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Sample records for causing spastic compressive

  1. Spasticity

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... are present? After determining the cause of your spasticity, the doctor may refer you to a physical therapist. Physical therapy involves different exercises, including muscle stretching and strengthening ...

  2. Spasticity

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... involuntary crossing of the legs), and fixed joints (contractures). The degree of spasticity varies from mild muscle ... involuntary crossing of the legs), and fixed joints (contractures). The degree of spasticity varies from mild muscle ...

  3. Analysis of spastic gait in cervical myelopathy: Linking compression ratio to spatiotemporal and pedobarographic parameters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagai, Taro; Takahashi, Yasuhito; Endo, Kenji; Ikegami, Ryo; Ueno, Ryuichi; Yamamoto, Kengo

    2018-01-01

    Gait dysfunction associated with spasticity and hyperreflexia is a primary symptom in patients with compression of cervical spinal cord. The objective of this study was to link maximum compression ratio (CR) to spatiotemporal/pedobarographic parameters. Quantitative gait analysis was performed by using a pedobarograph in 75 elderly males with a wide range of cervical compression severity. CR values were characterized on T1-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Statistical significances in gait analysis parameters (speed, cadence, stride length, step with, and toe-out angle) were evaluated among different CR groups by the non-parametric Kruskal-Wallis test followed by the Mann-Whitney U test using Bonferroni correction. The Spearman test was performed to verify correlations between CR and gait parameters. The Kruskal-Wallis test revealed significant decline in gait speed and stride length and significant increase in toe-out angle with progression of cervical compression myelopathy. The post-hoc Mann-Whitney U test showed significant differences in these parameters between the control group (0.45test revealed that CR was significantly correlated with speed, cadence, stride length, and toe-out angle. Gait speed, stride length, and toe-out angle can serve as useful indexes for evaluating progressive gait abnormality in cervical myelopathy. Our findings suggest that CR≤0.25 is associated with significantly poorer gait performance. Nevertheless, future prospective studies are needed to determine a potential benefit from decompressive surgery in such severe compression patients. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Hereditary spastic paraplegia caused by the PLP1 'rumpshaker mutation'

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svenstrup, Kirsten; Giraud, Geneviève; Boespflug-Tanguy, Odile

    2010-01-01

    with the 'rumpshaker mutation.' PATIENTS: A family with HSP caused by the 'rumpshaker mutation.' RESULTS: The patients showed nystagmus during infancy and had early onset of HSP. They had normal cognition, and cerebral MRI showed relatively unspecific white matter abnormalities on T2 sequences without clear...

  5. Acetabular paralabral cyst causing compression of the sciatic nerve

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caoimhe Byrne, MB BCh BAO

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Acetabular paralabral cysts are common. They vary in their clinical presentation and may be asymptomatic or cause pain and restriction at the hip joint. In rare instances they may cause symptoms by compressing local neurovascular structures. We report a case of symptomatic compression of the sciatic nerve by a posteriorly displaced acetabular paralabral cyst.

  6. Rhabdomyosarcome para vertebral : cause rare de compression ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Le rhabdomyosarcome est la tumeur maligne mésenchymateuse la plus fréquente chez l'enfant. Il se voit essentiellement au niveau des extrémités et la sphère ORL. La localisation paravertébrale avec compression médullaire est beaucoup plus rare. Les auteurs rapportent un cas de rhabdomyosarcome paravertébral ...

  7. On Denny-Brown's 'spastic dystonia' - What is it and what causes it?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lorentzen, Jakob; Pradines, Maud; Gracies, Jean-Michel

    2018-01-01

    In this review, we will work around two simple definitions of two different entities, which most often co-exist in patients with lesions to central motor pathways: Spasticity is “Enhanced excitability of velocity-dependent responses to phasic stretch at rest”, which will not be the subject...... of this review, while Spastic dystonia is tonic, chronic, involuntary muscle contraction in the absence of any stretch or any voluntary command (Gracies, 2005). Spastic dystonia is a much less well understood entity that will be the subject this review. Denny-Brown (1966) observed involuntary sustained muscle...... activity in monkeys with lesions restricted to the motor cortices . He further observed that such involuntary muscle activity persisted following abolition of sensory input to the spinal cord and concluded that a central mechanism rather than exaggerated stretch reflex activity had to be involved. He...

  8. Spastic paraplegia and OXPHOS impairment caused by mutations in paraplegin, a nuclear-encoded mitochondrial metalloprotease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casari, G; De Fusco, M; Ciarmatori, S; Zeviani, M; Mora, M; Fernandez, P; De Michele, G; Filla, A; Cocozza, S; Marconi, R; Dürr, A; Fontaine, B; Ballabio, A

    1998-06-12

    Hereditary spastic paraplegia (HSP) is characterized by progressive weakness and spasticity of the lower limbs due to degeneration of corticospinal axons. We found that patients from a chromosome 16q24.3-linked HSP family are homozygous for a 9.5 kb deletion involving a gene encoding a novel protein, named Paraplegin. Two additional Paraplegin mutations, both resulting in a frameshift, were found in a complicated and in a pure form of HSP. Paraplegin is highly homologous to the yeast mitochondrial ATPases, AFG3, RCA1, and YME1, which have both proteolytic and chaperon-like activities at the inner mitochondrial membrane. Immunofluorescence analysis and import experiments showed that Paraplegin localizes to mitochondria. Analysis of muscle biopsies from two patients carrying Paraplegin mutations showed typical signs of mitochondrial OXPHOS defects, thus suggesting a mechanism for neurodegeneration in HSP-type disorders.

  9. Non-motor Symptoms In Patients With Hereditary Spastic Paraplegia Caused By Spg4 Mutations.

    OpenAIRE

    Servelhere, K R; Faber, I; Saute, J A M; Moscovich, M; D'Abreu, A; Jardim, L B; Teive, H A G; Lopes-Cendes, I; Franca, M C

    2016-01-01

    Non-motor manifestations are frequently overlooked in degenerative disorders and little is known about their frequency and clinical relevance in SPG4 hereditary spastic paraplegia (SPG4-HSP). Thirty patients with SPG4-HSP and 30 healthy controls answered the Modified Fatigue Impact Scale, Epworth Sleepiness Scale, Brief Pain Inventory and Beck Depression Inventory. Student's t test was used to compare groups and linear regression was used to assess correlations. Patients had higher fatigue sc...

  10. Wegener granulomatosis causing compressive optic neuropathy in a child.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aakalu, Vinay K; Ahmad, Amjad Z

    2009-01-01

    Wegener granulomatosis is an uncommon illness in children that is known to cause myriad ophthalmic complications, but it is rarely a cause of compressive optic neuropathy. A 17-year-old Hispanic boy with Wegener granulomatosis developed unilateral loss of vision, pain, and proptosis of the left eye. CT findings revealed enlargement of bilateral lacrimal glands with compression of the left optic nerve. The patient was admitted for high-dose intravenous corticosteroids and daily oral cyclophosphamide treatment. The patient's vision, pain, and proptosis improved dramatically, and he is now stable on mycophenolate mofetil and prednisone.

  11. SLC1A4 mutations cause a novel disorder of intellectual disability, progressive microcephaly, spasticity and thin corpus callosum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heimer, G; Marek-Yagel, D; Eyal, E; Barel, O; Oz Levi, D; Hoffmann, C; Ruzzo, E K; Ganelin-Cohen, E; Lancet, D; Pras, E; Rechavi, G; Nissenkorn, A; Anikster, Y; Goldstein, D B; Ben Zeev, B

    2015-10-01

    Two unrelated patients, presenting with significant global developmental delay, severe progressive microcephaly, seizures, spasticity and thin corpus callosum (CC) underwent trio whole-exome sequencing. No candidate variant was found in any known genes related to the phenotype. However, crossing the data of the patients illustrated that they both manifested pathogenic variants in the SLC1A4 gene which codes the ASCT1 transporter of serine and other neutral amino acids. The Ashkenazi patient is homozygous for a deleterious missense c.766G>A, p.(E256K) mutation whereas the Ashkenazi-Iraqi patient is compound heterozygous for this mutation and a nonsense c.945delTT, p.(Leu315Hisfs*42) mutation. Structural prediction demonstrates truncation of significant portion of the protein by the nonsense mutation and speculates functional disruption by the missense mutation. Both mutations are extremely rare in general population databases, however, the missense mutation was found in heterozygous mode in 1:100 Jewish Ashkenazi controls suggesting a higher carrier rate among Ashkenazi Jews. We conclude that SLC1A4 is the disease causing gene of a novel neurologic disorder manifesting with significant intellectual disability, severe postnatal microcephaly, spasticity and thin CC. The role of SLC1A4 in the serine transport from astrocytes to neurons suggests a possible pathomechanism for this disease and implies a potential therapeutic approach. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Eagle Syndrome Causing Vascular Compression with Cervical Rotation: Case Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Demirtaş, Hakan; Kayan, Mustafa; Koyuncuoğlu, Hasan Rıfat; Çelik, Ahmet Orhan; Kara, Mustafa; Şengeze, Nihat

    2016-01-01

    Eagle syndrome is a condition caused by an elongated styloid process. Unilateral face, neck and ear pain, stinging pain, foreign body sensation and dysphagia can be observed with this syndrome. Rarely, the elongated styloid process may cause pain by compressing the cervical segment of the internal carotid and the surrounding sympathetic plexus, and that pain spreading along the artery can cause neurological symptoms such as vertigo and syncope. In this case report we presented a very rare eagle syndrome with neurological symptoms that occurred suddenly with cervical rotation. The symptoms disappeared as suddenly as they occurred, with the release of pressure in neutral position. We also discussed CT angiographic findings of this case. Radiological diagnosis of the Eagle syndrome that is manifested with a wide variety of symptoms and causes diagnostic difficulties when it is not considered in the differential diagnosis is easy in patients with specific findings. CT angiography is a fast and effective examination in terms of showing compression in patients with the Eagle syndrome that is considered to be atypical and causes vascular compression

  13. Non-motor symptoms in patients with hereditary spastic paraplegia caused by SPG4 mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Servelhere, K R; Faber, I; Saute, J A M; Moscovich, M; D'Abreu, A; Jardim, L B; Teive, H A G; Lopes-Cendes, I; Franca, M C

    2016-02-01

    Non-motor manifestations are frequently overlooked in degenerative disorders and little is known about their frequency and clinical relevance in SPG4 hereditary spastic paraplegia (SPG4-HSP). Thirty patients with SPG4-HSP and 30 healthy controls answered the Modified Fatigue Impact Scale, Epworth Sleepiness Scale, Brief Pain Inventory and Beck Depression Inventory. Student's t test was used to compare groups and linear regression was used to assess correlations. Patients had higher fatigue scores than controls (31.0 ± 16.5 vs. 14.5 ± 16.0, P = 0.002) as well as pain (3.4 ± 2.7 vs. 1.0 ± 1.6, P = 0.001) and depression (12.7 ± 8.9 vs. 4.4 ± 3.8, P depression and possibly with disease severity (P = 0.008 and 0.07, respectively). Fatigue, pain and depression are frequent and often severe manifestations in patients with SPG4-HSP. © 2016 EAN.

  14. Genetics Home Reference: spastic paraplegia type 15

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... eye called the macula , which is responsible for sharp central vision. Most people with spastic paraplegia type ... ethnic groups? Genetic Changes Mutations in the ZFYVE26 gene cause spastic paraplegia type 15 . This gene provides ...

  15. The Effect of Using Anti spastic Orthosis on the Reduction of Spasticity in Diplegic Spastic Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashkan Irani

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Background and aim: Cerebral palsy is a non progressive brain disorder and, cerebral plasy is the most common type of spastic paralysis which can be the cause of motor and postural deficits during child development. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of using Anti spastic Orthosis on the Reduction of Spasticity and in diplegic spastic children between 2 – 5 years in Tehran.Materials & Methods: 20 diplegic spastic children between 2- 5 years were selected randomly and divided into two groups. The first lower limb spasticity was assessed by a neurologist, and then by an experienced occupational therapist whitout being aware of research process before the intervention, The experimental group went under treatment using positioning therapeutic intervention and neurodevelopmental treatment, while the control group was treated and only with NDT. The research Instrument used was the Modified Ashworth scale (MAS and the H-Reflex and, H/M ratio in the lower limb spasticity was assessed, Utilizing Experimental pretest - post test with control group design. The data of this study was analyzed using t Test k square test and the findings showed meaningful differences between the two groups.Result: The findings of this study reveraled meaningful differences between the two groups, scores of mean spasticity in interference group was significantly less than control group (p=0/003 Conclusion: Application of Anti spastic Orthosis before rehabilitation exercises is recommended for diplegic spastic children.

  16. Rupture of sigmoid colon caused by compressed air.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Wan-Bin; Hu, Ji-Lin; Gao, Yuan; Zhang, Xian-Xiang; Zhang, Mao-Shen; Liu, Guang-Wei; Zheng, Xue-Feng; Lu, Yun

    2016-03-14

    Compressed air has been generally used since the beginning of the 20(th) century for various applications. However, rupture of the colon caused by compressed air is uncommon. We report a case of pneumatic rupture of the sigmoid colon. The patient was admitted to the emergency room complaining of abdominal pain and distention. His colleague triggered a compressed air nozzle against his anus as a practical joke 2 h previously. On arrival, his pulse rate was 126 beats/min, respiratory rate was 42 breaths/min and blood pressure was 86/54 mmHg. Physical examination revealed peritoneal irritation and the abdomen was markedly distended. Computed tomography of the abdomen showed a large volume of air in the abdominal cavity. Peritoneocentesis was performed to relieve the tension pneumoperitoneum. Emergency laparotomy was done after controlling shock. Laparotomy revealed a 2-cm perforation in the sigmoid colon. The perforation was sutured and temporary ileostomy was performed as well as thorough drainage and irrigation of the abdominopelvic cavity. Reversal of ileostomy was performed successfully after 3 mo. Follow-up was uneventful. We also present a brief literature review.

  17. Glutaric aciduria type I: a common cause of episodic encephalopathy and spastic paralysis in the Amish of Lancaster County, Pennsylvania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morton, D H; Bennett, M J; Seargeant, L E; Nichter, C A; Kelley, R I

    1991-10-01

    We have diagnosed type I glutaric aciduria (GA-I) in 14 children from 7 Old Order Amish families in Lancaster County, Pennsylvania. An otherwise rare disorder, GA-I appears to be a common cause of acute encephalopathy and cerebral palsy among the Amish. The natural history of the disease, which was previously unrecognized in this population, is remarkably variable and ranges from acute infantile encephalopathy and sudden death to static extrapyramidal cerebral palsy to normal adult. Ten patients first manifested the disease between 3 and 18 months at the time of an acute infectious illness. Four of these children died in early childhood, also during acute illnesses. However, there has been little progression of the neurological disease after age 5 years in the surviving children and intellect usually has been preserved, even in children with severe spastic paralysis. When well, patients have plasma glutaric acid concentrations ranging from 4.8 to 14.2 mumol/liter (nl 0-5.6 mumol/liter) and urinary glutaric acid concentrations from 12.5 to 196 mg/g creatinine (nl 0.5-8.4 mg/g creatinine). We have found that GA-I can be diagnosed in the Amish by measurement of urinary glutaric acid concentrations using isotope-dilution gas chromatography/mass spectrometry, whereas the diagnosis can easily be missed by routine urine organic acid gas chromatography.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  18. The comparative study of clinical efficacy and safety of baclofen vs tolperisone in spasticity caused by spinal cord injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dejun Luo

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available In the present study we compared the clinical efficacy and safety of baclofen vs tolperisone in spasticity caused by spinal cord injury. A total of 150 patients were enrolled in the present study and were divided into two groups with 75 patients in each group, receiving baclofen or tolperisone, respectively. We used Modified Ashworth Scale, Medical research council scale, Barthel Index, and Coefficient of efficacy to measure clinical efficacy. After 6-week treatment, both groups demonstrated significant improvement in muscle tone, muscle strength and functional outcome (Group I, 1.55 ± 0.053, 2.79 ± 0.032, 59.31 ± 1.32; Group II, 1.57 ± 0.053, 3.04 ± 0.032, 73 ± 1.32 respectively. There was no significant difference regarding improvement in muscle tone and muscle strength between the two groups (Group I, 1.055 ± 0.053 vs Group II, 1.57 ± 0.053; Group I, 2.79 ± 0.032 vs Group II, 3.04 ± 0.032, p > 0.05. However, the improvement in functional outcomes was greater in group II as compared to that in group I (Group I, 59.31 ± 1.32 vs Group II, 73 ± 1.32, p < 0.05. In addition, overall efficacy coefficient was greater for group II as compared to group I (Group I, 3.6 vs Group II, 2.3, p < 0.05. Group I had more side effects compared to Group II. Compared to baclofen, tolperisone offers greater improvement in activities of daily living compared to baclofen.

  19. A novel ABCD1 mutation detected by next generation sequencing in presumed hereditary spastic paraplegia: A 30-year diagnostic delay caused by misleading biochemical findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koutsis, Georgios; Lynch, David S; Tucci, Arianna; Houlden, Henry; Karadima, Georgia; Panas, Marios

    2015-08-15

    To present a Greek family in which 5 male and 2 female members developed progressive spastic paraplegia. Plasma very long chain fatty acids (VLCFA) were reportedly normal at first testing in an affected male and for over 30 years the presumed diagnosis was hereditary spastic paraplegia (HSP). Targeted next generation sequencing (NGS) was used as a further diagnostic tool. Targeted exome sequencing in the proband, followed by Sanger sequencing confirmation; mutation segregation testing in multiple family members and plasma VLCFA measurement in the proband. NGS of the proband revealed a novel frameshift mutation in ABCD1 (c.1174_1178del, p.Leu392Serfs*7), bringing an end to diagnostic uncertainty by establishing the diagnosis of adrenomyeloneuropathy (AMN), the myelopathic phenotype of X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy (ALD). The mutation segregated in all family members and the diagnosis of AMN/ALD was confirmed by plasma VLCFA measurement. Confounding factors that delayed the diagnosis are presented. This report highlights the diagnostic utility of NGS in patients with undiagnosed spastic paraplegia, establishing a molecular diagnosis of AMN, allowing proper genetic counseling and management, and overcoming the diagnostic delay that can be rarely caused by false negative VLCFA analysis. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Placebo effects in a multiple sclerosis spasticity enriched clinical trial with the oromucosal cannabinoid spray (THC/CBD): dimension and possible causes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Marzo, Vincenzo; Centonze, Diego

    2015-03-01

    Regulatory authorities admit clinical studies with an initial enrichment phase to select patients that respond to treatment before randomization (Enriched Design Studies; EDSs). The trial period aims to prevent long-term drug exposure risks in patients with limited chances of improvement while optimizing costs. In EDSs for symptom control therapies providing early improvements and without a wash-out period, it is difficult to show further improvements and thus large therapeutic gains versus placebo. Moreover, in trials with cannabinoids, the therapeutic gains can be further biased in the postenrichment randomized phase because of carryover and other effects. The aims of the present review article are to examine the placebo effects in the enrichment and postenrichment phases of an EDS with Δ(9) -tetrahydrocannabinol and cannabidiol (THC/CBD) oromucosal spray in patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) spasticity and to discuss the possible causes of maintained efficacy after randomization in the placebo-allocated patients. The overall mean therapeutic gain of THC/CBD spray over placebo in resistant MS spasticity after 16 weeks can be estimated as a ~1.27-point improvement on the spasticity 0-10 Numerical Rating Scale (NRS; ~-20.1% of the baseline NRS score). We conclude that careful interpretation of the results of EDSs is required, especially when cannabinoid-based medications are being investigated. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Successive motor nerve blocks to identify the muscles causing a spasticity pattern: example of the arm flexion pattern.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genet, F; Schnitzler, A; Droz-Bartholet, F; Salga, M; Tatu, L; Debaud, C; Denormandie, P; Parratte, B

    2017-01-01

    Botulinum Toxin A has been the main treatment for spasticity since the beginning of the 1990s. Surprisingly, there is still no consensus regarding injection parameters or, importantly, how to determine which muscles to target to improve specific functions. The aim of this study was to develop a systematic approach to determine this, using the example of the arm flexion pattern. We first determined anatomical landmarks for selective motor block of the brachialis nerve, using 20 forearms from 10 fresh cadavers in Ecole Européenne de Chirurgie and a university-based dissection centre, Paris, France. We then carried out selective blocks of the motor nerves to the brachialis, brachioradialis and biceps brachii in patients with stroke with an arm flexion pattern, in a University Rehabilitation Hospital, Garches, France. We measured: the resting angle of the elbow angle in standing (manual goniometer), active and passive range of extension, and spasticity using the Held and Tardieu and the Modified Ashworth scales. Range of passive elbow extension was also measured with the shoulder in 90° of flexion. The resting angle of the elbow in standing decreased by 35.0° (from 87.6 ± 23.7 to 52.6 ± 24.2°) with inhibition of brachialis, by a further 3.9° (from 52.6 ± 24.2 to 48.7 ± 23.7°) with inhibition of brachioradialis and a further 14.5° (from 48.7 ± 23.7to 34.2 ± 20.7°) with inhibition of biceps brachii. These results were consistent with the clinical evaluation of passive elbow range of motion with the shoulder at 90°. Sequential blocking of the nerves to the three main elbow flexors revealed that the muscle that limited elbow extension the most, was brachialis. This muscle should be the main target to improve the arm flexion pattern. These results show that it is important not simply to inject the most superficial or powerful muscles to treat a spastic deformity. A comprehensive assessment is required. The strategy proposed in this paper should

  2. A Brief Review for Managing Spasticity in Multiple Sclerosis

    OpenAIRE

    Najmi S; Hormoz A; Pourabolghasem S

    2016-01-01

    Spasticity is a common problem in MS. The stiffness often is minimal and not bothersome. Stiffness may become painful and may interfere with performing activities of daily living. Reducing spasticity produces greater freedom of movement and strength and frequently also lessens fatigue and increases coordination. The major ways in which spasticity is reduced include stretching exercises, physical therapy, and the use of medications. If spasticity does not respond to these measures and causes d...

  3. CDC WONDER: Compressed Mortality - Underlying Cause of Death

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The CDC WONDER Mortality - Underlying Cause of Death online database is a county-level national mortality and population database spanning the years since 1979...

  4. Autosomal recessive spastic tetraplegia caused by AP4M1 and AP4B1 gene mutation: expansion of the facial and neuroimaging features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tüysüz, Beyhan; Bilguvar, Kaya; Koçer, Naci; Yalçınkaya, Cengiz; Çağlayan, Okay; Gül, Ece; Sahin, Sezgin; Çomu, Sinan; Günel, Murat

    2014-07-01

    Adaptor protein complex-4 (AP4) is a component of intracellular transportation of proteins, which is thought to have a unique role in neurons. Recently, mutations affecting all four subunits of AP4 (AP4M1, AP4E1, AP4S1, and AP4B1) have been found to cause similar autosomal recessive phenotype consisting of tetraplegic cerebral palsy and intellectual disability. The aim of this study was analyzing AP4 genes in three new families with this phenotype, and discussing their clinical findings with an emphasis on neuroimaging and facial features. Using homozygosity mapping followed by whole-exome sequencing, we identified two novel homozygous mutations in AP4M1 and a homozygous deletion in AP4B1 in three pairs of siblings. Spastic tetraplegia, microcephaly, severe intellectual disability, limited speech, and stereotypic laughter were common findings in our patients. All patients also had similar facial features consisting of coarse and hypotonic face, bitemporal narrowing, bulbous nose with broad nasal ridge, and short philtrum which were not described in patients with AP4M1 and AP4B1 mutations previously. The patients presented here and previously with AP4M1, AP4B1, and AP4E1 mutations shared brain abnormalities including asymmetrical ventriculomegaly, thin splenium of the corpus callosum, and reduced white matter volume. The patients also had hippocampal globoid formation and thin hippocampus. In conclusion, disorders due to mutations in AP4 complex have similar neurological, facial, and cranial imaging findings. Thus, these four genes encoding AP4 subunits should be screened in patients with autosomal recessive spastic tetraplegic cerebral palsy, severe intellectual disability, and stereotypic laughter, especially with the described facial and cranial MRI features. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Hereditary Spastic Paraplegia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... treatments to prevent, slow, or reverse HSP. Symptomatic treatments used for spasticity, such as muscle relaxants, are sometimes helpful. Regular ... treatments to prevent, slow, or reverse HSP. Symptomatic treatments used for spasticity, such as muscle relaxants, are sometimes helpful. Regular ...

  6. Arterial compression of nerve is the primary cause of trigeminal neuralgia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Guo-Qiang; Wang, Xiao-Song; Wang, Lin; Zheng, Jia-Ping

    2014-01-01

    Whether arterial or venous compression or arachnoid adhesions are primarily responsible for compression of the trigeminal nerve in patients with trigeminal neuralgia is unclear. The aim of this study was to determine the causes of trigeminal nerve compression in patients with trigeminal neuralgia. The surgical findings in patients with trigeminal neuralgia who were treated by micro vascular decompression were compared to those in patients with hemifacial spasm without any signs or symptoms of trigeminal neuralgia who were treated with microvascular decompression. The study included 99 patients with trigeminal neuralgia (median age, 57 years) and 101 patients with hemifacial spasm (median age, 47 years). There were significant differences between the groups in the relationship of artery to nerve (p relationship of vein to nerve. After adjustment for age, gender, and other factors, patients with vein compression of nerve or with artery compression of nerve were more likely to have trigeminal neuralgia (OR = 5.21 and 42.54, p = 0.026 and p compression of the trigeminal nerve is the primary cause of trigeminal neuralgia and therefore, decompression of veins need not be a priority when performing microvascular dissection in patients with trigeminal neuralgia.

  7. Os odontoideum with "free-floating" atlantal arch causing C1-2 anterolisthesis and retrolisthesis with cervicomedullary compression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Behari Sanjay

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Os odontoideum (OO with C1-2 anterolisthesis and retrolisthesis may cause cervicomedullary injury both from anterior and posterior aspects. We analyzed fourteen such patients for biomechanical issues, radiological features and management of OO with free-floating atlantal arch and review pertinent literature. Materials and Methods: Fourteen patients having nonsyndromic, reducible atlantoaxial dislocation (AAD with orthotopic OO were analyzed. During neck flexion, their C1 anterior arch-os complex displaced anteriorly relative to remnant odontoid-C2 body. The posteriorly directed hypoplastic remnant odontoid sliding below the atlas and forward translation of the C1 posterior arch caused concomitant cervicomedullary compression. During neck extension, there was retrolisthesis of the "free-floating" C1 arch-os complex into spinal canal. Spinal stenosis and lateral C1-2 facet dislocation; Klippel-Feil anomaly; and posterior circulation infarcts were also present in one patient each, respectively. Posterior C1-2 (n=10 or occipitocervical fusion (n=3 was performed in neutral position to stabilize atlantoaxial movements. Results: Follow-up (mean, 3.9 years assessment revealed improvement in spasticity and weakness in 13 patients. One patient had neurological deterioration following C1-2 posterior sublaminar fusion, requiring its conversion to occipitocervical contoured rod fusion. One patient with posterior circulation stroke died prior to any operative intervention. Follow-up lateral view radiographs showed a bony union or a stable construct in these 13 patients. Conclusions: OO with free-floating atlantal arch may precipitate cord injury both during neck flexion and extension. This condition may be overlooked unless lateral radiographs of craniovertebral junction are undertaken in neck extension, along with the usual ones in neutral and flexed positions. Etiological factors include C1 ring-OO unrestrained movements above the hypoplastic

  8. Opalski syndrome caused by vertebral artery compression of the lateral surface of the medulla oblongata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dembo, Tomohisa; Tanahashi, Norio

    2013-01-01

    A 55-year-old man presented with vertigo, nystagmus, and gait ataxia followed by left hemiparesis (Opalski syndrome). T2-weighted magnetic resonance imaging revealed vascular compression of the left lateral side of the medulla oblongata by the left vertebral artery. On diffusion tensor imaging, the level of fractional anisotropy (FA) in the left corticospinal fibers caudal to the pyramidal decussation was lower than that observed in the right corticospinal fibers. Opalski syndrome caused by vascular compression is very rare. This is the first reported case of Opalski syndrome that was imaged on FA.

  9. Orthopaedic Management of Spasticity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pidgeon, Tyler S; Ramirez, Jose M; Schiller, Jonathan R

    2015-12-01

    Spasticity is a common manifestation of many neurological conditions including multiple sclerosis, stroke, cerebral palsy, traumatic brain injury, and spinal cord injuries. Management of spasticity seeks to reduce its burden on patients and to limit secondary complications. Non-operative interventions including stretching/splinting, postural management, physical therapy/strengthening, anti-spasticity medications, and botulinum toxin injections may help patients with spasticity. Surgical management of these conditions, however, is often necessary to improve quality of life and prevent complications. Orthopaedic surgeons manage numerous sequelae of spasticity, including joint contractures, hip dislocations, scoliosis, and deformed extremities. When combined with the efforts of rehabilitation specialists, neurologists, and physical/occupational therapists, the orthopaedic management of spasticity can help patients maintain and regain function and independence as well as reduce the risk of long-tem complications.

  10. Transconjunctival orbital emphysema caused by compressed air injury: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathew, Sunu; Vasu, Usha; Francis, Febson; Nazareth, Colin

    2008-01-01

    Orbital emphysema following conjunctival tear in the absence of orbital wall fracture, caused by air under pressure is rare. Usually orbital emphysema is seen in facial trauma associated with damage to the adjacent paranasal sinuses or facial bones. To the best of our knowledge, there have been only eight reports of orbital emphysema following use of compressed air during industrial work. The air under pressure is pushed through the subconjunctival space into the subcutaneous and retrobulbar spaces. We present here a rare cause of orbital emphysema in a young man working with compressed air gun. Although the emphysema was severe, there were no orbital bone fracture and the visual recovery of the patient was complete without attendant complications.

  11. Elastic stresses and plastic deformations in 'Santa Clara' tomato fruits caused by package dependent compression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    PEREIRA ADRIANA VARGAS

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this work was to study the fruit compression behavior aiming to develop new tomato packages. Deformations caused by compression forces were observed inside packages and in individual 'Santa Clara' tomato fruit. The forces applied by a transparent acrylic lever to the fruit surface caused pericarp deformation and the flattened area was proportional to the force magnitude. The deformation was associated to the reduction in the gas volume (Vg, caused by expulsion of the air from the loculus cavity and reduction in the intercellular air volume of the pericarp. As ripening advanced, smaller fractions of the Vg reduced by the compressive force were restored after the stress was relieved. The lack of complete Vg restoration was an indication of permanent plastic deformations of the stressed cells. Vg regeneration (elastic recovery was larger in green fruits than in the red ones. The ratio between the applied force and the flattened area (flattening pressure, which depends on cell turgidity, decreased during ripening. Fruit movements associated with its depth in the container were observed during storage in a transparent glass container (495 x 355 x 220 mm. The downward movement of the fruits was larger in the top layers because these movements seem to be driven by a summation of the deformation of many fruits in all layers.

  12. Assessment of Spasticity With Sonoelastography Following Stroke: A Feasibility Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kesikburun, Serdar; Yaşar, Evren; Adıgüzel, Emre; Güzelküçük, Ümüt; Alaca, Rıdvan; Tan, Arif Kenan

    2015-12-01

    To investigate the feasibility of sonoelastography to show muscle stiffness in poststroke spasticity, as well as the relationship between sonoelastography findings and muscle architecture features and clinical spasticity scores in the spastic gastrocnemius. Cross-sectional study. University rehabilitation center. A total of 26 stroke patients with gastrocnemius muscle spasticity (≥1 using the Modified Ashworth Scale score). None. Sonoelastography parameters (elasticity index and elasticity ratio) and muscle architecture features (muscle fascicle length, fascicle pennation angle, muscle thickness and compressibility) were measured from the medial and lateral gastrocnemius muscle on both the affected and unaffected sides. Both the elasticity index and elasticity ratio on the affected side were significantly increased in both the medial and lateral gastrocnemius compared with those on the unaffected side (P .05). Sonoelastographic findings showed a weak negative correlation with compressibility and a weak positive correlation with the Modified Ashworth Scale score in the spastic medial gastrocnemius. It was found to be feasible to assess stiffness in spastic gastrocnemius muscles of stroke patients with sonoelastography. Further studies are needed to confirm the potential role of sonoelastography to help guide treatment of spasticity and its sequelae. Copyright © 2015 American Academy of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation in Patients with Hereditary Spastic Paraplegia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehmet Ağırman

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Hereditary spastic paraplegia (HSPP is a heterogeneous genetic disease characterized by progressive spasticity of lower extremities. Spasticity is a major cause of long-term disability in HSPP and significantly affects the functional life of patients. Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS is widely used in diagnosis and treatment of many neurological and psychiatric diseases. Although the positive impacts of rTMS for spasticity have been reported, no study has been found on HSPP. We present two HSPP patients treated with low frequency rTMS (20 minutes at a frequency of 1 Hz (1200 pulses, for a period of 10 treatment sessions

  14. Repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation in Patients with Hereditary Spastic Paraplegia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehmet Ağırman

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Hereditary spastic paraplegia (HSPP is a heterogeneous genetic disease characterized by progressive spasticity of lower extremities. Spasticity is a major cause of long-term disability in HSPP and significantly affects the functional life of patients. Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS is widely used in diagnosis and treatment of many neurological and psychiatric diseases. Although the positive impacts of rTMS for spasticity have been reported, no study has been found on HSPP. We present two HSPP patients treated with low frequency rTMS (20 minutes at a frequency of 1 Hz (1200 pulses, for a period of 10 treatment sessions.

  15. Surgical management of spasticity

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    of gradual escalation of therapy; only when the preceding step is ... of the decision-making process, can however significantly improve functional outcomes in patients with spasticity. ... can completely remove spasticity and contractures, but these mostly leave a patient with more functional impairment than they had before.

  16. [Pediatric orbital emphysema caused by a compressed-air pistol shot: a case report].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navarro-Mingorance, A; Reyes-Dominguez, S B; León-León, M C

    2014-09-01

    We report the case of a 2 year-old child with orbital emphysema secondary to a compressed-air gun shot in the malar region, with no evidence of orbital wall fracture. Conservative treatment was applied, and no complications were observed. Orbital emphysema in the absence of an orbital wall fracture is a rare situation. Orbital emphysema is usually seen in facial trauma associated with damage to the adjacent paranasal sinuses or facial bones. To our knowledge there have been very few reports of orbital emphysema caused by a compressed-air injury. Copyright © 2012 Sociedad Española de Oftalmología. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  17. Management of generalized spasticity of lower limbs by selective ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Wael Fouad

    2011-08-09

    Aug 9, 2011 ... tions in functional abilities.15 After a period of time, the pa- tients will have a mixture of spasticity and muscle shortening or contracture. There are two types of deformities, dynamic caused by spasticity and fixed described as contracture that re- mains present under local blocks or anesthesia. The differenti-.

  18. Acute Compressive Myelopathy Caused by Spinal Subarachnoid Hemorrhage: A Combined Effect of Asymptomatic Cervical Spondylosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawasaki, Toshinari; Fukuda, Hitoshi; Kurosaki, Yoshitaka; Handa, Akira; Chin, Masaki; Yamagata, Sen

    2016-11-01

    Patients with subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) by hemorrhagic arteriovenous fistulas (AVFs) usually presents with meningeal signs, including headache and nausea, and focal neurologic deficit is found in rare cases. In this article, we report a case of acute compressive cervical myelopathy caused by hemorrhagic AVF at the craniocervical junction. A 73-year-old woman was transferred to our hospital for sudden headache and subsequent left hemiparesis. Head computed tomography scan showed SAH exclusively in the posterior fossa, and catheter angiography revealed a perimedullary arteriovenous fistula at the craniocervical junction as a source of the SAH. Detailed neurologic examination showed the sensory disturbance of bilateral upper extremities and bladder and rectal disturbance, suggesting concurrent cervical myelopathy. Magnetic resonance imaging of the cervical spine showed disk herniation at the C4-5 level, spinal SAH deposition above the C4-5 level, and accompanying myelomalacia. No intramedullary hemorrhage was found. Spinal SAH alone rarely causes focal neurologic deficit. However, this case suggests spinal SAH can cause acute compressive myelopathy when complicated with preexisting spinal canal stenosis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Radiation dermatitis caused by a bolus effect from an abdominal compression device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Connor, Michael; Wei, Randy L.; Yu, Suhong; Sehgal, Varun; Klempner, Samuel J.; Daroui, Parima

    2016-01-01

    American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) Task Group 176 evaluated the dosimetric effects caused by couch tops and immobilization devices. The report analyzed the extensive physics-based literature on couch tops, stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) frames, and body immobilization bags, while noting the scarcity of clinical reports of skin toxicity because of external devices. Here, we present a clinical case report of grade 1 abdominal skin toxicity owing to an abdominal compression device. We discuss the dosimetric implications of the utilized treatment plan as well as post hoc alternative plans and quantify differences in attenuation and skin dose/build-up between the device, a lower-density alternative device, and an open field. The description of the case includes a 66-year-old male with HER2 amplified poorly differentiated distal esophageal adenocarcinoma treated with neoadjuvant chemo-radiation and the use of an abdominal compression device. Radiation was delivered using volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) with 2 arcs using abdominal compression and image guidance. The total dose was 50.4 Gy delivered over 40 elapsed days. With 2 fractions remaining, the patient developed dermatitis in the area of the compression device. The original treatment plan did not include a contour of the device. Alternative post hoc treatment plans were generated, one to contour the device and a second with anterior avoidance. In conclusion, replanning with the device contoured revealed the bolus effect. The skin dose increased from 27 to 36 Gy. planned target volume (PTV) coverage at 45 Gy was reduced to 76.5% from 95.8%. The second VMAT treatment plan with an anterior avoidance sector and more oblique beam angles maintained PTV coverage and spared the anterior wall, however at the expense of substantially increased dose to lung. This case report provides an important reminder of the bolus effect from external devices such as abdominal compression. Special

  20. Etiology of Spastic Diplegia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Gordon Millichap

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available The clinical and etiologic profile of spastic diplegia was studied in a retrospective chart review of 54 patients diagnosed during a 12-year period at Montreal Children’s Hospital, Quebec, Canada.

  1. Microvascular Decompression for Classical Trigeminal Neuralgia Caused by Venous Compression: Novel Anatomic Classifications and Surgical Strategy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Min; Fu, Xianming; Ji, Ying; Ding, Wanhai; Deng, Dali; Wang, Yehan; Jiang, Xiaofeng; Niu, Chaoshi

    2018-05-01

    Microvascular decompression of the trigeminal nerve is the most effective treatment for trigeminal neuralgia. However, when encountering classical trigeminal neuralgia caused by venous compression, the procedure becomes much more difficult, and failure or recurrence because of incomplete decompression may become frequent. This study aimed to investigate the anatomic variation of the culprit veins and discuss the surgical strategy for different types. We performed a retrospective analysis of 64 consecutive cases in whom veins were considered as responsible vessels alone or combined with other adjacent arteries. The study classified culprit veins according to operative anatomy and designed personalized approaches and decompression management according to different forms of compressive veins. Curative effects were assessed by the Barrow Neurological Institute (BNI) pain intensity score and BNI facial numbness score. The most commonly encountered veins were the superior petrosal venous complex (SPVC), which was artificially divided into 4 types according to both venous tributary distribution and empty point site. We synthetically considered these factors and selected an approach to expose the trigeminal root entry zone, including the suprafloccular transhorizontal fissure approach and infratentorial supracerebellar approach. The methods of decompression consist of interposing and transposing by using Teflon, and sometimes with the aid of medical adhesive. Nerve combing (NC) of the trigeminal root was conducted in situations of extremely difficult neurovascular compression, instead of sacrificing veins. Pain completely disappeared in 51 patients, and the excellent outcome rate was 79.7%. There were 13 patients with pain relief treated with reoperation. Postoperative complications included 10 cases of facial numbness, 1 case of intracranial infection, and 1 case of high-frequency hearing loss. The accuracy recognition of anatomic variation of the SPVC is crucial for the

  2. ANTERIOR CERVICAL INTRADURAL ARACHNOID CYST - A RARE CAUSE OF SPINAL CORD COMPRESSION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kollam Chandra Sekhar

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Arachnoid cysts of spinal cord are relatively uncommon lesions. Most of them arise dorsal to the cord, and anteriorly placed intradural arachnoid cyst is a rare cause of cervical cord compression. To the best of our knowledge, only 30 cases were reported in the literature. We present a case of anterior cervical intradural arachnoid cyst with review of literature. METHODS We performed a literature search for anteriorly placed intradural arachnoid cysts in the cervical spinal cord through http://pubmed.com, a well-known worldwide internet medical address. To the best of our knowledge, only 30 cases were reported in the literature. We reviewed the literature with illustration of our case. We present a case of a 40-year-old male patient who presented with insidious onset of radicular pain. MRI cervical spine demonstrated cervical intradural cystic lesion extending from C2 to upper border of C4, lying anteriorly with compression over the cord. Cervical laminectomy followed by wide cyst fenestration and subtotal excision of cyst was done. Histopathological diagnosis was arachnoid cyst. RESULTS Patient totally recovered from his pain and sensory symptoms within a week and motor symptoms improved gradually over a period of six to eight weeks. With two years followup, patient had no further complaints. CONCLUSION Anterior cervical intradural arachnoid cysts are rare. These are amenable to resection through posterior approach safely with good postoperative recovery.

  3. Tropical spastic paraparesis in Northeastern Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. M. de Castro Costa

    1989-06-01

    Full Text Available Ten possible cases of tropical spastic paraparesis (TSP in Northeastern Brazil (Ceará are presented. They show the typical symptoms and signs of TSP consisting of weakness of the lower limbs, spastic gait, hiperreflexia, bladder dysfunction and variable signs of posterior columns impairment. The laboratory examinations excluded other compressive, infective, degenerative or demyelinating lesions of their spinal cord. Our patients age ranged from 21 to 59 years, all were of black origin and all were of lower social class. There was a slight preponderance of females. An etiological implication of a retrovirus (HTLV-I has been shown for TSP, but for lack of technical conditions we could not determine it in our patients, and that stands as our subsequent step in those and further cases.

  4. Gait Trainer for Children with Spastic Cerebral Palsy

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Urhan, Oguzhan

    2001-01-01

    A device is developed to improve the walking ability of children with Spastic Cerebral Palsy, who have damages to the area of their brain which controls the muscle tone and that causes trouble walking...

  5. [Peripheral nerves alcoholization in the spasticity managament].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turżańska, Karolina; Zaborek, Sławomir; Posturzyńska, Agnieszka; Niezbecka, Joanna; Zarębska, Aneta; Jabłoński, Mirosław

    Spasticity is velocity dependent increased resistance to passive lengthening of the muscle. Mild spasticity doesn't require treatment, but severe impede with hygiene, constrict range of motion and mobility, interfere with gait pattern and can be the cause of pain and discomfort. Proper spasticity management is crucial for correct rehabilitation. The assesment of chemodenervation with ethyl alcohol in spasticity treatment. 13 patients (5 female, 8 male) age 18-68 yrs (mean 46,8±13,3). Qualification to the procedure requiered high level of spasticity (mean 3,4 ± 0,5 in Ashworth scale), no response for pharmacological treatment, low level in Bartel scale. Patients were evaluated with VAS pain scale, EQ-5D before, day after and 6 weeks after procedure. Ashworth scale before procedure: 3-4 (mean 3.44±0.52), after procedure: 0-3 (mean 2.0±1.26), 6 weeks after procedure: 1-3 (mean 2.0±1.0). VAS before procedure: 0-4 (mean 1.49±1.9), after procedure: 0-2 (mean 1.33±1.0), 6 weeks after procedure (mean 1.0±1.0). Bartel scale before procedure: 0-16 (mean 9.25±6.7), after procedure: 0-16 (mean 6.0±8.71), 6 weeks after procedure: 0-16 (mean 9.25±6.7). EQ-5D results showed on Fig 5-19. Results shows improvement in every examinated aspect (decrease in spasticity level, decrease in pain, increase in quality of life and disability scale).

  6. Technologically-advanced assessment of upper-limb spasticity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Posteraro, Federico; Crea, Simona; Mazzoleni, Stefano

    2018-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Spasticity is a muscle disorder associated with upper motor neuron syndrome occurring in neurological disorders, such as stroke, multiple sclerosis, spinal cord injury and others. It influences the patient's rehabilitation, interfering with function, limiting independence, causing pain...... post stroke patients. METHODS: A new robotic device able to automatically assess upper-limb spasticity during passive and active mobilization has been developed. The elbow spasticity of five post stroke patients has been assessed by using the new device and by means of the Modified Ashworth Scale (MAS...

  7. Case of acute optic nerve compression caused by tuberculum sellae meningioma with optic canal involvement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chai Y

    2012-05-01

    sellae meningioma can cause acute visual symptoms due to optic canal involvement. Early consultation with a neurosurgeon is necessary. Visual evoked potentials and optical coherence tomography are sensitive and helpful in following patients with optic nerve compression.Keywords: optic nerve compression, tuberculum sellae meningioma, optic canal involvement, pattern visual evoked potentials, optical coherence tomography

  8. Quantifying spasticity in individual muscles using shear wave elastography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah F. Eby, BS

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Spasticity is common following stroke; however, high subject variability and unreliable measurement techniques limit research and treatment advances. Our objective was to investigate the use of shear wave elastography (SWE to characterize the spastic reflex in the biceps brachii during passive elbow extension in an individual with spasticity. The patient was a 42-year-old right-hand-dominant male with history of right middle cerebral artery-distribution ischemic infarction causing spastic left hemiparesis. We compared Fugl-Meyer scores (numerical evaluation of motor function, sensation, motion, and pain, Modified Ashworth scores (most commonly used clinical assessment of spasticity, and SWE measures of bilateral biceps brachii during passive elbow extension. We detected a catch that featured markedly increased stiffness of the brachialis muscle during several trials of the contralateral limb, especially at higher extension velocities. SWE was able to detect velocity-related increases in stiffness with extension of the contralateral limb, likely indicative of the spastic reflex. This study offers optimism that SWE can provide a rapid, real-time, quantitative technique that is readily accessible to clinicians for evaluating spasticity.

  9. Comprehensive Analysis To Assess And Remove Causes Of Decline Flow In An Offshore Compression Module.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vladimir Alexis Neri Quezadas

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available In a three stages compression module at an offshore installation was detected a sudden decrease in managed flow decreasing from 108 to 87 million standard cubic feet by day MMSCFD. Thermodynamic analysis on performance of three stages of compression axial compressor and power turbine was carried out. Each compression stage were found operating efficiently according to ranges indicated by manufacturer. However a power loss about 1200 hp was detected in turbine so that the problem between the power turbine and the main gearbox MG was focused. Boroscopic and thermographic inspections were carried out detecting hot spots and contaminants deposition. Upon disassembling MG lubrication ducts were detected partially obstructed by silicone.

  10. Pathophysiology of Spasticity: Implications for Neurorehabilitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlo Trompetto

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Spasticity is the velocity-dependent increase in muscle tone due to the exaggeration of stretch reflex. It is only one of the several components of the upper motor neuron syndrome (UMNS. The central lesion causing the UMNS disrupts the balance of supraspinal inhibitory and excitatory inputs directed to the spinal cord, leading to a state of disinhibition of the stretch reflex. However, the delay between the acute neurological insult (trauma or stroke and the appearance of spasticity argues against it simply being a release phenomenon and suggests some sort of plastic changes, occurring in the spinal cord and also in the brain. An important plastic change in the spinal cord could be the progressive reduction of postactivation depression due to limb immobilization. As well as hyperexcitable stretch reflexes, secondary soft tissue changes in the paretic limbs enhance muscle resistance to passive displacements. Therefore, in patients with UMNS, hypertonia can be divided into two components: hypertonia mediated by the stretch reflex, which corresponds to spasticity, and hypertonia due to soft tissue changes, which is often referred as nonreflex hypertonia or intrinsic hypertonia. Compelling evidences state that limb mobilisation in patients with UMNS is essential to prevent and treat both spasticity and intrinsic hypertonia.

  11. Ventral extradural spinal meningeal cyst causing cord compression: neurosurgical treatment Cisto meníngeo extradural ventral do canal espinhal causando compressão medular: tratamento neurocirúrgico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Monte-Serrat Prevedello

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available Spinal extradural meningeal cysts are typically formed by a thin fibrotic membranous capsule, macroscopically similar that of an arachnoid membrane, filled by cerebro spinal fluid and related to a nerve root or to the posterior midline. Ventral location is extremely rare and when it occurs they usually cause spinal cord herniation through the ventral dural gap. A 61 year-old man who began with a two years long history of insidious tetraparesis, spasticity and hyperreflexia in lower extremities, and flaccid atrophy of upper limbs, without sensory manifestations, is presented. Investigation through magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated an extensive spinal ventral extradural cystic collection from C6 to T11. The lesion was approached through a laminectomy and a cyst-peritoneal shunt was introduced. The cyst reduced in size significantly and the patient is asymptomatic over a 48 months follow-up. This is the first reported case of a spontaneous ventral extradural spinal meningeal cyst causing cord compression. Cyst-peritoneal shunt was effective in the treatment of the case and it should be considered in cases in which complete resection of the cyst is made more difficult or risky by the need of more aggressive surgical maneuvers.Cistos meníngeos extradurais espinhais são formados tipicamente por estreita cápsula membranosa fibrótica, macroscopicamente semelhante a uma membrana de aracnóide, repleta de líquor e relacionada com uma raiz nervosa ou com a linha média posterior. Eles são extremamente raros em posição anterior e, quando ocorrem, habitualmente causam herniação da medula espinhal pela falha dural ventral. O caso de um homem de 61 anos de idade que iniciou com tetraparesia, espasticidade e hiperreflexia em membros inferiores, e flacidez com hipotrofia nos membros superiores, sem manifestação sensitiva, é apresentado. A investigação com ressonância magnética demonstrou extensa coleção cística extradural ventral

  12. Evaluation of the distortions of the digital chest image caused by the data compression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ando, Yutaka; Kunieda, Etsuo; Ogawa, Koichi; Tukamoto, Nobuhiro; Hashimoto, Shozo; Aoki, Makoto; Kurotani, Kenichi.

    1988-01-01

    The image data compression methods using orthogonal transforms (Discrete cosine transform, Discrete fourier transform, Hadamard transform, Haar transform, Slant transform) were analyzed. From the points of the error and the speed of the data conversion, the discrete cosine transform method (DCT) is superior to the other methods. The block quantization by the DCT for the digital chest image was used. The quality of data compressed and reconstructed images by the score analysis and the ROC curve analysis was examined. The chest image with the esophageal cancer and metastatic lung tumors was evaluated at the 17 checkpoints (the tumor, the vascular markings, the border of the heart and ribs, the mediastinal structures and et al). By our score analysis, the satisfactory ratio of the data compression is 1/5 and 1/10. The ROC analysis using normal chest images superimposed by the artificial coin lesions was made. The ROC curve of the 1/5 compressed ratio is almost as same as the original one. To summarize our study, the image data compression method using the DCT is thought to be useful for the clinical use and the 1/5 compression ratio is a tolerable ratio. (author)

  13. Solitary vertebral plasmacytoma causing compression fracture in a patient with multiple vertebral hemangiomas: a diagnosis easily missed!

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shagufta Wahab

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The imaging mimics, acute osteoporotic compression fractures, metastasis and malignant melanoma or plasmacytoma pathological fractures are the important clinical problems in geriatric age group that need to be differentiated due to their grossly differing prognostic and therapeutic implications. There are few suggestive features on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI that help differentiate between these entities. Hemangiomas are very common benign spinal tumors that have characteristic features on MRI. In the setting of multiple vertebral hemangiomas causing cord compression in elderly patients, the scenario is even more complex with four different entities with different prognostic profiles. We report such a diagnostic dilemma we encountered in a middle aged female patient with multiple vertebral hemangiomas and compression fracture in D10 vertebra.

  14. Pitfalls with the "chest compression-only" approach: the challenge of an unusual cause

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reid Bjørn

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Chest compression-only (CC-only is now incorporated in the Norwegian protocol for dispatch guided CPR (cardiopulmonary resuscitation in cardiac arrest of presumed cardiac aetiology. We present a case that is unique and instructive as well as unusual. It reminds us of the challenges that face bystanders, dispatch centres and ambulance services when faced with possible cardiac arrest. This case report describes a 50 year old man in a rural community. He had suffered a heart attack 8 months previously, and was found unconscious with respiratory arrest in his garden one morning. Due to the proximity to the ambulance station, the paramedics were on the scene within three minutes. A chain-saw was lying beside him, but no external injuries were seen. The patient had no radial pulse, central cyanosis and respiratory gasps approximately every 30 seconds. Ventilation with bag and mask was given, and soon a femoral pulse could be palpated. Blood sugar was elevated and ECG (electrocardiogram was normal. GCS (Glasgow Coma Scale was 3. Upon arrival of the physician staffed air ambulance, further examination revealed bilateral miosis of the pupils and continuing bradypnoea. Naloxone was given with an immediate effect and the patient woke up. The patient denied intake of narcotics, but additional information from the dispatch centre revealed that he was hepatitis C positive. After a few hours, the patient admitted to have obtained a fentanyl transdermal patch from an acquaintance, having chewed it before falling unconscious. This case report shows the importance as well as the challenges of identifying a non-cardiac cause of possible cardiac arrest, and the value of providing causal therapy.

  15. A Rare Case of Atretic Uterus Causing Compression Over the Sigmoid Colon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shirish Vaidya

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Pseudo-hermaphroditism is so called when a person is born with primary sex characteristics of one sex but develops the secondary sexual characteristics that are different sex from what would actually be expected on the basis of the primary sex (testis or ovaries. Sometimes, there is partial appearance of the either of the external sex organs together that is a one between a typical penis and clitoris. In rest of the cases, the expected external sex organs are seen. Thus, pseudo-hermaphroditism can be difficult to identify until puberty. The condition may also remain hidden until adulthood. Male pseudo-hermaphroditism is an individual with XY karyotype and testes is present with a partial or complete female phenotype. This condition is attributed to hypoandrogenism in XY individuals. There is a lack in the action or presence of testosterone and dihydrotestosterone. This is a case report of a 60-year-old male who presented to the surgery out-patient services with complain of lower abdominal pain since 6 months. After proper clinical history and consent, the patient was subjected to endoscopy and contrast enhanced CT of abdomen. On endoscopy, there was restriction at passing the probe beyond the distal end of sigmoid colon and the probe could not be passed beyond it. A stricture of unknown etiology was reported. CT revealed an ill-defined elongated enhancing soft tissue lesion noted in right side of pelvis superolateral to the urinary bladder causing compression over the sigmoid colon with no obvious bowel connection. Exploratory laparotomy was them performed which revealed an elongated soft tissue lesion adherent to the sigmoid colon without obvious communication to the bowel lumen. The organ of origin could not be confirmed. The lesion was excised and sent for histopathology which revealed atretic uterine tissue.

  16. Retrospective clinic and urodynamic study in the neurogenic bladder dysfunction caused by human T cell lymphotrophic virus type 1 associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis (HAM/TSP).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Troisgros, Odile; Barnay, Jose-Luis; Darbon-Naghibzadeh, Farideh; Olive, Pascale; René-Corail, Patrick

    2017-02-01

    HTLV-I associated tropical spastic paraparesis (TSP) and HTLV-I associated myelopathy (HAM) is an endemic disease in Caribbean Island. Bladder-sphincter dysfunctions are almost present. The objectives of the study are to describe clinic and urodynamic characteristics of voiding disorders in Martiniquan population, evaluate if there is a relationship between motor and urinary handicap, and evaluate prognosis factors of urologic complications. Retrospective study of 60 patients suffering from HAM/TSP. Clinical, urodynamic datas, scale of urinary and motor handicap (Urinary Symptom Profile [USP] questionnaire and Osame Score) were collected. Storage symptoms were the most frequent (75%) whatever type of detrusor activity. Detrusor overactivity was the most frequent disorder (68.3%). Bladder compliance was normal in half percent of the cases. Urethral activity was increased in 47% of the cases. Detrusor sphincter dysynergia was found in 78% of the cases, post-void residual in 58% of cases. Sixty five percent of the patients present at least one urologic complication (morphologic and/or infectious) but there was no correlation with motor enablement (P = 0.3097), neither urodynamic study (P = 0.432 for detrusor overactivity, P = 0.107 for detrusor underactivity, P = 0.058 for high urethral activity, P = 0.893 for detrusor sphincter dysynergia, P = 0.850 for post-void residual volume), neither with evolution duration of HAM/TSP (P = 0.348). USP score was not in correlation with Osame score (P = 0.07). Urologic symptoms are not always in relationship with urodynamic study: a systematic urodynamic study is necessary to evaluate HAM/TSP neurogenic bladder. No clinic or urodynamic criterias are predictive of urologic complications. These patients need a close follow up. Neurourol. Urodynam. 36:449-452, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Pharmacotherapy of Spasticity in Children With Cerebral Palsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chia-Ying Chung

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Spasticity is a common disability in children with cerebral palsy. Pharmacological and non-pharmacological treatments, including physical therapy, occupational therapy, orthotics, rhizotomy, and orthopedic surgery, all play important roles in the management of spasticity. The purpose of this article is to provide an overview of available medications for treatment of spasticity in children with cerebral palsy. Common medications include benzodiazepines, dantrolene sodium, baclofen, tizanidine, botulinum toxins, phenol, alcohol and intrathecal baclofen. In general, oral medications and intrathecal baclofen are used for treating generalized spasticity, whilst chemodenervation agents (botulinum toxins, phenol, and alcohol are used to treat localized spasticity. There is more sufficient evidence for the recommendation of botulinum toxin A as an effective anti-spasticity treatment in children with cerebral palsy. However, more data concerning safety and long-term effects of botulinum toxin A is needed. Further study is needed to determine which kinds of medications can cause substantial improvement in daily activity, participation level, self-competence, or quality of life in children with cerebral palsy.

  18. Thoracic spinal cord compression by a tophus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ntsiba, Honoré; Makosso, Edouard; Moyikoua, Armand

    2010-03-01

    We report a case of thoracic (T10) spinal cord compression by a tophus in a patient with known chronic gout. Spastic paraplegia developed gradually over 6 months in this 43-year-old man with hypertension, alcohol abuse, and chronic gouty arthritis with tophi. Magnetic resonance imaging and computed tomography visualized an intradural nodule measuring 1.5cm in diameter at the level of T10, as well as geodes in the left T10 lamina and left T9-T10 articular processes. The nodule was removed surgically and shown by histological examination to be a tophus. The neurological impairments resolved rapidly and completely. We found about 60 similar cases in the literature. Spinal cord compression in a patient with chronic gout can be caused by a tophus. Copyright 2010 Société française de rhumatologie. Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  19. Endovascular treatment of external iliac vein stenosis caused by graft compression after kidney transplantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Willamax Oliveira de Sousa

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available A 57-year old patient presented with approximately 80% stenosis of the left external iliac vein due to compression by the renal graft after kidney transplantation. The initial clinical manifestation of this vascular complication was progressive edema of the left lower limb, starting in the foot during the immediate postoperative period and reaching the thigh. Renal function also deteriorated during the first four months after transplantation. Venous Doppler ultrasound findings were suggestive of a diagnosis of extrinsic compression by the kidney graft and so phlebography was ordered, confirming stenosis of the left external iliac vein. The patient was initially treated with balloon angioplasty, but there was still residual stenosis so a stent was inserted, eliminating the stenosis. The edema reduced over time and the patient's renal function improved. While vascular complications are rare, and potentially severe, events, success rates are good if treatment is started early.

  20. Disappearance of spasticity after selective dorsal rhizotomy does not prevent muscle shortening in children with cerebral palsy: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spijker, Margje; Strijers, Rob L M; van Ouwerkerk, Willem J R; Becher, Jules G

    2009-05-01

    Selective dorsal rhizotomy is an effective treatment for spasticity in children with cerebral palsy who have a spastic motor disorder. It is hypothesized that muscle shortening is related to spasticity; the lack of stretch of a muscle is thought to be the cause of muscle shortening. If this is true, the treatment for spasticity should prevent the occurrence of muscle shortening during growth. We present the case of 1 child with cerebral palsy and spastic diplegia, for whom the treatment with selective dorsal rhizotomy was successful in improving the walking abilities. She did, however, develop muscle shortening during growth. In conclusion, the development of muscle shortening during growth in children with cerebral palsy and spastic paresis cannot be prevented by treatment for the spasticity alone.

  1. Spinal cord compression caused by anaplastic large cell lymphoma in an HIV infected individual

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kumar Susheel

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Lymphomas occur with an increased frequency in patients with Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV infection. These are usually high-grade immunoblastic lymphomas and primary central nervous system lymphomas. Anaplastic large cell lymphoma (ALCL is a distinct type of non-Hodgkin′s lymphoma. It is uncommon in HIV infected individuals. We describe here an uncommon presentation of this relatively rare lymphoma in the form of spinal cord compression syndrome in a young HIV infected individual.

  2. Spasticity Mechanisms – for the Clinician

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukherjee, Angshuman; Chakravarty, Ambar

    2010-01-01

    Spasticity, a classical clinical manifestation of an upper motor neuron lesion, has been traditionally and physiologically defined as a velocity dependent increase in muscle tone caused by the increased excitability of the muscle stretch reflex. Clinically spasticity manifests as an increased resistance offered by muscles to passive stretching (lengthening) and is often associated with other commonly observed phenomenon like clasp-knife phenomenon, increased tendon reflexes, clonus, and flexor and extensor spasms. The key to the increased excitability of the muscle stretch reflex (muscle tone) is the abnormal activity of muscle spindles which have an intricate relation with the innervations of the extrafusal muscle fibers at the spinal level (feed-back and feed-forward circuits) which are under influence of the supraspinal pathways (inhibitory and facilitatory). The reflex hyperexcitability develops over variable period of time following the primary lesion (brain or spinal cord) and involves adaptation in spinal neuronal circuitries caudal to the lesion. It is highly likely that in humans, reduction of spinal inhibitory mechanisms (in particular that of disynaptic reciprocal inhibition) is involved. While simply speaking the increased muscle stretch reflex may be assumed to be due to an altered balance between the innervations of intra and extrafusal fibers in a muscle caused by loss of inhibitory supraspinal control, the delayed onset after lesion and the frequent reduction in reflex excitability over time, suggest plastic changes in the central nervous system following brain or spinal lesion. It seems highly likely that multiple mechanisms are operative in causation of human spasticity, many of which still remain to be fully elucidated. This will be apparent from the variable mechanisms of actions of anti-spasticity agents used in clinical practice. PMID:21206767

  3. Selective dorsal rhizotomy for spastic diplegia secondary to stroke in an adult patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eppinger, Melissa Ann; Berman, Casey Melissa; Mazzola, Catherine Anne

    2015-01-01

    Selective dorsal rhizotomy (SDR) is often recommended for children with spastic paraparesis and cerebral palsy. SDR reduces spasticity in the lower extremities for these children with spastic paraplegia. However, SDR is infrequently recommended for adults with spasticity. Spastic diplegia in adult patients can be due to stroke, brain or spinal cord injury from trauma, infection, toxic-metabolic disorders, and other causes. Although rarely considered, SDR is an option for adult patients with spastic diplegia as well. The authors describe a patient who underwent a SDR with a successful postoperative outcome. This man suffered a hypertensive and hemorrhagic stroke secondary to intravenous drug abuse at age 46. A SDR was performed after two failed intrathecal baclofen pump placements due to recurrent infections, likely resulting from his immunocompromised status. The patient underwent lumbar laminectomies and dorsal rhizotomies at levels L1-S1 bilaterally. Postoperatively, the patient's spasticity was significantly reduced. His Ashworth spasticity score decreased from 4/5 to 1/5, and the reduction in tone has been durable over 3 years. SDR in older patients with spastic paraparesis may be considered as a treatment option.

  4. Residual Stress State in Single-Edge Notched Tension Specimen Caused by the Local Compression Technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huang Yifan

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Three-dimensional (3D finite element analyses (FEA are performed to simulate the local compression (LC technique on the clamped single-edge notched tension (SE(T specimens. The analysis includes three types of indenters, which are single pair of cylinder indenters (SPCI, double pairs of cylinder indenters (DPCI and single pair of ring indenters (SPRI. The distribution of the residual stress in the crack opening direction in the uncracked ligament of the specimen is evaluated. The outcome of this study can facilitate the use of LC technique on SE(T specimens.

  5. Argininemia presenting with progressive spastic diplegia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Beom Hee; Jin, Hye Young; Kim, Gu-Hwan; Choi, Jin-Ho; Yoo, Han-Wook

    2011-03-01

    Argininemia is caused by a deficiency of arginase 1, which catalyzes the final step in the urea cycle, i.e., the cytosolic hydrolysis of arginine to ornithine and urea. In contrast to other urea cycle disorders, hyperammonemic encephalopathy is rarely observed in patients with argininemia. Rather, most exhibit an insidious onset and progression of neurologic manifestations, including spastic diplegia. We describe the first Korean patient with argininemia, manifesting as slowly progressive spastic diplegia. Our patient carries c.[32T>C]+[913G>A] (p.[Ile11Thr]+[Gly305Arg]) mutations in the ARG1 gene. The latter mutation was not previously reported. Although argininemia is a very rare disease, it is recognized as a pan-ethnic disorder. We conclude that argininemia should be considered more frequently in the differential diagnosis of a patient with slowly progressive neurologic manifestations, especially progressive spastic diplegia, even in a population where argininemia was previously unknown. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Recessive loss-of-function mutations in AP4S1 cause mild fever-sensitive seizures, developmental delay and spastic paraplegia through loss of AP-4 complex assembly

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hardies, Katia; May, Patrick; Djémié, Tania

    2015-01-01

    We report two siblings with infantile onset seizures, severe developmental delay and spastic paraplegia, in whom whole-genome sequencing revealed compound heterozygous mutations in the AP4S1 gene, encoding the σ subunit of the adaptor protein complex 4 (AP-4). The effect of the predicted loss-of-...... in reported patients, highlighting that seizures are part of the clinical manifestation of the AP-4 deficiency syndrome. We also hypothesize that endosomal trafficking is a common theme between heritable spastic paraplegia and some inherited epilepsies....

  7. Spasticity in multiple sclerosis: Contribution of inflammation, autoimmune mediated neuronal damage and therapeutic interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patejdl, Robert; Zettl, Uwe K

    2017-09-01

    In contrast to other diseases that go along with spasticity (e.g. spinal cord injury), spasticity in chronic autoimmune diseases involving the CNS is complicated by the ongoing damage of neuronal networks that leads to permanent changes in the clinical picture of spasticity. Multiple sclerosis (MS) is the most frequent autoimmune disease of the central nervous system (CNS) and spasticity is one of the most disabling symptoms. It occurs in more than 80% MS patients at some point of the disease and is associated with impaired ambulation, pain and the development of contractures. Besides causing cumulative structural damage, neuroinflammation occurring in MS leads to dynamic changes in motor circuit function and muscle tone that are caused by cytokines, prostaglandins, reactive oxygen species and stress hormones that affect neuronal circuits and thereby spasticity. The situation is complicated further by the fact that therapeutics used for the immunotherapy of MS may worsen spasticity and drugs used for the symptomatic treatment of spasticity have been shown to have the potential to alter immune cell function and CNS autoimmunity itself. This review summarizes the current knowledge on the immunologic pathways that are involved in the development, maintenance, dynamic changes and pharmacological modulation of spasticity in MS. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Numerical Analysis on the Compressible Flow Characteristics of Supersonic Jet Caused by High-Pressure Pipe Rupture Using CFD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jung, Jong-Kil; Yoon, Jun-Kyu [Gachon Univ., Sungnam (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Kwang-Chu [KEPCO-E& C, Kimchun (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-10-15

    A rupture in a high-pressure pipe causes the fluid in the pipe to be discharged in the atmosphere at a high speed resulting in a supersonic jet that generates the compressible flow. This supersonic jet may display complicated and unsteady behavior in general . In this study, Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) analysis was performed to investigate the compressible flow generated by a supersonic jet ejected from a high-pressure pipe. A Shear Stress Transport (SST) turbulence model was selected to analyze the unsteady nature of the flow, which depends upon the various gases as well as the diameter of the pipe. In the CFD analysis, the basic boundary conditions were assumed to be as follows: pipe of diameter 10 cm, jet pressure ratio of 5, and an inlet gas temperature of 300 K. During the analysis, the behavior of the shockwave generated by a supersonic jet was observed and it was found that the blast wave was generated indirectly. The pressure wave characteristics of hydrogen gas, which possesses the smallest molecular mass, showed the shortest distance to the safety zone. There were no significant difference observed for nitrogen gas, air, and oxygen gas, which have similar molecular mass. In addition, an increase in the diameter of the pipe resulted in the ejected impact caused by the increased flow rate to become larger and the zone of jet influence to extend further.

  9. Spasticity management in the child with spastic quadriplegia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gormley, M E; Krach, L E; Piccini, L

    2001-11-01

    In children with spastic quadriplegia, also described as 'whole body involvement', spasticity can interfere with motor function, contributes to the development of deformities and adversely impacts on care, positioning, and comfort. In this population, spasticity interventions address goals such as improving comfort, reducing pain, easing the burden of carers, slowing the progression of musculoskeletal deformities and perhaps improving function. Children with severe diplegia are distinguished from those with quadriplegia by their ability to ambulate, as well as by a greater emphasis being placed on functional motor goals even though similar treatment modalities are often employed to manage spasticity. The many treatment options currently available include, but are not limited to, botulinum toxin type A, phenol neurolysis, oral medications, intrathecal baclofen, selective dorsal rhizotomy, and orthopaedic surgery. The integration of these treatment modalities can help to optimize the overall care and function for a child with spastic quadriplegia or severe diplegia. However, the development of a management programme is complex and needs to take into account many factors, including age, weight and nutritional status, rate of progression of musculoskeletal deformities, developmental potential, comorbid conditions, current functional status and prognosis, and family and patient treatment goals. Children with marked spasticity are likely to benefit from a combination of interventions, rather than a single treatment modality. Because of these complexities, management should be planned and coordinated by a multidisciplinary team of medical and allied health professionals which recognizes the central role of the family in all decisions. Once the special characteristics of the child with spastic quadriplegia and the various treatment options are understood, outcomes can be maximized.

  10. Modeling neurodevelopment and cortical dysfunction in SPG11-linked hereditary spastic paraplegia using human induced pluripotent stem cells

    OpenAIRE

    Mishra, Himanshu Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Hereditary spastic paraplegias (HSPs) are a heterogeneous group of inherited motor neuron diseases characterized by progressive spasticity and weakness of the lower limbs. Mutations in the Spastic Paraplegia Gene11 (SPG11), encoding spatacsin, cause the most frequent form of autosomal recessive HSP. SPG11 patients are clinically distinguishable from most other HSPs, by severe cortical atrophy and presence of a thin corpus callosum (TCC), associated with cognitive deficits. Partly due to l...

  11. Comparison of efficacy between dorsal root entry zone lesioning and selective dorsal rhizotomy for spasticity of cerebral origin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sitthinamsuwan, Bunpot; Phonwijit, Luckchai; Khampalikit, Inthira; Nitising, Akkapong; Nunta-Aree, Sarun; Suksompong, Sirilak

    2017-12-01

    Severe spasticity adversely affects patient functional status and caregiving. No previous study has compared efficacy between dorsal root entry zone lesioning (DREZL) and selective dorsal rhizotomy (SDR) for reduction of spasticity. This study aimed to investigate the efficacy of DREZL and SDR for attenuating spasticity, and to compare efficacy between these two methods. All patients who underwent DREZL, SDR, or both for treatment of intractable spasticity caused by cerebral pathology at Siriraj Hospital during 2009 to 2016 were recruited. Severity of spasticity was assessed using Modified Ashworth Scale (MAS) and Adductor Tone Rating Scale (ATRS). Ambulatory status was also evaluated. Fifteen patients (13 males) with a mean age of 30.3 ± 17.5 years were included. Eight, six, and one patient underwent DREZL, SDR, and combined cervical DREZL and lumbosacral SDR, respectively. Eight of ten patients with preoperative bed-bound status had postoperative improvement in ambulatory status. Spasticity was significantly reduced in the DREZL group (p SDR group (p SDR was effective in both pediatric and adult spasticity patients. A significantly greater reduction in spasticity as assessed by MAS score (p SDR. DREZL is more effective for reducing spasticity, but is more destructive than SDR. DREZL should be preferred for bed-ridden patients, and SDR for ambulatory patients. Both operations are helpful for improving ambulatory status. Gait improvement was observed only in patients who underwent SDR. Adult patients with spasticity of cerebral origin benefit from SDR.

  12. Comparison of modified Ashworth scale and Hoffmann reflex in study of spasticity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohan, Amir Hassan; Abootalebi, Shahram; Khoshnevisan, Alireza; Rahgozar, Mehdi

    2010-01-01

    Spasticity is one of the common complications in upper motor neuron lesions and without appropriate treatment it causes disturbances in movement pattern. Assessments of patients are effective in patient's management. Modified Ashworth scale (MAS) is one of the criteria in qualitative assessment of spasticity, and there are lots of controversies about its validity. The purpose of this study is to compare MAS with electrophysiological indices of spasticity. The spasticity of upper limb muscles in patients with hemiplegic cerebral palsy are measured and recorded by MAS. Then electrophysiological indices of Hoffmann reflex (H reflex) and ratio of maximum range of action potential of combined movement of flexor carpi radialis (FCR) for upper limb and soleus for lower limb were estimated. Data of 11 patients with age range 4 to 6 were analyzed. There is no significant correlation between degree of spasticity and electrophysiological indices.

  13. NIPA1 mutation in complex hereditary spastic paraplegia with epilepsy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svenstrup, K; Møller, R S; Christensen, J

    2011-01-01

    or signs are found. Mutations in the NIPA1 gene have been reported to cause spastic paraplegia type 6 (SPG6) in 10 families. SPG6 is a rare form of autosomal dominantly inherited HSP associated with a pure phenotype; however, in one complex SPG6 family, idiopathic generalized epilepsy (IGE) has been...... described and in addition, recurrent microdeletions at 15q11.2 including NIPA1 have been identified in patients with IGE. The purpose was to identify NIPA1 mutations in patients with pure and complex HSP. Methods: Fifty-two patients with HSP were screened for mutations in NIPA1. Results: One previously...... reported missense mutation c.316G>A, p.Gly106Arg, was identified in a complex HSP patient with spastic dysarthria, facial dystonia, atrophy of the small hand muscles, upper limb spasticity, and presumably IGE. The epilepsy co-segregated with HSP in the family. Conclusion: NIPA1 mutations were rare in our...

  14. Spinal Cord Stimulation for Spasticity: Historical Approaches, Current Status, and Future Directions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagel, Sean J; Wilson, Saul; Johnson, Michael D; Machado, Andre; Frizon, Leonardo; Chardon, Matthieu K; Reddy, Chandan G; Gillies, George T; Howard, Matthew A

    2017-06-01

    Millions of people worldwide suffer with spasticity related to irreversible damage to the brain or spinal cord. Typical antecedent events include stroke, traumatic brain injury, and spinal cord injury, although insidious onset is also common. Regardless of the cause, the resulting spasticity leads to years of disability and reduced quality of life. Many treatments are available to manage spasticity; yet each is fraught with drawbacks including incomplete response, high cost, limited duration, dose-limiting side effects, and periodic maintenance. Spinal cord stimulation (SCS), a once promising therapy for spasticity, has largely been relegated to permanent experimental status. In this review, our goal is to document and critique the history and assess the development of SCS as a treatment of lower limb spasticity. By incorporating recent discoveries with the insights gained from the early pioneers in this field, we intend to lay the groundwork needed to propose testable hypotheses for future studies. SCS has been tested in over 25 different conditions since a potentially beneficial effect was first reported in 1973. However, the lack of a fully formed understanding of the pathophysiology of spasticity, archaic study methodology, and the early technological limitations of implantable hardware limit the validity of many studies. SCS offers a measure of control for spasticity that cannot be duplicated with other interventions. With improved energy-source miniaturization, tailored control algorithms, novel implant design, and a clearer picture of the pathophysiology of spasticity, we are poised to reintroduce and test SCS in this population. © 2017 International Neuromodulation Society.

  15. The pharmacological management of post-stroke muscle spasticity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakheit, Abdel Magid O

    2012-12-01

    Muscle hypertonia following upper motor neurone lesions (referred to here as 'spasticity') is a common problem in patients with neurological disease, and its management is one of the major challenges in clinical practice. Understanding the pathogenesis and clinical course of spasticity is essential for the effective management of this condition. The hypertonia initially results from increased excitability of the alpha motor neurones due to an imbalance between the excitatory and inhibitory influences of the vestibulospinal and reticulospinal tracts. This is the 'neural component' of muscle hypertonia. However, usually within 3-4 weeks, changes in the structure and mechanical properties of the paralysed muscles and the effect of thixotropy also contribute to the hypertonia. The selection of the optimal treatment option is often influenced by whether the neural or the non-neural component is more pronounced. Muscle spasticity often interferes with motor function or causes distressing symptoms, such as painful muscle spasms. If untreated, spasticity may also lead to soft tissue shortening (fixed contractures). However, spasticity can also be beneficial to patients. For example, despite severe leg muscle weakness, most hemiplegic patients are able to walk because the spasticity of the extensor muscles braces the lower limb in a rigid pillar. Other reported benefits of spasticity include the maintenance of muscle bulk and bone mineral density and possibly a reduced risk of lower limb deep vein thrombosis. Several factors, such as skin pressure sores, faecal impaction, urinary tract infections and stones in the urinary bladder, can aggravate muscle spasticity. These factors should always be looked for as their adequate treatment is often sufficient to reduce muscle tone without the need for specific antispasticity medication. Therefore, a careful evaluation of the patient's symptoms and their impact on function, and the setting of clear and realistic therapy goals are

  16. Serious axillary nerve injury caused by subscapular artery compression resulting from use of backpacks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haninec, Pavel; Mencl, Libor; Bačinský, Peter; Kaiser, Radek

    2013-12-01

    A palsy of the brachial plexus elements caused by carrying a heavy backpack is a very rare injury usually occurring in soldiers or hikers, and recovery is usually spontaneous. We describe here the case of male civilian presenting with an isolated serious axillary nerve palsy associated with chronic backpack use. During the surgery, a dumbbell-shaped neuroma-in-continuity was found which was caused by direct pressure from the subscapular artery. After resection of the neuroma, a nerve graft from the sural nerve was used to reconstruct the nerve. Reinnervation was successful and the patient was able to abduct his arm to its full range, with full muscle strength, within 24 months. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  17. Fitzsimmons Syndrome: Spastic Paraplegia, Brachydactyly, and Cognitive Impairment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Armour, Christine M.; Humphreys, Peter; Hennekam, Raoul C. M.; Boycott, Kym M.

    2009-01-01

    Fitzsimmons syndrome is an infrequently described entity comprising slowly progressive spastic paraplegia, brachydactyly, and cone-shaped epiphyses, dysarthria, and low-normal intelligence. Five patients with this syndrome have been reported. The cause remains unknown. Here we describe a 16-year-old

  18. [Botulinum toxin therapy for spasticity].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masakado, Yoshihisa

    2014-09-01

    Botulinum toxin (BTX) administered as an adjunct to other interventions for spasticity can act as a useful and effective therapeutic tool for treating patients disabled by spasticity. Presence of other non-reflex motor disorders (muscle stiffness, shortness, and contracture) can complicate the clinical course and disturb rehabilitative process of patients with spasticity. Treatment of spasticity using BTX can improve paralysis by correcting muscular imbalance that follows these diseases. In patients with chronic severe spasticity, we also have to address unique and difficult-to-treat clinical conditions such as abnormal posture and movement disorders. The effectiveness of BTX in treating some of these conditions is discussed. Because patients with neurological disabilities can show complex dysfunctions, specific functional limitations, goals, and expected outcomes of treatment should be evaluated and discussed with the patient, family members, and caregivers, prior to initiating BTX therapy. BTX therapy might improve not only care, passive function, but also motor functions in these patients by supplementing intensive rehabilitation with repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation, transcranial direct-current stimulation, peripheral electrical stimulation, muscle stretching, and other rehabilitation strategies.

  19. Biofeedback therapy for spastic dysphonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, H; Komiyama, S; Ryu, S; Kannae, S; Matsubara, H

    1982-01-01

    Spastic dysphonia is a disorder of phonation which is characterized by a strained, creaking, and choked vocal attack, a tense and squeezed voice sound. Spastic dysphonia in a functional voice disorder can be classified into two types from the viewpoint of activities of the extrinsic and intrinsic laryngeal muscle groups. A functional voice disorder pertaining to abnormal activities of the intrinsic and extrinsic laryngeal muscles results in spastic dysphonia. The adductor spastic dysphonia may be due to abnormal actions of the intrinsic laryngeal muscles as such is relieved by sectioning of the recurrent nerve, while spastic dysphonia mainly dealing with the extrinsic laryngeal muscles is relieved by relaxation on monitoring an electromyographic feedback system. Within 3 months we encountered two patients whose extrinsic laryngeal muscles were hyperactive on phonation. A trial on injection of lidocaine into extrinsic laryngeal muscles made their muscles relax. So, biofeedback therapy of relaxation was began using a monitoring system of EMG burst regarding to hypertonicity of the extrinsic laryngeal muscles. Normal vocal abilities were recovered using a biotrainer as a monitoring device of electromyographic feedback.

  20. Clinical Understanding of Spasticity: Implications for Practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rozina Bhimani

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Spasticity is a poorly understood phenomenon. The aim of this paper is to understand the effect of spasticity on daily life and identify bedside strategies that enhance patient’s function and improve comfort. Spasticity and clonus result from an upper motor neuron lesion that disinhibits the tendon stretch reflex; however, they are differentiated in the fact that spasticity results in a velocity dependent tightness of muscle whereas clonus results in uncontrollable jerks of the muscle. Clinical strategies that address function and comfort are paramount. This is a secondary content analysis using a qualitative research design. Adults experiencing spasticity associated with neuromuscular disorder were asked to participate during inpatient acute rehabilitation. They were asked to complete a semistructured interview to explain and describe the nature of their experienced spasticity on daily basis. Spasticity affects activities of daily living, function, and mobility. Undertreated spasticity can lead to pain, immobility, and risk of falls. There were missed opportunities to adequately care for patients with spasticity. Bedside care strategies identified by patients with spasticity are outlined. Uses of alternative therapies in conjunction with medications are needed to better manage spasticity. Patient reports on spasticity are important and should be part of clinical evaluation and practice.

  1. A rare cause of dysphagia: compression of the esophagus by an anterior cervical osteophyte due to ankylosing spondylitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albayrak, Ilknur; Bağcacı, Sinan; Sallı, Ali; Kucuksen, Sami; Uğurlu, Hatice

    2013-09-01

    Ankylosing spondylitis (AS) is a chronic inflammatory rheumatological disease affecting the axial skeleton with various extra-articular complications. Dysphagia due to a giant anterior osteophyte of the cervical spine in AS is extremely rare. We present a 48-year-old male with AS suffering from progressive dysphagia to soft foods and liquids. Esophagography showed an anterior osteophyte at C5-C6 resulting in esophageal compression. The patient refused surgical resection of the osteophyte and received conservative therapy. However, after 6 months there was no improvement in dysphagia. This case illustrates that a large cervical osteophyte may be the cause of dysphagia in patients with AS and should be included in the diagnostic workup in early stages of the disease.

  2. Spasticity-assessment: a review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Biering-Sørensen, F.; Nielsen, Jens Bo; Klinge, Klaus Peter

    2006-01-01

    Study design:Review of the literature on the validity and reliability of assessment of spasticity and spasms.Objectives:Evaluate the most frequently used methods for assessment of spasticity and spasms, with particular focus on individuals with spinal cord lesions.Setting:Clinic for Spinal Cord...... Injuries, Rigshospitalet, University Hospital of Copenhagen, and Department of Medical Physiology, University of Copenhagen, Denmark.Methods:The assessment methods are grouped into clinical, biomechanical and electrophysiological, and the correlation between these is evaluated.Results:Clinical methods......: For assessment of spasticity, the Ashworth and the modified Ashworth scales are commonly used. They provide a semiquantitative measure of the resistance to passive movement, but have limited interrater reliability. Guidelines for the testing procedures should be adhered to. Spasm frequency scales seem...

  3. Peliosis hepatis causing inferior vena cava compression in a 3-year-old child

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hiorns, Melanie P.; Rossi, Umberto G.; Roebuck, Derek J. [Great Ormond Street Children' s NHS Trust, Department of Radiology, London (United Kingdom)

    2005-02-01

    Peliosis hepatis is a rare benign condition characterized by oval or irregular, multiple blood-filled spaces within the liver parenchyma. It is most commonly seen in adults and may be idiopathic, but has various associations including malignancy, infection and drugs. The imaging findings are often non-specific and the condition may be mistaken for multiple abscesses, metastases or vascular malformations. Peliosis hepatis is an especially rare condition in children and to our knowledge only six cases have been described in the literature. Our case describes and illustrates peliosis in a 3-year-old girl and is the first described in any age group to cause complete IVC obstruction. The patient subsequently made a full recovery. (orig.)

  4. Prevalence and Effect of Problematic Spasticity After Traumatic Spinal Cord Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holtz, Kaila A; Lipson, Rachel; Noonan, Vanessa K; Kwon, Brian K; Mills, Patricia B

    2017-06-01

    To evaluate the prevalence and effect of spasticity after traumatic spinal cord injury (SCI). Prospective cohort study of the Rick Hansen Spinal Cord Injury Registry (RHSCIR) and retrospective review of inpatient medical charts. Quaternary trauma center, rehabilitation center, and community settings. Individuals (N=860) with a traumatic SCI between March 1, 2005, and March 31, 2014, prospectively enrolled in the Vancouver site RHSCIR were eligible for inclusion. Not applicable. Questionnaires (Penn Spasm Frequency Scale, Spinal Cord Injury Health Questionnaire) and antispasticity medication use. In 465 patients, the prevalence of spasticity at community discharge was 65%, and the prevalence of problematic spasticity (defined as discharged on antispasticity medication) was 35%. Problematic spasticity was associated with cervicothoracic neurologic level and injury severity (Pspasticity treatment (ie, problematic spasticity) was 35% at 1 year, 41% at 2 years, and 31% at 5 years postinjury. Interference with function caused by spasticity was reported by 27% of patients at 1 year, 25% at 2 years, and 20% at 5 years postinjury. Patients with American Spinal Injury Association Impairment Scale grade C injuries had the highest prevalence of ongoing spasticity treatment and functional limitation. Spasticity is a highly prevalent secondary consequence of SCI, particularly in patients with severe motor incomplete cervicothoracic injuries. It is problematic in one third of all patients with SCI up to 5 years postinjury. One in 5 patients will have ongoing functional limitations related to spasticity, highlighting the importance of close community follow-up and the need for further research into spasticity management strategies. Copyright © 2016 American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Human t-cell virus-1 associated myelopathy/tropical spastic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Its geographical distribution varies with area of high prevalence in the Caribbean, southern Japan and Africa. Human T-cell lymphtropic virus-1 associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis is more common in the tropics and present as a non-compressive, slowly progressive symmetrical paraparesis of the lower ...

  6. Comparing three-dimensional volume-rendered CT images with fibreoptic tracheobronchoscopy in the evaluation of airway compression caused by tuberculous lymphadenopathy in children

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Plessis, Jaco du; George, Reena [University of Stellenbosch, Department of Radiology, Tygerberg (South Africa); Goussard, Pierre; Gie, Robert [Tygerberg Children' s Hospital, Department of Paediatrics, Cape Town (South Africa); Andronikou, Savvas [University of Cape Town, Department of Radiology, Cape Town (South Africa)

    2009-07-15

    Lymphobronchial tuberculosis (TB) causes airway compression in 38% of patients. The airway obstruction is conventionally assessed with fibreoptic tracheobronchoscopy (FTB). Multidetector-row spiral computed tomography (MDCT) with three-dimensional volume rendering (3-D VR) has significantly improved the imaging of the airways. No previous studies have assessed the accuracy of 3-D VR in determining the degree of airway compression in children due to TB lymphadenopathy. To compare 3-D VR CT to FTB for the assessment of airway compression due to TB lymphadenopathy in children. Included in the study were 26 children presenting with symptoms of airway compression caused by pulmonary TB. MDCT of the chest and FTB were performed in all patients. Retrospective 3-D VR reconstruction of the major airways was performed from the original CT raw data and used to evaluate the tracheobronchial tree for site and degree of airway compression and then compared to the FTB findings. FTB was used as the reference standard By FTB 87 sites of airway compression were identified. Using the 3-D VR technique, 138 sites of airway compression were identified, of which 78 (90%) matched with the sites identified by FTB. The sensitivity and specificity of 3-D VR when compared with that of FTB was 92% and 85%, respectively. In four patients (15%), severe narrowing of the bronchus intermedius made FTB evaluation of the right middle and right lower lobe bronchi impossible. VR demonstrated significant distal obstruction in three of these four patients 3-D VR demonstrates a very good correlation with FTB in determining airway compression caused by TB lymphadenopathy in children. In combination with FTB, 3-D VR adds confidence to the bronchoscopy findings and complements FTB by adding additional information on the status of the airway distal to severe obstructions unreachable by FTB. (orig.)

  7. Treatment of spasticity: an update

    OpenAIRE

    TEIVE, HÉLIO A.G.; ZONTA, MARISE; KUMAGAI, YUMI

    1998-01-01

    Apresentamos revisão sobre o tratamento atual da espasticidade, enfocando a terapêutica farmacológica, fisioterápica e através da utilização de toxina botulínica.We present an update about the treatment of spasticity, stressing the pharmacological treatment, physical therapy and botulinum toxin therapy.

  8. Intrathecal baclofen pump, useful and safe therapeutic intervention in spasticity? Report of four cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cáceres-Jerez, Luz Elena

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Spasticity may cause immobility, prostration, chronic pain, bedsores, infections, thrombosis and pneumonia; the purposes of its treatment are to control pain, improve mobility and quality of life, and reincorporate the patient to its daily activities by means of oral anti-spastic drugs; however, patients suffering from severe spasticity may require high oral doses of these medications, which may lead to adverse effects. In such cases, intrathecal baclofen has been proposed as a solution. This procedure has not been widely used in Colombia, so that protocols to perform it have not been established. We report the results obtained with the intrathecal administration of baclofen in four severely spastic patients, who had not previously responded to oral anti-spastic drugs, including high doses of baclofen. Pain, spasticity and quality of life significantly improved in three of them. The remaining one presented tolerance to the medication. Intrathecal baclofen pump is a useful and safe procedure for patients with severe spasticity and poor response to oral treatment.

  9. Selective dorsal rhizotomy for spasticity not associated with cerebral palsy: reconsideration of surgical inclusion criteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gump, William C; Mutchnick, Ian S; Moriarty, Thomas M

    2013-11-01

    Children with spastic diplegia from cerebral palsy (CP) experience measurable improvement in their spasticity and motor function following selective dorsal rhizotomy (SDR). The role of this operation in the treatment of other spasticity causes is less well defined. A literature review was undertaken to survey outcomes from SDRs performed outside the CP population. Multiple sclerosis was the most common diagnosis found, accounting for 74 of 145 patients described. Selective dorsal rhizotomies have also been reported in patients with traumatic brain and spinal cord injuries, ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke, neurodegenerative disease, hypoxic encephalopathy, and other causes of spasticity. Outcomes from surgery are generally described as favorable, although postoperative assessments and follow-up times are not standardized across reports. Long-term outcomes are sparsely reported. Larger numbers of patients and more detailed outcomes data have the potential to form a basis for expanding the inclusion criteria for SDR.

  10. [Selective cervical dorsal root cutting off part of the vertebral lateral mass fixation combined with exercise therapy for treating spastic cerebral paralysis of the upper limbs caused by cerebral palsy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Peng; Hu, Wei; Cao, Xu; Xu, Shi-gang; Li, De-kui; Xu, Lin

    2009-10-01

    To explore the feasibility and the result for the surgical treatment of spastic cerebral paralysis of the upper limbs in patients who underwent the selective cervical dorsal root cutting off part of the vertebral lateral mass fixation combined with exercise therapy. From March 2004 to April 2008, 27 patients included 19 boys and 8 girls, aging 13-21 years with an average of 15 years underwent selective cervical dorsal root cutting off part of the vertebral lateral mass fixation with exercise therapy. The AXIS 8 holes titanium plate was inserted into the lateral mass of spinous process through guidance of the nerve stimulator, choosed fasciculus of low-threshold nerve dorsal root and cut off its 1.5 cm. After two weeks, training exercise therapy was done in patients. Training will include lying position, turning body, sitting position, crawling, kneeling and standing position, walking and so on. Spastic Bobath inhibiting abnormal pattern was done in the whole process of training. The muscular tension, motor function (GMFM), functional independence (WeeFIM) were observed after treatment. All patients were followed up from 4 to 16 months with an average of 6 months. Muscular tension score were respectively 3.30 +/- 0.47 and 1.25 +/- 0.44 before and after treatment;GMFM score were respectively 107.82 +/- 55.17 and 131.28 +/- 46.45; WeeFIM score were respectively 57.61 +/- 25.51 and 87.91 +/- 22.39. There was significant improvement before and after treatment (P therapy was used to treat spastic cerebral paralysis of the upper limbs is safe and effective method, which can decrease muscular tension and improve motor function, which deserves more wide use.

  11. Analysis of the Relationship Between the Epidural Spinal Cord Compression (ESCC) Scale and Paralysis Caused by Metastatic Spine Tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uei, Hiroshi; Tokuhashi, Yasuaki; Maseda, Masafumi

    2018-04-15

    A retrospective, single-institute, and radiographic study. To evaluate the relationship between the epidural spinal cord compression (ESCC) scale and the severity of metastatic spine tumor-induced paralysis. The ESCC scale is used to evaluate the grade of spinal cord compression on T2-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). However, few studies have investigated the relationship between such MRI findings and paralysis. The subjects were 467 patients with metastatic spine tumors and grade 1b or worse spinal cord compression according to the ESCC scale. Evaluations using this scale were performed by three spine surgeons, and results that were obtained by two or more surgeons were adopted. We also examined patients whose spinal cord compression deteriorated by one grade or more to American Spinal Injury Association (ASIA) grade C or worse within the first 3 weeks after MRI. The kappa coefficients for inter- and intraexaminer variability were 0.90 and 0.95, respectively. ASIA grade D or worse paralysis developed in at least 50% of the patients with ESCC grade 1b or worse spinal cord compression at the C1-T2 and at least 50% of those with ESCC grade 1c or worse spinal cord compression at the T3-L5. The frequency of ASIA grade C or worse paralysis was high among the patients with ESCC grade 2 or worse spinal cord compression at the C7-L1. Nineteen patients experienced rapid deterioration of one grade or more to ASIA grade C or worse paralysis within the first 3 weeks after MRI. Of these, paralysis occurred in at least 30% of the patients with anterolateral or circumferential cord compression combined with ESCC grade 2 or 3 compression at the C7-L1. The severity of paralysis was not correlated with the ESCC scale. Patients with anterolateral or circumferential ESCC grade 2 or 3 cord compression at the C7-L1 are at high risk of rapidly progressive paralysis. 4.

  12. Disabling Vertigo and Tinnitus Caused by Intrameatal Compression of the Anterior Inferior Cerebellar Artery on the Vestibulocochlear Nerve: A Case Report, Surgical Considerations, and Review of the Literature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borghei-Razavi, Hamid; Darvish, Omid; Schick, Uta

    2013-01-01

    Microvascular compression of the vestibulocochlear nerve is known as a cause of tinnitus and vertigo in the literature, but our review of the literature shows that the compression is usually located in the cerebellopontine angle and not intrameatal. We present a case of intrameatal compression of the anterior inferior cerebellar artery (AICA) on the vestibulocochlear nerve of a 40-year-old woman with symptoms of disabling vertigo and intermittent high-frequency tinnitus on the left side without any hearing loss for ∼ 4 years. Magnetic resonance imaging of the brain did not show any abnormality, but magnetic resonance angiography showed a left intrameatal AICA loop as a possible cause of the disabling symptoms. After the exclusion of other possible reasons for disabling vertigo, surgery was indicated. The intraoperative findings proved the radiologic findings. The large AICA loop was found extending into the internal auditory canal and compressing the vestibulocochlear nerve. The AICA loop was mobilized and separated from the vestibulocochlear nerve. The patient's symptoms resolved immediately after surgery, and no symptoms were noted during 2 years of follow-up in our clinic. Her hearing was not affected by the surgery. In addition to other common reasons, such as acoustic neuroma, disabling vertigo and tinnitus can occur from an intrameatal arterial loop compression of the vestibulocochlear nerve and may be treated successfully by drilling the internal acoustic meatus and separating the arterial conflict from the vestibulocochlear nerve. PMID:25083388

  13. Preliminary Results for the Treatment of a Pain-Causing Osteoporotic Vertebral Compression Fracture with a Sky Bone Expander

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Jin Bo; Tang, Xue Ming; Xu, Nan Wei; Bao, Hong Tao [Changzhou No 2. Hospital, Changzhou (China)

    2008-10-15

    Vertebral compression fractures (VCFs) are common complications of osteoporosis. The expansion of VCFs with a Sky Bone Expander is a new procedure which improves kyphotic deformities and decreases pain associated with VCFs. The purpose of this study was to investigate the preliminary results for the treatment of painful osteoporotic VCFs with a Sky Bone Expander. Twenty-six patients with pain-causing VCFs were treated with a Sky Bone Expander. This operation involved the percutaneous insertion of the Sky Bone Expander into a fractured vertebral body transpedicularly. Following the expansion, the Sky Bone Expander was contracted and removed, resulting in a cavity to be filled with bone cement. All fractures were analyzed for improvement in sagittal alignment. Clinical complications, pain relief and ambulation status were evaluated 1 day, 1 week, 1 month, and 3 months after the operation. Twenty-four hours after the operation, all the patients treated experienced some degree of pain relief. In addition, no postoperative neurologic complications were noted. The average operative time was 42.4 {+-} 15.5 min per vertebra. Moreover, an average cement volume of 3.5 mL (range, 2.5 {+-} 5.0 mL) was injected per vertebra. The average anterior height was 18.4 {+-} 5.1 mm preoperatively and 20.5 {+-} 5.3 mm postoperatively (p < 0.01). Furthermore, the average midline height was 15.5 {+-} 5.2 mm preoperatively and 18.9 {+-} 4.0 mm postoperatively (p < 0.01). The Cobb angle improved from 18.5 {+-} 8.2 degrees preoperatively to 9.2 {+-} 4.0 degrees postoperatively (p < 0.01). The Visual Anabog Scale scores decreased from 7.7 {+-} 1.8 points preoperatively to 3.1 {+-} 2.0, 2.9 {+-} 1.7, 2.6 {+-} 1.5 and 2.9 {+-} 11.3 after 1 day, 1 week, 1 month and 3 months after the operation, respectively. Cement extrusion was observed in four patients without any neurologic symptoms. As a result of this study, we can postulate that the expansion of compressed vetrebra with a Sky Bone Expander

  14. Changes in Muscle Spasticity in Patients With Cerebral Palsy After Spinal Manipulation: Case Series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kachmar, Oleh; Voloshyn, Taras; Hordiyevych, Mykhailo

    2016-12-01

    The purpose of this case series was to report quantitative changes in wrist muscle spasticity in children with cerebral palsy after 1 spinal manipulation (SM) and a 2-week course of treatment. Twenty-nine patients, aged 7 to 18 years, with spastic forms of cerebral palsy and without fixed contracture of the wrist, were evaluated before initiation of treatment, after 1 SM, and at the end of a 2-week course of treatment. Along with daily SM, the program included physical therapy, massage, reflexotherapy, extremity joint mobilization, mechanotherapy, and rehabilitation computer games for 3 to 4 hours' duration. Spasticity of the wrist flexor was measured quantitatively using a Neuroflexor device, which calculates the neural component (NC) of muscle tone, representing true spasticity, and excluding nonneural components, caused by altered muscle properties: elasticity and viscosity. Substantial decrease in spasticity was noted in all patient groups after SM. The average NC values decreased by 1.65 newtons (from 7.6 ± 6.2 to 5.9 ± 6.5) after 1 SM. Another slight decrease of 0.5 newtons was noted after a 2-week course of treatment. In the group of patients with minimal spasticity, the decrease in NC after the first SM was almost twofold-from 3.93 ± 2.9 to 2.01 ± 1.0. In cases of moderate spasticity, NC reduction was noted only after the 2-week course of intensive treatment. In this sample of patients with cerebral palsy, a decrease in wrist muscle spasticity was noted after SM. Spasticity reduction was potentiated during the 2-week course of treatment.

  15. Efficacy of cold therapy on spasticity and hand function in children with cerebral palsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gehan M. Abd El-Maksoud

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Spasticity remains a major cause of disability among children with cerebral palsy (CP. Effective management depends on careful assessment and an interdisciplinary treatment approach. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of cold therapy when used in combination with conventional physical and occupational therapy to control upper limbs’ spasticity and to improve hand function in children with spastic CP. Thirty children of both sexes (12 girls and 18 boys with spastic CP with ages ranged from 4 to 6 years (mean age 62.2 ± 7.5 months participated in this study. They had mild to moderate spasticity in elbow and wrist flexors. Children were randomly divided into two groups of equal number: group I and group II. Children in group I received cold therapy on elbow and wrist flexors immediately before the application of conventional physical and occupational therapy. Those in group II received the same conventional occupational and physical therapy only. In both groups treatment was conducted three times per week for a successive 3 months. Spasticity, range of motion (ROM and hand function were evaluated before and after the treatment by using the Modified Ashworth Scale, the electronic goniometer and the Peabody Developmental Motor Scale, respectively. Both groups showed a statistically significant reduction in spasticity, increase in ROM and improvement of hand function but group I showed a more significant improvement. It can be concluded that cold therapy in conjunction with conventional physical and occupational therapy significantly reduced spasticity, increased ROM and improved hand function in children with spastic CP.

  16. The Efficacy of Botulinum Toxin A Intramuscular Injections in After-Stroke Spasticity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melek Karaçam

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Spasticity is a common dysfunction in stroke patients. It hinders the performance of everyday living activities and lowers the quality of life. In this study, it was aimed to investigate the effects of botulinum toxin A therapy on various aspects, such as muscle tone, pain, daily living activities and disability. METHODS: Fifteen patients with stroke presenting with focal spasticity in the botulinum toxin outpatient unit were evaluated. Results before and after treatment were evaluated by applying different scales. Modified Ashworth Scale was applied for the severity of spasticity. The Medical Council Research Scale was used to test muscle power, and the disability scoring scale, Visual Analogue Pain Scale and Barthel index were the other measures tested. RESULTS: It was found that therapy with botulinum toxin A was effective in spasticity. The increased muscle tone and the disability scores decreased prominently after the treatment (p< 0.05. Lower values in pain scores (p< 0.05 also contributed to better functional outcome (p< 0.01. Along with the significantly good outcome according to the scales, the higher scores in quality of life, feeling of well-being, good performance during the physiotherapy sessions, and less medications needed for spasticity were also indications in commencing the therapy of botulinum toxin A in spasticity. CONCLUSION: Spasticity is a complicated condition causing serious disability. Botulinum toxin A is a preferred therapy when there is an increased motor activity. The effects of the agent are reversible and reliable. The duration of the treatment is long-lasting. Since botulinum toxin A is easily applied and the outcome in focal spasticity is favorable, it is recommended as the first-line choice in the treatment of focal spasticity.

  17. The Efficacy of Botulinum Toxin A Intramuscular Injections in After-Stroke Spasticity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melek Karaçam

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Spasticity is a common dysfunction in stroke patients. It hinders the performance of everyday living activities and lowers the quality of life. In this study, it was aimed to investigate the effects of botulinum toxin A therapy on various aspects, such as muscle tone, pain, daily living activities and disability. METHODS: Fifteen patients with stroke presenting with focal spasticity in the botulinum toxin outpatient unit were evaluated. Results before and after treatment were evaluated by applying different scales. Modified Ashworth Scale was applied for the severity of spasticity. The Medical Council Research Scale was used to test muscle power, and the disability scoring scale, Visual Analogue Pain Scale and Barthel index were the other measures tested. RESULTS: It was found that therapy with botulinum toxin A was effective in spasticity. The increased muscle tone and the disability scores decreased prominently after the treatment (p< 0.05. Lower values in pain scores (p< 0.05 also contributed to better functional outcome (p< 0.01. Along with the significantly good outcome according to the scales, the higher scores in quality of life, feeling of well-being, good performance during the physiotherapy sessions, and less medications needed for spasticity were also indications in commencing the therapy of botulinum toxin A in spasticity. CONCLUSION: Spasticity is a complicated condition causing serious disability. Botulinum toxin A is a preferred therapy when there is an increased motor activity. The effects of the agent are reversible and reliable. The duration of the treatment is long-lasting. Since botulinum toxin A is easily applied and the outcome in focal spasticity is favorable, it is recommended as the first-line choice in the treatment of focal spasticity

  18. Paravertebral cutaneous hemangiosarcoma in dog causing medular compression / Hemangiossarcoma cutâneo paravertebral em cão causando compressão medular

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Paula Frederico Rodrigues Loureiro Bracarense

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available A seven-year-old male Scottish terrier was examined at the Veterinary Hospital of the Universidade Estadual de Londrina due to a toracolumbar syndrome classified as V degree and a mass in lumbar region back right of slow growth with evaluation of two months. Myelography showed an interruption of the column of contrast between the 11th and 12th thoracic vertebrae. A hemilaminectomy was performed in this region. Spinal cord compression at this location was not observed, however during the caudal enlargement of hemilaminectomy it was visualized in the region of the fourth lumbar vertebrae, a spinal cord deviation to the left, due to the presence of a reddish mass at the right side that was diagnosed as a tumor infiltration in the vertebrae with cord compression. Surgical removal with appropriate margin was not possible. In histology, the tumor was classified as hemangiosarcoma. This report emphasizes the importance of considering the possibility of cancer as differential diagnosis of paraplegias, even in acute clinical changes.Um cão macho, Scottish Terrier, de sete anos foi atendido no Hospital Veterinário da Universidade Estadual de Londrina por apresentar paraplegia grau V e um nódulo em região dorso lombar direita de crescimento lento, com evolução de dois meses. Foi realizado mielografia, visibilizando-se interrupção na coluna de contraste entre as vértebras torácicas 11ª e 12ª. Assim, procedeu-se à hemilaminectomia nesta região, não sendo constatado compressão medular, procedendo-se a ampliação caudal da abertura da lâmina vertebral T12. Na região da quarta vértebra lombar observou-se um desvio da medula espinhal para o lado esquerdo devido à presença de uma massa de coloração avermelhada proveniente do lado direito, diagnosticando-se infiltração tumoral em vértebras com compressão medular, não sendo possível sua remoção cirúrgica. Na histologia classificou-se o tumor como hemangiossarcoma. Este relato

  19. Classification of gait patterns in spastic hemiplegia and spastic diplegia: a basis for a management algorithm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodda, J; Graham, H K

    2001-11-01

    Classifications of gait and postural patterns in spastic hemiplegia and spastic diplegiía are presented, based on the work of previous authors. The classifications are used as a biomechanical basis, linking spasticity, musculoskeletal pathology in the lower limbs, and the appropriate intervention strategies. The choice of target muscles for spasticity management, the muscle contractures requiring lengthening and the choice of orthotics are then linked to the underlying gait pattern.

  20. Optimal management for people with severe spasticity

    OpenAIRE

    Shilt, Jeffrey; Seibert,; Kadyan,

    2012-01-01

    Jeffrey Shilt,1 Pennie S Seibert,2 Vivek Kadyan11Idaho Spasticity Program, Saint Alphonsus Health Systems, Boise, ID, 2Department of Psychology, Boise State University, Boise, ID, USAAbstract: Spasticity is characterized by velocity-dependent increase in tonic stretch reflexes and tendon jerks. Many people affected by spasticity receive late treatment, or no treatment, which greatly reduces the potential to regain full motor control and restore function. There is much to consider before deter...

  1. Spasticity after stroke: Physiology, assessment and treatment

    OpenAIRE

    Thibaut, Aurore; Chatelle, Camille; Ziegler, Erik; Bruno, Marie-Aurelie; Laureys, Steven; Gosseries, Olivia

    2013-01-01

    Spasticity following a stroke occurs in about 30% of patients. The mechanisms underlying this disorder, however, are not well understood. This review aims to define spasticity, describe hypotheses explaining its development after a stroke, give an overview of related neuroimaging studies as well as a description of the most common scales used to quantify the degree of spasticity and finally explore which treatments are currently being used to treat this disorder. The lack of consensus is high...

  2. Treatment of Spasticity in Cerebral Palsy

    OpenAIRE

    Gül Mete Civelek; Ayçe Atalay

    2016-01-01

    The cerebral palsy diagnosis is a clinical one and it includes motor development delay, abnormal muscle tone and hyperreflexia. Muscle weakness, spasticity, loss of coordination, the continuation of the primitive reflexes and non-developed normal motor control are often seen in children with cerebral palsy. Spasticity is the velocity dependent increase in the resistance against passive muscle stretching. Spasticity treatment program should be established after detailed evaluation of degree an...

  3. Recessive loss-of-function mutations in AP4S1 cause mild fever-sensitive seizures, developmental delay and spastic paraplegia through loss of AP-4 complex assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardies, Katia; May, Patrick; Djémié, Tania; Tarta-Arsene, Oana; Deconinck, Tine; Craiu, Dana; Helbig, Ingo; Suls, Arvid; Balling, Rudy; Weckhuysen, Sarah; De Jonghe, Peter; Hirst, Jennifer; Afawi, Zaid; Barisic, Nina; Baulac, Stéphanie; Caglayan, Hande; Depienne, Christel; De Kovel, Carolien G.F.; Dimova, Petia; Guerrero-López, Rosa; Guerrini, Renzo; Hjalgrim, Helle; Hoffman-Zacharska, Dorota; Jahn, Johanna; Klein, Karl Martin; Koeleman, Bobby P.C.; Leguern, Eric; Lehesjoki, Anna-Elina; Lemke, Johannes; Lerche, Holger; Marini, Carla; Muhle, Hiltrud; Rosenow, Felix; Serratosa, Jose M.; Møller, Rikke S.; Stephani, Ulrich; Striano, Pasquale; Talvik, Tiina; Von Spiczak, Sarah; Weber, Yvonne; Zara, Federico

    2015-01-01

    We report two siblings with infantile onset seizures, severe developmental delay and spastic paraplegia, in whom whole-genome sequencing revealed compound heterozygous mutations in the AP4S1 gene, encoding the σ subunit of the adaptor protein complex 4 (AP-4). The effect of the predicted loss-of-function variants (p.Gln46Profs*9 and p.Arg97*) was further investigated in a patient's fibroblast cell line. We show that the premature stop mutations in AP4S1 result in a reduction of all AP-4 subunits and loss of AP-4 complex assembly. Recruitment of the AP-4 accessory protein tepsin, to the membrane was also abolished. In retrospect, the clinical phenotype in the family is consistent with previous reports of the AP-4 deficiency syndrome. Our study reports the second family with mutations in AP4S1 and describes the first two patients with loss of AP4S1 and seizures. We further discuss seizure phenotypes in reported patients, highlighting that seizures are part of the clinical manifestation of the AP-4 deficiency syndrome. We also hypothesize that endosomal trafficking is a common theme between heritable spastic paraplegia and some inherited epilepsies. PMID:25552650

  4. Upper limb impairments associated with spasticity in neurological disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirbagheri Mehdi M

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background While upper-extremity movement in individuals with neurological disorders such as stroke and spinal cord injury (SCI has been studied for many years, the effects of spasticity on arm movement have been poorly quantified. The present study is designed to characterize the nature of impaired arm movements associated with spasticity in these two clinical populations. By comparing impaired voluntary movements between these two groups, we will gain a greater understanding of the effects of the type of spasticity on these movements and, potentially a better understanding of the underlying impairment mechanisms. Methods We characterized the kinematics and kinetics of rapid arm movement in SCI and neurologically intact subjects and in both the paretic and non-paretic limbs in stroke subjects. The kinematics of rapid elbow extension over the entire range of motion were quantified by measuring movement trajectory and its derivatives; i.e. movement velocity and acceleration. The kinetics were quantified by measuring maximum isometric voluntary contractions of elbow flexors and extensors. The movement smoothness was estimated using two different computational techniques. Results Most kinematic and kinetic and movement smoothness parameters changed significantly in paretic as compared to normal arms in stroke subjects (p Conclusion The findings suggest that although the cause and location of injury are different in spastic stroke and SCI subjects, the impairments in arm voluntary movement were similar in the two spastic groups. Our results also suggest that the non-paretic arm in stroke subjects was not distinguishable from the normal, and might therefore be used as an appropriate control for studying movement of the paretic arm.

  5. Botulinum toxin type A in the healing of chronic lesion following bilateral spasticity of gluteus muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cigna, Emanuele; Maruccia, Michele; Fanelli, Benedetta; Scuderi, Nicolò

    2014-08-01

    Use of botulinum toxin is expanding as the clinical studies demonstrate new potential therapeutic applications. In rehabilitation, botulinum toxin is above all used as adjunct therapy for the treatment of spasticity, but it may prove useful for other atypical clinical situations. A 17-year-old man had a sub-arachnoid haemorrhage following the rupture of cerebral aneurism. The patient presented gluteus maximus and medius bilaterally spasticity that produced a chronic lesion in the intergluteal cleft, a flexed wrist and a flexed elbow. As treatment for this spasticity, a total of 100 U botulinum toxin type A were injected into the glutei muscles. This treatment allowed for application of topical medication and subsequently, chronic lesion healing. Botulinum toxin A may be an important therapeutic aid for clinicians faced with treating persistent pathological conditions caused by spasticity. © 2012 The Authors. International Wound Journal © 2012 Medicalhelplines.com Inc and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. The effect of Sativex in neuropathic pain and spasticity in spinal cord injury

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andresen, Sven Robert; Hansen, Rikke Bod Middelhede; Johansen, Inger Lauge

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Neuropathic pain and spasticity after spinal cord injury represent significant but still unresolved problems, which cause considerable suffering and reduced quality of life for patients with spinal cord injury. Treatment of neuropathic pain and spasticity is complicated and patients...... often receive incomplete relief from present available and recommended treatment. Cannabinoids has shown efficacy on both neuropathic pain and spasticity in patients with spinal cord injury, but the studies one the topic has been too small to make a general conclusion for patients with spinal cord...... injury. Aims: To investigate the effect of Sativex (cannabinoid agonist given as an oral mucosal spray), on neuropathic pain and spasticity in patients with spinal cord injury. Methods: A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled crossover study. We will include 30 patients with neuropathic pain...

  7. SPG7 mutations explain a significant proportion of French Canadian spastic ataxia cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choquet, Karine; Tétreault, Martine; Yang, Sharon; La Piana, Roberta; Dicaire, Marie-Josée; Vanstone, Megan R; Mathieu, Jean; Bouchard, Jean-Pierre; Rioux, Marie-France; Rouleau, Guy A; Boycott, Kym M; Majewski, Jacek; Brais, Bernard

    2016-07-01

    Hereditary cerebellar ataxias and hereditary spastic paraplegias are clinically and genetically heterogeneous and often overlapping neurological disorders. Mutations in SPG7 cause the autosomal recessive spastic paraplegia type 7 (SPG7), but recent studies indicate that they are also one of the most common causes of recessive cerebellar ataxia. In Quebec, a significant number of patients affected with cerebellar ataxia and spasticity remain without a molecular diagnosis. We performed whole-exome sequencing in three French Canadian (FC) patients affected with spastic ataxia and uncovered compound heterozygous variants in SPG7 in all three. Sanger sequencing of SPG7 exons and exon/intron boundaries was used to screen additional patients. In total, we identified recessive variants in SPG7 in 22 FC patients belonging to 12 families (38.7% of the families screened), including two novel variants. The p.(Ala510Val) variant was the most common in our cohort. Cerebellar features, including ataxia, were more pronounced than spasticity in this cohort. These results strongly suggest that variants affecting the function of SPG7 are the fourth most common form of recessive ataxia in FC patients. Thus, we propose that SPG7 mutations explain a significant proportion of FC spastic ataxia cases and that this gene should be considered in unresolved patients.

  8. Extrinsic tracheal compression caused by scoliosis of the thoracic spine and chest wall degormity: A case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baek, Kyong min Sarah; Lee, Bae Young; Kim, Hyeon Sook; Song, Kyung Sup; Kang, Hyeon Hul; Lee, Sang Haak; Moon, Hwa Sik [St. Paul' s Hospital, College of Medicine, The Catholic University of Korea, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-05-15

    Extrinsic airway compression due to chest wall deformity is not commonly observed. Although this condition can be diagnosed more easily with the help of multidetector CT, the standard treatment method has not yet been definitely established. We report a case of an eighteen-year-old male who suffered from severe extrinsic tracheal compression due to scoliosis and straightening of the thoracic spine, confirmed on CT and bronchoscopy. The patient underwent successful placement of tracheal stent but later died of bleeding from the tracheostomy site probably due to tracheo-brachiocephalic artery fistula. We describe the CT and bronchoscopic findings of extrinsic airway compression due to chest wall deformity as well as the optimal treatment method, and discuss the possible explanation for bleeding in the patient along with review of the literature.

  9. Extrinsic tracheal compression caused by scoliosis of the thoracic spine and chest wall degormity: A case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baek, Kyong min Sarah; Lee, Bae Young; Kim, Hyeon Sook; Song, Kyung Sup; Kang, Hyeon Hul; Lee, Sang Haak; Moon, Hwa Sik

    2014-01-01

    Extrinsic airway compression due to chest wall deformity is not commonly observed. Although this condition can be diagnosed more easily with the help of multidetector CT, the standard treatment method has not yet been definitely established. We report a case of an eighteen-year-old male who suffered from severe extrinsic tracheal compression due to scoliosis and straightening of the thoracic spine, confirmed on CT and bronchoscopy. The patient underwent successful placement of tracheal stent but later died of bleeding from the tracheostomy site probably due to tracheo-brachiocephalic artery fistula. We describe the CT and bronchoscopic findings of extrinsic airway compression due to chest wall deformity as well as the optimal treatment method, and discuss the possible explanation for bleeding in the patient along with review of the literature.

  10. Hereditary spastic paraplegia with cerebellar ataxia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, J E; Johnsen, B; Koefoed, P

    2004-01-01

    Complex forms of hereditary spastic paraplegia (HSP) are rare and usually transmitted in an autosomal recessive pattern. A family of four generations with autosomal dominant hereditary spastic paraplegia (AD-HSP) and a complex phenotype with variably expressed co-existing ataxia, dysarthria...

  11. Effects of intrathecal triamincinolone-acetonide treatment in MS patients with therapy-resistant spasticity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamin, F; Rommer, P S; Abu-Mugheisib, M; Koehler, W; Hoffmann, F; Winkelmann, A; Benecke, R; Zettl, U K

    2015-02-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is an autoimmune disease affecting young people and is a major cause of disability. In the course of time, disability progresses and symptoms like spasticity may occur. Spasticity is a major cost factor in MS patients. Various agents are approved for the treatment of spasticity, but each of those agents may have several side effects. Intrathecally administered steroids (triamcinolone-acetonide (TCA)) may be efficient in treating spasticity in patients with lesions in the spinal cord and no response to first-line therapeutics. The aim of this study is to show effects of TCA treatment on clinical parameters in patients with MS. This multicentre open label study included 54 patients with MS. The clinical outcome parameters were spasticity, disability, maximum walking distance, bladder function and quality of life. All patients received physiotherapy in addition to TCA treatment to obtain optimal effects on clinical parameters. Spasticity, maximum walking distance as well as disability improved significantly (P ⩽ 0.001) during TCA applications. Bladder function improved in every seventh patient. We observed the effects of intrathecally administered TCA on different clinical parameters including bladder function. TCA administration is a safe method to treat different symptoms in MS patients. Longitudinal trials with repeated TCA cycles are needed to show long-term effects. Besides TCA treatment, physiotherapy contributes to the improvement of clinical parameters.

  12. Vertebral hemangiosarcoma as a cause of spinal cord compression in a horse Hemangiossarcoma de vértebra como causa de compressão da medula espinhal em um eqüino

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudio Severo Lombardo de Barros

    1997-08-01

    Full Text Available A case compression of the spinal cord in a horse by a tumor located in the vertebra is described. A 10-year-old gelding was euthanized after being found recumbent with hind limb paresis of unknown duration. At necropsy an hemangiosarcoma was detected in the vertebral body of T3. The tumoral mass invaded upwards through the bone tissue of the vertebral body into the vertebral canal, compressing the spinal cord and causing Wallerian degeneration at T1-3 levels of the cord.É relatado um caso de compressão da medula espinhal em um cavalo por um tumor localizado na vértebra. Um eqüino, macho, castrado de 10 anos de idade foi sacrificado após ser encontrado em decúbito com paresia dos membros posteriores de duração desconhecida. Na necropsia, um hemangiossarcoma foi detectado no corpo da vértebra T3. A massa invadia o tecido ósseo do corpo da vértebra, penetrava o canal vertebral e comprimia a medula espinhal, causando degeneração walleriana ao nível dos segmentos T1-3.

  13. Tropical spastic paraparesis - anesthetic approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margarida Rodrigues

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction HTLV-1 infection is endemic in Japan, Caribbean, Africa, and South America. It is transmitted from mother to child, sexual contact, blood transfusions, or sharing needles. Tropical spastic paraparesis (TSP is a chronic degenerative neurological disease associated with this infection. It results from a spinal cord symmetrical degeneration at the thoracic level and is characterized by progressive motor weakness in the lower limbs, hyperreflexia, sensitivity changes, urinary incontinence, and bladder dysfunction. Clinical case Female, 53 years old, HTLV-1 infection and TSP. She had decreased strength in the lower limbs and hyperreflexia, paretic gait, spasticity, and neurogenic bladder symptoms, with recurrent urinary infections. She was scheduled for cystectomy. The patient was monitored according to standard ASA. Due to severe coagulopathy and the possibility of neurological worsening, epidural catheter was not placed. The induction of general anesthesia was performed with midazolam and fentanyl, followed by etomidate and cisatracurium. She was intubated with a tube size seven and maintained with desflurane and oxygen. Anesthesia was uneventful; the surgery lasted 1 hour and 50 min. There were no complications in the immediate postoperative period, during hospitalization, nor deterioration of the neurological examination. The patient was discharged 20 days later. Discussion/Conclusion There are reports of decreased electromyographic response and neurological deterioration associated with propofol in these patients, etomidate was used. The hepatic metabolism of rocuronium posed a risk, we chose to use cistracurium. It was concluded that the anesthesia chosen did not affect the course of the disease.

  14. The differential diagnosis of spastic diplegia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huntsman, Richard; Lemire, Edmond; Norton, Jonathon; Dzus, Anne; Blakley, Patricia; Hasal, Simona

    2015-05-01

    Spastic diplegia is the most common form of cerebral palsy worldwide. Many disorders mimic spastic diplegia, which can result in misdiagnosis for the child with resultant negative treatment and family counselling implications. In this paper, the authors provide a brief review of spastic diplegia and the various disorders in the differential diagnosis. We also provide a diagnostic algorithm to assist physicians in making the correct diagnosis. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  15. Spasticity in Children with Cerebral Palsy?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Willerslev-Olsen, Maria

    During the past 30 years spasticity research has raised fundamental concerns regarding the definition, evaluation and functional significance of spasticity. The present thesis is a direct continuation of this work. The aim of the thesis was to evaluate reflex mediated stiffness (spasticity...... produced a similar or in some cases a smaller drop in the soleus EMG activity in the children with CP compared to control children. This indicates that sensory feedback mechanisms contribute less to the soleus EMG activity in children with CP than in control children. We thus argue that exaggeration...

  16. Functional connectivity for somatosensory and motor cortex in spastic diplegia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burton, Harold; Dixit, Sachin; Litkowski, Patricia; Wingert, Jason R

    2009-12-01

    Functional connectivity (fcMRI) was analyzed in individuals with spastic diplegia and age-matched controls. Pearson correlations (r-values) were computed between resting state spontaneous activity in selected seed regions (sROI) and each voxel throughout the brain. Seed ROI were centered on foci activated by tactile stimulation of the second fingertip in somatosensory and parietal dorsal attention regions. The group with diplegia showed significantly expanded networks for the somatomotor but not dorsal attention areas. These expanded networks overran nearly all topological representations in somatosensory and motor areas despite a sROI in a fingertip focus. A possible underlying cause for altered fcMRI in the group with dipegia, and generally sensorimotor deficits in spastic diplegia, is that prenatal third trimester white-matter injury leads to localized damage to subplate neurons. We hypothesize that intracortical connections become dominant in spastic diplegia through successful competition with diminished or absent thalamocortical inputs. Similar to the effects of subplate ablations on ocular dominance columns (Kanold and Shatz, Neuron 2006;51:627-638), a spike timing-dependent plasticity model is proposed to explain a shift towards intracortical inputs.

  17. TFG associated hereditary spastic paraplegia: an addition to the phenotypic spectrum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tariq, Huma; Naz, Sadaf

    2017-04-01

    Hereditary spastic paraplegias (HSPs) constitute movement disorders with extreme lower limb spasticity caused by axonopathies of the upper motor neurons. We describe two siblings affected with a recessive form of movement disorder. Whole-exome sequencing revealed a homozygous missense mutation c.64 C>T (p.Arg22Trp) in TFG as cause of the disorder. Comparison of the phenotype of the patients of this study, with that reported previously, revealed differences in the severity of the disorder as well as new clinical findings. These include presence of clonus, undeveloped speech, and sleep disturbances. Our findings extend the phenotypic spectrum associated with the TFG mutations in HSP.

  18. Multiple thoracic vertebral compression fractures caused by non-accidental injury: case report with radiological-pathological correlation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Twomey, Eilish L.; Iemsawatdikul, Kriengkrai; Stephens, Boyd G.; Gooding, Charles A. [Department of Radiology, University of California at San Francisco, 505 Parnassus Avenue, Box 0628, 94143-0628, San Francisco, CA (United States)

    2004-08-01

    We report a 21-month-old boy with multiple contiguous thoracic vertebral compression fractures involving eight vertebral bodies, attributable to non-accidental injury. No subluxation was associated, however, there was extensive injury to the upper cervical and lower lumbar regions of the spinal cord. Anterosuperior beaking, thought to represent a previous injury, was evident in a mid-lumbar vertebra. Clinical examination revealed bilateral retinal hemorrhages and retinoschisis. Death occurred as a result of severe brain edema with bilateral subdural and subarachnoid hemorrhages. Radiological-pathological correlation is presented. (orig.)

  19. Genetics Home Reference: spastic paraplegia type 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Soderblom C, Blackstone C. Traffic accidents: molecular genetic insights into the pathogenesis of the hereditary spastic ... is direct-to-consumer genetic testing? What is precision medicine? What is ...

  20. Pharmacological management of spasticity in multiple sclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Otero-Romero, Susana; Sastre-Garriga, Jaume; Comi, Giancarlo

    2016-01-01

    Background and objectives: Treatment of spasticity poses a major challenge given the complex clinical presentation and variable efficacy and safety profiles of available drugs. We present a systematic review of the pharmacological treatment of spasticity in multiple sclerosis (MS) patients. Methods...... improvement is seen with the previous drugs. Nabiximols has a positive effect when used as add-on therapy in patients with poor response and/or tolerance to first-line oral treatments. Despite limited evidence, intrathecal baclofen and intrathecal phenol show a positive effect in severe spasticity...... and suboptimal response to oral drugs. Conclusion: The available studies on spasticity treatment offer some insight to guide clinical practice but are of variable methodological quality. Large, well-designed trials are needed to confirm the effectiveness of antispasticity agents and to produce evidence...

  1. “Appropriate Treatment” and Therapeutic Window in Spasticity Treatment with IncobotulinumtoxinA: From 100 to 1000 Units

    OpenAIRE

    Giancarlo Ianieri; Riccardo Marvulli; Giulia Alessia Gallo; Pietro Fiore; Marisa Megna

    2018-01-01

    Many neurological diseases (ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke, multiple sclerosis, infant cerebral palsy, spinal cord injuries, traumatic brain injury, and other cerebrovascular disorders) may cause muscle spasticity. Different therapeutic strategies have been proposed for the treatment of spasticity. One of the major treatments for tone modulation is botulinum toxin type A (BTX-A), performed in addition to other rehabilitation strategies based on individualized multidisciplinary programs aimed...

  2. Validity and Inter-Rater Reliability of a Novel Bedside Referral Tool for Spasticity

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-02-20

    Spasticity, Muscle; Muscular Diseases; Musculoskeletal Disease; Muscle Hypertonia; Muscle Spasticity; Neuromuscular Manifestations; Signs and Symptoms; Nervous System Diseases; Neurologic Manifestations

  3. Mania associated with complicated hereditary spastic paraparesis

    OpenAIRE

    Raghavendra B Nayak; Govind S Bhogale; Nanasaheb M Patil; Aditya A Pandurangi

    2011-01-01

    Hereditary spastic paraparesis (HSP) is an inherited group of neurological disorders with progressive lower limb spasticity. HSP can be clinically grouped into pure and complicated forms. Pure HSP is one without any associated neurological/psychiatric comorbidity. Depression is the most common psychiatric comorbidity. Presence of mania or bipolar affective illness with HSP is a rare phenomenon. We report a case of a 17-year-old boy who presented with classical features of HSP with complaints ...

  4. An unusual case of rapidly progressed cervical compression myelopathy caused by overnight inappropriate usage of Smartphone device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Chen-Ya; Wang, Jia-Chi

    2017-05-01

    A 38-year-old man was healthy before presenting to our clinic with pain and marked weakness in the right upper extremity. He stated that the symptoms developed the day after he accidentally fell asleep while playing with his Smartphone half-lying on his back with two thick pillows supporting his upper back. Physical examination revealed significant increase in deep tendon reflexes in the lower extremities and clonus. Hoffman's sign was positive in the left upper extremity. Magnetic resonance image showed high signal change on T2-weighted images of the left spinal cord at the C4-5 level, which was indicative of compression myelopathy. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Association of Early-Onset Spasticity and Risk for Cognitive Impairment With Mutations at Amino Acid 499 in SPAST.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillespie, Meredith K; Humphreys, Peter; McMillan, Hugh J; Boycott, Kym M

    2018-04-01

    Hereditary spastic paraplegia is a phenotypically and genetically heterogeneous group of neurodegenerative disorders characterized by lower extremity weakness and spasticity. Spastic paraplegia 4 (SPG4), caused by heterozygous mutations in the gene SPAST, typically causes a late-onset, uncomplicated form of hereditary spastic paraplegia in affected individuals. Additional clinical features in SPG4 have been reported on occasion, but no genotype-phenotype correlation has been established. Through targeted clinical testing, we identified 2 unrelated female patients with the same de novo p.Arg499His mutation in SPAST. Both patients presented with early-onset spasticity resulting in delayed motor milestones, which led to a diagnosis of cerebral palsy in one child and tethered cord in the other. Review of the literature identified several patients with mutations at amino acid 499 and early-onset symptoms associated with a risk of cognitive impairment. Early and accurate diagnosis of children with early-onset spasticity is important for informed prognosis and genetic counselling.

  6. SPG20 mutation in three siblings with familial hereditary spastic paraplegia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dardour, Leila; Roelens, Filip; Race, Valerie; Souche, Erika; Holvoet, Maureen; Devriendt, Koen

    2017-07-01

    Troyer syndrome (MIM#275900) is an autosomal recessive form of complicated hereditary spastic paraplegia. It is characterized by progressive lower extremity spasticity and weakness, dysarthria, distal amyotrophy, developmental delay, short stature, and subtle skeletal abnormalities. It is caused by deleterious mutations in the SPG20 gene, encoding spartin, on Chromosome 13q13. Until now, six unrelated families with a genetically confirmed diagnosis have been reported. Here we report the clinical findings in three brothers of a consanguineous Moroccan family, aged 24, 17, and 7 yr old, with spastic paraplegia, short stature, motor and cognitive delay, and severe intellectual disability. Targeted exon capture and sequencing showed a homozygous nonsense mutation in the SPG20 gene, c.1369C>T (p.Arg457*), in the three affected boys. © 2017 Dardour et al.; Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press.

  7. Treatment of os odontoideum in a patient with spastic quadriplegic cerebral palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akpolat, Yusuf T; Fegale, Ben; Cheng, Wayne K

    2015-08-01

    Severe atlantoaxial instability due to os odontoideum in a patient with spastic cerebral palsy has not been well described. There is no consensus on treatment, particularly with regard to conservative or surgical options. Our patient was a 9-year-old girl with spastic cerebral palsy and unstable os odontoideum as an incidental finding. During the waiting period for elective surgical treatment, the patient developed respiratory compromise. Surgery was performed to reduce the subluxation and for C1-C2 arthrodesis and the girl regained baseline respiratory function. A CT scan was obtained 1 year after the initial surgery and revealed adequate maintenance of reduction and patency of the spinal canal. This patient highlights the fact that unstable os odontoideum can cause mortality due to respiratory distress in patients with spastic cerebral palsy. This is an important factor in deciding treatment options for cerebral palsy patients with low functional demand. We review the relevant literature. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Cochleovestibular Nerve Compression Syndrome Caused by Intrameatal Anterior Inferior Cerebellar Artery Loop: Synthesis of Best Evidence for Clinical Decisions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esposito, Giacomo; Messina, Raffaella; Carai, Andrea; Colafati, Giovanna Stefania; Savioli, Alessandra; Randi, Franco; De Benedictis, Alessandro; Cossu, Silvia; Fontanella, Marco Maria; Marras, Carlo Efisio

    2016-12-01

    Intrameatal cochleovestibular neurovascular conflict is a rare condition with specific clinical and therapeutic implications. Although surgery is commonly indicated in other neurovascular conflicts, for this subset of patients there is little evidence to guide treatment decisions. Moving from a case description, we performed a review of the literature on this topic to systematically present the best available evidence to guide clinical decisions. We performed a literature review on reported cases of surgically treated intrameatal anterior inferior cerebellar artery (AICA)-cochleovestibular nerve neurovascular conflict, analyzing preoperative clinical data, surgical techniques, and outcomes. We analyzed the levels of evidence using the King's College guidelines. We found 35 studies of neurovascular compression of the cochleovestibular nerve by AICA for 536 patients operated on to resolve their neurovascular conflict. Only 4 of these studies describe intrameatal AICA neurovascular conflicts, for 9 cases, including our own. Tinnitus was the most frequent symptom (9/9), followed by vertigo (2/9). Our case was the only one showing unilateral hearing loss. Surgery consisted of microsurgical mobilization of the AICA loop performed through a retrosigmoid craniotomy. Tinnitus and vertigo resolved after surgery in all cases, whereas hearing loss did not improve after surgery. Surgical treatment offers the best results for tinnitus and vertigo, but it seems to have no effect on hearing loss, not even at long-term follow-up. Microvascular decompression should be proposed to intrameatal symptomatic patients before the onset of hearing loss. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Neuro-musculoskeletal simulation of instrumented contracture and spasticity assessment in children with cerebral palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Krogt, Marjolein Margaretha; Bar-On, Lynn; Kindt, Thalia; Desloovere, Kaat; Harlaar, Jaap

    2016-07-16

    Increased resistance in muscles and joints is an important phenomenon in patients with cerebral palsy (CP), and is caused by a combination of neural (e.g. spasticity) and non-neural (e.g. contracture) components. The aim of this study was to simulate instrumented, clinical assessment of the hamstring muscles in CP using a conceptual model of contracture and spasticity, and to determine to what extent contracture can be explained by altered passive muscle stiffness, and spasticity by (purely) velocity-dependent stretch reflex. Instrumented hamstrings spasticity assessment was performed on 11 children with CP and 9 typically developing children. In this test, the knee was passively stretched at slow and fast speed, and knee angle, applied forces and EMG were measured. A dedicated OpenSim model was created with motion and muscles around the knee only. Contracture was modeled by optimizing the passive muscle stiffness parameters of vasti and hamstrings, based on slow stretch data. Spasticity was modeled using a velocity-dependent feedback controller, with threshold values derived from experimental data and gain values optimized for individual subjects. Forward dynamic simulations were performed to predict muscle behavior during slow and fast passive stretches. Both slow and fast stretch data could be successfully simulated by including subject-specific levels of contracture and, for CP fast stretches, spasticity. The RMS errors of predicted knee motion in CP were 1.1 ± 0.9° for slow and 5.9 ± 2.1° for fast stretches. CP hamstrings were found to be stiffer compared with TD, and both hamstrings and vasti were more compliant than the original generic model, except for the CP hamstrings. The purely velocity-dependent spasticity model could predict response during fast passive stretch in terms of predicted knee angle, muscle activity, and fiber length and velocity. Only sustained muscle activity, independent of velocity, was not predicted by our model. The

  10. Spasticity: A review of Methods for Assessment and Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Amouzadeh Khalili

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Spasticity is the condition resulting of corticispinal damage as occurs in some neurological diseases. The aim of the article is to review the literature on assessment and treatment of spasticity and spastic limbs. The assessment and treatment methods are studied the study involves different method of mangement of spastic limbs in depth. Different method of evaluation of spasticity, including biomechanical and clinical assessment are reviewed and also some of the most common treatment methods of spasticity are studied. A number of methods for assessment and treatment of spasticity are reviewed, some of methods commonly used for assessment or management of spasticity, depend on the condition of the patient and the aim of the therapist a method may empoyed.

  11. Influence of cryotherapy on spasticity at the human ankle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, R; Lehmann, J F; Boswell-Bessette, S; Burleigh, A; deLateur, B J

    1993-03-01

    The application of cryotherapy to temporarily reduce spasticity is a widespread clinical practice. A method of quantifying spasticity, based on viscoelastic stiffness measurements at the ankle, was applied to objectively determine the efficacy of cryotherapy in reducing spasticity of the calf. Baseline, cryotherapy and one-hour postcryotherapy measurements of spasticity were performed in 25 subjects with clinical signs of spasticity secondary to traumatic brain injury, spinal cord injury, and stroke. A statistically significant reduction in spasticity occurred during cryotherapy. Postcryotherapy results were equivocal, although there was a tendency for diminished spasticity relative to the baseline measurement. Two subjects showed a clear aggravation of spasticity following cryotherapy, thus leading to the conclusion that dichotomous results are possible.

  12. Clinometric properties of a clinical spasticity measurement tool.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Voerman, Gerlienke; Burridge, J.H.; Hitchcock, R.A.; Hermens, Hermanus J.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose. To investigate clinometric properties of an Anglo-Dutch spasticity measurement tool (ADSMT), an objective tool providing information about both neurophysiological and biomechanical aspects of spasticity about the wrist joint in the clinical setting. Method. ADSMT measurements were performed

  13. Effect of whole-body vibration on muscle strength, spasticity, and motor performance in spastic diplegic cerebral palsy children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marwa M. Ibrahim

    2014-04-01

    Conclusion: The obtained results suggest that 12-weeks’ intervention of whole-body vibration training can increase knee extensors strength and decrease spasticity with beneficial effects on walking speed and motor development in spastic diplegic CP children.

  14. Botulinum toxin treatment of lower extremity spasticity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. E. Khat’kova

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The article reviews the current concept of lower extremity spasticity, which is a frequent disabling consequence of stroke. Gait biomechanics, step cycle and main pathologic patterns of lower extremity are described (hip adduction, knee flexion, knee extension, foot plantar flexion, equinovarus foot position, toes flexion, hallux extension, including muscles involved in the pathological process. Additionally the article contains detailed information on pathologic principles of lower extremity spasticity development. Special focus is given to sarcomeregenesis as an essential element of the development of potential conditions for muscle tissue adaptation to a new state and restoration of muscle length and strength. At present Botulinum toxin A (BTA is used in a complex spasticity management programs. The results of clinical studies performed in the last decade supporting the efficacy of Botox® (Onabotulinumtoxin A in the treatment of spasticity are reviewed. Effective BTA doses are proposed. Authors came to the conclusion that BTA as a part of complex rehabilitation in patients with poststroke spasticity of lower extremity promotes treatment efficacy due to a decrease of muscle tone and increase of range of movements in the joints. BTA should be regarded as an essential part of standard rehabilitation programs. Further studies to define optimal muscles for intervention, BTA doses and rehabilitation schemes are still needed. 

  15. Management of spastic hand by selective peripheral neurotomies

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Wael Fouad

    2011-08-20

    Aug 20, 2011 ... 4. Lagalla G, Danni M, Reiter F, et al. Post stroke spasticity management. Am J Phys Med Rehab 2000;79:377–84. 5. Hodgkinson I, Sindou M. Decision making for treatment of disabling spasticity in children in ''Neurosurgical Management of. Disabling Spasticity'' (Sindou ed.). Oper Tech Neurosurg 2004;.

  16. Management of spastic hand by selective peripheral neurotomies ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Methods: All patients preoperatively had spasticity either G3 or G4 as measured by modified Ashworth scale. All cases underwent surgery in the form of variable combination of SPN of median and ulnar nerves depending on the pattern and distribution of spasticity. Depending on the degree of preoperative spasticity, ...

  17. Characteristic anatomical conformation of the vertebral artery causing vascular compression against the root exit zone of the facial nerve in patients with hemifacial spasm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jung-Soo; Koh, Eun-Jeong; Choi, Ha-Young; Lee, Jong-Myong

    2015-03-01

    Hemifacial spasm (HFS) is caused by tortuous offending vessels near the facial nerve root exit zone. However, the definitive mechanism of offending vessel formation remains unclear. We hypothesized that vascular angulation and tortuosity, probably caused by uneven vertebral artery blood flow, result in vascular compression of the facial nerve root exit zone. The authors observed two anatomical characteristics of the vertebrobasilar arterial system in 120 subjects in the surgical group and 188 controls. The presence of the dominant vertebral artery (DVA) and laterality of the vertebrobasilar junction (VBJ) were observed. We also analyzed the morphological characteristics of the surgical group showing the presence of DVA. The morphological characteristics were classified into three types: type I had the VBJ and DVA on the same side, type II had the VBJ within 2 mm of the midline, and type III had the VBJ opposite the DVA. The DVA was more prevalent in the surgical group than in the control group (71 % versus 54 %, P DVA on the left (P DVA on the right (P DVA, which corresponds with the laterality of the HFS. In the surgical group with the DVA and HFS on the same side, type I was predominant, but in the surgical group with a contralateral DVA and HFS, type III was predominant. The presence of a DVA and shifting of the VBJ on the same side plays a role in the angulation and tortuosity of vessels in the perivertebrobasilar junction, resulting in neurovascular compression of the facial nerve root exit zone and thereby causing HFS.

  18. Aortic dissection presenting with secondary pulmonary hypertension caused by compression of the pulmonary artery by dissecting hematoma: a case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Dong Hun; Ryu, Sang Wan; Choi, Yong Sun; Ahn, Byoung Hee

    2004-01-01

    The rupture of an acute dissection of the ascending aorta into the space surrounding the pulmonary artery is an uncommon occurrence. No previous cases of transient pulmonary hypertension caused by a hematoma surrounding the pulmonary artery have been documented in the literature. Herein, we report a case of acute aortic dissection presenting as secondary pulmonary hypertension

  19. Quantitative evaluation for spasticity of calf muscle after botulinum toxin injection in patients with cerebral palsy: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yu-Ching; Lin, I-Ling; Chou, Te-Feng Arthur; Lee, Hsin-Min

    2016-03-12

    Cerebral palsy (CP) is the most common pediatric disease to cause motor disability. Two common symptoms in CP are spasticity and contracture. If this occurred in the ankle plantar flexors of children with CP, it will impair their gait and active daily living profoundly. Most children with CP receive botulinum toxin type A (BoNT-A) injection to reduce muscle tone, but a knowledge gap exists in the understanding of changes of neural and non-neural components of spasticity after injection. The purpose of this study was to determine if our device for quantitative modified Tardieu approach (QMTA) is a valid method to assess spasticity of calf muscles after botulinum toxin injection. In this study, we intended to develop a device for quantitative measurement of spasticity in calf muscles based on the modified Tardieu scale (MTS) and techniques of biomedical engineering. Our QMTA measures the angular displacement and resistance of stretched joint with a device that is light, portable and can be operated similar to conventional approaches for MTS. The static (R2), dynamic (R1) and R2-R1 angles derived from the reactive signals collected by the miniature sensors are used to represent the non-neural and neural components of stretched spastic muscles. Four children with CP were recruited to assess the change in spasticity in their gastrocnemius muscles before and 4 weeks after BoNT-A injection. A simulated ankle model validated the performance of our device in measuring joint displacement and estimating the angle of catch. Data from our participants with CP showed that R2 and R2-R1 improved significantly after BoNT-A administration. It indicates both neural and non-neural components of the spastic gastrocnemius muscles improved at four weeks after BoNT-A injection in children with CP. Our device for QMTA can objectively measure the changes in spasticity of the gastrocnemius muscle in children with cerebral palsy after BoNT-A injection.

  20. A single trial of transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) improves spasticity and balance in patients with chronic stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Hwi-young; In, Tae Sung; Cho, Ki Hun; Song, Chang Ho

    2013-03-01

    Spasticity management is pivotal for achieving functional recovery of stroke patients. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of a single trial of transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) on spasticity and balance in chronic stroke patients. Forty-two chronic stroke patients were randomly allocated into the TENS (n = 22) or the placebo-TENS (n = 20) group. TENS stimulation was applied to the gastrocnemius for 60 min at 100 Hz, 200 µs with 2 to 3 times the sensory threshold (the minimal threshold in detecting electrical stimulation for subjects) after received physical therapy for 30 min. In the placebo-TENS group, electrodes were placed but no electrical stimulation was administered. For measuring spasticity, the resistance encountered during passive muscle stretching of ankle joint was assessed using the Modified Ashworth Scale, and the Hand held dynamometer was used to assess the resistive force caused by spasticity. Balance ability was measured using a force platform that measures postural sway generated by postural imbalance. The TENS group showed a significantly greater reduction in spasticity of the gastrocnemius, compared to the placebo-TENS group (p TENS resulted in greater balance ability improvements, especially during the eyes closed condition (p TENS provides an immediately effective means of reducing spasticity and of improving balance in chronic stroke patients. The present data may be useful to establish the standard parameters for TENS application in the clinical setting of stroke.

  1. Hereditary spastic paraplegia with cerebellar ataxia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, J E; Johnsen, B; Koefoed, P

    2004-01-01

    Complex forms of hereditary spastic paraplegia (HSP) are rare and usually transmitted in an autosomal recessive pattern. A family of four generations with autosomal dominant hereditary spastic paraplegia (AD-HSP) and a complex phenotype with variably expressed co-existing ataxia, dysarthria...... in those individuals who were clinically affected by a complex phenotype consisting of HSP and cerebellar ataxia. Other features noted in this kindred including epilepsy, cognitive impairment, depression, and migraine did not segregate with the HSP phenotype or mutation, and therefore the significance...... relatively decreased regional cerebral blood flow in most of the cerebellum. We conclude that this kindred demonstrates a considerable overlap between cerebellar ataxia and spastic paraplegia, emphasizing the marked clinical heterogeneity of HSP associated with spastin mutations....

  2. Spasticity in disorders of consciousness: a behavioral study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thibaut, F A; Chatelle, C; Wannez, S; Deltombe, T; Stender, J; Schnakers, C; Laureys, S; Gosseries, O

    2015-08-01

    Spasticity is a frequent complication after severe brain injury, which may impede the rehabilitation process and diminish the patients' quality of life. We here investigate the presence of spasticity in a population of non-communicative patients with disorders of consciousness. We also evaluate the correlation between spasticity and potential factors of co-morbidity, frequency of physical therapy, time since insult, presence of pain, presence of tendon retraction, etiology and diagnosis. Cross-sectional study. University Hospital of Liège, Belgium. Sixty-five patients with chronic (>3 months post insult) disorders of consciousness were included (22 women; mean age: 44±14 y; 40 with traumatic etiology; 40 in a minimally conscious state; time since insult: 39±37 months). Spasticity was measured with the Modified Ashworth Scale (MAS) and pain was assessed using the Nociception Coma Scale-Revised (NCS-R). Out of 65 patients, 58 demonstrated signs of spasticity (89%; MAS≥1), including 40 who showed severe spasticity (61.5%; MAS≥3). Patients with spasticity receiving anti-spastic medication were more spastic than unmedicated patients. A negative correlation was observed between the severity of spasticity and the frequency of physical therapy. MAS scores correlated positively with time since injury and NCS-R scores. We did not observe a difference of spasticity between the diagnoses. A large proportion of patients with disorders of consciousness develop severe spasticity, possibly affecting their functional recovery and their quality of life. The observed correlation between degrees of spasticity and pain scores highlights the importance of pain management in these patients with altered states of consciousness. Finally, the relationship between spasticity and treatment (i.e., pharmacological and physical therapy) should be further investigated in order to improve clinical care. Managing spasticity at first signs could improve rehabilitation of patients with

  3. Leg Spasticity and Ambulation in Multiple Sclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Swathi Balantrapu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Spasticity of the legs is common in multiple sclerosis (MS, but there has been limited research examining its association with ambulatory outcomes. Objective. This study examined spasticity of the legs and its association with multiple measures of ambulation in persons with MS. Methods. The sample included 84 patients with MS. Spasticity of the legs was measured using a 5-point rating scale ranging between 0 (normal and 4 (contracted. Patients completed the 6-minute walk (6 MW, timed 25 foot walk (T25FW, and timed up-and-go (TUG, and O2 cost of walking was measured during the 6 MW. The patients undertook two walking trials on a GAITRite (CIR systems, Inc. for measuring spatial and temporal parameters of gait. The patients completed the Multiple Sclerosis Walking Scale-12 (MSWS-12 and wore an accelerometer over a seven-day period. Results. 52% (n=44 of the sample presented with spasticity of the legs. Those with leg spasticity had significantly worse ambulation as measured by 6 MW (P=0.0001, d=-0.86, T25FW (P=0.003,d=0.72, TUG (P=0.001, d=0.84, MSWS-12 (P=0.0001,d=1.09, O2 cost of walking (P=0.001, d=0.75, average steps/day (P<0.05, d=-0.45, and walking velocity (P<0.05, d=-0.53 and cadence (P<0.05, d=-0.46. Conclusion. Leg spasticity was associated with impairments in ambulation, including alterations in spatiotemporal parameters and free-living walking.

  4. Sensory Barrage Stimulation in the Treatment of Elbow Spasticity: A Crossover Double Blind Randomized Pilot Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slovak, Martin; Chindo, Joseph; Nair, Krishnan Padmakumari Sivaraman; Reeves, Mark L; Heller, Ben; Barker, Anthony T

    2016-02-01

    To assess the feasibility of using a novel form of multichannel electrical stimulation, termed Sensory Barrage Stimulation (SBS) for the treatment of spasticity affecting the elbow flexor muscles and to compare this with conventional single-channel TENS stimulation. Altogether ten participants with spasticity of the flexor muscles of the elbow of Grade 2 or above on the Modified Ashworth Scale (MAS) were recruited to this crossover double blind randomized trial. The participants received two intervention sessions (SBS and TENS), one week apart in a randomized order. Both interventions were applied over the triceps brachii on the affected arm for a duration of 60 minutes. Spasticity was measured using the MAS. Secondary outcome measures were self-reported change in spasticity, measured on a visual analog scale (VAS, 0-100), and therapist-rated strength of elbow extension and strength of elbow flexion. Measurements were taken immediately before each intervention was applied, immediately after the intervention, and one hour after the intervention. Immediately after stimulation spasticity showed a significant reduction for both TENS and SBS groups assessed by MAS -0.9 ± 0.2 vs. -1.1 ± 0.2 and by VAS -15 ± 3 vs. -31 ± 8. For SBS this improvement in MAS was still present at one hour after the stimulation, but not for TENS. Altogether seven SBS responders and four TENS responders were identified. This study demonstrates the feasibility and practicality of applying the new concept of SBS. Promising results indicate it causes a reduction in spasticity. © 2015 International Neuromodulation Society.

  5. Case report of deep vein thrombosis caused by artificial urinary sphincter reservoir compressing right external iliac vein

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcus J Yip

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Artificial urinary sphincters (AUSs are commonly used after radical prostatectomy for those who are incontinent of urine. However, they are associated with complications, the most common being reservoir uprising or migration. We present a unique case of occlusive external iliac and femoral vein obstruction by the AUS reservoir causing thrombosis. Deflation of the reservoir and anticoagulation has, thus far, not been successful at decreasing thrombus burden. We present this case as a rare, but significant surgical complication; explore the risk factors that may have contributed, and other potential endovascular therapies to address this previously unreported AUS complication.

  6. Spasticity: its physiology and management. Part IV. Current and projected treatment procedures for spasticity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bishop, B

    1977-04-01

    Today's prescriptions for treating spasticity may include pharmacological, surgical, or physical procedures. All derive their rationale from the classical concepts of decerebrate rigidity and of brain organization as discussed in Part I. This paper describes the advantages and disadvantages of these current treatment procedures and proposes that recent discoveries about the "recovery" capabilities of the central nervous system may influence the means for managing spasticity in the future.

  7. Risk Factors for Dystonia after Selective Dorsal Rhizotomy in Nonwalking Children and Adolescents with Bilateral Spasticity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van de Pol, Laura A; Vermeulen, R Jeroen; van 't Westende, Charlotte; van Schie, Petra E M; Bolster, Eline A M; van Ouwerkerk, Pim W J R; Strijers, Rob L; Becher, Jules G; Stadhouder, Agnita; de Graaf, Pim; Buizer, Annemieke I

    2018-02-01

    We recently showed a beneficial effect of selective dorsal rhizotomy (SDR) on daily care and comfort in nonwalking children with severe bilateral spasticity. However, despite careful selection, some patients showed dystonia after the intervention, in which cases caregivers tended to be less satisfied with the result.The aim of this study is to identify risk factors for dystonia after SDR in children and adolescents with severe bilateral spasticity (GMFCS levels IV/V).Clinical and MRI risk factors for dystonia after SDR were studied in our cohort of 24 patients. Patients with clinical evidence of dystonia and brain MRI showing basal ganglia abnormalities were excluded for SDR.Nine of 24 patients (38%) showed some degree of dystonia after SDR. There was a significant association between the cause of spasticity and dystonia after SDR; in six (67%) patients with a congenital disorder, dystonia was present versus three (20%) with an acquired disorder (Chi-squared test: C(1) = 5.23, p  = 0.02).This study allows more optimal selection of patients that may benefit from SDR. Patients with an acquired cause of spasticity, when selected carefully on clinical examination and MRI, rarely show dystonia after SDR. However, patients with an underlying congenital disorder have a considerable risk of dystonia after SDR. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  8. Epidemic spastic paraparesis in Bandundu (Zaire).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carton, H; Kayembe, K; Kabeya; Odio; Billiau, A; Maertens, K

    1986-06-01

    Epidemiological findings of twenty sporadic cases of epidemic spastic paraparesis (buka-buka) in three areas of Bandundu (Zaire) are reported. These findings suggest the involvement of an infectious agent and do not support the hypothesis of a dietary cyanide intoxication, which has been advanced to explain the outbreak of a very similar disease (Mantakassa) in Mozambique.

  9. Communication skills in individuals with spastic diplegia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamônica, Dionísia Aparecida Cusin; Paiva, Cora Sofia Takaya; Abramides, Dagma Venturini Marques; Biazon, Jamile Lozano

    2015-01-01

    To assess communication skills in children with spastic diplegia. The study included 20 subjects, 10 preschool children with spastic diplegia and 10 typical matched according to gender, mental age, and socioeconomic status. Assessment procedures were the following: interviews with parents, Stanford - Binet method, Gross Motor Function Classification System, Observing the Communicative Behavior, Vocabulary Test by Peabody Picture, Denver Developmental Screening Test II, MacArthur Development Inventory on Communicative Skills. Statistical analysis was performed using the values of mean, median, minimum and maximum value, and using Student's t-test, Mann-Whitney test, and Paired t-test. Individuals with spastic diplegia, when compared to their peers of the same mental age, presented no significant difference in relation to receptive and expressive vocabulary, fine motor skills, adaptive, personal-social, and language. The most affected area was the gross motor skills in individuals with spastic cerebral palsy. The participation in intervention procedures and the pairing of participants according to mental age may have approximated the performance between groups. There was no statistically significant difference in the comparison between groups, showing appropriate communication skills, although the experimental group has not behaved homogeneously.

  10. Genetics Home Reference: spastic paraplegia type 8

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... The pure types involve only the nerves and muscles controlling the lower limbs and bladder, whereas the complex types also have significant involvement of the nervous system in other parts of the body. ... spasticity of the leg muscles and muscle weakness. People with this condition can ...

  11. MRI of autosomal dominant pure spastic paraplegia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krabbe, K; Nielsen, J E; Fallentin, E

    1997-01-01

    We examined 16 patients with autosomal dominant pure spastic paraplegia (HSP) and 15 normal controls matched for age and sex using MRI of the brain and spinal cord. Images were assessed qualitatively by two independent radiologists, blinded to the clinical diagnosis. Areas of the brain and corpus...

  12. Incidence estimate and guideline-oriented treatment for post-stroke spasticity: an analysis based on German statutory health insurance data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Egen-Lappe V

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Veronika Egen-Lappe, Ingrid Köster, Ingrid SchubertPMV Research Group, Department of Child and Adolescence Psychiatry and Psychotherapy, University of Cologne, Cologne, GermanyBackground: Spasticity after stroke has been internationally recognized as an important health problem causing impairment of mobility, deformity, and pain. The aim of this study was to assess the frequency of first-ever and recurrent stroke and of subsequent spastic and flaccid paresis. Factors influencing the development of spasticity were analyzed. A further major aim was to provide a "real-life" assessment of the treatment of spasticity in Germany and to discuss this in view of the treatment recommended by German and international clinical guidelines.Methods: The database used in this study comprised a cohort of 242,090 insurants from a large statutory health insurance fund in the federal state of Hesse, Germany. A first hospital discharge diagnosis in 2009 with any of the International Classification of Diseases, Tenth Revision (ICD-10 codes I60–I64 was used to identify patients with acute stroke (hemorrhage and ischemic. These patients were followed up six months after stroke to monitor whether they developed spastic or flaccid paresis (hospital or ambulatory care diagnoses ICD-10 code G81–G83 [excluding G82.6/G83.4/G83.8]. For patients with spastic paresis after stroke the spasticity treatment was analyzed for a six-month period (physiotherapy, oral muscle relaxants, intrathecal baclofen, and botulinum toxin.Results: Standardized to the population of Germany, 3.7 per 1000 persons suffered a stroke in 2009 (raw 5.2/1000. Of all surviving patients, 10.2% developed spasticity within 6 months. Cox regression revealed no significant influence of patient age, gender, morbidity (diabetes, hypertensive diseases, ischemic heart diseases or type of stroke on development of spasticity. 97% of surviving patients with spasticity received physiotherapy (inpatient care 89

  13. Management of spastic cerebral palsy through multiple Ayurveda treatment modalities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhinde, Sagar M; Patel, Kalpana S; Kori, Virendra Kumar; Rajagopala, S

    2014-01-01

    Cerebral palsy (CP) is a leading cause of childhood disability affecting function and development. The global incidence of CP is 2:1000. It has been reported that children with CP and their caretaker have impaired health-related quality of life (QOL). Of the many types and subtypes of CP, none has any known cure. For a detailed description of the disease CP, though, there is no one to one correlation in Ayurvedic classics; it can be taken as Vata Vyadhi as far as its etiology and symptomatology are concerned. To assess the effect of certain Panchakarma procedures in the management of CP. Total 8 patients were registered and treated with 5 days of Udvartana, 5 days of Abhyanga followed by Sarvanga Swedana and then 8 days of Yoga Basti. The same course of treatment has been repeated for 3 times with an interval of 14 days. Ashtanga Ghrita was given during whole procedures as internal medication. Results of treatment were assessed with anthropometrical measurement, developmental milestone, Modified Ashworth Scale, spasm scale, reflex scale, and muscle power grading. This Ayurvedic management shows good result in CP patients, especially by improving growth (height, weight, chest circumference) and development (head holding and sitting), reducing spasticity of left upper limb and muscle spasm. Multisystem approach is needed to improve the condition of the patient. Panchakarma along with internal medication should be given to improve all the facets of spastic CP. Yoga Basti acts by their own mode of action and can be used freely for such disease conditions.

  14. Transient Changes in Brain Metabolites after Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation in Spastic Cerebral Palsy: A Pilot Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paradee Auvichayapat

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundMuscle spasticity is a disability caused by damage to the pyramidal system. Standard treatments for spasticity include muscle stretching, antispastic medications, and tendon release surgeries, but treatment outcomes remain unsatisfactory. Anodal transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS in patients with muscle spasticity is known to result in significant improvement in spastic tone (p < 0.001. However, the mechanism of action by which tDCS treatment affects spasticity remains unclear. This pilot study aimed to investigate the effect of anodal tDCS upon brain metabolites in the left basal ganglia and ipsilateral primary motor cortex (M1 in children with spastic cerebral palsy (CP.Materials and methodsThis study consisted of three steps: a baseline evaluation, a treatment period, and a follow-up period. During the treatment period, patients were given 20 min of 1 mA anodal tDCS over the left M1 for five consecutive days. Outcomes were compared between pre- and immediate posttreatment in terms of brain metabolites, Tardieu scales, and the quality of upper extremity skills test.ResultsTen patients with spastic CP were enrolled. Following tDCS, there were significant increases in the ratio of N-acetylaspartate (NAA/creatine (Cr (p = 0.030, choline (Cho/Cr (p = 0.043, and myoinositol (mI/Cr (p = 0.035 in the basal ganglia. Moreover, increased glutamine–glutamate (Glx/Cr ratio in the left M1 (p = 0.008 was found. In addition, we also observed improvements in the extent of spasticity and hand function (p = 0.028.ConclusionFive consecutive days of anodal tDCS over the left M1 appeared statistically to reduce the degree of spasticity and increase NAA, Cho, mI, and Glx. Future research studies, involving a larger sample size of spastic CP patients undergoing tDCS is now warranted.

  15. "Compressed" Compressed Sensing

    OpenAIRE

    Reeves, Galen; Gastpar, Michael

    2010-01-01

    The field of compressed sensing has shown that a sparse but otherwise arbitrary vector can be recovered exactly from a small number of randomly constructed linear projections (or samples). The question addressed in this paper is whether an even smaller number of samples is sufficient when there exists prior knowledge about the distribution of the unknown vector, or when only partial recovery is needed. An information-theoretic lower bound with connections to free probability theory and an upp...

  16. OnabotulinumtoxinA muscle injection patterns in adult spasticity: a systematic literature review

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background OnabotulinumtoxinA has demonstrated significant benefit in adult focal spasticity. This study reviews the injection patterns (i.e., muscle distribution, dosing) of onabotulinumtoxinA for treatment of adult spasticity, as reported in published studies. Methods A systematic review of clinical trials and observational studies published between 1990 and 2011 reporting data on muscles injected with onabotulinumtoxinA in adult patients treated for any cause of spasticity. Results 28 randomized, 5 nonrandomized, and 37 single-arm studies evaluating 2,163 adult patients were included. The most frequently injected upper-limb muscles were flexor carpi radialis (64.0% of patients), flexor carpi ulnaris (59.1%), flexor digitorum superficialis (57.2%), flexor digitorum profundus (52.5%), and biceps brachii (38.8%). The most frequently injected lower-limb muscles were the gastrocnemius (66.1% of patients), soleus (54.7%), and tibialis posterior (50.5%). The overall dose range reported was 5–200 U for upper-limb muscles and 10–400 U for lower-limb muscles. Conclusions The reviewed evidence indicates that the muscles most frequently injected with onabotulinumtoxinA in adults with spasticity were the wrist, elbow, and finger flexors and the ankle plantar flexors. OnabotulinumtoxinA was injected over a broad range of doses per muscle among the studies included in this review, but individual practitioners should be mindful of local regulatory approvals and regulations. PMID:24011236

  17. Relationships between spasticity, strength, gait, and the GMFM-66 in persons with spastic diplegia cerebral palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, Sandy A; Engsberg, Jack R

    2007-09-01

    To determine the relationships between spasticity, strength, and the functional measures of gait and gross motor function in persons with spastic diplegia cerebral palsy (CP). Retrospective, cross-sectional study. Hospital clinic. Ninety-seven participants (49 boys, 48 girls; mean age+/-standard deviation, 9.11+/-4.8 y) with spastic diplegia CP were tested once. Not applicable. A KinCom dynamometer was used to objectively measure spasticity (ankle plantarflexors, knee flexors, hip adductors) and maximum strength (ankle dorsiflexors and plantarflexors, knee flexors and extensors, hip abductors and adductors). A gait analysis was conducted to evaluate linear variables (gait speed, stride length, cadence) and kinematic variables (ankle dorsiflexion, foot progression, knee and hip flexion, pelvic tilt at initial contact and ankle dorsiflexion, knee and hip flexion, pelvic tilt, trunk rotation range of motion) during gait. Gross motor function was measured using the Gross Motor Function Measure (GMFM-66) and separately, the GMFM walking, running & jumping dimension. Multiple linear regression analysis was used to determine the relationships between spasticity, strength, gait, and the GMFM (PSpasticity did not account for a substantial amount of explained variance in gait and gross motor function (up to 8% for the GMFM walking, running & jumping dimension). Moderate to high correlations existed between strength and gait linear data and function, accounting for up to 69% of the explained variance (strength and GMFM-66, r2=.69). For this cohort of participants with spastic diplegia CP who ambulated with or without an assistive device, strength was highly related to function and explained far more of the variance than spasticity. The results may not be generalized to those with more severe forms of CP.

  18. Neurosurgical treatment of spasticity and other pediatric movement disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albright, A Leland

    2003-09-01

    For children whose spasticity and movement disorders are inadequately treated by oral medications and botulinum toxins, neurosurgical procedures are now available to effectively treat spasticity, tremor, and many cases of dystonia. Spastic diplegia can be treated with selective lumbar rhizotomies, which significantly decrease spasticity, increase range of motion, and improve Gross Motor Function Measure scores. Children with spastic quadriparesis and those with secondary dystonia can be treated with intrathecal baclofen, which diminishes both spasticity and dystonia and is associated with improved function and quality of life. Children with primary dystonia and those with tremor can be treated with deep brain stimulation of the internal globus pallidus and thalamus, respectively. Some children with chorea respond to deep brain stimulation. There are no effective neurosurgical treatments for athetosis or ataxia. The effectiveness of neurosurgical treatments of pediatric movement disorders has increased significantly in the past 15 years.

  19. Growing rod erosion through the lamina causing spinal cord compression in an 8-year-old girl with early-onset scoliosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abduljabbar, Fahad H; Waly, Feras; Nooh, Anas; Ouellet, Jean

    2016-09-01

    Early-onset scoliosis often occurs by the age of 5 years and is attributed to many structural abnormalities. Syndromic early-onset scoliosis is considered one of the most aggressive types of early-onset scoliosis. Treatment starts with serial casting and bracing, but eventually most of these patients undergo growth-sparing procedures, such as a single growing rod, dual growing rods, or a vertical expandable titanium prosthetic rib. This case report aimed to describe an unusual complication of erosion of a growing rod through the lamina that caused spinal cord compression in an 8-year-old girl with early-onset scoliosis. This is a case report. A retrospective chart review was used to describe the clinical course and radiographic findings of this case after rod erosion into the spinal canal. The patient underwent successful revision surgery removing the rod without neurologic complications. Patients with syndromic early-onset scoliosis are more prone to progressive curves and severe rotational deformity. We believe that the severe kyphotic deformity in addition to the dysplastic nature of the deformity in this population may predispose them to this unusual complication. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Data condensed synthesis regarding kinesiotherapeutic procedures used in spasticity therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Moraru, E; Onose, G

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Spasticity represents an important feature of the upper motoneuron syndrome (UMNS). The clinical signs, such as the abnormal movement models, the unwanted muscular co-contractions, the muscular and joint rigidity with a consecutive deformity can be signs of spasticity and, also of upper motoneuron lesion. The different therapeutic options applied in the management of spasticity are a basic component of UMNS treatment scheme. This article presents the main kinesiotherapeutic procedure...

  1. Pharmacotherapy of Spasticity in Children With Cerebral Palsy

    OpenAIRE

    Chia-Ying Chung; Chia-Ling Chen; Alice May-Kuen Wong

    2011-01-01

    Spasticity is a common disability in children with cerebral palsy. Pharmacological and non-pharmacological treatments, including physical therapy, occupational therapy, orthotics, rhizotomy, and orthopedic surgery, all play important roles in the management of spasticity. The purpose of this article is to provide an overview of available medications for treatment of spasticity in children with cerebral palsy. Common medications include benzodiazepines, dantrolene sodium, baclofen, tizanidine,...

  2. Spasticity in disorders of consciousness: a behavioral study

    OpenAIRE

    Thibaut, Aurore; Chatelle, Camille; Wannez, Sarah; Deltombe, Thierry; Stender, Johan; Schnakers, Caroline

    2015-01-01

    Background: Spasticity is a frequent complication after severe brain injury, which may impede the rehabilitation process and diminish the patients’ quality of life. Aim: We here investigate the presence of spasticity in a population of non-communicative patients with disorders of consciousness. We also evaluate the correlation between spasticity and potential factors of co-morbidity, frequency of physical therapy, time since insult presence of pain, presence of tendon retraction, etiology...

  3. Effects of repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation on lower extremity spasticity and motor function in stroke patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rastgoo, Maryam; Naghdi, Sofia; Nakhostin Ansari, Noureddin; Olyaei, Gholamreza; Jalaei, Shohreh; Forogh, Bijan; Najari, Hamidreza

    2016-09-01

    To investigate the effect of low-frequency repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) on lower extremity (LE) spasticity, motor function and motor neurone excitability in chronic stroke patients. This study was a randomised sham-controlled cross-over trial with 1-week follow-up. A total of 20 post-stroke patients were randomised to receive active (n = 10) or sham (n = 10) rTMS. Fourteen of them (7 in each group) crossed over to the sham or active rTMS after a washout period of 1 month. Interventions consist of five consecutive daily sessions of active or sham rTMS to the unaffected lower extremity motor area (1000 pulses; 1 Hz; 90% of the tibialis anterior motor threshold). Outcome measures were modified modified ashworth scale (MMAS), the H-reflex, lower extremity section of Fugl-Mayer assessment (LE-FMA) and timed UP and GO (TUG) test. All outcomes were measured at three levels in each intervention period: pre- and post-intervention and 1-week follow-up. Friedman's test revealed significant improvement in MMAS score only after active rTMS. This improvement lasted for one week after the active rTMS. Repeated measure analysis of variance (ANOVA) showed significant time*intervention interaction for LE-FMA. There are no differences between groups for the MMAS and LE-FMA. No significant change in Hmax/Mmax ratio and TUG test was noted. Low-frequency rTMS over the LE motor area can improve clinical measures of muscle spasticity and motor function. More studies are needed to clarify the changes underlying this improvement in spasticity. Implications for Rehabilitation Spasticity is a common disorder and one of the causes of long-term disability after stroke. Physical therapy modalities, oral medications, focal intervention and surgical procedures have been used for spasticity reduction. Beneficial effect of the repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) for post-stroke upper extremity spasticity reduction and motor function improvement was

  4. Mania associated with complicated hereditary spastic paraparesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raghavendra B Nayak

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Hereditary spastic paraparesis (HSP is an inherited group of neurological disorders with progressive lower limb spasticity. HSP can be clinically grouped into pure and complicated forms. Pure HSP is one without any associated neurological/psychiatric comorbidity. Depression is the most common psychiatric comorbidity. Presence of mania or bipolar affective illness with HSP is a rare phenomenon. We report a case of a 17-year-old boy who presented with classical features of HSP with complaints of excessive happiness, irritability, increased self-esteem and decreased sleep since 1 month. The patient also had complex partial seizure ever since he had features of HSP. The patient′s father and younger sister suffer from pure HSP. The patient was diagnosed to have first episode mania with complicated HSP. The details of treatment and possible neurobiology are discussed in this case report.

  5. Hereditary spastic paraplegia with cerebellar ataxia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, J E; Johnsen, B; Koefoed, P

    2004-01-01

    Complex forms of hereditary spastic paraplegia (HSP) are rare and usually transmitted in an autosomal recessive pattern. A family of four generations with autosomal dominant hereditary spastic paraplegia (AD-HSP) and a complex phenotype with variably expressed co-existing ataxia, dysarthria......, unipolar depression, epilepsy, migraine, and cognitive impairment was investigated. Genetic linkage analysis and sequencing of the SPG4 gene was performed and electrophysiologic investigations were carried out in six individuals and positron emission tomography (PET) in one patient. The disease was linked...... in those individuals who were clinically affected by a complex phenotype consisting of HSP and cerebellar ataxia. Other features noted in this kindred including epilepsy, cognitive impairment, depression, and migraine did not segregate with the HSP phenotype or mutation, and therefore the significance...

  6. Mania associated with complicated hereditary spastic paraparesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nayak, Raghavendra B; Bhogale, Govind S; Patil, Nanasaheb M; Pandurangi, Aditya A

    2011-07-01

    Hereditary spastic paraparesis (HSP) is an inherited group of neurological disorders with progressive lower limb spasticity. HSP can be clinically grouped into pure and complicated forms. Pure HSP is one without any associated neurological/psychiatric comorbidity. Depression is the most common psychiatric comorbidity. Presence of mania or bipolar affective illness with HSP is a rare phenomenon. We report a case of a 17-year-old boy who presented with classical features of HSP with complaints of excessive happiness, irritability, increased self-esteem and decreased sleep since 1 month. The patient also had complex partial seizure ever since he had features of HSP. The patient's father and younger sister suffer from pure HSP. The patient was diagnosed to have first episode mania with complicated HSP. The details of treatment and possible neurobiology are discussed in this case report.

  7. “Appropriate Treatment” and Therapeutic Window in Spasticity Treatment with IncobotulinumtoxinA: From 100 to 1000 Units

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giancarlo Ianieri

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Many neurological diseases (ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke, multiple sclerosis, infant cerebral palsy, spinal cord injuries, traumatic brain injury, and other cerebrovascular disorders may cause muscle spasticity. Different therapeutic strategies have been proposed for the treatment of spasticity. One of the major treatments for tone modulation is botulinum toxin type A (BTX-A, performed in addition to other rehabilitation strategies based on individualized multidisciplinary programs aimed at achieving certain goals for each patient. Therapeutic plans must be precisely defined as they must balance the reduction of spastic hypertonia and retention of residual motor function. To perform and optimize the treatment, an accurate clinical and instrumental evaluation of spasticity is needed to determine how this symptom is invalidating and to choose the best doses, muscles and times of injection in each patient. We introduce an “appropriate treatment” and no “standard or high dosage treatment” concept based on our retrospective observational study on 120 patients lasting two years, according to the larger Therapeutic Index and Therapeutic Window of Incobotulinumtoxin A doses from 100 to 1000 units. We studied the efficiency and safety of this drug considering the clinical spasticity significance for specialist physicians and patients.

  8. Botulinum toxin treatment for limb spasticity in childhood cerebral palsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vito ePavone

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available CP is the most common cause of chronic disability in childhood occurring in 2 to 2.5/1000 births. It is a severe disorder and a significant number of patients present cognitive delay and difficulty in walking. The use of botulinum toxin (BTX has become a popular treatment for CP especially for spastic and dystonic muscles while avoiding deformity and pain. Moreover, the combination of physiotherapy, casting, orthotics and injection of BTX may delay or decrease the need for surgical intervention while reserving single-event, multi-level surgery for fixed musculotendinous contractures and bony deformities in older children. This report highlights the utility of BTX in the treatment of cerebral palsy in children. We include techniques for administration, side effects and possible resistance as well as specific use in the upper and lower limbs muscles

  9. Compression-Based Compressed Sensing

    OpenAIRE

    Rezagah, Farideh Ebrahim; Jalali, Shirin; Erkip, Elza; Poor, H. Vincent

    2016-01-01

    Modern compression algorithms exploit complex structures that are present in signals to describe them very efficiently. On the other hand, the field of compressed sensing is built upon the observation that "structured" signals can be recovered from their under-determined set of linear projections. Currently, there is a large gap between the complexity of the structures studied in the area of compressed sensing and those employed by the state-of-the-art compression codes. Recent results in the...

  10. MRI Findings of Early-Stage Hyperacute Hemorrhage Causing Extramedullary Compression of the Cervical Spinal Cord in a Dog with Suspected Steroid-Responsive Meningitis-Arteritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriano Wang-Leandro

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available A 9-month-old female Weimaraner was presented to the emergency service due to episodes of fever and neck pain. Physical examination revealed a stiff neck posture and elevated body temperature. Shortly after clinical examination was performed, the dog developed peracute onset of non-ambulatory tetraparesis compatible with a C1–C5 spinal cord (SC lesion. Immediately thereafter (<1 h, MRI of the cervical SC was performed with a 3-T scanner. A left ventrolateral intradural-extramedullary SC compression caused by a round-shaped structure at the level of C3––C4 was evidenced. The structure was iso- to slightly hyperintense in T1-weighted (T1W sequences compared to SC parenchyma and hyperintense in T2-weighted, gradient echo, and fluid-attenuated inversion recovery. Moreover, the structure showed a strong homogeneous contrast uptake in T1W sequences. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF analysis revealed a mixed pleocytosis, as well as elevated protein and erythrocyte count. Early-stage hyperacute extramedullary hemorrhage was suspected due to immune mediated vasculitis. The dog was maintained under general anesthesia and artificial ventilation for 24 h and long-term therapy with corticosteroids and physiotherapy was initiated. Eight weeks after initial presentation, the dog was ambulatory, slightly tetraparetic. Follow-up MRI showed a regression of the round-shaped structure and pleocytosis was not evident in CSF analysis. This report describes an early-stage hyperacute extramedullary hemorrhage, a condition rarely recorded in dogs even in experimental settings.

  11. Unexplained spastIc paraplegia

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    MAIN CLINICAL FEATURES. No. of patients ... Where possible the history included details of diet, alcohol consumption, smoking and .... methods. TABLE V. MAIN CORD SYNDROMES REPORTED PREVIOUSLY. No. of. Geographical area cases. Main clinical features. Supposed cause. Author. Natal, South Africa. 41.

  12. New insights into the pathophysiology of post-stroke spasticity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheng eLi

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Spasticity is one of many consequences after stroke. It is characterized by a velocity-dependent increase in resistance during passive stretch, resulting from hyperexcitability of the stretch reflex. The underlying mechanism of the hyperexcitable stretch reflex, however, remains poorly understood. Accumulated experimental evidence has supported supraspinal origins of spasticity, likely from an imbalance between descending inhibitory and facilitatory regulation of spinal stretch reflexes secondary to cortical disinhibition after stroke. The excitability of reticulospinal and vestibulospinal tracts has been assessed in stroke survivors with spasticity using non-invasive indirect measures. There are strong experimental findings that support the reticulospinal hyperexcitability as a prominent underlying mechanism of post-stroke spasticity. This mechanism can at least partly account for clinical features associated with spasticity and provide insightful guidance for clinical assessment and management of spasticity. However, the possible role of VST hyperexcitability can not be ruled out from indirect measures. In vivo measure of individual brainstem nuclei in stroke survivors with spasticity using advanced fMRI techniques in the future is probably able to provide direct evidence of pathogenesis of post-stroke spasticity.

  13. Use of Botulinum Neurotoxin Injections to Treat Spasticity

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... your family understand the use of BoNT for treatment of spasticity, a disorder following injury to the brain or ... available evidence on the effect of BoNT for treatment of spasticity. What is botulinum neurotoxin and how does it ...

  14. Management of generalized spasticity of lower limbs by selective ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Introduction: Spasticity can be defined as a velocity-dependent resistance to passive movement of a joint and its associated musculature. Functional neurosurgery should be considered when spasticity cannot be controlled by physical therapy and medications. Objective: This study was done to evaluate the functional ...

  15. Balneotherapy in Treatment of Spastic Upper Limb after Stroke

    OpenAIRE

    Erceg-Rukavina, Tatjana; Stefanovski, Mihajlo

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: After stroke, spasticity is often the main problem that prevents functional recovery. Pain occurs in up to 70% of patients during the first year post-stroke. Materials and methods: A total of 70 patients (30 female and 45 male) mean age (65.67) participated in prospective, controlled study. Inclusion criteria: ischaemic stroke, developed spasticity of upper limb, post-stroke interval

  16. Shock wave therapy for spastic plantar flexor muscles in hemiplegic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    CP). Spastic equines foot is the most frequent deformity in ambulated children with CP. Shock wave therapy on spastic muscles of the upper limb in stroke patients provided a significant reduction in muscle tone. Aim: The present study aimed to ...

  17. Relationship Between Spasticity and Health Related Quality of Life ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: There is growing awareness of health related quality of life in cerebral palsy patients, though there is paucity of data in determining its relationship with spasticity in cerebral palsy patients. Objective: The purpose of this study was to determine the relationship between spasticity and health related quality of life in ...

  18. Compression embedding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandford, M.T. II; Handel, T.G.; Bradley, J.N.

    1998-07-07

    A method and apparatus for embedding auxiliary information into the digital representation of host data created by a lossy compression technique and a method and apparatus for constructing auxiliary data from the correspondence between values in a digital key-pair table with integer index values existing in a representation of host data created by a lossy compression technique are disclosed. The methods apply to data compressed with algorithms based on series expansion, quantization to a finite number of symbols, and entropy coding. Lossy compression methods represent the original data as ordered sequences of blocks containing integer indices having redundancy and uncertainty of value by one unit, allowing indices which are adjacent in value to be manipulated to encode auxiliary data. Also included is a method to improve the efficiency of lossy compression algorithms by embedding white noise into the integer indices. Lossy compression methods use loss-less compression to reduce to the final size the intermediate representation as indices. The efficiency of the loss-less compression, known also as entropy coding compression, is increased by manipulating the indices at the intermediate stage. Manipulation of the intermediate representation improves lossy compression performance by 1 to 10%. 21 figs.

  19. [Selection of treatment modalities in patients with spasticity].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ota, Tetsuo

    2014-09-01

    Spasticity is the most common abnormality of muscle tone. Typically, oral antispastic drugs, phenol blocks, motor-point blocks, selective dorsal rhizotomies, and selective peripheral neurotomies are used to reduce muscle tone and/or improve ranges of motion. Recently, botulinum toxin injections and intrathecal baclofen have been used as treatment modalities. The selection of the most appropriate treatment modality by doctors treating patients with spasticity is critical. Furthermore, rehabilitation techniques, such as physiotherapy, occupational therapy, therapeutic electrical nerve stimulation, and orthosis, are useful as combination therapy for the treatment of spasticity. The purpose of this study was to outline the various modalities that are currently used for the treatment of spasticity. Regardless of the modality selected, it is imperative that treatment goals are carefully identified. The reduction of spasticity is not an appropriate treatment goal. Appropriate goals include improving gait, activities of daily living, and the quality of life.

  20. Botulinum Toxin Treatment of Spasticity in Adults and Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moeini-Naghani, Iman; Hashemi-Zonouz, Taraneh; Jabbari, Bahman

    2016-02-01

    Spasticity is a frequent symptom in stroke, multiple sclerosis, cerebral or spinal trauma, and cerebral palsy that affects and disables a large number of adults and children. In this review, we discuss the pathophysiology and nonpharmacologic and pharmacologic treatments of spasticity with emphasis on the role of botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs). The world literature is reviewed on double-blind and placebo-controlled clinical trials reporting safety and efficacy of BoNT treatment in adult spasticity and spasticity of children with cerebral palsy. The evidence for efficacy is presented from recommendations of the Assessment and Therapeutics subcommittee of the American Academy of Neurology. A technical section describes the techniques and recommended doses of BoNTs in spasticity. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  1. Full Body Gait Analysis May Improve Diagnostic Discrimination Between Hereditary Spastic Paraplegia and Spastic Diplegia: A Preliminary Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonnefoy-Mazure, A.; Turcot, K.; Kaelin, A.; De Coulon, G.; Armand, S.

    2013-01-01

    Hereditary spastic paraplegia (HSP) and spastic diplegia (SD) patients share a strong clinical resemblance. Thus, HSP patients are frequently misdiagnosed with a mild form of SD. Clinical gait analysis (CGA) has been highlighted as a possible tool to support the differential diagnosis of HSP and SD. Previous analysis has focused on the lower-body…

  2. Does calf muscle spasticity contribute to postural imbalance? A study in persons with pure hereditary spastic paraparesis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Niet, M. de; Weerdesteyn, V.G.M.; Bot, S.T. de; Warrenburg, B.P.C. van de; Geurts, A.C.H.

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The contribution of spasticity to postural imbalance in patients with upper motor neuron syndrome is still unclear. This study aimed to evaluate the responses to support-surface perturbations in patients with hereditary spastic paraparesis (HSP). These patients typically suffer from

  3. Multilevel botulinum toxin type a as a treatment for spasticity in children with cerebral palsy: a retrospective study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ece Unlu

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Cerebral palsy is the most common cause of physical disability in children. Spasticity is a disabling clinical symptom that is prevalent among patients suffering from cerebral palsy. The treatment of spasticity with botulinum toxin type A (BTX-A is a well-established option in the interdisciplinary management of spasticity, providing focal reductions in muscle tone in cerebral palsy patients. OBJECTIVE: The aim of this retrospective study was to describe the effect of multilevel BTX-A injections in the lower extremities, focusing mainly on gross motor function and functional status in cerebral palsy patients. METHODS: Data from 71 cerebral palsy patients (64% male, 36% female, mean age 6.7 ±3.2 years were analyzed retrospectively. We used the Ashworth and Tardieu scales to evaluate the degree of spasticity. Motor function was measured by the Gross Motor Function Measure (GMFM-88, and functional status was classified by the Gross Motor Function Classification System (GMFCS I-V. Multilevel BTX-A injections were applied after sedation and with electrostimulation guidance. The evaluations were repeated every three months, and the patients were followed for six months. RESULTS: We found that the Ashworth and Tardieu scores decreased significantly at the three-month evaluation (p0.05. Although the improvement in spasticity was not maintained at the six-month evaluation, GMFM-88 scores increased significantly at the three- and six-month assessments. GMFSC levels showed no change in the three- and six-month assessments. CONCLUSION: We believe that a single multilevel BTX-A injection reduces spasticity and improves motor function in children with cerebral palsy.

  4. Orthopedic management of spasticity in cerebral palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novacheck, Tom F; Gage, James R

    2007-09-01

    This article summarizes our experience with cerebral palsy. The primary and secondary deformities that occur with cerebral palsy are described, followed by a brief overview of the nature and role of gait analysis in the treatment of gait problems in cerebral palsy. The concept of lever-arm dysfunction is introduced. Our current treatment program is then presented and subsequently illustrated by two case examples. Finally, an outcomes analysis of a group of patients with spastic diplegia treated with selective dorsal rhizotomy is presented to illustrate our current method of evaluating treatment outcomes and the need for team management in the treatment of this complex condition.

  5. Effects of a Nintendo Wii exercise program on spasticity and static standing balance in spastic cerebral palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gatica-Rojas, Valeska; Cartes-Velásquez, Ricardo; Méndez-Rebolledo, Guillermo; Guzman-Muñoz, Eduardo; Lizama, L Eduardo Cofré

    2017-08-01

    This study sought to evaluate the effects of a Nintendo Wii Balance Board (NWBB) intervention on ankle spasticity and static standing balance in young people with spastic cerebral palsy (SCP). Ten children and adolescents (aged 72-204 months) with SCP participated in an exercise program with NWBB. The intervention lasted 6 weeks, 3 sessions per week, 25 minutes for each session. Ankle spasticity was assessed using the Modified Modified Ashworth Scale (MMAS), and static standing balance was quantified using posturographic measures (center-of-pressure [CoP] measures). Pre- and post-intervention measures were compared. Significant decreases of spasticity in the ankle plantar flexor muscles (p CoP sway area (p = 0.04), CoP mediolateral velocity (p =0.03), and CoP anterior-posterior velocity (p = 0.03). A 6-session NWBB program reduces the spasticity at the ankle plantar flexors and improves the static standing balance in young people with SCP.

  6. Spasticity over time during acute rehabilitation: a study of patient and clinician scores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhimani, Rozina H; Peden-McAlpine, Cynthia; Gaugler, Joseph; Anderson, Lisa Carney

    2016-05-01

    The aims of this study were to describe spasticity trajectories as a function of time, gender, and diagnosis and to explore the correspondence between patient and clinician scores of spasticity. Discrepancy between examiner assessment and patient rating of spasticity exists. Assessments that include the patient perspective are critical for patient safety. This mixed-method study provided patient descriptors of spasticity integrated with clinical scales. Twenty-three participants provided spasticity descriptors and rated their spasticity based on Numeric Rating Scale (NRS) scores. A clinician evaluated spasticity daily using the Modified Ashworth Scale (MAS). This resulted in 1976 points of data for analysis. Spasticity was highly variable over time. The empirical correspondence between the clinician-rated MAS and the patient-rated NRS revealed that patient and examiner understanding of spasticity were diverged considerably. Clinical evaluation protocols should include patient reports on spasticity. Knowledge about patient word choice can enhance patient-provider communication. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Shock wave therapy for spastic plantar flexor muscles in hemiplegic cerebral palsy children

    OpenAIRE

    Hala A. Abdel Gawad; Amel E. Abdel Karim; Amira H. Mohammed

    2015-01-01

    Background: The spastic motor type is the most common form of cerebral palsy (CP). Spastic equines foot is the most frequent deformity in ambulated children with CP. Shock wave therapy on spastic muscles of the upper limb in stroke patients provided a significant reduction in muscle tone. Aim: The present study aimed to investigate the efficiency of shock wave therapy on spastic planter flexor muscles and its relation to the gait in spastic hemiplegic cerebral palsy children. Methods: T...

  8. A Screening Tool to Identify Spasticity in Need of Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zorowitz, Richard D.; Wein, Theodore H.; Dunning, Kari; Deltombe, Thierry; Olver, John H.; Davé, Shashank J.; Dimyan, Michael A.; Kelemen, John; Pagan, Fernando L.; Evans, Christopher J.; Gillard, Patrick J.; Kissela, Brett M.

    2017-01-01

    Objective To develop a clinically useful patient-reported screening tool for health care providers to identify patients with spasticity in need of treatment regardless of etiology. Design Eleven spasticity experts participated in a modified Delphi panel and reviewed and revised 2 iterations of a screening tool designed to identify spasticity symptoms and impact on daily function and sleep. Spasticity expert panelists evaluated items pooled from existing questionnaires to gain consensus on the screening tool content. The study also included cognitive interviews of 20 patients with varying spasticity etiologies to determine if the draft screening tool was understandable and relevant to patients with spasticity. Results The Delphi panel reached an initial consensus on 21 of 47 items for the screening tool and determined that the tool should have no more than 11 to 15 items and a 1-month recall period for symptom and impact items. After 2 rounds of review, 13 items were selected and modified by the expert panelists. Most patients (n = 16 [80%]) completed the cognitive interview and interpreted the items as intended. Conclusions Through the use of a Delphi panel and patient interviews, a 13-item spasticity screening tool was developed that will be practical and easy to use in routine clinical practice. PMID:27552355

  9. Spasticity, Motor Recovery, and Neural Plasticity after Stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Sheng

    2017-01-01

    Spasticity and weakness (spastic paresis) are the primary motor impairments after stroke and impose significant challenges for treatment and patient care. Spasticity emerges and disappears in the course of complete motor recovery. Spasticity and motor recovery are both related to neural plasticity after stroke. However, the relation between the two remains poorly understood among clinicians and researchers. Recovery of strength and motor function is mainly attributed to cortical plastic reorganization in the early recovery phase, while reticulospinal (RS) hyperexcitability as a result of maladaptive plasticity, is the most plausible mechanism for poststroke spasticity. It is important to differentiate and understand that motor recovery and spasticity have different underlying mechanisms. Facilitation and modulation of neural plasticity through rehabilitative strategies, such as early interventions with repetitive goal-oriented intensive therapy, appropriate non-invasive brain stimulation, and pharmacological agents, are the keys to promote motor recovery. Individualized rehabilitation protocols could be developed to utilize or avoid the maladaptive plasticity, such as RS hyperexcitability, in the course of motor recovery. Aggressive and appropriate spasticity management with botulinum toxin therapy is an example of how to create a transient plastic state of the neuromotor system that allows motor re-learning and recovery in chronic stages.

  10. Obturator neurolysis using 65% alcohol for adductor muscle spasticity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anju Ghai

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Spasticity is motor alteration characterized by muscle hypertonia and hyperreflexia. It is an important complication of spinal cord injury, traumatic brain injury, cerebral palsy, and multiple sclerosis. If uncorrected, fibrosis and eventually bony deformity lock the joint into a fixed contracture. Chemical neurolysis using various agents is one of the therapeutic possibilities to alleviate spasticity. We are, hereby, reporting 3 patients in whom 65% alcohol was used as neurolytic agent for the treatment of hip adductor spasticity, and the effect lasted for a variable period.

  11. Relationship between neuromuscular fatigue and spasticity in chronic stroke patients: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boudarham, Julien; Roche, Nicolas; Teixeira, Mickael; Hameau, Sophie; Robertson, Johanna; Bensmail, Djamel; Zory, Raphael

    2014-04-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the effects of neuromuscular fatigue on stretch reflex-related torque and electromyographic activity of spastic knee extensor muscles in hemiplegic patients. The second aim was to characterize the time course of quadriceps muscle fatigue during repetitive concentric contractions. Eighteen patients performed passive, isometric and concentric isokinetic evaluations before and after a fatigue protocol using an isokinetic dynamometer. Voluntary strength and spasticity were evaluated following the simultaneous recording of torque and electromyographic activity of rectus femoris (RF), vastus lateralis (VL) and biceps femoris (BF). Isometric knee extension torque and the root mean square (RMS) value of VL decreased in the fatigued state. During the fatigue protocol, the normalized peak torque decreased whereas the RMS of RF and BF increased between the first five and last five contractions. There was a linear decrease in the neuromuscular efficiency-repetitions relationships for RF and VL. The peak resistive torque and the normalized RMS of RF and VL during passive stretching movements were not modified by the fatigue protocol for any stretch velocity. This study showed that localized quadriceps muscle fatigue caused a decrease in voluntary strength which did not modify spasticity intensity. Changes in the distribution of muscle fiber type, with a greater number of slow fibers on the paretic side, may explain why the stretch reflex was not affected by fatigue. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  12. A spastic paraplegia mouse model reveals REEP1-dependent ER shaping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beetz, Christian; Koch, Nicole; Khundadze, Mukhran; Zimmer, Geraldine; Nietzsche, Sandor; Hertel, Nicole; Huebner, Antje-Kathrin; Mumtaz, Rizwan; Schweizer, Michaela; Dirren, Elisabeth; Karle, Kathrin N; Irintchev, Andrey; Alvarez, Victoria; Redies, Christoph; Westermann, Martin; Kurth, Ingo; Deufel, Thomas; Kessels, Michael M; Qualmann, Britta; Hübner, Christian A

    2013-10-01

    Axonopathies are a group of clinically diverse disorders characterized by the progressive degeneration of the axons of specific neurons. In hereditary spastic paraplegia (HSP), the axons of cortical motor neurons degenerate and cause a spastic movement disorder. HSP is linked to mutations in several loci known collectively as the spastic paraplegia genes (SPGs). We identified a heterozygous receptor accessory protein 1 (REEP1) exon 2 deletion in a patient suffering from the autosomal dominantly inherited HSP variant SPG31. We generated the corresponding mouse model to study the underlying cellular pathology. Mice with heterozygous deletion of exon 2 in Reep1 displayed a gait disorder closely resembling SPG31 in humans. Homozygous exon 2 deletion resulted in the complete loss of REEP1 and a more severe phenotype with earlier onset. At the molecular level, we demonstrated that REEP1 is a neuron-specific, membrane-binding, and membrane curvature-inducing protein that resides in the ER. We further show that Reep1 expression was prominent in cortical motor neurons. In REEP1-deficient mice, these neurons showed reduced complexity of the peripheral ER upon ultrastructural analysis. Our study connects proper neuronal ER architecture to long-term axon survival.

  13. Botulinum toxin type A chemodenervation treatment in spastic forms of cerebral palsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. L. Kurenkov

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Cerebral palsy (CP is one of the most serious outcomes of the perinatal lesion of central nervous system and the most common reason for neurological disability in children. Being the key cause of pathological dynamic stereotypes that frequently result in pathological posture and contractures, spasticity is critically important for CP. The use of botulinum toxin type A (BTA in complex treatment 2-6 years old CP patients allows significantly to improve motor abilities, help to change the surgical procedure, delay or even avoid some types of surgery. For elder children the use of BTA allows to improve local motor impairment. The treatment of spasticity in CP with BTA is safe (evidence level A and highly effective (evidence level A. It leads to the positive change of pathological dynamic stereotype, significantly improves gait, decreases muscle tone with Ashworth and Tardeu scales and rises the gross motor function score. Our own experience of onabotulinumtoxinA treatment as a part of complex therapy in 68 patients with spastic forms of CP demonstrates the significant improvement of motor function, most noticeable in younger patients(early pre-school age with GMFS I-III.

  14. A hereditary spastic paraplegia mutation in kinesin-1A/KIF5A disrupts neurofilament transport

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brown Anthony

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hereditary spastic paraplegias are a group of neurological disorders characterized by progressive distal degeneration of the longest ascending and descending axons in the spinal cord, leading to lower limb spasticity and weakness. One of the dominantly inherited forms of this disease (spastic gait type 10, or SPG10 is caused by point mutations in kinesin-1A (also known as KIF5A, which is thought to be an anterograde motor for neurofilaments. Results We investigated the effect of an SPG10 mutation in kinesin-1A (N256S-kinesin-1A on neurofilament transport in cultured mouse cortical neurons using live-cell fluorescent imaging. N256S-kinesin-1A decreased both anterograde and retrograde neurofilament transport flux by decreasing the frequency of anterograde and retrograde movements. Anterograde velocity was not affected, whereas retrograde velocity actually increased. Conclusions These data reveal subtle complexities to the functional interdependence of the anterograde and retrograde neurofilament motors and they also raise the possibility that anterograde and retrograde neurofilament transport may be disrupted in patients with SPG10.

  15. Muscle torque of healthy individuals and individuals with spastic hemiparesis after passive static streching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tatsukawa DE Freitas, Sérgio Takeshi; DE Carvalho Abreu, Elizângela Márcia; Dos Reis, Mariane Cecilia; DE Souza Cunha, Bruna; Souza Moreira Prianti, Tamires; Pupio Silva Lima, Fernanda; Oliveira Lima, Mário

    2016-01-01

    Spasticity is one of the main causes of contracture, muscle weakness and subsequent functional incapacity. The passive static stretching can be included as having the purpose of increasing musculoskeletal flexibility, however, it also can influence the muscle torque. The objective is to verify the immediate effect of passive static stretching in the muscle strength of healthy and those who present spastic hemiparesis. There were assessed 20 subjects, 10 spastic hemiparetic (EG) and 10 healthy individuals (CG), including both sexes, aged between 22 and 78 years. The torque of extensor muscles of the knee was analyzed using isokinetic dynamometer. Results have shown that EG has less muscle torque compared to CG ( p muscle torque after stretching ( p muscle torque of CG after performing the program that was prescribed. Immediately after the passive stretch, a significant torque decrease can be seen in hypertonic muscle; it is believed that this reduction may be associated with the physiological overlap between actin and myosin filaments and so preventing the muscle to develop a maximum contraction.

  16. USE OF BOTULINUM TOXIN TYPE A IN THE TREATMENT OF SPASTICITY IN CHILDREN WITH CEREBRAL PALSY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ljiljana Lazić

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Cerebral palsy has an incidence of about 1-2 per 1000 live births, and in spite of the progress of neonatal medicine, it seems that the incidence will not subside in the near future. The most important characteristic of cerebral palsy is movement abnormality: spasticity, chorea, athetosis, ataxia, dystonia, as well as their different combinations. About 70% of children who suffer from cerebral palsy also suffer from some form of spasticity. Spasticity is a type of muscle hypertonicity characterized by rapid increase in resistance to passive stretching of muscles. The interest for botulinum toxin application in the treatment of spasticity has dramatically increased in the last 10 years. Botulinum toxin is the most powerful neurotoxin that is found in nature. It is produced by anaerobic bacteria – clostridium botulinum. It is produced in eight serotypes of which type A is the most commonly used. Botulinum toxin blocks neuromuscular transmission and causes irreversible weakness of the treated muscle. It has been used since 1993 in the treatment of cerebral palsy in children. The toxin effect is permanent and it results in irreversible denervation. Functional recovery is possible after 2-4 months, due to sprouting of nerve endings and the formation of new synaptic contacts. Treatment with botulinum toxin is safe. Adverse effects are rare, temporary and completely reversible. Application of botulinum toxin prevents or reduces contractures and deformities, and thus delays or avoids surgical treatment. Yet, physical therapy, which prolongs and improves the effects of botulinum toxin, remains an essential and most important form of therapy in the treatment of children with cerebral palsy.

  17. Left Lobe Mobilization Strategy of Right-Sided Major Hepatectomy for Treatment of a Tumor Causing Severe Inferior Vena Cava Compression: A Novel Strategy Using the Modified Liver-Hanging Maneuver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Araki, Kenichiro; Kubo, Norio; Ishii, Norihiro; Tsukagoshi, Mariko; Igarashi, Takamichi; Watanabe, Akira; Kuwano, Hiroyuki; Shirabe, Ken

    2018-02-14

    Massive bleeding during major hepatectomy is associated with greater mortality and morbidity.1 Our previous study shows that inferior vena cava (IVC) compression by tumor and an anterior approach without the liver-hanging maneuver (LHM) are risk factors for massive bleeding.2 The LHM is useful for controlling bleeding in deeper parenchymal transection planes.3 However, severe compression of the IVC by tumor makes it difficult to insert a hanging tape.4 The study shows a novel modified LHM strategy for severe IVC compression to minimize intraoperative bleeding. The procedure was disassembled into six steps: (1) the glissonian bifurcation is encircled using an extrahepatic approach (2) the hepatic ligaments are dissected, and the root of each hepatic vein trunk is exposed (3) the left lobe is fully mobilized, and the short hepatic veins are carefully dissected with a systematic procedure established from hemi-left lobe procurement in living donor liver transplantation5 (4) the tape is inserted from the space between the right and middle hepatic vein trunks into the glissonian bifurcation along the anterior surface of the IVC (5) liver parenchymal transection is performed with upward pulling of the tape (6) the right hepatic vein is dissected, and the right lobe is dissected from the diaphragm and the right hepatic ligaments. Right hepatectomy with this procedure was performed for two patients with IVC compressed by hepatocellular carcinoma. The operative times were respectively 483 and 396 min. The respective estimated blood losses were 1195 and 485 ml, without transfusion. Both patients had acceptable outcomes without complications. The novel modified LHM strategy ensured minimal bleeding in the resection of a huge liver tumor causing severe IVC compression.

  18. Clinical features of pure hereditary spastic paraplegia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    WEI Qian-qian

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Objective To study the clinical features and diagnostic methods of patients with pure hereditary spastic paraplegia (HSP. Methods Patients diagnosed with pure HSP from October 2006 to February 2013 admitted to Department of Neurology, West China Hospital, Sichuan University were included. The patients were assessed by the Spastic Paraplegia Rating Scale and the clinical features were reviewed. Results Thirty-three HSP patients (21 men and 12 women were included in the study. Thirteen patients (39.39% had family history of HSP and the most common genetic mode of the familial cases were autosomal dominant inheritance (11/13. The mean age of onset were (20.35 ± 15.55 years and the mean disease duration were (12.77 ± 9.83 years. All of the included patients presented with signs of impairment of the pyramidal tract such as increased muscular tone, tendon hyperreflexia and positive Babinski's sign of the lower limbs. Impairment of the pyramidal tract also presented in the upper limbs in some patients. Scissors gait appeared in 29 patients and feet deformity in 5 patients. Atrophy of thoracic cord on MRI were presented in 5 patients while 2 patients complicated with peripheral nerve damage. Four patients had a novel exon 10-17 deletion in SPG4 gene. There were no differences in onset age, disease duration and mean score of the Spastic Paraplegia Rating Scale between male and female patients as well as between patients with and without family history (P > 0.05, for all. Conclusion The onset age of pure HSP is variational and males are more common than females. The most common inheritance mode is autosomal dominant and most of the cases are characterized by impairment of the pyramidal tract of the lower limbs and occasionally bladder dysfunction and peripheral nerve damage. Gender and family history do not affect the clinical features. Clinical features, family history and spinal cord MRI will assist the correct diagnosis, and making a definite

  19. Functional effects of botulinum toxin type-A treatment and subsequent stretching of spastic calf muscles: a study in patients with hereditary spastic paraplegia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Niet, M. de; Bot, S.T. de; Warrenburg, B.P.C. van de; Weerdesteijn, V.G.M.; Geurts, A.C.H.

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Although calf muscle spasticity is often treated with botulinum toxin type-A, the effects on balance and gait are ambiguous. Hereditary spastic paraplegia is characterized by progressive spasticity and relatively mild muscle weakness of the lower limbs. It is therefore a good model to

  20. Developmental and Degenerative Features in a Complicated Spastic Paraplegia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manzini, M Chiara; Rajab, Anna; Maynard, Thomas M; Mochida, Ganeshwaran H; Tan, Wen-Hann; Nasir, Ramzi; Hill, R Sean; Gleason, Danielle; Al Saffar, Muna; Partlow, Jennifer N; Barry, Brenda J; Vernon, Mike; LaMantia, Anthony-Samuel; Walsh, Christopher A

    2010-01-01

    Objective We sought to explore the genetic and molecular causes of Troyer syndrome, one of several complicated hereditary spastic paraplegias (HSPs). Troyer syndrome had been thought to be restricted to the Amish; however, we identified 2 Omani families with HSP, short stature, dysarthria and developmental delay—core features of Troyer syndrome—and a novel mutation in the SPG20 gene, which is also mutated in the Amish. In addition, we analyzed SPG20 expression throughout development to infer how disruption of this gene might generate the constellation of developmental and degenerative Troyer syndrome phenotypes. Methods Clinical characterization of 2 non-Amish families with Troyer syndrome was followed by linkage and sequencing analysis. Quantitative polymerase chain reaction and in situ hybridization analysis of SPG20 expression were carried out in embryonic and adult human and mouse tissue. Results Two Omani families carrying a novel SPG20 mutation displayed clinical features remarkably similar to the Amish patients with Troyer syndrome. SPG20 mRNA is expressed broadly but at low relative levels in the adult brain; however, it is robustly and specifically expressed in the limbs, face, and brain during early morphogenesis. Interpretation Null mutations in SPG20 cause Troyer syndrome, a specific clinical entity with developmental and degenerative features. Maximal expression of SPG20 in the limb buds and forebrain during embryogenesis may explain the developmental origin of the skeletal and cognitive defects observed in this disorder. ANN NEUROL 2010;67:516–525 PMID:20437587

  1. Impact of Spasticity on Balance Control during Quiet Standing in Persons after Stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mochizuki, George; Ismail, Farooq; Boulias, Chris

    2017-01-01

    Background Balance impairments, falls, and spasticity are common after stroke, but the effect of spasticity on balance control after stroke is not well understood. Methods In this cross-sectional study, twenty-seven participants with stroke were divided into two groups, based on ankle plantar flexor spasticity level. Fifteen individuals with high spasticity (Modified Ashworth Scale (MAS) score of ≥2) and 12 individuals with low spasticity (MAS score spasticity group demonstrated greater ML COP velocity, trunk roll velocity, trunk roll velocity frequency amplitude at 3.7 Hz, and trunk roll velocity frequency amplitude at 4.9 Hz, particularly in the eyes closed condition (spasticity by vision interaction). ML COP MPF was greater in the high spasticity group. Conclusion Individuals with high spasticity after stroke demonstrated greater impairment of balance control in the frontal plane, which was exacerbated when vision was removed. PMID:29098109

  2. Chest compression pauses during defibrillation attempts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Deakin, Charles D.; Koster, Rudolph W.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose of review This article summarizes current knowledge of the causes and consequences of interruption of chest compressions during cardiopulmonary resuscitation. Recent findings Pauses in chest compressions occur during analysis of the heart rhythm, delivery of ventilation, interventions such

  3. Stretch reflex regulation in healthy subjects and patients with spasticity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Jens Bo; Petersen, Nicolas; Crone, Clarissa

    2005-01-01

    In recent years, part of the muscle resistance in spastic patients has been explained by changes in the elastic properties of muscles. However, the adaptive spinal mechanisms responsible for the exaggeration of stretch reflex activity also contribute to muscle stiffness. The available data suggest...... of the spastic symptoms. A recent finding also shows no sign of exaggerated stretch reflexes in muscles voluntarily activated by the spastic patient in general. This is easily explained by the control of stretch reflex activity in healthy subjects. In healthy subjects, the stretch reflex activity is increased...... movements, antagonist muscles should remain silent and maximally relaxed. This is ensured by increasing transmission in several spinal inhibitory pathways. In spastic patients, this control is inadequate, and therefore stretch reflexes in antagonist muscles are easily evoked at the beginning of voluntary...

  4. Neuropathic pain and spasticity: intricate consequences of spinal cord injury

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Finnerup, Nanna Brix

    2017-01-01

    STUDY DESIGN: The 2016 International Spinal Cord Society Sir Ludwig Guttmann Lecture. OBJECTIVES: The aim of this review is to identify different symptoms and signs of neuropathic pain and spasticity after spinal cord injury (SCI) and to present different methods of assessing them. The objective......', 'neuropathic', 'spasticity', 'spasms' and 'spinal cord injury'. RESULTS: This review identified different domains of neuropathic pain and spasticity after SCI and methods to assess them in preclinical and clinical research. Different factors important for pain description include location, onset, pain...... of SCI, and a careful examination and characterization of the symptoms and signs, are a prerequisite for understanding the relationship between neuropathic pain and spasticity and the intricate underlying mechanisms.Spinal Cord advance online publication, 11 July 2017; doi:10.1038/sc.2017.70....

  5. Genetics Home Reference: infantile-onset ascending hereditary spastic paralysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 2 years of life, the initial symptoms of infantile-onset ascending hereditary spastic paralysis appear. Early symptoms include exaggerated reflexes (hyperreflexia) and recurrent muscle spasms in the legs. As the condition progresses, affected ...

  6. Treatment diary for botulinum toxin spasticity treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Biering-Sørensen, Bo; Iversen, Helle K; Frederiksen, Inge M S

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study is to develop a treatment diary for patients receiving spasticity treatment including botulinum toxin injection and physiotherapy and/or occupational therapy. The diary focuses on problems triggered by skeletal muscle overactivity; agreed goals for treatment and the patient......'s self-evaluation of achievement on the Goal Attainment Scale; which skeletal muscles were injected; physiotherapists' and occupational therapists' evaluation of the patients' achievement of objectives on the Goal Attainment Scale; and proposals for optimization of treatment and changing goals....... The evaluation included a satisfaction questionnaire and the WHO-QoL BREF and WHO-5 well-being score. Overall, 10 patients were enrolled in the pilot study. The patients were generally satisfied with the diary, found that it involved them more in their treatment and made it easier to set personal goals...

  7. Treatment diary for botulinum toxin spasticity treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Biering-Sørensen, Bo; Iversen, Helle K; Frederiksen, Inge M S

    2017-01-01

    's self-evaluation of achievement on the Goal Attainment Scale; which skeletal muscles were injected; physiotherapists' and occupational therapists' evaluation of the patients' achievement of objectives on the Goal Attainment Scale; and proposals for optimization of treatment and changing goals......The aim of this study is to develop a treatment diary for patients receiving spasticity treatment including botulinum toxin injection and physiotherapy and/or occupational therapy. The diary focuses on problems triggered by skeletal muscle overactivity; agreed goals for treatment and the patient....... The evaluation included a satisfaction questionnaire and the WHO-QoL BREF and WHO-5 well-being score. Overall, 10 patients were enrolled in the pilot study. The patients were generally satisfied with the diary, found that it involved them more in their treatment and made it easier to set personal goals...

  8. Spasticity in Children with Cerebral Palsy?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Willerslev-Olsen, Maria

    significantly reduced passive stiffness following training. This indicates that it is possible to reverse the development of passive muscle stiffness and maybe even prevent the development of contractures if the problem is revealed sufficiently early. These three studies together highlight the essence of proper......) and passive stiffness (changes in the elastic properties of muscles) of ankle joint muscles at rest, during gait and in relation to gait training in children with cerebral palsy (CP). In study I we found that reflex mediated stiffness is difficult to distinguish clinically from changes in passive muscle...... stiffness and notably that passive muscle stiffness rather than increased reflex stiffness (spasticity) is the most frequent explanation of ankle muscle hyper tonicity in children with CP. These findings emphasises the importance of properly distinguishing different contributions to muscle stiffness...

  9. Spasticity and Its Contribution to Hypertonia in Cerebral Palsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molenaers, Guy; Aertbeliën, Erwin; Van Campenhout, Anja; Feys, Hilde; Desloovere, Kaat

    2015-01-01

    Spasticity is considered an important neural contributor to muscle hypertonia in children with cerebral palsy (CP). It is most often treated with antispasticity medication, such as Botulinum Toxin-A. However, treatment response is highly variable. Part of this variability may be due to the inability of clinical tests to differentiate between the neural (e.g., spasticity) and nonneural (e.g., soft tissue properties) contributions to hypertonia, leading to the terms “spasticity” and “hypertonia” often being used interchangeably. Recent advancements in instrumented spasticity assessments offer objective measurement methods for distinction and quantification of hypertonia components. These methods can be applied in clinical settings and their results used to fine-tune and improve treatment. We reviewed current advancements and new insights with respect to quantifying spasticity and its contribution to muscle hypertonia in children with CP. First, we revisit what is known about spasticity in children with CP, including the various definitions and its pathophysiology. Second, we summarize the state of the art on instrumented spasticity assessment in CP and review the parameters developed to quantify the neural and nonneural components of hypertonia. Lastly, the impact these quantitative parameters have on clinical decision-making is considered and recommendations for future clinical and research investigations are discussed. PMID:25649546

  10. Beneficial effects of footbaths in controlling spasticity after stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumoto, Shuji; Shimodozono, Megumi; Etoh, Seiji; Shimozono, Yurika; Tanaka, Nobuyuki; Kawahira, Kazumi

    2010-07-01

    Footbaths are considered to provide beneficial thermal therapy for post-stroke patients with spasticity, but their anti-spastic effects have not been investigated comprehensively. The present study aimed to evaluate alterations in motor-neuron excitability using F-wave parameters in post-stroke patients with spastic hemiplegia. Subjects’ legs below the knee joint were immersed in water at 41°C and F-wave recordings were made over the abductor hallucis muscle before, immediately after, and 30 min after thermal treatment. Antidromic stimulation was performed on the tibial nerve at the ankle. Measurements included F-wave amplitude, F-wave/M-response ratio, changes in modified Ashworth scale (MAS), body temperature and surface-skin temperature. The mean values of both F-wave parameters were higher on the affected side before footbath treatment. In post-stroke patients, the mean values of F-wave parameters were significantly reduced after footbath treatment ( P spastic effects of footbath treatment were indicated by decreased F-wave parameters, in parallel with decreases in MAS. Body temperature was significantly increased both immediately after, and 30 min following footbath treatment in both groups, which appeared to play an important role in decreased spasticity. Surface-skin temperature increased immediately after footbath treatment in both groups and returned to baseline 30 min later. These findings demonstrate that the use of footbaths is an effective nonpharmacological anti-spastic treatment that might facilitate stroke rehabilitation.

  11. Spasticity in multiple sclerosis and role of glatiramer acetate treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meca-Lallana, Jose Eustasio; Hernández-Clares, Rocío; Carreón-Guarnizo, Ester

    2015-09-01

    Spasticity is one of the most disabling and difficult-to-treat symptoms shown by patients with multiple sclerosis, who often show a suboptimal and unsatisfactory response to classic treatment and new available nonpharmacological alternatives. Due to the progressive nature of this condition, the early management should be essential to improve long-term outcomes. We performed a narrative literature review of the contribution of spasticity to the burden of multiple sclerosis and the potential role of classic disease-modifying drugs. Added to the underlying pathophysiology of spasticity, certain external factors and drugs such as interferon may exacerbate the existing condition, hence their awareness is crucial as part of an effective management of spasticity. Furthermore, the evidence for the effectiveness of glatiramer acetate in preventing spasticity in naïve patients and in those switching from interferon should not be ignored. This literature review proposes the examination of spasticity and the influence of classic disease-modifying agents on the level of existing condition among the variables to be considered when deciding on therapy for multiple sclerosis in clinical practice.

  12. Spastic paraplegia type 7 is associated with multiple mitochondrial DNA deletions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iselin Marie Wedding

    Full Text Available Spastic paraplegia 7 is an autosomal recessive disorder caused by mutations in the gene encoding paraplegin, a protein located at the inner mitochondrial membrane and involved in the processing of other mitochondrial proteins. The mechanism whereby paraplegin mutations cause disease is unknown. We studied two female and two male adult patients from two Norwegian families with a combination of progressive external ophthalmoplegia and spastic paraplegia. Sequencing of SPG7 revealed a novel missense mutation, c.2102A>C, p.H 701P, which was homozygous in one family and compound heterozygous in trans with a known pathogenic mutation c.1454_1462del in the other. Muscle was examined from an additional, unrelated adult female patient with a similar phenotype caused by a homozygous c.1047insC mutation in SPG7. Immunohistochemical studies in skeletal muscle showed mosaic deficiency predominantly affecting respiratory complex I, but also complexes III and IV. Molecular studies in single, microdissected fibres showed multiple mitochondrial DNA deletions segregating at high levels (38-97% in respiratory deficient fibres. Our findings demonstrate for the first time that paraplegin mutations cause accumulation of mitochondrial DNA damage and multiple respiratory chain deficiencies. While paraplegin is not known to be directly associated with the mitochondrial nucleoid, it is known to process other mitochondrial proteins and it is possible therefore that paraplegin mutations lead to mitochondrial DNA deletions by impairing proteins involved in the homeostasis of the mitochondrial genome. These studies increase our understanding of the molecular pathogenesis of SPG7 mutations and suggest that SPG7 testing should be included in the diagnostic workup of autosomal recessive, progressive external ophthalmoplegia, especially if spasticity is present.

  13. Compressed Counting Meets Compressed Sensing

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Ping; Zhang, Cun-Hui; Zhang, Tong

    2013-01-01

    Compressed sensing (sparse signal recovery) has been a popular and important research topic in recent years. By observing that natural signals are often nonnegative, we propose a new framework for nonnegative signal recovery using Compressed Counting (CC). CC is a technique built on maximally-skewed p-stable random projections originally developed for data stream computations. Our recovery procedure is computationally very efficient in that it requires only one linear scan of the coordinates....

  14. [Method of measuring spasticity. Studies of 12 cases of spastic patients treated with chronic epidural implanted electrodes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossi, L; Rasella, M; Ubiali, E

    1984-01-01

    The Authors have applied the method for determination of the H reflex, in order to measure the spasticity in a group of patients operated with chronic implantation of epidural electrodes. After a brief discussion about a clinical and neurophysiological problems of the spasticity, they refers the methodologie and results obtained by determination of H/M ratio and H1/H2 curve with double stimulus. They conclude that this method is rather uncertain and useful only at a approximative clinical level.

  15. Dynamometer-based measure of spasticity confirms limited association between plantarflexor spasticity and walking function in persons with multiple sclerosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kremer, Theodore R.; Van Dillen, Linda R.; Wagner, Joanne M.

    2017-01-01

    The literature shows inconsistent evidence regarding the association between clinically assessed plantarflexor (PF) spasticity and walking function in ambulatory persons with multiple sclerosis (pwMS). The use of a dynamometer-based spasticity measure (DSM) may help to clarify this association. Our cohort included 42 pwMS (27 female, 15 male; age: 42.9 +/− 10.2 yr) with mild clinical disability (Expanded Disability Status Scale score: 3.6 +/− 1.6). PF spasticity was assessed using a clinical measure, the modified Ashworth Scale (MAS), and an instrumented measure, the DSM. Walking function was assessed by the timed 25-foot walk test (T25FWT), the 6-minute walk test (6MWT), and the 12-item Multiple Sclerosis Walking Scale (MSWS-12). Spearman rho correlations were used to evaluate relationships between spasticity measures, measures of walking speed and endurance, and self-perceived limitations in walking. The correlation was small between PF spasticity and the T25FWT (PF maximum [Max] MAS rho = 0.27, PF Max DSM rho = 0.26), the 6MWT (PF Max MAS rho = −0.20, PF Max DSM rho = −0.21), and the MSWS-12 (PF Max MAS rho = 0.11, PF Max DSM rho = 0.26). Our results are similar to reports in other neurologic clinical populations, wherein spasticity has a limited association with walking dysfunction. PMID:25356797

  16. Dynamometer-based measure of spasticity confirms limited association between plantarflexor spasticity and walking function in persons with multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kremer, Theodore R; Van Dillen, Linda R; Wagner, Joanne M

    2014-01-01

    The literature shows inconsistent evidence regarding the association between clinically assessed plantar-flexor (PF) spasticity and walking function in ambulatory persons with multiple sclerosis (pwMS). The use of a dynamometer-based spasticity measure (DSM) may help to clarify this association. Our cohort included 42 pwMS (27 female, 15 male; age: 42.9 +/- 10.1 yr) with mild clinical disability (Expanded Disability Status Scale score: 3.6 +/- 1.6). PF spasticity was assessed using a clinical measure, the modified Ashworth Scale (MAS), and an instrumented measure, the DSM. Walking function was assessed by the timed 25-foot walk test (T25FWT), the 6-minute walk test (6MWT), and the 12-item Multiple Sclerosis Walking Scale (MSWS-12). Spearman rho correlations were used to evaluate relationships between spasticity measures, measures of walking speed and endurance, and self-perceived limitations in walking. The correlation was small between PF spasticity and the T25FWT (PF maximum [Max] MAS rho = 0.27, PF Max DSM rho = 0.26), the 6MWT (PF Max MAS rho = -0.20, PF Max DSM rho = -0.21), and the MSWS-12 (PF Max MAS rho = 0.11, PF Max DSM rho = 0.26). Our results are similar to reports in other neurologic clinical populations, wherein spasticity has a limited association with walking dysfunction.

  17. Is spasticity always the same? An observational study comparing the features of spastic equinus foot in patients with chronic stroke and multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Picelli, Alessandro; Vallies, Gabriella; Chemello, Elena; Castellazzi, Paola; Brugnera, Annalisa; Gandolfi, Marialuisa; Baricich, Alessio; Cisari, Carlo; Santamato, Andrea; Saltuari, Leopold; Waldner, Andreas; Smania, Nicola

    2017-09-15

    Spasticity is common in stroke and multiple sclerosis. To treat spasticity we have a wide range of interventions, whose application may depend not only on the severity of spasticity but also on its etiology. Consequently, a better understanding of muscle spasticity in different neurological diseases may inform clinicians as to the more appropriate therapeutic approach. Our aim was to compare the clinical and ultrasonographic features of spastic equinus in patients with chronic stroke and multiple sclerosis. Thirty-eight patients with secondary progressive multiple sclerosis and 38 chronic stroke patients with spastic equinus were evaluated at the affected ankle according to the following outcomes: modified Ashworth scale, Tardieu scale, passive range of motion, spastic gastrocnemius muscle echo intensity and thickness. Affected calf muscles tone was significantly greater in patients with chronic stroke (modified Ashworth scale P=0.008; Tardieu scale angle P=0.004) as well as spastic gastrocnemius muscle echo intensity (P<0.001). Affected ankle range of motion was significantly greater in patients with multiple sclerosis (P<0.001) as well as spastic gastrocnemius muscle thickness (medialis: P=0.003; lateralis: P=0.004). Our findings evidenced that the same pattern of spasticity (equinus foot) has some different features according to its etiology. This may help the management of spasticity. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. An international survey of patients living with spasticity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnes, Michael; Kocer, Serdar; Murie Fernandez, Manuel; Balcaitiene, Jovita; Fheodoroff, Klemens

    2017-07-01

    To better understand patient perspectives on the life impact of spasticity. Global Internet survey (April 2014-May 2015) of 281 people living with spasticity. Respondents indicated that spasticity has a broad impact on their daily-life: 72% reported impact on quality of life, 44% reported loss of independence and 44% reported depression. Most respondents (64%) were cared for by family members, of whom half had stopped working or reduced their hours. Overall, 45% reported dissatisfaction with the information provided at diagnosis; main reasons were "not enough information" (67%) and "technical terminology" (36%). Respondents had high treatment expectations; 63% expected to be free of muscle spasm, 41% to take care of themselves and 36% to return to a normal routine. However, 33% of respondents had not discussed these expectations with their physician. The most common treatments were physiotherapy (75%), botulinum neurotoxin (BoNT, 73%) and oral spasmolytics (57%). Of those treated with BoNT, 47% waited >1 year from spasticity onset to treatment. This survey emphasises the broad impact of spasticity and highlights unmet needs in the patient journey. Improvements with regards to communication and the therapeutic relationship would be especially welcomed by patients, and would help manage treatment expectations. Implications of Rehabilitation Spasticity has broad impact on the lives of patients and their families that extends beyond the direct physical disability. Patients with spasticity need to be well informed about their condition and treatments available and should be given the opportunity to discuss their expectations. Physicians need to be aware of the patient's individual needs and expectations in order to better help them achieve their therapeutic goals.

  19. Global gene expression analysis of rodent motor neurons following spinal cord injury associates molecular mechanisms with development of post-injury spasticity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wienecke, Jacob; Westerdahl, Ann-Charlotte; Hultborn, Hans

    2010-01-01

    in this cell population. We adopted a rat tail-spasticity model with a caudal spinal transection that causes a progressive development of spasticity from its onset after two to three weeks until two months post injury. Gene expression changes of fluorescently identified tail motor neurons were studied 21...... of endogenous plateau potentials in motor neurons and the development of spasticity after spinalization. To unravel the molecular mechanisms underlying the increased excitability of motor neurons and the return of plateau potentials below a spinal cord injury we investigated changes in gene expression...... and 60 days post injury. The motor neurons undergo substantial transcriptional regulation in response to injury. The patterns of differential expression show similarities at both time points, though there are 20 % more differentially expressed genes 60 days compared to 21 days post injury. The study...

  20. Celiac artery compression syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kokotsakis, J N; Lambidis, C D; Lioulias, A G; Skouteli, E T; Bastounis, E A; Livesay, J J

    2000-04-01

    Celiac artery compression syndrome occurs when the median arcuate ligament of the diaphragm causes extrinsic compression of the celiac trunk. We report a case of a 65-year-old woman who presented with a three-month history of postprandial abdominal pain, nausea and some emesis, without weight loss. There was a bruit in the upper mid-epigastrium and the lateral aortic arteriography revealed a significant stenosis of the celiac artery. At operation, the celiac axis was found to be severely compressed anteriorly by fibers forming the inferior margin of the arcuate ligament of the diaphragm. The ligament was cut and a vein by-pass from the supraceliac aorta to the distal celiac artery was performed. The patient remains well and free of symptoms two and a half years since operation.In this report we discuss the indications and the therapeutic options of this syndrome as well as a review of the literature is being given.

  1. Advances in the management of multiple sclerosis symptoms: pathophysiology and assessment of spasticity in multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tintoré, Mar

    2015-01-01

    Spasticity is a prevalent and troublesome symptom for people with multiple sclerosis (MS). Common instruments to measure MS spasticity include the clinician-rated (modified) Ashworth scale and the patient-rated 0-10 spasticity Numerical Rating Scale (NRS). Current opinion is that measurement of MS spasticity should incorporate the patient's perspective. Other instruments to assess spasticity-associated symptoms such as the Penn spasms frequency scale, sleep quality NRS and pain NRS can assist in tracking MS spasticity evolution and inform management choices. Worsening spasticity reduces patient autonomy, impacts negatively on quality of life and increases health resource utilization and costs. Despite the wide range of issues associated with MS spasticity, undertreatment is common and standard treatment options (physiotherapy and classical oral therapies) often fail to provide adequate symptomatic control.

  2. Compressive beamforming

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xenaki, Angeliki; Mosegaard, Klaus

    2014-01-01

    Sound source localization with sensor arrays involves the estimation of the direction-of-arrival (DOA) from a limited number of observations. Compressive sensing (CS) solves such underdetermined problems achieving sparsity, thus improved resolution, and can be solved efficiently with convex...

  3. Novel missense mutation in the L1 gene in a child with corpus callosum agenesis, retardation, adducted thumbs, spastic paraparesis, and hydrocephalus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sztriha, L; Frossard, P; Hofstra, RMW; Verlind, E; Nork, M

    Corpus callosum agenesis, retardation, adducted thumbs, spastic paraparesis, and hydrocephalus (CRASH syndrome) is an X-linked recessive disorder caused by mutations in the neuronal cell adhesion molecule L1 (L1CAM) gene. L1 plays a key role in axon outgrowth and pathfinding during the development

  4. The prevalence of depression in hereditary spastic paraplegia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vahter, L; Braschinsky, M; Haldre, S; Gross-Paju, K

    2009-09-01

    To evaluate the prevalence of depression and sensitivity and specificity of the single-item interview 'Are you depressed?' for people with hereditary spastic paraplegia in Estonia. Single-item interview 'Are you depressed?' was used as a screening question for depression; all participants then completed the Beck Depression Inventory. People with hereditary spastic paraplegia identified from the epidemiological database who agreed to participate in the study. Beck Depression Inventory, clinical interview. The epidemiological database consisted of 59 patients with clinically confirmed diagnosis of hereditary spastic paraplegia. Forty-eight of these consented to participate in the study. The Beck Depression Inventory score was higher than cut-off point in 58% (28/48) and lower in 42% (20/48). Of the study group, 44% (21/48) had mild, 13% (6/48) moderate and one person revealed severe depression. There was a statistically significant correlation between Beck Depression Inventory score and level of mobility; no other significant correlations with other measures were detected. Of the participants, 54% (26/48) had subjective complaints about depression and answered 'Yes' to the single-item interview 'Are you depressed?'. The sensitivity of the one-item interview in the hereditary spastic paraplegia group was 75% and specificity 75%. Our results show that mild depression is prevalent among people with hereditary spastic paraplegia. Although the single question may be helpful, it cannot be relied upon entirely when assessing a person for depression.

  5. AbobotulinumtoxinA: A Review in Pediatric Lower Limb Spasticity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Syed, Yahiya Y

    2017-08-01

    AbobotulinumtoxinA (Dysport ® ) is currently the only botulinum toxin A formulation approved by the US FDA for the treatment of lower limb spasticity in pediatric patients aged ≥2 years. Intramuscular abobotulinumtoxinA was approved based on the results of a pivotal phase 3 trial in children with lower limb spasticity due to cerebral palsy. In this trial, a single treatment cycle with abobotulinumtoxinA 10-15 U/kg/leg injected into the gastrocnemius and soleus muscles significantly improved ankle plantar flexor muscle tone (primary endpoint), with abobotulinumtoxinA recipients showing a significant response to treatment relative to placebo. AbobotulinumtoxinA treatment also improved spasticity grade. The improvements in muscle tone and spasticity were associated with an improved ability to attain functional goals. Clinical benefits of abobotulinumtoxinA treatment lasted for 16-22 weeks in most patients, and were maintained with multiple treatment cycles during 1 year in an open-label extension study. AbobotulinumtoxinA was generally well tolerated, with a relatively low incidence of treatment-related adverse events. In summary, abobotulinumtoxinA is an effective and generally well tolerated treatment option for children with lower limb spasticity.

  6. MRI of autosomal dominant pure spastic paraplegia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krabbe, K.; Fallentin, E.; Herning, M.; Nielsen, J.E.; Fenger, K.

    1997-01-01

    We examined 16 patients with autosomal dominant pure spastic paraplegia (HSP) and 15 normal controls matched for age and sex using MRI of the brain and spinal cord. Images were assessed qualitatively by two independent radiologists, blinded to the clinical diagnosis. Areas of the brain and corpus callosum on one midsagittal slice and the area of the brain on one axial slice were measured and a ''corpus-callosum index'' expressing the size of the corpus callosum relative to that of the brain was calculated. Cross-sectional areas and anteroposterior and transverse diameters of the spinal cord at the levels of C 2, C 5, T 3, T 6, T 9 and T 11 were measured. No significant differences between patients and controls were found on qualitative evaluation of the images. The patients had a significantly smaller corpus callosum and ''corpus-callosum index'' than controls. This finding, not reported previously, might indicate that the disease process in pure HSP is not confined to the spinal cord. The anteroposterior diameters of the spinal cord at T 3 and T 9 were significantly smaller in patients than in controls. This might correspond to the degeneration of the pyramidal tracts and the dorsal columns described at neuropathological examination. (orig.). With 1 fig., 3 tabs

  7. MRI of autosomal dominant pure spastic paraplegia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krabbe, K.; Fallentin, E.; Herning, M. [Danish Research Center of Magnetic Resonance, Hvidovre Hospital, Kettegaard alle 30, DK-2650 Hvidovre (Denmark); Nielsen, J.E.; Fenger, K. [Institute of Medical Biochemistry and Genetics, Laboratory of Medical Genetics, Section of Neurogenetics, University of Copenhagen (Denmark)

    1997-10-01

    We examined 16 patients with autosomal dominant pure spastic paraplegia (HSP) and 15 normal controls matched for age and sex using MRI of the brain and spinal cord. Images were assessed qualitatively by two independent radiologists, blinded to the clinical diagnosis. Areas of the brain and corpus callosum on one midsagittal slice and the area of the brain on one axial slice were measured and a ``corpus-callosum index`` expressing the size of the corpus callosum relative to that of the brain was calculated. Cross-sectional areas and anteroposterior and transverse diameters of the spinal cord at the levels of C 2, C 5, T 3, T 6, T 9 and T 11 were measured. No significant differences between patients and controls were found on qualitative evaluation of the images. The patients had a significantly smaller corpus callosum and ``corpus-callosum index`` than controls. This finding, not reported previously, might indicate that the disease process in pure HSP is not confined to the spinal cord. The anteroposterior diameters of the spinal cord at T 3 and T 9 were significantly smaller in patients than in controls. This might correspond to the degeneration of the pyramidal tracts and the dorsal columns described at neuropathological examination. (orig.). With 1 fig., 3 tabs.

  8. Effects of radial extracorporeal shock wave therapy on hand spasticity in poststroke patient

    OpenAIRE

    Gjerakaroska Savevska, C; Nikolikj Dimitrova, E; Gocevska, M

    2016-01-01

    Background: Hand spasticity after a stroke greatly increases the difficulties of the daily living activities and limits the effectiveness of rehabilitation. Radial extracorporeal shock wave therapy (RESWT) has been suggested as an alternative treatment for spasticity reduction. We demonstrate the effectiveness of RESWT regarding hand spasticity in a stroke patient.

  9. Genotype-phenotype correlations in spastic paraplegia type 7: a study in a large Dutch cohort

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Gassen, K.L.; van der Heijden, C.D.; Bot, S.T. de; Dunnen, W. den; Berg, L.H. van den; Verschuuren-Bemelmans, C.C.; Kremer, H.P.H.; Veldink, J.H.; Kamsteeg, E.J.; Scheffer, H.; Warrenburg, B.P.C. van de

    2012-01-01

    Spastic paraplegia type 7 is an autosomal recessive neurodegenerative disorder mainly characterized by progressive bilateral lower limb spasticity and referred to as a form of hereditary spastic paraplegia. Additional disease features may also be observed as part of a more complex phenotype. Many

  10. Genotype-phenotype correlations in spastic paraplegia type 7 : a study in a large Dutch cohort

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Gassen, Koen L. I.; van der Heijden, Charlotte D. C. C.; de Bot, Susanne T.; den Dunnen, Wilfred F. A.; van den Berg, Leonard H.; Verschuuren - Bemelmans, Corien C.; Kremer, H. P. H.; Veldink, Jan H.; Kamsteeg, Erik-Jan; Scheffer, Hans; van de Warrenburg, Bart P.

    2012-01-01

    Spastic paraplegia type 7 is an autosomal recessive neurodegenerative disorder mainly characterized by progressive bilateral lower limb spasticity and referred to as a form of hereditary spastic paraplegia. Additional disease features may also be observed as part of a more complex phenotype. Many

  11. Inter-rater Reliability of the Modified Ashworth Scale for Spasticity in Hemiplegic Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sloan, R. L.; And Others

    1992-01-01

    This study tested the interrater reliability of the Modified Ashworth Scale in measuring upper and lower limb spasticity in 34 hemiplegic adult patients examined by 2 physiotherapists and 2 doctors. Findings indicated satisfactory reliability for upper limb spasticity but less satisfactory results for lower limb spasticity. (DB)

  12. Characterization of Spasticity in Cerebral Palsy: Dependence of Catch Angle on Velocity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yi-Ning; Ren, Yupeng; Goldsmith, Ashlee; Gaebler, Deborah; Liu, Shu Q.; Zhang, Li-Qun

    2010-01-01

    Aim: To evaluate spasticity under controlled velocities and torques in children with cerebral palsy (CP) using a manual spasticity evaluator. Method: The study involved 10 children with spastic CP (six males, four females; mean age 10y 1mo, SD 2y 9mo, range 7-16y; one with quadriplegia, six with right hemiplegia, three with left hemiplegia; Gross…

  13. Mammographic compression in Asian women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, Susie; Abdul Aziz, Yang Faridah; Ng, Kwan Hoong

    2017-01-01

    To investigate: (1) the variability of mammographic compression parameters amongst Asian women; and (2) the effects of reducing compression force on image quality and mean glandular dose (MGD) in Asian women based on phantom study. We retrospectively collected 15818 raw digital mammograms from 3772 Asian women aged 35-80 years who underwent screening or diagnostic mammography between Jan 2012 and Dec 2014 at our center. The mammograms were processed using a volumetric breast density (VBD) measurement software (Volpara) to assess compression force, compression pressure, compressed breast thickness (CBT), breast volume, VBD and MGD against breast contact area. The effects of reducing compression force on image quality and MGD were also evaluated based on measurement obtained from 105 Asian women, as well as using the RMI156 Mammographic Accreditation Phantom and polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) slabs. Compression force, compression pressure, CBT, breast volume, VBD and MGD correlated significantly with breast contact area (pAsian women. The median compression force should be about 8.1 daN compared to the current 12.0 daN. Decreasing compression force from 12.0 daN to 9.0 daN increased CBT by 3.3±1.4 mm, MGD by 6.2-11.0%, and caused no significant effects on image quality (p>0.05). Force-standardized protocol led to widely variable compression parameters in Asian women. Based on phantom study, it is feasible to reduce compression force up to 32.5% with minimal effects on image quality and MGD.

  14. In Vivo Evidence for Lysosome Depletion and Impaired Autophagic Clearance in Hereditary Spastic Paraplegia Type SPG11.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varga, Rita-Eva; Khundadze, Mukhran; Damme, Markus; Nietzsche, Sandor; Hoffmann, Birgit; Stauber, Tobias; Koch, Nicole; Hennings, J Christopher; Franzka, Patricia; Huebner, Antje K; Kessels, Michael M; Biskup, Christoph; Jentsch, Thomas J; Qualmann, Britta; Braulke, Thomas; Kurth, Ingo; Beetz, Christian; Hübner, Christian A

    2015-08-01

    Hereditary spastic paraplegia (HSP) is characterized by a dying back degeneration of corticospinal axons which leads to progressive weakness and spasticity of the legs. SPG11 is the most common autosomal-recessive form of HSPs and is caused by mutations in SPG11. A recent in vitro study suggested that Spatacsin, the respective gene product, is needed for the recycling of lysosomes from autolysosomes, a process known as autophagic lysosome reformation. The relevance of this observation for hereditary spastic paraplegia, however, has remained unclear. Here, we report that disruption of Spatacsin in mice indeed causes hereditary spastic paraplegia-like phenotypes with loss of cortical neurons and Purkinje cells. Degenerating neurons accumulate autofluorescent material, which stains for the lysosomal protein Lamp1 and for p62, a marker of substrate destined to be degraded by autophagy, and hence appears to be related to autolysosomes. Supporting a more generalized defect of autophagy, levels of lipidated LC3 are increased in Spatacsin knockout mouse embryonic fibrobasts (MEFs). Though distinct parameters of lysosomal function like processing of cathepsin D and lysosomal pH are preserved, lysosome numbers are reduced in knockout MEFs and the recovery of lysosomes during sustained starvation impaired consistent with a defect of autophagic lysosome reformation. Because lysosomes are reduced in cortical neurons and Purkinje cells in vivo, we propose that the decreased number of lysosomes available for fusion with autophagosomes impairs autolysosomal clearance, results in the accumulation of undegraded material and finally causes death of particularly sensitive neurons like cortical motoneurons and Purkinje cells in knockout mice.

  15. Speech Compression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jerry D. Gibson

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Speech compression is a key technology underlying digital cellular communications, VoIP, voicemail, and voice response systems. We trace the evolution of speech coding based on the linear prediction model, highlight the key milestones in speech coding, and outline the structures of the most important speech coding standards. Current challenges, future research directions, fundamental limits on performance, and the critical open problem of speech coding for emergency first responders are all discussed.

  16. Clinical features and management of hereditary spastic paraplegia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ingrid Faber

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Hereditary spastic paraplegia (HSP is a group of genetically-determined disorders characterized by progressive spasticity and weakness of lower limbs. An apparently sporadic case of adult-onset spastic paraplegia is a frequent clinical problem and a significant proportion of cases are likely to be of genetic origin. HSP is clinically divided into pure and complicated forms. The later present with a wide range of additional neurological and systemic features. To date, there are up to 60 genetic subtypes described. All modes of monogenic inheritance have been described: autosomal dominant, autosomal recessive, X-linked and mitochondrial traits. Recent advances point to abnormal axonal transport as a key mechanism leading to the degeneration of the long motor neuron axons in the central nervous system in HSP. In this review we aim to address recent advances in the field, placing emphasis on key diagnostic features that will help practicing neurologists to identify and manage these conditions.

  17. Balneotherapy in treatment of spastic upper limb after stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erceg-Rukavina, Tatjana; Stefanovski, Mihajlo

    2015-02-01

    After stroke, spasticity is often the main problem that prevents functional recovery. Pain occurs in up to 70% of patients during the first year post-stroke. A total of 70 patients (30 female and 45 male) mean age (65.67) participated in prospective, controlled study. ischaemic stroke, developed spasticity of upper limb, post-stroke interval cryotherapy. The outcome was evaluated using Modified Ashworth scale for spasticity and VAS scale for pain. The significance value was sat at pspasticity and pain in affected upper limb. Reduction in tone of affected upper limb muscles was significant in Ex group (pspasticity and pain significantly and can help in treatment of post-stroke patients.

  18. Lumbosacral Dorsal Rhizotomy for Spastic Cerebral Palsy: A Health Technology Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pron, Gaylene; Chan, Brian; Tu, Hong Anh; Xie, Xuanqian; Weir, Mark; Wells, David; Higgins, Caroline

    2017-01-01

    Background Cerebral palsy, a spectrum of neuromuscular conditions caused by abnormal brain development or early damage to the brain, is the most common cause of childhood physical disability. Lumbosacral dorsal rhizotomy is a neurosurgical procedure that permanently decreases spasticity and is always followed by physical therapy. The objectives of this health technology assessment were to evaluate the clinical effectiveness, safety, cost effectiveness, and family perspectives of dorsal rhizotomy. Methods We performed a systematic literature search until December 2015 with auto-alerts until December 2016. Search strategies were developed by medical librarians, and a single reviewer reviewed the abstracts. The health technology assessment included a clinical review based on functional outcomes, safety, and treatment satisfaction; an economic study reviewing cost-effective literature; a budget impact analysis; and interviews with families evaluating the intervention. Results Eighty-four studies (1 meta-analysis, 5 randomized controlled studies [RCTs], 75 observational pre-post studies, and 3 case reports) were reviewed. A meta-analysis of RCTs involving dorsal rhizotomy and physical therapy versus physical therapy confirmed reduced lower-limb spasticity and increased gross motor function (4.5%, P = .002). Observational studies reported statistically significant improvements in gross motor function over 2 years or less (12 studies, GRADE moderate) and over more than 2 years (10 studies, GRADE moderate) as well as improvements in functional independence in the short term (10 studies, GRADE moderate) and long term (4 studies, GRADE low). Major operative complications, were infrequently reported (4 studies). Bony abnormalities and instabilities monitored radiologically in the spine (15 studies) and hip (8 studies) involved minimal or clinically insignificant changes after surgery. No studies evaluated the cost effectiveness of dorsal rhizotomy. The budget impact of

  19. Clinical and imaging characterization of progressive spastic dysarthria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, H M; Duffy, J R; Whitwell, J L; Ahlskog, J E; Sorenson, E J; Josephs, K A

    2014-03-01

    To describe speech, neurological and imaging characteristics of a series of patients presenting with progressive spastic dysarthria as the first and predominant sign of a presumed neurodegenerative disease. Participants were 25 patients with spastic dysarthria as the only or predominant speech disorder. Clinical features, pattern of MRI volume loss on voxel-based morphometry and pattern of hypometabolism on F18-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) scan are described. All patients demonstrated speech characteristics consistent with spastic dysarthria, including strained voice quality, slow speaking rate, monopitch and monoloudness, and slow and regular speech alternating motion rates. Eight patients did not have additional neurological findings on examination. Pseudobulbar affect, upper motor neuron pattern limb weakness, spasticity, Hoffman sign and positive Babinski reflexes were noted in some of the remaining patients. Twenty-three patients had electromyographic assessment and none had diffuse motor neuron disease or met El Escorial criteria for amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. Voxel-based morphometry revealed striking bilateral white matter volume loss affecting the motor cortex (BA 4), including the frontoparietal operculum (BA 43) with extension into the middle cerebral peduncle. FDG-PET showed subtle hypometabolism affecting the premotor and motor cortices in some patients, particularly in those who had a disease duration longer than 2 years. A neurodegenerative disorder that begins focally with spastic dysarthria due to involvement of the motor and premotor cortex and descending corticospinal and corticobulbar pathways is characterized. The descriptive label 'progressive spastic dysarthria' to best capture the dominant presenting feature of the syndrome is proposed. © 2013 The Author(s) European Journal of Neurology © 2013 EFNS.

  20. Expanding the Clinical Spectrum of SPG11 Gene Mutations in Recessive Hereditary Spastic Paraplegia with Thin Corpus Callosum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aleem, Alice Abdel; Abu-Shahba, Nourhan; Swistun, Dominika; Silhavy, Jennifer; Bielas, Stephanie L.; Sattar, Shifteh; Gleeson, Joseph G.; Zaki, Maha

    2011-01-01

    Hereditary spastic paraplegia (HSP) represents a large group of neurological disorders characterized by progressive spasticity of the lower limbs. One subtype of HSP shows an autosomal recessive form of inheritance with this corpus callosum (ARHSP-TCC), and displays genetic heterogeneity with four known loci. We identified a consanguineous Egyptian family with five affected individuals with ARHSP-TCC. We found linkage to the SPG11 locus and identified a novel homozygous p.Q498X stop codon mutation in exon 7 in the SPG11 gene encoding Spatacsin. Cognitive impairment and polyneuropathy, reported as frequent in SPG11, were not evident. This family supports the importance of SPG11 as a frequent cause for ARHSP-TCC, and expands the clinic SPG11 spectrum. PMID:20971220

  1. Tilt table standing for reducing spasticity after spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohannon, R W

    1993-10-01

    A patient with a T12 spinal cord injury and intractable extensor spasms of the lower extremities participated in tilt table standing trial on 5 nonconsecutive days to determine if the intervention would affect his spasticity and spasms. Each day's standing trial was followed by an immediate reduction in lower extremity spasticity (measured using the modified Ashworth scale and pendulum testing). Standing was also accompanied by a reduction in spasms that lasted until the following morning. The reduction of spasms was particularly advantageous to the performance of car transfers. Tilt table standing merits further examination as a physical treatment of spasms that accompany central nervous system lesions.

  2. Femoral derotation osteotomy in spastic diplegia. Proximal or distal?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pirpiris, M; Trivett, A; Baker, R; Rodda, J; Nattrass, G R; Graham, H K

    2003-03-01

    We describe the results of a prospective study of 28 children with spastic diplegia and in-toed gait, who had bilateral femoral derotation osteotomies undertaken at either the proximal intertrochanteric or the distal supracondylar level of the femur. Preoperative clinical evaluation and three-dimensional movement analysis determined any additional soft-tissue surgery. Distal osteotomy was faster with significantly lower blood loss than proximal osteotomy. The children in the distal group achieved independent walking earlier than those in the proximal group (6.9 +/- 1.3 v 10.7 +/- 1.7 weeks; p spastic diplegia.

  3. A Descriptive Study of Lower Limb Torsional Kinematic Profiles in Children With Spastic Diplegia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, Anne-Laure; Ilharreborde, Brice; Megrot, Fabrice; Mallet, Cindy; Azarpira, Reza; Mazda, Keyvan; Presedo, Ana; Penneçot, Georges F

    2015-09-01

    Lower limb rotational anomalies in spastic diplegic children with cerebral palsy (CP) are common and difficult to identify through physical examination alone. The identification and treatment of the overall rotational disorders must be considered to restore physiological lever-arms lengths and lever-arms orientation.The aims of the study were to assess the prevalence of lower limb rotational malalignment and to describe the distribution of the different kinematic torsional profiles in children with spastic diplegia. Instrumented gait analysis data from 188 children with spastic diplegia were retrospectively reviewed. None of the patients had undergone surgery previously or received botulinum toxin treatment within 6 months before the review. Kinematic data, collected at the midstance phase, included: pelvic, hip, and ankle rotation and foot progression angle. The prevalence of kinematic rotational deviations was 98.4%. Sixty-one percent of the children walked with an internal foot progression angle and 21% exhibited external alignment. The pelvis was internally rotated in 41% of the cases and externally in another 27%. Hip rotation was internal in 29% and external in 27% of the cases. Ankle rotation was internal in 55% and external in 16% of the cases. Lower limb rotational anomalies involved more than one level in 77% of the limbs. A kinematic compensatory deviation was identified in at least one level in 48% of the limbs. Kinematic rotational anomalies were identified in nearly all the 188 children in the study. The multilevel involvement of lower limb malalignment was not systematically associated with compensatory mechanisms between the levels. Ankle rotational anomalies were the most frequent cause of lower limb torsional deviations followed by pelvic malalignment. Level IV.

  4. Association of Interleukin 6 gene polymorphisms with genetic susceptibilities to spastic tetraplegia in males: a case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Mingjie; Li, Tongchuan; Lin, Sheyu; Bi, Dan; Zhu, Dengna; Shang, Qing; Ma, Caiyun; Wang, Honglian; Wang, Lei; Zhang, Yiting; He, Lin; Zhu, Changlian; Xing, Qinghe

    2013-03-01

    Cerebral palsy (CP) is a group of non-progressive motor impairment and permanent disorders causing limitation of activity and abnormal posture. It may be caused by infection (such as chorioamnionitis), asphyxia or multiple genetic factors. The Interleukin 6 gene (IL6) was suggested to be involved in the susceptibilities to CP risk as a kind of proinflammatory cytokine. To explore the genetic association between the polymorphisms of the IL6 gene and CP in the Chinese population. A total of 542 CP patients and 483 healthy control children were recruited in this study to detect five single nucleotide polymorphisms (rs1800796, rs2069837, rs2066992, rs2069840, and rs10242595) in the IL6 locus. Genotyping of SNPs was performed by the MassArray platform-based genotyping approach. The SHEsis program was applied to analyze the genotyping data. Of the five selected SNPs, no significant allelic and genotypic association was found between CP patients and controls. However, subgroup analysis found significant differences in allele frequencies between spastic tetraplegia in males compared with controls at rs1800796 (OR=1.39, P=0.033, P=0.099 after SNPSpD correction) and rs2069837 (OR=1.58, P=0.012, P=0.035 after SNPSpD correction). The frequencies of the C allele of rs1800796 and the A allele of rs2069837 were greater in males with spastic tetraplegia than in the controls. The two SNPs haplotype rs1800796 (G) - rs2069837 (G) were also associated with a decreased risk of spastic tetraplegia in males (OR=0.619, P=0.009, P=0.027 after Bonferroni correction). Genetic variation of the IL6 gene may influence susceptibility to spastic tetraplegia in males and its role in cerebral palsy deserves further evaluation in a large-scale and well-designed study. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Effect of neurodevelopmental treatment-based physical therapy on the change of muscle strength, spasticity, and gross motor function in children with spastic cerebral palsy

    OpenAIRE

    Park, Eun-Young; Kim, Won-Ho

    2017-01-01

    [Purpose] This study aimed to investigate the effectiveness of neurodevelopmental treatment-based physical therapy on muscle tone, strength, and gross motor function in children with spastic cerebral palsy. [Subjects and Methods] One-hundred-seventy-five children with spastic cerebral palsy (88 diplegia; 78 quadriplegia) received neurodevelopmental treatment-based physical therapy for 35 minutes per day, 2?3 times per week for 1?year. Spasticity, muscle strength, and gross motor function were...

  6. Relationship Between Botulinum Toxin, Spasticity, and Pain: a Survey of Patient Perception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaikh, Adil; Phadke, Chetan P; Ismail, Farooq; Boulias, Chris

    2016-03-01

    To assess the prevalence of pain in adults with spasticity and to assess the association between the subjective experience of pain and spasticity. Cross-sectional study. outpatient spasticity management clinic of a rehabilitation centre. Patients with upper motor neuron lesions and spasticity (n=131) were recruited. We assessed pain intensity and location, relationship between spasticity and pain perception, and perception of pain relief from botulinum toxin type-A (BoNTA) injections. Pain perception rated on a 10-point numerical rating scale and pain quality. 65% of the patients with spasticity reported presence of pain and 60% described it as an aching pain. More patients reported pain with movement (34%) compared to rest (21%). There was a statistically poor correlation between the severity of pain and spasticity (r=0.16; p>0.05). Most patients (80%) believed that their pain was related to spasticity and 62% reported that BoNTA injections decreased their pain. The high incidence of pain noted within our sample suggests that physicians may have to consider pain management as part of spasticity treatment. Participants reported that their pain was related to their spasticity, and that it decreased after BoNTA treatment. Further study is needed to explore the relationships between objective measures of spasticity and pain.

  7. Occurrence and temporal evolution of upper limb spasticity in stroke patients admitted to a rehabilitation unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Keng H; Lee, Jeanette; Chua, Karen S

    2012-01-01

    To document the temporal development and evolution of upper limb spasticity, and to establish clinical correlates and predictors of upper limb spasticity in a cohort of stroke patients. Prospective cohort study. A rehabilitation unit. Patients (N=163) with a first-ever ischemic stroke. Not applicable. Ashworth Scale for measuring upper limb spasticity, Motor Assessment Scale for upper limb activity, Motricity Index for upper limb strength, and Modified Barthel Index for self-care. Upper limb spasticity was defined as an Ashworth Scale score of 1 or greater. Upper limb spasticity occurred in 54 patients (33%) at 3 months after stroke. Development of spasticity at later stages of the stroke was infrequent, occurring in only 28 patients (17%). In patients with mild spasticity (Ashworth Scale score 1) at 3 months after stroke, worsening of spasticity occurred in only 1 patient. On the other hand, almost half of the patients with moderate spasticity (Ashworth Scale score 2) at 3 months progressed to severe spasticity (Ashworth Scale score 3). Poor upper limb activity was the most important correlate of "moderate to severe spasticity" (Ashworth Scale score ≥2) (PAshworth Scale score of 2 or greater at 3 months after stroke, and in patients with severe upper limb weakness on admission to rehabilitation. Copyright © 2012 American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Outcome of selective motor fasciculotomy in the treatment of upper limb spasticity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puligopu, Aneel Kumar; Purohit, Anirudh Kumar

    2011-10-01

    The objective was to assess the outcome of selective motor fasciculotomy in relieving upper limb harmful resistant spasticity and thereby to improve motor functions in persons with cerebral palsy. Twenty people having cerebral palsy (12 females and 8 males) with age ranging from 5 to 35 (mean 12.85) years with upper limb resistant spasticity due to spastic hemiplegia (n=7), triplegia (n=6), and quadriplegia (n=7) were assessed using Modified Ashworth Scale, Selective Voluntary Control Grade, Wee FIM Scale and hand function evaluation. Selective motor fasciculotomy was performed on the musculocutaneous nerve (n=13) for elbow flexors spasticity, median nerve (n=24) for pronators and radial wrist flexors spasticity and ulnar nerve (n=3) for ulnar wrist flexors spasticity. Pre- and post-op therapeutic exercises were performed. Statistical analysis using the Wilcoxon Signed Ranks test showed significant reduction in spasticity and improvement in selective voluntary control, hand functions (grasp to hold a 2 inch rod), and Wee FIM (self-care domain in particular). There was no recurrence in spasticity and complications following surgery. The selective motor fasciculotomy of musculocutaneous, median, and ulnar nerves significantly reduces spasticity in the affected muscle groups and thereby improves the self-care (motor) functions in selected people with cerebral palsy who have harmful resistant spasticity without any organic shortening of the muscles. The procedure is safe and the spasticity does not recur.

  9. Role of dorsal rhizotomy in spinal cord injury-induced spasticity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynolds, Renee M; Morton, Ryan P; Walker, Marion L; Massagli, Teresa L; Browd, Samuel R

    2014-09-01

    Selective dorsal rhizotomy may have a role in the management of spinal cord injury (SCI)-induced spasticity. Spasticity and spasms are common sequelae of SCI in children. Depending on the clinical scenario, treatments may include physical and occupational therapy, oral medications, chemodenervation, and neurosurgical interventions. Selective dorsal rhizotomy (SDR) is used in the management of spasticity in selected children with cerebral palsy, but, to the authors' knowledge, its use has not been reported in children with SCI. The authors describe the cases of 3 pediatric patients with SCI and associated spasticity treated with SDR. Two of the 3 patients have had significant long-term improvement in their preoperative spasticity. Although the third patient also experienced initial relief, his spasticity quickly returned to its preoperative severity, necessitating additional therapies. Selective dorsal rhizotomy may have a place in the treatment of selected children with spasticity due to SCI.

  10. The swimming test is effective for evaluating spasticity after contusive spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryu, Youngjae; Ogata, Toru; Nagao, Motoshi; Kitamura, Taku; Morioka, Kazuhito; Ichihara, Yoshinori; Doi, Toru; Sawada, Yasuhiro; Akai, Masami; Nishimura, Ryohei; Fujita, Naoki

    2017-01-01

    Spasticity is a frequent chronic complication in individuals with spinal cord injury (SCI). However, the severity of spasticity varies in patients with SCI. Therefore, an evaluation method is needed to determine the severity of spasticity. We used a contusive SCI model that is suitable for clinical translation. In this study, we examined the feasibility of the swimming test and an EMG for evaluating spasticity in a contusive SCI rat model. Sprague-Dawley rats received an injury at the 8th thoracic vertebra. Swimming tests were performed 3 to 6 weeks after SCI induction. We placed the SCI rats into spasticity-strong or spasticity-weak groups based on the frequency of spastic behavior during the swimming test. Subsequently, we recorded the Hoffman reflex (H-reflex) and examined the immunoreactivity of serotonin (5-HT) and its receptor (5-HT2A) in the spinal tissues of the SCI rats. The spasticity-strong group had significantly decreased rate-dependent depression of the H-reflex compared to the spasticity-weak group. The area of 5-HT2A receptor immunoreactivity was significantly increased in the spasticity-strong group. Thus, both electrophysiological and histological evaluations indicate that the spasticity-strong group presented with a more severe upper motor neuron syndrome. We also observed the groups in their cages for 20 hours. Our results suggest that the swimming test provides an accurate evaluation of spasticity in this contusive SCI model. We believe that the swimming test is an effective method for evaluating spastic behaviors and developing treatments targeting spasticity after SCI.

  11. A longitudinal study of self-reported spasticity among individuals with chronic spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DiPiro, Nicole D; Li, Chao; Krause, James S

    2018-03-01

    A longitudinal study. To describe the prevalence and stability of self-reported spasticity severity in adults with chronic spinal cord injury (SCI) over a 3-year timeframe and examine predictors of severity and change in spasticity severity. The data were collected by mail at a medical university in the Southeastern United States. A total of 1790 adults with chronic SCI responded to two self-report assessments, one between 2007 and 2009 (baseline) and another between 2011 and 2014 (follow-up). Average spasticity severity was measured on a numeric rating scale from 0 (no spasticity) to 10 (spasticity as bad as you can imagine). Frequency of prescription medication use for spasticity in the past year was also reported (never, sometimes/weekly, daily). About 82.5% of participants had spasticity at baseline and 86.5% at follow-up. There was a significant change in spasticity severity (0.9 ± 2.3; p < 0.001), corresponding to a 31% increase in mean severity. Overall, the frequency of medication use did not significantly change. At baseline, 55.6% of participants reported using medications for spasticity in the past year; 54.9% reported use at follow-up. Variables significantly associated with spasticity severity included race/ethnicity, age, and spasticity medication use. Spasticity is highly prevalent after SCI. Though severity is mild on average, a statistically significant increase was observed over a relatively short natural timeframe. The changes observed in spasticity severity categories (mild, moderate, severe) highlight the need to monitor spasticity in individuals with chronic SCI.

  12. The swimming test is effective for evaluating spasticity after contusive spinal cord injury.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Youngjae Ryu

    Full Text Available Spasticity is a frequent chronic complication in individuals with spinal cord injury (SCI. However, the severity of spasticity varies in patients with SCI. Therefore, an evaluation method is needed to determine the severity of spasticity. We used a contusive SCI model that is suitable for clinical translation. In this study, we examined the feasibility of the swimming test and an EMG for evaluating spasticity in a contusive SCI rat model. Sprague-Dawley rats received an injury at the 8th thoracic vertebra. Swimming tests were performed 3 to 6 weeks after SCI induction. We placed the SCI rats into spasticity-strong or spasticity-weak groups based on the frequency of spastic behavior during the swimming test. Subsequently, we recorded the Hoffman reflex (H-reflex and examined the immunoreactivity of serotonin (5-HT and its receptor (5-HT2A in the spinal tissues of the SCI rats. The spasticity-strong group had significantly decreased rate-dependent depression of the H-reflex compared to the spasticity-weak group. The area of 5-HT2A receptor immunoreactivity was significantly increased in the spasticity-strong group. Thus, both electrophysiological and histological evaluations indicate that the spasticity-strong group presented with a more severe upper motor neuron syndrome. We also observed the groups in their cages for 20 hours. Our results suggest that the swimming test provides an accurate evaluation of spasticity in this contusive SCI model. We believe that the swimming test is an effective method for evaluating spastic behaviors and developing treatments targeting spasticity after SCI.

  13. Neuroepidemiology of Konzo a Spastic Para-Tetraparesis of Acute ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The main symptom was a sudden onset of a non-progressive spastic paraparesis or a tetraparesis in severe cases. Bitter cassava was the staple diet. We found high exposure to cyanogenic compounds i.e., mean (± SD) concentration of serum thiocyanate 502 (±153) mmol/L, of urinary linamarin 482 (±322) mmol/L, and ...

  14. Changes in body composition after spasticity treatment with intrathecal baclofen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skogberg, Olle; Samuelsson, Kersti; Ertzgaard, Per; Levi, Richard

    2017-01-19

    To assess changes in body composition, body weight and resting metabolic rate in patients who received intrathecal baclofen therapy for spasticity. Prospective, longitudinal, quasi-experimental, with a pre/post design. Twelve patients with spasticity, fulfilling study criteria, and due for pump implantation for intrathecal baclofen therapy, completed the study. Data were obtained before, 6 months and 12 months after commencement of intrathecal baclofen therapy as regards body composition (by skinfold calliper), body weight, and resting metabolic rate (by resting oxygen consumption). Spasticity was assessed according to the Modified Ashworth Scale (MAS) and Penn Spasm Frequency Scale (PSFS). A reduction in spasticity according to MAS occurred. Mean fat body mass increased and mean lean body mass decreased. Mean body weight showed a non-significant increase and resting metabolic rate a non-significant decrease. This explorative study indicates that unfavourable changes in body composition might occur after intrathecal baclofen therapy. Since obesity and increased fat body mass contribute to an increased cardiovascular risk, these findings may indicate a need for initiation of countermeasures, e.g. increased physical activity and/or dietary measures, in conjunction with intrathecal baclofen therapy. Further studies, including larger study samples and control groups, are needed to corroborate these findings.

  15. Topical cryotherapy-use for relief of pain and spasticity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mead, S; Knott, M

    1966-09-01

    Cold applications are sometimes of pronounced symptomatic benefit in some rheumatic disorders such as acute myalgia; in the temporary relief of spasticity; in helping to release tight structures in poliomyelitis and allied diseases; and in temporary recovery of energy in multiple sclerosis.

  16. Topical Cryotherapy—Use for Relief of Pain and Spasticity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mead, Sedgwick; Knott, Margaret

    1966-01-01

    Cold applications are sometimes of pronounced symptomatic benefit in some rheumatic disorders such as acute myalgia; in the temporary relief of spasticity; in helping to release tight structures in poliomyelitis and allied diseases; and in temporary recovery of energy in multiple sclerosis. PMID:18730022

  17. Operant Control of Pathological Tongue Thrust in Spastic Cerebral Palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, George A., Jr.

    1979-01-01

    The behavior modification procedure, carried out at mealtime with a ten-year-old retarded boy who had spastic cerebral palsy, consisted of differential reinforcement and punishment, and resulted in substantial decreases in tongue thrust (reverse swallowing) and food expulsion, and a large increase in observed chewing. (Author/DLS)

  18. Assessment of spasticity: from EMG to patients' perception

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fleuren, J.F.M.; Fleuren, Judith Francina Maria

    2009-01-01

    Spasticity is a common phenomenon which often develops after an upper motor neuro lesion, such as stroke, multiple sclerosis or spinal cord injury. The clinical picture after an UMN lesion depends primarily upon its location and extent, and the time since it occurred, rather than on the pathogenesis

  19. foot orthosis in improving the balance in children with spastic

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Khaled A. Olama

    2012-11-02

    Nov 2, 2012 ... exercise program is highly useful in rehabilitation of spastic diplegic cerebral palsy children as they enabled them ... Rehabilitation of the patient with cerebral ..... Stepping before standing: hip muscle function in stepping and standing balance after stroke. J Neurol Neurosurg Psychiatry 2000;68(4):458–64.

  20. A retrospective neurocognitive study in children with spastic diplegia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pirila, S; van der Meere, J; Korhonen, P; Ruusu-Niemi, P; Kyntaja, M; Nieminen, P; Korpela, R

    2004-01-01

    The study presents the results on neonatal cranial ultrasonography (US) and later intelligence (Wechsler Intelligence Scale-Third Edition and Wechsler Preschool and Primary Scale of Intelligence-Revised) and Neuropsychological assessments of 15 children with spastic diplegia. The assessments were

  1. Stop using the Ashworth Scale for the assessment of spasticity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fleuren, J.F.M.; Fleuren, J.F.M.; Voerman, Gerlienke; Erren-Wolters, C.V.; Snoek, G.J.; Rietman, Johan Swanik; Hermens, Hermanus J.; Nene, A.V.

    2010-01-01

    Aim: Many studies have been performed on the methodological qualities of the (modified) Ashworth Scale but overall these studies seem inconclusive. The aim of this study was to investigate the construct validity and inter-rater reliability of the Ashworth Scale (AS) for the assessment of spasticity

  2. Stop using the Ashworth Scale for the assessment of spasticity.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fleuren, J.F.; Voerman, G.E.; Erren-Wolters, C.V.; Snoek, G.J.; Rietman, J.S.; Hermens, H.J.; Nene, A.V.

    2010-01-01

    AIM: Many studies have been performed on the methodological qualities of the (modified) Ashworth Scale but overall these studies seem inconclusive. The aim of this study was to investigate the construct validity and inter-rater reliability of the Ashworth Scale (AS) for the assessment of spasticity

  3. Modulation of back geometry in children with spastic diplegic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Gehan H. El-Meniawy

    2011-11-29

    Nov 29, 2011 ... Modulation of back geometry in children with spastic diplegic cerebral palsy via hippotherapy training. Gehan H. El-Meniawy, Nahed S. Thabet *. Department of Physical Therapy for Growth and Developmental Disorders in Children and its Surgery, Faculty of. Physical Therapy, Cairo University, Egypt.

  4. Motor activation in SPG4-linked hereditary spastic paraplegia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Scheuer, KH; Nielsen, JE; Krabbe, Katja

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to investigate the extent of motor cortical functional reorganisation in patients with SPG4-linked hereditary spastic paraplegia by exploring cortical motor activation related to movements of clinically affected (lower) and unaffected (upper) limbs. METHODS: T...

  5. Altered sense of agency in children with spastic cerebral palsy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ritterband-Rosenbaum, Anina; Christensen, Mark S; Kliim-Due, Mette

    2011-01-01

    ABSTRACT: Background Children diagnosed with spastic Cerebral Palsy (CP) often show perceptual and cognitive problems, which may contribute to their functional deficit. Here we investigated if altered ability to determine whether an observed movement is performed by themselves (sense of agency...

  6. Spastic pelvic floor syndrome: Definition in double-exposure defaecography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Helzel, M.V.

    1989-01-01

    Double-exposure defaecography and the so-called pinching test improve conventional defaecography in the diagnosis of functional rectal outlet disorders. In particular, the pinching test makes quantitative evaluation of the m. puborectalis possible. 'Spastic pelvic floor syndrome' is defined by quantitative parameters in double-exposure defaecography and the pinching test. (orig.) [de

  7. Phenotype and frequency of STUB1 mutations: next-generation screenings in Caucasian ataxia and spastic paraplegia cohorts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Synofzik, Matthis; Schüle, Rebecca; Schulze, Martin; Gburek-Augustat, Janina; Schweizer, Roland; Schirmacher, Anja; Krägeloh-Mann, Ingeborg; Gonzalez, Michael; Young, Peter; Züchner, Stephan; Schöls, Ludger; Bauer, Peter

    2014-04-17

    Mutations in the gene STUB1, encoding the protein CHIP (C-terminus of HSC70-interacting protein), have recently been suggested as a cause of recessive ataxia based on the findings in few Chinese families. Here we aimed to investigate the phenotypic and genotypic spectrum of STUB1 mutations, and to assess their frequency in different Caucasian disease cohorts. 300 subjects with degenerative ataxia (n = 167) or spastic paraplegia (n = 133) were screened for STUB1 variants by whole-exome-sequencing (n = 204) or shotgun-fragment-library-sequencing (n = 96). To control for the specificity of STUB1 variants, we screened an additional 1707 exomes from 891 index families with other neurological diseases. We identified 3 ataxia patients (3/167 = 1.8%) with 4 novel missense mutations in STUB1, including 3 mutations in its tetratricopeptide-repeat domain. All patients showed evidence of pyramidal tract damage. Cognitive impairment was present only in one and hypogonadism in none of them. Ataxia did not start before age 48 years in one subject. No recessive STUB1 variants were identified in families with other neurological diseases, demonstrating that STUB1 variants are not simply rare polymorphisms ubiquitous in neurodegenerative disease. STUB1-disease occurs also in Caucasian ataxia populations (1.8%). Our results expand the genotypic spectrum of STUB1-disease, showing that pathogenic mutations affect also the tetratricopeptide-repeat domain, thus providing clinical evidence for the functional importance of this domain. Moreover, they further delineate the phenotypic core features of STUB1-ataxia. Pyramidal tract damage is a common accompanying feature and can include lower limb spasticity, thus adding STUB1-ataxia to the differential diagnosis of "spastic ataxias". However, STUB1 is rare in subjects with predominant spastic paraplegia (0/133). In contrast to previous reports, STUB1-ataxia can start even above age 40 years, and neither hypogonadism nor prominent cognitive

  8. Revisiting genotype-phenotype overlap in neurogenetics: triplet-repeat expansions mimicking spastic paraplegias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bettencourt, Conceição; Quintáns, Beatriz; Ros, Raquel; Ampuero, Israel; Yáñez, Zuleima; Pascual, Samuel Ignacio; de Yébenes, Justo García; Sobrido, María-Jesús

    2012-09-01

    Hereditary spastic paraplegias (HSPs) constitute a heterogeneous group of neurological disorders, characterized primarily by progressive spasticity and weakness of the lower limbs. HSPs are caused by mutations in multiple genes (at least 48 loci and 28 causative genes). The clinical spectrum of HSPs is wide and important differences have been reported between patients with distinct mutations in the same gene, or even between different family members bearing the same mutation. Many patients with HSP present clinical deficits related to the involvement of neuronal systems other than corticospinal tracts, namely, peripheral nerves, sensory, or cerebellar pathways. These cases may be difficult to differentiate from other neurological diseases (e.g., hereditary ataxias), also genetically and clinically heterogeneous. As an illustration of how overlapping this genotype-phenotype relationship is, and the difficulties that it brings upon the development of neurogenetic algorithms and databases, we review the main clinical and genetic features of HSPs, and summarize reports on cases of triplet-repeat spinocerebellar ataxias that can mimic HSP phenotypes. This complex scenario makes the necessity of high-quality, curated mutation databases even more urgent, in order to develop adequate diagnostic guidelines, correct interpretation of genetic testing, and appropriate genetic counseling. © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. CYP2U1 activity is altered by missense mutations in hereditary spastic paraplegia 56.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durand, Christelle M; Dhers, Laura; Tesson, Christelle; Tessa, Alessandra; Fouillen, Laetitia; Jacqueré, Stéphanie; Raymond, Laure; Coupry, Isabelle; Benard, Giovanni; Darios, Frédéric; El-Hachimi, Khalid H; Astrea, Guja; Rivier, François; Banneau, Guillaume; Pujol, Claire; Lacombe, Didier; Durr, Alexandra; Babin, Patrick J; Santorelli, Filippo M; Pietrancosta, Nicolas; Boucher, Jean-Luc; Mansuy, Daniel; Stevanin, Giovanni; Goizet, Cyril

    2018-01-01

    Hereditary spastic paraplegia (HSP) is an inherited disorder of the central nervous system mainly characterized by gradual spasticity and weakness of the lower limbs. SPG56 is a rare autosomal recessive early onset complicated form of HSP caused by mutations in CYP2U1. The CYP2U1 enzyme was shown to catalyze the hydroxylation of arachidonic acid. Here, we report two further SPG56 families carrying three novel CYP2U1 missense variants and the development of an in vitro biochemical assay to determine the pathogenicity of missense variants of uncertain clinical significance. We compared spectroscopic, enzymatic, and structural (from a 3D model) characteristics of the over expressed wild-type or mutated CYP2U1 in HEK293T cells. Our findings demonstrated that most of the tested missense variants in CYP2U1 were functionally inactive because of a loss of proper heme binding or destabilization of the protein structure. We also showed that functional data do not necessarily correlate with in silico predictions of variants pathogenicity, using different bioinformatic phenotype prediction tools. Our results therefore highlight the importance to use biological tools, such as the enzymatic test set up in this study, to evaluate the effects of newly identified variants in clinical settings. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Treatment of the Spasticity in Children with Cerebral Palsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ajša Meholjić-Fetahović

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Botulinum toxin is a natural purified protein and one of the strongest biological poisons - neurotoxin. It is produced by the bacterium Clostridium botulinum. Its medical usage started in USA in 1981 and in Europe in 1992. There are seven different immune types of the toxin: A, B, C1, D, E, F and G. Toxin types A and B are used to decrease muscular spasticity. Botulinum toxin prevents the formation of acetylcholine from cholinergic nerve tissues in muscles, which in the end irreversibly destroys neuromuscular synapses. It is called temporary local chemodenervation. It does not affect the synthesis of acetylcholine.As it affects neuromuscular bond it also affects one of the symptoms of cerebral palsy - spasticity Decreasing the spasticity of children with cerebral palsy leads to the improvement of conscious movements, muscles are less toned, passive mobility is improved, orthosis tolerance is also improved, and the child is enabled to perform easier and better motor functions such as crawling, standing and walking. Since the action of Botulinum toxin is limited to 2-6 months, new neural collaterals are formed and neuromuscular conductivity is reestablished which in the end once again develops a muscular spasm. This leads to a conclusion that botulinum toxin should again be applied into spastic muscles.It is very important for good effect of Botulinum toxin to set the goals of the therapy in advance. The goals include improvement of a function, prevention of contractions and deformities, ease of care and decrease of pain for children with cerebral palsy. After application of botulinum toxin, it is necessary to perform adequate and intensive physical treatment with regular monitoring of effects.This work shows a case of a boy with spastic form of cerebral palsy. After being habilitated using Vojta therapy and Bobath concept and the conduct of certain physical procedures, botulinum toxin is administered into his lower limbs’ muscles and

  11. Selective dorsal rhizotomy: A multidisciplinary approach to treating spastic diplegia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abou Al-Shaar, Hussam; Imtiaz, Muhammad Tariq; Alhalabi, Hazem; Alsubaie, Shara M; Sabbagh, Abdulrahman J

    2017-01-01

    Spasticity is a motor disorder that interferes with mobility and affects the quality of life. Different approaches have been utilized to address patients with spastic diplegia, among which is selective dorsal rhizotomy (SDR). Although SDR has been shown to be efficacious in treating spastic patients, many neurologists and neurosurgeons are not well aware of the procedure, its indications, and expected outcomes due to the limited number of centers performing this procedure. The aim of this study is to describe the collaborative multidisciplinary approach between neurosurgeons, neurophysiologists, and physiotherapists in performing SDR. In addition, we delineate three illustrative cases in which SDR was performed in our patients. A retrospective review and analysis of the clinical records of our three patients who underwent SDR was conducted and reported. Patients' outcomes were evaluated and compared to preoperative measurements based on clinical examination of power, tone (Ashworth scale), gait, and range of motion, as well as subjective functional assessment, gross motor function classification system, and gross motor function measure with follow-up at 6, 12, and 24 months postoperatively. A detailed description of our neurosurgical technique in performing SDR in collaboration with neurophysiology and physiotherapy monitoring is provided. The three patients who underwent SDR using our multidisciplinary approach improved both functionally and objectively after the procedure. No intraoperative or postoperative complications were encountered. All patients were doing well over a long postoperative follow-up period. A multidisciplinary approach to treating spastic diplegia with SDR can provide good short-term and long-term outcomes in select patients suffering from spastic diplegia.

  12. Development of a self-report scale of spasticity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barker, Steve; Horton, Mike; Kent, Ruth M; Tennant, Alan

    2013-01-01

    Although the Modified Ashworth Scale is the most common instrument used to grade spasticity, it is unsuitable for busy follow-up clinics, longer term follow-up, or community surveys. To establish a simple questionnaire that would indicate the presence and extent of spasticity and would be suitable for use in everyday outpatient clinical practice and/or community follow-up. Qualitative exploration of the experience and impact of spasticity among stroke patients led to the development of a short questionnaire. Rasch analysis was performed on the data and the scale items were externally validated by correlation with comparator measures. Forty-eight subjects were recruited for the qualitative interviews, half of whom were more than 2 years post stroke. Interviews generated items relating to spasticity that were categorized into pain, spasm, fatigue, restricted movement, loss of balance, and altered appearance. Eight items were chosen for the draft questionnaire. Five hundred questionnaires were sent, and 188 (38%) were returned. The mean age of the 188 responders was 72.6 years. In regard to health, 18.5% reported that they were in good or excellent health, and 49.7% reported only fair or poor health. Data from the 8-item scale were fitted to the Rasch measurement model. Initial fit of the 8 items was good, and all the assumptions of the model were satisfied. A strong and significant gradient was found between the summed 8-item scale and self-reported health. A short self-perceived scale for spasticity has been developed from grounded theory, which satisfies the most rigorous standards for measurement with fit to the Rasch model.

  13. TREATMENT OF THE SPASTICITY IN CHILDREN WITH CEREBRAL PALSY

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meholjić-Fetahović, Ajša

    2007-01-01

    Botulinum toxin is a natural purified protein and one of the strongest biological poisons - neurotoxin. It is produced by the bacterium Clostridium botulinum. Its medical usage started in USA in 1981 and in Europe in 1992. There are seven different immune types of the toxin: A, B, C1, D, E, F and G. Toxin types A and B are used to decrease muscular spasticity. Botulinum toxin prevents the formation of acetylcholine from cholinergic nerve tissues in muscles, which in the end irreversibly destroys neuromuscular synapses. It is called temporary local chemodenervation. It does not affect the synthesis of acetylcholine. As it affects neuromuscular bond it also affects one of the symptoms of cerebral palsy - spasticity Decreasing the spasticity of children with cerebral palsy leads to the improvement of conscious movements, muscles are less toned, passive mobility is improved, orthosis tolerance is also improved, and the child is enabled to perform easier and better motor functions such as crawling, standing and walking. Since the action of Botulinum toxin is limited to 2-6 months, new neural collaterals are formed and neuromuscular conductivity is reestablished which in the end once again develops a muscular spasm. This leads to a conclusion that botulinum toxin should again be applied into spastic muscles. It is very important for good effect of Botulinum toxin to set the goals of the therapy in advance. The goals include improvement of a function, prevention of contractions and deformities, ease of care and decrease of pain for children with cerebral palsy. After application of botulinum toxin, it is necessary to perform adequate and intensive physical treatment with regular monitoring of effects. This work shows a case of a boy with spastic form of cerebral palsy. After being habilitated using Vojta therapy and Bobath concept and the conduct of certain physical procedures, botulinum toxin is administered into his lower limbs’ muscles and kinezitherapy intensified

  14. [Palliative surgical treatment of spastic paralysis in the upper extremity].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suso-Vergara, S; López-Prats, F; Forés-Viñeta, J; Ferreres-Claramunt, A; Gutiérrez-Carbonell, P

    In this paper we review the main studies conducted on therapy applied to the bony and soft parts in spastic paralysis of the upper extremity. Spasticity presents muscular hypertonia and hyperexcitability of the stretch reflex, which are typical of upper motoneuron syndrome. Physiopathologically, spasticity is due to the medullar and supramedullar alteration of the afferent and efferent pathways. Treatment is multidisciplinary and involves the collaboration of rehabilitators, neurophysiologists, neurologists, paediatricians, orthopaedic surgeons and psychologists, who all contribute with their different therapeutic aspects and characteristics (which can be pharmacological, peripheral neurological blockages, surgical, etc.). The characteristic posture of the upper extremities in spastic cerebral palsy is the inward rotation of the shoulder, flexion of the elbow and pronated forearm, and the deformity of the fingers (swan-neck and thumbs-in-palm). The primary objectives in these patients will be to improve communication with their surroundings, perform activities of daily living, increase mobility and walking. The surgical treatment applied by orthopaedic surgeons in the upper extremities are aimed at achieving an enhanced adaptive functionality rather than morphological normality. Factors to be taken into account include age, voluntary control over muscles and joints, level of severity of the spasticity (Ashworth scale) and stereognostic sensitivity. In general, on soft parts we will use procedures such as dehiscence or lengthening of the flexor muscles of the shoulder and elbow or of the adductor of the thumb; transfer of the pronators in order to adopt the supinating function or of the flexors so as to reinforce the extensors of the forearm, and capsulodesis or tenodesis in the hand. The bony procedures will consist in derotational osteotomies of the humerus and radius and arthrodesis in the wrist or in the metacarpophalangeal joints of the thumb, depending on

  15. Does spasticity interfere with functional recovery after stroke? A novel approach to understand, measure and treat spasticity after acute stroke

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Malhotra, S.; Malhotra, Shweta

    2013-01-01

    The principal aim of this thesis is on identifying if spasticity on the wrist after an acute stroke interferes with functional recovery of the upper limb.This randomized study demonstrated that sNMES treatment along with standardized upper limb therapy improves muscle strength for wrist extension

  16. 3D gait analysis in patients with hereditary spastic paraparesis and spastic diplegia: a kinematic, kinetic and EMG comparison.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piccinini, Luigi; Cimolin, Veronica; D'Angelo, Maria Grazia; Turconi, Anna Carla; Crivellini, Marcello; Galli, Manuela

    2011-03-01

    The predominant clinical feature of patients with Hereditary Spastic Paraparesis (HSP) is gait disturbance owing to spasticity and weakness of the lower limbs; the spasticity in early-onset disease (infancy or childhood) often cannot be distinguished from mild form of spastic diplegia (SD). The aim of this study was to quantify the gait strategy in HSP and SD children, focusing on the differences between groups as concerns functional limitation during gait. 9 HSP and 16 SD children were evaluated using Gait Analysis; kinematic and kinetic parameters and EMG pattern during walking were identified and calculated to compare the two gait strategies. The results revealed that these two pathologies are characterised by different gait strategies. In particular we found that knee joint, in terms of kinematics and kinetics, and rectus femoris pattern represent discriminatory aspects in order to compare and differentiate gait patterns of HSP and SD children. The findings strongly support the issue that HSP and SD patients need individualised therapeutical program, either neurosurgical or pharmacological treatment, based on the quantification of gait deficiencies and in order to address the peculiarity of their motor limitations and to prevent the onset of compensatory strategies. Copyright © 2010 European Paediatric Neurology Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Functional Brain Correlates of Upper Limb Spasticity and Its Mitigation following Rehabilitation in Chronic Stroke Survivors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pundik, Svetlana; Falchook, Adam D.; McCabe, Jessica; Daly, Janis J.

    2014-01-01

    Background. Arm spasticity is a challenge in the care of chronic stroke survivors with motor deficits. In order to advance spasticity treatments, a better understanding of the mechanism of spasticity-related neuroplasticity is needed. Objective. To investigate brain function correlates of spasticity in chronic stroke and to identify specific regional functional brain changes related to rehabilitation-induced mitigation of spasticity. Methods. 23 stroke survivors (>6 months) were treated with an arm motor learning and spasticity therapy (5 d/wk for 12 weeks). Outcome measures included Modified Ashworth scale, sensory tests, and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) for wrist and hand movement. Results. First, at baseline, greater spasticity correlated with poorer motor function (P = 0.001) and greater sensory deficits (P = 0.003). Second, rehabilitation produced improvement in upper limb spasticity and motor function (P spasticity correlated with higher fMRI activation in the ipsilesional thalamus (rho = 0.49, P = 0.03). Fourth, following rehabilitation, greater mitigation of spasticity correlated with enhanced fMRI activation in the contralesional primary motor (r = −0.755, P = 0.003), premotor (r = −0.565, P = 0.04), primary sensory (r = −0.614, P = 0.03), and associative sensory (r = −0.597, P = 0.03) regions while controlling for changes in motor function. Conclusions. Contralesional motor regions may contribute to restoring control of muscle tone in chronic stroke. PMID:25101190

  18. Adrenomyeloneuropathy due to mutation in the ABCD1 gene as underlying factor in spastic paraparesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ylikallio, Emil; Rahikkala, Elisa; Keski-Filppula, Riikka; Auranen, Mari; Tyynismaa, Henna

    We present a Finnish family in which adrenomyeloneuropathy (AMN) caused by the mutation in the ABCD1 gene was revealed as the cause of spastic paraparesis. . Two patients had hypoadrenalism, which is in some cases some associated with the disease . AMN is a hereditary disease manifested both in men and women. but owing to the location of the gene in the X chromosome the symptoms are usually more severe in male patients. . Diagnoses was trucked down with gene-panel sequencing and confirmed through detection of an elevated level of very long-chain fatty acids in the serum of the patients. Specific molecular genetic diagnosis is beneficial, because it enables precise genetic counseling as well as recognition and treatment of associated symptoms, such as severe cortisol deficiency.

  19. Interventions for managing skeletal muscle spasticity following traumatic brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Synnot, Anneliese; Chau, Marisa; Pitt, Veronica; O'Connor, Denise; Gruen, Russell L; Wasiak, Jason; Clavisi, Ornella; Pattuwage, Loyal; Phillips, Kate

    2017-11-22

    Skeletal muscle spasticity is a major physical complication resulting from traumatic brain injury (TBI), which can lead to muscle contracture, joint stiffness, reduced range of movement, broken skin and pain. Treatments for spasticity include a range of pharmacological and non-pharmacological interventions, often used in combination. Management of spasticity following TBI varies from other clinical populations because of the added complexity of behavioural and cognitive issues associated with TBI. To assess the effects of interventions for managing skeletal muscle spasticity in people with TBI. In June 2017, we searched key databases including the Cochrane Injuries Group Specialised Register, CENTRAL, MEDLINE (Ovid), Embase (Ovid) and others, in addition to clinical trials registries and the reference lists of included studies. We included randomised controlled trials (RCTs) and cross-over RCTs evaluating any intervention for the management of spasticity in TBI. Only studies where at least 50% of participants had a TBI (or for whom separate data for participants with TBI were available) were included. The primary outcomes were spasticity and adverse effects. Secondary outcome measures were classified according to the World Health Organization International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health including body functions (sensory, pain, neuromusculoskeletal and movement-related functions) and activities and participation (general tasks and demands; mobility; self-care; domestic life; major life areas; community, social and civic life). We used standard methodological procedures expected by Cochrane. Data were synthesised narratively; meta-analysis was precluded due to the paucity and heterogeneity of data. We included nine studies in this review which involved 134 participants with TBI. Only five studies reported between-group differences, yielding outcome data for 105 participants with TBI. These five studies assessed the effects of a range of

  20. Evaluation of mammogram compression efficiency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Przelaskowski, A.; Surowski, P.; Kukula, A.

    2005-01-01

    quality of 0.6 bpp and 0.1 bpp reconstructions was decreased. The compression performance of the most effective reversible coders is rather unsatisfactory. The subjective rating with the diagnostic criteria of image quality was more sensitive to distortions caused by lossy compression compared with the pathology detection test. The observers constituted 14:1 as the accepted ratio of lossy wavelet compression for test mammograms. This is significantly higher than the mean ratio of 2:1 achieved with lossless methods. (author)

  1. Compression limits in cascaded quadratic soliton compression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bache, Morten; Bang, Ole; Krolikowski, Wieslaw

    2008-01-01

    Cascaded quadratic soliton compressors generate under optimal conditions few-cycle pulses. Using theory and numerical simulations in a nonlinear crystal suitable for high-energy pulse compression, we address the limits to the compression quality and efficiency.......Cascaded quadratic soliton compressors generate under optimal conditions few-cycle pulses. Using theory and numerical simulations in a nonlinear crystal suitable for high-energy pulse compression, we address the limits to the compression quality and efficiency....

  2. Validity of Modified Ashworth Scale as a Measure of Wrist Spasticity in Stroke Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Heidari

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: There are some controversies about the value of modified Ashworth Scale (MAS for assessing spasticity. The goal of this study was to investigate if there is any correlation between scores obtained from MAS for wrist spasticity and electrophysiological recordings as the objective measure of spasticity. Methods: In this cross-sectional study, 34 stroke patients were employed. Wrist spasticity was clinically measured by means of MAS. Also, an electromyogram (EMG machine was used to elicit Hmax and Mmax from the flexor carpi radialis muscle. Spearman’s correlation coefficient test was used to investigate potential correlation between clinically and electrophysiologically measures of spasticity. Results: The observed relation between MAS and EMG recordings was not statistically significant (rho=0.183, P>0.05. Discussion: Our findings suggest that MAS may be a useful tool for grading hypertonia, but it is not a valid measure of spasticity in selected patients.

  3. Outcome of selective motor fasciculotomy in the treatment of upper limb spasticity

    OpenAIRE

    Puligopu, Aneel Kumar; Purohit, Anirudh Kumar

    2011-01-01

    Objective: The objective was to assess the outcome of selective motor fasciculotomy in relieving upper limb harmful resistant spasticity and thereby to improve motor functions in persons with cerebral palsy. Materials and Methods: Twenty people having cerebral palsy (12 females and 8 males) with age ranging from 5 to 35 (mean 12.85) years with upper limb resistant spasticity due to spastic hemiplegia (n=7), triplegia (n=6), and quadriplegia (n=7) were assessed using Modified Ashworth Scale, S...

  4. Muscle Synergies in Cycling after Incomplete Spinal Cord Injury: Correlation with Clinical Measures of Motor Function and Spasticity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barroso, Filipe O; Torricelli, Diego; Bravo-Esteban, Elisabeth; Taylor, Julian; Gómez-Soriano, Julio; Santos, Cristina; Moreno, Juan C; Pons, José L

    2015-01-01

    spasticity symptoms measured by Penn, Modified Ashworth and SCATS scales. Overall, the results of this study support the hypothesis that the analysis of muscle synergies during cycling can provide detailed quantitative assessment of functional motor impairments and symptoms of spasticity caused by abnormal spatiotemporal muscle co-activation following iSCI.

  5. Brazilian studies on tropical spastic paraparesis: a meta-analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C.M. de Castro Costa

    1994-12-01

    Full Text Available Tropical spastic paraparesis (TSP is a chronic progressive myelopathy and in most of the cases has a retroviral (HTLV-1 etiology, when it is denominated HTLV-1 associated-mielopathy (HAM/TSP. Around 433 cases of TSP have been described in Northeast and Southeast Brazil. Among these cases, 157 (36.2% are HTLV-1 positive and 276 (63.7% are negative. Their mean age is 43.8 years with a slight predominance of females and mulattoes, although white patients are also numerous. Clinically all patients exhibit a spastic paraparesis with variable sphincter and sensory disturbance. Pain and autonomic symptoms seem to be expressive in the HTLV-1 positive HAM/TSP Brazilian patients.

  6. Acquired atlantoaxial instability in children with spastic cerebral palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsirikos, Athanasios I; Chang, Wei-Ning; Shah, Suken A; Miller, Freeman

    2003-01-01

    The development of nontraumatic atlantoaxial instability in children with spastic cerebral palsy has not been reported. The authors present three patients with severe spastic quadriplegia who developed C1-C2 instability and cervical myelopathy at mean age 12.6 years. These patients demonstrated a similar clinical picture with symptoms attributed to cervical myelopathy in varied severity including apneic episodes, opisthotonus, alteration in muscle tone, torticollis, respiratory problems, hyperreflexia, and bradycardia. Patient 1 was scheduled for surgery but died due to an apneic episode. Patient 2 refused surgery and has been followed for 3 years while his neurologic condition remains unchanged. Patient 3 underwent occipitocervical decompression and fusion, recovered neurologically, and resumed his previous functional skills. Patients demonstrating considerable functional deterioration or insidious change in their established neurologic status should undergo detailed screening to rule out developing upper cervical instability. Early surgical intervention consisting of spinal decompression and fusion may prevent the development of myelopathy.

  7. Safety and efficacy of incobotulinumtoxinA as a potential treatment for poststroke spasticity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santamato, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    Spasticity is a common disabling symptom for several neurological conditions. Botulinum toxin type A injection represents the gold standard treatment for focal spasticity after stroke showing efficacy, reversibility, and low prevalence of complications. In recent years, incobotulinumtoxinA, a new Botulinum toxin type A free of complexing proteins, has been used for treating several movement disorders with safety and efficacy. IncobotulinumtoxinA is currently approved for treating spasticity of the upper limb in stroke survivors, even if several studies described the use also in lower limb muscles. In the present review article, we examine the safety and effectiveness of incobotulinumtoxinA for the treatment of spasticity after stroke. PMID:26869793

  8. Leg-robot with MR clutch to realize virtual spastic movements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kikuchi, T; Oda, K; Yamaguchi, S; Furusho, J

    2009-01-01

    In this study, we propose a leg-robot with an MR clutch to realize virtual haptic control for spastic movements of brain-injured patients. This system can be used in the practical training for trainees of physical therapy. Additionally, we will study to figure out the physiological mechanism of spastic movements of human with the process to simulate patientlike spastic motion by this robot. In this paper, basic structure and mechanism of the leg-robot with the MR clutch are explained. Finally, experimental results of some kinds of haptic control for spastic movements are described.

  9. Impact of Spasticity on Balance Control during Quiet Standing in Persons after Stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahimzadeh Khiabani, Reza; Mochizuki, George; Ismail, Farooq; Boulias, Chris; Phadke, Chetan P; Gage, William H

    2017-01-01

    Balance impairments, falls, and spasticity are common after stroke, but the effect of spasticity on balance control after stroke is not well understood. In this cross-sectional study, twenty-seven participants with stroke were divided into two groups, based on ankle plantar flexor spasticity level. Fifteen individuals with high spasticity (Modified Ashworth Scale (MAS) score of ≥2) and 12 individuals with low spasticity (MAS score Balance control measures included centre of pressure (COP) root mean square (RMS), COP velocity, and COP mean power frequency (MPF) in anterior-posterior and mediolateral (ML) directions. Trunk sway was estimated using a wearable inertial measurement unit to measure trunk angle, trunk velocity, and trunk velocity frequency amplitude in pitch and roll directions. The high spasticity group demonstrated greater ML COP velocity, trunk roll velocity, trunk roll velocity frequency amplitude at 3.7 Hz, and trunk roll velocity frequency amplitude at 4.9 Hz, particularly in the eyes closed condition ( spasticity by vision interaction). ML COP MPF was greater in the high spasticity group. Individuals with high spasticity after stroke demonstrated greater impairment of balance control in the frontal plane, which was exacerbated when vision was removed.

  10. Spasticity after stroke: an overview of prevalence, test instruments, and treatments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sommerfeld, Disa K; Gripenstedt, Ullabritt; Welmer, Anna-Karin

    2012-09-01

    The objective of this study was to present an overview of the prevalence of spasticity after stroke as well as of test instruments and treatments. Recent studies show that spasticity occurs in 20%-30% of all stroke victims and in less than half of those with pareses. Although spasticity may occur in paretic patients after stroke, muscle weakness is more likely to be the reason for the pareses. Spasticity after stroke is more common in the upper than the lower limbs, and it seems to be more common among younger than older people. To determine the nature of passive stretch, electromyographic equipment is needed. However, the Modified Ashworth Scale, which measures the sum of the biomechanical and neural components in passive stretch, is the most common instrument used to grade spasticity after stroke. Treatment of spasticity with physiotherapy is recommended, although its beneficial effect is uncertain. The treatment of spasticity with botulinum toxin in combination with physiotherapy is suggested to improve functioning in patients with severe spasticity. A task-specific approach rather than a neurodevelopmental approach in assessing and treating a patient with spasticity after stroke seems to be preferred.

  11. Leg-robot with MR clutch to realize virtual spastic movements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kikuchi, T; Oda, K; Yamaguchi, S; Furusho, J [Osaka University, Yamadaoka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan)], E-mail: kikuchi@mech.eng.osaka-u.ac.jp

    2009-02-01

    In this study, we propose a leg-robot with an MR clutch to realize virtual haptic control for spastic movements of brain-injured patients. This system can be used in the practical training for trainees of physical therapy. Additionally, we will study to figure out the physiological mechanism of spastic movements of human with the process to simulate patientlike spastic motion by this robot. In this paper, basic structure and mechanism of the leg-robot with the MR clutch are explained. Finally, experimental results of some kinds of haptic control for spastic movements are described.

  12. Clinical experiences with cannabinoids in spasticity management in multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorente Fernández, L; Monte Boquet, E; Pérez-Miralles, F; Gil Gómez, I; Escutia Roig, M; Boscá Blasco, I; Poveda Andrés, J L; Casanova-Estruch, B

    2014-06-01

    Spasticity is a common symptom among patients with multiple sclerosis (MS). This study aims to assess the effectiveness and safety of the combination of delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) and cannabidiol (CBD) in clinical practice for the treatment of spasticity in MS. Retrospective observational study with patients treated with inhaled THC/CBD between April 2008 and March 2012. Descriptive patient and treatment variables were collected. Therapeutic response was evaluated based on the doctor's analysis and overall impression. Of the 56 patients who started treatment with THC/CBD, 6 were excluded because of missing data. We evaluated 50 patients (42% male) with a median age 47.8 years (25.6-76.8); 38% were diagnosed with primary progressive MS, 44% with secondary progressive MS, and 18% with relapsing-remitting MS. The reason for prescribing the drug was spasticity (44%), pain (10%), or both (46%). Treatment was discontinued in 16 patients because of ineffectiveness (7 patients), withdrawal (4), and adverse effects (5). The median exposure time in patients whose treatment was discontinued was 30 days vs 174 days in those whose treatment continued at the end of the study. THC/CBD was effective in 80% of patients at a median dose of 5 (2-10) inhalations/day. The adverse event profile consisted of dizziness (11 patients), somnolence (6), muscle weakness (7), oral discomfort (2), diarrhoea (3), dry mouth (2), blurred vision (2), agitation (1), nausea (1), and paranoid ideation (1). THC/CBD appears to be a good alternative to standard treatment as it improves refractory spasticity in MS and has an acceptable toxicity profile. Copyright © 2013 Sociedad Española de Neurología. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  13. Effective treatment of spasticity using dronabinol in pediatric palliative care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuhlen, Michaela; Hoell, Jessica I; Gagnon, Gabriele; Balzer, Stefan; Oommen, Prasad T; Borkhardt, Arndt; Janßen, Gisela

    2016-11-01

    Cannabis extracts have a wide therapeutic potential but in many countries they have not been approved for treatment in children so far. We conducted an open, uncontrolled, retrospective study on the administration of dronabinol to determine the value, efficacy, and safety of cannabis-based medicines in the treatment of refractory spasticity in pediatric palliative care. Sixteen children, adolescents and young adults having complex neurological conditions with spasticity (aged 1.3-26.6 years, median 12.7 years) were treated with dronabinol by our specialized pediatric palliative care team between 01.12.2010 and 30.04.2015 in a home-care setting. Therapeutic efficacy and side effects were closely monitored. Drops of the 2.5% oily tetrahydrocannabinol solution (dronabinol) were administered. A promising therapeutic effect was seen, mostly due to abolishment or marked improvement of severe, treatment resistant spasticity (n = 12). In two cases the effect could not be determined, two patients did not benefit. The median duration of treatment was 181 days (range 23-1429 days). Dosages to obtain a therapeutic effect varied from 0.08 to 1.0 mg/kg/d with a median of 0.33 mg/kg/d in patients with a documented therapeutic effect. When administered as an escalating dosage scheme, side effects were rare and only consisted in vomiting and restlessness (one patient each). No serious and enduring side effects occurred even in young children and/or over a longer period of time. In the majority of pediatric palliative patients the treatment with dronabinol showed promising effects in treatment resistant spasticity. Copyright © 2016 European Paediatric Neurology Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Ocular disorders in children with spastic subtype of cerebral palsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aylin Yaman

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available AIM: To document common ocular abnormalities in children with spastic subtype of cerebral palsy (CP and to find out whether any correlation exists between their occurance and etiologic factors. METHODS: Totally 194 patients with the diagnosis of spastic type CP were enrolled in this retrospective study. Detailed ophthalmic examinations were performed. Demographic data and neuroradiological findings were documented. Kruskal-Wallis, Mann Whitney U, Pearson Chi-square tests and Student’s t tests were used in the statistical analysis. RESULTS: The mean age was 64.7±44.2 months on the first ophthalmic examination. Prevalences of diplegia (47.4% and tetraplegia (36.1% were found to be higher than the frequency of hemiplegia (16.5% in our study population. Etiologic factor was asphyxia in 60.8% of the patients. Abnormal ocular findings were present in 78.9% of the patients. Statistically significant poor vision was detected in tetraplegia group among all the spastic ubtypes of CP (P=0.000. Anisometropia and significant refractive error were found in 14.4% and 70.1% of the patients, respectively. Thirty-six children (18.6% had nystagmus and 107 children (55.2% had strabismus. Lower gestational age and birth weight were statistically higher in patients with esotropia than exotropia (P=0.009 and P=0.024, respectively. Abnormal morphology of the optic disc was present in 152 eyes (39.2%. Severe periventricular leukomalacia (PVL was found in 48 patients and statistically significant poor vision was detected in the presence of PVL (P=0.000. CONCLUSION: Spastic diplegic or tetraplegic CP patients with positive neuroradiological symptoms, younger gestational age and lower birth weight ought to have detailed ophthalmic examinations as early as possible to provide best visual rehabilitation.

  15. Reduction in spasticity in stroke patient with paraffin therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jing; Yu, Peng; Zeng, Ming; Gu, Xudong; Liu, Yan; Xiao, Mingyue

    2017-01-01

    The aim of the study was to confirm whether paraffin therapy offer clinical value in the treatment of spasticity due to stroke. Fifty-two patients with spasticity in the upper limb were included. The patients were randomized into the experimental group with paraffin therapy (n = 27) and the control group with placebo therapy (n = 25). The outcome measures besides temperature examination were undertaken at time points of 0 (T0), 2 (T1) and 4 weeks (T2) following therapy treatment. The extent of spasticity was measured using Modified Ashworth Score (MAS) during passive movement at the shoulder, elbow, wrist and finger joints. Visual analogue scale (VAS) was used to evaluate the hemiplegic upper limb pain and functional activity of the upper limb motor function was evaluated by Brunnstrom recovery stage. All adverse events were recorded. MAS decreased significantly in Exp group compared with Con group, at the time points of T1 and T2, both before and immediately after paraffin therapy. Paraffin treatment failed to show remarkable improvement in pain compared with placebo-treated patient at movement at any time point. But VAS in Exp exhibited a tendency to decrease over time in shoulder, elbow, wrist and hand. With regard to the Brunnstrom score, patients in Exp showed significant improvement at the end of trial compared to the beginning. The values of temperature showed significant increment immediately after paraffin therapy at each time point in Exp group. Paraffin therapy may be a kind of noninvasive, promising method to reduce spasticity of stroke patients.

  16. Rehabilitation After Spasticity-Correcting Upper Limb Surgery in Tetraplegia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wangdell, Johanna; Fridén, Jan

    2016-06-01

    To describe the early active rehabilitation concept developed for spasticity-correcting surgery in tetraplegia and to report the outcomes in grip ability and change of performance and satisfaction in patients' prioritized activities 1 year postoperatively. Retrospective case-control study. Nonprofit rehabilitation unit. All patients who underwent surgeries for correction of spasticity in tetraplegic hands between 2009 and 2013 in the studied unit (N=37). Spasticity-correcting upper limb surgery with early active rehabilitation to restore grip ability in tetraplegia. Grasp and release test (GRT) and modified Canadian Occupational Performance Measure (COPM). All patients could accomplish the early active rehabilitation concept. The complication rate related to the treatment was low. Compared with preoperatively, all evaluated individuals experienced improvements in grasp ability and activity performance and satisfaction at 1-year follow-up. The performance in prioritized activities, as measured by the COPM, improved by 2.6 scale steps. Satisfaction with performance improved 3.0 scale steps postoperatively (n=21). The grasp ability, measured by the GRT, improved significantly, from 80 preoperatively to 111 (n=10). The surgery, combined with the early active rehabilitation protocol, is a reliable and safe procedure. The ability to use the hand improved, and gains were maintained at least 1 year after surgery in all patients with respect to both the objective grasp ability and patients' subjective rating of their performance and satisfaction in their prioritized activities. The procedure should therefore be considered as an adjunct to other treatments of upper limb spasticity in spinal cord injury. Copyright © 2016 American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Botulinum toxin injection of spastic finger flexors in hemiplegic patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriquez, A A; McGinn, M; Chappell, R

    2000-01-01

    To assess the outcomes of botulinum toxin injection of spastic finger flexors followed by intensive training of finger extensors. Fourteen subjects with chronic hemiplegia spasticity of the upper limb had electromyographic-guided botulinum toxin injection into the long finger flexors. All patients presented with minimal active finger extension with the wrist flexed, sustained clonus of the finger flexors, functional proximal arm function, and absence of fixed contracture. Cadaver dissections directed selection of two injection sites: the flexor digitorum sublimis and the flexor digitorum profundus. Fifty mouse units of botulinum toxin were injected into each muscle. After injection, the subjects were instructed in a home program of stretching the long finger flexors, upper limb weight bearing with a weight-bearing splint, and exercise to improve finger extension control. Compared with preinjection measures, assessment the first week after the initial injection showed significantly reduced tone, reduced clonus, and greater active finger extension with the wrist in the neutral position. Four months later, the Ashworth scale increased to preinjection levels in the six subjects with repeated injections but was again decreased postinjection. Active finger extension with the wrist in the neutral position and clonus showed a statistically nonsignificant trend toward cumulative improvement after the second injection. The greatest change in finger extension and spasticity reduction occurred after the first injection. Continued significant improvement in finger extension was not observed.

  18. Cannabinoids in the management of spasticity associated with multiple sclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Maria Malfitano

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Anna Maria Malfitano, Maria Chiara Proto, Maurizio BifulcoDipartimento di Scienze Farmaceutiche, Università degli Studi di SalernoAbstract: The endocannabinoid system and cannabinoid-based treatments have been involved in a wide number of diseases. In particular, several studies suggest that cannabinoids and endocannabinoids may have a key role in the pathogenesis and therapy of multiple sclerosis (MS. In this study we highlight the main findings reported in literature about the relevance of cannabinoid drugs in the management and treatment of MS. An increasing body of evidence suggests that cannabinoids have beneficial effects on the symptoms of MS, including spasticity and pain. In this report we focus on the effects of cannabinoids in the relief of spasticity describing the main findings in vivo, in the mouse experimental allergic encephalomyelitis model of MS. We report on the current treatments used to control MS symptoms and the most recent clinical studies based on cannabinoid treatments, although long-term studies are required to establish whether cannabinoids may have a role beyond symptom amelioration in MS.Keywords: cannabinoids, multiple sclerosis, spasticity

  19. Stop using the Ashworth Scale for the assessment of spasticity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleuren, J F M; Voerman, G E; Erren-Wolters, C V; Snoek, G J; Rietman, J S; Hermens, H J; Nene, A V

    2010-01-01

    Many studies have been performed on the methodological qualities of the (modified) Ashworth Scale but overall these studies seem inconclusive. The aim of this study was to investigate the construct validity and inter-rater reliability of the Ashworth Scale (AS) for the assessment of spasticity in the upper and lower extremities. A cross-sectional study on spasticity in the elbow flexors (part 1) and knee extensors (part 2) was carried out. In both parts AS was assessed while muscle activity and resistance were recorded simultaneously in patients with upper motor neuron syndrome. Each patient was measured by three raters. 30 patients participated, 19 in each part of the study. For elbow flexor muscles, AS was not significantly associated with electromyographic parameters, except for rater 2 (rho = 0.66, p<0.01). A significant moderate association was found with resistance (0.54< or = rho < or =0.61, p<0.05). For knee extensors, AS scores were moderately associated with muscle activity (0.56< or = rho < or =0.66, p<0.05) and also with resistance (0.55< or = rho < or =0.87, p<0.05). The intraclass correlation coefficient for absolute agreement was 0.58 for elbow flexors and 0.63 for knee extensors. In linear mixed model analysis, the factor rater appeared to be highly associated with AS. The validity and reliability of the AS is insufficient to be used as a measure of spasticity.

  20. Reliability of the Spinal Cord Assessment Tool for Spastic Reflexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akpinar, Pinar; Atici, Arzu; Ozkan, Feyza U; Aktas, Ilknur; Kulcu, Duygu G; Kurt, Kubra Neslihan

    2017-06-01

    To assess the reliability of the Spinal Cord Assessment Tool for Spastic Reflexes (SCATS). Observational reliability study of the SCATS. Inpatient rehabilitation unit at an education and research hospital. Subjects (N=47) between the ages of 18 and 88 years with spinal cord injury (SCI) and with American Spinal Injury Association Impairment Scale grades from A to D with spasticity, who were at least 6 months postinjury. Not applicable. Interrater and test-retest reliability of the SCATS. The SCATS had substantial to almost perfect interrater agreement (κ=.669-1.000) between the 2 physiatrists. Test-retest agreement of the SCATS was also substantial to almost perfect (κ=.614-1.000) as well. There was a significant correlation between the SCATS clonus scores and the Modified Ashworth scores of the hip, knee, and ankle. No correlation was found between SCATS extensor spasm scores and Modified Ashworth scores. The SCATS flexor spasm scores were only correlated significantly with the ankle plantar flexor Modified Ashworth scores (P<.05). The SCATS is a reliable tool for assessing spasm activity and spastic hypertonia in patients with SCI. Copyright © 2016 American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Reliability of goniometric measurements in children with spastic cerebral palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mutlu, Akmer; Livanelioglu, Ayse; Gunel, Mintaze Kerem

    2007-07-01

    A prospective, cross-sectional, observational study was designed to determine the reliability of goniometric measurements in children with spastic diplegic cerebral palsy (CP). The study included 38 children with spastic diplegic CP. Passive range of motion (PROM) of hip extension, abduction, and external rotation, hip flexion with knee extended, and ankle dorsi flexion was measured using universal goniometry. Each child was assessed by three physical therapists once in each session on two different sessions a week apart. Intra-test reliability was determined by paired comparison of measurements for each therapist across the two assessments. Inter-test reliability was determined by paired comparisons of the three therapists' measurements on the same session. The interclass correlation coefficient (ICC) was calculated for intra- and inter-test reliability. The mean absolute differences for all measures between sessions ranged from 0.10-4.86 degrees for the three physical therapists. There was no statistical significance in the mean differences between the physical therapists in all measurements (p>0.05) except for hip flexion with the knee extended (preliability was high (preliability scores were high for all the physiotherapists, the most experienced physiotherapists' results were higher compared with the others. The results from this study encourage the use of goniometric measurements in assessing children with spastic diplegic CP.

  2. A hereditary spastic paraplegia mouse model supports a role of ZFYVE26/SPASTIZIN for the endolysosomal system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khundadze, Mukhran; Kollmann, Katrin; Koch, Nicole; Biskup, Christoph; Nietzsche, Sandor; Zimmer, Geraldine; Hennings, J Christopher; Huebner, Antje K; Symmank, Judit; Jahic, Amir; Ilina, Elena I; Karle, Kathrin; Schöls, Ludger; Kessels, Michael; Braulke, Thomas; Qualmann, Britta; Kurth, Ingo; Beetz, Christian; Hübner, Christian A

    2013-01-01

    Hereditary spastic paraplegias (HSPs) are characterized by progressive weakness and spasticity of the legs because of the degeneration of cortical motoneuron axons. SPG15 is a recessively inherited HSP variant caused by mutations in the ZFYVE26 gene and is additionally characterized by cerebellar ataxia, mental decline, and progressive thinning of the corpus callosum. ZFYVE26 encodes the FYVE domain-containing protein ZFYVE26/SPASTIZIN, which has been suggested to be associated with the newly discovered adaptor protein 5 (AP5) complex. We show that Zfyve26 is broadly expressed in neurons, associates with intracellular vesicles immunopositive for the early endosomal marker EEA1, and co-fractionates with a component of the AP5 complex. As the function of ZFYVE26 in neurons was largely unknown, we disrupted Zfyve26 in mice. Zfyve26 knockout mice do not show developmental defects but develop late-onset spastic paraplegia with cerebellar ataxia confirming that SPG15 is caused by ZFYVE26 deficiency. The morphological analysis reveals axon degeneration and progressive loss of both cortical motoneurons and Purkinje cells in the cerebellum. Importantly, neuron loss is preceded by accumulation of large intraneuronal deposits of membrane-surrounded material, which co-stains with the lysosomal marker Lamp1. A density gradient analysis of brain lysates shows an increase of Lamp1-positive membrane compartments with higher densities in Zfyve26 knockout mice. Increased levels of lysosomal enzymes in brains of aged knockout mice further support an alteration of the lysosomal compartment upon disruption of Zfyve26. We propose that SPG15 is caused by an endolysosomal membrane trafficking defect, which results in endolysosomal dysfunction. This appears to be particularly relevant in neurons with highly specialized neurites such as cortical motoneurons and Purkinje cells.

  3. SUMO expression shortens the lag phase of Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeast growth caused by complex interactive effects of major mixed fermentation inhibitors found in hot-compressed water-treated lignocellulosic hydrolysate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayakody, Lahiru N; Kadowaki, Masafumi; Tsuge, Keisuke; Horie, Kenta; Suzuki, Akihiro; Hayashi, Nobuyuki; Kitagaki, Hiroshi

    2015-01-01

    The complex inhibitory effects of inhibitors present in lignocellulose hydrolysate suppress the ethanol fermentation of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Although the interactive inhibitory effects play important roles in the actual hydrolysate, few studies have investigated glycolaldehyde, the key inhibitor of hot-compressed water-treated lignocellulose hydrolysate. Given this challenge, we investigated the interactive effects of mixed fermentation inhibitors, including glycolaldehyde. First, we confirmed that glycolaldehyde was the most potent inhibitor in the hydrolysate and exerted interactive inhibitory effects in combination with major inhibitors. Next, through genome-wide analysis and megavariate data modeling, we identified SUMOylation as a novel potential mechanism to overcome the combinational inhibitory effects of fermentation inhibitors. Indeed, overall SUMOylation was increased and Pgk1, which produces an ATP molecule in glycolysis by substrate-level phosphorylation, was SUMOylated and degraded in response to glycolaldehyde. Augmenting the SUMO-dependent ubiquitin system in the ADH1-expressing strain significantly shortened the lag phase of growth, released cells from G2/M arrest, and improved energy status and glucose uptake in the inhibitor-containing medium. In summary, our study was the first to establish SUMOylation as a novel platform for regulating the lag phase caused by complex fermentation inhibitors.

  4. Novel mutation in the ATL1 with autosomal dominant hereditary spastic paraplegia presented as dysautonomia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Jung-Won; Jung, Keun-Hwa; Lee, Soon-Tae; Moon, Jangsup; Seong, Moon-Woo; Park, Sung Sup; Lee, Sang Kun; Chu, Kon

    2014-10-01

    SPG3A, which is the second most common type of autosomal dominant hereditary spastic paraplegia (HSP), is caused by mutations in the atlastin GTPase 1 gene, ATL1. We report a case of a patient who presented as dysautonomia and had a novel splicing mutation c.35-3C>T in exon 2 of the ATL1. Orthostatic intolerance, urinary symptoms, hyperreflexia in the biceps and knee jerk, and decreased proprioception in both limbs were observed on neurological examinations. We tested the autonomic function and performed genetic tests for the SPG4 and SPG3A forms of HSP. This case is a genetically confirmed HSP with a novel mutation in SPG3A, and extends the phenotype of SPG3A. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Post-activation depression of the lower extremities in stroke patients with spasticity and spastic equinovarus deformity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuanbin Yang

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to investigate changes of post-activation depression in two groups of patients with or without spastic equinovarus deformity (SED. Paired and independent t-tests were used to compare post-activation depression within and between the groups, respectively. There was a significant positive correlation between diminished post-activation depression and spasticity severity. The soleus and tibialis anterior (TA post-activation depression values were significantly decreased on the affected sides of patients with SED compared to those without. In patients without SED, the soleus post-activation depression was significantly decreased on the affected side; however, TA post-activation depression was higher on the affected side. Both the soleus and TA become active, but the onset time may be different. The imbalanced muscle tone between the soleus and TA in the early stage after stroke may be related to equinus deformity.

  6. A randomised controlled cross-over double-blind pilot study protocol on THC:CBD oromucosal spray efficacy as an add-on therapy for post-stroke spasticity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marinelli, Lucio; Balestrino, Maurizio; Mori, Laura; Puce, Luca; Rosa, Gian Marco; Giorello, Laura; Currà, Antonio; Fattapposta, Francesco; Serrati, Carlo; Gandolfo, Carlo; Abbruzzese, Giovanni; Trompetto, Carlo

    2017-09-07

    Stroke is the most disabling neurological disorder and often causes spasticity. Transmucosal cannabinoids (tetrahydrocannabinol and cannabidiol (THC:CBD), Sativex) is currently available to treat spasticity-associated symptoms in patients with multiple sclerosis. Cannabinoids are being considered useful also in the treatment of pain, nausea and epilepsy, but may bear and increased risk for cardiovascular events. Spasticity is often assessed with subjective and clinical rating scales, which are unable to measure the increased excitability of the monosynaptic reflex, considered the hallmark of spasticity. The neurophysiological assessment of the stretch reflex provides a precise and objective method to measure spasticity. We propose a novel study to understand if Sativex could be useful in reducing spasticity in stroke survivors and investigating tolerability and safety by accurate cardiovascular monitoring. We will recruit 50 patients with spasticity following stroke to take THC:CBD in a double-blind placebo-controlled cross-over study. Spasticity will be assessed with a numeric rating scale for spasticity, the modified Ashworth scale and with the electromyographical recording of the stretch reflex. The cardiovascular risk will be assessed prior to inclusion. Blood pressure, heart rate, number of daily spasms, bladder function, sleep disruption and adverse events will be monitored throughout the study. A mixed-model analysis of variance will be used to compare the stretch reflex amplitude between the time points; semiquantitative measures will be compared using the Mann-Whitney test (THC:CBD vs placebo) and Wilcoxon test (baseline vs treatment). The study was registered on the EudraCT database with number 2016-001034-10 and approved by both the Italian Medicines Agency (Agenzia Italiana del Farmaco) and local Ethics Committee 'Comitato Etico Regionale della Liguria'. Data will be made anonymous and uploaded to a open access repository. Results will be disseminated

  7. Rupture of esophagus by compressed air.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jie; Tan, Yuyong; Huo, Jirong

    2016-11-01

    Currently, beverages containing compressed air such as cola and champagne are widely used in our daily life. Improper ways to unscrew the bottle, usually by teeth, could lead to an injury, even a rupture of the esophagus. This letter to editor describes a case of esophageal rupture caused by compressed air.

  8. Force balancing in mammographic compression

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Branderhorst, W.; de Groot, J. E.; Neeter, L. M. F. H.; van Lier, M. G. J. T. B.; Neeleman, C.; den Heeten, G. J.; Grimbergen, C. A.

    2016-01-01

    In mammography, the height of the image receptor is adjusted to the patient before compressing the breast. An inadequate height setting can result in an imbalance between the forces applied by the image receptor and the paddle, causing the clamped breast to be pushed up or down relative to the body

  9. Neurosurgical Management of Childhood Spasticity: Functional Posterior Rhizotomy and Intrathecal Baclofen Infusion Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    MOROTA, Nobuhito; IHARA, Satoshi; OGIWARA, Hideki

    2015-01-01

    A paradigm shift is currently ongoing in the treatment of spasticity in childhood in Japan. Functional posterior rhizotomy (FPR), which was first introduced to Japan in 1996, is best indicated for children with spastic cerebral palsy, regardless of the clinical severity of spasticity. Surgery is generally carried out in the cauda equina, where the posterior root is separated from the anterior one, and neurophysiological procedures are used to judge which nerve root/rootlet should be cut. The outcome of FPR is favorable for reducing spasticity in the long-term follow-up. Intrathecal baclofen (ITB) treatment for childhood spasticity was approved in 2007 in Japan and the number of children undergoing ITB pump implantation has been gradually increasing. ITB treatment is best indicated for children with severe spasticity, especially those with dystonia, regardless of the pathological background. Since it is a surgery performed to implant foreign bodies, special attention should be paid to avoid perioperative complications such as CSF leakage, meningitis, and mechanical failure. Severely disabled children with spasticity would benefit most from ITB treatment. We would especially like to emphasize the importance of a strategic approach to the treatment of childhood spasticity. The first step is to reduce spasticity by FPR, ITB, and botulinum toxin injection. The second step is to aim for functional improvement after controlling spasticity. Traditional orthopedic surgery and neuro-rehabilitation form the second step of treatment. The combination of these treatments that allows them to complement each other is the key to a successful treatment of childhood spasticity. PMID:26227057

  10. Neural tension technique is no different from random passive movements in reducing spasticity in patients with traumatic brain injury

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lorentzen, Jakob; Nielsen, Dorthe; Holm, Karl

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Neural tension technique (NTT) is a therapy believed to reduce spasticity and to increase range of motion (ROM). This study compared the ability of NTT and random passive movements (RPMs) to reduce spasticity in the knee flexors in 10 spastic patients with brain injury. Methods: An RCT...... was found. Conclusions: An objective evaluation of NTT demonstrates that it does not reduce spasticity. However, it does increase ROM with the same effect as RPM. [Box: see text]....

  11. Trial of Contralateral Seventh Cervical Nerve Transfer for Spastic Arm Paralysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Mou-Xiong; Hua, Xu-Yun; Feng, Jun-Tao; Li, Tie; Lu, Ye-Chen; Shen, Yun-Dong; Cao, Xiao-Hua; Zhao, Nai-Qing; Lyu, Jia-Ying; Xu, Jian-Guang; Gu, Yu-Dong; Xu, Wen-Dong

    2018-01-04

    Spastic limb paralysis due to injury to a cerebral hemisphere can cause long-term disability. We investigated the effect of grafting the contralateral C7 nerve from the nonparalyzed side to the paralyzed side in patients with spastic arm paralysis due to chronic cerebral injury. We randomly assigned 36 patients who had had unilateral arm paralysis for more than 5 years to undergo C7 nerve transfer plus rehabilitation (18 patients) or to undergo rehabilitation alone (18 patients). The primary outcome was the change from baseline to month 12 in the total score on the Fugl-Meyer upper-extremity scale (scores range from 0 to 66, with higher scores indicating better function). Results The mean increase in Fugl-Meyer score in the paralyzed arm was 17.7 in the surgery group and 2.6 in the control group (difference, 15.1; 95% confidence interval, 12.2 to 17.9; Parm. There were no significant differences from baseline to month 12 in power, tactile threshold, or two-point discrimination in the hand on the side of the donor graft. The mean increase in Fugl-Meyer score in the paralyzed arm was 17.7 in the surgery group and 2.6 in the control group (difference, 15.1; 95% confidence interval, 12.2 to 17.9; Parm. There were no significant differences from baseline to month 12 in power, tactile threshold, or two-point discrimination in the hand on the side of the donor graft. In this single-center trial involving patients who had had unilateral arm paralysis due to chronic cerebral injury for more than 5 years, transfer of the C7 nerve from the nonparalyzed side to the side of the arm that was paralyzed was associated with a greater improvement in function and reduction of spasticity than rehabilitation alone over a period of 12 months. Physiological connectivity developed between the ipsilateral cerebral hemisphere and the paralyzed hand. (Funded by the National Natural Science Foundation of China and others; Chinese Clinical Trial Registry number, 13004466 .).

  12. Compression for preventing recurrence of venous ulcers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, E Andrea; Bell-Syer, Sally E M

    2014-09-09

    Up to 1% of adults will have a leg ulcer at some time. The majority of leg ulcers are venous in origin and are caused by high pressure in the veins due to blockage or weakness of the valves in the veins of the leg. Prevention and treatment of venous ulcers is aimed at reducing the pressure either by removing/repairing the veins, or by applying compression bandages/stockings to reduce the pressure in the veins.The majority of venous ulcers heal with compression bandages, however ulcers frequently recur. Clinical guidelines therefore recommend that people continue to wear compression, usually in the form of hosiery (tights, stockings, socks) after their ulcer heals, to prevent recurrence. To assess the effects of compression (socks, stockings, tights, bandages) in preventing the recurrence of venous ulcers. If compression does prevent ulceration compared with no compression, then to identify whether there is evidence to recommend particular levels of compression (high, medium or low, for example), types of compression, or brands of compression to prevent ulcer recurrence after healing. For this second update we searched The Cochrane Wounds Group Specialised Register (searched 4 September 2014) which includes the results of regular searches of MEDLINE, EMBASE and CINAHL; The Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) (The Cochrane Library 2014, Issue 8). Randomised controlled trials (RCTs)evaluating compression bandages or hosiery for preventing the recurrence of venous ulcers. Two review authors undertook data extraction and risk of bias assessment independently. Four trials (979 participants) were eligible for inclusion in this review. One trial in patients with recently healed venous ulcers (n = 153) compared recurrence rates with and without compression and found that compression significantly reduced ulcer recurrence at six months (Risk ratio (RR) 0.46, 95% CI 0.27 to 0.76).Two trials compared high-compression hosiery (equivalent to UK class 3) with

  13. Spasticity can be a major causeof

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    MR. MORUF

    Dr. C.O. Akosile, Department of Medican Rehabilitation, Faculty of Health Sciences and Technology, Nnamdi. Azikiwe University, Awka, Nnewi Campus, Nnewi, Anambra State, Nigeria • E-mail ..... caused by the hyperexcitable alpha motor neuron pool. The relaxation period lasts about 3 months with loss of effects occurring ...

  14. Long-Term Effects of Repeated Cycles of Intrathecal Triamcinolone Acetonide on Spasticity in MS Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rommer, Paulus Stefan; Kamin, Frank; Abu-Mugheisib, Mazen; Koehler, Wolfgang; Hoffmann, Frank; Winkelmann, Alexander; Benecke, Reiner; Zettl, Uwe Klaus

    2016-01-01

    Spasticity is a common feature in patients with multiple sclerosis (MS). Although options have broadened over the last years, there are still patients with no response to common therapeutic agents. Intrathecal administered triamcinolone acetonide (TCA) has been tested for spasticity in patients with MS. However, the long run effects are not known so far. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of repeated cycles of intrathecal TCA instillations on clinical parameters. A total of 54 patients with clinically definite MS and no response to commonly utilized antispastic drugs were enrolled. TCA was administered every 3 months for a period of 9 months. Clinical assessments including spasticity, disability (EDSS), mobility (walking distance, and timed 25-foot walk), bladder function, and quality of life were carried out prior to and at the end of each treatment cycle. Repeated TCA treatment led to repeated effects on spasticity (P spasticity or EDSS was not shown at end of the study. Effects diminished over 3 months. Repeated TCA instillations led to replicable effects on spasticity; subgroup analyses suggest that higher spasticity, more frequent treatments, and higher EDSS may lead to pronounced effects on spasticity and EDSS. Intrathecal TCA treatment was safe and no severe side effects occurred. We hypothesize a significant time dependence of re-administration of TCA and that an interval of 3 months between the treatments might be too long. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Breakthroughs in the spasticity management: Are non-pharmacological treatments the future?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naro, Antonino; Leo, Antonino; Russo, Margherita; Casella, Carmela; Buda, Antonio; Crespantini, Aurelio; Porcari, Bruno; Carioti, Luigi; Billeri, Luana; Bramanti, Alessia; Bramanti, Placido; Calabrò, Rocco Salvatore

    2017-05-01

    The present paper aims at providing an objective narrative review of the existing non-pharmacological treatments for spasticity. Whereas pharmacologic and conventional physiotherapy approaches result well effective in managing spasticity due to stroke, multiple sclerosis, traumatic brain injury, cerebral palsy and incomplete spinal cord injury, the real usefulness of the non-pharmacological ones is still debated. We performed a narrative literature review of the contribution of non-pharmacological treatments to spasticity management, focusing on the role of non-invasive neurostimulation protocols (NINM). Spasticity therapeutic options available to the physicians include various pharmacological and non-pharmacological approaches (including NINM and vibration therapy), aimed at achieving functional goals for patients and their caregivers. A successful treatment of spasticity depends on a clear comprehension of the underlying pathophysiology, the natural history, and the impact on patient's performances. Even though further studies aimed at validating non-pharmacological treatments for spasticity should be fostered, there is growing evidence supporting the usefulness of non-pharmacologic approaches in significantly helping conventional treatments (physiotherapy and drugs) to reduce spasticity and improving patient's quality of life. Hence, non-pharmacological treatments should be considered as a crucial part of an effective management of spasticity. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Spasticity : Revisiting the role and the individual value of several pharmacological treatments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lapeyre, Eric; Kuks, Jan B. M.; Meijler, Andwillem J.

    2010-01-01

    Though in the last few decades only a few new drugs have come available for the treatment of spasticity, new insights may revise the role and individual value of several pharmacological treatments. Diazepam, baclofen and tizanidine are the most prescribed drugs for the treatment of spasticity.

  17. Consensus on the appropriate use of intrathecal baclofen (ITB) therapy in paediatric spasticity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dan, B.; Motta, F.; Vles, J.S.; Vloeberghs, M.; Becher, J.G.S.J.S.; Eunson, P.; Gautheron, V.; Lutjen, S.; Mall, V.; Pascual-Pascual, S.I.; Pauwels, P.; Roste, G.K.

    2010-01-01

    Among features of motor disorders in children, spasticity is associated with considerable morbidity and problems in care, particularly in severely affected patients. Intrathecal baclofen (ITB) has been increasingly used as a relatively specific treatment modality for spasticity. To date, most of the

  18. European consensus table on the use of botulinum toxin type A in adult spasticity.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wissel, J.; Ward, A.B.; Erztgaard, P.; Bensmail, D.; Hecht, M.J.; Lejeune, T.M.; Schnider, P.; Altavista, M.C.; Cavazza, S.; Deltombe, T.; Duarte, E.; Geurts, A.C.H.; Gracies, J.M.; Haboubi, N.H.; Juan, F.J.; Kasch, H.; Katterer, C.; Kirazli, Y.; Manganotti, P.; Parman, Y.; Paternostro-Sluga, T.; Petropoulou, K.; Prempeh, R.; Rousseaux, M.; Slawek, J.; Tieranta, N.

    2009-01-01

    A group of clinicians from across Europe experienced in the use of botulinum toxin type A for the treatment of spasticity following acquired brain injury gathered to develop a consensus statement on best practice in managing adults with spasticity. This consensus table summarizes the current

  19. Reduced regional cerebral blood flow in SPG4-linked hereditary spastic paraplegia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Scheuer, Kristin H; Nielsen, Jørgen E; Krabbe, Katja

    2005-01-01

    Hereditary spastic paraplegia (HSP) linked to the spastic gait gene 4 (SPG4) is controversial, as the "pure" form traditionally has been considered confined to the long axons of the spinal cord. However, recent immunolabeling experiments have demonstrated extensive Spastin expression in the corte...

  20. Sensitivity of qualitative and quantitative spasticity measures to clinical treatment with cryotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allison, S C; Abraham, L D

    2001-03-01

    This study examined the extent to which a battery of tests could detect a reduction of plantarflexor spasticity resulting from cryotherapy. The tests included a traditional qualitative spasticity scale, three potential quantitative spasticity measures and a measure of voluntary ankle muscle function. Twenty-six adult traumatic-brain-injured subjects were examined; these included 22 males and 4 females. The mean age was 28.15 years (range: 18-57, SD 10.78). The five tests were performed in random sequence on both ankles of each subject, before and after a 20 minute cold pack application to the calf. Tests were: modified Ashworth scale (MAS) scoring; H-reflex testing with and without dorsiflexor contraction (Hdf/Hctrl ratio); H-reflex testing with and without Achilles tendon vibration (Hvib/Hctrl ratio); reflex threshold angle (RTA) and timed toe tapping (TIT). Cryotherapy resulted in lowered MAS scores consistent with a reduction in spasticity. Doubly multivariate repeated measures ANOVA revealed a significant difference (F = 24.16, P cryotherapy test batteries. Significant pre- and post-cryotherapy differences (P cryotherapy. However, among the potential quantitative measures of spasticity only the RTA test demonstrated appropriate sensitivity to the reduction in spasticity. In spite of spasticity reduction, TIT performance was impaired following muscle cooling. Failure of the H-reflex ratios to show a reduction consistent with reduced spasticity was attributed to competing alpha and gamma motoneuron effects resulting from peripheral cooling.

  1. Outcome of medial hamstring lengthening in children with spastic paresis: A biomechanical and morphological observational study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haberfehlner, Helga; Jaspers, Richard T.; Rutz, Erich; Harlaar, J.; Harlaar, Jaap; Van Der Sluijs, Johannes A.; Witbreuk, Melinda; van Hutten, Kim; Romkes, Jacqueline; Freslier, Marie; Brunner, Reinald; Becher, Jules G.; Maas, H.; Buizer, Annemieke I.

    2018-01-01

    To improve gait in children with spastic paresis due to cerebral palsy or hereditary spastic paresis, the semitendinosus muscle is frequently lengthened amongst other medial hamstring muscles by orthopaedic surgery. Side effects on gait due to weakening of the hamstring muscles and overcorrections

  2. Outcome of medial hamstring lengthening in children with spastic paresis : A biomechanical and morphological observational study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haberfehlner, Helga; Jaspers, Richard T.; Rutz, Erich; Harlaar, Jaap; Van Der Sluijs, Johannes A.; Witbreuk, Melinda M.; van Hutten, Kim; Romkes, Jacqueline; Freslier, Marie; Brunner, Reinald; Becher, Jules G.; Maas, Huub; Buizer, Annemieke I.

    2018-01-01

    To improve gait in children with spastic paresis due to cerebral palsy or hereditary spastic paresis, the semitendinosus muscle is frequently lengthened amongst other medial hamstring muscles by orthopaedic surgery. Side effects on gait due to weakening of the hamstring muscles and overcorrections

  3. Intramuscular connective tissue differences in spastic and control muscle: a mechanical and histological study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Bruin, M.; Smeulders, M.J.C.; Kreulen, M.; Huijing, P.A.; Jaspers, R.T.

    2014-01-01

    Cerebral palsy (CP) of the spastic type is a neurological disorder characterized by a velocity-dependent increase in tonic stretch reflexes with exaggerated tendon jerks. Secondary to the spasticity, muscle adaptation is presumed to contribute to limitations in the passive range of joint motion.

  4. Effect of whole-body vibration on muscle strength, spasticity, and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Marwa M. Ibrahim

    Abstract Background and purpose: Spastic diplegia is a common form of cerebral palsy (CP) and is characterized by spasticity and muscle weakness of both lower limbs resulting in decreased walk- ing ability. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of whole body vibration (WBV) training on muscle strength, ...

  5. Intrathecal baclofen therapy in children with intractable spastic cerebral palsy: a cost-effectiveness analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoving, M.A.; Evers, S.M.A.A.; Ament, A.J.H.A.; van Raak, E.P.M.; Becher, J.G.; Rotteveel, J.; Vles, J.S.H.

    2008-01-01

    In a Dutch national study, we recently established the effectiveness and safety of continuous intrathecal baclofen infusion (CITB) in children with intractable spastic cerebral palsy (CP). Because prospective studies on the cost-effectiveness of CITB in children with spastic CP are lacking, we

  6. Intrathecal baclofen therapy in children with intractable spastic cerebral palsy: a cost-effectiveness analysis.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoving, M.A.; Evers, S.M.; Ament, A.J.; Raak, E.P. van; Vles, J.S.; Becher, J.G.; Vermeulen, R.; Brouwer, O.F.; Maathuis, C.G.B.; Catsman-Berrevoets, C.E.; Gerritsen, J.; Geerts, M.J.; Jongerius, P.H.; Nieuwenhuizen, O.F.; Rotteveel, J.J.; Speth, L.A.; Stroink, H.; Ziel, E.G. van der

    2008-01-01

    In a Dutch national study, we recently established the effectiveness and safety of continuous intrathecal baclofen infusion (CITB) in children with intractable spastic cerebral palsy (CP). Because prospective studies on the cost-effectiveness of CITB in children with spastic CP are lacking, we

  7. Prevalence and risk factors for epilepsy in children with spastic cerebral palsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dedy Rahmat

    2010-03-01

    Conclusions The prevalence of epilepsy in spastic CP is 39%. The risk factors for epilepsy in spastic CP are post central nervous system infection, and ocurrence of seizure in the first year of life. [Paediatr Indones. 2010;50:11-7].

  8. Intensive Voice Treatment (LSVT LOUD) for Children with Spastic Cerebral Palsy and Dysarthria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, Cynthia Marie; Boliek, Carol Ann

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of an intensive voice treatment (Lee Silverman Voice Treatment, commonly known as LSVT LOUD) for children with spastic cerebral palsy (CP) and dysarthria. Method: A nonconcurrent multiple baseline single-subject design with replication across 5 children with spastic CP was used.…

  9. Intrathecal baclofen pump for spasticity: an evidence-based analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-01-01

    To conduct an evidence-based analysis of the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of intrathecal baclofen for spasticity. Spasticity is a motor disorder characterized by tight or stiff muscles that may interfere with voluntary muscle movements and is a problem for many patients with multiple sclerosis (MS), spinal cord injury (SCI), cerebral palsy (CP), and acquired brain injury (ABI).(1). Increased tone and spasm reduces mobility and independence, and interferes with activities of daily living, continence and sleep patterns. Spasticity may also be associated with significant pain or discomfort (e.g., due to poor fit in braces, footwear, or wheelchairs), skin breakdown, contractures, sleep disorders and difficulty in transfer. Goals of treatment are to decrease spasticity in order to improve range of motion, facilitate movement, reduce energy expenditure and reduce risk of contractures. Existing treatments include physical therapy, oral medications, injections of phenol or botulinum toxin, or surgical intervention. Baclofen is the oral drug most frequently prescribed for spasticity in cases of SCI and MS.(1) Baclofen is a muscle relaxant and antispasticity drug. In the brain, baclofen delivered orally has some supraspinal activity that may contribute to clinical side effects. The main adverse effects of oral baclofen include sedation, excessive weakness, dizziness, mental confusion, and somnolence.(2) The incidence of adverse effects is reported to range from 10% to 75%.(2) Ochs et al. estimated that approximately 25-30% of SCI and MS patients fail to respond to oral baclofen.(3;4) Adverse effects appear to be dose-related and may be minimized by initiating treatment at a low dose and gradually titrating upwards.(2) Adverse effects usually appear at doses >60 mg/day.(2) The rate of treatment discontinuation due to intolerable adverse effects has generally been reported to range from 4% to 27%.(2) When baclofen is administered orally, only a small portion of the

  10. Asphyxia-related risk factors and their timing in spastic cerebral palsy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Lene F.; Schendel, Diana; Grove, Jakob

    2008-01-01

    Objective To investigate the association of asphyxia-related conditions (reducing blood flow or blood oxygen levels in the fetus) with spastic cerebral palsy (CP) considering different gestational age groups and the timing of risk. Design Population-based case-control study. Setting Danish Cerebral...... Palsy Register in eastern Denmark and Danish Medical Birth Register. Population or Sample 271 singletons with spastic CP and 217 singleton controls, frequency matched by gestational age group, born 1982-1990 in eastern Denmark. Methods Data were abstracted from medical records, and a priori asphyxia...... an especially high risk for spastic quadriplegia. Placental and cord complications were present in 21% of cases and 12% of controls. Conclusions The risk for spastic quadriplegia from placental infarction may be linked in some cases with abnormal fetal growth (17% of all children with spastic quadriplegia and 3...

  11. Tibialis Spastic Varus Foot With Calcaneonavicular Coalition: A Case Report and Review of the Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurashige, Toshinori; Suzuki, Seiichi

    2015-12-01

    Peroneal spastic flat foot is a well-known condition usually occurring with tarsal coalition. Conversely, tibialis spastic varus foot is a rare condition, which can be difficult to diagnose. Moreover, tibialis spastic varus foot with calcaneonavicular coalition is extremely rare, with only a few published case reports. Resection of the calcaneonavicular bar is performed in the majority of patients. We report a case of tibialis spastic varus foot with calcaneonavicular coalition in an 11-year-old boy with intellectual disability. His family noticed his right varus foot deformity 1.5 years earlier. There was no obvious history of trauma. The deformity gradually worsened with running. Because conservative treatment failed, resection of the coalition was performed that facilitated a good outcome. In this article, we report our experience of tibialis spastic varus foot with calcaneonavicular coalition and review the English literature of this condition. Therapeutic, Level IV: Case report. © 2015 The Author(s).

  12. Excellent functional outcome following selective dorsal rhizotomy in a child with spasticity secondary to transverse myelitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazarakis, N K; Ughratdar, I; Vloeberghs, M H

    2015-11-01

    Selective dorsal rhizotomy (SDR) is a neurosurgical procedure used to treat spasticity in children with cerebral palsy (CP). The vast majority of studies to date suggest SDR is particularly effective in reducing lower limb spasticity in spastic diplegia with long-lasting effect. We report, to the best of our knowledge for the first time, the case of a teenager who underwent SDR for the management of spasticity secondary to transverse myelitis. This is an unusual indication for SDR which resulted in completely loose lower limbs and an excellent functional outcome. At a follow-up 18 months following the procedure, the child had no re-occurrence of his symptoms. This report raises the possibility that the use of SDR could be expanded to include other pathologies. We discuss the case and the relevant literature. Our spasticity service at NUH has to date inserted 300 baclofen pumps and performed 60 SDRs mainly in children with cerebral palsy.

  13. Effects of Thai Massage on Spasticity in Young People with Cerebral Palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malila, Pisamai; Seeda, Kantarakorn; Machom, Savet; Eungpinithpong, Wichai

    2015-06-01

    To determine the effects of Thai massage on muscle spasticity in young people with cerebral palsy. Young people with spastic diplegia, aged 6-18 years old, were recruitedfrom the Srisungwan School in Khon Kaen Province. Spasticity of right quadriceps femoris muscles was measured using Modified Ashworth Scale (MAS) at pre- and immediately post 30-minute session of Thai massage. Thai massage was applied on the lower back and lower limbs. Wilcoxon Signed Ranks test was used to compare the outcome between pre- and post treatment. Seventeen participants with spastic diplegia aged 13.71 +/- 3.62 years old participated. A significant difference of MAS was observed between pre- and post treatment (1+, 1; pspasticity and is suggested to be an alternative treatmentfor reducing spasticity in young people with cerebral palsy.

  14. Static standing, dynamic standing and spasticity in individuals with spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadeghi, M; Mclvor, J; Finlayson, H; Sawatzky, B

    2016-05-01

    This was a cross-over efficacy study design. To determine spasticity differences between static and dynamic standing training in individuals with spinal cord injury (SCI). Vancouver, Canada. Ten individuals with SCI who could stand with or without bracing or supports participated in both dynamic and static standing training (one session each, 2 days apart) using a Segway. The primary outcome was spasticity as measured by Visual Analog Scale (VAS), Modified Ashworth Scale (MAS) and electromyography (EMG) of the quadriceps, hamstrings, adductors and gastrocnemius. There was no statistically detectable difference in spasticity between dynamic and static standing training in individuals with SCI as measured by VAS, MAS or EMG, although there was a trend towards decreased spasticity after the dynamic training. There is no significant difference in spasticity outcomes between static and dynamic standing training on a Segway for individuals with SCI. This research was funded by Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada and International Collaboration on Repair Discoveries.

  15. Rectal perforation by compressed air.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Young Jin

    2017-07-01

    As the use of compressed air in industrial work has increased, so has the risk of associated pneumatic injury from its improper use. However, damage of large intestine caused by compressed air is uncommon. Herein a case of pneumatic rupture of the rectum is described. The patient was admitted to the Emergency Room complaining of abdominal pain and distension. His colleague triggered a compressed air nozzle over his buttock. On arrival, vital signs were stable but physical examination revealed peritoneal irritation and marked distension of the abdomen. Computed tomography showed a large volume of air in the peritoneal cavity and subcutaneous emphysema at the perineum. A rectal perforation was found at laparotomy and the Hartmann procedure was performed.

  16. Four-fold increase in direct costs of stroke survivors with spasticity compared with stroke survivors without spasticity: the first year after the event.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lundström, Erik; Smits, Anja; Borg, Jörgen; Terént, Andreas

    2010-02-01

    The prevalence of spasticity after first-ever stroke is approximately 20%, but there are no health economic studies on costs associated with spasticity after stroke. The objective of our study was to estimate direct costs of stroke with spasticity for patients surviving up to 1 year after the stroke event in comparison to costs of stroke without spasticity. A representative sample of patients with first-ever stroke hospitalized at Uppsala University Hospital was eligible for our cross-sectional survey. All direct costs during 1 year were identified for each patient, including costs for hospitalization (acute and rehabilitation), primary health care, medication, and costs for municipality services. Swedish currency was converted to Purchasing Power Parities US dollar (PPP$). Median age (interquartile range) was 73 years (18), and the proportion of women was 48%. The majority of the direct costs (78%) was associated with hospitalization, whereas 20% was associated with municipality services during 1 year after a first-ever stroke. Only 1% of all direct costs were related to primary health care and 1% to medication. The level of costs for patients with stroke was correlated with the presence of spasticity as measured with the modified Ashworth scale (r(s)=0.524) and with the degree of disability as measured with modified Rankin Scale (r(s)=0.624). The mean (median, interquartile range) direct cost for stroke patients with spasticity was PPP$ 84,195 (72,116, 53,707) compared with PPP$ 21,842 (12,385, 17,484) for patients with stroke without spasticity (Pstroke survivors are 4 times higher than direct costs for patients with stroke without spasticity during the first year after the event.

  17. Research of the spatial-temporal gait parameters and pressure characteristic in spastic diplegia children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pauk, Jolanta; Ihnatouski, Mikhail; Daunoraviciene, Kristina; Laskhousky, Uladimir; Griskevicius, Julius

    2016-01-01

    Spastic diplegia is the most common form of cerebral palsy. It presents with symmetric involvement of the lower limbs and upper limbs. Children with spastic diplegia frequently experience problems with motor control, spasticity, and balance which lead to gait abnormalities. The aim of this study is twofold. Firstly, to determine the differences in spatial-temporal gait parameters and magnitude of plantar pressure distribution between children with spastic diplegia (CP) and typical children. Secondly, to compare and evaluate main changes of plantar pressure and spatial-temporal gait parameters instead of data between spastic diplegia children with prescribed ankle - solid foot orthosis (AFOs) and without using AFOs. The evaluation was carried out on 20 spastic diplegia children and 10 agematched children as a control group aged 6-15 years. Twenty children with spastic diplegia CP were divided into two groups: ten subjects with prescribed AFOs and ten subjects without use of assistive device. Patients used the AFOs orthosis for one year. Measurements included in-shoe plantar pressure distribution and spatial-temporal gait parameters. Spatial-temporal gait parameters showed meaningful difference between study groups in velocity, stride length, step length and cadence ( p 0.05). Significant differences between typical and spastic diplegia children with AFOs were observed in the magnitude of plantar pressure under the toes, the metatarsal heads, the medial arch, and the heel ( p spastic diplegia patients with AFOs and without it. In conclusion, our current results showed that the use of AFOs, prescribed on a clinical basis by doctors improves gait patterns and gait stability in children with spastic cerebral palsy.

  18. Functional Brain Correlates of Upper Limb Spasticity and Its Mitigation following Rehabilitation in Chronic Stroke Survivors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Svetlana Pundik

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Arm spasticity is a challenge in the care of chronic stroke survivors with motor deficits. In order to advance spasticity treatments, a better understanding of the mechanism of spasticity-related neuroplasticity is needed. Objective. To investigate brain function correlates of spasticity in chronic stroke and to identify specific regional functional brain changes related to rehabilitation-induced mitigation of spasticity. Methods. 23 stroke survivors (>6 months were treated with an arm motor learning and spasticity therapy (5 d/wk for 12 weeks. Outcome measures included Modified Ashworth scale, sensory tests, and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI for wrist and hand movement. Results. First, at baseline, greater spasticity correlated with poorer motor function (P=0.001 and greater sensory deficits (P=0.003. Second, rehabilitation produced improvement in upper limb spasticity and motor function (P<0.0001. Third, at baseline, greater spasticity correlated with higher fMRI activation in the ipsilesional thalamus (rho=0.49, P=0.03. Fourth, following rehabilitation, greater mitigation of spasticity correlated with enhanced fMRI activation in the contralesional primary motor (r=-0.755, P=0.003, premotor (r=−0.565, P=0.04, primary sensory (r=−0.614, P=0.03, and associative sensory (r=−0.597, P=0.03 regions while controlling for changes in motor function. Conclusions. Contralesional motor regions may contribute to restoring control of muscle tone in chronic stroke.

  19. A de novo mosaic mutation in SPAST with two novel alternative alleles and chromosomal copy number variant in a boy with spastic paraplegia and autism spectrum disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthews, A M; Tarailo-Graovac, M; Price, E M; Blydt-Hansen, I; Ghani, A; Drögemöller, B I; Robinson, W P; Ross, C J; Wasserman, W W; Siden, H; van Karnebeek, C D

    2017-10-01

    Here we report a 12 year old male with an extreme presentation of spastic paraplegia along with autism and dysmorphisms. Whole exome sequencing identified a predicted pathogenic pair of missense variants in SPAST at the same chromosomal location, each with a different alternative allele, while a chromosome microarray identified a 1.73 Mb paternally inherited copy gain of 1q21.1q21.2 resulting in a blended phenotype of both Spastic paraplegia 4 and 1q21.1 microduplication syndrome. We believe that the extreme phenotype observed is likely caused by the presence of cells which contain only mutant SPAST, but that the viability of the patient is possible due mosaicism of mutant alleles observed in different proportions across tissues. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  20. Procedure Oriented Torsional Anatomy of the Forearm for Spasticity Injection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiou-Tan, Faye; Cianca, John; John, Joslyn; Furr-Stimming, Erin; Pandit, Sindhu; Taber, Katherine H

    2015-01-01

    : This is the second in a series of articles related to the concept of "torsional" anatomy. The objective of this article is to provide musculoskeletal ultrasound (MSKUS) anatomy of the forearm in the position of hemispastic flexion as a reference relevant to needle procedures. The MSKUS images were obtained in a healthy human subject. Marker dots were placed over common injection sites in the forearm for spasticity. The MSKUS probe was centered over each dot to obtain a cross-sectional view. A pair of MSKUS images was recorded for each site: the first in anatomic neutral and second in hemiparetic spastic position. The images were compared side to side. In addition, a video recording was made at each site to track the movement of the muscles and nerves during internal rotation. The pronator teres (PT) rotated medially and the brachialis and biceps tendon rotated in view. In addition, the median nerve became more superficial. The flexor carpi radialis rotated medially and was replaced by PT and the median nerve. The flexor carpi ulnaris and flexor digitorum profundus rotated medially and were replaced by the flexor carpi radialis, PT and median nerve. The flexor digitorum superficialis was replaced by the brachioradialis, extensor carpi radialis brevis, and radial nerve. The brachioradialis was replaced by the extensor carpi radialis brevis and extensor digitorum communis. Intended muscle targets rotate out of view and injection range. These are replaced by other muscles and nerves that could inadvertently be injected. This potentially could result in both increased complications and decreased efficacy of the procedure. It is hoped that this series of images will increase the accuracy and safety of needle placement for spasticity injections in the forearm.

  1. Hip joint pain in spastic dislocation: aetiological aspects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masłoń, Adrian; Jóźwiak, Marek; Pawlak, Maciej; Modrzewski, Tadeusz; Grzegorzewski, Andrzej

    2011-11-01

    Children with severe forms of cerebral palsy (CP) are at high risk of hip joint displacement. Various studies have found that the pain from affected joints occurs in 40 to 84% of studied individuals. The purpose of this study was to establish a correlation between the density of nociceptors localized in selected areas of the spastic dislocated hip joint and clinical evidence of hip joint pain in children with CP. Nineteen samples of articular capsule and 19 samples of teres ligaments, collected during open hip joint reduction from 19 non-ambulatory children with spastic CP (Gross Motor Function Classification System level V; mean age 9y 6mo; 10 males, nine females), were studied. Pain was assessed using the numeric rating scale completed by caregivers. The density of nociceptive fibres was compared between the children with painful and children with painless hip joints, using S-100 and substance P monoclonal antibodies. The presence of S-100 protein and substance P were significantly increased (p=0.024 and p=0.02 respectively) in the children with painful hip joints. There were significantly positive correlations between the intensity of pain and the density of nerve fibres with S-100 protein (teres ligament, p=0.001; joint capsule, p=0.032) as well as substance P (teres ligament, p=0.001). Direct and indirect inflammatory factors, present in dislocated hip joints with cartilage damage in children with spastic CP, lead to hip joint sensitization. © The Authors. Developmental Medicine & Child Neurology © 2011 Mac Keith Press.

  2. Effect of neurodevelopmental treatment-based physical therapy on the change of muscle strength, spasticity, and gross motor function in children with spastic cerebral palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Eun-Young; Kim, Won-Ho

    2017-06-01

    [Purpose] This study aimed to investigate the effectiveness of neurodevelopmental treatment-based physical therapy on muscle tone, strength, and gross motor function in children with spastic cerebral palsy. [Subjects and Methods] One-hundred-seventy-five children with spastic cerebral palsy (88 diplegia; 78 quadriplegia) received neurodevelopmental treatment-based physical therapy for 35 minutes per day, 2-3 times per week for 1 year. Spasticity, muscle strength, and gross motor function were measured before and after treatment with the Modified Ashworth Scale, Manual Muscle Testing, and Gross Motor Function Measure, respectively. [Results] Spasticity was significantly reduced after 1 year of treatment. The Gross Motor Functional Classification System levels I-II group showed a significant increase in muscle strength compared with the Gross Motor Functional Classification System levels III-V, and the latter showed a significant decrease in spasticity compared with the former. [Conclusion] Neurodevelopmental treatment-based physical therapy in children with cerebral palsy seems to be effective in reducing spasticity, but does not improve gross motor function. Therefore, other interventional approaches are needed to improve gross motor function in children with cerebral palsy.

  3. Functional effects of botulinum toxin type-A treatment and subsequent stretching of spastic calf muscles: a study in patients with hereditary spastic paraplegia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Niet, Mark; de Bot, Susanne T; van de Warrenburg, Bart P C; Weerdesteyn, Vivian; Geurts, Alexander C

    2015-02-01

    Although calf muscle spasticity is often treated with botulinum toxin type-A, the effects on balance and gait are ambiguous. Hereditary spastic paraplegia is characterized by progressive spasticity and relatively mild muscle weakness of the lower limbs. It is therefore a good model to evaluate the functional effects of botulinum toxin type-A. Explorative pre-post intervention study. Fifteen subjects with pure hereditary spastic paraplegia. Patients with symptomatic calf muscle spasticity and preserved calf muscle strength received botulinum toxin type-A injections in each triceps surae (Dysport®, 500-750 MU) followed by daily stretching exercises (18 weeks). Before intervention (T0), and 4 (T1) and 18 (T2) weeks thereafter, gait, balance, motor selectivity, calf muscle tone and strength were tested. Mean comfortable gait velocity increased from T0 (0.90 m/s (standard deviation (SD) 0.18)) to T1 (0.98 m/s (SD 0.20)), which effect persisted at T2, whereas balance and other functional measures remained unchanged. Calf muscle tone declined from T0 (median 2; range 1-2) to T1 (median 0; range 0-1), which effect partially persisted at T2 (median 1; range 0-2). Calf muscle strength did not change. Botulinum toxin type-A treatment and subsequent muscle stretching of the calves improved comfortable gait velocity and reduced muscle tone in patients with hereditary spastic paraplegia, while preserving muscle strength. Balance remained unaffected.

  4. Association between spasticity and the level of motor function with quality of life in community dwelling Iranian young adults with spastic cerebral palsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nasrin Salehi Dehno

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available  Abstract Background: Consequences of cerebral palsy in adulthood can affect physical, psychological capabilities and quality of life. The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between quality of life with spasticity and level of motor function in Iranian young adults with spastic cerebral palsy who were community dweller. Methods: In an analytical cross sectional study, 77 participants with spastic cerebral palsy (44 women، 33 men with age range of 20 to 40 years; (mean age 26.19±5 yr took part in this study. They were enrolled from three Raad Rehabilitation Goodwill complexes in Tehran and Karaj cities. All subjects were recruited through convenient sampling. Severity of Spasticity for knee flexors was measured with Modified Tardieu Scale. In addition, the level of motor function, and quality of life were assessed respectively through Gross Motor Function Classification System and World Health Organization Quality of life questionnaire (WHOQOL- BREF. To analyze data, Pearson and spearman correlation coefficient was used. Results: No correlation found between quality of life with knee flexor muscles spasticity and level of motor function (p> 0.05. Conclusion: Quality of life as a multi dimensional concept has been impacted by many factors such as physical status, environmental issues and culture. Possibly, severity of spasticity and level of function have a less pronounced effect on quality of life in community dwelling adults with cerebral palsy. 

  5. A literature review on the efficacy and safety of botulinum toxin: an injection in post-stroke spasticity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghasemi, Majid; Salari, Mehri; Khorvash, Fariborz; Shaygannejad, Vahid

    2013-05-01

    A variety of techniques for the management of spasticity have been suggested, including positioning, cryotherapy, splinting and casting, biofeedback, electrical stimulation, and medical management by pharmacological agents, Botulinum toxin A (BTA) is now the pharmacological treatment of choice in focal spasticity. BTA by blocking acetylcholine release at neuromuscular junctions accounts for its therapeutic action to relieve spasticity. A computerized search of Pub Med was carried out to find the latest result about efficacy of BTA in management of post stroke spasticity. Among 84 articles were found, frothy of them included in this review and divided to lower and upper extremity. BTA is a treatment choice in reducing tone and managing post stroke spasticity .

  6. Iatrogenic botulism in a child with spastic quadriparesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Partikian, Arthur; Mitchell, Wendy G

    2007-10-01

    Botulinum toxins are potent neurotoxins used in a variety of neurological disorders. Few pediatric reports have been published to date regarding the potential hazards of therapeutic use of botulinum toxins. We describe the case of a 10-year-old boy who developed systemic weakness following treatment of spasticity with botulinum toxin type B. The patient developed iatrogenic botulism with ptosis, facial diplegia, neck flexor and extensor weakness, and profound hypopharyngeal laxity with respiratory compromise from which he eventually recovered. Clinicians should be mindful of the risk for systemic botulism when using local injections of the neurotoxin.

  7. Experience of using hippotherapy in complex effects on muscle spirals in children with spastic forms of cerebral palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strashko, Evhen Y; Kapustianska, Аnna A; Bobyreva, Lyudmyla E

    Matters of physical and medical rehabilitation of children with organic lesions of the nervous system, in particular, with cerebral palsy, are actual in countries around the world. Hippotherapy is neurophysiologically oriented therapy using horses. Determine whether a combination of hippotherapy as a method of rehabilitation in the aftermath of outpatient comprehensive impact on MS on a stationary phase; Study of the effect of hippotherapy as securing and preparation method for learning new postures and movements in children with spastic cerebral palsy forms; The study of the possible optimization of psychophysical state, activation motivations of patients; Determination of the optimal timing of hippotherapy sessions, the number of procedures, the study of possible fatigue factor children. HT classes were conducted at the Ippotsentra "Wind of Change" in the period 2010-2013 the main group of children surveyed (36 people) with spastic forms of cerebral palsy. HT procedure took place twice a day - morning and evening - 30 minutes during 10-12 days. Thus, the proposed integration of the HT program of complex effects on muscle spirals children with spastic cerebral palsy forms is physiologically and anthropologically based on 4-5 day training children adequately transferred the full amount of lessons learned new postures and movements, HT does not cause complications in the somatic and psycho-emotional state of the children, HT enables sensorimotor and psychomotor effects, save and normalize muscle tone for a longer period (up to three months), compared with traditional methods of physiotherapy. HT can serve as a method of learning a new "postures and movements", the preparation of the locomotor apparatus to learn walking.

  8. Unveil Compressed Sensing

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Xiteng

    2013-01-01

    We discuss the applicability of compressed sensing theory. We take a genuine look at both experimental results and theoretical works. We answer the following questions: 1) What can compressed sensing really do? 2) More importantly, why?

  9. A Compressive Superresolution Display

    KAUST Repository

    Heide, Felix

    2014-06-22

    In this paper, we introduce a new compressive display architecture for superresolution image presentation that exploits co-design of the optical device configuration and compressive computation. Our display allows for superresolution, HDR, or glasses-free 3D presentation.

  10. [The application of high-frequency and iTBS transcranial magnetic stimulation for the treatment of spasticity in the patients presenting with secondary progressive multiple sclerosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korzhova, J E; Chervyakov, A V; Poydasheva, A G; Kochergin, I A; Peresedova, A V; Zakharova, M N; Suponeva, N A; Chernikova, L A; Piradov, M A

    Spasticity is considered to be a common manifestation of multiple sclerosis. Muscle relaxants are not sufficiently effective; more than that, some of them often cause a variety of adverse reactions. Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) can be a promising new tool for the treatment of spasticity. The objective of the present study was to compare the effectiveness of the two TMS protocols: rhythmic (high-frequency) TMS (rTMS) and stimulation with the theta bursts (iTBS) in terms of their ability to reduce spasticity in the patients presenting with multiple sclerosis. Twenty two patients with secondary-progressive multiple sclerosis were pseudo-randomized into two groups: those in the first (high-frequency) group received the treatment with the use of rTMS therapy at a frequency of 10 Hz; the patients of the second group, underwent stimulation with the theta bursts (iTBS). All the patients received 10 sessions of either stimulation applied to the primary motor area (M1) of both legs. The effectiveness of TMS protocols was evaluated before therapy and after 10 sessions of stimulation based on the Modified Ashworth scale (MAS), the expanded disability status scale (EDSS), and the Kurtzke functional scale (Kfs). In addition, the patients were interviewed before treatment, after 10 rTMS sessions, immediately after and within 2 and 12 weeks after the completion of the treatment using questionnaires for the evaluation of spasticity (SESS) , fatigue, and dysfunction of the pelvic organs (severity of defecation and urination disorders), fatigue. The study has demonstrated a significant reduction in spasticity in the patients of both groups at the end of the TMS protocol based on the MAS scale. There was no significant difference between the outcomes of the two protocols. Both had positive effect on the concomitant «non-motor» symptoms (fatigue, dysfunction of the pelvic organs). High-frequency transcranial magnetic stimulation (10 sessions of rTMS therapy at a frequency

  11. Microbunching and RF Compression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Venturini, M.; Migliorati, M.; Ronsivalle, C.; Ferrario, M.; Vaccarezza, C.

    2010-01-01

    Velocity bunching (or RF compression) represents a promising technique complementary to magnetic compression to achieve the high peak current required in the linac drivers for FELs. Here we report on recent progress aimed at characterizing the RF compression from the point of view of the microbunching instability. We emphasize the development of a linear theory for the gain function of the instability and its validation against macroparticle simulations that represents a useful tool in the evaluation of the compression schemes for FEL sources.

  12. Hyperspectral data compression

    CERN Document Server

    Motta, Giovanni; Storer, James A

    2006-01-01

    Provides a survey of results in the field of compression of remote sensed 3D data, with a particular interest in hyperspectral imagery. This work covers topics such as compression architecture, lossless compression, lossy techniques, and more. It also describes a lossless algorithm based on vector quantization.

  13. Compression test assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kariotis, A. H. (Inventor)

    1973-01-01

    A compression test assembly is described which prevents buckling of small diameter rigid specimens undergoing compression testing and permits attachment of extensometers for strain measurements. The test specimen is automatically aligned and laterally supported when compressive force is applied to the end caps and transmitted to the test specimen during testing.

  14. Quantitative measures of spasticity in post-stroke patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pisano, F; Miscio, G; Del Conte, C; Pianca, D; Candeloro, E; Colombo, R

    2000-06-01

    Quantitative evaluation of muscle tone in post-stroke patients; correlation of biomechanical indices with conventional clinical scales and neurophysiological measures; characterization of passive and neural components of muscle tone. Mechanical stretches of the wrist flexor muscles of 53 post-stroke patients were imposed by means of a torque motor at constant speed. Patients were clinically studied using the Ashworth scale for spasticity and the Medical Research Council score for residual muscle strength. The neurophysiological measures were Hoffmann reflex latency, Hmax/Mmax ratio, stretch reflex threshold speed (SRTS), stretch reflex (SR) latency and area, passive (ISI) and total (TSI) stiffness indices. Hmax/Mmax ratio, SR area, ISI and TSI values were significantly higher in patients, while SRTS was significantly lower. TSI, SRTS and SR area were highly correlated to the Ashworth score. This EMG-biomechanical technique allows an objective evaluation of changes in muscle tone in post-stroke patients, providing easily measurable, quantitative indices of muscle stiffness. The linear distribution of these measures is particularly indicated for monitoring changes induced by treatment. The apparatus seems suitable to characterize neural stiffness, while difficulties were found in isolating the passive components, because of the occurrence of tonic EMG activity in most spastic patients.

  15. The use of hydrotherapy for the management of spasticity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kesiktas, N; Paker, N; Erdogan, N; Gülsen, G; Biçki, D; Yilmaz, H

    2004-12-01

    Spasticity is a major problem for the rehabilitation team. Physiotherapy is a vital component of therapy. Oral medication and other modalities such as heat, cold, ultrasound, electrical stimulation, and surgery (neuro-surgical or orthopedic) can also be used. The aim of this study was to compare the effects of hydrotherapy on spasticity and Functional Independence Measure (FIM) scores of patients with spinal cord injury (SCI). This is a control case matched study. Twenty SCI patients were divided into 2 groups and matched for age, gender, injury time, Ashworth scores, oral baclofen intake, American Spinal Injury Association, and FIM scores. The control group received passive range of motion exercise twice a day and oral baclofen for 10 weeks. The study group also received passive range of motion and oral baclofen, as well as 20 min of water exercises (at 71 degrees F, full immersion) 3 times per week. The authors evaluated spasm severity, FIM scores, oral baclofen intake, and Ashworth scales, between groups at the beginning and at the end of the treatment period. Both groups demonstrated a significant increase in FIM scores. However, the hydrotherapy group demonstrated a larger increase (P hydrotherapy group (P hydrotherapy produced a significant decrease in spasm severity (P hydrotherapy to the rehabilitation program can be helpful in decreasing the amount of medication required. Future studies must evaluate benefits of hydrotherapy for rehabilitation.

  16. Adult Spasticity International Registry Study: methodology and baseline patient, healthcare provider, and caregiver characteristics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerard E. Francisco

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The main aim of this study was to determine the utilization patterns and effectiveness of onabotulinumtoxinA (Botox® for treatment of spasticity in clinical practice. Design: An international, multicentre, prospective, observational study at selected sites in North America, Europe, and Asia. Patients: Adult patients with newly diagnosed or established focal spasticity, including those who had previously received treatment with onabotulinum-toxin A. Methods: Patients were treated with onabotulinumtoxinA, approximately every 12 weeks, according to their physician’s usual clinical practice over a period of up to 96 weeks, with a final follow-up interview at 108 weeks. Patient, physician and caregiver data were collected. Results: Baseline characteristics are reported. Of the 745 patients enrolled by 75 healthcare providers from 54 sites, 474 patients had previously received onabotulinumtoxinA treatment for spasticity. Lower limb spasticity was more common than upper limb spasticity, with stroke the most common underlying aetiology. The Short-Form 12 (SF-12 health survey scores showed that patients’ spasticity had a greater perceived impact on physical rather than mental aspects. Conclusion: The data collected in this study will guide the development of administration strategies to optimize the effectiveness of onabotulinumtoxinA in the management of spasticity of various underlying aetiologies.

  17. Development, Test and Validation of a Mechatronic Device for Spasticity Quantification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    João F. Ferreira

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Spasticity is a common pathological phenomenon in clinical practices, frequently expressed as a stroke, multiple sclerosis or cerebral palsy. The accurate quantification of spasticity allows early action to prevent the potentially irreversible consequences. The aim of this work is to develop and implement a mechatronic device for the accurate quantification of spasticity, which is able to differentiate spasticity from other motor disorders. The proposed method is based on the quantification of the tonic stretch reflex threshold (TSRT for the assessment of the range of motion of the limb affected by spasticity. In order to validate the developed device, experimental trials have been conducted, considering the flexor muscle of the elbow joint. The developed device was tested, first in a laboratory environment with healthy subjects and secondly, in a clinical environment with the collaboration of patients with spasticity. The evaluations in th clinical environment were performed on three different days in order to evaluate the reproducibility of the obtained results. The experimental trials confirm the sensibility, reproducibility and reliability of spasticity quantification based on the TSRT method. This project has been developed in cooperation with the Hospital of Braga and Fisimaia rehabilitation clinic, both in Portugal.

  18. The Tardieu Scale differentiates contracture from spasticity whereas the Ashworth Scale is confounded by it.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patrick, Emily; Ada, Louise

    2006-02-01

    To compare the Tardieu Scale as a clinical measure of spasticity after stroke with the Ashworth Scale. Cross-sectional study. Sixteen people, living in the community three years after their stroke. The Ashworth Scale and Tardieu Scale as well as laboratory measures of spasticity (stretch-induced electromyographic (EMG) activity) and contracture (maximum passive joint excursion) were collected from the affected elbow flexors and extensors and ankle plantarflexors and dorsiflexors by three examiners who were blinded to the results of the other measures. The percentage exact agreement (PEA) between the Tardieu Scale and a laboratory measure of spasticity was 100% for both the elbow flexors and ankle plantarflexors. This was significantly (P= 0.02) greater than the PEA of 63% for both muscles between the Ashworth Scale and the same laboratory measure of spasticity. For contracture, the PEA between the Tardieu Scale and a laboratory measure was 94% for both the elbow flexors and the ankle plantarflexors. Pearson correlation coefficients between the Tardieu Scale and laboratory measures of spasticity were 0.86 for the elbow flexors and 0.62 for the ankle plantarflexors and between the Tardieu Scale and laboratory measures of contracture were 0.89 for the elbow flexors and 0.84 for the ankle plantarflexors. In all cases that spasticity was overestimated by the Ashworth Scale, participants had a contracture. These findings suggest that the Tardieu Scale differentiates spasticity from contracture whereas the Ashworth Scale is confounded by it.

  19. Baclofen in the Therapeutic of Sequele of Traumatic Brain Injury: Spasticity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Arredondo, Adán; Cázares-Ramírez, Eduardo; Carrillo-Mora, Paul; Martínez-Vargas, Marina; Cárdenas-Rodríguez, Noemí; Coballase-Urrutia, Elvia; Alemón-Medina, Radamés; Sampieri, Aristides; Navarro, Luz; Carmona-Aparicio, Liliana

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is an alteration in brain function, caused by an external force, which may be a hit on the skull, rapid acceleration or deceleration, penetration of an object, or shock waves from an explosion. Traumatic brain injury is a major cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide, with a high prevalence rate in pediatric patients, in which treatment options are still limited, not available at present neuroprotective drugs. Although the therapeutic management of these patients is varied and dependent on the severity of the injury, general techniques of drug types are handled, as well as physical and surgical. Baclofen is a muscle relaxant used to treat spasticity and improve mobility in patients with spinal cord injuries, relieving pain and muscle stiffness. Pharmacological support with baclofen is contradictory, because disruption of its oral administration may cause increased muscle tone syndrome and muscle spasm, prolonged seizures, hyperthermia, dysesthesia, hallucinations, or even multisystem organ failure. Combined treatments must consider the pathophysiology of broader alterations than only excitation/inhibition context, allowing the patient's reintegration with the greatest functionality. PMID:27563745

  20. Identifying the brain regions associated with acute spasticity in patients diagnosed with an ischemic stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barlow, Susan J

    2016-06-01

    Spasticity is a common impairment found in patients that have been diagnosed with a stroke. Little is known about the pathophysiology of spasticity at the level of the brain. This retrospective study was performed to identify an association between the area of the brain affected by an ischemic stroke and the presence of acute spasticity. Physical and occupational therapy assessments from all patients (n = 441) that had suffered a stroke and were admitted into a local hospital over a 4-year period were screened for inclusion in this study. Subjects that fit the inclusion criteria were grouped according to the presence (n = 42) or absence (n = 129) of acute spasticity by the Modified Ashworth Scale score given during the hospital admission assessment. Magnetic resonance images from 20 subjects in the spasticity group and 52 from the control group were then compared using lesion density plots and voxel-based lesion-symptom mapping. An association of acute spasticity with the gray matter regions of the insula, basal ganglia, and thalamus was found in this study. White matter tracts including the pontine crossing tract, corticospinal tract, internal capsule, corona radiata, external capsule, and the superior fronto-occipital fasciculus were also found to be significantly associated with acute spasticity. This is the first study to describe an association between a region of the brain affected by an infarct and the presence of acute spasticity. Understanding the regions associated with acute spasticity will aid in understanding the pathophysiology of this musculoskeletal impairment at the level of the brain.

  1. Compressible effect algebras

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gudder, Stan

    2004-08-01

    We define a special type of additive map J on an effect algebra E called a compression. We call J(1) the focus of J and if p is the focus of a compression then p is called a projection. The set of projections in E is denoted by P(E). A compression J is direct if J( a) ≤ a for all a ɛ E. We show that direct compressions are equivalent to projections onto components of cartesian products. An effect algebra E is said to be compressible if every compression on E is uniquely determined by its focus and every compression on E has a supplement. We define and characterize the commutant C(p) of a projection p and show that a compression with focus p is direct if and only if C(p) = E. We show that P(E) is an orthomodular poset. It is proved that the cartesian product of effect algebras is compressible if and only if each component is compressible. We then consider compressible sequential effect algebras, Lüders maps and conditional probabilities.

  2. Compressing Binary Decision Diagrams

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Esben Rune; Satti, Srinivasa Rao; Tiedemann, Peter

    2008-01-01

    The paper introduces a new technique for compressing Binary Decision Diagrams in those cases where random access is not required. Using this technique, compression and decompression can be done in linear time in the size of the BDD and compression will in many cases reduce the size of the BDD to ......-2 bits per node. Empirical results for our compression technique are presented, including comparisons with previously introduced techniques, showing that the new technique dominate on all tested instances......The paper introduces a new technique for compressing Binary Decision Diagrams in those cases where random access is not required. Using this technique, compression and decompression can be done in linear time in the size of the BDD and compression will in many cases reduce the size of the BDD to 1...

  3. Compressing Binary Decision Diagrams

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rune Hansen, Esben; Srinivasa Rao, S.; Tiedemann, Peter

    The paper introduces a new technique for compressing Binary Decision Diagrams in those cases where random access is not required. Using this technique, compression and decompression can be done in linear time in the size of the BDD and compression will in many cases reduce the size of the BDD to ......-2 bits per node. Empirical results for our compression technique are presented, including comparisons with previously introduced techniques, showing that the new technique dominate on all tested instances.......The paper introduces a new technique for compressing Binary Decision Diagrams in those cases where random access is not required. Using this technique, compression and decompression can be done in linear time in the size of the BDD and compression will in many cases reduce the size of the BDD to 1...

  4. Sudden viscous dissipation in compressing plasma turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davidovits, Seth; Fisch, Nathaniel

    2015-11-01

    Compression of a turbulent plasma or fluid can cause amplification of the turbulent kinetic energy, if the compression is fast compared to the turnover and viscous dissipation times of the turbulent eddies. The consideration of compressing turbulent flows in inviscid fluids has been motivated by the suggestion that amplification of turbulent kinetic energy occurred on experiments at the Weizmann Institute of Science Z-Pinch. We demonstrate a sudden viscous dissipation mechanism whereby this amplified turbulent kinetic energy is rapidly converted into thermal energy, which further increases the temperature, feeding back to further enhance the dissipation. Application of this mechanism in compression experiments may be advantageous, if the plasma can be kept comparatively cold during much of the compression, reducing radiation and conduction losses, until the plasma suddenly becomes hot. This work was supported by DOE through contract 67350-9960 (Prime # DOE DE-NA0001836) and by the DTRA.

  5. Spotlight on botulinum toxin and its potential in the treatment of stroke-related spasticity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaku, Michelle; Simpson, David M

    2016-01-01

    Poststroke spasticity affects up to one-half of stroke patients and has debilitating effects, contributing to diminished activities of daily living, quality of life, pain, and functional impairments. Botulinum toxin (BoNT) is proven to be safe and effective in the treatment of focal poststroke spasticity. The aim of this review is to highlight BoNT and its potential in the treatment of upper and lower limb poststroke spasticity. We review evidence for the efficacy of BoNT type A and B formulations and address considerations of optimal injection technique, patient and caregiver satisfaction, and potential adverse effects of BoNT. PMID:27022247

  6. Hereditary spastic paraplegia and amyotrophy associated with a novel locus on chromosome 19

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meilleur, K.G.; Traoré, M.; Sangaré, M.; Britton, A.; Landouré, G.; Coulibaly, S.; Niaré, B.; Mochel, F.; La Pean, A.; Rafferty, I.; Watts, C.; Littleton-Kearney, M. T.; Blackstone, C.; Singleton, A.; Fischbeck, K.H.

    2010-01-01

    We identified a family in Mali with two sisters affected by spastic paraplegia. In addition to spasticity and weakness of the lower limbs, the patients had marked atrophy of the distal upper extremities. Homozygosity mapping using single nucleotide polymorphism arrays showed that the sisters shared a region of extended homozygosity at chromosome 19p13.11-q12 that was not shared by controls. These findings indicate a clinically and genetically distinct form of hereditary spastic paraplegia with amyotrophy, designated SPG43. PMID:20039086

  7. Lipid myopathy associated with renal tubular acidosis and spastic diplegia in two brothers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tung, Y C; Tsau, Y K; Chu, L W; Young, C; Shen, Y Z

    2001-07-01

    Lipid myopathy is a group of disorders involving mitochondrial fatty acid oxidation. We describe two brothers, 3 years 8 months old and 2 years 9 months old, respectively, with progressive spastic diplegia, developmental delay, failure to thrive, and chronic metabolic acidosis who had lipid myopathy and renal tubular acidosis. Brain magnetic resonance imaging revealed demyelinating changes in the periventricular white matter, which was compatible with spastic diplegia. These symptoms may be related to errors in fatty acid metabolism. Cerebral palsy had been misdiagnosed in both of these patients at another hospital. Therefore, for patients with late-onset and progressive spastic diplegia, detailed investigations for underlying diseases are warranted.

  8. Role Of Stretching Exercises In The Management Of Constipation In Spastic Cerebral Palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Awan, Waqar Ahmed; Masood, Tahir

    2016-01-01

    Constipation is considered as one of the most common non-motor manifestations in cerebral palsy (CP). Along with other reasons, spasticity also contributes in developing constipation in CP, by decreasing mobility of trunk and lower extremities and abdominal viscera. Stretching exercises of upper extremities, trunk and lower extremities are routine management of spasticity in CP children. The objective of the study was to determine the role of stretching exercises in improving constipation symptoms in children with spastic cerebral palsy and to explore the association between spasticity and constipation among cerebral palsy children. Single-group Pretest-Posttest Design (Quasi Experimental Study Design). The study was conducted at Physiotherapy Department of National Institute of Rehabilitation Medicine (NIRM) Islamabad. Thirty spastic CP children - both male and female - with complaints of constipation were recruited through non-probability, convenience sampling. The mean age of the children was 7.55±1.33 years. Each child was assessed for defecation frequency (DF), constipation severity by constipation assessment scale (CAS) and level of spasticity by modified ash worth scale for spasticity (MASS) at baseline. Stretching exercises were performed for 30 seconds with five repetitions and at least once a day for six week, followed by positioning of patients in reflex inhibiting posture. Final data was collected using the same tools as done at the baseline. Paired samples t-test was used to analyse the rehabilitation-induced changes after 6 weeks. To determine association between spasticity and constipation Pearson product-moment correlation coefficient was used. The data was analysed through SPSS 20. Significant changes, compared to the baseline scores, were observed after 6 weeks of stretching exercises in MASS (2.53±0.62 Vs 1.53±0.77), DF (2.43±0.67 Vs 3.70±1.02) and CAS (7.23±1.50 Vs 5.43±1.73) with p≤0.05. The results also showed significant correlation

  9. Whole-exome sequencing identifies homozygous AFG3L2 mutations in a spastic ataxia-neuropathy syndrome linked to mitochondrial m-AAA proteases.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tyler Mark Pierson

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available We report an early onset spastic ataxia-neuropathy syndrome in two brothers of a consanguineous family characterized clinically by lower extremity spasticity, peripheral neuropathy, ptosis, oculomotor apraxia, dystonia, cerebellar atrophy, and progressive myoclonic epilepsy. Whole-exome sequencing identified a homozygous missense mutation (c.1847G>A; p.Y616C in AFG3L2, encoding a subunit of an m-AAA protease. m-AAA proteases reside in the mitochondrial inner membrane and are responsible for removal of damaged or misfolded proteins and proteolytic activation of essential mitochondrial proteins. AFG3L2 forms either a homo-oligomeric isoenzyme or a hetero-oligomeric complex with paraplegin, a homologous protein mutated in hereditary spastic paraplegia type 7 (SPG7. Heterozygous loss-of-function mutations in AFG3L2 cause autosomal-dominant spinocerebellar ataxia type 28 (SCA28, a disorder whose phenotype is strikingly different from that of our patients. As defined in yeast complementation assays, the AFG3L2(Y616C gene product is a hypomorphic variant that exhibited oligomerization defects in yeast as well as in patient fibroblasts. Specifically, the formation of AFG3L2(Y616C complexes was impaired, both with itself and to a greater extent with paraplegin. This produced an early-onset clinical syndrome that combines the severe phenotypes of SPG7 and SCA28, in additional to other "mitochondrial" features such as oculomotor apraxia, extrapyramidal dysfunction, and myoclonic epilepsy. These findings expand the phenotype associated with AFG3L2 mutations and suggest that AFG3L2-related disease should be considered in the differential diagnosis of spastic ataxias.

  10. Surgical Treatment Guidelines for Digital Deformity Associated With Intrinsic Muscle Spasticity (Intrinsic Plus Foot) in Adults With Cerebral Palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boffeli, Troy J; Collier, Rachel C

    2015-01-01

    Intrinsic plus foot deformity has primarily been associated with cerebral palsy and involves spastic contracture of the intrinsic musculature with resultant toe deformities. Digital deformity is caused by a dynamic imbalance between the intrinsic muscles in the foot and extrinsic muscles in the lower leg. Spastic contracture of the toes frequently involves curling under of the lesser digits or contracture of the hallux into valgus or plantarflexion deformity. Patients often present with associated pressure ulcers, deformed toenails, shoe or brace fitting challenges, and pain with ambulation or transfers. Four different patterns of intrinsic plus foot deformity have been observed by the authors that likely relate to the different patterns of muscle involvement. Case examples are provided of the 4 patterns of intrinsic plus foot deformity observed, including global intrinsic plus lesser toe deformity, isolated intrinsic plus lesser toe deformity, intrinsic plus hallux valgus deformity, and intrinsic plus hallux flexus deformity. These case examples are presented to demonstrate each type of deformity and our approach for surgical management according to the contracture pattern. The surgical approach has typically involved tenotomy, capsulotomy, or isolated joint fusion. The main goals of surgical treatment are to relieve pain and reduce pressure points through digital realignment in an effort to decrease the risk of pressure sores and allow more effective bracing to ultimately improve the patient's mobility. Copyright © 2015 American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Upper-limb spasticity during the first year after stroke: stroke arm longitudinal study at the University of Gothenburg.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Opheim, Arve; Danielsson, Anna; Alt Murphy, Margit; Persson, Hanna C; Sunnerhagen, Katharina Stibrant

    2014-10-01

    The aims of this study were to describe the prevalence and the severity of upper-limb spasticity during the first year after stroke and to analyze sensorimotor function, pain, reduced range of motion, and sensibility in persons with and without spasticity. This is a longitudinal design with assessments at days 3 and 10; week 4; and mos 3, 6, and 12. A total of 117 patients with first-ever stroke and arm paresis on day 3 were consecutively included. Sixty-five percent were assessed at 12 mos. Upper-limb spasticity was assessed with the Modified Ashworth Scale, and a score of 1 or greater was considered spastic. Sensorimotor function, pain, sensibility, and joint range of motion were assessed with the Fugl-Meyer Assessment. Impairment was defined as a score of less than maximum on the motor and nonmotor domains of the Fugl-Meyer Assessment. Spasticity was present in 25% of the patients at day 3 and in 46% at 12 mos. In most patients with spasticity, the severity increased during the first year after stroke. Spasticity appeared first in the elbow flexors and later in the elbow extensors and the wrist flexors. The patients with spasticity had significantly worse sensorimotor function and more pain, reduced joint range of motion, and reduced sensibility. Spasticity developed in almost half of the assessed patients, and the severity of spasticity increased over time. Because spasticity and impairments related to spasticity, such as pain and limitation in joint range of motion, influence upper extremity function negatively, early identification and treatment of spasticity may be warranted.

  12. Therapeutic Effect of Extracorporeal Shock Wave Therapy According to Treatment Session on Gastrocnemius Muscle Spasticity in Children With Spastic Cerebral Palsy: A Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Dong-Soon; Kwon, Dong Rak; Park, Gi-Young; Lee, Michael Y

    2015-12-01

    To investigate the therapeutic effect of extracorporeal shockwave therapy (ESWT) according to treatment session on gastrocnemius muscle spasticity in children with spastic cerebral palsy (CP). Twelve children with spastic CP underwent 1 ESWT and 2 sham ESWT sessions for gastrocnemius (group 1) or 3 ESWT sessions (group 2) once per week for 3 weeks. Modified Ashworth Scale (MAS) score, passive range of motion (PROM) of the ankle plantar-flexor muscles with knee extension, and median red pixel intensity (RPI) of color histogram of medial gastrocnemius on real-time sonoelastography (RTS) were measured before ESWT, immediately after the first and third ESWT, and at 4 weeks after the third ESWT. Mean ankle PROM was significantly increased whereas as mean ankle MAS and median gastrocnemius RPI were significantly decreased in both groups after the first ESWT. Clinical and RTS parameters before ESWT were not significantly different from those immediately after the third ESWT or at 4 weeks after the third ESWT in group 1. However, they were significantly different from those immediately after the third ESWT or at 4 weeks after the third ESWT in group 2. Mean ankle PROM, mean ankle MAS, and median gastrocnemius RPI in group 2 were significantly different from that in group 1 at 4 weeks or immediately after the third ESWT. The therapeutic effect of ESWT on spastic medial gastrocnemius in children with spastic CP is dependent on the number of ESWT sessions.

  13. Therapeutic Effect of Extracorporeal Shock Wave Therapy According to Treatment Session on Gastrocnemius Muscle Spasticity in Children With Spastic Cerebral Palsy: A Pilot Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Dong-Soon; Park, Gi-Young; Lee, Michael Y.

    2015-01-01

    Objective To investigate the therapeutic effect of extracorporeal shockwave therapy (ESWT) according to treatment session on gastrocnemius muscle spasticity in children with spastic cerebral palsy (CP). Methods Twelve children with spastic CP underwent 1 ESWT and 2 sham ESWT sessions for gastrocnemius (group 1) or 3 ESWT sessions (group 2) once per week for 3 weeks. Modified Ashworth Scale (MAS) score, passive range of motion (PROM) of the ankle plantar-flexor muscles with knee extension, and median red pixel intensity (RPI) of color histogram of medial gastrocnemius on real-time sonoelastography (RTS) were measured before ESWT, immediately after the first and third ESWT, and at 4 weeks after the third ESWT. Results Mean ankle PROM was significantly increased whereas as mean ankle MAS and median gastrocnemius RPI were significantly decreased in both groups after the first ESWT. Clinical and RTS parameters before ESWT were not significantly different from those immediately after the third ESWT or at 4 weeks after the third ESWT in group 1. However, they were significantly different from those immediately after the third ESWT or at 4 weeks after the third ESWT in group 2. Mean ankle PROM, mean ankle MAS, and median gastrocnemius RPI in group 2 were significantly different from that in group 1 at 4 weeks or immediately after the third ESWT. Conclusion The therapeutic effect of ESWT on spastic medial gastrocnemius in children with spastic CP is dependent on the number of ESWT sessions. PMID:26798605

  14. Keyhole interlaminar dorsal rhizotomy for spastic diplegia in cerebral palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sindou, Marc; Georgoulis, George

    2015-07-01

    The efficiency and safety of dorsal rhizotomies for cerebral palsy lie in the accuracy of radicular identification together with selectivity of root sectioning. Two different exposures are currently in use. The first is extended laminotomy/laminectomy from the upper lumbar level to the sacrum, which allows accurate identification of all L2-S2 roots/rootlets. The second is limited laminotomy exposing the conus/cauda equina at the thoracolumbar junction; this less invasive method limits accessibility to the roots. To optimize the accuracy and selectivity while minimizing invasiveness, the authors developed a tailored interlaminar procedure targeting the radicular levels involved in the harmful components of spasticity directly and individually. Six patients with spastic diplegia at different levels of the Gross Motor Functional Classification System were selected. In each patient, two to three interlaminar spaces, preselected according to planning, were enlarged in the "keyhole" fashion, respecting the spinous processes and interspinous ligaments. Ventral root stimulation identified the radicular level. Dorsal root stimulation evaluated its implication in the hyperactive segmental circuits, helping quantify the percentage of rootlets to be cut. There were neither wound-related nor general complications. At 1 year of follow-up, X-ray examination did not reveal kyphosis or instability. In all children, the excess of spasticity was reduced. The Ashworth score decreased from 3.2 on average to 0.6 postoperatively (range: 2-4 to 0-2). Regarding the functional status at 1 year of follow-up for the three ambulatory children, the Gillette ability-to-walk score increased from 3/10 on average to 7.3/10 postoperatively (range: 2-4 to 7-8). For the three non-ambulatory children, abnormal postures, painful contractures and ease of care were much improved. Keyhole interlaminar dorsal rhizotomy (KIDr) offers direct intradural access to each of the ventral/dorsal roots, thus

  15. Intrathecal Baclofen Therapy for the Treatment of Spasticity in Sjögren-Larsson Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hidalgo, Eveline Teresa; Orillac, Cordelia; Hersh, Andrew; Harter, David H; Rizzo, William B; Weiner, Howard L

    2017-01-01

    Intrathecal baclofen therapy is widely accepted as a treatment option for patients with severe spasticity. The current treatment of spasticity in patients with Sjögren-Larsson syndrome is largely symptomatic, given that no effective causal therapy treatments are available. We report the outcome of 2 patients with Sjögren-Larsson syndrome who had pump implantation for intrathecal baclofen. We observed a positive response, with a decrease of spasticity, reflecting in the Modified Ashworth Scale, and parents and caregivers observed a functional improvement in both patients. One patient experienced skin irritation 15 months after surgery, necessitating pump repositioning. No infection occurred. Our report shows that intrathecal baclofen therapy can have a positive therapeutic effect on spasticity in patients with Sjögren-Larsson syndrome, and therefore may be a promising addition to current treatments.

  16. Comparison of Agonist vs. Antagonist Stimulation on Triceps Surae Spasticity in Spinal Cord

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sneha Khanna

    2017-06-01

    Discussion: This study provides evidence that both agonist electrical stimulation and antagonist electrical stimulations are equally effective in reducing spasticity in triceps surae muscle in patients with spinal cord injury.

  17. The relationship between spasticity and muscle volume of the knee extensors in children with cerebral palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierce, Samuel R; Prosser, Laura A; Lee, Samuel C K; Lauer, Richard T

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between spasticity and muscle volume in children with cerebral palsy (CP), using isokinetic dynamometry and magnetic resonance imaging. A retrospective sample of 8 children with diplegic CP was analyzed. One set of 10 passive knee flexion movements was completed at a velocity of 180° per second with concurrent surface electromyography of the medial hamstrings (MH) and vastus lateralis (VL) to assess knee extensor spasticity. Magnetic resonance imaging was used to measure maximum cross-sectional area and muscle volume of the quadriceps femoris. The quadriceps femoris muscle volume was positively correlated with MH reflex activity, VL reflex activity, MH/VL co-contraction, and peak knee extensor passive torque (P spasticity are associated with greater quadriceps muscle volume in children with spastic diplegic CP.

  18. Flexion synergy overshadows flexor spasticity during reaching in chronic moderate to severe hemiparetic stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellis, Michael D; Schut, Ingrid; Dewald, Julius P A

    2017-07-01

    Pharmaceutical intervention targets arm flexor spasticity with an often-unsuccessful goal of improving function. Flexion synergy is a related motor impairment that may be inadvertently neglected. Here, flexor spasticity and flexion synergy are disentangled to determine their contributions to reaching dysfunction. Twenty-six individuals participated. A robotic device systematically modulated shoulder abduction loading during ballistic reaching. Elbow muscle electromyography data were partitioned into windows delineated by elbow joint velocity allowing for the separation of synergy- and spasticity-related activation. Reaching velocity decreased with abduction loading (psynergy increased with abduction loading (psynergy is the predominant contributor to reaching dysfunction while flexor spasticity appears only relevant during unnaturally occurring passively supported movement. Interventions targeting flexion synergy should be leveraged in future stroke recovery trials. Copyright © 2017 International Federation of Clinical Neurophysiology. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Influence of posture and muscle length on stretch reflex activity in poststroke patients with spasticity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fleuren, J.F.M.; Fleuren, Judith F.; Nederhand, Marcus Johannes; Hermens, Hermanus J.

    Objective To investigate the influence of different positions on stretch reflex activity of knee flexors and extensors measured by electromyography in poststroke patients with spasticity and its expression in the Ashworth Scale.

  20. Hand muscles corticomotor excitability in hereditary spastic paraparesis type 4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ginanneschi, Federica; Carluccio, Maria A; Mignarri, Andrea; Tessa, Alessandra; Santorelli, Filippo M; Rossi, Alessandro; Federico, Antonio; Dotti, Maria T

    2014-08-01

    Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) studies on the pathways to the upper limbs have revealed inconsistent results in patients harboring mutations in SPAST/SPG4 gene, responsible for the commonest form of hereditary spastic paraplegia (HSP). This paper is addressed to study the corticomotor excitability of the pathways to the upper limbs in SPG4 subjects. We assessed the corticomotor excitability of hand muscles in 12 subjects belonging to 7 unrelated SPG4 families and in 12 control subjects by stimulus-response curve [input-output (I-O) curve]. All the parameters of the recruitment curve (threshold, V50, slope and plateau) did not differ significantly from those of the controls. Presence of upper limb hyper-reflexia did not influence the results of I-O curve. Considering the multiplicity of possible genes/loci accounting for pure HSPs, performing TMS analyses could be helpful in differential diagnosis of pure HSPs in the absence of other clinical or neuroimaging tools.

  1. MR imaging of spastic diplegia. The importance of corpus callosum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hayakawa, K. [Kyoto City Hospital (Japan). Dept. of Radiology; Kanda, T. [St. Joseph Hospital for Handicapped Children, Kyoto (Japan). Dept. of Pediatric Neurology; Hashimoto, K. [Ukyo Hospital, Kyoto (Japan). Dept. of Pediatrics; Okuno, Y. [Kyoto City Hospital (Japan). Dept. of Radiology; Yamori, Y. [St. Joseph Hospital for Handicapped Children, Kyoto (Japan). Dept. of Pediatric Neurology; Yuge, M. [St. Joseph Hospital for Handicapped Children, Kyoto (Japan). Dept. of Pediatric Neurology; Ando, R. [St. Joseph Hospital for Handicapped Children, Kyoto (Japan). Dept. of Pediatric Neurology; Ozaki, N. [Ukyo Hospital, Kyoto (Japan). Dept. of Pediatrics; Tamamoto, A. [Ukyo Hospital, Kyoto (Japan). Dept. of Pediatrics

    1996-09-01

    Purpose: The MR findings in patients with spastic diplegia were investigated and the role of MR imaging in assessing the extent of brain injury was evaluated. Material and Methods: 39 male and 24 female patients (preterm/term 43/20) were imaged using a 0.5 T MR system. Results: The MR findings in term patients were quite different from those in preterm patients; 55% of the term patients showed normal and minimal changes on MR, whereas 90.7% of the 43 preterm children had periventricular leucomalacia. The deep cerebral white matter was the most frequently involved site. Objective measurements revealed significant reductions of the entire sagittal area of corpus callosum in diplegic patients in comparison with normal controls. The motor plasy severity correlated well with the extent of corpus callosum involvement. Conclusion: The corpus callosum appears to be a sensitive marker site for the assessment of the extent of white matter injury. (orig.).

  2. Patellar tendon shortening for flexed knee gait in spastic diplegia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sossai, Roberto; Vavken, Patrick; Brunner, Reinald; Camathias, Carlo; Graham, H Kerr; Rutz, Erich

    2015-02-01

    We evaluated the outcome of three different approaches to the management of flexed knee gait patients with spastic diplegia. The three surgical procedures were patellar tendon shortening (PTS), PTS combined with rotational osteotomies of the femur and/or tibia, and PTS combined with supracondylar extension osteotomy (SEO) of the distal femur. The primary outcome measure was gait kinematics. The knee gait variable score (GVS) and the gait profile score (GPS) were derived from gait kinematics. 24 patients (16 male and 8 female), mean age 16.1 years (SD 5.8 years), who had surgery between 2002 and 2008, were followed for a mean of 22 months. Knee extension during gait improved by a mean of 20° throughout the gait cycle, with an improvement in the knee GVS of 14° (pspastic diplegia is both feasible and appropriate. Level III. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Motor activation in SPG4-linked hereditary spastic paraplegia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Scheuer, KH; Nielsen, JE; Krabbe, Katja

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to investigate the extent of motor cortical functional reorganisation in patients with SPG4-linked hereditary spastic paraplegia by exploring cortical motor activation related to movements of clinically affected (lower) and unaffected (upper) limbs. METHODS......) and between-group comparisons of movement vs. rest (group x behavioural state interaction) were performed using a random effects approach and statistical parametric mapping (SPM99). RESULTS: Patterns of motor activation were generally comparable between groups during both tasks, although patients had...... a tendency towards more widespread activation in sensorimotor cortical and cerebellar regions. Statistically significant differences were restricted to the ankle movement response, however, where patients showed significantly increased regional cerebral blood flow in the right and left primary motor cortices...

  4. Designing Slow Fun! Physical Therapy Games to Remedy the Negative Consequences of Spasticity

    OpenAIRE

    Vanden Abeele, Vero; Geurts, Luc; Husson, Jelle; Windey, Frederik; Annema, Jan Henk; Verstraete, Mathijs; Desmet, Stef

    2010-01-01

    Spasticity is a motor disorder defined by involuntary muscle contractions, resulting in uncoordinated gait, stiff body posture and shortening of range of limb movement. The first line treatment of spasticity is physical and occupational therapy, involving physical exercises that focus on stretching and strengthening of muscles. In this paper, we report on the difficulty of designing fun games that build upon these physical exercises and remedy the negative consequences of...

  5. Effects of Prolonged Standing on Gait in Children with Spastic Cerebral Palsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salem, Yasser; Lovelace-Chandler, Venita; Zabel, Reta J.; McMillan, Amy Gross

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of prolonged standing on gait characteristics in children with spastic cerebral palsy. Six children with spastic cerebral palsy participated in this study with an average age of 6.5 years (SD = 2.5, range = 4.0-9.8 years). A reverse baseline design (A-B-A) was used over a 9-week period. During…

  6. The spasticity in the motor and functional disability in adults with post-stroke hemiparetic

    OpenAIRE

    Cacho, Roberta de Oliveira; Cacho, Enio Walker Azevedo; Loureiro, Anderson Barbosa; Cirne, Gabriele Natane de Medeiros; Pereira, Silvana Alves; Freitas, Rodrigo Pegado de Abreu; Lima, Núbia Maria Freire Vieira; Borges, Guilherme

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Introduction: Spasticity acts as a limiting factor in motor and functional recovery after Stroke, impairing the performance of daily living activities. Objective: To analyze the influence of spasticity on main muscle groups and to associate it with motor impairment and functional level of chronic hemiparetic patients after stroke. Methods: Twenty-seven chronic hemiparetic patients of both sexes were selected at the Physical Therapy and Occupational Therapy Service of the Unicamp...

  7. Biomechanic changes in passive properties of hemiplegic ankles with spastic hypertonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Sun G; Van Rey, Elton; Bai, Zhiqiang; Roth, Elliot J; Zhang, Li-Qun

    2004-10-01

    To investigate quantitatively biomechanic changes in the passive properties of hemiplegic spastic ankles. Evaluation of spastic hypertonia by moving the ankle joint slowly between dorsiflexion and plantarflexion extreme positions under controlled joint torque and position. Institutional research center. Twenty-four stroke patients with spastic ankles and 32 healthy controls. Not applicable. Passive resistance torque at controlled dorsiflexion and plantarflexion positions, dorsiflexion and plantarflexion range of motion (ROM) at controlled torques, and quasistatic stiffness and energy loss in dorsiflexion and plantarflexion. Spastic hypertonic ankles showed significant alterations of the passive properties in plantarflexion (P=.041) as well as in dorsiflexion (P=.016) directions. Compared with healthy controls, spastic ankles showed higher resistance torque (9.51+/-4.79Nm vs 6.21+/-3.64Nm, P=.016), higher quasistatic stiffness (.54+/-.19Nm/deg vs .35+/-.20Nm/deg, P=.001) at 10 degrees of dorsiflexion, larger normalized dorsiflexion energy loss (.068+/-.04J/deg vs .04+/-.02J/deg, P=.037), and decreased dorsiflexion ROM at 10Nm of resistance torque (10.77 degrees +/-8.69 degrees vs 20.02 degrees +/-11.67 degrees , P=.014). The resistance torque, ROM, and stiffness of spastic hypertonic ankles in plantarflexion showed similar changes (Pbiomechanic changes in both plantar- and dorsiflexors are associated with spastic hypertonia of chronic stroke patients, and they can be evaluated quantitatively under well-controlled conditions. With simplifications, the various measures in this study can potentially be used to obtain more comprehensive and quantitative evaluations of spastic hypertonia in a clinical setting.

  8. Whole plant cannabis extracts in the treatment of spasticity in multiple sclerosis: a systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rowland Marie

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cannabis therapy has been considered an effective treatment for spasticity, although clinical reports of symptom reduction in multiple sclerosis (MS describe mixed outcomes. Recently introduced therapies of combined Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC and cannabidiol (CBD extracts have potential for symptom relief with the possibility of reducing intoxication and other side effects. Although several past reviews have suggested that cannabinoid therapy provides a therapeutic benefit for symptoms of MS, none have presented a methodical investigation of newer cannabinoid treatments in MS-related spasticity. The purpose of the present review was to systematically evaluate the effectiveness of combined THC and CBD extracts on MS-related spasticity in order to increase understanding of the treatment's potential effectiveness, safety and limitations. Methods We reviewed MEDLINE/PubMed, Ovid, and CENTRAL electronic databases for relevant studies using randomized controlled trials. Studies were included only if a combination of THC and CBD extracts was used, and if pre- and post-treatment assessments of spasticity were reported. Results Six studies were systematically reviewed for treatment dosage and duration, objective and subjective measures of spasticity, and reports of adverse events. Although there was variation in the outcome measures reported in these studies, a trend of reduced spasticity in treated patients was noted. Adverse events were reported in each study, however combined TCH and CBD extracts were generally considered to be well-tolerated. Conclusion We found evidence that combined THC and CBD extracts may provide therapeutic benefit for MS spasticity symptoms. Although some objective measures of spasticity noted improvement trends, there were no changes found to be significant in post-treatment assessments. However, subjective assessment of symptom relief did often show significant improvement post-treatment. Differences in

  9. Botulinum toxin for spasticity in children with cerebral palsy: a comprehensive evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bjornson, Kristie; Hays, Ross; Graubert, Cathy; Price, Robert; Won, Francine; McLaughlin, John F; Cohen, Morty

    2007-07-01

    Spasticity is a prevalent disabling clinical symptom for children with cerebral palsy. Treatment of spasticity with botulinum toxin in children with cerebral palsy was first reported in 1993. Botulinum toxin provides a focal, controlled muscle weakness with reduction in spasticity. Interpretation of the literature is difficult because of the paucity of reliable measures of spasticity and challenges with measuring meaningful functional changes in children with disabilities. This study documents the effects of botulinum toxin A injections into the gastrocnemius muscles in children with spastic diplegia. Outcomes are evaluated across all 5 domains of the National Centers for Medical and Rehabilitation Research domains of medical rehabilitation. A randomized, double-masked, placebo-controlled design was applied to 33 children with spastic diplegia with a mean age of 5.5 and Gross Motor Function Classification System Levels of I through III. Participants received either 12 U/kg botulinum toxin A or placebo saline injections to bilateral gastrocnemius muscles. Outcomes were measured at baseline and 3, 8, 12, and 24 weeks after injection. Significant decreases in the electromyographic representation of spasticity were documented 3 weeks after botulinum toxin A treatment. A significant decrease in viscoelastic aspects of spasticity was present at 8 weeks, and subsequent increases in dorsiflexion range were documented at 12 weeks for the botulinum toxin A group. Improvement was found in performance goals at 12 weeks and in maximum voluntary torque and gross motor function at 24 weeks for the botulinum toxin A. There were no significant differences between groups in satisfaction with performance goals, energy expenditure, Ashworth scores, or frequency of adverse effects. The safety profile of 12 U/kg of botulinum toxin A is excellent. Although physiologic and mechanical effects of treatment with botulinum toxin A were documented with functional improvement at 6 months

  10. ANTAGONIST VERSUS AGONIST MUSCLE NEUROMUSCULAR ELECTRICAL STIMULATION ON SPASTICITY IN STROKE PATIENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suchetha P. S

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Spasticity is the common problem encountered in the treatment of hemiplegic patients. Various treatment techniques have been developed to reduce spasticity, neuromuscular electrical stimulation is one of them. Several studies have proved that stimulation of either spastic muscle or stimulation of antagonist muscle to spastic muscle results in a reduction of spasticity. However, there is no literature available on a comparative study to suggest which method is more effective in spasticity reduction. Hence this study was undertaken to find out the efficacy of each technique and to compare the two techniques of Neuromuscular electrical stimulation to determine the most effective technique. Methods: In this study with pre and post-experimental design 30 post-stroke patients were selected and they were randomly assigned into two groups. Group A received anatagonist (triceps muscle Neuromuscular electrical stimulation and Group B received agonist (biceps brachii muscle Neuromuscular electrical stimulation for 2 weeks, one session per day for a duration of 30 minutes. Outcome measures were recorded using modified Ashworth scale and deep tendon reflex grading scale. Results: Statistical analysis was carried out by using Wilcoxon signed rank sum test and Mann-Whitney U test at 0.05 level of significance. There was a significant recovery after the treatment based on the Modified Ashworth Scale and deep tendon reflex grading scale scores before and after the intervention within the groups and between the groups with p-value< 0.001. The group receiving the antagonist muscle neuromuscular electrical stimulation showed better recovery with a mean difference of 1.8 and 1.2 on Modified Ashworth Scale and reflex grading scale respectively. Conclusion: The study concluded that both the techniques resulted in reduction of spasticity and on comparison it was found that antagonist muscle (triceps Neuromuscular electrical stimulation reduced spasticity

  11. Mechanomyography signals in spastic muscle and the correlation with the modified Ashworth scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, E L; Santos, M C; Krueger, E; Nogueira-Neto, G N; Nohama, P

    2016-08-01

    The modified Ashworth scale (MAS) is the most widely used measurement technique to assess levels of spasticity. In MAS, the evaluator graduates spasticity considering his/her subjective analysis of the muscular endurance during passive stretching. Therefore, it is a subjective scale. Mechanomyography (MMG) allows registering the vibrations generated by muscle contraction and stretching events that propagate through the tissue until the surface of the skin. With this in mind, this study aimed to investigate possible correlations between MMG signal and muscle spasticity levels determined by MAS. We evaluated 34 limbs considered spastic by MAS, including upper and lower limbs of 22 individuals of both sexes. Simultaneously, the MMG signals of the spastic muscle group (agonists) were acquired. The features investigated involved, in the time domain, the median energy (MMGME) of the MMG Z-axis (perpendicular to the muscle fibers) and, in the frequency domain, the median frequency (MMG mf ). The Kruskal-Wallis test (p<;0.001) determined that there were significant differences between intergroup MAS spasticity levels for MMG me . There was a high linear correlation between the MMG me and MAS (R 2 =0.9557) and also a high correlation as indicated by Spearman test (ρ=0.9856; p<;0.001). In spectral analysis, the Kruskal-Wallis test (p = 0.0059) showed that MMG mf did not present significant differences between MAS spasticity levels. There was moderate linear correlation between MAS and MMG mf (R 2 =0.4883 and Spearman test [ρ = 0.4590; p <; 0.001]). Between the two investigated features, we conclude that the median energy is the most viable feature to evaluate spasticity due to strong correlations with the MAS.

  12. Hindlimb spasticity after unilateral motor cortex lesion in rats is reduced by contralateral nerve root transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zong, Haiyang; Ma, Fenfen; Zhang, Laiyin; Lu, Huiping; Gong, Jingru; Cai, Min; Lin, Haodong; Zhu, Yizhun; Hou, Chunlin

    2016-01-01

    Lower extremity spasticity is a common sequela among patients with acquired brain injury. The optimum treatment remains controversial. The aim of our study was to test the feasibility and effectiveness of contralateral nerve root transfer in reducing post stroke spasticity of the affected hindlimb muscles in rats. In our study, we for the first time created a novel animal hindlimb spastic hemiplegia model in rats with photothrombotic lesion of unilateral motor cortex and we established a novel surgical procedure in reducing motor cortex lesion-induced hindlimb spastic hemiplegia in rats. Thirty six rats were randomized into three groups. In group A, rats received sham operation. In group B, rats underwent unilateral hindlimb motor cortex lesion. In group C, rats underwent unilateral hindlimb cortex lesion followed by contralateral L4 ventral root transfer to L5 ventral root of the affected side. Footprint analysis, Hoffmann reflex (H-reflex), cholera toxin subunit B (CTB) retrograde tracing of gastrocnemius muscle (GM) motoneurons and immunofluorescent staining of vesicle glutamate transporter 1 (VGLUT1) on CTB-labelled motoneurons were used to assess spasticity of the affected hindlimb. Sixteen weeks postoperatively, toe spread and stride length recovered significantly in group C compared with group B (P<0.001). Hmax (H-wave maximum amplitude)/Mmax (M-wave maximum amplitude) ratio of gastrocnemius and plantaris muscles (PMs) significantly reduced in group C (P<0.01). Average VGLUT1 positive boutons per CTB-labelled motoneurons significantly reduced in group C (P<0.001). We demonstrated for the first time that contralateral L4 ventral root transfer to L5 ventral root of the affected side was effective in relieving unilateral motor cortex lesion-induced hindlimb spasticity in rats. Our data indicated that this could be an alternative treatment for unilateral lower extremity spasticity after brain injury. Therefore, contralateral neurotization may exert a potential

  13. Watsu approach for improving spasticity and ambulatory function in hemiparetic patients with stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chon, Seung Chul; Oh, Duck Won; Shim, Jae Hun

    2009-06-01

    This study reports the effect of Watsu as rehabilitation method for hemiparetic patients with stroke. Watsu consisted of 40 treatment sessions for 8 weeks, delivered underwater or at water surface level, it applied in three patients. Outcome measures included tools for assessing spasticity and ambulatory function. All patients showed decreased scores in the TAS and RVGA after Watsu application. Watsu was helpful in controlling spasticity and improving ambulatory function of the patients with hemiparesis.

  14. Compressed sensing & sparse filtering

    CERN Document Server

    Carmi, Avishy Y; Godsill, Simon J

    2013-01-01

    This book is aimed at presenting concepts, methods and algorithms ableto cope with undersampled and limited data. One such trend that recently gained popularity and to some extent revolutionised signal processing is compressed sensing. Compressed sensing builds upon the observation that many signals in nature are nearly sparse (or compressible, as they are normally referred to) in some domain, and consequently they can be reconstructed to within high accuracy from far fewer observations than traditionally held to be necessary. Apart from compressed sensing this book contains other related app

  15. zlib compression library

    OpenAIRE

    Gailly, Jean-loup; Adler, Mark

    2004-01-01

    (taken from http://www.gzip.org/ on 2004-12-01) zlib is designed to be a free, general-purpose, legally unencumbered -- that is, not covered by any patents -- lossless data-compression library for use on virtually any computer hardware and operating system. The zlib data format is itself portable across platforms. Unlike the LZW compression method used in Unix compress(1) and in the GIF image format, the compression method currently used in zlib essentially never expands the data. (LZW ca...

  16. Breaking of rod-shaped model material during compression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lukas Kulaviak

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The breakage of a model anisometric dry granular material caused by uniaxial compression was studied. The bed of uniform rod-like pasta particles (8 mm long, aspect ratio 1:8 was compressed (Gamlen Tablet Press and their size distribution was measured after each run (Dynamic Image Analysing. The compression dynamics was recorded and the effect of several parameters was tested (rate of compression, volume of granular bed, pressure magnitude and mode of application. Besides the experiments, numerical modelling of the compressed breakable material was performed as well, employing the DEM approach (Discrete Element Method. The comparison between the data and the model looks promising.

  17. Emittance Growth during Bunch Compression in the CTF-II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raubenheimer, Tor O

    1999-02-26

    Measurements of the beam emittance during bunch compression in the CLIC Test Facility (CTF-II) are described. The measurements were made with different beam charges and different energy correlations versus the bunch compressor settings which were varied from no compression through the point of full compression and to over-compression. Significant increases in the beam emittance were observed with the maximum emittance occurring near the point of full (maximal) compression. Finally, evaluation of possible emittance dilution mechanisms indicate that coherent synchrotron radiation was the most likely cause.

  18. Emittance Growth during Bunch Compression in the CTF-II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raubenheimer, Tor O.

    1999-01-01

    Measurements of the beam emittance during bunch compression in the CLIC Test Facility (CTF-II) are described. The measurements were made with different beam charges and different energy correlations versus the bunch compressor settings which were varied from no compression through the point of full compression and to over-compression. Significant increases in the beam emittance were observed with the maximum emittance occurring near the point of full (maximal) compression. Finally, evaluation of possible emittance dilution mechanisms indicate that coherent synchrotron radiation was the most likely cause

  19. ADVANCED RECIPROCATING COMPRESSION TECHNOLOGY (ARCT)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Danny M. Deffenbaugh; Klaus Brun; Ralph E. Harris; J. Pete Harrell; Robert J. Mckee; J. Jeffrey Moore; Steven J. Svedeman; Anthony J. Smalley; Eugene L. Broerman; Robert A Hart; Marybeth G. Nored; Ryan S. Gernentz; Shane P. Siebenaler

    2005-12-01

    The U.S. natural gas pipeline industry is facing the twin challenges of increased flexibility and capacity expansion. To meet these challenges, the industry requires improved choices in gas compression to address new construction and enhancement of the currently installed infrastructure. The current fleet of installed reciprocating compression is primarily slow-speed integral machines. Most new reciprocating compression is and will be large, high-speed separable units. The major challenges with the fleet of slow-speed integral machines are: limited flexibility and a large range in performance. In an attempt to increase flexibility, many operators are choosing to single-act cylinders, which are causing reduced reliability and integrity. While the best performing units in the fleet exhibit thermal efficiencies between 90% and 92%, the low performers are running down to 50% with the mean at about 80%. The major cause for this large disparity is due to installation losses in the pulsation control system. In the better performers, the losses are about evenly split between installation losses and valve losses. The major challenges for high-speed machines are: cylinder nozzle pulsations, mechanical vibrations due to cylinder stretch, short valve life, and low thermal performance. To shift nozzle pulsation to higher orders, nozzles are shortened, and to dampen the amplitudes, orifices are added. The shortened nozzles result in mechanical coupling with the cylinder, thereby, causing increased vibration due to the cylinder stretch mode. Valve life is even shorter than for slow speeds and can be on the order of a few months. The thermal efficiency is 10% to 15% lower than slow-speed equipment with the best performance in the 75% to 80% range. The goal of this advanced reciprocating compression program is to develop the technology for both high speed and low speed compression that will expand unit flexibility, increase thermal efficiency, and increase reliability and integrity

  20. Respiratory Function Under Intrathecal Baclofen Therapy in Patients With Spastic Tetraplegia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kishima, Haruhiko; Yanagisawa, Takufumi; Goto, Yuko; Oshino, Satoru; Maruo, Tomoyuki; Tani, Naoki; Khoo, Hui Ming; Hosomi, Koichi; Hirata, Masayuki; Yoshimine, Toshiki

    2016-08-01

    Intrathecal baclofen (ITB) therapy is an effective treatment for patients with severe spasticity. However, the effect of ITB therapy on respiratory function has not been reported in detail. In this study we quantitatively analyzed the effects of ITB on the respiratory function of patients with spastic tetraplegia. We retrospectively reviewed 23 patients who were administrated ITB therapy from January 2009 to December 2012. Six of these 23 patients, who had spastic tetraplegia and were able to undergo spirometric testing, were included this study. The spasticity derived from cervical spinal cord injury in four patients and cerebral palsy (CP) in two patients. Patients' Ashworth Scale scores and spirometer measurements obtained before and 1-6 months after the start of ITB therapy were evaluated and compared. Before ITB therapy, %FVC of all six patients was below 80%, and a restrictive respiratory disorder was diagnosed in five patients and a combined respiratory disorder in one patient. Ashworth Scale scores for both the lower and upper extremities improved significantly with ITB therapy. Forced vital capacity (FVC), %FVC, and forced expiratory volume at one sec also improved significantly with ITB therapy. Respiratory disorders were indeed present in our SCI and CP patients with spastic tetraplegia, and the respiratory function of these patients improved with ITB therapy. Our results suggest that ITB therapy is safe and efficacious in patients with spastic tetraplegia and respiratory dysfunction. © 2016 International Neuromodulation Society.

  1. Assessing muscle spasticity with Myotonometric and passive stretch measurements: validity of the Myotonometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiaoyan; Shin, Henry; Li, Sheng; Zhou, Ping

    2017-01-01

    Spasticity of the biceps brachii muscle was assessed using the modified Ashworth Scale (MAS), Myotonometry and repeated passive stretch techniques, respectively. Fourteen subjects with chronic hemiplegia participated in the study. Spasticity was quantified by muscle displacements and compliance from the Myotonometer measurements and resistive torques from the repeated passive stretch at velocities of 5 °/s and 100 °/s, respectively. Paired t-tests indicated a significant decrease of muscle displacement and compliance in the spastic muscles as compared to the contralateral side (muscle displacement: spastic: 4.84 ± 0.33 mm, contralateral: 6.02 ± 0.49 mm, p = 0.038; compliance: spastic: 1.79 ± 0.12 mm/N, contralateral: 2.21 ± 0.18 mm/kg, p = 0.048). In addition, passive stretch tests indicated a significant increase of total torque at the velocity of 100 °/s compared with that of 5 °/s (Tt5 = 2.82 ± 0.41 Nm, Tt100 = 6.28 ± 1.01 Nm, p stretch test and the Myotonometer measurements (r spasticity in stroke. PMID:28281581

  2. Relationship between Quality of Life and Hypertonia in Young Adults with Spastic Cerebral Palsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nasrin Salehi Dehno

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: The complications associated with spastic cerebral palsy can affect the physical ability and quality of life of individuals suffering from this motor disorder. The aim of this study was to assess the relationship between quality of life and hypertonia in adults with spastic cerebral palsy. Methods: In an analytical cross sectional study, 70 subjects with the diagnosis of spastic cerebral palsy from three Ra’ad Rehabilitation Goodwill complexes in Tehran and Karaj cities took part in this study through convenient sampling. The severity of spasticity and contracture of the knee flexors were measured by Modified Tardieu Scale. Also the quality of life was assessed through World Health Organization quality of life-BREF questionnaire. To analyze data, Pearson and spearman correlation coefficient were used. Results: Participants of this study were 42.90% male, 57.10% female with mean age 26.24±5 years. No correlation existed between quality of life with knee flexor muscles spasticity. However, psychological and environmental domains showed low correlations with knee extension range (respectively r=0.26 and r=0.28; P<0.05. Conclusion: The influences of the mechanical component of hypertonia (contracture on the quality of life are more prominent than neural factors such as spasticity.

  3. Effect of shock wave therapy on ankle plantar flexors spasticity in stroke patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawan, Salah; Abd-Allah, Foad; Hegazy, Montasser M; Farrag, Mohammad A; El-Den, Nancy Hosney Sharf

    2017-01-01

    Large number of patients with first-ever stroke developed spasticity. Spasticity can reduce the range of motion, hinder voluntary movements, provoke pain, and result in impairment of functional activities of daily living. Demonstrate the effect of shock wave therapy on ankle plantar flexors spasticity in stroke patients. We included forty ischemic stroke patients divided into 2 groups; group I were subjected to the selected physical therapy program and shock wave therapy whereas group II received the selected physical therapy program as well as placebo shock wave for six weeks. Both groups were subjected to pre- and post-treatment assessment by H/M ratio, dorsiflexion active range of motion, and time of ten-meters walking. Baseline characteristics showed no significant difference between the two groups regarding the grades of spasticity. Whereas After treatment, there were a highly significant difference between both groups regarding the grades of spasticity according to the 3 parameters, H/M ratio, dorsiflexion active range of motion, and time of ten-meters walking test (P values; therapy is effective in controlling spasticity, increase dorsiflexion active range of motion of ankle and improving ten- meters walking test in stroke patients.

  4. The use of transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (tens in the treatment of the spasticity - a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dahyan Wagner da Silva Silveira

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available This study it has as objective to argue the job of TENS in the spasticity, observing the main parameters, form of application and the mechanism for which TENS it acts in the spasticity. One is about a bibliographical revision based in the literature specialized selected scientific articles through search in the data base of scielo and of bireme, from the sources Medline and Lilacs. The studies found on the job of TENS in the spasticity, had pointed mainly that this chain reduces the spasticity significantly, in lower degrees. The stimulation electrical parameters had disclosed that TENS it (about 100Hz of raised frequency provides one better effect in the reduction of the spasticity. The types of TENS more used had been the conventional and the soon-intense one, however some studies had not presented the used duration of pulse, limit the determination of one better modality of TENS. Few studies had explained the mechanism of performance of the current related one. The ones that had made it, had pointed the release of opioid endogenous (Dynorphins for the central nervous system as main mechanism of performance, however this contrasts with the neurophysiologic bases of the high-frequency stimulation, that demonstrated better resulted in the joined studies. Still it is necessary more studies on the job of this modality of stimulation electrical in the spasticity, since important parameters as duration of pulse, time of application, numbers of attendance and performance mechanism remains without scientific evidence.

  5. [Evaluation of effectiveness of local cryotherapy in patients with post-stroke spasticity].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krukowska, Jolanta; Dalewski, Macidej; Czernicki, Jan

    2014-01-01

    Spasticity is a source of functional limitations in patients. It leads to weakening of muscles, reduced mobility, muscle fatigue and irreversible changes in tissues. The aim of the study is to evaluate the effectiveness of local cryotherapy in patients with post-stroke spasticity. The study was conducted in 56 patients with post-stroke spasticity. They were divided into two groups (Group 1 was administered cryotherapy and kinesitherapy and Group 2- kinesitherapy only). The researchers assessed the level of spasticity according to the Modified Ashworth Scale as well as functions of lower limbs, upper limbs and hands according to the Brunnström Scale twice (before and after the therapy). The findings were statistically analyzed. In the treatment groups decreased muscle tone. An improvement of the efficiency of locomotion and hand in performing activities of daily living. More favorable results were observed in group 1. Local cryotherapy combined with kinesitherapy appeared to be more effective in treating spasticity rather than kinesitherapy alone. A decrease in spasticity and an improvement of the limb function indicate a stabilization of muscular tension in patients with disorders upper motor neuron.

  6. A Comparison of Spastic Diplegia in Term and Preterm-Born Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jauhari, Prashant; Singhi, Pratibha; Sankhyan, Naveen; Malhi, Prahbhjot; Vyas, Sameer; Khandelwal, Niranjan

    2018-01-01

    This study compared the risk factors and clinical and radiologic profile of children with spastic diplegic cerebral palsy born at term (≥37 weeks) with those born preterm. Children (2-14 years) with cerebral palsy meeting the study criteria for spastic diplegia were enrolled. Antecedent risk factors, clinical profile, and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings were recorded. Spasticity, functional ability, intellectual ability, and social quotient were assessed using standard scales. Ninety-three children met the study inclusion criteria (45 term, 48 preterm). Moderate to severe intellectual disability (53% vs 21%, P = .001) and epilepsy (51% vs 33%) were significantly more common in term-born children, whereas periventricular white matter injury was less common in term-born children (64%vs 89.4%, P = .004). Term spastic diplegia was associated with cortical/subcortical involvement in (11/42 (26%) vs 3/47(6.4%); P = .01). We conclude that term-spastic-diplegia is clinicopathologically different from preterm-spastic-diplegia. Their neuroradiologic pattern also differs with more frequent involvement of cortical/subcortical areas.

  7. Interrater reliability of the Modified Modified Ashworth Scale (MMAS) for patients with wrist flexor muscle spasticity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naghdi, Soofia; Ansari, Noureddin Nakhostin; Azarnia, Somayye; Kazemnejad, Anoushiravan

    2008-01-01

    The measurement of spasticity is part of the neurological examination of patients with disorders of the central nervous system. Recently, the Modified Modified Ashworth Scale (MMAS) was developed for the characterization of muscle spasticity. The purpose of this study was to determine the interrater reliability of the MMAS in the assessment of wrist flexor muscle spasticity in adult patients after upper motoneuron lesions resulted in hemiplegia. Thirty hemiplegic patients (17 males and 13 females) with a mean age of 55.6+/-7.8 years participated in this study. The wrist flexor spasticity was assessed according to MMAS by two female physiotherapists. The raters gave 23 patients the same spasticity score (weighted percentage agreement=97.4%). The most agreement occurred for scores 3 (46.7%) and 0 (16.7%), respectively. The agreement between raters was very good (weighted kappa=0.92, SE=0.03, p<0.0001). In conclusion, the MMAS has very good interrater reliability for the assessment of wrist flexor muscle spasticity.

  8. Association between Severe Upper Limb Spasticity and Brain Lesion Location in Stroke Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandro Picelli

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Association between the site of brain injury and poststroke spasticity is poorly understood. The present study investigated whether lesion analysis could document brain regions associated with the development of severe upper limb poststroke spasticity. A retrospective analysis was conducted on 39 chronic stroke patients. Spasticity was assessed at the affected upper limb with the modified Ashworth scale (shoulder, elbow, wrist, and fingers. Brain lesions were traced from magnetic resonance imaging performed within the first 7 days after stroke and region of interest images were generated. The association between severe upper limb spasticity (modified Ashworth scale ≥2 and lesion location was determined with the voxel-based lesion-symptom mapping method implemented in MRIcro software. Colored maps representing the z statistics were generated and overlaid onto the automated anatomical labeling and the Johns Hopkins University white matter templates provided with MRIcron. Thalamic nuclei were identified with the Talairach Daemon software. Injuries to the insula, the thalamus, the basal ganglia, and white matter tracts (internal capsule, corona radiata, external capsule, and superior longitudinal fasciculus were significantly associated with severe upper limb poststroke spasticity. Further advances in our understanding of the neural correlates of spasticity may lead to early targeted rehabilitation when key regions are damaged.

  9. Ankle plantarflexor spasticity is not differentially disabling for those who are weak following traumatic brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Gavin; Banky, Megan; McKenzie, Dean; Olver, John

    2017-01-01

    The main aim of this study was to determine whether the presence of distal lower-limb spasticity had a greater impact on mobility for those who had greater levels of muscle paresis following traumatic brain injury (TBI). This was a cross-sectional cohort study of convenience. Seventy-five people attending physiotherapy for mobility limitations following TBI participated in this study. All participants had sustained a moderate-severe TBI and were grouped according to the presence or absence of ankle plantarflexor spasticity for comparison. The primary outcome measure for mobility was self-selected walking speed and the primary outcome measure for muscle strength was hand-held dynamometry. Secondary outcome measures for mobility and muscle strength were the High-level Mobility Assessment Tool (HiMAT) and ankle power generation (APG) at push-off. Spasticity was quantified with the Modified Tardieu scale. Participants with ankle plantarflexor spasticity (Group 2) had slower self-selected walking speeds. There was no statistically significant effect for Group and plantarflexor strength (p = 0.81). Although participants with ankle plantarflexor spasticity walked significantly slower than those without, the presence of ankle plantarflexor spasticity did not lead to greater mobility limitations for those who were weak.

  10. Comparison between the spastic paraplegia rating scale, Kurtzke scale, and Osame scale in the tropical spastic paraparesis/myelopathy associated with HTLV

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodrigo Antonio Rocha da Cruz Adry

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION:The objective of this study was to compare Osame's scale of motor incapacity and the expanded scale of the state of incapacity of Kurtzke with the spastic paraplegia rating scale for the clinical evaluation of patients with HTLV-I-associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis (HAM/TSP. METHODS: Patients with the diagnosis of infection by HTLV-I/HTLV-II and with the clinical suspicion of HAM/TSP were included in the study. RESULTS: There were 45 patients who were evaluated. When analyzing the results of the scales, the researchers found the following averages of 21.08 points for the spastic paraplegia rating scale, 4.35 points for Osame's scale, and 4.77 points for Kurtzke's scale. The relation between the scale of paraplegia with Osame's was very significant with p < 0.0001, and regarding Kurtzke's scale, there was a similar result of p < 0.0001. When comparing Osame's, Kurtze's, and the spastic paraplegia rating scale with the time of disease, the researchers found a significant result of p = 0.0004 for the scale of spastic paraplegia, p = 0.0018 for Osame's scale, and p < 0.0001 for Kurtzke's scale. CONCLUSION: The spastic paraplegia rating scale has a good relation with Osame's and Kurtzke's scales showing a p index that is very significant that indicates that, although the scale was not initially made to be applied to patients with HAM/TSP because of the infection by HLTV, it showed to be as efficient as Osame's and Kurtzke's scales in evaluating the patients' neurological conditions.

  11. Using the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health as a tool for analysis of the effect of physical therapy on spasticity in HAM/TSP patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luana Rego Rodrigues

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: This study aimed to evaluate spasticity in human T-lymphotropic virus type 1-associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis (HAM/TSP patients before and after physical therapy using the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF. METHODS: Nine subjects underwent physical therapy. Spasticity was evaluated using the Modified Ashworth Scale. The obtained scores were converted into ICF body functions scores. RESULTS: The majority of subjects had a high degree of spasticity in the quadriceps muscles. According to the ICF codes, the spasticity decreased after 20 sessions of physical therapy. CONCLUSIONS: The ICF was effective in evaluating spasticity in HAM/TSP patients.

  12. Using the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health as a tool for analysis of the effect of physical therapy on spasticity in HAM/TSP patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    dosRodrigues, Luana Rego; Glória, Luzielma Macedo; Santos, Mayara do Socorro Brito dos; Medeiros, Rita; Dias, George Alberto da Silva; Pinto, Denise da Silva

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to evaluate spasticity in human T-lymphotropic virus type 1-associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis (HAM/TSP) patients before and after physical therapy using the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF). Nine subjects underwent physical therapy. Spasticity was evaluated using the Modified Ashworth Scale. The obtained scores were converted into ICF body functions scores. The majority of subjects had a high degree of spasticity in the quadriceps muscles. According to the ICF codes, the spasticity decreased after 20 sessions of physical therapy. The ICF was effective in evaluating spasticity in HAM/TSP patients.

  13. A literature review on the efficacy and safety of botulinum toxin: An injection in post-stroke spasticity

    OpenAIRE

    Majid Ghasemi; Mehri Salari; Fariborz Khorvash; Vahid Shaygannejad

    2013-01-01

    Background: A variety of techniques for the management of spasticity have been suggested, including positioning, cryotherapy, splinting and casting, biofeedback, electrical stimulation, and medical management by pharmacological agents, Botulinum toxin A (BTA) is now the pharmacological treatment of choice in focal spasticity. BTA by blocking acetylcholine release at neuromuscular junctions accounts for its therapeutic action to relieve spasticity. Methods: A computerized search of Pub Me...

  14. Spasticity and its association with functioning and health-related quality of life 18 months after stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welmer, Anna-Karin; von Arbin, Magnus; Widén Holmqvist, Lotta; Sommerfeld, Disa K

    2006-01-01

    There is no consensus concerning the presence of spasticity or the relationship between spasticity and functioning and spasticity and health-related quality of life (HRQL) in the stable phase after stroke. The aim of the present study was to describe, 18 months after stroke, the frequency of spasticity and its association with functioning and HRQL. In a cohort of 66 consecutive patients with first-ever stroke, studied prospectively, the following parameters were assessed 18 months after stroke: spasticity, by the Modified Ashworth Scale (0-4 points with 1+ as the modification), muscle stiffness, by self-report, abnormal tendon reflexes, by physical examination, motor performance, by the Lindmark Motor Assessment Scale, mobility, by the Rivermead Mobility Index, activities of daily living, by the Barthel Index, and HRQL, by the Swedish Short Form 36 Health Survey Questionnaire (SF-36). Of 66 patients studied, 38 were hemiparetic; of these, 13 displayed spasticity, 12 had increased tendon reflexes, and 7 reported muscle stiffness 18 months after stroke. Weak (r < 0.5) to moderate (r = 0.5-0.75) correlations were seen between spasticity and functioning scores. Correlations between spasticity and HRQL were generally weak (r < 0.5). Hemiparetic patients without spasticity had significantly better functioning scores and significantly better HRQL on 1 of the 8 SF-36 health scales (physical functioning) than patients with spasticity. Few patients displayed spasticity 18 months after stroke. Spasticity might contribute to impairment of movement function and to limitation of activity, but seems to have a less pronounced effect on HRQL.

  15. Location and severity of spasticity in the first 1-2 weeks and at 3 and 18 months after stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welmer, A-K; Widén Holmqvist, L; Sommerfeld, D K

    2010-05-01

    There is no consensus concerning the location or severity of spasticity, or how this changes with time after stroke. The purpose was to describe: the location and severity of spasticity, in different muscle groups, during the first 1-2 weeks and at 3 and 18 months after stroke; the association between the severity of spasticity and control of voluntary movements; and the occurrence of spasticity in younger versus older patients. In a cohort of consecutive patients, the following parameters were assessed during the first 1-2 weeks (n = 109) and at 3 (n = 95) and 18 (n = 66) months after first-ever stroke: spasticity, by the Modified Ashworth Scale in different muscle groups; plantar-flexor clonus, by physical examination; and movement function, by the Lindmark Motor Assessment Scale. During the first 1-2 weeks and at 3 months after stroke, spasticity was most common in the anti-gravity muscles. The severity of upper extremity spasticity increased over time (P < 0.05). Upper extremity spasticity and movement scores were moderately associated (r = -0.61, P < 0.05). At 3 months, spasticity was more common amongst the younger patients (P < 0.05). The results confirm that spasticity is most common in the anti-gravity muscles and is associated with the control of voluntary movements. As the severity of spasticity also increased after 3 months, when neurally mediated spasticity is expected to have passed its peak, intrinsic muscle changes may play a larger role than neural components with the passage of time after stroke.

  16. Quadriceps femoris spasticity in children with cerebral palsy: measurement with the pendulum test and relationship with gait abnormalities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szopa, Andrzej; Domagalska-Szopa, Małgorzata; Kidoń, Zenon; Syczewska, Małgorzata

    2014-12-16

    Development of a reliable and objective test of spasticity is important for assessment and treatment of children with cerebral palsy. The pendulum test has been reported to yield reliable measurements of spasticity and to be sensitive to variations in spasticity in these children. However, the relationship between the pendulum test scores and other objective measures of spasticity has not been studied. The present study aimed to assess the effectiveness of an accelerometer-based pendulum test as a measurement of spasticity in CP, and to explore the correlation between the measurements of this test and the global index of deviation from normal gait in in children with cerebral palsy. We studied thirty-six children with cerebral palsy, including 18 with spastic hemiplegia and 18 with spastic diplegia, and a group of 18 typically-developing children. Knee extensor spasticity was assessed bilaterally using the accelerometer-based pendulum test and three-dimensional gait analysis. The Gillette Gait Index was calculated from the results of the gait analysis. The data from the accelerometer-based pendulum test could be used to distinguish between able-bodied children and children with cerebral palsy. Additionally, two of the measurements, first swing excursion and relaxation index, could be used to differentiate the degree of knee extensor spasticity in the children with cerebral palsy. Only a few moderate correlations were found between the Gillette Gait Index and the pendulum test data. This study demonstrates that the pendulum test can be used to discriminate between typically developing children and children with CP, as well as between various degrees of spasticity, such as spastic hemiplegia and spastic diplegia, in the knee extensor muscle of children with CP. Deviations from normal gait in children with CP were not correlated with the results of the pendulum test.

  17. Full body gait analysis may improve diagnostic discrimination between hereditary spastic paraplegia and spastic diplegia: a preliminary study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonnefoy-Mazure, A; Turcot, K; Kaelin, A; De Coulon, G; Armand, S

    2013-01-01

    Hereditary spastic paraplegia (HSP) and spastic diplegia (SD) patients share a strong clinical resemblance. Thus, HSP patients are frequently misdiagnosed with a mild form of SD. Clinical gait analysis (CGA) has been highlighted as a possible tool to support the differential diagnosis of HSP and SD. Previous analysis has focused on the lower-body but not the upper-body, where numerous compensations during walking occur. The aim of this study was to compare the full-body movements of HSP and SD groups and, in particular, the movement of the upper limbs. Ten HSP and 12 SD patients were evaluated through a CGA (VICON 460 and Mx3+; ViconPeak(®), Oxford, UK) between 2008 and 2012. The kinematic parameters were computed using the ViconPeak(®) software (Plug-In-Gait). In addition, the mean amplitude of normalised (by the patient's height) arm swing was calculated. All patients were asked to walk at a self-selected speed along a 10-m walkway. The mean kinematic parameters for the two populations were analysed with Mann-Whitney comparison tests, with a significant P-value set at 0.05. The results demonstrated that HSP patients used more spine movement to compensate for lower limb movement alterations, whereas SD patients used their arms for compensation. SD patients had increased shoulder movements in the sagittal plane (Flexion/extension angle) and frontal plane (elevation angle) compared to HSP patients. These arm postures are similar to the description of the guard position that toddlers exhibit during the first weeks of walking. To increase speed, SD patients have larger arm swings in the sagittal, frontal and transversal planes. Upper-body kinematics, and more specifically arm movements and spine movements, may support the differential diagnosis of HSP and SD. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Split tendon transfers for the correction of spastic varus foot deformity: a case series study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dimitriadis Dimitris

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Overactivity of anterior and/or posterior tibial tendon may be a causative factor of spastic varus foot deformity. The prevalence of their dysfunction has been reported with not well defined results. Although gait analysis and dynamic electromyography provide useful information for the assessment of the patients, they are not available in every hospital. The purpose of the current study is to identify the causative muscle producing the deformity and apply the most suitable technique for its correction. Methods We retrospectively evaluated 48 consecutive ambulant patients (52 feet with spastic paralysis due to cerebral palsy. The average age at the time of the operation was 12,4 yrs (9-18 and the mean follow-up 7,8 yrs (4-14. Eigtheen feet presented equinus hind foot deformity due to gastrocnemius and soleus shortening. According to the deformity, the feet were divided in two groups (Group I with forefoot and midfoot inversion and Group II with hindfoot varus. The deformities were flexible in all cases in both groups. Split anterior tibial tendon transfer (SPLATT was performed in Group I (11 feet, while split posterior tibial tendon transfer (SPOTT was performed in Group II (38 feet. In 3 feet both procedures were performed. Achilles tendon sliding lengthening (Hoke procedure was done in 18 feet either preoperatively or concomitantly with the index procedure. Results The results in Group I, were rated according to Hoffer's clinical criteria as excellent in 8 feet and satisfactory in 3, while in Group II according to Kling's clinical criteria were rated as excellent in 20 feet, good in 14 and poor in 4. The feet with poor results presented residual varus deformity due to intraoperative technical errors. Conclusion Overactivity of the anterior tibial tendon produces inversion most prominent in the forefoot and midfoot and similarly overactivity of the posterior tibial tendon produces hindfoot varus. The deformity can be

  19. Anisotropic Concrete Compressive Strength

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gustenhoff Hansen, Søren; Jørgensen, Henrik Brøner; Hoang, Linh Cao

    2017-01-01

    When the load carrying capacity of existing concrete structures is (re-)assessed it is often based on compressive strength of cores drilled out from the structure. Existing studies show that the core compressive strength is anisotropic; i.e. it depends on whether the cores are drilled parallel...

  20. Motor pathway injury in patients with periventricular leucomalacia and spastic diplegia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jong Doo; Park, Hae-Jeong; Park, Eun Sook; Oh, Maeng-Keun; Park, Bumhee; Rha, Dong-Wook; Cho, Sung-Rae; Kim, Eung Yeop; Park, Jun Young; Kim, Chul Hoon; Kim, Dong Goo; Park, Chang Il

    2011-04-01

    Periventricular leucomalacia has long been investigated as a leading cause of motor and cognitive dysfunction in patients with spastic diplegic cerebral palsy. However, patients with periventricular leucomalacia on conventional magnetic resonance imaging do not always have motor dysfunction and preterm children without neurological abnormalities may have periventricular leucomalacia. In addition, it is uncertain whether descending motor tract or overlying cortical injury is related to motor impairment. To investigate the relationship between motor pathway injury and motor impairment, we conducted voxelwise correlation analysis using tract-based spatial statistics of white matter diffusion anisotropy and voxel-based-morphometry of grey matter injury in patients with periventricular leucomalacia and spastic diplegia (n = 43, mean 12.86 ± 4.79 years, median 12 years). We also evaluated motor cortical and thalamocortical connectivity at resting state in 11 patients using functional magnetic resonance imaging. The functional connectivity results of patients with spastic diplegic cerebral palsy were compared with those of age-matched normal controls. Since γ-aminobutyric acid(A) receptors play an important role in the remodelling process, we measured neuronal γ-aminobutyric acid(A) receptor binding potential with dynamic positron emission tomography scans (n = 27) and compared the binding potential map of the patient group with controls (n = 20). In the current study, white matter volume reduction did not show significant correlation with motor dysfunction. Although fractional anisotropy within most of the major white matter tracts were significantly lower than that of age-matched healthy controls (P < 0.05, family wise error corrected), fractional anisotropy mainly within the bilateral corticospinal tracts and posterior body and isthmus of the corpus callosum showed more significant correlation with motor dysfunction (P < 0.03) than

  1. Physical therapy in patients with disorders of consciousness: Impact on spasticity and muscle contracture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thibaut, A; Wannez, S; Deltombe, T; Martens, G; Laureys, S; Chatelle, C

    2018-01-01

    Spasticity is a frequent complication after severe brain injury, which may prevent the rehabilitation process and worsen the patients' quality of life. In this study, we investigated the correlation between spasticity, muscle contracture, and the frequency of physical therapy (PT) in subacute and chronic patients with disorders of consciousness (DOC). 109 patients with subacute and chronic disorders of consciousness (Vegetative state/Unresponsive wakefulness syndrome - VS/UWS; minimally conscious state - MCS and patients who emerged from MCS - EMCS) were included in the study (39 female; mean age: 40±13.5y; 60 with traumatic etiology; 35 VS/UWS, 68 MCS, 6 EMCS; time since insult: 38±42months). The number of PT sessions (i.e., 20 to 30 minutes of conventional stretching of the four limbs) was collected based on patients' medical record and varied between 0 to 6 times per week (low PT = 0-3 and high PT = 4-6 sessions per week). Spasticity was measured with the Modified Ashworth Scale (MAS) on every segment for both upper (UL) and lower limbs (LL). The presence of muscle contracture was assessed in every joint. We tested the relationship between spasticity and muscle contracture with the frequency of PT as well as other potential confounders such as time since injury or anti-spastic medication intake. We identified a negative correlation between the frequency of PT and MAS scores as well as the presence of muscle contracture. We also identified that patients who received less than four sessions per week were more likely to be spastic and suffer from muscle contracture than patients receiving 4 sessions or more. When separating subacute (3 to 12 months post-insult) and chronic (>12months post-insult) patients, these negative correlations were only observed in chronic patients. A logit regression model showed that frequency of PT influenced spasticity, whereas neither time since insult nor medication had a significant impact on the presence of spasticity. On

  2. Possible etiologies for tropical spastic paraparesis and human T lymphotropic virus I-associated myelopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Zaninovic'

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available The epidemiology of tropical spastic paraparesis/human T lymphotropic virus I (HTLV-I-associated myelopathy (TSP/HAM is frequently inconsistent and suggests environmental factors in the etiology of these syndromes. The neuropathology corresponds to a toxometabolic or autoimmune process and possibly not to a viral disease. Some logical hypotheses about the etiology and physiopathology of TSP and HAM are proposed. Glutamate-mediated excitotoxicity, central distal axonopathies, cassava, lathyrism and cycad toxicity may explain most cases of TSP. The damage caused to astrocytes and to the blood-brain barrier by HTLV-I plus xenobiotics may explain most cases of HAM. Analysis of the HTLV-I/xenobiotic ratio clarifies most of the paradoxical epidemiology of TSP and HAM. Modern neurotoxicology, neuroimmunology and molecular biology may explain the neuropathology of TSP and HAM. It is quite possible that there are other xenobiotics implicated in the etiology of some TSP/HAMs. The prevention of these syndromes appears to be possible today.

  3. Post-operative Hypertension following Correction of Flexion Deformity of the Knees in a Spastic Diplegic Child: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vipin Mohan

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available An adolescent boy with spastic diplegic cerebral palsy presented with crouch gait. He had bilateral severe flexion deformities of knees and hips. He was treated with single event multilevel surgery for the correction of deformities. Surgical procedures included bilateral adductor release, iliopsoas lengthening, bilateral femoral shortening and patella plication. Persistent hypertension was noted in the post-operative period. All causes of secondary hypertension were ruled out. Having persistent hypertension following the femoral shortening procedure is unusual. Antihypertensive medication controlled his blood pressure 15 months after surgery. Hypertension following correction of knee flexion deformity and limb lengthening is well known. Hypertension has not been described with the shortening osteotomy of the femur. Hypertension is a rare complication following the corrective surgery for the treatment of crouch gait. Blood pressure should be monitored during the post-operative period to detect such a rare complication.

  4. Decrease of spasticity with muscle vibration in patients with spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murillo, Narda; Kumru, Hatice; Vidal-Samso, Joan; Benito, Jesus; Medina, Josep; Navarro, Xavier; Valls-Sole, Josep

    2011-06-01

    Spasticity is common after spinal cord injury (SCI). Exaggerated tendon jerks, clonus, and spasms are key features of spasticity that result from hyperexcitability of the stretch reflex circuit. Here we studied the effects of vibration on the rectus femoris muscle (RF) on clinical and electrophysiological measures of spasticity in the leg. Nineteen SCI patients with spasticity and nine healthy subjects were studied at baseline and under stimulation (vibration at 50 Hz during 10 min on the thigh). Neurophysiological studies included evaluation of the soleus T wave and Hmax/Mmax ratio. Clinical measurements of spasticity were the score in the Modified Ashworth Scale (MAS), range of motion (ROM), and duration and frequency of clonus. Patients with incomplete SCI (iSCI) presented higher number of cycles and longer duration of clonus than patients with complete SCI (cSCI). The Hmax/Mmax ratio and T wave amplitude at baseline were significantly larger in iSCI patients than in cSCI or healthy subjects. During vibration, we found a significant reduction of MAS and duration of clonus, and an increase in ROM, in all patients as a group. The Hmax/Mmax ratio and the T wave amplitude decreased significantly in both, patients and controls. Prolonged vibration on proximal lower extremity muscles decreased limb spasticity in patients with spinal cord injury, regardless of whether the lesion is complete or incomplete. Muscle vibration may be useful for physical therapy, by facilitating passive and active movements of the extremities in spastic SCI patients. Copyright © 2010 International Federation of Clinical Neurophysiology. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Muscle elastography: a new imaging technique for multiple sclerosis spasticity measurement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Illomei, G; Spinicci, G; Locci, E; Marrosu, M G

    2017-03-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) spasticity is currently evaluated on the basis of neurological examinations such as Ashworth Scale (AS) and 0-10 NRS. Severity of spasticity is difficult to quantify. We investigated the use of real time elastography (RTHE) ultrasounds for evaluating objectively the muscle fibers status in MS spasticity patients and their changes after a new antispasticity treatment. Two studies were performed. In study A, 110 MS patients underwent a neurological evaluation based on the AS and RTHE. The RTHE images were scored with the new 1-5 muscle fibers rigidity imaging scale, here called MEMSs (Muscle Elastography Multiple Sclerosis Score). The correlation between AS and MEMSs was found to be statistically significant. In study B, 55 MS patients treated with THC:CBD oromucosal spray for their resistant spasticity were followed prospectively. MS spasticity was evaluated by the 0-10 NRS scale at baseline and after 4 weeks of treatment. MEMSs' figures were obtained at both timepoints. Responders to THC:CBD oromucosal spray (pre-defined as an improvement ≥20% in their 0-10 NRS spasticity score vs. baseline) were 65% of sample. These patients had a mean 0-10 NRS reduction of 1.87 and a MEMSs reduction of 1.97 (P values <0.0001). The remaining 35% of patients, classified as clinically non-responders, showed still a significant mean reduction in MEMSs (0.8, P = 0.002). Our overall results showed that RTHE, operativized throughout MEMSs, could be an objective gold standard to evaluate MS muscle spasticity as well as the effectiveness of antispasticity therapy.

  6. Testing framework for compression methods

    OpenAIRE

    Štoček, Ondřej

    2008-01-01

    There are many algorithms for data compression. These compression methods often achieve different compression rate and also use computer resources differently. In practice a combination of compression is usually used instead of standalone compression methods. The software tool can be evolved, where we can easily combine existing compression methods to new one and test it consequently. Main goal of this work is to propound such tool and implement it. Further goal is to implement basic library ...

  7. Low dose tubulin-binding drugs rescue peroxisome trafficking deficit in patient-derived stem cells in Hereditary Spastic Paraplegia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yongjun Fan

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Hereditary Spastic Paraplegia (HSP is a genetically heterogeneous group of disorders, diagnosed by progressive gait disturbances with muscle weakness and spasticity, for which there are no treatments targeted at the underlying pathophysiology. Mutations in spastin are a common cause of HSP. Spastin is a microtubule-severing protein whose mutation in mouse causes defective axonal transport. In human patient-derived olfactory neurosphere-derived (ONS cells, spastin mutations lead to lower levels of acetylated α-tubulin, a marker of stabilised microtubules, and to slower speed of peroxisome trafficking. Here we screened multiple concentrations of four tubulin-binding drugs for their ability to rescue levels of acetylated α-tubulin in patient-derived ONS cells. Drug doses that restored acetylated α-tubulin to levels in control-derived ONS cells were then selected for their ability to rescue peroxisome trafficking deficits. Automated microscopic screening identified very low doses of the four drugs (0.5 nM taxol, 0.5 nM vinblastine, 2 nM epothilone D, 10 µM noscapine that rescued acetylated α-tubulin in patient-derived ONS cells. These same doses rescued peroxisome trafficking deficits, restoring peroxisome speeds to untreated control cell levels. These results demonstrate a novel approach for drug screening based on high throughput automated microscopy for acetylated α-tubulin followed by functional validation of microtubule-based peroxisome transport. From a clinical perspective, all the drugs tested are used clinically, but at much higher doses. Importantly, epothilone D and noscapine can enter the central nervous system, making them potential candidates for future clinical trials.

  8. A comparative experimental study on engine operating on premixed charge compression ignition and compression ignition mode

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhiogade Girish E.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available New combustion concepts have been recently developed with the purpose to tackle the problem of high emissions level of traditional direct injection Diesel engines. A good example is the premixed charge compression ignition combustion. A strategy in which early injection is used causing a burning process in which the fuel burns in the premixed condition. In compression ignition engines, soot (particulate matter and NOx emissions are an extremely unsolved issue. Premixed charge compression ignition is one of the most promising solutions that combine the advantages of both spark ignition and compression ignition combustion modes. It gives thermal efficiency close to the compression ignition engines and resolves the associated issues of high NOx and particulate matter, simultaneously. Premixing of air and fuel preparation is the challenging part to achieve premixed charge compression ignition combustion. In the present experimental study a diesel vaporizer is used to achieve premixed charge compression ignition combustion. A vaporized diesel fuel was mixed with the air to form premixed charge and inducted into the cylinder during the intake stroke. Low diesel volatility remains the main obstacle in preparing premixed air-fuel mixture. Exhaust gas re-circulation can be used to control the rate of heat release. The objective of this study is to reduce exhaust emission levels with maintaining thermal efficiency close to compression ignition engine.

  9. Radio frequency pulse compression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farkas, Z.D.

    1988-12-01

    High gradients require peak powers. One possible way to generate high peak powers is to generate a relatively long pulse at a relatively low power and compress it into a shorter pulse with higher peak power. It is possible to compress before dc to rf conversion as is done for the relativistic klystron or after dc to rf conversion as is done with SLED. In this note only radio frequency pulse compression (RFPC) is considered. Three methods of RFPC will be discussed: SLED, BEC, and REC. 3 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab

  10. Mutations in DARS cause hypomyelination with brain stem and spinal cord involvement and leg spasticity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Taft, Ryan J.; Vanderver, Adeline; Leventer, Richard J.; Damiani, Stephen A.; Simons, Cas; Grimmond, Sean M.; Miller, David; Schmidt, Johanna; Lockhart, Paul J.; Pope, Kate; Ru, Kelin; Crawford, Joanna; Rosser, Tena; de Coo, Irenaeus F. M.; Juneja, Monica; Verma, Ishwar C.; Prabhakar, Prab; Blaser, Susan; Raiman, Julian; Pouwels, Petra J. W.; Bevova, Marianna R.; Abbink, Truus E. M.; van der Knaap, Marjo S.; Wolf, Nicole I.

    2013-01-01

    Inherited white-matter disorders are a broad class of diseases for which treatment and classification are both challenging. Indeed, nearly half of the children presenting with a leukoencephalopathy remain without a specific diagnosis. Here, we report on the application of high-throughput genome and

  11. Adrenomyeloneuropathy as a cause of primary adrenal insufficiency and spastic paraparesis

    OpenAIRE

    Spurek, Monika; Taylor-Gjevre, Regina; Van Uum, Stan; Khandwala, Hasnain M.

    2004-01-01

    ADRENOMYELONEUROPATHY IS A VARIENT OF ADRENOLEUKODYSTROPHY, both of which are rare inherited disorders of peroxisomes characterized by the accumulation of very-long-chain fatty acids in plasma, the central and peripheral nervous systems, adrenal glands and testes, which leads to dysfunction of these organs and systems. In this article, we describe an illustrative case of adrenomyeloneuropathy and discuss the clinical presentation, diagnosis and management of the 2 disorders.

  12. Využití prostředků fyzikální terapie k ovlivnění spasticity z pohledu fyzioterapeuta

    OpenAIRE

    Bouzková, Gabriela Natálie

    2014-01-01

    The theme of the bachelor thesis is using means of physical therapy to influence spasticity from the physiotherapeutist's point of view. Theoretical part describes upper motor neuron syndrome and spasticity as one of its symptoms. Further it states methods of evaluation and options of influence of spasticity including latest research methods. Separate chapter is dedicated to the physical therapy, its impact on human organism and means used to treat spasticity. In the practical part the influe...

  13. The Italian real-life post-stroke spasticity survey: unmet needs in the management of spasticity with botulinum toxin type A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Picelli, A; Baricich, A; Cisari, C; Paolucci, Stefano; Smania, Nicola; Sandrini, Giorgio

    The present national survey seeking to identify unmet needs in the management of spasticity with botulinum toxin type A focused on the use of OnabotulinumoxinA, since this is the brand with the widest range of licensed indications in Italy. Physicians from twenty-four Italian neurorehabilitation units compiled a questionnaire about "real-life" post-stroke spasticity management. OnabotulinumtoxinA was reported to be used in the following average doses: upper limb 316.7 ± 79.1 units; lower limb 327.8 ± 152.3; upper and lower limb 543.7 ± 123.7 units. Of the physicians surveyed, 37.5% felt that increasing the frequency of OnabotulinumtoxinA injection would improve its efficacy; 70.8% use electrical stimulation/electromyography guidance (one fourth of injections with no instrumental guidance). Instrumental evaluation was used by 41.7% of the physicians. The participants expressed the view that early identification of post-stroke spasticity would be facilitated by the availability of a post-stroke checklist, and that this should be used by physiotherapists (91.7%), physiatrists (58.3%), family doctors (50%), stroke unit physicians (25%), patients and caregivers (79.2%). According to our findings, the management of poststroke spasticity has several unmet needs that, were they addressed, might improve these patients' clinical outcomes and quality of life. These needs concern patient follow-up, where a clearly defined pathway is lacking; furthermore, there is a need to use maximum doses per treatment and to ensure early intervention on post-stroke spasticity.

  14. Intrathecal Versus Oral Baclofen: A Matched Cohort Study of Spasticity, Pain, Sleep, Fatigue, and Quality of Life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCormick, Zachary L; Chu, Samuel K; Binler, Danielle; Neudorf, Daniel; Mathur, Sunjay N; Lee, Jungwha; Marciniak, Christina

    2016-06-01

    Baclofen commonly is used to manage spasticity caused by central nervous system lesions or dysfunction. Although both intrathecal and oral delivery routes are possible, no study has directly compared clinical outcomes associated with these 2 routes of treatment. To compare spasticity levels, pain, sleep, fatigue, and quality of life between individuals receiving treatment with intrathecal versus oral baclofen. Cross-sectional matched cohort survey study. Urban academic rehabilitation outpatient clinics. Adult patients with spasticity, treated with intrathecal or oral baclofen for at least 1 year, matched 1:1 for age, gender, and diagnosis. Standardized surveys were administered during clinic appointments or by telephone. Surveys included the Penn Spasm Frequency Scale, Brief Pain Inventory, Epworth Sleepiness Scale, Fatigue Severity Scale, Life Satisfaction Questionnaire, and Diener Satisfaction with Life Scale. A total of 62 matched subjects were enrolled. The mean (standard deviation [SD]) age was 46 (11) years with a mean duration of intrathecal baclofen or oral baclofen treatment of 11 (6) and 13 (11) years, respectively. There were 40 (64%) male and 22 (36%) female subjects. Primary diagnoses included spinal cord injury (n = 38), cerebral palsy (n = 10), stroke (n = 10), and multiple sclerosis (n = 4). The mean (SD) dose of intrathecal and oral baclofen at the time of survey were 577 (1429) μg/day and 86 (50) mg/day, respectively. Patients receiving intrathecal compared with oral baclofen experienced significantly fewer (1.44 [0.92] versus 2.37 [1.12]) and less severe (1.44 [0.92] versus 2.16 [0.83]) spasms, respectively as measured by the Penn Spasm Frequency Scale (P life between groups. Subanalysis of patients with SCI mirrored results of the entire study sample, with significant decreases in spasm frequency and severity associated with intrathecal compared to oral baclofen (P < .01; P < .01), but no other between group differences. The mean (SD) percent

  15. Enhanced regional washout of technetium-99m-sestamibi in patients with coronary spastic angina

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ono, Souichi; Yamaguchi, Hiroyuki; Abe, Shigeru; Tachibana, Hidetada; Sato, Takayuki; Takeishi, Yasuchika; Kubota, Isao

    2003-01-01

    Reverse redistribution and rapid washout of 99m Tc-sestamibi are observed in patients with acute myocardial infarction and may indicate viable myocardium. However, the clinical significance of this phenomenon has not been rigorously examined in other cardiac diseases. Thus, we investigated whether reverse redistribution and washout of 99m Tc-sestamibi could be used in the diagnosis and follow-up of patients with coronary spastic angina. Thirty patients diagnosed as coronary spastic angina were examined. During coronary arteriography, spasm was induced by provocation test with ergonovine, and only total or subtotal occlusion was considered positive. Myocardial perfusion tomography was obtained 45 min (early) and 3 hr (delayed) after 99m Tc-sestamibi injection. Segmental defect score was visually graded from 0 (normal) to 4 (defect), and a total defect score was determined as the sum of defect scores for all segments. Washout rate of 99m Tc-sestamibi from the myocardium was calculated for each segment. After medical treatment with calcium antagonists and nitrates for 3 months, 99m Tc-sestamibi imaging was repeated. Out of 30 patients, on the early images 17 (57%) patients demonstrated decreased 99m Tc-sestamibi uptake in spastic segments; on the other hand, 24 (80%) patients did decreased 99m Tc-sestamibi uptake in spastic segments on delayed images. Total defect scores in delayed images were higher than those in early images (6.9±0.3 vs. 3.6±0.4, p 99m Tc-sestamibi was observed in 17 out of 30 patients (57%) with coronary spastic angina. Washout rate of 99m Tc-sestamibi from spastic segments was higher than that from non-spastic segments (16±2% vs. 11±5%, p 99m Tc-sestamibi was observed in patients with coronary spastic angina and might indicate that the ability of myocyte to retain the tracer was impaired due to repetitive brief ischemia by coronary spasm. The early and delayed 99m Tc-sestamibi imaging provides useful information for the diagnosis and responses

  16. Biceps femoris late latency responses and the "notching sign" in spasticity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gürbüz, Mehmet; Bilgin, Süleyman; Albayrak, Yalçın; Kızılay, Ferah; Uysal, Hilmi

    2015-10-20

    Spasticity is a motor impairment due to lesions in the brain and spinal cord. Despite being a well-known problem, difficulties remain in the assessment of the condition. The electrophysiological and kinesiological characteristics of the patellar pendulum changes during the movement triggered by the patellar T reflex could be used to assess spasticity. Features of the patellar pendulum during the patellar T reflex were considered using a goniometric approach in spastic patients evaluated with the Ashworth scale. Medium and late latency responses in the rectus and biceps femoris muscles were examined electrophysiologically. For each pendulum, the maximum angle extension during an oscillation of the knee joint, maximal extension time, angular velocities of extensions of the knee joint and frequency of motion due to the patellar reflex were calculated. The damping of the amplitude in the pendulum was calculated. The spasticity group consisted of 65 patients (38 males and 27 females) with a mean age of 47.6 ± 14.0 years. The normal control group consisted of 25 individuals (19 males and six females) with a mean age of 32.1 ± 10 years. The biceps and rectus femoris long latency late responses were not observed in the normal cases. The biceps femoris medium latency response was observed only in 24 % of healthy individuals; conversely, late responses were observed in 84 % of patients. Activation of the antagonist muscles at a certain level of spasticity created a notching phenomenon. Amplitude of the reflex response and mean angular velocity of the first oscillation present in a dichotomic nature in the spasticity groups. Frequency of the first pendular oscillation increased with the increase of the Ashworth scale, while the damping ratio decreased with increasing scale. The Ashworth scale showed a correlation with the damping ratio. The damping ratio strongly distinguished the spastic subgroups and showed a strong negative correlation with the Ashworth scale

  17. Compressed Video Segmentation

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kobla, Vikrant; Doermann, David S; Rosenfeld, Azriel

    1996-01-01

    ... changes in content and camera motion. The analysis is performed in the compressed domain using available macroblock and motion vector information, and if necessary, discrete cosine transform (DCT) information...

  18. Mechanical chest compressions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pomeroy, Matthew

    2012-09-13

    The authors of this study state that there is a lack of evidence about the efficiency of mechanical devices in producing chest compressions as an adjunct to resuscitation during cardiorespiratory arrest.

  19. Biaxial compression test technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansard, E. T.

    1975-01-01

    Fixture and technique have been developed for predicting behavior of stiffened skin panels under biaxial compressive loading. Tester can load test panel independently in longitudinal and transverse directions. Data can also be obtained in combined mode.

  20. Muon cooling: longitudinal compression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bao, Yu; Antognini, Aldo; Bertl, Wilhelm; Hildebrandt, Malte; Khaw, Kim Siang; Kirch, Klaus; Papa, Angela; Petitjean, Claude; Piegsa, Florian M; Ritt, Stefan; Sedlak, Kamil; Stoykov, Alexey; Taqqu, David

    2014-06-06

    A 10  MeV/c positive muon beam was stopped in helium gas of a few mbar in a magnetic field of 5 T. The muon "swarm" has been efficiently compressed from a length of 16 cm down to a few mm along the magnetic field axis (longitudinal compression) using electrostatic fields. The simulation reproduces the low energy interactions of slow muons in helium gas. Phase space compression occurs on the order of microseconds, compatible with the muon lifetime of 2  μs. This paves the way for the preparation of a high-quality low-energy muon beam, with an increase in phase space density relative to a standard surface muon beam of 10^{7}. The achievable phase space compression by using only the longitudinal stage presented here is of the order of 10^{4}.

  1. Design of a clinically relevant upper-limb exoskeleton robot for stroke patients with spasticity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Dong Jin; Bae, Sung Jin; Jang, Sung Ho; Chang, Pyung Hun

    2017-07-01

    The purpose of this research is to propose a design of a clinically relevant upper-limb (hand, wrist, and elbow) exoskeleton that meets the clinical requirements. At first, the proposed robot was designed to have sufficient torque for passive exercise therapy and spasticity measurement of post-stroke patients with spasticity (grade 3 or lower in Modified Ashworth Scale). Because the therapy of patients with high level spasticity could be laborious for therapists by increased muscle tone, and the patients tend not to get enough rehabilitation treatment. Secondly, this robot was designed to have user friendly features like as modularity, so that users have easy approach to assemble and disassemble for practical use. Thirdly, this robot system was designed to guarantee the safety for robot-aided passive training of patients with spasticity. As a result, we were able to see the usability of the robot system, even though it was a pilot test. This shows the possibility of measuring and classifying the spasticity.

  2. Common goal areas in the treatment of upper limb spasticity: a multicentre analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashford, Stephen; Fheodoroff, Klemens; Jacinto, Jorge; Turner-Stokes, Lynne

    2016-06-01

    We aimed to develop a goal classification of individualised goals for spasticity treatment incorporating botulinum toxin intervention for upper limb spasticity to under-pin a more structured approach to future goal setting. Individualised goals for spasticity treatment incorporating botulinum toxin intervention for upper limb spasticity (n=696) were analysed initially from four studies published in 2008-2012, spanning a total of 18 centres (12 in the UK and 6 in Australia). Goals were categorised and mapped onto the closest matching domains of the WHO International Classification of Functioning. Confirmatory analysis included a further 927 goals from a large international cohort study spanning 22 countries published in 2013. Goal categories could be assigned into two domains, each subdivided into three key goal areas: Domain 1: symptoms/impairment n=322 (46%): a. pain/discomfort n=78 (11%), b. involuntary movements n=75 (11%), c. range of movement/contracture prevention n=162 (23%). Domain 2: Activities/function n=374 (54%): a. passive function (ease of caring for the affected limb) n=242 (35%), b active function (using the affected limb in active tasks) n=84 (12%), c. mobility n=11 (2%).Over 99% of the goals from the large international cohort fell into the same six areas, confirming the international applicability of the classification. Goals for management of upper limb spasticity, in worldwide clinical practice, fall into six main goal areas. © The Author(s) 2015.

  3. The spasticity in the motor and functional disability in adults with post-stroke hemiparetic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberta de Oliveira Cacho

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction: Spasticity acts as a limiting factor in motor and functional recovery after Stroke, impairing the performance of daily living activities. Objective: To analyze the influence of spasticity on main muscle groups and to associate it with motor impairment and functional level of chronic hemiparetic patients after stroke. Methods: Twenty-seven chronic hemiparetic patients of both sexes were selected at the Physical Therapy and Occupational Therapy Service of the Unicamp Clinics Hospital. Assessments were carried out in two sessions, in the first one the motor impairment (Fugl-Meyer Assessment - FM and functional impairment (Barthel Index - BI were evaluated, and in the second, the degree of spasticity of the main muscle groups (Modified Ashworth Scale - MAS. Results: A negative correlation was detected between upper limb spasticity and motor and functional impairment. No muscle group evaluated in the lower limbs showed correlation between muscle tone and the level of impairment of the lower extremity on FM and the functional level measured by BI. Conclusion: Spasticity has been shown to be a negative influence factor in the level of motor and functional impairment of the upper limbs of chronic hemiparetic patients after stroke.

  4. Selective dorsal rhizotomies in the treatment of spasticity related to cerebral palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farmer, Jean-Pierre; Sabbagh, Abdulrahman J

    2007-09-01

    Selective dorsal rhizotomy (SDR) is a surgical technique developed over the past decades to manage patients diagnosed with cerebral palsy suffering from spastic diplegia. It involves selectively lesioning sensory rootlets in an effort to maintain a balance between elimination of spasticity and preservation of function. Several recent long-term outcome studies have been published. In addition, shorter follow-up randomized controlled studies have compared the outcome of patients having undergone physiotherapy alone with those that received physiotherapy after selective dorsal rhizotomy. In this account, we will discuss the rationale and outcome after SDR. The outcome is addressed in terms of the gross motor function measurement scale (GMFM), degree of elimination of spasticity, strength enhancement, range of motion, fine motor skills, activity of daily living, spastic hip, necessity for postoperative orthopedic procedures, bladder and sphincteric function, and finally possible early or late complications associated with the procedure. We conclude that SDR is a safe procedure, which offers durable and significant functional gains to properly selected children with spasticity related to cerebral palsy.

  5. A systematic review of the Tardieu Scale for the measurement of spasticity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haugh, A B; Pandyan, A D; Johnson, G R

    2006-08-15

    The Tardieu Scale has been suggested a more appropriate clinical measure of spasticity than the Ashworth or modified Ashworth Scales. It appears to adhere more closely to Lance's definition of spasticity as it involves assessment of resistance to passive movement at both slow and fast speeds. To review the available literature in which the Tardieu Scale has been used or discussed as a measure of spasticity, with a view to determining its validity and reliability. A systematic review of all literature found related to the Tardieu Scale (keywords: Tardieu scale, spasticity) from Pubmed and Ovid databases, including medline, CINAHL, EMBASE, Journals at Ovid full text, EBM reviews and Cochrane database of systematic reviews. Hand searching was also used to track the source literature. In theory, we can acknowledge that the Tardieu Scale does, in fact, adhere more closely to Lance's definition of spasticity. However, there is a dearth of literature investigating validity and reliability of the scale. Some studies have identified the Tardieu Scale to be more sensitive than other measures, to change following treatment with botulinum toxin. Further studies need to be undertaken to clarify the validity and reliability of the scale for a variety of muscle groups in adult neurological patients.

  6. Measurement of lower-limb muscle spasticity: intrarater reliability of Modified Modified Ashworth Scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghotbi, Nastaran; Nakhostin Ansari, Noureddin; Naghdi, Soofia; Hasson, Scott

    2011-01-01

    The Modified Modified Ashworth Scale (MMAS) is a clinical instrument for measuring spasticity. Few studies have been performed on the reliability of the MMAS. The aim of the present study was to investigate the intrarater reliability of the MMAS for the assessment of spasticity in the lower limb. We conducted a test-retest study on spasticity in the hip adductors, knee extensors, and ankle plantar flexors. Each patient was measured by a hospital-based clinical physiotherapist. Twenty-three patients with stroke or multiple sclerosis (fourteen women, nine men) and a mean +/- standard deviation age of 37.3 +/- 14.1 years participated. The weighted kappa was moderate for the hip adductors (weighted kappa = 0.45, standard error [SE] = 0.16, p = 0.007), good for the knee extensors (weighted kappa = 0.62, SE = 0.12, p < 0.001), and very good for the ankle plantar flexors (weighted kappa = 0.85, SE = 0.05, p < 0.001). The kappa value for overall agreement was very good (weighted kappa = 0.87, SE = 0.03, p < 0.001). The reliability for the ankle plantar flexors was significantly higher than that for the hip adductors. The intrarater reliability of the MMAS in patients with lower-limb muscle spasticity was very good, and it can be used as a measure of spasticity over time.

  7. Clinical and neuroimaging profile of congenital brain malformations in children with spastic cerebral palsy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kulak, W.; Okurowska-Zawada, B.; Sobaniec, W.; Goscik, M.; Olenski, J.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: Analysis of the incidence of congenital brain malformations in children with spastic cerebral palsy (CP) in a hospital based study. Material and Methods: The present study included 74 boys and 56 girls with spastic tetraplegia, diplegia, and hemiplegia CP. Magnetic resonance imaging MRI findings were analyzed in children with CP. Results: Significant abnormalities relevant to the CP were evident on MRI in 124 (95.3%) subjects. Periventicular leukomalacia (PVL) was detected more frequently in children with spastic diplegia than in patients with tetraplegia or hemiplegia. Cerebral atrophy was found more often in the tetraplegic group compared to the diplegic patients. Porencephalic cysts were detected more often in children with spastic hemiplegia. Congenital brain anomalies were evident in 15 (10.7%) children with spastic CP. Brain malformations included: schizencephaly (5), agenesis corpus callosum (4), polymicrogyria (2), holoprosencephaly (2) and lissencephaly (2). Intractable epilepsy and mental retardation were observed more often in children with brain anomalies. Twelve patients with congenital brain malformations were born at term and three born at preterm. Conclusions: Neuroimaging results in children with CP may help determine the etiology and make better prognosis of CP. (authors)

  8. Effect of repetitive arm cycling following botulinum toxin injection for poststroke spasticity: evidence from FMRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diserens, Karin; Ruegg, Dieter; Kleiser, Raimund; Hyde, Sandrine; Perret, Nicolas; Vuadens, Philippe; Fornari, Eleonora; Vingerhoets, Francois; Seitz, Rüdiger J

    2010-10-01

    Investigations were performed to establish if repetitive arm cycling training enhances the antispastic effect of intramuscular botulinum toxin (BTX) injections in postischemic spastic hemiparesis. Effects on cerebral activation were evaluated by functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). Eight chronic spastic hemisyndrome patients (49 ± 10 years) after middle cerebral artery infarction (5.5 ± 2.7 years) were investigated. BTX was injected into the affected arm twice, 6 months apart. Spasticity was assessed using the Ashworth Scale and range of motion before and 3 months after BTX injections. Images were analyzed using Brain Voyager QX 1.8, and fMRI signal changes were corrected for multiple comparisons. During passive movements of affected and nonaffected hands, fMRI activity was increased bilaterally in the sensorimotor cortex (MISI), secondary somatosensory areas (SII), and supplementary motor area predominantly in the contralesional hemisphere, compared with the rest. Following repetitive arm cycling, fMRI activity increased further in MISI of the lesioned hemisphere and SII of the contralesional hemisphere. For patients with residual motor activity, treatment-related fMRI activity increases were associated with reduced spasticity; in completely plegic patients, there was no fMRI activity change in SII but increased spasticity after training. Increased activity in SII of the contralesional hemisphere and in MISI of the lesioned hemisphere reflect a treatment-induced effect in the paretic arm. It is hypothesized that the increased BOLD activity results from increased afferent information related to the antispastic BTX effect reinforced by training.

  9. Treatment diary for botulinum toxin spasticity treatment: a pilot study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iversen, Helle K.; Frederiksen, Inge M.S.; Vilhelmsen, Jeanet R.; Biering-Sørensen, Fin

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study is to develop a treatment diary for patients receiving spasticity treatment including botulinum toxin injection and physiotherapy and/or occupational therapy. The diary focuses on problems triggered by skeletal muscle overactivity; agreed goals for treatment and the patient’s self-evaluation of achievement on the Goal Attainment Scale; which skeletal muscles were injected; physiotherapists’ and occupational therapists’ evaluation of the patients’ achievement of objectives on the Goal Attainment Scale; and proposals for optimization of treatment and changing goals. The evaluation included a satisfaction questionnaire and the WHO-QoL BREF and WHO-5 well-being score. Overall, 10 patients were enrolled in the pilot study. The patients were generally satisfied with the diary, found that it involved them more in their treatment and made it easier to set personal goals, and found it worth the time spent using it. However, no clear advantage in relation to their quality of life (WHO-QoL BREF and WHO-5 well-being score) was reported. PMID:28225535

  10. Effect of nutritional support in children with spastic quadriplegia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soylu, Ozlem Bekem; Unalp, Aycan; Uran, Nedret; Dizdarer, Gülsen; Ozgonul, Figen Oksel; Conku, Aliye; Ataman, Hamide; Ozturk, Aysel Aydogan

    2008-11-01

    Malnutrition is a common problem in patients with cerebral palsy. We evaluated the effect of nutritional support on clinical findings in children with spastic quadriplegia. Feeding history, numbers of lower respiratory tract infections, and gastrointestinal and neurologic findings were evaluated via questionnaire. Weight, height, head circumference, midarm circumference, and triceps skinfold thickness were measured. Height for age, weight for age, weight for height, body mass index, and weight and height z-scores were calculated. Clinical findings and anthropometric parameters were re-evaluated after nutritional support for 6 months. Forty-five patients were enrolled. No difference was evident between the first and the last height z-scores of 31 patients who completed the follow-up. Weight, height, weight z-scores, weight for age, weight for height, body mass index, midarm circumference, and triceps skinfold thickness exhibited improvement. Moreover, a significant decrease in number of infections was evident. Frequency of seizures and Gross Motor Function Classification System status did not change. Constipation decreased significantly. Nutritional therapy revealed improvements in some anthropometric findings and a decrease in number of infections. Although there was no difference regarding motor development or seizure frequency, further studies with a longer follow-up are required.

  11. Deterministic Compressed Sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-01

    programs. Examples of such algorithms are the interior point methods [51, 52], Lasso modification to LARS [106, 171], homotopy methods [99], weighted...component analysis . IEEE Signal Processing Letters, 9(2):40–42, 2002. [171] S. J. Kim, K. Koh, M. Lustig, S. Boyd, and D. Gorinevsky. A method for...53 7.3 Analysis of the GAME Algorithm . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 57 III Expander-Based Compressed Sensing 61 8 Efficient Compressed

  12. Blind Compressed Sensing

    OpenAIRE

    Gleichman, Sivan; Eldar, Yonina C.

    2011-01-01

    The fundamental principle underlying compressed sensing is that a signal, which is sparse under some basis representation, can be recovered from a small number of linear measurements. However, prior knowledge of the sparsity basis is essential for the recovery process. This work introduces the concept of blind compressed sensing, which avoids the need to know the sparsity basis in both the sampling and the recovery process. We suggest three possible constraints on the sparsity basis that can ...

  13. Spastic paraplegia mutation N256S in the neuronal microtubule motor KIF5A disrupts axonal transport in a Drosophila HSP model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petra Füger

    Full Text Available Hereditary spastic paraplegias (HSPs comprise a group of genetically heterogeneous neurodegenerative disorders characterized by spastic weakness of the lower extremities. We have generated a Drosophila model for HSP type 10 (SPG10, caused by mutations in KIF5A. KIF5A encodes the heavy chain of kinesin-1, a neuronal microtubule motor. Our results imply that SPG10 is not caused by haploinsufficiency but by the loss of endogenous kinesin-1 function due to a selective dominant-negative action of mutant KIF5A on kinesin-1 complexes. We have not found any evidence for an additional, more generalized toxicity of mutant Kinesin heavy chain (Khc or the affected kinesin-1 complexes. Ectopic expression of Drosophila Khc carrying a human SPG10-associated mutation (N256S is sufficient to disturb axonal transport and to induce motoneuron disease in Drosophila. Neurofilaments, which have been recently implicated in SPG10 disease manifestation, are absent in arthropods. Impairments in the transport of kinesin-1 cargos different from neurofilaments are thus sufficient to cause HSP-like pathological changes such as axonal swellings, altered structure and function of synapses, behavioral deficits, and increased mortality.

  14. Sativex in the management of multiple sclerosis-related spasticity: An overview of the last decade of clinical evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giacoppo, Sabrina; Bramanti, Placido; Mazzon, Emanuela

    2017-10-01

    Spasticity is a common symptom of multiple sclerosis (MS) affecting about 80% of MS patients. Numerous lines of evidence suggest that spasticity due to its complexity is not adequately managed with conventional anti-spastic therapies. Therefore, in order to improve the outcomes for the majority of MS patients, alternative approaches are needed to be discovered. Over the last years, the use of cannabinoid compounds as a potential treatment for MS-related symptoms has aroused great interest, owing to encouraging preclinical and clinical studies. To date, Sativex, an oromucosal spray containing tetrahydrocannabinol and cannabidiol in approximately 1:1 ratio, is the only commercially available formulation containing cannabinoids used as add-on therapy for treatment of spasticity in adult MS patients who are not responding to conventional antispastic therapies. Here, by performing a literature search, we provided an overview of the last decade of clinical evaluations as well as post-marketing studies about effectiveness and safety of Sativex in the management of MS-related spasticity. Sativex was proven effective in treating spasticity and also in improving the patient's quality of life. In addition, a low incidence of adverse reactions Sativex-related supports the good safety profile and its tolerability. This review by recognizing the clinical effectiveness of Sativex in spasticity management, opened a new opportunity for many patients with spasticity resistant to common antispastic drugs. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. The effect of penile vibratory stimulation on male fertility potential, spasticity and neurogenic detrusor overactivity in spinal cord lesioned individuals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Biering-Sørensen, F; Læssøe, Line; Sønksen, J

    2005-01-01

    Present the possibility for treatment of male infertility, spasticity, and neurogenic detrusor overactivity in spinal cord lesioned (SCL) individuals with penile vibratory stimulation (PVS).......Present the possibility for treatment of male infertility, spasticity, and neurogenic detrusor overactivity in spinal cord lesioned (SCL) individuals with penile vibratory stimulation (PVS)....

  16. Effect of Selective Dorsal Rhizotomy on Gait in Children with Bilateral Spastic Paresis: Kinematic and EMG-Pattern Changes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Grunt, S.; Henneman, W.J.P.; Bakker, M.J.; Harlaar, J.; van Ouwerkerk, W.J.R.; van Schie, P.E.M.; Reeuwijk, A.; Becher, J.G.; Vermeulen, R.J.

    2010-01-01

    Introduction: Selective dorsal rhizotomy (SDR) is an effective treatment for reducing spasticity and improving gait in children with spastic cerebral palsy. Data concerning muscle activity changes after SDR treatment are limited. Patients and Methods: In 30 children who underwent SDR a gait analysis

  17. Selection criteria for selective dorsal rhizotomy in children with spastic cerebral palsy: a systematic review of the literature

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Grunt, S.; Fieggen, A.G.; Vermeulen, R.J.; Becher, J.G.; Langerak, N.G.

    2014-01-01

    Aim: Information regarding the selection procedure for selective dorsal rhizotomy (SDR) in children with spastic cerebral palsy (CP) is scarce. Therefore, the aim of this study was to summarize the selection criteria for SDR in children with spastic CP. Method: A systematic review was carried out

  18. Inter-Rater Reliability of the Modified Ashworth Scale and Modified Modified Ashworth Scale in Assessing Poststroke Elbow Flexor Spasticity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaya, Taciser; Goksel Karatepe, Altinay; Gunaydin, Rezzan; Koc, Aysegul; Altundal Ercan, Ulku

    2011-01-01

    The Modified Ashworth Scale (MAS) is commonly used in clinical practice for grading spasticity. However, it was modified recently by omitting grade "1+" of the MAS and redefining grade "2". The aim of this study was to investigate the inter-rater reliability of MAS and modified MAS (MMAS) for the assessment of poststroke elbow flexor spasticity.…

  19. Passive Range of Motion in a Population-Based Sample of Children with Spastic Cerebral Palsy Who Walk

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDowell, Brona C.; Salazar-Torres, Jose J.; Kerr, Claire; Cosgrove, Aidan P.

    2012-01-01

    -While passive range of motion (PROM) is commonly used to inform decisions on therapeutic management, knowledge of PROM of children with spastic cerebral palsy (CP) is limited. A population-based sample of 178 children with spastic CP (110 male; unilateral, n = 94; bilateral, n = 84; age range 4-17 years) and 68 typically developing children (24…

  20. A literature review on the efficacy and safety of botulinum toxin: An injection in post-stroke spasticity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Majid Ghasemi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: A variety of techniques for the management of spasticity have been suggested, including positioning, cryotherapy, splinting and casting, biofeedback, electrical stimulation, and medical management by pharmacological agents, Botulinum toxin A (BTA is now the pharmacological treatment of choice in focal spasticity. BTA by blocking acetylcholine release at neuromuscular junctions accounts for its therapeutic action to relieve spasticity. Methods: A computerized search of Pub Med was carried out to find the latest result about efficacy of BTA in management of post stroke spasticity. Result: Among 84 articles were found, frothy of them included in this review and divided to lower and upper extremity. Conclusions: BTA is a treatment choice in reducing tone and managing post stroke spasticity .

  1. Regional anesthesia for a total knee arthroplasty on an adult patient with spastic diplegia and an intrathecal baclofen pump.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bojaxhi, Elird; Salek, David R; Sherman, Courtney E; Greengrass, Roy A

    2017-04-01

    We describe the clinical presentation of a patient with spastic diplegia, and its unique perioperative challenges. Opioids and antispasmodic medications are the primary therapy for managing pain and spasticity in the perioperative setting. However, such combination results in several side-effects and their sedative properties are synergistic. A 64-year-old woman with a history of spastic diplegia and an intrathecal baclofen pump for the treatment of her lower extremity spasticity was scheduled for a third elective left knee arthroplasty. She requested a regional anesthetic for the anticipated surgery and an opioid sparing postoperative analgesic regiment. We describe the successful use of a lumbar plexus and a sciatic nerve block as the primary anesthetic for the surgery and the use of a continuous lumbar plexus catheter for the postoperative course. Based on our patient's past anesthetic history, a regional anesthetic/analgesic technique is the ideal strategy in controlling perioperative pain and spasticity.

  2. Inter- and intrarater reliability of the Modified Modified Ashworth Scale in patients with knee extensor poststroke spasticity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ansari, Noureddin Nakhostin; Naghdi, Soofia; Younesian, Parastoo; Shayeghan, Mohammad

    2008-01-01

    Muscle spasticity is a common motor disorder following upper motor neuron syndrome. A reliable and valid clinical tool is essential to document the effect of therapeutic interventions aimed to improve function by reducing spasticity. The Modified Ashworth Scale (MAS) is the most widely used and accepted clinical scale of spasticity. The MAS has been recently modified. The aim of this investigation was to determine the interrater and intrarater reliability of clinical test of knee extensor post-stroke spasticity graded on a Modified Modified Ashworth Scale (MMAS). Two raters scored the muscle spasticity of 15 patients with ischaemic stroke. For the inter- and intrarater reliability, two raters agreed on 80.1% and 86.6%, respectively. The Kappa values were good (kappa=0.72, SE=0.14, pscale.

  3. Severe crouch gait in spastic diplegia can be prevented: a population-based study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vuillermin, C; Rodda, J; Rutz, E; Shore, B J; Smith, K; Graham, H K

    2011-12-01

    We studied the prevalence of severe crouch gait over a 15-year period in a defined population of children with spastic diplegia and Gross Motor Function Classification System levels II and III, to determine if there had been a decrease following changes to the management of equinus gait. These changes were replacing observational with three-dimensional gait analysis, replacing single level with multilevel surgery, and replacing gastrocsoleus lengthening with gastrocnemius recession. Of 464 children and adolescents with spastic diplegia who underwent three-dimensional gait analysis, 27 had severe crouch gait. Seventeen of these had been managed by isolated lengthening of the gastrocsoleus. Following changes in the management of equinus gait, the prevalence of severe crouch gait decreased from 25% and stabilised at a significantly lower rate, fluctuating between 0% and 4% annually (p spastic diplegia.

  4. Effects of sustained electrical stimulation on spasticity assessed by the pendulum test

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vargas Luna José L.

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Neuromodulation using electrical stimulation is able to enhance motor control of individuals suffering an upper motor neuron disorder. This work examined the effect of sustained electrical stimulation to modify spasticity in the leg muscles. We applied transcutaneous spinal cord stimulation with a pulse rate of 50 Hz for 30 min. The subjects were assessed before and after the intervention using in a pendulum test setup. The motion of the free swinging leg was acquired through video tracking and goniometer measurements. The quantification was done through the R2n index which shows consistency identifying the spasticity levels. In all incomplete SCI subjects having severe spasticity, the results show that electrical stimulation is effective to modify the increased muscle tone.

  5. Systolic Compression of Epicardial Coronary and Intramural Arteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohiddin, Saidi A.; Fananapazir, Lameh

    2002-01-01

    It has been suggested that systolic compression of epicardial coronary arteries is an important cause of myocardial ischemia and sudden death in children with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. We examined the associations between sudden death, systolic coronary compression of intra- and epicardial arteries, myocardial perfusion abnormalities, and severity of hypertrophy in children with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. We reviewed the angiograms from 57 children with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy for the presence of coronary and septal artery compression; coronary compression was present in 23 (40%). The left anterior descending artery was most often affected, and multiple sites were found in 4 children. Myocardial perfusion abnormalities were more frequently present in children with coronary compression than in those without (94% vs 47%, P = 0.002). Coronary compression was also associated with more severe septal hypertrophy and greater left ventricular outflow gradient. Septal branch compression was present in 65% of the children and was significantly associated with coronary compression, severity of septal hypertrophy, and outflow obstruction. Multivariate analysis showed that septal thickness and septal branch compression, but not coronary compression, were independent predictors of perfusion abnormalities. Coronary compression was not associated with symptom severity, ventricular tachycardia, or a worse prognosis. We conclude that compression of coronary arteries and their septal branches is common in children with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and is related to the magnitude of left ventricular hypertrophy. Our findings suggest that coronary compression does not make an important contribution to myocardial ischemia in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy; however, left ventricular hypertrophy and compression of intramural arteries may contribute significantly. (Tex Heart Inst J 2002;29:290–8) PMID:12484613

  6. Non-traumatic spinal cord compression at Parirenyatwa Hospital in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Compression of the spinal cord by encroachment on its space is of major importance as a cause of injury to its tissues, with serious neurological consequences. Patients with non-traumatic spinal cord compression represent a significant proportion of paraplegic/paretic individuals attended to in the neurosurgical units in ...

  7. Spastic quadraparesis following a relatively minor injury - the \\'os ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    We present a case of an adult male who sustained severe spinal injury following relatively minor injury. Plain film, computed tomography (CT) scans and magnetic resonance (MR) images aided the diagnosis of os odontoideum with C1-2 subluxation and high cervical spinal cord compression. Incidental detection of an os ...

  8. Prevalence, impact and treatment of spasticity in nursing home patients with central nervous system disorders: a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meijer, Ronald; Wolswijk, Adrie; Eijsden, Hanna van

    2017-02-01

    Purpose To assess prevalence, impact and treatment of spasticity in nursing home patients with central nervous system (CNS) disorders. Methods The Modified Ashworth Scale was used as the main indicator of spasticity to assess muscle tone of the extremities. Further information was obtained on burden of care, level of independence, sleeping pattern, complaints, restrictions in functions/activities/participation and indication for treatment. Clinical assessments included coordination/sensibility parameters and various tests to assess motor performance. Results Fifty-six out of 77 participants (73%) with CNS disorders had spasticity, of whom 38 subjects also showed pathologically enhanced reflexes and 45 subjects had contractures in various joints. A high burden of care was observed in 71% and cramps/pain, cosmetic problems or other complaints due to spasticity were seen in 46, 20 and 26%, respectively. The vast majority of subjects were dependent for daily living activities and ambulation. Extra treatment of spasticity was indicated for 36% of the patients. Conclusion A high prevalence of spasticity was observed in nursing home residents with CNS disorders associated with substantial impact in terms of caregiving, complaints and compromised clinical outcome measures. To further optimize the treatment of spasticity in this vulnerable population, regional treatment plans should be developed. Implications for Rehabilitation The prevalence of spasticity in nursing home residents with central nervous system disorders is high (73%). The impact of spasticity is substantial in terms of increased dependency in activities of daily living, increased burden of care, sleeping problems and many complaints. Thirty-six percent of patients could be helped by extra specialized treatment, so the challenge for the multidisciplinary rehabilitation team is huge. Regional treatment plans should be developed to further optimize the treatment of spasticity in the vulnerable ageing population

  9. Muscle-specific changes in length-force characteristics of the calf muscles in the spastic Han-Wistar rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olesen, Annesofie T; Jensen, Bente R; Uhlendorf, Toni L; Cohen, Randy W; Baan, Guus C; Maas, Huub

    2014-11-01

    The purpose of the present study was to investigate muscle mechanical properties and mechanical interaction between muscles in the lower hindlimb of the spastic mutant rat. Length-force characteristics of gastrocnemius (GA), soleus (SO), and plantaris (PL) were assessed in anesthetized spastic and normally developed Han-Wistar rats. In addition, the extent of epimuscular myofascial force transmission between synergistic GA, SO, and PL, as well as between the calf muscles and antagonistic tibialis anterior (TA), was investigated. Active length-force curves of spastic GA and PL were narrower with a reduced maximal active force. In contrast, active length-force characteristics of spastic SO were similar to those of controls. In reference position (90° ankle and knee angle), higher resistance to ankle dorsiflexion and increased passive stiffness was found for the spastic calf muscle group. At optimum length, passive stiffness and passive force of spastic GA were decreased, whereas those of spastic SO were increased. No mechanical interaction between the calf muscles and TA was found. As GA was lengthened, force from SO and PL declined despite a constant muscle-tendon unit length of SO and PL. However, the extent of this interaction was not different in spastic rats. In conclusion, the effects of spasticity on length-force characteristics were muscle specific. The changes observed for GA and PL muscles are consistent with the changes in limb mechanics reported for human patients. Our results indicate that altered mechanics in spastic rats cannot be attributed to differences in mechanical interaction, but originate from individual muscular structures. Copyright © 2014 the American Physiological Society.

  10. THE USE OF TRANSCUTANEOUS ELECTRICAL NERVE STIMULATION (TENS IN THE TREATMENT OF THE SPASTICITY - A REVIEW

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dahyan Wagner da Silva Silveira

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available This study it has as objective to argue the job of TENS in the spasticity, observing the main parameters, form of application and the mechanism for which TENS it acts in the spasticity. One is about a bibliographical revision based in the literature specialized selected scientific articles through search in the data base of scielo and of bireme, from the sources Medline and Lilacs. The studies found on the job of TENS in the spasticity, had pointed mainly that this chain reduces the spasticity significantly, in lower degrees. The stimulation electrical parameters had disclosed that TENS it (about A utilização da estimulação elétrica nervosa transcutânea (tens... 100Hz of raised frequency provides one better effect in the reduction of the spasticity. The types of TENS more used had been the conventional and the soon-intense one, however some studies had not presented the used duration of pulse, limit the determination of one better modality of TENS. Few studies had explained the mechanism of performance of the current related one. The ones that had made it, had pointed the release of opioid endogenous (Dynorphins for the central nervous system as main mechanism of performance, however this contrasts with the neurophysiologic bases of the high-frequency stimulation, that demonstrated better resulted in the joined studies. Still it is necessary more studies on the job of this modality of stimulation electrical in the spasticity, since important parameters as duration of pulse, time of application, numbers of attendance and performance mechanism remains without scientific evidence.

  11. Plantarflexor weakness negatively impacts walking in persons with multiple sclerosis more than plantarflexor spasticity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Joanne M.; Kremer, Theodore R.; Van Dillen, Linda R.; Naismith, Robert T.

    2014-01-01

    Objective To determine if plantarflexor (PF) spasticity or ankle strength best predicts variance in walking capacity or self-perceived limitations in walking in persons with multiple sclerosis (pwMS), and if pwMS with PF spasticity are weaker and have greater walking dysfunction than pwMS without PF spasticity. Design Cross-sectional study. Setting University research laboratory. Participants Forty-two pwMS (age: 42.9 ± 10.1 years; Expanded Disability Status Scale (EDSS): median = 3.0, range = 0–6) and 14 adults without disability (WD) (age: 41.9 ± 10.1 years). Intervention Not applicable. Main Outcome Measures PF spasticity and dorsiflexion (DF) and PF maximum voluntary isometric torque (MVIT) were assessed using the Modified Ashworth Scale (MAS) and a computerized dynamometer, respectively. The Timed 25-Foot Walk Test (T25FWT) was the primary outcome measure of walking capacity. Secondary measures included the Six Minute Walk Test (6MWT) and 12-item Multiple Sclerosis Walking Scale (MSWS-12). Results PF strength was the most consistent predictor of the variance in walking capacity (T25FWT: R2 change = 0.23 to 0.29, p ≤ 0.001; 6MWT: R2 change = 0.12 to 0.29, p ≤ 0.012), and self-perceived limitations of walking (MSWS-12: R2 change = 0.04 to 0.14, p 0.05) between the pwMS with PF spasticity and pwMS without PF spasticity for any of the outcome measures. Conclusions Our study suggests a unique contribution of PF weakness to walking dysfunction in pwMS, and highlights the importance of evaluating PF strength in this clinical population. PMID:24582617

  12. The efficacy of traditional Thai massage in decreasing spasticity in elderly stroke patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thanakiatpinyo T

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Thanitta Thanakiatpinyo,1 Supakij Suwannatrai,2 Ueamphon Suwannatrai,2 Phanitanong Khumkaew,2 Dokmai Wiwattamongkol,2 Manmas Vannabhum,2 Somluck Pianmanakit,1 Vilai Kuptniratsaikul1 1Department of Rehabilitation Medicine, 2Center of Applied Thai Traditional Medicine, Faculty of Medicine Siriraj Hospital, Mahidol University, Bangkok, Thailand Purpose: To study the efficacy of traditional Thai massage (TTM versus conventional physical therapy (PT programs in treating muscle spasticity, functional ability, anxiety, depression, and quality of life (QoL in Thai stroke patients.Methods: This randomized controlled trial with a blinded assessor was carried out at the Department of Rehabilitation Medicine, Siriraj Hospital (Bangkok, Thailand. The study included 50 stroke (onset ≥3 months outpatients experiencing spasticity at the elbow or knee muscles at a grade of ≥1+ on the modified Ashworth Scale who were ≥50 years old and able to communicate. The subjects were randomly allocated to the treatment group receiving TTM (24 subjects or the control group receiving the PT program (26 subjects. Both groups received treatment (either TTM or PT twice a week for 6 weeks. Spasticity grade, functional ability, anxiety, depression, and QoL were measured at Week 0 and Week 6.Results: At Week 6, the percentage of patients whose modified Ashworth Scale score had decreased by at least one grade was not statistically significant between the two groups. Both TTM and PT groups experienced a significant increase in functional ability and QoL, but no difference was found between the groups. Anxiety and depression scores showed a decreasing trend in the TTM group.Conclusion: This preliminary report showed no evidence that TTM differed from the PT program in decreasing spasticity. However, both interventions may relieve spasticity, increase functional ability, and improve QoL after 6 weeks. Only TTM can decrease anxiety and depression scores. Further studies with

  13. [Management of symptoms associated with spasticity in patients with multiple sclerosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Pablos, María Asunción; Costa-Frossard, Lucienne; García-Hernández, Carlos; García-Montes, Inmaculada; Escutia-Roig, Matilde

    To describe the role of nurses in the management of symptoms related to spasticity in patients with multiple sclerosis (MS). A descriptive study was developed based on a questionnaire on spasticity in MS patients. The questionnarie was completed through an anonymous tele-voting system at a national meeting with nurses involved in the management of these patients. Apart from fatigue, according to the opinion of the participants, the spasticity symptom associated with MS most notified by patients was difficulty in walking, followed by spasms and pain. Participants thought that it is important that nursing takes: 1) a role in identifying these symptoms, 2) should focus on the detection of the triggering or aggravating factors, and 3) on providing support in the assessment of the level of spasticity. It is important to inform about the correct use of anti-spasticity drugs, how to adjust the dosage and side effects of treatments, including cannabinoids via an oromucosal spray, titrating its doses according to each patient, and monitoring its tolerability, efficacy and adherence. Although there are usually resources to follow up these patients, there are still important gaps, including the lack of a specific follow-up protocol. Although all the participants are experts in the management of patients with MS, there is still diversity in the functions they perform, and the available resources they have in their hospitals. Nurses act as a key element in the process of identification of symptoms, training and monitoring of these patients with spasticity in EM. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  14. The relation between Ashworth scores and neuromechanical measurements of spasticity following stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alibiglou, Laila; Rymer, William Z; Harvey, Richard L; Mirbagheri, Mehdi M

    2008-07-15

    Spasticity is a common impairment that follows stroke, and it results typically in functional loss. For this reason, accurate quantification of spasticity has both diagnostic and therapeutic significance. The most widely used clinical assessment of spasticity is the modified Ashworth scale (MAS), an ordinal scale, but its validity, reliability and sensitivity have often been challenged. The present study addresses this deficit by examining whether quantitative measures of neural and muscular components of spasticity are valid, and whether they are strongly correlated with the MAS. We applied abrupt small amplitude joint stretches and Pseudorandom Binary Sequence (PRBS) perturbations to both paretic and non-paretic elbow and ankle joints of stroke survivors. Using advanced system identification techniques, we quantified the dynamic stiffness of these joints, and separated its muscular (intrinsic) and reflex components. The correlations between these quantitative measures and the MAS were investigated. We showed that our system identification technique is valid in characterizing the intrinsic and reflex stiffness and predicting the overall net torque. Conversely, our results reveal that there is no significant correlation between muscular and reflex torque/stiffness and the MAS magnitude. We also demonstrate that the slope and intercept of reflex and intrinsic stiffnesses plotted against the joint angle are not correlated with the MAS. Lack of significant correlation between our quantitative measures of stroke effects on spastic joints and the clinical assessment of muscle tone, as reflected in the MAS suggests that the MAS does not provide reliable information about the origins of the torque change associated with spasticity, or about its contributing components.

  15. Watermark Compression in Medical Image Watermarking Using Lempel-Ziv-Welch (LZW) Lossless Compression Technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badshah, Gran; Liew, Siau-Chuin; Zain, Jasni Mohd; Ali, Mushtaq

    2016-04-01

    In teleradiology, image contents may be altered due to noisy communication channels and hacker manipulation. Medical image data is very sensitive and can not tolerate any illegal change. Illegally changed image-based analysis could result in wrong medical decision. Digital watermarking technique can be used to authenticate images and detect as well as recover illegal changes made to teleradiology images. Watermarking of medical images with heavy payload watermarks causes image perceptual degradation. The image perceptual degradation directly affects medical diagnosis. To maintain the image perceptual and diagnostic qualities standard during watermarking, the watermark should be lossless compressed. This paper focuses on watermarking of ultrasound medical images with Lempel-Ziv-Welch (LZW) lossless-compressed watermarks. The watermark lossless compression reduces watermark payload without data loss. In this research work, watermark is the combination of defined region of interest (ROI) and image watermarking secret key. The performance of the LZW compression technique was compared with other conventional compression methods based on compression ratio. LZW was found better and used for watermark lossless compression in ultrasound medical images watermarking. Tabulated results show the watermark bits reduction, image watermarking with effective tamper detection and lossless recovery.

  16. Mutations in GALC cause late-onset Krabbe disease with predominant cerebellar ataxia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Yi-Hong; Choquet, Karine; La Piana, Roberta; Tétreault, Martine; Dicaire, Marie-Josée; Boycott, Kym M; Majewski, Jacek; Brais, Bernard

    2016-04-01

    Mutations in GALC cause Krabbe disease. This autosomal recessive leukodystrophy generally presents in early infancy as a severe disorder, but sometimes manifests as a milder adult-onset disease with spastic paraplegia as the main symptom. We recruited a family with five affected individuals presenting with adult-onset predominant cerebellar ataxia with mild spasticity. Whole exome sequencing (WES) revealed one novel and one previously reported compound heterozygous variants in GALC. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) confirmed the presence of typical Krabbe features. Our findings expand the phenotypic spectrum of adult-onset Krabbe disease and demonstrate the usefulness of combining WES and pattern-specific MRI for the diagnosis of neurodegenerative diseases.

  17. Electroacupuncture for Poststroke Spasticity: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Yiyi; Zhang, Claire Shuiqing; Liu, Shaonan; Wen, Zehuai; Zhang, Anthony Lin; Guo, Xinfeng; Lu, Chuanjian; Xue, Charlie Changli

    2017-12-01

    To evaluate the effects and safety of electroacupuncture (EA) for stroke patients with spasticity. Five English databases (PubMed, EMBASE, CINAHL, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, Allied and Complementary Medicine Database) and 4 Chinese databases (Chinese Biomedical Database, Chinese National Knowledge Infrastructure, Chongqing VIP Database, Wanfang Database) were searched from their inception to September 2016. Randomized controlled trials were included if they measured spasticity with the Modified Ashworth Scale (MAS) in stroke patients and investigated the add-on effects of electroacupuncture to routine pharmacotherapy and rehabilitation therapies. Information on patients, study design, treatment details and outcomes assessing spasticity severity, motor function, and activities of daily living was extracted. In total, 22 trials involving 1425 participants met the search criteria and were included. The estimated add-on effects of EA to reduce spasticity in the upper limbs as measured by the MAS (standardized mean difference [SMD]=-.57; 95% confidence interval [CI], -.84 to -.29), and to improve overall motor function as measured by the Fugl-Meyer Assessment of Sensorimotor Recovery (mean difference [MD]=10.60; 95% CI, 8.67-12.53) were significant. Significant add-on effects of EA were also shown for spasticity in the lower limbs, lower-limb motor function, and activities of daily living ([SMD=-.88; 95% CI, -1.42 to -.35;], [MD=4.42; 95% CI, .06-8.78], and [MD=6.85; 95% CI, 3.64-10.05], respectively), although with high heterogeneity. For upper-limb motor function, no significant add-on effects of EA were found. EA combined with conventional routine care has the potential of reducing spasticity in the upper and lower limbs and improving overall and lower extremity motor function and activities of daily living for patients with spasticity, within 180 days poststroke. Further studies of high methodological and reporting quality are needed to confirm

  18. Development of spasticity with age in a total population of children with cerebral palsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wagner Philippe

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The development of spasticity with age in children with cerebral palsy (CP has, to our knowledge, not been studied before. In 1994, a register and a health care program for children with CP in southern Sweden were initiated. In the programme the child's muscle tone according to the modified Ashworth scale is measured twice a year until six years of age, then once a year. We have used this data to analyse the development of spasticity with age in a total population of children with cerebral palsy. Methods All measurements of muscle tone in the gastrocnemius-soleus muscle in all children with CP from 0 to 15 years during the period 1995–2006 were analysed. The CP subtypes were classified according to the Surveillance of Cerebral Palsy in Europe network system. Using these criteria, the study was based on 6218 examinations in 547 children. For the statistical analysis the Ashworth scale was dichotomized. The levels 0–1 were gathered in one category and levels 2–4 in the other. The pattern of development with age was evaluated using piecewise logistic regression in combination with Akaike's An Information Criterion. Results In the total sample the degree of muscle tone increased up to 4 years of age. After 4 years of age the muscle tone decreased each year up to 12 years of age. A similar development was seen when excluding the children operated with selective dorsal rhizotomy, intrathecal baclofen pump or tendo Achilles lengthening. At 4 years of age about 47% of the children had spasticity in their gastro-soleus muscle graded as Ashworth 2–4. After 12 years of age 23% of the children had that level of spasticity. The CP subtypes spastic bilateral and spastic unilateral CP showed the same pattern as the total sample. Children with dyskinetic type of CP showed an increasing muscle tone up to age 6, followed by a decreasing pattern up to age 15. Conclusion In children with CP, the muscle tone as measured with the Ashworth

  19. Decreased contribution from afferent feedback to the soleus muscle during walking in patients with spastic stroke

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mazzaro, Nazarena; Nielsen, Jørgen Feldbæk; Grey, Michael James

    2007-01-01

    attached to the foot and leg was used to apply 3 types of ankle perturbations during treadmill walking. First, fast dorsiflexion perturbations were applied to elicit stretch reflexes in the SOL muscle. The SOL short-latency stretch reflex was facilitated in the patients (1.4 +/- 0.3) compared...... by the Ashworth score. These results indicate that although the stretch reflex response is facilitated during spastic gait, the contribution of afferent feedback to the ongoing locomotor SOL activity is depressed in patients with spastic stroke....

  20. Long-term functional benefits of selective dorsal rhizotomy for spastic cerebral palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dudley, Roy W R; Parolin, Michele; Gagnon, Bruno; Saluja, Rajeet; Yap, Rita; Montpetit, Kathleen; Ruck, Joanne; Poulin, Chantal; Cantin, Marie-Andrée; Benaroch, Thierry E; Farmer, Jean-Pierre

    2013-08-01

    Large-scale natural history studies of gross motor development have shown that children with spastic cerebral palsy (CP) plateau during childhood and actually decline through adolescence. Selective dorsal rhizotomy (SDR) is a well-recognized treatment for spastic CP, but little is known about long-term outcomes of this treatment. The purpose of this study was to assess the durability of functional outcomes in a large number of patients through adolescence and into early adulthood using standardized assessment tools. The authors analyzed long-term follow-up data in children who had been evaluated by a multidisciplinary team preoperatively and at 1, 5, 10, and 15 years after SDR. These evaluations included quantitative, standardized assessments of lower-limb tone (Ashworth Scale), Gross Motor Function Measure (GMFM), and performance of activities of daily living (ADLs) by the Pediatric Evaluation of Disability Inventory in children who had been stratified by motor severity using the Gross Motor Function Classification System (GMFCS). In addition, group-based trajectory modeling (GBTM) was used to identify any heterogeneity of response to SDR among these treated children, and to find which pretreatment variables might be associated with this heterogeneity. Finally, a chart review of adjunct orthopedic procedures required by these children following SDR was performed. Of 102 patients who underwent preoperative evaluations, 97, 62, 57, and 14 patients completed postoperative assessments at 1, 5, 10, and 15 years, respectively. After SDR, through adolescence and into early adulthood, statistically significant durable improvements in lower-limb muscle tone, gross motor function, and performance of ADLs were found. When stratified by the GMFCS, long-lasting improvements for GMFCS Groups I, II, and III were found. The GBTM revealed 4 groups of patients who responded differently to SDR. This group assignment was associated with distribution of spasticity (diplegia was

  1. Inter-rater reliability of the Modified Modified Ashworth Scale in assessing lower limb muscle spasticity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghotbi, Nastaran; Ansari, Noureddin Nakhostin; Naghdi, Soofia; Hasson, Scott; Jamshidpour, Boushra; Amiri, Somayeh

    2009-09-01

    To assess the inter-rater reliability of the Modified Modified Ashworth Scale (MMAS) in lower limb muscle spasticity. Cross-sectional observational study. Not applicable. Twenty-two adults with neurological conditions (17 women, five men, age range 21-82 years; mean +/- SD, 44 +/- 18 years) participated. Hip adductor, knee extensor and ankle plantarflexor were assessed in a random order. Inter-rater agreement for two raters was very good for the hip adductor and the knee extensor (weighted kappa = 0.82, p Ashworth Scale produced reliable measurements between raters in the assessment of lower limb muscle spasticity.

  2. Channel box compression device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakamizo, Hiroshi; Tanaka, Yuki.

    1996-01-01

    The device of the present invention reduces the volume of spent fuel channel boxes of power plant facilities to eliminate secondary wastes, suppress generation of radiation sources and improve storage space efficiency. The device has a box-like shape. A support frame is disposed on the lateral side of the box for supporting spent channel boxes. A horizontal transferring unit and a vertical transferring compression unit driven by a driving mechanism are disposed in the support frame. Further, the compression unit may have a rotational compression roller so as to move freely in the transferring unit. In addition, the transferring unit and the driving mechanism may be disposed outside of pool water. With such a constitution, since spent channel boxes are compressed and bent by horizontal movement of the transferring unit and the vertical movement of the compression unit, no cut pieces or cut powders are generated. Further, if the transferring unit and the driving mechanism are disposed outside of the pool water, it is not necessary to make them waterproof, which facilitates the maintenance. (I.S.)

  3. Optical pulse compression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glass, A.J.

    1975-01-01

    The interest in using large lasers to achieve a very short and intense pulse for generating fusion plasma has provided a strong impetus to reexamine the possibilities of optical pulse compression at high energy. Pulse compression allows one to generate pulses of long duration (minimizing damage problems) and subsequently compress optical pulses to achieve the short pulse duration required for specific applications. The ideal device for carrying out this program has not been developed. Of the two approaches considered, the Gires--Tournois approach is limited by the fact that the bandwidth and compression are intimately related, so that the group delay dispersion times the square of the bandwidth is about unity for all simple Gires--Tournois interferometers. The Treacy grating pair does not suffer from this limitation, but is inefficient because diffraction generally occurs in several orders and is limited by the problem of optical damage to the grating surfaces themselves. Nonlinear and parametric processes were explored. Some pulse compression was achieved by these techniques; however, they are generally difficult to control and are not very efficient. (U.S.)

  4. Percutaneous radiofrequency lesions adjacent to the dorsal root ganglion alleviate spasticity and pain in children with cerebral palsy: pilot study in 17 patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    van Rhijn Lodewijk W

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cerebral palsy (CP may cause severe spasticity, requiring neurosurgical procedures. The most common neurosurgical procedures are continuous infusion of intrathecal baclofen and selective dorsal rhizotomy. Both are invasive and complex procedures. We hypothesized that a percutaneous radiofrequency lesion of the dorsal root ganglion (RF-DRG could be a simple and safe alternative treatment. We undertook a pilot study to test this hypothesis. Methods We performed an RF-DRG procedure in 17 consecutive CP patients with severe hip flexor/adductor spasms accompanied by pain or care-giving difficulties. Six children were systematically evaluated at baseline, and 1 month and 6 months after treatment by means of the Modified Ashworth Scale (MAS, Gross Motor Function Measure (GMFM and a self-made caregiver's questionnaire. Eleven subsequent children were evaluated using a Visual Analogue Scale (VAS for spasticity, pain and ease of care. Results A total of 19 RF-DRG treatments were performed in 17 patients. We found a small improvement in muscle tone measured by MAS, but no effect on the GMFM scale. Despite this, the caregivers of these six treated children unanimously stated that the quality of life of their children had indeed improved after the RF-DRG. In the subsequent 11 children we found improvements in all VAS scores, in a range comparable to the conventional treatment options. Conclusion RF-DRG is a promising new treatment option for severe spasticity in CP patients, and its definitive effectiveness remains to be defined in a randomised controlled trial.

  5. Isentropic Compression of Argon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oona, H.; Solem, J.C.; Veeser, L.R.; Ekdahl, C.A.; Rodriquez, P.J.; Younger, S.M.; Lewis, W.; Turley, W.D.

    1997-01-01

    We are studying the transition of argon from an insulator to a conductor by compressing the frozen gas isentropically to pressures at which neighboring atomic orbitals overlap sufficiently to allow some electron motion between atoms. Argon and the other rare gases have closed electron shells and therefore remain montomic, even when they solidify. Their simple structure makes it likely that any measured change in conductivity is due to changes in the atomic structure, not in molecular configuration. As the crystal is compressed the band gap closes, allowing increased conductivity. We have begun research to determine the conductivity at high pressures, and it is our intention to determine the compression at which the crystal becomes a metal

  6. Passive muscle properties are altered in children with cerebral palsy before the age of 3 years and are difficult to distinguish clinically from spasticity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Willerslev-Olsen, Maria; Lorentzen, Jakob; Sinkjær, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    AIM: Clinical determination of spasticity is confounded by the difficulty in distinguishing reflex from passive contributions to muscle stiffness. There is, therefore, a risk that children with cerebral palsy (CP) receive antispasticity treatment unnecessarily. To investigate this, we aimed...... children with spastic CP (21 males, 14 females; mean age 9y, SD 3y 4mo; range 3-15y) and 28 control children without CP (19 males, nine females; mean age 8y 11mo, SD 2y 10mo; range 3-15y). Twenty-seven children were diagnosed as having spastic hemiplegia, six with spastic diplegia, and two with spastic...... tetraplegia. According to the Gross Motor Function Classification System, 31 children were classified in level I, two in level II, and two in level III. RESULTS: Only seven children with spastic CP showed reflex stiffness outside the range of the control children. In contrast, 20 children with spastic CP...

  7. Flexor origin slide for contracture of spastic finger flexor muscles: a retrospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thevenin-Lemoine, Camille; Denormandie, Philippe; Schnitzler, Alexis; Lautridou, Christine; Allieu, Yves; Genêt, François

    2013-03-06

    Contracture of the wrist and extrinsic finger flexor and pronator muscles is a common consequence of central nervous system disorders. The proximal release of the extrinsic flexor and pronator muscles was first described by Page and Scaglietti for a Volkmann contracture. The aim of the present study was to assess the amount of increase in extension and the improvements in global hand function that can be expected following this lengthening procedure in patients with central nervous system disorders. A single-center retrospective review of patients with central nervous system lesions and contractures of the wrist and extrinsic finger flexor and forearm pronator muscles, causing aesthetic, hygienic, or functional impairment, was carried out. The Page-Scaglietti technique was used for all interventions. Before the operation, motor nerve blocks were used to distinguish between spasticity and contractures with surgical intervention only for contractures. The Zancolli and House classifications were used to evaluate improvements. Data from fifty-four hands and fifty patients (thirty-five men and fifteen women) were evaluated. The mean duration of follow-up (and standard deviation) was 26 ± 21 months (range, three to 124 months). The mean gain (and standard deviation) in wrist extension with fingers extended was 67° ± 25° (range, -10° to 110°). Preoperatively, no hands were classified as Zancolli Group 1, whereas twenty-five hands were classified as Zancolli Group 1 at the latest follow-up review. Ten nonfunctional hands (rated as House Group 0 or Group 1) became functional as a supporting hand postoperatively. Zancolli and House classifications increased significantly (p contracture of the intrinsic muscles, which required further intervention. The Page-Scaglietti technique appears to improve range of motion and function in people with wrist and finger contractures due to central nervous system disorders.

  8. Cortical somatosensory reorganization in children with spastic cerebral palsy: a multimodal neuroimaging study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    CHRISTOS ePAPADELIS

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Although cerebral palsy (CP is among the most common causes of physical disability in early childhood, we know little about the functional and structural changes of this disorder in the developing brain. Here, we investigated with three different neuroimaging modalities (magnetoencephalography (MEG, diffusion tension imaging (DTI, and resting state fMRI whether spastic CP is associated with functional and anatomical abnormalities in the sensorimotor network. Ten children participated in the study: four with diplegic CP (DCP, three with hemiplegic CP (HCP, and three typically-developing (TD children. Somatosensory evoked fields (SEFs were recorded in response to pneumatic stimuli applied to digits D1, D3, and D5 of both hands. Several parameters of water diffusion were calculated from DTI between the thalamus and the precentral and postcentral gyri in both hemispheres. The sensorimotor resting state networks (RSNs were examined by using an independent component analysis method. Tactile stimulation of the fingers elicited the first prominent cortical response at ~50 ms, in all except one child, localized over the primary somatosensory cortex (S1. In five CP children, abnormal somatotopic organization was observed in the affected (or more affected hemisphere. Euclidean distances were markedly different between the two hemispheres in the HCP children, and between DCP and TD children for both hemispheres. DTI analysis revealed decreased fractional anisotropy and increased apparent diffusion coefficient for the thalamocortical pathways in the more affected compared to less affected hemisphere in CP children. Rs-fMRI results indicated absent and/or abnormal sensorimotor RSNs for children with HCP and DCP consistent with the severity and location of their lesions. Our findings suggest an abnormal somatosensory processing mechanism in the sensorimotor network of children with CP possibly as a result of diminished thalamocortical projections.

  9. Anisotropic Concrete Compressive Strength

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gustenhoff Hansen, Søren; Jørgensen, Henrik Brøner; Hoang, Linh Cao

    2017-01-01

    When the load carrying capacity of existing concrete structures is (re-)assessed it is often based on compressive strength of cores drilled out from the structure. Existing studies show that the core compressive strength is anisotropic; i.e. it depends on whether the cores are drilled parallel...... correlation to the curing time. The experiments show no correlation between the anisotropy and the curing time and a small strength difference between the two drilling directions. The literature shows variations on which drilling direction that is strongest. Based on a Monto Carlo simulation of the expected...

  10. Image data compression investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myrie, Carlos

    1989-01-01

    NASA continuous communications systems growth has increased the demand for image transmission and storage. Research and analysis was conducted on various lossy and lossless advanced data compression techniques or approaches used to improve the efficiency of transmission and storage of high volume stellite image data such as pulse code modulation (PCM), differential PCM (DPCM), transform coding, hybrid coding, interframe coding, and adaptive technique. In this presentation, the fundamentals of image data compression utilizing two techniques which are pulse code modulation (PCM) and differential PCM (DPCM) are presented along with an application utilizing these two coding techniques.

  11. [Seven patients of argininemia with spastic tetraplegia as the first and major symptom and prenatal diagnosis of two fetuses with high risk].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Tongfei; Li, Xiyuan; Ding, Yuan; Liu, Yupeng; Song, Jinqing; Wang, Qiao; Li, Mengqiu; Qin, Yaping; Yang, Yanling

    2015-06-01

    Argininemia is a rare disorder of urea cycle defect. The clinical manifestations of this disorder are similar to those of cerebral palsy so that the diagnosis is usually much delayed. This study aimed to investigate the phenotypes and genotypes of seven Chinese patients suffering from argininemia. Three boys and four girls with spastic tetraplegia were diagnosed as argininemia by blood aminoacids analysis and ARG1 gene study. Patients were given a protein-restricted diet, citrulline, sodium benzoate, and other treatment intervention. The mother of Patient 5 and 6 accepted genetic counseling and underwent prenatal diagnosis by amniocentesis. Seven patients presented with progressive spastic tetraplegia and poor physical growth from the age of 1 month to 4 years. Argininemia was found at the age of 1 year and 10 months to 12 years. Five patients had mental retardations. Three had seizures. Their blood arginine elevated (86.66 to 349.83 µmol/L, normal controls 5 to 25 µmol/L). Liver dysfunction was found in six patients. Five patients had elevated blood ammonia levels. In four patients, cerebral atrophy was observed by cranial magnetic resonance imaging. Nine mutations in the ARG1 gene were identified from 7 patients. Only two mutations, c.703G > A in exon 7 and c.32T > C in exon 1 had been reported. c.34G > T, c.53G > A, c.67delG, c.232dupG, c.374C > T, c.539G > C and c.646-649delCTCA, were novel mutations of ARG1. A homozygous mutation c.703G > A was found in the amniocytes of Patient 5's mother, indicating that the fetus was affected by argininemia. Induced abortion was performed. c.53G > A from Patient 6 was not found in the amniocytes of her mother, indicating that the fetus was not affected by hepatocyte arginase deficiency. The result was confirmed by postnatal mutation analysis of cord blood and the normal blood arginine of the newborn. Argininemia is one of the few treatable causes of pediatric spastic paralysis. In this study, seven Chinese patients with

  12. The possibilities of compressed sensing based migration

    KAUST Repository

    Aldawood, Ali

    2013-09-22

    Linearized waveform inversion or Least-square migration helps reduce migration artifacts caused by limited acquisition aperture, coarse sampling of sources and receivers, and low subsurface illumination. However, leastsquare migration, based on L2-norm minimization of the misfit function, tends to produce a smeared (smoothed) depiction of the true subsurface reflectivity. Assuming that the subsurface reflectivity distribution is a sparse signal, we use a compressed-sensing (Basis Pursuit) algorithm to retrieve this sparse distribution from a small number of linear measurements. We applied a compressed-sensing algorithm to image a synthetic fault model using dense and sparse acquisition geometries. Tests on synthetic data demonstrate the ability of compressed-sensing to produce highly resolved migrated images. We, also, studied the robustness of the Basis Pursuit algorithm in the presence of Gaussian random noise.

  13. Compression syndrome of the left renal vein

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Justich, E.

    1982-04-01

    Severe compression of the left renal vein produces a pressure gradient between it and the inferior vena cava and results in changes in haemodynamics. The cause of the narrowing is usually the aorta, less commonly the superior mesenteric artery. Compression of the left renal vein may be responsible for a number of abnormalities such as primary varicoceles, primary varices of the ovarian, renal, pelvic and ureteric veins on the left, the more frequent occurrence of unilateral renal vein thrombosis on the left and the development of renovascular hypertension. One hundred and twenty-three selective phlebograms of the left renal vein and CT examinations of this structure in a further 87 patients acting as a control group were carried out. The significance of compression of the left renal vein as an aetiological factor in the development of the above mentioned abnormalities is discussed.

  14. Patient-Identified Factors That Influence Spasticity in People with Stroke and Multiple Sclerosis Receiving Botulinum Toxin Injection Treatments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheung, Janice; Rancourt, Amanda; Di Poce, Stephanie; Levine, Amy; Hoang, Jessica; Ismail, Farooq; Boulias, Chris

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Purpose: To describe the nature, extent, and impact of spasticity; determine factors that are perceived to influence its severity; and examine the relationship between time since diagnosis and impact of spasticity on daily activities in people with stroke and multiple sclerosis (MS) who are receiving botulinum toxin injection treatments. Methods: After a cross-sectional telephone survey, descriptive statistics and correlations were analyzed separately for the stroke and MS groups. Results: A total of 29 people with stroke and 10 with MS were surveyed. Both groups perceived increased spasticity with outdoor cold (69% stroke, 60% MS), muscle fatigue (59% stroke, 80% MS), and mental stress (59% stroke, 90% MS). No statistically significant correlations were found between time since diagnosis and perceived impact of spasticity on function in the stroke (r=0.07, p=0.37) or MS (r=0.16, p=0.33) groups. The MS group experienced bilateral and more severe perception of spasticity in the legs than the stroke group and identified more factors as worsening their spasticity (pspasticity was significantly correlated with severity of impact of the following factors in the MS group only: lying on the back (r=0.70, pspasticity differently depending on individual factors, severity, location (arm vs. leg), and distribution of spasticity (unilateral vs. bilateral). Clinicians can use the findings to better understand, educate, and treat people with stroke and MS. PMID:25931667

  15. [Foot deformity in children with spastic forms of cerebral palsy: the treatment with botulinum toxin type A (dysport)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurenkova, A L; Dutikova, E M; Nikitin, S S; Artemenko, A R

    2010-01-01

    The objective is to study the effect of dysport injections on the clinical and electromyographic changes in 35 patients (mean age 5,3+/-2,0 years) with spastic forms of cerebral palsy (26 with spastic diplegia, 9 with hemiparetic form) with equinus and equinovarus deformity. Depending on the clinical situation, dysport was injected in a total dose of 20-30 u per 1 kg of the body mass. Gastrocnemius muscles were injected more frequently than soleus and posterior tibial muscles. The treatment resulted in the significant reduction of spasticity on the Ashworth scale, decrease of equinus deformity, positive changes in the parameters of stepping on flat foot, independent standing and walking, the beginning of support period from the heel. During the arbitrary contraction, the amplitude of bioelectrical activity of target muscles of low extremities reduced, though not to the extent of the motor activity loss; the reciprocity coefficient decreased from 0,69+/-0,32 to 0,47+/-0,28 in patients with spastic diplegia and from 0,45+/-0,34 to 0,34+/-0,25 in patients with hemiparetic form. The effect of dysport was higher in hemiparetic form compared to spastic diplegia. The best results for spastic diplegia were revealed in patients with isolated spasticity without severe disturbances of reciprocal relations in shin muscles and pathological synkinesia.

  16. Modified Ashworth Scale (MAS) Model based on Clinical Data Measurement towards Quantitative Evaluation of Upper Limb Spasticity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puzi, A. Ahmad; Sidek, S. N.; Mat Rosly, H.; Daud, N.; Yusof, H. Md

    2017-11-01

    Spasticity is common symptom presented amongst people with sensorimotor disabilities. Imbalanced signals from the central nervous systems (CNS) which are composed of the brain and spinal cord to the muscles ultimately leading to the injury and death of motor neurons. In clinical practice, the therapist assesses muscle spasticity using a standard assessment tool like Modified Ashworth Scale (MAS), Modified Tardiue Scale (MTS) or Fugl-Meyer Assessment (FMA). This is done subjectively based on the experience and perception of the therapist subjected to the patient fatigue level and body posture. However, the inconsistency in the assessment is prevalent and could affect the efficacy of the rehabilitation process. Thus, the aim of this paper is to describe the methodology of data collection and the quantitative model of MAS developed to satisfy its description. Two subjects with MAS of 2 and 3 spasticity levels were involved in the clinical data measurement. Their level of spasticity was verified by expert therapist using current practice. Data collection was established using mechanical system equipped with data acquisition system and LABVIEW software. The procedure engaged repeated series of flexion of the affected arm that was moved against the platform using a lever mechanism and performed by the therapist. The data was then analyzed to investigate the characteristics of spasticity signal in correspondence to the MAS description. Experimental results revealed that the methodology used to quantify spasticity satisfied the MAS tool requirement according to the description. Therefore, the result is crucial and useful towards the development of formal spasticity quantification model.

  17. Temporal compressive sensing systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reed, Bryan W.

    2017-12-12

    Methods and systems for temporal compressive sensing are disclosed, where within each of one or more sensor array data acquisition periods, one or more sensor array measurement datasets comprising distinct linear combinations of time slice data are acquired, and where mathematical reconstruction allows for calculation of accurate representations of the individual time slice datasets.

  18. Compressive CFAR Radar Processing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Anitori, L.; Rossum, W.L. van; Otten, M.P.G.; Maleki, A.; Baraniuk, R.

    2013-01-01

    In this paper we investigate the performance of a combined Compressive Sensing (CS) Constant False Alarm Rate (CFAR) radar processor under different interference scenarios using both the Cell Averaging (CA) and Order Statistic (OS) CFAR detectors. Using the properties of the Complex Approximate

  19. Compressive CFAR radar detection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Anitori, L.; Otten, M.P.G.; Rossum, W.L. van; Maleki, A.; Baraniuk, R.

    2012-01-01

    In this paper we develop the first Compressive Sensing (CS) adaptive radar detector. We propose three novel architectures and demonstrate how a classical Constant False Alarm Rate (CFAR) detector can be combined with ℓ1-norm minimization. Using asymptotic arguments and the Complex Approximate

  20. Gas compression infrared generator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hug, W.F.

    1980-01-01

    A molecular gas is compressed in a quasi-adiabatic manner to produce pulsed radiation during each compressor cycle when the pressure and temperature are sufficiently high, and part of the energy is recovered during the expansion phase, as defined in U.S. Pat. No. 3,751,666; characterized by use of a cylinder with a reciprocating piston as a compressor