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Sample records for causing multidrug resistance

  1. Multidrug resistant citrobacter: an unusual cause of liver abscess.

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    Kumar, Prabhat; Ghosh, Soumik; Rath, Deepak; Gadpayle, A K

    2013-04-22

    Liver abscesses are infectious, space occupying lesions in the liver, the two most common abscesses being pyogenic and amoebic. A pyogenic liver abscess (PLA) is a rare condition with a reported incidence of 20 per 100 000 hospital admissions in the western population. The right lobe of the liver is the most common site in both types of liver abscess. Clinical presentation is elusive with complaints of fever, right upper quadrant pain in the abdomen and hepatomegaly with or without jaundice. The aetiology of PLA has changed in the past few decades and may be of biliary, portal, arterial or traumatic origin, but many cases are still cryptogenic. The most common organisms causing PLA are Gram-negative aerobes, especially Escherichia coli and Klebsiella pneumoniae. Studies have shown a high degree of antimicrobial susceptibility of isolated organism resulting in an overall lower mortality in PLA. Here, we present a case of PLA caused by multidrug-resistant Citrobacter freundii, which is an unusual organism to be isolated.

  2. Multidrug resistance associated proteins in multidrug resistance

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    Sodani, Kamlesh; Patel, Atish; Kathawala, Rishil J.; Chen, Zhe-Sheng

    2012-01-01

    Multidrug resistance proteins (MRPs) are members of the C family of a group of proteins named ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters. These ABC transporters together form the largest branch of proteins within the human body. The MRP family comprises of 13 members, of which MRP1 to MRP9 are the major transporters indicated to cause multidrug resistance in tumor cells by extruding anticancer drugs out of the cell. They are mainly lipophilic anionic transporters and are reported to transport fr...

  3. Risk factors for nosocomial bloodstream infection caused by multidrug resistant gram-negative bacilli in pediatrics

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    Mariana V. Arnoni

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to identify the risk factors for nosocomial bloodstream infections by multidrug resistant Gram-negative bacilli. From November 2001 to December 2003, in the Pediatric Department of the Santa Casa de São Paulo, a retrospective case-control study was developed concerning patients who had nosocomial bloodstream infection caused by Gram-negative bacilli. Patients with multidrug resistant infections were designated as case patients, and control patients were those with an infection that did not meet the criteria for multidrug resistance. Previous use of central venous catheter and previous use of vancomycin plus third generation cephalosporins were associated to a higher chance of infections by multidrug resistant Gram-negative bacilli (Odds ratio - 5.8 and 5.2, respectively. Regarding sensitivity of the isolated agents, 47.8% were multidrug resistant, 54.2% were Klebsiella spp. ESBL producers and 36.4% were imipenem resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The lethality rate was 36.9% in the studied cases and this rate was significantly higher in the group of patients with multidrug resistant infections (p=0.013. Risk factor identification as well as the knowledge of the susceptibility of the nosocomial infectious agents gave us the possibility to perform preventive and control strategies to reduce the costs and mortality related to these infections.

  4. Multidrug-resistant Achromobacter animicus causing wound infection in a street child in Mwanza, Tanzania.

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    Moremi, Nyambura; Claus, Heike; Hingi, Marko; Vogel, Ulrich; Mshana, Stephen E

    2017-02-10

    Achromobacter animicus (A. animicus) is an aerobic, motile, gram-negative, non-fermenting small bacillus that can also grow anaerobically with potassium nitrate. It has been isolated from sputum of humans suffering from respiratory infections. Literature regarding the role of A. animicus in wound infections is limited. We report a first case of a chronic post-traumatic wound infection caused by a multidrug-resistant A. animicus in a street child from Africa and accompanied diagnostic challenges.

  5. Multidrug resistance associated proteins in multidrug resistance

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kamlesh Sodani; Atish Patel; Rishil J. Kathawala; Zhe-Sheng Chen

    2012-01-01

    Multidrug resistance proteins (MRPs) are members of the C family of a group of proteins named ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters.These ABC transporters together form the largest branch of proteins within the human body.The MRP family comprises of 13 members,of which MRP1 to MRP9 are the major transporters indicated to cause multidrug resistance in tumor cells by extruding anticancer drugs out of the cell.They are mainly lipophilic anionic transporters and are reported to transport free or conjugates of glutathione (GSH),glucuronate,or sulphate.In addition,MRP1 to MRP3 can transport neutral organic drugs in free form in the presence of free GSH.Collectively,MRPs can transport drugs that differ structurally and mechanistically,including natural anticancer drugs,nucleoside analogs,antimetabolites,and tyrosine kinase inhibitors.Many of these MRPs transport physiologically important anions such as leukotriene C4,bilirubin glucuronide,and cyclic nucleotides.This review focuses mainly on the physiological functions,cellular resistance characteristics,and probable in vivo role of MRP1 to MRP9.

  6. Risk factors for healthcare-acquired urinary tract infections caused by multi-drug resistant microorganisms

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    Đorđević Zorana M.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Healthcare-acquired urinary tract infections (HAUTI make up to 40% of all healthcareacquired infections and contribute significantly to hospital morbidity, mortality, and overall cost of treatment. Objective. The aim of our study was to investigate possible risk factors for development of HAUTI caused by multi-drug resistant pathogens. Methods. The prospective case-control study in a large tertiary-care hospital was conducted during a five-year period. The cases were patients with HAUTI caused by multi-drug resistant (MDR pathogens, and the controls were patients with HAUTI caused by non-MDR pathogens. Results. There were 562 (62.6% patients with MDR isolates and 336 (37.4% patients with non-MDR isolates in the study. There were four significant predictors of HAUTI caused by MDR pathogens: hospitalization before insertion of urinary catheter for more than eight days (ORadjusted = 2.763; 95% CI = 1.352-5.647; p = 0.005, hospitalization for more than 15 days (ORadjusted = 2.144; 95% CI = 1.547-2.970; p < 0.001, previous stay in another department (intensive care units, other wards or hospitals (ORadjusted = 2.147; 95% CI = 1.585-2.908; p < 0.001, and cancer of various localizations (ORadjusted = 2.313; 95% CI = 1.255-4.262; p = 0.007. Conclusion. Early removal of urinary catheter and reduction of time spent in a hospital or in an ICU could contribute to a decrease in the rate of HAUTI caused by MDR pathogens.

  7. Risk factors for nosocomial burn wound infection caused by multidrug resistant Acinetobacter baumannii.

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    Tekin, Recep; Dal, Tuba; Bozkurt, Fatma; Deveci, Ozcan; Palanc, Ylmaz; Arslan, Eyüp; Selçuk, Caferi Tayyar; Hoşoğlu, Salih

    2014-01-01

    Acinetobacter baumannii infections in burn patients may lead to delays in wound healing, graft losses, and development of sepsis. Determining the risk factors for multidrug resistant A. baumannii (MDR-AB) infections is essential for infection control. In the present study, the authors aimed to evaluate risk factors for wound infections caused by A. baumannii in burn patients. The study was conducted at Dicle University Hospital Burn Center, from April 2011 to July 2012, to investigate the risk factors for MDR-AB infections. The data of both the case and control group patients and the result of wound cultures were recorded on a daily basis, on individual forms given for each patient, and analyzed. A total of 30 cases infected with MDR-AB, and 60 uninfected control patients, were included in the study. The mean age (±SD) was 7.7 ± 15.4 years in infected patients and 11.4 ± 16.5 years in uninfected patients. The mean total burn surface area was 13.5 ± 10.9% in uninfected patients and 34.7 ± 16.2% in infected patients. The mean total burn surface area, the abbreviated burn severity index, acute physiological and chronic health evaluation II score, day of admission to hospital, length of hospital stay, first excision day, prior usage of third-generation cephalosporins, and stay in intensive care unit of the infected patients were significantly higher (P infection. Univariate analysis found that high acute physiological and chronic health evaluation II score, first excision time of wound, invasive device usage, admission day to hospital, and prior usage of broad-spectrum antibiotics were risk factors for nosocomial infections. This study showed that multiple factors contribute to multidrug resistance in A. baumannii. A combination of an early diagnosis of wound infections, appropriate antimicrobial treatments, surgical debridement, and early wound closure may be effective in the management.

  8. Multidrug-Resistant Tuberculosis

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2008-10-28

    In this podcast, Dr. Oeltmann discusses multidrug-resistant tuberculosis. An outbreak occurred in Thailand, which led to 45 cases in the U.S. This serious illness can take up to 2 years to treat. MDR TB is a real threat and a serious condition.  Created: 10/28/2008 by Emerging Infectious Diseases.   Date Released: 10/28/2008.

  9. Surveillance of multidrug resistant suppurative infection causing bacteria in hospitalized patients in an Indian tertiary care hospital

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    Nabakishore Nayak

    2014-01-01

    Conclusions: Of these S. aureus, particularly the methicillin resistant strain predominates, followed by strains of S. pyogenes and P. aeruginosa that were in the higher proportions of multidrug resistance.

  10. Aggressive regimens for multidrug-resistant tuberculosis decrease all-cause mortality.

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    Carole D Mitnick

    Full Text Available RATIONALE: A better understanding of the composition of optimal treatment regimens for multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB is essential for expanding universal access to effective treatment and for developing new therapies for MDR-TB. Analysis of observational data may inform the definition of an optimized regimen. OBJECTIVES: This study assessed the impact of an aggressive regimen-one containing at least five likely effective drugs, including a fluoroquinolone and injectable-on treatment outcomes in a large MDR-TB patient cohort. METHODS: This was a retrospective cohort study of patients treated in a national outpatient program in Peru between 1999 and 2002. We examined the association between receiving an aggressive regimen and the rate of death. MEASUREMENTS AND MAIN RESULTS: In total, 669 patients were treated with individualized regimens for laboratory-confirmed MDR-TB. Isolates were resistant to a mean of 5.4 (SD 1.7 drugs. Cure or completion was achieved in 66.1% (442 of patients; death occurred in 20.8% (139. Patients who received an aggressive regimen were less likely to die (crude hazard ratio [HR]: 0.62; 95% CI: 0.44,0.89, compared to those who did not receive such a regimen. This association held in analyses adjusted for comorbidities and indicators of severity (adjusted HR: 0.63; 95% CI: 0.43,0.93. CONCLUSIONS: The aggressive regimen is a robust predictor of MDR-TB treatment outcome. TB policy makers and program directors should consider this standard as they design and implement regimens for patients with drug-resistant disease. Furthermore, the aggressive regimen should be considered the standard background regimen when designing randomized trials of treatment for drug-resistant TB.

  11. Antibacterial and antioxidant activities of Musa sp. leaf extracts against multidrug resistant clinical pathogens causing nosocomial infection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ponmurugan Karuppiah; Muhammed Mustaffa

    2013-01-01

    Objective:To investigate different Musa sp. leave extracts of hexane, ethyl acetate and methanol were evaluated for antibacterial activity against multi-drug resistant pathogens causing nosocomial infection by agar well diffusion method and also antioxidant activities. Methods:The four different Musa species leaves were extracted with hexane, ethyl acetate and methanol. Antibacterial susceptibility test, minimum inhibitory concentration and minimum inhibitory bacterial concentration were determined by agar well diffusion method. Total phenolic content and in vitro antioxidant activity was determined. Results: All the Musa sp. extracts showed moderate antibacterial activities expect Musa paradisiaca with the inhibition zone ranging from 8.0 to 18.6 mm. Among four species ethyl acetate extracts of Musa paradisiaca showed highest activity against tested pathogens particularly E. coli, P. aeruginosa and Citrobacter sp. The minimum inhibitory concentrations were within the value of 15.63-250 µg/mL and minimum bactericidal concentrations were ranging from 31.25-250 µg/mL. Antioxidant activity of Musa acuminate exhibited maximum activity among other three Musa species. Conclusions: The present study concluded that among the different Musa species, Musa paradisiaca displayed efficient antibacterial activity followed by Musa acuminata against multi-drug resistant nosocomial infection causing pathogens. Further, an extensive study is needed to identify the bioactive compounds, mode of action and toxic effect in vivo of Musa sp.

  12. Multidrug-resistant tuberculosis

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    McNerney Ruth

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background With almost 9 million new cases each year, tuberculosis remains one of the most feared diseases on the planet. Led by the STOP-TB Partnership and WHO, recent efforts to combat the disease have made considerable progress in a number of countries. However, the emergence of mutated strains of Mycobacterium tuberculosis that are resistant to the major anti-tuberculosis drugs poses a deadly threat to control efforts. Multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB has been reported in all regions of the world. More recently, extensively drug resistant-tuberculosis (XDR-TB that is also resistant to second line drugs has emerged in a number of countries. To ensure that adequate resources are allocated to prevent the emergence and spread of drug resistance it is important to understand the scale of the problem. In this article we propose that current methods of describing the epidemiology of drug resistant tuberculosis are not adequate for this purpose and argue for the inclusion of population based statistics in global surveillance data. Discussion Whereas the prevalence of tuberculosis is presented as the proportion of individuals within a defined population having disease, the prevalence of drug resistant tuberculosis is usually presented as the proportion of tuberculosis cases exhibiting resistance to anti-tuberculosis drugs. Global surveillance activities have identified countries in Eastern Europe, the former Soviet Union and regions of China as having a high proportion of MDR-TB cases and international commentary has focused primarily on the urgent need to improve control in these settings. Other regions, such as sub-Saharan Africa have been observed as having a low proportion of drug resistant cases. However, if one considers the incidence of new tuberculosis cases with drug resistant disease in terms of the population then countries of sub-Saharan Africa have amongst the highest rates of transmitted MDR-TB in the world. We propose

  13. Multidrug-Resistant TB

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    Cox, Helen; Coomans, Fons

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The right to enjoy the benefits of scientific progress (REBSP) is a little-known but potentially valuable right that can contribute to rights-based approaches to addressing multidrug-resistant TB (MDR-TB). We argue that better understanding of the REBSP may help to advance legal and civil society action for health rights. While the REBSP does not provide an individual entitlement to have a new drug developed for MDR-TB, it sets up entitlements to expect a state to establish a legislative and policy framework aimed at developing scientific capacity to address the most important health issues and at disseminating the outcomes of scientific research. By making scientific findings available and accessible, people can be enabled to claim the use of science for social benefits. Inasmuch as the market fails to address neglected diseases such as MDR-TB, the REBSP provides a potential counterbalance to frame a positive obligation on states to both marshal their own resources and to coordinate the actions of multiple other actors towards this goal, including non-state actors. While the latter do not hold the same level of accountability as states, the REBSP can still enable the recognition of obligations at a level of “soft law” responsibilities.

  14. Ability of bacteriophage in resolving wound infection caused by multidrug-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii in uncontrolled diabetic rats.

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    Shivaswamy, VinodKumar Chickmangalure; Kalasuramath, Suneeta Basavaraj; Sadanand, Chethan Kumar; Basavaraju, Abhishek Kilagere; Ginnavaram, Varsha; Bille, Sumanth; Ukken, Sanjay Saju; Pushparaj, Usha Nandini

    2015-04-01

    Acinetobacter baumannii, a substantial nosocomial pathogen, has developed resistance to almost all available antimicrobial drugs. Bacteriophage therapy is a possible alternative treatment for multidrug-resistant (MDR) bacterial infections. In this study, we have successfully isolated bacteriophage active against clinical strains of A. baumannii by enrichment from hospital sewage sludge using representatives of those strains. The bacteriophage isolated against A. baumannii formed plaques against beta-lactamases producing strains of A. baumannii. The utility of bacteriophage specific for A. baumannii to resolve wound infection in uncontrolled diabetic rats was evaluated. Five groups of uncontrolled diabetic rats were used. Group I was noninfected (Control), Group II was infected with MDR A. baumannii and challenged with bacteriophage, Group III was infected with MDR A. baumannii, Group IV was infected with MDR A. baumannii and challenged with antibiotic colistin, and Group V consisted of noninfected rats and sprayed with phage (Phage control). A significant decrease in infection, period of epithelization, and wound contraction was observed in the phage-challenged group when compared with antibiotic-treated uncontrolled diabetic rats and the control group. To conclude the study, new insights are provided into the biology of the broad host range of A. baumannii phage, demonstrating that A. baumannii phage has prospects for the treatment of infections caused by the MDR A. baumannii.

  15. Multidrug Resistance: An Emerging Crisis

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    Jyoti Tanwar

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The resistance among various microbial species (infectious agents to different antimicrobial drugs has emerged as a cause of public health threat all over the world at a terrifying rate. Due to the pacing advent of new resistance mechanisms and decrease in efficiency of treating common infectious diseases, it results in failure of microbial response to standard treatment, leading to prolonged illness, higher expenditures for health care, and an immense risk of death. Almost all the capable infecting agents (e.g., bacteria, fungi, virus, and parasite have employed high levels of multidrug resistance (MDR with enhanced morbidity and mortality; thus, they are referred to as “super bugs.” Although the development of MDR is a natural phenomenon, the inappropriate use of antimicrobial drugs, inadequate sanitary conditions, inappropriate food-handling, and poor infection prevention and control practices contribute to emergence of and encourage the further spread of MDR. Considering the significance of MDR, this paper, emphasizes the problems associated with MDR and the need to understand its significance and mechanisms to combat microbial infections.

  16. Multidrug resistance: an emerging crisis.

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    Tanwar, Jyoti; Das, Shrayanee; Fatima, Zeeshan; Hameed, Saif

    2014-01-01

    The resistance among various microbial species (infectious agents) to different antimicrobial drugs has emerged as a cause of public health threat all over the world at a terrifying rate. Due to the pacing advent of new resistance mechanisms and decrease in efficiency of treating common infectious diseases, it results in failure of microbial response to standard treatment, leading to prolonged illness, higher expenditures for health care, and an immense risk of death. Almost all the capable infecting agents (e.g., bacteria, fungi, virus, and parasite) have employed high levels of multidrug resistance (MDR) with enhanced morbidity and mortality; thus, they are referred to as "super bugs." Although the development of MDR is a natural phenomenon, the inappropriate use of antimicrobial drugs, inadequate sanitary conditions, inappropriate food-handling, and poor infection prevention and control practices contribute to emergence of and encourage the further spread of MDR. Considering the significance of MDR, this paper, emphasizes the problems associated with MDR and the need to understand its significance and mechanisms to combat microbial infections.

  17. Surveillance of multidrug resistant suppurative infection causing bacteria in hospitalized patients in an Indian tertiary care hospital

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Nabakishore Nayak; Rajesh K Lenka; Rabindra N Padhy

    2014-01-01

    Objective:To examine antibiograms of a cohort of suppurative bacteria isolated from wound-swabs from hospitalized patients of all economic groups of a typicalIndian teaching hospital. Methods:In surveillance, antibiotic resistance patterns of10 species of suppurative bacteria isolated from wound-swabs over a period of24 months were recorded.Those were subjected to antibiotic sensitivity test, using16 prescribed antibiotics of5 different groups(3 aminoglycosides, 4 beta-lactams,3 cephalosporins,4 fluoroquinolones, and2 stand-alone) in each6-month interval of the study period.Results:Of1156 samples collected,819 samples yielded pathogenic bacteria, of which,Staphylococcus aureus(S. aureus),Streptococcus pyogenes(S. pyogenes), Escherichia coli(E. coli),Pseudomonas aeruginosa(P. aeruginosa),Enterococcus faecalis(E. faecalis), Klebsiella pneumoniae(K. pneumoniae),Acinetobacter baumannii(A. baumannii),Enterobacter aerogenes(E. aerogenes),Proteus mirabilis(P. mirabilis) andProteus vulgaris(P. vulgaris) were isolated in the order of predominance.Isolated bacterial strains were floridly multidrug resistant.Strains ofE. faecalis andS. aureus were found resistant to vancomycin, one of the newly introduced antibiotics.Conclusions:Of theseS. aureus, particularly the methicillin resistant strain predominates, followed by strains ofS. pyogenes andP. aeruginosa that were in the higher proportions of multidrug resistance.

  18. Role of multidrug resistance in photodynamic therapy

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    Diddens, Heyke C.

    1992-06-01

    Multidrug resistance in cancer chemotherapy is a well established phenomenon. One of the most common phenotypical changes in acquired or intrinsic multidrug resistance in human tumor cells is the overexpression of the mdrl gene product P-glycoprotein, which acts as an active efflux pump. Increased levels of P-glycoprotein are associated with resistance to a variety of anticancer drugs commonly used in tumor chemotherapy like anthracyclins, vinca- alcaloids, epipodophyllotoxins or actinomycin D. We investigated the efficacy or photodynamic therapy in the treatment of tumor cells expressing the multidrug resistance phenotype. Our data show that multidrug resistant cells are highly cross resistant to the phototoxic stain rhodamine 123 but exhibit only low degrees of cross resistance (2 - 3 -folds) to the photosensitizers Photosan-3, Clorin-2, methylene blue and meso-tetra (4- sulfonatophenyl) porphine (TPPS4). Resistance is associated with a decrease in intracellular accumulation of the photosensitizer. Verapamil, a membrane active compound known to enhance drug sensitivity in multidrug resistant cells by inhibition of P-glycoprotein, also increases phototoxicity in multidrug resistant cells. Our results imply that tumors expressing the multidrug resistance phenotype might fail to respond to photochemotherapy with rhodamine 123. On the other hand, multidrug resistance may not play an important role in photodynamic therapy with Photosan-3, Chlorin-2, methylene blue or TPPS4.

  19. Epidemiology of Primary Multidrug-Resistant Tuberculosis, Vladimir Region, Russia.

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    Ershova, Julia V; Volchenkov, Grigory V; Kaminski, Dorothy A; Somova, Tatiana R; Kuznetsova, Tatiana A; Kaunetis, Natalia V; Cegielski, J Peter; Kurbatova, Ekaterina V

    2015-11-01

    We studied the epidemiology of drug-resistant tuberculosis (TB) in Vladimir Region, Russia, in 2012. Most cases of multidrug-resistant TB (MDR TB) were caused by transmission of drug-resistant strains, and >33% were in patients referred for testing after mass radiographic screening. Early diagnosis of drug resistance is essential for preventing transmission of MDR TB.

  20. Nosocomial infection caused by vancomycin-susceptible multidrug-resistant Enterococcus faecalis over a long period in a university hospital in Japan.

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    Kudo, Michiaki; Nomura, Takahiro; Yomoda, Sachie; Tanimoto, Koichi; Tomita, Haruyoshi

    2014-11-01

    Compared with other developed countries, vancomycin-resistant enterococci (VRE) are not widespread in clinical environments in Japan. There have been no VRE outbreaks and only a few VRE strains have sporadically been isolated in our university hospital in Gunma, Japan. To examine the drug susceptibility of Enterococcus faecalis and nosocomial infection caused by non-VRE strains, a retrospective surveillance was conducted in our university hospital. Molecular epidemiological analyses were performed on 1711 E. faecalis clinical isolates collected in our hospital over a 6-year period [1998-2003]. Of these isolates, 1241 (72.5%) were antibiotic resistant and 881 (51.5%) were resistant to two or more drugs. The incidence of multidrug resistant E. faecalis (MDR-Ef) isolates in the intensive care unit increased after enlargement and restructuring of the hospital. The major group of MDR-Ef strains consisted of 209 isolates (12.2%) resistant to the five drug combination tetracycline/erythromycin/kanamycin/streptomycin/gentamicin. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis analysis of the major MDR-Ef isolates showed that nosocomial infections have been caused by MDR-Ef over a long period (more than 3 years). Multilocus sequence typing showed that these strains were mainly grouped into ST16 (CC58) or ST64 (CC8). Mating experiments suggested that the drug resistances were encoded on two conjugative transposons (integrative conjugative elements), one encoded tetracycline-resistance and the other erythromycin/kanamycin/streptomycin/gentamicin-resistance. To our knowledge, this is the first report of nosocomial infection caused by vancomycin-susceptible MDR-Ef strains over a long period in Japan.

  1. Bacteremic Urinary Tract Infection Caused by Multidrug-Resistant Enterobacteriaceae Are Associated With Severe Sepsis at Admission: Implication for Empirical Therapy.

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    Lee, Yi-Chien; Hsiao, Chih-Yen; Hung, Miao-Chiu; Hung, Sheng-Che; Wang, Hung-Ping; Huang, Yun-Jhong; Wang, Jann-Tay

    2016-05-01

    The purpose of this study is to compare the clinical features and treatment outcomes among patients with bacteremic urinary tract infection (UTI) caused by multidrug-resistant (MDR) and non-MDR Enterobacteriaceae and to identify whether MDR pathogens were independently associated with severe sepsis or septic shock at presentation.The clinical data of adult patients visiting and being treated at Chia-Yi Christian Hospital due to bacteremic UTI caused by Enterobacteriaceae from January 2006 to August 2015 were retrospectively analyzed.A total of 585 patients were enrolled. Among them, 220 (37.6%) were caused by the MDR Enterobacteriaceae. A total of 206 patients (35.2%) developed severe sepsis or septic shock at presentation. Patients in the MDR group tend to be male and have a past history of gout, recurrent UTI, prior hospitalization, hydronephrosis, renal stone, ureteral stone, indwelling urinary catheter, newly development of renal dysfunction, severe sepsis or septic shock, intensive care unit (ICU) admission, receipt of ineffective empirical therapy, longer hospital stay, and higher in-hospital mortality (2.7% vs 1.9%, P = 0.569). Using multivariate logistic regression analysis, it is revealed that independent predictors associated with severe sepsis or septic shock at presentation were liver cirrhosis (OR 2.868; 95% CI 1.439-5.716; P = 0.003), indwelling urinary catheter (OR 1.936; 95% CI 1.238-3.027; P = 0.004), and MDR Enterobacteriaceae (OR 1.447; 95% CI 1.002-2.090; P = 0.049).Multidrug resistance was associated with the development of severe sepsis or septic shock upon presentation among patients with bacteremic UTI caused by Enterobacteriaceae. Therefore, empirical antibiotics therapy for patients with UTI presented with severe sepsis and/or septic shock should be more broad-spectrum to effectively cover MDR Enterobacteriaceae.

  2. Carriage and transmission dynamics of multidrug-resistant Enterobacteriaceae

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    Haverkate, M.R.

    2015-01-01

    Antimicrobial-resistant bacteria cause big problems in health care. Infections with these bacteria are hard to treat and lead to high morbidity, mortality, and costs. In this PhD thesis, carriage and transmission dynamics of multidrug-resistant Enterobacteriaceae have been investigated in various se

  3. Incidence of multidrug-resistant organisms causing ventilator-associated pneumonia in a tertiary care hospital: A nine months′ prospective study

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    Dey Arindam

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP is an important intensive care unit (ICU infection in mechanically ventilated patients. VAP occurs approximately in 9-27% of all intubated patients. Due to the increasing incidence of multidrug-resistant organisms in ICUs, early and correct diagnosis of VAP is an urgent challenge for an optimal antibiotic treatment. Aim of the Study: The aim of the study was to assess the incidence of VAP caused by multidrug-resistant organisms in the multidisciplinary intensive care unit (MICU of our tertiary care 1,400-bedded hospital. Materials and Methods: This prospective study was done in the period from December 2005 to August 2006, enrolling patients undergoing mechanical ventilation (MV for> 48 h. Endotracheal aspirates (ETA were collected from patients with suspected VAP, and quantitative cultures were performed on all samples. VAP was diagnosed by the growth of pathogenic organism _10 5 cfu/ml. Results: Incidence of VAP was found to be 45.4% among the mechanically ventilated patients, out of which 47.7% had early-onset (< 5 days MV VAP and 52.3% had late-onset (>5 days MV VAP. Multiresistant bacteria, mainly Acinetobacter spp. (47.9% and Pseudomonas aeruginosa (27%, were the most commonly isolated pathogens in both types of VAP. Most of the isolates of Escherichia coli (80% and Klebsiella pneumoniae (100% produced extended-spectrum beta lactamases (ESBLs. As many as 30.43% isolates of Acinetobacter spp. showed production of AmpC beta lactamases among all types of isolates. Metallo-beta lactamases (MBLs were produced by 50% of Pseudomonas aeruginosa and 21.74% of Acinetobacter spp. Conclusion : High incidence (45.4% of VAP and the potential multidrug-resistant organisms are the real threat in our MICU. This study highlighted high incidence of VAP in our setup, emphasizing injudicious use of antimicrobial therapy. Combined approaches of rotational antibiotic therapy and education programs might be

  4. The ABCs of multidrug resistance in malaria.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koenderink, J.B.; Kavishe, R.A.; Rijpma, S.R.; Russel, F.G.M.

    2010-01-01

    Expanding drug resistance could become a major problem in malaria treatment, as only a limited number of effective antimalarials are available. Drug resistance has been associated with single nucleotide polymorphisms and an increased copy number of multidrug resistance protein 1 (MDR1), an ATP-bindi

  5. Next-Generation Sequencing and Comparative Analysis of Sequential Outbreaks Caused by Multidrug-Resistant Acinetobacter baumannii at a Large Academic Burn Center.

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    Kanamori, Hajime; Parobek, Christian M; Weber, David J; van Duin, David; Rutala, William A; Cairns, Bruce A; Juliano, Jonathan J

    2015-12-07

    Next-generation sequencing (NGS) analysis has emerged as a promising molecular epidemiological method for investigating health care-associated outbreaks. Here, we used NGS to investigate a 3-year outbreak of multidrug-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii (MDRAB) at a large academic burn center. A reference genome from the index case was generated using de novo assembly of PacBio reads. Forty-six MDRAB isolates were analyzed by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) and sequenced using an Illumina platform. After mapping to the index case reference genome, four samples were excluded due to low coverage, leaving 42 samples for further analysis. Multilocus sequence types (MLST) and the presence of acquired resistance genes were also determined from the sequencing data. A transmission network was inferred from genomic and epidemiological data using a Bayesian framework. Based on single-nucleotide variant (SNV) differences, this MDRAB outbreak represented three sequential outbreaks caused by distinct clones. The first and second outbreaks were caused by sequence type 2 (ST2), while the third outbreak was caused by ST79. For the second outbreak, the MLST and PFGE results were discordant. However, NGS-based SNV typing detected a recombination event and consequently enabled a more accurate phylogenetic analysis. The distribution of resistance genes varied among the three outbreaks. The first- and second-outbreak strains possessed a blaOXA-23-like group, while the third-outbreak strains harbored a blaOXA-40-like group. NGS-based analysis demonstrated the superior resolution of outbreak transmission networks for MDRAB and provided insight into the mechanisms of strain diversification between sequential outbreaks through recombination.

  6. Septic arthritis of the hip in a Cambodian child caused by multidrug-resistant Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi with intermediate susceptibility to ciprofloxacin treated with ceftriaxone and azithromycin.

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    Pocock, J M; Khun, P A; Moore, C E; Vuthy, S; Stoesser, N; Parry, C M

    2014-08-01

    Septic arthritis is a rare complication of typhoid fever. A 12-year-old boy without pre-existing disease attended a paediatric hospital in Cambodia with fever and left hip pain. A hip synovial fluid aspirate grew multidrug-resistant Salmonella enterica ser. Typhi with intermediate susceptibility to ciprofloxacin. Arthrotomy, 2 weeks of intravenous ceftriaxone and 4 weeks of oral azithromycin led to resolution of symptoms. The optimum management of septic arthritis in drug-resistant typhoid is undefined.

  7. Infection by multidrug-resistant Elizabethkingia meningoseptica: case reports

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jailton Lobo da Costa Lima

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available We report two cases of sepsis in critically ill patients in two tertiary care hospitals in Recife-PE, Brazil. The first case is an 87-year-old patient with chronic myeloid leukemia and sepsis; and the second case is a 93-year-old patient with prostate cancer and septic shock caused by multidrug-resistant (MDR Elizabethkingia meningoseptica.

  8. Invasive Infections with Multidrug-Resistant Yeast Candida auris, Colombia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morales-López, Soraya E.; Parra-Giraldo, Claudia M.; Ceballos-Garzón, Andrés; Martínez, Heidys P.; Rodríguez, Gerson J.; Álvarez-Moreno, Carlos A.

    2017-01-01

    Candida auris is an emerging multidrug-resistant fungus that causes a wide range of symptoms. We report finding 17 cases of C. auris infection that were originally misclassified but correctly identified 27.5 days later on average. Patients with a delayed diagnosis of C. auris had a 30-day mortality rate of 35.2%. PMID:27983941

  9. Multidrug resistance: Physiological principles and nanomedical solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunjachan, Sijumon; Rychlik, Błażej; Storm, Gert; Kiessling, Fabian; Lammers, Twan

    2013-11-01

    Multidrug resistance (MDR) is a pathophysiological phenomenon employed by cancer cells which limits the prolonged and effective use of chemotherapeutic agents. MDR is primarily based on the over-expression of drug efflux pumps in the cellular membrane. Prominent examples of such efflux pumps, which belong to the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) superfamily of proteins, are Pgp (P-glycoprotein) and MRP (multidrug resistance-associated protein), nowadays officially known as ABCB1 and ABCC1. Over the years, several strategies have been evaluated to overcome MDR, based not only on the use of low-molecular-weight MDR modulators, but also on the implementation of 1-100(0) nm-sized drug delivery systems. In the present manuscript, after introducing the most important physiological principles of MDR, we summarize prototypic nanomedical strategies to overcome multidrug resistance, including the use of carrier materials with intrinsic anti-MDR properties, the use of nanomedicines to modify the mode of cellular uptake, and the co-formulation of chemotherapeutic drugs together with low- and high-molecular-weight MDR inhibitors within a single drug delivery system. While certain challenges still need to be overcome before such constructs and concepts can be widely applied in the clinic, the insights obtained and the progress made strongly suggest that nanomedicine formulations hold significant potential for improving the treatment of multidrug-resistant malignancies.

  10. Multidrug resistance: Physiological principles and nanomedical solutions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kunjachan, S.; Rychlik, B.; Storm, G.; Kiessling, F.; Lammers, T.G.G.M.

    2013-01-01

    Multidrug resistance (MDR) is a pathophysiological phenomenon employed by cancer cells which limits the prolonged and effective use of chemotherapeutic agents. MDR is primarily based on the over-expression of drug efflux pumps in the cellular membrane. Prominent examples of such efflux pumps, which

  11. Drug efflux proteins in multidrug resistant bacteria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    vanVeen, HW; Konings, WN

    1997-01-01

    Bacteria contain an array of transport proteins in their cytoplasmic membrane. Many of these proteins play an important role in conferring resistance to toxic compounds. The multidrug efflux systems encountered in prokaryotic cells are very similar to those observed in eukaryotic cells. Therefore, a

  12. Genomic analysis reveals multi-drug resistance clusters in Group B Streptococcus CC17 hypervirulent isolates causing neonatal invasive disease in southern mainland China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edmondo Campisi

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Neonatal invasive disease caused by group B Streptococcus (GBS represents a significant public health care concern globally. However, data related to disease burden, serotype distribution and molecular epidemiology in China and other Asian countries are very few and specifically relative to confined regions. The aim of this study was to investigate the genetic characteristics of GBS isolates recovered from neonates with invasive disease during 2013-2014 at Guangzhou and Changsha hospitals in southern mainland China. We assessed the capsular polysaccharide (CPS type, pilus islands (PIs distribution and hvgA gene presence in a panel of 26 neonatal clinical isolates, of which 8 were recovered from Early Onset Disease (EOD and 18 from Late Onset Disease (LOD. Among 26 isolates examined, five serotypes were identified. Type III was the most represented (15 cases, particularly among LOD strains (n=11, followed by types Ib (n=5, V (n=3, Ia (n=2 and II (n=1. We performed whole-genome sequencing (WGS analysis and antimicrobial susceptibility testing on the 14 serotype III isolates belonging to the hypervirulent Clonal Complex 17 (serotype III-CC17.The presence of PI-2b alone was associated with 13 out of 14 serotype III-CC17 strains. Genome analysis led us to identify two multi-drug resistance gene clusters harbored in two new versions of integrative and conjugative elements (ICEs, carrying five or eight antibiotic resistance genes, respectively. These ICEs replaced the 16 kb-locus that normally contains the PI-1 operon. All isolates harboring the identified ICEs showed multiple resistances to aminoglycoside, macrolide and tetracycline antibiotic classes. In conclusion, we report the first whole-genome sequence analysis of 14 GBS serotype III-CC17 strains isolated in China, representing the most prevalent lineage causing neonatal invasive disease. The acquisition of newly identified ICEs conferring multiple antibiotic resistances could in part explain

  13. Bacterial multidrug resistance mediated by a homologue of the human multidrug transporter P-glycoprotein

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Konings, WN; Poelarends, GJ

    2002-01-01

    Most ATP-binding cassette (ABC) multidrug transporters known to date are of eukaryotic origin, such as the P-glycoproteins (Pgps) and multidrug resistance-associated proteins (MRPs). Only one well-characterized ABC multidrug transporter, LmrA, is of bacterial origin. On the basis of its structural a

  14. Primary disseminated extrapulmonary multidrug resistant tuberculosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S K Das

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Disseminated tuberculosis is a common mode of presentation of tuberculosis in patients both with and without HIV/AIDS in India. However, primary multidrug resistance in disseminated tuberculosis involving only the extrapulmonary sites in an immunocompetent adult is rare. Here, we report a case of a 19-year-old man who had disseminated tuberculosis involving left pleura, pericardium, peritoneum and intraabdominal lymph nodes. He was initially taking WHO category I antituberculous drugs, but was not responding in spite of 5 months of chemotherapy. Culture of the pleural biopsy specimen grew Mycobacterium tuberculosis which was resistant to isoniazid and rifampicin. He was put on therapy for multidrug resistant tuberculosis,following 24 months of chemotherapyhe had an uneventful recovery.

  15. [Travellers and multi-drug resistance bacteria].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeshita, Nozomi

    2012-02-01

    The number of international travellers has increased. There is enormous diversity in medical backgrounds, purposes of travel, and travelling styles among travellers. Travellers are hospitalized abroad because of exotic and common diseases via medical tourism. This is one way of transporting and importing human bacteria between countries, including multi-drug resistant organisms. In developing countries, the antimicrobial resistance in Shigella sp. and Salmonella sp. have been a problem, because of this trend, the first choice of antibiotics has changed in some countries. Community acquired infections as well as hospital acquired infections with MRSA, multi-drug resistance (MDR) Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and ESBL have been a problem. This review will discuss the risk of MDR bacterial infectious diseases for travellers.

  16. Chromosomal Instability Confers Intrinsic Multidrug Resistance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lee, Alvin J. X.; Endesfelder, David; Rowan, Andrew J.

    2011-01-01

    their diploid parental cells only with increasing chromosomal heterogeneity and isogenic cell line models of CIN+ displayed multidrug resistance relative to their CIN- parental cancer cell line derivatives. In a meta-analysis of CRC outcome following cytotoxic treatment, CIN+ predicted worse progression......-free or disease-free survival relative to patients with CIN- disease. Our results suggest that stratifying tumor responses according to CIN status should be considered within the context of clinical trials to minimize the confounding effects of tumor CIN status on drug sensitivity. Cancer Res; 71(5); 1858-70. (c......Aneuploidy is associated with poor prognosis in solid tumors. Spontaneous chromosome missegregation events in aneuploid cells promote chromosomal instability (CIN) that may contribute to the acquisition of multidrug resistance in vitro and heighten risk for tumor relapse in animal models...

  17. Study of multidrug resistance and radioresistance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Yoon Koo; Yoo, Young Do

    1999-04-01

    We investigated the mechanism of 5-FU, adriamycin, radiation resistance in Korean gastric cancer cells. First we investigated the relation between Rb and multidrug resistance. Rb stable transfectants exhibited 5- to 10- fold more resistance to adriamycin than the control cells. These Rb transfectants showed increased MDR1 expression. We also investigated up-regulation in radiation-resistant tumor tissues. HSP27, MRP-8, GST, and NKEF-B were up-regulated in radiation resistant tumor. Expression of NKEF-B was also increased by radiation exposure in Head and Neck cells. These results demonstrated that NKEF-B is a stress response protein and it may have an important role in radiation resistance.

  18. STUDIES ON ANTIBACTERIAL EFFECT OF APAMARGA (ACHYRANTHES ASPERA ON MULTI-DRUG RESISTANT CLINICAL ISOLATES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patil Usha

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Recent reports on emergence of multidrug resistant bacteria are cause of concern in medical world. Several ayurvedic drugs have been proved to contain the antimicrobial activity. Literature on effect of ayurvedic drugs on multidrug resistant bacterial pathogens is limited. Present study reports the antimicrobial effect of Achyranthes aspera (Apamarga crude extracts on the clinical isolates of multidrug resistant bacteria. The drug was evaluated by using phytochemical tests. Crude extracts of aqueous, methanol, ethanol and chloroform was prepared. Antibacterial activity against clinically isolated multidrug resistant bacteria belonging to groups of bacillus, citrobacter, E.coli, klebsiella, proteus and salmonella was tested. The drug showed highest efficacy against Bacillus organism while least effectiveness on Proteus spp bacteria. Results of the study conclude that the medicinal plant A. aspera might be useful against multidrug resistance in pathogens of clinical importance.

  19. Multidrug-Resistant Tuberculosis: Treatment and Outcomes of 93 Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah K Brode

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Tuberculosis (TB remains a leading cause of death worldwide and the emergence of multidrug-resistant TB (MDR TB poses a threat to its control. There is scanty evidence regarding optimal management of MDR TB. The majority of Canadian cases of MDR TB are diagnosed in Ontario; most are managed by the Tuberculosis Service at West Park Healthcare Centre in Toronto. The authors reviewed 93 cases of MDR TB admitted from January 1, 2000 to December 31, 2011.

  20. Multidrug resistant to extensively drug resistant tuberculosis: What is next?

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Amita Jain; Pratima Dixit

    2008-11-01

    Drug resistant tuberculosis is a man made problem. While tuberculosis is hundred percent curable, multidrug resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB) is difficult to treat. Inadequate and incomplete treatment and poor treatment adherence has led to a newer form of drug resistance known as extensively drug resistant tuberculosis (XDR-TB). XDR-TB is defined as tuberculosis caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis strain, which is resistant to at least rifampicin and isoniazid among the first line anti tubercular drugs (MDR-TB) in addition to resistance to any fluroquinolones and at least one of three injectable second line anti tubercular drugs i.e. amikacin, kanamycin and/or capreomycin. Mismanagement of tuberculosis paves the way to drug resistant tuberculosis. Emergence of XDR-TB is reported world wide. Reported prevalence rates of XDR-TB of total MDR cases are; 6.6% overall worldwide, 6.5% in industrialized countries, 13.6% in Russia and Eastern Europe, 1.5% in Asia, 0.6% in Africa and Middle East and 15.4% in Republic of Korea. Better management and control of tuberculosis specially drug resistant TB by experienced and qualified doctors, access to standard microbiology laboratory, co-morbitidy of HIV and tuberculosis, new anti-TB drug regimens, better diagnostic tests, international standards for second line drugs (SLD)-susceptibility testing, invention of newer anti-tubercular molecules and vaccines and knowing the real magnitude of XDR-TB are some of the important issues to be addressed for effective prevention and management of XDR-TB.

  1. Multidrug-resistant breast cancer: current perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin HL

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Heather L Martin,1 Laura Smith,2 Darren C Tomlinson11BioScreening Technology Group, Leeds Institutes of Molecular Medicine, University of Leeds, Leeds, UK; 2Leeds Institute of Cancer and Pathology, University of Leeds, Leeds, UKAbstract: Breast cancer is the most common cancer in women worldwide, and resistance to the current therapeutics, often concurrently, is an increasing clinical challenge. By understanding the molecular mechanisms behind multidrug-resistant breast cancer, new treatments may be developed. Here we review the recent advances in this understanding, emphasizing the common mechanisms underlying resistance to both targeted therapies, notably tamoxifen and trastuzumab, and traditional chemotherapies. We focus primarily on three molecular mechanisms, the phosphatidylinositide 3-kinase/Akt pathway, the role of microRNAs in gene silencing, and epigenetic alterations affecting gene expression, and discuss how these mechanisms can interact in multidrug resistance. The development of therapeutics targeting these mechanisms is also addressed.Keywords: PI3K/Akt, epigenetics, miRNA, ER, HER2, triple negative

  2. What is Multidrug and Extensively Drug Resistant TB?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and Extensively Drug Resistant TB? Multidrug-resistant tuberculosis ( MDR TB ) is a very dangerous form of tuberculosis. Some ... TB medicine so that you will not develop MDR TB. Extensively drug-resistant TB ( XDR TB ) is an ...

  3. Doctors Seeing More HIV Patients with Multidrug Resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... html Doctors Seeing More HIV Patients With Multidrug Resistance People resistant to older medication also have problems ... to modern drugs had HIV mutations linked with resistance to older drugs called thymidine analogues. Among patients ...

  4. Antiviral Drug- and Multidrug Resistance in Cytomegalovirus Infected SCT Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katharina Göhring

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In pediatric and adult patients after stem cell transplantation (SCT disseminated infections caused by human cytomegalovirus (HCMV can cause life threatening diseases. For treatment, the three antivirals ganciclovir (GCV, foscarnet (PFA and cidofovir (CDV are approved and most frequently used. Resistance to all of these antiviral drugs may induce a severe problem in this patient cohort. Responsible for resistance phenomena are mutations in the HCMV phosphotransferase-gene (UL97 and the polymerase-gene (UL54. Most frequently mutations in the UL97-gene are associated with resistance to GCV. Resistance against all three drugs is associated to mutations in the UL54-gene. Monitoring of drug resistance by genotyping is mostly done by PCR-based Sanger sequencing. For phenotyping with cell culture the isolation of HCMV is a prerequisite. The development of multidrug resistance with mutation in both genes is rare, but it is often associated with a fatal outcome. The manifestation of multidrug resistance is mostly associated with combined UL97/UL54-mutations. Normally, mutations in the UL97 gene occur initially followed by UL54 mutation after therapy switch. The appearance of UL54-mutation alone without any detection of UL97-mutation is rare. Interestingly, in a number of patients the UL97 mutation could be detected in specific compartments exclusively and not in blood.

  5. Multidrug-Resistant Tuberculosis Complicated by Nosocomial Infection with Multidrug-Resistant Enterobacteriaceae

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gröschel, Matthias I; Omansen, Till F; de Lange, Wiel; van der Werf, Tjip S; Lokate, M.; Bathoorn, Erik; Akkerman, Onno W; Stienstra, Ymkje

    2016-01-01

    Treatment of mycobacterial diseases such as tuberculosis (TB) entails long and intense antimicrobial therapy. TB patients are at risk of coinfection with other multidrug-resistant bacteria, such as those from Enterobacteriaceae family, because of antimicrobial selection pressure and nosocomial trans

  6. Third generation cephalosporin resistant Enterobacteriaceae and multidrug resistant gram-negative bacteria causing bacteremia in febrile neutropenia adult cancer patients in Lebanon, broad spectrum antibiotics use as a major risk factor, and correlation with poor prognosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rima eMoghnieh

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Bacteremia remains a major cause of life-threatening complications in patients receiving anticancer chemotherapy. The spectrum and susceptibility profiles of causative microorganisms differ with time and place. Data from Lebanon are scarce. We aim at evaluating the epidemiology of bacteremia in cancer patients in a university hospital in Lebanon, emphasizing antibiotic resistance and risk factors of multi-drug resistant organism (MDRO-associated bacteremia.This is a retrospective study of 75 episodes of bacteremia occurring in febrile neutropenic patients admitted to the hematology-oncology unit at Makassed General Hospital, Lebanon, from October 2009-January 2012.It corresponds to epidemiological data on bacteremia episodes in febrile neutropenic cancer patients including antimicrobial resistance and identification of risk factors associated with third generation cephalosporin resistance (3GCR and MDRO-associated bacteremia. Out of 75 bacteremias, 42.7% were gram-positive (GP, and 57.3% were gram-negative (GN. GP bacteremias were mostly due to methicillin-resistant coagulase negative staphylococci (28% of total bacteremias and 66% of GP bacteremias. Among the GN bacteremias, Escherichia coli (22.7% of total, 39.5% of GN organisms and Klebsiellapneumoniae(13.3% of total, 23.3% of GN organisms were the most important causative agents. GN bacteremia due to 3GC sensitive (3GCS bacteria represented 28% of total bacteremias, while 29% were due to 3GCR bacteria and 9% were due to carbapenem-resistant organisms. There was a significant correlation between bacteremia with MDRO and subsequent intubation, sepsis and mortality. Among potential risk factors, only broad spectrum antibiotic intake >4 days before bacteremia was found to be statistically significant for acquisition of 3GCR bacteria. Using carbapenems or piperacillin/ tazobactam>4 days before bacteremia was significantly associated with the emergence of MDRO (p value<0.05.

  7. The secondary resistome of multidrug-resistant Klebsiella pneumoniae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jana, Bimal; Cain, Amy K.; Doerrler, William T.; Boinett, Christine J.; Fookes, Maria C.; Parkhill, Julian; Guardabassi, Luca

    2017-01-01

    Klebsiella pneumoniae causes severe lung and bloodstream infections that are difficult to treat due to multidrug resistance. We hypothesized that antimicrobial resistance can be reversed by targeting chromosomal non-essential genes that are not responsible for acquired resistance but essential for resistant bacteria under therapeutic concentrations of antimicrobials. Conditional essentiality of individual genes to antimicrobial resistance was evaluated in an epidemic multidrug-resistant clone of K. pneumoniae (ST258). We constructed a high-density transposon mutant library of >430,000 unique Tn5 insertions and measured mutant depletion upon exposure to three clinically relevant antimicrobials (colistin, imipenem or ciprofloxacin) by Transposon Directed Insertion-site Sequencing (TraDIS). Using this high-throughput approach, we defined three sets of chromosomal non-essential genes essential for growth during exposure to colistin (n = 35), imipenem (n = 1) or ciprofloxacin (n = 1) in addition to known resistance determinants, collectively termed the “secondary resistome”. As proof of principle, we demonstrated that inactivation of a non-essential gene not previously found linked to colistin resistance (dedA) restored colistin susceptibility by reducing the minimum inhibitory concentration from 8 to 0.5 μg/ml, 4-fold below the susceptibility breakpoint (S ≤ 2 μg/ml). This finding suggests that the secondary resistome is a potential target for developing antimicrobial “helper” drugs that restore the efficacy of existing antimicrobials. PMID:28198411

  8. Prolonged weightlessness affects promyelocytic multidrug resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piepmeier, E H; Kalns, J E; McIntyre, K M; Lewis, M L

    1997-12-15

    An immortalized promyelocytic cell line was studied to detect how doxorubicin uptake is affected by microgravity. The purpose of this experiment was to identify the effect that microgravity may have on multidrug resistance in leukocytes. HL60 cells and HL60 cells resistant to anthracycline (HL60/AR) were grown in RPMI and 10% FBS. Upon reaching orbit in the Space Shuttle Endeavour, the cells were robotically mixed with doxorubicin. Three days after mixing, cells were fixed with paraformaldehyde/glutaraldehyde. Ground control experiments were conducted concurrently using a robot identical to the one used on the Shuttle. Fixed cells were analyzed within 2 weeks of launch. Confocal micrographs identified changes in cell structure (transmittance), drug distribution (fluorescence), and microtubule polymerization (fluorescence). Flight cells showed a lack of cytoskeletal polymerization resulting in an overall amorphic globular shape. Doxorubicin distribution in ground cells included a large numbers of vesicles relative to flight cells. There was a greater amount of doxorubicin present in flight cells (85% +/- 9.7) than in ground control cells (43% +/- 26) as determined by image analysis. Differences in microtubule formation between flight cells and ground cells could be partially responsible for the differences in drug distribution. Cytoskeletal interactions are critical to the function of P-glycoprotein as a drug efflux pump responsible for multidrug resistance.

  9. 多药耐药菌医院感染控制措施%Measures to control nosocomial infections caused by multidrug-resistant bacteria

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈京; 杨怀; 徐艳; 牟霞; 郑金鼎

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To implement the multi-resistant hospital infection control measures to reduce hospital infection and protect patients and medical staff safety. METHODS Developed control programs and work plans of clinical multi-drug resistant hospital infection,through the medical quality management system, multi-disciplinary efforted to cooperate on the implementation of multi-drug resistant clinical control to all aspects of hospital infection. RESULTS After a multi-sectoral, clinical departments implemented specific communication control program of multi-drug resistant, hospital infection control department for inspectors, and medical quality assessment and feedback. Dissemination of multiple drug-resistant control measures continued to be implemented. Subjects of medical staff and patients under the protection of preventive measures in isolation, diagnosis and treatment of normal activities. CONCLUSION The multi-resistant hospital infection control programs in the medical quality management system in the management level attention. Multiple drug-resistant hospital infection control inspectors at the quality of evaluation in the hospital announce that director of undergraduate responsible the problems to the individual, so that clinicians and nurses, enhance the sense of responsibility, self-awareness increased substantially and facilitate the hospital infection control programs and measures to more comprehensive efforts in the promotion and clinical implementation.%目的 落实多药耐药菌医院感染控制措施,减少医院感染发生,保障患者和医务人员安全.方法 制定临床多药耐药菌医院感染控制方案及工作计划,通过医疗质量管理体系,多学科努力合作,落实到临床控制多药耐药菌医院感染的各个环节.结果 经过多部门合作,临床科室具体落实多药耐药菌传播控制方案,医院感染科进行督察,结合医疗质量考评、反馈,多药耐药菌传播控制措施不断得到落实;各

  10. ABC transporters and multidrug resistance in Aspergillus nidulans

    OpenAIRE

    ANDRADE, A. C.

    2000-01-01

    The term multidrug resistance (MDR) stands for simultaneous cellular resistance to chemically unrelated toxicants and is often associated with overproduction of multidrug-efflux proteins of the A TP- b inding- c assette (ABC) superfamily. The ABC transporters comprise a large and multifunctional family of proteins. Besides multidrug transporters, the superfamily includes proteins involved in transmembrane transport of various substances such as ions, amino acids, peptides, sugars, vitamins, s...

  11. ABC transporters and multidrug resistance in Aspergillus nidulans

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Andrade, A.C.

    2000-01-01

    The term multidrug resistance (MDR) stands for simultaneous cellular resistance to chemically unrelated toxicants and is often associated with overproduction of multidrug-efflux proteins of the A TP- b inding- c assette (ABC) superfamily. The ABC tr

  12. Establishment of a Multidrug Resistance Cell Line A549/cDDP of Human Lung Adenocarcinoma and Expression Analysis of Multidrug Resistance-Associated Genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yongcheng PAN

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Background and objective It has been proven that chemotherapy failure caused by multidrug resistance in lung tumor cells is the main cause for the patient's survival rate. The aim of this study is to establish a multidrug resistance cell line of human lung adenocarcinoma and study the mechanism of multidrug resistance. Methods Human lung adenocarcinoma cell line A549 was induced to multidrug resistance cell line A549/cDDP by intermittentadministration of high dose of cisplatin (cDDP. The multidrug resistance was detected by using MTT assay. The levels of expression of MDR-1 gene-coded P-glycoportein (P-gp, multidrug resistance-associated protein (MRP, and GSH/GST were examined by flow cytometric assay. The levels of expression of MDR and MRP gene were also detected by RTPCR in both A549/cDDP and A549 cell lines. Results A549/cDDP was resistant to many anti-tumor agents. The IC50 of A549/cDDP was 16.87 times higher than that of A549. The expressions of P-gp and MRP in A549/cDDP were increased significantly to (70.5±4.9% and (29.4±2.9%, respectively, vs (42.4±5.6% and (21.4±3.5% in A549. There was no difference of the GSH/GST expression between A549/cDDPand A549 cells. Conclusion A549/cDDP is a model with multidrug resistance and the levels of MDR and MRP mRNA expressions are remarkably higher in A549/cDDP than those in A549.

  13. Mycobacterium tuberculosis of the RDRio genotype is the predominant cause of tuberculosis and associated with multidrug resistance in Porto Alegre City, South Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalla Costa, Elis Regina; Lazzarini, Luiz Claudio Oliveira; Perizzolo, Paulo Fernado; Díaz, Chyntia Acosta; Spies, Fernanda S; Costa, Lucas Laux; Ribeiro, Andrezza W; Barroco, Caroline; Schuh, Sandra Jungblut; da Silva Pereira, Marcia Aparecida; Dias, Claudia F; Gomes, Harrison M; Unis, Gisela; Zaha, Arnaldo; Almeida da Silva, Pedro E; Suffys, Philip N; Rossetti, Maria L R

    2013-04-01

    Spoligotyping has shown Mycobacterium tuberculosis strains to be composed of different lineages, and some of them are not just geographically restricted but also affect specific ethnic populations and are associated with outbreaks and drug resistance. We recently described a particular subtype within the Latin American-Mediterranean (LAM) family, called RD(Rio), widespread in Brazil. Moreover, recent data also indicate that RD(Rio) is present in many countries on all continents and is associated with cavitary disease and multidrug resistance (MDR). To further explore the relationship between RD(Rio) and MDR, we conducted a study in a tuberculosis (TB) reference center responsible for the care of MDR patients in Rio Grande do Sul, the southernmost Brazilian state. From a collection of 237 clinical isolates, RD(Rio) alone was responsible for one-half of all MDR cases, including one large group composed of strains with identical IS6110-restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) and having the LAM5 signature. We additionally had complete data records for 96 patients and could make comparisons between the presence and absence of RD(Rio). No difference in clinical, radiological or laboratory features was observed, but a significantly greater number of cases with MDR were described in patients infected with an RD(Rio) strain (P = 0.0015). Altogether, RD(Rio) was responsible for 38% of all TB cases. These data support and confirmed previous findings that RD(Rio) is the main agent responsible for TB in Brazil and is associated with drug resistance. Considering that RD(Rio) is a globally distributed genotype, such findings raise concern about the increase in MDR in certain human populations.

  14. The emergence and outbreak of multidrug-resistant typhoid fever in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Meiying; Li, Xinlan; Liao, Qiaohong; Li, Fang; Zhang, Jing; Kan, Biao

    2016-06-22

    Typhoid fever remains a severe public health problem in developing countries. The emergence of resistant typhoid, particularly multidrug-resistant typhoid infections, highlights the necessity of monitoring the resistance characteristics of this invasive pathogen. In this study, we report a typhoid fever outbreak caused by multidrug-resistant Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi strains with an ACSSxtT pattern. Resistance genes conferring these phenotypes were harbored by a large conjugative plasmid, which increases the threat of Salmonella Typhi and thus requires close surveillance for dissemination of strains containing such genes.

  15. Mechanisms of multidrug resistance in cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillet, Jean-Pierre; Gottesman, Michael M

    2010-01-01

    The development of multidrug resistance (MDR) to chemotherapy remains a major challenge in the treatment of cancer. Resistance exists against every effective anticancer drug and can develop by numerous mechanisms including decreased drug uptake, increased drug efflux, activation of detoxifying systems, activation of DNA repair mechanisms, evasion of drug-induced apoptosis, etc. In the first part of this chapter, we briefly summarize the current knowledge on individual cellular mechanisms responsible for MDR, with a special emphasis on ATP-binding cassette transporters, perhaps the main theme of this textbook. Although extensive work has been done to characterize MDR mechanisms in vitro, the translation of this knowledge to the clinic has not been crowned with success. Therefore, identifying genes and mechanisms critical to the development of MDR in vivo and establishing a reliable method for analyzing clinical samples could help to predict the development of resistance and lead to treatments designed to circumvent it. Our thoughts about translational research needed to achieve significant progress in the understanding of this complex phenomenon are therefore discussed in a third section. The pleotropic response of cancer cells to chemotherapy is summarized in a concluding diagram.

  16. [Fosfomycin--its significance for treatment of diseases due to multidrug-resistant bacteria].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stock, Ingo

    2015-01-01

    Fosfomycin is a bactericidal phosphonic acid derivative, which engages by inhibiting pyruvyltransferase at an early stage in the peptidoglycan synthesis. It shows a broad spectrum of activity that includes many multidrug-resistant gram-negative and gram-positive bacteria. Fosfomycin is active against most strains of Pseudomonas aeruginosa and several multidrug-resistant Enterobacteriaceae, e.g., Escherichia coli strains expressing extended spectrum beta-lactamases (ESBL) and Klebsiella pneumoniae strains with decreased susceptibilities to carbapenems. Most methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) strains as well as enterococci with and without vancomycin resistance are also sensitive to fosfomycin. During the last decade, a variety of studies showed that fosfomycin is not only suitable for treating uncomplicated urinary tract diseases, but also for the treatment of many other diseases caused by bacterial pathogens with and without multidrug resistance. However, large controlled studies demonstrating the efficacy of the drug to treat diseases caused by multidrug-resistant bacteria are still missing. Considering the low number of antibacterial agents with good activity against multidrug-resistant bacteria, fosfomycin should be evaluated as an important antibiotic for the treatment of several severe illnesses due to these pathogens. However, because some multidrug-resistant bacteria are also resistant to fosfomycin, this agent should only be applied if the pathogen is sensitive to this drug. In addition, because rapid development of resistance cannot be excluded if fosfomycin will be applied alone, this drug should only be given in combination with other effective drugs for the treatment of serious systemic diseases due to multidrug-resistant bacterial pathogens.

  17. Multidrug-Resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis of the Latin American Mediterranean Lineage, Wrongly Identified as Mycobacterium pinnipedii (Spoligotype International Type 863 [SIT863]), Causing Active Tuberculosis in South Brazil

    KAUST Repository

    Dalla Costa, Elis R.

    2015-09-23

    We recently detected the spoligotype patterns of strains of Mycobacterium pinnipedii, a species of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex, in sputum samples from nine cases with pulmonary tuberculosis residing in Porto Alegre, South Brazil. Because this species is rarely encountered in humans, we further characterized these nine isolates by additional genotyping techniques, including 24-locus mycobacterial interspersed repetitive-unit–variable-number tandem-repeat (MIRU-VNTR) typing, verification of the loci TbD1, RD9, pks15/1, RDRio, and fbpC, the insertion of IS6110 at a site specific to the M. tuberculosis Latin American Mediterranean (LAM) lineage, and whole-genome sequencing. The combined analysis of these markers revealed that the isolates are in fact M. tuberculosis and more specifically belong to the LAM genotype. Most of these isolates (n = 8) were shown to be multidrug resistant (MDR), which prompted us to perform partial sequencing of the rpoA, rpoB, rpoC, katG, and inhA genes. Seven isolates (77.8%) carried the S315T mutation in katG, and one of these (11%) also presented the C(−17)T single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) in inhA. Interestingly, six of the MDR isolates also presented an undescribed insertion of 12 nucleotides (CCA GAA CAA CCC) in codon 516 of rpoB. No putative compensatory mutation was found in either rpoA or rpoC. This is the first report of an M. tuberculosis LAM family strain with a convergent M. pinnipedii spoligotype. These spoligotypes are observed in genotype databases at a modest frequency, highlighting that care must be taken when identifying isolates in the M. tuberculosis complex on the basis of single genetic markers.

  18. Multidrug resistance in tumour cells: characterisation of the multidrug resistant cell line K562-Lucena 1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    VIVIAN M. RUMJANEK

    2001-03-01

    Full Text Available Multidrug resistance to chemotherapy is a major obstacle in the treatment of cancer patients. The best characterised mechanism responsible for multidrug resistance involves the expression of the MDR-1 gene product, P-glycoprotein. However, the resistance process is multifactorial. Studies of multidrug resistance mechanisms have relied on the analysis of cancer cell lines that have been selected and present cross-reactivity to a broad range of anticancer agents. This work characterises a multidrug resistant cell line, originally selected for resistance to the Vinca alkaloid vincristine and derived from the human erythroleukaemia cell K562. This cell line, named Lucena 1, overexpresses P-glycoprotein and have its resistance reversed by the chemosensitisers verapamil, trifluoperazine and cyclosporins A, D and G. Furthermore, we demonstrated that methylene blue was capable of partially reversing the resistance in this cell line. On the contrary, the use of 5-fluorouracil increased the resistance of Lucena 1. In addition to chemotherapics, Lucena 1 cells were resistant to ultraviolet A radiation and hydrogen peroxide and failed to mobilise intracellular calcium when thapsigargin was used. Changes in the cytoskeleton of this cell line were also observed.A resistência a múltiplos fármacos é o principal obstáculo no tratamento de pacientes com câncer. O mecanismo responsável pela resistência múltipla mais bem caracterizado envolve a expressão do produto do gene MDR-1, a glicoproteína P. Entretanto, o processo de resistência tem fatores múltiplos. Estudos de mecanismos de resistência m��ltipla a fármacos têm dependido da análise de linhagens celulares tumorais que foram selecionadas e apresentam reatividade cruzada a uma ampla faixa de agentes anti-tumorais. Este trabalho caracteriza uma linhagem celular com múltipla resistência a fármacos, selecionada originalmente pela resistência ao alcalóide de Vinca vincristina e derivado

  19. Multidrug-resistant pathogens in the food supply.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doyle, Marjorie E

    2015-04-01

    Antimicrobial resistance, including multidrug resistance (MDR), is an increasing problem globally. MDR bacteria are frequently detected in humans and animals from both more- and less-developed countries and pose a serious concern for human health. Infections caused by MDR microbes may increase morbidity and mortality and require use of expensive drugs and prolonged hospitalization. Humans may be exposed to MDR pathogens through exposure to environments at health-care facilities and farms, livestock and companion animals, human food, and exposure to other individuals carrying MDR microbes. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention classifies drug-resistant foodborne bacteria, including Campylobacter, Salmonella Typhi, nontyphoidal salmonellae, and Shigella, as serious threats. MDR bacteria have been detected in both meat and fresh produce. Salmonellae carrying genes coding for resistance to multiple antibiotics have caused numerous foodborne MDR outbreaks. While there is some level of resistance to antimicrobials in environmental bacteria, the widespread use of antibiotics in medicine and agriculture has driven the selection of a great variety of microbes with resistance to multiple antimicrobials. MDR bacteria on meat may have originated in veterinary health-care settings or on farms where animals are given antibiotics in feed or to treat infections. Fresh produce may be contaminated by irrigation or wash water containing MDR bacteria. Livestock, fruits, and vegetables may also be contaminated by food handlers, farmers, and animal caretakers who carry MDR bacteria. All potential sources of MDR bacteria should be considered and strategies devised to reduce their presence in foods. Surveillance studies have documented increasing trends in MDR in many pathogens, although there are a few reports of the decline of certain multidrug pathogens. Better coordination of surveillance programs and strategies for controlling use of antimicrobials need to be implemented in

  20. [Significance of efflux pumps in multidrug resistance of Gram-negative bacteria].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiercińska, Olga; Chojecka, Agnieszka; Kanclerski, Krzysztof; Rőhm-Rodowald, Ewa; Jakimiak, Bożenna

    2015-01-01

    The phenomenon of multidrug. resistance of bacteria is a serious problem of modern medicine. This resistance largely is a consequence of abuse and improper use of antibacterial substances, especially antibiotics and chemotherapeutics in hospital settings. Multidrug resistance is caused by a number of interacting mechanisms of resistance. Recent studies have indicated that efflux pumps and systems of efflux pumps are an important determinant of this phenomenon. Contribute to this particular RND efflux systems of Gram-negative bacteria, which possess a wide range of substrates such as antibiotics, dyes, detergents, toxins and active substances of disinfectants and antiseptics. These transporters are usually encoded on bacterial chromosomes. Genes encoding efflux pumps' proteins may also be carried on plasmids and other mobile genetic elements. Such pumps are usually specific to a small group of substrates, but as an additional mechanism of resistance may contribute to the multidrug resistance.

  1. Multi-drug resistant tuberculosis in the Netherlands : Personalised treatment and outcome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Altena, Richard

    2016-01-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) caused by bacilli that are resistant to the two major drugs, rifampicin and isoniazid is defined as Multi-Drug Resistant TB or MDRTB. MDRTB kills around 50% of people affected around the world. In contrast, treatment results of MDR-TB in the Netherlands (1985-2013) have consistentl

  2. How to Measure Export via Bacterial Multidrug Resistance Efflux Pumps

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica M. A. Blair

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Bacterial multidrug resistance (MDR efflux pumps are an important mechanism of antibiotic resistance and are required for many pathogens to cause infection. They are also being harnessed to improve microbial biotechnological processes, including biofuel production. Therefore, scientists of many specialties must be able to accurately measure efflux activity. However, myriad methodologies have been described and the most appropriate method is not always clear. Within the scientific literature, many methods are misused or data arising are misinterpreted. The methods for measuring efflux activity can be split into two groups, (i those that directly measure efflux and (ii those that measure the intracellular accumulation of a substrate, which is then used to infer efflux activity. Here, we review the methods for measuring efflux and explore the most recent advances in this field, including single-cell or cell-free technologies and mass spectrometry, that are being used to provide more detailed information about efflux pump activity.

  3. Multidrug-resistant tuberculosis in Europe, 2010-2011

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gunther, G.; Leth, F. van; Alexandru, S.; Altet, N.; Avsar, K.; Bang, D.; Barbuta, R.; Bothamley, G.; Ciobanu, A.; Crudu, V.; Davilovits, M.; Dedicoat, M.; Duarte, R.; Gualano, G.; Kunst, H.; Lange, W. de; Leimane, V.; Magis-Escurra Ibanez, C.; McLaughlin, A.M.; Muylle, I.; Polcova, V.; Pontali, E.; Popa, C; Rumetshofer, R.; Skrahina, A.; Solodovnikova, V.; Spinu, V.; Tiberi, S.; Viiklepp, P.; Lange, C.

    2015-01-01

    Drug-resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis is challenging elimination of tuberculosis (TB). We evaluated risk factors for TB and levels of second-line drug resistance in M. tuberculosis in patients in Europe with multidrug-resistant (MDR) TB. A total of 380 patients with MDR TB and 376 patients with

  4. Multidrug-Resistant Tuberculosis in Europe, 2010-2011

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Guenther, Gunar; van Leth, Frank; Alexandru, Sofia; Altet, Neus; Avsar, Korkut; Bang, Didi; Barbuta, Raisa; Bothamley, Graham; Ciobanu, Ana; Crudu, Valeriu; Danilovits, Manfred; Dedicoat, Martin; Duarte, Raquel; Gualano, Gina; Kunst, Heinke; de Lange, Wiel; Leimane, Vaira; Magis-Escurra, Cecile; McLaughlin, Anne-Marie; Muylle, Inge; Polcova, Veronika; Pontalli, Emanuele; Popa, Christina; Rumetshofer, Rudolf; Skrahina, Alena; Solodovnikova, Varvara; Spinu, Victor; Tiberi, Simon; Viiklepp, Piret; Lange, Christoph

    2015-01-01

    Drug-resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis is challenging elimination of tuberculosis (TB). We evaluated risk factors for TB and levels of second-line drug resistance in M. tuberculosis in patients in Europe with multidrug-resistant (MDR) TB. A total of 380 patients with MDR TB and 376 patients with

  5. Pharmacokinetics of ertapenem in patients with multidrug-resistant tuberculosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Rijn, Sander P; van Altena, Richard; Akkerman, Onno W; van Soolingen, Dick; van der Laan, Tridia; de Lange, Wiel C M; Kosterink, Jos G W; van der Werf, Tjip S; Alffenaar, Jan-Willem C

    2016-01-01

    Treatment of multidrug-resistant (MDR) and extensively drug-resistant (XDR) tuberculosis (TB) is becoming more challenging because of increased levels of drug resistance against second-line TB drugs. One promising group of antimicrobial drugs is carbapenems. Ertapenem is an attractive carbapenem for

  6. Multidrug resistant Gram-negative bacilli in lower respiratory tract infections.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shashidhar Vishwanath

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Lower respiratory tract infections are among important causes of morbidity and mortality for all age groups. The emergence of multidrug resistant Gram-negative bacilli is an issue of increasing concern.A retrospective study including respiratory specimens (sputum and BAL was conducted in our tertiary care centre. Samples were processed for microscopy, culture and susceptibility testing following standard methods. Multidrug resistant Gram-negative bacilli causing lower respiratory tract infections were studied for their causation of disease. The effect of appropriate treatment on clinical outcome was observed.A total of 472 Gram-negative pathogens were isolated from sputum and broncho-alveolar lavage fluid specimens during the study period. Among these Gram-negative pathogens 175 (37% were found to be multidrug resistant. Klebsiella pneumoniae 85 (48.6% and Acinetobacter spp. 59 (33.7% were the predominant multidrug resistant Gram-negative bacilli isolated. Based on clinico-microbiological correlation, 138 (78.9% multidrug resistant isolates were found to be pathogenic and the rest 37 (21.1% were considered as colonizers. After initiating appropriate antibiotic therapy, clinical improvement was seen in 110 (79.7% patients. In the patients who showed improvement, amikacin (34.3% and cefoperazone-sulbactum (21.8% were found to be the most effective drugs.A large majority of the isolated multidrug resistant Gram-negative bacilli were found to be pathogenic. Regular surveillance which directs appropriate empirical therapy; and good clinic-microbiological workup of each case of lower respiratory tract infection can reduce the morbidity and mortality associated with multidrug resistant organisms.

  7. Multidrug resistant Acinetobacter baumannii in veterinary medicine--emergence of an underestimated pathogen?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Stefanie; Janssen, Traute; Wieler, Lothar H

    2014-01-01

    The proportion of multidrug resistant bacteria causing infections in animals has continuously been increasing. While the relevance of ESBL (extended spectrum beta-lactamase)-producing Enterobacteriaceae spp. and MRSA (methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus) is unquestionable, knowledge about multidrug resistant Acinetobacter baumannii in veterinary medicine is scarce. This is a worrisome situation, as A. baumannii are isolated from veterinary clinical specimens with rising frequency. The remarkable ability of A. baumannii to develop multidrug resistance and the high risk of transmission are known in human medicine for years. Despite this, data regarding A. baumannii isolates of animal origin are missing. Due to the changing role of companion animals with closer contact between animal and owner, veterinary intensive care medicine is steadily developing. It can be assumed that the number of "high risk" patients with an enhanced risk for hospital acquired infections will be rising simultaneously. Thus, development and spread of multidrug resistant pathogens is envisioned to rise. It is possible, that A. baumannii will evolve into a veterinary nosocomial pathogen similar to ESBL-producing Enterobacteriaceae and MRSA. The lack of attention paid to A. baumannii in veterinary medicine is even more worrying, as first reports indicate a transmission between humans and animals. Essential questions regarding the role of livestock, especially as a potential source of multidrug resistant isolates, remain unanswered. This review summarizes the current knowledge on A. baumannii in veterinary medicine for the first time. It underlines the utmost significance of further investigations of A. baumannii animal isolates, particularly concerning epidemiology and resistance mechanisms.

  8. Capreomycin-induced optic neuritis in a case of multidrug resistant pulmonary tuberculosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magazine Rahul

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available A patient of multidrug-resistant pulmonary tuberculosis was prescribed an anti-tubercular regimen containing capreomycin. Patient developed optic neuritis 3 months after starting treatment. Investigations did not reveal any specific cause for this ocular condition and on discontinuing capreomycin his vision recovered. We conclude that capreomycin is the cause of reversible optic neuritis in our case.

  9. Resistance patterns, prevalence, and predictors of fluoroquinolones resistance in multidrug resistant tuberculosis patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nafees Ahmad

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Fluoroquinolones are the backbone of multidrug resistant tuberculosis treatment regimens. Despite the high burden of multidrug resistant tuberculosis in the country, little is known about drug resistance patterns, prevalence, and predictors of fluoroquinolones resistance among multidrug resistant tuberculosis patients from Pakistan. Objective To evaluate drug resistance patterns, prevalence, and predictors of fluoroquinolones resistance in multidrug resistant tuberculosis patients. Methods This was a cross-sectional study conducted at a programmatic management unit of drug resistant tuberculosis, Lady Reading Hospital Peshawar, Pakistan. Two hundred and forty-three newly diagnosed multidrug resistant tuberculosis patients consecutively enrolled for treatment at study site from January 1, 2012 to July 28, 2013 were included in the study. A standardized data collection form was used to collect patients’ socio-demographic, microbiological, and clinical data. SPSS 16 was used for data analysis. Results High degree of drug resistance (median 5 drugs, range 2–8 was observed. High proportion of patients was resistant to all five first-line anti-tuberculosis drugs (62.6%, and more than half were resistant to second line drugs (55.1%. The majority of the patients were ofloxacin resistant (52.7%. Upon multivariate analysis previous tuberculosis treatment at private (OR = 1.953, p = 0.034 and public private mix (OR = 2.824, p = 0.046 sectors were predictors of ofloxacin resistance. Conclusion The high degree of drug resistance observed, particularly to fluoroquinolones, is alarming. We recommend the adoption of more restrictive policies to control non-prescription sale of fluoroquinolones, its rational use by physicians, and training doctors in both private and public–private mix sectors to prevent further increase in fluoroquinolones resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis strains.

  10. Drug susceptibility of multidrug-resistant bacteria causing nosocomial infections%医院感染多药耐药菌的临床调查与药敏分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    佟青; 张一兵; 刘阳

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To investigate the distribution and drug resistance of multiple drug resistant bacteria causing nosocomial infections so as to raise the level of infection prevention and guide clinical rational administration. METHODS The specimens of nosocomial infection were isolated routinely from Jan to Jul 2011} the identification of bacteria and drug susceptibility testing were finished by VITEK2 automatic microbial analyzer. RESULTS A total of 230 strains of pathogenic bacteria were isolated, including 129 (56.1%) multidrug-resistant bacteria. The isolation rate of gram-positive multidrug-resistant bacteria was 4. 8%, Stuphylococcus aureus accounted for 0. 9% and Enlerococci accounted for 3. 9% ; the isolation rate of gram-negative multidrug resistant bacteria was 45. 0% , Escherichia coli accounted for 16. 9%, KUbsiella pneumoniae accounted for 13.0%. CONCLUSION The distribution of multiple resistant bacteria isolated in our hospital is partly different from the target strains reported by the Ministry of Health, which indicates that the antibiotics should be used reasonably on the basis of the species of the pathogens isolated, drug resistance as well as the drug susceptibility testing.%目的 了解医院感染多药耐药菌的分布及耐药性,提高预防感染水平,指导临床合理使用抗菌药物.方法 对2011年1-7月临床标本按常规进行病原菌分离,采用VITEK IMS全自动细菌鉴定与药敏分析仪,对病原菌进行鉴定.结果 共检出病原菌230株,其中多药耐药菌129株,检出率为56.1%;革兰阳性多药耐药菌检出率为4.8%,主要为金黄色葡萄球菌占0,9%,屎肠球菌占3.9%;革兰阴性多药耐药菌检出率为45.0%,主要为大肠埃希菌占16,9%、肺炎克雷伯菌占13.0%.结论 医院分离的多药耐药菌分布与卫生部公布的主要多药耐药目标菌有一定差异,提示临床医师在使用抗菌药物时应根据病原菌的分离株种类、耐药性特点及药敏试验,合理选用抗菌药物.

  11. Multidrug-resistant tuberculosis, Somalia, 2010-2011.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sindani, Ireneaus; Fitzpatrick, Christopher; Falzon, Dennis; Suleiman, Bashir; Arube, Peter; Adam, Ismail; Baghdadi, Samiha; Bassili, Amal; Zignol, Matteo

    2013-03-01

    In a nationwide survey in 2011, multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR TB) was found in 5.2% and 40.8% of patients with new and previously treated TB, respectively. These levels of drug resistance are among the highest ever documented in Africa and the Middle East. This finding presents a serious challenge for TB control in Somalia.

  12. Nanodrugs: optimism for emerging trend of multidrug resistance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khan AU

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Asad U KhanMedical Microbiology and Molecular Biology Laboratory, Interdisciplinary Biotechnology Unit, Aligarh Muslim University, Aligarh, IndiaThis is with reference to an article published recently in your journal regarding the antibiotic activity of chitosan-coated silver nanoparticles.1 This is an inspiring move towards control of infection caused by multidrug-resistant bacteria which has become a serious problem for clinicians and physicians worldwide.2 At the moment, carbapenems are being used as the drugs of choice to combat infections. However, the emergence of carbapenem resistance has changed current remedial approaches in the management of serious infections. One of the latest enzymes, NDM-1 (New Delhi metallo-β-lactamase-1, first identified in a Swedish patient of Indian origin in 2008,3 has been key in the development of resistance to almost all antibiotics. Infection caused by NDM-1 producers is widespread on the Indian subcontinent,4 and is now emerging in the US and other countries throughout the world.5View original paper by Jena and colleagues.

  13. Imaging multidrug resistance with 4-[18F]fluoropaclitaxel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurdziel, Karen A; Kalen, Joseph D; Hirsch, Jerry I; Wilson, John D; Agarwal, Rakesh; Barrett, Daniel; Bear, Harry D; McCumiskey, James F

    2007-10-01

    Multidrug resistance (MDR) is a cause of treatment failure in many cancer patients. MDR refers to a phenotype whereby a tumor is resistant to a large number of natural chemotherapeutic drugs. Having prior knowledge of the presence of such resistance would decrease morbidity from unsuccessful therapy and allow for the selection of individuals who may benefit from the coadministration of MDR-inhibiting drugs. The Tc-99m-labeled single-photon-emitting radiotracers sestamibi and tetrofosmin have shown some predictive value. However, positron-emitting radiotracers, which allow for dynamic quantitative imaging, hold promise for a more accurate and specific identification of MDRtumors.MDR-expressing tumors are resistant to paclitaxel, which is commonly used as a chemotherapeutic agent. 4-[18F]Fluoropaclitaxel (FPAC) is a PET-radiolabeled analogue of paclitaxel. Preclinical studies have shown the uptake of FPAC to be inversely proportional to tumor MDR expression. FPAC PET imaging in normal volunteers shows biodistribution to be similar to that in nonhuman primates. Imaging in a breast cancer patient showed FPAC localization in a primary tumor that responded to chemotherapy, while failure to localize in mediastinal disease corresponded with only partial response.FPAC PET imaging shows promise for the noninvasive pretreatment identification of MDR-expressing tumors. While much additional work is needed, this work represents a step toward image-guided personalized medicine.

  14. Imaging multidrug resistance with 4-[{sup 18}F]fluoropaclitaxel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kurdziel, Karen A. [Department of Radiology, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, VA (United States)], E-mail: kurdziel@vcu.edu; Kalen, Joseph D. [School of Medicine, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, VA (United States)], E-mail: jdkalen@vcu.edu; Hirsch, Jerry I. [School of Medicine, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, VA (United States)], E-mail: jihirsch@vcu.edu; Wilson, John D. [School of Medicine, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, VA (United States)], E-mail: wilsonjd@hsc.vcu.edu; Agarwal, Rakesh [Surgical Oncology, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, VA (United States)], E-mail: dbarrett@vcu.edu; Barrett, Daniel [School of Medicine, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, VA (United States)], E-mail: ragarwal@vcu.edu; Bear, Harry D. [Surgical Oncology, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, VA (United States)], E-mail: 9jmccumi@mail2.vcu.edu; McCumiskey, James F. [Department of Radiology, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, VA (United States)], E-mail: hbear@hsc.vcu.edu

    2007-10-15

    Multidrug resistance (MDR) is a cause of treatment failure in many cancer patients. MDR refers to a phenotype whereby a tumor is resistant to a large number of natural chemotherapeutic drugs. Having prior knowledge of the presence of such resistance would decrease morbidity from unsuccessful therapy and allow for the selection of individuals who may benefit from the coadministration of MDR-inhibiting drugs. The Tc-99m-labeled single-photon-emitting radiotracers sestamibi and tetrofosmin have shown some predictive value. However, positron-emitting radiotracers, which allow for dynamic quantitative imaging, hold promise for a more accurate and specific identification of MDRtumors.MDR-expressing tumors are resistant to paclitaxel, which is commonly used as a chemotherapeutic agent. 4-[{sup 18}F]Fluoropaclitaxel (FPAC) is a PET-radiolabeled analogue of paclitaxel. Preclinical studies have shown the uptake of FPAC to be inversely proportional to tumor MDR expression. FPAC PET imaging in normal volunteers shows biodistribution to be similar to that in nonhuman primates. Imaging in a breast cancer patient showed FPAC localization in a primary tumor that responded to chemotherapy, while failure to localize in mediastinal disease corresponded with only partial response.FPAC PET imaging shows promise for the noninvasive pretreatment identification of MDR-expressing tumors. While much additional work is needed, this work represents a step toward image-guided personalized medicine.

  15. Levofloxacin-ceftriaxone combination attenuates lung inflammation in a mouse model of bacteremic pneumonia caused by multidrug-resistant Streptococcus pneumoniae via inhibition of cytolytic activities of pneumolysin and autolysin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majhi, Arnab; Adhikary, Rana; Bhattacharyya, Aritra; Mahanti, Sayantika; Bishayi, Biswadev

    2014-09-01

    In this study, our objective was to determine whether a synergistic antimicrobial combination in vitro would be beneficial in the downregulation of pneumococcal virulence genes and whether the associated inflammation of the lung tissue induced by multidrug-resistant Streptococcus pneumoniae infection in vivo needs to be elucidated in order to consider this mode of therapy in case of severe pneumococcal infection. We investigated in vivo changes in the expression of these virulence determinants using an efficacious combination determined in previous studies. BALB/c mice were infected with 10(6) CFU of bacteria. Intravenous levofloxacin at 150 mg/kg and/or ceftriaxone at 50 mg/kg were initiated 18 h postinfection; the animals were sacrificed 0 to 24 h after the initiation of treatment. The levels of cytokines, chemokines, and C-reactive protein (CRP) in the serum and lungs, along with the levels of myeloperoxidase and nitric oxide the inflammatory cell count in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF), changes in pneumolysin and autolysin gene expression and COX-2 and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) protein expression in the lungs were estimated. Combination therapy downregulated inflammation and promoted bacterial clearance. Pneumolysin and autolysin expression was downregulated, with a concomitant decrease in the expression of COX-2 and iNOS in lung tissue. Thus, the combination of levofloxacin and ceftriaxone can be considered for therapeutic use even in cases of pneumonia caused by drug-resistant isolates.

  16. Clinical analysis of 74 cases of bloodstream infections caused by multidrug-resist-ant Acinetobacter%多重耐药不动杆菌属血流感染74例临床分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    邹颖; 徐晓刚; 郭庆兰; 李光辉

    2014-01-01

    Objective To study the clinical characteristics,antimicrobial restistance of bloodstream infections (bacteremia) caused by multidrug-resistant Acinetobacter and analyze the outcomes of antibacterial therapy.Methods The clinical data were reviewed retrospectively for 74 patients with bloodstream infection caused by multidrug-resistant Acinetobacter who were trea-ted in HuaShan hospital from January 2005 to December 2011 .Results During the 6-year period,74 patients were diagnosed with multidrug-resistant Acinetobacter bacteremia,73 of which were nosocomial infections.The remaining one was community-acquired. Primary bloodstream infection accounted for 51 .4% (38/74),and secondary infection 48.6% (36/74), mainly secondary to pulmonary infections (23.0%,17/74). Solid tumor was the most common underlying disease (24.3%,18/74).Prior corticosteroid therapy,indwelling deep venous catheter,surgery and invasive procedures were predisposing factors of bacteremia. Acinetobacter-related bloodstream infections were associated with higher white blood cell count,increased neutrophil percentage,higher APACHE II score and lower serum albumin level.The bloodstream infection was caused by Acinetobacter baumannii in 65 pa-tients,Acinetobacter lwoffi in 7 patients,both Acinetobacter baumannii and Acinetobacter junii in one patient.The all-cause mortality rate was 27.0% (20/74).In vitro susceptibility testing showed that 20.0% (15/75 )of the Acinetobacter isolates were resistant to cefoperazone-sulbactam,which was the lowest among all the antibiotics tested.About 40.0% to 42.7% of the isolates were resistant to carbapenems.The outcome was related to the antimicrobial restistance.Carbapenem non-suscepti-ble Acinetobacter was associated with poorer outcome compared with carbapenem-susceptible Acinetobacter (mortality 46.9%vs 11 .9%,P <0.05 ).Cefoperazone-sulbactam non-susceptible Acinetobacter was also associated with poorer outcome com-pared with cefoperazone-sulbactam susceptible

  17. Linezolid susceptibility in Helicobacter pylori, including strains with multidrug resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyanova, Lyudmila; Evstatiev, Ivailo; Gergova, Galina; Yaneva, Penka; Mitov, Ivan

    2015-12-01

    Only a few studies have evaluated Helicobacter pylori susceptibility to linezolid. The aim of the present study was to assess linezolid susceptibility in H. pylori, including strains with double/multidrug resistance. The susceptibility of 53 H. pylori strains was evaluated by Etest and a breakpoint susceptibility testing method. Helicobacter pylori resistance rates were as follows: amoxicillin, 1.9%; metronidazole, 37.7%; clarithromycin, 17.0%; tetracycline, 1.9%; levofloxacin, 24.5%; and linezolid (>4 mg/L), 39.6%. The linezolid MIC50 value was 31.2-fold higher than that of clarithromycin and 10.5-fold higher than that of levofloxacin; however, 4 of 11 strains with double/multidrug resistance were linezolid-susceptible. The MIC range of the oxazolidinone agent was larger (0.125-64 mg/L) compared with those in the previous two reports. The linezolid resistance rate was 2.2-fold higher in metronidazole-resistant strains and in strains resistant to at least one antibiotic compared with the remaining strains. Briefly, linezolid was less active against H. pylori compared with clarithromycin and levofloxacin, and linezolid resistance was linked to resistance to metronidazole as well as to resistance to at least one antibiotic. However, linezolid activity against some strains with double/multidrug resistance may render the agent appropriate to treat some associated H. pylori infections following in vitro susceptibility testing of the strains. Clinical trials are required to confirm this suggestion.

  18. Synthesis of 5-oxyquinoline derivatives for reversal of multidrug resistance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Torsten Dittrich

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The inhibition of ABC (ATP binding cassette transporters is considered a powerful tool to reverse multidrug resistance. Zosuquidar featuring a difluorocyclopropyl-annulated dibenzosuberyl moiety has been found to be an inhibitor of the P-glycoprotein, one of the best-studied multidrug efflux pumps. Twelve 5-oxyisoquinoline derivatives, which are analogues of zosuquidar wherein the dibenzosuberyl-piperazine moiety is replaced by either a diarylaminopiperidine or a piperidone-derived acetal or thioacetal group, have been synthesized as pure enantiomers. Their inhibitory power has been evaluated for the bacterial multidrug-resistance ABC transporter LmrCD and fungal Pdr5. Four of the newly synthesized compounds reduced the transport activity to a higher degree than zosuquidar, being up to fourfold more efficient than the lead compound in the case of LmrCD and about two times better for Pdr5.

  19. Polymorphisms in Plasmodium falciparum chloroquine resistance transporter and multidrug resistance 1 genes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Venkatesan, Meera; Gadalla, Nahla B; Stepniewska, Kasia;

    2014-01-01

    Adequate clinical and parasitologic cure by artemisinin combination therapies relies on the artemisinin component and the partner drug. Polymorphisms in the Plasmodium falciparum chloroquine resistance transporter (pfcrt) and P. falciparum multidrug resistance 1 (pfmdr1) genes are associated...

  20. Prevalence of multidrug resistant pathogens in children with urinary tract infection: a retrospective analysis

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    Srinivasan S, Madhusudhan NS

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Urinary tract infection (UTI is one of the commonest medical problems in children. It can distress the child and may cause kidney damage. Prompt diagnosis and effective treatment can prevent complications in the child. But treatment of UTI in children has now become a challenge due to the emergence of multidrug resistant bacteria. Aims & Objectives: To know the bacteriological profile and susceptibility pattern of urinary tract infections in children and to know the prevalence of multidrug resistant uropathogens. Materials & Methods: A retrospective analysis was done on all paediatric urine samples for a period of one year. A total of 1581 samples were included in the study. Antimicrobial susceptibility testing was done on samples showing significant growth by Kirby-Bauer disc diffusion method. Statistical analysis: Prevalence and pattern were analyzed using proportions and percentages. Results: E.coli was the most predominant organism (56% causing UTI in children followed by Klebsiella sp (17%. Fifty three percent of gram negative organisms isolated from children were found to be multidrug resistant. Majority of E. coli isolates were found to be highly resistant to Ampicillin (91% and Cotrimoxazole (82% and highly sensitive to Imipenem (99% and Amikacin (93%. Conclusion: Paediatric UTI was common in children less than 5 years of age. Gram negative bacteria (E. coli and Klebsiella sp were more common than gram positive bacteria. Our study revealed that multidrug resistance was higher in E.coli.

  1. Bacterial Multidrug Efflux Pumps: Much More Than Antibiotic Resistance Determinants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanco, Paula; Hernando-Amado, Sara; Reales-Calderon, Jose Antonio; Corona, Fernando; Lira, Felipe; Alcalde-Rico, Manuel; Bernardini, Alejandra; Sanchez, Maria Blanca; Martinez, Jose Luis

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial multidrug efflux pumps are antibiotic resistance determinants present in all microorganisms. With few exceptions, they are chromosomally encoded and present a conserved organization both at the genetic and at the protein levels. In addition, most, if not all, strains of a given bacterial species present the same chromosomally-encoded efflux pumps. Altogether this indicates that multidrug efflux pumps are ancient elements encoded in bacterial genomes long before the recent use of antibiotics for human and animal therapy. In this regard, it is worth mentioning that efflux pumps can extrude a wide range of substrates that include, besides antibiotics, heavy metals, organic pollutants, plant-produced compounds, quorum sensing signals or bacterial metabolites, among others. In the current review, we present information on the different functions that multidrug efflux pumps may have for the bacterial behaviour in different habitats as well as on their regulation by specific signals. Since, in addition to their function in non-clinical ecosystems, multidrug efflux pumps contribute to intrinsic, acquired, and phenotypic resistance of bacterial pathogens, the review also presents information on the search for inhibitors of multidrug efflux pumps, which are currently under development, in the aim of increasing the susceptibility of bacterial pathogens to antibiotics. PMID:27681908

  2. Confronting multidrug-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neonakis, Ioannis K; Spandidos, Demetrios A; Petinaki, Efthimia

    2011-02-01

    Multidrug-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii (MDR-AB) infections are difficult to treat owing to the extremely limited armamentarium. The present review reports all available treatment options against MDR-AB, including single molecules, combination schemes, and alternative modes of antimicrobial administration. Additionally, a group of recently reported peptides with anti-MDR-AB activity is described.

  3. Antimicrobial activity of peptidomimetics against multidrug-resistant Escherichia coli

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jahnsen, Rasmus D; Frimodt-Møller, Niels; Franzyk, Henrik

    2012-01-01

    -lactamase-producing Escherichia coli was assessed by testing an array comprising different types of cationic peptidomimetics obtained by a general monomer-based solid-phase synthesis protocol. Most of the peptidomimetics possessed high to moderate activity toward multidrug-resistant E. coli as opposed to the corresponding...

  4. Multidrug-Resistant Pathogens in Hospitalized Syrian Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kassem, Diana Faour; Hoffmann, Yoav; Shahar, Naama; Ocampo, Smadar; Salomon, Liora; Zonis, Zeev

    2017-01-01

    Since 2013, wounded and ill children from Syria have received treatment in Israel. Screening cultures indicated that multidrug-resistant (MDR) pathogens colonized 89 (83%) of 107 children. For 58% of MDR infections, the pathogen was similar to that identified during screening. MDR screening of these children is valuable for purposes of isolation and treatment. PMID:27618479

  5. Multidrug transporters and antibiotic resistance in Lactococcus lactis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Poelarends, GJ; Mazurkiewicz, P; Konings, WN

    2002-01-01

    The Gram-positive bacterium Lactococcus lactis produces two distinct multidrug transporters, designated LmrA and LmrP, that both confer resistance to a wide variety of cationic lipophilic cytotoxic compounds as well as to many clinically relevant antibiotics. While LmrP is a proton/drug antiporter t

  6. Molecular characterization of multidrug-resistant Klebsiella pneumoniae isolates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiang-hua Hou

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Klebsiella pneumoniae is an important cause of healthcare-associated infections worldwide. Selective pressure, the extensive use of antibiotics, and the conjugational transmission of antibiotic resistance genes across bacterial species and genera facilitate the emergence of multidrug-resistant (MDR K. pneumoniae. Here, we examined the occurrence, phenotypes and genetic features of MDR K. pneumoniae isolated from patients in intensive care units (ICUs at the First Affiliated Hospital of Xiamen University in Xiamen, China, from January to December 2011. Thirty-eight MDR K. pneumoniae strains were collected. These MDR K. pneumoniae isolates possessed at least seven antibiotic resistance determinants, which contribute to the high-level resistance of these bacteria to aminoglycosides, macrolides, quinolones and β-lactams. Among these isolates, 24 strains were extended-spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL producers, 2 strains were AmpC producers, and 12 strains were both ESBL and AmpC producers. The 38 MDR isolates also contained class I (28/38 and class II integrons (10/38. All 28 class I-positive isolates contained aacC1, aacC4, orfX, orfX’ and aadA1 genes. β-lactam resistance was conferred through blaSHV (22/38, blaTEM (10/38, and blaCTX-M (7/38. The highly conserved blaKPC-2 (37/38 and blaOXA-23(1/38 alleles were responsible for carbapenem resistance, and a gyrAsite mutation (27/38 and the plasmid-mediated qnrB gene (13/38 were responsible for quinolone resistance. Repetitive-sequence-based PCR (REP-PCR fingerprinting of these MDR strains revealed the presence of five groups and sixteen patterns. The MDR strains from unrelated groups showed different drug resistance patterns; however, some homologous strains also showed different drug resistance profiles. Therefore, REP-PCR-based analyses can provide information to evaluate the epidemic status of nosocomial infection caused by MDR K. pneumoniae; however, this test lacks the power to discriminate some

  7. Molecular characterization of multidrug-resistant Klebsiella pneumoniae isolates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Xiang-hua; Song, Xiu-yu; Ma, Xiao-bo; Zhang, Shi-yang; Zhang, Jia-qin

    2015-01-01

    Klebsiella pneumoniae is an important cause of healthcare-associated infections worldwide. Selective pressure, the extensive use of antibiotics, and the conjugational transmission of antibiotic resistance genes across bacterial species and genera facilitate the emergence of multidrug-resistant (MDR) K. pneumoniae. Here, we examined the occurrence, phenotypes and genetic features of MDR K. pneumoniae isolated from patients in intensive care units (ICUs) at the First Affiliated Hospital of Xiamen University in Xiamen, China, from January to December 2011. Thirty-eight MDR K. pneumoniae strains were collected. These MDR K. pneumoniae isolates possessed at least seven antibiotic resistance determinants, which contribute to the high-level resistance of these bacteria to aminoglycosides, macrolides, quinolones and β-lactams. Among these isolates, 24 strains were extended-spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL) producers, 2 strains were AmpC producers, and 12 strains were both ESBL and AmpC producers. The 38 MDR isolates also contained class I (28/38) and class II integrons (10/38). All 28 class I-positive isolates contained aacC1, aacC4, orfX, orfX' and aadA1 genes. β-lactam resistance was conferred through bla SHV (22/38), bla TEM (10/38), and bla CTX-M (7/38). The highly conserved bla KPC-2 (37/38) and bla OXA-23(1/38) alleles were responsible for carbapenem resistance, and a gyrAsite mutation (27/38) and the plasmid-mediated qnrB gene (13/38) were responsible for quinolone resistance. Repetitive-sequence-based PCR (REP-PCR) fingerprinting of these MDR strains revealed the presence of five groups and sixteen patterns. The MDR strains from unrelated groups showed different drug resistance patterns; however, some homologous strains also showed different drug resistance profiles. Therefore, REP-PCR-based analyses can provide information to evaluate the epidemic status of nosocomial infection caused by MDR K. pneumoniae; however, this test lacks the power to discriminate some

  8. Overcoming Multidrug Resistance in Cancer Stem Cells

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    Karobi Moitra

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The principle mechanism of protection of stem cells is through the expression of ATP-binding cassette (ABC transporters. These transporters serve as the guardians of the stem cell population in the body. Unfortunately these very same ABC efflux pumps afford protection to cancer stem cells in tumors, shielding them from the adverse effects of chemotherapy. A number of strategies to circumvent the function of these transporters in cancer stem cells are currently under investigation. These strategies include the development of competitive and allosteric modulators, nanoparticle mediated delivery of inhibitors, targeted transcriptional regulation of ABC transporters, miRNA mediated inhibition, and targeting of signaling pathways that modulate ABC transporters. The role of ABC transporters in cancer stem cells will be explored in this paper and strategies aimed at overcoming drug resistance caused by these particular transporters will also be discussed.

  9. Severe infection with multidrug-resistant Salmonella choleraesuis in a young patient with primary sclerosing cholangitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferstl, Philip G; Reinheimer, Claudia; Jozsa, Katalin; Zeuzem, Stefan; Kempf, Volkhard AJ; Waidmann, Oliver; Grammatikos, Georgios

    2017-01-01

    Massive global spread of multidrug-resistant (MDR) Salmonella spp. expressing extended-spectrum beta-lactamase (ESBL) and additional resistance to fluoroquinolones has often been attributed to high international mobility as well as excessive use of oral antibiotics in livestock farming. However, MDR Salmonella spp. have not been mentioned as a widespread pathogen in clinical settings so far. We demonstrate the case of a 25-year-old male with primary sclerosing cholangitis who tested positive for MDR Salmonella enterica serotype Choleraesuis expressing ESBL and fluoroquinolone resistance. The pathogen was supposedly acquired during a trip to Thailand, causing severe fever, cholangitis and pancreatitis. To our knowledge, this is the first report of Salmonella enterica serotype Choleraesuis in Europe expressing such a multidrug resistance pattern. ESBL resistance of Salmonella enterica spp. should be considered in patients with obstructive biliary tract pathology and travel history in endemic countries. PMID:28373776

  10. [Antimicrobial therapy in severe infections with multidrug-resistant Gram-negative bacterias].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duszyńska, Wiesława

    2010-01-01

    Multidrug-resistant Gram-negative bacteria pose a serious and rapidly emerging threat to patients in healthcare settings, and are especially prevalent and problematic in intensive therapy units. Recently, the emergence of pandrug-resistance in Gram-negative bacteria poses additional concerns. This review examines the clinical impact and epidemiology of multidrug-resistant Gram-negative bacteria as a cause of increased morbidity and mortality among ITU patients. Beta-lactamases, cephalosporinases and carbapenemases play the most important role in resistance to antibiotics. Despite the tendency to increased resistance, carbapenems administered by continuous infusion remain the most effective drugs in severe sepsis. Drug concentration monitoring, albeit rarely used in practice, is necessary to ensure an effective therapeutic effect.

  11. Multidrug resistant Acinetobacter baumannii: a descriptive study in a city hospital

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    Pratap Siddharth

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Multidrug resistant Acinetobacter baumannii, (MRAB is an important cause of hospital acquired infection. The purpose of this study is to determine the risk factors for MRAB in a city hospital patient population. Methods This study is a retrospective review of a city hospital epidemiology data base and includes 247 isolates of Acinetobacter baumannii (AB from 164 patients. Multidrug resistant Acinetobacter baumannii was defined as resistance to more than three classes of antibiotics. Using the non-MRAB isolates as the control group, the risk factors for the acquisition of MRAB were determined. Results Of the 247 AB isolates 72% (177 were multidrug resistant. Fifty-eight percent (143/247 of isolates were highly resistant (resistant to imipenem, amikacin, and ampicillin-sulbactam. Of the 37 patients who died with Acinetobacter colonization/infection, 32 (86% patients had the organism recovered from the respiratory tract. The factors which were found to be significantly associated (p ≤ 0.05 with multidrug resistance include the recovery of AB from multiple sites, mechanical ventilation, previous antibiotic exposure, and the presence of neurologic impairment. Multidrug resistant Acinetobacter was associated with significant mortality when compared with sensitive strains (p ≤ 0.01. When surgical patients (N = 75 were considered separately, mechanical ventilation and multiple isolates remained the factors significantly associated with the development of multidrug resistant Acinetobacter. Among surgical patients 46/75 (61% grew a multidrug resistant strain of AB and 37/75 (40% were resistant to all commonly used antibiotics including aminoglycosides, cephalosporins, carbepenems, extended spectrum penicillins, and quinolones. Thirty-five percent of the surgical patients had AB cultured from multiple sites and 57% of the Acinetobacter isolates were associated with a co-infecting organism, usually a Staphylococcus or Pseudomonas. As

  12. Horizontal gene transfer—emerging multidrug resistance in hospital bacteria

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SenkaDZIDIC; VladimirBEDEKOVIC

    2003-01-01

    The frequency and spectrum of antibiotic resistant infections have increased worldwide during the past few decades. This increase has been attributed to a combination of microbial characteristics, the selective pressure of antimicrobial use, and social and technical changes that enhance the transmission of resistant organisms. The resistance is acquired by mutational changer or by the acquisition of resistance-encoding genetic material which is transfered from another bacteria. The spread of antibiotic resistance genes may be causally related to the overuse of antibiotics in human health care and in animal feeds, increased use of invasive devices and procedures, a greater number of susceptible hosts, and lapses in infection control practices leading to increased transmission of resistant organisms. The resistance gene sequences are integrated by recombination into several classes of naturally occurring gene expression cassettes and disseminated within the microbial population by horizontal gene transfer mechanisms: transformation, conjugation or transduction. In the hospital, widespread use of antimicrobials in the intensive care units (ICU) and for immunocompromised patients has resulted in the selection of multidrug-resistant organisms. Methicilin-resistant Staphylococci, vancomycin resistant Enterococci and extended-spectrum betalactamase(ESBL) producing Gram negative bacilli are identified as major phoblem in nosocomial infections. Recent surveillance studies have demonstrated trend towares more seriously ill patients suffering from multidrug-resistant nosocomial infections. Emergence of multiresistant bacteria and spread of resistance genes should enforce the aplication of strict prevention strategies, including changes in antibiotic treatment regimens, hygiene measures, infection prevention and control of horizontal nosocomial transmission of organisms.

  13. Multidrug-Resistant Enterococci Lack CRISPR-cas

    OpenAIRE

    Palmer, Kelli L.; Michael S Gilmore

    2010-01-01

    Clustered, regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR) provide bacteria and archaea with sequence-specific, acquired defense against plasmids and phage. Because mobile elements constitute up to 25% of the genome of multidrug-resistant (MDR) enterococci, it was of interest to examine the codistribution of CRISPR and acquired antibiotic resistance in enterococcal lineages. A database was built from 16 Enterococcus faecalis draft genome sequences to identify commonalities and polymo...

  14. Whole genome sequencing of emerging multidrug resistant Candida auris isolates in India demonstrates low genetic variation

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    Candida auris is an emerging multidrug resistant yeast that causes nosocomial fungaemia and deep-seated infections. Notably, the emergence of this yeast is alarming as it exhibits resistance to azoles, amphotericin B and caspofungin, which may lead to clinical failure in patients. The multigene phylogeny and amplified fragment length polymorphism typing methods report the C. auris population as clonal. Here, using whole genome sequencing analysis, we decipher for the first time that C. auris ...

  15. Multidrug resistant bacteria in companion animals: impact on animal health and zoonotic aspects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Damborg, Peter Panduro

    The role of companion animals as a source of antibiotic resistant bacteria has historically been given little emphasis when compared with that of food animals. However, various resistant bacteria may cause serious treatment problems in companion animal medicine. Some of the most important multidrug......-resistant bacteria include methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus pseudintermedius (MRSP), methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and extended-spectrum beta-lactamase (ESBL)-producing Enterobacteriaceae. These bacteria will be described with focus on their prevalence across Europe, their impact on animal...

  16. Modulation of Bacterial Multidrug Resistance Efflux Pumps of the Major Facilitator Superfamily

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanath Kumar

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Bacterial infections pose a serious public health concern, especially when an infectious disease has a multidrug resistant causative agent. Such multidrug resistant bacteria can compromise the clinical utility of major chemotherapeutic antimicrobial agents. Drug and multidrug resistant bacteria harbor several distinct molecular mechanisms for resistance. Bacterial antimicrobial agent efflux pumps represent a major mechanism of clinical resistance. The major facilitator superfamily (MFS is one of the largest groups of solute transporters to date and includes a significant number of bacterial drug and multidrug efflux pumps. We review recent work on the modulation of multidrug efflux pumps, paying special attention to those transporters belonging primarily to the MFS.

  17. Nuclear multidrug-resistance related protein 1 contributes to multidrug-resistance of mucoepidermoid carcinoma mainly via regulating multidrug-resistance protein 1: a human mucoepidermoid carcinoma cells model and Spearman's rank correlation analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bolei Cai

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Multidrug resistance-related protein 1 (MRP1/ABCC1 and multidrug resistance protein 1 (MDR1/P-glycoprotein/ABCB1 are both membrane-bound drug transporters. In contrast to MDR1, MRP1 also transports glutathione (GSH and drugs conjugated to GSH. Due to its extraordinary transport properties, MRP1/ABCC1 contributes to several physiological functions and pathophysiological incidents. We previously found that nuclear translocation of MRP1 contributes to multidrug-resistance (MDR of mucoepidermoid carcinoma (MEC. The present study investigated how MRP1 contributes to MDR in the nuclei of MEC cells. METHODS: Western blot and RT-PCR was carried out to investigate the change of multidrug-resistance protein 1 (MDR1 in MC3/5FU cells after MRP1 was downregulated through RNA interference (RNAi. Immunohistochemistry (IHC staining of 127 cases of MEC tissues was scored with the expression index (EI. The EI of MDR1 and MRP1 (or nuclear MRP1 was analyzed with Spearman's rank correlation analysis. Using multiple tumor tissue assays, the location of MRP1 in other tissues was checked by HIC. Luciferase reporter assays of MDR1 promoter was carried out to check the connection between MRP1 and MDR1 promoter. RESULTS: MRP1 downregulation led to a decreased MDR1 expression in MC3/5FU cells which was caused by decreased activity of MDR1 promoter. IHC study of 127 cases of MEC tissues demonstrated a strong positive correlation between nuclear MRP1 expression and MDR1 expression. Furthermore, IHC study of multiple tumor tissue array sections showed that although nuclear MRP1 widely existed in MEC tissues, it was not found in normal tissues or other tumor tissues. CONCLUSIONS: Our findings indicate that nuclear MRP1 contributes to MDR mainly through regulating MDR1 expression in MEC. And the unique location of MRP1 made it an available target in identifying MEC from other tumors.

  18. The Role of Antimicrobial Peptides in Preventing Multidrug-Resistant Bacterial Infections and Biofilm Formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyung-Soo Hahm

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Over the last decade, decreasing effectiveness of conventional antimicrobial-drugs has caused serious problems due to the rapid emergence of multidrug-resistant pathogens. Furthermore, biofilms, which are microbial communities that cause serious chronic infections and dental plaque, form environments that enhance antimicrobial resistance. As a result, there is a continuous search to overcome or control such problems, which has resulted in antimicrobial peptides being considered as an alternative to conventional drugs. Antimicrobial peptides are ancient host defense effector molecules in living organisms. These peptides have been identified in diverse organisms and synthetically developed by using peptidomimic techniques. This review was conducted to demonstrate the mode of action by which antimicrobial peptides combat multidrug-resistant bacteria and prevent biofilm formation and to introduce clinical uses of these compounds for chronic disease, medical devices, and oral health. In addition, combinations of antimicrobial peptides and conventional drugs were considered due to their synergetic effects and low cost for therapeutic treatment.

  19. Dominance of multidrug-resistant Denmark(14)-32 (ST230) clone among Streptococcus pneumoniae serotype 19A isolates causing pneumococcal disease in Bulgaria from 1992 to 2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Setchanova, Lena Petrova; Alexandrova, Alexandra; Dacheva, Daniela; Mitov, Ivan; Kaneva, Radka; Mitev, Vanio

    2015-02-01

    A pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV10) was introduced in Bulgarian national immunization program since April 2010. Clonal composition based on pulsed-field gel electrophoresis and multilocus sequence typing genotyping of 52 serotype 19A Streptococcus pneumoniae isolates was analyzed. These were invasive and respiratory isolates collected between 1992 and 2013 from both children (78.8% clone. The most frequent sequence type (ST) was ST230 (48.1%) and together with four other closely related STs (15.4%), belonging to ST1611, ST276, ST7466, and ST2013, which were single- and double-locus variants; they were included in the main CC230. The disappearance of highly drug-resistant ST663 clone and emergence of new clones as CC320 and CC199 was also observed among the rest 19A isolates. A comparison of clonal composition between invasive and noninvasive isolates did not show a great genetic diversity among both kinds of isolates. Continuous surveillance of serotype 19A population following the introduction of PCV10 is essential to evaluate the impact of the vaccine on the epidemiology of this serotype.

  20. Pneumocephalus as a complication of multidrug-resistant Klebsiella pneumoniae meningitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sreejith, P; Vishad, V; Pappachan, Joseph M; Laly, D C; Jayaprakash, R; Ranjith, V T

    2008-03-01

    Pneumocephalus implies air inside the cranial vault, which usually results from cranio-facial trauma. Occasionally, meningitis caused by gas-forming organisms can result in pneumocephalus. Klebsiella pneumoniae meningitis can, on rare occasions, cause pneumocephalus as a complication. The drug of choice for K. pneumoniae meningitis is a third-generation cephalosporin, and resistance to these drugs is unusual. We report a case of multidrug-resistant K. pneumoniae meningitis resulting from chronic suppurative otitis media, which was later complicated by pneumocephalus. The patient was successfully managed with meropenam and amikacin, the only antibiotics to which these bacilli showed no resistance.

  1. Multidrug-resistant tuberculosis in Europe, 2010-2011

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Günther, Gunar; van Leth, Frank; Alexandru, Sofia

    2015-01-01

    Drug-resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis is challenging elimination of tuberculosis (TB). We evaluated risk factors for TB and levels of second-line drug resistance in M. tuberculosis in patients in Europe with multidrug-resistant (MDR) TB. A total of 380 patients with MDR TB and 376 patients...... with non-MDR TB were enrolled at 23 centers in 16 countries in Europe during 2010-2011. A total of 52.4% of MDR TB patients had never been treated for TB, which suggests primary transmission of MDR M. tuberculosis. At initiation of treatment for MDR TB, 59.7% of M. tuberculosis strains tested were...

  2. Characterization of integrons and resistance genes in multidrug-resistant Salmonella enterica isolated from meat and dairy products in Egypt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Ashraf M; Shimamoto, Toshi; Shimamoto, Tadashi

    2014-10-17

    Foodborne pathogens are a leading cause of illness and death, especially in developing countries. The problem is exacerbated if bacteria attain multidrug resistance. Little is currently known about the extent of antibiotic resistance in foodborne pathogens and the molecular mechanisms underlying this resistance in Africa. Therefore, the current study was carried out to characterize, at the molecular level, the mechanism of multidrug resistance in Salmonella enterica isolated from 1600 food samples (800 meat products and 800 dairy products) collected from different street venders, butchers, retail markets and slaughterhouses in Egypt. Forty-seven out of 69 isolates (68.1%) showed multidrug resistance phenotypes to at least three classes of antimicrobials. The incidence of multidrug-resistant isolates was higher in meat products (37, 69.8%) than in dairy products (10, 62.5%). The multidrug-resistant serovars included, S. enterica serovar Typhimurium (24 isolates, 34.8%), S. enterica serovar Enteritidis, (15 isolates, 21.8%), S. enterica serovar Infantis (7 isolates, 10.1%) and S. enterica non-typable serovar (1 isolate, 1.4%). The highest resistance was to ampicillin (95.7%), then to kanamycin (93.6%), spectinomycin (93.6%), streptomycin (91.5%) and sulfamethoxazole/trimethoprim (91.5%). PCR and DNA sequencing were used to screen and characterize integrons and antibiotic resistance genes and 39.1% and 8.7% of isolates were positive for class 1 and class 2 integrons, respectively. β-lactamase-encoding genes were identified in 75.4% of isolates and plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance genes were identified in 27.5% of isolates. Finally, the florphenicol resistance gene, floR, was identified in 18.8% of isolates. PCR screening identified S. enterica serovar Typhimurium DT104 in both meat and dairy products. This is the first study to report many of these resistance genes in dairy products. This study highlights the high incidence of multidrug-resistant S. enterica in

  3. Intracellular pH and the Control of Multidrug Resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, Sanford; Roy, Deborshi; Schindler, Melvin

    1994-02-01

    Many anticancer drugs are classified as either weak bases or molecules whose binding to cellular structures is pH dependent. Accumulation of these drugs within tumor cells should be affected by transmembrane pH gradients. Indeed, development of multidrug resistance (MDR) in tumor cells has been correlated with an alkaline shift of cytosolic pH. To examine the role of pH in drug partitioning, the distribution of two drugs, doxorubicin and daunomycin, was monitored in fibroblasts and myeloma cells. In both cell types the drugs rapidly accumulated within the cells. The highest concentrations were measured in the most acidic compartments-e.g., lysosomes. Modifying the cellular pH in drug-sensitive cells to mimic reported shifts in MDR caused an immediate change in the cellular drug concentration. Drug accumulation was enhanced by acidic shifts and reversed by alkaline shifts. All of these effects were rapid and reversible. These results demonstrate that the alkaline shift observed in MDR is sufficient to prevent the accumulation of chemotherapeutic drugs independent of active drug efflux.

  4. Natural History of Multi-Drug Resistant Organisms in a New Military Medical Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-01

    Staphylococcus saprophyticus 14 (3) Enterococcus (faecium and faecalis) 11 (2) The remaining 11 species each comprised less than 2% of total 169 (32...environment plays in the transmission of multidrug-resistant Gram-negative bacteria and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MDRO) is increasingly...Pseudomonas aeruginosa, methicillin- resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA); Klebsiella pneumoniea; and Clostridium difficile. Multidrug- resistance (MDR

  5. Multidrug-resistant Gram-negative bacteria-resistant infections: epidemiology, clinical issues and therapeutic options

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matteo Bassetti

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available In the last decade, we have witnessed a dramatic increase in the number of multidrug resistant Gram-negative (MDRGN bacterial pathogens, both in Italy and worldwide, with Enterobacteriacae (mostly Klebsiella pneumoniae, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Acinetobacter baumannii being the major threats in clinical practice. Inadequate empirical antimicrobial therapy of severe infections caused by MDR Enterobacteriacae has been associated with an increased morbidity and mortality. However, a careful selection of patients who may receive empirical treatment covering MDR Enterobacteriacae is important to avoid the overuse of broad-spectrum antibiotics. The aim of this review is to describe the mechanism of resistance, epidemiology, risk factors, clinical issues, and therapeutic options for MDRGN pathogens.

  6. Multidrug-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Acinetobacter baumannii: resistance mechanisms and implications for therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zavascki, Alexandre P; Carvalhaes, Cecília G; Picão, Renata C; Gales, Ana C

    2010-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Acinetobacter baumannii are major nosocomial pathogens worldwide. Both are intrinsically resistant to many drugs and are able to become resistant to virtually any antimicrobial agent. An increasing prevalence of infections caused by multidrug-resistant (MDR) isolates has been reported in many countries. The resistance mechanisms of P. aeruginosa and A. baumannii include the production of beta-lactamases, efflux pumps, and target-site or outer membrane modifications. Resistance to multiple drugs is usually the result of the combination of different mechanisms in a single isolate or the action of a single potent resistance mechanism. There are many challenges in the treatment of MDR P. aeruginosa and A. baumannii, especially considering the absence of new antimicrobials in the drug-development pipeline. In this review, we present the major resistance mechanisms of P. aeruginosa and A. baumannii, and discuss how they can affect antimicrobial therapy, considering recent clinical, microbiological, pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic findings of the main drugs used to treat MDR isolates.

  7. Enterobacter cloacae multidrug-resistant: a case report of nosocomial urinary catheter-associated infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dino De Conno

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Enterobacter species, particularly E. cloacae and E. aerogenes, are important nosocomial pathogenes responsible for various infections.We report a 70-y-old patient with catheter-associated urinary tract infection (UTI caused by a nosocomial Enterobacter cloacae with multidrug-resistance.The identification of isolates from clinical culture and the study of pattern antimicrobial susceptibility were performed to the clinical risolution of the patient’s disease.The initial empirical antimicrobial therapy resulted ineffective.

  8. Reversal of Multidrug Resistance in Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-08-23

    cellular resistance to multiple therapeutic agents such as anthracyclines, vinca alkaloids , epipodophyllotoxins, taxol, and actinomycin-D. MDR1 gene...Sci USA 84:3004.1987. Zacher, V., Thomas, R.A., and Goustin, A.S. Absolute quantification of target DNA: a simple competitive PCR for efficient...target appears to be the microtubular apparatus, but unlike vinca alkaloids or epipodophyllotoxin, Paclitaxel actually promotes microtubular assemblyin

  9. Multidrug efflux pumps in Gram-negative bacteria and their role in antibiotic resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blair, Jessica M A; Richmond, Grace E; Piddock, Laura J V

    2014-01-01

    Gram-negative bacteria express a plethora of efflux pumps that are capable of transporting structurally varied molecules, including antibiotics, out of the bacterial cell. This efflux lowers the intracellular antibiotic concentration, allowing bacteria to survive at higher antibiotic concentrations. Overexpression of some efflux pumps can cause clinically relevant levels of antibiotic resistance in Gram-negative pathogens. This review discusses the role of efflux in resistance of clinical isolates of Gram-negative bacteria, the regulatory mechanisms that control efflux pump expression, the recent advances in our understanding of efflux pump structure and how inhibition of efflux is a promising future strategy for tackling multidrug resistance in Gram-negative pathogens.

  10. Whole genome sequencing of emerging multidrug resistant Candida auris isolates in India demonstrates low genetic variation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, C; Kumar, N; Pandey, R; Meis, J F; Chowdhary, A

    2016-09-01

    Candida auris is an emerging multidrug resistant yeast that causes nosocomial fungaemia and deep-seated infections. Notably, the emergence of this yeast is alarming as it exhibits resistance to azoles, amphotericin B and caspofungin, which may lead to clinical failure in patients. The multigene phylogeny and amplified fragment length polymorphism typing methods report the C. auris population as clonal. Here, using whole genome sequencing analysis, we decipher for the first time that C. auris strains from four Indian hospitals were highly related, suggesting clonal transmission. Further, all C. auris isolates originated from cases of fungaemia and were resistant to fluconazole (MIC >64 mg/L).

  11. Multidrug-resistant Streptococcus pneumoniae isolates from healthy Ghanaian preschool children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dayie, Nicholas Tete Kwaku Dzifa; Arhin, Reuben E.; Newman, Mercy J.

    2015-01-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae is the cause of high mortality among children worldwide. Antimicrobial treatment and vaccination are used to control pneumococcal infections. In Ghana, data on antimicrobial resistance and the prevalence of multidrug-resistant pneumococcal clones are scarce; hence, the aim...... of this study was to determine the antibiogram of S. pneumoniae recovered from Ghanaian children younger than six years of age and to what extent resistances were due to the spread of certain sero- and multilocus sequence typing (MLST) types. The susceptibility of 115 pneumococcal isolates, recovered...

  12. 多重耐药菌相关尿路感染的临床研究%A Case-control Study of Urinary Tract Infection Caused by Multidrug-Resistant Organism

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈伟; 程琼

    2014-01-01

    目的:通过对多重耐药菌尿路感染的临床特征及其致病菌进行分析研究,以期在对抗生素的选择方面提供依据。方法本研究采用回顾性病例对照研究,对我院2013年3月至2014年3月间14岁以上成年人多重耐药菌尿路感染的临床特征及其致病菌进行分析研究。结果 Logistic回归分析显示:长期留置尿管、尿潴留、肾积水及神经源性膀胱均与多重耐药菌尿路感染的发生相关(OR=2.21,OR=2.77, OR=4.55,OR=1.96,P<0.05)。多重耐药菌尿路感染的致病菌分别是E.coli-ESBL strain、Kleb.pneumoniae-ESBL strain和Staphylococcus aureus(MRSA);主要敏感抗生素是阿米卡星、环丙沙星、庆大霉素、美洛培南、亚胺培南。结论长期留置尿管、尿潴留、肾积水及神经源性膀胱是多重耐药菌尿路感染的易感因素。主要致病菌是E.coli-ESBL strain。%Objective To retrospectively evaluate the relevant factors for urinary tract infection caused by Multidrug-resistant organism(MDRD) and further analysis comprise of bacterial uropathogens, so as to can be used to guide the treatment of urinary tract infection caused by MDRD.Methods The study population comprised 91 cases and 93 controls with urinary tract infection caused by MDRD and non MDRD respectively. Logistic regression analysis was used to detect the relevant factors for urinary tract infection caused by MDRD.Results On univariate analysis, the factors associated with urinary tract infection caused by MDRD were as follows: hydronephrosis(OR 4.57, 95%CI 1.40-14.92,P=0.001), permanent urinary catheter(OR 2.61, 95%CI 1.43-4.52,P=0.002), urinary retention(OR 3.62, 95%CI 1.79-7.31,P<0.01), neurogenic bladder(OR 2.77, 95%CI 1.46-5.23, P=0.001), antibiotics prior to admission(OR 2.59, 95%CI 1.47-4.51,P=0.001), purely nephrolithiasis(OR 5.35, 95%CI 1.24-16.79,P=0.001). On multivariate analysis, the associations remained signiifcant for permanent urinary

  13. Multi-drug carbapenem-resistant Klebsiella pneumoniae infection carrying the OXA-48 gene and showing variations in outer membrane protein 36 causing an outbreak in a tertiary care hospital in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia

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    Taher uz Zaman

    2014-11-01

    Conclusions: This is probably the first reported outbreak of multidrug/carbapenem-resistant Klebsiella infection involving the OXA-48 gene from Saudi Arabia. Although the presence of ESBLs such as OXA, CTX-M, TEM, and SHV are predictable reasons for resistance, variations in the Omp-36 gene might also have precipitated this phenomenon. Disruption of the Omp-36 sequence by large insertional elements, the insertion of two amino acids in a very crucial part of this protein, and the presence of a premature stop codon in one isolate might have rendered this protein incomplete and non-functional. The study also demonstrated that more than one type of clone was responsible for this reported apparent outbreak and that ST29, a clone not reported from this region before, was the major clone responsible.

  14. Targeted investigation of nosocomial infections caused by multidrug-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii and analysis of drug resistance%多药耐药鲍氏不动杆菌医院感染目标性调查及耐药性分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨春玲; 宋平; 杨卉; 周传能

    2013-01-01

    目的 了解多药耐药鲍氏不动杆菌医院感染相关因素及其耐药性,以预防与控制多药耐药鲍氏不动杆菌医院感染的发生与流行.方法 采用前瞻性和回顾性调查方法,对医院2008年1月22日-2010年12月28日多药耐药及全耐药鲍氏不动杆菌感染的63例患者进行综合性分析.结果 多药耐药鲍氏不动杆菌感染患者中,36.5%为肺部感染合并多种基础性疾病,42.9%为多发性创伤骨折,73.0%入住过ICU,60.3%做过手术,38.1%~54.0%进行过各种侵入性操作,69.9%伴随混合菌感染;医院感染率为60.3%,总死亡率为31.7%,肺部感染死亡率高达71.4%;鲍氏不动杆菌耐药率高,其对头孢哌酮/舒巴坦的耐药率为15.9%,其次对亚胺培南的耐药率为31.7%,对其余抗菌药物耐药率达63.5%~100.0%.结论 加强对多药耐药鲍氏不动杆菌医院感染全方位预防和控制,尤其是对ICU的监控已经刻不容缓.%OBJECTIVE To investigate the relevant factors for nosocomial infections caused by multidrug-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii (MDRAB) and analyze its drug resistance so as to prevent and control the incidence and spreacl of MDRAB infections. METHODS By means of the prospective and retrospective survey, a total of 63 patients with multidrug-resistant A. baumannii and full drug-resistant A. baumannii infections, who enrolled the hospital form Jan 22, 2008 to Dec 28, 2010, were comprehensively analyzed. RESULTS Among the patients infected with multidrug-resistant A .baumannii, 36. 5% were with pulmonary infections complicated by multiple underlying diseases, 42. 9% were recurring traumatic fracture, 73. 0% have been hospitalized in ICU, 60. 3% have undergone the surgery, 38. l%-54. 0% undergoing various types of invasive operations, and 69. 9% were complicated by mixed infections. The incidence rate of nosocomial infections was 60. 3%, the overall mortality was 31. 7%, and the fatality rate was 71. 4% due

  15. Photoexcited quantum dots for killing multidrug-resistant bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Courtney, Colleen M.; Goodman, Samuel M.; McDaniel, Jessica A.; Madinger, Nancy E.; Chatterjee, Anushree; Nagpal, Prashant

    2016-05-01

    Multidrug-resistant bacterial infections are an ever-growing threat because of the shrinking arsenal of efficacious antibiotics. Metal nanoparticles can induce cell death, yet the toxicity effect is typically nonspecific. Here, we show that photoexcited quantum dots (QDs) can kill a wide range of multidrug-resistant bacterial clinical isolates, including methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, carbapenem-resistant Escherichia coli, and extended-spectrum β-lactamase-producing Klebsiella pneumoniae and Salmonella typhimurium. The killing effect is independent of material and controlled by the redox potentials of the photogenerated charge carriers, which selectively alter the cellular redox state. We also show that the QDs can be tailored to kill 92% of bacterial cells in a monoculture, and in a co-culture of E. coli and HEK 293T cells, while leaving the mammalian cells intact, or to increase bacterial proliferation. Photoexcited QDs could be used in the study of the effect of redox states on living systems, and lead to clinical phototherapy for the treatment of infections.

  16. MULTIDRUG RESISTANT BACTERIA IN A TERTIARY CARE HOS PITAL.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sujata

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Antibiotic resistance is a global problem in the hos pitals as well as in the community. Selection pressure exerted by over use of antimicrobial agents is the commonest predisposing factor of development of resist ance. Problems faced are especially with Methicillin Resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MR SA, Vancomycin Resistant Enterococci (VRE and Multidrug resistant Gram-negative bacilli (MDR-GNB. AIMS: A study was undertaken to find out the prevalence of all bacteri a isolated in this hospital from different specimens, which are resistant to first line antibio tics and their antimicrobial susceptibility pattern with higher antibiotics during a six-month pe riod. MATERIAL AND METHODS: All isolates from different specimens were processed by s tandard techniques and identified by standard biochemical tests. Antibiotic susceptibilit y was performed on Mueller Hinton Agar (MHA by Kirby-Bauer Disc Diffusion Method (KBDDM, according to CLSI guidelines. Those resistant to first line antibiotics were further te sted for higher antibiotics. For Extended Spectrum β -lactamse (ESBL detection, double disc synergy met hod was carried out for all Gram-negative bacilli. RESULTS: Out of 2987 bacteria grown, 904 (30.3% were multi drug resistant bacteria. Resistance to first line antib iotics was 83.4% and resistance to all higher antibiotics tested was 16.6%. Sixty percent of Staph ylococcus aureus was MRSA and all were sensitive to vancomycin. Prevalence of VRE was 5.3 %. Carbapenem resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Acinetobacter species were 19.1% and 9.8% respectively and 10.1% of Klebsiella species was carbapenem resistant. CONCLUSIONS: This study highlights the extensive problem of antibiotic resistance encounter ed in this hospital. Thus, prudent and appropriate uses of antibiotics are required to reduce the emergence of resistance. Each hospital should also have its own antibiotic policy based on the susceptibility pattern of

  17. Isolation and characterization of a bacteriophage phiEap-2 infecting multidrug resistant Enterobacter aerogenes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Erna; Wei, Xiao; Ma, Yanyan; Yin, Zhe; Li, Huan; Lin, Weishi; Wang, Xuesong; Li, Chao; Shen, Zhiqiang; Zhao, Ruixiang; Yang, Huiying; Jiang, Aimin; Yang, Wenhui; Yuan, Jing; Zhao, Xiangna

    2016-06-20

    Enterobacter aerogenes (Enterobacteriaceae) is an important opportunistic pathogen that causes hospital-acquired pneumonia, bacteremia, and urinary tract infections. Recently, multidrug-resistant E. aerogenes have been a public health problem. To develop an effective antimicrobial agent, bacteriophage phiEap-2 was isolated from sewage and its genome was sequenced because of its ability to lyse the multidrug-resistant clinical E. aerogenes strain 3-SP. Morphological observations suggested that the phage belongs to the Siphoviridae family. Comparative genome analysis revealed that phage phiEap-2 is related to the Salmonella phage FSL SP-031 (KC139518). All of the structural gene products (except capsid protein) encoded by phiEap-2 had orthologous gene products in FSL SP-031 and Serratia phage Eta (KC460990). Here, we report the complete genome sequence of phiEap-2 and major findings from the genomic analysis. Knowledge of this phage might be helpful for developing therapeutic strategies against E. aerogenes.

  18. Expression of multidrug resistance-related markers in primary neuroblastoma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吕庆杰; 董芳; 张锦华; 李晓晗; 马颖; 姜卫国

    2004-01-01

    Background Multidrug resistance is associated with a poor prognosis in various human cancers. However, the clinical significance of the expression of multidrug resistance-related markers in neuroblastoma is still on debate. In this study, the effect of the expression of p-glycoprotein (P-gp), multidrug resistance-associated protein (MRP), and lung resistance protein (LRP) in neuroblastoma was evaluated. Methods The streptavidin-biotin immunoperoxidase (SP) technique was used to evaluate the expression of P-gp, MRP, and LRP in 70 cases of untreated primary neuroblastoma. Results The frequencies of the expression of P-gp, MRP, and LRP were 61.4%, 38.6%, and 24.3%, respectively. A significant positive correlation was observed between P-gp and MRP expression (P=0.001), as well as between LRP and MRP expression (P=0.01). The rates of expression of P-gp and MRP were higher in tumors from patients aged greater than one year old than in tumors from patients aged less than 1 year old at time of diagnosis (P=0.01 and 0.018, respectively). MRP expression in tumors that had metastasized was significantly more frequent than in tumors that had not metastasized (P=0.015). The expression of all tested proteins showed a significant relationship with whether or not the tumor had differentiated (P=0.006, 0.000 or 0.001, respectively). MRP expression was significantly associated with a reduction in both median survival time and 2-year cumulative survival (P=0.02). By contrast, P-gp and MRP expression did not correlate with survival. According to Cox regression analysis, only the co-expression of P-gp and MRP had significant prognostic value (relative hazard, 3.513, P=0.033). Conclusions The intrinsic, multidrug resistance of neuroblastoma involves the combined effects of P-gp, MRP, and LRP. MRP expression may be an important factor determining prognosis in neuroblastoma.

  19. 2-Pyrrolinodoxorubicin and its peptide-vectorized form bypass multidrug resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castex, Cédric; Merida, Peggy; Blanc, Emmanuelle; Clair, Philippe; Rees, Anthony R; Temsamani, Jamal

    2004-07-01

    A well-known mechanism leading to the emergence of multidrug-resistant tumor cells is the overexpression of P-glycoprotein, which is capable of lowering intracellular drug concentrations. In the present study, we tested the capability of 2-pyrrolinodoxorubicin (p-DOX), a highly potent derivative of DOX, to bypass multidrug resistance. The accumulation, intracellular distribution and cytotoxicity of p-DOX were tested in two cell lines (K562 and A2780) and their DOX-resistant counterparts (K562/ADR and A2780/ADR). Cellular accumulation and cytotoxicity were dramatically lowered for DOX in resistant cell lines, in comparison with non-resistant cells. In contrast, cellular accumulation, intracellular distribution and cytotoxicity of p-DOX were independent of the nature of the cell lines. The p-DOX showed potent dose-dependent inhibition of cell growth against resistant cells as compared with DOX. After treatment of resistant cells with verapamil, the intracellular levels of DOX were markedly increased and consequent cytotoxicity improved. In contrast, treatment of resistant cells with verapamil did not cause any further enhancement of cell uptake or an increase in the cytotoxic effect of the derivative p-DOX, indicating that the compound bypasses the P-glycoprotein. Finally, we show that vectorization of p-DOX by a peptide vector (SynB3) which has been shown to enhance the brain uptake of DOX and to decrease its heart accumulation does not affect this property. These results indicate that p-DOX and its vectorized form are potent and effective in overcoming multidrug resistance.

  20. [Multidrug-resistant tuberculosis: current epidemiology, therapeutic regimens, new drugs].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez-Ayerbe, C; Vivancos, M J; Moreno, S

    2016-09-01

    Multidrug and extensively resistant tuberculosis are especially severe forms of the disease for which no efficacious therapy exists in many cases. All the countries in the world have registered cases, although most of them are diagnosed in resource-limited countries from Asia, Africa and South America. For adequate treatment, first- and second-line antituberculosis drugs have to be judiciously used, but the development of new drugs with full activity, good tolerability and little toxicity is urgently needed. There are some drugs in development, some of which are already available through expanded-access programs.

  1. Overcoming multidrug resistance(MDR) in cancer by nanotechnology

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    The emerging nanotechnology-based drug delivery holds tremendous potential to deliver chemotherapeutic drugs for treatment of multidrug resistance(MDR) cancer.This drug delivery system could improve the pharmacokinetic behavior of antitumor drugs,deliver chemotherapeutic drugs to target sites,control release of drugs,and reduce the systemic toxicity of drugs in MDR cancer.This review addresses the use of nanotechnology to overcome MDR classified on the bases of the fundamental mechanisms of MDR and various approaches to deliver drugs for treatment of MDR cancer.

  2. Human Multidrug Resistance 1 gene polymorphisms and Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinelli, Marcella; Scapoli, Luca; Pacilli, Angela Maria Grazia; Carbonara, Paolo; Girardi, Ambra; Mattei, Gabriella; Rodia, Maria Teresa; Solmi, Rossella

    2015-01-01

    Background: For the first time we tested an association between the human multidrug resistance gene 1 (MDR1) polymorphisms (SNPs) and idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF). Several MDR1 polymorphisms are associated with pathologies in which they modify the drug susceptibility and pharmacokinetics. Materials and Methods: We genotyped three MDR1 polymorphisms of 48 IPF patients and 100 control subjects with Italian origins. Results: No evidence of association was detected. Conclusion: There are 50 known MDR1 SNPs, and their role is explored in terms of the effectiveness of drug therapy. We consider our small-scale preliminary study as a starting point for further research. PMID:25767528

  3. Effect of methylglyoxal on multidrug-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katsuhiko eHayashi

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Honey has a complex chemistry, and its broad-spectrum antimicrobial activity varies with floral source, climate, and harvesting conditions. Methylglyoxal was identified as the dominant antibacterial component of manuka honey. Although it has been known that methylglyoxal has antibacterial activity against gram-positive bacteria, including methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus and vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus, there is not much information describing its activity against gram-negative bacteria. In this study, we report the effect of methylglyoxal against multidrug-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa (MDRP using 53 clinically isolated strains. We also assessed the effect of deleting the five multidrug efflux systems in P. aeruginosa, as well as the efflux systems in Escherichia coli and Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium, on MICs of methylglyoxal. Our results indicate that methylglyoxal inhibits the growth of MDRP at concentrations of 128–512 µg/ml (1.7–7.1 mM and is not recognized by drug efflux systems.

  4. Second-line drug resistance in multidrug-resistant tuberculosis cases of various origins in the Netherlands.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ingen, J. van; Boeree, M.J.; Wright, A.; Laan, T.; Dekhuijzen, P.N.R.; Soolingen, D van

    2008-01-01

    SETTING: The Netherlands. OBJECTIVE: To investigate the frequency of resistance to second-line drugs among multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB) cases and its correlation with patients' geographic origin. DESIGN: Retrospective laboratory database study of multidrug-resistant Mycobacterium tuberc

  5. Identification of multi-drug resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa clinical isolates that are highly disruptive to the intestinal epithelial barrier

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shevchenko Olga

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Multi-drug resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa nosocomial infections are increasingly recognized worldwide. In this study, we focused on the virulence of multi-drug resistant clinical strains P. aeruginosa against the intestinal epithelial barrier, since P. aeruginosa can cause lethal sepsis from within the intestinal tract of critically ill and immuno-compromised patients via mechanisms involving disruption of epithelial barrier function. Methods We screened consecutively isolated multi-drug resistant P. aeruginosa clinical strains for their ability to disrupt the integrity of human cultured intestinal epithelial cells (Caco-2 and correlated these finding to related virulence phenotypes such as adhesiveness, motility, biofilm formation, and cytotoxicity. Results Results demonstrated that the majority of the multi-drug resistant P. aeruginosa clinical strains were attenuated in their ability to disrupt the barrier function of cultured intestinal epithelial cells. Three distinct genotypes were found that displayed an extreme epithelial barrier-disrupting phenotype. These strains were characterized and found to harbor the exoU gene and to display high swimming motility and adhesiveness. Conclusion These data suggest that detailed phenotypic analysis of the behavior of multi-drug resistant P. aeruginosa against the intestinal epithelium has the potential to identify strains most likely to place patients at risk for lethal gut-derived sepsis. Surveillance of colonizing strains of P. aeruginosa in critically ill patients beyond antibiotic sensitivity is warranted.

  6. Nanodrug Delivery in Reversing Multidrug Resistance in Cancer Cells

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    Sonali eKapse-Mistry

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Different mechanisms in cancer cells become resistant to one or more chemotherapeutics is known as multidrug resistance(MDR which hinders chemotherapy efficacy. Potential factors for MDR includes enhanced drug detoxification, decreased drug uptake, increased intracellular nucleophiles levels, enhanced repair of drug induced DNA damage, overexpression of drug transporter such as P-glycoprotein(P-gp, multidrug resistance-associated proteins(MRP1, MRP2 and breast cancer resistance protein(BCRP. Currently nanoassemblies such as polymeric/solid lipid/inorganic/metal nanoparticles, quantum dots, dendrimers, liposomes, micelles has emerged as an innovative, effective and promising platforms for treatment of drug resistant cancer cells. Nanocarriers have potential to improve drug therapeutic index, ability for multifunctionality, divert ABC-transporter mediated drug efflux mechanism and selective targeting to tumor cells, cancer stem cells, tumor initiating cells or cancer microenvironment. Selective nanocarrier targeting to tumor overcomes dose-limiting side effects, lack of selectivity, tissue toxicity, limited drug access to tumor tissues, high drug doses and emergence of multiple drug resistance with conventional or combination chemotherapy. Current review highlights various nanodrug delivery systems to overcome mechanism of MDR by neutralizing, evading or exploiting the drug efflux pumps and those independent of drug efflux pump mechanism by silencing Bcl-2 and HIF1 gene expressions by siRNA and miRNA, modulating ceramide levels and targeting NF-B. Theragnostics combining a cytotoxic agent, targeting moiety, chemosensitizing agent and diagnostic imaging aid are highlighted as effective and innovative systems for tumor localization and overcoming MDR. Physical approaches such as combination of drug with thermal/ultrasound/photodynamic therapies to overcome MDR are focused. The review focuses on newer drug delivery systems developed to overcome

  7. Utility of lytic bacteriophage in the treatment of multidrug-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa septicemia in mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vinodkumar C

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Drug resistance is the major cause of increase in morbidity and mortality in neonates. One thousand six hundred forty-seven suspected septicemic neonates were subjected for microbiological analysis over a period of 5 years. Forty-two P. aeruginosa were isolated and the antibiogram revealed that 28 P. aeruginosa were resistant to almost all the common drugs used (multidrug-resistant. The emergence of antibiotic-resistant bacterial strains is one of the most critical problems of modern medicine. As a result, a novel and most effective approaches for treating infection caused by multidrug-resistant bacteria are urgently required. In this context, one intriguing approach is to use bacteriophages (viruses that kill bacteria in the treatment of infection caused by drug-resistant bacteria. In the present study, the utility of lytic bacteriophages to rescue septicemic mice with multidrug-resistant (MDR P. aeruginosa infection was evaluated. MDR P. aeruginosa was used to induce septicemia in mice by intraperitoneal (i.p. injection of 10 7 CFU. The resulting bacteremia was fatal within 48 hrs. The phage strain used in this study had lytic activity against a wide range of clinical isolates of MDR P. aeruginosa. A single i.p. injection of 3 x 10 9 PFU of the phage strain, administered 45 min after the bacterial challenge, was sufficient to rescue 100% of the animals. Even when treatment was delayed to the point where all animals were moribund, approximately 50% of them were rescued by a single injection of this phage preparation. The ability of this phage to rescue septicemic mice was demonstrated to be due to the functional capabilities of the phage and not to a nonspecific immune effect. The rescue of septicemic mice could be affected only by phage strains able to grow in vitro on the bacterial host used to infect the animals and when such strains are heat-inactivated, they lose their ability to rescue the infected mice. Multidrug-resistant bacteria have

  8. Multidrug resistance reversal in human gastric carcinoma cells by neferine

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jian-Guo Cao; Xiao-Qing Tang; Shu-Hong Shi

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the reversal effect of neferine on multidrug resistance in human gastric carcinoma cell line.METHODS: Cells of a human gastric cancer cells line, SGC7901,and its vincristine (VCR) -resistant variant, SGC7901/VCR,were cultivated with or without neferine and/or VCR. The cytotoxic effect of VCR was evaluated by the MTT assay. Cell apoptosis induced by VCR was determined by flow cytometry (FCM). The expression of P-glycoprotein (P-gp) and a multidrug-resistance-associated protein (MRP) in cells was examined by immunofluorescence and FCM.RESULTS: Neferine at the concentration from 2.5 μmol/L to 10 μmol/L had no cytotoxicity to SGC7901 cells, and its variant SGC7901/VCR cells. The IC50 of VCR against SGC7901 and SGC7901/VCR cells was 0.059 μg/mL and 2.32 μg/mL,respectively, indicating that SGC7901/VCR cells were 39 times more resistant to VCR than its parent SGC7 901 cells. After treatment with neferine at concentrations of 2.5, 5 and 10 μmol/L, the IC50 of VCR to SGC7901/VCR cell line decreased to 0.340, 0.128 and 0.053 μg/mL, respectively,thus, increased the chemosensitivity by 6.8-, 18.1- and 43.8-fold, respectively. SGC7901/VCR cells were apoptosis resistant to VCR. Neferine (2.5, 5 and 10 μmol/L) promoted the VCR-induced apoptosis of SGC7901/VCR cells in a dosedependent manner. The expressions of P-gp and MRP were strongly positive in SGC7901/VCR cells, which were significantly down-regulated after treatment with neferine (10 μmol/L)for 24 h.CONCLUSION: Neferine reverses multidrug resistance of human gastric carcinoma SGC7901/VCR cells, which may be associated with the down-regulations of P-gp and MRP expression in SGC701/VCR cells.

  9. Multi-drug resistant E.coli urosepsis in physicians following transrectal ultrasound guided prostate biopsies--three cases including one death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlson, William H; Bell, David G; Lawen, Joseph G; Rendon, Ricardo A

    2010-04-01

    Three male physicians underwent transrectal ultrasound guided prostate biopsies for elevated prostate-specific antigen levels or irregular digital rectal exam findings. All three of these patients developed urosepsis secondary to multi-drug resistant organisms despite antibiotic prophylaxis. There are increasing reports of infectious complications following prostate biopsy caused by multi-drug resistant organisms. These cases highlight the potentially lethal risks to healthcare workers who are more likely to harbor multi-drug resistant organisms than the general population. Further research into preoperative assessment and appropriate antibiotic prophylaxis in all potentially high risk patients is warranted.

  10. Phenotypic and molecular characterization of multidrug resistant Klebsiella pneumoniae isolated from a university teaching hospital, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Jikun; Li, Peipei; Liu, Helu; Lü, Dongyue; Liang, Hong; Dou, Yuhong

    2014-01-01

    The multidrug-resistant rate of Klebsiella pneumoniae has risen rapidly worldwide. To better understand the multidrug resistance situation and molecular characterization of Klebsiella pneumoniae, a total of 153 Klebsiella pneumoniae isolates were collected, and drug susceptibility test was performed to detect its susceptibility patterns to 13 kinds of antibiotics. Phenotypic tests for carbapenemases ESBLs and AmpC enzyme-producing strains were performed to detect the resistance phenotype of the isolates. Then PCR amplification and sequencing analysis were performed for the drug resistance determinants. The results showed that 63 strains harbored bla CTX-M gene, and 14 strains harbored bla DHA gene. Moreover, there were 5 strains carrying bla KPC gene, among which 4 strains carried bla CTX-M, bla DHA and bla KPC genes, and these 4 strains were also resistant to imipenem. Our data indicated that drug-resistant Klebsiella pneumoniae were highly prevalent in the hospital. Thus it is warranted that surveillance of epidemiology of those resistant isolates should be a cause for concern, and appropriate drugs should be chosen.

  11. Phenotypic and molecular characterization of multidrug resistant Klebsiella pneumoniae isolated from a university teaching hospital, China.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jikun Du

    Full Text Available The multidrug-resistant rate of Klebsiella pneumoniae has risen rapidly worldwide. To better understand the multidrug resistance situation and molecular characterization of Klebsiella pneumoniae, a total of 153 Klebsiella pneumoniae isolates were collected, and drug susceptibility test was performed to detect its susceptibility patterns to 13 kinds of antibiotics. Phenotypic tests for carbapenemases ESBLs and AmpC enzyme-producing strains were performed to detect the resistance phenotype of the isolates. Then PCR amplification and sequencing analysis were performed for the drug resistance determinants. The results showed that 63 strains harbored bla CTX-M gene, and 14 strains harbored bla DHA gene. Moreover, there were 5 strains carrying bla KPC gene, among which 4 strains carried bla CTX-M, bla DHA and bla KPC genes, and these 4 strains were also resistant to imipenem. Our data indicated that drug-resistant Klebsiella pneumoniae were highly prevalent in the hospital. Thus it is warranted that surveillance of epidemiology of those resistant isolates should be a cause for concern, and appropriate drugs should be chosen.

  12. Molecular Pathways: Regulation and Therapeutic Implications of Multidrug Resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Kevin G.; Sikic, Branimir I.

    2012-01-01

    Multidrug transporters constitute major mechanisms of multidrug resistance (MDR) in human cancers. The ABCB1 (MDR1) gene encodes a well-characterized transmembrane transporter, termed P-glycoprotein (P-gp), which is expressed in many normal human tissues and cancers. P-gp plays a major role in the distribution and excretion of drugs, and is involved in intrinsic and acquired drug resistance of cancers. The regulation of ABCB1 expression is complex, and has not been well studied in a clinical setting. In this review, we elucidate molecular signaling and epigenetic interactions that govern ABCB1 expression and the development of MDR in cancer. We focus on acquired expression of ABCB1 that is associated with genomic instability of cancer cells, including mutational events that alter chromatin structures, gene rearrangements, and mutations in tumor suppressor proteins (e.g., mutant p53) that guard the integrity of genome. In addition, epigenetic modifications of the ABCB1 proximal and far upstream promoters by either demethylation of DNA or acetylation of histone H3 play a pivotal role in inducing ABCB1 expression. We describe a molecular network that coordinates genetic and epigenetic events leading to the activation of ABCB1. These mechanistic insignts provide additional translational targets and potential strategies to deal with clinical MDR. PMID:22344233

  13. Draft Genome of the Multidrug-Resistant Acinetobacter baumannii Strain A155 Clinical Isolate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arivett, Brock A; Fiester, Steven E; Ream, David C; Centrón, Daniela; Ramírez, Maria S; Tolmasky, Marcelo E; Actis, Luis A

    2015-03-26

    Acinetobacter baumannii is a bacterial pathogen with serious implications on human health, due to increasing reports of multidrug-resistant strains isolated from patients. Total DNA from the multidrug-resistant A. baumannii strain A155 clinical isolate was sequenced to greater than 65× coverage, providing high-quality contig assemblies.

  14. The lactococcal secondary multidrug transporter LmrP confers resistance to lincosamides, macrolides, streptogramins and tetracyclines

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Putman, M; van Veen, HW; Degener, JE; Konings, WN

    2001-01-01

    The active efflux of toxic compounds by (multi)drug transporters is one of the mechanisms that bacteria have developed to resist cytotoxic drugs. The authors describe the role of the lactococcal secondary multidrug transporter LmrP in the resistance to a broad range of clinically important antibioti

  15. Complete Genome Sequences of Isolates of Enterococcus faecium Sequence Type 117, a Globally Disseminated Multidrug-Resistant Clone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tedim, Ana P.; Lanza, Val F.; Manrique, Marina; Pareja, Eduardo; Ruiz-Garbajosa, Patricia; Cantón, Rafael; Baquero, Fernando; Tobes, Raquel

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT The emergence of nosocomial infections by multidrug-resistant sequence type 117 (ST117) Enterococcus faecium has been reported in several European countries. ST117 has been detected in Spanish hospitals as one of the main causes of bloodstream infections. We analyzed genome variations of ST117 strains isolated in Madrid and describe the first ST117 closed genome sequences. PMID:28360174

  16. Transcriptomic analysis of multidrug-resistant Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium isolates that exhibit a tetracycline-induced invasion phenotype

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salmonella is a highly prevalent bacterial food-borne disease in the U.S. and is estimated to cause over 1 million cases, 19,000 hospitalizations, and 350 deaths every year. Multidrug-resistant (MDR) Salmonella has emerged as an important food safety concern as it is associated with increased morbi...

  17. Hypoxia-inducible factor-1α induces multidrug resistance protein in colon cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lv Y

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Yingqian Lv, Shan Zhao, Jinzhu Han, Likang Zheng, Zixin Yang, Li Zhao Department of Oncology, The Second Hospital, Hebei Medical University, Shijiazhuang, Hebei Province, People’s Republic of China Abstract: Multidrug resistance is the major cause of chemotherapy failure in many solid tumors, including colon cancer. Hypoxic environment is a feature for all solid tumors and is important for the development of tumor resistance to chemotherapy. Hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF-1α is the key transcription factor that mediates cellular response to hypoxia. HIF-1α has been shown to play an important role in tumor resistance; however, the mechanism is still not fully understood. Here, we found that HIF-1α and the drug resistance-associated gene multidrug resistance associated protein 1 (MRP1 were induced by treatment of colon cancer cells with the hypoxia-mimetic agent cobalt chloride. Inhibition of HIF-1α by RNA interference and dominant-negative protein can significantly reduce the induction of MRP1 by hypoxia. Bioinformatics analysis showed that a hypoxia response element is located at -378 to -373 bp upstream of the transcription start site of MRP1 gene. Luciferase reporter assay combined with mutation analysis confirmed that this element is essential for hypoxia-mediated activation of MRP gene. Furthermore, RNA interference revealed that HIF-1α is necessary for this hypoxia-driven activation of MRP1 promoter. Importantly, chromatin immunoprecipitation analysis demonstrated that HIF-1α could directly bind to this HRE site in vivo. Together, these data suggest that MRP1 is a downstream target gene of HIF-1α, which provides a potential novel mechanism for HIF-1α-mediated drug resistance in colon cancer and maybe other solid tumors as well. Keywords: hypoxia, hypoxia-inducible factor-1α, multidrug resistance associated protein, transcriptional regulation, chemotherapy tolerance

  18. Effect of multidrug resistance 1/P-glycoprotein on the hypoxia-induced multidrug resistance of human laryngeal cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Dawei; Zhou, Liang; Huang, Jiameng; Xiao, Xiyan

    2016-08-01

    In a previous study, it was demonstrated that hypoxia upregulated the multidrug resistance (MDR) of laryngeal cancer cells to chemotherapeutic drugs, with multidrug resistance 1 (MDR1)/P-glycoprotein (P-gp) expression also being upregulated. The present study aimed to investigate the role and mechanism of MDR1/P-gp on hypoxia-induced MDR in human laryngeal carcinoma cells. The sensitivity of laryngeal cancer cells to multiple drugs and cisplatin-induced apoptosis was determined by CCK-8 assay and Annexin-V/propidium iodide staining analysis, respectively. The accumulation of rhodamine 123 (Rh123) in the cells served as an estimate of drug accumulation and was evaluated by flow cytometry (FCM). MDR1/P-gp expression was inhibited using interference RNA, and the expression of the MDR1 gene was analyzed using reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction and western blotting. As a result, the sensitivity to multiple chemotherapeutic agents and the apoptosis rate of the hypoxic laryngeal carcinoma cells increased following a decrease in MDR1/P-gp expression (PP-gp markedly increased intracellular Rh123 accumulation (PP-gp serves an important role in regulating hypoxia-induced MDR in human laryngeal carcinoma cells through a decrease in intracellular drug accumulation.

  19. Antibiotic resistance determinants of a group of multidrug-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao-Min, Xu; You-Fen, Fan; Wei-Yun, Feng; Zu-Huang, Mi; Xing-Bei, Weng

    2014-06-01

    A group of Acinetobacter baumannii confers multidrug resistance, but the molecular epidemiology and multidrug resistance mechanisms are poorly understood. Nineteen isolates were identified, and the antimicrobial susceptibility profile was determined using the disc diffusion method. Then, PCR of 78 kinds of resistance-associated genes were performed. A novel variant of blaADC gene: blaADC-67 gene (Genbank accession No. JX169789) was prevalent in all 19 isolates. Moreover, ISAba1 could also provide strong promoter to upregulate the expression of blaADC67 to confer resistance to beta-lactam. This is the first report of emergence of blaADC-67 in A. baumannii worldwide, which might confer resistance to beta-lactam.

  20. Functional study of the novel multidrug resistance gene HA117 and its comparison to multidrug resistance gene 1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Tingfu

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The novel gene HA117 is a multidrug resistance (MDR gene expressed by all-trans retinoic acid-resistant HL-60 cells. In the present study, we compared the multidrug resistance of the HA117 with that of the classical multidrug resistance gene 1 (MDR1 in breast cancer cell line 4T1. Methods Transduction of the breast cancer cell line 4T1 with adenoviral vectors encoding the HA117 gene and the green fluorescence protein gene (GFP (Ad-GFP-HA117, the MDR1 and GFP (Ad-GFP-MDR1 or GFP (Ad-GFP was respectively carried out. The transduction efficiency and the multiplicity of infection (MOI were detected by fluorescence microscope and flow cytometry. The transcription of HA117 gene and MDR1 gene were detected by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR. Western blotting analysis was used to detect the expression of P-glycoprotein (P-gp but the expression of HA117 could not be analyzed as it is a novel gene and its antibody has not yet been synthesized. The drug-excretion activity of HA117 and MDR1 were determined by daunorubicin (DNR efflux assay. The drug sensitivities of 4T1/HA117 and 4T1/MDR1 to chemotherapeutic agents were detected by Methyl-Thiazolyl-Tetrazolium (MTT assay. Results The transducted efficiency of Ad-GFP-HA117 and Ad-GFP-MDR1 were 75%-80% when MOI was equal to 50. The transduction of Ad-GFP-HA117 and Ad-GFP-MDR1 could increase the expression of HA117 and MDR1. The drug resistance index to Adriamycin (ADM, vincristine (VCR, paclitaxel (Taxol and bleomycin (BLM increased to19.8050, 9.0663, 9.7245, 3.5650 respectively for 4T1/HA117 and 24.2236, 11.0480, 11.3741, 0.9630 respectively for 4T1/MDR1 as compared to the control cells. There were no significant differences in drug sensitivity between 4T1/HA117 and 4T1/MDR1 for the P-gp substrates (ADM, VCR and Taxol (P Conclusions These results confirm that HA117 is a strong MDR gene in both HL-60 and 4T1 cells. Furthermore, our results indicate that the MDR

  1. Genome evolution and plasticity of Serratia marcescens, an important multidrug-resistant nosocomial pathogen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iguchi, Atsushi; Nagaya, Yutaka; Pradel, Elizabeth; Ooka, Tadasuke; Ogura, Yoshitoshi; Katsura, Keisuke; Kurokawa, Ken; Oshima, Kenshiro; Hattori, Masahira; Parkhill, Julian; Sebaihia, Mohamed; Coulthurst, Sarah J; Gotoh, Naomasa; Thomson, Nicholas R; Ewbank, Jonathan J; Hayashi, Tetsuya

    2014-08-01

    Serratia marcescens is an important nosocomial pathogen that can cause an array of infections, most notably of the urinary tract and bloodstream. Naturally, it is found in many environmental niches, and is capable of infecting plants and animals. The emergence and spread of multidrug-resistant strains producing extended-spectrum or metallo beta-lactamases now pose a threat to public health worldwide. Here we report the complete genome sequences of two carefully selected S. marcescens strains, a multidrug-resistant clinical isolate (strain SM39) and an insect isolate (strain Db11). Our comparative analyses reveal the core genome of S. marcescens and define the potential metabolic capacity, virulence, and multidrug resistance of this species. We show a remarkable intraspecies genetic diversity, both at the sequence level and with regards genome flexibility, which may reflect the diversity of niches inhabited by members of this species. A broader analysis with other Serratia species identifies a set of approximately 3,000 genes that characterize the genus. Within this apparent genetic diversity, we identified many genes implicated in the high virulence potential and antibiotic resistance of SM39, including the metallo beta-lactamase and multiple other drug resistance determinants carried on plasmid pSMC1. We further show that pSMC1 is most closely related to plasmids circulating in Pseudomonas species. Our data will provide a valuable basis for future studies on S. marcescens and new insights into the genetic mechanisms that underlie the emergence of pathogens highly resistant to multiple antimicrobial agents.

  2. Purification of a Multidrug Resistance Transporter for Crystallization Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamela O. Alegre

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Crystallization of integral membrane proteins is a challenging field and much effort has been invested in optimizing the overexpression and purification steps needed to obtain milligram amounts of pure, stable, monodisperse protein sample for crystallography studies. Our current work involves the structural and functional characterization of the Escherichia coli multidrug resistance transporter MdtM, a member of the major facilitator superfamily (MFS. Here we present a protocol for isolation of MdtM to increase yields of recombinant protein to the milligram quantities necessary for pursuit of structural studies using X-ray crystallography. Purification of MdtM was enhanced by introduction of an elongated His-tag, followed by identification and subsequent removal of chaperonin contamination. For crystallization trials of MdtM, detergent screening using size exclusion chromatography determined that decylmaltoside (DM was the shortest-chain detergent that maintained the protein in a stable, monodispersed state. Crystallization trials of MdtM performed using the hanging-drop diffusion method with commercially available crystallization screens yielded 3D protein crystals under several different conditions. We contend that the purification protocol described here may be employed for production of high-quality protein of other multidrug efflux members of the MFS, a ubiquitous, physiologically and clinically important class of membrane transporters.

  3. Ribosomal mutations promote the evolution of antibiotic resistance in a multidrug environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomez, James E; Kaufmann-Malaga, Benjamin B; Wivagg, Carl N; Kim, Peter B; Silvis, Melanie R; Renedo, Nikolai; Ioerger, Thomas R; Ahmad, Rushdy; Livny, Jonathan; Fishbein, Skye; Sacchettini, James C; Carr, Steven A; Hung, Deborah T

    2017-01-01

    Antibiotic resistance arising via chromosomal mutations is typically specific to a particular antibiotic or class of antibiotics. We have identified mutations in genes encoding ribosomal components in Mycobacterium smegmatis that confer resistance to several structurally and mechanistically unrelated classes of antibiotics and enhance survival following heat shock and membrane stress. These mutations affect ribosome assembly and cause large-scale transcriptomic and proteomic changes, including the downregulation of the catalase KatG, an activating enzyme required for isoniazid sensitivity, and upregulation of WhiB7, a transcription factor involved in innate antibiotic resistance. Importantly, while these ribosomal mutations have a fitness cost in antibiotic-free medium, in a multidrug environment they promote the evolution of high-level, target-based resistance. Further, suppressor mutations can then be easily acquired to restore wild-type growth. Thus, ribosomal mutations can serve as stepping-stones in an evolutionary path leading to the emergence of high-level, multidrug resistance. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.20420.001 PMID:28220755

  4. Overcoming drug efflux-based multidrug resistance in cancer with nanotechnology

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xue Xue; Xing-Jie Liang

    2012-01-01

    Multidrug resistance (MDR),which significantly decreases the efficacy of anticancer drugs and causes tumor recurrence,has been a major challenge in clinical cancer treatment with chemotherapeutic drugs for decades.Several mechanisms of overcoming drug resistance have been postulated.Well known Pglycoprotein (P-gp) and other drug efflux transporters are considered to be critical in pumping anticancer drugs out of cells and causing chemotherapy failure.Innovative theranostic (therapeutic and diagnostic)strategies with nanoparticles are rapidly evolving and are anticipated to offer opportunities to overcome these limits.In this review,we discuss the mechanisms of drug efflux-mediated resistance and the application of multiple nanoparticle-based platforms to overcome chemoresistance and improve therapeutic outcome.

  5. Susceptibility of multidrug resistant clinical pathogens to a chlorhexidine formulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Günther, F; Kaiser, S J; Fries, T; Frank, U; Mutters, N T

    2015-01-01

    Multidrug resistant pathogens are a widespread problem in the hospital setting especially on intensive care units (ICU). This study evaluated the susceptibility of clinical isolates of gramnegative extensively drug resistant organisms (XDR), methicillinresistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), and vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus (VRE) to a proprietary chlorhexidine digluconate (CHG) formulation used in one brand of CHG-impregnated cloths. Ten isolates each of XDR Pseudomonas aeruginosa, XDR Acinetobacter baumannii, XDR Klebsiella pneumoniae, XDR Escherichia coli, MRSA, and vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus faecium from our hospital were tested. All isolates were susceptible to the proprietary CHG formulation (0.5%, 1%, 2%), with 99% to 100% suppression of growth at the earliest time point in time kill assays (1 minute for gram-positive and 15 seconds for gram-negative organisms). Minimum inhibitory concentrations ranged from 1 : 4096 to 1 : 65536 for MRSA, 1 : 1024 to 1 : 2048 for VRE, 1 : 2048 to 1 : 4096 for XDR E. coli, 1 : 512 to 1 : 2048 for XDR A. baumannii, 1 : 512 to 1 : 1024 for XDR P. aeruginosa, and 1 : 512 to 1 : 1024 for XDR K. pneumoniae. Cloths impregnated with this CHG formulation provide effective protection against colonization and infection by many pathogens. This study provides in vitro evidence that the proprietary CHG formulation used in one brand of CHG-impregnated cloths is effective against XDR gram-negative organisms, MRSA, and VRE.

  6. Multistrain models predict sequential multidrug treatment strategies to result in less antimicrobial resistance than combination treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ahmad, Amais; Zachariasen, Camilla; Christiansen, Lasse Engbo;

    2016-01-01

    Background: Combination treatment is increasingly used to fight infections caused by bacteria resistant to two or more antimicrobials. While multiple studies have evaluated treatment strategies to minimize the emergence of resistant strains for single antimicrobial treatment, fewer studies have...... generated by a mathematical model of the competitive growth of multiple strains of Escherichia coli.Results: Simulation studies showed that sequential use of tetracycline and ampicillin reduced the level of double resistance, when compared to the combination treatment. The effect of the cycling frequency...... frequency did not play a role in suppressing the growth of resistant strains, but the specific order of the two antimicrobials did. Predictions made from the study could be used to redesign multidrug treatment strategies not only for intramuscular treatment in pigs, but also for other dosing routes....

  7. Multidrug-resistant tuberculosis and migration to Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hargreaves, S; Lönnroth, K; Nellums, L B

    2016-01-01

    Multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB) in low-incidence countries in Europe is more prevalent among migrants than the native population. The impact of the recent increase in migration to EU and EEA countries with a low incidence of TB (<20 cases per 100 000) on MDR-TB epidemiology is unclear. ...... to treat and prevent MDR-TB among migrants in Europe. An evidence-base is urgently needed to inform guidelines for effective approaches for MDR-TB management in migrant populations in Europe....... outcomes. Although concerns have been raised around 'health tourists' migrating for MDR-TB treatment, numbers are probably small and data are lacking. Migrants experience significant barriers to testing and treatment for MDR-TB, exacerbated by increasingly restrictive health systems. Screening for latent...

  8. Preparation of silver nanoparticles fabrics against multidrug-resistant bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanh, Truong Thi; Thu, Nguyen Thi; Hien, Nguyen Quoc; An, Pham Ngoc; Loan, Truong Thi Kieu; Hoa, Phan Thi

    2016-04-01

    The silver nanoparticles (AgNPs)/peco fabrics were prepared by immobilization of AgNPs on fabrics in which AgNPs were synthesized by γ-irradiation of the 10 mM AgNO3 chitosan solution at the dose of 17.6 kGy. The AgNPs size has been estimated to be about 11 nm from TEM image. The AgNPs content onto peco fabrics was of 143±6 mg/kg at the initial AgNPs concentration of 100 ppm. The AgNPs colloidal solution was characterized by UV-vis spectroscopy and TEM image. The antibacterial activity of AgNPs/peco fabrics after 60 washings against Staphylococcus aureus and Klebsiella pneumoniae was found to be over 99%. Effects of AgNPs fabics on multidrug-resistant pathogens from the clinical specimens were also tested.

  9. Bacteriophages: biosensing tools for multi-drug resistant pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tawil, N; Sacher, E; Mandeville, R; Meunier, M

    2014-03-21

    Pathogen detection is of utmost importance in many sectors, such as in the food industry, environmental quality control, clinical diagnostics, bio-defence and counter-terrorism. Failure to appropriately, and specifically, detect pathogenic bacteria can lead to serious consequences, and may ultimately be lethal. Public safety, new legislation, recent outbreaks in food contamination, and the ever-increasing prevalence of multidrug-resistant infections have fostered a worldwide research effort targeting novel biosensing strategies. This review concerns phage-based analytical and biosensing methods targeted towards theranostic applications. We discuss and review phage-based assays, notably phage amplification, reporter phage, phage lysis, and bioluminescence assays for the detection of bacterial species, as well as phage-based biosensors, including optical (comprising SPR sensors and fiber optic assays), electrochemical (comprising amperometric, potentiometric, and impedimetric sensors), acoustic wave and magnetoelastic sensors.

  10. Detection of multidrug resistance using molecular nuclear technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jae Tae; Ahn, Byeong Cheol [School of Medicine, Kyungpook National Univ., Daegu (Korea, Republic of)

    2004-04-01

    Although the outcome of cancer patients after cytotoxic chemotherapy is related diverse mechanisms, multidrug resistance (MDR) for chemotherapeutic drugs due to cellular P-glycoprotein (Pgp) or multidrug-resistance associated protein (MRP) is most important factor in the chemotherapy failure to cancer. A large number of pharmacologic compounds, including verapamil, quinidine, tamoxifen, cyclosporin A and quinolone derivatives have been reported to overcome MDR. Single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) and positron emission tomography (PET) are available for the detection of Pgp and MRP-mediated transporter. {sup 99}m-Tc-MIBI and other {sup 99}m-Tc-radiopharmaceuticals are substrates for Pgp and MRP, and have been used in clinical studies for tumor imaging, and to visualize blockade of Pgp-mediated transport after modulation of Pgp pump. Colchicine, verapamil and daunorubicin labeled with {sup 11}C have been evaluated for the quantification of Pgp-mediated transport with PET in vivo and reported to be feasible substrates with which to image Pgp function in tumors. Leukotrienes are specific substrates for MRP and N-({sup 11}C)acetyl-leukotriene E4 provides an opportunity to study MRP function non-invasively in vivo. SPECT and PET pharmaceuticals have successfully used to evaluate pharmacologic effects of MDR modulators. Imaging of MDR and reversal of MDR with bioluminescence in a living animal is also evaluated for future clinical trial. We have described recent advances in molecular imaging of MDR and reviewed recent publications regarding feasibility of SPECT and PET imaging to study the functionality of MDR transporters in vivo.

  11. Multidrug resistance and ESBL-producing Salmonella spp. isolated from broiler processing plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziech, Rosangela Estel; Lampugnani, Camila; Perin, Ana Paula; Sereno, Mallu Jagnow; Sfaciotte, Ricardo Antônio Pilegi; Viana, Cibeli; Soares, Vanessa Mendonça; Pinto, José Paes de Almeida Nogueira; Bersot, Luciano dos Santos

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the occurrence of multidrug-resistant, extended spectrum beta-lactamase (ESBL) producing Salmonella spp. isolated from conveyor belts of broiler cutting rooms in Brazilian broiler processing plants. Ninety-eight strains of Salmonella spp. were analyzed. Multidrug resistance was determined by the disk diffusion test and the susceptibility of the isolated bacteria was evaluated against 18 antimicrobials from seven different classes. The double disk diffusion test was used to evaluate ESBL production. Of the 98 strains tested, 84 were multidrug resistant. The highest rates of resistance were against nalidixic acid (95%), tetracycline (91%), and the beta-lactams: ampicillin and cefachlor (45%), followed by streptomycin and gentamicin with 19% and 15% of strain resistance, respectively. By contrast, 97% of the strains were sensitive to chloramphenicol. 45% of the strains were positive for the presence of ESBL activity. In this study, high rates of multidrug resistance and ESBL production were observed in Salmonella spp.

  12. A review of intravenous minocycline for treatment of multidrug-resistant Acinetobacter infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ritchie, David J; Garavaglia-Wilson, Alexandria

    2014-12-01

    Options for treatment of multidrug-resistant (MDR) Acinetobacter baumannii infections are extremely limited. Minocycline intravenous is active against many MDR strains of Acinetobacter, and Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute breakpoints exist to guide interpretation of minocycline susceptibility results with Acinetobacter. In addition, minocycline intravenous holds a US Food and Drug Administration indication for treatment of infections caused by Acinetobacter. There is an accumulating amount of literature reporting successful use of minocycline intravenous for treatment of serious MDR Acinetobacter infections, particularly for nosocomial pneumonia. These results, coupled with the generally favorable tolerability of minocycline intravenous, support its use as a viable therapeutic option for treatment of MDR Acinetobacter infections.

  13. Selection of a multidrug resistance plasmid by sublethal levels of antibiotics and heavy metals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gullberg, Erik; Albrecht, Lisa M; Karlsson, Christoffer; Sandegren, Linus; Andersson, Dan I

    2014-10-07

    How sublethal levels of antibiotics and heavy metals select for clinically important multidrug resistance plasmids is largely unknown. Carriage of plasmids generally confers substantial fitness costs, implying that for the plasmid-carrying bacteria to be maintained in the population, the plasmid cost needs to be balanced by a selective pressure conferred by, for example, antibiotics or heavy metals. We studied the effects of low levels of antibiotics and heavy metals on the selective maintenance of a 220-kbp extended-spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL) plasmid identified in a hospital outbreak of Klebsiella pneumoniae and Escherichia coli. The concentrations of antibiotics and heavy metals required to maintain plasmid-carrying bacteria, the minimal selective concentrations (MSCs), were in all cases below (almost up to 140-fold) the MIC of the plasmid-free susceptible bacteria. This finding indicates that the very low antibiotic and heavy metal levels found in polluted environments and in treated humans and animals might be sufficiently high to maintain multiresistance plasmids. When resistance genes were moved from the plasmid to the chromosome, the MSC decreased, showing that MSC for a specific resistance conditionally depends on genetic context. This finding suggests that a cost-free resistance could be maintained in a population by an infinitesimally low concentration of antibiotic. By studying the effect of combinations of several compounds, it was observed that for certain combinations of drugs each new compound added lowered the minimal selective concentration of the others. This combination effect could be a significant factor in the selection of multidrug resistance plasmids/bacterial clones in complex multidrug environments. Importance: Antibiotic resistance is in many pathogenic bacteria caused by genes that are carried on large conjugative plasmids. These plasmids typically contain multiple antibiotic resistance genes as well as genes that confer resistance to

  14. Genomic analysis of globally diverse Mycobacterium tuberculosis strains provides insights into the emergence and spread of multidrug resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manson, Abigail L; Cohen, Keira A; Abeel, Thomas; Desjardins, Christopher A; Armstrong, Derek T; Barry, Clifton E; Brand, Jeannette; Chapman, Sinéad B; Cho, Sang-Nae; Gabrielian, Andrei; Gomez, James; Jodals, Andreea M; Joloba, Moses; Jureen, Pontus; Lee, Jong Seok; Malinga, Lesibana; Maiga, Mamoudou; Nordenberg, Dale; Noroc, Ecaterina; Romancenco, Elena; Salazar, Alex; Ssengooba, Willy; Velayati, A A; Winglee, Kathryn; Zalutskaya, Aksana; Via, Laura E; Cassell, Gail H; Dorman, Susan E; Ellner, Jerrold; Farnia, Parissa; Galagan, James E; Rosenthal, Alex; Crudu, Valeriu; Homorodean, Daniela; Hsueh, Po-Ren; Narayanan, Sujatha; Pym, Alexander S; Skrahina, Alena; Swaminathan, Soumya; Van der Walt, Martie; Alland, David; Bishai, William R; Cohen, Ted; Hoffner, Sven; Birren, Bruce W; Earl, Ashlee M

    2017-03-01

    Multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB), caused by drug-resistant strains of Mycobacterium tuberculosis, is an increasingly serious problem worldwide. Here we examined a data set of whole-genome sequences from 5,310 M. tuberculosis isolates from five continents. Despite the great diversity of these isolates with respect to geographical point of isolation, genetic background and drug resistance, the patterns for the emergence of drug resistance were conserved globally. We have identified harbinger mutations that often precede multidrug resistance. In particular, the katG mutation encoding p.Ser315Thr, which confers resistance to isoniazid, overwhelmingly arose before mutations that conferred rifampicin resistance across all of the lineages, geographical regions and time periods. Therefore, molecular diagnostics that include markers for rifampicin resistance alone will be insufficient to identify pre-MDR strains. Incorporating knowledge of polymorphisms that occur before the emergence of multidrug resistance, particularly katG p.Ser315Thr, into molecular diagnostics should enable targeted treatment of patients with pre-MDR-TB to prevent further development of MDR-TB.

  15. Chaperonin GroEL/GroES over-expression promotes multi-drug resistance in E. coli following exposure to aminoglycoside antibiotics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lise eGoltermann

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Antibiotic resistance is an increasing challenge to modern healthcare. Aminoglycoside antiobiotics cause translation corruption and protein misfolding and aggregation in Escherichia coli. We previously showed that chaperonin GroEL/GroES depletion and overexpression sensitize and promote short-term tolerance, respectively, to this drug class. Here we show that chaperonin GroEL/GroES over-expression accelerates acquisition of aminoglycoside resistance and multi-drug resistance following sub-lethal aminoglycoside antibiotic exposure. Chaperonin buffering could provide a novel mechanism for antibiotic resistance and multi-drug resistance development.

  16. "Emergence of Multidrug Resistant Strains of Escherichia coli Isolated from Urinary Tract Infections"

    OpenAIRE

    R Moniri; Khorshidi, A; H Akbari

    2003-01-01

    The emergence of multidrug resistant strains of Escherichia coli has complicated treatment decision and may lead to treatment failures. From April to November 2001 we prospectively evaluated the prevalence of resistance to trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole (SXT), gentamicin, cephalothin, ciprofloxacin, and nitrofurantoin in 220 Escherichia coli isolates from patients with urinary tract infections in kashan, Iran. To assess the current breadth of multidrug resistance among urinary isolates of E. c...

  17. [Multidrug-resistant tuberculosis: challenges of a global emergence].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Comolet, T

    2015-10-01

    Drug-resistant tuberculosis, in particular Multi-Drug Resistant (MDR-TB) is an increasing global concern and a major burden for some developing countries, especially the BRICS. It is assumed that every year roughly 350 000 new MDR-TB cases occur in the world, on average in 20.5% of TB patients that have been previously treated but also in 3.5% of persons that have never been on TB treatment before. The global distribution of cases is very heterogeneous and is now better understood thanks to a growing number of specific surveys and routine surveillance systems: incidence is much higher in southern Africa and in all countries formerly part of the USSR. Countries with weak health systems and previously inefficient TB control programs are highly vulnerable to MDR epidemics because program failures do help creating, maintaining and spreading resistances. Global response is slowly rolled out and diagnosis capacities are on the rise (mostly with genotypic methods) but adequate and successful treatment and care is still limited to a minority of global cases. From a public health perspective the MDR-TB growing epidemics will not be controlled merely by the introduction of few new antibiotics because it is also linked to patient's compliance and adequate case management supported by efficient TB program. In depth quality improvement will only be achieved after previous errors are thoroughly analyzed and boldly corrected.

  18. Antibiotic Restriction Might Facilitate the Emergence of Multi-drug Resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obolski, Uri; Stein, Gideon Y; Hadany, Lilach

    2015-06-01

    High antibiotic resistance frequencies have become a major public health issue. The decrease in new antibiotics' production, combined with increasing frequencies of multi-drug resistant (MDR) bacteria, cause substantial limitations in treatment options for some bacterial infections. To diminish overall resistance, and especially the occurrence of bacteria that are resistant to all antibiotics, certain drugs are deliberately scarcely used--mainly when other options are exhausted. We use a mathematical model to explore the efficiency of such antibiotic restrictions. We assume two commonly used drugs and one restricted drug. The model is examined for the mixing strategy of antibiotic prescription, in which one of the drugs is randomly assigned to each incoming patient. Data obtained from Rabin medical center, Israel, is used to estimate realistic single and double antibiotic resistance frequencies in incoming patients. We find that broad usage of the hitherto restricted drug can reduce the number of incorrectly treated patients, and reduce the spread of bacteria resistant to both common antibiotics. Such double resistant infections are often eventually treated with the restricted drug, and therefore are prone to become resistant to all three antibiotics. Thus, counterintuitively, a broader usage of a formerly restricted drug can sometimes lead to a decrease in the emergence of bacteria resistant to all drugs. We recommend re-examining restriction of specific drugs, when multiple resistance to the relevant alternative drugs already exists.

  19. Higher Desolvation Energy Reduces Molecular Recognition in Multi-Drug Resistant HIV-1 Protease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ladislau C. Kovari

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Designing HIV-1 protease inhibitors that overcome drug-resistance is still a challenging task. In this study, four clinical isolates of multi-drug resistant HIV-1 proteases that exhibit resistance to all the US FDA-approved HIV-1 protease inhibitors and also reduce the substrate recognition ability were examined. A multi-drug resistant HIV-1 protease isolate, MDR 769, was co-crystallized with the p2/NC substrate and the mutated CA/p2 substrate, CA/p2 P1’F. Both substrates display different levels of molecular recognition by the wild-type and multi-drug resistant HIV-1 protease. From the crystal structures, only limited differences can be identified between the wild-type and multi-drug resistant protease. Therefore, a wild-type HIV-1 protease and four multi-drug resistant HIV-1 proteases in complex with the two peptides were modeled based on the crystal structures and examined during a 10 ns-molecular dynamics simulation. The simulation results reveal that the multi-drug resistant HIV-1 proteases require higher desolvation energy to form complexes with the peptides. This result suggests that the desolvation of the HIV-1 protease active site is an important step of protease-ligand complex formation as well as drug resistance. Therefore, desolvation energy could be considered as a parameter in the evaluation of future HIV-1 protease inhibitor candidates.

  20. High prevalence of multidrug resistance in bacterial uropathogens from Kathmandu, Nepal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baral Pankaj

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Urinary Tract Infection (UTI is one of the most common infectious diseases and people of all age-groups and geographical locations are affected. The impact of disease is even worst in low-resource developing countries due to unaware of the UTIs caused by multidrug-resistant (MDR pathogens and the possibility of transfer of MDR traits between them. The present study aimed to determine the prevalence of MDR bacterial isolates from UTI patients, the antibiotic resistance pattern and the conjugational transfer of multidrug resistance phenotypes in Escherichia coli (E. coli. Results Two hundred and nineteen bacterial isolates were recovered from 710 urine samples at Kathmandu Model hospital during the study period. All samples and isolates were investigated by standard laboratory procedures. Among the significant bacterial growth (30.8%, 219 isolates, 41.1% isolates were MDR. The most prevailing organism, E. coli (81.3%, 178 isolates was 38.2% MDR, whereas second most common organism, Citrobacter spp. (5%, 11 isolates was found 72.7% MDR. Extended-spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL production was detected in 55.2% of a subset of MDR E. coli isolates. Among the 29 MDR E. coli isolates, plasmids of size ranging 2-51 kb were obtained with different 15 profiles. The most common plasmid of size 32 kb was detected in all of the plasmid-harbored E. coli strains. The majority of E. coli isolates investigated for the multidrug resistance transfer were able to transfer plasmid-mediated MDR phenotypes along with ESBL pattern with a frequency ranging from 0.3 × 10-7 to 1.5 × 10-7 to an E. coli HB101 recipient strain by conjugation. Most of the donor and recipient strain showed high levels of minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC values for commonly-used antibiotics. Conclusions The high prevalence of multidrug resistance in bacterial uropathogens was observed. Particularly, resistance patterns were alarmingly higher for amoxycillin, co

  1. Salvianolic acid A shows selective cytotoxicity against multidrug-resistant MCF-7 breast cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xin; Wang, Chunyan; Zhang, Longjiang; Li, Yanjun; Wang, Shouju; Wang, Jiandong; Yuan, Caiyun; Niu, Jia; Wang, Chengsheng; Lu, Guangming

    2015-02-01

    Multidrug resistance (MDR) is a major cause for incurable breast cancer. Salvianolic acid A (SAA), the hydrophilic polyphenolic derivative of Salvia miltiorrhiza Bunge (Danshen/Red Sage), was examined for cytotoxicities to MDR MCF-7 human breast cancer cells and their parental counterparts. We have shown that SAA inhibited proliferation, caused cell cycle arrest at the S phase, and induced apoptosis dose dependently to the two kinds of cancer cells. However, the resistant cells were significantly susceptible to the inhibition of SAA compared with the parental cells. SAA increased the level of reactive oxygen species (ROS) by 6.2-fold in the resistant cells, whereas the level of SAA-induced ROS changed only by 1.6-fold in their parental counterparts. Thus, the data showed that the selective cytotoxicity resulted from the hypersensitivity of the resistant cells to the strongly elevated ROS by SAA. In addition, SAA-triggered apoptosis was associated with increased caspase-3 activity, disrupted mitochondrial membrane potential, downregulated Bcl-2 expression, and upregulated Bax expression in the resistant cells. Moreover, SAA downregulated the level of P-glycoprotein, which was overexpressed in the resistant cells. This indicated that SAA modulated MDR. Furthermore, SAA showed higher antitumor activity than did doxorubicin in xenografts established from the resistant cells. The present work raised a possibility that SAA might be considered a potential choice to overcome MDR for the selective susceptibility of the resistant breast cancer cells to SAA treatment.

  2. Antimicrobial resistance determinant microarray for analysis of multi-drug resistant isolates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taitt, Chris Rowe; Leski, Tomasz; Stenger, David; Vora, Gary J.; House, Brent; Nicklasson, Matilda; Pimentel, Guillermo; Zurawski, Daniel V.; Kirkup, Benjamin C.; Craft, David; Waterman, Paige E.; Lesho, Emil P.; Bangurae, Umaru; Ansumana, Rashid

    2012-06-01

    The prevalence of multidrug-resistant infections in personnel wounded in Iraq and Afghanistan has made it challenging for physicians to choose effective therapeutics in a timely fashion. To address the challenge of identifying the potential for drug resistance, we have developed the Antimicrobial Resistance Determinant Microarray (ARDM) to provide DNAbased analysis for over 250 resistance genes covering 12 classes of antibiotics. Over 70 drug-resistant bacteria from different geographic regions have been analyzed on ARDM, with significant differences in patterns of resistance identified: genes for resistance to sulfonamides, trimethoprim, chloramphenicol, rifampin, and macrolide-lincosamidesulfonamide drugs were more frequently identified in isolates from sources in Iraq/Afghanistan. Of particular concern was the presence of genes responsible for resistance to many of the last-resort antibiotics used to treat war traumaassociated infections.

  3. Ceragenins – a new weapon to fight multidrug resistant bacterial infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Urszula Surel

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Growing antibiotic resistance among pathogenic microorganisms is one of the most challenging problems. Often, a single mutation in a bacterial cell leads to the formation of a new drug resistance mechanism. The ceragenins are a novel class of antibiotic, offering great promise in future treatment of infections. These cationic antimicrobial lipids are net positively charged cholic acid derivates that are electrostatically attracted to the negatively charged membranes of bacteria, certain viruses, fungi, and protozoa. After membrane insertion, they interfere with membrane organisation, resulting in membrane dysfunction and cell death. This review focuses on the broad spectrum of antibacterial activity of ceragenins, and their potential to become a new group of antibiotics for prevention and treatment of infections, especially those caused by multidrug-resistant bacteria.

  4. Whole genome sequencing of emerging multidrug resistant Candida auris isolates in India demonstrates low genetic variation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Sharma

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Candida auris is an emerging multidrug resistant yeast that causes nosocomial fungaemia and deep-seated infections. Notably, the emergence of this yeast is alarming as it exhibits resistance to azoles, amphotericin B and caspofungin, which may lead to clinical failure in patients. The multigene phylogeny and amplified fragment length polymorphism typing methods report the C. auris population as clonal. Here, using whole genome sequencing analysis, we decipher for the first time that C. auris strains from four Indian hospitals were highly related, suggesting clonal transmission. Further, all C. auris isolates originated from cases of fungaemia and were resistant to fluconazole (MIC >64 mg/L.

  5. Effects of mefloquine use on Plasmodium vivax multidrug resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khim, Nimol; Andrianaranjaka, Voahangy; Popovici, Jean; Kim, Saorin; Ratsimbasoa, Arsene; Benedet, Christophe; Barnadas, Celine; Durand, Remy; Thellier, Marc; Legrand, Eric; Musset, Lise; Menegon, Michela; Severini, Carlo; Nour, Bakri Y M; Tichit, Magali; Bouchier, Christiane; Mercereau-Puijalon, Odile; Ménard, Didier

    2014-10-01

    Numerous studies have indicated a strong association between amplification of the multidrug resistance-1 gene and in vivo and in vitro mefloquine resistance of Plasmodium falciparum. Although falciparum infection usually is not treated with mefloquine, incorrect diagnosis, high frequency of undetected mixed infections, or relapses of P. vivax infection triggered by P. falciparum infections expose non-P. falciparum parasites to mefloquine. To assess the consequences of such unintentional treatments on P. vivax, we studied variations in number of Pvmdr-1 (PlasmoDB accession no. PVX_080100, NCBI reference sequence NC_009915.1) copies worldwide in 607 samples collected in areas with different histories of mefloquine use from residents and from travelers returning to France. Number of Pvmdr-1 copies correlated with drug use history. Treatment against P. falciparum exerts substantial collateral pressure against sympatric P. vivax, jeopardizing future use of mefloquine against P. vivax. A drug policy is needed that takes into consideration all co-endemic species of malaria parasites.

  6. What's new in multidrug-resistant pathogens in the ICU?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zilahi, Gabor; Artigas, Antonio; Martin-Loeches, Ignacio

    2016-12-01

    Over the last several decades, antibacterial drug use has become widespread with their misuse being an ever-increasing phenomenon. Consequently, antibacterial drugs have become less effective or even ineffective, resulting in a global health security emergency. The prevalence of multidrug-resistant organisms (MDROs) varies widely among regions and countries. The primary aim of antibiotic stewardship programs is to supervise the three most influential factors contributing to the development and transmission of MDROs, namely: (1) appropriate antibiotic prescribing; (2) early detection and prevention of cross-colonization of MDROs; and (3) elimination of reservoirs. In the future, it is expected that a number of countries will experience a rise in MDROs. These infections will be associated with a high consumption of healthcare resources manifested by a prolonged hospital stay and high mortality. As a counteractive strategy, minimization of broad-spectrum antibiotic use and prompt antibiotic administration will aid in reduction of antibiotic resistance. Innovative management approaches include development and implementation of rapid diagnostic tests that will help in both shortening the duration of therapy and allowing early targeted therapy. The institution of more accessible therapeutic drug monitoring will help to optimize drug administration and support a patient-specific approach. Areas where further research is required are investigation into the heterogeneity of critically ill patients and the need for new antibacterial drug development.

  7. Clinical analysis of intracranial infections caused by multidrug-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii%多药耐药鲍氏不动杆菌颅内感染临床分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张文生; 李勐; 李泽福; 孙雷涛; 李珍珠

    2014-01-01

    目的:分析神经外科术后颅内感染多药耐药鲍氏不动杆菌的危险因素、诊断标准及治疗方法,探讨应用敏感、安全抗菌药物的临床效果,从而指导临床预防及治疗,降低多药耐药鲍氏不动杆菌颅内感染的病死率。方法对医院神经外科自2011年5月-2012年12月术后并发颅内感染多药耐药鲍氏不动杆菌的5例患者,采取单人单间隔离、严格消毒,根据脑脊液培养以及药敏试验结果应用敏感抗菌药物;颅内感染确诊后及时行腰大池持续引流,并根据培养结果选用敏感安全抗菌药物进行鞘内注射;给予全身营养支持治疗、积极预防治疗并发症;每3 d进行1次脑脊液培养,监测脑脊液细菌种类及药敏变化等措施。结果5例患者按疗效评定标准及细菌学评定标准,治愈4例,好转1例;好转患者脑脊液细菌培养为阴性,脑脊液常规示有核细胞总数约20×106/L ;脑脊液生化示糖正常,蛋白约0.55 g/L ;5例患者随访6~24个月,预后良好。结论神经外科术后颅内感染多药耐药鲍氏不动杆菌重在预防,合理应用抗菌药物,早期诊断、及时放置腰大池持续引流、鞘内注射敏感安全抗菌药物、联合静脉用药,能有效防止多药耐药鲍氏不动杆菌交叉感染,提高开颅术后颅内感染多药耐药鲍氏不动杆菌的治愈率,降低致死率。%OBJECTIVE To investigate the risk factors ,diagnostic criteria and treatment methods of multidrug-resistant A cinetobacter baumannii intracranial infections ,assess the efficacy of sensitive and safe antibiotic use so as to guide clinical prevention and treatment and reduce the intracranial infection mortality .METHODS Totally 5 patients with postoperative intracranial infections due to multidrug-resistant A .baumannii from May 2011 to Dec . 2012 in our department were taken to receive the following measures :single room isolation and

  8. Analysis of embCAB mutations associated with ethambutol resistance in multidrug-resistant mycobacterium tuberculosis isolates from China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Li-Li; Sun, Qing; Liu, Hai-Can; Wu, Xiao-Cui; Xiao, Tong-Yang; Zhao, Xiu-Qin; Li, Gui-Lian; Jiang, Yi; Zeng, Chun-Yan; Wan, Kang-Lin

    2015-04-01

    Ethambutol (EMB) plays a pivotal role in the chemotherapy of drug-resistant tuberculosis (TB), including multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB). Resistance to EMB is considered to be caused by mutations in the embCAB operon (embC, embA, and embB). In this study, we analyzed the embCAB mutations among 139 MDR-TB isolates from China and found a possible association between embCAB operon mutation and EMB resistance. Our data indicate that 56.8% of MDR-TB isolates are resistant to EMB, and 82.2% of EMB-resistant isolates belong to the Beijing family. Overall, 110 (79.1%) MDR-TB isolates had at least one mutation in the embCAB operon. The majority of mutations were present in the embB gene and the embA upstream region, which also displayed significant correlations with EMB resistance. The most common mutations occurred at codon 306 in embB (embB306), followed by embB406, embA(-16), and embB497. Mutations at embB306 were associated with EMB resistance. DNA sequencing of embB306-497 was the best strategy for detecting EMB resistance, with 89.9% sensitivity, 58.3% specificity, and 76.3% accuracy. Additionally, embB306 had limited value as a candidate predictor for EMB resistance among MDR-TB infections in China.

  9. Biofilm formation in clinical isolates of nosocomial Acinetobacter baumannii and its relationship with multidrug resistance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ebrahim Babapour

    2016-06-01

    Conclusions: Since most of the multidrug resistant strains produce biofilm, it seems necessary to provide continuous monitoring and determination of antibiotic susceptibility of clinical A. baumannii. This would help to select the most appropriate antibiotic for treatment.

  10. Impact of fungal drug transporters on fungicide sensitivity, multidrug resistance and virulence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Waard, de M.A.; Andrade, A.C.; Hayashi, K.; Schoonbeek, H.; Stergiopoulos, I.; Zwiers, L.H.

    2006-01-01

    Drug transporters are membrane proteins that provide protection for organisms against natural toxic products and fungicides. In plant pathogens, drug transporters function in baseline sensitivity to fungicides, multidrug resistance (MDR) and virulence on host plants. This paper describes drug transp

  11. Ontogeny, aging, and gender-related changes in hepatic multidrug resistant protein genes in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Qiong-Ni; Hou, Wei-Yu; Xu, Shang-Fu; Lu, Yuan-Fu; Liu, Jie

    2017-02-01

    Multidrug resistance proteins (Mrps) are efflux transporters playing important roles in endogenous substances and xenobiotics transport out of the liver. Children, elderly, gender and physio-pathological conditions could influence their expression and result in changes in drug disposition.

  12. Phenotypic and genotypic analysis of multidrug-resistant tuberculosis in Ethiopia.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Agonafir, M.; Lemma, E.; Wolde-Meskel, D.; Goshu, S.; Santhanam, A.; Girmachew, F.; Demissie, D.; Getahun, M.; Gebeyehu, M.; Soolingen, D. van

    2010-01-01

    SETTING: National Tuberculosis Reference Laboratory, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia. OBJECTIVES: To determine the drug susceptibility pattern of Mycobacterium tuberculosis isolates and to genetically characterise multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB) isolates. DESIGN: A total of 107 M. tuberculosis isola

  13. The serum resistome of a globally disseminated multidrug resistant uropathogenic Escherichia coli clone.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minh-Duy Phan

    Full Text Available Escherichia coli ST131 is a globally disseminated, multidrug resistant clone responsible for a high proportion of urinary tract and bloodstream infections. The rapid emergence and successful spread of E. coli ST131 is strongly associated with antibiotic resistance; however, this phenotype alone is unlikely to explain its dominance amongst multidrug resistant uropathogens circulating worldwide in hospitals and the community. Thus, a greater understanding of the molecular mechanisms that underpin the fitness of E. coli ST131 is required. In this study, we employed hyper-saturated transposon mutagenesis in combination with multiplexed transposon directed insertion-site sequencing to define the essential genes required for in vitro growth and the serum resistome (i.e. genes required for resistance to human serum of E. coli EC958, a representative of the predominant E. coli ST131 clonal lineage. We identified 315 essential genes in E. coli EC958, 231 (73% of which were also essential in E. coli K-12. The serum resistome comprised 56 genes, the majority of which encode membrane proteins or factors involved in lipopolysaccharide (LPS biosynthesis. Targeted mutagenesis confirmed a role in serum resistance for 46 (82% of these genes. The murein lipoprotein Lpp, along with two lipid A-core biosynthesis enzymes WaaP and WaaG, were most strongly associated with serum resistance. While LPS was the main resistance mechanism defined for E. coli EC958 in serum, the enterobacterial common antigen and colanic acid also impacted on this phenotype. Our analysis also identified a novel function for two genes, hyxA and hyxR, as minor regulators of O-antigen chain length. This study offers novel insight into the genetic make-up of E. coli ST131, and provides a framework for future research on E. coli and other Gram-negative pathogens to define their essential gene repertoire and to dissect the molecular mechanisms that enable them to survive in the bloodstream and

  14. Chloramphenicol – A Potent Armament Against Multi-Drug Resistant (MDR) Gram Negative Bacilli?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Multidrug-resistant gram-negative bacteria cause infections which are hard to treat and cause high morbidity and mortality. Due to limited therapeutic options there is a renewed interest upon older antimicrobials which had fallen into disuse as a result of toxic side effects. One such antibiotic is chloramphenicol which was sidelined due to reports linking its use with the development of aplastic anaemia. Aim A study was conducted to evaluate the susceptibility of chloramphenicol in light of the emerging problem of multi-drug resistant gram negative bacteria (MDR GNB). Materials and Methods A total of 483 MDR GNB of the 650 consecutive Gram Negative Bacteria isolated from various clinical samples of patients admitted at a tertiary care hospital in Jaipur between January-June 2014 were screened for chloramphenicol susceptibility by the disc diffusion method as per CLSI guidelines. Results The MDR GNB isolates were obtained from 217 (45%) urine, 163 (34%) from respiratory samples, 52(11%) from pus, 42 (9%) from blood and 9 (2%) from body fluids. A 68% of the MDR GNB isolates were found to be sensitive to chloramphenicol. Conclusion Clinicians should always check for the local susceptibility of Gram-negative bacteria to chloramphenicol. This antibiotic has a potential to play a role in the therapeutic management of infections due to MDR GNB pathogens. PMID:27042458

  15. Hospital costs of nosocomial multi-drug resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa acquisition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morales Eva

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We aimed to assess the hospital economic costs of nosocomial multi-drug resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa acquisition. Methods A retrospective study of all hospital admissions between January 1, 2005, and December 31, 2006 was carried out in a 420-bed, urban, tertiary-care teaching hospital in Barcelona (Spain. All patients with a first positive clinical culture for P. aeruginosa more than 48 h after admission were included. Patient and hospitalization characteristics were collected from hospital and microbiology laboratory computerized records. According to antibiotic susceptibility, isolates were classified as non-resistant, resistant and multi-drug resistant. Cost estimation was based on a full-costing cost accounting system and on the criteria of clinical Activity-Based Costing methods. Multivariate analyses were performed using generalized linear models of log-transformed costs. Results Cost estimations were available for 402 nosocomial incident P. aeruginosa positive cultures. Their distribution by antibiotic susceptibility pattern was 37.1% non-resistant, 29.6% resistant and 33.3% multi-drug resistant. The total mean economic cost per admission of patients with multi-drug resistant P. aeruginosa strains was higher than that for non-resistant strains (15,265 vs. 4,933 Euros. In multivariate analysis, resistant and multi-drug resistant strains were independently predictive of an increased hospital total cost in compared with non-resistant strains (the incremental increase in total hospital cost was more than 1.37-fold and 1.77-fold that for non-resistant strains, respectively. Conclusions P. aeruginosa multi-drug resistance independently predicted higher hospital costs with a more than 70% increase per admission compared with non-resistant strains. Prevention of the nosocomial emergence and spread of antimicrobial resistant microorganisms is essential to limit the strong economic impact.

  16. The ABC family of multidrug transporters in microorganisms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Veen, H.W; Konings, W.N

    1998-01-01

    Multidrug transporters are membrane proteins that are able to expel a broad range of toxic molecules from the cell. In humans, the overexpression of the multidrug resistance P-glycoprotein (Pgp) and the multidrug resistance-associated protein MRP1 (MRP) is a principal cause of resistance of cancers

  17. Drug accumulation in the presence of the multidrug resistance pump

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ayesh, S; Litman, Thomas; Stein, W D

    1997-01-01

    We studied the interaction between the multidrug transporter, P-glycoprotein, and two compounds that interact with it: vinblastine, a classical substrate of the pump, and verapamil, a classical reverser. Steady-state levels of accumulation of these two drugs were determined in a multidrug resista...

  18. Modulation of multidrug resistance by flavonoids. Inhibitors of glutathione conjugation and MRP-mediated transport

    OpenAIRE

    Zanden, van, J.J.

    2005-01-01

    In this thesis, the use of flavonoids for inhibition of two important players in the glutathione related biotransformation system involved in multidrug resistance was investigated using several in vitro model systems. The enzymes of interest included the phase II glutathione S-transferase enzyme GSTP1-1, able to detoxify anticancer agents through conjugation with glutathione and the two multidrug resistance proteins MRP1 and MRP2 involved in glutathione mediated cellular efflux of, amongst ot...

  19. Influence of efflux pump inhibitors on the multidrug resistance of Helicobacter pylori

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    AIM:To evaluate the effect of efflux pump inhibitors (EPIs) on multidrug resistance of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori).METHODS: H. pylori strains were isolated and cultured on Brucella agar plates with 10% sheep's blood. The multidrug resistant (MDR) H. pylori were obtained with the inducer chloramphenicol by repeated doubling of the concentration until no colony was seen, then the susceptibilities of the MDR strains and their parents to 9 antibiotics were assessed with agar dilution tests. The present stud...

  20. Characterisation of multidrug-resistant Ehrlich ascites tumour cells selected in vivo for resistance to etoposide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, D; Maare, C; Eriksen, J;

    2000-01-01

    -extractable immunoreactive topoisomerase IIalpha and beta in EHR2/VP16 was reduced by 30-40% relative to that in EHR2. The multidrug resistance-associated protein (MRP) mRNA was increased 20-fold in EHR2/VP16 as compared with EHR2, whereas the expression of P-glycoprotein was unchanged. In EHR2/VP16, the steady-state...

  1. Prevalence of Multidrug Resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis by Mycobacteria growth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Livani S

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and objectives: Identification and monitoring ofmultidrugresistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis strains (MDR ishighlighted by the high risk of their spreading in different areas.Prevalence of these strains was evaluated in Golestan province innortheast of Iran.Material and Methods: Drug susceptibility testing to Isoniazid andrifampin was carried out for 148 clinical samples that had grown inMycobacteria growth indicator tube (MGIT system, according to themanufacturer's instructions (Becton-Dickinson, USA. The associationof drug resistance frequency with demographic characteristics andgrowth time were investigated. The appropriate statistical tests, X2 andstudent Ttest were performed for comparison of these variants. A pvalue>0.05 was considered significant in all cases.Results: The turnaround time required for growth of Mycobacteriumtuberculosis in MGIT system was between 2 to 55 days (mean16.3±10.4 days. Of all samples studied, 17.6% and 3.4% wereresistant to Isoniazid and rifampin, respectively, and 3.4% (5 sampleswere MDR (CI 95%; 1- 6%. The turnaround time required fordetermining MDR cases was 9.6 days. No statistically significantassociation was found between the resistance to the drugs and none ofthe factors including sex, age, type of clinical sample, and positivity ofthe smear.Conclusion: The prevalence of MDR in the studied region wasdetermined to be 3.4% which is similar to the country-wideevaluations. The turnaround time for Mycobacterium growth and antidrug susceptibility result can be shortened by MGIT method.Key words: Mycobacterium tuberculosis, Mycobacterium GrowthIndicator Tube, Multidrug Resistant

  2. Distribution of multidrug-resistant bacteria causing infections in patients of department of respiratory medicine and analysis of related factors%呼吸科患者多药耐药菌感染的类型及相关因素分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吕少敏; 王玲玲; 俞万钧

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To explore the distribution of multidrug-resistant bacteria causing infections in department of respiratory medicine and put forward targeted prevention measures so as to reduce the incidence of infections . METHODS The clinical data of 60 patients with multidrug-resistant bacteria infections who were treated in the re-spiratory department from Jan 2011 to Jan 2013 were retrospectively analyzed ,then the species of the drug-resist-ant bacteria and the influencing factors were analyzed ,the specific intervention measures were formulated ,and the statistical analysis was performed with the use of WHONET 5 .3 software .RESULTS A total of 118 strains of mul-tidrug-resistant bacteria have been isolated , including 47 (39 .8% ) strains of gram-positive bacteria and 71 (60 .2% ) strains of gram-negative bacteria ;the Staphylococcus aureus was the predominant species of gram-posi-tive bacteria ,accounting for 37 .3% ;the Acinetobacter baumannii ,Klebsiella pneumoniae ,and Escherichia coli were dominant among the gram-negative bacteria ,accounting for 23 .7% ,17 .8% ,and 12 .7% ,respectively .The influencing factors for the infections caused by the multidrug-resistant bacteria included the broad use of antibiot-ics ,complication of underlying diseases ,invasive operation ,decreased immunity ,without strict implementation of isolation measures ,and poor environment for hospital stay .CONCLUSION The gram-negative bacteria are the pre-dominant multidrug-resistant bacteria causing the infections in department of respiratory medicine ;there are a vari-ety of influencing factors .It is necessary for the hospital to strengthen the surveillance of pathogens and develop targeted intervention measures so as to reduce the incidence of infections .%目的:探讨呼吸科感染多药耐药菌的类型及相关因素,并制定针对性预防措施,以降低感染的发生。方法对呼吸科2011年1月-2013年1月60例多药耐药菌感染患者的临床资料进

  3. Tetracyclines for multidrug-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falagas, Matthew E; Vardakas, Konstantinos Z; Kapaskelis, Anastasios; Triarides, Nikolaos A; Roussos, Nikolaos S

    2015-05-01

    Multidrug-resistant (MDR) Acinetobacter baumannii infections have emerged as a serious threat worldwide. As novel agents have yet to be developed, understanding the effectiveness and safety of older antibiotics has become a priority. The purpose of this systematic review was to summarise the available clinical evidence on the use of tetracyclines for the treatment of A. baumannii infections. Ten retrospective studies regarding doxycycline and minocycline for the treatment of 185 A. baumannii infections (of which 65.4% were respiratory infections and 13% were bloodstream infections) in 156 patients were available. In most cases (86.4%), tetracyclines were administered in combination with another agent. The usual dosage of doxycycline or minocycline was 100mg intravenous or per os twice daily (usually with a 200mg loading dose for minocycline). Clinical success was achieved in 120 (76.9%) of 156 patients; in 87 (71.9%) of 121 respiratory infections and in 21 (87.5%) of 24 bloodstream infections. Twenty-two deaths occurred in 100 recorded cases. Microbiological eradication was attained in 72 (71.3%) of 101 available cases and documented microbiological eradication was reached in 59 (66.3%) of 89 available cases. Adverse events were noted in only 1 of 88 cases. Overall, although tetracycline-containing regimens showed encouraging results, more data from larger comparative trials are required to establish a role for these antibiotics in the treatment of MDR A. baumannii infections.

  4. Marine Natural Products as Models to Circumvent Multidrug Resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Solida; Sousa, Emília; Kijjoa, Anake; Pinto, Madalena M M

    2016-07-08

    Multidrug resistance (MDR) to anticancer drugs is a serious health problem that in many cases leads to cancer treatment failure. The ATP binding cassette (ABC) transporter P-glycoprotein (P-gp), which leads to premature efflux of drugs from cancer cells, is often responsible for MDR. On the other hand, a strategy to search for modulators from natural products to overcome MDR had been in place during the last decades. However, Nature limits the amount of some natural products, which has led to the development of synthetic strategies to increase their availability. This review summarizes the research findings on marine natural products and derivatives, mainly alkaloids, polyoxygenated sterols, polyketides, terpenoids, diketopiperazines, and peptides, with P-gp inhibitory activity highlighting the established structure-activity relationships. The synthetic pathways for the total synthesis of the most promising members and analogs are also presented. It is expected that the data gathered during the last decades concerning their synthesis and MDR-inhibiting activities will help medicinal chemists develop potential drug candidates using marine natural products as models which can deliver new ABC transporter inhibitor scaffolds.

  5. Whole-Genome Sequence of Multidrug-Resistant Campylobacter coli Strain COL B1-266, Isolated from the Colombian Poultry Chain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernal, Johan F; Donado-Godoy, Pilar; Arévalo, Alejandra; Duarte, Carolina; Realpe, María E; Díaz, Paula L; Gómez, Yolanda; Rodríguez, Fernando; Agarwala, Richa; Landsman, David; Mariño-Ramírez, Leonardo

    2016-03-17

    Campylobacter coli is considered one of the main causes of food-borne illness worldwide. We report here the whole-genome sequence of multidrug-resistant Campylobacter coli strain COL B1-266, isolated from the Colombian poultry chain. The genome sequences encode genes for a variety of antimicrobial resistance genes, including aminoglycosides, β-lactams, lincosamides, fluoroquinolones, and tetracyclines.

  6. Dominance of multidrug resistant CC271 clones in macrolide-resistant streptococcus pneumoniae in Arizona

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    Bowers Jolene R

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Rates of resistance to macrolide antibiotics in Streptococcus pneumoniae are rising around the world due to the spread of mobile genetic elements harboring mef(E and erm(B genes and post-vaccine clonal expansion of strains that carry them. Results Characterization of 592 clinical isolates collected in Arizona over a 10 year period shows 23.6% are macrolide resistant. The largest portion of the macrolide-resistant population, 52%, is dual mef(E/erm(B-positive. All dual-positive isolates are multidrug-resistant clonal lineages of Taiwan19F-14, mostly multilocus sequence type 320, carrying the recently described transposon Tn2010. The remainder of the macrolide resistant S. pneumoniae collection includes 31% mef(E-positive, and 9% erm(B-positive strains. Conclusions The dual-positive, multidrug-resistant S. pneumoniae clones have likely expanded by switching to non-vaccine serotypes after the heptavalent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine release, and their success limits therapy options. This upsurge could have a considerable clinical impact in Arizona.

  7. Multidrug-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii ventriculitis: successful treatment with intraventricular colistin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Alvarez, B; Martín-Láez, R; Fariñas, M C; Paternina-Vidal, B; García-Palomo, J D; Vázquez-Barquero, A

    2009-11-01

    Acinetobacter baumannii has emerged as an important nosocomial pathogen that can cause a multitude of severe infections. In neurosurgical patients the usual presentation is ventriculitis associated with external ventricular drainage. Carbapenems have been considered the gold standard for the treatment of Acinetobacter baumannii ventriculitis, but resistant isolates are increasing worldwide, reducing the therapeutic options. In many cases polymyxins are the only possible alternative, but their poor blood-brain barrier penetration could require them to be directly administered intraventricularly and clinical experience with this route is limited. We review the literature concerning intraventricular use of colistin (polymyxin E) for A. baumannii ventriculitis and add three cases successfully treated with this method. Our experience suggests that intraventricular colistin is a potentially effective and safe therapy for the treatment of multidrug-resistant A. baumannii central nervous system infections.

  8. Diverse and abundant multi-drug resistant E. coli in Matang mangrove estuaries, Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghaderpour, Aziz; Ho, Wing Sze; Chew, Li-Lee; Bong, Chui Wei; Chong, Ving Ching; Thong, Kwai-Lin; Chai, Lay Ching

    2015-01-01

    E.coli, an important vector distributing antimicrobial resistance in the environment, was found to be multi-drug resistant, abundant, and genetically diverse in the Matang mangrove estuaries, Malaysia. One-third (34%) of the estuarine E. coli was multi-drug resistant. The highest antibiotic resistance prevalence was observed for aminoglycosides (83%) and beta-lactams (37%). Phylogenetic groups A and B1, being the most predominant E. coli, demonstrated the highest antibiotic resistant level and prevalence of integrons (integron I, 21%; integron II, 3%). Detection of phylogenetic group B23 downstream of fishing villages indicates human fecal contamination as a source of E. coli pollution. Enteroaggregative E. coli (1%) were also detected immediately downstream of the fishing village. The results indicated multi-drug resistance among E. coli circulating in Matang estuaries, which could be reflective of anthropogenic activities and aggravated by bacterial and antibiotic discharges from village lack of a sewerage system, aquaculture farms and upstream animal husbandry.

  9. A nuclear receptor-like pathway regulating multidrug resistance in fungi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thakur, Jitendra K; Arthanari, Haribabu; Yang, Fajun; Pan, Shih-Jung; Fan, Xiaochun; Breger, Julia; Frueh, Dominique P; Gulshan, Kailash; Li, Darrick K; Mylonakis, Eleftherios; Struhl, Kevin; Moye-Rowley, W Scott; Cormack, Brendan P; Wagner, Gerhard; Näär, Anders M

    2008-04-03

    Multidrug resistance (MDR) is a serious complication during treatment of opportunistic fungal infections that frequently afflict immunocompromised individuals, such as transplant recipients and cancer patients undergoing cytotoxic chemotherapy. Improved knowledge of the molecular pathways controlling MDR in pathogenic fungi should facilitate the development of novel therapies to combat these intransigent infections. MDR is often caused by upregulation of drug efflux pumps by members of the fungal zinc-cluster transcription-factor family (for example Pdr1p orthologues). However, the molecular mechanisms are poorly understood. Here we show that Pdr1p family members in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and the human pathogen Candida glabrata directly bind to structurally diverse drugs and xenobiotics, resulting in stimulated expression of drug efflux pumps and induction of MDR. Notably, this is mechanistically similar to regulation of MDR in vertebrates by the PXR nuclear receptor, revealing an unexpected functional analogy of fungal and metazoan regulators of MDR. We have also uncovered a critical and specific role of the Gal11p/MED15 subunit of the Mediator co-activator and its activator-targeted KIX domain in antifungal/xenobiotic-dependent regulation of MDR. This detailed mechanistic understanding of a fungal nuclear receptor-like gene regulatory pathway provides novel therapeutic targets for the treatment of multidrug-resistant fungal infections.

  10. Modulation of breast cancer resistance protein mediated atypical multidrug resistance using RNA interference delivered by adenovirus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Wen-tong; ZHOU Geng-yin; WANG Chun-ling; GUO Cheng-hao; SONG Xian-rang; CHI Wei-ling

    2005-01-01

    @@ Clinical multidrug resistance (MDR) of malignancies to many antineoplastic agents is the major obstacle in the successful treatment of cancer. The emergence of breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP), a member of the adenosine triphosphate (ATP) binding cassette (ABC) transporter family, has necessitated the development of antagonists. To overcome the BCRP-mediated atypical MDR, RNA interference (RNAi) delivered by adenovirus targeting BCRP mRNA was used to inhibit the atypical MDR expression by infecting MCF-7/MX100 cell lines with constructed RNAi adenovirus.

  11. Emergence of fluoroquinolones-resistant strains of Salmonella typhi: Watch on multidrug-resistant isolates

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    Subhash C Arya

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Subhash C Arya, Nirmala Agarwal, Shekhar Agarwal, Dolly WadhwaSant Parmanand Hospital, Delhi, IndiaEmergence of multidrug-resistant Salmonella typhi has been responsible for clinical challenges for clinicians. Recently, frequent isolation and dissemination of fluoroquinolones-resistant strains of S. enterica in Surabaya, Indonesia was in the news. Subsequently, Yangai and colleagues1 recommended regular communications between laboratory professionals and clinicians. Collaboration between laboratory personnel and clinicians would be essential to offer a rational empiric antibiotic recipe while awaiting antibiotic susceptibility test results (AST for any patient.

  12. Colistin and tigecycline for management of external ventricular device-related ventriculitis due to multidrug-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shrestha, Gentle Sunder; Tamang, Sushil; Paneru, Hem Raj; Shrestha, Pramesh Sunder; Keyal, Niraj; Acharya, Subhash Prasad; Marhatta, Moda Nath; Shilpakar, Sushil

    2016-01-01

    Acinetobacter baumannii is an important cause of nosocomial ventriculitis associated with external ventricular device (EVD). It is frequently multidrug resistant (MDR), carries a poor outcome, and is difficult to treat. We report a case of MDR Acinetobacter ventriculitis treated with intravenous and intraventricular colistin together with intravenous tigecycline. The patient developed nephrotoxicity and poor neurological outcome despite microbiological cure. Careful implementation of bundle of measures to minimize EVD-associated ventriculitis is valuable. PMID:27365967

  13. Antimicrobial activity of some essential oils against oral multidrug-resistant Enterococcus faecalis in both planktonic and biofilm state

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fethi Benbelad; Abdelmounam Khadir; Mohamed Amine Abdoune; Mourad Bendahou; Alain Muselli; Jean Costa

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate some essential oils in treatment of intractable oral infections, principally caused by biofilm of multidrug-resistant Enterococcus faecalis (E. faecalis), such as persistent endodontic infections in which their treatment exhibits a real challenge for dentists.Methods:were evaluated for antimicrobial activity against sensitive and resistant clinical strains of E. faecalis in both planktonic and biofilm state using two methods, disk diffusion and broth micro-dilution.Results:Studied essential oils showed a good antimicrobial activity and high ability in E. Ten chemically analyzed essential oils by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry faecalis biofilm eradication, whether for sensitive or multidrug-resistant strains, especially those of Origanum glandulosum and Thymbra capitata with interesting minimum inhibitory concentration, biofilm inhibitory concentration, and biofilm eradication concentration values which doesn’t exceed 0.063%, 0.75%, and 1.5%, respectively.Conclusions:Findings of this study indicate that essential oils extracted from aromatic plants can be used in treatment of intractable oral infections, especially caused by biofilm of multidrug-resistant E. faecalis.

  14. Draft genome sequence of a multidrug-resistant Chryseobacterium indologenes isolate from Malaysia

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    Choo Yee Yu

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Chryseobacterium indologenes is an emerging pathogen which poses a threat in clinical healthcare setting due to its multidrug-resistant phenotype and its common association with nosocomial infections. Here, we report the draft genome of a multidrug-resistant C. indologenes CI_885 isolated in 2014 from Malaysia. The 908,704-kb genome harbors a repertoire of putative antibiotic resistance determinants which may elucidate the molecular basis and underlying mechanisms of its resistant to various classes of antibiotics. The genome sequence has been deposited in DDBJ/EMBL/GenBank under the accession number LJOD00000000.

  15. ACTION OF NEWER DISINFECTANTS ON MULTIDRUG RESISTANT BACTERIA

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    Bipasa

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Current procedures for infection control in hospital environments have not been successful in curbing the rise in infections by multi-drug-resistant (MDR pathogens. Emergence of resistance to chemical disinfectants is increasing steadily and has been reported worldwide. So prevention of multidrug-resistant health care associated infections (HAI has become a priority issue and great challenge to clinicians. This requires appropriate sterilization and disinfection procedures and strict adherence to protocol in infection control policy. There is a need to evaluate the efficacy of newer disinfectants which have come into the market for better control of HAI. AIMS AND OBJECTIVES: The aim of this study was to evaluate and compare disinfection efficacy of three newer disinfectants– Novacide (didecyldimethylammonium chloride and polyhexamethylene biguanide, Silvicide a strong oxidizing agent (hydrogen peroxide and silver nitrate and Virkon, a powerful oxidizing agent (a stabilized blend of peroxygen compounds and potassium salts, pitting them against two time-honored conventional disinfectants phenol and lysol and testing them against common MDR clinical isolates, reference strains and spores. MATERIALS AND METHODS: All the disinfectants at different dilutions were tested for bactericidal efficacy by liquid suspension time-kill tests. A heavy initial microbial load was simulated by preparing bacterial inoculum. Numbers of viable cells were counted and reduction in microbial colony counts before and after disinfectant exposure was expressed as log reduction. RESULTS: Among the disinfectants, Novacide was most effective. All clinical MDR bacterial isolates and reference strains were killed within 30 seconds of exposure at 0.156% solution, whereas spores got killed after 30 minutes of exposure at 2.5% solution which is the recommended concentration. For Silvicide all vegetative bacteria were killed at 5% solution after 20 minutes contact time

  16. Antibacterial activity of Argemone mexicana L. against multidrug resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa, isolated from clinical samples

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mahesh C Sahu; Nagen K Debata; Rabindra N Padhy

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To monitor the antipseudomonad activity of the weed Argemone mexicana (A.mexicana), with multidrug strains isolated from clinical samples. Methods: Antibiogram of isolated strains were done with disc diffusion method and antipseudomonad activity was monitored with the agar well diffusion method. Results: Twenty seven strains of Pseudomonas aeruginosa (P. aeruginosa) were isolated from clinical samples from a hospital; among them, 22 were resistant to antibiotics (μg/disc): cefotaxime-30, 16 to amoxyclav-30, 15 to ofloxacin-5, 13 to gentamicin-10, 10 to piperacillin-100/tazobactam-10, 8 to amikacin-30, 7 to gatifloxacin-30, 6 to netilmicin-30, 4 to piperacillin100, 3 to imipenem-10 and 3 strains to nitrofurantoin-300. Each strain was resistant to several antibiotics at specified levels. Of these 27 clinical strains, 15 antibiotic-resistant strains and a antibiotic-sensitive standard strain were used in monitoring antimicrobial activity of leaf-extracts using 3 organic solvents (acetone, methanol and ethanol) and water of the weed, prickly poppy (A. mexicana L.). The methanol-extract had the highest level of antipseudomonad activity both with cold and hot extracts, confirmed by separate Kruskal-Wallis H tests. With the Student’s t-test it was ascertained that the hot extraction concentrate yielded promising antipseudomonad activity than the cold extraction with methanol. Values of minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of extracts of A. mexicana using acetone, methanol and ethanol as solvents were 10, 8 and 8 mg/mL, respectively; corresponding values of minimum bactericidal concentration (MBC) were 32, 28 and 24 mg/mL for these solvents, respectively.Conclusions:This study suggests that A. mexicana leaf can be used as complementary medicinein treating diseases caused by multidrug resistant strains of P. aeruginosa.

  17. Multidrug resistance 1 gene polymorphisms may determine Crohn's disease behavior in patients from Rio de Janeiro

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    Ana Teresa P. Carvalho

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: Conflicting data from studies on the potential role of multidrug resistance 1 gene polymorphisms in inflammatory bowel disease may result from the analysis of genetically and geographically distinct populations. Here, we investigated whether multidrug resistance 1 gene polymorphisms are associated with inflammatory bowel diseases in patients from Rio de Janeiro. METHODS: We analyzed 123 Crohn's disease patients and 83 ulcerative colitis patients to determine the presence of the multidrug resistance 1 gene polymorphisms C1236T, G2677T and C3435T. In particular, the genotype frequencies of Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis patients were analyzed. Genotype-phenotype associations with major clinical characteristics were established, and estimated risks were calculated for the mutations. RESULTS: No significant difference was observed in the genotype frequencies of the multidrug resistance 1 G2677T/A and C3435T polymorphisms between Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis patients. In contrast, the C1236T polymorphism was significantly more common in Crohn's disease than in ulcerative colitis (p = 0.047. A significant association was also found between the multidrug resistance 1 C3435T polymorphism and the stricturing form of Crohn's disease (OR: 4.13; p = 0.009, whereas no association was found with penetrating behavior (OR: 0.33; p = 0.094. In Crohn's disease, a positive association was also found between the C3435T polymorphism and corticosteroid resistance/refractoriness (OR: 4.14; p = 0.010. However, no significant association was found between multidrug resistance 1 gene polymorphisms and UC subphenotypic categories. CONCLUSION: The multidrug resistance 1 gene polymorphism C3435T is associated with the stricturing phenotype and an inappropriate response to therapy in Crohn's disease. This association with Crohn's disease may support additional pathogenic roles for the multidrug resistance 1 gene in regulating gut

  18. Diminished expression of multidrug resistance-associated protein 1 (MRP1) in bronchial epithelium of COPD patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Deen, Margaretha; Marks, Hendrik; Willemse, Brigitte W. M.; Postma, Dirkje S.; Muller, Michael; Smit, Egbert F.; Scheffer, George L.; Scheper, Rik J.; de Vries, Elisabeth G. E.; Timens, Wim

    2006-01-01

    Cigarette smoke is the principal risk factor for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Multidrug resistance proteins, such as multidrug resistance-associated protein-1 (MRP1), P-glycoprotein (P-gp), and lung resistance-related protein (LRP), may protect against oxidative stress and toxic com

  19. Molecular characterization of multidrug resistant hospital isolates using the antimicrobial resistance determinant microarray.

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    Tomasz A Leski

    Full Text Available Molecular methods that enable the detection of antimicrobial resistance determinants are critical surveillance tools that are necessary to aid in curbing the spread of antibiotic resistance. In this study, we describe the use of the Antimicrobial Resistance Determinant Microarray (ARDM that targets 239 unique genes that confer resistance to 12 classes of antimicrobial compounds, quaternary amines and streptothricin for the determination of multidrug resistance (MDR gene profiles. Fourteen reference MDR strains, which either were genome, sequenced or possessed well characterized drug resistance profiles were used to optimize detection algorithms and threshold criteria to ensure the microarray's effectiveness for unbiased characterization of antimicrobial resistance determinants in MDR strains. The subsequent testing of Acinetobacter baumannii, Escherichia coli and Klebsiella pneumoniae hospital isolates revealed the presence of several antibiotic resistance genes [e.g. belonging to TEM, SHV, OXA and CTX-M classes (and OXA and CTX-M subfamilies of β-lactamases] and their assemblages which were confirmed by PCR and DNA sequence analysis. When combined with results from the reference strains, ~25% of the ARDM content was confirmed as effective for representing allelic content from both Gram-positive and -negative species. Taken together, the ARDM identified MDR assemblages containing six to 18 unique resistance genes in each strain tested, demonstrating its utility as a powerful tool for molecular epidemiological investigations of antimicrobial resistance in clinically relevant bacterial pathogens.

  20. CD44-engineered mesoporous silica nanoparticles for overcoming multidrug resistance in breast cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Xin; Liu, Ying; Wang, Shouju; Shi, Donghong [Department of Radiology, Jinling Hospital, Clinical School of Medical College, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210002 (China); Zhou, Xianguang [National Clinical Research Center of Kidney Diseases, Jinling Hospital, Nanjing 210016 (China); Wang, Chunyan; Wu, Jiang; Zeng, Zhiyong; Li, Yanjun; Sun, Jing [Department of Radiology, Jinling Hospital, Clinical School of Medical College, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210002 (China); Wang, Jiandong [Department of Pathology, Jinling Hospital, Clinical School of Medical College, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210002 (China); Zhang, Longjiang [Department of Radiology, Jinling Hospital, Clinical School of Medical College, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210002 (China); Teng, Zhaogang, E-mail: tzg@fudan.edu.cn [Department of Radiology, Jinling Hospital, Clinical School of Medical College, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210002 (China); State Key Laboratory of Analytical Chemistry for Life Science, School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China); Lu, Guangming, E-mail: cjr.luguangming@vip.163.com [Department of Radiology, Jinling Hospital, Clinical School of Medical College, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210002 (China); State Key Laboratory of Analytical Chemistry for Life Science, School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China)

    2015-03-30

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • CD44-engineered mesoporous silica nanoparticles are synthesized. • The mechanism of CD44-engineered mesoporous silica nanoparticles is revealed. • This new delivery system increased the drug accumulation in vitro and in vivo. • This new delivery system offers an effective approach to treat multidrug resistance. - Abstract: Multidrug resistance is a major impediment for the successful chemotherapy in breast cancer. CD44 is over-expressed in multidrug resistant human breast cancer cells. CD44 monoclonal antibody exhibits anticancer potential by inhibiting proliferation and regulating P-glycoprotein-mediated drug efflux activity in multidrug resistant cells. Thereby, CD44 monoclonal antibody in combination with chemotherapeutic drug might be result in enhancing chemosensitivity and overcoming multidrug resistance. The purpose of this study is to investigate the effects of the CD44 monoclonal antibody functionalized mesoporous silica nanoparticles containing doxorubicin on human breast resistant cancer MCF-7 cells. The data showed that CD44-modified mesoporous silica nanoparticles increased cytotoxicity and enhanced the downregulation of P-glycoprotein in comparison to CD44 antibody. Moreover, CD44-engineered mesoporous silica nanoparticles provided active target, which promoted more cellular uptake of DOX in the resistant cells and more retention of DOX in tumor tissues than unengineered counterpart. Animal studies of the resistant breast cancer xenografts demonstrated that CD44-engineered drug delivery system remarkably induced apoptosis and inhibited the tumor growth. Our results indicated that the CD44-engineered mesoporous silica nanoparticle-based drug delivery system offers an effective approach to overcome multidrug resistance in human breast cancer.

  1. Treatment of multidrug-resistant pseudomonas aeruginosa using extended-infusion antimicrobial regimens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heil, Emily L; Lowery, Ashleigh V; Thom, Kerri A; Nicolau, David P

    2015-01-01

    In the management of multidrug-resistant infections in critically ill patients with multiorgan dysfunction, consideration must be given to the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of an antimicrobial agent to optimize dosing. We describe a 25-year-old woman who was undergoing thrice-weekly hemodialysis and developed multidrug-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa bacteremia secondary to infected left and right ventricular assist devices. After multiple courses of antibiotics, her blood cultures revealed that the infecting organism was becoming progressively more resistant to antibiotic options. Cefepime 2 g administered over 3 hours/day (in combination with colistimethate) provided adequate drug levels for multidrug-resistant, cefepime-intermediate P. aeruginosa bacteremia in this patient. We present the clinical case of this patient, followed by a discussion of possible therapeutic approaches to be considered, including illustration of the principles of using extended-infusion antimicrobial regimens, and present the patient's resulting clinical course.

  2. Multidrug Resistance in Escherichia coli Strains Isolated from Infections in Dogs and Cats in Poland (2007–2013

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    Magdalena Rzewuska

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The antimicrobial susceptibility of Escherichia coli isolates associated with various types of infections in dogs and cats was determined. The studied isolates were most frequently susceptible to fluoroquinolones and the extended-spectrum cephalosporins (ESCs, antimicrobials commonly used in treatment of infections in companion animals. However, an increase in the percentage of strains resistant to β-lactam antibiotics including ESCs was noted between January 2007 and December 2013. The frequency of multidrug-resistant (MDR E. coli isolation (66.8% of isolates is alarming. Moreover, the statistically significant increase of the percentage of MDR isolates was observed during the study period. No difference in the prevalence of multidrug resistance was found between bacteria causing intestinal and extraintestinal infections and between canine and feline isolates. Nonhemolytic E. coli isolates were MDR more often than hemolytic ones. Our study showed the companion animals in Poland as an important reservoir of MDR bacteria. These results indicate that continuous monitoring of canine and feline E. coli antimicrobial susceptibility is required. Furthermore, introduction and application of recommendations for appropriate use of antimicrobials in small animal practice should be essential to minimize the emergence of multidrug resistance among E. coli in companion animals.

  3. Virulence Genes Profile of Multidrug Resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa Isolated from Iranian Children with UTIs

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    Zohreh Heidary

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Virulent and resistant strains Pseudomonas aeruginosa (P. aeruginosa is one of the most important cause of UTIs in pediatrics. The present study was carried to investigate the frequency of virulence factors in the multi-drug resistant strains of P. aeruginosa isolated from pediatrics hospitalized due to the UTIs. One - hundred and forty three urine samples were collected from pediatric patients suffered from UTIs. Samples were cultured and those that were P. aeruginosa positive were analyzed for the presence of putative virulence genes. Seventy one out of 143 samples (49.65% were positive for P. aeruginosa. Monthly, sex and age-dependent prevalence were seen for P. aeruginosa. Bacterial strains had the highest levels of resistance against ampicillin (95.77%, gentamicin (92.95% and ciprofloxacin (81.69%. Of 71 P. aeruginosa isolates, 12 strains were resistant to more than 9 antibiotics (16.90%. The most commonly detected virulence factors in the cases of urethral infections were exoU and plcH while those of pyelonephritis and cystitis were were exoS and lasB. Our findings should raise awareness about antibiotic resistance in hospitalized pediatrics with UTIs in Iran. Clinicians should exercise caution in prescribing antibiotics, especially in cases of UTIs. Such information can help in identifying these virulence genes as useful diagnostic markers for clinical P. aeruginosa strains isolated from UTIs.

  4. Virulence and genomic feature of multidrug resistant Campylobacter jejuni isolated from broiler chicken

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    Haihong Hao

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to reveal the molecular mechanism involved in multidrug resistance and virulence of Campylobacter jejuni isolated from broiler chickens. The virulence of six multidrug resistant C. jejuni was determined by in vitro and in vivo methods. The de novo whole genome sequencing technology and molecular biology methods were used to analyze the genomic features associated with the multidrug resistance and virulence of a selected isolate (C. jejuni 1655. The comparative genomic analyses revealed a large number of single nucleotide polymorphisms, deletions, rearrangements, and inversions in C. jejuni 1655 compared to reference C. jejuni genomes. The co-emergence of Thr-86-Ile mutation in gyrA gene, A2075G mutation in 23S rRNA gene, tetO, aphA and aadE genes and pTet plasmid in C. jejuni 1655 contributed its multidrug resistance to fluoroquinolones, macrolides, tetracycline and aminoglycosides. The combination of multiple virulence genes may work together to confer the relative higher virulence in C. jejuni 1655. The co-existence of mobile gene elements (e.g. pTet and CRISPR-Cas system in C. jejuni 1655 may play an important role in the gene transfer and immune defense. The present study provides basic information of phenotypic and genomic features of C. jejuni 1655, a strain recently isolated from a chicken displaying multidrug resistance and relatively high level of virulence.

  5. Virulence and Genomic Feature of Multidrug Resistant Campylobacter jejuni Isolated from Broiler Chicken

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Haihong; Ren, Ni; Han, Jing; Foley, Steven L.; Iqbal, Zahid; Cheng, Guyue; Kuang, Xiuhua; Liu, Jie; Liu, Zhenli; Dai, Menghong; Wang, Yulian; Yuan, Zonghui

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to reveal the molecular mechanism involved in multidrug resistance and virulence of Campylobacter jejuni isolated from broiler chickens. The virulence of six multidrug resistant C. jejuni was determined by in vitro and in vivo methods. The de novo whole genome sequencing technology and molecular biology methods were used to analyze the genomic features associated with the multidrug resistance and virulence of a selected isolate (C. jejuni 1655). The comparative genomic analyses revealed a large number of single nucleotide polymorphisms, deletions, rearrangements, and inversions in C. jejuni 1655 compared to reference C. jejuni genomes. The co-emergence of Thr-86-Ile mutation in gyrA gene, A2075G mutation in 23S rRNA gene, tetO, aphA and aadE genes and pTet plasmid in C. jejuni 1655 contributed its multidrug resistance to fluoroquinolones, macrolides, tetracycline, and aminoglycosides. The combination of multiple virulence genes may work together to confer the relative higher virulence in C. jejuni 1655. The co-existence of mobile gene elements (e.g., pTet) and CRISPR-Cas system in C. jejuni 1655 may play an important role in the gene transfer and immune defense. The present study provides basic information of phenotypic and genomic features of C. jejuni 1655, a strain recently isolated from a chicken displaying multidrug resistance and relatively high level of virulence. PMID:27790202

  6. Mutational and acquired carbapenem resistance mechanisms in multidrug resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa clinical isolates from Recife, Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavalcanti, Felipe Lira de Sá; Mirones, Cristina Rodríguez; Paucar, Elena Román; Montes, Laura Álvarez; Leal-Balbino, Tereza Cristina; de Morais, Marcia Maria Camargo; Martínez-Martínez, Luis; Ocampo-Sosa, Alain Antonio

    2015-01-01

    An investigation was carried out into the genetic mechanisms responsible for multidrug resistance in nine carbapenem-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosaisolates from different hospitals in Recife, Brazil. Susceptibility to antimicrobial agents was determined by broth microdilution. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was employed to detect the presence of genes encoding β-lactamases, aminoglycoside-modifying enzymes (AMEs), 16S rRNA methylases, integron-related genes and OprD. Expression of genes coding for efflux pumps and AmpC cephalosporinase were assessed by quantitative PCR. The outer membrane proteins were separated by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. The blaSPM-1, blaKPC-2 and blaGES-1 genes were detected in P. aeruginosaisolates in addition to different AME genes. The loss of OprD in nine isolates was mainly due to frameshift mutations, premature stop codons and point mutations. An association of loss of OprD with the overexpression of MexAB-OprM and MexXY-OprM was observed in most isolates. Hyper-production of AmpC was also observed in three isolates. Clonal relationship of the isolates was determined by repetitive element palindromic-PCR and multilocus sequence typing. Our results show that the loss of OprD along with overexpression of efflux pumps and β-lactamase production were responsible for the multidrug resistance in the isolates analysed. PMID:26676375

  7. Contribution of efflux to the emergence of isoniazid and multidrug resistance in Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diana Machado

    Full Text Available Multidrug resistant (MDR tuberculosis is caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis resistant to isoniazid and rifampicin, the two most effective drugs used in tuberculosis therapy. Here, we investigated the mechanism by which resistance towards isoniazid develops and how overexpression of efflux pumps favors accumulation of mutations in isoniazid targets, thus establishing a MDR phenotype. The study was based on the in vitro induction of an isoniazid resistant phenotype by prolonged serial exposure of M. tuberculosis strains to the critical concentration of isoniazid employed for determination of drug susceptibility testing in clinical isolates. Results show that susceptible and rifampicin monoresistant strains exposed to this concentration become resistant to isoniazid after three weeks; and that resistance observed for the majority of these strains could be reduced by means of efflux pumps inhibitors. RT-qPCR assessment of efflux pump genes expression showed overexpression of all tested genes. Enhanced real-time efflux of ethidium bromide, a common efflux pump substrate, was also observed, showing a clear relation between overexpression of the genes and increased efflux pump function. Further exposure to isoniazid resulted in the selection and stabilization of spontaneous mutations and deletions in the katG gene along with sustained increased efflux activity. Together, results demonstrate the relevance of efflux pumps as one of the factors of isoniazid resistance in M. tuberculosis. These results support the hypothesis that activity of efflux pumps allows the maintenance of an isoniazid resistant population in a sub-optimally treated patient from which isoniazid genetically resistant mutants emerge. Therefore, the use of inhibitors of efflux should be considered in the development of new therapeutic strategies for preventing the emergence of MDR-TB during treatment.

  8. Contribution of Efflux to the Emergence of Isoniazid and Multidrug Resistance in Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machado, Diana; Couto, Isabel; Perdigão, João; Rodrigues, Liliana; Portugal, Isabel; Baptista, Pedro; Veigas, Bruno; Amaral, Leonard; Viveiros, Miguel

    2012-01-01

    Multidrug resistant (MDR) tuberculosis is caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis resistant to isoniazid and rifampicin, the two most effective drugs used in tuberculosis therapy. Here, we investigated the mechanism by which resistance towards isoniazid develops and how overexpression of efflux pumps favors accumulation of mutations in isoniazid targets, thus establishing a MDR phenotype. The study was based on the in vitro induction of an isoniazid resistant phenotype by prolonged serial exposure of M. tuberculosis strains to the critical concentration of isoniazid employed for determination of drug susceptibility testing in clinical isolates. Results show that susceptible and rifampicin monoresistant strains exposed to this concentration become resistant to isoniazid after three weeks; and that resistance observed for the majority of these strains could be reduced by means of efflux pumps inhibitors. RT-qPCR assessment of efflux pump genes expression showed overexpression of all tested genes. Enhanced real-time efflux of ethidium bromide, a common efflux pump substrate, was also observed, showing a clear relation between overexpression of the genes and increased efflux pump function. Further exposure to isoniazid resulted in the selection and stabilization of spontaneous mutations and deletions in the katG gene along with sustained increased efflux activity. Together, results demonstrate the relevance of efflux pumps as one of the factors of isoniazid resistance in M. tuberculosis. These results support the hypothesis that activity of efflux pumps allows the maintenance of an isoniazid resistant population in a sub-optimally treated patient from which isoniazid genetically resistant mutants emerge. Therefore, the use of inhibitors of efflux should be considered in the development of new therapeutic strategies for preventing the emergence of MDR-TB during treatment. PMID:22493700

  9. Folate concentration dependent transport activity of the Multidrug Resistance Protein 1 (ABCC1).

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hooijberg, J.H.; Jansen, G.; Assaraf, Y.G.; Kathmann, I.; Pieters, R.; Laan, AC; Veerman, A.J.P.; Kaspers, G.J.L.; Peters, G.J.

    2004-01-01

    The Multidrug Resistance Protein MRP1 (ABCC1) can confer resistance to a variety of therapeutic drugs. In addition, MRP1/ABCC1 mediates cellular export of natural folates, such as folic acid and l-leucovorin. In this study we determined whether cellular folate status affected the functional activity

  10. Role of multidrug resistance protein (MRP) in glutathione S-conjugate transport in mammalian cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Muller, M; deVries, EGE; Jansen, PLM

    1996-01-01

    The human multidrug resistance protein (MRP), a 190-kDa member of the ABC-protein superfamily, is an ATP-dependent glutathione S-conjugate carrier (GS-X pump) and is present in membranes of many, if not all, cells, Overexpression of MRP in tumor cells contributes to resistance to natural product dru

  11. Multidrug resistance in oncology and beyond : from imaging of drug efflux pumps to cellular drug targets

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nagengast, Wouter B; Oude Munnink, Thijs H; Dijkers, Eli; Hospers, Geesiena; Brouwers, Adrienne H; Schröder, Carolien P; Lub-de Hooge, Marjolijn; de Vries, Elisabeth G E

    2010-01-01

    Resistance of tumor cells to several structurally unrelated classes of natural products, including anthracyclines, taxanes, and epipodophyllotoxines, is often referred as multidrug resistance (MDR). This is associated with ATP-binding cassette transporters, which function as drug efflux pumps such a

  12. Molecular characterisation of multidrug-resistant Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium isolates from Gomel region, Belarus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tapalski, D.; Hendriksen, Rene S.; Hasman, Henrik;

    2007-01-01

    an infection outside hospitals in the Gomel region of Belarus. Thirty-one isolates were highly similar according to PFGE and MLVA typing, were multidrug-resistant, including resistance to ceftiofur, and harboured the bla(CTX-M-5) gene. These results indicate that a common source may have been responsible...

  13. Highly successful treatment outcome of multidrug-resistant tuberculosis in the Netherlands, 2000-2009

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Altena, R.; de Vries, G.; Haar, C. H.; de Lange, W. C. M.; Magis-Escurra, C.; van den Hof, S.; van Soolingen, D.; Boeree, M. J.; van der Werf, T. S.

    2015-01-01

    SETTING: Resistance to the two key anti-tuberculosis drugs isoniazid and rifampicin is a characteristic of multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB). MDR-TB is a scourge requiring toxic, prolonged treatment and is associated with poor outcomes. The Netherlands is a country with a long-standing, inte

  14. Biofilm-Forming Capability of Highly Virulent, Multidrug-Resistant Candida auris

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherry, Leighann; Ramage, Gordon; Kean, Ryan; Borman, Andrew; Johnson, Elizabeth M.; Richardson, Malcolm D.

    2017-01-01

    The emerging multidrug-resistant yeast pathogen Candida auris has attracted considerable attention as a source of healthcare–associated infections. We report that this highly virulent yeast has the capacity to form antifungal resistant biofilms sensitive to the disinfectant chlorhexidine in vitro. PMID:28098553

  15. Multidrug-Resistant Bacteroides fragilis Bacteremia in a US Resident: An Emerging Challenge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristian Merchan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We describe a case of Bacteroides fragilis bacteremia associated with paraspinal and psoas abscesses in the United States. Resistance to b-lactam/b-lactamase inhibitors, carbapenems, and metronidazole was encountered despite having a recent travel history to India as the only possible risk factor for multidrug resistance. Microbiological cure was achieved with linezolid, moxifloxacin, and cefoxitin.

  16. Effects of highly purified anthraquinoid compounds from Aloe vera on sensitive and multidrug resistant leukemia cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grimaudo, S; Tolomeo, M; Gancitano, R; Dalessandro, N; Aiello, E

    1997-01-01

    Folk medicine has attributed antitumor properties to preparations from Aloe vera. We have studied the effects of five purified compounds from the plant on human K562 leukemia and on its multidrug resistant (MDR) variant, K562/R. The glycosides aloin A and B, aloesin and aloeresin were devoid of antitumor activity up to 200 mu M concentrations. Only the aglycone aloe emodin produced reproducible antitumor effects, which, interestingly, were more pronounced in the MDR, P-glycoprotein overexpressing, cell line. Its IC50 was in fact 29 mu M in K562 and 10.5 mu M in K562/R. Aloe emodine caused mainly cytostasis and accumulation of the cells in the S and G(2)-M phases of the cell cycle during the first 48 h of treatment. Thereafter, massive cell death ensued. Research on the antitumor activity of compounds extracted from Aloe vera probably deserves continuation.

  17. Importance of detecting multidrug resistance proteins in acute leukemia prognosis and therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Moraes, Ana Carolina Rabello; Maranho, Caroline Klein; Rauber, Gabriela Schneider; Santos-Silva, Maria Cláudia

    2013-01-01

    Multidrug resistance (MDR) is a multifactorial phenomenon and the role of these proteins in generating the MDR phenotype is controversial. With this in mind, this review compiled the current data on the role of ABCB1, ABCC1, and LRP proteins in the prognosis of hematologic neoplasms and their influence on the choice of therapy. Literature showed that the detection of these proteins, mainly ABCB1, is important in the AL prognosis. However, there is controversy regarding the methodology used for their detection. In summary, the expression and activity profiles of ABCB1, ABCC1, and LRP, proteins capable of promoting the efflux of a variety of chemotherapeutic agents from the cell cytoplasm represent one of the greatest causes of failure in AL treatment.

  18. Enterococcus faecalis as multidrug resistance strains in clinical isolates in Imam Reza Hospital in Kermanshah, Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammadi, F; Ghafourian, S; Mohebi, R; Taherikalani, M; Pakzad, I; Valadbeigi, H; Hatami, V; Sadeghifard, N

    2015-01-01

    The current study aimed to investigate the prevalence of vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus in E. faecalis and E. faecium and antimicrobial susceptibility patterns, then dominant genes responsible for vancomycin resistance were determined. For this propose, 180 clinical isolates of Enterococcus were subjected for identification and antibiotic susceptibility assay. Then, the gene responsible vancomycin resistant strains were determined. The results demonstrated the E. faecalis as a dominant Enterococcus. Resistance to erythromycin was dominant and multidrug resistance strains observed in E. faecalis. vanA was responsible for vancomycin resistance. In conclusion, a high rate of resistance to antibiotics in Enterococcus is clearly problematic, and a novel strategy is needed to decrease resistance in Enterococcus.

  19. Antimicrobial activity of medicinal plants used by aborigines of Kalahandi, Orissa, India against multidrug resistant bacteria

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Debasmita Dubey; Mahesh C Sahu; Shakti Rath; Bimoch Projna Paty; Nagen K Debata; Rabindra N Padhy

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the antimicrobial potency of 20 non-edible and/or poisonous plants used by an aborigine tribe (Kandha) of Kalahandi district for infectious diseases. Methods: Over a period of 5 months from two hospitals, 10 pathogenic bacteria (Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus), Acinetobacter sp., Citrobacter freundii (C. freundii), Chromobacterium violeceum (C. violeceum),Escherichia coli (E. coli), Klebsiella sp., Proteus sp., Pseudomonas aeruginosa (P. aeruginosa) Salmonella typhi (S. typhi) and Vibrio cholerae (V. cholerae) were isolated to pure axenic cultures from clinical samples. Water and ethanolic extracts of leaves and barks were concentrated before monitoring antimicrobial activity by agar-well diffusion method. Results: All bacterial strains isolated were multidrug resistant. Ethanolic extract of most plants had effective antimicrobial activity against all the isolated multidrug resistant bacteria. Plants, Anthocephalus cadamba (A. cadamba) and Pterocarpus santalinus (P. santalinus) had antibacterial effect on all used bacteria. Water extract of several plants too had effective antimicrobial activity for all bacteria used. Effective in vitro control of MDR strains of Acinetobacter sp., C. freundii, Proteus sp. and P. aeruginosa, the most potential urinary tract infection causing organisms by plant extracts of all major plant used herein is recorded. MDR C. violaceum isolated from skin lesions was found to be resistant to imipenem, piperacillin-tazobactam and amoxyclav and was found sensitive to 13 plant extracts. Conclusion: Effective in vitro control of MDR strains of Acinetobacter sp.,C. freundii, Proteus sp. and P. aeruginosa; enteropathogenic bacteria, E. coli, S. typhi, Klebsiella sp. and V. cholerae were found to be well controlled by all plant extracts used.

  20. Effects of multidrug resistance, antisense RNA on the chemosensitivity of hepatocellular carcinoma cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Bo Li; Jian-Ping Gong; Tian Ye; Lei Zhao; De-Hua Li; Xing-Hua Gou; Lan-Ying Zhao; Lei Han; Lin Chen; Lu-Nan Yan

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Multidrug resistance is a major obstacle in cancer chemotherapy. We examined whether the antisense RNA of multidrug resistance gene 1 (mdr1) could reverse multidrug resistance in the human hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) cell line SMMC7721/ADM. METHODS: The recombinant adenoviruses pAdEasy-GFP-ASmdr1 product was produced by the adenoviral vector AdEasy system, which can express antisense RNA against the mdr1 gene. Following that, the recombinant adenovirus was transfected into the P-glycoprotein-producing multidrug resistance cell line, SMMC7721/ADM human HCC cells resistant to adriamycin (ADM) and daunorubicin (DNR). In order to investigate the reversal of multidrug resistance phenotype, we measured the expression of mdr1 mRNA by RT-PCR and the production of P-glycoprotein by lfow cytometry. The sensitivities for ADM and DNR SMMC7721/ADM cells were examined by [3-(4, 5-dimethylthi-azol-2-yl)-2,5 diphenyl-terazolium bromide] (MTT) analysis. RESULTS: The low-level expression of mdr1 mRNA and P-glycoprotein production were observed in parental sensitive cells SMMC/7721 in addition to the overexpression of mdr1 mRNA and P-glycoprotein in SMMC7721/ADM cells. The transfection of antisense-RNA into SMMC7721/ADM cells resulted in decreases of mdr1 mRNA and P-glycoprotein, but increase of drug sensitivities. The sensitivities of transfected SMMC7721/ADM cells to ADM and DNR in IC50 reduced by 31.25% and 62.96%respectively. CONCLUSIONS: Mdr1 antisense RNA can increase the sensitivities of SMMC7721/ADM cells to anticancer drug by decreasing the expression of the mdr1 gene and inhibiting P-glycoprotein expression. This strategy may be applicable to cancer patients with P-glycoportein mediated multidrug resistance.

  1. Structural and biochemical analyses of alanine racemase from the multidrug-resistant Clostridium difficile strain 630.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asojo, Oluwatoyin A; Nelson, Sarah K; Mootien, Sara; Lee, Yashang; Rezende, Wanderson C; Hyman, Daniel A; Matsumoto, Monica M; Reiling, Scott; Kelleher, Alan; Ledizet, Michel; Koski, Raymond A; Anthony, Karen G

    2014-07-01

    Clostridium difficile, a Gram-positive, spore-forming anaerobic bacterium, is the leading cause of infectious diarrhea among hospitalized patients. C. difficile is frequently associated with antibiotic treatment, and causes diseases ranging from antibiotic-associated diarrhea to life-threatening pseudomembranous colitis. The severity of C. difficile infections is exacerbated by the emergence of hypervirulent and multidrug-resistant strains, which are difficult to treat and are often associated with increased mortality rates. Alanine racemase (Alr) is a pyridoxal-5'-phosphate (PLP)-dependent enzyme that catalyzes the reversible racemization of L- and D-alanine. Since D-alanine is an essential component of the bacterial cell-wall peptidoglycan, and there are no known Alr homologs in humans, this enzyme is being tested as an antibiotic target. Cycloserine is an antibiotic that inhibits Alr. In this study, the catalytic properties and crystal structures of recombinant Alr from the virulent and multidrug-resistant C. difficile strain 630 are presented. Three crystal structures of C. difficile Alr (CdAlr), corresponding to the complex with PLP, the complex with cycloserine and a K271T mutant form of the enzyme with bound PLP, are presented. The structures are prototypical Alr homodimers with two active sites in which the cofactor PLP and cycloserine are localized. Kinetic analyses reveal that the K271T mutant CdAlr has the highest catalytic constants reported to date for any Alr. Additional studies are needed to identify the basis for the high catalytic activity. The structural and activity data presented are first steps towards using CdAlr for the development of structure-based therapeutics for C. difficile infections.

  2. Identifying more epidemic clones during a hospital outbreak of multidrug-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthieu Domenech de Cellès

    Full Text Available Infections caused by multidrug-resistant bacteria are a major concern in hospitals. Current infection-control practices legitimately focus on hygiene and appropriate use of antibiotics. However, little is known about the intrinsic abilities of some bacterial strains to cause outbreaks. They can be measured at a population level by the pathogen's transmission rate, i.e. the rate at which the pathogen is transmitted from colonized hosts to susceptible hosts, or its reproduction number, counting the number of secondary cases per infected/colonized host. We collected data covering a 20-month surveillance period for carriage of multidrug-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii (MDRAB in a surgery ward. All isolates were subjected to molecular fingerprinting, and a cluster analysis of profiles was performed to identify clonal groups. We then applied stochastic transmission models to infer transmission rates of MDRAB and each MDRAB clone. Molecular fingerprinting indicated that 3 clonal complexes spread in the ward. A first model, not accounting for different clones, quantified the level of in-ward cross-transmission, with an estimated transmission rate of 0.03/day (95% credible interval [0.012-0.049] and a single-admission reproduction number of 0.61 [0.30-1.02]. The second model, accounting for different clones, suggested an enhanced transmissibility of clone 3 (transmission rate 0.047/day [0.018-0.091], with a single-admission reproduction number of 0.81 [0.30-1.56]. Clones 1 and 2 had comparable transmission rates (respectively, 0.016 [0.001-0.045], 0.014 [0.001-0.045]. The method used is broadly applicable to other nosocomial pathogens, as long as surveillance data and genotyping information are available. Building on these results, more epidemic clones could be identified, and could lead to follow-up studies dissecting the functional basis for variation in transmissibility of MDRAB lineages.

  3. Multidrug Resistant Salmonella typhi in Asymptomatic Typhoid Carriers among Food Handlers in Namakkal District, Tamil Nadu

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Senthilkumar B

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: to screen Salmonella typhi in asymptomatic typhoid carriers and to find out drug resistance and ability of the strains to transmit drug resistance to other bacteria. Methods: Cultural characters, biochemical tests, antibiotic sensitivity test (disc diffusion, agarose gel electrophoresis, and conjugation protocols were done. Thirty five stool samples were collected from the suspected food handlers for the study. Results: Among 35 samples, (17.14% yielded a positive result. Out of these 4 (20.0% were women and 2 (13.33% were men. The isolates were tested with a number of conventional antibiotics viz, amikacin, amoxicillin, ampicillin, chloramphenicol, ciprofloxacin, co-trimaxazole, rifampicin, gentamicin, nalidixic acid, ofloxacin and tetracycline. Five isolates were having the multidrug resistant character. Four (66.66% multidrug resistant isolates were found to have plasmids, while one (16.66% multidrug resistant isolate had no plasmid and the chromosome encoded the resistance. Only one strain (16.66% showed single antibiotic resistance in the study and had no plasmid DNA. The molecular weights of the plasmids were determined and found to be 120 kb.The mechanism of spreading of drug resistance through conjugation process was analyzed. In the conjugation studies, the isolates having R+ factor showed the transfer of drug resistance through conjugation, which was determined by the development of antibiotic resistance in the recipients. Conclusion: This study shows that drug resistant strains are able to transfer genes encoding drug resistance.

  4. 儿童重症监护病房多重耐药鲍氏不动杆菌肺部感染危险因素及耐药性分析%Risk factors and antibiotic resistance analysis of pneumonia caused by multidrug resistant acinetobacter baumannii in pediatric intensive care unit

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    蔡小芳; 孙继民; 鲍连生; 李文斌

    2012-01-01

    Objective To investigate the risk factors involved in the refractory pneumonia caused by multidrug resistant acinetobacter baumannii (MDRAb) in pediatric Intensive care unit (PICU).Methods From January 2009 to August 2011,115 patients with MDRAb pneumonia were treated in Department of Emergency,Wuhan Children's Hospital,Wuhan.Another 45 patients with negative MDRAb (NMDRAb)pneumonia served as control.The patients in the two goups were analyzed using univariate and multivariate Logistic regression to find out the risk factors for MDRAb infection.Results Among the 176 clinical strains of acinetobacter baumannii isolated,128 (72.73%) strains were MDRAb.After drug susceptibility tests,acinetobacter baumannii showed the rates of resistance to β-lactams antibiotics not including cefoperazone-sulbactam were more than 70%,and the rates of resistance to carbapenems antibiotics were higher than 90%.All rates of resistance to antibiotics of betalactams and carbapenems in MDRAb were higher than those in NMDRAb significantly.There were very low rates of drug-resistance found in Amikacin,Levofloxacin,Ciprofloxacin and Minocycline ( <20% ).Multivariate logistic regression revealed that ICU stay,length of time for mechanical ventilation,anemia,hypoproteinemia and the use of carbapenems were independent risk factors involved in MDRAb pneumonia.Conclusions MDRAb was an important conditional pathogen with high rate of drug-resistance to many antibiotics leading to pneumonia in PICU.It increased the mortality of patients significantly.To control the infection of MDRAb was the key to increasing efficacy of treatment of pneumonia in PCIU.%目的 调查儿童重症监护病房(PICU)多重耐药鲍氏不动杆菌(MDRAb)肺部感染危险因素及药物敏感性,为减少MDRAb感染发生及有效治疗提供帮助.方法 以45例非MDRAb肺部感染患儿(NMDRAb组)为对照,回顾性分析2009年1月至2011年8月武汉市儿童医院PICU收治的115例MDRAb肺部感染(MDRAb

  5. Direct detection of multidrug-resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis in clinical specimens in low- and high-incidence countries by line probe assay

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, Isik Somuncu; Lundgren, Bettina; Sosnovskaja, Anaida;

    2003-01-01

    The INNO-LiPA Rif.TB assay is designed for the detection of rpoB gene mutations causing rifampin resistance in isolates. We applied the method directly to 60 Lithuanian and Danish clinical specimens to detect rifampin resistance rapidly. Results were obtained in 78.3% of clinical specimens, and a...... were concordant with those obtained by BACTEC 460. The assay could have major impact on the management of multidrug-resistant tuberculosis....

  6. Multidrug-Resistant Bacteria Isolated from Surface Water in Bassaseachic Falls National Park, Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delgado-Gardea, Ma Carmen E; Tamez-Guerra, Patricia; Gomez-Flores, Ricardo; Zavala-Díaz de la Serna, Francisco Javier; Eroza-de la Vega, Gilberto; Nevárez-Moorillón, Guadalupe Virginia; Pérez-Recoder, María Concepción; Sánchez-Ramírez, Blanca; González-Horta, María Del Carmen; Infante-Ramírez, Rocío

    2016-06-16

    Bacterial pathogens are a leading cause of waterborne disease, and may result in gastrointestinal outbreaks worldwide. Inhabitants of the Bassaseachic Falls National Park in Chihuahua, Mexico show seasonal gastroenteritis problems. This aim of this study was to detect enteropathogenic microorganisms responsible for diarrheal outbreaks in this area. In 2013, 49 surface water samples from 13 selected sampling sites along the Basaseachi waterfall and its main rivers, were collected during the spring, summer, autumn, and winter seasons. Fecal and total coliform counts were determined using standard methods; the AutoScan-4 system was used for identification of isolates and the antibiotic resistance profile by challenging each organism using 21 antibiotics. Significant differences among seasons were detected, where autumn samples resulted in the highest total (p microbiological analysis, 33 bacterial isolates from 13 different sites and four sampling seasons were selected; 53% of isolates were resistant to at least one antibiotic, and 15% exhibited a multidrug resistance (MDB) phenotype. MDB were identified as Klebsiella oxytoca (two out of four identified isolates), Escherichia coli (2/7), and Enterobacter cloacae (1/3). In addition, some water-borne microorganisms exhibited resistance to cefazoline, cefuroxime, ampicillin, and ampicillin-sulbactam. The presence of these microorganisms near rural settlements suggests that wastewater is the contamination source, providing one possible transmission mechanism for diarrheal outbreaks.

  7. Identification of mutations conferring streptomycin resistance in multidrug-resistant tuberculosis of China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Li-Li; Liu, Hai-Can; Sun, Qing; Xiao, Tong-Yang; Zhao, Xiu-Qin; Li, Gui-Lian; Zeng, Chun-Yan; Wan, Kang-Lin

    2015-10-01

    We investigated the spectrum and frequency of mutations in rpsL, rrs, and gidB among 140 multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB) clinical isolates from China. The association between mutations and different genotypes was also analyzed. Our data revealed that 65.7% of MDR-TB were resistant to streptomycin (STR), and 90.2% of STR-resistant isolates were Beijing strains. STR resistance was correlated with Beijing family (P=0.00). Compared with phenotypic data, detection of mutations for the combination of these 3 genes exhibited 94.6% sensitivity, 91.7% specificity, and 93.6% accuracy. The most common mutations in STR-resistant isolates were rpsL128, 262, and rrs514, of which rpsL128 showed association with Beijing lineage (P=0.00). A combination of these 3 mutations can serve as the reliable predictors for STR resistance, showing the sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy of 85.9%, 97.9%, and 90.0%, respectively. Furthermore, gidBA276C, not A615G, was Beijing lineage specific. These findings are useful to develop rapid molecular diagnostic methods for STR resistance in China.

  8. Reversal of HCC Drug Resistance by Using Hammerhead Ribozymes against Multidrug Resistance 1 Gene

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    QIAO Sen; WANG Hai; CHEN Xiaoping

    2005-01-01

    To reverse multidrug resistance(MDR) of HepG2 by anti-MDR1 hammerhead ribozyme,an anti-MDR1 hammerhead ribozyme was developed and delivered to P-gp-overproducing human hepatocarcinoma cell line HepG2 by a retroviral vector containing RNA polymerase Ⅲ promoter.The expression of mdr1/Pgp and Rz was detected in HepG2, HepG2 multidrug-resistant cell line and HepG2 Rz-transfected cells by semi quantitative RT-PCR and Western blot methods. Moreover, MTT assay was employed to detect the sensitivity of these ribozyme-transfected cells, and Rhodamine123 (Rh123) was used to test the function of Pgp. The Rz- transfected HepG2 cells became doxorubicin-sensitive, which was concomitant with the decreased MDR1 expression. The study showed that the retrovirus vector encoding the anti-MDR1 ribozyme may be applicable to the treatment of MDR cells.

  9. Management of patients with multidrug-resistant/extensively drug-resistant tuberculosis in Europe : a TBNET consensus statement

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lange, Christoph; Abubakar, Ibrahim; Alffenaar, Jan-Willem C.; Bothamley, Graham; Caminero, Jose A.; Carvalho, Anna Cristina C.; Chang, Kwok-Chiu; Codecasa, Luigi; Correia, Ana; Crudu, Valeriu; Davies, Peter; Dedicoat, Martin; Drobniewski, Francis; Duarte, Raquel; Ehlers, Cordula; Erkens, Connie; Goletti, Delia; Guenther, Gunar; Ibraim, Elmira; Kampmann, Beate; Kuksa, Liga; de lange, Wiel; van Leth, Frank; van Lunzen, Jan; Matteelli, Alberto; Menzies, Dick; Monedero, Ignacio; Richter, Elvira; Ruesch-Gerdes, Sabine; Sandgren, Andreas; Scardigli, Anna; Skrahina, Alena; Tortoli, Enrico; Volchenkov, Grigory; Wagner, Dirk; van der Werf, Marieke J.; Williams, Bhanu; Yew, Wing-Wai; Zellweger, Jean-Pierre; Cirillo, Daniela Maria

    2014-01-01

    The emergence of multidrug-resistant (MDR) and extensively drug-resistant (XDR) tuberculosis (TB) substantially challenges TB control, especially in the European Region of the World Health Organization, where the highest prevalence of MDR/XDR cases is reported. The current management of patients wit

  10. Current status of multidrug resistant tuberculosis in a tertiary care hospital of East Delhi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T Sagar

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objective: Multidrug resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB is caused by infection due to Mycobacterium tuberculosis which is resistant to both isoniazid (INH and rifampicin (RIF. It is caused by selection of resistant mutant strains due to inadequate treatment and poor compliance. MDR-TB is a major public health problem as the treatment is complicated, cure rates are well below those for drug susceptible tuberculosis and patient remains infectious for months despite receiving the best available therapy. The drug susceptibility pattern of M. tuberculosis is essential for proper control of MDR-TB in every health care setting, hence the study was initiated with the aim of studying the prevalence of MDR-TB in patients attending a tertiary care hospital in east Delhi. Materials and Methods: Five hundred and forty-three pulmonary and extrapulmonary samples from suspected cases of tuberculosis received in the mycobacteriology laboratory from November 2009 through October 2010 were investigated for M. tuberculosis. All the samples were subjected to direct microscopic examination for demonstration of acid fast bacilli followed by culture on Lowenstein-Jensen (LJ medium to isolate M. tuberculosis. Identification was done by conventional biochemical methods. Drug susceptibility of isolated M. tuberculosis strains was done by conventional 1% proportion method followed by sequencing of RIF resistant isolates to detect mutations to confirm resistance. Results and Conclusions: M. tuberculosis was isolated from 75 out of 543 suspected cases of pulmonary/extrapulmonary TB. Three of the total 75 M. tuberculosis isolates (4% showed resistance to any one of the first line drugs. Prevalence of MDR-TB was 1.3%. The sequencing of single MDR strain showed mutations at codons 516, 517, and 518. Amplification of rpoB and sequential analysis of the amplicon is a better way of detection of mutation and the evidence of new mutation in this study indicate that

  11. Multidrug resistance and ESBL-producing Salmonella spp. isolated from broiler processing plants

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    Rosangela Estel Ziech

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The aim of this study was to investigate the occurrence of multidrug-resistant, extended spectrum beta-lactamase (ESBL producing Salmonella spp. isolated from conveyor belts of broiler cutting rooms in Brazilian broiler processing plants. Ninety-eight strains of Salmonella spp. were analyzed. Multidrug resistance was determined by the disk diffusion test and the susceptibility of the isolated bacteria was evaluated against 18 antimicrobials from seven different classes. The double disk diffusion test was used to evaluate ESBL production. Of the 98 strains tested, 84 were multidrug resistant. The highest rates of resistance were against nalidixic acid (95%, tetracycline (91%, and the beta-lactams: ampicillin and cefachlor (45%, followed by streptomycin and gentamicin with 19% and 15% of strain resistance, respectively. By contrast, 97% of the strains were sensitive to chloramphenicol. 45% of the strains were positive for the presence of ESBL activity. In this study, high rates of multidrug resistance and ESBL production were observed in Salmonella spp.

  12. Multidrug resistance and ESBL-producing Salmonella spp. isolated from broiler processing plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziech, Rosangela Estel; Lampugnani, Camila; Perin, Ana Paula; Sereno, Mallu Jagnow; Sfaciotte, Ricardo Antônio Pilegi; Viana, Cibeli; Soares, Vanessa Mendonça; de Almeida Nogueira Pinto, José Paes; dos Santos Bersot, Luciano

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the occurrence of multidrug-resistant, extended spectrum beta-lactamase (ESBL) producing Salmonella spp. isolated from conveyor belts of broiler cutting rooms in Brazilian broiler processing plants. Ninety-eight strains of Salmonella spp. were analyzed. Multidrug resistance was determined by the disk diffusion test and the susceptibility of the isolated bacteria was evaluated against 18 antimicrobials from seven different classes. The double disk diffusion test was used to evaluate ESBL production. Of the 98 strains tested, 84 were multidrug resistant. The highest rates of resistance were against nalidixic acid (95%), tetracycline (91%), and the beta-lactams: ampicillin and cefachlor (45%), followed by streptomycin and gentamicin with 19% and 15% of strain resistance, respectively. By contrast, 97% of the strains were sensitive to chloramphenicol. 45% of the strains were positive for the presence of ESBL activity. In this study, high rates of multidrug resistance and ESBL production were observed in Salmonella spp. PMID:26887244

  13. Differential expression of sphingolipids in P-glycoprotein or multidrug resistance-related protein 1 expressing human neuroblastoma cell lines

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijkhuis, AJ; Douwes, J; Kamps, W; Sietsma, H; Kok, JW

    2003-01-01

    The sphingolipid composition and multidrug resistance status of three human neuroblastoma cell lines were established. SK-N-FI cells displayed high expression and functional (efflux) activity of P-glycoprotein, while multidrug resistance-related protein 1 was relatively abundant and most active in S

  14. Expression and cellular distribution of multidrug resistance-related proteins in the hippocampus of patients with mesial temporal lobe epilepsy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E. Aronica; J.A. Gorter; M. Ramkema; S. Redeker; F. Ozbas-Gercer; E.A. van Vliet; G.L. Scheffer; R.J. Scheper; P. van der Valk; J.C. Baayen; D. Troost

    2004-01-01

    Purpose: This study investigated the cellular distribution of different multidrug resistance (MDR)-related proteins such as P-glycoprotein (P-gp), the multidrug resistance-associated proteins (MRP) 1 and 2, and the major vault protein (MVP) in normal and sclerotic hippocampus of patients with medica

  15. [MOLECULAR CHARACTERISTICS OF THE MULTIDRUG-RESISTANT MYCOBACTERIUM TUBERCULOSIS STRAINS IN THE NORTHWEST RUSSIA].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vyazovaya, A A; Mokrousov, I V; Zhuravlev, V Yu; Solovieva, N S; Otten, T F; Manicheva, O A; Vishnevsky, B I; Narvskaya, O V

    2016-01-01

    The goal of this work was to study the genotypic characteristics of the multidrug-resistant (MDR, i.e., resistant to at least rifampicine and isoniazid) Mycobacterium tuberculosis strains isolated in 2011-2012 from tuberculosis (TB) patients in the Northwest Russia. Spoligotyping of 195 M. tuberculosis isolates identified 14 different spoligotypes and assigned isolates to the genetic families Beijing (n = 162, 83%), LAM (n = 15), H3/URAL (n = 14), as well as T, Haarlem and X. Spoligotypes SIT1 (Beijing), SIT42 (LAM) and SIT262 (H3/URAL) were the most prevalent. Irrespective to the genotype, all the isolates were resistant to streptomycin. The multidrug resistance was accompanied by the resistance to ethionamide (56%), amikacin (31%), kanamycin (40%), and capreomycin (33%). The ethambutol resistance was found in 71% (n = 115) and 42% (n = 14) of the Beijing and non-Beijing strains, respectively (p Russia continues to be dominated by the Beijing family strains.

  16. Comparing amikacin and kanamycin-induced hearing loss in multidrug-resistant tuberculosis treatment under programmatic conditions in a Namibian retrospective cohort

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sagwa, Evans L; Ruswa, Nunurai; Mavhunga, Farai; Rennie, Timothy; Leufkens, Hubert G M; Mantel-Teeuwisse, Aukje K

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Amikacin and kanamycin are mainly used for treating multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB), especially in developing countries where the burden of MDR-TB is highest. Their protracted use in MDR-TB treatment is known to cause dose-dependent irreversible hearing loss, requiring hearing

  17. Monobactam and aminoglycoside combination therapy against metallo-beta-lactamase-producing multidrug-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa screened using a 'break-point checkerboard plate'.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Araoka, Hideki; Baba, Masaru; Takagi, Shinsuke; Matsuno, Naofumi; Ishiwata, Kazuya; Nakano, Nobuaki; Tsuji, Masanori; Yamamoto, Hisashi; Seo, Sachiko; Asano-Mori, Yuki; Uchida, Naoyuki; Masuoka, Kazuhiro; Wake, Atsushi; Taniguchi, Shuichi; Yoneyama, Akiko

    2010-03-01

    Metallo-beta-lactamase-producing multidrug-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa (MDR P. aeruginosa) is a cause of life-threatening infections. With parenteral colistin not available in Japan, we treated MDR P. aeruginosa sepsis with monobactam and aminoglycoside combination therapy, with screening using a 'break-point checkerboard plate'.

  18. Importance of inducible multidrug resistance 1 expression in HL-60 cells resistant to gemtuzumab ozogamicin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumoto, Taichi; Jimi, Shiro; Hara, Shuuji; Takamatsu, Yasushi; Suzumiya, Junji; Tamura, Kazuo

    2012-07-01

    Resistance to gemtuzumab ozogamicin (GO) hampers the effective treatment of refractory acute myeloid leukemia (AML). To clarify the mechanism of resistance to GO, HL-60 cells were persistently exposed to GO in order to establish GO-resistant HL-60 (HL-60/GOR) cells. Multidrug resistance 1 (MDR-1) was strongly expressed in HL-60/GOR cells, but not in HL-60 cells. Although withdrawal of GO after the chronic exposure of HL-60/GOR cells to this compound gradually decreased MDR-1 expression to trace levels, reintroducing GO restored high MDR-1 expression in HL-60/GOR cells, but not in HL-60 cells. These results indicate that HL-60/GOR cells acquired the ability to induce MDR-1 expression in response to GO. U0126, a MEK1/2 inhibitor, prevented GO-inducible MDR-1 expression and abrogated GO resistance in HL-60/GOR cells. These results suggest that in the clinical use of GO, inducible MDR-1 expression in tumor cells should be investigated before treatment with GO. If the cells are positive then MEK1/2 inhibitors may be effective in overcoming resistance to GO.

  19. Diversity of multi-drug resistant Acinetobacter baumannii population in a major hospital in Kuwait

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leila eVali

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Acinetobacter baumannii is one of the most important opportunistic pathogens that causes serious health care associated complications in critically ill patients. In the current study we report on the diversity of the clinical multi-drug resistant A. baumannii in Kuwait by molecular characterization. One hundred A. baumannii were isolated from one of the largest governmental hospitals in Kuwait. Following the identification of the isolates by molecular methods, the amplified blaOXA-51-like gene product of one isolate (KO-12 recovered from blood showed the insertion of the ISAba19 at position 379 in blaOXA-78. Of the 33 multi-drug resistant isolates, 28 (85% contained blaOXA-23, 2 (6% blaOXA-24 and 6 (18% blaPER-1 gene. We did not detect blaOXA-58, blaVIM, blaIMP, blaGES, blaVEB and blaNDM genes in any of the tested isolates. In 3 blaPER-1 positive isolates the genetic environment of blaPER-1 consisted of two copies of ISPa12 (tnpiA1 surrounding the blaPER-1 gene on a highly stable plasmid of ca. 140-kb. MLST analysis of the 33 A. baumannii isolates identified 20 different STs, of which 6 (ST-607, ST-608, ST-609, ST-610, ST-611 and ST-612 were novel. Emerging STs such as ST15 (identified for the first time in the Middle East, ST78 and ST25 were also detected. The predominant clonal complex was CC2. PFGE and MLST defined the MDR isolates as multi-clonal with diverse lineages. Our results lead us to believe that A. baumannii is diverse in clonal origins and / or is undergoing clonal expansion continuously while multiple lineages of MDR A. baumannii circulate in hospital wards simultaneously.

  20. Rapid emergence of multidrug resistant, H58-lineage Salmonella typhi in Blantyre, Malawi.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicholas A Feasey

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Between 1998 and 2010, S. Typhi was an uncommon cause of bloodstream infection (BSI in Blantyre, Malawi and it was usually susceptible to first-line antimicrobial therapy. In 2011 an increase in a multidrug resistant (MDR strain was detected through routine bacteriological surveillance conducted at Queen Elizabeth Central Hospital (QECH.Longitudinal trends in culture-confirmed Typhoid admissions at QECH were described between 1998-2014. A retrospective review of patient cases notes was conducted, focusing on clinical presentation, prevalence of HIV and case-fatality. Isolates of S. Typhi were sequenced and the phylogeny of Typhoid in Blantyre was reconstructed and placed in a global context.Between 1998-2010, there were a mean of 14 microbiological diagnoses of Typhoid/year at QECH, of which 6.8% were MDR. This increased to 67 in 2011 and 782 in 2014 at which time 97% were MDR. The disease predominantly affected children and young adults (median age 11 [IQR 6-21] in 2014. The prevalence of HIV in adult patients was 16.7% [8/48], similar to that of the general population (17.8%. Overall, the case fatality rate was 2.5% (3/94. Complications included anaemia, myocarditis, pneumonia and intestinal perforation. 112 isolates were sequenced and the phylogeny demonstrated the introduction and clonal expansion of the H58 lineage of S. Typhi.Since 2011, there has been a rapid increase in the incidence of multidrug resistant, H58-lineage Typhoid in Blantyre. This is one of a number of reports of the re-emergence of Typhoid in Southern and Eastern Africa. There is an urgent need to understand the reservoirs and transmission of disease and how to arrest this regional increase.

  1. Priorities in the prevention and control of multidrug-resistant Enterobacteriaceae in hospitals.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Khan, A S

    2012-10-01

    Multidrug-resistant Enterobacteriaceae (MDE) are a major public health threat due to international spread and few options for treatment. Furthermore, unlike meticillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), MDE encompass several genera and multiple resistance mechanisms, including extended-spectrum beta-lactamases and carbapenemases, which complicate detection in the routine diagnostic laboratory. Current measures to contain spread in many hospitals are somewhat ad hoc as there are no formal national or international guidelines.

  2. IncA/C plasmids harboured in serious multidrug-resistant Vibrio cholerae serogroup O139 strains in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ruibai; Yu, Dong; Zhu, Lianhui; Li, Jie; Yue, Junjie; Kan, Biao

    2015-03-01

    Vibrio cholerae serogroup O139 emerged in 1992 and is one of two major serogroups to have caused cholera epidemics. After 1998, serious multidrug-resistant (MDR) O139 strains quickly became common in China, showing a multidrug resistance profile to eight antibiotics. It is a great threat to public health, and elucidation of its mechanisms of resistance will provide a helpful guide for the clinical treatment and prevention of cholera. In this study, mega-plasmids from MDR V. cholerae O139 strains were identified by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) without enzyme digestion. One plasmid was isolated and sequenced, belonging to the IncA/C family. Ten antibiotic resistance genes were found in the MDR regions, including a blaTEM-20 gene, and these genes endowed the host with resistance to seven antibiotics. This kind of plasmid was positive in 71.2% (198/278) of toxigenic O139 strains, and the rate of plasmid positivity was consistent with the yearly change in MDR rates of these strains. This study reveals an important role of the IncA/C family plasmid in the spread of multiple antibiotic resistance of epidemic V. cholerae serogroup O139 strains, which has recombined with plasmids from different bacterial species and transferred among V. cholerae strains.

  3. 头孢哌酮/舒巴坦联合米诺环素治疗鲍氏不动杆菌呼吸机相关性肺炎临床观察%Clinical observation on cefoperazone/sulbactam combined with minocycline in treating ventilator associated pneumonia caused by multi-drug resistant acinetobacter baumannii

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    林梅瑟; 许建平; 张贻雯

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To observe the efficacy of cefoperazone/sulbactam combined with minocycline in treatment of ventilator associated pneumonia (VAP) with multidrug-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii (MDR-ABA). METHODS The data were retrospectively collected from patients with ventilator associated pneumonia with multidrug-resistant acinetobacter baumannii treated by cefoperazone/sulbactam combined with minocycline from Nov 2008 to Mar 2010. The drug susceptibility, clinical efficacy and outcomes were reviewed. RESULTS Bacterial susceptibility to cefoperazone/sulbactam, and minocycline were higher while the resistance to other antibiotics was higher. Cefoperazone/sulbactam puls minocycline showed good efficacy for patients with MDR-ABA VAP. The total clinical cure rate 68.8%. Bacterial eradication rate was 28.1%, 8 cases were dead. Age, APACHE Ⅱ and plasma B-type natriuretic peptide were independent factors for the prognosis (P<0.05). Eight patients were died. CONCLUSION This study suggests that cefoperazone/sulbactam combined with minocycline may be an effective treatment for VAP infections caused by MDR-ABA in hospitals.%目的 头孢哌酮/舒巴坦联合米诺环素治疗多药耐药鲍氏不动杆菌(MDR-ABA)呼吸机相关性肺炎(VAP)的临床疗效.方法 收集医院2008年11月-2010年3月使用头孢哌酮/舒巴坦联合米诺环素治疗MDR-ABA所致VAP患者临床资料,对其药敏、临床疗效和预后进行回顾性总结分析.结果 32例VAP患者MDR-ABA仅对头孢哌酮/舒巴坦和米诺环素保持高敏感率,对其余抗菌药物高度耐药,使用头孢哌酮/舒巴坦联合米诺环索治疗,临床总有效率68.8%,细菌清除率28.1%,死亡8例;年龄、APACHEⅡ和血浆脑钠肽是影响预后的独立危险因素(P<0.05).结论 MDR-ABA引起的VAP,根据医院分离株的耐药特点,使用头孢哌酮/舒巴坦联合米诺环素治疗具有较好疗效.

  4. Role of novel multidrug efflux pump involved in drug resistance in Klebsiella pneumoniae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vijaya Bharathi Srinivasan

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Multidrug resistant Klebsiella pneumoniae have caused major therapeutic problems worldwide due to the emergence of the extended-spectrum β-lactamase producing strains. Although there are >10 major facilitator super family (MFS efflux pumps annotated in the genome sequence of the K. pneumoniae bacillus, apparently less is known about their physiological relevance. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Insertional inactivation of kpnGH resulting in increased susceptibility to antibiotics such as azithromycin, ceftazidime, ciprofloxacin, ertapenem, erythromycin, gentamicin, imipenem, ticarcillin, norfloxacin, polymyxin-B, piperacillin, spectinomycin, tobramycin and streptomycin, including dyes and detergents such as ethidium bromide, acriflavine, deoxycholate, sodium dodecyl sulphate, and disinfectants benzalkonium chloride, chlorhexidine and triclosan signifies the wide substrate specificity of the transporter in K. pneumoniae. Growth inactivation and direct fluorimetric efflux assays provide evidence that kpnGH mediates antimicrobial resistance by active extrusion in K. pneumoniae. The kpnGH isogenic mutant displayed decreased tolerance to cell envelope stressors emphasizing its added role in K. pneumoniae physiology. CONCLUSIONS AND SIGNIFICANCE: The MFS efflux pump KpnGH involves in crucial physiological functions besides being an intrinsic resistance determinant in K. pneumoniae.

  5. Chemotherapeutic activities of Carthami Flos and its reversal effect on multidrug resistance in cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jimmy Yiu-Cheong; Yu, Zhi-Ling; Fong, Wang-Fun; Shi, Yi-Qian

    2013-01-01

    Multidrug-resistance (MDR) represents a major cause of failure in cancer chemotherapy. The need for a reduction in MDR by natural-product-based drugs of low toxicity led to the current investigation of applying medicinal herbs in future cancer adjuvant therapy. Carthami Flos (CF), the dried flower of safflower (Carthamus tinctorius L.), is one of the most popular traditional Chinese medicinal herbs used to alleviate pain, increase circulation, and reduce blood-stasis syndrome. The drug resistance index of the total extract of CF in MDR KB-V1 cells and its synergistic effects with other chemotherapeutic agents were studied. SRB cell viability assays were used to quantify growth inhibition after exposure to single drug and in combinations with other chemotherapeutic agents using the median effect principle. The combination indexes were then calculated according to the classic isobologram equation. The results revealed that CF showed a drug resistance index of 0.096. In combination with other chemotherapeutic agents, it enhanced their chemo-sensitivities by 2.8 to 4.0 folds and gave a general synergism in cytotoxic effect. These results indicate that CF could be a potential alternative adjuvant antitumour herbal medicine representing a promising approach to the treatment of some malignant and MDR cancers in the future.

  6. Chlorine Dioxide is a Better Disinfectant than Sodium Hypochlorite against Multi-Drug Resistant Staphylococcus aureus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Acinetobacter baumannii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinenoya, Atsushi; Awasthi, Sharda Prasad; Yasuda, Noritomo; Shima, Ayaka; Morino, Hirofumi; Koizumi, Tomoko; Fukuda, Toshiaki; Miura, Takanori; Shibata, Takashi; Yamasaki, Shinji

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we evaluated and compared the antibacterial activity of chlorine dioxide (ClO2) and sodium hypochlorite (NaClO) on various multidrug-resistant strains in the presence of bovine serum albumin and sheep erythrocytes to mimic the blood contamination that frequently occurs in the clinical setting. The 3 most important species that cause nosocomial infections, i.e., methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), multidrug-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa (MDRP), and multidrug-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii (MDRA), were evaluated, with three representative strains of each. At a 10-ppm concentration, ClO2 drastically reduced the number of bacteria of all MDRP and MDRA strains, and 2 out of 3 MRSA strains. However, 10 ppm of NaClO did not significantly kill any of the 9 strains tested in 60 seconds (s). In addition, 100 ppm of ClO2 completely killed all MRSA strains, whereas 100 ppm of NaClO failed to significantly lower the number of 2 MRSA strains and 1 MDRA strain. A time-course experiment demonstrated that, within 15 s, 100 ppm of ClO2, but not 100 ppm of NaClO, completely killed all tested strains. Taken together, these data suggest that ClO2 is more effective than NaClO against MRSA, MDRP, and MDRA, and 100 ppm is an effective concentration against these multidrug-resistant strains, which cause fatal nosocomial infections.

  7. [Nosocomial infections and infections with multidrug-resistant pathogens - frequency and mortality].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gastmeier, Petra; Geffers, Christine; Herrmann, Mathias; Lemmen, Sebastian; Salzberger, Bernd; Seifert, Harald; Kern, Winfried; Fätkenheuer, Gerd

    2016-03-01

    There is no agreement about the frequency of nosocomial infections and infections caused by multidrug resistant organisms (MDRO) in Germany. The aim of this review is to generate updated estimates of the national burden of these infections and to discuss them in an international context. The most important sources of this analysis are the data of the national prevalence studies conducted in various European countries and in the U.S. It can be assumed that there are between 400,000 and 600,000 patients with nosocomial infections each year in Germany. The mortality attributable to them is between 6000 and 15,000 patients. About 30,000 to 35,000 patients develop nosocomial infections caused by MDRO. Currently there are no robust data how many patients die each year because of MDRO infections. According to the best available estimate, the annual number may be between 1000 and 4000 cases. The problems of nosocomial infections and the increase of antimicrobial resistance are highly relevant and should not be belittled. However, an overestimation of this dangerous trend may lead to inappropriate use of limited resources.

  8. Influence of multidrug resistance on {sup 18}F-FCH cellular uptake in a glioblastoma model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vanpouille, Claire; Jeune, Nathalie le; Clotagatide, Anthony; Dubois, Francis [Universite de Lyon, Universite Jean Monnet-Cancer Research Group IFRESIS 143, Saint-Etienne (France); Kryza, David; Janier, Marc [Hospice Civils de Lyon, Quai Des Celestins, CREATIS, UMR CNRS, Lyon (France); Perek, Nathalie [Universite de Lyon, Universite Jean Monnet-Cancer Research Group IFRESIS 143, Saint-Etienne (France); Laboratoire de Biophysique, Faculte de Medecine, Saint-Etienne (France)

    2009-08-15

    Multidrug resistance, aggressiveness and accelerated choline metabolism are hallmarks of malignancy and have motivated the development of new PET tracers like {sup 18}F-FCH, an analogue of choline. Our aim was to study the relationship of multidrug resistance of cultured glioma cell lines and {sup 18}F-FCH tracer uptake. We used an in vitro multidrug-resistant (MDR) glioma model composed of sensitive parental U87MG and derived resistant cells U87MG-CIS and U87MG-DOX. Aggressiveness, choline metabolism and transport were studied, particularly the expression of choline kinase (CK) and high-affinity choline transporter (CHT1). FCH transport studies were assessed in our glioblastoma model. As expected, the resistant cell lines express P-glycoprotein (Pgp), multidrug resistance-associated protein isoform 1 (MRP1) and elevated glutathione (GSH) content and are also more mobile and more invasive than the sensitive U87MG cells. Our results show an overexpression of CK and CHT1 in the resistant cell lines compared to the sensitive cell lines. We found an increased uptake of FCH (in % of uptake per 200,000 cells) in the resistant cells compared to the sensitive ones (U87MG: 0.89{+-}0.14; U87MG-CIS: 1.27{+-}0.18; U87MG-DOX: 1.33{+-}0.13) in line with accelerated choline metabolism and aggressive phenotype. FCH uptake is not influenced by the two ATP-dependant efflux pumps: Pgp and MRP1. FCH would be an interesting probe for glioma imaging which would not be effluxed from the resistant cells by the classic MDR ABC transporters. Our results clearly show that FCH uptake reflects accelerated choline metabolism and is related to tumour aggressiveness and drug resistance. (orig.)

  9. Molecular characterization of multidrug-resistant Shigella spp. of food origin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Ashraf M; Shimamoto, Tadashi

    2015-02-02

    Shigella spp. are the causative agents of food-borne shigellosis, an acute enteric infection. The emergence of multidrug-resistant clinical isolates of Shigella presents an increasing challenge for clinicians in the treatment of shigellosis. Several studies worldwide have characterized the molecular basis of antibiotic resistance in clinical Shigella isolates of human origin, however, to date, no such characterization has been reported for Shigella spp. of food origin. In this study, we characterized the genetic basis of multidrug resistance in Shigella spp. isolated from 1600 food samples (800 meat products and 800 dairy products) collected from different street venders, butchers, retail markets, and slaughterhouses in Egypt. Twenty-four out of 27 Shigella isolates (88.9%) showed multidrug resistance phenotypes to at least three classes of antimicrobials. The multidrug-resistant Shigella spp. were as follows: Shigella flexneri (66.7%), Shigella sonnei (18.5%), and Shigella dysenteriae (3.7%). The highest resistance was to streptomycin (100.0%), then to kanamycin (95.8%), nalidixic acid (95.8%), tetracycline (95.8%), spectinomycin (93.6%), ampicillin (87.5%), and sulfamethoxazole/trimethoprim (87.5%). PCR and DNA sequencing were used to screen and characterize integrons and antibiotic resistance genes. Our results indicated that 11.1% and 74.1% of isolates were positive for class 1 and class 2 integrons, respectively. Beta-lactamase-encoding genes were identified in 77.8% of isolates, and plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance genes were identified in 44.4% of isolates. These data provide useful information to better understand the molecular basis of antimicrobial resistance in Shigella spp. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of the molecular characterization of antibiotic resistance in Shigella spp. isolated from food.

  10. The culturable soil antibiotic resistome: a community of multi-drug resistant bacteria.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fiona Walsh

    Full Text Available Understanding the soil bacterial resistome is essential to understanding the evolution and development of antibiotic resistance, and its spread between species and biomes. We have identified and characterized multi-drug resistance (MDR mechanisms in the culturable soil antibiotic resistome and linked the resistance profiles to bacterial species. We isolated 412 antibiotic resistant bacteria from agricultural, urban and pristine soils. All isolates were multi-drug resistant, of which greater than 80% were resistant to 16-23 antibiotics, comprising almost all classes of antibiotic. The mobile resistance genes investigated, (ESBL, bla NDM-1, and plasmid mediated quinolone resistance (PMQR resistance genes were not responsible for the respective resistance phenotypes nor were they present in the extracted soil DNA. Efflux was demonstrated to play an important role in MDR and many resistance phenotypes. Clinically relevant Burkholderia species are intrinsically resistant to ciprofloxacin but the soil Burkholderia species were not intrinsically resistant to ciprofloxacin. Using a phenotypic enzyme assay we identified the antibiotic specific inactivation of trimethoprim in 21 bacteria from different soils. The results of this study identified the importance of the efflux mechanism in the soil resistome and variations between the intrinsic resistance profiles of clinical and soil bacteria of the same family.

  11. Distribution and physiology of ABC-Type transporters contributing to multidrug resistance in bacteria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lubelski, Jacek; Konings, Wil N.; Driessen, Arnold J. M.

    2007-01-01

    Membrane proteins responsible for the active efflux of structurally and functionally unrelated drugs were first characterized in higher eukalyotes. To date, a vast number of transporters contributing to multidrug resistance (MDR transporters) have been reported for a large variety of organisms. Pred

  12. Identification of New Drug Targets in Multi-Drug Resistant Bacterial Infections

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-01

    COVERED 26 September 2011 25 September 2012 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Identification of New Drug Targets in Multi-Drug Resistant...will be necessary for the fragment based screening and subsequent design of new drug lead compounds. To accompany and validate the structural studies

  13. Intestinal Decontamination of Multidrug-resistant Klebsiella pneumoniae After Recurrent Infections in an Immunocompromised Host

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kronman, Matthew P.; Zerr, Danielle M.; Qin, Xuan; Englund, Janet; Cornell, Cathy; Sanders, Jean E.; Myers, Jeffrey; Rayar, Jaipreet; Berry, Jessica E.; Adler, Amanda L.; Weissman, Scott J.

    2014-01-01

    Multidrug-resistant (MDR) Enterobacteriaceae infections are associated with increased morbidity. We describe a 20-year-old hematopoietic cell transplantation recipient with recurrent MDR Klebsiella pneumoniae infection, prolonged intestinal colonization, and subsequent intestinal decontamination. Further study should evaluate stool surveillance, molecular typing, and fecal microbiota transplantation for patients with intestinal MDR Enterobacteriaceae carriage. PMID:25041704

  14. Antibacterial activities of ethanol extracts of Philippine medicinal plants against multidrug-resistant bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Demetrio L. Valle Jr.

    2015-07-01

    Conclusions: P. betle had the greatest potential value against both Gram-negative and Gram-positive multidrug-resistant bacteria. Favorable antagonistic activities were also exhibited by the ethanol extracts of Psidium guajava, Phyllanthus niruri and Ehretia microphylla.

  15. Recycling antibiotics into GUMBOS: A new combination strategy to combat multi-drug resistant bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    The emergence of multi-drug resistant bacteria, coupled with the lack of new antibiotics in development, is fast evolving into a global crisis. New strategies utilizing existing antibacterial agents are urgently needed. We propose one such strategy in which four outmoded ß-lactam antibiotics (amp...

  16. Isolation and characterization of antimicrobial compounds in plant extracts against multidrug-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoko Miyasaki

    Full Text Available The number of fully active antibiotic options that treat nosocomial infections due to multidrug-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii (A. baumannii is extremely limited. Magnolia officinalis, Mahonia bealei, Rabdosia rubescens, Rosa rugosa, Rubus chingii, Scutellaria baicalensis, and Terminalia chebula plant extracts were previously shown to have growth inhibitory activity against a multidrug-resistant clinical strain of A. baumannii. In this study, the compounds responsible for their antimicrobial activity were identified by fractionating each plant extract using high performance liquid chromatography, and determining the antimicrobial activity of each fraction against A. baumannii. The chemical structures of the fractions inhibiting >40% of the bacterial growth were elucidated by liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry analysis and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. The six most active compounds were identified as: ellagic acid in Rosa rugosa; norwogonin in Scutellaria baicalensis; and chebulagic acid, chebulinic acid, corilagin, and terchebulin in Terminalia chebula. The most potent compound was identified as norwogonin with a minimum inhibitory concentration of 128 µg/mL, and minimum bactericidal concentration of 256 µg/mL against clinically relevant strains of A. baumannii. Combination studies of norwogonin with ten anti-Gram negative bacterial agents demonstrated that norwogonin did not enhance the antimicrobial activity of the synthetic antibiotics chosen for this study. In conclusion, of all identified antimicrobial compounds, norwogonin was the most potent against multidrug-resistant A. baumannii strains. Further studies are warranted to ascertain the prophylactic and therapeutic potential of norwogonin for infections due to multidrug-resistant A. baumannii.

  17. Characterization of putative multidrug resistance transporters of the major facilitator-superfamily expressed in Salmonella Typhi

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shaheen, Aqsa; Ismat, Fouzia; Iqbal, Mazhar

    2015-01-01

    of this study was to gain insight into the substrate specificity of previously uncharacterized transporters of Salmonella Typhi to identify their role in the development of multidrug resistance. S. Typhi genes encoding putative members of the major facilitator superfamily were cloned and expressed in the drug...

  18. Novel mechanism of bacteriocin secretion and immunity carried out by lactococcal multidrug resistance proteins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gajic, O; Buist, G; Kojic, M; Topisirovic, L; Kuipers, OP; Kok, J

    2003-01-01

    A natural isolate of Lactococcus lactis was shown to produce two narrow spectrum class II bacteriocins, designated LsbA and LsbB. The cognate genes are located on a 5.6-kb plasmid within a gene cluster specifying LmrB, an ATP-binding cassette-type multidrug resistance transporter protein. LsbA is a

  19. Expression of multidrug resistance-associated proteins predicts prognosis in childhood and adult acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Plasschaert, SLA; de Bont, ESJM; Boezen, M; vander Kolk, DM; Daenen, SMJG; Faber, KN; Kamps, WA; de Vries, EGE; Vellenga, E

    2005-01-01

    PURPOSE: Patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) are treated with a variety of chemotherapeutic drugs, which can be transported by six multidrug resistance-associated proteins (MRP). These MRPs have strongly overlapping functional activities. The aim of this study was to investigate the exp

  20. Evaluation of macrolides for possible use against multidrug-resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Paardt, Anne-Fleur; Wilffert, Bob; Akkerman, Onno W.; de Lange, Wiel C. M.; van Soolingen, Dick; Sinha, Bhanu; van der Werf, Tjip S.; Kosterink, Jos G. W.; Alffenaar, Jan-Willem C.

    2015-01-01

    Multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB) is a major global health problem. The loss of susceptibility to an increasing number of drugs behoves us to consider the evaluation of non-traditional anti-tuberculosis drugs. Clarithromycin, a macrolide antibiotic, is defined as a group 5 anti-tuberculosis

  1. Individualized treatment of multidrug-resistant tuberculosis using therapeutic drug monitoring

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bolhuis, Mathieu S; Akkerman, Onno W; Sturkenboom, Marieke G G; de Lange, Wiel C M; van der Werf, Tjip S; Alffenaar, Jan-Willem C

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE/BACKGROUND: Globally, approximately 50% of patients with multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB) experience treatment failure. MDR-TB treatment is hindered by adverse events, toxicity of the second-line anti-TB drugs, logistics and costs, especially in low-income countries, and problems

  2. A cohort study on the outcome of multidrug-resistant tuberculosis in elderly patients

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郝晓晖

    2014-01-01

    Objective To investigate the clinical curative effect and outcomes of multidrug-resistant tuberculosis(MDRTB)in elderly patients.Methods Fifty-nine elderly patients with MDR-TB were enrolled from Shanghai Pulmonary Hospital from January 2007 to January 2010,and80 younger patients with MDR-TB during the same period served as the control group.Clinical characteristics,out-

  3. Targeting multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB) by therapeutic vaccines

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Prabowo, Satria A.; Groeschel, Matthias I.; Schmidt, Ed D. L.; Skrahina, Alena; Mihaescu, Traian; Hasturk, Serap; Mitrofanov, Rotislav; Pimkina, Edita; Visontai, Ildik; de Jong, Bouke; Stanford, John L.; Cardona, Pere-Joan; Kaufmann, Stefan H. E.; van der Werf, Tjipke

    2013-01-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) has scourged humankind for millennia, and latent infection affects nearly one-third of today's world population. The emergence of multidrug-resistant (MDR)-TB is a major global threat and reflects treatment failure of drug-sensitive disease. MDR-TB management is a burden for patien

  4. Potential antimicrobial agents for the treatment of multidrug-resistant tuberculosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Alsaad, Noor; Wilffert, Bob; van Altena, Richard; de Lange, Wiel C. M.; van der Werf, Tjip S.; Kosterink, Jos G. W.; Alffenaar, Jan-Willem C.

    2014-01-01

    Treatment of multidrug-resistant (MDR) tuberculosis (TB) is challenging because of the high toxicity of second-line drugs and the longer treatment duration than for drug-susceptible TB patients. In order to speed up novel treatment for MDR-TB, we suggest considering expanding the indications of alre

  5. Multidrug-resistant tuberculosis, People's Republic of China, 2007-2009.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    He, G.X.; Wang, H.Y.; Borgdorff, M.W.; Soolingen, D. van; Werf, M.J. van der; Liu, Z.M.; Li, X.Z.; Guo, H.; Zhao, Y.L.; Varma, J.K.; Tostado, C.P.; Hof, S. van den

    2011-01-01

    We conducted a case-control study to investigate risk factors for multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR TB) in the People's Republic of China. Genotyping analysis was used to estimate the percentage of cases from recent transmission among 100 MDR TB case-patients hospitalized during April 2007-July

  6. Beauvericin counteracted multi-drug resistant Candida albicans by blocking ABC transporters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tong, Yaojun; Liu, Mei; Zhang, Yu

    2016-01-01

    screening and whole-cell based mechanism study, identified a natural product, beauvericin (BEA) as a drug efflux pump modulator, which can reverse the multi-drug resistant phenotype of Candida albicans by specifically blocking the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters; meantime, BEA alone has fungicidal...

  7. What do proton motive force driven multidrug resistance transporters have in common?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mazurkiewicz, P.; Driessen, A.J.M.; Konings, W.N

    2005-01-01

    The extensive progress of genome sequencing projects in recent years has demonstrated that multidrug resistance (MDR) transporters are widely spread among all domains of life. This indicates that they play crucial roles in the survival of organisms. Moreover, antibiotic and chemotherapeutic treatmen

  8. Multidrug resistant Acinetobacter baumannii reaches a new frontier: prosthetic hip joint infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hischebeth, G T R; Wimmer, M D; Molitor, E; Seifert, H; Gravius, S; Bekeredjian-Ding, I

    2015-02-01

    Acinetobacter baumannii is an emerging nosocomial pathogen primarily in countries with a high prevalence of multidrug resistance. Here we report the detection of a bla OXA23 carbapenemase-producing A. baumannii strain in a German patient with prosthetic hip joint infection following several hip joint surgeries but no history of foreign travel.

  9. [Reversing effects of emodin on multidrug resistance in resistant HL-60/ADR cells].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ying-Yu; Li, Jing; Hu, Jian-Da; Zheng, Jing; Zheng, Zhi-Hong; Zhu, Liang-Fang; Chen, Xin-Ji; Lin, Zhen-Xing

    2013-12-01

    This study was aimed to investigate the reversing effects of emodin on multidrug resistance (MDR) in resistant HL-60/ADR cells, and to explore the underlying mechanisms. The MTT assay was used to assess the chemoresistance of HL-60/ADR cells to emodin and 8 chemotherapeutic agents commonly used in clinic. The reversal effects of emodin on MDR of HL-60/ADR cells were also evaluated by MTT method. DNA ploidy analysis and DNA Ladder assay were used to detect apoptosis-induced effects on HL-60/ADR cells via the adriamycin (ADR) and emodin combination. The expression changes of the drug resistance-associated genes and proteins were detected by RT-PCR and Western Blot respectively. The intracellular accumulation and subcellular distribution of ADR and DNR were measured by flow cytometry and confocal laser scanning microscopy. The results showed that emodin inhibited HL-60/ADR cell proliferation with an average IC50 value of 24.09 ± 1.72 µmol/L, which was similar to that of the parental HL-60 cells (average IC50 = 23.18 ± 0.87 µmol/L). HL-60/ADR cells were resistant to a variety of chemotherapeutic agents, such as ADR, DNR, VP16, VCR,Ara-C, HHT, MTZ and THP. The reversal multiple were between 1.58 and 4.12 after the treatment with low concentration of emodin combined with the above mentioned different agents. The combination of ADR with emodin showed the best reversal effects, and the typical hypodiploid peak (apoptotic peak) and DNA ladder could be detected after the co-treatment.In addition, emodin down-regulated the mRNA and protein expression levels of MRP1, TOPOIIβ, GST π and BCL-2. Furthermore, the addition of emodin enhanced ADR and DNR intracellular accumulation and subcellular distribution in HL-60/ADR cells in dose-dependent manner. It is concluded that the emodin shows reversing effects on the multidrug resistant HL-60/ADR cells, possibly via decreasing the expression levels of drug resistance-associated genes, increasing the intracellular accumulation of

  10. 多药耐药铜绿假单胞菌医院感染的高危因素及药物敏感性分析%High risk factors of nosocomial infection caused by multidrug-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa and analysis of drug sensitivity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    曹利君; 王春萍

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To investigate the risk factors for nosocomial infection caused by multidrug-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa and analyze the drug sensitivity. METHODS A total of 98 cases of patients with P. Aeruginosa infection in our hospital from Jan 2007 to May 2011 were selected in this study and divided them into control group (sensitive group) with 48 cases and observation group (multi-drug resistant group) with 50 patients. The age, length of stay, mechanical ventilation rate associated with lung-based diseases, APACHE TJ score and so on for the two groups were compared, and statistics and analysis for the observation group of departments and MIC distribution were performed. RESULTS The age of the observed group (60. 25±5. 66)years was older than the control group (53. 14±6. 13)years, length of stay (35. 28±6. 89)d was longer than the control group (26. 52±6. 37)d, mechanical ventilation rate (50. 0%) was higher than control group (25. 0%) , associated with lung disease (28.0%) was proportion (12. 5%} higher than the control group, APACHE II score (20. 5± 3.1) points was (15. 4i2, 9) points higher than the control group. The highest proportion in distributed departments were ICU and neurology, and they were 24. 0% and 20. 0% respectively, There were significantly different (P<0. 05). CONCLUSION There are characteristics of the nosocomial infection in risk factors and drug sensitivity of multi-drug resistant P. Aeruginosa, which are is worthy of the attention in clinic.%目的 探讨分析多药耐药性铜绿假单胞菌医院感染的高危因素及药物敏感性.方法 选取2007年1月-2011年5月检测出的98例铜绿假单胞菌感染患者为研究对象,将其分为对照组(敏感组)48例和观察组(多药耐药组)50例,对两组年龄、住院时间、机械通气率、伴有肺部基础疾病、APACHEⅡ评分等进行统计及比较,并对观察组的科室分布及MIC进行统计及分析.结果 观察组平均年龄(60.25±5.66)

  11. Zoonotic potential of multidrug-resistant extraintestinal pathogenic Escherichia coli obtained from healthy poultry carcasses in Salvador, Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lima-Filho, José Vitor; Martins, Liliane Vilela; Nascimento, Danielle Cristina de Oliveira; Ventura, Roberta Ferreira; Batista, Jacqueline Ellen Camelo; Silva, Ayrles Fernanda Brandão; Ralph, Maria Taciana; Vaz, Renata Valença; Rabello, Carlos Boa-Viagem; Silva, Isabella de Matos Mendes da; Evêncio-Neto, Joaquim

    2013-01-01

    The zoonotic potential to cause human and/or animal infections among multidrug-resistant extraintestinal pathogenic Escherichia coli from avian origin was investigated. Twenty-seven extraintestinal pathogenic E. coli isolates containing the increased survival gene (iss) were obtained from the livers of healthy and diseased poultry carcasses at two slaughterhouses in Salvador, northeastern Brazil. The antimicrobial resistance-susceptibility profiles were conducted with antibiotics of avian and/or human use by the standardized disc-diffusion method. Antimicrobial resistance was higher for levofloxacin (51.8%), amoxicillin/clavulanic acid (70.4%), ampicillin (81.5%), cefalotin (88.8%), tetracycline (100%) and streptomycin (100%). The minimum inhibitory concentrations above the resistance breakpoints of doxycycline, neomycin, oxytetracycline and enrofloxacin reached, respectively, 88.0%, 100%, 75% and 91.7% of the isolates. Strains with high and low antimicrobial resistance were i.p. administered to Swiss mice, and histopathological examination was carried out seven days after infection. Resistance to goat and human serum complement was also evaluated. The results show that Swiss mice challenged with strain 2B (resistant to 11 antimicrobials) provoked a severe degeneration of hepatocytes besides lymphocytic infiltration in the liver, whereas the spleen showed areas of degeneration of the white and red pulp. Conversely, the spleen and liver of mice challenged with strain 4A (resistant to two antimicrobials) were morphologically preserved. In addition, complement resistance to goat and human serum was high for strain 2B and low for strain 4A. Our data show that multidrug resistance and pathogenesis can be correlated in extraintestinal pathogenic E. coli strains obtained from apparently healthy poultry carcasses, increasing the risk for human public healthy.

  12. Zoonotic potential of multidrug-resistant extraintestinal pathogenic Escherichia coli obtained from healthy poultry carcasses in Salvador, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Vitor Lima-Filho

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available The zoonotic potential to cause human and/or animal infections among multidrug-resistant extraintestinal pathogenic Escherichia coli from avian origin was investigated. Twenty-seven extraintestinal pathogenic E. coli isolates containing the increased survival gene (iss were obtained from the livers of healthy and diseased poultry carcasses at two slaughterhouses in Salvador, northeastern Brazil. The antimicrobial resistance-susceptibility profiles were conducted with antibiotics of avian and/or human use by the standardized disc-diffusion method. Antimicrobial resistance was higher for levofloxacin (51.8%, amoxicillin/clavulanic acid (70.4%, ampicillin (81.5%, cefalotin (88.8%, tetracycline (100% and streptomycin (100%. The minimum inhibitory concentrations above the resistance breakpoints of doxycycline, neomycin, oxytetracycline and enrofloxacin reached, respectively, 88.0%, 100%, 75% and 91.7% of the isolates. Strains with high and low antimicrobial resistance were i.p. administered to Swiss mice, and histopathological examination was carried out seven days after infection. Resistance to goat and human serum complement was also evaluated. The results show that Swiss mice challenged with strain 2B (resistant to 11 antimicrobials provoked a severe degeneration of hepatocytes besides lymphocytic infiltration in the liver, whereas the spleen showed areas of degeneration of the white and red pulp. Conversely, the spleen and liver of mice challenged with strain 4A (resistant to two antimicrobials were morphologically preserved. In addition, complement resistance to goat and human serum was high for strain 2B and low for strain 4A. Our data show that multidrug resistance and pathogenesis can be correlated in extraintestinal pathogenic E. coli strains obtained from apparently healthy poultry carcasses, increasing the risk for human public healthy.

  13. Evaluation of multidrug resistance-1 gene C>T polymorphism frequency in patients with asthma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ümran Toru

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES:Asthma is a chronic inflammatory lung disease characterized by bronchial hyperresponsiveness and airflow obstruction. Genetic and oxidative stress factors, in addition to pulmonary and systemic inflammatory processes, play a pivotal role in the pathogenesis of asthma. The products of the multidrug resistance-1 gene protect lung tissue from oxidative stress. Here, we aimed to evaluate the association between the multidrug resistance-1 gene C>T polymorphism and asthma with regard to oxidative stress-related parameters of asthmatic patients.METHODS:Forty-five patients with asthma and 27 healthy age-matched controls were included in this study. Blood samples were collected in tubes with ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid. DNA was extracted from the blood samples. The multidrug resistance-1 gene polymorphism was detected by polymerase chain reaction and a subsequent enzyme digestion technique. The serum levels of total oxidant status and total antioxidant status were determined by the colorimetric measurement method.RESULTS:The heterozygous polymorphic genotype was the most frequent in both groups. A significant difference in the multidrug resistance-1 genotype frequencies between groups indicated an association of asthma with the TT genotype. A significant difference between groups was found for wild type homozygous participants and carriers of polymorphic allele participants. The frequency of the T allele was significantly higher in asthmatic patients. The increase in the oxidative stress index parameter was significant in the asthma group compared with the control group.CONCLUSIONS:The multidrug resistance-1 gene C/T polymorphism may be an underlying genetic risk factor for the development of asthma via oxidant-antioxidant imbalance, leading to increased oxidative stress.

  14. Transmission of Multidrug-Resistant and Drug-Susceptible Tuberculosis within Households: A Prospective Cohort Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grandjean, Louis; Gilman, Robert H.; Martin, Laura; Soto, Esther; Castro, Beatriz; Lopez, Sonia; Coronel, Jorge; Castillo, Edith; Alarcon, Valentina; Lopez, Virginia; San Miguel, Angela; Quispe, Neyda; Asencios, Luis; Dye, Christopher; Moore, David A. J.

    2015-01-01

    Background The “fitness” of an infectious pathogen is defined as the ability of the pathogen to survive, reproduce, be transmitted, and cause disease. The fitness of multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDRTB) relative to drug-susceptible tuberculosis is cited as one of the most important determinants of MDRTB spread and epidemic size. To estimate the relative fitness of drug-resistant tuberculosis cases, we compared the incidence of tuberculosis disease among the household contacts of MDRTB index patients to that among the contacts of drug-susceptible index patients. Methods and Findings This 3-y (2010–2013) prospective cohort household follow-up study in South Lima and Callao, Peru, measured the incidence of tuberculosis disease among 1,055 household contacts of 213 MDRTB index cases and 2,362 household contacts of 487 drug-susceptible index cases. A total of 35/1,055 (3.3%) household contacts of 213 MDRTB index cases developed tuberculosis disease, while 114/2,362 (4.8%) household contacts of 487 drug-susceptible index patients developed tuberculosis disease. The total follow-up time for drug-susceptible tuberculosis contacts was 2,620 person-years, while the total follow-up time for MDRTB contacts was 1,425 person-years. Using multivariate Cox regression to adjust for confounding variables including contact HIV status, contact age, socio-economic status, and index case sputum smear grade, the hazard ratio for tuberculosis disease among MDRTB household contacts was found to be half that for drug-susceptible contacts (hazard ratio 0.56, 95% CI 0.34–0.90, p = 0.017). The inference of transmission in this study was limited by the lack of genotyping data for household contacts. Capturing incident disease only among household contacts may also limit the extrapolation of these findings to the community setting. Conclusions The low relative fitness of MDRTB estimated by this study improves the chances of controlling drug-resistant tuberculosis. However, fitter

  15. Transmission of Multidrug-Resistant and Drug-Susceptible Tuberculosis within Households: A Prospective Cohort Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Louis Grandjean

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The "fitness" of an infectious pathogen is defined as the ability of the pathogen to survive, reproduce, be transmitted, and cause disease. The fitness of multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDRTB relative to drug-susceptible tuberculosis is cited as one of the most important determinants of MDRTB spread and epidemic size. To estimate the relative fitness of drug-resistant tuberculosis cases, we compared the incidence of tuberculosis disease among the household contacts of MDRTB index patients to that among the contacts of drug-susceptible index patients.This 3-y (2010-2013 prospective cohort household follow-up study in South Lima and Callao, Peru, measured the incidence of tuberculosis disease among 1,055 household contacts of 213 MDRTB index cases and 2,362 household contacts of 487 drug-susceptible index cases. A total of 35/1,055 (3.3% household contacts of 213 MDRTB index cases developed tuberculosis disease, while 114/2,362 (4.8% household contacts of 487 drug-susceptible index patients developed tuberculosis disease. The total follow-up time for drug-susceptible tuberculosis contacts was 2,620 person-years, while the total follow-up time for MDRTB contacts was 1,425 person-years. Using multivariate Cox regression to adjust for confounding variables including contact HIV status, contact age, socio-economic status, and index case sputum smear grade, the hazard ratio for tuberculosis disease among MDRTB household contacts was found to be half that for drug-susceptible contacts (hazard ratio 0.56, 95% CI 0.34-0.90, p = 0.017. The inference of transmission in this study was limited by the lack of genotyping data for household contacts. Capturing incident disease only among household contacts may also limit the extrapolation of these findings to the community setting.The low relative fitness of MDRTB estimated by this study improves the chances of controlling drug-resistant tuberculosis. However, fitter multidrug-resistant strains that emerge

  16. Multidrug and heavy metal-resistant Raoultella planticola isolated from surface water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koc, Serkan; Kabatas, Burak; Icgen, Bulent

    2013-08-01

    A surface water isolate of Raoultella sp. having both multidrug- and multimetal-resistant ability was isolated and identified as Raoultella planticola. R. planticola displayed resistance to 15 drugs like ampicillin, amoxicillin/clavulanic acid, aztreonam, erythromycin, imipenem, oxacillin, pefloxacin, penicillin, piperacillin, piperacillin/tazobactam, rifampin, sulbactam/cefoperazone, ticarsillin, ticarsillin/clavulanic acid, vancomycin, and to 11 heavy metals like aluminum, barium, copper, iron, lead, lithium, manganese, nickel, silver, strontium, and tin. The multidrug and multi-metal-resistant R. planticola may remain present in the environment for a long time. Due to a possible health risk of these pathogenic bacteria, a need exists for an accurate assessment of their acquired resistance to multiple drugs and metals.

  17. Antimicrobial metallopolymers and their bioconjugates with conventional antibiotics against multidrug-resistant bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jiuyang; Chen, Yung Pin; Miller, Kristen P; Ganewatta, Mitra S; Bam, Marpe; Yan, Yi; Nagarkatti, Mitzi; Decho, Alan W; Tang, Chuanbing

    2014-04-02

    Bacteria are now becoming more resistant to most conventional antibiotics. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), a complex of multidrug-resistant Gram-positive bacterial strains, has proven especially problematic in both hospital and community settings by deactivating conventional β-lactam antibiotics, including penicillins, cephalosporins, and carbapenems, through various mechanisms, resulting in increased mortality rates and hospitalization costs. Here we introduce a class of charged metallopolymers that exhibit synergistic effects against MRSA by efficiently inhibiting activity of β-lactamase and effectively lysing bacterial cells. Various conventional β-lactam antibiotics, including penicillin-G, amoxicillin, ampicillin, and cefazolin, are protected from β-lactamase hydrolysis via the formation of unique ion-pairs between their carboxylate anions and cationic cobaltocenium moieties. These discoveries could provide a new pathway for designing macromolecular scaffolds to regenerate vitality of conventional antibiotics to kill multidrug-resistant bacteria and superbugs.

  18. Pharmaceutical practice of clinical pharmacists participating in the treatment of a patient with pneumonia caused by multi-drug resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa after operation%临床药师参与1例术后由多重耐药铜绿假单胞菌引起的肺炎治疗的药学实践

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张晨; 陈燕

    2014-01-01

    1例高龄患者在因发生急性胃穿孔和急性腹膜炎而施行剖腹探查和乙结肠近端造瘘术后出现由多重耐药铜绿假单胞菌引起的肺炎,临床药师协助临床医师制定治疗方案并选择合理、有效的抗感染药物,挽救了患者的生命。临床药师及时提供临床药学服务可获得良好的效果。%An elderly patient suffered from the pneumonia caused by multi-drug resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa after performing exploratory laparotomy and sigmoid colostomy due to acute gastric perforation and acute peritonitis. The clinical pharmacists collaborated with clinicians to develop a therapeutic program and select reasonable and effective anti-infective agents, resulting in saving the life of this patient. A good clinical outcome should be received in case clinical pharmacists can provide pharmaceutical care for patients in time.

  19. Cloning and characterization of the rat multidrug resistance-associated protein 1

    OpenAIRE

    Yang, Ziping; Li, Cheryl S. W.; Shen, Danny D.; Ho, Rodney J. Y.

    2002-01-01

    Multidrug resistance-associated protein 1 (MRP1) was originally shown to confer resistance of human tumor cells to a broad range of natural product anticancer drugs. MRP1 has also been shown to mediate efflux transport of glutathione and glucuronide conjugates of drugs and endogenous substrates. An ortholog of MRP1 in the mouse has been cloned and characterized. Significant functional differences between murine and human MRP1 have been noted. Since drug disposition and pharmacology studies of...

  20. Regulation of Multidrug Resistance Proteins by Genistein in a Hepatocarcinoma Cell Line: Impact on Sorafenib Cytotoxicity

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is the fifth most frequent cancer worldwide. Sorafenib is the only drug available that improves the overall survival of HCC patients. P-glycoprotein (P-gp), Multidrug resistance-associated proteins 2 and 3 (MRP2 and 3) and Breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP) are efflux pumps that play a key role in cancer chemoresistance. Their modulation by dietary compounds may affect the intracellular accumulation and therapeutic efficacy of drugs that are substrates of t...

  1. In vitro antimicrobial activity of five essential oils on multidrug resistant Gram-negative clinical isolates

    OpenAIRE

    Sakkas, Hercules; Gousia, Panagiota; Economou, Vangelis; Sakkas, Vassilios; Petsios, Stefanos; Papadopoulou, Chrissanthy

    2016-01-01

    Aim/Background: The emergence of drug-resistant pathogens has drawn attention on medicinal plants for potential antimicrobial properties. The objective of the present study was the investigation of the antimicrobial activity of five plant essential oils on multidrug resistant Gram-negative bacteria. Materials and Methods: Basil, chamomile blue, origanum, thyme, and tea tree oil were tested against clinical isolates of Acinetobacter baumannii (n = 6), Escherichia coli (n = 4), Klebsiella pneum...

  2. Novel Bis-Indole Agents Active Against Multidrug-Resistant Acinetobacter baumannii

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs, Michael R.; Bajaksouzian, Saralee; Good, Caryn E.; Butler, Michelle M.; Williams, John D.; Peet, Norton P.; Bowlin, Terry L.; Endimiani, Andrea; Bonomo, Robert A

    2013-01-01

    The in vitro activity of five novel Microbiotix bis-indole agents (MBXs) against 30 multidrug-resistant (MDR) A. baumannii (including 18 resistant to carbapenems) was evaluated. Overall, MIC90s ranged from 1-8 μg/ml, whereas those for imipenem were > 64 μg/ml. MBX 1196 was the most potent (MIC90 1 μg/ml). MBXs are compounds that are highly effective against MDR A. baumannii. PMID:21146724

  3. The burden of transmitted multi-drug resistance among epidemics of tuberculosis: A transmission model

    OpenAIRE

    Emily A Kendall; Fofana, Mariam O.; Dowdy, David W.

    2015-01-01

    Background Multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB) can be acquired through de novo mutation during TB treatment or through transmission from other individuals with active MDR-TB. Understanding the balance between these two mechanisms is essential when allocating resources for MDR-TB. Methods We constructed a dynamic transmission model of an MDR-TB epidemic, allowing for both treatment-related acquisition and person-to-person transmission of resistance. We used national TB notification data ...

  4. Multidrug-resistant Acinetobacter Infection Mortality Rate and Length of Hospitalization

    OpenAIRE

    Sunenshine, Rebecca H.; Wright, Marc-Oliver; Maragakis, Lisa L.; Harris, Anthony D.; Song, Xiaoyan; Hebden, Joan; Cosgrove, Sara E.; Anderson, Ashley; Carnell, Jennifer; Jernigan, Daniel B.; Kleinbaum, David G.; Perl, Trish M.; Standiford, Harold C.; Srinivasan, Arjun

    2007-01-01

    Acinetobacter infections have increased and gained attention because of the organism’s prolonged environmental survival and propensity to develop antimicrobial drug resistance. The effect of multidrug-resistant (MDR) Acinetobacter infection on clinical outcomes has not been reported. A retrospective, matched cohort investigation was performed at 2 Baltimore hospitals to examine outcomes of patients with MDR Acinetobacter infection compared with patients with susceptible Acinetobacter infectio...

  5. Anthelmintic Avermectins Kill Mycobacterium tuberculosis, Including Multidrug-Resistant Clinical Strains

    OpenAIRE

    Lim, Leah E.; Vilchèze, Catherine; Ng, Carol; Jacobs, William R.; Ramón-García, Santiago; Thompson, Charles J

    2013-01-01

    Avermectins are a family of macrolides known for their anthelmintic activities and traditionally believed to be inactive against all bacteria. Here we report that members of the family, ivermectin, selamectin, and moxidectin, are bactericidal against mycobacterial species, including multidrug-resistant and extensively drug-resistant clinical strains of Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Avermectins are approved for clinical and veterinary uses and have documented pharmacokinetic and safety profiles....

  6. Global Assessment of the Activity of Tigecycline against Multidrug-Resistant Gram-Negative Pathogens between 2004 and 2014 as Part of the Tigecycline Evaluation and Surveillance Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giammanco, Anna; Calà, Cinzia; Fasciana, Teresa; Dowzicky, Michael J

    2017-01-01

    Multidrug-resistant (MDR) Gram-negative organisms are a burden on the global health care system. The Tigecycline Evaluation and Surveillance Trial (TEST) is an ongoing global study designed to monitor the in vitro activities of tigecycline and a panel of marketed antimicrobials against a range of clinically significant pathogens. In this study, in vitro data are presented for MDR Acinetobacter baumannii, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Klebsiella oxytoca, Enterobacter aerogenes, and Enterobacter cloacae isolates collected from 2004 to 2014. In total, 13% (21,967/170,759) of isolates displayed multidrug resistance globally, with the highest rates recorded among A. baumannii (overall rate, 44% [8,294/18,741], increasing from 23% [309/1,323] in 2004 to 63% [447/712] in 2014). Other multidrug resistance rates ranged from 2.5% for K. oxytoca (203/8,000) to 12% for P. aeruginosa and K. pneumoniae (3,951/32,786 and 3,895/32,888, respectively), and rates among these pathogens remained stable during the study period. Against MDR E. coli, Klebsiella spp., and E. aerogenes, the lowest rates of resistance were to tigecycline (0.2%, 6%, and 12%, respectively), and the lowest MIC90 value against A. baumannii was observed for tigecycline (2 mg/liter; MIC range, ≤0.008 to ≥32 mg/liter). The only significant change in resistance to tigecycline during the study period was for MDR E. coli (P negative organisms presented here, but the rising rates of MDR A. baumannii highlight the need for the continued monitoring of global multidrug resistance. IMPORTANCE Multidrug resistance among bacterial pathogens is an ongoing global problem and renders antimicrobial agents ineffective at treating bacterial infections. In the health care setting, infections caused by multidrug-resistant (MDR) Gram-negative bacteria can cause increased mortality, longer hospital stays, and higher treatments costs. The aim of the Tigecycline Evaluation and

  7. Lipoteichoic acid synthesis inhibition in combination with antibiotics abrogates growth of multidrug-resistant Enterococcus faecium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paganelli, Fernanda L; van de Kamer, Tim; Brouwer, Ellen C; Leavis, Helen L; Woodford, Neil; Bonten, Marc J M; Willems, Rob J L; Hendrickx, Antoni P A

    2017-03-01

    Enterococcus faecium is a multidrug-resistant (MDR) nosocomial pathogen causing significant morbidity in debilitated patients. New antimicrobials are needed to treat antibiotic-resistant E. faecium infections in hospitalised patients. E. faecium incorporates lipoteichoic acid (LTA) (1,3-polyglycerol-phosphate linked to glycolipid) in its cell wall. The small-molecule inhibitor 1771 [2-oxo-2-(5-phenyl-1,3,4-oxadiazol-2-ylamino)ethyl 2-naphtho[2,1-b]furan-1-ylacetate] specifically blocks the activity of Staphylococcus aureus LtaS synthase, which polymerises 1,3-glycerolphosphate into LTA polymers. Here we characterised the effects of the small-molecule inhibitor 1771 on the growth of E. faecium isolates, alone (28 strains) or in combination with the antibiotics vancomycin, daptomycin, ampicillin, gentamicin or linezolid (15 strains), and on biofilm formation (16 strains). Inhibition of LTA synthesis at the surface of the cell by compound 1771 in combination with current antibiotic therapy abrogates enterococcal growth in vitro but does not affect mature E. faecium biofilms. Targeting LTA synthesis may provide new possibilities to treat MDR E. faecium infections.

  8. Multidrug-resistant Vibrio cholerae O1 in Belgaum, south India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Subarna; Parande, M V; Mantur, B G; Bhat, S; Shinde, R; Parande, A M; Meti, Rajanish S; Chandrasekhar, M R; Kholkute, S D; Saini, A; Joshi, M; Gaonkar, A

    2012-11-01

    An outbreak of acute diarrhoea occurred in the Belgundi area (population 3896) of Belgaum Taluka (population 815 581) in Karnataka, South India, in June 2010. An estimated 16.22 % of people were affected and 0.16 % deaths were reported. Vibrio cholerae O1 El Tor was isolated from 18 of the 147 stool samples cultured. Seven out of eight drinking water samples collected from different sources were found to be grossly contaminated with faecal coliforms. All isolates were multidrug resistant, with some showing resistance to quinolones, gentamicin and cephalosporins in addition to co-trimoxazole and tetracycline, the drugs that were being used by the state health authorities for empirical treatment. Two serotypes and at least eight genotypes of V. cholerae were observed among the isolates. Cholera was confirmed as one, if not the only, cause of the outbreak, which, to our belief, is the first report of cholera from this region. It might have occurred due to a 'flare up' in the number of endemic strains triggered by shortage of portable water, onset of monsoon rains and breakdown of sanitation systems, rather than being a de novo outbreak arising out of new exogenous infectious sources. A change in the empirical treatment, coupled with chlorination, improvement in sanitation measures and extensive Information Education Communication activities, resulted in decline of the outbreak and prevention of further deaths.

  9. Phosphate-Containing Polyethylene Glycol Polymers Prevent Lethal Sepsis by Multidrug-Resistant Pathogens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zaborin, Alexander; Defazio, Jennifer; Kade, Matthew; Kaiser, Brooke LD; Belogortseva, Natalia; Camp, David G.; Smith, Richard D.; Adkins, Joshua N.; Kim, Sangman M.; Alverdy, Alexandria; Goldfeld, David; Firestone, Millicent; Collier, Joel; Jabri, Bana; Tirrell, Matthew; Zaborina, Olga; Alverdy, John C.

    2014-02-01

    The gastrointestinal tract is the primary site of colonization for multi-drug resistant healthcare associated pathogens (HAPs) that are the principal source and cause of life-threatening infections in critically ill patients. We previously identified a high molecular weight co-polymer (PEG15-20) with mucoadhesive and cytoprotective actions on the intestinal epithelium. In this report we covalently bonded phosphate (Pi) to PEG15-20 ( termed Pi-PEG15-20) to enhance its cytoprotective activity against microbial virulence activation and invasion based on our previous work showing that Pi is a key environmental cue regulating microbial virulence across pathogens of clinical importance to hospitalized patients. We demonstrated that Pi-PEG15-20 can suppress phosphate-, iron-, and quorum sensing signal- mediated activation of bacterial virulence as well as inhibit intestinal epithelial IL-8 release during lipopolysaccharide (LPS) exposure. Pi-PEG15-20 also prevented mortality in C. elegans and mice exposed to several highly virulent and antibiotic(?)-resistant health care acquired pathogens (HAPs) while preserving the normal microbiota. Intestinal application Pi-PEG 15-20 has the potential to be a useful agent to prevent the pathogenic activation of microbes during critical illness where exposure to HAPs is ubiquitous.

  10. Detection of multidrug resistance Aeromonas hydrophila in farm raised fresh water prawns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Md. Bakhtiar Lijon

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This study was undertaken for isolation, identification and determination of antibiogram profile of Aeromonas hydrophila in farm raised fresh water prawn (Macrobrachium rosenbergii on five commercial ghers. Fresh water prawns (n=25 were collected from five ghers located at Satkhira, Bagerhat and Khulna districts of Bangladesh. Brain (n=25, muscle (n=25 and intestine (n=25 samples were collected aseptically from fresh water prawn and inoculated into alkaline peptone (APW water for enrichment at 37℃ for 8 h. Enriched cultured was streaked into Thiosulfate Citrate Bile Salt Sucrose (TCBS agar to isolate bacteria. Bacteria were identified by cultural, Gram staining, biochemical properties and polymerase chain reaction (PCR assay. The antibiogram profiles of bacteria were investigated against 5 commonly used antibiotics (Gentamicin, Cefalexin, Ampicillin, Azithromycin and Ciprofloxacin by disc diffusion method. Thirteen A. hydrophila isolates were identified and the prevalence of the A. hydrophila in fresh water prawn was 17.33%. All 13 (100% isolates were sensitive to Ciprofloxacin, Gentamicin, Azithromycin and resistant to Ampicillin and Cefalexin. The results of this study indicate that farm raised fresh water prawn harbor multidrug resistant A. hydrophila which might causes public health problem if enter into human food chain.

  11. Bactericidal Efficacy of Allium sativum (garlic Against Multidrug Resistant Vibrio cholerae O1 Epidemic Strains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pramod Kumar

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, emerging trend of antibiotic resistance in Vibrio cholerae associated with cholera epidemics is a matter of serious concern for the management of the disease. Indiscriminate use of antibiotics generally results in selection of antibiotic resistant strains. Introduction of newer antibiotics is a challenging task for the researchers as bacteria soon attain resistance. Therefore, identifying natural compounds of medicinal importance for control of cholera would be the best alternative. Garlic (Allium sativum was recognised for many centuries in early Chinese, Egyptian and Indian civilisations as an herbal or traditional medicine. In present study, garlic was selected for screening of antimicrobial efficacy against V. cholerae. A total of 55 V. cholerae strains isolated from various outbreaks/epidemics were subjected to antimicrobial testing as per CLSI, USA 2010 guidelines. Antimicrobial screening of garlic extract was performed against all the multidrug resistant strains of V. cholerae. The garlic extracts showed antibacterial activity against all the V. cholerae strains tested, irrespective of their origin, multidrug resistance and virulence. Antibacterial efficacy of garlic on V. cholerae was also evident from in vivo study on sealed adult mice model. Thus, the Garlic extract harnesses the potential to control infection of multidrug resistant V. cholerae, especially in outbreak like situations in remote and under developed areas where drug supply itself is a challenge

  12. ICU下呼吸道多重耐药菌感染的病原菌及易感因素分析%Analysis of the distribution of pathogens and predisposing factors for lower respiratory tract infections caused by multidrug resistant bacteria in intensive care unit

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李惠; 孙昀; 曹利军; 尹路; 鹿中华; 华天凤; 郑瑶

    2012-01-01

    Objective To investigate the pathogens and predisposing factors of patients in ICU, who were infected by multidrug resistance bacterias ( MDRB ) in lower respiratory tract. Methods Retrospective survey of 78 cases infected in lower respiratory tract from January 2011 to March 2012 was performed, and the distribution and predisposing factors of MDRB were analyzed. Results A total of 98 pathogens were detected, 77 strains were multidrug resistant bacterial, the top three isolated pathogenic bacteria were acinetobacter bauman-nii/haemol ( 41. 56% ), Klebsiella pneumoniae ( 22. 08% ) and pseudomonas aeruginosa ( 15. 08% ). Multi - factor logistic analysis revealed that the length of stay in ICU, more than 48 hours of mechanical ventilation, multiple injuries and sedatives were independent predisposing factors for multidrug resistant bacterial infection( P 48 h、多发伤、镇静药物使用为多重耐药菌感染的独立易感因素(P<0.05).结论 ICU 中下呼吸道多重耐药菌感染的病原菌以革兰阴性菌占优势,ICU住院时间、有创机械通气>48 h、多发伤、镇静药应用与患者多重耐药菌感染关系密切.

  13. Surveillance of multidrug resistance-associated genes in Acinetobacter baumannii isolates from elderly patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhe DONG

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective To understand the status of multidrug resistance-associated genes carried by Acinetobacter baumannii isolates from elderly patients in our hospital in order to provide a basis for surveillance of drug-resistance and inflection control. Methods One hundred and twenty A. baumannii isolates were collected from elderly patients between 2008 and 2010. The mean age of the patients was 85 (65 to 95 years. Whonet 5.6 software was used to analyze the resistance rate of 16 antimicrobial agents. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR and the sequencing method were adopted to detect 10 kinds of resistance genes (blaOXA-51-like, blaOXA- 23-like, blaOXA-24-like, blaOXA-58-like, blaTEM, blaampC, armA, ISAba1, intI 1, and intI 2. The corresponding resistance gene profiling(RGP was analyzed and designated according to the status of resistance genes. Results The resistance rates to the remaining 15 kinds of antibiotics varied between 70.8% and 97.5%, with the exception of the sensitivity rate to polymyxin B by up to more than 90%. The positivity rates of blaOXA-51-like, blaOXA-23-like, blaOXA-58-like, blaTEM, blaampC, armA, ISAba1 and intI 1 were 100%, 81.7%, 0.8%, 10.8%, 91.7%, 81.7%, 86.7%, and 83.3% respectively. A total of 18 kinds of drug-resistant gene maps were found, but blaOXA-24-like and intI 2 were not detected. Among these gene maps, the rate of RGP1 (blaOXA-23-like+blaampC+armA+ISAba1+ intI 1 was as high as 60.8%. Conclusions A. baumannii isolates from elderly patients have a higher carrying rate of drug-resistant genes, resulting in severe multidrugresistant conditions. Therefore, full-time infection control personnel and clinical physicians should actively participate in the surveillance, prevention, and control of infections caused by A. baumannii in the elderly.

  14. Critical shortage of new antibiotics in development against multidrug-resistant bacteria-Time to react is now.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freire-Moran, Laura; Aronsson, Bo; Manz, Chris; Gyssens, Inge C; So, Anthony D; Monnet, Dominique L; Cars, Otto

    2011-04-01

    Two commercial databases (Pharmaprojects and Adis Insight R&D) were queried for antibacterial agents in clinical development. Particular attention was given to antibacterial agents for systemic administration. For each agent, reviewers were requested to indicate whether its spectrum of activity covered a set of selected multidrug-resistant bacteria, and whether it had a new mechanism of action or a new target. In addition, PubMed was searched for antibacterial agents in development that appeared in review articles. Out of 90 agents that were considered to fulfil the inclusion criteria for the analysis, 66 were new active substances. Fifteen of these could be systemically administered and were assessed as acting via a new or possibly new mechanism of action or on a new or possibly new target. Out of these, 12 agents were assessed as having documented in vitro activity against antibiotic-resistant Gram-positive bacteria and only four had documented in vitro activity against antibiotic-resistant Gram-negative bacteria. Of these four, two acted on new or possibly new targets and, crucially, none acted via new mechanisms of action. There is an urgent need to address the lack of effective treatments to meet the increasing public health burden caused by multidrug-resistant bacteria, in particular against Gram-negative bacteria.

  15. Intraventricular ciprofloxacin usage in treatment of multidrug-resistant central nervous system infections: report of four cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayse Karaaslan

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, multidrug-resistant microorganisms appear as important nosocomial pathogens which treatment is quite difficult. As sufficient drug levels could not be achieved in cerebrospinal fluid during intravenous antibiotic therapy for central nervous system infections and due to multidrug-resistance treatment alternatives are limited. In this study, four cases of central nervous system infections due to multidrug-resistant microorganisms who were successfully treated with removal of the devices and intraventricular ciprofloxacin are presented. In conclusion, intraventricular ciprofloxacin can be used for treatment of central nervous system infections if the causative microorganism is sensitive to the drug and no other alternative therapy is available.

  16. Temporal fluctuation of multidrug resistant salmonella typhi haplotypes in the mekong river delta region of Vietnam.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathryn E Holt

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: typhoid fever remains a public health problem in Vietnam, with a significant burden in the Mekong River delta region. Typhoid fever is caused by the bacterial pathogen Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi (S. Typhi, which is frequently multidrug resistant with reduced susceptibility to fluoroquinolone-based drugs, the first choice for the treatment of typhoid fever. We used a GoldenGate (Illumina assay to type 1,500 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs and analyse the genetic variation of S. Typhi isolated from 267 typhoid fever patients in the Mekong delta region participating in a randomized trial conducted between 2004 and 2005. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: the population of S. Typhi circulating during the study was highly clonal, with 91% of isolates belonging to a single clonal complex of the S. Typhi H58 haplogroup. The patterns of disease were consistent with the presence of an endemic haplotype H58-C and a localised outbreak of S. Typhi haplotype H58-E2 in 2004. H58-E2-associated typhoid fever cases exhibited evidence of significant geo-spatial clustering along the Sông H u branch of the Mekong River. Multidrug resistance was common in the established clone H58-C but not in the outbreak clone H58-E2, however all H58 S. Typhi were nalidixic acid resistant and carried a Ser83Phe amino acid substitution in the gyrA gene. SIGNIFICANCE: the H58 haplogroup dominates S. Typhi populations in other endemic areas, but the population described here was more homogeneous than previously examined populations, and the dominant clonal complex (H58-C, -E1, -E2 observed in this study has not been detected outside Vietnam. IncHI1 plasmid-bearing S. Typhi H58-C was endemic during the study period whilst H58-E2, which rarely carried the plasmid, was only transient, suggesting a selective advantage for the plasmid. These data add insight into the outbreak dynamics and local molecular epidemiology of S. Typhi in southern Vietnam.

  17. Multidrug-Resistant Bacteria Isolated from Surface Water in Bassaseachic Falls National Park, Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delgado-Gardea, Ma. Carmen E.; Tamez-Guerra, Patricia; Gomez-Flores, Ricardo; Zavala-Díaz de la Serna, Francisco Javier; Eroza-de la Vega, Gilberto; Nevárez-Moorillón, Guadalupe Virginia; Pérez-Recoder, María Concepción; Sánchez-Ramírez, Blanca; González-Horta, María del Carmen; Infante-Ramírez, Rocío

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial pathogens are a leading cause of waterborne disease, and may result in gastrointestinal outbreaks worldwide. Inhabitants of the Bassaseachic Falls National Park in Chihuahua, Mexico show seasonal gastroenteritis problems. This aim of this study was to detect enteropathogenic microorganisms responsible for diarrheal outbreaks in this area. In 2013, 49 surface water samples from 13 selected sampling sites along the Basaseachi waterfall and its main rivers, were collected during the spring, summer, autumn, and winter seasons. Fecal and total coliform counts were determined using standard methods; the AutoScan-4 system was used for identification of isolates and the antibiotic resistance profile by challenging each organism using 21 antibiotics. Significant differences among seasons were detected, where autumn samples resulted in the highest total (p < 0.05) and fecal (p < 0.001) coliform counts, whereas the lowest total coliform counts were recorded in spring. Significant differences between sampling sites were observed, where samples from sites 6, 8, and 11 had the highest total coliform counts (p < 0.009), whereas samples from site 9 exhibited the lowest one. From the microbiological analysis, 33 bacterial isolates from 13 different sites and four sampling seasons were selected; 53% of isolates were resistant to at least one antibiotic, and 15% exhibited a multidrug resistance (MDB) phenotype. MDB were identified as Klebsiella oxytoca (two out of four identified isolates), Escherichia coli (2/7), and Enterobacter cloacae (1/3). In addition, some water-borne microorganisms exhibited resistance to cefazoline, cefuroxime, ampicillin, and ampicillin-sulbactam. The presence of these microorganisms near rural settlements suggests that wastewater is the contamination source, providing one possible transmission mechanism for diarrheal outbreaks. PMID:27322297

  18. Multidrug-Resistant Bacteria Isolated from Surface Water in Bassaseachic Falls National Park, Mexico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ma. Carmen E. Delgado-Gardea

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Bacterial pathogens are a leading cause of waterborne disease, and may result in gastrointestinal outbreaks worldwide. Inhabitants of the Bassaseachic Falls National Park in Chihuahua, Mexico show seasonal gastroenteritis problems. This aim of this study was to detect enteropathogenic microorganisms responsible for diarrheal outbreaks in this area. In 2013, 49 surface water samples from 13 selected sampling sites along the Basaseachi waterfall and its main rivers, were collected during the spring, summer, autumn, and winter seasons. Fecal and total coliform counts were determined using standard methods; the AutoScan-4 system was used for identification of isolates and the antibiotic resistance profile by challenging each organism using 21 antibiotics. Significant differences among seasons were detected, where autumn samples resulted in the highest total (p < 0.05 and fecal (p < 0.001 coliform counts, whereas the lowest total coliform counts were recorded in spring. Significant differences between sampling sites were observed, where samples from sites 6, 8, and 11 had the highest total coliform counts (p < 0.009, whereas samples from site 9 exhibited the lowest one. From the microbiological analysis, 33 bacterial isolates from 13 different sites and four sampling seasons were selected; 53% of isolates were resistant to at least one antibiotic, and 15% exhibited a multidrug resistance (MDB phenotype. MDB were identified as Klebsiella oxytoca (two out of four identified isolates, Escherichia coli (2/7, and Enterobacter cloacae (1/3. In addition, some water-borne microorganisms exhibited resistance to cefazoline, cefuroxime, ampicillin, and ampicillin-sulbactam. The presence of these microorganisms near rural settlements suggests that wastewater is the contamination source, providing one possible transmission mechanism for diarrheal outbreaks.

  19. Transmission of extensively drug-resistant and multidrug resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis in families identified by genotyping

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YAN Li-ping; QIN Lian-hua; ZHANG Qing; SUN Hua; HAN Min; XIAO He-ping

    2013-01-01

    Background Diagnosis and appropriate treatment of multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB) remain major challenges.We sought to elucidate that persons who share a household with drug resistance tuberculosis patients are at high risk for primary drug resistance tuberculosis and how to prevent these outbreaks.Methods We used 12-locus mycobacterial interspersed repetitive unit and 7-locus variable-number tandem repeat to identify household transmission of extensively drug resistant and multiple drug resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis in three families admitted in Shanghai Pulmonary Hospital affiliated with Tongji University.Drug susceptibility tests were done by the modified proportion method in the MGIT 960 system in the same time.Clinical data were also obtained from the subjects' medical records.Results All of the six strains were defined as Beijing genotype by the deletion-targeted multiplex PCR (DTM-PCR) identification on the genomic deletion RD105.Strains from family-1 had the same minisatellite interspersed repetitive unit (MIRU) pattem (232225172531) and the same MIRU pattern (3677235).Strains from family-2 had the same MIRU pattern (2212261553323) and the same MIRU pattern (3685134).Strains from family-3 did not have the same MIRU pattern and they differed at only one locus (223326173533,223325173533),and did not have the same VNTR pattern with two locus differed (3667233,3677234).Conclusions Household transmission exists in the three families.A clear chain of tuberculosis transmission within family exists.Tuberculosis susceptibility should be considered when there is more than one tuberculosis patients in a family.Household tuberculosis transmission could be prevented with adequate treatment of source patients.

  20. A high-resolution genomic analysis of multidrug-resistant hospital outbreaks of Klebsiella pneumoniae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung The, Hao; Karkey, Abhilasha; Pham Thanh, Duy; Boinett, Christine J; Cain, Amy K; Ellington, Matthew; Baker, Kate S; Dongol, Sabina; Thompson, Corinne; Harris, Simon R; Jombart, Thibaut; Le Thi Phuong, Tu; Tran Do Hoang, Nhu; Ha Thanh, Tuyen; Shretha, Shrijana; Joshi, Suchita; Basnyat, Buddha; Thwaites, Guy; Thomson, Nicholas R; Rabaa, Maia A; Baker, Stephen

    2015-03-01

    Multidrug-resistant (MDR) Klebsiella pneumoniae has become a leading cause of nosocomial infections worldwide. Despite its prominence, little is known about the genetic diversity of K. pneumoniae in resource-poor hospital settings. Through whole-genome sequencing (WGS), we reconstructed an outbreak of MDR K. pneumoniae occurring on high-dependency wards in a hospital in Kathmandu during 2012 with a case-fatality rate of 75%. The WGS analysis permitted the identification of two MDR K. pneumoniae lineages causing distinct outbreaks within the complex endemic K. pneumoniae. Using phylogenetic reconstruction and lineage-specific PCR, our data predicted a scenario in which K. pneumoniae, circulating for 6 months before the outbreak, underwent a series of ward-specific clonal expansions after the acquisition of genes facilitating virulence and MDR. We suggest that the early detection of a specific NDM-1 containing lineage in 2011 would have alerted the high-dependency ward staff to intervene. We argue that some form of real-time genetic characterisation, alongside clade-specific PCR during an outbreak, should be factored into future healthcare infection control practices in both high- and low-income settings.

  1. Coarse-grained Simulations of Conformational Changes in Multidrug Resistance Transporters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jewel, S. M. Yead; Dutta, Prashanta; Liu, Jin

    2016-11-01

    The overexpression of multidrug resistance (MDR) systems on the gram negative bacteria causes serious problems for treatment of bacterial infectious diseases. The system effectively pumps the antibiotic drugs out of the bacterial cells. During the pumping process one of the MDR components, AcrB undergoes a series of large-scale conformational changes which are responsible for drug recognition, binding and expelling. All-atom simulations are unable to capture those conformational changes because of computational cost. Here, we implement a hybrid coarse-grained force field that couples the united-atom protein models with the coarse-grained MARTINI water/lipid, to investigate the proton-dependent conformational changes of AcrB. The simulation results in early stage ( 100 ns) of proton-dependent conformational changes agree with all-atom simulations, validating the coarse-grained model. The coarse-grained force field allows us to explore the process in microsecond simulations. Starting from the crystal structures of Access(A)/Binding(B)/Extrusion(E) monomers in AcrB, we find that deprotonation of Asp407 and Asp408 in monomer E causes a series of large-scale conformational changes from ABE to AAA in absence of drug molecules, which is consistent with experimental findings. This work is supported by NIH Grant: 1R01GM122081-01.

  2. Survival and evolution of a large multidrug resistance plasmid in new clinical bacterial hosts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Porse, Andreas; Schønning, Kristian; Munck, Christian;

    2016-01-01

    Large conjugative plasmids are important drivers of bacterial evolution and contribute significantly to the dissemination of antibiotic resistance. Although plasmid borne multidrug resistance is recognized as one of the main challenges in modern medicine, the adaptive forces shaping the evolution...... sequencing to show that the long-term persistence and molecular integrity of the plasmid is highly influenced by multiple factors within a 25 kb plasmid region constituting a host-dependent burden. In the E. coli hosts investigated here, improved plasmid stability readily evolves via IS26 mediated deletions...... consistently followed by all evolved E. coli lineages exposes a trade-off between horizontal and vertical transmission that may ultimately limit the dissemination potential of clinical multidrug resistance plasmids in these hosts....

  3. Antibiotic Synergy Interaction against Multidrug-Resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa Isolated from an Abattoir Effluent Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Etinosa O. Igbinosa

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an opportunistic pathogen in environmental waters with a high prevalence of multidrug resistance. In this study the synergistic efficacy of synergy antibiotic combinations in multidrug-resistant P. aeruginosa strains isolated from an abattoir effluent was investigated. Water samples were processed using membrane filtration; Pseudomonas was isolated with Pseudomonas Isolation Agar and confirmed using polymerase chain reaction with specie-specific primer. Susceptibility studies and in vitro synergy interaction testing were carried out, employing agar dilution and Etest procedure, respectively. Resistance was noted for clinically relevant antipseudomonal agents tested. Finding from antibiotic synergy interaction studies revealed that cefepime, imipenem, and meropenem combined with amikacin resulted in statistically significant (P<0.0001 in vitro antibiotics synergy interaction, indicating the possible use of this regimen in treatment of pseudomonal infections.

  4. Many chromosomal genes modulate MarA-mediated multidrug resistance in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz, Cristian; Levy, Stuart B

    2010-05-01

    Multidrug resistance (MDR) in clinical isolates of Escherichia coli can be associated with overexpression of marA, a transcription factor that upregulates multidrug efflux and downregulates membrane permeability. Using random transposome mutagenesis, we found that many chromosomal genes and environmental stimuli affected MarA-mediated antibiotic resistance. Seven genes affected resistance mediated by MarA in an antibiotic-specific way; these were mostly genes encoding unrelated enzymes, transporters, and unknown proteins. Other genes affected MarA-mediated resistance to all antibiotics tested. These genes were acrA, acrB, and tolC (which encode the major MarA-regulated multidrug efflux pump AcrAB-TolC), crp, cyaA, hns, and pcnB (four genes involved in global regulation of gene expression), and the unknown gene damX. The last five genes affected MarA-mediated MDR by altering marA expression or MarA function specifically on acrA. These findings demonstrate that MarA-mediated MDR is regulated at multiple levels by different genes and stimuli, which makes it both complex and fine-tuned and interconnects it with global cell regulation and metabolism. Such a regulation could contribute to the adaptation and spread of MDR strains and may be targeted to treat antibiotic-resistant E. coli and related pathogens.

  5. Overcoming of multidrug resistance by introducing the apoptosis gene, bcl-Xs, into MRP-overexpressing drug resistant cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohi, Y; Kim, R; Toge, T

    2000-05-01

    Multidrug resistance associated protein (MRP) is one of drug transport membranes that confer multidrug resistance in cancer cells. Multidrug resistance has been known to be associated with resistance to apoptosis. In this study, using MRP overexpressing multidrug resistant nasopharyngeal cancer cells, we examined the expression of apoptosis related genes including p53, p21WAF1, bax and bcl-Xs between drug sensitive KB and its resistant KB/7D cells. We also examined whether the introduction of apoptosis related gene could increase the sensitivity to anticancer drugs in association with apoptotic cell death. The relative resistances to anticancer drugs in KB/7D cells evaluated by IC50 values were 3.6, 61.3, 10.4 and 10.5 to adriamycin (ADM), etoposide (VP-16), vincristine (VCR) and vindesine (VDS), respectively. The resistance to anticancer drugs in KB/7D cells was associated with the attenuation of internucleosomal DNA ladder formation in apoptosis. Of important, the mRNA expression of bcl-Xs gene in KB/7D cells was decreased in one-fourth as compared to that of KB cells among the apoptosis genes. The mRNA expression of bcl-Xs gene in a bcl-Xs transfected clone (KB/7Dbcl-Xs) was increased about 2-fold compared to that of KB/7Dneo cells, while the mRNA expression of MRP gene was not significantly different in KB/7bcl-Xs and KB/7Dneo cells. The sensitivities to anticancer drugs including ADM, VCR and VDS except VP-16 were increased in KB/7Dbcl-Xs cells, in turn, the relative resistance in KB/7Dbcl-Xs cells was decreased to 1.4, 4.0, and 3.0 in ADM, VCR and VDS, respectively, as compared to those of KB/7Dneo cells. Of interest, the studies on the accumulation of [3H]VCR showed that the decrease of [3H]VCR accumulation in KB/7Dbcl-Xs was not significantly different from that of KB/7Dneo cells. Collectively, these results indicated that the mechanism(s) of drug resistance in KB/7D cells could be explained at least by two factors: a) reduced drug accumulation mediated by

  6. Prevalence of plasmid-mediated multidrug resistance determinants in fluoroquinolone-resistant bacteria isolated from sewage and surface water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osińska, Adriana; Harnisz, Monika; Korzeniewska, Ewa

    2016-06-01

    Fluoroquinolones (FQs) are fully synthetic broad-spectrum antibacterial agents that are becoming increasingly popular in the treatment of clinical and veterinary infections. Being excreted during treatment, mostly as active compounds, their biological action is not limited to the therapeutic site, but it is moved further as resistance selection pressure into the environment. Water environment is an ideal medium for the aggregation and dissemination of antibiotics, antibiotic-resistant bacteria (ARB), and antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs), which can pose a serious threat to human health. Because of this, the aim of this study was to determine the number of fluoroquinolone-resistant bacteria (FQRB) and their share in total heterotrophic plate counts (HPC) in treated wastewater (TWW), and upstream and downstream river water (URW, DRW) samples where TWW is discharged. The spread of plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance (PMQR) determinants and the presence/absence of resistance genes to other most popular antibiotic groups (against tetracyclines and beta-lactams) in selected 116 multiresistant isolates were investigated. The share of FQRB in total HPC in all samples was rather small and ranged from 0.7 % in URW samples to 7.5 % in TWW. Bacteria from Escherichia (25.0 %), Acinetobacter (25.0 %), and Aeromonas (6.9 %) genera were predominant in the FQRB group. Fluoroquinolone resistance was mostly caused by the presence of the gene aac(6')-1b-cr (91.4 %). More rarely reported was the occurrence of qnrS, qnrD, as well as oqxA, but qnrA, qnrB, qepA, and oqxB were extremely rarely or never noted in FQRB. The most prevalent bacterial genes connected with beta-lactams' resistance in FQRB were bla TEM, bla OXA, and bla CTX-M. The bla SHV was less common in the community of FQRB. The occurrence of bla genes was reported in almost 29.3 % of FQRB. The most abundant tet genes in FQRB were tet(A), tet(L), tet(K), and tet(S). The prevalence of tet genes was observed in 41.4

  7. In-vitro activity of polymyxin B in combination with imipenem, rifampicin and azithromycin versus multidrug resistant strains of Acinetobacter baumannii producing OXA-23 carbapenemases

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    Bean David C

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Acinetobacter baumannii has emerged as a major nosocomial pathogen worldwide. Many of the circulating strains exhibit multi-drug resistance remaining consistently susceptible only to polymyxins. In-vitro studies have reported that polymyxins combined with carbapenems, rifampicin or azithromycin are synergistic against these strains despite in-vitro resistance to these agents alone. The use of antimicrobial combinations have therefore been advocated for the treatment of severe A. baumannii infection in man. In order to determine whether such combinations are synergistic against the prevalent clones of multi-drug resistant A. baumannii causing infection in the UK, we performed synergy testing against representative isolates using two rapid Etest methods. Methods The activity of polymyxin in combination with imipenem, azithromycin or rifampicin was assessed against five strains of multi-drug resistant A. baumannii encoding OXA-23 carbapenemases. Synergy studies were performed by Etest-agar dilution and a combined Etest strip method. Synergy was defined as a FICI of ≤ 0.5. Results All strains were resistant to β-lactams, carbapenems, quinolones and aminoglycosides but susceptible to polymyxins. Marked synergy was not seen with polymyxin in combination with imipenem, rifampicin or azithromycin against any of the strains. Borderline synergy (FICI = 0.5 was seen against one strain belonging to OXA-23 clonal group 2, using the Etest-agar dilution method only. Conclusion In-vitro synergy with polymxyin in combination with imipenem, rifampicin or azithromycin is highly strain and method dependent. As reliable synergy could not be demonstrated against the prevalent UK multi-drug resistant strains, use of such combinations should not be used for empirical treatment of these infections in the UK. The optimal treatment for serious multi-drug A. baumannii infection and the role of combination therapy should be addressed in a prospective

  8. Characteristics of multidrug-resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis in southern Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perizzolo, Paulo F; Dalla Costa, Elis R; Ribeiro, Andrezza W; Spies, Fernanda S; Ribeiro, Marta O; Dias, Cláudia F; Unis, Gisela; Almeida da Silva, Pedro; Gomes, Harrison M; Suffys, Philip N; Rossetti, Maria Lucia R

    2012-01-01

    A major threat to tuberculosis (TB) control programs is the emergence of drug resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis strains that cause TB that cannot be cured by standard anti-TB drug regimens. Because few data exist on MDR-TB in this region of the country, we performed an epidemiologic study that combined conventional and molecular analysis of MDR-TB cases from Rio Grande do Sul (RS) that were diagnosed in this period and included cases that were under treatment with second line drug schemes. Included were 121 MDR cases and sequencing of rpoB and katG showed that 106 (87.6%) strains were mutated in rpoB and 97 (80.2%) in katG. Spoligotyping demonstrated that the LAM genotype was predominant (n = 70, 57.8%) and included the largest group composed by 22 (18.1%) strains with the LAM5 ST93 genotype. Other main genotypes belonged to the families T (n = 22, 18.2%), U family (n = 16, 13.2%), Haarlem (n = 5, 4.1%) and X (n = 1, 0.8%). Genotyping by IS6110-RFLP analysis showed 51 distinct fingerprints, 38 (31.4%) of these observed only once and the other 13 patterns being shared among the rest of the isolates (n = 83, 68.6%). Among the 22 strains that were LAM5 ST93, only two had different IS6110-RFLP genotypes. In conclusion, there exists a high degree of M. Tuberculosis genotype clustering among MDR-TB cases in Rio Grande do Sul. Moreover, we observed a large MDR-TB outbreak.

  9. Transcriptional and proteomic analyses of two-component response regulators in multidrug-resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Lei; Yang, Liu; Zeng, Xianfei; Danzheng, Jiacuo; Zheng, Qing; Liu, Jiayun; Liu, Feng; Xin, Yijuan; Cheng, Xiaodong; Su, Mingquan; Ma, Yueyun; Hao, Xiaoke

    2015-07-01

    Two-component systems (TCSs) have been reported to exhibit a sensing and responding role under drug stress that induces drug resistance in several bacterial species. However, the relationship between TCSs and multidrug resistance in Mycobacterium tuberculosis has not been comprehensively analysed to date. In this study, 90 M. tuberculosis clinical isolates were analysed using 15-loci mycobacterial interspersed repetitive unit (MIRU)-variable number tandem repeat (VNTR) typing and repetitive extragenic palindromic (rep)-PCR-based DNA fingerprinting. The results showed that all of the isolates were of the Beijing lineage, and strains with a drug-susceptible phenotype had not diverged into similar genotype clusters. Expression analysis of 13 response regulators of TCSs using real-time PCR and tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) proteomic analysis demonstrated that four response regulator genes (devR, mtrA, regX3 and Rv3143) were significantly upregulated in multidrug-resistant (MDR) strains compared with the laboratory strain H37Rv as well as drug-susceptible and isoniazid-monoresistant strains (PMycobacterium bovis BCG did not alter its sensitivity to the four antitubercular drugs. This suggests that upregulation of devR, which is common in MDR-TB strains, might be induced by drug stress and hypoxic adaptation following the acquisition of multidrug resistance.

  10. The cmbT gene encodes a novel major facilitator multidrug resistance transporter in Lactococcus lactis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filipic, Brankica; Golic, Natasa; Jovcic, Branko; Tolinacki, Maja; Bay, Denice C; Turner, Raymond J; Antic-Stankovic, Jelena; Kojic, Milan; Topisirovic, Ljubisa

    2013-01-01

    Functional characterization of the multidrug resistance CmbT transporter was performed in Lactococcus lactis. The cmbT gene is predicted to encode an efflux protein homologous to the multidrug resistance major facilitator superfamily. The cmbT gene (1377 bp) was cloned and overexpressed in L. lactis NZ9000. Results from cell growth studies revealed that the CmbT protein has an effect on host cell resistance to lincomycin, cholate, sulbactam, ethidium bromide, Hoechst 33342, sulfadiazine, streptomycin, rifampicin, puromycin and sulfametoxazole. Moreover, in vivo transport assays showed that overexpressed CmbT-mediated extrusion of ethidium bromide and Hoechst 33342 was higher than in the control L. lactis NZ9000 strain. CmbT-mediated extrusion of Hoechst 33342 was inhibited by the ionophores nigericin and valinomycin known to dissipate proton motive force. This indicates that CmbT-mediated extrusion is based on a drug-proton antiport mechanism. Taking together results obtained in this study, it can be concluded that CmbT is a novel major facilitator multidrug resistance transporter candidate in L. lactis, with a possible signaling role in sulfur metabolism.

  11. Silver Nanocomposite Biosynthesis: Antibacterial Activity against Multidrug-Resistant Strains of Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Acinetobacter baumannii

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    Klebson Silva Santos

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Bacterial resistance is an emerging public health issue that is disseminated worldwide. Silver nanocomposite can be an alternative strategy to avoid Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria growth, including multidrug-resistant strains. In the present study a silver nanocomposite was synthesized, using a new green chemistry process, by the addition of silver nitrate (1.10−3 mol·L−1 into a fermentative medium of Xanthomonas spp. to produce a xanthan gum polymer. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM was used to evaluate the shape and size of the silver nanoparticles obtained. The silver ions in the nanocomposite were quantified by flame atomic absorption spectrometry (FAAS. The antibacterial activity of the nanomaterial against Escherichia coli (ATCC 22652, Enterococcus faecalis (ATCC 29282, Pseudomonas aeruginosa (ATCC 27853 and Staphylococcus aureus (ATCC 25923 was carried out using 500 mg of silver nanocomposite. Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Acinetobacter baumannii multidrug-resistant strains, isolated from hospitalized patients were also included in the study. The biosynthesized silver nanocomposite showed spherical nanoparticles with sizes smaller than 10 nm; 1 g of nanocomposite contained 49.24 µg of silver. Multidrug-resistant strains of Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Acinetobacter baumannii, and the other Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria tested, were sensitive to the silver nanocomposite (10–12.9 mm of inhibition zone. The biosynthesized silver nanocomposite seems to be a promising antibacterial agent for different applications, namely biomedical devices or topical wound coatings.

  12. Characterization of putative multidrug resistance transporters of the major facilitator-superfamily expressed in Salmonella Typhi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaheen, Aqsa; Ismat, Fouzia; Iqbal, Mazhar; Haque, Abdul; De Zorzi, Rita; Mirza, Osman; Walz, Thomas; Rahman, Moazur

    2015-05-01

    Multidrug resistance mediated by efflux pumps is a well-known phenomenon in infectious bacteria. Although much work has been carried out to characterize multidrug efflux pumps in Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria, such information is still lacking for many deadly pathogens. The aim of this study was to gain insight into the substrate specificity of previously uncharacterized transporters of Salmonella Typhi to identify their role in the development of multidrug resistance. S. Typhi genes encoding putative members of the major facilitator superfamily were cloned and expressed in the drug-hypersensitive Escherichia coli strain KAM42, and tested for transport of 25 antibacterial compounds, including representative antibiotics of various classes, antiseptics, dyes and detergents. Of the 15 tested putative transporters, STY0901, STY2458 and STY4874 exhibited a drug-resistance phenotype. Among these, STY4874 conferred resistance to at least ten of the tested antimicrobials: ciprofloxacin, norfloxacin, levofloxacin, kanamycin, streptomycin, gentamycin, nalidixic acid, chloramphenicol, ethidium bromide, and acriflavine, including fluoroquinolone antibiotics, which were drugs of choice to treat S. Typhi infections. Cell-based functional studies using ethidium bromide and acriflavine showed that STY4874 functions as a H(+)-dependent exporter. These results suggest that STY4874 may be an important drug target, which can now be tested by studying the susceptibility of a STY4874-deficient S. Typhi strain to antimicrobials.

  13. Biofilm formation in clinical isolates of nosocomial Acinetobacter baumannii and its relationship with multidrug resistance

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ebrahim Babapour; Azam Haddadi; Reza Mirnejad; Seyed-Abdolhamid Angaji; Nour Amirmozafari

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To check biofilm formation by Acinetobacter baumannii(A. baumannii)clinical isolates and show their susceptibility to different antibiotics and investigate a possible link between establishment of biofilm and multidrug resistance.Methods: This study was performed on clinical samples collected from patients with nosocomial infections in three hospitals of Tehran. Samples were initially screened by culture and biochemical tests for the presence of different species of Acinetobacter. Identifications were further confirmed by PCR assays. Their susceptibilities to 11 antibiotics of different classes were determined by disc diffusion method according to Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute guidelines. The ability to produce biofilm was investigated using methods: culture on Congo red agar, microtiter plate, and test tube method.Results: From the overall clinical samples, 156 specimens were confirmed to contain A. baumannii. The bacteria were highly resistant to most antibiotics except polymyxin B.Of these isolates, 10.26% were able to produce biofilms as shown on Congo red agar.However, the percentage of bacteria with positive biofilm in test tube, standard microtiter plate, and modified microtiter plate assays were 48.72%, 66.66%, and 73.72%, respectively. At least 92% of the biofilm forming isolates were multidrug resistant.Conclusions: Since most of the multidrug resistant strains produce biofilm, it seems necessary to provide continuous monitoring and determination of antibiotic susceptibility of clinical A. baumannii. This would help to select the most appropriate antibiotic for treatment.

  14. Biofilm formation in clinical isolates of nosocomial Acinetobacter baumannii and its relationship with multidrug resistance

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ebrahim Babapour; Azam Haddadi; Reza Mirnejad; Seyed-Abdolhamid Angaji; Nour Amirmozafari

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To check biofilm formation by Acinetobacter baumannii (A. baumannii) clinical isolates and show their susceptibility to different antibiotics and investigate a possible link between establishment of biofilm and multidrug resistance. Methods: This study was performed on clinical samples collected from patients with nosocomial infections in three hospitals of Tehran. Samples were initially screened by culture and biochemical tests for the presence of different species of Acinetobacter. Iden-tifications were further confirmed by PCR assays. Their susceptibilities to 11 antibiotics of different classes were determined by disc diffusion method according to Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute guidelines. The ability to produce biofilm was investigated using methods:culture on Congo red agar, microtiter plate, and test tube method. Results: From the overall clinical samples, 156 specimens were confirmed to contain A. baumannii. The bacteria were highly resistant to most antibiotics except polymyxin B. Of these isolates, 10.26% were able to produce biofilms as shown on Congo red agar. However, the percentage of bacteria with positive biofilm in test tube, standard microtiter plate, and modified microtiter plate assays were 48.72%, 66.66%, and 73.72%, respec-tively. At least 92%of the biofilm forming isolates were multidrug resistant. Conclusions: Since most of the multidrug resistant strains produce biofilm, it seems necessary to provide continuous monitoring and determination of antibiotic susceptibility of clinical A. baumannii. This would help to select the most appropriate antibiotic for treatment.

  15. Multidrug and extensively drug-resistant TB (M/XDR-TB): problems and solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasad, Rajendra

    2010-10-01

    Multi Drug Resistant Tuberculosis (MDR-TB) and Extensively Drug Resistant Tuberculosis (XDR-TB) are posing a threat to the control of tuberculosis. The first WHO-IUATLD antituberculosis drug resistance surveillance carried out in 1994 in 35 countries reported the median prevalence of primary and acquired multi drug resistance as 1.4% and 13% respectively. Subsequently, second, third and fourth WHO-IUATLD global drug resistance surveillances were carried out in 1996-99, 1999-2002 and 2002-2007 respectively. Based on drug resistance information from 114 countries, the proportion of MDR-TB among all cases was estimated for countries with no survey information. It was estimated that 4,89,139 cases of MDR-TB emerged in 2006. China and India carry approximately 50% of the global burden. 35 countries and two Special Administrative Regions (SARs) reported data on XDR-TB for the first time in 2006. Multidrug and extensively drug-resistant TB 2010 Global report on Surveillance and response estimated that 4,40,000 cases of MDR-TB emerged globally in 2008 and caused an estimated 1,50,000 deaths. 5.4% of MDR-TB cases were found to have XDR-TB. To date, a cumulative total of 58 countries have confirmed at least one case of XDR-TB. M/XDR-TB is a man-made problem and its emergence can be prevented by prompt diagnosis and effective use of first line drugs in every new patient. The DOTS Plus proposed by WHO highlights the comprehensive management strategy to control MDR-TB. Laboratory services for adequate and timely diagnosis of M/XDR-TB must be strengthened and programmatic management of M/XDR-TB must be scaled up as per target set by global plan. Proper use of second-line drugs must be ensured to cure existing MDR-TB, to reduce its transmission and to prevent XDR-TB. Sound infection control measures to avoid further transmission of M/XDR-TB and research towards development of new diagnostics, drugs and vaccines should be promoted to control M/XDR-TB.

  16. Incidence of multidrug-resistant pseudomonas spp. in ICU patients with special reference to ESBL, AMPC, MBL and biofilm production

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    Richa Gupta

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Multidrug-resistant (MDR Pseudomonas spp. have been reported to be the important cause of ICU infections. The appearance of ESBL, AmpC and MBL genes and their spread among bacterial pathogens is a matter of great concern. Biofilm production also attributes to antimicrobial resistance due to close cell to cell contact that permits bacteria to more effectively transfer plasmids to one another. This study aimed at determining the incidence of ESBL, AmpC, MBL and biofilm producing Pseudomonas spp. in ICU patients. Material and Methods: The clinical specimens were collected aseptically from 150 ICU patients from February 2012 to October 2013. Identification and antimicrobial susceptibility was performed according to Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI guidelines. ESBLs and AmpC were detected phenotypically and genotypically. MBL was detected by modified Hodge and imipenem-EDTA double-disk synergy test. Results: Pseudomonas spp. 35(28% were the most prevalent pathogen in ICU infections. Multidrug resistance and biofilm production was observed in 80.1% and 60.4% isolates, respectively. Prevalence of ESBL, AmpC and MBL was 22.9%, 42.8% and 14.4%, respectively. The average hospital stay was 25 days and was associated with 20% mortality. Conclusions: A regular surveillance is required to detect ESBL, AmpC and MBL producers especially in ICU patients. Carbapenems should be judiciously used to prevent their spread. The effective antibiotics, such as fluoroquinolones and piperacillin-tazobactum should be used after sensitivity testing.

  17. Complex polymorphisms in the Plasmodium falciparum multidrug resistance protein 2 gene and its contribution to antimalarial response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veiga, Maria Isabel; Osório, Nuno S; Ferreira, Pedro Eduardo; Franzén, Oscar; Dahlstrom, Sabina; Lum, J Koji; Nosten, Francois; Gil, José Pedro

    2014-12-01

    Plasmodium falciparum has the capacity to escape the actions of essentially all antimalarial drugs. ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter proteins are known to cause multidrug resistance in a large range of organisms, including the Apicomplexa parasites. P. falciparum genome analysis has revealed two genes coding for the multidrug resistance protein (MRP) type of ABC transporters: Pfmrp1, previously associated with decreased parasite drug susceptibility, and the poorly studied Pfmrp2. The role of Pfmrp2 polymorphisms in modulating sensitivity to antimalarial drugs has not been established. We herein report a comprehensive account of the Pfmrp2 genetic variability in 46 isolates from Thailand. A notably high frequency of 2.8 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs)/kb was identified for this gene, including some novel SNPs. Additionally, we found that Pfmrp2 harbors a significant number of microindels, some previously not reported. We also investigated the potential association of the identified Pfmrp2 polymorphisms with altered in vitro susceptibility to several antimalarials used in artemisinin-based combination therapy and with parasite clearance time. Association analysis suggested Pfmrp2 polymorphisms modulate the parasite's in vitro response to quinoline antimalarials, including chloroquine, piperaquine, and mefloquine, and association with in vivo parasite clearance. In conclusion, our study reveals that the Pfmrp2 gene is the most diverse ABC transporter known in P. falciparum with a potential role in antimalarial drug resistance.

  18. Ecotope-Based Entomological Surveillance and Molecular Xenomonitoring of Multidrug Resistant Malaria Parasites in Anopheles Vectors

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    Prapa Sorosjinda-Nunthawarasilp

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The emergence and spread of multidrug resistant (MDR malaria caused by Plasmodium falciparum or Plasmodium vivax have become increasingly important in the Greater Mekong Subregion (GMS. MDR malaria is the heritable and hypermutable property of human malarial parasite populations that can decrease in vitro and in vivo susceptibility to proven antimalarial drugs as they exhibit dose-dependent drug resistance and delayed parasite clearance time in treated patients. MDR malaria risk situations reflect consequences of the national policy and strategy as this influences the ongoing national-level or subnational-level implementation of malaria control strategies in endemic GMS countries. Based on our experience along with current literature review, the design of ecotope-based entomological surveillance (EES and molecular xenomonitoring of MDR falciparum and vivax malaria parasites in Anopheles vectors is proposed to monitor infection pockets in transmission control areas of forest and forest fringe-related malaria, so as to bridge malaria landscape ecology (ecotope and ecotone and epidemiology. Malaria ecotope and ecotone are confined to a malaria transmission area geographically associated with the infestation of Anopheles vectors and particular environments to which human activities are related. This enables the EES to encompass mosquito collection and identification, salivary gland DNA extraction, Plasmodium- and species-specific identification, molecular marker-based PCR detection methods for putative drug resistance genes, and data management. The EES establishes strong evidence of Anopheles vectors carrying MDR P. vivax in infection pockets epidemiologically linked with other data obtained during which a course of follow-up treatment of the notified P. vivax patients receiving the first-line treatment was conducted. For regional and global perspectives, the EES would augment the epidemiological surveillance and monitoring of MDR falciparum and

  19. Synergistic effect of Thymbra spicata L. extracts with antibiotics against multidrug- resistant Staphylococcus aureus and Klebsiella pneumoniae strains

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    Mohammad F Haroun

    2016-11-01

    Conclusion: These results may indicate that T. spicata extracts potentiates the antimicrobial action of antibiotics, suggesting a possible utilization of this herb in combination therapy against emerging multidrug-resistance S. aureus and K. pneumoniae.

  20. Establishment of a human hepatoma multidrug resistant cell line in vitro

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    AIM:To establish a multidrug-resistant hepatoma cell line(SK-Hep-1),and to investigate its biological characteristics.METHODS:A highly invasive SK-Hep-1 cell line of human hepatocellular carcinoma,also known as malignant hepatoma was incubated with a high concentration of cisplatin(CDDP) to establish a CDDP-resistant cell subline(SK-Hep-1/CDDP).The 50% inhibitory dose(IC50) values and the resistance indexes [(IC50 SK-Hep-1/CDDP)/(IC50 SK-Hep-1)] for other chemotherapeutic agents and the growth curve of cell...

  1. Characterization of an IncA/C Multidrug Resistance Plasmid in Vibrio alginolyticus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Lianwei; Li, Ruichao; Lin, Dachuan; Zhou, Yuanjie; Fu, Aisi; Ding, Qiong; Chan, Edward Wai Chi; Yao, Wen; Chen, Sheng

    2016-05-01

    Cephalosporin-resistant Vibrio alginolyticus was first isolated from food products, with β-lactamases encoded by blaPER-1, blaVEB-1, and blaCMY-2 being the major mechanisms mediating their cephalosporin resistance. The complete sequence of a multidrug resistance plasmid, pVAS3-1, harboring the blaCMY-2 and qnrVC4 genes was decoded in this study. Its backbone exhibited genetic homology to known IncA/C plasmids recoverable from members of the family Enterobacteriaceae, suggesting its possible origin in Enterobacteriaceae.

  2. Clinical Management of an Increasing Threat: Outpatient Urinary Tract Infections Due to Multidrug-Resistant Uropathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Emily; Lyman, Alessandra; Gupta, Kalpana; Mahoney, Monica V; Snyder, Graham M; Hirsch, Elizabeth B

    2016-10-01

    Urinary tract infections (UTIs) are among the most commonly treated bacterial infections. Over the past decade, antimicrobial resistance has become an increasingly common factor in the management of outpatient UTIs. As treatment options for multidrug-resistant (MDR) uropathogens are limited, clinicians need to be aware of specific clinical and epidemiological risk factors for these infections. Based on available literature, the activity of fosfomycin and nitrofurantoin remain high for most cases of MDR Escherichia coli UTIs. Trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole retains clinical efficacy, but resistance rates are increasing internationally. Beta-lactam agents have the highest rates of resistance and lowest rates of clinical success. Fluoroquinolones have high resistance rates among MDR uropathogens and are being strongly discouraged as first-line agents for UTIs. In addition to accounting for local resistance rates, consideration of patient risk factors for resistance and pharmacological principles will help guide optimal empiric treatment of outpatient UTIs.

  3. Antibacterial activities of ethanol extracts of Philippine medicinal plants against multidrug-resistant bacteria

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Demetrio L Valle Jr; Jeannie I Andrade; Juliana Janet M Puzon; Esperanza C Cabrera; Windell L Rivera

    2015-01-01

    Objective:To investigate the antibacterial activities of crude ethanol extracts of 12 Philippine medicinal plants. Methods:Crude ethanol extracts from 12 Philippine medicinal plants were evaluated for their antibacterial activity against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus, extended spectrum β-lactamase-producing, carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae and metallo-β-lactamase-producing Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Acinetobacter baumannii. Results:The leaf extracts of Psidium guajava, Phyllanthus niruri, Ehretia microphylla and Piper betle (P. betle) showed antibacterial activity against the Gram-positive methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus and vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus. P. betle showed the highest antibacterial activity for these bacteria in the disk diffusion (16-33 mm inhibition diameter), minimum inhibitory concentration (19-156 μg/mL) and minimum bactericidal concentration (312μg/mL) assays. P. betle leaf extracts only showed remarkable antibacterial activity for all the Gram-negative multidrug-resistant bacteria (extended spectrumβ-lactamase-producing, carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae and metallo-β-lactamase-producing) in the disk diffusion (17-21 mm inhibition diameter), minimum inhibitory concentration (312-625μg/mL) and minimum bactericidal concentration (312-625μg/mL) assays. Conclusions:P. betle had the greatest potential value against both Gram-negative and Gram-positive multidrug-resistant bacteria. Favorable antagonistic activities were also exhibited by the ethanol extracts of Psidium guajava, Phyllanthus niruri and Ehretia microphylla.

  4. Multidrug-Resistant Salmonella Isolates from Swine in the Eastern Cape Province, South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwu, Chinwe Juliana; Iweriebor, Benson Chuks; Obi, Larry Chikwelu; Basson, Albertus Kotze; Okoh, Anthony Ifeanyi

    2016-07-01

    The exposure of farm animals to antimicrobials for treatment, prophylaxis, or growth promotion can select for resistant bacteria that can be transmitted to humans, and Salmonella as an important zoonotic pathogen can act as a potential reservoir of antimicrobial resistance determinants. We assessed the antibiogram profiles of Salmonella species isolated from pig herds in two commercial farms in South Africa. Two hundred fifty-eight presumptive Salmonella isolates were recovered from the fecal samples of 500 adult pigs. Specific primers targeting Salmonella serogroups A, B, C1, C2, and D were used to determine the prevalence of different serogroups. Only serogroup A (n = 48) was detected, while others were not. Antimicrobial susceptibility of the confirmed Salmonella serogroup A isolates was performed by using the disk diffusion method against a panel of 18 antibiotics. All the 48 isolates were resistant to tetracycline and oxytetracycline, while 75% were resistant to ampicillin, sulphamethoxazole-trimethoprim, nalidixic acid, and streptomycin. All the isolates exhibited multidrug resistance, with the predominant phenotype being against 11 antibiotics, and multiple antibiotic resistance index ranged between 0.3 and 0.6. The incidence of genes encoding resistance against ampicillin (ampC), tetracycline (tetA), and streptomycin (strA) were 54, 61, and 44%, respectively. We conclude that healthy pigs are potential reservoirs of multidrug-resistant Salmonella that could be transmitted to humans through the food chain and, hence, a significant public health threat.

  5. Expression of Survivin Gene and Its Relationship with Clinical Multidrug Resistance in Osteosarcoma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    NIETao; DAIMin; ZONGShizhang

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To study the expression of survivin and its relationship with clinical multidrug resistance in osteosarcoma. Methods: By using immunohistochemistry (S-P) method, the expression of Survivin in osteosarcoma, osteochondroma and normal osseous tissue, and the expression of P-glycoprotein in osteosarcoma was detected. Results: Survivin positive expression rate was 65.71% in osteosarcoma, but no expression of Survivin was detectable in osteochondroma and normal osseous tissue. The positive expression rate of Survivin was significantly associated with Enneking clinical stages and histological typing (WHO), but no relationship was found among Survivin expression and age, sex and tumor location. The positive expression rate of P-glycoprotein was 45.71%. There was a significant correlation between Survivin and p-glycoprotein. Conclusion: Survivin overexpression was significantly associated with clinical multidrug resistance in osteosarcoma. It could be a potential target for treatment of osteosarcoma.

  6. SUCCESSFUL TREATMENT OF MULTIDRUG-RESISTANT ACINETOBACTOR BAUMANII BLISTERS ON THE KNEE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afridi, Sikandar Aziz; Alvi, Hamid Fazeel; Lodhi, Fahad Saqib; Muhammad, Gul; Qureshi, Zaheer Uddin; Ullah, Raffat; Muhammad, Taj; Afridi, Bakhtiar Ullah

    2015-01-01

    Acinetobacter baumannii (A. baumannii), nosocomial infections, especially those due to multi-drug resistant (MDR) strains, are increasingly detected. This study reports the case of a 50-year-old man with blisters on the right knee for 8 months, first admitted through the outpatient department for incisional biopsy. Microbiological and histo-pathological examination confirmed the diagnosis of blisters extending deeply up to the knee joint caused by MDR- A. baumannii. A broad spectrum antibiotic therapy was administered and later readjusted according to the results of microbiological culture and biopsy report. Intensive hemodynamic support was required. An extensive surgical debridement was promptly performed and repeated until complete control of the infection with intravenous colistins. Blisters were excised; wounds were dressed daily with chlorhexidine dressings and polymyxine-impregnated dressing. Wounds were finally covered with split-thickness skin grafts. The infection was overcome 120 days after admission. The graft take was 40%. Postoperative rehabilitation was required because of the functional limitation of lower limb movements at the knee joint. Follow-up at 8 months showed no functional deficit and an acceptable aesthetic result. AB-MDR affecting soft tissues is a life-threatening disease, especially in patients with poor immunity and limited access to health facilities, whose clinical diagnosis may sometimes be challenging. Early recognition and treatment represent the most important factors influencing survival.

  7. The role of ATP-binding cassette transporter A2 in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia multidrug resistance

    OpenAIRE

    Aberuyi, N; Rahgozar, S; Moafi, A

    2014-01-01

    Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is one of the most prevalent hematologic malignancies in children. Although the cure rate of ALL has improved over the past decades, the most important reason for ALL treatment failure is multidrug resistance (MDR) phenomenon. The current study aims to explain the mechanisms involved in multidrug resistance of childhood ALL, and introduces ATP-binding cassette transporterA2 (ABCA2) as an ABC transporter gene which may have a high impact on MDR. Benefiting fr...

  8. Effect of curcumin on multidrug resistance in resistant human gastric carcinoma cell line SGC7901/VCR

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiao-qing TANG; Hu BI; Jian-qiang FENG; Jian-guo CAO

    2005-01-01

    Aim: To investigate the reversal effects of curcumin on multidrug resistance (MDR)in a resistant human gastric carcinoma cell line. Methods: The cytotoxic effect of vincristine (VCR) was evaluated by MTT assay. The cell apoptosis induced by VCR was determined by propidium iodide (PI)-stained flow cytometry (FCM) and a morphological assay using acridine orange (AO)/ethidium bromide (EB) dual staining. P-glycoprotein (P-gp) function was demonstrated by the accumulation and efflux of rhodamine123 (Rh123) using FCM. The expression of P-gp and the activation of caspase-3 were measured by FCM using fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC)-conjugated anti-P-gp and anti-cleaved caspase-3 antibodies, respectively.Results: Curcumin, at concentrations of 5 μmol/L, 10 μmol/L, or 20 μmol/L, had no cytotoxic effect on a parent human gastric carcinoma cell line (SGC7901) or its VCR-resistant variant cell line (SGC7901/VCR). The VCR-IC50 value of the SGC7901/VCR cells was 45 times more than that of the SGC7901cells and the SGC7901/VCR cells showed apoptotic resistance to VCR. SGC7901/VCR cells treated with 5μmol/L, 10 μmol/L, or 20 μmol/L curcumin decreased the IC50 value of VCR and promoted VCR-mediated apoptosis in a dose-dependent manner. Curcumin (10μmol/L) increased Rh 123 accumulation and inhibited the efflux of Rh 123 in S GC7901/VCR cells, but did not change the accumulation and efflux of Rh123 in SGC7901cells. P-gp was overexpressed in SGC7901/VCR cells, whereas it was downregulated after a 24-h treatment with curcumin (10 μmol/L). Resistant cells treated with 1μmol/L VCR alone showed 77% lower levels of caspase-3 activation relative to SGC7901 cells, but the activation of caspase-3 in the resistant cell line increased by 44% when cells were treated with VCR in combination with curcumin.Conclusion: Curcumin can reverse the MDR of the human gastric carcinoma SGC7901/VCR cell line. This might be associated with decreased P-gp function and expression, and the promotion of

  9. Vinblastine and sulfinpyrazone export by the multidrug resistance protein MRP2 is associated with glutathione export

    OpenAIRE

    Evers, R.; Haas, M; Sparidans, R; Beijnen, J.; Wielinga, P R; Lankelma, J.; Borst, P

    2000-01-01

    The multidrug resistance proteins MRP1 and MRP2 are members of the same subfamily of ATP-binding cassette transporters. Besides organic molecules conjugated to negatively charged ligands, these proteins also transport cytotoxic drugs for which no negatively charged conjugates are known to exist. In polarized MDCKII cells, MRP1 routes to the lateral plasma membrane, and MRP2 to the apical plasma membrane. In these cells MRP1 transports daunorubicin, and MRP2 vinblastine; both transporters expo...

  10. Left-Sided Endocarditis Associated with Multi-Drug Resistance Acinetobacter Lwoffii

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naghmeh Moshtaghi

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Acinetobacter lwoffii, an important nosocomial pathogen, is a gram-negative aerobic bacillus that is a component of the normal flora on the skin, oropharynx, and perineum of about 20-25% of healthy individuals. We herein present a case of a 66-year-old man with combined mitral and aortic valve endocarditis associated with multi-drug resistance acinetobacter lowffii bacteremia.

  11. Combination antibiotic therapy for multidrug-resistant Gram-negative bacteria

    OpenAIRE

    Tängdén, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Combination antibiotic therapy for Gram-negative sepsis is controversial. The present review provides a brief summary of the existing knowledge on combination therapy for severe infections with multidrug-resistant Pseudomonas spp., Acinetobacter spp., and Enterobacteriaceae. Empirical combination antibiotic therapy is recommended for severe sepsis and septic shock to reduce mortality related to inappropriate antibiotic treatment. Because definitive combination therapy has not been proven supe...

  12. Multidrug-resistant Bacteroides fragilis group on the rise in Europe?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hartmeyer, G N; Sóki, J; Nagy, E;

    2012-01-01

    We report a case of multidrug-resistance (MDR) in a strain of Bacteroides fragilis from a blood culture and abdominal fluid in a Danish patient. The patient had not been travelling for several years and had not received antibiotics prior to the present case. We also summarize the cases that have...... been reported to date of MDR B. fragilis group in Europe. As far as we know, a case like this with MDR B. fragilis has not been described in Scandinavia before....

  13. Glutathione depletion regulates both extrinsic and intrinsic apoptotic signaling cascades independent from multidrug resistance protein 1

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    Glutathione (GSH) depletion is an important hallmark of apoptosis. We previously demonstrated that GSH depletion, by its efflux, regulates apoptosis by modulation of executioner caspase activity. However, both the molecular identity of the GSH transporter(s) involved and the signaling cascades regulating GSH loss remain obscure. We sought to determine the role of multidrug resistance protein 1 (MRP1) in GSH depletion and its regulatory role on extrinsic and intrinsic pathways of apoptosis. In...

  14. Experience with Fosfomycin for Treatment of Urinary Tract Infections Due to Multidrug-Resistant Organisms

    OpenAIRE

    Neuner, Elizabeth A.; Sekeres, Jennifer; Hall, Gerri S.; van Duin, David

    2012-01-01

    Fosfomycin has shown promising in vitro activity against multidrug-resistant (MDR) urinary pathogens; however, clinical data are lacking. We conducted a retrospective chart review to describe the microbiological and clinical outcomes of urinary tract infections (UTIs) with MDR pathogens treated with fosfomycin tromethamine. Charts for 41 hospitalized patients with a urine culture for an MDR pathogen who received fosfomycin tromethamine from 2006 to 2010 were reviewed. Forty-one patients had 4...

  15. Draft genome of a commonly misdiagnosed multidrug resistant pathogen Candida auris

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    Background Candida auris is a multidrug resistant, emerging agent of fungemia in humans. Its actual global distribution remains obscure as the current commercial methods of clinical diagnosis misidentify it as C. haemulonii. Here we report the first draft genome of C. auris to explore the genomic basis of virulence and unique differences that could be employed for differential diagnosis. Results More than 99.5 % of the C. auris genomic reads did not align to the current whole (or draft) genom...

  16. A case of acute postoperative keratitis after deep anterior lamellar keratoplasty by multidrug resistant Klebsiella

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leena Bajracharya

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A healthy lady of 42 years underwent deep anterior lamellar keratoplasty for granular dystrophy. The very next day, it was complicated by development of infectious keratitis. The organism was identified as multidrug resistant Klebsiella pneumoniae. Donor corneal button may be implicated in the transmission of infection in an otherwise uneventful surgery and follow-up. Nosocomial infections are usually severe, rapidly progressive and difficult to treat. Finally, the lady had to undergo therapeutic penetrating keratoplasty for complete resolution of infection.

  17. Multidrug-Resistant Tuberculosis: Long Term Follow-Up of 40 Non-HIV-Infected Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monica Avendaño

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: There has been a steady increase in referrals of patients with multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB who are human immunodeficiency virus (HIV negative. Between 1986 and 1999, 40 patients were admitted to the authors' institution, eight of whom were admitted between January and June 1999. The management of such individuals is difficult. Although they are a clinically and epidemiologically important group of patients, few reports detail their management.

  18. Disease Control Implications of India's Changing Multi-Drug Resistant Tuberculosis Epidemic

    OpenAIRE

    Sze-Chuan Suen; Eran Bendavid; Goldhaber-Fiebert, Jeremy D.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Multi-drug resistant tuberculosis (MDR TB) is a major health challenge in India that is gaining increasing public attention, but the implications of India's evolving MDR TB epidemic are poorly understood. As India's MDR TB epidemic is transitioning from a treatment-generated to transmission-generated epidemic, we sought to evaluate the potential effectiveness of the following two disease control strategies on reducing the prevalence of MDR TB: a) improving treatment of non-MDR TB;...

  19. Multidrug resistance and retroviral transduction potential in human small cell lung cancer cell lines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Theilade, M D; Gram, G J; Jensen, P B;

    1999-01-01

    Multidrug resistance (MDR) remains a major problem in the successful treatment of small cell lung cancer (SCLC). New treatment strategies are needed, such as gene therapy specifically targeting the MDR cells in the tumor. Retroviral LacZ gene-containing vectors that were either pseudotyped...... cells, and that MLV-A as well as GALV-1 retroviral vectors are suitable for further development of gene therapy in SCLC....

  20. Antibacterial activity of some natural products against bacteria expressing a multidrug-resistant phenotype

    OpenAIRE

    2011-01-01

    Abstract The present study assessed the antimicrobial activities of various natural products belonging to the terpenoids, alkaloids and phenolics against a collection of Gram-negative multidrug-resistant (MDR) bacteria. The results demonstrated that most of the compounds were extruded by bacterial efflux pumps. In the presence of the efflux pump inhibitor phenylalanine arginine ?-naphthylamide (PA?N), the activities of laurentixanthone B (xanthone), plumbagin (naphthoquinone), 4-hy...

  1. Insights into a multidrug resistant Escherichia coli pathogen of the globally disseminated ST131 lineage: genome analysis and virulence mechanisms.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Makrina Totsika

    Full Text Available Escherichia coli strains causing urinary tract infection (UTI are increasingly recognized as belonging to specific clones. E. coli clone O25b:H4-ST131 has recently emerged globally as a leading multi-drug resistant pathogen causing urinary tract and bloodstream infections in hospitals and the community. While most molecular studies to date examine the mechanisms conferring multi-drug resistance in E. coli ST131, relatively little is known about their virulence potential. Here we examined E. coli ST131 clinical isolates from two geographically diverse collections, one representing the major pathogenic lineages causing UTI across the United Kingdom and a second representing UTI isolates from patients presenting at two large hospitals in Australia. We determined a draft genome sequence for one representative isolate, E. coli EC958, which produced CTX-M-15 extended-spectrum β-lactamase, CMY-23 type AmpC cephalosporinase and was resistant to ciprofloxacin. Comparative genome analysis indicated that EC958 encodes virulence genes commonly associated with uropathogenic E. coli (UPEC. The genome sequence of EC958 revealed a transposon insertion in the fimB gene encoding the activator of type 1 fimbriae, an important UPEC bladder colonization factor. We identified the same fimB transposon insertion in 59% of the ST131 UK isolates, as well as 71% of ST131 isolates from Australia, suggesting this mutation is common among E. coli ST131 strains. Insertional inactivation of fimB resulted in a phenotype resembling a slower off-to-on switching for type 1 fimbriae. Type 1 fimbriae expression could still be induced in fimB-null isolates; this correlated strongly with adherence to and invasion of human bladder cells and bladder colonisation in a mouse UTI model. We conclude that E. coli ST131 is a geographically widespread, antibiotic resistant clone that has the capacity to produce numerous virulence factors associated with UTI.

  2. Resin glycosides from Ipomoea wolcottiana as modulators of the multidrug resistance phenotype in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corona-Castañeda, Berenice; Rosas-Ramírez, Daniel; Castañeda-Gómez, Jhon; Aparicio-Cuevas, Manuel Alejandro; Fragoso-Serrano, Mabel; Figueroa-González, Gabriela; Pereda-Miranda, Rogelio

    2016-03-01

    Recycling liquid chromatography was used for the isolation and purification of resin glycosides from the CHCl3-soluble extracts prepared using flowers of Ipomoea wolcottiana Rose var. wolcottiana. Bioassay-guided fractionation, using modulation of both antibiotic activity against multidrug-resistant strains of Gram-negative bacteria and vinblastine susceptibility in breast carcinoma cells, was used to isolate the active glycolipids as modulators of the multidrug resistance phenotype. An ester-type dimer, wolcottine I, one tetra- and three pentasaccharides, wolcottinosides I-IV, in addition to the known intrapilosin VII, were characterized by NMR spectroscopy and mass spectrometry. In vitro assays established that none of these metabolites displayed antibacterial activity (MIC>512 μg/mL) against multidrug-resistant strains of Escherichia coli, and two nosocomial pathogens: Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi and Shigella flexneri; however, when tested (25 μg/mL) in combination with tetracycline, kanamycin or chloramphenicol, they exerted a potentiation effect of the antibiotic susceptibility up to eightfold (64 μg/mL from 512 μg/mL). It was also determined that these non-cytotoxic (CI50>8.68 μM) agents modulated vinblastine susceptibility at 25 μg/mL in MFC-7/Vin(+) cells with a reversal factor (RFMCF-7/Vin(+)) of 2-130 fold.

  3. Noma Neonatorum From Multidrug-Resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa: An Underestimated Threat?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raimondi, Francesco; Veropalumbo, Claudio; Coppola, Clara; Maddaluno, Sergio; Ferrara, Teresa; Cangiano, Giancarlo; Capasso, Letizia

    2015-09-01

    We present the case of an extremely low birth weight infant with diffuse gingival noma, initially misdiagnosed as thrush. Multidrug-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain was cultured and treated with systemic and local colistin with complete healing. Noma neonatorum from multidrug-resistant pathogens may appear in neonatal intensive care units. Old antibiotics may help.Noma (cancrum oris) is a devastating gangrenous disease that leads to destruction of facial tissue with significant morbidity and mortality in children and young adults. Noma has virtually disappeared from Europe and North America, but it is still common among children and young adults in India, Africa, and South America. Noma is a polymicrobial opportunistic infection related to malnutrition and immune dysfunction. In the neonate, a similar but distinct condition, known as "noma neonatorum" was described in 1977, in which gangrenous lesions involve the mucocutaneous junctions of oral, nasal, and anal area, and, occasionally, the eyelids and the scrotum. The neonatal disease has been linked to Pseudomonas aeruginosa, prematurity, and low birth weight. There is no established treatment, and mortality is almost inevitable in the few reported cases. In this study, we present the first European case of noma neonatorum from a multidrug-resistant strain of P aeruginosa.

  4. Genotyping and serotyping of macrolide and multidrug resistant Streptococcus pneumoniae isolated from carrier children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S F Swedan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims: Streptococcus pneumoniae, an opportunistic pathogen commonly carried asymptomatically in the nasopharynx of children, is associated with increasing rates of treatment failures due to a worldwide increase in drug resistance. We investigated the carriage of S. pneumoniae in children 5 years or younger, the identity of prevalent serotypes, the rates of resistance to macrolides and other antimicrobial agents and the genotypes responsible for macrolide resistance. Materials and Methods: Nasopharyngeal swabs were collected from 157 children under 5 years for cultural isolation of S. pneumoniae. Antibiogram of isolates  was determined using the disk diffusion test, and the minimal inhibitory concentration to macrolides was determined using the E-test. Isolate serotypes and macrolide resistance genes, erm(B and mef(E, were identified using multiplex polymerase chain reactions. Results: S. pneumoniae was recovered from 33.8% of children; 41.9% among males and 21.9% among females (P = 0.009. The highest carriage rate occurred among age groups 7-12 months and 49-60 months. Most frequent serotypes were 19F, 6A/B, 11A, 19A, 14 and 15B/C.  Resistance to macrolides was 60.4%. Resistance to oxacillin, trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole and clindamycin was present among 90.6%, 54.7% and 32.1% of isolates, respectively. All isolates were susceptible to chloramphenicol, levofloxacin and vancomycin. Isolates resistant to one or more macrolide drugs were more likely to be multidrug resistant. Resistance to clindamycin or oxacillin coexisted with macrolide resistance. Among the erythromycin-resistant isolates, erm(B, mef(E and erm(B and mef(E genes were present at rates of 43.8%, 37.5% and 6.3%, respectively. Erm(B and mef(E were associated with very high level and moderate-to-high level resistance to macrolides, respectively. Conclusion: A significant proportion of children harboured macrolide and multidrug-resistant S. pneumoniae.

  5. Antimicrobial activity of green tea extract against isolates of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus and multi-drug resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Maksum Radji; Rafael Adi Agustama; Berna Elya; Conny Riana Tjampakasari

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate antibacterial activity of the Indonesian water soluble green tea extract,Camellia sinensis, against clinical isolates of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) (MRSA) and multi-drug resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa (MDR-P. aeruginosa). Methods:Antimicrobial activity of green tea extract was determined by the disc diffusion method and the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) was determined by the twofold serial broth dilutions method. The tested bacteria using in this study were the standard strains and multi-drug resistant clinical isolates of S. aureus and P. aeruginosa, obtained from Laboratory of Clinical Microbiology, Faculty of Medicine, University of Indonesia. Results:The results showed that the inhibition zone diameter of green tea extracts for S. aureus ATCC 25923 and MRSA were (18.970±0.287) mm, and (19.130±0.250) mm respectively. While the inhibition zone diameter for P. aeruginosa ATCC 27853 and MDR-P. aeruginosa were (17.550±0.393) mm and (17.670±0.398) mm respectively. The MIC of green tea extracts against S. aureus ATCC 25923 and MRSA were 400 µg/mL and 400 µg/mL, respectively, whereas the MIC for P. aeruginosa ATCC 27853 and MDR-P. aeruginosa were 800 µg/mL, and 800 µg/mL, respectively. Conclusions: Camellia sinensis leaves extract could be useful in combating emerging drug-resistance caused by MRSA and P. aeruginosa.

  6. Epidemic and nonepidemic multidrug-resistant Enterococcus faecium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leavis, Helen L; Willems, Rob J L; Top, Janetta; Spalburg, Emile; Mascini, Ellen M; Fluit, Ad C; Hoepelman, Andy; de Neeling, Albert J; Bonten, Marc J M

    2003-09-01

    The epidemiology of vancomycin-resistant Entero- coccus faecium (VREF) in Europe is characterized by a large community reservoir. In contrast, nosocomial outbreaks and infections (without a community reservoir) characterize VREF in the United States. Previous studies demonstrated host-specific genogroups and a distinct genetic lineage of VREF associated with hospital outbreaks, characterized by the variant esp-gene and a specific allele-type of the purK housekeeping gene (purK1). We investigated the genetic relatedness of vanA VREF (n=108) and vancomycin-susceptible E. faecium (VSEF) (n=92) from different epidemiologic sources by genotyping, susceptibility testing for ampicillin, sequencing of purK1, and testing for presence of esp. Clusters of VSEF fit well into previously described VREF genogroups, and strong associations were found between VSEF and VREF isolates with resistance to ampicillin, presence of esp, and purK1. Genotypes characterized by presence of esp, purK1, and ampicillin resistance were most frequent among outbreak-associated isolates and almost absent among community surveillance isolates. Vancomycin-resistance was not specifically linked to genogroups. VREF and VSEF from different epidemiologic sources are genetically related; evidence exists for nosocomial selection of a subtype of E. faecium, which has acquired vancomycin-resistance through horizontal transfer.

  7. Phenothiazines as a solution for multidrug resistant tuberculosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristiansen, Jette E.; Dastidar, Sujata G.; Palchoudhuri, Shauroseni;

    2015-01-01

    . The phenothiazines were first recognised for their antipsychotic properties, but soon after their antimicrobial functions came to be known and then such compounds were designated as non-antibiotics. The emergence of highly drug-resistant bacteria had initiated an urgent need to search for novel affordable compounds...... thioridazine and its (-) form to be combined with other antitubercular drugs to treat infections by drug-resistant strains of Mycobacterium tuberculosis and try to eradicate this deadly disease. [Int Microbiol 2015; 18(1):1-12]....

  8. Threat of multidrug resistant Staphylococcus aureus in Western Nepal

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bhatta, Dharm R.; Cavaco, Lina; Nath, Gopal;

    2015-01-01

    ObjectiveTo determine the prevalence of methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and antimicrobial susceptibility patterns of the isolates from Manipal Teaching Hospital, Pokhara, Nepal. MethodsThis study was conducted over a period of 11 months (September 2012–August 2013) at the Manip...

  9. Molecular evidence and functional expression of multidrug resistance associated protein (MRP) in rabbit corneal epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karla, Pradeep K; Pal, Dananjay; Mitra, Ashim K

    2007-01-01

    Multidrug resistance associated protein (MRP) is a major family of efflux transporters involved in drug efflux leading to drug resistance. The objective of this study was to explore physical barriers for ocular drug absorption and to verify if the role of efflux transporters. MRP-2 is a major homologue of MRP family and found to express on the apical side of cell membrane. Cultured Rabbit Corneal Epithelial Cells (rCEC) were selected as an in vitro model for corneal epithelium. [14C]-erythromycin which is a proven substrate for MRP-2 was selected as a model drug for functional expression studies. MK-571, a known specific and potent inhibitor for MRP-2 was added to inhibit MRP mediated efflux. Membrane fraction of rCEC was used for western blot analysis. Polarized transport of [14C]-erythromycin was observed in rCEC and transport from B-->A was significantly high than from A-->B. Permeability's increased significantly from A-->B in the presence of MK-571 and ketoconozole. Uptake of [14C]-erythromycin in the presence of MK-571 was significantly higher than control in rCEC. RT-PCR analysis indicated a unique and distinct band at approximately 498 bp corresponding to MRP-2 in rCEC and MDCK11-MRP-2 cells. Immunoprecipitation followed by Western Blot analysis indicated a specific band at approximately 190 kDa in membrane fraction of rCEC and MDCK11-MRP-2 cells. For the first time we have demonstrated high expression of MRP-2 in rabbit corneal epithelium and its functional activity causing drug efflux. RT-PCR, immunoprecipitation followed by Western blot analysis further confirms the result.

  10. Fluoroquinolone induction of phage-mediated gene transfer in multidrug-resistant Salmonella.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bearson, Bradley L; Brunelle, Brian W

    2015-08-01

    Fluoroquinolones are broad-spectrum antibiotics that inhibit bacterial DNA gyrase and topoisomerase activity, which can cause DNA damage and result in bacterial cell death. In response to DNA damage, bacteria induce an SOS response to stimulate DNA repair. However, the SOS response may also induce prophage with production of infectious virions. Salmonella strains typically contain multiple prophages, and certain strains including phage types DT120 and DT104 contain prophage that upon induction are capable of generalised transduction. In this study, strains of multidrug-resistant (MDR) Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium DT120 and DT104 were exposed to fluoroquinolones important for use in human and veterinary disease therapy to determine whether prophage(s) are induced that could facilitate phage-mediated gene transfer. Cultures of MDR S. Typhimurium DT120 and DT104 containing a kanamycin resistance plasmid were lysed after exposure to fluoroquinolones (ciprofloxacin, enrofloxacin and danofloxacin). Bacterial cell lysates were able to transfer the plasmid to a recipient kanamycin-susceptible Salmonella strain by generalised transduction. In addition, exposure of DT120 to ciprofloxacin induced the recA gene of the bacterial SOS response and genes encoded in a P22-like generalised transducing prophage. This research indicates that fluoroquinolone exposure of MDR Salmonella can facilitate horizontal gene transfer, suggesting that fluoroquinolone usage in human and veterinary medicine may have unintended consequences, including the induction of phage-mediated gene transfer from MDR Salmonella. Stimulation of gene transfer following bacterial exposure to fluoroquinolones should be considered an adverse effect, and clinical decisions regarding antibiotic selection for infectious disease therapy should include this potential risk.

  11. Antibacterial activities of ethanol extracts of Philippine medicinal plants against multidrug-resistant bacteria

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Demetrio; L.Valle; Jr.; Jeannie; I.Andrade; Juliana; Janet; M.Puzon; Esperanza; C.Cabrera; Windell; L.Rivera

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the antibacterial activities of crude ethanol extracts of 12 Philippine medicinal plants.Methods: Crude ethanol extracts from 12 Philippine medicinal plants were evaluated for their antibacterial activity against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, vancomycinresistant Enterococcus, extended spectrum β-lactamase-producing, carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae and metallo-β-lactamase-producing Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Acinetobacter baumannii. Results: The leaf extracts of Psidium guajava, Phyllanthus niruri, Ehretia microphylla and Piper betle(P. betle) showed antibacterial activity against the Gram-positive methicillinresistant Staphylococcus aureus and vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus. P. betle showed the highest antibacterial activity for these bacteria in the disk diffusion(16-33 mm inhibition diameter), minimum inhibitory concentration(19-156 μg/m L) and minimum bactericidal concentration(312 μg/m L) assays. P. betle leaf extracts only showed remarkable antibacterial activity for all the Gram-negative multidrug-resistant bacteria(extended spectrum β-lactamaseproducing, carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae and metallo-β-lactamase-producing) in the disk diffusion(17-21 mm inhibition diameter), minimum inhibitory concentration(312-625 μg/m L) and minimum bactericidal concentration(312-625 μg/m L) assays. Conclusions: P. betle had the greatest potential value against both Gram-negative and Grampositive multidrug-resistant bacteria. Favorable antagonistic activities were also exhibited by the ethanol extracts of Psidium guajava, Phyllanthus niruri and Ehretia microphylla.

  12. Poly (l-γ-glutamylglutamine Polymer Enhances Doxorubicin Accumulation in Multidrug Resistant Breast Cancer Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ting Peng

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Drug resistance is one of the bottlenecks of cancer chemotherapy in the clinic. Polymeric nanomedicine is one of the most promising strategies for overcoming poor chemotherapy responses due to the multidrug resistance (MDR. Methods: In this study, a new polymer-based drug delivery system, poly (l-γ-glutamylglutamine-doxorubicin (PGG-Dox conjugate, was studied in both drug-induced resistant human breast cancer MDA-MB-231/MDR cells and their parent human breast cancer MDA-MB-231 cells. The effect of PGG on facilitating the growth inhibition of Dox against multidrug resistant cells were investigated by evaluating the cytotoxicity of PGG-Dox conjugate, PGG/Dox unconjugated complex and free Dox on both cells. The underlying mechanisms in resistant cells were further studied via the intracellular traffic studies. Results: Both conjugated and unconjugated PGG significantly increased Dox uptake, prolonged Dox retention and reduced Dox efflux in the MDA-MB-231/MDR cells. The PGG-Dox conjugate is taken up by tumor cells mainly by pinocytosis pathway, in which PGG-Dox conjugate-containing vesicles are formed and enter the cells. Conclusions: This study indicated that both polymer-drug conjugate and unconjugated complex are promising strategies of overcoming resistance of anti-tumor drugs.

  13. Antisense RNA regulation and application in the development of novel antibiotics to combat multidrug resistant bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Yinduo; Lei, Ting

    2013-01-01

    Despite the availability of antibiotics and vaccines, infectious diseases remain one of most dangerous threats to humans and animals. The overuse and misuse of antibacterial agents have led to the emergence of multidrug resistant bacterial pathogens. Bacterial cells are often resilient enough to survive in even the most extreme environments. To do so, the organisms have evolved different mechanisms, including a variety of two-component signal transduction systems, which allow the bacteria to sense the surrounding environment and regulate gene expression in order to adapt and respond to environmental stimuli. In addition, some bacteria evolve resistance to antibacterial agents while many bacterial cells are able to acquire resistance genes from other bacterial species to enable them to survive in the presence of toxic antimicrobial agents. The crisis of antimicrobial resistance is an unremitting menace to human health and a burden on public health. The rapid increase in antimicrobial resistant organisms and limited options for development of new classes of antibiotics heighten the urgent need to develop novel potent antibacterial therapeutics in order to combat multidrug resistant infections. In this review, we introduce the regulatory mechanisms of antisense RNA and significant applications of regulated antisense RNA interference technology in early drug discovery. This includes the identification and evaluation of drug targets in vitro and in vivo, the determination of mode of action for antibiotics and new antibacterial agents, as well as the development of peptide-nucleic acid conjugates as novel antibacterials.

  14. Evaluation of the Efficacy of a Bacteriophage in the Treatment of Pneumonia Induced by Multidrug Resistance Klebsiella pneumoniae in Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fang Cao

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Multidrug-resistant Klebsiella pneumoniae (MRKP has steadily grown beyond antibiotic control. However, a bacteriophage is considered to be a potential antibiotic alternative for treating bacterial infections. In this study, a lytic bacteriophage, phage 1513, was isolated using a clinical MRKP isolate KP 1513 as the host and was characterized. It produced a clear plaque with a halo and was classified as Siphoviridae. It had a short latent period of 30 min, a burst size of 264 and could inhibit KP 1513 growth in vitro with a dose-dependent pattern. Intranasal administration of a single dose of 2 × 109 PFU/mouse 2 h after KP 1513 inoculation was able to protect mice against lethal pneumonia. In a sublethal pneumonia model, phage-treated mice exhibited a lower level of K. pneumoniae burden in the lungs as compared to the untreated control. These mice lost less body weight and exhibited lower levels of inflammatory cytokines in their lungs. Lung lesion conditions were obviously improved by phage therapy. Therefore, phage 1513 has a great effect in vitro and in vivo, which has potential to be used as an alternative to an antibiotic treatment of pneumonia that is caused by the multidrug-resistant K. pneumoniae.

  15. Evaluation of the efficacy of a bacteriophage in the treatment of pneumonia induced by multidrug resistance Klebsiella pneumoniae in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Fang; Wang, Xitao; Wang, Linhui; Li, Zhen; Che, Jian; Wang, Lili; Li, Xiaoyu; Cao, Zhenhui; Zhang, Jiancheng; Jin, Liji; Xu, Yongping

    2015-01-01

    Multidrug-resistant Klebsiella pneumoniae (MRKP) has steadily grown beyond antibiotic control. However, a bacteriophage is considered to be a potential antibiotic alternative for treating bacterial infections. In this study, a lytic bacteriophage, phage 1513, was isolated using a clinical MRKP isolate KP 1513 as the host and was characterized. It produced a clear plaque with a halo and was classified as Siphoviridae. It had a short latent period of 30 min, a burst size of 264 and could inhibit KP 1513 growth in vitro with a dose-dependent pattern. Intranasal administration of a single dose of 2×10(9) PFU/mouse 2 h after KP 1513 inoculation was able to protect mice against lethal pneumonia. In a sublethal pneumonia model, phage-treated mice exhibited a lower level of K. pneumoniae burden in the lungs as compared to the untreated control. These mice lost less body weight and exhibited lower levels of inflammatory cytokines in their lungs. Lung lesion conditions were obviously improved by phage therapy. Therefore, phage 1513 has a great effect in vitro and in vivo, which has potential to be used as an alternative to an antibiotic treatment of pneumonia that is caused by the multidrug-resistant K. pneumoniae.

  16. Relationship between Methylation Status of Multi-drug Resistance Protein(MRP) and Multi-drug Resistance in Lung Cancer Cell Lines

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Rui-jun; ZHONG Hong

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To study the relationship between the methylation status of multi-drug resistance protein (MRP) gene and the expression of its mRNA and protein in lung cancer cell lines. Methods: Human embryo lung cell line WI-38, lung adenocarcinoma cell line SPCA-1 and its drug-resistant cells induced by different concentrations of doxorubicin were treated with restriction endonuclease Eco47Ⅲ. The methylation status of MRP was examined by PCR, and the expressions of its mRNA and protein were evaluated by in situ hybridization and immunohistochemistry. Results: MRP gene promoter region of WI-38 cells was in hypermethylation status, but the promoter region of MRP in SPCA-1 cells and their resistant derivatives induced by different concentrations of doxorubicin were in hypomethylation status. There were significant differences in the expression of MRP mRNA among WI-38 cell line, SPCA-1 cells and their drug-resistant derivatives induced by different concentration of doxorubicin. Consistently, MRP immunostaining presented similar significant differences. Conclusion: The promoter region of MRP in SPCA-1 lung adenocarcinoma cells was in hypomethylation status. The hypomethylation status of 5' regulatory region of MRP promoter is an important structural basis that can increase the activity of transcription and results in the development of drug resistance in lung cancer.

  17. Iodination increases the activity of verapamil derivatives in reversing PGP multidrug resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barattin, Regis; Gerby, Bastien; Bourges, Kevin; Hardy, Gaëlle; Olivares, Jose; Boutonnat, Jean; Arnoult, Christophe; D'Hardemare, Amaury D U Moulinet; Ronot, Xavier

    2010-07-01

    Iodinated derivatives of verapamil were synthesized and tested as P-glycoprotein (Pgp)-mediated multidrug resistance (MDR) reversal agents. The ability of these compounds to revert MDR was evaluated on daunorubicin-resistant K562 cells, by measuring the intracellular accumulation of rhodamine 123, a fluorescent probe of Pgp transport activity. One of the investigated compounds (16c) was found to be a more potent MDR reversal agent than verapamil and cyclosporin A, used as reference molecules. Further in vitro studies showed that compound 16c restored daunorubicin activity and, when used alone, did not induce cell death, cell cycle perturbation and modification of calcium channel activity in comparison with verapamil.

  18. [Evaluation of colonization by multidrug-resistant organisms and infections' frequency in chronically and incurably ill children under care of the Cracow children's Hospice of Father J. Tischner].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czogała, Wojciech; Goździk, Jolanta; Czogała, Małgorzata; Klepacka, Joanna; Krasowska-Kwiecień, Aleksandra; Skoczen, Szymon; Wiecha, Oktawiusz; Pietrys, Danuta; Wedrychowicz, Anna

    2010-01-01

    Infections are one of the most important clinical problem and most frequent cause of interventions among chronically ill children under hospice care. Frequent and long-lasting hospitalizations before admission to the hospice cause patients' colonization with nosocomial pathogens. These pathogens usually cause returning infections, difficult to cure in home care. The aim of the study was evaluation of colonization by multidrug-resistant organisms and infections' frequency in chronically and incurably ill children under care of the Cracow Children's Hospice of Father J. Tischner. We analyzed infections in patients of the Hospice in 2008-2009. Frequency of infections, their localization, pathogens and necessity of hospitalization were evaluated. On the basis of microbiological examination we distinguished infections caused by multidrug resistant pathogens. Ninety microbiological examination were made in 24 children. Urine, stool, pharyngeal and nasal swap and others were examined. Nosocomial pathogens including Gram-negative rods with ESBL phenotype, Gram-positive Enterococci with HLAR phenotype and Staphylococci with MRCNS and MRSA phenotype were isolated in 36 (40%) examinations, in 17 (71%) patients. Frequency of infections was higher in patients colonized by nosocomial pathogens in comparison with patients without colonization, but difference was not statistically important. There are many factors that increase risk of infections and make them difficult to treat, like: immobilization, impaired swallowing and coughing reflexes, thorax deformation, neurogenic bladder, tracheostomy. Multi-drug resistant pathogens are additional risk factor that can lead to the necessity of hospitalization. In chronically and incurably ill patients time of hospitalization should be minimized to reduce the risk of colonization with multi-drug resistant pathogens.

  19. Phenothiazines as a solution for multidrug resistant tuberculosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristiansen, Jette E.; Dastidar, Sujata G.; Palchoudhuri, Shauroseni

    2015-01-01

    Historically, multiplicity of actions in synthetic compounds is a rule rather than exception. The science of non-antibiotics evolved in this background. From the antimalarial and antitrypanosomial dye methylene blue, chemically similar compounds, the phenothiazines, were developed. The phenothiaz...... thioridazine and its (-) form to be combined with other antitubercular drugs to treat infections by drug-resistant strains of Mycobacterium tuberculosis and try to eradicate this deadly disease. [Int Microbiol 2015; 18(1):1-12]....

  20. Identification and deconvolution of cross-resistance signals from antimalarial compounds using multidrug-resistant Plasmodium falciparum strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chugh, Monika; Scheurer, Christian; Sax, Sibylle; Bilsland, Elizabeth; van Schalkwyk, Donelly A; Wicht, Kathryn J; Hofmann, Natalie; Sharma, Anil; Bashyam, Sridevi; Singh, Shivendra; Oliver, Stephen G; Egan, Timothy J; Malhotra, Pawan; Sutherland, Colin J; Beck, Hans-Peter; Wittlin, Sergio; Spangenberg, Thomas; Ding, Xavier C

    2015-02-01

    Plasmodium falciparum, the most deadly agent of malaria, displays a wide variety of resistance mechanisms in the field. The ability of antimalarial compounds in development to overcome these must therefore be carefully evaluated to ensure uncompromised activity against real-life parasites. We report here on the selection and phenotypic as well as genotypic characterization of a panel of sensitive and multidrug-resistant P. falciparum strains that can be used to optimally identify and deconvolute the cross-resistance signals from an extended panel of investigational antimalarials. As a case study, the effectiveness of the selected panel of strains was demonstrated using the 1,2,4-oxadiazole series, a newly identified antimalarial series of compounds with in vitro activity against P. falciparum at nanomolar concentrations. This series of compounds was to be found inactive against several multidrug-resistant strains, and the deconvolution of this signal implicated pfcrt, the genetic determinant of chloroquine resistance. Targeted mode-of-action studies further suggested that this new chemical series might act as falcipain 2 inhibitors, substantiating the suggestion that these compounds have a site of action similar to that of chloroquine but a distinct mode of action. New antimalarials must overcome existing resistance and, ideally, prevent its de novo appearance. The panel of strains reported here, which includes recently collected as well as standard laboratory-adapted field isolates, is able to efficiently detect and precisely characterize cross-resistance and, as such, can contribute to the faster development of new, effective antimalarial drugs.

  1. Fluoroquinolone-induced gene transfer in multidrug-resistant Salmonella

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fluoroquinolones are broad spectrum antibiotics that inhibit bacterial DNA gyrase and topoisomerase activity. Bacterial exposure to fluoroquinolones can cause DNA damage and induce a bacterial SOS response to stimulate repair of damaged DNA. Certain prophages (integrated in bacterial chromosomes) ...

  2. ABC transporters as multidrug resistance mechanisms and the development of chemosensitizers for their reversal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Choi Cheol-Hee

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract One of the major problems related with anticancer chemotherapy is resistance against anticancer drugs. The ATP-binding cassette (ABC transporters are a family of transporter proteins that are responsible for drug resistance and a low bioavailability of drugs by pumping a variety of drugs out cells at the expense of ATP hydrolysis. One strategy for reversal of the resistance of tumor cells expressing ABC transporters is combined use of anticancer drugs with chemosensitizers. In this review, the physiological functions and structures of ABC transporters, and the development of chemosensitizers are described focusing on well-known proteins including P-glycoprotein, multidrug resistance associated protein, and breast cancer resistance protein.

  3. Multidrug-resistant Gram-negative bacteria: a product of globalization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawkey, P M

    2015-04-01

    Global trade and mobility of people has increased rapidly over the last 20 years. This has had profound consequences for the evolution and the movement of antibiotic resistance genes. There is increasing exposure of populations all around the world to resistant bacteria arising in the emerging economies. Arguably the most important development of the last two decades in the field of antibiotic resistance is the emergence and spread of extended-spectrum β-lactamases (ESBLs) of the CTX-M group. A consequence of the very high rates of ESBL production among Enterobacteriaceae in Asian countries is that there is a substantial use of carbapenem antibiotics, resulting in the emergence of plasmid-mediated resistance to carbapenems. This article reviews the emergence and spread of multidrug-resistant Gram-negative bacteria, focuses on three particular carbapenemases--imipenem carbapenemases, Klebsiella pneumoniae carbapenemase, and New Delhi metallo-β-lactamase--and highlights the importance of control of antibiotic use.

  4. Establishment and biological characteristics of a multi-drug resistant cell line A549/Gem

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    Yunfeng ZHU

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Background and objective Multi-drug resistance is one of the most important reason why the survival time of non-small cell lung cancer patients is so short. The aim of this study is to establish multi-drug resistant cell line A549/Gem and discuss its biological characters so as to elaborate the possible mechanisms of gemcitabine resistance. Methods Human gemcitabine-resistant non-small cell lung cancer cell line A549/Gem was established by repeated clinical serous peak concentration then low but gradually increasing concentration of gemcitabine from its parental cell human lung adenocarcinoma cell line A549 which is sensitive to gemcitabine. During the course of inducement, monitored its morphology, checked its resistance index and resistant pedigree by MTT method, gathered its growth curve and calculated its doubling time, examined its DNA contents and cell cycles by flow cytometry; at the same time, measured its expression of P53, EGFR, c-erb-B-2, PTEN, PCNA, c-myc, VEGF, MDR-1, Bcl-2, nm23, MMP-9, TIMP-1, CD44v6 Proteins, and RRM1 mRNA. Results The resistance index of A549/Gem?to gemcitabine was 163.228, and the cell line also exhibited cross-resistance to vinorelbine, taxotere, fluorouraci, etoposide and cisplatin, but kept sensitivity to paclitaxol and oxaliplatin. The doubling time of it was shorter and figures in G0-G1 phase were increased than A549. Compared with A549, A549/Gem?achieved EGFR and c-myc protein expression, nm23 protein expression enhanced, p53, Cerb-B-2 and bcl-2 protein expression reduced, PTEN, PCNA and MDR-1 protein expression vanished, but that of MMP-9, VEGF, CD44v6 and TIMP-1 protein changed trivially. Meanwhile, the expression of RRM1 mRNA was augmented markedly. The resistance index of A549/Gem to gemcitabine was 129.783, and the cell line also held cross-resistance to vinorelbine, taxotere, etoposide, cisplatin and sensitivity to paclitaxol. But the resistance to fluorouracil and sensitivity to oxaliplatin

  5. What do proton motive force driven multidrug resistance transporters have in common?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazurkiewicz, Piotr; Driessen, Arnold J M; Konings, Wil N

    2005-01-01

    The extensive progress of genome sequencing projects in recent years has demonstrated that multidrug resistance (MDR) transporters are widely spread among all domains of life. This indicates that they play crucial roles in the survival of organisms. Moreover, antibiotic and chemotherapeutic treatments have revealed that microorganisms and cancer cells may use MDR transporters to fight the cytotoxic action of drugs. Currently, several MDR extrusion systems are being investigated in detail. It is expected that understanding of the molecular basis of multidrug recognition and the transport mechanisms will allow a more rational design of new drugs which either will not be recognized and expelled by or will efficiently inhibit the activity of the MDR transporters. MDR transporters either utilize ATP hydrolysis or an ion motive force as an energy source to drive drugs out of the cell. This review summarizes the recent progress in the field of bacterial proton motive force driven MDR transporters.

  6. Prevalence and characterization of multidrug-resistant zoonotic Enterobacter spp. in poultry of Bangladesh.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nandi, Shuvro Prokash; Sultana, Munawar; Hossain, M Anwar

    2013-05-01

    Poultry and poultry products are major contributors of zoonotic pathogens. Limited data are available on Enterobacter spp. as a potent zoonotic pathogen in poultry. The present study is a first endeavor on the emergence of multidrug-resistant zoonotic Enterobacter spp. and its prevalence arising from poultry in Bangladesh. Cloacal swabs from poultry samples of five different farms at Savar, Dhaka, Bangladesh were collected and from 106 isolates, 18 presumptive Enterobacter spp. were obtained. Antibiogram using 19 used antibiotics belonging to 15 major groups revealed that all of the 18 isolates were completely resistant to penicillin and rifampicin, but differed in their drug resistance pattern against ampicillin (94.4%), clindamycin (94.4%), erythromycin (94.4%), vancomycin (88.9%), sulfonamides (72.2%), imipenem (66.6%), streptomycin (55.6%), nitrofurantoin (33.3%), doxycycline (33.3%), tetracyclines (33.3%), cefepime (11.1%), and gentamicin (5.6%). All Enterobacter spp. were found to be plasmid free, implying that multidrug-resistant properties are chromosomal borne. The vanA and sulI were detected by polymerase chain reaction assay in 17 and 13 isolates, respectively. Amplified ribosomal DNA restriction analysis and randomly amplified polymorphic DNA distributed the 18 multidrug-resistant Enterobacter spp. into three genotypes. Phylogenetic analysis of the representatives of the three genotypes using partial 16S rRNA gene sequence (approximately 900 bp) showed that the genotypically diverse groups belonged to Enterobacter hormaechei, E. cloacae, and E. cancerogenus, respectively. The clinical significance of the close relative Enterobacter spp. is indicative of their zoonotic potential. Therefore, urgent intervention is required to limit the emergence and spread of these bacteria in poultry feed as well as prudent use of antibiotics among poultry farmers in Bangladesh.

  7. A Review of Novel Combinations of Colistin and Lipopeptide or Glycopeptide Antibiotics for the Treatment of Multidrug-Resistant Acinetobacter baumannii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Claeys, Kimberly C; Fiorvento, Anna D; Rybak, Michael J

    2014-12-01

    As antibiotic resistance continues to increase among Gram-negative organisms such as Acinetobacter baumannii there is a growing need for novel therapies to overcome these resistance mechanisms. Antibiotics active against multidrug-resistant A. baumannii (MDRAB) are few, and agents in development are primarily active against other multidrug-resistant Gram-negative organisms. The combinations of colistin and antimicrobials such as glycopeptides and lipopeptides are unique potential treatment modalities against MDRAB. For both lipopeptides and glycopeptides in vitro data have demonstrated significant synergy, resulting in rapid bactericidal activity in time-kill curves. Several invertebrate in vivo models have also demonstrated increased survival compared to colistin alone. Currently, very little clinical data have focused on using these combinations for infections caused exclusively by multidrug-resistant Gram-negatives. The combination of vancomycin and colistin has been studied with conflicting results regarding both improved outcomes and risk of nephrotoxicity. Although in vitro and in vivo models have proved promising, further investigation is required to provide clinical data necessary to support the use of these combinations. The objective of this review is to summarize literature currently available for the novel combination of lipopeptides or glycopeptides with colistin for the treatment of A. baumannii, in particular MDRAB.

  8. OAK-based cochleates as a novel approach to overcome multidrug resistance in bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Livne, L; Epand, R F; Papahadjopoulos-Sternberg, B; Epand, R M; Mor, A

    2010-12-01

    Antibiotic resistance has become a worldwide medical problem. To find new ways of overcoming this phenomenon, we investigated the role of the membrane-active oligo-acyl-lysyl (OAK) sequence C(12)K-7α(8), in combination with essentially ineffective antibiotics. Determination of minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) against gram-negative multidrug-resistant strains of Escherichia coli revealed combinations with sub-MIC OAK levels that acted synergistically with several antibiotics, thus lowering their MICs by several orders of magnitude. To shed light into the molecular basis for this synergism, we used both mutant strains and biochemical assays. Our results suggest that bacterial sensitization to antibiotics was derived mainly from the OAK's capacity to overcome the efflux-enhanced resistance mechanism, by promoting backdoor entry of otherwise excluded antibiotics. To facilitate simultaneous delivery of the pooled drugs to an infection site, we developed a novel OAK-based cochleate system with demonstrable stability in whole blood. To assess the potential therapeutic use of such cochleates, we performed preliminary experiments that imitate systemic treatment of neutropenic mice infected with lethal inoculums of multidrug resistance E. coli. Single-dose administration of erythromycin coencapsulated in OAK-based cochleates has decreased drug toxicity and increased therapeutic efficacy in a dose-dependent manner. Collectively, our findings suggest a potentially useful approach for fighting efflux-enhanced resistance mechanisms.

  9. Antimicrobial potential of Pakistani medicinal plants against multi-drug resistance Staphylococcus aureus

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    Rahat Ejaz

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To determine resistance patterns of Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus isolated from different areas of Pakistan and to identify antimicrobial agents against multi-drug resistant S. aureus strains. Methods: A total of 67 samples (sewerage, nasal and milk were collected from different farm areas of Pakistan to identify local strains of S. aureus. Sixteen out of 67 samples were positive for S. aureus. Only 6 out of 16 S. aureus strains showed resistance to antibiotics. Then the antibacterial effect of 29 medicinal plants was evaluated on these S. aureus isolates and a standard S. aureus strain ATCC 25923. The solvents used for the extraction of plants were acetone, dimethyl sulfoxide and methanol. The in vitro antibacterial activity was performed using agar disc diffusion method. Moreover, minimum inhibitory concentration of effective medicinal plant extracts was identified through micro-dilution method to find out their 50% inhibitory concentration. Results: Plant extracts of 5 medicinal plants (Psidium guajava, Nigella sativa, Piper nigrum, Valeriana jatamansi, and Cucurbita pepo exhibited antibacterial activity against locally isolated multidrug resistant strains of S. aureus. The minimum inhibitory concentration of these extracts was ranged from 0.328 to 5.000 mg/mL. Conclusions: Plant extracts of Psidium guajava, Piper nigrum seed, Valeriana jatamansi, Cucurbita pepo and Nigella sativa showed significant in vitro antibacterial activity and thus, such findings may serve as valuable contribution in the treatment of infection and may contribute to the development of potential antimicrobial agents against multi drug resistant strains of S. aureus

  10. Antimicrobial potential of Pakistani medicinal plants against multi-drug resistance Staphylococcus aureus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Rahat Ejaz; Usman A Ashfaq; Sobia Idrees

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To determine resistance patterns of Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) isolated from different areas of Pakistan and to identify antimicrobial agents against multi-drug resistant S.aureus strains. Methods: A total of 67 samples (sewerage, nasal and milk) were collected from different farm areas of Pakistan to identify local strains of S. aureus. Sixteen out of 67 samples were positive for S.aureus. Only 6 out of 16 S. aureus strains showed resistance to antibiotics. Then the antibacterial effect of 29 medicinal plants was evaluated on these S. aureus isolates and a standard S. aureus strain ATCC 25923. The solvents used for the extraction of plants were acetone, dimethyl sulfoxide and methanol. The in vitro antibacterial activity was performed using agar disc diffusion method. Moreover, minimum inhibitory concentration of effective medicinal plant extracts was identified through micro-dilution method to find out their 50% inhibitory concentration.Results:Plant extracts of 5 medicinal plants (Psidium guajava, Nigella sativa, Piper nigrum, Valeriana jatamansi, and Cucurbita pepo) exhibited antibacterial activity against locally isolated multidrug resistant strains of S. aureus. The minimum inhibitory concentration of these extracts was ranged from 0.328 to 5.000 mg/mL. Conclusions: Plant extracts of Psidium guajava, Piper nigrum seed, Valeriana jatamansi, Cucurbita pepo and Nigella sativa showed significant in vitro antibacterial activity and thus, such findings may serve as valuable contribution in the treatment of infection and may contribute to the development of potential antimicrobial agents against multi drug resistant strains of S. aureus.

  11. High prevalence of multi-drug resistant Streptococcus pneumoniae among healthy children in Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thummeepak, Rapee; Leerach, Nontapat; Kunthalert, Duangkamol; Tangchaisuriya, Udomsak; Thanwisai, Aunchalee; Sitthisak, Sutthirat

    2015-01-01

    Antibiotic resistance in Streptococcus pneumoniae is an emerging health problem worldwide. The incidence of antimicrobial-resistant S. pneumoniae is increasing, and nasal colonization of S. pneumoniae in children increases the risk of pneumococcal infection. In this study, the prevalence of S. pneumoniae nasal colonization was studied in Thai children from three different districts. S. pneumoniae nasal colonization was found in 38 of 237 subjects (16.0%). The carriage rate indicated higher rates in two rural districts (18.2% and 29.8%) than in the urban district (2.8%). The antibiotic susceptibility pattern was determined using the disk diffusion method. Prevalence of multi-drug resistance S. pneumoniae (MDR-SP) was 31.6%. Resistance to commonly prescribed antibiotics was found for ampicillin (5.3%), azithromycin (26.3%), cefepime (2.6%), chloramphenicol (18.4%), clindamycin (18.4%), erythromycin (21.1%), oxacillin (44.7%), trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole (78.9%) and tetracycline (15.8%). All isolates were sensitive to ceftriaxone. The pulsed-field gel electrophoresis pattern was used to compare genetic diversity of the S. pneumoniae isolates. PFGE demonstrated the variation in genotypes of S. pneumoniae from different areas. High prevalence of multi-drug resistance S. pneumoniae nasal colonization in healthy Thai children was indicated. Effective strategies for appropriate use of antibiotics are therefore needed in the community.

  12. Molecular Genetic Analysis of Multi-drug Resistance in Indian Isolates of Mycobacterium tuberculosis

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    Noman Siddiqi

    1998-09-01

    Full Text Available A total of 116 isolates from patients attending the out-patient department at the All India Institute of Medical Sciences, New Delhi and the New Delhi Tuberculosis Centre, New Delhi, India were collected. They were analyzed for resistance to drugs prescribed in the treatment for tuberculosis. The drug resistance was initially determined by microbiological techniques. The Bactec 460TB system was employed to determine the type and level of resistance in each isolate. The isolates were further characterized at molecular level. The multi-drug loci corresponding to rpo b, gyr A, kat G were studied for mutation(s by the polymerase chain reaction-single strand conformational polymorphism (PCR-SSCP technique. The SSCP positive samples were sequenced to characterize the mutations in rpo b, and gyr A loci. While previously reported mutations in the gyr A and rpo b loci were found to be present, several novel mutations were also scored in the rpo b locus. Interestingly, analysis of the gyr A locus showed the presence of point mutation(s that could not be detected by PCR-SSCP. Furthermore, rifampicin resistance was found to be an important marker for checking multi-drug resistance (MDR in clinical isolates of Mycobacterium tuberculosis. This is the first report on molecular genetic analysis of MDR tuberculosis one from India, highlights the increasing incidence of MDR in the Indian isolates of M. tuberculosis.

  13. Diagnostic and therapeutic progress of multi-drug resistance with anti-HBV nucleos(t)ide analogues

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhuo-Lun Song; Yu-Jun Cui; Wei-Ping Zheng; Da-Hong Teng; Hong Zheng

    2012-01-01

    Nucleos(t)ide analogues (NA) are a breakthrough in the treatment and management of chronic hepatitis B.NA could suppress the replication of hepatitis B virus (HBV) and control the progression of the disease.However,drug resistance caused by their long-term use becomes a practical problem,which influences the long-term outcomes in patients.Liver transplantation is the only choice for patients with HBV-related end-stage liver disease.But,the recurrence of HBV after transplantation often caused by the development of drug resistance leads to unfavorable outcomes for the recipients.Recentiy,the multi-drug resistance (MDR) has become a common issue raised due to the development and clinical application of a variety of NA.This may complicate the antiviral therapy and bring poorly prognostic outcomes.Although clinical evidence has suggested that combination therapy with different NA could effectively reduce the viral load in patients with MDR,the advent of new antiviral agents with high potency and high genetic barrier to resistance brings hope to antiviral therapy.The future of HBV researches relies on how to prevent the MDR occurrence and develop reasonable and effective treatment strategies.This review focuses on the diagnostic and therapeutic progress in MDR caused by the anti-HBV NA and describes some new research progress in this field.

  14. Management of multidrug-resistant tuberculosis and patients in retreatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caminero, J A

    2005-05-01

    Retreatment of tuberculosis involves the management of entities as diverse as relapse, failure, treatment after default, and poor patient adherence to the previous treatment. The emergence of conditions for selection of resistance (failure and partial abandonment) is a matter of great concern. The development of a retreatment regimen for tuberculosis requires consideration of certain basic premises. The importance of a comprehensive and directed history of drugs taken in the past, and the limited reliability of susceptibility tests to many of these drugs, should be kept in mind. Taking this into account, and possessing a thorough knowledge of all anti-tuberculosis medications, it is possible to cure almost all patients with an appropriate retreatment regimen including a minimum of three or four drugs not previously used. Nonetheless, the treatment of these patients is so complex that it should only be carried out by experienced staff. Concern about treating tuberculosis patients with drug resistance varies greatly depending on the available resources. High-income countries should provide individual treatment regimens adapted to each patient; however, in other settings, restricted resources could justify the implementation of standardised therapeutic guidelines with second-line drugs in order to facilitate management and reduce costs.

  15. High rates of multidrug resistance among uropathogenic Escherichia coli in children and analyses of ESBL producers from Nepal

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    Narayan Prasad Parajuli

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Emergence of Extended-spectrum beta-lactamase producing Escherichia coli causing urinary tract infections (UTI among pediatric patients is an increasing problem worldwide. However, very little is known about pediatric urinary tract infections and antimicrobial resistance trend from Nepal. This study was conducted to assess the current antibiotic resistance rate and ESBL production among uropathogenic Escherichia coli in pediatric patients of a tertiary care teaching hospital of Nepal. Methods A total of 5,484 urinary tract specimens from children suspected with UTI attending a teaching hospital of Nepal over a period of one year were processed for the isolation of bacterial pathogens and their antimicrobial susceptibility testing. Escherichia coli (n = 739, the predominant isolate in pediatric UTI, was further selected for the detection of ESBL-production by phenotypic combination disk diffusion test. Results Incidence of urinary tract infection among pediatric patients was found to be 19.68% and E coli (68.4% was leading pathogen involved. Out of 739 E coli isolates, 64.9% were multidrug resistant (MDR and 5% were extensively drug resistant (XDR. Extended spectrum beta lactamase (ESBL was detected in 288 (38.9% of the E coli isolates. Conclusion Alarming rate of drug resistance among pediatric uropathogens and high rate of ESBL-producing E. coli was observed. It is extremely necessary to routinely investigate the drug resistance among all isolates and formulate strict antibiotics prescription policy in our country.

  16. Effect of Chlorine Exposure on the Survival and Antibiotic Gene Expression of Multidrug Resistant Acinetobacter baumannii in Water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deepti Prasad Karumathil

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Acinetobacter baumannii is a multidrug resistant pathogen capable of causing a wide spectrum of clinical conditions in humans. Acinetobacter spp. is ubiquitously found in different water sources. Chlorine being the most commonly used disinfectant in water, the study investigated the effect of chlorine on the survival of A. baumannii in water and transcription of genes conferring antibiotic resistance. Eight clinical isolates of A. baumannii, including a fatal meningitis isolate (ATCC 17978 (~108 CFU/mL were separately exposed to free chlorine concentrations (0.2, 1, 2, 3 and 4 ppm with a contact time of 30, 60, 90 and 120 second. The surviving pathogen counts at each specified contact time were determined using broth dilution assay. In addition, real-time quantitative PCR (RT-qPCR analysis of the antibiotic resistance genes (efflux pump genes and those encoding resistance to specific antibiotics of three selected A. baumannii strains following exposure to chlorine was performed. Results revealed that all eight A. baumannii isolates survived the tested chlorine levels during all exposure times (p > 0.05. Additionally, there was an up-regulation of all or some of the antibiotic resistance genes in A. baumannii, indicating a chlorine-associated induction of antibiotic resistance in the pathogen.

  17. Antibiotic combination therapy can select for broad-spectrum multidrug resistance in Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vestergaard, Martin; Paulander, Wilhelm; Marvig, Rasmus L; Clasen, Julie; Jochumsen, Nicholas; Molin, Søren; Jelsbak, Lars; Ingmer, Hanne; Folkesson, Anders

    2016-01-01

    Combination therapy with several antibiotics is one strategy that has been applied in order to limit the spread of antimicrobial resistance. We compared the de novo evolution of resistance during combination therapy with the β-lactam ceftazidime and the fluoroquinolone ciprofloxacin with the resistance evolved after single-drug exposure. Combination therapy selected for mutants that displayed broad-spectrum resistance, and a major resistance mechanism was mutational inactivation of the repressor gene mexR that regulates the multidrug efflux operon mexAB-oprM. Deregulation of this operon led to a broad-spectrum resistance phenotype that decreased susceptibility to the combination of drugs applied during selection as well as to unrelated antibiotic classes. Mutants isolated after single-drug exposure displayed narrow-spectrum resistance and carried mutations in the MexCD-OprJ efflux pump regulator gene nfxB conferring ciprofloxacin resistance, or in the gene encoding the non-essential penicillin-binding protein DacB conferring ceftazidime resistance. Reconstruction of resistance mutations by allelic replacement and in vitro fitness assays revealed that in contrast to single antibiotic use, combination therapy consistently selected for mutants with enhanced fitness expressing broad-spectrum resistance mechanisms.

  18. DNA sequence analysis of plasmids from multidrug resistant Salmonella enterica serotype Heidelberg isolates.

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    Jing Han

    Full Text Available Salmonella enterica serovar Heidelberg is among the most detected serovars in swine and poultry, ranks among the top five serotypes associated with human salmonellosis and is disproportionately associated with invasive infections and mortality in humans. Salmonella are known to carry plasmids associated with antimicrobial resistance and virulence. To identify plasmid-associated genes in multidrug resistant S. enterica serovar Heidelberg, antimicrobial resistance plasmids from five isolates were sequenced using the 454 LifeSciences pyrosequencing technology. Four of the isolates contained incompatibility group (Inc A/C multidrug resistance plasmids harboring at least eight antimicrobial resistance genes. Each of these strains also carried a second resistance plasmid including two IncFIB, an IncHI2 and a plasmid lacking an identified Inc group. The fifth isolate contained an IncI1 plasmid, encoding resistance to gentamicin, streptomycin and sulfonamides. Some of the IncA/C plasmids lacked the full concert of transfer genes and yet were able to be conjugally transferred, likely due to the transfer genes carried on the companion plasmids in the strains. Several non-IncA/C resistance plasmids also carried putative virulence genes. When the sequences were compared to previously sequenced plasmids, it was found that while all plasmids demonstrated some similarity to other plasmids, they were unique, often due to differences in mobile genetic elements in the plasmids. Our study suggests that Salmonella Heidelberg isolates harbor plasmids that co-select for antimicrobial resistance and virulence, along with genes that can mediate the transfer of plasmids within and among other bacterial isolates. Prevalence of such plasmids can complicate efforts to control the spread of S. enterica serovar Heidelberg in food animal and human populations.

  19. Phenothiazines as a solution for multidrug resistant tuberculosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristiansen, Jette E; Dastidar, Sujata G; Palchoudhuri, Shauroseni;

    2015-01-01

    . The phenothiazines were first recognised for their antipsychotic properties, but soon after their antimicrobial functions came to be known and then such compounds were designated as non-antibiotics. The emergence of highly drug-resistant bacteria had initiated an urgent need to search for novel affordable compounds......Historically, multiplicity of actions in synthetic compounds is a rule rather than exception. The science of non-antibiotics evolved in this background. From the antimalarial and antitrypanosomial dye methylene blue, chemically similar compounds, the phenothiazines, were developed...... try to remain and multiply silently. Such a small dose is devoid of its adverse side-effects. Recent studies have shown that the (-) thioridazine is a more active antimicrobial agent and devoid of the toxic side effects normally encountered. This review describes the possibilities of bringing down...

  20. Toxicological relevance of the multidrug resistance protein 1, MRP1 (ABCC1) and related transporters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leslie, E M; Deeley, R G; Cole, S P

    2001-10-05

    The 190 kDa multidrug resistance protein 1 (MRP1/ABCC1) is a founding member of a subfamily of the ATP binding cassette (ABC) superfamily of transport proteins and was originally identified on the basis of its elevated expression in multidrug resistant lung cancer cells. In addition to its ability to confer resistance in tumour cells, MRP1 is ubiquitously expressed in normal tissues and is a primary active transporter of GSH, glucuronate and sulfate conjugated and unconjugated organic anions of toxicological relevance. Substrates include lipid peroxidation products, herbicides, tobacco specific nitrosamines, mycotoxins, heavy metals, and natural product and antifolate anti-cancer agents. MRP1 also transports unmodified xenobiotics but often requires GSH to do so. Active efflux is generally an important aspect of cellular detoxification since it prevents the accumulation of conjugated and unconjugated compounds that have the potential to be directly toxic. The related transporters MRP2 and MRP3 have overlapping substrate specificities with MRP1 but different tissue distributions, and evidence that they also have chemoprotective functions are discussed. Finally, MRP homologues have been described in other species including yeast and nematodes. Those isolated from the vascular plant Arabidopsis thaliana (AtMRPs) decrease the cytoplasmic concentration of conjugated toxins through sequestration in vacuoles and are implicated in providing herbicide resistance to plants.

  1. DbMDR: a relational database for multidrug resistance genes as potential drug targets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Sanchita; Mishra, Manoj; Sen, Naresh; Parihar, Rashi; Dwivedi, Gaurav Raj; Khan, Feroz; Sharma, Ashok

    2011-10-01

    DbMDR is non-redundant reference database of multidrug resistance (MDR) genes and their orthologs acting as potential drug targets. Drug resistance is a common phenomenon of pathogens, creating a serious problem of inactivation of drugs and antibiotics resulting in occurrence of diseases. Apart from other factors, the MDR genes present in pathogens are shown to be responsible for multidrug resistance. Much of the unorganized information on MDR genes is scattered across the literature and other web resources. Thus, consolidation of such knowledge about MDR genes into one database will make the drug discovery research more efficient. Mining of text for MDR genes has resulted into a large number of publications but in scattered and unorganized form. This information was compiled into a database, which enables a user not only to look at a particular MDR gene but also to find out putative homologs based on sequence similarity, conserved domains, and motifs in proteins encoded by MDR genes more efficiently. At present, DbMDR database contains 2843 MDR genes characterized experimentally as well as functionally annotated with cross-referencing search support. The DbMDR database (http://203.190.147.116/dbmdr/) is a comprehensive resource for comparative study focused on MDR genes and metabolic pathway efflux pumps and intended to provide a platform for researchers for further research in drug resistance.

  2. Control of multidrug resistant bacteria in a tertiary care hospital in India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaggi Namita

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The objective of this study was to assess the impact of antimicrobial stewardship programs on the multidrug resistance patterns of bacterial isolates. The study comprised an initial retrospective analysis of multidrug resistance in bacterial isolates for one year (July 2007-June 2008 followed by prospective evaluation of the impact of Antimicrobial Stewardship programs on resistance for two years and nine months (July 2008-March 2011. Setting A 300-bed tertiary care private hospital in Gurgaon, Haryana (India Findings Methods Study Design • July 2007 to June 2008: Resistance patterns of bacterial isolates were studied. • July 2008: Phase I intervention programme Implementation of an antibiotic policy in the hospital. • July 2008 to June 2010: Assessment of the impact of the Phase I intervention programme. • July 2010 to March 2011: Phase II intervention programme: Formation and effective functioning of the antimicrobial stewardship committee. Statistical correlation of the Defined daily dose (DDD for prescribed drugs with the antimicrobial resistance of Gram negatives. Results Phase I intervention programme (July 2008 resulted in a decrease of 4.47% in ESBLs (E.coli and Klebsiella and a significant decrease of 40.8% in carbapenem-resistant Pseudomonas. Phase II intervention (July 2010 brought a significant reduction (24.7% in carbapenem-resistant Pseudomonas. However, the resistance in the other Gram negatives (E.coli, Klebsiella, and Acinetobacter rose and then stabilized. A positive correlation was observed in Pseudomonas and Acinetobacter with carbapenems and cefoperazone-sulbactam. Piperacillin-tazobactam showed a positive correlation with Acinetobacter only. E.coli and Klebsiella showed positive correlation with cefoparazone-sulbactam and piperacillin-tazobactam. Conclusion An antimicrobial stewardship programme with sustained and multifaceted efforts is essential to promote the judicious use of antibiotics.

  3. Antibiotic resistance and multidrug-resistant efflux pumps expression in lactic acid bacteria isolated from pozol, a nonalcoholic Mayan maize fermented beverage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wacher-Rodarte, Maria Del Carmen; Trejo-Muñúzuri, Tanya Paulina; Montiel-Aguirre, Jesús Fernando; Drago-Serrano, Maria Elisa; Gutiérrez-Lucas, Raúl L; Castañeda-Sánchez, Jorge Ismael; Sainz-Espuñes, Teresita

    2016-05-01

    Pozol is a handcrafted nonalcoholic Mayan beverage produced by the spontaneous fermentation of maize dough by lactic acid bacteria. Lactic acid bacteria (LAB) are carriers of chromosomal encoded multidrug-resistant efflux pumps genes that can be transferred to pathogens and/or confer resistance to compounds released during the fermentation process causing food spoiling. The aim of this study was to evaluate the antibiotic sensibility and the transcriptional expression of ABC-type efflux pumps in LAB isolated from pozol that contributes to multidrug resistance. Analysis of LAB and Staphylococcus (S.) aureus ATCC 29213 and ATCC 6538 control strains to antibiotic susceptibility, minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC), and minimal bactericidal concentration (MBC) to ethidium bromide were based in "standard methods" whereas the ethidium bromide efflux assay was done by fluorometric assay. Transcriptional expression of efflux pumps was analyzed by RT-PCR. LAB showed antibiotic multiresistance profiles, moreover, Lactococcus (L.) lactis and Lactobacillus (L.) plantarum displayed higher ethidium bromide efflux phenotype than S. aureus control strains. Ethidium bromide resistance and ethidium bromide efflux phenotypes were unrelated with the overexpression of lmrD in L. lactics, or the underexpression of lmrA in L. plantarum and norA in S. aureus. These findings suggest that, moreover, the analyzed efflux pumps genes, other unknown redundant mechanisms may underlie the antibiotic resistance and the ethidium bromide efflux phenotype in L. lactis and L. plantarum. Phenotypic and molecular drug multiresistance assessment in LAB may improve a better selection of the fermentation starter cultures used in pozol, and to control the antibiotic resistance widespread and food spoiling for health safety.

  4. Neuronal and glial expression of the multidrug resistance gene product in an experimental epilepsy model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazarowski, Alberto; Ramos, Alberto Javier; García-Rivello, Hernán; Brusco, Alicia; Girardi, Elena

    2004-02-01

    1. Failure of anticonvulsive drugs to prevent seizures is a common complication of epilepsy treatment known as drug-refractory epilepsy but their causes are not well understood. It is hypothesized that the multidrug resistance P-glycoprotein (Pgp-170), the product of the MDR-1 gene that is normally expressed in several excretory tissues including the blood brain barrier, may be participating in the refractory epilepsy. 2. Using two monoclonal antibodies against Pgp-170, we investigated the expression and cellular distribution of this protein in the rat brain during experimentally induced epilepsy. Repeated seizures were induced in male Wistar rats by daily administration of 3-mercaptopropionic acid (MP) 45 mg/kg i.p. for either 4 days (MP-4) or 7 days (MP-7). Control rats received an equivalent volume of vehicle. One day after the last injection, rats were sacrificed and brains were processed for immunohistochemistry for Pgp-170. As it was previously described, Pgp-170 immunostaining was observed in some brain capillary endothelial cells of animals from control group. 3. Increased Pgp-170 immunoreactivity was detected in MP-treated animals. Besides the Pgp-170 expressed in blood vessels, neuronal, and glial immunostaining was detected in hippocampus, striatum, and cerebral cortex of MP-treated rats. Pgp-170 immunolabeled neurons and glial cells were observed in a nonhomogeneous distribution. MP-4 animals presented a very prominent Pgp-170 immunostaining in the capillary endothelium, surrounding astrocytes and some neighboring neurons while MP-7 group showed increased neuronal labeling. 4. Our results demonstrate a selective increase in Pgp-170 immunoreactivity in the brain capillary endothelial cells, astrocytes, and neurons during repetitive MP-induced seizures. 5. The role for this Pgp-170 overexpression in endothelium and astrocytes as a clearance mechanism in the refractory epilepsy, and the consequences of neuronal Pgp-170 expression remain to be disclosed.

  5. Breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP/ABCG2): its role in multidrug resistance and regulation of its gene expression

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Takeo Nakanishi; Douglas D. Ross

    2012-01-01

    Breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP)/ATP-binding cassette subfamily G member 2 (ABCG2) is an ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter identified as a molecular cause of multidrug resistance (MDR) in diverse cancer cells.BCRP physiologically functions as a part of a self-defense mechanism for the organism; it enhances elimination of toxic xenobiotic substances and harmful agents in the gut and biliary tract,as well as through the blood-brain,placental,and possibly blood-testis barriers.BCRP recognizes and transports numerous anticancer drugs including conventional chemotherapeutic and targeted small therapeutic molecules relatively new in clinical use.Thus,BCRP expression in cancer cells directly causes MDR by active efflux of anticancer drugs.Because BCRP is also known to be a stem cell marker,its expression in cancer cells could be a manifestation of metabolic and signaling pathways that confer multiple mechanisms of drug resistance,self-renewal (stemness),and invasiveness (aggressiveness),and thereby impart a poor prognosis.Therefore,blocking BCRP-mediated active efflux may provide a therapeutic benefit for cancers.Delineating the precise molecular mechanisms for BCRP gene expression may lead to identification of a novel molecular target to modulate BCRP-mediated MDR.Current evidence suggests that BCRP gene transcription is regulated by a number of trans-acting elements including hypoxia inducible factor 1α, estrogen receptor, and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor.Furthermore,alternative promoter usage,demethylation of the BCRP promoter,and histone modificationare likely associated with drug-induced BCRP overexpression in cancer cells.Finally,PI3K/AKT signaling may play a critical role in modulating BCRP function under a variety of conditions.These biological events seem involved in a complicated manner.Untangling the events would be an essential first step to developing a method to modulate BCRP function to aid patients with cancer.This review will

  6. In vitro antimicrobial potential of Terminalia chebula fruit extracts against multidrug-resistant uropathogens

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Anwesa Bag; Subir Kumar Bhattacharyya; Nishith Kumar Pal; Rabi Ranjan Chattopadhyay

    2012-01-01

    Objective: Terminalia chebula Retz. (combretaceae) is called the “King of Medicine” in Tibet and is always listed at the top of the list of “Ayurvedic Materia Medica” because of its extraordinary power of healing. The present study was carried out to evaluate the possible in vitro antibacterial potential of different solvent extracts of T. chebula fruit against multidrug-resistant uropathogens. Methods: A total of 52 multidrug-resistant uropathogenic bacteria were used in this study. Successive extractions of T. chebula fruits were performed with solvents of different polarities. Agar well diffusion and microbroth dilution assay methods were used for antibacterial susceptibility testing. Kill-kinetics study was done to know the rate and extent of bacterial killing. Qualitative phytochemical screening was done to know the major phytoconstituents present in the plant material. Acute oral toxicity study in mice was performed to evaluate the toxic potential of the plant material, if any. Results:The ethanol extract of T. chebula fruits demonstrated a strong antimicrobial activity against all the test isolates and found to be most effective over others. Kill-kinetics study showed dose and time dependent antibacterial activity of ethanol extract. Phytochemical analysis revealed the presence of high concentration of phenolics and low concentration of flavonoids and terpenoids. In acute oral toxicity study, no gross behavioral changes were observed in mice at recommended dosage level and 24 h LD50 of ethanol extract was found to be >4 g/kg, p.o. in mice. Conclusions: The results provide justification for the use of Terminalia chebula fruit in folk medicine to treat various infectious diseases and could be useful for the development of alternative/ complementary medicine for multidrug-resistant uropathogens.

  7. Curative effect of transbronchoscopic perfusion combined with conventional chemotherapy on multi-drug resistant tuberculosis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yang Li

    2016-01-01

    Objective:To analyze the curative effect of transbronchoscopic perfusion combined with conventional chemotherapy on multi-drug resistant tuberculosis.Methods: A total of 70 patients with multi-drug resistant tuberculosis treated in our hospital between April 2012 and April 2015 were selected and randomly divided into two groups, control group received conventional chemotherapy and observation group received transbronchoscopic perfusion + conventional chemotherapy. After treatment, negative conversion ratio of sputum mycobacterium tuberculosis, immune function, disease-specific indexes, oxidative stress indexes and liver function indexes were compared between two groups of patients. Results: After 6 months and 12 months of treatment, negative conversion ratio of sputum mycobacterium tuberculosis of observation group were significantly higher than those of control group; after 12 months of treatment, CD3+, CD4+, CD4+/CD8+, IgA, IgM and IgG levels in peripheral blood of observation group were significantly higher than those of control group while disease-specific indexes ADA and LDH content in serum were lower than those of control group; oxidative stress indexes TOS, MAOA and OSI content in serum were lower than those of control group while TAS and GSH-Px content were higher than those of control group; liver function indexes STB, ALP, ALT and AST content in serum were lower than those of control group while TP content was higher than that of control group.Conclusions:Transbronchoscopic perfusion combined with conventional chemotherapy can improve the treatment effectiveness, improve immune function as well as reduce oxidative stress and liver damage in patients with multi-drug resistant tuberculosis, and is advantageous in optimizing long-term treatment outcome.

  8. Epidemiology and molecular characterization of multidrug-resistant Gram-negative bacteria in Southeast Asia

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    Nuntra Suwantarat

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Multidrug-resistant Gram-negative bacteria (MDRGN, including extended-spectrum β-lactamases (ESBLs and multidrug-resistant glucose-nonfermenting Gram-negative bacilli (nonfermenters, have emerged and spread throughout Southeast Asia. Methods We reviewed and summarized current critical knowledge on the epidemiology and molecular characterization of MDRGN in Southeast Asia by PubMed searches for publications prior to 10 March 2016 with the term related to “MDRGN definition” combined with specific Southeast Asian country names (Thailand, Singapore, Malaysia, Vietnam, Indonesia, Philippines, Laos, Cambodia, Myanmar, Brunei. Results There were a total of 175 publications from the following countries: Thailand (77, Singapore (35, Malaysia (32, Vietnam (23, Indonesia (6, Philippines (1, Laos (1, and Brunei (1. We did not find any publications on MDRGN from Myanmar and Cambodia. We did not include publications related to Shigella spp., Salmonella spp., and Vibrio spp. and non-human related studies in our review. English language articles and abstracts were included for analysis. After the abstracts were reviewed, data on MDRGN in Southeast Asia from 54 publications were further reviewed and included in this study. Conclusions MDRGNs are a major contributor of antimicrobial-resistant bacteria in Southeast Asia. The high prevalence of ESBLs has been a major problem since 2005 and is possibly related to the development of carbapenem resistant organisms in this region due to the overuse of carbapenem therapy. Carbapenem–resistant Acinetobacter baumannii is the most common pathogen associated with nosocomial infections in this region followed by carbapenem-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Although Southeast Asia is not an endemic area for carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae (CRE, recently, the rate of CRE detection has been increasing. Limited infection control measures, lack of antimicrobial control, such as the presence of

  9. New drugs to treat multidrug-resistant tuberculosis: the case for bedaquiline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leibert, Eric; Danckers, Mauricio; Rom, William N

    2014-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis develops spontaneous resistance mutants to virtually every drug in use. Courses of therapy select for these mutants and drug-resistant organisms emerge. The development of drug-resistant organisms has reached the point that drug resistance now threatens to undermine global success against tuberculosis (TB). New drugs are needed. The last new class of drugs specifically developed for treatment of TB was the rifamycins over 40 years ago. New funding sources and the development of product development partnerships have energized the TB drug development effort. There are now more TB drugs in development than at any time in the past. The first of these drugs to be developed and marketed was bedaquiline. Bedaquiline has an entirely novel mechanism of action and so should be active against otherwise highly resistant organisms. It acts on the transmembrane component of adenosine triphosphate synthase and acts by preventing electron transport. This raises the exciting possibility that bedaquiline may be active against less metabolically active organisms. Drug-drug interactions between rifamycins and the cytochrome P450-3A system will limit bedaquiline's utility and create complexity in treatment regimens. In clinical trials, treatment with bedaquiline added to a background multidrug-resistant TB regimen was associated with earlier culture conversion and higher cure rates, but there were unexplained excess deaths in the bedaquiline arms of these trials. Food and Drug Administration approved bedaquiline for the treatment of multidrug-resistant TB when an effective treatment regimen cannot otherwise be provided. They required a black box warning about excess deaths and require that a phase III trial be completed. A planned Phase III trial is being reorganized. While bedaquiline is an exciting drug and marks a dramatic moment in the history of TB treatment, its ultimate place in the anti-TB drug armamentarium is unclear pending the Phase III trial and

  10. Role of serum interleukin-6 in deciding therapy for multidrug resistant oral lichen planus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marwah, Akanksha; Kaushik, Smita; Garg, Vijay K.; Gupta, Sunita

    2015-01-01

    Background Oral lichen planus (OLP) is a T cell mediated immune response. T cells locally present in the involved tissues release cytokines like interleukin-6 (IL-6), which contributes to pathogenesis of OLP. Also IL-6 has been associated with multidrug resistance protein (MRP) expression by keratinocytes. Correspondingly, upregulation of MRP was found in OLP. We conducted this study to evaluate the effects of various drugs on serum IL-6 in OLP; and correlation of these effects with the nature of clinical response and resistance pattern seen in OLP lesions with various therapeutic modalities. Thus we evaluated the role of serum IL-6 in deciding therapy for multidrug resistant OLP. Material and Methods Serum IL-6 was evaluated in 42 erosive OLP (EOLP) patients and 10 normal mucosa and 10 oral squamous cell carcinoma cases using ELISA technique. OLP patients were randomly divided into 3 groups of 14 patients each and were subjected to Pimecrolimus local application, oral Mycophenolate Mofetil (MMF) and Methotrexate (MTX) alongwith Pimecrolimus local application. IL-6 levels were evaluated before and after treatment. Results Serum IL-6 levels were raised above 3pg/ml in 26.19% erosive OLP (EOLP) cases (mean- 3.72±8.14). EOLP (5%) cases with IL-6 levels above 5pg/ml were resistant in MTX group. However significant decrease in serum IL-6 corresponding with the clinical resolution was seen in MMF group. Conclusions Significantly raised IL-6 levels in EOLP reflect the chronic inflammatory nature of the disease. As serum IL-6 levels significantly decreased in MMF group, correspondingly no resistance to treatment was noted. However with MTX there was no significant decrease in IL-6 and resistance to treatment was noted in some, especially plaque type lesions. Thus IL-6 can be a possible biomarker in deciding the best possible therapy for treatment resistant OLP. Key words:Lichen planus, biological markers, cytokines, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, immunosuppressive

  11. Prevalence and multidrug resistance pattern of Salmonella isolated from resident wild birds of Bangladesh

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    Abdullah Al Faruq

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Aim: Salmonellosis is one of the most common zoonotic diseases, and the presence of antimicrobial resistant Salmonella in wild birds is global public health threat. Throughout the last decades, multidrug resistance of Salmonella spp. has increased, particularly in developing countries. Therefore, a cross-sectional study was conducted to investigate the prevalence of Salmonella spp. and antimicrobial resistance pattern against Salmonella spp. from two species of resident wild birds namely house crow (Corvus splendens and Asian pied starling (Gracupica contra. Materials and Methods: Samples were collected from cloacal swabs of house crows and Asian pied starling for isolating Salmonella spp. (bacteriological culture methods followed by antimicrobial susceptibility testing (disk diffusion method against Salmonella spp. isolates during March to December 2014. Results: The prevalence of Salmonella in Asian pied starling and house crows were 67% and 65%, respectively. Within the category of samples from different species, the variation in prevalence was not varied significantly (p>0.05. Isolated Salmonella spp. was tested for resistance to six different antimicrobial agents. Among six antimicrobial tested, 100% resistance were found to penicillin, oxacillin, and clindamycin followed by erythromycin (50-93%, kanamycin (7-20%, and cephalothin (30-67% from both species of birds. Kanamycin remained sensitive in (70-73%, cephalothin (26-70%, and erythromycin appeared to be (0-30% sensitive against Salmonella spp. isolates. Isolated Salmonella spp. was multidrug resistant up to three of the six antimicrobials tested. Conclusion: It can be said that the rational use of antimicrobials needs to be adopted in the treatment of disease for livestock, poultry, and human of Bangladesh to limit the emergence of drug resistance to Salmonella spp.

  12. Undomesticated animals as a reservoir of multidrug-resistant Enterococcus in eastern Poland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowakiewicz, Aneta; Ziółkowska, Grażyna; Zięba, Przemysław; Kostruba, Anna

    2014-07-01

    To assess implications for public health we compared the resistance of Enterococcus spp. strains to antibacterial drugs in wild and exotic animals with strains originating in domesticated animals and characterized correlations between Enterococcus species, the source of the isolate, and the degree of resistance to selected antibiotics. All strains, regardless of source, were susceptible to β-lactams, gentamicin, linezolid, and teicoplanin; the highest resistance was to kanamycin, quinupristin, and rifampicin. Thirteen strains from undomesticated animals were resistant to vancomycin, and one strain, from a fox, was resistant to streptomycin (high-dose). Multidrug-resistant strains accounted for 46% of the strains from wild animals and 59% of the strains from an exotic animal (the Russian tortoise; Testudo horsfieldii). Despite the relatively low level of resistance in the strains isolated from wild and exotic animals, the large number of intermediately susceptible strains in these groups is an indication of the evolutionary character of the development of resistance, suggesting that these animals may be potential reservoirs of Enterococcus strains resistant to a wide panel of currently used antibiotics.

  13. New drugs to treat multidrug-resistant tuberculosis: the case for bedaquiline

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leibert E

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Eric Leibert, Mauricio Danckers, William N Rom Department of Internal Medicine, Division of Pulmonary, Critical Care and Sleep Medicine, New York University School of Medicine, New York, NY, USA Abstract: Mycobacterium tuberculosis develops spontaneous resistance mutants to virtually every drug in use. Courses of therapy select for these mutants and drug-resistant organisms emerge. The development of drug-resistant organisms has reached the point that drug resistance now threatens to undermine global success against tuberculosis (TB. New drugs are needed. The last new class of drugs specifically developed for treatment of TB was the rifamycins over 40 years ago. New funding sources and the development of product development partnerships have energized the TB drug development effort. There are now more TB drugs in development than at any time in the past. The first of these drugs to be developed and marketed was bedaquiline. Bedaquiline has an entirely novel mechanism of action and so should be active against otherwise highly resistant organisms. It acts on the transmembrane component of adenosine triphosphate synthase and acts by preventing electron transport. This raises the exciting possibility that bedaquiline may be active against less metabolically active organisms. Drug–drug interactions between rifamycins and the cytochrome P450-3A system will limit bedaquiline's utility and create complexity in treatment regimens. In clinical trials, treatment with bedaquiline added to a background multidrug-resistant TB regimen was associated with earlier culture conversion and higher cure rates, but there were unexplained excess deaths in the bedaquiline arms of these trials. Food and Drug Administration approved bedaquiline for the treatment of multidrug-resistant TB when an effective treatment regimen cannot otherwise be provided. They required a black box warning about excess deaths and require that a phase III trial be completed. A planned Phase

  14. Multi-drug resistance gene (MDR1) and opioid analgesia in horses

    OpenAIRE

    Natalini Cláudio Corrêa; Cunha Anderson Fávaro da; Linardi Renata Lehn

    2006-01-01

    Opioid absorption in the intestinal tract as well as its effects in the central nervous system is modulated by the P-glycoprotein (P-gp) encoded in the Multi-drug Resistance gene (MDR1) also named ATP-binding cassete, subfamily B, member 1 (ABCB1). This MDR1 gene acts as a selective pump. The expression of this protein in humans and rodents inhibits cellular uptake of substrate opioids. The presence of the intestinal iso-enzyme CYP3A4 associated with MDR1 gene decreases the opioid analgesic a...

  15. Strong in vitro activities of two new rifabutin analogs against multidrug-resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García, Ana-Belén; Palacios, Juan J; Ruiz, María-Jesús; Barluenga, José; Aznar, Fernando; Cabal, María-Paz; García, José María; Díaz, Natalia

    2010-12-01

    Two new rifabutin analogs, RFA-1 and RFA-2, show high in vitro antimycobacterial activities against Mycobacterium tuberculosis. MIC values of RFA-1 and RFA-2 were ≤0.02 μg/ml against rifamycin-susceptible strains and 0.5 μg/ml against a wide selection of multidrug-resistant strains, compared to ≥50 μg/ml for rifampin and 10 μg/ml for rifabutin. Molecular dynamic studies indicate that the compounds may exert tighter binding to mutants of RNA polymerase that have adapted to the rifamycins.

  16. Intrinsic Conformational Plasticity of Native EmrE Provides a Pathway for Multidrug Resistance

    OpenAIRE

    Cho, Min-Kyu; Gayen, Anindita; Banigan, James R.; Leninger, Maureen; Traaseth, Nathaniel J.

    2014-01-01

    EmrE is a multidrug resistance efflux pump with specificity to a wide range of antibiotics and antiseptics. To obtain atomic-scale insight into the attributes of the native state that encodes the broad specificity, we used a hybrid of solution and solid-state NMR methods in lipid bilayers and bicelles. Our results indicate that the native EmrE dimer oscillates between inward and outward facing structural conformations at an exchange rate (k ex) of ∼300 s–1 at 37 °C (millisecond motions), whic...

  17. Multidrug-resistant tuberculosis in transplant recipients: Case report and review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huaman, Moises A; Brawley, Robert; Ashkin, David

    2017-04-01

    Transplant recipients are at increased risk of tuberculosis (TB). We describe a case of pulmonary and vertebral multidrug-resistant TB (MDR-TB) in a kidney transplant patient who required neurosurgical intervention and unfortunately developed fatal nosocomial complications. Thirteen transplant recipients with MDR-TB were previously reported in the literature (one hematopoietic cell transplant, one heart transplant, one lung transplant, one heart-lung transplant, and nine kidney transplant recipients). Extrapulmonary disease, severe treatment complications, and deaths were observed in patients who developed MDR-TB after transplantation.

  18. Laser thermal ablation of multidrug-resistant bacteria using functionalized gold nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mocan, Lucian; Tabaran, Flaviu A; Mocan, Teodora; Pop, Teodora; Mosteanu, Ofelia; Agoston-Coldea, Lucia; Matea, Cristian T; Gonciar, Diana; Zdrehus, Claudiu; Iancu, Cornel

    2017-01-01

    The issue of multidrug resistance (MDR) has become an increasing threat to public health. One alternative strategy against MDR bacteria would be to construct therapeutic vectors capable of physically damaging these microorganisms. Gold nanoparticles hold great promise for the development of such therapeutic agents, since the nanoparticles exhibit impressive properties, of which the most important is the ability to convert light into heat. This property has scientific significance since is exploited to develop nano-photothermal vectors to destroy bacteria at a molecular level. The present paper summarizes the latest advancements in the field of nanotargeted laser hyperthermia of MDR bacteria mediated by gold nanoparticles. PMID:28356741

  19. Multi-drug resistant tuberculosis in Chuuk State Federated States of Micronesia, 2008-2009.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fred, D; Desai, M; Song, R; Bamrah, S; Pavlin, B I; Heetderks, A; Ekiek, M J

    2010-04-01

    Multi-drug resistant tuberculosis (MDR TB) is a growing public health concern, particularly for the Pacific, where rates of tuberculosis infection are extremely high. In May 2008, a cluster of patients with MDR TB were identified in Chuuk State, Federated States of Micronesia. A multi-agency investigation led to the eventual discovery of 21 cases, and over 100 latent TB infections. Incomplete implementation of Directly Observed Therapy (DOT) and contact investigation were major contributors to the outbreak. The problem of MDR TB in Chuuk was controlled only after a concerted effort on the part of multiple agencies coupled with the highest level of political commitment.

  20. Survival and evolution of a large multidrug resistance plasmid in new clinical bacterial hosts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Porse, Andreas; Schønning, Kristian; Munck, Christian;

    2016-01-01

    of these plasmids within pathogenic hosts are poorly understood. Here we study plasmid-host adaptations following transfer of a 73 kb conjugative multidrug resistance plasmid to naïve clinical isolates of Klebsiella pneumoniae and Escherichia coli We use experimental evolution, mathematical modelling and population...... of costly regions from the plasmid backbone, effectively expanding the host-range of the plasmid. Although these adaptations were also beneficial to plasmid persistence in a naïve K. pneumoniae host, they were never observed in this species, indicating that differential evolvability can limit opportunities...

  1. Genome sequencing and annotation of multidrug resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MDR-TB PR10 strain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohd Zakihalani A. Halim

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Here, we report the draft genome sequence and annotation of a multidrug resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis strain PR10 (MDR-TB PR10 isolated from a patient diagnosed with tuberculosis. The size of the draft genome MDR-TB PR10 is 4.34 Mbp with 65.6% of G + C content and consists of 4637 predicted genes. The determinants were categorized by RAST into 400 subsystems with 4286 coding sequences and 50 RNAs. The whole genome shotgun project has been deposited at DDBJ/EMBL/GenBank under the accession number CP010968.

  2. Inactivation of Multidrug Resistance Proteins Disrupts Both Cellular Extrusion and Intracellular Degradation of cAMP

    OpenAIRE

    Xie, Moses; Rich, Thomas C.; Scheitrum, Colleen; Conti, Marco; Richter, Wito

    2011-01-01

    In addition to xenobiotics and several other endogenous metabolites, multidrug-resistance proteins (MRPs) extrude the second-messenger cAMP from various cells. Pharmacological and/or genetic inactivation of MRPs has been shown to augment intracellular cAMP signaling, an effect assumed to be a direct consequence of the blockade of cAMP extrusion. Here we provide evidence that the augmented intracellular cAMP levels are not due exclusively to the prevention of cAMP efflux because MRP inactivati...

  3. Diterpene Constituents of Euphorbia exigua L. and Multidrug Resistance Reversing Activity of the Isolated Diterpenes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rédei, Dóra; Boros, Klára; Forgo, Peter; Molnár, Joseph; Kele, Zoltán; Pálinkó, István; Pinke, Gyula; Hohmann, Judit

    2015-08-01

    Phytochemical investigation of the MeOH extract obtained from the aerial parts of the annual weed Euphorbia exigua L. resulted in the isolation of two novel (1, 2) and one known (3) jatrophane diterpenes. Their structures were established by extensive 1D- and 2D-NMR spectroscopy and HR-ESI-MS. The isolated compounds were evaluated for multidrug resistance (MDR) reversing activity on human MDR gene-transfected L5178 mouse lymphoma cells; and all three compounds were found to modulate the intracellular drug accumulation.

  4. The effect of terminal cleaning on environmental contamination rates of multidrug-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strassle, Paula; Thom, Kerri A; Johnson, J Kristie; Johnsonm, J Kristie; Leekha, Surbhi; Lissauer, Matthew; Zhu, Jingkun; Harris, Anthony D

    2012-12-01

    We evaluated the prevalence of multidrug-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii environmental contamination before and after discharge cleaning in rooms of infected/colonized patients. 46.9% of rooms and 15.3% of sites were found contaminated precleaning, and 25% of rooms and 5.5% of sites were found contaminated postcleaning. Cleaning significantly decreased environmental contamination of A baumannii; however, persistent contamination represents a significant risk factor for transmission. Further studies on this and more effective cleaning methods are needed.

  5. Draft Genome Sequence of an Invasive Multidrug-Resistant Strain, Pseudomonas aeruginosa BK1, Isolated from a Keratitis Patient

    KAUST Repository

    Jeganathan, Lakshmi Priya

    2014-03-27

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa infections are difficult to treat due to the presence of a multitude of virulence factors and antibiotic resistance. Here, we report the draft genome sequence of P. aeruginosa BK1, an invasive and multidrug-resistant strain, isolated from a bacterial keratitis patient in southern India.

  6. Amurensin G, a potent natural SIRT1 inhibitor, rescues doxorubicin responsiveness via down-regulation of multidrug resistance 1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Oh, Won Keun; Cho, Kyoung Bin; Hien, Tran Thi

    2010-01-01

    The transition from a chemotherapy-responsive cancer to a chemotherapy-resistant one is accompanied by increased expression of multidrug resistance 1 (MDR1, p-glycoprotein), which plays an important role in the efflux from the target cell of many anticancer agents. We recently showed that a Forkh...

  7. Whole-genome pyrosequencing of an epidemic multidrug-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii strain belonging to the European clone II group

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iacono, M.; Villa, L.; Fortini, D.

    2008-01-01

    The whole-genome sequence of an epidemic, multidrug-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii strain (strain ACICU) belonging to the European clone II group and carrying the plasmid-mediated bla(OXA-58) carbapenem resistance gene was determined. The A. baumannii ACICU genome was compared with the genomes...

  8. Non-cytotoxic nanomaterials enhance antimicrobial activities of cefmetazole against multidrug-resistant Neisseria gonorrhoeae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lan-Hui Li

    Full Text Available The emergence and spread of antibiotic-resistant Neisseria gonorrhoeae has led to difficulties in treating patients, and novel strategies to prevent and treat this infection are urgently needed. Here, we examined 21 different nanomaterials for their potential activity against N. gonorrhoeae (ATCC 49226. Silver nanoparticles (Ag NPs, 120 nm showed the greatest potency for reducing N. gonorrhoeae colony formation (MIC: 12.5 µg/ml and possessed the dominant influence on the antibacterial activity with their properties of the nanoparticles within a concentration range that did not induce cytotoxicity in human fibroblasts or epithelial cells. Electron microscopy revealed that the Ag NPs significantly reduced bacterial cell membrane integrity. Furthermore, the use of clinical isolates of multidrug-resistant N. gonorrhoeae showed that combined treatment with 120 nm Ag NPs and cefmetazole produced additive effects. This is the first report to screen the effectiveness of nanomaterials against N. gonorrhoeae, and our results indicate that 120 nm Ag NPs deliver low levels of toxicity to human epithelial cells and could be used as an adjuvant with antibiotic therapy, either for topical use or as a coating for biomaterials, to prevent or treat multidrug-resistant N. gonorrhoeae.

  9. Multi-drug resistant Acinetobacter infections in critically injured Canadian forces soldiers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brisebois Ronald

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Military members, injured in Afghanistan or Iraq, have returned home with multi-drug resistant Acinetobacter baumannii infections. The source of these infections is unknown. Methods Retrospective study of all Canadian soldiers who were injured in Afghanistan and who required mechanical ventilation from January 1 2006 to September 1 2006. Patients who developed A. baumannii ventilator associated pneumonia (VAP were identified. All A. baumannii isolates were retrieved for study patients and compared with A. baumannii isolates from environmental sources from the Kandahar military hospital using pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE. Results During the study period, six Canadian Forces (CF soldiers were injured in Afghanistan, required mechanical ventilation and were repatriated to Canadian hospitals. Four of these patients developed A. baumannii VAP. A. baumannii was also isolated from one environmental source in Kandahar – a ventilator air intake filter. Patient isolates were genetically indistinguishable from each other and from the isolates cultured from the ventilator filter. These isolates were resistant to numerous classes of antimicrobials including the carbapenems. Conclusion These results suggest that the source of A. baumannii infection for these four patients was an environmental source in the military field hospital in Kandahar. A causal linkage, however, was not established with the ventilator. This study suggests that infection control efforts and further research should be focused on the military field hospital environment to prevent further multi-drug resistant A. baumannii infections in injured soldiers.

  10. Human multidrug resistance ABCB and ABCG transporters: participation in a chemoimmunity defense system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarkadi, Balázs; Homolya, László; Szakács, Gergely; Váradi, András

    2006-10-01

    In this review we give an overview of the physiological functions of a group of ATP binding cassette (ABC) transporter proteins, which were discovered, and still referred to, as multidrug resistance (MDR) transporters. Although they indeed play an important role in cancer drug resistance, their major physiological function is to provide general protection against hydrophobic xenobiotics. With a highly conserved structure, membrane topology, and mechanism of action, these essential transporters are preserved throughout all living systems, from bacteria to human. We describe the general structural and mechanistic features of the human MDR-ABC transporters and introduce some of the basic methods that can be applied for the analysis of their expression, function, regulation, and modulation. We treat in detail the biochemistry, cell biology, and physiology of the ABCB1 (MDR1/P-glycoprotein) and the ABCG2 (MXR/BCRP) proteins and describe emerging information related to additional ABCB- and ABCG-type transporters with a potential role in drug and xenobiotic resistance. Throughout this review we demonstrate and emphasize the general network characteristics of the MDR-ABC transporters, functioning at the cellular and physiological tissue barriers. In addition, we suggest that multidrug transporters are essential parts of an innate defense system, the "chemoimmunity" network, which has a number of features reminiscent of classical immunology.

  11. Implication of the RD(Rio) Mycobacterium tuberculosis sublineage in multidrug resistant tuberculosis in Portugal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    David, Susana; Duarte, Elsa L; Leite, Clarice Queico Fugimura; Ribeiro, João-Nuno; Maio, José-Nuno; Paixão, Eleonora; Portugal, Clara; Sancho, Luísa; Germano de Sousa, José

    2012-10-01

    Multidrug and extensively drug resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis are a threat to tuberculosis control programs. Genotyping methods, such as spoligotyping and MIRU-VNTR typing (Mycobacterial Interspersed Repetitive Units), are useful in monitoring potentially epidemic strains and estimating strain phylogenetic lineages and/or genotypic families. M. tuberculosis Latin American Mediterranean (LAM) family is a major worldwide contributor to tuberculosis (TB). LAM specific molecular markers, Ag85C(103) single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) and RD(Rio) long-sequence polymorphism (LSP), were used to characterize spoligotype signatures from 859 patient isolates from Portugal. LAM strains were found responsible for 57.7% of all tuberculosis cases. Strains with the RD(Rio) deletion (referred to as RD(Rio)) were estimated to represent 1/3 of all the strains and over 60% of the multidrug resistant (MDR) strains. The major spoligotype signature SIT20 belonging to the LAM1 RD(Rio) sublineage, represented close to 1/5th of all the strains, over 20% of which were MDR. Analysis of published datasets according to stipulated 12loci MIRU-VNTR RD(Rio) signatures revealed that 96.3% (129/134) of MDR and extensively drug resistant (XDR) clusters were RD(Rio). This is the first report associating the LAM RD(Rio) sublineage with MDR. These results are an important contribution to the monitoring of these strains with heightened transmission for future endeavors to arrest MDR-TB and XDR-TB.

  12. Multidrug and extensively drug-resistant tuberculosis management: Evidences and controversies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R Prasad

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Multi-drug and extensively drug resistant tuberculosis (M/XDR-TB has been an area of growing concern among clinicians, epidemiologists, and public health workers worldwide. Lack of controlled trials in M/XDR-TB patients hinders the optimal management of such patients, and guidelines that have been developed based largely on expert opinion are controversial. Lack of new effective drugs, improper regimens prescribed by poorly trained doctors and unreliable drug susceptibility testing add to the magnitude of the problem. M/XDR-TB is mostly a man made problem and its emergence can be checked by prompt diagnosis and effective use of first-line drugs in every new patient. DOTS-Plus proposed by World Health Organization (WHO has highlighted the comprehensive management strategy to control multi-drug resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB. Laboratory services must be strengthened for adequate and timely diagnosis of M/extensively drug resistant tuberculosis (XDR-TB and programmatic management of M/XDR-TB must be scaled up as per target set by global plan to stop TB 2011-2015. In MDR-TB patients with localized disease, surgery, as an adjunct to chemotherapy, can improve outcomes and should be considered when there is poor response to appropriate chemotherapy. Proper use of second-line drugs must be ensured to cure existing MDR-TB, to reduce its transmission and to prevent emergence of XDR-TB.

  13. Factors influencing survival in patients with multidrug-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariana Lima Prata-Rocha

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Multidrug-resistant (MDR Acinetobacter baumannii (Acb is a rapidly emerging pathogen in healthcare settings. The aim of this study was to evaluate the predictors of poor outcome in patients with MDR Acb. This is the first report documenting factors influencing survival in patients with MDR Acb in this tertiary hospital. This study is a prospective of the hospital epidemiology database. A total of 73 patients with 84 Acb isolates were obtained between August 2009 and October 2010 in this hospital. In the present study, the 30-day mortality rate was 39.7%. Of 84 Acb isolates, 50 (59% were MDR, nine (11% were pan-resistant, and 25 (30% were non-MDR. The non-MDR isolates were used as the control group. The factors significantly associated with multidrug resistance included previous surgeries, presence of comorbidity (renal disease, use of more than two devices, parenteral nutrition, and inappropriate antimicrobial therapy. Significant predictors of 30-day mortality in the univariate analysis included pneumonia, diabetes mellitus, renal disease, use of more than two devices, and inappropriate antimicrobial therapy administered within two days of the onset of infection. The factors associated with mortality in patients with MDR Acb infection in this study were: age > 60 years, pneumonia, diabetes mellitus, renal disease, use of more than two invasive procedures, and inappropriate antimicrobial therapy. Vigilance is needed to prevent outbreaks of this opportunistic and deadly pathogen.

  14. Reversal of MRP7 (ABCC10-mediated multidrug resistance by tariquidar.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yue-Li Sun

    Full Text Available Multidrug resistance protein 7 (MRP7, ABCC10 is a recently discovered member of the ATP-binding cassette (ABC family which are capable of conferring resistance to a variety of anticancer drugs, including taxanes and nucleoside analogs, in vivo. MRP7 is highly expressed in non-small cell lung cancer cells, and Mrp7-KO mice are highly sensitive to paclitaxel, making MRP7 an attractive chemotherapeutic target of non-small cell lung cancer. However, only a few inhibitors of MRP7 are currently identified, with none of them having progressed to clinical trials. We used MRP7-expressing cells to investigate whether tariquidar, a third generation inhibitor of P-glycoprotein, could inhibit MRP7-mediated multidrug resistance (MDR. We found that tariquidar, at 0.1 and 0.3 µM, significantly potentiated the sensitivity of MRP7-transfected HEK293 cells to MRP7 substrates and increased the intracellular accumulation of paclitaxel. We further demonstrated that tariquidar directly impaired paclitaxel efflux and could downregulate MRP7 protein expression in a concentration- and time-dependent manner after prolonged treatment. Our findings suggest that tariquidar, at pharmacologically achievable concentrations, reverses MRP7-mediated MDR through inhibition of MRP7 protein expression and function, and thus represents a promising therapeutic agent in the clinical treatment of chemoresistant cancer patients.

  15. Multi-drugs resistant acne rosacea in a child affected by Ataxia-Telangiectasia: successful treatment with Isotretinoin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cantarutti, Nicoletta; Claps, Alessia; Angelino, Giulia; Chessa, Luciana; Callea, Francesco; El Hachem, May; Diociaiuti, Andrea; Finocchi, Andrea

    2015-03-28

    Ataxia-Telangiectasia is a rare multisystem autosomal recessive disorder [OMIM 208900], caused by mutations in Ataxia-Telangiectasia Mutated gene. It is characterized by neurological, immunological and cutaneous involvement. Granulomas have been previously reported in Ataxia-Telangiectasia patients, even if acne rosacea has not been described.We report a case of a young Ataxia-Telangiectasia patient with a severe immunological and neurological involvement, who developed granulomatous skin lesions diagnosed by skin biopsy as acne rosacea. Considering the severe clinical picture and the lack of improvement to multiple topic and systemic therapies, treatment with Isotretinoin was started and the skin lesions disappeared after five months. However the therapy was stopped due to drug-hepatotoxicity.Systemic treatment with Isotretinoin should be carefully considered in patient with Ataxia-Telangiectasia for the treatment of multi-drug resistant acne rosacea, however its toxicity may limit long-term use and the risk/benefit ratio of the treatment should be evaluated.

  16. Non-slip socks: a potential reservoir for transmitting multidrug-resistant organisms in hospitals?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahida, N; Boswell, T

    2016-11-01

    Non-slip socks are increasingly used to prevent falls in hospitals. Patients use them to walk to various parts of the hospital and also wear them in bed. Fifty-four pairs of socks and 35 environmental floor samples were obtained from seven wards in a tertiary referral hospital. Vancomycin-resistant enterococci (VRE) were detected from 46 (85%) socks and meticillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) from five (9%). Environmental sampling cultured VRE from 24 (69%) floor samples and MRSA from six (17%) floor samples. Clostridium difficile was not detected from any sample. Non-slip socks may become contaminated with multidrug-resistant pathogens and may form a potential route for cross-transmission.

  17. Multidrug-resistant tuberculosis: treatment outcome in Denmark, 1992-2007

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bang, Didi; Lillebaek, Troels; Thomsen, Vibeke Østergaard;

    2010-01-01

    A retrospective nationwide study including all culture-verified multidrug-resistant (MDR) tuberculosis (TB) cases was performed in Denmark. The aim was to examine the long-term treatment outcome of MDR-TB, to assess if MDR-TB transmission occurs, and to evaluate a rapid mutation analysis detecting...... rifampin and isoniazid resistance in this cohort. Clinical data were obtained from patient records. A restriction fragment length polymorphism genotype database of all TB cases was compared for identical strains indicating active transmission. Twenty-nine cases of MDR-TB were identified and the incidence...... was low at 0.5%. Acquired MDR-TB and active transmission was rare. Mutations in rifampin (rpoB) and isoniazid (katG, inhA) genes correctly determined resistance in 100% and 82% of all isolates tested, respectively. Initial treatment success was 89% for 27 MDR-TB patients with available outcome data...

  18. Isolation and partial characterization of actinomycetes with antimicrobial activity against multidrug resistant bacteria

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Smriti Singh; Pramod Kumar; N Gopalan; Bhuvnesh Shrivastava; RC Kuhad; Hotam Singh Chaudhary

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To isolate strains of Actinomycetes from different locations of Gwalior to evaluate its antimicrobial activity against multidrug resistant pathogenic strains. Method: Soil samples collected from different niche habitats of Gwalior were serially diluted and plated on selective media. Potential colonies were further purified and stored in agar slants and glycerol stocks. Isolates were biochemically characterized and purified isolates were test against pathogenic microorganisms for screening. Isolates with antagonistic properties were inoculated in production media and secondary metabolites or antimicrobial products were extracted. Result: The seven actinomycetes strains showing maximum antibacterial activity were isolated further characterized based on their colony characteristics and biochemical analyses. The isolates were screened for their secondary metabolites activity on three human pathogenic bacteria are Escherichia coli (E. coli), Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) and Vancomycin-Resistant Enterococci (VRE). Discussion: The strain MITS 1005 was found to be more active against the test bacteria.

  19. International spread of multidrug-resistant Salmonella Schwarzengrund in food products

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aarestrup, Frank Møller; Hendriksen, Rene S.; Lockett, Jana;

    2007-01-01

    , was frequent among isolates from persons and chickens in Thailand, persons in the United States, and food imported from Thailand to Denmark and the United States. A total of 183 PFGE patterns were observed, and 136 (23.4%) isolates had the 3 most common patterns. Seven of 14 isolates from persons in Denmark...... had patterns found in persons and chicken meat in Thailand; 22 of 390 human isolates from the United States had patterns found in Denmark and Thailand. This study suggests spread of multidrug-resistant S. Schwarzengrund from chickens to persons in Thailand, and from imported Thai food products......We compared 581 Salmonella enterica serotype Schwarzengrund isolates from persons, food, and food animals in Denmark, Thailand, and the United States by antimicrobial drug susceptibility and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) typing. Resistance, including resistance to nalidixic acid...

  20. Construction and expression of recombinant prokaryotic vector PGEX-4T-1-BC006151 correlated with multidrug resistant of lung adenocarcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xuejun LI

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Background and objective The drug resistance to chemotherapeutics is one of the important causes of low survival rate of lung cancer patients. Our previous study has demonstrated that BC006151 is a gene correlated with multidrug resistance of adenocarcinoma of lung. The aim of this study is to clone the BC006151 gene, and to construct recombinant prokaryotic vector PGEX-4T-1-BC006151, and to express it in E. coli BL21. Methods The primer was designed with restriction endonuclease position, then amplified BC006151 by RT-PCR, cleaved BC006151 cDNA and PGEX-4T-1 by BamH and EcoR I. linked it with PGEX-4T-1. Then the two fragments were linked by T4DNA. The post-linked vector was transformed into E. coli. DH5 and then expressed. Transformed the recombinant plasmids containing the correct clone into E. coli BL21 and protein was highly effective expressed. The production of GST fusion protein was identifisd by SDS-PAGE and Western-Blotting. Results The sequence of BC006151 was amplified and identified with that published in GenBank. The prokaryotic expression plasmid PGEX-4T-1-BC006151 was constructed successfully. And a new fusion protein with relative molecular mass of 13 KD was highly effectively expressed in E. coli. Conclusion The BC006151 gene correlated with multidrug resistance of lung adenocarcinoma is successfully cloned and expressed, which is helpful for the preparation of monoclonal and polyclonal antibodies.

  1. A new mixed-backbone oligonucleotide against glucosylceramide synthase sensitizes multidrug-resistant tumors to apoptosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gauri A Patwardhan

    Full Text Available Enhanced ceramide glycosylation catalyzed by glucosylceramide synthase (GCS limits therapeutic efficiencies of antineoplastic agents including doxorubicin in drug-resistant cancer cells. Aimed to determine the role of GCS in tumor response to chemotherapy, a new mixed-backbone oligonucleotide (MBO-asGCS with higher stability and efficiency has been generated to silence human GCS gene. MBO-asGCS was taken up efficiently in both drug-sensitive and drug-resistant cells, but it selectively suppressed GCS overexpression, and sensitized drug-resistant cells. MBO-asGCS increased doxorubicin sensitivity by 83-fold in human NCI/ADR-RES, and 43-fold in murine EMT6/AR1 breast cancer cells, respectively. In tumor-bearing mice, MBO-asGCS treatment dramatically inhibited the growth of multidrug-resistant NCI/ADR-RE tumors, decreasing tumor volume to 37%, as compared with scrambled control. Furthermore, MBO-asGCS sensitized multidrug-resistant tumors to chemotherapy, increasing doxorubicin efficiency greater than 2-fold. The sensitization effects of MBO-asGCS relied on the decreases of gene expression and enzyme activity of GCS, and on the increases of C(18-ceramide and of caspase-executed apoptosis. MBO-asGCS was accumulation in tumor xenografts was greater in other tissues, excepting liver and kidneys; but MBO-asGCS did not exert significant toxic effects on liver and kidneys. This study, for the first time in vivo, has demonstrated that GCS is a promising therapeutic target for cancer drug resistance, and MBO-asGCS has the potential to be developed as an antineoplastic agent.

  2. Antimicrobial hydrogels: a new weapon in the arsenal against multidrug-resistant infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Victor W L; Chan, Julian M W; Sardon, Haritz; Ono, Robert J; García, Jeannette M; Yang, Yi Yan; Hedrick, James L

    2014-11-30

    The rapid emergence of antibiotic resistance in pathogenic microbes is becoming an imminent global public health problem. Treatment with conventional antibiotics often leads to resistance development as the majority of these antibiotics act on intracellular targets, leaving the bacterial morphology intact. Thus, they are highly prone to develop resistance through mutation. Much effort has been made to develop macromolecular antimicrobial agents that are less susceptible to resistance as they function by microbial membrane disruption. Antimicrobial hydrogels constitute an important class of macromolecular antimicrobial agents, which have been shown to be effective in preventing and treating multidrug-resistant infections. Advances in synthetic chemistry have made it possible to tailor molecular structure and functionality to impart broad-spectrum antimicrobial activity as well as predictable mechanical and rheological properties. This has significantly broadened the scope of potential applications that range from medical device and implant coating, sterilization, wound dressing, to antimicrobial creams for the prevention and treatment of multidrug-resistant infections. In this review, advances in both chemically and physically cross-linked natural and synthetic hydrogels possessing intrinsic antimicrobial properties or loaded with antibiotics, antimicrobial polymers/peptides and metal nanoparticles are highlighted. Relationships between physicochemical properties and antimicrobial activity/selectivity, and possible antimicrobial mechanisms of the hydrogels are discussed. Approaches to mitigating toxicity of metal nanoparticles that are encapsulated in hydrogels are reviewed. In addition, challenges and future perspectives in the development of safe and effective antimicrobial hydrogel systems especially involving co-delivery of antimicrobial polymers/peptides and conventional antimicrobial agents for eventual clinical applications are presented.

  3. Enhancement of antibiotic activity by efflux inhibitors against multidrug resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis clinical isolates from Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatiane eCoelho

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Drug resistant tuberculosis continues to increase and new approaches for its treatment are necessary. The identification of M. tuberculosis clinical isolates presenting efflux as part of their resistant phenotype has a major impact in tuberculosis treatment. In this work, we used a checkerboard procedure combined with the tetrazolium microplate-based assay (TEMA to study single combinations between antituberculosis drugs and efflux inhibitors (EIs against multidrug resistant M. tuberculosis clinical isolates using the fully susceptible strain H37Rv as reference. Efflux activity was studied on a real-time basis by a fluorometric method that uses ethidium bromide as efflux substrate. Quantification of efflux pump genes mRNA transcriptional levels were performed by RT-qPCR. The fractional inhibitory concentrations (FIC indicated synergistic activity for the interactions between isoniazid, rifampicin, amikacin, ofloxacin, and ethidium bromide plus the EIs verapamil, thioridazine and chlorpromazine. The FICs ranged from 0.25, indicating a four-fold reduction on the MICs, to 0.015, 64-fold reduction. The detection of active efflux by real-time fluorometry showed that all strains presented intrinsic efflux activity that contributes to the overall resistance which can be inhibited in the presence of the EIs. The quantification of the mRNA levels of the most important efflux pump genes on these strains shows that they are intrinsically predisposed to expel toxic compounds as the exposure to subinhibitory concentrations of antibiotics were not necessary to increase the pump mRNA levels when compared with the non-exposed counterpart. The results obtained in this study confirm that the intrinsic efflux activity contributes to the overall resistance in multidrug resistant clinical isolates of M. tuberculosis and that the inhibition of efflux pumps by the EIs can enhance the clinical effect of antibiotics that are their substrates.

  4. Genetic characterisation of multidrug-resistant Salmonella enterica serotypes isolated from poultry in Cairo, Egypt

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammed Abdel-Maksoud

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: Food-borne diseases pose serious health problems, affecting public health and economic development worldwide.Methods: Salmonella was isolated from samples of chicken parts, skin samples of whole chicken carcasses, raw egg yolks, eggshells and chicken faeces. Resulting isolates were characterised by serogrouping, serotyping, antimicrobial susceptibility testing and detection of extended-spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL production. Antibiotic resistance genes and integrons were identified by polymerase chain reaction (PCR.Results: The detection rates of Salmonella were 60%, 64% and 62% in chicken parts, skin, and faeces, respectively, whereas the egg yolks and eggshells were uniformly negative. Salmonella Kentucky and S. Enteritidis serotypes comprised 43.6% and 2.6% of the isolates, respectively, whilst S. Typhimurium was absent. Variable resistance rates were observed against 16 antibiotics; 97% were resistant to sulfamethoxazole, 96% to nalidixic acid and tetracycline and 76% to ampicillin. Multidrug resistance was detected in 82% (64/78 of the isolates and ESBL production was detected in 8% (6/78. The β-lactamase blaTEM-1 gene was detected in 57.6% and blaSHV-1 in 6.8% of the isolates, whilst the blaOXA gene was absent. The sul1gene was detected in 97.3% and the sul2 gene in 5.3% of the isolates. Sixty-four of the 78 isolates (82% were positive for the integrase gene (int I from class 1 integrons, whilst int II was absent.Conclusion: This study reveals the presence of an alarming number of multidrug-resistant Salmonella isolates in the local poultry markets in Cairo. The high levels of drug resistance suggest an emerging problem that could impact negatively on efforts to prevent and treat poultry and poultry-transmitted human diseases in Egypt.

  5. TgPRELID, a Mitochondrial Protein Linked to Multidrug Resistance in the Parasite Toxoplasma gondii

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamau, Edwin T.; Srinivasan, Ananth R.; Harper, Jonathan; Sankaran, Preethi; Post, Sarah E.; Varberg, Joseph M.

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT New drugs to control infection with the protozoan parasite Toxoplasma gondii are needed as current treatments exert toxic side effects on patients. Approaches to develop novel compounds for drug development include screening of compound libraries and targeted inhibition of essential cellular pathways. We identified two distinct compounds that display inhibitory activity against the parasite’s replicative stage: F3215-0002, which we previously identified during a compound library screen, and I-BET151, an inhibitor of bromodomains, the “reader” module of acetylated lysines. In independent studies, we sought to determine the targets of these two compounds using forward genetics, generating resistant mutants and identifying the determinants of resistance with comparative genome sequencing. Despite the dissimilarity of the two compounds, we recovered resistant mutants with nonsynonymous mutations in the same domain of the same gene, TGGT1_254250, which we found encodes a protein that localizes to the parasite mitochondrion (designated TgPRELID after the name of said domain). We found that mutants selected with one compound were cross resistant to the other compound, suggesting a common mechanism of resistance. To further support our hypothesis that TgPRELID mutations facilitate resistance to both I-BET151 and F3215-0002, CRISPR (clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat)/CAS9-mediated mutation of TgPRELID directly led to increased F3215-0002 resistance. Finally, all resistance mutations clustered in the same subdomain of TgPRELID. These findings suggest that TgPRELID may encode a multidrug resistance factor or that I-BET151 and F3215-0002 have the same target(s) despite their distinct chemical structures. IMPORTANCE We report the discovery of TgPRELID, a previously uncharacterized mitochondrial protein linked to multidrug resistance in the parasite Toxoplasma gondii. Drug resistance remains a major problem in the battle against parasitic

  6. Prevalence and risk factors for carriage of multi-drug resistant Staphylococci in healthy cats and dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gandolfi-Decristophoris, Paola; Regula, Gertraud; Petrini, Orlando; Zinsstag, Jakob; Schelling, Esther

    2013-01-01

    We investigated the distribution of commensal staphylococcal species and determined the prevalence of multi-drug resistance in healthy cats and dogs. Risk factors associated with the carriage of multi-drug resistant strains were explored. Isolates from 256 dogs and 277 cats were identified at the species level using matrix-assisted laser desorption ionisation-time of flight mass spectrometry. The diversity of coagulase-negative Staphylococci (CNS) was high, with 22 species in dogs and 24 in cats. Multi-drug resistance was frequent (17%) and not always associated with the presence of the mecA gene. A stay in a veterinary clinic in the last year was associated with an increased risk of colonisation by multi-drug resistant Staphylococci (OR = 2.4, 95% CI: 1.1~5.2, p value LRT = 0.04). When identifying efficient control strategies against antibiotic resistance, the presence of mechanisms other than methicillin resistance and the possible role of CNS in the spread of resistance determinants should be considered.

  7. Bodipy-FL-Verapamil: A Fluorescent Probe for the Study of Multidrug Resistance Proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Rosati

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Most of the substances used as fluorescent probes to study drug transport and the effect of efflux blockers in multidrug resistant cells have many drawbacks, such as toxicity, unspecific background, accumulation in mitochondria. New fluorescent compounds, among which Bodipy‐FL‐verapamil (BV, have been therefore proposed as more useful tools. The uptake of BV has been evaluated by cytofluorimetry and fluorescence microscopy using cell lines that overexpress P‐glycoprotein (P388/ADR and LLC‐PK1/ADR or MRP (multidrug resistance‐related protein (PANC‐1 and clinical specimens from patients. The effect of specific inhibitors for P‐glycoprotein (verapamil and vinblastine or MRP (MK571 and probenecid has been also studied. BV intracellular concentrations were significantly lower in the two P‐glycoprotein overexpressing cell lines in comparison with the parental lines. In addition, verapamil and vinblastine increased the intracellular concentrations of the dye; MK571 and probenecid, two MRP inhibitors, increased BV levels in PANC‐1 cells, that express this protein. These findings were confirmed in clinical specimens from patients. Fluorescence microscopy revealed a faint fluorescence emission in P‐glycoprotein or MRP expressing cell lines; however, treatment with specific inhibitors significantly increased the fluorescence. BV is a useful tool for studying multidrug resistance proteins with different techniques such as cytofluorimetry and fluorescence microscopy, but does not discriminate between P‐glycoprotein and MRP. In comparison with other classic fluorescent probes, the assay with this dye is extremely rapid, simple, not toxic for cells, devoid of fluorescent background, and can be useful in the clinical settings.

  8. Synergistic effects of antimicrobial peptide DP7 combined with antibiotics against multidrug-resistant bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Xiaozhe; Li, Zhan; Li, Xiaolu; Tian, Yaomei; Fan, Yingzi; Yu, Chaoheng; Zhou, Bailing; Liu, Yi; Xiang, Rong; Yang, Li

    2017-01-01

    Antibiotic-resistant bacteria present a great threat to public health. In this study, the synergistic effects of antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) and antibiotics on several multidrug-resistant bacterial strains were studied, and their synergistic effects on azithromycin (AZT)-resistance genes were analyzed to determine the relationships between antimicrobial resistance and these synergistic effects. A checkerboard method was used to evaluate the synergistic effects of AMPs (DP7 and CLS001) and several antibiotics (gentamicin, vancomycin [VAN], AZT, and amoxicillin) on clinical bacterial strains (Staphylococcus aureus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Acinetobacter baumannii, and Escherichia coli). The AZT-resistance genes (ermA, ermB, ermC, mefA, and msrA) were identified in the resistant strains using quantitative polymerase chain reaction. For all the clinical isolates tested that were resistant to different antibiotics, DP7 had high antimicrobial activity (≤32 mg/L). When DP7 was combined with VAN or AZT, the effect was most frequently synergistic. When we studied the resistance genes of the AZT-resistant isolates, the synergistic effect of DP7–AZT occurred most frequently in highly resistant strains or strains carrying more than two AZT-resistance genes. A transmission electron microscopic analysis of the S. aureus strain synergistically affected by DP7–AZT showed no noteworthy morphological changes, suggesting that a molecular-level mechanism plays an important role in the synergistic action of DP7–AZT. AMP DP7 plus the antibiotic AZT or VAN is more effective, especially against highly antibiotic-resistant strains. PMID:28356719

  9. Carbapenemase Genes among Multidrug Resistant Gram Negative Clinical Isolates from a Tertiary Hospital in Mwanza, Tanzania

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martha F. Mushi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The burden of antimicrobial resistance (AMR is rapidly growing across antibiotic classes, with increased detection of isolates resistant to carbapenems. Data on the prevalence of carbapenem resistance in developing countries is limited; therefore, in this study, we determined the prevalence of carbapenemase genes among multidrug resistant gram negative bacteria (MDR-GNB isolated from clinical specimens in a tertiary hospital in Mwanza, Tanzania. A total of 227 MDR-GNB isolates were analyzed for carbapenem resistance genes. For each isolate, five different PCR assays were performed, allowing for the detection of the major carbapenemase genes, including those encoding the VIM-, IMP-, and NDM-type metallo-beta-lactamases, the class A KPC-type carbapenemases, and the class D OXA-48 enzyme. Of 227 isolates, 80 (35% were positive for one or more carbapenemase gene. IMP-types were the most predominant gene followed by VIM, in 49 (21.59% and 28 (12% isolates, respectively. Carbapenemase genes were most detected in K. pneumoniae 24 (11%, followed by P. aeruginosa 23 (10%, and E. coli with 19 isolates (8%. We have demonstrated for the first time a high prevalence of MDR-GNB clinical isolates having carbapenem resistance genes in Tanzania. We recommend routine testing for carbapenem resistance among the MDR-GNB particularly in systemic infections.

  10. Antimicrobial resistance in Salmonella that caused foodborne disease outbreaks: United States, 2003-2012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, A C; Grass, J E; Richardson, L C; Nisler, A L; Bicknese, A S; Gould, L H

    2017-03-01

    Although most non-typhoidal Salmonella illnesses are self-limiting, antimicrobial treatment is critical for invasive infections. To describe resistance in Salmonella that caused foodborne outbreaks in the United States, we linked outbreaks submitted to the Foodborne Disease Outbreak Surveillance System to isolate susceptibility data in the National Antimicrobial Resistance Monitoring System. Resistant outbreaks were defined as those linked to one or more isolates with resistance to at least one antimicrobial drug. Multidrug resistant (MDR) outbreaks had at least one isolate resistant to three or more antimicrobial classes. Twenty-one per cent (37/176) of linked outbreaks were resistant. In outbreaks attributed to a single food group, 73% (16/22) of resistant outbreaks and 46% (31/68) of non-resistant outbreaks were attributed to foods from land animals (P foodborne Salmonella outbreaks can help determine which foods are associated with resistant infections.

  11. The expression and significance of P-glycoprotein, lung resistance protein and multidrug resistance-associated protein in gastric cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Yan

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To detect the expression of multidrug resistance molecules P-glycoprotein (P-gp, Lung resistnce protein (LRP and Multidrug resistance-associated protein (MRP and analyze the relationship between them and the clinico-pathological features. Methods The expressions of P-gp, LRP and MRP in formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissue sections from 59 gastric cancer patients were determined by a labbelled Streptavidin-Peroxidase (SP immunohistochemical technique, and the results were analyzed in correlation with clinicopathological data. None of these patients received chemotherapy prior to surgery. Results The positive rates of P-gp, LRP, MRP were 86.4%, 84.7% and 27.1%, respectively. The difference between the positive rate of P-gp and MRP was significant statistically, as well as the difference between the expression of MRP and LRP. No significant difference was observed between P-gp and LRP, but the positively correlation between the expression of P-gp and LRP had been found. No significant correlation between the expression of P-gp, LRP, MRP and the grade of differentiation were observed. The expression of P-gp was correlated with clinical stages positively (r = 0.742, but the difference with the expression of P-gp in different stages was not significant. Conclusion The expressions of P-gp, LRP and MRP in patients with gastric cancer without prior chemotherapy are high, indicating that innate drug resistance may exist in gastric cancer.

  12. Role of the Caenorhabditis elegans multidrug resistance gene, mrp-4, in gut granule differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Currie, Erin; King, Brian; Lawrenson, Andrea L; Schroeder, Lena K; Kershner, Aaron M; Hermann, Greg J

    2007-11-01

    Caenorhabditis elegans gut granules are lysosome-related organelles with birefringent contents. mrp-4, which encodes an ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter homologous to mammalian multidrug resistance proteins, functions in the formation of gut granule birefringence. mrp-4(-) embryos show a delayed appearance of birefringent material in the gut granule but otherwise appear to form gut granules properly. mrp-4(+) activity is required for the extracellular mislocalization of birefringent material, body-length retraction, and NaCl sensitivity, phenotypes associated with defective gut granule biogenesis exhibited by embryos lacking the activity of GLO-1/Rab38, a putative GLO-1 guanine nucleotide exchange factor GLO-4, and the AP-3 complex. Multidrug resistance protein (MRP)-4 localizes to the gut granule membrane, consistent with it playing a direct role in the transport of molecules that compose and/or facilitate the formation of birefringent crystals within the gut granule. However, MRP-4 is also present in oocytes and early embryos, and our genetic analyses indicate that its site of action in the formation of birefringent material may not be limited to just the gut granule in embryos. In a search for genes that function similarly to mrp-4(+), we identified WHT-2, another ABC transporter that acts in parallel to MRP-4 for the formation of birefringent material in the gut granule.

  13. Synergy between verapamil and other multidrug -resistance modulators in model membranes

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Madeleine Castaing; Alain Loiseau; Athel Cornish-Bowden

    2007-06-01

    Various cationic lipophilic compounds can reverse the multidrug resistance of cancer cells. Possible interaction between these compounds, which are known as modulators, has been assessed by measuring leakage of Sulphan blue from anionic liposomes, induced both by verapamil alone and by verapamil in combination with diltiazem, quinine, thioridazine or clomipramine. An equation was derived to quantify the permeation doses and Hill coefficients of the drugs and mixtures between them by simultaneous fitting of the experimental data. The interaction was tested by two methods, the competition plot and the isobole method; both showed synergy between verapamil and each of diltiazem, quinine and thioridazine. The dose factor of potentiation for verapamil determined within membranes was 4.0 ± 0.4 with diltiazem, 3.2 ± 0.4 with quinine and 2.4 ± 0.3 with thioridazine. The results suggest that the effectiveness of reversing multidrug resistance may be increased with modulators such as verapamil and diltiazem that have a much greater effect in combination than what would be expected from their effects when considered separately.

  14. Global Assessment of the Activity of Tigecycline against Multidrug-Resistant Gram-Negative Pathogens between 2004 and 2014 as Part of the Tigecycline Evaluation and Surveillance Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calà, Cinzia; Fasciana, Teresa; Dowzicky, Michael J.

    2017-01-01

    , infections caused by multidrug-resistant (MDR) Gram-negative bacteria can cause increased mortality, longer hospital stays, and higher treatments costs. The aim of the Tigecycline Evaluation and Surveillance Trial (TEST) is to assess the in vitro antimicrobial activities of tigecycline and other contemporary agents against clinically relevant pathogens. This paper presents antimicrobial activity data from the TEST study between 2004 and 2014 and examines global rates of MDR Gram-negative isolates, including Acinetobacter baumannii, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and members of the Enterobacteriaceae, during this time. Our results show that tigecycline retained in vitro activity against many MDR Gram-negative pathogens over the study period, while rates of MDR A. baumannii increased globally. Using these findings, we hope to highlight the current status of multidrug resistance in medical facilities worldwide. PMID:28124025

  15. Bacillus subtilis from Soybean Food Shows Antimicrobial Activity for Multidrug-Resistant Acinetobacter baumannii by Affecting the adeS Gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Tieshan; Su, Jianrong

    2016-12-28

    Exploring novel antibiotics is necessary for multidrug-resistant pathogenic bacteria. Because the probiotics in soybean food have antimicrobial activities, we investigated their effects on multidrug-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii. Nineteen multidrug-resistant A. baumannii strains were clinifcally isolated as an experimental group and 11 multidrug-sensitive strains as controls. The growth rates of all bacteria were determined by using the analysis for xCELLigence Real-Time Cell. The combination of antibiotics showed synergistic effects on the strains in the control group but no effect on the strains in the experimental group. Efflux pump gene adeS was absent in all the strains from the control group, whereas it exists in all the strains from the experimental group. Furthermore, all the strains lost multidrug resistance when an adeS inhibitor was used. One strain of probiotics isolated from soybean food showed high antimicrobial activity for multidrug-resistant A. baumannii. The isolated strain belongs to Bacillus subtilis according to 16S RNA analysis. Furthermore, E. coli showed multidrug resistance when it was transformed with the adeS gene from A. baumannii whereas the resistant bacteria could be inhibited completely by isolated Bacillus subtilis. Thus, probiotics from soybean food provide potential antibiotics against multidrug-resistant pathogenic bacteria.

  16. Multidrug-resistant, extensively drug-resistant and pandrug-resistant bacteria: an international expert proposal for interim standard definitions for acquired resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magiorakos, A-P; Srinivasan, A; Carey, R B; Carmeli, Y; Falagas, M E; Giske, C G; Harbarth, S; Hindler, J F; Kahlmeter, G; Olsson-Liljequist, B; Paterson, D L; Rice, L B; Stelling, J; Struelens, M J; Vatopoulos, A; Weber, J T; Monnet, D L

    2012-03-01

    Many different definitions for multidrug-resistant (MDR), extensively drug-resistant (XDR) and pandrug-resistant (PDR) bacteria are being used in the medical literature to characterize the different patterns of resistance found in healthcare-associated, antimicrobial-resistant bacteria. A group of international experts came together through a joint initiative by the European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control (ECDC) and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), to create a standardized international terminology with which to describe acquired resistance profiles in Staphylococcus aureus, Enterococcus spp., Enterobacteriaceae (other than Salmonella and Shigella), Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Acinetobacter spp., all bacteria often responsible for healthcare-associated infections and prone to multidrug resistance. Epidemiologically significant antimicrobial categories were constructed for each bacterium. Lists of antimicrobial categories proposed for antimicrobial susceptibility testing were created using documents and breakpoints from the Clinical Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI), the European Committee on Antimicrobial Susceptibility Testing (EUCAST) and the United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA). MDR was defined as acquired non-susceptibility to at least one agent in three or more antimicrobial categories, XDR was defined as non-susceptibility to at least one agent in all but two or fewer antimicrobial categories (i.e. bacterial isolates remain susceptible to only one or two categories) and PDR was defined as non-susceptibility to all agents in all antimicrobial categories. To ensure correct application of these definitions, bacterial isolates should be tested against all or nearly all of the antimicrobial agents within the antimicrobial categories and selective reporting and suppression of results should be avoided.

  17. Molecular approaches for detection of the multi-drug resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB in Bangladesh.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tafsina Haque Aurin

    Full Text Available The principal obstacles in the treatment of tuberculosis (TB are delayed and inaccurate diagnosis which often leads to the onset of the drug resistant TB cases. To avail the appropriate treatment of the patients and to hinder the transmission of drug-resistant TB, accurate and rapid detection of resistant isolates is critical. Present study was designed to demonstrate the efficacy of molecular techniques inclusive of line probe assay (LPA and GeneXpert MTB/RIF methods for the detection of multi-drug resistant (MDR TB. Sputum samples from 300 different categories of treated and new TB cases were tested for the detection of possible mutation in the resistance specific genes (rpoB, inhA and katG through Genotype MTBDRplus assay or LPA and GeneXpert MTB/RIF tests. Culture based conventional drug susceptibility test (DST was also carried out to measure the efficacy of the molecular methods employed. Among 300 samples, 191 (63.7% and 193 (64.3% cases were found to be resistant against rifampicin in LPA and GeneXpert methods, respectively; while 189 (63% cases of rifampicin resistance were detected by conventional DST methods. On the other hand, 196 (65.3% and 191 (63.7% isolates showed isoniazid resistance as detected by LPA and conventional drug susceptibility test (DST, respectively. Among the drug resistant isolates (collectively 198 in LPA and 193 in conventional DST, 189 (95.6% and 187 (96.9% were considered to be MDR as examined by LPA and conventional DST, respectively. Category-II and -IV patients encountered higher frequency of drug resistance compared to those from category-I and new cases. Considering the higher sensitivity, specificity and accuracy along with the required time to results significantly shorter, our study supports the adoption of LPA and GeneXpert assay as efficient tools in detecting drug resistant TB in Bangladesh.

  18. Enhanced chemosensitization in multidrug-resistant human breast cancer cells by inhibition of IL-6 and IL-8 production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Zhi; Yang, Wei-Min; Chen, Li-Pai; Yang, Dong-Hua; Zhou, Qi; Zhu, Jin; Chen, Jun-Jiang; Huang, Ruo-Chun; Chen, Zhe-Sheng; Huang, Ruo-Pan

    2012-10-01

    Drug resistance remains a major hurdle to successful cancer treatment. Many mechanisms such as overexpression of multidrug-resistance related proteins, increased drug metabolism, decreased apoptosis, and impairment of signal transduction pathway can contribute multidrug resistance (MDR). Recent studies strongly suggest a close link between cytokines and drug resistance. To identify new targets involved in drug resistance, we established a multidrug-resistant human breast cancer cell line MCF-7/R and examined the cytokine profile using cytokine antibody array technology. Among 120 cytokines/chemokines screened, IL-6, IL-8, and 13 other proteins were found to be markedly increased in drug-resistant MCF-7/R cell line as compared to sensitive MCF-7/S cell line, while 7 proteins were specifically reduced in drug-resistant MCF-7/R cells. Neutralizing antibodies against IL-6 and IL-8 partially reversed the drug resistance of MCF-7/R to paclitaxel and doxorubicin, while a neutralizing antibody against MCP-1 had no significant effect. Inhibition of endogenous IL-6 or IL-8 by siRNA technology significantly enhanced drug sensitivity of MCF-7/R cells. Furthermore, overexpression of IL-6 or IL-8 expression by transfection increased the ADM resistance in MCF-7/S cells. Our data suggest that increased expression levels of IL-6 and IL-8 may contribute to MDR in human breast cancer cells.

  19. rpoB Mutations in Multidrug-Resistant Strains of Mycobacterium tuberculosis Isolated in Italy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pozzi, G.; Meloni, M.; Iona, E.; Orrù, G.; Thoresen, O. F.; Ricci, M. L.; Oggioni, M. R.; Fattorini, L.; Orefici, G.

    1999-01-01

    Mutations of rpoB associated with rifampin resistance were studied in 37 multidrug-resistant (MDR) clinical strains of Mycobacterium tuberculosis isolated in Italy. At least one mutated codon was found in each MDR strain. It was always a single-base substitution leading to an amino acid change. Nine different rpoB alleles, three of which had not been reported before, were found. The relative frequencies of specific mutations in this sample were different from those previously reported from different geographical areas, since 22 strains (59.5%) carried the mutated codon TTG in position 531 (Ser→Leu) and 11 (29.7%) had GAC in position 526 (His→Asp). PMID:10074552

  20. [Cluster of multidrug-resistant tuberculosis cases in a school of the district of Ica, Peru].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres, Julio; Sardón, Victoria; Soto, Mirtha G; Anicama, Rolado; Arroyo-Hernández, Hugo; Munayco, César V

    2011-01-01

    We describe the evolution and features of a cluster of Multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR TB) cases that occurred in 2001, in a school located in a sub-urban area of the district of Ica, Peru. We identified 15 students related before becoming infected with tuberculosis. The mean age of the cluster was 15 years. A total of 12 students were MDR-TB cases and 7 were drug-resistant to 5 first-line drugs (RHEZS). Five out of the 15 cases received at least 3 different anti-tuberculosis treatment schemes. The average treatment duration was 37 months (minimum 21 and maximum 59 months). A total of 13 cases recovered and 2 died. This study describes a cluster of MDR -TB cases in an educational facility, which due to the epidemiological link and time presentation, is probably an outbreak of MDR TB with a satisfactory outcome after prolonged treatment.

  1. Intracellular Self-Assembly of Taxol Nanoparticles for Overcoming Multidrug Resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Yue; Wang, Lin; Du, Wei; Ding, Zhanling; Zhang, Jia; Han, Tao; An, Linna; Zhang, Huafeng; Liang, Gaolin

    2015-08-10

    Multidrug resistance (MDR) remains the biggest challenge in treating cancers. Herein we propose the intracellular self-assembly of nanodrugs as a new strategy for overcoming MDR. By employing a biocompatible condensation reaction, we rationally designed a taxol derivative Ac-Arg-Val-Arg-Arg-Cys(StBu)-Lys(taxol)-2-cyanobenzothiazole (CBT-Taxol) which could be subjected to furin-controlled condensation and self-assembly of taxol nanoparticles (Taxol-NPs). In vitro and in vivo studies indicated that, compared with taxol, CBT-Taxol showed a 4.5-fold or 1.5-fold increase in anti-MDR effects, respectively, on taxol-resistant HCT 116 cancer cells or tumors without being toxic to the cells or the mice. Our results demonstrate that structuring protease-susceptible agents and assembling them intracellularly into nanodrugs could be a new optimal strategy for overcoming MDR.

  2. ABCG2 Inhibition as a Therapeutic Approach for Overcoming Multidrug Resistance in Cancer

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Maryam Hosseini Hasanabady; Fatemeh Kalalinia

    2016-06-01

    Breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP, ABCP or MXR) / ATP-binding cassette subfamily G member 2 (ABCG2) was characterized as a multidrug resistance efflux transporter in 1998. ABCG2 physiologically acts as a part of a self-defense mechanism for the organism; it enhances eliminating of toxic xenobiotic substances and harmful agents in the intestine, as well as through the blood-brain barrier and placental. ABCG2 recognizes and transports numerous anticancer drugs including conventional chemotherapeutic and new targeted small therapeutic molecules in clinical usage. Development of ABCG2 inhibitors for clinical usage may allow increased penetration of therapeutic agents into sanctuary sites and increased their intestinal absorption. In this report, we review the mechanisms that modulate MDR mediated by the ABC transporter ABCG2 in normal and cancer cells by different levels including, epigenetic modifications, transcriptional, posttranscriptional, translation and posttranslational regulation. Some clinical applications of ABCG2 inhibitors, also is explained.

  3. Eradication of multidrug-resistant A. baumannii in burn wounds by antiseptic pulsed electric field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golberg, Alexander; Broelsch, G Felix; Vecchio, Daniela; Khan, Saiqa; Hamblin, Michael R; Austen, William G; Sheridan, Robert L; Yarmush, Martin L

    2014-06-01

    Emerging bacterial resistance to multiple drugs is an increasing problem in burn wound management. New non-pharmacologic interventions are needed for burn wound disinfection. Here we report on a novel physical method for disinfection: antiseptic pulsed electric field (PEF) applied externally to the infected burns. In a mice model, we show that PEF can reduce the load of multidrug resistant Acinetobacter baumannii present in a full thickness burn wound by more than four orders of magnitude, as detected by bioluminescence imaging. Furthermore, using a finite element numerical model, we demonstrate that PEF provides non-thermal, homogeneous, full thickness treatment for the burn wound, thus, overcoming the limitation of treatment depth for many topical antimicrobials. These modeling tools and our in vivo results will be extremely useful for further translation of the PEF technology to the clinical setting, as they provide the essential elements for planning of electrode design and treatment protocol.

  4. Multidrug-Resistant Salmonella Heidelberg Associated with Mechanically Separated Chicken at a Correctional Facility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Amanda L; Murphree, Rendi; Ingram, L Amanda; Garman, Katie; Solomon, Deborah; Coffey, Eric; Walker, Deborah; Rogers, Marsha; Marder, Ellyn; Bottomley, Marie; Woron, Amy; Thomas, Linda; Roberts, Sheri; Hardin, Henrietta; Arjmandi, Parvin; Green, Alice; Simmons, Latoya; Cornell, Allyson; Dunn, John

    2015-12-01

    We describe multidrug-resistant (MDR) Salmonella Heidelberg infections associated with mechanically separated chicken (MSC) served at a county correctional facility. Twenty-three inmates met the case definition. All reported diarrhea, 19 (83%) reported fever, 16 (70%) reported vomiting, 4 (17%) had fever ≥103°F, and 3 (13%) were hospitalized. A case-control study found no single food item significantly associated with illness. Salmonella Heidelberg with an indistinguishable pulsed-field gel electrophoresis pattern was isolated from nine stool specimens; two isolates displayed resistance to a total of five drug classes, including the third-generation cephalosporin, ceftriaxone. MDR Salmonella Heidelberg might have contributed to the severity of illness. Salmonella Heidelberg indistinguishable from the outbreak subtype was isolated from unopened MSC. The environmental health assessment identified cross-contamination through poor food-handling practices as a possible contributing factor. Proper hand-washing techniques and safe food-handling practices were reviewed with the kitchen supervisor.

  5. Multidrug resistance as a dominant molecular marker in transformation of wine yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozovska, Z; Maraz, A; Magyar, I; Subik, J

    2001-12-14

    Pure wine yeast cultures are increasingly used in winemaking to perform controlled fermentations and produce wine of reproducible quality. For the genetic manipulation of natural wine yeast strains dominant selective markers are obviously useful. Here we demonstrate the successful use of the mutated PDR3 gene as a dominant molecular marker for the selection of transformants of prototrophic wine yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The selected transformants displayed a multidrug resistance phenotype that was resistant to strobilurin derivatives and azoles used to control pathogenic fungi in agriculture and medicine, respectively. Random amplification of DNA sequences and electrophoretic karyotyping of the host and transformed strains after microvinification experiments resulted in the same gel electrophoresis patterns. The chemical and sensory analysis of experimental wines proved that the used transformants preserved all their useful winemaking properties indicating that the pdr3-9 allele does not deteriorate the technological properties of the transformed wine yeast strain.

  6. PET imaging of multidrug resistance in tumors using 18F-fluoropaclitaxel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurdziel, Karen A; Kiesewetter, D O

    2010-01-01

    The failure of solid tumors to respond to chemotherapy is a complicated and clinically frustrating issue. The ability to predict which tumors will respond to treatment could reduce the human and monetary costs of cancer therapy by allowing pro-active selection of a chemotherapeutic to which the tumor does not express resistance. PET/CT imaging with a radiolabeled form of paclitaxel, F-18 fluoropaclitaxel (FPAC), may be able to predict the uptake of paclitaxel in solid tumors, and as a substrate of P-glycoprotein, it may also predict which tumors exhibit multidrug resistance (MDR), a phenotype in which tumors fail to respond to a wide variety of chemically unrelated chemotherapeutic agents. This article reviews the synthetic, preclinical and early human data obtained during the development phase of this promising new radiopharmaceutical.

  7. The Hedgehog receptor patched functions in multidrug transport and chemotherapy resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bidet, Michel; Tomico, Amandine; Martin, Patrick; Guizouarn, Hélène; Mollat, Patrick; Mus-Veteau, Isabelle

    2012-11-01

    Most anticancer drugs fail to eradicate tumors, leading to the development of drug resistance and disease recurrence. The Hedgehog signaling plays a crucial role during embryonic development, but is also involved in cancer development, progression, and metastasis. The Hedgehog receptor Patched (Ptc) is a Hedgehog signaling target gene that is overexpressed in many cancer cells. Here, we show a link between Ptc and resistance to chemotherapy, and provide new insight into Ptc function. Ptc is cleared from the plasma membrane upon interaction with its ligand Hedgehog, or upon treatment of cells with the Hedgehog signaling antagonist cyclopamine. In both cases, after incubation of cells with doxorubicin, a chemotherapeutic agent that is used for the clinical management of recurrent cancers, we observed an inhibition of the efflux of doxorubicin from Hedgehog-responding fibroblasts, and an increase of doxorubicin accumulation in two different cancer cell lines that are known to express aberrant levels of Hedgehog signaling components. Using heterologous expression system, we stringently showed that the expression of human Ptc conferred resistance to growth inhibition by several drugs from which chemotherapeutic agents such as doxorubicin, methotrexate, temozolomide, and 5-fluorouracil. Resistance to doxorubicin correlated with Ptc function, as shown using mutations from Gorlin's syndrome patients in which the Ptc-mediated effect on Hedgehog signaling is lost. Our results show that Ptc is involved in drug efflux and multidrug resistance, and suggest that Ptc contributes to chemotherapy resistance of cancer cells.

  8. Multidrug efflux pumps as main players in intrinsic and acquired resistance to antimicrobials.

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    Hernando-Amado, Sara; Blanco, Paula; Alcalde-Rico, Manuel; Corona, Fernando; Reales-Calderón, Jose A; Sánchez, María B; Martínez, José L

    2016-09-01

    Multidrug efflux pumps constitute a group of transporters that are ubiquitously found in any organism. In addition to other functions with relevance for the cell physiology, efflux pumps contribute to the resistance to compounds used for treating different diseases, including resistance to anticancer drugs, antibiotics or antifungal compounds. In the case of antimicrobials, efflux pumps are major players in both intrinsic and acquired resistance to drugs currently in use for the treatment of infectious diseases. One important aspect not fully explored of efflux pumps consists on the identification of effectors able to induce their expression. Indeed, whereas the analysis of clinical isolates have shown that mutants overexpressing these resistance elements are frequently found, less is known on the conditions that may trigger expression of efflux pumps, hence leading to transient induction of resistance in vivo, a situation that is barely detectable using classical susceptibility tests. In the current article we review the structure and mechanisms of regulation of the expression of bacterial and fungal efflux pumps, with a particular focus in those for which a role in clinically relevant resistance has been reported.

  9. The overexpression of MRP4 is related to multidrug resistance in osteosarcoma cells

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    Zhonghui He

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Doxorubicin (Adriamycin, ADM is an antimitotic drug used in the treatment of a wide range of malignant tumors, including acute leukemia, lymphoma, osteosarcoma, breast cancer, and lung cancer. Multidrug resistance-associated proteins (MRPs are members of a superfamily of ATP-binding cassette (ABC transporters, which can transport various molecules across extra- and intra-cellular membranes. The aim of this study was to investigate whether there was a correlation between MRP4 and primary ADM resistance in osteosarcoma cells. In this paper, we chose the human osteosarcoma cell line MG63, ADM resistant cell line MG63/DOX, and the patient′s primary cell GSF-0686. We checked the ADM sensitivity and cytotoxicity of all the three cells by cell proliferation assay. The intracellular drug concentrations were measured by using LC-MS/MS. We also examined MRP4 gene expression by RT-PCR and Western Blot. We found that the intracellular ADM concentration of the parent osteosarcoma cell line MG63 was higher than the ADM resistant osteosarcoma MG63/DOX cell line or the GSF-0686 cell after ADM treatment (P < 0.05. In addition, MRP4 mRNA and protein levels in ADM resistant osteosarcoma cells were higher than in MG63 cell (P < 0.05. Taking together, this work suggests that overexpression of MRP4 may confer ADM resistance in osteosarcoma cells.

  10. Correlation between Twist expression and multidrug resistance of breast cancer cell lines

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    Yue-Xi Wang; Xiao-Mei Chen; Jun Yan; Zhi-Ping Li

    2016-01-01

    Objective:To study the correlation between Twist expression and multidrug resistance of breast cancer cell lines. Methods:Human breast cancer cell lines MCF-7, cisplatin-resistant human breast cancer cell lines MCF-7/DDP, doxorubicin-resistant human breast cancer cell lines MCF-7/Adr and taxol-resistant human breast cancer cell lines MCF/PTX were cultured, Twist in human breast cancer cell lines MCF-7 was overexpressed and treated with doxorubicin, and then cell viability and expression levels of EMT marker molecules and related signaling pathway molecules were detected. Results:mRNA contents and protein contents of Twist in drug-resistant breast cancer cell lines MCF-7/DDP, MCF-7/Adr and MCF/PTX were higher than those in MCF-7 cell lines;after doxorubicin treatment, inhibitory rates of cell viability in MCF-7 cell lines were higher than those in MCF-7/Adr and MCF-7/Twist cell lines;E-cadherin expression levels in MCF-7/Adr cell lines and MCF-7/Twist cell lines were lower than those in MCF-7 cell lines, and mRNA contents and protein contents of N-cadherin, Vimentin, TGF-β, Smad, Wnt,β-catenin, TNF-αand NF-kB were higher than those in MCF-7 cell lines. Conclusion:Increased expression of Twist is associated with the occurrence of drug resistance in breast cancer cells.

  11. INFLUENCE OF NEOADJUVANT INTRAARTERIAL INFUSION CHEMOTHERAPY ON APOPTOSIS AND MULTIDRUG RESISTANCE ASSOCIATED GENES OF ENDOMETRIAL CANCER

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    朱雪琼; 岳天孚; 张颖; 惠京; 王德华

    2002-01-01

    Objective: Through investigating the influence of neoadjuvant intraarterial infusion chemotherapy (NIAC) on the timing changes of apoptosis, PCNA and multiple drug resistance associated genes of endometrial cancer, to study the mechanism of chemotherapy and to define the best operation time. Methods: Twenty patients were subjected to neoadjuvant consecutive uterine arterial infusion with CDDP 100 mg and ADM 50 mg. The biopsy of endometrial tumor tissues was performed before, immediate after and 1, 2-2+3 w, 3+3-4 w after chemotherapy. Apoptosis index (AI) was estimated by a combination of histologic and TUNEL assays. Proliferative index (PI) was examined by SABC immunohistochemical staining. Expressions of multidrug resistance 1 (MDR1), multidrug resistance-associated protein (MRP) and lung resistance protein (LRP) were detected by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Results: The AI of endometrial cancer cells immediate after and 1, 2-2+3 w, after chemotherapy were 3.03%, 3.47% and 5.04%, respectively, much higher than that before chemotherapy which was 2.31%. After chemotherapy, AI/PI gradually increased. It was highest in 2-2+3 w, while 3+3-4 w after chemotherapy the AI and AI/PI were both significantly lower than that before chemotherapy. The expression of MDR1, MRP and LRP all decreased temporarily after chemotherapy, while 3+3-4 w after chemotherapy they all increased to levels higher than that before chemotherapy, but the difference were not significant (P>0.05). Conclusion: Neoadjuvant consecutive intra-arterial infusion chemotherapy via uterine artery can inhibit tumor cells proliferation and induce apoptosis effectively. To evaluate the response of intra-arterial chemotherapy the change of apoptosis index and cell proliferation should be analyzed. The most suitable time for the operation is 3 weeks after intra-arterial infusion chemotherapy.

  12. Combination antibiotic therapy for multidrug-resistant Gram-negative bacteria.

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    Tängdén, Thomas

    2014-05-01

    Combination antibiotic therapy for Gram-negative sepsis is controversial. The present review provides a brief summary of the existing knowledge on combination therapy for severe infections with multidrug-resistant Pseudomonas spp., Acinetobacter spp., and Enterobacteriaceae. Empirical combination antibiotic therapy is recommended for severe sepsis and septic shock to reduce mortality related to inappropriate antibiotic treatment. Because definitive combination therapy has not been proven superior to monotherapy in meta-analyses, it is generally advised to de-escalate antibiotic therapy when the antibiotic susceptibility profile is known, although it cannot be excluded that some subgroups of patients might still benefit from continued combination therapy. Definitive combination therapy is recommended for carbapenemase-producing Enterobacteriaceae and should also be considered for severe infections with Pseudomonas and Acinetobacter spp. when beta-lactams cannot be used. Because resistance to broad-spectrum beta-lactams is increasing in Gram-negative bacteria and because no new antibiotics are expected to become available in the near future, the antibacterial potential of combination therapy should be further explored. In vitro data suggest that combinations can be effective even if the bacteria are resistant to the individual antibiotics, although existing evidence is insufficient to support the choice of combinations and explain the synergistic effects observed. In vitro models can be used to screen for effective combinations that can later be validated in animal or clinical studies. Further, in the absence of clinical evidence, in vitro data might be useful in supporting therapeutic decisions for severe infections with multidrug-resistant Gram-negative bacteria.

  13. Multidrug resistant commensal Escherichia coli in animals and its impact for public health

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    Ama eSzmolka

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available After the era of plentiful antibiotics we are alarmed by the increasing number of antibiotic resistant strains. The genetic flexibility and adaptability of E. coli to constantly changing environments allows to acquire a great number of antimicrobial resistance mechanisms. Commensal strains of E. coli as versatile residents of the lower intestine are also repeatedly challenged by antimicrobial pressures during the lifetime of their host. As a consequence, commensal strains acquire the respective resistance genes, and/or develop resistant mutants in order to survive and maintain microbial homeostasis in the lower intestinal tract. Thus, commensal E. coli strains are regarded as indicators of antimicrobial load on their hosts. This chapter provides a short historic background of the appearance and presumed origin and transfer of antimicrobial resistance genes in commensal intestinal E. coli of animals with comparative information on their pathogenic counterparts. The dynamics, development and ways of evolution of resistance in the E. coli populations differ according to hosts, resistance mechanisms and antimicrobial classes used. The most frequent tools of E. coli against a variety of antimicrobials are the efflux pumps and mobile resistance mechanisms carried by plasmids and/or other transferable elements. The emergence of hybrid plasmids (both resistance and virulence among E. coli is of further concern. Co-existence and co-transfer of these bad genes in this huge and most versatile in vivo compartment may represent an increased public health risk in the future. Significance of multidrug resistant (MDR commensal E. coli seem to be highest in the food animal industry, acting as reservoir for intra- and interspecific exchange and a source for spread of MDR determinants through contaminated food to humans. Thus, public health potential of MDR commensal E. coli of food animals can be a concern and needs monitoring and more molecular analysis in the

  14. Eradication of multidrug-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii in a female patient with total hip arthroplasty, with debridement and retention: a case report

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    Beieler Alison M

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Multidrug-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii has become a significant cause of healthcare-associated infections, but few reports have addressed Acinetobacter baumannii infections associated with orthopedic devices. The current recommended treatment for complicated infections due to orthopedic devices, including resistant gram-negative rods, consists of antimicrobial therapy with debridement and removal of implants. Case presentation The patient, a 47-year-old woman, had previously had a prior total hip arthroplasty at 16 years of age for a complex femoral neck fracture, and multiple subsequent revisions. This time, she underwent a fifth revision secondary to pain. Surgery was complicated by hypotension resulting in transfer to the intensive care unit and prolonged respiratory failure. She received peri-operative cefazolin but postoperatively developed surgical wound drainage requiring debridement of a hematoma. Cultures of this grew ampicillin-sensitive Enterococcus and Acinetobacter baumannii (sensitive only to amikacin and imipenem. The patient was started on imipenem. Removal of the total hip arthroplasty was not recommended because of the recent surgical complications, and the patient was eventually discharged home. She was seen weekly for laboratory tests and examinations and, after 4 months of therapy, the imipenem was discontinued. She did well clinically for 7 months before recurrent pain led to removal of the total hip arthroplasty. Intra-operative cultures grew ampicillin-sensitive Enterococcus and coagulase-negative Staphylococcus but no multidrug-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii. The patient received ampicillin for 8 weeks and had not had recurrent infection at the time of writing, 37 months after discontinuing imipenem. Conclusion We describe the successful treatment of an acute infection from multidrug-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii with debridement and retention of the total hip arthroplasty, using

  15. New Ceftriaxone- and Multidrug-Resistant Neisseria gonorrhoeae Strain with a Novel Mosaic penA Gene Isolated in Japan.

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    Nakayama, Shu-Ichi; Shimuta, Ken; Furubayashi, Kei-Ichi; Kawahata, Takuya; Unemo, Magnus; Ohnishi, Makoto

    2016-07-01

    We have characterized in detail a new ceftriaxone- and multidrug-resistant Neisseria gonorrhoeae strain (FC428) isolated in Japan in 2015. FC428 differed from previous ceftriaxone-resistant strains and contained a novel mosaic penA allele encoding a new mosaic penicillin-binding protein 2 (PBP 2). However, the resistance-determining 3'-terminal region of penA was almost identical to the regions of two previously reported ceftriaxone-resistant strains from Australia and Japan, indicating that both ceftriaxone-resistant strains and conserved ceftriaxone resistance-determining PBP 2 regions might spread.

  16. Multidrug-exporting secondary transporters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murakami, Satoshi; Yamaguchi, Akihito

    2003-08-01

    The major cause of intrinsic drug resistance in Gram-negative bacteria is a resistance nodulation division type multidrug exporter, which couples with an outer membrane channel and a membrane fusion protein and exports drugs out of the cell, bypassing the periplasm; this process is driven by proton motive force. A recent crystal structure determination of a major resistance nodulation division type multidrug exporter, AcrB in Escherichia coli, greatly advances our understanding of the multidrug export mechanism. The most striking feature of the AcrB trimer is the presence of three vestibules open to the periplasm at the boundary between the periplasmic headpiece and the transmembrane region. Substrates can gain access to the central cavity from the periplasmic surface of the cytoplasmic membrane and are then actively transported through the extramembrane pore into the outer membrane channel TolC, via the funnel at the top of the AcrB headpiece.

  17. Pharmacological, molecular, and cytogenetic analysis of "atypical" multidrug-resistant human leukemic cells.

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    Beck, W T; Cirtain, M C; Danks, M K; Felsted, R L; Safa, A R; Wolverton, J S; Suttle, D P; Trent, J M

    1987-10-15

    We previously described the cross-resistance patterns and cellular pharmacology of a human leukemic cell line, CEM/VM-1, selected for resistance to the epipodophyllotoxin teniposide (M. K. Danks et al., Cancer Res., 47: 1297-1301, 1987). Compared to CEM/VLB100, which is a well characterized "classic" multidrug-resistant (MDR) cell line, the CEM/VM-1 cells display "atypical" multidrug resistance (at-MDR) in that they are cross-resistant to a wide variety of natural product antitumor drugs, except the Vinca alkaloids, and they are not impaired in their ability to accumulate radiolabeled epipodophyllotoxin. We have extended our characterization of this at-MDR cell line in the present study. In comparison to CEM/VLB100 cells, we found that CEM/VM-1 cells are not cross-resistant to either actinomycin D or colchicine. Verapamil and chloroquine, which enhance the cytotoxicity of vinblastine in CEM/VLB100 cells, had little or no ability to do so in the CEM/VM-1 cells. Membrane vesicles of the two resistant sublines were examined for overexpression of the MDR-associated plasma membrane protein (P-glycoprotein, Mr 170,000 protein, or 180,000 glycoprotein) by photoaffinity labeling with the vinblastine analogue N-(p-azido[3-125I]salicyl)-N'-beta-aminoethylvindesine. We were unable to visualize the MDR-associated protein in the CEM/VM-1 membranes with this photoaffinity probe under conditions in which the P-glycoprotein was readily seen in the membranes of CEM/VLB100 cells. Furthermore, no hybridization of the pMDR1 complementary DNA was seen in slot-blot analyses of the RNA from at-MDR cells, indicating that the mdr gene coding for P-glycoprotein is not overexpressed as is the case in the classic MDR cells. However, cytogenetic analysis indicated that the CEM/VM-1 cells contained an abnormally banded region on chromosome 13q, suggesting that a gene other than mdr may be amplified in these cells. Thus, despite the two cell lines having approximately equal degrees of resistance

  18. Viruses versus bacteria-novel approaches to phage therapy as a tool against multidrug-resistant pathogens.

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    Viertel, Tania Mareike; Ritter, Klaus; Horz, Hans-Peter

    2014-09-01

    Bacteriophage therapy (the application of phages to treat bacterial infections) has a tradition dating back almost a century, but interest in phage therapy slowed down in the West when antibiotics were discovered. With the emerging threat of infections caused by multidrug-resistant bacteria and scarce prospects of newly introduced antibiotics in the future, phages are currently being reconsidered as alternative therapeutics. Conventional phage therapy uses lytic bacteriophages for treatment and recent human clinical trials have revealed encouraging results. In addition, several other modern approaches to phages as therapeutics have been made in vitro and in animal models. Dual therapy with phages and antibiotics has resulted in significant reductions in the number of bacterial pathogens. Bioengineered phages have overcome many of the problems of conventional phage therapy, enabled targeted drug delivery or reversed the resistance of drug-resistant bacteria. The use of enzymes derived from phages, such as endolysin, as therapeutic agents has been efficient in the elimination of Gram-positive pathogens. This review presents novel strategies for phage-related therapies and describes our current knowledge of natural bacteriophages within the human microbiome. Our aim is to provide an overview of the high number of different methodological concepts, thereby encouraging further research on this topic, with the ultimate goal of using phages as therapeutic or preventative medicines in daily clinical practice.

  19. Psycho-Socio-Economic Issues Challenging Multidrug Resistant Tuberculosis Patients: A Systematic Review.

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    Beena Elizabeth Thomas

    Full Text Available Limited treatment options, long duration of treatment and associated toxicity adversely impact the physical and mental well-being of multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB patients. Despite research advances in the microbiological and clinical aspects of MDR-TB, research on the psychosocial context of MDR-TB is limited and less understood.We searched the databases of PubMed, MEDLINE, Embase and Google Scholar to retrieve all published articles. The final manuscripts included in the review were those with a primary focus on psychosocial issues of MDR-TB patients. These were assessed and the information was thematically extracted on the study objective, methodology used, key findings, and their implications. Intervention studies were evaluated using components of the methodological and quality rating scale. Due to the limited number of studies and the multiple methodologies employed in the observational studies, we summarized these studies using a narrative approach, rather than conducting a formal meta-analysis. We used 'thematic synthesis' method for extracting qualitative evidences and systematically organised to broader descriptive themes.A total of 282 published articles were retrieved, of which 15 articles were chosen for full text review based on the inclusion criteria. Six were qualitative studies; one was a mixed methods study; and eight were quantitative studies. The included studies were divided into the following issues affecting MDR-TB patients: a psychological issues b social issues and economic issues c psychosocial interventions. It was found that all studies have documented range of psychosocial and economic challenges experienced by MDR-TB patients. Depression, stigma, discrimination, side effects of the drugs causing psychological distress, and the financial constraints due to MDR-TB were some of the common issues reported in the studies. There were few intervention studies which addressed these psychosocial issues most of

  20. Cloacael Carriage and Multidrug Resistance Escherichia coli O157:H7 from Poultry Farms, Eastern Ethiopia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shecho, Mude; Muktar, Yimer

    2017-01-01

    A cross-sectional study was carried out to determine antimicrobial drug resistance patterns of E. coli O157:H7 isolates and estimate the level of the pathogen. A total of 194 cloacae swab samples were collected randomly in two poultry farms. Standard cultural, biochemical, and serological (latex agglutination) methods were used to isolate E. coli O157:H7. The isolates were subjected to antimicrobial susceptibility testing using disc diffusion method. Out of 194 cloacae samples examined, 13.4% (n = 26) were found to be positive for E. coli O157:H7. The finding indicated differences in E. coli O157:H7 infection among the different risk factors. Chicken from Adele Poultry Farm showed higher E. coli O157:H7 infection (OR = 3.89) than Haramaya University poultry farm and young birds had more infection (OR = 4.62) than adult birds. Of the total 14 antimicrobials included in the panel of study, the susceptibility results were varied with 96.15% and 0% E. coli O157:H7 isolates expressing resistance to erythromycin, clindamycin, spectinomycin, and ciprofloxacin, respectively. Multidrug resistance to more than two antimicrobial agents was detected in 24 (92.30%) of the isolates. The study showed high presence of antimicrobial resistant isolates of E. coli O157:H7. Further study is required to better understand the ecology and evolution of bacterial resistance to antimicrobial agents.

  1. Cloacael Carriage and Multidrug Resistance Escherichia coli O157:H7 from Poultry Farms, Eastern Ethiopia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mude Shecho

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available A cross-sectional study was carried out to determine antimicrobial drug resistance patterns of E. coli O157:H7 isolates and estimate the level of the pathogen. A total of 194 cloacae swab samples were collected randomly in two poultry farms. Standard cultural, biochemical, and serological (latex agglutination methods were used to isolate E. coli O157:H7. The isolates were subjected to antimicrobial susceptibility testing using disc diffusion method. Out of 194 cloacae samples examined, 13.4% (n=26 were found to be positive for E. coli O157:H7. The finding indicated differences in E. coli O157:H7 infection among the different risk factors. Chicken from Adele Poultry Farm showed higher E. coli O157:H7 infection (OR = 3.89 than Haramaya University poultry farm and young birds had more infection (OR = 4.62 than adult birds. Of the total 14 antimicrobials included in the panel of study, the susceptibility results were varied with 96.15% and 0% E. coli O157:H7 isolates expressing resistance to erythromycin, clindamycin, spectinomycin, and ciprofloxacin, respectively. Multidrug resistance to more than two antimicrobial agents was detected in 24 (92.30% of the isolates. The study showed high presence of antimicrobial resistant isolates of E. coli O157:H7. Further study is required to better understand the ecology and evolution of bacterial resistance to antimicrobial agents.

  2. Metalloprobes for functional monitoring of tumour multidrug resistance by nuclear imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendes, Filipa; Paulo, António; Santos, Isabel

    2011-05-28

    Cancer chemotherapy has been used since the early 1950s and still remains one the major therapeutic options for many malignant tumours. A major obstacle to successful cancer chemotherapy is drug resistance. Frequently resistance is intrinsic to the cancer, but as therapy becomes more effective, acquired resistance has also become more frequent. One form of resistance, named multidrug resistance (MDR), is responsible for the failure of tumours to respond to a wide spectrum of chemotherapeutic agents. The in vivo monitoring of MDR could assist in the selection of patients for therapy and can avoid ineffective and potentially toxic treatments. Therefore, methods for functionally interrogating MDR transport activity have been sought, namely single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) and positron emission tomography (PET). Cationic radiotracers originally developed as SPECT myocardial imaging agents, such as [(99m)Tc(MIBI)(6)](+) and [(99m)Tc(tetrofosmin)(2)O(2)](+), are used for both early cancer detection and non-invasive monitoring of the tumour MDR transport function. With the ultimate goal of obtaining better performing radioprobes for MDR imaging, other metal-based complexes and/or small molecules have also been synthesized and biologically evaluated. In this perspective we will report on the chemical efforts made to find metalloprobes for in vivo monitoring of MDR by nuclear imaging techniques. The current knowledge on the biological mechanisms and proteins involved in tumour MDR will be also briefly presented, as its understanding is invaluable for the rational design and biological evaluation of new radioprobes.

  3. Multidrug resistant Escherichia coli strains isolated from urine sample, University of Gondar Hospital, Northwest Ethiopia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Setegn Eshetie; Fentahun Tarekegn; Gemechu Kumera; Feleke Mekonnen

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To assess multidrug resistant (MDR) Escherichia coli (E. coli) isolates from patients with urinary tract infection. Methods: From February to June 2014, a cross sectional study was conducted among urinary tract infection patients at the University of Gondar Hospital. Culture and disk diffusion method were used for E. coli isolation and to determine the antibiotic susceptibility patterns. Data were entered and analyzed using SPSS version 20. P Results: A total of 112 E. coli isolates were identified and the rate of isolation was higher among female participants (28.7%; P = 0.03). Of the isolates, 104 (92.9%) were MDR E. coli; and the isolates showed high resistance rates towards ampicillin (99%), cotrimoxazole (69%), chloramphenicol (58.7%), gentamycin (56.7%) and ceftazidime (55.8%). However, comparative isolates showed low resistance rates to ciprofloxacin (1%), cefepime (8.7%), and ceftriaxone (11.5%). Moreover, resistance rates of MDR E. coli isolates were significantly higher than non-MDR strains for ceftazidime (55.8% versus 12.5%; P = 0.015), and ampicillin (99% versus 87.5%; P = 0.018). Conclusions: High prevalence of MDR E. coli isolates was observed in this study. Regular monitoring of antibiotic resistance rates is necessarily required to improve and revise empirical antibiotic therapy protocols.

  4. Isolation, Identification And Screening Antibacterial Activity from Marine Sponge-Associated Fungi Against Multidrug-Resistant (MDR) Escherichia coli

    Science.gov (United States)

    Triandala Sibero, Mada; Sabdaningsih, Aninditia; Cristianawati, Olvi; Nuryadi, Handung; Karna Radjasa, Ocky; Sabdono, Agus; Trianto, Agus

    2017-02-01

    Irrational used of antibiotic in several decades ago causing resistant in bacteria and decreasing the cure rate of infectious diseases. Multidrug-resistant (MDR) Escherichia coli is known to cause various of infectious diseases such as urinary tract infection, nosocomial bloodstream infection, meningitis, bacteraemia, and gastrointestinal disease. Marine sponge-associated fungi have potential as source of new compound to combat MDR E. coli. The aims of this research were to isolate marine sponge-assosiated fungi, to screen potential fungi against MDR E. coli, to identify the potential fungi and its host sponge. There were 29 marine sponge-associated fungi successfully isolated from 9 sponges. Among 29 sponge-associated fungi screened, there were 7 isolates showed antibacterial activity against MDR E. coli. The best inhibition zone produced by MPS 14.1/MT 02 and MPS 14.3/MT 04 from sponge PP.SP.16.14. According to fungi identification result fungus MPS 14.1/MT 02 was identified as Trichoderma asperellum while MPS 14.3/MT 04 was identified as Trichoderma reesei. Sponge identification leaded the PP.SP.16.14 as Cinachyrella sp.

  5. MiR-30a Decreases Multidrug Resistance (MDR) of Gastric Cancer Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chunying; Zou, Jinhai; Zheng, Guoqi; Chu, Jiankun

    2016-01-01

    Background The effectiveness of chemotherapy for gastric cancer is largely limited by either intrinsic or acquired drug resistance. In this study, we aimed to explore the association between miR-30a dysregulation and multidrug resistance (MDR) in gastric cancer cells. Material/Methods We recruited 20 patients with advanced gastric cancer. Chemosensitivity was assessed after completion of the chemotherapy. SGC-7901 and SGC-7901/DDP cells were transfected for miR-30a overexpression or knockdown. Then, MTT assay was performed to assess the IC50 of DPP and 5-FU in SGC-7901 and SGC-7901/DDP cells. Flow cytometry analysis was used to detect DPP- and 5-FU-induced cell apoptosis. Western blot analysis and immunofluorescence staining were used to assess EMT of the cells. Results MiR-30a was significantly downregulated in the chemoresistant tissues. In both SGC-7901 and SGC-7901/DDP cells, miR-30a overexpression decreased the expression of P-gp, a MDR-related protein. MTT assay and flow cytometry analysis showed that miR-30a inhibition increased chemoresistance, while miR-30a overexpression decreased chemoresistance in gastric cancer cells. Both Western blot analysis and immunofluorescence staining confirmed that miR-30a inhibition decreased E-cadherin but increased N-cadherin in SGC-7901 cells, while miR-30a overexpression increased E-cadherin but decreased N-cadherin in SGC-7901 cells. Conclusions MiR-30a can decrease multidrug resistance (MDR) of gastric cancer cells. It is also an important miRNA modulating EMT of the cancer cells.

  6. Modulation of P-glycoprotein function and multidrug resistance in cancer cells by Thai plant extracts.

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    Takano, M; Kakizoe, S; Kawami, M; Nagai, J; Patanasethnont, D; Sripanidkulchai, B; Yumoto, R

    2014-11-01

    The effects of ethanol extracts from Thai plants belonging to the families of Annonaceae, Rutaceae, and Zingiberaceae on P-glycoprotein (P-gp) function and multidrug resistance were examined in paclitaxel-resistant HepG2 (PR-HepG2) cells. All the extracts tested, significantly increased the accumulation of [3H]paclitaxel, a P-gp substrate, in the cells. Among nine extracts, Z01 and Z02, extracts from Curcuma comosa and Kaempferia marginata (Zingiberaceae family), respectively, potently increased the accumulation. In addition, Z01 and Z02 increased the accumulation of other P-gp substrates, rhodamine 123 and doxorubicin, in PR-HepG2 cells in a concentration-dependent manner. Increased accumulation of rhodamine 123 and doxorubicin by Z01 and Z02 was also confirmed by confocal laser scanning microscopy. The effect of Z01 and Z02 pretreatment on the expression of MDR1 mRNA was also examined. The expression of MDR1 mRNA was not affected by the treatment of PR-HepG2 cells with these extracts for 48 hours. Cytotoxicity of paclitaxel was examined by XTT and protein assays in the absence and presence of Z02. Z02 potentiated the cytotoxicity of paclitaxel in PR-HepG2 cells. These results suggest that Curcuma comosa and Kaempferia marginata belonging to Zingiberaceae are useful sources to search for new P-gp modulator(s) that can be used to overcome multidrug resistance of cancer cells.

  7. Modulation of human multidrug-resistance MDR-1 gene by natural curcuminoids

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    Buddhasukh Duang

    2004-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Multidrug resistance (MDR is a phenomenon that is often associated with decreased intracellular drug accumulation in patient's tumor cells resulting from enhanced drug efflux. It is related to the overexpression of a membrane protein, P-glycoprotein (Pgp-170, thereby reducing drug cytotoxicity. A variety of studies have tried to find MDR modulators which increase drug accumulation in cancer cells. Methods In this study, natural curcuminoids, pure curcumin, demethoxycurcumin and bisdemethoxycurcumin, isolated from turmeric (Curcuma longa Linn, were compared for their potential ability to modulate the human MDR-1 gene expression in multidrug resistant human cervical carcinoma cell line, KB-V1 by Western blot analysis and RT-PCR. Results Western blot analysis and RT-PCR showed that all the three curcuminoids inhibited MDR-1 gene expression, and bisdemethoxycurcumin produced maximum effect. In additional studies we found that commercial grade curcuminoid (approximately 77% curcumin, 17% demethoxycurcumin and 3% bisdemthoxycurcumin decreased MDR-1 gene expression in a dose dependent manner and had about the same potent inhibitory effect on MDR-1 gene expression as our natural curcuminoid mixtures. Conclusion These results indicate that bisdemethoxycurcumin is the most active of the curcuminoids present in turmeric for modulation of MDR-1 gene. Treatment of drug resistant KB-V1 cells with curcumin increased their sensitivity to vinblastine, which was consistent with a decreased MDR-1 gene product, a P-glycoprotein, on the cell plasma membrane. Although many drugs that prevent the P-glycoprotein function have been reported, this report describes the inhibition of MDR-1 expression by a phytochemical. The modulation of MDR-1 expression may be an attractive target for new chemosensitizing agents.

  8. Genetic knockdown and pharmacological inhibition of parasite multidrug resistance transporters disrupts egg production in Schistosoma mansoni.

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    Ravi S Kasinathan

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available P-glycoprotein (Pgp and multidrug resistance-associated proteins (MRPs are ATP-dependent transporters involved in efflux of toxins and xenobiotics from cells. When overexpressed, these transporters can mediate multidrug resistance (MDR in mammalian cells, and changes in Pgp expression and sequence are associated with drug resistance in helminths. In addition to the role they play in drug efflux, MDR transporters are essential components of normal cellular physiology, and targeting them may prove a useful strategy for development of new therapeutics or of compounds that enhance the efficacy of current anthelmintics. We previously showed that expression of Schistosoma mansoni MDR transporters increases in response to praziquantel (PZQ, the current drug of choice against schistosomiasis, and that reduced PZQ sensitivity correlates with higher levels of these parasite transporters. We have also shown that PZQ inhibits transport by SMDR2, a Pgp orthologue from S. mansoni, and that PZQ is a likely substrate of SMDR2. Here, we examine the physiological roles of SMDR2 and SmMRP1 (the S. mansoni orthologue of MRP1 in S. mansoni adults, using RNAi to knock down expression, and pharmacological agents to inhibit transporter function. We find that both types of treatments disrupt parasite egg deposition by worms in culture. Furthermore, administration of different MDR inhibitors to S. mansoni-infected mice results in a reduction in egg burden in host liver. These schistosome MDR transporters therefore appear to play essential roles in parasite egg production, and can be targeted genetically and pharmacologically. Since eggs are responsible for the major pathophysiological consequences of schistosomiasis, and since they are also the agents for transmission of the disease, these results suggest a potential strategy for reducing disease pathology and spread.

  9. Effect of mutated IκBα transfection on multidrug resistance in hilar cholangiocarcinoma cell lines

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ru-Fu Chen; Zhi-Hua Li; Xian-He Kong; Ji-Sheng Chen

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To explore the expression effect of mutated IκBαtransfection on multidrug resistance gene (MDR-1) in hilar cholangiocarcinoma cells by inhibiting the activity of nuclear transcription factor-κB (NF-κB).METHODS: We used the mutated IκBα plasmid to transfect QBC939HCVC+ cells and QBC939 cells, and electrophoretic gel mobility shift assay (EMSA) to detect the binding activity of NF-κB DNA and the effect of the transfrecting mutated IκBα plasmid on multidrug resistance gene (MDR-1) in hilar cholangiocarcinoma cells and its expression protein (P-GP).RFSULTS: Plasmid DNA was digested by restriction enzymes Xbal and Hand Ⅲ, and its product after electrophoresis showed two bands with a big difference in molecular weight,with a size of 4.9 kb and 1.55 kb respectively, which indicated that the carrier was successfully constructed and digested with enzymes. The radioactivity accumulation of QBC939HCVC+and QBC939 cells transfected with mutated IκBα plasmid was significantly lower than that of the control group not transfected with mutated IκBα plasmid. Double densimeter scanning showed that the relative signal density between the tansfection group and non-transfection group was significantly different, which proved that the mutated IκBα plasmid could inhibit the binding activity of NF-κB DNA in hilar cholangiocarcinoma cells. Compared to control group not transfected with m IκBα plasmid, the expression level of MDR-1mRNA in the QBC939 and QBC939HCVC+ cells transfected with mutated IκBα plasmid was lower. The expression intensity of P-GP protein in QBC939 and QBC939HCVC+ cells transfected with mutated IκBα was significantly lower than that of the control group not transfected with mutated IκBα plasmid.CONCLUSION: The mutated IκBα plasmid transfection can markedly reverse the multidrug resistance of hilar cholangiocarcinoma cells. Interruption of NF-κB activity may become a new target in gene therapy for hilar cholangiocarcinogenesic carcinoma.

  10. Multidrug-resistant organisms in refugees: prevalences and impact on infection control in hospitals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heudorf, Ursel; Albert-Braun, Sabine; Hunfeld, Klaus-Peter; Birne, Franz-Ulrich; Schulze, Jörg; Strobel, Klaus; Petscheleit, Knut; Kempf, Volkhard A. J.; Brandt, Christian

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: The refugee crisis is a great challenge to the social and healthcare system in European countries, especially in Germany. An abundance of data has been published on the refugees’ health problems (infections as well as physical diseases and psychiatric problems) and their prevention (i.e., sanitary and vaccination programs). However, data on prevalences of multidrug-resistant organisms (MDRO) in refugees are scarce, although it is known that most refugees are from or travelled through countries with high prevalences of MDRO. This paper presents current data on MDRO colonization of refugees admitted to hospitals, and the impact of screening upon admission and infection control in hospitals is discussed. Methods: Anonymous data obtained by screening upon hospital admission were reported by hospitals in the Rhine-Main region of Germany to the local public health department. Screening and microbiological analyses were performed from December 2015 to March 2016 according to standardized and validated methods. Results: 9.8% of the refugees screened (32/325) exhibited colonization with methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), and 23.3% of the refugees (67/290) were colonized with Gram-negative bacteria with extended spectrum beta-lactamases, and/or enterobacteria with resistance against 3 or 4 groups of antibacterials, so-called 3MRGN (multidrug-resistant Gram-negative bacteria with resistance against penicillins, cephalosporins and quinolones) and 4MRGN (with additional resistance against carbapenems). Carbapenem-resistant Gram-negative bacteria (CRGN) were detected in 2.1% (6/290) of the refugees. Conclusion: The data confirms the studies published between 2014 and 2016, encompassing refugees tested in Germany, the Netherlands and Israel, with prevalences of MRSA and CRGN up to 13.5% and 5.6%. The MDRO prevalences are higher than those of “risk groups” for MRSA, such as hemodialysis patients and patients depending on outpatient home

  11. Characterization of multidrug-resistant Escherichia coli by antimicrobial resistance profiles, plasmid replicon typing, and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindsey, Rebecca L; Frye, Jonathan G; Thitaram, Sutawee N; Meinersmann, Richard J; Fedorka-Cray, Paula J; Englen, Mark D

    2011-06-01

    The objective of this study was to examine the distribution of multidrug resistance in Escherichia coli in relation to plasmid replicon types, animal sources, and genotypes. E. coli isolates (n = 35) from seven different animal sources were selected and tested for susceptibility to 15 antimicrobials; pulsed-field gel electrophoresis was used to determine genetic relationships among the E. coli isolates. Plasmid types based on their incompatibility (Inc) replicon types were determined, and linkage disequilibrium analysis was performed for antimicrobial resistance profiles, replicon types, and animal source. A high degree of genotypic diversity was observed: 34 different pulsed-field gel electrophoresis types among the 35 isolates examined. Twelve different plasmid Inc types were detected, and all isolates carried at least one replicon type. IncF (n = 25; 71.4%) and IncFIB (n = 19; 54.3%) were the most common replicon types identified. Chloramphenicol resistance was significantly linked with four Inc types (A/C, FIIA, F, and Y), and amoxicillin/clavulanic acid was linked with three Inc types (B/O, P and Y). Resistance to any other antimicrobial was linked to two or fewer replicon types. The isolate source was linked with resistance to seven antimicrobials and IncI1. We conclude that commensal E. coli from animal sources are highly variable genotypically and are reservoirs of a diverse array of plasmids carrying antimicrobial resistance.

  12. Multidrug resistance protein 1 (ABCC1) confers resistance to arsenic compounds in human myeloid leukemic HL-60 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Shi; Zhang, Yan Fang; Carew, Micheal W; Hao, Wen Hui; Loo, Jacky Fong Chuen; Naranmandura, Hua; Le, X Chris

    2013-06-01

    Arsenic trioxide (As(2)O(3)) is established as one of the most effective drugs for treatment of patients with acute promyelocytic leukemia, as well as other types of malignant tumors. However, HL-60 cells are resistant to As(2)O(3), and little is known about the underlying resistance mechanism for As(2)O(3) and its biomethylation products, namely, monomethylarsonous acid (MMA(III)) on the treatment of tumors. In the present study, we investigated the molecular mechanisms underlying iAs(III) and its intermediate metabolite MMA(III)-induced anticancer effects in the HL-60 cells. Here, we show that the HL-60 cells exhibit resistance to inorganic iAs(III) (IC(50) = 10 μM), but are relatively sensitive to its intermediate MMA(III) (IC(50) = 3.5 μM). Moreover, we found that the multidrug resistance protein 1 (MRP1), but not MRP2, is expressed in HL-60 cells, which reduced the intracellular arsenic accumulation, and conferred resistance to inorganic iAs(III) and MMA(III). Pretreatment of HL-60 with MK571, an inhibitor of MRP1, significantly increased iAs(III) and MMA(III)-induced cytotoxicity and arsenic accumulations, suggesting that the expression of MRP1/4 may lead to HL-60 cells resistance to trivalent arsenic compounds.

  13. The widespread presence of a multidrug- resistant Escherichia coli ST131 clade among community-associated and hospitalized patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P.M. Den Reijer (P. Martijn); S. Van Burgh (Sebastian); A. Burggraaf (Arjan); J.M. Ossewaarde (Jacobus); A. van der Zee (Anneke)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractBackground & Aims The extent of entry of multidrug-resistant Escherichia coli from the community into the hospital and subsequent clonal spread amongst patients is unclear. To investigate the extent and direction of clonal spread of these bacteria within a large teaching hospital, we pro

  14. Complete Genome Sequence of the Triclosan- and Multidrug-Resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa Strain B10W Isolated from Municipal Wastewater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Chuanqing; Nelson, Matthew; Cao, Guangxiang

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Here, we report the complete genome sequence of the triclosan- and multidrug-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain B10W, obtained from municipal wastewater in Hawaii. The bacterium has a 6.7-Mb genome, contains 6,391 coding sequences and 78 RNAs, with an average G+C content of 66.2 mol%. PMID:28104659

  15. Dual Agent Loaded PLGA Nanoparticles Enhanced Antitumor Activity in a Multidrug-Resistant Breast Tumor Eenograft Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Chen

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Multidrug-resistant breast cancers have limited and ineffective clinical treatment options. This study aimed to develop PLGA nanoparticles containing a synergistic combination of vincristine and verapamil to achieve less toxicity and enhanced efficacy on multidrug-resistant breast cancers. The 1:250 molar ratio of VCR/VRP showed strong synergism with the reversal index of approximately 130 in the multidrug-resistant MCF-7/ADR cells compared to drug-sensitive MCF-7 cells. The lyophilized nanoparticles could get dispersed quickly with the similar size distribution, zeta potential and encapsulation efficiency to the pre-lyophilized nanoparticles suspension, and maintain the synergistic in vitro release ratio of drugs. The co-encapsulated nanoparticle formulation had lower toxicity than free vincristine/verapamil combinations according to the acute-toxicity test. Furthermore, the most effective tumor growth inhibition in the MCF-7/ADR human breast tumor xenograft was observed in the co-delivery nanoparticle formulation group in comparison with saline control, free vincristine, free vincristine/verapamil combinations and single-drug nanoparticle combinations. All the data demonstrated that PLGANPs simultaneously loaded with chemotherapeutic drug and chemosensitizer might be one of the most potential formulations in the treatment of multidrug-resistant breast cancer in clinic.

  16. Quantitative structure activity relationship studies on the flavonoid mediated inhibition of multidrug resistance proteins 1 and 2

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zanden, J.J. van; Wortelboer, H.M.; Bijlsma, S.; Punt, A.; Usta, M.; Bladeren, P.J.V.; Rietjens, I.M.C.M.; Cnubben, N.H.P.

    2005-01-01

    In the present study, the effects of a large series of flavonoids on multidrug resistance proteins (MRPs) were studied in MRP1 and MRP2 transfected MDCKII cells. The results were used to define the structural requirements of flavonoids necessary for potent inhibition of MRP1- and MRP2-mediated calce

  17. Intravenous immunoglobulin enhances the killing activity and autophagy of neutrophils isolated from immunocompromised patients against multidrug-resistant bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuo, Hidemasa; Itoh, Hiroshi; Kitamura, Naoko; Kamikubo, Yasuhiko; Higuchi, Takeshi; Shiga, Shuichi; Ichiyama, Satoshi; Kondo, Tadakazu; Takaori-Kondo, Akifumi; Adachi, Souichi

    2015-08-14

    Intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG) is periodically administered to immunocompromised patients together with antimicrobial agents. The evidence that supports the effectiveness of IVIG is mostly based on data from randomized clinical trials; the underlying mechanisms are poorly understood. A recent study revealed that killing of multidrug-resistant bacteria and drug-sensitive strains by neutrophils isolated from healthy donors is enhanced by an IVIG preparation. However, the effectiveness of IVIG in immunocompromised patients remains unclear. The present study found that IVIG increased both killing activity and O2(-) release by neutrophils isolated from six patients receiving immune-suppressive drugs after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT); these neutrophils killed both multidrug-resistant extended-spectrum β-lactamase-producing Escherichia coli (E. coli) and multidrug-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa (P. aeruginosa). Moreover, IVIG increased the autophagy of the neutrophils, which is known to play an important role in innate immunity. These results suggest that IVIG promotes both the killing activity and autophagy of neutrophils isolated from immunocompromised patients against multidrug-resistant bacteria.

  18. Diagnosis and interim treatment outcomes from the first cohort of multidrug-resistant tuberculosis patients in Tanzania

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mpagama, S.G.; Heysell, S.K.; Ndusilo, N.D.; Kumburu, H.H.; Lekule, I.A.; Kisonga, R.M.; Gratz, J.; Boeree, M.J.; Houpt, E.R.; Kibiki, G.S.

    2013-01-01

    SETTING: Kibong'oto National Tuberculosis Hospital (KNTH), Kilimanjaro, Tanzania. OBJECTIVE: Characterize the diagnostic process and interim treatment outcomes from patients treated for multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB) in Tanzania. DESIGN: A retrospective cohort study was performed among al

  19. A data-driven mathematical model of multi-drug resistant Acinetobacter baumannii transmission in an intensive care unit

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wang, Xia; Chen, Yong; Zhao, Wei; Wang, Yan; Song, Qing; Liu, Hui; Zhao, Jingya; Han, Xuelin; Hu, Xiaohua; Grundmann, Hajo; Xiao, Yanni; Han, Li

    2015-01-01

    Major challenges remain when attempting to quantify and evaluate the impacts of contaminated environments and heterogeneity in the cohorting of health care workers (HCWs) on hospital infections. Data on the detection rate of multidrug-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii (MRAB) in a Chinese intensive c

  20. Glutathione-dependent interaction of heavy metal compounds with multidrug resistance proteins MRP1 and MRP2

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wortelboer, H.M.; Balvers, M.G.J.; Usta, M.; Bladeren, P.J. van; Cnubben, N.H.P.

    2008-01-01

    The interactions of three heavy metal-containing compounds, cisplatin (CDDP), arsenic trioxide (As2O3), and mercury dichloride (HgCl2), with the multidrug resistance transporters MRP1 and MRP2 and the involvement of glutathione (GSH)-related processes herein were investigated. In Madin-Darby canine

  1. Glutathione-dependent interaction of heavy metal compounds with multidrug resistance proteins MRP1 and MRP2

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wortelboer, H.M.; Balvers, M.G.J.; Usta, M.; Bladeren, van P.J.; Cnubben, N.H.P.

    2008-01-01

    The interactions of three heavy metal-containing compounds, cisplatin (CDDP), arsenic trioxide (AS(2)O(3)), and mercury dichloride (HgCl2), with the multidrug resistance transporters MRP1 and MRP2 and the involvement of glutathione (GSH)-related processes herein were investigated. In Madin-Darby can

  2. Reversion of multidrug resistance of human gastric cancer SGC7901/DDP cells by E2F-1 gene silencing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    廉超

    2014-01-01

    Objective To investigate the effects of E2F-1 gene silencing on multidrug resistance of human gastric cancer SGC7901/DDP cells and its possible mechanisms.Methods Gastric cancer SGC7901/DDP cells were seeded in 6 well plates and divided into three groups:the experimental group,blank control and the negative con-

  3. Efflux pump gene expression in multidrug-resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis clinical isolates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Guilian; Zhang, Jingrui; Guo, Qian; Jiang, Yi; Wei, Jianhao; Zhao, Li-li; Zhao, Xiuqin; Lu, Jianxin; Wan, Kanglin

    2015-01-01

    Isoniazid (INH) and rifampicin (RIF) are the two most effective drugs in tuberculosis therapy. Understanding the molecular mechanisms of resistance to these two drugs is essential to quickly diagnose multidrug-resistant (MDR) tuberculosis and extensive drug-resistant tuberculosis. Nine clinical Mycobacterium tuberculosis isolates resistant to only INH and RIF and 10 clinical pan-sensitive isolates were included to evaluate the expression of 20 putative drug efflux pump genes and sequence mutations in rpoB (RIF), katG (INH), the inhA promoter (INH), and oxyR-ahpC (INH). Nine and three MDR isolates were induced to overexpress efflux pump genes by INH and RIF, respectively. Eight and two efflux pump genes were induced to overexpress by INH and RIF in MDR isolates, respectively. drrA, drrB, efpA, jefA (Rv2459), mmr, Rv0849, Rv1634, and Rv1250 were overexpressed under INH or RIF stress. Most efflux pump genes were overexpressed under INH stress in a MDR isolates that carried the wild-type katG, inhA, and oxyR-ahpC associated with INH resistance than in those that carried mutations. The expression levels of 11 genes (efpA, Rv0849, Rv1250, P55 (Rv1410c), Rv1634, Rv2994, stp, Rv2459, pstB, drrA, and drrB) without drug inducement were significantly higher (P < 0.05) in nine MDR isolates than in 10 pan-sensitive isolates. In conclusion, efflux pumps may play an important role in INH acquired resistance in MDR M. tuberculosis, especially in those strains having no mutations in genes associated with INH resistance; basal expression levels of some efflux pump genes are higher in MDR isolates than in pan-sensitive isolates and the basal expressional differences may be helpful to diagnose and treat resistant tuberculosis.

  4. Efflux pump gene expression in multidrug-resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis clinical isolates.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guilian Li

    Full Text Available Isoniazid (INH and rifampicin (RIF are the two most effective drugs in tuberculosis therapy. Understanding the molecular mechanisms of resistance to these two drugs is essential to quickly diagnose multidrug-resistant (MDR tuberculosis and extensive drug-resistant tuberculosis. Nine clinical Mycobacterium tuberculosis isolates resistant to only INH and RIF and 10 clinical pan-sensitive isolates were included to evaluate the expression of 20 putative drug efflux pump genes and sequence mutations in rpoB (RIF, katG (INH, the inhA promoter (INH, and oxyR-ahpC (INH. Nine and three MDR isolates were induced to overexpress efflux pump genes by INH and RIF, respectively. Eight and two efflux pump genes were induced to overexpress by INH and RIF in MDR isolates, respectively. drrA, drrB, efpA, jefA (Rv2459, mmr, Rv0849, Rv1634, and Rv1250 were overexpressed under INH or RIF stress. Most efflux pump genes were overexpressed under INH stress in a MDR isolates that carried the wild-type katG, inhA, and oxyR-ahpC associated with INH resistance than in those that carried mutations. The expression levels of 11 genes (efpA, Rv0849, Rv1250, P55 (Rv1410c, Rv1634, Rv2994, stp, Rv2459, pstB, drrA, and drrB without drug inducement were significantly higher (P < 0.05 in nine MDR isolates than in 10 pan-sensitive isolates. In conclusion, efflux pumps may play an important role in INH acquired resistance in MDR M. tuberculosis, especially in those strains having no mutations in genes associated with INH resistance; basal expression levels of some efflux pump genes are higher in MDR isolates than in pan-sensitive isolates and the basal expressional differences may be helpful to diagnose and treat resistant tuberculosis.

  5. Proteomics for Drug Resistance on the Food Chain? Multidrug-Resistant Escherichia coli Proteomes from Slaughtered Pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos, Sónia; Silva, Nuno; Hébraud, Michel; Santos, Hugo M; Nunes-Miranda, Júlio Dinis; Pinto, Luís; Pereira, José E; Capelo, José-Luis; Poeta, Patrícia; Igrejas, Gilberto

    2016-06-01

    Understanding global drug resistance demands an integrated vision, focusing on both human and veterinary medicine. Omics technologies offer new vistas to decipher mechanisms of drug resistance in the food chain. For example, Escherichia coli resistance to major antibiotics is increasing whereas multidrug resistance (MDR) strains are now commonly found in humans and animals. Little is known about the structural and metabolic changes in the cell that trigger resistance to antimicrobial agents. Proteomics is an emerging field that is used to advance our knowledge in global health and drug resistance in the food chain. In the present proteomic analysis, we offer an overview of the global protein expression of different MDR E. coli strains from fecal samples of pigs slaughtered for human consumption. A full proteomic survey of the drug-resistant strains SU60, SU62, SU76, and SU23, under normal growth conditions, was made by two-dimensional electrophoresis, identifying proteins by MALDI-TOF/MS. The proteomes of these four E. coli strains with different genetic profiles were compared in detail. Identical transport, stress response, or metabolic proteins were discovered in the four strains. Several of the identified proteins are essential in bacterial pathogenesis (GAPDH, LuxS, FKBPs), development of bacterial resistance (Omp's, TolC, GroEL, ClpB, or SOD), and potential antibacterial targets (FBPA, FabB, ACC's, or Fab1). Effective therapies against resistant bacteria are crucial and, to accomplish this, a comprehensive understanding of putative resistance mechanisms is essential. Moving forward, we suggest that multi-omics research will further improve our knowledge about bacterial growth and virulence on the food chain, especially under antibiotic stress.

  6. Carbonyl Cyanide m-Chlorophenylhydrazine (CCCP) Reverses Resistance to Colistin, but Not to Carbapenems and Tigecycline in Multidrug-Resistant Enterobacteriaceae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osei Sekyere, John; Amoako, Daniel G.

    2017-01-01

    Background: Carbapenems (CAR), colistin (CST), and tigecycline (TGC) alone or in combination therapy has become the last-resort antibiotics for treating infections caused by multidrug resistant (MDR) bacteria. However, resistance to these reserve antibiotics are increasingly being reported worldwide. Hence, the quest to find other agents that will synergistically restore the efficacy of these antibiotics have increased. Methods: Sixty-three clinical Enterobacteriaceae isolates comprising of Klebsiella pneumoniae (n = 24), Enterobacter spp. (n = 15), Serratia marcescens (n = 12), Citrobacter freundii (n = 8), Escherichia coli (n = 2), and K. oxytoca/michiganensis (n = 2) with known carbapenem resistance mechanisms and undescribed CST and TGC resistance mechanisms were subjected to broth microdilution and meropenem (MEM) disc synergy test in the presence and absence of carbonyl cyanide m-chlorophenylhydrazine (CCCP), a H+ conductor (protonophore). Results and conclusions: Susceptibility to MEM, imipenem (IMP), CST, and TGC was found in only 2, 0, 17, and 9 isolates respectively. Addition of CCCP reversed resistance to CST, TGC, IMP, and MEM in 44, 3, 0, and 0 isolates respectively; CST had the highest mean minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) fold change (193.12; p < 0.0001) post CCCP compared to that of MEM (1.70), IMP (1.49) and TGC (1.16). Eight isolates tested positive for the MEM-CCCP disc synergy test. We concluded that CCCP reverse CST resistance in CST-resistant Enterobacteriaceae. Although CCCP is an experimental agent with no therapeutic value clinically, further studies are necessary to decipher the mechanisms underlying the CST-CCCP synergy to inform the development of adjuvants that could be therapeutically effective in CST-resistant infections. PMID:28261184

  7. Evaluation of antibacterial efficacy of anise wastes against some multidrug resistant bacterial isolates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed Khaled Ibrahim

    2017-01-01