN THE TYPE Ia SUPERNOVA 2009ig

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marion, G. H.; Foley, Ryan J.; Challis, Peter; Kirshner, Robert P. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Vinko, Jozsef; Wheeler, J. Craig; Silverman, Jeffrey M. [University of Texas at Austin, 1 University Station C1400, Austin, TX 78712-0259 (United States); Hsiao, Eric Y. [Carnegie Observatories, Las Campanas Observatory, Colina El Pino, Casilla 601 (Chile); Brown, Peter J. [George P. and Cynthia Woods Mitchell Institute for Fundamental Physics and Astronomy, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Texas A and M University, 4242 AMU, College Station, TX 77843 (United States); Filippenko, Alexei V. [Department of Astronomy, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720-3411 (United States); Garnavich, Peter [Department of Physics, University of Notre Dame, 225 Nieuwland Science Hall, Notre Dame, IN 46556 (United States); Landsman, Wayne B. [Adnet Systems, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Parrent, Jerod T. [Las Cumbres Observatory Global Telescope Network, Goleta, CA 93117 (United States); Pritchard, Tyler A.; Roming, Peter W. A. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Penn State University, 525 Davey Lab, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Wang, Xiaofeng, E-mail: gmarion@cfa.harvard.edu [Physics Department and Tsinghua Center for Astrophysics (THCA), Tsinghua University, Beijing 1,00084 (China)

    2013-11-01

    We report measurements and analysis of high-velocity (HVF) (>20,000 km s{sup –1}) and photospheric absorption features in a series of spectra of the Type Ia supernova (SN) 2009ig obtained between –14 days and +13 days with respect to the time of maximum B-band luminosity (B-max). We identify lines of Si II, Si III, S II, Ca II, and Fe II that produce both HVF and photospheric-velocity (PVF) absorption features. SN 2009ig is unusual for the large number of lines with detectable HVF in the spectra, but the light-curve parameters correspond to a slightly overluminous but unexceptional SN Ia (M{sub B} = –19.46 mag and Δm{sub 15}(B) = 0.90 mag). Similarly, the Si II λ6355 velocity at the time of B-max is greater than 'normal' for an SN Ia, but it is not extreme (v{sub Si} = 13,400 km s{sup –1}). The –14 days and –13 days spectra clearly resolve HVF from Si II λ6355 as separate absorptions from a detached line forming region. At these very early phases, detached HVF are prevalent in all lines. From –12 days to –6 days, HVF and PVF are detected simultaneously, and the two line forming regions maintain a constant separation of about 8000 km s{sup –1}. After –6 days all absorption features are PVF. The observations of SN 2009ig provide a complete picture of the transition from HVF to PVF. Most SNe Ia show evidence for HVF from multiple lines in spectra obtained before –10 days, and we compare the spectra of SN 2009ig to observations of other SNe. We show that each of the unusual line profiles for Si II λ6355 found in early-time spectra of SNe Ia correlate to a specific phase in a common development sequence from HVF to PVF.

  11. CUTLASS HF radar observations of high-velocity E-region echoes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. V. Uspensky

    Full Text Available A short event of high-velocity E-region echo observations by the Pykkvibaer HF radar is analysed to study echo parameters and the echo relation to the Farley-Buneman plasma instability. The echoes were detected in several beams aligned closely to the magnetic L-shell direction. Two echo groups were identified: one group corresponded to the classical type 1 echoes with velocities close to the nominal ion-acoustic speed of 400 ms1 , while the other group had significantly larger velocities, of the order of 700 ms1 . The mutual relationship between the echo power, Doppler velocity, spectral width and elevation angles for these two groups was studied. Plotting of echo parameters versus slant range showed that all ~700 ms1 echoes originated from larger heights and distances of 500–700 km, while all ~400 ms1 echoes came from lower heights and from farther distances; 700–1000 km. We argue that both observed groups of echoes occurred due to the Farley-Buneman plasma instability excited by strong ( ~70 mVm1 and uniformly distributed electric fields. We show that the echo velocities for the two groups were different because the echoes were received from different heights. Such a separation of echo heights occurred due to the differing amounts of ionospheric refraction at short and large ranges. Thus, the ionospheric refraction and related altitude modulation of ionospheric parameters are the most important factors to consider, when various characteristics of E-region decametre irregularities are derived from HF radar measurements.

    Key words. Ionosphere (ionospheric irregularities; plasma waves and instabilities; polar ionosphere

  12. ULTRA-COMPACT HIGH VELOCITY CLOUDS AS MINIHALOS AND DWARF GALAXIES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Faerman, Yakov; Sternberg, Amiel [Raymond and Beverly Sackler School of Physics and Astronomy, Tel Aviv University, Ramat Aviv 69978 (Israel); McKee, Christopher F., E-mail: yakovfae@post.tau.ac.il [Department of Physics and Department of Astronomy, University of California at Berkeley, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States)

    2013-11-10

    We present dark matter minihalo models for the Ultra-Compact, High-Velocity H I Clouds (UCHVCs) recently discovered in the 21 cm ALFALFA survey. We assume gravitational confinement of 10{sup 4} K H I gas by flat-cored dark-matter subhalos within the Local Group. We show that for flat cores, typical (median) tidally stripped cosmological subhalos at redshift z = 0 have dark-matter masses of ∼10{sup 7} M{sub ☉} within the central 300 pc (independent of total halo mass), consistent with the 'Strigari mass scale' observed in low-luminosity dwarf galaxies. Flat-cored subhalos also resolve the mass discrepancy between simulated and observed satellites around the Milky Way. For the UCHVCs, we calculate the photoionization-limited hydrostatic gas profiles for any distance-dependent total observed H I mass and predict the associated (projected) H I half-mass radii, assuming the clouds are embedded in distant (d ∼> 300 kpc) and unstripped subhalos. For a typical UCHVC (0.9 Jy km s{sup –1}), we predict physical H I half-mass radii of 0.18 to 0.35 kpc (or angular sizes of 0.'6 to 2.'1) for distances ranging from 300 kpc to 2 Mpc. As a consistency check, we model the gas-rich dwarf galaxy Leo T, for which there is a well-resolved H I column density profile and a known distance (420 kpc). For Leo T, we find that a subhalo with M{sub 300} = 8 (± 0.2) × 10{sup 6} M{sub ☉} best fits the observed H I profile. We derive an upper limit of P{sub HIM} ∼< 150 cm{sup –3} K for the pressure of any enveloping hot intergalactic medium gas at the distance of Leo T. Our analysis suggests that some of the UCHVCs may in fact constitute a population of 21 cm-selected but optically faint dwarf galaxies in the Local Group.

  13. Earthquake Energy Dissipation in Light of High-Velocity, Slip-Pulse Shear Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reches, Z.; Liao, Z.; Chang, J. C.

    2014-12-01

    We investigated the energy dissipation during earthquakes by analysis of high-velocity shear experiments conducted on room-dry, solid samples of granite, tonalite, and dolomite sheared at slip-velocity of 0.0006-1m/s, and normal stress of 1-11.5MPa. The experimental fault were loaded in one of three modes: (1) Slip-pulse of abrupt, intense acceleration followed by moderate deceleration; (2) Impact by a spinning, heavy flywheel (225 kg); and (3) Constant velocity loading. We refer to energy dissipation in terms of power-density (PD=shear stress*slip-velocity; units of MW/m^2), and Coulomb-energy-density (CED= mechanical energy/normal stress; units of m). We present two aspects: Relative energy dissipation of the above loading modes, and relative energy dissipation between impact experiments and moderate earthquakes. For the first aspect, we used: (i) the lowest friction coefficient of the dynamic weakening; (ii) the work dissipated before reaching the lowest friction; and (iii) the cumulative mechanical work during the complete run. The results show that the slip-pulse/impact modes are energy efficient relatively to the constant-velocity mode as manifested by faster, more intense weakening and 50-90% lower energy dissipation. Thus, for a finite amount of pre-seismic crustal energy, the efficiency of slip-pulse would amplify earthquake instability. For the second aspect, we compare the experimental CED of the impact experiments to the reported breakdown energy (EG) of moderate earthquakes, Mw = 5.6 to 7.2 (Chang et al., 2012). In is commonly assumed that the seismic EG is a small fraction of the total earthquake energy, and as expected in 9 out of 11 examined earthquakes, EG was 0.005 to 0.07 of the experimental CED. We thus speculate that the experimental relation of Coulomb-energy-density to total slip distance, D, CED = 0.605 × D^0.933, is a reasonable estimate of total earthquake energy, a quantity that cannot be determined from seismic data.

  14. On the Metallicity and Origin of the Smith High-velocity Cloud

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, Andrew J.; Lehner, Nicolas; Lockman, Felix J.; Wakker, Bart P.; Hill, Alex S.; Heitsch, Fabian; Stark, David V.; Barger, Kathleen A.; Sembach, Kenneth R.; Rahman, Mubdi

    2016-01-01

    The Smith Cloud (SC) is a gaseous high-velocity cloud (HVC) in an advanced state of accretion, only 2.9 kpc below the Galactic plane and due to impact the disk in ≈27 Myr. It is unique among HVCs in having a known distance (12.4 ± 1.3 kpc) and a well-constrained 3D velocity (296 km s-1), but its origin has long remained a mystery. Here we present the first absorption-line measurements of its metallicity, using Hubble Space Telescope/COS UV spectra of three active galactic nuclei lying behind the Cloud together with Green Bank Telescope 21 cm spectra of the same directions. Using Voigt-profile fitting of the S ii λλ1250, 1253, 1259 triplet together with ionization corrections derived from photoionization modeling, we derive the sulfur abundance in each direction; a weighted average of the three measurements gives [S/H] = -0.28 ± 0.14, or {0.53}-0.15+0.21 solar metallicity. The finding that the SC is metal-enriched lends support to scenarios where it represents recycled Galactic material, rather than the remnant of a dwarf galaxy or accreting intergalactic gas. The metallicity and trajectory of the Cloud are both indicative of an origin in the outer disk. However, its large mass and prograde kinematics remain to be fully explained. If the cloud has accreted cooling gas from the corona during its fountain trajectory, as predicted in recent theoretical work, its current mass would be higher than its launch mass, alleviating the mass concern. Based on observations taken under program 13840 of the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, obtained at the Space Telescope Science Institute, which is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc., under NASA contract NAS 5-26555, and under program GBT09A_17 of the Robert C. Byrd Green Bank Telescope (GBT) of the National Radio Astronomy Observatory, a facility of the National Science Foundation operated under a cooperative agreement by Associated Universities, Inc.

  15. Turbulent combustion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Talbot, L.; Cheng, R.K. [Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, CA (United States)

    1993-12-01

    Turbulent combustion is the dominant process in heat and power generating systems. Its most significant aspect is to enhance the burning rate and volumetric power density. Turbulent mixing, however, also influences the chemical rates and has a direct effect on the formation of pollutants, flame ignition and extinction. Therefore, research and development of modern combustion systems for power generation, waste incineration and material synthesis must rely on a fundamental understanding of the physical effect of turbulence on combustion to develop theoretical models that can be used as design tools. The overall objective of this program is to investigate, primarily experimentally, the interaction and coupling between turbulence and combustion. These processes are complex and are characterized by scalar and velocity fluctuations with time and length scales spanning several orders of magnitude. They are also influenced by the so-called {open_quotes}field{close_quotes} effects associated with the characteristics of the flow and burner geometries. The authors` approach is to gain a fundamental understanding by investigating idealized laboratory flames. Laboratory flames are amenable to detailed interrogation by laser diagnostics and their flow geometries are chosen to simplify numerical modeling and simulations and to facilitate comparison between experiments and theory.

  16. Turbulence Model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Mogens Peter; Shui, Wan; Johansson, Jens

    2011-01-01

    term with stresses depending linearly on the strain rates. This term takes into account the transfer of linear momentum from one part of the fluid to another. Besides there is another term, which takes into account the transfer of angular momentum. Thus the model implies a new definition of turbulence...

  17. Interaction of HVCs with the Outskirts of Galactic Disks: Turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Santillan, A; Kim, J; Franco, J; Hernandez-Cervantes, L

    2009-01-01

    There exist many physical processes that may contribute to the driving of turbulence in galactic disks. Some of them could drive turbulence even in the absence of star formation. For example, hydrodynamic (HD) or magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) instabilities, frequent mergers of small satellite clumps, ram pressure, or infalling gas clouds. In this work we present numerical simulations to study the interaction of compact high velocity clouds (CHVC) with the outskirts of magnetized gaseous disks. With our numerical simulations we show that the rain of small HVCs onto the disk is a potential source of random motions in the outer parts of HI disks.

  18. Burgers Turbulence

    OpenAIRE

    Bec, Jeremie; Khanin, Konstantin

    2007-01-01

    The last decades witnessed a renewal of interest in the Burgers equation. Much activities focused on extensions of the original one-dimensional pressureless model introduced in the thirties by the Dutch scientist J.M. Burgers, and more precisely on the problem of Burgers turbulence, that is the study of the solutions to the one- or multi-dimensional Burgers equation with random initial conditions or random forcing. Such work was frequently motivated by new emerging applications of Burgers mod...

  19. Influence of oxides on high velocity arc sprayed Fe-Al/Cr3C2 composite coatings

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU Bin-shi; ZHANG Wei; XU Wei-pu

    2005-01-01

    Fe-Al/Cr3 C2 coatings were sprayed on low steel by high velocity arc spraying(HVAS) technology. The influences of oxides on erosion, corrosion and wear behavior for high velocity arc sprayed Fe-Al/Cr3C2 coatings were studied. The results show that HVAS-sprayed Fe-Al/Cr3 C2 coatings have good erosion, heat corrosion and wear resistance. The erosion resistance improves with the increase of the temperature. On one hand, the ferrous oxides are incompact, so they peel off the surface of the coatings easily during the high temperature erosion. On the other hand, compact Al2O3 films on the surface can protect the coatings.

  20. Imprints of a high velocity wind on the soft x-ray spectrum of PG 1211+143

    CERN Document Server

    Pounds, Ken; Reeves, James; Vaughan, Simon; Costa, Michele

    2016-01-01

    An extended XMM-Newton observation of the luminous narrow line Seyfert galaxy PG 1211+143 in 2014 has revealed a more complex high velocity wind, with components distinguished in velocity, ionization level, and column density. Here we report soft x-ray emission and absorption features from the ionized outflow, finding counterparts of both high velocity components, v ~ 0.129c and v ~ 0.066c, recently identified in the highly ionized Fe K absorption spectrum. The lower ionization of the co-moving soft x-ray absorbers imply a distribution of higher density clouds embedded in the main outflow, while much higher column densities for the same flow component in the hard x-ray spectra suggest differing sight lines to the continuum x-ray source.

  1. Imprints of a high-velocity wind on the soft X-ray spectrum of PG1211+143

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pounds, K. A.; Lobban, A.; Reeves, J. N.; Vaughan, S.; Costa, M.

    2016-07-01

    An extended XMM-Newton observation of the luminous narrow-line Seyfert galaxy PG1211+143 in 2014 has revealed a more complex high-velocity wind, with components distinguished in velocity, ionization level, and column density. Here we report soft X-ray emission and absorption features from the ionized outflow, finding counterparts of both high-velocity components, v ˜ 0.129c and v ˜ 0.066c, recently identified in the highly ionized Fe K absorption spectrum. The lower ionization of the comoving soft X-ray absorbers imply a distribution of higher density clouds embedded in the main outflow, while much higher column densities for the same flow component in the hard X-ray spectra suggest differing sightlines to the continuum X-ray source.

  2. Controlling turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kühnen, Jakob; Hof, Björn

    2015-11-01

    We show that a simple modification of the velocity profile in a pipe can lead to a complete collapse of turbulence and the flow fully relaminarises. The annihilation of turbulence is achieved by a steady manipulation of the streamwise velocity component alone, greatly reducing control efforts. Several different control techniques are presented: one with a local modification of the flow profile by means of a stationary obstacle, one employing a nozzle injecting fluid through a small gap at the pipe wall and one with a moving wall, where a part of the pipe is shifted in the streamwise direction. All control techniques act on the flow such that the streamwise velocity profile becomes more flat and turbulence gradually grows faint and disappears. In a smooth straight pipe the flow remains laminar downstream of the control. Hence a reduction in skin friction by a factor of 8 and more can be accomplished. Stereoscopic PIV-measurements and movies of the development of the flow during relaminarisation are presented.

  3. H2O Maser Observations of Candidate Post-AGB Stars and Discovery of Three High-velocity Water Sources

    CERN Document Server

    Deacon, R M; Green, A J; Sevenster, M N; 10.1086/511383

    2009-01-01

    We present the results of 22 GHz H_2O maser observations of a sample of 85 post-Asymptotic Giant Branch (post-AGB) candidate stars, selected on the basis of their OH 1612 MHz maser and far-infrared properties. All sources were observed with the Tidbinbilla 70-m radio telescope and 21 detections were made. 86 GHz SiO Mopra observations of a subset of the sample are also presented. Of the 21 H_2O detections, 15 are from sources that are likely to be massive AGB stars and most of these show typical, regular H_2O maser profiles. In contrast, nearly all the detections of more evolved stars exhibited high-velocity H_2O maser emission. Of the five sources seen, v223 (W43A, IRAS 18450-0148) is a well known `water-fountain' source which belongs to a small group of post-AGB stars with highly collimated, high-velocity H_2O maser emission. A second source in our sample, v270 (IRAS 18596+0315), is also known to have high-velocity emission. We report the discovery of similar emission from a further three sources, d46 (IRAS...

  4. The origin of the X-ray emission from the high-velocity cloud MS30.7–81.4–118

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Henley, David B.; Shelton, Robin L. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Georgia, Athens, GA 30602 (United States); Kwak, Kyujin, E-mail: dbh@physast.uga.edu, E-mail: rls@physast.uga.edu, E-mail: kkwak@unist.ac.kr [School of Natural Science, Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology (UNIST), 50 UNIST-gil, Ulju-gun, Ulsan 689-798 (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-08-10

    A soft X-ray enhancement has recently been reported toward the high-velocity cloud MS30.7–81.4–118 (MS30.7), a constituent of the Magellanic Stream. In order to investigate the origin of this enhancement, we have analyzed two overlapping XMM-Newton observations of this cloud. We find that the X-ray enhancement is ∼6' or ∼100 pc across, and is concentrated to the north and west of the densest part of the cloud. We modeled the X-ray enhancement with a variety of spectral models. A single-temperature equilibrium plasma model yields a temperature of (3.69{sub −0.44}{sup +0.47})×10{sup 6} K and a 0.4-2.0 keV luminosity of 7.9 × 10{sup 33} erg s{sup –1}. However, this model underpredicts the on-enhancement emission around 1 keV, which may indicate the additional presence of hotter plasma (T ≳ 10{sup 7} K), or that recombination emission is important. We examined several different physical models for the origin of the X-ray enhancement. We find that turbulent mixing of cold cloud material with hot ambient material, compression or shock heating of a hot ambient medium, and charge exchange reactions between cloud atoms and ions in a hot ambient medium all lead to emission that is too faint. In addition, shock heating in a cool or warm medium leads to emission that is too soft (for reasonable cloud speeds). We find that magnetic reconnection could plausibly power the observed X-ray emission, but resistive magnetohydrodynamical simulations are needed to test this hypothesis. If magnetic reconnection is responsible for the X-ray enhancement, the observed spectral properties could potentially constrain the magnetic field in the vicinity of the Magellanic Stream.

  5. Theorem of turbulent intensity and macroscopic mechanism of the turbulence development

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HU YinQiao; CHEN JinBei; ZUO HongChao

    2007-01-01

    Turbulence is one of the most common nature phenomena in everyday experience, but that is not adequately understood yet. This article reviews the history and present state of development of the turbulence theory and indicates the necessity to probe into the turbulent features and mechanism with the different methods at different levels. Therefore this article proves a theorem of turbulent transportation and a theorem of turbulent intensity by using the theory of the nonequilibrium thermodynamics,turbulent intensity and the turbulent transportation. The macroscopic cause of the development of fluid turbulence is a result from shearing effect of the velocity together with the temperature, which is also the macroscopic cause of the stretch and fold of trajectory in the phase space of turbulent field. And it is proved by the observed data of atmosphere that the phenomenological coefficient of turbulent intensity is not only a function of the velocity shear but also a function of temperature shear, viz the stability of temperature stratification, in the atmosphere. Accordingly, authenticity of the theorem, which is proved by the theory of nonequilibrium thermodynamics, of turbulent intensity is testified by the facts of observational experiment.

  6. Graphical Turbulence Guidance - Composite

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Forecast turbulence hazards identified by the Graphical Turbulence Guidance algorithm. The Graphical Turbulence Guidance product depicts mid-level and upper-level...

  7. Magnetohydrodynamic Turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montgomery, David C.

    2004-01-01

    Magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) turbulence theory is modeled on neutral fluid (Navier-Stokes) turbulence theory, but with some important differences. There have been essentially no repeatable laboratory MHD experiments wherein the boundary conditions could be controlled or varied and a full set of diagnostics implemented. The equations of MHD are convincingly derivable only in the limit of small ratio of collision mean-free-paths to macroscopic length scales, an inequality that often goes the other way for magnetofluids of interest. Finally, accurate information on the MHD transport coefficients-and thus, the Reynolds-like numbers that order magnetofluid behavior-is largely lacking; indeed, the algebraic expressions used for such ingredients as the viscous stress tensor are often little more than wishful borrowing from fluid mechanics. The one accurate thing that has been done extensively and well is to solve the (strongly nonlinear) MHD equations numerically, usually in the presence of rectangular periodic boundary conditions, and then hope for the best when drawing inferences from the computations for those astrophysical and geophysical MHD systems for which some indisputably turbulent detailed data are available, such as the solar wind or solar prominences. This has led to what is perhaps the first field of physics for which computer simulations are regarded as more central to validating conclusions than is any kind of measurement. Things have evolved in this way due to a mixture of the inevitable and the bureaucratic, but that is the way it is, and those of us who want to work on the subject have to live with it. It is the only game in town, and theories that have promised more-often on the basis of some alleged ``instability''-have turned out to be illusory.

  8. Small-scale magnetic buoyancy and magnetic pumping effects in a turbulent convection

    OpenAIRE

    Rogachevskii, I.; Kleeorin, N.

    2006-01-01

    We determine the nonlinear drift velocities of the mean magnetic field and nonlinear turbulent magnetic diffusion in a turbulent convection. We show that the nonlinear drift velocities are caused by the three kinds of the inhomogeneities, i.e., inhomogeneous turbulence; the nonuniform fluid density and the nonuniform turbulent heat flux. The inhomogeneous turbulence results in the well-known turbulent diamagnetic and paramagnetic velocities. The nonlinear drift velocities of the mean magnetic...

  9. Ribbon Turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Venaille, Antoine; Vallis, Geoffrey K

    2014-01-01

    We investigate the non-linear equilibration of a two-layer quasi-geostrophic flow in a channel forced by an imposed unstable zonal mean flow, paying particular attention to the role of bottom friction. In the limit of low bottom friction, classical theory of geostrophic turbulence predicts an inverse cascade of kinetic energy in the horizontal with condensation at the domain scale and barotropization on the vertical. By contrast, in the limit of large bottom friction, the flow is dominated by ribbons of high kinetic energy in the upper layer. These ribbons correspond to meandering jets separating regions of homogenized potential vorticity. We interpret these result by taking advantage of the peculiar conservation laws satisfied by this system: the dynamics can be recast in such a way that the imposed mean flow appears as an initial source of potential vorticity levels in the upper layer. The initial baroclinic instability leads to a turbulent flow that stirs this potential vorticity field while conserving the...

  10. Turbulent General Magnetic Reconnection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eyink, G. L.

    2015-07-01

    Plasma flows with a magnetohydrodynamic (MHD)-like turbulent inertial range, such as the solar wind, require a generalization of general magnetic reconnection (GMR) theory. We introduce the slip velocity source vector per unit arclength of field line, the ratio of the curl of the non-ideal electric field in the generalized Ohm’s Law and magnetic field strength. It diverges at magnetic nulls, unifying GMR with null-point reconnection. Only under restrictive assumptions is the slip velocity related to the gradient of quasi-potential (which is the integral of parallel electric field along magnetic field lines). In a turbulent inertial range, the non-ideal field becomes tiny while its curl is large, so that line slippage occurs even while ideal MHD becomes accurate. The resolution is that ideal MHD is valid for a turbulent inertial range only in a weak sense that does not imply magnetic line freezing. The notion of weak solution is explained in terms of renormalization group (RG) type theory. The weak validity of the ideal Ohm’s law in the inertial range is shown via rigorous estimates of the terms in the generalized Ohm’s Law. All non-ideal terms are irrelevant in the RG sense and large-scale reconnection is thus governed solely by ideal dynamics. We discuss the implications for heliospheric reconnection, in particular for deviations from the Parker spiral model. Solar wind observations show that reconnection in a turbulence-broadened heliospheric current sheet, which is consistent with Lazarian-Vishniac theory, leads to slip velocities that cause field lines to lag relative to the spiral model.

  11. Scalings of intermittent structures in magnetohydrodynamic turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Zhdankin, Vladimir; Uzdensky, Dmitri A

    2016-01-01

    Turbulence is ubiquitous in plasmas, leading to rich dynamics characterized by irregularity, irreversibility, energy fluctuations across many scales, and energy transfer across many scales. Another fundamental and generic feature of turbulence, although sometimes overlooked, is the inhomogeneous dissipation of energy in space and in time. This is a consequence of intermittency, the scale-dependent inhomogeneity of dynamics caused by fluctuations in the turbulent cascade. Intermittency causes turbulent plasmas to self-organize into coherent dissipative structures, which may govern heating, diffusion, particle acceleration, and radiation emissions. In this paper, we present recent progress on understanding intermittency in incompressible magnetohydrodynamic turbulence with a strong guide field. We focus on the statistical analysis of intermittent dissipative structures, which occupy a small fraction of the volume but arguably account for the majority of energy dissipation. We show that, in our numerical simulat...

  12. Multi-Epoch Observations of Extremely High-Velocity Emergent Broad Absorption

    CERN Document Server

    Rogerson, Jesse A; Hidalgo, Paola Rodríguez; Pirkola, Patrik; Brandt, William N; Ak, Nur Filiz

    2015-01-01

    We present the discovery of the highest velocity CIV broad absorption line to date in the z=2.47 quasar SDSS J023011.28+005913.6, hereafter J0230. In comparing the public DR7 and DR9 spectra of J0230, we discovered an emerging broad absorption trough outflowing at~60,000 km/s. In pursuing follow up observations we discovered a second emergent broad absorption trough outflowing at ~40,000 km/s. We collected seven spectral epochs of J0230 that demonstrate emergent and rapidly (~10 days in the rest-frame) varying broad absorption. We investigate two possible scenarios that could cause these rapid changes: bulk motion and ionization variability. Given our multi-epoch data, a transverse motion scenario would likely be a flow-tube feature travelling across the emitting region at 8,000 =1540 cm^-3 and is at r_{eq} >= 1.37 kpc, or is at r < 1.37 kpc with no constraint on the density.

  13. GALACTIC ALL-SKY SURVEY HIGH-VELOCITY CLOUDS IN THE REGION OF THE MAGELLANIC LEADING ARM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    For, Bi-Qing; Staveley-Smith, Lister [International Centre for Radio Astronomy Research, University of Western Australia, 35 Stirling Hwy, Crawley, WA 6009 (Australia); McClure-Griffiths, N. M., E-mail: biqing.for@uwa.edu.au [Australia Telescope National Facility, CSIRO Astronomy and Space Science, PO Box 76, Epping, NSW 1710 (Australia)

    2013-02-10

    We present a catalog of high-velocity clouds in the region of the Magellanic Leading Arm. The catalog is based on neutral hydrogen (H I) observations from the Parkes Galactic All-Sky Survey. Excellent spectral resolution allows clouds with narrow-line components to be resolved. The total number of detected clouds is 419. We describe the method of cataloging and present the basic parameters of the clouds. We discuss the general distribution of the high-velocity clouds and classify the clouds based on their morphological type. The presence of a significant number of head-tail clouds and their distribution in the region is discussed in the context of Magellanic System simulations. We suggest that ram-pressure stripping is a more important factor than tidal forces for the morphology and formation of the Magellanic Leading Arm and that different environmental conditions might explain the morphological difference between the Magellanic Leading Arm and Magellanic Stream. We also discuss a newly identified population of clouds that forms the LA IV and a new diffuse bridge-like feature connecting the LA II and III complexes.

  14. Observations of high-velocity SAPS-like flows with the King Salmon SuperDARN radar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. V. Koustov

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available In this study, a focused investigation of the potential for the King Salmon (KS SuperDARN HF radar to monitor high-velocity flows near the equatorial edge of the auroral oval is undertaken. Events are presented with line-of-sight velocities as high as 2km/s, observed roughly along the L-shell. Statistically, the enhanced flows are shown to be typical for the dusk sector (16:00–23:00 MLT, and the average velocity in this sector is larger (smaller for winter (summer conditions. It is also demonstrated that the high-velocity flows can be very dynamical with more localized enhancements existing for just several minutes. These short-lived enhancements occur when the luminosity at the equatorial edge of the auroral oval suddenly decreases during the substorm recovery phase. The short-lived velocity enhancements can be established because of proton and ion injections into the inner magnetosphere and low conductance of the ionosphere and not because of enhanced tail reconnection. This implies that some KS velocity enhancements have the same origin as subauroral polarization streams (SAPS.

  15. MULTIPLE HIGH-VELOCITY SiO MASER FEATURES FROM THE HIGH-MASS PROTOSTAR W51 NORTH

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present the detection of multiple high-velocity silicon monoxide (SiO v = 1, 2, J = 1-0) maser features in the high-mass protostar W51 North which are distributed over an exceedingly large velocity range from 105 to 230 km s-1. The SiO v = 1, J = 1-0 maser emission shows 3-5 narrow components which span a velocity range from 154 to 230 km s-1 according to observational epochs. The SiO v = 2, J = 1-0 maser also shows 3-5 narrow components that do not correspond to the SiO v = 1 maser and span a velocity range from 105 to 154 km s-1. The multiple maser components show significant changes on very short timescales (<1 month) from epoch to epoch. We suggest that the high-velocity SiO masers may be emanated from massive star-forming activity of the W51 North protostar as SiO maser jets and will be a good probe of the earliest evolutionary stages of high-mass star formation via an accretion model. Further high angular resolution observations will be required for confirmation.

  16. GALACTIC ALL-SKY SURVEY HIGH-VELOCITY CLOUDS IN THE REGION OF THE MAGELLANIC LEADING ARM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present a catalog of high-velocity clouds in the region of the Magellanic Leading Arm. The catalog is based on neutral hydrogen (H I) observations from the Parkes Galactic All-Sky Survey. Excellent spectral resolution allows clouds with narrow-line components to be resolved. The total number of detected clouds is 419. We describe the method of cataloging and present the basic parameters of the clouds. We discuss the general distribution of the high-velocity clouds and classify the clouds based on their morphological type. The presence of a significant number of head-tail clouds and their distribution in the region is discussed in the context of Magellanic System simulations. We suggest that ram-pressure stripping is a more important factor than tidal forces for the morphology and formation of the Magellanic Leading Arm and that different environmental conditions might explain the morphological difference between the Magellanic Leading Arm and Magellanic Stream. We also discuss a newly identified population of clouds that forms the LA IV and a new diffuse bridge-like feature connecting the LA II and III complexes.

  17. A Catalog of Ultra-compact High Velocity Clouds from the ALFALFA Survey: Local Group Galaxy Candidates?

    CERN Document Server

    Adams, Elizabeth A K; Haynes, Martha P

    2013-01-01

    We present a catalog of 59 ultra-compact high velocity clouds (UCHVCs) extracted from the 40% complete ALFALFA HI-line survey. The ALFALFA UCHVCs have median flux densities of 1.34 Jy km/s, median angular diameters of 10', and median velocity widths of 23 km/s. We show that the full UCHVC population cannot easily be associated with known populations of high velocity clouds. Of the 59 clouds presented here, only 11 are also present in the compact cloud catalog extracted from the commensal GALFA-HI survey, demonstrating the utility of this separate dataset and analysis. Based on their sky distribution and observed properties, we infer that the ALFALFA UCHVCs are consistent with the hypothesis that they may be very low mass galaxies within the Local Volume. In that case, most of their baryons would be in the form of gas, and because of their low stellar content, they remain unidentified by extant optical surveys. At distances of ~1 Mpc, the UCHVCs have neutral hydrogen (HI) masses of ~10^5 -10^6 M_sun, HI diamet...

  18. THE 21 cm 'OUTER ARM' AND THE OUTER-GALAXY HIGH-VELOCITY CLOUDS: CONNECTED BY KINEMATICS, METALLICITY, AND DISTANCE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Using high-resolution ultraviolet spectra obtained with the Hubble Space Telescope Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph and the Far Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer, we study the metallicity, kinematics, and distance of the gaseous 'outer arm' (OA) and the high-velocity clouds (HVCs) in the outer Galaxy. We detect the OA in a variety of absorption lines toward two QSOs, H1821+643 and HS0624+6907. We search for OA absorption toward eight Galactic stars and detect it in one case, which constrains the OA Galactocentric radius to 9 kpc G G = 8-10 kpc. HVC Complex C is known to be at a similar Galactocentric radius. Toward H1821+643, the low-ionization absorption lines are composed of multiple narrow components, indicating the presence of several cold clouds and rapid cooling and fragmentation. Some of the highly ionized gas is also surprisingly cool. Accounting for ionization corrections, we find that the OA metallicity is Z = 0.2-0.5 Z☉, but nitrogen is underabundant and some species are possibly mildly depleted by dust. The similarity of the OA metallicity, Galactocentric location, and kinematics to those of the adjacent outer-Galaxy HVCs, including high velocities that are not consistent with Galactic rotation, suggests that the OA and outer-Galaxy HVCs could have a common origin.

  19. Observations of high-velocity SAPS-like flows with the King Salmon SuperDARN radar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koustov, A. V.; Drayton, R. A.; Makarevich, R. A.; McWilliams, K. A.; St-Maurice, J.-P.; Kikuchi, T.; Frey, H. U.

    2006-07-01

    In this study, a focused investigation of the potential for the King Salmon (KS) SuperDARN HF radar to monitor high-velocity flows near the equatorial edge of the auroral oval is undertaken. Events are presented with line-of-sight velocities as high as 2km/s, observed roughly along the L-shell. Statistically, the enhanced flows are shown to be typical for the dusk sector (16:00-23:00 MLT), and the average velocity in this sector is larger (smaller) for winter (summer) conditions. It is also demonstrated that the high-velocity flows can be very dynamical with more localized enhancements existing for just several minutes. These short-lived enhancements occur when the luminosity at the equatorial edge of the auroral oval suddenly decreases during the substorm recovery phase. The short-lived velocity enhancements can be established because of proton and ion injections into the inner magnetosphere and low conductance of the ionosphere and not because of enhanced tail reconnection. This implies that some KS velocity enhancements have the same origin as subauroral polarization streams (SAPS).

  20. Characterization of High-Velocity Solution Precursor Flame-Sprayed Manganese Cobalt Oxide Spinel Coatings for Metallic SOFC Interconnectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puranen, Jouni; Laakso, Jarmo; Kylmälahti, Mikko; Vuoristo, Petri

    2013-06-01

    A modified high-velocity oxy-fuel spray (HVOF) thermal spray torch equipped with liquid feeding hardware was used to spray manganese-cobalt solutions on ferritic stainless steel grade Crofer 22 APU substrates. The HVOF torch was modified in such a way that the solution could be fed axially into the combustion chamber through 250- and 300-μm-diameter liquid injector nozzles. The solution used in this study was prepared by diluting nitrates of manganese and cobalt, i.e., Mn(NO3)2·4H2O and Co(NO3)2·6H2O, respectively, in deionized water. The as-sprayed coatings were characterized by X-ray diffraction and field-emission scanning electron microscopy operating in secondary electron mode. Chemical analyses were performed on an energy dispersive spectrometer. Coatings with remarkable density could be prepared by the novel high-velocity solution precursor flame spray (HVSPFS) process. Due to finely sized droplet formation in the HVSPFS process and the use of as delivered Crofer 22 APU substrate material having very low substrate roughness ( R a < 0.5 μm), thin and homogeneous coatings, with thicknesses lower than 10 μm could be prepared. The coatings were found to have a crystalline structure equivalent to MnCo2O4 spinel with addition of Co-oxide phases. Crystallographic structure was restored back to single-phase spinel structure by heat treatment.

  1. Introduction to quantum turbulence

    OpenAIRE

    Barenghi, Carlo F.; Skrbek, Ladislav; Sreenivasan, Katepalli R.

    2014-01-01

    The term quantum turbulence denotes the turbulent motion of quantum fluids, systems such as superfluid helium and atomic Bose–Einstein condensates, which are characterized by quantized vorticity, superfluidity, and, at finite temperatures, two-fluid behavior. This article introduces their basic properties, describes types and regimes of turbulence that have been observed, and highlights similarities and differences between quantum turbulence and classical turbulence in ordinary fluids. Our ai...

  2. Phase mixing versus nonlinear advection in drift-kinetic plasma turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schekochihin, A. A.; Parker, J. T.; Highcock, E. G.; Dellar, P. J.; Dorland, W.; Hammett, G. W.

    2016-04-01

    > A scaling theory of long-wavelength electrostatic turbulence in a magnetised, weakly collisional plasma (e.g. drift-wave turbulence driven by ion temperature gradients) is proposed, with account taken both of the nonlinear advection of the perturbed particle distribution by fluctuating flows and of its phase mixing, which is caused by the streaming of the particles along the mean magnetic field and, in a linear problem, would lead to Landau damping. It is found that it is possible to construct a consistent theory in which very little free energy leaks into high velocity moments of the distribution function, rendering the turbulent cascade in the energetically relevant part of the wavenumber space essentially fluid-like. The velocity-space spectra of free energy expressed in terms of Hermite-moment orders are steep power laws and so the free-energy content of the phase space does not diverge at infinitesimal collisionality (while it does for a linear problem); collisional heating due to long-wavelength perturbations vanishes in this limit (also in contrast with the linear problem, in which it occurs at the finite rate equal to the Landau damping rate). The ability of the free energy to stay in the low velocity moments of the distribution function is facilitated by the `anti-phase-mixing' effect, whose presence in the nonlinear system is due to the stochastic version of the plasma echo (the advecting velocity couples the phase-mixing and anti-phase-mixing perturbations). The partitioning of the wavenumber space between the (energetically dominant) region where this is the case and the region where linear phase mixing wins its competition with nonlinear advection is governed by the `critical balance' between linear and nonlinear time scales (which for high Hermite moments splits into two thresholds, one demarcating the wavenumber region where phase mixing predominates, the other where plasma echo does).

  3. Application of minimal energy dissipation principle to turbulence modeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A new model of turbulence is proposed to solve Reynolds equations for fully-developed flow in a wall-bounded straight channel. We show that Reynolds number can be defined as a ratio of flow kinetic energy to the work of friction/dissipation forces. Then, we introduce a turbulent Reynolds number that represent a balance between energy loses due to the momentum exchange by turbulent vortices travelling from low to high velocity areas and wall friction. The main idea of Multi-Scale Viscosity (MSV) model that is expressed in the following phenomenological rule: A local deformation of the axial velocity profile can and should generate the turbulence with such intensity that keeps the local turbulent Reynolds number below the critical value. Thus, in MSV, the only empirical parameter is the critical Reynolds number. MSV has been applied to the several basic channel flows such as a circular tube, an infinitive plane channel and an annulus. The MSV model can be considered as an integral-equation algebraic model of turbulence. (author)

  4. Measuring turbulent fluid dispersion using laser induced phosphorescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Voort, Dennis; Dam, Nico; van de Water, Willem; Kunnen, Rudie; Clercx, Herman; van Heijst, Gertjan

    2015-11-01

    Fluid dispersion due to turbulence is an important subject in both natural and engineering processes, from cloud formation to turbulent mixing and liquid spray combustion. The combination of small scales and often high velocities results in few experimental techniques that can follow the course of events. We introduce a novel technique, which measures the dispersion of ``tagged'' fluid particles by means of laser-induced phosphorescence, using a solution containing a europium-based molecular complex with a relatively long phosphorescence half-life. This technique is used to measure transport processes in both the dispersion of droplets in homogeneous isotropic turbulence and the dispersion of fluid of near-nozzle spray breakup processes. By tagging a small amount of droplets/fluid via laser excitation, the tagged droplets can be tracked in a Lagrangian way. The absolute dispersion of the droplets can be measured in a variety of turbulent flows. Using this technique it is shows that droplets around St =τp /τη ~ 1 (Stokes number) disperse faster than true fluid tracers in homogeneous isotropic turbulence, as well as differences between longitudinal and radial dispersion in turbulent sprays. This work is part of the research programme of the Foundation for Fundamental Research on Matter (FOM), which is part of the Dutch Organisation for Scientific Research (NWO).

  5. Fossil turbulence revisited

    CERN Document Server

    Gibson, C H

    1999-01-01

    A theory of fossil turbulence presented in the 11th Liege Colloquium on Marine turbulence is "revisited" in the 29th Liege Colloquium "Marine Turbulence Revisited". The Gibson (1980) theory applied universal similarity theories of turbulence and turbulent mixing to the vertical evolution of an isolated patch of turbulence in a stratified fluid as it is constrained and fossilized by buoyancy forces. Towed oceanic microstructure measurements of Schedvin (1979) confirmed the predicted universal constants. Universal constants, spectra, hydrodynamic phase diagrams (HPDs) and other predictions of the theory have been reconfirmed by a wide variety of field and laboratory observations. Fossil turbulence theory has many applications; for example, in marine biology, laboratory and field measurements suggest phytoplankton species with different swimming abilities adjust their growth strategies differently by pattern recognition of several days of turbulence-fossil-turbulence dissipation and persistence times above thres...

  6. The improvement of turbulence modeling for the aerothermal computation of hypersonic turbulent boundary layers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    The engineering computation of turbulent flows is mainly based on turbulence modeling,however,accurate aerothermal computation of hypersonic turbulent boundary layers is still a not well-solved problem. Aerothermal computation for turbulent boundary layers on a supersonic or hypersonic blunt cone with small bluntness is done firstly by using both direct numerical simulation and BL model,and seven different cases are investigated. Then the results obtained by the two methods are compared,and the reason causing the differences is found to be the incorrect assumption in the turbulence modeling that the ratio between eddy heat conductivity and eddy viscosity is constant throughout the whole boundary layer. Based on certain theoretical arguments,a method of modifying the expression of eddy heat conductivity in the region surrounding the peak location of the turbulent kinetic energy is proposed,which is verified to be effective,at least for the seven cases investigated.

  7. High-Pressure Shock Compression of Solids VIII The Science and Technology of High-Velocity Impact

    CERN Document Server

    Chhabildas, Lalit C; Horie, Yasuyuki

    2005-01-01

    Research in the field of shock physics and ballistic impact has always been intimately tied to progress in development of facilities for accelerating projectiles to high velocity and instrumentation for recording impact phenomena. The chapters of this book, written by leading US and European experts, cover a broad range of topics and address researchers concerned with questions of material behaviour under impulsive loading and the equations of state of matter, as well as the design of suitable instrumentation such as gas guns and high-speed diagnostics. Applications include high-speed impact dynamics, the inner composition of planets, syntheses of new materials and materials processing. Among the more technologically-oriented applications treated is the testing of the flight characteristics of aeroballistic models and the assessment of impacts in the aerospace industry.

  8. Detection of a second high velocity component in the highly ionized wind from PG 1211+143

    CERN Document Server

    Pounds, Ken; Reeves, James; Vaughan, Simon

    2016-01-01

    An extended XMM-Newton observation of the luminous narrow line Seyfert galaxy PG 1211+143 in 2014 has revealed a more complex highly ionized, high velocity outflow. The detection of previously unresolved spectral structure in Fe K absorption finds a second outflow velocity component of the highly ionized wind, with an outflow velocity of v~0.066+/-0.003c, in addition to a still higher velocity outflow of v~0.129+/-0.002c consistent with that first seen in 2001. We note that chaotic accretion, consisting of many prograde and retrograde events, offers an intriguing explanation of the dual velocity wind. In that context the persisting outflow velocities could relate to physically distinct orientations of the inner accretion flow, with prograde accretion yielding a higher launch velocity than retrograde accretion in a ratio close to that observed.

  9. Dynamic imaging and hydrodynamics study of high velocity, laser-accelerated thin foil targets using multiframe optical shadowgraphy

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    S Tripathi; S Chaurasia; P Leshma; L J Dhareshwar

    2012-12-01

    The main aim of the study of thin target foil–laser interaction experiments is to understand the physics of hydrodynamics of the foil acceleration, which is highly relevant to inertial confinement fusion (ICF). This paper discusses a simple, inexpensive multiframe optical shadow-graphy diagnostics developed for dynamic imaging of high velocity laser-accelerated target foils of different thicknesses. The diagnostic has a spatial and temporal resolution of 12 m and 500 ps respectively in the measurements. The target velocity is in the range of 106 - 107 cm/s. Hydrodynamic efficiency of such targets was measured by energy balance experiments together with the measurement of kinetic energy of the laser-driven targets. Effect of target foil thickness on the hydrodynamics of aluminum foils was studied for determining the optimum conditions for obtaining a directed kinetic energy transfer of the accelerated foil. The diagnostics has also been successfully used to study ablatively accelerated targets of other novel materials.

  10. A statistical study on the occurrence of discrete frequencies in the high velocity solar wind and in the magnetosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Matteo, Simone; Villante, Umberto

    2016-04-01

    The possible occurrence of oscillations at discrete frequencies in the solar wind and their possible correspondence with magnetospheric field oscillations represent an interesting aspect of the solar wind/magnetopheric research. We analyze a large set of high velocity streams following interplanetary shocks in order to ascertain the possible occurrence of preferential sets of discrete frequencies in the oscillations of the solar wind pressure in such structures. We evaluate, for each event, the power spectrum of the dynamic pressure by means of two methods (Welch and multitaper windowing) and accept the common spectral peaks that also pass a harmonic F-test at the 95% confidence level. We compare these frequencies with those detected at geosynchronous orbit in the magnetospheric field components soon after the manifestation of the corresponding Sudden Impulses.

  11. A Comprehensive Archival Search for Counterparts to Ultra-Compact High Velocity Clouds: Five Local Volume Dwarf Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Sand, D J; Bennet, P; Willman, B; Hargis, J; Strader, J; Olszewski, E; Tollerud, E J; Simon, J D; Caldwell, N; Guhathakurta, P; James, B L; Koposov, S; McLeod, B; Morrell, N; Peacock, M; Salinas, R; Seth, A C; Stark, D P; Toloba, E

    2015-01-01

    We report the discovery of five Local Volume dwarf galaxies uncovered during a comprehensive archival search for optical counterparts to ultra-compact high velocity clouds (UCHVCs). The UCHVC population of HI clouds are thought to be candidate gas-rich, low mass halos at the edge of the Local Group and beyond, but no comprehensive search for stellar counterparts to these systems has been presented. Careful visual inspection of all publicly available optical and ultraviolet imaging at the position of the UCHVCs revealed six blue, diffuse counterparts with a morphology consistent with a faint dwarf galaxy beyond the Local Group. Optical spectroscopy of all six candidate dwarf counterparts show that five have an H$\\alpha$-derived velocity consistent with the coincident HI cloud, confirming their association; the sixth diffuse counterpart is likely a background object. The size and luminosity of the UCHVC dwarfs is consistent with other known Local Volume dwarf irregular galaxies. The gas fraction ($M_{HI}/M_{sta...

  12. Optimizing pulse shaping and zooming for acceleration to high velocities and fusion neutron production on the Nike laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karasik, Max; Weaver, J. L.; Aglitskiy, Y.; Zalesak, S. T.; Velikovich, A. L.; Oh, J.; Obenschain, S. P.; Arikawa, Y.; Watari, T.

    2010-11-01

    We will present results from follow-on experiments to the record-high velocities of 1000 km/s achieved on Nike [Karasik et al., Phys. Plasmas 17, 056317 (2010) ], in which highly accelerated planar foils of deuterated polystyrene were made to collide with a witness foil to produce extreme shock pressures and result in heating of matter to thermonuclear temperatures. Still higher velocities and higher target densities are required for impact fast ignition. The aim of these experiments is shaping the driving pulse to minimize shock heating of the accelerated target and using the focal zoom capability of Nike to achieve higher densities and velocities. Spectroscopic measurements of electron temperature achieved upon impact will complement the neutron time-of-flight ion temperature measurement. Work is supported by US DOE and Office of Naval Research.

  13. Use of zooming and pulseshaping for acceleration to high velocities and fusion neutron production on the Nike laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karasik, Max; Weaver, J. L.; Aglitskiy, Y.; Kehne, D. M.; Zalesak, S. T.; Velikovich, A. L.; Oh, J.; Obenschain, S. P.; Arikawa, Y.

    2011-10-01

    We will present results from follow-on experiments to the record-high velocities of 1000 km/s achieved on Nike [Karasik et al, Phys. Plasmas 17, 056317(2010)], in which highly accelerated planar foils of deuterated polystyrene were made to collide with a witness foil to produce ~ 1 Gbar shock pressures and result in heating of matter to thermonuclear temperatures. Still higher velocities and higher target densities are required for impact fast ignition. The aim of these experiments is using the focal zoom capability of Nike and shaping the driving pulse to minimize shock heating of the accelerated target to achieve higher densities and velocities. In-flight target density is inferred from target heating upon collision via DD neutron time-of-flight ion temperature measurement. Work is supported by US DOE (NNSA) and Office of Naval Research. SAIC

  14. Large- and small-scale structure of the intermediate- and high-velocity clouds towards the LMC and SMC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smoker, J. V.; Fox, A. J.; Keenan, F. P.

    2015-08-01

    We employ Ca II K and Na I D interstellar absorption-line spectroscopy of early-type stars in the Large and Small Magellanic Clouds (LMC, SMC) to investigate the large- and small-scale structure in foreground intermediate- and high-velocity clouds (I/HVCs). Data include FLAMES-GIRAFFE Ca II K observations of 403 stars in four open clusters, plus FEROS or UVES spectra of 156 stars in the LMC and SMC. The FLAMES observations are amongst the most extensive probes to date of Ca II structures on ˜20 arcsec scales in Magellanic I/HVCs. From the FLAMES data within a 0.5° field of view, the Ca II K equivalent width in the I/HVC components towards three clusters varies by factors of ≥10. There are no detections of molecular gas in absorption at intermediate or high velocities, although molecular absorption is present at LMC and Galactic velocities towards some sightlines. The FEROS/UVES data show Ca II K I/HVC absorption in ˜60 per cent of sightlines. The range in the Ca II/Na I ratio in I/HVCs is from -0.45 to +1.5 dex, similar to previous measurements for I/HVCs. In 10 sightlines we find Ca II/O I ratios in I/HVC gas ranging from 0.2 to 1.5 dex below the solar value, indicating either dust or ionization effects. In nine sightlines I/HVC gas is detected in both H I and Ca II at similar velocities, implying that the two elements form part of the same structure.

  15. A CATALOG OF ULTRA-COMPACT HIGH VELOCITY CLOUDS FROM THE ALFALFA SURVEY: LOCAL GROUP GALAXY CANDIDATES?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adams, Elizabeth A. K.; Giovanelli, Riccardo; Haynes, Martha P., E-mail: betsey@astro.cornell.edu, E-mail: riccardo@astro.cornell.edu, E-mail: haynes@astro.cornell.edu [Center for Radiophysics and Space Research, Space Sciences Building, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853 (United States)

    2013-05-01

    We present a catalog of 59 ultra-compact high velocity clouds (UCHVCs) extracted from the 40% complete ALFALFA HI-line survey. The ALFALFA UCHVCs have median flux densities of 1.34 Jy km s{sup -1}, median angular diameters of 10', and median velocity widths of 23 km s{sup -1}. We show that the full UCHVC population cannot easily be associated with known populations of high velocity clouds. Of the 59 clouds presented here, only 11 are also present in the compact cloud catalog extracted from the commensal GALFA-HI survey, demonstrating the utility of this separate dataset and analysis. Based on their sky distribution and observed properties, we infer that the ALFALFA UCHVCs are consistent with the hypothesis that they may be very low mass galaxies within the Local Volume. In that case, most of their baryons would be in the form of gas, and because of their low stellar content, they remain unidentified by extant optical surveys. At distances of {approx}1 Mpc, the UCHVCs have neutral hydrogen (H I) masses of {approx}10{sup 5}-10{sup 6} M{sub Sun }, H I diameters of {approx}2-3 kpc, and indicative dynamical masses within the H I extent of {approx}10{sup 7}-10{sup 8} M{sub Sun }, similar to the Local Group ultra-faint dwarf Leo T. The recent ALFALFA discovery of the star-forming, metal-poor, low mass galaxy Leo P demonstrates that this hypothesis is true in at least one case. In the case of the individual UCHVCs presented here, confirmation of their extragalactic nature will require further work, such as the identification of an optical counterpart to constrain their distance.

  16. Two-dimensional turbulence in magnetised plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Kendl, Alexander

    2010-01-01

    In an inhomogeneous magnetised plasma the transport of energy and particles perpendicular to the magnetic field is in general mainly caused by quasi two-dimensional turbulent fluid mixing. The physics of turbulence and structure formation is of ubiquitous importance to every magnetically confined laboratory plasma for experimental or industrial application. Specifically, high temperature plasmas for fusion energy research are also dominated by the properties of this turbulent transport. Self-organisation of turbulent vortices to mesoscopic structures like zonal flows is related to the formation of transport barriers that can significantly enhance the confinement of a fusion plasma. This subject of great importance in research is rarely touched on in introductory plasma physics or continuum dynamics courses. Here a brief tutorial on 2D fluid and plasma turbulence is presented as an introduction to the field, appropriate for inclusion in undergraduate and graduate courses.

  17. The influence of pool geometry and induced flow patterns in rock scour by high-velocity plunging jets

    OpenAIRE

    De Almeida Manso, P.; Schleiss, Anton

    2007-01-01

    The dissipation of energy of flood discharges from water releasing structures of dams is often done by plunging jets diffusing in water and impacting on the riverbed downstream. The construction of expensive concrete structures for energy dissipation can be avoided but the assessment of the scour evolution is mandatory for dam safety. The scour growth rate and shape depend on the riverbed geology. The geometry of scour may influence the turbulent flow pattern in the pool, the dynamic loadings...

  18. The influence of pool geometry and induced flow patterns in rock scour by high-velocity plunging jets

    OpenAIRE

    Almeida Manso, Pedro Filipe de

    2006-01-01

    The dissipation of energy of flood discharges from water releasing structures of dams is often done by plunging jets diffusing in water and impacting on the riverbed downstream. The construction of expensive concrete structures for energy dissipation can be avoided but the assessment of the scour evolution is mandatory for dam safety. The scour growth rate and shape depend on the riverbed geology. The geometry of scour may influence the turbulent flow pattern in the pool, the dynamic loadings...

  19. Turbulence and wind turbines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brand, Arno J.; Peinke, Joachim; Mann, Jakob

    2011-01-01

    The nature of turbulent flow towards, near and behind a wind turbine, the effect of turbulence on the electricity production and the mechanical loading of individual and clustered wind turbines, and some future issues are discussed....

  20. Distributed chaos and helicity in turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Bershadskii, A

    2016-01-01

    The distributed chaos driven by Levich-Tsinober (helicity) integral: $I=\\int \\langle h({\\bf x},t)~h({\\bf x}+{\\bf r}, t)\\rangle d{\\bf r}$ has been studied. It is shown that the helical distributed chaos can be considered as basis for complex turbulent flows with interplay between large-scale coherent structures and small-scale turbulence, such as Cuette-Taylor flow, wake behind cylinder and turbulent flow in the Large Plasma Device (LAPD) with inserted limiters. In the last case appearance of the helical distributed chaos, caused by the limiters, results in improvement of radial particle confinement.

  1. Turbulent Magnetohydrodynamic Jet Collimation and Thermal Driving

    OpenAIRE

    Williams, Peter T.

    2003-01-01

    We have argued that magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) turbulence in an accretion disk naturally produces hoop-stresses, and that in a geometrically-thick flow these stresses could both drive and collimate an outflow. We based this argument on an analogy of turbulent MHD fluids to viscoelastic fluids, in which azimuthal shear flow creates hoop-stresses that cause a variety of flow phenomena, including the Weissenberg effect in which a fluid climbs a spinning rod. One of the more important differences ...

  2. Introduction to quantum turbulence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barenghi, Carlo F; Skrbek, Ladislav; Sreenivasan, Katepalli R

    2014-03-25

    The term quantum turbulence denotes the turbulent motion of quantum fluids, systems such as superfluid helium and atomic Bose-Einstein condensates, which are characterized by quantized vorticity, superfluidity, and, at finite temperatures, two-fluid behavior. This article introduces their basic properties, describes types and regimes of turbulence that have been observed, and highlights similarities and differences between quantum turbulence and classical turbulence in ordinary fluids. Our aim is also to link together the articles of this special issue and to provide a perspective of the future development of a subject that contains aspects of fluid mechanics, atomic physics, condensed matter, and low-temperature physics. PMID:24704870

  3. Turbulent Soret Effect

    CERN Document Server

    Mitra, Dhrubaditya; Rogachevskii, Igor

    2016-01-01

    We show, by direct numerical simulations, that heavy inertial particles (with Stokes number ${\\rm St}$) in inhomogeneously forced statistically stationary turbulent flows cluster at the minima of turbulent kinetic energy. We further show that two turbulent transport processes, turbophoresis and turbulent diffusion together determine the spatial distribution of the particles. The ratio of the corresponding transport coefficient -- the turbulent Soret coefficient -- increases with ${\\rm St}$ for small ${\\rm St}$, reaches a maxima for ${\\rm St}\\approx 10$ and decreases as $\\sim {\\rm St}^{-0.33}$ for large ${\\rm St}$.

  4. Idealised Simulations of Turbulence Near Thunderstorms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zovko Rajak, D.; Lane, T.

    2012-04-01

    Atmospheric turbulence is a significant hazard to the aviation industry because it can cause injuries, damage to aircraft as well as financial losses. A number of recent studies have been conducted in order to explain the mechanisms that are responsible for convectively induced turbulence (CIT), which can occur within the cloud as well as in the clear air regions surrounding the cloud. The majority of these studies were focused on above cloud turbulence, however, relatively little is known about the mechanisms that generate turbulence around thunderstorms. This type of turbulence, also known as near-cloud turbulence, is of particular interest because it is much more difficult to avoid than turbulence within clouds since it is invisible and undetectable using standard hazard methods (e.g. on-board and ground-based radars). This study examines turbulence generation by organised convection (viz. supercells) using three-dimensional (3D) simulations conducted with the Weather Research and Forecasting model. Results from several high-resolution idealised simulations will be shown, with a focus on the role of 3D cloud-induced flow perturbations on turbulence generation and their sensitivity to different background flow conditions like wind shear. High resolution numerical modeling is necessary for more realistic treatment of deep convection and turbulence processes on a scale that affect aircraft (these are on the order of 100 m). Since conducting 3D simulations with cloud-resolving scales is very computationally expensive it is necessary to use nesting in order to resolve these small scale processes. The simulation results show regions of turbulence that extend more than 100 km away from the active deep convection (i.e. regions with high radar reflectivity). These turbulent regions are related to strong upper-level storm outflow and the associated enhanced vertical shear. Simulations also show localised modulation of the outflow jet by small-scale gravity waves (~ 4 km

  5. Dynamics of High-Velocity Evanescent Clumps [HVECs] Emitted from Comet C/2011 L4 as Observed by STEREO

    CERN Document Server

    Raouafi, N -E; Stenborg, G; Jones, G H; Schmidt, C A

    2015-01-01

    High-quality white-light images from the SECCHI/HI-1 telescope onboard STEREO-B reveal high-velocity evanescent clumps [HVECs] expelled from the coma of the C/2011 L4 [Pan-STARRS] comet. Animated images provide evidence of highly dynamic ejecta moving near-radially in the anti-sunward direction. The bulk speed of the clumps at their initial detection in the HI1-B images range from $200-400$ km s$^{-1}$ followed by an appreciable acceleration up to speeds of $450-600$ km s$^{-1}$, which are typical of slow to intermediate solar wind speeds. The clump velocities do not exceed these limiting values and seem to reach a plateau. The images also show that the clumps do not expand as they propagate. Order of magnitude calculations show that ionized single atoms or molecules accelerate too quickly compared to observations, while dust grains micron sized or larger accelerate too slowly. We find that neutral Na, Li, K, or Ca atoms with $\\beta>50$ could possibly fit the observations. Just as likely, we find that an inte...

  6. Hot corrosion of nanostructured CoNiCrAlYSi coatings deposited by high velocity oxy fuel process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yaghtin, A.H., E-mail: yaghtin@gmail.com; Javadpour, S.; Shariat, M.H.

    2014-01-25

    Highlights: • Hot corrosion of a nanostructured MCrAlY coating was studied. • Cryomilling was used to prepare nanostructured powders. • The corrosion improvement was attributed to α-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} particles. -- Abstract: This paper focuses on the structure and cyclic hot corrosion behavior of nanostructured MCrAlY coatings used in thermal barrier coatings of gas turbines as the bond coat. Cryomilling in a liquid nitrogen environment was used to prepare nanostructured CoNiCrAlYSi powders, as characterized by scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction. Also, the long-term hot corrosion resistance of the coating deposited by high velocity oxy fuel thermal spraying of the cryomilled powders was studied in a molten salt medium of Na{sub 2}SO{sub 4}–Na{sub 2}VO{sub 3} at 880 °C up to 640 h. According to the results, the cryomilling process improved the corrosion resistance of the nanostructured coating, as compared with coarse-grained CoNiCrAlYSi coatings. This improvement was attributed to some α-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} particles dispersed in the structure, created by cryomilling, and high-diffusivity paths, created by nanocrystallization, which favors the formation of a continuous α-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} barrier layer on the top of the coating.

  7. Hot corrosion resistance of high-velocity oxyfuel sprayed coatings on a nickel-base superalloy in molten salt environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sidhu, T. S.; Prakash, S.; Agrawal, R. D.

    2006-09-01

    No alloy is immune to hot corrosion attack indefinitely. Coatings can extend the lives of substrate materials used at higher temperatures in corrosive environments by forming protective oxides layers that are reasonably effective for long-term applications. This article is concerned with studying the performance of high-velocity oxyfuel (HVOF) sprayed NiCrBSi, Cr3C2-NiCr, Ni-20Cr, and Stellite-6 coatings on a nickel-base superalloy at 900 °C in the molten salt (Na2SO4-60% V2O5) environment under cyclic oxidation conditions. The thermogravimetric technique was used to establish kinetics of corrosion. Optical microscope, x-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy/electron dispersive analysis by x-ray (SEM/EDAX), and electron probe microanalysis (EPMA) techniques were used to characterize the as-sprayed coatings and corrosion products. The bare superalloy suffered somewhat accelerated corrosion in the given environmental conditions. whereas hot corrosion resistance of all the coated superalloys was found to be better. Among the coating studied, Ni-20Cr coated superalloy imparted maximum hot corrosion resistance, whereas Stellite-6 coated indicated minimum resistance. The hot corrosion resistance of all the coatings may be attributed to the formation of oxides and spinels of nickel, chromium, or cobalt.

  8. Influence of high velocity oxy-fuel parameters on properties of nanostructured TiO2 coatings

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Maryamossadat Bozorgtabar; Mehdi Salehi; Mohammadreza Rahimipour; Mohammadreza Jafarpour

    2010-12-01

    A liquid fuel high velocity oxy-fuel (HVOF) thermal spray process has been used to deposit TiO2 nanostructured coatings utilizing a commercially available nanopowder as the feedstock. The coatings were characterized by means of X-ray diffraction analysis (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscope (TEM), respectively. Photocatalytic activity was evaluated as a rate constant of decomposition reaction of methylene blue (MB) determined from the changes of relative concentration of MB with UV irradiation time. The results indicate that the sprayed TiO2 coatings were composed of both TiO2 phases viz. anatase and rutile, with different phase contents and crystallite sizes. A high anatase content of 80% by volume was achieved at 0.00015, fuel-to-oxygen ratio with nanostructure coating by grain size smaller than feedstock powder. Photocatalytic activity evaluation results indicated that all the TiO2 coatings are effective to degradation MB under UV radiation and their activities differ in different spray conditions. It is found that fuel flow rate strongly influenced on phase transformation of anatase to rutile and by optimizing the rate which can promote structural transformation and grain coarsening in coating and improving photocatalytic activity.

  9. Microstructure and Wear Properties of Fe-based Amorphous Coatings Deposited by High-velocity Oxygen Fuel Spraying

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Gang WANG; Ping XIAO; Zhong-jia HUANG; Ru-jie HE

    2016-01-01

    Fe-based powder with a composition of Fe42·87 Cr15·98 Mo16·33 C15·94 B8·88 (at·%)was used to fabricate coatings by high-velocity oxygen fuel spraying.The effects of the spraying parameters on the microstructure and the wear properties of the Fe-based alloy coatings were systematically studied.The results showed that the obtained Fe-based coatings with a thickness of about 400μm consisted of a large-volume amorphous phase and some nanocrystals.With increasing the fuel and oxygen flow rates,the porosity of the obtained coatings decreased.The coating deposited un-der optimized parameters exhibited the lowest porosity of 2·8%.The excellent wear resistance of this coating was at-tributed to the properties of the amorphous matrix and the presence of nanocrystals homogeneously distributed with-in the matrix.The wear mechanism of the coatings was discussed on the basis of observations of the worn surfaces.

  10. Low porosity and fine coatings produced by a new type nozzle of high velocity arc spray gun

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Ruijun; Zhang Tianjian; Xu Lin; Huang Xiaoou

    2006-01-01

    The new designed high-velocity arc spray gun with three different nozzles is developed to match the DZ400 arc spray system, which can produce the coatings with the structure of superfine and low porosity.This system can be used to spray three normal wires such as 4Cr13, FeCrAl and 7Cr13 (flux cored wires).Using the scanning electron microscope (SEM) to analyze shape and particles size that sprayed by the nozzles with different parameters, as well as with the S-3500N SEM and the energy spectrum analytic ( ESA ) instrument to identify the content of the oxides, porosity and thickness of the coatings, we get the result that the porosity in the coatings of solid wire is less than 3%, of the flux-cored wires is less than 5%, and the distribution of the coatings sprayed by the nozzle with secondary supplementary airflow is typically shown in the form of highdensity lamellarsplat structure and the average lamellar thickness is around 5 μm.

  11. Manufacturing and Properties of High-Velocity Oxygen Fuel (HVOF)-Sprayed FeVCrC Coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sassatelli, Paolo; Bolelli, Giovanni; Lusvarghi, Luca; Manfredini, Tiziano; Rigon, Rinaldo

    2016-10-01

    This paper studies the microstructure, sliding wear behavior and corrosion resistance of high-velocity oxygen fuel (HVOF)-sprayed FeVCrC-based coatings. Various process parameters were tested to evaluate their effects on the coating properties, which were also compared to those of HVOF-sprayed NiCrBSi and Stellite-6 coatings. The Fe alloy coatings are composed of flattened splats, originating from molten droplets and consisting of a super-saturated solid solution, together with rounded particles, coming from partially unmolten material and containing V- and Fe-based carbide precipitates. All process parameters, apart from "extreme" settings with excess comburent in the flame, produce dense coatings, indicating that the feedstock powder is quite easily processable by HVOF. These coatings, with a microhardness of 650-750 HV0.3, exhibit wear rates of ≈2 × 10-6 mm3/(Nm) in ball-on-disk tests against sintered Al2O3 spheres. They perform far better than the reference coatings, and better than other Fe- and Ni-based alloy coatings tested in previous research. On the other hand, the corrosion resistance of the coating material (tested by electrochemical polarization in 0.1 M HCl solution) is quite low. Even in the absence of interconnected porosity, this results in extensive, selective damage to the Fe-based matrix. This coating material is therefore unadvisable for severely corrosive environments.

  12. Survivability of bare, individual Bacillus subtilis spores to high-velocity surface impact: Implications for microbial transfer through space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barney, Brandon L.; Pratt, Sara N.; Austin, Daniel E.

    2016-06-01

    Laboratory experiments show that endospores of Bacillus subtilis survive impact against a solid surface at velocities as high as 299 ±28 m/s. During impact, spores experience and survive accelerations of at least 1010 m/s2. The spores were introduced into a vacuum chamber using an electrospray source and accelerated to a narrow velocity distribution by entrainment in a differentially pumped gas flow. Different velocity ranges were studied by modifying the gas flow parameters. The spores were electrically charged, allowing direct measurement of the velocity of each spore as it passed through an image charge detector prior to surface impact. Spores impacted a glass surface and were collected for subsequent analysis by culturing. Most spores survived impact at all measured velocities. These experiments differ fundamentally from other studies that show either shock or impact survivability of bacteria embedded within or on the surface of a projectile. Bacteria in the present experiments undergo a single interaction with a solid surface at the full impact velocity, in the absence of any other effects such as cushioning due to microbe agglomerations, deceleration due to air or vapor, or transfer of impact shock through solid or liquid media. During these full-velocity impact events, the spores experience extremely high decelerations. This study is the first reported instance of accelerations of this magnitude experienced during a bacteria impact event. These results are discussed in the context of potential transfer of viable microbes in space and other scenarios involving surface impacts at high velocities.

  13. Microstructure and hydroabrasive wear behaviour of high velocity oxy-fuel thermally sprayed WC-Co(Cr) coatings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sand erosion tests were performed on WC-Co and WC-CoCr coatings deposited by the high velocity oxy-fuel spraying method. Several analytical techniques, including X-ray diffraction, Auger electron spectroscopy and energy-dispersive spectroscopy in a transmission electron microscope were used to characterize the microstructures formed during powder processing and spraying. It was found that a substantial fraction of WC decomposed into W2C or reacted with the cobalt matrix to form ternary carbides such as Co3W3C and other mixed compounds. In both cases the binder phase had a nanocrystalline structure of size 4-8 nm containing tungsten, cobalt, carbon and chromium elements. The addition of chromium inhibits to a large extent the decomposition of WC and avoids the formation of metallic tungsten. In addition, chromium improved the erosion resistance by several times compared with the WC-Co coating. Scanning electron microscopy showed that the CoCr matrix binds carbides better than the cobalt matrix, thereby inhibiting carbide loss at the spray particle boundaries. The hydroabrasive wear behaviour of coatings and the mechanisms for material removal are discussed with respect to the microstructures formed during spraying. (orig.)

  14. Hot corrosion of nanostructured CoNiCrAlYSi coatings deposited by high velocity oxy fuel process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Hot corrosion of a nanostructured MCrAlY coating was studied. • Cryomilling was used to prepare nanostructured powders. • The corrosion improvement was attributed to α-Al2O3 particles. -- Abstract: This paper focuses on the structure and cyclic hot corrosion behavior of nanostructured MCrAlY coatings used in thermal barrier coatings of gas turbines as the bond coat. Cryomilling in a liquid nitrogen environment was used to prepare nanostructured CoNiCrAlYSi powders, as characterized by scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction. Also, the long-term hot corrosion resistance of the coating deposited by high velocity oxy fuel thermal spraying of the cryomilled powders was studied in a molten salt medium of Na2SO4–Na2VO3 at 880 °C up to 640 h. According to the results, the cryomilling process improved the corrosion resistance of the nanostructured coating, as compared with coarse-grained CoNiCrAlYSi coatings. This improvement was attributed to some α-Al2O3 particles dispersed in the structure, created by cryomilling, and high-diffusivity paths, created by nanocrystallization, which favors the formation of a continuous α-Al2O3 barrier layer on the top of the coating

  15. Patient-centered outcomes of high-velocity, low-amplitude spinal manipulation for low back pain: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goertz, C M; Pohlman, K A; Vining, R D; Brantingham, J W; Long, C R

    2012-10-01

    Low back pain (LBP) is a well-recognized public health problem with no clear gold standard medical approach to treatment. Thus, those with LBP frequently turn to treatments such as spinal manipulation (SM). Many clinical trials have been conducted to evaluate the efficacy or effectiveness of SM for LBP. The primary objective of this paper was to describe the current literature on patient-centered outcomes following a specific type of commonly used SM, high-velocity low-amplitude (HVLA), in patients with LBP. A systematic search strategy was used to capture all LBP clinical trials of HVLA using our predefined patient-centered outcomes: visual analogue scale, numerical pain rating scale, Roland-Morris Disability Questionnaire, and the Oswestry Low Back Pain Disability Index. Of the 1294 articles identified by our search, 38 met our eligibility criteria. Like previous SM for LBP systematic reviews, this review shows a small but consistent treatment effect at least as large as that seen in other conservative methods of care. The heterogeneity and inconsistency in reporting within the studies reviewed makes it difficult to draw definitive conclusions. Future SM studies for LBP would benefit if some of these issues were addressed by the scientific community before further research in this area is conducted.

  16. Teaching and Assessment of High-Velocity, Low-Amplitude Techniques for the Spine in Predoctoral Medical Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Channell, Millicent King

    2016-09-01

    Although national didactic criteria have been set for predoctoral education and assessment in osteopathic manipulative treatment, there is no criterion standard for teaching methods and assessments of osteopathic manipulative treatment competence in colleges of osteopathic medicine. This issue is more pressing with the creation of the single graduate medical education accreditation system by the American Osteopathic Association and Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education, which introduced the creation of "osteopathic recognition" for residencies that want to incorporate osteopathic principles and practice into their programs. Residencies with osteopathic recognition may include both osteopathic and allopathic graduates. Increased standardization at the predoctoral level, however, is recommended as osteopathic principles and practice training applications are expanded. The objectives of this article are to review the standards for teaching osteopathic medical students high-velocity, low-amplitude (HVLA) techniques for the spine; to review and discuss the methods used to assess medical students' proficiency in using HVLA; and to propose baseline standards for teaching and assessing HVLA techniques among medical students.

  17. High-velocity collimated outflows in planetary nebulae NGC 6337, He 2-186, and K 4-47

    CERN Document Server

    Corradi, R L M; Villaver, E; Mampaso, A; Perinotto, M; Schwarz, H E; Zanin, C; Corradi, Romano L.M.; Goncalves, Denise R.; Villaver, Eva; Mampaso, Antonio; Perinotto, Mario; Schwarz, Hugo E.; Zanin, Caterina

    2000-01-01

    We have obtained narrow-band images and high-resolution spectra of the planetary nebulae NGC 6337, He 2-186, and K 4-47, with the aim of investigating the relation between their main morphological components and several low-ionization features present in these nebulae. The data suggest that NGC 6337 is a bipolar PN seen almost pole on, with polar velocities higher than 200 km/s. The bright inner ring of the nebula is interpreted to be the "equatorial" density enhancement. It contains a number of low-ionization knots and outward tails that we ascribe to dynamical instabilities leading to fragmentation of the ring or transient density enhancements due to the interaction of the ionization front with previous density fluctuations in the ISM. The lobes show a pronounced point-symmetric morphology and two peculiar low-ionization filaments whose nature remains unclear. The most notable characteristic of He 2-186 is the presence of two high-velocity (higher than 135 km/s) knots from which an S-shaped lane of emission...

  18. An Extreme High-Velocity Bipolar Outflow in the Pre-Planetary Nebula IRAS 08005-2356

    CERN Document Server

    Sahai, R

    2015-01-01

    We report interferometric mapping of the bipolar pre-planetary nebula IRAS 08005-2356 with an angular-resolution of ~1"-5", using the Submillimeter Array (SMA), in the 12CO J=2-1, 3-2, 13CO J=2-1 and SiO J=5-4 (v=0) lines. Single-dish observations, using the SMT 10-m, were made in these lines as well as in the CO J=4-3 and SiO J-6-5 (v=0) lines. The lines profiles are very broad, showing the presence of a massive (>0.1 Msun), extreme high-velocity outflow (V~200 km/s) directed along the nebular symmetry axis derived from the HST imaging of this object. The outflow's scalar momentum far exceeds that available from radiation pressure of the central post-AGB star, and it may be launched from an accretion disk around a main-sequence companion. We provide indirect evidence for such a disk from its previously published, broad H-alpha emission profile, which we propose results from Ly-beta emission generated in the disk followed by Raman-scattering in the innermost regions of a fast, neutral wind.

  19. Searching for Optical Counterparts to Ultra-compact High Velocity Clouds: Possible Detection of a Counterpart to AGC 198606

    CERN Document Server

    Janesh, William; Salzer, John J; Janowiecki, Steven; Adams, Elizabeth A K; Haynes, Martha P; Giovanelli, Riccardo; Cannon, John M; Muñoz, Ricardo R

    2015-01-01

    We report on initial results from a campaign to obtain optical imaging of a sample of Ultra Compact High Velocity Clouds (UCHVCs) discovered by the ALFALFA neutral hydrogen (HI) survey. UCHVCs are sources with velocities and sizes consistent with their being low-mass dwarf galaxies in the Local Volume, but without optical counterparts in existing catalogs. We are using the WIYN 3.5-m telescope and pODI camera to image these objects and search for an associated stellar population. In this paper, we present our observational strategy and method for searching for resolved stellar counterparts to the UCHVCs. We combine careful photometric measurements, a color-magnitude filter, and spatial smoothing techniques to search for stellar overdensities in the g- and i-band images. We also run statistical tests to quantify the likelihood that whatever overdensities we find are real and not chance superpositions of sources. We demonstrate the method by applying it to two data sets: WIYN imaging of Leo P, a UCHVC discovere...

  20. The Silicon and Calcium High-Velocity Features in Type Ia Supernovae from Early to Maximum Phases

    CERN Document Server

    Zhao, Xulin; Maeda, Keiichi; Sai, Hanna; Zhang, Tianmeng; Zhang, Jujia; Huang, Fang; Rui, Liming; Zhou, Qi; Mo, Jun

    2015-01-01

    The high-velocity features (HVFs) in optical spectra of type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) are examined with a large sample including very early-time spectra (e.g., t < -7 days). Multiple Gaussian fits are applied to examine the HVFs and their evolutions, using constraints on expansion velocities for the same species (i.e., SiII 5972 and SiII 6355). We find that strong HVFs tend to appear in SNe Ia with smaller decline rates (e.g., dm15(B)<1.4 mag), clarifying that the finding by Childress et al. (2014) for the Ca-HVFs in near-maximum-light spectra applies both to the Si-HVFs and Ca-HVFs in the earlier phase. The Si-HVFs seem to be more common in fast-expanding SNe Ia, which is different from the earlier result that the Ca-HVFs are associated with SNe Ia having slower SiII 6355 velocities at maximum light (i.e., Vsi). This difference can be due to that the HVFs in fast-expanding SNe Ia usually disappear more rapidly and are easily blended with the photospheric components when approaching the maximum light. Mor...

  1. Feature of high velocity oxygen-fuel flame spraying; Kosoku flame yoshaho no tokucho to sono oyo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shimizu, Y.; Sakaki, K. [Shinshu University, Nagano (Japan). Faculty of Engineering

    1996-05-01

    A description is given about the high velocity flame spraying method. In this method, fuel and oxygen under high pressure are supplied to a spraying gun, a supersonic stream of flame is jetted out of a fine nozzle, and spray particles are injected into the flame to impinge on the substrate surface at a very high speed for the formation of a coating. This method is advantageous in that the spray particles are higher in flying speed than in other spraying methods, that the produced coating is dense and close and excellent in adhesion, that the flame temperature is relatively low, and that the spray material is suppressed in terms of phase transformation, oxidation, and decomposition. This spraying technique is disadvantageous in that the spray materials that it can use are limited in variety because this method meets difficulties in spraying upon high melting-point metal or ceramics. This paper also outlines the spraying devices (chamber combustion type and throat combustion type) and the characteristics of produced coatings, and spray materials and their application (centering about carbide thermit spraying) are mentioned. 23 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs.

  2. Structure and sliding wear behavior of 321 stainless steel/Al composite coating deposited by high velocity arc spraying technique

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Yong-xiong; XU Bin-shi; LIU Yan; LIANG Xiu-bing; XU Yi

    2008-01-01

    A typical 321 stainless steel/aluminum composite coating (321/Al coating) was prepared by high velocity arc spraying technique (HVAS) with 321 stainless steel wire as the anode and aluminum wire as the cathode.The traditional 321 stainless steel coating was also prepared for comparison.Tribological properties of the coatings were evaluated with the ring-block wear tester under different conditions.The structure and worn surface of the coatings were analyzed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM),X-ray diffractometry (XRD) and energy dispersion spectroscopy (EDS).The results show that,except for aluminum phase addition in tne 321/Al coating,no other phases are created compared with the 321 coating.However,due to the addition of aluminum,the 321/Al coating forms a type of "ductile/hard phases inter-deposited" structure and performs quite different tribological behavior.Under the dry sliding condition,the anti-wear property of 321/Al coating is about 42% lower than that of 321 coating.Butunder the oil lubricated conditions with or without 32h oil-dipping pretreatment,the anti-wear property of 321/Al coating is about 9% and 5% higher than that of 321 coating,respectively.The anti-wear mechanism of the composite coating is mainly relevant to the decrease of oxide impurities and the strengthening action resulted from the "ductile/hard phases inter-deposited" coating structure.

  3. X-ray imaging of high velocity moving objects by scanning summation using a single photon processing system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    X-ray imaging has been used extensively in the manufacturing industry. In the paper and paperboard industry X-ray imaging has been used for measuring parameters such as coat weight, using mean values of X-ray absorption inline in the manufacturing machines. Recently, an interest has surfaced to image paperboard coating with pixel resolved images showing material distribution in the coating on the paperboard, and to do this inline in the paper machine. Naturally, imaging with pixel resolution in an application where the paperboard web travels with velocities in the order of 10 m/s sets harsh demands on the X-ray source and the detector system to be used. This paper presents a scanning imaging method for single photon imaging systems that lower the demands on the source flux by hundreds of times, enabling a system to be developed for high velocity industrial measurement applications. The paper presents the imaging method, a discussion of system limitations, simulations and real measurements in a laboratory environment with a moving test object of low velocity, all to verify the potential and limits of the proposed method

  4. Comparative characteristic and erosion behavior of NiCr coatings deposited by various high-velocity oxyfuel spray processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sidhu, Hazoor Singh; Sidhu, Buta Singh; Prakash, S.

    2006-12-01

    The purpose of this study is to analyze and compare the mechanical properties and microstructure details at the interface of high-velocity oxyfuel (HVOF)-sprayed NiCr-coated boiler tube steels, namely ASTM-SA-210 grade A1, ASTM-SA213-T-11, and ASTM-SA213-T-22. Coatings were developed by two different techniques, and in these techniques liquefied petroleum gas was used as the fuel gas. First, the coatings were characterized by metallographic, scanning electron microscopy/energy-dispersive x-ray analysis, x-ray diffraction, surface roughness, and microhardness, and then were subjected to erosion testing. An attempt has been made to describe the transformations taking place during thermal spraying. It is concluded that the HVOF wire spraying process offers a technically viable and cost-effective alternative to HVOF powder spraying process for applications in an energy generation power plant with a point view of life enhancement and to minimize the tube failures because it gives a coating having better resistance to erosion.

  5. High-velocity extended molecular outflow in the star-formation dominated luminous infrared galaxy ESO 320-G030

    CERN Document Server

    Pereira-Santaella, M; García-Burillo, S; Alonso-Herrero, A; Arribas, S; Cazzoli, S; Emonts, B; López, J Piqueras; Planesas, P; Bergmann, T Storchi; Usero, A; Villar-Martín, M

    2016-01-01

    We analyze new high spatial resolution (~60 pc) ALMA CO(2-1) observations of the isolated luminous infrared galaxy ESO 320-G030 (d=48 Mpc) in combination with ancillary HST optical and near-IR imaging as well as VLT/SINFONI near-IR integral field spectroscopy. We detect a high-velocity (~450 km/s) spatially resolved (size~2.5 kpc; dynamical time ~3 Myr) massive (~10^7 Msun; mass rate~2-8 Msun/yr) molecular outflow originated in the central ~250 pc. We observe a clumpy structure in the outflowing cold molecular gas with clump sizes between 60 and 150 pc and masses between 10^5.5 and 10^6.4 Msun. The mass of the clumps decreases with increasing distance, while the velocity is approximately constant. Therefore, both the momentum and kinetic energy of the clumps decrease outwards. In the innermost (~100 pc) part of the outflow, we measure a hot-to-cold molecular gas ratio of 7x10^-5, which is similar to that measured in other resolved molecular outflows. We do not find evidence of an ionized phase in this outflow...

  6. Is Fish Response related to Velocity and Turbulence Magnitudes? (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, C. A.; Hockley, F. A.; Cable, J.

    2013-12-01

    Riverine fish are subject to heterogeneous velocities and turbulence, and may use this to their advantage by selecting regions which balance energy expenditure for station holding whilst maximising energy gain through feeding opportunities. This study investigated microhabitat selection by guppies (Poecilia reticulata) in terms of the three-dimensional velocity structure generated by idealised boulders in an experimental flume. Velocity and turbulence influenced intra-species variation in swimming behaviour with respect to size, sex and parasite intensity. With increasing body length, fish swam further and more frequently between boulder regions. Larger guppies spent more time in the high velocity and low turbulence region, whereas smaller guppies preferred the low velocity and high shear stress region directly behind the boulders. Male guppies selected the region of low velocity, indicating a possible reduced swimming ability due to hydrodynamic drag imposed by their fins. With increasing parasite (Gyrodactylus turnbulli) burden, fish preferentially selected the region of moderate velocity which had the lowest bulk measure of turbulence of all regions and was also the most spatially homogeneous velocity and turbulence region. Overall the least amount of time was spent in the recirculation zone which had the highest magnitude of shear stresses and mean vertical turbulent length scale to fish length ratio. Shear stresses were a factor of two greater than in the most frequented moderate velocity region, while mean vertical turbulent length scale to fish length ratio were six times greater. Indeed the mean longitudinal turbulent scale was 2-6 times greater than the fish length in all regions. While it is impossible to discriminate between these two turbulence parameters (shear stress and turbulent length to fish length ratio) in influencing the fish preference, our study infers that there is a bias towards fish spending more time in a region where both the bulk

  7. Building blocks of turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Avila, Marc; Roland, Nicolas; Hof, Bjoern

    2013-01-01

    Turbulence is ubiquitous in nature and although the equations governing fluid flow are well known, there are no analytical expressions that describe the complexity of turbulent motion. The nonlinear nature and the large number of spatial and temporal degrees of freedom turn this into one of the most challenging problems in mathematics and the physical sciences alike. We here report the discovery of unstable localised solutions for pipe flow that share key spatial characteristics of turbulence in the intermittent regime. While their temporal dynamics are very simple, much of the spatial complexity found in low Reynolds number turbulence is already encoded in them. We furthermore demonstrate how turbulent transients arise from one such solution branch. Our observations shed light on the origin of turbulence and link the localised structures commonly observed in turbulent flows to invariant solutions of the Navier-Stokes equations.

  8. Airfoils in Turbulent Inflow

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gilling, Lasse

    Wind turbines operate in inflow turbulence whether it originates from the shear in the atmospheric boundary layer or from the wake of other wind turbines. Consequently, the airfoils of the wings experience turbulence in the inflow. The main topic of this thesis is to investigate the effect...... of resolved inflow turbulence on airfoil simulations in CFD. The detached-eddy simulation technique is used because it can resolve the inflow turbulence without becoming too computationally expensive due to its limited requirements for mesh resolution in the boundary layer. It cannot resolve the turbulence...... that is formed in attached boundary layers, but the freestream turbulence can penetrate the boundary layer. The idea is that the resolved turbulence from the freestream should mix high momentum flow into the boundary layer and thereby increase the resistance against separation and increase the maximum lift...

  9. New trends in turbulence; Turbulence: nouveaux aspects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lesieur, M. [Institut National Polytechnique, LEGI/INPG, Institut de Mecanique, UMR 101, 38 - Grenoble (France); Yaglom, A. [Institut of Atmospheric Physics, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation)]|[MIT, Dept. of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Cambridge, MA (United States); David, F. [CEA Saclay, SPhT, 91 - Gif-sur-Yvette (France)

    2001-07-01

    According to a Russian scientist, the flow of fluids actually met both in nature and engineering practice are turbulent in the overwhelmingly majority of cases. This document that reviews all the progress made recently in the understanding of turbulence, is made up of 10 courses. Course 1 ''a century of turbulence'' deals with the linear and non-linear points of views. In course 2 ''measures of anisotropy and the universal properties of turbulence'' the author gives a very complete account of fully developed turbulence experimental data both in the laboratory and in the atmosphere. Course 3 ''large-eddy simulations of turbulence (LES)'', LES are powerful tools to simulate the coherent vortices formation and evolution in a deterministic way. In Course 4 ''statistical turbulence modelling for the computation of physically complex flows'' the author describes methods used for predicting statistical industrial flows, where the geometry is right now too complex to allow the use of LES. In course 5 ''computational aero-acoustics'' an informative review of computational aero-acoustics with many applications to aircraft noise, is made. In course 6 ''the topology of turbulence'' the author presents the basis of topological fluid dynamics and stresses the importance of helicity in neutral and in magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) flows. In course 7 ''burgulence'' the authors deal with finite-time singularities, but mostly on the basis of Burger equations in one or several dimensions with the formation of multiple shocks. In course 8 ''2-dimensional turbulence'' the author presents numerous examples of 2D turbulence in the laboratory (rotating or MHD flows, plasmas), in the ocean and in the planetary atmosphere. Course 9 ''analysing and computing turbulent flows using wavelets'' is a useful presentation of

  10. Asymmetry of high-velocity lower crust on the South Atlantic rifted margins and implications for the interplay of magmatism and tectonics in continental break-up

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Becker

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available High-velocity lower crust (HVLC and seaward dipping reflector sequences (SDRs are typical features of volcanic rifted margins. However, the nature and origin of HVLC is under discussion. Here we provide a comprehensive analysis of deep crustal structures in the southern segment of the South Atlantic and an assessment of HVLC along the margins. Two new seismic refraction lines off South America fill a gap in the data coverage and together with five existing velocity models allow a detailed investigation of the lower crustal properties on both margins. An important finding is the major asymmetry in volumes of HVLC on the conjugate margins. The seismic refraction lines across the South African margin reveal four times larger cross sectional areas of HVLC than at the South American margin, a finding that is in sharp contrast to the distribution of the flood basalts in the Paraná-Etendeka Large Igneous Provinces (LIP. Also, the position of the HVLC with respect to the seaward dipping reflector sequences varies consistently along both margins. Close to the Falkland-Agulhas Fracture Zone a small body of HVLC is not accompanied by seaward dipping reflectors. In the central portion of both margins, the HVLC is below the inner seaward dipping reflector wedges while in the northern area, closer to the Rio Grande Rise/Walvis Ridge, large volumes of HVLC extend far seawards of the inner seaward dipping reflectors. This challenges the concept of a simple extrusive/intrusive relationship between seaward dipping reflector sequences and HVLC, and it provides evidence for formation of the HVLC at different times during the rifting and break-up process. We suggest that the drastically different HVLC volumes are caused by asymmetric rifting in a simple shear dominated extension.

  11. Signal modeling of turbulence-distorted imagery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, S. Susan; Driggers, Ronald G.; Krapels, Keith; Espinola, Richard L.; Reynolds, Joseph P.; Cha, Jae

    2009-05-01

    Understanding turbulence effects on wave propagation and imaging systems has been an active research area for more than 50 years. Conventional atmospheric optics methods use statistical models to analyze image degradation effects that are caused by turbulence. In this paper, we intend to understand atmospheric turbulence effects using a deterministic signal processing and imaging theory point of view and modeling. The model simulates the formed imagery by a lens by tracing the optical rays from the target through a band of turbulence. We examine the nature of the turbulence-degraded image, and identify its characteristics as the parameters of the band of turbulence, e.g., its width, angle, and index of refraction, are varied. Image degradation effects due to turbulence, such as image blurring and image dancing, are revealed by this signal modeling. We show that in fact these phenomena can be related not only to phase errors in the frequency domain of the image but also a 2D modulation effect in the image spectrum. Results with simulated and realistic data are provided.

  12. High-Velocity Frictional Properties of Westerly Granite and the Role of Thermal Cracking on Gouge Production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Passelegue, Francois; Spanuolo, Elena; Violay, Marie; Nielsen, Stefan; Di Toro, Giulio; Schubnel, Alexandre

    2016-04-01

    With the advent of high-velocity shear apparatus, several experimental studies have been conducted in recent years improving our understanding of fault friction at seismic slip rates (0.1-10 m/s). Here, we present the results of a series of tests conducted on Westerly granite, at INGV Roma, on a Slow to HIgh Velocity Apparatus (SHIVA), coupled with a high frequency monitoring (4MHz sampling rate). Experiments were conducted under normal stress (σn) ranging from 5 to 20 MPa and at sliding velocities (V) comprised between 3 mm/s and 3 m/s. Additional experiments were conducted in the presence of pore fluid at equivalent effective normal stress. In dry conditions, two friction drops are observed. The first drop is independent of the normal stress and occurs when V become higher than a critical value (Vc≈0.15 m/s). The second friction drop occurs after a critical slip weakening distance which decreases as a power law with the power density (τV). The first, abrupt, drop is explained by flash heating and weakening mechanism while the second, smooth, drop is due to the formation and growth of molten patches on the fault surface. In wet conditions, only the second drop of friction is observed. Average values of the fracture energy are independent of normal stress and sliding velocity at V > 0.01 m/s. However, measurements of elastic wave velocities travelling through the fault strongly suggest that higher damage is induced for 0.1 AE) recordings. Indeed, most the AEs are recorded after the initiation of the second friction drop, that is, once the fault surface temperature is high. Some AEs are even recorded few seconds after the end of the experiments, suggesting they may be due to thermal cracking induced by heat diffusion. In addition, the presence of pore fluid pressure (water) delayed the apparition of AEs at equivalent effective pressure, supporting the link between AEs and the production and diffusion of heat. Using the thermo-elastic crack model developed by

  13. Present-day Galactic Evolution: Low-metallicity, Warm, Ionized Gas Inflow Associated with High-velocity Cloud Complex A

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barger, K. A.; Haffner, L. M.; Wakker, B. P.; Hill, Alex. S.; Madsen, G. J.; Duncan, A. K.

    2012-12-01

    The high-velocity cloud Complex A is a probe of the physical conditions in the Galactic halo. The kinematics, morphology, distance, and metallicity of Complex A indicate that it represents new material that is accreting onto the Galaxy. We present Wisconsin Hα Mapper kinematically resolved observations of Complex A over the velocity range of -250 to -50 km s-1 in the local standard of rest reference frame. These observations include the first full Hα intensity map of Complex A across (\\mathit {l, b}) = (124{^\\circ }, 18{^\\circ }) to (171°, 53°) and deep targeted observations in Hα, [S II] λ6716, [N II] λ6584, and [O I] λ6300 toward regions with high H I column densities, background quasars, and stars. The Hα data imply that the masses of neutral and ionized material in the cloud are similar, both being greater than 106 M ⊙. We find that the Bland-Hawthorn & Maloney model for the intensity of the ionizing radiation near the Milky Way is consistent with the known distance of the high-latitude part of Complex A and an assumed cloud geometry that puts the lower-latitude parts of the cloud at a distance of 7-8 kpc. This compatibility implies a 5% ionizing photon escape fraction from the Galactic disk. We also provide the nitrogen and sulfur upper abundance solutions for a series of temperatures, metallicities, and cloud configurations for purely photoionized gas; these solutions are consistent with the sub-solar abundances found by previous studies, especially for temperatures above 104 K or for gas with a high fraction of singly ionized nitrogen and sulfur.

  14. Friction and wear properties of high-velocity oxygen fuel sprayed WC-17Co coating under rotational fretting conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Jun; Cai, Zhenbing; Mo, Jiliang; Peng, Jinfang; Zhu, Minhao

    2016-05-01

    Rotational fretting which exist in many engineering applications has incurred enormous economic loss. Thus, accessible methods are urgently needed to alleviate or eliminate damage by rotational fretting. Surface engineering is an effective approach that is successfully adopted to enhance the ability of components to resist the fretting damage. In this paper, using a high-velocity oxygen fuel sprayed (HVOF) technique WC-17Co coating is deposited on an LZ50 steel surface to study its properties through Vickers hardness testing, scanning electric microscope (SEM), energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX), and X-ray diffractrometry (XRD). Rotational fretting wear tests are conducted under normal load varied from 10 N to 50 N, and angular displacement amplitudes vary from 0.125° to 1°. Wear scars are examined using SEM, EDX, optical microscopy (OM), and surface topography. The experimental results reveal that the WC-17Co coating adjusted the boundary between the partial slip regime (PSR) and the slip regime (SR) to the direction of smaller amplitude displacement. As a result, the coefficients of friction are consistently lower than the substrate's coefficients of friction both in the PSR and SR. The damage to the coating in the PSR is very slight. In the SR, the coating exhibits higher debris removal efficiency and load-carrying capacity. The bulge is not found for the coating due to the coating's higher hardness to restrain plastic flow. This research could provide experimental bases for promoting industrial application of WC-17Co coating in prevention of rotational fretting wear.

  15. Spatially extended and high-velocity dispersion molecular component in spiral galaxies: Single-dish versus interferometric observations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caldú-Primo, Anahi; Walter, Fabian [Max-Planck-Institut für Astronomie, Königstuhl 17, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Schruba, Andreas [Max-Planck-Institut für Extraterrestrische Physik, Giessenbachstr. 1, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Leroy, Adam [National Radio Astronomy Observatory, 520 Edgemont Road, Charlottesville, VA 22903 (United States); Bolatto, Alberto D.; Vogel, Stuart, E-mail: caldu@mpia.de [Department of Astronomy, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742-2421 (United States)

    2015-02-01

    Recent studies of the molecular medium in nearby galaxies have provided mounting evidence that the molecular gas can exist in two phases: one that is clumpy and organized as molecular clouds and another one that is more diffuse. This last component has a higher velocity dispersion than the clumpy one. In order to investigate these two molecular components further, we compare the fluxes and line widths of CO in NGC 4736 and NGC 5055, two nearby spiral galaxies for which high-quality interferometric as well as single-dish data sets are available. Our analysis leads to two main results: (1) employing three different methods, we determine the flux recovery of the interferometer as compared to the single-dish to be within a range of 35%–74% for NGC 4736 and 81%–92% for NGC 5055, and (2) when focusing on high (S/N ≥ 5) lines of sight (LOSs), the single-dish line widths are larger by ∼(40 ± 20)% than the ones derived from interferometric data, which is in agreement with stacking all LOSs. These results point to a molecular gas component that is distributed over spatial scales larger than 30″(∼1 kpc), and is therefore filtered out by the interferometer. The available observations do not allow us to distinguish between a truly diffuse gas morphology and a uniform distribution of small clouds that are separated by less than the synthesized beam size (∼3″ or ∼100 pc), as they would both be invisible for the interferometer. This high velocity dispersion component has a dispersion similar to what is found in the atomic medium, as traced through observations of the H i line.

  16. Neural responses to the mechanical parameters of a high velocity, low amplitude spinal manipulation: effect of preload parameters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reed, William. R.; Long, Cynthia R.; Kawchuk, Gregory N.; Pickar, Joel G.

    2014-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this study was to determine how the preload that precedes a high velocity low amplitude spinal manipulation (HVLA-SM) affects muscle spindle input from lumbar paraspinal muscles both during and after the HVLA-SM. Methods Primary afferent activity from muscle spindles in lumbar paraspinal muscles were recorded from the L6 dorsal root in anesthetized cats. HVLA-SM of the L6 vertebra was preceded either by no preload or by systematic changes in the preload magnitude, duration, and the presence or absence of a downward incisural point (DIP). Immediate effects of preload on muscle spindle responses to the HVLA-SM were determined by comparing mean instantaneous discharge frequencies (MIF) during the HVLA-SM’s thrust phase with baseline. Longer lasting effects of preload on spindle responses to the HVLA-SM were determined by comparing MIF during slow ramp and hold movement of the L6 vertebra before and following the HVLA-SM. Results The smaller compared to the larger preload magnitude and the longer compared to the shorter preload duration significantly increased (P=0.02 and P=0.04) respectively) muscle spindle responses during the HVLA-SM thrust. The absence of preload had the greatest effect on the change in MIF. Interactions between preload magnitude, duration and DIP often produced statistically significant but arguably physiologically modest changes in the passive signaling properties of the muscle spindle following the manipulation. Conclusion Because preload parameters in this animal model were shown to affect neural responses to an HVLA-SM, preload characteristics should be taken into consideration when judging this intervention’s therapeutic benefit in both clinical efficacy studies and in clinical practice. PMID:24387888

  17. High-Velocity Frictional Properties of Westerly Granite and the Role of Thermal Cracking on Gouge Production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Passelegue, F. X.; Di Toro, G.; Spagnuolo, E.; Violay, M.; Nielsen, S. B.; Schubnel, A.

    2015-12-01

    With the advent of high-velocity rotary shear apparatus, several experimental studies have been conducted in the last decades improving our understanding of fault friction at seismic slip rates (0.1 two friction drops are observed: the first drop at Vs > 0.1 m/s is explained by flash heating mechanism while the second drop is due to the formation and growth of a continuous melt layer on the fault surface. In wet conditions, only the second drop of friction is observed. Average values of the fracture energy are independent of normal stress and sliding velocity. However, measurements of elastic wave velocities travelling through the fault strongly suggest that higher damage is induced for 0.1< Vs <0.3 m/s for equivalent final displacement. This observation is also supported by acoustic emission (AEs) recordings. Indeed, most the AEs are recorded after the initiation of the second friction drop, that is, once the fault surface temperature is high, suggesting they may be due to thermal cracking induced by heat diffusion. In addition, the presence of pore fluid pressure (water) delayed the appearance of AEs, supporting the link between AEs and the production and diffusion of heat. Using the thermo-elastic crack model, we demonstrate that damage can indeed be induced by heat diffusion. Our theoretical results predict accurately the amount of sample wear, supporting the idea that gouge production and gouge comminution is in fact largely controlled by thermal cracking. Finally, we show that this new fracture energy term is non-negligible in the energy balance so that thermal cracking induced during seismic slip, in dry conditions, could play a key role both in the evolution of the physical properties of the slip zone and the high frequency radiation.

  18. Efficient Turbulence Modeling for CFD Wake Simulations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van der Laan, Paul

    Wind turbine wakes can cause 10-20% annual energy losses in wind farms, and wake turbulence can decrease the lifetime of wind turbine blades. One way of estimating these effects is the use of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) to simulate wind turbines wakes in the atmospheric boundary layer. Since...... wind farm, the simulated results cannot be compared directly with wind farm measurements that have a high uncertainty in the measured reference wind direction. When this uncertainty is used to post-process the CFD results, a fairer comparison with measurements is achieved....... this flow is in the high Reynolds number regime, it is mainly dictated by turbulence. As a result, the turbulence modeling in CFD dominates the wake characteristics, especially in Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS). The present work is dedicated to study and develop RANS-based turbulence models...

  19. Physical Processes of Interstellar Turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Vazquez-Semadeni, Enrique

    2012-01-01

    I discuss the role of self-gravity and radiative heating and cooling in shaping the nature of the turbulence in the interstellar medium (ISM) of our galaxy. The heating and cooling cause it to be highly compressible, and, in some regimes of density and temperature, to become thermally unstable, tending to spontaneously segregate into warm/diffuse and cold/dense phases. On the other hand, turbulence is an inherently mixing process, tending to replenish the density and temperature ranges that would be forbidden under thermal processes alone. The turbulence in the ionized ISM appears to be transonic (i.e, with Mach numbers $\\Ms \\sim 1$), and thus to behave essentially incompressibly. However, in the neutral medium, thermal instability causes the sound speed of the gas to fluctuate by up to factors of $\\sim 30$, and thus the flow can be highly supersonic with respect to the dense/cold gas, although numerical simulations suggest that this behavior corresponds more to the ensemble of cold clumps than to the clumps'...

  20. High velocity features in the spectra of the Type Ia SN 1999ee: a property of the explosion or evidence of circumstellar interaction?

    CERN Document Server

    Mazzali, P A; Stehle, M; Branch, D; Deng, J; Maeda, K; Nomoto, K; Hamuy, M

    2004-01-01

    The near-maximum spectra of the Type Ia SN 1999ee are reviewed. Two narrow absorption features corresponding to the strongest component of the CaII IR triplet appear in the spectra from 7 days before to 2 days after B-band maximum, at a high velocity (~22,000 km/s). Before these features emerge, the CaII IR triplet has an anomalously high velocity, indicating that the narrow features were still blended with the main, photospheric component. High-velocity CaII absorption has been observed in other SNe Ia, but usually detached from the photospheric component. Furthermore, the SiII 6355A line is observed at a comparably high velocity (~20,000 km/s) 9 and 7 days before B maximum, but then it suddenly shifts to much lower velocities. Synthetic spectra are used to reproduce the data under various scenarios. An abundance enhancement requires an outer region dominated by Si and Ca, the origin of which is not easy to explain in terms of nuclear burning. A density enhancement leads to a good reproduction of the spectra...

  1. Fossil turbulence and fossil turbulence waves can be dangerous

    OpenAIRE

    Gibson, Carl H.

    2012-01-01

    Turbulence is defined as an eddy-like state of fluid motion where the inertial-vortex forces of the eddies are larger than any other forces that tend to damp the eddies out. By this definition, turbulence always cascades from small scales where vorticity is created to larger scales where turbulence fossilizes. Fossil turbulence is any perturbation in a hydrophysical field produced by turbulence that persists after the fluid is no longer turbulent at the scale of the perturbation. Fossil turbu...

  2. Inhomogeneous turbulence in magnetic reconnection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yokoi, Nobumitsu

    2016-07-01

    Turbulence is expected to play an essential role in enhancing magnetic reconnection. Turbulence associated with magnetic reconnection is highly inhomogeneous: it is generated by inhomogeneities of the field configuration such as the velocity shear, temperature gradient, density stratification, magnetic shear, etc. This self-generated turbulence affects the reconnection through the turbulent transport. In this reconnection--turbulence interaction, localization of turbulent transport due to dynamic balance between several turbulence effects plays an essential role. For investigating inhomogeneous turbulence in a strongly nonlinear regime, closure or turbulence modeling approaches provide a powerful tool. A turbulence modeling approach for the magnetic reconnection is introduced. In the model, the mean-field equations with turbulence effects incorporated are solved simultaneously with the equations of turbulent statistical quantities that represent spatiotemporal properties of turbulence under the effect of large-scale field inhomogeneities. Numerical simulations of this Reynolds-averaged turbulence model showed that self-generated turbulence enhances magnetic reconnection. It was pointed out that reconnection states may be divided into three category depending on the turbulence level: (i) laminar reconnection; (ii) turbulent reconnection, and (iii) turbulent diffusion. Recent developments in this direction are also briefly introduced, which includes the magnetic Prandtl number dependence, spectral evolution, and guide-field effects. Also relationship of this fully nonlinear turbulence approach with other important approaches such as plasmoid instability reconnection will be discussed.

  3. High-Velocity Frictional Behavior of Clay-Rich Sediments from IODP Expedition 316, Nankai Trough, Offshore Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirose, T.; Tanikawa, W.; Sakaguchi, M.; Tadai, O.; Lin, W.; Scientific Party, I.

    2008-12-01

    Subduction zone related earthquakes involve a wide range of slip velocities ranging from low strain-rate aseismic creep to high strain-rate dynamic rupture. Understanding the frictional behavior of accreted sediments, especially at seismic slip velocities, is essential in helping to understand rupture propagation processes within the accretional prism during subduction great earthquakes. In order to investigate the coseismic frictional properties of these sediments, high velocity friction experiments were performed using a rotary-shear friction apparatus at slip velocities, V, of 0.02-1.3 m/s, normal stresses of 0.6-1.8 MPa and displacements of over 3 m under dry and wet (water-saturated) conditions. Samples used in this study were collected from IODP Expedition 316, site C0007D, 437.4 mbsf: the basal part of the accretionary prism above the frontal thrust (Kimura et al. 2008). It consists mainly of clay minerals (smectite and illite) with quartz, plagioclase and calcite. Samples were disaggregated to less than 0.1 mm in grain size, and then sheared between cylindrical sandstones with a porosity of ~9%. A Teflon sleeve was used to keep the disaggregated sediment between the sandstones. Our preliminary results can be summarized as follows: (1) At V >0.17 m/s, the frictional coefficient increased rapidly to 0.7-0.8 at the initiation of slip and then decreased gradually with displacement to steady- state values of 0.2-0.6 and 0.05-0.1 for dry and wet conditions, respectively. In contrast, as V decreased below 0.06 m/s, no marked slip-weakening behavior appeared. Steady-state friction coefficient indicated 0.7- 0.8 for dry and 0.3-0.4 for wet condition. (2) On the experiments at V = 1.3 m/s under the wet conditions, the steady-state shear stress became independent of normal stress (slope of the shear- versus normal- stress curve was nearly zero). (3) Localized zones with tens of microns in thickness were developed within the artificial fault zone, with an initial

  4. Characterizing high-velocity angular vestibulo-ocular reflex function in service members post-blast exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scherer, Matthew R; Shelhamer, Mark J; Schubert, Michael C

    2011-02-01

    Blasts (explosions) are the most common mechanism of injury in modern warfare. Traumatic brain injury (TBI) and dizziness are common sequelae associated with blasts, and many service members (SMs) report symptoms worsen with activity. The purpose of this study was to measure angular vestibulo-ocular reflex gain (aVOR) of blast-exposed SMs with TBI during head impulse testing. We also assessed their symptoms during exertion. Twenty-four SMs recovering from TBI were prospectively assigned to one of two groups based on the presence or absence of dizziness. Wireless monocular scleral search coil and rate sensor were used to characterize active and passive yaw and pitch head and eye rotations. Visual analog scale (VAS) was used to monitor symptoms during fast walking/running. For active yaw head impulses, aVOR gains were significantly lower in the symptomatic group (0.79 ± 0.15) versus asymptomatic (0.87 ± 0.18), but not for passive head rotation. For pitch head rotation, the symptomatic group had both active (0.915 ± 0.24) and passive (0.878 ± 0.22) aVOR gains lower than the asymptomatic group (active 1.03 ± 0.27, passive 0.97 ± 0.23). Some SMs had elevated aVOR gain. VAS scores for all symptoms were highest during exertion. Our data suggest symptomatic SMs with TBI as a result of blast have varied aVOR gain during high-velocity head impulses and provide compelling evidence of pathology affecting the vestibular system. Potential loci of injury in this population include the following: disruption of pathways relaying vestibular efference signals, differential destruction of type I vestibular hair cells, or selective damage to irregular afferent pathways-any of which may explain the common discrepancy between reports of vestibular-like symptoms and laboratory testing results. Significantly reduced pitch aVOR in symptomatic SMs and peak symptom severity during exertional testing support earlier findings in the chronic blast-exposed active duty SMs.

  5. Characterizing high-velocity angular vestibulo-ocular reflex function in service members post-blast exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scherer, Matthew R; Shelhamer, Mark J; Schubert, Michael C

    2011-02-01

    Blasts (explosions) are the most common mechanism of injury in modern warfare. Traumatic brain injury (TBI) and dizziness are common sequelae associated with blasts, and many service members (SMs) report symptoms worsen with activity. The purpose of this study was to measure angular vestibulo-ocular reflex gain (aVOR) of blast-exposed SMs with TBI during head impulse testing. We also assessed their symptoms during exertion. Twenty-four SMs recovering from TBI were prospectively assigned to one of two groups based on the presence or absence of dizziness. Wireless monocular scleral search coil and rate sensor were used to characterize active and passive yaw and pitch head and eye rotations. Visual analog scale (VAS) was used to monitor symptoms during fast walking/running. For active yaw head impulses, aVOR gains were significantly lower in the symptomatic group (0.79 ± 0.15) versus asymptomatic (0.87 ± 0.18), but not for passive head rotation. For pitch head rotation, the symptomatic group had both active (0.915 ± 0.24) and passive (0.878 ± 0.22) aVOR gains lower than the asymptomatic group (active 1.03 ± 0.27, passive 0.97 ± 0.23). Some SMs had elevated aVOR gain. VAS scores for all symptoms were highest during exertion. Our data suggest symptomatic SMs with TBI as a result of blast have varied aVOR gain during high-velocity head impulses and provide compelling evidence of pathology affecting the vestibular system. Potential loci of injury in this population include the following: disruption of pathways relaying vestibular efference signals, differential destruction of type I vestibular hair cells, or selective damage to irregular afferent pathways-any of which may explain the common discrepancy between reports of vestibular-like symptoms and laboratory testing results. Significantly reduced pitch aVOR in symptomatic SMs and peak symptom severity during exertional testing support earlier findings in the chronic blast-exposed active duty SMs. PMID

  6. Fault strength evolution during high velocity friction experiments with slip-pulse and constant-velocity loading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Z.; Chang, J. C.; Reches, Z.

    2014-12-01

    Seismic analyses show that slip during large earthquakes evolves in a slip-pulse mode that is characterized by abrupt, intense acceleration followed by moderate deceleration. We experimentally analyze the friction evolution under slip-pulse proxy of a large earthquake, and compare it with the evolution at loading modes of constant-velocity and changing-velocity. We present a series of 42 experiments conducted on granite samples sheared in a high-velocity rotary apparatus. The experiments were conducted on room-dry, solid granite samples at slip-velocities of 0.0006-1 m/s, and normal stress of 1-11.5 MPa. The constitutive relations are presented with respect to mechanical power-density: PD= [shear stress * slip velocity], with units of power per area (MW/m^2). The experimental constitutive relations strongly depend on the loading mode. Constant velocity mode displays initial weakening with increasing PD that is followed by strengthening for PD = 0.02-0.5 MW/m^2, and abrupt weakening at PD > 0.5 MW/m^2. Changing-velocity modes display gentle strengthening for PD < 0.2 MW/m^2 that is followed by abrupt weakening as PD reaches 0.7-0.8 MW/m^2. Beyond this level of power-density, the two loading modes diverge: in changing-velocity of quake-mode the experimental fault continues to weaken with friction coefficient approaching 0.2, whereas in changing-velocity of ramp-mode the fault strengthens with friction coefficient approaching 1.0. The analysis demonstrates that (1) the strength evolution and constitutive parameters of the granite fault strongly depend on the loading mode, and (2) the slip-pulse mode is energy efficient relatively to the constant-velocity mode as manifested by faster, more intense weakening and 50-90% lower energy dissipation. The results suggest that the frictional strength determined in slip-pulse experiments, is more relevant to simulations of earthquake rupture than frictional strength determined in constant-velocity experiments.Figure 1. Friction

  7. High-velocity extended molecular outflow in the star-formation dominated luminous infrared galaxy ESO 320-G030

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira-Santaella, M.; Colina, L.; García-Burillo, S.; Alonso-Herrero, A.; Arribas, S.; Cazzoli, S.; Emonts, B.; Piqueras López, J.; Planesas, P.; Storchi Bergmann, T.; Usero, A.; Villar-Martín, M.

    2016-10-01

    We analyze new high spatial resolution (~60 pc) ALMA CO(2-1) observations of the isolated luminous infrared galaxy ESO 320-G030 (d = 48 Mpc) in combination with ancillary Hubble Space Telescope optical and near infrared (IR) imaging, as well as VLT/SINFONI near-IR integral field spectroscopy. We detect a high-velocity (~450 km s-1) spatially resolved (size~2.5 kpc; dynamical time ~3 Myr) massive (~107 M⊙; Ṁ ~ 2-8 M⊙ yr-1) molecular outflow that has originated in the central ~250 pc. We observe a clumpy structure in the outflowing cold molecular gas with clump sizes between 60 and 150 pc and masses between 105.5 and 106.4 M⊙. The mass of the clumps decreases with increasing distance, while the velocity is approximately constant. Therefore, both the momentum and kinetic energy of the clumps decrease outwards. In the innermost (~100 pc) part of the outflow, we measure a hot-to-cold molecular gas ratio of 7 × 10-5, which is similar to that measured in other resolved molecular outflows. We do not find evidence of an ionized phase in this outflow. The nuclear IR and radio properties are compatible with strong and highly obscured star-formation (Ak ~ 4.6 mag; star formation rate ~ 15 M⊙ yr-1). We do not find any evidence for the presence of an active galactic nucleus. We estimate that supernova explosions in the nuclear starburst (νSN ~ 0.2 yr-1) can power the observed molecular outflow. The kinetic energy and radial momentum of the cold molecular phase of the outflow correspond to about 2% and 20%, respectively, of the supernovae output. The cold molecular outflow velocity is lower than the escape velocity, so the gas will likely return to the galaxy disk. The mass loading factor is ~0.1-0.5, so the negative feedback owing to this star-formation-powered molecular outflow is probably limited. The reduced images and datacubes (FITS files) are only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (http://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc

  8. Reconnection by turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    BELMONT, G.; REZEAU, L.

    2001-12-01

    Transfers of mass and magnetic flux are known to take place through the magnetopause boundary. When looking for the cause of these transfers, several scenarios have been invoked in the literature: 1) quasi-stationary reconnection; 2) localized reconnection (FTEs) 3) growing reconnection due to a local instability (tearing); 4) impulsive penetration of a magnetosheath inhomogeneity. As the very existence of the transfers implies that the frozen-in condition must be broken at some place, all of the preceding scenarios can be termed "reconnection" scenarios. The larger difference between them is that the two first scenarios pre-suppose the existence of an external electrostatic field; while the two others make use of a self-consistent inductive electric field. The varying magnetic field giving rise to the inductive electric field is due the growth of the tearing mode in the third case, while it is due to the spatial gradients limiting the incident blob in the fourth one. We will present a new scenario, of the fourth type, where the original cause for reconnection is the existence of a magnetic turbulence convecting from the shock region and impinging the magnetopause. We first show that this turbulence is converted onto the Alfven mode in the boundary gradient, where it is trapped and amplified. We also show how it can allow for transfers through the boundary, for both the magnetic flux and the plasma. A non ideal effect is of course mandatory for allowing such transfers: our model is calculated in the frame of Hall MHD, which means that the ion inertia effects are taken into account in the Ohm's law; the finite Larmor radius effects, nevertheless, have not yet been included up to now. Finally, we show that the magnetic flux reconnected per second through a perpendicular elementary surface can be calculated as a function of the local parameters; we are thus able to propose the definition of a local "reconnection rate". Analyzing the numerical results corresponding to

  9. Pulsating instability and self-acceleration of fast turbulent flames

    CERN Document Server

    Poludnenko, A Y

    2015-01-01

    (Abridged) A series of three-dimensional numerical simulations is used to study the intrinsic stability of high-speed turbulent flames. Calculations model the interaction of a fully-resolved premixed flame with a highly subsonic, statistically steady, homogeneous, isotropic turbulence. We consider a wide range of turbulent intensities and system sizes, corresponding to the Damk\\"ohler numbers Da = 0.1-6.0. These calculations show that turbulent flames in the regimes considered are intrinsically unstable. In particular, we find three effects. 1) Turbulent flame speed develops pulsations with the observed peak-to-peak amplitude > 10 and a characteristic time scale close to a large-scale eddy turnover time. Such variability is caused by the interplay between turbulence, which continuously creates the flame surface, and highly intermittent flame collisions, which consume the flame surface. 2) Unstable burning results in the periodic pressure build-up and the formation of pressure waves or shocks, when the flame s...

  10. Sound generation by turbulence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dowling, A.P.; Hynes, T.P. [Cambridge Univ., Dept. of Engineering (United Kingdom)

    2004-06-01

    Sound is a weak by-product of a subsonic turbulent flow. The main convective elements of the turbulence are silent and it is only spectral components with supersonic phase speeds that couple to the far-field sound. This paper reviews recent work on sound generation by turbulence. Just as there is a hierarchy of numerical models for turbulence (scaling, RANS, LES and DNS), there are different approaches for relating the near-field turbulence to the far-field sound. Kirchhoff approaches give the far-field sound in a straightforward way, but provide little insight into the sources of sound. Acoustic analogies can be used with different base flows to describe the propagation effects and to highlight the major noise producing regions. (authors)

  11. Water velocity, turbulence, and migration rate of subyearling fall Chinook salmon in the free-flowing and impounded Snake River

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-01-01

    We studied the migratory behavior of subyearling fall Chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha in free-flowing and impounded reaches of the Snake River to evaluate the hypothesis that velocity and turbulence are the primary causal mechanisms of downstream migration. The hypothesis states that impoundment reduces velocity and turbulence and alters the migratory behavior of juvenile Chinook salmon as a result of their reduced perception of these cues. At a constant flow (m3 /s), both velocity (km/d) and turbulence (the SD of velocity) decreased from riverine to impounded habitat as cross-sectional areas increased. We found evidence for the hypothesis that subyearling Chinook salmon perceive velocity and turbulence cues and respond to these cues by varying their behavior. The percentage of the subyearlings that moved faster than the average current speed decreased as fish made the transition from riverine reaches with high velocities and turbulence to upper reservoir reaches with low velocities and turbulence but increased to riverine levels again as the fish moved further down in the reservoir, where velocity and turbulence remained low. The migration rate (km/d) decreased in accordance with longitudinal reductions in velocity and turbulence, as predicted by the hypothesis. The variation in migration rate was better explained by a repeatedmeasures regression model containing velocity (Akaike’s information criterion ¼ 1,769.0) than a model containing flow (2,232.6). We conclude that subyearling fall Chinook salmon respond to changes in water velocity and turbulence, which work together to affect the migration rate.

  12. Scalings of intermittent structures in magnetohydrodynamic turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhdankin, Vladimir; Boldyrev, Stanislav; Uzdensky, Dmitri A.

    2016-05-01

    Turbulence is ubiquitous in plasmas, leading to rich dynamics characterized by irregularity, irreversibility, energy fluctuations across many scales, and energy transfer across many scales. Another fundamental and generic feature of turbulence, although sometimes overlooked, is the inhomogeneous dissipation of energy in space and in time. This is a consequence of intermittency, the scale-dependent inhomogeneity of dynamics caused by fluctuations in the turbulent cascade. Intermittency causes turbulent plasmas to self-organize into coherent dissipative structures, which may govern heating, diffusion, particle acceleration, and radiation emissions. In this paper, we present recent progress on understanding intermittency in incompressible magnetohydrodynamic turbulence with a strong guide field. We focus on the statistical analysis of intermittent dissipative structures, which occupy a small fraction of the volume but arguably account for the majority of energy dissipation. We show that, in our numerical simulations, intermittent structures in the current density, vorticity, and Elsässer vorticities all have nearly identical statistical properties. We propose phenomenological explanations for the scalings based on general considerations of Elsässer vorticity structures. Finally, we examine the broader implications of intermittency for astrophysical systems.

  13. Kinetic scale turbulence and dissipation in the solar wind: key observational results and future outlook.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldstein, M L; Wicks, R T; Perri, S; Sahraoui, F

    2015-05-13

    Turbulence is ubiquitous in the solar wind. Turbulence causes kinetic and magnetic energy to cascade to small scales where they are eventually dissipated, adding heat to the plasma. The details of how this occurs are not well understood. This article reviews the evidence for turbulent dissipation and examines various diagnostics for identifying solar wind regions where dissipation is occurring. We also discuss how future missions will further enhance our understanding of the importance of turbulence to solar wind dynamics.

  14. Modeling turbulent flame propagation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ashurst, W.T.

    1994-08-01

    Laser diagnostics and flow simulation techniques axe now providing information that if available fifty years ago, would have allowed Damkoehler to show how turbulence generates flame area. In the absence of this information, many turbulent flame speed models have been created, most based on Kolmogorov concepts which ignore the turbulence vortical structure, Over the last twenty years, the vorticity structure in mixing layers and jets has been shown to determine the entrainment and mixing behavior and these effects need to be duplicated by combustion models. Turbulence simulations reveal the intense vorticity structure as filaments and simulations of passive flamelet propagation show how this vorticity Creates flame area and defines the shape of the expected chemical reaction surface. Understanding how volume expansion interacts with flow structure should improve experimental methods for determining turbulent flame speed. Since the last decade has given us such powerful new tools to create and see turbulent combustion microscopic behavior, it seems that a solution of turbulent combustion within the next decade would not be surprising in the hindsight of 2004.

  15. Edge turbulence in tokamaks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nedospasov, A. V.

    1992-12-01

    Edge turbulence is of decisive importance for the distribution of particle and energy fluxes to the walls of tokamaks. Despite the availability of extensive experimental data on the turbulence properties, its nature still remains a subject for discussion. This paper contains a review of the most recent theoretical and experimental studies in the field, including mainly the studies to which Wootton (A.J. Wooton, J. Nucl. Mater. 176 & 177 (1990) 77) referred to most in his review at PSI-9 and those published later. The available theoretical models of edge turbulence with volume dissipation due to collisions fail to fully interpret the entire combination of experimental facts. In the scrape-off layer of a tokamak the dissipation prevails due to the flow of current through potential shifts near the surface of limiters of divertor plates. The different origins of turbulence at the edge and in the core plasma due to such dissipation are discussed in this paper. Recent data on the electron temperature fluctuations enabled one to evaluate the electric probe measurements of turbulent flows of particles and heat critically. The latest data on the suppression of turbulence in the case of L-H transitions are given. In doing so, the possibility of exciting current instabilities in biasing experiments (rather than only to the suppression of existing turbulence) is given some attention. Possible objectives of further studies are also discussed.

  16. OPTICAL AND 21-CM OBSERVATIONS OF HIGH-VELOCITY GAS TOWARDS SUBDWARFS IN THE HALO AND EARLY-TYPE STARS IN THE DISK

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    CENTURION, M; VLADILO, G; DEBOER, KS; HERBSTMEIER, U; SCHWARZ, UJ

    1994-01-01

    We present a study of high-velocity gas in the direction of 13 halo sub-dwarfs located at \\z\\ similar or equal to 0.5 - 2 kpc and of 8 early-type stars in the Galactic disk at d similar or equal to 1 - 4 kpc. For each line of sight of our sample we collected Ca II and Na I absorption spectra with th

  17. Comparative study of iron oxide nanoparticles as-prepared and dispersed in Copaiba oil using Mössbauer spectroscopy with low and high velocity resolution

    OpenAIRE

    Oshtrakh, M. I.; Šepelák, V.; Rodriguez, A. F. R.; Semionkin, V. A.; Ushakov, M. V.; J.G. Santos; Silveira, L. B.; Marmolejo, E. M.; Parise, M. D. S.; Morais, P C

    2013-01-01

    Iron oxide nanoparticles, probably magnetite, as-prepared and dispersed in Copaiba oil were studied by Mössbauer spectroscopy using two different spectrometers: with a low velocity resolution (512 channels) for measurements at 295 and 21 K and with a high velocity resolution (4096 channels) for measurements at 295 and 90 K. The fitting of all measured spectra demonstrated that usual models applied to fit Mössbauer spectra of magnetite and maghemite particles were not suitable. Therefore, the ...

  18. Detection of high-velocity material from the wind-wind collision zone of Eta Carinae across the 2009.0 periastron passage

    CERN Document Server

    Groh, Jose H; Damineli, Augusto; Gull, Theodore R; Madura, Thomas I; Hillier, D J; Teodoro, Mairan; Driebe, Thomas; Weigelt, Gerd; Hartman, Henrik; Kerber, Florian; Okazaki, Atsuo T; Owocki, Stan P; Millour, Florentin; Murakawa, Koji; Kraus, Stefan; Hofmann, Karl-Heinz; Schertl, Dieter

    2010-01-01

    We report near-IR spectroscopic observations of the Eta Carinae massive binary system during 2008-2009 using VLT/CRIRES. We detect a strong, broad absorption wing in He I 10833 extending up to -1900 km/s across the 2009.0 spectroscopic event. Archival HST/STIS ultraviolet and optical data shows a similar high-velocity absorption (up to -2100 km/s) in the UV resonance lines of Si IV 1394, 1403 across the 2003.5 event. UV lines from low-ionization species, such as Si II 1527, 1533 and C II 1334, 1335, show absorption up to -1200 km/s, indicating that the absorption with v from -1200 to -2100 km/s originates in a region markedly faster and more ionized than the nominal wind of the primary star. Observations obtained at the OPD/LNA during the last 4 spectroscopic cycles (1989-2009) also display high-velocity absorption in He I 10833 during periastron. Based on the OPD/LNA dataset, we determine that material with v 1.049. Therefore, we constrain the duration of the high-velocity absorption to be 95 to 206 days (o...

  19. Spectroscopic Observations of SN 2012fr: A Luminous Normal Type Ia Supernova with Early High Velocity Features and Late Velocity Plateau

    CERN Document Server

    Childress, M J; Sim, S A; Tucker, B E; Yuan, F; Schmidt, B P; Cenko, S B; Silverman, J M; Contreras, C; Hsiao, E Y; Phillips, M; Morrell, N; Jha, S W; McCully, C; Filippenko, A V; Anderson, J P; Benetti, S; Bufano, F; de Jaeger, T; Forster, F; Gal-Yam, A; Guillou, L Le; Maguire, K; Maund, J; Mazzali, P A; Pignata, G; Smartt, S; Spyromilio, J; Sullivan, M; Taddia, F; Valenti, S; Bayliss, D D R; Bessell, M; Blanc, G A; Carson, D J; Clubb, K I; de Burgh-Day, C; Desjardins, T D; Fang, J J; Fox, O D; Gates, E L; Ho, I-T; Keller, S; Kelly, P L; Lidman, C; Loaring, N S; Mould, J R; Owers, M; Ozbilgen, S; Pei, L; Pickering, T; Pracy, M B; Rich, J A; Schaefer, B E; Scott, N; Stritzinger, M; Vogt, F P A; Zhou, G

    2013-01-01

    We present 65 optical spectra of the Type Ia supernova SN 2012fr, of which 33 were obtained before maximum light. At early times SN 2012fr shows clear evidence of a high-velocity feature (HVF) in the Si II 6355 line which can be cleanly decoupled from the lower velocity "photospheric" component. This Si II 6355 HVF fades by phase -5; subsequently, the photospheric component exhibits a very narrow velocity width and remains at a nearly constant velocity of v~12,000 km/s until at least 5 weeks after maximum brightness. The Ca II infrared (IR) triplet exhibits similar evidence for both a photospheric component at v~12,000 km/s with narrow line width and long velocity plateau, as well as a high-velocity component beginning at v~31,000 km/s two weeks before maximum. SN 2012fr resides on the border between the "shallow silicon" and "core-normal" subclasses in the Branch et al. (2009) classification scheme, and on the border between normal and "high-velocity" SNe Ia in the Wang et al. (2009a) system. Though it is a ...

  20. Non-gaussian turbulence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoejstrup, J. [NEG Micon Project Development A/S, Randers (Denmark); Hansen, K.S. [Denmarks Technical Univ., Dept. of Energy Engineering, Lyngby (Denmark); Pedersen, B.J. [VESTAS Wind Systems A/S, Lem (Denmark); Nielsen, M. [Risoe National Lab., Wind Energy and Atmospheric Physics, Roskilde (Denmark)

    1999-03-01

    The pdf`s of atmospheric turbulence have somewhat wider tails than a Gaussian, especially regarding accelerations, whereas velocities are close to Gaussian. This behaviour is being investigated using data from a large WEB-database in order to quantify the amount of non-Gaussianity. Models for non-Gaussian turbulence have been developed, by which artificial turbulence can be generated with specified distributions, spectra and cross-correlations. The artificial time series will then be used in load models and the resulting loads in the Gaussian and the non-Gaussian cases will be compared. (au)

  1. Periodically kicked turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lohse

    2000-10-01

    Periodically kicked turbulence is theoretically analyzed within a mean-field theory. For large enough kicking strength A and kicking frequency f the Reynolds number grows exponentially and then runs into some saturation. The saturation level Re(sat) can be calculated analytically; different regimes can be observed. For large enough Re we find Re(sat) approximately Af, but intermittency can modify this scaling law. We suggest an experimental realization of periodically kicked turbulence to study the different regimes we theoretically predict and thus to better understand the effect of forcing on fully developed turbulence. PMID:11089041

  2. Homogeneous turbulence theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bershadskii, A.G.

    1985-06-01

    An exact solution for the nonlinear problem of the spectral energy function of a homogeneous turbulence is derived under the assumption that energy transfer under the effect of inertial forces is determined mainly by the interactions among vortices whose wavenumbers are only slightly different from each other. The results are experimentally verified for turbulence behind grids. Similar problems are solved for MHD turbulence and for a nonstationary spectral energy function. It is shown that at the initial stage of degeneration, the spectral energy function is little influenced by the Stewart number; this agrees with experimental data for the damping of longitudinal velocity pulsations behind a grid in a longitudinal magnetic field. 15 references.

  3. Corrosion behaviour of gas turbine alloys under high velocity burnt fuels; Korrosionsverhalten von Gasturbinenwerkstoffen unter stroemenden Heissgasbedingungen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haubold, T.I.; Brill, U. [Krupp VDM GmbH, Altena (Germany); Abel, H.J. [Fachhochschule Dortmund (Germany). Fachbereich 5/Maschinenbau, Laborgruppe Werkstofftechnik; Klauke, P. [Fachhochschule Gelsenkirchen (Germany). Fachbereich Chemie und Materialtechnik

    2001-04-01

    The aim of alloy development in the field of nickel based superalloys for flying and land based gas turbines is to enhance significantly the mechanical properties at high temperatures thus leading to a higher temperature capability. The higher temperature capability of the structural elements of gas turbines results in an increased efficiency, a lowered fuel consumption and less emissions. To achieve an increased high temperature capability, however, surface degradation of the material must be adjusted adequately, hence corrosion resistance has to be improved. Additional to the isothermal and cyclic oxidation tests which are performed in stagnant air the oxidation behaviour of alloy 2100 GT and alloy C-263 was investigated by means of burner-rig-experiments under high velocity burnt fuels. In the burner rig test facility the sample is exposed to a hot gas stream of burned natural gas with gas velocities in the range of 60 m/s to 150 m/s. The metal temperature of the sample can be adjusted in the range of 900 C to 1200 C. In the tests described in this paper the gas velocities were chosen to be 60 m/s, 100 m/s and 140 m/s. The test duration was 1 h and 10 h. The test temperature was kept constant at 1000 C. After 1 h of testing both alloys showed mass gain which was significantly higher for alloy C-263. After 10 h of testing the mass loss of alloy C-263 was enhanced with increasing gas velocity. Alloy 2100 GT showed only at the highest gas velocity a mass loss. The examinations by means of SEM and light-optical microscopy of the oxide scale and of the microstructure showed that alloy 2100 GT has a dense adherent alumina scale and suffers no internal oxidation even under burner-rig-test conditions. Alloy C-263 forms a mixed chromia and Cr-Ti-mixed oxide scale. The chromia is evaporated with increasing gas velocity, leaving (Cr-Ti)O{sub 2}-needles on the surface. In the isothermal and cyclic oxidation tests alloy 2100 GT shows an excellent oxidation behaviour up to

  4. X-rays from High-Velocity Clouds: XMM-Newton Observations of MS30.7-81.4-118

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shelton, Robin

    Recently, XMM-Newton and Chandra observations have shown evidence of enhanced X- ray emission associated with compact high-velocity clouds (HVCs). While the Chandra detections are of low significance, XMM-Newton observed a 6.4sigma X-ray enhancement associated with the HVC MS30.7-81.4-118 (hereafter, MS30.7), which is part of the Magellanic Stream. As there is currently only one detection of X-rays from a compact HVC with any great significance, it is important to confirm that this enhancement is real, and not due to some transient event. If it is real, then X-ray enhancements associated with HVCs potentially provide a new way to study HVCs and their interaction with the Galaxy. Both the morphology and the spectrum of the emission provide clues to the mechanism that produces the hot X-ray-emitting gas, as different physical processes predict different morphologies and spectral properties. For example, shock-heating of the ambient gas leads to X-ray emission in front the HVC, while mixing of the cool cloud material with hot ambient material leads to enhanced emission behind the cloud. (Note that in the case of MS30.7, we know its likely direction of motion on the sky, as it is likely moving toward the Magellanic Clouds.) On the spectral side, different physical processes lead to different temperatures for the X-ray-emitting gas. Strong adiabatic shocks with speeds of 300-400 km/s (the speed of the Magellanic Stream) will yield temperatures of ~1e6-2e6 K. Slower and/or radiative shocks will yield lower temperatures, while magnetic reconnection is predicted to lead to temperatures of >~ 6e6 K. Furthermore, spectral models generated from hydrodynamical simulations, such as those carried out by our group, can be used to narrow down the region of parameter space relevant to the X-ray enhancement. In the most recent XMM-Newton proposal round (AO-10), we were awarded a second observation of MS30.7 (PI: Shelton), to the east of the existing observation. We are applying for

  5. Probing 2D Quantum Turbulence in Atomic Superfluid Gas using Bragg Scattering

    CERN Document Server

    Seo, Sang Won; Kim, Joon Hyun; Shin, Yong-il

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrate the use of spatially resolved Bragg spectroscopy for detection of the quantum vortex circulation signs in an atomic Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC). High-velocity atoms near the vortex cores are resonantly scattered from the BEC, and the vortex signs are determined from the scattered atom positions relative to the corresponding vortex cores. Using this method, we investigate decaying 2D quantum turbulence in a highly oblate BEC at temperatures of $\\sim 0.5 T_c$, where $T_c$ is the critical temperature of the trapped sample. Clustering of like-sign vortices is not observed; rather, the measured vortex configurations reveal weak pair correlations between the vortices and antivortices in the turbulent BEC. Our Bragg scattering method enables a direct experimental study of 2D quantum turbulence in BECs.

  6. Modeling of turbulent chemical reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, J.-Y.

    1995-01-01

    Viewgraphs are presented on modeling turbulent reacting flows, regimes of turbulent combustion, regimes of premixed and regimes of non-premixed turbulent combustion, chemical closure models, flamelet model, conditional moment closure (CMC), NO(x) emissions from turbulent H2 jet flames, probability density function (PDF), departures from chemical equilibrium, mixing models for PDF methods, comparison of predicted and measured H2O mass fractions in turbulent nonpremixed jet flames, experimental evidence of preferential diffusion in turbulent jet flames, and computation of turbulent reacting flows.

  7. A Real-Time Turbulence Hazard Cockpit Display Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Aircraft encounters with turbulence are the leading cause of injuries in the airline industry and result in significant human, operational, and maintenance costs to...

  8. Turbulent buoyant jets and plumes

    CERN Document Server

    Rodi, Wolfgang

    The Science & Applications of Heat and Mass Transfer: Reports, Reviews, & Computer Programs, Volume 6: Turbulent Buoyant Jets and Plumes focuses on the formation, properties, characteristics, and reactions of turbulent jets and plumes. The selection first offers information on the mechanics of turbulent buoyant jets and plumes and turbulent buoyant jets in shallow fluid layers. Discussions focus on submerged buoyant jets into shallow fluid, horizontal surface or interface jets into shallow layers, fundamental considerations, and turbulent buoyant jets (forced plumes). The manuscript then exami

  9. Effects of light propagation in middle intensity atmospheric turbulence

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiubua YUAN; Dexiu HUANG; Bangxu LI

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this report is to present an experimental study of the effects of light propagation through atmospheric turbulence.Free space optical communication is a line-of-sight technology that transmits a modulated beam of visible light through the atmosphere for broadband communication.The fundamental limitations of free space optical communications arise from the environment through which it propagates.However these systems are vulnerable to atmospheric turbulence, such as attenuation and scintillation, Scintillation is due to the air index variation under the temperature effects.These factors cause an attenuated receiver signal and lead to higher bit error rate (BER).An experiment of laser propagation was carried out to characterize the light intensity through turbulent air in the laboratory environment.The experimental results agree with the calculation based on Rytov for the case of weak to intermediate turbulence.Also, we show the characteristics of irradiance scintillation, intensity distribution and atmospheric turbulence strength.By means of laboratory simulated turbulence, the turbulence box is constructed with the following measurements: 0.5 m wide, 2m long and 0.5m high.The simulation box consists of three electric heaters and is well described for understanding the experimental set up.The fans and heaters are used to increase the homogeneity of turbulence and to create different scintillation indices.The received intensity scintillation and atmosphere turbulence strength were obtained and the variation of refractive index, with its corresponding structure parameter, is calculated from the experimental results.

  10. Containerless Ripple Turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Putterman, Seth; Wright, William; Duval, Walter; Panzarella, Charles

    2002-11-01

    One of the longest standing unsolved problems in physics relates to the behavior of fluids that are driven far from equilibrium such as occurs when they become turbulent due to fast flow through a grid or tidal motions. In turbulent flows the distribution of vortex energy as a function of the inverse length scale [or wavenumber 'k'] of motion is proportional to 1/k5/3 which is the celebrated law of Kolmogorov. Although this law gives a good description of the average motion, fluctuations around the average are huge. This stands in contrast with thermally activated motion where large fluctuations around thermal equilibrium are highly unfavorable. The problem of turbulence is the problem of understanding why large fluctuations are so prevalent which is also called the problem of 'intermittency'. Turbulence is a remarkable problem in that its solution sits simultaneously at the forefront of physics, mathematics, engineering and computer science. A recent conference [March 2002] on 'Statistical Hydrodynamics' organized by the Los Alamos Laboratory Center for Nonlinear Studies brought together researchers in all of these fields. Although turbulence is generally thought to be described by the Navier-Stokes Equations of fluid mechanics the solution as well as its existence has eluded researchers for over 100 years. In fact proof of the existence of such a solution qualifies for a 1 M millennium prize. As part of our NASA funded research we have proposed building a bridge between vortex turbulence and wave turbulence. The latter occurs when high amplitude waves of various wavelengths are allowed to mutually interact in a fluid. In particular we have proposed measuring the interaction of ripples [capillary waves] that run around on the surface of a fluid sphere suspended in a microgravity environment. The problem of ripple turbulence poses similar mathematical challenges to the problem of vortex turbulence. The waves can have a high amplitude and a strong nonlinear

  11. Color of turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Zare, Armin; Georgiou, Tryphon T

    2016-01-01

    Second-order statistics of turbulent flows can be obtained either experimentally or via direct numerical simulations. Statistics reflect fundamentals of flow physics and can be used to develop low-complexity turbulence models. Due to experimental or numerical limitations it is often the case that only partial flow statistics can be reliably known, i.e., only certain correlations between a limited number of flow field components are available. Thus, it is of interest to complete the statistical signature of the flow field in a way that is consistent with the known dynamics. This is an inverse problem and our approach utilizes stochastically-forced linearization around turbulent mean velocity profile. In general, white-in-time stochastic forcing is not sufficient to explain turbulent flow statistics. In contrast, colored-in-time forcing of the linearized equations allows for exact matching of available correlations. To accomplish this, we develop dynamical models that generate the required stochastic excitation...

  12. Elasto-inertial turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Samanta, Devranjan; Holzner, Markus; Schäfer, Christof; Morozov, Alexander; Wagner, Christian; Hof, Björn

    2013-01-01

    Turbulence is ubiquitous in nature yet even for the case of ordinary Newtonian fluids like water our understanding of this phenomenon is limited. Many liquids of practical importance however are more complicated (e.g. blood, polymer melts or paints), they exhibit elastic as well as viscous characteristics and the relation between stress and strain is nonlinear. We here demonstrate for a model system of such complex fluids that at high shear rates turbulence is not simply modified as previously believed but it is suppressed and replaced by a new type of disordered motion, elasto-inertial turbulence (EIT). EIT is found to occur at much lower Reynolds numbers than Newtonian turbulence and the dynamical properties differ significantly. In particular the drag is strongly reduced and the observed friction scaling resolves a longstanding puzzle in non-Newtonian fluid mechanics regarding the nature of the so-called maximum drag reduction asymptote. Theoretical considerations imply that EIT will arise in complex fluid...

  13. EFFECT OF COOLED BOUNDARY ON THE TURBULENT STRUCTURE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Guo-xiang; Mao Hua-yong; Li Na

    2003-01-01

    The flow field in the cooled channel of a heat exchanger was measured using the X-type film probes of Hot Wire/Firm Anemotheter, and the turbulent mechanism was discussed. It is concluded that the airflow is cooled in the flow process, the distribution of the turbulent intensity is relatively convergent near the centerline and the boundary, the constriction action produced due to heat release at the foot of the fins causes u to decrease and w to increase near the root downstream. It is concluded that the turbulent flow with cooled boundary results from the balance of production, dissipation and intermittency caused by constriction action.

  14. On Turbulent Reconnection

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Eun-Jin; Diamond, P. H.

    2001-01-01

    We examine the dynamics of turbulent reconnection in 2D and 3D reduced MHD by calculating the effective dissipation due to coupling between small-scale fluctuations and large-scale magnetic fields. Sweet-Parker type balance relations are then used to calculate the global reconnection rate. Two approaches are employed -- quasi-linear closure and an eddy-damped fluid model. Results indicate that despite the presence of turbulence, the reconnection rate remains inversely proportional to $\\sqrt{R...

  15. Stochastic tools in turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Lumey, John L

    2012-01-01

    Stochastic Tools in Turbulence discusses the available mathematical tools to describe stochastic vector fields to solve problems related to these fields. The book deals with the needs of turbulence in relation to stochastic vector fields, particularly, on three-dimensional aspects, linear problems, and stochastic model building. The text describes probability distributions and densities, including Lebesgue integration, conditional probabilities, conditional expectations, statistical independence, lack of correlation. The book also explains the significance of the moments, the properties of the

  16. Turbulence in magnetohydrodynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Beresnyak, Andrey

    2016-01-01

    Magnetohydrodynamics describes dynamics in electrically conductive fluids. These occur in our environment as well as in our atmosphere and magnetosphere, and play a role in the sun's interaction with our planet. This work gives the basic information on turbulence in nature, comprising the needed equations, notions and numerical simulations. The current state of our knowledge and future implications of MHD turbulence are outlined systematically. It is indispensable for all scientists engaged in research of our atmosphere and in space science.

  17. Dissipation in unsteady turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Bos, Wouter

    2016-01-01

    Recent experiments and simulations have shown that unsteady turbulent flows, before reaching a dynamic equilibrium state, display a universal behaviour. We show that the observed universal non-equilibrium scaling can be explained using a non-equilibrium correction of Kolmogorov's energy spectrum. Given the universality of the experimental and numerical observations, the ideas presented here lay the foundation for the modeling of a wide class of unsteady turbulent flows.

  18. Turbulent Plasmoid Reconnection

    CERN Document Server

    Widmer, Fabien; Yokoi, Nobumitsu

    2016-01-01

    The plasmoid instability may lead to fast magnetic reconnection through long current sheets(CS). It is well known that large-Reynolds-number plasmas easily become turbulent. We address the question whether turbulence enhances the energy conversion rate of plasmoid-unstable current sheets. We carry out appropriate numerical MHD simulations, but resolving simultaneously the relevant large-scale (mean-) fields and the corresponding small-scale, turbulent, quantities by means of direct numerical simulations (DNS) is not possible. Hence we investigate the influence of small scale turbulence on large scale MHD processes by utilizing a subgrid-scale (SGS) turbulence model. We verify the applicability of our SGS model and then use it to investigate the influence of turbulence on the plasmoid instability. We start the simulations with Harris-type and force-free CS equilibria in the presence of a finite guide field in the direction perpendicular to the reconnection plane. We use the DNS results to investigate the growt...

  19. 城市风的脉动特性对建筑通风效果的影响%Analysis of the Effect on Building Ventilation Caused by The Turbulent Characteristics of the Urban Wind

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    谷宇新; 刘刚; 周杰

    2012-01-01

    通过对作用在深圳市某办公建筑室内边界的自然脉动风进行的连续测试,对脉动周期和脉动强度的统计值进行分析研究。同时对由脉动风引起的CO2浓度变化进行记录,结合脉动风速的变化规律,讨论了城市风的脉动特性对建筑通风效果的影响。基于不同开窗位置的通风效果比较,提出关于建筑自然通风设计中考虑城市脉动风的波动性的必要性。%Consecutive observation of natural wind imposed on Shenzhen Institute of Building Research Mansion was performed,the turbulent cycle and turbulent intensity were summarized based on amount of measured data.At the same time concentration of CO2 changed with the natural wind was also recorded,combined with the change of pulse wind speed rule,the characteristics of effected on the city the pulsation of the building ventilation was discussed.Based on the comparison between different effects on different position of the window,considering the volatility of natural wind in city is a necessity when designing the building ventilation.

  20. Modeling turbulence structure. Chemical kinetics interaction in turbulent reactive flows

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Magnussen, B.F. [The Norwegian Univ. of Science and Technology, Trondheim (Norway)

    1997-12-31

    The challenge of the mathematical modelling is to transfer basic physical knowledge into a mathematical formulation such that this knowledge can be utilized in computational simulation of practical problems. The combustion phenomena can be subdivided into a large set of interconnected phenomena like flow, turbulence, thermodynamics, chemical kinetics, radiation, extinction, ignition etc. Combustion in one application differs from combustion in another area by the relative importance of the various phenomena. The difference in fuel, geometry and operational conditions often causes the differences. The computer offers the opportunity to treat the individual phenomena and their interactions by models with wide operational domains. The relative magnitude of the various phenomena therefore becomes the consequence of operational conditions and geometry and need not to be specified on the basis of experience for the given problem. In mathematical modelling of turbulent combustion, one of the big challenges is how to treat the interaction between the chemical reactions and the fluid flow i.e. the turbulence. Different scientists adhere to different concepts like the laminar flamelet approach, the pdf approach of the Eddy Dissipation Concept. Each of these approaches offers different opportunities and problems. All these models are based on a sound physical basis, however none of these have general validity in taking into consideration all detail of the physical chemical interaction. The merits of the models can only be judged by their ability to reproduce physical reality and consequences of operational and geometric conditions in a combustion system. The presentation demonstrates and discusses the development of a coherent combustion technology for energy conversion and safety based on the Eddy Dissipation Concept by Magnussen. (author) 30 refs.

  1. Turbulence and Fossil Turbulence in Oceans and Lakes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Pak-Tao Leung; Carl H. Gibson

    2004-01-01

    Turbulence is defined as an eddy-like state of fluid motion where the inertial-vortex forces of the eddies are larger than any of the other forces that tend to damp the eddies out. Energy cascades of irrotational flows from large scales to small are non-turbulent, even if they supply energy to turbulence. Turbulent flows are rotational and cascade from small scales to large, with feedback. Viscous forces limit the smallest turbulent eddy size to the Kolmogorov scale. In stratified fluids, buoyancy forces limit large vertical overturns to the Ozmidov scale and convert the largest turbulent eddies into a unique class of saturated, non-propagating, internal waves, termed fossil-vorticity-turbulence. These waves have the same energy but different properties and spectral forms than the original turbulence patch. The Gibson (1980, 1986) theory of fossil turbulence applies universal similarity theories of turbulence and turbulent mixing to the vertical evolution of an isolated patch of turbulence in a stratified fluid as its growth is constrained and fossilized by buoyancy forces. Quantitative hydrodynamic-phase-diagrams (HPDs) from the theory are used to classify microstructure patches according to their hydrodynamic states. When analyzed in HPD space, previously published oceanic datasets showed their dominant microstructure patches are fossilized at large scales in all layers. Laboratory and field measurements suggested phytoplankton species with different swimming abilities adjust their growth strategies by pattern recognition of turbulence-fossil-turbulence dissipation and persistence times that predict survival-relevant surface layer sea changes. New data collected near a Honolulu waste-water outfall showed the small-to-large evolution of oceanic turbulence microstructure from active to fossil states, and revealed the ability of fossil-density-turbulence patches to absorb, and vertically radiate, internal wave energy, information, and enhanced turbulent

  2. When Physics Meets Biology: Low and High Velocity Penetration, Blunt Trauma and Blast Injuries to the Brain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leanne eYoung

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The incidence of TBI in the US has reached epidemic proportions with well over 2 million new cases reported each year. TBI can occur in both civilians and warfighters, with head injuries occurring in both combat and non-combat situations from a variety of threats, including ballistic penetration, acceleration, blunt impact, and blast. Most generally, TBI is a condition in which physical loads exceed the capacity of brain tissues to absorb without injury. More specifically, TBI results when sufficient external force is applied to the head and is subsequently converted into stresses that must be absorbed or redirected by protective equipment. If the stresses are not sufficiently absorbed or redirected, they will lead to damage of extracranial soft tissue and the skull. Complex interactions and kinematics of the head, neck and jaw cause strains within the brain tissue, resulting in structural, anatomical damage that is characteristic of the inciting insult. This mechanical trauma then initiates a neuro-chemical cascade that leads to the functional consequences of TBI, such as cognitive impairment. To fully understand the mechanisms by which TBI occurs, it is critically important to understand the effects of the loading environments created by these threats. In the following, a review is made of the pertinent complex loading conditions and how these loads cause injury. Also discussed are injury thresholds and gaps in knowledge, both of which are needed to design improved protective systems.

  3. When Physics Meets Biology: Low and High-Velocity Penetration, Blunt Impact, and Blast Injuries to the Brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Leanne; Rule, Gregory T.; Bocchieri, Robert T.; Walilko, Timothy J.; Burns, Jennie M.; Ling, Geoffrey

    2015-01-01

    The incidence of traumatic brain injuries (TBI) in the US has reached epidemic proportions with well over 2 million new cases reported each year. TBI can occur in both civilians and warfighters, with head injuries occurring in both combat and non-combat situations from a variety of threats, including ballistic penetration, acceleration, blunt impact, and blast. Most generally, TBI is a condition in which physical loads exceed the capacity of brain tissues to absorb without injury. More specifically, TBI results when sufficient external force is applied to the head and is subsequently converted into stresses that must be absorbed or redirected by protective equipment. If the stresses are not sufficiently absorbed or redirected, they will lead to damage of extracranial soft tissue and the skull. Complex interactions and kinematics of the head, neck and jaw cause strains within the brain tissue, resulting in structural, anatomical damage that is characteristic of the inciting insult. This mechanical trauma then initiates a neuro-chemical cascade that leads to the functional consequences of TBI, such as cognitive impairment. To fully understand the mechanisms by which TBI occurs, it is critically important to understand the effects of the loading environments created by these threats. In the following, a review is made of the pertinent complex loading conditions and how these loads cause injury. Also discussed are injury thresholds and gaps in knowledge, both of which are needed to design improved protective systems. PMID:25999910

  4. PHYSICAL MECHANISMS OF TURBULENT VISCOSITY AND SIMULATION OF TURBULENCE ON THE NAVIER-STOKES EQUATIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trunev A. P.

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The article deals with the solution of the NavierStokes equations describing turbulent flows over rough surfaces. It is known, that there is a mechanism of turbulent mixing in natural systems, leading to an increase in the viscosity of the continuous medium. In this regard, we suggest methods of regularization of the Navier-Stokes equations, similar to the natural mechanisms of mixing. It is shown, that in threedimensional flows over a rough surface turbulent viscosity increases proportionally to the square of the distance from the wall. The models of the flow, taking into account the properties of the turbulent environment are considered. A modification of the continuity equation taking into account the limiting magnitude of pressure fluctuations is proposed. It is shown, that due to the pressure pulsation, the incompressibility condition may be violated even for flows with low Mach numbers. Modification of the continuity equation taking into account turbulent fluctuations leads to a system of nonlinear equations of parabolic type. Modification of continuity equation in the system of Navier-Stokes by the introduction of turbulent viscosity allows the regularization of the Navier-Stokes equations to solve the problems with rapidly changing dynamic parameters. The main result of which is obtained by numerical simulation of the modified system of equations is the stability of the numerical algorithm at a large Reynolds number, which can be explained, first, a system of parabolic type, and a large quantity of turbulent viscosity. A numerical model of flow around plates with the rapid change in angle of attack has been verified. We have discovered the type of instability of the turbulent boundary layer associated with the rapid changes in dynamic parameters. It is shown, that the fluctuations of the boundary layer to cause generation of sound at a frequency of 100 Hz to 1 kHz

  5. Turbulence as a constrained system

    CERN Document Server

    Mendes, A C R; Takakura, F I

    2000-01-01

    Hydrodynamic turbulence is studied as a constrained system from the point of view of metafluid dynamics. We present a Lagrangian description for this new theory of turbulence inspired from the analogy with electromagnetism. Consequently it is a gauge theory. This new approach to the study of turbulence tends to renew the optimism to solve the difficult problem of turbulence. As a constrained system, turbulence is studied in the Dirac and Faddeev-Jackiw formalisms giving the Dirac brackets. An important result is that we show these brackets are the same in and out of the inertial range, giving the way to quantize turbulence.

  6. Measurement of the magnetic moment of the 21+ state of 72Zn via extension of the high-velocity transient-field method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magnetic moments can provide deep insight for nuclear structure and of the wave function composition, particularly when the single particle character of the nucleus is dominating. For this reason, the magnetic moment of the first excited state of the radioactive neutron-rich 72Zn was measured at the GANIL facility (Caen, France). The result of the experiment confirmed the trend predicted by the shell model calculations, even if the error on the measurement did not allow for a rigorous constraint of the theories. The measurement was performed using the transient field (TF) technique and the nuclei of interest were produced in a fragmentation reaction. Before this experiment, the high-velocity TF (HVTF) technique had been used only with projectile up to Z = 24. It was the first time that a magnetic moment of an heavy ion with Z > 24 was measured in the high velocity regime. To further develop the technique and to gather information about the hyperfine interaction between the polarized electrons and the nucleons, two experiments were performed at LNS (Catania, Italy). In this thesis the development of the high-velocity TF technique for the experiments on g(2+; 72Zn) and field strength BTF (Kr, Ge) is presented. The analysis of the results and their interpretation is then discussed. It was demonstrated that the HVTF technique, combined with Coulomb excitation, can be used for the measurement of g-factors of very short-lived states, with lifetimes of the order of tens of ps and lower, of heavy ions (A ∼ 80) traveling with intermediate relativistic speeds, β ∼ 0.25. The standard TF technique at low velocities (a few percent of the speed of light) has been used for a long time to provide the strong magnetic field necessary for the measurement of g-factors of very short-lived states. The breakthrough of the present development is the different velocity regime of the higher mass projectile under which the experiment is carried out

  7. Inverse scattering problem in turbulent magnetic fluctuations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Treumann, Rudolf A.; Baumjohann, Wolfgang; Narita, Yasuhito

    2016-08-01

    We apply a particular form of the inverse scattering theory to turbulent magnetic fluctuations in a plasma. In the present note we develop the theory, formulate the magnetic fluctuation problem in terms of its electrodynamic turbulent response function, and reduce it to the solution of a special form of the famous Gelfand-Levitan-Marchenko equation of quantum mechanical scattering theory. The last of these applies to transmission and reflection in an active medium. The theory of turbulent magnetic fluctuations does not refer to such quantities. It requires a somewhat different formulation. We reduce the theory to the measurement of the low-frequency electromagnetic fluctuation spectrum, which is not the turbulent spectral energy density. The inverse theory in this form enables obtaining information about the turbulent response function of the medium. The dynamic causes of the electromagnetic fluctuations are implicit to it. Thus, it is of vital interest in low-frequency magnetic turbulence. The theory is developed until presentation of the equations in applicable form to observations of turbulent electromagnetic fluctuations as input from measurements. Solution of the final integral equation should be done by standard numerical methods based on iteration. We point to the possibility of treating power law fluctuation spectra as an example. Formulation of the problem to include observations of spectral power densities in turbulence is not attempted. This leads to severe mathematical problems and requires a reformulation of inverse scattering theory. One particular aspect of the present inverse theory of turbulent fluctuations is that its structure naturally leads to spatial information which is obtained from the temporal information that is inherent to the observation of time series. The Taylor assumption is not needed here. This is a consequence of Maxwell's equations, which couple space and time evolution. The inversion procedure takes advantage of a particular

  8. Turbulence and Stochastic Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Celani, Antonio; Mazzino, Andrea; Pumir, Alain

    sec:08-1In 1931 the monograph Analytical Methods in Probability Theory appeared, in which A.N. Kolmogorov laid the foundations for the modern theory of Markov processes [1]. According to Gnedenko: "In the history of probability theory it is difficult to find other works that changed the established points of view and basic trends in research work in such a decisive way". Ten years later, his article on fully developed turbulence provided the framework within which most, if not all, of the subsequent theoretical investigations have been conducted [2] (see e.g. the review by Biferale et al. in this volume [3]. Remarkably, the greatest advances made in the last few years towards a thorough understanding of turbulence developed from the successful marriage between the theory of stochastic processes and the phenomenology of turbulent transport of scalar fields. In this article we will summarize these recent developments which expose the direct link between the intermittency of transported fields and the statistical properties of particle trajectories advected by the turbulent flow (see also [4], and, for a more thorough review, [5]. We also discuss the perspectives of the Lagrangian approach beyond passive scalars, especially for the modeling of hydrodynamic turbulence.

  9. Phase-detection measurements in free-surface turbulent shear flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chanson, Hubert

    2016-04-01

    High-velocity self-aerated flows are described as ‘white waters’ because of the entrained air bubbles. The air entrainment induces a drastic change in the multiphase flow structure of the water column and this leads to significant bubble-turbulence interactions, turbulence modulation and associated mixing processes impacting on the bulk flow properties. In these high-velocity free-surface turbulent flows, the phase-detection needle probe is a most reliable instrumentation. The signal processing of a phase-detection probe is re-visited herein. It is shown that the processing may be performed on the raw probe signal as well as the thresholded data. The latter yields the time-averaged void fraction, the bubble count rate, the particle chord time distributions and the particle clustering properties within the particulate flow regions. The raw probe signal analysis gives further the auto-correlation time scale and the power spectrum density function. Finally dimensional considerations are developed with a focus on the physical modelling of free-surface flows in hydraulic structures. It is argued that the notion of scale effects must be defined in terms of some specific set of air-water flow properties within well-defined testing conditions, while a number of free-surface flow characteristics are more prone to scale effects than others, even in large-size physical facilities.

  10. Turbulence introduction to theory and applications of turbulent flows

    CERN Document Server

    Westerweel, Jerry; Nieuwstadt, Frans T M

    2016-01-01

    This book provides a general introduction to the topic of turbulent flows. Apart from classical topics in turbulence, attention is also paid to modern topics. After studying this work, the reader will have the basic knowledge to follow current topics on turbulence in scientific literature. The theory is illustrated with a number of examples of applications, such as closure models, numerical simulations and turbulent diffusion, and experimental findings. The work also contains a number of illustrative exercises.

  11. Wave turbulent statistics in non-weak wave turbulence

    OpenAIRE

    Yokoyama, Naoto

    2011-01-01

    In wave turbulence, it has been believed that statistical properties are well described by the weak turbulence theory, in which nonlinear interactions among wavenumbers are assumed to be small. In the weak turbulence theory, separation of linear and nonlinear time scales derived from the weak nonlinearity is also assumed. However, the separation of the time scales is often violated even in weak turbulent systems where the nonlinear interactions are actually weak. To get rid of this inconsiste...

  12. Turbulence and Fossil Turbulence in Oceans and Lakes

    CERN Document Server

    Leung, P T; Leung, Pak Tao; Gibson, Carl H.

    2003-01-01

    Turbulence is defined as an eddy-like state of fluid motion where the inertial-vortex forces of the eddies are larger than any of the other forces that tend to damp the eddies out. Energy cascades of irrotational flows from large scales to small are non-turbulent, even if they supply energy to turbulence. Turbulent flows are rotational and cascade from small scales to large, with feedback. Viscous forces limit the smallest turbulent eddy size to the Kolmogorov scale. In stratified fluids, buoyancy forces limit large vertical overturns to the Ozmidov scale and convert the largest turbulent eddies into a unique class of saturated, non-propagating, internal waves, termed fossil-vorticity-turbulence. These waves have the same energy but different properties and spectral forms than the original turbulence patch. The Gibson (1980, 1986) theory of fossil turbulence applies universal similarity theories of turbulence and turbulent mixing to the vertical evolution of an isolated patch of turbulence in a stratified flu...

  13. Turbulent black holes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Huan; Zimmerman, Aaron; Lehner, Luis

    2015-02-27

    We demonstrate that rapidly spinning black holes can display a new type of nonlinear parametric instability-which is triggered above a certain perturbation amplitude threshold-akin to the onset of turbulence, with possibly observable consequences. This instability transfers from higher temporal and azimuthal spatial frequencies to lower frequencies-a phenomenon reminiscent of the inverse cascade displayed by (2+1)-dimensional fluids. Our finding provides evidence for the onset of transitory turbulence in astrophysical black holes and predicts observable signatures in black hole binaries with high spins. Furthermore, it gives a gravitational description of this behavior which, through the fluid-gravity duality, can potentially shed new light on the remarkable phenomena of turbulence in fluids.

  14. Turbulence in complex terrain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mann, Jakob [Risoe National Lab., Wind Energy and Atmosheric Physics Dept., Roskilde (Denmark)

    1999-03-01

    The purpose of this work is to develop a model of the spectral velocity-tensor in neutral flow over complex terrain. The resulting equations are implemented in a computer code using the mean flow generated by a linear mean flow model as input. It estimates turbulence structure over hills (except on the lee side if recirculation is present) in the so-called outer layer and also models the changes in turbulence statistics in the vicinity roughness changes. The generated turbulence fields are suitable as input for dynamic load calculations on wind turbines and other tall structures and is under implementation in the collection of programs called WA{sup s}P Engineering. (au) EFP-97; EU-JOULE-3. 15 refs.

  15. Turbulent black holes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Huan; Zimmerman, Aaron; Lehner, Luis

    2015-02-27

    We demonstrate that rapidly spinning black holes can display a new type of nonlinear parametric instability-which is triggered above a certain perturbation amplitude threshold-akin to the onset of turbulence, with possibly observable consequences. This instability transfers from higher temporal and azimuthal spatial frequencies to lower frequencies-a phenomenon reminiscent of the inverse cascade displayed by (2+1)-dimensional fluids. Our finding provides evidence for the onset of transitory turbulence in astrophysical black holes and predicts observable signatures in black hole binaries with high spins. Furthermore, it gives a gravitational description of this behavior which, through the fluid-gravity duality, can potentially shed new light on the remarkable phenomena of turbulence in fluids. PMID:25768746

  16. Stochastic modelling of turbulence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Emil Hedevang Lohse

    This thesis addresses stochastic modelling of turbulence with applications to wind energy in mind. The primary tool is ambit processes, a recently developed class of computationally tractable stochastic processes based on integration with respect to Lévy bases. The subject of ambit processes...... turbine operates in the turbulent atmospheric boundary layer. In this respect, three regimes are of particular interest: modelling the turbulent wind before it interacts with the wind turbine (e.g. to be used in load simulations), modelling of the interaction of the wind with the wind turbine (e.......g. to extract information about a wind turbine's production of power), and modelling the wake generated by the wind turbine so that its influence on other wind turbines further downstream in turn can be modelled (e.g. to be used in load simulations). The thesis makes the contributions listed below. A spatial...

  17. Magnetic turbulence in Tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    From a discussion of the disruption process, it is concluded that this process plausibly consists of the onset of a fine grain turbulence. This turbulence must be able to produce the large values of the inductive electric field which are associated with the reorganization of the poloidal flux and the current density on the magnetic surfaces. It is then plausible that the turbulence belongs to a class of 'rippling' modes, that may explain the experimental values for the magnetic perturbations corresponding to a substantial radial ergodicity of the flux lines. The stability of the modes in the presence of such an ergodicity is accordingly considered. It is found that the modes may be unstable even in collisionless regime, the ergodicity playing a role similar to the resistivity to partially remove the M.H.D. constraint

  18. MODERN TURBULENCE AND NEW CHALLENGES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张兆顺; 崔桂香; 许春晓

    2002-01-01

    The paper briefly reviews the progress in turbulence research in the 20th century and a number of issues are addressed based on achievements. The modern theory of Navier-Stokes equation provides the theoretical basis for the development of turbulence research. The significance and bottle neck of DNS and the physical experiment in exploring turbulent flows are analyzed. The active manipulation of turbulence is directly guided by the knowledge of large-scale coherent structures. The existing problems in the large-eddy simulation are also pointed out. Scalar turbulence, which behaves quite different from fluid turbulence in many aspects, has drawn much attention in recent years. Besides the analysis of the difficulties in turbulence research, a number of examples are also presented to show how to use modern theory,computer and high technology to explore the nature of turbulence.

  19. Turbulence in the Interstellar Medium

    CERN Document Server

    Falceta-Goncalves, D; Falgarone, E; Chian, A C -L

    2014-01-01

    Turbulence is ubiquitous in the insterstellar medium and plays a major role in several processes such as the formation of dense structures and stars, the stability of molecular clouds, the amplification of magnetic fields, and the re-acceleration and diffusion of cosmic rays. Despite its importance, interstellar turbulence, alike turbulence in general, is far from being fully understood. In this review we present the basics of turbulence physics, focusing on the statistics of its structure and energy cascade. We explore the physics of compressible and incompressible turbulent flows, as well as magnetized cases. The most relevant observational techniques that provide quantitative insights of interstellar turbulence are also presented. We also discuss the main difficulties in developing a three-dimensional view of interstellar turbulence from these observations. Finally, we briefly present what could be the the main sources of turbulence in the interstellar medium.

  20. Turbulent acceleration of auroral electrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It is shown that the characteristic peak in the auroral electron velocity distribution can be generated stochastically through resonant interactions with lower-hybrid electrostatic turbulence. The peak itself is shown to be a direct consequence of restrictions imposed on reflexion of electron velocities in the frame of reference of individual wave packets by the limitation in group velocity. A Monte-Carlo model demonstrates how the various properties of the acceleration region are reflected in the resultant electron distribution. It is shown, in particular, that the width of the peak is governed by the amplitude of the turbulence, while the amplitude of the peak reflects the column density of wave energy. Electron distributions encountered within three auroral arcs are interpreted to yield order of magnitude estimates of the amplitude and rms electric field of lower-hybrid wave packets. The velocities and frequencies of the resonant waves, the net electric field, the column density of wave energy and the electric-field energy density are also estimated. The results are found to be consistent with available electric-field measurements. A general broadening of the electron distribution caused by less systematic interactions between electrons and wave packets is shown to have a negligible effect on the peak resulting from the reflexion process; it does, though, lead to the creation of a characteristic high-energy tail. (author)

  1. Characterizing the High-Velocity Stars of RAVE: The Discovery of a Metal-Rich Halo Star Born in the Galactic Disk

    CERN Document Server

    Hawkins, K; Gilmore, G; Masseron, T; Wyse, R F G; Ruchti, G; Bienayme, O; Bland-Hawthorn, J; Boeche, C; Freeman, K; Gibson, B K; Grebel, E K; Helmi, A; Kunder, A; Munari, U; Navarro, J F; Parker, Q A; Reid, W A; Scholz, R D; Seabroke, G; Siebert, A; Steinmetz, M; Watson, F; Zwitter, T

    2014-01-01

    We aim to characterize high-velocity (HiVel) stars in the solar vicinity both chemically and kinematically using the fourth data release of the RAdial Velocity Experiment (RAVE). We used a sample of 57 HiVel stars with Galactic rest-frame velocities larger than 275 km s$^{-1}$. With 6D position and velocity information, we integrated the orbits of the HiVel stars and found that, on average, they reach out to 13 kpc from the Galactic plane and have relatively eccentric orbits consistent with the Galactic halo. Using the stellar parameters and [$\\alpha$/Fe] estimates from RAVE, we found the metallicity distribution of the HiVel stars peak at [M/H] = -1.2 dex and is chemically consistent with the inner halo. There are a few notable exceptions that include a hypervelocity star (HVS) candidate, an extremely high-velocity bound halo star, and one star that is kinematically consistent with the halo but chemically consistent with the disk. High-resolution spectra were obtained for the metal-rich HiVel star candidate ...

  2. A Comprehensive Review on Fluid Dynamics and Transport of Suspension/Liquid Droplets and Particles in High-Velocity Oxygen-Fuel (HVOF Thermal Spray

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehdi Jadidi

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available In thermal spraying processes, molten, semi-molten, or solid particles, which are sufficiently fast in a stream of gas, are deposited on a substrate. These particles can plastically deform while impacting on the substrate, which results in the formation of well-adhered and dense coatings. Clearly, particles in flight conditions, such as velocity, trajectory, temperature, and melting state, have enormous influence on the coating properties and should be well understood to control and improve the coating quality. The focus of this study is on the high velocity oxygen fuel (HVOF spraying and high velocity suspension flame spraying (HVSFS techniques, which are widely used in academia and industry to generate different types of coatings. Extensive numerical and experimental studies were carried out and are still in progress to estimate the particle in-flight behavior in thermal spray processes. In this review paper, the fundamental phenomena involved in the mentioned thermal spray techniques, such as shock diamonds, combustion, primary atomization, secondary atomization, etc., are discussed comprehensively. In addition, the basic aspects and emerging trends in simulation of thermal spray processes are reviewed. The numerical approaches such as Eulerian-Lagrangian and volume of fluid along with their advantages and disadvantages are explained in detail. Furthermore, this article provides a detailed review on simulation studies published to date.

  3. High-velocity neon line emission from the ULIRG IRAS F00183-7111: revealing the optically obscured base of a nuclear outflow

    CERN Document Server

    Spoon, H W W; Marshall, J A; Bernard-Salas, J; Farrah, D; Charmandaris, V; Kent, B R

    2008-01-01

    We report the first mid-IR detection of highly disturbed ionized gas in the ultraluminous infrared galaxy IRAS F00183-7111. The gas, traced by the 12.81um [NeII] and 15.56um [NeIII] lines, spans a velocity range of-3500 to 3000 km/s with respect to systemic velocity. Optical and near-IR spectroscopic studies show no evidence for similarly high velocity gas components in forbidden lines at shorter wavelengths. We interpret this as the result of strong extinction (Av=10-50) on the high-velocity gas, which identifies the base of the outflow traced in 5007A [OIII] as a plausible origin. Unusual excitation conditions are implied by a comparison of the mid-infrared low-excitation neon line emission and the PAH emission for a sample of 56 ULIRGs. For IRAS F00183, the neon/PAH ratio is 8 times higher than the average ratio. Similar mid-infrared kinematic and excitation characteristics are found for only 2 other ULIRGs in our sample: IRAS 12127-1412NE and IRAS 13451+1232. Both sources have an elevated neon/PAH ratio a...

  4. Comparative study of iron oxide nanoparticles as-prepared and dispersed in Copaiba oil using Mössbauer spectroscopy with low and high velocity resolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oshtrakh, M. I.; Šepelák, V.; Rodriguez, A. F. R.; Semionkin, V. A.; Ushakov, M. V.; Santos, J. G.; Silveira, L. B.; Marmolejo, E. M.; Parise, M. De Souza; Morais, P. C.

    Iron oxide nanoparticles, probably magnetite, as-prepared and dispersed in Copaiba oil were studied by Mössbauer spectroscopy using two different spectrometers: with a low velocity resolution (512 channels) for measurements at 295 and 21 K and with a high velocity resolution (4096 channels) for measurements at 295 and 90 K. The fitting of all measured spectra demonstrated that usual models applied to fit Mössbauer spectra of magnetite and maghemite particles were not suitable. Therefore, the recorded spectra were fitted using a large number of spectral components on the basis of better quality of the fit and linearity of differential spectra. The number of components obtained for the better fit appeared to be different for spectra measured with a low and a high velocity resolution. However, these results demonstrated differences of Mössbauer parameters for iron oxide nanoparticles as-prepared and dispersed in Copaiba oil at applied temperatures. The effect of Copaiba oil molecules on Mössbauer parameters may be a result of the interactions of polar molecules such as kaurinic acid with nanoparticles' surface.

  5. Turbulence Measurements in Swirling Flows

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. M. Domkundwar

    1981-10-01

    Full Text Available Investigation have been conducted to find out the region of high turbulent intensities in a swirling jet passing through a divergent passage. A hot wire anemometer is used to measure the turbulence intensity using a four position method. It has been concluded that the jet spreads with increasing diffuser angle and the region of high turbulent intensity also spreads. The high turbulence intensity region lies around the recirculation zone and it decays rapidly along the main flow direction.

  6. Wave turbulent statistics in non-weak wave turbulence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In wave turbulence, which is made by nonlinear interactions among waves, it has been believed that statistical properties are well described by the weak turbulence theory, where separation of linear and nonlinear time scales derived from weak nonlinearity is assumed. However, the separation of the time scales is often violated. To get rid of this inconsistency, closed equations are derived in wave turbulence without assuming the weak nonlinearity according to Direct-Interaction Approximation (DIA), which has been successful in Navier–Stokes turbulence. The DIA equations is a natural extension of the conventional kinetic equation to not-necessarily-weak wave turbulence. -- Highlights: ► Direct-Interaction Approximation is applied to wave turbulence. ► The DIA equations describe non-weak wave turbulent statistics. ► They can be applied to spatio-temporal intermittent structures. ► The conventional kinetic equation is recoverable in the weak nonlinear limit.

  7. Multilevel turbulence simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tziperman, E. [Princeton Univ., NJ (United States)

    1994-12-31

    The authors propose a novel method for the simulation of turbulent flows, that is motivated by and based on the Multigrid (MG) formalism. The method, called Multilevel Turbulence Simulations (MTS), is potentially more efficient and more accurate than LES. In many physical problems one is interested in the effects of the small scales on the larger ones, or in a typical realization of the flow, and not in the detailed time history of each small scale feature. MTS takes advantage of the fact that the detailed simulation of small scales is not needed at all times, in order to make the calculation significantly more efficient, while accurately accounting for the effects of the small scales on the larger scale of interest. In MTS, models of several resolutions are used to represent the turbulent flow. The model equations in each coarse level incorporate a closure term roughly corresponding to the tau correction in the MG formalism that accounts for the effects of the unresolvable scales on that grid. The finer resolution grids are used only a small portion of the simulation time in order to evaluate the closure terms for the coarser grids, while the coarse resolution grids are then used to accurately and efficiently calculate the evolution of the larger scales. The methods efficiency relative to direct simulations is of the order of the ratio of required integration time to the smallest eddies turnover time, potentially resulting in orders of magnitude improvement for a large class of turbulence problems.

  8. Mixing in manipulated turbulence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuczaj, A.K.; Geurts, B.J.

    2006-01-01

    A numerical investigation of turbulent flow, subject to deterministic broad-band forcing, is presented. Explicit forcing procedures are included that represent the simultaneous agitation of a wide spectrum of length-scales, including both large scales as well as a band of much smaller scales. Such f

  9. Spirituality in Turbulent Times.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wheatley, Margaret J.

    2002-01-01

    Discusses the importance of spiritual leadership in turbulent, uncertain times. Describes several spiritual principles--for example, life is cyclical; all life is interconnected. Offers six suggestions for personal health: Start day peacefully, learn to be mindful, slow things down, create own measures, expect surprise, practice gratefulness. (PKP)

  10. Near free-surface turbulent structures in a high-froude number turbulent open-channel flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this study, Direct Numerical Simulation (DNS) of an air-liquid counter current flow induced by a high-speed liquid film at Froude number of 1.8 based on the bulk water mean-velocity and wave velocity of long wave, was conducted. As the results, Air-liquid interaction effects on the water phase were very weak, and present flow field formed so-called ''Super-critical turbulent open-channel flow''. In the supercritical open-channel flow, vertical turbulent confinement effect cannot be observed and vertical turbulent intensity was increased near free-surface caused from surface deformation effects. (author)

  11. Impact of turbulent mixing on isoprene chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, S.-W.; Barth, M. C.; Trainer, M.

    2016-07-01

    Isoprene, a volatile organic compound that is mainly emitted from trees, rapidly reacts with hydroxyl radical (OH) during daytime and subsequently forms ozone and aerosols in the troposphere. The isoprene-OH reaction can be affected by the interplay between chemistry and mixing because the two processes occur at a similar time scale. We investigate the impact of turbulent mixing on isoprene-OH reactivity with large eddy simulations (LES) coupled with comprehensive chemistry. Our results show that the covariance of isoprene and OH causes ~20% decrease to ~10% increase of the horizontal average reaction rate, depending on nitrogen oxides (NOx = NO + NO2) abundances, compared to the rate that neglects the covariance. This wide range of effects on reaction rates is caused by the primary production and loss reactions of OH in each NOx regime. Our research promotes the use of LES for better understanding the role of turbulence in isoprene-OH reaction and parameterizations in large-scale models.

  12. Analysis of turbulent boundary layers

    CERN Document Server

    Cebeci, Tuncer

    1974-01-01

    Analysis of Turbulent Boundary Layers focuses on turbulent flows meeting the requirements for the boundary-layer or thin-shear-layer approximations. Its approach is devising relatively fundamental, and often subtle, empirical engineering correlations, which are then introduced into various forms of describing equations for final solution. After introducing the topic on turbulence, the book examines the conservation equations for compressible turbulent flows, boundary-layer equations, and general behavior of turbulent boundary layers. The latter chapters describe the CS method for calculati

  13. Remarks on turbulent constitutive relations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shih, Tsan-Hsing; Lumley, John L.

    1993-01-01

    The paper demonstrates that the concept of turbulent constitutive relations can be used to construct general models for various turbulent correlations. Some of the Generalized Cayley-Hamilton formulas for relating tensor products of higher extension to tensor products of lower extension are introduced. The combination of dimensional analysis and invariant theory can lead to 'turbulent constitutive relations' (or general turbulence models) for, in principle, any turbulent correlations. As examples, the constitutive relations for Reynolds stresses and scalar fluxes are derived. The results are consistent with ones from Renormalization Group (RNG) theory and two-scale Direct-Interaction Approximation (DIA) method, but with a more general form.

  14. On the structure of turbulent gravel bed flow: Implications for sediment transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohajeri, Seyed Hossein; Righetti, Maurizio; Wharton, Geraldene; Romano, Giovanni Paolo

    2016-06-01

    The main objective of this study was to examine the turbulent flow field over gravel particles as a first step towards understanding sediment transport in a gravel bed river. Specifically, the vertical momentum flux in gravel bed turbulent flow was investigated with particular attention to the near-bed region. Spatial organization of vertical momentum flux was studied with stereoscopic Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) measurements in a horizontal layer 1mm above the gravel crests. The vertical momentum flux through the water column was described with digital PIV measurements in three vertical planes. The data showed that near the gravel bed, net turbulent momentum flux spatially varies with respect to bed topography. Analysis of the vertical velocity data revealed that near the gravel particle crests, there is a significant net vertical form-induced momentum flux approximately with the same order of magnitude as the net vertical turbulent momentum flux. Above the crests, total net vertical momentum flux is positive. However, below the crests, despite noticeable positive form-induced momentum flux, total net vertical momentum flux is negative. Results of quadrant analysis show that variation of turbulent net vertical momentum flux through water column is in agreement with prevalence of upward movement of low velocity flow (known as ejection) above gravel crests and downward movement of high velocity flow (known as sweep) below gravel crests. Below gravel crests (- 0.1 particles but their contribution is not sufficient to move fine particles in the longitudinal direction.

  15. Intermittent Turbulence in the Very Stable Ekman Layer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barnard, James C.

    2001-01-05

    INTERMITTENT TURBULENCE IN THE VERY STABLE EKMAN LAYER This study describes a Direct Numerical Simulation (DNS) of a very stable Ekman layer in which a constant downward heat flux is applied at the lower boundary, thus cooling the fluid above. Numerical experiments were performed in which the strength of the imposed heat flux was varied. For downward heat fluxes above a certain critical value the turbulence becomes intermittent and, as the heat flux increases beyond this value, the flow tends to relaminarize because of the very strong ambient stratification. We adopt Mahrt?s (1999) definition of the very stable boundary layer as a boundary layer in which intermittent, rather than continuous turbulence, is observed. Numerical experiments were used to test various hypothesis of where in ?stability parameter space? the very stable boundary layer is found. These experiments support the findings of Howell and Sun (1999) that the boundary layer will exhibit intermittency and therefore be categorized as ?very stable?, when the stability parameter, z/L, exceeds unity. Another marker for the very stable boundary layer, Derbyshire?s (1990) maximum heat flux criterion, was also examined. Using a case study drawn from the simulations where turbulence intermittency was observed, the mechanism that causes the intermittence was investigated. It was found that patchy turbulence originates from a vigorous inflectional, Ekman-like instability -- a roll cell -- that lifts colder air over warmer air. The resulting convective instability causes an intense burst of turbulence. This turbulence is short-lived because the lifting motion of the roll cell, as well as the roll cell itself, is partially destroyed after the patchy turbulence is generated. Examples of intermittent turbulence obtained from the simulations appear to be consistent with observations of intermittency even though the Reynolds number of the DNS is relatively low (400).

  16. Turbulent ventilation of a street canyon

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Morten

    2000-01-01

    A selection of turbulence data corresponding to 185 days of field measurements has een analysed. The non-ideal building geometry influenced the circulation patterns in the street canyon and the largest average vertical velocities were observed in the wake of an unbroken line of buildings. The...... small, and this suggests that most of the velocity fluctuations were fairly local and not caused by unsteady street vortices. The observed velocities scaled with the ambient wind speed except under low-wind conditions....

  17. Static magnetic fields enhance turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Pothérat, Alban

    2015-01-01

    More often than not, turbulence occurs under the influence of external fields, mostly rotation and magnetic fields generated either by planets, stellar objects or by an industrial environment. Their effect on the anisotropy and the dissipative behaviour of turbulence is recognised but complex, and it is still difficult to even tell whether they enhance or dampen turbulence. For example, externally imposed magnetic fields suppress free turbulence in electrically conducting fluids (Moffatt 1967), and make it two-dimensional (2D) (Sommeria & Moreau 1982); but their effect on the intensity of forced turbulence, as in pipes, convective flows or otherwise, is not clear. We shall prove that since two-dimensionalisation preferentially affects larger scales, these undergo much less dissipation and sustain intense turbulent fluctuations. When higher magnetic fields are imposed, quasi-2D structures retain more kinetic energy, so that rather than suppressing forced turbulence, external magnetic fields indirectly enha...

  18. Laboratory Experiments on Wave Turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Falcon, Eric

    2010-01-01

    This review paper is devoted to a presentation of recent progress in wave turbulence. I first present the context and state of the art of this field of research both experimentally and theoretically. I then focus on the case of wave turbulence on the surface of a fluid, and I discuss the main results obtained by our group: caracterization of the gravity and capillary wave turbulence regimes, the first observation of intermittency in wave turbulence, the occurrence of strong fluctuations of injected power in the fluid, the observation of a pure capillary wave turbulence in low gravity environment and the observation of magnetic wave turbulence on the surface of a ferrofluid. Finally, open questions in wave turbulence are discussed.

  19. Power spectra of outflow-driven turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Moraghan, Anthony; Yoon, Suk-Jin

    2015-01-01

    We investigate the power spectra of outflow-driven turbulence through high-resolution three-dimensional isothermal numerical simulations where the turbulence is driven locally in real-space by a simple spherical outflow model. The resulting turbulent flow saturates at an average Mach number of ~2.5 and is analysed through density and velocity power spectra, including an investigation of the evolution of the solenoidal and compressional components. We obtain a shallow density power spectrum with a slope of ~-1.2 attributed to the presence of a network of localised dense filamentary structures formed by strong shock interactions. The total velocity power spectrum slope is found to be ~-2.0, representative of Burgers shock dominated turbulence model. The density weighted velocity power spectrum slope is measured as ~-1.6, slightly less than the expected Kolmogorov scaling value (slope of -5/3) found in previous works. The discrepancy may be caused by the nature of our real space driving model and we suggest ther...

  20. Study of the rhizobacterium Azospirillum brasilense Sp245 using Mössbauer spectroscopy with a high velocity resolution: Implication for the analysis of ferritin-like iron cores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alenkina, I. V.; Oshtrakh, M. I.; Tugarova, A. V.; Biró, B.; Semionkin, V. A.; Kamnev, A. A.

    2014-09-01

    The results of a comparative study of two samples of the rhizobacterium Azospirillum brasilense (strain Sp245) prepared in different conditions and of human liver ferritin using Mössbauer spectroscopy with a high velocity resolution demonstrated the presence of ferritin-like iron (i.e. iron similar to that found in ferritin-like proteins) in the bacterium. Mössbauer spectra of these samples were fitted in two ways: as a rough approximation using a one quadrupole doublet fit (the homogeneous iron core model) and using a superposition of quadrupole doublets (the heterogeneous iron core model). Both results demonstrated differences in the Mössbauer parameters for mammalian ferritin and for bacterial ferritin-like iron. Moreover, some differences in the Mössbauer parameters were observed between the two samples of A. brasilense Sp245 related to the differences in their preparation conditions.

  1. Improvement of the Oxidation Resistance of CoNiCrAlY Bond Coats Sprayed by High Velocity Oxygen-Fuel onto Nickel Superalloy Substrate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessio Fossati

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available CoNiCrAlY powders with similar granulometry and chemical composition, but different starting reactivity toward oxygen, were sprayed onto superalloy substrates by High Velocity Oxygen-Fuel producing coatings of similar thicknesses. After spraying, samples were maintained at 1,273 K in air for different test periods of up to 5,000 hours. Morphological, microstructural, compositional and electrochemical analyses were performed on the coated samples in order to assess the high temperature oxidation resistance provided by the two different powders. The powder with higher starting reactivity towards oxygen improves the oxidation resistance of the coated samples by producing thinner and more adherent thermally grown oxide layers.

  2. Mikrostruktur dan Karakterisasi Sifat Mekanik Lapisan Cr3C2-NiAl-Al2O3 Hasil Deposisi Dengan Menggunakan High Velocity Oxygen Fuel Thermal Spray Coating

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edy Riyanto

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Surface coating processing of industrial component with thermal spray coatings have been applied in many industrial fields. Ceramic matrix composite coating which consists of Cr3C2-Al2O3-NiAl had been carried out to obtain layers of material that has superior mechanical properties to enhance component performance. Deposition of CMC with High Velocity Oxygen Fuel (HVOF thermal spray coating has been employed. This study aims to determine the effect of powder particle size on the microstructure, surface roughness and hardness of the layer, by varying the NiAl powder particle size. Test results show NiAl powder particle size has an influence on the mechanical properties of CMC coating. Hardness of coating increases and surface roughness values of coating decrease with smaller NiAl particle size.  

  3. AN EXPERIMENTAL INVESTIGATION OF PRESSURE AND CAVITATION CHARACTERISTICS OF HIGH VELOCITY FLOW OVER A CYLINDRICAL PROTRUSION IN THE PRESENCE AND ABSENCE OF AERATION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DONG Zhi-yong; LIU Zhi-ping; WU Yi-hong; ZHANG Dong

    2008-01-01

    This article experimentally investigated the pressure and cavitation characteristics of high velocity flow over a surface irregularity with and without aeration in a non-circulating water tunnel system. The surface irregularity is a cylindrical protrusion made of stainless steel of 6 mm diameter and 2 mm height. Pressures with and without aeration were measured with MPX400D pressure transducers and real-timely acquired by a SINOCERA YE6263 data acquisition system. Variations in flow regimes with and without aeration were observed. Pressure profiles and their variations with air concentration upper and lower cylindrical protrusion on the invert and obvert walls were determined. Variations of cavitation number with air concentration lower cylindrical protrusion were analyzed. Also, cavitation numbers in the presence and absence of aeration were compared.

  4. A Kiloparsec-scale Nuclear Stellar Disk in the Milky Way as a Possible Explanation of the High Velocity Peaks in the Galactic Bulge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Debattista, Victor P.; Ness, Melissa; Earp, Samuel W. F.; Cole, David R.

    2015-10-01

    The Apache Point Observatory Galactic Evolution Experiment has measured the stellar velocities of red giant stars in the inner Milky Way. We confirm that the line of sight velocity distributions (LOSVDs) in the mid-plane exhibit a second peak at high velocities, whereas those at | b| =2^\\circ do not. We use a high resolution simulation of a barred galaxy, which crucially includes gas and star formation, to guide our interpretation of the LOSVDs. We show that the data are fully consistent with the presence of a thin, rapidly rotating, nuclear disk extending to ∼1 kpc. This nuclear disk is orientated perpendicular to the bar and is likely to be composed of stars on x2 orbits. The gas in the simulation is able to fall onto such orbits, leading to stars populating an orthogonal disk.

  5. Effect of ultrasonic cavitation erosion on corrosion behavior of high-velocity oxygen-fuel (HVOF) sprayed near-nanostructured WC-10Co-4Cr coating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Sheng; Wu, Yuping; Zhang, Jianfeng; Zheng, Yugui; Qin, Yujiao; Lin, Jinran

    2015-11-01

    The effect of ultrasonic cavitation erosion on electrochemical corrosion behavior of high-velocity oxygen-fuel (HVOF) sprayed near-nanostructured WC-10Co-4Cr coating in 3.5 wt.% NaCl solution, was investigated using free corrosion potential, potentiodynamic polarization curves and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) in comparison with stainless steel 1Cr18Ni9Ti. The results showed that cavitation erosion strongly enhanced the cathodic current density, shifted the free corrosion potential in the anodic direction, and reduced the magnitude of impedance of the coating. The impedance of the coating decreased more slowly under cavitation conditions than that of the stainless steel 1Cr18Ni9Ti, suggesting that corrosion behavior of the coating was less affected by cavitation erosion than that of the stainless steel. PMID:26186856

  6. Satellite sensing of submerged fossil turbulence and zombie turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibson, Carl H.

    2004-11-01

    Surface brightness anomalies from a submerged municipal wastewater outfall trapped by buoyancy in an area 0.1 km^2 are surprisingly detected from space satellites in areas > 200 km^2. How is this possible? Microstructure measurements near the outfall diffuser reveal enhanced turbulence and temperature dissipation rates above the 50 m trapping depth. Near-vertical radiation of internal waves by fossil and zombie turbulence microstructure patches produce wind ripple smoothing with 30-50 m internal wave patterns in surface Fourier brightness anomalies near the outfall. Detections at 10-14 km distances are at 100-220 m bottom boundary layer (BBL) fossil turbulence scales. Advected outfall fossils form zombie turbulence patches in internal wave patterns as they extract energy, vorticity, turbulence and ambient vertical internal wavelength information as their density gradients are tilted by the waves. As the zombies fossilize, patterned energy radiates near-vertically to produce the detected Fourier anomalies. Zombie turbulence patches beam extracted energy in a preferred direction with a special frequency, like energized metastable molecules in a chemical maser. Thus, kilowatts to produce the submerged field of advected fossil outfall turbulence patches are amplified by beamed zombie turbulence maser action (BZTMA) into megawatts of turbulence dissipation to affect sea surface brightness on wide surface areas using gigawatts of BBL fossil turbulence wave energy available.

  7. Direct numerical simulation of fractal-generated turbulence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suzuki, H; Hasegawa, Y; Ushijima, T [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Nagoya Institute of Technology, Gokiso-cho, Showa-ku, Nagoya 466-8555 (Japan); Nagata, K; Sakai, Y [Department of Mechanical Science and Engineering, Nagoya University, Furho-cho, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya 464-8603 (Japan); Hayase, T, E-mail: hsuzuki@nitech.ac.jp [Institute of Fluid Science, Tohoku University, 2-1-1, Katahira, Aoba-ku, Sendai 980-8577 (Japan)

    2013-12-01

    We simulate fractal-generated turbulence (Hurst and Vassilicos 2007 Phys. Fluids 19 035103)) by means of a direct numerical simulation and address its fundamental characteristics. We examine whether the fractal-generated turbulence in the upstream region has a nature similar to that of a wake. We propose an equation for predicting peak values of the velocity fluctuation intensity and devise a method for formulating the functional form of the quantity of interest by focusing on the time scale of decaying turbulence, and we examine those forms for the turbulent kinetic energy and rms of pressure fluctuation through this method. By using the method, both of these functional forms are found to be power-law functions in the downstream region, even though these profiles follow exponential functions around these peaks. In addition, decay exponents of these quantities are estimated. The integral length scales of velocity fluctuations for transverse as well as streamwise directions are essentially constant in the downstream direction. Decaying turbulence having both these characteristics conflicts with decaying turbulence described by the theory predicting exponential decay. We discuss a factor causing the difference by focusing on the functional form of the transfer function of homogeneous, isotropic turbulence. (paper)

  8. Gravity-driven clustering of inertial particles in turbulence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Yongnam; Lee, Changhoon

    2014-06-01

    We report a different kind of particle clustering caused purely by gravity, discovered in our simulation of particle-laden turbulence. Clustering in a vertical strip pattern forms when strong gravity acts on heavy particles. This phenomenon is explained by the skewness of the flow velocity gradient in the gravitational direction experienced by particles, which causes horizontal convergence of particles.

  9. Oscillating grids turbulence generator for turbulent transport studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Eidelman

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available An oscillating grids turbulence generator was constructed for studies of two new effects associated with turbulent transport of particles, turbulent thermal diffusion and clustering instability. These effects result in formation of large-scale and small-scale inhomogeneities in the spatial distribution of particles. The advantage of this experimental set-up is the feasibility to study turbulent transport in mixtures with controllable composition and unlimited observation time. For flow measurements we used Particle Image Velocimetry with the adaptive multi-pass algorithm to determine a turbulent velocity field and its statistical characteristics. Instantaneous velocity vector maps, flow streamlines and probability density function of velocity field demonstrate properties of turbulence generated in the device.

  10. Turbulent multiphase flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faeth, G. M.

    1989-01-01

    Measurements and predictions of the structure of several multiphase flows are considered. The properties of dense sprays near the exits of pressure-atomizing injectors and of noncombusting and combusting dilute dispersed flows in round-jet configurations are addressed. It is found that the properties of dense sprays exhibit structure and mixing properties similar to variable-density single-phase flows at high Reynolds numbers within the atomization regime. The degree of development and turbulence levels at the injector exit have a surprisingly large effect on the structure and mixing properties of pressure-atomized sprays, particularly when the phase densities are large. Contemporary stochastic analysis of dilute multiphase flows provides encouraging predictions of turbulent dispersion for a wide variety of jetlike flows, particle-laden jets in gases and liquids, noncondensing and condensing bubbly jets, and nonevaporating, evaporating, and combusting sprays.

  11. Area of turbulence

    CERN Multimedia

    Anaïs Schaeffer

    2015-01-01

    As a member of the EuHIT (European High-Performance Infrastructures in Turbulence - see here) consortium, CERN is participating in fundamental research on turbulence phenomena. To this end, the Laboratory provides European researchers with a cryogenic research infrastructure (see here), where the first tests have just been performed.   The last day of data collection, tired but satisfied after seven intense days of measurements. Around the cryostat, from left to right: Philippe-E. Roche, Éléonore Rusaouen (CNRS),
Olivier Pirotte, Jean-Marc Quetsch (CERN), Nicolas Friedlin (CERN),
Vladislav Benda (CERN). Not in the photo: Laurent Le Mao (CERN), Jean-Marc Debernard (CERN), 
Jean-Paul Lamboy (CERN), Nicolas Guillotin (CERN), Benoit Chabaud (Grenoble Uni), and Gregory Garde (CNRS). CERN has a unique cryogenic facility in hall SM18, consisting of 21 liquid-helium-cooled test stations. While this equipment was, of course, designed for testing parts of CERN's acce...

  12. Controlled-Turbulence Bioreactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolf, David A.; Schwartz, Ray; Trinh, Tinh

    1989-01-01

    Two versions of bioreactor vessel provide steady supplies of oxygen and nutrients with little turbulence. Suspends cells in environment needed for sustenance and growth, while inflicting less damage from agitation and bubbling than do propeller-stirred reactors. Gentle environments in new reactors well suited to delicate mammalian cells. One reactor kept human kidney cells alive for as long as 11 days. Cells grow on carrier beads suspended in liquid culture medium that fills cylindrical housing. Rotating vanes - inside vessel but outside filter - gently circulates nutrient medium. Vessel stationary; magnetic clutch drives filter cylinder and vanes. Another reactor creates even less turbulence. Oxygen-permeable tubing wrapped around rod extending along central axis. Small external pump feeds oxygen to tubing through rotary coupling, and oxygen diffuses into liquid medium.

  13. Influence of turbulence on the wake of a marine current turbine simulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blackmore, T.; Batten, W. M. J.; Bahaj, A. S.

    2014-01-01

    Marine current turbine commercial prototypes have now been deployed and arrays of multiple turbines under design. The tidal flows in which they operate are highly turbulent, but the characteristics of the inflow turbulence have not being considered in present design methods. This work considers the effects of inflow turbulence on the wake behind an actuator disc representation of a marine current turbine. Different turbulence intensities and integral length scales were generated in a large eddy simulation using a gridInlet, which produces turbulence from a grid pattern on the inlet boundary. The results highlight the significance of turbulence on the wake profile, with a different flow regime occurring for the zero turbulence case. Increasing the turbulence intensity reduced the velocity deficit and shifted the maximum deficit closer to the turbine. Increasing the integral length scale increased the velocity deficit close to the turbine due to an increased production of turbulent energy. However, the wake recovery was increased due to the higher rate of turbulent mixing causing the wake to expand. The implication of this work is that marine current turbine arrays could be further optimized, increasing the energy yield of the array when the site-specific turbulence characteristics are considered. PMID:25294966

  14. Stagnation Region Heat Transfer Augmentation at Very High Turbulence Levels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ames, Forrest [University of North Dakota; Kingery, Joseph E. [University of North Dakota

    2015-06-17

    A database for stagnation region heat transfer has been extended to include heat transfer measurements acquired downstream from a new high intensity turbulence generator. This work was motivated by gas turbine industry heat transfer designers who deal with heat transfer environments with increasing Reynolds numbers and very high turbulence levels. The new mock aero-combustor turbulence generator produces turbulence levels which average 17.4%, which is 37% higher than the older turbulence generator. The increased level of turbulence is caused by the reduced contraction ratio from the liner to the exit. Heat transfer measurements were acquired on two large cylindrical leading edge test surfaces having a four to one range in leading edge diameter (40.64 cm and 10.16 cm). Gandvarapu and Ames [1] previously acquired heat transfer measurements for six turbulence conditions including three grid conditions, two lower turbulence aero-combustor conditions, and a low turbulence condition. The data are documented and tabulated for an eight to one range in Reynolds numbers for each test surface with Reynolds numbers ranging from 62,500 to 500,000 for the large leading edge and 15,625 to 125,000 for the smaller leading edge. The data show augmentation levels of up to 136% in the stagnation region for the large leading edge. This heat transfer rate is an increase over the previous aero-combustor turbulence generator which had augmentation levels up to 110%. Note, the rate of increase in heat transfer augmentation decreases for the large cylindrical leading edge inferring only a limited level of turbulence intensification in the stagnation region. The smaller cylindrical leading edge shows more consistency with earlier stagnation region heat transfer results correlated on the TRL (Turbulence, Reynolds number, Length scale) parameter. The downstream regions of both test surfaces continue to accelerate the flow but at a much lower rate than the leading edge. Bypass transition occurs

  15. Random functions and turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Panchev, S

    1971-01-01

    International Series of Monographs in Natural Philosophy, Volume 32: Random Functions and Turbulence focuses on the use of random functions as mathematical methods. The manuscript first offers information on the elements of the theory of random functions. Topics include determination of statistical moments by characteristic functions; functional transformations of random variables; multidimensional random variables with spherical symmetry; and random variables and distribution functions. The book then discusses random processes and random fields, including stationarity and ergodicity of random

  16. The turbulent ocean

    OpenAIRE

    Nihoul, J.C.J.

    1980-01-01

    The variability of the ocean over a wide range of scales, from the megameter to the millimeter, is examined in the light of turbulence theory.The geophysical constraints which arise from the Earth's rotation and curvature and from the stratification are discussed with emphasis on the role they can play at different scales in inducing instabilities and a transfer of energy to other scales of motion.

  17. Wave turbulent statistics in non-weak wave turbulence

    OpenAIRE

    Yokoyama, Naoto

    2011-01-01

    In wave turbulence, which is made by nonlinear interactions among waves, it has been believed that statistical properties are well described by the weak turbulence theory, where separation of linear and nonlinear time scales derived from weak nonlinearity is assumed. However, the separation of the time scales is often violated. To get rid of this inconsistency, closed equations are derived in wave turbulence without assuming the weak nonlinearity according to Direct-Interaction Approximation ...

  18. From Planetesimals to Planets in Turbulent Protoplanetary Disks I. Onset of Runaway Growth

    OpenAIRE

    Kobayashi, Hiroshi; Tanaka, Hidekazu; Okuzumi, Satoshi

    2015-01-01

    When planetesimals grow via collisions in a turbulent disk, stirring through density fluctuation caused by turbulence effectively increases the relative velocities between planetesimals, which suppresses the onset of runaway growth. We investigate the onset of runaway growth in a turbulent disk through simulations that calculate the mass and velocity evolution of planetesimals. When planetesimals are small, the average relative velocity between planetesimals, $v_{\\rm r}$, is much greater than...

  19. Suppression of turbulent resistivity in turbulent Couette flow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Si, Jiahe, E-mail: jsi@nmt.edu; Sonnenfeld, Richard G.; Colgate, Arthur S.; Westpfahl, David J.; Romero, Van D.; Martinic, Joe [New Mexico Institute of Mining and Technology, Socorro, New Mexico 87801 (United States); Colgate, Stirling A.; Li, Hui [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87544 (United States); Nornberg, Mark D. [University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, Wisconsin 53706 (United States)

    2015-07-15

    Turbulent transport in rapidly rotating shear flow very efficiently transports angular momentum, a critical feature of instabilities responsible both for the dynamics of accretion disks and the turbulent power dissipation in a centrifuge. Turbulent mixing can efficiently transport other quantities like heat and even magnetic flux by enhanced diffusion. This enhancement is particularly evident in homogeneous, isotropic turbulent flows of liquid metals. In the New Mexico dynamo experiment, the effective resistivity is measured using both differential rotation and pulsed magnetic field decay to demonstrate that at very high Reynolds number rotating shear flow can be described entirely by mean flow induction with very little contribution from correlated velocity fluctuations.

  20. Towards Quantum Turbulence in Finite Temperature Bose-Einstein Condensates

    CERN Document Server

    Lan, Shanquan; Zhang, Hongbao

    2016-01-01

    Motivated by the various indications that holographic superfluid is BCS like at the standard quantization but BEC like at the alternative quantization, we have implemented the alternative quantization in the dynamical holographic superfluid for the first time. With this accomplishment, we further initiate the detailed investigation of quantum turbulence in finite temperature BEC by a long time stable numerical simulation of bulk dynamics, which includes the two body decay of vortex number caused by vortex pair annihilation, the onset of superfluid turbulence signaled by Kolmogorov scaling law, and a direct energy cascade demonstrated by injecting energy to the turbulent superfluid. All of these results share the same patterns as the holographic superfluid at the standard quantization, thus suggest that these should be universal features for quantum turbulence at temperatures order of the critical temperature.

  1. Towards quantum turbulence in finite temperature Bose-Einstein condensates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lan, Shanquan; Tian, Yu; Zhang, Hongbao

    2016-07-01

    Motivated by the various indications that holographic superfluid is BCS like at the standard quantization but BEC like at the alternative quantization, we have implemented the alternative quantization in the dynamical holographic superfluid for the first time. With this accomplishment, we further initiate the detailed investigation of quantum turbulence in finite temperature BEC by a long time stable numerical simulation of bulk dynamics, which includes the two body decay of vortex number caused by vortex pair annihilation, the onset of superfluid turbulence signaled by Kolmogorov scaling law, and a direct energy cascade demonstrated by injecting energy to the turbulent superfluid. All of these results share the same patterns as the holographic superfluid at the standard quantization, thus suggest that these should be universal features for quantum turbulence at temperatures order of the critical temperature.

  2. Statistical Properties of Turbulence: An Overview

    CERN Document Server

    Pandit, Rahul; Ray, Samriddhi Sankar

    2009-01-01

    We present an introductory overview of several challenging problems in the statistical characterisation of turbulence. We provide examples from fluid turbulence in three and two dimensions, from the turbulent advection of passive scalars, turbulence in the one-dimensional Burgers equation, and fluid turbulence in the presence of polymer additives.

  3. Statistical properties of turbulence: An overview

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Rahul Pandit; Prasad Perlekar; Samriddhi Sankar Ray

    2009-07-01

    We present an introductory overview of several challenging problems in the statistical characterization of turbulence. We provide examples from fluid turbulence in three and two dimensions, from the turbulent advection of passive scalars, turbulence in the one-dimensional Burgers equation, and fluid turbulence in the presence of polymer additives.

  4. Model of strong stationary vortex turbulence in space plasmas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. D. Aburjania

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper investigates the macroscopic consequences of nonlinear solitary vortex structures in magnetized space plasmas by developing theoretical model of plasma turbulence. Strongly localized vortex patterns contain trapped particles and, propagating in a medium, excite substantial density fluctuations and thus, intensify the energy, heat and mass transport processes, i.e., such vortices can form strong vortex turbulence. Turbulence is represented as an ensemble of strongly localized (and therefore weakly interacting vortices. Vortices with various amplitudes are randomly distributed in space (due to collisions. For their description, a statistical approach is applied. It is supposed that a stationary turbulent state is formed by balancing competing effects: spontaneous development of vortices due to nonlinear twisting of the perturbations' fronts, cascading of perturbations into short scales (direct spectral cascade and collisional or collisionless damping of the perturbations in the short-wave domain. In the inertial range, direct spectral cascade occurs through merging structures via collisions. It is shown that in the magneto-active plasmas, strong turbulence is generally anisotropic Turbulent modes mainly develop in the direction perpendicular to the local magnetic field. It is found that it is the compressibility of the local medium which primarily determines the character of the turbulent spectra: the strong vortex turbulence forms a power spectrum in wave number space. For example, a new spectrum of turbulent fluctuations in k−8/3 is derived which agrees with available experimental data. Within the framework of the developed model particle diffusion processes are also investigated. It is found that the interaction of structures with each other and particles causes anomalous diffusion in the medium. The effective coefficient of diffusion has a square root dependence on the stationary level of noise.

  5. 4th European Turbulence Conference

    CERN Document Server

    1993-01-01

    The European Turbulence Conferences have been organized under the auspices of the European Mechanics Committee (Euromech) to provide a forum for discussion and exchange of recent and new results in the field of turbulence. The first conference was organized in Lyon in 1986 with 152 participants. The second and third conferences were held in Berlin (1988) and Stockholm (1990) with 165 and 172 participants respectively. The fourth was organized in Delft from 30 June to 3 July 1992 by the J.M. Burgers Centre. There were 214 participants from 22 countries. This steadily growing number of participants demonstrates both the success and need for this type of conference. The main topics of the Fourth European Turbulence Conference were: Dynamical Systems and Transition; Statistical Physics and Turbulence; Experiments and Novel Experimental Techniques; Particles and Bubbles in Turbulence; Simulation Methods; Coherent Structures; Turbulence Modelling and Compressibility Effects. In addition a special session was held o...

  6. Turbulence in the solar wind

    CERN Document Server

    Bruno, Roberto

    2016-01-01

    This book provides an overview of solar wind turbulence from both the theoretical and observational perspective. It argues that the interplanetary medium offers the best opportunity to directly study turbulent fluctuations in collisionless plasmas. In fact, during expansion, the solar wind evolves towards a state characterized by large-amplitude fluctuations in all observed parameters, which resembles, at least at large scales, the well-known hydrodynamic turbulence. This text starts with historical references to past observations and experiments on turbulent flows. It then introduces the Navier-Stokes equations for a magnetized plasma whose low-frequency turbulence evolution is described within the framework of the MHD approximation. It also considers the scaling of plasma and magnetic field fluctuations and the study of nonlinear energy cascades within the same framework. It reports observations of turbulence in the ecliptic and at high latitude, treating Alfvénic and compressive fluctuations separately in...

  7. Tackling turbulent flows in engineering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dewan, Anupam [Indian Institute of Technology Delhi, New Delhi (India). Dept. of Applied Mechanics

    2011-07-01

    The emphasis of this book is on engineering aspects of fluid turbulence. The book explains for example how to tackle turbulence in industrial applications. It is useful to several disciplines, such as, mechanical, civil, chemical, aerospace engineers and also to professors, researchers, beginners, under graduates and post graduates. The following issues are emphasized in the book: - Modeling and computations of engineering flows: The author discusses in detail the quantities of interest for engineering turbulent flows and how to select an appropriate turbulence model; Also, a treatment of the selection of appropriate boundary conditions for the CFD simulations is given. - Modeling of turbulent convective heat transfer: This is encountered in several practical situations. It basically needs discussion on issues of treatment of walls and turbulent heat fluxes. - Modeling of buoyancy driven flows, for example, smoke issuing from chimney, pollutant discharge into water bodies, etc. (orig.)

  8. Turbulent Reconnection and Its Implications

    CERN Document Server

    Lazarian, Alex; Vishniac, Ethan T; Kowal, Grzegorz

    2015-01-01

    Magnetic reconnection is a process of magnetic field topology change, which is one of the most fundamental processes in magnetized plasmas. In most astrophysical environments the Reynolds numbers are large and therefore the transition to turbulence is inevitable. This turbulence must be taken into account for any theory of magnetic reconnection, since the initially laminar configurations can transit to the turbulence state, what is demonstrated by 3D high resolution numerical simulations. We discuss ideas of how turbulence can modify reconnection with the focus on the Lazarian & Vishniac (1999) reconnection model and present numerical evidence supporting the model and demonstrate that it is closely connected to the concept of Richardson diffusion and compatible with the Lagrangian dynamics of magnetized fluids. We point out that the Generalized Ohm's Law, that accounts for turbulent motion, predicts the subdominance of the microphysical plasma effects for a realistically turbulent media. We show that on o...

  9. Transition to turbulence in ferrofluids

    CERN Document Server

    Altmeyer, Sebastian; Lai, Ying-Cheng

    2015-01-01

    It is known that in classical fluids turbulence typically occurs at high Reynolds numbers. But can turbulence occur at low Reynolds numbers? Here we investigate the transition to turbulence in the classic Taylor-Couette system in which the rotating fluids are manufactured ferrofluids with magnetized nanoparticles embedded in liquid carriers. We find that, in the presence of a magnetic field turbulence can occur at Reynolds numbers that are at least one order of magnitude smaller than those in conventional fluids. This is established by extensive computational ferrohydrodynamics through a detailed bifurcation analysis and characterization of behaviors of physical quantities such as the energy, the wave number, and the angular momentum through the bifurcations. A striking finding is that, as the magnetic field is increased, the onset of turbulence can be determined accurately and reliably. Our results imply that experimental investigation of turbulence can be greatly facilitated by using ferrofluids, opening up...

  10. Invariants of free turbulent decay

    OpenAIRE

    Llor, Antoine

    2006-01-01

    In practically all turbulent flows, turbulent energy decay is present and competes with numerous other phenomena. In Kolmogorov's theory, decay proceeds by transfer from large energy-containing scales towards small viscous scales through the "inertial cascade." Yet, this description cannot predict an actual decay rate, even in the simplest case of homogeneous isotropic turbulence (HIT). As empirically observed over 50 years, the steepness of the "infrared" spectrum - at scales larger than ene...

  11. Galactic turbulence and paleoclimate variability

    CERN Document Server

    Bershadskii, A

    2010-01-01

    The wavelet regression detrended fluctuations of the reconstructed temperature for the past three ice ages: approximately 340000 years (Antarctic ice cores isotopic data), exhibit clear evidences of the galactic turbulence modulation up to 2500 years time-scales. The observed strictly Kolmogorov turbulence features indicates the Kolmogorov nature of galactic turbulence, and provide explanation to random-like fluctuations of the global temperature on the millennial time scales.

  12. Wave turbulence in magnetized plasmas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Galtier

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available The paper reviews the recent progress on wave turbulence for magnetized plasmas (MHD, Hall MHD and electron MHD in the incompressible and compressible cases. The emphasis is made on homogeneous and anisotropic turbulence which usually provides the best theoretical framework to investigate space and laboratory plasmas. The solar wind and the coronal heating problems are presented as two examples of application of anisotropic wave turbulence. The most important results of wave turbulence are reported and discussed in the context of natural and simulated magnetized plasmas. Important issues and possible spurious interpretations are also discussed.

  13. Comparative study of iron oxide nanoparticles as prepared and dispersed in copaiba oil using Moessbauer spectroscopy with low and high velocity resolution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oshtrakh, M.I., E-mail: oshtrakh@mail.utnet.ru [Faculty of Physical Techniques and Devices for Quality Control, Ural Federal University, Ekaterinburg (Russian Federation); Sepelak, V. [Institute of Nanotechnology, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany); Rodriguez, A.F.R. [Universidade Federal do Acre, Rio Branco, AC (Brazil); Semionkina, V.A.; Ushakov, M.V. [Faculty of Physical Techniques and Devices for Quality Control, Ural Federal University, Ekaterinburg (Russian Federation); Faculty of Experimental Physics, Ural Federal University, Ekaterinburg (Russian Federation); Santos, J.G.; Silveira, L.B.; Marmolejo, E.M. [Fundacao Universidade Federal de Rondonia, Departamento de Fisica, Ji-Parana, RO (Brazil); Souza-Parisef, M. de; Morais, P.C. [Universidade de Brasilia, Instituto de Fisica, Nucleo de Fisica Aplicada, Brasilia, DF (Brazil)

    2011-07-01

    Full text: Development of biocompatible magnetic fluids is one of the interesting topics in biomedical research. Typical magnetic fluids consist of iron-containing magnetic nanoparticles. Therefore, {sup 57}Fe Moessbauer spectroscopy can be used for their characterization. Iron oxide nanoparticles dispersed in biocompatible Copaiba oil may be developed as magnetic fluids for biomedical aims. In this case it is interesting to analyze the effect of Copaiba oil molecules on magnetic features of nanoparticles. Iron oxides nanoparticles were synthesized by co-precipitation of a heated mixture of ferrous and ferric chloride aqueous solutions with concentrated ammonia (25 % v.v.), under vigorous stirring. Addition of hydrochloric acid after precipitation of nanoparticles and repeated washing produced a stable sol at pH2. Copaiba oil dispersed in cyclohexane was then added to the as-prepared sol under stirring. The resulting suspension was dried to remove out the organic solvent whereas the precipitated sample was collected. The obtained samples were characterized using X-ray diffraction, TEM and HRTEM. X-ray diffraction patterns were usual for magnetite and maghemite or their mixture. TEM analysis demonstrated uniform nanoparticles with a diameter of 8 nm. Moessbauer spectra of iron oxide nanoparticles as prepared and dispersed in Copaiba oil were measured using two different spectrometers: Wissel spectrometer with a low velocity resolution (512 channels) for measurements at 295 and 21 K and automated precision Moessbauer spectrometric system with a high velocity resolution (4096 channels) for measurements at 295 and 90 K. Moessbauer spectra of iron oxide nanoparticles, as-prepared and dispersed in Copaiba oil, measured at corresponding temperatures using both spectrometers demonstrated some differences which may be a result of the effect of Copaiba oil molecules. The fitting of all measured spectra demonstrated that usual models used for fitting Moessbauer spectra of

  14. Turbulence closure: turbulence, waves and the wave-turbulence transition – Part 1: Vanishing mean shear

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Z. Baumert

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper extends a turbulence closure-like model for stably stratified flows into a new dynamic domain in which turbulence is generated by internal gravity waves rather than mean shear. The model turbulent kinetic energy (TKE, K balance, its first equation, incorporates a term for the energy transfer from internal waves to turbulence. This energy source is in addition to the traditional shear production. The second variable of the new two-equation model is the turbulent enstrophy (Ω. Compared to the traditional shear-only case, the Ω-equation is modified to account for the effect of the waves on the turbulence time and space scales. This modification is based on the assumption of a non-zero constant flux Richardson number in the limit of vanishing mean shear when turbulence is produced exclusively by internal waves. This paper is part 1 of a continuing theoretical development. It accounts for mean shear- and internal wave-driven mixing only in the two limits of mean shear and no waves and waves but no mean shear, respectively.

    The new model reproduces the wave-turbulence transition analyzed by D'Asaro and Lien (2000b. At small energy density E of the internal wave field, the turbulent dissipation rate (ε scales like ε~E2. This is what is observed in the deep sea. With increasing E, after the wave-turbulence transition has been passed, the scaling changes to ε~E1. This is observed, for example, in the highly energetic tidal flow near a sill in Knight Inlet. The new model further exhibits a turbulent length scale proportional to the Ozmidov scale, as observed in the ocean, and predicts the ratio between the turbulent Thorpe and Ozmidov length scales well within the range observed in the ocean.

  15. Compressibility, turbulence and high speed flow

    CERN Document Server

    Gatski, Thomas B

    2013-01-01

    Compressibility, Turbulence and High Speed Flow introduces the reader to the field of compressible turbulence and compressible turbulent flows across a broad speed range, through a unique complimentary treatment of both the theoretical foundations and the measurement and analysis tools currently used. The book provides the reader with the necessary background and current trends in the theoretical and experimental aspects of compressible turbulent flows and compressible turbulence. Detailed derivations of the pertinent equations describing the motion of such turbulent flows is provided and

  16. Global simulations of magnetorotational turbulence II: turbulent energetics

    CERN Document Server

    Parkin, E R

    2013-01-01

    Magnetorotational turbulence draws its energy from gravity and ultimately releases it via dissipation. However, the quantitative details of this energy flow have not been assessed for global disk models. In this work we examine the energetics of a well-resolved, three-dimensional, global magnetohydrodynamic accretion disk simulation by evaluating statistically-averaged mean-field equations for magnetic, kinetic, and internal energy using simulation data. The results reveal that turbulent magnetic (kinetic) energy is primarily injected by the correlation between Maxwell (Reynolds) stresses and shear in the (almost Keplerian) mean flow, and removed by dissipation. This finding differs from previous work using local (shearing-box) models, which indicated that turbulent kinetic energy was primarily sourced from the magnetic energy reservoir. Lorentz forces provide the bridge between the magnetic and kinetic energy reservoirs, converting ~ 1/5 of the total turbulent magnetic power input into turbulent kinetic ener...

  17. Residual stress characteristics of high velocity oxygen-fuel MCrAlY coatings; Kosoku flame yosha MCrAlY gokin himaku no zanryu oryoku tokusei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ito, Y.; Saito, M.; Takahashi, M. [Toshiba Corp., Tokyo (Japan)

    1997-09-15

    Characteristics of stress residual in coatings of MCrAlY (M being Ni or Co or both) formed by high velocity oxygen-fuel (HVOF) spraying are studied. A diffusion heat treatment is performed after spraying, by which unmelted grains, pores, and unwelded sections are sintered for the formation of a homogeneous coating for the manifest precipitation of intermetallic compounds. Thanks to the diffusion heat treatment, again, crack type pores are eliminated for Young`s modulus to be as high as that of a coating formed by vacuum plasma spraying (VSP). As compared with coatings formed by VSP, stress residual in a CoCrAlY alloy coating surface, as sprayed by HVOF, is higher and the same in an NiCoCrAlY or CoNiCrAlY alloy coating surface, as sprayed by HVOF, is lower. The residual stress in their surfaces becomes equal in level thanks to the diffusion heat treatment. There exists high residual stress in the CoCrAlY alloy coating surface as sprayed by HVOF because the spray powder is so fine that it melts completely to coagulate and shrink a great deal. There exists low residual stress in the NiCoCrAlY or CoNiCrAlY coating because a quantity of grains therein remain unmelted to coagulate and shrink but a little and to allow the peening effect to exert influence. 15 refs., 9 figs., 1 tab.

  18. Characterization of Oxide Scales Formed on High-Velocity Oxyfuel-Sprayed Ni-Co-Cr-Al-Y + ReTa Coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, D. B.; Ko, J. H.; Yi, J. H.

    2005-09-01

    A high-velocity oxyfuel-sprayed 30 wt.% Ni-20 wt.% Co-30 wt.% Cr-10 wt.% Al-2 wt.% Y-4 wt.% Re-4 wt.% Ta coating was oxidized between 1000 and 1200 °C for up to 200 h in air, and the oxide scales were examined. The dense, sprayed coating consisted mainly of Cr3Ni2, Ni3Al, Ni3Ta, Ni, NiO, Al5Y3O12, and Cr2O3. Intermetallics and some oxides formed during spraying. During oxidation, mainly αAl2O3, along with some Al5Y3O12, CoAl2O4, CoCr2O4, Ta2O5, and Ta2O2.2 formed on the coating. The preferential oxidation of Al to form the Al-rich scales resulted in the formation of an Al-depleted region beneath the scales. Rhenium, being the most noble element, was distributed throughout the oxide scale and the coating, without forming any independent oxides.

  19. Structure and properties of WC-Co coatings deposited to Cu substrate using high-velocity pulsed plasma jet with subsequent W ion implantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It is known, that deposition of protecting coatings on copper crystallizes is seems to be deposition of coatings of a hard alloy WC+15%Co using a high-velocity jet applied in a plasma-detonation technology. To deposit coatings we applied a modified plasmatron 'Impulse-3', in which the jet velocity reached 6 km/s and its temperature was 104 K. The coating structure was comprised of WC (with fcc close-packed lattice), α-β-Co crystallites in WC with a cubic lattice. An average dimension of WC crystallites was 0.15 μm, that of cobalt was 25 nm. We observed particles of W3Co3C phases of 15 nm dimension along the crystallite boundaries. Implantation of W ions was realized using a vacuum-arc implanter 'Diana-3', which energy was 60 and 40 keV, dose reached 2·1017 and 1017 cm-2 respectively for those energies, pulse duration of the ion beam was τp = 200 μs. As a result of implantation the coating roughness decreased, the concentration of W ions at about 50 nm depth from the surface reached about 12 at.%, though in the initial state it amounted only 1 to 2 at.% till the depth of l μm. The coating hardness also increased by 20 %, and the number of pores, being visible in the coating surface, decreased

  20. High-Temperature Behavior of a High-Velocity Oxy-Fuel Sprayed Cr3C2-NiCr Coating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaur, Manpreet; Singh, Harpreet; Prakash, Satya

    2012-08-01

    High-velocity oxy-fuel (HVOF) sprayed coatings have the potential to enhance the high-temperature oxidation, corrosion, and erosion-corrosion resistance of boiler steels. In the current work, 75 pct chromium carbide-25 pct (nickel-20 pct chromium) [Cr3C2-NiCr] coating was deposited on ASTM SA213-T22 boiler steel using the HVOF thermal spray process. High-temperature oxidation, hot corrosion, and erosion-corrosion behavior of the coated and bare steel was evaluated in the air, molten salt [Na2SO4-82 pct Fe2(SO4)3], and actual boiler environments under cyclic conditions. Weight-change measurements were taken at the end of each cycle. Efforts were made to formulate the kinetics of the oxidation, corrosion, and erosion-corrosion. X-ray diffraction (XRD) and field-emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM)/energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) techniques were used to analyze the oxidation products. The coating was found to be intact and spallation free in all the environments of the study in general, whereas the bare steel suffered extensive spallation and a relatively higher rate of degradation. The coating was found to be useful to enhance the high-temperature resistance of the steel in all the three environments in this study.

  1. The StEllar Counterparts of COmpact high velocity clouds (SECCO) survey. II. Sensitivity of the survey and an Atlas of Synthetic Dwarf Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Beccari, G; Battaglia, G; Ibata, R; Martin, N; Testa, V; Cignoni, M; Correnti, M

    2016-01-01

    SECCO is a survey devoted to the search for stellar counterparts within Ultra Compact High Velocity Clouds. In this contribution we present the results of a set of simulations aimed at the quantitative estimate of the sensitivity of the survey as a function of the total luminosity, size and distance of the stellar systems we are looking for. For all our synthetic galaxies we assumed an exponential surface brightness profile and an old and metal-poor population. The synthetic galaxies are simulated both on the images and on the photometric catalogs, taking into account all the observational effects. In the fields where the available observational material is of the top quality we detect synthetic galaxies as >=5 sigma over-densities of resolved stars down to muV,h=30.0 mag/arcsec2, for D<=1.5 Mpc, and down to muV,h~29.5 mag/arcsec2, for D<=2.5 Mpc. In the field with the worst observational material of the whole survey we detect synthetic galaxies with muV,h<=28.8 mag/arcsec2 out to D<=1.0 Mpc, and ...

  2. Comparison of in vitro behavior of as-sprayed, alkaline-treated and collagen-treated bioceramic coatings obtained by high velocity oxy-fuel spray

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hydroxyapatite (HAp)–TiO2 samples obtained using high velocity oxy-fuel spray (HVOF), that had previously shown excellent mechanical behaviour, were innovatively surface treated in order to improve their biological performance. The chosen treatments were an alkaline treatment to increase –OH radicals density on the surface (especially on TiO2 zones), and a collagen treatment to bond collagen fibrils to the –OH radicals present in hydroxyapatite. These coatings were analysed using scanning electron microscopy, energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy and infrared spectroscopy, and tested for human osteoblast biocompatibility and functionality. In the case of the alkaline treatment, although the –OH radicals density did not increase compared to the as-sprayed coatings, a nanostructured layer of sodium hydroxycarbonate precipitated on the surface, thus improving biological behaviour due to the nanoroughness effect. For the collagen-treated samples, collagen fibrils appeared well-adhered to the surface, and in vitro cell culture tests showed that these surfaces were much more conducive to cell adhesion and differentiation than the as-sprayed and alkaline-treated samples. These results pointed to collagen treatment as a very promising method to improve bioactivity of HAp–TiO2 thermal-sprayed coatings.

  3. CO observations of water-maser post-AGB stars and detection of a high-velocity outflow in IRAS 15452-5459

    CERN Document Server

    Cerrigone, L; Kaminski, T; ),

    2012-01-01

    Many aspects of the evolutionary phase in which Asymptotic Giant Branch stars (AGB stars) are in transition to become Planetary Nebulae (PNe) are still poorly understood. An important question is how the circumstellar envelopes of AGB stars switch from spherical symmetry to the axially symmetric structures frequently observed in PNe. In many cases there is clear evidence that the shaping of the circumstellar envelopes of PNe is linked to the formation of jets/collimated winds and their interaction with the remnant AGB envelope. Because of the short evolutionary time, objects in this phase are rare, but their identification provides valuable probes for testing evolutionary models. We have observed (sub)millimeter CO rotational transitions with the APEX telescope in a small sample of stars hosting high-velocity OH and water masers. These targets are supposed to have recently left the AGB, as indicated by the presence of winds traced by masers, with velocities larger than observed during that phase. We have carr...

  4. Fragmentation of neutral carbon clusters formed by high velocity atomic collision; Fragmentation d'agregats de carbone neutres formes par collision atomique a haute vitesse

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martinet, G

    2004-05-01

    The aim of this work is to understand the fragmentation of small neutral carbon clusters formed by high velocity atomic collision on atomic gas. In this experiment, the main way of deexcitation of neutral clusters formed by electron capture with ionic species is the fragmentation. To measure the channels of fragmentation, a new detection tool based on shape analysis of current pulse delivered by semiconductor detectors has been developed. For the first time, all branching ratios of neutral carbon clusters are measured in an unambiguous way for clusters size up to 10 atoms. The measurements have been compared to a statistical model in microcanonical ensemble (Microcanonical Metropolis Monte Carlo). In this model, various structural properties of carbon clusters are required. These data have been calculated with Density Functional Theory (DFT-B3LYP) to find the geometries of the clusters and then with Coupled Clusters (CCSD(T)) formalism to obtain dissociation energies and other quantities needed to compute fragmentation calculations. The experimental branching ratios have been compared to the fragmentation model which has allowed to find an energy distribution deposited in the collision. Finally, specific cluster effect has been found namely a large population of excited states. This behaviour is completely different of the atomic carbon case for which the electron capture in the ground states predominates. (author)

  5. Comparison of in vitro behavior of as-sprayed, alkaline-treated and collagen-treated bioceramic coatings obtained by high velocity oxy-fuel spray

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Melero, H., E-mail: hortensia.melero.correas@gmail.com [Thermal Spray Centre, Universitat de Barcelona, Martí i Franqués, 1, 08028 Barcelona (Spain); Garcia-Giralt, N. [URFOA, IMIM (Institut Hospital del Mar d’Investigacions Mèdiques), RETICEF, Doctor Aiguader, 80, 08003 Barcelona (Spain); Fernández, J. [Thermal Spray Centre, Universitat de Barcelona, Martí i Franqués, 1, 08028 Barcelona (Spain); Díez-Pérez, A. [URFOA, IMIM (Institut Hospital del Mar d’Investigacions Mèdiques), RETICEF, Doctor Aiguader, 80, 08003 Barcelona (Spain); Servei de Medicina Interna, Hospital del Mar, Barcelona (Spain); Guilemany, J.M. [Thermal Spray Centre, Universitat de Barcelona, Martí i Franqués, 1, 08028 Barcelona (Spain)

    2014-07-01

    Hydroxyapatite (HAp)–TiO{sub 2} samples obtained using high velocity oxy-fuel spray (HVOF), that had previously shown excellent mechanical behaviour, were innovatively surface treated in order to improve their biological performance. The chosen treatments were an alkaline treatment to increase –OH radicals density on the surface (especially on TiO{sub 2} zones), and a collagen treatment to bond collagen fibrils to the –OH radicals present in hydroxyapatite. These coatings were analysed using scanning electron microscopy, energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy and infrared spectroscopy, and tested for human osteoblast biocompatibility and functionality. In the case of the alkaline treatment, although the –OH radicals density did not increase compared to the as-sprayed coatings, a nanostructured layer of sodium hydroxycarbonate precipitated on the surface, thus improving biological behaviour due to the nanoroughness effect. For the collagen-treated samples, collagen fibrils appeared well-adhered to the surface, and in vitro cell culture tests showed that these surfaces were much more conducive to cell adhesion and differentiation than the as-sprayed and alkaline-treated samples. These results pointed to collagen treatment as a very promising method to improve bioactivity of HAp–TiO{sub 2} thermal-sprayed coatings.

  6. Experimental Study on Penetration Properties of High Velocity Fragment into Safety Liquid Cabin%高速破片侵彻防护液舱试验研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    沈晓乐; 朱锡; 侯海量; 陈长海

    2011-01-01

    为研究水下接触爆炸产生的高速破片在水中的侵彻特性,针对3.3 g立方体破片进行了水下弹道试验,结果表明:破片的侵彻阻力系数受形状的影响较大,撞击隔板时产生压缩波使破片产生墩粗和侵蚀,造成破片迎流面积的增加和质量的下降,从而使破片在速度较高时侵彻深度反而下降。%In order to study penetration properties of high velocity fragment produced by underwater contact explosion, underwater ballistic experiments of 3.3 g cubic fragment was carried out, the results show that resistance coefficient of fragment is significantly influenced by the fragment shape. When the fragment crash on the steel plate, it will bring about great compress wave which makes fragment generate mushrooming and erosion, so the incident flow area increases and the weight decreases, consequently the underwater penetration ability of the fragments decrease with the increasing of velocity.

  7. Transport equation for the time scale of a turbulent scalar field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The two-parametric turbulence models cause serious difficulties by modeling the near-wall flows due to absence of the natural boundary condition on the wall for dissipation of the ε turbulence energy and the εθ scalar field destruction. This difficulty may be overcome, if instead of the ε and εθ, as the second parameter of the model, to apply the time scales of the turbulent dynamic and scalar fields. The equation of the scalar field is derived and numerical coefficients included therein, are determined from the simplest problems on the turbulent heat transfer

  8. Dispersed Phase of Non-Isothermal Particles in Rotating Turbulent Flows

    CERN Document Server

    Pandya, R V R

    2015-01-01

    We suggest certain effects, caused by interaction between rotation and gravitation with turbulence structure, for the cooling/heating of dispersed phase of non-isothermal particles in rotating turbulent fluid flows. These effects are obtained through the derivation of kinetic or probability density function based macroscopic equations for the particles. In doing so, for one-way temperature coupling, we also show that homogeneous, isotropic non-isothermal fluid turbulence does not influence the mean temperature (though it influences mean velocity) of the dispersed phase of particles settling due to gravitational force in the isotropic turbulence.

  9. An Examination of Aviation Accidents Associated with Turbulence, Wind Shear and Thunderstorm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Joni K.

    2013-01-01

    The focal point of the study reported here was the definition and examination of turbulence, wind shear and thunderstorm in relation to aviation accidents. NASA project management desired this information regarding distinct subgroups of atmospheric hazards, in order to better focus their research portfolio. A seven category expansion of Kaplan's turbulence categories was developed, which included wake turbulence, mountain wave turbulence, clear air turbulence, cloud turbulence, convective turbulence, thunderstorm without mention of turbulence, and low altitude wind shear, microburst or turbulence (with no mention of thunderstorms).More than 800 accidents from flights based in the United States during 1987-2008 were selected from a National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) database. Accidents were selected for inclusion in this study if turbulence, thunderstorm, wind shear or microburst was considered either a cause or a factor in the accident report, and each accident was assigned to only one hazard category. This report summarizes the differences between the categories in terms of factors such as flight operations category, aircraft engine type, the accident's geographic location and time of year, degree of injury to aircraft occupants, aircraft damage, age and certification of the pilot and the phase of flight at the time of the accident.

  10. Advances in compressible turbulent mixing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This volume includes some recent additions to original material prepared for the Princeton International Workshop on the Physics of Compressible Turbulent Mixing, held in 1988. Workshop participants were asked to emphasize the physics of the compressible mixing process rather than measurement techniques or computational methods. Actual experimental results and their meaning were given precedence over discussions of new diagnostic developments. Theoretical interpretations and understanding were stressed rather than the exposition of new analytical model developments or advances in numerical procedures. By design, compressibility influences on turbulent mixing were discussed--almost exclusively--from the perspective of supersonic flow field studies. The papers are arranged in three topical categories: Foundations, Vortical Domination, and Strongly Coupled Compressibility. The Foundations category is a collection of seminal studies that connect current study in compressible turbulent mixing with compressible, high-speed turbulent flow research that almost vanished about two decades ago. A number of contributions are included on flow instability initiation, evolution, and transition between the states of unstable flow onset through those descriptive of fully developed turbulence. The Vortical Domination category includes theoretical and experimental studies of coherent structures, vortex pairing, vortex-dynamics-influenced pressure focusing. In the Strongly Coupled Compressibility category the organizers included the high-speed turbulent flow investigations in which the interaction of shock waves could be considered an important source for production of new turbulence or for the enhancement of pre-existing turbulence. Individual papers are processed separately

  11. Advances in compressible turbulent mixing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dannevik, W.P.; Buckingham, A.C.; Leith, C.E. [eds.

    1992-01-01

    This volume includes some recent additions to original material prepared for the Princeton International Workshop on the Physics of Compressible Turbulent Mixing, held in 1988. Workshop participants were asked to emphasize the physics of the compressible mixing process rather than measurement techniques or computational methods. Actual experimental results and their meaning were given precedence over discussions of new diagnostic developments. Theoretical interpretations and understanding were stressed rather than the exposition of new analytical model developments or advances in numerical procedures. By design, compressibility influences on turbulent mixing were discussed--almost exclusively--from the perspective of supersonic flow field studies. The papers are arranged in three topical categories: Foundations, Vortical Domination, and Strongly Coupled Compressibility. The Foundations category is a collection of seminal studies that connect current study in compressible turbulent mixing with compressible, high-speed turbulent flow research that almost vanished about two decades ago. A number of contributions are included on flow instability initiation, evolution, and transition between the states of unstable flow onset through those descriptive of fully developed turbulence. The Vortical Domination category includes theoretical and experimental studies of coherent structures, vortex pairing, vortex-dynamics-influenced pressure focusing. In the Strongly Coupled Compressibility category the organizers included the high-speed turbulent flow investigations in which the interaction of shock waves could be considered an important source for production of new turbulence or for the enhancement of pre-existing turbulence. Individual papers are processed separately.

  12. Stochastic Subspace Modelling of Turbulence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sichani, Mahdi Teimouri; Pedersen, B. J.; Nielsen, Søren R.K.

    2009-01-01

    Turbulence of the incoming wind field is of paramount importance to the dynamic response of civil engineering structures. Hence reliable stochastic models of the turbulence should be available from which time series can be generated for dynamic response and structural safety analysis. In the pape...

  13. Magnetized Turbulent Dynamo in Protogalaxies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The prevailing theory for the origin of cosmic magnetic fields is that they have been amplified to their present values by the turbulent dynamo inductive action in the protogalactic and galactic medium. Up to now, in calculation of the turbulent dynamo, it has been customary to assume that there is no back reaction of the magnetic field on the turbulence, as long as the magnetic energy is less than the turbulent kinetic energy. This assumption leads to the kinematic dynamo theory. However, the applicability of this theory to protogalaxies is rather limited. The reason is that in protogalaxies the temperature is very high, and the viscosity is dominated by magnetized ions. As the magnetic field strength grows in time, the ion cyclotron time becomes shorter than the ion collision time, and the plasma becomes strongly magnetized. As a result, the ion viscosity becomes the Braginskii viscosity. Thus, in protogalaxies the back reaction sets in much earlier, at field strengths much lower than those which correspond to field-turbulence energy equipartition, and the turbulent dynamo becomes what we call the magnetized turbulent dynamo. In this paper we lay the theoretical groundwork for the magnetized turbulent dynamo. In particular, we predict that the magnetic energy growth rate in the magnetized dynamo theory is up to ten times larger than that in the kinematic dynamo theory. We also briefly discuss how the Braginskii viscosity can aid the development of the inverse cascade of magnetic energy after the energy equipartition is reached

  14. Conditional Eddies in Plasma Turbulence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johnsen, Helene; Pécseli, Hans; Trulsen, J.

    1986-01-01

    Conditional structures, or eddies, in turbulent flows are discussed with special attention to electrostatic turbulence in plasmas. The potential variation of these eddies is obtained by sampling the fluctuations only when a certain condition is satisfied in a reference point. The resulting...

  15. MHD turbulence and distributed chaos

    CERN Document Server

    Bershadskii, A

    2016-01-01

    It is shown, using results of recent direct numerical simulations, that spectral properties of distributed chaos in MHD turbulence with zero mean magnetic field are similar to those of hydrodynamic turbulence. An exception is MHD spontaneous breaking of space translational symmetry, when the stretched exponential spectrum $\\exp(-k/k_{\\beta})^{\\beta}$ has $\\beta=4/7$.

  16. Active turbulence in active nematics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thampi, S. P.; Yeomans, J. M.

    2016-07-01

    Dense, active systems show active turbulence, a state characterised by flow fields that are chaotic, with continually changing velocity jets and swirls. Here we review our current understanding of active turbulence. The development is primarily based on the theory and simulations of active liquid crystals, but with accompanying summaries of related literature.

  17. Magnetized Turbulent Dynamo in Protogalaxies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leonid Malyshkin; Russell M. Kulsrud

    2002-01-28

    The prevailing theory for the origin of cosmic magnetic fields is that they have been amplified to their present values by the turbulent dynamo inductive action in the protogalactic and galactic medium. Up to now, in calculation of the turbulent dynamo, it has been customary to assume that there is no back reaction of the magnetic field on the turbulence, as long as the magnetic energy is less than the turbulent kinetic energy. This assumption leads to the kinematic dynamo theory. However, the applicability of this theory to protogalaxies is rather limited. The reason is that in protogalaxies the temperature is very high, and the viscosity is dominated by magnetized ions. As the magnetic field strength grows in time, the ion cyclotron time becomes shorter than the ion collision time, and the plasma becomes strongly magnetized. As a result, the ion viscosity becomes the Braginskii viscosity. Thus, in protogalaxies the back reaction sets in much earlier, at field strengths much lower than those which correspond to field-turbulence energy equipartition, and the turbulent dynamo becomes what we call the magnetized turbulent dynamo. In this paper we lay the theoretical groundwork for the magnetized turbulent dynamo. In particular, we predict that the magnetic energy growth rate in the magnetized dynamo theory is up to ten times larger than that in the kinematic dynamo theory. We also briefly discuss how the Braginskii viscosity can aid the development of the inverse cascade of magnetic energy after the energy equipartition is reached.

  18. Aperture-averaging effects for weak to strong scintillations in turbulent atmosphere

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yixin Zhang(张逸新); Tuo Zhu(朱拓); Chunkan Tao(陶纯堪)

    2004-01-01

    Under the approximations of (1) the received irradiance fluctuations of an optical wave caused by small scale turbulent eddies are multiplicatively modulated by the fluctuations caused by large scale turbulent eddies;(2) the scintillations caused by small- and large-scale eddies, respectively, are statistically independent; (3)the Rytov method for optical scintillation collected by the finite-diameter receiving aperture is valid for light wave propagation under weak to saturation fluctuation regime, we develop the applicable apertureaveraging analytic formulas in the week-to-strong-fluctuation for the scintillations of plane and spherical waves, which include the outer- and inner-scale rules of turbulence.

  19. Experimental detection of turbulent thermaldiffusion of aerosols in non-isothermal flows

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Eidelman

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available We studied experimentally a new phenomenon of turbulent thermal diffusion of particles which can cause formation of the large-scale aerosol layers in the vicinity of the atmospheric temperature inversions. This phenomenon was detected experimentally in oscillating grids turbulence in air flow. Three measurement techniques were used to study turbulent thermal diffusion in strongly inhomogeneous temperature fields, namely Particle Image Velocimetry to determine the turbulent velocity field, an image processing technique to determine the spatial distribution of aerosols, and an array of thermocouples for the temperature field. Experiments are presented for both, stably and unstably stratified fluid flows, by using both directions of the imposed mean vertical temperature gradient. We demonstrated that even in strongly inhomogeneous temperature fields particles in turbulent fluid flow accumulate at the regions with minimum of mean temperature of surrounding fluids due to the phenomenon of turbulent thermal diffusion.

  20. Formation of Large-Scale Semi-Organized Structures in Turbulent Convection

    CERN Document Server

    Elperin, T; Rogachevskii, I; Zilitinkevich, S

    2002-01-01

    A new mean-field theory of turbulent convection is developed. This theory predicts the convective wind instability in a shear-free turbulent convection which causes formation of large-scale semi-organized fluid motions in the form of cells or rolls. Spatial characteristics of these motions, such as the minimum size of the growing perturbations and the size of perturbations with the maximum growth rate, are determined. This study predicts also the existence of the convective shear instability in a sheared turbulent convection which results in generation of convective shear waves with a nonzero hydrodynamic helicity. Increase of shear promotes excitation of the convective shear instability. Applications of the obtained results to the atmospheric turbulent convection and the laboratory experiments on turbulent convection are discussed. This theory can be applied also for the describing a mesogranular turbulent convection in astrophysics.

  1. Hydrodynamical simulations of the decay of high-speed molecular turbulence. I. Dense molecular regions

    CERN Document Server

    Pavlovski, G; MacLow, M M; Rosén, A; Pavlovski, Georgi; Smith, Michael D.; Low, Mordecai-Mark Mac; Rosen, Alexander

    2002-01-01

    We present the results from three dimensional hydrodynamical simulations of decaying high-speed turbulence in dense molecular clouds. We compare our results, which include a detailed cooling function, molecular hydrogen chemistry and a limited C and O chemistry, to those previously obtained for decaying isothermal turbulence. After an initial phase of shock formation, power-law decay regimes are uncovered, as in the isothermal case. We find that the turbulence decays faster than in the isothermal case because the average Mach number remains higher, due to the radiative cooling. The total thermal energy, initially raised by the introduction of turbulence, decays only a little slower than the kinetic energy. We discover that molecule reformation, as the fast turbulence decays, is several times faster than that predicted for a non-turbulent medium. This is caused by moderate speed shocks which sweep through a large fraction of the volume, compressing the gas and dust. Through reformation, the molecular density a...

  2. Shear dynamo, turbulence, and the magnetorotational instability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Squire, Jonathan

    The formation, evolution, and detailed structure of accretion disks remain poorly understood, with wide implications across a variety of astrophysical disciplines. While the most pressing question --- what causes the high angular momentum fluxes that are necessary to explain observations? --- is nicely answered by the idea that the disk is turbulent, a more complete grasp of the fundamental processes is necessary to capture the wide variety of behaviors observed in the night sky. This thesis studies the turbulence in ionized accretion disks from a theoretical standpoint, in particular focusing on the generation of magnetic fields in these processes, known as dynamo. Such fields are expected to be enormously important, both by enabling the magnetorotational instability (which evolves into virulent turbulence), and through large-scale structure formation, which may transport angular momentum in different ways and be fundamental for the formation of jets. The central result of this thesis is the suggestion of a new large-scale dynamo mechanism in shear flows --- the "magnetic shear-current effect" --- which relies on a positive feedback from small-scale magnetic fields. As well as being a very promising candidate for driving field generation in the central regions of accretion disks, this effect is interesting because small-scale magnetic fields have historically been considered to have a negative effect on the large-scale dynamo, damping growth and leading to dire predictions for final saturation amplitudes. Given that small-scale fields are ubiquitous in plasma turbulence above moderate Reynolds numbers, the finding that they could instead have a positive effect in some situations is interesting from a theoretical and practical standpoint. The effect is studied using direct numerical simulation, analytic techniques, and novel statistical simulation methods. In addition to the dynamo, much attention is given to the linear physics of disks and its relevance to

  3. Shell Models of Magnetohydrodynamic Turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Plunian, Franck; Frick, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Shell models of hydrodynamic turbulence originated in the seventies. Their main aim was to describe the statistics of homogeneous and isotropic turbulence in spectral space, using a simple set of ordinary differential equations. In the eighties, shell models of magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) turbulence emerged based on the same principles as their hydrodynamic counter-part but also incorporating interactions between magnetic and velocity fields. In recent years, significant improvements have been made such as the inclusion of non-local interactions and appropriate definitions for helicities. Though shell models cannot account for the spatial complexity of MHD turbulence, their dynamics are not over simplified and do reflect those of real MHD turbulence including intermittency or chaotic reversals of large-scale modes. Furthermore, these models use realistic values for dimensionless parameters (high kinetic and magnetic Reynolds numbers, low or high magnetic Prandtl number) allowing extended inertial range and accu...

  4. Calculations of turbulent separated flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, J.; Shih, T. H.

    1993-01-01

    A numerical study of incompressible turbulent separated flows is carried out by using two-equation turbulence models of the K-epsilon type. On the basis of realizability analysis, a new formulation of the eddy-viscosity is proposed which ensures the positiveness of turbulent normal stresses - a realizability condition that most existing two-equation turbulence models are unable to satisfy. The present model is applied to calculate two backward-facing step flows. Calculations with the standard K-epsilon model and a recently developed RNG-based K-epsilon model are also made for comparison. The calculations are performed with a finite-volume method. A second-order accurate differencing scheme and sufficiently fine grids are used to ensure the numerical accuracy of solutions. The calculated results are compared with the experimental data for both mean and turbulent quantities. The comparison shows that the present model performs quite well for separated flows.

  5. Effect of turbulence on extinction of counterflow diffusion flame

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsuji, Hiroshi; Yoshida, Akira; Endo, Nobuyuki [Tokyo Denki Univ. (Japan). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering

    1994-12-31

    A laminar counterflow diffusion flame established in the forward stagnation region of a porous cylinder has been used widely for the laminar flame studies. In the present study, this flame was applied to investigating the extinction of a diffusion flame due to air stream turbulence. Propane or methane was ejected from a 30-mm porous cylinder. The turbulence was given to the counterflowing air stream by perforated plates. The results of this study show that the air stream turbulence causes large-scale distortions with small amplitude on the apparently laminar diffusion flame, and the time-averaged thickness of this flame is three times as large as the purely laminar flame. Even if the air stream becomes turbulent, there exists a critical stagnation velocity gradient beyond which the flame can never be stabilized, however large the fuel ejection velocity is. Local extinction near the stagnation region always leads to global extinction of the whole flame. As expected, the critical velocity gradient decreases as the turbulence intensity increases. This flame is subjected to the sum of the bulk stretch rate exerted by the mean flow and the turbulent stretch rate exerted by small eddies of Kolmogorov scale. The critical total stretch rate at which the extinction occurs is nearly constant for each fuel for all turbulence conditions tested in the present study and coincides with the critical stagnation velocity gradient of the laminar diffusion flame, that is, the total stretch rate without turbulence. This fact suggests that large-scale eddies are not so effective for the local extinction and that the chemical reaction that occurs in molecular scale is not affected by small eddies of the Kolmogorov scale.

  6. Advective turbulent transport in the fluid plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Min, Byung-Hoon; An, Chan-Yong; Kim, Chang-Bae

    2013-10-01

    The Hasegawa-Wakatani model (HWM) has been employed in pedagogical analyses of the physics behind the behavior of the tokamak plasmas. In addition to the geometric simplicity HWM has an appealing feature of sustaining autonomous quasi-steady state, unstable modes providing the power that is being transported by the nonlinear interactions and is eventually dissipated by the collisional damping at small scales. Emergence of the zonal flow out of the turbulence is a main candidate to cause the transition from the low plasma confinement to the high mode. In the study of such LH transition with the HWM, the adiabaticity parameter has been shown to play an important role in forcing the zonal flow that results in the regulation of the drift-wave turbulence. Instead of concentrating on the physics of the feedback loop between the turbulence and the zonal flow the present study focuses on the presence of the advective transport of the energy. Numerical simulations of HWM are performed and the connections between the advective transport and the zonal flow will be presented. This work was supported by the Supercpmputing Center/Korea Institute of Science and Technology Information with supercomputing resources including technical support (KSC-2013-C1-009).

  7. Turbulent premixed flames on fractal-grid-generated turbulence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A space-filling, low blockage fractal grid is used as a novel turbulence generator in a premixed turbulent flame stabilized by a rod. The study compares the flame behaviour with a fractal grid to the behaviour when a standard square mesh grid with the same effective mesh size and solidity as the fractal grid is used. The isothermal gas flow turbulence characteristics, including mean flow velocity and rms of velocity fluctuations and Taylor length, were evaluated from hot-wire measurements. The behaviour of the flames was assessed with direct chemiluminescence emission from the flame and high-speed OH-laser-induced fluorescence. The characteristics of the two flames are considered in terms of turbulent flame thickness, local flame curvature and turbulent flame speed. It is found that, for the same flow rate and stoichiometry and at the same distance downstream of the location of the grid, fractal-grid-generated turbulence leads to a more turbulent flame with enhanced burning rate and increased flame surface area. (paper)

  8. Turbulent premixed flames on fractal-grid-generated turbulence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soulopoulos, N; Kerl, J; Sponfeldner, T; Beyrau, F; Hardalupas, Y; Taylor, A M K P [Mechanical Engineering Department, Imperial College London, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom); Vassilicos, J C, E-mail: ns6@ic.ac.uk [Department of Aeronautics, Imperial College London, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom)

    2013-12-15

    A space-filling, low blockage fractal grid is used as a novel turbulence generator in a premixed turbulent flame stabilized by a rod. The study compares the flame behaviour with a fractal grid to the behaviour when a standard square mesh grid with the same effective mesh size and solidity as the fractal grid is used. The isothermal gas flow turbulence characteristics, including mean flow velocity and rms of velocity fluctuations and Taylor length, were evaluated from hot-wire measurements. The behaviour of the flames was assessed with direct chemiluminescence emission from the flame and high-speed OH-laser-induced fluorescence. The characteristics of the two flames are considered in terms of turbulent flame thickness, local flame curvature and turbulent flame speed. It is found that, for the same flow rate and stoichiometry and at the same distance downstream of the location of the grid, fractal-grid-generated turbulence leads to a more turbulent flame with enhanced burning rate and increased flame surface area. (paper)

  9. Coherence in Turbulence: New Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levich, Eugene

    2009-07-01

    It is claimed that turbulence in fluids is inherently coherent phenomenon. The coherence shows up clearly as strongly correlated helicity fluctuations of opposite sign. The helicity fluctuations have cellular structure forming clusters that are actually observed as vorticity bands and coherent structures in laboratory turbulence, direct numerical simulations and most obviously in atmospheric turbulence. The clusters are named BCC - Beltrami Cellular Clusters - because of the observed nearly total alignment of the velocity and vorticity fields in each particular cell, and hence nearly maximal possible helicity in each cell; although when averaged over all the cells the residual mean helicity in general is small and does not play active dynamical role. The Beltrami like fluctuations are short-lived and stabilize only in small and generally contiguous sub-domains that are tending to a (multi)fractal in the asymptotic limit of large Reynolds numbers, Re → ∞. For the model of homogeneous isotropic turbulence the theory predicts the leading fractal dimension of BCC to be: DF = 2.5. This particular BCC is responsible for generating the Kolmogorov -5/3 power law energy spectrum. The most obvious role that BCC play dynamically is that the nonlinear interactions in them are relatively reduced, due to strong spatial alignment between the velocity field v(r, t) and the vorticity field ω(r, t) = curlv(r, t), while the physical quantities typically best characterizing turbulence intermittency, such as entrophy, vorticity stretching and generation, and energy dissipation are maximized in and near them. The theory quantitatively relates the reduction of nonlinear inter-actions to the BCC fractal dimension DF and subsequent turbulence intermittency. It is further asserted that BCC is a fundamental feature of all turbulent flows, e.g., wall bounded turbulent flows, atmospheric and oceanic flows, and their leading fractal dimension remains invariant and universal in these flows

  10. Measurements in Transitional Boundary Layers Under High Free-Stream Turbulence and Strong Acceleration Conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volino, Ralph John

    1995-01-01

    fluctuations induced by the free-stream unsteadiness. The large scale fluctuations cause some turbulent mixing, but are not as effective at promoting turbulent transport as are smaller scale fluctuations resulting from near wall production in the turbulent boundary layer. To the author's knowledge, this is the first detailed documentation of boundary layer transition under such high free-stream turbulence conditions.

  11. The StEllar Counterparts of COmpact high velocity clouds (SECCO) survey. II. Sensitivity of the survey and the atlas of synthetic dwarf galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beccari, G.; Bellazzini, M.; Battaglia, G.; Ibata, R.; Martin, N.; Testa, V.; Cignoni, M.; Correnti, M.

    2016-06-01

    The searching for StEllar Counterparts of COmpact high velocity clouds (SECCO) survey is devoted to the search for stellar counterparts within ultra compact high velocity clouds that are candidate low-mass, low-luminosity galaxies. We present the results of a set of simulations aimed at the quantitative estimate of the sensitivity of the survey as a function of the total luminosity, size, and distance of the stellar systems we are looking for. For all of our synthetic galaxies we assumed an exponential surface brightness profile and an old and metal-poor population. The synthetic galaxies are simulated both on the images and on the photometric catalogues, taking all the observational effects into account. In the fields where the available observational material is of top quality (≃36% of the SECCO fields), we detect synthetic galaxies as ≥5σ over-densities of resolved stars down to μV,h ≃ 30.0 mag/arcsec2, for D ≤ 1.5 Mpc, and down to μV,h ≃ 29.5 mag/arcsec2, for D ≤ 2.5 Mpc. In the field with the worst observational material of the whole survey, we detect synthetic galaxies with μV,h ≤ 28.8 mag/arcsec2 out to D ≤ 1.0 Mpc, and those with μV,h ≤ 27.5 mag/arcsec2 out to D ≤ 2.5 Mpc. Dwarf galaxies with MV = -10.0, with sizes in the range spanned by known dwarfs, are detected by visual inspection of the images up to D = 5 Mpc independent of the image quality. In the best quality images, dwarfs are partially resolved into stars up to D = 3.0 Mpc and completely unresolved at D = 5 Mpc. As an independent test of the sensitivity of our images to low surface brightness galaxies, we report on the detection of several dwarf spheroidal galaxies probably located in the Virgo cluster with MV ≲ -8.0 and μV,h ≲ 26.8 mag/arcsec2. The nature of the previously discovered SECCO 1 stellar system, also likely located in the Virgo cluster, is rediscussed in comparison with these dwarfs. While specific for the SECCO survey, our study may also provide general

  12. Cyclic oxidation behavior and microstructure evolution of aluminized, Pt-aluminized high velocity oxygen fuel sprayed CoNiCrAlY coatings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jiing-Herng [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, National Formosa University, 64 Wenhua Road, Huwei, Yunlin, Taiwan (China); Tsai, Pi-Chuen, E-mail: pc6996@ms16.hinet.ne [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, National Formosa University, 64 Wenhua Road, Huwei, Yunlin, Taiwan (China); Graduate Institute of Materials Science and Green Energy Engineering, National Formosa University, Huwei, Yunlin, Taiwan (China); Lee, Jyh-Wei [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Tungnan University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Research Center for Micro/Nanotechnology, Tungnan University, Taipei, Taiwan (China)

    2009-07-01

    In this study, the Hastelloy-X superalloy samples were firstly overlaid by a CoNiCrAlY bond coating utilizing a high pressure, high velocity oxygen fuel (HVOF) spray process. Then platinum thin film approx. 7.5 {mu}m thick was introduced to selected test samples of CoNiCrAlY coatings by a magnetron sputtering deposition process. Then the HVOF sprayed superalloy coupons, with and without Pt coating were pack aluminized for 4 h at 850 {sup o}C to produce (Co,Ni)Al and PtAl{sub 2} aluminide phases on their surfaces, respectively. All specimens were subjected to a thermal cycling test at 1100 {sup o}C. Then the aluminizing and Pt-aluminizing effects relative to cyclical oxidation behavior and microstructure evolutions of the coatings were evaluated. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray diffractometry (XRD) and electron probe microanalyzer (EPMA) were used to identify crystalline phases and microstructures of each coating. Results clearly indicated that the surface roughness of the HVOF sprayed CoNiCrAlY coatings were unchanged after aluminizing or the Pt-aluminizing process. The oxide scales spalled after 50 h and 100 h cyclic oxidation for the HVOF sprayed sample and aluminized sample respectively, while the oxide scale attached successfully to the substrate for the Pt-aluminized sample after testing for 150 h. It is obvious that the Pt-aluminizing process significantly improves the oxidation resistance of HVOF sprayed coatings, while the isolated aluminizing process demonstrated negligible effect.

  13. Fe-Al Weld Overlay and High Velocity Oxy-Fuel Thermal Spray Coatings for Corrosion Protection of Waterwalls in Fossil Fired Plants with Low NOx Burners

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Regina, J.R.

    2002-02-08

    Iron-aluminum-chromium coatings were investigated to determine the best candidates for coatings of boiler tubes in Low NOx fossil fueled power plants. Ten iron-aluminum-chromium weld claddings with aluminum concentrations up to 10wt% were tested in a variety of environments to evaluate their high temperature corrosion resistance. The weld overlay claddings also contained titanium additions to investigate any beneficial effects from these ternary and quaternary alloying additions. Several High-Velocity Oxy-Fuel (HVOF) thermal spray coatings with higher aluminum concentrations were investigated as well. Gaseous corrosion testing revealed that at least 10wt%Al is required for protection in the range of environments examined. Chromium additions were beneficial in all of the environments, but additions of titanium were beneficial only in sulfur rich atmospheres. Similar results were observed when weld claddings were in contact with corrosive slag while simultaneously, exposed to the corrosive environments. An aluminum concentration of 10wt% was required to prevent large amounts of corrosion to take place. Again chromium additions were beneficial with the greatest corrosion protection occurring for welds containing both 10wt%Al and 5wt%Cr. The exposed thermal spray coatings showed either significant cracking within the coating, considerable thickness loss, or corrosion products at the coating substrate interface. Therefore, the thermal spray coatings provided the substrate very little protection. Overall, it was concluded that of the coatings studied weld overlay coatings provide superior protection in these Low NOx environments; specifically, the ternary weld composition of 10wt%Al and 5wt%Cr provided the best corrosion protection in all of the environments tested.

  14. Constraints from sill intrusions and their deeper source magma chambers (seismic high velocity bodies) on the origins of volcanic rifted margins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rohrman, M.

    2015-12-01

    Volcanic rifted margins are characterized by massive igneous activity originating from the rift margin, characterized by seaward dipping reflectors. These consist of basalt flows and associated magmatic products, from deep magma chambers imaged on seismic data as High Velocity Bodies (HVB) with seismic velocities between 7 and 7.5 km/s. The relationship between rifting and decompression melting have been well quantified, using the HVB's as constraints on magmatic production to match extension models. Crucial in this approach are the relationship between extension and mantle plumes, with HVB's generated by mantle plumes often indicative of velocities between 7.5 - 7.8 km/s. Here I address information that can be obtained from sill complexes in sedimentary basins associated with rifting, representing the earliest phase of magmatism. I use a simple crustal scale hydrostatic model for dikes while incorporating the presence of sills by calculating magmatic overpressures from differences in pressure gradients. It transpires that the presence of sills as observed on seismic reflection and outcrop data, can be predicted. Modelling further suggests that the source of these sill complexes are large magma chambers at or near the Moho, and equate to HVB's observed on seismic data. Utilizing simple mass balance calculations, the ratio of cumulate thickness (from HVB thickness) and expelled melt (from accumulated sill thicknesses) can be related to MgO content in expelled liquids, primary magma and cumulates. Higher MgO content translates in higher seismic velocities. Thus, HVB velocity can subsequently be used to discriminate between mantle plume, or shallow rift related melting. The theory is applied to various basins bordering the northern North Atlantic (Vøring Basin, Jameson Land Basin and Rockall Basin) and South Atlantic rifts (Namibia), associated with the Paleocene/Eocene Iceland mantle plume and the Early Cretaceous Tristan da Cunha mantle plume magmatism respectively.

  15. Effect of Sampling Rates on the Quantification of Forces, Durations, and Rates of Loading of Simulated Side Posture High-Velocity, Low-Amplitude Lumbar Spine Manipulation☆

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gudavalli, Maruti Ram; DeVocht, James; Tayh, Ali; Xia, Ting

    2013-01-01

    Objective Quantification of chiropractic high-velocity, low-amplitude spinal manipulation (HVLA-SM) may require biomechanical equipment capable of sampling data at high rates. However, there are few studies reported in the literature regarding the minimal sampling rate required to record the HVLA-SM force-time profile data accurately and precisely. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of different sampling rates on the quantification of forces, durations, and rates of loading of simulated side posture lumbar spine HVLA-SM delivered by doctors of chiropractic. Methods Five doctors of chiropractic (DCs) and 5 asymptomatic participants were recruited for this study. Force-time profiles were recorded during (i) 52 simulated HVLA-SM thrusts to a force transducer placed on a force plate by 2 DCs and (ii) 12 lumbar side posture HVLA-SM on 5 participants by 3 DCs. Data sampling rate of the force plate remained the same at 1000 Hz, whereas the sampling rate of the force transducer varied at 50, 100, 200, and 500 Hz. The data were reduced using custom-written MATLAB (Mathworks, Inc, Natick, MA) and MathCad (version 15; Parametric Technologies, Natick, MA) programs and analyzed descriptively. Results The average differences in the computed durations and rates of loading are smaller than 5% between 50 and 1000 Hz sampling rates. The differences in the computed preloads and peak loads are smaller than 3%. Conclusions The small differences observed in the characteristics of force-time profiles of simulated manual HVLA-SM thrusts measured using various sampling rates suggest that a sampling rate as low as 50 to 100 Hz may be sufficient. The results are applicable to the manipulation performed in this study: manual side posture lumbar spine HVLA-SM. PMID:23790603

  16. Validation of the cat as a model for the human lumbar spine during simulated high-velocity, low-amplitude spinal manipulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ianuzzi, Allyson; Pickar, Joel G; Khalsa, Partap S

    2010-07-01

    High-velocity, low-amplitude spinal manipulation (HVLA-SM) is an efficacious treatment for low back pain, although the physiological mechanisms underlying its effects remain elusive. The lumbar facet joint capsule (FJC) is innervated with mechanically sensitive neurons and it has been theorized that the neurophysiological benefits of HVLA-SM are partially induced by stimulation of FJC neurons. Biomechanical aspects of this theory have been investigated in humans while neurophysiological aspects have been investigated using cat models. The purpose of this study was to determine the relationship between human and cat lumbar spines during HVLA-SM. Cat lumbar spine specimens were mechanically tested, using a displacement-controlled apparatus, during simulated HVLA-SM applied at L5, L6, and L7 that produced preload forces of approximately 25% bodyweight for 0.5 s and peak forces that rose to 50-100% bodyweight within approximately 125 ms, similar to that delivered clinically. Joint kinematics and FJC strain were measured optically. Human FJC strain and kinematics data were taken from a prior study. Regression models were established for FJC strain magnitudes as functions of factors species, manipulation site, and interactions thereof. During simulated HVLA-SM, joint kinematics in cat spines were greater in magnitude compared with humans. Similar to human spines, site-specific HVLA-SM produced regional cat FJC strains at distant motion segments. Joint motions and FJC strain magnitudes for cat spines were larger than those for human spine specimens. Regression relationships demonstrated that species, HVLA-SM site, and interactions thereof were significantly and moderately well correlated for HVLA-SM that generated tensile strain in the FJC. The relationships established in the current study can be used in future neurophysiological studies conducted in cats to extrapolate how human FJC afferents might respond to HVLA-SM. The data from the current study warrant further

  17. Effect of heat flux on differential rotation in turbulent convection

    CERN Document Server

    Kleeorin, N

    2006-01-01

    We studied the effect of the turbulent heat flux on the Reynolds stresses in a rotating turbulent convection. To this end we solved a coupled system of dynamical equations which includes the equations for the Reynolds stresses, the entropy fluctuations and the turbulent heat flux. We used a spectral $\\tau$ approximation in order to close the system of dynamical equations. We found that the ratio of the contributions to the Reynolds stresses caused by the turbulent heat flux and the anisotropic eddy viscosity is of the order of $\\sim 10 (L_\\rho / l_0)^2$, where $l_{0}$ is the maximum scale of turbulent motions and $L_\\rho$ is the fluid density variation scale. This effect is crucial for the formation of the differential rotation and should be taken into account in the theories of the differential rotation of the Sun, stars and planets. In particular, we demonstrated that this effect may cause the differential rotation which is comparable with the typical solar differential rotation.

  18. Why turbulence sustains in supercritically stratified free atmosphere?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zilitinkevich, Sergej

    2016-04-01

    It is widely believed that in very stable stratifications, at Richardson numbers (Ri) exceeding critical value Ric ˜ 0.25 turbulence decays and flow becomes laminar. This is so at low Reynolds numbers (Re), e.g., in lab experiments; but this is not true in very-high-Re geophysical flows. Free atmosphere and deep ocean are turbulent in spite of strongly supercritical stratifications: 1 self-control mechanisms. Until recently, the role of negative buoyancy flux, Fb > 0, in turbulence energetics was treated in terms of the turbulent kinetic energy (TKE) budget equation and understood as just consumption of TKE by the buoyancy forces. This has led to the conclusion that sufficiently strong static stability causes the negative buoyancy flux sufficiently strong to exceed the TKE generation rate and thus to kill turbulence. However, considering TKE equation together with budget equation for turbulent potential energy (TPE proportional to the squared buoyancy fluctuations) shows that the role of Fb in turbulence energetics is nothing but conversion of TKE into TPE (Fb just quantifies the rate of this conversion); so that Fb does not affect total turbulent energy (TTE = TKE + TPE). Moreover, as follows from the buoyancy-flux budget equation, TPE generates positive (directed upward) buoyancy flux irrespective of the sign of the buoyancy gradient. Indeed, the warmer fluid particles (with positive buoyancy fluctuation) rise up, whereas the cooler particles sink down, so that both contribute to the positive buoyancy flux opposing to the usual, negative flux generated by mean buoyancy gradient. In this context, strengthening the negative buoyancy flux leads to decreasing TKE and increasing TPE. The latter enhances the counter-gradient share of the total flux, thus reduces |Fb| and, eventually, increases TKE. The above negative feedback was disregarded in the conventional concept of down-gradient turbulent transport. This mechanism imposes a limit on the maximal (independent of

  19. Magnetohydrodynamics turbulence: An astronomical perspective

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    S Sridhar

    2011-07-01

    Early work on magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) turbulence in the 1960s due, independently, to Iroshnikov and Kraichnan (IK) considered isotropic inertial-range spectra. Whereas laboratory experiments were not in a position to measure the spectral index, they showed that the turbulence was strongly anisotropic. Theoretical horizons correspondingly expanded in the 1980s, to accommodate both the isotropy of the IK theory and the anisotropy suggested by the experiments. Since the discovery of pulsars in 1967, many years of work on interstellar scintillation suggested that small-scale interstellar turbulence must have a hydromagnetic origin; but the IK spectrum was too flat and the ideas on anisotropic spectra too qualitative to explain the observations. In response, new theories of balanced MHD turbulence were proposed in the 1990s, which argued that the IK theory was incorrect, and made quantitative predictions of anisotropic inertial-range spectra; these theories have since found applications in many areas of astrophysics. Spacecraft measurements of solar-wind turbulence show that there is more power in Alfvén waves that travel away from the Sun than towards it. Theories of imbalanced MHD turbulence have now been proposed to address interplanetary turbulence. This very active area of research continues to be driven by astronomy.

  20. Turbulent deflagrations, autoignitions, and detonations

    KAUST Repository

    Bradley, Derek

    2012-09-01

    Measurements of turbulent burning velocities in fan-stirred explosion bombs show an initial linear increase with the fan speed and RMS turbulent velocity. The line then bends over to form a plateau of high values around the maximum attainable burning velocity. A further increase in fan speed leads to the eventual complete quenching of the flame due to increasing localised extinctions because of the flame stretch rate. The greater the Markstein number, the more readily does flame quenching occur. Flame propagation along a duct closed at one end, with and without baffles to increase the turbulence, is subjected to a one-dimensional analysis. The flame, initiated at the closed end of the long duct, accelerates by the turbulent feedback mechanism, creating a shock wave ahead of it, until the maximum turbulent burning velocity for the mixture is attained. With the confining walls, the mixture is compressed between the flame and the shock plane up to the point where it might autoignite. This can be followed by a deflagration to detonation transition. The maximum shock intensity occurs with the maximum attainable turbulent burning velocity, and this defines the limit for autoignition of the mixture. For more reactive mixtures, autoignition can occur at turbulent burning velocities that are less than the maximum attainable one. Autoignition can be followed by quasi-detonation or fully developed detonation. The stability of ensuing detonations is discussed, along with the conditions that may lead to their extinction. © 2012 by Pleiades Publishing, Ltd.

  1. Helically Decomposed Turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Alexakis, Alexandros

    2016-01-01

    A decomposition of the energy and helicity fluxes in a turbulent hydrodynamic flow is proposed. The decomposition is based on the projection of the flow to a helical basis that allows to investigate separately the role of interactions among modes of different helicity. The proposed formalism is then applied in large scale numerical simulations of a non-helical and a helical flow, where the decomposed fluxes are explicitly calculated. It is shown that the total energy flux can be split in to three fluxes that independently remain constant in the inertial range. One of these fluxes that corresponds to the interactions of fields with the same helicity is negative implying the presence of an inverse cascade that is `hidden' inside the forward cascade. Similar to the energy flux the helicity flux is also shown that it can be decomposed to two fluxes that remain constant in the inertial range. Implications of these results as well possible new directions for investigations are discussed.

  2. Mixing in manipulated turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Kuczaj, A K; Geurts, Bernard J.; Kuczaj, Arkadiusz K.

    2006-01-01

    A new computational framework for the simulation of turbulent flow through complex objects and along irregular boundaries is presented. This is motivated by the application of metal foams in compact heat-transfer devices, or as catalyst substrates in process-engineering. The flow-consequences of such complicated objects are incorporated by adding explicit multiscale forcing to the Navier-Stokes equations. The forcing represents the simultaneous agitation of a wide spectrum of length-scales when flow passes through the complex object. It is found that a considerable modulation of the traditional energy cascading can be introduced with a specific forcing strategy. In spectral space, forcing yields strongly localized deviations from the common Kolmogorov scaling law, directly associated with the explicitly forced scales. In addition, the accumulated effect of forcing induces a significant non-local alteration of the kinetic energy including the spectrum for the large scales. Consequently, a manipulation of turbu...

  3. Unsteady turbulent buoyant plumes

    CERN Document Server

    Woodhouse, Mark J; Hogg, Andrew J

    2015-01-01

    We model the unsteady evolution of turbulent buoyant plumes following temporal changes to the source conditions. The integral model is derived from radial integration of the governing equations expressing the conservation of mass, axial momentum and buoyancy. The non-uniform radial profiles of the axial velocity and density deficit in the plume are explicitly described by shape factors in the integral equations; the commonly-assumed top-hat profiles lead to shape factors equal to unity. The resultant model is hyperbolic when the momentum shape factor, determined from the radial profile of the mean axial velocity, differs from unity. The solutions of the model when source conditions are maintained at constant values retain the form of the well-established steady plume solutions. We demonstrate that the inclusion of a momentum shape factor that differs from unity leads to a well-posed integral model. Therefore, our model does not exhibit the mathematical pathologies that appear in previously proposed unsteady i...

  4. A study on turbulence modulation via an analysis of turbulence anisotropy-invariants

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Michael; MANHART

    2010-01-01

    We investigate the turbulence modulation by particles in a turbulent two-phase channel flow via an analysis of turbulence anisotropy-invariants. The fluid turbulence is calculated by a large eddy simulation with a point-force two-way coupling model and particles are tracked by the Lagrangian trajectory method. The channel turbulence follows the two-component turbulence state within the viscous sub-layer region and outside the region the turbulence tends to follow the right curve of the anisotropy-invariant. The channel turbulence, interacting with heavy particles, is modulated to the two-component turbulence limit state near the wall and is separate from the axisymmetric turbulence state in the turbulence anisotropy-invariants map. The fluctuations of streamwise component are transferred to the other two components and hence the anisotropy decreases due to particle modulation. The study has deepened the understanding of the turbulence modulation mechanism in two-phase turbulent flows.

  5. Saturation of the turbulent dynamo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schober, J; Schleicher, D R G; Federrath, C; Bovino, S; Klessen, R S

    2015-08-01

    The origin of strong magnetic fields in the Universe can be explained by amplifying weak seed fields via turbulent motions on small spatial scales and subsequently transporting the magnetic energy to larger scales. This process is known as the turbulent dynamo and depends on the properties of turbulence, i.e., on the hydrodynamical Reynolds number and the compressibility of the gas, and on the magnetic diffusivity. While we know the growth rate of the magnetic energy in the linear regime, the saturation level, i.e., the ratio of magnetic energy to turbulent kinetic energy that can be reached, is not known from analytical calculations. In this paper we present a scale-dependent saturation model based on an effective turbulent resistivity which is determined by the turnover time scale of turbulent eddies and the magnetic energy density. The magnetic resistivity increases compared to the Spitzer value and the effective scale on which the magnetic energy spectrum is at its maximum moves to larger spatial scales. This process ends when the peak reaches a characteristic wave number k☆ which is determined by the critical magnetic Reynolds number. The saturation level of the dynamo also depends on the type of turbulence and differs for the limits of large and small magnetic Prandtl numbers Pm. With our model we find saturation levels between 43.8% and 1.3% for Pm≫1 and between 2.43% and 0.135% for Pm≪1, where the higher values refer to incompressible turbulence and the lower ones to highly compressible turbulence. PMID:26382506

  6. Is Navier-Stokes turbulence chaotic?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deissler, R. G.

    1986-01-01

    Whether turbulent solutions of the Navier-Stokes equations are chaotic is considered. Initially neighboring solutions for a low-Reynolds-number fully developed turbulence are compared. The turbulence is sustained by a nonrandom time-independent external force. The solutions separate exponentially with time, having a positive Liapunov characteristic exponent. Thus the turbulence is characterized as chaotic.

  7. Impurity transport in plasma edge turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Naulin, V; Rasmussen, J J; Naulin, Volker; Wood, Martin Priego; Rasmussen, Jens Juul

    2004-01-01

    The turbulent transport of minority species/impurities is investigated in 2D drift-wave turbulence as well as in 3D toroidal drift-Alfven edge turbulence. The full effects of perpendicular and -- in 3D -- parallel advection are kept for the impurity species. Anomalous pinch effects are recovered and explained in terms of Turbulent EquiPartition (TEP)

  8. Strong Turbulence in Partially Ionized Plasmas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mikkelsen, Torben; Pécseli, Hans

    1980-01-01

    Experimental investigations of strong turbulence in partially ionized, low-β plasmas are reported. The observed spectra are interpreted by applying Taylor's hypothesis and related to turbulent fluctuations in the ionosphere.......Experimental investigations of strong turbulence in partially ionized, low-β plasmas are reported. The observed spectra are interpreted by applying Taylor's hypothesis and related to turbulent fluctuations in the ionosphere....

  9. On the Turbulent Mixing in Horizontal Axis Wind Turbine Wakes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lignarolo, L.E.M.

    2016-01-01

    The wake flow of a horizontal axis wind turbine is characterised by lower wind speed and higher turbulence than the free-stream conditions. When clustered in large wind farms, wind turbines regularly operate inside the wake of one or more upstream machines. This is a major cause of energy production

  10. Experimental study of turbulence induced wall temperature fluctuations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garai, Anirban; Kleissl, Jan; Boundary Layer Late Afternoon and Sunset Turbulence Collaboration

    2012-11-01

    Turbulent heat transport is critical in engineering applications and atmospheric flows. The relative strength of background shear and buoyancy near the wall influences coherent structures responsible for much of the heat transport. Previous studies show that shear dominated flow causes streaky-like structures; whereas buoyancy dominated flow causes cell-like structures. In this work, we investigated the influence of flow structures on the wall temperature and heat flux in a convective atmospheric boundary layer. Turbulence data at different heights and high frequency wall temperature were obtained during the Boundary Layer Late Afternoon and Sunset Turbulence field campaign at Lannemezan, France from 7 June - 8 July, 2011. Conditional averaging confirms that the warm wall causes warm ejection events, and cold sweep events cause cooling of the wall. The wall temperature structures move along the wind and their advection speed is close to the wind speed of the upper logarithmic layer and mixed layer, have a size of about 0.2 times the boundary layer depth, become streakier with stability and its standard deviation follows a -1/3 power law with stability parameter, Obukhov length. We are thankful to all Boundary Layer Late Afternoon and Sunset Turbulence field campaign participants for data sharing and funding from a NASA New Investigator Program award.

  11. Clumps in drift wave turbulence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pecseli, H. L.; Mikkelsen, Torben

    1986-01-01

    , two-dimensional random flow serves as a particularly simple illustration. For this case particles can be trapped for all times in a local vortex (macro-clump). A small test-cloud of particles (micro-clump) chosen arbitrarily in a realization will on the other hand expand on average. A formulation is...... proposed in terms of conditional eddies, in order to discriminate turbulent flows where macro-clumps may be observed. The analysis is illustrated by results from experimental investigations of strongly turbulent, resistive drift-wave fluctuations. The related problem for electrostatic turbulence in...

  12. Subcritical excitation of plasma turbulence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Itoh, K.; Itoh, S.; Yagi, M.; Fukuyama, A.

    1996-01-01

    Theory of current-diffusive interchange mode turbulence in plasmas is developed in the presence of collisional transport. Double-valued amplitude of stationary fluctuations is expressed in terms of the pressure gradient. The backward bifurcation is shown to appear near the linear stability boundary. The subcritical nature of the turbulence is explicitly illustrated. Critical pressure gradient at which the transition from collisional transport to the turbulent one is to occur is predicted. This provides a prototype of the transport theory for nonlinear-non-equilibrium systems. (author).

  13. Bumblebee flight in heavy turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Engels, T; Schneider, K; Lehmann, F -O; Sesterhenn, J

    2016-01-01

    High-resolution numerical simulations of a tethered model bumblebee in forward flight are performed superimposing homogeneous isotropic turbulent fluctuations to the uniform inflow. Despite tremendous variation in turbulence intensity, between 17% and 99% with respect to the mean flow, we do not find significant changes in cycle-averaged aerodynamic forces, moments or flight power when averaged over realizations, compared to laminar inflow conditions. The variance of aerodynamic measures, however, significantly increases with increasing turbulence intensity, which may explain flight instabilities observed in freely flying bees.

  14. Turbulent mixing condensation nucleus counter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mavliev, Rashid

    The construction and operating principles of the Turbulent Mixing Condensation Nucleus Counter (TM CNC) are described. Estimations based on the semiempirical theory of turbulent jets and the classical theory of nucleation and growth show the possibility of detecting particles as small as 2.5 nm without the interference of homogeneous nucleation. This conclusion was confirmed experimentally during the International Workshop on Intercomparison of Condensation Nuclei and Aerosol Particle Counters (Vienna, Austria). Number concentration, measured by the Turbulent Mixing CNC and other participating instruments, is found to be essentially equal.

  15. Two-dimensional elastic turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Berti, S; Boffetta, G; Celani, A; Musacchio, S; 10.1103/PhysRevE.77.055306

    2010-01-01

    We investigate the effect of polymer additives on a two-dimensional Kolmogorov flow at very low Reynolds numbers by direct numerical simulations of the Oldroyd-B viscoelastic model. We find that above the elastic instability threshold the flow develops the elastic turbulence regime recently observed in experiments. We observe that both the turbulent drag and the Lyapunov exponent increase with Weissenberg, indicating the presence of a disordered, turbulent-like mixing flow. The energy spectrum develops a power-law scaling range with an exponent close to the experimental and theoretical expectations.

  16. Fragmentation in turbulent primordial gas

    CERN Document Server

    Glover, S C O; Klessen, R S; Bromm, V

    2010-01-01

    We report results from numerical simulations of star formation in the early universe that focus on the role of subsonic turbulence, and investigate whether it can induce fragmentation of the gas. We find that dense primordial gas is highly susceptible to fragmentation, even for rms turbulent velocity dispersions as low as 20% of the initial sound speed. The resulting fragments cover over two orders of magnitude in mass, ranging from 0.1 to 40 solar masses. However, our results suggest that the details of the fragmentation depend on the local properties of the turbulent velocity field and hence we expect considerable variations in the resulting stellar mass spectrum in different halos.

  17. Turbulent Mixing of Multiphase Flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Y.-N.; Ferziger, J.; Ham, F. E.; Herrmann, M.

    2003-01-01

    Thus we conduct numerical simulations of multiphase fluids stirred by two-dimensional turbulence to assess the possibility of self-similar drop size distribution in turbulence. In our turbulence simulations, we also explore the non-diffusive limit, where molecular mobility for the interface is vanishing. Special care is needed to transport the non-diffusive interface. Numerically, we use the particle level set method to evolve the interface. Instead of using the usual methods to calculate the surface tension force from the level set function, we reconstruct the interface based on phase- field modeling, and calculate the continuum surface tension forcing from the reconstructed interface.

  18. Turbulence evolution in MHD plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Wisniewski, M; Spanier, F

    2013-01-01

    Turbulence in the interstellar medium has been an active field of research in the last decade. Numerical simulations are the tool of choice in most cases. But while there are a number of simulations on the market some questions have not been answered finally. In this paper we are going to examine the influence of compressible and incompressible driving on the evolution of turbulent spectra in a number of possible interstellar medium scenarios. We conclude that the driving not only has an influence on the ratio of compressible to incompressible component but also on the anisotropy of turbulence.

  19. On Lean Turbulent Combustion Modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Constantin LEVENTIU

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper investigates a lean methane-air flame with different chemical reaction mechanisms, for laminar and turbulent combustion, approached as one and bi-dimensional problem. The numerical results obtained with Cantera and Ansys Fluent software are compared with experimental data obtained at CORIA Institute, France. First, for laminar combustion, the burn temperature is very well approximated for all chemical mechanisms, however major differences appear in the evaluation of the flame front thickness. Next, the analysis of turbulence-combustion interaction shows that the numerical predictions are suficiently accurate for small and moderate turbulence intensity.

  20. Wind energy impact of turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Hölling, Michae; Ivanell, Stefan

    2014-01-01

    This book presents the results of the seminar ""Wind Energy and the Impact of Turbulence on the Conversion Process"" which was supported from three societies, namely the EUROMech, EAWE and ERCOFATC and took place in Oldenburg, Germany in spring 2012.The seminar was one of the first scientific meetings devoted to the common topic of wind energy and basic turbulence. The established community of researchers working on the challenging puzzle of turbulence for decades met the quite young community of researchers, who face the upcoming challenges in the fast growing field of wind energy application

  1. Fundamentals of premixed turbulent combustion

    CERN Document Server

    Lipatnikov, Andrei

    2012-01-01

    Lean burning of premixed gases is considered to be a promising combustion technology for future clean and highly efficient gas turbine engines. This book highlights the phenomenology of premixed turbulent flames. The text provides experimental data on the general appearance of premixed turbulent flames, physical mechanisms that could affect flame behavior, and physical and numerical models aimed at predicting the key features of premixed turbulent combustion. The author aims to provide a simple introduction to the field for advanced graduate and postgraduate students. Topics covered include La

  2. Modelling the dynamics of turbulent floods

    CERN Document Server

    Mei, Z; Li, Z; Li, Zhenquan

    1999-01-01

    Consider the dynamics of turbulent flow in rivers, estuaries and floods. Based on the widely used k-epsilon model for turbulence, we use the techniques of centre manifold theory to derive dynamical models for the evolution of the water depth and of vertically averaged flow velocity and turbulent parameters. This new model for the shallow water dynamics of turbulent flow: resolves the vertical structure of the flow and the turbulence; includes interaction between turbulence and long waves; and gives a rational alternative to classical models for turbulent environmental flows.

  3. Turbulence Modeling Verification and Validation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rumsey, Christopher L.

    2014-01-01

    Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) software that solves the Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) equations has been in routine use for more than a quarter of a century. It is currently employed not only for basic research in fluid dynamics, but also for the analysis and design processes in many industries worldwide, including aerospace, automotive, power generation, chemical manufacturing, polymer processing, and petroleum exploration. A key feature of RANS CFD is the turbulence model. Because the RANS equations are unclosed, a model is necessary to describe the effects of the turbulence on the mean flow, through the Reynolds stress terms. The turbulence model is one of the largest sources of uncertainty in RANS CFD, and most models are known to be flawed in one way or another. Alternative methods such as direct numerical simulations (DNS) and large eddy simulations (LES) rely less on modeling and hence include more physics than RANS. In DNS all turbulent scales are resolved, and in LES the large scales are resolved and the effects of the smallest turbulence scales are modeled. However, both DNS and LES are too expensive for most routine industrial usage on today's computers. Hybrid RANS-LES, which blends RANS near walls with LES away from walls, helps to moderate the cost while still retaining some of the scale-resolving capability of LES, but for some applications it can still be too expensive. Even considering its associated uncertainties, RANS turbulence modeling has proved to be very useful for a wide variety of applications. For example, in the aerospace field, many RANS models are considered to be reliable for computing attached flows. However, existing turbulence models are known to be inaccurate for many flows involving separation. Research has been ongoing for decades in an attempt to improve turbulence models for separated and other nonequilibrium flows. When developing or improving turbulence models, both verification and validation are important

  4. Diffusion in anisotropic fully developed turbulence: Turbulent Prandtl number

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jurčišinová, E.; Jurčišin, M.

    2016-10-01

    Using the field theoretic renormalization group technique in the leading order of approximation of a perturbation theory the influence of the uniaxial small-scale anisotropy on the turbulent Prandtl number in the framework of the model of a passively advected scalar field by the turbulent velocity field driven by the Navier-Stokes equation is investigated for spatial dimensions d >2 . The influence of the presence of the uniaxial small-scale anisotropy in the model on the stability of the Kolmogorov scaling regime is briefly discussed. It is shown that with increasing of the value of the spatial dimension the region of stability of the scaling regime also increases. The regions of stability of the scaling regime are studied as functions of the anisotropy parameters for spatial dimensions d =3 ,4 , and 5. The dependence of the turbulent Prandtl number on the anisotropy parameters is studied in detail for the most interesting three-dimensional case. It is shown that the anisotropy of turbulent systems can have a rather significant impact on the value of the turbulent Prandtl number, i.e., on the rate of the corresponding diffusion processes. In addition, the relevance of the so-called weak anisotropy limit results are briefly discussed, and it is shown that there exists a relatively large region of small absolute values of the anisotropy parameters where the results obtained in the framework of the weak anisotropy approximation are in very good agreement with results obtained in the framework of the model without any approximation. The dependence of the turbulent Prandtl number on the anisotropy parameters is also briefly investigated for spatial dimensions d =4 and 5. It is shown that the dependence of the turbulent Prandtl number on the anisotropy parameters is very similar for all studied cases (d =3 ,4 , and 5), although the numerical values of the corresponding turbulent Prandtl numbers are different.

  5. An IntegratedTurbulence Hazard Decision Aid for the Cockpit Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Aircraft encounters with turbulence are the leading cause of injuries in the airline industry and result in significant human, operational, and maintenance costs to...

  6. Turbulent mixing of a passive scalar in grid turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Y.; Watanabe, T.; Nagata, K.; Sakai, Y.

    2016-07-01

    Fractal grids have attracted attention as a new-type of turbulence-generating grid due to their unique characteristics. Recent studies have revealed that such uniqueness appears in the near field of regular grid-generated turbulence. Scalar transport in those flows is also of great interest as it is not yet fully understood. In this study, we investigate the scalar mixing in the near field of regular grid-generated turbulence with various grid configurations. Experiments have been carried out in liquid mixing layers with a Reynolds number of 5000 based on the mesh size of the grid and uniform velocity. Simultaneous measurements of two-component velocities and concentration have been performed by particle image velocimetry and a planar laser-induced fluorescence technique, respectively. The results show that the scaling law using the wake-interaction length scale is applicable for the turbulence intensity in the grid turbulence with different mesh sizes and the same thickness of the grid bar. The turbulence intensity increases as the thickness of the grid bar increases; thus, consequently increasing the scalar diffusion. The streamwise development of the scalar mixing layer thickness collapses onto a single curve by normalization based on the thickness of the grid bar.

  7. Turbulence Investigation and Reproduction for Assisting Downstream Migrating Juvenile Salmonids, Part II of II; Effects of Induced Turbulence on Behavior of Juvenile Salmon, 2001-2005 Final Report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perry, Russell W.; Farley, M. Jared; Hansen, Gabriel S. (US Geological Survey, Western Fisheries Research Center, Columbia River Research Laboratory, Cook, WA)

    2005-07-01

    Passage through dams is a major source of mortality of anadromous juvenile salmonids because some populations must negotiate up to eight dams in Columbia and Snake rivers. Dams cause direct mortality when fish pass through turbines, but dams may also cause indirect mortality by altering migration conditions in rivers. Forebays immediately upstream of dams have decreased the water velocity of rivers and may contribute substantially to the total migration delay of juvenile salmonids. Recently, Coutant (2001a) suggested that in addition to low water velocities, lack of natural turbulence may contribute to migration delay by causing fish to lose directional cues. Coutant (2001a) further hypothesized that restoring turbulence in dam forebays may reduce migration delay by providing directional cues that allow fish to find passage routes more quickly (Coutant 2001a). Although field experiments have yielded proof of the concept of using induced turbulence to guide fish to safe passage routes, little is known about mechanisms actually causing behavioral changes. To test hypotheses about how turbulence influences movement and behavior of migrating juvenile salmonids, we conducted two types of controlled experiments at Cowlitz Falls Dam, Washington. A common measure of migration delay is the elapsed time between arrival at, and passage through, a dam. Therefore, for the first set of experiments, we tested the effect of induced turbulence on the elapsed time needed for fish to traverse through a raceway and pass over a weir at its downstream end (time trial experiment). If turbulence helps guide fish to passage routes, then fish should pass through the raceway quicker in the presence of appropriately scaled and directed turbulent cues. Second, little is known about how the physical properties of water movement provide directional cues to migrating juvenile salmonids. To examine the feasibility of guiding fish with turbulence, we tested whether directed turbulence could guide

  8. Orbital angular momentum entanglement in turbulence

    OpenAIRE

    Ibrahim, Alpha Hamadou; Roux, Filippus S.; McLaren, Melanie; Konrad, Thomas; Forbes, Andrew

    2013-01-01

    The turbulence induced decay of orbital angular momentum (OAM) entanglement between two photons is investigated numerically and experimentally. To compare our results with previous work, we simulate the turbulent atmosphere with a single phase screen based on the Kolmogorov theory of turbulence. We consider two different scenarios: in the first only one of the two photons propagates through turbulence, and in the second both photons propagate through uncorrelated turbulence. Comparing the ent...

  9. Magnetic moment of the 2+ state in the neutron-rich radioactive 72Zn using the High-Velocity Transient-Field technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report the first measurement of the g factor of the first 2+ state of the radioactive neutron-rich nucleus 72Zn using the High-Velocity Transient-Field (HVTF) technique. The neutron-rich N=40 region has long been discussed regarding the competition between single-particle-like structures in the Ni isotopes and the collective states in their immediate vicinity. Nuclear gyromagnetic factors, with their sensitivity to the single-particle properties of the nuclear states, can be one of the most sensitive probes of this interplay. Whereas the g factors of the 2+ states of the stable Ni isotopes show predominantly single particle behavior, consistent with relatively simple shell model structures [1], those of the nearby Zn and Ge isotopes show a trend consistent with the Z/A rule characteristic of collective states [2]. Particular interest in the Zn isotopes comes about because a number of theoretical calculations predict a change from collective to single-particle dominated behavior in the N=40 region. The main difference between the various models is related to the strength of this change and how sudden or gradual it is expected to be. The last known g factor of the stable isotope 70Zn still implies collective behavior. In the present experiment we have applied the HVTF technique for the first time to nuclei with Z>20 and A>40. As has been demonstrated in the previous measurement of this type [3], the technique can provide a very strong transient magnetic field (TF) for ions traversing ferromagnetic layers with velocities ∼Zv0, which in the Z2Zn was produced at GANIL by intermediate-energy projectile fragmentation (∼60 MeV/A) of 76Ge on a 500 μg/cm2 Be target, and selected using the LISE spectrometer. The 2+ state was populated via Coulomb excitation in a secondary Gd target, also used as the ferromagnetic layer for providing the TF. The scattered beam particles were detected in a plastic scintillator in coincidence with gamma-rays registered by 8 EXOGAM

  10. Effects of thrust amplitude and duration of high velocity low amplitude spinal manipulation on lumbar muscle spindle responses to vertebral position and movement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Dong-Yuan; Reed, William R.; Long, Cynthia R.; Kawchuk, Gregory N.; Pickar, Joel G.

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Mechanical characteristics of high velocity low amplitude spinal manipulations (HVLA-SM) can be variable. Sustained changes in peripheral neuronal signaling due to altered load transmission to a sensory receptor’s local mechanical environment are often considered a mechanism contributing to the therapeutic effects of spinal manipulation. The purpose of this study was to determine whether an HVLA-SM’s thrust amplitude or duration altered neural responsiveness of lumbar muscle spindles to either vertebral movement or position. METHODS Anesthetized cats (n=112) received L6 HVLA-SMs delivered to the spinous process. Cats were divided into 6 cohorts depending upon the peak thrust force (25%, 55%, 85% body weight) or thrust displacement (1, 2, 3mm) they received. Cats in each cohort received 8 thrust durations (0–250ms). Afferent discharge from 112 spindles was recorded in response to ramp and hold vertebral movement before and after the manipulation. Changes in mean instantaneous frequency (MIF) during the baseline period preceding the ramps (ΔMIFresting), during ramp movements (ΔMIFmovement), and with the vertebra held in the new position (ΔMIFposition) were compared. RESULTS Thrust duration had a small but statistically significant effect on ΔMIFresting at all six thrust amplitudes compared to control (0ms thrust duration). The lowest amplitude thrust displacement (1mm) increased ΔMIFresting at all thrust durations. For all the other thrust displacements and forces, the direction of change in ΔMIFresting was not consistent and the pattern of change was not systematically related to thrust duration. Regardless of thrust force, displacement, or duration, ΔMIFmovement and ΔMIFposition were not significantly different from control. Conclusion Relatively low amplitude thrust displacements applied during an HVLA-SM produced sustained increases in the resting discharge of paraspinal muscle spindles regardless of the duration over which the thrust was

  11. An Analytical Means of Determining Mass Loss from High Velocity Rigid Penetrators based on the Thermodynamic and Mechanical Properties of the Penetrator and Target

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, Joseph C., Jr.; Jones, S. E.; Rule, William; Toness, Odin

    1999-06-01

    Sub-scale experimentation is commonly used as a cost-effective means of conducting terminal ballistics research. Analytical models of the penetration process focus on calculating the depth of penetration based on target density, target strength represented by the unconfined compressive-strength (f”c), the areal density of the penetrator (W/A), and the impact velocity.1 Forrestal, et. al. have documented the mass loss from the penetrator during the penetration process and employed improved equations of motion.2 Various researchers have investigated the upper limits of rigid body penetration and identified the onset of instabilities.3 In an effort to better understand the physical processes associated with this instability, experimental techniques have been developed to capture the details of the penetrator and target and subject them to microscopic analysis.4 These results have served as motivation to explore new forms for the physics included in the penetration equation as a means of identifying the processes associated with high velocity instability. We have included target shear and nose friction in the formulation of the fundamental load function expressions.5 When the resulting equations of motion are integrated and combined with the thermodynamics indicated by microscopic analysis, methods are identified to calculated penetrator mass loss. A comparison of results with experimental data serves as an indicator of the thermodynamic state variables associated with the quasi-steady state penetrator target interface conditions. 1 Young, C. W. , “Depth Predictions for Earth Penetrating Projectiles,” Journal of Soil Mechanics and Foundations, Division of ASCE, May 1998 pp 803-817 2. M.J. Forrestal, D.J. Frew, S.J. Hanchak, amd Brar, “ Pentration of Grout and Concrete Targets with Ogive-Nose Steel Projectiles,” Inrt. J. Impact Engng. Vol 18, pp. 465-476,1996 3. Andrew J. Piekutowski, Michael J. Forrestal, Kevin L. Poormon, and Thomas L. Warren,

  12. Structure and modeling of turbulence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Novikov, E.A. [Univ. of California, San Diego, La Jolla, CA (United States)

    1995-12-31

    The {open_quotes}vortex strings{close_quotes} scale l{sub s} {approximately} LRe{sup -3/10} (L-external scale, Re - Reynolds number) is suggested as a grid scale for the large-eddy simulation. Various aspects of the structure of turbulence and subgrid modeling are described in terms of conditional averaging, Markov processes with dependent increments and infinitely divisible distributions. The major request from the energy, naval, aerospace and environmental engineering communities to the theory of turbulence is to reduce the enormous number of degrees of freedom in turbulent flows to a level manageable by computer simulations. The vast majority of these degrees of freedom is in the small-scale motion. The study of the structure of turbulence provides a basis for subgrid-scale (SGS) models, which are necessary for the large-eddy simulations (LES).

  13. Toy models of developed turbulence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.Hnatich

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available We have investigated the advection of a passive scalar quantity by incompressible helical turbulent flow within the framework of extended Kraichnan model. Turbulent fluctuations of velocity field are assumed to have the Gaussian statistics with zero mean and defined noise with finite time-correlation. Actual calculations have been done up to two-loop approximation within the framework of field-theoretic renormalization group approach. It turned out that space parity violation (helicity of turbulent environment does not affect anomalous scaling which is a peculiar attribute of the corresponding model without helicity. However, stability of asymptotic regimes, where anomalous scaling takes place, strongly depends on the amount of helicity. Moreover, helicity gives rise to the turbulent diffusivity, which has been calculated in one-loop approximation.

  14. Rotating Rayleigh-Taylor turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boffetta, G.; Mazzino, A.; Musacchio, S.

    2016-09-01

    The turbulent Rayleigh-Taylor system in a rotating reference frame is investigated by direct numerical simulations within the Oberbeck-Boussinesq approximation. On the basis of theoretical arguments, supported by our simulations, we show that the Rossby number decreases in time, and therefore the Coriolis force becomes more important as the system evolves and produces many effects on Rayleigh-Taylor turbulence. We find that rotation reduces the intensity of turbulent velocity fluctuations and therefore the growth rate of the temperature mixing layer. Moreover, in the presence of rotation the conversion of potential energy into turbulent kinetic energy is found to be less effective, and the efficiency of the heat transfer is reduced. Finally, during the evolution of the mixing layer we observe the development of a cyclone-anticyclone asymmetry.

  15. Statistical description of turbulent dispersion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brouwers, J. J. H.

    2012-12-01

    We derive a comprehensive statistical model for dispersion of passive or almost passive admixture particles such as fine particulate matter, aerosols, smoke, and fumes in turbulent flow. The model rests on the Markov limit for particle velocity. It is in accordance with the asymptotic structure of turbulence at large Reynolds number as described by Kolmogorov. The model consists of Langevin and diffusion equations in which the damping and diffusivity are expressed by expansions in powers of the reciprocal Kolmogorov constant C0. We derive solutions of O(C00) and O(C0-1). We truncate at O(C0-2) which is shown to result in an error of a few percentages in predicted dispersion statistics for representative cases of turbulent flow. We reveal analogies and remarkable differences between the solutions of classical statistical mechanics and those of statistical turbulence.

  16. Singularities in fully developed turbulence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shivamoggi, Bhimsen K., E-mail: bhimsen.shivamoggi@ucf.edu

    2015-09-18

    Phenomenological arguments are used to explore finite-time singularity (FTS) development in different physical fully-developed turbulence (FDT) situations. Effects of spatial intermittency and fluid compressibility in three-dimensional (3D) FDT and the role of the divorticity amplification mechanism in two-dimensional (2D) FDT and quasi-geostrophic FDT and the advection–diffusion mechanism in magnetohydrodynamic turbulence are considered to provide physical insights into the FTS development in variant cascade physics situations. The quasi-geostrophic FDT results connect with the 2D FDT results in the barotropic limit while they connect with 3D FDT results in the baroclinic limit and hence apparently provide a bridge between 2D and 3D. - Highlights: • Finite-time singularity development in turbulence situations is phenomenologically explored. • Spatial intermittency and compressibility effects are investigated. • Quasi-geostrophic turbulence is shown to provide a bridge between two-dimensional and three-dimensional cases.

  17. Scaling laws of turbulent dynamos

    OpenAIRE

    Fauve, Stephan; Petrelis, Francois

    2007-01-01

    We consider magnetic fields generated by homogeneous isotropic and parity invariant turbulent flows. We show that simple scaling laws for dynamo threshold, magnetic energy and Ohmic dissipation can be obtained depending on the value of the magnetic Prandtl number.

  18. Broken Ergodicity in MHD Turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shebalin, John V.

    2010-01-01

    Ideal magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) turbulence may be represented by finite Fourier series, where the inherent periodic box serves as a surrogate for a bounded astrophysical plasma. Independent Fourier coefficients form a canonical ensemble described by a Gaussian probability density function containing a Hermitian covariance matrix with positive eigenvalues. The eigenvalues at lowest wave number can be very small, resulting in a large-scale coherent structure: a turbulent dynamo. This is seen in computations and a theoretical explanation in terms of 'broken ergodicity' contains Taylor s theory of force-free states. An important problem for future work is the case of real, i.e., dissipative flows. In real flows, broken ergodicity and coherent structure are still expected to occur in MHD turbulence at the largest scale, as suggested by low resolution simulations. One challenge is to incorporate coherent structure at the largest scale into the theory of turbulent fluctuations at smaller scales.

  19. TEM turbulence optimisation in stellarators

    CERN Document Server

    Proll, J H E; Xanthopoulos, P; Lazerson, S A; Faber, B J

    2015-01-01

    With the advent of neoclassically optimised stellarators, optimising stellarators for turbulent transport is an important next step. The reduction of ion-temperature-gradient-driven turbulence has been achieved via shaping of the magnetic field, and the reduction of trapped-electron mode (TEM) turbulence is adressed in the present paper. Recent analytical and numerical findings suggest TEMs are stabilised when a large fraction of trapped particles experiences favourable bounce-averaged curvature. This is the case for example in Wendelstein 7-X [C.D. Beidler $\\textit{et al}$ Fusion Technology $\\bf{17}$, 148 (1990)] and other Helias-type stellarators. Using this knowledge, a proxy function was designed to estimate the TEM dynamics, allowing optimal configurations for TEM stability to be determined with the STELLOPT [D.A. Spong $\\textit{et al}$ Nucl. Fusion $\\bf{41}$, 711 (2001)] code without extensive turbulence simulations. A first proof-of-principle optimised equilibrium stemming from the TEM-dominated stella...

  20. On turbulence in dilatant dispersions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumert, Helmut Z.; Wessling, Bernhard

    2016-07-01

    This paper presents a new theory on the behaviour of shear-thickening (dilatant) fluids under turbulent conditions. The structure of a dilatant colloidal fluid in turbulent motion may be characterized by (at least) four characteristic length scales: (i) the ‘statistically largest’ turbulent scale, {λ }0, labeling the begin of the inertial part of the wavenumber spectrum; (ii) the energy-containing scale, { L }; (iii) Kolmogorov’s micro-scale, {λ }{ K }, related with the size of the smallest vortices existing for a given kinematic viscosity and forcing; (iv) the inner (‘colloidal’) micro-scale, {λ }i, typically representing a major stable material property of the colloidal fluid. In particular, for small ratios r={λ }i/{λ }{ K }∼ { O }(1), various interactions between colloidal structures and smallest turbulent eddies can be expected. In the present paper we discuss particularly that for ρ ={λ }0/{λ }{ K }\\to { O }(1) turbulence (in the narrow, inertial sense) is strangled and chaotic but less mixing fluid motions remain. We start from a new stochastic, micro-mechanical turbulence theory without empirical parameters valid for inviscid fluids as seen in publications by Baumert in 2013 and 2015. It predicts e.g. von Karman’s constant correctly as 1/\\sqrt{2 π }=0.399. In its generalized version for non-zero viscosity and shear-thickening behavior presented in this contribution, it predicts two solution branches for the steady state: The first characterizes a family of states with swift (inertial) turbulent mixing and small {λ }{ K }, potentially approaching {λ }i. The second branch characterizes a state family with ρ \\to { O }(1) and thus strangled turbulence, ρ ≈ { O }(1). Stability properties and a potential dynamic commuting between the two solution branches had to be left for future research.