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Sample records for causing multidrug resistance

  1. A Case of Community-Acquired Pneumonia Caused by Multidrug-Resistant Acinetobacter baumannii in Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Son, Young Woong; Jung, In Young; Ahn, Mi Young; Jeon, Yong Duk; Ann, Hea Won; Ahn, Jin Young; Ku, Nam Su; Han, Sang Hoon; Choi, Jun Young; Song, Young Goo; Kim, June Myung

    2017-12-01

    Acinetobacter baumannii is an aerobic Gram-negative coccobacillus that causes nosocomial pneumonia in patients on mechanical ventilation or previously treated with broad-spectrum antibiotics. Nevertheless, community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) caused by A. baumannii, especially multi-drug resistant (MDR) strains, is rare. We experienced the first case of CAP caused by MDR A. baumannii in Korea in a 78-year-old man. This case shows that MDR A. baumannii can cause CAP in Korea. Copyright © 2017 by The Korean Society of Infectious Diseases and Korean Society for Chemotherapy.

  2. Risk factors for healthcare-acquired urinary tract infections caused by multi-drug resistant microorganisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Đorđević Zorana M.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Healthcare-acquired urinary tract infections (HAUTI make up to 40% of all healthcareacquired infections and contribute significantly to hospital morbidity, mortality, and overall cost of treatment. Objective. The aim of our study was to investigate possible risk factors for development of HAUTI caused by multi-drug resistant pathogens. Methods. The prospective case-control study in a large tertiary-care hospital was conducted during a five-year period. The cases were patients with HAUTI caused by multi-drug resistant (MDR pathogens, and the controls were patients with HAUTI caused by non-MDR pathogens. Results. There were 562 (62.6% patients with MDR isolates and 336 (37.4% patients with non-MDR isolates in the study. There were four significant predictors of HAUTI caused by MDR pathogens: hospitalization before insertion of urinary catheter for more than eight days (ORadjusted = 2.763; 95% CI = 1.352-5.647; p = 0.005, hospitalization for more than 15 days (ORadjusted = 2.144; 95% CI = 1.547-2.970; p < 0.001, previous stay in another department (intensive care units, other wards or hospitals (ORadjusted = 2.147; 95% CI = 1.585-2.908; p < 0.001, and cancer of various localizations (ORadjusted = 2.313; 95% CI = 1.255-4.262; p = 0.007. Conclusion. Early removal of urinary catheter and reduction of time spent in a hospital or in an ICU could contribute to a decrease in the rate of HAUTI caused by MDR pathogens.

  3. Investigational drugs for the treatment of infections caused by multidrug-resistant Gram-negative bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avery, Lindsay M; Nicolau, David P

    2018-04-01

    Infections caused by multidrug-resistant Gram-negative bacteria (MDR-GNB) are associated with significant mortality and costs. New drugs in development to combat these difficult-to-treat infections primarily target carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae, MDR Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and MDR Acinetobacter baumannii. Areas covered: The authors summarize in vitro and in vivo efficacy studies, as well as available clinical trial findings, for new agents in development for treatment of infection caused by MDR-GNB. Information regarding dosage regimens utilized in clinical trials and key pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic considerations are provided if available. A summary of recently approved agents, delafloxacin and meropenem/vaborbactam, is also included. Expert opinion: The development of multiple novel agents to fight MDR-GNB is promising to help save the lives of patients who acquire infection, and judicious use of these agents is imperative once they come to market to prevent the development of resistance. The other component paramount to this field of research is implementation of effective infection control policies and carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae (CRE) carrier screening protocols to mitigate the worldwide spread of MDR-GNB. Further investigation of anti-infective synergistic combinations will also be important, as well as support for economic research to reveal the true cost-benefit of utilization of the new agents discussed herein.

  4. Multidrug resistance in Lactococcus lactis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bolhuis, Hendrik

    1996-01-01

    Multidrug resistance (MDR) was initially recongnized as the major cause of the failure of the drug-based treatment of human cancers. It has become increasingly clear that MDR occurs in mammalian cells but also in lower eukaryotes and bacteria. The appearance of multiple antibiotic resistant

  5. Lethal Neonatal Meningoencephalitis Caused by Multi-Drug Resistant, Highly Virulent Escherichia coli

    OpenAIRE

    Iqbal, Junaid; Dufendach, Kevin R.; Wellons, John C.; Kuba, Maria G.; Nickols, Hilary H.; G��mez-Duarte, Oscar G.; Wynn, James L.

    2016-01-01

    Neonatal meningitis is a rare but devastating condition. Multi-drug resistant (MDR) bacteria represent a substantial global health risk. We report on an aggressive case of lethal neonatal meningitis due to a MDR Escherichia coli (serotype O75:H5:K1). Serotyping, MDR pattern, and phylogenetic typing revealed that this strain is an emergent and highly virulent neonatal meningitis E. coli isolate. The isolate was resistant to both ampicillin and gentamicin; antibiotics currently used for empiric...

  6. Multidrug-Resistant Tuberculosis

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2008-10-28

    In this podcast, Dr. Oeltmann discusses multidrug-resistant tuberculosis. An outbreak occurred in Thailand, which led to 45 cases in the U.S. This serious illness can take up to 2 years to treat. MDR TB is a real threat and a serious condition.  Created: 10/28/2008 by Emerging Infectious Diseases.   Date Released: 10/28/2008.

  7. Resistant plasmid profile analysis of multidrug resistant Escherichia ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Multi-drug resistant Escherichia coli has become a major threat and cause of many urinary tract infections (UTIs) in Abeokuta, Nigeria. Objectives: This study was carried out to determine the resistant plasmids of multidrug resistant Escherichia coli isolated from (Urinary tract infections)UTIs in Abeokuta.

  8. Prolonged and high dosage of tigecycline - successful treatment of spondylodiscitis caused by multidrug-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsachouridou, Olga; Georgiou, Adamantini; Nanoudis, Sideris; Chrysanthidis, Theofilos; Loli, Georgia; Morfesis, Petros; Zebekakis, Pantelis; Metallidis, Symeon

    2017-07-08

    The incidence of infectious spondylodiscitis has been increasing over the last few years. This reflects the expanding elderly and immunocompromised populations and the rising implementation of invasive spinal procedures. Infection may be inoculated into the disc space directly during invasive spinal procedures. Osteomyelitis caused by Acinetobacter species is rare and mainly caused by multidrug-resistant strains. We present the case of a 72-year-old Greek woman with postoperative spondylodiscitis caused by a multidrug-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii strain that was successfully treated, after she declined surgical treatment, with prolonged and high dosage of tigecycline. She received intravenously administered tigecycline 200 mg per day for 60 days and then 100 mg per day for a total of 102 days and was infection-free. We reviewed the literature on the role of Acinetobacter baumannii as a cause of osteomyelitis, emphasizing the difficulty of treatment and the potential role of tigecycline in conservative treatment of the infection. We believe that 102 days in total is the longest time that any patient has received tigecycline in the literature, thus our patient is a unique case of successful treatment of spondylodiscitis.

  9. Aggressive regimens for multidrug-resistant tuberculosis decrease all-cause mortality.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carole D Mitnick

    Full Text Available A better understanding of the composition of optimal treatment regimens for multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB is essential for expanding universal access to effective treatment and for developing new therapies for MDR-TB. Analysis of observational data may inform the definition of an optimized regimen.This study assessed the impact of an aggressive regimen-one containing at least five likely effective drugs, including a fluoroquinolone and injectable-on treatment outcomes in a large MDR-TB patient cohort.This was a retrospective cohort study of patients treated in a national outpatient program in Peru between 1999 and 2002. We examined the association between receiving an aggressive regimen and the rate of death.In total, 669 patients were treated with individualized regimens for laboratory-confirmed MDR-TB. Isolates were resistant to a mean of 5.4 (SD 1.7 drugs. Cure or completion was achieved in 66.1% (442 of patients; death occurred in 20.8% (139. Patients who received an aggressive regimen were less likely to die (crude hazard ratio [HR]: 0.62; 95% CI: 0.44,0.89, compared to those who did not receive such a regimen. This association held in analyses adjusted for comorbidities and indicators of severity (adjusted HR: 0.63; 95% CI: 0.43,0.93.The aggressive regimen is a robust predictor of MDR-TB treatment outcome. TB policy makers and program directors should consider this standard as they design and implement regimens for patients with drug-resistant disease. Furthermore, the aggressive regimen should be considered the standard background regimen when designing randomized trials of treatment for drug-resistant TB.

  10. Oral Fosfomycin for the Treatment of Acute and Chronic Bacterial Prostatitis Caused by Multidrug-Resistant Escherichia coli

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    George G. Zhanel

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Acute and chronic bacterial prostatitis in outpatients is commonly treated with oral fluoroquinolones; however, the worldwide dissemination of multidrug-resistant (MDR Escherichia coli has resulted in therapeutic failures with fluoroquinolones. We reviewed the literature regarding the use of oral fosfomycin in the treatment of acute and chronic prostatitis caused by MDR E. coli. All English-language references on PubMed from 1986 to June 2017, inclusive, were reviewed from the search “fosfomycin prostatitis.” Fosfomycin demonstrates potent in vitro activity against a variety of antimicrobial-resistant E. coli genotypes/phenotypes including ciprofloxacin-resistant, trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole-resistant, extended-spectrum β-lactamase- (ESBL- producing, and MDR isolates. Fosfomycin attains therapeutic concentrations (≥4 μg/g in uninflamed prostatic tissue and maintains a high prostate/plasma ratio up to 17 hours after oral administration. Oral fosfomycin’s clinical cure rates in the treatment of bacterial prostatitis caused by antimicrobial-resistant E. coli ranged from 50 to 77% with microbiological eradication rates of >50%. An oral regimen of fosfomycin tromethamine of 3 g·q 24 h for one week followed by 3 g·q 48 h for a total treatment duration of 6–12 weeks appeared to be effective. Oral fosfomycin may represent an efficacious and safe treatment for acute and chronic prostatitis caused by MDR E. coli.

  11. Multidrug-resistant tuberculosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    McNerney Ruth

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background With almost 9 million new cases each year, tuberculosis remains one of the most feared diseases on the planet. Led by the STOP-TB Partnership and WHO, recent efforts to combat the disease have made considerable progress in a number of countries. However, the emergence of mutated strains of Mycobacterium tuberculosis that are resistant to the major anti-tuberculosis drugs poses a deadly threat to control efforts. Multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB has been reported in all regions of the world. More recently, extensively drug resistant-tuberculosis (XDR-TB that is also resistant to second line drugs has emerged in a number of countries. To ensure that adequate resources are allocated to prevent the emergence and spread of drug resistance it is important to understand the scale of the problem. In this article we propose that current methods of describing the epidemiology of drug resistant tuberculosis are not adequate for this purpose and argue for the inclusion of population based statistics in global surveillance data. Discussion Whereas the prevalence of tuberculosis is presented as the proportion of individuals within a defined population having disease, the prevalence of drug resistant tuberculosis is usually presented as the proportion of tuberculosis cases exhibiting resistance to anti-tuberculosis drugs. Global surveillance activities have identified countries in Eastern Europe, the former Soviet Union and regions of China as having a high proportion of MDR-TB cases and international commentary has focused primarily on the urgent need to improve control in these settings. Other regions, such as sub-Saharan Africa have been observed as having a low proportion of drug resistant cases. However, if one considers the incidence of new tuberculosis cases with drug resistant disease in terms of the population then countries of sub-Saharan Africa have amongst the highest rates of transmitted MDR-TB in the world. We propose

  12. Bacteremic Urinary Tract Infection Caused by Multidrug-Resistant Enterobacteriaceae Are Associated With Severe Sepsis at Admission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yi-Chien; Hsiao, Chih-Yen; Hung, Miao-Chiu; Hung, Sheng-Che; Wang, Hung-Ping; Huang, Yun-Jhong; Wang, Jann-Tay

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The purpose of this study is to compare the clinical features and treatment outcomes among patients with bacteremic urinary tract infection (UTI) caused by multidrug-resistant (MDR) and non-MDR Enterobacteriaceae and to identify whether MDR pathogens were independently associated with severe sepsis or septic shock at presentation. The clinical data of adult patients visiting and being treated at Chia-Yi Christian Hospital due to bacteremic UTI caused by Enterobacteriaceae from January 2006 to August 2015 were retrospectively analyzed. A total of 585 patients were enrolled. Among them, 220 (37.6%) were caused by the MDR Enterobacteriaceae. A total of 206 patients (35.2%) developed severe sepsis or septic shock at presentation. Patients in the MDR group tend to be male and have a past history of gout, recurrent UTI, prior hospitalization, hydronephrosis, renal stone, ureteral stone, indwelling urinary catheter, newly development of renal dysfunction, severe sepsis or septic shock, intensive care unit (ICU) admission, receipt of ineffective empirical therapy, longer hospital stay, and higher in-hospital mortality (2.7% vs 1.9%, P = 0.569). Using multivariate logistic regression analysis, it is revealed that independent predictors associated with severe sepsis or septic shock at presentation were liver cirrhosis (OR 2.868; 95% CI 1.439–5.716; P = 0.003), indwelling urinary catheter (OR 1.936; 95% CI 1.238–3.027; P = 0.004), and MDR Enterobacteriaceae (OR 1.447; 95% CI 1.002–2.090; P = 0.049). Multidrug resistance was associated with the development of severe sepsis or septic shock upon presentation among patients with bacteremic UTI caused by Enterobacteriaceae. Therefore, empirical antibiotics therapy for patients with UTI presented with severe sepsis and/or septic shock should be more broad-spectrum to effectively cover MDR Enterobacteriaceae. PMID:27196480

  13. Multidrug Resistance in Infants and Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gian Maria Pacifici

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Bacterial infections may cause disease and death. Infants and children are often subject to bacterial infections. Antimicrobials kill bacteria protecting the infected patients andreducing the risk of morbidity and mortality caused by bacteria. The antibiotics may lose their antibacterial activity when they become resistant to a bacteria. The resistance to different antibiotics in a bacteria is named multidrug-resistance. Gram-negative bacilli, especially Escherichia coli, Klebsiella, Enterobacter, Salmonella, Shigella, Pseudomonas, Streptococcus, and Haemophilus influenzae type b, may become resistant. Amikacin ampicillin, amoxicillin, amoxiclav, cefuroxime, cefotaxime, ceftazidime, cefoperazone tetracycline, chloramphenicol, ciprofloxacin, and gentamicin may cause bacterial-resistance. Resistance to bacteria for several pathogens makes complications in the treatment of infections caused by them. Salmonella strains may become resistant to ampicillin, cephalotin, ceftriaxone, gentamicin, amikacin, trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole, chloramphenicol, and tetracycline. Shigella strains may become resistant to ampicillin, cotrimoxazole, chloramphenicol, and streptomycin. Multidrug-resistance of Streptococcus pneumoniae may be due to β-lactams, macrolides, tetracycline, chloramphenicol, and trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole. Multidrug-resistance of Pseudomonas aeruginosa may become resistant to β-lactams, chloramphenicol, trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole, and tetracycline. The antibacterial activity against Haemophilus strains may occur with ampicillin, sulbactam-ampicillin, trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole, gentamicin, chloramphenicol, and ciprofloxacin. Multidrug-resistance of the Klebsiella species may be due with ampicillin, cefotaxime, cefuroxime, co-amxilav, mezlocillin, chloramphenicol, gentamicin, and ceftazidime. Multidrug-resistance of Escherichia coli may be caused by ampicillin, cotrimoxazole, chloramphenicol, ceftriaxone, and ceftazidime. Vibrio

  14. Primary multidrug resistant tuberculosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarkar Supriya

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available A 37-year old man presented at our institution with back pain, low-grade fever and weight-loss. X-ray of chest (postero-anterior view showed multiple opacities with erosion of right 2nd and left 6th ribs. CT-scan of thorax and CT-guided FNAC con-firmed the diagnosis of tuberculosis of ribs. Even after 5-months of treatment with four first line drugs, the patient developed a cold abscess at the back. Mycobacterial culture and drug sensitivity of material aspirated by Radiometric method from the cold abscess showed growth of Mycobacterium tuberculosis, and those bacilli were resistant to both isoniazide and rifampicin. The patient did not have anti-tubercu-lar medication in the past, and that established the diagnosis of primary multidrug resistant tuberculosis of ribs. Patient was treated successfully with 2nd line drugs at the cost of moderate degree of hearing loss. After one and half years of treatment X-ray of chest (PA view showed complete healing of rib erosions with new bone formation.

  15. Expression of multidrug resistance proteins in retinoblastoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Swati Shukla

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available AIM: To elucidate the mechanism of multidrug resistance in retinoblastoma, and to acquire more insights into in vivo drug resistance. METHODS: Three anticancer drug resistant Y79 human RB cells were generated against vincristine, etoposide or carboplatin, which are used for conventional chemotherapy in RB. Primary cultures from enucleated eyes after chemotherapy (PCNC were also prepared. Their chemosensitivity to chemotherapeutic agents (vincristine, etoposide and carboplatin were measured using MTT assay. Western blot analysis was performed to evaluate the expression of p53, Bcl-2 and various multidrug resistant proteins in retinoblastoma cells. RESULTS: Following exposure to chemotherapeutic drugs, PCNC showed less sensitivity to drugs. No significant changes observed in the p53 expression, whereas Bcl-2 expression was found to be increased in the drug resistant cells as well as in PCNC. Increased expression of P-glycoprotein (P-gp was observed in drug resistant Y79 cells; however there was no significant change in the expression of P-gp found between primary cultures of primarily enucleated eyes and PCNC. Multidrug resistance protein 1 (Mrp-1 expression was found to be elevated in the drug resistant Y79 cells as well as in PCNC. No significant change in the expression of lung resistance associated protein (Lrp was observed in the drug resistant Y79 cells as well as in PCNC. CONCLUSION: Our results suggest that multidrug resistant proteins are intrinsically present in retinoblastoma which causes treatment failure in managing retinoblastoma with chemotherapy.

  16. Expression of multidrug resistance proteins in retinoblastoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shukla, Swati; Srivastava, Arpna; Kumar, Sunil; Singh, Usha; Goswami, Sandeep; Chawla, Bhavna; Bajaj, Mandeep Singh; Kashyap, Seema; Kaur, Jasbir

    2017-01-01

    To elucidate the mechanism of multidrug resistance in retinoblastoma, and to acquire more insights into in vivo drug resistance. Three anticancer drug resistant Y79 human RB cells were generated against vincristine, etoposide or carboplatin, which are used for conventional chemotherapy in RB. Primary cultures from enucleated eyes after chemotherapy (PCNC) were also prepared. Their chemosensitivity to chemotherapeutic agents (vincristine, etoposide and carboplatin) were measured using MTT assay. Western blot analysis was performed to evaluate the expression of p53, Bcl-2 and various multidrug resistant proteins in retinoblastoma cells. Following exposure to chemotherapeutic drugs, PCNC showed less sensitivity to drugs. No significant changes observed in the p53 expression, whereas Bcl-2 expression was found to be increased in the drug resistant cells as well as in PCNC. Increased expression of P-glycoprotein (P-gp) was observed in drug resistant Y79 cells; however there was no significant change in the expression of P-gp found between primary cultures of primarily enucleated eyes and PCNC. Multidrug resistance protein 1 (Mrp-1) expression was found to be elevated in the drug resistant Y79 cells as well as in PCNC. No significant change in the expression of lung resistance associated protein (Lrp) was observed in the drug resistant Y79 cells as well as in PCNC. Our results suggest that multidrug resistant proteins are intrinsically present in retinoblastoma which causes treatment failure in managing retinoblastoma with chemotherapy.

  17. Catheter-related bacteremia caused by multidrug-resistant Leclercia adecarboxylata in a patient with breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Gee-Wook; You, Myung-Jo; Lee, Hye-Soo; Lee, Chang-Seop

    2012-09-01

    We report a multidrug-resistant strain of Leclercia adecarboxylata responsible for catheter-related bacteremia in a 47-year-old female with breast cancer. The isolated strain was resistant to several β-lactams, aminoglycosides, and folate pathway inhibitors and harbored bla(TEM-1) and bla(CTX-M) group 1 and intl1 genes (dfrA12-orfF-aadA2) as genetic determinants for resistance. Based on a review of the L. adecarboxylata literature, there have been only 4 reports of antibiotic-resistant strains. To our knowledge, this is the first report of an L. adecarboxylata strain with simultaneous resistance to β-lactams, aminoglycosides, and sulfonamides.

  18. Tuberculosis Case Fatality and Other Causes of Death among Multidrug-Resistant Tuberculosis Patients in a High HIV Prevalence Setting, 2000-2008, South Africa

    OpenAIRE

    van der Walt, Martie; Lancaster, Joey; Shean, Karen

    2016-01-01

    Introduction South Africa has the highest reported rates of multi-drug resistant TB in Africa, typified by poor treatment outcomes, attributable mainly to high default and death rates. Concomitant HIV has become the strongest predictor of death among MDR-TB patients, while anti-retroviral therapy (ART) has dramatically reduced mortality. TB Case fatality rate (CFR) is an indicator that specifically reports on deaths due to TB. Aim The aim of this paper was to investigate causes of death among...

  19. Antibacterial Therapy for Nosocomial Pneumonias Caused by Multidrug-Resistant Microorganisms in Critical 1ll Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. V. Moroz

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the results of using the fourth-generation cephalosporin maxicef in the treatment of 20 patients with nosocomial pneumonia and severe concomitant injury. A control group comprised 20 patients receiving a combination of ceftazidime and amikacin. The total efficiency of the antibacterial therapy was 68.5% in the maxicef group and 40.9% in the control group (р<0.05. The therapy had to be modified in 42% of the maxicef group and in 72.7% in the control group (р<0.05. The average treatment cost was US $518 (429—606 and US $482 (368—596 in the maxicef and control groups, respectively. Nephrotoxicity was observed in 9% of the patients receiving a combination of the antibiotics. The activity of maxicef was also analyzed in vitro. Results. Maxicef was demonstrated to be highly active against the majority of gram-negative and gram-positive bacteria in vitro. Its efficacy against the most common bacteria (P.aeruginosa, S.aureus, E.coli, K.pneumonia causing infections in severe injury was in vitro significantly higher than that of ceftazidime. The comparative study indicates that the fourth-generation cephalosporin maxicef may be used as an alternative to the standard combined therapy. Key words: concomitant injury, maxicef, nosocomial pneumonia, a combination of ceftazidime and aminoglycoside, nosocomial infection pathogens.

  20. Is colistin effective in the treatment of infections caused by multidrug-resistant (MDR) or extremely drug-resistant (XDR) gram-negative microorganisms in children?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozsurekci, Yasemin; Aykac, Kubra; Cengiz, Ali Bulent; Bayhan, Cihangul; Sancak, Banu; Karadag Oncel, Eda; Kara, Ates; Ceyhan, Mehmet

    2016-06-01

    The increasing incidence of infections caused by multidrug-resistant (MDR) or extremely drug-resistant (XDR) gram-negative organisms has led to the reemergence of colistin use. Clinical and demographic data were collected on 94 pediatric patients diagnosed with MDR or XDR gram-negative infections and treated with either a colistin-containing regimen (colistin group) or at least one antimicrobial agent other than colistin (noncolistin group). The overall clinical response rates were 65.8% in the colistin group and 70.0% in the noncolistin group (P = 0.33). The infection-related mortality rates were 11% in the colistin group and 13.3% in the noncolistin group (P = 0.74). There was no statistically significant difference in nephrotoxicity in the colistin and noncolistin groups. Colistin therapy was at least as effective and as safe as beta-lactam antibiotics or quinolones, with or without aminoglycosides, in the treatment of infections caused by gram-negative organisms and may be a therapeutic option in children. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Multidrug-Resistant Candida

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arendrup, Maiken Cavling; Patterson, Thomas F

    2017-01-01

    Invasive Candida infections remain an important cause of morbidity and mortality, especially in hospitalized and immunocompromised or critically ill patients. A limited number of antifungal agents from only a few drug classes are available to treat patients with these serious infections. Resistan...

  2. Epidemiological typing of multidrug-resistant Klebsiella pneumoniae, which causes paediatric ventilator-associated pneumonia in Egypt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohamed, Eman R; Aly, Sherine A; Halby, Hamada M; Ahmed, Shabaan H; Zakaria, Amira M; El-Asheer, Osama M

    2017-05-01

    Multidrug-resistant Klebsiella pneumoniae is a common nosocomial pathogen that plays an important role in ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP). This study aimed to define the clonal relatedness of K. pneumoniae strains isolated from paediatric VAP in addition to those isolated from environmental samples. This study included 19 clinical and 4 environmental K. pneumoniae isolates recovered from the paediatric intensive care unit (PICU) in Assiut University Children's Hospital. The K. pneumoniae isolates were confirmed by biotyping using API strips and subjected to antimicrobial susceptibility testing. The genes coding K1 and K2 capsular types were detected by PCR. The clonal relationships between the K. pneumoniae isolates were determined by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE). Ten resistotypes were detected among all the K. pneumoniae isolates, while PFGE identified seventeen K. pneumoniae pulsotypes. Similar PFGE patterns were found between environmental and clinical isolates and between isolates recovered from different patients, suggesting the circulation of K. pneumoniae pathogens in the PICU and the role of the environment in the spread of infection. No correlation was found between the resistotypes and pulsotypes of the K. pneumoniae isolates. PFGE showed higher discriminatory power for the typing of nosocomial K. pneumoniae [Simpson's diversity index (DI)=0.96] than resistotyping (DI=0.72). As far as we know, this is the first report of the isolation of the same multidrug-resistant (MDR) K. pneumoniae pulsotype from patients and environmental samples in the same hospital ward in Egypt. This study provides a step on the way to understanding the genotyping and epidemiology of MDR K. pneumoniae for enhanced prevention of bacterial transmission.

  3. Altered membrane permeability in multidrug resistant Escherichia ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    PRECIOUS

    2009-11-02

    Nov 2, 2009 ... involvement during the transport of β - lactams in multidrug resistant Escherichia coli isolated from extra-intestinal infections. Also, the ... lactam resistance in multidrug resistant E. coli in ESBL and non-ESBL isolates. .... and decreased susceptibility to carbapenems, particularly ertapenem (Perez et al.,.

  4. Catfish egg lectin causes rapid activation of multidrug resistance 1 P-glycoprotein as a lipid translocase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugawara, Shigeki; Hosono, Masahiro; Ogawa, Yukiko; Takayanagi, Motoaki; Nitta, Kazuo

    2005-03-01

    Rhamnose-binding lectin from catfish (Silurus asotus) eggs (SAL) has the ability to induce externalization of phosphatidylserine (PS), followed by cell shrinkage in globotriaosylceramide (Gb3)-expressing Burkitt's lymphoma Raji cells. Because phospholipid scramblase and aminophospholipid translocase did not participate in SAL-induced PS externalization, we examined the relationship of ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters, such as multidrug resistance (MDR) 1 P-glycoprotein (MDR1 P-gp) and MDR-associated protein 1 (MRP1), for translocation of PS. Since cyclosporin A (MDR1 P-gp inhibitor) but not MK571 (MRP1 inhibitor) inhibited SAL-induced PS externalization, it was suggested that MDR1 P-gp is involved in this phenomenon. On the other hand, SAL activated both of the ABC transporters for efflux of rhodamine123 (MDR1 P-gp substrate, Rho123) and 5-carboxyfluorescein diacetate (MRP1 substrate, 5-CFDA) in Raji cells. In contrast, SAL did not activate these two transporters in Gb3-negative cell lines, such as K562 and doxorubicin-resistant K562 cells, involving not only PS externalization but also efflux of Rho123 or 5-CFDA. Since Gb3 and both transporters in Raji cells are located in the glycosphingolipid-enriched microdomain (GEM), it is suggested that the binding of SAL to Gb3 localized in the GEM specifically induces MDR1 P-gp activation in Raji cells.

  5. Synergy between verapamil and other multidrug -resistance ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    PRAKASH KUMAR

    Synergy between verapamil and other multidrug-resistance modulators in model membranes. 737. J. Biosci. 32(4), June 2007. 1. Introduction. A major problem in the treatment of cancer is that of multidrug resistance, which remains imperfectly understood, though in some instances it certainly involves altered membrane ...

  6. The secondary resistome of multidrug-resistant Klebsiella pneumoniae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jana, Bimal; Cain, Amy K.; Doerrler, William T.

    2017-01-01

    for resistant bacteria under therapeutic concentrations of antimicrobials. Conditional essentiality of individual genes to antimicrobial resistance was evaluated in an epidemic multidrug-resistant clone of K. pneumoniae (ST258). We constructed a high-density transposon mutant library of >430,000 unique Tn5......Klebsiella pneumoniae causes severe lung and bloodstream infections that are difficult to treat due to multidrug resistance. We hypothesized that antimicrobial resistance can be reversed by targeting chromosomal non-essential genes that are not responsible for acquired resistance but essential...

  7. First report of a multidrug-resistant Klebsiella pneumoniae of sequence type 11 causing sepsis in a free-ranging beaver (Castor fiber).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pilo, Paola; Vogt, Debora; Origgi, Francesco C; Endimiani, Andrea; Peterson, Susanne; Perreten, Vincent

    2015-04-01

    Klebsiella pneumoniae of sequence type (ST) 11 is a hyper-epidemic nosocomial clone spreading worldwide among humans and also emerging in pets. In this report, we describe a clinical case of fatal sepsis due to this multidrug-resistant (MDR) pathogen in a Eurasian beaver. The isolate showed resistance to six different classes of antimicrobials including third generation cephalosporins and fluoroquinolones. This is the first report describing the detection of a MDR K. pneumoniae ST11 in a free-ranging animal. Our finding highlights the potential for environmental dissemination of hyper-epidemic clones of K. pneumoniae and possible spread in wildlife and cause epizootics. © 2014 Society for Applied Microbiology and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Bacteremic Urinary Tract Infection Caused by Multidrug-Resistant Enterobacteriaceae Are Associated With Severe Sepsis at Admission: Implication for Empirical Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yi-Chien; Hsiao, Chih-Yen; Hung, Miao-Chiu; Hung, Sheng-Che; Wang, Hung-Ping; Huang, Yun-Jhong; Wang, Jann-Tay

    2016-05-01

    The purpose of this study is to compare the clinical features and treatment outcomes among patients with bacteremic urinary tract infection (UTI) caused by multidrug-resistant (MDR) and non-MDR Enterobacteriaceae and to identify whether MDR pathogens were independently associated with severe sepsis or septic shock at presentation.The clinical data of adult patients visiting and being treated at Chia-Yi Christian Hospital due to bacteremic UTI caused by Enterobacteriaceae from January 2006 to August 2015 were retrospectively analyzed.A total of 585 patients were enrolled. Among them, 220 (37.6%) were caused by the MDR Enterobacteriaceae. A total of 206 patients (35.2%) developed severe sepsis or septic shock at presentation. Patients in the MDR group tend to be male and have a past history of gout, recurrent UTI, prior hospitalization, hydronephrosis, renal stone, ureteral stone, indwelling urinary catheter, newly development of renal dysfunction, severe sepsis or septic shock, intensive care unit (ICU) admission, receipt of ineffective empirical therapy, longer hospital stay, and higher in-hospital mortality (2.7% vs 1.9%, P = 0.569). Using multivariate logistic regression analysis, it is revealed that independent predictors associated with severe sepsis or septic shock at presentation were liver cirrhosis (OR 2.868; 95% CI 1.439-5.716; P = 0.003), indwelling urinary catheter (OR 1.936; 95% CI 1.238-3.027; P = 0.004), and MDR Enterobacteriaceae (OR 1.447; 95% CI 1.002-2.090; P = 0.049).Multidrug resistance was associated with the development of severe sepsis or septic shock upon presentation among patients with bacteremic UTI caused by Enterobacteriaceae. Therefore, empirical antibiotics therapy for patients with UTI presented with severe sepsis and/or septic shock should be more broad-spectrum to effectively cover MDR Enterobacteriaceae.

  9. Diversity of Multi-Drug Resistant Avian Pathogenic Escherichia coli (APEC Causing Outbreaks of Colibacillosis in Broilers during 2012 in Spain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marc Solà-Ginés

    Full Text Available Avian pathogenic Escherichia coli (APEC are the major cause of colibacillosis in poultry production. In this study, a total of 22 E. coli isolated from colibacillosis field cases and 10 avian faecal E. coli (AFEC were analysed. All strains were characterised phenotypically by susceptibility testing and molecular typing methods such as pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE and multi-locus sequence typing (MLST. The presence of 29 virulence genes associated to APEC and human extraintestinal pathogenic E. coli (ExPEC was also evaluated. For cephalosporin resistant isolates, cephalosporin resistance genes, plasmid location and replicon typing was assessed. Avian isolates belonged to 26 O:H serotypes and 24 sequence types. Out of 22 APEC isolates, 91% contained the virulence genes predictors of APEC; iutA, hlyF, iss, iroN and ompT. Of all strains, 34% were considered ExPEC. PFGE analysis demonstrated a high degree of genetic polymorphism. All strains were multi-resistant, including those isolated from healthy animals. Eleven strains were resistant to cephalosporins; six contained blaCTX-M-14, two blaSHV-12, two blaCMY-2 and one blaSHV-2. Two strains harboured qnrA, and two qnrA together with aac(6'-Ib-cr. Additionally, the emergent clone O25b:H4-B2-ST131 was isolated from a healthy animal which harboured blaCMY-2 and qnrS genes. Cephalosporin resistant genes were mainly associated to the presence of IncK replicons. This study demonstrates a very diverse population of multi-drug resistant E. coli containing a high number of virulent genes. The E. coli population among broilers is a reservoir of resistance and virulence-associated genes that could be transmitted into the community through the food chain. More epidemiological studies are necessary to identify clonal groups and resistance mechanisms with potential relevance to public health.

  10. Diversity of Multi-Drug Resistant Avian Pathogenic Escherichia coli (APEC) Causing Outbreaks of Colibacillosis in Broilers during 2012 in Spain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solà-Ginés, Marc; Cameron-Veas, Karla; Badiola, Ignacio; Dolz, Roser; Majó, Natalia; Dahbi, Ghizlane; Viso, Susana; Mora, Azucena; Blanco, Jorge; Piedra-Carrasco, Nuria; González-López, Juan José; Migura-Garcia, Lourdes

    2015-01-01

    Avian pathogenic Escherichia coli (APEC) are the major cause of colibacillosis in poultry production. In this study, a total of 22 E. coli isolated from colibacillosis field cases and 10 avian faecal E. coli (AFEC) were analysed. All strains were characterised phenotypically by susceptibility testing and molecular typing methods such as pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) and multi-locus sequence typing (MLST). The presence of 29 virulence genes associated to APEC and human extraintestinal pathogenic E. coli (ExPEC) was also evaluated. For cephalosporin resistant isolates, cephalosporin resistance genes, plasmid location and replicon typing was assessed. Avian isolates belonged to 26 O:H serotypes and 24 sequence types. Out of 22 APEC isolates, 91% contained the virulence genes predictors of APEC; iutA, hlyF, iss, iroN and ompT. Of all strains, 34% were considered ExPEC. PFGE analysis demonstrated a high degree of genetic polymorphism. All strains were multi-resistant, including those isolated from healthy animals. Eleven strains were resistant to cephalosporins; six contained blaCTX-M-14, two blaSHV-12, two blaCMY-2 and one blaSHV-2. Two strains harboured qnrA, and two qnrA together with aac(6')-Ib-cr. Additionally, the emergent clone O25b:H4-B2-ST131 was isolated from a healthy animal which harboured blaCMY-2 and qnrS genes. Cephalosporin resistant genes were mainly associated to the presence of IncK replicons. This study demonstrates a very diverse population of multi-drug resistant E. coli containing a high number of virulent genes. The E. coli population among broilers is a reservoir of resistance and virulence-associated genes that could be transmitted into the community through the food chain. More epidemiological studies are necessary to identify clonal groups and resistance mechanisms with potential relevance to public health.

  11. Carriage and transmission dynamics of multidrug-resistant Enterobacteriaceae

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haverkate, M.R.

    2015-01-01

    Antimicrobial-resistant bacteria cause big problems in health care. Infections with these bacteria are hard to treat and lead to high morbidity, mortality, and costs. In this PhD thesis, carriage and transmission dynamics of multidrug-resistant Enterobacteriaceae have been investigated in various

  12. Multidrug Resistant Acinetobacter Infection and Their Antimicrobial ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Conclusion: The high rate of antibiotic resistance shown by Acintobacter isolates in this study demonstrates the need for antibiotic stewardship protocols to be set up in health facilities to prevent outbreaks of multi-resistant bacterial infections. Key words: Acinotebacter infection, Multidrug resistant, Intensive care unit.

  13. Multidrug resistant shigella flexneri infection simulating intestinal intussusception

    OpenAIRE

    Srirangaraj Sreenivasan; Arunava Kali; Jothimani Pradeep

    2016-01-01

    Shigella enteritis remains an important cause of mortality and morbidity in all age groups, in developing as well as developed countries. Owing to the emerging resistance to multiple antibiotics among Shigella spp., it has been recognized as a major global public health concern and warrants constant monitoring of its resistance pattern. We report a case of segmental ileitis caused by non.-ESBL producing multidrug resistant Shigella flexneri in an infant clinically mimicking intussusception, w...

  14. Multidrug resistant shigella flexneri infection simulating intestinal intussusception

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Srirangaraj Sreenivasan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Shigella enteritis remains an important cause of mortality and morbidity in all age groups, in developing as well as developed countries. Owing to the emerging resistance to multiple antibiotics among Shigella spp., it has been recognized as a major global public health concern and warrants constant monitoring of its resistance pattern. We report a case of segmental ileitis caused by non.-ESBL producing multidrug resistant Shigella flexneri in an infant clinically mimicking intussusception, which was effectively treated by ceftriaxone.

  15. MDRO - Multidrug-Resistant Organisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Staphylococcus aureus VRE - Vancomycin-resistant enterococci ESBLs - Extended-spectrum beta-lactamases (which are resistant to cephalosporins and monobactams) PRSP - Penicillin-resistant Streptococcus pneumoniae Multi- ...

  16. ABC transporters and multidrug resistance in Aspergillus nidulans

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Andrade, A.C.

    2000-01-01

    The term multidrug resistance (MDR) stands for simultaneous cellular resistance to chemically unrelated toxicants and is often associated with overproduction of multidrug-efflux proteins of the A TP- b inding-

  17. Infection by multidrug-resistant Elizabethkingia meningoseptica: case reports

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jailton Lobo da Costa Lima

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available We report two cases of sepsis in critically ill patients in two tertiary care hospitals in Recife-PE, Brazil. The first case is an 87-year-old patient with chronic myeloid leukemia and sepsis; and the second case is a 93-year-old patient with prostate cancer and septic shock caused by multidrug-resistant (MDR Elizabethkingia meningoseptica.

  18. Increased multi-drug resistant Escherichia coli from hospitals in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Multidrug-resistant Escherichia coli (MDR E. coli) has become a major public health concern in Sudan and many countries, causing failure in treatment with consequent huge health burden. Objectives: To determine the prevalence and susceptibility of MDR E. coli isolated from patients in hospitals at Khartoum ...

  19. Multidrug-resistant typhoid fever: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaki, Syed Ahmed; Karande, Sunil

    2011-05-28

    Multidrug-resistant typhoid fever (MDRTF) is defined as typhoid fever caused by Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi strains (S. Typhi), which are resistant to the first-line recommended drugs for treatment such as chloramphenicol, ampicillin and trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole. Since the mid-1980s, MDRTF has caused outbreaks in several countries in the developing world, resulting in increased morbidity and mortality, especially in affected children below five years of age and those who are malnourished. Two methods were used to gather the information presented in this article. First PubMed was searched for English language references to published relevant articles. Secondly, chapters on typhoid fever in standard textbooks of paediatric infectious diseases and preventive and social medicine were reviewed. Although there are no pathognomonic clinical features of MDRTF at the onset of the illness, high fever ( > 104°F), toxaemia, abdominal distension, abdominal tenderness, hepatomegaly and splenomegaly are often reported. The gold standard for the diagnosis of MDRTF is bacterial isolation of the organism in blood cultures. Ciprofloxacin and ceftriaxone are the drugs most commonly used for treatment of MDRTF and produce good clinical results. MDRTF remains a major public health problem, particularly in developing countries. Mass immunization in endemic areas with either the oral live attenuated Typhi 21a or the injectable unconjugated Vi typhoid vaccine, rational use of antibiotics, improvement in public sanitation facilities, availability of clean drinking water, promotion of safe food handling practices and public health education are vital in the prevention of MDRTF.

  20. Multidrug resistance: Physiological principles and nanomedical solutions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kunjachan, S.; Rychlik, B.; Storm, Gerrit; Kiessling, F.; Lammers, Twan Gerardus Gertudis Maria

    2013-01-01

    Multidrug resistance (MDR) is a pathophysiological phenomenon employed by cancer cells which limits the prolonged and effective use of chemotherapeutic agents. MDR is primarily based on the over-expression of drug efflux pumps in the cellular membrane. Prominent examples of such efflux pumps, which

  1. Multidrug resistance: Physiological principles and nanomedical solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunjachan, Sijumon; Rychlik, Błażej; Storm, Gert; Kiessling, Fabian; Lammers, Twan

    2013-11-01

    Multidrug resistance (MDR) is a pathophysiological phenomenon employed by cancer cells which limits the prolonged and effective use of chemotherapeutic agents. MDR is primarily based on the over-expression of drug efflux pumps in the cellular membrane. Prominent examples of such efflux pumps, which belong to the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) superfamily of proteins, are Pgp (P-glycoprotein) and MRP (multidrug resistance-associated protein), nowadays officially known as ABCB1 and ABCC1. Over the years, several strategies have been evaluated to overcome MDR, based not only on the use of low-molecular-weight MDR modulators, but also on the implementation of 1-100(0) nm-sized drug delivery systems. In the present manuscript, after introducing the most important physiological principles of MDR, we summarize prototypic nanomedical strategies to overcome multidrug resistance, including the use of carrier materials with intrinsic anti-MDR properties, the use of nanomedicines to modify the mode of cellular uptake, and the co-formulation of chemotherapeutic drugs together with low- and high-molecular-weight MDR inhibitors within a single drug delivery system. While certain challenges still need to be overcome before such constructs and concepts can be widely applied in the clinic, the insights obtained and the progress made strongly suggest that nanomedicine formulations hold significant potential for improving the treatment of multidrug-resistant malignancies. © 2013.

  2. Multidrug Resistant Acinetobacter Infection and Their Antimicrobial ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Acinetobacter baumannii, a non-glucose fermenting Gram negative bacillus, has emerged in the last three decades as a major etiological agent of hospital-associated infections giving rise to significant morbidity and mortality particularly in immunocompromised patients. Multidrug resistant A. baumannii ...

  3. Drug efflux proteins in multidrug resistant bacteria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    vanVeen, HW; Konings, WN

    Bacteria contain an array of transport proteins in their cytoplasmic membrane. Many of these proteins play an important role in conferring resistance to toxic compounds. The multidrug efflux systems encountered in prokaryotic cells are very similar to those observed in eukaryotic cells. Therefore, a

  4. Altered membrane permeability in multidrug resistant Escherichia ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The study was conducted with the objective of examining the outer membrane proteins and their involvement during the transport of β - lactams in multidrug resistant Escherichia coli isolated from extra-intestinal infections. Also, the response of gram negative bacterial biomembrane alteration was studied using extended ...

  5. Multidrug-resistant Tuberculosis in Military Recruits

    OpenAIRE

    Freier, Grace; Wright, Allen; Nelson, Gregory; Brenner, Eric; Mase, Sundari; Tasker, Sybil; Matthews, Karen L.; Bohnker, Bruce K.

    2006-01-01

    We conducted a tuberculosis contact investigation for a female military recruit with an unreported history of multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDRTB) and subsequent recurrence. Pertinent issues included identification of likely contacts from separate training phases, uncertainty on latent MDRTB infection treatment regimens and side effects, and subsequent dispersal of the contacts after exposure.

  6. Antimicrobial Activity of Actinomycetes Against Multidrug Resistant ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Antimicrobial Activity of Actinomycetes Against Multidrug Resistant Staphylococcus aureus, E. coli and Various Other Pathogens. ... Results: Among these isolates, 51 (38 %) showed antimicrobial activity against one or more test organisms and six exhibited promising broad-spectrum activity against all the tested organisms.

  7. Genomic analysis reveals multi-drug resistance clusters in Group B Streptococcus CC17 hypervirulent isolates causing neonatal invasive disease in southern mainland China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edmondo Campisi

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Neonatal invasive disease caused by group B Streptococcus (GBS represents a significant public health care concern globally. However, data related to disease burden, serotype distribution and molecular epidemiology in China and other Asian countries are very few and specifically relative to confined regions. The aim of this study was to investigate the genetic characteristics of GBS isolates recovered from neonates with invasive disease during 2013-2014 at Guangzhou and Changsha hospitals in southern mainland China. We assessed the capsular polysaccharide (CPS type, pilus islands (PIs distribution and hvgA gene presence in a panel of 26 neonatal clinical isolates, of which 8 were recovered from Early Onset Disease (EOD and 18 from Late Onset Disease (LOD. Among 26 isolates examined, five serotypes were identified. Type III was the most represented (15 cases, particularly among LOD strains (n=11, followed by types Ib (n=5, V (n=3, Ia (n=2 and II (n=1. We performed whole-genome sequencing (WGS analysis and antimicrobial susceptibility testing on the 14 serotype III isolates belonging to the hypervirulent Clonal Complex 17 (serotype III-CC17.The presence of PI-2b alone was associated with 13 out of 14 serotype III-CC17 strains. Genome analysis led us to identify two multi-drug resistance gene clusters harbored in two new versions of integrative and conjugative elements (ICEs, carrying five or eight antibiotic resistance genes, respectively. These ICEs replaced the 16 kb-locus that normally contains the PI-1 operon. All isolates harboring the identified ICEs showed multiple resistances to aminoglycoside, macrolide and tetracycline antibiotic classes. In conclusion, we report the first whole-genome sequence analysis of 14 GBS serotype III-CC17 strains isolated in China, representing the most prevalent lineage causing neonatal invasive disease. The acquisition of newly identified ICEs conferring multiple antibiotic resistances could in part explain

  8. Lipoteichoic acid synthesis inhibition in combination with antibiotics abrogates growth of multidrug-resistant Enterococcus faecium

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Paganelli, Fernanda L.; van de Kamer, Tim; Brouwer, Ellen C.; Leavis, Helen L.; Woodford, Neil; Bonten, Marc J M; Willems, Rob J L; Hendrickx, Antoni P A

    Enterococcus faecium is a multidrug-resistant (MDR) nosocomial pathogen causing significant morbidity in debilitated patients. New antimicrobials are needed to treat antibiotic-resistant E. faecium infections in hospitalised patients. E. faecium incorporates lipoteichoic acid (LTA)

  9. Candida auris: An emerging multidrug-resistant pathogen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Sears

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Candida aurisis an emerging multidrug-resistant pathogen that can be difficult to identify using traditional biochemical methods. C. auris is capable of causing invasive fungal infections, particularly among hospitalized patients with significant medical comorbidities. Echinocandins are the empiric drugs of choice for C. auris, although not all isolates are susceptible and resistance may develop on therapy. Nosocomial C. auris outbreaks have been reported in a number of countries and aggressive infection control measures are paramount to stopping transmission.

  10. Multidrug-Resistant Candida: Epidemiology, Molecular Mechanisms, and Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arendrup, Maiken Cavling; Patterson, Thomas F

    2017-08-15

    Invasive Candida infections remain an important cause of morbidity and mortality, especially in hospitalized and immunocompromised or critically ill patients. A limited number of antifungal agents from only a few drug classes are available to treat patients with these serious infections. Resistance can be either intrinsic or acquired. Resistance mechanisms are not exchanged between Candida; thus, acquired resistance either emerges in response to an antifungal selection pressure in the individual patient or, more rarely, occur due to horizontal transmission of resistant strains between patients. Although multidrug resistance is uncommon, increasing reports of multidrug resistance to the azoles, echinocandins, and polyenes have occurred in several Candida species, most notably Candida glabrata and more recently Candida auris. Drivers are overall antifungal use, subtherapeutic drug levels at sites of infection/colonization, drug sequestration in the biofilm matrix, and, in the setting of outbreaks, suboptimal infection control. Moreover, recent research suggests that DNA mismatch repair gene mutations may facilitate acquisition of resistance mutations in C. glabrata specifically. Diagnosis of antifungal-resistant Candida infections is critical to the successful management of patients with these infections. Reduction of unnecessary use of antifungals via antifungal stewardship is critical to limit multidrug resistance emergence. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press for the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  11. Primary disseminated extrapulmonary multidrug resistant tuberculosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S K Das

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Disseminated tuberculosis is a common mode of presentation of tuberculosis in patients both with and without HIV/AIDS in India. However, primary multidrug resistance in disseminated tuberculosis involving only the extrapulmonary sites in an immunocompetent adult is rare. Here, we report a case of a 19-year-old man who had disseminated tuberculosis involving left pleura, pericardium, peritoneum and intraabdominal lymph nodes. He was initially taking WHO category I antituberculous drugs, but was not responding in spite of 5 months of chemotherapy. Culture of the pleural biopsy specimen grew Mycobacterium tuberculosis which was resistant to isoniazid and rifampicin. He was put on therapy for multidrug resistant tuberculosis,following 24 months of chemotherapyhe had an uneventful recovery.

  12. Bacterial multidrug resistance mediated by a homologue of the human multidrug transporter P-glycoprotein

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Konings, WN; Poelarends, GJ

    2002-01-01

    Most ATP-binding cassette (ABC) multidrug transporters known to date are of eukaryotic origin, such as the P-glycoproteins (Pgps) and multidrug resistance-associated proteins (MRPs). Only one well-characterized ABC multidrug transporter, LmrA, is of bacterial origin. On the basis of its structural

  13. Tuberculosis Case Fatality and Other Causes of Death among Multidrug-Resistant Tuberculosis Patients in a High HIV Prevalence Setting, 2000-2008, South Africa.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martie van der Walt

    Full Text Available South Africa has the highest reported rates of multi-drug resistant TB in Africa, typified by poor treatment outcomes, attributable mainly to high default and death rates. Concomitant HIV has become the strongest predictor of death among MDR-TB patients, while anti-retroviral therapy (ART has dramatically reduced mortality. TB Case fatality rate (CFR is an indicator that specifically reports on deaths due to TB.The aim of this paper was to investigate causes of death amongst MDR-TB patients, the contribution of conditions other than TB to deaths, and to determine if causes differ between HIV-uninfected patients, HIV-infected patients receiving ART and those without ART.We carried out a retrospective review of data captured from the register of the MDR-TB programme of the North West Province, South Africa. We included 671 patients treated between 2000-2008; 59% of the cohort was HIV-infected and 33% had received ART during MDR treatment. The register contained data on treatment outcomes and causes of death.Treatment outcomes between HIV-uninfected cases, HIV-infected cases receiving ART and HIV-infected without ART differed significantly (p<0.000. The cohort death rate was 24%, 13% for HIV-uninfected cases and 31% for HIV-infected cases. TB caused most of the deaths, resulting in a cohort CFR of 15%, 9% for HIV-uninfected cases and 20% for HIV-infected cases. Cohort mortality rate due to other conditions was 2%. AIDS-conditions rather than TB caused significantly more deaths among HIV-infected cases receiving ART than those not (p = 0.02.The deaths among HIV-infected individuals contribute substantially to the high death rate. ART co-therapy protected HIV-infected cases from death due to TB and AIDS-conditions. Mechanisms need to be in place to ensure that HIV-infected individuals are retained in care upon completion of their MDR-TB treatment.

  14. Colistin for the treatment of ventilator-associated pneumonia caused by multidrug-resistant Gram-negative bacteria: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Wan-Jie; Wang, Fei; Tang, Lu; Bakker, Jan; Liu, Jing-Chen

    2014-12-01

    Ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP) caused by multidrug-resistant (MDR) Gram-negative bacteria (GNB) has emerged as an important and intractable clinical problem. This review assessed the efficacy and safety of colistin for treatment of MDR GNB VAP. PubMed and Embase were searched for controlled studies of colistin for treatment of MDR GNB VAP. The Mantel-Haenszel random-effects model was used to pool odds ratios (ORs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs). The primary outcome was clinical cure; secondary outcomes were microbiological eradication, ICU mortality, hospital mortality, length of ICU stay and nephrotoxicity. Fourteen controlled studies involving 1167 patients were identified, including six reporting colistin versus β-lactam antibiotics, three reporting aerosolised (AS) plus intravenous (IV) colistin versus IV colistin alone and five reporting colistin combined therapy versus colistin monotherapy. The clinical cure rate of colistin was comparable with that of β-lactam antibiotics (OR=1.00, 95% CI 0.68-1.47). Compared with IV colistin alone, AS plus IV colistin exhibited a better clinical cure (OR=2.12, 95% CI 1.40-3.20). Compared with colistin monotherapy, colistin combined therapy did not appear to provide a better clinical cure (OR=1.38, 95% CI 0.81-2.33). There was no significant difference in nephrotoxicity and other secondary outcomes between the treatment groups. Colistin appears as effective and safe as β-lactam antibiotics for the treatment of MDR GNB VAP. AS colistin may be a beneficial adjunct to IV colistin in the management of MDR GNB VAP. Colistin combined therapy does not appear to provide better outcomes compared with colistin monotherapy. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. and the International Society of Chemotherapy. All rights reserved.

  15. Unusual Complication of Multidrug Resistant Tuberculosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prerna Sharma

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Capreomycin is a second-line drug often used for multidrug-resistant tuberculosis which can result in nephrotoxic effects similar to other aminoglycosides. We describe a case of capreomycin induced Bartter-like syndrome with hypocalcemic tetany. Case Report. 23-year-old female patient presented with carpopedal spasms and tingling sensations in hands. Patient was being treated with capreomycin for two months for tuberculosis. On further investigation, hypocalcemia, hyponatremia, hypomagnesemia, hypokalemia, and hypochloremic metabolic alkalosis were noted. Vitamin D and serum PTH levels were within normal limits. Hypercalciuria was confirmed by urine calcium/creatinine ratio. Calcium, potassium, and magnesium supplementation was given and capreomycin was discontinued. Electrolytes normalized in two days after cessation of capreomycin with no further abnormalities on repeat investigations. Discussion. Aminoglycosides can result in renal tubular dysfunction leading to Fanconi syndrome, Bartter syndrome, and distal tubular acidosis. Impaired mitochondrial function in the tubular cells has been hypothesized as the possible cause of these tubulopathies. Acquired Bartter-like syndrome phenotypically resembles autosomal dominant type 5 Bartter syndrome. Treatment consists of correction of electrolyte abnormalities, indomethacin, and potassium-sparing diuretics. Prompt diagnosis and treatment of severe dyselectrolytemia are warranted in patients on aminoglycoside therapy.

  16. Pesticide degrading natural multidrug resistance bacterial flora.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rangasamy, Kirubakaran; Athiappan, Murugan; Devarajan, Natarajan; Samykannu, Gopinath; Parray, Javid A; Aruljothi, K N; Shameem, Nowsheen; Alqarawi, Abdulaziz A; Hashem, Abeer; Abd Allah, Elsayed Fathi

    2018-01-01

    Multidrug-resistant (MDR) bacteria are a growing threat to humans across the world. Antibiotic resistance is a global problem that has developed through continuous antibiotic use, combinatorial antibiotic use, pesticide-antibiotic cross-resistance, and horizontal gene transfer, as well as various other modes. Pesticide-antibiotic cross-resistance and the subsequent expansion of drug-resistant bacteria are critically documented in this review, the primary focus of which is to assess the impact of indiscriminate pesticide use on the development of microbial communities with parallel pesticide and multidrug resistance. The consumption of pesticide-contaminated food products and the use of broad-spectrum antibiotics by humans and in livestock animals have favored the development of both antibiotic and pesticide-resistant bacterial flora via natural selection. Pesticide resistance mainly develops through defensive bacterial adaptations such as biofilm formation, induced mutations, and horizontal/vertical gene transfer through plasmids or transposons, as well as through the increased expression of certain hydrolytic enzymes. Pesticide resistance genes are always transferred as gene clusters, and they may also carry genes essential for antibiotic resistance. Moreover, for some induced mutations, the mutated active site of the affected enzyme may allow degradation of both pesticides and antibiotics, resulting in cross-resistance. A few studies have shown that the sub-lethal exposure of wild-type strains to herbicides induces antibiotic resistance. This review concludes that xenobiotic exposure leads to cross-resistance in wild microbial flora, which requires further study to develop therapeutic approaches to overcome the threats of MDR bacteria and superbugs. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Study of multidrug resistance and radioresistance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Yoon Koo; Yoo, Young Do

    1999-04-01

    We investigated the mechanism of 5-FU, adriamycin, radiation resistance in Korean gastric cancer cells. First we investigated the relation between Rb and multidrug resistance. Rb stable transfectants exhibited 5- to 10- fold more resistance to adriamycin than the control cells. These Rb transfectants showed increased MDR1 expression. We also investigated up-regulation in radiation-resistant tumor tissues. HSP27, MRP-8, GST, and NKEF-B were up-regulated in radiation resistant tumor. Expression of NKEF-B was also increased by radiation exposure in Head and Neck cells. These results demonstrated that NKEF-B is a stress response protein and it may have an important role in radiation resistance.

  18. plasmid mediated resistance in multidrug resistant bacteria isolated

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    User

    PLASMID MEDIATED RESISTANCE IN MULTIDRUG RESISTANT BACTERIA. ISOLATED FROM CHILDREN WITH SUSPECTED SEPTICAEMIA IN ZARIA,. NIGERIA. AbdulAziz, Z. A.,1* Ehinmidu, J. O.,1 Adeshina, G. O.,1 Pala, Y. Y2., Yusuf, S. S2. and. Bugaje, M. A.3. 1Department of Pharmaceutics and Pharmaceutical ...

  19. Multidrug-Resistant Tuberculosis: Treatment and Outcomes of 93 Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah K Brode

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Tuberculosis (TB remains a leading cause of death worldwide and the emergence of multidrug-resistant TB (MDR TB poses a threat to its control. There is scanty evidence regarding optimal management of MDR TB. The majority of Canadian cases of MDR TB are diagnosed in Ontario; most are managed by the Tuberculosis Service at West Park Healthcare Centre in Toronto. The authors reviewed 93 cases of MDR TB admitted from January 1, 2000 to December 31, 2011.

  20. Yeast ABC proteins involved in multidrug resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piecuch, Agata; Obłąk, Ewa

    2014-03-01

    Pleiotropic drug resistance is a complex phenomenon that involves many proteins that together create a network. One of the common mechanisms of multidrug resistance in eukaryotic cells is the active efflux of a broad range of xenobiotics through ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters. Saccharomyces cerevisiae is often used as a model to study such activity because of the functional and structural similarities of its ABC transporters to mammalian ones. Numerous ABC transporters are found in humans and some are associated with the resistance of tumors to chemotherapeutics. Efflux pump modulators that change the activity of ABC proteins are the most promising candidate drugs to overcome such resistance. These modulators can be chemically synthesized or isolated from natural sources (e.g., plant alkaloids) and might also be used in the treatment of fungal infections. There are several generations of synthetic modulators that differ in specificity, toxicity and effectiveness, and are often used for other clinical effects.

  1. Appropriateness of antibiotic prescription for targeted therapy of infections caused by multidrug-resistant bacteria: assessment of the most common improper uses in a tertiary hospital in southern Italy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viceconte, Giulio; Maraolo, Alberto Enrico; Iula, Vita Dora; Catania, Maria Rosaria; Tosone, Grazia; Orlando, Raffaele

    2017-09-01

    A huge proportion of antibiotic therapies for infections caused by multidrug-resistant bacteria (MDR) are inappropriate. In this study, we described the most common causes of inappropriateness of definitive antibiotic regimes in a large university hospital in southern Italy and we evaluated the impact on microbial eradication, length of stay, 30-day readmission and mortality. We retrospectively assessed 45 patients who received a definitive antibiotic therapy after isolation of multidrug-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, Enterococcus spp., Enterobacteriaceae, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Acinetobacter spp. strains between 2014 and 2015. From the literature, we set a series of criteria to retrospectively determine the appropriateness of the therapy. In all, 61% of the prescribed antibiotic regimes were found to be inappropriate, especially due to incorrect drug dosage. It emerged that meropenem was the antibiotic most frequently inappropriately used. In 46% of infections caused by MDR but not extended-spectrum β-lactamase-producing Enterobacteriaceae, carbapenems were inappropriately administered. Microbial eradication was achieved in 87% of the appropriate therapy group compared to 31% of the inappropriate therapy group (chi-square=6.750, p<0.027). No statistically significant association was found between inappropriate therapy and the length of stay (chi-square=3.084, p=0.101) and 30-day readmission (p=0.103). Definitive antibiotic therapy in infections caused by multidrug-resistant bacteria in a large university hospital is often inappropriate, especially due to the drug dosing regimen, particularly in the case of meropenem and colistin. This inappropriateness has a significant impact on post-treatment microbial eradication in specimens collected after antibiotic therapy.

  2. Third generation cephalosporin resistant Enterobacteriaceae and multidrug resistant gram-negative bacteria causing bacteremia in febrile neutropenia adult cancer patients in Lebanon, broad spectrum antibiotics use as a major risk factor, and correlation with poor prognosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rima eMoghnieh

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Bacteremia remains a major cause of life-threatening complications in patients receiving anticancer chemotherapy. The spectrum and susceptibility profiles of causative microorganisms differ with time and place. Data from Lebanon are scarce. We aim at evaluating the epidemiology of bacteremia in cancer patients in a university hospital in Lebanon, emphasizing antibiotic resistance and risk factors of multi-drug resistant organism (MDRO-associated bacteremia.This is a retrospective study of 75 episodes of bacteremia occurring in febrile neutropenic patients admitted to the hematology-oncology unit at Makassed General Hospital, Lebanon, from October 2009-January 2012.It corresponds to epidemiological data on bacteremia episodes in febrile neutropenic cancer patients including antimicrobial resistance and identification of risk factors associated with third generation cephalosporin resistance (3GCR and MDRO-associated bacteremia. Out of 75 bacteremias, 42.7% were gram-positive (GP, and 57.3% were gram-negative (GN. GP bacteremias were mostly due to methicillin-resistant coagulase negative staphylococci (28% of total bacteremias and 66% of GP bacteremias. Among the GN bacteremias, Escherichia coli (22.7% of total, 39.5% of GN organisms and Klebsiellapneumoniae(13.3% of total, 23.3% of GN organisms were the most important causative agents. GN bacteremia due to 3GC sensitive (3GCS bacteria represented 28% of total bacteremias, while 29% were due to 3GCR bacteria and 9% were due to carbapenem-resistant organisms. There was a significant correlation between bacteremia with MDRO and subsequent intubation, sepsis and mortality. Among potential risk factors, only broad spectrum antibiotic intake >4 days before bacteremia was found to be statistically significant for acquisition of 3GCR bacteria. Using carbapenems or piperacillin/ tazobactam>4 days before bacteremia was significantly associated with the emergence of MDRO (p value<0.05.

  3. [Innovative treatments for multidrug-resistant bacteria].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierre, Tattevin; Aurélien, Lorleac'h; Matthieu, Revest

    2014-03-01

    The spread of multidrug-resistant bacteria has accelerated sharply in the last decade. According to the World Health Organization they are responsible for an estimated 25 000 deaths in Europe each year. In addition, few new antibiotics are under development, raising the spectrum of a return to the "pre-antibiotic era". Non antibiotic antibacterial agents have recently attracted renewed interest. The most promising candidates are: i) phages (bacteria-infecting viruses) have been widely used in Eastern European countries since the 1930s but come up against logistic and regulatory obstacles due to the evolutionary nature of these biologic agents, while convincing clinical data are lacking; ii) bacteriocines are smallantibacterialpeptidesproducedby numerous bacteria; some have a rapid bactericidal effect, good tolerability, and a limited impact on the commensal flora; however, clinical use of bacteriocines is complicated by their fragility, poor penetration, and substantial risk of resistance selection ; iii) antisense oligonucleo tides act by inactivating genes through specific interaction with a complementary DNA or RNA fragment, potentially allowing specific inhibition of selected bacterial virulence factors. However, this therapeutic class may be more suitable for viral or genetic diseases than for multidrug-resistant bacterial infections, owing to the difficulty of delivering them inside bacteria.

  4. Inhibition of multidrug resistance-associated protein (MRP) activity by rifampicin in human multidrug-resistant lung tumor cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Courtois, A; Payen, L; Vernhet, L; de Vries, EGE; Guillouzo, A; Fardel, O

    1999-01-01

    The multidrug resistance-associated protein (MRP) is a drug efflux membrane pump conferring multidrug resistance on tumor cells. In order to look for compounds that can lead to reversal of such a resistance, the antituberculosis compound rifampicin, belonging to the chemical class of rifamycins, was

  5. Multidrug resistant to extensively drug resistant tuberculosis: What is ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Prakash

    reported figure, because the annual risk of tuberculosis and prevalence of acquired multi-drug resistant tuberculosis and tuberculosis with HIV is increasing in India (Narain and Lo 2004). One case of XDR- TB is recently reported from Tuberculosis Research Center, Chennai (Thomas et al. 2007). 7. XDR-TB with HIV/AIDS.

  6. Reversal of multidrug resistance by surfactants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodcock, D. M.; Linsenmeyer, M. E.; Chojnowski, G.; Kriegler, A. B.; Nink, V.; Webster, L. K.; Sawyer, W. H.

    1992-01-01

    Cremophor EL, a pharmacologically inactive solubilising agent, has been shown to reverse multidrug resistance (MDR). Using flow cytometric evaluation of equilibrium intracellular levels of daunorubicin (DNR), we found that eight other surface active agents will also reverse MDR. All the active detergents contain polyethoxylated moieties but have no similarities in their hydrophobic components. The properties of three polyethoxylated surfactants that showed the lowest toxicities, Cremophor, Tween 80 and Solutol HS15, were examined in more detail. The concentrations of Tween 80 and Solutol required to reverse DNR exclusion were 10-fold lower than for Cremophor. However while concentrations greater than or equal to 1:10(2) of the former two surfactants resulted in breakdown of cells, even 1:10 of Cremophor did not lyse cells. Studies of the effects of Cremophor on the uptake and efflux of DNR in normal and MDR cell types showed that Cremophor increases intracellular DNR primarily by locking the rapid efflux from the cells. This blockage of drug efflux may be mediated by a substantial alteration in the fluidity of cell membranes induced by Cremophor, as shown by decreased fluorescence anisotropy of a membrane probe. Consistent with these data, coinjection of adriamycin plus Cremophor into mice carrying a multidrug resistant P388 transplantable tumour significantly increased the survival time of the mice compared with adriamycin treatment alone. PMID:1637678

  7. Surveillance of multidrug resistant bacteria pathogens from female ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Highest sensitivity was observed with gatifloxacin, imipenam and piperacillin and tazobactum. Thus, according to this study, these antibiotics can be recommended against multi drug resistant bacteria pathogens. Keywords: Multidrug resistance, female infertility, bacteria pathogens. African Journal of Biotechnology Vol.

  8. Susceptibility of Selected Multi-Drug Resistant Clinical Isolates to ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2018-03-01

    . ... multi-drug resistance. INTRODUCTION. Antimicrobials are great resorts in the treatment of bacterial infectious diseases (1). However, over the past few decades, these ..... of carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae from.

  9. Third generation cephalosporin resistant Enterobacteriaceae and multidrug resistant gram-negative bacteria causing bacteremia in febrile neutropenia adult cancer patients in Lebanon, broad spectrum antibiotics use as a major risk factor, and correlation with poor prognosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moghnieh, Rima; Estaitieh, Nour; Mugharbil, Anas; Jisr, Tamima; Abdallah, Dania I; Ziade, Fouad; Sinno, Loubna; Ibrahim, Ahmad

    2015-01-01

    Bacteremia remains a major cause of life-threatening complications in patients receiving anticancer chemotherapy. The spectrum and susceptibility profiles of causative microorganisms differ with time and place. Data from Lebanon are scarce. We aim at evaluating the epidemiology of bacteremia in cancer patients in a university hospital in Lebanon, emphasizing antibiotic resistance and risk factors of multi-drug resistant organism (MDRO)-associated bacteremia. This is a retrospective study of 75 episodes of bacteremia occurring in febrile neutropenic patients admitted to the hematology-oncology unit at Makassed General Hospital, Lebanon, from October 2009-January 2012. It corresponds to epidemiological data on bacteremia episodes in febrile neutropenic cancer patients including antimicrobial resistance and identification of risk factors associated with third generation cephalosporin resistance (3GCR) and MDRO-associated bacteremia. Out of 75 bacteremias, 42.7% were gram-positive (GP), and 57.3% were gram-negative (GN). GP bacteremias were mostly due to methicillin-resistant coagulase negative staphylococci (28% of total bacteremias and 66% of GP bacteremias). Among the GN bacteremias, Escherichia coli (22.7% of total, 39.5% of GN organisms) and Klebsiella pneumoniae(13.3% of total, 23.3% of GN organisms) were the most important causative agents. GN bacteremia due to 3GC sensitive (3GCS) bacteria represented 28% of total bacteremias, while 29% were due to 3GCR bacteria and 9% were due to carbapenem-resistant organisms. There was a significant correlation between bacteremia with MDRO and subsequent intubation, sepsis and mortality. Among potential risk factors, only broad spectrum antibiotic intake >4 days before bacteremia was found to be statistically significant for acquisition of 3GCR bacteria. Using carbapenems or piperacillin/tazobactam>4 days before bacteremia was significantly associated with the emergence of MDRO (p < 0.05). Our findings have major

  10. Safety and effectiveness of home intravenous antibiotic therapy for multidrug-resistant bacterial infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mujal, A; Sola, J; Hernandez, M; Villarino, M-A; Machado, M-L; Baylina, M; Tajan, J; Oristrell, J

    2015-06-01

    Home intravenous antibiotic therapy is an alternative to hospital admission for moderately severe infections. However, few studies have analyzed its safety and effectiveness in the treatment of infections caused by multidrug-resistant bacteria. The purpose of this study is to analyze the safety and effectiveness of home intravenous antibiotic therapy in multidrug-resistant bacterial infections. We analyzed prospectively all patients admitted to our service who underwent home intravenous antibiotic therapy during the period 2008-2012. All the treatments were administered by caretakers or self-administered by patients, through elastomeric infusion devices. Effectiveness was evaluated by analyzing the readmission rate for poor infection control. Safety was evaluated by analyzing adverse events, catheter-related complications, and readmissions not related to poor infection control. There were 433 admissions (in 355 patients) for home intravenous antibiotic therapy during the study period. There were 226 (52.2 %) admissions due to multidrug-resistant bacterial infections and 207 (47.8 %) due to non-multidrug-resistant infections. Hospital readmissions in patients with multidrug-resistant infections were uncommon. Multidrug-resistant enterococcal infections, healthcare-associated infections, and carbapenem therapy were independent variables associated with increased readmissions due to poor infection control. Readmissions not related to poor infection control, adverse events, and catheter-related complications were similar in multidrug-resistant compared to non-multidrug-resistant bacterial infections. Home intravenous therapy, administered by patients or their caretakers using elastomeric infusion pumps, was safe and effective for the treatment of most multidrug-resistant bacterial infections.

  11. In Vitro antibacterial efficacy of 21 Indian timber-yielding plants against multidrug-resistant bacteria causing urinary tract infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, Monali P; Padhy, Rabindra N

    2013-12-01

    To screen methanolic leaf extracts of 21 timber-yielding plants for antibacterial activity against nine species of uropathogenic bacteria isolated from clinical samples of a hospital (Enterococcus faecalis, Staphylococcus aureus, Acinetobacter baumannii, Citrobacter freundii, Enterobacter aerogenes, Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Proteus mirabilis, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa). Bacterial strains were subjected to antibiotic sensitivity tests by the Kirby-Bauer's disc diffusion method. The antibacterial potentiality of leaf extracts was monitored by the agar-well diffusion method with multidrug-resistant (MDR) strains of nine uropathogens. Two Gram-positive isolates, E. faecalis and S. aureus, were resistant to 14 of the 18 antibiotics used. Gram-negative isolates A. baumannii, C. freundii, E. aerogenes, E. coli, K. pneumoniae, P. mirabilis, and P. aeruginosa were resistant to 10, 12, 9, 11, 11, 10, and 11 antibiotics, respectively, of the 14 antibiotics used. Methanolic leaf extracts of Anogeissus acuminata had the maximum zone of inhibition size-29 mm against S. aureus and 28 mm against E. faecalis and P. aeruginosa. Cassia tora had 29 mm as the zone of inhibition size for E. faecalis, E. aerogenes, and P. aeruginosa. Based on the minimum inhibitory concentration and minimum bactericidal concentration values, the most effective 10 plants against uropathogens could be arranged in decreasing order as follows: C. tora > A. acuminata > Schleichera oleosa > Pterocarpus santalinus > Eugenia jambolana > Bridelia retusa > Mimusops elengi > Stereospermum kunthianum > Tectona grandis > Anthocephalus cadamba. The following eight plants had moderate control capacity: Artocarpus heterophyllus, Azadirachta indica, Dalbergia latifolia, Eucalyptus citriodora, Gmelina arborea, Pongamia pinnata, Pterocarpus marsupium, and Shorea robusta. E. coli, followed by A. baumannii, C. freundii, E. aerogenes, P. mirabilis, and P. aeruginosa were controlled by

  12. Drug accumulation in the presence of the multidrug resistance pump

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ayesh, S; Litman, Thomas; Stein, W D

    1997-01-01

    We studied the interaction between the multidrug transporter, P-glycoprotein, and two compounds that interact with it: vinblastine, a classical substrate of the pump, and verapamil, a classical reverser. Steady-state levels of accumulation of these two drugs were determined in a multidrug resistant...

  13. Multidrug-Resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis of the Latin American Mediterranean Lineage, Wrongly Identified as Mycobacterium pinnipedii (Spoligotype International Type 863 [SIT863]), Causing Active Tuberculosis in South Brazil

    KAUST Repository

    Dalla Costa, Elis R.

    2015-09-23

    We recently detected the spoligotype patterns of strains of Mycobacterium pinnipedii, a species of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex, in sputum samples from nine cases with pulmonary tuberculosis residing in Porto Alegre, South Brazil. Because this species is rarely encountered in humans, we further characterized these nine isolates by additional genotyping techniques, including 24-locus mycobacterial interspersed repetitive-unit–variable-number tandem-repeat (MIRU-VNTR) typing, verification of the loci TbD1, RD9, pks15/1, RDRio, and fbpC, the insertion of IS6110 at a site specific to the M. tuberculosis Latin American Mediterranean (LAM) lineage, and whole-genome sequencing. The combined analysis of these markers revealed that the isolates are in fact M. tuberculosis and more specifically belong to the LAM genotype. Most of these isolates (n = 8) were shown to be multidrug resistant (MDR), which prompted us to perform partial sequencing of the rpoA, rpoB, rpoC, katG, and inhA genes. Seven isolates (77.8%) carried the S315T mutation in katG, and one of these (11%) also presented the C(−17)T single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) in inhA. Interestingly, six of the MDR isolates also presented an undescribed insertion of 12 nucleotides (CCA GAA CAA CCC) in codon 516 of rpoB. No putative compensatory mutation was found in either rpoA or rpoC. This is the first report of an M. tuberculosis LAM family strain with a convergent M. pinnipedii spoligotype. These spoligotypes are observed in genotype databases at a modest frequency, highlighting that care must be taken when identifying isolates in the M. tuberculosis complex on the basis of single genetic markers.

  14. Multidrug resistance in tumour cells: characterisation of the multidrug resistant cell line K562-Lucena 1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    VIVIAN M. RUMJANEK

    2001-03-01

    Full Text Available Multidrug resistance to chemotherapy is a major obstacle in the treatment of cancer patients. The best characterised mechanism responsible for multidrug resistance involves the expression of the MDR-1 gene product, P-glycoprotein. However, the resistance process is multifactorial. Studies of multidrug resistance mechanisms have relied on the analysis of cancer cell lines that have been selected and present cross-reactivity to a broad range of anticancer agents. This work characterises a multidrug resistant cell line, originally selected for resistance to the Vinca alkaloid vincristine and derived from the human erythroleukaemia cell K562. This cell line, named Lucena 1, overexpresses P-glycoprotein and have its resistance reversed by the chemosensitisers verapamil, trifluoperazine and cyclosporins A, D and G. Furthermore, we demonstrated that methylene blue was capable of partially reversing the resistance in this cell line. On the contrary, the use of 5-fluorouracil increased the resistance of Lucena 1. In addition to chemotherapics, Lucena 1 cells were resistant to ultraviolet A radiation and hydrogen peroxide and failed to mobilise intracellular calcium when thapsigargin was used. Changes in the cytoskeleton of this cell line were also observed.A resistência a múltiplos fármacos é o principal obstáculo no tratamento de pacientes com câncer. O mecanismo responsável pela resistência múltipla mais bem caracterizado envolve a expressão do produto do gene MDR-1, a glicoproteína P. Entretanto, o processo de resistência tem fatores múltiplos. Estudos de mecanismos de resistência m��ltipla a fármacos têm dependido da análise de linhagens celulares tumorais que foram selecionadas e apresentam reatividade cruzada a uma ampla faixa de agentes anti-tumorais. Este trabalho caracteriza uma linhagem celular com múltipla resistência a fármacos, selecionada originalmente pela resistência ao alcalóide de Vinca vincristina e derivado

  15. Multidrug resistant tuberculosis diagnosed by synovial fluid analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. van Zeller

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Tuberculosis remains a major public health problem worldwide. HIV co-infection is contributing to an increased incidence of the disease, particularly that caused by multidrug resistant strains of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MT. We describe an HIV-infected patient with pleural and lymph node tuberculosis diagnosed by pleural effusion characteristics and biopsy specimens, without MT identification, that further presented with knee-joint involvement. Arthrocentesis allowed MT isolation and drug susceptibility testing, resulting in a diagnosis of multidrug-resistant tuberculosis and an appropriate treatment regimen.MT identification and drug susceptibility tests are very important, especially for HIV co-infected patients. Resumo: A tuberculose constitui um importante problema de saúde pública mundial. A co-infecção pelo HIV contribui para o aumento da incidência da doença e em particular a causada por estirpes de Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MT multirresistentes. Os autores descrevem um doente HIV-positivo com tuberculose pleural e ganglionar diagnosticada pelas características bioquímicas do líquido pleural e resultados anatomo-patológicos de biopsias mas sem identificação do agente, que posteriormente apresentou envolvimento do joelho. A artrocentese do joelho permitiu o isolamento do MT e a realização de teste de sensibilidade possibilitando o diagnóstico de tuberculose multirresistente e a instituição de um esquema terapêutico adequado.A identificação do MT e a realização de testes de sensibilidade são muito importantes, especialmente em doentes com co-infecção por HIV. Keywords: Multidrug resistant tuberculosis, Drug susceptibility test, HIV, Palavras-chave: Tuberculose multirresistente, Teste de sensibilidade aos antimicrobiana, Infecção VIH

  16. The imaging feature of multidrug-resistant tuberculosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Jun; Zhou Xinhua; Li Xi; Fu Yuhong; Zheng Suhua; Lv Pingxin; Ma Daqing

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the imaging features of multidrug-resistant tuberculosis by collecting multidrug-resistant tuberculosis verified by test of drug-sensitivity, which defined as resistance to three anti-tuberculosis drugs. Methods:Fifty-one cases of multidrug-resistant tuberculosis were categorized as group of observed, and 46 cases of drug sensitive tuberculosis were categorized as control. Cultures were positive for Mycobacterium tuberculosis in all cases with no other illness such as diabetes mellitus. All patients had chest radiographs available for review, while 64 cases had tomography and 30 cases had CT during the same time. All images were analyzed by three of the radiologists, disagreement among them was discussed and a consensus was reached. Results: There was no difference in the distribution of lesions between the multidrug-resistant tuberculosis group and control group. However, the radiological findings in the multidrug-resistant tuberculosis group were significantly more common than in control group, such as multiple nodules (10 cases), disseminated foci (23 cases), cavity (9 cases), and complications (10 cases). Comparing the dynamic cases, deteriorating cases were more commonly seen in observed group than in control group, while improved cases were less in observed group than in control group. Conclusion: Multidrug-resistant tuberculosis is the most serious tuberculosis, which is characterized with significant activity, more disseminated foci, cavity, and complications. The lesion deteriorated while correct anti-tuberculosis treatment is applied. (authors)

  17. Epidemiologic analysis: Prophylaxis and multidrug-resistance in surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Solís-Téllez

    2017-04-01

    Conclusions: The prophylactic guidelines are not strictly adhered to in our environment. There was a significant association between the development of nosocomial infections from multidrug-resistant germs and admission to the intensive care unit.

  18. Carriage of multidrug-resistant bacteria among pediatric patients ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Carriage of multidrug-resistant bacteria among pediatric patients before and during their hospitalization in a tertiary pediatric unit in Tunisia. ... carbapenemase-producing Enterobacteriaceae (CPE), multiresistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa and multiresistant Acinetobacter baumannii) pose a threat to healthcare Worldwide.

  19. Visualization of multidrug resistance in vivo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hendrikse, N.H. [PET Center, University Hospital, Groningen (Netherlands)]|[Department of Internal Medicine, Division of Medical Oncology, University Hospital, Groningen (Netherlands); Franssen, E.J.F. [PET Center, University Hospital, Groningen (Netherlands)]|[Department of Nuclear Medicine, University Hospital, Groningen (Netherlands); Graaf, W.T.A. van der; Vries, E.G.E. de [Department of Internal Medicine, Division of Medical Oncology, University Hospital, Groningen (Netherlands); Vaalburg, W. [PET Center, University Hospital, Groningen (Netherlands)

    1999-03-01

    Various mechanisms are involved in multidrug resistance (MDR) for chemotherapeutic drugs, such as the drug efflux pumps, P-glycoprotein (Pgp) and multidrug resistance-associated protein (MRP). In this review the mechanisms involved in MDR are described and results are reviewed with particular attention to the in vivo imaging of Pgp and MRP. Various detection assays provide information about the presence of drug efflux pumps at the mRNA and protein levels. However, these methods do not yield information about the dynamic function of Pgp and MRP in vivo. For the study of Pgp- and MRP-mediated transport, single-photon emission tomography (SPET) and positron emission tomography (PET) are available. Technetium-99m sestamibi is a substrate for Pgp and MRP, and has been used in clinical studies for tumour imaging, and to visualize blockade of Pgp-mediated transport after modulation of the Pgp pump. Other {sup 99m}Tc radiopharmaceuticals, such as {sup 99m}Tc-tetrofosmin and several {sup 99}Tc-Q complexes, are also substrates for Pgp, but to date only results from in vitro and animal studies are available for these compounds. Several agents, including [{sup 11}C]colchicine, [{sup 11}C]verapamil and [{sup 11}C]daunorubicin, have been evaluated for the quantification of Pgp-mediated transport with PET in vivo. The results suggest that radiolabelled colchicine, verapamil and daunorubicin are feasible substrates with which to image Pgp function in tumours. Uptake of [{sup 11}C]colchicine and [{sup 11}C]verapamil is relatively high in the chest area, reducing the value of both tracers for monitoring Pgp-mediated drug transport in tumours located in this region. In addition, it has to be borne in mind that only comparison of Pgp-mediated transport of radioalabelled substrates in the absence and in the presence of Pgp blockade gives quantitative information on Pgp-mediated pharmacokinetics. Leukotrienes are specific substrates for MRP. Therefore, N-[{sup 11}C]acetyl-leukotriene E

  20. Antibiotic dosing for multidrug-resistant pathogen pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdul-Aziz, Mohd H; Lipman, Jeffrey; Roberts, Jason A

    2017-04-01

    Nosocomial pneumonia caused by multidrug-resistant pathogens is increasing in the ICU, and these infections are negatively associated with patient outcomes. Optimization of antibiotic dosing has been suggested as a key intervention to improve clinical outcomes in patients with nosocomial pneumonia. This review describes the recent pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic data relevant to antibiotic dosing for nosocomial pneumonia caused by multidrug-resistant pathogens. Optimal antibiotic treatment is challenging in critically ill patients with nosocomial pneumonia; most dosing guidelines do not consider the altered physiology and illness severity associated with severe lung infections. Antibiotic dosing can be guided by plasma drug concentrations, which do not reflect the concentrations at the site of infection. The application of aggressive dosing regimens, in accordance to the antibiotic's pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic characteristics, may be required to ensure rapid and effective drug exposure in infected lung tissues. Conventional antibiotic dosing increases the likelihood of therapeutic failure in critically ill patients with nosocomial pneumonia. Alternative dosing strategies, which exploit the pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic properties of an antibiotic, should be strongly considered to ensure optimal antibiotic exposure and better therapeutic outcomes in these patients.

  1. Induction of apoptosis and reversal of permeability glycoprotein-mediated multidrug resistance of MCF-7/ADM by ginsenoside Rh2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hui; Gong, Jian; Zhang, Huilai; Kong, Di

    2015-01-01

    Multidrug resistance is a phenomenon that cancer cells develop a cross-resistant phenotype against several unrelated drugs, and permeability glycoprotein derived from the overexpression of multidrug resistance gene 1 has been taken as the most significant cause of multidrug resistance. In the present study, ginsenoside Rh2 was used to reverse permeability glycoprotein-mediated multidrug resistance of MCF-7/ADM cell line. Effects of ginsenoside Rh2 on the apoptotic process and caspase-3 activity of MCF-7 and MCF-7/ADM cell lines were determined using flow cytometry and microplate reader. Methyl thiazolyl tetrazolium test was conducted to assess the IC50 values of ginsenoside Rh2 and adriamycin on MCF-7 and MCF-7/ADM cultures; Rhodamin 123 assay was used to assess the retention of permeability glycoprotein after ginsenoside Rh2 treatment; flow cytometry and real time polymerase chain reaction were used to determine the expression levels of permeability glycoprotein and multidrug resistance gene 1 in drug-resistant cells and their parental cells after exposure to ginsenoside Rh2. The results showed that ginsenoside Rh2, except for inducing apoptosis, had the ability to reverse multidrug resistance in MCF-7/ADM cell line without changing the expression levels of permeability glycoprotein and multidrug resistance gene 1. Our findings provided some valuable information for the application of ginsenoside Rh2 in cancer therapy, especially for multidrug resistance reversal in clinic. PMID:26191135

  2. Effectiveness of tigecycline-based versus colistin- based therapy for treatment of pneumonia caused by multidrug-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii in a critical setting: a matched cohort analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chuang, Yu-Chung; Cheng, Chien-Yu; Sheng, Wang-Huei; Sun, Hsin-Yun; Wang, Jann-Tay; Chen, Yee-Chun; Chang, Shan-Chwen

    2014-02-24

    Colistin and tigecycline have both been shown good in vitro activity among multi-drug resistant Acinetobacter baumannii (MDRAB). A comparative study of colistin versus tigecycline for MDRAB pneumonia is lacking. The study enrolled adults with MDRAB pneumonia admitted to intensive care units at a referral medical center during 2009-2010. Since there were no standardized minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) interpretation criteria of tigecycline against A. baumannii, MIC of tigecycline was not routinely tested at our hospital. During the study periods, MIC of colistin was not routinely tested also. We consider both colistin and tigecycline as definite treatments of MDRAB pneumonia. Patients who received tigecycline were selected as potential controls for those who had received colistin. We performed a propensity score analysis, by considering the criteria of age, gender, underlying diseases, and disease severity, in order to match and equalize potential prognostic factors and severity in the two groups. A total of 294 adults with MDRAB pneumonia were enrolled, including 119 who received colistin and 175 who received tigecycline. We matched 84 adults who received colistin with an equal number of controls who received tigecycline. The two well matched cohorts share similar characteristics: the propensity scores are colistin: 0.37 vs. tigecycline: 0.37, (P = .97); baseline creatinine (1.70 vs. 1.81, P = .50), and the APACHE II score (21.6 vs. 22.0, P = .99). The tigecycline group has an excess mortality of 16.7% (60.7% vs. 44%, 95% confidence interval 0.9% - 32.4%, P = .04). The excess mortality of tigecycline is significant only among those with MIC >2 μg/mL (10/12 vs. 37/84, P = .01), but not for those with MIC ≦ 2 μg/mL (4/10 vs. 37/84, P = .81). Our data disfavors the use of tigecycline-based treatment in treating MDRAB pneumonia when tigecycline and colistin susceptibilities are unknown, since choosing tigecycline-based treatment

  3. Management of multidrug resistant bacterial endemic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zahar, J-R; Lesprit, P

    2014-09-01

    The fight against multi-drug resistant Gram-negative bacilli (MDRGNB), especially extended-spectrum β-lactamase producing Enterobacteriaceae, is about to be lost in our country. The emergence of new resistance mechanisms to carbapenems in these Enterobacteriaceae exposes patients to a risk of treatment failure without any other therapeutic options. This dramatic situation is paradoxical because we are well aware of the 2 major factors responsible for this situation: 1) MDRO cross-transmission, associated with a low compliance to standard precautions, especially hand hygiene, and 2) overexposure of patients to antibiotics. The implementation of a "search and isolate" policy, which was justified to control the spread of some MDRO that remained rare in the country, was not associated with a better adherence to standard precautions. The antibiotic policy and the measures implemented to control antibiotic consumptions have rarely been enforced and have shown inconsistent results. Notably, no significant decrease of antibiotic consumption has been observed. There is no excuse for these poor results, because some authors evaluating the effectiveness of programs for the control of MDRO have reported their positive effects on antimicrobial resistance without any detrimental effects. It is now urgent to deal with the 2 major factors by establishing an educational and persuasive program with quantified and opposable objectives. Firstly, we have to improve the observance of hand hygiene above 70%. Secondly, we have to define and reach a target for the reduction of antibiotic consumption both in community and in hospital settings. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  4. Emergence of Multidrug-Resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa: Detection of Isolates harboring blaCTX gene causing infections in hospital and determination of their susceptibility to antibiotics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z Rabani

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Background & aim: Because of its ubiquitous nature, ability to survive in moist environments, and innate resistance to many antibiotics and antiseptics, P. aeruginosa is a common pathogen in hospitals. The goals of this study were detection of Psudomonas aeruginosa harboring blaCTX gene causing infections in hospitals and determination of their susceptibility to antibiotics and ESBL production. Methods: In the present cross-sectional study, clinical samples from hospitalized patients were collected and culture was done on apropriate media. Final identification was performed using biochemical tests and API 20NE system. According to the protocol CLSI 2014 disc diffusion, combination disk, modified hodge test (MHT and E-test were used for antibiotic susceptibility, ESBL production, carbapenemas production, and MIC values of imipenem respectively. The blaCTX gene was detected in the isolates by PCR molecular method. Results: In the current study, 45 isolates of Pseudomonas aeroginosa were obtained from hospitalized patients, consisting of 19 males (42.2% and 26 females (57.8%. As observed, 57.8% (26 strains of isolates were recovered from sputum. The most effective antibiotics against isolates were amikacin and colistin with 97.8% suseptibility whereas the highest resistance was to cefotaxime (97.8%. As revealed 77.8% of isolates showed response to group 2 carbapenems (imipenem, meropenem. All imipenem resistant strains had the MIC more than 32. Seventeen strains (37.7% were  showed resistant to quinolones (ciprofloxacin, norfloxacin. The results of PCR on blaCTX gene indicated that 15.5% of the isolates possess the gene. Conclusion: Carbapenem group of antibiotic in 22% of infections caused by Pseudomonas aeruginosa were ineffective and indiscriminate prescribing of these drugs will increase the ratet of resistance.

  5. Relationship Between Substance Abuse and Multidrug-Resistant Tuberculosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sadya Afroz

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available This case control study was conducted between January to June 2010 to determine the relationship between substance abuse and multidrug- resistant tuberculosis. A total of 73 cases were selected purposively, from culture- positive multidrug- resistant tuberculosis patients admitted in the National Institute of Diseases of the Chest and Hospital, Dhaka and compared with 81 un-matched controls, recruited from the cured patients of pulmonary tuberculosis who attended several DOTS centers of ‘Nagar Shastho Kendra’ under Urban Primary Health Care Project in Dhaka city. Data were collected by face to face interview and documents’ review, using a pre- tested structured questionnaire and a checklist. Multidrug- resistance was found to be associated with smoking status (χ2 = 11.76; p = 0.01 and panmasala use (χ2 = 8.28; p = 0.004. The study also revealed that alcohol consumption and other substance abuse such as jarda, sadapata, gul, snuff, heroine, cannabis, injectable drugs was not associated with the development of multidrug- resistant tuberculosis. Relationship between substance abuse and multidrug- resistant tuberculosis are more or less similar in the developing countries. Bangladesh is not out of this trend. The present study revealed the same fact, which warrants actions targeting specific factors. Further study is recommended to assess the magnitude and these factors related to the development of multidrug- resistant tuberculosis in different settings in our country. Ibrahim Med. Coll. J. 2012; 6(2: 50-54

  6. Identification of antimicrobial resistance genes in multidrug-resistant clinical Bacteroides fragilis isolates by whole genome shotgun sequencing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sydenham, Thomas Vognbjerg; Sóki, József; Hasman, Henrik

    2015-01-01

    Bacteroides fragilis constitutes the most frequent anaerobic bacterium causing bacteremia in humans. The genetic background for antimicrobial resistance in B. fragilis is diverse with some genes requiring insertion sequence (IS) elements inserted upstream for increased expression. To evaluate whole...... genome shotgun sequencing as a method for predicting antimicrobial resistance properties, one meropenem resistant and five multidrug-resistant blood culture isolates were sequenced and antimicrobial resistance genes and IS elements identified using ResFinder 2.1 (http...

  7. Multidrug-resistant Streptococcus pneumoniae isolates from healthy Ghanaian preschool children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dayie, Nicholas Tete Kwaku Dzifa; Arhin, Reuben E.; Newman, Mercy J.

    2015-01-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae is the cause of high mortality among children worldwide. Antimicrobial treatment and vaccination are used to control pneumococcal infections. In Ghana, data on antimicrobial resistance and the prevalence of multidrug-resistant pneumococcal clones are scarce; hence, the ai...

  8. Multi-drug resistant tuberculosis in the Netherlands : Personalised treatment and outcome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Altena, Richard

    2016-01-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) caused by bacilli that are resistant to the two major drugs, rifampicin and isoniazid is defined as Multi-Drug Resistant TB or MDRTB. MDRTB kills around 50% of people affected around the world. In contrast, treatment results of MDR-TB in the Netherlands (1985-2013) have

  9. How to Measure Export via Bacterial Multidrug Resistance Efflux Pumps

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica M. A. Blair

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Bacterial multidrug resistance (MDR efflux pumps are an important mechanism of antibiotic resistance and are required for many pathogens to cause infection. They are also being harnessed to improve microbial biotechnological processes, including biofuel production. Therefore, scientists of many specialties must be able to accurately measure efflux activity. However, myriad methodologies have been described and the most appropriate method is not always clear. Within the scientific literature, many methods are misused or data arising are misinterpreted. The methods for measuring efflux activity can be split into two groups, (i those that directly measure efflux and (ii those that measure the intracellular accumulation of a substrate, which is then used to infer efflux activity. Here, we review the methods for measuring efflux and explore the most recent advances in this field, including single-cell or cell-free technologies and mass spectrometry, that are being used to provide more detailed information about efflux pump activity.

  10. Multidrug and vancomycin resistance among clinical isolates of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The prevalence of multi-drug and vancomycin resistance strains of S. aureus from clinical samples was determined using disk diffusion and agar dilution methods respectively. Results: The result showed (165)82.5% of the isolates were resistant to ≥3 antibiotics tested. They were highly resistant to ceftazidime 180(90%), ...

  11. Detection of Multidrug Resistant Tuberculosis (MDR-TB) among ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A.I. Aminu, A.D. Tukur. Abstract. The Emergence of drug-resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis strains especially multidrug resistant-TB (MDR-TB) and indeed extensively drug resistant TB (XDR-TB) is considered a real threat to achieving TB control. Thus, the WHO identified the need for accelerated access to rapid testing ...

  12. High incidence of multidrug-resistant strains of methicill inresistant ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Infections of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) are becoming an increasingly concerning clinical problem. The aim of this study was to assess the development of multidrug resistant strains of MRSA from clinical samples andpossibilities for reducing resistance. This study included a total of seventy-five (75) ...

  13. Multidrug resistant Acinetobacter baumannii in veterinary medicine--emergence of an underestimated pathogen?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Stefanie; Janssen, Traute; Wieler, Lothar H

    2014-01-01

    The proportion of multidrug resistant bacteria causing infections in animals has continuously been increasing. While the relevance of ESBL (extended spectrum beta-lactamase)-producing Enterobacteriaceae spp. and MRSA (methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus) is unquestionable, knowledge about multidrug resistant Acinetobacter baumannii in veterinary medicine is scarce. This is a worrisome situation, as A. baumannii are isolated from veterinary clinical specimens with rising frequency. The remarkable ability of A. baumannii to develop multidrug resistance and the high risk of transmission are known in human medicine for years. Despite this, data regarding A. baumannii isolates of animal origin are missing. Due to the changing role of companion animals with closer contact between animal and owner, veterinary intensive care medicine is steadily developing. It can be assumed that the number of "high risk" patients with an enhanced risk for hospital acquired infections will be rising simultaneously. Thus, development and spread of multidrug resistant pathogens is envisioned to rise. It is possible, that A. baumannii will evolve into a veterinary nosocomial pathogen similar to ESBL-producing Enterobacteriaceae and MRSA. The lack of attention paid to A. baumannii in veterinary medicine is even more worrying, as first reports indicate a transmission between humans and animals. Essential questions regarding the role of livestock, especially as a potential source of multidrug resistant isolates, remain unanswered. This review summarizes the current knowledge on A. baumannii in veterinary medicine for the first time. It underlines the utmost significance of further investigations of A. baumannii animal isolates, particularly concerning epidemiology and resistance mechanisms.

  14. Carriage of multidrug resistant Enterococcus faecium and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Enterococci are indigenous flora of the gastro-intestinal tracts of animals and humans. Recently, interest in two major species, E. faecium and E. faecalis, has heightened because of their ability to cause serious infections and their intrinsic resistance to antimicrobials. This study was aimed at determining the ...

  15. Antibiotics: Pharmacokinetics, toxicity, resistance and multidrug efflux pumps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yılmaz, Çiğdem; Özcengiz, Gülay

    2017-06-01

    The discovery of penicillin followed by streptomycin, tetracycline, cephalosporins and other natural, semi-synthetic and synthetic antimicrobials completely revolutionized medicine by reducing human morbidity and mortality from most of the common infections. However, shortly after they were introduced to clinical practice, the development of resistance was emerged. The decreasing interest from antibiotic industry in spite of rapid global emergence of antibiotic resistance is a tough dilemma from the pointview of public health. The efficiency of antimicrobial treatment is determined by both pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics. In spite of their selective toxicity, antibiotics still cause severe, life-threatening adverse reactions in host body mostly due to defective drug metabolism or excessive dosing regimen. The present article aims at updating current knowledge on pharmacokinetics/pharmacodynamics concepts and models, toxicity of antibiotics as well as antibiotic resistance mechanisms, resistome analyses and search for novel antibiotic resistance determinants with special emphasis given to the-state-of-the-art regarding multidrug efflux pumps and their additional physiological functions in stress adaptation and virulence of bacteria. All these issues are highly linked to each other and not only important for most efficient and prolonged use of current antibiotics, but also for discovery and development of new antibiotics and novel inhibitors of antibiotic resistance determinants of pathogens. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Multidrug Resistant and Extensively Drug Resistant Bacteria: A Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silpi Basak

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objective. Antimicrobial resistance is now a major challenge to clinicians for treating patients. Hence, this short term study was undertaken to detect the incidence of multidrug-resistant (MDR, extensively drug-resistant (XDR, and pandrug-resistant (PDR bacterial isolates in a tertiary care hospital. Material and Methods. The clinical samples were cultured and bacterial strains were identified in the department of microbiology. The antibiotic susceptibility profile of different bacterial isolates was studied to detect MDR, XDR, and PDR bacteria. Results. The antibiotic susceptibility profile of 1060 bacterial strains was studied. 393 (37.1% bacterial strains were MDR, 146 (13.8% strains were XDR, and no PDR was isolated. All (100% Gram negative bacterial strains were sensitive to colistin whereas all (100% Gram positive bacterial strains were sensitive to vancomycin. Conclusion. Close monitoring of MDR, XDR, or even PDR must be done by all clinical microbiology laboratories to implement effective measures to reduce the menace of antimicrobial resistance.

  17. Interplay Between Antibiotic Resistance and Virulence During Disease Promoted by Multidrug-Resistant Bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geisinger, Edward; Isberg, Ralph R

    2017-02-15

    Diseases caused by antibiotic-resistant bacteria in hospitals are the outcome of complex relationships between several dynamic factors, including bacterial pathogenicity, the fitness costs of resistance in the human host, and selective forces resulting from interventions such as antibiotic therapy. The emergence and fate of mutations that drive antibiotic resistance are governed by these interactions. In this review, we will examine how different forms of antibiotic resistance modulate bacterial fitness and virulence potential, thus influencing the ability of pathogens to evolve in the context of nosocomial infections. We will focus on 3 important multidrug-resistant pathogens that are notoriously problematic in hospitals: Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Acinetobacter baumannii, and Staphylococcus aureus. An understanding of how antibiotic resistance mutations shape the pathobiology of multidrug-resistant infections has the potential to drive novel strategies that can control the development and spread of drug resistance. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press for the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  18. Molecular Analysis of Multi-Drug Resistance (MDR) in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The recent emergence of multi-drug resistant (MDR) strains of Mycobacterium tuberculosis has become an area of great concern. This occurs as a result of inadequate treatment management of tuberculosis which provides a selective pressure that favours the emergence of resistant mutants with enhanced infectiousness.

  19. Risk factors for multidrug resistant tuberculosis patients in Amhara ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Multidrug resistant tuberculosis(MDR-TB) is becoming a major threat to tuberculosis control programs in Ethiopia. Objectives: To determine risk factors of MDR-TB patients in Amhara National Regional State, Ethiopia. Methods: Case-control study was conducted from May 2013 to January 2014. Resistance to ...

  20. Multi-drug resistant tuberculosis in Tanzania: Initial description of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Drug resistant Tuberculosis is well documented worldwide and is associated with increasing morbidity and mortality complicating Tuberculosis control with increasing costs of managing the disease. Broad. Objective: To describe clinical and laboratory characteristics of multi-drug resistant Tuberculosis ...

  1. Multidrug-resistant hepatocellular carcinoma cells are enriched for ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Chemotherapy is a main treatment for cancer, while multidrug-resistance is the main reason for chemotherapy failure, and tumor relapse and metastasis. Cancer stem cells or cancer stem-like cells (CSCs) are a small subset of cancer cells, which may be inherently resistant to the cytotoxic effect of chemotherapy.

  2. Multidrug-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus in US Meat and Poultry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waters, Andrew E; Contente-Cuomo, Tania; Buchhagen, Jordan; Liu, Cindy M; Watson, Lindsey; Pearce, Kimberly; Foster, Jeffrey T; Bowers, Jolene; Driebe, Elizabeth M; Engelthaler, David M; Keim, Paul S; Price, Lance B

    2011-05-01

    We characterized the prevalence, antibiotic susceptibility profiles, and genotypes of Staphylococcus aureus among US meat and poultry samples (n = 136). S. aureus contaminated 47% of samples, and multidrug resistance was common among isolates (52%). S. aureus genotypes and resistance profiles differed significantly among sample types, suggesting food animal-specific contamination.

  3. Effect of biocides on biofilms of some multidrug resistant clinical ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The ability of Escherichia coli and Klebsiella aerogenes to form biofilms was most affected. There was little inhibition of biofilm formation by the biocides on Staphylococcus aureus. This study has shown a relationship between biocide and multidrug resistance. Keywords: Biocides, Multi drug resistance, sodium hypochlorite, ...

  4. Modulation of Multidrug Resistance Gene Expression by Coumarin Derivatives in Human Leukemic Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubrak, Tomasz; Bogucki, Jacek; Galkowski, Dariusz; Kaczmarczyk, Robert; Feldo, Marcin; Cioch, Maria; Kocki, Janusz

    2017-01-01

    The presence of multidrug resistance (MDR) in tumor cells is considered as the major cause of failure of cancer chemotherapy. The mechanism responsible for the phenomenon of multidrug resistance is explained, among others, as overexpression of membrane transporters primarily from the ABC family which actively remove cytostatics from the tumor cell. The effect of 20 coumarin derivatives on the cytotoxicity and expression of MDR1, MRP1, BCRP, and LRP genes (encoding proteins responsible for multidrug resistance) in cancer cells was analyzed in the study. The aim of this research included determination of IC10 and IC50 values of selected coumarin derivatives in the presence and absence of mitoxantrone in leukemia cells and analysis of changes in the expression of genes involved in multidrug resistance: MDR1, MRP, LRP, and BCRP after 24-hour exposure of the investigated cell lines to selected coumarins in the presence and absence of mitoxantrone in IC10 and IC50 concentrations. The designed research was conducted on 5 cell lines derived from the human hematopoietic system: CCRF/CEM, CEM/C1, HL-60, HL-60/MX1, and HL-60/MX2. Cell lines CEM/C1, HL-60/MX1, and HL-60/MX2 exhibit a multidrug resistance phenotype. PMID:29387293

  5. Nanodrugs: optimism for emerging trend of multidrug resistance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khan AU

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Asad U KhanMedical Microbiology and Molecular Biology Laboratory, Interdisciplinary Biotechnology Unit, Aligarh Muslim University, Aligarh, IndiaThis is with reference to an article published recently in your journal regarding the antibiotic activity of chitosan-coated silver nanoparticles.1 This is an inspiring move towards control of infection caused by multidrug-resistant bacteria which has become a serious problem for clinicians and physicians worldwide.2 At the moment, carbapenems are being used as the drugs of choice to combat infections. However, the emergence of carbapenem resistance has changed current remedial approaches in the management of serious infections. One of the latest enzymes, NDM-1 (New Delhi metallo-β-lactamase-1, first identified in a Swedish patient of Indian origin in 2008,3 has been key in the development of resistance to almost all antibiotics. Infection caused by NDM-1 producers is widespread on the Indian subcontinent,4 and is now emerging in the US and other countries throughout the world.5View original paper by Jena and colleagues.

  6. Imaging multidrug resistance with 4-[18F]fluoropaclitaxel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kurdziel, Karen A.; Kalen, Joseph D.; Hirsch, Jerry I.; Wilson, John D.; Agarwal, Rakesh; Barrett, Daniel; Bear, Harry D.; McCumiskey, James F.

    2007-01-01

    Multidrug resistance (MDR) is a cause of treatment failure in many cancer patients. MDR refers to a phenotype whereby a tumor is resistant to a large number of natural chemotherapeutic drugs. Having prior knowledge of the presence of such resistance would decrease morbidity from unsuccessful therapy and allow for the selection of individuals who may benefit from the coadministration of MDR-inhibiting drugs. The Tc-99m-labeled single-photon-emitting radiotracers sestamibi and tetrofosmin have shown some predictive value. However, positron-emitting radiotracers, which allow for dynamic quantitative imaging, hold promise for a more accurate and specific identification of MDRtumors.MDR-expressing tumors are resistant to paclitaxel, which is commonly used as a chemotherapeutic agent. 4-[ 18 F]Fluoropaclitaxel (FPAC) is a PET-radiolabeled analogue of paclitaxel. Preclinical studies have shown the uptake of FPAC to be inversely proportional to tumor MDR expression. FPAC PET imaging in normal volunteers shows biodistribution to be similar to that in nonhuman primates. Imaging in a breast cancer patient showed FPAC localization in a primary tumor that responded to chemotherapy, while failure to localize in mediastinal disease corresponded with only partial response.FPAC PET imaging shows promise for the noninvasive pretreatment identification of MDR-expressing tumors. While much additional work is needed, this work represents a step toward image-guided personalized medicine

  7. Prevalence of multidrug resistant pathogens in children with urinary tract infection: a retrospective analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Srinivasan S, Madhusudhan NS

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Urinary tract infection (UTI is one of the commonest medical problems in children. It can distress the child and may cause kidney damage. Prompt diagnosis and effective treatment can prevent complications in the child. But treatment of UTI in children has now become a challenge due to the emergence of multidrug resistant bacteria. Aims & Objectives: To know the bacteriological profile and susceptibility pattern of urinary tract infections in children and to know the prevalence of multidrug resistant uropathogens. Materials & Methods: A retrospective analysis was done on all paediatric urine samples for a period of one year. A total of 1581 samples were included in the study. Antimicrobial susceptibility testing was done on samples showing significant growth by Kirby-Bauer disc diffusion method. Statistical analysis: Prevalence and pattern were analyzed using proportions and percentages. Results: E.coli was the most predominant organism (56% causing UTI in children followed by Klebsiella sp (17%. Fifty three percent of gram negative organisms isolated from children were found to be multidrug resistant. Majority of E. coli isolates were found to be highly resistant to Ampicillin (91% and Cotrimoxazole (82% and highly sensitive to Imipenem (99% and Amikacin (93%. Conclusion: Paediatric UTI was common in children less than 5 years of age. Gram negative bacteria (E. coli and Klebsiella sp were more common than gram positive bacteria. Our study revealed that multidrug resistance was higher in E.coli.

  8. Bacterial Multidrug Efflux Pumps: Much More Than Antibiotic Resistance Determinants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanco, Paula; Hernando-Amado, Sara; Reales-Calderon, Jose Antonio; Corona, Fernando; Lira, Felipe; Alcalde-Rico, Manuel; Bernardini, Alejandra; Sanchez, Maria Blanca; Martinez, Jose Luis

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial multidrug efflux pumps are antibiotic resistance determinants present in all microorganisms. With few exceptions, they are chromosomally encoded and present a conserved organization both at the genetic and at the protein levels. In addition, most, if not all, strains of a given bacterial species present the same chromosomally-encoded efflux pumps. Altogether this indicates that multidrug efflux pumps are ancient elements encoded in bacterial genomes long before the recent use of antibiotics for human and animal therapy. In this regard, it is worth mentioning that efflux pumps can extrude a wide range of substrates that include, besides antibiotics, heavy metals, organic pollutants, plant-produced compounds, quorum sensing signals or bacterial metabolites, among others. In the current review, we present information on the different functions that multidrug efflux pumps may have for the bacterial behaviour in different habitats as well as on their regulation by specific signals. Since, in addition to their function in non-clinical ecosystems, multidrug efflux pumps contribute to intrinsic, acquired, and phenotypic resistance of bacterial pathogens, the review also presents information on the search for inhibitors of multidrug efflux pumps, which are currently under development, in the aim of increasing the susceptibility of bacterial pathogens to antibiotics. PMID:27681908

  9. Bacterial Multidrug Efflux Pumps: Much More Than Antibiotic Resistance Determinants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanco, Paula; Hernando-Amado, Sara; Reales-Calderon, Jose Antonio; Corona, Fernando; Lira, Felipe; Alcalde-Rico, Manuel; Bernardini, Alejandra; Sanchez, Maria Blanca; Martinez, Jose Luis

    2016-02-16

    Bacterial multidrug efflux pumps are antibiotic resistance determinants present in all microorganisms. With few exceptions, they are chromosomally encoded and present a conserved organization both at the genetic and at the protein levels. In addition, most, if not all, strains of a given bacterial species present the same chromosomally-encoded efflux pumps. Altogether this indicates that multidrug efflux pumps are ancient elements encoded in bacterial genomes long before the recent use of antibiotics for human and animal therapy. In this regard, it is worth mentioning that efflux pumps can extrude a wide range of substrates that include, besides antibiotics, heavy metals, organic pollutants, plant-produced compounds, quorum sensing signals or bacterial metabolites, among others. In the current review, we present information on the different functions that multidrug efflux pumps may have for the bacterial behaviour in different habitats as well as on their regulation by specific signals. Since, in addition to their function in non-clinical ecosystems, multidrug efflux pumps contribute to intrinsic, acquired, and phenotypic resistance of bacterial pathogens, the review also presents information on the search for inhibitors of multidrug efflux pumps, which are currently under development, in the aim of increasing the susceptibility of bacterial pathogens to antibiotics.

  10. Clarithromycin increases linezolid exposure in multidrug-resistant tuberculosis patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bolhuis, Mathieu S.; van Altena, Richard; van Soolingen, Dick; de Lange, Wiel C. M.; Uges, Donald R. A.; van der Werf, Tjip S.; Kosterink, Jos G. W.; Alffenaar, Jan-Willem C.

    2013-01-01

    The use of linezolid for the treatment of multidrug-resistant tuberculosis is limited by dose-and time-dependent toxicity. Recently, we reported a case of pharmacokinetic drug drug interaction between linezolid and clarithromycin that resulted in increased linezolid exposure. The aim of this

  11. Multidrug-resistant tuberculosis and migration to Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hargreaves, S.; Lönnroth, K.; Nellums, L. B.

    2017-01-01

    Multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB) in low-incidence countries in Europe is more prevalent among migrants than the native population. The impact of the recent increase in migration to EU and EEA countries with a low incidence of TB (

  12. Risk factors associated with multidrug resistant tuberculosis among ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Multidrug resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB) remains is an important public health problem in developing world. We conducted this study to determine risk factors associated with MDR-TB and drug susceptibility pattern to second line drug among MDR TB patients in Tanzania. Methods: Unmatched case control ...

  13. Exploring the iron metabolism in multidrug resistant tuberculosis ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The iron metabolism plays a key role in the progression of active Tuberculosis. Several studies have shown a link between iron metabolism disorders an active tuberculosis. The aim of this study was to explore the iron metabolism of 100 patients with multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB) treated with second generation ...

  14. Exploring the iron metabolism in multidrug resistant tuberculosis ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The iron metabolism plays a key role in the progression of active Tuberculosis. Several studies have shown a link between iron metabolism disorders an active tuberculosis. The aim of this study was to explore the iron metabolism of 100 patients with multidrug-resistant tuberculosis. (MDR-TB) treated with second ...

  15. Multidrug-Resistant Tuberculosis and Culture Conversion with Bedaquiline

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Diacon, Andreas H.; Pym, Alexander; Grobusch, Martin P.; de Los Rios, Jorge M.; Gotuzzo, Eduardo; Vasilyeva, Irina; Leimane, Vaira; Andries, Koen; Bakare, Nyasha; de Marez, Tine; Haxaire-Theeuwes, Myriam; Lounis, Nacer; Meyvisch, Paul; de Paepe, Els; van Heeswijk, Rolf P. G.; Dannemann, Brian; Rolla, Valeria; Dalcomo, Margreth; Gripp, Karla; Escada, Rodrigo; Tavares, Isabel; Borga, Liamar; Thomas, Aleyamma; Rekha, Banu; Nair, Dina; Chandrasekar, Chockalingam; Parthasarathy, Ramavaran Thiruvengadaraj; Sekhar, Gomathi; Ganesh, Krishnamoorthy; Rajagopalan, Krishnakumar; Rajapandian, Gangadevi; Dorairajalu, Rajendran; Sharma, Surendra Kumar; Banavaliker, Jayant; Kadhiravan, Tamilarasu; Gulati, Vinay; Mahmud, Hanif; Gupta, Arvind; Bhatnagar, Anuj; Jain, Vipin; Hari, Smriti; Gupta, Yogesh Kumar; Vaid, Ashok; Cirule, Andra; Dravniece, Gunta; Skripconoka, Vija; Kuksa, Liga; Kreigere, Edite; Ramos, Carlos Rafael Seas; Amat y Leon, Ivan Arapovic; Huaman, Jorge Antonio Centeno; Carbajal, Roy German Duenas; Sasaki, Christian Andres Yoshiyama; Yllanes, Maria Angelica Garcia; Izzara, Mario Vilcahauman; Campos, Porfirio Fortunato Changa; Oviedo, Luis Enrique Bustinza; Zavala, Leslie Levano; Esquen, Cinthia Salome Hurtado; Fuertes, Carlos Eduardo Zamudio; Carrefio, Gabriela Carriquiry; Castañeda, Isaias Manuel Rolando; Ayala, Jesus Renato; Chavez, Eduardo Romulo Ticona; Onofre, Wilfredo Vargas; Paucar, Juan Genaro Sosa; Herrera, Elias Rodrigo Aliaga; Medina, Jamie Ismael Soria; Barraza, José Carlos Masciotti; Mateo, Domingo Elias Gómez-Sanchez; Reyna, Ruben Marino Azañero; Senmache, Jorge de los Rios; Vasquez, Christian Juan Galvez; Vargas, Zully Haydee Ruiz; Galvan, Blanca Luz Parra; Aparcana, Karin Marlene Reyes; Diaz, Dina Vera; Gonong, Joven Roque; Raymond, Lawrence; Llacer, Roxas Lee; Alvarez-Tiu, Aileen; Erokhin, Vladislav; Demikhova, Olga; Bagdasarian, Tatevik; Gorlova, Svetlana; Tikhonov, Alexey; Diacon, Andreas; Hanekom, Madeleine; Noveljic, Zoja; Patientia, Ramonde; Siwendu, Sweetness; Rustomjee, Roxana; Reddy, Carl; Osburn, Lancelot Garth; Ramjee, Aruna; Ntshanga, Sbongile Pumzile; Gabela, Lerato; Chirkut, Shivani; Fortuin-de Smidt, Melony C.; Narasimooloo, Ronelle; Quantrill, John Richard Yarr; Master, Iqbal Haroon; Gumede, Thulani Bethwell; Chotoo, Sunitha; Conradie, Francesca; Mahanyele, N. Russel; Dziewiecki, Alicja; Menezes, Collin N.; Sanne, Ian Mathias; John, Melanie-Anne; Kayumba, Jean Michel; Page-Shipp, Liesl; Kruger, Dawid; Schroeder, Irene; Leeuwner, Louwrens L.; O'Reilly, Cathryn Louise; Joubert, Myrtle; Coetzee, Corlia; Krause, Stephanie Rene; McPherson, Reinard; Muller, Louise; Chuchottaworn, Charoen; Sangsayunh, Piamplarp; Bangpattanasiri, Kittima; Wiwatworapan, Tawatchai; Anantasetagoon, Tanakorn

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND Bedaquiline (Sirturo, TMC207), a diarylquinoline that inhibits mycobacterial ATP synthase, has been associated with accelerated sputum-culture conversion in patients with multidrug-resistant tuberculosis, when added to a preferred background regimen for 8 weeks. METHODS In this phase 2b

  16. Susceptibility of Selected Multi-Drug Resistant Clinical Isolates to ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2018-03-01

    Mar 1, 2018 ... pharmacological potentials that could show efficiency in the treatment of bacterial infections. Keywords: Carpolobia lutea, antifungal, antibacterial, multi-drug ..... Antimicrobial Resistance 2016;7: 41-144. 21. Yoon Y, Kim J, Sohn J, Yang K, Kim M. Role of piperacillin/tazobactam as a carbapenem-sparing.

  17. Multi-Drug Resistance 1 Genetic Polymorphisms Gene Expression ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Although anthracycline-based chemotherapy is a crucial treatment for breast cancer, its outcome is limited by the multidrug resistance MDR. Overexpression of P-glycoprotein (Pgp), a transmembrane active efflux transporter of various drugs and carcinogenic substrate, may result in MDR. The impact of MDR1 ...

  18. Bedaquiline in the multidrug-resistant tuberculosis treatment: Belarus experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alena Skrahina

    2016-01-01

    Conclusion: Our interim results on safety and effectiveness of bedaquiline-containing regimens in multidrug and extensively drug-resistant tuberculosis (M/XDR-TB patients are encouraging. They will add value to understanding role and place of this new anti-TB drug in M/XDR-TB treatment.

  19. Antimicrobial activity of peptidomimetics against multidrug-resistant Escherichia coli

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jahnsen, Rasmus D; Frimodt-Møller, Niels; Franzyk, Henrik

    2012-01-01

    -lactamase-producing Escherichia coli was assessed by testing an array comprising different types of cationic peptidomimetics obtained by a general monomer-based solid-phase synthesis protocol. Most of the peptidomimetics possessed high to moderate activity toward multidrug-resistant E. coli as opposed to the corresponding...

  20. The screening of multi-drug resistance (MDR) susceptibilities of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The screening of multi-drug resistance (MDR) susceptibilities of Staphylococcus aureus and Staphylococcus epidermidis to methicillin and vancomycin in teaching hospitals in Nigeria. ... The antibiotics susceptibility patterns were determined both by overnight broth-micro-dilution and agar disk diffusion methods. Results: ...

  1. Carriage of multidrug-resistant bacteria among pediatric patients ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Miniar Tfifha

    2017-12-25

    Dec 25, 2017 ... To cite this article: Miniar Tfifha, Asma Ferjani, Manel Mallouli, Nesrine Mlika, Saoussen Abroug &. Jalel Boukadida (2018) Carriage of multidrug-resistant bacteria among pediatric patients before and during their hospitalization in a tertiary pediatric unit in Tunisia, Libyan Journal of Medicine, 13:1,. 1419047 ...

  2. Adverse effects profile of multidrug-resistant tuberculosis treatment ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In this study population, 72.6% of patients were HIV positive, and 85% were concomitantly on HAART and multidrug-resistant tuberculosis treatment. Adverse events were significantly more common in patients who were HIV positive than in patients who were HIV negative with regard to peripheral neuropathy (p-value ...

  3. Overcoming cellular multidrug resistance using classical nanomedicine formulations

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kunjachan, S.; Blauz, A.; Möckel, D.; Theek, B.; Kiessling, F.; Etrych, Tomáš; Ulbrich, K.; van Bloois, L.; Storm, G.; Bartosz, G.; Rychlik, B.; Lammers, T.

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 45, č. 4 (2012), s. 421-428 ISSN 0928-0987 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA400500806 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40500505 Keywords : cancer * nanomedicine * multidrug resistance Subject RIV: CD - Macromolecular Chemistry Impact factor: 2.987, year: 2012

  4. Molecular characterization of multidrug-resistant Klebsiella pneumoniae isolates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiang-hua Hou

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Klebsiella pneumoniae is an important cause of healthcare-associated infections worldwide. Selective pressure, the extensive use of antibiotics, and the conjugational transmission of antibiotic resistance genes across bacterial species and genera facilitate the emergence of multidrug-resistant (MDR K. pneumoniae. Here, we examined the occurrence, phenotypes and genetic features of MDR K. pneumoniae isolated from patients in intensive care units (ICUs at the First Affiliated Hospital of Xiamen University in Xiamen, China, from January to December 2011. Thirty-eight MDR K. pneumoniae strains were collected. These MDR K. pneumoniae isolates possessed at least seven antibiotic resistance determinants, which contribute to the high-level resistance of these bacteria to aminoglycosides, macrolides, quinolones and β-lactams. Among these isolates, 24 strains were extended-spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL producers, 2 strains were AmpC producers, and 12 strains were both ESBL and AmpC producers. The 38 MDR isolates also contained class I (28/38 and class II integrons (10/38. All 28 class I-positive isolates contained aacC1, aacC4, orfX, orfX’ and aadA1 genes. β-lactam resistance was conferred through blaSHV (22/38, blaTEM (10/38, and blaCTX-M (7/38. The highly conserved blaKPC-2 (37/38 and blaOXA-23(1/38 alleles were responsible for carbapenem resistance, and a gyrAsite mutation (27/38 and the plasmid-mediated qnrB gene (13/38 were responsible for quinolone resistance. Repetitive-sequence-based PCR (REP-PCR fingerprinting of these MDR strains revealed the presence of five groups and sixteen patterns. The MDR strains from unrelated groups showed different drug resistance patterns; however, some homologous strains also showed different drug resistance profiles. Therefore, REP-PCR-based analyses can provide information to evaluate the epidemic status of nosocomial infection caused by MDR K. pneumoniae; however, this test lacks the power to discriminate some

  5. Overcoming Multidrug Resistance in Cancer Stem Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karobi Moitra

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The principle mechanism of protection of stem cells is through the expression of ATP-binding cassette (ABC transporters. These transporters serve as the guardians of the stem cell population in the body. Unfortunately these very same ABC efflux pumps afford protection to cancer stem cells in tumors, shielding them from the adverse effects of chemotherapy. A number of strategies to circumvent the function of these transporters in cancer stem cells are currently under investigation. These strategies include the development of competitive and allosteric modulators, nanoparticle mediated delivery of inhibitors, targeted transcriptional regulation of ABC transporters, miRNA mediated inhibition, and targeting of signaling pathways that modulate ABC transporters. The role of ABC transporters in cancer stem cells will be explored in this paper and strategies aimed at overcoming drug resistance caused by these particular transporters will also be discussed.

  6. Risk Factors for Multidrug-resistant Tuberculosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cleopas Martin Rumende

    2018-04-01

    Diabetes mellitus has been a well-known risk factor for TB in the past. The global convergence of the accelerating type 2 DM pandemic, high TB prevalence and drug-resistant TB during the past couple of decades has become a serious challenge to clinicians worldwide. Over the past few years, some studies have shown that the treatment failure rate is higher in TB patients with DM as comorbidity. Moreover, there is significant association between DM an MDR-TB. There is higher chance of TB bacilli persistence to be present in sputum of pulmonary TB patient with DM than TB-only patient after 5 months treatment, and this persistence made it necessary for more longer treatment. Presence of DM in TB patients cause a longer period for sputum conversion, therefore it may become a major cause of poor treatment outcome in TB patients. Previous studies showed that a major mechanism for the emergence of drugs resistance in TB bacilli is random mutation in the bacterial genome and the pressure of selection by anti-TB drugs. Pulmonary TB in diabetic patients usually show higher mycobacterial loads at the initiation of treatment, hence they may have higher chance of bacillary mutation and the emergence of MDR-TB with the presenting of higher bacterial loads, longer treatment is needed to clear the bacteria. Therefore, it is not suprising that a higher chance of MDR-TB patients could be find in those patients. A pharmacokinetic study noted that plasma levels of rifampicin were 53% lower in TB patients with diabetes, which might affect treatment outcomes. Inadequate immune respons of the host may also be important in this negative effect of diabetes. Depressed production of IFN-γ in diabetic patients is related to decreasing immune response to TB infection. Reduction of IL-12 response to mycobacterial stimulation in leukocytes from TB with diabetic patients suggest a compromise of innate immune response.

  7. Multidrug resistance in cancer: its mechanism and its modulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pauwels, Ernest K J; Erba, Paula; Mariani, Giuliano; Gomes, Célia M F

    2007-01-01

    One of the major problems related with the curative treatment of cancer patients is resistance against anticancer drugs. This resistance, which may occur from the beginning or is evident only later as an acquired phenomenon, is due to the action of drug transporters. These transmembrane proteins belong to the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters which reduce bioavailability of drugs, but also determine the elimination of xenobiotics into bile, urine and feces. The present review summarizes recent knowledge in this area, highlighting the mechanism of action of these transporters, its clinical significance and its possible modulation. Novel approaches to overcome multidrug resistance include agents which inhibit or circumvent this efflux mechanism. For the latter category developments in nanomedicine may be of consequence. However, in spite of considerable progress in research regarding multidrug resistance, the phase of efficacious clinical use of this knowledge has not been reached yet. (c) 2007 Prous Science. All rights reserved.

  8. Spread of Multidrug-resistant microrganisms: a global threat and critical healthcare problem

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulo P. Gontijo Filho

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Multidrug-resistant organisms are usually associated with greater number of clinical manifestations and severe infections than those caused by susceptible pathogens. The high prevalence of antimicrobial resistance is a global concern, mainly in Latin America, where resistance levels are higher for important pathogens such as Gram-negative non-fermentative bacteria and Enterobacteriacae family, compared with those seen in US hospitals and Europe. The use of antimicrobial agents for the treatment of these infections is advantageous for the multidrug-resistant pathogens and contributes to the maintenance of the genetic determinants of resistance. Countries like Brazil, characterized by the allocation of limited financial resources for the health department, have in the infection prevention and control practices an economical necessity, because of the increased costs that nosocomial infection demand in addition to the reduction of rates morbidity and mortality.

  9. [Antimicrobial therapy in severe infections with multidrug-resistant Gram-negative bacterias].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duszyńska, Wiesława

    2010-01-01

    Multidrug-resistant Gram-negative bacteria pose a serious and rapidly emerging threat to patients in healthcare settings, and are especially prevalent and problematic in intensive therapy units. Recently, the emergence of pandrug-resistance in Gram-negative bacteria poses additional concerns. This review examines the clinical impact and epidemiology of multidrug-resistant Gram-negative bacteria as a cause of increased morbidity and mortality among ITU patients. Beta-lactamases, cephalosporinases and carbapenemases play the most important role in resistance to antibiotics. Despite the tendency to increased resistance, carbapenems administered by continuous infusion remain the most effective drugs in severe sepsis. Drug concentration monitoring, albeit rarely used in practice, is necessary to ensure an effective therapeutic effect.

  10. Heteroresistance to Colistin in Multidrug-Resistant Acinetobacter baumannii

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Jian; Rayner, Craig R.; Nation, Roger L.; Owen, Roxanne J.; Spelman, Denis; Tan, Kar Eng; Liolios, Lisa

    2006-01-01

    Multidrug-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii has emerged as a significant clinical problem worldwide and colistin is being used increasingly as “salvage” therapy. MICs of colistin against A. baumannii indicate its significant activity. However, resistance to colistin in A. baumannii has been reported recently. Clonotypes of 16 clinical A. baumannii isolates and ATCC 19606 were determined by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE), and colistin MICs were measured. The time-kill kinetics of coli...

  11. Multidrug resistant bacteria in companion animals: impact on animal health and zoonotic aspects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Damborg, Peter Panduro

    The role of companion animals as a source of antibiotic resistant bacteria has historically been given little emphasis when compared with that of food animals. However, various resistant bacteria may cause serious treatment problems in companion animal medicine. Some of the most important multidrug-resistant...... bacteria include methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus pseudintermedius (MRSP), methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and extended-spectrum beta-lactamase (ESBL)-producing Enterobacteriaceae. These bacteria will be described with focus on their prevalence across Europe, their impact on animal...

  12. Multidrug-resistant Neisseria gonorrhoeae infection with ceftriaxone resistance and intermediate resistance to azithromycin, Denmark, 2017

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Terkelsen, David; Tolstrup, Jacob; Johnsen, Camilla Hundahl

    2017-01-01

    We describe a multidrug-resistant Neisseria gonorrhoeae infection with ceftriaxone resistance and azithromycin intermediate resistance in a heterosexual man in Denmark, 2017. Whole genome sequencing of the strain GK124 identified MSLT ST1903, NG-MAST ST1614 and all relevant resistance determinants...... including similar penA resistance mutations previously described in ceftriaxone-resistant gonococcal strains. Although treatment with ceftriaxone 0.5 g plus azithromycin 2 g was successful, increased awareness of spread of gonococcal strains threatening the recommended dual therapy is crucial....

  13. Multidrug resistant bacteria isolated from septic arthritis in horses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodrigo G. Motta

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT: Septic arthritis is a debilitating joint infectious disease of equines that requires early diagnosis and immediate therapeutic intervention to prevent degenerative effects on the articular cartilage, as well as loss of athletic ability and work performance of the animals. Few studies have investigated the etiological complexity of this disease, as well as multidrug resistance of isolates. In this study, 60 horses with arthritis had synovial fluid samples aseptically collected, and tested by microbiological culture and in vitro susceptibility test (disk diffusion using nine antimicrobials belonging to six different pharmacological groups. Bacteria were isolated in 45 (75.0% samples, as follows: Streptococcus equi subsp. equi (11=18.3%, Escherichia coli (9=15.0%, Staphylococcus aureus (6=10.0%, Streptococcus equi subsp. zooepidemicus (5=8.3%, Staphylococcus intermedius (2=3.3%, Proteus vulgaris (2=3.3%, Trueperella pyogenes (2=3.3%, Pseudomonas aeruginosa (2=3.3%, Klebsiella pneumoniae (1=1.7%, Rhodococcus equi (1=1.7%, Staphylococcus epidermidis (1=1.7%, Klebsiella oxytoca (1=1.7%, Nocardia asteroides (1=1.7%, and Enterobacter cloacae (1=1.7%. Ceftiofur was the most effective drug (>70% efficacy against the pathogens in the disk diffusion test. In contrast, high resistance rate (>70% resistance was observed to penicillin (42.2%, enrofloxacin (33.3%, and amikacin (31.2%. Eleven (24.4% isolates were resistant to three or more different pharmacological groups and were considered multidrug resistant strains. The present study emphasizes the etiological complexity of equine septic arthritis, and highlights the need to institute treatment based on the in vitro susceptibility pattern, due to the multidrug resistance of isolates. According to the available literature, this is the first report in Brazil on the investigation of the etiology. of the septic arthritis in a great number of horses associated with multidrug resistance of the isolates.

  14. Diversity of Multi-Drug Resistant Avian Pathogenic Escherichia coli (APEC) Causing Outbreaks of Colibacillosis in Broilers during 2012 in Spain

    OpenAIRE

    Sol?-Gin?s, Marc; Cameron-Veas, Karla; Badiola, Ignacio; Dolz, Roser; Maj?, Natalia; Dahbi, Ghizlane; Viso, Susana; Mora, Azucena; Blanco, Jorge; Piedra-Carrasco, Nuria; Gonz?lez-L?pez, Juan Jos?; Migura-Garcia, Lourdes

    2015-01-01

    Avian pathogenic Escherichia coli (APEC) are the major cause of colibacillosis in poultry production. In this study, a total of 22 E. coli isolated from colibacillosis field cases and 10 avian faecal E. coli (AFEC) were analysed. All strains were characterised phenotypically by susceptibility testing and molecular typing methods such as pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) and multi-locus sequence typing (MLST). The presence of 29 virulence genes associated to APEC and human extraintestina...

  15. Dominance of multidrug-resistant Denmark(14)-32 (ST230) clone among Streptococcus pneumoniae serotype 19A isolates causing pneumococcal disease in Bulgaria from 1992 to 2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Setchanova, Lena Petrova; Alexandrova, Alexandra; Dacheva, Daniela; Mitov, Ivan; Kaneva, Radka; Mitev, Vanio

    2015-02-01

    A pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV10) was introduced in Bulgarian national immunization program since April 2010. Clonal composition based on pulsed-field gel electrophoresis and multilocus sequence typing genotyping of 52 serotype 19A Streptococcus pneumoniae isolates was analyzed. These were invasive and respiratory isolates collected between 1992 and 2013 from both children (78.8% clone. The most frequent sequence type (ST) was ST230 (48.1%) and together with four other closely related STs (15.4%), belonging to ST1611, ST276, ST7466, and ST2013, which were single- and double-locus variants; they were included in the main CC230. The disappearance of highly drug-resistant ST663 clone and emergence of new clones as CC320 and CC199 was also observed among the rest 19A isolates. A comparison of clonal composition between invasive and noninvasive isolates did not show a great genetic diversity among both kinds of isolates. Continuous surveillance of serotype 19A population following the introduction of PCV10 is essential to evaluate the impact of the vaccine on the epidemiology of this serotype.

  16. The Role of Antimicrobial Peptides in Preventing Multidrug-Resistant Bacterial Infections and Biofilm Formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyung-Soo Hahm

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Over the last decade, decreasing effectiveness of conventional antimicrobial-drugs has caused serious problems due to the rapid emergence of multidrug-resistant pathogens. Furthermore, biofilms, which are microbial communities that cause serious chronic infections and dental plaque, form environments that enhance antimicrobial resistance. As a result, there is a continuous search to overcome or control such problems, which has resulted in antimicrobial peptides being considered as an alternative to conventional drugs. Antimicrobial peptides are ancient host defense effector molecules in living organisms. These peptides have been identified in diverse organisms and synthetically developed by using peptidomimic techniques. This review was conducted to demonstrate the mode of action by which antimicrobial peptides combat multidrug-resistant bacteria and prevent biofilm formation and to introduce clinical uses of these compounds for chronic disease, medical devices, and oral health. In addition, combinations of antimicrobial peptides and conventional drugs were considered due to their synergetic effects and low cost for therapeutic treatment.

  17. Synergy between verapamil and other multidrug -resistance ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    PRAKASH KUMAR

    17 18–21. Klohs W D, Steinkampf R W, Havlick M J and Jackson R C. 1986 Resistance to anthrapyrazoles and anthracyclines in multi-resistant P388 murine leukemia cells: reversal by calcium blockers and calmodulin antagonists; Cancer Res. 46. 4352–4356. Loewe S 1928 Die quantitativen Probleme der Pharmakologie;.

  18. Fluoroquinolone resistance mechanisms in multidrug-resistant Escherichia coli isolated from extraintestinal infections in dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibson, Justine S; Cobbold, Rowland N; Kyaw-Tanner, Myat T; Heisig, Peter; Trott, Darren J

    2010-11-20

    Fluoroquinolone resistance is an emerging problem in companion animal practice. The present study aimed to determine comparative fluoroquinolone minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) for enrofloxacin, marbofloxacin and pradofloxacin and identify plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance (PMQR) mechanisms in 41 multidrug-resistant (MDR) Escherichia coli isolates representing three main clonal groups (CGs) cultured from extraintestinal infections in dogs. All isolates were resistant to fluoroquinolones and the PMQR genes qnrA1, qnrB2, qnrS1 and qepA were identified in isolates from each CG. For a subset of 13 representative isolates, fluoroquinolone chromosomal resistance mechanisms were characterized. CG1 isolates had three mutations in the quinolone resistance determining region (QRDR), two in gyrA (Ser TCG-83→Leu TTG and Asp GAC-87→Asn AAC) and one in parC (Ser AGC-80→Ile ATT), whilst CG2 and CG3 isolates also possessed an additional mutation in parC (Glu GAA-84→Gly GGA) which was reflected in higher fluoroquinolone MICs compared to CG1. Organic solvent tolerance was demonstrated in 8 of the 13 isolates, and all 13 isolates demonstrated enhanced efflux on the basis of a 4-fold decrease or greater in the MIC of enrofloxacin when incubated with an efflux pump inhibitor. A mutation in acrR which can cause overexpression of the AcrAB multidrug efflux pump was detected in CG1 strains. These findings indicate that fluoroquinolone resistance in MDR E. coli isolated from extraintestinal infections in dogs is associated with a combination of target mutations in the QRDRs, transferable PMQR mechanisms and enhanced efflux. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Isolation and evaluation of cocktail phages for the control of multidrug-resistant Escherichia coli serotype O104: H4 and E. coli O157: H7 isolates causing diarrhea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safwat Mohamed, Doaa; Farouk Ahmed, Eman; Mohamed Mahmoud, Abobakr; Abd El-Baky, Rehab Mahmoud; John, James

    2018-02-01

    Escherichia coli serotype O157: H7 and E. coli O104: H4 are well known foodborne pathogens causing sever enteric illness. Using bacteriophages as biocontrol agents of some foodborne pathogens and multidrug-resistant (MDR) bacteria has a great attention nowadays. This study aims to test the effect of cocktail phages on the growth of some foodborne pathogens and MDR E. coli. Routine conventional PCR was used to confirm the identification of E. coli isolates. Double-layered culture technique was used to isolate phages from sewage water. Morphology of bacteriophage was described using transmission electron microscopy, and spot test was performed to determine host range of the phage cocktail. Phage cocktail of Siphoviridae and Podoviridae family infecting E. coli O157: H7, E. coli O104: H4 and untypeable E. coli (neither O157 nor O104) has been isolated from sewage water. Phage cocktail showed both lytic and lysogenic activity. Lytic activity was observed against E. coli O157: H7, E. coli O104: H4 isolates, Staphylococcus. aureus ATCC6538 and Pseudomonas aeruginosa ATCC 10145, while the lysogenic activity was observed against the untypeable strain. The tested phage cocktail showed a promising inhibitory action on E. coli O157: H7 and O104: H4, S. aureus ATCC6538 and P. aeruginosa ATCC 10145, suggesting the possibility of its use as a biocontrol tool or as natural food preservatives for many food products. © FEMS 2017. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  20. Multidrug-resistant tuberculosis in Europe, 2010-2011

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Günther, Gunar; van Leth, Frank; Alexandru, Sofia

    2015-01-01

    Drug-resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis is challenging elimination of tuberculosis (TB). We evaluated risk factors for TB and levels of second-line drug resistance in M. tuberculosis in patients in Europe with multidrug-resistant (MDR) TB. A total of 380 patients with MDR TB and 376 patients...... with non-MDR TB were enrolled at 23 centers in 16 countries in Europe during 2010-2011. A total of 52.4% of MDR TB patients had never been treated for TB, which suggests primary transmission of MDR M. tuberculosis. At initiation of treatment for MDR TB, 59.7% of M. tuberculosis strains tested were...

  1. Overcoming Multidrug Resistance in Human Cancer Cells by Natural Compounds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomohiro Nabekura

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Multidrug resistance is a phenomenon whereby tumors become resistant to structurally unrelated anticancer drugs. P-glycoprotein belongs to the large ATP-binding cassette (ABC transporter superfamily of membrane transport proteins. P-glycoprotein mediates resistance to various classes of anticancer drugs including vinblastine, daunorubicin, and paclitaxel, by actively extruding the drugs from the cells. The quest for inhibitors of anticancer drug efflux transporters has uncovered natural compounds, including (--epigallocatechin gallate, curcumin, capsaicin, and guggulsterone, as promising candidates. In this review, studies on the effects of natural compounds on P-glycoprotein and anticancer drug efflux transporters are summarized.

  2. Multidrug-resistant Fusarium keratitis: diagnosis and treatment considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sara, Sergio; Sharpe, Kendall; Morris, Sharon

    2016-08-03

    Mycotic keratitis is an ocular infective process derived from any fungal species capable of corneal invasion. Despite its rarity in developed countries, its challenging and elusive diagnosis may result in keratoplasty or enucleation following failed medical management. Filamentous fungi such as Fusarium are often implicated in mycotic keratitis. Bearing greater morbidity than its bacterial counterpart, mycotic keratitis requires early clinical suspicion and initiation of antifungal therapy to prevent devastating consequences. We describe a case of multidrug-resistant mycotic keratitis in a 46-year-old man who continued to decline despite maximal therapy and therapeutic keratoplasty. Finally, enucleation was performed as a means of source control preventing dissemination of a likely untreatable fungal infection into the orbit. Multidrug-resistant Fusarium is rare, and may progress to endophthalmitis. We discuss potential management options which may enhance diagnosis and outcome in this condition. 2016 BMJ Publishing Group Ltd.

  3. Hearing loss in children treated for multidrug-resistant tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seddon, James A; Thee, Stephanie; Jacobs, Kayleen; Ebrahim, Adam; Hesseling, Anneke C; Schaaf, H Simon

    2013-04-01

    The aminoglycosides and polypeptides are vital drugs for the management of multidrug-resistant (MDR) tuberculosis (TB). Both classes of drug cause hearing loss. We aimed to determine the extent of hearing loss in children treated for MDR-TB. In this retrospective study, children (Hearing was assessed and classified using audiometry and otoacoustic emissions. Ninety-four children were included (median age: 43 months). Of 93 tested, 28 (30%) were HIV-infected. Twenty-three (24%) children had hearing loss. Culture-confirmed, as opposed to presumed, diagnosis of TB was a risk factor for hearing loss (OR: 4.12; 95% CI: 1.13-15.0; p = 0.02). Seven of 11 (64%) children classified as having hearing loss using audiometry had progression of hearing loss after finishing the injectable drug. Hearing loss is common in children treated for MDR-TB. Alternative drugs are required for the treatment of paediatric MDR-TB. Copyright © 2012 The British Infection Association. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Multidrug-Resistant Escherichia fergusonii: a Case of Acute Cystitis▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savini, Vincenzo; Catavitello, Chiara; Talia, Marzia; Manna, Assunta; Pompetti, Franca; Favaro, Marco; Fontana, Carla; Febbo, Fabio; Balbinot, Andrea; Di Berardino, Fabio; Di Bonaventura, Giovanni; Di Zacomo, Silvia; Esattore, Francesca; D'Antonio, Domenico

    2008-01-01

    We report a case in which Escherichia fergusonii, an emerging pathogen in various types of infections, was associated with cystitis in a 52-year-old woman. The offending strain was found to be multidrug resistant. Despite in vitro activity, beta-lactam treatment failed because of a lack of patient compliance with therapy. The work confirms the pathogenic potential of E. fergusonii. PMID:18256229

  5. Linezolid in multidrug-resistant tuberculosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bolhuis, Mathieu

    2015-01-01

    Tuberculose is een potentieel dodelijke infectieziekte die wordt veroorzaakt door de bacterie Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Een deel van de tuberculosepatiënten is besmet met multiresistente tuberculose. In het geval van multiresistente tuberculose is de bacterie resistent tegen de twee belangrijkste

  6. Emerging threat of multidrug resistant bugs--Acinetobacter calcoaceticus baumannii complex and methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, Shyam Kumar; Rijal, Basista Prasad; Pokhrel, Bharat Mani

    2013-03-15

    Infections caused by bacteria such as multidrug resistant (MDR) Acinetobacter spp. and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) constitute a worldwide pandemic. Without gathering information about these strains, we cannot reduce the morbidity and mortality due to infections caused by these notorious bugs. This study was conducted to identify the status of MDR Acinetobacter spp. and MRSA in a tertiary care centre of Nepal. Sputum, endotracheal aspirate and bronchial washing specimens were collected and processed from patients suspected of lower respiratory tract infection following standard microbiological methods recommended by the American Society for Microbiology (ASM). Double disk synergy test method was employed for the detection of extended-spectrum beta-lactamase (ESBL) in Acinetobacter isolates. Methicillin resistance in S. aureus was confirmed by using cefoxitin and oxacillin disks. Different genomespecies of Acinetobacter were isolated; these consisted of Acinetobacter calcoaceticus baumannii complex and A. lwoffii. Around 95% of Acinetobacter isolates were MDR, while 12.9% were ESBL-producer. Of the total 33 isolates of S. aureus, 26 (78.8%) were MDR and 14 (42.4%) were methicillin resistant. A large number of MDR Acinetobacter spp. and MRSA has been noted in this study. The condition is worsened by the emergence of ESBL producing Acinetobacter spp. Hence, judicious use of antimicrobials is mandatory in clinical settings. Moreover, there should be vigilant surveillance of resistant clones in laboratories.

  7. Emerging threat of multidrug resistant bugs – Acinetobacter calcoaceticus baumannii complex and Methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Infections caused by bacteria such as multidrug resistant (MDR) Acinetobacter spp. and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) constitute a worldwide pandemic. Without gathering information about these strains, we cannot reduce the morbidity and mortality due to infections caused by these notorious bugs. Methods This study was conducted to identify the status of MDR Acinetobacter spp. and MRSA in a tertiary care centre of Nepal. Sputum, endotracheal aspirate and bronchial washing specimens were collected and processed from patients suspected of lower respiratory tract infection following standard microbiological methods recommended by the American Society for Microbiology (ASM). Double disk synergy test method was employed for the detection of extended-spectrum beta-lactamase (ESBL) in Acinetobacter isolates. Methicillin resistance in S. aureus was confirmed by using cefoxitin and oxacillin disks. Results Different genomespecies of Acinetobacter were isolated; these consisted of Acinetobacter calcoaceticus baumannii complex and A. lwoffii. Around 95% of Acinetobacter isolates were MDR, while 12.9% were ESBL-producer. Of the total 33 isolates of S. aureus, 26 (78.8%) were MDR and 14 (42.4%) were methicillin resistant. Conclusions A large number of MDR Acinetobacter spp. and MRSA has been noted in this study. The condition is worsened by the emergence of ESBL producing Acinetobacter spp. Hence, judicious use of antimicrobials is mandatory in clinical settings. Moreover, there should be vigilant surveillance of resistant clones in laboratories. PMID:23497675

  8. Multi-drug carbapenem-resistant Klebsiella pneumoniae infection carrying the OXA-48 gene and showing variations in outer membrane protein 36 causing an outbreak in a tertiary care hospital in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taher uz Zaman

    2014-11-01

    Conclusions: This is probably the first reported outbreak of multidrug/carbapenem-resistant Klebsiella infection involving the OXA-48 gene from Saudi Arabia. Although the presence of ESBLs such as OXA, CTX-M, TEM, and SHV are predictable reasons for resistance, variations in the Omp-36 gene might also have precipitated this phenomenon. Disruption of the Omp-36 sequence by large insertional elements, the insertion of two amino acids in a very crucial part of this protein, and the presence of a premature stop codon in one isolate might have rendered this protein incomplete and non-functional. The study also demonstrated that more than one type of clone was responsible for this reported apparent outbreak and that ST29, a clone not reported from this region before, was the major clone responsible.

  9. Imaging Multidrug Resistance in Hematological Malignancies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kostakoglu, L; Goldsmith, S J

    In hematological malignancies, multidrag resistance (MDR) has been associated with the drag efflux pumps: one is the classical Mr 170,000 P-glycoprotein (Pgp) and the other Mr 190,000 multidrag resistance-associated protein (MRP). In addition, the overexpression of a recently identified protein, lung resistance protein (LRP), is also associated with reduced intracellular drag accumulation and retention. Currently available detection methods may provide variable results among laboratories, as there is no single set of standards for detection techniques at the mRNA or protein level. Moreover, these methods may not be informative about the in vivo function of Pgp, MRP or LRP. Single-photon emission tomography (SPECT) and positron emission tomography (PET) have been evaluated for the non-invasive determination of Pgp- and MRP- mediated transport systems. Tc-99m-hexaxis-2-methoxyisobutyl isonitrile (Tc-99m-Sestamibi), an agent used in myocardial perfusion and tumor imaging, is a substrate for Pgp and MRP, and has been used for tumor imaging, and to visualize Pgp expression. Tc-99m-Tetrofosmin and several Tc-99m-Q complexes, are also recognized as substrates by Pgp pump mechanism. Moreover, radiopharmaceuticals including carbon-11-labeled colchicine, verapamil and daunorabicin have been used for the assessment of Pgp-mediated transport functions in vivo using PET technology. The results suggest that the potential exists for nuclear medicine imaging using either Tc-99m-labeled compounds and SPECT or carbon-11-labeled compounds and PET to detect MDR in tumors prior to or after exposure to chemotherapeutic agents.

  10. Management of multidrug-resistant tuberculosis in human immunodeficiency virus patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jamil, K. F.

    2018-03-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) is a chronic infectious disease mainly caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis(MTB). 10.4 million new TB cases will appear in 2015 worldwide. There were an estimated 1.4 million TB deaths in 2015, and an additional 0.4 million deaths resulting from TB disease among people living with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). Multidrug- resistant and extensively drug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR and XDR-TB) are major public health concerns worldwide. 480.000 new cases of MDR-TB will appear in 2015 and an additional 100,000 people with rifampicin-resistant TB (RR-TB) who were also newly eligible for MDR-TB treatment. Their association with HIV infection has contributed to the slowing down of TB incidence decline over the last two decades, therefore representing one important barrier to reach TB elimination. Patients infected with MDR-TB require more expensive treatment regimens than drug-susceptible TB, with poor treatment.Patients with multidrug- resistant tuberculosis do not receive rifampin; drug interactions risk is markedly reduced. However, overlapping toxicities may limit options for co-treatment of HIV and multidrug- resistant tuberculosis.

  11. Identification and characterization of SSE15206, a microtubule depolymerizing agent that overcomes multidrug resistance

    KAUST Repository

    Manzoor, Safia

    2018-02-13

    Microtubules are highly dynamic structures that form spindle fibres during mitosis and are one of the most validated cancer targets. The success of drugs targeting microtubules, however, is often limited by the development of multidrug resistance. Here we describe the discovery and characterization of SSE15206, a pyrazolinethioamide derivative [3-phenyl-5-(3,4,5-trimethoxyphenyl)-4,5-dihydro-1H-pyrazole-1-carbothioamide] that has potent antiproliferative activities in cancer cell lines of different origins and overcomes resistance to microtubule-targeting agents. Treatment of cells with SSE15206 causes aberrant mitosis resulting in G2/M arrest due to incomplete spindle formation, a phenotype often associated with drugs that interfere with microtubule dynamics. SSE15206 inhibits microtubule polymerization both in biochemical and cellular assays by binding to colchicine site in tubulin as shown by docking and competition studies. Prolonged treatment of cells with the compound results in apoptotic cell death [increased Poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase cleavage and Annexin V/PI staining] accompanied by p53 induction. More importantly, we demonstrate that SSE15206 is able to overcome resistance to chemotherapeutic drugs in different cancer cell lines including multidrug-resistant KB-V1 and A2780-Pac-Res cell lines overexpressing MDR-1, making it a promising hit for the lead optimization studies to target multidrug resistance.

  12. CXC Chemokines Exhibit Bactericidal Activity against Multidrug-Resistant Gram-Negative Pathogens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew A. Crawford

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The continued rise and spread of antimicrobial resistance among bacterial pathogens pose a serious challenge to global health. Countering antimicrobial-resistant pathogens requires a multifaceted effort that includes the discovery of novel therapeutic approaches. Here, we establish the capacity of the human CXC chemokines CXCL9 and CXCL10 to kill multidrug-resistant Gram-negative bacteria, including New Delhi metallo-beta-lactamase-1-producing Klebsiella pneumoniae and colistin-resistant members of the family Enterobacteriaceae that harbor the mobile colistin resistance protein MCR-1 and thus possess phosphoethanolamine-modified lipid A. Colistin-resistant K. pneumoniae isolates affected by genetic mutation of the PmrA/PmrB two-component system, a chromosomally encoded regulator of lipopolysaccharide modification, and containing 4-amino-4-deoxy-l-arabinose-modified lipid A were also found to be susceptible to chemokine-mediated antimicrobial activity. However, loss of PhoP/PhoQ autoregulatory control, caused by disruption of the gene encoding the negative regulator MgrB, limited the bactericidal effects of CXCL9 and CXCL10 in a variable, strain-specific manner. Cumulatively, these findings provide mechanistic insight into chemokine-mediated antimicrobial activity, highlight disparities amongst determinants of colistin resistance, and suggest that chemokine-mediated bactericidal effects merit additional investigation as a therapeutic avenue for treating infections caused by multidrug-resistant pathogens.

  13. Selective conditions for a multidrug resistance plasmid depend on the sociality of antibiotic resistance"

    OpenAIRE

    Bottery, Michael; Wood, A. Jamie; Brockhurst, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Multidrug resistance (MDR) plasmids frequently carry antibiotic resistance genes conferring qualitatively different mechanisms of resistance. We show here that the antibiotic concentrations selecting for the RK2 plasmid in Escherichia coli depend upon the sociality of the drug resistance: the selection for selfish drug resistance (efflux pump) occurred at very low drug concentrations, just 1.3% of the MIC of the plasmid-free antibiotic-sensitive strain, whereas selection for cooperative drug ...

  14. Non-p-glycoprotein-mediated multidrug resistance in detransformed rat cells selected for resistance to methylglyoxal bis(guanylhydrazone).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, J M; Sircar, S; Horvath, J; Dion, P

    1989-11-01

    Three independent variants (G2, G4, G5), resistant to methylglyoxal bis(guanylhydrazone), an anticancer drug, have been isolated by single step selection from an adenovirus-transformed rat brain cell line (1). These variants display selective cross-resistance to several natural product drugs of dissimilar structure and action. Multidrug resistance has recently been shown to be caused by overexpression of the membrane-associated p-glycoprotein, most often caused by amplification of the mdr gene. Several types of experiments were conducted to determine whether the observed drug resistance in our cell lines could be due to changes at the mdr locus. The following results were obtained: (a) the mdr locus was not amplified; (b) transcription of the mdr gene and p-glycoprotein synthesis were not increased; (c) multidrug resistance cell lines, which carry an amplified mdr locus, were not cross-resistant to methylglyoxal bis(guanylhydrazone); (d) verapamil did not reverse the resistance of G cells or mdr cells to methylglyoxal bis(guanylhydrazone), nor that of G cells to vincristine; and (e) methylglyoxal bis(guanylhydrazone) resistance was recessive and depended on a block to drug uptake, as opposed to mdr cells which are dominant and express increased drug efflux. The results obtained suggest that the drug resistance in the G2, G4, and G5 cells was atypical and may be due to a mechanism distinct from that mediated by the mdr locus.

  15. Chinese hamster pleiotropic multidrug-resistant cells are not radioresistant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mitchell, J.B.; Gamson, J.; Russo, A.; Friedman, N.; DeGraff, W.; Carmichael, J.; Glatstein, E.

    1988-01-01

    The inherent cellular radiosensitivity of a Chinese hamster ovary pleiotropic cell line that is multidrug resistant (CHRC5) was compared to that of its parental cell line (AuxB1). Radiation survival curve parameters n and D0 were 4.5 and 1.1 Gy, respectively, for the CHRC5 line and 5.0 and 1.2 Gy, respectively, for the parental line. Thus, the inherent radiosensitivity of the two lines was similar even though key intracellular free radical scavenging and detoxifying systems employing glutathione, glutathione transferase, and catalase produced enzyme levels that were 2.0-, 1.9-, and 1.9-fold higher, respectively, in the drug-resistant cell line. Glutathione depletion by buthionine sulfoximine resulted in the same extent of aerobic radiosensitization in both lines (approximately 10%). Incorporation of iododeoxyuridine into cellular DNA sensitized both cell lines to radiation. These studies indicate that pleiotropic drug resistance does not necessarily confer radiation resistance

  16. Multidrug-Resistant Shigella Infections in Patients with Diarrhea, Cambodia, 2014-2015.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poramathikul, Kamonporn; Bodhidatta, Ladaporn; Chiek, Sivhour; Oransathid, Wilawan; Ruekit, Sirigade; Nobthai, Panida; Lurchachaiwong, Woradee; Serichantalergs, Oralak; Lon, Chanthap; Swierczewski, Brett

    2016-09-01

    We observed multidrug resistance in 10 (91%) of 11 Shigella isolates from a diarrheal surveillance study in Cambodia. One isolate was resistant to fluoroquinolones and cephalosporins and showed decreased susceptibility to azithromycin. We found mutations in gyrA, parC, β-lactamase, and mphA genes. Multidrug resistance increases concern about shigellosis treatment options.

  17. Multidrug-Resistant Tuberculosis in Europe, 2010–2011

    Science.gov (United States)

    Günther, Gunar; van Leth, Frank; Alexandru, Sofia; Altet, Neus; Avsar, Korkut; Bang, Didi; Barbuta, Raisa; Bothamley, Graham; Ciobanu, Ana; Crudu, Valeriu; Davilovits, Manfred; Dedicoat, Martin; Duarte, Raquel; Gualano, Gina; Kunst, Heinke; de Lange, Wiel; Leimane, Vaira; Magis-Escurra, Cecile; McLaughlin, Anne-Marie; Muylle, Inge; Polcová, Veronika; Pontali, Emanuele; Popa, Christina; Rumetshofer, Rudolf; Skrahina, Alena; Solodovnikova, Varvara; Spinu, Victor; Tiberi, Simon; Viiklepp, Piret

    2015-01-01

    Drug-resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis is challenging elimination of tuberculosis (TB). We evaluated risk factors for TB and levels of second-line drug resistance in M. tuberculosis in patients in Europe with multidrug-resistant (MDR) TB. A total of 380 patients with MDR TB and 376 patients with non–MDR TB were enrolled at 23 centers in 16 countries in Europe during 2010–2011. A total of 52.4% of MDR TB patients had never been treated for TB, which suggests primary transmission of MDR M. tuberculosis. At initiation of treatment for MDR TB, 59.7% of M. tuberculosis strains tested were resistant to pyrazinamide, 51.1% were resistant to ≥1 second-line drug, 26.6% were resistant to second-line injectable drugs, 17.6% were resistant to fluoroquinolones, and 6.8% were extensively drug resistant. Previous treatment for TB was the strongest risk factor for MDR TB. High levels of primary transmission and advanced resistance to second-line drugs characterize MDR TB cases in Europe. PMID:25693485

  18. Efflux-mediated fluoroquinolone resistance in the multidrug-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa clinical isolate PA7: identification of a novel MexS variant involved in upregulation of the mexEF-oprN multidrug efflux operon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morita, Yuji; Tomida, Junko; Kawamura, Yoshiaki

    2015-01-01

    The emergence of multidrug-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa has become a serious problem in medical settings. P. aeruginosa clinical isolate PA7 is resistant to fluoroquinolones, aminoglycosides, and most β-lactams but not imipenem. In this study, enhanced efflux-mediated fluoroquinolone resistance of PA7 was shown to reflect increased expression of two resistance nodulation cell division (RND) -type multidrug efflux operons, mexEF-oprN and mexXY-oprA. Such a clinical isolate has rarely been reported because MexEF-OprN-overproducing mutants often increase susceptibility to aminoglycosides apparently owing to impairment of the MexXY system. A mutant of PA7 lacking three RND-type multidrug efflux operons (mexAB-oprM, mexEF-oprN, and mexXY-oprA) was susceptible to all anti-pseudomonas agents we tested, supporting an idea that these RND-type multidrug efflux transporters are molecular targets to overcome multidrug resistance in P. aeruginosa. mexEF-oprN-upregulation in P. aeruginosa PA7 was shown due to a MexS variant harboring the Valine-155 amino acid residue. This is the first genetic evidence shown that a MexS variant causes mexEF-oprN-upregulation in P. aeruginosa clinical isolates.

  19. Efflux-mediated fluoroquinolone resistance in the multidrug-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa clinical isolate PA7: identification of a novel MexS variant involved in upregulation of the mexEF-oprN multidrug efflux operon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuji eMorita

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The emergence of multidrug-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa has become a serious problem in medical settings. P. aeruginosa clinical isolate PA7 is resistant to fluoroquinolones, aminoglycosides, and most -lactams but not imipenem. In this study, enhanced efflux-mediated fluoroquinolone resistance of PA7 was shown to reflect increased expression of two resistance nodulation cell division (RND -type multidrug efflux operons, mexEF-oprN and mexXY-oprA. Such a clinical isolate has rarely been reported because MexEF-OprN-overproducing mutants often increase susceptibility to aminoglycosides apparently owing to impairment of the MexXY system. A mutant of PA7 lacking three RND-type multidrug efflux operons (mexAB-oprM, mexEF-oprN, and mexXY-oprA was susceptible to all anti-pseudomonas agents we tested, supporting an idea that these RND-type multidrug efflux transporters are molecular targets to overcome multidrug resistance in P. aeruginosa. mexEF-oprN-upregulation in P. aeruginosa PA7 was shown due to a MexS variant harboring the Valine-155 amino acid residue. This is the first genetic evidence shown that a MexS variant causes mexEF-oprN-upregulation in P. aeruginosa clinical isolates.

  20. Epidemiologic analysis: Prophylaxis and multidrug-resistance in surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solís-Téllez, H; Mondragón-Pinzón, E E; Ramírez-Marino, M; Espinoza-López, F R; Domínguez-Sosa, F; Rubio-Suarez, J F; Romero-Morelos, R D

    Surgical site infection is defined as an infection related to the surgical procedure in the area of manipulation occurring within the first 30 postoperative days. The diagnostic criteria include: purulent drainage, isolation of microorganisms, and signs of infection. To describe the epidemiologic characteristics and differences among the types of prophylactic regimens associated with hospital-acquired infections at the general surgery service of a tertiary care hospital. The electronic case records of patients that underwent general surgery at a tertiary care hospital within the time frame of January 1, 2013 and December 31, 2014 were reviewed. A convenience sample of 728 patients was established and divided into the following groups: Group 1: n=728 for the epidemiologic study; Group 2: n=638 for the evaluation of antimicrobial prophylaxis; and Group 3: n=50 for the evaluation of multidrug-resistant bacterial strains in the intensive care unit. The statistical analysis was carried out with the SPSS 19 program, using the Mann-Whitney U test and the chi-square test. A total of 728 procedures were performed (65.9% were elective surgeries). Three hundred twelve of the patients were males and 416 were females. Only 3.98% of the patients complied with the recommended antimicrobial prophylaxis, and multidrug-resistant bacterial strains were found in the intensive care unit. A single prophylactic dose is effective, but adherence to this recommendation was not adequate. The prophylactic guidelines are not strictly adhered to in our environment. There was a significant association between the development of nosocomial infections from multidrug-resistant germs and admission to the intensive care unit. Copyright © 2016 Asociación Mexicana de Gastroenterología. Publicado por Masson Doyma México S.A. All rights reserved.

  1. Antifolate resistance mediated by the multidrug resistance proteins MRP1 and MRP2

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hooijberg, J. H.; Broxterman, H. J.; Kool, M.; Assaraf, Y. G.; Peters, G. J.; Noordhuis, P.; Scheper, R. J.; Borst, P.; Pinedo, H. M.; Jansen, G.

    1999-01-01

    Transfection of multidrug resistance proteins (MRPs) MRP1 and MRP2 in human ovarian carcinoma 2008 cells conferred a marked level of resistance to short-term (1-4 h) exposure to the polyglutamatable antifolates methotrexate (MTX; 21-74-fold), ZD1694 (4-138-fold), and GW1843 (101-156-fold). Evidence

  2. Pediatric multidrug-resistant tuberculosis clinical trials: challenges and opportunities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.E. McAnaw

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available On June 17, 2016, RESIST-TB, IMPAACT, Vital Strategies, and New Ventures jointly hosted the Pediatric Multidrug Resistant Tuberculosis Clinical Trials Landscape Meeting in Arlington, Virginia, USA. The meeting provided updates on current multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB trials targeting pediatric populations and adult trials that have included pediatric patients. A series of presentations were given that discussed site capacity needs, community engagement, and additional interventions necessary for clinical trials to improve the treatment of pediatric MDR-TB. This article presents a summary of topics discussed, including the following: current trials ongoing and planned; the global burden of MDR-TB in children; current regimens for MDR-TB treatment in children; pharmacokinetics of second-line anti-tuberculosis medications in children; design, sample size, and statistical considerations for MDR-TB trials in children; selection of study population, design, and treatment arms for a trial of novel pediatric MDR-TB regimens; practical aspects of pediatric MDR-TB treatment trials; and strategies for integrating children into adult tuberculosis trials. These discussions elucidated barriers to pediatric MDR-TB clinical trials and provided insight into necessary next steps for progress in this field. Investigators and funding agencies need to respond to these recommendations so that important studies can be implemented, leading to improved treatment for children with MDR-TB.

  3. Effect of methylglyoxal on multidrug-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katsuhiko eHayashi

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Honey has a complex chemistry, and its broad-spectrum antimicrobial activity varies with floral source, climate, and harvesting conditions. Methylglyoxal was identified as the dominant antibacterial component of manuka honey. Although it has been known that methylglyoxal has antibacterial activity against gram-positive bacteria, including methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus and vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus, there is not much information describing its activity against gram-negative bacteria. In this study, we report the effect of methylglyoxal against multidrug-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa (MDRP using 53 clinically isolated strains. We also assessed the effect of deleting the five multidrug efflux systems in P. aeruginosa, as well as the efflux systems in Escherichia coli and Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium, on MICs of methylglyoxal. Our results indicate that methylglyoxal inhibits the growth of MDRP at concentrations of 128–512 µg/ml (1.7–7.1 mM and is not recognized by drug efflux systems.

  4. The role of half-transporters in multidrug resistance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bates, S E; Robey, R; Miyake, K

    2001-01-01

    in the role of drug transporters in clinical drug resistance. These newly identified transporters include additional members of the MRP family, ABC2, and a new half-transporter, MXR/BCRP/ABCP1. This half-transporter confers high levels of resistance to mitoxantrone, anthracyclines, and the camptothecins SN-38......ATP-binding cassette proteins comprise a superfamily of transporter proteins, a subset of which have been implicated in multidrug resistance. Although P-glycoprotein was described over 15 years ago, the recent expansion in the number of transporters identified has prompted renewed interest...... and topotecan. At 72 kDa, MXR localizes to the plasma membrane in cells which highly overexpress the protein either through gene amplification or though gene rearrangement. Future studies will be aimed at identifying an inhibitor, and attempting to translate recognition of this new transporter into a target...

  5. Breaking the spell: Combating Multidrug resistant ‘Superbugs’

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shahper N Khan

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Multidrug-resistant (MDR bacteria have become a severe threat to community health. Conventional antibiotics are getting increasingly ineffective as a consequence of resistance, and so it is imperative to realize new antimicrobial strategies. In this review we emphasized the microorganisms primarily reported in the resistance process, the so called ESKAPE pathogens (Enterococcus faecium, Staphylococcus aureus, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Acinetobacter baumanii, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and enterobacteriaceae accentuating their capacity to escape from common antibacterial regimes. The upcoming antimicrobial agents showing great potential and can serve as alternative therapeutic options are discussed. We also provided succinct overview of two evolving technologies; specifically network pharmacology and functional genomics profiling. Furthermore, In vivo imaging techniques can provide novel targets and a real time tool for potential lead molecule assessment. The employment of such approaches at early stages of the drug development enables more informed decisions on candidate drug selection and moreover to maximize or predict efficacy before clinical development.

  6. Nanodrug Delivery in Reversing Multidrug Resistance in Cancer Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonali eKapse-Mistry

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Different mechanisms in cancer cells become resistant to one or more chemotherapeutics is known as multidrug resistance(MDR which hinders chemotherapy efficacy. Potential factors for MDR includes enhanced drug detoxification, decreased drug uptake, increased intracellular nucleophiles levels, enhanced repair of drug induced DNA damage, overexpression of drug transporter such as P-glycoprotein(P-gp, multidrug resistance-associated proteins(MRP1, MRP2 and breast cancer resistance protein(BCRP. Currently nanoassemblies such as polymeric/solid lipid/inorganic/metal nanoparticles, quantum dots, dendrimers, liposomes, micelles has emerged as an innovative, effective and promising platforms for treatment of drug resistant cancer cells. Nanocarriers have potential to improve drug therapeutic index, ability for multifunctionality, divert ABC-transporter mediated drug efflux mechanism and selective targeting to tumor cells, cancer stem cells, tumor initiating cells or cancer microenvironment. Selective nanocarrier targeting to tumor overcomes dose-limiting side effects, lack of selectivity, tissue toxicity, limited drug access to tumor tissues, high drug doses and emergence of multiple drug resistance with conventional or combination chemotherapy. Current review highlights various nanodrug delivery systems to overcome mechanism of MDR by neutralizing, evading or exploiting the drug efflux pumps and those independent of drug efflux pump mechanism by silencing Bcl-2 and HIF1 gene expressions by siRNA and miRNA, modulating ceramide levels and targeting NF-B. Theragnostics combining a cytotoxic agent, targeting moiety, chemosensitizing agent and diagnostic imaging aid are highlighted as effective and innovative systems for tumor localization and overcoming MDR. Physical approaches such as combination of drug with thermal/ultrasound/photodynamic therapies to overcome MDR are focused. The review focuses on newer drug delivery systems developed to overcome

  7. Identification of multi-drug resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa clinical isolates that are highly disruptive to the intestinal epithelial barrier

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shevchenko Olga

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Multi-drug resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa nosocomial infections are increasingly recognized worldwide. In this study, we focused on the virulence of multi-drug resistant clinical strains P. aeruginosa against the intestinal epithelial barrier, since P. aeruginosa can cause lethal sepsis from within the intestinal tract of critically ill and immuno-compromised patients via mechanisms involving disruption of epithelial barrier function. Methods We screened consecutively isolated multi-drug resistant P. aeruginosa clinical strains for their ability to disrupt the integrity of human cultured intestinal epithelial cells (Caco-2 and correlated these finding to related virulence phenotypes such as adhesiveness, motility, biofilm formation, and cytotoxicity. Results Results demonstrated that the majority of the multi-drug resistant P. aeruginosa clinical strains were attenuated in their ability to disrupt the barrier function of cultured intestinal epithelial cells. Three distinct genotypes were found that displayed an extreme epithelial barrier-disrupting phenotype. These strains were characterized and found to harbor the exoU gene and to display high swimming motility and adhesiveness. Conclusion These data suggest that detailed phenotypic analysis of the behavior of multi-drug resistant P. aeruginosa against the intestinal epithelium has the potential to identify strains most likely to place patients at risk for lethal gut-derived sepsis. Surveillance of colonizing strains of P. aeruginosa in critically ill patients beyond antibiotic sensitivity is warranted.

  8. Utility of lytic bacteriophage in the treatment of multidrug-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa septicemia in mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vinodkumar C

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Drug resistance is the major cause of increase in morbidity and mortality in neonates. One thousand six hundred forty-seven suspected septicemic neonates were subjected for microbiological analysis over a period of 5 years. Forty-two P. aeruginosa were isolated and the antibiogram revealed that 28 P. aeruginosa were resistant to almost all the common drugs used (multidrug-resistant. The emergence of antibiotic-resistant bacterial strains is one of the most critical problems of modern medicine. As a result, a novel and most effective approaches for treating infection caused by multidrug-resistant bacteria are urgently required. In this context, one intriguing approach is to use bacteriophages (viruses that kill bacteria in the treatment of infection caused by drug-resistant bacteria. In the present study, the utility of lytic bacteriophages to rescue septicemic mice with multidrug-resistant (MDR P. aeruginosa infection was evaluated. MDR P. aeruginosa was used to induce septicemia in mice by intraperitoneal (i.p. injection of 10 7 CFU. The resulting bacteremia was fatal within 48 hrs. The phage strain used in this study had lytic activity against a wide range of clinical isolates of MDR P. aeruginosa. A single i.p. injection of 3 x 10 9 PFU of the phage strain, administered 45 min after the bacterial challenge, was sufficient to rescue 100% of the animals. Even when treatment was delayed to the point where all animals were moribund, approximately 50% of them were rescued by a single injection of this phage preparation. The ability of this phage to rescue septicemic mice was demonstrated to be due to the functional capabilities of the phage and not to a nonspecific immune effect. The rescue of septicemic mice could be affected only by phage strains able to grow in vitro on the bacterial host used to infect the animals and when such strains are heat-inactivated, they lose their ability to rescue the infected mice. Multidrug-resistant bacteria have

  9. A Web-Based Multidrug-Resistant Organisms Surveillance and Outbreak Detection System with Rule-Based Classification and Clustering

    OpenAIRE

    Tseng, Yi-Ju; Wu, Jung-Hsuan; Ping, Xiao-Ou; Lin, Hui-Chi; Chen, Ying-Yu; Shang, Rung-Ji; Chen, Ming-Yuan; Lai, Feipei; Chen, Yee-Chun

    2012-01-01

    Background The emergence and spread of multidrug-resistant organisms (MDROs) are causing a global crisis. Combating antimicrobial resistance requires prevention of transmission of resistant organisms and improved use of antimicrobials. Objectives To develop a Web-based information system for automatic integration, analysis, and interpretation of the antimicrobial susceptibility of all clinical isolates that incorporates rule-based classification and cluster analysis of MDROs and implements co...

  10. ANTIMICROBIAL ACTIVITY OF PINEAPPLE (ANANAS COMOSUS L. MERR EXTRACT AGAINST MULTIDRUG-RESISTANT OF PSEUDOMONAS AERUGINOSA: AN IN VITRO STUDY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rahmat Sayyid Zharfan

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Pseudomonas aeruginosa is the main cause of nosocomial infection which is responsible for 10% of hospital-acquired infection. Pseudomonas aeruginosa tends to mutate and displays potential for development of antibiotic resistance. Approximately, 10% of global bacterial isolates are found as Multidrug-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Pseudomonas aeruginosa have a quite tremendous severity index, especially on pneumonia and urinary tract infections, even sepsis, which 50% mortality rate. Pineapple (Ananas comosus L. Merr has antimicrobial properties. The active antimicrobial compounds in Ananas comosus L. Merr include saponin and bromelain. This research aims to find the potency of antimicrobial effect of pineapple (Ananas comosus L. Merr extract towards Multidrug-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Multidrug-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa specimen is obtained from patient’s pus in orthopaedic department, Dr Soetomo Public Hospital, Surabaya. Multidrug-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa specimen is resistant to all antibiotic agents except cefoperazone-sulbactam. This research is conducted by measuring the Minimum Inhibitory Concentration (MIC through dilution test with Mueller-Hinton broth medium. Pineapple extract (Ananas comosus L. Merr. is dissolved in aquadest, then poured into test tube at varying concentrations (6 g/ml; 3 g/ml; 1.5 g/ml; 0.75 g/ml, 0.375 g/ml; and 0.1875 g/ml. After 24 hours’ incubation, samples are plated onto nutrient agar plate, to determine the Minimum Bactericidal Concentration (MBC. The extract of pineapple (Ananas comosus L. Merr has antimicrobial activities against Multidrug-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Minimum Inhibitory Concentration (MIC could not be determined, because turbidity changes were not seen. The Minimum Bactericidal Concentration (MBC of pineapple extract (Ananas comosus L. Merr to Multidrug-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa is 0.75 g/ml. Further study of in vivo is needed.

  11. Molecular characterization, spread and evolution of multidrug resistance in Salmonella enterica Typhimurium DT104

    OpenAIRE

    Cloeckaert, Axel; Schwarz, Stefan

    2001-01-01

    International audience; Multidrug-resistant Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium phage type DT104 has emerged during the last decade as a global health problem because of its involvement in diseases in animals and humans. Multidrug-resistant DT104 strains are mostly resistant to ampicillin, chloramphenicol, streptomycin, sulfonamides and tetracyclines (ACSSuT resistance type). The genes coding for such resistances are clustered on the chromosome. This paper reviews new developments in the ...

  12. The Culturable Soil Antibiotic Resistome: A Community of Multi-Drug Resistant Bacteria

    OpenAIRE

    Walsh, Fiona; Duffy, Brion

    2013-01-01

    Understanding the soil bacterial resistome is essential to understanding the evolution and development of antibiotic resistance, and its spread between species and biomes. We have identified and characterized multi-drug resistance (MDR) mechanisms in the culturable soil antibiotic resistome and linked the resistance profiles to bacterial species. We isolated 412 antibiotic resistant bacteria from agricultural, urban and pristine soils. All isolates were multi-drug resistant, of which greater ...

  13. Functional imaging of the multidrug resistance in vivo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jae Tae [College of Medicine, Kyungpook National Univ., Taegu (Korea, Republic of)

    2001-07-01

    Although diverse mechanisms are involved in multidrug resistance for chemotherapeutic drugs, the development of cellular P-glycoprotein(Pgp) and multidrug-resistance associated protein (MRP) are improtant factors in the chemotherapy failure to cancer. Various detection assays provide information about the presence of drug efflux pumps at the mRNA and protein levels. However these methods do not yield information about dynamic function of Pgp and MRP in vivo. Single photon emission tomograpy (SPECT) and positron emission tomograpy (PET) are available for the detection of Pgp and MRP-mediated transport. {sup 99m}Tc-sestaMIBI and other {sup 99m}Tc-radiopharmaceuticals are substrates for Pgp and MRP, and have been used in clinical studies of tumor imaging, and to visualize blockade of Pgp-mediated transport after modulation of Pgp pump. Colchicine, verapamil and daunorubicin labeled with {sup 11}C have been evaluated for the quantification of Pgp-mediated transport with PET in vivo and reported to be feasible substrates with which to image Pgp function in tumors. Leukotrienes are specific substrates for MRP and N-{sup (11}C]acetyl-leukotriene E4 provides an opportunity to study MRP function non-invasively in vivo. Results obtained from recent publications are reviewed to confirm the feasibility of using SPECT and PET to study the functionality of MDR transportes in vivo.

  14. Synergistic antimicrobial therapy using nanoparticles and antibiotics for the treatment of multidrug-resistant bacterial infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Akash; Saleh, Neveen M.; Das, Riddha; Landis, Ryan F.; Bigdeli, Arafeh; Motamedchaboki, Khatereh; Rosa Campos, Alexandre; Pomeroy, Kenneth; Mahmoudi, Morteza; Rotello, Vincent M.

    2017-06-01

    Infections caused by multidrug-resistant (MDR) bacteria pose a serious global burden of mortality, causing thousands of deaths each year. Antibiotic treatment of resistant infections further contributes to the rapidly increasing number of antibiotic-resistant species and strains. Synthetic macromolecules such as nanoparticles (NPs) exhibit broad-spectrum activity against MDR species, however lack of specificity towards bacteria relative to their mammalian hosts limits their widespread therapeutic application. Here, we demonstrate synergistic antimicrobial therapy using hydrophobically functionalized NPs and fluoroquinolone antibiotics for treatment of MDR bacterial strains. An 8-16-fold decrease in antibiotic dosage is achieved in presence of engineered NPs to combat MDR strains. This strategy demonstrates the potential of using NPs to ‘revive’ antibiotics that have been rendered ineffective due to the development of resistance by pathogenic bacteria.

  15. Multi-drug resistance and molecular pattern of erythromycin and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The appearance and dissemination of penicillin resistant and macrolide resistant Streptococcus pneumoniae strains has caused increasing concern worldwide. The aim of this study was to survey drug resistance and genetic characteristics of macrolide and penicillin resistance in S. pneumoniae. This is a cross-sectional ...

  16. Photodynamic therapy of cancer — Challenges of multidrug resistance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zheng Huang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Photodynamic therapy (PDT of cancer is a two-step drug-device combination modality, which involves the topical or systemic administration of a photosensitizer followed by light illumination of cancer site. In the presence of oxygen molecules, the light illumination of photosensitizer (PS can lead to the generation of cytotoxic reactive oxygen species (ROS and consequently destroy cancer. Similar to many other anticancer therapies, PDT is also subject to intrinsic cancer resistance mediated by multidrug resistance (MDR mechanisms. This paper will review the recent progress in understanding the interaction between MDR transporters and PS uptake. The strategies that can be used in a clinical setting to overcome or bypass MDR will also be discussed.

  17. Hypoxia-inducible factor-1α induces multidrug resistance protein in colon cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lv Y

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Yingqian Lv, Shan Zhao, Jinzhu Han, Likang Zheng, Zixin Yang, Li Zhao Department of Oncology, The Second Hospital, Hebei Medical University, Shijiazhuang, Hebei Province, People’s Republic of China Abstract: Multidrug resistance is the major cause of chemotherapy failure in many solid tumors, including colon cancer. Hypoxic environment is a feature for all solid tumors and is important for the development of tumor resistance to chemotherapy. Hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF-1α is the key transcription factor that mediates cellular response to hypoxia. HIF-1α has been shown to play an important role in tumor resistance; however, the mechanism is still not fully understood. Here, we found that HIF-1α and the drug resistance-associated gene multidrug resistance associated protein 1 (MRP1 were induced by treatment of colon cancer cells with the hypoxia-mimetic agent cobalt chloride. Inhibition of HIF-1α by RNA interference and dominant-negative protein can significantly reduce the induction of MRP1 by hypoxia. Bioinformatics analysis showed that a hypoxia response element is located at -378 to -373 bp upstream of the transcription start site of MRP1 gene. Luciferase reporter assay combined with mutation analysis confirmed that this element is essential for hypoxia-mediated activation of MRP gene. Furthermore, RNA interference revealed that HIF-1α is necessary for this hypoxia-driven activation of MRP1 promoter. Importantly, chromatin immunoprecipitation analysis demonstrated that HIF-1α could directly bind to this HRE site in vivo. Together, these data suggest that MRP1 is a downstream target gene of HIF-1α, which provides a potential novel mechanism for HIF-1α-mediated drug resistance in colon cancer and maybe other solid tumors as well. Keywords: hypoxia, hypoxia-inducible factor-1α, multidrug resistance associated protein, transcriptional regulation, chemotherapy tolerance

  18. Chlortetracycline and florfenicol induce expression of genes associated with pathogenicity in multidrug-resistant Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Background Multidrug-resistant (MDR) Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium (S. Typhimurium) is a serious public health threat as infections caused by these strains are more difficult and expensive to treat. Livestock serve as a reservoir for MDR Salmonella, and the antibiotics chlortetracycline an...

  19. Overcoming ABC transporter-mediated multidrug resistance: Molecular mechanisms and novel therapeutic drug strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wen; Zhang, Han; Assaraf, Yehuda G; Zhao, Kun; Xu, Xiaojun; Xie, Jinbing; Yang, Dong-Hua; Chen, Zhe-Sheng

    2016-07-01

    Multidrug resistance is a key determinant of cancer chemotherapy failure. One of the major causes of multidrug resistance is the enhanced efflux of drugs by membrane ABC transporters. Targeting ABC transporters projects a promising approach to eliminating or suppressing drug resistance in cancer treatment. To reveal the functional mechanisms of ABC transporters in drug resistance, extensive studies have been conducted from identifying drug binding sites to elucidating structural dynamics. In this review article, we examined the recent crystal structures of ABC proteins to depict the functionally important structural elements, such as domains, conserved motifs, and critical amino acids that are involved in ATP-binding and drug efflux. We inspected the drug-binding sites on ABC proteins and the molecular mechanisms of various substrate interactions with the drug binding pocket. While our continuous battle against drug resistance is far from over, new approaches and technologies have emerged to push forward our frontier. Most recent developments in anti-MDR strategies include P-gp inhibitors, RNA-interference, nano-medicines, and delivering combination strategies. With the advent of the 'Omics' era - genomics, epigenomics, transcriptomics, proteomics, and metabolomics - these disciplines play an important role in fighting the battle against chemoresistance by further unraveling the molecular mechanisms of drug resistance and shed light on medical therapies that specifically target MDR. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Activity of ceftazidime-avibactam against multidrug-resistance Enterobacteriaceae expressing combined mechanisms of resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Hernández, Inmaculada; Alonso, Noemí; Fernández-Martínez, Marta; Zamorano, Laura; Rivera, Alba; Oliver, Antonio; Conejo, M Carmen; Martínez-Martínez, Luis; Navarro, Ferrán; Pascual, Alvaro

    2017-10-01

    Antimicrobial resistance in Enterobacteriaceae is increasing worldwide and is making treating infections caused by multidrug-resistant Enterobacteriaceae a challenge. The use of β-lactam agents is compromised by microorganisms harboring extended-spectrum β-lactamases (ESBLs) and other mechanisms of resistance. Avibactam is a non β-lactam agent that inhibits clinically relevant β-lactamases, such as ESBL and AmpC. The ceftazidime-avibactam combination (CAZ-AVI) was recently approved for use in certain complicated infections, and may provide a therapeutic alternative for infections caused by these microorganisms. The in vitro activity of CAZ and CAZ-AVI (AVI at a fixed concentration of 4mg/L) was tested against 250 clinical isolates of Enterobacteriaceae using broth microdilution. EUCAST breakpoint criteria were used for CAZ, and FDA criteria for CAZ-AVI. Clinical isolates included bacteria producing extended-spectrum β-lactamases (ESBLs) and acquired AmpC β-lactamases (AACBLs). Porin loss in Klebsiella pneumoniae was also evaluated. The combination of AVI with CAZ displayed excellent activity against clinical isolates of ESBL-producing Escherichia coli and Klebsiella pneumoniae, rendering all the ceftazidime-resistant isolates susceptible to ceftazidime. CAZ-AVI retained activity against porin-deficient isolates of K. pneumoniae producing ESBLs, AACBLs, or both, although MIC values were higher compared to porin-expressing isolates. CAZ-AVI rendered all the ceftazidime-resistant AACBL-producing Enterobacteriaceae tested susceptible to ceftazidime. CAZ-AVI showed potent in vitro activity against clinical isolates of Enterobacteriaceae producing ESBLs and/or AACBLs, including K. pneumoniae with loss of porins. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier España, S.L.U. y Sociedad Española de Enfermedades Infecciosas y Microbiología Clínica. All rights reserved.

  1. Functional study of the novel multidrug resistance gene HA117 and its comparison to multidrug resistance gene 1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Tingfu

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The novel gene HA117 is a multidrug resistance (MDR gene expressed by all-trans retinoic acid-resistant HL-60 cells. In the present study, we compared the multidrug resistance of the HA117 with that of the classical multidrug resistance gene 1 (MDR1 in breast cancer cell line 4T1. Methods Transduction of the breast cancer cell line 4T1 with adenoviral vectors encoding the HA117 gene and the green fluorescence protein gene (GFP (Ad-GFP-HA117, the MDR1 and GFP (Ad-GFP-MDR1 or GFP (Ad-GFP was respectively carried out. The transduction efficiency and the multiplicity of infection (MOI were detected by fluorescence microscope and flow cytometry. The transcription of HA117 gene and MDR1 gene were detected by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR. Western blotting analysis was used to detect the expression of P-glycoprotein (P-gp but the expression of HA117 could not be analyzed as it is a novel gene and its antibody has not yet been synthesized. The drug-excretion activity of HA117 and MDR1 were determined by daunorubicin (DNR efflux assay. The drug sensitivities of 4T1/HA117 and 4T1/MDR1 to chemotherapeutic agents were detected by Methyl-Thiazolyl-Tetrazolium (MTT assay. Results The transducted efficiency of Ad-GFP-HA117 and Ad-GFP-MDR1 were 75%-80% when MOI was equal to 50. The transduction of Ad-GFP-HA117 and Ad-GFP-MDR1 could increase the expression of HA117 and MDR1. The drug resistance index to Adriamycin (ADM, vincristine (VCR, paclitaxel (Taxol and bleomycin (BLM increased to19.8050, 9.0663, 9.7245, 3.5650 respectively for 4T1/HA117 and 24.2236, 11.0480, 11.3741, 0.9630 respectively for 4T1/MDR1 as compared to the control cells. There were no significant differences in drug sensitivity between 4T1/HA117 and 4T1/MDR1 for the P-gp substrates (ADM, VCR and Taxol (P Conclusions These results confirm that HA117 is a strong MDR gene in both HL-60 and 4T1 cells. Furthermore, our results indicate that the MDR

  2. Genome evolution and plasticity of Serratia marcescens, an important multidrug-resistant nosocomial pathogen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iguchi, Atsushi; Nagaya, Yutaka; Pradel, Elizabeth; Ooka, Tadasuke; Ogura, Yoshitoshi; Katsura, Keisuke; Kurokawa, Ken; Oshima, Kenshiro; Hattori, Masahira; Parkhill, Julian; Sebaihia, Mohamed; Coulthurst, Sarah J; Gotoh, Naomasa; Thomson, Nicholas R; Ewbank, Jonathan J; Hayashi, Tetsuya

    2014-08-01

    Serratia marcescens is an important nosocomial pathogen that can cause an array of infections, most notably of the urinary tract and bloodstream. Naturally, it is found in many environmental niches, and is capable of infecting plants and animals. The emergence and spread of multidrug-resistant strains producing extended-spectrum or metallo beta-lactamases now pose a threat to public health worldwide. Here we report the complete genome sequences of two carefully selected S. marcescens strains, a multidrug-resistant clinical isolate (strain SM39) and an insect isolate (strain Db11). Our comparative analyses reveal the core genome of S. marcescens and define the potential metabolic capacity, virulence, and multidrug resistance of this species. We show a remarkable intraspecies genetic diversity, both at the sequence level and with regards genome flexibility, which may reflect the diversity of niches inhabited by members of this species. A broader analysis with other Serratia species identifies a set of approximately 3,000 genes that characterize the genus. Within this apparent genetic diversity, we identified many genes implicated in the high virulence potential and antibiotic resistance of SM39, including the metallo beta-lactamase and multiple other drug resistance determinants carried on plasmid pSMC1. We further show that pSMC1 is most closely related to plasmids circulating in Pseudomonas species. Our data will provide a valuable basis for future studies on S. marcescens and new insights into the genetic mechanisms that underlie the emergence of pathogens highly resistant to multiple antimicrobial agents. © The Author(s) 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Molecular Biology and Evolution.

  3. Purification of a Multidrug Resistance Transporter for Crystallization Studies

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    Kamela O. Alegre

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Crystallization of integral membrane proteins is a challenging field and much effort has been invested in optimizing the overexpression and purification steps needed to obtain milligram amounts of pure, stable, monodisperse protein sample for crystallography studies. Our current work involves the structural and functional characterization of the Escherichia coli multidrug resistance transporter MdtM, a member of the major facilitator superfamily (MFS. Here we present a protocol for isolation of MdtM to increase yields of recombinant protein to the milligram quantities necessary for pursuit of structural studies using X-ray crystallography. Purification of MdtM was enhanced by introduction of an elongated His-tag, followed by identification and subsequent removal of chaperonin contamination. For crystallization trials of MdtM, detergent screening using size exclusion chromatography determined that decylmaltoside (DM was the shortest-chain detergent that maintained the protein in a stable, monodispersed state. Crystallization trials of MdtM performed using the hanging-drop diffusion method with commercially available crystallization screens yielded 3D protein crystals under several different conditions. We contend that the purification protocol described here may be employed for production of high-quality protein of other multidrug efflux members of the MFS, a ubiquitous, physiologically and clinically important class of membrane transporters.

  4. Molecular epidemiological survey of bacteremia by multidrug resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa: the relevance of intrinsic resistance mechanisms.

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    Raquel Cristina Cavalcanti Dantas

    Full Text Available The bacterial factors associated with bacteremia by multidrug-resistant and extensively drug-resistant P. aeruginosa, including overexpression of efflux pumps, AmpC overproduction, and loss/alteration of the OprD porin in isolates that are non-Metallo-β-Lactamase producing were analyzed in a retrospective study. Molecular analyses included strain typing by Pulsed Field Gel Electrophoresis and identification of key genes via qualitative and quantitative PCR-based assays. Previous use of carbapenems and tracheostomy was independently associated with the development of bacteremia by extensively drug-resistant and multidrug-resistant strains of P. aeruginosa. A high consumption of antimicrobials was observed, and 75.0% of the isolates contained amplicons with the blaSPM-1 and blaVIM genes. Of the 47 non-Metallo-β-Lactamase isolates, none had another type of carbapenemase. However, the isolates exhibited high rates of hyperproduction of AmpC, loss of the OprD porin (71.4% and the presence of MexABOprM (57.1% and MexXY (64.3%. This study suggests that in non-Metallo-β-Lactamase isolates, the association of intrinsic resistance mechanisms could contributes to the expression of multidrug-resistant/extensively drug-resistant phenotypes.

  5. Targeting protein kinases to reverse multidrug resistance in sarcoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hua; Shen, Jacson; Choy, Edwin; Hornicek, Francis J; Duan, Zhenfeng

    2016-02-01

    Sarcomas are a group of cancers that arise from transformed cells of mesenchymal origin. They can be classified into over 50 subtypes, accounting for approximately 1% of adult and 15% of pediatric cancers. Wide surgical resection, radiotherapy, and chemotherapy are the most common treatments for the majority of sarcomas. Among these therapies, chemotherapy can palliate symptoms and prolong life for some sarcoma patients. However, sarcoma cells can have intrinsic or acquired resistance after treatment with chemotherapeutics drugs, leading to the development of multidrug resistance (MDR). MDR attenuates the efficacy of anticancer drugs and results in treatment failure for sarcomas. Therefore, overcoming MDR is an unmet need for sarcoma therapy. Certain protein kinases demonstrate aberrant expression and/or activity in sarcoma cells, which have been found to be involved in the regulation of sarcoma cell progression, such as cell cycle, apoptosis, and survival. Inhibiting these protein kinases may not only decrease the proliferation and growth of sarcoma cells, but also reverse their resistance to chemotherapeutic drugs to subsequently reduce the doses of anticancer drugs and decrease drug side-effects. The discovery of novel strategies targeting protein kinases opens a door to a new area of sarcoma research and provides insight into the mechanisms of MDR in chemotherapy. This review will focus on the recent studies in targeting protein kinase to reverse chemotherapeutic drug resistance in sarcoma. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Multidrug Resistant Tuberculosis involving the Clavicle, Spine and Ribs

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    H Krishnan

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available This report describes an unusual case of multidrug resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB, involving the right clavicle and multicentric aytpical spine involvement without any neurological deficit. The female patient presented with acute onset of right clavicular pain associated with a one-month history of lower backache with constitutional symptoms. The clavicular lesion and MRI spine findings were highly suggestive of TB. Anti TB drugs (ATD were started empirically as Sabah, Malaysia the patient’s home, is an endemic area for TB. Despite, 2 months of ATD administration, the patient did not respond well clinically and developed left sided chest wall abscesses arising from the left 3rd and 6th ribs. She was then treated for MDR-TB infection and has responded well to this treatment.

  7. Prevalence of current patterns and predictive trends of multidrug-resistant Salmonella Typhi in Sudan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayman A. Elshayeb

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Enteric fever has persistence of great impact in Sudanese public health especially during rainy season when the causative agent Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi possesses pan endemic patterns in most regions of Sudan - Khartoum. Objectives The present study aims to assess the recent state of antibiotics susceptibility of Salmonella Typhi with special concern to multidrug resistance strains and predict the emergence of new resistant patterns and outbreaks. Methods Salmonella Typhi strains were isolated and identified according to the guidelines of the International Standardization Organization and the World Health Organization. The antibiotics susceptibilities were tested using the recommendations of the Clinical Laboratories Standards Institute. Predictions of emerging resistant bacteria patterns and outbreaks in Sudan were done using logistic regression, forecasting linear equations and in silico simulations models. Results A total of 124 antibiotics resistant Salmonella Typhi strains categorized in 12 average groups were isolated, different patterns of resistance statistically calculated by (y = ax − b. Minimum bactericidal concentration’s predication of resistance was given the exponential trend (y = n ex and the predictive coefficient R2 > 0 < 1 are approximately alike. It was assumed that resistant bacteria occurred with a constant rate of antibiotic doses during the whole experimental period. Thus, the number of sensitive bacteria decreases at the same rate as resistant occur following term to the modified predictive model which solved computationally. Conclusion This study assesses the prediction of multi-drug resistance among S. Typhi isolates by applying low cost materials and simple statistical methods suitable for the most frequently used antibiotics as typhoid empirical therapy. Therefore, bacterial surveillance systems should be implemented to present data on the aetiology and current

  8. Prevalensi dan Pola Sensitivitas Antimikroba Multidrug Resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa di RSUD Arifin Achmad

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dewi Anggraini

    2018-03-01

    Prevalence and Antimicrobial Susceptibility Profile of Multidrug Resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa in Arifin Achmad General Hospital Antimicrobial resistance is one of major public health problems since the era of antimicrobial discovery, inclusing multidrug resistant (MDR P. aeruginosa. The prevalence of this resistance  is increasing in different parts of the world, leading to the difficulties in dealing with this bacteria. The aim of this descriptive retrospective study was to determine the prevalence of MDR P. aeruginosa and its susceptibility profile. Data were collected from the bacteria cultures and antibiotic susceptibility test results from various clinical specimens in Arifin Achmad General Hospital throughout 2015. The test was performed in VITEK 2 Compact. MDR P. aeruginosa is defined as P. aeruginosa which is not sensitive to three or more following antibiotics: meropenem or imipenem, ciprofloxacin, gentamicin or amikacin, ceftazidime or cefepime, and piperacilin/tazobactam. The prevalence of MDR P. aeruginosa was 45.5%. The isolates of MDR P. aeruginosa was mostly derived from pus and sputum specimens from the surgical ward and intensive care unit. .  The most sensitive antibiotics was amikacin (76.9% followed by piperacilin/tazobactam (57.2%, meropenem (57.0%, gentamicin (54.5%, cefepime (53.7%, ceftazidime (49.6%, ciprofloxacin (48.8%, and aztreonam (35.5%. Antibiotic sensitivity in MDR P. aeruginosa was much lower than in P. aeruginosa. This study shows a high prevalence of MDR P. aeruginosa, especially in Pekanbaru. This susceptibility profile can serve as a guideline for the selection of appropriate antibiotics for infections caused by P. aeruginosa. Key words: Antibiotic susceptibility, multidrug resistant, Pekanbaru, pseudomonas aeruginosa

  9. Detection of multidrug resistance using molecular nuclear technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jae Tae; Ahn, Byeong Cheol [School of Medicine, Kyungpook National Univ., Daegu (Korea, Republic of)

    2004-04-01

    Although the outcome of cancer patients after cytotoxic chemotherapy is related diverse mechanisms, multidrug resistance (MDR) for chemotherapeutic drugs due to cellular P-glycoprotein (Pgp) or multidrug-resistance associated protein (MRP) is most important factor in the chemotherapy failure to cancer. A large number of pharmacologic compounds, including verapamil, quinidine, tamoxifen, cyclosporin A and quinolone derivatives have been reported to overcome MDR. Single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) and positron emission tomography (PET) are available for the detection of Pgp and MRP-mediated transporter. {sup 99}m-Tc-MIBI and other {sup 99}m-Tc-radiopharmaceuticals are substrates for Pgp and MRP, and have been used in clinical studies for tumor imaging, and to visualize blockade of Pgp-mediated transport after modulation of Pgp pump. Colchicine, verapamil and daunorubicin labeled with {sup 11}C have been evaluated for the quantification of Pgp-mediated transport with PET in vivo and reported to be feasible substrates with which to image Pgp function in tumors. Leukotrienes are specific substrates for MRP and N-({sup 11}C)acetyl-leukotriene E4 provides an opportunity to study MRP function non-invasively in vivo. SPECT and PET pharmaceuticals have successfully used to evaluate pharmacologic effects of MDR modulators. Imaging of MDR and reversal of MDR with bioluminescence in a living animal is also evaluated for future clinical trial. We have described recent advances in molecular imaging of MDR and reviewed recent publications regarding feasibility of SPECT and PET imaging to study the functionality of MDR transporters in vivo.

  10. Polymorphisms in Plasmodium falciparum chloroquine resistance transporter and multidrug resistance 1 genes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Venkatesan, Meera; Gadalla, Nahla B; Stepniewska, Kasia

    2014-01-01

    Adequate clinical and parasitologic cure by artemisinin combination therapies relies on the artemisinin component and the partner drug. Polymorphisms in the Plasmodium falciparum chloroquine resistance transporter (pfcrt) and P. falciparum multidrug resistance 1 (pfmdr1) genes are associated...... with decreased sensitivity to amodiaquine and lumefantrine, but effects of these polymorphisms on therapeutic responses to artesunate-amodiaquine (ASAQ) and artemether-lumefantrine (AL) have not been clearly defined. Individual patient data from 31 clinical trials were harmonized and pooled by using standardized...

  11. Selection of a multidrug resistance plasmid by sublethal levels of antibiotics and heavy metals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gullberg, Erik; Albrecht, Lisa M; Karlsson, Christoffer; Sandegren, Linus; Andersson, Dan I

    2014-10-07

    How sublethal levels of antibiotics and heavy metals select for clinically important multidrug resistance plasmids is largely unknown. Carriage of plasmids generally confers substantial fitness costs, implying that for the plasmid-carrying bacteria to be maintained in the population, the plasmid cost needs to be balanced by a selective pressure conferred by, for example, antibiotics or heavy metals. We studied the effects of low levels of antibiotics and heavy metals on the selective maintenance of a 220-kbp extended-spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL) plasmid identified in a hospital outbreak of Klebsiella pneumoniae and Escherichia coli. The concentrations of antibiotics and heavy metals required to maintain plasmid-carrying bacteria, the minimal selective concentrations (MSCs), were in all cases below (almost up to 140-fold) the MIC of the plasmid-free susceptible bacteria. This finding indicates that the very low antibiotic and heavy metal levels found in polluted environments and in treated humans and animals might be sufficiently high to maintain multiresistance plasmids. When resistance genes were moved from the plasmid to the chromosome, the MSC decreased, showing that MSC for a specific resistance conditionally depends on genetic context. This finding suggests that a cost-free resistance could be maintained in a population by an infinitesimally low concentration of antibiotic. By studying the effect of combinations of several compounds, it was observed that for certain combinations of drugs each new compound added lowered the minimal selective concentration of the others. This combination effect could be a significant factor in the selection of multidrug resistance plasmids/bacterial clones in complex multidrug environments. Importance: Antibiotic resistance is in many pathogenic bacteria caused by genes that are carried on large conjugative plasmids. These plasmids typically contain multiple antibiotic resistance genes as well as genes that confer resistance to

  12. The radiological spectrum of pulmonary multidrug-resistant tuberculosis: in HIV-Negative patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zahirifard, S.; Amiri, M.V.; Bakhshayesh Karam, M.; Mirsaeidi, S.M.; Ehsanpour, A.; Masjedi, M.R.

    2003-01-01

    Background: Multidrug-resistant tuberculosis is a major worldwide health problem. In countries where tuberculosis is of moderate to high prevalence, the issue of Multidrug-resistant tuberculosis carries significant importance. Multidrug-resistant tuberculosis, similar to drug-sensitive tuberculosis, is contagious. Meanwhile its treatment is not only more difficult but also more expensive with lower success rates. Regarding clinical findings, there is no significant difference between Multidrug-resistant tuberculosis and drug-sensitive tuberculosis. Therefore determination of characteristic radiological findings in cases of Multidrug-resistant tuberculosis might be of help in early detection, and hence appropriate management of this disease condition. Objective: To explain the radiological spectrum of pulmonary Multidrug-resistant tuberculosis. Patients and methods: We retrospectively evaluated the radiographic images of 35 patients with clinically-and microbiologically- proven Multidrug-resistant tuberculosis admitted to our tertiary-care tuberculosis unit over a period of 13 months. The latest chest x-ray of all patients and the conventional chest CT scan without contrast of 15 patients were reviewed by three expert radiologists who rendered consensus opinion. Results: Of the 35 patients with imaging studies, 23 (66%) were male and 12 (34%) were female. The mean±SD age of participants was 38.2±17.3 (range: 16-20) years. 33 patients were known as secondary and only 2 had primary Multidrug-resistant tuberculosis. Chest radiography revealed cavitary lesion in 80% pulmonary infiltration in 89% and nodules in 80% of the cases. Pleurisy was the rarest finding observed in only 5 (14%) patients. All of 15 chest CT scans revealed cavitation, 93% of which were bilateral and multiple. Pleural involvement was seen in 93% of patients. Conclusion: Presence of multiple cavities, especially in both lungs, nodular and infiltrative lesions, and pleural effusion are main features

  13. Genetic Drivers of Multidrug Resistance inCandida glabrata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Healey, Kelley R; Jimenez Ortigosa, Cristina; Shor, Erika; Perlin, David S

    2016-01-01

    Both the incidence of invasive fungal infections and rates of multidrug resistance associated with fungal pathogen Candida glabrata have increased in recent years. In this perspective, we will discuss the mechanisms underlying the capacity of C. glabrata to rapidly develop resistance to multiple drug classes, including triazoles and echinocandins. We will focus on the extensive genetic diversity among clinical isolates of C. glabrata , which likely enables this yeast to survive multiple stressors, such as immune pressure and antifungal exposure. In particular, over half of C. glabrata clinical strains collected from U.S. and non-U.S. sites have mutations in the DNA mismatch repair gene MSH2 , leading to a mutator phenotype and increased frequencies of drug-resistant mutants in vitro . Furthermore, recent studies and data presented here document extensive chromosomal rearrangements among C. glabrata strains, resulting in a large number of distinct karyotypes within a single species. By analyzing clonal, serial isolates derived from individual patients treated with antifungal drugs, we were able to document chromosomal changes occurring in C. glabrata in vivo during the course of antifungal treatment. Interestingly, we also show that both MSH2 genotypes and chromosomal patterns cluster consistently into specific strain types, indicating that C. glabrata has a complex population structure where genomic variants arise, perhaps during the process of adaptation to environmental changes, and persist over time.

  14. [Multidrug-resistant tuberculosis: challenges of a global emergence].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Comolet, T

    2015-10-01

    Drug-resistant tuberculosis, in particular Multi-Drug Resistant (MDR-TB) is an increasing global concern and a major burden for some developing countries, especially the BRICS. It is assumed that every year roughly 350 000 new MDR-TB cases occur in the world, on average in 20.5% of TB patients that have been previously treated but also in 3.5% of persons that have never been on TB treatment before. The global distribution of cases is very heterogeneous and is now better understood thanks to a growing number of specific surveys and routine surveillance systems: incidence is much higher in southern Africa and in all countries formerly part of the USSR. Countries with weak health systems and previously inefficient TB control programs are highly vulnerable to MDR epidemics because program failures do help creating, maintaining and spreading resistances. Global response is slowly rolled out and diagnosis capacities are on the rise (mostly with genotypic methods) but adequate and successful treatment and care is still limited to a minority of global cases. From a public health perspective the MDR-TB growing epidemics will not be controlled merely by the introduction of few new antibiotics because it is also linked to patient's compliance and adequate case management supported by efficient TB program. In depth quality improvement will only be achieved after previous errors are thoroughly analyzed and boldly corrected.

  15. Barbigerone reverses multidrug resistance in breast MCF-7/ADR cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiuxia; Wan, Li; Wang, Fang; Pei, Heying; Zheng, Li; Wu, Wenshuang; Ye, Haoyu; Wang, Yanping; Chen, Lijuan

    2018-01-24

    Development of agents to overcome multidrug resistance (MDR) is one of the important strategies in cancer chemotherapy, and P-glycoprotein (P-gp) correlates with the degree of resistance. As a naturally occurring isoflavone, whether barbigerone (BA) could reverse MDR, is unknown. In this paper, we evaluated effects of BA on reversing P-gp mediated MDR of adriamycin (ADR)-resistant human breast carcinoma (MCF-7/ADR) cells. BA (0.5 μM) treatment showed strong potency to increase ADR cytotoxicity toward MCF-7/ADR cells. It was also demonstrated that BA time- and dose-dependently increased accumulations of ADR and reduced the efflux in MCF-7/ADR cells, pretreatment of these cells with BA might relocalized ADR to the nuclei. Furthermore, the results also revealed that BA did not affect P-gp, but alter P-gp ATPase activity. Intravenous administration of BA significantly increased anticancer efficacy of ADR to MCF-7/ADR xenograft model in nude mice. These results revealed that BA might reverse P-gp mediated MDR through inhibition of ATPase activity, which indicated a novel use of BA as a potent candidate for cancer chemotherapy. Copyright © 2018 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  16. Genotyping of clinical and environmental multidrug resistantEnterococcus faeciumstrains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shokoohizadeh, Leili; Mobarez, Ashraf Mohabati; Alebouyeh, Masoud; Zali, Mohammad Reza; Ranjbar, Reza

    2017-01-01

    Multidrug resistant (MDR) Enterococcus faecium is a nosocomial pathogen and clonal complex 17 (CC17) is the main genetic subpopulation of E. faecium in hospitals worldwide. There has thus far been no report of major E. faecium clones in Iranian hospitals. The present study analyzed strains of MDR E. faecium obtained from patients and the Intensive Care Unit environments using pulsed field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) and multilocus sequence typing (MLST) to determine the antibiotic resistance patterns and genetic features of the dominant. clones of E. faecium. PFGE and MLST analysis revealed the presence of 17and 15 different subtypes, respectively. Of these, 18 (86%) isolates belonged toCC17. Most strains in this clonal complex harbored the esp gene and exhibited resistance to vancomycin, teicoplanin, ampicillin, ciprofloxacin, gentamicin, and erythromycin. The MLST results revealed 12 new sequence types (ST) for the first time. Approximately 50% of the STs were associated with ST203. Detection of E. faecium strains belonging to CC17 on medical equipment and in clinical specimens verified the circulation of high-risk MDR clones among the patients and in hospital environments in Iran.

  17. Genetic drivers of multidrug resistance in Candida glabrata

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kelley R Healey

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Both the incidence of invasive fungal infections and rates of multidrug resistance associated with fungal pathogen Candida glabrata have increased in recent years. In this perspective, we will discuss the mechanisms underlying the capacity of C. glabrata to rapidly develop resistance to multiple drug classes, including triazoles and echinocandins. We will focus on the extensive genetic diversity among clinical isolates of C. glabrata, which likely enables this yeast to survive multiple stressors, such as immune pressure and antifungal exposure. In particular, over half of C. glabrata clinical strains collected from U.S. and non-U.S. sites have mutations in the DNA mismatch repair gene MSH2, leading to a partial mutator phenotype and increased frequencies of drug-resistant mutants in vitro. Furthermore, recent studies and data presented here document extensive chromosomal rearrangements among C. glabrata strains, resulting in a large number of distinct karyotypes within a single species. By analyzing clonal, serial isolates derived from individual patients treated with antifungal drugs, we were able to document chromosomal changes occurring in C. glabrata in vivo during the course of antifungal treatment. Interestingly, we also show that both MSH2 genotypes and chromosomal patterns cluster consistently into specific strain types, indicating that C. glabrata has a complex population structure where genomic variants arise, perhaps during the process of adaptation to environmental changes, and persist over time.

  18. Chaperonin GroEL/GroES over-expression promotes multi-drug resistance in E. coli following exposure to aminoglycoside antibiotics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lise eGoltermann

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Antibiotic resistance is an increasing challenge to modern healthcare. Aminoglycoside antiobiotics cause translation corruption and protein misfolding and aggregation in Escherichia coli. We previously showed that chaperonin GroEL/GroES depletion and overexpression sensitize and promote short-term tolerance, respectively, to this drug class. Here we show that chaperonin GroEL/GroES over-expression accelerates acquisition of aminoglycoside resistance and multi-drug resistance following sub-lethal aminoglycoside antibiotic exposure. Chaperonin buffering could provide a novel mechanism for antibiotic resistance and multi-drug resistance development.

  19. Cutaneous tuberculosis due to multidrug-resistant tubercle bacilli and difficulties in clinical diagnosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V Ramesh

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This report describes 6 HIV-negative patients including 5 children with scrofuloderma and an adult with lupus vulgaris, out of a total of 303 cases of cutaneous tuberculosis seen during a 4½-year period, who showed a positive tuberculin test and granulomatous histopathology, but failed to respond to first-line antitubercular therapy. They were suspected to have multidrug-resistant infection as no other cause could be ascertained. Tissue aspirate or biopsy was sent for histopathology and culture. Mycobacterium tuberculosis was isolated from the aspirate in three patients and sputum in one with associated pulmonary tuberculosis. Drug susceptibility tests showed that all isolates were resistant to rifampicin and isoniazid, and one each additionally to streptomycin and ethambutol, respectively. In two, culture was unsuccessful. All were administered second-line antitubercular drugs. Clinical improvement was appreciable within 2 months as weight gain, and regression of ulcers, swellings and plaques. Two completed the recommended 24 months of therapy. Multidrug-resistant cutaneous tuberculosis should be suspected in patients with no response to first-line drugs, with clinical deterioration, and where other causes of treatment failure are not forthcoming. Owing to poor isolation rates on culture and low sensitivity of molecular tests, in such cases, a trial of second-line anti-tubercular drugs may be justified for a reasonable period of 2 months. Where facilities permit, culture and drug sensitivity tests should be done before starting treatment. Culture positivity is better from aspirated material.

  20. Genome sequencing and annotation of a Campylobacter coli strain isolated from milk with multidrug resistance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kun C. Liu

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available As the most prevalent bacterial cause of human gastroenteritis, food-borne Campylobacter infections pose a serious threat to public health. Whole Genome Sequencing (WGS is a tool providing quick and inexpensive approaches for analysis of food-borne pathogen epidemics. Here we report the WGS and annotation of a Campylobacter coli strain, FNW20G12, which was isolated from milk in the United States in 1997 and carries multidrug resistance. The draft genome of FNW20G12 (DDBJ/ENA/GenBank accession number LWIH00000000 contains 1, 855,435 bp (GC content 31.4% with 1902 annotated coding regions, 48 RNAs and resistance to aminoglycoside, beta-lactams, tetracycline, as well as fluoroquinolones. There are very few genome reports of C. coli from dairy products with multidrug resistance. Here the draft genome of FNW20G12, a C. coli strain isolated from raw milk, is presented to aid in the epidemiology study of C. coli antimicrobial resistance and role in foodborne outbreak.

  1. Multidrug resistant to extensively drug resistant tuberculosis: What is ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Prakash

    major anti tuberculosis drugs; Isoniazid and Rifampicin with or without resistance to other anti-TB drugs has been termed. MDR-TB. MDR-TB is more difficult to treat than drug- susceptible TB, requiring the use of less effective second line anti tubercular drugs (SLDs) which are often associated with major side effects. 2.

  2. Plasmid mediated resistance in multidrug resistant bacteria isolated ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The antibiotic susceptibility testing of isolated bacteria associated with septicaemia in children were carried out using standard microbiological protocol. The MAR index for the test bacterial isolates was determined and the bacterial isolates that displayed multiple antibiotic resistance were investigated for the presence of ...

  3. Higher Desolvation Energy Reduces Molecular Recognition in Multi-Drug Resistant HIV-1 Protease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ladislau C. Kovari

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Designing HIV-1 protease inhibitors that overcome drug-resistance is still a challenging task. In this study, four clinical isolates of multi-drug resistant HIV-1 proteases that exhibit resistance to all the US FDA-approved HIV-1 protease inhibitors and also reduce the substrate recognition ability were examined. A multi-drug resistant HIV-1 protease isolate, MDR 769, was co-crystallized with the p2/NC substrate and the mutated CA/p2 substrate, CA/p2 P1’F. Both substrates display different levels of molecular recognition by the wild-type and multi-drug resistant HIV-1 protease. From the crystal structures, only limited differences can be identified between the wild-type and multi-drug resistant protease. Therefore, a wild-type HIV-1 protease and four multi-drug resistant HIV-1 proteases in complex with the two peptides were modeled based on the crystal structures and examined during a 10 ns-molecular dynamics simulation. The simulation results reveal that the multi-drug resistant HIV-1 proteases require higher desolvation energy to form complexes with the peptides. This result suggests that the desolvation of the HIV-1 protease active site is an important step of protease-ligand complex formation as well as drug resistance. Therefore, desolvation energy could be considered as a parameter in the evaluation of future HIV-1 protease inhibitor candidates.

  4. Resistant plasmid profile analysis of multidrug resistant Escherichia ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    trast to uropathogenic E. coli (UPEC), which causes symptomatic urinary tract infections (UTI), very lit- tle is known about the mechanisms by which these strains colonize the human urinary tract19. Escherichia coli is responsible for more than 80.0% of all UTIs and causes both ABU and symptomatic UTI19. The main.

  5. High prevalence of multidrug resistance in bacterial uropathogens from Kathmandu, Nepal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baral Pankaj

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Urinary Tract Infection (UTI is one of the most common infectious diseases and people of all age-groups and geographical locations are affected. The impact of disease is even worst in low-resource developing countries due to unaware of the UTIs caused by multidrug-resistant (MDR pathogens and the possibility of transfer of MDR traits between them. The present study aimed to determine the prevalence of MDR bacterial isolates from UTI patients, the antibiotic resistance pattern and the conjugational transfer of multidrug resistance phenotypes in Escherichia coli (E. coli. Results Two hundred and nineteen bacterial isolates were recovered from 710 urine samples at Kathmandu Model hospital during the study period. All samples and isolates were investigated by standard laboratory procedures. Among the significant bacterial growth (30.8%, 219 isolates, 41.1% isolates were MDR. The most prevailing organism, E. coli (81.3%, 178 isolates was 38.2% MDR, whereas second most common organism, Citrobacter spp. (5%, 11 isolates was found 72.7% MDR. Extended-spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL production was detected in 55.2% of a subset of MDR E. coli isolates. Among the 29 MDR E. coli isolates, plasmids of size ranging 2-51 kb were obtained with different 15 profiles. The most common plasmid of size 32 kb was detected in all of the plasmid-harbored E. coli strains. The majority of E. coli isolates investigated for the multidrug resistance transfer were able to transfer plasmid-mediated MDR phenotypes along with ESBL pattern with a frequency ranging from 0.3 × 10-7 to 1.5 × 10-7 to an E. coli HB101 recipient strain by conjugation. Most of the donor and recipient strain showed high levels of minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC values for commonly-used antibiotics. Conclusions The high prevalence of multidrug resistance in bacterial uropathogens was observed. Particularly, resistance patterns were alarmingly higher for amoxycillin, co

  6. [On the importance of multidrug-resistant strains of pathogenic microorganisms in ophthalmic practice].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galeeva, G Z; Samoylov, A N; Rascheskov, A Yu

    2015-01-01

    This is a review of epidemiological, microbiological and ophthalmological publications on the importance of multidrug-resistant bacterial strains in medical, particularly ophthalmological, care. Current state of pharmaceutical market and wide variety of generics confuses doctor's (including ophthalmologist's) sense of decision-making on the optimum antibiotic for the treatment of purulent inflammation. Indiscriminate use of antibiotics contributes to multiple drug resistance in bacteria. The world returns to the pre-antibiotic era, in which there was no treatment for severe infectious and inflammatory diseases. The most dangerous multiresistant strains known to medical science and their role in etiology of inflammatory eye diseases are listed in the article. Since neonatal conjunctivitis and postoperative endophthalmitis are the most common ocular inflammatory diseases caused by nosocomial multiresistant bacteria, their etiological classification is also described. Emergence of antibiotic resistance to most frequently used ophthalmic agents and prevention strategies are discussed.

  7. Multistrain models predict sequential multidrug treatment strategies to result in less antimicrobial resistance than combination treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ahmad, Amais; Zachariasen, Camilla; Christiansen, Lasse Engbo

    2016-01-01

    frequency did not play a role in suppressing the growth of resistant strains, but the specific order of the two antimicrobials did. Predictions made from the study could be used to redesign multidrug treatment strategies not only for intramuscular treatment in pigs, but also for other dosing routes.......Background: Combination treatment is increasingly used to fight infections caused by bacteria resistant to two or more antimicrobials. While multiple studies have evaluated treatment strategies to minimize the emergence of resistant strains for single antimicrobial treatment, fewer studies have...... considered combination treatments. The current study modeled bacterial growth in the intestine of pigs after intramuscular combination treatment (i.e. using two antibiotics simultaneously) and sequential treatments (i.e. alternating between two antibiotics) in order to identify the factors that favor...

  8. Cytotoxicity of rhein, the active metabolite of sennoside laxatives, is reduced by multidrug resistance-associated protein 1

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Gorkom, BAP; Timmer-Bosscha, H; de Jong, S; Kleibeuker, JH; de Vries, EGE

    2002-01-01

    Anthranoid laxatives, belonging to the anthraquinones as do anthracyclines, possibly Increase colorectal cancer risk. Anthracyclines Interfere with topoisomerase II, Intercalate DNA and are substrates for P-glycoprotein and multidrug resistance-associated protein I. P-glycoprotein and multidrug

  9. [Multidrug-resistant tuberculosis: epidemiology and risk factors].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smaoui Fourati, S; Mzid, H; Marouane, C; Kammoun, S; Messadi-Akrout, F

    2015-08-01

    Despite the availability of potent drugs and the availability of vaccine, tuberculosis remains until today one of the most worrying infectious diseases because of both its morbidity and mortality. This serious health problem is further complicated by the emergence of multidrug-resistant (MDR) or extensively drug-resistant strains (XDR). The number of MDR and XDR strains has continued to increase in recent years. Therefore, it is necessary to determine the risk factors leading to the emergence of MDR-TB strains to improve its overall management. Most studies indicate that the irregular previous treatment of tuberculosis with poor adherence is the main risk factor found. Other risk factors such as digestive issues, age, sex, and immunosuppression have been reported by several studies. In Tunisia, MDR-TB prevalence remains low with 0.8% among new cases and 12% among the restatements but control of this disease is necessary and remains essentially preventive. It is based on real preventive strategies planned according to local and updated regional data. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  10. Effects of mefloquine use on Plasmodium vivax multidrug resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khim, Nimol; Andrianaranjaka, Voahangy; Popovici, Jean; Kim, Saorin; Ratsimbasoa, Arsene; Benedet, Christophe; Barnadas, Celine; Durand, Remy; Thellier, Marc; Legrand, Eric; Musset, Lise; Menegon, Michela; Severini, Carlo; Nour, Bakri Y M; Tichit, Magali; Bouchier, Christiane; Mercereau-Puijalon, Odile; Ménard, Didier

    2014-10-01

    Numerous studies have indicated a strong association between amplification of the multidrug resistance-1 gene and in vivo and in vitro mefloquine resistance of Plasmodium falciparum. Although falciparum infection usually is not treated with mefloquine, incorrect diagnosis, high frequency of undetected mixed infections, or relapses of P. vivax infection triggered by P. falciparum infections expose non-P. falciparum parasites to mefloquine. To assess the consequences of such unintentional treatments on P. vivax, we studied variations in number of Pvmdr-1 (PlasmoDB accession no. PVX_080100, NCBI reference sequence NC_009915.1) copies worldwide in 607 samples collected in areas with different histories of mefloquine use from residents and from travelers returning to France. Number of Pvmdr-1 copies correlated with drug use history. Treatment against P. falciparum exerts substantial collateral pressure against sympatric P. vivax, jeopardizing future use of mefloquine against P. vivax. A drug policy is needed that takes into consideration all co-endemic species of malaria parasites.

  11. Multidrug resistance in fungi: regulation of transporter-encoding gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, Sanjoy; Moye-Rowley, W Scott

    2014-01-01

    A critical risk to the continued success of antifungal chemotherapy is the acquisition of resistance; a risk exacerbated by the few classes of effective antifungal drugs. Predictably, as the use of these drugs increases in the clinic, more resistant organisms can be isolated from patients. A particularly problematic form of drug resistance that routinely emerges in the major fungal pathogens is known as multidrug resistance. Multidrug resistance refers to the simultaneous acquisition of tolerance to a range of drugs via a limited or even single genetic change. This review will focus on recent progress in understanding pathways of multidrug resistance in fungi including those of most medical relevance. Analyses of multidrug resistance in Saccharomyces cerevisiae have provided the most detailed outline of multidrug resistance in a eukaryotic microorganism. Multidrug resistant isolates of S. cerevisiae typically result from changes in the activity of a pair of related transcription factors that in turn elicit overproduction of several target genes. Chief among these is the ATP-binding cassette (ABC)-encoding gene PDR5. Interestingly, in the medically important Candida species, very similar pathways are involved in acquisition of multidrug resistance. In both C. albicans and C. glabrata, changes in the activity of transcriptional activator proteins elicits overproduction of a protein closely related to S. cerevisiae Pdr5 called Cdr1. The major filamentous fungal pathogen, Aspergillus fumigatus, was previously thought to acquire resistance to azole compounds (the principal antifungal drug class) via alterations in the azole drug target-encoding gene cyp51A. More recent data indicate that pathways in addition to changes in the cyp51A gene are important determinants in A. fumigatus azole resistance. We will discuss findings that suggest azole resistance in A. fumigatus and Candida species may share more mechanistic similarities than previously thought.

  12. Multidrug-Resistant Enterococcal Infections : New Compounds, Novel Antimicrobial Therapies?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Harten, Roel M; Willems, Rob J L; Martin, Nathaniel I; Hendrickx, Antoni P A

    Over the past two decades infections due to antibiotic-resistant bacteria have escalated world-wide, affecting patient morbidity, mortality, and health care costs. Among these bacteria, Enterococcus faecium and Enterococcus faecalis represent opportunistic nosocomial pathogens that cause

  13. Nanomedicine to Deal With Cancer Cell Biology in Multi-Drug Resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tekchandani, Pawan; Kurmi, Balak Das; Paliwal, Shivani Rai

    2017-01-01

    Today Cancer still remains a major cause of mortality and death worldwide, in humans. Chemotherapy, a key treatment strategy in cancer, has significant hurdles such as the occurrence of chemoresistance in cancer, which is inherent unresponsiveness or acquired upon exposure to chemotherapeutics. The resistance of cancer cells to an antineoplastic agent accompanied to other chemotherapeutic drugs with different structures and mechanisms of action called multi-drug resistance (MDR) plays an important role in the failure of chemo- therapeutics. MDR is primarily based on the overexpression of drug efflux pumps in the cellular membrane, which belongs to the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) superfamily of proteins, are P-gp (P-glycoprotein) and multidrug resistance-associated protein (MRP). Over the years, various strategies have been evaluated to overcome MDR, based not only on the use of MDR modulators but also on the implementation an innovative approach and advanced nanosized drug delivery systems. Nanomedicine is an emerging tool of chemotherapy that focuses on alternative drug delivery for improvement of the treatment efficacy and reducing side effects to normal tissues. This review aims to focus on the details biology, reversal strategies option with the limitation of MDR and various advantages of the present medical science nanotechnology with intracellular delivery aspects for overcoming the significant potential for improving the treatment of MDR malignancies. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  14. [Potential antimicrobial drug interactions in clinical practice: consequences of polypharmacy and multidrug resistance].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Múgica, Cristina

    2015-12-01

    Polypharmacy is a growing problem nowadays, which can increase the risk of potential drug interactions, and result in a loss of effectiveness. This is particularly relevant to the anti-infective therapy, especially when infection is produced by resistant bacteria, because therapeutic options are limited and interactions can cause treatment failure. All antimicrobial prescriptions were retrospectively reviewed during a week in the Pharmacy Department, in order to detect potential drug-interactions and analysing their clinical significance. A total of 314 antimicrobial prescriptions from 151 patients were checked. There was at least one potential interaction detected in 40% of patients, being more frequent and severe in those infected with multidrug-resistant microorganisms. Drugs most commonly involved were quinolones, azoles, linezolid and vancomycin. Potential drug interactions with antimicrobial agents are a frequent problem that can result in a loss of effectiveness. This is why they should be detected and avoided when possible, in order to optimize antimicrobial therapy, especially in case of multidrug resistant infections.

  15. The serum resistome of a globally disseminated multidrug resistant uropathogenic Escherichia coli clone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phan, Minh-Duy; Peters, Kate M; Sarkar, Sohinee; Lukowski, Samuel W; Allsopp, Luke P; Gomes Moriel, Danilo; Achard, Maud E S; Totsika, Makrina; Marshall, Vikki M; Upton, Mathew; Beatson, Scott A; Schembri, Mark A

    2013-01-01

    Escherichia coli ST131 is a globally disseminated, multidrug resistant clone responsible for a high proportion of urinary tract and bloodstream infections. The rapid emergence and successful spread of E. coli ST131 is strongly associated with antibiotic resistance; however, this phenotype alone is unlikely to explain its dominance amongst multidrug resistant uropathogens circulating worldwide in hospitals and the community. Thus, a greater understanding of the molecular mechanisms that underpin the fitness of E. coli ST131 is required. In this study, we employed hyper-saturated transposon mutagenesis in combination with multiplexed transposon directed insertion-site sequencing to define the essential genes required for in vitro growth and the serum resistome (i.e. genes required for resistance to human serum) of E. coli EC958, a representative of the predominant E. coli ST131 clonal lineage. We identified 315 essential genes in E. coli EC958, 231 (73%) of which were also essential in E. coli K-12. The serum resistome comprised 56 genes, the majority of which encode membrane proteins or factors involved in lipopolysaccharide (LPS) biosynthesis. Targeted mutagenesis confirmed a role in serum resistance for 46 (82%) of these genes. The murein lipoprotein Lpp, along with two lipid A-core biosynthesis enzymes WaaP and WaaG, were most strongly associated with serum resistance. While LPS was the main resistance mechanism defined for E. coli EC958 in serum, the enterobacterial common antigen and colanic acid also impacted on this phenotype. Our analysis also identified a novel function for two genes, hyxA and hyxR, as minor regulators of O-antigen chain length. This study offers novel insight into the genetic make-up of E. coli ST131, and provides a framework for future research on E. coli and other Gram-negative pathogens to define their essential gene repertoire and to dissect the molecular mechanisms that enable them to survive in the bloodstream and cause disease.

  16. Lignans and norlignans inhibit multidrug resistance protein 1 (MRP1/ABCC1)-mediated transport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wróbel, Anna; Eklund, Patrik; Bobrowska-Hägerstrand, Malgorzata; Hägerstrand, Henry

    2010-11-01

    Multidrug resistance protein 1 (MRP1/ABCC1) is one of the drug efflux pumps mediating multidrug resistance in several cancer types. Efficient nontoxic inhibitors of MRP1-mediated transport are sought to potentially sensitise cancer cells to anticancer drugs. This study examined the potency of a series of plant lignans and norlignans of various structures to inhibit MRP1-mediated transport from human erythrocytes. The occurrence of MRP1 in the human erythrocyte membrane makes this cell a useful model in searching for efficient MRP1inhibitors. The inhibition of 2',7'-bis-(carboxypropyl)-5(6)-carboxyfluorescein (BCPCF) transport from human erythrocytes was measured fluorymetrically. In order to study possible membrane-perturbing effects of lignans and norlignans, the potency of these compounds to induce haemolysis, erythrocyte shape change, and phosphatidylserine (PS) exposure in the external layer of the erythrocyte membrane was examined. Nine compounds (six norlignans and three lignans) of the fourteen that were tested inhibited BCPCF transport from human erythrocytes. The most efficient inhibitor, the norlignan coded L1, had IC(50)=50 μM. Structure-activity relationship analysis showed that the strongest inhibitors were found among lignans and norlignans bearing a carbonyl function at position C-9. The highly oxidised structures and the presence of an ionisable group such as the carboxylic acid function enhance activity. All compounds that significantly decreased BCPCF transport were non-haemolytic, did not cause PS exposure and did not have any effect on erythrocyte shapes up to 200 μM. Lignans and norlignans can inhibit MRP1-mediated transport from human erythrocytes and should be further investigated as possible agents reversing multidrug resistance.

  17. The Beijing genotype is associated with young age and multidrug-resistant tuberculosis in rural Vietnam

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buu, T. N.; Huyen, M. N.; Lan, N. T. N.; Quy, H. T.; Hen, N. V.; Zignol, M.; Borgdorff, M. W.; Cobelens, F. G. J.; van Soolingen, D.

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Associations between multidrug resistance and the Mycobacterium tuberculosis Beijing genotype have been described mainly in populations with poor tuberculosis (TB) control such as prisons and inner cities, and may reflect shared risk factors rather than a biological association.

  18. Emergence and spread of a human-transmissible multidrug-resistant nontuberculous mycobacterium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bryant, Josephine M; Grogono, Dorothy M; Rodriguez-Rincon, Daniela

    2016-01-01

    Lung infections with Mycobacterium abscessus, a species of multidrug-resistant nontuberculous mycobacteria, are emerging as an important global threat to individuals with cystic fibrosis (CF), in whom M. abscessus accelerates inflammatory lung damage, leading to increased morbidity and mortality....

  19. Evaluation of co-trimoxazole in the treatment of multidrug-resistant tuberculosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Alsaad, Noor; van Altena, Richard; Pranger, Arianna D.; van Soolingen, Dick; de Lange, Wiel C. M.; van der Werf, Tjip S.; Kosterink, Jos G. W.; Alffenaar, Jan-Willem C.

    Co-trimoxazole (SXT), a combination of sulfamethoxazole and trimethoprim, has shown in vitro activity against Mycobacterium tuberculosis. However, the pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic parameters of SXT in multidrug-resistant (MDR) tuberculosis (TB) are, thus far, lacking. Therefore, we evaluated

  20. Evaluation of co-trimoxazole in the treatment of multidrug-resistant tuberculosis.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Alsaad, N.; Altena, R. van; Pranger, A.D.; Soolingen, D. van; Lange, W.C.M. de; Werf, T.S. van der; Kosterink, J.G.W.; Alffenaar, J.W.C.

    2013-01-01

    Co-trimoxazole (SXT), a combination of sulfamethoxazole and trimethoprim, has shown in vitro activity against Mycobacterium tuberculosis. However, the pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic parameters of SXT in multidrug-resistant (MDR) tuberculosis (TB) are, thus far, lacking. Therefore, we evaluated

  1. Biofilm formation in clinical isolates of nosocomial Acinetobacter baumannii and its relationship with multidrug resistance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ebrahim Babapour

    2016-06-01

    Conclusions: Since most of the multidrug resistant strains produce biofilm, it seems necessary to provide continuous monitoring and determination of antibiotic susceptibility of clinical A. baumannii. This would help to select the most appropriate antibiotic for treatment.

  2. Antimicrobial Activity of Nanoemulsion in Combination with Cetylpyridinium Chloride in Multidrug-Resistant Acinetobacter baumannii

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-01

    cetylpyridinium chloride in multidrug-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii . 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) Hwang...with Cetylpyridinium Chloride in Multidrug-Resistant Acinetobacter baumannii Yoon Y. Hwang,a Karthikeyan Ramalingam,b Diane R. Bienek,a Valerie Lee,b...San Antonio, Texas, USAb; and Army Institute of Surgical Research, Fort Sam Houston, Texas, USAc Acinetobacter baumannii has emerged as a serious

  3. The ABC family of multidrug transporters in microorganisms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Veen, H.W; Konings, W.N

    1998-01-01

    Multidrug transporters are membrane proteins that are able to expel a broad range of toxic molecules from the cell. In humans, the overexpression of the multidrug resistance P-glycoprotein (Pgp) and the multidrug resistance-associated protein MRP1 (MRP) is a principal cause of resistance of cancers

  4. Lethal inflammasome activation by a multi-drug resistant pathobiont upon antibiotic disruption of the microbiota

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayres, Janelle S.; Trinidad, Norver J.; Vance, Russell E.

    2012-01-01

    The mammalian intestine harbors a complex microbial community that provides numerous benefits to its host. However, the microbiota can also include potentially virulent species, termed pathobionts, which can cause disease when intestinal homeostasis is disrupted. The molecular mechanisms by which pathobionts cause disease remain poorly understood. Here we describe a sepsis-like disease that occurs upon gut injury in antibiotic-treated mice. Sepsis was associated with the systemic spread of a specific multidrug-resistant E. coli pathobiont that expanded dramatically in the microbiota of antibiotic-treated mice. Rapid sepsis-like death required a component of the innate immune system, the Naip5-Nlrc4 inflammasome. In accordance with Koch's postulates, we found the E. coli pathobiont was sufficient to activate Naip5-Nlrc4 and cause disease when injected intravenously into unmanipulated mice. These findings reveal how sepsis-like disease can result from recognition of pathobionts by the innate immune system. PMID:22522562

  5. Multidrug-resistant organisms in neonatal sepsis in two tertiary neonatal ICUs, Egypt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Awad, Hesham A; Mohamed, Maha H; Badran, Nabil F; Mohsen, Manal; Abd-Elrhman, Al-Sayed A

    2016-03-01

    Neonatal sepsis remains a serious problem in any neonatal intensive care unit (NICU). Bacterial organisms have developed increased resistance to commonly used antibiotics. Because not enough data are available from Egypt, the aim of the present study was to determine the causative bacteria and the level of their resistance to commonly used antibiotics in tertiary NICUs in Cairo, Egypt. A 3.5-year retrospective study was carried out at NICUs of the Children's Hospital of Ain Shams University and that of El-Hussein Hospital, Al-Azhar University, Egypt. Records of neonates were reviewed. All neonates with culture-proven sepsis were included in the study. Almost one-third of the admitted neonates (33.4%) were diagnosed as having neonatal sepsis, 32.25% of them culture-proven. Early/late onset sepsis was found in 35.4 and 64.6%, respectively. Gram-negative/gram-positive bacteria was found in 68 to 25.6%. Fungal infection was detected in 9% of the isolates. Escherichia coli was the main pathogen isolated in both early-onset sepsis (41.2%) and late-onset sepsis (24.5%). Overall, 77% of the isolates were multidrug-resistant (60% of gram-positive bacteria and 83.4% of gram-negative bacteria). Nearly 80% (79%) of mortality was caused by multidrug-resistant organisms. Gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria showed high resistance against commonly used antibiotics such as ampicillin, amoxicillin, cefotaxime, ceftriaxone, and gentamicin. There is an alarming increase in antibiotic resistance to the commonly used antibiotics. Continuous surveillance for antibiotic susceptibility is needed to ensure proper empirical therapy. Improvement of infection control practices, avoidance of irrational use of antibiotics, and revision of the protocols are mandatory in the prevention of neonatal sepsis.

  6. Dominance of multidrug resistant CC271 clones in macrolide-resistant streptococcus pneumoniae in Arizona

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bowers Jolene R

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Rates of resistance to macrolide antibiotics in Streptococcus pneumoniae are rising around the world due to the spread of mobile genetic elements harboring mef(E and erm(B genes and post-vaccine clonal expansion of strains that carry them. Results Characterization of 592 clinical isolates collected in Arizona over a 10 year period shows 23.6% are macrolide resistant. The largest portion of the macrolide-resistant population, 52%, is dual mef(E/erm(B-positive. All dual-positive isolates are multidrug-resistant clonal lineages of Taiwan19F-14, mostly multilocus sequence type 320, carrying the recently described transposon Tn2010. The remainder of the macrolide resistant S. pneumoniae collection includes 31% mef(E-positive, and 9% erm(B-positive strains. Conclusions The dual-positive, multidrug-resistant S. pneumoniae clones have likely expanded by switching to non-vaccine serotypes after the heptavalent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine release, and their success limits therapy options. This upsurge could have a considerable clinical impact in Arizona.

  7. Human hepatocellular carcinoma cell lines exhibit multidrug resistance unrelated to MRD1 gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, D W; Lu, Y G; Chin, K V; Pastan, I; Gottesman, M M

    1991-03-01

    Multidrug resistance of human cancer cells may result from expression of P-glycoprotein, the product of the MRD1 gene, acting as an energy-dependent drug efflux pump. However, direct evidence that expression of the MDR1 gene contributes to the multidrug resistance of human liver carcinomas has not been established. In this study, we tested five cell lines derived from human hepatocellular carcinomas for sensitivity to a variety of drugs used widely as anticancer agents; these included vinblastine, doxorubicin, actinomycin D, mitomycin C, 5-fluorouracil, 6-mercaptopurine, melphalan, methotrexate, cis-platinum and etoposide (VP-16). All five hepatoma cell lines were resistant at different levels to these chemicals compared to human KB cells. Although it has been demonstrated that resistance to vinblastine, colchicine, doxorubicin and actinomycin D in human multidrug-resistant cells is associated with overexpression of P-glycoprotein, very little expression of P-glycoprotein was found in these human hepatoma cells. Neither verapamil nor quinidine, inhibitors of the drug efflux pump, were able to overcome multidrug resistance in hepatoma cells. These results indicate that the multidrug resistance phenotype in human hepatocellular carcinoma cells cannot be attributed to expression of the MDR1 gene, but that novel mechanisms may account for the resistance of these cancer cells.

  8. Epidemiology of Multidrug Resistant Uropathogenic Escherichia coli in Iran: a Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadifar, Shima; Moghoofei, Mohsen; Nematollahi, Shahrzad; Ramazanzadeh, Rashid; Sedighi, Mansour; Salehi-Abargouei, Amin; Miri, Ali

    2017-01-24

    Urinary tract infection (UTI) is one of the most common infections in humans. It is primarily caused by uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC), which has a high multidrug resistance (MDR). In consideration of the prevalence of MDR-UPEC strains, the aims of the present study were to systematically review the published data about the prevalence rate of MDR-UPEC from different parts of Iran and to establish the overall relative frequency (RF) of these strains in Iran. We searched several databases including PubMed, ISI Web of Science, Scopus, Google Scholar, IranMedex, and Iranian Scientific Information Database by using the following keywords: "Escherichia coli", "multidrug resistant", "MDR", "urinary tract infections", "UTI", "uropathogenic". and "Iran". Articles or abstracts that reported the prevalence of MDR-UPEC were included in this review. We found 15 articles suitable for inclusion in this study. A pooled estimation of 10,247 UPEC strains showed that 49.4% (95% confidence interval = 48.0-50.7%) of the stranis were MDR positive. The RF of MDR-UPEC in different studies varied from 10.5% to 79.2% in the Kashan and Hamedan provinces, respectively. According to the results of the present study, the RF of MDR-UPEC in Iran is high. Thus, measures should be taken to keep the emergence and transmission of these strains to a minimum.

  9. Multidrug-resistant pathogenic Escherichia coli isolated from wild birds in a veterinary hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borges, C A; Beraldo, L G; Maluta, R P; Cardozo, M V; Barboza, K B; Guastalli, E A L; Kariyawasam, S; DebRoy, C; Ávila, F A

    2017-02-01

    Wild birds are carriers of Escherichia coli. However, little is known about their role as reservoirs for extra-intestinal pathogenic E. coli (ExPEC). In this work we investigated E. coli strains carrying virulence genes related to human and animal ExPEC isolated from free-living wild birds treated in a veterinary hospital. Multidrug resistance was found in 47.4% of the strains, but none of them were extended-spectrum beta-lactamase producers. Not only the virulence genes, but also the serogroups (e.g. O1 and O2) detected in the isolates of E. coli have already been implicated in human and bird diseases. The sequence types detected were also found in wild, companion and food animals, environmental and human clinical isolates in different countries. Furthermore, from the 19 isolates, 17 (89.5%) showed a degree of pathogenicity on an in vivo infection model. The isolates showed high heterogeneity by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis indicating that E. coli from these birds are clonally diverse. Overall, the results showed that wild birds can be reservoirs and/or vectors of highly pathogenic and multidrug-resistant E. coli that have the potential to cause disease in humans and poultry.

  10. The human multidrug resistance-associated protein MRP is a plasma membrane drug-efflux pump

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zaman, G. J.; Flens, M. J.; van Leusden, M. R.; de Haas, M.; Mülder, H. S.; Lankelma, J.; Pinedo, H. M.; Scheper, R. J.; Baas, F.; Broxterman, H. J.

    1994-01-01

    The multidrug-resistance associated protein MRP is a 180- to 195-kDa membrane protein associated with resistance of human tumor cells to cytotoxic drugs. We have investigated how MRP confers drug resistance in SW-1573 human lung carcinoma cells by generating a subline stably transfected with an

  11. Novel antimicrobial peptide CPF-C1 analogs with superior stabilities and activities against multidrug-resistant bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Junqiu; Zhao, Qian; Li, Sisi; Yan, Zhibin; Li, Jing; Li, Yao; Mou, Lingyun; Zhang, Bangzhi; Yang, Wenle; Miao, Xiaokang; Jiang, Xianxing; Wang, Rui

    2017-11-01

    As numerous clinical isolates are resistant to most conventional antibiotics, infections caused by multidrug-resistant bacteria are associated with a higher death rate. Antimicrobial peptides show great potential as new antibiotics. However, a major obstacle to the development of these peptides as useful drugs is their low stability. To overcome the problem of the natural antimicrobial peptide CPF-C1, we designed and synthesized a series of analogs. Our results indicated that by introducing lysine, which could increase the number of positive charges, and by introducing tryptophan, which could increase the hydrophobicity, we could improve the antimicrobial activity of the peptides against multidrug-resistant strains. The introduction of d-amino acids significantly improved stability. Certain analogs demonstrated antibiofilm activities. In mechanistic studies, the analogs eradicated bacteria not just by interrupting the bacterial membranes, but also by linking to DNA, which was not impacted by known mechanisms of resistance. In a mouse model, certain analogs were able to significantly reduce the bacterial load. Among the analogs, CPF-9 was notable due to its greater antimicrobial potency in vitro and in vivo and its superior stability, lower hemolytic activity, and higher antibiofilm activity. This analog is a potential antibiotic candidate for treating infections induced by multidrug-resistant bacteria. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  12. Draft genome sequence of a multidrug-resistant Chryseobacterium indologenes isolate from Malaysia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Choo Yee Yu

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Chryseobacterium indologenes is an emerging pathogen which poses a threat in clinical healthcare setting due to its multidrug-resistant phenotype and its common association with nosocomial infections. Here, we report the draft genome of a multidrug-resistant C. indologenes CI_885 isolated in 2014 from Malaysia. The 908,704-kb genome harbors a repertoire of putative antibiotic resistance determinants which may elucidate the molecular basis and underlying mechanisms of its resistant to various classes of antibiotics. The genome sequence has been deposited in DDBJ/EMBL/GenBank under the accession number LJOD00000000. Keywords: Chryseobacterium indologenes, Genome, Multi-drug resistant, blaIND, Next generation sequencing

  13. Current Status on Marine Products with Reversal Effect on Cancer Multidrug Resistance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huiqin Guo

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The resistance of tumor cells to a broad range of anticancer agents continues to be a problem for the success of cancer chemotherapy. Multidrug resistance (MDR is due in part to three drug transporter proteins: ABCB1/P-glycoprotein (P-gp, ABCC1/multidrug resistance protein 1 (MRP1 and ABCG2/breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP. These transporters are part of the ATP-binding cassette (ABC superfamily, whose members function as ATP-dependent drug-efflux pumps. Their activity can be blocked by various drugs such as verapamil (calcium channel blocker and cyclosporin A (immunosuppressive agent, etc. These compounds are called MDR modulators or reversals. This review highlights several marine natural products with reversal effect on multidrug resistance in cancer, including agosterol A, ecteinascidin 743, sipholane triterpenoids, bryostatin 1, and welwitindolinones.

  14. Multidrug-resistant acinetobacter infection and their susceptibility patterns in a tertiary care hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rit, Kalidas; Saha, Rajdeep

    2012-07-01

    Antibiotic-resistant Acinetobacter nosocomial infection is a leading problem. It acts as an opportunistic pathogen to cause a wide spectrum of infection including nosocomial pneumonia, meningitis, endocarditis, skin and soft tissue infections, urinary tract infection, conjunctivitis, burn wound infection and bacteremia. Multidrug-resistant Acinetobacter infection creates a great problem in hospital setting. The clinical specimens obtained from ICU and different surgical and medical wards were investigated using standard microbiological techniques to know the distribution of and their resistant profile. Antimicrobial resistance was studied using the modified Kirby Bauer disk diffusion technique following the CLSI protocol. Major infections found in different medical wards, surgical wards and ICU were due to Acinetobacter baumannii (74.02%), A. lowfii (14.2%), A. haemolyticus (7.79%), A. junii (3.8%) among Acinetobacter spices. Acinetobacter showed increased resistant against majority of commercially available drugs imipenem (5.2%), meropenem (9.75%), piperacillin-tazobactum (18.2%), netilmicin (16.24%), amikacin (14.29%), ceftazidime (74.1%), gentamicin (70.13%), ofloxacin (42.21%). A. baumannii was found to be associated with UTI, RTI, septicemia, bacteremia, and meningitis and wound infection. A. baumannii displayed higher resistance to more number of antibiotics than other nosocomial pathogens from ICU.

  15. A bacterial antibiotic-resistance gene that complements the human multidrug-resistance P-glycoprotein gene

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Veen, HW; Callaghan, R; Soceneantu, L; Sardini, A; Konings, WN; Higgins, CF

    1998-01-01

    Bacteria have developed many fascinating antibiotic-resistance mechanisms(1,2). A protein in Lactococcus lactis, LmrA, mediates antibiotic resistance by extruding amphiphilic compounds from the inner leaflet of the cytoplasmic membrane(3,4). Unlike other known bacterial multidrug-resistance

  16. Conservation of the multidrug resistance efflux gene oprM in Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    OpenAIRE

    Bianco, N; Neshat, S; Poole, K

    1997-01-01

    An intragenic probe derived from the multidrug resistance gene oprM hybridized with genomic DNA from all 20 serotypes of Pseudomonas aeruginosa and from all 34 environmental and clinical isolates tested, indicating that the MexA-MexB-OprM multidrug efflux system is highly conserved in this organism. The oprM probe also hybridized with genomic DNA from Pseudomonas aureofaciens, Pseudomonas chlororaphis, Pseudomonas syringae, Burkholderia pseudomallei, and Pseudomonas putida, suggesting that ef...

  17. Multidrug resistance 1 gene polymorphisms may determine Crohn's disease behavior in patients from Rio de Janeiro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Teresa P. Carvalho

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: Conflicting data from studies on the potential role of multidrug resistance 1 gene polymorphisms in inflammatory bowel disease may result from the analysis of genetically and geographically distinct populations. Here, we investigated whether multidrug resistance 1 gene polymorphisms are associated with inflammatory bowel diseases in patients from Rio de Janeiro. METHODS: We analyzed 123 Crohn's disease patients and 83 ulcerative colitis patients to determine the presence of the multidrug resistance 1 gene polymorphisms C1236T, G2677T and C3435T. In particular, the genotype frequencies of Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis patients were analyzed. Genotype-phenotype associations with major clinical characteristics were established, and estimated risks were calculated for the mutations. RESULTS: No significant difference was observed in the genotype frequencies of the multidrug resistance 1 G2677T/A and C3435T polymorphisms between Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis patients. In contrast, the C1236T polymorphism was significantly more common in Crohn's disease than in ulcerative colitis (p = 0.047. A significant association was also found between the multidrug resistance 1 C3435T polymorphism and the stricturing form of Crohn's disease (OR: 4.13; p = 0.009, whereas no association was found with penetrating behavior (OR: 0.33; p = 0.094. In Crohn's disease, a positive association was also found between the C3435T polymorphism and corticosteroid resistance/refractoriness (OR: 4.14; p = 0.010. However, no significant association was found between multidrug resistance 1 gene polymorphisms and UC subphenotypic categories. CONCLUSION: The multidrug resistance 1 gene polymorphism C3435T is associated with the stricturing phenotype and an inappropriate response to therapy in Crohn's disease. This association with Crohn's disease may support additional pathogenic roles for the multidrug resistance 1 gene in regulating gut

  18. CD44-engineered mesoporous silica nanoparticles for overcoming multidrug resistance in breast cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Xin; Liu, Ying; Wang, Shouju; Shi, Donghong [Department of Radiology, Jinling Hospital, Clinical School of Medical College, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210002 (China); Zhou, Xianguang [National Clinical Research Center of Kidney Diseases, Jinling Hospital, Nanjing 210016 (China); Wang, Chunyan; Wu, Jiang; Zeng, Zhiyong; Li, Yanjun; Sun, Jing [Department of Radiology, Jinling Hospital, Clinical School of Medical College, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210002 (China); Wang, Jiandong [Department of Pathology, Jinling Hospital, Clinical School of Medical College, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210002 (China); Zhang, Longjiang [Department of Radiology, Jinling Hospital, Clinical School of Medical College, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210002 (China); Teng, Zhaogang, E-mail: tzg@fudan.edu.cn [Department of Radiology, Jinling Hospital, Clinical School of Medical College, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210002 (China); State Key Laboratory of Analytical Chemistry for Life Science, School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China); Lu, Guangming, E-mail: cjr.luguangming@vip.163.com [Department of Radiology, Jinling Hospital, Clinical School of Medical College, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210002 (China); State Key Laboratory of Analytical Chemistry for Life Science, School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China)

    2015-03-30

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • CD44-engineered mesoporous silica nanoparticles are synthesized. • The mechanism of CD44-engineered mesoporous silica nanoparticles is revealed. • This new delivery system increased the drug accumulation in vitro and in vivo. • This new delivery system offers an effective approach to treat multidrug resistance. - Abstract: Multidrug resistance is a major impediment for the successful chemotherapy in breast cancer. CD44 is over-expressed in multidrug resistant human breast cancer cells. CD44 monoclonal antibody exhibits anticancer potential by inhibiting proliferation and regulating P-glycoprotein-mediated drug efflux activity in multidrug resistant cells. Thereby, CD44 monoclonal antibody in combination with chemotherapeutic drug might be result in enhancing chemosensitivity and overcoming multidrug resistance. The purpose of this study is to investigate the effects of the CD44 monoclonal antibody functionalized mesoporous silica nanoparticles containing doxorubicin on human breast resistant cancer MCF-7 cells. The data showed that CD44-modified mesoporous silica nanoparticles increased cytotoxicity and enhanced the downregulation of P-glycoprotein in comparison to CD44 antibody. Moreover, CD44-engineered mesoporous silica nanoparticles provided active target, which promoted more cellular uptake of DOX in the resistant cells and more retention of DOX in tumor tissues than unengineered counterpart. Animal studies of the resistant breast cancer xenografts demonstrated that CD44-engineered drug delivery system remarkably induced apoptosis and inhibited the tumor growth. Our results indicated that the CD44-engineered mesoporous silica nanoparticle-based drug delivery system offers an effective approach to overcome multidrug resistance in human breast cancer.

  19. Multidrug resistance in Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolated from nosocomial respiratory and urinary infections in Aleppo, Syria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahfoud, Maysa; Al Najjar, Mona; Hamzeh, Abdul Rezzak

    2015-02-19

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa represents a serious clinical challenge due to its frequent involvement in nosocomial infections and its tendency towards multidrug resistance. This study uncovered antibiotic susceptibility patterns in 177 isolates from inpatients in three key hospitals in Aleppo, the largest city in Syria. Exceptionally low susceptibility to most routinely used antibiotics was uncovered; resistance to ciprofloxacin and gentamicin was 64.9% and 70.3%, respectively. Contrarily, susceptibility to colistin was the highest (89.1%). Multidrug resistance was rife, found at a rate of 53.67% among studied P. aeruginosa isolates.

  20. Virulence Genes Profile of Multidrug Resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa Isolated from Iranian Children with UTIs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zohreh Heidary

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Virulent and resistant strains Pseudomonas aeruginosa (P. aeruginosa is one of the most important cause of UTIs in pediatrics. The present study was carried to investigate the frequency of virulence factors in the multi-drug resistant strains of P. aeruginosa isolated from pediatrics hospitalized due to the UTIs. One - hundred and forty three urine samples were collected from pediatric patients suffered from UTIs. Samples were cultured and those that were P. aeruginosa positive were analyzed for the presence of putative virulence genes. Seventy one out of 143 samples (49.65% were positive for P. aeruginosa. Monthly, sex and age-dependent prevalence were seen for P. aeruginosa. Bacterial strains had the highest levels of resistance against ampicillin (95.77%, gentamicin (92.95% and ciprofloxacin (81.69%. Of 71 P. aeruginosa isolates, 12 strains were resistant to more than 9 antibiotics (16.90%. The most commonly detected virulence factors in the cases of urethral infections were exoU and plcH while those of pyelonephritis and cystitis were were exoS and lasB. Our findings should raise awareness about antibiotic resistance in hospitalized pediatrics with UTIs in Iran. Clinicians should exercise caution in prescribing antibiotics, especially in cases of UTIs. Such information can help in identifying these virulence genes as useful diagnostic markers for clinical P. aeruginosa strains isolated from UTIs.

  1. Genotypic diversity of multidrug-, quinolone- and extensively drug-resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis isolates in Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Disratthakit, Areeya; Meada, Shinji; Prammananan, Therdsak; Thaipisuttikul, Iyarit; Doi, Norio; Chaiprasert, Angkana

    2015-06-01

    Drug-resistant tuberculosis (TB), which includes multidrug-resistant (MDR-TB), quinolone-resistant (QR-TB) and extensively drug-resistant tuberculosis (XDR-TB), is a serious threat to TB control. We aimed to characterize the genotypic diversity of drug-resistant TB clinical isolates collected in Thailand to establish whether the emergence of drug-resistant TB is attributable to transmitted resistance or acquired resistance. We constructed the first molecular phylogeny of MDR-TB (n=95), QR-TB (n=69) and XDR-TB (n=28) in Thailand based on spoligotyping and proposed 24-locus multilocus variable-number of tandem repeat analysis (MLVA). Clustering analysis was performed using the unweighted pair group method with arithmetic mean. Spoligotyping identified the Beijing strain (SIT1) as the most predominant genotype (n=139; 72.4%). The discriminatory power of 0.9235 Hunter-Gaston Discriminatory Index (HGDI) with the 15-locus variable-number tandem repeats of mycobacterial interspersed repetitive units typing was improved to a 0.9574 HGDI with proposed 24-locus MLVA, thereby resulting in the subdivision of a large cluster of Beijing strains (SIT1) into 17 subclusters. We identified the spread of drug-resistant TB clones caused by three different MLVA types in the Beijing strain (SIT1) and a specific clone of XDR-TB caused by a rare genotype, the Manu-ancestor strain (SIT523). Overall, 49.5% of all isolates were clustered. These findings suggest that a remarkable transmission of drug-resistant TB occurred in Thailand. The remaining 50% of drug-resistant TB isolates were unique genotypes, which may have arisen from the individual acquisition of drug resistance. Our results suggest that transmitted and acquired resistance have played an equal role in the emergence of drug-resistant TB. Further characterization of whole genome sequences of clonal strains could help to elucidate the mycobacterial genetic factors relevant for drug resistance, transmissibility and virulence

  2. Virulence and genomic feature of multidrug resistant Campylobacter jejuni isolated from broiler chicken

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haihong Hao

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to reveal the molecular mechanism involved in multidrug resistance and virulence of Campylobacter jejuni isolated from broiler chickens. The virulence of six multidrug resistant C. jejuni was determined by in vitro and in vivo methods. The de novo whole genome sequencing technology and molecular biology methods were used to analyze the genomic features associated with the multidrug resistance and virulence of a selected isolate (C. jejuni 1655. The comparative genomic analyses revealed a large number of single nucleotide polymorphisms, deletions, rearrangements, and inversions in C. jejuni 1655 compared to reference C. jejuni genomes. The co-emergence of Thr-86-Ile mutation in gyrA gene, A2075G mutation in 23S rRNA gene, tetO, aphA and aadE genes and pTet plasmid in C. jejuni 1655 contributed its multidrug resistance to fluoroquinolones, macrolides, tetracycline and aminoglycosides. The combination of multiple virulence genes may work together to confer the relative higher virulence in C. jejuni 1655. The co-existence of mobile gene elements (e.g. pTet and CRISPR-Cas system in C. jejuni 1655 may play an important role in the gene transfer and immune defense. The present study provides basic information of phenotypic and genomic features of C. jejuni 1655, a strain recently isolated from a chicken displaying multidrug resistance and relatively high level of virulence.

  3. Alpha-Mangostin Reverses Multidrug Resistance by Attenuating the Function of the Multidrug Resistance-Linked ABCG2 Transporter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Chung-Pu; Hsiao, Sung-Han; Murakami, Megumi; Lu, Yu-Jen; Li, Yan-Qing; Huang, Yang-Hui; Hung, Tai-Ho; Ambudkar, Suresh V; Wu, Yu-Shan

    2017-08-07

    The ATP-binding cassette (ABC) drug transporter ABCG2 can actively efflux a wide variety of chemotherapeutic agents out of cancer cells and subsequently reduce the intracellular accumulation of these drugs. Therefore, the overexpression of ABCG2 often contributes to the development of multidrug resistance (MDR) in cancer cells, which is one of the major obstacles to successful cancer chemotherapy. Moreover, ABCG2 is highly expressed in various tissues including the intestine and blood-brain barrier (BBB), limiting the absorption and bioavailability of many therapeutic agents. For decades, the task of developing a highly effective synthetic inhibitor of ABCG2 has been hindered mostly by the intrinsic toxicity, the lack of specificity, and complex pharmacokinetics. Alternatively, considering the wide range of diversity and relatively nontoxic nature of natural products, developing potential modulators of ABCG2 from natural sources is particularly valuable. α-Mangostin is a natural xanthone derived from the pericarps of mangosteen (Garcinia mangostana L.) with various pharmacological purposes, including suppressing angiogenesis and inducing cancer cell growth arrest. In this study, we demonstrated that at nontoxic concentrations, α-mangostin effectively and selectively inhibits ABCG2-mediated drug transport and reverses MDR in ABCG2-overexpressing MDR cancer cells. Direct interactions between α-mangostin and the ABCG2 drug-binding site(s) were confirmed by stimulation of ATPase activity and by inhibition of photolabeling of the substrate-binding site(s) of ABCG2 with [ 125 I]iodoarylazidoprazosin. In summary, our findings show that α-mangostin has great potential to be further developed into a promising modulator of ABCG2 for reversing MDR and for its use in combination therapy for patients with MDR tumors.

  4. Multidrug-Resistant Salmonella enterica Serovar Muenchen from Pigs and Humans and Potential Interserovar Transfer of Antimicrobial Resistance

    OpenAIRE

    Gebreyes, Wondwossen A.; Thakur, Siddhartha

    2005-01-01

    Salmonella serovars are important reservoirs of antimicrobial resistance. Recently, we reported on multidrug-resistant (MDR) Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium strains among pigs with resistance to ampicillin, kanamycin, streptomycin, sulfamethoxazole, and tetracycline (resistance [R] type AKSSuT) and resistance to amoxicillin-clavulanic acid, ampicillin, chloramphenicol, streptomycin, sulfamethoxazole, and tetracycline (R type AxACSSuT). In the present study, 67 isolates (39 from humans...

  5. Mutational and acquired carbapenem resistance mechanisms in multidrug resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa clinical isolates from Recife, Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavalcanti, Felipe Lira de Sá; Mirones, Cristina Rodríguez; Paucar, Elena Román; Montes, Laura Álvarez; Leal-Balbino, Tereza Cristina; Morais, Marcia Maria Camargo de; Martínez-Martínez, Luis; Ocampo-Sosa, Alain Antonio

    2015-12-01

    An investigation was carried out into the genetic mechanisms responsible for multidrug resistance in nine carbapenem-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates from different hospitals in Recife, Brazil. Susceptibility to antimicrobial agents was determined by broth microdilution. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was employed to detect the presence of genes encoding β-lactamases, aminoglycoside-modifying enzymes (AMEs), 16S rRNA methylases, integron-related genes and OprD. Expression of genes coding for efflux pumps and AmpC cephalosporinase were assessed by quantitative PCR. The outer membrane proteins were separated by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. The blaSPM-1, blaKPC-2 and blaGES-1 genes were detected in P. aeruginosa isolates in addition to different AME genes. The loss of OprD in nine isolates was mainly due to frameshift mutations, premature stop codons and point mutations. An association of loss of OprD with the overexpression of MexAB-OprM and MexXY-OprM was observed in most isolates. Hyper-production of AmpC was also observed in three isolates. Clonal relationship of the isolates was determined by repetitive element palindromic-PCR and multilocus sequence typing. Our results show that the loss of OprD along with overexpression of efflux pumps and β-lactamase production were responsible for the multidrug resistance in the isolates analysed.

  6. Multidrug-Resistant Bacteroides fragilis Bacteremia in a US Resident: An Emerging Challenge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristian Merchan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We describe a case of Bacteroides fragilis bacteremia associated with paraspinal and psoas abscesses in the United States. Resistance to b-lactam/b-lactamase inhibitors, carbapenems, and metronidazole was encountered despite having a recent travel history to India as the only possible risk factor for multidrug resistance. Microbiological cure was achieved with linezolid, moxifloxacin, and cefoxitin.

  7. Shorter treatment for multidrug-resistant tuberculosis : the good, the bad and the ugly

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Altena, Richard; Akkerman, Onno W.; Alffenaar, Jan-Willem C.; Kerstjens, Huib A. M.; Magis-Escurra, Cecile; Boeree, Martin J.; van Soolingen, Dick; de Lange, Wiel C. M.; Bolhuis, Mathieu S.; Hoefsloot, Wouter; de Vries, Gerard; van der Werf, Tjip S.

    2016-01-01

    We welcome the initiative by the Guideline Development Group (GDG) members to issue the 2016 update of World Health Organization (WHO) treatment guidelines for drug-resistant tuberculosis (TB) [1]. With one in two patients currently failing on treatment for multidrug-resistant (MDR)-TB, primarily as

  8. Challenges in detection and treatment of multidrug resistant tuberculosis patients in Vietnam

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoang, Thuy Thi Thanh; Nguyen, Nhung Viet; Dinh, Sy Ngoc; Nguyen, Hoa Binh; Cobelens, Frank; Thwaites, Guy; Nguyen, Huong Thien; Nguyen, Anh Thu; Wright, Pamela; Wertheim, Heiman F. L.

    2015-01-01

    Vietnam is ranked 14(th) among 27 countries with high burden of multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB). In 2009, the Vietnamese government issued a policy on MDR-TB called Programmatic Management of Drug-resistant Tuberculosis (PMDT) to enhance and scale up diagnosis and treatment services for

  9. Dynamics of Endogenous Intoxication Parameters in Multidrug-Resistant Destructive Pulmonary Tuberculosis

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    L.D. Todoriko

    2014-11-01

    The purpose of the study included the evaluation of endogenous intoxication indicators in patients with multi-drug resistant pulmonary tuberculosis with destructive changes depending on the profile of resistance of mycobacteria and determination of their role in the development of systemic inflammatory response.

  10. New-Onset Psychosis in a Multi-Drug Resistant Tuberculosis Patient ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Drug-resistant tuberculosis poses a serious challenge to global control of TB. These forms of TB do not respond to the standard six-month treatment; it can take two years or more to treat with category IV drugs that are less potent, more toxic and much more expensive. Treatment of multi-drug resistant tuberculosis is still ...

  11. Role of multidrug resistance protein (MRP) in glutathione S-conjugate transport in mammalian cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Muller, M; deVries, EGE; Jansen, PLM

    1996-01-01

    The human multidrug resistance protein (MRP), a 190-kDa member of the ABC-protein superfamily, is an ATP-dependent glutathione S-conjugate carrier (GS-X pump) and is present in membranes of many, if not all, cells, Overexpression of MRP in tumor cells contributes to resistance to natural product

  12. Role of multidrug resistance protein (MRP) in glutathione S-conjugate transport in mammalian cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Müller, M.; de Vries, E. G.; Jansen, P. L.

    1996-01-01

    The human multidrug resistance protein (MRP), a 190-kDa member of the ABC-protein superfamily, is an ATP-dependent glutathione S-conjugate carrier (GS-X pump) and is present in membranes of many, if not all, cells. Overexpression of MRP in tumor cells contributes to resistance to natural product

  13. Thiocarbamates from Moringa oleifera Seeds Bioactive against Virulent and Multidrug-Resistant Vibrio Species

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Sousa, Oscarina Viana; Hofer, Ernesto; Mafezoli, Jair; Barbosa, Francisco Geraldo

    2017-01-01

    Prospect of antibacterial agents may provide an alternative therapy for diseases caused by multidrug-resistant bacteria. This study aimed to evaluate the in vitro bioactivity of Moringa oleifera seed extracts against 100 vibrios isolated from the marine shrimp Litopenaeus vannamei. Ethanol extracts at low (MOS-E) and hot (MOS-ES) temperature are shown to be bioactive against 92% and 90% of the strains, respectively. The most efficient Minimum Inhibitory Concentration (MIC) levels of MOS-E and MOS-ES against a high percentage of strains were 32 µg mL−1. Bioguided screening of bioactive compounds showed that the ethyl acetate fraction from both extracts was the only one that showed antibacterial activity. Vibriocidal substances, niazirine and niazimicine, were isolated from the aforementioned fraction through chromatographic fractionation. PMID:28770224

  14. Rapid and Accurate Molecular Identification of the Emerging Multidrug-Resistant Pathogen Candida auris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kordalewska, Milena; Zhao, Yanan; Lockhart, Shawn R; Chowdhary, Anuradha; Berrio, Indira; Perlin, David S

    2017-08-01

    Candida auris is an emerging multidrug-resistant fungal pathogen causing nosocomial and invasive infections associated with high mortality. C. auris is commonly misidentified as several different yeast species by commercially available phenotypic identification platforms. Thus, there is an urgent need for a reliable diagnostic method. In this paper, we present fast, robust, easy-to-perform and interpret PCR and real-time PCR assays to identify C. auris and related species: Candida duobushaemulonii , Candida haemulonii , and Candida lusitaniae Targeting rDNA region nucleotide sequences, primers specific for C. auris only or C. auris and related species were designed. A panel of 140 clinical fungal isolates was used in both PCR and real-time PCR assays followed by electrophoresis or melting temperature analysis, respectively. The identification results from the assays were 100% concordant with DNA sequencing results. These molecular assays overcome the deficiencies of existing phenotypic tests to identify C. auris and related species. Copyright © 2017 Kordalewska et al.

  15. Biofilm formation and multidrug-resistant Aeromonas spp. from wild animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dias, Carla; Borges, Anabela; Saavedra, Maria José; Simões, Manuel

    2018-03-01

    The 'One Health' concept recognises that the health of humans, animals and the environment are interconnected. Therefore, knowledge on the behaviour of micro-organisms from the most diverse environmental niches is important to prevent the emergence and dissemination of antimicrobial resistance. Wild animals are known to carry antimicrobial-resistant micro-organisms with potential public health impact. However, no data are available on the behaviour of sessile bacteria from wild animals, although antimicrobial resistance is amplified in biofilms. This study characterised the ciprofloxacin susceptibility and the adhesion and biofilm formation abilities of 14 distinct Aeromonas spp. (8 Aeromonas salmonicida, 3 Aeromonas eucrenophila, 2 Aeromonas bestiarum and 1 Aeromonas veronii) isolated from wild animals and already characterised as resistant to β-lactam antibiotics. The ciprofloxacin MIC was determined according to CLSI guidelines. A biofilm formation assay was performed by a modified microtitre plate method. Bacterial surface hydrophobicity was assessed by sessile drop contact angle measurement. All Aeromonas spp. strains were resistant to ciprofloxacin (MICs of 6-60μg/mL) and had hydrophilic surfaces (range 2-37mJ/m 2 ). These strains were able to adhere and form biofilms with distinct magnitudes. Biofilm exposure to 10×MIC of ciprofloxacin only caused low to moderate biofilm removal. This study shows that the strains tested are of potential public health concern and emphasises that wild animals are potential reservoirs of multidrug-resistant strains. In fact, Aeromonas spp. are consistently considered opportunistic pathogens. Moreover, bacterial ability to form biofilms increases antimicrobial resistance and the propensity to cause persistent infections. Copyright © 2017 International Society for Chemotherapy of Infection and Cancer. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Drug resistance-associated markers P-glycoprotein, multidrug resistance-associated protein 1, multidrug resistance-associated protein 2, and lung resistance protein as prognostic factors in ovarian carcinoma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Arts, H. J.; Katsaros, D.; de Vries, E. G.; Massobrio, M.; Genta, F.; Danese, S.; Arisio, R.; Scheper, R. J.; Kool, M.; Scheffer, G. L.; Willemse, P. H.; van der Zee, A. G.; Suurmeijer, A. J.

    1999-01-01

    Intrinsic and/or acquired resistance to chemotherapy is the major obstacle to overcome in the treatment of patients with ovarian carcinoma. The aim of the present study was to investigate the prognostic value of drug resistance-associated proteins P-glycoprotein (P-gp), multidrug

  17. In vivo uptake of carbon-14-colchicine for identification of tumor multidrug resistance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mehta, B.M.; Rosa, E.; Biedler, J.L. [Nuclear Medicine Research Lab., New York, NY (United States)] [and others

    1994-07-01

    A major limitation in the treatment of cancer with natural product chemotherapeutic agents is the development of multidrug resistance (MDR). Multidrug resistance is attributed to enhanced expression of the multidrug resistance gene MDR1. Colchicine (CHC) is known to be one of the MDR drugs. The authors have previously demonstrated that it is possible to distinguish multidrug resistant tumors from the multidrug-sensitive tumors in vivo on the basis of tritium ({sup 3}H) uptake following injection of {sup 3}H-CHC. The present studies were carried out in xenografted animals using {sup 14}C-CHC which may be more indicative of {sup 11}C-labeled CHC distribution with regard to circulating metabolites, since metabolic processes following injection of (ring C, methoxy-{sup 11}C)-CHC may produce significant amounts of circulating 1l-carbon fragments (i.e., methanol and/or formaldehyde). Experiments were carried out at a dose of 2 mg/kg. Activity concentration per injected dose was approximately twice as great in sensitive as in resistant tumors (p < 0.05) at 60 min following intravenous injection of {sup 14}C-CHC. About 75% of total activity was CHC in the sensitive tumors. The findings are further confirmed by the quantitative autoradiographic evaluation of resistant and sensitive tumors. These studies confirm our previous observations that it is possible to noninvasively distinguish multidrug-resistant tumors from sensitive tumors in vivo based on uptake of an injected MDR drug using a{sup 14}C-labeled CHC at the same position and of comparable specific activity to a {sup 11}C-CHC tracer used for PET imaging. 16 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  18. Multidrug Resistant Salmonella typhi in Asymptomatic Typhoid Carriers among Food Handlers in Namakkal District, Tamil Nadu

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Senthilkumar B

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: to screen Salmonella typhi in asymptomatic typhoid carriers and to find out drug resistance and ability of the strains to transmit drug resistance to other bacteria. Methods: Cultural characters, biochemical tests, antibiotic sensitivity test (disc diffusion, agarose gel electrophoresis, and conjugation protocols were done. Thirty five stool samples were collected from the suspected food handlers for the study. Results: Among 35 samples, (17.14% yielded a positive result. Out of these 4 (20.0% were women and 2 (13.33% were men. The isolates were tested with a number of conventional antibiotics viz, amikacin, amoxicillin, ampicillin, chloramphenicol, ciprofloxacin, co-trimaxazole, rifampicin, gentamicin, nalidixic acid, ofloxacin and tetracycline. Five isolates were having the multidrug resistant character. Four (66.66% multidrug resistant isolates were found to have plasmids, while one (16.66% multidrug resistant isolate had no plasmid and the chromosome encoded the resistance. Only one strain (16.66% showed single antibiotic resistance in the study and had no plasmid DNA. The molecular weights of the plasmids were determined and found to be 120 kb.The mechanism of spreading of drug resistance through conjugation process was analyzed. In the conjugation studies, the isolates having R+ factor showed the transfer of drug resistance through conjugation, which was determined by the development of antibiotic resistance in the recipients. Conclusion: This study shows that drug resistant strains are able to transfer genes encoding drug resistance.

  19. Identifying more epidemic clones during a hospital outbreak of multidrug-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthieu Domenech de Cellès

    Full Text Available Infections caused by multidrug-resistant bacteria are a major concern in hospitals. Current infection-control practices legitimately focus on hygiene and appropriate use of antibiotics. However, little is known about the intrinsic abilities of some bacterial strains to cause outbreaks. They can be measured at a population level by the pathogen's transmission rate, i.e. the rate at which the pathogen is transmitted from colonized hosts to susceptible hosts, or its reproduction number, counting the number of secondary cases per infected/colonized host. We collected data covering a 20-month surveillance period for carriage of multidrug-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii (MDRAB in a surgery ward. All isolates were subjected to molecular fingerprinting, and a cluster analysis of profiles was performed to identify clonal groups. We then applied stochastic transmission models to infer transmission rates of MDRAB and each MDRAB clone. Molecular fingerprinting indicated that 3 clonal complexes spread in the ward. A first model, not accounting for different clones, quantified the level of in-ward cross-transmission, with an estimated transmission rate of 0.03/day (95% credible interval [0.012-0.049] and a single-admission reproduction number of 0.61 [0.30-1.02]. The second model, accounting for different clones, suggested an enhanced transmissibility of clone 3 (transmission rate 0.047/day [0.018-0.091], with a single-admission reproduction number of 0.81 [0.30-1.56]. Clones 1 and 2 had comparable transmission rates (respectively, 0.016 [0.001-0.045], 0.014 [0.001-0.045]. The method used is broadly applicable to other nosocomial pathogens, as long as surveillance data and genotyping information are available. Building on these results, more epidemic clones could be identified, and could lead to follow-up studies dissecting the functional basis for variation in transmissibility of MDRAB lineages.

  20. Potential role of non-antibiotics (helper compounds) in the treatment of multidrug-resistant Gram-negative infections

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martins, Marta; Dastidar, Sujata G; Fanning, Seamus

    2008-01-01

    Multidrug resistance in Gram-negative bacteria is now known to be primarily caused by overexpression of efflux pumps that extrude unrelated antibiotics from the periplasm or cytoplasm of the bacterium prior to their reaching their intended target. This review focuses on a variety of agents...... that have been shown to be efflux pump inhibitors (EPIs) and which, if used as 'helper compounds' in combination with antibiotics to which the organism is initially resistant, may produce the required cure. Although not all of the EPIs may serve a helper role owing to their toxicity, they may nevertheless...

  1. Effect of multidrug resistance-conferring mutations on the fitness and virulence of Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdelraouf, Kamilia; Kabbara, Samer; Ledesma, Kimberly R; Poole, Keith; Tam, Vincent H

    2011-06-01

    Multidrug resistance has become a quandary in the treatment of bacterial infections. The effect of resistance mutations and the fitness cost on the pathogenicity of Pseudomonas aeruginosa is not well established. The objective of this study was to examine the impact of multidrug resistance on the fitness and virulence of P. aeruginosa. Fourteen P. aeruginosa strains with various resistance mechanisms were used. In vitro growth of these isolates was investigated in full-strength and 0.25-strength Mueller-Hinton broth (MHB). Exponential growth rates were estimated from serial bacterial burden over 24 h. In vitro growth of two multidrug-resistant strains (PAO1ΔmexRΔoprD and PA9019) was studied when each was grown in co-culture with wild-type strain PAO1. In vivo growth was compared between PAO1 and PAO1ΔmexRΔopD using a murine pneumonia model; virulence over 10 days was studied in six isolates. Significant reduction in growth rate was observed in selected mutants (P resistance mutations were associated with fitness cost in P. aeruginosa, and accumulation of such mutations was associated with a reduction in virulence. However, it was difficult to predict the impact in clinical isolates. Knowledge of multidrug resistance mechanisms and compensatory mutations would likely be helpful.

  2. Colonization with Multidrug-Resistant Bacteria – On the Efficiency of Local Decolonization Procedures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Münch, Julia; Hagen, Ralf Matthias; Müller, Martin; Kellert, Viktor; Wiemer, Dorothea Franziska; Hinz, Rebecca; Schwarz, Norbert Georg; Frickmann, Hagen

    2017-01-01

    The effectiveness of a disinfectant-based decolonization strategy for multidrug-resistant bacteria like extended spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL)-positive Gram-negative bacteria with or without additional fluoroquinolon and carbapenem resistance as well as vancomycin-resistant enterococci and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus was assessed. Between 2011 and 2015, 25 patients from Libya, Syria, and the Ukraine with war traumata were treated at the Bundeswehr hospital Hamburg. The patients were heavily colonized and infected with multidrug-resistant bacteria, altogether comprising 371 distinct combinations of pathogens and isolation sites. Local disinfection was assessed for effectiveness regarding successful decolonization of multidrug-resistant bacteria. Altogether, 170 cases of successful decolonization were observed, comprising 95 (55.8%) such events at sampling sites that were accessible to disinfecting procedures. The remaining 75 (44.2%) decolonization events had to be considered as spontaneous. In contrast, 95 out of 172 (55.2%) colonized isolation sites that were accessible to disinfection procedures were successfully decolonized. Patient compliance with the enforced hygiene procedures was associated with decolonization success. Systemic antibiotic therapy did not relevantly affect isolation time. Disinfecting washing moderately supports local decolonization of multidrug-resistant pathogens in comparison with spontaneous decolonization rates if the patients’ compliance with the applied hygiene procedures is ensured. PMID:28690877

  3. Colonization with Multidrug-Resistant Bacteria - On the Efficiency of Local Decolonization Procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Münch, Julia; Hagen, Ralf Matthias; Müller, Martin; Kellert, Viktor; Wiemer, Dorothea Franziska; Hinz, Rebecca; Schwarz, Norbert Georg; Frickmann, Hagen

    2017-06-01

    The effectiveness of a disinfectant-based decolonization strategy for multidrug-resistant bacteria like extended spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL)-positive Gram-negative bacteria with or without additional fluoroquinolon and carbapenem resistance as well as vancomycin-resistant enterococci and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus was assessed. Between 2011 and 2015, 25 patients from Libya, Syria, and the Ukraine with war traumata were treated at the Bundeswehr hospital Hamburg. The patients were heavily colonized and infected with multidrug-resistant bacteria, altogether comprising 371 distinct combinations of pathogens and isolation sites. Local disinfection was assessed for effectiveness regarding successful decolonization of multidrug-resistant bacteria. Altogether, 170 cases of successful decolonization were observed, comprising 95 (55.8%) such events at sampling sites that were accessible to disinfecting procedures. The remaining 75 (44.2%) decolonization events had to be considered as spontaneous. In contrast, 95 out of 172 (55.2%) colonized isolation sites that were accessible to disinfection procedures were successfully decolonized. Patient compliance with the enforced hygiene procedures was associated with decolonization success. Systemic antibiotic therapy did not relevantly affect isolation time. Disinfecting washing moderately supports local decolonization of multidrug-resistant pathogens in comparison with spontaneous decolonization rates if the patients' compliance with the applied hygiene procedures is ensured.

  4. [Study on active constituents of traditional Chinese medicine reversing multidrug resistance of tumor cells in vitro].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, H; Yang, L; Liu, S; Ren, L

    2001-09-01

    To screen drugs reversing multidrug resistance of tumor cells from active constituents of traditional Chinese medicine and to study the reversal action. The kill effects of the drugs on tumor cell lines in vitro were determined with MTT method. The Jin's formula was used to analyse the effect of drug combination. 5 micrograms/ml rhynchophylline, 2 micrograms/ml jatrorrhizine and 1.25 micrograms/ml indirulin could reverse multidrug resistance for vincristine on KBv200 cell line by 16.8, 5.1 and 4 fold respectively. 1.56-12.5 micrograms/ml curcumine combining with vincristine could sensitize antitumor effect both on KB and KBv200 cell lines. All rhynchophylline, jatrorrhizine and indirulin could reverse multidrug resistance for vincristine on KBv200 cell line. Curcumine combinating vincristine could sensitize antitumor effect both on kB and kBv200 cell lines.

  5. Substrate-bound structure of the E. coli multidrug resistance transporter MdfA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heng, Jie; Zhao, Yan; Liu, Ming; Liu, Yue; Fan, Junping; Wang, Xianping; Zhao, Yongfang; Zhang, Xuejun C

    2015-09-01

    Multidrug resistance is a serious threat to public health. Proton motive force-driven antiporters from the major facilitator superfamily (MFS) constitute a major group of multidrug-resistance transporters. Currently, no reports on crystal structures of MFS antiporters in complex with their substrates exist. The E. coli MdfA transporter is a well-studied model system for biochemical analyses of multidrug-resistance MFS antiporters. Here, we report three crystal structures of MdfA-ligand complexes at resolutions up to 2.0 Å, all in the inward-facing conformation. The substrate-binding site sits proximal to the conserved acidic residue, D34. Our mutagenesis studies support the structural observations of the substrate-binding mode and the notion that D34 responds to substrate binding by adjusting its protonation status. Taken together, our data unveil the substrate-binding mode of MFS antiporters and suggest a mechanism of transport via this group of transporters.

  6. Identification of mutations conferring streptomycin resistance in multidrug-resistant tuberculosis of China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Li-Li; Liu, Hai-Can; Sun, Qing; Xiao, Tong-Yang; Zhao, Xiu-Qin; Li, Gui-Lian; Zeng, Chun-Yan; Wan, Kang-Lin

    2015-10-01

    We investigated the spectrum and frequency of mutations in rpsL, rrs, and gidB among 140 multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB) clinical isolates from China. The association between mutations and different genotypes was also analyzed. Our data revealed that 65.7% of MDR-TB were resistant to streptomycin (STR), and 90.2% of STR-resistant isolates were Beijing strains. STR resistance was correlated with Beijing family (P=0.00). Compared with phenotypic data, detection of mutations for the combination of these 3 genes exhibited 94.6% sensitivity, 91.7% specificity, and 93.6% accuracy. The most common mutations in STR-resistant isolates were rpsL128, 262, and rrs514, of which rpsL128 showed association with Beijing lineage (P=0.00). A combination of these 3 mutations can serve as the reliable predictors for STR resistance, showing the sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy of 85.9%, 97.9%, and 90.0%, respectively. Furthermore, gidBA276C, not A615G, was Beijing lineage specific. These findings are useful to develop rapid molecular diagnostic methods for STR resistance in China. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Characterization of highly virulent multidrug resistant Vibrio cholerae isolated from a large cholera outbreak in Ghana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feglo, Patrick Kwame; Sewurah, Miriam

    2018-01-18

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the virulent factors of Vibrio cholerae which caused an unprecedented large cholera outbreak in Ghana in 2014 and progressed into 2015, affected 28,975 people with 243 deaths. The V. cholerae isolates were identified to be the classical V. cholerae 01 biotype El Tor, serotype Ogawa, responsible for the large cholera outbreak in Ghana. These El Tor strains bear CtxAB and Tcp virulent genes, making the strains highly virulent. The strains also bear SXT transmissible element coding their resistance to antibiotics, causing high proportions of the strains to be multidrug resistant, with resistant proportions of 95, 90 and 75% to trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole, ampicillin and ceftriaxone respectively. PFGE patterns indicated that the isolates clustered together with the same pattern and showed clusters similar to strains circulating in DR Congo, Cameroun, Ivory Coast and Togo. The strains carried virulence genes which facilitated the disease causation and spread. This is the first time these virulent genes were determined on the Ghanaian Vibrio strains.

  8. Health system delay in treatment of multidrug resistant tuberculosis patients in Bangladesh.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rifat, Mahfuza; Hall, John; Oldmeadow, Christopher; Husain, Ashaque; Milton, Abul Hasnat

    2015-11-16

    Bangladesh is one of the 27 high burden countries for multidrug resistant tuberculosis listed by the World Health Organization. Delay in multidrug resistant tuberculosis treatment may allow progression of the disease and affect the attempts to curb transmission of drug resistant tuberculosis. The main objective of this study was to investigate the health system delay in multidrug resistant tuberculosis treatment in Bangladesh and to explore the factors related to the delay. Information related to the delay was collected as part of a previously conducted case-control study. The current study restricts analysis to patients with multidrug resistant tuberculosis who were diagnosed using rapid diagnostic methods (Xpert MTB/RIF or the line probe assay). Information was collected by face-to-face interviews and through record reviews from all three Government hospitals providing multidrug resistant tuberculosis services, from September 2012 to April 2013. Multivariable regression analysis was performed using Bootstrap variance estimators. Definitions were as follows: Provider delay: time between visiting a provider for first consultation on MDR-TB related symptom to visiting a designated diagnostic centre for testing; Diagnostic delay: time from date of diagnostic sample provided to date of result; Treatment initiation delay: time between the date of diagnosis and date of treatment initiation; Health system delay: time between visiting a provider to start of treatment. Health system delay was derived by adding provider delay, diagnostic delay and treatment initiation delay. The 207 multidrug resistant tuberculosis patients experienced a health system delay of median 7.1 weeks. The health system delay consists of provider delay (median 4 weeks), diagnostic delay (median 5 days) and treatment initiation delay (median 10 days). Health system delay (Coefficient: 37.7; 95 %; CI 15.0-60.4; p 0.003) was associated with the visit to private practitioners for first consultation

  9. Multidrug-Resistant Bacteria Isolated from Surface Water in Bassaseachic Falls National Park, Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delgado-Gardea, Ma Carmen E; Tamez-Guerra, Patricia; Gomez-Flores, Ricardo; Zavala-Díaz de la Serna, Francisco Javier; Eroza-de la Vega, Gilberto; Nevárez-Moorillón, Guadalupe Virginia; Pérez-Recoder, María Concepción; Sánchez-Ramírez, Blanca; González-Horta, María Del Carmen; Infante-Ramírez, Rocío

    2016-06-16

    Bacterial pathogens are a leading cause of waterborne disease, and may result in gastrointestinal outbreaks worldwide. Inhabitants of the Bassaseachic Falls National Park in Chihuahua, Mexico show seasonal gastroenteritis problems. This aim of this study was to detect enteropathogenic microorganisms responsible for diarrheal outbreaks in this area. In 2013, 49 surface water samples from 13 selected sampling sites along the Basaseachi waterfall and its main rivers, were collected during the spring, summer, autumn, and winter seasons. Fecal and total coliform counts were determined using standard methods; the AutoScan-4 system was used for identification of isolates and the antibiotic resistance profile by challenging each organism using 21 antibiotics. Significant differences among seasons were detected, where autumn samples resulted in the highest total (p resistant to at least one antibiotic, and 15% exhibited a multidrug resistance (MDB) phenotype. MDB were identified as Klebsiella oxytoca (two out of four identified isolates), Escherichia coli (2/7), and Enterobacter cloacae (1/3). In addition, some water-borne microorganisms exhibited resistance to cefazoline, cefuroxime, ampicillin, and ampicillin-sulbactam. The presence of these microorganisms near rural settlements suggests that wastewater is the contamination source, providing one possible transmission mechanism for diarrheal outbreaks.

  10. Green synthesised zinc oxide nanostructures throughPeriploca aphyllaextract shows tremendous antibacterial potential against multidrug resistant pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbas, Fazal; Maqbool, Qaisar; Nazar, Mudassar; Jabeen, Nyla; Hussain, Syed Zaheer; Anwaar, Sadaf; Mehmood, Nasir; Sheikh, Muhammad Saleem; Hussain, Talib; Iftikhar, Sidra

    2017-12-01

    To grapple with multidrug resistant bacterial infections, implementations of antibacterial nanomedicines have gained prime attention of the researchers across the globe. Nowadays, zinc oxide (ZnO) at nano-scale has emerged as a promising antibacterial therapeutic agent. Keeping this in view, ZnO nanostructures (ZnO-NS) have been synthesised through reduction by P. aphylla aqueous extract without the utilisation of any acid or base. Structural examinations via scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray diffraction have revealed pure phase morphology with highly homogenised average particle size of 18 nm. SEM findings were further supplemented by transmission electron microscopy examinations. The characteristic Zn-O peak has been observed around 363 nm using ultra-violet-visible spectroscopy. Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy examination has also confirmed the formation of ZnO-NS through detection of Zn-O bond vibration frequencies. To check the superior antibacterial activity of ZnO-NS, the authors' team has performed disc diffusion assay and colony forming unit testing against multidrug resistant E. coli, S. marcescens and E. cloacae . Furthermore, protein kinase inhibition assay and cytotoxicity examinations have revealed that green fabricated ZnO-NS are non-hazardous, economical, environmental friendly and possess tremendous potential to treat lethal infections caused by multidrug resistant pathogens.

  11. Topicality of the problem of combined course of multi-drug resistant pulmonary tuberculosis with diabetes mellitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. M. Raznatovska

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available According to the World Health Organization, today in the world among the infectious chronic diseases one of the leading places and causes of death is multi-drug resistant tuberculosis of the lungs, and chronic non-communicable diseases – diabetes mellitus. The situation is complicated by the fact that the number of patients with combined course of these two heavy separate illnesses that complicate each other increases. It is established that with increasing severity of diabetes mellitus, tuberculosis process in the lungs becomes more complicate and deteriorates, and vice versa, the specific process complicates the course of diabetes mellitus, contributing to the development of diabetic complications. Against this background, the effectiveness of treatment of patients suffering from multi-drug resistant tuberculosis of the lungs in our country remains very low, mainly due to the toxic adverse reactions to antimycobacterial drugs of the reserve line, and in the case of adding diabetes mellitus, it deteriorates even more. The aim of this study was to review the scientific literature to determine the relevance of the study of combined course of multi-drug resistant tuberculosis of the lungs with diabetes mellitus and perspectives of innovative methods of diagnosis of diabetes mellitus. Early diagnosis of pre-diabetes, and autoimmune diseases will allow the use of timely correction techniques that prevents the development of diabetes mellitus, depending on its type, and in the future the development of serious irreversible processes, allow timely applying appropriate methods of correction of the revealed violations. Results. Very little amount of work is dedicated to the problem of combined course of multi-drug resistant tuberculosis of the lungs with diabetes mellitus, regardless of its type, the theme is relevant for today, in Ukraine there are no data regarding its study. This combined course of very difficult in the treatment diseases requires

  12. Multidrug-Resistant Salmonella enterica 4,[5],12:i:- Sequence Type 34, New South Wales, Australia, 2016-2017.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnott, Alicia; Wang, Qinning; Bachmann, Nathan; Sadsad, Rosemarie; Biswas, Chayanika; Sotomayor, Cristina; Howard, Peter; Rockett, Rebecca; Wiklendt, Agnieszka; Iredell, Jon R; Sintchenko, Vitali

    2018-04-01

    Multidrug- and colistin-resistant Salmonella enterica serotype 4,[5],12:i:- sequence type 34 is present in Europe and Asia. Using genomic surveillance, we determined that this sequence type is also endemic to Australia. Our findings highlight the public health benefits of genome sequencing-guided surveillance for monitoring the spread of multidrug-resistant mobile genes and isolates.

  13. Multidrug-Resistant Salmonella enterica 4,[5],12:i:- Sequence Type 34, New South Wales, Australia, 2016–2017

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnott, Alicia; Wang, Qinning; Bachmann, Nathan; Sadsad, Rosemarie; Biswas, Chayanika; Sotomayor, Cristina; Howard, Peter; Rockett, Rebecca; Wiklendt, Agnieszka; Iredell, Jon R.

    2018-01-01

    Multidrug- and colistin-resistant Salmonella enterica serotype 4,[5],12:i:- sequence type 34 is present in Europe and Asia. Using genomic surveillance, we determined that this sequence type is also endemic to Australia. Our findings highlight the public health benefits of genome sequencing–guided surveillance for monitoring the spread of multidrug-resistant mobile genes and isolates. PMID:29553318

  14. Fighting infections due to multidrug-resistant Gram-positive pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornaglia, G

    2009-03-01

    Growing bacterial resistance in Gram-positive pathogens means that what were once effective and inexpensive treatments for infections caused by these bacteria are now being seriously questioned, including penicillin and macrolides for use against pneumococcal infections and-in hospitals-oxacillin for use against staphylococcal infections. As a whole, multidrug-resistant (MDR) Gram-positive pathogens are rapidly becoming an urgent and sometimes unmanageable clinical problem. Nevertheless, and despite decades of research into the effects of antibiotics, the actual risk posed to human health by antibiotic resistance has been poorly defined; the lack of reliable data concerning the outcomes resulting from antimicrobial resistance stems, in part, from problems with study designs and the methods used in resistence determination. Surprisingly little is known, too, about the actual effectiveness of the many types of intervention aimed at controlling antibiotic resistance. New antibiotics active against MDR Gram-positive pathogens have been recently introduced into clinical practice, and the antibiotic pipeline contains additional compounds at an advanced stage of development, including new glycopeptides, new anti-methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) beta-lactams, and new diaminopyrimidines. Many novel antimicrobial agents are likely to be niche products, endowed with narrow antibacterial spectra and/or targeted at specific clinical problems. Therefore, an important educational goal will be to change the current, long-lasting attitudes of both physicians and customers towards broad-spectrum and multipurpose compounds. Scientific societies, such as the European Society of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases (ESCMID), must play a leading role in this process.

  15. Low-level quinolone-resistance in multi-drug resistant typhoid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mirza, S.H.; Khan, M.A.

    2008-01-01

    To find out the frequency of low-level quinolone-resistance in Multi-Drug Resistant (MDR) typhoid using nalidixic acid screening disc. Blood was obtained from suspected cases of typhoid fever and cultured in to BacT/ALERT. The positive blood cultures bottles were subcultured. The isolates were identified by colony morphology and biochemical tests using API-20E galleries. Susceptibility testing of isolates was done by modified Kirby-Bauer disc diffusion method on Muellar Hinton Agar. For the isolates, which were resistant to nalidixic acid by disc diffusion method, Minimal Inhibitory Concentrations (MICs) of ciprofloxacin and nalidixic acid were determined by using the E-test strips. Disc diffusion susceptibility tests and MICs were interpreted according to the guidelines provided by National Committee for Control Laboratory Standard (NCCLS). A total of 21(65.5%) out of 32 isolates of Salmonellae were nalidixic acid-resistant by disk diffusion method. All the nalidixic acid-resistant isolates by disc diffusion method were confirmed by MICs for both ciprofloxacin and nalidixic acid. All the nalidixic acid-resistant isolates had a ciprofloxacin MIC of 0.25-1 microg/ml (reduced susceptibility) and nalidixic acid MICs > 32 microg (resistant). Out of all Salmonella isolates, 24 (75%) were found to be MDR, and all were S. typbi. Low-level quinolone-resistance in typhoid was high in this small series. Screening for nalidixic acid resistance with a 30 microg nalidixic acid disk is a reliable and cost-effective method to detect low-level fluoroquinolone resistance, especially in the developing countries. (author)

  16. [Multidrug-Resistant Tuberculosis by Strains of Beijing Family, in Patients from Lisbon, Portugal: Preliminary Report].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maltez, Fernando; Martins, Teresa; Póvoas, Diana; Cabo, João; Peres, Helena; Antunes, Francisco; Perdigão, João; Portugal, Isabel

    2017-03-31

    Beijing family strains of Mycobacterium tuberculosis are associated with multidrug-resistance. Although strains of the Lisboa family are the most common among multidrug-resistant and extensively drug-resistant patients in the region, several studies have reported the presence of the Beijing family. However, the features of patients from whom they were isolated, are not yet known. Retrospective study involving 104 multidrug-resistant and extensively drug-resistant strains of Mycobacterium tuberculosis, from the same number of patients, isolated and genotyped between 1993 and 2015 in Lisbon. We assessed the prevalence of strains of both families and the epidemiologic and clinical features of those infected with Beijing family strains. Seventy-four strains (71.2%) belonged to the Lisboa family, 25 (24.0%) showed a unique genotypic pattern and five (4.8%) belonged to the Beijing family, the latter identified after 2009. Those infected with Beijing family strains were angolan (n = 1), ukrainian (n = 2) and portuguese (n = 2), mainly young-aged and, four of five immunocompetent and with no past history of tuberculosis. All had multidrug-resistant tuberculosis. We did not find any distinctive clinical or radiological features, neither a predominant resistance pattern. Cure rate was high (four patients). Although the number of infected patients with Beijing strains was small, it suggests an important proportion of primary tuberculosis, a potential for transmission in the community but also a better clinical outcome when compared to other reported strains, such as W-Beijing and Lisboa. Although Lisboa family strains account for most of the multidrug and extensively drug-resistant tuberculosis cases in Lisbon area, Beijing strains are transmitted in the city and might change the local characteristics of the epidemics.

  17. Comparing amikacin and kanamycin-induced hearing loss in multidrug-resistant tuberculosis treatment under programmatic conditions in a Namibian retrospective cohort

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sagwa, Evans L; Ruswa, Nunurai; Mavhunga, Farai; Rennie, Timothy; Leufkens, Hubert G M; Mantel-Teeuwisse, Aukje K

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Amikacin and kanamycin are mainly used for treating multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB), especially in developing countries where the burden of MDR-TB is highest. Their protracted use in MDR-TB treatment is known to cause dose-dependent irreversible hearing loss, requiring hearing

  18. Rapid emergence of multidrug resistant, H58-lineage Salmonella typhi in Blantyre, Malawi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feasey, Nicholas A; Gaskell, Katherine; Wong, Vanessa; Msefula, Chisomo; Selemani, George; Kumwenda, Save; Allain, Theresa J; Mallewa, Jane; Kennedy, Neil; Bennett, Aisleen; Nyirongo, Joram O; Nyondo, Patience A; Zulu, Madalitso D; Parkhill, Julian; Dougan, Gordon; Gordon, Melita A; Heyderman, Robert S

    2015-04-01

    Between 1998 and 2010, S. Typhi was an uncommon cause of bloodstream infection (BSI) in Blantyre, Malawi and it was usually susceptible to first-line antimicrobial therapy. In 2011 an increase in a multidrug resistant (MDR) strain was detected through routine bacteriological surveillance conducted at Queen Elizabeth Central Hospital (QECH). Longitudinal trends in culture-confirmed Typhoid admissions at QECH were described between 1998-2014. A retrospective review of patient cases notes was conducted, focusing on clinical presentation, prevalence of HIV and case-fatality. Isolates of S. Typhi were sequenced and the phylogeny of Typhoid in Blantyre was reconstructed and placed in a global context. Between 1998-2010, there were a mean of 14 microbiological diagnoses of Typhoid/year at QECH, of which 6.8% were MDR. This increased to 67 in 2011 and 782 in 2014 at which time 97% were MDR. The disease predominantly affected children and young adults (median age 11 [IQR 6-21] in 2014). The prevalence of HIV in adult patients was 16.7% [8/48], similar to that of the general population (17.8%). Overall, the case fatality rate was 2.5% (3/94). Complications included anaemia, myocarditis, pneumonia and intestinal perforation. 112 isolates were sequenced and the phylogeny demonstrated the introduction and clonal expansion of the H58 lineage of S. Typhi. Since 2011, there has been a rapid increase in the incidence of multidrug resistant, H58-lineage Typhoid in Blantyre. This is one of a number of reports of the re-emergence of Typhoid in Southern and Eastern Africa. There is an urgent need to understand the reservoirs and transmission of disease and how to arrest this regional increase.

  19. Diversity of multi-drug resistant Acinetobacter baumannii population in a major hospital in Kuwait

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leila eVali

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Acinetobacter baumannii is one of the most important opportunistic pathogens that causes serious health care associated complications in critically ill patients. In the current study we report on the diversity of the clinical multi-drug resistant A. baumannii in Kuwait by molecular characterization. One hundred A. baumannii were isolated from one of the largest governmental hospitals in Kuwait. Following the identification of the isolates by molecular methods, the amplified blaOXA-51-like gene product of one isolate (KO-12 recovered from blood showed the insertion of the ISAba19 at position 379 in blaOXA-78. Of the 33 multi-drug resistant isolates, 28 (85% contained blaOXA-23, 2 (6% blaOXA-24 and 6 (18% blaPER-1 gene. We did not detect blaOXA-58, blaVIM, blaIMP, blaGES, blaVEB and blaNDM genes in any of the tested isolates. In 3 blaPER-1 positive isolates the genetic environment of blaPER-1 consisted of two copies of ISPa12 (tnpiA1 surrounding the blaPER-1 gene on a highly stable plasmid of ca. 140-kb. MLST analysis of the 33 A. baumannii isolates identified 20 different STs, of which 6 (ST-607, ST-608, ST-609, ST-610, ST-611 and ST-612 were novel. Emerging STs such as ST15 (identified for the first time in the Middle East, ST78 and ST25 were also detected. The predominant clonal complex was CC2. PFGE and MLST defined the MDR isolates as multi-clonal with diverse lineages. Our results lead us to believe that A. baumannii is diverse in clonal origins and / or is undergoing clonal expansion continuously while multiple lineages of MDR A. baumannii circulate in hospital wards simultaneously.

  20. Priorities in the prevention and control of multidrug-resistant Enterobacteriaceae in hospitals.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Khan, A S

    2012-10-01

    Multidrug-resistant Enterobacteriaceae (MDE) are a major public health threat due to international spread and few options for treatment. Furthermore, unlike meticillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), MDE encompass several genera and multiple resistance mechanisms, including extended-spectrum beta-lactamases and carbapenemases, which complicate detection in the routine diagnostic laboratory. Current measures to contain spread in many hospitals are somewhat ad hoc as there are no formal national or international guidelines.

  1. Efflux-mediated fluoroquinolone resistance in the multidrug-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa clinical isolate PA7: identification of a novel MexS variant involved in upregulation of the mexEF-oprN multidrug efflux operon

    OpenAIRE

    Morita, Yuji; Tomida, Junko; Kawamura, Yoshiaki

    2015-01-01

    The emergence of multidrug-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa has become a serious problem in medical settings. P. aeruginosa clinical isolate PA7 is resistant to fluoroquinolones, aminoglycosides, and most β-lactams but not imipenem. In this study, enhanced efflux-mediated fluoroquinolone resistance of PA7 was shown to reflect increased expression of two resistance nodulation cell division (RND) -type multidrug efflux operons, mexEF-oprN and mexXY-oprA. Such a clinical isolate has rarely been ...

  2. IncA/C plasmids harboured in serious multidrug-resistant Vibrio cholerae serogroup O139 strains in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ruibai; Yu, Dong; Zhu, Lianhui; Li, Jie; Yue, Junjie; Kan, Biao

    2015-03-01

    Vibrio cholerae serogroup O139 emerged in 1992 and is one of two major serogroups to have caused cholera epidemics. After 1998, serious multidrug-resistant (MDR) O139 strains quickly became common in China, showing a multidrug resistance profile to eight antibiotics. It is a great threat to public health, and elucidation of its mechanisms of resistance will provide a helpful guide for the clinical treatment and prevention of cholera. In this study, mega-plasmids from MDR V. cholerae O139 strains were identified by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) without enzyme digestion. One plasmid was isolated and sequenced, belonging to the IncA/C family. Ten antibiotic resistance genes were found in the MDR regions, including a blaTEM-20 gene, and these genes endowed the host with resistance to seven antibiotics. This kind of plasmid was positive in 71.2% (198/278) of toxigenic O139 strains, and the rate of plasmid positivity was consistent with the yearly change in MDR rates of these strains. This study reveals an important role of the IncA/C family plasmid in the spread of multiple antibiotic resistance of epidemic V. cholerae serogroup O139 strains, which has recombined with plasmids from different bacterial species and transferred among V. cholerae strains. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. and the International Society of Chemotherapy. All rights reserved.

  3. IND-2, a pyrimido[1″,2″:1,5]pyrazolo[3,4-b]quinoline derivative, circumvents multi-drug resistance and causes apoptosis in colon cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karthikeyan, Chandrabose; Lee, Crystal; Moore, Joshua; Mittal, Roopali; Suswam, Esther A; Abbott, Kodye L; Pondugula, Satyanarayana R; Manne, Upender; Narayanan, Narayanan K; Trivedi, Piyush; Tiwari, Amit K

    2015-02-01

    Naturally occurring condensed quinolines have anticancer properties. In efforts to find active analogues, we designed and synthesized eight polycyclic heterocycles with a pyrimido[1″,2″:1,5]pyrazolo[3,4-b]quinoline framework (IND series). The compounds were evaluated for activity against colon (HCT-116 and S1-MI-80), prostate (PC3 and DU-145), breast (MCF-7 and MDAMB-231), ovarian (ov2008 and A2780), and hepatocellular (HepG2) cancer cells and against non-cancerous Madin Darby canine kidney (MDCK), mouse embryonic fibroblast (NIH/3T3), and human embryonic kidney cells (HEK293). IND-2, a 4-chloro-2-methyl pyrimido[1″,2″:1,5]pyrazolo[3,4-b]quinoline, exhibited more than ten-fold selectivity and potent cytotoxic activity against colon cancer cells relative to the other cancer and non-cancer cells. With five additional colon cancer cell lines (HT-29, HCT-15, LS-180, LS-174, and LoVo), IND-2 had similar cytotoxicity and selectivity, and sub-micromolar concentrations caused changes in the morphology of HCT-116 and HCT-15 cells. IND-2 did not activate the transactivating function of the pregnane X receptor (PXR), indicating that it does not induce PXR-regulated ABCB1 or ABCG2 transporters. Indeed, IND-2 was not a substrate of ABCB1 or ABCG2, and it induced cytotoxicity in HEK293 cells overexpressing ABCB1 or ABCG2 to the same extent as in normal HEK293 cells. IND-2 was cytotoxic to resistant colon carcinoma S1-MI-80 cells, approximately three- and five-fold more than SN-38 and topotecan, respectively. In HCT-116 colon cancer cells, IND-2 produced concentration-dependent changes in mitochondrial membrane potential, leading to apoptosis, and sub-micromolar concentrations caused chromosomal DNA fragmentation. These findings suggest that, by increasing apoptosis, IND-2 has potential therapeutic efficacy for colorectal cancer. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Characterisation of multidrug-resistant Ehrlich ascites tumour cells selected in vivo for resistance to etoposide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, D; Maare, C; Eriksen, J

    2000-01-01

    An Ehrlich ascites tumour cell line (EHR2) was selected for resistance to etoposide (VP16) by in vivo exposure to this agent. The resulting cell line (EHR2/VP16) was 114.3-, 5.7-, and 4.0-fold resistant to VP16, daunorubicin, and vincristine, respectively. The amount of salt-extractable immunorea......An Ehrlich ascites tumour cell line (EHR2) was selected for resistance to etoposide (VP16) by in vivo exposure to this agent. The resulting cell line (EHR2/VP16) was 114.3-, 5.7-, and 4.0-fold resistant to VP16, daunorubicin, and vincristine, respectively. The amount of salt......-extractable immunoreactive topoisomerase IIalpha and beta in EHR2/VP16 was reduced by 30-40% relative to that in EHR2. The multidrug resistance-associated protein (MRP) mRNA was increased 20-fold in EHR2/VP16 as compared with EHR2, whereas the expression of P-glycoprotein was unchanged. In EHR2/VP16, the steady...

  5. Cost-Effectiveness of Antiretroviral Therapy for Multidrug-Resistant HIV: Past, Present, and Future

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marianne Harris

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In the early years of the highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART era, HIV with resistance to two or more agents in different antiretroviral classes posed a significant clinical challenge. Multidrug-resistant (MDR HIV was an important cause of treatment failure, morbidity, and mortality. Treatment options at the time were limited; multiple drug regimens with or without enfuvirtide were used with some success but proved to be difficult to sustain for reasons of tolerability, toxicity, and cost. Starting in 2006, data began to emerge supporting the use of new drugs from the original antiretroviral classes (tipranavir, darunavir, and etravirine and drugs from new classes (raltegravir and maraviroc for the treatment of MDR HIV. Their availability has enabled patients with MDR HIV to achieve full and durable viral suppression with more compact and cost-effective regimens including at least two and often three fully active agents. The emergence of drug-resistant HIV is expected to continue to become less frequent in the future, driven by improvements in the convenience, tolerability, efficacy, and durability of first-line HAART regimens. To continue this trend, the optimal rollout of HAART in both rich and resource-limited settings will require careful planning and strategic use of antiretroviral drugs and monitoring technologies.

  6. Role of novel multidrug efflux pump involved in drug resistance in Klebsiella pneumoniae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vijaya Bharathi Srinivasan

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Multidrug resistant Klebsiella pneumoniae have caused major therapeutic problems worldwide due to the emergence of the extended-spectrum β-lactamase producing strains. Although there are >10 major facilitator super family (MFS efflux pumps annotated in the genome sequence of the K. pneumoniae bacillus, apparently less is known about their physiological relevance. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Insertional inactivation of kpnGH resulting in increased susceptibility to antibiotics such as azithromycin, ceftazidime, ciprofloxacin, ertapenem, erythromycin, gentamicin, imipenem, ticarcillin, norfloxacin, polymyxin-B, piperacillin, spectinomycin, tobramycin and streptomycin, including dyes and detergents such as ethidium bromide, acriflavine, deoxycholate, sodium dodecyl sulphate, and disinfectants benzalkonium chloride, chlorhexidine and triclosan signifies the wide substrate specificity of the transporter in K. pneumoniae. Growth inactivation and direct fluorimetric efflux assays provide evidence that kpnGH mediates antimicrobial resistance by active extrusion in K. pneumoniae. The kpnGH isogenic mutant displayed decreased tolerance to cell envelope stressors emphasizing its added role in K. pneumoniae physiology. CONCLUSIONS AND SIGNIFICANCE: The MFS efflux pump KpnGH involves in crucial physiological functions besides being an intrinsic resistance determinant in K. pneumoniae.

  7. Advances in Drug Discovery of New Antitubercular Multidrug-Resistant Compounds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guilherme Felipe dos Santos Fernandes

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Tuberculosis (TB, a disease caused mainly by the Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb, is according to the World Health Organization (WHO the infectious disease responsible for the highest number of deaths worldwide. The increased number of multidrug-resistant (MDR-TB and extensively drug-resistant (XDR-TB strains, and the ineffectiveness of the current treatment against latent tuberculosis are challenges to be overcome in the coming years. The scenario of drug discovery becomes alarming when it is considered that the number of new drugs does not increase proportionally to the emergence of drug resistance. In this review, we will demonstrate the current advances in antitubercular drug discovery, focusing on the research of compounds with potent antituberculosis activity against MDR-TB strains. Herein, active compounds against MDR-TB with minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs less than 11 µM and low toxicity published in the last 4 years in the databases PubMed, Web of Science and Scopus will be presented and discussed.

  8. Sulbactam treatment for pneumonia involving multidrug-resistant Acinetobacter calcoaceticus-Acinetobacter baumannii complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Huang-Shen; Lee, Ming-Hsun; Cheng, Chun-Wen; Hsu, Po-Chang; Leu, Hsieh-Shong; Huang, Ching-Tai; Ye, Jung-Jr

    2015-06-01

    Multidrug-resistant (MDR) Acinetobacter calcoaceticus-Acinetobacter baumannii (Acb) complex has become an important cause of nosocomial pneumonia. Sulbactam is a β-lactamase inhibitor with antimicrobial activity against MDR Acb complex. To investigate outcomes of pneumonia involving MDR Acb complex treated with sulbactam or ampicillin/sulbactam for at least 7 days, we conducted a retrospective study of 173 adult patients over a 34 month period. Of 173 patients, 138 (79.8%) received combination therapy, mainly with carbapenems (119/138, 86.2%). The clinical response rate was 67.6% and the 30 day mortality rate was 31.2%. The independent predictors of clinical failure were malignancy, bilateral pneumonia and shorter duration of treatment. In patients with sulbactam-susceptible strains, there was no difference in clinical and microbiological outcome between combination therapy and monotherapy. Compared to the sulbactam-susceptible group, the sulbactam-resistant group had a lower rate of airway eradication, a longer duration of treatment and a higher rate of combination therapy with predominantly carbapenems (p < 0.05). There was no significant difference between the two groups in clinical resolution and 30 day mortality rates. Sulbactam could be a treatment option for pneumonia involving MDR Acb complex, and combination therapy with carbapenems could be considered for sulbactam-resistant cases.

  9. In vitro activity of fosfomycin trometamol and other oral antibiotics against multidrug-resistant uropathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mezzatesta, Maria Lina; La Rosa, Giulia; Maugeri, Gaetano; Zingali, Tiziana; Caio, Carla; Novelli, Andrea; Stefani, Stefania

    2017-06-01

    Clinical midstream and urinary catheter isolates (n = 106) of extended-spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL)-positive Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumoniae carbapenemase (KPC)-producing Klebsiella pneumoniae, Proteus mirabilis and meticillin-resistant Staphylococcus saprophyticus were tested against fosfomycin using the agar dilution method, the broth microdilution method and the gradient test described by the Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute. Nitrofurantoin, co-trimoxazole, amoxicillin/clavulanic acid, cefuroxime, levofloxacin and ciprofloxacin were tested using the gradient test alone. Breakpoints from the European Committee on Antimicrobial Susceptibility Testing 2015 guidelines were used. Fosfomycin inhibited all of the ESBL-positive E. coli, P. mirabilis and meticillin-resistant S. saprophyticus strains isolated from urine, as well as 82% of KPC-producing K. pneumoniae isolates. Substantial agreement for fosfomycin activity was found for the three test methods, particularly for Enterobacteriaceae. This study confirmed that fosfomycin has good in vitro activity against more common multidrug-resistant uropathogens. Fosfomycin could be a reliable empirical therapeutic option for uncomplicated urinary tract infections caused by these organisms, and a valid option for sparing parenteral antibiotics, such as carbapenems. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. and International Society of Chemotherapy. All rights reserved.

  10. In vitro activity of Tedizolid phosphate against multidrug-resistant Streptococcus pneumoniae isolates from Asian countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baek, Jin Yang; Kang, Cheol-In; Kim, So Hyun; Ko, Kwan Soo; Chung, Doo Ryeon; Peck, Kyong Ran; Hsueh, Po-Ren; Thamlikitkul, Visanu; So, Thomas Man-Kit; Lee, Nam Yong; Song, Jae-Hoon

    2016-06-01

    Tedizolid phosphate is a second-generation oxazolidinone prodrug that is potential activity against a wide range of Gram-positive pathogens, including methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, penicillin-resistant streptococci, and vancomycin-resistant enterococci. The in vitro activity of tedizolid and other comparator agents against multidrug-resistant (MDR) pneumococci from various Asian countries were evaluated. Of the S. pneumoniae clinical pneumonia isolates collected during 2008 and 2009 from 8 Asian countries (Korea, Taiwan, Thailand, Hong Kong, Vietnam, Malaysia, Philippines, and Sri Lanka), 104 isolates of MDR pneumococci were included in this study. Antimicrobial susceptibility testing for 18 antimicrobial agents was performed by broth microdilution method. Tedizolid was highly active against pneumococci. All isolates tested were inhibited at a tedizolid minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) value of ≤0.25μg/ml (ranged from ≤0.03μg/ml to 0.25μg/ml). The MIC50 and MIC90 of tedizolid against MDR pneumococci were both 0.12μg/ml, while MIC50 and MIC90 of linezolid were 0.5μg/ml and 1μg/ml, respectively. In addition, tedizolid maintained the activity against S. pneumoniae regardless of the extensively drug-resistant (XDR) phenotype of the isolates. The activity of tedizolid was excellent against all types of MDR pneumococci, exhibiting and maintaining at least 4-fold-greater potency compared to linezolid, regardless of resistance phenotypes to other commonly utilized agents. Tedizolid has the potential to be an agent to treat infections caused by MDR pneumococci in the Asia. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Multidrug-resistant extraintestinal pathogenic Escherichia coli of sequence type ST131 in animals and foods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Platell, Joanne L; Johnson, James R; Cobbold, Rowland N; Trott, Darren J

    2011-11-21

    Multidrug-resistant Escherichia coli sequence type 131 (ST131) has recently emerged as a globally distributed cause of extraintestinal infections in humans. Diverse factors have been investigated as explanations for ST131's rapid and successful dissemination, including transmission through animal contact and consumption of food, as suggested by the detection of ST131 in a number of nonhuman species. For example, ST131 has recently been identified as a cause of clinical infection in companion animals and poultry, and both host groups have been confirmed as faecal carriers of ST131. Moreover, a high degree of similarity has been shown among certain ST131 isolates from humans, companion animals, and poultry based on resistance characteristics and genomic background and human and companion animal ST131 isolates tend to exhibit similar virulence genotypes. However, most ST131 isolates from poultry appear to possess specific virulence genes that are typically absent from human and companion animal isolates, including genes associated with avian pathogenic E. coli. Since the number of reported animal and food-associated ST131 isolates is quite small, the role of nonhuman host species in the emergence, dissemination, and transmission of ST131 to humans remains unclear. Nevertheless, given the profound public health importance of the emergent ST131 clonal group, even the limited available evidence indicates a pressing need for further careful study of this significant question. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. The culturable soil antibiotic resistome: a community of multi-drug resistant bacteria.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fiona Walsh

    Full Text Available Understanding the soil bacterial resistome is essential to understanding the evolution and development of antibiotic resistance, and its spread between species and biomes. We have identified and characterized multi-drug resistance (MDR mechanisms in the culturable soil antibiotic resistome and linked the resistance profiles to bacterial species. We isolated 412 antibiotic resistant bacteria from agricultural, urban and pristine soils. All isolates were multi-drug resistant, of which greater than 80% were resistant to 16-23 antibiotics, comprising almost all classes of antibiotic. The mobile resistance genes investigated, (ESBL, bla NDM-1, and plasmid mediated quinolone resistance (PMQR resistance genes were not responsible for the respective resistance phenotypes nor were they present in the extracted soil DNA. Efflux was demonstrated to play an important role in MDR and many resistance phenotypes. Clinically relevant Burkholderia species are intrinsically resistant to ciprofloxacin but the soil Burkholderia species were not intrinsically resistant to ciprofloxacin. Using a phenotypic enzyme assay we identified the antibiotic specific inactivation of trimethoprim in 21 bacteria from different soils. The results of this study identified the importance of the efflux mechanism in the soil resistome and variations between the intrinsic resistance profiles of clinical and soil bacteria of the same family.

  13. Multi-drug resistant uropathogenic Escherichia coli and its treatment by Chinese medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Shi-Wei; Xu, Xiao-Yang; Xu, Jie; Yuan, Jiu-Yun; Wu, Wei-Kang; Zhang, Ning; Chen, Ze-Liang

    2017-10-01

    To investigate the resistance and virulence profiles of uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC) and its treatment by Chinese medicine (CM) Fuzheng Qingre Lishi Formula (, FQLF). UPEC strains were isolated from recurrent urinary tract infections (UTIs) patients. Patient sensitivities to 17 antibiotics were tested by the disk diffusion method. Virulence genes were screened by plolymerase chain reaction. A mouse model was constructed using a multi-drug resistant and virulent UPEC strain and treated with FQLF or the antibiotic imipenem. The treatment efficacy was evaluated by bacterial clearance from urine and the urinary organs. A total of 90 UPEC strains were collected, and 94.4% of the isolates were resistant to at least 1 antibiotic. Approximately 66.7% of the UPEC strains were multi-drug resistant. More than one virulence gene was found in 85.6% of the isolates. The extended-spectrum β-lactamases (ESBL)-positive strains were more resistant than the negative ones. The virulence gene number was positively correlated with the resistance number (PUPEC10. Treatment with either FQLF or antibiotics significantly cleared bacteria from the mouse urine after 14 days. In the untreated control, the bacteria lasted for 28 days. FQLF treatment of the UTI mouse model greatly reduced the bacterial number in the kidney and bladder, but could not completely clear the bacteria. Multi-drug resistance is common among UPEC isolates, and the resistance is positively related with virulence. FQLF could treat UPEC UTIs, but could not completely clear the bacteria from the host.

  14. Molecular characterization of multidrug-resistant Shigella spp. of food origin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Ashraf M; Shimamoto, Tadashi

    2015-02-02

    Shigella spp. are the causative agents of food-borne shigellosis, an acute enteric infection. The emergence of multidrug-resistant clinical isolates of Shigella presents an increasing challenge for clinicians in the treatment of shigellosis. Several studies worldwide have characterized the molecular basis of antibiotic resistance in clinical Shigella isolates of human origin, however, to date, no such characterization has been reported for Shigella spp. of food origin. In this study, we characterized the genetic basis of multidrug resistance in Shigella spp. isolated from 1600 food samples (800 meat products and 800 dairy products) collected from different street venders, butchers, retail markets, and slaughterhouses in Egypt. Twenty-four out of 27 Shigella isolates (88.9%) showed multidrug resistance phenotypes to at least three classes of antimicrobials. The multidrug-resistant Shigella spp. were as follows: Shigella flexneri (66.7%), Shigella sonnei (18.5%), and Shigella dysenteriae (3.7%). The highest resistance was to streptomycin (100.0%), then to kanamycin (95.8%), nalidixic acid (95.8%), tetracycline (95.8%), spectinomycin (93.6%), ampicillin (87.5%), and sulfamethoxazole/trimethoprim (87.5%). PCR and DNA sequencing were used to screen and characterize integrons and antibiotic resistance genes. Our results indicated that 11.1% and 74.1% of isolates were positive for class 1 and class 2 integrons, respectively. Beta-lactamase-encoding genes were identified in 77.8% of isolates, and plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance genes were identified in 44.4% of isolates. These data provide useful information to better understand the molecular basis of antimicrobial resistance in Shigella spp. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of the molecular characterization of antibiotic resistance in Shigella spp. isolated from food. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Influence of multidrug resistance on 18F-FCH cellular uptake in a glioblastoma model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vanpouille, Claire; Jeune, Nathalie le; Clotagatide, Anthony; Dubois, Francis; Kryza, David; Janier, Marc; Perek, Nathalie

    2009-01-01

    Multidrug resistance, aggressiveness and accelerated choline metabolism are hallmarks of malignancy and have motivated the development of new PET tracers like 18 F-FCH, an analogue of choline. Our aim was to study the relationship of multidrug resistance of cultured glioma cell lines and 18 F-FCH tracer uptake. We used an in vitro multidrug-resistant (MDR) glioma model composed of sensitive parental U87MG and derived resistant cells U87MG-CIS and U87MG-DOX. Aggressiveness, choline metabolism and transport were studied, particularly the expression of choline kinase (CK) and high-affinity choline transporter (CHT1). FCH transport studies were assessed in our glioblastoma model. As expected, the resistant cell lines express P-glycoprotein (Pgp), multidrug resistance-associated protein isoform 1 (MRP1) and elevated glutathione (GSH) content and are also more mobile and more invasive than the sensitive U87MG cells. Our results show an overexpression of CK and CHT1 in the resistant cell lines compared to the sensitive cell lines. We found an increased uptake of FCH (in % of uptake per 200,000 cells) in the resistant cells compared to the sensitive ones (U87MG: 0.89±0.14; U87MG-CIS: 1.27±0.18; U87MG-DOX: 1.33±0.13) in line with accelerated choline metabolism and aggressive phenotype. FCH uptake is not influenced by the two ATP-dependant efflux pumps: Pgp and MRP1. FCH would be an interesting probe for glioma imaging which would not be effluxed from the resistant cells by the classic MDR ABC transporters. Our results clearly show that FCH uptake reflects accelerated choline metabolism and is related to tumour aggressiveness and drug resistance. (orig.)

  16. Reversal of multidrug resistance by small interfering RNA (siRNA) in doxorubicin-resistant MCF-7 breast cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dönmez, Yaprak; Gündüz, Ufuk

    2011-03-01

    Resistance to anticancer drugs is a serious obstacle to cancer chemotherapy. A common form of multidrug resistance (MDR) is caused by the overexpression of transmembrane transporter proteins P-glycoprotein (P-gp) and multidrug resistance-associated protein-1 (MRP1), encoded by MDR1 and MRP1 genes, respectively. These proteins lead to reduced intracellular drug concentration and decreased cytotoxicity by means of their ability to pump the drugs out of the cells. Breast cancer tumor resistance is mainly associated with overexpression of P-gp/MDR1. Although some chemical MDR modulators aim to overcome MDR by interfering functioning of P-gp, their toxicities limit their usage in clinics. Consequently, RNA interference mediated sequence specific inhibition of the expression of P-gp/MDR1 mRNA may be an efficient tool to reverse MDR phenotype and increase the success of chemotherapy. Aim of this study was resensitizing doxorubicin-resistant breast cancer cells to anticancer agent doxorubicin by selective downregulation of P-gp/MDR1 mRNA. The effect of the selected MDR1 siRNA, and MRP1 expression after MDR1 silencing was determined by qPCR analysis. Intracellular drug accumulation and localization was investigated by confocal laser scanning microscopy after treatment with MDR1 siRNA. XTT cell proliferation assay was performed to determine the effect of MDR1 silencing on doxorubicin sensitivity. The results demonstrated that approximately 90% gene silencing occurred by the selected siRNA targeting MDR1 mRNA. However, the level of MRP1 mRNA did not change after MDR1 downregulation. Silencing of P-gp encoding MDR1 gene resulted in almost complete restoration of the intracellular doxorubicin accumulation and relocalization of the drug in the nuclei. Introduction of siRNA resulted in about 70% resensitization to doxorubicin. Selected siRNA duplex was shown to effectively inhibit MDR1 gene expression, restore doxorubicin accumulation and localization, and enhance

  17. Multidrug Resistant CTX-M-Producing Escherichia coli: A Growing Threat among HIV Patients in India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kesavaram Padmavathy

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Extended Spectrum β-Lactamases (ESBLs confer resistance to third-generation cephalosporins and CTX-M types have emerged as the most prominent ESBLs worldwide. This study was designed to determine the prevalence of CTX-M positive ESBL-producing urinary E. coli isolates from HIV patients and to establish the association of multidrug resistance, phylogeny, and virulence profile with CTX-M production. A total of 57 ESBL producers identified among 76 E. coli strains isolated from HIV patients from South India were screened for blaCTX-M, AmpC production, multidrug resistance, and nine virulence associated genes (VAGs, fimH, pap, afa/dra, sfa/foc, iutA, fyuA, iroN, usp, and kpsMII. The majority (70.2% of the ESBL producers harbored blaCTX-M and were AmpC coproducers. Among the CTX-M producers, 47.5% were found to be UPEC, 10% harbored as many as 7 VAGs, and 45% possessed kpsMII. Multidrug resistance (CIPRSXTRGENR was significantly more common among the CTX-M producers compared to the nonproducers (70% versus 41.2%. However, 71.4% of the multidrug resistant CTX-M producers exhibited susceptibility to nitrofurantoin thereby making it an effective alternative to cephalosporins/fluoroquinolones. The emergence of CTX-M-producing highly virulent, multidrug resistant uropathogenic E. coli is of significant public health concern in countries like India with a high burden of HIV/AIDS.

  18. Activity of Host Antimicrobials against Multidrug-Resistant Acinetobacter baumannii Acquiring Colistin Resistance through Loss of Lipopolysaccharide

    OpenAIRE

    García-Quintanilla, Meritxell; Pulido, Marina R.; Moreno-Martínez, Patricia; Martín-Peña, Reyes; López-Rojas, Rafael; Pachón, Jerónimo; McConnell, Michael J.

    2014-01-01

    Acinetobacter baumannii can acquire resistance to the cationic peptide antibiotic colistin through complete loss of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) expression. The activities of the host cationic antimicrobials LL-37 and human lysozyme against multidrug-resistant clinical isolates of A. baumannii that acquired colistin resistance through lipopolysaccharide loss were characterized. We demonstrate that LL-37 has activity against strains lacking lipopolysaccharide that is similar to that of their colis...

  19. Endothelin and calciotropic hormones share regulatory pathways in multidrug resistance protein 2-mediated transport

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wever, K.E.; Masereeuw, R.; Miller, D.S.; Hang, X.M.; Flik, G.

    2007-01-01

    The kidney of vertebrates plays a key role in excretion of endogenous waste products and xenobiotics. Active secretion in the proximal nephron is at the basis of this excretion, mediated by carrier proteins including multidrug resistance protein 2 (Mrp2). We previously showed that Mrp2 function is

  20. Endothelin and calciotropic hormones share regulatory pathways in multidrug resistance protein 2-mediated transport.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wever, K.E.; Masereeuw, R.; Miller, D.S.; Hang, X.M.; Flik, G.

    2007-01-01

    The kidney of vertebrates plays a key role in excretion of endogenous waste products and xenobiotics. Active secretion in the proximal nephron is at the basis of this excretion, mediated by carrier proteins including multidrug resistance protein 2 (Mrp2). We previously showed that Mrp2 function is

  1. Endothelin and calciotropic hormones share regulatory pathways in multidrug resistance protein 2 (Mrp2-) mediated transport

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wever, K.E.; Masereeuw, R.; Miller, D.S.; Hang, X.M.; Flik, G.

    2006-01-01

    The kidney of vertebrates plays a key role in excretion of endogenous waste products and xenobiotics. Active secretion in the proximal nephron is at the basis of this excretion, mediated by carrier proteins including multidrug resistance protein 2 (Mrp2). We previously showed that Mrp2 function is

  2. Multidrug resistance gene expression is controlled by steroid hormones in the secretory epithelium of the uterus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Arceci, R. J.; Baas, F.; Raponi, R.; Horwitz, S. B.; Housman, D.; Croop, J. M.

    1990-01-01

    The multidrug resistance (mdr) gene family has been shown to encode a membrane glycoprotein, termed the P-glycoprotein, which functions as a drug efflux pump with broad substrate specificity. This multigene family is expressed in a tissue-specific fashion in a wide variety of normal and neoplastic

  3. Limited Sampling Strategies for Therapeutic Drug Monitoring of Linezolid in Patients With Multidrug-Resistant Tuberculosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Alffenaar, Jan-Willem C.; Kosterink, Jos G. W.; van Altena, Richard; van der Werf, Tjip S.; Uges, Donald R. A.; Proost, Johannes H.

    Introduction: Linezolid is a potential drug for the treatment of multidrug-resistant tuberculosis but its use is limited because of severe adverse effects such as anemia, thrombocytopenia, and peripheral neuropathy. This study aimed to develop a model for the prediction of linezolid area. under the

  4. Multidrug-resistant TB in Zambia: review of national data from 2000 to 2011

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kapata, Nathan; Chanda-Kapata, Pascalina; Bates, Matthew; Mwaba, Peter; Cobelens, Frank; Grobusch, Martin P.; Zumla, Alimuddin

    2013-01-01

    Multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB) is posing a great threat to global TB control. The burden in Zambia is not well defined because routine surveillance data are scarce. We reviewed national MDR-TB data for the last decade to inform future public health policy with respect to MDR-TB in Zambia.

  5. Surgery as an Adjunctive Treatment for Multidrug-Resistant Tuberculosis : An Individual Patient Data Metaanalysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fox, Gregory J.; Mitnick, Carole D.; Benedetti, Andrea; Chan, Edward D.; Becerra, Mercedes; Chiang, Chen-Yuan; Keshavjee, Salmaan; Koh, Won-Jung; Shiraishi, Yuji; Viiklepp, Piret; Yim, Jae-Joon; Pasvol, Geoffrey; Robert, Jerome; Shim, Tae Sun; Shin, Sonya S.; Menzies, Dick; van der Werf, Tjip S.

    2016-01-01

    Background. Medical treatment for multidrug-resistant (MDR)-tuberculosis is complex, toxic, and associated with poor outcomes. Surgical lung resection may be used as an adjunct to medical therapy, with the intent of reducing bacterial burden and improving cure rates. We conducted an individual

  6. The effect of Cnidoscolus aconitifolius on multi-drug resistant micro ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Escherichia coli, Klebsiella species, Staphylococcus aureus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Salmonella enterica Gallinarum and Candida albicans. The results from this study show that none of the multi-drug resistant micro-organisms was sensitive to the leaf extract of C. aconitifolius. Key words: Cnidoscolus aconitifolius, ...

  7. Characterization of drug transport by the human multidrug resistance protein 3 (ABCC3)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zelcer, N.; Saeki, T.; Reid, G.; Beijnen, J. H.; Borst, P.

    2001-01-01

    We have characterized the substrate specificity and mechanism of transport of the human multidrug resistance-associated protein 3 (MRP3). A murine fibroblast-like cell line generated from the kidneys of mice that lack Mdr1a/b and Mrp1 was retrovirally transduced with MRP3 cDNA. Stable clones

  8. New-Onset Psychosis in a Multi-Drug Resistant Tuberculosis Patient ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... after which his condition ameliorated. It is imperative that clinicians involved in treating multi-drug resistant tuberculosis are conversant with the side effects of category IV drugs. Acute psychosis from cycloserine toxicity requires prompt intervention by trained medical personnel using the relevant psychotropic medications.

  9. What do proton motive force driven multidrug resistance transporters have in common?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mazurkiewicz, P.; Driessen, A.J.M.; Konings, W.N

    2005-01-01

    The extensive progress of genome sequencing projects in recent years has demonstrated that multidrug resistance (MDR) transporters are widely spread among all domains of life. This indicates that they play crucial roles in the survival of organisms. Moreover, antibiotic and chemotherapeutic

  10. Tigecycline use in two cases with multidrug-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii meningitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tutuncu, E Ediz; Kuscu, Ferit; Gurbuz, Yunus; Ozturk, Baris; Haykir, Asli; Sencan, Irfan

    2010-09-01

    The treatment of post-surgical meningitis due to multidrug-resistant (MDR) Acinetobacter baumannii is a therapeutic dilemma. The cases of two patients with MDR A. baumannii meningitis secondary to surgical site infections, successfully treated with combination regimens including tigecycline, are presented. Copyright © 2009 International Society for Infectious Diseases. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. The socioeconomic impact of multidrug resistant tuberculosis on patients: results from Ethiopia, Indonesia and Kazakhstan

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Hof, Susan; Collins, David; Hafidz, Firdaus; Beyene, Demissew; Tursynbayeva, Aigul; Tiemersma, Edine

    2016-01-01

    One of the main goals of the post-2015 global tuberculosis (TB) strategy is that no families affected by TB face catastrophic costs. We revised an existing TB patient cost measurement tool to specifically also measure multi-drug resistant (MDR) TB patients' costs and applied it in Ethiopia,

  12. Pattern of intensive phase treatment outcomes of multi-drug resistant ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Pattern of intensive phase treatment outcomes of multi-drug resistant tuberculosis in University of Port Harcourt Treatment Centre: a review of records from ... Data on patients' age, sex, HIV status, treatment outcomes were extracted from the hospital book records into a computer data sheet at the UPTH treatment centre.

  13. Targeting multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB) by therapeutic vaccines

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Prabowo, Satria A.; Groeschel, Matthias I.; Schmidt, Ed D. L.; Skrahina, Alena; Mihaescu, Traian; Hasturk, Serap; Mitrofanov, Rotislav; Pimkina, Edita; Visontai, Ildik; de Jong, Bouke; Stanford, John L.; Cardona, Pere-Joan; Kaufmann, Stefan H. E.; van der Werf, Tjipke

    Tuberculosis (TB) has scourged humankind for millennia, and latent infection affects nearly one-third of today's world population. The emergence of multidrug-resistant (MDR)-TB is a major global threat and reflects treatment failure of drug-sensitive disease. MDR-TB management is a burden for

  14. Expression of multidrug resistance-associated proteins predicts prognosis in childhood and adult acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Plasschaert, SLA; de Bont, ESJM; Boezen, M; vander Kolk, DM; Daenen, SMJG; Faber, KN; Kamps, WA; de Vries, EGE; Vellenga, E

    2005-01-01

    PURPOSE: Patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) are treated with a variety of chemotherapeutic drugs, which can be transported by six multidrug resistance-associated proteins (MRP). These MRPs have strongly overlapping functional activities. The aim of this study was to investigate the

  15. Evaluation of macrolides for possible use against multidrug-resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Paardt, Anne-Fleur; Wilffert, Bob; Akkerman, Onno W.; de Lange, Wiel C. M.; van Soolingen, Dick; Sinha, Bhanu; van der Werf, Tjip S.; Kosterink, Jos G. W.; Alffenaar, Jan-Willem C.

    Multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB) is a major global health problem. The loss of susceptibility to an increasing number of drugs behoves us to consider the evaluation of non-traditional anti-tuberculosis drugs. Clarithromycin, a macrolide antibiotic, is defined as a group 5 anti-tuberculosis

  16. Potential antimicrobial agents for the treatment of multidrug-resistant tuberculosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Alsaad, Noor; Wilffert, Bob; van Altena, Richard; de Lange, Wiel C. M.; van der Werf, Tjip S.; Kosterink, Jos G. W.; Alffenaar, Jan-Willem C.

    2014-01-01

    Treatment of multidrug-resistant (MDR) tuberculosis (TB) is challenging because of the high toxicity of second-line drugs and the longer treatment duration than for drug-susceptible TB patients. In order to speed up novel treatment for MDR-TB, we suggest considering expanding the indications of

  17. Increased levels of the multidrug resistance protein in lateral membranes of proliferating hepatocyte-derived cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roelofsen, H; Vos, TA; Schippers, IJ; Kuipers, F; Moshage, H; Jansen, PLM; Muller, M

    Background & Aims: The multidrug resistance protein (MRP) functions as an organic anion efflux carrier. Recent studies suggest that hepatocytes contain two mrp homologues, named mrp1 and mrp2, localized on the lateral and canalicular membrane, respectively. The aim of this study was to evaluate the

  18. Isolation and characterization of antimicrobial compounds in plant extracts against multidrug-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoko Miyasaki

    Full Text Available The number of fully active antibiotic options that treat nosocomial infections due to multidrug-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii (A. baumannii is extremely limited. Magnolia officinalis, Mahonia bealei, Rabdosia rubescens, Rosa rugosa, Rubus chingii, Scutellaria baicalensis, and Terminalia chebula plant extracts were previously shown to have growth inhibitory activity against a multidrug-resistant clinical strain of A. baumannii. In this study, the compounds responsible for their antimicrobial activity were identified by fractionating each plant extract using high performance liquid chromatography, and determining the antimicrobial activity of each fraction against A. baumannii. The chemical structures of the fractions inhibiting >40% of the bacterial growth were elucidated by liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry analysis and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. The six most active compounds were identified as: ellagic acid in Rosa rugosa; norwogonin in Scutellaria baicalensis; and chebulagic acid, chebulinic acid, corilagin, and terchebulin in Terminalia chebula. The most potent compound was identified as norwogonin with a minimum inhibitory concentration of 128 µg/mL, and minimum bactericidal concentration of 256 µg/mL against clinically relevant strains of A. baumannii. Combination studies of norwogonin with ten anti-Gram negative bacterial agents demonstrated that norwogonin did not enhance the antimicrobial activity of the synthetic antibiotics chosen for this study. In conclusion, of all identified antimicrobial compounds, norwogonin was the most potent against multidrug-resistant A. baumannii strains. Further studies are warranted to ascertain the prophylactic and therapeutic potential of norwogonin for infections due to multidrug-resistant A. baumannii.

  19. Nitrate reductase assay using sodium nitrate for rapid detection of multidrug resistant tuberculosis

    OpenAIRE

    Macedo, Ma?ra Bidart; Groll, Andrea Von; Fissette, Krista; Palomino, Juan Carlos; da Silva, Pedro Eduardo Almeida; Martin, Anandi

    2012-01-01

    We validated the nitrate reductase assay (NRA) for the detection of multidrug-resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MDR-TB) using sodium nitrate (NaNO3) in replacement of potassium nitrate (KNO3) as nitrate source. NaNO3 is cheaper than KNO3 and has no restriction on use which facilitates the implementation of NRA to detect MDR-TB.

  20. Multidrug-resistant viridans streptococcus (MDRVS) osteomyelitis of the mandible successfully treated with moxifloxacin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ang, Jocelyn Y; Asmar, Basim I

    2008-05-01

    Multidrug-resistant viridans group streptococcus (MDRVS) strains have emerged as important pathogens. Treatment of MDRVS infections is problematic. The use of fluoroquinolones for treatment of MDRVS osteomyelitis has not been established. We present the first case of MDRVS osteomyelitis of the mandible successfully treated with sequential intravenous then oral moxifloxacin, and review the literature on the subject.

  1. Recycling antibiotics into GUMBOS: A new combination strategy to combat multi-drug resistant bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    The emergence of multi-drug resistant bacteria, coupled with the lack of new antibiotics in development, is fast evolving into a global crisis. New strategies utilizing existing antibacterial agents are urgently needed. We propose one such strategy in which four outmoded ß-lactam antibiotics (amp...

  2. Multidrug-resistant tuberculosis : long-term treatment outcome in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geerligs, WA; van Altena, R; de Lange, WCM; van Soolingen, D; van der Werf, TS

    SETTING: Tuberculosis units (Beatrixoord, Haren; and Dekkerswald, Groesbeek) in the Netherlands. OBJECTIVE: TO study the long-term treatment outcome of patients with multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB). DESIGN: Descriptive analysis of all consecutively admitted patients with MDR-TB between 1

  3. Multidrug resistant pneumonia treated with aerosolized amikacin in a patient with acute renal insufficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bawany, Muhammad Z; Saeed, Bilal; Sodeman, Thomas; Mutgi, Anand; Duggan, Joan M

    2013-01-01

    Multidrug resistant pneumonia is an entity, which is difficult to treat, and in a patient with acute renal insufficiency, it leaves a physician with a handful of antibiotics to be considered. Aerosolized administration of antibiotics is one option that can be contemplated for a patient with acute renal insufficiency to avoid the nephrotoxic effect of the antibiotics.

  4. Endothelin and calciotropic hormones share regulatory pathways in multidrug resistance protein 2-mediated transport

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wever, K.E.; Masereeuw, R.; Miller, D.S.; Hang, X.M.; Flik, G.

    2006-01-01

    The kidney of vertebrates plays a key role in excretion of endogenous waste products and xenobiotics. Active secretion in the proximal nephron is at the basis of this excretion, mediated by carrier proteins including multidrug resistance protein 2 (Mrp2). We previously showed that Mrp2 function is

  5. Optimizing the Safety of Multidrug-resistant Tuberculosis Therapy in Namibia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sagwa, Evans

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: Multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB), a growing global menace, is seriously undermining the previous successes made in the elimination of TB. MDR-TB treatment takes a long time, is complex, and is frequently associated with the occurrence of adverse drug reactions, some of which

  6. Characterisation of multidrug-resistant Ehrlich ascites tumour cells selected in vivo for resistance to etoposide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, D; Maare, C; Eriksen, J

    2000-01-01

    -extractable immunoreactive topoisomerase IIalpha and beta in EHR2/VP16 was reduced by 30-40% relative to that in EHR2. The multidrug resistance-associated protein (MRP) mRNA was increased 20-fold in EHR2/VP16 as compared with EHR2, whereas the expression of P-glycoprotein was unchanged. In EHR2/VP16, the steady......M. ATPase activity was slightly stimulated by daunorubicin, whereas vinblastine, verapamil, and cyclosporin A had no effect. In conclusion, development of resistance to VP16 in EHR2 is accompanied by a significant reduction in topoisomerase II (alpha and beta) and by increased expression of MRP mRNA (20......An Ehrlich ascites tumour cell line (EHR2) was selected for resistance to etoposide (VP16) by in vivo exposure to this agent. The resulting cell line (EHR2/VP16) was 114.3-, 5.7-, and 4.0-fold resistant to VP16, daunorubicin, and vincristine, respectively. The amount of salt...

  7. Multidrug resistance among different serotypes of clinical Salmonella isolates in Taiwan

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lauderdale, T. L.; Aarestrup, Frank Møller; Chen, P. C.

    2006-01-01

    Of the 798 clinical Salmonella isolates collected from multiple hospitals in Taiwan, resistance to ampicillin (48.5%), chloramphenicol (55.3%), streptomycin (59.0%), sulfamethoxazole (68.0%), and tetracycline (67.8%) was high, whereas resistance to all 5 antimicrobials (ACSSuT R-type) comprised 327...... multiresistant to other antimicrobials. Studies are needed to determine the sources of different multidrug-resistant serotypes. Continued national surveillance is underway to monitor changes in resistance trends and to detect further emergence of resistant Salmonella serotypes in Taiwan. (c) 2006 Elsevier Inc...

  8. MicroRNA signatures from multidrug-resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    REN, NA; GAO, GUIJU; SUN, YUE; ZHANG, LING; WANG, HUIZHU; HUA, WENHAO; WAN, KANGLIN; LI, XINGWANG

    2015-01-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) infections, caused by multi-drug-resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MDR MTB), remain a significant public health concern worldwide. The regulatory mechanisms underlying the emergence of MDR MTB strains remain to be fully elucidated, and further investigation is required in order to develop better strategies for TB control. The present study investigated the expression profile of microRNA (miRNA) in MTB strains, and examined the differences between sensitive MTB and MDR MTB using next generation sequencing (NGS) with Illumina Deep Sequencing technology to better understand the mechanisms of resistance in MDR MTB, A total of 5, 785 and 195, and 6, 290 and 595 qualified Illumina reads were obtained from two MDR MTB strains, and 6, 673 and 665, and 7, 210 and 217 qualified Illumina reads were obtained from two sensitive MTB strains. The overall de novo assembly of miRNA sequence data generated 62 and 62, and 95 and 112 miRNAs between the 18 and 30 bp long from sensitive MTB strains and MDR MTB strains, respectively. Comparative miRNA analysis revealed that 142 miRNAs were differentially expressed in the MDR MTB strain, compared with the sensitive MTB strain, of which 48 were upregulated and 94 were downregulated. There were six similarly expressed miRNAs between the MDR and sensitive MTB strains, and 108 miRNAs were expressed only in the MDR MTB strain. The present study acquired miRNA data from sensitive MTB and MDR MTB strains using NGS techniques, and this identification miRNAs may serve as an invaluable resource for revealing the molecular basis of the regulation of expression associated with the mechanism of drug-resistance in MTB. PMID:26324150

  9. Multidrug-Resistant Enterococcal Infections: New Compounds, Novel Antimicrobial Therapies?

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Harten, Roel M; Willems, Rob J L; Martin, Nathaniel I; Hendrickx, Antoni P A

    2017-06-01

    Over the past two decades infections due to antibiotic-resistant bacteria have escalated world-wide, affecting patient morbidity, mortality, and health care costs. Among these bacteria, Enterococcus faecium and Enterococcus faecalis represent opportunistic nosocomial pathogens that cause difficult-to-treat infections because of intrinsic and acquired resistance to a plethora of antibiotics. In recent years, a number of novel antimicrobial compound classes have been discovered and developed that target Gram-positive bacteria, including E. faecium and E. faecalis. These new antibacterial agents include teixobactin (targeting lipid II and lipid III), lipopeptides derived from nisin (targeting lipid II), dimeric vancomycin analogues (targeting lipid II), sortase transpeptidase inhibitors (targeting the sortase enzyme), alanine racemase inhibitors, lipoteichoic acid synthesis inhibitors (targeting LtaS), various oxazolidinones (targeting the bacterial ribosome), and tarocins (interfering with teichoic acid biosynthesis). The targets of these novel compounds and mode of action make them very promising for further antimicrobial drug development and future treatment of Gram-positive bacterial infections. Here we review current knowledge of the most favorable anti-enterococcal compounds along with their implicated modes of action and efficacy in animal models to project their possible future use in the clinical setting. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Multidrug Efflux Pumps at the Crossroad between Antibiotic Resistance and Bacterial Virulence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alcalde-Rico, Manuel; Hernando-Amado, Sara; Blanco, Paula; Martínez, José L

    2016-01-01

    Multidrug efflux pumps can be involved in bacterial resistance to antibiotics at different levels. Some efflux pumps are constitutively expressed at low levels and contribute to intrinsic resistance. In addition, their overexpression may allow higher levels of resistance. This overexpression can be transient, in the presence of an effector (phenotypic resistance), or constitutive when mutants in the regulatory elements of the expression of efflux pumps are selected (acquired resistance). Efflux pumps are present in all cells, from human to bacteria and are highly conserved, which indicates that they are ancient elements in the evolution of different organisms. Consequently, it has been suggested that, besides antibiotic resistance, bacterial multidrug efflux pumps would likely contribute to other relevant processes of the microbial physiology. In the current article, we discuss some specific examples of the role that efflux pumps may have in the bacterial virulence of animals' and plants' pathogens, including the processes of intercellular communication. Based in these evidences, we propose that efflux pumps are at the crossroad between resistance and virulence of bacterial pathogens. Consequently, the comprehensive study of multidrug efflux pumps requires addressing these functions, which are of relevance for the bacterial-host interactions during infection.

  11. Multidrug efflux pumps at the crossroad between antibiotic resistance and bacterial virulence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuel Alcalde-Rico

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Multidrug efflux pumps can be involved in bacterial resistance to antibiotics at different levels. Some efflux pumps are constitutively expressed at low levels and contribute to intrinsic resistance. In addition, their overexpression may allow higher levels of resistance. This overexpression can be transient, in the presence of an effector (phenotypic resistance, or constitutive when mutants in the regulatory elements of the expression of efflux pumps are selected (acquired resistance. Efflux pumps are present in all cells, from human to bacteria and are highly conserved, which indicates that they are ancient elements in the evolution of different organisms. Consequently, it has been suggested that, besides antibiotic resistance, bacterial multidrug efflux pumps would likely contribute to other relevant process of the microbial physiology. In the current article, we discuss some specific examples of the role that efflux pumps may have in the bacterial virulence of animals' and plants' pathogens, including the processes of intercellular communication. Based in these evidences, we propose that efflux pumps are at the crossroad between resistance and virulence of bacterial pathogens. Consequently, the comprehensive study of multidrug efflux pumps requires addressing these functions, which are of relevance for the bacterial-host interactions during infection.

  12. Zoonotic potential of multidrug-resistant extraintestinal pathogenic Escherichia coli obtained from healthy poultry carcasses in Salvador, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Vitor Lima-Filho

    Full Text Available The zoonotic potential to cause human and/or animal infections among multidrug-resistant extraintestinal pathogenic Escherichia coli from avian origin was investigated. Twenty-seven extraintestinal pathogenic E. coli isolates containing the increased survival gene (iss were obtained from the livers of healthy and diseased poultry carcasses at two slaughterhouses in Salvador, northeastern Brazil. The antimicrobial resistance-susceptibility profiles were conducted with antibiotics of avian and/or human use by the standardized disc-diffusion method. Antimicrobial resistance was higher for levofloxacin (51.8%, amoxicillin/clavulanic acid (70.4%, ampicillin (81.5%, cefalotin (88.8%, tetracycline (100% and streptomycin (100%. The minimum inhibitory concentrations above the resistance breakpoints of doxycycline, neomycin, oxytetracycline and enrofloxacin reached, respectively, 88.0%, 100%, 75% and 91.7% of the isolates. Strains with high and low antimicrobial resistance were i.p. administered to Swiss mice, and histopathological examination was carried out seven days after infection. Resistance to goat and human serum complement was also evaluated. The results show that Swiss mice challenged with strain 2B (resistant to 11 antimicrobials provoked a severe degeneration of hepatocytes besides lymphocytic infiltration in the liver, whereas the spleen showed areas of degeneration of the white and red pulp. Conversely, the spleen and liver of mice challenged with strain 4A (resistant to two antimicrobials were morphologically preserved. In addition, complement resistance to goat and human serum was high for strain 2B and low for strain 4A. Our data show that multidrug resistance and pathogenesis can be correlated in extraintestinal pathogenic E. coli strains obtained from apparently healthy poultry carcasses, increasing the risk for human public healthy.

  13. Zoonotic potential of multidrug-resistant extraintestinal pathogenic Escherichia coli obtained from healthy poultry carcasses in Salvador, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Vitor Lima-Filho

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available The zoonotic potential to cause human and/or animal infections among multidrug-resistant extraintestinal pathogenic Escherichia coli from avian origin was investigated. Twenty-seven extraintestinal pathogenic E. coli isolates containing the increased survival gene (iss were obtained from the livers of healthy and diseased poultry carcasses at two slaughterhouses in Salvador, northeastern Brazil. The antimicrobial resistance-susceptibility profiles were conducted with antibiotics of avian and/or human use by the standardized disc-diffusion method. Antimicrobial resistance was higher for levofloxacin (51.8%, amoxicillin/clavulanic acid (70.4%, ampicillin (81.5%, cefalotin (88.8%, tetracycline (100% and streptomycin (100%. The minimum inhibitory concentrations above the resistance breakpoints of doxycycline, neomycin, oxytetracycline and enrofloxacin reached, respectively, 88.0%, 100%, 75% and 91.7% of the isolates. Strains with high and low antimicrobial resistance were i.p. administered to Swiss mice, and histopathological examination was carried out seven days after infection. Resistance to goat and human serum complement was also evaluated. The results show that Swiss mice challenged with strain 2B (resistant to 11 antimicrobials provoked a severe degeneration of hepatocytes besides lymphocytic infiltration in the liver, whereas the spleen showed areas of degeneration of the white and red pulp. Conversely, the spleen and liver of mice challenged with strain 4A (resistant to two antimicrobials were morphologically preserved. In addition, complement resistance to goat and human serum was high for strain 2B and low for strain 4A. Our data show that multidrug resistance and pathogenesis can be correlated in extraintestinal pathogenic E. coli strains obtained from apparently healthy poultry carcasses, increasing the risk for human public healthy.

  14. Detection of expression and modulation of multidrug-resistance (MDR) and establishment of a new bioassay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berger, W.

    1993-08-01

    The present thesis deals with the resistance of human malignant cells against cellular toxicity of anticancer drugs, a phenomenon representing one of the major obstacles to successful chemotherapy. One mechanism underlying a cross-resistance to different drugs called multidrug resistance (MDR) is characterized by the expression of an active transport protein (P-glycoprotein), causing decreased intracellular drug retention and cytotoxicity. The main subjects of the present work were to establish different detection methods for MDR and its modulation (by substances blocking activity of P-glycoprotein) including immunological methods (immunocytochemistry, radioimmunoassay), molecular biology (slot-blot analysis, in-situ hybridization) and functional assays (drug-accumulation analysis, drug-cytotoxicity analysis). The methods were evaluated and compared using human and mouse MDR control cell lines and human tumor cell lines established in our laboratory. In cell lines derived from human melanoma - a malignancy insensitive to chemotherapy - expression of P-glycoprotein of relatively low transporting activity was detected by different methods in 8 of 33 cases. Furthermore a new sensitive in vitro assay for the functional detection of MDR was established using the biological features of cytochalasins, a microfilament disrupting substance group. These compounds were shown to be substrates for the P-glycoprotein efflux pump and their effects on cell division (blockade of cytokinesis resulting in multinucleate cells) correlated with MDR-activity of the tested cells. With this new assay P-glycoprotein activity can be demonstrated and analysed over a wide range of resistance against different cytotoxic drugs. Therefore it may by a suitable tool for research and diagnosis in the field of drug resistance

  15. Cell-penetrating, guanidinium-rich molecular transporters for overcoming efflux-mediated multidrug resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vargas, Jessica R; Stanzl, Erika Geihe; Teng, Nelson N H; Wender, Paul A

    2014-08-04

    Multidrug resistance (MDR) is a major cause of chemotherapy failure in the clinic. Drugs that were once effective against naïve disease subsequently prove ineffective against recurrent disease, which often exhibits an MDR phenotype. MDR can be attributed to many factors; often dominating among these is the ability of a cell to suppress or block drug entry through upregulation of membrane-bound drug efflux pumps. Efflux pumps exhibit polyspecificity, recognizing and exporting many different types of drugs, especially those whose lipophilic nature contributes to residence in the membrane. We have developed a general strategy to overcome efflux-based resistance. This strategy involves conjugating a known drug that succumbs to efflux-mediated resistance to a cell-penetrating molecular transporter, specifically, the cell-penetrating peptide (CPP), d-octaarginine. The resultant conjugates are discrete single entities (not particle mixtures) and highly water-soluble. They rapidly enter cells, are not substrates for efflux pumps, and release the free drug only after cellular entry at a rate controlled by linker design and favored by target cell chemistry. This general strategy can be applied to many classes of drugs and allows for an exceptionally rapid advance to clinical testing, especially of drugs that succumb to resistance. The efficacy of this strategy has been successfully demonstrated with Taxol in cellular and animal models of resistant cancer and with ex vivo samples from patients with ovarian cancer. Next generation efforts in this area will involve the extension of this strategy to other chemotherapeutics and other MDR-susceptible diseases.

  16. Transmission of Multidrug-Resistant and Drug-Susceptible Tuberculosis within Households: A Prospective Cohort Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grandjean, Louis; Gilman, Robert H.; Martin, Laura; Soto, Esther; Castro, Beatriz; Lopez, Sonia; Coronel, Jorge; Castillo, Edith; Alarcon, Valentina; Lopez, Virginia; San Miguel, Angela; Quispe, Neyda; Asencios, Luis; Dye, Christopher; Moore, David A. J.

    2015-01-01

    Background The “fitness” of an infectious pathogen is defined as the ability of the pathogen to survive, reproduce, be transmitted, and cause disease. The fitness of multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDRTB) relative to drug-susceptible tuberculosis is cited as one of the most important determinants of MDRTB spread and epidemic size. To estimate the relative fitness of drug-resistant tuberculosis cases, we compared the incidence of tuberculosis disease among the household contacts of MDRTB index patients to that among the contacts of drug-susceptible index patients. Methods and Findings This 3-y (2010–2013) prospective cohort household follow-up study in South Lima and Callao, Peru, measured the incidence of tuberculosis disease among 1,055 household contacts of 213 MDRTB index cases and 2,362 household contacts of 487 drug-susceptible index cases. A total of 35/1,055 (3.3%) household contacts of 213 MDRTB index cases developed tuberculosis disease, while 114/2,362 (4.8%) household contacts of 487 drug-susceptible index patients developed tuberculosis disease. The total follow-up time for drug-susceptible tuberculosis contacts was 2,620 person-years, while the total follow-up time for MDRTB contacts was 1,425 person-years. Using multivariate Cox regression to adjust for confounding variables including contact HIV status, contact age, socio-economic status, and index case sputum smear grade, the hazard ratio for tuberculosis disease among MDRTB household contacts was found to be half that for drug-susceptible contacts (hazard ratio 0.56, 95% CI 0.34–0.90, p = 0.017). The inference of transmission in this study was limited by the lack of genotyping data for household contacts. Capturing incident disease only among household contacts may also limit the extrapolation of these findings to the community setting. Conclusions The low relative fitness of MDRTB estimated by this study improves the chances of controlling drug-resistant tuberculosis. However, fitter

  17. Resistance patterns among multidrug-resistant tuberculosis patients in greater metropolitan Mumbai: trends over time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalal, Alpa; Pawaskar, Akshay; Das, Mrinalini; Desai, Ranjan; Prabhudesai, Pralhad; Chhajed, Prashant; Rajan, Sujeet; Reddy, Deepesh; Babu, Sajit; Jayalakshmi, T K; Saranchuk, Peter; Rodrigues, Camilla; Isaakidis, Petros

    2015-01-01

    While the high burden of multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB) itself is a matter of great concern, the emergence and rise of advanced forms of drug-resistance such as extensively drug-resistant TB (XDR-TB) and extremely drug-resistant TB (XXDR-TB) is more troubling. The aim of this study was to investigate the trends over time of patterns of drug resistance in a sample of MDR-TB patients in greater metropolitan Mumbai, India. This was a retrospective, observational study of drug susceptibility testing (DST) results among MDR-TB patients from eight health care facilities in greater Mumbai between 2005 and 2013. We classified resistance patterns into four categories: MDR-TB, pre-XDR-TB, XDR-TB and XXDR-TB. A total of 340 MDR-TB patients were included in the study. Pre-XDR-TB was the most common form of drug-resistant TB observed overall in this Mumbai population at 56.8% compared to 29.4% for MDR-TB. The proportion of patients with MDR-TB was 39.4% in the period 2005-2007 and 27.8% in 2011-2013, while the proportion of those with XDR-TB and XXDR-TB was changed from 6.1% and 0% respectively to 10.6% and 5.6% during the same time period. During the same periods, the proportions of patients with ofloxacin, moxifloxacin and ethionamide resistance significantly increased from 57.6% to 75.3%, from 60.0% to 69.5% and from 24.2% to 52.5% respectively (pMumbai highlight the need for individualized drug regimens, designed on the basis of DST results involving first- and second-line anti-TB drugs and treatment history of the patient. A drug-resistant TB case-finding strategy based on molecular techniques that identify only rifampicin resistance will lead to initiation of suboptimal treatment regimens for a significant number of patients, which may in turn contribute to amplification of resistance and transmission of strains with increasingly advanced resistance within the community.

  18. In vivo selection of a multidrug-resistant Aeromonas salmonicida during medicinal leech therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Ruppé

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available We report the selection in a 15-year-old boy of a multidrug-resistant, extended-spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL-producing Aeromonas salmonicida after medicinal leech therapy that required an antibiotic prophylaxis based on piperacillin/tazobactam and cotrimoxazole. Whole genome sequencing of the strain indeed revealed 13 antibiotic resistance genes, including the ESBL CTX-M-3 and the unusual β-lactamase SCO-1.

  19. Regulation of Multidrug Resistance Proteins by Genistein in a Hepatocarcinoma Cell Line: Impact on Sorafenib Cytotoxicity

    OpenAIRE

    Rigalli, Juan Pablo; Ciriaci, Nadia; Arias, Agostina; Ceballos, Mar?a Paula; Villanueva, Silvina Stella Maris; Luquita, Marcelo Gabriel; Mottino, Aldo Domingo; Ghanem, Carolina In?s; Catania, Viviana Alicia; Ruiz, Mar?a Laura

    2015-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is the fifth most frequent cancer worldwide. Sorafenib is the only drug available that improves the overall survival of HCC patients. P-glycoprotein (P-gp), Multidrug resistance-associated proteins 2 and 3 (MRP2 and 3) and Breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP) are efflux pumps that play a key role in cancer chemoresistance. Their modulation by dietary compounds may affect the intracellular accumulation and therapeutic efficacy of drugs that are substrates of t...

  20. Distribution of the Strains of Multidrug-resistant, Extensively Drug-resistant, and Pandrug-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa Isolates from Burn Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hajieh Ghasemian Safaei

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an opportunistic and Gram-negative pathogen that is used as the most important factor in burn wound infections, and due to the rapid acquisition of multidrug resistance (MDR, it causes high mortality rates in these sectors. Thus, diagnosis and assessment of antibiotic resistance patterns are very important in these patients. The aim of this study was to evaluate antibiotic resistance pattern and determining P. aeruginosa MDR. Materials and Methods: In this study, phenotypic, biochemical, and polymerase chain reaction tests were used to identify P. aeruginosa from 120 wound burn samples that 96 samples were detected to P. aeruginosa species. In the next step, according to the Clinical and Laboratory Standard Institute standard guidelines, antibiogram test was performed by disk diffusion method for amikacin, ciprofloxacin, norfloxacin, gentamicin, cefepime, aztreonam, meropenem, colistin, ceftazidime, and piperacillin-tazobactam antibiotics. Antibiotic data were analyzed by WHONET software; finally, the rate of antibiotic resistance and MDR strains was determined. Results: The highest antibiotic resistance belonged to amikacin (94.8% and norfloxacin (90.6%; in contrast, colistin (8.3% had the lowest and the MDR strains were MDR (95.8% and extensively drug resistance (XDR (87.5%. Conclusion: In this study, there was MDR with an alarming rate including MDR (95.8%, XDR (87.5%, and pan-drug resistance (0%. As a result, given antibiotics to patients should be controlled by the antibiogram results to avoid increasing MDR strains.

  1. Prolonged restaurant-associated outbreak of multidrug-resistant Salmonella Typhimurium among patients from several European countries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ethelberg, S.; Lisby, M.; Torpdahl, M.

    2004-01-01

    This report concerns a prolonged restaurant-associated outbreak of infection caused by a multidrug-resistant (ASSuT) strain of Salmonella Typhimurium, phage-type U302, which took place during July and August 2003 and affected people from Denmark and neighbouring countries who had attended...... a specific restaurant. The outbreak comprised 67 laboratory-verified cases and ten probable cases; however, the actual number of patients was estimated to be more than 390. The outbreak strain was isolated from a buffet which was probably contaminated by an assistant chef who was found to excrete...

  2. Identification of novel vaccine candidates against multidrug-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danilo G Moriel

    Full Text Available Acinetobacter baumannii is an emerging opportunistic bacterium associated with nosocomial infections in intensive care units. The alarming increase in infections caused by A. baumannii is strongly associated with enhanced resistance to antibiotics, in particular carbapenems. This, together with the lack of a licensed vaccine, has translated into significant economic, logistic and health impacts to health care facilities. In this study, we combined reverse vaccinology and proteomics to identify surface-exposed and secreted antigens from A. baumannii. Using in silico prediction tools and comparative genome analysis in combination with in vitro proteomic approaches, we identified 42 antigens that could be used as potential vaccine targets. Considering the paucity of effective antibiotics available to treat multidrug-resistant A. baumannii infections, these vaccine targets may serve as a framework for the development of a broadly protective multi-component vaccine, an outcome that would have a major impact on the burden of A. baumannii infections in intensive care units across the globe.

  3. The antibiotic pipeline for multi-drug resistant gram negative bacteria: what can we expect?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falagas, Matthew E; Mavroudis, Andreas D; Vardakas, Konstantinos Z

    2016-08-01

    A real concern in the medical community is the increasing resistance of bacteria, especially that of Gram-negative types. New antibiotics are currently under clinical development, promising to tackle severe infections caused, especially, by multi-drug resistant (MDR) bacteria and broaden the armamentarium of clinicians. We searched PUBMED and GOOGLE databases. Combinations of already approved β-lactams or monobactams with new β-lactamase inhibitors [imipenem-cilastatin/MK-7655 (relebactam), meropenem/RPX7009 (vaborbactam), ceftaroline/avibactam, aztreonam/avibactam], new β-lactams (S-649266, BAL30072), aminoglycosides (plazomicin), quinolones (finafloxacin) and tetracyclines (eravacycline) were included in the review. Expert commentary: For the majority of the upcoming antibiotics the currently available data is limited to their microbiology and pharmacokinetics. Their effectiveness and safety against infections due to MDR bacteria remain to be proved. Significant issues are also the impact of these antibiotics on the human intestinal microbiota and their possible co-administration with already-known antimicrobial agents in difficult-to-treat-infections; further studies should be conducted for these objectives.

  4. Phosphate-Containing Polyethylene Glycol Polymers Prevent Lethal Sepsis by Multidrug-Resistant Pathogens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zaborin, Alexander; Defazio, Jennifer; Kade, Matthew; Kaiser, Brooke LD; Belogortseva, Natalia; Camp, David G.; Smith, Richard D.; Adkins, Joshua N.; Kim, Sangman M.; Alverdy, Alexandria; Goldfeld, David; Firestone, Millicent; Collier, Joel; Jabri, Bana; Tirrell, Matthew; Zaborina, Olga; Alverdy, John C.

    2014-02-01

    The gastrointestinal tract is the primary site of colonization for multi-drug resistant healthcare associated pathogens (HAPs) that are the principal source and cause of life-threatening infections in critically ill patients. We previously identified a high molecular weight co-polymer (PEG15-20) with mucoadhesive and cytoprotective actions on the intestinal epithelium. In this report we covalently bonded phosphate (Pi) to PEG15-20 ( termed Pi-PEG15-20) to enhance its cytoprotective activity against microbial virulence activation and invasion based on our previous work showing that Pi is a key environmental cue regulating microbial virulence across pathogens of clinical importance to hospitalized patients. We demonstrated that Pi-PEG15-20 can suppress phosphate-, iron-, and quorum sensing signal- mediated activation of bacterial virulence as well as inhibit intestinal epithelial IL-8 release during lipopolysaccharide (LPS) exposure. Pi-PEG15-20 also prevented mortality in C. elegans and mice exposed to several highly virulent and antibiotic(?)-resistant health care acquired pathogens (HAPs) while preserving the normal microbiota. Intestinal application Pi-PEG 15-20 has the potential to be a useful agent to prevent the pathogenic activation of microbes during critical illness where exposure to HAPs is ubiquitous.

  5. Lipoteichoic acid synthesis inhibition in combination with antibiotics abrogates growth of multidrug-resistant Enterococcus faecium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paganelli, Fernanda L; van de Kamer, Tim; Brouwer, Ellen C; Leavis, Helen L; Woodford, Neil; Bonten, Marc J M; Willems, Rob J L; Hendrickx, Antoni P A

    2017-03-01

    Enterococcus faecium is a multidrug-resistant (MDR) nosocomial pathogen causing significant morbidity in debilitated patients. New antimicrobials are needed to treat antibiotic-resistant E. faecium infections in hospitalised patients. E. faecium incorporates lipoteichoic acid (LTA) (1,3-polyglycerol-phosphate linked to glycolipid) in its cell wall. The small-molecule inhibitor 1771 [2-oxo-2-(5-phenyl-1,3,4-oxadiazol-2-ylamino)ethyl 2-naphtho[2,1-b]furan-1-ylacetate] specifically blocks the activity of Staphylococcus aureus LtaS synthase, which polymerises 1,3-glycerolphosphate into LTA polymers. Here we characterised the effects of the small-molecule inhibitor 1771 on the growth of E. faecium isolates, alone (28 strains) or in combination with the antibiotics vancomycin, daptomycin, ampicillin, gentamicin or linezolid (15 strains), and on biofilm formation (16 strains). Inhibition of LTA synthesis at the surface of the cell by compound 1771 in combination with current antibiotic therapy abrogates enterococcal growth in vitro but does not affect mature E. faecium biofilms. Targeting LTA synthesis may provide new possibilities to treat MDR E. faecium infections. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. and International Society of Chemotherapy. All rights reserved.

  6. In vitro activity of bioactive extracts from rare actinomycetes against multi-drug resistant Streptococcus pneumoniae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiwari, K; Raj, V S; Upadhyay, D J; Gupta, R K

    2015-06-01

    In this study, we investigated the in vitro potential of the bioactive extracts from five putatively novel species of actinomycetes isolated from the Indian hot desert against multi-drug resistant (MDR) Streptococcus pneumoniae. The antimicrobial activity of 10 different extracts was evaluated against S. pneumoniae strains with, erm(B) and mef(E) genes as well as fluoroquinolone-resistant (FQ(R) ) strains using the micro-broth dilution method. Of these 10 extracts, four exhibited good to excellent anti-S. pneumoniae activity with minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) ranging from 0·125 to 8 μg ml(-1) . The time-kill kinetics study showed that these extracts killed the pathogens in 2-8 h. In vitro cell-free transcription/translation of luciferase gene using S30 bacterial extract and TNT mammalian ribosome indicated that they inhibited bacterial ribosomes at much lower concentrations than those required to inhibit the mammalian ribosomes. This study demonstrates that these are potent concentration-dependent bactericidal metabolites with 16-fold higher in vitro activity than levofloxacin against MDR S. pneumoniae. Metabolites from actinomycetes can be excellent inhibitors of MDR S. pneumoniae. Considering the in vitro efficacy of these crude extracts against S. pneumoniae MDR spp., once purified these can be used against streptococcal pathogens causing community-acquired pneumonia. © 2015 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  7. Ability of polymer-bound P-glycoprotein inhibitor ritonavir to overcome multidrug resistance in various resistant neuroblastoma cell lines

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Koziolová, Eva; Chytil, Petr; Etrych, Tomáš; Janoušková, Olga

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 28, č. 10 (2017), s. 1126-1130 ISSN 0959-4973 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LO1507 Institutional support: RVO:61389013 Keywords : drug-delivery polymers * multidrug resistance * N-(2-hydroxypropyl) methacrylamide Subject RIV: CD - Macromolecular Chemistry OBOR OECD: Polymer science Impact factor: 2.320, year: 2016

  8. New Roads Leading to Old Destinations: Efflux Pumps as Targets to Reverse Multidrug Resistance in Bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriella Spengler

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Multidrug resistance (MDR has appeared in response to selective pressures resulting from the incorrect use of antibiotics and other antimicrobials. This inappropriate application and mismanagement of antibiotics have led to serious problems in the therapy of infectious diseases. Bacteria can develop resistance by various mechanisms and one of the most important factors resulting in MDR is efflux pump-mediated resistance. Because of the importance of the efflux-related multidrug resistance the development of new therapeutic approaches aiming to inhibit bacterial efflux pumps is a promising way to combat bacteria having over-expressed MDR efflux systems. The definition of an efflux pump inhibitor (EPI includes the ability to render the bacterium increasingly more sensitive to a given antibiotic or even reverse the multidrug resistant phenotype. In the recent years numerous EPIs have been developed, although so far their clinical application has not yet been achieved due to their in vivo toxicity and side effects. In this review, we aim to give a short overview of efflux mediated resistance in bacteria, EPI compounds of plant and synthetic origin, and the possible methods to investigate and screen EPI compounds in bacterial systems.

  9. Dental plaque bacteria with reduced susceptibility to chlorhexidine are multidrug resistant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saleem, Hafiz Ghulam Murtaza; Seers, Christine Ann; Sabri, Anjum Nasim; Reynolds, Eric Charles

    2016-09-15

    Chlorhexidine (CHX) is used in oral care products to help control dental plaque. In this study dental plaque bacteria were grown on media containing 2 μg/ml chlorhexidine gluconate to screen for bacteria with reduced CHX susceptibility. The isolates were characterized by 16S rRNA gene sequencing and antibiotic resistance profiles were determined using the disc diffusion method. The isolates were variably resistant to multiple drugs including ampicillin, kanamycin, gentamicin and tetracycline. Two species, Chryseobacterium culicis and Chryseobacterium indologenes were able to grow planktonically and form biofilms in the presence of 32 μg/ml CHX. In the CHX and multidrug resistant C. indologenes we demonstrated a 19-fold up-regulation of expression of the HlyD-like periplasmic adaptor protein of a tripartite efflux pump upon exposure to 16 μg/ml CHX suggesting that multidrug resistance may be mediated by this system. Exposure of biofilms of these resistant species to undiluted commercial CHX mouthwash for intervals from 5 to 60 s indicated that the mouthwash was unlikely to eliminate them from dental plaque in vivo. The study highlights the requirement for increased vigilance of the presence of multidrug resistant bacteria in dental plaque and raises a potential risk of long-term use of oral care products containing antimicrobial agents for the control of dental plaque.

  10. Diverse and Abundant Multi-Drug Resistant E. coli in Matang Mangrove Estuaries, Malaysia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aziz eGhaderpour

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available E. coli, an important vector distributing antimicrobial resistance in the environment, was found to be multi-drug resistant, abundant and genetically diverse in the Matang mangrove estuaries, Malaysia. One-third (34% of the estuarine E. coli was multi-drug resistant. The highest antibiotic resistance prevalence was observed for aminoglycosides (83% and beta-lactams (37%. Phylogenetic groups A and B1, being the most predominant E. coli, demonstrated the highest antibiotic resistant level and prevalence of integrons (integron I, 21%; integron II, 3%. Detection of phylogenetic group B23 downstream of fishing villages indicates human fecal contamination as a source of E. coli pollution. Enteroaggregative E. coli (1% were also detected immediately downstream of the fishing village. The results indicated multi-drug resistance among E. coli circulating in Matang estuaries, which could be reflective of anthropogenic activities and aggravated by bacterial and antibiotic discharges from village lack of a sewerage system, aquaculture farms and upstream animal husbandry.

  11. Diverse and abundant multi-drug resistant E. coli in Matang mangrove estuaries, Malaysia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghaderpour, Aziz; Ho, Wing Sze; Chew, Li-Lee; Bong, Chui Wei; Chong, Ving Ching; Thong, Kwai-Lin; Chai, Lay Ching

    2015-01-01

    E.coli, an important vector distributing antimicrobial resistance in the environment, was found to be multi-drug resistant, abundant, and genetically diverse in the Matang mangrove estuaries, Malaysia. One-third (34%) of the estuarine E. coli was multi-drug resistant. The highest antibiotic resistance prevalence was observed for aminoglycosides (83%) and beta-lactams (37%). Phylogenetic groups A and B1, being the most predominant E. coli, demonstrated the highest antibiotic resistant level and prevalence of integrons (integron I, 21%; integron II, 3%). Detection of phylogenetic group B23 downstream of fishing villages indicates human fecal contamination as a source of E. coli pollution. Enteroaggregative E. coli (1%) were also detected immediately downstream of the fishing village. The results indicated multi-drug resistance among E. coli circulating in Matang estuaries, which could be reflective of anthropogenic activities and aggravated by bacterial and antibiotic discharges from village lack of a sewerage system, aquaculture farms and upstream animal husbandry. PMID:26483759

  12. Surveillance of multidrug resistance-associated genes in Acinetobacter baumannii isolates from elderly patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhe DONG

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective To understand the status of multidrug resistance-associated genes carried by Acinetobacter baumannii isolates from elderly patients in our hospital in order to provide a basis for surveillance of drug-resistance and inflection control. Methods One hundred and twenty A. baumannii isolates were collected from elderly patients between 2008 and 2010. The mean age of the patients was 85 (65 to 95 years. Whonet 5.6 software was used to analyze the resistance rate of 16 antimicrobial agents. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR and the sequencing method were adopted to detect 10 kinds of resistance genes (blaOXA-51-like, blaOXA- 23-like, blaOXA-24-like, blaOXA-58-like, blaTEM, blaampC, armA, ISAba1, intI 1, and intI 2. The corresponding resistance gene profiling(RGP was analyzed and designated according to the status of resistance genes. Results The resistance rates to the remaining 15 kinds of antibiotics varied between 70.8% and 97.5%, with the exception of the sensitivity rate to polymyxin B by up to more than 90%. The positivity rates of blaOXA-51-like, blaOXA-23-like, blaOXA-58-like, blaTEM, blaampC, armA, ISAba1 and intI 1 were 100%, 81.7%, 0.8%, 10.8%, 91.7%, 81.7%, 86.7%, and 83.3% respectively. A total of 18 kinds of drug-resistant gene maps were found, but blaOXA-24-like and intI 2 were not detected. Among these gene maps, the rate of RGP1 (blaOXA-23-like+blaampC+armA+ISAba1+ intI 1 was as high as 60.8%. Conclusions A. baumannii isolates from elderly patients have a higher carrying rate of drug-resistant genes, resulting in severe multidrugresistant conditions. Therefore, full-time infection control personnel and clinical physicians should actively participate in the surveillance, prevention, and control of infections caused by A. baumannii in the elderly.

  13. Multidrug resistance among new tuberculosis cases: detecting local variation through lot quality-assurance sampling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hedt, Bethany Lynn; van Leth, Frank; Zignol, Matteo; Cobelens, Frank; van Gemert, Wayne; Nhung, Nguyen Viet; Lyepshina, Svitlana; Egwaga, Saidi; Cohen, Ted

    2012-03-01

    Current methodology for multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR TB) surveys endorsed by the World Health Organization provides estimates of MDR TB prevalence among new cases at the national level. On the aggregate, local variation in the burden of MDR TB may be masked. This paper investigates the utility of applying lot quality-assurance sampling to identify geographic heterogeneity in the proportion of new cases with multidrug resistance. We simulated the performance of lot quality-assurance sampling by applying these classification-based approaches to data collected in the most recent TB drug-resistance surveys in Ukraine, Vietnam, and Tanzania. We explored 3 classification systems- two-way static, three-way static, and three-way truncated sequential sampling-at 2 sets of thresholds: low MDR TB = 2%, high MDR TB = 10%, and low MDR TB = 5%, high MDR TB = 20%. The lot quality-assurance sampling systems identified local variability in the prevalence of multidrug resistance in both high-resistance (Ukraine) and low-resistance settings (Vietnam). In Tanzania, prevalence was uniformly low, and the lot quality-assurance sampling approach did not reveal variability. The three-way classification systems provide additional information, but sample sizes may not be obtainable in some settings. New rapid drug-sensitivity testing methods may allow truncated sequential sampling designs and early stopping within static designs, producing even greater efficiency gains. Lot quality-assurance sampling study designs may offer an efficient approach for collecting critical information on local variability in the burden of multidrug-resistant TB. Before this methodology is adopted, programs must determine appropriate classification thresholds, the most useful classification system, and appropriate weighting if unbiased national estimates are also desired.

  14. Whole genome sequencing of multidrug-resistant Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium isolated from humans and poultry in Burkina Faso.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kagambèga, Assèta; Lienemann, Taru; Frye, Jonathan G; Barro, Nicolas; Haukka, Kaisa

    2018-01-01

    Multidrug-resistant Salmonella is an important cause of morbidity and mortality in developing countries. The aim of this study was to characterize and compare multidrug-resistant Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium isolates from patients and poultry feces. Salmonella strains were isolated from poultry and patients using standard bacteriological methods described in previous studies. The strains were serotype according to Kaufmann-White scheme and tested for antibiotic susceptibility to 12 different antimicrobial agents using the disk diffusion method. The whole genome of the S. Typhimurium isolates was analyzed using Illumina technology and compared with 20 isolates of S. Typhimurium for which the ST has been deposited in a global MLST database.The ResFinder Web server was used to find the antibiotic resistance genes from whole genome sequencing (WGS) data. For comparative genomics, publicly available complete and draft genomes of different S. Typhimurium laboratory-adapted strains were downloaded from GenBank. All the tested Salmonella serotype Typhimurium were multiresistant to five commonly used antibiotics (ampicillin, chloramphenicol, streptomycin, sulfonamide, and trimethoprim). The multilocus sequence type ST313 was detected from all the strains. Our sequences were very similar to S. Typhimurium ST313 strain D23580 isolated from a patient with invasive non-typhoid Salmonella (NTS) infection in Malawi, also located in sub-Saharan Africa. The use of ResFinder web server on the whole genome of the strains showed a resistance to aminoglycoside associated with carriage of the following resistances genes: strA , strB , and aadA1 ; resistance to β-lactams associated with carriage of a bla TEM-1B genes; resistance to phenicol associated with carriage of catA1 gene; resistance to sulfonamide associated with carriage of sul1 and sul2 genes; resistance to tetracycline associated with carriage of tet B gene; and resistance to trimethoprim associated to dfrA1 gene

  15. Emergence of a Potent Multidrug Efflux Pump Variant That Enhances Campylobacter Resistance to Multiple Antibiotics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Hong; Shen, Zhangqi; Wang, Yang; Deng, Fengru; Liu, Dejun; Naren, Gaowa; Dai, Lei; Su, Chih-Chia; Wang, Bing; Wang, Shaolin; Wu, Congming; Yu, Edward W; Zhang, Qijing; Shen, Jianzhong

    2016-09-20

    Bacterial antibiotic efflux pumps are key players in antibiotic resistance. Although their role in conferring multidrug resistance is well documented, the emergence of "super" efflux pump variants that enhance bacterial resistance to multiple drugs has not been reported. Here, we describe the emergence of a resistance-enhancing variant (named RE-CmeABC) of the predominant efflux pump CmeABC in Campylobacter, a major zoonotic pathogen whose resistance to antibiotics is considered a serious antibiotic resistance threat in the United States. Compared to the previously characterized CmeABC transporters, RE-CmeABC is much more potent in conferring Campylobacter resistance to antibiotics, which was shown by increased MICs and reduced intracellular accumulation of antibiotics. Structural modeling suggests that sequence variations in the drug-binding pocket of CmeB possibly contribute to the enhanced efflux function. Additionally, RE-CmeABC expands the mutant selection window of ciprofloxacin, enhances the emergence of antibiotic-resistant mutants, and confers exceedingly high-level resistance to fluoroquinolones, an important class of antibiotics for clinical therapy of campylobacteriosis. Furthermore, RE-CmeABC is horizontally transferable, shifts antibiotic MIC distribution among clinical isolates, and is increasingly prevalent in Campylobacter jejuni isolates, suggesting that it confers a fitness advantage under antimicrobial selection. These findings reveal a new mechanism for enhanced multidrug resistance and an effective strategy utilized by bacteria for adaptation to selection from multiple antibiotics. Bacterial antibiotic efflux pumps are ubiquitously present in bacterial organisms and protect bacteria from the antibacterial effects of antimicrobials and other toxic compounds by extruding them out of cells. Thus, these efflux transporters represent an important mechanism for antibiotic resistance. In this study, we discovered the emergence and increasing

  16. Evidence for soft selective sweeps in the evolution of pneumococcal multidrug resistance and vaccine escape.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Croucher, Nicholas J; Chewapreecha, Claire; Hanage, William P; Harris, Simon R; McGee, Lesley; van der Linden, Mark; Song, Jae-Hoon; Ko, Kwan Soo; de Lencastre, Herminia; Turner, Claudia; Yang, Fan; Sá-Leão, Raquel; Beall, Bernard; Klugman, Keith P; Parkhill, Julian; Turner, Paul; Bentley, Stephen D

    2014-06-10

    The multidrug-resistant Streptococcus pneumoniae Taiwan(19F)-14, or PMEN14, clone was first observed with a 19F serotype, which is targeted by the heptavalent polysaccharide conjugate vaccine (PCV7). However, "vaccine escape" PMEN14 isolates with a 19A serotype became an increasingly important cause of disease post-PCV7. Whole genome sequencing was used to characterize the recent evolution of 173 pneumococci of, or related to, PMEN14. This suggested that PMEN14 is a single lineage that originated in the late 1980s in parallel with the acquisition of multiple resistances by close relatives. One of the four detected serotype switches to 19A generated representatives of the sequence type (ST) 320 isolates that have been highly successful post-PCV7. A second produced an ST236 19A genotype with reduced resistance to β-lactams owing to alteration of pbp1a and pbp2x sequences through the same recombination that caused the change in serotype. A third, which generated a mosaic capsule biosynthesis locus, resulted in serotype 19A ST271 isolates. The rapid diversification through homologous recombination seen in the global collection was similarly observed in the absence of vaccination in a set of isolates from the Maela refugee camp in Thailand, a collection that also allowed variation to be observed within carriage through longitudinal sampling. This suggests that some pneumococcal genotypes generate a pool of standing variation that is sufficiently extensive to result in "soft" selective sweeps: The emergence of multiple mutants in parallel upon a change in selection pressure, such as vaccine introduction. The subsequent competition between these mutants makes this phenomenon difficult to detect without deep sampling of individual lineages. © The Author(s) 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Molecular Biology and Evolution.

  17. Multidrug-Resistant Bacteria Isolated from Surface Water in Bassaseachic Falls National Park, Mexico

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    Ma. Carmen E. Delgado-Gardea

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Bacterial pathogens are a leading cause of waterborne disease, and may result in gastrointestinal outbreaks worldwide. Inhabitants of the Bassaseachic Falls National Park in Chihuahua, Mexico show seasonal gastroenteritis problems. This aim of this study was to detect enteropathogenic microorganisms responsible for diarrheal outbreaks in this area. In 2013, 49 surface water samples from 13 selected sampling sites along the Basaseachi waterfall and its main rivers, were collected during the spring, summer, autumn, and winter seasons. Fecal and total coliform counts were determined using standard methods; the AutoScan-4 system was used for identification of isolates and the antibiotic resistance profile by challenging each organism using 21 antibiotics. Significant differences among seasons were detected, where autumn samples resulted in the highest total (p < 0.05 and fecal (p < 0.001 coliform counts, whereas the lowest total coliform counts were recorded in spring. Significant differences between sampling sites were observed, where samples from sites 6, 8, and 11 had the highest total coliform counts (p < 0.009, whereas samples from site 9 exhibited the lowest one. From the microbiological analysis, 33 bacterial isolates from 13 different sites and four sampling seasons were selected; 53% of isolates were resistant to at least one antibiotic, and 15% exhibited a multidrug resistance (MDB phenotype. MDB were identified as Klebsiella oxytoca (two out of four identified isolates, Escherichia coli (2/7, and Enterobacter cloacae (1/3. In addition, some water-borne microorganisms exhibited resistance to cefazoline, cefuroxime, ampicillin, and ampicillin-sulbactam. The presence of these microorganisms near rural settlements suggests that wastewater is the contamination source, providing one possible transmission mechanism for diarrheal outbreaks.

  18. The emergence of multidrug-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa in cystic fibrosis patients on inhaled antibiotics

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    Atqah AbdulWahab

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Multidrug-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa (MDR-PA is an important and growing issue in the care of patients with cystic fibrosis (CF, and a major cause of morbidity and mortality. Objective: The objective of the study was to describe the frequency of MDR-PA recovered from the lower respiratory samples of pediatric and adult CF patients, and its antibiotic resistance pattern to commonly used antimicrobial agents including β-lactams, aminoglycosides, and fluoroquinolones. Materials and Methods: The lower respiratory isolates of P. aeruginosa were obtained from inpatients and outpatients CF clinics from a tertiary care teaching hospital for the period from October 2014 to September 2015. The identification and antimicrobial susceptibility for all the isolates were performed by using the BD Phoenix™ and E-test in compliance with Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI guidelines. Results: A total of 61 P. aeruginosa samples were isolated from thirty CF patients from twenty families. Twelve sputum samples were positive for MDR-PA (seven nonmucoid and five mucoid isolates from five CF patients (five families with moderate-to-very severe lung disease given MDR-PA frequency of 19.7%. The median age of the study group was 20 (range 10–30 years. Three CF patients were on chronic inhaled tobramycin and two on nebulized colistin. The antimicrobial patterns of isolates MDR-PA showed the highest rate of resistance toward each gentamycin, amikacin, and cefepime (100%, followed by 91.7% to ciprofloxacin, 75% to tobramycin, 58.3% to meropenem, and 50% to piperacillin-tazobactam. None of the isolates were resistant to colistin during the study period. Conclusion: The study results emphasize that the emergence of a significant problem in the clinical isolates of P. aeruginosa in CF patients that dictate appropriate attention to the antibiotic management after proper surveillance.

  19. Burn Patients Infected With Metallo-Beta-Lactamase-Producing Pseudomonas aeruginosa: Multidrug-Resistant Strains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anvarinejad, Mojtaba; Japoni, Aziz; Rafaatpour, Noroddin; Mardaneh, Jalal; Abbasi, Pejman; Amin Shahidi, Maneli; Dehyadegari, Mohammad Ali; Alipour, Ebrahim

    2014-01-01

    Background: Metallo-beta-lactamase (MBL) producing Pseudomonas aeruginosa in the burn patients is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality and remains a serious health concern among the clinicians. Objectives: The aim of this study was to detect MBL-producing P. aeruginosa in burn patients and determine multidrug-resistant (MDR) strains, and respective resistance patterns. Patients and Methods: In this cross-sectional study, 270 strains of P. aeruginosa were isolated from the burn patients referred to Ghotbeddin Burn Hospital, Shiraz, Iran. Among them, 55 MBL-producing P. aeruginosa strains were isolated from 55 patients hospitalized in burn unit. Minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) and MBLs were determined by the E-test method. Results: Of the 55 burn cases, 29 (53%) were females and 26 (47%) males. Injured burn patients’ ages ranged from 16 to 87 years, with maximum number of cases in the age group of 16 to 36 years (n, 40; 72.7%). Overall, 32 cases were accidental (60%), and 22 were suicidal burns (40%). Of the 55 burn patients, 17 cases were expired (30%). All deaths were due to chemical exposures. In antibiotic susceptibility testing by E-test method, ceftazidime was the most effective one and 35 isolates (63.5%) were resistant to all the 11 tested antibiotics. Conclusions: Routine microbiological surveillance and careful in vitro testing of antibiotics prior to prescription and strict adherence to hospital antibiotic policy may help to prevent, treat, and control MDR and pandrug-resistant (PDR) P. aeruginosa strains in burn units. PMID:25147779

  20. Intraventricular ciprofloxacin usage in treatment of multidrug-resistant central nervous system infections: report of four cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayse Karaaslan

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, multidrug-resistant microorganisms appear as important nosocomial pathogens which treatment is quite difficult. As sufficient drug levels could not be achieved in cerebrospinal fluid during intravenous antibiotic therapy for central nervous system infections and due to multidrug-resistance treatment alternatives are limited. In this study, four cases of central nervous system infections due to multidrug-resistant microorganisms who were successfully treated with removal of the devices and intraventricular ciprofloxacin are presented. In conclusion, intraventricular ciprofloxacin can be used for treatment of central nervous system infections if the causative microorganism is sensitive to the drug and no other alternative therapy is available.

  1. Dual effects of the PI3K inhibitor ZSTK474 on multidrug efflux pumps in resistant cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muthiah, Divya; Callaghan, Richard

    2017-11-15

    ZSTK474 is a potent phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) inhibitor that reduces cell proliferation via G 1 -arrest. However, there is little information on the susceptibility of this anticancer drug to resistance conferred by the multidrug pumps P-glycoprotein (ABCB1) and ABCG2. We have demonstrated that ZSTK474 generated cytotoxicity in cells over-expressing either pump with potency similar to that in drug sensitive cells. In addition, the co-administration of ZSTK474 with the cytotoxic anti-cancer drugs vinblastine and mitoxantrone caused a potentiated cytotoxic effect in both drug sensitive and efflux pump expressing cells. These observations suggest that ZSTK474 is unaffected by the presence of multidrug efflux pumps and may circumvent their activities. Indeed, ZSTK474 increased the cellular accumulation of calcein-AM and mitoxantrone in cells expressing ABCB1 and ABCG2, respectively. ZSTK474 treatment also resulted in reduced expression of both efflux pumps in multidrug resistant cancer cells. Measurement of ABCB1 or ABCG2 mRNA levels demonstrated that the reduction was not due to altered transcription. Similarly, inhibitor studies showed that the proteasomal degradation pathway for ABCB1 and the lysosomal route for ABCG2 degradation were unaffected by ZSTK474. Thus the mechanism underlying reduced ABCB1 and ABCG2 levels caused by ZSTK474 was due to a reduction in overall protein synthesis; a process influenced by the PI3K pathway. In summary, ZSTK474 is not susceptible to efflux by the resistance mediators ABCB1 and ABCG2. Moreover, it inhibits the drug transport function of the pumps and leads to a reduction in their cellular expression levels. Our observations demonstrate that ZSTK474 is a powerful anticancer drug. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Temporal fluctuation of multidrug resistant salmonella typhi haplotypes in the mekong river delta region of Vietnam.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathryn E Holt

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available typhoid fever remains a public health problem in Vietnam, with a significant burden in the Mekong River delta region. Typhoid fever is caused by the bacterial pathogen Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi (S. Typhi, which is frequently multidrug resistant with reduced susceptibility to fluoroquinolone-based drugs, the first choice for the treatment of typhoid fever. We used a GoldenGate (Illumina assay to type 1,500 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs and analyse the genetic variation of S. Typhi isolated from 267 typhoid fever patients in the Mekong delta region participating in a randomized trial conducted between 2004 and 2005.the population of S. Typhi circulating during the study was highly clonal, with 91% of isolates belonging to a single clonal complex of the S. Typhi H58 haplogroup. The patterns of disease were consistent with the presence of an endemic haplotype H58-C and a localised outbreak of S. Typhi haplotype H58-E2 in 2004. H58-E2-associated typhoid fever cases exhibited evidence of significant geo-spatial clustering along the Sông H u branch of the Mekong River. Multidrug resistance was common in the established clone H58-C but not in the outbreak clone H58-E2, however all H58 S. Typhi were nalidixic acid resistant and carried a Ser83Phe amino acid substitution in the gyrA gene.the H58 haplogroup dominates S. Typhi populations in other endemic areas, but the population described here was more homogeneous than previously examined populations, and the dominant clonal complex (H58-C, -E1, -E2 observed in this study has not been detected outside Vietnam. IncHI1 plasmid-bearing S. Typhi H58-C was endemic during the study period whilst H58-E2, which rarely carried the plasmid, was only transient, suggesting a selective advantage for the plasmid. These data add insight into the outbreak dynamics and local molecular epidemiology of S. Typhi in southern Vietnam.

  3. Epidemiological profi le of hospital infections by multidrug-resistant bacteria in a hospital of northern Minas Gerais (Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lúcia Maria Garcia

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Backgound and Objectives: Nosocomial infection (IH is an increasingly common problem and the presence of resistant microorganisms causes clinical and economic impact. This study aims to determine the epidemiology of nosocomial infections caused by Multidrug- Resistant bacteria in a hospital in northern Minas Gerais. Methods: Notifi cation forms obtained from the Infection Control Service (SCIH of a hospital of Northern Minas Gerais were analyzed, for the period April 2011 to April 2012. Were included in the study all cases of Hospital Infection (IH caused by multidrug- resistant bacteria (MDR. Results: There were 44 cases of MDR caused by IH, 19 females and 25 males. The most frequent infection sites were: Urinary Tract Infection (40,9% and Bloodstream Infection (25%. The highest frequency of cases occurred in the age group 60 to 69 years and in the period 0-15 days of hospitalization. The bacteria found were Klebsiella pneumoniae (27.7%, Escherichia coli (23.4%, Acinetobacter baumannii (21.3%, Staphylococcus aureus (14.9%, Pseudomonas aeruginosa (6.4%, Enterobacter sp (2.1%, Morganella morganii (2.1% and Burkholderia cepacia (2.1%. The resistance mechanism most frequent was ESBL production. IH by MDR has more invasive procedures that occur in bacteria IH not MDR, OR: 3.7 (95% CI: 2:02-4:03. Conclusion: The prevalence of MDR infection during the study period was 11.6%. It is important to detect and control the spread of MDR microorganisms because of their impact on morbidity and survival of patients. KEYWORDS: Hospital-Acquired Infection. Drug Resistance. Bacteria.

  4. In Vitro activity of novel glycopolymer against clinical isolates of multidrug-resistant Staphylococcus aureus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narayanaswamy, Vidya P; Giatpaiboon, Scott A; Uhrig, John; Orwin, Paul; Wiesmann, William; Baker, Shenda M; Townsend, Stacy M

    2018-01-01

    The incidence of multidrug-resistant (MDR) organisms, including methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), is a serious threat to public health. Progress in developing new therapeutics is being outpaced by antibiotic resistance development, and alternative agents that rapidly permeabilize bacteria hold tremendous potential for treating MDR infections. A new class of glycopolymers includes polycationic poly-N (acetyl, arginyl) glucosamine (PAAG) is under development as an alternative to traditional antibiotic strategies to treat MRSA infections. This study demonstrates the antibacterial activity of PAAG against clinical isolates of methicillin and mupirocin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus. Multidrug-resistant S. aureus was rapidly killed by PAAG, which completely eradicated 88% (15/17) of all tested strains (6-log reduction in CFU) in ≤ 12-hours at doses that are non-toxic to mammalian cells. PAAG also sensitized all the clinical MRSA strains (17/17) to oxacillin as demonstrated by the observed reduction in the oxacillin MIC to below the antibiotic resistance breakpoint. The effect of PAAG and standard antibiotics including vancomycin, oxacillin, mupirocin and bacitracin on MRSA permeability was studied by measuring propidium iodide (PI) uptake by bacterial cells. Antimicrobial resistance studies showed that S. aureus developed resistance to PAAG at a rate slower than to mupirocin but similar to bacitracin. PAAG was observed to resensitize drug-resistant S. aureus strains sampled from passage 13 and 20 of the multi-passage resistance study, reducing MICs of mupirocin and bacitracin below their clinical sensitivity breakpoints. This class of bacterial permeabilizing glycopolymers may provide a new tool in the battle against multidrug-resistant bacteria.

  5. Survival and evolution of a large multidrug resistance plasmid in new clinical bacterial hosts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Porse, Andreas; Schønning, Kristian; Munck, Christian

    2016-01-01

    Large conjugative plasmids are important drivers of bacterial evolution and contribute significantly to the dissemination of antibiotic resistance. Although plasmid borne multidrug resistance is recognized as one of the main challenges in modern medicine, the adaptive forces shaping the evolution...... of these plasmids within pathogenic hosts are poorly understood. Here we study plasmid-host adaptations following transfer of a 73 kb conjugative multidrug resistance plasmid to naïve clinical isolates of Klebsiella pneumoniae and Escherichia coli We use experimental evolution, mathematical modelling and population...... of costly regions from the plasmid backbone, effectively expanding the host-range of the plasmid. Although these adaptations were also beneficial to plasmid persistence in a naïve K. pneumoniae host, they were never observed in this species, indicating that differential evolvability can limit opportunities...

  6. A high-resolution genomic analysis of multidrug-resistant hospital outbreaks of Klebsiella pneumoniae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung The, Hao; Karkey, Abhilasha; Pham Thanh, Duy; Boinett, Christine J; Cain, Amy K; Ellington, Matthew; Baker, Kate S; Dongol, Sabina; Thompson, Corinne; Harris, Simon R; Jombart, Thibaut; Le Thi Phuong, Tu; Tran Do Hoang, Nhu; Ha Thanh, Tuyen; Shretha, Shrijana; Joshi, Suchita; Basnyat, Buddha; Thwaites, Guy; Thomson, Nicholas R; Rabaa, Maia A; Baker, Stephen

    2015-01-01

    Multidrug-resistant (MDR) Klebsiella pneumoniae has become a leading cause of nosocomial infections worldwide. Despite its prominence, little is known about the genetic diversity of K. pneumoniae in resource-poor hospital settings. Through whole-genome sequencing (WGS), we reconstructed an outbreak of MDR K. pneumoniae occurring on high-dependency wards in a hospital in Kathmandu during 2012 with a case-fatality rate of 75%. The WGS analysis permitted the identification of two MDR K. pneumoniae lineages causing distinct outbreaks within the complex endemic K. pneumoniae. Using phylogenetic reconstruction and lineage-specific PCR, our data predicted a scenario in which K. pneumoniae, circulating for 6 months before the outbreak, underwent a series of ward-specific clonal expansions after the acquisition of genes facilitating virulence and MDR. We suggest that the early detection of a specific NDM-1 containing lineage in 2011 would have alerted the high-dependency ward staff to intervene. We argue that some form of real-time genetic characterisation, alongside clade-specific PCR during an outbreak, should be factored into future healthcare infection control practices in both high- and low-income settings. PMID:25712531

  7. Mechanism of multidrug resistance of human small cell lung cancer cell line H446/VP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yan-Ling; Yan, Yun-Li; Zhou, Na-Jing; Han, Shuo; Zhao, Jun-Xia; Cao, Cui-Li; Lü, Yu-Hong

    2010-11-01

    Small cell lung cancer (SCLC) is the most aggressive form of lung cancer. This study aimed to investigate the mechanism of human small cell lung cancer cell line resistance to etoposide (VP-16), H446/VP. The cell viability was measured by MTT assay. Immunocytochemistry, reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and Western blotting methods were used to detect the multidrug resistance gene (MDR1), bcl-2, bax and the topoisomerase II (Topo II) expressions in H446 and H446/VP cells after treated with or without VP-16. The 50% inhibition concentration (IC50) of VP-16 on H446 cells was 49 mg/L, and 836 mg/L was for H446/VP cells. The expressions of MDR1 and bcl-2 were up-regulated, while the amounts of bax and Topo II were reduced in H446/VP cells. After treated with 49 mg/L of VP-16, it showed that the drug could significantly inhibit bcl-2 and Topo II expressions, and increase bax expression in H446 cells compared with that of H446/VP cells. The H446/VP cell was stably resistant to VP-16. The decreased expression of Topo II was correlated with the H446/VP multidrug resistance. The elevated expressions of MDR1, and the altered apoptotic pathways also played an important role in VP-16 induced multidrug resistance of SCLC.

  8. Increasing Incidence of Multidrug Resistance Among Cystic Fibrosis Respiratory Bacterial Isolates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rutter, W Cliff; Burgess, Donna R; Burgess, David S

    2017-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Staphylococcus aureus are common pathogens in cystic fibrosis (CF) patients with increasing multidrug resistance (MDR). This study characterized antimicrobial susceptibility trends among organisms isolated from the respiratory tract of CF patients. Microbiological culture and sensitivity results for all CF patients were collected from January 2010 through December 2014. Minimum inhibitory concentrations were obtained using Phoenix ® and Etest ® methods. Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute guidelines were used to remove duplicate isolates and develop antimicrobial susceptibility reports. MDR was defined as resistance to one agent in three or more antibiotic classes or oxacillin resistance in S. aureus. Overall, 542 bacterial isolates from 376 cultures were analyzed for trends. P. aeruginosa (41%), S. aureus (40%), and Stenotrophomonas maltophilia (8%) were the most commonly isolated organisms. Multidrug-resistant organism isolation increased from 39% to 49% (r = 0.76, p = 0.13), while representing 47.6% of all isolates. Multidrug-resistant P. aeruginosa incidence increased each year from 26% to 43% (r = 0.89, p = 0.046), while P. aeruginosa isolation decreased from 47% to 38% over the study period (r = -0.93, p = 0.02). MRSA accounted for 62.6% of all S. aureus isolated, while overall multidrug-resistant S. aureus incidence was 73.1% in all cultures. MDR among common pathogens in CF continues to increase. Empiric therapy for CF exacerbations should be targeted to previous antimicrobial susceptibility, and P. aeruginosa and S. aureus should be empirically covered.

  9. Genetic diversity of drug and multidrug-resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis circulating in Veracruz, Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munro-Rojas, Daniela; Fernandez-Morales, Esdras; Zarrabal-Meza, José; Martínez-Cazares, Ma. Teresa; Parissi-Crivelli, Aurora; Fuentes-Domínguez, Javier; Séraphin, Marie Nancy; Lauzardo, Michael; González-y-Merchand, Jorge Alberto; Rivera-Gutierrez, Sandra

    2018-01-01

    Background Mexico is one of the most important contributors of drug and multidrug-resistant tuberculosis in Latin America; however, knowledge of the genetic diversity of drug-resistant tuberculosis isolates is limited. Methods In this study, the genetic structure of 112 Mycobacterium tuberculosis strains from the southeastern Mexico was determined by spoligotyping and 24-loci MIRU-VNTRs. Findings The results show eight major lineages, the most of which was T1 (24%), followed by LAM (16%) and H (15%). A total of 29 (25%) isolates were identified as orphan. The most abundant SITs were SIT53/T1 and SIT42/LAM9 with 10 isolates each and SIT50/H3 with eight isolates. Fifty-two spoligotype patterns, twenty-seven clusters and ten clonal complexes were observed, demonstrating an important genetic diversity of drug and multidrug-resistant tuberculosis isolates in circulation and transmission level of these aggravated forms of tuberculosis. Being defined as orphan or as part of an orphan cluster, was a risk factor for multidrug resistant-tuberculosis (OR 2.5, IC 1.05–5.86 and OR 3.3, IC 1–11.03, respectively). Multiple correspondence analyses showed association of some clusters and SITs with specific geographical locations. Conclusions Our study provides one of the most detailed description of the genetic structure of drug and multidrug-resistant tuberculosis strains in southeast Mexico, establishing for the first time a baseline of the genotypes observed in resistant isolates circulating, however further studies are required to better elucidate the genetic structure of tuberculosis in region and the factors that could be participating in their dispersion. PMID:29543819

  10. Multidrug-resistant and extensively drug-resistant tuberculosis: a review of current concepts and future challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Günther, Gunar

    2014-06-01

    Multidrug-resistant and extensively drug-resistant tuberculosis are recent global health issues, which makes tuberculosis - after the success of short course treatment during the second half of the last century - a major health challenge. Globalisation, health inequalities, competing economic interests and political instability contribute substantially to the spread of drug-resistant strains, which are associated with high rates of morbidity and mortality. Issues such as increasing transmission of drug-resistant strains, poor diagnostic coverage and a lengthy, toxic treatment need to be overcome by innovative approaches to tuberculosis control, prevention, diagnostics and treatment. This review addresses recent developments and future concepts. © 2014 Royal College of Physicians.

  11. Surveillance for Travel and Domestically Acquired Multidrug-Resistant Human Shigella Infections-Pennsylvania, 2006-2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yu Lung; Tewari, Deepanker; Yealy, Courtney C; Fardig, David; M'ikanatha, Nkuchia M

    2016-01-01

    Shigellosis is a leading cause of enteric infections in the United States. We compared antimicrobial resistance in Shigella infections related to overseas travel (travel-associated) and in those acquired domestically by analyzing antimicrobial resistance patterns, geographic distributions, and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) patterns. We tested samples (n = 204) from a collection of isolates recovered from patients in Pennsylvania between 2006 and 2014. Isolates were grouped into travel- and non-travel-associated categories. Eighty-one (79.4%) of the Shigella isolates acquired during international travel were resistant to multiple antibiotics compared to 53 (52.1%) of the infections transmitted in domestic settings. A majority (79.4%) of isolates associated with international travel demonstrated resistance to aminoglycosides and tetracyclines, whereas 47 (46.1%) of the infections acquired domestically were resistant to tetracycline. Almost all isolates (92.2%) transmitted in domestic settings were resistant to aminoglycosides, and 5 isolates from adult male patients were resistant to azithromycin, a drug often used for empiric treatment of severe shigellosis. Twenty (19.6%) isolates associated with illnesses acquired during overseas travel in 4 countries were resistant to quinolones. One S. sonnei PFGE pattern was traced to a multidrug-resistant isolate acquired overseas that had caused a multistate outbreak of shigellosis, suggesting global dissemination of a drug-resistant species. Resistance to certain drugs-for example, tetracycline-increased in both overseas- and domestic-acquired infections during the study period. The prevalence of resistance to macrolides (azithromycin) and third-generation cephalosporins (ceftriaxone) was less than 1%; however, efforts to better monitor changes in drug resistance over time combined with increased antimicrobial stewardship are essential at the local, national, and global levels.

  12. A case of multidrug-resistant monoarticular joint tuberculosis in a renal transplant recipient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regmi, A; Singh, P; Harford, A

    2014-01-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) is a common opportunistic infection after renal transplantation. The risk of TB in renal transplant recipients is reported to be 20 to 74 times higher than in the general population. Although extrapulmonary TB occurs frequently, isolated ankle joint TB is a rare form of extrapulmonary TB infection. It is often difficult to diagnose because of its atypical presentation; management is complex, especially with multidrug-resistant TB, the need for a prolonged course of therapy, and the risks of drug interactions and drug toxicity. We report herein a case of a 60-year-old female renal allograft recipient who developed multidrug-resistant ankle joint TB 11 months after her deceased donor renal transplantation. She presented to the emergency department with escalating pain and swelling of the left ankle, difficulty in ambulation, and a low-grade fever. An x-ray of the ankle revealed an effusion and soft tissue swelling. A synovial fluid culture was performed which tested positive for acid fast bacilli which grew a multidrug-resistant form of Mycobacterium tuberculosis. She was initially treated with isoniazid, rifampin, ethambutol, and pyrazinamide; then therapy was tailored secondary to the resistant nature of the organism. She received a combination of extensive debridement of the joint and institution of second-line anti-TB therapy with pyrazinamide, ethambutol, moxifloxacin, and ethionamide. To our knowledge, no other cases of multidrug-resistant TB have been reported in the literature after renal transplantation. This case shows both an atypical presentation of TB and the difficulties in managing a transplant patient with this disease. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Silver Nanocomposite Biosynthesis: Antibacterial Activity against Multidrug-Resistant Strains of Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Acinetobacter baumannii

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Klebson Silva Santos

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Bacterial resistance is an emerging public health issue that is disseminated worldwide. Silver nanocomposite can be an alternative strategy to avoid Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria growth, including multidrug-resistant strains. In the present study a silver nanocomposite was synthesized, using a new green chemistry process, by the addition of silver nitrate (1.10−3 mol·L−1 into a fermentative medium of Xanthomonas spp. to produce a xanthan gum polymer. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM was used to evaluate the shape and size of the silver nanoparticles obtained. The silver ions in the nanocomposite were quantified by flame atomic absorption spectrometry (FAAS. The antibacterial activity of the nanomaterial against Escherichia coli (ATCC 22652, Enterococcus faecalis (ATCC 29282, Pseudomonas aeruginosa (ATCC 27853 and Staphylococcus aureus (ATCC 25923 was carried out using 500 mg of silver nanocomposite. Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Acinetobacter baumannii multidrug-resistant strains, isolated from hospitalized patients were also included in the study. The biosynthesized silver nanocomposite showed spherical nanoparticles with sizes smaller than 10 nm; 1 g of nanocomposite contained 49.24 µg of silver. Multidrug-resistant strains of Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Acinetobacter baumannii, and the other Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria tested, were sensitive to the silver nanocomposite (10–12.9 mm of inhibition zone. The biosynthesized silver nanocomposite seems to be a promising antibacterial agent for different applications, namely biomedical devices or topical wound coatings.

  14. Pattern of multi-drug resistant Salmonella enterica serovar typhi ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2008-11-05

    Nov 5, 2008 ... Typhoid fever continues to remain a health problem as the causative organism, Salmonella enterica serovar typhi, has developed resistance to many antibiotics used. This study was undertaken to determine the current pattern of resistance to antimicrobial agents by S. enterica serovar typhi isolates.

  15. Survey of Plasmodium falciparum multidrug resistance-1 and chloroquine resistance transporter alleles in Haiti.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elbadry, Maha A; Existe, Alexandre; Victor, Yves S; Memnon, Gladys; Fukuda, Mark; Dame, John B; Yowell, Charles A; Okech, Bernard A

    2013-11-19

    In Haiti where chloroquine (CQ) is widely used for malaria treatment, reports of resistance are scarce. However, recent identification of CQ resistance genotypes in one site is suggestive of an emerging problem. Additional studies are needed to evaluate genetic mutations associated with CQ resistance, especially in the Plasmodium falciparum multi-drug resistance-1 gene (pfmdr1) while expanding the already available information on P. falciparum CQ transporter gene (pfcrt) in Haiti. Blood samples were collected on Whatman filter cards (FTA) from eight clinics spread across Haiti. Following the confirmation of P. falciparum in the samples, PCR protocols were used to amplify regions of pfmdr1and pfcrt codons of interest, (86, 184, 1034, 1042, and 1246) and (72-76), respectively. Sequencing and site-specific restriction enzyme digestions were used to analyse these DNA fragments for the presence of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) known to confer resistance to anti-malarial drugs. P. falciparum infection was confirmed in160 samples by amplifying a segment of the P. falciparum 18S small subunit ribosomal RNA gene (pfssurrna). The sequence of pfmdr1 in 54 of these samples was determined between codons 86,184 codons 1034, 1042 and 1246. No sequence differences from that of the NF54 clone 3D7 were found among the 54 samples except at codon 184, where a non-silent mutation was found in all samples predicted to alter the amino acid sequence replacing tyrosine with phenylalanine (Y184F). This altered sequence was also confirmed by restriction enzyme digestion. The sequence of pfmdr1 at codons 86, 184, 1034 and 1042 encoded the NFSN haplotype. The sequence of pfcrt codons 72-76 from 79 samples was determined and found to encode CVMNK, consistent with a CQ sensitive genotype. The presence of the Y184F mutation in pfmdr1 of P. falciparum parasites in Haiti may have implications for resistance to antimalarial drugs. The absence of mutation in pfcrt at codon 76 among 79

  16. Cooperative Antibiotic Resistance in a Multi-Drug Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yurtsev, Eugene; Dai, Lei; Gore, Jeff

    2013-03-01

    The emergence of antibiotic resistance in bacteria is a significant health concern. A frequent mechanism of antibiotic resistance involves the production of an enzyme which inactivates the antibiotic. By inactivating the antibiotic, resistant cells can ``share'' their resistance with other cells in the bacterial population, suggesting that it may be possible to observe cooperation between strains that inactivate different antibiotics. Here, we experimentally track the population dynamics of two E. coli strains in the presence of two different antibiotics. We find that together the strains are able to grow in antibiotic concentrations that inhibit growth of either of the strains individually. We observe that even when there is stable coexistence between the two strains, the population size of each strain can undergo large oscillations. We expect that our results will provide insight into the evolution of antibiotic resistance and the evolutionary origin of phenotypic diversity and cooperative behaviors.

  17. Multidrug-resistance proteins are weak tumor associated antigens for colorectal carcinoma

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    Linnebacher Michael

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Multidrug resistance (MDR is a clinically, highly relevant phenomenon. Under chemotherapy many tumors show an increasing resistance towards the applied substance(s and to a certain extent also towards other agents. An important molecular cause of this phenomenon is an increased expression of transporter proteins. The functional relationship between high expression levels and chemotherapy resistance makes these MDR and MRP (MDR related protein proteins to interesting therapeutic targets. We here wanted to systematically analyze, whether these proteins are tumor specific antigens which could be targeted immunologically. Results Using the reverse immunology approach, 30 HLA-A2.1 restricted MDR and MRP derived peptides (MDP were selected. Stimulated T cell lines grew well and mainly contained activated CD8+ cells. Peptide specificity and HLA-A2.1 restriction were proven in IFN-γ-ELISpot analyses and in cytotoxicity tests against MDP loaded target cells for a total of twelve peptides derived from MDR-1, MDR-3, MRP-1, MRP-2, MRP-3 and MRP-5. Of note, two of these epitopes are shared between MDR-1 and MDR-3 as well as MRP-2 and MRP-3. However, comparably weak cytotoxic activities were additionally observed against HLA-A2.1+ tumor cells even after upregulation of MDR protein expression by in vitro chemotherapy. Conclusions Taken together, these data demonstrate that human T cells can be sensitised towards MDPs and hence, there is no absolute immunological tolerance. However, our data also hint towards rather low endogenous tumor cell processing and presentation of MDPs in the context of HLA-A2.1 molecules. Consequently, we conclude that MDR and MRP proteins must be considered as weak tumor specific antigens-at least for colorectal carcinoma. Their direct contribution to therapy-failure implies however, that it is worth to further pursue this approach.

  18. In vitro antibacterial potency of Butea monosperma Lam. against 12 clinically isolated multidrug resistant bacteria

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    Mahesh Chandra Sahu

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To investigate the antibacterial activity, using cold and hot extraction procedures with five solvents, petroleum ether, acetone, ethanol, methanol and water to validate medicinal uses of Butea monosperma Lam (B. monosperma in controlling infections; and to qualitatively estimate phytochemical constituents of leaf-extracts of the plant. Methods: The antibacterial activity of leaf-extracts was evaluated by the agar-well diffusion method against clinically isolated 12 Gram-positive and -negative multidrug resistant (MDR pathogenic bacteria in vitro. Values of minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC and minimum bactericidal concentration (MBC of leaf-extracts against each bacterium were obtained in a 96-well micro-titre plate, by broth dilution micro-titre plate technique. Results: The presence of tannins, flavonoids, starch, glycosides and carbohydrates in different leaf extracts was established. Pathogenic bacteria used were, Acinetobacter sp., Chromobacterium violaceum, Citrobacter freundii, Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Salmonella typhi, Shigella sp., Enterococcus sp., Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus, methicillin resistant S. aureus and vancomycin resistant S. aureus, along with standard bacterial strains. These MDR bacteria had been recorded to have significant inhibitions by leaf extracts, obtained by cold and hot extraction procedures with five solvents. In addition, the hot aqueous extract against Enterococcus sp. had the highest inhibition zone-size (21 mm. Ciprofloxacin 30 µg/disc was the positive/reference control and the diluting solvent, 10% dimethyl sulphoxide was the negative control. Recorded MIC values of different extracts ranged between 0.23 and 13.30 mg/mL, and MBC values were 0.52 to 30.00 mg/mL, for these bacteria. Conclusions: Leaf-extracts with hot water and ethanol had shown significant antibacterial activity against all bacteria. B. monosperma leaf-extract could be used in

  19. Anti-bacterial activity of graphene oxide as a new weapon nanomaterial to combat multidrug-resistance bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yousefi, Mohammadreza; Dadashpour, Mehdi; Hejazi, Maryam; Hasanzadeh, Mohammad; Behnam, Behzad; de la Guardia, Miguel; Shadjou, Nasrin; Mokhtarzadeh, Ahad

    2017-05-01

    Antibiotic resistance in microbial pathogens has become a serious health problem in the world. The increasing spread of hospital acquired infections especially in immunocompromised and cancer patients caused by multidrug-resistant (MDR) microbial pathogens is restricting the choices for impressive antibiotic therapy. So many efforts have been made to develop new compounds with antimicrobial activity. In recent years, nanoparticles, particularly graphene oxide (GO) nanoparticles have found many applications in various fields, including antibacterial action, pathogens bio detection, cancer therapy, and drug and gene delivery. The use of graphene oxide as an antibacterial agent for the treatment of infections with multidrug resistance is growing due to the unique physicochemical properties as wide surface area, excellent electrical and thermal conductivity, and biocompatibility. To reduce toxicity and increase the efficiency of graphene oxide as an antimicrobial agent, different surface modification and functionalization with inorganic nanostructures, biomolecules and polymers were developed. In this review article, we give our overview of the progress made on the graphene oxide nanocomposites as a new generation of antimicrobial agents. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  20. Features of Cytokine Regulation in Multidrug-Resistant Tuberculosis Depending on Severity of Endogenous Intoxication

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    L.D. Todoriko

    2016-02-01

    Conclusions. Comprehensive assessment of integral indices of endogenous intoxication and level of certain pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines in the blood plasma of patients with MDR TB shows a moderate endogenous intoxication, break down of the cellular component of the immune reactivity due to the formation of conditions for the development of Mycobacterium tuberculosis resistance, with further growth of cytotoxic hypoxia and activation of systemic inflammatory response syndrome. Analysis of plasma concentration of IL-6, IL-10 and IL-18 in patients with multidrug-resistance proved, that their level depends on the nature of Mycobacterium tuberculosis resistance.

  1. Characterization of an IncA/C Multidrug Resistance Plasmid in Vibrio alginolyticus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Lianwei; Li, Ruichao; Lin, Dachuan; Zhou, Yuanjie; Fu, Aisi; Ding, Qiong; Chan, Edward Wai Chi; Yao, Wen; Chen, Sheng

    2016-05-01

    Cephalosporin-resistant Vibrio alginolyticus was first isolated from food products, with β-lactamases encoded by blaPER-1, blaVEB-1, and blaCMY-2 being the major mechanisms mediating their cephalosporin resistance. The complete sequence of a multidrug resistance plasmid, pVAS3-1, harboring the blaCMY-2 and qnrVC4 genes was decoded in this study. Its backbone exhibited genetic homology to known IncA/C plasmids recoverable from members of the family Enterobacteriaceae, suggesting its possible origin in Enterobacteriaceae. Copyright © 2016, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  2. Lack of evidence to support policy development for management of contacts of multidrug-resistant tuberculosis patients: two systematic reviews

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Werf, M. J.; Langendam, M. W.; Sandgren, A.; Manissero, D.

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Existing international guidelines provide different recommendations for the management of contacts of multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB) patients. OBJECTIVE: To conduct two systematic reviews with the aim of identifying chemoprophylactic approaches that are effective in contacts

  3. Prevalence and molecular characterization of pyrazinamide resistance among multidrug-resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis isolates from Southern China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pang, Yu; Zhu, Damian; Zheng, Huiwen; Shen, Jing; Hu, Yan; Liu, Jie; Zhao, Yanlin

    2017-11-06

    Pyrazinamide (PZA) plays a unique role in the treatment for multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB) in both first- and second-line regimens. The aim of this study was to investigate the prevalence and molecular characterization of PZA resistance among MDR-TB isolates collected in Chongqing municipality. A total of 133 MDR-TB isolates were collected from the smear-positive tuberculosis patients who were registered at local TB dispensaries of Chongqing. PZA susceptibility testing was determined with a Bactec MGIT 960 system. In addition, the genes conferring for PZA resistance were screened by DNA sequencing. Of these 133 MDR-TB isolates, 83 (62.4%) were determined as PZA-resistant by MGIT 960. In addition, streptomycin- (83.1% vs. 56.0%, P < 0.01), ofloxacin- (51.8% vs. 18.0%, P < 0.01), kanamycin- (22.9% vs. 2.0%, P < 0.01), amikacin- (18.1% vs. 2.0%, P = 0.01), capromycin-resistance (12.0% vs. 2.0%, P = 0.05), were more frequently observed among PZA-resistant isolates compared with PZA-susceptible isolates. Sequence analysis revealed that 73 out of 83 (88.0%) MDR strains harbored a mutation located in the pncA gene, including 55 (75.3%, 55/73) of single nucleotide substitutions and 18 (24.7%, 18/73) of frameshift mutation, while no genetic mutation associated with PZA resistance was found in the rpsA gene. The pncA expression of strains harboring substitution from A to G at position -11 in the promoter region of pncA was significantly lower than that of H37Rv (P < 0.01). In conclusion, our data have demonstrated that the analysis of the pncA gene rather than rpsA gene provides rapid and accurate information regarding PZA susceptibility for MDR-TB isolates in Chongqing. In addition, loss of pncA expression caused by promoter mutation confers PZA resistance in MDR-TB isolates.

  4. Prevalence and molecular characterization of pyrazinamide resistance among multidrug-resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis isolates from Southern China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Pang

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pyrazinamide (PZA plays a unique role in the treatment for multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB in both first- and second-line regimens. The aim of this study was to investigate the prevalence and molecular characterization of PZA resistance among MDR-TB isolates collected in Chongqing municipality. Methods A total of 133 MDR-TB isolates were collected from the smear-positive tuberculosis patients who were registered at local TB dispensaries of Chongqing. PZA susceptibility testing was determined with a Bactec MGIT 960 system. In addition, the genes conferring for PZA resistance were screened by DNA sequencing. Results Of these 133 MDR-TB isolates, 83 (62.4% were determined as PZA-resistant by MGIT 960. In addition, streptomycin- (83.1% vs. 56.0%, P < 0.01, ofloxacin- (51.8% vs. 18.0%, P < 0.01, kanamycin- (22.9% vs. 2.0%, P < 0.01, amikacin- (18.1% vs. 2.0%, P = 0.01, capromycin-resistance (12.0% vs. 2.0%, P = 0.05, were more frequently observed among PZA-resistant isolates compared with PZA-susceptible isolates. Sequence analysis revealed that 73 out of 83 (88.0% MDR strains harbored a mutation located in the pncA gene, including 55 (75.3%, 55/73 of single nucleotide substitutions and 18 (24.7%, 18/73 of frameshift mutation, while no genetic mutation associated with PZA resistance was found in the rpsA gene. The pncA expression of strains harboring substitution from A to G at position −11 in the promoter region of pncA was significantly lower than that of H37Rv (P < 0.01. Conclusions In conclusion, our data have demonstrated that the analysis of the pncA gene rather than rpsA gene provides rapid and accurate information regarding PZA susceptibility for MDR-TB isolates in Chongqing. In addition, loss of pncA expression caused by promoter mutation confers PZA resistance in MDR-TB isolates.

  5. Community-acquired multidrug-resistant Gram-negative bacterial infective endocarditis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naha, Sowjanya; Naha, Kushal; Acharya, Vasudev; Hande, H Manjunath; Vivek, G

    2014-08-05

    We describe two cases of bacterial endocarditis secondary to multidrug-resistant Gram-negative organisms. In both cases, the diagnosis was made in accordance with the modified Duke's criteria and confirmed by histopathological analysis. Furthermore, in both instances there were no identifiable sources of bacteraemia and no history of contact with hospital or other medical services prior to the onset of symptoms. The patients were managed in similar fashion with prolonged broad-spectrum antibiotic therapy and surgical intervention and made complete recoveries. These cases highlight Gram-negative organisms as potential agents for endocarditis, as well as expose the dissemination of such multidrug-resistant bacteria into the community. The application of an integrated medical and surgical approach and therapeutic dilemmas encountered in managing these cases are described. 2014 BMJ Publishing Group Ltd.

  6. [Multi-drug resistant tuberculosis and the red queen - diagnosis speed is crucial].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costeira, João; Pina, Jaime

    2007-01-01

    The multi-drug resistant Tuberculosis (MDRTB) is a huge menace to Tuberculosis control. The early detection of MDRTB is essential to best appropriate measures. The detection methods for drug resistance based in evaluation of the genetic determinants (genotypic methods), instead of phenotypic methods, allows for faster results, the possibility of direct application in clinical samples and simultaneous identification of Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex. The inpatients data analysis in the "Serviço de Pneumologia 2 do Hospital Pulido Valente", showed a high prevalence of MDRTB (10.3%). In 34.1% of the MDRTB patients the multi-drug resistance was not been identified, with a mortality ratio in this cases of 31% versus 18.4% in the subset of patients with resistance previously identified. Moreover the mortality ratio was worst in MDRTB/AIDS patients with 50% versus 15%, respectively. Targeting for rapid drug resistance detection, in hospitalized patients at "Serviço de Pneumologia 2 do Hospital Pulido Valente", the test INNO-LIPA Rif.TB, to identify the rifampicin resistance as a marker of multi-drug resistance, was evaluated. The test was performed in 113 samples and had a high ratio of sensitivity (91.6%), specificity (98%), positive predictive value (84, 6%) and negative predictive value (99%). Time to obtain the results was 7.6 days for the genotypic test versus 23.4 days to the phenotypic test (BACTEC MGIT 960). The INNO-LIPA Rif.TB test is, now, performed in every patient with smear-positive Tuberculosis with no previous knows resistance profile, with good outcome. Rev

  7. Genetic relatedness and molecular characterization of multidrug resistant Acinetobacter baumannii isolated in central Ohio, USA

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    Tadesse Daniel

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Over the last decade, nosocomial infections due to Acinetobacter baumannii have been described with an increasing trend towards multidrug resistance, mostly in intensive care units. The aim of the present study was to determine the clonal relatedness of clinical isolates and to elucidate the genetic basis of imipenem resistance. Methods A. baumannii isolates (n = 83 originated from two hospital settings in central Ohio were used in this study. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis genotyping and antimicrobial susceptibility testing for clinically relevant antimicrobials were performed. Resistance determinants were characterized by using different phenotypic (accumulation assay for efflux and genotypic (PCR, DNA sequencing, plasmid analysis and electroporation approaches. Results The isolates were predominantly multidrug resistant (>79.5% and comprised of thirteen unique pulsotypes, with genotype VII circulating in both hospitals. The presence of blaOXA-23 in 13% (11/83 and ISAba1 linked blaOXA-66 in 79.5% (66/83 of clinical isolates was associated with high level imipenem resistance. In this set of OXA producing isolates, multidrug resistance was bestowed by blaADC-25, class 1 integron-borne aminoglycoside modifying enzymes, presence of sense mutations in gyrA/parC and involvement of active efflux (with evidence for the presence of adeB efflux gene. Conclusion This study underscores the major role of carbapenem-hydrolyzing class D β-lactamases, and in particular the acquired OXA-23, in the dissemination of imipenem-resistant A. baumannii. The co-occurrence of additional resistance determinant could also be a significant threat.

  8. Multidrug-resistant pathogens in hospitalised patients coming from the community with pneumonia: a European perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aliberti, Stefano; Cilloniz, Catia; Chalmers, James D; Zanaboni, Anna Maria; Cosentini, Roberto; Tarsia, Paolo; Pesci, Alberto; Blasi, Francesco; Torres, Antoni

    2013-11-01

    Probabilistic scores have been recently suggested to identify pneumonia caused by multidrug-resistant (MDR) bacteria. The aim of the study was to validate both Aliberti and Shorr scores in predicting MDR pneumonia, comparing them with healthcare associated pneumonia (HCAP) classification. Two independent European cohorts of consecutive patients hospitalised with pneumonia were prospectively evaluated in Barcelona, Spain (BC) and Edinburgh, UK (EC). Data on admission and during hospitalisation were collected. The predictive value of the three scores was explored for correctly indicating the presence of MDR pneumonia via a receiver-operating characteristic (ROC) curve. A total of 1591 patients in the BC and 1883 patients in the EC were enrolled. The prevalence of patients with MDR pathogen among those with isolated bacteria was 7.6% in the BC and 3.3% in the EC. The most common MDR pathogen found in both cohorts was MRSA, followed by MDR P aeruginosa. A significantly higher prevalence of MDR bacteria was found among patients in the intensive care unit (ICU). The two probabilistic scores, and particularly the Aliberti one, showed an area under the ROC curve higher than the HCAP classification in predicting MDR pneumonia, especially in the ICU. Risk scores able to identify MDR pneumonia could help in developing strategies for antimicrobial stewardship.

  9. A Fatal Case of Multidrug Resistant Acinetobacter Necrotizing Fasciitis: The Changing Scary Face of Nosocomial Infection

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    Nupur Sinha

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Necrotizing fasciitis is an uncommon soft-tissue infection, associated with high morbidity and mortality. Early recognition and treatment are crucial for survival. Acinetobacter baumannii is rarely associated with necrotizing fasciitis. Wound infections due to A. baumannii have been described in association with severe trauma in soldiers. There are only sporadic reports of monomicrobial A. baumannii necrotizing fasciitis. We report a unique case of monomicrobial necrotizing fasciitis caused by multidrug resistant (MDR A. baumannii, in absence of any preceding trauma, surgery, or any obvious breech in the continuity of skin or mucosa. A 48-year-old woman with history of HIV, asthma, hypertension, and tobacco and excocaine use presented with acute respiratory failure requiring mechanical ventilation. She was treated for pneumonia for 7 days and was successfully extubated. All septic work-up was negative. Two days later, she developed rapidly spreading nonblanching edema with bleb formation at the lateral aspect of right thigh. Emergent extensive debridement and fasciotomy were performed. Operative findings and histopathology were consistent with necrotizing fasciitis. Despite extensive debridement, she succumbed to septic shock in the next few hours. Blood, wound, and tissue cultures grew A. baumannii, sensitive only to amikacin and polymyxin. Histopathology was consistent with necrotizing fasciitis.

  10. The therapeutic potential of targeting ABC transporters to combat multi-drug resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bugde, Piyush; Biswas, Riya; Merien, Fabrice; Lu, Jun; Liu, Dong-Xu; Chen, Mingwei; Zhou, Shufeng; Li, Yan

    2017-05-01

    Most disseminated cancers remain fatal despite the availability of a variety of conventional and novel treatments including surgery, chemotherapy, radiotherapy, immunotherapy, and biologically targeted therapy. A major factor responsible for the failure of chemotherapy in the treatment of cancer is the development of multidrug resistance (MDR). The overexpression of various ABC transporters in cancer cells can efficiently remove the anticancer drug from the cell, thus causing the drug to lose its effect. Areas covered: In this review, we summarised the ongoing research related to the mechanism, function, and regulation of ABC transporters. We integrated our current knowledge at different levels from molecular biology to clinical trials. We also discussed potential therapeutic strategies of targeting ABC transporters to reverse MDR in cancer cells. Expert opinion: Involvement of various ABC transporters to cancer MDR lays the foundation for developing tailored therapies that can overcome MDR. An ideal MDR reversal agent should have broad-spectrum ABC-transporter inhibitory activity, be potent, have good pharmacokinetics, have no trans-stimulation effects, and have low or no toxicity. Alternatively, nanotechnology-based drug delivery systems containing both the cytotoxic drug and reversing agent may represent a useful approach to reversing MDR with minimal off-target toxicity.

  11. Antibacterial activities of medicinal plants against multidrug resistant urinary tract pathogens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aziz, M.A.; Adnan, M.; Rahman, H.; Allah, A.; Hashem, A.

    2017-01-01

    Urinary tract infections (UTI) caused by multi-drug resistant (MDR) bacterial pathogens have become a serious global health concern. Main etiological agents for UTI are Escherichia coli, Acinetobacter baumannii, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Recently, medicinal plants have found great popularity in medical treatment for different kinds of infections including urinary tract infections. The study has been planned to evaluate the efficacy of alkaloids, flavonoids, saponins and crude extracts of medicinal plants i.e. Syzygium aromaticum, Glycerrhiza glabra,Laurus nobilis and Brassica rapa against MDR urinary tract pathogens through agar well diffusion method. To investigate the Minimum Inhibitory Concentrations (MICs) and Minimum Bactericidal Concentration (MBCs), dilution method was used. Quantitative evaluations of phytochemicals indicated the presence of alkaloids in higher concentrations. Results obtained for the antibacterial activities, the crude extracts of the four plants showed significantly higher inhibition zones as compared to other phytochemicals. The MIC values obtained for different extracts varying from 7.5-15 mg/ml. Comparig the activities of the extracts of the the four medicinal plants it was found that Syzygium aromaticum was the most potent plant against the tested bacterial pathogens indicating its strong candidateship for the drug development. (author)

  12. Evaluation of Aromatic Plants and Compounds Used to Fight Multidrug Resistant Infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramar Perumal Samy

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Traditional medicine plays a vital role for primary health care in India, where it is widely practiced to treat various ailments. Among those obtained from the healers, 78 medicinal plants were scientifically evaluated for antibacterial activity. Methanol extract of plants (100 μg of residue was tested against the multidrug resistant (MDR Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria. Forty-seven plants showed strong activity against Burkholderia pseudomallei (strain TES and KHW and Staphylococcus aureus, of which Tragia involucrata L., Citrus acida Roxb. Hook.f., and Aegle marmelos (L. Correa ex Roxb. showed powerful inhibition of bacteria. Eighteen plants displayed only a moderate effect, while six plants failed to provide any evidence of inhibition against the tested bacteria. Purified compounds showed higher antimicrobial activity than crude extracts. The compounds showed less toxic effect to the human skin fibroblasts (HEPK cells than their corresponding aromatic fractions. Phytochemical screening indicates that the presence of various secondary metabolites may be responsible for this activity. Most of the plant extracts contained high levels of phenolic or polyphenolic compounds and exhibited activity against MDR pathogens. In conclusion, plants are promising agents that deserve further exploration. Lead molecules available from such extracts may serve as potential antimicrobial agents for future drug development to combat diseases caused by the MDR bacterial strains as reported in this study.

  13. Hypothyroidism during second-line treatment of multidrug-resistant tuberculosis: a prospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bares, R; Khalid, N; Daniel, H; Dittmann, H; Reimold, M; Gallwitz, B; Schmotzer, C

    2016-07-01

    Hypothyroidism is an adverse effect of certain anti-tuberculosis drugs. This is a prospective study of the frequency and possible pathomechanisms associated with hypothyroidism due to second-line treatment of multidrug-resistant tuberculosis. Fifty human immunodeficiency virus negative patients and 20 controls were included. All participants underwent ultrasonography of the thyroid and measurement of thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH). TSH levels were checked every 3 months. If hypothyroidism was present, T3, T4 and thyroid peroxidase autoantibodies were measured, and imaging extended to scintigraphy and repeated ultrasonography. Before treatment, 7 patients (14%) and 1 control (5%) were hypothyreotic. During the first 6 months of treatment, TSH levels increased in 41 patients (82%), 39 (78%) had values above the normal range and 19 (38%) had overt hypothyroidism. As none of the patients had signs of autoimmune thyroiditis, interaction with anti-tuberculosis drugs was assumed to be the cause of hypothyroidism. Nine patients died during treatment, all of whom had developed hypothyroidism. In seven, the metabolic situation at their death was known, and they had become euthyreotic following levothyroxine substitution. TSH levels should be checked before initiating anti-tuberculosis treatment and after 3 and 6 months to start timely replacement of levothyroxine. Further studies are needed to elucidate the exact pathomechanism involved in hypothyroidism and whether hypothyroidism can be used as predictor of treatment failure.

  14. Evaluation of aromatic plants and compounds used to fight multidrug resistant infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perumal Samy, Ramar; Manikandan, Jayapal; Al Qahtani, Mohammed

    2013-01-01

    Traditional medicine plays a vital role for primary health care in India, where it is widely practiced to treat various ailments. Among those obtained from the healers, 78 medicinal plants were scientifically evaluated for antibacterial activity. Methanol extract of plants (100  μ g of residue) was tested against the multidrug resistant (MDR) Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria. Forty-seven plants showed strong activity against Burkholderia pseudomallei (strain TES and KHW) and Staphylococcus aureus, of which Tragia involucrata L., Citrus acida Roxb. Hook.f., and Aegle marmelos (L.) Correa ex Roxb. showed powerful inhibition of bacteria. Eighteen plants displayed only a moderate effect, while six plants failed to provide any evidence of inhibition against the tested bacteria. Purified compounds showed higher antimicrobial activity than crude extracts. The compounds showed less toxic effect to the human skin fibroblasts (HEPK) cells than their corresponding aromatic fractions. Phytochemical screening indicates that the presence of various secondary metabolites may be responsible for this activity. Most of the plant extracts contained high levels of phenolic or polyphenolic compounds and exhibited activity against MDR pathogens. In conclusion, plants are promising agents that deserve further exploration. Lead molecules available from such extracts may serve as potential antimicrobial agents for future drug development to combat diseases caused by the MDR bacterial strains as reported in this study.

  15. Overcoming drug resistance in multi-drug resistant cancers and microorganisms: a conceptual framework.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avner, Benjamin S; Fialho, Arsenio M; Chakrabarty, Ananda M

    2012-01-01

    Resistance development against multiple drugs is a common feature among many pathogens--including bacteria such as Pseudomonas aeruginosa, viruses, and parasites--and also among cancers. The reasons are two-fold. Most commonly-used rationally-designed small molecule drugs or monoclonal antibodies, as well as antibiotics, strongly inhibit a key single step in the growth and proliferation of the pathogen or cancer cells. The disease agents quickly change or switch off this single target, or activate the efflux mechanisms to pump out the drug, thereby becoming resistant to the drug. A second problem is the way drugs are designed. The pharmaceutical industry chooses to use, by high-throughput screening, compounds that are maximally inhibitory to the key single step in the growth of the pathogen or cancer, thereby promoting selective pressure. An ideal drug would be one that inhibits multiple steps in the disease progression pathways with less stringency in these steps. Low levels of inhibition at multiple steps provide cumulative strong inhibitory effect, but little incentives or ability on the part of the pathogen/cancer to develop resistance. Such intelligent drug design involving multiple less stringent inhibitory steps is beyond the scope of the drug industry and requires evolutionary wisdom commonly possessed by bacteria. This review surveys assessments of the current clinical situation with regard to drug resistance in P. aeruginosa, and examines tools currently employed to limit this trend. We then provide a conceptual framework in which we explore the similarities between multi-drug resistance in pathogens and in cancers. We summarize promising work on anti-cancer drugs derived from the evolutionary wisdom of bacteria such as P. aeruginosa, and how such strategies can be the basis for how to look for candidate protein/peptide antibiotic drugs from bioengineered bugs. Such multi-domain proteins, unlike diffusible antibiotics, are not diffusible because of their

  16. Understanding institutional stakeholders’ perspectives on multidrug-resistant bacterial organism at the end of life: a qualitative study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heckel, Maria; Herbst, Franziska A; Adelhardt, Thomas; Tiedtke, Johanna M; Sturm, Alexander; Stiel, Stephanie; Ostgathe, Christoph

    2017-01-01

    Background Information lacks about institutional stakeholders’ perspectives on management approaches of multidrug-resistant bacterial organism in end-of-life situations. The term “institutional stakeholder” includes persons in leading positions with responsibility in hospitals’ multidrug-resistant bacterial organism management. They have great influence on how strategies on multidrug-resistant bacterial organism management approaches in institutions of the public health system are designed. This study targeted institutional stakeholders’ individual perspectives on multidrug-resistant bacterial organism colonization or infection and isolation measures at the end of life. Methods Between March and December 2014, institutional stakeholders of two study centers, a German palliative care unit and a geriatric ward, were queried in semistructured interviews. Interviews were audiotaped, transcribed verbatim, and analyzed qualitatively with the aid of the software MAXQDA for qualitative data analysis using principles of Grounded Theory. In addition, two external stakeholders were interviewed to enrich data. Results Key issues addressed by institutional stakeholders (N=18) were the relevance of multidrug-resistant bacterial organism in palliative and geriatric care, contradictions between hygiene principles and patients’ and family caregivers’ needs and divergence from standards, frame conditions, and reflections on standardization of multidrug-resistant bacterial organism end-of-life care procedures. Results show that institutional stakeholders face a dilemma between their responsibility in protecting third persons and ensuring patients’ quality of life. Until further empirical evidence establishes a clear multidrug-resistant bacterial organism management approach in end-of-life care, stakeholders suggest a case-based approach. Conclusion The institutional stakeholders’ perspectives and their suggestion of a case-based approach advance the development

  17. Understanding institutional stakeholders' perspectives on multidrug-resistant bacterial organism at the end of life: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heckel, Maria; Herbst, Franziska A; Adelhardt, Thomas; Tiedtke, Johanna M; Sturm, Alexander; Stiel, Stephanie; Ostgathe, Christoph

    2017-01-01

    Information lacks about institutional stakeholders' perspectives on management approaches of multidrug-resistant bacterial organism in end-of-life situations. The term "institutional stakeholder" includes persons in leading positions with responsibility in hospitals' multidrug-resistant bacterial organism management. They have great influence on how strategies on multidrug-resistant bacterial organism management approaches in institutions of the public health system are designed. This study targeted institutional stakeholders' individual perspectives on multidrug-resistant bacterial organism colonization or infection and isolation measures at the end of life. Between March and December 2014, institutional stakeholders of two study centers, a German palliative care unit and a geriatric ward, were queried in semistructured interviews. Interviews were audiotaped, transcribed verbatim, and analyzed qualitatively with the aid of the software MAXQDA for qualitative data analysis using principles of Grounded Theory. In addition, two external stakeholders were interviewed to enrich data. Key issues addressed by institutional stakeholders (N=18) were the relevance of multidrug-resistant bacterial organism in palliative and geriatric care, contradictions between hygiene principles and patients' and family caregivers' needs and divergence from standards, frame conditions, and reflections on standardization of multidrug-resistant bacterial organism end-of-life care procedures. Results show that institutional stakeholders face a dilemma between their responsibility in protecting third persons and ensuring patients' quality of life. Until further empirical evidence establishes a clear multidrug-resistant bacterial organism management approach in end-of-life care, stakeholders suggest a case-based approach. The institutional stakeholders' perspectives and their suggestion of a case-based approach advance the development process of a patient-, family-, staff-, and institutional

  18. Short Communication: High isolation rates of multidrug-resistant ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    resistant potentially pathogenic bacteria from water and carpets of mosques worldwide. The objective of the present investigation is to determine the bacteriological quality of water and carpets of mosques in Elkhomes city in Libya. Methods: ...

  19. Threat of multidrug resistant Staphylococcus aureus in Western Nepal

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bhatta, Dharm R.; Cavaco, Lina; Nath, Gopal

    2015-01-01

    antibiotic susceptibility testing in developing countries like Nepal. Hospital acquired infections including prevalence of MRSA can be minimized by appropriate hygienic measures in patient care and management and by antibiotic stewardship. Screening of erythromycin resistant isolates would minimize clinical...... Teaching Hospital, Pokhara, Nepal. A total of 400 isolates were collected from various clinical specimens including hospital units (operation theaters and intensive care units). Antibiotic susceptibility testing was performed by Kirby-Bauer disc diffusion method. Primary screening for MRSA was performed...... to vancomycin. Inducible clindamycin resistance was found in 54 (25.47%) isolates. ConclusionsThis study showed a high prevalence of MRSA in our hospital. There is need of regular surveillance of antibiotic resistance, standardization of laboratory methods for detecting methicillin resistance and performing...

  20. Multidrug resistant Vibrio cholerae O1 from clinical and environmental samples in Kathmandu city.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thapa Shrestha, Upendra; Adhikari, Nabaraj; Maharjan, Rojina; Banjara, Megha R; Rijal, Komal R; Basnyat, Shital R; Agrawal, Vishwanath P

    2015-02-27

    Cholera, an infectious disease caused by Vibrio cholerae, is a major public health problem and is a particularly burden in developing countries including Nepal. Although the recent worldwide outbreaks of cholera have been due to V. cholerae El Tor, the classical biotypes are still predominant in Nepal. Serogroup O1 of the V. cholerae classical biotype was the primary cause of a cholera outbreak in Kathmandu in 2012. Thus, this study was designed to know serotypes and biotypes of V. cholerae strains causing recent outbreak with reference to drug resistant patterns. Moreover, we also report the toxigenic strains of V. cholerae from both environmental and clinical specimens by detecting the ctx gene. Twenty four V. cholerae (n = 22 from stool samples and n = 2 from water samples) isolated in this study were subjected to Serotyping and biotyping following the standard protocols as described previously. All of the isolates were tested for antimicrobial susceptibility patterns using the modified Kirby-Bauer disk diffusion method as recommended by CLSI guidelines. The screening of the ctx genes (ctxA2-B gene) were performed by PCR method using a pair of primers; C2F (5'-AGGTGTAAAATTCCTTGACGA-3') and C2R (5'-TCCTCAGGGTATCCTTCATC-3') to identify the toxigenic strains of V. cholerae. Among twenty four V. cholerae isolates, 91.7% were clinical and 8.3% were from water samples. Higher rate of V. cholerae infection was found among adults of aged group 20-30 years. All isolates were serogroups O1 of the V. cholerae classical biotype and sub serotype, Ogawa. All isolates were resistant to ampicillin, nalidixic acid and cotrimoxazole. 90.9% were resistant to erythromycin however, tetracycline was found to be the most effective drug for the isolates. All isolates were multidrug resistant (MDR) and possessed a ctx gene of approximately 400 base pairs indicating the toxigenic strains. Hundred percent strains of V. cholerae were MDR possessing a ctx gene. It suggests that

  1. ANTIMICROBIAL SENSITIVITY OF MULTIDRUG-RESISTANT ACINETOBACTER BAUMANNII IN A TERTIARY CARE HOSPITAL OF PATNA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keshav Kumar Bimal

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Acinetobacter spp. has emerged as an important nosocomial pathogen especially in ICU settings. Acinetobacter baumannii is the most commonly isolated species among different Acinetobacters and is associated with variety of human infections. A. baumannii exhibits resistance not only to beta-lactams and cephalosporins, but also to other groups of antibiotics including carbapenems and this has resulted in the emergence of multidrug-resistance A. baumannii species, which is now widespread. To know the prevalence and antimicrobial susceptibility pattern of A. baumannii is crucial for the optimal antimicrobial therapy and to resist the spread of MDR Acinetobacter spp. The aim of the study is to study the antimicrobial susceptibility pattern of A. baumannii isolated from various clinical specimens and to explore the risk factors for multidrug-resistant A. baumannii infections. MATERIALS AND METHODS The present study was conducted from August 2015 to July 2016 at Indira Gandhi Institute of Medical Sciences, Patna. Antimicrobial susceptibility testing was done by Kirby-Bauer’s disc diffusion method. The zones of inhibition were interpreted for antibiotic sensitivity as per the CLSI guidelines 2014. Data regarding patients demographic and clinical status was obtained from medical records and possible risk factors for multidrug-resistant A. baumannii infections was evaluated for their statistical significance. Statistical analysis used- Microsoft excel sheet 2007 and Epi Info software (version 7.2.0.1 was used for different statistical analysis including Pearson’s x 2 test and simple logistic regression. RESULTS A. baumannii was isolated predominantly from respiratory samples (35.3%. Majority of the isolates were from different inpatient departments (59.1%, followed by different ICUs (40.9%. The A. baumannii isolates showed most sensitivity to colistin (100% followed by polymyxin B (90.20% and least sensitive to ampicillin (5.19%. Most of the

  2. Multidrug-resistant Bacteroides fragilis group on the rise in Europe?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hartmeyer, G N; Sóki, J; Nagy, E

    2012-01-01

    We report a case of multidrug-resistance (MDR) in a strain of Bacteroides fragilis from a blood culture and abdominal fluid in a Danish patient. The patient had not been travelling for several years and had not received antibiotics prior to the present case. We also summarize the cases that have...... been reported to date of MDR B. fragilis group in Europe. As far as we know, a case like this with MDR B. fragilis has not been described in Scandinavia before....

  3. Multifunctional magnetic Fe3O4 nanoparticles combined with chemotherapy and hyperthermia to overcome multidrug resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Yanyan; Zhang, Haijun; Chen, Baoan; Cheng, Jian; Cai, Xiaohui; Liu, Ran; Xia, Guohua; Wu, Weiwei; Wang, Shuai; Ding, Jiahua; Gao, Chong; Wang, Jun; Bao, Wen; Wang, Lei; Tian, Liang; Song, Huihui; Wang, Xuemei

    2012-01-01

    Multidrug resistance in cancer is a major obstacle for clinical therapeutics, and is the reason for 90% of treatment failures. This study investigated the efficiency of novel multifunctional Fe(3)O(4) magnetic nanoparticles (Fe(3)O(4)-MNP) combined with chemotherapy and hyperthermia for overcoming multidrug resistance in an in vivo model of leukemia. Nude mice with tumor xenografts were randomly divided into a control group, and the treatment groups were allocated to receive daunorubicin, 5-bromotetrandrine (5-BrTet) and daunorubicin, Fe(3)O(4)-MNP, and Fe(3)O(4)-MNP coloaded with daunorubicin and 5-bromotetrandrine (Fe(3)O(4)-MNP-DNR-5-BrTet), with hyperthermia in an alternating magnetic field. We investigated tumor volume and pathology, as well as P-glycoprotein, Bcl-2, Bax, and caspase-3 protein expression to elucidate the effect of multimodal treatment on overcoming multidrug resistance. Fe(3)O(4)-MNP played a role in increasing tumor temperature during hyperthermia. Tumors became significantly smaller, and apoptosis of cells was observed in both the Fe(3)O(4)-MNP and Fe(3)O(4)-MNP-DNR-5-BrTet groups, especially in the Fe(3)O(4)-MNP-DNR-5-BrTet group, while tumor volumes in the other groups had increased after treatment for 12 days. Furthermore, Fe(3)O(4)-MNP-DNR-5-BrTet with hyperthermia noticeably decreased P-glycoprotein and Bcl-2 expression, and markedly increased Bax and caspase-3 expression. Fe(3)O(4)-MNP-DNR-5-BrTet with hyperthermia may be a potential approach for reversal of multidrug resistance in the treatment of leukemia.

  4. Multidrug resistant tuberculosis in prisons located in former Soviet countries: A systematic review

    OpenAIRE

    Droznin, Maxwell; Johnson, Allen; Johnson, Asal Mohamadi

    2017-01-01

    Background A systematic literature review was performed to investigate the occurrence of multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR TB) in prisons located in countries formerly part of the Soviet Union. Methods A systematic search of published studies reporting MDR TB occurrence in prisons located in former Soviet countries was conducted by probing PubMed and Cumulative Index Nursing and Allied Health Literature for articles that met predetermined inclusion criteria. Results Seventeen studies were...

  5. Relationship between the Presence of the nalC Mutation and Multidrug Resistance in Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    OpenAIRE

    Sadeghifard, Nourkhoda; Valizadeh, Azar; Zolfaghary, Mohammad Reza; Maleki, Mohammad Hossien; Maleki, Abbas; Mohebi, Reza; Ghafourian, Sobhan; Khosravi, Afra

    2012-01-01

    Objectives. The current study was conducted to determine the relationship between the presences of significant multidrug resistance in Pseudomonas aeruginosa (P. aeruginosa) having intact mexR genes (nalC) to different antibiotics. Methods. In order to identify nalC, fifty strains of P. aeruginosa were obtained. All isolates were found in urinary tract infections. They were evaluated against different antibiotics. The nalC mutant was identified by PCR. Results. The 50 clinical isolates of P. ...

  6. Bioactive Compound Rich Indian Spices Suppresses the Growth of β-lactamase Produced Multidrug Resistant Bacteria

    OpenAIRE

    Eadlapalli Siddhartha; Vemula Sarojamma; Vadde Ramakrishna

    2017-01-01

    Background: Multidrug Resistance (MDR) among bacteria become a global concern due to failure of antibiotics, is drawn attention for best antimicrobials from the spices which have been using ancient days in Indian culinary and traditional medicine. Aim and Objectives: The present study was undertaken to evaluate the bioactive compounds and their antibacterial activity in routinely used culinary Indian spices against β-lactamase produced MDR bacteria. Material and Methods: Ethanolic extracts p...

  7. A case of acute postoperative keratitis after deep anterior lamellar keratoplasty by multidrug resistant Klebsiella

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leena Bajracharya

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A healthy lady of 42 years underwent deep anterior lamellar keratoplasty for granular dystrophy. The very next day, it was complicated by development of infectious keratitis. The organism was identified as multidrug resistant Klebsiella pneumoniae. Donor corneal button may be implicated in the transmission of infection in an otherwise uneventful surgery and follow-up. Nosocomial infections are usually severe, rapidly progressive and difficult to treat. Finally, the lady had to undergo therapeutic penetrating keratoplasty for complete resolution of infection.

  8. Genotyping and serotyping of macrolide and multidrug resistant Streptococcus pneumoniae isolated from carrier children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S F Swedan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims: Streptococcus pneumoniae, an opportunistic pathogen commonly carried asymptomatically in the nasopharynx of children, is associated with increasing rates of treatment failures due to a worldwide increase in drug resistance. We investigated the carriage of S. pneumoniae in children 5 years or younger, the identity of prevalent serotypes, the rates of resistance to macrolides and other antimicrobial agents and the genotypes responsible for macrolide resistance. Materials and Methods: Nasopharyngeal swabs were collected from 157 children under 5 years for cultural isolation of S. pneumoniae. Antibiogram of isolates  was determined using the disk diffusion test, and the minimal inhibitory concentration to macrolides was determined using the E-test. Isolate serotypes and macrolide resistance genes, erm(B and mef(E, were identified using multiplex polymerase chain reactions. Results: S. pneumoniae was recovered from 33.8% of children; 41.9% among males and 21.9% among females (P = 0.009. The highest carriage rate occurred among age groups 7-12 months and 49-60 months. Most frequent serotypes were 19F, 6A/B, 11A, 19A, 14 and 15B/C.  Resistance to macrolides was 60.4%. Resistance to oxacillin, trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole and clindamycin was present among 90.6%, 54.7% and 32.1% of isolates, respectively. All isolates were susceptible to chloramphenicol, levofloxacin and vancomycin. Isolates resistant to one or more macrolide drugs were more likely to be multidrug resistant. Resistance to clindamycin or oxacillin coexisted with macrolide resistance. Among the erythromycin-resistant isolates, erm(B, mef(E and erm(B and mef(E genes were present at rates of 43.8%, 37.5% and 6.3%, respectively. Erm(B and mef(E were associated with very high level and moderate-to-high level resistance to macrolides, respectively. Conclusion: A significant proportion of children harboured macrolide and multidrug-resistant S. pneumoniae.

  9. Insights into a multidrug resistant Escherichia coli pathogen of the globally disseminated ST131 lineage: genome analysis and virulence mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Totsika, Makrina; Beatson, Scott A; Sarkar, Sohinee; Phan, Minh-Duy; Petty, Nicola K; Bachmann, Nathan; Szubert, Marek; Sidjabat, Hanna E; Paterson, David L; Upton, Mathew; Schembri, Mark A

    2011-01-01

    Escherichia coli strains causing urinary tract infection (UTI) are increasingly recognized as belonging to specific clones. E. coli clone O25b:H4-ST131 has recently emerged globally as a leading multi-drug resistant pathogen causing urinary tract and bloodstream infections in hospitals and the community. While most molecular studies to date examine the mechanisms conferring multi-drug resistance in E. coli ST131, relatively little is known about their virulence potential. Here we examined E. coli ST131 clinical isolates from two geographically diverse collections, one representing the major pathogenic lineages causing UTI across the United Kingdom and a second representing UTI isolates from patients presenting at two large hospitals in Australia. We determined a draft genome sequence for one representative isolate, E. coli EC958, which produced CTX-M-15 extended-spectrum β-lactamase, CMY-23 type AmpC cephalosporinase and was resistant to ciprofloxacin. Comparative genome analysis indicated that EC958 encodes virulence genes commonly associated with uropathogenic E. coli (UPEC). The genome sequence of EC958 revealed a transposon insertion in the fimB gene encoding the activator of type 1 fimbriae, an important UPEC bladder colonization factor. We identified the same fimB transposon insertion in 59% of the ST131 UK isolates, as well as 71% of ST131 isolates from Australia, suggesting this mutation is common among E. coli ST131 strains. Insertional inactivation of fimB resulted in a phenotype resembling a slower off-to-on switching for type 1 fimbriae. Type 1 fimbriae expression could still be induced in fimB-null isolates; this correlated strongly with adherence to and invasion of human bladder cells and bladder colonisation in a mouse UTI model. We conclude that E. coli ST131 is a geographically widespread, antibiotic resistant clone that has the capacity to produce numerous virulence factors associated with UTI.

  10. Omega 3 fatty acids chemosensitize multidrug resistant colon cancer cells by down-regulating cholesterol synthesis and altering detergent resistant membranes composition.

    OpenAIRE

    Gelsomino, G; Gazzano, E

    2013-01-01

    Background The activity of P-glycoprotein (Pgp) and multidrug resistance related protein 1 (MRP1), two membrane transporters involved in multidrug resistance of colon cancer, is increased by high amounts of cholesterol in plasma membrane and detergent resistant membranes (DRMs). It has never been investigated whether omega 3 polyunsatured fatty acids (PUFAs), which modulate cholesterol homeostasis in dyslipidemic syndromes and have chemopreventive effects in colon cancer, may affect the respo...

  11. Inhibition of Snail Family Transcriptional Repressor 2 (SNAI2 Enhances Multidrug Resistance of Hepatocellular Carcinoma Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xin-Yu Zhao

    Full Text Available China accounts for almost half of the total number of liver cancer cases and deaths worldwide, and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC is the most primary liver cancer. Snail family transcriptional repressor 2 (SNAI2 is known as an epithelial to mesenchymal transition-inducing transcription factor that drives neoplastic epithelial cells into mesenchymal phenotype. However, the roles of endogenous SNAI2 remain controversial in different types of malignant tumors. Herein, we surprisingly identify that anchorage-independent growth, including the formation of tumor sphere and soft agar colony, is significantly increased when SNAI2 expression is inhibited by shRNAs in HCC cells. Suppression of SNAI2 suffices to up-regulate several cancer stem genes. Although unrelated to the metastatic ability, SNAI2 inhibition does increase the efflux of Hoechst 33342 and enhance multidrug resistance in vitro and in vivo. In agreement with this data, we demonstrate for the first time that decreasing SNAI2 level can transcriptionally upregulate several ATP binding cassette (ABC transporter genes such as ABCB1. Moreover, ABC transporters' inhibitor verapamil can rescue the multidrug resistance induced by SNAI2 inhibition. Our results implicate that SNAI2 behaves as a tumor suppressor by inhibiting multidrug resistance via suppressing ABC transporter genes in HCC cells.

  12. Resin glycosides from Ipomoea wolcottiana as modulators of the multidrug resistance phenotype in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corona-Castañeda, Berenice; Rosas-Ramírez, Daniel; Castañeda-Gómez, Jhon; Aparicio-Cuevas, Manuel Alejandro; Fragoso-Serrano, Mabel; Figueroa-González, Gabriela; Pereda-Miranda, Rogelio

    2016-03-01

    Recycling liquid chromatography was used for the isolation and purification of resin glycosides from the CHCl3-soluble extracts prepared using flowers of Ipomoea wolcottiana Rose var. wolcottiana. Bioassay-guided fractionation, using modulation of both antibiotic activity against multidrug-resistant strains of Gram-negative bacteria and vinblastine susceptibility in breast carcinoma cells, was used to isolate the active glycolipids as modulators of the multidrug resistance phenotype. An ester-type dimer, wolcottine I, one tetra- and three pentasaccharides, wolcottinosides I-IV, in addition to the known intrapilosin VII, were characterized by NMR spectroscopy and mass spectrometry. In vitro assays established that none of these metabolites displayed antibacterial activity (MIC>512 μg/mL) against multidrug-resistant strains of Escherichia coli, and two nosocomial pathogens: Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi and Shigella flexneri; however, when tested (25 μg/mL) in combination with tetracycline, kanamycin or chloramphenicol, they exerted a potentiation effect of the antibiotic susceptibility up to eightfold (64 μg/mL from 512 μg/mL). It was also determined that these non-cytotoxic (CI50>8.68 μM) agents modulated vinblastine susceptibility at 25 μg/mL in MFC-7/Vin(+) cells with a reversal factor (RFMCF-7/Vin(+)) of 2-130 fold. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Capsaicin and Piperine Can Overcome Multidrug Resistance in Cancer Cells to Doxorubicin

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    Hanmei Li

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Multidrug resistance (MDR can develop in cancer cells after treatment with anticancer drugs, mainly due to the overexpression of the ATP-binding cassette (ABC transporters. We analyzed the ability of two pungent-tasting alkaloids—capsaicin and piperine from Capsicum frutescens and Piper nigrum, respectively—to reverse multidrug resistance in the cancer cell lines Caco-2 and CEM/ADR 5000, which overexpress P-glycoprotein (P-gp and other ABC transporters. Methods: The MTT assay was first used to determine the cytotoxicity of doxorubicin, the alkaloids, and digitonin alone, and then their combinations. Furthermore, rhodamine (Rho 123 and calcein-AM were used to detect the effects of alkaloids on the activity of P-gp. Results: Capsaicin and piperine synergistically enhanced the cytotoxicity of doxorubicin in Caco-2 and CEM/ADR 5000 cells. Furthermore, capsaicin and piperine increased the intracellular accumulation of the fluorescent P-glycoprotein (P-gp substrates rhodamine and calcein and inhibited their efflux from the MDR cell lines. Conclusion: Our study has demonstrated that capsaicin and piperine are P-gp substrates and have potential chemosensitizing activity, which might be interesting for the development of novel modulators of multidrug resistance.

  14. Antibacterial activity of epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG) and its synergism with β-lactam antibiotics sensitizing carbapenem-associated multidrug resistant clinical isolates of Acinetobacter baumannii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Spencer; Razqan, Ghaida Saleh Al; Kwon, Dong H

    2017-01-15

    Infections caused by Acinetobacter baumannii were responsive to conventional antibiotic therapy. However, recently, carbapenem-associated multidrug resistant isolates have been reported worldwide and present a major therapeutic challenge. Epigallocatechin-3-Gallate (EGCG) extracted from green tea exhibits antibacterial activity. We evaluated the antibacterial activity of EGCG and possible synergism with antibiotics in carbapenem-associated multidrug resistant A. baumannii. A potential mechanism for synergism was also explored. Seventy clinical isolates of A. baumannii collected from geographically different areas were analyzed by minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) and minimum bactericidal concentration (MBC) of EGCG. Checkerboard and time-killing assays were performed to exam the synergism between EGCG and antibiotics. The effects of EGCG on a multidrug efflux pump inhibitor (1-[1-naphthylmethyl] piperazine; NMP) and β-lactamase production were also examined in A. baumannii. Sixty-three of 70 clinical isolates of A. baumannii carried carbapenemase-encoding genes with carbapenem-associated multidrug resistance. Levels of MIC and MBC of EGCG ranged from 64 to 512µg/ml and from 128 to ≥1024µg/ml, respectively among the clinical isolates. MIC 90 and MBC 86 levels were 256µg/ml and 512µg/ml of EGCG, respectively. Subinhibitory concentration of EGCG in combination with all antibiotics tested, including carbapenem, sensitized (MICs fall≤1.0µg/ml) all carbapenem-associated multidrug resistant isolates. Checkerboard and time-killing assays showed synergism between EGCG and meropenem (or carbenicillin) counted as fractional inhibitory concentration of 2log10 within 12h, respectively. EGCG significantly increased the effect of NMP but was unrelated to β-lactamase production in A. baumannii, suggesting EGCG may be associated with inhibition of efflux pumps. Overall we suggest that EGCG-antibiotic combinations might provide an alternative approach to treat

  15. Ceftaroline-Resistant, Daptomycin-Tolerant, and Heterogeneous Vancomycin-Intermediate Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus Causing Infective Endocarditis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nigo, Masayuki; Diaz, Lorena; Carvajal, Lina P; Tran, Truc T; Rios, Rafael; Panesso, Diana; Garavito, Juan D; Miller, William R; Wanger, Audrey; Weinstock, George; Munita, Jose M; Arias, Cesar A; Chambers, Henry F

    2017-03-01

    We report a case of infective endocarditis (IE) caused by ceftaroline-resistant, daptomycin-tolerant, and heterogeneous vancomycin-intermediate methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA). Resistance to ceftaroline emerged in the absence of drug exposure, and the E447K substitution in the active site of PBP2a previously associated with ceftaroline resistance was identified. Additionally, we present evidence of patient-to-patient transmission of the strain within the same unit. This case illustrates the difficulties in treating MRSA IE in the setting of a multidrug-resistant phenotype. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  16. The role of half-transporters in multidrug resistance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bates, S E; Robey, R; Miyake, K

    2001-01-01

    in the role of drug transporters in clinical drug resistance. These newly identified transporters include additional members of the MRP family, ABC2, and a new half-transporter, MXR/BCRP/ABCP1. This half-transporter confers high levels of resistance to mitoxantrone, anthracyclines, and the camptothecins SN-38...... and topotecan. At 72 kDa, MXR localizes to the plasma membrane in cells which highly overexpress the protein either through gene amplification or though gene rearrangement. Future studies will be aimed at identifying an inhibitor, and attempting to translate recognition of this new transporter into a target...

  17. Role of H- and D- MATE-type transporters from multidrug resistant clinical isolates of Vibrio fluvialis in conferring fluoroquinolone resistance.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Priyabrata Mohanty

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The study seeks to understand the role of efflux pumps in multidrug resistance displayed by the clinical isolates of Vibrio fluvialis, a pathogen known to cause cholera-like diarrhoea. METHODOLOGY: Two putative MATE family efflux pumps (H- and D-type were PCR amplified from clinical isolates of V. fluvialis obtained from Kolkata, India, in 2006 and sequenced. Bioinformatic analysis of these proteins was done to predict protein structures. Subsequently, the genes were cloned and expressed in a drug hypersusceptible Escherichia coli strain KAM32 using the vector pBR322. The recombinant clones were tested for the functionality of the efflux pump proteins by MIC determination and drug transport assays using fluorimeter. RESULTS: The sequences of the genes were found to be around 99% identical to their counterparts in V. cholerae. Protein structure predicting servers TMHMM and I-TASSER depicted ten-twelve membrane helical structures for both type of pumps. Real time PCR showed that these genes were expressed in the native V. fluvialis isolates. In the drug transport assays, the V. fluvialis clinical isolates as well as recombinant E. coli harbouring the efflux pump genes showed the energy-dependent and sodium ion-dependent drug transport activity. KAM32 cells harbouring the recombinant plasmids showed elevated MIC to the fluoroquinolones, norfloxacin and ciprofloxacin but H-type pumps VCH and VFH from V. cholerae and V. fluvialis respectively, showed decreased MIC to aminoglycosides like gentamicin, kanamycin and streptomycin. Decrease in MIC was also observed for acriflavin, ethidium bromide, safranin and nalidixic acid. SIGNIFICANCE: Increased resistance towards fluoroquinolones exhibited due to these efflux pumps from multidrug resistant clinical isolates of V. fluvialis implies that treatment procedure may become more elaborate for this simple but highly infectious disease. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of

  18. From multidrug-resistant to extensively drug-resistant tuberculosis in Lisbon, Portugal: the stepwise mode of resistance acquisition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perdigão, João; Macedo, Rita; Silva, Carla; Machado, Diana; Couto, Isabel; Viveiros, Miguel; Jordao, Luisa; Portugal, Isabel

    2013-01-01

    The development and transmission of extensively drug-resistant (XDR) tuberculosis (TB) constitutes a serious threat to the effective control of TB in several countries. Here, in an attempt to further elucidate the dynamics of the acquisition of resistance to second-line drugs and investigate an eventual role for eis promoter mutations in aminoglycoside resistance, we have studied a set of multidrug-resistant (MDR)/XDR-TB isolates circulating in Lisbon, Portugal. Forty-four MDR-TB or XDR-TB isolates were genotyped and screened for mutations in genes associated with second-line drug resistance, namely tlyA, gyrA, rrs and eis. The most prevalent mutations found in each gene were Ins755GT in tlyA, A1401G in rrs, G-10A in eis and S91P in gyrA. Additionally, two genetic clusters were found in this study: Lisboa3 and Q1. The characteristic mutational profile found among recent XDR-TB circulating in Lisbon was also found in MDR-TB strains isolated in the 1990s. Also investigated was the resistance level conferred by eis G-10A mutations, revealing that eis G-10A mutations may result in amikacin resistance undetectable by widely used phenotypic assays. The analysis of the distribution of the mutations found by genetic clustering showed that in the Q1 cluster, two mutations, gyrA D94A and rrs A1401G, were enough to ensure development of XDR-TB from an MDR strain. Moreover, in the Lisboa3 cluster it was possible to elaborate a model in which the development of low-level kanamycin resistance was at the origin of the emergence of XDR-TB strains that can be discriminated by tlyA mutations.

  19. Emergence of Multidrug Resistance and Metallo‑beta‑lactamase ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Aims: This study was aimed to determine the antimicrobial susceptibility and the prevalence of MβL among carbapenem‑resistant isolates of A. baumannii. Materials and Methods: In this cross‑sectional study from October 2012 to April 2013, 98 isolates were identified as A. baumannii using Microgen™ kits and confirmed by ...

  20. Transfer of Multidrug Resistance among Bacteria Isolated from ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    One hundred and twenty two (122) bacterial isolates belonging to the genera Micrococcus, Streptococcus, Pseudomonas, Actinomyces, Bacillus, Corynebacterium, Brucella, Shigella, Hafnia, Proteus and Salmonella were isolated from four different industrial waste sites. Thirty five (28.68%) of these were resistant to two or ...

  1. effect of biocides on biofilms of some multidrug resistant clinical ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    userpc

    The multi drug resistant clinical isolates used in this study are Staphylococcus aureus,. Pseudomonas ... Bacterial isolates were obtained from urine, ..... Staphylococcus epidermidis from implant infections. Comparison of a PCR method that recognizes the presence of icagenes with two classic phenotypic methods. Journal.

  2. Pattern of multi-drug resistant Salmonella enterica serovar typhi ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    There was an increase in the number of isolates with decreased sensitivity to nalixidic acid and cotrimoxazole. All isolates had complete resistance to augmentin, tetracycline and amoxicillin commonly used for treatment of typhoid fever. Therefore physicians should be advised to conduct effective susceptibility test before ...

  3. Multi-Drug Resistant Bacteria Isolated From Dogs Presented with ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Abstract. This investigation documents antibiotic resistant bacteria observed in dogs with otitis externa encountered at Veterinary Teaching Hospital, University of Ibadan, Nigeria. Four Alsatian dogs were presented to the Veterinary Clinic after over a year of treatment failures following a prolonged misuse of antibiotics.

  4. Emergence of Multidrug Resistance and Metallo‑beta‑lactamase ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Abstract. Background: Metallo‑beta‑lactamase (MβL) enzymes production is one of the most important resistance mechanisms against carbapenems in some bacteria including Acinetobacterbaumannii. Aims: This study was aimed to determine the antimicrobial susceptibility and the prevalence of MβL among ...

  5. Nasal carriage of multi-drug resistant Staphylococcus aureus in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Nasal Staphylococcus aureus is a major source of community and hospital associated staphylococcal infections. This study determined the prevalence of nasal S. aureus isolates and investigated their antimicrobial resistance profile in healthy volunteers. Methods: Nasal specimens of healthy volunteers in ...

  6. Multi-drug resistant Staphylococcus aureus isolated from emergency ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To study the prevalence of resistant strains of S. aureus isolated from surfaces, beds and various equipment of an Iranian hospital emergency ward. Methods: Two hundred swab samples were collected from the surfaces, beds, trolleys, surgical equipment and diagnostic medical devices in emergency ward.

  7. Molecular patterns of multidrug resistance of Mycobacterium tuberculosis in Georgia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N Shubladze

    2013-01-01

    Conclusions: A great majority of the Georgian MDR MTB strains have a strong preference for the drug resistance mutations carrying no or low fitness cost. Thus, it can be suggested that MDR MTB strains with such mutations will continue to arise in Georgia at a high frequency even in the absence of antibiotic pressure.

  8. The diarylquinoline TMC207 for multidrug-resistant tuberculosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Diacon, Andreas H.; Pym, Alexander; Grobusch, Martin; Patientia, Ramonde; Rustomjee, Roxana; Page-Shipp, Liesl; Pistorius, Christoffel; Krause, Rene; Bogoshi, Mampedi; Churchyard, Gavin; Venter, Amour; Allen, Jenny; Palomino, Juan Carlos; de Marez, Tine; van Heeswijk, Rolf P. G.; Lounis, Nacer; Meyvisch, Paul; Verbeeck, Johan; Parys, Wim; de Beule, Karel; Andries, Koen; Mc Neeley, David F.

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The diarylquinoline TMC207 offers a new mechanism of antituberculosis action by inhibiting mycobacterial ATP synthase. TMC207 potently inhibits drug-sensitive and drug-resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis in vitro and shows bactericidal activity in patients who have drug-susceptible

  9. Isolation and characterization of multidrug-resistant side population ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The SP cells showed high resistance to drugs such as 5-fluorouracil, cisplatin, paclitaxel (2 μmol/L) and oxaliplatin. The survival rate of SP cells after treatment with these drugs was significantly higher (p < 0.01) than that of non-SP cells. Furthermore, the number of spheres generated in serumfree medium was significantly ...

  10. Characterization of a Multidrug Resistant Salmonella Enterica Give

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Dr Olaleye

    levofloxacin resistant Salmonella Give that possessed gyrA mutation encoding histidine to Tyrosine conversion at amino acid 150(150His→Tyr) had been earlier isolated and characterized, one from septic poultry and one from asymptomatic pig (Ogunleye et al., 2011). The pig isolate possessed an additional (83Tyr→Ser) ...

  11. Proteome analysis of multidrug-resistant, breast cancer–derived microparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deep Pokharel

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Cancer multidrug resistance (MDR occurs when cancer cells evade the cytotoxic actions of chemotherapeutics through the active efflux of drugs from within the cells. Our group have previously demonstrated that multidrug-resistant breast cancer cells spontaneously shed microparticles (MPs and that these MPs can transfer resistance to drug-responsive cells and confer MDR on those cells in as little as 4 h. Furthermore, we also showed that, unlike MPs derived from leukaemia cells, breast cancer–derived MPs display a tissue selectivity in the transfer of P-glycoprotein (P-gp, transferring the resistance protein only to malignant breast cells. This study aims to define the proteome of breast cancer–derived MPs in order to understand the differences in protein profiles between those shed from drug-resistant versus drug-sensitive breast cancer cells. In doing so, we detail the protein cargo required for the intercellular transfer of MDR to drug-sensitive recipient cells and the factors governing the transfer selectivity to malignant breast cells. We describe the first proteomic analysis of MPs derived from human breast cancer cells using SDS PAGE and liquid chromatography–tandem mass spectrometry (LC/MS/MS, in which we identify 120 unique proteins found only in drug-resistant, breast cancer–derived MPs. Our results demonstrate that the MP-mediated transfer of P-gp to recipient cells occurs alongside CD44; the Ezrin, Radixin and Moesin protein family (ERM; and cytoskeleton motor proteins within the MP cargo.

  12. Multi-drug resistant non-typhoidal Salmonella associated with invasive disease in western Kenya.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam Akullian

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Non-typhoidal Salmonella (NTS is a leading cause of bloodstream infections in Africa, but the various contributions of host susceptibility versus unique pathogen virulence factors are unclear. We used data from a population-based surveillance platform (population ~25,000 between 2007-2014 and NTS genome-sequencing to compare host and pathogen-specific factors between individuals presenting with NTS bacteremia and those presenting with NTS diarrhea. Salmonella Typhimurium ST313 and Salmonella Enteritidis ST11 were the most common isolates. Multi-drug resistant strains of NTS were more commonly isolated from patients presenting with NTS bacteremia compared to NTS diarrhea. This relationship was observed in patients under age five [aOR = 15.16, 95% CI (2.84-81.05, P = 0.001], in patients five years and older, [aOR = 6.70 95% CI (2.25-19.89, P = 0.001], in HIV-uninfected patients, [aOR = 21.61, 95% CI (2.53-185.0, P = 0.005], and in patients infected with Salmonella serogroup B [aOR = 5.96, 95% CI (2.28-15.56, P < 0.001] and serogroup D [aOR = 14.15, 95% CI (1.10-182.7, P = 0.042]. Thus, multi-drug-resistant NTS was strongly associated with bacteremia compared to diarrhea among children and adults. This association was seen in HIV-uninfected individuals infected with either S. Typhimurium or S. Enteritidis. Risk of developing bacteremia from NTS infection may be driven by virulence properties of the Salmonella pathogen.

  13. Fluoroquinolone induction of phage-mediated gene transfer in multidrug-resistant Salmonella.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bearson, Bradley L; Brunelle, Brian W

    2015-08-01

    Fluoroquinolones are broad-spectrum antibiotics that inhibit bacterial DNA gyrase and topoisomerase activity, which can cause DNA damage and result in bacterial cell death. In response to DNA damage, bacteria induce an SOS response to stimulate DNA repair. However, the SOS response may also induce prophage with production of infectious virions. Salmonella strains typically contain multiple prophages, and certain strains including phage types DT120 and DT104 contain prophage that upon induction are capable of generalised transduction. In this study, strains of multidrug-resistant (MDR) Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium DT120 and DT104 were exposed to fluoroquinolones important for use in human and veterinary disease therapy to determine whether prophage(s) are induced that could facilitate phage-mediated gene transfer. Cultures of MDR S. Typhimurium DT120 and DT104 containing a kanamycin resistance plasmid were lysed after exposure to fluoroquinolones (ciprofloxacin, enrofloxacin and danofloxacin). Bacterial cell lysates were able to transfer the plasmid to a recipient kanamycin-susceptible Salmonella strain by generalised transduction. In addition, exposure of DT120 to ciprofloxacin induced the recA gene of the bacterial SOS response and genes encoded in a P22-like generalised transducing prophage. This research indicates that fluoroquinolone exposure of MDR Salmonella can facilitate horizontal gene transfer, suggesting that fluoroquinolone usage in human and veterinary medicine may have unintended consequences, including the induction of phage-mediated gene transfer from MDR Salmonella. Stimulation of gene transfer following bacterial exposure to fluoroquinolones should be considered an adverse effect, and clinical decisions regarding antibiotic selection for infectious disease therapy should include this potential risk. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  14. Antibacterial Activity of Glutathione-Stabilized Silver Nanoparticles Against Campylobacter Multidrug-Resistant Strains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jose M. Silvan

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Campylobacter is the leading cause of bacterial diarrheal disease worldwide. Although most episodes of campylobacteriosis are self-limiting, antibiotic treatment is usually needed in patients with serious enteritis, and especially in childrens or the elderly. In the last years, antibiotic resistance in Campylobacter has become a major public health concern and a great interest exists in developing new antimicrobial strategies for reducing the impact of this food-borne pathogen on human health. Among them, the use of silver nanoparticles as antibacterial agents has taken on increased importance in the field of medicine. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the antimicrobial effectiveness of glutathione-stabilized silver nanoparticles (GSH-Ag NPs against multidrug resistant (MDR Campylobacter strains isolated from the chicken food chain (FC and clinical patients (C. The results obtained showed that GSH-Ag NPs were highly effective against all MDR Campylobacter strains tested. The minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC and minimal bactericidal concentration (MBC were in a range from 4.92 to 39.4 μg/mL and 9.85 to 39.4 μg/mL, respectively. Cytotoxicity assays were also assessed using human intestinal HT-29, Caco-2, and CCD-18 epithelial cells. Exposure of GSH-Ag NPs to intestinal cells showed a dose-dependent cytotoxic effect in all cell lines between 9.85 and 39.4 μg/mL. More than 60% of the tested Campylobacter strains were susceptible to GSH-Ag NPs concentrations ≤ 9.85 μg/mL, suggesting that practical inhibitory levels could be reached at low GSH-Ag NPs concentrations. Further works are needed with the purpose to evaluate the practical implications of the toxicity studies and to know more about other attributes linked to the biological compatibility. This behavior makes GSH-Ag NPs as a promising tool for the design of novel antibacterial agents for controlling Campylobacter.

  15. Molecular evidence and functional expression of multidrug resistance associated protein (MRP) in rabbit corneal epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karla, Pradeep K; Pal, Dananjay; Mitra, Ashim K

    2007-01-01

    Multidrug resistance associated protein (MRP) is a major family of efflux transporters involved in drug efflux leading to drug resistance. The objective of this study was to explore physical barriers for ocular drug absorption and to verify if the role of efflux transporters. MRP-2 is a major homologue of MRP family and found to express on the apical side of cell membrane. Cultured Rabbit Corneal Epithelial Cells (rCEC) were selected as an in vitro model for corneal epithelium. [14C]-erythromycin which is a proven substrate for MRP-2 was selected as a model drug for functional expression studies. MK-571, a known specific and potent inhibitor for MRP-2 was added to inhibit MRP mediated efflux. Membrane fraction of rCEC was used for western blot analysis. Polarized transport of [14C]-erythromycin was observed in rCEC and transport from B-->A was significantly high than from A-->B. Permeability's increased significantly from A-->B in the presence of MK-571 and ketoconozole. Uptake of [14C]-erythromycin in the presence of MK-571 was significantly higher than control in rCEC. RT-PCR analysis indicated a unique and distinct band at approximately 498 bp corresponding to MRP-2 in rCEC and MDCK11-MRP-2 cells. Immunoprecipitation followed by Western Blot analysis indicated a specific band at approximately 190 kDa in membrane fraction of rCEC and MDCK11-MRP-2 cells. For the first time we have demonstrated high expression of MRP-2 in rabbit corneal epithelium and its functional activity causing drug efflux. RT-PCR, immunoprecipitation followed by Western blot analysis further confirms the result.

  16. The multidrug-resistant phenotype associated with overexpression of the new ABC half-transporter, MXR (ABCG2)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Litman, Thomas; Brangi, M; Hudson, E

    2000-01-01

    known as ABCP1 or BCRP. The pharmacodynamics of mitoxantrone and 12 other fluorescent drugs were evaluated by confocal microscopy in four multidrug-resistant human colon (S1) and breast (MCF-7) cancer cell lines. We utilized two sublines, MCF-7 AdVp3000 and S1-M1-80, and detected overexpression of MXR...... by PCR, immunoblot assay and immunohistochemistry. These MXR overexpressing sublines were compared to cell lines with P-glycoprotein- and MRP-mediated resistance. High levels of cross-resistance were observed for mitoxantrone, the anthracyclines, bisantrene and topotecan. Reduced levels of mitoxantrone......, the multidrug-resistant phenotype due to MXR expression is overlapping with, but distinct from, that due to P-glycoprotein. Further, cells that overexpress the MXR protein seem to be more resistant to mitoxantrone and topotecan than cells with P-glycoprotein-mediated multidrug resistance. Our studies suggest...

  17. ACTIVITY OF THYME OIL (OLEUM THYMI) AGAINST MULTIDRUG-RESISTANT ACINETOBACTER BAUMANNII AND PSEUDOMONAS AERUGINOSA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trojanowska, Danuta; Paluchowska, Paulina; Soja, Łukasz; Budak, Alicja

    2016-07-01

    Almost as soon as antibiotics were introduced to treat infectious diseases, it could be observed that bacteria were able to develop resistance against them. Currently, multidrug-resistant strains are being isolated mainly in the hospital environment. These are primarily non-fermenting Gram-negative bacilli, which exhibit both natural and acquired resistance to multiple antibiotics and disinfectants rendering them difficult to eradicate. The development of new, effective and safe substances that prevent troublesome infections is greatly needed to provide alternative therapeutic options for patients. There is increasing interest in drugs of natural origin, including essential oils. It is of particular interest that, although active against many bacterial strains, they do not contribute to antibacterial resistance against their components. The aim of our study was to evaluate the in vino antibacterial activity of thyme oil against multidrug-resistant strains of A. baumannii and P. aeriginosa using the disc diffusion and macrodilution methods. The strains were isolated from patients hospitalized in the years 2013-2014. The in vitto antibacterial activity of thyme oil was assessed by the disc diffusion method and the inhibition zones for the oil at different concentrations, produced against A. baumannii, ranged from 7 to 44 mm. Low level of activity of thyme oil was observed against P. aeruginosa strains. The results of serial dilution tests confirmed the high activity of thyme oil against A. baumannii isolates, expressed as MIC values ranging from 0.25 to 2 μL/mL. These results suggest the need for further studies of antibacterial activity of essential oils, especially against multidrug-resistant bacterial isolates.

  18. oprM as a new target for reversion of multidrug resistance in Pseudomonas aeruginosa by antisense phosphorothioate oligodeoxynucleotides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hui; Meng, Jingru; Jia, Min; Ma, Xue; He, Gonghao; Yu, Jichen; Wang, Rutao; Bai, Hui; Hou, Zheng; Luo, Xiaoxing

    2010-12-01

    Multidrug-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa (MDR-PA) is one of the leading Gram-negative organisms associated with nosocomial infections. The increasing frequency of MDR-PA has represented a huge challenge in conventional antibacterial therapy. The loss of effectiveness of commonly used antibiotics calls for the immediate need to develop an alternative strategy for combating MDR-PA infections. The multiantibiotic resistance of MDR-PA is largely attributable to the production of multidrug efflux pumps, MexAB-OprM. OprM forms the antibiotic-ejecting duct and plays a crucial role in exporting incoming chemotherapeutic agents across the membranes. Disruption of the OprM expression may inhibit the function of multidrug efflux pumps and lead to restoration of MDR-PA susceptibility to antibiotics. In this study, we developed a novel anion liposome for encapsulating and delivering specific anti-oprM phosphorothioate oligodeoxynucleotide (PS-ODN617) and polycation polyethylenimine (PEI) complexes. The additions of the encapsulated anti-oprM PS-ODN617/PEI to MDR-PA isolates caused a significant reduction of oprM expression and inhibition of MDR-PA growth in the presence of piperacillin in a concentration-dependent manner. The encapsulated PS-ODN617 treatment also reduced minimal inhibitory concentrations of five most commonly used antibiotics to the sensitive margin values on MDR-PA clinical isolates, respectively. The results of present study firstly indicate that PS-ODN targeted to oprM can significantly restore the susceptibility of MDR-PA to existing antibiotics, which appears to be a novel strategy for treating MDR-PA infections. © 2010 Federation of European Microbiological Societies. Published by Blackwell Publishing Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Evaluation of the efficacy of a bacteriophage in the treatment of pneumonia induced by multidrug resistance Klebsiella pneumoniae in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Fang; Wang, Xitao; Wang, Linhui; Li, Zhen; Che, Jian; Wang, Lili; Li, Xiaoyu; Cao, Zhenhui; Zhang, Jiancheng; Jin, Liji; Xu, Yongping

    2015-01-01

    Multidrug-resistant Klebsiella pneumoniae (MRKP) has steadily grown beyond antibiotic control. However, a bacteriophage is considered to be a potential antibiotic alternative for treating bacterial infections. In this study, a lytic bacteriophage, phage 1513, was isolated using a clinical MRKP isolate KP 1513 as the host and was characterized. It produced a clear plaque with a halo and was classified as Siphoviridae. It had a short latent period of 30 min, a burst size of 264 and could inhibit KP 1513 growth in vitro with a dose-dependent pattern. Intranasal administration of a single dose of 2×10(9) PFU/mouse 2 h after KP 1513 inoculation was able to protect mice against lethal pneumonia. In a sublethal pneumonia model, phage-treated mice exhibited a lower level of K. pneumoniae burden in the lungs as compared to the untreated control. These mice lost less body weight and exhibited lower levels of inflammatory cytokines in their lungs. Lung lesion conditions were obviously improved by phage therapy. Therefore, phage 1513 has a great effect in vitro and in vivo, which has potential to be used as an alternative to an antibiotic treatment of pneumonia that is caused by the multidrug-resistant K. pneumoniae.

  20. Antibacterial activity of Psidium guajava leaf and bark against multidrug-resistant Vibrio cholerae: implication for cholera control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahim, Niaz; Gomes, Donald James; Watanabe, Haruo; Rahman, Sabita Rizwana; Chomvarin, Chariya; Endtz, Hubert Ph; Alam, Munirul

    2010-07-01

    In clinical cholera, a 3-day course of antibiotic complements extensive rehydration therapy by reducing stool volume, shortening the illness, and averting death. However, antibiotic therapy, which has lifesaving implications for cholera, is often hindered due to multidrug resistance in Vibrio cholerae, the cause of cholera. Crude aqueous mixture and water soluble methanol extract from leaf and bark of Psidium guajava, a tropical fruit guava of the family Myrtaceae, showed strong antibacterial activity against multidrug-resistant V. cholerae O1. The in vitro minimum inhibitory concentration of the crude aqueous mixture and water soluble methanol extract, which was bactericidal against 10(7) CFU/mL of V. cholerae was determined to be 1,250 microg/mL and 850 microg/mL, respectively. The antibacterial activity of P. guajava was stable at 100 degrees C for 15-20 min, suggesting nonprotein nature of the active component. The growth of V. cholerae in rice oral rehydration saline (ORS) was completely inhibited when 10 mg/mL (wt/vol) of crude aqueous mixture was premixed with the ORS in a ratio of 1:7 (vol. extract/vol. ORS). P. guajava, which is widely distributed in Bangladesh, thus offers great potential for use in indigenous, herbal medicine for controlling epidemics of cholera.

  1. Contribution of AcrAB-ToIC to multidrug resistance in an Escherichia coli sequence type 131 isolate

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schuster, Sabine; Vavra, Martina; Schweigger, Tobias M.; Rossen, John W. A.; Matsumura, Yasufumi; Kern, Winfried V.

    Drug efflux by resistance-nodulation-cell division (RND)-type transporters, such as AcrAB-ToIC of Escherichia can, is an important resistance mechanism in Gram-negative bacteria; however, its contribution to multidrug resistance (MDR) in clinical isolates is poorly defined. We inactivated acrB of a

  2. Several Virulence Factors of Multidrug-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus Isolates From Hospitalized Patients in Tehran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdolmajid Ghasemian

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: Biofilm formation plays an important role in resistance of Staphylococcus aureus isolates; especially multidrug-resistant isolates are a threat to healthcare settings. Objectives: The aims of this study were to detect biofilm formation and presence of several related genes among multidrug-resistant (MDR isolates of Staphylococcus aureus. Patients and Methods: A total Of 209 S. aureus strains were isolated from patients and identified by conventional diagnostic tests. The multidrug-resistant MRSA isolates were detected by antibiotic susceptibility test. The phenotypic biofilm formation was detected by micro-titre tissue plate assay. The polymerase chain reaction (PCR was performed to detect the mecA, Staphylococcal Cassette Chromosome mec (SCCmec types, accessory gene regulatory (agr genes, the icaADBC and several genes encoding staphylococcal surface proteins including clfAB, fnbAB, fib, eno, can, ebps and bbp genes with specific primers. Results: Sixty-four (30.6% isolates were methicillin-resistant, among which thirty-six (56.2% were MDR. These isolates were resistant to amoxicillin, tetracycline, ciprofloxacin, gentamicin, erythromycin and trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole (except to 6 isolates. All the isolates were susceptible to vancomycin and linezolid. All the MDR-MRSA harbored SCCmec type III. All the MDR- MRSA isolates were strong biofilm producers in the phenotypic test. The majority of MDR- MRSA was belonged to agrI (67%, n = 24, followed by agr II (17%, n = 6, agrIV (11%, n = 4 and agrIII (5.5%, n = 2. The frequency of icaADBC genes were 75% (n = 27, 61% (n = 22, 72% (n = 26 and 72% (n = 26, respectively. Furthermore, the prevalence of clfA, clfB, fnbA, fnbB, fib, can, eno, ebps and bbp genes was 100%, 100%, 67%, 56%, 80%, 63%, 78%, 7% and 0%, respectively. Furthermore, approximately all the MRSA was strong biofilm producers. Conclusions: Multidrug-resistant isolates produced biofilm strongly and the majority harbored most

  3. Phenothiazines as a solution for multidrug resistant tuberculosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristiansen, Jette E.; Dastidar, Sujata G.; Palchoudhuri, Shauroseni

    2015-01-01

    Historically, multiplicity of actions in synthetic compounds is a rule rather than exception. The science of non-antibiotics evolved in this background. From the antimalarial and antitrypanosomial dye methylene blue, chemically similar compounds, the phenothiazines, were developed. The phenothiaz...... thioridazine and its (-) form to be combined with other antitubercular drugs to treat infections by drug-resistant strains of Mycobacterium tuberculosis and try to eradicate this deadly disease. [Int Microbiol 2015; 18(1):1-12]....

  4. Pilot study on multidrug resistant tuberculosis in Nigeria

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    control efforts should be improved. Keywords: Drug resistance, human immunodeficiency virus, prevalence, Nigeria, tuberculosis. Résumé. Arrière-plan: Résistant aux médicament de la tuberculose (TB) est apparu récemment et il représente un problème sérieux pour la santé publique. Nous exposons à afin de déterminer ...

  5. Resistance patterns, prevalence, and predictors of fluoroquinolones resistance in multidrug resistant tuberculosis patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nafees Ahmad

    2016-01-01

    Conclusion: The high degree of drug resistance observed, particularly to fluoroquinolones, is alarming. We recommend the adoption of more restrictive policies to control non-prescription sale of fluoroquinolones, its rational use by physicians, and training doctors in both private and public–private mix sectors to prevent further increase in fluoroquinolones resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis strains.

  6. ABC transporters as multidrug resistance mechanisms and the development of chemosensitizers for their reversal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Choi Cheol-Hee

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract One of the major problems related with anticancer chemotherapy is resistance against anticancer drugs. The ATP-binding cassette (ABC transporters are a family of transporter proteins that are responsible for drug resistance and a low bioavailability of drugs by pumping a variety of drugs out cells at the expense of ATP hydrolysis. One strategy for reversal of the resistance of tumor cells expressing ABC transporters is combined use of anticancer drugs with chemosensitizers. In this review, the physiological functions and structures of ABC transporters, and the development of chemosensitizers are described focusing on well-known proteins including P-glycoprotein, multidrug resistance associated protein, and breast cancer resistance protein.

  7. Fluoroquinolone-induced gene transfer in multidrug-resistant Salmonella

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fluoroquinolones are broad spectrum antibiotics that inhibit bacterial DNA gyrase and topoisomerase activity. Bacterial exposure to fluoroquinolones can cause DNA damage and induce a bacterial SOS response to stimulate repair of damaged DNA. Certain prophages (integrated in bacterial chromosomes) ...

  8. Health system factors influencing management of multidrug-resistant tuberculosis in four European Union countries - learning from country experiences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Vries, Gerard; Tsolova, Svetla; Anderson, Laura F; Gebhard, Agnes C; Heldal, Einar; Hollo, Vahur; Cejudo, Laura Sánchez-Cambronero; Schmid, Daniela; Schreuder, Bert; Varleva, Tonka; van der Werf, Marieke J

    2017-04-19

    In the European Union and European Economic Area only 38% of multidrug-resistant tuberculosis patients notified in 2011 completed treatment successfully at 24 months' evaluation. Socio-economic factors and patient factors such as demographic characteristics, behaviour and attitudes are associated with treatment outcomes. Characteristics of healthcare systems also affect health outcomes. This study was conducted to identify and better understand the contribution of health system components to successful treatment of multidrug-resistant tuberculosis. We selected four European Union countries to provide for a broad range of geographical locations and levels of treatment success rates of the multidrug-resistant tuberculosis cohort in 2009. We conducted semi-structured interviews following a conceptual framework with representatives from policy and planning authorities, healthcare providers and civil society organisations. Responses were organised according to the six building blocks of the World Health Organization health systems framework. In the four included countries, Austria, Bulgaria, Spain, and the United Kingdom, the following healthcare system factors were perceived as key to achieving good treatment results for patients with multidrug-resistant tuberculosis: timely diagnosis of drug-resistant tuberculosis; financial systems that ensure access to a full course of treatment and support for multidrug-resistant tuberculosis patients; patient-centred approaches with strong intersectoral collaboration that address patients' emotional and social needs; motivated and dedicated healthcare workers with sufficient mandate and means to support patients; and cross-border management of multidrug-resistant tuberculosis to secure continuum of care between countries. We suggest that the following actions may improve the success of treatment for multidrug-resistant tuberculosis patients: deployment of rapid molecular diagnostic tests; development of context-specific treatment

  9. Anti-biofilm activity and synergism of novel thiazole compounds with glycopeptide antibiotics against multidrug-resistant staphylococci

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammad, Haroon; Mayhoub, Abdelrahman S.; Cushman, Mark; Seleem, Mohamed N.

    2015-01-01

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) infections are a leading cause of death among all fatalities caused by antibiotic-resistant bacteria. With the rise of increasing resistance to current antibiotics, new antimicrobials and treatment strategies are urgently needed. Thiazole compounds have been shown to possess potent antimicrobial activity. A lead thiazole 1 and a potent derivative 2 were synthesized and their activity in combination with glycopeptide antibiotics was determined against an array of MRSA and vancomycin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (VRSA) clinical isolates. Additionally, the anti-biofilm activity of the novel thiazoles was investigated against Staphylococcus epidermidis. Compound 2 behaved synergistically with vancomycin against MRSA and was able to re-sensitize VRSA to vancomycin, reducing its minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) by 512-fold in two strains. Additionally, both thiazole compounds were superior to vancomycin in significantly reducing S. epidermidis biofilm mass. Collectively the results obtained demonstrate compounds 1 and 2 possess potent antimicrobial activity alone or in combination with vancomycin against multidrug-resistant staphylococci and show potential for use in disrupting staphylococcal biofilm. PMID:25315757

  10. Active surveillance for asymptomatic colonisation by multidrug-resistant bacteria in patients transferred to a tertiary care hospital in the occupied Palestinian territory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taha, Adham Abu; Daoud, Ayman; Zaid, Sawsan; Sammour, Sajida; Belleh, Maram; Daifi, Refqa

    2018-02-21

    Active surveillance is important in infection control programmes, allowing the detection of patients colonised with multi-drug resistant organisms and preventing the spread of multi-drug resistant organisms. The aim of this study was to determine the rate of asymptomatic colonisation with multi-drug resistant organisms and the prevalence of each organism in patients transferred to An-Najah National University Hospital, Nablus, occupied Palestinian territory. Patients transferred from other hospitals between January and December, 2015, were screened at time of admission by taking nasal, groin, and axillary swabs. Swabs were cultured and assessed for the presence of multi-drug resistant organisms (extended spectrum β-lactamase producers, Pseudomonas aeroginosae, Acinetobacter baumannii, methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, vancomycin-resistant enterococcus, and carbapenem-resistant enterobacteriaceae. Of the 822 screened patients, 265 (32%) had infections with multi-drug resistant organisms. 394 isolates of multi-drug resistant organisms were obtained: 131 (33%) isolates were extended spectrum β-lactamase producers, 119 (30%) isolates were P aeroginosae, 26 (9%) isolates were A baumannii, 94 (24%) isolates were methicillin-resistant S aureus, 13 (3%) isolates were vancomycin-resistant enterococci, and one (<1%) isolate was carbapenem-resistant enterobacteriaceae. We identified a high prevalence of asymptomatic colonisation with multidrug-resistant bacteria in transferred patients. These findings emphasise the need for a national strategy to combat the spread of multi-drug resistant organisms in the occupied Palestinian territory. An-Najah National University. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Prevalence and characterization of multidrug-resistant zoonotic Enterobacter spp. in poultry of Bangladesh.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nandi, Shuvro Prokash; Sultana, Munawar; Hossain, M Anwar

    2013-05-01

    Poultry and poultry products are major contributors of zoonotic pathogens. Limited data are available on Enterobacter spp. as a potent zoonotic pathogen in poultry. The present study is a first endeavor on the emergence of multidrug-resistant zoonotic Enterobacter spp. and its prevalence arising from poultry in Bangladesh. Cloacal swabs from poultry samples of five different farms at Savar, Dhaka, Bangladesh were collected and from 106 isolates, 18 presumptive Enterobacter spp. were obtained. Antibiogram using 19 used antibiotics belonging to 15 major groups revealed that all of the 18 isolates were completely resistant to penicillin and rifampicin, but differed in their drug resistance pattern against ampicillin (94.4%), clindamycin (94.4%), erythromycin (94.4%), vancomycin (88.9%), sulfonamides (72.2%), imipenem (66.6%), streptomycin (55.6%), nitrofurantoin (33.3%), doxycycline (33.3%), tetracyclines (33.3%), cefepime (11.1%), and gentamicin (5.6%). All Enterobacter spp. were found to be plasmid free, implying that multidrug-resistant properties are chromosomal borne. The vanA and sulI were detected by polymerase chain reaction assay in 17 and 13 isolates, respectively. Amplified ribosomal DNA restriction analysis and randomly amplified polymorphic DNA distributed the 18 multidrug-resistant Enterobacter spp. into three genotypes. Phylogenetic analysis of the representatives of the three genotypes using partial 16S rRNA gene sequence (approximately 900 bp) showed that the genotypically diverse groups belonged to Enterobacter hormaechei, E. cloacae, and E. cancerogenus, respectively. The clinical significance of the close relative Enterobacter spp. is indicative of their zoonotic potential. Therefore, urgent intervention is required to limit the emergence and spread of these bacteria in poultry feed as well as prudent use of antibiotics among poultry farmers in Bangladesh.

  12. Detection of VIM-2-, IMP-1- and NDM-1-producing multidrug resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa in Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liew, Siew Mun; Rajasekaram, Ganeswrei; Puthucheary, Savithri D; Chua, Kek Heng

    2018-02-09

    The increasing incidence of carbapenem-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa along with the discovery of novel metallo-β-lactamases (MBLs) is of concern. In this study, the isolation of Malaysian MBL-producing P. aeruginosa clinical strains was investigated. Fifty-three P. aeruginosa clinical strains were isolated from different patients in Sultanah Aminah Hospital, Johor Bahru, Malaysia in 2015. Antimicrobial susceptibility test was conducted. Minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) of imipenem and meropenem were determined by Etest. The carbapenem-resistant strains were screened for MBL production by IMP-EDTA double disk synergy test (DDST), MBL imipenem/imipenem-inhibitor (IP/IPI) Etest and polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Genotyping was performed by multilocus sequence typing (MLST) analysis. Three (5.7%) clinical strains were identified as MBL producers. Multidrug resistance was observed in the three strains, and two were resistant to all the antimicrobials tested. Sequencing analysis confirmed the three strains to harbour carbapenemase genes: one with bla IMP-1 , one with bla VIM-2 and the other with bla NDM-1 genes. These multidrug resistant strains were identified as sequence type (ST) 235 and ST308. None of the bla IMP-1 and bla NDM-1 genes have been reported in Malaysian P. aeruginosa. The emergence of imipenemase 1 (IMP-1)- and New Delhi metallo-β-lactamase 1 (NDM-1)-producing P. aeruginosa in Malaysia maybe travel-associated. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  13. Antimicrobial potential of Pakistani medicinal plants against multi-drug resistance Staphylococcus aureus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rahat Ejaz

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To determine resistance patterns of Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus isolated from different areas of Pakistan and to identify antimicrobial agents against multi-drug resistant S. aureus strains. Methods: A total of 67 samples (sewerage, nasal and milk were collected from different farm areas of Pakistan to identify local strains of S. aureus. Sixteen out of 67 samples were positive for S. aureus. Only 6 out of 16 S. aureus strains showed resistance to antibiotics. Then the antibacterial effect of 29 medicinal plants was evaluated on these S. aureus isolates and a standard S. aureus strain ATCC 25923. The solvents used for the extraction of plants were acetone, dimethyl sulfoxide and methanol. The in vitro antibacterial activity was performed using agar disc diffusion method. Moreover, minimum inhibitory concentration of effective medicinal plant extracts was identified through micro-dilution method to find out their 50% inhibitory concentration. Results: Plant extracts of 5 medicinal plants (Psidium guajava, Nigella sativa, Piper nigrum, Valeriana jatamansi, and Cucurbita pepo exhibited antibacterial activity against locally isolated multidrug resistant strains of S. aureus. The minimum inhibitory concentration of these extracts was ranged from 0.328 to 5.000 mg/mL. Conclusions: Plant extracts of Psidium guajava, Piper nigrum seed, Valeriana jatamansi, Cucurbita pepo and Nigella sativa showed significant in vitro antibacterial activity and thus, such findings may serve as valuable contribution in the treatment of infection and may contribute to the development of potential antimicrobial agents against multi drug resistant strains of S. aureus

  14. Quercetin Suppresses CYR61-Mediated Multidrug Resistance in Human Gastric Adenocarcinoma AGS Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ho Bong Hyun

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Cysteine-rich angiogenic inducer 61 (CYR61 is an extracellular matrix-associated protein involved in survival, tumorigenesis, and drug resistance. Therefore, we examined the effects of flavones against CYR61-overexpressing human gastric adenocarcinoma AGS (AGS-cyr61 cells, which show remarkable resistance to 5-fluorouracil (5-FU, adriamycin (ADR, tamoxifen (TAM, paclitaxel (PAC, and docetaxel (DOC. Among the tested flavones, quercetin had the lowest 50% inhibitory concentration (IC50 and significantly reduced the viability of AGS-cyr61 cells compared with AGS cells. Quercetin: (1 reduced multidrug resistance-associated protein 1 and nuclear factor (NF-kappa B p65 subunit levels; (2 reversed multidrug resistance (MDR; (3 inhibited colony formation and induced caspase-dependent apoptosis; and (4 suppressed migration and down-regulated epithelial–mesenchymal transition-related proteins in AGS-cyr61. Moreover, AGS-cyr61 cells treated with quercetin concentrations close to the IC50 and simultaneously treated with 5-FU or ADR in the sub-lethal range showed strong synergism between quercetin and these two drugs. These findings indicate that CYR61 is a potential regulator of drug resistance and that quercetin may be a novel agent for improving the efficacy of anticancer drugs in AGS-cyr61 cells.

  15. Time to sputum conversion in multidrug-resistant tuberculosis patients in Armenia: retrospective cohort study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arax Hovhannesyan

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To characterize time to sputum conversion among patients with multidrug resistant tuberculosis who were enrolled into second-line tuberculosis treatment program; to identify risk factors for delayed sputum conversion. DESIGN: Retrospective cohort study designed to identify the factors associated with sputum conversion. Survival analysis was performed using Kaplan-Meier estimator to compute estimates for median time to sputum conversion and Cox proportional hazards model to compute hazard ratios (HR. RESULTS: Sputum conversion from positive to negative was observed in 134 out of 195 cases (69%. Among these who converted the median time to conversion was 3.7 months. Factors independently associated with time to sputum conversion in the proportional hazards model were: male sex (HR=0.51, 95% CI 0.32-0.81, ofloxacin-resistant tuberculosis (HR = 0.45, 95% CI 0.26-0.78 and first period of recruitment into second-line treatment (HR= 0.69, 95% CI 0.47-1.01. CONCLUSION: Time to sputum conversion in patients with multidrug-resistant tuberculosis in Armenia was 5.8 months (range 0.5-17.0 months. High level of ofloxacin resistance was the main reason for compromised response to treatment. Patients with a poor resistance profile and males should be targeted with more aggressive initial therapy.

  16. Time to sputum conversion in multidrug-resistant tuberculosis patients in Armenia: retrospective cohort study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arax Hovhannesyan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To characterize time to sputum conversion among patients with multidrug resistant tuberculosis who were enrolled into second-line tuberculosis treatment program; to identify risk factors for delayed sputum conversion. DESIGN: Retrospective cohort study designed to identify the factors associated with sputum conversion. Survival analysis was performed using Kaplan-Meier estimator to compute estimates for median time to sputum conversion and Cox proportional hazards model to compute hazard ratios (HR. RESULTS: Sputum conversion from positive to negative was observed in 134 out of 195 cases (69%. Among these who converted the median time to conversion was 3.7 months. Factors independently associated with time to sputum conversion in the proportional hazards model were: male sex (HR=0.51, 95% CI 0.32-0.81, ofloxacin-resistant tuberculosis (HR = 0.45, 95% CI 0.26-0.78 and first period of recruitment into second-line treatment (HR= 0.69, 95% CI 0.47-1.01. CONCLUSION: Time to sputum conversion in patients with multidrug-resistant tuberculosis in Armenia was 5.8 months (range 0.5- 17.0 months. High level of ofloxacin resistance was the main reason for compromised response to treatment. Patients with a poor resistance profile and males should be targeted with more aggressive initial therapy.

  17. Evaluation of Etest for Susceptibility Testing of Multidrug-Resistant Isolates of Mycobacterium tuberculosis†

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hazbón, Manzour Hernando; del Socorro Orozco, Maria; Labrada, Luz Angela; Tovar, Rafael; Weigle, Kristen A.; Wanger, Audrey

    2000-01-01

    To prescribe effective treatment schemes for patients with tuberculosis, more-efficient susceptibility testing techniques for Mycobacterium tuberculosis are needed, especially in regions with multidrug resistance. Etest (AB BIODISK, Solna, Sweden) is a simple technique that provides quantitative drug susceptibility results for M. tuberculosis in 5 to 10 days from a culture grown at low cost. The performance of Etest was compared to that of the reference proportion method, using 95 M. tuberculosis clinical isolates of which 42.1% (40 of 95) were resistant to at least one antibiotic by the reference method. Overall agreement between Etest and the reference method was 98.9% (94 of 95) for detection of multidrug resistance; for resistance to individual drugs, agreement was 97.9% (93 of 95) for rifampin, 96.0% (92 of 95) for ethambutol, 94.7% (90 of 95) for isoniazid, and 85.3% (81 of 95) for streptomycin. This study supports the utility of Etest for timely detection of drug resistance in M. tuberculosis and for use in tuberculosis control programs. PMID:11101602

  18. A multidrug resistance plasmid contains the molecular switch for type VI secretion in Acinetobacter baumannii

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, Brent S.; Ly, Pek Man; Irwin, Joshua N.; Pukatzki, Stefan; Feldman, Mario F.

    2015-01-01

    Infections with Acinetobacter baumannii, one of the most troublesome and least studied multidrug-resistant superbugs, are increasing at alarming rates. A. baumannii encodes a type VI secretion system (T6SS), an antibacterial apparatus of Gram-negative bacteria used to kill competitors. Expression of the T6SS varies among different strains of A. baumannii, for which the regulatory mechanisms are unknown. Here, we show that several multidrug-resistant strains of A. baumannii harbor a large, self-transmissible resistance plasmid that carries the negative regulators for T6SS. T6SS activity is silenced in plasmid-containing, antibiotic-resistant cells, while part of the population undergoes frequent plasmid loss and activation of the T6SS. This activation results in T6SS-mediated killing of competing bacteria but renders A. baumannii susceptible to antibiotics. Our data show that a plasmid that has evolved to harbor antibiotic resistance genes plays a role in the differentiation of cells specialized in the elimination of competing bacteria. PMID:26170289

  19. Intracellular targeted co-delivery of shMDR1 and gefitinib with chitosan nanoparticles for overcoming multidrug resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Xiwei; Yang, Guang; Shi, Yijie; Su, Chang; Liu, Ming; Feng, Bo; Zhao, Liang

    2015-01-01

    Nowadays, multidrug resistance and side effects of drugs limit the effectiveness of chemotherapies in clinics. P-glycoprotein (P-gp) (MDR1), as a member of the ATP-binding cassette family, acts on transporting drugs into cell plasma across the membrane of cancer cells and leads to the occurrence of multidrug resistance, thus resulting in the failure of chemotherapy in cancer. The main aims of this research were to design a nanodelivery system for accomplishing the effective co-delivery of gene and antitumor drug and overcoming multidrug resistance effect. In this study, shMDR1 and gefitinib-encapsulating chitosan nanoparticles with sustained release, small particle size, and high encapsulation efficiency were prepared. The serum stability, protection from nuclease, and transfection efficiency of gene in vitro were investigated. The effects of co-delivery of shMDR1 and gefitinib in nanoparticles on reversing multidrug resistance were also evaluated by investigating the cytotoxicity, cellular uptake mechanism, and cell apoptosis on established gefitinib-resistant cells. The results demonstrated that chitosan nanoparticles entrapping gefitinib and shMDR1 had the potential to overcome the multidrug resistance and improve cancer treatment efficacy, especially toward resistant cells. PMID:26648717

  20. In vitro activity of tigecycline in combination with various antimicrobials against multidrug resistant Acinetobacter baumannii

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petrosillo Nicola

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Infections sustained by multidrug-resistant (MDR and pan-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii have become a challenging problem in Intensive Care Units. Tigecycline provided new hope for the treatment of MDR A. baumannii infections, but isolates showing reduced susceptibility have emerged in many countries, further limiting the therapeutic options. Empirical combination therapy has become a common practice to treat patients infected with MDR A. baumannii, in spite of the limited microbiological and clinical evidence supporting its efficacy. Here, the in vitro interaction of tigecycline with seven commonly used anti-Acinetobacter drugs has been assessed. Methods Twenty-two MDR A. baumannii isolates from Intensive Care Unit (ICU patients and two reference strains for the European clonal lineages I and II (including 3, 15 and 6 isolates that were resistant, intermediate and susceptible to tigecycline, respectively were tested. Antimicrobial agents were: tigecycline, levofloxacin, piperacillin-tazobactam, amikacin, imipenem, rifampicin, ampicillin-sulbactam, and colistin. MICs were determined by the broth microdilution method. Antibiotic interactions were determined by chequerboard and time-kill assays. Only antibiotic combinations showing synergism or antagonism in both chequerboard and time-kill assays were accepted as authentic synergistic or antagonistic interactions, respectively. Results Considering all antimicrobials in combination with tigecycline, chequerboard analysis showed 5.9% synergy, 85.7% indifference, and 8.3% antagonism. Tigecycline showed synergism with levofloxacin (4 strains; 16.6%, amikacin (2 strains; 8.3%, imipenem (2 strains; 8.3% and colistin (2 strains; 8.3%. Antagonism was observed for the tigecycline/piperacillin-tazobactam combination (8 strains; 33.3%. Synergism was detected only among tigecycline non-susceptible strains. Time-kill assays confirmed the synergistic interaction between tigecycline and

  1. Effect of Chlorine Exposure on the Survival and Antibiotic Gene Expression of Multidrug Resistant Acinetobacter baumannii in Water

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    Deepti Prasad Karumathil

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Acinetobacter baumannii is a multidrug resistant pathogen capable of causing a wide spectrum of clinical conditions in humans. Acinetobacter spp. is ubiquitously found in different water sources. Chlorine being the most commonly used disinfectant in water, the study investigated the effect of chlorine on the survival of A. baumannii in water and transcription of genes conferring antibiotic resistance. Eight clinical isolates of A. baumannii, including a fatal meningitis isolate (ATCC 17978 (~108 CFU/mL were separately exposed to free chlorine concentrations (0.2, 1, 2, 3 and 4 ppm with a contact time of 30, 60, 90 and 120 second. The surviving pathogen counts at each specified contact time were determined using broth dilution assay. In addition, real-time quantitative PCR (RT-qPCR analysis of the antibiotic resistance genes (efflux pump genes and those encoding resistance to specific antibiotics of three selected A. baumannii strains following exposure to chlorine was performed. Results revealed that all eight A. baumannii isolates survived the tested chlorine levels during all exposure times (p > 0.05. Additionally, there was an up-regulation of all or some of the antibiotic resistance genes in A. baumannii, indicating a chlorine-associated induction of antibiotic resistance in the pathogen.

  2. High rates of multidrug resistance among uropathogenic Escherichia coli in children and analyses of ESBL producers from Nepal

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    Narayan Prasad Parajuli

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Emergence of Extended-spectrum beta-lactamase producing Escherichia coli causing urinary tract infections (UTI among pediatric patients is an increasing problem worldwide. However, very little is known about pediatric urinary tract infections and antimicrobial resistance trend from Nepal. This study was conducted to assess the current antibiotic resistance rate and ESBL production among uropathogenic Escherichia coli in pediatric patients of a tertiary care teaching hospital of Nepal. Methods A total of 5,484 urinary tract specimens from children suspected with UTI attending a teaching hospital of Nepal over a period of one year were processed for the isolation of bacterial pathogens and their antimicrobial susceptibility testing. Escherichia coli (n = 739, the predominant isolate in pediatric UTI, was further selected for the detection of ESBL-production by phenotypic combination disk diffusion test. Results Incidence of urinary tract infection among pediatric patients was found to be 19.68% and E coli (68.4% was leading pathogen involved. Out of 739 E coli isolates, 64.9% were multidrug resistant (MDR and 5% were extensively drug resistant (XDR. Extended spectrum beta lactamase (ESBL was detected in 288 (38.9% of the E coli isolates. Conclusion Alarming rate of drug resistance among pediatric uropathogens and high rate of ESBL-producing E. coli was observed. It is extremely necessary to routinely investigate the drug resistance among all isolates and formulate strict antibiotics prescription policy in our country.

  3. Genome-wide mutagenesis and multi-drug resistance in American trypanosomes induced by the front-line drug benznidazole

    KAUST Repository

    Campos, Mônica C.

    2017-10-25

    Chagas disease is caused by the protozoan parasite Trypanosoma cruzi and affects 5–8 million people in Latin America. Although the nitroheterocyclic compound benznidazole has been the front-line drug for several decades, treatment failures are common. Benznidazole is a pro-drug and is bio-activated within the parasite by the mitochondrial nitroreductase TcNTR-1, leading to the generation of reactive metabolites that have trypanocidal activity. To better assess drug action and resistance, we sequenced the genomes of T. cruzi Y strain (35.5 Mb) and three benznidazole-resistant clones derived from a single drug-selected population. This revealed the genome-wide accumulation of mutations in the resistant parasites, in addition to variations in DNA copy-number. We observed mutations in DNA repair genes, linked with increased susceptibility to DNA alkylating and inter-strand cross-linking agents. Stop-codon-generating mutations in TcNTR-1 were associated with cross-resistance to other nitroheterocyclic drugs. Unexpectedly, the clones were also highly resistant to the ergosterol biosynthesis inhibitor posaconazole, a drug proposed for use against T. cruzi infections, in combination with benznidazole. Our findings therefore identify the highly mutagenic activity of benznidazole metabolites in T. cruzi, demonstrate that this can result in multi-drug resistance, and indicate that vigilance will be required if benznidazole is used in combination therapy.

  4. Strategies for decreasing multidrug antibiotic resistance: role of ototopical agents for treatment of middle ear infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Jerome O

    2002-10-01

    Change in the susceptibility of bacterial pathogens to antimicrobial agents is constant. The efficacy of a new drug may change as it is used in clinical settings, and resistant bacterial clones result from the encounter of drug and organism. Soon after the introduction of the sulfonamides in the mid-1930s, the first effective agents of the antimicrobial era, resistance of pneumococci and group A streptococci was evident. In each of the following decades, a different problem in multidrug resistance occurred among common bacterial pathogens: beta-lactamase-producing staphylococci in the 1950s; highly resistant gram-negative enteric bacteria in the 1960s; beta-lactamase-producing Haemophilus influenzae and Moraxella catarrhalis in the 1970s; and multidrug-resistant pneumococci in the 1980s. Antimicrobial resistance among respiratory pathogens is now a common clinical problem throughout the world, and its management is a part of routine office practice. Currently in the United States, about 25% of pneumococci are resistant to penicillin, and 25% of H influenzae and 90% of M catarrhalis produce beta-lactamase and would be inactivated by organisms producing the enzyme. The emergence of penicillin and multidrug-resistant pneumococci and beta-lactamase-producing strains of H influenzae and M catarrhalis have special importance for the management of infections of the middle ear. The widespread use of oral and parenteral antimicrobial drugs for appropriate and inappropriate uses has driven the emergence and spread of resistant organisms. This article discusses current susceptibility patterns of organisms involved in middle ear infections, risk factors associated with development of resistant strains, strategies for limiting the incidence and spread of resistant organisms and, as part of the strategy, use of ototopical rather than systemic antimicrobial drugs for chronic suppurative otitis media (CSOM) and acute otitis media (AOM) in children with tympanostomy tubes. Although

  5. Thyroid function in multidrug-resistant tuberculosis patients with or ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    HIV) are known to cause abnormal thyroid function. There is little information on whether HIV infection aggravates alteration of thyroid function in patients with MDRTB. Objectives: This study was carried out to determine if HIV co-infection alters ...

  6. Multi-drug resistant Staphylococcus aureus isolated from emergency ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    implicated as a cause of long-term survival pathogens in the environment [4]. High capability of S. aureus to .... spreadsheet (Microsoft Corp, Redmond, WA,. USA) for analysis. Using SPSS 16.0 statistical .... Sambrok, J.A. Molecular Cloning: A Laboratory Manual. 3rd ed. New York; Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press;.

  7. Multidrug resistant enterohaemorrhagic Escherichia coli O157:H7 in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Pigeons are commonly seen around human dwellings and in city centres. The movement of these birds from place to place makes them a veritable vehicle for environmental dissemination of pathogens. Enterohaemorrhagic E. coli (EHEC) O157:H7 can cause severe and sometimes fatal gastroenteritis in humans. This study ...

  8. Staphylococci isolated from carriage sites and infected sites of dogs as a reservoir of multidrug resistance and methicillin resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garbacz, Katarzyna; Żarnowska, Sabina; Piechowicz, Lidia; Haras, Krystyna

    2013-02-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the spread of multidrug-resistant (MDR) and methicillin-resistant (MR) staphylococci in healthy dogs and in dogs with evident symptoms of infection. The samples from 172 healthy and 197 infected dogs were examined. The staphylococci were identified with conventional methods and by means of the polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) method (MboI). Susceptibility to 15 antibiotics from 10 different antimicrobial classes was tested. Resistance to methicillin was confirmed by the presence of Staphylococcus aureus mecA and S. sciuri mecA genes. Multidrug resistance was defined as resistance to three or more antimicrobial classes. The oral mucosa to be the most frequent site of staphylococcal colonization (55.8 %), followed by nasal cavity (44.2 %), and anus (32.6 %). The prevalence of MDR staphylococci in infected dogs was significantly higher than in the healthy animals (74/137 vs. 34/95, P = 0.006). The MR strains of S. pseudintermedius (2.9 %) originated solely from infected dogs. In contrast, the MR coagulase-negative strains (7.4 %) were isolated solely from healthy dogs. S. aureus strains originated from nasal swabs, MRSA strains were not isolated. MDR staphylococci and MR S. pseudintermedius are more common among infected dogs, but coagulase-negative staphylococci (mostly S. sciuri) seem to be a reservoir of methicillin resistance in healthy dogs.

  9. Antibiotic combination therapy can select for broad-spectrum multidrug resistance in Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vestergaard, Martin; Paulander, Wilhelm; Marvig, Rasmus L; Clasen, Julie; Jochumsen, Nicholas; Molin, Søren; Jelsbak, Lars; Ingmer, Hanne; Folkesson, Anders

    2016-01-01

    Combination therapy with several antibiotics is one strategy that has been applied in order to limit the spread of antimicrobial resistance. We compared the de novo evolution of resistance during combination therapy with the β-lactam ceftazidime and the fluoroquinolone ciprofloxacin with the resistance evolved after single-drug exposure. Combination therapy selected for mutants that displayed broad-spectrum resistance, and a major resistance mechanism was mutational inactivation of the repressor gene mexR that regulates the multidrug efflux operon mexAB-oprM. Deregulation of this operon led to a broad-spectrum resistance phenotype that decreased susceptibility to the combination of drugs applied during selection as well as to unrelated antibiotic classes. Mutants isolated after single-drug exposure displayed narrow-spectrum resistance and carried mutations in the MexCD-OprJ efflux pump regulator gene nfxB conferring ciprofloxacin resistance, or in the gene encoding the non-essential penicillin-binding protein DacB conferring ceftazidime resistance. Reconstruction of resistance mutations by allelic replacement and in vitro fitness assays revealed that in contrast to single antibiotic use, combination therapy consistently selected for mutants with enhanced fitness expressing broad-spectrum resistance mechanisms. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. and the International Society of Chemotherapy. All rights reserved.

  10. DNA sequence analysis of plasmids from multidrug resistant Salmonella enterica serotype Heidelberg isolates.

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    Jing Han

    Full Text Available Salmonella enterica serovar Heidelberg is among the most detected serovars in swine and poultry, ranks among the top five serotypes associated with human salmonellosis and is disproportionately associated with invasive infections and mortality in humans. Salmonella are known to carry plasmids associated with antimicrobial resistance and virulence. To identify plasmid-associated genes in multidrug resistant S. enterica serovar Heidelberg, antimicrobial resistance plasmids from five isolates were sequenced using the 454 LifeSciences pyrosequencing technology. Four of the isolates contained incompatibility group (Inc A/C multidrug resistance plasmids harboring at least eight antimicrobial resistance genes. Each of these strains also carried a second resistance plasmid including two IncFIB, an IncHI2 and a plasmid lacking an identified Inc group. The fifth isolate contained an IncI1 plasmid, encoding resistance to gentamicin, streptomycin and sulfonamides. Some of the IncA/C plasmids lacked the full concert of transfer genes and yet were able to be conjugally transferred, likely due to the transfer genes carried on the companion plasmids in the strains. Several non-IncA/C resistance plasmids also carried putative virulence genes. When the sequences were compared to previously sequenced plasmids, it was found that while all plasmids demonstrated some similarity to other plasmids, they were unique, often due to differences in mobile genetic elements in the plasmids. Our study suggests that Salmonella Heidelberg isolates harbor plasmids that co-select for antimicrobial resistance and virulence, along with genes that can mediate the transfer of plasmids within and among other bacterial isolates. Prevalence of such plasmids can complicate efforts to control the spread of S. enterica serovar Heidelberg in food animal and human populations.

  11. Use of Ceftolozane/Tazobactam in the Treatment of Multidrug-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa Bloodstream Infection in a Pediatric Leukemia Patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aitken, Samuel L; Kontoyiannis, Dimitrios P; DePombo, April M; Bhatti, Micah M; Tverdek, Frank P; Gettys, Suzanne C; Nicolau, David P; Nunez, Cesar A

    2016-09-01

    Multidrug-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa is of increasing concern in pediatric patients. Ceftolozane/tazobactam is a novel cephalosporin/β-lactamase inhibitor combination with activity against multidrug-resistant Pseudomonas; however, no data exist on its use in children. This report summarizes the treatment of a multidrug-resistant P. aeruginosa bloodstream infection in a pediatric leukemia patient with ceftolozane/tazobactam and provides the first description of its pharmacokinetics in pediatrics.

  12. Kitchen phytochemicals from Allium cepa - their role in multidrug resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaur, Gunpreet; Gupta, Vikas; Christopher, Ajay Francis; Bansal, Renu; Bansal, Parveen

    2017-05-01

    Bacterial resistance to antibiotics is increasingly becoming a concern to public health. Current antibiotics have failed to bring desirable results to many bacterial infections due to multi-resistant strains. So, concerted efforts are being made to curve this with the help of dietary phytohemicals. A number of dietary phytochemical are being put to trials for antimicrobial activity; however it is worthwhile to search such a part of diet that is very frequently used by major population. Keeping this view in mind an effort has been made to evaluate the antimicrobial activity of most common vegetable component Allium cepa. Methanolic and aqueous extracts were prepared from Allium cepa and antibacterial activity was tested on four pathogenic bacteria (Gram-positive and Gram negative) Staphylococcus aureus, Bacillus Subtilis, Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa using Disc diffusion method and Minimum inhibitory concentration by the Microtitre well plate method. Conventional antibiotic discs of Tetracycline and Gentamycin were used as positive control. Among the two extracts, methanolic extract exhibited a significant antimicrobial activity on the test organisms Ps. aeruginosa (17.5mm) and B. subtilis (11.3mm). The minimum inhibitory concentration value for Ps. aeruginosa was 500μl and for B. subtilis was 250μl for methanolic extract. The growth of other two bacteria i.e. E. coli and S. aureus were not inhibited by methanolic as well as aqueous extract that indicates non susceptibility to aqueous and methanol extract of Allium cepa. From the study, it was concluded that the commonly used Allium cepa possess potent antibacterial property against Bacillus Subtilis and Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

  13. The Putative Response Regulator BaeR Stimulates Multidrug Resistance of Escherichia coli via a Novel Multidrug Exporter System, MdtABC

    OpenAIRE

    Nagakubo, Satoshi; Nishino, Kunihiko; Hirata, Takahiro; Yamaguchi, Akihito

    2002-01-01

    Overproduction of the response regulator BaeR confers resistance to novobiocin and bile salts in a ΔacrAB mutant by stimulating drug exporter gene expression. The mdtABC (multidrug transporter ABC, formerly known as yegMNO) genes, which encode a resistance-nodulation-cell division (RND) drug efflux system, are responsible for resistance. The MdtABC system comprises the transmembrane MdtB/MdtC heteromultimer and MdtA membrane fusion protein. MdtAC also confers bile salt, but not novobiocin, re...

  14. Effect of oxygen on multidrug resistance in the first trimester human placenta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lye, P; Bloise, E; Dunk, C; Javam, M; Gibb, W; Lye, S J; Matthews, S G

    2013-09-01

    The multidrug resistance proteins, P-glycoprotein (P-gp, encoded by the ABCB1 gene) and breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP, encoded by ABCG2) are highly expressed in the first trimester placenta. These transporters protect the fetus from exposure to maternally derived toxins and xenobiotics. Since oxygen is a regulator of multidrug resistance in various tissues, we hypothesized that changes in oxygen tension alter placental ABCB1/P-gp and ABCG2/BCRP expression in the first trimester. Placental specimens were collected from first (n = 7), second (n = 5) and term pregnancies (n = 5). First trimester placental villous explants were incubated (24 or 48 h) in different oxygen tension (3-20%). ABCB1, ABCG2 and VEGFA mRNA expression levels were assessed by RT-PCR and protein was localized by IHC. ABCB1 is expressed most highly in the first trimester placenta (p < 0.05), whereas ABCG2 expression does not change significantly over pregnancy. P-gp and BCRP staining is present in the syncytiotrophoblast and in cytotrophoblasts. ABCG2 mRNA is increased in hyperoxic (20%) conditions after 48 h (p < 0.05). In contrast, hypoxia (3%) did not change ABCB1 mRNA expression but significantly increased VEGFA mRNA (p < 0.05). Hypoxia resulted in increased BCRP staining in cytotrophoblasts and in the microvillous membrane of the syncytium. Whereas, hypoxia resulted in increased P-gp staining in proliferating cytotrophoblasts. We conclude that placental multidrug resistance expression, specifically ABCG2, is regulated by oxygen tension in the first trimester. It is possible that changes in placental oxygen supply are capable of altering fetal drug exposure especially during early pregnancy. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Survival and Evolution of a Large Multidrug Resistance Plasmid in New Clinical Bacterial Hosts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porse, Andreas; Schønning, Kristian; Munck, Christian; Sommer, Morten O A

    2016-11-01

    Large conjugative plasmids are important drivers of bacterial evolution and contribute significantly to the dissemination of antibiotic resistance. Although plasmid borne multidrug resistance is recognized as one of the main challenges in modern medicine, the adaptive forces shaping the evolution of these plasmids within pathogenic hosts are poorly understood. Here we study plasmid-host adaptations following transfer of a 73 kb conjugative multidrug resistance plasmid to naïve clinical isolates of Klebsiella pneumoniae and Escherichia coli. We use experimental evolution, mathematical modelling and population sequencing to show that the long-term persistence and molecular integrity of the plasmid is highly influenced by multiple factors within a 25 kb plasmid region constituting a host-dependent burden. In the E. coli hosts investigated here, improved plasmid stability readily evolves via IS26 mediated deletions of costly regions from the plasmid backbone, effectively expanding the host-range of the plasmid. Although these adaptations were also beneficial to plasmid persistence in a naïve K. pneumoniae host, they were never observed in this species, indicating that differential evolvability can limit opportunities of plasmid adaptation. While insertion sequences are well known to supply plasmids with adaptive traits, our findings suggest that they also play an important role in plasmid evolution by maintaining the plasticity necessary to alleviate plasmid-host constrains. Further, the observed evolutionary strategy consistently followed by all evolved E. coli lineages exposes a trade-off between horizontal and vertical transmission that may ultimately limit the dissemination potential of clinical multidrug resistance plasmids in these hosts. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Molecular Biology and Evolution.

  16. Isolation and characterization of multidrug-resistant Leclercia species from animal clinical case.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choudhary, M; Choudhary, B K; Bhoyar, S; Kale, S B; Chaudhari, S P; Bera, B C; Jain, A; Barbuddhe, S B

    2018-01-01

    Leclercia adecarboxylata, a Gram-negative bacillus of family Enterobacteriaceae, is an uncommonly identified pathogen isolated from environmental and clinical specimens. Most of the human infections are polymicrobial and commonly occur in immunocompromised hosts, although nosocomial infections in immunocompetent hosts have been documented. Here, we describe the case of isolation of Leclercia species as polymicrobial infection from bovine suffering from respiratory distress in Chhattisgarh state of India. The isolates were identified by their phenotypes, 16S rDNA sequencing and MALDI-TOF-MS. The isolate was found to be resistant to aminoglycosides and fluoroquinolone antibiotics and intermediate resistant to cephalosporins and evidenced for uncertain clinical relevance and could act as hidden source of public health hazard. Leclercia adecarboxylata is a rarely reported human pathogen. We report here the case from bovine suffering from respiratory distress; the sample yielded Leclercia species as polymicrobial culture. The isolate was found to be multidrug resistant and evidenced for uncertain clinical relevance and could act as hidden source of public health hazard. The limited literature available on this organism is reviewed, and the potential implications of findings are discussed. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of isolation and characterization of multidrug-resistant Leclercia species from animal clinical case from India. © 2017 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  17. Isolation and partial characterization of soils actinomycetes with antimicrobial activity against multidrug-resistant bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Romina Belén Parada

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Two hundred and thirty four actinobacteria strains were isolated from Argentinian and Peruvian soil in order to evaluate the antimicrobial activity against multidrug resistant bacteria On the basis of their antagonist activity against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA and two vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus (EVR-Van A and  EVR Van B,13 strains were selected. The presence of NRPS, PKS-I and PKS-II genes were also investigated by PCR techniques. Among the 13 selected actinobacteria, strain AC69C displayed the higher activity in diffusion tests in solid medium and was further evaluated for the production of antagonist metabolites in liquid media. The best results were obtained using fermentation broth with carbohydrates, when starch and glucose were used in combination. Antimicrobial activities of 640 arbitrary units (AU, 320 AU, 320 AU and 80 AU were obtained against EVR-Van A, EVR-Van B, Listeria monocytogenes ATCC7644 and MRSA, respectively. PCR amplification of 16S rRNA gene and subsequent phylogenetic analysis of AC69C strain displayed a 100 % homology with Streptomyces antibioticus NRRL B-1701. It was not possible to establish a correlation between the amplified genes and antimicrobial activity of the 13 selected strains. The results of this work show the wide distribution of actinobacteria in soil and the importance of the isolation of strain to screen novel active metabolites against multidrug resistant bacteria of clinical origin.

  18. Complete Genome Sequences of Plasmid-Bearing Multidrug-Resistant Campylobacter jejuni and Campylobacter coli Strains with Type VI Secretion Systems, Isolated from Retail Turkey and Pork

    OpenAIRE

    Marasini, Daya; Fakhr, Mohamed K.

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT We report the complete genome sequences of multidrug-resistant Campylobacter jejuni and Campylobacter coli isolated from retail turkey and pork, respectively. The chromosomes of these two isolates contained type VI secretion system genes. The two isolates also harbored large plasmids with antimicrobial resistance genes possibly contributing to their multidrug resistance.

  19. Control of multidrug resistant bacteria in a tertiary care hospital in India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaggi Namita

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The objective of this study was to assess the impact of antimicrobial stewardship programs on the multidrug resistance patterns of bacterial isolates. The study comprised an initial retrospective analysis of multidrug resistance in bacterial isolates for one year (July 2007-June 2008 followed by prospective evaluation of the impact of Antimicrobial Stewardship programs on resistance for two years and nine months (July 2008-March 2011. Setting A 300-bed tertiary care private hospital in Gurgaon, Haryana (India Findings Methods Study Design • July 2007 to June 2008: Resistance patterns of bacterial isolates were studied. • July 2008: Phase I intervention programme Implementation of an antibiotic policy in the hospital. • July 2008 to June 2010: Assessment of the impact of the Phase I intervention programme. • July 2010 to March 2011: Phase II intervention programme: Formation and effective functioning of the antimicrobial stewardship committee. Statistical correlation of the Defined daily dose (DDD for prescribed drugs with the antimicrobial resistance of Gram negatives. Results Phase I intervention programme (July 2008 resulted in a decrease of 4.47% in ESBLs (E.coli and Klebsiella and a significant decrease of 40.8% in carbapenem-resistant Pseudomonas. Phase II intervention (July 2010 brought a significant reduction (24.7% in carbapenem-resistant Pseudomonas. However, the resistance in the other Gram negatives (E.coli, Klebsiella, and Acinetobacter rose and then stabilized. A positive correlation was observed in Pseudomonas and Acinetobacter with carbapenems and cefoperazone-sulbactam. Piperacillin-tazobactam showed a positive correlation with Acinetobacter only. E.coli and Klebsiella showed positive correlation with cefoparazone-sulbactam and piperacillin-tazobactam. Conclusion An antimicrobial stewardship programme with sustained and multifaceted efforts is essential to promote the judicious use of antibiotics.

  20. Autophagy facilitates multidrug resistance development through inhibition of apoptosis in breast cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, W L; Lan, D; Gan, T Q; Cai, Z W

    2015-01-01

    Acquired multidrug resistance (MDR) is the main mechanism of chemotherapeutic drugs resistance. Nevertheless, the mechanisms of MDR are complex and still not very clear. Recently, including our previous study, several studies have revealed that macroautophagy (here referred to as autophagy) induced by anti-cancer drugs in breast cancer cells may facilitate the development of resistance to epirubicin (EPI), paclitaxel (PTX), tamoxifen or herceptin. Whereas there are a few studies on the relationship between autophagy and MDR, especially the studies designed directly employing induced resistant breast cancer cells. Based on previous study, we explored the relationship between autophagy and MDR. The results showed that induced EPI-resistant MCF-7er and SK-BR-3er cells were simultaneously resistant to PTX and vinorelbine (NVB), which demonstrated that the cells obtained MDR phenotype. Furthermore, PTX and NVB could also induce autophagy in MCF-7er and SK-BR-3er cells, and the induced autophagy protected the cells from apoptosis, which facilitated the development of resistance to PTX and NVB. Thus, autophagy promoted the development of MDR in breast cancer cells through inhibition of apoptosis. In addition, we found that P-glycoprotein (Pgp) was overexpressed in MCF-7er and SK-Br-3er cells. And we preliminarily investigated the relationship between autophagy and P-glycoprotein (Pgp). The results showed that the expression of the protein did not obviously change despite the inhibition of autophagy. Therefore, the role of Pgp in the development of MDR might be independent of autophahy. Also this finding implies that autophagy might be a target to overcome MDR in breast cancer cells, and clinical use autophagy inhibitors might be one of the important strategies for overcoming MDR in breast cancer therapy. Autophagy, apoptosis, multidrug resistance, breast cancer, chemotherapy.

  1. Effect of oxygen on multidrug resistance in term human placenta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Javam, M; Audette, M C; Iqbal, M; Bloise, E; Gibb, W; Matthews, S G

    2014-05-01

    The placenta contains efflux transporters, including P-glycoprotein (P-gp) and breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP), that limit the passage of xenobiotics, certain hormones and nutrients from the maternal to the fetal circulation. The expression of these transporters changes with gestational age, yet the mechanisms involved remain unknown. However, the changes in P-gp and BCRP transporter expression coincide with those of oxygen tension in the placenta, and oxygen tension has been shown to modulate P-gp and BCRP expression in other tissues. The objective of this study was to investigate the effects of oxygen tension on P-gp and BCRP expression in the term human placenta. Following equilibration in culture (96 h), term placental explants (n = 7) were cultured in 3% or 20% oxygen for 24 and 48 h. Culture medium was collected every 24 h to measure lactate dehydrogenase (LDH; explant viability) and human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG; syncytiotrophoblast function). P-gp (encoded by ABCB1) and BCRP (encoded by ABCG2) protein and mRNA, as well as VEGFA mRNA were measured using western blot and qRT-PCR. P-gp localization was determined using immunofluorescence. Oxygen tension had a significant effect on P-gp expression, with ABCB1/P-gp mRNA and protein levels increased in the hypoxic condition (3% O2) after 48 h (p placenta in the third trimester may alter levels of placental P-gp, and in doing so alter fetal exposure to P-gp substrates, including xenobiotics and certain hormones. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Cytotoxicity of South-African medicinal plants towards sensitive and multidrug-resistant cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saeed, Mohamed E M; Meyer, Marion; Hussein, Ahmed; Efferth, Thomas

    2016-06-20

    Traditional medicine plays a major role for primary health care worldwide. Cancer belongs to the leading disease burden in industrialized and developing countries. Successful cancer therapy is hampered by the development of resistance towards established anticancer drugs. In the present study, we investigated the cytotoxicity of 29 extracts from 26 medicinal plants of South-Africa against leukemia cell lines, most of which are used traditionally to treat cancer and related symptoms. We have investigated the plant extracts for their cytotoxic activity towards drug-sensitive parental CCRF-CEM leukemia cells and their multidrug-resistant P-glycoprotein-overexpressing subline, CEM/ADR5000 by means of the resazurin assay. A panel of 60 NCI tumor cell lines have been investigated for correlations between selected phytochemicals from medicinal plants and the expression of resistance-conferring genes (ABC-transporters, oncogenes, tumor suppressor genes). Seven extracts inhibited both cell lines (Acokanthera oppositifolia, Hypoestes aristata, Laurus nobilis, Leonotis leonurus, Plectranthus barbatus, Plectranthus ciliates, Salvia apiana). CEM/ADR5000 cells exhibited a low degree of cross-resistance (3.35-fold) towards the L. leonurus extract, while no cross-resistance was observed to other plant extracts, although CEM/ADR5000 cells were highly resistant to clinically established drugs. The log10IC50 values for two out of 14 selected phytochemicals from these plants (acovenoside A and ouabain) of 60 tumor cell lines were correlated to the expression of ABC-transporters (ABCB1, ABCB5, ABCC1, ABCG2), oncogenes (EGFR, RAS) and tumor suppressors (TP53). Sensitivity or resistance of the cell lines were not statistically associated with the expression of these genes, indicating that multidrug-resistant, refractory tumors expressing these genes may still respond to acovenoside A and ouabain. The bioactivity of South African medicinal plants may represent a basis for the development

  3. Efflux pump contribution to multidrug resistance in clinical isolates of Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiser, Tyree H; Obritsch, Marilee D; Jung, Rose; MacLaren, Robert; Fish, Douglas N

    2010-07-01

    To determine if increased expression of efflux pumps, mutations in the genes encoding regulatory proteins for efflux pumps, or the combination is associated with multidrug-resistant (MDR) Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates. Microbiologic evaluation of prospectively collected Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates. University teaching hospital. ISOLATES: One hundred eight unique P. aeruginosa isolates-50 non-MDR and 58 MDR isolates-obtained from pulmonary or blood sources from patients admitted to the intensive care unit between January 1, 1999, and December 31, 2004. Isolates were considered MDR if they were resistant to at least three of the following four drugs: ciprofloxacin, tobramycin, ceftazidime, or imipenem. Possible mutations in efflux regulatory genes mexR, nfxB, and mexZ were analyzed by using polymerase chain reaction amplification and DNA sequencing. Determination of the expression of outer membrane proteins OprM and OprJ was performed by using sodium dodecyl sulfate- polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis immunoblotting. Differences in regulatory gene mutations and outer membrane protein expression were compared between non-MDR and MDR isolates. Among the 108 P. aeruginosa isolates, the MDR isolates were more likely to overexpress OprM compared with non-MDR isolates (64% vs 2%, pMutations in mexR and mexZ were present in 64% and 26% of MDR strains, respectively, but were not associated with OprM overexpression or multidrug resistance. Expression of OprJ was not associated with MDR isolates (odds ratio [OR] 3.7, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.7-18.5, p=0.11). Mutations in nfxB (12% of MDR strains) were also not associated with multidrug resistance (OR 3.5, 95% CI 0.7-17.8, p=0.13). Eight (100%) of 8 isolates with OprJ expression plus OprM overexpression, 12 (92%) of 13 isolates with combined mexR and mexZ mutations, 5 (100%) of 5 isolates with nfxB plus mexZ mutations, and 16 (100%) of 16 isolates with OprM overexpression plus mexZ mutations were MDR isolates. The

  4. Photochemical internalisation of chemotherapy potentiates killing of multidrug-resistant breast and bladder cancer cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adigbli, D K; Wilson, D G G; Farooqui, N; Sousi, E; Risley, P; Taylor, I; MacRobert, A J; Loizidou, M

    2007-01-01

    Multidrug resistance (MDR) is the major confounding factor in adjuvant solid tumour chemotherapy. Increasing intracellular amounts of chemotherapeutics to circumvent MDR may be achieved by a novel delivery method, photochemical internalisation (PCI). PCI consists of the co-administration of drug and photosensitiser; upon light activation the latter induces intracellular release of organelle-bound drug. We investigated whether co-administration of hypericin (photosensitiser) with mitoxantrone (MTZ, chemotherapeutic) plus illumination potentiates cytotoxicity in MDR cancer cells. We mapped the extent of intracellular co-localisation of drug/photosensitiser. We determined whether PCI altered drug-excreting efflux pump P-glycoprotein (Pgp) expression or function in MDR cells. Bladder and breast cancer cells and their Pgp-overexpressing MDR subclones (MGHU1, MGHU1/R, MCF-7, MCF-7/R) were given hypericin/MTZ combinations, with/without blue-light illumination. Pilot experiments determined appropriate sublethal doses for each. Viability was determined by the 3-[4,5-dimethylthiazolyl]-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide assay. Intracellular localisation was mapped by confocal microscopy. Pgp expression was detected by immunofluorescence and Pgp function investigated by Rhodamine123 efflux on confocal microscopy. MTZ alone (0.1–0.2 μg ml−1) killed up to 89% of drug-sensitive cells; MDR cells exhibited less cytotoxicity (6–28%). Hypericin (0.1–0.2 μM) effects were similar for all cells; light illumination caused none or minimal toxicity. In combination, MTZ /hypericin plus illumination, potentiated MDR cell killing, vs hypericin or MTZ alone. (MGHU1/R: 38.65 and 36.63% increase, P<0.05; MCF-7/R: 80.2 and 46.1% increase, P<0.001). Illumination of combined MTZ/hypericin increased killing by 28.15% (P<0.05 MGHU1/R) compared to dark controls. Intracytoplasmic vesicular co-localisation of MTZ/hypericin was evident before illumination and at serial times post

  5. Combination Effect of Antituberculosis Drugs and Ethanolic Extract of Selected Medicinal Plants against Multi-Drug Resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis Isolates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fauziyah, Prabasiwi Nur; Sukandar, Elin Yulinah; Ayuningtyas, Dhyan Kusuma

    2017-01-01

    Adverse drug reaction and resistance to antituberculosis drugs remain the causes of tuberculosis therapeutic failure. This research aimed to find the combination effect of standard antituberculosis drugs with Hibiscus sabdariffa L., Kaempferia galanga L., and Piper crocatum N.E. Br against multi-drug resistant (MDR) Mycobacterium tuberculosis isolates. Two MDR strains (i.e., isoniazid/ethambutol resistant and rifampicin/streptomycin resistant) of M. tuberculosis were inoculated in Löwenstein–Jensen medium containing a combination of standard antituberculosis drugs and ethanolic extracts of H. sabdariffa calyces, K. galanga rhizomes, and P. crocatum leaves using various concentration combinations of drug and extract. The colony numbers were observed for 8 weeks. The effect of the combination was analyzed using the proportion method which was calculated by the mean percentage of inhibition reduction in a number of colonies on drug–extract containing medium compared to extract-free control medium. The results showed that all three plant extracts achieved good combination effects with rifampicin against the rifampicin/streptomycin resistant strain. Antagonistic effects were, however, observed with streptomycin, ethambutol and isoniazid, therefore calling for caution when using these plants in combination with antituberculosis treatment. PMID:28335544

  6. The UDP-glucose ceramide glycosyltransferase (UGCG) and the link to multidrug resistance protein 1 (MDR1).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wegner, Marthe-Susanna; Gruber, Lisa; Mattjus, Peter; Geisslinger, Gerd; Grösch, Sabine

    2018-02-06

    The UDP-glucose ceramide glycosyltransferase (UGCG) is a key enzyme in the sphingolipid metabolism by generating glucosylceramide (GlcCer), the precursor for all glycosphingolipids (GSL), which are essential for proper cell function. Interestingly, the UGCG is also overexpressed in several cancer types and correlates with multidrug resistance protein 1 (MDR1) gene expression. This membrane protein is responsible for efflux of toxic substances and protects cancer cells from cell damage through chemotherapeutic agents. Studies showed a connection between UGCG and MDR1 overexpression and multidrug resistance development, but the precise underlying mechanisms are unknown. Here, we give an overview about the UGCG and its connection to MDR1 in multidrug resistant cells. Furthermore, we focus on UGCG transcriptional regulation, the impact of UGCG on cellular signaling pathways and the effect of UGCG and MDR1 on the lipid composition of membranes and how this could influence multidrug resistance development. To our knowledge, this is the first review presenting an overview about UGCG with focus on the relationship to MDR1 in the process of multidrug resistance development.

  7. Activity of solvent extracts of Prosopis spicigera, Zingiber officinale and Trachyspermum ammi against multidrug resistant bacterial and fungal strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Rosina; Zakir, Mohammad; Afaq, Sadul H; Latif, Abdul; Khan, Asad U

    2010-06-03

    The emerging trends of multidrug resistance among several groups of microorganisms against different classes of antibiotics led different researchers to develop efficient drugs from plant sources to counter multidrug resistant strains. This study investigated different solvent extracts of Prosopis spicigera (P. Spicigera), Zingiber officinale, and Trachyspermum ammi (T. ammi) to determine their efficacy against multidrug resistant microbes. Successive extractions of these plants were performed using a Soxhlet apparatus, using solvents with increasing polarities. Preliminary phytochemical analysis was also performed. Minimum inhibitory concentration was determined by a two-fold serial dilution method followed by determination of minimum bactericidal/fungicidal concentration. Multidrug resistant (MDR) strains of Candida albicans, Candida krusei, Candida tropicalis, Candida glabrata, Escherichia coli and reference strains of Streptococcus mutans and Streptococcus bovis were used in the study. The ethanolic fraction of P. spicigera (least minimum inhibitory concentration [MIC] - 4.88 microg/ml) demonstrated a remarkable inhibition of the microorganisms while fractions obtained from those of Zingiber officinale (least MIC-78.125 microg/ml) exhibited little activity. The petroleum ether fraction of T. ammi (least MIC- 625 microg/ml) showed best activity when compared to its other fractions. Qualitative analysis of the phytoconstituents was also performed. The potency shown by these extracts recommends their use against multidrug resistant microorganisms. This study also showed that P. spicigera could be a potential source of new antimicrobial agents.

  8. Perspectives on multidrug-resistant organisms at the end of life : A focus group study of staff members and institutional stakeholders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herbst, Franziska A; Heckel, Maria; Tiedtke, Johanna M; Adelhardt, Thomas; Sturm, Alexander; Stiel, Stephanie; Ostgathe, Christoph

    2018-03-16

    perceived similar barriers to practice caused by multidrug-resistant organisms and similar needs for continuing education. The staff members' preferred management approach might originate from an uncertainty about the multidrug-resistant organism infection risk. Experiences and visions of both groups should be included in a specific recommendation for end-of-life care to ensure behavioral confidence.

  9. Overlapping phenotypes of multidrug resistance among panels of human cancer-cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izquierdo, M A; Shoemaker, R H; Flens, M J; Scheffer, G L; Wu, L; Prather, T R; Scheper, R J

    1996-01-17

    In addition to P-glycoprotein (Pgp), 2 proteins related to multidrug resistance (MDR) have recently been described. The Multidrug-Resistance-associated protein (MRP) is one of the ATP-binding-cassette (ABC) transporters. The Lung-Resistance Protein (LRP) is the major component of human vaults, which are newly described cellular organelles and thought to mediate intracellular transport processes. Using immunocytochemical methods, we have examined the expression of MRP and LRP among panels of human cancer-cell lines not selected for drug resistance which have been previously characterized for expression of Pgp, and in vitro response to a variety of anti-cancer drugs. Expression of MRP and LRP was observed in 47/55 (87%) and 46/59 (78%) cell lines, respectively. Statistically significant correlations were observed between expression of each of these 3 proteins and in vitro sensitivity to at least one drug classically associated with MDR. LRP showed the greatest individual predictive value, which also applied to several non-classical MDR drugs. Co-expression of 2-3 MDR-related proteins was observed in 64% of the lines and was, in general, associated with high relative levels of drug resistance. Previously identified "classic" MDR lines as well as "pan-resistant" lines concurrently expressed all 3 MDR-related proteins. Some highly drug-resistant cell lines without detectable MDRI/Pgp were found to express relatively high levels of MRP and LRP. The high prevalence of MRP and LRP expression observed in this large set of cell lines, which have not been subjected to laboratory drug selection, suggests that MDR mechanisms associated with these proteins may be widespread in human malignancies. Moreover, the overlapping of these more recently recognized MDR phenotypes with Pgp-type MDR results in a complex phenotype, the understanding of which may be of importance in the development of new drugs and design of clinical treatment protocols, particularly those seeking to employ

  10. Epidemiology and molecular characterization of multidrug-resistant Gram-negative bacteria in Southeast Asia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nuntra Suwantarat

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Multidrug-resistant Gram-negative bacteria (MDRGN, including extended-spectrum β-lactamases (ESBLs and multidrug-resistant glucose-nonfermenting Gram-negative bacilli (nonfermenters, have emerged and spread throughout Southeast Asia. Methods We reviewed and summarized current critical knowledge on the epidemiology and molecular characterization of MDRGN in Southeast Asia by PubMed searches for publications prior to 10 March 2016 with the term related to “MDRGN definition” combined with specific Southeast Asian country names (Thailand, Singapore, Malaysia, Vietnam, Indonesia, Philippines, Laos, Cambodia, Myanmar, Brunei. Results There were a total of 175 publications from the following countries: Thailand (77, Singapore (35, Malaysia (32, Vietnam (23, Indonesia (6, Philippines (1, Laos (1, and Brunei (1. We did not find any publications on MDRGN from Myanmar and Cambodia. We did not include publications related to Shigella spp., Salmonella spp., and Vibrio spp. and non-human related studies in our review. English language articles and abstracts were included for analysis. After the abstracts were reviewed, data on MDRGN in Southeast Asia from 54 publications were further reviewed and included in this study. Conclusions MDRGNs are a major contributor of antimicrobial-resistant bacteria in Southeast Asia. The high prevalence of ESBLs has been a major problem since 2005 and is possibly related to the development of carbapenem resistant organisms in this region due to the overuse of carbapenem therapy. Carbapenem–resistant Acinetobacter baumannii is the most common pathogen associated with nosocomial infections in this region followed by carbapenem-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Although Southeast Asia is not an endemic area for carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae (CRE, recently, the rate of CRE detection has been increasing. Limited infection control measures, lack of antimicrobial control, such as the presence of

  11. Photodynamic responsiveness of human leukemia Jurkat/A4 cells with multidrug resistant phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Philchenkov, A A; Shishko, E D; Zavelevich, M P; Kuiava, L M; Miura, K; Blokhin, D Y; Shton, I O; Gamaleia, N F

    2014-12-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is considered as a possible alternative approach to overcoming multidrug resistance (MDR). Analysis of cross-resistance to PDT in cells with different MDR pathways and resistance levels seems to be advantageous for elucidating the general mechanisms of cancer cell resistance to various treatment modalities. The aim of the study was to clarify whether the Jurkat/A4 leukemia cells with MDR phenotype are cross-resistant to PDT. Human T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia line Jurkat and Jurkat/A4 subline with MDR phenotype were used. 5-Aminolevulinic acid (ALA) and Photolon (a complex of chlorine-e6 and polyvinylpyrrolidone; PL) or gold nanocomposite of PL were applied as photosensitizers. The cells were pretreated with photosensitizers and exposed to laser radiation at corresponding wavelengths. The phototoxicity was assessed in trypan blue exclusion test. The hypodiploid cell fraction was analyzed by flow cytometry of propidium iodide-stained cells. Expression of genes related to PDT resistance was analyzed by microarray technique with Affymetrix U133A chips. ALA-mediated PDT resulted in dose-dependent cell death in both lines, the relative photodynamic efficacy in Jurkat/A4 cells being inferior to that in the parental Jurkat cells. There was no correlation between phototoxicity and apoptosis induction both in Jurkat and Jurkat/A4 cells. PL-mediated general phototoxicity in Jurkat cells amounted up to 75% at the maximal photosensitizer dose with about 40% of apoptotic death fraction. PL-phototoxicity in Jurkat/A4 cells was considerably lower. In contrast to Jurkat cells, PL-gold composite did not increase the efficacy of photosensitization as compared to free PL in Jurkat/A4 cells. Multidrug-resistant Jurkat/A4 cells exhibit reduced sensitivity to phototoxic effect in comparison with parental Jurkat cells independently of nature of the photosensitizer being assayed.

  12. Prevalence and multidrug resistance pattern of Salmonella isolated from resident wild birds of Bangladesh

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdullah Al Faruq

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Aim: Salmonellosis is one of the most common zoonotic diseases, and the presence of antimicrobial resistant Salmonella in wild birds is global public health threat. Throughout the last decades, multidrug resistance of Salmonella spp. has increased, particularly in developing countries. Therefore, a cross-sectional study was conducted to investigate the prevalence of Salmonella spp. and antimicrobial resistance pattern against Salmonella spp. from two species of resident wild birds namely house crow (Corvus splendens and Asian pied starling (Gracupica contra. Materials and Methods: Samples were collected from cloacal swabs of house crows and Asian pied starling for isolating Salmonella spp. (bacteriological culture methods followed by antimicrobial susceptibility testing (disk diffusion method against Salmonella spp. isolates during March to December 2014. Results: The prevalence of Salmonella in Asian pied starling and house crows were 67% and 65%, respectively. Within the category of samples from different species, the variation in prevalence was not varied significantly (p>0.05. Isolated Salmonella spp. was tested for resistance to six different antimicrobial agents. Among six antimicrobial tested, 100% resistance were found to penicillin, oxacillin, and clindamycin followed by erythromycin (50-93%, kanamycin (7-20%, and cephalothin (30-67% from both species of birds. Kanamycin remained sensitive in (70-73%, cephalothin (26-70%, and erythromycin appeared to be (0-30% sensitive against Salmonella spp. isolates. Isolated Salmonella spp. was multidrug resistant up to three of the six antimicrobials tested. Conclusion: It can be said that the rational use of antimicrobials needs to be adopted in the treatment of disease for livestock, poultry, and human of Bangladesh to limit the emergence of drug resistance to Salmonella spp.

  13. Amikacin Concentrations Predictive of Ototoxicity in Multidrug-Resistant Tuberculosis Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Modongo, Chawangwa; Pasipanodya, Jotam G; Zetola, Nicola M; Williams, Scott M; Sirugo, Giorgio; Gumbo, Tawanda

    2015-10-01

    Aminoglycosides, such as amikacin, are used to treat multidrug-resistant tuberculosis. However, ototoxicity is a common problem and is monitored using peak and trough amikacin concentrations based on World Health Organization recommendations. Our objective was to identify clinical factors predictive of ototoxicity using an agnostic machine learning method. We used classification and regression tree (CART) analyses to identify clinical factors, including amikacin concentration thresholds that predicted audiometry-confirmed ototoxicity among 28 multidrug-resistant pulmonary tuberculosis patients in Botswana. Amikacin concentrations were measured for all patients. The quantitative relationship between predictive factors and the probability of ototoxicity were then identified using probit analyses. The primary predictors of ototoxicity on CART analyses were cumulative days of therapy, followed by cumulative area under the concentration-time curve (AUC), which improved on the primary predictor by 87%. The area under the receiver operating curve was 0.97 on the test set. Peak and trough were not predictors in any tree. When algorithms were forced to pick peak and trough as primary predictors, the area under the receiver operating curve fell to 0.46. Probit analysis revealed that the probability of ototoxicity increased sharply starting after 6 months of therapy to near maximum at 9 months. A 10% probability of ototoxicity occurred with a threshold cumulative AUC of 87,232 days · mg · h/liter, while that of 20% occurred at 120,000 days · mg · h/liter. Thus, cumulative amikacin AUC and duration of therapy, and not peak and trough concentrations, should be used as the primary decision-making parameters to minimize the likelihood of ototoxicity in multidrug-resistant tuberculosis. Copyright © 2015, Modongo et al.

  14. Curative effect of transbronchoscopic perfusion combined with conventional chemotherapy on multi-drug resistant tuberculosis

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    Yang Li

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To analyze the curative effect of transbronchoscopic perfusion combined with conventional chemotherapy on multi-drug resistant tuberculosis. Methods: A total of 70 patients with multi-drug resistant tuberculosis treated in our hospital between April 2012 and April 2015 were selected and randomly divided into two groups, control group received conventional chemotherapy and observation group received transbronchoscopic perfusion + conventional chemotherapy. After treatment, negative conversion ratio of sputum mycobacterium tuberculosis, immune function, disease-specific indexes, oxidative stress indexes and liver function indexes were compared between two groups of patients. Results: After 6 months and 12 months of treatment, negative conversion ratio of sputum mycobacterium tuberculosis of observation group were significantly higher than those of control group; after 12 months of treatment, CD3+ , CD4+ , CD4+ /CD8+ , IgA, IgM and IgG levels in peripheral blood of observation group were significantly higher than those of control group while disease-specific indexes ADA and LDH content in serum were lower than those of control group; oxidative stress indexes TOS, MAOA and OSI content in serum were lower than those of control group while TAS and GSH-Px content were higher than those of control group; liver function indexes STB, ALP, ALT and AST content in serum were lower than those of control group while TP content was higher than that of control group. Conclusions: Transbronchoscopic perfusion combined with conventional chemotherapy can improve the treatment effectiveness, improve immune function as well as reduce oxidative stress and liver damage in patients with multi-drug resistant tuberculosis, and is advantageous in optimizing long-term treatment outcome.

  15. A portable 3D printer system for the diagnosis and treatment of multidrug-resistant bacteria

    OpenAIRE

    Glatzel, Stefan; Hezwani, Mohammed; Kitson, Philip J.; Gromski, Piotr S.; Schürer, Sophie; Cronin, Leroy

    2016-01-01

    Summary: Multidrug-resistant bacteria are a major threat to human health, but broad-spectrum\\ud antibiotics are losing efficacy. There is a need to screen a given drug against\\ud a bacterial infection outside of the laboratory. To address this need, we have designed\\ud and built an inexpensive and easy-to-use 3D-printer-based system that\\ud allows easily readable quantitative tests for the performance of antibacterial\\ud drugs. The platform creates a sterile diagnostic device by using 3D prin...

  16. Tumor-targeted micelle-forming block copolymers for overcoming of multidrug resistance

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Braunová, Alena; Kostka, Libor; Sivák, Ladislav; Cuchalová, Lucie; Hvězdová, Zuzana; Laga, Richard; Filippov, Sergey K.; Černoch, Peter; Pechar, Michal; Janoušková, Olga; Šírová, Milada; Etrych, Tomáš

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 245, 10 January (2017), s. 41-51 ISSN 0168-3659 R&D Projects: GA MZd(CZ) NV16-28600A; GA MŠk(CZ) LO1507; GA MŠk(CZ) LQ1604; GA MŠk(CZ) ED1.1.00/02.0109 Institutional support: RVO:61389013 ; RVO:61388971 Keywords : multidrug resistance * P-glycoprotein inhibitor * EPR effect Subject RIV: CD - Macromolecular Chemistry; EE - Microbiology, Virology (MBU-M) OBOR OECD: Polymer science; Microbiology (MBU-M) Impact factor: 7.786, year: 2016

  17. Thermodynamic secrets of multidrug resistance: A new take on transport mechanisms of secondary active antiporters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xuejun C; Liu, Min; Lu, Guangyuan; Heng, Jie

    2018-03-01

    Multidrug resistance (MDR) presents a growing challenge to global public health. Drug extrusion transporters play a critical part in MDR; thus, their mechanisms of substrate recognition are being studied in great detail. In this work, we review common structural features of key transporters involved in MDR. Based on our membrane potential-driving hypothesis, we propose a general energy-coupling mechanism for secondary-active antiporters. This putative mechanism provides a common framework for understanding poly-specificity of most-if not all-MDR transporters. © 2017 The Protein Society.

  18. Draft Genome Sequence of an Invasive Multidrug-Resistant Strain, Pseudomonas aeruginosa BK1, Isolated from a Keratitis Patient

    KAUST Repository

    Jeganathan, Lakshmi Priya

    2014-03-27

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa infections are difficult to treat due to the presence of a multitude of virulence factors and antibiotic resistance. Here, we report the draft genome sequence of P. aeruginosa BK1, an invasive and multidrug-resistant strain, isolated from a bacterial keratitis patient in southern India.

  19. P-glycoprotein and multidrug resistance protein activities in relation to treatment outcome in acute myeloid leukemia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Vries, EGE; van Putten, WLJ; Verdonck, LF; Ossenkoppele, GJ; Verhoef, GEG; Vellenga, E

    Despite treatment with intensive chemotherapy, a considerable number of patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) die from their disease due to the occurrence of resistance. Overexpression of the transporter proteins P-glycoprotein (P-gp) and multidrug resistance protein (MRP) 1 has been identified

  20. Whole-genome pyrosequencing of an epidemic multidrug-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii strain belonging to the European clone II group

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iacono, M.; Villa, L.; Fortini, D.

    2008-01-01

    The whole-genome sequence of an epidemic, multidrug-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii strain (strain ACICU) belonging to the European clone II group and carrying the plasmid-mediated bla(OXA-58) carbapenem resistance gene was determined. The A. baumannii ACICU genome was compared with the genomes...