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Sample records for causing psychosomatic illness

  1. Association between psychosomatic health symptoms and common mental illness in Ghanaian adolescents: Age and gender as potential moderators.

    Glozah, Franklin N; Pevalin, David J

    2017-09-01

    Little is known about the role of age and gender in the association between psychosomatic symptoms and common mental illness in Ghanaian adolescents. This cross-sectional study examined age and gender as moderators between psychosomatic symptoms and common mental illness using data from a school-based survey ( N = 770). Males reported higher psychosomatic symptoms and common mental illness, while younger adolescents reported higher common mental illness only. Psychosomatic symptoms were positively associated with common mental illness, but age and gender did not moderate this association. Interventions aimed at reducing the prevalence rate in psychosomatic symptoms are crucial in decreasing common mental illness in Ghanaian adolescents.

  2. Preejaculatory illness syndrome: Two cases of a rare psychosomatic disorder

    Adel Mohsen

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Human ejaculation happens in the orgasmic phase of the human sexual response cycle. Among psychosomatic ejaculatory disorders that may happen before ejaculation, we present two cases of preejaculatory illness syndrome. The two cases shared common symptoms of sympathetic over activity, the sensation of impending death, and muscle atonia with subsequent failure to ejaculate. Depression, anxiety disorders, and family histories of psychiatric problems were noticed as risk factors. Medical conditions that may lead to panic attack type symptoms were eliminated before the final diagnosis. After the failure of empirical medications, symptoms became controlled with fluoxetine. Patients reported a recurrence of the symptoms on trying to stop the prescribed medication. On the last follow-up, they still take fluoxetine on a regular base with satisfactory sexual life.

  3. Severe psychosomatic illness in children: effect on a pediatric ward's staff.

    Fialkov, M J; Miller, J A

    1981-12-01

    Observations of a pediatric ward's response to the repeated hospitalization of an asthmatic child revealed a close parallel to the transactional patterns described in families of children with psychosomatic illnesses. Characteristics of such families include enmeshment, overprotectiveness, rigidity and resistance to change, lack of conflict resolution, and use of the child's sick role to relieve tension and discomfort within the family. In this article we have attempted to demonstrate the similarity of responses between these families and groups of hospital ward personnel. Resolution of the ward personnel's internal conflict was followed by changes in the coping abilities of the staff, with a successful outcome for a second child with a similar clinical condition.

  4. Somatic expressions of grief and psychosomatic illness in the works of William Shakespeare and his coevals.

    Heaton, Kenneth W

    2012-10-01

    To find out if Shakespeare, famed for his insights into human nature, is exceptional in how much his characters express grief through somatic symptoms and signs, and by physical illness. The texts of all large-scale works currently attributed to Shakespeare (39 plays, 3 long narrative poems) were systematically searched for bodily changes and for evidence of grief as dominating the character's emotional state at the time. The findings were compared with those from a search of 46 works, similar in genre, by 15 prominent playwrights active at the same time as Shakespeare. In Shakespeare 31 different grief-associated symptoms or signs were found, in 140 instances. They are present in all but two of his plays and long poems and involve most systems of the body. With non-Shakespearean writers there were 26 kinds, 132 instances. Twenty-two changes are common to both groups, including fainting, death (sudden or after a decline), and wrinkled face, and symptoms such as malaise, fatigue, awareness of the heart-beat, and anorexia. Ten somatic expressions of grief were found only in Shakespeare, including hyperventilation, hair turning white and premature childbirth. Four were found only in his contemporaries but were trivial or unconvincing. Deaths and non-fatal illnesses are prevalent in Shakespeare. Grieving Shakespearean characters exhibit many somatic symptoms and signs and a wide range of psychosomatic illnesses. This panoply of psychosomatic phenomena may be an artistic artefact but it also confirms that Shakespeare's empathy with grieving humanity was unrivalled. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. [Misdiagnosis of psychosomatic disorders].

    Laemmel, K

    1993-09-07

    Considering the frequency with which the diagnosis 'psychosomatic illness' is established, it is puzzling how little attention has been paid to its differential diagnosis. The reason for this may be found not only in the difficulties with which that diagnosis is made but also in the doctor's view of the world and his or her understanding of illness in general. If the doctor only believes in what can be measured and weighed as being real, all symptoms for which no identifiable cause can be found must be considered as imaginary and 'all in the patient's head'. Most contemporary theories about the origin of psychosomatic illness are based on Freud's speculations, established at the beginning of this century. The are deeply rooted in the mechanistic, reductionistic and monocausalitic theories typical for his time. They suggested that the metamorphosis from thought-processes to somatic symptoms begin with a rather mysterious 'jump', taking place in the unconscious of the patient and thus remaining unknown to him. Today we know that all illness has a multifactorial basis and does not develop in a straight line but as a cybernetic loop. Psychosocial factors play as much a role as biological ones. Diagnosis by exclusion (no clear physical findings) or through dualistic thinking (the cause must be either psychological or physical) are, after inadequate knowledge of somatic or psychological medicine, the most common source of the erroneous diagnosis of psychosomatic illnesses. To avoid this, a psychosomatic perspective is needed, an outlook which is based on a holistic understanding of man in health and sickness.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  6. Psychosomatic medicine and cybernetics.

    Ishikawa, H

    1979-01-01

    In our daily psychosomatic medicine clinics, we have adopted four principles from Wiener's cybernetics and von Bertalanffy's general system theory. We use the polygraphic method for the diagnosis of psychosomatic disease (black box principle). For the control of psychosomatic symptoms, we use the biofeedback method (feedback principle). We use systematic desensitization to relieve social stresses which cause psychosomatic disease (open and closed system principle). And lastly, transactional analysis, which corresponds to the information and energy principle.

  7. Alexithymia and Somatosensory Amplification Link Perceived Psychosocial Stress and Somatic Symptoms in Outpatients with Psychosomatic Illness

    Mutsuhiro Nakao

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: Psychosomatic patients often complain of a variety of somatic symptoms. We sought to clarify the role of clinical predictors of complaints of somatic symptoms. Methods: We enrolled 604 patients visiting a psychosomatic outpatient clinic. The outcome was the total number of somatic symptoms, and the candidate clinical predictors were perceived psychosocial stress, alexithymia, somatosensory amplification, adaptation, anxiety, and depression. All participants completed questionnaires assessing the outcome and the predictors. Results: The average number of reported somatic symptoms was 4.8; the most frequent was fatigue (75.3%, followed by insomnia (56.1%, low-back pain (49.5%, headache (44.7%, and palpitations (43.1%. Multiple regression analysis showed that the total number of somatic symptoms was significantly associated with the degree of perceived psychosocial stress, alexithymia, somatosensory amplification, and depression. Also, structural equation models indicated links between excessive adaptation (via perceived psychosocial stress, alexithymia, and somatosensory amplification and the total number of somatic symptoms. Conclusion: The results suggested that the association between psychosocial stress and reported somatic symptoms is mediated by alexithymia and somatosensory amplification in psychosomatic patients.

  8. Psychosomatic syndromes and anorexia nervosa

    Abbate-Daga Giovanni

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In spite of the role of some psychosomatic factors as alexithymia, mood intolerance, and somatization in both pathogenesis and maintenance of anorexia nervosa (AN, few studies have investigated the prevalence of psychosomatic syndromes in AN. The aim of this study was to use the Diagnostic Criteria for Psychosomatic Research (DCPR to assess psychosomatic syndromes in AN and to evaluate if psychosomatic syndromes could identify subgroups of AN patients. Methods 108 AN inpatients (76 AN restricting subtype, AN-R, and 32 AN binge-purging subtype, AN-BP were consecutively recruited and psychosomatic syndromes were diagnosed with the Structured Interview for DCPR. Participants were asked to complete psychometric tests: Body Shape Questionnaire, Beck Depression Inventory, Eating Disorder Inventory–2, and Temperament and Character Inventory. Data were submitted to cluster analysis. Results Illness denial (63% and alexithymia (54.6% resulted to be the most common syndromes in our sample. Cluster analysis identified three groups: moderate psychosomatic group (49%, somatization group (26%, and severe psychosomatic group (25%. The first group was mainly represented by AN-R patients reporting often only illness denial and alexithymia as DCPR syndromes. The second group showed more severe eating and depressive symptomatology and frequently DCPR syndromes of the somatization cluster. Thanatophobia DCPR syndrome was also represented in this group. The third group reported longer duration of illness and DCPR syndromes were highly represented; in particular, all patients were found to show the alexithymia DCPR syndrome. Conclusions These results highlight the need of a deep assessment of psychosomatic syndromes in AN. Psychosomatic syndromes correlated differently with both severity of eating symptomatology and duration of illness: therefore, DCPR could be effective to achieve tailored treatments.

  9. Mental stress as consequence and cause of vision loss: the dawn of psychosomatic ophthalmology for preventive and personalized medicine.

    Sabel, Bernhard A; Wang, Jiaqi; Cárdenas-Morales, Lizbeth; Faiq, Muneeb; Heim, Christine

    2018-06-01

    The loss of vision after damage to the retina, optic nerve, or brain has often grave consequences in everyday life such as problems with recognizing faces, reading, or mobility. Because vision loss is considered to be irreversible and often progressive, patients experience continuous mental stress due to worries, anxiety, or fear with secondary consequences such as depression and social isolation. While prolonged mental stress is clearly a consequence of vision loss, it may also aggravate the situation. In fact, continuous stress and elevated cortisol levels negatively impact the eye and brain due to autonomous nervous system (sympathetic) imbalance and vascular dysregulation; hence stress may also be one of the major causes of visual system diseases such as glaucoma and optic neuropathy. Although stress is a known risk factor, its causal role in the development or progression of certain visual system disorders is not widely appreciated. This review of the literature discusses the relationship of stress and ophthalmological diseases. We conclude that stress is both consequence and cause of vision loss. This creates a vicious cycle of a downward spiral, in which initial vision loss creates stress which further accelerates vision loss, creating even more stress and so forth. This new psychosomatic perspective has several implications for clinical practice. Firstly, stress reduction and relaxation techniques (e.g., meditation, autogenic training, stress management training, and psychotherapy to learn to cope) should be recommended not only as complementary to traditional treatments of vision loss but possibly as preventive means to reduce progression of vision loss. Secondly, doctors should try their best to inculcate positivity and optimism in their patients while giving them the information the patients are entitled to, especially regarding the important value of stress reduction. In this way, the vicious cycle could be interrupted. More clinical studies are now

  10. Family functioning and illness perception of parents of children with atopic dermatitis, living without skin symptoms, but with psychosomatic symptoms.

    Rodríguez-Orozco, Alain R; Kanán-Cedeño, E G; Guillén Martínez, E; Campos Garibay, M J

    2011-03-01

    Emotional factors and a recurrent psychosomatic environment, have been implicated in the evolution of atopic dermatitis. These, in turn, affect the disease. This study was under taken to evaluate the functioning of families with a child that has atopic dermatitis without skin symptoms and the parents' perceptions of their child's disease.Semi-quantitative and cross-sectional study in which questionnaires were applied: one to study family functioning (Espejel et al. scale) and the second to determine aspects of parental perception of their child's atopic dermatitis. Pearson's correlation was used to analyze the correlation between the categories of the Family Function Scale.The most affected categories of family functioning were authority, handling of disruptive conduct, communication, and negative affect. The most significant positive correlations between the categories of family functioning were: authority and support, r=0.867, pparents, 66.4% thought that the pharmacotherapy used for their child's atopic dermatitis was not effective, and 33.3% of parents stated that the disease had affected their child's daily activities.In families of children with atopic dermatitis, various family environment factors facilitate the recurrence of symptoms even when no cutaneous lesions have been found on the child. The identification and use of family resources to face this disease are aspects that should be taken into consideration during the psychotherapeutic management of these families, putting emphasis on the most affected functional categories of these families in a strategy that should be implanted in a multi-disciplinary context.

  11. Psychosomatic disorders: An overview for oral physician

    Nerella Narendra Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A psychosomatic disorder involves both the body and mind. These diseases have physical symptoms originating from mental or emotional causes. Most common causes are stress, anxiety, and depression. When these psychological entities are not perceived properly, it may result in somatic disease due to conversion hysteria. Even the oral and paraoral structures show manifestations of these psychosomatic disorders. The present review has been done from text books and articles relevant to psychosomatic disorders. Relevant articles have been selected and filtered from databases using MeSH terms psychosomatic diseases, oral mucosal diseases, stress, etc., with boolean operators from 1990 till date. This review highlights the important aspects of the psychosomatic diseases affecting oral cavity.

  12. What Do Patients Think about the Cause of Their Mental Disorder? A Qualitative and Quantitative Analysis of Causal Beliefs of Mental Disorder in Inpatients in Psychosomatic Rehabilitation.

    Magaard, Julia Luise; Schulz, Holger; Brütt, Anna Levke

    2017-01-01

    Patients' causal beliefs about their mental disorders are important for treatment because they affect illness-related behaviours. However, there are few studies exploring patients' causal beliefs about their mental disorder. (a) To qualitatively explore patients' causal beliefs of their mental disorder, (b) to explore frequencies of patients stating causal beliefs, and (c) to investigate differences of causal beliefs according to patients' primary diagnoses. Inpatients in psychosomatic rehabilitation were asked an open-ended question about their three most important causal beliefs about their mental illness. Answers were obtained from 678 patients, with primary diagnoses of depression (N = 341), adjustment disorder (N = 75), reaction to severe stress (N = 57) and anxiety disorders (N = 40). Two researchers developed a category system inductively and categorised the reported causal beliefs. Qualitative analysis has been supplemented by logistic regression analyses. The causal beliefs were organized into twelve content-related categories. Causal beliefs referring to "problems at work" (47%) and "problems in social environment" (46%) were most frequently mentioned by patients with mental disorders. 35% of patients indicate causal beliefs related to "self/internal states". Patients with depression and patients with anxiety disorders stated similar causal beliefs, whereas patients with reactions to severe stress and adjustment disorders stated different causal beliefs in comparison to patients with depression. There was no opportunity for further exploration, because we analysed written documents. These results add a detailed insight to mentally ill patients' causal beliefs to illness perception literature. Additionally, evidence about differences in frequencies of causal beliefs between different illness groups complement previous findings. For future research it is important to clarify the relation between patients' causal beliefs and the chosen treatment.

  13. What Do Patients Think about the Cause of Their Mental Disorder? A Qualitative and Quantitative Analysis of Causal Beliefs of Mental Disorder in Inpatients in Psychosomatic Rehabilitation.

    Julia Luise Magaard

    Full Text Available Patients' causal beliefs about their mental disorders are important for treatment because they affect illness-related behaviours. However, there are few studies exploring patients' causal beliefs about their mental disorder.(a To qualitatively explore patients' causal beliefs of their mental disorder, (b to explore frequencies of patients stating causal beliefs, and (c to investigate differences of causal beliefs according to patients' primary diagnoses.Inpatients in psychosomatic rehabilitation were asked an open-ended question about their three most important causal beliefs about their mental illness. Answers were obtained from 678 patients, with primary diagnoses of depression (N = 341, adjustment disorder (N = 75, reaction to severe stress (N = 57 and anxiety disorders (N = 40. Two researchers developed a category system inductively and categorised the reported causal beliefs. Qualitative analysis has been supplemented by logistic regression analyses.The causal beliefs were organized into twelve content-related categories. Causal beliefs referring to "problems at work" (47% and "problems in social environment" (46% were most frequently mentioned by patients with mental disorders. 35% of patients indicate causal beliefs related to "self/internal states". Patients with depression and patients with anxiety disorders stated similar causal beliefs, whereas patients with reactions to severe stress and adjustment disorders stated different causal beliefs in comparison to patients with depression.There was no opportunity for further exploration, because we analysed written documents.These results add a detailed insight to mentally ill patients' causal beliefs to illness perception literature. Additionally, evidence about differences in frequencies of causal beliefs between different illness groups complement previous findings. For future research it is important to clarify the relation between patients' causal beliefs and the chosen treatment.

  14. [Perspectives of psychoanalytic psychosomatics].

    Küchenhoff, J

    2001-01-01

    The paper discusses a variety of perspectives of psychoanalytic psychosomatics in the past, the present and the future. An epigenetic model of scientific development is introduced and developmental strains in psychosomatic medicine are evaluated according to the claims of the bio-psycho-social model. In historical terms, the psychological dimension of psychoanalytic psychosomatics has been the first strain to be elaborated; it is being extended still. The biological, somatic and bodily dimension of psychosomatic medicine was the next to be explored; during the last decade, this strain has found increasing interest, especially neurobiological research. Though the social dimension has not been neglected, it will be the main task for psychoanalytic psychosomatics to consider in the future. Likewise, a mandatory future challenge will be a more intensive discussion of the epistemological basis of psychosomatic medicine and psychoanalytic psychosomatics. The historical development of psychosomatic medicine is highlighted by examples drawn mainly from the history of Heidelberg Psychosomatic University Clinic that has its 50th anniversary in 2000.

  15. Psychosomatic Aspects of Cancer: An Overview.

    Murray, John B.

    1980-01-01

    It is suggested in this literature review on the psychosomatic aspects of cancer that psychoanalytic interpretations which focused on intrapsychic elements have given way to considerations of rehabilitation and assistance with the complex emotional reactions of patients and their families to terminal illness and death. (Author/DB)

  16. Gulf War illnesses are autoimmune illnesses caused by reactive oxygen species which were caused by nerve agent prophylaxis.

    Moss, J I

    2012-08-01

    Gulf War illnesses (GWI share many of the features of chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) and both CFS and GWI may be the result of chronic immune system processes. The main suspected cause for GWI, the drug pyridostigmine bromide (PB), has been shown to cause neuronal damage from reactive oxygen species (ROS). ROS have been associated with IgM mediated autoimmune responses against ROS induced neoepitopes in depressed patients and this may also apply to CFS. It therefore follows that the drug used in the Gulf War caused ROS, the ROS modified native molecules, and that this trigged the autoimmune condition we refer to as Gulf War illnesses. Similar mechanisms may apply to other autoimmune illnesses. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Surrogate motherhood in illness that does not cause infertility ...

    The threshold requirement for surrogate motherhood requires that a commissioning parent or parents are permanently unable to give birth to a child. The question has arisen of a commissioning mother who suffers from a permanent illness that does not cause infertility but that renders pregnancy a significant health risk to ...

  18. Stigma of Mental Illness as Cause of Divorce in Byzantium

    Athanassia Nestor

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available In Byzantium mentally ill persons were stigmatized, despite the fact that they could live normally. This stigma consisted a very serious problem not only for the patients themselves, but also for their families.Through the legislation of the Byzantine Emperor Justinian and also the Leo's VI the Wise (9th – 10th A.C. legislation, mental illness was a main health cause of divorce and it concerned both males and females.During these years men were treated different than women, which had to wait five years in order to get a divorce. On the opposite men had to wait only three years to get a divorce for the cause of mentally retarded wife.

  19. [Psychosomatic aspects of stress].

    Okuse, S; Anzai, T

    1992-03-01

    We established the Bromocriptine test for the dopaminergic function of the hypothalamopituitary gland. The secretion patterns of plasma GH and PRL to 2.5 mg Bromocriptine, a dopamine receptor agonist, were classified into two types; a response type and a non-response type. The former showed an increase in plasma GH levels and suppression of PRL secretion; the latter showed no change in GH after Bromocriptine administration. The response type cases corresponded to psychosocial stress by neurotic and maladaptive behavior. The non-response type cases corresponded to psychosocial stress by alexithymic and over adaptive behaviors. Case Presentation 1. Essential Hypertension: a. 56-year old male, response type, blood pressure elevated by stress in daily life. Psychosomatic treatment: advice about blood pressure measurement at his home, brief psychotherapy and drug therapy. b. 53-year-old male, non-response type, type A behavior. Psychosomatic treatment: advice to increase awareness of body-mind relationships of his disorder, self-control training and drug therapy. 2. Gastric ulcers: a. 40-year-old male, response type, CMI IV region (Neurotic tendencies). Psychosomatic treatment: autogenic training and drug therapy. b. 28-year-old male, non-response type, high JAS scores(Over adaptative behavior). Psychosomatic treatment: advice to increase awareness of body-mind relationships of occurrence of his ulcers, to induce change in his perceptions of way of life, to encourage taking rest. 3. Technostress syndrome: a. 23-year-old female, response type, technoanxiety. Psychosomatic treatment: advice to make her take rest, and change in arrangements at her working place. b. 27-year-old male, non-response type, technodependent. Psychosomatic treatment: Fasting therapy. This therapy changed the non-response pattern to normal.

  20. Causes of death in critically ill multiple sclerosis patients.

    Karamyan, A; Brandtner, H; Grinzinger, S; Chroust, V; Bacher, C; Otto, F; Reisp, M; Hauer, L; Sellner, J

    2017-10-01

    Patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) experience higher mortality rates as compared to the general population. While the risk of intensive care unit (ICU) admission is also reported to be higher, little is known about causes of death CoD in critically ill MS patients. To study the causes of death (CoD) in the series of critically ill patients with MS verified by autopsy. We reviewed hospital electronic charts of MS patients treated at the neurological ICU of a tertiary care hospital between 2000 and 2015. We compared clinical and pathological CoD for those who were autopsied. Overall, 10 patients were identified (seven female; median age at death 65 years, range 27-80), and six of them were autopsied. The median MS duration prior to ICU admission was 27.5 years (range 1-50), and the median EDSS score at the time of ICU admission was 9 (range 5-9.5). The median length of ICU stay was 3 days (range 2-213). All the individuals in our series had experienced respiratory insufficiency during their ICU stay. The autopsy examination of brain tissue did not reveal evidences of MS lesions in one patient. In another patient, Lewy bodies were found on brain immunohistochemistry. Mortality in critically ill MS patients is largely driven by respiratory complications. Sporadic disparities between clinical and pathological findings can be expected. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Psychosomatic correlations in atrial fibrillations

    Vladimir Ernstovich Medvedev

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Patients with atrial fibrillations (AF and comorbid mental disorders were examined. Two patient groups differing in the structure of psychosomatic ratios were identified. Group 1 comprised patients with AF and signs of reactivity lability that manifested itself as psychopathological reactions to the primary manifestations of AF; Group 2 included those who had developed mental disorders mainly in end-stage cardiovascular disease (predominantly a permanent form of AF in the presence of such events as chronic heart failure (CHF. The results of the study suggest that the patients with AF have frequently anxiety and hypochondriacal disorders, which agrees with the data available in the literature. In addition, end-stage AF is marked by depressive syndromes caused by the severe course of cardiovascular diseases resulting in CHF.

  2. Metapsychological and clinical issues in psychosomatics research.

    Press, Jacques

    2016-02-01

    The author starts by treating the general epistemological problems inherent to research and emphasizes that all investigation takes place between two poles: a creative pole and one that is defensive in relation to the unknown and formlessness. In the psychosomatic field, an additional difficulty resides in the western dualistic vision of the relationship between psyche and soma which influences our way of thinking about the body as well as about otherness. The author continues by exploring Pierre Marty's psychosomatic model. Its psychosomatic monism is revolutionary but incomplete and creates a distance with the other, the somatizing patient, resulting in a medically oriented nosology symptomatic of the impossibility to think about some of the most important aspects of counter-transference. With the help of clinical material, the author considers these unthought aspects and some of their theoretical implications, particularly the way of understanding the negative often so prevalent with these patients. Based on these reflections as well as Freud's on beyond the pleasure principle and Winnicott's theorization on the fear of breakdown, the author suggests some directions for research. Somatic illness might occur when the attempts at filling the cracks created by a breakdown are unsuccessful. Copyright © 2015 Institute of Psychoanalysis.

  3. Psychosomatics today: a review of contemporary theory and practice.

    Gubb, Karen

    2013-02-01

    In the past few years there has been a dramatic increase in the number of psychoanalytic publications on the topic of psychosomatic illness, including edited collections and special editions of psychoanalytic journals. This paper is a critical conceptual review of the topic of psychosomatic illness using the material contained in a number of these recent publications as a basis, but also drawing on other works by the key authors of the publications discussed herein. This paper proposes that currently there appear to be two schools of thought around the origin, development, and treatment of psychosomatic symptoms. The first of these is the well-established "Paris School of Psychosomatics." The second approach does not formally exist, but is referred to in this paper as the "Attachment approach" since there are a number of authors who theorize about the treatment of psychosomatic symptoms in a similar and important way. The paper will compare and contrast the two approaches with respect to their underlying theories, treatment approaches, and conceptualization of the mind-body problem, with particular attention paid to how this is related to mentalization. The understanding of how problems in mentalization may be linked to psychosomatic illness can be conceptualized as the "speechless mind" from the perspective of the Paris School and as the "speaking body" by the Attachment approach. The paper concludes by engaging with these two conceptualizations and suggests that in order for an individual to achieve both psychological and physical health, the work of sensation must be located primarily in the logic and function of the body, while the work of making sense of these sensations and interpreting them must be located in the mind.

  4. The psychosomatic disorders pertaining to dental practice with revised working type classification.

    Shamim, Thorakkal

    2014-01-01

    Psychosomatic disorders are defined as disorders characterized by physiological changes that originate partially from emotional factors. This article aims to discuss the psychosomatic disorders of the oral cavity with a revised working type classification. The author has added one more subset to the existing classification, i.e., disorders caused by altered perception of dentofacial form and function, which include body dysmorphic disorder. The author has also inserted delusional halitosis under the miscellaneous disorders classification of psychosomatic disorders and revised the already existing classification proposed for the psychosomatic disorders pertaining to dental practice. After the inclusion of the subset (disorders caused by altered perception of dentofacial form and function), the terminology "psychosomatic disorders of the oral cavity" is modified to "psychosomatic disorders pertaining to dental practice".

  5. Attitudes of Students at a US Medical School Toward Mental Illness and Its Causes.

    Chiles, Catherine; Stefanovics, Elina; Rosenheck, Robert

    2017-06-01

    Stigma among health care providers toward people with mental illness is a worldwide problem. This study at a large US university examined medical student attitudes toward mental illness and its causes, and whether student attitudes change as they progress in their education. An electronic questionnaire focusing on attitudes toward people with mental illness, causes of mental illness, and treatment efficacy was used to survey medical students at all levels of training. Exploratory factor analysis was used to establish attitudinal factors, and analysis of variance was used to identify differences in student attitudes among these factors. Independent-samples t tests were used to assess attitudes toward efficacy of treatments for six common psychiatric and medical conditions. The study response rate was 42.6 % (n = 289). Exploratory factor analysis identified three factors reflecting social acceptance of mental illness, belief in supernatural causes, and belief in biopsychosocial causes. Stages of student education did not differ across these factors. Students who had completed the psychiatry clerkship were more likely to believe that anxiety disorders and diabetes could be treated effectively. Students reporting personal experiences with mental illness showed significantly more social acceptance, and people born outside the USA were more likely to endorse supernatural causes of mental illness. Sociocultural influences and personal experience with mental illness have a greater effect than medical education on attitudes toward people with mental illness. Psychiatric education appears to have a small but significant effect on student attitudes regarding treatment efficacy.

  6. Belief in supernatural causes of mental illness among Malay patients: impact on treatment.

    Razali, S M; Khan, U A; Hasanah, C I

    1996-10-01

    The concept of aetiology of mental illness in 134 Malay patients was investigated by means of a 20-item checklist. About 53% of the patients attributed their illnesses to supernatural agents. Witchcraft and possession by evil spirits were regarded as common causes of illness. The number of patients who believed in supernatural causes of their mental illness was significantly higher among those who had consulted bomohs (Malay traditional healers) than among those who had not consulted them. The belief that mental illness is caused by supernatural agents is firmly held by bomohs, who reinforce this notion in those who seek their advice. Belief in supernatural causes of mental illness was not significantly associated with age, gender, level of education or occupation of the patients. Patients who believed in supernatural causes of mental illness were also found to show poor drug compliance, and the number of such patients at 6 months follow-up was significantly lower than the corresponding figure for those who did not believe in supernatural causes. The importance of understanding the patients' cultural background when treating psychiatric patients is highlighted.

  7. [Psychology and psychosomatics of the orthodontic treatment].

    Fábián, Gábor; Bálint, Mária; Fábían, Tibor Károly

    2005-06-01

    Psychosomatic problems related to orthodontic treatment are a special group of oral psychosomatic disorders. The most frequent complaints are related to aesthetics and occlusion. Most of the patients are children, adolescence or young adults, with special emotional problems. Authors reviewed the most important knowledge related to this specific field, but some general aspects of oral psychosomatics are also discussed.

  8. Cardiac disorders with psychosomatic background

    Ada Bielejewska

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Psychosomatic disorders can be described as psychosocial-derived organic disorders. The influence of depression, sleep disorders, quality of life, addictions, work environment, family situation, and stress on atrial fibrillation, palpitations, syncope, chest pain, coronary heart disease, and heart failure has been analysed in this paper. The correlation between psychosomatic disorders and the cardiovascular system has been shown. It allows us to conclude that an attending physician, while taking medical history of cardiac patients, should take into consideration factors that may have a negative impact on their mental health, which can be risk factors in the development or aggravation of an already present cardiovascular disease.

  9. Epilogue: meditations on psychosomatic medicine.

    Cobb, S

    1975-01-01

    Presented are some personal views on the state of psychosomatic medicine as a science. It is suggested that the field needs more precision in language including exorcism of value judgments from certain dimensions, less circularity in stress-strain reasoning, more complex hypotheses, more emphasis on social support as a central variable and more acceptance of divergent research styles.

  10. All-Cause, 30-Day Readmissions Among Persons With Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities and Mental Illness.

    Balogh, Robert; Lin, Elizabeth; Dobranowski, Kristin; Selick, Avra; Wilton, Andrew S; Lunsky, Yona

    2018-03-01

    Early hospital readmissions within 30 days of discharge are common and costly. This research describes predictors of all-cause, 30-day hospital readmissions among persons with intellectual and developmental disabilities (IDD), a group known to experience high rates of hospitalization. A cohort of 66,484 adults with IDD from Ontario, Canada, was used to create two subgroups: individuals with IDD only and those with IDD and mental illness. The rates of hospital readmission were determined and contrasted with a comparison subgroup of people without IDD who have mental illness. Compared with those with mental illness only, individuals with IDD and mental illness were 1.7 times more likely to experience a hospital readmission within 30 days. Predictors of their readmission rates included being a young adult and having high morbidity levels. The high rate of hospital readmission suggests that individuals with IDD and mental illness need attention regarding discharge planning and outpatient follow-up.

  11. Descriptive survey about causes of illness given by the parents of children with cancer.

    Matteo, Bernardi; Pierluigi, Badon

    2008-04-01

    When a doctor diagnoses a child's illness as cancer, parents very often react by creating wrong and unrealistic theories about the origins of their child's illness which in turn generates self-blame in the parents, who take responsibility for the disease. To find what are the parents' beliefs about the origins of their children's illness. Descriptive study. Seventy-two couples of parents whose children with cancer are under treatment in the haemato-oncology paediatric ward of the Padova hospital. They have been collected by a no probabilistic method of sampling. A questionnaire was used, based on current literature, which investigates the beliefs of the parents as to what are the causes of illness, whether the parents research information about the illness and the origins of cancer and what are the information sources they use in order to establish if there is a connection between these factors. Eighty-seven percent of the sample group thinks that there is a specific origin of their child's illness: 27% believes the cause is environmental pollution, 26% believes it is due to radiation emissions, 26% believes it is due to genetic factors and 8% believes it is due to other causes. Eighty six percent and 70% of the sample search for information about the illness and its causes; 64% of the parents state that the first meeting with the medical staff, in which the illness is explained and they are informed that there are no known causes that produce it, does not clarify their doubts. The sources more often used to search for more information and explanations are the physicians in the ward, internet and medical books. This survey confirms the importance of an "advocacy" role of the nurse in educating the caregiver and the need to create instruments which guide the parents in the informative process and the research for good information. Nurses need to be cognizant that their care is crucial not just for the child, but for the entire family.

  12. Specific job anxiety in comparison to general psychosomatic symptoms at admission, discharge and six months after psychosomatic inpatient treatment.

    Muschalla, Beate; Linden, Michael

    2012-01-01

    different course during treatment and are differently related to sick leave. General psychosomatic symptom load can be understood as a measure of the degree of the chronic illness status, whereas job anxiety reflects specific additional context-related problems, i.e. problems with work. A core finding is that job anxiety is related to work avoidance, but work exposure may reduce job anxiety. This has direct consequences for putting patients on sick leave or not. Copyright © 2012 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  13. Effects of adolescent online gaming time and motives on depressive, musculoskeletal, and psychosomatic symptoms.

    Hellström, Charlotta; Nilsson, Kent W; Leppert, Jerzy; Åslund, Cecilia

    2015-01-01

    To investigate whether adolescent online gaming time and the additive effect of gaming motives were associated with depressive, musculoskeletal, and psychosomatic symptoms. The hypothesis was that adolescents who engage in online gaming with escape motives and increased online gaming time have higher probability for depressive, musculoskeletal, and psychosomatic symptoms compared to adolescents with other online gaming motives and/or less online gaming time. An anonymous and voluntary questionnaire was completed during class hours by 7,757 Swedish adolescents aged 13-18 years. The questionnaire included demographic background, gaming habits, and depressive, musculoskeletal, and psychosomatic symptoms. It was found that increased online gaming time during weekdays increased the probability of having depressive, musculoskeletal, and psychosomatic symptoms. However, these relations with time spent gaming were further explained by online gaming motives. Weekday online gaming for more than five hours a day, in combination with escape motives, was associated with an increased probability of depressive symptoms (odds ratio (OR) 4.614, 95% CI 3.230-6.590), musculoskeletal symptoms (OR 2.494, 95% CI 1.598-3.892), and psychosomatic symptoms (OR 4.437, 95% CI 2.966-6.637). The probability of ill health decreased when gaming was for fun or had social motives. Excessive gaming time and escape motives were found to be associated with increased probability of ill health among adolescents. Gaming motives may identify gamers in need of support to reduce unhealthy gaming behaviour as well as identify individuals at risk for ill health.

  14. Deaths from natural causes in peole with mental illness: A cohort study

    Hiroeh, Urara; Kapur, N.; Webb, Roger

    2008-01-01

    a range of psychiatric illnesses in both sexes. We observed SMRs greater than 200 in men and women with alcoholism, drug abuse, organic psychoses, dementia, and learning difficulties. Alcoholism and drug misuse in particular were important causes of premature mortality. The highest cause-specific SMRs...... were for nervous system diseases, gastrointestinal diseases, lung diseases, and "all other natural causes"; the lowest were for neoplasm. The greatest excess, in terms of absolute numbers, was for circulatory disease mortality. CONCLUSION: Adults experiencing a range of psychiatric illnesses are more...... likely to die at any age, and also prematurely, from natural causes. The consistency of elevated risk across psychiatric diagnoses and causes of death indicates an important health inequality. Those involved in planning and providing mental health services should address the heightened need for physical...

  15. [Ill-defined causes of death and unattended deaths, Brazil, 2003].

    Santo, Augusto Hasiak

    2008-01-01

    We studied the distribution of deaths from ill-defined causes that occurred in Brazil during 2003, from which was identified the proportion of unattended deaths. Data were obtained from the Mortality Information System, coordinated by the Ministry of Health. Causes of death included in "Chapter XVIII - Symptoms, signs and abnormal clinical and laboratory findings, not classified elsewhere" of the International Statistical Classification of Diseases and Related Health Problems, tenth revision, were considered ill-defined, among which the category R98 identified "unattended deaths". In Brazil during 2003 the underlying causes of 13.3% of deaths were included in the Chapter of ill-defined causes, and the highest proportions of these deaths occurred in the Northeast and North Regions. Considering the total deaths from ill-defined causes, 53 % correspond to unattended deaths. This proportion increased to over 70% in the states of Maranhão, Piauí, Rio Grande do Norte, Pernambuco, Bahia, Paraíba and Alagoas. Due to the decentralized structure of data collection in the country, we believe that the municipalities bear the major responsibility, followed by the states, for upgrading the quality of mortality statistics.

  16. Stress and psychosomatic symptoms in Chinese school children: cross-sectional survey.

    Hesketh, Therese; Zhen, Yan; Lu, Li; Dong, Zhou Xu; Jun, Ye Xu; Xing, Zhu Wei

    2010-02-01

    The Chinese educational system is highly competitive from the start of primary school with great emphasis on academic performance and intolerance of failure. This study aimed to explore the pressures on primary schoolchildren, and to determine the relationship between these pressures and psychosomatic symptoms: abdominal pain and headache. Cross-sectional survey using self-completion questionnaires. 9- to 12-year-olds in primary schools in urban and rural areas of Zhejiang Province, eastern China. Proportion of children with defined school-related stressors and frequency of psychosomatic illness. Completed questionnaires were obtained from 2191 children. All stressors were common in boys and girls and in urban and rural schools. Eighty-one per cent worry 'a lot' about exams, 63% are afraid of the punishment of teachers, 44% had been physically bullied at least sometimes, with boys more often victims of bullying, and 73% of children are physically punished by parents. Over one-third of children reported psychosomatic symptoms at least once per week, 37% headache and 36% abdominal pain. All individual stressors were highly significantly associated with psychosomatic symptoms. Children identified as highly stressed (in the highest quartile of the stress score) were four times as likely to have psychosomatic symptoms. The competitive and punitive educational environment leads to high levels of stress and psychosomatic symptoms in Chinese primary schoolchildren. Measures to reduce unnecessary stress on children in schools should be introduced urgently.

  17. Are adolescents with high self-esteem protected from psychosomatic symptomatology?

    Piko, Bettina F; Varga, Szabolcs; Mellor, David

    2016-06-01

    This study investigated the role of self-esteem, social (need to belong, loneliness, competitiveness, and shyness), and health (smoking, drinking) behaviors in Hungarian adolescents' psychosomatic symptoms. Our sample of 490 students (ages 14-19 years) from Debrecen (Hungary) completed the questionnaires. Besides descriptive statistics, correlation and multiple regression analyses were applied to test interrelationships. Frequency analysis revealed that fatigue was the most commonly experienced psychosomatic symptom in this sample, followed by sleeping problems and (lower) back pain. Girls reported experiencing more symptoms. Multiple regression analyses suggested that (1) need to belong, shyness, and competitiveness may serve as social behavioral risk factors for adolescents' psychosomatic symptomatology, whereas (2) self-esteem may play a protective role. The role of social and health behaviors was modified when analyzed by gender: the psychosomatic index score was positively related to smoking and shyness among girls, and need to belong among boys. Self-esteem provided protection for both sexes. We conclude that problems with social relationships (namely, unmet need to belong, competitiveness, and shyness) may lead to psychosomatic health complaints, whereas self-esteem may serve as a protection. Findings suggest that social skills training and strengthening self-esteem should be an important part of children's health promotion programs in schools to improve their psychosomatic health and well-being. • Despite being free of serious physical illness, many adolescents often report subjective health complaints, such as psychosomatic symptoms • As children in this life stage develop independence and autonomy, new types of social relationships, and identity, their social needs and skills also change What is new: • Need to belong, shyness, and competitiveness may serve as social behavioral risk factors for adolescents' psychosomatic symptomatology, whereas self

  18. Psychosomatic factors in pruritus.

    Tey, Hong Liang; Wallengren, Joanna; Yosipovitch, Gil

    2013-01-01

    Pruritus and psyche are intricately and reciprocally related, with psychophysiological evidence and psychopathological explanations helping us to understand their complex association. Their interaction may be conceptualized and classified into 3 groups: pruritic diseases with psychiatric sequelae, pruritic diseases aggravated by psychosocial factors, and psychiatric disorders causing pruritus. Management of chronic pruritus is directed at treating the underlying causes and adopting a multidisciplinary approach to address the dermatologic, somatosensory, cognitive, and emotional aspects. Pharmcotherapeutic agents that are useful for chronic pruritus with comorbid depression and/or anxiety comprise selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors, mirtazapine, tricyclic antidepressants (amitriptyline and doxepin), and anticonvulsants (gabapentin, pregabalin); the role of neurokinin receptor-1 antagonists awaits verification. Antipsychotics are required for treating itch and formication associated with schizophrenia and delusion of parasitosis (including Morgellons disease). Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Fatal illness associated with pulmonary hypertension in a neonate caused by intrauterine echovirus 11 infection

    Willems, A.; Benne, CA; Timmer, A; Bergman, K.A.

    Nonpolio enterovirus (NPEV) infections are known to cause a wide range of illnesses in the neonatal period. In most cases, NPEV is presumed to be contracted during birth. Intrauterine NPEV infections occur infrequently. A case of Intrauterine echovirus 11 infection with pneumonia, persistent

  20. How consistent are beliefs about the causes and solutions to illness? An experimental study.

    Ogden, J; Jubb, A

    2008-01-01

    Objectives: Research illustrates that people hold beliefs about the causes and solutions to illness. This study aimed to assess the consistency in these beliefs in terms of their variation according to type of problem and whether they are consistent with each other. Further, the study aimed to assess whether they are open to change and whether changing beliefs about cause resulted in a subsequent shift in beliefs about solutions. Design: Experimental factorial 3 (problem) × 2 (manipulated cau...

  1. Psychosomatic plasticity: An "emergent property" of personality research?

    Jawer, Michael

    2006-03-01

    Psychosomatic plasticity, defined as an extreme capacity to turn suggestions into bodily realities, is as phenomenon well worth investigating because it challenges mainstream conceptions about the relationship between mind and body in health as well as illness. The field of psychoneuroimmunology (PNI) offers a framework within which to understand this phenomenon because PNI makes a compelling case for the biological unity of self. Hartmann's Boundaries concept is particularly applicable because it suggests that the minds of "thin-boundary" persons are relatively fluid and able to make numerous connections. Wilson and Barber's identification of the fantasy prone person and Thalbourne's transliminality concept are similarly relevant. Taking these explorations a step further, this author proposes that the flow of feeling within individuals represents the key to psychosomatic plasticity. Blushing, psoriasis, and immune reactions are offered as examples, as are more anomalous reports such as those provided by heart transplantation recipients and cases said to be indicative of reincarnation. In each instance, persons who are highly sensitive (ie, have a speedier and more direct flow of feeling) are more likely to evidence physical reactions. Psychosomatic plasticity represents an emerging area of interest in personality research, one that clearly merits further investigation.

  2. [The psychosomatics of chronic back pain. Classification, aetiology and therapy].

    Henningsen, P

    2004-05-01

    An overview is given on the current classification, description and treatment of chronic pain with causally relevant psychological factors. It is based on the "practice guidelines on somatoform disorders" and on a thematically related meta-analysis. The classificatory problems, especially of the demarcation of somatoform and other chronic pain, are presented. Additional descriptive dimensions of the relevant psychosocial factors are: pain description, other organically unexplained pain- and non-pain-symptoms, anxiety and depression, disease conviction and illness behaviour, personality and childhood abuse. A modified psychotherapy for (somatoform) chronic pain is outlined. Finally, this aetiologically oriented psychosomatic-psychiatric approach is compared to psychological coping models for chronic pain.

  3. Medical Care Expenditure in Suicides From Non-illness-related Causes

    Jungwoo Sohn

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Several epidemiological studies on medical care utilization prior to suicide have considered the motivation of suicide, but focused on the influence of physical illnesses. Medical care expenditure in suicide completers with non-illness-related causes has not been investigated. Methods: Suicides motivated by non-illness-related factors were identified using the investigator’s note from the National Police Agency, which was then linked to the Health Insurance Review and Assessment data. We investigated the medical care expenditures of cases one year prior to committing suicide and conducted a case-control study using conditional logistic regression analysis after adjusting for age, gender, area of residence, and socioeconomic status. Results: Among the 4515 suicides motivated by non-illness-related causes, medical care expenditures increased in only the last 3 months prior to suicide in the adolescent group. In the younger group, the proportion of total medical expenditure for external injuries was higher than that in the older groups. Conditional logistic regression analysis showed significant associations with being a suicide completer and having a rural residence, low socioeconomic status, and high medical care expenditure. After stratification into the four age groups, a significant positive association with medical care expenditures and being a suicide completer was found in the adolescent and young adult groups, but no significant results were found in the elderly groups for both men and women. Conclusions: Younger adults who committed suicide motivated by non-illness-related causes had a higher proportion of external injuries and more medical care expenditures than their controls did. This reinforces the notion that suicide prevention strategies for young people with suicidal risk factors are needed.

  4. Relational ethics and psychosomatic assessment.

    Barbosa, António

    2012-01-01

    The main ethical perspective in the clinical relationship takes into consideration the vulnerability of the clinical condition before threats and risks that can undermine the integrity and dignity of the person. Psychosomatic medicine faces complex cases whose ethical problems cannot only be solved by applying top-down deontological or utilitarian approaches, principlism, which is limited mainly to easing ethical tensions, or a bottom-up approach, the casuistic model, case-based reasoning. In introducing vulnerability as the core of ethical questioning as a principle ontological priority over other principles, relational ethics refers to the appreciation of the responsibility of health professionals through which a health care professional and the patient 'together' can construct more reasonable and prudential courses of action with, for, and by the patient. The model of relational ethics is based on three main aspects, clinically integrated approach, science/philosophy partnership, and deliberative process, that when taken together, form an intermediate model that ensures prudent and reasonable decision-making. The three structural elements and characteristics of relational ethics create and maintain a responsible relationship between the professional and the patient being aware that the mutual vulnerability of health professional and the patient has a moral value and recognizing that their relationship will allow for personal development of each. I conceptualized the model of relational ethics as one that embraces the meta-ethical principles of vulnerability, dignity, responsibility, and respect for autonomy as they are considered by many international declarations or conventions. This model integrates three key polarities: ensure conditions of authenticity, facilitate a process of cooperative mutuality, and promote opportunities for growth and development. Relational ethics can be used to solve major ethical problems in psychosomatic medicine, capacity

  5. Lay perceptions of current and future health, the causes of illness, and the nature of recovery: explaining health and illness in Malaysia.

    Swami, Viren; Arteche, Adriane; Chamorro-Premuzic, Tomas; Maakip, Ismail; Stanistreet, Debbi; Furnham, Adrian

    2009-09-01

    This study examined beliefs about the causes and determinants of health, illness, and recovery in an opportunistic sample from Malaysia. In all, 371 women and 350 men completed the Health and Illness Scale, a 124-item scale that examined beliefs about current and future health, and beliefs about the causes of illness and recovery. Each of the four subscales of the Health Illness Scale were factor analysed to reveal the underlying structure. Results showed the emergence of a number of distinct factors in the case of each subscale, of which environmental, life-style, psychological, religious, and fate-related factors were fairly stable across subscales. Results also showed a number of differences in beliefs between religious groups, and that religiosity and sex were the strongest predictors of beliefs across the four subscales. The results are discussed in terms of the available cross-cultural literature on lay beliefs about health.

  6. Intra- and extra-familial adverse childhood experiences and a history of childhood psychosomatic disorders among Japanese university students

    Munemoto Takao

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Japan has been witnessing a considerable increase in the number of children with psychosomatic disorders. The purpose of this study is to examine the relationship between the risk of psychosomatic disorder in adolescents and intra- and extra-familial adverse childhood experiences (ACEs. Methods A retrospective cohort study of 1592 Japanese university students (52% male, mean age 19.9 years who completed a survey about intra- and extra-familial ACEs and the incidence of childhood psychosomatic disorders. Intra-familial ACEs included domestic violence, physical violence, emotional abuse, illness in household, parental divorce, no parental affection, and dysfunctional family. Extra-familial ACEs included physical violence or negative recognition by teachers, being bullied in elementary or junior high school, or sexual violence. Results The frequency of psychosomatic disorders among the respondents was 14.8%. Among the 7 intra-familial ACEs, emotional abuse (relative risk, RR = 1.9 and illness in household (RR = 1.7 increased the risk of psychosomatic disorders. Estimates of the relative risk for the 5 extra-familial ACEs were statistically significant and ranged from 1.5 for being bullied in elementary school or physical violence from teachers to 2.4. Students who had 3 or more intra-familial ACEs and 2 or more extra-familial ACEs had a 3.0 relative risk for psychosomatic disorder. Conclusion These results suggest that intra- and extra-familial ACEs are associated with the development of psychosomatic disorders. Therefore, sufficient evaluation of ACEs should be performed in adolescent patients with psychosomatic disorder.

  7. [The inner coherence of psychosomatic medicine].

    Herrmann-Lingen, Christoph

    2012-01-01

    The body-mind dualism of somatic medicine is resolved through the concept of psychosomatic medicine. More unspecific descriptions such as "integrative medicine" (which does not clarify what should be integrated) or the "holistic approach" (which comes close to esoterics) suggest the unity of mind, body and soul, although the term "psycho-somatic" still reflects dualistic thinking. The American Psychosomatic Society has been considering a name change for years, partially to rid itself of the dualistic label, but so far these efforts have not resulted in a viable alternative. Engel's concept of biopsychosocial medicine supposes a triangular array of the body, mind, and social environment, setting body and mind into a relationship with each other and with a third party. Based on the physician-patient relationship (Balint), psychosomatic medicine can be understood in a broader sense as "relationship medicine," covering not only the use of the interpersonal relationship as a medical agent, but also a science of medicine that puts mind, body, and social environment into a theoretical framework of interrelations, with the perspective of integrating the different system levels. The translation processes among the system levels are, for example, addressed by biosemiotics (v. Uexküll). Both clinical medicine and medical research, if they intend to be psychosomatic, need to take these theoretical concepts into account and utilize them practically for (team)work with patients. Together with a clear differentiation from other cultures of (para)medicine, this can serve to develop a "psychosomatic identity."

  8. Chikungunya as a cause of acute febrile illness in southern Sri Lanka.

    Megan E Reller

    Full Text Available Chikungunya virus (CHIKV re-emerged in Sri Lanka in late 2006 after a 40-year hiatus. We sought to identify and characterize acute chikungunya infection (CHIK in patients presenting with acute undifferentiated febrile illness in unstudied rural and semi-urban southern Sri Lanka in 2007.We enrolled febrile patients ≥ 2 years of age, collected uniform epidemiologic and clinical data, and obtained serum samples for serology, virus isolation, and real-time reverse-transcriptase PCR (RT-PCR. Serology on paired acute and convalescent samples identified acute chikungunya infection in 3.5% (28/797 patients without acute dengue virus (DENV infection, 64.3% (18/28 of which were confirmed by viral isolation and/or real-time RT-PCR. No CHIKV/DENV co-infections were detected among 54 patients with confirmed acute DENV. Sequencing of the E1 coding region of six temporally distinct CHIKV isolates (April through October 2007 showed that all isolates posessed the E1-226A residue and were most closely related to Sri Lankan and Indian isolates from the same time period. Except for more frequent and persistent musculoskeletal symptoms, acute chikungunya infections mimicked DENV and other acute febrile illnesses. Only 12/797 (1.5% patients had serological evidence of past chikungunya infection.Our findings suggest CHIKV is a prominent cause of non-specific acute febrile illness in southern Sri Lanka.

  9. Effects of adolescent online gaming time and motives on depressive, musculoskeletal, and psychosomatic symptoms

    Nilsson, Kent W; Leppert, Jerzy; Åslund, Cecilia

    2015-01-01

    Aim. To investigate whether adolescent online gaming time and the additive effect of gaming motives were associated with depressive, musculoskeletal, and psychosomatic symptoms. The hypothesis was that adolescents who engage in online gaming with escape motives and increased online gaming time have higher probability for depressive, musculoskeletal, and psychosomatic symptoms compared to adolescents with other online gaming motives and/or less online gaming time. Method. An anonymous and voluntary questionnaire was completed during class hours by 7,757 Swedish adolescents aged 13–18 years. The questionnaire included demographic background, gaming habits, and depressive, musculoskeletal, and psychosomatic symptoms. Results. It was found that increased online gaming time during weekdays increased the probability of having depressive, musculoskeletal, and psychosomatic symptoms. However, these relations with time spent gaming were further explained by online gaming motives. Weekday online gaming for more than five hours a day, in combination with escape motives, was associated with an increased probability of depressive symptoms (odds ratio (OR) 4.614, 95% CI 3.230–6.590), musculoskeletal symptoms (OR 2.494, 95% CI 1.598–3.892), and psychosomatic symptoms (OR 4.437, 95% CI 2.966–6.637). The probability of ill health decreased when gaming was for fun or had social motives. Conclusion. Excessive gaming time and escape motives were found to be associated with increased probability of ill health among adolescents. Gaming motives may identify gamers in need of support to reduce unhealthy gaming behaviour as well as identify individuals at risk for ill health. PMID:26072677

  10. Functional status and all-cause mortality in serious mental illness.

    Richard D Hayes

    Full Text Available Serious mental illness can affect many aspects of an individual's ability to function in daily life. The aim of this investigation was to determine if the environmental and functional status of people with serious mental illness contribute to the high mortality risk observed in this patient group.We identified cases of schizophrenia, schizoaffective and bipolar disorder aged ≥ 15 years in a large secondary mental healthcare case register linked to national mortality tracing. We modelled the effect of activities of daily living (ADLs, living conditions, occupational and recreational activities and relationship factors (Health of the Nation Outcome Scale [HoNOS] subscales on all-cause mortality over a 4-year observation period (2007-10 using Cox regression.We identified 6,880 SMI cases (242 deaths in the observation period. ADL impairment was associated with an increased risk of all-cause mortality (adjusted HR 1.9; 95% CI 1.3-2.8; p = 0.001, p for trend across ADL categories = 0.001 after controlling for a broad range of covariates (including demographic factors, physical health, mental health symptoms and behaviours, socio-economic status and mental health service contact. No associations were found for the other three exposures. Stratification by age indicated that ADLs were most strongly associated with mortality in the youngest (15 to <35 years and oldest (≥ 55 years groups.Functional impairment in people with serious mental illness diagnoses is a marker of increased mortality risk, possibly in younger age groups as a marker of negative symptomatology.

  11. Worksite element as causes of occupational accidents and illnesses in Malaysian residential construction industry

    Hafiidz, J. Mohd; Arifin, K.; Aiyub, K.; Razman, M. R.; Samsurijan, M. S.; Syakir, M. I.

    2017-09-01

    Construction industry is an important sector that contributes to the development of economy and socioeconomy in Malaysia. It is a vital component in achieving the developed country status. However, fatalities in the Malaysian construction industry are a critical problem. Number of fatalities in this industry is the highest compared to other industries registered in Malaysia under the investigation of Department of Occupational Safety and Health (DOSH). Worksite element (worksite conditions, poor site management, construction tasks, and equipment & materials) was identified as one category of causes of occupational accidents and illnesses in Malaysian construction industry. The main objective of this study is to understand the perception of local construction personnel in terms of worksite element as causes of occupational accidents and illnesses in Malaysian residential construction industry. 13 housing projects that were registered with Ministry of Urban Wellbeing, Housing and Local Government and being permitted to perform construction work in 2012 were selected in Pulau Pinang to be studied using questionnaire survey. Worksite condition and poor site management was perceived as the most significant with the mean values of 3.68 and 3.61 respectively.

  12. Psychosomatic aspects of Cushing's syndrome.

    Sonino, Nicoletta; Fallo, Francesco; Fava, Giovanni A

    2010-06-01

    There has been growing interest in the psychosocial aspects of Cushing's syndrome, such as the role of life stress as a pathogenetic factor, the association with affective disorders, and the presence of residual symptoms after treatment. Interestingly, a temporal relationship between stressful life events and disease onset is relevant only to pituitary-dependent Cushing's disease, and not to the pituitary-independent forms. A number of psychiatric and psychological disturbances may be associated with the active hypercortisolemic state, regardless of its etiology. Within the high frequency of mood disorders (about 60%), major depression is the most common complication. Other psychopathological aspects include mania, anxiety disorders, psychological symptoms (demoralization, irritable mood, somatization) and cognitive impairment. Cognitive symptoms are associated with brain abnormalities (mainly loss of brain volume). Quality of life may be seriously compromised during both active and post-treatment phases. Long-standing hypercortisolism may imply a degree of irreversibility of the pathological process. Recovery, thus, may be delayed and be influenced by highly individualized affective responses. Outcomes of Cushing's syndrome treatment are not fully satisfactory. Within its great complexity, a conceptual shift from a merely biomedical care to a psychosomatic consideration of the person and his/her quality of life appears to be necessary to improve effectiveness. It is time to translate the research evidence that has accumulated into clinical practice initiatives. To patients who show persistence or even worsening of psychological distress upon adequate endocrine treatment psychiatric/psychological interventions should be readily available. Applying interdisciplinary expertise and addressing the needs for rehabilitation would markedly improve final outcome.

  13. A prospective study of the causes of febrile illness requiring hospitalization in children in Cambodia.

    Kheng Chheng

    Full Text Available Febrile illnesses are pre-eminent contributors to morbidity and mortality among children in South-East Asia but the causes are poorly understood. We determined the causes of fever in children hospitalised in Siem Reap province, Cambodia.A one-year prospective study of febrile children admitted to Angkor Hospital for Children, Siem Reap. Demographic, clinical, laboratory and outcome data were comprehensively analysed. Between October 12(th 2009 and October 12(th 2010 there were 1225 episodes of febrile illness in 1180 children. Median (IQR age was 2.0 (0.8-6.4 years, with 850 (69% episodes in children <5 years. Common microbiological diagnoses were dengue virus (16.2%, scrub typhus (7.8%, and Japanese encephalitis virus (5.8%. 76 (6.3% episodes had culture-proven bloodstream infection, including Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi (22 isolates, 1.8%, Streptococcus pneumoniae (13, 1.1%, Escherichia coli (8, 0.7%, Haemophilus influenzae (7, 0.6%, Staphylococcus aureus (6, 0.5% and Burkholderia pseudomallei (6, 0.5%. There were 69 deaths (5.6%, including those due to clinically diagnosed pneumonia (19, dengue virus (5, and melioidosis (4. 10 of 69 (14.5% deaths were associated with culture-proven bloodstream infection in logistic regression analyses (odds ratio for mortality 3.4, 95% CI 1.6-6.9. Antimicrobial resistance was prevalent, particularly in S. enterica Typhi, (where 90% of isolates were resistant to ciprofloxacin, and 86% were multi-drug resistant. Comorbid undernutrition was present in 44% of episodes and a major risk factor for acute mortality (OR 2.1, 95% CI 1.1-4.2, as were HIV infection and cardiac disease.We identified a microbiological cause of fever in almost 50% of episodes in this large study of community-acquired febrile illness in hospitalized children in Cambodia. The range of pathogens, antimicrobial susceptibility, and co-morbidities associated with mortality described will be of use in the development of rational guidelines

  14. A prospective study of the causes of febrile illness requiring hospitalization in children in Cambodia.

    Chheng, Kheng; Carter, Michael J; Emary, Kate; Chanpheaktra, Ngoun; Moore, Catrin E; Stoesser, Nicole; Putchhat, Hor; Sona, Soeng; Reaksmey, Sin; Kitsutani, Paul; Sar, Borann; van Doorn, H Rogier; Uyen, Nguyen Hanh; Van Tan, Le; Paris, Daniel H; Paris, Daniel; Blacksell, Stuart D; Amornchai, Premjit; Wuthiekanun, Vanaporn; Parry, Christopher M; Day, Nicholas P J; Kumar, Varun

    2013-01-01

    Febrile illnesses are pre-eminent contributors to morbidity and mortality among children in South-East Asia but the causes are poorly understood. We determined the causes of fever in children hospitalised in Siem Reap province, Cambodia. A one-year prospective study of febrile children admitted to Angkor Hospital for Children, Siem Reap. Demographic, clinical, laboratory and outcome data were comprehensively analysed. Between October 12(th) 2009 and October 12(th) 2010 there were 1225 episodes of febrile illness in 1180 children. Median (IQR) age was 2.0 (0.8-6.4) years, with 850 (69%) episodes in children <5 years. Common microbiological diagnoses were dengue virus (16.2%), scrub typhus (7.8%), and Japanese encephalitis virus (5.8%). 76 (6.3%) episodes had culture-proven bloodstream infection, including Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi (22 isolates, 1.8%), Streptococcus pneumoniae (13, 1.1%), Escherichia coli (8, 0.7%), Haemophilus influenzae (7, 0.6%), Staphylococcus aureus (6, 0.5%) and Burkholderia pseudomallei (6, 0.5%). There were 69 deaths (5.6%), including those due to clinically diagnosed pneumonia (19), dengue virus (5), and melioidosis (4). 10 of 69 (14.5%) deaths were associated with culture-proven bloodstream infection in logistic regression analyses (odds ratio for mortality 3.4, 95% CI 1.6-6.9). Antimicrobial resistance was prevalent, particularly in S. enterica Typhi, (where 90% of isolates were resistant to ciprofloxacin, and 86% were multi-drug resistant). Comorbid undernutrition was present in 44% of episodes and a major risk factor for acute mortality (OR 2.1, 95% CI 1.1-4.2), as were HIV infection and cardiac disease. We identified a microbiological cause of fever in almost 50% of episodes in this large study of community-acquired febrile illness in hospitalized children in Cambodia. The range of pathogens, antimicrobial susceptibility, and co-morbidities associated with mortality described will be of use in the development of rational

  15. Unsuspected Dengue as a Cause of Acute Febrile Illness in Children and Adults in Western Nicaragua.

    Megan E Reller

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Dengue is an emerging infectious disease of global significance. Suspected dengue, especially in children in Nicaragua's heavily-urbanized capital of Managua, has been well documented, but unsuspected dengue among children and adults with undifferentitated fever has not.To prospectively study dengue in semi-urban and rural western Nicaragua, we obtained epidemiologic and clinical data as well as acute and convalescent sera (2 to 4 weeks after onset of illness from a convenience sample (enrollment Monday to Saturday daytime to early evening of consecutively enrolled patients (n = 740 aged ≥ 1 years presenting with acute febrile illness. We tested paired sera for dengue IgG and IgM and serotyped dengue virus using reverse transcriptase-PCR. Among 740 febrile patients enrolled, 90% had paired sera. We found 470 (63.5% were seropositive for dengue at enrollment. The dengue seroprevalance increased with age and reached >90% in people over the age of 20 years. We identified acute dengue (serotypes 1 and 2 in 38 (5.1% patients. Only 8.1% (3/37 of confirmed cases were suspected clinically.Dengue is an important and largely unrecognized cause of fever in rural western Nicaragua. Since Zika virus is transmitted by the same vector and has been associated with severe congenital infections, the population we studied is at particular risk for being devastated by the Zika epidemic that has now reached Central America.

  16. Impact of socioeconomic deprivation on rate and cause of death in severe mental illness.

    Martin, Julie Langan; McLean, Gary; Park, John; Martin, Daniel J; Connolly, Moira; Mercer, Stewart W; Smith, Daniel J

    2014-09-12

    Socioeconomic status has important associations with disease-specific mortality in the general population. Although individuals with Severe Mental Illnesses (SMI) experience significant premature mortality, the relationship between socioeconomic status and mortality in this group remains under investigated. We aimed to assess the impact of socioeconomic status on rate and cause of death in individuals with SMI (schizophrenia and bipolar disorder) relative to the local (Glasgow) and wider (Scottish) populations. Cause and age of death during 2006-2010 inclusive for individuals with schizophrenia or bipolar disorder registered on the Glasgow Psychosis Clinical Information System (PsyCIS) were obtained by linkage to the Scottish General Register Office (GRO). Rate and cause of death by socioeconomic status, measured by Scottish Index of Multiple Deprivation (SIMD), were compared to the Glasgow and Scottish populations. Death rates were higher in people with SMI across all socioeconomic quintiles compared to the Glasgow and Scottish populations, and persisted when suicide was excluded. Differences were largest in the most deprived quintile (794.6 per 10,000 population vs. 274.7 and 252.4 for Glasgow and Scotland respectively). Cause of death varied by socioeconomic status. For those living in the most deprived quintile, higher drug-related deaths occurred in those with SMI compared to local Glasgow and wider Scottish population rates (12.3% vs. 5.9%, p = socioeconomic quintiles compared to the Glasgow and Scottish populations but was most marked in the most deprived quintiles when suicide was excluded as a cause of death. Further work assessing the impact of socioeconomic status on specific causes of premature mortality in SMI is needed.

  17. Beliefs about causes, symptoms, and stigma associated with severe mental illness among 'highly acculturated' Chinese-American patients.

    Lin, Susan Y

    2013-12-01

    Literature about experiences of mental illness among ethnic minority has tended to focus on first-generation migrants. This study fills that gap by exploring experiences among highly acculturated Chinese-American patients with mental illness. Twenty-nine participants completed semi-structured interviews based on Kleinman's explanatory model, which were audio-taped, transcribed and coded for qualitative analysis. Beliefs about the causes of mental illness included biological factors, head trauma and personal losses. Issues relating to stigma and shame were also discussed. Highly acculturated ethnic minority patients may ascribe to a biomedical model at the same time as ascribing to culture-specific beliefs.

  18. Coding ill-defined and unknown cause of death is 13 times more frequent in Denmark than in Finland

    Ylijoki-Sørensen, Seija; Sajantila, Antti; Lalu, Kaisa

    2014-01-01

    Exact cause and manner of death determination improves legislative safety for the individual and for society and guides aspects of national public health. In the International Classification of Diseases, codes R00-R99 are used for "symptoms, signs and abnormal clinical and laboratory findings......, not elsewhere classified" designated as "ill-defined" or "with unknown etiology". The World Health Organisation recommends avoiding the use of ill-defined and unknown causes of death in the death certificate as this terminology does not give any information concerning the possible conditions that led...... autopsy. Our study suggests that if all deaths in all age groups with unclear cause of death were systematically investigated with a forensic autopsy, only 2-3/1000 deaths per year would be coded as an ill-defined and unknown cause of death in national mortality statistics. At the same time the risk...

  19. Evidence of psychosomatic influences in compensated and decompensated tinnitus.

    Stobik, Corinna; Weber, Rainer K; Münte, Thomas F; Walter, Marc; Frommer, Jörg

    2005-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the role and interaction of individual factors on decompensated tinnitus. Subjects consisted of 53 adult patients with chronic tinnitus. They were selected and assigned to two groups, compensated (n = 28) and decompensated (n = 25), according to the results of an established tinnitus questionnaire. Both groups were evaluated and compared. The patients with decompensated tinnitus suffered from more pronounced social disabilities, were more prone to depression, and used less effective techniques to cope with their illness. They showed a higher degree of somatic multimorbidity, with particularly strong correlations between tinnitus and the incidence of cardiovascular diseases and hypoacusis. As a consequence, in the psychosomatic tinnitus therapy, greater attention should be given to the treatment of the somatic complaints in addition to psychological and psychosocial aspects.

  20. Peculiarities of psychological status of liquidators of Chernobyl accident after-effects having psychosomatic pathology

    Vishnevskaya, V.P.

    2006-01-01

    Eight hundred and ninety two men aged 25-55 yrs including five hundred and eighty three persons taking part in the Chernobyl accident after-effects liquidation and three hundred and nine persons having similar psychosomatic pathologies but lacking radiation 'anamnesis'. The radiation risk understanding was shown to effect negatively on the disease run and the remission period duration. The psychic process after the radiation exposure was determined to be caused by a radiation effect on the central nervous system as well. The outcomes of the clinical and psychological study evidenced that the psychosomatic pathology including the discirculating encephalopathy developed in the persons exposed to irradiation in the early age. (authors)

  1. Problematyka medycyny psychosomatycznej – od historii do współczesności = The issue of Psychosomatic Medicine – form history to nowadays

    Malwina Tudorowska

    2016-06-01

    At the source of the understanding of psychosomatic medicine are references to ancient Greek thought (Plato, Hippocrates, Galen on the unity and interconnectedness of body and soul. The 40’s of the twentieth century are considered to be the beginning of the development of psychosomatic medicine. It was demanded to look at the whole human, on individual’s health and disease in the perspective of psychological problems and environmental conditions. The first physicians with an interest in psychosomatic disorders, such as Franz Alexander and Flanders Dunbar, were psychoanalysts. They pointed out that medicine should identify not only physical factors, like microorganisms, injuries or the wrong genes as the etiology of illnesses. Also personality traits, established ways of behavior or psychological trauma are important to take into consideration. Development of psychosomatic medicine has contributed to the current understanding of human in a holistic way, both in health and disease. Modern psychosomatic medicine is a proposal to practice clinical medicine as well as health promotion and prevention. The aim of this article is to present the thinking of the etiology of diseases and disorders in the direction of the search for synthesis. It is also important to emphasize the importance of cooperation medics and psychologists in the diagnostic process and healing of many diseases. Key words: psychosomatic medicine, psychosomatic disorders, psychoneuroimmunology.

  2. [Respiratory infections caused by Aspergillus spp. in critically ill patients admitted to the intensive care units].

    Álvarez Lerma, F; Olaechea Astigarraga, P; Palomar Martínez, M; Rodríguez Carvajal, M; Machado Casas, J F; Jiménez Quintana, M M; Esteve Urbano, F; Ballesteros Herráez, J C; Zavala Zegarra, E

    2015-04-01

    The presence of respiratory fungal infection in the critically ill patient is associated with high morbidity and mortality. To assess the incidence of respiratory infection caused by Aspergillus spp. independently of the origin of infection in patients admitted to Spanish ICUs, as well as to describe the rates, characteristics, outcomes and prognostic factors in patients with this type of infection. An observational, retrospective, open-label and multicenter study was carried out in a cohort of patients with respiratory infection caused by Aspergillus spp. admitted to Spanish ICUs between 2006 and 2012 (months of April, May and June), and included in the ENVIN-HELICS registry (108,244 patients and 825,797 days of ICU stay). Variables independently related to in-hospital mortality were identified by multiple logistic regression analysis. A total of 267 patients from 79 of the 198 participating ICUs were included (2.46 cases per 1000 ICU patients and 3.23 episodes per 10,000 days of ICU stay). From a clinical point of view, infections were classified as ventilator-associated pneumonia in 93 cases (34.8%), pneumonia unrelated to mechanical ventilation in 120 cases (44.9%), and tracheobronchitis in 54 cases (20.2%). The study population included older patients (mean 64.8±17.1 years), with a high severity level (APACHE II score 22.03±7.7), clinical diseases (64.8%) and prolonged hospital stay before the identification of Aspergillus spp. (median 11 days), transferred to the ICU mainly from hospital wards (58.1%) and with high ICU (57.3%) and hospital (59.6%) mortality rates, exhibiting important differences depending on the type of infection involved. Independent mortality risk factors were previous admission to a hospital ward (OR=7.08, 95%CI: 3.18-15.76), a history of immunosuppression (OR=2.52, 95%CI: 1.24-5.13) and severe sepsis or septic shock (OR=8.91, 95%CI: 4.24-18.76). Respiratory infections caused by Aspergillus spp. in critically ill patients admitted to

  3. A diverse group of previously unrecognized human rhinoviruses are common causes of respiratory illnesses in infants.

    Wai-Ming Lee

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Human rhinoviruses (HRVs are the most prevalent human pathogens, and consist of 101 serotypes that are classified into groups A and B according to sequence variations. HRV infections cause a wide spectrum of clinical outcomes ranging from asymptomatic infection to severe lower respiratory symptoms. Defining the role of specific strains in various HRV illnesses has been difficult because traditional serology, which requires viral culture and neutralization tests using 101 serotype-specific antisera, is insensitive and laborious.To directly type HRVs in nasal secretions of infants with frequent respiratory illnesses, we developed a sensitive molecular typing assay based on phylogenetic comparisons of a 260-bp variable sequence in the 5' noncoding region with homologous sequences of the 101 known serotypes. Nasal samples from 26 infants were first tested with a multiplex PCR assay for respiratory viruses, and HRV was the most common virus found (108 of 181 samples. Typing was completed for 101 samples and 103 HRVs were identified. Surprisingly, 54 (52.4% HRVs did not match any of the known serotypes and had 12-35% nucleotide divergence from the nearest reference HRVs. Of these novel viruses, 9 strains (17 HRVs segregated from HRVA, HRVB and human enterovirus into a distinct genetic group ("C". None of these new strains could be cultured in traditional cell lines.By molecular analysis, over 50% of HRV detected in sick infants were previously unrecognized strains, including 9 strains that may represent a new HRV group. These findings indicate that the number of HRV strains is considerably larger than the 101 serotypes identified with traditional diagnostic techniques, and provide evidence of a new HRV group.

  4. Privacy and Psychosomatic Stress: An Empirical Analysis.

    Webb, Stephen D.

    1978-01-01

    Examines the supposition that insufficient privacy is stressful to the individual. Data were obtained from urban centers in New Zealand. Findings support the hypothesis that a percieved lack of privacy is associated with psychosomatic stress. The relationship is specified by measures of stress and sex of respondents. (Author)

  5. Dental practitioners and ill health retirement: a qualitative investigation into the causes and effects.

    Hill, K B; Burke, F J T; Brown, J; Macdonald, E B; Morris, A J; White, D A; Murray, K

    2010-09-11

    Data published in 1999 from the Government Actuary on the National Health Service Pension Scheme (1989-1994) have indicated that the frequency of ill health premature retirement (IHR) was four times more prevalent among dentists at age 42 years compared with doctors.Objective The aim of this project was to determine the factors that contributed to IHR in dental practitioners, and the effects of IHR on their lives. Semi-structured interviews were carried out during 2007. A topic list was developed, piloted and used to guide the interviewer. A purposive sampling technique was used to recruit the respondents from an insurance company database. A framework approach to data analysis was utilised. Twenty-three respondents were interviewed, 19 male and 4 female, aged between 39-59 years. Depression, stress and anxiety were reported by respondents to be major causes of their retirement, followed by musculoskeletal disease and premature disability caused by trauma. This is illustrated by the following: '...just went straight into general practice but with some regrets. Practice was so depressing' (GDS/NHS); 'I withdraw, I don't engage ... I found it more and more difficult and one morning... I collapsed in tears at the practice' (GDS/NHS). Dentists reported both negative and positive comments in relation to support received from their health insurance company. The main causes of IHR were depression, musculoskeletal disease and specific skin conditions. Respondents expressed concern regarding the level of support available to dentists in distress. Respondents to this study found that continuing to work had a positive impact on their health.

  6. Chest radiography for predicting the cause of febrile illness among inpatients in Moshi, Tanzania

    Fiorillo, S.P.; Diefenthal, H.C.; Goodman, P.C.; Ramadhani, H.O.; Njau, B.N.; Morrissey, A.B.; Maro, V.P.; Saganda, W.; Kinabo, G.D.; Mwako, M.S.; Bartlett, J.A.

    2013-01-01

    Aim: To describe chest radiographic abnormalities and assess their usefulness for predicting causes of fever in a resource-limited setting. Materials and methods: Febrile patients were enrolled in Moshi, Tanzania, and chest radiographs were evaluated by radiologists in Tanzania and the United States. Radiologists were blinded to the results of extensive laboratory evaluations to determine the cause of fever. Results: Of 870 febrile patients, 515 (59.2%) had a chest radiograph available; including 268 (66.5%) of the adolescents and adults, the remainder were infants and children. One hundred and nineteen (44.4%) adults and 51 (20.6%) children were human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected. Among adults, radiographic abnormalities were present in 139 (51.9%), including 77 (28.7%) with homogeneous and heterogeneous lung opacities, 26 (9.7%) with lung nodules, 25 (9.3%) with pleural effusion, 23 (8.6%) with cardiomegaly, and 13 (4.9%) with lymphadenopathy. Among children, radiographic abnormalities were present in 87 (35.2%), including 76 (30.8%) with homogeneous and heterogeneous lung opacities and six (2.4%) with lymphadenopathy. Among adolescents and adults, the presence of opacities was predictive of Streptococcus pneumoniae and Coxiella burnetii, whereas the presence of pulmonary nodules was predictive of Histoplasma capsulatum and Cryptococcus neoformans. Conclusions: Chest radiograph abnormalities among febrile inpatients are common in northern Tanzania. Chest radiography is a useful adjunct for establishing an aetiologic diagnosis of febrile illness and may provide useful information for patient management, in particular for pneumococcal disease, Q fever, and fungal infections

  7. Causes of non-malarial febrile illness in outpatients in Tanzania.

    Hildenwall, Helena; Amos, Ben; Mtove, George; Muro, Florida; Cederlund, Kerstin; Reyburn, Hugh

    2016-01-01

    In sub-Saharan Africa, the use of malaria rapid diagnostic tests (mRDT) has raised awareness of alternative fever causes in children but few studies have included adults. To address this gap, we conducted a study of mRDT-negative fever aetiologies among children and adults in Tanzania. A total of 1028 patients aged 3 months to 50 years with a febrile illness and negative mRDT were enrolled from a Tanzanian hospital outpatient department. All had a physical examination and cultures from blood, nasopharynx/throat and urine. Patients were followed on Days 7 and 14 and children meeting WHO criteria for pneumonia were followed on Day 2 with chest radiology. Respiratory symptoms were the most frequent presenting complaint, reported by 20.3% of adults and 64.0% (339/530) of children. Of 38 X-rayed children meeting WHO pneumonia criteria, 47.4% had a normal X-ray. Overall, only 1.3% of 1028 blood cultures were positive. Salmonella typhi was the most prevalent pathogen isolated (7/13, 53.8%) and S. typhi patients reported fever for a median of 7 days (range 2-14). Children with bacteraemia did not present with WHO symptoms requiring antibiotic treatment. Young children and adults had similar prevalences of positive urine cultures (24/428 and 29/498, respectively). Few outpatient fevers are caused by blood stream bacterial infection, and most adult bacteraemia would be identified by current clinical guidelines although paediatric bacteraemia may be more difficult to diagnose. While pneumonia may be overdiagnosed, urinary tract infection was relatively common. Our results emphasise the difficulty in identifying African children in need of antibiotics among the majority who do not. © 2015 The Authors. Tropical Medicine & International Health Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Transcriptional Profile during Deoxycholate-Induced Sporulation in a Clostridium perfringens Isolate Causing Foodborne Illness.

    Yasugi, Mayo; Okuzaki, Daisuke; Kuwana, Ritsuko; Takamatsu, Hiromu; Fujita, Masaya; Sarker, Mahfuzur R; Miyake, Masami

    2016-05-15

    Clostridium perfringens type A is a common source of foodborne illness (FBI) in humans. Vegetative cells sporulate in the small intestinal tract and produce the major pathogenic factor C. perfringens enterotoxin. Although sporulation plays a critical role in the pathogenesis of FBI, the mechanisms inducing sporulation remain unclear. Bile salts were shown previously to induce sporulation, and we confirmed deoxycholate (DCA)-induced sporulation in C. perfringens strain NCTC8239 cocultured with human intestinal epithelial Caco-2 cells. In the present study, we performed transcriptome analyses of strain NCTC8239 in order to elucidate the mechanism underlying DCA-induced sporulation. Of the 2,761 genes analyzed, 333 were up- or downregulated during DCA-induced sporulation and included genes for cell division, nutrient metabolism, signal transduction, and defense mechanisms. In contrast, the virulence-associated transcriptional regulators (the VirR/VirS system, the agr system, codY, and abrB) were not activated by DCA. DCA markedly increased the expression of signaling molecules controlled by Spo0A, the master regulator of the sporulation process, whereas the expression of spo0A itself was not altered in the presence or absence of DCA. The phosphorylation of Spo0A was enhanced in the presence of DCA. Collectively, these results demonstrated that DCA induced sporulation, at least partially, by facilitating the phosphorylation of Spo0A and activating Spo0A-regulated genes in strain NCTC8239 while altering the expression of various genes. Disease caused by Clostridium perfringens type A consistently ranks among the most common bacterial foodborne illnesses in humans in developed countries. The sporulation of C. perfringens in the small intestinal tract is a key event for its pathogenesis, but the factors and underlying mechanisms by which C. perfringens sporulates in vivo currently remain unclear. Bile salts, major components of bile, which is secreted from the liver for

  9. Attitudes of U.S. Psychiatry Residents and Fellows towards Mental Illness and its Causes: a Comparison Study with Medical Students.

    Chiles, Catherine; Stefanovics, Elina; Rosenheck, Robert

    2018-01-13

    Stigma towards people with mental illness remains a burden for patients and healthcare providers. This study at a large US university examined the attitudes of psychiatry residents and fellows towards mental illness and its causes, and whether their attitudes differed from the medical student attitudes previously studied utilizing the same survey method. An electronic questionnaire examining attitudes toward people with mental illness, causes of mental Illness, and treatment efficacy was used to survey the attitudes of psychiatry residents and fellows. Exploratory factor analysis derived from the authors' medical student survey was used to examine attitudinal factors. The study response rate was 54.2% (n = 94). Factor analysis employed three factors previously identified reflecting social acceptance of mental illness, belief in supernatural causes, and belief in biopsychosocial causes. Residents and fellows reporting more personal experiences with mental illness, both as a group and when compared with medical students, were significantly more willing to socialize with the mentally ill. Respondents who had more professional (work) experience other than medical school or post-graduate training were less likely to believe in supernatural causes of mental illness. Female residents and fellows were more willing to socialize with the mentally ill, and were less likely to believe in supernatural causes for mental illness than their male counterparts. In our study, increased social acceptance of the mentally ill relates to having personal experiences, advanced training in psychiatry, and female gender. Both professional experiences outside of training and female gender reduced the belief in supernatural causes.

  10. [Frequency and consequences of financial problems in patients undergoing outpatient psychosomatic treatment].

    Wagner, Stefanie; Münster, Eva; Beutel, Manfred E

    2010-01-01

    About seven million people in Germany are affected by overindebtedness and insolvency. Being severely in debt is a very stressful situation that can result in social marginalisation, reducted overall activity, and physical and mental illness. The present study investigated the frequency of financial problems and their effects on physical and mental disorders at a university psychosomatic clinic. The study included a total of 659 patients. Their mental status was assessed with the Symptom Checklist (SCL-90-R), their physical status with the Gießener Beschwerdebogen (GBB). 37 percent of the subjects reported experiencing financial problems. We found that subjects with financial problems reported more physical and mental disorders than those without financial problems. Furthermore, therapists more often recommended that patients with financial problems receive inpatient therapy than patients without financial problems. The study suggests that financial problems should be included in any anamnesis, therapeutic recommendation, and actual therapy of patients in psychosomatic treatment.

  11. Clinical application of somatosensory amplification in psychosomatic medicine

    Nakao Mutsuhiro

    2007-10-01

    . The specific role of somatosensory amplification with regard to both neurological and psychological function should be clarified in future studies. In this paper, we will explain the concept of amplification and describe its role in psychosomatic illness.

  12. Manual materials handling: the cause of over-exertion injury and illness in industry.

    Chaffin, D B

    1979-01-01

    It is reported from various sources that overexertion due to lifting, pushing, pulling, and carrying objects accounts for about 27 percent of all compensable industrial injury and illness in the United States. Resulting strain/sprain injuries account for over 50 percent of workmen's compensation clams in many industries. Almont two-thirds of these involve back pain, with reported compensation and medical payments totaling well over one billion dollars annually in the U.S. An estimated 300,000 plus workers will be affected each year, 5 to 10 percent of whom will have a permanent disability and often will be unemployable. This paper attempts to describe four basic approaches used to study this occupational health problem. In so doing, a concerted effort is made to identifiy the gaps in knowledge which need to be more fully researched. The approaches utilized to understand and control the hazards of manual materials handling are: 1) epidemiological studies of job and worker attributes to identify those that individually and in combination cause musculoskeletal incidents, 2) psychophysical studies to ascertain the volitional tolerance of workers to the stress mitigated by manual materials-handling activities, 3) biomechanical studies of the musculoskeletal system during common exertions required in manual materials-handling activities, and 4) physiological studies of the strain imposed on the cardiovascular system during repeated load-handling activities. The state of knowledge from each of these approaches is summarized briefly, and a case is made that much research is still needed to substantiate the necessary controls to lessen the economic burden and human suffering associated with manual materials-handling acts in industry.

  13. Mediation Analysis in Psychosomatic Medicine Research

    Lockhart, Ginger; MacKinnon, David P.; Ohlrich, Vanessa

    2010-01-01

    This article presents an overview of statistical mediation analysis and its application to psychosomatic medicine research. The article begins with a description of the major approaches to mediation analysis and an evaluation of the strengths and limits of each. Emphasis is placed on longitudinal mediation models, and an application using latent growth modeling is presented. The article concludes with a description of recent developments in mediation analysis and suggestions for the use of me...

  14. Work-related stress and psychosomatic medicine

    Nakao, Mutsuhiro

    2010-01-01

    Abstract This article introduces key concepts of work-related stress relevant to the clinical and research fields of psychosomatic medicine. Stress is a term used to describe the body's physiological and/or psychological reaction to circumstances that require behavioral adjustment. According to the Japanese National Survey of Health, the most frequent stressors are work-related problems, followed by health-related and then financial problems. Conceptually, work-related stress includes a varie...

  15. [Culture sensitive analysis of psychosomatic complaints in migrants in Germany].

    Bermejo, Isaac; Nicolaus, Leonhard; Kriston, Levente; Hölzel, Lars; Härter, Martin

    2012-05-01

    To ensure an adequate health care of migrants, differentiated information on the association of cultural background and migration related factors and psychosomatic complaints are necessary. Cross-sectional questionnaire based survey regarding psychosomatic complaints of migrants from Turkey (n = 77), Italy (n = 95), and Spain (n = 67) and ethnic German resettled from the states of the former Soviet Union (n = 196). Questionnaires distributed by non-health specific counselling agencies of welfare associations. The cultural background was a relevant factor for psychosomatic complaints, showing higher complaints in Turkish and ethnic German resettled migrants, also compared to a sample of age corresponding Germans. In contrast, Spanish and Italian migrants showed a lower risk for psychosomatic complaints. Also gender, feeling unwell in Germany and fatalism showed a significant association with psychosomatic complaints. Migrants in Germany do not have per se a higher risk for psychosomatic complaints. A distinct differentiation by cultural background is necessary. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  16. PSYCHOSOMATIC "ARC" IN THE PSYCHOTHERAPEUTIC PRACTICE

    Ivanka Boncheva

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available The psychoneuroimmunology, the new brain science and the endocrinology today show a lot of results, with which symptoms are better to understand. The psychotherapeutic practice shows the ways to influence them by encoding the levels of bounding between the physical symptom and the psychological condition. The aim of the study was to show the encoding of the psychosomatic arc within a real psychotherapeutic contact. 59 psychotherapeutic cases are followed. 33 of them were with somatoform disorders and 26 with chronic psychosomatic diseases. Every patient has minimum 12 psychotherapeutic sessions. The treatment is provided on the base of the 5 levels model of the positive psychotherapy.We ascertain the following:1. The most significant moment in the arise of such symptomatic is the gained past experience - "vital concepts"; "coping strategies";2. Unlocking moment for the arise of the affection is the fixed emotion - fear, aggression or depression, specific for the particular morbid pictures;3. Showing the connection between symptom and fixed emotion by the technique "positive interpretation", which unlocks the process of changingThis shows that the psychotherapeutic help is possible only if the patient rethink the psychosomatic arc. Showing the connections between the content of the unconscious, the fixed emotion in behavioral models and the symptom gives the impetus to change.

  17. Pesticide-related illness reported to and diagnosed in Primary Care: implications for surveillance of environmental causes of ill-health

    Mann Vera

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In Great Britain (GB, data collected on pesticide associated illness focuses on acute episodes such as poisonings caused by misuse or abuse. This study aimed to investigate the extent and nature of pesticide-related illness presented and diagnosed in Primary Care and the feasibility of establishing a routine monitoring system. Methods A checklist, completed by General Practitioners (GP for all patients aged 18+ who attended surgery sessions, identified patients to be interviewed in detail on exposures and events that occurred in the week before their symptoms appeared. Results The study covered 59320 patients in 43 practices across GB and 1335 detailed interviews. The annual incidence of illness reported to GPs because of concern about pesticide exposure was estimated to be 0.04%, potentially 88400 consultations annually, approximately 1700 per week. The annual incidence of consultations where symptoms were diagnosed by GPs as likely to be related to pesticide exposure was 0.003%, an annual estimate of 6630 consultations i.e. about 128 per week. 41% of interviewees reported using at least one pesticide at home in the week before symptoms occurred. The risk of having symptoms possibly related to pesticide exposure compared to unlikely was associated with home use of pesticides after adjusting for age, gender and occupational pesticide exposure (OR = 1.88, 95% CI 1.51 – 2.35. Conclusion GP practices were diverse and well distributed throughout GB with similar symptom consulting patterns as in the Primary Care within the UK. Methods used in this study would not be feasible for a routine surveillance system for pesticide related illness. Incorporation of environmental health into Primary Care education and practice is needed.

  18. Mental Illness

    ... the same time. For example, you may have depression and a substance use disorder. Complications Mental illness is a leading cause of disability. Untreated mental illness can cause severe emotional, behavioral and physical health problems. Complications sometimes linked to mental illness include: ...

  19. The dappled nature of causes of psychiatric illness: replacing the organic-functional/hardware-software dichotomy with empirically based pluralism.

    Kendler, K S

    2012-04-01

    Our tendency to see the world of psychiatric illness in dichotomous and opposing terms has three major sources: the philosophy of Descartes, the state of neuropathology in late nineteenth century Europe (when disorders were divided into those with and without demonstrable pathology and labeled, respectively, organic and functional), and the influential concept of computer functionalism wherein the computer is viewed as a model for the human mind-brain system (brain=hardware, mind=software). These mutually re-enforcing dichotomies, which have had a pernicious influence on our field, make a clear prediction about how 'difference-makers' (aka causal risk factors) for psychiatric disorders should be distributed in nature. In particular, are psychiatric disorders like our laptops, which when they dysfunction, can be cleanly divided into those with software versus hardware problems? I propose 11 categories of difference-makers for psychiatric illness from molecular genetics through culture and review their distribution in schizophrenia, major depression and alcohol dependence. In no case do these distributions resemble that predicted by the organic-functional/hardware-software dichotomy. Instead, the causes of psychiatric illness are dappled, distributed widely across multiple categories. We should abandon Cartesian and computer-functionalism-based dichotomies as scientifically inadequate and an impediment to our ability to integrate the diverse information about psychiatric illness our research has produced. Empirically based pluralism provides a rigorous but dappled view of the etiology of psychiatric illness. Critically, it is based not on how we wish the world to be but how the difference-makers for psychiatric illness are in fact distributed.

  20. Psychosomatic medicine and the philosophy of life

    Wiggins Osborne P; Schwartz Michael A

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Basing ourselves on the writings of Hans Jonas, we offer to psychosomatic medicine a philosophy of life that surmounts the mind-body dualism which has plagued Western thought since the origins of modern science in seventeenth century Europe. Any present-day account of reality must draw upon everything we know about the living and the non-living. Since we are living beings ourselves, we know what it means to be alive from our own first-hand experience. Therefore, our philosophy of lif...

  1. Sequelae of Foodborne Illness Caused by 5 Pathogens, Australia, Circa 2010

    Ford, Laura; Kirk, Martyn; Glass, Kathryn; Hall, Gillian

    2014-01-01

    In Australia circa 2010, 4.1 million (90% credible interval [CrI] 2.3–6.4 million) episodes of foodborne gastroenteritis occurred, many of which might have resulted in sequelae. We estimated the number of illnesses, hospitalizations, and deaths from Guillain-Barré syndrome, hemolytic uremic syndrome, irritable bowel syndrome, and reactive arthritis that were associated with contaminated food in Australia. Data from published studies, hospital records, and mortality reports were combined with ...

  2. Psychosomatic problems and countermeasures in Japanese children and adolescents

    Tanaka Hidetaka

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract In Japan there are a number of children and adolescents with emotion-related disorders including psychosomatic diseases (orthostatic dysregulation, anorexia nervosa, recurrent pains, behavior problems and school absenteeism. According to our previous report, the Japanese children had significantly higher score of physical symptoms and psychiatric complaints than did the Swedish children, and these were more strongly influenced by school-related stress than by home-related stress. To enforce countermeasures for psychosomatic problems in children, the Japanese Society of Psychosomatic Pediatrics (established in 1982 have started several new projects including multi-center psychosomatic researches and society-based activities. In this article, we present an outline of our study on mental health in Japanese children in comparison with Swedish children. Countermeasures including clinical guidelines for child psychosomatic diseases are reviewed and discussed.

  3. Research Paradigms in Psychosomatic Medicine with Special Emphasis on Whiplash - Cervical Hyperextension Flexion Injury (CHFI

    Harold Merskey

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available There have been a number of attempts, particularly in the last five decades to understand the origins of pain in terms of psychological or psychosomatic patterns. These include psychoanalytic explanations relying on hysterical mechanisms, and psychophysiological proposals. The occurrence of pain in the course of psychiatric illness and its remission after the illness, has long been known and is not a controversial issue. However, the reported explanations of pain without overt and obvious prior psychiatric illness have largely failed to convince a significant portion of the professional establishment. These explanations have very often coincided with the interests of insurance companies, whether those insurance companies were providing medical benefits, disability insurance or workers' or accident compensation. Critical examination of the evidence generated by insurance company related research indicates profound weaknesses in it.

  4. Research paradigms in psychosomatic medicine with special emphasis on whiplash - cervical hyperextension flexion injury (CHFI).

    Merskey, Harold

    2003-01-01

    There have been a number of attempts, particularly in the last five decades to understand the origins of pain in terms of psychological or psychosomatic patterns. These include psychoanalytic explanations relying on hysterical mechanisms, and psychophysiological proposals. The occurrence of pain in the course of psychiatric illness and its remission after the illness, has long been known and is not a controversial issue. However, the reported explanations of pain without overt and obvious prior psychiatric illness have largely failed to convince a significant portion of the professional establishment. These explanations have very often coincided with the interests of insurance companies, whether those insurance companies were providing medical benefits, disability insurance or workers' or accident compensation. Critical examination of the evidence generated by insurance company related research indicates profound weaknesses in it.

  5. Reversible acute adrenal insufficiency caused by fluconazole in a critically ill patient

    Krishnan, S G Santhana; Cobbs, R K

    2006-01-01

    A 38 year old man with history of obstructive sleep apnea and polycythaemia presented with hypercapnic respiratory failure that required intubation. He developed fever with infiltrates on chest radiography that required empiric antifungal therapy with fluconazole along with broad spectrum antibiotics. He developed acute adrenal insufficiency that recovered after fluconazole was stopped. It is believed that this complication of adrenal suppression attributable to fluconazole is underrecognised and it may be prudent to monitor all critically ill patients who are given fluconazole for this complication. PMID:16954446

  6. Sequelae of foodborne illness caused by 5 pathogens, Australia, circa 2010.

    Ford, Laura; Kirk, Martyn; Glass, Kathryn; Hall, Gillian

    2014-11-01

    In Australia circa 2010, 4.1 million (90% credible interval [CrI] 2.3-6.4 million) episodes of foodborne gastroenteritis occurred, many of which might have resulted in sequelae. We estimated the number of illnesses, hospitalizations, and deaths from Guillain-Barré syndrome, hemolytic uremic syndrome, irritable bowel syndrome, and reactive arthritis that were associated with contaminated food in Australia. Data from published studies, hospital records, and mortality reports were combined with multipliers to adjust for different transmission routes. We used Monte Carlo simulation to estimate median estimates and 90% CrIs. In Australia, circa 2010, we estimated that 35,840 (90% CrI 25,000-54,000) illnesses, 1,080 (90% CrI 700-1,600) hospitalizations, and 10 (90% CrI 5-14) deaths occurred from foodborne gastroenteritis-associated sequelae. Campylobacter spp. infection was responsible for 80% of incident cases. Reducing the incidence of campylobacteriosis and other foodborne diseases would minimize the health effects of sequelae.

  7. Physics of Intrinsic and Extrinsic Factors that Cause the Onset of the Deadliest Illness of Mankind and are Important for Diagnostics and Treatment

    Saxena, Arjun

    One of the most important topic of research in the field of Physics of Behavior is the deadliest illness of mankind which is the group of illnesses called mental illnesses. They are getting attention increasingly worldwide by the medical communities and their respective governments, because of the following fact. It is now well established that these illnesses cause more loss of human lives, destruction of families, businesses and overall economy than all the other illnesses combined. The purpose of this paper is to identify and provide solutions to two fundamental issues of such illnesses which still remain as problems. One is the stigma associated with them because of their name ``mental''. The patients are regarded as less than normal because their illness is only ``mental'' in origin. The second is that it is still not widely recognized that they are caused by medical problems in their ``brain'' which afflict their ``mind''. This paper explains this and gives an improved 3-D model using the physics of intrinsic and extrinsic factors of both ``brain'' and ``mind''. It leads to an important new name, ``BAMI'' (Brain and Mind Illness), which eliminates the stigma and gives quantitative parameters to diagnose the illness and monitor medicines to treat such illnesses.

  8. Cumulative radiation dose caused by radiologic studies in critically ill trauma patients.

    Kim, Patrick K; Gracias, Vicente H; Maidment, Andrew D A; O'Shea, Michael; Reilly, Patrick M; Schwab, C William

    2004-09-01

    Critically ill trauma patients undergo many radiologic studies, but the cumulative radiation dose is unknown. The purpose of this study was to estimate the cumulative effective dose (CED) of radiation resulting from radiologic studies in critically ill trauma patients. The study group was composed of trauma patients at an urban Level I trauma center with surgical intensive care unit length of stay (LOS) greater than 30 days. The radiology records were reviewed. A typical effective dose per study for each type of plain film radiograph, computed tomographic scan, fluoroscopic study, and nuclear medicine study was used to calculate CED. Forty-six patients met criteria. The mean surgical intensive care unit and hospital LOS were 42.7 +/- 14.0 and 59.5 +/- 28.5 days, respectively. The mean Injury Severity Score was 32.2 +/- 15.0. The mean number of studies per patient was 70.1 +/- 29.0 plain film radiographs, 7.8 +/- 4.1 computed tomographic scans, 2.5 +/- 2.6 fluoroscopic studies, and 0.065 +/- 0.33 nuclear medicine study. The mean CED was 106 +/- 59 mSv per patient (range, 11-289 mSv; median, 104 mSv). Among age, mechanism, Injury Severity Score, and LOS, there was no statistically significant predictor of high CED. The mean CED in the study group was 30 times higher than the average yearly radiation dose from all sources for individuals in the United States. The theoretical additional morbidity attributable to radiologic studies was 0.78%. From a radiobiologic perspective, risk-to-benefit ratios of radiologic studies are favorable, given the importance of medical information obtained. Current practice patterns regarding use of radiologic studies appear to be acceptable.

  9. The relation of vocal fold lesions and voice quality to voice handicap and psychosomatic well-being

    Smits, R.; Marres, H.A.; de Jong, F.

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Voice disorders have a multifactorial genesis and may be present in various ways. They can cause a significant communication handicap and impaired quality of life. OBJECTIVE: To assess the effect of vocal fold lesions and voice quality on voice handicap and psychosomatic well-being.

  10. Work-related stress and psychosomatic medicine

    Nakao Mutsuhiro

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract This article introduces key concepts of work-related stress relevant to the clinical and research fields of psychosomatic medicine. Stress is a term used to describe the body's physiological and/or psychological reaction to circumstances that require behavioral adjustment. According to the Japanese National Survey of Health, the most frequent stressors are work-related problems, followed by health-related and then financial problems. Conceptually, work-related stress includes a variety of conditions, such as overwork, unemployment or job insecurity, and lack of work-family balance. Job stress has been linked to a range of adverse physical and mental health outcomes, such as cardiovascular disease, insomnia, depression, and anxiety. Stressful working conditions can also impact employee well-being indirectly by directly contributing to negative health behaviors or by limiting an individual's ability to make positive changes to lifestyle behaviors, such as smoking and sedentary behavior. Over the past two decades, two major job stress models have dominated the occupational health literature: the job demand-control-support model and the effort-reward imbalance model. In both models, standardized questionnaires have been developed and frequently used to assess job stress. Unemployment has also been reported to be associated with increased mortality and morbidity, such as by cardiovascular disease, stroke, and suicide. During the past two decades, a trend toward more flexible labor markets has emerged in the private and public sectors of developed countries, and temporary employment arrangements have increased. Temporary workers often complain that they are more productive but receive less compensation than permanent workers. A significant body of research reveals that temporary workers have reported chronic work-related stress for years. The Japanese government has urged all employers to implement four approaches to comprehensive mind

  11. Work-related stress and psychosomatic medicine.

    Nakao, Mutsuhiro

    2010-05-26

    This article introduces key concepts of work-related stress relevant to the clinical and research fields of psychosomatic medicine. Stress is a term used to describe the body's physiological and/or psychological reaction to circumstances that require behavioral adjustment. According to the Japanese National Survey of Health, the most frequent stressors are work-related problems, followed by health-related and then financial problems. Conceptually, work-related stress includes a variety of conditions, such as overwork, unemployment or job insecurity, and lack of work-family balance. Job stress has been linked to a range of adverse physical and mental health outcomes, such as cardiovascular disease, insomnia, depression, and anxiety. Stressful working conditions can also impact employee well-being indirectly by directly contributing to negative health behaviors or by limiting an individual's ability to make positive changes to lifestyle behaviors, such as smoking and sedentary behavior. Over the past two decades, two major job stress models have dominated the occupational health literature: the job demand-control-support model and the effort-reward imbalance model. In both models, standardized questionnaires have been developed and frequently used to assess job stress. Unemployment has also been reported to be associated with increased mortality and morbidity, such as by cardiovascular disease, stroke, and suicide. During the past two decades, a trend toward more flexible labor markets has emerged in the private and public sectors of developed countries, and temporary employment arrangements have increased. Temporary workers often complain that they are more productive but receive less compensation than permanent workers. A significant body of research reveals that temporary workers have reported chronic work-related stress for years. The Japanese government has urged all employers to implement four approaches to comprehensive mind/body health care for stress

  12. Anxiety and psychosomatic symptoms in palliative care: from neuro-psychobiological response to stress, to symptoms' management with clinical hypnosis and meditative states.

    Satsangi, Anirudh Kumar; Brugnoli, Maria Paola

    2018-01-01

    Psychosomatic disorder is a condition in which psychological stresses adversely affect physiological (somatic) functioning to the point of distress. It is a condition of dysfunction or structural damage in physical organs through inappropriate activation of the involuntary nervous system and the biochemical response. In this framework, this review will consider anxiety disorders, from the perspective of the psychobiological mechanisms of vulnerability to extreme stress in severe chronic illnesses. Psychosomatic medicine is a field of behavioral medicine and a part of the practice of consultation-liaison psychiatry. Psychosomatic medicine in palliative care, integrates interdisciplinary evaluation and management involving diverse clinical specialties including psychiatry, psychology, neurology, internal medicine, allergy, dermatology, psychoneuroimmunology, psychosocial oncology and spiritual care. Clinical conditions where psychological processes act as a major factor affecting medical outcomes are areas where psychosomatic medicine has competence. Thus, the psychosomatic symptom develops as a physiological connected of an emotional state. In a state of rage or fear, for example, the stressed person's blood pressure is likely to be elevated and his pulse and respiratory rate to be increased. When the fear passes, the heightened physiologic processes usually subside. If the person has a persistent fear (chronic anxiety), however, which he is unable to express overtly, the emotional state remains unchanged, though unexpressed in the overt behavior, and the physiological symptoms associated with the anxiety state persist. This paper wants highlight how clinical hypnosis and meditative states can be important psychosocial and spiritual care, for the symptom management on neuro-psychobiological response to stress.

  13. The treatment of patients with medically unexplained physical symptoms in China: a study comparing expectations and treatment satisfaction in psychosomatic medicine, biomedicine, and traditional Chinese medicine.

    Fritzsche, Kurt; Xudong, Zhao; Anselm, Kathrin; Kern, Stephanie; Wirsching, Michael; Schaefert, Rainer

    2011-01-01

    Little is known about treatment for patients with medically unexplained symptoms (MUS) in China. This study investigates the treatment expectations and treatment satisfaction of patients with MUS in psychosomatic medicine, biomedicine, and Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM). In a cross-sectional survey, n = 96 (10.3%) out of 931 participating patients were screened positive for multiple somatoform symptoms. These patients answered questionnaires concerning symptom duration, number of doctor visits, functional impairment, emotional distress, treatment expectations, treatment satisfaction, and empathy in the consultation. The physicians filled in a questionnaire about applied or recommended treatment. Most of the patients from psychosomatic medicine wanted psychotherapy. In TCM, 55% of the patients had already received TCM treatment and most of them wanted to continue TCM treatment. Patients in biomedicine did not express clear expectations; most of them had had no previous treatment. A combination of treatment methods was most prevalent in biomedicine in comparison to psychosomatic medicine and TCM. The outcome from the patients' point of view was significantly better in TCM than in psychosomatic medicine and biomedicine. Psychosomatic medicine's strength was the empathetic physician-patient interaction. From a biopsychosocial perspective, these results suggest that various treatment approaches with various emphases can be effective depending on the patient's complaints, his illness beliefs, and what the physician offers. The results will be verified in a larger multicenter longitudinal study.

  14. Analysis of as a cause of foodborne illness and its associated differential diagnosis

    Sung Uk Lee

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES Recently kudoa septempuctata in olive flounders is suggested as a cause of food poisoning, however whether kudoa septempuctata can affect human gastrointestinal systems is controversial and its pathogenecity remains unclear. In view of the field epidemiology, food poisonings caused by kudoa septempuctata should be distinguished from those caused by Staphylococcus aureus and bacillus cereus. METHODS The statistics of food poisoning investigations published by Korea Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in 2013-2015 were reviewed. The characteristics of kudoa septempuctata food poisoning reported by Korea Centers for Disease Control and Prevention were reviewed. Information regarding clinical symptoms or epidemiology was extracted. RESULTS Total eleven kudoa septempuctata food poisoning cases were analyzed. Food poisonings caused by kudoa septempuctata, Staphylococcus aureus and bacillus cereus have clinical and epidemiological similarities. Forty five percent of food poisoning outbreaks occurred in Korea was concluded as unknown. The food poisoning caused by Staphylococcus aureus and bacillus cereus accounted for 4.5% (50/1,092 of all food poisoning outbreaks in Korea between 2013 and 2015. CONCLUSIONS This study suggests the possibilities of misdiagnosis in the investigations of food poisoning by Staphylococcus aureus and bacillus cereus with kudoa septempuctata.

  15. Are brucellosis, Q fever and melioidosis potential causes of febrile illness in Madagascar?

    Boone, Ides; Henning, Klaus; Hilbert, Angela; Neubauer, Heinrich; von Kalckreuth, Vera; Dekker, Denise Myriam; Schwarz, Norbert Georg; Pak, Gi Deok; Krüger, Andreas; Hagen, Ralf Matthias; Frickmann, Hagen; Heriniaina, Jean Noël; Rakotozandrindrainy, Raphael; Rakotondrainiarivelo, Jean Philibert; Razafindrabe, Tsiry; Hogan, Benedikt; May, Jürgen; Marks, Florian; Poppert, Sven; Al Dahouk, Sascha

    2017-08-01

    Brucellosis, Q fever and melioidosis are zoonoses, which can lead to pyrexia. These diseases are often under-ascertained and underreported because of their unspecific clinical signs and symptoms, insufficient awareness by physicians and public health officers and limited diagnostic capabilities, especially in low-resource countries. Therefore, the presence of Brucella spp., Coxiella burnetii and Burkholderia pseudomallei was investigated in Malagasy patients exhibiting febrile illness. In addition, we analyzed zebu cattle and their ticks as potential reservoirs for Brucella and C. burnetii, respectively. Specific quantitative real-time PCR assays (qPCRs) were performed on 1020 blood samples drawn from febrile patients. In total, 15 samples (1.5%) were Brucella-positive, mainly originating from patients without travel history, while DNA from C. burnetii and Bu. pseudomallei was not detected. Anti-C. burnetii antibodies were found in four out of 201 zebu serum samples (2%), whereas anti-Brucella antibodies could not be detected. Brucella DNA was detected in a single zebu sample. Three out of 330 ticks analyzed (1%) were positively tested for C. burnetii DNA but with high Ct values in the qPCR assay. Our data suggest that zebus as well as Amblyomma and Boophilus ticks have to be considered as a natural reservoir or vector for C. burnetii, but the risk of cattle-to-human transmission is low. Since bovine brucellosis does not seem to contribute to human infections in Madagascar, other transmission routes have to be assumed. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. as a cause of acute-onset febrile illness in cats

    Edward B Breitschwerdt

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Case series summary At different time points spanning 6 months, three adopted feral flea-infested cats, residing in the household of a veterinary technician, became acutely anorexic, lethargic and febrile. Enrichment blood culture/PCR using Bartonella alpha Proteobacteria growth medium (BAPGM confirmed initial infection with the same Bartonella henselae genotype in all three cases. With the exception of anemia and neutropenia, complete blood counts, serum biochemical profiles and urinalysis results were within reference intervals. Also, tests for feline leukemia virus, feline immunodeficiency virus, Toxoplasma gondii and feline coronavirus antibodies were negative. Serial daily temperature monitoring in one case confirmed a cyclic, relapsing febrile temperature pattern during 1 month, with resolution during and after treatment with azithromycin. Bartonella henselae Western immunoblot (WB results did not consistently correlate with BAPGM enrichment blood culture/PCR results or B henselae indirect fluorescent antibody (IFA titers, and WB titration results were not informative for establishing antibiotic treatment failure. During the respective follow-up periods, no illnesses or additional febrile episodes were reported, despite repeat documentation of B henselae bacteremia in two cats available for follow-up (one with the same genotype and the other with a different B henselae genotype; one cat was, unfortunately, killed by dogs before follow-up testing. Relevance and novel information We conclude that microbiological diagnosis and treatment of B henselae infection in cats can be challenging, that antibody titration results and resolution of clinical abnormalities may not correlate with a therapeutic cure, and that fever and potentially neutropenia should be differential diagnostic considerations for young cats with suspected bartonellosis.

  17. Human parechoviruses as an important viral cause of sepsislike illness and meningitis in young children

    Wolthers, Katja C.; Benschop, Kimberley S. M.; Schinkel, Janke; Molenkamp, Richard; Bergevoet, Rosemarijn M.; Spijkerman, Ingrid J. B.; Kraakman, H. Carlijn; Pajkrt, Dasja

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Enteroviruses (EVs) belong to the family Picornaviridae and are a well-known cause of neonatal sepsis and viral meningitis. Human parechoviruses (HPeVs) type 1 and 2, previously named echovirus 22 and 23, have been associated with mild gastrointestinal or respiratory symptoms in young

  18. A CONCEPTUAL APPROACH OF PSYCHOSOMATIC DISORDERS (MANODAHIC VYADHIYAN)

    Anil Kumar Singh

    2013-01-01

    Psychosomatic means psyche (mind) and soma (body) - A psychosomatic disorder is a disease which involves both mind and body. Some physical diseases are thought to be particularly prone to be made worse by mental factors such as stress and anxiety. Your current mental state can affect how bad a physical disease is at any given time. Both mind and body are a single identity so the involvements of one definitely affect the others. So the bidirectional approach should be done to proper diagnosis ...

  19. Psychosomatics in gynaecology and their meaning in specific gynaecological conditions

    Siedentopf, Friederike

    2013-01-01

    At an early time point in the history of gynaecology and obstetrics, psychosomatic aspects became relevant in the development of etiological theories and the understanding of different conditions and diseases. The scientific discourse makes it apparent that this applies nowadays in a comparable intensity. In our work we discuss specific aspects of psychosomatic obstetrics and gynaecology and their association with basic medical research, chronic diseases and psychological constructs. Po...

  20. The psychosomatic symptom and the self: a sirens' song.

    Kradin, R L

    1997-07-01

    This paper examines the symbolic nature of the psychosomatic symptom. It is suggested that the psychosomatic symptom is an informationally rich symbolic derivative of the Self that serves to focus attention on developmental disturbances in the archetypal processes of constructing body image and interpreting dysphoric somatic sensations. Clinical examples are offered to illustrate the changing nature of the psychomatic symptom in society. The therapeutic importance of monitoring affectual transactions in the transference-countertransference field is stressed.

  1. The indissociable unity of psyche and soma: a view from the Paris Psychosomatic School.

    Aisenstein, Marilia

    2006-06-01

    Depending on whether or not psyche/soma is seen as singular or dual, one may construct different systems explaining man and the world, life and death. In the author's view, the discoveries of psychoanalysis offer a perfectly cogent and unique solution to the famous mind/body problem. In transferring the duality psyche/soma on to the duality of drives, psychoanalysis places the origin of the thought process in the body. In Beyond the pleasure principle, Freud discusses the drastic effect of a painful somatic illness on the distribution and modalities of the libido. He provides a starting point for the Paris Psychosomatic School's psychoanalytical approach to patients afflicted with somatic illnesses. To illustrate the technical implications of this theory the author relates two clinical cases.

  2. Psychosomatic aspects of the behavior of cancer patients that should be considered in the rehabilitation

    S. A. Misiak

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The article is dedicated to the psychological aspects of the relationship of the organisms of patients suffering from malignisation, and neoplasms, for further study of the disease during the rehabilitation period after standard treatment. If during the treatment of neoplastic disease doctors are encountering with the consequences of illness then the rehabilitation team need to identify the reasons of the disease occurrence. This helps to give the patient rehabilitation in full to improve the life quality and to provide effective socialization. The article analyzes the problems of the psychological characteristics of the origin and course of cancer, psychosomatic theories to explain the origin of the tumor during the illness. Also theories of the models of the patient’s psychological reactions to the presence of the cancer were studied in the article. The rehabilitation period in the cancer patients should include technological methods of psychotherapy.

  3. [Psychosomatic stress factors in compensated and decompensated tinnitus].

    Stobik, Corinna; Weber, Rainer K; Münte, Thomas F; Frommer, Jörg

    2003-08-01

    In modern medical practice, chronic decompensated tinnitus is defined as a complex psychosomatic process in which mental and social factors are considered to have a determining effect on the patient's subjective response to the impairment of otological or other somatic functions attributed to tinnitus. What is still largely unknown is the interaction of the individual factors and their impact on the patient's ability to cope with tinnitus. The impact of psycho-social and somatic factors on the subjective experience of patients with compensated and decompensated tinnitus is evaluated. 53 patients with chronic tinnitus were divided into two groups, compensated and decompensated, on the basis of their subjective experience of the disorder, established according to the tinnitus questionnaire published by Goebel and Hiller. Self-assessment instruments and a survey of symptoms of somatic stress disorders were used to compare the two groups in terms of differences in the patients' mental and psycho-social behaviour, in their strategies for coping with tinnitus and in the incidence of co-morbidity. The patients with decompensated tinnitus suffered from more pronounced mental and social disabilities, were more prone to depression and used less effective techniques to cope with their illness. The principal difference between the two groups, however, appeared to lie in a significantly higher degree of somatic multi-morbidity, where a particularly strong correlation was found between tinnitus and the incidence of cardiovascular diseases and hypacusis. 81 percent of the total sample of patients suffered from impaired hearing. Patients with decompensated tinnitus experienced greater communication difficulties as a result of their auditory impairment. In the diagnosis and therapy of tinnitus, in addition to psychic and psycho-social aspects greater attention ought to be paid to somatic factors, influencing the patient's ability to cope with the disorder.

  4. Antibacterial Effects of Afzelin Isolated from Cornus macrophylla on Pseudomonas aeruginosa, A Leading Cause of Illness in Immunocompromised Individuals

    Sang Yeol Lee

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The crude ethyl acetate extract of the leaves of Cornus macrophylla showed antibacterial activity against Pseudomonas aeruginosa, a leading cause of illness in immunocompromised individuals. Bioactivity-guided separation led to the isolation of kaempferol 3-O-α-L-rhamnopyranoside (afzelin. The structure was determined based on evaluation of its spectroscopic (UV, MS, and NMR data. The minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC of afzelin against Pseudomonas aeruginosa was found to be 31 µg/mL. In addition, the results indicated that a hydroxyl group at C3 of the C-ring of the flavone skeleton and the rhamnose group may act as a negative factor and an enhancing factor, respectively, in the antibacterial activities of afzelin.

  5. [Acne vulgaris: morphologic, endocrinologic and psychosomatic aspects].

    Welp, K; Gieler, U

    1990-12-01

    25 male patients suffering from acne vulgaris were examined by means of endocrinological, morphological, and 5 psychometric procedures in order to check the correlations and interactions between the psychological and dermatological aspects of the disease. In comparison with a control group, the acne patients did not show any striking endocrinological abnormalities; we found no correlation between the extensiveness of the lesions and the level of DHEA sulphate. All the psychological tests yielded results deviating from those achieved by the representative controls, but they were comparable with those of other patients suffering from psychosomatic diseases. The individual feeling of being "disfigured" found its expression in self-consciousness, lack of trust in his/her own body, as well as the clinically relevant difference between his/her conception of self and the ideal of self. During times of enhanced psychosocial strains subjectively assumed by the patients, the lesions increased and the patients were disturbed in social interaction and communication. Surprisingly, we did not find any correlation between the clinical status and significant psychometric findings. Our results show that in acne vulgaris, the individual experience of wanting physical attractiveness, associated with a predominantly neurotic depressive personal structure, may play a central part in a disturbed process of interaction with the environment and suggest the influence of psychic factors in the pathogenesis of acne vulgaris.

  6. Preliminary study on psychosomatic status of nuclear power plant operators

    Bi Jinling; Liu Yulong; Li Yuan; Bian Huahui; Sun Yiling; Qiu Mengyue; Liu Chunfeng

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To understand the operators' psychosomatic health status in nuclear power plant; and provide the scientific basis of measures for preventing and reducing mental disorders in operators. Methods: The Psychosomatic Health Battery (PSHB) was used to assess the psychosomatic health status in 109 operators who were random selected from Qinshan nuclear power plant, etc. They were tested from lie, emotional stability, liveliness, tension, apprehension, mental health, such as psychopathic deviatesuch 7 personality traits. Results: Lie < 8, all inspected groups were normal. Psychopathic deviate: 98.2% for normal group 0.9% for both of groups occurred possible mental health problems and confirmed mental health problems; Mental health: 80.7% (88/109) for fine mental health ones, 29.4% (32/109) for those with excellent mental health, 51.4% (56/109) for good mental health ones, 13.8% (15/109) for general mental health ones, 5.5% (6/109) for poor mental health ones. Age factor could influence the mean values of the factors of apprehension, tension, mental health and psychopathic deviate. Correlation analysis showed that there was a correlation between tension and psychopathic deviate (r=0.664, P<0.01), and the other correlation coefficient was between apprehension and mental health (r=-0.789, P<0.01). Conclusions: There is an excellent condition of psychosomatic health in most of the operators, however, there are still a very small percentage of psychosomatic disorders among these operators, to improve the quality of their psychosomatic health, psychological counseling should be particularly strengthened to those with problems of psychosomatic health. (authors)

  7. [Patients with ICD-10 disorders F3 and F4 in psychiatric and psychosomatic in-patient units - who is treated where? : Allocation features from the PfAD study].

    Bichescu-Burian, D; Cerisier, C; Czekaj, A; Grempler, J; Hund, S; Jaeger, S; Schmid, P; Weithmann, G; Steinert, T

    2017-01-01

    In Germany, in-patient treatment of patients with depressive, neurotic, anxiety, and somatoform disorders (ICD-10 F3, F4) is carried out in different settings in psychiatry and psychosomatics. Which patient characteristics determine referral to one or the other specialty is a crucial question in mental health policy and is a matter of ongoing controversy. However, comparative data on patient populations are widely lacking. In the study of Treatment Pathways of Patients with Anxiety and Depression (PfAD study), a total of 320 patients with ICD-10 F3/F4 clinical diagnoses were consecutively recruited from four treatment settings (psychiatric depression ward, psychiatric crisis intervention ward, psychiatric day hospitals, or psychosomatic hospital units; 80 participants per setting) and investigated. In all treatment settings, patients with considerable severity of illness and chronicity were treated. Female gender, higher education, and higher income predicted referral to psychosomatic units; male gender, transfer from another hospital or emergency hospitalization, co-morbidity with a personality disorder, higher general psychiatric co-morbidity, and danger to self at admission predicted referral to psychiatric unit. Patients in psychosomatic units had neither more psychosomatic disorders nor more somatic problems. There is considerable overlap between the clientele of psychiatric and psychosomatic units. Referral and allocation appears to be determined by aspects of severity and social status.

  8. Impact of Preexisting Mental Illness on All-Cause and Breast Cancer-Specific Mortality in Elderly Patients With Breast Cancer.

    Iglay, Kristy; Santorelli, Melissa L; Hirshfield, Kim M; Williams, Jill M; Rhoads, George G; Lin, Yong; Demissie, Kitaw

    2017-12-20

    Purpose Limited data are available on the survival of patients with breast cancer with preexisting mental illness, and elderly women are of special interest because they experience the highest incidence of breast cancer. Therefore, we compared all-cause and breast cancer-specific mortality for elderly patients with breast cancer with and without mental illness. Methods A retrospective cohort study was conducted by using SEER-Medicare data, including 19,028 women ≥ 68 years of age who were diagnosed with stage I to IIIa breast cancer in the United States from 2005 to 2007. Patients were classified as having severe mental illness if an International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Edition, Clinical Modification code for bipolar disorder, schizophrenia, or other psychotic disorder was recorded on at least one inpatient or two outpatient claims during the 3 years before breast cancer diagnosis. Patients were followed for up to 5 years after breast cancer diagnosis to assess survival outcomes, which were then compared with those of patients without mental illness. Results Nearly 3% of patients had preexisting severe mental illness. We observed a two-fold increase in the all-cause mortality hazard between patients with severe mental illness compared with those without mental illness after adjusting for age, income, race, ethnicity, geographic location, and marital status (adjusted hazard ratio, 2.19; 95% CI, 1.84 to 2.60). A 20% increase in breast cancer-specific mortality hazard was observed, but the association was not significant (adjusted hazard ratio, 1.20; 95% CI, 0.82 to 1.74). Patients with severe mental illness were more likely to be diagnosed with advanced breast cancer and aggressive tumor characteristics. They also had increased tobacco use and more comorbidities. Conclusion Patients with severe mental illness may need assistance with coordinating medical services.

  9. [Stumbling-blocks: initiating a psychosomatic pain clinic].

    Heger, S; Lieberz, K

    2000-12-01

    Despite psychosocial factors playing an important role in the course of chronic pain disorder, there is a noticeable imbalance between demand and availability of psychosomatic care for these patients. This led us to establish a psychosomatic pain clinic within the framework of our outpatient clinic at the Department of Psychosomatic Medicine and Psychotherapy at the Central Institute of Mental Health, Mannheim, Germany. A recent study aimed at the evaluation of sociodemographic variables, state of chronification, symptom load and psychiatric comorbidity. Additionally we wanted to determine whether existing conditions at our hospital can be considered suitable for those patients. During the clinic's first year we assessed 40 consecutive patients based on a psychosomatic interview as well as a set of psychometric questionnaires (BDI, STAI, SCL-90-R). To detect differences between pain patients and psychotherapy inpatients, we compared the two groups in terms of sociodemographic variables and symptom load. Most pain patients were in advanced states of chronification, showing extensive psychiatric comorbidity, particularly anxiety and depressive syndromes. Drug addiction was found more infrequently. Use of the before mentioned questionnaires prevented us from underestimating existing anxiety syndromes. Pain patients differed substantially from psychotherapy inpatients in terms of age, education, family status and symptom load. Our examination routine effectively demonstrated the special needs of chronic pain patients. As there is significant demand for psychosomatic intervention in those patients, earlier referral appears highly desirable. As pain patients differ also greatly from the remaining hospital population, specialized therapeutic concepts must be developed.

  10. The influence of united psychosomatic factors on clinical features of acne vulgaris

    Dejanović Lidija

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Acne is a chronic inflammatory disorder of the pilosebaceal unit. Dermatological disorders are often associated with a variety of psychological problems which the patient have. Psichodermatologic disorders (acne are associated with skin problems that are not directly connected to the mind, but that react to emotional states, such as stress. The aim of this article is to show if there is any psychological characteristic which are common for the whole group of ill-patients from acne, as well as whether there is correlation between any type of acne and psychological parameters. Own exploration consist at thirty patients with three clinical type of acne. Personality test-Kornel index were used for identification and diagnostic psychosomatic disorders. The results are: neurastenic parameters, parameters of conversion and parameters of psychopathy in different percent at both sex, and different clinical features. We show correlation united 2-6 psichosomatic disorders in male sex with softly type of acne. In female sex with any type of acne are responsible 7-12 united findings. The association of several psychosomatic factors could possibly be responsible for the onset of acne at any type.

  11. Tinnitus: clinical experience of the psychosomatic connection

    Salviati M

    2014-02-01

    the lack of coping capabilities can play a critical role in the clinical history of patients affected by severe tinnitus.Keywords: tinnitus, psychosomatics, stress, psychopathological dimensions, personality

  12. Group supervision for healthcare professionals within primary care for patients with psychosomatic health problems: a pilot intervention study.

    Bullington, Jennifer; Cronqvist, Agneta

    2018-03-01

    In primary health care, efficacious treatment strategies are lacking for these patients, although the most prominent symptoms accounting for consultation in primary care often cannot be related to any biological causes. The aim was to explore whether group supervision from a specific phenomenological theory of psychosomatics could provide healthcare professionals treating patients with psychosomatic health issues within primary care a deeper understanding of these conditions and stimulate profession-specific treatment strategies. Our research questions were as follows: (i) What is the healthcare professionals' understanding of psychosomatics before and after the intervention? (ii) What are the treatment strategies for this group of patients before and after the intervention? The study was an explorative qualitative intervention pilot study. The six participants from a primary healthcare setting in a medium-sized city in Sweden participated in the study. A supervision group was formed, based on a mix of professions, age, gender and years of clinical experience. Supervision consisted of one 75-minutes meeting every month during the course of 6 months. Participants were interviewed before and after the supervision intervention. The study showed two distinct categories emerged from the data. One category of healthcare professionals espoused a psycho-educative approach, while the other lacked a cohesive approach. The supervision improved the second category of healthcare professionals' understanding of psychosomatics. The psycho-educative group did not change their understanding of psychosomatics, although they felt strengthened in their approach by the supervision. Profession-specific strategies were not developed. This pilot study indicates that a relatively short supervision intervention can aid clinicians in their clinical encounters with these patients; however, further research is necessary to ascertain the value of the specific phenomenologically based

  13. Stress, social support and psychosomatic symptoms in a deprived neighbourhood

    Bancila, Delia; Andersen, Pernille Tanggaard; Kronborg Bak, Carsten

    2012-01-01

    From a transactional perspective on stress, the study aimed to examine if the relationships of social support with perceived stress and psychosomatic symptoms are equivalent in deprived and wealthier neighbourhoods. Cross-sectional data were randomly collected from 2906 inhabitants in a deprived...... neighbourhood (851) and wealthier communities (2055), in Esbjerg, Denmark. A model that included psychosomatic symptoms as outcome, and daily worries, economic deprivation, perceived stress and social support as predictors was tested with structural equation modelling in two-group analyses. The findings showed...... significant differences (D2 (6)¼16.66, p.¼0.011) between neighbourhoods, and the fit statistics (CFI¼0.930, RMSEA¼0.034, R2¼0.48) showed good fit. Under an increased perceived stress’ effect, the social support’s impact on psychosomatic symptoms decreased in the deprived neighbourhood compared with the other...

  14. School-related stress and psychosomatic symptoms among school adolescents.

    Natvig, G K; Albrektsen, G; Anderssen, N; Qvarnstrøm, U

    1999-11-01

    Associations between psychosomatic symptoms and school-induced stress, and personal and social resources were analyzed among 862 Norwegian adolescents ages 13-15 years participating in the WHO project, "Health Promoting Schools." Stress-related factors were represented by the average of scores of 3-12 items. Both in combined and separate analyses of each psychosomatic symptom, increasing school distress, the most direct measure of stress experience, was associated with increased risk. A similar relationship was found with school alienation, though not significant for all symptoms. Social support from the teacher decreased the risk among girls, whereas social support from other pupils reduced the risk among both genders, but in particular among boys. No consistent associations were seen between psychosomatic complaints and general or school-related self-efficacy or decision control. In some analyses, however, these factors seemed to modify the association with school distress or school alienation.

  15. Psychosomatic approaches to obstetrics, gynaecology and andrology--a review.

    Lal, Mira

    2009-01-01

    This review aims to clarify the scope and clinical importance of psychosomatic approaches to obstetrics, gynaecology and andrology. This gradually expanding sub-specialty covers a wide domain of complex disease conditions that can be managed more effectively if the various biological, psychological and social aspects are recognised at the start and concurrent treatment initiated. The current need to practise biopsychosocial management of disease conditions is highlighted along with a description of what this would involve. The nine-field psychosomatic approach, which can be applied to everyday clinical encounters, has been illustrated. Clinical applications of the psychosomatic approach are discussed for various conditions including chronic pelvic pain, eating disorders, tokophobia, post-traumatic stress disorder, depression, menstrual disorders, infertility, bereavement and testicular cancer. Cultural considerations and the need for further research are also briefly discussed.

  16. Psychosomatic medicine and the philosophy of life.

    Schwartz, Michael A; Wiggins, Osborne P

    2010-01-21

    Basing ourselves on the writings of Hans Jonas, we offer to psychosomatic medicine a philosophy of life that surmounts the mind-body dualism which has plagued Western thought since the origins of modern science in seventeenth century Europe. Any present-day account of reality must draw upon everything we know about the living and the non-living. Since we are living beings ourselves, we know what it means to be alive from our own first-hand experience. Therefore, our philosophy of life, in addition to starting with what empirical science tells us about inorganic and organic reality, must also begin from our own direct experience of life in ourselves and in others; it can then show how the two meet in the living being. Since life is ultimately one reality, our theory must reintegrate psyche with soma such that no component of the whole is short-changed, neither the objective nor the subjective. In this essay, we lay out the foundational components of such a theory by clarifying the defining features of living beings as polarities. We describe three such polarities: 1) Being vs. non-being: Always threatened by non-being, the organism must constantly re-assert its being through its own activity. 2) World-relatedness vs. self-enclosure: Living beings are both enclosed with themselves, defined by the boundaries that separate them from their environment, while they are also ceaselessly reaching out to their environment and engaging in transactions with it. 3) Dependence vs. independence: Living beings are both dependent on the material components that constitute them at any given moment and independent of any particular groupings of these components over time.We then discuss important features of the polarities of life: Metabolism; organic structure; enclosure by a semi-permeable membrane; distinction between "self" and "other"; autonomy; neediness; teleology; sensitivity; values. Moral needs and values already arise at the most basic levels of life, even if only human

  17. Psychosomatic medicine and the philosophy of life

    Wiggins Osborne P

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Basing ourselves on the writings of Hans Jonas, we offer to psychosomatic medicine a philosophy of life that surmounts the mind-body dualism which has plagued Western thought since the origins of modern science in seventeenth century Europe. Any present-day account of reality must draw upon everything we know about the living and the non-living. Since we are living beings ourselves, we know what it means to be alive from our own first-hand experience. Therefore, our philosophy of life, in addition to starting with what empirical science tells us about inorganic and organic reality, must also begin from our own direct experience of life in ourselves and in others; it can then show how the two meet in the living being. Since life is ultimately one reality, our theory must reintegrate psyche with soma such that no component of the whole is short-changed, neither the objective nor the subjective. In this essay, we lay out the foundational components of such a theory by clarifying the defining features of living beings as polarities. We describe three such polarities: 1 Being vs. non-being: Always threatened by non-being, the organism must constantly re-assert its being through its own activity. 2 World-relatedness vs. self-enclosure: Living beings are both enclosed with themselves, defined by the boundaries that separate them from their environment, while they are also ceaselessly reaching out to their environment and engaging in transactions with it. 3 Dependence vs. independence: Living beings are both dependent on the material components that constitute them at any given moment and independent of any particular groupings of these components over time. We then discuss important features of the polarities of life: Metabolism; organic structure; enclosure by a semi-permeable membrane; distinction between "self" and "other"; autonomy; neediness; teleology; sensitivity; values. Moral needs and values already arise at the most basic levels of

  18. Psychosomatic medicine and the philosophy of life

    2010-01-01

    Basing ourselves on the writings of Hans Jonas, we offer to psychosomatic medicine a philosophy of life that surmounts the mind-body dualism which has plagued Western thought since the origins of modern science in seventeenth century Europe. Any present-day account of reality must draw upon everything we know about the living and the non-living. Since we are living beings ourselves, we know what it means to be alive from our own first-hand experience. Therefore, our philosophy of life, in addition to starting with what empirical science tells us about inorganic and organic reality, must also begin from our own direct experience of life in ourselves and in others; it can then show how the two meet in the living being. Since life is ultimately one reality, our theory must reintegrate psyche with soma such that no component of the whole is short-changed, neither the objective nor the subjective. In this essay, we lay out the foundational components of such a theory by clarifying the defining features of living beings as polarities. We describe three such polarities: 1) Being vs. non-being: Always threatened by non-being, the organism must constantly re-assert its being through its own activity. 2) World-relatedness vs. self-enclosure: Living beings are both enclosed with themselves, defined by the boundaries that separate them from their environment, while they are also ceaselessly reaching out to their environment and engaging in transactions with it. 3) Dependence vs. independence: Living beings are both dependent on the material components that constitute them at any given moment and independent of any particular groupings of these components over time. We then discuss important features of the polarities of life: Metabolism; organic structure; enclosure by a semi-permeable membrane; distinction between "self" and "other"; autonomy; neediness; teleology; sensitivity; values. Moral needs and values already arise at the most basic levels of life, even if only human

  19. "Don't crack under pressure!"--Do leisure time physical activity and self-esteem moderate the relationship between school-based stress and psychosomatic complaints?

    Gerber, Markus; Pühse, Uwe

    2008-10-01

    Stressful experiences occupy a central role in most etiological models of developmental psychopathology. Stress alone, however, insufficiently explains negative health outcomes. This raises the question why some children and adolescents are more vulnerable to the development of psychopathological symptoms than others. The primary purpose of this research was to demonstrate whether leisure time physical activity and self-esteem protect against stress-induced health problems. The findings are based on a cross-sectional study of 407 Swiss boys and girls (M=14.01 years). All variables are self-reported. Analyses of covariance were applied to test for main and moderator effects. The findings suggest that school-based stress and psychosomatic complaints are important issues during adolescence. The results show that a higher level of psychosomatic complaints accompanies stress. Surprisingly, psychosomatic complaints and physical activity were unrelated. Likewise, no association was found between physical activity and stress. In contrast, students with high self-esteem reported significantly less complaints and a lower extent of perceived stress. Finally, the results do not support the stress-moderation hypothesis. Neither physical activity nor self-esteem buffered against the detrimental effects of school-based stress on psychosomatic health. The findings lend support to previous research with German-speaking samples but are in marked contrast to Anglo-Saxon studies, which generally support the role of physical activity as a moderator of the health-illness relationship. In this investigation, developmental features and methodological limitations may have accounted for the insignificant results.

  20. [Risks and health problems caused by the use of video terminals].

    Tamez González, Silvia; Ortiz-Hernández, Luis; Martínez-Alcántara, Susana; Méndez-Ramírez, Ignacio

    2003-01-01

    To evaluate the association between video display terminal (VDT) use and health hazards, occupational risks, and psychosocial factors, in newspaper workers. A cross-sectional study was conducted in 1998 in a representative sample (n = 68) drawn from a population of 218 VDT operators in Mexico City. Data were collected using a self-administered questionnaire. Data were confirmed by performing physical examinations. The research hypothesis was that both the current and cumulative use of VDT are associated with visual, musculoskeletal system, and skin illnesses, as well as with fatigue and mental or psychosomatic disorders. Occupational health hazards were assessed (visual problems, postural risks, sedentary work, computer mouse use, excessive heat, and overcrowding), as well as psychosocial factors related to work organization (psychological demands, work control, and social support). Prevalence ratios were adjusted for confounding variables like age, sex and schooling. Women were more likely than men to have upper extremity musculoskeletal disorders (MSD), dermatitis, and seborrheic eczema. VDT use was associated with neuro-visual fatigue, upper extremity MSD, dermatitis, and seborrheic eczema. Computer mouse use and postural risks were significantly associated with health problems. Psychosocial factors were mainly associated with mental problems, psychosomatic disorders, and fatigue. Intense use of video screens has been found to cause musculoskeletal disorders of the hand. The diversification of tasks and control of labor processes itself had a protective effect against psychosomatic disorders and pathological fatigue.

  1. Attachment, Acculturation, and Psychosomatic Complaints among Hispanic American University Students

    Wang, Chiachih D. C.; Scalise, Dominick A.; Barajas-Munoz, I. Alejandro; Julio, Kathy; Gomez, Ayleen

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated adult attachment and acculturation frameworks of reported psychosomatic complaints related to perceived discrimination among a sample of Latino/Hispanic university students (N = 160). The model supported by the data suggests that attachment anxiety, acculturation toward the dominant cultural norms, and adherence to…

  2. Operational Thinking at Adolescence in Relation to Psychosomatic Disorder.

    Anthony, E. James

    1978-01-01

    Relating disorders to Piaget's and Freud's developmental stages, it is proposed that, in the somatopsychic group, resomatization is associated with primitive modes of thinking and feeling; while in the psychosomatic group, resomatization is connected with an operational type of cognition and emotion. A case history is used as illustration.…

  3. Defense Mechanisms, Psychosomatic Symptomatology, and Conjugate Lateral Eye Movements

    Gur, Raquel E.; Gur, Ruben C.

    1975-01-01

    Subjects were classified into left movers, right movers, and bidirectionals according to the characteristic direction of their eye movements in response to questions. The three groups were compared on their preferential use of defense mechanisms and on the number of psychosomatic complaints. (Author)

  4. School-Related Stress and Psychosomatic Symptoms among Norwegian Adolescents

    Murberg, Terje A.; Bru, Edvin

    2004-01-01

    This study examines the relationships between school-related stress, gender and psychosomatic symptoms in a sample of 531 adolescent pupils in years (grades) 8, 9 and 10 (aged 13-16 years) from two compulsory schools in Norway. Results showed that 18.1 percent reported being very much affected by at least one of the assessed psychosomatic…

  5. The Relationship between the Family Physician and Psychosomatic Medicine

    Farzad Goli

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Organizing the health system around family medicine (FM has been a productive approach for developed countries. The aim of this study, which was concurrent with the Iran Health Transform Plan (HTP and the establishment of the family physician in Iran, was to discuss the sufficiency of a family physician training program for their roles and increase their competency.Methods: This descriptive study was conducted in the Psychosomatic Research Center affiliated to Isfahan University of Medical Science, Iran, with the assistance of the Iranian Institute of Higher Health (2015. An expert panel consisting of 6 individuals including specialists, trainers, and researchers in FM and psychosomatic medicine was held for this purpose. Using the World Organization of Family Doctors‎ (WONCA website for the definition of a family physician, the curriculum developed by the Ministry of Health and Medical Education was studied. Data were summarized in one table.Results: The current FM curriculum, with this content and method, does not seem to be capable of enabling physicians to perform their multidisciplinary roles. it still has a reductionist approach and disease orientation instead of a clinical reasoning method and systematic viewpoint. The psychosomatic approach is applicable at all prevention levels and in all diseases‎, since it is basically designed for this longitudinal (between all preventive levels and horizontal (bio-physical–social-spiritual intervention integration.Conclusion: Psychosomatic medicine, not as a biomedical specialty, but rather as a systems thinking model in health, had a rapid rise during previous decades. Now, its services have been integrated into all medical fields. This means that it should be adopted in the core of health care services (i.e., the family physician position before other sections. This would help the implementation of this approach in the health system, and the reduction of patients' pain and

  6. Psychosomatic consultation in the workplace” – a new model of care at the interface of company-supported mental health care and consultation-liaison psychosomatics: design of a mixed methods implementation study

    Rothermund Eva

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mental health issues are gaining in importance in society and the economic system. At the same time, the accessibility and stigmatisation of the mental health care system in Germany can obstruct help-seeking behavior and delay early psychotherapeutic interventions. Therefore, new models of care are being established at the interface of company-supported health promotion and conventional health insurance sponsored outpatient care for people developing mental illnesses. Two large industrial companies, in cooperation with two psychosomatic clinics, have recently established a model of “psychosomatic consultation in the workplace“. This new model of care offers the opportunity for a first psychotherapeutic door to door consultation with occupational medicine within the industrial workplace. The main empirical goals of this study are: 1 Describing the differences between patients who use this new diagnostic and therapeutic offer within the industrial workplace vs. patients who visit a conventional regional outpatient clinic, especially in regard to symptom duration and severity, work ability, and demographic characteristics, and 2 A first evaluation of how patients may benefit more from this new model of care compared to those first seen by standard outpatient care. In the qualitative part of the study, occupational physicians, psychosomatic therapists, involved personnel and select employees of the involved companies will be asked to comment on their experiences with this new approach. Methods/Design The implementation study will take place in Ulm and in Stuttgart, with each site looking at one regional conventional psychosomatic outpatient clinic and one psychosomatic consultation offer within the workplace. 70 consecutive patients in each setting will be recruited (overall n = 280. For the cross-sectional study and pre-post comparison we will use established and validated survey instruments (PHQ, SF-12, WAI, MBI, IS as

  7. [Institutional Prevalence and Context of Severe Sleep Disorders in Psychosomatic Rehabilitation].

    Linden, Michael

    2015-07-01

    In cases of burnout, chronic fatigue, depression, somatization, overtaxation, or impairment in wellbeing and work capacity, the cause can be sleep problems. Goal of the present study was to estimate the prevalence of sleep problems in psychosomatic inpatients. Included were 1325 unselected patients from a psychosomatic rehabilitation hospital. They filled in the SCL-90, the PSQI and were assessed in respect to their clinical, social and occupational status. At admission 13.4% of patients had a PSQI score of 5 at maximum (no sleep problem), 34.6% 6 to 10 (moderate sleep problem) und 52.1% over 10 (severe sleep problem). At discharge there was a reduction of sleep problems with 32.7% of patients over 10. Sleep problems were significantly associated with more severe mental problems, older age, women, lower socioeconomic status, and also incapacity to work or early retirement. Mental disorders can cause sleep problems and sleep problems mental disorders and incapacity to work, with a negative interaction. The high rate of severe sleep problems in rehabilitation patients shows that this problem is in need of special diagnostic and therapeutic attention. Also, the equipment of hospitals and the qualification of therapists should allow adequate care. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  8. [Rash and fever illness caused by herpes simplex virus type 1 needs to be distinguished from hand, foot and mouth disease].

    Zhu, Shuang-Li; Liu, Jian-Feng; Sun, Qiang; Li, Jing; Li, Xiao-Lei; Zhang, Yong; Chen, Ying; Wen, Xiao-Yun; Yan, Dong-Mei; Huang, Guo-Hong; Zhang, Bao-Min; Zhang, Bo; An, Hong-Qiu; Li, Hui; Xu, Wen-Bo

    2013-06-01

    An epidemic of rash and fever illnesses suspected of hand, foot and mouth disease (HFMD) occurred in Gansu Province of China in 2008, laboratory tests were performed in order to identify the pathogen that caused this epidemic. Eight clinical specimens collected from the 4 patients (each patient has throat swab and herpes fluid specimens) with rash and febrile illness, were inoculated onto RD and HEp-2 cells for virus isolation, and the viral nucleic acid was then extracted with the positive virus isolates, the dual-channel real-time reverse transcript-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) was performed to detect the nucleic acid of human enterovirus (HEV) in the viral isolates at the same time. For the viral isolates with the negative results of HEV, a sequence independent single primer amplification technique (SISPA) was used for "unknown pathogen" identification. Totally, 6 viral isolates were identified as herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1). Comprehensive analyses results of the clinical manifestations of the patients, epidemiological findings and laboratory test indicated that this epidemic of rash and febrile illness was caused by HSV-1. The differences among the gG region of 6 HSV-1 isolates at nucleotide level and amino acid level were all small, and the identities were up to 98. 8% and 97.9%, respectively, showing that this outbreak was caused by only one viral transmission chain of HSV-1. HSV-1 and other viruses that cause rash and febrile illnesses need differential diagnosis with HFMD. The etiology of rash and febrile illness is sometimes difficult to distinguish from the clinical symptoms and epidemiological data, the laboratory diagnosis is therefore critical.

  9. Burnout, psychosomatic symptoms and job satisfaction among Dutch nurse anaesthetists: a survey.

    Meeusen, V; VAN Dam, K; Brown-Mahoney, C; VAN Zundert, A; Knape, H

    2010-05-01

    To meet the increasing demand for healthcare providers, it is crucial to recruit and retain more nurse anaesthetists (NAs). The majority of NAs in the Netherlands are >45 years old, and retaining them in their jobs is very important. This study investigates the relationships among burnout, physical health and job satisfaction among Dutch NAs. Two thousand NAs working in Dutch hospitals were invited to participate in this online questionnaire. We tested the relationships among burnout, psychosomatic symptoms, sickness absence, perceived general health and job satisfaction. Nine hundred and twenty-three questionnaires were completed and analysed (46% response rate). Burnout and psychosomatic symptoms were negatively associated with job satisfaction, and predicted 27% of job satisfaction. Perceived general health was positively and sickness absence was negatively related to job satisfaction. Older NAs had a higher incidence of burnout than their younger counterparts. The results confirmed the importance of a healthy psychosocial work environment for promoting job satisfaction. To prevent burnout, further research is necessary to determine the factors causing stress. These findings may also apply to anaesthesiologists who share many tasks and work in close cooperation with NAs.

  10. Affective disorders and endocrine disease. New insights from psychosomatic studies.

    Fava, G A

    1994-01-01

    This is a review of psychosomatic interactions between affective disorders (depressive and anxiety disturbances, irritable mood) and endocrine disease. Particular reference is made to stressful life events in the pathogenesis of endocrine disease, psychopathology of hormonal disturbances, and pathophysiology of hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis function in depression and Cushing's disease. These psychosomatic interactions may lead to appraisal of common etiological mechanisms in endocrine and psychiatric disorders, of the value of retaining the category of organic affective syndromes in psychiatric classification, and of the need for research on quality-of-life measures in endocrine disease. The establishment of "psychoendocrine units," where both endocrinologists and psychiatrists should work, is advocated. Such psychoendocrine units may serve and benefit clinical populations who currently defy traditional medical subdivisions.

  11. Psychosomatic symptoms as biomarkers: transcending the psyche-soma dichotomy.

    Neuman, Yair

    2010-01-01

    Following the advancement in understanding dynamical systems, the author presents a novel metaphor of psychosomatic symptoms as low-dimensional biomarkers. This metaphor, which transcends the old binary of psyche-soma, resonates with classical psychoanalytic concepts and with Matte-Blanco's idea of repetition as indicative of dimensionality reduction. The relevance of this metaphor for explanation, diagnosis, and treatment is illustrated through a case study of a male patient suffering from hyperprolactinemia.

  12. The role of traditional Japanese medicine (Kampo) in the practice of psychosomatic medicine: the usefulness of Kampo in the treatment of the stress-related symptoms of women, especially those with peri-menopausal disorder.

    Ushiroyama, Takahisa

    2013-10-22

    A serious problem currently plaguing the medical field is the widening gap between academic medicine, which studies the features and causes of illness, and the medical care that patients desire. An example of this gap can be observed in the practice of psychotherapy, which is effective only for certain patients. Kampo medicine that combines the advantages of Western medicine with those of traditional Japanese medicine is currently undergoing a revival in the healthcare sector. The therapeutic policies underlying Kampo medicine are based on the physical constitution and current symptoms of each patient. For this reason, Kampo medicine is referred to as "tailor-made medicine" and has properties similar to "mind and body" or psychosomatic medicine. Some women exhibit multiple undefined stress-related symptoms during the peri-menopausal period. In order to accurately diagnose and provide patient-specific treatment, physicians should not only investigate the various stress factors in patients' lives but should also provide a Sho, or a Kampo diagnosis. The therapeutic approach in Kampo medicine is aimed at harmonizing the mind, body, and spirit; this practice involves the use of narrative and holistic medication that treats the entire being of the patient, resulting in an increased number of specialized treatment plans.There are many Kampo prescriptions tailored to treat women who exhibit various stress-related symptoms. Both Kampo and psychosomatic medicine are based on the principles of narrative-based medicine, and by integrating these two medical systems, an ideal system can be devised to better cope with the various needs of patients. This new medical system established by integrating and harmonizing Western and Eastern medicine can be used for the treatment of women with stress-related symptoms.

  13. Childhood physical abuse in outpatients with psychosomatic symptoms

    Kubo Chiharu

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In Japan and Asia, few studies have been done of physical and sexual abuse. This study was aimed to determine whether a history of childhood physical abuse is associated with anxiety, depression and self-injurious behavior in outpatients with psychosomatic symptoms. Methods We divided 564 consecutive new outpatients at the Department of Psychosomatic Medicine of Kyushu University Hospital into two groups: a physically abused group and a non-abused group. Psychological test scores and the prevalence of self-injurious behavior were compared between the two groups. Results A history of childhood physical abuse was reported by patients with depressive disorders(12.7%, anxiety disorders(16.7%, eating disorders (16.3%, pain disorders (10.8%, irritable bowel syndrome (12.5%, and functional dyspepsia(7.5%. In both the patients with depressive disorders and those with anxiety disorders, STAI-I (state anxiety and STAI-II (trait anxiety were higher in the abused group than in the non-abused group (p In the patients with depressive disorders, the abused group was younger than the non-abused group (p Conclusion A history of childhood physical abuse is associated with psychological distress such as anxiety, depression and self-injurious behavior in outpatients with psychosomatic symptoms. It is important for physicians to consider the history of abuse in the primary care of these patients.

  14. The Art and Science of Learning, Teaching, and Delivering Feedback in Psychosomatic Medicine.

    Lokko, Hermioni N; Gatchel, Jennifer R; Becker, Madeleine A; Stern, Theodore A

    2016-01-01

    The teaching and learning of psychosomatic medicine has evolved with the better understanding of effective teaching methods and feedback delivery in medicine and psychiatry. We sought to review the variety of teaching methods used in psychosomatic medicine, to present principles of adult learning (and how these theories can be applied to students of psychosomatic medicine), and to discuss the role of effective feedback delivery in the process of teaching and learning psychosomatic medicine. In addition to drawing on the clinical and teaching experiences of the authors of the paper, we reviewed the literature on teaching methods, adult learning theories, and effective feedback delivery methods in medicine to draw parallels for psychosomatic medicine education. We provide a review of teaching methods that have been employed to teach psychosomatic medicine over the past few decades. We outline examples of educational methods using the affective, behavioral, and cognitive domains. We provide examples of learning styles together with the principles of adult learning theory and how they can be applied to psychosomatic medicine learners. We discuss barriers to feedback delivery and offer suggestions as to how to give feedback to trainees on a psychosomatic medicine service. The art of teaching psychosomatic medicine is dynamic and will continue to evolve with advances in the field. Psychosomatic medicine educators must familiarize themselves with learning domains, learning styles, and principles of adult learning in order to be impactful. Effective feedback delivery methods are critical to fostering a robust learning environment for psychosomatic medicine. Copyright © 2016 The Academy of Psychosomatic Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. [Spirituality and ethics in psychosomatic medicine].

    Irmiš, Felix

    2015-01-01

    A patient has to cope with an illness on a physical, mental and spiritual level. There exists a difference between religiousness and spirituality even though the approach has a common foundation. Nonreligious spirituality relates to an inner experience, transcendent states of consciousness, meaningfulness, responsibility, sympathy, ethics, humanisation, faith. We encounter the spiritual point of view in humanistic psychotherapy, pastoral medicine, work of hospital chaplains, New Age, psychotherapies with religious and alternative aspects, transpersonal psychotherapy, psycho-spiritual crises, unusual states of consciousness, in meditation, Yoga, relaxation, kinesiology, ethicotherapy, reincarnation therapy, positive motivation, holotropic breathing, etc. There is description of different degrees of spiritual development, rational and irrational feeling of spirituality, Quantum Physics, spiritual intelligence, neuro-theology, physiological change, effects on improving adaptation during stress, drugs addiction, etc. Spirituality in relation with ethics is discussed in terms of socio-biology, evolution, emotions, aggressivity, genetics and social influence. The work analyses the effect of stressful situations on the deterioration of moral attitudes: during lack of time, obedience to authority and order. It is described how temperament and personality disorders can affect perception of spirituality, guilt feeling and conscience. Stressful situations, lack of time, relying only on the auxiliary objective methods leads to alienation of physician with a patient. Spirituality can partially improve the doctor-patient relationship, communication and sense of responsibility.

  16. FitzPatrick Lecture: King George III and the porphyria myth - causes, consequences and re-evaluation of his mental illness with computer diagnostics.

    Peters, Timothy

    2015-04-01

    Recent studies have shown that the claim that King George III suffered from acute porphyria is seriously at fault. This article explores some of the causes of this misdiagnosis and the consequences of the misleading claims, also reporting on the nature of the king's recurrent mental illness according to computer diagnostics. In addition, techniques of cognitive archaeology are used to investigate the nature of the king's final decade of mental illness, which resulted in the appointment of the Prince of Wales as Prince Regent. The results of this analysis confirm that the king suffered from bipolar disorder type I, with a final decade of dementia, due, in part, to the neurotoxicity of his recurrent episodes of acute mania. © 2015 Royal College of Physicians.

  17. Diarrheal Illness

    2011-08-30

    Dr. Steve Monroe, director of CDC’s Division of High-Consequence Pathogens and Pathology, discusses diarrheal illness, its causes, and prevention.  Created: 8/30/2011 by National Center for Emerging Zoonotic and Infectious Diseases (NCEZID).   Date Released: 8/31/2011.

  18. Community-acquired pneumonia caused by methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus in critically-ill patients: systematic review

    Nuria Carballo

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Community-acquired pneumonia (CAP is associated with high morbidity and mortality rates. Despite methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA having often been associated with nosocomial pneumonia, the condition of some MRSA CAP patients is severe enough to warrant their being admitted to ICU. Objective: The purpose of this study is to conduct a systematic review of the literature on antibiotic treatment of MRSA CAP in critically-ill patients. Material and methods: An online search was conducted for locating articles on MRSA CAP in critically ill patients. Relevant publications were identified in PUBMED, the BestPractice database, UpToDate database and the Cochrane Library for articles published in English within the December 2001 - April 2016 time frame. Results: A total of 70 articles were found to have been published, 13 (18.8% having been included and 57 (81.4% excluded. Cohort studies were predominant, having totaled 16 in number (20.7% as compared to one sole cross-sectional study (3.5%. Conclusions: The experience in the treatment of MRSA CAP in patients requiring admission to ICU is quite limited. Vancomycin or linezolid seem to be the treatments of choice for MRSA CAP, although there not be any specific recommendation in this regard. It may be useful to use alternative routes, such as administration via aerosolized antibiotics, continuous infusion or in association with other antibiotics.

  19. Psychosomatic Factors and Psychologic Status in Psoriatic Patients and Approach to the Psoriatic Patients

    Ertuğrul H. Aydemir

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Even if it has not been completely proven, psychosomatic factors are generally agreed and most of the patients talk about stress and the other emotional traumas at the beginning of disease and at the attacks. Furthermore since it is a difficult to treat disease easily seen on the skin, cause to hopeless, loneliness and isolation senses and they feel theirselves dirty and guilty. Then it leads to an unbreakable vicious circle. It is very important to make an approach with much care and affection. It is very important that to listen, to examine and to touch the dermatologist to the patient with patience and affection. Besides that to take a psychiatric support may also help too much to the treatment of the diseases.

  20. [Guideline-oriented inpatient psychiatric psychotherapeutic/psychosomatic treatment of anxiety disorders : How many personnel are need?].

    Bandelow, B; Lueken, U; Wolff, J; Godemann, F; Menzler, C W; Deckert, J; Ströhle, A; Beutel, M; Wiltink, J; Domschke, K; Berger, M

    2016-03-01

    The reimbursement of inpatient psychiatric psychotherapeutic/psychosomatic hospital treatment in Germany is regulated by the German personnel ordinance for psychiatric hospitals (Psych-PV), which has remained unchanged since 1991. The aim of this article was to estimate the personnel requirements for guideline-adherent psychiatric psychotherapeutic hospital treatment. A normative concept for the required psychotherapeutic "dose" for anxiety disorders was determined based on a literature review. The required staffing contingent was compared to the resources provided by the Psych-PV based on category A1. According to the German policy guidelines for outpatient psychotherapy, a quota of 25 sessions of 50 min each (as a rule plus 5 probatory sessions) is reimbursed. This approach is supported by studies on dose-response relationships. As patients undergoing inpatient treatment for anxiety disorders are usually more severely ill than outpatients, a contingent of 30 sessions for the average treatment duration of 5 weeks seems appropriate in order to fully exploit the costly inpatient treatment time (300 min per patient and week). In contrast, only 70 min are reimbursed according to the Psych-PV. The total personnel requirement for the normative concept is 624 min per patient and week. The Psych-PV only covers 488 min (78 %). Currently, the time contingents for evidence-based psychiatric psychotherapeutic/psychosomatic hospital care are nowhere near sufficient. In the development of future reimbursement systems this needs to be corrected.

  1. Altered gut microbiome in a mouse model of Gulf War Illness causes neuroinflammation and intestinal injury via leaky gut and TLR4 activation.

    Firas Alhasson

    Full Text Available Many of the symptoms of Gulf War Illness (GWI that include neurological abnormalities, neuroinflammation, chronic fatigue and gastrointestinal disturbances have been traced to Gulf War chemical exposure. Though the association and subsequent evidences are strong, the mechanisms that connect exposure to intestinal and neurological abnormalities remain unclear. Using an established rodent model of Gulf War Illness, we show that chemical exposure caused significant dysbiosis in the gut that included increased abundance of phylum Firmicutes and Tenericutes, and decreased abundance of Bacteroidetes. Several gram negative bacterial genera were enriched in the GWI-model that included Allobaculum sp. Altered microbiome caused significant decrease in tight junction protein Occludin with a concomitant increase in Claudin-2, a signature of a leaky gut. Resultant leaching of gut caused portal endotoxemia that led to upregulation of toll like receptor 4 (TLR4 activation in the small intestine and the brain. TLR4 knock out mice and mice that had gut decontamination showed significant decrease in tyrosine nitration and inflammatory mediators IL1β and MCP-1 in both the small intestine and frontal cortex. These events signified that gut dysbiosis with simultaneous leaky gut and systemic endotoxemia-induced TLR4 activation contributes to GW chemical-induced neuroinflammation and gastrointestinal disturbances.

  2. PSYCHOSOMATIC CONSEQUENCES OF TEACHERS' OCUPPATIONAL STRESS

    Anna Romanowska-Tolloczko

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The need to adapt to the ever-increasing socio-professional requirements carries many risks to human health, both in somatic and psychological aspects. Strong stress associated with work leads to the occurrence of burnout syndrome. Persons performing so called aid professions, where teachers belong to a special group, are usually vulnerable to this syndrome. The aim of this paper is to present the causes, course and consequences of teacher burnout and to highlight the multidimensional nature of the phenomenon, indicating possible corrective and preventive actions. Among the that contribute to burnout important are environmental , organizational and subjective factors. Subjective factors like professional training and personality dispositions, are treated as the primary determinants of resistance or susceptibility of individuals to stress. They can intensify or protect against burning out. The lack of ability to counter stress is considered crucial in the formation and accumulation of burnout symptoms.

  3. PSYCHOSOMATIC CONSEQUENCES OF TEACHERS’ OCUPPATIONAL STRESS

    Romanowska-Tołłoczko Anna

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The need to adapt to the ever-increasing socio-professional requirements carries many risks to human health, both in somatic and psychological aspects. Strong stress associated with work leads to the occurrence of burnout syndrome. Persons performing so called aid professions, where teachers belong to a special group, are usually vulnerable to this syndrome. The aim of this paper is to present the causes, course and consequences of teacher burnout and to highlight the multidimensional nature of the phenomenon, indicating possible corrective and preventive actions. Among the that contribute to burnout important are environmental , organizational and subjective factors. Subjective factors like professional training and personality dispositions, are treated as the primary determinants of resistance or susceptibility of individuals to stress. They can intensify or protect against burning out. The lack of ability to counter stress is considered crucial in the formation and accumulation of burnout symptoms.

  4. Influence of physical activity on psychosomatic health in obese women.

    Menzyk, K; Cajdler, A; Pokorski, M

    2008-12-01

    It is unclear to what extent the known psychosomatic benefits of exercise hold true for the obese. In the present study, we investigated the hypothesis that the psychosomatic health and components of general intelligence, such as the capacity for logical-deductive tasks, would be better in regularly exercising than non-exercising obese women. We addressed the issue in a self-reported survey study, comprising two groups of middle-aged obese women (age 30-50 years, BMI >30 kg/m(2)) of 25 persons each. The criterion for the group division was regular exercise, minimum twice a week, for at least 2 months. The following psychometric tools were used: Physical Fitness and Exercise Scale, Patient Health Questionnaire-9 for depression, Life Satisfaction Scale, General Health Inventory-28, Raven's Matrices Test for intelligence, and a test for selfcontentment with one's body figure shape. The exercising obese women scored significantly better in Life Satisfaction Scale (17.1 +/- 1.2 vs.12.0 +/- 0.9), had a lower level of depression (8.1 +/- 0.6 vs. 13.4 +/- 0.7), and a better assessment of the health status (24.6 +/- 1.6 vs. 36.4 +/- 2.2) (reversed score) compared with non-exercising ones (Pexercising obese women also appreciably better assessed their bodily looks. Interestingly, if depression was present in exercising women, it had more detrimental health effects than in physically inactive ones. The study failed to substantiate appreciable changes in general intelligence between active and non-active obese women. In conclusion, physical activity is of benefit for the psychosomatic health in obese women, which should be considered in behavioral counseling.

  5. Psychosomatic disorders of gravida status: false and denied pregnancies.

    Kenner, William D; Nicolson, Stephen E

    2015-01-01

    The authors review the literature on two dramatic psychosomatic disorders of reproduction and offer a potential classification of pregnancy denial. Information on false and denied pregnancies is summarized by comparing the descriptions, differential diagnoses, epidemiology, patient characteristics, psychological factors, abdominal tone, and neuroendocrinology. Pregnancy denial's association with neonaticide is reviewed. False and denied pregnancies have fooled women, families, and doctors for centuries as the body obscures her true condition. Improvements in pregnancy testing have decreased reports of false pregnancy. However, recent data suggests 1/475 pregnancies are denied to 20 weeks, and 1/2455 may go undiagnosed to delivery. Factors that may contribute to the unconscious deception include abdominal muscle tone, persistent corpus luteum function, and reduced availability of biogenic amines in false pregnancy, and posture, fetal position, and corpus luteum insufficiency in denied pregnancy. For each condition, there are multiple reports in which the body reveals her true pregnancy status as soon as the woman is convinced of her diagnosis. Forensic literature on denied pregnancy focused on the woman's rejection of motherhood, while psychiatric studies have revealed that trauma and dissociation drive her denial. False pregnancy has firm grounding as a classic psychosomatic disorder. Pregnancy denial's association with neonaticide has led to misleading forensic data, which obscures the central role of trauma and dissociation. A reappraisal of pregnancy denial confirms it as the somatic inverse of false pregnancy. With that perspective, clinicians can help women understand their pregnancy status to avoid unexpected deliveries with tragic outcomes. Copyright © 2015 The Academy of Psychosomatic Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Past, Present, and Future of Psychosomatic Movements in an Ever-Changing World: Presidential Address.

    Herrmann-Lingen, Christoph

    The American Psychosomatic Society was founded in 1942 and is celebrating its 75th anniversary in 2017. In recognizing the society's anniversary, this article provides a historical perspective on its history, the field of psychosomatic medicine in general, and anticipated future directions. Essay and narrative review of the literature on the historic development of psychosomatic concepts and their impact on medicine over time. Mind-body associations have been described in the medical literature for more than 3500 years. Early concepts of mind-body dualism and attempts to overcome them are found in classical Greek medicine. Psychosomatic thinking can be observed ever since, but only in the 20th century, a "psychosomatic movement" emerged in Europe and North America, aiming at humanizing medicine by introducing a holistic understanding of man into what was considered a widely reductionistic practice of medicine. This movement led to the inauguration of the American Psychosomatic Society during World War II and of national and international societies of psychosomatic medicine and its subspecializations thereafter. Psychosomatic medicine has its roots in the beginnings of medicine. During the past 75 years, it has made substantial contributions to the science and practice of medicine. The field has also changed in response to developments in medicine, technology, and society and is facing new challenges and opportunities that may require further adaptation of its concepts and practice.

  7. Does the Association with Psychosomatic Health Problems Differ between Cyberbullying and Traditional Bullying?

    Beckman, Linda; Hagquist, Curt; Hellstrom, Lisa

    2012-01-01

    The association between mental health problems and traditional bullying is well known, whereas the strength of the association in cyberbullying is less known. This study aimed to compare the association between mutually exclusive groups of bullying involvement and psychosomatic problems as measured by the PsychoSomatic Problems scale. The sample…

  8. Poly(adenosine 5'-diphosphate) ribose polymerase activation as a cause of metabolic dysfunction in critical illness.

    Liaudet, Lucas

    2002-03-01

    Poly(adenosine 5'-diphosphate) ribose polymerase is a nuclear enzyme activated in response to genotoxic stress induced by a variety of DNA damaging agents. Several oxygen and nitrogen-centered free radicals, notably peroxynitrite, are strong inducers of DNA damage and poly(adenosine 5'-diphosphate) ribose polymerase activation in vitro and in vivo. Activation of this nuclear enzyme depletes the intracellular stores of its substrate nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide, slowing the rate of glycolysis, mitochondrial electron transport and adenosine triphosphate formation. This process triggers a severe energetic crisis within the cell, leading to acute cell dysfunction and cell necrosis. Poly(adenosine 5'-diphosphate) ribose polymerase also plays an important role in the regulation of inflammatory cascades, through a functional association with various transcription factors and transcription co-activators. Recent works identified this enzyme as a critical mediator of cellular metabolic dysfunction, inflammatory injury, and organ damage in conditions associated with overwhelming oxidative stress, including systemic inflammation, circulatory shock, and ischemia-reperfusion. Accordingly, pharmacological inhibitors of poly(adenosine 5'-diphosphate) ribose polymerase protect against cell death and tissue injury in such conditions, and may therefore represent novel therapeutic tools to limit multiple organ damage and dysfunction in critically ill patients.

  9. Evaluation of validity of Integrated Management of Childhood Illness guidelines in identifying edema of nutritional causes among Egyptian children.

    El Habashy, Safinaz A; Mohamed, Maha H; Amin, Dina A; Marzouk, Diaa; Farid, Mohammed N

    2015-12-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the validity of the Integrated Management of Childhood Illness (IMCI) algorithm to detect edematous type of malnutrition in Egyptian infants and children ranging in age from 2 months to 5 years. This study was carried out by surveying 23 082 children aged between 2 months and 5 years visiting the pediatric outpatient clinic, Ain Shams University Hospital, over a period of 6 months. Thirty-eight patients with edema of both feet on their primary visit were enrolled in the study. Every child was assessed using the IMCI algorithm 'assess and classify' by the same physician, together with a systematic clinical evaluation with all relevant investigations. Twenty-two patients (57.9%) were proven to have nutritional etiology. 'Weight for age' sign had a sensitivity of 95.5%, a specificity of 56%, and a diagnostic accuracy of 78.95% in the identification of nutritional edema among all cases of bipedal edema. Combinations of IMCI symptoms 'pallor, visible severe wasting, fever, diarrhea', and 'weight for age' increased the sensitivity to 100%, but with a low specificity of 38% and a diagnostic accuracy of 73.68%. Bipedal edema and low weight for age as part of the IMCI algorithm can identify edema because of nutritional etiology with 100% sensitivity, but with 37% specificity. Revisions need to be made to the IMCI guidelines published in 2010 by the Egyptian Ministry of Health in the light of the new WHO guidelines of 2014.

  10. Human coronavirus OC43 causes influenza-like illness in residents and staff of aged-care facilities in Melbourne, Australia.

    Birch, C. J.; Clothier, H. J.; Seccull, A.; Tran, T.; Catton, M. C.; Lambert, S. B.; Druce, J. D.

    2005-01-01

    Three outbreaks of respiratory illness associated with human coronavirus HCoV-OC43 infection occurred in geographically unrelated aged-care facilities in Melbourne, Australia during August and September 2002. On clinical and epidemiological grounds the outbreaks were first thought to be caused by influenza virus. HCoV-OC43 was detected by RT-PCR in 16 out of 27 (59%) specimens and was the only virus detected at the time of sampling. Common clinical manifestations were cough (74%), rhinorrhoea (59%) and sore throat (53%). Attack rates and symptoms were similar in residents and staff across the facilities. HCoV-OC43 was also detected in surveillance and diagnostic respiratory samples in the same months. These outbreaks establish this virus as a cause of morbidity in aged-care facilities and add to increasing evidence of the significance of coronavirus infections. PMID:15816152

  11. PSYCHOSOMATIC ASPECTS IN THE TREATMENT OF GASTROESOPHAGEAL REFLUX DISEASE

    V. I. Trofimov

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Gastroesophageal reflux disease is the most common disease of the esophagus, through the development of which is impaired motor function of the upper gastrointestinal system, allowing the disease to be quite be classified as psychosomatic, especially in the early stages of development, when no apparent organic complications that affect the structure of tissues. A significant percentage of mental disorders is observed in patients even before the development of somatic complaints. Patients in number of 105 people are examined. The first group — experienced (71 patient received complex treatment, which includes the basic pathogenetic, symptomatic, and psychotropic treatment in the form of anxiolytics and antidepressants. The choice of drug was based on the results of psychological testing. The second group — the comparison group (34 patients received only conventional treatment, without psychiatric support. Analysis was conducted of the astheno-vegetative syndrome, psychological characteristics of patients in relation to their disease, indicators of anxiety level and severity of depression. Patients with not erosive reflux disease have a frequency of detection of a depression and uneasiness was more than twice higher, than at patients with erosive reflux disease. After carrying out psychotropic treatment these indicators were practically made even. Prescription of psychotropic therapy in the form of antidepressants and anxiolytics has allowed to minimize the timing regression of clinical and psychosomatic manifestations of disease.

  12. The "Ulysses syndrome": An eponym identifies a psychosomatic disorder in modern migrants.

    Bianucci, Raffaella; Charlier, Philippe; Perciaccante, Antonio; Lippi, Donatella; Appenzeller, Otto

    2017-06-01

    Due to civil wars, violence and persecutions, between 2015 and 2016, more than 1.4 million people, from the Middle East and Africa, fled their counties and migrated to Europe. The vast majority of migrants, who have already experienced enormous level of stressors, are faced with dangerous, often lethal, migratory journeys. Those who survive are exposed to adaptation stressors such as different languages, isolation, lack of work opportunities, diminished social status and a sense of failure in the new countries of residence. These are stressors that go far beyond the usual adaptation stresses to new cultures and migrants experience permanent crises with an imminent risk of developing the "Ulysses syndrome". As a consequence, many individuals often develop symptoms such as irritability, nervousness, migraine, tension headache, insomnia, tiredness, fear, loss of appetite and generalized ill-defined discomfort. If left untreated these symptoms, originally described by Hofer in the 17th century, may degenerate into a severe psychosomatic disorder leading to reactive depression. Here we expand the concept of Ulysses' syndrome and illustrate new initiatives aimed at reducing the level of stressors in migrants and at promoting their successful integration in their new countries. Copyright © 2017 European Federation of Internal Medicine. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. 'Actual neurosis' and psychosomatic medicine: the vicissitudes of an enigmatic concept.

    Hartocollis, Peter

    2002-12-01

    Out of the concept of neurasthenia, the main non-psychotic diagnosis of nineteenth-century psychiatry besides hysteria, and on the basis of psychophysiological problems of his own, self-diagnosed as neurasthenia, Freud developed the notion of 'actual neurosis', a 'contentless psychic state' manifested by various somatic symptoms and a depressive mood, which he attributed to a chemical factor associated with aberrant sexual practices and in particular masturbation. Rejected by post-Freudian analysts as such along with the diagnosis of neurasthenia, the concept of 'actual neurosis' has survived under various theoretical schemes that seek to explain psychosomatic illness and somatisation, in general, with its concomitant poverty of affects and dearth of fantasy life. In more recent years, the concept of 'actual neurosis' has resurfaced under the label of chronic fatigue syndrome, a medical entity thought to be an immunological deficiency, while in psychoanalysis Freud's idea of a contentless mental state has been replaced by that of unconscious fantasy and symbolisation at a pre-genital or pre-verbal level.

  14. [The relationship between depression, anxiety and heart disease - a psychosomatic challenge].

    Kapfhammer, Hans-Peter

    2011-12-01

    Depressive and cardiological disorders present a major comorbidity. Their manifold interrelations may be best analysed within a biopsychosocial model of disease. A systematic research was done on empirical studies published during the last 15 years and dealing with epidemiological, etiopathogenetic and therapeutic dimensions of the comorbidity of depression, anxiety and heart disease. From an epidemiological perspective recurrent depressions are associated with a significantly increased risk of coronary heart disease. Depressive disorders play a major role in triggering critical cardiac events, e.g. myocardial infarction. The prevalence rates of depressive disorders in various cardiological conditions are significantly higher than the frequencies that can be expected in healthy general population. Depression shows a negative impact on the somatic morbidity and mortality during the further course of illness. Anxiety and posttraumatic stress disorders seem to be interrelated with cardiological conditions in quite a similar way, probably contributing even more negatively to critical and lethal cardiological events than depression. From an etiopathogenetic perspective some clusters of depressive symptoms seem to be linked to cardiotoxicity more closely than other, vital exhaustion, anhedonia, and hopelessness probably mediating a special risk. In any case, postmyocardial infarct depression that proves treatment-resistent indicates a negative prognosis of the prevailing cardiological condition. On a level of psychological and psychosocial constructs type-A personality, anger/hostility, type-D personality, and alexithymia have been explored regarding its proper pathogenetic role. Psychological and psychopathological variables have to be set into a context of psychosocial stressors on the one hand, and have to be simultaneously analysed with various underlying psycho- and neurobiological variables on the other. Above all, HPA- and sympathicomedullary dysfunctions, reduced

  15. The moderating effects of gender on the associations between multidimensional hostility and psychosomatic symptoms: a Chinese case.

    Weng, Chia-Ying; Lin, I-Mei; Jiang, Ding-Yu

    2010-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of gender on the relationship between multidimensional hostility and psychosomatic symptoms in Chinese culture. The participants in this study were 398 Chinese college students (40% female) recruited from Taiwan. Four dimensions of multidimensional hostility-hostility cognition, hostility affect, expressive hostility behavior, and suppressive hostility behavior-were measured by the Chinese Hostility Inventory. After controlling for the effects of depression and anxiety, the results of path analysis revealed that the multidimensional hostility predicted psychosomatic symptoms directly, and predicted psychosomatic symptoms indirectly through negative health behavior. Furthermore, gender moderated the relationships between multidimensional hostility and health outcomes. Expressive hostility exacerbated psychosomatic symptom in females but buffered it in males, while affective hostility exacerbated psychosomatic symptoms in males. Additionally, suppressive hostility behavior was correlated to psychosomatic symptoms indirectly through negative health behavior in females. Moreover, expressive hostility was correlated to psychosomatic symptoms indirectly through negative health behavior more in males than in females.

  16. Causas mal definidas de morte e óbitos sem assistência Ill-defined causes of death and unattended deaths, Brazil, 2003

    Augusto Hasiak Santo

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVOS: Este trabalho estuda a distribuição dos óbitos por causas mal definidas no Brasil, no ano de 2003, entre as quais identifica a proporção de mortes sem assistência. MÉTODOS: Os dados provieram do Sistema de Informações Sobre Mortalidade, coordenado pelo Ministério da Saúde. As causas mal definidas de morte compreenderam as incluídas no "Capítulo XVIII - Sintomas, sinais e achados anormais de exames clínicos e de laboratório não classificados em outra parte" da Classificação Estatística Internacional de Doenças e Problemas Relacionados à Saúde, décima revisão, capítulo este no qual a categoria R98 identificava a "morte sem assistência". RESULTADOS: No Brasil, em 2003, a causa básica de 13,3% dos óbitos foi identificada como mal definida, sendo que as proporções maiores ocorreram nas Regiões Nordeste e Norte. Do total de causas mal definidas no país, 53,3% corresponderam a mortes sem assistência, proporção esta que superou 70% nos Estados do Maranhão, Piauí, Rio Grande do Norte, Pernambuco, Bahia, Paraíba e Alagoas. CONCLUSÃO: Dada a estrutura descentralizada para o levantamento dos óbitos no país, identifica-se a maior responsabilidade dos municípios e, em seguida, dos Estados para o aprimoramento da qualidade das estatísticas de mortalidade.BACKGROUND: We studied the distribution of deaths from ill-defined causes that occurred in Brazil during 2003, from which was identified the proportion of unattended deaths. METHODS: Data were obtained from the Mortality Information System, coordinated by the Ministry of Health. Causes of death included in "Chapter XVIII - Symptoms, signs and abnormal clinical and laboratory findings, not classified elsewhere" of the International Statistical Classification of Diseases and Related Health Problems, tenth revision, were considered ill-defined, among which the category R98 identified "unattended deaths". RESULTS: In Brazil during 2003 the underlying causes of

  17. Parvovirus B19 and Other Illnesses

    ... Cheek Rash Parvovirus B19 and Other Illnesses References Parvovirus B19 and Other Illnesses Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share ... disease is the most common illness caused by parvovirus B19 infection. Learn More Parvovirus B19 infection can cause ...

  18. From Biomedical to Psychosomatic Reasoning: A Theoretical Framework

    Alireza Monajemi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Despite a general acceptance of the biopsychosocial model, medical education and patient care are still largely biomedical in focus, and physicians have many deficiencies in biopsychosocial formulations and care. Education in medical schools puts more emphasis on providing biomedical education (BM than biopsychosocial education (BPS; the initial knowledge formed in medical students is mainly with a biomedical approach. Therefore, it seems that psychosocial aspects play a minor role at this level and PSM knowledge will lag behind BM knowledge. However, it seems that the integration of biomedical and psychosocial-knowledge is crucial for a successful and efficient patient encounter. In this paper, based on the theory of medical expertise development, the steps through which biomedical reasoning transforms to psychosomatic reasoning will be discussed.

  19. Foodborne Germs and Illnesses

    ... Español (Spanish) Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir What Causes Food Poisoning? Many different disease-causing germs can contaminate ... email address: Enter Email Address What’s this? Submit What's this? Submit Button ... of Foodborne Illness in the U.S. Food Safety is a CDC Winnable Battle Foodborne Illness ...

  20. Effects of adolescent online gaming time and motives on depressive, musculoskeletal, and psychosomatic symptoms

    Hellstr?m, Charlotta; Nilsson, Kent W; Leppert, Jerzy; ?slund, Cecilia

    2015-01-01

    Aim. To investigate whether adolescent online gaming time and the additive effect of gaming motives were associated with depressive, musculoskeletal, and psychosomatic symptoms. The hypothesis was that adolescents who engage in online gaming with escape motives and increased online gaming time have higher probability for depressive, musculoskeletal, and psychosomatic symptoms compared to adolescents with other online gaming motives and/or less online gaming time. Method. An anonymous and volu...

  1. Psychosomatic health impacts of power plants and computer aided risk management

    Pop-Jordanova, N.; Pop-Jordanov, J.; Boskovska, V.

    1998-07-01

    The concept ``psychosomatic'', initially introduced in the first half of this century, has recently being reconfirmed by the theory and practice of modern medicine. The psychosomatic disorders are generally defined as physical (somatic) diseases produced, in part, by psychological factors, primarily stress. The organs of cardiovascular, gastrointestinal, respiratory and endocrine system are being affected, as a result of innervation by the autonomic nervous system. In some of these diseases the psychological factors can play relatively essential role; these are named ``primary psychosomatic diseases'': essential hypertension, peptic ulcer, bronchial asthma, ulcerative colitis, neurodermatitis, rheumatoid arthritis and hyperthyroidism (the last two diseases were later replaced by eating disorders as bulimia and anorexia nervosa). In many other cases the psychological element is only one among several parallel factors; these are sometimes called ``secondary psychosomatic diseases''. As known from the psychosomatic medicine, the stressors are being refracted through the individual history of a person as through a prism, leading to a spectrum of possible reactions. The personality prism comprises heredity, early child experiences and actual conflict, while the resulting disorders, as a response of the human being, have the form of neuroses, disturbed behavior and psychoses from one side, and psychophysiological disorders and other psychosomatic diseases, including synergetic amplification, from the other side. The probability of each outcome depends primarily on the individual personality prism, as well as on the characteristics of the stressors.

  2. Association of work-related factors with psychosocial job stressors and psychosomatic symptoms among Japanese pediatricians.

    Umehara, Katsura; Ohya, Yukihiro; Kawakami, Norito; Tsutsumi, Akizumi; Fujimura, Masanori

    2007-11-01

    A cross-sectional study was conducted to explore what work-related factors were associated with job stress among pediatricians in Japan, as determined by the demand-control-support model and psychosomatic symptoms. We sent an anonymous questionnaire to a random sample of 3,000 members selected from the nationwide register of the Japan Pediatric Society and received 850 responses (response rate, 28%). Data from the 590 respondents who worked more than 35 h per week as a pediatrician and had no missing responses in the questionnaire were analyzed. We measured workload-related variables (e.g. working hours, work schedule) and recovery-related variables (e.g. workdays with no overtime, days off with no work in the past month) as exposure variables, and psychosocial job stressors (the Brief Job Stress Questionnaire) and psychosomatic symptoms as outcome variables. Longer working hours per week was significantly associated with greater job demand, lower job control and more psychosomatic symptoms (pworking hours, more workdays with no overtime was significantly associated with lower job demand, greater job control and fewer psychosomatic symptoms (plong working hours is a risk factor for job stressors and psychosomatic symptoms, and that workdays with no overtime is a protective factor which may facilitate recovery. Controlling working hours and encouraging non-overtime workdays may be important for reducing job stressors and psychosomatic symptoms among pediatricians in Japan.

  3. Association between psychosomatic symptoms and work stress among Taiwan police officers.

    Chueh, Ke-Hsin; Yen, Cheng-Fang; Lu, Luo; Yang, Mei-Sang

    2011-04-01

    The aim of the study was to explore the association between the severity of psychosomatic symptoms and perceived work stress among male police officers in southern Taiwan. By stratified random sampling, a total of 698 male police officers were recruited into this study (the response rate was 73.4%; 512 of 698). A structured self-administered questionnaire on demographic and working characteristics, the severity of psychosomatic symptoms, perceived work stress, and social support was used to collect data anonymously. The results of multiple regression analysis revealed that (1) the police officers who perceived high-work stress reported more severe psychosomatic symptoms than those who perceived low-work stress; and (2) perceived social support had a moderating effect on the association between severity of psychosomatic symptoms and perceived work stress. Perceived work stress is an indicator of psychosomatic symptoms in police officers. Strategies for reducing psychosomatic symptoms of police officers include police administrators taking into account the level of work stress as well as more attention being paid to the resources of social support. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Taiwan LLC. All rights reserved.

  4. Lifestyles and psychosomatic symptoms among elementary school students and junior high school students.

    Isshiki, Yuriko; Morimoto, Kanehisa

    2004-05-01

    To examine the relationship between lifestyles and psychosomatic symptoms in children, we conducted a self-administered questionnaire survey of elementary school students and junior high school students in Japan. We designed an original questionnaire to investigate the lifestyles and psychosomatic symptoms of children. In 1997, responses to the questionnaires were elicited from public elementary school fourth grade students (then aged 9-10) and public junior high school seventh grade students (then aged 12-13). The survey was repeated annually for three years as the students advanced through school. For both boys and girls, each cross-sectional analysis revealed a strong relationship between lifestyle behaviors and psychosomatic symptoms. Psychosomatic, symptoms scores varied according to daily hours of sleep, eating of breakfast, having strong likes and dislikes of food, bowel habits, and daily hours of television watching. Both boys and girls with "good" lifestyle, behaviors evaluated by the HPI (Health Practice Index) showed lower scores for psychosomatic symptoms. These findings show that the lifestyle behaviors of children are significantly associated with psychosomatic symptoms and suggest that poor lifestyle behaviors are likely to increase physical and psychological health risks.

  5. Reflections on relevance: Psychotherapy and Psychosomatics in 2004.

    Balon, Richard

    2005-01-01

    Relevance of an article is a highly desirable yet hardly predictable quality at the time of its publication. Article relevance is frequently measured by the impact factor of the journal where the article is published. Furthermore, impact factor, citation index and citation analysis are used as a measure of research progress and scientific wealth of a nation. The wisdom and significance of this approach to relevance is debatable and thus discussed here. In 2004, Psychotherapy and Psychosomatics published a variety of articles which, in the author's view, are clinically relevant. Several selected clinically relevant issues reviewed in this article include: the conceptualization of fibromyalgia as a stress disorder; the psychosocial impact and psychosocial interventions in cancer; the impact of alexithymia on patient care; the possible relationship between depression and nutrition (namely intake of folate and pyridoxal phosphate); the significance of hypercoagulability in panic-like anxiety; the questionable value of single isomer drugs, and the relevance and adequacy of clinimetrics versus psychometrics in clinical research. The reviewed issues seem to be relevant to clinical practice, research or both, but also to our critical thinking, and the critical review of the developments in psychiatry and psychology. Copyright 2005 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  6. [Relationships between psychosomatics and somatopsychiatry in modern medicine].

    Paleev, N R; Krasnov, V N

    2009-01-01

    Progress in many clinical disciplines and neurobiology for the last decades give reason to reconsider some fundamental provisions of psychosomatic medicine and its relationships with somatopsychiatry. The universally accepted biopsychosocial model of the disease as proposed by V.N.Bekhterev implies involvement of psychological and psychosocial factors at early stages of many forms of somatic pathology. Intricate interplay between somatic and psychic components is exemplified by correlation of cardiovascular disorders and depression. Depression is diagnosed in 17-27% of the patients with coronary heart disease undergoing coronary angiography and in 16-45% of the post-infarction cases. Frequency of depression/hypertensive disease comorbidity is estimated at 30%. Similarity of pathogenetic mechanisms of cardiovascular diseases and depressive states is due to stress as their common provoking factor. Another important aspect of the relationship between medicine and psychiatry (disregarded until recently) is high frequency of somatic disorders in psychiatric patients. Cooperation of psychiatrists and representatives of different medical disciplines in such areas as research and practical health care is needed to address this problem.

  7. [Oswald Schwarz: a pioneer in psychosomatic urology and sexual medicine].

    Berberich, H J; Schultheiss, D; Kieser, B

    2015-01-01

    Oswald Schwarz, a urologist from Vienna, was a scholar of Anton Ritter von Frisch and Hans Rubritius. As a physician during World War I, he was confronted with numerous bullet wounds to the spinal cord. In 1919, he completed his professorial thesis"Bladder dysfunction as a result of bullet wounds to the spinal cord". Oswald Schwarz was known as a committed surgeon. As an urologist he also treated patients with sexual dysfunction. Besides his practical and scientific urology-related work, he was also interested in psychology and philosophy. He held lectures on both subjects earning himself the nickname, the Urosoph. In the 1920s, Oswald Schwarz belonged to the inner circle of Alfred Adler, the founder of Individual Psychology, and was editor of the first psychosomatic textbook published in German, "Psychological origin and psychotherapy of physical symptoms" (1925). In addition, Schwarz wrote numerous articles and several books on sexual medicine. He also made many valuable contributions to the development of medical anthropology. Altogether, his work includes over 130 publications. Faced with the rise of fascism and National Socialism in Europe, Oswald Schwarz, who was of Jewish origin, emigrated to England in 1934. There he died in 1949. Unfortunately his scientific work has largely been forgotten. The aim of the following article is to remind us of his important contributions to the field.

  8. Surveillance of psychosomatic disorders in internal medicine in Cipto Mangunkusumo Hospital, Jakarta, Indonesia.

    Shatri, Hamzah; Mudjaddid, E; Lapau, Buchari

    2004-01-01

    to examine certain characteristics of patients who suffer from psychosomatic disorders. We called data through medical report outpatient clinic of the Psychosomatic Division, Department of internal medicine, Cipto Mangunkusumo Central General Hospital/Faculty of Medicine of the University of Indonesia (FKUI/RSUPN-CM), Jakarta, Indonesia, in 1996. The data was processed manually and by computer from which table and graphic were obtained. The descriptive analysis was performed to the objective the study. the FPD patients consisted of those with vegetative imbalance (multiple psychosomatic syndrome) (30.2%), dyspepsia (20.8%), functional heart disease (11.3%) and others 1%-6%. All of SPD consisted of chronic disease, such as hypertension (38.3%), diabetes mellitus (29.8%), bronchial asthma (10.6%), coronary artery disease (6.4%), and others 2%-5%. According to DSM IV, among the psychosomatic patients, 52.7% met the criteria for anxiety, 29.3% for depression, 14.2% for mixed anxiety and depression, and 3.8% unclear. The psychosocial stressor groups were family problems (38%), physical conditions (16%), work-related problems (13.4%), marriage problems (8.4%) and others (1%-4%). The most common physical symptoms of psychosomatic disorders were functional. Common functional psychosomatic disorders were multiple psychosomatic syndrome, dyspepsia and functional heart disease. Structural disorders found were chronic diseases. There was no difference in prevalence between males and females. The most frequent functional disorders were more commonly found among those under 40 years of age, while those with structural disorders were more common among patients 40 years of age or more. The psychological diagnoses were anxiety and depression. The most frequent psychological stressors were family problems, medical conditions, work-related problems and marriage problems.

  9. Family residency and psychosomatic problems among adolescents in Sweden: The impact of child-parent relations.

    Hagquist, Curt

    2016-02-01

    Profound changes in family structure took place in many countries, during the second part of the previous century. The purpose of this paper is to analyse the association between the type of family residency and psychosomatic problems in younger and older adolescents, particularly focusing on alternate residency, and to examine the impact of child-parent relations. We used data collected in 2009 by Statistics Sweden among 172,298 Swedish students in Grade 6 and Grade 9 (approximate ages 12 and 15 years old); comprising 80% and 86%, respectively, of the entire population of students in those grades. We collected the data with a questionnaire, completed anonymously in school: We used the Psychosomatic Problems (PSP) scale as the outcome measure. The type of family residency showed a weaker association with psychosomatic problems than the child-parent relationships did. Living in non-intact families increased the probability of adolescent psychosomatic problems by 0-0.05, compared to intact families. In Grade 9, there were no differences in psychosomatic problems between the students in alternate residency and those living with their two parents; and in Grade 6, these differences were relatively small. In comparison, a worse relationship with parents increased the probability of psychosomatic problems by 0.11-0.17, depending on the school grade and type of family residency. The structure of the family, as well as the child-parent relationships needs to be taken into account, to properly estimate the magnitude of the family situation as a determinant of adolescent psychosomatic problems. Our results justify universal intervention at the policy level. © 2015 the Nordic Societies of Public Health.

  10. Population pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of fosfomycin in non-critically ill patients with bacteremic urinary infection caused by multidrug-resistant Escherichia coli.

    Merino-Bohórquez, V; Docobo-Pérez, F; Sojo, J; Morales, I; Lupión, C; Martín, D; Cameán, M; Hope, W; Pascual, Á; Rodríguez-Baño, J

    2018-04-10

    To describe the population pharmacokinetics of fosfomycin for patients with bacteraemic urinary tract infection (BUTI). The analysis identified optimal regimens on the basis of pharmacodynamic targets and assessed the adequacy of Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI) and European Committee on Antimicrobial Susceptibility Testing (EUCAST) susceptibility breakpoints for Escherichia coli. Data of 16 patients with BUTI caused by multidrug-resistant E. coli (FOREST clinical trial) received intravenous fosfomycin (4 g every 6 hours) were analysed. A population pharmacokinetic analysis was performed, and Monte Carlo simulations were undertaken using 4 g every 6 hours and 8 g every 8 hours. The probability of pharmacodynamic target attainment was assessed using pharmacodynamic targets for E. coli for static effect, 1-log drop in bacterial burden and resistance suppression. Sixty-four plasma samples were collected over a single dosing interval (day 2 or 3 after starting fosfomycin treatment). Fosfomycin concentrations were highly variable. Pharmacodynamic target attainment analysis showed mild improvement by increasing fosfomycin dosing (4 g every 6 hours vs. every 8 hours). These dosages showed success for decreasing 1-log bacterial burden in 89% to 96% (EUCAST breakpoints) and 33% to 54% (CLSI breakpoints) of patients, but they were unable to reach bacterial resistance suppression targets. Fosfomycin concentrations are highly variable-a fact partially explained by renal impairment. The present work supports the use of 4 g every 6 hours as an effective regimen for the treatment of non-critically ill patients with BUTI caused by multidrug-resistant E. coli, as higher dosages might increase toxicity but may not significantly increase efficacy. The current information may suggest that fosfomycin susceptibility breakpoints need to be reappraised. Copyright © 2018 European Society of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases. Published by

  11. Time feature of Chinese military personnel’s suicide ideation and its relationship with psychosomatic health

    Li-yi ZHANG

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Objective To investigate the time feature of Chinese military personnel's suicide ideation and its relationship with psychosomatic health to provide scientific basis for formulation of mental health policy and intervention of related psychological crisis. Methods By random cluster sampling, a total of 11 362 military personnel including army, navy and air-force (1100 in 1980s, 8000 in 1990s, 2262 in year 2000 were tested by Chinese Psychosomatic Health Scale (CPSHS. SPSS statistic 17.0 program was used for data analysis, i.e., χ2-test, T-test and stepwise regression analysis. Results The incidence rate of military personnel's suicide ideation in the three decades from 1980 to 2000 was 10.27%, 7.09% and 2.83% respectively, which revealed a decreasing trend (P 0.05. Suicide ideation was selected into the regression equation of mental health, physical health, and total psychosomatic health scores, which could positively predict the level of military personnel's psychosomatic health (P=0.05 or 0.01. Conclusions Military personnel's suicide ideation presents a decreasing trend; the psychosomatic health of military personnel who have suicide ideation is worse than that of personnel without suicide ideation.

  12. Abusive supervision, psychosomatic symptoms, and deviance: Can job autonomy make a difference?

    Velez, Maria João; Neves, Pedro

    2016-07-01

    Recently, interest in abusive supervision has grown (Tepper, 2000). However, little is still known about organizational factors that can reduce its adverse effects on employee behavior. Based on the Job Demands-Resources Model (Demerouti, Bakker, Nachreiner, & Schaufeli, 2001), we predict that job autonomy acts as a buffer of the positive relationship between abusive supervision, psychosomatic symptoms and deviance. Therefore, when job autonomy is low, a higher level of abusive supervision should be accompanied by increased psychosomatic symptoms and thus lead to higher production deviance. When job autonomy is high, abusive supervision should fail to produce increased psychosomatic symptoms and thus should not lead to higher production deviance. Our model was explored among a sample of 170 supervisor-subordinate dyads from 4 organizations. The results of the moderated mediation analysis supported our hypotheses. That is, abusive supervision was significantly related to production deviance via psychosomatic symptoms when job autonomy was low, but not when job autonomy was high. These findings suggest that job autonomy buffers the impact of abusive supervision perceptions on psychosomatic symptoms, with consequences for production deviance. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved).

  13. Cholera Illness and Symptoms

    ... Share Compartir Cholera is an acute, diarrheal illness caused by infection of the intestine with the bacterium Vibrio cholerae and is spread by ingestion of contaminated food or water. The infection is often mild or without symptoms, ...

  14. Heat-Related Illnesses

    Full Text Available ... Health System in Chesterfield, Missouri Heat-related illness can be caused by overexposure to the sun or ... the elderly are most at risk, but anyone can be affected. Here you will find information about ...

  15. Mass Psychogenic Illness

    ... Outbreaks of mass psychogenic illness show us how stress affects us. Think of how stage fright can cause nausea, shortness of breath, headache, dizziness, a racing heart, a stomachache, or diarrhea. ...

  16. On our need to move beyond folk medicine: A commentary on Karen Gubb's paper, "Psychosomatics today: a review of contemporary theory and practice".

    Gottlieb, Richard M

    2013-02-01

    In her thoughtful review and synthesis, Karen Gubb overstimates the breadth of resurgent interest among psychoanalysts in psychosomatic medicine. Such a modest revival as there has been reflects primarily the activity of a few authors and editors. Still, after several decades of inactivity following the intense excitement about this subject during the 1940s and 1950s, there has been some renewal of interest, primarily in Europe and among a small group in the United States. The golden age of psychoanalytic psychosomatics came to an end with the failure to find evidence in support of the promising but overly simplistic specificity theories, especially those of Franz Alexander. If we were going to better understand the complex relations between bodily states (including illnesses) and mental phenomena new theories and modes of investigation would be required. Many apparently new theories have been put forward over the past few decades. Of these, Gubb focuses her attention on two that relate somatic illness to failures in linguistic or symbolic elaboration, that is, to failures in the working over or binding of somatic excitations by the mental apparatus. These theories share the attractive feature that they seem consistent with the claim that psychosomatically ill patients are impaired in their language capacities, being unable to put feelings into words (alexithymia) and unable to move to abstract from concrete thinking (pensée opératoire). While apparently new, when closely examined these theories turn out to be but minor variations of one of Freud's own fundamental theories of mind/body, the one explicated in The Interpretation of Dreams and based upon the neurological model of the reflex arc as known in the 19th century. We know too much today about neuronal functioning, brain operations, and the importance of our subtle interactions with others to be satisfied with a superannuated scientific model. If we analysts are to lay claim to a science beyond a quaint

  17. Psychosomatic health status of children exposed to the Chernobyl accident

    Korol, N.; Shibata, Yoshisada; Nakane, Yoshibumi

    1998-01-01

    Childhood victims were investigated focussing on the psychosomatic disorders. The subjects were some of the 3834 children who evacuated from the Chernobyl zone to Kiev (evacuees) and 200 children who have been living in Kiev since prior to the accident (comparison group). A psychological test administered to 504 evacuees aged 12-14 years at the time of the accident and the comparison group indicated that the frequencies of neutroticism, high level of anxiety and conflicts were significantly higher in the evacuees than in the comparison group (p<0.001). Another psychological test administered at puberty to the 504 evacuees and 200 other evacuees exposed to the accident at 4-6 years of age indicated that the psycho-emotional portrait of evacuated teenagers significantly changed with time since the accident. The effects of the Chernobyl accident on the health of the vegetative dystonia observed in 1987-1990 and 1990-1995 were higher in the evacuees than in the comparison group, although they were not statistically significant. Furthermore, a significant (p<0.001) association of the vegetative dystonia with peptic and cardiovascular disorders was observed. The present study indicates that the vegetative dystonia is still highly prevalent among childhood victims and deems to support that the vegetative dystonia may be a precursor of several diseases such as cardiovascular and peptic disorders. It should be emphasized that a health promotion program to produce a change in psychological and social problems after the Chernobyl accident is necessary to decrease the health impact among Ukrainian people. (author)

  18. Psychosomatic health status of children exposed to the Chernobyl accident

    Korol, N. [Scientific Center for Radiation Medicine, Kiev (Ukraine); Shibata, Yoshisada; Nakane, Yoshibumi

    1998-12-01

    Childhood victims were investigated focussing on the psychosomatic disorders. The subjects were some of the 3834 children who evacuated from the Chernobyl zone to Kiev (evacuees) and 200 children who have been living in Kiev since prior to the accident (comparison group). A psychological test administered to 504 evacuees aged 12-14 years at the time of the accident and the comparison group indicated that the frequencies of neutroticism, high level of anxiety and conflicts were significantly higher in the evacuees than in the comparison group (p<0.001). Another psychological test administered at puberty to the 504 evacuees and 200 other evacuees exposed to the accident at 4-6 years of age indicated that the psycho-emotional portrait of evacuated teenagers significantly changed with time since the accident. The effects of the Chernobyl accident on the health of the vegetative dystonia observed in 1987-1990 and 1990-1995 were higher in the evacuees than in the comparison group, although they were not statistically significant. Furthermore, a significant (p<0.001) association of the vegetative dystonia with peptic and cardiovascular disorders was observed. The present study indicates that the vegetative dystonia is still highly prevalent among childhood victims and deems to support that the vegetative dystonia may be a precursor of several diseases such as cardiovascular and peptic disorders. It should be emphasized that a health promotion program to produce a change in psychological and social problems after the Chernobyl accident is necessary to decrease the health impact among Ukrainian people. (author)

  19. Results of psychosomatic screening of people having suffered from the Chernobyl accident and evacuated from the alienation area

    Bronskij, V.I.; Tolkanets, S.V.

    2000-01-01

    A psychosomatic screening of 105 persons evacuated from the alienation area was fulfilled. The received data were compared with those of migrants from areas from which people were evacuated later. Sociometric, psychometric, adaptive characteristics evidence of close relations between conditions of living and worsening of psychosomatic health. The tendency to a higher frequency of psychoorganic syndrome in that group was revealed

  20. [Interdisciplinary longitudinal curriculum "Medical psychology, psychotherapy and psychosomatics" (MPPP) at the University of Ulm].

    Allert, Gebhard; Gommel, Michael; Tamulionyté, Liudvika; Appelt, Matthias; Zenz, Helmuth; Kächele, Horst

    2002-08-01

    We report the clinical part of the longitudinal curriculum MPPP which was developed by the departments of Medical Psychology, Psychotherapy and Psychosomatic Medicine at the University of Ulm. The commitment and creativity of the participating students in their two undergraduate years inspired us to offer them an interest-guided curriculum for their six clinical semesters. Our paper reports the extensive results of two evaluations that we conducted during the clinical part of this new teaching-model. It became evident that we were successful in transferring continuous, intense and patient-centred psychosomatic and psychosocial contents. Yet the transfer of basic and methodological knowledge was not realised to the extent the students would have appreciated. The positive results of our project encouraged us to expand the concept of an interest-guided curriculum onto the whole academic education in psychotherapy and psychosomatic medicine at our university.

  1. Psychological and psychosomatic disorders during pregnancy and childbirth: a review of contemporary international researches

    Lantsburg M.E.,

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available In recent decades, the increasing worldwide problems in the reproductive sphere of people, the problem of preserving reproductive health of the population has become very topical, it requires joint medical and psychological efforts. This article presents a review of more than 70 modern English-language scientific publications devoted to the study of psychological and psychosomatic peculiarities of men, women and couples with reproductive disorders and psychological predictors and consequences of these problems. The best known and the least explored psychological aspects of reproductive disorders are highlighted, the results of research are described, also R. Linder’s psychotherapeutic method of preventing premature births is outlined. The article has two parts: the first part presents the research of psychosomatic aspects of male and female reproductive diseases, including infertility; the second one is devoted to psychological and psychosomatic disorders of women during pregnancy and childbirth.

  2. Electronic Support Groups: An Open Line of Communication in Contested Illness.

    Murphy, Michael; Kontos, Nicholas; Freudenreich, Oliver

    Patients with functional somatic syndromes are often difficult to treat. The relationship between doctors and patients can be strained, which limits communication. Instead, patients often communicate with each other over the Internet in electronic support groups. This perspective summarizes studies of patient-to-patient communication over the Internet and uses the concept of contested illness to provide insights into the experiences of patients with functional somatic disorders. Conflict between a patient and their physician is a key feature of functional somatic syndromes. Physicians and patients do not have a shared understanding or appreciation of the patient's experiences. Patients with functional somatic syndromes often value their own embodied experience over medical knowledge. At the same time, they remain deeply invested in finding a "good doctor" who believes that the patient is suffering, agrees with their conception of the cause, and assents to the treatment as directed by the patient. Electronic support groups reinforce these beliefs. Patients may benefit from a compromising, collaborative approach that is realistic about the limitations of medical knowledge. However, physicians should not engage in unsafe treatment practices. Electronic support groups exist for a wide range of illnesses and the issues that rise to the surface in functional somatic syndromes likely occur to some extent with almost every patient. Copyright © 2016 The Academy of Psychosomatic Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Survey Study of the "Experience of Illness" in the General Adult Population: Examining Differences in Age and Gender Characteristics

    馬場, 天信; 駿地, 眞由; 深尾, 篤嗣; 濱野, 清志; 金山, 由美; 村川, 治彦; 千秋, 佳世; Takanobu, BABA; Mayumi, SURUJI; Atsushi, FUKAO; Kiyoshi, HAMANO; Yumi, KANAYAMA; Haruhiko, MURAKAWA; Kayo, SENSHU; 追手門学院大学心理学部心理学科

    2015-01-01

    Recently in the field of medical anthropology and psychosomatic medicine, the importance of the integration of physical and spiritual approaches to patients with physical ailments. In this study we focused on how patients experience illness, and explored general tendencies of experience, in order to shed light on the importance of a clinical psychological approach seeking to understand the individuality and diversity of illness experience. 1088 (544 male and 544 female) general adults in thei...

  4. [Normative-empirical determination of personnel requirements in psychosomatic medicine and psychotherapy].

    Heuft, Gereon; Hochlehnert, Achim; Barufka, Steffi; Nikendei, Christoph; Kruse, Johannes; Zipfel, Stephan; Hofmann, Tobias; Hildenbrand, Gerhard; Cuntz, Ulrich; Herzog, Wolfgang; Heller, Michael

    2015-01-01

    There is a high degree of misallocated medical care for patients with somatoform disorders and patients with concomitant mental diseases. This complex of problems could be reduced remarkably by integrating psychosomatic departments into hospitals with maximum medical care. Admitting a few big psychosomatic specialist clinics into the calculation basis decreased the Day-Mix Index (DMI). The massive reduction of the calculated costs per day leads to a gap in funding resulting in a loss of the necessary personnel requirements - at least in university psychosomatic departments. The objective of this article is therefore to empirically verify the reference numbers of personnel resources calculated on the basis of the new German lump-sum reimbursement system in psychiatry and psychosomatics (PEPP). The minute values of the reference numbers of Heuft (1999) are contrasted with the minute values of the PEPP reimbursement system in the years 2013 and 2014, as calculated by the Institute for Payment Systems in Hospitals (InEK). The minute values derived from the PEPP data show a remarkable convergence with the minute values of Heuft's reference numbers (1999). A pure pricing system like the PEPP reimbursement system as designed so far threatens empirically verifiable and qualified personnel requirements of psychosomatic departments. In order to ensure the necessary therapy dosage and display it in minute values according to the valid OPS procedure codes, the minimum limit of the reference numbers is mandatory to maintain the substance of psychosomatic care. Based on the present calculation, a base rate of at least 285 e has to be politically demanded. Future developments in personnel costs have to be refinanced at 100 %.

  5. Role of anxiety and depressive disorders in the genesis of psychosomatic disorders

    Aleksandr Anatolyevich Shatenshtein

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Patients and methods. The results of clinical and psychodiagnostic examination using the Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory (MMPI were analyzed in 210 therapeutic inpatients from 4 groups of psychosomatic diseases (coronary heart disease, hypertensive disease, duodenal ulcer disease, asthma, and bronchitis with an asthmatic component and 3 groups of diseases in whose genesis the psychosomatic mechanisms (pneumonia, gastritis, renal diseases played a lesser role. Healthy individuals (n=38 served as a control group. The correlation coefficients between the first scale reflecting the number of somatic complaints and the magnitude of their hypochondriacal fixation and the second one characterizing the degree of anxiety and depressive disorders were calculated within each disease group. Results. In psychosomatic diseases, the correlation coefficients between the first and second MMPI scales proved to be insignificant and substantially lower than those in the healthy individuals. This suggests that in such patients, a larger number of somatic complaints and their enhanced hypochondriacal fixation alleviate anxiety and depressive disorders, which may be regarded as an indication that there is psychosomatic defense that lessens anxiety due to a somatic disease. In somatic diseases that are not referring to as psychosomatic ones, the correlation coefficient between the first and second scales is highly significant and considerably higher than that in the healthy individuals and particularly higher than in the group of psychosomatic diseases. In the patients of these groups, an increase in anxiety and depression aggravates autonomic dysregulation reflecting in the larger number of hypochondriacal complaints. This direct relationship between autonomic functions and the level of anxiety and depression may be a risk factor for developing these disorders.

  6. Helen Flanders Dunbar, John Dewey, and clinical pragmatism: reflections on method in psychosomatic medicine and bioethics.

    Hart, Curtis W

    2002-01-01

    This article outlines the method utilized by physicians and major figures in the founding of Clinical Pastoral Education, Helen Flanders Dunbar, in her work of 1943, Psychosomatic Diagnosis, and relates it to the currently evolving approach in bioethics known as clinical pragmatism. It assesses Dewey's influence on both Dunbar in psychosomatic medicine and clinical pragmatism in bioethics, and illustrates the breadth of influence of the school of philosophical thought known as pragmatism with which Dewey's name and those of William James and Charles Sanders Pierce are most often identified.

  7. Teaching psychosomatic (biopsychosocial) medicine in United States medical schools: survey findings.

    Waldstein, S R; Neumann, S A; Drossman, D A; Novack, D H

    2001-01-01

    A survey of US medical schools regarding the incorporation of psychosomatic (biopsychosocial) medicine topics into medical school curriculum was conducted. The perceived importance and success of this curriculum, barriers to teaching psychosomatic medicine, and curricular needs were also assessed. From August 1997 to August 1999, representatives of US medical schools were contacted to complete a survey instrument either by telephone interview or by written questionnaire. Survey responses were received from 54 of the 118 US medical schools contacted (46%). Responses were obtained from representatives of both public (57%) and private (43%) institutions. Only 20% of respondents indicated that their schools used the term "psychosomatic medicine"; the terms "behavioral medicine" (63%) and "biopsychosocial medicine" (41%) were used more frequently. Coverage of various health habits (eg, substance use and exercise) ranged from 52% to 96%. The conceptualization and/or measurement of psychosocial factors (eg, stress and social support) was taught by 80% to 93% of schools. Teaching about the role of psychosocial factors in specific disease states or syndromes ranged from 33% (renal disease) to 83% (cardiovascular disease). Coverage of treatment-related issues ranged from 44% (relaxation/biofeedback) to 98% (doctor-patient communication). Topics in psychosomatic medicine were estimated to comprise approximately 10% (median response) of the medical school curriculum. On a scale of 1 (lowest) to 10 (highest), ratings of the relative importance of this curriculum averaged 7 (SD = 2.5; range = 2-10). Student response to the curriculum varied from positive to mixed to negative. Perceived barriers to teaching psychosomatic medicine included limited resources (eg, time, money, and faculty), student and faculty resistance, and a lack of continuity among courses. Sixty-three percent of respondents expressed an interest in receiving information about further incorporation of topics in

  8. [A 20-year follow-up study of a sample of 50 pairs of twins with neurotic-psychosomatic disorders].

    Muhs, A; Schepank, H; Manz, R

    1990-01-01

    As part of a research project, examination was made of a sample of 50 pairs of twins (21 pairs of identical twins, 16 pairs of non-identical twins of the same sex, and 13 pairs of male-female twins [n = 100 test persons]) between 1963 and 1969 and again recently after a period of 20 years. The index twins were drawn from among the patients who made use of the services of an out-patient psychotherapeutic clinic, and they were determined to be either psychoneurotic, character neurotic, or psychosomatically ill. The question examined was again one of nature vs. nurture. Identical twins showed a significantly higher similarity with regard to the seriousness of their neuroses and the manifestation of neurotic symptoms than did non-identical twins. Noticeable similarities existed in cases of depressive disturbances, disturbances of oral and aggressive behavior, and disturbances of interpersonal contact. With regard to the influence of variables in the environment, we examined the effect of factors in early childhood on neurotic development. Lack of a reference person, a negative attitude on the part of parents toward the child, etc., frustration within and outside the family have an effect on the manifestation of neuroses and on the course of their development. The influence of early childhood factors on the degree of neurotic disorder is still to be noted in the current point prevalence.

  9. Contemporary perspectives on psychosomatics in Germany: A commentary on Karen Gubb's paper, "Psychosomatics today: a review of contemporary theory and practice".

    Frommer, Jörg

    2013-02-01

    Karen Gubb's (2013) review focuses on contemporary developments in psychoanalytic theory and practice in relation to psychosomatics, starting with some historical remarks, and Paris School with the Attachment approach. This paper examines the question of how the German scene fits into the issues raised in Gubb's discussion. From a historical point of view, psychosomatic thinking had already come into existence at the beginning of the twentieth century in internal medicine, influenced not only by Freud's ideas, but also by holistic philosophical approaches, anthropology, and semiotic systems theory as well. Psychosomatics is still under the influence of psychodynamic thinking, but as a required subject for all medical students, it is currently more involved in inpatient treatment settings than in psychoanalyses in the classical couch setting. Research projects using standardized questionnaires, neuroimaging, and other empirical methods have also proved that these treatments are as effective as therapy based on psychoanalytic concepts like alexithymia or the Attachment approach. In addition, qualitative methods have been implemented to grasp the fine-grained conscious and unconscious processes in the inner life of patients and in the verbal and nonverbal interaction phenomena of therapies. To sum up: Recent developments in psychoanalytic theory, which begin to overcome the differences among psychoanalytic schools in favor of re-erecting a common psychoanalytic understanding like that demonstrated in Gubb's article, fit together in bridging the gap between insights from classical psychoanalyses and results from empirical research.

  10. Brucellosis is not a major cause of febrile illness in patients at public health care facilities in Binh Thuan Province, Vietnam

    Nga, Tran T. T.; de Vries, Peter J.; Abdoel, Theresia H.; Smits, Henk L.

    2006-01-01

    To determine the presence of brucellosis among patients with acute febrile illness at health care facilities in Binh Thuan province, Vietnam. A retrospective seroepidemiological study on serum samples collected at 13 not adjacent health care facilities using the Rose Bengal test as a rapid screening

  11. Stressful Life Events and Psychosomatic Symptoms among Students Smokers and Non-smokers

    Dodaj, Arta; Simic, Natasa

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this study is to analyze the rate of stressful life events and psychosomatic symptoms among students smokers and non-smokers and examine the predictive contribution of stress and smoking to subjective health status. Methods were conducted on a convenience sample of 200 students from the University of Mostar, with a median age of…

  12. Bullying behavior and associations with psychosomatic complaints and depression in victims

    Fekkes, M.; Pijpers, F.I.M.; Verloove-Vanhorick, S.P.

    2004-01-01

    Objectives: To assess the association between bullying behavior and a wide variety of psychosomatic health complaints and depression. Study design: In a cross-sectional study, 2766 elementary school children age 9 to 12 years filled out a questionnaire on bullying behavior and health complaints.

  13. Gender Differences in the Psychosomatic Reactions of Students Subjected to Examination Stress

    Kosmala-Anderson, Joanna; Wallace, Louise M.

    2007-01-01

    Introduction: The study investigated pre-examination anxiety and emotional control strategies as possible mediators of gender differences in self reported intensity and type of psychosomatic reactions to examination stress. Method: Sample comprised 150 male and 150 female high school senior students and university students who voluntarily…

  14. Development of Self-Perceived Risk Behaviour and Psychosomatic Symptoms in Adolescents: A Longitudinal Approach.

    Choquet, M.; Menke, H.

    1987-01-01

    Investigated health and behavior problems in cohort samples of 327 high school students between 1983 and 1985. Showed that psychosomatic, depressive, and behavioral problems appeared to be common during adolescence. Found sex differences in that boys experienced behavioral problems such as alcohol or drug use, smoking, and violence, while girls…

  15. Psychosomatic development of girls with neoplastic diseases in puberty after multidrug chemotherapy

    Korzon, M.; Mielnik, J.; Bohdan, Z.

    1993-01-01

    We estimated the psychosomatic development of 25 girls aged 13-19 years after antineoplastic therapy. Normal parameters of physical development were stated in all cases. No injury of central nervous system in all cases was seen. Psychological examination revealed strong suppression reactions and evident anxiety signs in majority of girls. (author)

  16. Psychosomatic aspects in the treatment of patients with gynaecological malignant growths

    Richter, D.

    1981-01-01

    The psychosomatic reaction during treatment of gynaecologic neoplasms represents a special problem to the patients. In this article, the relationships between doctor and patient, disturbances in the sexual, family- and environmental situation, and the special psychological problems occurring during radiation therapy are discussed. (APR) [de

  17. Bullying in Context: An Analysis of Psychosomatic Complaints among Adolescents in Stockholm

    Modin, Bitte; Låftman, Sara Brolin; Östberg, Viveca

    2015-01-01

    Using multilevel modeling, this study examined how different types of bullying, involving both peers and teachers, relate to psychosomatic health complaints. Data were obtained via the Stockholm School Survey from 41,032 ninth- and eleventh-grade students in the years 2004, 2006, 2008, and 2010. Results showed that students involved in bullying as…

  18. Disability in Relation to Different Peer-Victimization Groups and Psychosomatic Problems

    Beckman, Linda; Stenbeck, Magnus; Hagquist, Curt

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the associations between disability, victims, perpetrators, and so-called "bully-victims" (someone reporting being both a victim and a perpetrator) of traditional, cyber, or combined victimization or perpetration and psychosomatic health among adolescents. Authors analyzed cross-sectional data…

  19. Management of the self : An interdisciplinary approach to self-management in psychiatry and psychosomatic medicine

    Van Geelen, S.; Franssen, G.

    For this special issue, we asked nine specialists to explicate what they believe to be the fundamental dimensions of self-experience in mental healthcare, and to fully consider the consequences of those dimensions for adequate strategies of self-management in psychiatry and psychosomatic medicine.

  20. Anxiety sensitivity and psychosomatic symptoms in children and adolescents

    Vulić-Prtorić, Anita; Cohza, Renata; Grubić, Marina; Lopižić, Josip; Padelin, Patricija

    2008-01-01

    Anxiety sensitivity is described as the fear of anxiety symptoms and physical sensations associated with anxiety. Understanding this fear of fear has particular importance in prevention and therapy of anxiety disorders, and especially in health psychology and ways of coping with health problems and illness in children and adolescents. The paper presents the results of the research in the sample of 184 participants in the age between 10 and 15 years, divided in 4 samples: 1) children with head...

  1. Quantum­holographic framework for psychosomatics and spirituality: Complete healing and spiritual integration without a mask

    Raković, Dejan

    2017-01-01

    The subject of this paper is quantum­holographic framework for holistic psychosomatics (including integrative medicine and transpersonal psychology). Such a framework could have significant implications for understanding the mechanisms of quantum­holographic feedback control in the morphogenesis and bio­resonant application of the healing boundary conditions in psychosomatics, based on acupuncture and consciousness. It sheds new light on the long standing open problems of the holistic role an...

  2. Somali Refugees' Perceptions of Mental Illness.

    Bettmann, Joanna E; Penney, Deb; Clarkson Freeman, Pamela; Lecy, Natalie

    2015-01-01

    Nearly 13% of the U.S. population is comprised of foreign-born individuals, with Somalis constituting one of the largest resettled groups. Research suggests that, among Somali refugees, rates of mental illness are high. Yet research shows Somalis underutilize mental health services. Understanding their perceptions of mental illness and its cures may help practitioners to design more effective treatments for this population. Thus, this pilot study investigated Somali refugees' perceptions of mental illness and its treatments. Using purposive sampling, this qualitative study interviewed 20 Somali refugees using a semi-structured interview guide. Qualitative analysis yielded participants' perceptions of mental illness through their descriptions of physical symptoms accompanying mental illness, the stigma of mental illness, causes of mental illness, medical and non-medical treatments for mental illness, spirit possession causing mental illness, and the Qur'an as treatment for mental illness. Such information may help practitioners in the United States approach Somali clients in the most culturally coherent manner.

  3. [Psychosomatic symptoms as an expression of the deterioration of the health-related quality of life in adolescents].

    Fuentes Chacón, Rosa M; Simón Saiz, M José; Garrido Abejar, Margarita; Serrano Parra, M Dolores; Larrañaga Rubio, M Elisa; Yubero Jiménez, Santiago

    2017-12-04

    To analyze, in a population of adolescents in school, the relationship between psychosomatic symptoms and the perception of health-related quality of life (HRQoL), differentiating by gender and age group. Transversal study. Five Secondary Schools. Eight hundred and forty four adolescents between the ages of 15 and 18 in secondary school. HRQoL using KIDSCREEN-52 and psychosomatic symptoms with the psychosomatic problems scale (PSP). Girls and adolescents aged 17-18 years presented significantly higher psychosomatic symptoms, both groups also scored worse in all dimensions of HRQoL, although only the dimensions related to physical and mental wellness, mood and stress reached significance. All psychosomatic symptoms were inversely associated with the ten dimensions of KIDSCREEN-52. The regression models showed that sadness, concentrating difficulties and sleeping difficulties were the predictors of worse HRQoL in both sexes and age groups and these variables explained between 30 and 41% of the HRQoL variance of the adolescents. Psychosomatic symptoms are frequent especially in girls and in older adolescents and predictors of worse HRQoL. It is important to distinguish them from medical conditions to avoid unnecessary interventions. As expressions of emotional discomfort they must be evaluated and treated in an integral way because they interfere with daily life and increase the vulnerability proper of adolescence. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  4. [Unhealthy lifestyle in patients of a psychosomatic outpatient and consultation-liaison clinic].

    Beutel, Till F; Weiser, Prisca; Zwerenz, Rüdiger; Wiltink, Jörg; Subic-Wrana, Claudia; Michal, Matthias

    2014-09-01

    Patients with mental disorders have an increased risk for somatic diseases. Especially life style risk factors contribute to this increased risk. In order to identify targets for preventive measures, we aimed to determine the prevalence of an unhealthy lifestyle in a clinical sample and to analyze associations with severity of mental disorders and somatic complaints. We analyzed the medical records of n=1 919 outpatients, who were treated between 2009-2011 in the Department of Psychosomatic Medicine and Psychotherapy of the University Medical Center Mainz. 62.4% of the patients were physically inactive, 33.2% were smokers and 17.4% were obese. Lifestyle risk factors were associated with increased symptom burden and impairment. Smoking was strongly associated with more previous psychiatric or psychosomatic inpatient treatments. These results indicate an urgent need for targeting health behavior more rigorously in the treatment of patients with common mental disorders. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  5. Longitudinal view of the psychological correlates and antecedents of subjectively assessed psychosomatic problems

    Slezáčková, Alena; Blatný, Marek; Millová, Katarína; Jelínek, Martin

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 26, č. 2 (2011), s. 219-219 ISSN 0887-0446. [European Health Psychology Conference: Engaging with Other Health Professions: Challenges and Perspectives /25./. 20.09.2011-24.09.2011, Hersonissos, Kréta] R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP407/10/2410 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z70250504 Keywords : psychosomatic problems * middle adulthood * subjectively assessed health Subject RIV: AN - Psychology

  6. De la cuestión de la psicosomática en el campo del psicoanálisis: Puntos de convergencia y divergencia Points of convergence and divergence about the question of psychosomatics: Different perspectives from psicoanálisis

    Liliana Szapiro

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Los objetivos de este trabajo son: en primer lugar, la exposición sintética de los aspectos más importantes de la obra de los autores de diferentes corrientes psicoanalíticas en relación a la temática. Así, se remarcan los aportes más relevantes con relación a la temática de Joyce Mc. Dougall (1991, Hebe Lenarduzzi (2005, Zulma López Arranz (2009 y Liliana Szapiro (1992-2011. En segundo lugar, puntuar puntos de convergencia y de divergencia en la obra de los autores arriba mencionados con relación a: a. Diferenciación entre fenómeno psicosomático y síntoma neurótico b. Singularidades de la estructuración subjetiva de los sujetos que padecen fenómenos psicosomáticos c. Singularidades en la Dirección de la Cura de los sujetos que padecen estas dolencias.The aims of this work are: 1 To present briely the theoretico-clinical developments of the different psycoanalytical currents that have dealt with psychosomatics. We will state the most recent contributions of authors such as Joyce Mc. Dougall(1991, Hebe Lenarduzzi (2005, Zulma López Arranz (2009 y Liliana Szapiro (1992-2011 2 To show the points of convergence and divergence of the above mentioned authors in relation to: a. The difference between psychosomatic phenome non and neurotic symptom. b. The singularities of the psyco logical structure of the subjects that suffer from psychosomatic illnesses. c. The singularities in the Direction of the Cure of the subjects that suffer from psychosomatic illnesses.

  7. Teaching psychosomatic medicine using problem-based learning and role-playing.

    Heru, Alison M

    2011-01-01

    Problem-based learning (PBL) has been implemented in medical education world-wide. Despite its popularity, it has not been generally considered useful for residency programs. The author presents a model for the implementation of PBL in residency programs. The author presents a description of a PBL curriculum for teaching psychosomatic medicine to PGY 2 members in a psychiatry training program. The goals of PBL are to encourage self-directed learning; enhance curiosity, using case-based, contextualized learning; promote collaborative practice; and support patient-centered care. The addition of role-playing exercises helps PGY 2 residents to develop their skills from simply developing a differential diagnosis to being able to construct biopsychosocial formulations, and it provides these residents an opportunity to practice presenting case formulations to the patient and family. Residents and faculty enjoyed the PBL role-playing sessions. Residents wanted the learning objectives given to them rather than generating their own learning objectives, to move through the cases faster, and to receive more information and more cases. Teaching psychosomatic medicine, using PBL and role-playing, allows many of the proposed Academy of Psychosomatic Medicine residency core competencies to be met. However, further refinement of the PBL method needs to take place in order to adapt its use to residency programs.

  8. Mental and somatic symptoms related to suicidal ideation in patients visiting a psychosomatic clinic in Japan

    Kouichi Yoshimasu

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Kouichi Yoshimasu1, Tetsuya Kondo2,4, Shoji Tokunaga3, Yoshio Kanemitsu2, Hideyo Sugahara2, Mariko Akamine2, Kanichiro Fujisawa2, Kazuhisa Miyashita1, Chiharu Kubo21Department of Hygiene, School of Medicine, Wakayama Medical University, Wakayama, Japan; 2Department of Psychosomatic Medicine, Graduate school of Medical Sciences, Kyushu University, Fukuoka, Japan; 3Department of Medical Informatics, Kyushu University Hospital, Fukuoka, Japan; 4Department of Acupuncture and Moxibustion, Kansai University of Health Sciences, Osaka, JapanAbstract: Patients with suicidal ideation (SI have various mental or somatic symptoms. A questionnaire-based interview elicited details concerning mental and somatic symptoms in patients visiting a psychosomatic clinic in Japan. Univariate logistic regression analyses followed by multiple regression models using a stepwise method were selected for identifying the candidate symptoms. Overall, symptoms related to depression were associated with SI in both sexes. Although women showed more various somatic symptoms associated with SI than men, many of those associations were diminished once severity of the depression was controlled. The current results suggest that a variety of self-reported symptoms, mainly related to depression, might reveal suicidal risk in outpatients with an urban hospital clinical setting.Keywords: suicidal ideation, psychosomatic clinic, subjective symptoms

  9. Caring for homeless persons with serious mental illness in general hospitals.

    Bauer, Leah K; Baggett, Travis P; Stern, Theodore A; O'Connell, Jim J; Shtasel, Derri

    2013-01-01

    The care of homeless persons with serious mental illness remains a common and challenging problem in general hospital settings. This article aims to review data on homelessness and its psychiatric comorbidities, and to expand the skills of providers who encounter homeless individuals in general hospital settings. Literature review reveals patient, provider, and systems factors that contribute to suboptimal health outcomes in homeless individuals. Diagnostic rigor, integrated medical and psychiatric care, trauma-informed interventions, special considerations in capacity evaluations, and health care reform initiatives can improve the treatment of homeless persons with serious mental illness. Copyright © 2013 The Academy of Psychosomatic Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. All-cause mortality among people with serious mental illness (SMI, substance use disorders, and depressive disorders in southeast London: a cohort study

    Lee William

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Higher mortality has been found for people with serious mental illness (SMI, including schizophrenia, schizoaffective disorders, and bipolar affective disorder at all age groups. Our aim was to characterize vulnerable groups for excess mortality among people with SMI, substance use disorders, depressive episode, and recurrent depressive disorder. Methods A case register was developed at the South London and Maudsley National Health Services Foundation Trust (NHS SLAM, accessing full electronic clinical records on over 150,000 mental health service users as a well-defined cohort since 2006. The Case Register Interactive Search (CRIS system enabled searching and retrieval of anonymised information since 2008. Deaths were identified by regular national tracing returns after 2006. Standardized mortality ratios (SMRs were calculated for the period 2007 to 2009 using SLAM records for this period and the expected number of deaths from age-specific mortality statistics for the England and Wales population in 2008. Data were stratified by gender, ethnicity, and specific mental disorders. Results A total of 31,719 cases, aged 15 years old or more, active between 2007-2009 and with mental disorders of interest prior to 2009 were detected in the SLAM case register. SMRs were 2.15 (95% CI: 1.95-2.36 for all SMI with genders combined, 1.89 (1.64-2.17 for women and 2.47 (2.17-2.80 for men. In addition, highest mortality risk was found for substance use disorders (SMR = 4.17; 95% CI: 3.75-4.64. Age- and gender-standardised mortality ratios by ethnic group revealed huge fluctuations, and SMRs for all disorders diminished in strength with age. The main limitation was the setting of secondary mental health care provider in SLAM. Conclusions Substantially higher mortality persists in people with serious mental illness, substance use disorders and depressive disorders. Furthermore, mortality risk differs substantially with age, diagnosis, gender

  11. Subjective sleep complaints indicate objective sleep problems in psychosomatic patients: a prospective polysomnographic study

    Linden M

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Michael Linden,1,2 Marie Dietz,1 Christian Veauthier,3 Ingo Fietze3 1Research Group Psychosomatic Rehabilitation, Charité University Medicine Berlin, 2Department of Psychosomatic Medicine, Rehabilitation Centre Seehof, Teltow, 3Interdisciplinary Center of Sleep Medicine, Charité University Medicine Berlin, Berlin, Germany Objective: To elucidate the relationship between subjective complaints and polysomnographical parameters in psychosomatic patients.Method: A convenience sample of patients from a psychosomatic inpatient unit were classified according to the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI as very poor sleepers (PSQI >10, n=80 and good sleepers (PSQI <6, n=19. They then underwent a polysomnography and in the morning rated their previous night’s sleep using a published protocol (Deutschen Gesellschaft für Schlafforschung und Schlafmedizin morning protocol [MP].Results: In the polysomnography, significant differences were found between very poor and good sleepers according to the PSQI with respect to sleep efficiency and time awake after sleep onset. When comparing objective PSG and subjective MP, the polysomnographical sleep onset latency was significantly positively correlated with the corresponding parameters of the MP: the subjective sleep onset latency in minutes and the subjective evaluation of sleep onset latency (very short, short, normal, long, very long were positively correlated with the sleep latency measured by polysomnography. The polysomnographical time awake after sleep onset (in minutes was positively correlated with the subjective time awake after sleep onset (in minutes, evaluation of time awake after sleep onset (seldom, normal often, and subjective restfulness. The polysomnographical total sleep time (TST was positively correlated with the subjective TST. Conversely, the polysomnographical TST was negatively correlated with the evaluation of TST (high polysomnographical TST was correlated with the subjective

  12. The Australian Burden of Disease Study: impact and causes of illness and death in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people, 2011

    Fadwa Al-Yaman

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available This study estimates fatal and nonfatal disease burden among Indigenous Australians in 2011 and compares it with non-Indigenous Australians. The study found that there were 284 years lost per 1000 people because of premature death or living with ill health. Most of the disease burden was from chronic diseases (64%, particularly mental and substance-use disorders, injuries, cardiovascular diseases, cancer and respiratory diseases. The burden of disease was higher among males (54% than females (46% and higher for fatal (53% than for nonfatal burden (47%. The disease groups with the highest burden varied by age group, with mental and substance-use disorders and injuries being the largest disease groups among those aged 5–44 years, and cardiovascular disease and cancer becoming more prominent among those aged 45 and older. Large disparities existed between Indigenous and non-Indigenous Australians, with the total burden being 2.3 times the non-Indigenous rates, fatal burden being 2.7 times and nonfatal burden being 2 times.

  13. Review: Gisela Brünner & Elisabeth Gülich (Eds. (2002. Krankheit verstehen. Interdisziplinäre Beiträge zur Sprache in Krankheitsdarstellungen [Understanding Illness. Interdisciplinary Approaches to Communication about Illness

    Rudolf Schmitt

    2002-09-01

    Full Text Available GÜLICH and BRÜNNER's book presents different approaches to linguistics, social science, psychosomatics, literary history and therapeutic approaches in the discourse about somatic and mental illness. Some articles are very inspiring; some seem to have a narrow point of view. Many of them converge on the topic of metaphor and the cognitive metaphor theory of LAKOFF and JOHNSON, that enrich the methodical and theoretical repertoire of qualitative research. URN: urn:nbn:de:0114-fqs020382

  14. [System-immanent incentives in the remuneration for psychiatry and psychosomatics : Analysis exemplified by treatment of alcohol-related disorders].

    Horter, H; Zapp, W; Driessen, M

    2016-07-01

    The German fixed rate remuneration system in psychiatry and psychosomatics (PEPP) has been criticized by many specialty associations because negative effects on mental healthcare are expected through economic incentives. Through analysis of performance data in the treatment of alcohol dependency at the Evangelical Hospital Bielefeld (Evangelisches Krankenhaus Bielefeld, EvKB) from 2014 and various simulations, the incentives of the PEPP (version 2015) were analyzed and its potential impact on patient care was evaluated. Groups of cases were created based on the clinical data. Various parameters were evaluated, such as duration of treatment, PEPP coding, loss of income by merging cases and case remuneration. Additionally, changes in the duration of treatment, the intensity of treatment and the intensity of care were simulated. In the simulations a reduction in the duration of treatment by 16.1 % led to additional revenues of 1.9 % per treatment day. The calculated additional costs of 1:1 care and intensive nursing care were not completely covered by the additional revenues, whereas psychotherapeutic inpatient treatment programs showed positive profit contributions. Complicated cases with increased merging of cases showed lower revenues but with above average expenditure of efforts. The current version of the PEPP leads to misdirected incentives in patient care. This is caused, for example, by the fact that higher profit contributions can be realized in some patient groups and intensive nursing care of patients is insufficiently represented. It is not clear whether these incentives will persist or can be compensated in subsequent versions of the system.

  15. Necropsia e mortalidade por causa mal definida no Estado de São Paulo, Brasil Autopsy and ill-defined cause of death in the state of São Paulo, Brazil

    Mauro Abrahão Rozman

    2006-11-01

    mortalidade proporcional por causa mal definida entre as áreas estudadas. O aumento observado entre 1980 e 2002 na classificação de óbitos por causa mal definida pelo primeiro avaliador no Estado de São Paulo indica uma importante piora na qualidade do preenchimento da declaração de óbito nessa instância. São necessárias investigações adicionais para esclarecer as causas dessa mudança.OBJECTIVE: To investigate the proportion of deaths with an ill-defined cause in the Brazilian state of São Paulo between 1980 and 2002, taking into account the influence of autopsies on this proportion. METHOD: Data on the number of deaths were obtained from the Brazilian Ministry of Health. The communities of the state of São Paulo were divided into three groups: (1 municipalities with a service to verify the cause of death (and that may conduct an autopsy, (2 municipalities without a cause of death verification service, and (3 the region of Baixada Santista, which had an extremely large increase in the proportion of deaths from ill-defined causes between 1980 and 1995. The impact of autopsies on the proportion of deaths with an ill-defined cause was defined based on the classification made by the first physician evaluating the cause of death, that is, the physician who referred the case to the verification service for autopsy or who completed the death certificate without referring the case to the verification service. Deaths from external causes were excluded, since autopsy is mandatory in these cases. The following were evaluated: (1 proportion of cases classified by the first evaluating physician as having an ill-defined cause, (2 proportion of autopsies in relation to the total number of deaths (except from external causes, and (3 proportion of deaths classified as ill-defined by the first evaluating physician but explained by the autopsy. RESULTS: The proportion of deaths classified by the first evaluating physician as having an ill-defined cause increased over the 1980

  16. A prospective study of the importance of enteric fever as a cause of non-malarial febrile illness in patients admitted to Chittagong Medical College Hospital, Bangladesh

    Maude, Rapeephan R.; Ghose, Aniruddha; Samad, Rasheda; de Jong, Hanna K.; Fukushima, Masako; Wijedoru, Lalith; Hassan, Mahtab Uddin; Hossain, Md Amir; Karim, Md Rezaul; Sayeed, Abdullah Abu; van den Ende, Stannie; Pal, Sujat; Zahed, A. S. M.; Rahman, Wahid; Karnain, Rifat; Islam, Rezina; Tran, Dung Thi Ngoc; Ha, Tuyen Thanh; Pham, Anh Hong; Campbell, James I.; van Doorn, H. Rogier; Maude, Richard J.; van der Poll, Tom; Wiersinga, W. Joost; Day, Nicholas P. J.; Baker, Stephen; Dondorp, Arjen M.; Parry, Christopher M.; Faiz, Md Abul

    2016-01-01

    Fever is a common cause of hospital admission in Bangladesh but causative agents, other than malaria, are not routinely investigated. Enteric fever is thought to be common. Adults and children admitted to Chittagong Medical College Hospital with a temperature of ≥38.0 °C were investigated using a

  17. Foodborne Illness

    He, Zhan; Liu, Xuan; Li, Renjie

    2008-01-01

    Foodborne illnesses are a significant public health challenge in the world. Preventing foodborne disease in meat processing is an essential point to insure food safety and quality. HACCP systems currently are used for food processor to identify food safety hazards and prevent food is contaminated. By the introducing HACCP system into China in 1990s, Chinese government and enterprises have took more attention to control and monitoring the flow of food to insure food quality in processors. Meat...

  18. Foodborne Illness

    1983-02-01

    contaminate different dietary constituents. These toxins may be of biologic origin (microbial. plant, or animal toxins) or they may be inorganic or...food mine if similar illness has occurred concomitantly poisoning for planning specific therapy, for esti- in companions or family members. Seek to...gin 4 to 8 hours after ingestion of the toxin and speciated botulinum immunoglobulin of equine include severe retching, vomiting, diarrhea, and

  19. Effect of cognitive behavioral stress management program on psychosomatic patients′ quality of life

    Zahra Ghazavi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Level of stress and its management affects the dimensions of psychosomatic patients′ quality of life (QoL, which is an important psychological issue. The present study aimed to investigate the effect of cognitive behavioral stress management program on psychosomatic patients′ QoL. In cognitive behavioral method, patients discover thought and behavioral mistakes and recover them. The criterion to evaluate the success of the present study was measurement of the patients′ QoL and its notable improvement after intervention. Materials and Methods: This is a before-and-after clinical trial with a control group. The study participants comprised 70 psychosomatic patients referred to subspecial psychiatry clinic in Isfahan who were selected through convenient sampling and allocated to the study and control groups. Quality of Life Questionnaire (SF36 was adopted to collect the data. The questionnaire was completed by the participants in three stages of before-and-after up to a month after intervention. Cognitive behavioral stress management program was administrated in study group for eight straight sessions, two month, and a month after intervention. Along with this, conventional medical treatments were conducted for both the groups. Data were analyzed by ANOVA. The significance level was P < 0.001. Results: There was no significant difference in QoL mean scores between the two groups before intervention (44, 43.1, but mean scores of QoL were significantly higher in intervention G (55.7, 59.1, compared to control (39.8, 35.7, after intervention (P < 0.001 and one month after intervention (P < 0.001. Conclusions: Cognitive behavioral stress management, conducted in the present study, had a notable effect on QoL. Therefore, designing psychological interventions based on cognitive behavioral stress management is suggested as an efficient clinical intervention.

  20. Rate and predictors of negative effects of psychotherapy in psychiatric and psychosomatic inpatients.

    Rheker, Julia; Beisel, Sylvia; Kräling, Svenja; Rief, Winfried

    2017-08-01

    Studies examining the rates of negative effects of psychotherapy are rare and the reported rates differ widely. To be able to calculate adequate benefit-cost ratios in conjunction with different samples and settings, we need a deeper understanding of these effects. We therefore investigated whether different treatment settings would reveal varying rates and kinds of negative effects by recruiting patients from a psychiatric (n=93) and a psychosomatic rehabilitation (n=63) hospital. Negative effects of psychotherapy were assessed with the Inventory for the Assessment of Negative Effects of Psychotherapy post-treatment. To investigate whether patients' pre-treatment expectations have an influence on reported negative effects, patients filled in the Patient Questionnaire on Therapy Expectation and Evaluation prior to treatment begin. Patients from the psychiatric hospital reported an average 1.41 negative effects, with 58.7% reporting at least one negative effect. Those from the psychosomatic hospital reported 0.76 negative effects on average, with 45.2% of patients reporting at least one negative effect. The differences between these samples are significant. The two samples' top three reported types of negative effects are that patients had experienced more downs during or just before the end of the therapy, that patients had difficulty making important decisions without the therapist, and that patients were concerned that colleagues or friends might find out about the therapy. A regression analysis revealed that the clinical setting (psychosomatic rehabilitation hospital vs. psychiatric hospital) and expectations in the form of hope of improvement were significant predictors for negative effects of psychotherapy. Our study highlights the need to examine the negative effects of psychotherapy in different settings and samples to better evaluate the benefit-cost ratios of treatments for different patient groups. It also shows that we need guidelines for assessing and

  1. [On the relationship of psychosomatic and mind-body medicine: integrative, complementary or alternative disciplines within an evolutionary approach?].

    Brunnhuber, Stefan; Michalsen, Andreas

    2012-01-01

    The text outlines the relation between psychosomatic medicine as an established medical discipline and the emerging concept of mind-body medicine from a historical, clinical and epistemological perspective. Limitations and contributions of both disciplines are discussed and the opportunities within the concept of Integrative Medicine are outlined. Whereas psychosomatic medicine is perceived as a form of transformation through a primarily verbal discoursive relationship, mind-body medicine claims healing through increased traditional techniques of the relaxation response, increased awareness, mindfulness, increasing des-identification and health-promoting lifestyle modification. It becomes clear that mind-body medicine seems to be epistemologically the broader theoretical framework, whereas in a clinical context the combination of both disciplines appears to be complementary and synergistic. The connection between psychosomatic medicine and mind-body medicine can make an important and exemplary contribution to the concept of Integrative Medicine. Copyright © 2012 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  2. Investigation of psychosomatic aspects of gynecological and andrological diseases and infertility: a review of contemporary international researches

    Lantsburg M.E.

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available In recent decades, the increasing worldwide problems in the reproductive sphere of people, the problem of preserving reproductive health of the population has become very topical, it requires joint medical and psychological efforts. This article presents a review of more than 70 modern English-language scientific publications devoted to the study of psychological and psychosomatic peculiarities of men, women and couples with reproductive disorders and psychological predictors and consequences of these problems. The best known and the least explored psychological aspects of reproductive disorders are highlighted, the results of research are described, also R. Linder’s psychotherapeutic method of preventing premature births is outlined. The article has two parts: the first part presents the research of psychosomatic aspects of male and female reproductive diseases, including infertility; the second one is devoted to psychological and psychosomatic disorders of women during pregnancy and childbirth.

  3. [Psychosomatic symptoms in somatic diseases - open-angle glaucoma for example].

    Emmerich, G M

    2010-08-01

    Psychological aspects exist in somatic diseases like tumours and even fractures, not only in the beginning but also in the management of disease. Somatic diseases give rise to signs of a special constellation of life and management of these diseases is important for the psychological constellation of the individual. Studies on open-angle glaucoma have shown that many patients suffering from this disease are anxious, hypochondric, perfectionist and emotional instable. Chronic diseases are demanding processes of flexibility and defense, and define how the individual can deal with the diseases and what place in life the disease will occupy in the future. In the holistic view of medicine even psychological conflicts should be treated. In many situations, these conflicts are not consciously experienced by the individual. Therapeutically, 2 different tools can be used: symbolic stories can bring forces to manage the conflict and to solve the conflict (2 examples in the text). The method of positive psychotherapy describes the reasons for psychosomatic diseases in three parts: psychosomatic in the traditional understanding, in further and comprehensive understanding. Especially the psychosomatic effects in comprehensive understanding are embedded in the individual's sociocultural environment and provide tips on reasons for the diseases in those parts of life. The "positive balance model" gives an example of life-management and conflict-therapy. In ophthalmology, fear is often more important for the patient than pain. To avoid this, the patients develop techniques to deny, to cover or to suppress the fear. In the article questions are presented like those the ophthalmologist should be able to ask patients in the office concerning open-angle glaucoma. Tips for the therapy and management for neurotic stress are offered and some special anamnestic questions for the ophthalmologist are presented. Unsolved conflicts and denied desires as neurotic symptoms can be focused in

  4. Recording of dissimulation and denial in the context of the psychosomatic evaluation at living kidney transplantation using the Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory (MMPI)

    Wutzler, Uwe; Venner, Margit; Villmann, Thomas; Decker, Oliver; Ott, Undine; Steiner, Thomas; Gumz, Antje

    2009-01-01

    Objective: Living organ donation involves interference with a healthy organism. Therefore, most transplantation centres ascertain the voluntariness of the donation as well as its motivation by means of a psychosomatic evaluation. The circumstance that the evaluation is compulsory and not a primary concern of the donor-recipient pair may occasion respondents to present only what they consider innocuous and socially adequate. Thus, the information value of the results can be considerably affected. Methods: In the context of a psychosomatic evaluation prior to living kidney transplantation, 71 donor-recipient pairs were screened at the transplantation centre of Friedrich Schiller University, Jena. Using the validity scales of the Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory (MMPI) (“infrequency” (F), “lie” (L) and “correction-scales” (K)) and the Dissimulation Index according to Gough (“F-K”), we tried to find traits of dissimulation and denial. Results: About 50% of the participants showed an infrequency raw score of zero. This means that at least half of the sample is apprehensive which may cause a cautious and controlled attitude towards the examination. The K-value (T≥59) and the Dissimulation Index (F-K≤–15) indicated dissimulation in 29% and 26% of the overall sample. Moreover, it affects the score of 11 respondents (8%) so profoundly that any significance regarding the personality traits is lost. Conclusion: In the setup of the examination situation as well as in the interpretation of test-psychological findings, the occurrence and possible influence of dissimulation should be considered. The validity scale of the MMPI can help to obtain an objective clinical impression of dissimulation in problem cases. PMID:19911073

  5. Effectiveness of an Internet-based preparation for psychosomatic treatment: Results of a controlled observational study.

    Zimmer, Benjamin; Moessner, Markus; Wolf, Markus; Minarik, Carla; Kindermann, Sally; Bauer, Stephanie

    2015-11-01

    Patients often have to sustain long waiting periods between the time they first apply for psychotherapy and the actual uptake of the treatment. To support patients who are on a wait-list for inpatient psychosomatic treatment an Internet-based preparatory treatment (VORSTAT) was developed. In a randomized controlled trial, VORSTAT proved to increase treatment motivation prior to intake and to accelerate the accommodation phase at the beginning of inpatient treatment. No impact of VORSTAT on inpatient treatment outcome was found. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effectiveness of VORSTAT after implementing the service into routine care. A large naturalistic observational study comparing VORSTAT participants (N=911) against non-participants (N=1721) was conducted. Propensity scores were used to control for potential confounding variables due to the non-randomized group allocation. Reliable improvement of self-reported impairment achieved during inpatient treatment was used as outcome measure. VORSTAT participants showed higher rates of reliable improvement in physical impairment (50.8% vs. 44.9%), psychological impairment (41.2% vs. 29.9%), and social problems (22.3% vs. 15.2%). An Internet-based preparation for psychotherapy is an effective approach to improve outcome of inpatient psychosomatic treatment. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. [Influence of tendencies toward depression, neurosis and psychosomatic disorders on oral symptoms].

    Sasaki, Emi

    2005-12-01

    This study revealed that the tendencies towards depression, neurosis, and psychosomatic disorders have effects on oral symptoms. The total number of subjects was 102. The subjects were divided into two groups using the SDS (Self-rating Depression Scale): a control group of 66 subjects with an SDS value of less than 40, and a group of 36 subjects having depression tendencies with an SDS value of over 50. Most of the subjects in the depression tendency group showed symptoms of neurosis and psychosomatic disorders as well. The two groups were compared on the basis of their psychological characteristics, dosages of medicine taken, esthesis of mouth dryness, glossalgia, salivary flow rate, oral wettability, existence of dental cavities, and condition of the oral mucosa. No xerostomia at the mucobuccal fold was observed in the depression tendency group. However, there was an evident decrease of the resting salivary flow rate and the wettability of proglossis. It is considered that such a decrease resulted in an increase in the symptoms derived from xerostomia or esthesis of mouth dryness. The number of conservable but untreated dental cavities in the depression tendency group was larger than that in the control group with a significant difference, suggesting that both oral self-care and dental care management tended to be inadequate in the depression tendency group.

  7. Do Work Beliefs Moderate the Relationship Between Work Interruptions, Wellbeing and Psychosomatic Symptoms?

    Zoupanou, Zoi(e); Rydstedt, Leif W.

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the moderating effects of work beliefs in the relationship between work interruptions and general health, wellbeing and reports of psychosomatic symptoms. Self-report data were gathered from 310 employees from different occupational sectors. Results revealed that beliefs in hard work and morality ethic moderated the positive appraisal of work interruptions and acted as protective factors on impaired general health and wellbeing. The relationship was stronger among employees who endorsed strong beliefs in hard work and did not have regard for morality/ethics as a value. Likewise, beliefs in delay of gratification and morality/ethics moderated positive appraisal of work interruptions and reduced psychosomatic complaints. More specifically, the relationship was stronger among employees who had strong belief in the values of delayed gratification and weaker morality/ethics. These findings indicate that organisations should adopt work ideology or practices focused on work values particularly of hard work, delay of gratification and conformity to morality as protective factors that reduce the impact of work interruptions on employees’ general health and wellbeing. PMID:28580023

  8. Play Experience as Individual Ability and a Factor of Individual Resistance to Psychosomatic Disorders

    Serikov A.V.,

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The paper analyzes the constructs of ‘play experience’ and ‘play experiencing ability’ from the perspective of cultural-historical psychology. The paper stresses the importance of education, play, art, wealth and cultural diversity in the formation of healthy and independent personality. The role of play experience as a healthful factor that allows an individual to acquire resistance to psychosomatic disorders is supported both theoretically and empirically. It is argued that the individual capable of play experience can transform the meaning of a situation (within his/her play experience and therefore eliminate its psychotraumatic effect which contributes to the development of psychosomatic disorders. The paper provides outcomes of an empirical research with 73 participants (40 female, 33 male; aged 18—45, with the average age of 25 years. The statistical analysis revealed a significant inverse correlation between the level of the individual’s play experiencing ability and the level of his/her somatization (rs = -0,435; p ≤ 0,01, which confirms the research hypothesis.

  9. The Cartesian doctor, François Bayle (1622-1709), on psychosomatic explanation.

    Easton, Patricia

    2011-06-01

    There are two standing, incompatible accounts of Descartes' contributions to the study of psychosomatic phenomena that pervade histories of medicine, psychology, and psychiatry. The first views Descartes as the father of "rational psychology" a tradition that defines the soul as a thinking, unextended substance. The second account views Descartes as the father of materialism and the machine metaphor. The consensus is that Descartes' studies of optics and motor reflexes and his conception of the body-machine metaphor made early and important contributions to physiology and neuroscience but otherwise his impact was minimal. These predominately negative assessments of Descartes' contributions give a false impression of the role his philosophy played in the development of medicine and psychiatry in seventeenth-century France and beyond. I explore Descartes' influence in the little-known writings of a doctor from Toulouse, François Bayle (1622-1709). A study of Bayle gives us occasion to rethink the nature and role of psychosomatic explanation in Descartes' philosophy. The portrait I present is of a Cartesian science that had an actual and lasting effect on medical science and practice, and may offer something of value to practitioners today. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Illness perceptions among cancer survivors.

    Zhang, Na; Fielding, Richard; Soong, Inda; Chan, Karen K K; Tsang, Janice; Lee, Victor; Lee, Conrad; Ng, Alice; Sze, Wing Kin; Tin, Pamela; Lam, Wendy Wing Tak

    2016-03-01

    The purpose of the study is to document in Hong Kong Chinese cancer survivors cross-sectional associations between illness perceptions, physical symptom distress and dispositional optimism. A consecutive sample of 1036 (response rate, 86.1%, mean age 55.18 years, 60% female) survivors of different cancers recruited within 6 months of completion of adjuvant therapy from Hong Kong public hospitals completed the Brief Illness Perception Questionnaire (B-IPQ), Chinese version of the Memorial Symptom Assessment Scale Short-Form (MSAS-SF), and the revised Chinese version of Life Orientation Test (C-LOT-R), respectively. Stepwise multiple regression analyses examined adjusted associations. IPQ seriousness, symptom identity, illness concern, and emotional impact scores varied by cancer type (p Stress-related, lifestyle, environment, psychological/personality, and health-related factors were most frequently attributed causes of cancer. After adjustment for sample differences, physical symptom distress was significantly associated with all illness perception dimensions (p differences by cancer type were eliminated by adjustment for sample characteristics. Illness perceptions did not differ by cancer type. Greater physical symptom distress and lower levels of optimism were associated with more negative illness perceptions. Understanding how cancer survivors make sense of cancer can clarify an important aspect of adaptation. This in turn can inform interventions to facilitate adjustment. Knowledge contributions include evidence of physical symptom distress correlating with most dimensions of illness perception. Optimism was also associated with cancer survivors' illness perceptions.

  11. Parasitic Diseases and Psychiatric Illness

    Weiss, Mitchell Gralnick

    1994-01-01

    Distinguishing parasitic diseases from other infections and tropical medical disorders based on microbiological classification is a matter of convenience. Organic brain syndromes are associated with both protozoan and helminthic infections; side-effects of drugs commonly used to treat parasitoses may impair mood and cause anxiety, agitation or psychosis. Emotional states may in turn affect the experience of medical illness. Psychiatrically significant features of medical illness are determine...

  12. Psychosomatic medicine : A new psychiatric subspecialty in the US focused on the interface between psychiatry and medicine

    Lyketsos, Constantine G.; Huyse, Frits J.; Gitlin, David F.; Levenson, James L.

    2006-01-01

    Background and Objectives: In the past, Psychosomatic Medicine (PM) has had ambiguous connotations, and there have been many other names for this specialized fields, including Consultation-Liaison Psychiatry. The objective of this report is to briefly review the background, the history and current

  13. Improvement of balance between work stress and recovery after a body awareness program for chronic aspecific psychosomatic symptoms

    Landsman-Dijkstra, Jeanet J. A.; van Wijck, R; Groothoff, JW

    Objective: A 3-day residential body awareness program (BAP) was developed to teach people with chronic aspecific psychosomatic symptoms (CAPS) to react adequately to disturbances of the balance between a daily workload and the capacity to deal with it. The long-term effects of the program in

  14. Effects of health education for migrant females with psychosomatic complaints treated by general practitioners. A randomised controlled evaluation study

    Kocken, P.L.; Zwanenburg, E.J.-v.; Hoop, T.de

    2008-01-01

    Objective: : The effectiveness of use of migrant health educators in the general practitioners' care for female migrants with psychosomatic problems was evaluated to contribute to the improvement of the care for these patients. Methods: : A randomised controlled trial (RCT) design was used. A total

  15. High altitude illness

    Hartman-Ksycińska, Anna; Kluz-Zawadzka, Jolanta; Lewandowski, Bogumił

    High-altitude illness is a result of prolonged high-altitude exposure of unacclimatized individuals. The illness is seen in the form of acute mountain sickness (AMS) which if not treated leads to potentially life-threatening high altitude pulmonary oedema and high-altitude cerebral oedema. Medical problems are caused by hypobaric hypoxia stimulating hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF) release. As a result, the central nervous system, circulation and respiratory system function impairment occurs. The most important factor in AMS treatment is acclimatization, withdrawing further ascent and rest or beginning to descent; oxygen supplementation, and pharmacological intervention, and, if available, a portable hyperbaric chamber. Because of the popularity of high-mountain sports and tourism better education of the population at risk is essential.

  16. Mental illness: psychiatry's phlogiston.

    Szasz, T

    2001-10-01

    In physics, we use the same laws to explain why airplanes fly, and why they crash. In psychiatry, we use one set of laws to explain sane behaviour, which we attribute to reasons (choices), and another set of laws to explain insane behaviour, which we attribute to causes (diseases). God, man's idea of moral perfection, judges human deeds without distinguishing between sane persons responsible for their behaviour and insane persons deserving to be excused for their evil deeds. It is hubris to pretend that the insanity defence is compassionate, just, or scientific. Mental illness is to psychiatry as phlogiston was to chemistry. Establishing chemistry as a science of the nature of matter required the recognition of the non-existence of phlogiston. Establishing psychiatry as a science of the nature of human behaviour requires the recognition of the non-existence of mental illness.

  17. Does job loss cause ill health?

    Salm, M.

    2009-01-01

    This study estimates the effect of job loss on health for near elderly employees based on longitudinal data from the Health and Retirement Study. Previous studies find a strong negative correlation between unemployment and health. To control for possible reverse causality, this study focuses on

  18. More on Darwin's illness: comment on the final diagnosis of Charles Darwin.

    Sheehan, William; Meller, William H; Thurber, Steven

    2008-06-20

    Without the possibility of confirmatory exhumation, diagnostic inferences about Darwin's illness must remain speculative. A diagnosis of Darwin's aggregate symptoms must account for not only gastrointestinal distress but also his predominant and excessive retching and the conglomerate of other heterogeneous symptoms. We opine that Crohn's disease, posited as the 'final diagnosis', is not sufficient for subsuming his pleiomorphic symptomatology. An additional proposal is outlined that may help to explain his presentation with heterogeneous symptoms. It incorporates constitutional vulnerabilities, psychosomatic influences and Pavlovian conditioning as explanatory variables.

  19. Computational Psychosomatics and Computational Psychiatry: Toward a Joint Framework for Differential Diagnosis.

    Petzschner, Frederike H; Weber, Lilian A E; Gard, Tim; Stephan, Klaas E

    2017-09-15

    This article outlines how a core concept from theories of homeostasis and cybernetics, the inference-control loop, may be used to guide differential diagnosis in computational psychiatry and computational psychosomatics. In particular, we discuss 1) how conceptualizing perception and action as inference-control loops yields a joint computational perspective on brain-world and brain-body interactions and 2) how the concrete formulation of this loop as a hierarchical Bayesian model points to key computational quantities that inform a taxonomy of potential disease mechanisms. We consider the utility of this perspective for differential diagnosis in concrete clinical applications. Copyright © 2017 Society of Biological Psychiatry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Tackling the global mental health challenge: a psychosomatic medicine/consultation-liaison psychiatry perspective.

    Bauer, Amy M; Fielke, Ken; Brayley, John; Araya, Mesfin; Alem, Atalay; Frankel, Bernard L; Fricchione, Gregory L

    2010-01-01

    Consultation-liaison (C-L) psychiatry, informed by principles of psychosomatic medicine, is well-positioned to address the global impact of mental disorders through primary care C-L models. The authors review the international burden of mental disorders, highlighting medical comorbidity, undertreatment, and the rationale for enhancing primary-care management. C-L psychiatry fosters the skills required for global mental health work. The authors describe successful C-L models developed in a low-income country (Ethiopia) and an under-resourced region of a high-income country (Australia). C-L psychiatrists have the potential to marshal their unique skill-set to reduce the global burden of mental disorders.

  1. Psychosomatic symptoms in medical outpatients: an investigation of self-handicapping theory.

    Organista, P B; Miranda, J

    1991-01-01

    Investigated self-handicapping theory as it relates to somatization in medical patients. We predicted that medical outpatients (N = 113) would report psychosomatic symptoms in response to events that threaten their self-esteem. As predicted, results of hierarchical multiple regression indicated that high-perfectionism patients reported somatic symptoms positively related to the number of events that jeopardize their sense of accomplishment, whereas low-perfectionism patients' somatic symptoms were not related to these events (p = .005). Contrary to prediction, high-dependency patients did not differ significantly from low-dependency patients in the relationship of somatic symptoms and events that threatened their interpersonal relationships (p = .115). Implications of these findings and the utility of self-handicapping theory for predicting somatization in medical patients are discussed.

  2. Management of certain psychosomatic disorders by low dosage of 131I

    Udupa, K.N.; Dubey, G.P.; Soni, K.L.; Agrawal, Sharmila

    1982-01-01

    With the advent of short-lived radioisotopes, it is possible not only to diagnose, but also to make their application in the treatment of various stressful conditions. In the present investigation twenty-five cases of anxiety neurosis and twenty cases of early thyrotoxicosis are included. Before subjecting the cases for administration of radio-iodine therapy, various neurohumoral and physiological examinations were carried out at basal conditions. All these investigations were repeated after oral administration of 200-300 μCi of radioiodine in a fasting state. A significant reduction of cortical activity is marked in cases of anxiety neurosis and early thyrotoxicosis. It is concluded that it may provide an altertnative remedy in the treatment of various psycho-somatic disorders in early condition, where the response of conventional treatment is not satisfactory. (author)

  3. Management of certain psychosomatic disorders by low dosage of /sup 131/I

    Udupa, K.N.; Dubey, G.P.; Soni, K.L.; Agrawal, S. (Banaras Hindu Univ., Varanasi (India). Inst. of Medical Sciences)

    1982-08-01

    With the advent of short-lived radioisotopes, it is possible not only to diagnose, but also to make their application in the treatment of various stressful conditions. In the present investigation twenty-five cases of anxiety neurosis and twenty cases of early thyrotoxicosis are included. Before subjecting the cases for administration of radio-iodine therapy, various neurohumoral and physiological examinations were carried out at basal conditions. All these investigations were repeated after oral administration of 200-300 ..mu..Ci of radioiodine in a fasting state. A significant reduction of cortical activity is marked in cases of anxiety neurosis and early thyrotoxicosis. It is concluded that it may provide an alternative remedy in the treatment of various psychosomatic disorders in early condition, where the response of conventional treatment is not satisfactory.

  4. Psychosomatic regularities of psychotic disorders of women in involution (pathogenesis, clinics, psychodynamic psychotherapy

    М. М. Pustovoyt

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The problem of psychotic disorders with onset in the age of involution from broader perspective, guided by modern multidimensional paradigm, was never discussed before. Involutional psychosis is considered as a constellation of the biological changes that are irrefutable in this age period. Certain personality traits and coping strategies can be predisposing to psychotic response, as well as typical features of the “life curve” and external stressors that can run a psychotic reaction. The paper presents the result of our study. This study pays much attention to study of premorbid personality, with emphasis on characteristic features, peculiarities of the emotional reaction and motivation-behavioral area, which completely coincided with characteristics of the narcissistic personality disorder listed in DSM-V (2013. Aim: To explore the psychosomatic pathogenetic connections inherent involutionary psychosis, given pathogenic and pathoplastic impact of premorbid personality structure their syndromic form and dynamics, determine their place on the psychosomatic continuum and develop adequate and pathogenetic justified method of therapy. Methods. Data obtained by the clinical method were confirmed by the results of experimental psychological and neuropsychological researches. Results. Clinical characteristics of psychotic disorders in the patient population showed in the structure of psychosis the existence of two oppositely directed continuums: affective (depressive and delusional. This allows to allocate four main clinical forms of psychosis and their tendency to unite in two clusters that differed each other by the features, and also by their response to therapy and, therefore, by the prognosis. Conclusions: The psychodynamic approach to understanding the involutional psychosis, that was introduced by the author, got natural development in the proposed method of treatment that included complex medication and psychotherapy. The schemes of

  5. Mental Illness Statistics

    ... News & Events About Us Home > Health Information Share Statistics Research shows that mental illnesses are common in ... of mental illnesses, such as suicide and disability. Statistics Top ı cs Mental Illness Any Anxiety Disorder ...

  6. Exercise Prevents Mental Illness

    Purnomo, K. I.; Doewes, M.; Giri, M. K. W.; Setiawan, K. H.; Wibowo, I. P. A.

    2017-03-01

    Multiple current studies show that neuroinflammation may contribute to mental illness such as depression, anxiety, and mood disorder. Chronic inflammation in peripheral tissues is indicated by the increase of inflammatory marker like cytokine IL-6, TNF-α, and IL-1β. Pro-inflammatory cytokine in peripheral tissues can reach brain tissues and activate microglia and it causes neuroinflammation. Psychological stress may led peripheral and central inflammation. Activated microglia will produce pro-inflammatory cytokine, ROS, RNS, and tryptophan catabolizes. This neuroinflammation can promote metabolism changes of any neurotransmitter, such as serotonin, dopamine, and glutamate that will influence neurocircuit in the brain including basal ganglia and anterior cingulated cortex. It leads to mental illness. Exercise give contribution to reduce tissue inflammation. When muscle is contracting in an exercise, muscle will produce the secretion of cytokine like IL-6, IL-1ra, and IL-10. It will react as anti-inflammation and influence macrophage, T cell, monosit, protein Toll-Like Receptor (TLR), and then reduce neuroinflammation, characterised by the decrease of pro-inflammatory cytokine and prevent the activation of microglia in the brain. The objective of the present study is to review scientific articles in the literature related to the contribution of exercise to prevent and ease mental illness.

  7. Decompression illness - critical review

    C S Mohanty

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Decompression illness is caused by intravascular or extravascular bubbles that are formed as a result of reduction in environmental pressure (decompression. The term covers both arterial gas embolism, in which alveolar gas or venous gas emboli (via cardiac shunts or via pulmonary vessels are introduced into the arterial circulation, and decompression sickness, which is caused by in-situ bubble formation from dissolved inert gas. Both syndromes can occur in divers, compressed air workers, aviators, and astronauts, but arterial gas embolism also arises from iatrogenic causes unrelated to decompression. Risk of decompression illness is affected by immersion, exercise, and heat or cold. Manifestations range from itching and minor pain to neurological symptoms, cardiac collapse, and death. First-aid treatment is 1 0 0 % oxygen and definitive treatment is recompression to increased pressure, breathing 1 0 0 % oxygen. Adjunctive treatment, including fluid administration and prophylaxis against venous thromboembolism in paralysed patients, is also recommended Treatment is, in most cases, effective although residual deficits can remain in serious cases, even after several recompressions.

  8. [Blended-learning in psychosomatics and psychotherapy - Increasing the satisfaction and knowledge of students with a web-based e-learning tool].

    Ferber, Julia; Schneider, Gudrun; Havlik, Linda; Heuft, Gereon; Friederichs, Hendrik; Schrewe, Franz-Bernhard; Schulz-Steinel, Andrea; Burgmer, Markus

    2014-01-01

    To improve the synergy of established methods of teaching, the Department of Psychosomatics and Psychotherapy, University Hospital Münster, developed a web-based elearning tool using video clips of standardized patients. The effect of this blended-learning approach was evaluated. A multiple-choice test was performed by a naive (without the e-learning tool) and an experimental (with the tool) cohort of medical students to test the groups' expertise in psychosomatics. In addition, participants' satisfaction with the new tool was evaluated (numeric rating scale of 0-10). The experimental cohort was more satisfied with the curriculum and more interested in psychosomatics. Furthermore, the experimental cohort scored significantly better in the multiple-choice test. The new tool proved to be an important addition to the classical curriculum as a blended-learning approach which improves students' satisfaction and knowledge in psychosomatics.

  9. From Evidence-based Medicine to Human-based Medicine in Psychosomatics.

    Musalek, Michael

    2016-08-23

    Human-based medicine (HbM), a form of psychiatry that focuses not only on fragments and constructs but on the whole person, no longer finds its theoretical basis in the positivism of the modern era, but rather owes its central maxims to the post-modernist ideal that ultimate truths or objectivity in identifying the final cause of illness remain hidden from us for theoretical reasons alone. Evidence-based medicine (EbM) and HbM are thus not mutually exclusive opposites; rather, despite superficial differences in methods of diagnosis and treatment, EbM must be integrated into HbM as an indispensable component of the latter. Probably the most important difference between EbM and HbM lies in the aims and methods of treatment. In HbM the goal is no longer simply to make illnesses disappear but rather to allow the patient to return to a life that is as autonomous and happy as possible. The human being with all his or her potential and limitations once again becomes the measure of all things. This also implies, however, that the multidimensional diagnostics of HbM are oriented not only towards symptoms, pathogenesis, process and understanding but also to a greater degree towards the patient's resources. Treatment options and forms of therapy do not put the disease construct at the centre of the diagnostic and therapeutic interest, but have as their primary aim the reopening of the possibility of a largely autonomous and joyful life for the patient.

  10. [Psychosomatic basic care in the general hospital - an empirical investigation of the bio-psycho-social stress, treatment procedures and treatment outcomes from the vantage point of medical doctors].

    Fritzsche, Kurt; Schäfer, Inna; Wirsching, Michael; Leonhart, Rainer

    2012-01-01

    The present study investigates the psycho-social stress, the treatment procedures and the treatment outcomes of stressed patients in the hospital from the perspective of the hospital doctors. Physicians from all disciplines who had completed the course "Psychosomatic Basic Care" as part of their specialist training documented selected treatment cases. 2,028 documented treatment cases of 367 physicians were evaluated. Anxiety, depression and family problems were the most common causes of psychosocial stress. In over 40 % of the cases no information was found on the medical history. Diagnostic and therapeutic conversations took place with almost half the patients (45%). From the vantage point of the physicians patients receiving diagnostic and therapeutic conversations achieved significantly more positive scores with respect to outcome variables than patients without these measures. Collegial counseling was desired for more than half of the patients and took place mainly among the ward team. There were few significant differences in the views of surgical and nonsurgical physicians. Psychosomatic basic care in general hospitals is possible, albeit with some limitations. Patients undergoing psychosocial interventions have better treatment outcomes. Therefore, extending training to 80 hours for all medical disciplines seems reasonable.

  11. Psychosomatic disturbances at patients with uterine corpus cancer with cortisolemia of various expression at stages of the combined treatment

    Prokhach, N.E.; Sorochan, P.P.; Gromakova, Yi.A.; Kuz'menko, O.V.; Yivanenko, M.O.

    2015-01-01

    The assessment of an integrated indicator of quality of life, indicators of emotional and cognitive functioning, indicators of fatigue, pain and sleep disorders at stages of the combined treatment at patients with uterine corpus cancer with cortisolemia of various expression is carried out. Psychosomatic disorders are least expressed at patients with the low and high level of a hydrocortisone whereas patients with intermediate levels of a hydro-cortisone have more expressed fatigue, the feeling of pain, essential sleep disorders is stronger. Clarification of the mechanisms involved to development of psychosomatic disturbances in patients with different expression of a cortisolemia is necessary for development of the individualized strategy of prophylaxis and treatment focused on conservation of quality of life

  12. Heat-related illness in the African wilderness

    Wilderness heat-related illnesses span a continuum of medical problems caused by ... of modern science, clothing technology, and an understanding of physiology ..... guidelines for wilderness emergency care, heat-related illnesses, and EAH ...

  13. Explanations for female excess psychosomatic symptoms in adolescence: evidence from a school-based cohort in the West of Scotland

    West Patrick B

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background By mid adolescence there is an excess in female physical and/or psychosomatic, as well as psychological morbidity. This paper examines the contribution of a range of factors (self-esteem, body image, gender-role orientation, body mass index, smoking and physical activity to explaining the female excess in three psychosomatic symptoms (headaches, stomach ache/sickness, and dizziness and depressive mood at age 15. Methods A cohort of 2,196 school pupils (analyses restricted to 2,005 with complete data surveyed at age 15. All measures were obtained via self-completion questionnaires, apart from body mass index, derived from measured height and weight. Analyses examined (a sex differences in each potential explanatory factor; (b their associations with the health measures; (c the effect of adjustment for these factors on sex differences in the health measures; and (d the existence of interactive effects between sex and the explanatory factors on the health measures Results Each potential explanatory factor was significantly differentiated by sex. Self-esteem, body image (represented by weight-related worries, smoking and physical activity were related to the health measures. These factors accounted for one third of the female excess in headaches and stomach problems, half the excess in dizziness and almost all that in respect of depressive mood. Self-esteem and body image were the factors most consistently related to health, and adjustment for these resulted in the largest reductions in the odds of a female excess in both the psychosomatic symptoms and depressive mood. Conclusion Adjustment for a range of potential psychosocial and behavioural factors largely explains (statistically excess female depressive mood. These factors also partially explain the female excess in certain psychosomatic symptoms.

  14. The Perspective of Psychosomatic Medicine on the Effect of Religion on the Mind–Body Relationship in Japan

    Nakao, Mutsuhiro; Ohara, Chisin

    2012-01-01

    Shintoism, Buddhism, and Qi, which advocate the unity of mind and body, have contributed to the Japanese philosophy of life. The practice of psychosomatic medicine emphasizes the connection between mind and body and combines the psychotherapies (directed at the mind) and relaxation techniques (directed at the body), to achieve stress management. Participation in religious activities such as preaching, praying, meditating, and practicing Zen can also elicit relaxation responses. Thus, it is ti...

  15. The Effectiveness of the Unified Protocol on Emotional Dysregulation and Cognitive Emotion Regulation Strategies in Patients with Psychosomatic Disorders

    Mina Mazaheri

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The unified treatment approach (UP is an emotion-focused cognitive-behavioral therapy in which the main object of treatment is emotional processes. The aim of the present research was to examine the effectiveness of The Unified Protocol (UP on emotional dysregulation and cognitive emotion regulation strategies in patients with psychosomatic disorders. Methods: Emotion-focused cognitive behavioral therapy (ECBT, a unified treatment, with 12 weekly group sessions of 2 hours, was presented to 14 patients with psychosomatic complaints at the Subspecialty Center of Psychiatry in Isfahan in 2013. Pre- and post-intervention assessments were done by means of the self-report tests of Difficulties in Emotion Regulation Scale (DERS and Cognitive Emotion Regulation Questionnaire (CERQ. Results: Significant reductions in post-test scores of total emotional dysregulation (P < 0.01 as well as the factors of non-acceptance (P < 0.05 and strategy (P < 0.01 were seen, while the other factors (goal, impulse, awareness, and clarity did not change. Moreover, a significant reduction was observed in the catastrophizing strategy score (P < 0.05, in comparison with other cognitive strategies. Conclusion: This pilot study including 14 patients with psychosomatic disorders indicates that the Unified treatment approach is an effective treatment in improvement of emotional dysregulation and in reduction of utilizing maladaptive cognitive strategies.

  16. Health-seeking behaviour of mentally ill patients in Enugu, Nigeria

    2009-03-01

    Mar 1, 2009 ... Awareness of mental illness as a significant cause of morbidity is increasing ... of disability throughout the world, 5 are psychiatric illnesses.2 ... war of 1967 - 1970. ... illness, and the treatment that they first employed, with their.

  17. [Patients' experiences and picture processes during the art therapy in a psychosomatic day hospital].

    Oster, Jörg; Poetsch, Stephanie; Danner-Weinberger, Alexandra; von Wietersheim, Jörn

    2014-02-01

    The aim of this study was the examination of the experiences of patients participating in an art therapy during a psychosomatic day hospital. The data basis were 15 transliterated interviews from the end of the treatment, conducted with a presentation of the pictures painted in the art therapy sessions, as well as the digitised pictures. The evaluation was done with a qualitative analysis of the interviews and an analysis of the pictures, using a specially-developed category system. In the art therapy, most part of the pa-tients dealt with own conflicts. Nearly all pa-tients benefitted from the art therapy and indicated an improvement of their feeling. The picture processes are different; at the beginning, wishes and familiar techniques dominated. Pictures of turning points differed in their dimensions. The art therapy was seen as a part of the complete treatment in which several therapies assembled. The final interviews were experienced as helpful for further reflections. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  18. [Utilization of self-help groups and psychotherapy after psychosomatic-psychotherapeutic in-patient treatment].

    Höflich, Anke; Matzat, Jürgen; Meyer, Friedhelm; Knickenberg, Rudolf J; Bleichner, Franz; Merkle, Wolfgang; Reimer, Christian; Franke, Wolfram; Beutel, Manfred E

    2007-05-01

    Until now little is known about the role of participation in self-help groups alone or combined with psychotherapy in post-in-patient care. In the present study 2933 patients were questioned about their experience of self-help groups and psychotherapy after discharge from a clinic for psychosomatic medicine and psychotherapy. Nearly 8 % of them utilized self-help groups (mostly combined with out-patient psychotherapy), and altogether 68 % out-patient psychotherapy following in-patient treatment. Patients without out-patient treatment were psychologically less burdened and had better resources than participants of self-help groups or psychotherapy. Self-help group members differed from patients in out-patient psychotherapy by expressing a more positive opinion of groupwork and higher openness to new experiences. Additionly, they had discussed the topic of self-help groups more frequently with their therapists. This may be a starting-point for promoting more self-help activities of patients in the future.

  19. Non-pharmacological treatment effects on psychosomatic and immune regulatory mechanisms in patients with rheumatic arthritis

    Zharikova I.P.

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: comparative analysis of the influence of the methods of the lateral ophthalmotilapia and low-intensity magnetic therapy on the Central and peripheral nervous system and the immune status in patients with rheumatoid arthritis. Material and methods: a comparative analysis of the impact of the 44 patients with rheumatoid arthritis aged 18 to 65 years, of which 19 patients (43.2 percent — 1 group received low-frequency low-intensity magnetic therapy and 25 patients (56.8 per cent — group 2, the lateral ophthalmotilapia. Results. In group 1 significantly improved memory both short-term (from 69.2±9.0 to 81,7±12,7, p=0.003, and the reminiscence relating to medium-term characteristics of memory (57,3±22 to 79,0±14,5; p=0.004. In patients of the 2nd group in the course of treatment was observed more pronounced dynamics of improvement of parameters of higher nervous activity, namely short-term memory (79,4±17 to 88,2±12, p=0.003and reminiscences of memory (from 69.4±27 to 82.4±19,5, p=0,0016. Conclusion. Lateral ophthalmotilapia and low-frequency magnetotherapy for help expand the list of rehabilitation programs in rheumatoid arthritis, the disease having dual autoimmune and psychosomatic genesis.

  20. Effect of stapedotomy on pre-operative tinnitus and its psychosomatic burden.

    Bast, Florian; Mazurek, Birgit; Schrom, Thomas

    2013-12-01

    According to the literature, between 40 and 90% of otosclerosis patients suffering from hearing loss also suffer from tinnitus on the affected side. For a lot of these patients tinnitus represents a handicap that is just as debilitating as the hearing loss itself. The main goal of the surgical treatment of otosclerosis is a significant improvement in hearing loss, but frequent reports of reduced tinnitus after surgery suggest that this can be a positive side effect. All patients who underwent stapedotomy were initially included in the study. Retrospectively, the tinnitus questionnaire as compiled by Goebel and Hiller was sent to the patients, and 34 patients (37 ears) replied. The pre- and postoperative cases of tinnitus were divided into compensated and non-compensated tinnitus. In addition the following tinnitus-related factors were evaluated: emotional, cognitive and mental burden; intrusiveness of the tinnitus; hearing problems; somatic ailments; and sleep disturbances. Over 80% of the patients surveyed suffered from tinnitus pre-operation. The tinnitus disappeared or improved in over 60% of the cases after stapedotomy. In addition, the related factors surveyed also improved appreciably post surgery and reached a significant level in patients with compensated tinnitus. Besides a significant improvement in hearing loss the intensity and the psychosomatic burden of a pre-operative tinnitus can be reduced by stapedotomy. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. [Interdisciplinary longitudinal curriculum "Medical Psychology, Psychotherapy and Psychosomatics." Experiences from the preclinical segment].

    Schüppel, R; Bayer, A; Hrabal, V; Hölzer, M; Allert, G; Tiedemann, G; Hochkirchen, B; Stephanos, S; Kächele, H; Zenz, H

    1998-05-01

    The departments of Medical Psychology, Psychosomatics and Psychotherapy developed an interdisciplinary longitudinal curriculum in order to coach medical students for the whole length of their medical education. Experiences from the first four undergraduate semesters are reported. 46 students (33 females, 13 males), mean age 22.3 +/- 2.6 years, attended 60 hours of interdisciplinary group sessions. Frequent motives to join the course were interest in psychosocial disciplines and relevant previous experience. The students expected to benefit from this project in their study, their future practice as a physician, and in their personal development. Important educational goals that could be attained were the adoption of a patient-centred view in medicine as well as strengthening of the students' critical capacities and sensitivity. The students especially appreciated the possibility of group discussions and the opportunity to participate actively in the course. Based on a critical review of the evaluation, the possibility of a transfer of our model is considered and perspectives for the future are developed.

  2. The Development of Psychosomatic Reasoning in General Practitioners: An Empirical Study

    Alireza Monajemi

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Monajemi, Goli, and Scheidt (2014 proposed a theory of development of psychosomatic (PSM reasoning. They hypothesized that the integration of psychosocial knowledge with biomedical (BM knowledge may have started at the level of GPs. An experimental study was conducted to explore and compare junior and senior practitioners regarding their shift from BM to PSM in terms of their decision-making.Methods: Two cases were presented to GPs in a sequential manner based on the reports of different settings (inpatient vs. outpatient. Each participant read each part of the case carefully in order to provide the management plan (Mx, determine which parts of the scenario were the most important, and write down, first, an explanatory model, and then, the management plan for the patient. The accuracy of item selection, explanatory models, and management plans were analysed.Results: GPs have already acquired some PSM knowledge, and thus, they will be able to differentiate between the two focuses (i.e., BM and PSM, but are not yet proficient enough to deal with a case in a PSM focus efficiently. This results in ineffective judgment. In other words, GPs discern the importance that should be given to psychosocial factors when examining their patients; however, they do not take into consideration such factors in the management plan.Conclusion: The results were largely in line with our assumptions based on the theory of the development of PSM reasoning; however, there is a definite need for more experimental studies here to support this argument.

  3. Differential economic stability and psychosocial stress at work: associations with psychosomatic complaints and absenteeism.

    Godin, Isabelle; Kittel, France

    2004-04-01

    Stressful working conditions are well known to have a negative impact on the worker's health. We investigated this association in a Belgian study with a psychosocial health perspective, including individual work characteristics as well as firms' features. These data come from the first measure of the Somstress study. This is a 4 year project, initiated in 1999 and conducted in four different firms. The objective of this article is to investigate the relationships between stress, working conditions and absenteeism, self-reported health and psychosomatic complaints. Firms were selected according to their degree of structural environment and job stability. Among the four work sites, one can be considered as stable, one unstable and the remaining ones in an in-between situation. Stress is generally measured according to one of the following models: the job demands control model (Karasek) and the effort-reward imbalance model (Siegrist). We used here both models, along with the social support at work (Karasek) and overcommitment (Siegrist). Sex, age and education are important health determinants. After adjustment for those three variables and additionally for the work instability, it appeared that poor health outcomes (measured by the self-rated health, depression (SCL-90), anxiety (SCL-90), somatisation (SCL-90), chronic fatigue (Vercoulen) and reported absenteeism) are mainly associated with a low control, low social support at work, high overcommitment and high level of imbalance. Inversely, job demands do not make any significant contribution in the logistic regression models for the above-mentioned health outcomes.

  4. Do Illness Perceptions in Patients with Fibromyalgia Differ Across Countries? A Comparative Study

    Kuppens, Kevin; Neels, Hedwig; van Wilgen, C. Paul; Roussel, Nathalie; Heyrman, Annette; Lambrecht, Luc; van Ittersum, Miriam W.; Nijs, Jo

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Illness perceptions, i.e. how patients think about their illness in terms of identity, cause and consequences, are important, as negative illness perceptions are associated with maladaptive illness behavior, more dysfunctioning, poor treatment adherence and treatment outcome. As illness

  5. Illness causal beliefs in Turkish immigrants

    Klimidis Steven

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background People hold a wide variety of beliefs concerning the causes of illness. Such beliefs vary across cultures and, among immigrants, may be influenced by many factors, including level of acculturation, gender, level of education, and experience of illness and treatment. This study examines illness causal beliefs in Turkish-immigrants in Australia. Methods Causal beliefs about somatic and mental illness were examined in a sample of 444 members of the Turkish population of Melbourne. The socio-demographic characteristics of the sample were broadly similar to those of the Melbourne Turkish community. Five issues were examined: the structure of causal beliefs; the relative frequency of natural, supernatural and metaphysical beliefs; ascription of somatic, mental, or both somatic and mental conditions to the various causes; the correlations of belief types with socio-demographic, modernizing and acculturation variables; and the relationship between causal beliefs and current illness. Results Principal components analysis revealed two broad factors, accounting for 58 percent of the variation in scores on illness belief scales, distinctly interpretable as natural and supernatural beliefs. Second, beliefs in natural causes were more frequent than beliefs in supernatural causes. Third, some causal beliefs were commonly linked to both somatic and mental conditions while others were regarded as more specific to either somatic or mental disorders. Last, there was a range of correlations between endorsement of belief types and factors defining heterogeneity within the community, including with demographic factors, indicators of modernizing and acculturative processes, and the current presence of illness. Conclusion Results supported the classification of causal beliefs proposed by Murdock, Wilson & Frederick, with a division into natural and supernatural causes. While belief in natural causes is more common, belief in supernatural causes

  6. Illness causal beliefs in Turkish immigrants.

    Minas, Harry; Klimidis, Steven; Tuncer, Can

    2007-07-24

    People hold a wide variety of beliefs concerning the causes of illness. Such beliefs vary across cultures and, among immigrants, may be influenced by many factors, including level of acculturation, gender, level of education, and experience of illness and treatment. This study examines illness causal beliefs in Turkish-immigrants in Australia. Causal beliefs about somatic and mental illness were examined in a sample of 444 members of the Turkish population of Melbourne. The socio-demographic characteristics of the sample were broadly similar to those of the Melbourne Turkish community. Five issues were examined: the structure of causal beliefs; the relative frequency of natural, supernatural and metaphysical beliefs; ascription of somatic, mental, or both somatic and mental conditions to the various causes; the correlations of belief types with socio-demographic, modernizing and acculturation variables; and the relationship between causal beliefs and current illness. Principal components analysis revealed two broad factors, accounting for 58 percent of the variation in scores on illness belief scales, distinctly interpretable as natural and supernatural beliefs. Second, beliefs in natural causes were more frequent than beliefs in supernatural causes. Third, some causal beliefs were commonly linked to both somatic and mental conditions while others were regarded as more specific to either somatic or mental disorders. Last, there was a range of correlations between endorsement of belief types and factors defining heterogeneity within the community, including with demographic factors, indicators of modernizing and acculturative processes, and the current presence of illness. Results supported the classification of causal beliefs proposed by Murdock, Wilson & Frederick, with a division into natural and supernatural causes. While belief in natural causes is more common, belief in supernatural causes persists despite modernizing and acculturative influences. Different

  7. Attributing illness to food

    Batz, M. B.; Doyle, M. P.; Morris, J. G.

    2005-01-01

    source responsible for illness. A wide variety of food attribution approaches and data are used around the world including the analysis of outbreak data, case-control studies, microbial subtyping and source tracking methods, and expert judgment, among others. The Food Safety Research Consortium sponsored......Identification and prioritization of effective food safety interventions require an understanding of the relationship between food and pathogen from farm to consumption. Critical to this cause is food attribution, the capacity to attribute cases of foodborne disease to the food vehicle or other...... the Food Attribution Data Workshop in October 2003 to discuss the virtues and limitations of these approaches and to identify future options for collecting food attribution data in the United States. We summarize workshop discussions and identify challenges that affect progress in this critical component...

  8. Heat-Related Illnesses

    Full Text Available ... Your Wishes Visiting The ER Who Takes Care Of You In An Emergency? Checking Into ... Illnesses Dr. Glenn Mitchell , Emergency physician at Mercy Health System in Chesterfield, Missouri Heat-related illness can be ...

  9. Children's Conceptions of Mental Illness: A Naive Theory Approach

    Fox, Claudine; Buchanan-Barrow, Eithne; Barrett, Martyn

    2010-01-01

    This paper reports two studies that investigated children's conceptions of mental illness using a naive theory approach, drawing upon a conceptual framework for analysing illness representations which distinguishes between the identity, causes, consequences, curability, and timeline of an illness. The studies utilized semi-structured interviewing…

  10. [Pre- and posttreatment results of an inpatient neurotologic and psychosomatic tinnitus therapy].

    Schaaf, H; Hesse, G

    2015-08-01

    Inpatient treatment of chronic complex tinnitus can be necessary for patients with a high symptomatic strain, mostly accompanied by a corresponding mental comorbidity, and/or for patients that can only perceive their psychogenic suffering through somatization into tinnitus. We report the results of 368 consecutively treated inpatients with chronic complex tinnitus. Patients' audiometric data were collected, and at the beginning and end of treatment, the Mini-Tinnitus Questionnaire (Mini-TQ12; Hiller und Goebel) was completed, as was the German version of the Hospitality Anxiety and Depression Score (HADS). Effect sizes were calculated for both questionnaires. Mean treatment duration was 38.8 days (standard deviation, SD: 13.6 days). The main therapeutic elements were intensive disorder-specific neurotologic counselling and psychoeducation; improvement of hearing by fitting of hearing aids, complemented by an individualized hearing therapy; and intensive individual and group-based psychotherapy. In addition to tinnitus, 82.1% of the patients had reduced hearing requiring rehabilitation with hearing aids. After hospitalization, a highly significant improvement in tinnitus strain could be demonstrated by the Mini-TQ12. Furthermore, a significant reduction in the depression and anxiety components of HADS was also achieved, with high effect sizes of 1.6 to 2.2. No reduction of tinnitus symptoms to a medium- or low-range level was experienced by 8.9% of patients. With corresponding symptomatic suffering, disorder-specific inpatient tinnitus treatment comprising neurotologic and psychosomatic alignment can achieve medium- to high-range therapeutic effects.

  11. Nonpeptide corticotropin-releasing hormone receptor type 1 antagonists and their applications in psychosomatic disorders.

    Contoreggi, Carlo; Rice, Kenner C; Chrousos, George

    2004-01-01

    'psychosomatic' disorders.

  12. [The assessment of the general functional status and of the psychosomatic complaints of workers at hydroelectric power plants].

    Danev, S; Dapov, E; Pavlov, E; Nikolova, R

    1992-01-01

    Evaluation of the general functional status and psychosomatic complaints of 61 workers from the hydroelectric power stations is made. The following methods are used: 1. Assessment of the general functional state, by means of computer analysis of the cardiac variability, analysing the changes in the values of the following indices: average value of the cardiac intervals (X), their standard deviation (SD), coefficient of variation (CV), amplitude of the mode (AMO), index of stress (IS), index of the vegetative balance (IVB), homeostatic index (HI). The last 3 indices serve for determination of the complex evaluation of chronic fatigue and work adaptation (ChFWA). 2. Evaluation of the psychosomatic complaints, by the use of a questionnaire for the subjective psychosomatic complaints. 3. Studying the systolic and diastolic blood pressure. The average values received in workers from HPS were compared with the average values of the population of the country and with the average values of a similar working activity of a group of operators from the thermal power station HPS. In conclusion it could be noted that concerning ChFWA the received values in workers from HPS are not more unfavourable generalized values from that measured in workers, occupied with similar type of work in other industrial branches of the country. However, they are with more unfavourable data in comparison with the workers from HPS. The subjective evaluation of the operators concerning their psychic and body health status is moderately worse, both in comparison with the values of the index for the country, and in comparison with those of the operators from HPS.

  13. Are doctors who have been ill more compassionate? Attitudes of resident physicians regarding personal health issues and the expression of compassion in clinical care.

    Roberts, Laura Weiss; Warner, Teddy D; Moutier, Christine; Geppert, Cynthia M A; Green Hammond, Katherine A

    2011-01-01

    Compassion is an attribute central to professionalism and modern clinical care, yet little is known about how compassion is acquired and preserved in medical training. We sought to understand whether personal illness experiences are thought by residents to foster compassion. The authors surveyed 155 (71% response rate) second- and third-year residents at the University of New Mexico School of Medicine regarding their views of the relationship of personal life experience with illness to compassion and empathy for patients. Residents believe that experience with personal health issues enhances physician compassion for patients. Residents who report more personal health concerns, such as physical or mental health problems and family health problems, endorse the connection between direct experience with illness and empathy. Health care trainees' own illness experiences may increase compassionate patient care practices and foster empathy. Copyright © 2011 The Academy of Psychosomatic Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. The perspective of psychosomatic medicine on the effect of religion on the mind-body relationship in Japan.

    Nakao, Mutsuhiro; Ohara, Chisin

    2014-02-01

    Shintoism, Buddhism, and Qi, which advocate the unity of mind and body, have contributed to the Japanese philosophy of life. The practice of psychosomatic medicine emphasizes the connection between mind and body and combines the psychotherapies (directed at the mind) and relaxation techniques (directed at the body), to achieve stress management. Participation in religious activities such as preaching, praying, meditating, and practicing Zen can also elicit relaxation responses. Thus, it is time for traditional religions to play an active role in helping those seeking psychological stability after the Great East Japan Earthquake and the ongoing crisis related to the nuclear accident in Fukushima, Japan, to maintain a healthy mind-body relationship.

  15. Psychosomatic and somatopsychic aspects of the development of mental disturbances in liquidators of the Chernobyl NPP accident

    Rumyantseva, G.M.

    2003-01-01

    For mathematic-statistical analysis of factors, probably influencing the formation of mental disorders in participants of the liquidation of Chernobyl NPP accident the database containing 165 variables was made. By factor and dispersion analysis variables, influencing mental disorders formation rate, and share of influence and correlation dependencies were discriminated and calculated. The mental disturbances, emerging after an ecological radiation catastrophe, form not only due to direct and indirect action of physical factors, but as a consequence of inclusion of somatopsychic and psychosomatic mechanisms, associated directly with catastrophe effect

  16. Five dramas of illness.

    Frank, Arthur W

    2007-01-01

    First-person narratives of illness experience are dramatic: the narrator, who is also the sufferer, is caught in conflicts of forces that permit understanding more than control. Among the dramas of illness, five occur frequently in autobiographical accounts of illness. These dramas overlap and have varying emphases in different people's stories. They are the drama of genesis (what instigated the illness); the drama of emotion work (what emotional displays are required or prohibited); the drama of fear and loss; the drama of meaning; and finally, the drama of self. This five-drama framework can focus critical and clinical attention on which conflicting forces the ill person is working to reconcile, what makes that work difficult, and how conceiving of one's illness as a drama can be a source of meaning and value.

  17. Clinical Pharmacology Studies in Critically Ill Children

    Thakkar, Nilay; Salerno, Sara; Hornik, Christoph P.; Gonzalez, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Developmental and physiological changes in children contribute to variation in drug disposition with age. Additionally, critically ill children suffer from various life-threatening conditions that can lead to pathophysiological alterations that further affect pharmacokinetics (PK). Some factors that can alter PK in this patient population include variability in tissue distribution caused by protein binding changes and fluid shifts, altered drug elimination due to organ dysfunction, and use of medical interventions that can affect drug disposition (e.g., extracorporeal membrane oxygenation and continuous renal replacement therapy). Performing clinical studies in critically ill children is challenging because there is large inter-subject variability in the severity and time course of organ dysfunction; some critical illnesses are rare, which can affect subject enrollment; and critically ill children usually have multiple organ failure, necessitating careful selection of a study design. As a result, drug dosing in critically ill children is often based on extrapolations from adults or non-critically ill children. Dedicated clinical studies in critically ill children are urgently needed to identify optimal dosing of drugs in this population. This review will summarize the effect of critical illness on pediatric PK, the challenges associated with performing studies in this vulnerable subpopulation, and the clinical PK studies performed to date for commonly used drugs. PMID:27585904

  18. Do personality traits predict outcome of psychodynamically oriented psychosomatic inpatient treatment beyond initial symptoms?

    Steinert, Christiane; Klein, Susanne; Leweke, Frank; Leichsenring, Falk

    2015-03-01

    Whether personality characteristics have an impact on treatment outcome is an important question in psychotherapy research. One of the most common approaches for the description of personality is the five-factor model of personality. Only few studies investigated whether patient personality as measured with the NEO-Five-Factor Inventory (NEO-FFI, Costa & McCrae [1992b]. Revised NEO-PI-R and NEO-FFI. Professional manual. Odessa, FL: Psychological Assessment Recources) predicts outcome. Results were inconsistent. Studies reporting personality to be predictive of outcome did not control for baseline symptoms, while studies controlling initial symptoms could not support these findings. We hypothesized that after taking into account baseline symptoms, the NEO-FFI would not predict outcome and tested this in a large sample of inpatients at a psychosomatic clinic. Naturalistic, non-controlled study using patients' data for multiple regression analysis to identify predictors of outcome. Data of 254 inpatients suffering primarily from depressive, anxiety, stress, and somatoform disorders were analysed. Personality was assessed at the beginning of therapy. For psychotherapy outcome, changes in anxiety and depression (Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale; HADS), overall psychopathology (Symptom Checklist-90-R Global Severity Index [GSI]), and interpersonal problems (Inventory of Interpersonal Problems; IIP) were measured. The treatment resulted in significant decreases on all outcome measures corresponding to moderate to large effect sizes (HADS: d = 1.03; GSI: d = 0.90; IIP: d = 0.38). Consistent with our hypothesis, none of the personality domains predicted outcome when baseline symptoms were controlled for. Personality assessment at baseline does not seem to have an added value in the prediction of inpatient psychotherapy outcome beyond initial symptoms. Clinical implications Personality dimensions overlap with symptomatic distress. Rather than serve as predictors of

  19. Dysfunctional illness perception and illness behaviour associated with high somatic symptom severity and low quality of life in general hospital outpatients in China.

    Zhang, Yaoyin; Fritzsche, Kurt; Leonhart, Rainer; Zhao, Xudong; Zhang, Lan; Wei, Jing; Yang, Jianzhong; Wirsching, Michael; Nater-Mewes, Ricarda; Larisch, Astrid; Schaefert, Rainer

    2014-09-01

    In primary care populations in Western countries, high somatic symptom severity (SSS) and low quality of life (QoL) are associated with adverse psychobehavioural characteristics. This study assessed the relationship between SSS, QoL and psychobehavioural characteristics in Chinese general hospital outpatients. This multicentre cross-sectional study enrolled 404 patients from 10 outpatient departments, including Neurology, Gastroenterology, Traditional Chinese Medicine [TCM] and Psychosomatic Medicine departments, in Beijing, Shanghai, Chengdu and Kunming. A structured interview was used to assess the cognitive, affective and behavioural features associated with somatic complaints, independent of their origin. Several standard instruments were used to assess SSS, emotional distress and health-related QoL. Patients who reported low SSS (PHQ-15Western countries, high SSS was associated with negative illness and self-perception, low physical QoL with avoidance behaviour, and low mental QoL with reassurance seeking in Chinese general hospital outpatients. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Heat-Related Illnesses

    ... Share this! EmergencyCareForYou » Emergency 101 » Heat-Related Illnesses Heat-Related Illnesses Dr. Glenn Mitchell , Emergency physician at ... about heat cramps and heat stroke and exhaustion. Heat Cramps Symptoms include muscle spasms, usually in the ...

  1. Heat-Related Illnesses

    Full Text Available ... Share this! EmergencyCareForYou » Emergency 101 » Heat-Related Illnesses Heat-Related Illnesses Dr. Glenn Mitchell , Emergency physician at ... about heat cramps and heat stroke and exhaustion. Heat Cramps Symptoms include muscle spasms, usually in the ...

  2. Psychosomatic development of girls with neoplastic diseases in puberty after multidrug chemotherapy; Badania psychofizyczne dziewczat z choroba nowotworowa w okresie pokwitania, po zakonczeniu chemioterapii wielolekowej

    Korzon, M.; Mielnik, J.; Bohdan, Z. [Akademia Medyczna, Gdansk (Poland)] [and others

    1993-12-31

    We estimated the psychosomatic development of 25 girls aged 13-19 years after antineoplastic therapy. Normal parameters of physical development were stated in all cases. No injury of central nervous system in all cases was seen. Psychological examination revealed strong suppression reactions and evident anxiety signs in majority of girls. (author) 15 refs, 2 tabs

  3. The short-term effects of a body awareness program : better self-management of health problems for individuals with chronic a-specific psychosomatic symptoms

    Landsman-Dijkstra, Jeanet J. A.; van Wijck, R; Groothoff, JW; Rispens, P

    A three-day residential Body Awareness Program (BAP) was developed to teach people with Chronic A-specific Psychosomatic Symptoms (CAPS) to react adequately to disturbances of the balance between a daily workload and the capacity to deal with it. The short-term effects of the program for people with

  4. The short-term effects of a body awareness program : better self-management of health problems for individuals with chronic a-specific psychosomatic symptoms

    Landsman-Dijkstra, Jeanet J. A.; van Wijck, R; Groothoff, JW; Rispens, P

    2004-01-01

    A three-day residential Body Awareness Program (BAP) was developed to teach people with Chronic A-specific Psychosomatic Symptoms (CAPS) to react adequately to disturbances of the balance between a daily workload and the capacity to deal with it. The short-term effects of the program for people with

  5. Results of a psychosomatic training program in China, Vietnam and Laos: successful cross-cultural transfer of a postgraduate training program for medical doctors.

    Fritzsche, Kurt; Scheib, Peter; Ko, Nayeong; Wirsching, Michael; Kuhnert, Andrea; Hick, Jie; Schüßler, Gerhard; Wu, Wenyuan; Yuan, Shen; Cat, Nguyen Huu; Vongphrachanh, Sisouk; Linh, Ngo Tich; Viet, Ngyuen Kim

    2012-08-29

    With the "ASIA-LINK" program, the European Community has supported the development and implementation of a curriculum of postgraduate psychosomatic training for medical doctors in China, Vietnam and Laos. Currently, these three countries are undergoing great social, economic and cultural changes. The associated psychosocial stress has led to increases in psychological and psychosomatic problems, as well as disorders for which no adequate medical or psychological care is available, even in cities. Health care in these three countries is characterized by the coexistence of Western medicine and traditional medicine. Psychological and psychosomatic disorders and problems are insufficiently recognized and treated, and there is a need for biopsychosocially orientated medical care. Little is known about the transferability of Western-oriented psychosomatic training programs in the Southeast Asian cultural context. The curriculum was developed and implemented in three steps: 1) an experimental phase to build a future teacher group; 2) a joint training program for future teachers and German teachers; and 3) training by Asian trainers that was supervised by German teachers. The didactic elements included live patient interviews, lectures, communication skills training and Balint groups. The training was evaluated using questionnaires for the participants and interviews of the German teachers and the future teachers. Regional training centers were formed in China (Shanghai), Vietnam (Ho Chi Minh City and Hue) and Laos (Vientiane). A total of 200 physicians completed the training, and 30 physicians acquired the status of future teacher. The acceptance of the training was high, and feelings of competence increased during the courses. The interactive training methods were greatly appreciated, with the skills training and self-experience ranked as the most important topics. Adaptations to the cultural background of the participants were necessary for the topics of "breaking bad

  6. Results of a psychosomatic training program in China, Vietnam and Laos: successful cross-cultural transfer of a postgraduate training program for medical doctors

    Fritzsche Kurt

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background With the “ASIA-LINK” program, the European Community has supported the development and implementation of a curriculum of postgraduate psychosomatic training for medical doctors in China, Vietnam and Laos. Currently, these three countries are undergoing great social, economic and cultural changes. The associated psychosocial stress has led to increases in psychological and psychosomatic problems, as well as disorders for which no adequate medical or psychological care is available, even in cities. Health care in these three countries is characterized by the coexistence of Western medicine and traditional medicine. Psychological and psychosomatic disorders and problems are insufficiently recognized and treated, and there is a need for biopsychosocially orientated medical care. Little is known about the transferability of Western-oriented psychosomatic training programs in the Southeast Asian cultural context. Methods The curriculum was developed and implemented in three steps: 1 an experimental phase to build a future teacher group; 2 a joint training program for future teachers and German teachers; and 3 training by Asian trainers that was supervised by German teachers. The didactic elements included live patient interviews, lectures, communication skills training and Balint groups. The training was evaluated using questionnaires for the participants and interviews of the German teachers and the future teachers. Results Regional training centers were formed in China (Shanghai, Vietnam (Ho Chi Minh City and Hue and Laos (Vientiane. A total of 200 physicians completed the training, and 30 physicians acquired the status of future teacher. The acceptance of the training was high, and feelings of competence increased during the courses. The interactive training methods were greatly appreciated, with the skills training and self-experience ranked as the most important topics. Adaptations to the cultural background of the

  7. Antenatal psychosomatic programming to reduce postpartum depression risk and improve childbirth outcomes: a randomized controlled trial in Spain and France.

    Ortiz Collado, Maria Assumpta; Saez, Marc; Favrod, Jérôme; Hatem, Marie

    2014-01-15

    Postpartum depression (PPD) and poor childbirth outcomes are associated with poverty; these variables should be addressed by an adapted approach. The aim of this research was to evaluate the impact of an antenatal programme based on a novel psychosomatic approach to pregnancy and delivery, regarding the risk of PPD and childbirth outcomes in disadvantaged women. A multi-centre, randomized, controlled trial comparing a novel to standard antenatal programme. Primary outcome was depressive symptoms (using EPDS) and secondary outcome was preterm childbirth (fewer 37 weeks). The sample comprised 184 couples in which the women were identified to be at PPD risk by validated interview. The study was conducted in three public hospitals with comparable standards of perinatal care. Women were randomly distributed in to an experimental group (EG) or a control group (CG), and evaluated twice: during pregnancy (T1) and four weeks post-partum (T2). At T2, the variables were compared using the chi square test. Data analysis was based on intention to treat. The novel programme used the Tourné psychosomatic approach focusing on body awareness sensations, construction of an individualized childbirth model, and attachment. The 10 group antenatal sessions each lasted two hours, with one telephone conversation between sessions. In the control group, the participants choose the standard model of antenatal education, i.e., 8 to 10 two-hour sessions focused on childbirth by obstetrical prophylaxis. A difference of 11.2% was noted in postpartum percentages of PPD risk (EPDS ≥ 12): 34.3% (24) in EG and 45.5% (27) in CG (p = 0.26). The number of depressive symptoms among EG women decreased at T2 (intragroup p = 0.01). Premature childbirth was four times less in EG women: three (4.4%) compared to 13 (22.4%) among CG women (p = 0.003). Birth weight was higher in EG women (p = 0.01). The decrease of depressive symptoms in women was not conclusive. However, because birth weight was higher and

  8. [DGPPN compass of participation for vocational integration of persons with mental illnesses].

    Stengler, K; Rauschenbach, J; Riedel-Heller, S G; Becker, T; Steinhart, I; Gerlinger, G; Hauth, I

    2016-11-01

    Working and living for persons with mental illnesses are a major concern of rehabilitative psychiatry. In Germany the definition of rehabilitation for persons with mental illnesses is closely linked to different sectors of social welfare and to the strongly organized supply chain of prevention, acute treatment, rehabilitation and care. In successfully supporting people with mental health problems in terms of vocational integration, professionals face various obstacles. Besides finding the correct content, structural and organizational difficulties can also arise. The welfare system with its specific institutions and settings is complicated which often leads to delays in the onset of rehabilitation. Some essential reasons are insufficient knowledge about established options of rehabilitative treatment and about responsibilities related to participation in specialized training and further education for professional caregivers. Also information and (positive) experiences from pilot projects working in an inclusive, cross-sectional way and across different settings are practically unavailable in Germany. The presented compass of participation from the German Association for Psychiatry, Psychotherapy and Psychosomatics (DGPPN) for vocational integration of persons with mental illnesses starts at this point: it provides guidelines for psychiatric and psychotherapeutic practitioners, general practitioners as well as for physicians working in residential or day care institutions with a psychiatric and psychotherapeutic background. Both the paper and planned online versions should help professionals to help people, particularly those with severe mental illnesses to navigate the system of services for vocational integration in Germany.

  9. Diaphragm Dysfunction in Critical Illness.

    Supinski, Gerald S; Morris, Peter E; Dhar, Sanjay; Callahan, Leigh Ann

    2018-04-01

    The diaphragm is the major muscle of inspiration, and its function is critical for optimal respiration. Diaphragmatic failure has long been recognized as a major contributor to death in a variety of systemic neuromuscular disorders. More recently, it is increasingly apparent that diaphragm dysfunction is present in a high percentage of critically ill patients and is associated with increased morbidity and mortality. In these patients, diaphragm weakness is thought to develop from disuse secondary to ventilator-induced diaphragm inactivity and as a consequence of the effects of systemic inflammation, including sepsis. This form of critical illness-acquired diaphragm dysfunction impairs the ability of the respiratory pump to compensate for an increased respiratory workload due to lung injury and fluid overload, leading to sustained respiratory failure and death. This review examines the presentation, causes, consequences, diagnosis, and treatment of disorders that result in acquired diaphragm dysfunction during critical illness. Copyright © 2017 American College of Chest Physicians. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. [Anorexia nervosa in German medical literature 1900 to 1945. The role of anorexia nervosa in the origin of psychosomatic medicine].

    Habermas, T

    1992-01-01

    German-language publications on anorexia nervosa and Simmonds' disease from between 1900 and 1945 are reviewed in order to trace factors inherent in medical thinking which have mostly hindered German-language medicine in understanding anorexia nervosa. It is demonstrated that a) the few German-language physicians who did describe central and possible characteristics of a.n. (weight-phobia, overactivity, bulimia, self-induced vomiting) were enabled to do so by valuing detailed clinical description, also of psychic characteristics, and an interest in the neuroses; b) the concept of anorexia nervosa was better known than previously assumed, though largely misunderstood; c) typical diagnostic misinterpretations led to typical biases in the description of the syndrome; d) in Germany more than in other countries a.n. was confounded with Simmonds' disease; and e) in addition to other factors, one reason for this lay in the 'holistic' ideal of psychosomatic medicine in the 1930s.

  11. An anonymous survey of psychosomatic medicine fellowship directors regarding breaches of contracts and a proposal for prevention.

    Levenson, James L; Bialer, Philip

    2010-01-01

    The authors studied how often applicants accept positions at more than one program, or programs offer positions to applicants who have already signed contracts with other programs. An anonymous survey was distributed to all psychosomatic medicine fellowship program directors. It is fairly common for applicants to sign contracts for fellowship positions and then back out of the contracts. Only one program reported ever knowingly offering a contract to an applicant who had accepted a position elsewhere. Programs are divided over whether there are extenuating circumstances under which it would be acceptable to offer a position to an applicant who has already signed a contract with another program. Guidelines for fellowship programs that do not use the National Resident Match Program can improve the recruitment process.

  12. Irradiation's promise: fewer foodborne illnesses?

    Roberts, T.

    1986-01-01

    Food irradiation offers a variety of potential benefits to the food supply. It can delay ripening and sprouting of fruits and vegetables, and substitute for chemical fumigants to kill insects. However, one of the most important benefits of food irradiation is its potential use for destroying microbial pathogens that enter the food supply, including the two most common disease causing bacteria: salmonella and campylobacter. Animal products are one of the primary carriers of pathogens. Food borne illnesses are on the rise, and irradiation of red meats and poultry could significantly reduce their occurrence. Food irradiation should be examined more closely to determine its possible benefits in curtailing microbial diseases

  13. Heat-Related Illnesses

    Full Text Available ... exhaustion symptoms include cool, moist, pale or flushed skin; headache; dizziness; weakness; feeling exhausted; heavy sweating; nausea; ... stage of heat illness) include flushed, hot, dry skin; fainting; a rapid, weak pulse; rapid, shallow breathing; ...

  14. Heat Related Illnesses

    Carter, R; Cheuvront, S. N; Sawka, M. N

    2006-01-01

    .... The risk of serious heat illness can be markedly reduced by implementing a variety of countermeasures, including becoming acclimated to the heat, managing heat stress exposure, and maintaining hydration...

  15. Obesity and Mental Illness

    People with serious mental illness who are overweight or obese can benefit from taking part in a fitness program called InSHAPE where they receive help with fitness, weight loss, and even grocery shopping on a budget.

  16. Caregivers and Serious Illness

    ... toll on you. You may experience distress, anxiety, depression, exhaustion, and worsening of your own physical and emotional well-being. As a result of these types of stress, your health can suffer. FAMILIES AND SERIOUS ILLNESS You are ...

  17. Heat-Related Illnesses

    Full Text Available ... ICE” in Your Cell Phone Prepare for Disasters Communication With Your Family And Your Doctor About Your ... Dr. Glenn Mitchell , Emergency physician at Mercy Health System in Chesterfield, Missouri Heat-related illness can be ...

  18. Neutrophils in critical illness.

    McDonald, Braedon

    2018-03-01

    During critical illness, dramatic alterations in neutrophil biology are observed including abnormalities of granulopoeisis and lifespan, cell trafficking and antimicrobial effector functions. As a result, neutrophils transition from powerful antimicrobial protectors into dangerous mediators of tissue injury and organ dysfunction. In this article, the role of neutrophils in the pathogenesis of critical illness (sepsis, trauma, burns and others) will be explored, including pathological changes to neutrophil function during critical illness and the utility of monitoring aspects of the neutrophil phenotype as biomarkers for diagnosis and prognostication. Lastly, we review findings from clinical trials of therapies that target the harmful effects of neutrophils, providing a bench-to-bedside perspective on neutrophils in critical illness.

  19. Comorbidities and psychotic illness. Part 1: Philosophy and clinical consequences.

    Agius, Mark; Aquilina, Francesca Falzon

    2014-11-01

    This article aims at addressing the implications of defining 'comorbidity' within the field of psychiatry. We have looked at the standard definition of comorbidity and then discussed whether this definition can be applied to comorbidities in psychiatry. While comorbidities in physical illness are clearly the coexistence of two independent illnesses, Comorbidities in Mental illness are the result of the polygenic nature of mental illnesses, especially in psychotic illness whether schizophrenia or bipolar disorder. As a consequence, often the comorbidities of psychiatric illness are caused by two conditions which have in common the presence of particular single nucleotide polymorphisms (snps), which regulate the metabolism of neurotransmitters or the presence of neurotrophic factors . Thus inevitably, many such comorbidities are inextricably linked. We discuss the consequences of this form of comorbidity for the description, classification, and risk profile of mental illness.

  20. THE HISTORICAL DEVELOPMENT OF CONSULTATION LIAISON PSYCHIATRY AND PSYCHOSOMATIC MEDICINE IN TURKISH CULTURE

    ÖZKAN, Sedat

    2012-01-01

    Before discussing the approach traditionally taken towards the mentally ill by Turkish society, let me say a few words about just who the Turks are. The first historical references to them appear in Chinese records of about 200 BC who lived in Central Asia and are believed to be the ancestors of modern-day Turks. Other Turkic tribes gradually came and settled in Anatolia, where they found a local culture that had been developing over the centuries from a mixture of peoples and societies. The ...

  1. Mass psychogenic illness after vaccination.

    Clements, C John

    2003-01-01

    When vaccines are administered to groups, the physical reactions of the recipients may be similar, causing a form of mass reaction, the mechanism for which is the same as that for mass reactions from other causes. These phenomena have been categorised as mass psychogenic illness (MPI), and have been defined as the collective occurrence of a constellation of symptoms suggestive of organic illness but without an identified cause in a group of people with shared beliefs about the cause of the symptom(s). A review of the literature shows that such outbreaks have been reported in differing cultural and environmental settings including developing and industrialised countries, in the work place, on public transport, in schools, and the military. The perceived threats have been against agents such as food poisoning, fire and toxic gases. Whatever the place or perceived threat, the response seems to be similar. The symptoms generally included headache, dizziness, weakness, and loss of consciousness. Once under way, MPIs are not easy to stop. Incidents reported in the literature show that they can quickly gather momentum and can be amplified by the press who disseminate information rapidly, escalating the events. Management of such mass events can be extremely difficult. Should the public health official in charge continue to try and determine the cause, or should this person call off the entire investigation? It is suggested here that once vaccines are identified as a probable cause of the phenomenon, a dismissive approach may actually be harmful. Unless the spokesperson has already earned a high level of trust, the public are not likely to be convinced easily that nothing was wrong with the vaccine until it has been tested. An increased awareness of MPIs on the part of organisers of future mass vaccination campaigns seems appropriate. Immunisation managers should be aware that mass immunisation campaigns could generate such mass reactions. It is therefore essential that

  2. The illness/non-illness model: hypnotherapy for physically ill patients.

    Navon, Shaul

    2014-07-01

    This article proposes a focused, novel sub-set of the cognitive behavioral therapy approach to hypnotherapy for physically ill patients, based upon the illness/non-illness psychotherapeutic model for physically ill patients. The model is based on three logical rules used in differentiating illness from non-illness: duality, contradiction, and complementarity. The article discusses the use of hypnotic interventions to help physically ill and/or disabled patients distinguish between illness and non-illness in their psychotherapeutic themes and attitudes. Two case studies illustrate that patients in this special population group can be taught to learn the language of change and to use this language to overcome difficult situations. The model suggests a new clinical mode of treatment in which individuals who are physically ill and/or disabled are helped in coping with actual motifs and thoughts related to non-illness or non-disability.

  3. Carrion’s disease: an eradicable illness?

    Gomes, Cláudia; Pons, Maria J.; Del Valle Mendoza, Juana Mercedes; Ruiz, Joaquim

    2016-01-01

    Carrion's disease is a neglected tropical disease caused by Bartonella bacilliformis, a vector-borne pathogen restricted to the Andean valleys of Peru, Ecuador and Colombia. Carrion's disease is a biphasic illness; in the acute phase the case-fatality rate can be as high as 88 %, related to high parasitemia, arriving to almost all erythrocytes, and secondary bacterial infections c...

  4. Correlates of illness severity in infectious mononucleosis

    Odame, John; Robinson, Joan; Khodai-Booran, Nasser; Yeung, Simon; Mazzulli, Tony; Stephens, Derek; Allen, Upton D

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Understanding the spectrum and frequencies of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) complications and markers of illness severity in immunocompetent patients with primary EBV infection will inform management of patients with EBV-related illnesses. OBJECTIVES: To determine the clinical and laboratory correlates of illness severity among infants, children and youth with infectious mononucleosis (IM). METHODS: Study subjects with confirmed IM were prospectively enrolled. Illness severity was assessed at baseline and at six weeks using a scoring tool. Peripheral blood viral loads served as a measure of viral burden. RESULTS: Among 32 children and young adults with IM, the median age was 16 years (range two to 24 years). The predominant clinical findings were lymphadenopathy (23 of 32 [72%]), pharyngitis (16 of 32 [50%]), fever (nine of 32 [28%]) and splenomegaly (six of 32 [19%]). With respect to symptoms or signs that persisted to at least six weeks after illness onset, the predominant complaint was lymphadenopathy in 35% of subjects available for reassessment. Deranged liver function tests were present at presentation in up to 44% of subjects. Patients with the highest viral loads at presentation had significantly higher illness severity scores associated with fatigue (P=0.02). Other than the scores associated with fatigue, viral load values were not significantly correlated with the illness severity scores at baseline and at six weeks. CONCLUSION: In IM, viral loads are not necessarily correlated with illness severity, with the exception of fatigue. EBV-related hepatitis is common in IM, confirming the status of this virus as a relatively common cause of transient hepatitis in children and youth. This entity is not necessarily a marker of disease severity. PMID:25371691

  5. Notions Of Mental Illness By Vhavenda Traditional Healers in ...

    This article is based on a study that investigated the notions of mental illness by Vhavenda traditional healers in Limpopo Province, South Africa. Specifically, the aim of the researchers was to understand and describe these traditional healers' representations of the causes of mental illness, including the diagnostic and ...

  6. [School principals--too ill for healthy schools?].

    Weber, A; Weltle, D; Lederer, P

    2004-03-01

    School principals on the one hand play an important role in maintaining the performance and health of teachers, but on the other hand often feel over-burdened themselves and suffer from illnesses which not only impair their health-promoting function, but also lead to limitations in their fitness for the occupation. The aim of our study was therefore, using objective parameters and larger numbers of cases, to obtain a differentiated insight into the type and extent of morbidity spectrum and the health-related early retirement of school principals. In a prospective total assessment (the whole of Bavaria in the period 1997-1999), all the reports about the premature unfitness for work of school directors were evaluated. The analysis included for example socio-demographic/occupational factors, diagnoses, assessment of performance and rehabilitation. The answers given in a standardised, anonymous questionnaire provided the database. Evaluation was carried out by means of descriptive statistics. The median age of the 408 school principals included in the evaluation (heads and vice-heads, 30% of whom were women) was 58 (min: 41 years old, max: 64 years old). The most frequent workplaces were primary schools (38%) and secondary schools (25%). 84% (n=342) of the headmasters were assessed to be unfit for work. The main reasons for early retirement were psychic/psychosomatic illnesses (F-ICD 10) which made up 45% of the cases. The relative frequency was higher in women than in men. Depressive disorders and exhaustion syndromes (burnout) dominated among the psychiatric diagnoses (proportion: 57%). The most frequent somatic diseases were cardio-vascular diseases (I-ICD10) in 19% of cases, then muscular/skeletal diseases (M-ICD10) in 10% and malignant tumours (C-ICD 10) in 9% of cases. Cardio-vascular diseases, in particular arterial hypertonia and ischaemic heart disease, were, in addition, found in headmasters significantly more frequently than in teachers without a leadership

  7. Evaluation of a video-based Internet intervention as preparation for inpatient psychosomatic rehabilitation: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial

    Becker, Jan; Beutel, Manfred E.; Gerzymisch, Katharina; Schulz, Dirk; Siepmann, Martin; Knickenberg, Rudolf J.; Schm?deke, Stefan; Ferdinand, Peter; Zwerenz, R?diger

    2016-01-01

    Background Patients? treatment expectations are a key factor in psychotherapy. Several studies have linked higher expectations to better treatment success. Therefore, we want to evaluate the impact of a targeted video-based intervention on patients? expectations and the treatment success of inpatient rehabilitation. Methods/design All patients who will be referred to inpatient psychosomatic rehabilitation in three clinics will receive a study flyer with information about how to log in to the ...

  8. On being Credibly Ill

    Mik-Meyer, Nanna

    2011-01-01

    unexplained symptoms. The study is conducted in Denmark using qualitative interviews with welfare officers and clients. The paper's focus is on how issues of gender and class intersect in the negotiation of illness among welfare officers and clients. The particular client group in question consists...... of individuals that are defined by their lack of a bio-medical diagnosis. Their ‘lack’ of identity accentuates how gender and class become central in the categorisation practices, constructing the ill person as either bio-medically sick or as a person who may be suffering but only from diffuse psychological...

  9. Catamnesis results of an inpatient neuro-otologic and psychosomatic tinnitus therapy 1-5 years after discharge.

    Schaaf, H; Weiß, S; Hesse, G

    2017-02-01

    Treating tinnitus with the resources offered in hospitals can become necessary for patients suffering from complex tinnitus if a high symptom severity, usually accompanied by a corresponding psychosomatic comorbidity, is present. For such costly therapies, for example, the neuro-otologic psychosomatic tinnitus therapy (NPT) examined here, the long-term effect is particularly important; however, reliable catamnesis studies for inpatient treatments are not yet available. Data from 169 (from a total of 327 contacted) inpatients suffering from complex tinnitus were analysed here. To assess the tinnitus stress, the Mini-Tinnitus Questionnaire (Mini-TF12-In German language) according to Hiller and Goebel [1], and for the assessment of the anxiety and depression element, the German version of the Hospitality Anxiety and Depression Score (HADS) [2] were analysed at the start of the therapy, at the end of the therapy and at the earliest 1 year (up to 5 years) after discharge from inpatient treatment. The data were correlated with the current hearing status. In addition, the subjectively perceived effect factors of the therapy as well as the therapies continued outside of hospital were queried. On average, the therapy lasted 39.3 days (SD 13.6) = 5.6 weeks, and the mean of the follow-up time was 38.5 months (12-70 months) (SD 18). The therapy focused on daily neuro-otologic counselling, the improvement of the concrete hearing ability, an audio-therapy as well as frequent individual and group psychotherapy based on neuro-otology. 53.8 % of patients experienced relevant hearing loss (according to WHO criteria) which needed to be treated in addition to tinnitus. Both at the end of the therapy and the follow-up consultation, a significant improvement of the tinnitus stress and a continuing significant improvement of the depression and anxiety element could be achieved in the HADS with high effect levels ranging from 1 to 2.5. Patients who did not improve (n = 7) or

  10. Analysis of the main activities of the city center of Alexander's psychosomatic hospital of St. Petersburg, focused on the choice of priorities in perfection of treatment and prophylaxis

    N. P. Vanchakova

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The authors have analyzed the results of the City Psychosomatic Centre (CPSC activity in 2009-2011 ys in order to find out the most important trends in the clinical work that may be helpful in planning of management and prophylaxis. The methods applied were statistical and clinico-statistical analyses of the results of of the Center work in 2009-2011 ys. There were changes in the structure by increasing the incidence of diseases associated with stress and organic damage brain with mental disorders, showed an increase in the flow of male patients. Found that the average length of stay in bed in the center of psychosomatic inpatient unit was 9.2-9.7 days, which creates barriers to good practice the use of antidepressants. Overcoming of these challenges can be achieved through the formation of new forms of continuity between the departments of the psychosomatic center, the health center and the offices of St. Petersburg SHCI «Alexander's Hospital,» and other medical institutions of the city.

  11. Increased rate of depression and psychosomatic symptoms in Jewish migrants from the post-Soviet-Union to Germany in the 3rd generation after the Shoa

    Ullmann, E; Barthel, A; Licinio, J; Petrowski, K; Bornstein, S R; Strauß, B

    2013-01-01

    The mental health status of persons with Jewish background living in Germany is discussed with special regard to social exclusion like anti-Semitism and overprotective parental rearing behavior, as a transmissional factor of the KZ-Syndrome. These stressors are considered in the context of a higher risk for depression/fear and psychosomatic disorders and also abnormal cortisol levels. The present sample (N=89) is derived from the Jewish population currently living in the German region of Saxony aged between 17–36 years that emigrated from the post-Soviet-Union areas. The mean age was 22.9 years. Two questionnaires to detect psychosomatic symptoms (Giessen complaint list (GBB)-24, hospital anxiety and depression scale) and one questionnaire addressing parental rearing behavior (FEE) were employed. Comparisons were drawn with normative data from the literature about the German residential population. In addition, questions were asked concerning the experience of anti-Semitism in Germany and in the post-Soviet-Union areas. A higher prevalence of depression/fear (10.3% versus 18.2%) and psychosomatic symptoms (M=14.03 versus 17.8; t=2.42; Poverprotecting maternal rearing behavior more frequently than the German standard random sample (M=15.39 versus 18.6; t=2.68; Poverprotection as parental rearing measures appear to be important factors specifically contributing to the pathogenesis of the attributed symptoms. PMID:23481628

  12. [The role of cognitive emotional self-regulation in adolescence in levels of depression, psychosomatic symptoms and subjective well-being].

    Kriston, Pálma; Pikó, Bettina

    More and more studies suggest that mental health may be determined by processes of emotional self-regulation. Emotion regulation is a complex concept which can be explicit and implicit and includes different cognitive and behavioral processes: evaluation, modifying of emotional reaction to accomplish goals. Our research aim was to explore the use of cognitive emotional self-regulation strategies related to mental health indicators among adolescents. The youth study was performed with a sample size of 1245 participants in Makó, in 2016. Data collection was based on self-administrated questionnaries that contained items on mental health, subjective well-being and background of sociodemographics. The data were compared on the basis of gender differences and tested by multiple linear regression analysis to map associations between the regulation strategies and mental health indicators: depression, psychosomatic symptoms, satisfaction with life. Girls reported higher levels of depression and psychosomatic symptoms and lower satisfaction with life than boys. Significant differences were observed between boys and girls in using rumination, positive refocusing, selfblame, others-blame and putting into perspective regulation strategy. In addition the nonadaptive strategies were proved to be related to higher depression and psychosomatic symptom scores, whereas adaptive strategies to higher level of satisfaction with life in both boys and girls. The study draws attention to the importance of cognitive emotion regulation strategies from the point of view of mental health and to explore the background factors of cognitive processes of emotional self-regulation.

  13. Effects of Twenty-four Move Shadow Boxing Combined with psychosomatic relaxation on Depression and Anxiety in Patients with Type-2 Diabetes.

    Zheng, Yingying; Zhou, Yiyi; Lai, Qiujia

    2015-06-01

    The aim of the current study was to observe the effects of Twenty-four Move Shadow Boxing combined with psychosomatic relaxation on depression and anxiety in patients with Type-2 Diabetes. One hundred and twenty (120) patients with Type-2 Diabetes and depressive/anxious symptoms were divided into intervention group (60 cases) and control group (60 cases) according to the minimum distribution principle of unbalanced indicators. Twenty-four Move Shadow Boxing group used this intervention combined with psychosomatic relaxation. Control group underwent conventional treatment. All the patients in the two groups completed the Self-rating Depression Scale (SDS) and Self-Rating Anxiety Scale (SAS) before and after treatment. Among the 52 people included in the statistical analysis, the recovery rate was 13.3%. The differences between depression and anxiety scores in the intervention group before and after treatment were statistically significant (PBoxing and psychosomatic relaxation has a beneficial auxiliary therapeutic effect on depression and anxiety accompanying Type-2 Diabetes.

  14. Study about Illness: Through the Narrative of "Illness Image"

    岩城, 晶子

    2013-01-01

    In this research, the meaning of the illness was studied from the perpective of Image. From listening to the narrative about two types of Illness Image, i.e., "my illness" and "A's illness, " we found that there was a characteristic that the Illness Image was similar to the real image. In addition, there were several differences between 2 images, which indicated that distance between the narrator and these images had an influence. From the syudy of two cases, it was indicated that Illness Ima...

  15. Glucose metabolism in critically ill patients

    Nielsen, Signe Tellerup; Krogh-Madsen, Rikke; Møller, Kirsten

    2015-01-01

    glucose (BG). This is taken advantage of in the treatment of patients with T2DM, for whom GLP-1 analogs have been introduced during the recent years. Infusion of GLP-1 also lowers the BG level in critically ill patients without causing severe hypoglycemia. The T2DM and critical illness share similar......, stimulates insulin secretion and inhibits glucagon release both in healthy individuals and in patients with type 2 diabetes (T2DM). Compared to insulin, GLP-1 appears to be associated with a lower risk of severe hypoglycemia, probably because the magnitude of its insulinotropic action is dependent on blood...

  16. Improvement of balance between work stress and recovery after a body awareness program for chronic aspecific psychosomatic symptoms.

    Landsman-Dijkstra, Jeanet J A; van Wijck, Ruud; Groothoff, Johan W

    2006-02-01

    A 3-day residential body awareness program (BAP) was developed to teach people with chronic aspecific psychosomatic symptoms (CAPS) to react adequately to disturbances of the balance between a daily workload and the capacity to deal with it. The long-term effects of the program in improving the balance between work stress and recovery are presented in this study. The intervening effect of 'improved balance' on quality of life is also analysed. A pre-post design is used with post-measures at 2 and 12 months after the program, without controls (n = 122). Mean age is 42.5 years (S.D. = 9.0) and 60% of participants are female. The results show participants become more active physically and socially, and at the same time take the opportunity to recover. There was a difference measured in changing balance for participants who are fully employed and participants who are not working or are working part-time due to health problems: the second group reintegrated into work, the first group spent more time socialising inside the family. Personal goals are realised by 85% of the participants. Realising personal goals and becoming more active is a mediating factor for increasing quality of life. The majority of the measured changes can be interpreted as clinically relevant outcomes with medium-to-large effect sizes. Spouses of the participants also confirm these effects. Evaluation of the BAP gives evidence to conclude that this program leads to long-term effects in CAPS. Participants react more adequately to disturbances between daily workload and the capacity to deal with this load. Two and 12 months after the 3-day program, they changed their behaviour to a more active lifestyle and increased self-management in coping with stress and psychosomatic symptoms. By paying more attention to the balance between work stress and recovery, patient educators may be able to increase their effectiveness. Personal goal realization can be effective in guiding people by getting them out of

  17. Illness beliefs and psychological outcome in people with Parkinson's disease.

    Simpson, Jane; Lekwuwa, Godwin; Crawford, Trevor

    2013-06-01

    Illness beliefs are important predictors of psychological outcome in people with chronic illness and evidence suggests these could also be significant in furthering our understanding of psychological functioning in people with Parkinson's disease. Illness beliefs are specific, dynamic representations of an illness and cover dimensions such as cause, identity, consequences and controllability. Eighty-one people with Parkinson's disease completed a series of questionnaires to provide demographic, clinical and psychosocial data, which were then used to assess the relative impact of illness beliefs on their psychological functioning. Psychological functioning was assessed by measuring levels of depression, anxiety, stress, positive affect and emotional well-being. Hierarchical block regression indicated that illness beliefs were important independent predictors across some but not all outcomes and the results emphasised the importance of testing new predictors against more established predictors of outcome such as physical functioning and self-esteem. The illness beliefs most important in psychological outcome in people with PD were causal beliefs (particularly in psychosocial causes) and illness coherence (the level of understanding of the illness). The therapeutic potential of psychosocial variables was discussed given that these can be modified during therapy and this change can positively influence psychological outcome.

  18. Illness management and recovery

    Dalum, Helle Stentoft; Waldemar, Anna Kristine; Korsbek, Lisa

    2018-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Illness Management and Recovery (IMR) is a psychosocial intervention with a recovery-oriented approach. The program has been evaluated in different settings; however evidence for the effects of IMR is still deficient. The aim of this trial was to investigate the benefits and harms...

  19. Chronic Illness & Mental Health

    ... increased risk of cardiovascular disease, diabetes, stroke, and Alzheimer’s disease, for example. Research also suggests that people with depression are at higher risk for osteoporosis relative to others. The reasons are not yet clear. One factor with some of these illnesses is that many ...

  20. Conceptualizing Health and Illness

    Kouba, Petr

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 39, č. 1 (2008), s. 59-80 ISSN 0047-2662 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR(CZ) IAA900090603; GA ČR(CZ) GP401/07/P293 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z90090514 Keywords : health * illness * existence * finitude Subject RIV: AA - Philosophy ; Religion

  1. Foodborne Illness Retrospective

    2015-05-07

    Dr. Paul Mead and Dr. Peter Drotman discuss the historic October 1999 article, Food-related Illness and Death in the United States.  Created: 5/7/2015 by National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases (NCEZID).   Date Released: 5/7/2015.

  2. Major Mental Illness in Those Who Sexually Abuse.

    Moulden, Heather M; Marshall, Liam E

    2017-11-09

    There is evidence showing an increasing prevalence of mental illness in those in conflict with the law. However, there are many factors affecting the detection, treatment, and management of criminals who are mentally ill. Sex offenders with major mental illness present many challenges to those providing treatment and management services. For example, it is important to consider whether sexually offensive behavior is the cause of criminal behavior or whether it is reflective of an antisocial orientation. Recent evidence suggests it may help better understand and inform risk assessment and management. This paper will review the literature on mental illness among sexual offenders, present a typology to aid in the assessment, treatment, and management of sexual offender with mental illness, and highlight important considerations when providing treatment to sexual offenders with mental illness.

  3. Community Perceptions of Mental Illness in Jharkhand, India.

    Sangeeta, S J; Mathew, K J

    2017-09-01

    Understanding and perceptions about mental illness vary among individuals based on their experience with the illness or their contact with the people affected by it. These may be further influenced by the individuals' sociocultural background. This study aimed to understand the differences in the beliefs about, understanding of, and explanations for mental illness between different population groups of Jharkhand, India. During July 2014 to February 2016, we recruited the following 3 groups of individuals aged between 18 and 60 years: individuals with mental illness (group 1, n = 240), relatives of individuals with mental illness (group 2, n = 240), and the general public (group 3, n = 240). Qualitative and quantitative findings were combined in this study, and participants were asked about their beliefs about, understanding of, and explanations about mental illness. Individuals with mental illness and their relatives shared similar beliefs whereas the general public held a different opinion in various domains. There were significant differences among all groups in their understanding of various aspects of mental illnesses including the definition, causes, signs and symptoms, treatment, and outcomes. Individuals' perception towards different aspects of mental illness varies, despite they are sharing the same sociocultural milieu. Differences in beliefs, understanding, and explanations may lead to conflicts in treatment goals and expectations, and hamper the intervention strategies that promote mental health and patient care. Focused strategies to develop uniformity in beliefs and explanations about various aspects of mental illness may help to develop collaboration with different community groups that may in turn help in developing effective interventions and treatment.

  4. The critical role of psychosomatics in promoting a new perspective upon health and disease.

    Dragoş, Dorin; Tănăsescu, Maria Daniela

    2009-01-01

    In an evolutionary model, health and disease are regarded as successful and respectively failed adaptation to the demands of the environment. The social factors are critical for a successful adaptation, while emotions are means of both signaling the organism's state and of adapting the physiological responses to environmental challenges. Hence the importance of a biopsychosocial model of health and disease. Psychoemotional distress generates and/or amplifies somatic symptoms. Somatization may be viewed as an altered cognitive process, inclining the individual to an augmented perception of bodily sensations and to an increased degree of complexity in reporting negative experiences (hence the greater cognitive effort allocated thereto). Somatosensory amplification and alexithymia are key elements in this process. The brain's right hemisphere is more involved in the generation of emotionally conditioned somatization symptoms. Somatic symptoms have various psychological and social functions and are strongly influenced by the particular belief system of the individual. Inappropriately perceiving the environment as an aggressor and excessively responding to it (by activating the cytokine system in correlation with the arousal of the psychic, nervous, and endocrine systems) may be a key element in the altered cognition conducive to ill health.

  5. Ethics and mental illness research.

    Roberts, Laura Weiss

    2002-09-01

    ethical issues are recognized as inextricably linked: science as a human activity carries complex ethical meanings and responsibilities, and ethics itself is subject to scrutiny and amenable to scientific inquiry. Building a broader, more versatile, and more effective repertoire of safeguards will be increasingly important, and safeguards, in this view, represent a modest price for the privilege of studying serious illnesses--diseases that cause grave suffering and yet are a source of both vulnerability and strength. In this paradigm, attention to ethics safeguards is no longer understood as a barrier to scientific advancement, but rather as the means by which psychiatric research may be conducted with broad societal support, honorably and, ultimately, with the expectation of bringing benefit to millions of people with mental illness.

  6. The concept of "psychosomatic" in general practice. Reflections on body language and a tentative model for understanding.

    Mattsson, Bengt; Mattsson, Monica

    2002-09-01

    In medicine, the concept "psychosomatic" indicates both dualism and polarisation. "Could it mean something psychic or is it something somatic?" This artificial dichotomy and body/mind split is not as apparent in general practice as it is in other medical disciplines. In general practice, the prerequisites for a division are overlooked. Following the work of Piaget, the article outlines manifestations of a body/mind unity as exposed in the language. Words and expressions describing the way we move, stand and walk therefore indicate our attitude and state of mind. Our body language conveys a message. The importance of breathing and its relation to our emotions is highlighted. The function of breathing is said to represent a bridge between the conscious and the unconscious--breathing can be controlled by our will, but generally we breathe reflexively. Restricted breathing is not just a mechanical process; it is shown that there is a connection between breathing and our emotions. Finally, a model of the "human organism" is presented linking four concepts, "human activity", "organ functions", "physical body" and "neurophysiological functions". Activities within the different systems are linked and relate to each other. The model supports the necessity to overcome the body/mind split, which is one of the obstacles to the fulfillment of good quality general practice.

  7. The Psycho-cardiac Coupling, Myocardial Remodeling, and Neuroendocrine Factor Levels: The Psychosomatics of Major Depressive Disorder.

    Syeda, Javeria N; Rutkofsky, Ian H; Muhammad, Adnan S; Balla Abdalla, Tarig H; Saghir, Zahid

    2018-04-11

    The association of major depressive disorder (MDD) with myocardial infarction (MI) and vice versa is not unknown. Depression, along with many other systemic factors like atherosclerosis, obesity, diabetes and vascular dysfunction, contributes to the development of adverse cardiac events in the future and, has always been a topic of interest in the fields of cardiology and psychosomatics. We wrote this review article to elaborate this relationship in detail. This article suggests that the individuals with type D personality who already had cardiovascular disease had undergone more serious myocardial damage. In addition, we elucidated the effects of depression on sympathetic activity and remodeling of myocardium after MI. The alterations in the neuroendocrine factors, which included the changes in levels of Serotonin (5-HT), Norepinephrine and Corticosterone, also geared towards the changes associated with depression-induced myocardial injury. However, we need more studies in the near future to further dig into this association process. Therefore, we recommend more research to explore the relationship of psychological factors and adverse cardiac outcomes.

  8. A 67-Item Stress Resilience item bank showing high content validity was developed in a psychosomatic sample.

    Obbarius, Nina; Fischer, Felix; Obbarius, Alexander; Nolte, Sandra; Liegl, Gregor; Rose, Matthias

    2018-04-10

    To develop the first item bank to measure Stress Resilience (SR) in clinical populations. Qualitative item development resulted in an initial pool of 131 items covering a broad theoretical SR concept. These items were tested in n=521 patients at a psychosomatic outpatient clinic. Exploratory and Confirmatory Factor Analysis (CFA), as well as other state-of-the-art item analyses and IRT were used for item evaluation and calibration of the final item bank. Out of the initial item pool of 131 items, we excluded 64 items (54 factor loading .3, 2 non-discriminative Item Response Curves, 4 Differential Item Functioning). The final set of 67 items indicated sufficient model fit in CFA and IRT analyses. Additionally, a 10-item short form with high measurement precision (SE≤.32 in a theta range between -1.8 and +1.5) was derived. Both the SR item bank and the SR short form were highly correlated with an existing static legacy tool (Connor-Davidson Resilience Scale). The final SR item bank and 10-item short form showed good psychometric properties. When further validated, they will be ready to be used within a framework of Computer-Adaptive Tests for a comprehensive assessment of the Stress-Construct. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  9. Prevalence of Psychosomatic and Emotional Symptoms in European School-Aged Children and its Relationship with Childhood Adversities

    Vanaelst, Barbara; De Vriendt, Tineke; Ahrens, Wolfgang

    2012-01-01

    The prevalence of childhood stress and psychosomatic and emotional symptoms (PES) has increased in parallel, indicating that adverse, stressful circumstances and PES in children might be associated. This study describes the prevalence of PES in European children, aged 4–11 years old, and examines...... quantitatively (i.e. the number of adversities) and qualitatively (i.e. the type of adversity). This study demonstrates the importance and the impact of the child’s family and social context on the occurrence of PES in children younger than 12 years old....... the relationship among PES, negative life events (NLE) and familial or social adversities in the child’s life. Parent-reported data on childhood adversities and PES was collected for 4,066 children from 8 European countries, who participated in the follow-up survey of IDEFICS (2009–2010), by means of the ‘IDEFICS......-demographics, family lifestyle and health of the child. Chi-square analyses were performed to investigate the prevalence of PES among survey centres, age groups and sex of the child. Odds ratios were calculated to examine the childhood adversity exposure between PES groups and logistic regression analyses were...

  10. “How well one has to be, to be ill!”: Work, Pain, and the Discourse of Neurasthenia in The Diary of Alice James

    Shawna Rushford-Spence

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Neurasthenia, though no longer diagnosed today, was an illness that was commonly diagnosed in the late 19th and early 20th centuries. It was an umbrella category that encompassed all manner of somatic and psychosomatic ailments. In order to make this disease more palatable to the American public, Dr. George Miller Beard constructed an economic metaphor, in which people had certain amounts of “nerve-force” that could be saved or spent and, when overspent, could result in “nervous bankruptcy.” My essay analyzes The Diary of Alice James from a disability studies perspective in order to how Alice James uses this economic terminology rhetorically to reclaim her subjectivity, to characterize disability as central to identity, to disrupt the narrative of disability as global incapacity, and to configure pain (rather than illness itself as work. Keywords: neurasthenia, "rest cure," invalid, discourse, nervous, nerve-force, and "nervous bankruptcy"

  11. Looking after chronically ill dogs

    Christiansen, Stine B.; Kristensen, Annemarie Thuri; Sandøe, Peter

    2013-01-01

    thus face similar challenges when caring for their animals. This qualitative study uncovers impacts on an owner's life, when attending to the care of an aged or chronically ill dog and reflects on the differing roles of caregivers with animal and human patients. Twelve dog owners were selected for in......-depth interviews based on the dogs' diagnoses, and the choice of treatments and care expected to affect the owner's life. Interviews were recorded, transcribed, and analyzed qualitatively. The dog owners reported several changes in their lives due to their dog's condition: practicalities like extra care, changes...... in use of the home, and restrictions relating to work, social life, and finances. These were time-consuming, tough, and annoying, but could often be dealt with through planning and prioritizing. Changes in the human–dog relationship and activities caused sadness and frustration, which in turn led...

  12. HIGH-ALTITUDE ILLNESS

    Dwitya Elvira

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available AbstrakHigh-altitude illness (HAI merupakan sekumpulan gejala paru dan otak yang terjadi pada orang yang baru pertama kali mendaki ke ketinggian. HAI terdiri dari acute mountain sickness (AMS, high-altitude cerebral edema (HACE dan high-altitude pulmonary edema (HAPE. Tujuan tinjauan pustaka ini adalah agar dokter dan wisatawan memahami risiko, tanda, gejala, dan pengobatan high-altitude illness. Perhatian banyak diberikan terhadap penyakit ini seiring dengan meningkatnya popularitas olahraga ekstrim (mendaki gunung tinggi, ski dan snowboarding dan adanya kemudahan serta ketersediaan perjalanan sehingga jutaan orang dapat terpapar bahaya HAI. Di Pherice, Nepal (ketinggian 4343 m, 43% pendaki mengalami gejala AMS. Pada studi yang dilakukan pada tempat wisata di resort ski Colorado, Honigman menggambarkan kejadian AMS 22% pada ketinggian 1850 m sampai 2750 m, sementara Dean menunjukkan 42% memiliki gejala pada ketinggian 3000 m. Aklimatisasi merupakan salah satu tindakan pencegahan yang dapat dilakukan sebelum pendakian, selain beberapa pengobatan seperti asetazolamid, dexamethasone, phosopodiestrase inhibitor, dan ginko biloba.Kata kunci: high-altitude illness, acute mountain sickness, edema cerebral, pulmonary edema AbstractHigh-altitude illness (HAI is symptoms of lung and brain that occurs in people who first climb to altitude. HAI includes acute mountain sickness (AMS, high-altitude cerebral edema (HACE and high altitude pulmonary edema (HAPE. The objective of this review was to understand the risks, signs, symptoms, and treatment of high-altitude illness. The attention was given to this disease due to the rising popularity of extreme sports (high mountain climbing, skiing and snowboarding and the ease and availability of the current travelling, almost each year, millions of people could be exposed to the danger of HAI. In Pherice, Nepal (altitude 4343 m, 43% of climbers have symptoms of AMS. Furthermore, in a study conducted at sites in

  13. Psychological Stressors and Burden of Medical Conditions in Older Adults: A Psychosomatic Approach

    Arash Mani

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available "n  "n  "nObjective: "nIn geriatric practice, the impact of psychological distress on health status has been undermined due to ageism, atypical presentation and less tendency to report negative affect among elderly people. Few studies have examined the impact of psychological stressors on medical burden in older adults. The current study has investigated the correlation of psychological distress and burden of medical conditions in a sample of older people .     "n  "n  "nMethod: A convenient study sample of 120 elderly subjects was recruited from the places where there was greater chance for the elderly people to attend. Data were collected by a trained research assistant using perceived stress scale, cumulative illness rating scale, geriatric depressive scale and a demographic questionnaire.     "n  "n  "nResults: "nOur participants perceived more level of stress than the average for their age. In the current study, the burden of medical condition was significantly correlated with the level of perceived stress(r = .197, p = .044. Moreover, in regression analysis, perceived stress was the strongest predictor for physical health morbidity (R2 =.049, significant f= .03.     "n  "n  "nConclusions: "nThe result of this study suggested that the psychological stressors contribute to poor health outcome in older adults ; the area that is usually overlooked due to ageism and its physiological related changes. The medical practitioners should consider the psychological distress as a part of etiological factors implicating in health morbidity among their aged patients.

  14. Spatial revolution and «uprooting». A criticism of its psychosomatic implications on virtual Capitalism

    Borja García Ferrer

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Irreversibly enshrined by the omnipresent telematic communication technologies, the virtual metamorphosis of Capitalism and its untameable proliferation demand a hermeneutical key beyond an economy-focused level, since the ontological turn that they foster finds its fateful echo in the existential misery that all of us experience, every day, with no exception. Our aim is to prepare, from the point of view of the uneasiness-culture relationship, a pathological profile of «uprooting», which, according to our hypothesis, is one of the syndromes with a higher epidemic scope in our time of distress. First, we are going to examine the aetiology of «uprooting» in the new horizon formed, by means of the contemporary blending of technology and power, by the virtual overcoming of space, reduced to the category of «cyberspace», «virtual reality» o «web space» without ontological consistency, spectral and accelerated to paroxysm. Then, we are going to identify and describe the nature of the pathology concerned, seen as «being-in-theimpossibility », in light of the inquiries of the Existential Analysis School on the heideggerian criticism of «being-in-front-of-the-world». Finally, we are going to analyze the morbid expressions of «uprooting» in the actual praxis of action and understanding, recovering the therapeuticdimension of Philosophy in order to show, on the basis of the concept of «corporeality» developed by Merleau-Ponty and debated with the psychopathological tradition, the pathological transformation of the experience of space which constitutes its ill-fated corollary.

  15. ILL. Annual report 1976

    In 1976 the three major functions of ILL continued to be generally satisfactorily performed (provision of neutron beams at the high flux reactor, development of advanced instrumentation, establishment of a forum). The implementation of the programme of measurements approved by the Scientific Council was again given absolute priority. This report gives a survey of the state of the experimental facilities at ILL and the scientific work carried out in 1976, and of the main technical and administrative activities of the Institute Chapters correspond to the various colleges (theory, fundamental and nuclear physics, excitations, structures liquid, gases and amorphous materials, impurities, structural biology and chemistry), reactor operation and instrument support services, computing services... A second volume of this report contains more detailed descriptions of the individual experiments

  16. ILL. Annual report 1979. Annex

    1980-01-01

    This second volume, entitled 'Annex to the Annual Report' deals in more detail with the scientific work of the I.L.L. The scientific activity of theoreticians at the I.L.L. for 1979 is described. The experimental reports giving details on the experiments performed at the I.L.L. up to October 1, 1979 have been compiled. They are published here under their proposal number within the classification cheme in use at the I.L.L

  17. Illness Attitudes Scale dimensions and their associations with anxiety-related constructs in a nonclinical sample.

    Stewart, S H; Watt, M C

    2000-01-01

    Illness Attitudes Scale in a nonclinical sample. Behaviour Research and Therapy; Speckens, A. E., Spinhoven, P., Sloekers, P. P. A., Bolk, J. H. & van Hemert, A. M. (1996). A validation study of the Whitley Index, the Illness Attitude Scales and the Somatosensory Amplification Scale in general medical and general practice patients. Journal of Psychosomatic Research, 40, 95-104]. The Fears, Beliefs and Effects lower-order factors and the General Hypochondriacal Concerns higher-order factor, were shown to be strongly associated with anxiety sensitivity, even after accounting for trait anxiety and panic history. Implications for understanding the high degree of comorbidity between the diagnoses of panic disorder and hypochondriasis, as well as future research directions for exploring the utility of various IAS dimensions in predicting responses to lab-based bodily symptom-induction procedures, are discussed.

  18. ILL Annual Report 1974

    1974-01-01

    This annual report provides a general view of the activities of the different sections of the ILL. In 1974, twenty-two different neutron spectrometers with different characteristics were available on a regular basis. Moreover, a number of special neutron sources were employed for on-line experiments. The major effort was devoted to an increase in experimental systems and to the development of new measurement techniques [fr

  19. The Stigma of Mental Illness

    Overton, Stacy L.; Medina, Sondra L.

    2008-01-01

    Stigma surrounding major mental illness creates many barriers. People who experience mental illness face discrimination and prejudice when renting homes, applying for jobs, and accessing mental health services. The authors review the current literature regarding stigma and mental illness. They define stigma and review theories that explain its…

  20. Stigmatising attitudes towards the mentally ill: A survey in a Nigerian ...

    Background. The burden of mental illness is particularly severe for people living in low-income countries. Negative attitudes towards the mentally ill, stigma experiences and discrimination constitute part of this disease burden. Objective. The aim of this study was to investigate knowledge of possible causes of mental illness ...

  1. Children's understanding of mental illness: an exploratory study.

    Fox, C; Buchanan-Barrow, E; Barrett, M

    2008-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate children's thinking about mental illness by employing a well-established framework of adult illness understanding. The study adopted a semistructured interview technique and a card selection task to assess children's responses to causes, consequences, timeline and curability of the different types of mental illness. The children were aged between 5 and 11 years. Results indicated a developmental trend in the children's thinking about mental illness; there was an increase in the children's understanding of the causes, consequences, curability and timeline of mental illness with age. The older children demonstrated a more sophisticated and accurate thinking about mental illness compared with the younger children, who tended to rely on a medical model in order to comprehend novel mental illnesses. Furthermore, the girls exhibited more compassion, showing greater social acceptance compared with the boys. The Leventhal model provides a useful framework within which to investigate children's knowledge and understanding of mental illness. Limitations of the study and implications for future research are discussed.

  2. Activation of latent Graves' disease in children. Review of possible psychosomatic mechanisms.

    Morillo, E; Gardner, L I

    1980-03-01

    In some children, psychological events have appeared to be important in the triggering of Graves' disease. This report examines the case histories of three children in whom the appearance of symptomatology of Graves' disease was associated with depression following the death of a loved one. An analysis of neuroendocrine and immunologie pathways suggests that depression, set off by bereavement, causes low levels of norepinephrine in the brain. The latter in turn may mediate an increase in ACTH and cortisol, leading to reductions in immune surveillance and resultant production of thyroid-stimulating immunoglobulins, hence the development of Graves' disease.

  3. Psychosomatic consultation in the workplace: opportunities and limitations of the services offered--results of a qualitative study.

    Preiser, Christine; Rothermund, Eva; Wittich, Andrea; Gündel, Harald; Rieger, Monika A

    2016-05-01

    In Germany, innovative concepts of anchoring psychotherapeutic consultations within an occupational setting emerge in models like the "psychosomatic consultation in the workplace" (PCIW). Characteristic quality is the close cooperation between company-based occupational health physicians (OPs) and external psychotherapeutic consultants. Little is currently known about the attitudes of OPs and other stakeholders in companies in terms of possible contributions of these offers to their tasks within the field of mental health and work. Data were collected via individual interviews with different stakeholders (n = 8) and two OP focus groups (each n = 5) with and without experience with PCIW. Data were analysed with content analysis. Common mental disorders (CMD) were perceived as occurring increasingly but still being stigmatized. PCIW allows employees quick access to a neutral psychotherapist and thus might help to avoid chronification of CMD. For companies, this may mean that longer periods of absenteeism (and presenteeism) can be avoided. The interviewees also feel that the ongoing collaboration with a psychotherapeutic specialist may sensitize OPs to recognize mental disorders earlier and provide basic treatment. PCIW was stated as an early, easy and fast first access to psychotherapy. The effort of PCIW is limited if structural changes in the workplace are necessary to reduce mental stressors. Also, if financed by the company, PCIW should have clear time limits and cannot aim to replace health insurance benefits. Taking above-mentioned limitations into account, PCIW appears to be a promising tool to bridge the gap between OP-conducted company-based health promotion and early secondary care.

  4. Addressing the social causes of illness | IDRC - International ...

    2011-01-28

    Jan 28, 2011 ... ... practitioners, scholars, and civil society leaders” to guide the Commission's work. ... It showed that for each gradient up or down in social and economic ... that their decisions will have critical ramifications for citizens' health.

  5. Gingival Necrosis Caused by an Ill-Fitting Denture

    Vanja VUČIĆEVIĆ BORAS

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We present a case of an 80-year-old male who was referred to the Department of Oral Medicine, School of Dental Medicine University of Zagreb, Croatia due to gingival ulcer which was present for eight days. Clinical examination has revealed exposed bone on the toothless alveolar ridge in the lower molar region on the right side of 0.8 cm in diameter. Otherwise, the patient was taking doxazosin due to urinary problems and ipatropium bromide due to respiratory problems. The patient wore a 6-year-old partial lower denture. He was initially treated with periodontal bandage (Resopack, HagenWerken, Germany for the first three days and was instructed not to wear the denture; however, no benefit could be seen. Therefore, we added a local corticosteroid (betamethasone and an oral antiseptic (chlorhexidine digluconate applied three times a day. After 3 weeks the lesion healed. A list of possible causative factors regarding gingival ulcers is included.

  6. Children's Knowledge of Contagion and Contamination as Causes of Illness.

    Siegal, Michael

    1988-01-01

    Findings of three experiments indicated that preschool children have a more substantial knowledge of contagion and contamination than has been estimated previously. Results are discussed in terms of children's ability to understand causal relations. (RH)

  7. Surrogate motherhood in illness that does not cause infertility

    Surrogate motherhood in South Africa (SA) is regulated by the. Children's Act,[1] the National Health Act[2] and its regulations,[3] and court cases.[4-6] The Children's Act formulates the legal requirement for a commissioning parent or parents to legally access surrogacy:[1]. 'A court may not confirm a surrogate motherhood ...

  8. Travails of travel. Subtle and obscure causes of illness.

    Gordon, M E

    1988-07-01

    Knowledge of patients' travel history is an important facet of diagnosis. Malaria, Chagas' disease, toxoplasmosis, Lyme disease, arboviruses, and many other relatively unusual diseases can be contracted while the patient is traveling, and the symptoms, which may mimic another disease, may not become obvious until the patient returns. The Roman philosopher Marcus Aurelius Antoninus alerts us to easier resolutions of our daily diagnostic dilemmas: "Look within and let neither the peculiar quality of anything nor its value escape thee."

  9. Gaius Caligula's mental illness.

    Sidwell, Barbara

    2010-01-01

    The strange behavior of emperor Gaius has been the subject of debate for many historians. Some charge him with madness and attribute it to his illness in A.D. 37, whereas others believe it occurred later, or else had nothing to do with his sickness.We have no real evidence to reconstruct his mental state. Therefore speculations about madness are fruitless, as they can't be proven. Also, his madness belongs to a discourse which originates mainly from the senatorial narrative that sought to discredit him through any means possible. Thus, his acts should be seen from other angles, and the search for "mad Caligula" abandoned.

  10. [Antibiotics in the critically ill].

    Kolak, Radmila R

    2010-01-01

    Antibiotics are one the most common therapies administered in the intensive care unit setting. This review outlines the strategy for optimal use of antimicrobial agents in the critically ill. In severely ill patients, empirical antimicrobial therapy should be used when a suspected infection may impair the outcome. It is necessary to collect microbiological documentation before initiating empirical antimicrobial therapy. In addition to antimicrobial therapy, it is recommended to control a focus of infection and to modify factors that promote microbial growth or impair the host's antimicrobial defence. A judicious choice of antimicrobial therapy should be based on the host characteristics, the site of injection, the local ecology, and the pharmacokinetics/pharmacodynamics of antibiotics. This means treating empirically with broad-spectrum antimicrobials as soon as possible and narrowing the spectrum once the organism is identified (de-escalation), and limiting duration of therapy to the minimum effective period. Despite theoretical advantages, a combined antibiotic therapy is nor more effective than a mono-therapy in curing infections in most clinical trials involving intensive care patients. Nevertheless, textbooks and guidelines recommend a combination for specific pathogens and for infections commonly caused by these pathogens. Avoiding unnecessary antibiotic use and optimizing the administration of antimicrobial agents will improve patient outcomes while minimizing risks for the development of bacterial resistance. It is important to note that each intensive care unit should have a program in place which monitors antibiotic utilisation and its effectiveness. Only in this way can the impact of interventions aimed at improving antibiotic use be evaluated at the local level.

  11. Historical perspectives on music as a cause of disease.

    Kennaway, James

    2015-01-01

    The relationship between music and medicine is generally understood in the benign context of music therapy, but, as this chapter shows, there is a long parallel history of medical theories that suggest that music can cause real physical and mental illness. During the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries, the idea of music as an expression of universal harmony was challenged by a more mechanistic model of nervous stimulation. By the 1790s, there was a substantial discourse on the dangers of musical overstimulation to health in medicine, literature, and etiquette books. During the nineteenth century, the sense of music as a pathogenic stimulant gained in influence. It was often linked to fears about sexuality, female gynecological health, and theories of hypnosis and degeneration. In the twentieth century, the debate on the medical perils of the wrong kinds of music became overtly politicized in Germany and the Soviet Union. Likewise, the opponents of jazz, particularly in the United States, often turned to medicine to fend off its supposed social, moral, and physical consequences. The Cold War saw an extensive discourse on the idea of musical "brainwashing," that rumbled on into the 1990s. Today, regular media panics about pathological music are mirrored by alarming evidence of the deliberate use of music to harm listeners in the context of the so-called War on Terror. Can music make you ill? Music therapy is a common if perhaps rather neglected part of medicine, but its diametric opposite, the notion that music might lead to real mental and physical illness, may seem improbable. In fact, over the last two hundred years, there have been many times when as much was written about the medical dangers of music as about its potential benefits. Since the eighteenth century, fears about music's effects on the nerves and the mind have created a remarkably extensive discourse on pathological music based on a view of both music and the causation of disease as matters of

  12. The Attack on Psychosomatic Integrity: a Study of the Psychological Sequelae of Burn Trauma

    Cavaleri, V.; Epifanio, M.S.; Benigno, A.; Conte, F.; Di Pasquale, A.

    2009-01-01

    Summary Burns pathology is characterized not only by insidious damage to the patients' outward appearance but also by the equally painful emotional difficulties they encounter as they reorganize their identity and their personal history. This exploratory survey, combining research work with medical action, considers the cases of 41 outpatients who were hospitalized and subjected to skin grafting. The patients were recruited through the database of the Palermo Civic Hospital Plastic Surgery and Burns Therapy Operative Unit. The questionnaires were compiled 6 and 12 months post-burn (12 months' observation). The main objective of the research was to investigate the quality of life of burn patients in relation to the way they handled their condition on the emotional level, in order to cope with the stress caused by the burn. PMID:21991160

  13. Features of clinical signs of nervous and psychosomatic disorders in the Chernobyl' NPP personnel and human populations of affected regions at different stages of accident and its response

    Aleksandrovskij, Yu.A.; Tabachnikov, S.I.; Bebeshko, V.G.; Shchukin, B.P.; Rumyantseva, G.M.; Roslyakov, V.S.; Mel'nik, V.V.; Cherenkov, V.N.; Bero, M.P.; Mukhamadieva, R.A.

    1989-01-01

    Clinical signs of nervous and psychosomatic disorders in the Chernobyl' NPP personnel and persons taking part in the emergency response were analysed. Main stress factors for the personnel side by side with radiation hazard were the following ones: house loss, family separation, future uncertainties, etc. Singularity of labour under conditions of remaining threat for life and health, absence of information on the environmental radioactivity, unsatisfactory life conditions were in the first place for arrived persons. Analysis of determined psychopathological signs testifies to the prevalence of wide range of nervous disorders peculiar to natural calamities and disasters

  14. Comparative Analysis of the Clinical Significance of Oscillatory Components in the Rhythmic Structure of Pulse Signal in the Diagnostics of Psychosomatic Disorders in School Age Children.

    Desova, A A; Dorofeyuk, A A; Anokhin, A M

    2017-01-01

    We performed a comparative analysis of the types of spectral density typical of various parameters of pulse signal. The experimental material was obtained during the examination of school age children with various psychosomatic disorders. We also performed a typological analysis of the spectral density functions corresponding to the time series of different parameters of a single oscillation of pulse signals; the results of their comparative analysis are presented. We determined the most significant spectral components for two disordersin children: arterial hypertension and mitral valve prolapse.

  15. ILL Annual report 97

    NONE

    1997-12-31

    In 1997 the reactor operated for the planned 225 days and more than 750 experiments were carried out. Among the experimental highlights are 2 contrasting examples of the new types of experiments now possible using the new high-intensity diffractometer D2O: stroboscopic measurements of kinetic processes and rapid texture measurements of structural materials. Some early results from the new high-resolution gamma spectrometer in the study of nuclear structure are also presented. Another new facility is just coming into service: the 2{pi} image-plate detector LADI, optimised for Laue measurements on biological crystals. The contrast between biological experiments and for example those on superconductivity or neutron {beta}-decay, illustrates very well the range of scientific questions addressed through the use of ILL`s neutron beams. 30 brief accounts of research work achieved during this year are given, they are classified under 9 topics: polymers and colloids, chemistry and structure, biology, materials science, liquids and glasses, magnetism, strongly correlated electron systems, quantum systems, nuclear and fundamental physics. The scheduled new developments are described and a list of the publications is also given

  16. ILL Annual report 97

    NONE

    1998-12-31

    In 1997 the reactor operated for the planned 225 days and more than 750 experiments were carried out. Among the experimental highlights are 2 contrasting examples of the new types of experiments now possible using the new high-intensity diffractometer D2O: stroboscopic measurements of kinetic processes and rapid texture measurements of structural materials. Some early results from the new high-resolution gamma spectrometer in the study of nuclear structure are also presented. Another new facility is just coming into service: the 2{pi} image-plate detector LADI, optimised for Laue measurements on biological crystals. The contrast between biological experiments and for example those on superconductivity or neutron {beta}-decay, illustrates very well the range of scientific questions addressed through the use of ILL`s neutron beams. 30 brief accounts of research work achieved during this year are given, they are classified under 9 topics: polymers and colloids, chemistry and structure, biology, materials science, liquids and glasses, magnetism, strongly correlated electron systems, quantum systems, nuclear and fundamental physics. The scheduled new developments are described and a list of the publications is also given

  17. ILL. Annual report 1977

    In 1977 the three major functions of ILL continued to be performed (provision of neutron beams at the high flux reactor, development of advanced instrumentation, workshop organization). An integrated programme of improvement to the existing instruments and of new instrument construction, was carried out. A high priority was given to finishing instruments in the course of construction and both the ultra cold neutron source, PN5, and spin echo spectrometer, IN11, came into operation. No new instrument construction was started; even so, the completion of D18 (the interferometer) and IN12 (the cold three-axis machine) was delayed until 1978. Some advantage was taken of the delay to implement a new system of three-axis drive mechanics and interfacing electronics. This report gives a survey of the state of the experimental facilities at ILL and the scientific work carried out in 1977, and of the main technical and administrative activites of the Institute. Chapters correspond to the various colleges (theory, fundamental and nuclear physics, excitations, structures, liquid, gases and amorphous materials, impurities, structural biology and chemistry), reactor operation and instrument support services, computing services... A second volume of this report contains more detailed descriptions of the individual experiments [fr

  18. Illness perceptions predict survival in haemodialysis patients.

    Chilcot, Joseph; Wellsted, David; Farrington, Ken

    2011-01-01

    Illness perceptions have been shown to be important determinants of functional and psychosocial outcomes, including quality of life and treatment adherence in end-stage renal disease patients. The aim of this prospective study was to determine whether haemodialysis patients' illness perceptions impact upon survival. Haemodialysis patients from a UK renal service completed the Revised Illness Perception Questionnaire. Over the study period (May 2007 to December 2010), all-cause mortality was recorded as the endpoint. 223 patients were followed up for a median of 15.9 months (min. 10 days, max. 42.7 months). The median dialysis vintage was 17.6 months (min. 4 days, max. 391.3 months). Treatment control perceptions demonstrated a significant association with mortality (HR = 0.91, 95% CI: 0.83-0.99, p = 0.03). After controlling for covariates, including age, albumin, extra renal comorbidity and depression scores, perception of treatment control remained a significant predictor of mortality (HR = 0.89, 95% CI: 0.80-0.99, p = 0.03). Patients' perceptions of treatment control (dialysis therapy) predict survival independently of survival risk factors, including comorbidity. Studies are required to test whether psychological interventions designed to modify maladaptive illness perceptions influence clinical outcomes in this patient setting. Copyright © 2011 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  19. Illness Identity in Adults with a Chronic Illness.

    Oris, Leen; Luyckx, Koen; Rassart, Jessica; Goubert, Liesbet; Goossens, Eva; Apers, Silke; Arat, Seher; Vandenberghe, Joris; Westhovens, René; Moons, Philip

    2018-02-21

    The present study examines the concept of illness identity, the degree to which a chronic illness is integrated into one's identity, in adults with a chronic illness by validating a new self-report questionnaire, the Illness Identity Questionnaire (IIQ). Self-report questionnaires on illness identity, psychological, and physical functioning were assessed in two samples: adults with congenital heart disease (22-78 year old; n = 276) and with multisystem connective tissue disorders (systemic lupus erythematosus or systemic sclerosis; 17-81 year old; n = 241). The IIQ could differentiate four illness identity states (i.e., engulfment, rejection, acceptance, and enrichment) in both samples, based on exploratory and confirmatory factor analysis. All four subscales proved to be reliable. Rejection and engulfment were related to maladaptive psychological and physical functioning, whereas acceptance and enrichment were related to adaptive psychological and physical functioning. The present findings underscore the importance of the concept of illness identity. The IIQ, a self-report questionnaire, is introduced to measure four different illness identity states in adults with a chronic illness.

  20. CASE REPORT Uncommon Pathogen Bacillus Cereus Causing ...

    2018-01-01

    Jan 1, 2018 ... Causing Subdural Empyema in a Child. Ethiop J ... 1Department of Child Health,. Airlangga ... secondary to middle ear infection, meningitis, brain surgery, ... classic clinical syndrome is an acute febrile illness punctuated by.

  1. Concepts of Illness Among the Swahili of Lamu, Kenya.

    Gearhart, Rebecca; Abdulrehman, Munib Said

    2014-07-01

    The Swahili of Lamu, Kenya, understand illness as the result of a spiritual imbalance caused by personal transgression or an attack by harmful forces directed by an envious person. Another underlying component of the Swahili concept of illness is that each person's physical body operates in conjunction with personal attributes that are fixed at birth and determine moral character, behavior, and predisposition to ailments. When physical symptoms occur, the Swahili focus on identifying the human or supernatural entity that caused the illness in consultation with a range of healers who specialize in a variety of curing strategies. Two case studies illustrate how culturally congruent nursing care can be achieved when health care providers understand the Swahili framework of diagnosing and treating illness. © The Author(s) 2013.

  2. Rumination, depressive symptoms and awareness of illness in schizophrenia.

    Thomas, Neil; Ribaux, Darryl; Phillips, Lisa J

    2014-03-01

    Depressive symptoms are common in schizophrenia. Previous studies have observed that depressive symptoms are associated with both insight and negative appraisals of illness, suggesting that the way in which the person thinks about their illness may influence the occurrence of depressive responses. In affective disorders, one of the most well-established cognitive processes associated with depressive symptoms is rumination, a pattern of perseverative, self-focused negative thinking. This study examined whether rumination focused on mental illness was predictive of depressive symptoms during the subacute phase of schizophrenia. Forty participants with a diagnosis of schizophrenia and in a stable phase of illness completed measures of rumination, depressive symptoms, awareness of illness, and positive and negative symptoms. Depressive symptoms were correlated with rumination, including when controlling for positive and negative symptoms. The content of rumination frequently focused on mental illness and its causes and consequences, in particular social disability and disadvantage. Depressive symptoms were predicted by awareness of the social consequences of mental illness, an effect that was mediated by rumination. Results suggest that a process of perseveratively dwelling upon mental illness and its social consequences may be a factor contributing to depressive symptoms in people with chronic schizophrenia.

  3. Parent and child asthma illness representations: a systematic review.

    Sonney, Jennifer T; Gerald, Lynn B; Insel, Kathleen C

    2016-06-01

    The purpose of this article is to synthesize the current literature on parent and child asthma illness representations and their consequent impact on parent-child asthma shared management. This systematic review was conducted in concordance with the PRISMA statement. An electronic search of five computerized databases (PubMed, PsycINFO, CINAHL, Cochrane, and EMBASE) was conducted using the following key words: asthma, illness representation, and child. Due to the limited number of articles identified, the search was broadened to include illness perceptions as well. Studies were included if they were specific to asthma and included parent and/or child asthma illness representations or perception, were published after 2000, and available in English. Fifteen articles were selected for inclusion. All of the articles are descriptive studies that used cross-sectional designs. Seven of the studies used parent and child participants, eight used parents only, and none used only child participants. None of the selected studies describe child asthma illness representations, and only three describe parental asthma illness representations. Domains of illness representations, including symptoms, timeline, consequences, cause, and controllability were described in the remaining articles. Symptoms and controllability appear to have the most influence on parental asthma management practices. Parents prefer symptomatic or intermittent asthma management and frequently cite concerns regarding daily controller medication use. Parents also primarily rely on their own objective symptom observations rather than the child's report of symptoms. Asthma illness representations are an important area of future study to better understand parent-child shared asthma management.

  4. [Psychosomatic aspects of hyperthyroidism with special reference to Basedow's disease. An overview].

    Rodewig, K

    1993-08-01

    The following paper deals with the current research in hyperthyroidism, with special accent to Graves' disease. Besides severe psychological trauma a breakdown of neurotic defense mechanism on the ground of a special personality structure was thought to be the trigger of the disease. The metabolic changes became the main point of interest. The influence of thyrostatic, surgical and radioactive therapies on psychological symptoms, was investigated. Thereby, the previously anticipated emotional factors became less significant in the aetiology of the disease. A recent study (Paschke 1990) suggests that patient with hyperthyroidism have, even in an euthyrotic state, an increased vulnerability to anxiety provoking situations. At this point it is not clear, due to the retrospective nature of the study, whether the vulnerability exists prior to the unset of the disease or is a result of the metabolic disorder. Both thyroxin and TRH are being successfully used in the treatment of major depression. TRH acts as a neurotransmitter in the autonomic nervous system and can be demonstrated in the peripheral lymphocytes. However, the exact mechanisms of action of thyroxin and TRH are still unknown. Graves' disease is an autoimmune disease, that can be caused by specific HLA antigens. Thereby, a changed subpopulation of lymphocytes can be demonstrated, as well as there disturbed functions. A correlation between high scores for anxiety and depression on one hand and the occurrence of an abnormal T4/T8 ratio on the other hand, have been reported in a small number of cases (Paschke 1990). The psychological symptoms in hyperthyroidism are similar to the symptomatology of neurotic anxiety and the anxious depressive syndrome.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  5. Estimating the true global burden of mental illness.

    Vigo, Daniel; Thornicroft, Graham; Atun, Rifat

    2016-02-01

    We argue that the global burden of mental illness is underestimated and examine the reasons for under-estimation to identify five main causes: overlap between psychiatric and neurological disorders; the grouping of suicide and self-harm as a separate category; conflation of all chronic pain syndromes with musculoskeletal disorders; exclusion of personality disorders from disease burden calculations; and inadequate consideration of the contribution of severe mental illness to mortality from associated causes. Using published data, we estimate the disease burden for mental illness to show that the global burden of mental illness accounts for 32·4% of years lived with disability (YLDs) and 13·0% of disability-adjusted life-years (DALYs), instead of the earlier estimates suggesting 21·2% of YLDs and 7·1% of DALYs. Currently used approaches underestimate the burden of mental illness by more than a third. Our estimates place mental illness a distant first in global burden of disease in terms of YLDs, and level with cardiovascular and circulatory diseases in terms of DALYs. The unacceptable apathy of governments and funders of global health must be overcome to mitigate the human, social, and economic costs of mental illness. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Ill-posedness in modeling mixed sediment river morphodynamics

    Chavarrías, Víctor; Stecca, Guglielmo; Blom, Astrid

    2018-04-01

    In this paper we analyze the Hirano active layer model used in mixed sediment river morphodynamics concerning its ill-posedness. Ill-posedness causes the solution to be unstable to short-wave perturbations. This implies that the solution presents spurious oscillations, the amplitude of which depends on the domain discretization. Ill-posedness not only produces physically unrealistic results but may also cause failure of numerical simulations. By considering a two-fraction sediment mixture we obtain analytical expressions for the mathematical characterization of the model. Using these we show that the ill-posed domain is larger than what was found in previous analyses, not only comprising cases of bed degradation into a substrate finer than the active layer but also in aggradational cases. Furthermore, by analyzing a three-fraction model we observe ill-posedness under conditions of bed degradation into a coarse substrate. We observe that oscillations in the numerical solution of ill-posed simulations grow until the model becomes well-posed, as the spurious mixing of the active layer sediment and substrate sediment acts as a regularization mechanism. Finally we conduct an eigenstructure analysis of a simplified vertically continuous model for mixed sediment for which we show that ill-posedness occurs in a wider range of conditions than the active layer model.

  7. Do biogenetic causal beliefs reduce mental illness stigma in people with mental illness and in mental health professionals? A systematic review.

    Larkings, Josephine S; Brown, Patricia M

    2018-06-01

    Viewing mental illness as an 'illness like any other' and promoting biogenetic causes have been explored as a stigma-reduction strategy. The relationship between causal beliefs and mental illness stigma has been researched extensively in the general public, but has gained less attention in more clinically-relevant populations (i.e. people with mental illness and mental health professionals). A systematic review examining whether endorsing biogenetic causes decreases mental illness stigma in people with mental illness and mental health professionals was undertaken using the preferred reporting items for systematic reviews and meta-analyses guidelines. Multiple databases were searched, and studies that explored the relationship between biogenetic causal beliefs and mental illness stigma in people with mental illness or mental health professionals were considered. Studies were included if they focussed on depression, schizophrenia, or mental illness in general, were in English, and had adult participants. The search identified 11 journal articles reporting on 15 studies, which were included in this review. Of these, only two provided evidence that endorsing biogenetic causes was associated with less mental illness stigma in people with mental illness or mental health professionals. The majority of studies in the present review (n = 10) found that biogenetic causal beliefs were associated with increased stigma or negative attitudes towards mental illness. The present review highlights the lack of research exploring the impacts of endorsing biogenetic causes in people with mental illness and mental health professionals. Clinical implications associated with these results are discussed, and suggestions are made for further research that examines the relationship between causal beliefs and treatment variables. © 2017 Australian College of Mental Health Nurses Inc.

  8. Subjective Illness theory and coping

    Gessmann H.-W.

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The article presents a view of a problem of subjective illness theory in context of coping behavior. The article compiles the results of the latest studies of coping; discloses the way subjective illness theory affects the illness coping and patient's health; presents the study of differences in coping behaviour of patients at risk of heart attack and oncology. The article is recommended for specialists, concerned with psychological reasons of pathogenic processes and coping strategies of patients.

  9. Children’s conceptions of mental illness: A naïve theory approach.

    Fox, C; Buchanan-Barrow, E; Barrett, MD

    2010-01-01

    This paper reports two studies that investigated children's conceptions of mental illness using a naïve theory approach, drawing upon a conceptual framework for analysing illness representations which distinguishes between the identity, causes, consequences, curability, and timeline of an illness. The studies utilized semi-structured interviewing and card selection tasks to assess 6- to 11-year-old children's conceptions of the causes and consequences (Study 1) and the curability and timeline...

  10. Exertional Heat Illness among Secondary School Athletes: Statewide Policy Implications

    Rodgers, Jill; Slota, Peggy; Zamboni, Beth

    2018-01-01

    Exertional heat illness (EHI) is a leading cause of preventable death among student athletes. While causes and preventative measures for EHI are known, school districts may not be implementing evidence-based practices. This descriptive, exploratory study explored school policies, resources, and practices of coaches in a mid-Atlantic state in the…

  11. Traditional and Alternative Therapy for Mental Illness in Jamaica ...

    Results indicate that among psychiatric patients more than a third expressed the belief that the overall cause of their mental illness was as a result of supernatural factors. In general, the majority of patients felt that their perception of their problems did not concur with the western practitioner, which in turn caused distress for ...

  12. Children's conceptions of mental illness: a naïve theory approach.

    Fox, Claudine; Buchanan-Barrow, Eithne; Barrett, Martyn

    2010-09-01

    This paper reports two studies that investigated children's conceptions of mental illness using a naïve theory approach, drawing upon a conceptual framework for analysing illness representations which distinguishes between the identity, causes, consequences, curability, and timeline of an illness. The studies utilized semi-structured interviewing and card selection tasks to assess 6- to 11-year-old children's conceptions of the causes and consequences (Study 1) and the curability and timeline (Study 2) of different mental and physical illnesses/ailments. The studies revealed that, at all ages, the children held coherent causal-explanatory ideas about the causes, consequences, curability, and timeline of both mental and physical illnesses/ailments. However, while younger children tended to rely on their knowledge of common physical illnesses when thinking about mental illnesses, providing contagion and contamination explanations of cause, older children demonstrated differences in their thinking about mental and physical illnesses. No substantial gender differences were found in the children's thinking. It is argued that children hold coherent conceptions of mental illness at all ages, but that mental illness only emerges as an ontologically distinct conceptual domain by the end of middle childhood.

  13. The Injury/Illness Performance Project (IIPP): A Novel Epidemiological Approach for Recording the Consequences of Sports Injuries and Illnesses

    Fuller, Colin; Jaques, Rod; Hunter, Glenn

    2013-01-01

    Background. Describing the frequency, severity, and causes of sports injuries and illnesses reliably is important for quantifying the risk to athletes and providing direction for prevention initiatives. Methods. Time-loss and/or medical-attention definitions have long been used in sports injury/illness epidemiology research, but the limitations to these definitions mean that some events are incorrectly classified or omitted completely, where athletes continue to train and compete at high levels but experience restrictions in their performance. Introducing a graded definition of performance-restriction may provide a solution to this issue. Results. Results from the Great Britain injury/illness performance project (IIPP) are presented using a performance-restriction adaptation of the accepted surveillance consensus methodologies. The IIPP involved 322 Olympic athletes (males: 172; female: 150) from 10 Great Britain Olympic sports between September 2009 and August 2012. Of all injuries (n = 565), 216 were classified as causing time-loss, 346 as causing performance-restriction, and 3 were unclassified. For athlete illnesses (n = 378), the majority (P < 0.01) resulted in time-loss (270) compared with performance-restriction (101) (7 unclassified). Conclusions. Successful implementation of prevention strategies relies on the correct characterisation of injury/illness risk factors. Including a performance-restriction classification could provide a deeper understanding of injuries/illnesses and better informed prevention initiatives. PMID:26464883

  14. Illness Severity and Work Productivity Loss Among Working Adults With Medically Attended Acute Respiratory Illnesses: US Influenza Vaccine Effectiveness Network 2012-2013.

    Petrie, Joshua G; Cheng, Caroline; Malosh, Ryan E; VanWormer, Jeffrey J; Flannery, Brendan; Zimmerman, Richard K; Gaglani, Manjusha; Jackson, Michael L; King, Jennifer P; Nowalk, Mary Patricia; Benoit, Joyce; Robertson, Anne; Thaker, Swathi N; Monto, Arnold S; Ohmit, Suzanne E

    2016-02-15

    Influenza causes significant morbidity and mortality, with considerable economic costs, including lost work productivity. Influenza vaccines may reduce the economic burden through primary prevention of influenza and reduction in illness severity. We examined illness severity and work productivity loss among working adults with medically attended acute respiratory illnesses and compared outcomes for subjects with and without laboratory-confirmed influenza and by influenza vaccination status among subjects with influenza during the 2012-2013 influenza season. Illnesses laboratory-confirmed as influenza (ie, cases) were subjectively assessed as more severe than illnesses not caused by influenza (ie, noncases) based on multiple measures, including current health status at study enrollment (≤7 days from illness onset) and current activity and sleep quality status relative to usual. Influenza cases reported missing 45% more work hours (20.5 vs 15.0; P productivity as impeded to a greater degree (6.0 vs 5.4; P productivity loss were noted for vaccinated subjects. Influenza illnesses were more severe and resulted in more missed work hours and productivity loss than illnesses not confirmed as influenza. Modest reductions in illness severity for vaccinated cases were observed. These findings highlight the burden of influenza illnesses and illustrate the importance of laboratory confirmation of influenza outcomes in evaluations of vaccine effectiveness. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press for the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, e-mail journals.permissions@oup.com.

  15. ILL Annual report 97

    1997-01-01

    In 1997 the reactor operated for the planned 225 days and more than 750 experiments were carried out. Among the experimental highlights are 2 contrasting examples of the new types of experiments now possible using the new high-intensity diffractometer D2O: stroboscopic measurements of kinetic processes and rapid texture measurements of structural materials. Some early results from the new high-resolution gamma spectrometer in the study of nuclear structure are also presented. Another new facility is just coming into service: the 2π image-plate detector LADI, optimised for Laue measurements on biological crystals. The contrast between biological experiments and for example those on superconductivity or neutron β-decay, illustrates very well the range of scientific questions addressed through the use of ILL's neutron beams. 30 brief accounts of research work achieved during this year are given, they are classified under 9 topics: polymers and colloids, chemistry and structure, biology, materials science, liquids and glasses, magnetism, strongly correlated electron systems, quantum systems, nuclear and fundamental physics. The scheduled new developments are described and a list of the publications is also given

  16. Narcissistic rage: The Achilles’ heel of the patient with chronic physical illness

    Thomas Hyphantis

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Thomas Hyphantis1, Augustina Almyroudi1, Vassiliki Paika1, Panagiota Goulia1, Konstantinos Arvanitakis2,31Department of Psychiatry, Medical School, University of Ioannina, Ioannina, Greece; 2Canadian Institute of Psychoanalysis, Mcgill University, Montreal, Canada; 3Departments of Philosophy and Psychiatry, Mcgill University Health Centre, Montreal, CanadaAbstract: Based on the psychoanalytic reading of Homer’s Iliad whose principal theme is “Achilles’ rage” (the semi-mortal hero invulnerable in all of his body except for his heel, hence “Achilles’ heel” has come to mean a person’s principal weakness, we aimed to assess whether “narcissistic rage” has an impact on several psychosocial variables in patients with severe physical illness across time. In 878 patients with cancer, rheumatological diseases, multiple sclerosis, inflammatory bowel disease, and glaucoma, we assessed psychological distress (SCL-90 and GHQ-28, quality of life (WHOQOL-BREF, interpersonal difficulties (IIP-40, hostility (HDHQ, and defense styles (DSQ. Narcissistic rage comprised DSQ “omnipotence” and HDHQ “extraverted hostility”. Hierarchical multiple regressions analyses were performed. We showed that, in patients with disease duration less than one year, narcissistic rage had a minor impact on psychosocial variables studied, indicating that the rage was rather part of a “normal” mourning process. On the contrary, in patients with longer disease duration, increased rates of narcissistic rage had a great impact on all outcome variables, and the opposite was true for patients with low rates of narcissistic rage, indicating that narcissistic rage constitutes actually an “Achilles’ Heel” for patients with long-term physical illness. These findings may have important clinical implications.Keywords: consultation-liaison psychiatry, psychosomatics, narcissism, physical illness, quality of life, psychological distress, personality

  17. The long-term lasting effectiveness on self-efficacy, attribution style, expression of emotions and quality of life of a body awareness program for chronic a-specific psychosomatic symptoms

    Landsman-Dijkstra, Jeanet J. A.; van Wijck, R; Groothoff, JW

    Objective: A 3-day residential body awareness program (BAP) was developed to teach people with chronic a-specific psychosomatic symptoms (CAPS) to react adequately to disturbances of the balance between a daily workload and the capacity to deal with it. The long-term effects of the program on body

  18. Perception of stigma toward mental illness in South India

    Bhumika T Venkatesh

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Stigma associated with mental illnesses is one of the principal causes for mentally ill people not receiving adequate mental health care and treatment. The study was conducted to assess the extent of stigma associated with mental illness and knowledge of mental illness among the community. Materials and Methods: Community-based, cross-sectional study was conducted among 445 respondents from Udupi district; the community attitude toward the mentally ill (CAMI scale was used to assess stigma. The probability proportional to sampling size technique was adopted to select the wards/blocks. Household from blocks/wards were selected using convenience sampling. Self- administered semi-structured questionnaire was used to collect the information. Data was analyzed using the software SPSS version 15. Results: Of the total 445 respondents, the prevalence of stigma toward mentally ill people was 74.61% (95% confidence interval, 0.7057, 0.7866. The prevalence of stigma was high under all the four domains of CAMI scale. High prevalence of stigma was seen among females and people with higher income. Conclusions: The overall prevalence of stigma toward PWMI was found to be high. The stigma toward PWMI was associated with gender with respect to AU, BE and CMHI. Hence, the study suggests that there is a strong need to eliminate stigma associated with mental illness to improve the mental health status of the region.

  19. [Psychosomatic approach to encopresis].

    Boige, N; Missonnier, S; Bellaïche, M; Foucaud, P

    1999-12-01

    Encopresis most often results from functional constipation and a behaviour disorder characterised by retention of faeces. Rarely it is a passive or active expulsion of normal faeces. It indicates a failure in the education of sphincter control, often with a preferential development of autoerotic versus relational investments. A depressive component is frequent. We propose a bidisciplinary approach with a somatic and psychological evaluation of the encopretic child from the first visit. The physical examination assesses constipation and stercoral stasis. Associated psychopathological symptoms or a pathogenic psychosocial situation must be sought. The therapeutic means must be directed towards the different etiologic features. Explanations of the physiopathology of the symptom and discussion with the child and the parents on the origin of the dysfunction must be accomplished first. A medical treatment of the constipation is generally indicated. Psychotherapy is initiated according to the background and associated psychopathological symptoms.

  20. Youth blogging and serious illness.

    Nesby, Linda; Salamonsen, Anita

    2016-03-01

    In recent years, a growing number of young people who experience illness tend to blog about it. In this paper, we question whether and how illness blogs illustrate the intercommunicative aspect of blogging by bringing forth both the literary concept of the implied reader and the sociological concepts of empowerment and agency in the analysis. We argue that young people blogging about serious illness demonstrate the inherent intercommunicative potential of blogging. We also argue that youth blogging about serious illness may represent a fruitful strategy for ill young people to create meaning, stay front-stage in youth communities and build self-esteem and confidence out of chaos. Furthermore, we argue that these blogs may contribute rather unique experience-based knowledge and reflections about existential issues to other young blog readers, who may otherwise not get access to this aspect of life. Youth blogging about serious illness thereby reflects a patient group so far not very visible and through the genre youth stand out as more competent when it comes to illness and healthcare issues than what is often presumed. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  1. Disaster related heat illness

    Miyake, Yasufumi

    2012-01-01

    Explained and discussed are the outline of heat illness (HI), its raised risk and measures taken at the disaster of the Fukushima Nuclear Power Plant Accident (FNPPA; Mar. 2011). High temperature and humid environment induce HI through the fervescence and dehydration resulting in the intestinal ischemia/hypoxia and organ failure. Epidemiologic data of the heatstroke in Japan suggest its seemingly parallel incidence to seasonal hotness of the summer. HI is classified in either classical (non-exertional) or exertional heatstroke, both with severity of I (slight), II (slight symptom of the central nervous system (CNS); necessary for consultation) and III (most serious; having dysfunction of CNS, organ or coagulation). Therapy depends on the severity: I for the first aid on site, II necessary for carrying to hospital and III for hospitalization. Protection is possible by personal, neighbors' and managers' carefulness, and supply of sufficient water and minerals. Risk of HI was suddenly raised at taking measures to meet with the FNPPA. Japanese Association for Acute Medicine (JAAM) promptly organized JAAM-FNPPA Working Group to treat the emergent multiple incidents including the radiation exposure and HI as well. Exertional HI was mainly in labors wearing rather sealed closes to protect radiation to work for steps of the Accident, and which was similar to evacuees temporarily entering the evacuation area for visit to their own vacant houses. In the summer, classical HI was also a problem mainly in elderly living in the evacuation dwellings. Document of HI incidents and patients at FNPPA should be recorded for the reference to possible disaster in future. (T.T.)

  2. Mental illness, mass shootings, and the politics of American firearms.

    Metzl, Jonathan M; MacLeish, Kenneth T

    2015-02-01

    Four assumptions frequently arise in the aftermath of mass shootings in the United States: (1) that mental illness causes gun violence, (2) that psychiatric diagnosis can predict gun crime, (3) that shootings represent the deranged acts of mentally ill loners, and (4) that gun control "won't prevent" another Newtown (Connecticut school mass shooting). Each of these statements is certainly true in particular instances. Yet, as we show, notions of mental illness that emerge in relation to mass shootings frequently reflect larger cultural stereotypes and anxieties about matters such as race/ethnicity, social class, and politics. These issues become obscured when mass shootings come to stand in for all gun crime, and when "mentally ill" ceases to be a medical designation and becomes a sign of violent threat.

  3. [A retrospective study of expert opinions of a psychosomatic-psychotherapeutic university hospital for public and private customers over a period of 12 years].

    Uhlenbrock, Judith; Hinrichs, Jens; Heuft, Gereon

    2017-09-01

    A retrospective study of expert opinions of a psychosomatic-psychotherapeutic university hospital for public and private customers over a period of 12 years Objectives: Both the public and the legislative have developed an increasingly critical awareness for the fact that expert witnesses need to be independent. In contrast, to date there have been few studies concerning the quantity and the results of psychosomatic-psychotherapeutic expert opinions for public and private clients. In a retrospective study design, 285 expert opinions of a psychosomatic-psychotherapeutic university hospital stemming from consecutive, unselected random sampling over a 12-year time period (1990-2011) were analyzed using a predefined list of criteria. Besides client data, the study also noted the type and the objectives of the expertise, the sociodemographic data of the subjects, the biographic data of the subjects, the size of records, the particular psychopathological findings including conflict and structural diagnostics via the Operationalized Psychodynamic Diagnostics (OPD-2, Research Group 2006), syndromic diagnostics according to ICD-10 (WHO) including the related Impairment Scale Score (ISS, Schepank 1995), and the Global Assessment of Functioning-Scale (GAF, Heuft 2016). 54% of the subjects were men. All subjects were 46 years old at the time of examination; on average symptomatology had existed for 7 years, which made assessment of causality difficult. Most assignments referred to the effects of diseases or accidents in private contexts, followed by pension reports. Among the expert opinions related to possible implications of acts of violence, 95% were women. In 43.2% (n = 123) of the cases, the assessment had occurred in the context of legal action. In 65 cases at least one party had requested a supplemental written report during further procedure. In 17.8% (n = 22) of the cases sought by the courts, the expert witness was requested by at least one party to present the

  4. Cost of illness and illness perceptions in patients with fibromyalgia.

    Vervoort, Vera M; Vriezekolk, Johanna E; Olde Hartman, Tim C; Cats, Hans A; van Helmond, Toon; van der Laan, Willemijn H; Geenen, Rinie; van den Ende, Cornelia H

    2016-01-01

    The disease impact and economic burden of fibromyalgia (FM) are high for patients and society at large. Knowing potential determinants of economic costs may help in reducing this burden. Cognitive appraisals (perceptions) of the illness could affect costs. The present study estimated costs of illness in FM and examined the association between these costs and illness perceptions. Questionnaire data of FM severity (FIQ), illness perceptions (IPQ-R-FM), productivity losses (SF-HLQ) and health care use were collected in a cohort of patients with FM. Costs were calculated and dichotomised (median split). Univariate and hierarchic logistic regression models examined the unique association of each illness perception with 1) health care costs and 2) costs of productivity losses. Covariates were FM severity, comorbidity and other illness perceptions. 280 patients participated: 95% female, mean age 42 (SD=12) years. Annualised costs of FM per patient were €2944 for health care, and €5731 for productivity losses. In multivariate analyses, a higher disease impact (FIQ) and two of seven illness perceptions (IPQ-R-FM) were associated with high health care costs: 1) high scores on 'cyclical timeline' reflecting a fluctuating, unpredictable course and 2) low scores on 'emotional representations', thus not perceiving a connection between fibromyalgia and emotions. None of the variables was associated with productivity losses. Our study indicates that perceiving a fluctuating course and low emotional representation, which perhaps reflects somatic fixation, are associated with health care costs in FM. Future studies should examine whether targeting these illness perceptions results in reduction of costs.

  5. Caring for a Seriously Ill Child

    ... Search English Español Caring for a Seriously Ill Child KidsHealth / For Parents / Caring for a Seriously Ill ... helping hand. Explaining Long-Term Illness to a Child Honest communication is vital to helping a child ...

  6. Illness perspectives of Thais diagnosed with schizophrenia.

    Sanseeha, Ladda; Chontawan, Ratanawadee; Sethabouppha, Hunsa; Disayavanish, Chamlong; Turale, Sue

    2009-09-01

    This study explored the perceptions of 18 people diagnosed with schizophrenia from 1-10 years to uncover how they perceived themselves and their illness. It also involved 12 family members who added their perceptions. The data were collected using in-depth interviews, reflective journaling, and observations. The data were analyzed through the lens of Heidegger's hermeneutic phenomenology. Four themes emerged: perceptions of mental illness, perceptions of the causes of illness, perceptions of discrimination, and attempting to live with schizophrenia. The findings included strong underlying cultural and spiritual beliefs, and attitudes unique to the Thai participants, including the causation of schizophrenia by supernatural powers, black magic, and bad karma stemming from past deeds. Understanding the perceptions of the participants might help health-care providers to be more sensitive to those living with schizophrenia in Thailand and elsewhere. In particular, the findings could be useful in informing psychiatric careproviders about developing better caring systems for clients diagnosed with schizophrenia. This should help the sufferers of schizophrenia to live their lives to their own satisfaction and as normally as possible.

  7. Mental illness--stigma and discrimination in Zambia.

    Kapungwe, A; Cooper, S; Mwanza, J; Mwape, L; Sikwese, A; Kakuma, R; Lund, C; Flisher, A J

    2010-07-01

    The aim of this qualitative study was to explore the presence, causes and means of addressing individual and systemic stigma and discrimination against people with mental illness in Zambia. This is to facilitate the development of tailor-made antistigma initiatives that are culturally sensitive for Zambia and other low-income African countries. This is the first in-depth study on mental illness stigma in Zambia. Fifty semi-structured interviews and 6 focus group discussions were conducted with key stakeholders drawn from 3 districts in Zambia (Lusaka, Kabwe and Sinazongwe). Transcripts were analyzed using a grounded theory approach. Mental illness stigma and discrimination is pervasive across Zambian society, prevailing within the general community, amongst family members, amid general and mental health care providers, and at the level of government. Such stigma appears to be fuelled by misunderstandings of mental illness aetiology; fears of contagion and the perceived dangerousness of people with mental illness; and associations between HIV/AIDS and mental illness. Strategies suggested for reducing stigma and discrimination in Zambia included education campaigns, the transformation of mental health policy and legislation and expanding the social and economic opportunities of the mentally ill. In Zambia, as in many other low-income African countries, very little attention is devoted to addressing the negative beliefs and behaviours surrounding mental illness, despite the devastating costs that ensue. The results from this study underscore the need for greater commitment from governments and policy-makers in African countries to start prioritizing mental illness stigma as a major public health and development issue.

  8. Sports injuries and illnesses during the second Asian Beach Games.

    Al-Shaqsi, Sultan; Al-Kashmiri, Ammar; Al-Risi, Ahmed; Al-Mawali, Suleiman

    2012-09-01

    Prevention of sport injuries and illnesses is a focus for epidemiological surveillance. To record and analyse all sports injuries and illnesses registered during the second Asian Beach Games. A descriptive epidemiological study using the International Olympic Committee Surveillance system to register injuries and illnesses during the second Asian Beach Games. The second Asian Beach Games hosted 1132 athletes from 43 countries competing in 14 beach sports. All National Olympic Committees' physicians of the participating teams were invited to report all injuries and illnesses. In addition, medical officers at the different Olympic venues and the main Olympic village reported injuries and illnesses treated at the clinics on a daily basis. A total of 177 injuries were reported equating to an incidence rate of 156.4 per 1000 registered athletes. Tent pegging recorded the highest incidence of injuries with 357 per 1000 registered athletes. The most prevalent injuries were in the foot/toe with 14.1% of all reported injuries. The majority of injuries were incurred during competition (75.4%). In addition, the most common mechanism of injury was contact with another athlete (n=42, 23.7%) and combined sudden and gradual overuse contributed to 30% of the total injury burden. Furthermore, 118 illnesses were reported resulting in an incidence rate of 104.2 illnesses per 1000 registered athletes. The most affected system was the respiratory tract (39.1%) with infection being the most common cause (n=33, 38.0%). The incidence of injury and illness differed significantly among the 14 sports. The data indicate that the risk of injury from beach games is sport dependant. This means that any preventive measures have to be tailored for each discipline. Furthermore, the study showed that respiratory infections are the commonest illness in beach sports and therefore, event organisers should focus improving public health measures and hygiene awareness.

  9. Improving Communication About Serious Illness

    2017-01-07

    Critical Illness; Chronic Disease; Terminal Care; Palliative Care; Communication; Advance Care Planning; Neoplasm Metastasis; Lung Neoplasms; Pulmonary Disease, Chronic Obstructive; Heart Failure; End Stage Liver Disease; Kidney Failure, Chronic

  10. Student Attitudes Toward Mental Illness

    Hare-Mustin, Rachel T.; Garvine, Richard

    1974-01-01

    Inquiry into the initial attitudes toward mental illness of students taking an abnormal psychology class indicates students' concerns and preconceptions and provides a basis for shaping the course to respond to student needs. (JH)

  11. Living with Mentally Ill Parent

    Kadriye Buldukoglu

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The present review seeks to identify and analyze qualitative studies that examined experiences of children whose parents have a mental illness. This study reported that children whose parents have a mental illness had some common experiences. These experiences may have negative effects on children’s coping skills, resilience to tough living conditions and ability to maintain their mental health. In spite of these negative conditions, some of these children have much more self-confidence, resilience and independence because of inner development and early maturation. Some effective intervention programs are needed to promote information to children and other family members about mental illness, coping behaviors. Availability of such psychiatric services and nation-wide programs with professionals to deal with these problems should be organized properly to increase quality of life of these children. Furthermore, qualitative researches that explore the experiences of children whose parents with mental illness should also be conducted in our country.

  12. Transfusion in critically ill children

    Secher, E L; Stensballe, J; Afshari, A

    2013-01-01

    Transfusion of blood products is a cornerstone in managing many critically ill children. Major improvements in blood product safety have not diminished the need for caution in transfusion practice. In this review, we aim to discuss the interplay between benefits and potential adverse effects...... of transfusion in critically ill children by including 65 papers, which were evaluated based on previously agreed selection criteria. Current practice on transfusing critically ill children is mainly founded on the basis of adult studies, common practices with cut-off values, and expert opinions, rather than...... evidence-based medicine. Paediatric patients have explicit physiological challenges and requirements to be addressed. Critically ill children often suffer from anaemia, have substantial iatrogenic blood loss with subsequent transfusions, and are at a higher risk of complications, often due to human errors...

  13. Mental illness: psychiatry's phlogiston

    Szasz, T

    2001-01-01

    In physics, we use the same laws to explain why airplanes fly, and why they crash. In psychiatry, we use one set of laws to explain sane behaviour, which we attribute to reasons (choices), and another set of laws to explain insane behaviour, which we attribute to causes (diseases). God, man's idea of moral perfection, judges human deeds without distinguishing between sane persons responsible for their behaviour and insane persons deserving to be excused for their evil deeds. It is hubris to p...

  14. Cost-of-illness studies.

    Oderda, Gary M

    2003-01-01

    Cost-of-illness studies measure the overall economic impact of a disease on society. Such studies are important in setting public health priorities and for economic evaluation of new treatments. These studies should take the societal perspective and include both direct and indirect costs. Often indirect costs exceed direct costs. Comparison of cost-of-illness studies from different countries is difficult because of differences in population, currency, the way health care is provided, and other social and political factors.

  15. No departure to "Pandora"? Using critical phenomenology to differentiate "naive" from "reflective" experience in psychiatry and psychosomatic medicine (a comment on Schwartz and Wiggins, 2010).

    Schlimme, Jann E; Bonnemann, Catharina; Mishara, Aaron L

    2010-10-31

    The mind-body problem lies at the heart of the clinical practice of both psychiatry and psychosomatic medicine. In their recent publication, Schwartz and Wiggins address the question of how to understand life as central to the mind-body problem. Drawing on their own use of the phenomenological method, we propose that the mind-body problem is not resolved by a general, evocative appeal to an all encompassing life-concept, but rather falters precisely at the insurmountable difference between "natural" and a "reflective" experience built into phenomenological method itself. Drawing on the works of phenomenologically oriented thinkers, we describe life as inherently "teleological" without collapsing life with our subjective perspective, or stepping over our epistemological limits. From the phenomenology it can be demonstrated that the hypothetical teleological qualities are a reflective reconstruction modelled on human behavioural structure.

  16. No departure to "Pandora"? Using critical phenomenology to differentiate "naive" from "reflective" experience in psychiatry and psychosomatic medicine (A comment on Schwartz and Wiggins, 2010

    Bonnemann Catharina

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The mind-body problem lies at the heart of the clinical practice of both psychiatry and psychosomatic medicine. In their recent publication, Schwartz and Wiggins address the question of how to understand life as central to the mind-body problem. Drawing on their own use of the phenomenological method, we propose that the mind-body problem is not resolved by a general, evocative appeal to an all encompassing life-concept, but rather falters precisely at the insurmountable difference between "natural" and a "reflective" experience built into phenomenological method itself. Drawing on the works of phenomenologically oriented thinkers, we describe life as inherently "teleological" without collapsing life with our subjective perspective, or stepping over our epistemological limits. From the phenomenology it can be demonstrated that the hypothetical teleological qualities are a reflective reconstruction modelled on human behavioural structure.

  17. Perceived mental stress in women associated with psychosomatic symptoms, but not mortality: observations from the Population Study of Women in Gothenburg, Sweden

    Hange D

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Dominique Hange,1 Kirsten Mehlig,2 Lauren Lissner,2 Xinxin Guo,3 Calle Bengtsson,1,† Ingmar Skoog,3 Cecilia Björkelund1 1Department of Public Health and Community Medicine/Primary Health Care, 2Department of Public Health and Community Medicine/Public Health Epidemiology, 3Institute of Neuroscience and Physiology, Section of Psychiatry and Neurochemistry, Neuropsychiatric Epidemiology Unit, The Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden †Calle Bengtsson passed away on 23rd March 2013 Purpose: To investigate possible association between mental stress and psychosomatic symptoms, socioeconomic status, lifestyle, as well as incident mortality in a middle-aged female population followed over 37 years. Methods: A prospective observational study initiated in 1968–1969, including 1462 women aged 60, 54, 50, 46, and 38 years, with follow-ups in 1974–1975, 1980–1981, and 2000–2001, was performed. Measures included self-reported mental stress as well as psychosomatic symptoms and smoking, physical activity, total cholesterol, S-triglycerides, body mass index, waist–hip ratio, blood pressure, socioeconomic status and mortality. Results: Smoking, not being single, and not working outside home were strongly associated with reported mental stress at baseline. Women who reported high mental stress in 1968–1969 were more likely to report presence of abdominal symptoms (odds ratio [OR] = 1.85, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.39–2.46, headache/migraine (OR = 2.04, 95% CI: 1.53–2.72, frequent infections (OR = 1.75, 95% CI: 1.14–2.70, and musculoskeletal symptoms (OR = 1.70, 95% CI: 1.30–2.23 than women who did not report mental stress. Women without these symptoms at baseline 1968–1969, but with perceived mental stress were more likely to subsequently report incident abdominal symptoms (OR = 2.15, 95% CI: 1.39–3.34, headache/migraine (OR = 2.27, 95% CI: 1.48–3.48 and frequent infections (OR = 2.21, 95% CI: 1.12

  18. Healthcare disparities in critical illness.

    Soto, Graciela J; Martin, Greg S; Gong, Michelle Ng

    2013-12-01

    To summarize the current literature on racial and gender disparities in critical care and the mechanisms underlying these disparities in the course of acute critical illness. MEDLINE search on the published literature addressing racial, ethnic, or gender disparities in acute critical illness, such as sepsis, acute lung injury, pneumonia, venous thromboembolism, and cardiac arrest. Clinical studies that evaluated general critically ill patient populations in the United States as well as specific critical care conditions were reviewed with a focus on studies evaluating factors and contributors to health disparities. Study findings are presented according to their association with the prevalence, clinical presentation, management, and outcomes in acute critical illness. This review presents potential contributors for racial and gender disparities related to genetic susceptibility, comorbidities, preventive health services, socioeconomic factors, cultural differences, and access to care. The data are organized along the course of acute critical illness. The literature to date shows that disparities in critical care are most likely multifactorial involving individual, community, and hospital-level factors at several points in the continuum of acute critical illness. The data presented identify potential targets as interventions to reduce disparities in critical care and future avenues for research.

  19. Dependency in Critically Ill Patients

    Rumei Yang

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available By necessity, critically ill patients admitted to intensive care units (ICUs have a high level of dependency, which is linked to a variety of negative feelings, such as powerlessness. However, the term dependency is not well defined in the critically ill patients. The concept of “dependency” in critically ill patients was analyzed using a meta-synthesis approach. An inductive process described by Deborah Finfgeld-Connett was used to analyze the data. Overarching themes emerged that reflected critically ill patients’ experience and meaning of being in dependency were (a antecedents: dependency in critically ill patients was a powerless and vulnerable state, triggered by a life-threatening crisis; (b attributes: the characteristic of losing “self” was featured by dehumanization and disembodiment, which can be alleviated by a “self”-restoring process; and (c outcomes: living with dependency and coping with dependency. The conceptual model explicated here may provide a framework for understanding dependency in critically ill patients.

  20. Transparency of outcome reporting and trial registration of randomized controlled trials in top psychosomatic and behavioral health journals: A systematic review.

    Milette, Katherine; Roseman, Michelle; Thombs, Brett D

    2011-03-01

    The most reliable evidence for evaluating healthcare interventions comes from well-designed and conducted randomized controlled trials (RCTs). The extent to which published RCTs reflect the efficacy of interventions, however, depends on the completeness and accuracy of published results. The Consolidated Standards of Reporting Trials statement, initially developed in 1996, provides guidelines intended to improve the transparency of published RCT reports. A policy of the International Committee of Medical Journal Editors, initiated in 2005, requires clinical trials published in member journals to be registered in publicly accessible registries prior to patient enrollment. The objective of this study was to assess the clarity of outcome reporting, proportion of registered trials, and adequacy of outcome registration in RCTs published in top behavioral health journals. Eligible studies were primary or secondary reports of RCTs published in Annals of Behavioral Medicine, Health Psychology, Journal of Psychosomatic Research, and Psychosomatic Medicine from January 2008 to September 2009. Data were extracted for each study on adequacy of outcome reporting and registration. Of 63 articles reviewed, only 25 (39.7%) had adequately declared primary or secondary outcomes, whereas 38 (60.3%) had multiple primary outcomes or did not define outcomes. Only 13 studies (20.6%) were registered. Only 1 study registered sufficiently precise outcome information to compare with published outcomes, and registered and published outcomes were discrepant in that study. Greater attention to outcome reporting and trial registration by researchers, peer reviewers, and journal editors will increase the likelihood that effective behavioral health interventions are readily identified and made available to patients. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. African American Women's Beliefs About Mental Illness, Stigma, and Preferred Coping Behaviors

    Ward, Earlise C.; Heidrich, Susan M.

    2009-01-01

    We examined African American women's representations/beliefs about mental illness, preferred coping behaviors if faced with mental illness, whether perceived stigma was associated with treatment-seeking, and if so, whether it was related to beliefs and coping preference, and whether these variables differed by age group. Participants were 185 community-dwelling African American women 25 to 85 years of age. Results indicated the women believed that mental illness is caused by several factors, ...

  2. Culturally prescribed beliefs about mental illness among the Akan of Ghana.

    Opare-Henaku, Annabella; Utsey, Shawn O

    2017-08-01

    Mental illness is a culturally laden phenomenon, and different cultures have unique ways of constructing mental illness. In this study, conceptions of mental illness were explored among 30 participants of Akan descent in Ghana through individual and group interviews. Participants demonstrated a wide range of knowledge on mental illness indicating that poor self-care, deficits in social functioning, and disordered behaviors are the cardinal features of mental illness. The data revealed that Akan cultural beliefs influenced notions of etiology of mental illness and care of the mentally ill. While participants recognized the role of multiple factors such as genetics, substance abuse, daily hassles (for example, concerns about basic needs such as food, clothing, and shelter), and trauma in the cause of mental illness, the predominant belief was that mental illness is a retributive and/or a spiritual illness. This belief encourages pluralistic health-seeking behaviors: use of hospitals, prayer camps, herbalists, and traditional healers. The implications of these findings for public health education on mental illness, and clinical training and practice are discussed.

  3. Caregiver coping with the mentally ill: a qualitative study.

    Azman, Azlinda; Jamir Singh, Paramjit Singh; Sulaiman, Jamalludin

    2017-04-01

    Mental illness is a disease that affects millions of people every year. It not only causes stress to the mentally ill patients, but also for the family members who provide them the care. The family caregivers, therefore need some form of coping strategies in dealing with their mentally ill family members. This qualitative study aims at identifying and analysing the coping strategies adopted by the family caregivers in dealing with their mentally ill family members. A total of 15 family caregivers from the state of Kedah, Malaysia participated in the face-to-face semi structured interview. The study findings identified an array of coping strategies used by the family caregivers, including religious coping, emotional coping, acceptance, becoming engaged in leisure activities, and the use of traditional healing to help them cope with their mentally ill members. Suggestions and conclusions: Study suggests that the family caregivers should engage themselves in social support groups to learn about and obtain the positive coping strategies used by other caregivers who have similar experiences in caring for the mentally ill. Study also suggests that they should get appropriate training from the mental health professionals in order to enhance the caregivers' coping skills.

  4. Effect of influenza-like illness and other wintertime respiratory illnesses on worker productivity: The child and household influenza-illness and employee function (CHIEF) study.

    Palmer, Liisa A; Rousculp, Matthew D; Johnston, Stephen S; Mahadevia, Parthiv J; Nichol, Kristin L

    2010-07-12

    Acute respiratory illnesses (ARI), comprising influenza-like illness (ILI) and other wintertime respiratory illnesses (ORI), impose substantial health and economic burdens on the United States. Little is known about the impact of ILI among household members (HHM), particularly children, on employees' productivity. To quantify the impact of employee and HHM-ILI and ARI on employee productivity, a prospective, observational cohort study was conducted among employees from three large US companies. Employees who had at least one child living at home (N=2013) completed a monthly survey during the 2007-2008 influenza season, reporting the number of days missed from work and hours of presenteeism due to: (1) personal ILI, (2) HHM-ILI, and (3) personal and HHM-ARI. Employee ILI ranged from 4.8% (April) to 13.5% (February). Employees reporting ILI reported more absences than employees not reporting ILI (72% vs 30%, respectively; Pemployees surveyed had at least one child with an ILI; these employees missed more days of work due to HHM illness than employees without an ARI-ill child (0.9 days vs 0.3 days, respectively; PEmployees with ILI were less productive, on average, for 4.8h each day that they worked while sick, 2.5h of which was attributable to ILI. HHM illnesses accounted for 17.7% (1389/7868 days) of employee absenteeism, over half of which was due to HHM-ARI. ILI causes a significant amount of employee absence. Household members, particularly children, comprise a sizable proportion of general illness and injury-related employee absences. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Mental illness - stigma and discrimination in Zambia | Kapungwe ...

    Objective: The aim of this qualitative study was to explore the presence, causes and means of addressing individual and systemic stigma and discrimination against people with mental illness in Zambia. This is to facilitate the development of tailor-made antistigma initiatives that are culturally sensitive for Zambia and other ...

  6. Psychodynamics in medically ill patients.

    Nash, Sara Siris; Kent, Laura K; Muskin, Philip R

    2009-01-01

    This article explores the role of psychodynamics as it applies to the understanding and treatment of medically ill patients in the consultation-liaison psychiatry setting. It provides historical background that spans the eras from Antiquity (Hippocrates and Galen) to nineteenth-century studies of hysteria (Charcot, Janet, and Freud) and into the twentieth century (Flanders Dunbar, Alexander, Engle, and the DSM). The article then discusses the effects of personality on medical illness, treatment, and patients' ability to cope by reviewing the works of Bibring, Kahana, and others. The important contribution of attachment theory is reviewed as it pertains the patient-physician relationship and the health behavior of physically ill patients. A discussion of conversion disorder is offered as an example of psychodynamics in action. This article highlights the important impact of countertransference, especially in terms of how it relates to patients who are extremely difficult and "hateful," and explores the dynamics surrounding the topic of physician-assisted suicide, as it pertains to the understanding of a patient's request to die. Some attention is also given to the challenges surrounding the unique experience of residents learning how to treat medically ill patients on the consultation-liaison service. Ultimately, this article concludes that the use and understanding of psychodynamics and psychodynamic theory allows consultation-liaison psychiatrists the opportunity to interpret the life narratives of medically ill patients in a meaningful way that contributes importantly to treatment.

  7. Eugenics, genetics, and mental illness stigma in Chinese Americans.

    WonPat-Borja, Ahtoy J; Yang, Lawrence H; Link, Bruce G; Phelan, Jo C

    2012-01-01

    The increasing interest in the genetic causes of mental disorders may exacerbate existing stigma if negative beliefs about a genetic illness are generally accepted. China's history of policy-level eugenics and genetic discrimination in the workplace suggests that Chinese communities will view genetic mental illness less favorably than mental illness with non-genetic causes. The aim of this study is to identify differences between Chinese Americans and European Americans in eugenic beliefs and stigma toward people with genetic mental illness. We utilized data from a 2003 national telephone survey designed to measure how public perceptions of mental illness differ if the illness is described as genetic. The Chinese American (n = 42) and European American (n = 428) subsamples were analyzed to compare their support of eugenic belief items and measures of stigma. Chinese Americans endorsed all four eugenic statements more strongly than European Americans. Ethnicity significantly moderated the relationship between genetic attribution and three out of five stigma outcomes; however, genetic attribution actually appeared to be de-stigmatizing for Chinese Americans while it increased stigma or made no difference for European Americans. Our findings show that while Chinese Americans hold more eugenic beliefs than European Americans, these attributions do not have the same effect on stigma as they do in Western cultures. These results suggest that future anti-stigma efforts must focus on eugenic attitudes as well as cultural beliefs for Chinese Americans, and that the effects of genetic attributions for mental illness should be examined relative to other social, moral, and religious attributions common in Chinese culture.

  8. Illness Causation and Interpretation in a Newar Town

    Madhusudan Subedi

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available One of the core concerns of medical anthropology is to explore how people in different cultures and social groups explain the causes of ill health, the type of treatment they believe in, and to whom they turn if they do become ill. This article focuses on the understanding of illness causation by the Newars in Kirtipur and their concern about biological and socio-cultural aspects of healthy behavior, and particularly with the ways in which they have been coping in everyday life. The basic method of data collection for this study was formal and informal discussions with the elderly Newar males and females, followed by discussions with youths to explore the variations in their perceptions. The findings show that the understanding of illness etiology is multi-causal. The individual, natural, social, and supernatural causes are not mutually exclusive but are usually linked together in a particular case. In any specific case of illness, moreover, people’s explanatory model varies in how they explain its etiology.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.3126/dsaj.v5i0.6358 Dhaulagiri Journal of Sociology and Anthropology Vol. 5, 2011: 101-120    

  9. Foodborne illness: new developments concerning an old problem.

    Kasowski, Eric J; Gackstetter, Gary D; Sharp, Trueman W

    2002-08-01

    Foodborne illnesses continue to cause substantial morbidity and mortality in the United States, primarily as gastroenteritis but occasionally as other syndromes as well. Most of these illnesses are caused by a variety of widely known infectious agents, principally viruses, and are probably the result of common mistakes in food handling in the home or in restaurants. The epidemiology of foodborne illness is evolving. Major changes in food production, distribution, and consumption have created opportunities for new pathogens to emerge and for old ones to reemerge, and the potential for widespread outbreaks is increasing. Antibiotic resistance in bacterial pathogens resulting from the widespread use of antimicrobial agents in animal husbandry is also an important concern. Clinicians must be aware of the changing epidemiology of foodborne illness to recognize and manage these conditions in the clinical setting. In addition, clinicians are critical in the reporting of recognized or suspected foodborne illness, so that public health authorities are able to investigate, understand, and ultimately better control them. A number of new techniques have been employed, and others under development will improve our ability to recognize and cope with foodborne diseases.

  10. Illness perceptions of leprosy-cured individuals in Surinam with residual disfigurements - "I am cured, but still I am ill".

    van Haaren, Mark Ac; Reyme, Melinda; Lawrence, Maggie; Menke, Jack; Kaptein, Ad A

    2017-06-01

    Objective Leprosy has rarely been the subject of health psychology research despite its substantial impact. Our aim was to explore illness perceptions in patients and their health care providers in Surinam. The Common Sense Model (CSM) was the guiding theoretical model. Design Patients with biomedically cured leprosy and their health care providers completed the B-IPQ and took part in semi-structured interviews. The literature on illness perceptions in patients with leprosy was reviewed. Main outcome measures Patients' B-IPQ scores were compared with samples of patients with other (chronic) illnesses, and with health care providers completing the questionnaire as if they were visibly disfigured patients. Quotations from the semi-structured interviews were used to contextualise the illness perceptions. Results Patients' B-IPQ scores reflected the chronic nature of leprosy and were comparable with those with other chronic illnesses. Health care providers perceived leprosy to have a greater negative impact than did the patients. Perceived understanding of causes differed considerably between patients and health care providers. Conclusion Leprosy continues to be experienced as an illness with major psychological and social consequences such as stigmatisation, even after biomedical cure. Interventions that target patients, health care providers, and society at large may help reduce perceived shame and stigma. The CSM is a helpful theoretical model in studying this population.

  11. Epidemiology of Sepsis-like Illness in Young Infants Major Role of Enterovirus and Human Parechovirus

    de Jong, Eveline P.; van den Beuken, Monique G. A.; van Elzakker, Erika P. M.; Wolthers, Katja C.; Sprij, Arwen J.; Lopriore, Enrico; Walther, Frans J.; Brus, Frank

    2018-01-01

    Background: Sepsis-like illness is a main cause for hospital admission in young infants. Our aim was to investigate incidence, epidemiology and clinical characteristics of enterovirus (EV) and human parechovirus (HPeV) infections in young infants with sepsis-like illness. Methods: This is a

  12. Treatment of Persons with Mental Illness in the Criminal Justice System: A Literature Review

    Brandt, Anna L. S.

    2012-01-01

    The number of mentally ill inmates in the criminal justice system has increased dramatically. This article evaluates the prevalence and causes of mental illness in the criminal justice system and describes the inadequate care that is provided, the effects of imprisonment, and the problem of rehabilitation. (Contains 4 notes.)

  13. 10 CFR 55.25 - Incapacitation because of disability or illness.

    2010-01-01

    ... § 55.25 Incapacitation because of disability or illness. If, during the term of the license, the licensee develops a permanent physical or mental condition that causes the licensee to fail to meet the... 10 Energy 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Incapacitation because of disability or illness. 55.25...

  14. Dissimilary in patients' and spouses' representations of chronic illness: exploration of relations to patient adaptation.

    Heijmans, M.; Ridder, D. de; Bensing, J.

    1999-01-01

    In this cross-sectional study, the illness representations of patients suffering from Chronic Fatigue Syndrome (n=49) and Addison's Disease (n=52) and those of their spouses were compared. Couples generally held similar views with regard to the dimensions of illness identity and cause but disagreed

  15. Public stigma associated with mental illnesses in Pakistani university students: a cross sectional survey

    Ahmed Waqas

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Background. The objectives of the study were to explore the knowledge and attitudes of Pakistani university students toward mental illnesses. People with mental illnesses are challenged not only by their symptoms but also by the prejudices associated with their illness. Acknowledging the stigma of mental illness should be the first essential step toward devising an appropriate treatment plan.Methods. A cross-sectional survey was conducted at the University of Punjab, Lahore, CMH Lahore Medical and Dental College, Lahore, and University of Sargodha, Sub-campus Lahore, from February to May 2014. The self-administered questionnaire consisted of three sections: demographics, general knowledge of psychiatric illnesses, and Community Attitudes towards Mental Illnesses (CAMI Scale. The questionnaire was distributed to 650 participants enrolled in different disciplines (Social Sciences, Medicine and Formal Sciences.Results. Response rate was 81% (527/650 respondents. Mean age was 20.98 years. Most of the students (331, 62.8% had an urban background and studied Social Sciences (238, 45.2%. Four hundred and eighteen respondents (79.3% considered religion very important and most respondents considered psychiatrists (334, 63.4% and spiritual leaders (72, 13.7% to be best able to treat mental illnesses. One hundred and sixty nine respondents (32.1% considered black magic to be a cause of mental illness. Only 215 (41% respondents had ever read an article on mental illnesses. Multiple regression analysis revealed study discipline, exposure, perceived causes of mental illnesses and superstitions to be significantly associated with attitudes towards mental illnesses (p < .05.Conclusion. Although low awareness and exposure were found in this sample of Pakistani university students, their attitude towards mental illnesses was generally positive. Most respondents gave supernatural explanations for mental illnesses but only a few believed that spiritual leaders can

  16. Modernization of ILL instrument electronics

    Descamps, F.

    1999-01-01

    We have built new general purpose cards for data acquisition taking advantage of recent developments in electronics. At the end of the year, most scheduled instruments at the ILL will be running under UNIX with VME electronics front-end. As the VME electronics of the ILL was designed at the beginning of the eighties, the instrument control section (SCI) at ILL has prepared a renewal plan for two reasons: - first, all the processor cards of the Institute are based on MIZAR processor boards and MIZAR stopped the production of this card last year, as the market was shrinking; - in addition, processors and programmable electronics are now 10 times faster. The electronics services want to take full advantage of these new performances. (author)

  17. Cultural diversity in causal attributions for illness: the role of the supernatural.

    Landrine, H; Klonoff, E A

    1994-04-01

    We investigated cultural diversity in beliefs about the causes of illness and assessed the possibility that popular free-form methodologies (asking subjects to generate causes) inhibit minorities from expressing their belief in supernatural causes. As predicted, when asked to generate causes of illness and rate these in terms of their importance, whites and minorities did not differ in the number or type (natural vs supernatural) of causes they generated or in the importance rating they assigned to these. However, when these same subjects were provided with natural and supernatural causes to rate in terms of importance, minorities rated supernatural causes significantly more important than did whites, and more minorities than whites endorsed such causes. Cultural differences in causal attributions for illness are examined, and the role of methodology in determining such attributions is highlighted.

  18. Physiotherapy in critically ill patients

    N. Ambrosino

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Prolonged stay in Intensive Care Unit (ICU can cause muscle weakness, physical deconditioning, recurrent symptoms, mood alterations and poor quality of life.Physiotherapy is probably the only treatment likely to increase in the short- and long-term care of the patients admitted to these units. Recovery of physical and respiratory functions, coming off mechanical ventilation, prevention of the effects of bed-rest and improvement in the health status are the clinical objectives of a physiotherapy program in medical and surgical areas. To manage these patients, integrated programs dealing with both whole-body physical therapy and pulmonary care are needed.There is still limited scientific evidence to support such a comprehensive approach to all critically ill patients; therefore we need randomised studies with solid clinical short- and long-term outcome measures. Resumo: Uma estadia prolongada na Unidade de Cuidados Intensivos (UCI pode causar fraqueza muscular, descondicionamento físico, sintomas recorrentes, alterações de humor e má qualidade de vida.A fisioterapia é, provavelmente, o único tratamento com potencial para aumentar nos cuidados a curto e longo prazo aos pacientes internados nestas unidades. A recuperação das funções físicas e respiratórias, retirar a ventilação mecânica, prevenção de efeitos do repouso na cama e melhoria do estado de saúde são objectivos clínicos de um programa de fisioterapia nas áreas médicas e cirúrgicas. Para tratar estes pacientes, são necessários programas integrados que englobem tanto a fisioterapia global como os cuidados respiratórios necessários.A evidência científica para apoiar esta abordagem abrangente para todos os doentes críticos é ainda limitada; portanto, são necessários estudos aleatorizados com medidas de resultados a curto e longo prazo. Keywords: Rehabilitation, Mechanical ventilation, Physiotherapy, Weaning, Palavras-chave: Reabilitação, Ventilação mec

  19. Cost of illness and illness perceptions in patients with fibromyalgia

    Vervoort, V.M.C.; Vriezekolk, J.E.; Olde Hartman, T.C.; Cats, H.A.; van Helmond, T.; Van der Laan, W.H.; Geenen, R.; Van den Ende, C.H.M.

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The disease impact and economic burden of fibromyalgia (FM) are high for patients and society at large. Knowing potential determinants of economic costs may help in reducing this burden. Cognitive appraisals (perceptions) of the illness could affect costs. The present study estimated

  20. Sports injuries and illnesses during the London Summer Olympic Games 2012.

    Engebretsen, Lars; Soligard, Torbjørn; Steffen, Kathrin; Alonso, Juan Manuel; Aubry, Mark; Budgett, Richard; Dvorak, Jiri; Jegathesan, Manikavasagam; Meeuwisse, Willem H; Mountjoy, Margo; Palmer-Green, Debbie; Vanhegan, Ivor; Renström, Per A

    2013-05-01

    The Olympic Movement Medical Code encourages all stakeholders to ensure that sport is practised without danger to the health of the athletes. Systematic surveillance of injuries and illnesses is the foundation for developing preventive measures in sport. To analyse the injuries and illnesses that occurred during the Games of the XXX Olympiad, held in London in 2012. We recorded the daily occurrence (or non-occurrence) of injuries and illnesses (1) through the reporting of all National Olympic Committee (NOC) medical teams and (2) in the polyclinic and medical venues by the London Organising Committee of the Olympic and Paralympic Games' (LOCOG) medical staff. In total, 10 568 athletes (4676 women and 5892 men) from 204 NOCs participated in the study. NOC and LOCOG medical staff reported 1361 injuries and 758 illnesses, equalling incidences of 128.8 injuries and 71.7 illnesses per 1000 athletes. Altogether, 11% and 7% of the athletes incurred at least one injury or illness, respectively. The risk of an athlete being injured was the highest in taekwondo, football, BMX, handball, mountain bike, athletics, weightlifting, hockey and badminton, and the lowest in archery, canoe slalom and sprint, track cycling, rowing, shooting and equestrian. 35% of the injuries were expected to prevent the athlete from participating during competition or training. Women suffered 60% more illnesses than men (86.0 vs 53.3 illnesses per 1000 athletes). The rate of illness was the highest in athletics, beach volleyball, football, sailing, synchronised swimming and taekwondo. A total of 310 illnesses (41%) affected the respiratory system and the most common cause of illness was infection (n=347, 46%). At least 11% of the athletes incurred an injury during the games and 7% of the athletes' an illness. The incidence of injuries and illnesses varied substantially among sports. Future initiatives should include the development of preventive measures tailored for each specific sport and the

  1. Anomalies of subjective experience in schizophrenia and psychotic bipolar illness

    Parnas, J; Handest, P; Saebye, D

    2003-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Contemporary psychopathology, as a result of behaviourally dominated epistemological stance, downplays anomalies of the patient's subjectivity. This neglect has probably deleterious consequences for research in the causes and the boundaries of the schizophrenia spectrum conditions....... The purpose of this study is to explore frequency of qualitative, not-yet-psychotic, anomalies of subjective experience in patients with residual schizophrenia and psychotic bipolar illness in remission. METHOD: The patients were examined with the Danish version of the Bonn Scale for the Assessment of Basic...... differential diagnosis and therefore potentially useful in the preonset detection of the schizophrenia spectrum illness....

  2. Florence Nightingale: her Crimean fever and chronic illness.

    Dossey, Barbara M

    2010-03-01

    Florence Nightingale's Crimean fever and chronic illness have intrigued historians for more than a century and a half. The purpose of this article is threefold: (a) to discuss the facts that point to the cause of Nightingale's Crimean fever as brucellosis, (b) to show that her debilitating illness for 32 years (1855-1887) was compatible with the specific form of chronic brucellosis, and (c) to present new evidence that she was still having severe symptoms in December 1887, when it was previously felt that she had no severe symptoms after 1870.

  3. A pill for every ill?

    Buhagiar, Marc

    2015-01-01

    In the US, non-medical use of prescription drugs is second only to marijuana. Marc Buhagiar meets up with Prof. Marilyn Clark to investigate just how dangerous this problem is around Europe. Illustrations by Sonya Hallett. http://www.um.edu.mt/think/a-pill-for-every-ill/

  4. Illness, suffering and voluntary euthanasia.

    Varelius, Jukka

    2007-02-01

    It is often accepted that we may legitimately speak about voluntary euthanasia only in cases of persons who are suffering because they are incurably injured or have an incurable disease. This article argues that when we consider the moral acceptability of voluntary euthanasia, we have no good reason to concentrate only on persons who are ill or injured and suffering.

  5. New chopper control at ILL

    Descamps, F [Institut Max von Laue - Paul Langevin (ILL), 38 - Grenoble (France)

    1997-04-01

    Proper phasing is an essential characteristic of the chopper systems used at ILL. A wide variety of choppers and selectors differing in weight, speed and bearing types are controlled by a unique electronic card performing digital adaptative filtering. The chopper regulation system is described. (author).

  6. The Etiology of the Illnesses of the Psyche in the Hippocratic Texts

    Niki Papavramidou

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The Hippocratic Corpus played a key role to the disengagement of illness from the divine element that was believed to be to cause of all illnesses and injuries. Especially for the illnesses of the psyche (some call it “self” or “soul”, the Hippocratic physicians managed to recognize their biological origin and to create a “primitive” nosological structure. The aim of this paper is to identify the etiological factors of the illnesses of the psyche, according to the Hippocratic authors and to correlate them to modern medical observations. The Hippocratic physicians enumerated certain etiological factors for the occurrence of the illnesses of the psyche: imbalance of the humours, injuries of the head, extreme emotions, along with environmental features that were supposed to favor the appearance of such illnesses, such as the climate, the quality of the water, the winds, etc. Keywords: Hippocratic medicine; History of medicine; history of psychiatry; psyche

  7. Illness Perceptions in Patients of Schizophrenia: A Preliminary Investigation from Lahore, Pakistan.

    Hussain, Sadia; Imran, Nazish; Hotiana, Usman Amin; Mazhar, Nauman; Asif, Aftab

    2017-01-01

    Patient's perception of their illness influences their healthcare decisions. The objectives of this study were to explore patient's own beliefs about their illness (Schizophrenia) and perceived social support, and its impact on their attitudes toward pharmacological treatment in Lahore, Pakistan. This study was conducted at Mayo Hospital Lahore from March to September 2016. Hundred individuals suffering from Schizophrenia completed four questionnaires; a socio-demographic questionnaire, the Illness Perception Questionnaire for Schizophrenia(IPQ-S), Drug attitude Inventory-10 (DAI) and Multidimensional Scale of Perceived Social Support (PSS). Stress, family problems, lack of friends & financial worries were endorsed strongly by patients as cause of their mental illness. Ambiguity regarding their mental illness duration and personal control was observed. Patients' perceived significant negative consequences, negative emotional response, as well as had poor understanding of their mental illness and treatment effectiveness. Statistically significant gender differences in treatment control and illness coherence subscales of IPQS were observed. Drug attitude inventory was positively correlated with Treatment control subscale (p Illness coherence subscale of IPQS (p consequences subscale and perceived social support was negatively correlated (p illness is predictor of their drug taking attitude and perceived social support. Study results should help to develop new interventions to correct inaccurate beliefs in patients with schizophrenia to improve illness outcome.

  8. Parents' and Coaches' Guide to Dehydration and Other Heat Illnesses in Children

    ... gives specific return-to-play instructions. Parents should work with the child’s doctor to rule out or treat any other conditions or illnesses that may cause continued problems with heat stroke. The child should ...

  9. Micafungin versus anidulafungin in critically ill patients with invasive candidiasis: A retrospective study

    P.J. van der Geest (Patrick); N.G.M. Hunfeld (Nicola); S.E. Ladage (Sophie E.); A.B.J. Groeneveld (Johan)

    2016-01-01

    markdownabstract_Background:_ In critically ill patients the incidence of invasive fungal infections caused by Candida spp. has increased remarkably. Echinocandins are recommended as initial treatment for invasive fungal infections. The safety and efficacy of micafungin compared to caspofungin is

  10. The Mind-Body Connection - How to Fight Stress and Ward Off Illness

    ... to help prevent illness caused by stress. "This new science is forcing the medical community to take more seriously the popular notions of the mind-body connection," says Esther M. Sternberg, M.D., ...

  11. Demographic and epidemiological determinants of healthcare costs in Netherlands: cost of illness study

    W.J. Meerding (Willem Jan); L.G.A. Bonneux (Luc); J.J. Polder (Johan); M.A. Koopmanschap (Marc); P.J. van der Maas (Paul)

    1998-01-01

    textabstractOBJECTIVES: To determine the demands on healthcare resources caused by different types of illnesses and variation with age and sex. DESIGN: Information on healthcare use was obtained from all 22 healthcare sectors in the Netherlands. Most important sectors

  12. Infants' symptoms of illness assessed by parents: Impact and implications

    Ertmann, Ruth Kirk; Siersma, Volkert; Reventlow, Susanne

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Objectives. Some parents with a sick infant contact a doctor, while others do not. The reasons underlying such parental decisions have not been thoroughly studied. The purpose of this study was to explore how the actual symptoms in the infant were associated with parent-rated illness......, illness severity, and the probability of the parents contacting a doctor. Design. A retrospective questionnaire and a prospective diary study covering 14 months of the participating infants' lives. Setting and subjects. The 194 participating infants were followed for three months prospectively from...... with at least one symptom; 38% of the infants were reported to have had five or more symptoms for more than five days. Fever, earache, and vomiting were the symptoms most likely to cause parents to rate their infant as ill. Earache was the symptom that triggered doctor contact most immediately. The parent...

  13. About status of oncological illness rate in Kazakhstan

    Omarova, K.O.

    2000-01-01

    One of the principal problem of Republic of Kazakhstan's pediatricians is onco-hematological diseases. In 1999 hematological illness rate in the Republic makes up 2964.8 per 100,000 of children's population. Side by side with widespread iron-deficit anemia the aplastic anemia and the acute leukemia are often meeting. Annual index of acute leukemia illness number in Kazakhstan makes up 2.6 per 100,000 of children's population. Core of examined children group with acute leukemia presents children living nearby nuclear sites and arrived from Chernobyl and who in consequence (after 3-5 years) fallen ill. It is concluded, that cause of leukemia is sum of unfavourable epidemiologic factors

  14. Categorizing food-related illness: Have we got it right?

    Manning, Louise

    2017-06-13

    Since the 1950s food safety hazards have been categorized simply as (micro) biological, chemical or physical hazards with no clear differentiation between those that cause acute and chronic harm. Indeed international risk assessment methods, including hazard analysis critical control point (HACCP) use these criteria. However, the spectrum of food related illness continues to grow now encompassing food allergy and intolerance, obesity, type 2 diabetes, stroke, heart disease, cancer as well as food poisoning, foodborne illness and food contamination. Therefore over a half-century later is this the time to redefine the spectrum of what constitutes food related illness? This paper considers whether such "redefinition" of food related intoxicating and infectious agents would provide more targeted policy instruments and lead to better risk assessment and thus mitigation of such risk within the food supply chain.

  15. Public stigma associated with mental illnesses in Pakistani university students: a cross sectional survey

    Zubair, Muhammad; Ghulam, Hamzah; Wajih Ullah, Muhammad; Zubair Tariq, Muhammad

    2014-01-01

    Background. The objectives of the study were to explore the knowledge and attitudes of Pakistani university students toward mental illnesses. People with mental illnesses are challenged not only by their symptoms but also by the prejudices associated with their illness. Acknowledging the stigma of mental illness should be the first essential step toward devising an appropriate treatment plan. Methods. A cross-sectional survey was conducted at the University of Punjab, Lahore, CMH Lahore Medical and Dental College, Lahore, and University of Sargodha, Sub-campus Lahore, from February to May 2014. The self-administered questionnaire consisted of three sections: demographics, general knowledge of psychiatric illnesses, and Community Attitudes towards Mental Illnesses (CAMI) Scale. The questionnaire was distributed to 650 participants enrolled in different disciplines (Social Sciences, Medicine and Formal Sciences). Results. Response rate was 81% (527/650 respondents). Mean age was 20.98 years. Most of the students (331, 62.8%) had an urban background and studied Social Sciences (238, 45.2%). Four hundred and eighteen respondents (79.3%) considered religion very important and most respondents considered psychiatrists (334, 63.4%) and spiritual leaders (72, 13.7%) to be best able to treat mental illnesses. One hundred and sixty nine respondents (32.1%) considered black magic to be a cause of mental illness. Only 215 (41%) respondents had ever read an article on mental illnesses. Multiple regression analysis revealed study discipline, exposure, perceived causes of mental illnesses and superstitions to be significantly associated with attitudes towards mental illnesses (p supernatural explanations for mental illnesses but only a few believed that spiritual leaders can play a role in treatment. PMID:25548734

  16. Illness Perception of Patients with Functional Gastrointestinal Disorders

    Na-na Xiong

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available ObjectiveTo investigate the illness perception characteristics of Chinese patients with functional gastrointestinal disorders (FGID, and the mediating role between symptoms, psychopathology, and clinical outcomes.MethodsSix illness groups from four outpatient departments of a general hospital in China were recruited, including the FGID patient group. The modified and validated Chinese version of the illness perception questionnaire-revised was utilized, which contained three sections: symptom identity, illness representation, and causes. The 12-item short-form health survey was utilized to reflect the physical and mental health-related quality of life (HRQoL. The Toronto alexithymia scale was used to measure the severity of alexithymia. Additional behavioral outcome about the frequency of doctor visits in the past 12 months was measured. Pathway analyses with multiple-group comparisons were conducted to test the mediating role of illness perception.ResultsOverall, 600 patients were recruited. The illness perceptions of FGID patients were characterized as with broad non-gastrointestinal symptoms (6.8 ± 4.2, a negative illness representation (more chronic course, worse consequences, lower personal and treatment control, lower illness coherence, and heavier emotional distress, and high numbers of psychological and culture-specific attributions. Fit indices of the three hypothesized path models (for physical and mental HRQoL and doctor-visit frequency, respectively supported the mediating role of illness perceptions. For example, the severity of alexithymia and non-gastrointestinal symptoms had significant negative effect on mental quality of life through both direct (standardized effect: −0.085 and −0.233 and indirect (standardized effect: −0.045 and −0.231 influence via subscales of consequences, emotional representation, and psychological and risk factor attributions. Multi-group confirmatory factor analysis showed similar

  17. Memory bias for emotional and illness-related words in patients with depression, anxiety and somatization disorders: an investigation with the directed forgetting task.

    Wingenfeld, Katja; Terfehr, Kirsten; Meyer, Björn; Löwe, Bernd; Spitzer, Carsten

    2013-01-01

    Memory bias to emotion- and illness-related information plays a prominent role in many mental disorders, particularly major depressive disorder, anxiety disorders and somatoform disorder. The current study aimed to investigate memory bias in different mental disorders by using neutral, emotionally valenced and illness-related word stimuli in a directed forgetting task. Seventy-eight inpatients from a university-based psychosomatic hospital participated in the study. The item method of the directed forgetting task was used, in which participants are instructed to either forget or remember each item immediately after it has been presented. Memory performance was tested with a free recall test. Overall, 36 words were presented - 6 from each of 6 categories: neutral, negative, positive, illness related ('somatoform'), depression related, and anxiety related. Three words of each category were to be remembered and 3 were to be forgotten. Independently of the patients' diagnoses, we found that most patients had relative difficulties remembering anxiety- and depression-related words, compared to neutral words, when they were instructed to remember them. By contrast, in the 'instructed forgetting' condition, patients showed deficits in the ability to forget illness-related stimuli relative to neutral material. These effects were unspecific with regard to diagnosis. The results in the 'instructed remembering' condition might be interpreted in the context of cognitive avoidance instead of a memory bias. In the 'instructed forgetting' condition, it appeared that illness-related words were more difficult to suppress compared to the other word types, which could explain the observed memory bias. Copyright © 2012 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  18. Psychogenic Explanations of Physical Illness: Time to Examine the Evidence.

    Wilshire, Carolyn E; Ward, Tony

    2016-09-01

    In some patients with chronic physical complaints, detailed examination fails to reveal a well-recognized underlying disease process. In this situation, the physician may suspect a psychological cause. In this review, we critically evaluated the evidence for this causal claim, focusing on complaints presenting as neurological disorders. There were four main conclusions. First, patients with these complaints frequently exhibit psychopathology but not consistently more often than patients with a comparable "organic" diagnosis, so a causal role cannot be inferred. Second, these patients report a high incidence of adverse life experiences, but again, there is insufficient evidence to indicate a causal role for any particular type of experience. Third, although psychogenic illnesses are believed to be more responsive to psychological interventions than comparable "organic" illnesses, there is currently no evidence to support this claim. Finally, recent evidence suggests that biological and physical factors play a much greater causal role in these illnesses than previously believed. We conclude that there is currently little evidential support for psychogenic theories of illness in the neurological domain. In future research, researchers need to take a wider view concerning the etiology of these illnesses. © The Author(s) 2016.

  19. What causes cancer?

    Trichopoulos, D.; Li, F.P.; Hunter, D.J.

    1996-01-01

    Cancer, a major killer throughout human history, changed its grasp as humankind advanced industrially and technologically. Although the risk of a few types of cancer has declined dramatically in developed countries in this century, the incidence of the most significant forms of the disease has increased. Cancers of the lung, breast, prostate and colon and rectum have all become more frequent in countries where risk factors such as cigarette smoking, unhealthful dietary habits and exposure to dangerous chemicals at work or in the environment are now more common. As industrialization has proliferated, so, too, have the suspected causes of cancer. In recent years, news accounts have been full of warnings about all manner of modern conveniences, from pharmaceuticals to cellular telephones. Meanwhile the pace of technological advance makes it more vital than ever to single out definitive causes of cancer from an ever expanding array of possibilities. For this daunting task, researchers rely heavily on epidemiology. Epidemiologists identify factors that are common to cancer victims’ history and way of life and evaluate them in the context of current biological understanding. Ultimately, the evidence may persuade researchers that one or more of these factors or characteristics “cause” the disease— that is to say, exposure to them significantly increases the odds of the illness developing

  20. Correlates of Illness Severity in Infectious Mononucleosis

    John Odame

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Understanding the spectrum and frequencies of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV complications and markers of illness severity in immunocompetent patients with primary EBV infection will inform management of patients with EBV-related illnesses.

  1. Mental Illness in Children: Know the Signs

    ... how you can help. By Mayo Clinic Staff Mental illness in children can be hard for parents to ... help they need. Understand the warning signs of mental illness in children and how you can help your ...

  2. Adult Neurogenesis and Mental Illness

    Schoenfeld, Timothy J; Cameron, Heather A

    2015-01-01

    Several lines of evidence suggest that adult neurogenesis, the production of new neurons in adulthood, may play a role in psychiatric disorders, including depression, anxiety, and schizophrenia. Medications and other treatments for mental disorders often promote the proliferation of new neurons; the time course for maturation and integration of new neurons in circuitry parallels the delayed efficacy of psychiatric therapies; adverse and beneficial experiences similarly affect development of mental illness and neurogenesis; and ablation of new neurons in adulthood alters the behavioral impact of drugs in animal models. At present, the links between adult neurogenesis and depression seem stronger than those suggesting a relationship between new neurons and anxiety or schizophrenia. Yet, even in the case of depression there is currently no direct evidence for a causative role. This article reviews the data relating adult neurogenesis to mental illness and discusses where research needs to head in the future. PMID:25178407

  3. Depressive illness delayed Hamlet's revenge.

    Shaw, A B; Pickering, Neil

    2002-12-01

    If Hamlet had not delayed his revenge there would have been no play. Many explanations of the delay have been offered in the last four centuries. None is convincing. The interpretation which best fits the evidence best is that Hamlet was suffering from an acute depressive illness, with some obsessional features. He could not make a firm resolve to act. In Shakespeare's time there was no concept of acute depressive illness, although melancholy was well known. Melancholy, however, would have been seen as a character defect. In the tragic model the hero brings himself and others to ruin because of a character defect. Thus, at the time, the play conformed to the tragic model. With today's knowledge, it does not. This analysis adds to, but does not replace, other insights into the play.

  4. Hinduism, marriage and mental illness.

    Sharma, Indira; Pandit, Balram; Pathak, Abhishek; Sharma, Reet

    2013-01-01

    For Hindus, marriage is a sacrosanct union. It is also an important social institution. Marriages in India are between two families, rather two individuals, arranged marriages and dowry are customary. The society as well as the Indian legislation attempt to protect marriage. Indian society is predominantly patriarchal. There are stringent gender roles, with women having a passive role and husband an active dominating role. Marriage and motherhood are the primary status roles for women. When afflicted mental illness married women are discriminated against married men. In the setting of mental illness many of the social values take their ugly forms in the form of domestic violence, dowry harassment, abuse of dowry law, dowry death, separation, and divorce. Societal norms are powerful and often override the legislative provisions in real life situations.

  5. Anxiety in Medically Ill Children/Adolescents

    Pao, Maryland; Bosk, Abigail

    2010-01-01

    Anxiety disorders are thought to be one of the most common psychiatric diagnoses in children/adolescents. Chronic medical illness is a significant risk factor for the development of an anxiety disorder and the prevalence rate of anxiety disorders among youths with chronic medical illnesses is higher compared to their healthy counterparts. Anxiety disorders may develop secondary to predisposing biological mechanisms related to a child’s specific medical illness, as a response to being ill or i...

  6. Psychological and interactional characteristics of patients with somatoform disorders: Validation of the Somatic Symptoms Experiences Questionnaire (SSEQ) in a clinical psychosomatic population.

    Herzog, Annabel; Voigt, Katharina; Meyer, Björn; Wollburg, Eileen; Weinmann, Nina; Langs, Gernot; Löwe, Bernd

    2015-06-01

    The new DSM-5 Somatic Symptom Disorder (SSD) emphasizes the importance of psychological processes related to somatic symptoms in patients with somatoform disorders. To address this, the Somatic Symptoms Experiences Questionnaire (SSEQ), the first self-report scale that assesses a broad range of psychological and interactional characteristics relevant to patients with a somatoform disorder or SSD, was developed. This prospective study was conducted to validate the SSEQ. The 15-item SSEQ was administered along with a battery of self-report questionnaires to psychosomatic inpatients. Patients were assessed with the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV to confirm a somatoform, depressive, or anxiety disorder. Confirmatory factor analyses, tests of internal consistency and tests of validity were performed. Patients (n=262) with a mean age of 43.4 years, 60.3% women, were included in the analyses. The previously observed four-factor model was replicated and internal consistency was good (Cronbach's α=.90). Patients with a somatoform disorder had significantly higher scores on the SSEQ (t=4.24, pquality of life. Sensitivity to change was shown by significantly higher effect sizes of the SSEQ change scores for improved patients than for patients without improvement. The SSEQ appears to be a reliable, valid, and efficient instrument to assess a broad range of psychological and interactional features related to the experience of somatic symptoms. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. [Concept of budget-based remuneration system for the fields of psychiatry and psychotherapy, psychosomatic medicine and psychotherapy, child and adolescent psychiatry and psychotherapy].

    2015-11-01

    A new remuneration system is currently being developed for the hospital care of people with mental disorders. Last year, because of sharp criticism the option phase of the planned Flat-rate Charges in Psychiatry and Psychosomatics (Pauschalierende Entgelte Psychiatrie und Psychosomatik, PEPP) was extended by 2 years. During this time the Federal Ministry of Health wants to look for alternatives and possible starting points for the further development of care. Now, 16 scientific professional associations and organisations have presented a joint concept for a sustainable solution: the budget-based remuneration system. The system is suitable for ensuring that people with mental disorders are treated according to their particular needs and for promoting the appropriate further development of regional care in all treatment settings. It corresponds with the objectives as formulated in Section 17d of the Hospital Finance Act (Krankenhausfinanzierungsgesetz, KHG) and translates the PEPP system, which is currently being developed and focusses on average prices, into a performance-oriented, transparent budgetary system. The fundamental principle is the separation of the individual hospitals' budgeting on the basis of evidence-based, feature- and performance-related modules and billing in the form of advance payments from the agreed budget.

  8. [Application of the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF) in Psychosomatic Rehabilitation and Addiction Rehabilitation in Germany - The Current State].

    Spies, M; Brütt, A L; Freitag, M; Buchholz, A

    2015-10-01

    The aim of this study was to gather information on the current state of the implementation of the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF) in psychosomatic and addiction rehabilitation. In the summer of 2013, rehabilitation clinics in Germany were surveyed online on their ICF utilization. The questionnaire covered scope and purpose of ICF use, application of ICF core sets and assessments as well as barriers to the use of ICF. Of 359 clinics invited, 104 (30%) participated in the survey. Of those surveyed, 60 (61.9%) claimed to have taken measures to implement the ICF in their clinic; only 37 (38.5%), however, reported using the ICF in their daily work. The main barriers identified were complexity of the ICF, time management issues and training deficits. Approaches to ICF use are not uniform. There is a need for training programs, and guidance from health care insurance providers could help towards uniform implementation of the ICF. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  9. Evaluation of a video-based Internet intervention as preparation for inpatient psychosomatic rehabilitation: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial.

    Becker, Jan; Beutel, Manfred E; Gerzymisch, Katharina; Schulz, Dirk; Siepmann, Martin; Knickenberg, Rudolf J; Schmädeke, Stefan; Ferdinand, Peter; Zwerenz, Rüdiger

    2016-06-13

    Patients' treatment expectations are a key factor in psychotherapy. Several studies have linked higher expectations to better treatment success. Therefore, we want to evaluate the impact of a targeted video-based intervention on patients' expectations and the treatment success of inpatient rehabilitation. All patients who will be referred to inpatient psychosomatic rehabilitation in three clinics will receive a study flyer with information about how to log in to the study platform together with the usual clinic information leaflet. Patients will receive the study information and informed consent upon login and will be randomized into the intervention or the control group. The intervention group (n = 394) will get access to our virtual online clinic, containing several videos about inpatient rehabilitation, until their admission to inpatient rehabilitation. The control group (n = 394) will receive no special treatment preparation. Questionnaires will be given at study inclusion (T0), two weeks before admission to (T1), and at the end of (T2) inpatient rehabilitation. The primary outcome is the outcome expectancy measured with the Credibility Expectancy Questionnaire at T1. Secondary outcomes include treatment motivation, mental health, work ability, depression, anxiety, and satisfaction with and usage of the Internet platform. We expect the intervention group to benefit from the additional preparation concerning their outcome expectancy. If successful, this approach could be used in the future to enhance the efficacy of inpatient rehabilitation. ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT02532881 . Registered on 25 August 2015.

  10. What Influences Mental Illness? Discrepancies Between Medical Education and Conception

    Evan Hy Einstein

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective: This preliminary study examined the differences between what was taught during a formal medical education and medical students’ and psychiatry residents’ conceptions of notions regarding the causes and determinants of mental illness. Methods: The authors surveyed 74 medical students and 11 residents via convenience sampling. The survey contained 18 statements which were rated twice based on truthfulness in terms of a participant’s formal education and conception, respectively. Descriptive statistics and a Wilcoxon signed rank test determined differences between education and conception. Results: Results showed that students were less likely to perceive a neurotransmitter imbalance to cause mental illness, as opposed to what was emphasized during a formal medical education. Students and residents also understood the importance of factors such as systemic racism and socioeconomic status in the development of mental illness, which were factors that did not receive heavy emphasis during medical education. Furthermore, students and residents believed that not only did mental illnesses have nonuniform pathologies, but that the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders also had the propensity to sometimes arbitrarily categorize individuals with potentially negative consequences. Conclusions: If these notions are therefore part of students’ and residents’ conceptions, as well as documented in the literature, then it seems appropriate for medical education to be further developed to emphasize these ideas.

  11. What Influences Mental Illness? Discrepancies Between Medical Education and Conception.

    Einstein, Evan Hy; Klepacz, Lidia

    2017-01-01

    This preliminary study examined the differences between what was taught during a formal medical education and medical students' and psychiatry residents' conceptions of notions regarding the causes and determinants of mental illness. The authors surveyed 74 medical students and 11 residents via convenience sampling. The survey contained 18 statements which were rated twice based on truthfulness in terms of a participant's formal education and conception, respectively. Descriptive statistics and a Wilcoxon signed rank test determined differences between education and conception. Results showed that students were less likely to perceive a neurotransmitter imbalance to cause mental illness, as opposed to what was emphasized during a formal medical education. Students and residents also understood the importance of factors such as systemic racism and socioeconomic status in the development of mental illness, which were factors that did not receive heavy emphasis during medical education. Furthermore, students and residents believed that not only did mental illnesses have nonuniform pathologies, but that the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders also had the propensity to sometimes arbitrarily categorize individuals with potentially negative consequences. If these notions are therefore part of students' and residents' conceptions, as well as documented in the literature, then it seems appropriate for medical education to be further developed to emphasize these ideas.

  12. Causal attributions in Brazilian children's reasoning about health and illness

    Boruchovitch Evely

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: At a time when a great number of diseases can be prevented by changing one's habits and life style, investigations have focused on understanding what adults and children believe to be desirable health practices and uncovering the factors associated with successful adherence to such practices. For these, causal attributions for health and illness were investigated among 96 Brazilian elementary school students. METHODS: Ninety six subjects, aged 6 to 14, were interviewed individually and their causal attributions were assessed through 14 true-false items (e.g. people stay well [healthy] because they are lucky. The relationship between the children's causal attributions and demographic characteristics were also examined. RESULTS: Overall, the results were consistent with previous researches. "Taking care of oneself" was considered the most important cause of good health. "Viruses and germs" and "lack of self-care" were the most selected causes of illness. Analyses revealed significant relationship between subjects' causal attribution and their age, school grade level, socioeconomic status and gender. CONCLUSIONS: The study findings suggest that there may be more cross-cultural similarities than differences in children's causal attributions for health and illness. Finding ways to help individuals engage in appropriate preventive-maintenance health practices without developing an exaggerated notion that the individuals can control their own health and illness is a challenge which remains to be addressed by further research.

  13. Common sense model of mental illness: Understanding the impact of cognitive and emotional representations of mental illness on recovery through the mediation of self-stigma.

    Chan, Randolph C H; Mak, Winnie W S

    2016-12-30

    The present study applied the common sense model to understand the underlying mechanism of how cognitive and emotional representations of mental illness among people in recovery of mental illness would impact their endorsement of self-stigma, and how that would, in turn, affect clinical and personal recovery. A cross-sectional survey was administered to 376 people in recovery. Participants were recruited from seven public specialty outpatient clinics and substance abuse assessment clinics across various districts in Hong Kong. They were asked to report their perception towards their mental illness, self-stigma, symptom severity, and personal recovery. The results of structural equation modeling partially supported the hypothesized mediation model indicating that controllability, consequences, and emotional concern of mental illness, but not cause, timeline, and identity, were associated with self-stigma, which was subsequently negatively associated with clinical and personal recovery. The present study demonstrated the mediating role of self-stigma in the relationship between individuals' illness representations towards their mental illness and their recovery. Illness management programs aimed at addressing the maladaptive mental illness-related beliefs and emotions are recommended. Implications on developing self-directed and empowering mental health services are discussed. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Stereotactic lesioning for mental illness

    Kim, M.-C.; Lee, T.-K.

    2008-01-01

    The authors report stereotactically created lesioning by radiofrequency or Cyberknife radiosurgery for patients with mental illness. Since 1993, thirty-eight patients have undergone stereotactic psychosurgery for medically intractable mental illnesses. Two patients had aggressive behavior. Twenty-five patients suffered from Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder (OCD) and ten patients had depression. Another patient suffered from atypical psychosis. Bilateral amygdalotomy and subcaudate tractotomy were done for aggressive behavior. Limbic leucotomy or anterior cingulotomy was done for CCD and subcaudate tractotomy with or without cingulotomy was done for depression. In twenty-three patients, the lesions were made by a radiofrequency (RF) lesion generator. In fifteen cases, the lesions were made with Cyberknife Radiosurgery (CKRS). The Overt Aggression Scale (OAS) declined from 8 to 2 with clinical improvement during follow up period. With long-term follow up (meaning 57 months) in 25 OCDs, the mean Yale Brown Obsessive Compulsive Score (YBOCS) declined from 34 to 13 (n = 25). The Hamilton Depression scale (HAMD) for ten patients with depression declined from 38.5 to 10.5 (n = 10). There was no operative mortality and no significant morbidity except one case with transient urinary incontinence. Authors suggest that stereotactic psychosurgery by RF and CKRS could be a safe and effective means of treating some medically intractable mental illnesses. (author)

  15. Illness perceptions of cancer patients: relationships with illness characteristics and effects on coping.

    Hopman, E.P.C.; Rijken, P.M.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Illness perceptions have proven to be predictive of coping and adjustment in many chronically ill patients. Insights into illness perceptions of cancer patients are however scarce. The purpose of the present study was to explore how people with cancer perceive their illness. Moreover, we

  16. Beyond attributions: Understanding public stigma of mental illness with the common sense model.

    Mak, Winnie W S; Chong, Eddie S K; Wong, Celia C Y

    2014-03-01

    The present study applied the common sense model (i.e., cause, controllability, timeline, consequences, and illness coherence) to understand public attitudes toward mental illness and help-seeking intention and to examine the mediating role of perceived controllability between causal attributions with public attitudes and help seeking. Based on a randomized household sample of 941 Chinese community adults in Hong Kong, results of the structural equation modeling demonstrated that people who endorsed cultural lay beliefs tended to perceive the course of mental illness as less controllable, whereas those with psychosocial attributions see its course as more controllable. The more people perceived the course of mental illness as less controllable, more chronic, and incomprehensible, the lower was their acceptance and the greater was mental illness stigma. Furthermore, those who perceived mental illness with dire consequences were more likely to feel greater stigma and social distance. Conversely, when people were more accepting, they were more likely to seek help for psychological services and felt a shorter social distance. The common sense model provides a multidimensional framework in understanding public's mental illness perceptions and stigma. Not only should biopsychosocial determinants of mental illness be advocated to the public, cultural myths toward mental illness must be debunked.

  17. Outbreak bias in illness reporting and case confirmation in ciguatera fish poisoning surveillance in south Florida.

    Begier, Elizabeth M; Backer, Lorraine C; Weisman, Richard S; Hammond, Roberta M; Fleming, Lora E; Blythe, Donna

    2006-01-01

    Ciguatera fish poisoning is a potentially life-threatening disease caused by eating coral reef fish contaminated with ciguatoxins and is the most common marine poisoning. However, existing surveillance systems capture few cases. To improve regional ciguatera surveillance in South Florida, this study compared ciguatera illnesses in the Florida Poison Information Center-Miami (FPICM) call database to ciguatera cases in the Florida Department of Health (FDOH) disease surveillance systems. Univariate and multivariate logistic regression were used to identify predictors of when FPICM reported ciguatera illnesses to FDOH and whether FDOH confirmed reported ciguatera cases. FPICM staff preferentially reported ciguatera illnesses that were of shorter duration (adjusted odds ratio [AOR] = 0.84 per additional illness day; 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.74, 0.97); outbreak-associated (AOR = 7.0; 95% CI 2.5, 19.5); and clinically more severe (AOR = 21.6; 95% CI 2.3, 198.5). Among ciguatera illnesses reported to FDOH, outbreak-associated illnesses were more likely than single, sporadic illnesses to become confirmed surveillance cases (crude OR = 11.1; 95% CI 2.0, 62.5). The over-representation of outbreak-associated ciguatera cases underestimates the true contribution of sporadic illnesses to ciguatera disease burden. This bias should be considered when evaluating surveillance systems that include both outbreak-associated and sporadic illness reports.

  18. Relationships between perceived diagnostic disclosure, patient characteristics, psychological distress and illness perceptions in Indian cancer patients.

    Chittem, Mahati; Norman, Paul; Harris, Peter R

    2013-06-01

    Non-disclosure of a cancer diagnosis is a common practice in many Asian cultures where family-based medical decision making is the norm. The present study sought to compare Indian cancer patients who were aware versus unaware of their cancer diagnosis on a range of patient characteristics, levels of psychological distress and illness perceptions. A sample of 329 Indian cancer patients were interviewed about their understanding of their illness (to assess awareness of a cancer diagnosis) and administered the following measures: the modified Rotterdam Symptom Checklist, the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale, and the Brief Illness Perceptions Questionnaire. Demographic and medical details were also obtained. Over half of the sample (54.1%) was unaware of their cancer diagnosis. A logistic regression analysis predicting perceived diagnostic disclosure indicated that awareness of a cancer diagnosis was associated with being involved in medical decisions, receiving multiple treatments, longer treatment durations, greater perceived understanding of one's illness (illness coherence) and citing a cause for one's illness. The results highlight the importance of the context in which decisions about the patient's illness are made (e.g. by whom) as well as illness perceptions relating to patients' understanding of their illness. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  19. Information processing in illness representation: Implications from an associative-learning framework.

    Lowe, Rob; Norman, Paul

    2017-03-01

    The common-sense model (Leventhal, Meyer, & Nerenz, 1980) outlines how illness representations are important for understanding adjustment to health threats. However, psychological processes giving rise to these representations are little understood. To address this, an associative-learning framework was used to model low-level process mechanics of illness representation and coping-related decision making. Associative learning was modeled within a connectionist network simulation. Two types of information were paired: Illness identities (indigestion, heart attack, cancer) were paired with illness-belief profiles (cause, timeline, consequences, control/cure), and specific illness beliefs were paired with coping procedures (family doctor, emergency services, self-treatment). To emulate past experience, the network was trained with these pairings. As an analogue of a current illness event, the trained network was exposed to partial information (illness identity or select representation beliefs) and its response recorded. The network (a) produced the appropriate representation profile (beliefs) for a given illness identity, (b) prioritized expected coping procedures, and (c) highlighted circumstances in which activated representation profiles could include self-generated or counterfactual beliefs. Encoding and activation of illness beliefs can occur spontaneously and automatically; conventional questionnaire measurement may be insensitive to these automatic representations. Furthermore, illness representations may comprise a coherent set of nonindependent beliefs (a schema) rather than a collective of independent beliefs. Incoming information may generate a "tipping point," dramatically changing the active schema as a new illness-knowledge set is invoked. Finally, automatic activation of well-learned information can lead to the erroneous interpretation of illness events, with implications for [inappropriate] coping efforts. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all

  20. Sports injuries and illnesses in the Sochi 2014 Olympic Winter Games.

    Soligard, Torbjørn; Steffen, Kathrin; Palmer-Green, Debbie; Aubry, Mark; Grant, Marie-Elaine; Meeuwisse, Willem; Mountjoy, Margo; Budgett, Richard; Engebretsen, Lars

    2015-04-01

    Systematic surveillance of injuries and illnesses is the foundation for developing preventive measures in sport. To analyse the injuries and illnesses that occurred during the XXII Olympic Winter Games, held in Sochi in 2014. We recorded the daily occurrence (or non-occurrence) of injuries and illnesses (1) through the reporting of all National Olympic Committee (NOC) medical teams and (2) in the polyclinic and medical venues by the Sochi 2014 medical staff. NOC and Sochi 2014 medical staff reported 391 injuries and 249 illnesses among 2780 athletes from 88 NOCs, equalling incidences of 14 injuries and 8.9 illnesses per 100 athletes over an 18-day period of time. Altogether, 12% and 8% of the athletes incurred at least one injury or illness, respectively. The percentage of athletes injured was highest in aerial skiing, snowboard slopestyle, snowboard cross, slopestyle skiing, halfpipe skiing, moguls skiing, alpine skiing, and snowboard halfpipe. Thirty-nine per cent of the injuries were expected to prevent the athlete from participating in competition or training. Women suffered 50% more illnesses than men. The rate of illness was highest in skeleton, short track, curling, cross-country skiing, figure skating, bobsleigh and aerial skiing. A total of 159 illnesses (64%) affected the respiratory system, and the most common cause of illness was infection (n=145, 58%). Overall, 12% of the athletes incurred at least one injury during the games, and 8% an illness, which is similar to prior Olympic Games. The incidence of injuries and illnesses varied substantially between sports. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  1. Cultural Variation in Implicit Mental Illness Stigma.

    Cheon, Bobby K; Chiao, Joan Y

    2012-10-01

    Culture shapes how individuals perceive and respond to others with mental illness. Prior studies have suggested that Asians and Asian Americans typically endorse greater stigma of mental illness compared to Westerners (White Europeans and Americans). However, whether these differences in stigma arise from cultural variations in automatic affective reactions or deliberative concerns of the appropriateness of one's reactions to mental illness remains unknown. Here we compared implicit and explicit attitudes toward mental illness among Asian and Caucasian Americans. Asian Americans showed stronger negative implicit attitudes toward mental illness relative to Caucasian Americans, suggesting that cultural variation in stigma of mental illness can be observed even when concerns regarding the validity and appropriateness of one's attitudes toward mental illness are minimized. Asian Americans also explicitly endorsed greater desire for social distance from mental illness relative to Caucasian Americans. These findings suggest that cultural variations in mental illness stigma may arise from cultural differences in automatic reactions to mental illness, though cultural variations in deliberative processing may further shape differences in these immediate reactions to mental illness.

  2. Attribution of mental illness to work: a Delphi study.

    Wong, M G P; Poole, C J M; Agius, R

    2015-07-01

    Clinicians may be asked whether mental ill-health has been caused by work but there is no guidance on how this judgement should be made. To seek a consensus on the factors that should be considered and how they should be sought when attributing mental ill-health to work. A three-round Delphi study involving expert academics, occupational physicians, psychiatrists and psychologists. We deemed consensus had been reached when 66% or more of the experts were in agreement. Of 54 invited experts, 35 (65%) took part in the first round, 30 of these 35 (86%) in the second and 29 of these 30 (97%) in the final round. Consensus was reached for 11 workplace stressors: high job strain; effort-reward imbalance; major trauma; interpersonal conflict; inadequate support; role ambiguity; person-job mismatch; organizational injustice; organizational culture; work scheduling and threats to job security. Seven personal factors were identified as being important: previous mental illness; personality traits of neuroticism; adverse life events or social circumstances; resilience; a family history of mental illness and secondary gain. The worker, manager and co-workers were thought to be the most useful sources of workplace information. Consensus was reached for a definition of occupational mental illness but not for a threshold of work-relatedness. The attribution of mental ill-health to work is complex and involves the consideration of both workplace stressors and personal factors of vulnerability. Clinical consultation with an occupational physician who is familiar with the workplace is central to the process. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society of Occupational Medicine. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  3. Chronic physical illness, psychiatric disorder and disability in the workplace.

    Dewa, C S; Lin, E

    2000-07-01

    While agreement is growing that mental illness burdens the North American economy, how it impacts productivity--particularly compared to physical illness--is unclear. Hypothesizing that lost work days are only the tip of the iceberg, we also examined the association of mental and chronic physical illness with partial work days and days requiring extra effort to function. Data from 4225 employed individuals, aged 18-54, were analyzed. These were a subset of respondents to the Ontario Health Survey's Mental Health Supplement, a 1990/91 epidemiologic survey of households across Ontario, Canada. Psychiatric disorder was assessed using the University of Michigan' modification of WHO's Composite International Diagnostic Interview (UM-CIDI). Similar to US reports, professional/managerial groups had lower rates of affective and anxiety disorders and fewer disability days compared to the rest of the workforce. However, no single occupational group was consistently at greater risk for either physical or psychiatric problems. Even after accounting for sociodemographic characteristics and work conditions, mental and physical status had clear, but different, impacts on productivity. Physical conditions alone had a fairly constant effect across all types of disability days and were the largest contributor to total work day loss. They also significantly impacted partial and extra effort days but were far less important than conditions involving a mental disorder. Respondents with mental health problems, either alone or in combination with physical illnesses, appeared more likely to go to work but to require greater effort to function. WHO projects that mental illness will become the second most important cause of global disease burden in the next century. Our findings suggest that among working individuals, it affects productivity more subtly than does physical illness. However, with an estimated eight percent of Ontario's workforce experiencing more than two months annually of

  4. Infecting academic conferences: brands linked to ill health

    Stuart W Flint

    2015-01-01

    Empirical evidence shows the links between sweetened soft drinks (1,2) or fast food (3) and chronic illness such as obesity and diabetes. However, as a researcher investigating the causes of obesity, I have become disappointed at the presence of brands of unhealthy products at major conferences relating to obesity, physical activity, and nutrition. In recent years, brands such as Coca Cola Inc and McDonalds Corp have sponsored several conference events.

  5. Acute kidney injury in critically ill child.

    Al-Jboor, Wejdan; Almardini, Reham; Al Bderat, Jwaher; Frehat, Mahdi; Al Masri, Hazem; Alajloni, Mohammad Saleh

    2016-01-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) is a common and serious complication in patients in the Pediatric Intensive Care Unit (PICU). We conducted this study to estimate the incidence and the mortality rate of AKI in critically ill children as well as to describe some other related factors. A retrospective study was conducted at PICU of Queen Rania Abdulla Children Hospital, Amman, Jordan for the period extending from May 2011 to June 2013. The medical records of all patients admitted during this period, and their demographic data were reviewed. Patients with AKI were identified, and management and outcomes were reviewed and analyzed. AKI was evaluated according to modified RIFLE criteria. Of the 372 patients admitted to PICU, 64 (17.2%) patients developed AKI. Of these 64 patients who had AKI, 28 (43.7%) patients reached RIFLE max of risk, 21 (32.8%) patients reached injury, and 15 (23.4%) reached failure. Mean Pediatric Risk of Mortality II score at admission was significantly higher in patients with AKI than those without P <0.001. The age ranged between one month and 14 years with the median age as 5.4 year. Thirty-five (54.7%) were males. Sepsis was the most common cause of AKI. The mortality rate in critically ill children without AKI was 58.7%, whereas increased in children with AKI to 73.4%. The mortality rate in patients who received renal replacement therapy was 71.4% and was higher (81.5%) in patients who received mechanical ventilation (95%, [confidence interval (CI)] 79.3-83.4%) and was significantly higher in patients with multi-organ system dysfunction 90.3% (95%, [CI] 88.7-92.5%). The incidence of AKI in critically ill children is high and increased their mortality rate and higher mortality seen in the younger age group, especially those below one year. High mortality rate was associated with multi-organ system dysfunction and the need for mechanical ventilation.

  6. Cultural relativism and psychiatric illness.

    Fabrega, H

    1989-07-01

    Psychiatry has had a long-standing association with sociology and, especially, cultural anthropology. These social sciences have been influential in developing the concept of cultural relativism and applying it to psychiatry, sometimes in a challenging way and with much detriment. The concept has been used by some antipsychiatrists in attempts to discredit psychiatric practice. Contemporary psychiatrists endorsing a form of biological determinism have tended to either disregard the concept or judge it as trivial if not nonsensical. This study describes the concept of cultural relativism, reviews its applications to illness, and analyzes its implications from a historical and theoretical point of view. Its varied aspects, power, and limitations are discussed.

  7. Predictors of agitation in critically ill adults.

    Burk, Ruth S; Grap, Mary Jo; Munro, Cindy L; Schubert, Christine M; Sessler, Curtis N

    2014-09-01

    Agitation in critically ill adults is a frequent complication of hospitalization and results in multiple adverse outcomes. Potential causes of agitation are numerous; however, data on factors predictive of agitation are limited. To identify predictors of agitation by examining demographic and clinical characteristics of critically ill patients. A medical record review was performed. Documentation of agitation was indicated by scores on the Richmond Agitation-Sedation Scale or the use of an agitation keyword. Records of 200 patients from 1 medical and 1 surgical intensive care unit were used for the study. Risk factors were determined for 2 points in time: admission to the intensive care unit and within 24 hours before the first episode of agitation. Data on baseline demographics, preadmission risk factors, and clinical data were collected and were evaluated by using logistic multivariable regression to determine predictors of agitation. Predictors of agitation on admission to intensive care were history of use of illicit substances, height, respiratory and central nervous system subscores on the Sequential Organ Failure Assessment, and use of restraints. Predictors of agitation within 24 hours before the onset of agitation were history of psychiatric diagnosis, height, score on the Sequential Organ Failure Assessment, ratio of Pao2 to fraction of inspired oxygen less than 200, serum pH, percentage of hours with restraints, percentage of hours of mechanical ventilation, pain, and presence of genitourinary catheters. Predictors of agitation on admission and within 24 hours before the onset of agitation were primarily clinical variables. ©2014 American Association of Critical-Care Nurses.

  8. [Subjective illness beliefs of Turkish migrants with mental disorders--specific characteristics compared to german patients].

    Franz, Michael; Lujić, Claudia; Koch, Eckhardt; Wüsten, Bernd; Yürük, Nergüz; Gallhofer, Bernd

    2007-10-01

    Knowledge about culture- and migration-specific characteristics of subjective illness beliefs in Turkish patients is necessary for adequate treatment. Analysis of subjective illness beliefs in Turkish patients (F3; F4; n = 79) in comparison to matched Germans (n = 79) using a modified version of the Illness Perception Questionnaire IPQ-R. Differences were explored by t-tests and chi(2)-tests. Turkish patients believed significantly stronger in a chronical timeline of illness and in negative illness consequences, while German patients believed significantly stronger in treatment control and personal control. Turkish patients more often mentioned external causes of their disease compared to Germans. The results provide explanations of the deficient health care situation for Turkish migrants in Germany.

  9. Indigenous representations of illness and AIDS in Sub-Saharan Africa.

    Liddell, Christine; Barrett, Louise; Bydawell, Moya

    2005-02-01

    Cultures all over the world have evolved illness representations that can accommodate not only new diseases, but also new epistemologies for explaining disease. This paper examines illness representations in Sub-Saharan Africa, and how these have responded to the emergence of AIDS. Indigenous views of illness (particularly STDs) exhibit coherent structure, in which causation, prevention and treatment relate to one another in functional ways. As an STD, an epidemic, and a disease which leads to premature death, AIDS lends itself readily to accommodation into established indigenous representations of illness. Even biomedical views of causation can be readily incorporated into traditional views of how illnesses are caused. However, biomedical and traditional views concerning prevention appear to be in direct conflict with one another, with potentially hazardous consequences. Research exploring the extent to which indigenous beliefs may be influencing people's decisions about safe sex could offer useful insights for AIDS prevention programs.

  10. 'Individualism-collectivism' as an explanatory device for mental illness stigma.

    Papadopoulos, Chris; Foster, John; Caldwell, Kay

    2013-06-01

    The aim of this study is investigate whether the cross-cultural value paradigm 'individualism-collectivism' is a useful explanatory model for mental illness stigma on a cultural level. Using snowball sampling, a quantitative questionnaire survey of 305 individuals from four UK-based cultural groups (white-English, American, Greek/Greek Cypriot, and Chinese) was carried out. The questionnaire included the 'Community Attitudes to Mental Illness scale' and the 'vertical-horizontal individualism-collectivism scale'. The results revealed that the more stigmatizing a culture's mental illness attitudes are, the more likely collectivism effectively explains these attitudes. In contrast, the more positive a culture's mental illness attitudes, the more likely individualism effectively explains attitudes. We conclude that a consideration of the individualism-collectivism paradigm should be included in any future research aiming to provide a holistic understanding of the causes of mental illness stigma, particularly when the cultures stigmatization levels are particularly high or low.

  11. Sleep disturbances in critically ill patients in ICU: how much do we know?

    Boyko, Y.; Ording, H.; Jennum, Poul

    2012-01-01

    the underlying literature. There are no studies of level 1 evidence proving the positive impact of the tested interventions on the critically ill patients sleep pattern. Thus, disturbed sleep in critically ill patients with all the severe consequences remains an unresolved problem and needs further investigation.......Sleep disturbances in the intensive care unit (ICU) seem to lead to development of delirium, prolonged ICU stay, and increased mortality. That is why sufficient sleep is important for good outcome and recovery in critically ill patients. A variety of small studies reveal pathological sleep patterns...... in critically ill patients including abnormal circadian rhythm, high arousal and awakening index, reduced Slow Wave Sleep, and Rapid Eye Movement sleep. The purpose of this study is to summarise different aspects of sleep-awake disturbances, causes and handling methods in critically ill patients by reviewing...

  12. Interwoven histories: Mental health nurses with experience of mental illness, qualitative findings from a mixed methods study.

    Oates, Jennifer; Drey, Nicholas; Jones, Julia

    2018-02-15

    The effects of mental health nurses' own experience of mental illness or being a carer have rarely been researched beyond the workplace setting. This study aimed to explore how the experience of mental illness affects mental health nurses' lives outside of and inside work. A sample of 26 mental health nurses with personal experience of mental illness took part in semistructured interviews. Data were analysed thematically using a six-phase approach. The analysis revealed the broad context of nurses' experiences of mental illness according to three interwoven themes: mental illness as part of family life; experience of accessing services; and life interwoven with mental illness. Participants typically described personal and familial experience of mental illness across their life course, with multiple causes and consequences. The findings suggest that nurses' lives outside of work should be taken into account when considering the impact of their personal experience of mental illness. Similarly being a nurse influences how mental illness is experienced. Treatment of nurses with mental illness should account for their nursing expertise whilst recognizing that the context for nurses' mental illness could be much broader than the effect of workplace stress. © 2018 Australian College of Mental Health Nurses Inc.

  13. Causal Beliefs and Effects upon Mental Illness Identification Among Chinese Immigrant Relatives of Individuals with Psychosis.

    Yang, Lawrence H; Wonpat-Borja, Ahtoy J

    2012-08-01

    Identifying factors that facilitate treatment for psychotic disorders among Chinese-immigrants is crucial due to delayed treatment use. Identifying causal beliefs held by relatives that might predict identification of 'mental illness' as opposed to other 'indigenous labels' may promote more effective mental health service use. We examine what effects beliefs of 'physical causes' and other non-biomedical causal beliefs ('general social causes', and 'indigenous Chinese beliefs' or culture-specific epistemologies of illness) might have on mental illness identification. Forty-nine relatives of Chinese-immigrant consumers with psychosis were sampled. Higher endorsement of 'physical causes' was associated with mental illness labeling. However among the non-biomedical causal beliefs, 'general social causes' demonstrated no relationship with mental illness identification, while endorsement of 'indigenous Chinese beliefs' showed a negative relationship. Effective treatment- and community-based psychoeducation, in addition to emphasizing biomedical models, might integrate indigenous Chinese epistemologies of illness to facilitate rapid identification of psychotic disorders and promote treatment use.

  14. Costs of occupational injuries and illnesses in Croatia.

    Bađun, Marijana

    2017-03-01

    Apart from influencing the quality of life, occupational injuries and illnesses can pose a large economic burden to a society. There are many studies that estimate the costs of occupational injuries and illnesses in highly developed economies, but the evidence for other countries is scarce. This study aimed to estimate the financial costs of occupational injuries and illnesses to Croatian government and employers in 2015. Workers were excluded due to the lack of data. Costs were estimated by analysing available data sources on occupational health and safety. Financial costs were grouped in several categories: medical costs, productivity losses, disability pensions, compensation for physical impairment, administrative costs, and legal costs. Unlike in other studies, the costs of compliance with occupational safety and health regulations were also investigated. In 2015, financial costs to employers were twice higher than costs to the government (HRK 604.6 m vs HRK 297 m). Employers additionally covered around HRK 300 m of compliance costs. Taking into account that financial costs of occupational injuries and illnesses are significant, even without including the costs to workers, policy makers should put additional efforts into their prevention. A prerequisite is transparency in Croatian Health Insurance Fund's expenditures, as well as more detailed data on lost days from work by industries, causes of injury etc. Organisations in charge of occupational health and safety and policy makers should observe relevant statistics in monetary terms too.

  15. Exertional heat illness: emerging concepts and advances in prehospital care.

    Pryor, Riana R; Roth, Ronald N; Suyama, Joe; Hostler, David

    2015-06-01

    Exertional heat illness is a classification of disease with clinical presentations that are not always diagnosed easily. Exertional heat stroke is a significant cause of death in competitive sports, and the increasing popularity of marathons races and ultra-endurance competitions will make treating many heat illnesses more common for Emergency Medical Services (EMS) providers. Although evidence is available primarily from case series and healthy volunteer studies, the consensus for treating exertional heat illness, coupled with altered mental status, is whole body rapid cooling. Cold or ice water immersion remains the most effective treatment to achieve this goal. External thermometry is unreliable in the context of heat stress and direct internal temperature measurement by rectal or esophageal probes must be used when diagnosing heat illness and during cooling. With rapid recognition and implementation of effective cooling, most patients suffering from exertional heat stroke will recover quickly and can be discharged home with instructions to rest and to avoid heat stress and exercise for a minimum of 48 hours; although, further research pertaining to return to activity is warranted.

  16. Integration of Biosensors and Drug Delivery Technologies for Early Detection and Chronic Management of Illness

    Viness Pillay

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Recent advances in biosensor design and sensing efficacy need to be amalgamated with research in responsive drug delivery systems for building superior health or illness regimes and ensuring good patient compliance. A variety of illnesses require continuous monitoring in order to have efficient illness intervention. Physicochemical changes in the body can signify the occurrence of an illness before it manifests. Even with the usage of sensors that allow diagnosis and prognosis of the illness, medical intervention still has its downfalls. Late detection of illness can reduce the efficacy of therapeutics. Furthermore, the conventional modes of treatment can cause side-effects such as tissue damage (chemotherapy and rhabdomyolysis and induce other forms of illness (hepatotoxicity. The use of drug delivery systems enables the lowering of side-effects with subsequent improvement in patient compliance. Chronic illnesses require continuous monitoring and medical intervention for efficient treatment to be achieved. Therefore, designing a responsive system that will reciprocate to the physicochemical changes may offer superior therapeutic activity. In this respect, integration of biosensors and drug delivery is a proficient approach and requires designing an implantable system that has a closed loop system. This offers regulation of the changes by means of releasing a therapeutic agent whenever illness biomarkers prevail. Proper selection of biomarkers is vital as this is key for diagnosis and a stimulation factor for responsive drug delivery. By detecting an illness before it manifests by means of biomarkers levels, therapeutic dosing would relate to the severity of such changes. In this review various biosensors and drug delivery systems are discussed in order to assess the challenges and future perspectives of integrating biosensors and drug delivery systems for detection and management of chronic illness.

  17. Probiotics in critically ill children [version 1; referees: 2 approved

    Sunit C. Singhi

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Gut microflora contribute greatly to immune and nutritive functions and act as a physical barrier against pathogenic organisms across the gut mucosa. Critical illness disrupts the balance between host and gut microflora, facilitating colonization, overgrowth, and translocation of pathogens and microbial products across intestinal mucosal barrier and causing systemic inflammatory response syndrome and sepsis. Commonly used probiotics, which have been developed from organisms that form gut microbiota, singly or in combination, can restore gut microflora and offer the benefits similar to those offered by normal gut flora, namely immune enhancement, improved barrier function of the gastrointestinal tract (GIT, and prevention of bacterial translocation. Enteral supplementation of probiotic strains containing either Lactobacillus alone or in combination with Bifidobacterium reduced the incidence and severity of necrotizing enterocolitis and all-cause mortality in preterm infants. Orally administered Lactobacillus casei subspecies rhamnosus, Lactobacillus reuteri, and Lactobacillus rhamnosus were effective in the prevention of late-onset sepsis and GIT colonization by Candida in preterm very low birth weight infants. In critically ill children, probiotics are effective in the prevention and treatment of antibiotic-associated diarrhea. Oral administration of a mix of probiotics for 1 week to children on broad-spectrum antibiotics in a pediatric intensive care unit decreased GIT colonization by Candida, led to a 50% reduction in candiduria, and showed a trend toward decreased incidence of candidemia. However, routine use of probiotics cannot be supported on the basis of current scientific evidence. Safety of probiotics is also a concern; rarely, probiotics may cause bacteremia, fungemia, and sepsis in immunocompromised critically ill children. More studies are needed to answer questions on the effectiveness of a mix versus single-strain probiotics

  18. Stigmatization of people with mental illness among inhabitants of a rural community in northern Nigeria.

    Audu, Ishaq A; Idris, Suleiman H; Olisah, Victor O; Sheikh, Taiwo L

    2013-02-01

    Despite the fact that mental illness is a common problem in society, people's perception of the mentally ill and community attitude towards them is still rather poor, making their rehabilitation and reintegration into society an uphill task. To examine the stigmatization of people with mental illness within a rural community and identify the socio-demographic variables involved. A cross-sectional descriptive study using a multi-stage random sampling technique to obtain data through an interviewer-administered questionnaire to 325 adult inhabitants of a rural community in Nigeria. The results showed widespread ignorance about causation, mode of transmission and remedies available for mental illness, with only 0.9% of respondents attributing mental illness to brain disease. The others attributed it to spiritual attack, punishment for evil doing and illicit psychoactive substance use, among other things. Negative views about the mentally ill were also widely expressed resulting in discriminatory practices. Stigmatization of people with mental illness is still rampant in our community. There is a need for adequate public education about the causes and mode of transmission of mental illness and the treatment options available in the community.

  19. Psychiatric disorders and leukocyte telomere length: Underlying mechanisms linking mental illness with cellular aging.

    Lindqvist, Daniel; Epel, Elissa S; Mellon, Synthia H; Penninx, Brenda W; Révész, Dóra; Verhoeven, Josine E; Reus, Victor I; Lin, Jue; Mahan, Laura; Hough, Christina M; Rosser, Rebecca; Bersani, F Saverio; Blackburn, Elizabeth H; Wolkowitz, Owen M

    2015-08-01

    Many psychiatric illnesses are associated with early mortality and with an increased risk of developing physical diseases that are more typically seen in the elderly. Moreover, certain psychiatric illnesses may be associated with accelerated cellular aging, evidenced by shortened leukocyte telomere length (LTL), which could underlie this association. Shortened LTL reflects a cell's mitotic history and cumulative exposure to inflammation and oxidation as well as the availability of telomerase, a telomere-lengthening enzyme. Critically short telomeres can cause cells to undergo senescence, apoptosis or genomic instability, and shorter LTL correlates with poorer health and predicts mortality. Emerging data suggest that LTL may be reduced in certain psychiatric illnesses, perhaps in proportion to exposure to the psychiatric illnesses, although conflicting data exist. Telomerase has been less well characterized in psychiatric illnesses, but a role in depression and in antidepressant and neurotrophic effects has been suggested by preclinical and clinical studies. In this article, studies on LTL and telomerase activity in psychiatric illnesses are critically reviewed, potential mediators are discussed, and future directions are suggested. A deeper understanding of cellular aging in psychiatric illnesses could lead to re-conceptualizing them as systemic illnesses with manifestations inside and outside the brain and could identify new treatment targets. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. [A Screening-Tool for Three Dimensions of Work-Related Behavior and Experience Patterns in the Psychosomatic Rehabilitation - A Proposal for a Short-Form of the Occupational Stress and Coping Inventory (AVEM-3D)].

    Beierlein, V; Köllner, V; Neu, R; Schulz, H

    2016-12-01

    Objectives: The assessment of work pressures is of particular importance in psychosomatic rehabilitation. An established questionnaire is the Occupational Stress and Coping Inventory (German abbr. AVEM), but it is quite long and with regard to scoring time-consuming in routine clinical care. It should therefore be tested, whether a shortened version of the AVEM can be developed, which is able to assess the formerly described three second-order factors of the AVEM, namely Working Commitment, Resilience, and Emotions, sufficiently reliable and valid, and which also may be used for screening of patients with prominent work-related behavior and experience patterns. Methods: Data were collected at admission from consecutive samples of three hospitals of psychosomatic rehabilitation ( N  = 10,635 patients). The sample was randomly divided in two subsamples (design and validation sample). Using exploratory principal component analyses in the design sample, items with the highest factor loadings for the three new scales were selected and evaluated psychometrically using the validation sample. Possible Cut-off values ought to be derived from distribution patterns of scores in the scales. Relationships with sociodemographic, occupational and diagnosis-related characteristics, as well as with patterns of work-related experiences and behaviors are examined. Results: The three performed principal component analyses explained in the design sample on the respective first factor between 31 % and 34 % of the variance. The selected 20 items were assigned to the 3-factor structure in the validation sample as expected. The three new scales are sufficiently reliable with values of Cronbach's α between 0,84 and 0,88. The naming of the three new scales is based on the names of the secondary factors. Cut-off values for the identification of distinctive patient-reported data are proposed. Conclusion: Main advantages of the proposed shortened version AVEM-3D are that with a

  1. Perception and beliefs about mental illness among adults in Karfi village, northern Nigeria

    Kabir Mohammed

    2004-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background This study was designed to examine the knowledge, attitude and beliefs about causes, manifestations and treatment of mental illness among adults in a rural community in northern Nigeria. Methods A cross sectional study design was used. A pre-tested, semi-structured questionnaire was administered to 250 adults residing in Karfi village, northern Nigeria. Results The most common symptoms proffered by respondents as manifestations of mental illness included aggression/destructiveness (22.0%, loquaciousness (21.2%, eccentric behavior (16.1% and wandering (13.3%. Drug misuse including alcohol, cannabis, and other street drugs was identified in 34.3% of the responses as a major cause of mental illness, followed by divine wrath/ God's will (19%, and magic/spirit possession (18.0%. About 46% of respondents preferred orthodox medical care for the mentally sick while 34% were more inclined to spiritual healing. Almost half of the respondents harbored negative feelings towards the mentally ill. Literate respondents were seven times more likely to exhibit positive feelings towards the mentally ill as compared to non-literate subjects (OR = 7.6, 95% confidence interval = 3.8–15.1. Conclusions Our study demonstrates the need for community educational programs in Nigeria aimed at demystifying mental illness. A better understanding of mental disorders among the public would allay fear and mistrust about mentally ill persons in the community as well as lessen stigmatization towards such persons.

  2. Cultural Variation in Implicit Mental Illness Stigma

    Cheon, Bobby K.; Chiao, Joan Y.

    2012-01-01

    Culture shapes how individuals perceive and respond to others with mental illness. Prior studies have suggested that Asians and Asian Americans typically endorse greater stigma of mental illness compared to Westerners (White Europeans and Americans). However, whether these differences in stigma arise from cultural variations in automatic affective reactions or deliberative concerns of the appropriateness of one’s reactions to mental illness remains unknown. Here we compared implicit and expli...

  3. Measurements of respiratory illness among construction painters.

    White, M C; Baker, E L

    1988-01-01

    The prevalence of different measurements of respiratory illness among construction painters was examined and the relation between respiratory illness and employment as a painter assessed in a cross sectional study of current male members of two local affiliates of a large international union of painters. Respiratory illness was measured by questionnaire and spirometry. Longer employment as a painter was associated with increased prevalence of chronic obstructive disease and an interactive eff...

  4. Curcumin Nanoparticle Therapy for Gulf War Illness

    2017-10-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-16-1-0480 TITLE: Curcumin Nanoparticle Therapy for Gulf War Illness PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Ashok K. Shetty, Ph.D...Nanoparticle Therapy for Gulf War Illness 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-16-1-0480 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) Ashok K...biodegradable polymer nanosystems (nCUR) for alleviating cognitive, memory and mood impairments in a rat model of gulf war illness (GWI). Specific

  5. The Fight against Stigma toward Mental Illness

    Olcay Cam

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available In many health conditions, stigma is receiving increasing attention. Public stigmatization toward mental illness can affect particularly the patients and family memberships to help seeking behavior and treatment. These stigmatized persons in the society are deprived of rights and benefits. In this paper, reasons and consequences of stigma associated with mental illness are reviewed and combat against mental illnesses originated stigma are discussed. [TAF Prev Med Bull 2010; 9(1.000: 71-78

  6. Children coping with a serious illness

    Pretzlik, Ursula

    1996-01-01

    A solid empirical base is needed to expand our understanding of coping in children who are seriously ill. The six studies reported were designed to describe the ways seriously ill children cope with their illness and treatment, and to explore factors (both individual and familial) which influence their coping. The choice of instniments and design were influenced by the Lazanis and Folkman transactional model of stress and coping (1984), especially their concept of coping. In the first study t...

  7. Illness of Gorham - Report of two cases in the National Institute of Cancerology

    Escandon Villota, Santiago; Soto Montoya, Camilo; Gomez Mier, Luis C; Pereira Betancourt, Carlos

    2001-01-01

    The illness of Gorham, also well-known as illness of bony disappearance or massive osteoIisis, a strange pathology of unknown cause is considered and unpredictable predict that histologically is characterized by the presence of bony cavernous angiomas with medullar fibrosis that are translated in absorption of the bone. The treatment modalities used among those that radiotherapy and surgery are included; most of the times are ineffective to stop the process. The revision of two cases is made with localization in the scapular waist that they illustrate the natural history of the illness, one of them fatal for the lung commitment with quilothorax

  8. Stigma associated with mental illness: perspectives of university students in Qatar.

    Zolezzi, Monica; Bensmail, Nawal; Zahrah, Farah; Khaled, Salma Mawfek; El-Gaili, Tayseer

    2017-01-01

    Stigma in relation to mental illness is one of the main factors inhibiting people from seeking help. Studies have been undertaken looking into the knowledge, attitudes, and beliefs (KAB) about mental illness among residents in Qatar; however, none have looked specifically at students in higher education. The aim of this study was to understand the KAB toward mental illness among students at a Qatari university and determine if there are any differences based on gender, nationality, and college type. A convenience sample of students from all genders, colleges, and nationalities was approached to participate in a survey that consisted of four sections: demographic, beliefs, attitudes, and help-seeking and treatment preferences associated with mental illness. Chi-square testing was performed to test for differences in the distribution of proportions of our primary outcomes (students' beliefs, attitudes, and help-seeking and treatment preferences). A total of 282 students completed the survey. The majority of the participating students were females (59.3%), non-Qataris (64.3%), and enrolled in science-based colleges (62.7%). Beliefs reflecting poor mental health literacy, such as "medications to treat mental illness can cause addiction", "mental illness is not like any other illness", or that "mental illness is a punishment from God", were reported by a majority of students (84.4%, 56.7%, and 50.2%, respectively). Stigmatizing attitudes that were endorsed by a majority of students included believing that people with mental illness cannot have regular jobs (60.2%), that people with mental illness are dangerous (65.7%), and that they would not marry someone with a mental illness (88.9%). Additionally, 33.6% of students indicated they would be ashamed to mention if someone in their family or they themself, had a mental illness. A vast majority of students (86.3%) indicated to prefer family and friend's support as treatment options. Significant differences in KAB about

  9. Air pollution and respiratory illness

    Indra, G. [DIET, Uttamasolapuram, Salem (India)

    2005-07-01

    This presentation provides an overview of air pollution and impacts on public health. It provides a definition of pollution according to the Oxford English dictionary and categorizes the different types of pollution according to air, water, land and noise. It discusses air pollution and its pollutants (gaseous and particulate pollutants) as well as the diameter of the pollutant (dust, smoke, and gas). The paper also illustrates the formation of acid rain and discusses the amount of pollutants in the atmosphere per year. It presents occupational diseases, discusses radio active pollutants, respiratory illnesses as well as pollution prevention and control. The paper concluded that more research is needed to obtain information on ways to reduce the quantity of pollutants being discharged from special processes. 3 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  10. [Health pedagogy instead of consolation. Theological adjustment to illness by Philipp Melanchthon and Caspar Peucer].

    Bröer, R; Hofheinz, R

    2001-01-01

    Subject of this paper is the interpretation of disease as physical evil (malum physicum) by the university professors Philipp Melanchthon (1497-1560) and Caspar Peucer (1525-1602) at Protestant Wittenberg. Melanchthon and Peucer settled the problem of theodicy principally by theological strategies of moralization and compensation. In most cases, therefore, disease resulted from inadequate health behavior, especially drunkenness, furthermore from disdain for medicine and obstruction of divine healing. As a rule, natural factors (e.g. celestial bodies or human affections) only contributed to disease. In general it was caused by free will. In consequence the strategies of depotentiation and functionalization of disease became insignificant resulting in the accentuation of its evil nature. By way of compensation Melanchthon and Peucer stressed the Divine healing of disease. God created the natural remedies and later He created the medical arts by granting heroic virtue to the greatest doctors (Hippocrates, Galen, Avicenna). Moreover the divine Trinity could directly harmonize affections. Thus, God incited a psychosomatical healing within the human organism. As far as physical evil is concerned Lutheran pathology substituted medieval pessimism for therapeutical optimism. Melanchthon and Peucer strived to discipline the patients' behavior and to legitimate the medical arts by God. In this sense their pathology formed part of a program of social and religious stabilization. The academic medicine profited greatly from that program in later years.

  11. Perception of the etiology of illness: causal attributions in a heart patient population.

    Koslowsky, M; Croog, S H; La Voie, L

    1978-10-01

    This study examined perceived causes of myocardial infarction in a patient population of 345 men previously free from significant medical problems. Investigation of their perceptions following the life-threatening illness crisis indicated that stress and tension factors were the causes most commonly cited. Possible social and psychological correlates are analyzed using an attribution theory framework, and their implications are discussed.

  12. Causes of death in Vanuatu.

    Carter, Karen; Tovu, Viran; Langati, Jeffrey Tila; Buttsworth, Michael; Dingley, Lester; Calo, Andy; Harrison, Griffith; Rao, Chalapati; Lopez, Alan D; Taylor, Richard

    2016-01-01

    The population of the Pacific Melanesian country of Vanuatu was 234,000 at the 2009 census. Apart from subsistence activities, economic activity includes tourism and agriculture. Current completeness of vital registration is considered too low to be usable for national statistics; mortality and life expectancy (LE) are derived from indirect demographic estimates from censuses/surveys. Some cause of death (CoD) data are available to provide information on major causes of premature death. Deaths 2001-2007 were coded for cause (ICDv10) for ages 0-59 years from: hospital separations (HS) (n = 636), hospital medical certificates (MC) of death (n = 1,169), and monthly reports from community health facilities (CHF) (n = 1,212). Ill-defined causes were 3 % for hospital deaths and 20 % from CHF. Proportional mortality was calculated by cause (excluding ill-defined) and age group (0-4, 5-14 years), and also by sex for 15-59 years. From total deaths by broad age group and sex from 1999 and 2009 census analyses, community deaths were estimated by deduction of hospital deaths MC. National proportional mortality by cause was estimated by a weighted average of MC and CHF deaths. National estimates indicate main causes of deaths <5 years were: perinatal disorders (45 %) and malaria, diarrhea, and pneumonia (27 %). For 15-59 years, main causes of male deaths were: circulatory disease 27 %, neoplasms 13 %, injury 13 %, liver disease 10 %, infection 10 %, diabetes 7 %, and chronic respiratory disease 7 %; and for females: neoplasms 29 %, circulatory disease 15 %, diabetes 10 %, infection 9 %, and maternal deaths 8 %. Infection included tuberculosis, malaria, and viral hepatitis. Liver disease (including hepatitis and cancer) accounted for 18 % of deaths in adult males and 9 % in females. Non-communicable disease (NCD), including circulatory disease, diabetes, neoplasm, and chronic respiratory disease, accounted for 52 % of premature deaths in adult

  13. Cost-of-illness studies: concepts, scopes, and methods

    Changik Jo

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Liver diseases are one of the main causes of death, and their ever-increasing prevalence is threatening to cause significant damage both to individuals and society as a whole. This damage is especially serious for the economically active population in Korea. From the societal perspective, it is therefore necessary to consider the economic impacts associated with liver diseases, and identify interventions that can reduce the burden of these diseases. The cost-of-illness study is considered to be an essential evaluation technique in health care. By measuring and comparing the economic burdens of diseases to society, such studies can help health-care decision-makers to set up and prioritize health-care policies and interventions. Using economic theories, this paper introduces various study methods that are generally applicable to most disease cases for estimating the costs of illness associated with mortality, morbidity, disability, and other disease characteristics. It also presents concepts and scopes of costs along with different cost categories from different research perspectives in cost estimations. By discussing the epidemiological and economic grounds of the cost-of-illness study, the reported results represent useful information about several evaluation techniques at an advanced level, such as cost-benefit analysis, cost-effectiveness analysis, and cost-utility analysis.

  14. Cost-of-illness studies: concepts, scopes, and methods

    2014-01-01

    Liver diseases are one of the main causes of death, and their ever-increasing prevalence is threatening to cause significant damage both to individuals and society as a whole. This damage is especially serious for the economically active population in Korea. From the societal perspective, it is therefore necessary to consider the economic impacts associated with liver diseases, and identify interventions that can reduce the burden of these diseases. The cost-of-illness study is considered to be an essential evaluation technique in health care. By measuring and comparing the economic burdens of diseases to society, such studies can help health-care decision-makers to set up and prioritize health-care policies and interventions. Using economic theories, this paper introduces various study methods that are generally applicable to most disease cases for estimating the costs of illness associated with mortality, morbidity, disability, and other disease characteristics. It also presents concepts and scopes of costs along with different cost categories from different research perspectives in cost estimations. By discussing the epidemiological and economic grounds of the cost-of-illness study, the reported results represent useful information about several evaluation techniques at an advanced level, such as cost-benefit analysis, cost-effectiveness analysis, and cost-utility analysis. PMID:25548737

  15. Illness Uncertainty and Illness Intrusiveness as Predictors of Depressive and Anxious Symptomology in College Students with Chronic Illnesses

    Mullins, Alexandria J.; Gamwell, Kaitlyn L.; Sharkey, Christina M.; Bakula, Dana M.; Tackett, Alayna P.; Suorsa, Kristina I.; Chaney, John M.; Mullins, Larry L.

    2017-01-01

    Objective: To examine predictors of psychological functioning in college students with chronic illnesses. Participants: Participants (N = 1413) included 364 students with self-reported diagnoses of asthma or allergies, 148 students with other chronic illnesses (eg, epilepsy, type 1 diabetes), and 901 healthy students. Data were collected between…

  16. World survey of mental illness stigma.

    Seeman, Neil; Tang, Sabrina; Brown, Adalsteinn D; Ing, Alton

    2016-01-15

    To obtain rapid and reproducible opinions that address mental illness stigma around the world. Random global Web users were exposed to brief questions, asking whether they interacted daily with someone with mental illness, whether they believed that mental illness was associated with violence, whether it was similar to physical illness, and whether it could be overcome. Over a period of 1.7 years, 596,712 respondents from 229 countries completed the online survey. The response rate was 54.3%. China had the highest proportion of respondents in daily contact with a person with mental illness. In developed countries, 7% to 8% of respondents endorsed the statement that individuals with mental illness were more violent than others, in contrast to 15% or 16% in developing countries. While 45% to 51% of respondents from developed countries believed that mental illness was similar to physical illness, only 7% believed that mental illness could be overcome. To test for reproducibility, 21 repeats of the same questions were asked monthly in India for 21 months. Each time, 10.1 ± 0.11% s.e., of respondents endorsed the statement that persons who suffer from mental illness are more violent than others, indicating strong reproducibility of response. This study shows that surveys of constructs such as stigma towards mental illness can be carried out rapidly and repeatedly across the globe, so that the impact of policy interventions can be readily measured. The method engages English speakers only, mainly young, educated males. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Illness narratives of people who are homeless

    Cecilia Håkanson

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Multiple illnesses are common in all homeless populations. While most previous studies have focused on experiences of mental illness, there is a scarcity of studies about experiences of bodily illness among people who are homeless. This study aimed to explore illness narratives of people who are homeless, and how homelessness as a social context shapes the experience of multiple and/or advancing somatic conditions. The design was a qualitative single-case study, using interpretive description. Data were generated through interviews, with nine participants who were homeless rough sleepers in Stockholm, Sweden, recruited while receiving care in a support home for homeless people with complex care needs. The findings revealed experiences of illness embedded in narratives about falling ill, being ill, and the future. The particularity of these illness narratives and the way that they are shaped by homelessness give rise to several observations: the necessity of a capable body for survival; chaos and profound solitude in illness and self-care management; ambiguous feelings about receiving care, transitioning from independence, and “freedom” in the streets to dependency and being institutionalized; and finally, the absence of hope and desire for recovery or a better future. The narratives are discussed from the perspective of Frank's four types of illness stories (restitution, chaos, quest, and testimony. The findings stress that to provide appropriate care and support to people who are homeless and have multiple and/or advancing somatic conditions, health care professionals need to be informed both about the individual's biography and about the circumstances under which illness and self-care takes place in the streets.

  18. Economic hardship associated with managing chronic illness: a qualitative inquiry

    Jan Stephen

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chronic illness and disability can have damaging, even catastrophic, socioeconomic effects on individuals and their households. We examined the experiences of people affected by chronic heart failure, complicated diabetes and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease to inform patient centred policy development. This paper provides a first level, qualitative understanding of the economic impact of chronic illness. Methods Interviews were conducted with patients aged between 45 and 85 years who had one or more of the index conditions and family carers from the Australian Capital Territory and Western Sydney, Australia (n = 66. Content analysis guided the interpretation of data. Results The affordability of medical treatments and care required to manage illness were identified as the key aspects of economic hardship, which compromised patients' capacity to proactively engage in self-management and risk reduction behaviours. Factors exacerbating hardship included ineligibility for government support, co-morbidity, health service flexibility, and health literacy. Participants who were on multiple medications, from culturally and linguistically diverse or Indigenous backgrounds, and/or not in paid employment, experienced economic hardship more harshly and their management of chronic illness was jeopardised as a consequence. Economic hardship was felt among not only those ineligible for government financial supports but also those receiving subsidies that were insufficient to meet the costs of managing long-term illness over and above necessary daily living expenses. Conclusion This research provides insights into the economic stressors associated with managing chronic illness, demonstrating that economic hardship requires households to make difficult decisions between care and basic living expenses. These decisions may cause less than optimal health outcomes and increased costs to the health system. The findings support the necessity

  19. Mental Illness and Firearms: Legal Context and Clinical Approaches.

    Pinals, Debra A; Anacker, Lisa

    2016-12-01

    Gun violence and mental illness is a major area of media attention, especially because highly publicized mass shootings seem to have become more commonly reported in the press. Gun access also is undergoing a highly politicized debate in the United States. It is important for mental health practitioners to understand the background and context of laws related to firearms access, and to understand data related to risk of suicide and violence toward others caused by gun violence among persons with mental illness. In addition, clinically driven risk assessments with specific inquiry related to firearms can be important for identifying individuals for whom firearm-focused clinical risk mitigation may be warranted. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Attributions of Mental Illness: An Ethnically Diverse Community Perspective.

    Bignall, Whitney J Raglin; Jacquez, Farrah; Vaughn, Lisa M

    2015-07-01

    Although the prevalence of mental illness is similar across ethnic groups, a large disparity exists in the utilization of services. Mental health attributions, causal beliefs regarding the etiology of mental illness, may contribute to this disparity. To understand mental health attributions across diverse ethnic backgrounds, we conducted focus groups with African American (n = 8; 24 %), Asian American (n = 6; 18 %), Latino/Hispanic (n = 9; 26 %), and White (n = 11; 32 %) participants. We solicited attributions about 19 mental health disorders, each representing major sub-categories of the DSM-IV. Using a grounded theory approach, participant responses were categorized into 12 themes: Biological, Normalization, Personal Characteristic, Personal Choice, Just World, Spiritual, Family, Social Other, Environment, Trauma, Stress, and Diagnosis. Results indicate that ethnic minorities are more likely than Whites to mention spirituality and normalization causes. Understanding ethnic minority mental health attributions is critical to promote treatment-seeking behaviors and inform culturally responsive community-based mental health services.