WorldWideScience

Sample records for causing lumbar radiculopathy

  1. Lumbar radiculopathy caused by foraminal stenosis in rheumatoid arthritis

    OpenAIRE

    Koakutsu, Tomoaki; Morozumi, Naoki; Koizumi, Yutaka; Ishii, Yushin

    2011-01-01

    Study design Case-series study. Objective To describe the clinical presentation, characteristic findings of imaging studies, and treatment of lumbar radiculopathy caused by foraminal stenosis in rheumatoid arthritis. Background Lumbar lesions in rheumatoid arthritis are relatively rare, with a limited number of systemic reports. Methods Six patients with lumbar radiculopathy caused by foraminal stenosis in rheumatoid arthritis were treated. The patients were all women with a mean age of 69 ye...

  2. Lumbar radiculopathy caused by a tunneling transvertebral Schmorl's node

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report a rare case of lumbar spinal radiculopathy caused by a tunneling Schmorl's node originating from the superior endplate of the L3 vertebra of a 75-year-old patient and penetrating the spinal canal through the posterior wall of this vertebra. This case highlights recent reports emphasizing the clinical pain syndromes possibly associated with Schmorl's nodes. (orig.)

  3. Lumbar discal cyst causing bilateral radiculopathy

    OpenAIRE

    Hyung-Jun, Kwak; Dae-Yong, Kim; Tae-Ho, Kim; Ho-Sang, Park; Jae-Sung, Kim; Jae-Won, Jang; Jung-Kil, Lee; Pawl, Ron; Nancy E Epstein; Bydon, Ali

    2011-01-01

    Background: Discal cyst is a rare lesion that can result in clinical symptoms typical of disc herniation manifesting as a unilateral single nerve root lesion. To the best of the authors’ knowledge, this is the first reported case of discal cyst resulting in bilateral radiculopathy. Case Description: A 48-year-old female presented with bilateral sciatica and neurogenic claudication for 3 months. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed an extradural cystic lesion compressing the ventral aspect of t...

  4. Heterotopic Ossification Causing Radiculopathy after Lumbar Total Disc Arthroplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Keith L; Hire, Justin M; Jacobs, Jeremy M; Key, Charles C; DeVine, John G

    2015-06-01

    To date, no reports have presented radiculopathy secondary to heterotopic ossification following lumbar total disc arthroplasty. The authors present a previously unpublished complication of lumbar total disk arthroplasty (TDA) secondary to heterotopic ossification (HO) in the spinal canal, and they propose a modification to the McAfee classification of HO. The patient had undergone an L5/S1 lumbar TDA two years prior due to discogenic back pain. His preoperative back pain was significantly relieved, but he developed new, atraumatic onset radiculopathy. Radiographs and a computed tomography myelogram revealed an implant malposition posteriorly with heterotopic bone formation in the canal, causing an impingement of the traversing nerve root. Revision surgery was performed with implant extraction, L5/S1 anterior lumbar interbody fusion, supplemental posterior decompression, and pedicle screw fixation. The patient tolerated the procedure well, with complete resolution of the radicular leg pain. At a two-year follow up, the patient had a solid fusion without subsidence or recurrence of heterotopic bone. This case represents a novel pattern of heterotopic ossification, and it describes a previously unreported cause for implant failure in lumbar disc replacement surgery-reinforcing the importance of proper intraoperative component positioning. We propose a modification to the existing McAfee classification of HO after TDA with the addition of Class V and VI HO. PMID:26097664

  5. Heterotopic Ossification Causing Radiculopathy after Lumbar Total Disc Arthroplasty

    OpenAIRE

    Jackson, Keith L.; Hire, Justin M; Jacobs, Jeremy M.; Key, Charles C.; DeVine, John G.

    2015-01-01

    To date, no reports have presented radiculopathy secondary to heterotopic ossification following lumbar total disc arthroplasty. The authors present a previously unpublished complication of lumbar total disk arthroplasty (TDA) secondary to heterotopic ossification (HO) in the spinal canal, and they propose a modification to the McAfee classification of HO. The patient had undergone an L5/S1 lumbar TDA two years prior due to discogenic back pain. His preoperative back pain was significantly re...

  6. Ganglion Cyst of the Posterior Longitudinal Ligament Causing Lumbar Radiculopathy

    OpenAIRE

    Cho, Sung-Min; Rhee, Woo-Tack; Lee, Sang-Youl; Lee, Sang-Bok

    2010-01-01

    Degenerated conditions such as herniated disc or spinal stenosis are common etiologies of lumbar radiculopathy. Less common etiologies include spinal extradural cyst such as synovial cysts and ganglion cysts. Ganglion cyst of the posterior longitudinal ligament (PLL) of the spine is a rare entity that can result in classical sciatica. Posterior longitudinal ligament cyst has no continuity with the facet joint and has no epithelial lining. Two young male patients presented with unilateral scia...

  7. Radiculopathy Caused by Discal Cyst

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Sae Young

    2013-01-01

    Discal cyst is an intraspinal cyst with a distinct communication with the corresponding intervertebral disc. It is a rare condition and could present with radiculopathy similar to that caused by lumbar disc herniation. We present a patient with a large discal cyst in the ventrolateral epidural space of the 5th lumbar vertebral (L5) level that communicated with the adjacent 4th lumbar and 5th lumbar intervertebral disc, causing L5 radiculopathy. We alleviated the radiating pain with selective ...

  8. Lumbar radiculopathy caused by a tunneling transvertebral Schmorl's node

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coulier, B. [Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Cliniques St Luc, Rue St Luc 8, 5004 Bouge (Namur) (Belgium); Ghosez, J.P. [Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Cliniques St Luc, Bouge (Namur) (Belgium)

    2002-08-01

    We report a rare case of lumbar spinal radiculopathy caused by a tunneling Schmorl's node originating from the superior endplate of the L3 vertebra of a 75-year-old patient and penetrating the spinal canal through the posterior wall of this vertebra. This case highlights recent reports emphasizing the clinical pain syndromes possibly associated with Schmorl's nodes. (orig.)

  9. A case of lumbar ganglion cyst causing radiculopathy

    OpenAIRE

    Milcan, Abdullah; Ozdemir, Cengiz; Karabacak, Tuba; Duce, Meltem Nas; Bagdatoglu, Celal

    2004-01-01

    Ganglion cysts represent a rare pathology mostly encountered in the lumbar region of the spinal column. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed a ganglion cyst at the L4-5 level in a 46-year-old woman who had a complaint of long-standing pain in her right leg. The cyst was completely excised following total laminectomy at L4. After surgery, her symptoms and neurological signs completely disappeared.

  10. Lumbar disc cyst with contralateral radiculopathy

    OpenAIRE

    Kishore Tourani; Belman Murali; Akshay Sahoo; Dandu Ravi Varma; Narayan Prasad

    2012-01-01

    Disc cysts are uncommon intraspinal cystic lesions located in the ventrolateral epidural space. They communicate with the nucleus pulposus of the intervertebral disc and cause symptoms by radicular compression. We report a unique case of lumbar disc cyst that was associated with disc herniation and contralateral radiculopathy. A 22 year old male presented with one month history of back-ache radiating to the left leg. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) showed L3-L4 disc herniation with annular t...

  11. Preoperative education for lumbar surgery for radiculopathy

    OpenAIRE

    Louw, A; Q Louw; L. Crous

    2009-01-01

    To date no studies have been published on preoperative education forpatients who had lumbar surgery. The aim of this study was to determine if there is a demand for preoperative education for patients who had lumbar surgery for radiculopathy. A convenience sample of 47 patients who had lumbar surgery and a random sample of 141 physiotherapists involved in treating patients who had lumbar surgery completed a newly developed spinal surgery questionnaire. The data were analyzed using descriptive...

  12. Contralateral radiculopathy after transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion

    OpenAIRE

    Hunt, Travis; Shen, Francis H.; Shaffrey, Christopher I.; Arlet, Vincent

    2007-01-01

    Transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (TLIF) is an effective treatment for patients with degenerative spondylolisthesis and degenerative disc disease. Opposite side radiculopathy after the TLIF procedure has been recognized in this institution but has not been addressed in the literature. We present a case of opposite side radiculopathy after the TLIF procedure. We believe that this complication is related to asymptomatic stenosis on the contralateral side that is unmasked by the increased l...

  13. Lumbar disc cyst with contralateral radiculopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kishore Tourani

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Disc cysts are uncommon intraspinal cystic lesions located in the ventrolateral epidural space. They communicate with the nucleus pulposus of the intervertebral disc and cause symptoms by radicular compression. We report a unique case of lumbar disc cyst that was associated with disc herniation and contralateral radiculopathy. A 22 year old male presented with one month history of back-ache radiating to the left leg. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI showed L3-L4 disc herniation with annular tear and cystic lesion in the extradural space anterior to the thecal sac on right side, which increased in size over a period of 3 weeks. L3 laminectomy and bilateral discectomy and cyst excision was done with partial improvement of patients symptoms.

  14. Accuracy of physical examination for chronic lumbar radiculopathy

    OpenAIRE

    Iversen, Trond; Solberg, Tore K; Romner, Bertil; Wilsgaard, Tom; Nygaard, Øystein; Waterloo, Knut; Brox, Jens I; Ingebrigtsen, Tor

    2013-01-01

    Background Clinical examination of patients with chronic lumbar radiculopathy aims to clarify whether there is nerve root impingement. The aims of this study were to investigate the association between findings at clinical examination and nerve root impingement, to evaluate the accuracy of clinical index tests in a specialised care setting, and to see whether imaging clarifies the cause of chronic radicular pain. Method...

  15. Accuracy of physical examination for chronic lumbar radiculopathy

    OpenAIRE

    Iversen, Trond; Solberg, Tore; Romner, Bertil; Wilsgaard, Tom; Nygaard, Øystein Petter; Waterloo, Knut; Brox, Jens Ivar; Ingebrigtsen, Tor

    2013-01-01

    Background: Clinical examination of patients with chronic lumbar radiculopathy aims to clarify whether there is nerve root impingement. The aims of this study were to investigate the association between findings at clinical examination and nerve root impingement, to evaluate the accuracy of clinical index tests in a specialised care setting, and to see whether imaging clarifies the cause of chronic radicular pain. Methods: A total of 116 patients referred with symptoms of lumbar r...

  16. Preoperative education for lumbar surgery for radiculopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Louw

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available To date no studies have been published on preoperative education forpatients who had lumbar surgery. The aim of this study was to determine if there is a demand for preoperative education for patients who had lumbar surgery for radiculopathy. A convenience sample of 47 patients who had lumbar surgery and a random sample of 141 physiotherapists involved in treating patients who had lumbar surgery completed a newly developed spinal surgery questionnaire. The data were analyzed using descriptiveand inferential statistical tests. Results showed that 100% of the patients and 99% of therapists view preoperative education to be an important component for lumbar surgery for radiculopathy. The most important factors identifiedfor inclusion in preoperative educational programs were reason for surgery, risks associated with surgery, limitations following surgery and more education regarding pain. The preferred method of education delivery was verbal one-on-one education. This study demonstrates that there is a demand for preoperative education for patients who had lumbar surgery.

  17. THE ROLE OF LIGAMENTUM FLAVUM CALCIFICATION AT LUMBAR SPINE CAUSING CAUDA EQUINA SYNDROME AND LUMBAR RADICULOPATHY: CASE REPORT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gajanan

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT: The focal calcification or ossification of ligamentum flavum is a rare cau se of thoracic myelopathy and most often occurs among individuals of Japanese descent. It is rare in other ethnic groups and in individuals below the age of 50 year. It is most often described at the lower thoracic level, being uncommon in the lumbar regio n and rare in the cervical region. Here, we present the case of a 40 - year - old Indian female patient who sought medical attention with a six month history of paraesthesia of the lower limbs and progressive difficulty in walking. The clinical profile, togeth er with computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging of the spine, led to a diagnosis of compressive lumbar myelopathy due to ossification of the ligamentum flavum of lumbar spine. The patient underwent laminectomy and dissection of some of the affec ted ligamentum flavum. After three months of clinical follow - up, the patient had progressed favorably , having no sensory complaints and again becoming ambulatory

  18. Endoscopic foraminotomy for recurrent lumbar radiculopathy after TLIF: Technical report

    OpenAIRE

    Telfeian, Albert E.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (TLIF) is a well-accepted fusion technique that uses unilateral facet removal as an oblique corridor for inserting an interbody spacer. This manuscript focused on five cases of endoscopic foraminotomy for patients presenting with recurrent radiculopathy after TLIF procedures. Methods: After Institutional Review Board approval, charts from five patients with lumbar radiculopathy and instrumented TLIF procedures who underwent subsequent end...

  19. Taking it to the next level: lumbar radiculopathy from thoracic nerve schwannoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anene Ukaigwe

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Compression or irritation of the sciatic nerve and its branches, the common fibular and tibial nerves, causes sciatica which is a common syndrome characterized most often by radiating pain from the lower back down the legs and also manifesting as sensory and motor deficits. Sciatica is a common presentation of lumbosacral disc prolapse and degenerative disease of the lumbar spine in ambulatory settings. Schwannomas rarely cause sciatica; hence, it is seldom considered in evaluation of a patient with radiculopathy. Our patient presented with lumbar radiculopathy, mild degenerative changes on lumbar magnetic resonance imaging (MRI scan, and failed conservative treatment. Myelopathy was confirmed with electromyogram (EMG. Thoracolumbar spine MRI revealed the schwannoma in the thoracic region. He recovered neurologic function after tumor excision. This case highlights the diagnostic challenge that may arise in evaluating a patient with lumbar radiculopathy, negative lumbosacral spine imaging, and failure of conservative therapy.

  20. The comparison of the efficacy of radiofrequency nucleoplasty and targeted disc decompression in lumbar radiculopathy

    OpenAIRE

    Barıs Adakli; Keziban Sanem Cakar Turhan; Ibrahim Asik

    2015-01-01

    Chronic low back pain is a common clinical condition causing medical, socioeconomic, and treatment difficulties. In our study, we aimed to compare early and long-term efficacy of lumbar radiofrequency thermocoagulation (RFTC) nucleoplasty and targeted disc decompression (TDD) in patients with lumbar radiculopathy in whom previous conventional therapy had failed. The medical records of 37 patients undergoing TDD and 36 patients undergoing lumbar RFTC nucleoplasty were retrospectively examined ...

  1. Is that lumbar disc symptomatic? Herniated lumbar disc associated with contralateral radiculopathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdul Jalil, Muhammad Fahmi; Lam, Miu Fei; Wang, Yi Yuen

    2014-01-01

    Herniated lumbar disc may be asymptomatic or associated with lower limb radiculopathy. Most spinal surgeons would offer surgery following a period of conservative measures if the radiological and clinical findings correlate. However, the existing dictum that lumbar radiculopathy should correlate with ipsilateral lumbar disc herniation may not be accurate as it can rarely present with contralateral sciatica. Literature regarding this phenomenon is scarce. Therefore, we report a patient with herniated lumbar disc presenting with predominantly contralateral motor weakness radiculopathy, which resolved after discectomy. PMID:24811105

  2. Clinical Analysis of Acute Radiculopathy after Osteoporotic Lumbar Compression Fracture

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Do Eon; Kim, Hyeun Sung; Kim, Seok Won; Kim, Hyun Sook

    2015-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this study was to analyze the relationship between fracture pattern and the development of acute radiculopathy after osteoporotic lumbar compression fracture. Methods This study included 59 patients who underwent bone cement augmentation for osteoporotic compression fracture below the L2 level, which can lead to radiculopathic radiating pain. The patients were divided into two groups according to the presence of radiculopathy (group A : back pain only; group B : back ...

  3. Restless Leg Syndrome and Sleep Quality in Lumbar Radiculopathy Patients

    OpenAIRE

    Ersoy Kocabicak; Murat Terzi; Kursad Akpinar; Kemal Paksoy; Ibrahim Cebeci; Omer Iyigun

    2014-01-01

    Background. To investigate the frequency of restless leg syndrome (RLS), sleep quality impairment, depression, fatigue, and sleep behavior disorder and to determine the effects of surgery on these parameters in radiculopathy patients resistant to conservative treatment. Methods. The present study included 66 lumbar radiculopathy patients, who were resistant to conservative treatment and had indication of surgery. Five different questionnaires were performed to assess depression (the Beck Depr...

  4. Is that lumbar disc symptomatic? Herniated lumbar disc associated with contralateral radiculopathy

    OpenAIRE

    Abdul Jalil, Muhammad Fahmi; Lam, Miu Fei; Wang, Yi Yuen

    2014-01-01

    Herniated lumbar disc may be asymptomatic or associated with lower limb radiculopathy. Most spinal surgeons would offer surgery following a period of conservative measures if the radiological and clinical findings correlate. However, the existing dictum that lumbar radiculopathy should correlate with ipsilateral lumbar disc herniation may not be accurate as it can rarely present with contralateral sciatica. Literature regarding this phenomenon is scarce. Therefore, we report a patient with he...

  5. Bias in the physical examination of patients with lumbar radiculopathy

    OpenAIRE

    Katz Jeffrey N; Hunter David J; Suri Pradeep; Li Ling; Rainville James

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Background No prior studies have examined systematic bias in the musculoskeletal physical examination. The objective of this study was to assess the effects of bias due to prior knowledge of lumbar spine magnetic resonance imaging findings (MRI) on perceived diagnostic accuracy of the physical examination for lumbar radiculopathy. Methods This was a cross-sectional comparison of the performance characteristics of the physical examination with blinding to MRI results (the 'independent...

  6. Manual therapy treatment of lumbar radiculopathy: A single case report

    OpenAIRE

    J.A. Riley

    2011-01-01

    Patients  with  lumbar  radiculopathy  are  often  managed with  manual therapy.  The  aim  of  this  single  case  study  was  to  describe  the outcome of manual therapy treatment of a patient with lumbar radiculopathy.  A 47-year-old female presented with acute, severe left buttock and postero-lateral thigh pain.  Symptom provocation occurred during lumbar flexion, coughing, sneezing, driving and prolonged sitting. her left straight leg raise neurodynamic test was limited and reproduced he...

  7. Bias in the physical examination of patients with lumbar radiculopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katz Jeffrey N

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background No prior studies have examined systematic bias in the musculoskeletal physical examination. The objective of this study was to assess the effects of bias due to prior knowledge of lumbar spine magnetic resonance imaging findings (MRI on perceived diagnostic accuracy of the physical examination for lumbar radiculopathy. Methods This was a cross-sectional comparison of the performance characteristics of the physical examination with blinding to MRI results (the 'independent group' with performance in the situation where the physical examination was not blinded to MRI results (the 'non-independent group'. The reference standard was the final diagnostic impression of nerve root impingement by the examining physician. Subjects were recruited from a hospital-based outpatient specialty spine clinic. All adults age 18 and older presenting with lower extremity radiating pain of duration ≤ 12 weeks were evaluated for participation. 154 consecutively recruited subjects with lumbar disk herniation confirmed by lumbar spine MRI were included in this study. Sensitivities and specificities with 95% confidence intervals were calculated in the independent and non-independent groups for the four components of the radiculopathy examination: 1 provocative testing, 2 motor strength testing, 3 pinprick sensory testing, and 4 deep tendon reflex testing. Results The perceived sensitivity of sensory testing was higher with prior knowledge of MRI results (20% vs. 36%; p = 0.05. Sensitivities and specificities for exam components otherwise showed no statistically significant differences between groups. Conclusions Prior knowledge of lumbar MRI results may introduce bias into the pinprick sensory testing component of the physical examination for lumbar radiculopathy. No statistically significant effect of bias was seen for other components of the physical examination. The effect of bias due to prior knowledge of lumbar MRI results should be considered

  8. Infectious Endocarditis Presenting as Intracranial Hemorrhage in a Patient Admitted for Lumbar Radiculopathy

    OpenAIRE

    David Ethan Kahn; Ross Bullock; Kristine O'Phelan

    2011-01-01

    Infectious endocarditis is frequently found in the neurologic intensive care unit and may rarely be the cause of intracranial hemorrhage. In such instances, further diagnostic imaging to search for an underlying structural lesion is prudent. Well-known causes of these hemorrhages include cardioembolism with hemorrhagic transformation, septic emboli, and mycotic aneurysms. We present a case of a patient who was admitted for routine evaluation and pain management of lumbar radiculopathy, who de...

  9. Modified Posterior Lumbar Interbody Fusion for Radiculopathy Following Healed Vertebral Collapse of the Middle-Lower Lumbar Spine

    OpenAIRE

    Yamashita, Tomoya; Sakaura, Hironobu; Miwa, Toshitada; Ohwada, Tetsuo

    2014-01-01

    Study Design Retrospective study. Objectives Lumbar radiculopathy is rarely observed in patients who have achieved bony healing of vertebral fractures in the middle-lower lumbar spine. The objectives of the study were to clarify the clinical features of such radiculopathy and to evaluate the preliminary outcomes of treatment using a modified posterior lumbar interbody fusion (PLIF) procedure. Methods Fourteen patients with at least 2-year follow-up were enrolled in this study. The radiologic ...

  10. The Location of Multifidus Atrophy in Patients With a Single Level, Unilateral Lumbar Radiculopathy

    OpenAIRE

    Kang, Jung-Il; Kim, Sun-Yu; Kim, Jin-Hyun; Bang, Hyun; Lee, In-Sik

    2013-01-01

    Objective To identify the correlations between the location of multifidus atrophy and the level of lumbar radiculopathy. Methods Thirty-seven patients who had unilateral L4 or L5 radiculopathy were divided into 2 groups; the L4 radiculopathy (L4 RAD) group and the L5 radiculopathy (L5 RAD) group. Bilateral lumbar multifidus muscles at the mid-spinous process level of L4 vertebra (L4 MSP), the mid-spinous process level of L5 vertebra (L5 MSP), and the mid-sacral crest level of S1 vertebra (S1 ...

  11. Sympathectomy attenuates excitability of dorsal root ganglion neurons and pain behaviour in a lumbar radiculopathy model

    OpenAIRE

    Iwase, T; Takebayashi, T; Tanimoto, K; Terashima, Y.; Miyakawa, T.; Kobayashi, T.; Tohse, N.; Yamashita, T

    2012-01-01

    Objectives In order to elucidate the influence of sympathetic nerves on lumbar radiculopathy, we investigated whether sympathectomy attenuated pain behaviour and altered the electrical properties of the dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons in a rat model of lumbar root constriction. Methods Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into three experimental groups. In the root constriction group, the left L5 spinal nerve root was ligated proximal to the DRG as a lumbar radiculopathy model. In the root con...

  12. The comparison of the efficacy of radiofrequency nucleoplasty and targeted disc decompression in lumbar radiculopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barıs Adakli

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Chronic low back pain is a common clinical condition causing medical, socioeconomic, and treatment difficulties. In our study, we aimed to compare early and long-term efficacy of lumbar radiofrequency thermocoagulation (RFTC nucleoplasty and targeted disc decompression (TDD in patients with lumbar radiculopathy in whom previous conventional therapy had failed. The medical records of 37 patients undergoing TDD and 36 patients undergoing lumbar RFTC nucleoplasty were retrospectively examined and assigned to the Group D and Group N, respectively. In all patients Visual Analogue Scale (VAS and Functional Rating Index (FRI were recorded before treatment and after one, six and twelve months after the procedure. The North American Spine Society Satisfaction Scale (NASSSS was also recoreded twelve months after the therapeutic procedure. Statistically significant postprocedural improvement in VAS and FRI was evident in both groups. VAS scores after one, six, and twelve month were slightly higher in Group N, compared to Group D. The overall procedure-related patient satisfaction ratio was 67.5% in the Group D, compared to 75% in the Group N. Regardless of the different mechanism of action, both methods are effective therapies for lumbar radiculopathy, with TDD showing long-term lower pain scores.

  13. Manual therapy treatment of lumbar radiculopathy: A single case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.A. Riley

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Patients  with  lumbar  radiculopathy  are  often  managed with  manual therapy.  The  aim  of  this  single  case  study  was  to  describe  the outcome of manual therapy treatment of a patient with lumbar radiculopathy.  A 47-year-old female presented with acute, severe left buttock and postero-lateral thigh pain.  Symptom provocation occurred during lumbar flexion, coughing, sneezing, driving and prolonged sitting. her left straight leg raise neurodynamic test was limited and reproduced her pain, as did trigger points in the left lumbar and gluteal muscles. clinical neuro-conduction testing revealed weakness of the big and other toe extensors, as well as eversion and plantar flexion of the left ankle, and a diminished left ankle reflex. This indicated possible involvement of both the l5 and S1 nerve roots.   A  manual  therapy  treatment  approach including  lumbar rotation mobilisations (Maitland approach, massage, trigger point pressure release  and  Transversus  Abdominus muscle activation  was  used.   The  patient  was  symptom  free,  had  full pain-free  range  of  all  lumbar  movements,  a full  pain-free  left  straight leg  raise  neurodynamic  test  and  normal  neurological  conduction  six weeks  after  onset, following seven manual therapy treatments.  Although the results of this case report cannot be generalised, it describes the successful outcome of a patient with severe radicular pain and neurological deficits, whose signs and symptoms  had completely resolved following manual therapy treatment.

  14. Effect of caudal epidural steroid or saline injection in chronic lumbar radiculopathy: multicentre, blinded, randomised controlled trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iversen, Trond; Solberg, Tore K; Romner, Bertil;

    2011-01-01

    To assess the efficacy of caudal epidural steroid or saline injection in chronic lumbar radiculopathy in the short (6 weeks), intermediate (12 weeks), and long term (52 weeks).......To assess the efficacy of caudal epidural steroid or saline injection in chronic lumbar radiculopathy in the short (6 weeks), intermediate (12 weeks), and long term (52 weeks)....

  15. Efficacy of lumbar epidural corticosteroid injections on clinical status of the patients with radiculopathy

    OpenAIRE

    Jülide Öncü; Reşat İlişer; Göksel Çelebi; Banu Kuran; Gülgün Durlanık

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the effect of lumbar epidural steroid injection in patients with radiculopathy Materials-Methods: 37 patients with radiculopathy were recruited retrospectively in the study. Radicular, low back pain and paresthesia intensity were evaluated using visual analog scale (VAS); the evidence of nerve stretch was evaluated by straight leg rising (SRL), disability levels were evaluated using the Oswestry Disability Index (ODI) and the quality of life was evaluated by ...

  16. Sacral Stress Fracture Mimicking Lumbar Radiculopathy in a Mounted Police Officer: Case Report and Literature Review

    OpenAIRE

    Bednar, Drew A.; Almansoori, Khaled

    2015-01-01

    Study Design Case report and review of the literature. Objective To present a unique case of L5 radiculopathy caused by a sacral stress fracture without neurologic compression. Methods We present our case and its clinical evolution and review the available literature on similar pathologies. Results Relief of the unusual mechanical loading causing sacral stress fracture led to rapid resolution of radiculopathy. Conclusion L5 radiculopathy can be caused by a sacral stress fracture and can be re...

  17. Ruling out Piriformis Syndrome before Diagnosing Lumbar Radiculopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chi-Chien Niu

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Piriformis syndrome (PS, a rare cause of sciatica, is usually diagnosed onlyafter excluding all other possibilities. But this principle is being challengedbecause of the number of patients with PS who have had ineffective lumbardecompressive surgery after positive findings on image study.Methods: From 2001 to 2004, twelve patients with piriformis syndrome diagnosed byphysical examination were retrospectively enrolled in this study. Indicatorsof piriformis syndrome include a positive Freiberg sign and local tendernessover the piriformis tendon. All patients received local injection of triamcinoloneacetonide and lidocaine into the piriformis tendon. The course ofdiagnosis and treatment was reviewed retrospectively from patient recordsand patient recollections.Results: Of seven (58.3% patients who had positive findings on computed tomography(CT or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI studies of the lumbar spine,four had previously undergone unsuccessful lumbar surgeries but wereresponsive to local injection and three received the injection first. Two ofthose three required no lumbar discectomy thereafter. However, one patientsubsequently underwent lumbar decompression surgery because of failedresponse to the local injection. Three patients had negative CT or MRI findings,and two received no CT or MRI study. According to our diagnosticflowchart for PS, further lumbar surgery was unnecessary for eleven of thetwelve patients at follow-up.Conclusions: According to experience in this series, a Freiberg test and local injectionshould be performed first to rule out PS in patients with unilateral sciatica. Ifsymptoms are relieved by local injection and further physical therapy for PS,unnecessary lumbar surgery can be avoided.

  18. Lumbar Intervertebral Discal Cyst: A Rare Cause of Low Back Pain and Radiculopathy. Case Report and Review of the Current Evidences on Diagnosis and Management

    OpenAIRE

    Certo, Francesco; Visocchi, Massimiliano; Borderi, Alessandro; Pennisi, Claudia; Albanese, Vincenzo; Barbagallo, Giuseppe M. V.

    2014-01-01

    Study Design Case Report and review of the literature. Objective The objective of the article is to report an illustrative case successfully treated by microsurgery and to review the literature on the current evidence on diagnosis and management of lumbar discal cysts. Methods A 43-year-old male patient presented with severe back pain, radiating down to the right leg, as well as with paraesthesias in the right L3 and L4 dermatomes. Magnetic resonance imaging of the lumbar spine revealed an in...

  19. Successful operative management of an upper lumbar spinal canal stenosis resulting in multilevel lower nerve root radiculopathy

    OpenAIRE

    Shearwood McClelland; Stefan S Kim

    2015-01-01

    Lumbar stenosis is a common disorder, usually characterized clinically by neurogenic claudication with or without lumbar/sacral radiculopathy corresponding to the level of stenosis. We present a case of lumbar stenosis manifesting as a multilevel radiculopathy inferior to the nerve roots at the level of the stenosis. A 55-year-old gentleman presented with bilateral lower extremity pain with neurogenic claudication in an L5/S1 distribution (posterior thigh, calf, into the foot) concomitant wit...

  20. Postpartum Sacral Stress Fracture Mimicking Lumbar Radiculopathy in a Patient With Pregnancy-Associated Osteoporosis

    OpenAIRE

    Park, Joohye; Ok, Eunjae; Park, Hye Jeong; Hong, Seok Ha; Lee, Jong In

    2013-01-01

    Postpartum sacral fracture is relatively rare, and its diagnosis is often delayed. We herein report such a case of a 28-year-old patient who presented with an insidious-onset lower back pain, left buttock pain, and radicular symptoms mimicking lumbar radiculopathy. Laboratory tests showed a decreased 25-hydroxy vitamin D level, and the bone mineral densitometry of both femurs was below the expected range. Plain radiographs of the lumbar spine and pelvis showed no definite abnormality, but lum...

  1. Sacral Stress Fracture Mimicking Lumbar Radiculopathy in a Mounted Police Officer: Case Report and Literature Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bednar, Drew A; Almansoori, Khaled

    2015-10-01

    Study Design Case report and review of the literature. Objective To present a unique case of L5 radiculopathy caused by a sacral stress fracture without neurologic compression. Methods We present our case and its clinical evolution and review the available literature on similar pathologies. Results Relief of the unusual mechanical loading causing sacral stress fracture led to rapid resolution of radiculopathy. Conclusion L5 radiculopathy can be caused by a sacral stress fracture and can be relieved by simple mechanical treatment of the fracture. PMID:26430605

  2. Role of 3D MRI with proset technique in the evaluation of lumbar radiculopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grasso, D; Borreggine, C; Melchionda, D; Bristogiannis, C; Stoppino, L P; Macarini, L

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study is to demonstrate the effectiveness of 3-Dimensional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (3D MRI) using the ProSet technique in the diagnosis of lumbar radiculopathy and to compare morphological findings with clinical and neurophysiological data. 40 patients suffering from L5 or S1 mono-radiculopathy caused by a disc herniation were evaluated through preliminary clinical assessment and electromyography (EMG) technique. Both conventional spin-echo sequences and 3D coronal FFE with selective water excitation (ProSet imaging) were acquired. Indentation, swelling and tilt angle of the nerve root were assessed by means of a 3D MR radiculography. 3D ProSet multiplanar reconstructions (MPR) were used for quantitative measurements of L5 and S1 nerve root widths. Widths of the symptomatic nerve root were compared with those of the contralateral nerve. Data were processed using Epi Info 3.3 software (CDC, Atlanta, GA, USA) and were compared through a paired t-Student test. We observed an abnormal tilt angle in 22 patients (57,2 percent, P less than 0.05). Morphologic alterations such as monolateral swelling or indentation of the involved roots were found in 36 patients (90 percent, P less than0.01) using 3D MR radiculography. In 10 patients, EMG revealed more nerve roots involved, while 3D FFE with ProSet technique shows a single root involved. In 2 patients, alterations were demonstrated only through EMG technique. We suggest that 3D MR radiculography can provide more information than other techniques about symptomatic disc herniation, supporting the detection of morphological changes of all nerve segments. 3D FFE with ProSet technique demonstrates high sensibility to exactly identify the level of the root involved and can provide an extremely useful tool to lead a surgical planning. PMID:24152846

  3. Application NO TGCH-therapy in complex treatment of postoperative lumbar localization radiculopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salina E.A.

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the results of a survey of 50 patients to study the application of terahertz therapy of NO in the complex treatment of postoperative lumbar radiculopathy localization. Materials and methods. Using a visual analogue scale assessed the degree of regression of pain, depending on the nature of the therapy. For the diagnosis of intra-articular inflammation in the postoperative motor segment and a local mikrovaskulita determined the level of antibodies in the serum of patients to collagen and myeloperoxidase. The results suggest shortening pain and reducing the content of antibodies to MPO and collagen in patients receiving short-wave therapy. Therefore, we conclude that the use of NO therapy TGCH improves the treatment of postoperative lumbar radiculopathy localization

  4. Application NO TGCH-therapy in complex treatment of postoperative lumbar localization radiculopathy

    OpenAIRE

    Salina E.A.; Sholomov l.l.; Bugaeva I.О; Lyubitsky l.P.; Ablyaev l.l.; Fomina A.V.

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents the results of a survey of 50 patients to study the application of terahertz therapy of NO in the complex treatment of postoperative lumbar radiculopathy localization. Materials and methods. Using a visual analogue scale assessed the degree of regression of pain, depending on the nature of the therapy. For the diagnosis of intra-articular inflammation in the postoperative motor segment and a local mikrovaskulita determined the level of antibodies in the serum of patients t...

  5. Preoperative education for lumbar radiculopathy: A survey of US spine surgeons

    OpenAIRE

    Louw, Adriaan; Butler, David S.; Diener, Ina; Puentedura, Emilio J.

    2012-01-01

    Background We sought to determine current utilization, importance, content, and delivery methods of preoperative education by spine surgeons in the United States for patients with lumbar radiculopathy. Methods An online cross-sectional survey was used to study a random sample of spine surgeons in the United States. The Spinal Surgery Education Questionnaire (SSEQ) was developed based on previous related surveys and assessed for face and content validity by an expert panel. The SSEQ captured i...

  6. The quality of life of lumbar radiculopathy patients under conservative treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bošković Ksenija

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. The quality of life of lumbar radiculopathy patients conditioned by their health status is a result of both their subjective perception of the disease and their objective health status. The aim of this study was to evaluate the quality of life of lumbar radiculopathy patients under conservative treatment by means of generic and another lumbar syndrome specific questionnaires. Methods. A total of 50 patients (33 males, 17 females average age 46.1 years, under conservative treatment in a hospital over four weeks were included in the study. They were interviewed using two questionnaires: the SF36 (Short form (36 Health Survey generic questionnaire measuring eight domains of their quality of life summarized into two main ones (i.e. overall physical and overall mental health, and the lumbar syndrome specific North American Spine Society - Low Back Pain Outcome Instrument (NASS LBP, a questionnaire measuring four domains (functional limitations, motor and sensitive neurological symptoms, expectations from the treatment and satisfaction with it. Results. The values of physical health domain was low as 31.1 at the beginning of the treatment, were rising over the following six months and dropped insignificantly after four years (42.1/48.7 /47.0 The mental health values (47.2 did not alter as compared to that of the general population. A values of the quality of life stabilized within six months. The neurological symptoms domain did not correlate with other value scales and domains. Conclusion. The quality of life of lumbar radiculopathy patients was impaired only from its physical aspect, but after conservative treatment it improved over the following six months. After four years there is an insignificant drop of all quality of life values, indicating a need for a longer term monitoring of there patients.

  7. Limited Unilateral Decompression and Pedicle Screw Fixation with Fusion for Lumbar Spinal Stenosis with Unilateral Radiculopathy: A Retrospective Analysis of 25 Cases

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Li; Miao, Hai-xiong; Wang, Yong; Chen, An-fu; Zhang, Tao; Xiao-guang LIU

    2015-01-01

    Objective Lumbar spinal stenosis is conventionally treated with surgical decompression. However, bilateral decompression and laminectomy is more invasive and may not be necessary for lumbar stenosis patients with unilateral radiculopathy. We aimed to report the outcomes of unilateral laminectomy and bilateral pedicle screw fixation with fusion for patients with lumbar spinal stenosis and unilateral radiculopathy. Methods Patients with lumbar spinal stenosis with unilateral lower extremity rad...

  8. Kinematic and dynamic gait compensations in a rat model of lumbar radiculopathy and the effects of tumor necrosis factor-alpha antagonism

    OpenAIRE

    Allen, Kyle D; Shamji, Mohammed F; Mata, Brian A.; Gabr, Mostafa A; Sinclair, S. Michael; Schmitt, Daniel O.; Richardson, William J.; Setton, Lori A.

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Tumor necrosis factor-α (TNFα) has received significant attention as a mediator of lumbar radiculopathy, with interest in TNF antagonism to treat radiculopathy. Prior studies have demonstrated that TNF antagonists can attenuate heightened nociception resulting from lumbar radiculopathy in the preclinical model. Less is known about the potential impact of TNF antagonism on gait compensations, despite being of clinical relevance. In this study, we expand on previous descriptions of...

  9. EFFECTIVENESS OF SPINAL MOBILIZATION WITH LEG MOVEMENT (SMWLM) IN PATIENTS WITH LUMBAR RADICULOPATHY (L5 / S1 NERVE ROOT) IN LUMBAR DISC HERNIATION

    OpenAIRE

    Sahiba Yadav; Megha Arora Nijhawan; Paresh Panda

    2014-01-01

    Background: Various manual therapy techniques are known to treat discogenic pain. Research is limited and controversial in the effectiveness of manual therapy for treatment of lumbar radiculopathy due to lumbar disc disease. In manual therapy, Mulligan has described spinal mobilisation with leg movement technique, for improvement in lumbar lesion resulting in pain and other signs below knee. Purpose of the study: To find out if Mulligan’s Spinal Mobilisation with Leg Movement technique (...

  10. Successful operative management of an upper lumbar spinal canal stenosis resulting in multilevel lower nerve root radiculopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shearwood McClelland

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Lumbar stenosis is a common disorder, usually characterized clinically by neurogenic claudication with or without lumbar/sacral radiculopathy corresponding to the level of stenosis. We present a case of lumbar stenosis manifesting as a multilevel radiculopathy inferior to the nerve roots at the level of the stenosis. A 55-year-old gentleman presented with bilateral lower extremity pain with neurogenic claudication in an L5/S1 distribution (posterior thigh, calf, into the foot concomitant with dorsiflexion and plantarflexion weakness. Imaging revealed grade I spondylolisthesis of L3 on L4 with severe spinal canal stenosis at L3-L4, mild left L4-L5 disc herniation, no stenosis at L5-S1, and no instability. EMG revealed active and chronic L5 and S1 radiculopathy. The patient underwent bilateral L3-L4 hemilaminotomy with left L4-L5 microdiscectomy for treatment of his L3-L4 stenosis. Postoperatively, he exhibited significant improvement in dorsiflexion and plantarflexion. The L5-S1 level was not involved in the operative decompression. Patients with radiculopathy and normal imaging at the level corresponding to the radiculopathy should not be ruled out for operative intervention should they have imaging evidence of lumbar stenosis superior to the expected affected level.

  11. Diagnostic challenge: bilateral infected lumbar facet cysts - a rare cause of acute lumbar spinal stenosis and back pain

    OpenAIRE

    Yoon S Timothy; Bui Tuan L; Freedman Brett A

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Symptomatic synovial lumbar facet cysts are a relatively rare cause of radiculopathy and spinal stenosis. This case and brief review of the literature, details a patient who presented with acutely symptomatic bilateral spontaneously infected synovial facet (L4/5) cysts. This report highlights diagnostic clues for identifying infection of a facet cyst.

  12. Diagnostic challenge: bilateral infected lumbar facet cysts - a rare cause of acute lumbar spinal stenosis and back pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoon S Timothy

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Symptomatic synovial lumbar facet cysts are a relatively rare cause of radiculopathy and spinal stenosis. This case and brief review of the literature, details a patient who presented with acutely symptomatic bilateral spontaneously infected synovial facet (L4/5 cysts. This report highlights diagnostic clues for identifying infection of a facet cyst.

  13. The use of metformin is associated with decreased lumbar radiculopathy pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taylor A

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Amber Taylor,1 Anton H Westveld,2,6 Magdalena Szkudlinska,1 Prathima Guruguri,1 Emil Annabi,3 Amol Patwardhan,3 Theodore J Price,4 Hussein N Yassine51Department of Medicine, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ, USA; 2Statistics Laboratory, Bio5 Institute, Statistics GIDP, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ, USA; 3Department of Anesthesia, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ, USA; 4Department of Pharmacology, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ, USA; 5Department of Medicine, University of Southern California, LA, CA, USA; 6Faculty of ESTeM, University of Canberra, Canberra, ACT, AustraliaAbstract: Lumbar radiculopathy pain represents a major public health problem, with few effective long-term treatments. Preclinical neuropathic and postsurgical pain studies implicate the kinase adenosine monophosphate activated kinase (AMPK as a potential pharmacological target for the treatment of chronic pain conditions. Metformin, which acts via AMPK, is a safe and clinically available drug used in the treatment of diabetes. Despite the strong preclinical rationale, the utility of metformin as a potential pain therapeutic has not yet been studied in humans. Our objective was to assess whether metformin is associated with decreased lumbar radiculopathy pain, in a retrospective chart review. We completed a retrospective chart review of patients who sought care from a university pain specialist for lumbar radiculopathy between 2008 and 2011. Patients on metformin at the time of visit to a university pain specialist were compared with patients who were not on metformin. We compared the pain outcomes in 46 patients on metformin and 94 patients not taking metformin therapy. The major finding was that metformin use was associated with a decrease in the mean of “pain now,” by −1.85 (confidence interval: −3.6 to −0.08 on a 0–10 visual analog scale, using a matched propensity scoring analysis and confirmed using a Bayesian analysis, with a significant mean decrease

  14. Differences in Gait Characteristics of Patients with Lumbar Spinal Canal Stenosis (L4 Radiculopathy) and Those with Osteoarthritis of the Hip

    OpenAIRE

    Yokogawa, Noriaki; Toribatake, Yasumitsu; Murakami, Hideki; Hayashi, Hiroyuki; Yoneyama, Takeshi; Watanabe, Tetsuyou; Tsuchiya, Hiroyuki

    2015-01-01

    It is important to differentially diagnose thigh pain from lumbar spinal stenosis (particularly lumbar fourth nerve root radiculopathy) and osteoarthritis of the hip. In this study, using a treadmill and a motion analysis method, gait characteristics were compared between these conditions. Patients with lumbar fourth nerve root radiculopathy had increased physiological knee flexion immediately after foot-ground contact, possibly owing to a slight decrease in the muscle strength of the quadric...

  15. Genetic disorders producing compressive radiculopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corey, Joseph M

    2006-11-01

    Back pain is a frequent complaint seen in neurological practice. In evaluating back pain, neurologists are asked to evaluate patients for radiculopathy, determine whether they may benefit from surgery, and help guide management. Although disc herniation is the most common etiology of compressive radiculopathy, there are many other causes, including genetic disorders. This article is a discussion of genetic disorders that cause or contribute to radiculopathies. These genetic disorders include neurofibromatosis, Paget's disease of bone, and ankylosing spondylitis. Numerous genetic disorders can also lead to deformities of the spine, including spinal muscular atrophy, Friedreich's ataxia, Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease, familial dysautonomia, idiopathic torsional dystonia, Marfan's syndrome, and Ehlers-Danlos syndrome. However, the extent of radiculopathy caused by spine deformities is essentially absent from the literature. Finally, recent investigation into the heritability of disc degeneration and lumbar disc herniation suggests a significant genetic component in the etiology of lumbar disc disease. PMID:17048153

  16. Lumbar epidural varices: An unusual cause of lumbar claudication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meenakshisundaram Subbiah

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Lumbar epidural varices can also present with radiculopathy similar to acute intervertebral disc prolapse (IVDP. However as the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI in these patients are usually normal without significant compressive lesions of the nerve roots, the diagnosis is commonly missed or delayed leading to persistent symptoms. We present a rare case of acute severe unilateral claudication with a normal MRI unresponsive to conservative management who was treated surgically. The nerve root on the symptomatic side was found to be compressed by large anterior epidural varices secondary to an abnormal cranial attachment of ligamentum flavum. Decompression of the root and coagulation of the varices resulted in complete pain relief. To conclude, lumbar epidural varices should be considered in the differential diagnosis of acute onset radiculopathy and claudication in the absence of significant MRI findings.

  17. EFFECTIVENESS OF SPINAL MOBILIZATION WITH LEG MOVEMENT (SMWLM IN PATIENTS WITH LUMBAR RADICULOPATHY (L5 / S1 NERVE ROOT IN LUMBAR DISC HERNIATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sahiba Yadav

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Various manual therapy techniques are known to treat discogenic pain. Research is limited and controversial in the effectiveness of manual therapy for treatment of lumbar radiculopathy due to lumbar disc disease. In manual therapy, Mulligan has described spinal mobilisation with leg movement technique, for improvement in lumbar lesion resulting in pain and other signs below knee. Purpose of the study: To find out if Mulligan’s Spinal Mobilisation with Leg Movement technique (SMWLM in conjunction with conventional treatment is better than conventional treatment alone in improving leg pain intensity (VAS, localization of leg pain (body diagram by Donelson, back specific disability (RMQ in patients with lumbar radiculopathy (L5/ S1 nerve root in lumbar disc herniation. Methods: The study is a randomized controlled trial performed on 30 patients with lumbar radiculopathy. Both the groups received back extension exercises, hot pack, precautions and ergonomic advice. The experimental group received SMWLM technique in addition to the conventional treatment. Outcomes included leg pain intensity, Roland Morris Questionnaire and body diagram by Donelson. Results: There was significant improvement in VAS (p=0.000, body diagram (p=0.000 for experimental group and p=0.003 for conventional group and Roland Morris Questionnaire score (p=0.000 within the groups. Between group analysis showed significant improvement in VAS (p=0.000, body diagram score (p=0.000. Although there was significant improvement in Roland Morris Questionnaire score within the groups but there no significant difference between the group (p=0.070. Conclusion: Spinal Mobilization with Leg Movement technique in addition to conventional physical therapy produced significant improvement in leg pain intensity, location of pain and back specific disability in patients with lumbar radiculopathy in lumbar disc herniation.

  18. Radiculopathy in the setting of lumbar nerve root compression due to an extradural intraforaminal lipoma: a report of 3 cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loriaux, Daniel B; Adogwa, Owoicho; Gottfried, Oren N

    2015-07-01

    A true adult spinal lipoma is an exceedingly rare cause of lumbar compression neuropathy. Only 5 cases of true extradural intraforaminal lipomas have been documented in the medical literature. The diagnostic criteria and treatment guidelines for this specific lipoma have yet to be established. This report features 3 histologically confirmed cases of extradural intraforaminal spinal lipomas that recently presented to the authors' practice. In addition, the literature was surveyed to include the 5 previously reported cases of true adult extradural intraforaminal spinal lipomas. The consistency in presentation, response to surgical intervention, and postoperative recovery in these 8 cases supports surgical intervention at the time of diagnosis. The authors' findings support elevated clinical suspicion, efficient diagnosis based on MRI, and early surgical intervention for this rare pathological entity. All cases presented in this report were symptomatic and occurred in the absence of other significant pathologies such as general spinal epidural lipomatosis, intradural lesions, tethering, or severe degenerative stenosis or herniated discs. The clinical, neuroradiological, and histological findings characteristic of a true adult extradural intraforaminal lipoma are emphasized to differentiate this lesion from the more common etiologies for lumbar compression neuropathy. Heightened awareness and clinical suspicion for the focal, foraminal spinal lipoma as a cause of radiculopathy symptoms will enable more efficient diagnosis and treatment. PMID:25840038

  19. Transforaminal epidural steroid injection via a preganglionic approach for lumbar spinal stenosis and lumbar discogenic pain with radiculopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kabatas Serdar

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Epidural steroid injection (ESIs is one of the treatment modalities for chronic low back pain (CLBP with various degrees of success. Aim: We analyzed the efficacy of fluoroscopically guided transforaminal epidural steroid injections (TFESIs via a preganglionic approach in patients with foraminal stenosis due to lumbar spinal stenosis and lumbar discogenic pain with radiculopathy. Materials and Methods: We analyzed the data of 40 patients (February 2008 and April 2009 with the diagnosis of CLBP and treated by fluoroscopically guided TFESIs via a preganglionic approach. Patients were followed-up at one month (short term, six months (midterm and one year (long term after injections. Follow-up data collection included the Visual Numeric Pain Scale (VNS and North American Spine Society (NASS patient satisfaction scores. Results: The mean age of the patients was 59.87 ± 15.06 years (range 30 - 89 years, 25 women. Average follow-up period was 9.22 ± 3.56 months. Statistically significant differences were observed between the pre-procedure and post-procedure VNSs (P < 0.01, Pearson Correlation Test. Improvements in VNS scores were correlated with improvements in the NASS scores. When the VNS scores were evaluated with respect to the age of patient, level numbers, gender, pre-procedure symptom duration and pre-procedure VNS, no significant differences were found (P < 0.05, linear regression test. At short term evaluation in post treatment (one month, 77.78 % of patients were found to have a successful outcome and 22.22 % were deemed failures. Overall patient satisfaction was 67.23 % in the midterm period. Additionally, 54.83 % of patients (N/n: 15/8 had a successful long-term outcome at a follow-up of one year. Conclusion: Our data suggest that fluoroscopically guided TFESIs via a preganglionic approach, in patients with foraminal stenosis due to lumbar spinal stenosis and lumbar discogenic pain with radiculopathy, has effective outcome and

  20. Distinct degree of radiculopathy at different levels of peripheral nerve injury

    OpenAIRE

    Takiguchi Noboru; Yoshida Munehito; Taniguchi Wataru; Hashizume Hiroshi; Yamada Hiroshi; Miyazaki Nobuyuki; Nishio Naoko; Nakatsuka Terumasa

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background Lumbar radiculopathy is a common clinical problem, characterized by dorsal root ganglion (DRG) injury and neural hyperactivity causing intense pain. However, the mechanisms involved in DRG injury have not been fully elucidated. Furthermore, little is known about the degree of radiculopathy at the various levels of nerve injury. The purpose of this study is to compare the degree of radiculopathy injury at the DRG and radiculopathy injury proximal or distal to the DRG. Resul...

  1. Back school or brain school for patients undergoing surgery for lumbar radiculopathy? Protocol for a randomised, controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kelly Ickmans

    2016-07-01

    Discussion: This study will determine whether pain neuroscience education is worthwhile for patients undergoing surgery for lumbar radiculopathy. It is expected that participants who receive perioperative pain neuroscience education will report less pain and have improved endogenous pain modulation, lower postoperative healthcare costs and improved surgical experience. Lower pain and improved endogenous pain modulation after surgery may reduce the risk of developing postoperative chronic pain.

  2. Upright magnetic resonance imaging of the lumbar spine: Back pain and radiculopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ha Son Nguyen

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Lumbar back pain and radiculopathy are common diagnoses. Unfortunately, conventional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI findings and clinical symptoms do not necessarily correlate in the lumbar spine. With upright imaging, disc pathologies or foraminal stenosis may become more salient, leading to improvements in diagnosis. Materials and Methods: Seventeen adults (10 asymptomatic and 7 symptomatic volunteers provided their informed consent and participated in the study. A 0.6T upright MRI scan was performed on each adult in the seated position. Parameters were obtained from the L2/3 level to the L5/S1 level including those pertaining to the foramen [cross-sectional area (CSA, height, mid-disc width, width, thickness of ligamentum flavum], disc (bulge, height, width, vertebral body (height and width, and alignment (lordosis angle, wedge angle, lumbosacral angle. Each parameter was compared based on the spinal level and volunteer group using two-factor analysis of variance (ANOVA. Bonferroni post hoc analysis was used to assess the differences between individual spinal levels. Results: Mid-disc width accounted for 56% of maximum foramen width in symptomatic volunteers and over 63% in asymptomatic volunteers. Disc bulge was 48% greater in symptomatic volunteers compared to asymptomatic volunteers. CSA was generally smaller in symptomatic volunteers compared to asymptomatic volunteers, particularly at the L4-L5 and L5-S1 spinal levels. Thickness of ligamentum flavum (TLF generally increased from the cranial to caudal spinal levels where the L4-L5 and L5-S1 spinal levels were significantly thicker than the L1-L2 spinal level. Conclusions: The data implied that upright MRI could be a useful diagnostic option, as it can delineate pertinent differences between symptomatic volunteers and asymptomatic volunteers, especially with respect to foraminal geometry.

  3. Preoperative therapeutic neuroscience education for lumbar radiculopathy: a single-case fMRI report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Louw, Adriaan; Puentedura, Emilio J; Diener, Ina; Peoples, Randal R

    2015-01-01

    Therapeutic neuroscience education (TNE) has been shown to be effective in the treatment of mainly chronic musculoskeletal pain conditions. This case study aims to describe the changes in brain activation on functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) scanning, before and after the application of a newly-designed preoperative TNE program. A 30-year-old female with a current acute episode of low back pain (LBP) and radiculopathy participated in a single preoperative TNE session. She completed pre- and post-education measures including visual analog scale (VAS) for LBP and leg pain; Oswestry Disability Index (ODI); Fear Avoidance Beliefs Questionnaire (FABQ); Pain Catastrophizing Scale (PCS) and a series of Likert-scale questions regarding beliefs and attitudes to lumbar surgery (LS). After a 30-minute TNE session, ODI decreased by 10%, PCS decreased by 10 points and her beliefs and attitudes shifted positively regarding LS. Immediately following TNE straight leg raise increased by 7° and forward flexion by 8 cm. fMRI testing following TNE revealed 3 marked differences compared to pre-education scanning: (1) deactivation of the periaqueductal gray area; (2) deactivation of the cerebellum; and (3) increased activation of the motor cortex. The immediate positive fMRI, psychometric and physical movement changes may indicate a cortical mechanism of TNE for patients scheduled for LS. PMID:26395827

  4. Influence of preoperative nucleus pulposus status and radiculopathy on outcomes in mono-segmental lumbar total disc replacement: results from a nationwide registry

    OpenAIRE

    Zweig Thomas; Hemmeler Christoph; Aghayev Emin; Melloh Markus; Etter Christian; Röder Christoph

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background Currently, herniated nucleus pulposus (HNP) with radiculopathy and other preconditions are regarded as relative or absolute contraindications for lumbar total disc replacement (TDR). In Switzerland it is left to the surgeon's discretion when to operate. The present study is based on the dataset of SWISSspine, a governmentally mandated health technology assessment registry. We hypothesized that preoperative nucleus pulposus status and presence or absence of radiculopathy ha...

  5. Value of functional myelography with both lateral bending anterior-posterior views in lumbar radiculopathy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Young Joon; Park, Jong Yeon; Kim, Kun Il; Sol, Chang Hyo; Kim, Byung Soo [Pusan National University College of Medicine, Pusan (Korea, Republic of)

    1993-07-15

    There are considerable discrepancies between clinical symptoms and imaging diagnosis in the localization of the responsible rediculopathy. The purpose of this study are to analyze the dynamic alteration of contrast filling of the spinal nerve sleeves during positional changes and determine how the abnormalities of nerve sleeves on lateral bending A-P views correlate with sciatica. The criteria indicating the root abnormality in functional myelography were (1) bad filling of ipsolateral root to sciatica and (2) good filling of contralateral root compared with those in neutral A-P view. Of total 77 patients, 67 had radiculopathy and 10 had no radiculopathy. In 23 (34.3%) of 67 patients with radiculopathy and 6 (60%) of 10 patients with no radiculopathy, their clinical symptoms well correlated with conventional myelographic findings. However, in 35 (52.2%) of 67 patients with radiculopathy and 6 (60%) of 10 patients with no radiculopathy, their symptoms well correlated with functional myelographic findings. This study suggest that the functional myelography using both lateral bending A-P views can be used as a complementary tool in the evaluation of the radiculopathy.

  6. Value of functional myelography with both lateral bending anterior-posterior views in lumbar radiculopathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    There are considerable discrepancies between clinical symptoms and imaging diagnosis in the localization of the responsible rediculopathy. The purpose of this study are to analyze the dynamic alteration of contrast filling of the spinal nerve sleeves during positional changes and determine how the abnormalities of nerve sleeves on lateral bending A-P views correlate with sciatica. The criteria indicating the root abnormality in functional myelography were (1) bad filling of ipsolateral root to sciatica and (2) good filling of contralateral root compared with those in neutral A-P view. Of total 77 patients, 67 had radiculopathy and 10 had no radiculopathy. In 23 (34.3%) of 67 patients with radiculopathy and 6 (60%) of 10 patients with no radiculopathy, their clinical symptoms well correlated with conventional myelographic findings. However, in 35 (52.2%) of 67 patients with radiculopathy and 6 (60%) of 10 patients with no radiculopathy, their symptoms well correlated with functional myelographic findings. This study suggest that the functional myelography using both lateral bending A-P views can be used as a complementary tool in the evaluation of the radiculopathy

  7. Taking it to the next level: lumbar radiculopathy from thoracic nerve schwannoma

    OpenAIRE

    Ukaigwe, Anene; Olugbodi, Akintomi; Richard L. Alweis

    2015-01-01

    Compression or irritation of the sciatic nerve and its branches, the common fibular and tibial nerves, causes sciatica which is a common syndrome characterized most often by radiating pain from the lower back down the legs and also manifesting as sensory and motor deficits. Sciatica is a common presentation of lumbosacral disc prolapse and degenerative disease of the lumbar spine in ambulatory settings. Schwannomas rarely cause sciatica; hence, it is seldom considered in evaluation of a patie...

  8. Tratamiento de la radiculopatía lumbar con radiofrecuencia pulsada Treatment of lumbar radiculopathy with pulsed radiofrequency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Abejón

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available Objectivos: Valorar la eficacia y los efectos secundarios derivados del tratamiento con radiofrecuencia pulsada en pacientes diagnosticados de radiculopatía lumbar. Material y métodos: Se realiza un estudio observacional prospectivo. Se realizan 20 radiofrecuencias en modo pulsado en 17 pacientes consecutivos con diagnóstico de radiculopatía confirmado mediante electromiografía y clínica congruente desde enero de 2001 hasta enero del 2002. En todos los pacientes antes de efectuar la radiofrecuencia pulsada se realiza un bloqueo radicular selectivo que ha de reducir a sintomatología de los pacientes en al menos el 50% para que se considere positivo. Se evalúa, mediante una escala analógica visual, la intensidad del dolor en cinco momentos. En la visita inicial, al mes del tratamiento, a los 2 meses, a los 3 meses y a los 6 meses. La capacidad funcional del paciente se evalúa, mediante el test de Lattinen, en la visita inicial, a los 3 y 6 meses. Se valora la eficacia de la técnica mediante la escala de Likert de 7 puntos, así como la reducción del tratamiento en el periodo de estudio y la existencia de complicaciones. Para comparar los valores de la EVA a lo largo del periodo de estudio se realiza el test de Friedman no paramétrico para datos apareados de muestras múltiples aplicando un contraste de una sola cola. Se considera significación estadística cuando el valor de p es Objectives: To assess the effectiveness and side effects derived from the treatment with pulsed radiofrequency in patients diagnosed of lumbar radiculopathy. Material and methods: A prospective observational study was performed. Twenty pulsed radiofrequencies were performed in 17 consecutive patients with diagnosis of radioculopathy confirmed by electromyography and congruent clinical manifestations from January 2001 to January 2002. In all the patients and prior to the pulsed radiofrequency, a selective radicular blockade was performed. This blockade had to

  9. Solitary Epidural Lipoma with Ipsilateral Facet Arthritis Causing Lumbar Radiculopathy

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Hong Kyun; Koh, Sung Hye; Chung, Kook Jin

    2012-01-01

    A 55-year-old obese man (body mass index, 31.6 kg/m2) presented radiating pain and motor weakness in the left leg. Magnetic resonance imaging showed an epidural mass posterior to the L5 vertebral body, which was isosignal to subcutaneous fat and it asymmetrically compressed the left side of the cauda equina and the exiting left L5 nerve root on the axial T1 weighted images. Severe arthritis of the left facet joint and edema of the bone marrow regarding the left pedicle were also found. As far...

  10. Diagnostic imaging of the lumbar disc herniation for radiculopathy by 3D-MRI (MR-myelography)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have developed a new method of three-dimensional MRI (3D-MRI) which enables a stereoscopic view of the spinal cord and both sides of spinal nerve roots in one image. Anatomical study for normal subjects, the S1 angulations and length were significantly smaller than those of others. The S1 DRG was oval and was the largest. In a pathological study the use of 3D-MRI defects the signal changes following damage to the spinal nerve roots or ganglion in lumbar disc herniation. With regard to signal changes in damaged root ganglion, a good correlation between root compression and root inflammation was detected by experiments. We are currently examining the relationship between the damaged root ganglion, pain sensory disturbance. This study showed that the dorsal root ganglion plays an important role in sensory control of radiculopathy on 3D-MRI. (author)

  11. Diagnostic imaging of the lumbar disc herniation for radiculopathy by 3D-MRI (MR-myelography)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taira, Gaku; Imakiire, Atsuhiro; Endo, Kenji [Tokyo Medical Coll. (Japan); Ichimaru, Katuji

    2002-02-01

    We have developed a new method of three-dimensional MRI (3D-MRI) which enables a stereoscopic view of the spinal cord and both sides of spinal nerve roots in one image. Anatomical study for normal subjects, the S1 angulations and length were significantly smaller than those of others. The S1 DRG was oval and was the largest. In a pathological study the use of 3D-MRI defects the signal changes following damage to the spinal nerve roots or ganglion in lumbar disc herniation. With regard to signal changes in damaged root ganglion, a good correlation between root compression and root inflammation was detected by experiments. We are currently examining the relationship between the damaged root ganglion, pain sensory disturbance. This study showed that the dorsal root ganglion plays an important role in sensory control of radiculopathy on 3D-MRI. (author)

  12. Hemorrhagic Lumbar Synovial Cyst

    OpenAIRE

    Park, Hyun Seok; Sim, Hong Bo; Kwon, Soon Chan; Park, Jun Bum

    2012-01-01

    Synovial cysts of the lumbar spine are an uncommon cause of back and radicular pain. These cysts most frequently present as back pain, followed by chronic progressive radiculopathy or gradual onset of symptoms secondary to spinal canal compromise. Although less common, they can also present with acute spinal cord or root compression symptoms. We report of a case in which hemorrhaging into a right L2-3 facet synovial cyst caused an acute onset of back pain and radiculopathy, requiring surgical...

  13. Variation in eligibility criteria from studies of radiculopathy due to a herniated disc and of neurogenic claudication due to lumbar spinal stenosis: a structured literature review

    OpenAIRE

    Genevay, Stéphane; Atlas, Steve J.; Katz, Jeffrey N.

    2010-01-01

    STUDY DESIGN: A structured literature review. SUMMARY OF THE BACKGROUND DATA: Widely recognized classification criteria for rheumatologic disorders have resulted in well-defined patient populations for clinical investigation. OBJECTIVE: We sought to determine whether similar criteria were needed for back pain disorders by examining variability in eligibility criteria in published studies. METHODS: Studies involving radiculopathy due to lumbar herniated disc (HD) and for neurogenic claudicatio...

  14. Tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin-1β, and interleukin-6 in the cerebrospinal fluid of patients with cervical myelopathy and lumbar radiculopathy

    OpenAIRE

    Nagashima, Hideki; Morio, Yasuo; Yamane, Koji; Nanjo, Yoshiro; Teshima, Ryota

    2009-01-01

    There have been few reports describing cytokines in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of patients with spinal degenerative disorders. This study investigated whether interleukin-1β (IL-1β), interleukin-6 (IL-6), and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) could be detected in CSF of patients with cervical myelopathy or lumbar radiculopathy and whether the concentrations of those cytokines correlated with the severity of disease conditions. CSF samples were obtained from 21 patients with cervical myelopat...

  15. Short-term assessment of periradicular corticosteroid injections in lumbar radiculopathy associated with disc pathology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Viton, J.M.; Rubino, T.; Delarque, A. [Departement Universitaire de Reeducation et Readaptation, Marseille (France); Peretti-Viton, P.; Salamon, N. [Service de Neuroradiologie, C. H. U. de la Timone, 264 Rue Saint-Pierre, F-13385 Marseille Cedex 05 (France)

    1998-01-01

    We evaluated periradicular injection of corticosteroids performed by neuroradiologists under fluoroscopic guidance in the treatment of lumbosacral nerve root pain in 40 patients (average age 48 years) presenting with lumbosciatica or radiculopathy not responding to conservative treatment. Patients with root pain due to infectious, neoplastic or inflammatory diseases were excluded, as were patients who needed immediate surgery. Pain was evaluated using a visual analogue scale (VAS) 10 and 90 days after the injection. After 10 days a substantial decrease in root pain was observed, with a statistically significant decrease in mean VAS. This decrease was observed in 90 % of patients, and it persisted after 90 days in 85 %. Side effects were rare, mild and disappeared spontaneously. They were related to the drug injected (corticosteroids). (orig.) With 2 figs., 3 tabs., 24 refs.

  16. Short-term assessment of periradicular corticosteroid injections in lumbar radiculopathy associated with disc pathology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We evaluated periradicular injection of corticosteroids performed by neuroradiologists under fluoroscopic guidance in the treatment of lumbosacral nerve root pain in 40 patients (average age 48 years) presenting with lumbosciatica or radiculopathy not responding to conservative treatment. Patients with root pain due to infectious, neoplastic or inflammatory diseases were excluded, as were patients who needed immediate surgery. Pain was evaluated using a visual analogue scale (VAS) 10 and 90 days after the injection. After 10 days a substantial decrease in root pain was observed, with a statistically significant decrease in mean VAS. This decrease was observed in 90 % of patients, and it persisted after 90 days in 85 %. Side effects were rare, mild and disappeared spontaneously. They were related to the drug injected (corticosteroids). (orig.)

  17. Analysis of SNRB in patients with lumbar radiculopathy resistant to conservative treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sundar Suriyakumar

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The transforaminal application performed with SNRB (Selective nerve root blocks should be more accurate. Moreover, the amount of corticosteroid and local anesthetic can be reduced compared to the amount of these agents administered with the epidural steroid. Methods: Prospective study of 72 patients with low back pain done in Sri Ramachandra medical centre, Chennai during April 2012 to April 2014. 46 patients were diagnosed to have inter vertebral disc and 26 patients with Lumbar canal stenosis. The patients were evaluated using VAS score and Oswestry disability index. The indication and determination of the therapeutic SNRB level was established by the spine surgeon after all the diagnostic test results had been obtained and after a detailed discussion with the patient. After confirming the correct placement of spinal needle with a short bevel with the help of contrast, a solution of 1ml of 0.5% sensorcaine with 1 ml of triamcinolone acetonide (Inj. kenocort is injected. Results: Only 2 patients out of 72 had persistent pain and underwent surgery. 60 of our patients were comfortable and were able to proceed with their normal life/day to day activities following the administration of one block. Conclusion: Selective nerve root block is effective and less invasive intervention, and serves as an adjunct to non-operative treatment. The blocks give the best result in disc herniation cases, followed by favorable results in foraminal stenosis. [Int J Res Med Sci 2015; 3(1.000: 194-197

  18. Isolated Painless Foot Drop due to Cerebral Infarction Mimicking Lumbar Radiculopathy: A Case Report

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Ji Yong; Kim, Do Keun; Yoon, Seung Hwan

    2015-01-01

    Although they usually originate from peripheral problems, foot drop is caused by lesions affecting the neural pathway related to dorsiflexor muscles, whether of central or peripheral origin. We present a patient with sudden isolated foot drop caused by a small infarct in the primary motor cortex mimicking a peripheral origin. This report indicates that patients presenting isolated foot drop should be managed carefully and the possibility of both central and peripheral causes should be conside...

  19. Distinct degree of radiculopathy at different levels of peripheral nerve injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takiguchi Noboru

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Lumbar radiculopathy is a common clinical problem, characterized by dorsal root ganglion (DRG injury and neural hyperactivity causing intense pain. However, the mechanisms involved in DRG injury have not been fully elucidated. Furthermore, little is known about the degree of radiculopathy at the various levels of nerve injury. The purpose of this study is to compare the degree of radiculopathy injury at the DRG and radiculopathy injury proximal or distal to the DRG. Results The lumbar radiculopathy rat model was created by ligating the L5 nerve root 2 mm proximal to the DRG or 2 mm distal to the DRG with 6.0 silk. We examined the degree of the radiculopathy using different points of mechanical sensitivity, immunohistochemistry and in vivo patch-clamp recordings, 7 days after surgery. The rats injured distal to the DRG were more sensitive than those rats injured proximal to the DRG in the behavioral study. The number of activated microglia in laminas I–II of the L5 segmental level was significantly increased in rats injured distal to the DRG when compared with rats injured proximal to the DRG. The amplitudes and frequencies of EPSC in the rats injured distal to the DRG were higher than those injured proximal to the DRG. The results indicated that there is a different degree of radiculopathy at the distal level of nerve injury. Conclusions Our study examined the degree of radiculopathy at different levels of nerve injury. Severe radiculopathy occurred in rats injured distal to the DRG when compared with rats injured proximal to the DRG. This finding helps to correctly diagnose a radiculopathy.

  20. Physical examination for lumbar radiculopathy due to disc herniation in patients with low-back pain.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Windt, D.A.W.M. van der; Simons, E.; Riphagen, I.I.; Ammendolia, C.; Verhangen, A.P.; Laslett, M.; Devillé, W.; Deyo, R.A.; Bouter, L.M.; Vet, H.C.W. de; Aertgeerts, B.

    2010-01-01

    Background: Low-back pain with leg pain (sciatica) may be caused by a herniated intervertebral disc exerting pressure on the nerve root. Most patients will respond to conservative treatment, but in carefully selected patients, surgical discectomy may provide faster relief of symptoms. Primary care c

  1. Physical examination for lumbar radiculopathy due to disc herniation in patients with low-back pain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D.A.W.M. van der Windt; E. Simons; I.I. Riphagen; C. Ammendolia; A.P. Verhagen; M. Laslett; W. Devillé; R.A. Deyo; L.M. Bouter; H.C.W. de Vet; B. Aertgeerts

    2010-01-01

    Background Low-back pain with leg pain (sciatica) may be caused by a herniated intervertebral disc exerting pressure on the nerve root. Most patients will respond to conservative treatment, but in carefully selected patients, surgical discectomy may provide faster relief of symptoms. Primary care cl

  2. Hemorrhagic Facet Cyst in the Lumbar Spine Causing Contralateral Leg Symptoms: A Case Report

    OpenAIRE

    Utsunomiya, Risa; Sakai, Toshinori; Wada, Keizo; Sairyo, Koichi; Kosaka, Hirofumi; Katoh, Shinsuke; Yasui, Natsuo

    2011-01-01

    Here we present a case of hemorrhagic lumbar facet cyst presenting with progressive radiculopathy only on the contralateral side. If a patient has previous back pain or neuropathy for several months and then suddenly deteriorates, hemorrhagic facet cyst of the lumbar spine should be part of the differential diagnosis. However, as in the present case, we should be aware that there is a possibility of a contralateral lesion.

  3. Postradiation lumbosacral radiculopathy with spinal root cavernomas mimicking carcinomatous meningitis

    OpenAIRE

    Ducray, François; Guillevin, Rémy; Psimaras, Dimitri; Sanson, Marc; Mokhtari, Karima; Delanian, Sylvie; Navarro, Soledad; Maisonobe, Thierry; Cornu, Philippe; Hoang-Xuan, Khê; Delattre, Jean-Yves; Pradat, Pierre-François

    2008-01-01

    Lumbosacral radiculopathy is a rare complication of radiotherapy and may be challenging to differentiate from diagnosis of a tumor recurrence. We reviewed the records of three patients with a past history of cancer and radiotherapy who were referred for suspicion of carcinomatous meningitis on lumbar MRI, but whose final diagnosis was radiation-induced lumbosacral radiculopathy. The three patients developed a progressive lumbosacral radiculopathy at 20, 13, and 47 years after lumbar radiother...

  4. Discal Cyst of the Lumbar Spine: A Case Report

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Seong-Hwan; Ahn, Soon-Seob; Choi, Gi-Hwan; Kim, Dae-Hyun

    2012-01-01

    Discal cysts are a rare cause of lumbar radiculopathy. There are only a few reports of this disease in medical literature. The authors describe the case of a 40-year-old man with a lumbar discal cyst that led to radiculopathy. An intraspinal extradural cystic mass was responsible for low and high signal intensities observed in lumbar lesions on T1 and T2 weighted magnetic resonance images. This cyst was a grossly spherical mass with clear serous fluid, which was connected to an adjacent inter...

  5. Haemorrhagic Lumbar Juxtafacet Cyst with Ligamentum Flavum Involvement

    OpenAIRE

    Finn Ghent; Trent Davidson; Ralph Jasper Mobbs

    2014-01-01

    Juxtafacet cysts are an uncommon cause of radiculopathy. They occur most frequently in the lumbar region, and their distribution across the spine correlates with mobility. Haemorrhagic complications are rare and may occur in the absence of any provocation, although there is some association with anticoagulation and trauma. We present a case of acute radiculopathy due to an L5/S1 juxtafacet cyst with unprovoked haemorrhage which was found to extend into ligamentum flavum. The patient underwent...

  6. Cervical radiculopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iyer, Sravisht; Kim, Han Jo

    2016-09-01

    Cervical radiculopathy is a common clinical scenario. Patients with radiculopathy typically present with neck pain, arm pain, or both. We review the epidemiology of cervical radiculopathy and discuss the diagnosis of this condition. This includes an overview of the pertinent findings on the patient history and physical examination. We also discuss relevant clinical syndromes that must be considered in the differential diagnosis including peripheral nerve entrapment syndromes and shoulder pathology. The natural history of cervical radiculopathy is reviewed and options for management are discussed. These options include conservative management, non-operative modalities such as physical therapy, steroid injections, and operative intervention. While the exact indications for surgical intervention have not yet been elucidated, we provide an overview of the available literature regarding indications and discuss the timing of intervention. The surgical outcomes of anterior cervical decompression and fusion (ACDF), cervical disc arthroplasty (CDA), and posterior cervical foraminotomy (PCF) are discussed. PMID:27250042

  7. Sciatica from a Foraminal Lumbar Root Schwannoma: Case Report and Review of Literature

    OpenAIRE

    Tarush Rustagi; Siddharth Badve; Aseem N. Parekh

    2012-01-01

    Sciatica is commonly caused by lumbar prolapsed intervertebral disc (PID) and other spinal lesions. Uncommon causes like nerve root schwannoma are rarely considered in the differential diagnosis of sciatica. Spinal schwannomas occur both sporadically and in association with neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1; von Recklinghausen's disease). This case report describes lumbar foraminal schwannoma as an unusual cause of radiculopathy, presenting clinically as a lumbar disc prolapse. The diagnosis was ...

  8. Health-related quality of life in sacroiliac syndrome: A comparison to lumbosacral radiculopathy

    OpenAIRE

    Cheng, Marc B; Ferrante, F Michael

    2006-01-01

    Background and objectives: This study attempts to assess the intensity and quality of pain and health-related quality of life in patients with sacroiliac syndrome and to compare those constructs to patients with lumbar radiculopathy. Methods: A retrospective review of patient records with the diagnosis of sacroiliac syndrome or lumbar radiculopathy was performed. Patients with sacroiliac syndrome were age and gender matched to patients with lumbar radiculopathy. Data from the McGill Pain Ques...

  9. Discogenic lumbosacral radiculopathy

    OpenAIRE

    Ekaterina Vladimirovna Podchufarova

    2010-01-01

    In most cases, spinal nerve root lesion is due to vertebral causes, such as disk herniation, degenerative changes in the intervertebral joints, and a narrow vertebral canal. The paper considers the pathogenetic mechanisms responsible for the development of discogenic radiculopathy and its associated pain syndrome and main approaches to its diagnosis and treatment. Some attention is given to therapy for neuropathic pain syndrome.

  10. Motor radiculopathy

    OpenAIRE

    Khan, Afsha; Camilleri, Jeremy

    2012-01-01

    A 48-year-old immunosuppressed woman presented to a rheumatology follow-up clinic after suffering from herpes zoster infection. She had manifestations of foot drop 3 months after the initial infection. She was diagnosed with motor radiculopathy following herpes zoster infection that was effectively managed by physiotherapy and amitriptyline.

  11. Causes and clinical significance of intervertebral disk flavus ligamentum space in lumbar stenosis (a comparative study of CT non-contrast and CT-myelography of 83 cases)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To compare the imaging findings of CT non-contrast (CTNOC) and CT-myelography (CTM) in lumbar intervertebral disk, the authors proposed a new concept of intervertebral disk-flavum ligamentum space (DFLS), analyzed the causes of stenosis in lumbar DFLS and evaluated its diagnostic value in compressed lumbar radiculopathy. Methods: The images of CTNOC and CTM of 83 cases were retrospectively analyzed, and the shapes of L3-S1 disk, the width of flavum ligament at each side, the degree of prominence interior of the joint process superior at each side, and the sagittal diameter of the dural sac in L3-S1 were recorded. The relation of these restrictions and parameters to DFLS stenosis and the compressed lumbar nerve roots shown in CTNOC and CTM were analyzed. Results: The herniation of intervertebral disk were found in 138 level with the diameter of the corresponding dural sac 5 mm; 67 joint process superior prominent interior > 2 mm; 157 of 83 cases of mean width DFLS 3.8 mm. Conclusion: The DFLS≤5 mm can be diagnosed as stenosis. The main causes of stenosis are the herniation of intervertebral disk, flavum ligament thicker; and joint process superior prominent interior. It can be used as a valuable criterion in diagnosing lumbar nerve root compression in CT study

  12. Patient-reported-outcomes in subjects with painful lumbar or cervical radiculopathy treated with pregabalin: evidence from medical practice in primary care settings

    OpenAIRE

    Saldaña, María Teresa; Navarro, Ana; Pérez, Concepción; Masramón, Xavier; Rejas, Javier

    2009-01-01

    Abstract The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of pregabalin in painful cervical or lumbosacral radiculopathy treated in Primary Care settings under routine clinical practice. An observational, prospective 12-week secondary analysis was carried-out. Male and female above 18 years, naive to PGB, with refractory chronic pain secondary to cervical/lumbosacral radiculopathy were enrolled. SF-MPQ, Sheehan Disability Inventory, MOS Sleep Scale, Hospital Anxiety and Depre...

  13. [Acute rupture of lumbar intervertebral disc caused by violent manipulation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, J S

    1989-08-01

    Five cases of acute rupture of lumbar intervertebral disc caused by violent manipulation are reported. After protrusion of the lumbar intervertebral disc were treated by violent manipulation, the lumbo-leg pain were severe suddenly. The operations found that the annulus fibrosus had ruptured and the nerve root or cauda equina was constricted by the nucleus pulposus which had entered into the spinal canal. It must be emphasized that their is in danger of more damaging intervertebral disc degenerated by violent manipulation, then the adhesion of the nerve root will occur gradually. We don't suggest to make violent manipulation for the patient with the nerve root injured. We have acquired good results in treating protrusion of lumbar intervertebral disc by combined therapy and they are introduced in this article. PMID:2620603

  14. Percutaneous discectomy on lumbar radiculopathy related to disk herniation: Why under CT guidance? An open study of 100 consecutive patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The primary objective of this study conducted on 100 patients is to demonstrate that performing CT-guided percutaneous discectomy for herniated disks results in a significant improvement in pain symptoms at several times (D1, D2, D7, 1 month, 3 months, 6 months). This objective assesses the effectiveness and feasibility of this technique under CT guidance in patients presenting documented lower back pain related to disk herniation that has not improved with appropriate medical treatment. The impact of various factors on the effectiveness of discectomy will also be evaluated. At 1 week, we notes a decrease in average VAS respectively of 71% and 67% in patients treated for posterolateral and foraminal herniated disks; the result for posteromedian herniated disks is only 45% in average decrease. At 6 months post op, 79% of lateralized herniated disks have a satisfactory result (≥70% decrease in pain as compared to initial pain), whereas post median herniated disks had a satisfactory result in only 50% of cases. Percutaneous fine needle discectomy probe under combined CT and fluoroscopic guidance is a minimally invasive spine surgery which should be considered as an alternative to surgery. This technique presents several advantages: the small diameter of the probe used (maximum 16G or 1.5 mm) allows a cutaneous incision of only a few millimeters, and a trans-canal approach can be possible; it also decreases the risk of ligamentary lesion and does not cause an osseous lesion of the posterior arc or of the adjacent muscular structures.

  15. Lumbar Epidural Varix Mimicking Disc Herniation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bursalı, Adem; Akyoldas, Goktug; Guvenal, Ahmet Burak; Yaman, Onur

    2016-07-01

    Lumbar radiculopathy is generally caused by such well-recognized entity as lumbar disc herniation in neurosurgical practice; however rare pathologies such as thrombosed epidural varix may mimic them by causing radicular symptoms. In this case report, we present a 26-year-old man with the complaint of back and right leg pain who was operated for right L4-5 disc herniation. The lesion interpreted as an extruded disc herniation preoperatively was found to be a thrombosed epidural varix compressing the nerve root preoperatively. The nerve root was decompressed by shrinking the lesion with bipolar thermocoagulation and excision. The patient's complaints disappeared in the postoperative period. Thrombosed lumbar epidural varices may mimic lumbar disc herniations both radiologically and clinically. Therefore, must be kept in mind in the differential diagnosis of lumbar disc herniations. Microsurgical techniques are mandatory for the treatment of these pathologies and decompression with thermocoagulation and excision is an efficient method. PMID:27446525

  16. Lumbar Epidural Varix Mimicking Disc Herniation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bursalı, Adem; Guvenal, Ahmet Burak; Yaman, Onur

    2016-01-01

    Lumbar radiculopathy is generally caused by such well-recognized entity as lumbar disc herniation in neurosurgical practice; however rare pathologies such as thrombosed epidural varix may mimic them by causing radicular symptoms. In this case report, we present a 26-year-old man with the complaint of back and right leg pain who was operated for right L4–5 disc herniation. The lesion interpreted as an extruded disc herniation preoperatively was found to be a thrombosed epidural varix compressing the nerve root preoperatively. The nerve root was decompressed by shrinking the lesion with bipolar thermocoagulation and excision. The patient's complaints disappeared in the postoperative period. Thrombosed lumbar epidural varices may mimic lumbar disc herniations both radiologically and clinically. Therefore, must be kept in mind in the differential diagnosis of lumbar disc herniations. Microsurgical techniques are mandatory for the treatment of these pathologies and decompression with thermocoagulation and excision is an efficient method. PMID:27446525

  17. Haemorrhagic Lumbar Juxtafacet Cyst with Ligamentum Flavum Involvement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Finn Ghent

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Juxtafacet cysts are an uncommon cause of radiculopathy. They occur most frequently in the lumbar region, and their distribution across the spine correlates with mobility. Haemorrhagic complications are rare and may occur in the absence of any provocation, although there is some association with anticoagulation and trauma. We present a case of acute radiculopathy due to an L5/S1 juxtafacet cyst with unprovoked haemorrhage which was found to extend into ligamentum flavum. The patient underwent uncomplicated microscope assisted decompression with excellent results. The demographics, presentation, aetiology, and management of juxtafacet cysts are discussed.

  18. Axon Count and Sympathetic Skin Responses in Lumbosacral Radiculopathy

    OpenAIRE

    Erdem Tilki, Hacer; Coşkun, Melek; Ünal Akdemir, Neslihan; İncesu, Lütfi

    2014-01-01

    Background and Purpose Electrodiagnostic studies can be used to confirm the diagnosis of lumbosacral radiculopathies, but more sensitive diagnostic methods are often needed to measure the ensuing motor neuronal loss and sympathetic failure. Methods Twenty-six patients with lumbar radiculopathy and 30 controls were investigated using nerve conduction studies, motor unit number estimation (MUNE), testing of the sympathetic skin response (SSR), quantitative electromyography (QEMG), and magnetic ...

  19. Ganglion cyst in the lumbar anterior epidural space:a case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A ganglion cyst is a tumor-like lesion that contains mucous or myxoid material in the fibrous capsule. We report a case of ganglion cyst located in the lumbar anterior epidural space and causing lumbar radiculopathy. Computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging revealed the cyst as a cystic lesion with wall enhancement. Myelography showed that it was not filled with contrast medium and not connected with the dura, nerve root, or facet joint

  20. Ganglion cyst in the lumbar anterior epidural space:a case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jin, Sung Chan; Park, Dong Woo; Lee, Seoung Ro; Joo, Kyung Bin [Hanyang Univ. College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2001-03-01

    A ganglion cyst is a tumor-like lesion that contains mucous or myxoid material in the fibrous capsule. We report a case of ganglion cyst located in the lumbar anterior epidural space and causing lumbar radiculopathy. Computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging revealed the cyst as a cystic lesion with wall enhancement. Myelography showed that it was not filled with contrast medium and not connected with the dura, nerve root, or facet joint.

  1. Spontaneously disappearing lumbar disc protrusion

    OpenAIRE

    Ushewokunze, Shungu; Abbas, Naeem; Dardis, Ronan; Killeen, Ian

    2008-01-01

    Spontaneous disappearance of a herniated lumbar disc is known to occur. This case study describes a 45-year-old patient whose symptoms of lumbar radiculopathy resolved and follow-up imaging showed complete disappearance of the disc prolapse. This phenomenon strengthens the role of conservative treatment in the management of lumbar disc protrusions.

  2. Blindness, ophthalmoplegia and extensive radiculopathy: An unusual clinical syndrome in intracranial sino-venous thrombosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moosa A

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Isolated intracranial hypertension is a common manifestation of intracranial sino-venous thrombosis (ISVT. Markedly elevated intracranial tension presents with unusual features including cranial neuropathies and radiculopathy. We report two cases with ISVT, which presented with headache, papilledema, progressive visual loss, complete ophthalmoplegia and flaccid areflexic quadriparesis along with a normal sensorium. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI of the brain and cervical spinal cord showed no lesions that could account for the neurological deficits. Markedly elevated lumbar CSF pressure was noted in both cases. Nerve conduction study favored radiculopathy in one case and was normal in the other. Raised intracranial pressure was found to be the sole cause for the clinical manifestations. Visual impairment persisted in one patient despite lumbo-peritoneal shunting while the other died of septicemia. To our knowledge there are no previous reports of a syndrome comprising blindness, ophthalmoplegia and flaccid quadriplegia due to intracranial hypertension in ISVT.

  3. Successful resolution of signs and symptoms from L4 radiculopathy with spinal manipulation: a case report

    OpenAIRE

    Janzen, Andrew; Nykoliation, Jim

    2003-01-01

    The management of a patient with L4 radiculopathy with side posture spinal manipulative therapy (SMT) is described. Dramatic improvement both subjectively and objectively followed a short course of SMT of the lumbar spine. This case is used to illustrate aspects of the natural history of lumbar discogenic radiculopathy, safety and effectiveness of SMT for disc herniations, diagnostic imaging, and differentiation of referred vs. radicular pain syndromes. Also included is a short summary of the...

  4. Intraoperative Discography for Detecting Concealed Lumbar Discal Cysts

    OpenAIRE

    Kwon, Yoon-Kwang; Choi, Kyung-Chul; Lee, Choon Dae; Lee, Sang-Ho

    2013-01-01

    Lumbar discal cyst is a rare cause of radiculopathy. Their exact pathogenesis and the optimal treatment modality remain unidentified. Depending on their location, discal cysts cannot always be easily identified intraoperatively. We describe 2 patients with discal cysts and introduce an intraoperative discography technique for discal cyst location. Both patients were treated with surgical excision; with intraoperative discography, the cystic lesions could easily be detected and removed.

  5. L2 Radicular Compression Caused by a Foraminal Extradural Gas Pseudocyst

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Dong Yeob; Lee, Sang-Ho

    2010-01-01

    Gas pseudocysts are a rare cause of lumbar radiculopathy and most symptomatic gas pseudocysts are found within the confines of the spinal canal. A gas pseudocyst in the foramen causing lumbar radiculopathy is very rare. We present a case of a 67-year-old woman suffering from severe pain in the right leg. Computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging revealed a gas pseudocyst compressing the L2 root at the right L2-3 foramen. The patient underwent cyst excision using the lateral transmusc...

  6. Peroneal neuropathy misdiagnosed as L5 radiculopathy: a case report

    OpenAIRE

    Reife, Michael D; Coulis, Christopher M

    2013-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this case report is to describe a patient who presented with a case of peroneal neuropathy that was originally diagnosed and treated as a L5 radiculopathy. Clinical features A 53-year old female registered nurse presented to a private chiropractic practice with complaints of left lateral leg pain. Three months earlier she underwent elective left L5 decompression surgery without relief of symptoms. Intervention and outcome Lumbar spine MRI seven months prior to lumbar ...

  7. Sciatica from a Foraminal Lumbar Root Schwannoma: Case Report and Review of Literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tarush Rustagi

    2012-01-01

    This case report describes lumbar foraminal schwannoma as an unusual cause of radiculopathy, presenting clinically as a lumbar disc prolapse. The diagnosis was confirmed on MRI scan. Patient had complete symptomatic recovery following surgical enucleation of the tumour mass from the L5 nerve root. This case report is of particular interest as it highlights the diagnostic confusion, which is bound to arise, because the clinical presentation closely mimics a lumbar PID. This often leads to delay in diagnosis and “failure of conservative treatment.”

  8. Lumbar hernia: a rare cause of large bowel obstruction

    OpenAIRE

    Hide, I; Pike, E; Uberoi, R

    1999-01-01

    We describe a 70-year-old woman presenting with large bowel obstruction secondary to incarceration of the mid descending colon within a lumbar hernia. This was diagnosed on barium enema and successfully treated surgically.


Keywords: hernia; intestinal obstruction; colon

  9. Discogenic lumbosacral radiculopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ekaterina Vladimirovna Podchufarova

    2010-01-01

    narrow vertebral canal. The paper considers the pathogenetic mechanisms responsible for the development of discogenic radiculopathy and its associated pain syndrome and main approaches to its diagnosis and treatment. Some attention is given to therapy for neuropathic pain syndrome.

  10. [A Case of Cramps Caused by Lumbar Spinal Stenosis Treated Successfully with Arterial Stenting following Lumbar Sympathetic Ganglion Block].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takekawa, Kimiko

    2016-04-01

    An 82-year-old woman who had received two operations for lumbar spinal stenosis was treated successfully for persistent nocturnal leg cramps with lumbar sympathetic ganglion block. The stent in the right popliteal artery improved cramps again following the recurrence one month after the block. The head up position in bed against gastroesophageal reflux was found injurious at the time of second recurrence one year after stenting. After the correction of lying position, her legs were in good condition for over one year. Cramps in this case might be caused by disturbances of blood flow supply for motor nerves of the legs by obstructive arterial sclerosis of the nerve injured from root compression. PMID:27188122

  11. Myeloperoxidase Activities in Polymorphonuclear Leukocytes in Lumbar Disc Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Mehmet ŞENOĞLU; Ergul Belge KURUTAŞ; İdris ALTUN; Yalçın ATLI; Vedat NACİTARHAN

    2009-01-01

    Objectives: The exact pathogenesis of lumbar pain and radiculopathy is often poorly understood. Although nerve root entrapment resulting in mechanical pressure has been the most widely held concept to explain radiculopathy and lumbar pain, much of the recent research work increasingly supports an inflammatory reaction occurring in the lumbar intervertebral disc tissue. In this study, we aimed to show the role of Myeloperoxidase as an inflammatory marker and the correlation of inflammation wit...

  12. Proximal tibiofibular synostosis as a possible cause of a pseudoradicular syndrome: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Ooij, Bas; van Ooij, André; Morrenhof, J Wim; van Dijk, C Niek

    2011-12-01

    This paper presents a case report of persistent low back pain and suspected lumbar radiculopathy. A synostosis at the level of the proximal tibiofibular joint was diagnosed. After successful resection of the synostosis, the low back symptoms resolved completely. This is the first report of a proximal tibiofibular synostosis as a possible cause of referred pain proximally. PMID:21222100

  13. Proximal tibiofibular synostosis as a possible cause of a pseudoradicular syndrome: a case report

    OpenAIRE

    van Ooij, Bas; van Ooij, André; Morrenhof, J. Wim; van Dijk, C. Niek

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents a case report of persistent low back pain and suspected lumbar radiculopathy. A synostosis at the level of the proximal tibiofibular joint was diagnosed. After successful resection of the synostosis, the low back symptoms resolved completely. This is the first report of a proximal tibiofibular synostosis as a possible cause of referred pain proximally.

  14. CLINICAL EVALUATION OF CAUDAL EPIDURAL STEROID INJECTIONS IN MANAGING LUMBAR DISC PROLAPSE

    OpenAIRE

    Dhrubajyoti; Mituban

    2015-01-01

    Lumber disc prolapse as a cause of back and leg pain is quite a common presentation at a pain clinic which results in significant disability & overall loss of productive work. This study is an uncontrolled, prospective study that included 25 patients (15 m ales and 10 females) during the period 2013 – 2014 with signs and symptoms of back pain associated with lumber disc prolapsed with lumbar radiculopathy, in whom conservative treatment of least 6 weeks had failed. ...

  15. CT- and fluoroscopy-guided percutaneous discectomy for lumbar radiculopathy related to disc herniation: a comparative prospective study comparing lateral to medial herniated discs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amoretti, Nicolas; Huwart, Laurent; Marcy, Pierre-Yves [Centre Hospital-Universitaire de Nice, Department of Radiology, Hopital archet 2, Nice (France); Foti, Pauline [Centre Hospital-Universitaire de Nice, Department of Medical Statistics, Hopital archet 2, Nice (France); Hauger, Olivier [Centre Hospitalo-Universitaire de Bordeaux, Department of Radiology, Hopital Pellegrin, Bordeaux (France); Boileau, Pascal [Centre Hospital-Universitaire de Nice, Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Hopital archet 2, Nice (France)

    2013-01-15

    To evaluate and compare two groups of patients with sciatica due to intervertebral disc herniation with no neurologic deficit. The groups consisted of patients with intervertebral disc herniation in a medial location (group 1) and those in a lateral location (group 2). A total of 200 patients were included in the study and were followed for a minimum of 6 months. In our series, we treated 80 postero-lateral herniated discs (40% of cases), 46 postero-medial herniated discs (23%), and 74 foraminal herniated discs (37%). Level L3-L4 was treated in 30 cases (15%), L4-L5 in 98 cases (49%), and L5-S1 in 72 cases (36%). The procedure was performed under dual guidance: fluoroscopic and CT. A helical probe was activated. It penetrates the herniated disc and causes the pulpous material to be mechanically evacuated through the probe. All 200 patients were followed for a minimum of 6 months. In group 1, the patients had a mean pain score of 7.9 {+-} 2.5 VAS units (range 6-10 units) prior to intervention. This was reduced to 3.2 {+-} 2.1 VAS units (range 0-10 units) at 48 h follow-up and increased to 3.9 {+-} 1.2 VAS units (range 0-10 VAS units) at 1 month follow-up and further reduced to 2.7 {+-} 1.2 units (range 0-10 VAS units) at 6 month follow-up. In group 2, the patients had a mean pain score of 8.2 {+-} 3.2 VAS units (range 6-10 units) prior to intervention. This was reduced to 2.8 {+-} 1.5 VAS units (range 0-10 units) at 48 h follow-up and decreased to 1.5 {+-} 0.9 VAS units (range 0-10 units) at 1 month and further reduced to 1.1 {+-} 0.5 VAS units (range 0-10 units) at 6 months. Our study showed that results were more satisfactory for the hernia located laterally (postero-lateral, foraminal, and extra-foraminal) as compared to the hernia located posteromedially. (orig.)

  16. CT- and fluoroscopy-guided percutaneous discectomy for lumbar radiculopathy related to disc herniation: a comparative prospective study comparing lateral to medial herniated discs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To evaluate and compare two groups of patients with sciatica due to intervertebral disc herniation with no neurologic deficit. The groups consisted of patients with intervertebral disc herniation in a medial location (group 1) and those in a lateral location (group 2). A total of 200 patients were included in the study and were followed for a minimum of 6 months. In our series, we treated 80 postero-lateral herniated discs (40% of cases), 46 postero-medial herniated discs (23%), and 74 foraminal herniated discs (37%). Level L3-L4 was treated in 30 cases (15%), L4-L5 in 98 cases (49%), and L5-S1 in 72 cases (36%). The procedure was performed under dual guidance: fluoroscopic and CT. A helical probe was activated. It penetrates the herniated disc and causes the pulpous material to be mechanically evacuated through the probe. All 200 patients were followed for a minimum of 6 months. In group 1, the patients had a mean pain score of 7.9 ± 2.5 VAS units (range 6-10 units) prior to intervention. This was reduced to 3.2 ± 2.1 VAS units (range 0-10 units) at 48 h follow-up and increased to 3.9 ± 1.2 VAS units (range 0-10 VAS units) at 1 month follow-up and further reduced to 2.7 ± 1.2 units (range 0-10 VAS units) at 6 month follow-up. In group 2, the patients had a mean pain score of 8.2 ± 3.2 VAS units (range 6-10 units) prior to intervention. This was reduced to 2.8 ± 1.5 VAS units (range 0-10 units) at 48 h follow-up and decreased to 1.5 ± 0.9 VAS units (range 0-10 units) at 1 month and further reduced to 1.1 ± 0.5 VAS units (range 0-10 units) at 6 months. Our study showed that results were more satisfactory for the hernia located laterally (postero-lateral, foraminal, and extra-foraminal) as compared to the hernia located posteromedially. (orig.)

  17. Comparing Utility Scores in Common Spinal Radiculopathies: Results of a Prospective Valuation Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nayak, Nikhil R; Stephen, James H; Abdullah, Kalil G; Stein, Sherman C; Malhotra, Neil R

    2016-05-01

    Study Design Prospective observational study. Objective To determine whether preference-based health utility scores for common spinal radiculopathies vary by specific spinal level. Methods We employed a standard gamble study using the general public to calculate individual preference-based quality of life for four common radiculopathies: C6, C7, L5, and S1. We compared utility scores obtained for each level of radiculopathy with analysis of variance and t test. Multivariable regression was used to test the effects of the covariates age, sex, and years of education. We also reviewed the literature for publications reporting EuroQol-5 Dimensions (EQ-5D) scores for patients with radiculopathy. Results Two hundred participants were included in the study. Average utility for the four spinal levels fell within a narrow range (0.748 to 0.796). There were no statistically significant differences between lumbar and cervical radiculopathies, nor were there significant differences among the different spinal levels (F = 0.0850, p = 0.086). Age and sex had no significant effect on utility scores. There was a significant correlation between years of education and utility values for S1 radiculopathy (p = 0.037). On review of the literature, no study separated utility values by specific spinal level. EQ-5D utilities for both cervical and lumbar radiculopathy were considerably lower than the results of our study. Conclusions Utility values associated with the most common levels of cervical and lumbar radiculopathy do not significantly differ from each other, validating the current practice of grouping utility by spinal segment rather than by specific root levels. The discrepancy in average utility values between our study and the EQ-5D highlights the need to be mindful of the underlying instruments used when assessing outcomes studies from different sources. PMID:27099818

  18. Spontaneous hemorrhage into a lumbar synovial cyst

    OpenAIRE

    Cicuendez, Marta; Jose F Alen; Ana RAMOS; Lobato, Ramiro D.; Lagares, Alfonso

    2010-01-01

    Lumbar synovial cysts frequently present with back pain, chronic radiculopathy and/or progressive symptoms of spinal canal compromise. These cysts generally appear in the context of degenerative lumbar spinal disease. Few cases of spontaneous hemorrhage into synovial cysts have been reported in the literature.

  19. Study of the relationship and importance of clinical semiology, axial computed tomography and electroneuromyography in lumbar radioculopathies

    OpenAIRE

    Murade Emílio Cezar Mamede; Hungria Neto José Soares; Avanzi Osmar

    2002-01-01

    The authors evaluated forty-three patients with clinical suspect of lumbar radiculopathy caused by disk hernia, concerning to clinical semiology, computed tomography and electromyography were studied and their correlations. The clinical semiology was altered in 100,0% of the patients, the computed tomography in 90,7% and the electromyography in 88,7%. The correlation among the three exams didnt show any prevalency among any of the possible associations. The authors emphasize the importance of...

  20. An Evaluation of the Effectiveness of Hyaluronidase in the Selective Nerve Root Block of Radiculopathy: A Double Blind, Controlled Clinical Trial

    OpenAIRE

    Ko, Sang-Bong; Alexander R Vaccaro; Chang, Ho-Jin; Shin, Dong-Young

    2015-01-01

    Study Design Prospective, double-blind, randomized controlled trial. Purpose To determine the ability of hyaluronidase to provide longer lasting pain relief and functional improvement in patients with lumbar radiculopathy. Overview of Literature Selective nerve root block (SNRB) is a good treatment option in lumbar radiculopathy. We studied the effectiveness of hyaluronidase when added to the traditional SNRB regimen. Methods A sample size of 126 patients per group was necessary. A sample of ...

  1. Chronic Q-Fever (Coxiella burnetii) Causing Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm and Lumbar Osteomyelitis: A Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leahey, P Alexander; Tahan, Steven R; Kasper, Ekkehard M; Albrecht, Mary

    2016-01-01

    Coxiella burnetii is a rare cause of chronic infection that most frequently presents as endocarditis. We report a case of C burnetii causing an infected abdominal aortic aneurysm with contiguous lumbar osteomyelitis resulting in spinal cord compromise. The diagnosis was established by serologic studies consistent with chronic Q-fever (ratio of C burnetii immunoglobulin [Ig]G phase II titer to IgG phase I titer <1) and was confirmed by positive C burnetii polymerase chain reaction of vertebral tissue in addition to pathology of vertebral bone showing intracellular Gram-negative coccobacillary bacteria. The patient clinically improved after surgical decompression and prolonged treatment with doxycycline and hydroxychloroquine. PMID:26730393

  2. Distinguishing Radiculopathies from Mononeuropathies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robblee, Jennifer; Katzberg, Hans

    2016-01-01

    Identifying “where is the lesion” is particularly important in the approach to the patient with focal dysfunction where a peripheral localization is suspected. This article outlines a methodical approach to the neuromuscular patient in distinguishing focal neuropathies versus radiculopathies, both of which are common presentations to the neurology clinic. This approach begins with evaluation of the sensory examination to determine whether there are irritative or negative sensory signs in a peripheral nerve or dermatomal distribution. This is followed by evaluation of deep tendon reflexes to evaluate if differential hyporeflexia can assist in the two localizations. Finally, identification of weak muscle groups unique to a nerve or myotomal pattern in the proximal and distal extremities can most reliably assist in a precise localization. The article concludes with an application of the described method to the common scenario of distinguishing radial neuropathy versus C7 radiculopathy in the setting of a wrist drop and provides additional examples for self-evaluation and reference. PMID:27468275

  3. Root compression on MRI compared with clinical findings in patients with recent onset cervical radiculopathy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    B. Kuijper; J.T.J. Tans; B.F. van der Kallen; F. Nollet; G.J. Lycklama a Nijeholt; M. Visser

    2011-01-01

    Objectives To evaluate the occurrence of symptomatic and asymptomatic root compression caused by herniated discs and spondylotic foraminal stenosis by MRI in patients with recent onset cervical radiculopathy. Participants 78 patients with symptoms and signs of cervical radiculopathy of less than one

  4. Asymmetry of the multifidus muscle in lumbar radicular nerve compression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The multifidus muscle is the only paraspinal lumbar muscle that is innervated by a single nerve root. This study aimes to evaluate if the asymmetry of the multifidus muscle is related to the severity of compression of the nerve root or the duration of radiculopathy. MRI scans of 79 patients with symptomatic single level, unilateral, lumbar radiculopathy were reviewed for this retrospective case series with a nested case-control study. The cross-sectional area (CSA) of the multifidus muscle and the perpendicular distance of the multifidus to the lamina (MLD) were measured bilaterally by two radiologists and set into relation to the severity of nerve compression, duration of radiculopathy and probability of an indication for surgical decompression. In 67 recessal and 12 foraminal symptomatic nerve root compressions, neither the MLD ratio (severe 1.19 ± 0.55 vs less severe nerve compression: 1.12 ± 0.30, p = 0.664) nor the CSA ratio (severe 1 ± 0.16 vs less severe 0.98 ± 0.13, p = 0.577) nor the duration of symptoms significantly correlated with the degree of nerve compression. MR measurements of multifidus were not different in patients with (n = 20) and those without (n = 59) clinical muscle weakness in the extremity caused by nerve root compression. A MLD >1.5 was, however, associated with the probability of an indication for surgical decompression (OR 3, specificity 92 %, PPV 73 %). Asymmetry of the multifidus muscle correlates with neither the severity nor the duration of nerve root compression in the lumbar spine. Severe asymmetry with substantial multifidus atrophy seems associated with the probability of an indication of surgical decompression. (orig.)

  5. Asymmetry of the multifidus muscle in lumbar radicular nerve compression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farshad, Mazda; Gerber, Christian; Farshad-Amacker, Nadja A.; Dietrich, Tobias J.; Laufer-Molnar, Viviane; Min, Kan [Balgrist University Hospital, University of Zuerich, Zuerich (Switzerland)

    2014-01-15

    The multifidus muscle is the only paraspinal lumbar muscle that is innervated by a single nerve root. This study aimes to evaluate if the asymmetry of the multifidus muscle is related to the severity of compression of the nerve root or the duration of radiculopathy. MRI scans of 79 patients with symptomatic single level, unilateral, lumbar radiculopathy were reviewed for this retrospective case series with a nested case-control study. The cross-sectional area (CSA) of the multifidus muscle and the perpendicular distance of the multifidus to the lamina (MLD) were measured bilaterally by two radiologists and set into relation to the severity of nerve compression, duration of radiculopathy and probability of an indication for surgical decompression. In 67 recessal and 12 foraminal symptomatic nerve root compressions, neither the MLD ratio (severe 1.19 ± 0.55 vs less severe nerve compression: 1.12 ± 0.30, p = 0.664) nor the CSA ratio (severe 1 ± 0.16 vs less severe 0.98 ± 0.13, p = 0.577) nor the duration of symptoms significantly correlated with the degree of nerve compression. MR measurements of multifidus were not different in patients with (n = 20) and those without (n = 59) clinical muscle weakness in the extremity caused by nerve root compression. A MLD >1.5 was, however, associated with the probability of an indication for surgical decompression (OR 3, specificity 92 %, PPV 73 %). Asymmetry of the multifidus muscle correlates with neither the severity nor the duration of nerve root compression in the lumbar spine. Severe asymmetry with substantial multifidus atrophy seems associated with the probability of an indication of surgical decompression. (orig.)

  6. Towards the causes of secondary post-traumatic deformations of thoracic and lumbar spine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shulga А.Е.

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the study is to analyze and systematize main causes of secondary spine deformations forming in patients who had operations due to thoracic and lumbar spine damages. Material and Methods. The analysis of poor surgical results of 155 patients previously operated due to various thoracic and lumbar spine damages has been conducted. All patients had complications associated with secondary spinal column deformations at various time after the intervention. Standard investigation included the analysis of patients' complaints, their previous history, somatic, neurological and orthopedic status. Results. The intensity of spinal column deformation was defined due to the character and level of primary trauma structurally characterized predominantly by unstable damages. However as it has been found in this research the main cause of this complicated pathology lied in the number of tactical and technical pitfalls of primary surgical treatment. Conclusion. Surgical operations due to secondary post-traumatic deformations in most cases are laborious and are accompanied by significant surgical trauma therefore systematization and analysis of the main causes of poor results of primary spine surgery may contribute to the preventive treatment of this type of pathology.

  7. Myelopathy hand in cervical radiculopathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The so-called 'myelopathy hand', or characteristic finger paralysis, often recognized in cervical compression myelopathy, has been considered a unique manifestation of cervical myelopathy. We used our original grip and release test, a 15-second test in which finger motion is captured with a digital camera, to investigate whether cervical radiculopathy has the same characteristics as myelopathy hand. Thirty patients with pure radiculopathy, id est (i.e.), who had radiating arm pain and evidence of corresponding nerve root impingement on X-ray images or MRI scans, but did not have spinal cord compression, served as the subjects. In contrast to other radiculopathies, C7 radiculopathy was manifested by a significant reduction in the number of finger motion cycles on the affected side in comparison with the unaffected side, the same as in myelopathy hand. Uncoordinated finger motion was significantly more frequent on the affected side in C6 radiculopathy than on the unaffected side. These findings contradict the conventional notion that myelopathy hand is a unique manifestation of cervical myelopathy, but some radiculopathies manifested the same kinds of finger paralysis observed in myelopathy hand. (author)

  8. Paraplegia by Acute Cervical Disc Protrusion after Lumbar Spine Surgery.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheng-Huan Chen

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available Non-traumatic paraplegia caused by herniation of the cervical intervertebral disc is anuncommon postoperative complication. A patient with claudication and radiculopathy wasscheduled for lumbar laminectomy due to spinal stenosis. Postoperatively, numbness belowT6 was found in his both legs of the patient. MRI showed a protruded intervertebral discbetween C6 and C7. Despite urgent disectomy, the patient's lower extremities remained paralyzedwithout significant improvement for 3 months. Loss of muscle support during generalanesthesia, excessive neck extension during endotracheal intubation and positioning, as wellas bucking and agitation are believed as triggering factors for the protrusion of the cervicaldisc. We suggest that a complete history taking and physical examination be accomplishedin patients scheduled for lumbar spine surgery in order to exclude coexisting cervical spinedisorders. In addition, skillful endotracheal intubation and careful neck positioning aremandatory for patients receiving surgery in the prone position.

  9. Lumbar spondylolysis: a review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leone, Antonio; Magarelli, Nicola; Bonomo, Lorenzo [Dept. of Bioimaging and Radiological Sciences, Catholic Univ., Rome (Italy); Cianfoni, Alessandro [Dept. of Radiology and Radiological Sciences, Medical Univ. of South Carolina, Charleston (United States); Cerase, Alfonso [General Hospital, Unit Neuroimaging and Neurointervention (NINT), Department of Neurosciences, Azienda Ospedaliera Universitaria Senese, Siena (Italy)

    2011-06-15

    Spondylolysis is an osseous defect of the pars interarticularis, thought to be a developmental or acquired stress fracture secondary to chronic low-grade trauma. It is encountered most frequently in adolescents, most commonly involving the lower lumbar spine, with particularly high prevalence among athletes involved in certain sports or activities. Spondylolysis can be asymptomatic or can be a cause of spine instability, back pain, and radiculopathy. The biomechanics and pathophysiology of spondylolysis are complex and debated. Imaging is utilized to detect spondylolysis, distinguish acute and active lesions from chronic inactive non-union, help establish prognosis, guide treatment, and to assess bony healing. Radiography with satisfactory technical quality can often demonstrate a pars defect. Multislice CT with multiplanar reformats is the most accurate modality for detecting the bony defect and may also be used for assessment of osseous healing; however, as with radiographs, it is not sensitive for detection of the early edematous stress response without a fracture line and exposes the patient to ionizing radiation. Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging should be used as the primary investigation for adolescents with back pain and suspected stress reactions of the lumbar pars interarticularis. Several imaging pitfalls render MR imaging less sensitive than CT for directly visualizing the pars defects (regional degenerative changes and sclerosis). Nevertheless, the presence of bone marrow edema on fluid-sensitive images is an important early finding that may suggest stress response without a visible fracture line. Moreover, MR is the imaging modality of choice for identifying associated nerve root compression. Single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) use is limited by a high rate of false-positive and false-negative results and by considerable ionizing radiation exposure. In this article, we provide a review of the current concepts regarding spondylolysis, its

  10. Lumbar spondylolysis: a review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spondylolysis is an osseous defect of the pars interarticularis, thought to be a developmental or acquired stress fracture secondary to chronic low-grade trauma. It is encountered most frequently in adolescents, most commonly involving the lower lumbar spine, with particularly high prevalence among athletes involved in certain sports or activities. Spondylolysis can be asymptomatic or can be a cause of spine instability, back pain, and radiculopathy. The biomechanics and pathophysiology of spondylolysis are complex and debated. Imaging is utilized to detect spondylolysis, distinguish acute and active lesions from chronic inactive non-union, help establish prognosis, guide treatment, and to assess bony healing. Radiography with satisfactory technical quality can often demonstrate a pars defect. Multislice CT with multiplanar reformats is the most accurate modality for detecting the bony defect and may also be used for assessment of osseous healing; however, as with radiographs, it is not sensitive for detection of the early edematous stress response without a fracture line and exposes the patient to ionizing radiation. Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging should be used as the primary investigation for adolescents with back pain and suspected stress reactions of the lumbar pars interarticularis. Several imaging pitfalls render MR imaging less sensitive than CT for directly visualizing the pars defects (regional degenerative changes and sclerosis). Nevertheless, the presence of bone marrow edema on fluid-sensitive images is an important early finding that may suggest stress response without a visible fracture line. Moreover, MR is the imaging modality of choice for identifying associated nerve root compression. Single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) use is limited by a high rate of false-positive and false-negative results and by considerable ionizing radiation exposure. In this article, we provide a review of the current concepts regarding spondylolysis, its

  11. Firearm bullet settling into the lumbar spinal canal without causing neurological deficit: A report of two cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tayfun Hakan

    2016-01-01

    Conclusion: Bullet settling into the lumbar spinal canal without causing neurological deficit may require surgical intervention. Removal of bullets provided not only pain relief in both the cases but also prevented future complications such as migration of the bullets, plumbism, and neuropathic pain and instability.

  12. Lumbar spine spondylolysis in the adult population: using computed tomography to evaluate the possibility of adult onset lumbar spondylosis as a cause of back pain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To determine if new onset of low back pain in adults could be secondary to lumbar spondylolysis by establishing the age-related prevalence in the general population by examining patients undergoing computed tomography (CT) for reasons unrelated to back pain. The records of 2,555 patients who had undergone abdominal and pelvic CT in 2008 were reviewed electronically. In order to determine a true representation of the general population, we reviewed all indications for CT, excluding patients with a primary complaint of low back pain as the primary indication for imaging. Equal numbers of patients were separated into age groups by decade to ensure an even distribution of ages for statistical analysis. Patients older than 70 years were grouped together to provide case numbers comparable to those of the other decades. Logistic regression analysis was performed to evaluate the significance of the results. Three board-certified radiologists, including two musculoskeletal fellows and a radiology resident, retrospectively evaluated CT scans for lumbar spondylolysis, including unilateral and bilateral defects. Of the 2,555 cases evaluated, there were 203 positive cases of defects of the lumbar pars interarticularis. This corresponded to an overall prevalence of 8.0%. Prevalence per decade was fairly evenly distributed and ranged from 7.0%(ages 30-39 years) to 9.2% (ages 70 years and above). Prevalence of ages 20-49 years was 7.9%, and that of ages 50 years and older was 8.0%. Male to female ratio was 1.5:1. Logistic regression showed no significant increase in spondylolysis based on age. No significant increase in the prevalence of lumbar spondylolysis was demonstrated in patients older than 20 years. This suggests that the development of symptomatic lumbar pars defects do not occur in this population and should not be considered as a rare but potentially treatable cause of new onset low back pain in adults. This study demonstrated an overall prevalence of pars defects of 8

  13. Spontaneous Regression of Lumbar Disc Herniation: Report of Two Cases

    OpenAIRE

    Mehmet ŞENOĞLU; Kasım Zafer YÜKSEL; Mürvet YÜKSEL

    2006-01-01

    Spontaneous disc regression is described in lumbar, thoracic, cervical regions and also in various clinical situations. Although, spontaneous regression of lumbar disc herniation is a well defined clinical situation, the exact mechanism has not been adequately clarified yet. Currently , there are some suggested hypotheses. In this study, two cases with the complaint of lumbar radiculopathy and spontaneous regression of the disc herniation during their follow-up period, relevant with their cli...

  14. Electrophysiological Evaluation in Lumbosacral Radiculopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyedeh Simindokht Hosseini

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Prevalence of electrophysiological abnormalities in patients with lumbosacral radiculopathy was evaluated.Methods: A cross-sectional study was performed on 97 consecutive patients with the clinical diagnosis of lumbosacral radiculopathy. Complete neurological examinations and standard electrophysiological evaluation was performed on the patients.Results: Patients under study had the mean age of 46.4 ± 13.1 years (mean ± standard deviation. There were positive MRI findings in 64% of the patients. In 43% L5 root and in 40% S1 root was involved. Abnormal electrophysiological findings were recorded in 82% of the patients. In patients with pretibial muscle weakness, there were significant abnormalities recorded in compound motor action potential (CMAP amplitude of the common peroneal nerve. There was significantly increased frequency of electrophysiological abnormalities in the presence of chronic clinical symptoms (P = 0.001.Conclusion: The 82% positive findings in electrophysiological studies in the diagnosis of lumbosacral radiculopathy make it an efficacious tool in the evaluation of the patients suffering from lumbosacral radiculopathy.

  15. Transforaminal epidural steroid injection for lumbosacral radiculopathy: preganglionic versus conventional approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present study was undertaken to evaluate the effectiveness of transforaminal epidural steroid injection (TFESI) with using a preganglionic approach for treating lumbar radiculopathy when the nerve root compression was located at the level of the supra-adjacent intervertebral disc. The medical records of the patients who received conventional TFESI at our department from June 2003 to May 2004 were retrospectively reviewed. TFESI was performed in a total of 13 cases at the level of the exiting nerve root, in which the nerve root compression was at the level of the supra-adjacent intervertebral disc (the conventional TFESI group). Since June 2004, we have performed TFESI with using a preganglionic approach at the level of the supra-adjacent intervertebral disc (for example, at the neural foramen of L4-5 for L5 nerve root) if the nerve root compression was at the level of the supra-adjacent intervertebral disc. Using the inclusion criteria described above, 20 of these patients were also consecutively enrolled in our study (the preganglionic TFESI group). The treatment outcome was assessed using a 5-point patient satisfaction scale and by using a VAS (visual assessment scale). A successful outcome required a patient satisfaction scale score of 3(very good) or 4 (excellent), and a reduction on the VAS score of > 50% two weeks after performing TFESI. Logistic regression analysis was also performed. Of the 13 patients in the conventional TFESI group, nine showed satisfactory improvement two weeks after TFESI (69.2%). However, in the preganglionic TFESI group, 18 of the 20 patients (90%) showed satisfactory improvement, The difference between the two approaches in terms of TFESI effectiveness was of borderline significance (ρ = 0.056; odds ratio: 10.483). We conclude that preganglionic TFESI has the better therapeutic effect on radiculopathy caused by nerve root compression at the level of the supra-adjacent disc than does conventional TFESI, and the difference between

  16. Transforaminal epidural steroid injection for lumbosacral radiculopathy: preganglionic versus conventional approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Joon Woo; Kim, Sung Hyun; Choi, Ja Young [Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)] (and others)

    2006-06-15

    The present study was undertaken to evaluate the effectiveness of transforaminal epidural steroid injection (TFESI) with using a preganglionic approach for treating lumbar radiculopathy when the nerve root compression was located at the level of the supra-adjacent intervertebral disc. The medical records of the patients who received conventional TFESI at our department from June 2003 to May 2004 were retrospectively reviewed. TFESI was performed in a total of 13 cases at the level of the exiting nerve root, in which the nerve root compression was at the level of the supra-adjacent intervertebral disc (the conventional TFESI group). Since June 2004, we have performed TFESI with using a preganglionic approach at the level of the supra-adjacent intervertebral disc (for example, at the neural foramen of L4-5 for L5 nerve root) if the nerve root compression was at the level of the supra-adjacent intervertebral disc. Using the inclusion criteria described above, 20 of these patients were also consecutively enrolled in our study (the preganglionic TFESI group). The treatment outcome was assessed using a 5-point patient satisfaction scale and by using a VAS (visual assessment scale). A successful outcome required a patient satisfaction scale score of 3(very good) or 4 (excellent), and a reduction on the VAS score of > 50% two weeks after performing TFESI. Logistic regression analysis was also performed. Of the 13 patients in the conventional TFESI group, nine showed satisfactory improvement two weeks after TFESI (69.2%). However, in the preganglionic TFESI group, 18 of the 20 patients (90%) showed satisfactory improvement, The difference between the two approaches in terms of TFESI effectiveness was of borderline significance ({rho} = 0.056; odds ratio: 10.483). We conclude that preganglionic TFESI has the better therapeutic effect on radiculopathy caused by nerve root compression at the level of the supra-adjacent disc than does conventional TFESI, and the difference

  17. Evaluación del impacto funcional e intensidad del dolor antes y después de la inyección de esteroides por vía transforaminal en una muestra preliminar de pacientes con radiculopatía lumbar por hernia de disco Evaluation of functionality and pain intensity before and after a transformial steroid injection in a preliminary sample of patients with lumbar radiculopathy due to a disk hernia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Medel

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Objetivo: Evaluar el grado de mejoría en el estado funcional e intensidad del dolor, en una muestra preliminar de pacientes con radiculopatía compresiva lumbar por hernia de disco a quienes se les realizó una inyección de esteroides por vía transforaminal (ITE bajo guía fluoroscópica. Material y método: Se seleccionaron prospectivamente en el periodo de Octubre a Diciembre del 2006, pacientes con dolor de espalda baja por radiculopatía secundaria a hernia de disco lumbar corroborado por clínica e imagen de resonancia magnética y que presentaran mala respuesta al manejo conservador. Se evaluó la intensidad de dolor por medio de la Escala Visual Análoga (EVA y el índice de funcionalidad mediante el Cuestionario de Oswestry previo al ITE y posterior al mismo a los 7,14 y 30 días en todos los pacientes incluidos. Resultados: Se incluyeron a 14 pacientes; de ellos doce fueron mujeres (87.5% y dos varones (14.3%; con una edad promedio de 62 ± 12.8 (40-84. La intensidad de dolor antes del procedimiento, según la EVA fue de 74.0 ± 17.0. Se observaron diferencias significativas en la intensidad del dolor a los 7 (EVA 46.4 ± 22.4, 14 (EVA 45.0 ± 17.0 y 30 (EVA 46.4 ± 25.9 días después del ITE (p Objective: To evalUate the level of improvement in the functionality and pain intensity in a preliminary sample of patients with compressive lumbar radiculopathology due to disk hernia who received a transforaminal steroid injection (TSI under fluoroscopic guidance. Material and Method: From October to December 2006, patients experiencing back pain due to radiculopathy secondary to a lumbar disk hernia were selected. These diagnoses had to have been corroborated clinically and by a magnetic resonance image. Furthermore, these were patients that responded poorly to conservative management. Pain intensity was evaluated by Visual Analog Scale Analogy (VAS and the functionality by the Oswestry Questionnaire before the TSI and 7, 14 and 30 days

  18. Lumbar percutaneous discectomy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Since November 88, 28 patients with lumbar L5 radiculopathy refractory to conservative care and with a radiologically verified central or mediolateral disc herniation at the level of L4/L5 had had a percutaneous discectomy. A short-term follow-up analysis of at least 2 months taking the clinical and functional status as well as the professional reintegration into account revealed a 64.3% (18/28 patients) satisfactory outcome and a 32.1% (10/28 patients) failure rate. Of the latter 28.6% (8/28 patients) required further open surgery. (orig./GDG)

  19. Rare ligamentum flavum cyst causing incapacitating lumbar spinal stenosis: Experience with 3 Chinese patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheung Kai-Yin

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Three Chinese patients suffered from severe lumbar spinal stenosis with debilitating symptoms due to a rare condition of ligamentum flavum cysts in the midline of the lumbar spine. This disease is distinct from synovial cyst of the facet joints or ganglion cysts, both intraoperatively and histopathologically. Magnetic Resonance imaging features of the ligamentum flavum cyst are also demonstrated. We share our surgical experiences of identification of the ligamentum flavum cysts, decompression and excision for two of the patients with demonstrably good recovery. This disease should be considered in the differential diagnosis of an extradural instraspinal mass in patients with lumbar spinal stenosis.

  20. Lateral Pectoral Nerve Injury Mimicking Cervical Radiculopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aktas, Ilknur; Palamar, Deniz; Akgun, Kenan

    2015-07-01

    The lateral pectoral nerve (LPN) is commonly injured along with the brachial plexus, but its isolated lesions are rare. Here, we present a case of an isolated LPN lesion confused with cervical radiculopathy. A 41-year-old man was admitted to our clinic because of weakness in his right arm. Previous magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) examination revealed right posterolateral protrusion at the C6-7 level. At the initial assessment, atrophy of the right pectoralis major muscle was evident, and mild weakness of the right shoulder adductor, internal rotator, and flexor muscles was observed. Therefore, electrodiagnostic evaluation was performed, and a diagnosis of isolated LPN injury was made. Nerve injury was thought to have been caused by weightlifting exercises and traction injury. Lateral pectoral nerve injury can mimic cervical radiculopathy, and MRI examination alone may lead to misdiagnosis. Repeated physical examinations during the evaluation and treatment phase will identify the muscle atrophy that occurs 1 or more months after the injury. PMID:25290103

  1. Study of the relationship and importance of clinical semiology, axial computed tomography and electroneuromyography in lumbar radioculopathies Estudo da relação e da importância entre a semiologia clínica, tomografia axial computadorizada e eletroneuromiografia nas radiculopatias lombares

    OpenAIRE

    Emílio Cezar Mamede Murade; José Soares Hungria Neto; Osmar Avanzi

    2002-01-01

    The authors evaluated forty-three patients with clinical suspect of lumbar radiculopathy caused by disk hernia, concerning to clinical semiology, computed tomography and electromyography were studied and their correlations. The clinical semiology was altered in 100,0% of the patients, the computed tomography in 90,7% and the electromyography in 88,7%. The correlation among the three exams didn´t show any prevalency among any of the possible associations. The authors emphasize the import...

  2. Spine imaging after lumbar disc replacement: pitfalls and current recommendations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandén Bengt

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Most lumbar artificial discs are still composed of stainless steel alloys, which prevents adequate postoperative diagnostic imaging of the operated region when using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI. Thus patients with postoperative radicular symptoms or claudication after stainless steel implants often require alternative diagnostic procedures. Methods Possible complications of lumbar total disc replacement (TDR are reviewed from the available literature and imaging recommendations given with regard to implant type. Two illustrative cases are presented in figures. Results Access-related complications, infections, implant wear, loosening or fracture, polyethylene inlay dislodgement, facet joint hypertrophy, central stenosis, and ankylosis of the operated segment can be visualised both in titanium and stainless steel implants, but require different imaging modalities due to magnetic artifacts in MRI. Conclusion Alternative radiographic procedures should be considered when evaluating patients following TDR. Postoperative complications following lumbar TDR including spinal stenosis causing radiculopathy and implant loosening can be visualised by myelography and radionucleotide techniques as an adjunct to plain film radiographs. Even in the presence of massive stainless steel TDR implants lumbar radicular stenosis and implant loosening can be visualised if myelography and radionuclide techniques are applied.

  3. Chronic pure radiculopathy in patient with organizing epidural hematoma around C8 nerve root

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Sang-Hyuk; Jeon, Sang-ho; Cho, Jae-lim; Chong, Hung-tae; Kim, Dong-Jun; Kim, Moon-Chan; Eun, Jong-Pil

    2012-01-01

    Spontaneously occurring spinal epidural hematomas are uncommon clinical findings, and the chronic form is the rarest and its most frequent location is the lumbar spine. Pure radicular involvement is far less frequent than myelopathy. We report a case of progressive radiculopathy in a 52-year-old man with spontaneously occurring cervical epidural hematoma (SCEH). The patient had left hand weakness and numbness for 4 months. MRI scan showed small space-occupying lesion around left 8th cervical ...

  4. Lumbar microdiscectomy and lumbar decompression improve functional outcomes and depression scores

    OpenAIRE

    Tharin, Suzanne; Mayer, Eric; Krishnaney, Ajit

    2012-01-01

    Study design:  Retrospective review. Introduction:  Lumbar radiculopathy and claudicant leg pain are common degenerative spinal conditions often treated by elective microdiscectomy or decompression. Published outcome data for these procedures have focused on improvement in pain scores, and not on grounded functional outcome or depression scores.1,2,3 Moreover, depression is considered by many surgeons to be a red flag for poor outcome for surgical treatment. We asked what effect lumbar microd...

  5. Rare ligamentum flavum cyst causing incapacitating lumbar spinal stenosis: Experience with 3 Chinese patients

    OpenAIRE

    Cheung Kai-Yin; Leung Simon; Sieh Koon-Man; Wong Tsz; Chan Alexander; Fung Kwai-Yau

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Three Chinese patients suffered from severe lumbar spinal stenosis with debilitating symptoms due to a rare condition of ligamentum flavum cysts in the midline of the lumbar spine. This disease is distinct from synovial cyst of the facet joints or ganglion cysts, both intraoperatively and histopathologically. Magnetic Resonance imaging features of the ligamentum flavum cyst are also demonstrated. We share our surgical experiences of identification of the ligamentum flavum cysts, deco...

  6. Clinical application of dermatomal somatosensory evoked potential in pre- and post-percutaneous lumbar discectomy in patients with lumbosacral disc herniation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To study the changes of dermatomal somatosensory evoked potential (DSEP) in patients with lumbosacral disc herniation (LDH) before and after percutaneous lumbar discectomy(PLD). Methods: L5 and S1 DSEP was recorded from 31 patients with radiculopathy caused by LDH before and after PLD. Results: The DSEP from L5 and/or S1 dermatomes was abnormal in 28 cases (90.3%) before PLD and in only 5 cases (16.1%) after PLD. The abnormality of DSEP from L5 dermatome was detected mainly in patients with L4-5 LDH, and the abnormality of DSEP from S1 dermatome was demonstrated mainly in patients with L5-S1 LDH. Conclusion: The DSEP from L5 and S1 dermatomes was a sensitive method to diagnose the radiculopathy caused by LDH, and it was helpful in evaluating the effect of the PLD

  7. Treatment of radiculopathies: a study of efficacy and tollerability of paravertebral oxygen-ozone injections compared with pharmacological anti-inflammatory treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melchionda, D; Milillo, P; Manente, G; Stoppino, L; Macarini, L

    2012-01-01

    The study was performed to evaluate the effectiveness of lumbar paravertebral injections of a gas mixture of Oxygen and Ozone in patients with lumbar radiculopathies caused by L4-L5 or L5-S1 disk herniations compared to a pharmacological therapy based on non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. Lumbar radiculopathy caused by disc herniation is widely spread. Many therapeutic options are available before steering patients to the surgery. Low back pain and sciatica represent some of the most frequent causes of antinflammatory-analgesic drugs overuse. Recent findings have shown that medical Ozone can be used in the treatment of radicular syndrome caused by herniated intervertebral discs. Although widely spread, there are insufficient published data supporting the effectiveness of this approach in clinical practice. We studied 38 affected patients with acute L5 or S1 radicolopathy. The patients were randomly divided in two groups: A) 20 patients treated with lumbar paravertebral injections of Oxygen and Ozone; B) 18 patients treated pharmacologically with antinflammatory-analgesic drugs. All patients underwent a clinical and neurological examination at baseline (T1) and after 1 (T2), 2 (T3), 4 weeks (T4) and after 3 (T5) and 6 months (T6). An MRI and EMG examination were performed at baseline and after 6 months. The intensity of pain and the outcome of treatments were evaluated in all patients with the Visual Analogue Scale and with the Oswestry Disability Index. We found a reduction of pain and discomfort soon after one week with oxygen-ozone injections compared with pharmacological treatment, but this difference of response became statistically significant after two weeks (50 percent vs 16.6 percent) and is confirmed after 3 and 6 months, when 80 percent of patients treated with injections turned out pain free compared with half of the patients treated pharmacologically. No statistical difference were found in MRI and EMG examinations. No adverse effects were found in

  8. Paraplegia caused by giant intradural herniation of a lumbar disk after combined spinal-epidural anesthesia in total hip arthroplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawai, Toshiyuki; Nakahira, Junko; Minami, Toshiaki

    2016-08-01

    Total paraplegia after epidural or spinal anesthesia is extremely rare. We herein report a case of total paraplegia caused by a giant intradural herniation of a lumbar disk at the L3-L4 level after total hip arthroplasty for coxarthrosis. The patient had no preoperative neurologic abnormalities. Intraoperative anesthetic management involved combined spinal-epidural anesthesia at the L3-L4 level with continuous intravenous propofol administration. Postoperatively, the patient complained of numbness and total paraplegia of the lower extremities. Magnetic resonance imaging showed a giant herniation of a lumbar disk compressing the spinal cord at the L3-L4 level. The intradural herniation was surgically treated, and the patient's symptoms completely resolved. PMID:27290969

  9. EFFICACY OF TRANSFORAMINAL EPIDURAL STEROID INJECTION IN LUMBOSACRAL RADICULOPATHY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saheel

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Lumbosacral radiculopathy is a common medical and socioeconomic problem with a lifetime prevalence estimated to be around 40%-60%. In 1930, Evans reported that sciatica could be treated by epidural injection. The use of epidural corticosteroid injection for the treatment of axial and radicular back pain was first reported in 1953. Lumbar Transforminal Epidural Steroid Injections (TFESIs are performed to provide symptomatic relief in patients with radicular pain. A transforaminal epidural steroid injection (TFESI using a small volume of local anaesthetic will anaesthetize the spinal nerve and also partially anaesthetize the dura, the posterior longitudinal ligament, the intervertebral disc and facet joint. For these reasons, fluoroscopy-guided TFESI has become the preferred approach to epidural space. AIMS AND OBJECTIVES To study the role of transforaminal epidural steroid injection in management of radiculopathy. SETTINGS AND DESIGN This prospective study was conducted in the Department of Orthopaedics, SKIMS Medical College and Hospital, Bemina, Srinagar, J and K, India, for a 2-year period from November 2012 to October 2014; 110 cases, both male and female in the age group of 20-60 years having back pain with radiculopathy of varied types and duration without neurodeficit were enrolled in the study. MATERIALS AND METHODS After selecting a patient for giving transforaminal block, we used a local anaesthetic (2% Xylocaine. Contrast media, e.g. Iohexol was used to demarcate the correct positioning of the needle. A spinal needle (20-25 gauge and 5mL syringe were used to deliver the drug. CONCLUSION Transforaminal epidural steroid injections with long acting anaesthetic is an excellent form of conservative treatment in management of low back ache with radicular pain. It is relatively safe, simple, economical and shortens the time of recovery from severe pain, avoids risks and complications of surgery and also avoids long periods of bed

  10. Topacheous gout as a rare cause of spinal stenosis in the lumbar region. Case report.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Kelly, Joseph

    2012-02-03

    Despite the fact that gout is a common metabolic disorder, because its involvement of the axial skeleton is rare the diagnosis is often delayed, even in patients with long-standing gout who present with neurological deficits. The authors report the case of a woman with a history of extensive gout, emphasizing the clinical, radiological, and pathological features of a lumbar spinal stenosis.

  11. Cervical Radiculopathy (Pinched Nerve)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the seven small vertebrae that form the neck. Spinal nerve root. AAOS does not endorse any treatments, procedures, ... whether your symptoms are caused by pressure on spinal nerve roots and nerve damage or by another condition ...

  12. Focal neuromyotonia as a presenting feature of lumbosacral radiculopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tushar Premraj Raut

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Neuromyotonia is characterized by motor, sensory, and autonomic features along with characteristic electrophysiologic findings, resulting from hyperexcitability of the peripheral nerves. We describe the case of a 36-year-old man, who presented with the disabling symptoms suggestive of focal neuromyotonia involving both the lower limbs. His neurological examination revealed continuous rippling of both the calf muscles with normal power, reflexes, and sensory examination. Electrophysiology revealed spontaneous activity in the form of doublets, triplets, and neuromyotonic discharges along with the neurogenic motor unit potentials in bilateral L5, S1 innervated muscles. Magnetic resonance imaging lumbosacral spine revealed lumbar intervertebral disc protrusion with severe foraminal and spinal canal stenosis. Patient had good response to steroids and carbamazepine. The disabling focal neuromyotonia, occurring as a result of chronic active radiculopathy, brought the patient to medical attention. Patient responded to medical management.

  13. Nonoperative Management of Cervical Radiculopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Childress, Marc A; Becker, Blair A

    2016-05-01

    Cervical radiculopathy describes pain in one or both of the upper extremities, often in the setting of neck pain, secondary to compression or irritation of nerve roots in the cervical spine. It can be accompanied by motor, sensory, or reflex deficits and is most prevalent in persons 50 to 54 years of age. Cervical radiculopathy most often stems from degenerative disease in the cervical spine. The most common examination findings are painful neck movements and muscle spasm. Diminished deep tendon reflexes, particularly of the triceps, are the most common neurologic finding. The Spurling test, shoulder abduction test, and upper limb tension test can be used to confirm the diagnosis. Imaging is not required unless there is a history of trauma, persistent symptoms, or red flags for malignancy, myelopathy, or abscess. Electrodiagnostic testing is not needed if the diagnosis is clear, but has clinical utility when peripheral neuropathy of the upper extremity is a likely alternate diagnosis. Patients should be reassured that most cases will resolve regardless of the type of treatment. Nonoperative treatment includes physical therapy involving strengthening, stretching, and potentially traction, as well as nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, muscle relaxants, and massage. Epidural steroid injections may be helpful but have higher risks of serious complications. In patients with red flag symptoms or persistent symptoms after four to six weeks of treatment, magnetic resonance imaging can identify pathology amenable to epidural steroid injections or surgery. PMID:27175952

  14. Ventricular Pneumocephalus with Meningitis after Lumbar Nerve Root Block

    OpenAIRE

    Shin Ahn; Young Sang Ko; Kyung Soo Lim

    2013-01-01

    Lumbar nerve root block is a common modality used in the management of radiculopathy. Its complications are rare and usually minor. Despite its low morbidity, significant acute events can occur. Pneumocephalus is an accumulation of air in the intracranial space. It indicates a violation of the dura or the presence of infection. The object of this report is to describe the case of a patient with intraventricular pneumocephalus and bacterial meningitis after lumbar nerve root block. A 70-year-o...

  15. Lumbar multifidus muscle changes in unilateral lumbar disc herniation using magnetic resonance imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Altinkaya, Naime [Baskent University Medical School, Department of Radiology, Adana (Turkey); Cekinmez, Melih [Baskent University Medical School Adana, Department of Neurosurgery, Adana (Turkey)

    2016-01-15

    To assess multifidus muscle asymmetry using the cross-sectional area (CSA) and perpendicular distance of the multifidus muscle to the lamina (MLD) measurements in patients with nerve compression due to lumbosacral disc hernia. In total, 122 patients who underwent microdiscectomy for unilateral radiculopathy caused by disc herniation, diagnosed by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), were evaluated retrospectively. Posterolateral or foraminal disc herniation at only one disc level, the L3-4, L4-L5, or L5-S1 region, was confirmed using MRI. Subjects were divided by symptom duration: 1-30 days, (group A), 31-90 days (group B), and > 90 days (group C). There were 48 cases in group A, 26 in group B, and 48 in group C. In groups A, B, and C, the median MLD differed significantly between the diseased and normal sides (P < 0.05). The MLD increased on the diseased side with symptom duration by lumbar disc herniation. The diseased side MLD was 5.1, 6.7, and 7.6 mm in groups A, B, and C, respectively (P < 0.05). The cut-off values for the MLD measurements were 5.3 mm (sensitivity = 62.3 %, specificity = 55.5 %; P < 0.05). In groups A, B, and C, the median CSA of the multifidus muscle was not significantly different between the diseased and the normal side (P > 0.05). The MLD measurement correlated significantly with multifidus asymmetry in patients with lumbar disc herniation. (orig.)

  16. Lumbar multifidus muscle changes in unilateral lumbar disc herniation using magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To assess multifidus muscle asymmetry using the cross-sectional area (CSA) and perpendicular distance of the multifidus muscle to the lamina (MLD) measurements in patients with nerve compression due to lumbosacral disc hernia. In total, 122 patients who underwent microdiscectomy for unilateral radiculopathy caused by disc herniation, diagnosed by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), were evaluated retrospectively. Posterolateral or foraminal disc herniation at only one disc level, the L3-4, L4-L5, or L5-S1 region, was confirmed using MRI. Subjects were divided by symptom duration: 1-30 days, (group A), 31-90 days (group B), and > 90 days (group C). There were 48 cases in group A, 26 in group B, and 48 in group C. In groups A, B, and C, the median MLD differed significantly between the diseased and normal sides (P < 0.05). The MLD increased on the diseased side with symptom duration by lumbar disc herniation. The diseased side MLD was 5.1, 6.7, and 7.6 mm in groups A, B, and C, respectively (P < 0.05). The cut-off values for the MLD measurements were 5.3 mm (sensitivity = 62.3 %, specificity = 55.5 %; P < 0.05). In groups A, B, and C, the median CSA of the multifidus muscle was not significantly different between the diseased and the normal side (P > 0.05). The MLD measurement correlated significantly with multifidus asymmetry in patients with lumbar disc herniation. (orig.)

  17. Lumbosacral radiculopathy, reflex sympathetic dystrophy and tarsal tunnel syndrome: an unusual presentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chodoroff, B; Ball, R D

    1985-03-01

    This case documents a patient with lumbosacral radiculopathy, reflex sympathetic dystrophy, and tarsal tunnel syndrome affecting one extremity. After lumbar laminectomy for L5-S1 radiculopathy, the patient developed foot pain diagnosed as secondary to reflex sympathetic dystrophy. Because of increasing foot pain despite long-term conservative therapy, the patient underwent further evaluation, including electrodiagnostic studies leading to the diagnosis of a superimposed tarsal tunnel syndrome. Following surgical decompression, pain decreased. Because of the unusual presentation, diagnosis and treatment of the tarsal tunnel syndrome was significantly delayed. To help understand the coexistence of these conditions, interrelating pathophysiologic mechanisms have been postulated, including the possibility that a "double-crush" phenomenon may have contributed to the development of tarsal tunnel syndrome. Earlier diagnosis and definitive treatment of the foot pain may have been possible had these mechanisms been better understood. PMID:2983640

  18. A Diagnostic Algorithm for Eosinophilic Granulomatosis with Polyangiitis Initially Diagnosed as Lumbar Disc Hernia or Lumbar Spinal Stenosis: Personal Experience and Review of the Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagata, Kosei; Yamamoto, Shinichi; Miyoshi, Kota; Sato, Masaki; Arino, Yusuke; Mikami, Yoji

    2016-08-01

    Eosinophilic granulomatosis with polyangiitis (EGPA, Churg-Strauss syndrome) is a rare systemic vasculitis and is difficult to diagnose. EGPA has a number of symptoms including peripheral dysesthesia caused by mononeuropathy multiplex, which is similar to radiculopathy due to lumbar disc hernia or lumbar spinal stenosis. Therefore, EGPA patients with mononeuropathy multiplex often visit orthopedic clinics, but orthopedic doctors and spine neurosurgeons have limited experience in diagnosing EGPA because of its rarity. We report a consecutive series of patients who were initially diagnosed as having lumbar disc hernia or lumbar spinal stenosis by at least 2 medical institutions from March 2006 to April 2013 but whose final diagnosis was EGPA. All patients had past histories of asthma or eosinophilic pneumonia, and four out of five had peripheral edema. Laboratory data showed abnormally increased eosinophil counts, and nerve conduction studies of all patients revealed axonal damage patterns. All patients recovered from paralysis to a functional level after high-dose steroid treatment. We shortened the duration of diagnosis from 49 days to one day by adopting a diagnostic algorithm after experiencing the first case. PMID:27549670

  19. Interobserver agreement on MRI evaluation of patients with cervical radiculopathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aim: To evaluate the interobserver agreement on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) evaluation of herniated discs, spondylotic neuroforaminal stenosis, and root compression in patients with recent onset cervical radiculopathy and in addition, to assess the added value of disclosure of clinical information to interobserver agreement. Materials and methods: The MRI images of 82 patients with less than 1 month of symptoms and signs of cervical radiculopathy were evaluated independently by two neuroradiologists who were unaware of clinical findings. MRI analysis was repeated after disclosure of clinical information. Interobserver agreement was calculated using kappa statistics. Results: The kappa score for evaluation of herniated discs and of spondylotic foramen stenosis was 0.59 and 0.63, respectively. A kappa score of 0.67 was found for the presence of root compression. After disclosure of clinical information kappa scores increased slightly: from 0.59 to 0.62 for the detection of herniated discs, from 0.63 to 0.66 for spondylotic foramen stenosis, and from 0.67 to 0.76 for root compression. Conclusion: Interobserver reliability of MRI evaluation in patients with cervical radiculopathy was substantial for root compression, with or without clinical information. Agreement on the cause of the compression, i.e., herniated disc or spondylotic foraminal stenosis, was lower.

  20. Interobserver agreement on MRI evaluation of patients with cervical radiculopathy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuijper, B., E-mail: kuijperb@maasstadziekenhuis.n [Department of Neurology, Medical Centre Haaglanden, The Hague (Netherlands); Department of Neurology, Maasstad Hospital, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Beelen, A. [Department of Rehabilitation, Academic Medical Centre, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Kallen, B.F. van der [Department of Neurology, Medical Centre Haaglanden, The Hague (Netherlands); Department of Radiology, Medical Centre Haaglanden, The Hague (Netherlands); Nollet, F. [Department of Rehabilitation, Academic Medical Centre, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Lycklama a Nijeholt, G.J. [Department of Neurology, Medical Centre Haaglanden, The Hague (Netherlands); Department of Radiology, Medical Centre Haaglanden, The Hague (Netherlands); Visser, M. de [Department of Neurology, Academic Medical Centre, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Tans, J. Th.J. [Department of Neurology, Medical Centre Haaglanden, The Hague (Netherlands)

    2011-01-15

    Aim: To evaluate the interobserver agreement on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) evaluation of herniated discs, spondylotic neuroforaminal stenosis, and root compression in patients with recent onset cervical radiculopathy and in addition, to assess the added value of disclosure of clinical information to interobserver agreement. Materials and methods: The MRI images of 82 patients with less than 1 month of symptoms and signs of cervical radiculopathy were evaluated independently by two neuroradiologists who were unaware of clinical findings. MRI analysis was repeated after disclosure of clinical information. Interobserver agreement was calculated using kappa statistics. Results: The kappa score for evaluation of herniated discs and of spondylotic foramen stenosis was 0.59 and 0.63, respectively. A kappa score of 0.67 was found for the presence of root compression. After disclosure of clinical information kappa scores increased slightly: from 0.59 to 0.62 for the detection of herniated discs, from 0.63 to 0.66 for spondylotic foramen stenosis, and from 0.67 to 0.76 for root compression. Conclusion: Interobserver reliability of MRI evaluation in patients with cervical radiculopathy was substantial for root compression, with or without clinical information. Agreement on the cause of the compression, i.e., herniated disc or spondylotic foraminal stenosis, was lower.

  1. Impact of timing on surgical outcome in patients with cauda equina syndrome caused by lumbar disc herniation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bečulić, Hakija; Skomorac, Rasim; Jusić, Aldin; Alić, Fahrudin; Imamović, Melica; Mekić-Abazović, Alma; Efendić, Alma; Brkić, Harun; Denjalić, Amir

    2016-08-01

    Aim To analyze the relationship between timing of surgery and outcome in patients with cauda equina syndrome caused by lumbar disc herniation. Methods A retrospective, non-randomized clinical study included 25 consecutive patients with cauda equina syndrome (CES) caused by lumbar disc herniation. All patients were operated within 24 hours after hospitalization at the Department of Neurosurgery, Cantonal Hospital Zenica, Bosnia and Herzegovina, between January 2000 and December 2010. All patients were evaluated before surgery on the basis of complete history, neurological examination and neuroimaging evaluations using CT (computed tomography)and MRI (magnetic resonance imaging). Results Statistically significant difference between preoperative and postoperative bladder (p=0.05) and bowel (p=0.05) function was found. A significant number of patients had bladder and bowel recovery after surgery, nine (36%) and 11 (44%), respectively. Significant recovery of muscle strength was noted with complete recovery(5/5) in 12 (48%) and partial recovery in 13 (52%) patients. Complete sensory recovery was noted in 16 (64%), incomplete in four (16%), and in five (20%) patients there were no changes. Most commonly, patients with complete sensory recovery were operated within 48 hours of symptom onset. In most patients early surgery was associated with better outcome. Conclusion This research showed that early decompression correlated with better outcome. Patients with cauda equina syndrome must be cleared for surgery in optimal conditions and, if it possible within optimal timing for recovery (within 48 hours). PMID:27452326

  2. Septic arthritis in a lumbar facet joint: a rare cause of an epidural abscess

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A 10-year-old boy presented with a 7-day history of back pain and pyrexia. MRI showed an epidural abscess arising from septic arthritis in a lumbar facet joint. To our knowledge, there are only two previously reported cases of septic arthritis of a facet joint leading to an epidural abscess. This case illustrates how infection in a synovial joint may extend into the extradural space and might be the route of infection in more cases than has previously been recognised. (orig.)

  3. [Renal angiomyolipoma rupture as a cause of lumbar pain: report of one case].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cifuentes, Melissa; Calleja, Félix; Hola, José; Daviú, Antonio; Jara, Danilo; Vallejos, Humberto

    2008-08-01

    Renal angiomyolipoma is a benign tumor formed by smooth muscle, adipose tissue and blood vessels. It is commonly found incidentally and its clinical manifestations are pain and abdominal mass or spontaneous tumor rupture with retroperitoneal bleeding. The clinical presentation of a hemorrhagic shock secondary to a retroperitoneal hematoma is uncommon. We report a 40 year-old male who presented to the emergency room with lumbar pain and deterioration of hemodynamic parameters. The CT scan showed a left renal injury associated to an expansive retroperitoneal process. The abdominal exploration, vascular control of the renal pedicle and nephrectomy allowed a successful outcome. PMID:18949188

  4. Septic arthritis in a lumbar facet joint: a rare cause of an epidural abscess

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heenan, S.D. [Dept. of Neuroradiology, Atkinson Morley`s Hospital, London (United Kingdom); Britton, J. [Dept. of Neuroradiology, Atkinson Morley`s Hospital, London (United Kingdom)

    1995-08-01

    A 10-year-old boy presented with a 7-day history of back pain and pyrexia. MRI showed an epidural abscess arising from septic arthritis in a lumbar facet joint. To our knowledge, there are only two previously reported cases of septic arthritis of a facet joint leading to an epidural abscess. This case illustrates how infection in a synovial joint may extend into the extradural space and might be the route of infection in more cases than has previously been recognised. (orig.)

  5. Outpatient Treatment of Lumbar Disc Sciatica

    OpenAIRE

    Swezey, Robert L.; Crittenden, James O.; Swezey, Annette M.

    1986-01-01

    Of 47 patients with lumbar disc disease and sciatic radiculopathy (L-5 or S-1), 39 were successfully managed at home and as outpatients in an ambulatory care facility designed for the treatment of arthritis and back pain. When these patients were evaluated one to three years following discharge, they maintained their maximum level of activity and functional improvement noted at discharge. The average total cost per patient including physician's fees, x-rays, laboratory and therapy was approxi...

  6. Frequencies of different peripheral nervous system pathologies among Cases of Lumbar Radicular Pain using Electrodiagnostic Studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: to discover the spectrum of diagnoses on nerve conduction studies/ Electromyography in patients with lumbar radicular pain, test preponderance of the commonest pathology and correlate commonest pathology with age > 50 years, gender and unilateral involvement. Study design: A descriptive cross-sectional study of 539 patients. Place and Duration of the study: the department of Electrodiagnostic studies, Armed Forces Institute of Rehabilitation Medicine, Rawalpindi from January 2012 to December 2012. Material and methods: using non-probability consecutive sampling 539 patients referred with complaints of lumbar radicular pain were subjected to electrodiagnostic evaluation for presence of lumbosacral radiculopathy, polyneuropathy, sciatic nerve injury or a combination of these. The preponderance of commonest pathology was tested statistically. The frequencies were then related statistically to age > 50 years, gender and unilateral or bilateral involvement. Result: A total of 539 patients (age:18-85 years) were registered. 355 (66% ) were males and 261 (48.4%) patients were > 50 years. Nerve conduction studies/Electromyography findings were abnormal in 386 (77.6%) patients. The commonest diagnosis was lumbosacral radiculopathy in 65% followed by polyneuropathy with superimposed lumbosacral radiculopathy in 7%. The preponderance of lumbosacral radiculopathy was statistically found significant (p50 years. Conclusion: Lumbosacral radiculopathy is highly expected to be found on nerve conduction studies /electromyography in patients who present with lumbar radicular pain. The lumbosacral radiculopathy is more common in individuals of age 50 years and above. (author)

  7. Microdiscectomy for a Paracentral Lumbar Herniated Disk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millhouse, Paul W; Schroeder, Gregory D; Kurd, Mark F; Kepler, Christopher K; Vaccaro, Alexander R; Savage, Jason W

    2016-02-01

    Lumbar disk herniations occur frequently and are often associated with leg pain, weakness, and paresthesias. Fortunately, the natural outcomes of radiculopathy due to a disk herniation are generally favorable, and the vast majority of patients improve with nonoperative care. Surgical intervention is reserved for patients who have significant pain that is refractory to at least 6 weeks of conservative care, patients who have a severe or progressive motor deficit, or patients who have any symptoms of bowel or bladder dysfunction. This paper reviews the preoperative and postoperative considerations, as well as the surgical technique, for a microdiscectomy for a lumbar intervertebral disk herniation. PMID:26710186

  8. Posterior Lumbar Subcutaneous Edema on Spine Magnetic Resonance Images: What Is the Cause?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, Ga Jin; Lee, In Sook; Han, In Ho; Lee, Jung Sub [Pusan National University Hospital, Pusan National University School of Medicine, Busan (Korea, Republic of); Moon, Tae Yong [Dept. of Radiology, Pusan National University Yangsan Hospital, Yangsan (Korea, Republic of); Song, Jong Woon [Dept. of Radiology, Inje University Haeundae Paik Hospital, Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-04-15

    Posterior lumbar subcutaneous (PLS) edema on spine magnetic resonance (MR) images is a common incidental, though neglected finding. This study was undertaken to investigate the relations between PLS edema and pathologic conditions. Between January and December 2009, 138 patients with PLS edema, but without a spinal tumor or a history of recent surgery or trauma, and 80 infectious spondylitis patients without PLS edema were enrolled in this retrospective study. Available medical records and lumbar spine MR images were evaluated. The degree of edema was quantified using an arbitrary scoring system. Further, the correlations between the degree of edema and age, sex, body mass index (BMI), degeneration of posterior spinal structures (PSS) and infectious spondylitis were analyzed. Of the 93 cases with a calculable BMI, 61 (66%) had a BMI of > 23 kg/m2. Correlations between the degree of edema and sex, age and BMI grade were all statistically non-significant. Thirty-three cases (24%) had an underlying disease, such as heart problem, diabetes mellitus, liver cirrhosis, chronic renal failure, extra-spinal tumor or connective tissue disorder. The numbers of cases with infectious spondylitis and an idiopathic condition was 61 (44%) and 44 (32%), respectively. The grade of infectious spondylitis was not found to be significantly associated with the degree of edema (p = 0.084). In cases with an idiopathic condition, the correlation between the degree of edema and PSS degeneration was statistically significant (p = 0.042). Radiologists should not disregard PLS edema, because it is related to an underlying disease and thus may be of clinical significance.

  9. Posterior Lumbar Subcutaneous Edema on Spine Magnetic Resonance Images: What Is the Cause?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Posterior lumbar subcutaneous (PLS) edema on spine magnetic resonance (MR) images is a common incidental, though neglected finding. This study was undertaken to investigate the relations between PLS edema and pathologic conditions. Between January and December 2009, 138 patients with PLS edema, but without a spinal tumor or a history of recent surgery or trauma, and 80 infectious spondylitis patients without PLS edema were enrolled in this retrospective study. Available medical records and lumbar spine MR images were evaluated. The degree of edema was quantified using an arbitrary scoring system. Further, the correlations between the degree of edema and age, sex, body mass index (BMI), degeneration of posterior spinal structures (PSS) and infectious spondylitis were analyzed. Of the 93 cases with a calculable BMI, 61 (66%) had a BMI of > 23 kg/m2. Correlations between the degree of edema and sex, age and BMI grade were all statistically non-significant. Thirty-three cases (24%) had an underlying disease, such as heart problem, diabetes mellitus, liver cirrhosis, chronic renal failure, extra-spinal tumor or connective tissue disorder. The numbers of cases with infectious spondylitis and an idiopathic condition was 61 (44%) and 44 (32%), respectively. The grade of infectious spondylitis was not found to be significantly associated with the degree of edema (p = 0.084). In cases with an idiopathic condition, the correlation between the degree of edema and PSS degeneration was statistically significant (p = 0.042). Radiologists should not disregard PLS edema, because it is related to an underlying disease and thus may be of clinical significance.

  10. Estudo clínico da eficácia do bloqueio anestésico radicular transforaminal no tratamento da radiculopatia lombar Estudio clínico de la eficacia del bloqueo anestésico radicular transforaminal en el tratamiento de la radiculopatía lumbar Clinical study on the efficacy of transforaminal radicular block in lumbar radiculopathy treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabiano Fonseca Rodrigues de Souza

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: O objetivo deste estudo é avaliar a eficácia da injeção transforaminal nos pacientes com dor radicular devido à hérnia de disco ou estenose foraminal lombar por meio de estudo prospectivo randomizado. MÉTODOS: Foram avaliados 61 pacientes com quadro de radiculopatia nos membros inferiores. Esses pacientes foram divididos em dois grupos escolhidos aleatoriamente. Desses, 32 foram submetidos à injeção de corticosteroides e 29 foram submetidos à injeção salina. O período de acompanhamento foi de 12 meses. Para avaliar os resultados aplicamos a Escala Analógica Visual de Dor (EAV e o Índice Oswestry (ODI. RESULTADOS: Houve melhora significativa da intensidade de dor (p OBJETIVO: El presente estudio tuvo como objetivo evaluar la eficacia de la inyección transforaminal en pacientes con dolor radicular, debido a la hernia discal lumbar o estenosis foraminal, mediante un estudio prospectivo y aleatorizado. MÉTODOS: Se analizó un total de 61 pacientes con cuadro de radiculopatía en miembros inferiores. Estos pacientes fueron divididos en dos grupos seleccionados al azar. De ellos, 31 fueron sometidos a inyecciones de corticoides y a 29 se les aplicaron inyecciones de suero fisiológico. El período de seguimiento fue de 12 meses. Para evaluar los resultados se les aplicó la Escala Visual Analógica del dolor (EAV y el Índice de Oswestry (ODI, sigla en inglés. RESULTADOS: Hubo una mejora significativa en la intensidad del dolor (p OBJECTIVE: To assess the efficacy of corticosteroid injections in patients with sciatica due to lumbar disc herniation or lumbar foraminal stenosis by a prospective randomized study. METHODS: There were analyzed 61 patients with sciatica due to lumbar disc degeneration. These patients were divided into two groups randomly chosen to radicular blocks with saline solution or corticosteroids. Thirty-one of these patients were submitted to corticosteroids radicular block and 29 patients were submitted

  11. Strangulated or incarcerated spontaneous lumbar hernia as exceptional cause of intestinal obstruction: case report and review of the literature

    OpenAIRE

    Fokou, Marcus; Fotso, Patrick; Ngowe Ngowe, Marcelin; Essomba, Arthur; Sosso, Maurice

    2014-01-01

    Lumbar hernias are rare conditions and about 300 cases have been reported since the first description by Barbette in 1672. Therefore strangulation or incarceration are also exceptionally encountered. We present a 62 -year-old-man who had strangulated left lumbar hernia and consequent mechanical small-bowel obstruction, alongside with a non strangulated right lumbar hernia. Through a median laparotomy, an intestinal necrosis was found. A bowel resection with end to end anastomosis was performe...

  12. Lumbar intraforaminal synovial cyst in young adulthood: case report and review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalevski, Svetoslav K; Haritonov, Dimitar Georgiev; Peev, Nikolay Angelov

    2014-08-01

    Study Design Case report. Objective Lumbar juxtafacet cysts (synovial and ganglion cysts) are a rare cause of low back and radicular leg pain. Most patients with lumbar cysts are in their sixth decade of life and have significant facet joint and disk degeneration. Lumbar synovial cysts (LSCs) are extremely rare in adolescence and young adulthood, and to our knowledge, only two pediatric cases of LSC have been reported in the literature. We aim to prove the existence of LSC in adolescent patients as a real entity that causes low back and radicular complaints and to discuss the possibility of traumatic injury as a pathogenic cause of LSC formation in adolescence. A case of an 18-year old patient with LSC is presented. We report the clinical presentation, management, outcome, and review of the literature, focusing on issues that remain debatable. Methods The case is presented together with its clinical course, the diagnostic techniques, the surgical findings, histologic results, and the treatment outcome. Results After surgical treatment, the patient's complaints were alleviated and almost no complaints were registered during the next 6 months' follow-up. Conclusions LSCs are extremely rare in adolescence, but they could be considered in the differential diagnosis in adolescent patients with low back pain and radiculopathy. Surgical removal of LSC could be considered as a treatment option to provide immediate and safe symptomatic relief. PMID:25083362

  13. Cervical interlaminar epidural steroid injection for unilateral cervical radiculopathy: Comparison of midline and paramedian approaches for efficacy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoon, Ji Young; Kwon, Jong Won; Yoon, Young Cheol [Dept. of Radiology and Center for Imaging Science, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Jong Seok [School of Business Administration, Hallym University, Chuncheon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-06-15

    The objective of this study was to compare the clinical outcomes of the cervical interlaminar epidural steroid injection (CIESI) for unilateral radiculopathy by the midline or paramedian approaches and to determine the prognostic factors of CIESI. We retrospectively analyzed 182 patients who underwent CIESI from January 2009 to December 2012. Inclusion criteria were no previous spinal steroid injection, presence of a cross-sectional image, and presence of follow-up records. Exclusion criteria were patients with bilateral cervical radiculopathy and/or dominant cervical axial pain, combined peripheral neuropathy, and previous cervical spine surgery. Short-term clinical outcomes were evaluated at the first follow-up after CIESI. We compared the clinical outcomes between the midline and paramedian approaches. Possible prognostic factors for the outcome, such as age, gender, duration of radiculopathy, and cause of radiculopathy were also analyzed. Cervical interlaminar epidural steroid injections were effective in 124 of 182 patients (68.1%) at the first follow-up. There was no significant difference in the clinical outcomes of CIESI, between midline (69.6%) and paramedian (63.7%) approaches (p = 0.723). Cause of radiculopathy was the only significant factor affecting the efficacy of CIESI. Patients with disc herniation had significantly better results than patients with neural foraminal stenosis (82.9% vs. 56.0%) (p < 0.001). There is no significant difference in treatment efficacy between the midline and paramedian approaches in CIESI, for unilateral radiculopathy. The cause of the radiculopathy is significantly associated with the treatment efficacy; patients with disc herniation experience better pain relief than those with neural foraminal stenosis.

  14. Cervical interlaminar epidural steroid injection for unilateral cervical radiculopathy: Comparison of midline and paramedian approaches for efficacy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objective of this study was to compare the clinical outcomes of the cervical interlaminar epidural steroid injection (CIESI) for unilateral radiculopathy by the midline or paramedian approaches and to determine the prognostic factors of CIESI. We retrospectively analyzed 182 patients who underwent CIESI from January 2009 to December 2012. Inclusion criteria were no previous spinal steroid injection, presence of a cross-sectional image, and presence of follow-up records. Exclusion criteria were patients with bilateral cervical radiculopathy and/or dominant cervical axial pain, combined peripheral neuropathy, and previous cervical spine surgery. Short-term clinical outcomes were evaluated at the first follow-up after CIESI. We compared the clinical outcomes between the midline and paramedian approaches. Possible prognostic factors for the outcome, such as age, gender, duration of radiculopathy, and cause of radiculopathy were also analyzed. Cervical interlaminar epidural steroid injections were effective in 124 of 182 patients (68.1%) at the first follow-up. There was no significant difference in the clinical outcomes of CIESI, between midline (69.6%) and paramedian (63.7%) approaches (p = 0.723). Cause of radiculopathy was the only significant factor affecting the efficacy of CIESI. Patients with disc herniation had significantly better results than patients with neural foraminal stenosis (82.9% vs. 56.0%) (p < 0.001). There is no significant difference in treatment efficacy between the midline and paramedian approaches in CIESI, for unilateral radiculopathy. The cause of the radiculopathy is significantly associated with the treatment efficacy; patients with disc herniation experience better pain relief than those with neural foraminal stenosis.

  15. Iatrogenic neurologic deficit after lumbar spine surgery: A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghobrial, George M; Williams, Kim A; Arnold, Paul; Fehlings, Michael; Harrop, James S

    2015-12-01

    Iatrogenic neurologic deficits after lumbar spine surgery are rare complications, but important to recognize and manage. Complications such as radiculopathy, spinal cord compression, motor deficits (i.e. foot drop with L5 radiculopathy), and new onset radiculitis, while uncommon do occur. Attempts at mitigating these complications with the use of neuromonitoring have been successful. Guidance in the literature as to the true rate of iatrogenic neurologic deficit is limited to several case studies and retrospective designed studies describing the management, prevention and treatment of these deficits. The authors review the lumbar spinal surgery literature to examine the incidence of iatrogenic neurologic deficit in the lumbar spinal surgery literature. An advanced MEDLINE search conducted on May 14th, 2015 from January 1, 2004 through May 14, 2015, using the following MeSH search terms "postoperative complications," then subterms "lumbar vertebrae," treatment outcome," "spinal fusion," and "radiculopathy" were included together with "postoperative complications" in a single search. Postoperative complications including radiculopathy, weakness, and spinal cord compression were included. The definition of iatrogenic neurologic complication was limited to post-operative radiculopathy, motor weakness or new onset pain/radiculitis. An advanced MEDLINE search conducted on May 14th, 2015 using all of the above terms together yielded 21 results. After careful evaluation, 11 manuscripts were excluded and 10 were carefully reviewed. The most common indications for surgery were degenerative spondylolisthesis, spondylosis, scoliosis, and lumbar stenosis. In 2783 patients in 12 total studies, there were 56 patients who had reported a postoperative neurologic deficit for a rate of 5.7. The rates of deficits ranged from 0.46% to 17% in the studies used. The average rate of reported neurologic complications within these papers was 9% (range 0.46-24%). Thirty patients of a total of

  16. Lumbar stenosis: clinical case

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro Sá

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Lumbar stenosis is an increasingly common pathological condition that is becoming more frequent with increasing mean life expectancy, with high costs for society. It has many causes, among which degenerative, neoplastic and traumatic causes stand out. Most of the patients respond well to conservative therapy. Surgical treatment is reserved for patients who present symptoms after implementation of conservative measures. Here, a case of severe stenosis of the lumbar spine at several levels, in a female patient with pathological and surgical antecedents in the lumbar spine, is presented. The patient underwent two different decompression techniques within the same operation.

  17. [Progress on the cause and mechanism of a separation of clinical symptoms and signs and imaging features in lumbar disk herniation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Xing-xin; Liu, Li-min

    2015-10-01

    A few of patients with lumbar disk herniation having a separation of clinical symptoms and signs and imaging features, can be found in clinic, but the traditional theory of direct mechanical compression of nerve roots by herniated nucleus pulposus can't be used to explain this abnormal protrusion of lumbar intervertebral disc. The clinical symptoms and signs of the atypical lumbar disk herniation are affected by multiple factors. The indirect mechanical compression and distraction effect of spinal nerve roots may play an important role in the occurrence of the separation, and the appearance of abnormal clinical symptoms and signs is closely related to the migration of herniated nucleus pulposus tissue, transmission of injury information in the nervous system, and the complex interactions among the nucleus pulposus, dural sac and nerve roots. Moreover,the changes of microcirculation and inflammation secondary to the herniated nucleus pulposus tissue, the hyperosteogeny in the corresponding segment of the lumbar vertebrae and the posture changes all results in a diversity of symptoms and signs in patients with lumbar intervertebral disc herniation. Besides, there exist congenital variation of lumbosacral nerve roots and vertebral bodies in some patients, and the misdiagnosis or missed diagnosis of imaging finding may occur in some cases. However, the appearance of a separation of clinical symptoms and signs and imaging examination in patients may be caused by a variety of reasons in clinic. The exact mechanism involved in the interaction among nucleus pulposus tissue, dural sac and nerve root, secondary changes of pathophysiology and biomechanics around the nucleus pulposus, the determination of lesioned responsible segments, and how to overcome the limitations of imaging all need the further researches. PMID:26727796

  18. Evaluación del impacto funcional e intensidad del dolor antes y después de la inyección de esteroides por vía transforaminal en una muestra preliminar de pacientes con radiculopatía lumbar por hernia de disco Evaluation of functionality and pain intensity before and after a transformial steroid injection in a preliminary sample of patients with lumbar radiculopathy due to a disk hernia

    OpenAIRE

    Medel, P.; A.C. Tamayo; Velázquez, D.; Salinas, J; U. Guevara

    2007-01-01

    Objetivo: Evaluar el grado de mejoría en el estado funcional e intensidad del dolor, en una muestra preliminar de pacientes con radiculopatía compresiva lumbar por hernia de disco a quienes se les realizó una inyección de esteroides por vía transforaminal (ITE) bajo guía fluoroscópica. Material y método: Se seleccionaron prospectivamente en el periodo de Octubre a Diciembre del 2006, pacientes con dolor de espalda baja por radiculopatía secundaria a hernia de disco lumbar corroborado por clín...

  19. LUMBAR DISC HERNIATION

    OpenAIRE

    Vialle, Luis Roberto; Vialle, Emiliano Neves; Suárez Henao, Juan Esteban; Giraldo, Gustavo

    2015-01-01

    Lumbar disc herniation is the most common diagnosis among the degenerative abnormalities of the lumbar spine (affecting 2 to 3% of the population), and is the principal cause of spinal surgery among the adult population. The typical clinical picture includes initial lumbalgia, followed by progressive sciatica. The natural history of disc herniation is one of rapid resolution of the symptoms (four to six weeks). The initial treatment should be conservative, managed through medication and physi...

  20. Value of repeat CT scans in low back pain and radiculopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schroeder, Josh E; Barzilay, Yair; Kaplan, Leon; Itshayek, Eyal; Hiller, Nurith

    2016-02-01

    We assessed the clinical value of repeat spine CT scan in 108 patients aged 18-60years who underwent repeat lumbar spine CT scan for low back pain or radiculopathy from January 2008 to December 2010. Patients with a neoplasm or symptoms suggesting underlying disease were excluded from the study. Clinical data was retrospectively reviewed. Index examinations and repeat CT scan performed at a mean of 24.3±11.3months later were compared by a senior musculoskeletal radiologist. Disc abnormalities (herniation, sequestration, bulge), spinal stenosis, disc space narrowing, and bony changes (osteophytes, fractures, other changes) were documented. Indications for CT scan were low back pain (60 patients, 55%), radiculopathy (46 patients, 43%), or nonspecific back pain (two patients, 2%). A total of 292 spine pathologies were identified in 98 patients (90.7%); in 10 patients (9.3%) no spine pathology was seen on index or repeat CT scan. At repeat CT scan, 269/292 pathologies were unchanged (92.1%); 10/292 improved (3.4%), 8/292 worsened (2.8%, disc herniation or spinal stenosis), and five new pathologies were identified. No substantial therapeutic change was required in patients with worsened or new pathology. Added diagnostic value from repeat CT scan performed within 2-3years was rare in patients suffering chronic or recurrent low back pain or radiculopathy, suggesting that repeat CT scan should be considered only in patients with progressive neurologic deficits, new neurologic complaints, or signs implying serious underlying conditions. PMID:26601814

  1. Increased expression of vascular endothelial growth factor is associated with hypertrophic ligamentum flavum in lumbar spinal canal stenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jirathanathornnukul, Napaphat; Limthongkul, Worawat; Yingsakmongkol, Wicharn; Singhatanadgige, Weerasak; Parkpian, Vinai; Honsawek, Sittisak

    2016-04-01

    Lumbar spinal canal stenosis (LSCS) is the most common spinal disorder in elderly patients, causing low back and leg pain, radiculopathy, and cauda equina syndrome. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) is a potent regulator of many cellular functions including proliferation, differentiation, wound healing, and angiogenesis. The present study aimed to investigate the pattern of VEGF expression in the ligamentum flavum (LF) of patients with LSCS. 24 patients with LSCS were recruited in this prospective study. We quantified and localized VEGF expression in LF tissues obtained during surgery. VEGF messenger RNA and protein expression in LF were determined using reverse transcription PCR (RT-PCR), and quantitative real-time PCR, immunohistochemistry, and ELISA. VEGF expression was significantly higher in the hypertrophic LF group than in the non-pathological LF group (plumbar spinal stenosis. PMID:26956787

  2. Gait Analysis Using a Support Vector Machine for Lumbar Spinal Stenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashi, Hiroyuki; Toribatake, Yasumitsu; Murakami, Hideki; Yoneyama, Takeshi; Watanabe, Tetsuyou; Tsuchiya, Hiroyuki

    2015-11-01

    Lumbar spinal canal stenosis (LSS) is diagnosed based on physical examination and radiological documentation of lumbar spinal canal narrowing. Differential diagnosis of the level of lumbar radiculopathy is difficult in multilevel spinal stenosis. Therefore, the authors focused on gait analysis as a classification method to improve diagnostic accuracy. The goal of this study was to identify gait characteristics of L4 and L5 radiculopathy in patients with LSS and to classify L4 and L5 radiculopathy using a support vector machine (SVM). The study group comprised 13 healthy volunteers (control group), 11 patients with L4 radiculopathy (L4 group), and 22 patients with L5 radiculopathy (L5 group). Light-emitting diode markers were attached at 5 sites on the affected side, and walking motion was analyzed using video recordings and the authors' development program. Potential gait characteristics of each group were identified to use as SVM parameters. In the knee joint of the L4 group, the waveform was similar to that of normal gait, but knee extension at initial contact was slightly greater than that of the other groups. In the ankle joint of the L5 group, the one-peak waveform pattern with disappearance of the second peak was present in 10 (45.5%) of 22 cases. The total classification accuracy was 80.4% using the SVM. The highest and lowest classification accuracies were obtained in the control group (84.6%) and the L4 group (72.7%), respectively. The authors' walking motion analysis system identified several useful factors for differentiating between healthy individuals and patients with L4 and L5 radiculopathy, with a high accuracy rate. PMID:26558674

  3. Interpretation of lumbar spine CT: An objective grading system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The lumbar spine can be conveniently divided into five clinically important anatomic zones: foramine, facets, lateral recesses, intervertebral discs, and the bony canal. Specific deformity of any of these five zones may occur as isolated abnormalities, producing the signs and symptoms of radiculopathy or back pain. Because the appropriate surgical approach for each of these potential sources of pain may be radically different, and it may be impossible to differentiate the precise cause of the symptoms, the responsibility to provide a precise preoperative analysis of each vertebral segment is placed on the radiologist. With this analysis, our clinical colleagues can tailor their surgery precisely to the anatomic causes defined by the CT scan. The 1-5 grading system was devised to code the amount of pathology in order to define surgically significant abnormalities. Specific measurements are not necessarily made in our schema. The assessment of anatomic abnormality may vary slightly with each observer, but definite guidelines, herein presented, allow objective definition and description of pathologic changes within each anatomic zone. When this system is used with a carefully conceived reporting form, it provides an accurate, objective method to convey clinically useful anatomic information to the surgeon

  4. Biomechanical study of percutaneous lumbar diskectomy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To investigate the stiffness of lumbar spine after the injury caused by percutaneous diskectomy and evaluate the efficiency of percutaneous lumbar diskectomy by biomechanical study. Methods: Four fresh lumbar specimens were used to analyse load-displacement curves in the intact lumbar spine and vertical disc-injured lumbar spine. The concepts of average flexibility coefficient (f) and standardized average flexibility coefficient (fs) were also introduced. Results: The load-displacement curves showed a good stabilization effect of the intact lumbar spine and disc-injured lumbar spine in flexion, extension, right and left bending. The decrease of anti-rotation also can be detected (P<0.05). Conclusion: In biomechanical study, percutaneous lumbar diskectomy is one of the efficiency methods to treat lumbar diac hernia

  5. Comparison of Modic Changes in the Lumbar and Cervical Spine, in 3167 Patients with and without Spinal Pain

    OpenAIRE

    Sheng-yun, Li; Letu, Suyou; JIAN, CHEN; Mamuti, Maiwulanjiang; Jun-Hui, Liu; Zhi, Shan; Chong-yan, Wang; Shunwu, Fan; Zhao, Fengdong

    2014-01-01

    Background Context There are few comparisons of Modic changes (MCs) in the lumbar and cervical spine. Purpose Compare the prevalence of MCs in the lumbar and cervical spine, and determine how MC prevalence depends on spinal pain, age, disc degeneration, spinal level, and the presence or absence of kyphosis. Study Design Retrospective clinical survey. Materials and Methods Magnetic resonance images (MRIs) were compared from five patient groups: 1. 1223 patients with low-back pain/radiculopathy...

  6. Spontaneous septic arthritis of the lumbar facet caused by methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus in an otherwise healthy adolescent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papaliodis, Dean N; Roberts, Timothy T; Richardson, Nicholas G; Lawrence, James B

    2014-07-01

    We report the case of a 16-year-old boy with isolated septic arthritis of a lumbar facet. This rare presentation of an infection in a lumbar facet joint occurred after minor trauma sustained in a football game. Septic arthritis of the spinal facet joint is an uncommon phenomenon. Only 5 cases have been reported in immunocompromised pediatric patients. To our knowledge, no case of septic arthritis in an immunocompetent pediatric patient has been reported. An otherwise healthy 16-year-old boy presented with 4 weeks of escalating back pain after a minor athletics-related trauma. Evaluation showed incapacitating pain, lumbar musculature spasms, and the absence of fever, hemodynamic, or neurologic changes. Laboratory values were within normal limits. Magnetic resonance images showed a fluid collection within the L3-L4 facet and a localized abscess. Computed tomographic-guided aspiration showed methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus infection, for which the patient received 6 weeks of vancomycin with complete resolution of symptoms. Refractory lumbago in an adolescent requires careful evaluation. PMID:25046186

  7. Clinical and neuroimaging features vertebral radiculopathy in the combination with vertebral hemangiomas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Che-honatskaya M.L.

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available

    Aim of the study: to study the clinical and neuroimaging features of radiculopathy vertebral hemangiomas in conjunction with the vertebrae. Materials and methods. A total of 56 patients with radiculopathy vertebral hemangiomas combined with the vertebrae. Results. The patients in addition to pain, and focal neurological symptoms were observed violation of urination, and chronic venous insuffciency of lower extremities. MRI identifed three types of vertebral hem-angiomas, depending on the structural characteristics. Conclusion. The aim of the study is realized.Most hemangiomas are asymptomatic yourself. Pain and neurological symptoms caused by musculo-tonic component, the presence of disc herniation, changes in the intervertebral joints, ligaments violation. Type III meets the criteria for hemangiomas and requires aggressive surgical treatment.

  8. Postirradiation lumbosacral radiculopathy following seminoma treatment presenting as flaccid neuropathic bladder: a case report

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Raheem, Omer A

    2011-04-14

    Abstract Introduction Postirradiation lumbosacral syndrome is a radiculopathy induced by radiation injury to the spinal cord. Its usual presentation is motor deficit and or sensory loss involving the lower limbs. Visceral involvement has not been reported previously. Case presentation We describe a case of severe hypotonic bladder caused by radiation-induced spinal cord injury following treatment of stage Ι testicular seminoma in a 38-year-old Caucasian man who had undergone radical orchidectomy and prophylactic paraaortic lymph node irradiation for stage Ι seminoma. Three years later he had clinical and urodynamic findings of hypotonic bladder. The magnetic resonance imaging results suggested a radiation-induced injury. Conclusion Such an unusual presentation of the syndrome of postirradiation lumbosacral radiculopathy can impose a clinical challenge to practicing clinicians. Future studies are required to further delineate the mechanism of injury and further management plans.

  9. Postirradiation lumbosacral radiculopathy following seminoma treatment presenting as flaccid neuropathic bladder: a case report.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Raheem, Omer A

    2012-02-01

    INTRODUCTION: Postirradiation lumbosacral syndrome is a radiculopathy induced by radiation injury to the spinal cord. Its usual presentation is motor deficit and or sensory loss involving the lower limbs. Visceral involvement has not been reported previously. CASE PRESENTATION: We describe a case of severe hypotonic bladder caused by radiation-induced spinal cord injury following treatment of stage Iota testicular seminoma in a 38-year-old Caucasian man who had undergone radical orchidectomy and prophylactic paraaortic lymph node irradiation for stage Iota seminoma. Three years later he had clinical and urodynamic findings of hypotonic bladder. The magnetic resonance imaging results suggested a radiation-induced injury. CONCLUSION: Such an unusual presentation of the syndrome of postirradiation lumbosacral radiculopathy can impose a clinical challenge to practicing clinicians. Future studies are required to further delineate the mechanism of injury and further management plans.

  10. Lumbar hernia: a diagnostic dilemma

    OpenAIRE

    Ahmed, Syed Tausif; Ranjan, Rajeeva; Saha, Subhendu Bikas; Singh, Balbodh

    2014-01-01

    Lumbar hernia is one of the rare cases that most surgeons are not exposed to. Hence the diagnosis can be easily missed. This leads to delay in the treatment causing increased morbidity. We report a case of lumbar hernia in a middle-aged woman. It was misdiagnosed as lipoma by another surgeon. It was a case of primary acquired lumbar hernia in the superior lumbar triangle. Clinical and MRI findings were correlated to reach the diagnosis. We also highlight the types, the process of diagnosis an...

  11. MR imaging of lumbar facet joint synovial cysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Apostolaki, E.; Davies, A.M.; Evans, N. [Royal Orthopaedic Hospital, Birmingham (United Kingdom). Dept. of Radiology; Cassar-Pullicino, V.N. [Robert Jones and Agnes Hunt Orthopaedic Hospital, Oswestry (United Kingdom)

    2000-04-01

    The increasing application of magnetic resonance (MR) imaging of the spine has raised the awareness of lumbar facet synovial cysts (LFSC). This well recognised, yet uncommon condition, presents with low back pain and radiculopathy due to the presence of an extradural mass. The commonest affected level is L4/5 with a mild degenerative spondylolisthesis a frequent associated finding. MR imaging is the technique of choice to detect and diagnose a LFSC. This pictorial essay, drawing on experience of 43 cases seen in 40 patients, illustrates the spectrum of appearances that can be encountered and suggest differing causes for the variable signal characteristics exhibited. Computed tomography (CT) can be of value in some cases to aid interpretation of the MR images. In addition, CT facet arthrography by injection of air or iodinated non-ionic contrast medium may be used to confirm the diagnosis in doubtful cases as well as noting whether the patients presenting symptoms can be provoked. A comprehensive review of the existing literature is presented. (orig.)

  12. MR imaging of lumbar facet joint synovial cysts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The increasing application of magnetic resonance (MR) imaging of the spine has raised the awareness of lumbar facet synovial cysts (LFSC). This well recognised, yet uncommon condition, presents with low back pain and radiculopathy due to the presence of an extradural mass. The commonest affected level is L4/5 with a mild degenerative spondylolisthesis a frequent associated finding. MR imaging is the technique of choice to detect and diagnose a LFSC. This pictorial essay, drawing on experience of 43 cases seen in 40 patients, illustrates the spectrum of appearances that can be encountered and suggest differing causes for the variable signal characteristics exhibited. Computed tomography (CT) can be of value in some cases to aid interpretation of the MR images. In addition, CT facet arthrography by injection of air or iodinated non-ionic contrast medium may be used to confirm the diagnosis in doubtful cases as well as noting whether the patients presenting symptoms can be provoked. A comprehensive review of the existing literature is presented. (orig.)

  13. Herniated intervertebral disc associated with a lumbar spine dislocation as a cause of Cauda Equina syndrome: a case report

    OpenAIRE

    Kreichati, Gaby E.; Kassab, Farid N.; Kharrat, Khalil E.

    2006-01-01

    To report a case of Cauda Equina syndrome with the completion of the paralysis after the reduction of a L4L5 dislocation due to a herniated disc. Although several articles have described a post-traumatic disc herniation in the cervical spinal canal, this is not well known in the lumbar region. A 30-year-old man was admitted to the emergency room with blunt trauma to the chest and abdomen with multiple contusions plus a dislocation of L4-L5 with an incomplete neurological injury. After an emer...

  14. CLINICAL EVALUATION OF CAUDAL EPIDURAL STEROID INJECTIONS IN MANAGING LUMBAR DISC PROLAPSE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dhrubajyoti

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Lumber disc prolapse as a cause of back and leg pain is quite a common presentation at a pain clinic which results in significant disability & overall loss of productive work. This study is an uncontrolled, prospective study that included 25 patients (15 m ales and 10 females during the period 2013 – 2014 with signs and symptoms of back pain associated with lumber disc prolapsed with lumbar radiculopathy, in whom conservative treatment of least 6 weeks had failed. The present study was undertaken with the aim to observe the effectiveness of caudal epidural injection of a combination of depomedrol ( M ethyl prednisolone acetate along with a local anesthetic (0.5% bupivacaine in relieving symptoms of lumbar disc prolapse with radiculopathy. Quantitative assessme nt was done for back pain & leg pain separately using the visual analogue scale and the functional disability was measured using oswestry disability index (ODI before the procedure and at regular intervals after the procedure for a period of 6 months. All the patients had an ODI more than 40% before the procedure . At 24 hours, significant pain relief was seen in all the patients. After 3 weeks, symptomatic improvement was seen in 100.0% (25/25 patients of the cases, with good results in 68.0% (17/25, ODI 0 - 20% and fair result (ODI 20 - 40% in 32.0% (8/25 patients. At 6 months follow up, 60.0% (15 patients/25 of patients showed functional improvement of which with good results were seen in 52.0% (13/25 and fair result in 8.0% (2/25 and poor results in 40.0% (10/25. None of the patients had any major complications. Thus, it can be concluded that caudal epidural steroid injections are one of the safe and effective modality of treatment in back pain associated with lumbar disc prolapse with good short ter m results and possibly long term in some patients.

  15. Operative techniques for cervical radiculopathy and myelopathy.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Moran, C

    2012-02-01

    The surgical treatment of cervical spondylosis and resulting cervical radiculopathy or myelopathy has evolved over the past century. Surgical options for dorsal decompression of the cervical spine includes the traditional laminectomy and laminoplasty, first described in Asia in the 1970\\'s. More recently the dorsal approch has been explored in terms of minimally invasive options including foraminotomies for nerve root descompression. Ventral decompression and fusion techniques are also described in the article, including traditional anterior cervical discectomy and fusion, strut grafting and cervical disc arthroplasty. Overall, the outcome from surgery is determined by choosing the correct surgery for the correct patient and pathology and this is what we hope to explain in this brief review.

  16. ROLE OF EPIDURAL INJECTIONS IN THE MANAGEMENT OF ACUTE LUMBAR DISCOGENIC PAIN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Srinivas

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: The use of epidural injections in the cervical , thoracic and lumbo sacral spine for both diagnostic and therapeutic purposes has developed as an important part of a comprehensive interdisci plinary approach to spinal pain . (1, 2 It is well known that structural abnormalities see n on CT or MRI scans do not always cause pain and diagnostic injections often can help correlate abnormalities on imaging studies with associated pain complaints. Therapeutically , epidural injections can provide significant pain relief during which , time r ecovery of disc and nerve root injuries can occur and patients also can progress their level of physical activity. In acute disc injury with or without radiculopathy , therapeutic injections can help and manage the patient ’ s pain without reliance on oral analgesics. Epidural cortico steroid injections with physical therapy is recommended in conjunction . (1 Mechanism of pain relief is due to potent and anti - inflammatory properties of the cortico steroids . ( 3,2 Aim to know the effic acy and results of the epidural steroid injection in acute lumbar discogenic pain . ( 2 MATERIALS AND METHODS: I have treated 800 patients with lumbar epidural injections for 3 weeks ( W eekly interval since 2005 at Sri Venkata Hospital and pain management ce ntre SP Nagar , Kukatpally , Hyderabad , Telangana. F or the management of Lumbar Discogenic Pain till 2014. RESULTS: E xcellent in 90% of patients and no patient complained of recurrence of symptoms and reached their normal activities without surgery after epidural injection treatment. Lumbar Epidural steroid injection is usually performed in about 6 weeks after the onset of low back pain or radicular pain. Lumbar Epidural steroid injection is appropriate for an outpatient setting provided all necessary resu scitative equipment is available i.e. O 2 , intubation equipment , emergency drugs , IV access and we can avoid the hospitalization . DISCUSSION: LESIs

  17. Treatment of lumbar disc herniation: Evidence-based practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew J Schoenfeld

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Andrew J Schoenfeld1, Bradley K Weiner21Department of Orthopedic Surgery, William Beaumont Army Medical Center, Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center, El Paso, TX, USA; 2Weill Cornell Medical College and The Methodist Hospital, Houston, TX, USAClinical question: What is the best treatment for lumbar disc herniations? Results: For patients failing six weeks of conservative care, the current literature supports surgical intervention or prolonged conservative management as appropriate treatment options for lumbar radiculopathy in the setting of disc herniation. Surgical intervention may result in more rapid relief of symptoms and restoration of function.Implementation: While surgery appears to provide more rapid relief, many patients will gradually get better with continued nonoperative management; thus, patient education and active participation in decision-making is vital.Keywords: lumbar disc, herniation, back pain, spine

  18. Cervical interlaminar epidural steroid injection for neck pain and cervical radiculopathy: effect and prognostic factors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kwon, Jong Won; Lee, Joon Woo; Kim, Sung Hyun; Kwack, Kyu-Sung [Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Department of Radiology, Gyeonggi-do (Korea); Choi, Ja-Young; Moon, Sung Gyu; Jun, Woo Sun [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Seoul (Korea); Yeom, Jin-Sup [Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Gyeongi-Do (Korea); Kim, Hyun-Jib [Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Department of Neurosurgery, Gyeongi-Do (Korea); Kang, Heung Sik [Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Department of Radiology, Gyeonggi-do (Korea); Seoul National University College of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Seoul (Korea)

    2007-05-15

    To verify the usefulness of a fluoroscopy guided cervical interlaminar epidural steroid injection (CIESI) in patients with neck pain and cervical radiculopathy and to evaluate outcome predictors. We retrospectively analyzed 91 patients from July 2004 to June 2005 in whom CIESI was initially performed for neck pain and cervical radiculopathy. Therapeutic effects were evaluated 2 weeks after the administration of CIESI, and CIESI effectiveness was graded using a five-point scale, namely, whether the pain had disappeared, was much improved, slightly improved, the same, or aggravated. We also used a visual analog scale (VAS) for the clinical evaluation. According to documentation and follow-up charts, we categorized treatments as effective or ineffective. Possible outcome predictors, namely, diagnosis (spinal stenosis vs herniated disc), primary symptoms (neck pain vs radiculopathy vs both), age, gender, and duration of pain (more or less than 6 months) were also analyzed. Fisher's exact test, the chi-square test, and multiple logistic regression analysis were used for the statistical analysis. After their medical records had been reviewed, 76 patients were included in this study. Inclusion criteria were: the availability of a cross-sectional image, such as a CT scan or an MR image, and a follow-up record after injection. The medical records of 76 patients (male:female = 41: 35) of mean age 53.1 years (range 32 years to 82 years) were reviewed. Two weeks after injection, 55 patients (72.4%) had experienced effective pain relief. Patients with herniated discs had significantly better results than patients with spinal stenosis (86.1% vs 60.0%) (P < 0.05). Other non-significant predictors of an improved outcome included: a symptom duration of <6 months, a young age, and the presence of cervical radiculopathy. Multiple regression analysis showed that the only factor that was significantly associated with outcome was the cause of the pain, i.e., herniated disc or

  19. Clinical research on the safety of evoked dermatomal somatosensory potential in pre-and post-percutaneous lumbar chemonucleolysis for patients with lumbosacral disc herniation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To study the changes of evoked dermatomal somatosensory potential (EDSP) in patients with lumbosacral disc herniation (LDH) during pre-and post-percutaneous lumbar chemonucleolysis (PLCN) and to evaluate the procedural safety. Methods: L5 and S1 EDSP were recorded from 24 patients with radiculopathy caused by LDH before and after PLCN. Result: The EDSP from L5 and/or S1 dermatomes were abnormal in 21 cases (87.5%) before PLCN presenting as prolongation of N40 peak latent period. And 17 out of the 21 cases, 6-10 days after PLCN showed nearly same in the peak latent period with different bilateral value, 10 out of the 21 cases, 29-45 days after PLCN recorded statistical significance in total peak latent periods and different bilateral values, presenting as shortening of peak latent periods and decrease of different bilateral value. The EDSP calculated totally 27 times in 21 pre-PLCN abnormal EDSP patients demonstrated as obvious prolongation of peak latent periods after PLCN. Conclusion: Calculating the EDSP in an objective, sensitive and reliable testing method for evaluating the safety and efficacy of PLCN through interpreting the influences on radiculopathy. (authors)

  20. Study of the relationship and importance of clinical semiology, axial computed tomography and electroneuromyography in lumbar radioculopathies Estudo da relação e da importância entre a semiologia clínica, tomografia axial computadorizada e eletroneuromiografia nas radiculopatias lombares

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emílio Cezar Mamede Murade

    2002-12-01

    Full Text Available The authors evaluated forty-three patients with clinical suspect of lumbar radiculopathy caused by disk hernia, concerning to clinical semiology, computed tomography and electromyography were studied and their correlations. The clinical semiology was altered in 100,0% of the patients, the computed tomography in 90,7% and the electromyography in 88,7%. The correlation among the three exams didn´t show any prevalency among any of the possible associations. The authors emphasize the importance of clinical semiology, computed tomography and electromyography for a more accurate diagnosis of lumbar radiculopathy following by disk hernia.Os autores estudaram 43 pacientes com suspeita clínica de radiculopatia lombar, causada por hérnia de disco, relacionando os achados da semiologia clínica, tomografia axial computadorizada e eletroneuromiografia, entre si. A semiologia clínica estava alterada em 100,0% dos pacientes, a tomografia axial computadorizada em 90,7% e a eletroneuromiografia em 88,7%. A correlação entre os três exames não mostrou prevalência entre nenhuma associação. Os autores enfatizam a importância da semiologia clínica, tomografia axial computadorizada e eletroneuromiografia para maior exatidão diagnóstica das radiculopatias lombares por hérnia de disco.

  1. Inflammatory myofibroblastic tumor in the intradural extramedullary space of the lumbar spine with spondylolisthesis: case report and review of the literature

    OpenAIRE

    Yoon, Sang Hoon; Kim, Ki-Jeong; Chung, Sang Ki; Kim, Hyun-Jib; Choe, Gheeyoung; Chung, Sang Bong; Jin, Yong Jun

    2009-01-01

    An inflammatory myofibroblastic tumor (IMT) is a rare disease entity reported to arise in various organs but still thought to be a neoplastic or reactive inflammatory condition controversially. The author reports an extremely rare case of intradural extramedullary IMT of lumbar spine which was presenting radiculopathy and neurogenic intermittent claudication due to concomitant spondylolisthesis.

  2. Early experience with endoscopic revision of lumbar spinal fusions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGrath, Lynn B; Madhavan, Karthik; Chieng, Lee Onn; Wang, Michael Y; Hofstetter, Christoph P

    2016-02-01

    Approximately half a million spinal fusion procedures are performed annually in the US. It is estimated that up to one-third of arthrodesis constructs require revision surgeries. In this study the authors present endoscopic treatment strategies targeting 3 types of complications following arthrodesis surgery: 1) adjacent-level foraminal stenosis; 2) foraminal stenosis at an arthrodesis segment; and 3) stenosis caused by a displaced interbody cage. A retrospective chart review of 11 patients with a mean age of 68 ± 15 years was performed (continuous variables are shown as the mean ± SEM). All patients had a history of lumbar arthrodesis surgery and suffered from unilateral radiculopathy. Endoscopic revision surgeries were done as outpatient procedures, and there were no intraoperative or perioperative complications. The cohort included 3 patients with foraminal stenosis at the level of previous arthrodesis. They presented with unilateral radicular leg pain (visual analog scale [VAS] score: 7.3 ± 2.1) and were severely disabled, as evidenced by an Oswestry Disability Index (ODI) of 46 ± 4.9. Transforaminal endoscopic foraminotomies were performed, and at a mean follow-up time of 9.0 ± 2.5 months VAS was reduced by an average of 6.3. The cohort also includes 7 patients suffering unilateral radiculopathy due to adjacent-level foraminal stenosis. Preoperative VAS for leg pain of the symptomatic side was 6.0 ± 1.6, VAS for back pain was 5.2 ± 1.7, and ODI was 40 ± 6.33. Endoscopic decompression led to reduction of the ipsilateral leg VAS score by an average of 5, resulting in leg pain of 1 ± 0.5 at an average of 8 months of follow-up. The severity of back pain remained stable (VAS 4.2 ± 1.4). Two of these patients required revision surgery for recurrent symptoms. Finally, this study includes 1 patient who presented with weakness and pain due to retropulsion of an L5/S1 interbody spacer. The patient underwent an endoscopic interlaminar approach with partial

  3. Clinical and surgical outcomes after lumbar laminectomy: An analysis of 500 patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamad Bydon

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The objective of this study is to determine the clinical and surgical outcomes following lumbar laminectomy. Methods: We retrospectively reviewed medical records of neurosurgical patients who underwent first-time, bilateral, 1-3 level laminectomies for degenerative lumbar disease. Patients with discectomy, complete facetectomy, and fusion were excluded. Results: Five hundred patients were followed for an average of 46.79 months. Following lumbar laminectomy, patients experienced statistically significant improvement in back pain, neurogenic claudication, radiculopathy, weakness, and sensory deficits. The rate of intraoperative durotomy was 10.00%; however, 1.60% experienced a postoperative cerebrospinal fluid leak. The risk of experiencing at least one postoperative complication with a lumbar laminectomy was 5.60%. Seventy-two patients (14.40% required reoperations for progression of degenerative disease over a mean of 3.40 years. The most common symptoms prior to reoperation included back pain (54.17%, radiculopathy (47.22%, weakness (18.06%, sensory deficit (15.28%, and neurogenic claudication (19.44%. The relative risk of reoperation for patients with postoperative back pain was 6.14 times higher than those without postoperative back pain (P < 0.001. Of the 72 patients undergoing reoperations, 55.56% underwent decompression alone, while 44.44% underwent decompression and posterolateral fusions. When considering all-time reoperations, the lifetime risk of requiring a fusion after a lumbar laminectomy based on this study (average follow-up of 46.79 months was 8.0%. Conclusion: Patients experienced statistically significant improvements in back pain, neurogenic claudication, radiculopathy, motor weakness, and sensory deficit following lumbar laminectomy. Incidental durotomy rate was 10.00%. Following a first-time laminectomy, the reoperation rate was 14.4% over a mean of 3.40 years.

  4. Percutaneous Adhesiolysis Versus Transforaminal Epidural Steroid Injection for the Treatment of Chronic Radicular Pain Caused by Lumbar Foraminal Spinal Stenosis: A Retrospective Comparative Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Yongbum; Lee, Woo Yong; Ahn, Jae Ki; Nam, Hee-Seung

    2015-01-01

    Objective To investigate the efficacy of percutaneous adhesiolysis (PA) compared to fluoroscopy (FL)-guided transforaminal epidural steroid injection (TFESI) in patients with radicular pain caused by lumbar foraminal spinal stenosis (LFSS) by assessing pain relief and functional improvement at 4 and 12 weeks post-procedure. Methods This retrospective study included 45 patients who underwent PA or FL-guided TFSEI for radicular pain caused by LFSS of at least 3 months' duration. Outcomes were assessed with the Oswestry Disability Index (ODI) and Verbal Numeric Pain Scale (VNS) before the procedure and at 4 and 12 weeks post-procedure. A successful outcome was defined by >50% improvement in the VNS score and >40% improvement in the ODI score. Results ODI and VNS scores improved 4 and 12 weeks post-procedure in both groups. Statistically significant differences between groups were observed in ODI and VNS at 12 weeks (p<0.05). The proportion of patients with successful outcomes was significantly different between the two groups only at the 12-week time point. Conclusion Our study suggests that PA is effective for pain reduction and functional improvement in patients with chronic radicular pain caused by LFSS. Therefore, PA can be considered for patients with previous ineffective responses to conservative treatment. Although PA seems to be more effective than TFEFI according to the results of our study, in order to fully elucidate the difference in effectiveness, a prospective study with a larger sample size is necessary. PMID:26798608

  5. Lumbar percutaneous discectomy. Initial experience in 28 cases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Faubert, C. (Saarland Univ., Homburg/Saar (Germany). Neuroradiological Inst.); Caspar, W. (Saarland Univ., Homburg/Saar (Germany). Dept. of Neurosurgery)

    1991-10-01

    Since November 88, 28 patients with lumbar L5 radiculopathy refractory to conservative care and with a radiologically verified central or mediolateral disc herniation at the level of L4/L5 had had a percutaneous discectomy. A short-term follow-up analysis of at least 2 months taking the clinical and functional status as well as the professional reintegration into account revealed a 64.3% (18/28 patients) satisfactory outcome and a 32.1% (10/28 patients) failure rate. Of the latter 28.6% (8/28 patients) required further open surgery. (orig./GDG).

  6. Regression of lumbar disk herniation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Yu Evzikov

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Compression of the spinal nerve root, giving rise to pain and sensory and motor disorders in the area of its innervation is the most vivid manifestation of herniated intervertebral disk. Different treatment modalities, including neurosurgery, for evolving these conditions are discussed. There has been recent evidence that spontaneous regression of disk herniation can regress. The paper describes a female patient with large lateralized disc extrusion that has caused compression of the nerve root S1, leading to obvious myotonic and radicular syndrome. Magnetic resonance imaging has shown that the clinical manifestations of discogenic radiculopathy, as well myotonic syndrome and morphological changes completely regressed 8 months later. The likely mechanism is inflammation-induced resorption of a large herniated disk fragment, which agrees with the data available in the literature. A decision to perform neurosurgery for which the patient had indications was made during her first consultation. After regression of discogenic radiculopathy, there was only moderate pain caused by musculoskeletal diseases (facet syndrome, piriformis syndrome that were successfully eliminated by minimally invasive techniques. 

  7. Upright positional MRI of the lumbar spine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Supine magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is routinely used in the assessment of low back pain and radiculopathy. However, imaging findings often correlate poorly with clinical findings. This is partly related to the positional dependence of spinal stenosis, which reflects dynamic changes in soft-tissue structures (ligaments, disc, dural sac, epidural fat, and nerve roots). Upright MRI in the flexed, extended, rotated, standing, and bending positions, allows patients to reproduce the positions that bring about their symptoms and may uncover MRI findings that were not visible with routine supine imaging. Assessment of the degree of spinal stability in the degenerate and postoperative lumbar spine is also possible. The aim of this review was to present the current literature concerning both the normal and symptomatic spine as imaged using upright MRI and to illustrate the above findings using clinical examples

  8. Upright positional MRI of the lumbar spine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alyas, F.; Connell, D. [London Upright MRI Centre, London (United Kingdom); Department of Radiology, Royal National Orthopaedic Hospital NHS Trust, Stanmore, Middlesex (United Kingdom); Saifuddin, A. [London Upright MRI Centre, London (United Kingdom); Department of Radiology, Royal National Orthopaedic Hospital NHS Trust, Stanmore, Middlesex (United Kingdom)], E-mail: asif.saifuddin@rnoh.nhs.uk

    2008-09-15

    Supine magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is routinely used in the assessment of low back pain and radiculopathy. However, imaging findings often correlate poorly with clinical findings. This is partly related to the positional dependence of spinal stenosis, which reflects dynamic changes in soft-tissue structures (ligaments, disc, dural sac, epidural fat, and nerve roots). Upright MRI in the flexed, extended, rotated, standing, and bending positions, allows patients to reproduce the positions that bring about their symptoms and may uncover MRI findings that were not visible with routine supine imaging. Assessment of the degree of spinal stability in the degenerate and postoperative lumbar spine is also possible. The aim of this review was to present the current literature concerning both the normal and symptomatic spine as imaged using upright MRI and to illustrate the above findings using clinical examples.

  9. Minimally Invasive Lumbar Discectomy

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... a few minutes. Lumbar surgery, particularly from the micro-lumbar discectomy style, it is a very common ... used for cervical spine problems? Yeah. We perform micro-lumbar surgical procedures in the cervical spine routinely. ...

  10. Clinical significance of the position of dorsal root ganglia in degenerative lumbar diseases. Correlation between anatomic study and imaging study with MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In order to estimate the ralationship between the position of dorsal root ganglia (DRG) and radicular symptoms, anatomical study was done on 81 cadavers, and a clinical study with MRI was done on 20 cases of lumbar disc herniation and 20 of lumbar spondylosis with L5 radiculopathy. The position of DRG is not related to the occurrence of radicular symptoms in disc herniation, while in lumbar spondylosis proximally placed DRG are related to both of unilateral and bilateral occurrence of redicular symptoms. Unilateral occurrence of radicular symptoms is influenced by surrounding tissues of the nerve root, rather than the position of DRG. (author)

  11. Clinical significance of the position of dorsal root ganglia in degenerative lumbar diseases. Correlation between anatomic study and imaging study with MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seki, Masahiro; Kikuchi, Tomiichi [Fukushima Medical Coll., Matsuoka (Japan)

    1995-06-01

    In order to estimate the ralationship between the position of dorsal root ganglia (DRG) and radicular symptoms, anatomical study was done on 81 cadavers, and a clinical study with MRI was done on 20 cases of lumbar disc herniation and 20 of lumbar spondylosis with L{sub 5} radiculopathy. The position of DRG is not related to the occurrence of radicular symptoms in disc herniation, while in lumbar spondylosis proximally placed DRG are related to both of unilateral and bilateral occurrence of redicular symptoms. Unilateral occurrence of radicular symptoms is influenced by surrounding tissues of the nerve root, rather than the position of DRG. (author).

  12. Clinical anatomy and 3D virtual reconstruction of the lumbar plexus with respect to lumbar surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ding Zi-hai

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Exposure of the anterior or lateral lumbar via the retroperitoneal approach easily causes injuries to the lumbar plexus. Lumbar plexus injuries which occur during anterior or transpsoas lumbar spine exposure and placement of instruments have been reported. This study aims is to provide more anatomical data and surgical landmarks in operations concerning the lumbar plexus in order to prevent lumbar plexus injuries and to increase the possibility of safety in anterior approach lumbar surgery. Methods To study the applied anatomy related to the lumbar plexus of fifteen formaldehyde-preserved cadavers, Five sets of Virtual Human (VH data set were prepared and used in the study. Three-dimensional (3D computerized reconstructions of the lumbar plexus and their adjacent structures were conducted from the VH female data set. Results The order of lumbar nerves is regular. From the anterior view, lumbar plexus nerves are arranged from medial at L5 to lateral at L2. From the lateral view, lumbar nerves are arranged from ventral at L2 to dorsal at L5. The angle of each nerve root exiting outward to the corresponding intervertebral foramen increases from L1 to L5. The lumbar plexus nerves are observed to be in close contact with transverse processes (TP. All parts of the lumbar plexus were located by sectional anatomy in the dorsal third of the psoas muscle. Thus, access to the psoas major muscle at the ventral 2/3 region can safely prevent nerve injuries. 3D reconstruction of the lumbar plexus based on VCH data can clearly show the relationships between the lumbar plexus and the blood vessels, vertebral body, kidney, and psoas muscle. Conclusion The psoas muscle can be considered as a surgical landmark since incision at the ventral 2/3 of the region can prevent lumbar plexus injuries for procedures requiring exposure of the lateral anterior of the lumbar. The transverse process can be considered as a landmark and reference in surgical

  13. Late post-traumatic spinal stenotic progressive myelo-radiculopathy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharma R

    1990-01-01

    Full Text Available A case of late progressive myelo-radiculopathy associated with severe canal stenosis secondary to post-traumatic hypertrophy of thoracic laminae and ossification of spinal ligaments viz. ligamentum flavum and posterior longitudinal ligament in the absence of developmental spinal stenosis or post-traumatic deformity, is presented with a brief critical review of the relevant literature.

  14. Jingtong Granule: A Chinese Patent Medicine for Cervical Radiculopathy

    OpenAIRE

    Liguo Zhu; Jinghua Gao; Jie Yu; Minshan Feng; Jinyu Li; Shangquan Wang; Xu Wei

    2015-01-01

    Objective. This paper systematically assessed the efficacy and safety of Jingtong granule (JG) for cervical radiculopathy (CR). Methods. Randomized controlled trials comparing JG with no intervention, placebo, or conventional therapies were retrieved. The trials testing JG combined with conventional therapies versus conventional therapies were also enrolled. Study selection, methodological assessment, data extraction, and analysis were conducted in accordance with the Cochrane standards. The ...

  15. Intrasubstance Schwannoma of Posterior Tibial Nerve Presenting as Lumbo-Sacral Radiculopathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banshelkikar, Santosh; Nistane, Pruthviraj

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Peripheral nerve tumours are rarely acknowledged as a cause of radiating pain in lower limbs and suspicion is almost always pointed towards lumbo-sacral causes. Schwannomas are tumours of peripheral nerve sheaths occurring anywhere along the peripheral nervous system. Often it can produce symptoms, which can be misleading in cases where obvious swelling is not present. The diagnosis may therefore be delayed by several years of emergence of symptoms. Very few such cases have been reported previously and none of them had an intrasubstance location of the tumour as in our case. Case Report: We present a case of a middle aged female patient presenting with radiating pain in left lower limb, which was diagnosed and treated as lumbo-sacral radiculopathy for five years before an obvious swelling appeared, which on further investigations led to diagnosis of schwannoma of tibial nerve. Intraoperatively, the schwannoma was found to be intrasubstance in location which has never been reported in the past literatures making its excision, without damaging the conducting elements, a challenge. Conclusion: The possibility of peripheral nerve tumour should always be kept in mind while dealing with long standing cases diagnosed as radiculopathy and which do not get better with treatment on similar lines. A thorough clinical examination of the entire limb including Tinel’s sign can clinch the diagnosis earlier in cases where obvious swelling is not present. Even unusual presentations, as in our case, can be dealt surgically with good results. PMID:27299039

  16. fMRI in patients with lumbar disc disease: a paradigm to study patients over time

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharma HA

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Harish A Sharma1, Rajarsi Gupta2, William Olivero31Robarts Imaging, University of Western Ontario, London, ON, Canada; 2University of Illinois, Urbana, IL, USA; 3Neurological Surgery, University of Illinois UC/Carle Foundation Hospital, Urbana, IL, USAAbstract: Low back pain is a common human ailment. It is estimated that over 70% of the population will experience low back pain that will require medication and/or medical attention. There are many causes for low back pain, one being herniation of the discs of the lumbar spine. Treatment options are very limited. Why patients develop chronic pain especially when there is no known organic cause or when the offending painful stimulus has been removed remains poorly understood. Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI is a technique that allows researchers to image which regions of the brain that are activated during motor, cognitive, and sensory experiences. Using fMRI to study pain has revealed new information about how the brain responds to painful stimuli and what regions of the brain are activated during pain. However, many of the paradigms used do not replicate the subject's pain or use painful stimuli in volunteers without pain. Also, following patients from their acute phase of pain to the chronic phase with serial fMRI has not been performed. In this study we developed a paradigm that would allow studying patients with low back pain and leg pain including lumbar radiculopathy to better mimic a clinical pain syndrome and to have a method of following patients with this type of pain over time.Keywords: functional magnetic resonance imaging, low back pain, pain syndrome, chronic pain

  17. Endoscopic thoracic laminoforaminoplasty for the treatment of thoracic radiculopathy: report of 12 cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scott M.W. Haufe, Ryan A. Baker, Morgan L. Pyne

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Spinal stenosis of the thoracic spine is less common than that of the cervical and lumbar regions. Due to the close proximity to thoracic and abdominal organs, surgical operations can be difficult and carry a greater risk of complications. The most efficacious intervention for thoracic stenosis, whether central or foraminal, refractory to conservative management is uncertain. We aimed to evaluate the efficacy of endoscopic laminoforaminoplasty (ELFP in the treatment of thoracic radiculopathy. Methods: Twelve patients with radicular pain involving the lower thoracic levels (at or below T6 were treated with ELFP. Results: Seven of twelve patients showed marked improvement in pain scores. Average follow-up scores were 2.9 and 12.08 on the Visual Analog Scale (VAS and Oswestry Disability Index, respectively. The significance was 0.005 between the pre and post surgical data. One patient with moderate symptoms, two with severe symptoms, and two with crippling symptoms did not report significant improvement on VAS or Oswestry. No complications were encountered. Conclusions: Endoscopic laminoforaminoplasty offers an alternative to fusion or conventional laminotomy with similar success rates. Patients additionally benefit from a decrease risk of complications, short hospital stay, and faster recovery.

  18. Traumatic lumbar visceral herniation in a young woman ☆

    OpenAIRE

    Woolbert, Ashley; Calasanz, Emily R.; Nazim, Muhammad

    2013-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Lumbar herniation is uncommon, with traumatic etiology being rare. Traumatic lumbar hernias are usually caused by seatbelt injury in motor vehicle accidents. It is exceedingly uncommon to see lumbar hernias in an unrestrained passenger of a motor vehicle accident. PRESENTATION OF CASE We present a case of a traumatic inferior lumbar hernia in a young woman who was an unrestrained driver of a vehicle involved in a high-speed collision, with multiple rollover and ejection. CT scans...

  19. Lumbar Osteotomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Kirkham B

    2016-04-01

    When a patient presents with spine problems, the spine surgeon would do well to avoid use of, reliance on, and acceptance of radiographs as the sole or primary source of information. Measurement of pelvic incidence and lumbar lordosis, although crucial, does not take into account the effort the patient must make to move, the level of involvement of other parts of the body, and the history of previous procedures and outcomes. Radiographs may show pathology that is not consistent with the appearance of the patient. How should we assess this situation? PMID:27015064

  20. A novel minimally invasive percutaneous facet augmentation device for the treatment of lumbar radiculopathy and axial back pain: technical description, surgical technique and case presentations Un nuevo dispositivo percutáneo mínimamente invasivo de aumento facetáreo para el tratamiento de radiculopatía lumbar y dolor axial lumbar: descripción técnica, técnica quirúrgica y presentación de casos Um novo dispositivo percutâneo minimamente invasivo de aumento facetário para o tratamento da radiculopatia lombar e dor axial lombar: descrição técnica, técnica cirúrgica e apresentação de casos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Larry T. Khoo

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: to describe a new posterior minimally invasive method of facet stabilization for treatment of the degenerating lumbar motion segment. The biomechanics of this Percudyn (Interventional Spine; Irvine, CA system are distinct from that of other interspinous dynamic stabilization systems as it acts bilaterally directly within the middle column of the spine. Based on biomechanical evalution, the paired prosthesis supports, cushions, and reinforces the facet complexes by limiting both extension and lateral bending thereby maintaining central and foraminal volumes. METHODS: the Percudyn device consists of a pedicle anchor upon which sits a cushioning polycarbonate-urethane stabilizer that serves as a mechanically reinforcing stop between the inferior and superior articular facets. A 1.5 cm skin incision is made bilaterally over the lower pedicle of the treated segment through which a Jamshidi needle is percutaneously targeted under biplanar fluoroscopic guidance into the caudal aspect of the superior articular process directly underneath the lip of the inferior facet from the level above. Progressive onestep tubular dilation is then performed to secure a small disposable working portal. Through this access, the Percudyn stabilizers are then placed over the wire and anchored bilaterally into the inferior pedicles of the degenerated motion segment. RESULTS: three patients (ages 26-41, male with significant low back pain as well as radiculopathy with lateral recess stenosis from a large disc herniation/ ligamentum and facet hypertrophy (L4-5 and/or L5-S1 underwent a minimally invasive decompression/ discectomy and bilateral Percudyn placement at each disease level. Each patient had significant relief of both his radiculopathy and axial back pain post-operatively and was discharged home within 18 hours without sequelae. CONCLUSION: this novel technique of percutaneous posterior facet augmentation allows for safe placement of bilateral middle

  1. Co-occurrence of lumbar spondylolysis and lumbar disc herniation with lumbosacral nerve root anomaly

    OpenAIRE

    Tevfik Yilmaz; Yahya Turan; Ismail Gulsen; Sedat Dalbayrak

    2014-01-01

    Lumbosacral nerve root anomalies are the leading cause of lumbar surgery failures. Although co-occurrence of lumbar spondylolysis and disc herniation is common, it is very rare to observe that a nerve root anomaly accompanies these lesions. A 49-year-old male patient presented with sudden-onset right leg pain. Examinations revealed L5/S1 lumbar spondylolysis and disc herniation. At preoperative period, he was also diagnosed with lumbosacral root anomaly. Following discectomy and root decompre...

  2. Late Responses in the Electrodiagnosis of Cervical Radiculopathies

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    Backround and aim This paper aims to assess the parameters of late responses and then determine their usefulness in patients with cervical radiculopathy. Patients and methods We studied a total of 114 patients with bilateral assessment of median and ulnar nerves and of F and A waves parameters. Results We draw attention to the need of bilateral electrodiagnostic examination due to changes occurring in a third of cases also in the asymptomatic limb. Pluriradicular injuries occurred in one thir...

  3. Prolonged conservative care versus early surgery in patients with sciatica caused by lumbar disc herniation: Two year results of a randomised controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    W.C. Peul (Wilco); W.B. van den Hout (Wilbert); R. Brand (René); R.T.W.M. Thomeer (Raph); B.W. Koes (Bart)

    2008-01-01

    textabstractObjectives: To evaluate the effects of early lumbar disc surgery compared with prolonged conservative care for patients with sciatica over two years of follow-up. Design: Randomised controlled trial. Setting: Nine Dutch hospitals. Participants: 283 patients with 6-12 weeks of sciatica. I

  4. Prolonged conservative care versus early surgery in patients with sciatica caused by lumbar disc herniation : two year results of a randomised controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peul, W.C.; Hout, van den W.B.; Brand, R.; Thomeer, R.T.W.M.; Koes, B.W.

    2008-01-01

    Objectives: To evaluate the effects of early lumbar disc surgery compared with prolonged conservative care for patients with sciatica over two years of follow-up. Design: Randomised controlled trial. Setting: Nine Dutch hospitals. Participants: 283 patients with 6-12 weeks of sciatica. Interventions

  5. Differential diagnosis of cervical radiculopathy and superior pulmonary sulcus tumor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GU Rui; KANG Ming-yang; GAO Zhong-li; ZHAO Jian-wu; WANG Jin-cheng

    2012-01-01

    Background The result would be disastrous if the superior pulmonary sulcus tumor (Pancoast tumor) was misdiagnosed as degenerative cervical spine diseases.The aim of this study was to investigate the differential diagnosis methods of cervical radiculopathy and superior pulmonary sulcus tumor.Methods Clinical manifestations,physical,and radiological findings of 10 patients,whose main complaints were radiating shoulder and arm pain and later were diagnosed with superior pulmonary sulcus tumor,were reviewed and compared with those of cervical radiculopathy.Results Superior pulmonary sulcus tumor patients have shorter mean history and fewer complaints of neck pain or limitation of neck movement.Physical examination showed almost normal cervical spine range of motion.Spurling's neck compression test was negative in all patients.Anteroposterior cervical radiographs showed the lack of pulmonary air at the top of the affected lung in all cases and first rib encroachment in one case.The diagnosis of superior pulmonary sulcus tumor can be further confirmed by CT and MRI.Conclusions By the method of combination of history,physical examination,and radiological findings,superior pulmonary sulcus tumor can be efficiently differentiated from cervical radiculopathy.Normal motion range of the cervical spine,negative Spurling's neck compression test,and the lack of pulmonary air at the top of the affected lung in anteroposterior cervical radiographs should be considerad as indications for further chest radiograph examinations.

  6. Lumbar paraganglioma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dillard-Cannon, Erika; Atsina, Kofi-Buaku; Ghobrial, George; Gnass, Esteban; Curtis, Mark T; Heller, Joshua

    2016-08-01

    Spinal paragangliomas (SP) are benign and overall rare extra-adrenal neuroendocrine tumors often diagnosed during workup for lower back pain. Complete surgical resection achieves both symptomatic relief and cure. We present a 32-year-old man with a longstanding history of lumbago and bilateral lower extremity pain found to have a lumbar paraganglioma at the level of the L3 vertebrae. The clinical, histopathological, and radiological characteristics are described, including the rare finding of superficial siderosis on MRI of the brain. A laminectomy with microscopic dissection of the intradural mass achieved complete debulking without evidence of residual tumor. Excellent prognosis can be achieved with complete surgical resection of SP without the need for adjuvant therapy. Therefore, care should be taken to distinguish these spinal tumors from those that appear similar but are more aggressive. As such, the radiological finding of superficial siderosis should raise the suspicion for SP when a vascular intradural extramedullary spinal tumor is observed. PMID:27032749

  7. Clinical and functional evaluation of patients with acute low back pain and radiculopathy treated with different energy doses of low level laser therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jovičić Milica

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. The main clinical phenomena in acute low back pain (LBP with radiculopathy are pain and neurological disorders. Although some studies show that low level laser therapy (LLLT has the ability to modulate inflammatory processes and relieve acute pain condition, the laser therapy dose protocol has not been yet completely established. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of three different energy doses of LLLT in patients with acute LBP and radiculopathy. Methods. The study included 66 patients with acute LBP and radiculopathy who had been randomly divided into three groups (22 patients each received three different doses of LLLT. The patients were treated 5 times weekly, for a total of 10 treatments, with the following parameters: wave length 904 nm, frequency 3,000 Hz, average diode power 25 mW; energy dose of 0.1 J per point in the first group, 1 J per point in the second and 4 J per point in the third group; daily treatment time and accumulated energy were 16 s and 0.4 J in the first group, 160 s and 4 J in the second group and 640 s and 16 J in the third group, respectively. The parameters of assessment before and after the therapy were: lumbar and leg pain measured by visual analogue scale (VAS, local and general functional changes (Schober test, manual muscle test, straight leg raise test and the modified North American Spine Society-Low Back Pain Outcome Instrument-NASS LBP. Results. Highly significant improvements (p < 0.01 were noted in all the groups after LLLT with respect to all the investigated parameters. The VAS scores were significantly lower in all the groups without a difference between the groups (p > 0,05. Functional improvements were better in the third group treated with the dose of 4 J per point than in other two groups (p < 0.05. Conclusions. Three different energy doses of LLLT were equally effective in alleviating lumbar and leg pain without side effects, but the dose of 4 J per point seemed

  8. Anterior cervical fusion versus minimally invasive posterior keyhole decompression for cervical radiculopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard M. Young

    2015-12-01

    Conclusion: ACDF has been demonstrated to be an effective surgical procedure in treating degenerative spine disease in patients with radiculopathy and/or myelopathy. However, in a population with isolated radiculopathy and radiological imaging confirming an anterolateral disc or osteophyte complex, the MIPKF can provide similar results without the associated risks that accompany an anterior cervical spine fusion.

  9. The use of metformin is associated with decreased lumbar radiculopathy pain

    OpenAIRE

    Taylor A; Westveld AH; Szkudlinska M; Guruguri P; Annabi E; Patwardhan A; Price TJ; Yassine HN

    2013-01-01

    Amber Taylor,1 Anton H Westveld,2,6 Magdalena Szkudlinska,1 Prathima Guruguri,1 Emil Annabi,3 Amol Patwardhan,3 Theodore J Price,4 Hussein N Yassine51Department of Medicine, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ, USA; 2Statistics Laboratory, Bio5 Institute, Statistics GIDP, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ, USA; 3Department of Anesthesia, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ, USA; 4Department of Pharmacology, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ, USA; 5Department of Medicine, University of Southern Ca...

  10. The use of metformin is associated with decreased lumbar radiculopathy pain [Erratum

    OpenAIRE

    Taylor A; Westveld AH; Szkudlinska M; Guruguri P; Annabi E; Patwardhan A; Price TJ; Yassine HN

    2014-01-01

    Taylor A, Westveld AH, Szkudlinska M, et al. J Pain Res. 2013;6:755–763. The notes section for Table 2 should read:Notes: Sections 1 and 2 are adapted from the short-form McGill pain questionnaire.19 Patients were asked to identify their pain with the provided scale. Melzack R. The short-form McGill Pain Questionnaire. Pain. 1987;30(2):191–197. The figure has been reproduced with permission of the International Association for the Study of Pain® (IASP). The figure may not be r...

  11. The use of metformin is associated with decreased lumbar radiculopathy pain [Erratum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taylor A

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Taylor A, Westveld AH, Szkudlinska M, et al. J Pain Res. 2013;6:755–763. The notes section for Table 2 should read:Notes: Sections 1 and 2 are adapted from the short-form McGill pain questionnaire.19 Patients were asked to identify their pain with the provided scale. Melzack R. The short-form McGill Pain Questionnaire. Pain. 1987;30(2:191–197. The figure has been reproduced with permission of the International Association for the Study of Pain® (IASP. The figure may not be reproduced for any other purpose without permission.Read the original article

  12. Optimal Duration of Conservative Management Prior to Surgery for Cervical and Lumbar Radiculopathy: A Literature Review

    OpenAIRE

    Alentado, Vincent J.; Lubelski, Daniel; Steinmetz, Michael P.; Benzel, Edward C.; Mroz, Thomas E.

    2014-01-01

    Study Design Literature review. Objective Since the 1970s, spine surgeons have commonly required 6 weeks of failed conservative treatment prior to considering surgical intervention for various spinal pathologies. It is unclear, however, if this standard has been validated in the literature. The authors review the natural history, outcomes, and cost-effectiveness studies relating to the current standard of 6 weeks of nonoperative care prior to surgery for patients with spinal pathologies. Meth...

  13. Hidden spondylolisthesis: unrecognized cause of low back pain? Prospective study about the use of dynamic projections in standing and recumbent position for the individuation of lumbar instability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dynamic X-rays (DXR) are widely recognized as an effective method to detect lumbar instability (LI). They are usually performed with the patient in standing position (SDXR). In our opinion, standing position inhibits micromovements of the lumbar segment interested by the listhesis, thanks to paravertebral muscles antalgic contraction and augmented tone. We aim to demonstrate that DXR in recumbent position (RDXR), reducing the action of paravertebral muscles, can discover hypermovements not evidenced in SDXR. Between January 2011 and January 2013, we studied 200 consecutive patients with lumbar degenerative disease with MRI, SDXR, and RDXR. We aimed to find a correlation between low back or radicular pain and the presence of a spondylolisthesis not showed by the SDXR, but showed by the RDXR. We analysed 200 patients: of the 133 not pathologic in SDXR, 43 patients (32.3 %) showed an hypermovement in RDXR (p = 0.0001) without any significant correlation between hidden listhesis and age, sex, or level involved. The aim of our study is to determine whether in patients with lumbalgy without evidence of listhesis in SDXR, pain can be attributed to a faccettal syndrome or to a spondylolisthesis. Consequence of pain is augmented muscular tone of the paravertebral musculature, particularly in standing position. Augmented muscular tone tries to inhibit the pain generator, attempting to limit the slippage of the involved segment. In patients examined in RDXR, the tone of paravertebral musculature is reduced, showing the hidden spondylolisthesis. (orig.)

  14. Hidden spondylolisthesis: unrecognized cause of low back pain? Prospective study about the use of dynamic projections in standing and recumbent position for the individuation of lumbar instability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Landi, Alessandro; Gregori, Fabrizio; Marotta, Nicola; Donnarumma, Pasquale; Delfini, Roberto [University of Rome - Policlinico Umberto I, Department of Neurology and Psychiatry, Division of Neurosurgery, Rome (Italy)

    2015-03-26

    Dynamic X-rays (DXR) are widely recognized as an effective method to detect lumbar instability (LI). They are usually performed with the patient in standing position (SDXR). In our opinion, standing position inhibits micromovements of the lumbar segment interested by the listhesis, thanks to paravertebral muscles antalgic contraction and augmented tone. We aim to demonstrate that DXR in recumbent position (RDXR), reducing the action of paravertebral muscles, can discover hypermovements not evidenced in SDXR. Between January 2011 and January 2013, we studied 200 consecutive patients with lumbar degenerative disease with MRI, SDXR, and RDXR. We aimed to find a correlation between low back or radicular pain and the presence of a spondylolisthesis not showed by the SDXR, but showed by the RDXR. We analysed 200 patients: of the 133 not pathologic in SDXR, 43 patients (32.3 %) showed an hypermovement in RDXR (p = 0.0001) without any significant correlation between hidden listhesis and age, sex, or level involved. The aim of our study is to determine whether in patients with lumbalgy without evidence of listhesis in SDXR, pain can be attributed to a faccettal syndrome or to a spondylolisthesis. Consequence of pain is augmented muscular tone of the paravertebral musculature, particularly in standing position. Augmented muscular tone tries to inhibit the pain generator, attempting to limit the slippage of the involved segment. In patients examined in RDXR, the tone of paravertebral musculature is reduced, showing the hidden spondylolisthesis. (orig.)

  15. Minimally Invasive Lumbar Discectomy

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Lumbar surgery, particularly from the micro-lumbar discectomy style, it is a very common procedure. Many patients ... muscles and get them functioning back into normal style. So I do not routinely send patients to ...

  16. Lumbar spine CT scan

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... an x-ray of the spinal cord and spinal nerve roots (myelography) or an x-ray of the disk (discography). ... spine Bone problems Fracture Lumbar disk herniation Lumbar spinal stenosis Spondylolisthesis

  17. Minimally Invasive Lumbar Discectomy

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Lumbar surgery, particularly from the micro-lumbar discectomy style, it is a very common procedure. Many patients ... have been around for a while, but the learning curve is quite steep. It takes some specialized ...

  18. Herniated Lumbar Disc

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herniated Lumbar Disc What is a herniated disc? Nonsurgical treatment Medication and pain management Surgery What can I expect after ... at and just below the waist. A herniated lumbar disc can press on the nerves in the spine ...

  19. The anterior flavum ligamentum space in lumbar nerve root compression: a comparison study of MG and CTM of 217 cases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To study the findings of lumbar nerve-roots compression in myelography (MG) and CT-myelography (CTM), proposing a new concept of anterior flavum ligament space (AFLS) and evaluate the AFLS as well as other findings in diagnosis of compressed lumbar radiculopathy, in order to guide lumbar plain CT study. Methods: The images of MG and CTM of 217 cases were reviewed, and the relative sites to the pediculus of L3∼S1 nerve roots getting out of the dural sac at each side, the width of AFLS, the width of superior outlet of lateral recess and the morphology of the disks and the sagittal diameter of the dural sac in L4 to S1 were recorded respectively. The relations of these parameters to the compressed swollen lumbar nerve roots shown in MG were analysed. Results: 254 lumbar nerve roots of 217 cases were swollen as shown in MG. The herniations or bulgings of intervertebral disk were found in 195 level with the diameter of the corresponding dural sac < 10 mm. The sensitivity was 71.4%, specificity was 82.9% and accuracy 80.2% for diagnosis of L-nerve root compression. The width of the superior outlet≤ 3mm was found in 286 lateral recesses, and it's sensitivity, specificity and accuracy were 55.1%, 86.1% and 80.0% respectively in the diagnosis of the lumbar compressed radiculopathy. 229 in 271 (90.2%) lumbar nerve roots were compressed and swollen as demonstrated in MG with the AFLS<5 mm. It's sensitivity was 90.2%, specificity 96.0% and accuracy 94.9% in the diagnosis of the lumbar compressed radiculopathy. The mean width of the AFLS with the corresponding swollen nerve root as shown in MG was 3.6 mm and the mean width of AFLS without the corresponding swollen nerve root shown in MG was 6.9 mm (P<0.001, U test). Conclusion: The AFLS<5 mm can be used as a valuable criterion in diagnosing lumbar nerve root compression in CT study

  20. Congenital Lumbar Hernia

    OpenAIRE

    Sanjay Sharma; Gagan Bali; Satish Parihar; Neeraj Koul

    2008-01-01

    Lumbar hernia is a rare hernia. It constitutes less than one percent of all abdominal hernias. It can becongenital or acquired. Acquired can occur either spontaneously or after surgery or trauma. Only 300cases of lumbar hernia are reported till date. We report a case of congenital lumbar hernia in one month oldmale baby

  1. Congenital Lumbar Hernia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanjay Sharma

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Lumbar hernia is a rare hernia. It constitutes less than one percent of all abdominal hernias. It can becongenital or acquired. Acquired can occur either spontaneously or after surgery or trauma. Only 300cases of lumbar hernia are reported till date. We report a case of congenital lumbar hernia in one month oldmale baby

  2. Idiopathic Lumbar Epidural Lipomatosis Mimicking Disc Herniation: A Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duran, Efe; Ilik, Kemal; Acar, Turker; Yıldız, Melda

    2016-05-01

    Spinal epidural lipomatosis is a rare condition which is described as the accumulation of fat in the extradural territory and often causes dural impingement. Spinal epidural lipomatosis has been implicated in causing a variety of neurologic impairments ranging from back pain, radiculopathy, claudication, myelopathy or even cauda equina syndrome. We report a 46-year-old female with obesity and a history of chronic back pain and radiculopathy who developed idiopathic Spinal epidural lipomatosis diagnosed by magnetic resonance imaging. The purpose of this report is to present a case of spinal epidural lipomatosis presenting with symptomatic cord compression and also remind this rare condition as a the differential diagnosis of epidural lesions in patients with risk factors. PMID:27309484

  3. Cervico thoracic junction spinal tuberculosis presenting as radiculopathy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gopalakrishnan D

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available A case of cervico thoracic junctional area spinal tuberculosis presenting as painful radiculitis of the upper extremity is reported. The predominant symptom of radicular pain and muscle weakness in the hand, along with a claw deformity, led to considerable delay in diagnosis. The presence of advanced bone destruction with severe instability was demonstrated on the MRI scan done later. Surgical management by radical anterior debridement and fusion, along with chemotherapy, led to resolution of the upper extremity symptoms. The brachial plexus radiculopathy secondary to tuberculosis has not been reported. The absence of myelopathic signs even in the presence of advanced bone destruction, thecal compression and instability is uncommon in adults.

  4. [Brachioradial pruritus as a symptom of cervical radiculopathy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mataix, J; Silvestre, J F; Climent, J M; Pastor, N; Lucas, A

    2008-11-01

    Brachioradial pruritus is characterized by the presence of pruritus on the lateral aspect of the arms. The etiology of this enigmatic entity is the subject of some debate some authors claim that brachioradial pruritus is a photodermatosis whereas others attribute it to the presence of underlying cervical radiculopathy. In these case reports, we present our experience with brachioradial pruritus and discuss the role of underlying neuropathy in its etiology and that of other types of localized pruritus such as notalgia paresthetica, anogenital pruritus, and burning mouth syndrome. PMID:19087811

  5. Co-occurrence of lumbar spondylolysis and lumbar disc herniation with lumbosacral nerve root anomaly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tevfik Yilmaz

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Lumbosacral nerve root anomalies are the leading cause of lumbar surgery failures. Although co-occurrence of lumbar spondylolysis and disc herniation is common, it is very rare to observe that a nerve root anomaly accompanies these lesions. A 49-year-old male patient presented with sudden-onset right leg pain. Examinations revealed L5/S1 lumbar spondylolysis and disc herniation. At preoperative period, he was also diagnosed with lumbosacral root anomaly. Following discectomy and root decompression, stabilization was performed. The complaints of the patient diagnosed with lumbosacral root anomaly at intraoperative period were improved at postoperative period. It should be remembered that in patients with lumbar disc herniation and spondylolysis, lumbar root anomalies may coexist when clinical and neurological picture is severe. Preoperative and perioperative assessments should be made meticulously to prevent neurological injury.

  6. Lumbar myelography in 79 dogs, using different puncture sites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lumbar myelography was performed in 79 dogs either before spinal surgery or as part of an investigation of neurological disease. In small dogs the site of the puncture was between L1 and L5, avoiding the lumbosacral intumescence, whereas in large dogs the site was between T13 and L2. It was found that a lumbar puncture cranial to the lumbar intumescence was easier and caused no problems. The lumbar puncture was unsuccessful in three obese dogs. In 72 per cent of the cases the myelogram revealed a lesion, and the main cause of a non-diagnostic myelogram was epidural leakage

  7. Assessment of Lumbar Spine Instability Using C-Arm Fluoroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Temes, Bill; Karas, Steve; Manwill, James

    2016-09-01

    A 47-year-old woman was referred to physical therapy with a diagnosis of lumbar radiculopathy. Weight-bearing flexion/extension radiographs showed no change in a 13-mm (at L5-S1) spondylolisthesis measured with a neutral posture. Physical therapy with a focus on flexion-biased stabilization exercises was initiated. After failing to improve after 6 weeks, her referring physician ordered magnetic resonance imaging, which revealed a 6-mm spondylolisthesis in a supine position. Additionally, the physical therapist performed an anterior stability test of L5 on S1 under C-arm fluoroscopy, which demonstrated a palpable shift of S1 posteriorly that was measured on imaging as a change from a 13-mm to a 17-mm spondylolisthesis. J Orthop Sports Phys Ther 2016;46(9):810. doi:10.2519/jospt.2016.0415. PMID:27581181

  8. Detecting the nerve function of fibril in patients with cervicalspondylotic radiculopathy using quantitative sensory testing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lang He; Ying Zhao

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Pain and sensory disability are greatly affected by subjective factors, there are no quantitative indexes to evaluate cervical spondylotic radiculopathy (CSR). The judgment on clinical body examination and chief complaint always causes nonobjective results with great individual differences. Quantitative sensory testing (QST) can be used to judge the nerve function of fibril. The application of QST for the quantitative evaluation of peripheral nervous system disease needs to be further studied.OBJECTIVE: The cold-thermal sensation and pain of patients with CSR are quantitatively analyzed by using QST technology in order to evaluate the nerve function of fibril in patients with CSR.DESIGN: Case-control observation.SETTING: Pain Center of Beijing Hospital of Ministry of Health.PARTICIPANTS: Twenty patients with CSR, including 8 males and 12 females, aged from 33 to 70 years, who received treatment between January and April 2005 in Pain Center of Beijing Hospital of Ministry of Health were involved in CSR group. All the involved patients presented symptoms in unilateral upper extremity (left side 10patients, right side 10 patients). They did not undergo physical therapy or nerve block therapy in 1 week before examination. Eight non-CSR patients who received treatment in Pain Center concurrently were involved in the control group (2 patients with trigeminal neuralgia, 4 with osteoarthrosis of knee joint and 2 with lumbar intervertebral disc protrusion), and another 12 healthy volunteers were involved. Four non-CSR patients and 12healthy volunteers, 8 male and 12 female, were aged from 23 to 75 years. The informed consents were obtained from all the involved subjects.METHODS: The volar thresholds of cold sensation, thermal sensation, cryalgesia of thenar eminence of both upper extremities of all the subjects were examined separately by limit method with type TSA- Ⅱ temperature sensation analysator made by Medco Company (Israel). The subjects were pre

  9. Lumbar Intraspinal Extradural Ganglion Cysts

    OpenAIRE

    Cho, Sung Min; Rhee, Woo Tack; Choi, Soo Jung; Eom, Dae Woon

    2009-01-01

    The lumbar intraspinal epidural ganglion cyst has been a rare cause of the low back pain or leg pain. Ganglion cysts and synovial cysts compose the juxtafacet cysts. Extensive studies have been performed about the synovial cysts, however, very little has been known about the ganglion cyst. Current report is about two ganglion cysts associated with implicative findings in young male patients. We discuss about the underlying pathology of the ganglion cyst based on intraoperative evidences, asso...

  10. Cervical transforaminal epidural steroid injection for the management of cervical radiculopathy: a comparative study of particulate versus non-particulate steroids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To determine if a particulate steroid which has a risk for embolic infarct would be more effective than a non-particulate steroid for transforaminal epidural steroid injection (TFESI). The purpose of this study was (1) to compare the effect of cervical TFESI using particulate (e.g., triamcinolone) and non-particulate (e.g., dexamethasone) steroids and (2) to evaluate the effectiveness of cervical TFESI in general. From January 2006 to August 2008, 159 consecutive patients [male:female (M:F) 89:70; mean age 53 years, range 33-75 years] who underwent cervical TFESI were included in this non-randomized study. For cervical TFESI, triamcinolone was injected into 97 patients and dexamethasone into 62 patients. Short-term follow-up was conducted within 1 month. The outcome was classified as effective or ineffective. Fisher's exact test was used to analyze the difference of outcome according to the injected steroid (triamcinolone vs dexamethasone). Other possible outcome predictors, such as age, gender, duration of radiculopathy, predominant symptom, attack of radiculopathy, cause of radiculopathy, number of nerve root compression levels, previous operation, and failure of previous interlaminar epidural injection, were also analyzed. Cervical TFESI using triamcinolone (78/97, 80.4%) was slightly more effective than that using dexamethasone (43/62, 69.4%), which was not significant (P = 0.129). In general, cervical TFESIs were effective in 121 of 159 patients (76.1%) at short-term follow-up. The only significant outcome predictor was whether the patient had had a previous operation (6/13, 46/2%) or not (115/146, 78.8%) (P = 0.015). There was no significant difference between particulate or non-particulate steroid for the effect of cervical TFESI. Cervical TFESI was effective in managing cervical radiculopathy in general. (orig.)

  11. Cervical transforaminal epidural steroid injection for the management of cervical radiculopathy: a comparative study of particulate versus non-particulate steroids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Joon Woo; Kang, Heung Sik [Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Department of Radiology, Gyeonggi-Do (Korea); Park, Kun Woo; Yeom, Jin S. [Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Gyeonggi-Do (Korea); Chung, Sang-Ki; Kim, Ki-Jeong; Kim, Hyun-Jib [Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Department of Neurosurgery, Gyeonggi-do (Korea)

    2009-11-15

    To determine if a particulate steroid which has a risk for embolic infarct would be more effective than a non-particulate steroid for transforaminal epidural steroid injection (TFESI). The purpose of this study was (1) to compare the effect of cervical TFESI using particulate (e.g., triamcinolone) and non-particulate (e.g., dexamethasone) steroids and (2) to evaluate the effectiveness of cervical TFESI in general. From January 2006 to August 2008, 159 consecutive patients [male:female (M:F) 89:70; mean age 53 years, range 33-75 years] who underwent cervical TFESI were included in this non-randomized study. For cervical TFESI, triamcinolone was injected into 97 patients and dexamethasone into 62 patients. Short-term follow-up was conducted within 1 month. The outcome was classified as effective or ineffective. Fisher's exact test was used to analyze the difference of outcome according to the injected steroid (triamcinolone vs dexamethasone). Other possible outcome predictors, such as age, gender, duration of radiculopathy, predominant symptom, attack of radiculopathy, cause of radiculopathy, number of nerve root compression levels, previous operation, and failure of previous interlaminar epidural injection, were also analyzed. Cervical TFESI using triamcinolone (78/97, 80.4%) was slightly more effective than that using dexamethasone (43/62, 69.4%), which was not significant (P = 0.129). In general, cervical TFESIs were effective in 121 of 159 patients (76.1%) at short-term follow-up. The only significant outcome predictor was whether the patient had had a previous operation (6/13, 46/2%) or not (115/146, 78.8%) (P = 0.015). There was no significant difference between particulate or non-particulate steroid for the effect of cervical TFESI. Cervical TFESI was effective in managing cervical radiculopathy in general. (orig.)

  12. Full-endoscopic interlaminar removal of chronic lumbar epidural hematoma after spinal manipulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yen-Po Cheng

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Spinal manipulation is widely used for low back pain treatments. Complications associated with spinal manipulation are seen. Lumbar epidural hematoma (EDH is one of the complications reported in the literature. If lumbar chronic EDH symptoms are present, which are similar to those of a herniated nucleus pulposus, surgery may be considered if medical treatment fails. Percutaneous endoscopic discectomy utilizing an interlaminar approach can be successfully applied to those with herniated nucleus pulposus. We use the same technique to remove the lumbar chronic EDH, which is the first documented report in the related literature. Methods: We present a case with chronic lumbar EDH associated with spinal manipulation. Neurologic deficits were noted on physical examination. We arranged for a full-endoscopic interlaminar approach to remove the hematoma for the patient with the rigid endoscopy (Vertebris system; Richard Wolf, Knittlingen, Germany. Results: After surgery, the patient′s radiculopathy immediately began to disappear. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI follow-up 10 days after the surgery revealed no residual hematoma. No complications were noted during the outpatient department follow up. Conclusions: Lumbar EDH is a possible complication of spinal manipulation. Patient experiencing rapidly progressive neurologic deficit require early surgical evacuation, while conservative treatment may only be applied to those with mild symptoms. A percutaneous full-endoscopic interlaminar approach may be a viable alternative for the treatment of those with chronic EDH with progressive neurologic deficits.

  13. Patient radiation exposure during transforaminal lumbar endoscopic spine surgery: a prospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iprenburg, Menno; Wagner, Ralf; Godschalx, Alexander; Telfeian, Albert E

    2016-02-01

    OBJECTIVE The aim of this study was to describe patient radiation exposure during single-level transforaminal endoscopic lumbar discectomy procedures at levels L2-5 and L5-S1. METHODS Radiation exposure was monitored in 151 consecutive patients undergoing single-level transforaminal endoscopic lumbar discectomy procedures. Two groups were studied: patients undergoing procedures at the L4-5 level or above and those undergoing an L5-S1 procedure. RESULTS For the discectomy procedures at L4-5 and above, the average duration of fluoroscopy was 38.4 seconds and the mean calculated patient radiation exposure dose was 1.5 mSv. For the L5-S1 procedures, average fluoroscopy time was 54.6 seconds and the mean calculated radiation exposure dose was 2.1 mSv. The average patient radiation exposure dose among these cases represents a 3.5-fold decrease compared with the senior surgeon's first 100 cases. CONCLUSIONS Transforaminal lumbar endoscopic discectomy can be used as a minimally invasive technique for the treatment of lumbar radiculopathy in the setting of a herniated lumbar disc without the significant concern of exposing the patient to harmful doses of radiation. One caveat is that both the surgeon and the patient are likely to be exposed to higher doses of radiation during a surgeon's early experience in minimally invasive endoscopic spine surgery. PMID:26828888

  14. A history of lumbar disc herniation from Hippocrates to the 1990s.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Truumees, Eeric

    2015-06-01

    In ancient times, a supernatural understanding of the syndrome of lumbar radiculopathy often involved demonic forces vexing the individual with often crippling pain. The ancient Greeks and Egyptians began to take a more naturalistic view and, critically, suspected a relationship between lumbar spinal pathology and leg symptoms. Relatively little then changed for those with sciatica until the classic works by Cotugno and Kocher arrived in the late 18th century. Early lumbar canal explorations were performed in the late 1800s and early 1900s by MacEwen, Horsley, Krause, Taylor, Dandy, and Cushing, among others. In these cases, when compressive pathologies were found and removed, the lesions typically were (mis-)identified as enchondromas or osteochondritis dissecans. To better understand the history, learn more about the first treatments of lumbar disc herniation, and evaluate the impact of the early influences on modern spine practice, searches of PubMed and Embase were performed using the search terms discectomy, medical history, lumbar spine surgery, herniated disc, herniated nucleus pulposus, sciatica, and lumbar radiculopathy. Additional sources were identified from the reference lists of the reviewed papers. Many older and ancient sources including De Ischiade Nervosa are available in English translations and were used. When full texts were not available, English abstracts were used. The first true, intentional discectomy surgery was performed by Mixter and Barr in 1932. Early on, a transdural approach was favored. In 1938, Love described the intralaminar, extradural approach. His technique, although modified with improved lighting, magnification, and retractors, remains a staple approach to disc herniations today. Other modalities such as chymopapain have been investigated. Some remain a part of the therapeutic armamentarium, whereas others have disappeared. By the 1970s, CT scanning after myelography markedly improved the clinical evaluation of patients with

  15. Lateral lumbar disc herniation: MR imaging findings and correlation with clinical symptoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To evaluate MRI findings of lateral lumbar disc herniations (LLDHs) and to determine whether those correlate with clinical symptoms. The study included 105 patients with LLDHs that were diagnosed by MRI. The distribution and location of the LLDHs (foraminal, extraforaminal, and foraminal and extraforaminal), the displacement of adjacent nerves, and the detection rate of LLDHs from axial and sagittal images were reviewed retrospectively by two radiologists. 36 patients were included in evaluating whether location of LLDHs and displacement of adjacent nerve correlate with radiculopathy. The distribution of the LLDHs were 3.4% at L1-2, 14.4% at L2-3, 33% at L3-4, 33% at L4-5, and 16.9% at L5-S1. The locations were foraminal in 38.6% of cases, extraforaminal in 45.4% of cases, and foraminal and extraforaminal in 16% of cases. In addition, 77.3% of the diagnosed LLDH cases displaced the adjacent nerve. The detection rates of LLDHs in the axial and sagittal images were 100% and 77.3%, respectively. In 36 patients, 47.4% had radiculopathy related to LLDHs. Location of LLDHs and displacement of adjacent nerve had no statistically significant difference between patients with or without radiculopathy. MRI is an effective method for evaluating the location of LLDHs and their influence on adjacent nerves. The axial image is more important than the sagittal image in diagnosing LLDHs. The location of LLDHs and the displacement of adjacent nerve were not found to be related to radiculopathy

  16. Lateral lumbar disc herniation: MR imaging findings and correlation with clinical symptoms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, So Young; Park, Ji Seon; Jin, Wook; Ryu, Kyung Nam [KyungHee University Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2008-03-15

    To evaluate MRI findings of lateral lumbar disc herniations (LLDHs) and to determine whether those correlate with clinical symptoms. The study included 105 patients with LLDHs that were diagnosed by MRI. The distribution and location of the LLDHs (foraminal, extraforaminal, and foraminal and extraforaminal), the displacement of adjacent nerves, and the detection rate of LLDHs from axial and sagittal images were reviewed retrospectively by two radiologists. 36 patients were included in evaluating whether location of LLDHs and displacement of adjacent nerve correlate with radiculopathy. The distribution of the LLDHs were 3.4% at L1-2, 14.4% at L2-3, 33% at L3-4, 33% at L4-5, and 16.9% at L5-S1. The locations were foraminal in 38.6% of cases, extraforaminal in 45.4% of cases, and foraminal and extraforaminal in 16% of cases. In addition, 77.3% of the diagnosed LLDH cases displaced the adjacent nerve. The detection rates of LLDHs in the axial and sagittal images were 100% and 77.3%, respectively. In 36 patients, 47.4% had radiculopathy related to LLDHs. Location of LLDHs and displacement of adjacent nerve had no statistically significant difference between patients with or without radiculopathy. MRI is an effective method for evaluating the location of LLDHs and their influence on adjacent nerves. The axial image is more important than the sagittal image in diagnosing LLDHs. The location of LLDHs and the displacement of adjacent nerve were not found to be related to radiculopathy.

  17. Lumbosacral transitional vertebra and S1 radiculopathy: the value of coronal MR imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bezuidenhout, Abraham Fourie; Lotz, Jan Willem [Stellenbosch University, Division of Radiodiagnosis, Department of Medical Imaging and Clinical Oncology, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, Tygerberg (South Africa)

    2014-06-15

    The association of a lumbosacral transitional vertebra with accelerated degeneration of the disc above has been described. Lumbosacral transitional vertebrae have also been reported as a cause of extraforaminal entrapment of the L5 nerve root between the transverse segment of the transitional vertebra and the sacral ala optimally demonstrated by coronal MRI. The association of the lumbosacral transitional vertebra pseudoarthroses and S1 nerve root entrapment due to degenerative stenosis of the nerve root canal has never been described. We present 12 patients with lumbosacral transitional vertebrae that were referred for symptoms and signs of S1 nerve root radiculopathy in which the sagittal and axial MRI sequences failed to identify a plausible cause for the patients' S1 nerve root symptoms. A coronal T1-weighted imaging (T1WI) MRI sequence was consequently added to the investigation. The coronal T1WI MRI sequence demonstrated hypertrophic degenerative stenosis of the S1 nerve root canal at the level of the lumbosacral transitional vertebra pseudoarthrosis, with entrapment of the respective S1 nerve root in all patients. We emphasize the value of coronal T1WI MRI of the lumbosacral junction and sacrum if the cause for S1 radicular symptoms was not identified on conventional sagittal and axial MRI sequences in patients with lumbosacral transitional vertebrae. (orig.)

  18. QUANTITATIVE SIZE ASSESSMENT OF THE LUMBAR SPINAL CANAL BY COMPUTED TOMOGRAPHY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Midia Z. Miabi

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available By determining normal ranges of spinal canal diameters we can make early diagnosis in persons who have lower diameters of spinal canal. These persons are predisposed to spinal canal stenosis that is a major cause of spinal radiculopathies. In different studies performed in several countries, minimum and maximum ranges of spinal canal diameters were different for each population. In this study, we tried to determine the mean values of normal spinal canal diameters and areas in Tabriz and its suburb. 39 healthy, young to mid-age cases were selected. Our study was focused on L3-L4 and L4-L5. The following parameters were measured: the area of cross-section of the vertebral body, the area of cross-section of the dural sac, interarticular diameter, interligamentous diameter, antero-posterior diameter of the lumbar canal, inter-pedicular diameter, and the area of cross-section of the vertebral canal. A correlation between the parameters studied and the height of subjects was significant for interligamentous diameter (for L3/L4 and L4/L5 and interarticular diameter (only at L3/L4, cross-section area of the vertebrae (both L3 and L4, cross-section area of vertebral canal (only at L5 level, area of dural sac (at L3/L4 and L4. It was suggested that these diameters and areas should be interpreted as a unction of height of the subject. Most of diameters studied had smaller means than those in previous studies. This can be attributed to differences between populations and it can be interpreted as predisposition to spinal canal stenosis in our population.

  19. Automatic Lumbar Spondylolisthesis Measurement in CT Images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Shu; Zhan, Yiqiang; Dong, Zhongxing; Yan, Ruyi; Gong, Liyan; Zhou, Xiang Sean; Salganicoff, Marcos; Fei, Jun

    2016-07-01

    Lumbar spondylolisthesis is one of the most common spinal diseases. It is caused by the anterior shift of a lumbar vertebrae relative to subjacent vertebrae. In current clinical practices, staging of spondylolisthesis is often conducted in a qualitative way. Although meyerding grading opens the door to stage spondylolisthesis in a more quantitative way, it relies on the manual measurement, which is time consuming and irreproducible. Thus, an automatic measurement algorithm becomes desirable for spondylolisthesis diagnosis and staging. However, there are two challenges. 1) Accurate detection of the most anterior and posterior points on the superior and inferior surfaces of each lumbar vertebrae. Due to the small size of the vertebrae, slight errors of detection may lead to significant measurement errors, hence, wrong disease stages. 2) Automatic localize and label each lumbar vertebrae is required to provide the semantic meaning of the measurement. It is difficult since different lumbar vertebraes have high similarity of both shape and image appearance. To resolve these challenges, a new auto measurement framework is proposed with two major contributions: First, a learning based spine labeling method that integrates both the image appearance and spine geometry information is designed to detect lumbar vertebrae. Second, a hierarchical method using both the population information from atlases and domain-specific information in the target image is proposed for most anterior and posterior points positioning. Validated on 258 CT spondylolisthesis patients, our method shows very similar results to manual measurements by radiologists and significantly increases the measurement efficiency. PMID:26849859

  20. MANAGEMENT OF LUMBAR SPINAL CANAL STENOSIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mukhergee G. S

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Spinal stenosis is one of the most common conditions in the elderly. It is defined as a narrowing of the spinal canal. The term stenosis is derived from the Greek word for narrow, which is “Stenos”. The first description of this condition is attributed to Antoine portal in 1803. Verbiest is credited with coining the term spinal stenosis and the associated narrowing of the spinal canal as its potential cause. [1-10] Kirkaldy–Willis subsequently described the degenerative cascade in the lumbar spine as the cause for the altered anatomy and pathophysiology in spinal stenosis. [11-15] If compression does not occur, the canal should be described as narrow but not stenotic. Some studies defined lumbar spinal stenosis as a “narrowing of the osteoligamentous vertebral canal and/or the intervertebral foramina causing compression of the thecal sac and/or the caudal nerve roots; at a single vertebral level, narrowing may affect the whole canal or part of it” (Postacchini 1983. This definition distinguished between disc herniation and stenosis. [16] . The most common type of spinal stenosis is caused by degenerative arthritis of the spine. Hypertrophy and ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament which usually are confined to the cervical spine, and diffuse idiopathic skeletal hyperostosis (DISH syndrome also may result in an acquired form of spinal stenosis. Congenital forms caused by disorders such as achondroplasia and dysplastic spondylolisthesis are much less common. Congenital spinal stenosis usually is central and is evident or imaging studies. Idiopathic congenital narrowing usually involves the anteroposterior dimension of the canal secondary to short pedicles; the patient otherwise is normal. In contrast, in achondroplasia, the canal is narrowed in the anteroposterior plane owing to shortened pedicles and in lateral dimension because of diminished interpedicular distance. Acquired forms of spinal stenosis usually are

  1. Midline lumbar ganglion/synovial cyst mimicking an epidural tumor: case report and review of pathogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azzam, C J

    1988-08-01

    A case of a midline lumbar extradural ganglion/synovial cyst causing lumbar canal stenosis and mimicking an epidural tumor is presented. The lesion was demonstrated by a magnetic resonance imaging study, and relief of symptoms was achieved with decompressive laminectomy and total removal of the mass. The pathogenesis of lumbar ganglion/synovial cyst is reviewed. PMID:2972941

  2. Lumbar Disc Degenerative Disease: Disc Degeneration Symptoms and Magnetic Resonance Image Findings

    OpenAIRE

    Saleem, Shafaq; Aslam, Hafiz Muhammad; Rehmani, Muhammad Asim Khan; Raees, Aisha; Alvi, Arsalan Ahmad; Ashraf, Junaid

    2013-01-01

    Study Design Cross sectional and observational. Purpose To evaluate the different aspects of lumbar disc degenerative disc disease and relate them with magnetic resonance image (MRI) findings and symptoms. Overview of Literature Lumbar disc degenerative disease has now been proven as the most common cause of low back pain throughout the world. It may present as disc herniation, lumbar spinal stenosis, facet joint arthropathy or any combination. Presenting symptoms of lumbar disc degeneration ...

  3. Degenerative lumbar stenosis: update Estenose lombar degenerativa: atualização

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrei F. Joaquim

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available We present a literature review of the diagnosis and treatment of acquired lumbar spinal stenosis (LS, with a brief description of new surgical techniques. LS is the most common cause of spinal surgery in individuals older than 65 years of age. Neurogenic claudication and radiculopathy result from compression of the cauda equina and lumbosacral nerve roots by degenerated spinal elements. Surgical decompression is a well established treatment for patients with refractory, or moderate to severe clinical symptoms. However, the variety of surgical options is vast. New techniques have been developed with the goal of increasing long term functional outcomes. In this article we review lumbar decompression and fusion as treatment options for LS but also present other recent developments. Prospective long term studies are necessary to know which procedures would result in optimal patient outcome.Apresentamos uma revisão de literatura do diagnóstico e tratamento da estenose lombar (EL adquirida, enfatizando as novas técnicas de manejo cirúrgico. A EL é a causa mais comum de cirurgia na coluna de pacientes com mais de 65 anos de idade. Claudicação neurogênica e radiculopatias são sintomas resultantes da compressão das raízes lombossacrais pelos elementos degenerados. A descompressão cirúrgica é um procedimento bem estabelecido para pacientes com sintomas severos ou refratários ao tratamento clínico. Contudo, as opções cirúrgicas são amplas. Novas técnicas de fusão e artrodese são úteis para melhorar os resultados funcionais. Neste artigo, varias alternativas cirúrgicas são apresentadas, incluindo as novas tecnologias na área. Evidências científicas mais contundentes com seguimento longo são necessárias para a incorporação destas práticas na atividade médica de rotina.

  4. Prolonged conservative treatment or 'early' surgery in sciatica caused by a lumbar disc herniation: rationale and design of a randomized trial [ISRCT 26872154

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tans Joseph

    2005-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The design of a randomized multicenter trial is presented on the effectiveness of a prolonged conservative treatment strategy compared with surgery in patients with persisting intense sciatica (lumbosacral radicular syndrome. Methods/design Patients presenting themselves to their general practitioner with disabling sciatica lasting less than twelve weeks are referred to the neurology outpatient department of one of the participating hospitals. After confirmation of the diagnosis and surgical indication MRI scanning is performed. If a distinct disc herniation is discerned which in addition covers the clinically expected site the patient is eligible for randomization. Depending on the outcome of the randomization scheme the patient will either be submitted to prolonged conservative care or surgery. Surgery will be carried out according to the guidelines and between six and twelve weeks after onset of complaints. The experimental therapy consists of a prolonged conservative treatment under supervision of the general practitioner, which may be followed by surgical intervention in case of persisting or progressive disability. The main primary outcome measure is the disease specific disability of daily functioning. Other primary outcome measures are perceived recovery and intensity of legpain. Secondary outcome measures encompass severity of complaints, quality of life, medical consumption, absenteeism, costs and preference. The main research question will be answered at 12 months after randomization. The total follow-up period covers two years. Discussion Evidence is lacking concerning the optimal treatment of lumbar disc induced sciatica. This pragmatic randomized trial, focusses on the 'timing' of intervention, and will contribute to the decision of the general practictioner and neurologist, regarding referral of patients for surgery.

  5. Post traumatic retroperitoneal fibrosis as a cause of low-back pain Fibrosis retroperitoneal postraumática como causa de dolor lumbar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.M. Hidalgo-Ovejero

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available We present the case of a male patient with post traumatic retroperitoneal fibrosis whose main clinical expression was low-back pain. Diagnosis was established using CAT-scan and MRI, which revealed a large mass of soft tissue that almost entirely enveloped the abdominal aorta. Treatment with 40 mg of prednisone every 24 hours was established. This dose was reduced gradually, and progressive remission of clinical signs and symptoms was achieved, with a significant improvement of subsequent imaging-test results. Treatment was continued for one year. Two and a half years later the patient remains symptom-free, with no recurrence of his condition.Se presenta el caso de un paciente varón afecto de una fibrosis retroperitoneal postraumática, a cuyo diagnóstico se llegó a partir de dolor lumbar como síntoma principal. El diagnóstico se efectuó en base a los estudios mediante CT y RM, los cuales demostraron una gran masa de tejido de partes blandas que rodeaban la aorta. El tratamiento consistió en dosis de prednisona que inicialmente se instauró a 40 mg cada 24 horas, y posteriormente se fue reduciendo de forma gradual hasta la remisión de los signos y síntomas, y consecuentemente de los estudios de imagen. El tratamiento con corticoides se mantuvo durante un año. Dos años y medio el paciente está libre de síntomas sin recidiva de su proceso.

  6. EFFECTIVENESS OF TENS VERSUS INTERMITTENT CERVICAL TRACTION IN PATIENTS WITH CERVICAL RADICULOPATHY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Himanshi Sharma

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Cervical radiculopathy is a dysfunction of nerve root of the cervical spine where C6& C7 nerve roots are the most commonly affected. It encompasses important symptoms other than pain, such as paresthesia, numbness and muscle weakness in dermatomal or myotomal distribution of an affected nerve root. A multitude of physical therapy interventions have been proposed to be effective in the management of cervical radiculopathy, including mechanical cervical traction, manipulation, therapeutic exercises and TENS. Studies to find out the effectiveness of TENS versus Intermittent Cervical Traction among patients with Cervical Radiculopathy are sparse. Hence the present study was undertaken to find out and compare effectiveness of TENS versus Intermittent Cervical Traction a newer technique towards betterment in treatment of cervical radiculopathy patients. Methodology: 30 patients from Baroda association for the blind (Lions club of Baroda, Subhanpura & Sushrut Physiotherapy Clinic, Akota were chosen based on the inclusion and exclusion criteria. Group A comprised of 15 people with cervical radiculopathy were given TENS with Isometric neck exercises and active neck movements. Group B comprised of 15 people with cervical radiculopathy were given Intermittent Cervical Traction with Isometric neck exercise and active neck movements. VAS Scale & Neck Disability Index (NDI were used as outcome measures pre & post treatment. Results: The pre test evaluation showed that, there is no significant difference (P> 0.05 between the two groups for all the variables measured. The post-test evaluation of both groups showed a very high significance (P< 0.05 within the group for all the outcome measurements. A post-test comparison of measured variables, between the groups showed that the Group A demonstrated a statistically significant (P< 0.05 reduction in pain and Neck Disability Index. Conclusion: From the above study concluded that TENS was more effective

  7. Lumbar discoidectomy by minimal incision

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objective is to review the experience with the presented technique. Background: Lumbar disc herniation is the most frequent cause of low back pain, becoming a disabling condition. There are multiple surgical procedures to treat lumbar disc herniation; however, review of the literature found similar outcomes within open and percutaneous techniques. Materials and methods: Seventy patients with lumbar disc herniation were operated within 1990 and 2003, 38 years-old of mean age, 6 years 3 months of mean follow-up. Results were evaluated by Spain type, severity of herniation, and presence of neurological deficit, preoperative treatment, and complications and assessment of outcomes according to Ebeling's Scale. Results: 91% of disc herniation were by a physical mechanism. 57% were protruded disc herniation; most common paint type was lumbo-radicular (83%). Disturbances Motor improved in 100% and 69% of sensitive. There were no infections. According to Ebeling's Scale, 94,3% of patients had excellent outcomes, 4.3% well and 1.4% had regular outcomes. Recommendations: The minimally invasive technique is safe and has low incidence of complications, this promotes early clinical recovery and reintegration to daily and laboral activities. Costs are less with this technique than the microsurgical technique because of this does not require of high-technology equipment

  8. What is the Role of Epidural Injections in the Treatment of Lumbar Discogenic Pain: A Systematic Review of Comparative Analysis with Fusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staats, Peter S.; Nampiaparampil, Devi E.; Hirsch, Joshua A.

    2015-01-01

    Background Lumbar discogenic pain without pain mediated by a disc herniation, facet joints, or the sacroiliac joints, is common and often results in chronic, persistent pain and disability. After conservative treatment failure, injection therapy, such as an epidural injection, is frequently the next step considered in managing discogenic pain. The objective of this systematic review is to determine the efficacy of lumbar epidural injections in managing discogenic pain without radiculopathy, and compare this approach to lumbar fusion or disc arthroplasty surgery. Methods A systematic review of randomized trials published from 1966 through October 2014 of all types of epidural injections and lumbar fusion or disc arthroplasty in managing lumbar discogenic pain was performed with methodological quality assessment and grading of evidence. The level of evidence was based on the grading of evidence criteria which, was conducted using 5 levels of evidence ranging from levels I to V. Results Based on a qualitative assessment of the evidence for both approaches, there is Level II evidence for epidural injections, either caudal or lumbar interlaminar. Conclusions The available evidence suggests fluoroscopically directed epidural injections provide long-term improvement in back and lower extremity pain for patients with lumbar discogenic pain. There is also limited evidence showing the potential effectiveness of surgical interventions compared to nonsurgical treatments. PMID:25852828

  9. Minimally Invasive Lumbar Discectomy

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... invasive microscopic lumbar discectomy.” Now this is a patient who a 46-year-old woman who had ... style, it is a very common procedure. Many patients throughout the country and the world have herniated ...

  10. Minimally Invasive Lumbar Discectomy

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... not improve and we have on the MRI study a demonstrable compression of the nerve, which correlates ... lumbar nerve roots. But without getting some imaging studies, you’re really not going to know for ...

  11. Minimally Invasive Lumbar Discectomy

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... to make an appropriate diagnosis. And that, by far, is the best option that there is for ... a diagnostic test, and an MRI is by far the gold standard for evaluation of the lumbar ...

  12. Minimally Invasive Lumbar Discectomy

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... minimally invasive approach in terms of, you know, effectiveness of treating lumbar herniations? 2 Well, the minimally ... think it’s important to stress here that the effectiveness of this procedure is about the same as ...

  13. Herniated lumbar disc

    OpenAIRE

    Jordon, Jo; Konstantinou, Kika; O'Dowd, John

    2011-01-01

    Herniated lumbar disc is a displacement of disc material (nucleus pulposus or annulus fibrosis) beyond the intervertebral disc space. The highest prevalence is among people aged 30 to 50 years, with a male to female ratio of 2:1.

  14. Minimally Invasive Lumbar Discectomy

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... on the type of job that the work environment, they can go to work right after I ... MRI is by far the gold standard for evaluation of the lumbar spine. Okay. If they can’ ...

  15. Minimally Invasive Lumbar Discectomy

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... the lumbar nerve roots. But without getting some imaging studies, you’re really not going to know ... to what’s going on, but he really needs imaging study, and that really, today, relies on an ...

  16. Minimally Invasive Lumbar Discectomy

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... a bony spur, or whether it’s a degenerative process that lumbar spinal stenosis, which is a very ... a little bit more. I mean with conservative management, people think about taking the non-steroidal anti- ...

  17. Minimally Invasive Lumbar Discectomy

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... inside the MRI. But MRI is really the gold standard for diagnosing these types of conditions. What ... test, and an MRI is by far the gold standard for evaluation of the lumbar spine. Okay. ...

  18. Jingtong Granule: A Chinese Patent Medicine for Cervical Radiculopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liguo Zhu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. This paper systematically assessed the efficacy and safety of Jingtong granule (JG for cervical radiculopathy (CR. Methods. Randomized controlled trials comparing JG with no intervention, placebo, or conventional therapies were retrieved. The trials testing JG combined with conventional therapies versus conventional therapies were also enrolled. Study selection, methodological assessment, data extraction, and analysis were conducted in accordance with the Cochrane standards. The strength of evidence was evaluated according to GRADE approach. Results. Three trials with 400 participants were included. Methodological quality was evaluated as generally low. One study found that JG showed significant difference on decreasing pain scores compared with placebo. Meta-analysis indicated that JG plus conventional analgesic exhibited a significant immediate effect on the pain scores (WMD = 1.63; 95% CI: 1.29 to 1.98; P<0.00001. Additionally, JG combined with analgesic presented beneficial immediate effect on neck disability index. However, the treatment effects of JG demonstrated in the trials were not large, and the safety of JG was unproven. Finally the evidence level was evaluated to be low. Conclusions. Our results indicated that JG showed some potential benefits for CR. Nevertheless, treatment effects are uncertain due to both the methodological concerns and the very modest reported improvements.

  19. Jingtong Granule: A Chinese Patent Medicine for Cervical Radiculopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Liguo; Gao, Jinghua; Yu, Jie; Feng, Minshan; Li, Jinyu; Wang, Shangquan; Wei, Xu

    2015-01-01

    Objective. This paper systematically assessed the efficacy and safety of Jingtong granule (JG) for cervical radiculopathy (CR). Methods. Randomized controlled trials comparing JG with no intervention, placebo, or conventional therapies were retrieved. The trials testing JG combined with conventional therapies versus conventional therapies were also enrolled. Study selection, methodological assessment, data extraction, and analysis were conducted in accordance with the Cochrane standards. The strength of evidence was evaluated according to GRADE approach. Results. Three trials with 400 participants were included. Methodological quality was evaluated as generally low. One study found that JG showed significant difference on decreasing pain scores compared with placebo. Meta-analysis indicated that JG plus conventional analgesic exhibited a significant immediate effect on the pain scores (WMD = 1.63; 95% CI: 1.29 to 1.98; P < 0.00001). Additionally, JG combined with analgesic presented beneficial immediate effect on neck disability index. However, the treatment effects of JG demonstrated in the trials were not large, and the safety of JG was unproven. Finally the evidence level was evaluated to be low. Conclusions. Our results indicated that JG showed some potential benefits for CR. Nevertheless, treatment effects are uncertain due to both the methodological concerns and the very modest reported improvements. PMID:26064154

  20. Modic改变在腰椎间盘退变中的意义%The significance of Modic change in lumbar disc degeneration

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    马铮; 丁文元; 杨大龙; 孙亚澎; 张立军

    2013-01-01

    Concerning the Modic change of lumbar spinal endplate, the Modic change types, forming causes, and the relationship between Modic change and degenerative lumbar diseases have been studied from anatomy, pathology, molecular biology and many other aspects at present. The degeneration of lumbar disc is a high risk factor of the Modic change. The degeneration of lumbar disc usually starts from cartilage endplate degeneration. The injury of cartilage endplate could accelerate the degeneration of lumbar disc. This article reviews the significance of Modic change of lumbar spinal endplate in lumbar disc degeneration. The cause of Modic change of the endplate, pathological change, the influence of inflammatory mediators on the endplate and the significance of Modic change in the treatment of degenerative lumbar diseases are summarized to analyze the relationship between the degeneration of lumbar disc and Modic change of endplate and to describe the influence of Modic change in the treatment of degenerative lumbar disc diseases.

  1. [Lumbar disc herniation and andrological diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Bao-fang

    2015-10-01

    Lumbar disc herniation is a common male disease. In the past, More academic attention was directed to its relationship with lumbago and leg pain than to its association with andrological diseases. Studies show that central lumber intervertebral disc herniation may cause cauda equina injury and result in premature ejaculation, erectile dysfunction, chronic pelvic pain syndrome, priapism, and emission. This article presents an overview on the correlation between central lumbar intervertebral disc herniation and andrological diseases, focusing on the aspects of etiology, pathology, and clinical progress, hoping to invite more attention from andrological and osteological clinicians. PMID:26665671

  2. L5 radiculopathy due to sacral stress fracture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report the case of a 70-year-old man who presented with a history of left buttock pain with radiation into the left leg in an L5 distribution. MRI of the lumbar spine revealed a left sacral stress fracture with periosteal reaction involving the left L5 nerve root anterior to the sacral ala. With spontaneous healing of the fracture, the patient's symptoms resolved completely. (orig.)

  3. L5 radiculopathy due to sacral stress fracture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aylwin, Anthony; Saifuddin, Asif [Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Royal National Orthopaedic Hospital NHS Trust, HA7 4LP, Stanmore, Middlesex (United Kingdom); Tucker, Stuart [Department of Spinal Surgery, Royal National Orthopaedic Hospital NHS Trust, HA7 4LP, Stanmore, Middlesex (United Kingdom)

    2003-10-01

    We report the case of a 70-year-old man who presented with a history of left buttock pain with radiation into the left leg in an L5 distribution. MRI of the lumbar spine revealed a left sacral stress fracture with periosteal reaction involving the left L5 nerve root anterior to the sacral ala. With spontaneous healing of the fracture, the patient's symptoms resolved completely. (orig.)

  4. Minimally invasive procedures on the lumbar spine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skovrlj, Branko; Gilligan, Jeffrey; Cutler, Holt S; Qureshi, Sheeraz A

    2015-01-16

    Degenerative disease of the lumbar spine is a common and increasingly prevalent condition that is often implicated as the primary reason for chronic low back pain and the leading cause of disability in the western world. Surgical management of lumbar degenerative disease has historically been approached by way of open surgical procedures aimed at decompressing and/or stabilizing the lumbar spine. Advances in technology and surgical instrumentation have led to minimally invasive surgical techniques being developed and increasingly used in the treatment of lumbar degenerative disease. Compared to the traditional open spine surgery, minimally invasive techniques require smaller incisions and decrease approach-related morbidity by avoiding muscle crush injury by self-retaining retractors, preventing the disruption of tendon attachment sites of important muscles at the spinous processes, using known anatomic neurovascular and muscle planes, and minimizing collateral soft-tissue injury by limiting the width of the surgical corridor. The theoretical benefits of minimally invasive surgery over traditional open surgery include reduced blood loss, decreased postoperative pain and narcotics use, shorter hospital length of stay, faster recover and quicker return to work and normal activity. This paper describes the different minimally invasive techniques that are currently available for the treatment of degenerative disease of the lumbar spine. PMID:25610845

  5. Analysis of concurrent severe sciatica without pressure cause following lumbar spinal surgery%腰椎管术后并发无致压因素剧烈坐骨神经痛的剖析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    倪凤民; 宋恒平; 王平均; 张皓; 陈睿; 杨小龙

    2013-01-01

    Objective To explore the reasons of concurrent severe sciatica without pressure cause following lumbar spinal surgery in a short term,to provide ideas for processing. Methods The patient characteristics and treatment of 12 cases of concurrent severe sciatica following lumbar spinal surgery shortly which appeared between October 2004 to August 2011 lumbar are reviewed, analyze the possible factors,and evaluate the effectiveness of treatment measures. Results The males in 12 cases are 3 cases, females are 9 cases,2 cases broke out after anesthesia disappear hours latter, the others for 1-2 days after the operations,presented lower limb pain just like which were tored or were cut by knife, pure sick limb pain are 10 cases,only healthy limb pain in 1,1 case of sick limb pain with healthy limb. Nothing had been found to pressure roots during the healing process. Calm、diminish inflammation、 dehydration,nourish nerve and so on,all patients get rid of their pain during staying be in hospital, the longest condition lasted 1 month,follow-up half year-2 years, did not see the repetition symptoms. Conclusion The physique factors, segmental aseptic inflammation around nerve root, root sensitization and root reaction caused by the sudden change of roots pathological environment and so on may be the reasons which lead to their emergency response sciatica.%目的 探讨腰椎管手术后短期内出现无椎管内致压因素的剧烈坐骨神经痛的原因,为处理提供思路.方法 对2004-10-2011-08月腰椎术后短期内发生剧烈坐骨神经痛的12例患者的病情特点及治疗进行回顾,分析产生症状的可能因素,评价处置措施的有效性.结果 12例中男3例,女9例,2例术后麻醉消失数小时后发作,其他为术后1~2 d发作,呈现撕裂样、刀割样下肢串痛,单纯患肢痛10例,单纯健肢痛1例,伴有健肢痛1例.治疗过程中未发现手术节段有任何致压物.镇静、消炎、脱水、神经营养神经治疗后,

  6. POST - OPERATIVE NEUROLOGICAL RECOVERY PATTERN IN DEGENERATIVE CERVICAL MYELOPATHY AND RADICULOPATHY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raju B

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE : To study the neurological recovery pattern and clinical recovery after surgical intervention in patients of degenerative cervical myelopathy and radiculopathy to know the surgical outcome, at L okmanya T ilak M unicipal M edical C ollege , Mumbai, Maharashtra . METHOD : We ca rried out prospective and retrospective observational study of 30 patients with functional disability secondary to cervical degenerative myelopathy and radiculopathy who underwent surgery for decompression of the cervical spinal cord with or without spinal stabilization. March 2012 to March 2013 were studied and followed for more than 1year. All patients were operated by a single surgeon and reviewed independently. All the patients had received appropriate conservative management before undergoing surgical intervention . Data was analysed by using appropriate software. RESULTS : The study group comprised of 27 males and 3 females aged between 36 and 75 years with a mean age of 56 years that presented with functional disability secondary to cervical myelopathy and radiculopathy. Pain and neurological examination were used as criteria at sequential follow – ups. Functional outcome was assessed using Japanese Orthopaedic Association score, Oswestry Disability Index and Visual Analogue Scale. It was found that neuro logical recovery for myelopathy by mJOA score at intervals between 15 days to 3 months was significant after which recovery was occurring but was not significant. Anterior cervical discectomy with fusion for 1 - 2 levels has given good results than posterior laminectomy for 3 or more levels. Cervical radiculopathy alone has good recovery results after decompression surgery than myelopathy or myelopathy with radiculopathy. CONCLUSION: Based on this study, we found that the results of surgery for cervical spon dylotic myelopathy and radiculopathy are excellent. The best neurological and functional recovery is seen in patients with mild to moderate

  7. Partial Facetectomy for Lumbar Foraminal Stenosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kevin Kang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Several different techniques exist to address the pain and disability caused by isolated nerve root impingement. Failure to adequately decompress the lumbar foramen may lead to failed back surgery syndrome. However, aggressive treatment often causes spinal instability or may require fusion for satisfactory results. We describe a novel technique for decompression of the lumbar nerve root and demonstrate its effectiveness in relief of radicular symptoms. Methods. Partial facetectomy was performed by removal of the medial portion of the superior facet in patients with lumbar foraminal stenosis. 47 patients underwent the procedure from 2001 to 2010. Those who demonstrated neurogenic claudication without spinal instability or central canal stenosis and failed conservative management were eligible for the procedure. Functional level was recorded for each patient. These patients were followed for an average of 3.9 years to evaluate outcomes. Results. 27 of 47 patients (57% reported no back pain and no functional limitations. Eight of 47 patients (17% reported moderate pain, but had no limitations. Six of 47 patients (13% continued to experience degenerative symptoms. Five of 47 patients (11% required additional surgery. Conclusions. Partial facetectomy is an effective means to decompress the lumbar nerve root foramen without causing spinal instability.

  8. Results of arthrospine assisted percutaneous technique for lumbar discectomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohinder Kaushal

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Avaialable minimal invasive arthro/endoscopic techniques are not compatible with 30 degree arthroscope which orthopedic surgeons uses in knee and shoulder arthroscopy. Minimally invasive “Arthrospine assisted percutaneous technique for lumbar discectomy” is an attempt to allow standard familiar microsurgical discectomy and decompression to be performed using 30° arthroscope used in knee and shoulder arthroscopy with conventional micro discectomy instruments. Materials and Methods: 150 patients suffering from lumbar disc herniations were operated between January 2004 and December 2012 by indiginously designed Arthrospine system and were evaluated retrospectively. In lumbar discectomy group, there were 85 males and 65 females aged between 18 and 72 years (mean, 38.4 years. The delay between onset of symptoms to surgery was between 3 months to 7 years. Levels operated upon included L1-L2 (n = 3, L2-L3 (n = 2, L3-L4 (n = 8, L4-L5 (n = 90, and L5-S1 (n = 47. Ninety patients had radiculopathy on right side and 60 on left side. There were 22 central, 88 paracentral, 12 contained, 3 extraforaminal, and 25 sequestrated herniations. Standard protocol of preoperative blood tests, x-ray LS Spine and pre operative MRI and pre anaesthetic evaluation for anaesthesia was done in all cases. Technique comprised localization of symptomatic level followed by percutaneous dilatation and insertion of a newly devised arthrospine system devise over a dilator through a 15 mm skin and fascial incision. Arthro/endoscopic discectomy was then carried out by 30° arthroscope and conventional disc surgery instruments. Results: Based on modified Macnab's criteria, of 150 patients operated for lumbar discectomy, 136 (90% patients had excellent to good, 12 (8% had fair, and 2 patients (1.3% had poor results. The complications observed were discitis in 3 patients (2%, dural tear in 4 patients (2.6%, and nerve root injury in 2 patients (1.3%. About 90% patients

  9. Lateral Lumbar Interbody Fusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pawar, Abhijit; Hughes, Alexander; Girardi, Federico; Sama, Andrew; Lebl, Darren; Cammisa, Frank

    2015-12-01

    The lateral lumbar interbody fusion (LLIF) is a relatively new technique that allows the surgeon to access the intervertebral space from a direct lateral approach either anterior to or through the psoas muscle. This approach provides an alternative to anterior lumbar interbody fusion with instrumentation, posterior lumbar interbody fusion, and transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion for anterior column support. LLIF is minimally invasive, safe, better structural support from the apophyseal ring, potential for coronal plane deformity correction, and indirect decompression, which have has made this technique popular. LLIF is currently being utilized for a variety of pathologies including but not limited to adult de novo lumbar scoliosis, central and foraminal stenosis, spondylolisthesis, and adjacent segment degeneration. Although early clinical outcomes have been good, the potential for significant neurological and vascular vertebral endplate complications exists. Nevertheless, LLIF is a promising technique with the potential to more effectively treat complex adult de novo scoliosis and achieve predictable fusion while avoiding the complications of traditional anterior surgery and posterior interbody techniques. PMID:26713134

  10. Microendoscopic discectomy for treatment of lumbar disc herniation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ARJUN Sinkemani; WU Xiao-tao

    2015-01-01

    A lumbar microendoscopic discectomy ( MED ) is a minimally invasive surgical technique performed through a tubular device which is designed for the pain relieve caused by herniated discs pressing the nerve roots . In 1997, a new minimally invasive surgical approach for the management of symptomatic lumbar disc herniation , MED was introduced .This technique uses a tubular retractor system and a microendoscope for visualization rather than the operating microscope .However , recent literature suggests that MED is an effective microendoscopic system which has a fine long-term outcome in treating lumbar disc herniation .This article describes the operative tech-niques and outcomes reported in the literature for MED .

  11. Traumatic Lumbar Hernia Diagnosed by Ultrasonography: A Case Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Kwang Lae; Yim, Yoon Myung; Lim, Oh Kyung; Park, Ki Deok; Choi, Chung Hwan; Lee, Ju Kang [Gachon University of Medicine and Science, Incheon (Korea, Republic of)

    2009-12-15

    Traumatic lumbar hernia describes the extrusion of intraperitoneal or extraperitoneal contents through a defect in the posterolateral abdominal wall caused by a trauma. This is a rare entity and usually diagnosed by computed tomography. A 64-year-old male received an injury on his cervical spinal cord after an accident in which he fell down. He complained of a mass on his left posterolateral back area. We diagnosed the mass as a traumatic lumbar hernia by ultrasonography and confirmed it by computed tomography. We conclude that the ultrasonography can be a useful diagnostic tool for traumatic lumbar hernia

  12. Traumatic Lumbar Hernia Diagnosed by Ultrasonography: A Case Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Traumatic lumbar hernia describes the extrusion of intraperitoneal or extraperitoneal contents through a defect in the posterolateral abdominal wall caused by a trauma. This is a rare entity and usually diagnosed by computed tomography. A 64-year-old male received an injury on his cervical spinal cord after an accident in which he fell down. He complained of a mass on his left posterolateral back area. We diagnosed the mass as a traumatic lumbar hernia by ultrasonography and confirmed it by computed tomography. We conclude that the ultrasonography can be a useful diagnostic tool for traumatic lumbar hernia

  13. Clinicoradiological Images of a Rare Type of Lumbar Hernia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agarwal, Arjun; Mukherjee, Sujoy; Garg, Cheena

    2015-12-01

    A surgeon will rarely see a case of lumbar hernia in his lifetime. They are usually divided into superior and inferior types, but in cases of huge hernias where anatomical delineation is not possible, they are called as diffuse. Further classification into primary and secondary types (on the basis of etiology) and congenital and acquired types is done. Evisceration in a lumbar hernia can be present due to secondary causes but never spontaneously. This is therefore probably the first reported case of a primary eviscerated diffuse lumbar hernia. PMID:26884669

  14. POST - OPERATIVE NEUROLOGICAL RECOVERY PATTERN IN DEGENERATIVE CERVICAL MYELOPATHY AND RADICULOPATHY

    OpenAIRE

    Raju B; Arvind B; Anuraag G

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE : To study the neurological recovery pattern and clinical recovery after surgical intervention in patients of degenerative cervical myelopathy and radiculopathy to know the surgical outcome, at L okmanya T ilak M unicipal M edical C ollege , Mumbai, Maharashtra . METHOD : We ca rried out prospective and retrospective observational ...

  15. Cervical collar or physiotherapy versus wait and see policy for recent onset cervical radiculopathy: randomised trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    B. Kuijper; J.T.J. Tans; A. Beelen; F. Nollet; M. de Visser

    2009-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the effectiveness of treatment with collar or physiotherapy compared with a wait and see policy in recent onset cervical radiculopathy. Design Randomised controlled trial. Setting Neurology outpatient clinics in three Dutch hospitals. Participants 205 patients with symptoms and

  16. Cervical collar or physiotherapy versus wait and see policy for recent onset cervical radiculopathy: randomised trial.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    B. Kuijper (Barbara); J.T. Tans; A. Beelen (Anita); F. Nollet (Frans); M. de Visser (Marianne)

    2009-01-01

    textabstractOBJECTIVE: To evaluate the effectiveness of treatment with collar or physiotherapy compared with a wait and see policy in recent onset cervical radiculopathy. DESIGN: Randomised controlled trial. SETTING: Neurology outpatient clinics in three Dutch hospitals. PARTICIPANTS: 205 patients w

  17. Blindness, ophthalmoplegia and extensive radiculopathy: An unusual clinical syndrome in intracranial sino-venous thrombosis

    OpenAIRE

    Moosa A; Kishore A; Gupta A; Radhakrishnan K

    2004-01-01

    Isolated intracranial hypertension is a common manifestation of intracranial sino-venous thrombosis (ISVT). Markedly elevated intracranial tension presents with unusual features including cranial neuropathies and radiculopathy. We report two cases with ISVT, which presented with headache, papilledema, progressive visual loss, complete ophthalmoplegia and flaccid areflexic quadriparesis along with a normal sensorium. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the brain and cervical spinal cord showed...

  18. Clinical characteristics and surgical management for juxtafacet cysts of the lumbar spine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Retrospective analysis of 10 cases of resection of symptomatic lumbar juxtafacet cysts in nine patients (mean age 65.4 years) investigated the relationship between surgical method and progression of spinal spondylolisthesis or cyst recurrence. Patient characteristics, surgical methods, and postoperative course were reviewed. The most common preoperative symptom, painful radiculopathy, occurred in all cases, followed by motor weakness in five, sensory loss in four, and intermittent claudication in four. All patients underwent bilateral total (n=6) or partial laminectomy (n=4), with minimal (n=3) or no (n=7) facetectomy. Cysts were gross totally resected in eight cases and partially resected in two. Concomitant fixation was not performed. Painful radiculopathy, motor weakness, and sensory disturbance all resolved, resulting in good or excellent outcome in all patients. Postoperative symptomatic spondylolisthesis had not been noted at mean 52.1 months postoperatively. However, new juxtafacet cysts were later detected on the contralateral side to the initial lesion in two patients. Surgical removal of juxtafacet cysts is recommended for immediate symptomatic relief. Concomitant spinal fixation to prevent progression of spinal spondylolisthesis or cyst recurrence depends on cyst size, involvement of surrounding structures, degree of preoperative spondylolisthesis, and facet joint destruction. (author)

  19. Optimal imaging parameters to visualize lumbar spinal nerve roots in MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiculopathy due to lumber spine disorders is diagnosed mainly by radiculography. Recent advances in MRI have enabled non-invasive visualization of the lumbar nerve roots. Fifty normal volunteers were evaluated for optimal imaging angle to visualize the lumbar nerve roots and optimal imaging sequences. Results showed that in the coronal oblique plane, angles that visualized the nerve roots best were L4 17, L5 29.6, and S1 36.8. In the left sagittal oblique plane, the angles were L4 17.9, L5 21.4, and S1 12.6, and in the right sagittal oblique plane, L4 16.3, L5 19.4 and S1 12.6. SPGR showed the best results both in CNR values and visually. In summary, the optimal angle by which to visualize the lumbar spinal nerve roots increased as the roots became more caudal, except for S1 of the sagittal oblique plane, where individual variations were pronounced. SPGR was the best sequence for visualizing the nerve roots. (author)

  20. Optimal imaging parameters to visualize lumbar spinal nerve roots in MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamato, Hidetada; Takahashi, Toshiyuki; Funata, Tomonari; Nitta, Masaru; Nakazawa, Yasuo [Showa Univ., Tokyo (Japan). Hospital

    2001-05-01

    Radiculopathy due to lumber spine disorders is diagnosed mainly by radiculography. Recent advances in MRI have enabled non-invasive visualization of the lumbar nerve roots. Fifty normal volunteers were evaluated for optimal imaging angle to visualize the lumbar nerve roots and optimal imaging sequences. Results showed that in the coronal oblique plane, angles that visualized the nerve roots best were L4 17, L5 29.6, and S1 36.8. In the left sagittal oblique plane, the angles were L4 17.9, L5 21.4, and S1 12.6, and in the right sagittal oblique plane, L4 16.3, L5 19.4 and S1 12.6. SPGR showed the best results both in CNR values and visually. In summary, the optimal angle by which to visualize the lumbar spinal nerve roots increased as the roots became more caudal, except for S1 of the sagittal oblique plane, where individual variations were pronounced. SPGR was the best sequence for visualizing the nerve roots. (author)

  1. Imaging and outcome in severe complications of lumbar epidural anaesthesia: report of 16 cases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We reviewed the clinical and neuroradiological features in 16 patients with serious neurological complications of lumbar epidural anaesthesia. We observed acute, transient or permanent and delayed complications. Four patients had symptoms immediately after the procedure. One patient developed a subacute flaccid paraparesis. Two other patients had infectious spondylodiscitis at lumbar puncture level. Eight patients had a delayed progressive spastic paraparesis and were found to have subarachnoid cysts and irregularities of the surface of the spinal cord consistent with arachnoiditis; six of them had an extensive, complex syrinx within the cord. One patient had a severe lumbar polyradiculopathy, and MRI showed adhesive arachnoiditis involving the cauda equina. Although epidural anaesthesia is generally considered safe, rare but severe complications, such as radiculopathy, infectious disease, myelopathy from ischemia and arachnoiditis with a syrinx may occur. The patients with arachnoiditis had a relentless progression of the disease and a poor outcome: five are confined to a wheelchair, one is bedridden. Complications of epidural anaesthesia are easily recognised when they develop immediately; their relationship to the anaesthesia may be ignored or underestimated when they appear after a delay. Awareness of the possibility of delayed complications is important. (orig.)

  2. Imaging and outcome in severe complications of lumbar epidural anaesthesia: report of 16 cases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chiapparini, L.; Savoiardo, M. [Department of Neuroradiology, Istituto Nazionale Neurologico, Milano (Italy); Sghirlanzoni, A.; Pareyson, D. [Department of Neurology, Istituto Nazionale Neurologico, Milano (Italy)

    2000-08-01

    We reviewed the clinical and neuroradiological features in 16 patients with serious neurological complications of lumbar epidural anaesthesia. We observed acute, transient or permanent and delayed complications. Four patients had symptoms immediately after the procedure. One patient developed a subacute flaccid paraparesis. Two other patients had infectious spondylodiscitis at lumbar puncture level. Eight patients had a delayed progressive spastic paraparesis and were found to have subarachnoid cysts and irregularities of the surface of the spinal cord consistent with arachnoiditis; six of them had an extensive, complex syrinx within the cord. One patient had a severe lumbar polyradiculopathy, and MRI showed adhesive arachnoiditis involving the cauda equina. Although epidural anaesthesia is generally considered safe, rare but severe complications, such as radiculopathy, infectious disease, myelopathy from ischemia and arachnoiditis with a syrinx may occur. The patients with arachnoiditis had a relentless progression of the disease and a poor outcome: five are confined to a wheelchair, one is bedridden. Complications of epidural anaesthesia are easily recognised when they develop immediately; their relationship to the anaesthesia may be ignored or underestimated when they appear after a delay. Awareness of the possibility of delayed complications is important. (orig.)

  3. Lumbar intervertebral disc degeneration and related factors in Korean firefighters

    OpenAIRE

    Jang, Tae-Won; Ahn, Yeon-Soon; Byun, Junsu; Lee, Jong-In; Kim, Kun-Hyung; KIM, YOUNGKI; Song, Han-Soo; Lee, Chul-Gab; Kwon, Young-Jun; Yoon, Jin-Ha; Jeong, Kyoungsook

    2016-01-01

    Objectives The job of firefighting can cause lumbar burden and low back pain. This study aimed to identify the association between age and lumbar intervertebral disc degeneration and whether the association differs between field and administrative (non-field) firefighters. Methods Subjects were selected using a stratified random sampling method. Firefighters were stratified by geographic area, gender, age and type of job. First, 25 fire stations were randomly sampled considering regional dist...

  4. Minimally Invasive Lumbar Discectomy

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... called a “minimally invasive microscopic lumbar discectomy.” Now this is a patient who a 46-year-old ... L-5, S-1. So that’s why she’s having this procedure. The man who is doing the procedure ...

  5. Minimally Invasive Lumbar Discectomy

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... We perform micro-lumbar surgical procedures in the cervical spine routinely. These are procedures that are done for herniated discs, for bony spurs when they compress a nerve or the spinal cord, creating significant compression. And so also those patients we usually like ...

  6. Minimally Invasive Lumbar Discectomy

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Miami’s Baptist Hospital. You’re going to be a seeing a procedure called a “minimally invasive microscopic lumbar discectomy.” Now this is a patient who a 46-year-old woman who ...

  7. Acute Sciatic Neuritis following Lumbar Laminectomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Foad Elahi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available It is commonly accepted that the common cause of acute/chronic pain in the distribution of the lumbosacral nerve roots is the herniation of a lumbar intervertebral disc, unless proven otherwise. The surgical treatment of lumbar disc herniation is successful in radicular pain and prevents or limits neurological damage in the majority of patients. Recurrence of sciatica after a successful disc surgery can be due to many possible etiologies. In the clinical setting we believe that the term sciatica might be associated with inflammation. We report a case of acute sciatic neuritis presented with significant persistent pain shortly after a successful disc surgery. The patient is a 59-year-old female with complaint of newly onset sciatica after complete pain resolution following a successful lumbar laminectomy for acute disc extrusion. In order to manage the patient’s newly onset pain, the patient had multiple pain management visits which provided minimum relief. Persistent sciatica and consistent physical examination findings urged us to perform a pelvic MRI to visualize suspected pathology, which revealed right side sciatic neuritis. She responded to the electrical neuromodulation. Review of the literature on sciatic neuritis shows this is the first case report of sciatic neuritis subsequent to lumbar laminectomy.

  8. Deficits in foot skin sensation are related to alterations in balance control in chronic low back patients experiencing clinical signs of lumbar nerve root impingement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frost, Lydia R; Bijman, Marc; Strzalkowski, Nicholas D J; Bent, Leah R; Brown, Stephen H M

    2015-05-01

    Chronic low back pain (LBP) patients with radiculopathy, or sciatica, experience pain, tingling or numbness radiating down their leg due to compression of the lumbar nerve root. The resulting reduction in somatosensory information from the foot sole may contribute to deficits in standing balance control. This work was designed to investigate the relationship between foot skin sensitivity and standing balance control in chronic LBP patients with associated radiculopathy. Patients (n=9) and matched healthy controls (n=9) were recruited to the study, and were tested for balance control in both quiet standing as well as during rapid arm raise perturbation trials on a force plate. Foot skin sensitivity was tested bilaterally for vibratory threshold (3, 40 and 250 Hz) and touch (monofilament) threshold. Results demonstrate that patients had reduced sensitivity to 250 Hz vibration in their affected compared to unaffected foot (at the great toe and heel), as well as compared to controls (at the great toe), but there were no differences with lower frequency vibratory testing or with monofilament testing. While there were no significant between-group differences in balance measures, moderate statistically significant correlations between 250 Hz sensitivity and quiet standing balance parameters were uncovered. Thus, patients demonstrate reduced high-frequency vibratory sensitivity at the foot sole, and correlations with quiet standing balance measures indicate a connection between these foot skin sensitivity deficits and alterations in balance control. Clinically, this identifies high frequency vibration testing as an important measure of skin sensitivity in patients with radiculopathy. PMID:25887249

  9. Hypertrophy and pseudohypertrophy of the lower leg following chronic radiculopathy and neuropathy: imaging findings in two patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beuckeleer, L. de; Schepper, A. de [Department of Radiology, University Hospital Antwerp, Edegem (Netherlands); Vanhoenacker, F. [Department of Radiology, University Hospital Antwerp, Edegem (Netherlands)]|[Department of Radiology, AZ St. Maarten, Campus Duffel, Duffel (Belgium); Schepper, A. Jr. de [Department of Radiology, University Hospital Antwerp, Edegem (Netherlands)]|[Department of Radiology, AZ Middelheim, Antwerpen (Belgium); Seynaeve, P. [Department of Radiology, AZ Middelheim, Antwerpen (Belgium)

    1999-04-01

    Enlargement of the ipsilateral muscle compartment is an exceptional finding in patients with chronic radiculopathy, peripheral nerve injury, anterior horn cell diseases, or acquired peripheral neuropathy. We report radiographic, ultrasonographic, CT and MRI findings in a patient with chronic S1 radiculopathy and another with chronic neuropathy of the common fibular nerve (L4-S2), both presenting with painless enlargement of the calf muscles. (orig.) With 2 figs., 7 refs.

  10. Hypertrophy and pseudohypertrophy of the lower leg following chronic radiculopathy and neuropathy: imaging findings in two patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Enlargement of the ipsilateral muscle compartment is an exceptional finding in patients with chronic radiculopathy, peripheral nerve injury, anterior horn cell diseases, or acquired peripheral neuropathy. We report radiographic, ultrasonographic, CT and MRI findings in a patient with chronic S1 radiculopathy and another with chronic neuropathy of the common fibular nerve (L4-S2), both presenting with painless enlargement of the calf muscles. (orig.)

  11. Autologous Conditioned Serum as a Novel Alternative Option in the Treatment of Unilateral Lumbar Radiculopathy: A Prospective Study

    OpenAIRE

    H. S., Ravi Kumar; Goni, Vijay G.; Y. K., Batra

    2015-01-01

    Study Design The study was conducted on patients who received autologous conditioned serum (ACS) as a line of treatment at the Orthopedics outpatient department of Post Graduate Institute of Medical Education and Research (PGIMER, Chandigarh) from January 2011 to June 2012. Of the 1,224 patients, 20 males or females were included in the study based on the inclusion and exclusion criteria. The institutional board of PGIMER approved the study before it was initiated. Purpose To study the effica...

  12. Lumbar artery pseudoaneurysm and arteriovenous fistula as a complication of laparoscopic splenectomy: treatment by transcatheter embolization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maleux, G.; Wilms, G. [Department of Radiology, University Hospitals, Leuven (Belgium); Vermylen, J. [Department of Internal Medicine-Vascular Diseases, University Hospitals, Leuven (Belgium)

    2002-06-01

    Iatrogenic injury of a lumbar artery is very rare and mostly causes retroperitoneal hemorrhage. We report a case of a lumbar artery pseudoaneurysm and a concomitant arteriovenous fistula complicating laparoscopic splenectomy and provoking renal colic-like flank pain due to mass effect on the left ureter. Definitive treatment of both vascular lesions was obtained after percutaneous transcatheter embolization of several lumbar arteries. Control computed tomography scan 3 months after embolization showed almost complete resorption of the retroperitoneal hematoma. (orig.)

  13. Ligamentum flavum cyst in the lumbar spine: a case report and review of the literature

    OpenAIRE

    Taha, H.; Bareksei, Y.; Albanna, W.; Schirmer, M.

    2010-01-01

    Degenerative changes in the lumbar spine can be followed by cystic changes. Most reported intraspinal cysts are ganglion or synovial cysts. Ligamentum flavum pseudocyst, as a cystic lesion in the lumbar spine, is a rare and unusual cause of neurologic signs and symptoms and is usually seen in elderly persons (due to degenerative changes). They are preferentially located in the lower lumbar region, while cervical localization is rare. Complete removal of the cyst leads to excellent results and...

  14. Laparoscopic transabdominal extraperitoneal repair of lumbar hernia

    OpenAIRE

    Sharma A.; Panse R; Khullar R; Soni V; Baijal M; Chowbey P

    2005-01-01

    Lumbar hernias need to be repaired due to the risk of incarceration and strangulation. A laparoscopic intraperitoneal approach in the modified flank position causes the intraperitoneal viscera to be displaced medially away from the hernia. The creation of a wide peritoneal flap around the hernial defect helps in mobilization of the colon, increased length of margin is available for coverage of mesh and more importantly for secure fixation of the mesh under vision to the underlying fascia. Lap...

  15. The activL® Artificial Disc: a next-generation motion-preserving implant for chronic lumbar discogenic pain

    OpenAIRE

    Yue, James J.; Garcia, Rolando; Miller, Larry E.

    2016-01-01

    Degeneration of the lumbar intervertebral discs is a leading cause of chronic low back pain in adults. Treatment options for patients with chronic lumbar discogenic pain unresponsive to conservative management include total disc replacement (TDR) or lumbar fusion. Until recently, only two lumbar TDRs had been approved by the US Food and Drug Administration − the Charité Artificial Disc in 2004 and the ProDisc-L Total Disc Replacement in 2006. In June 2015, a next-generation lumbar TDR receive...

  16. Laparoscopic lumbar spine surgery

    OpenAIRE

    O’Dowd, J. K.

    2000-01-01

    The use of transperitoneal endoscopic approaches to the distal segments of the lumbar spine has recently been described. This has been the catalyst for the development of other minimally invasive anterior ¶approaches to the spine. This review looks at the published results so ¶far, and highlights the principles, techniques and complications. The limitations of laparoscopic approaches have meant that surgeons are moving on to endoscopic extraperitoneal and mini-open approaches, but important l...

  17. Computed tomography in the diagnosis of cervical disc herniation with radiculopathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Computed tomography (CT) is an accurate method of diagnosing cervical disc herniation in patients with radiculopathy. We evaluated 7 patients for the treatment of radiculopathy. The CT features of lateral cervical disc herniation include: (1) plain CT reveals a soft tissue mass compatible with laterally herniated disc material within the intervertebral foramen; (2) plain CT shows a soft tissue mass, which implies a fragmented disc, in the lateral recess; (3) CT with the intravenous administration of the contrast medium shows no delineation of the nerve root in the intervertebral foramen; and (4) CT metrizamide myelography demonstrates the filling defect of the root sleeve and hypertrophy of the nerve root. In those seven patients, all CT examinations were interpreted as positive for lateral disc herniation. There was a good correlation between the results of the neurologic examination and the CT findings. We wish to stress the usefulness of CT in the diagnosis of lateral cervical disc herniation. (author)

  18. Usefulness of curved coronal MPR imaging for the diagnosis of cervical radiculopathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In surgical treatment of cervical radiculopathy, localization of the responsible lesions by various imaging modalities is essential. Among them, MRI is non-invasive and plays a primary role in the assessment of spinal radicular symptoms. However, demonstration of nerve root compression is sometimes difficult by the conventional methods of MRI, such as T1 weighted (T1W) and T2 weighted (T2W) sagittal or axial images. We have applied a new technique of curved coronal multiplanar reconstruction (MPR) imaging for the diagnosis of cervical radiculopathy. Ten patients (4 male, 6 female) with ages between 31 and 79 year-old, who had clinical diagnosis of cervical radiculopathy, were included in this study. Seven patients underwent anterior key-hole foraminotomy to decompress the nerve root with successful results. All the patients had 3D MRI studies, such as true fast imaging with steady-state precession (FISP), 3DT2W sampling perfection with application optimized contrasts using different fillip angle evolution (SPACE), and 3D multi-echo data image combination (MEDIC) imagings in addition to the routine MRI (1.5 T Avanto, Siemens, Germany) with a phased array coil. The curved coronal MPR images were produced from these MRI data using a workstation. The nerve root compression was diagnosed by curved coronal MPR images in all the patients. The compression sites were compatible with those of the operative findings in 7 patients, who underwent surgical treatment. The MEDIC imagings were the most demonstrable to visualize the nerve root, while the 3D-space imagings were the next. The curved coronal MPR imaging is useful for the diagnosis of accurate localization of the compressing lesions in patients with cervical radiculopathy. (author)

  19. Lack of uniform diagnostic criteria for cervical radiculopathy in conservative intervention studies: a systematic review

    OpenAIRE

    Thoomes, Erik J.; Scholten-Peeters, Gwendolijne G. M.; de Boer, Alice J.; Olsthoorn, Remy A.; Verkerk, Karin; Lin, Christine; Verhagen, Arianne P

    2012-01-01

    Purpose Cervical radiculopathy (CR) is a common diagnosis. It is unclear if intervention studies use uniform definitions and criteria for patient selection. Our objective was to assess the uniformity of diagnostic criteria and definitions used in intervention studies to select patients with CR. Methods We electronically searched the Cochrane Controlled Trials Register, MEDLINE, EMBASE and CINAHL. Studies were included when evaluating conservative interventions in randomised clinical trials (R...

  20. Lumbar corsets can decrease lumbar motion in golf swing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashimoto, Koji; Miyamoto, Kei; Yanagawa, Takashi; Hattori, Ryo; Aoki, Takaaki; Matsuoka, Toshio; Ohno, Takatoshi; Shimizu, Katsuji

    2013-01-01

    Swinging a golf club includes the rotation and extension of the lumbar spine. Golf-related low back pain has been associated with degeneration of the lumbar facet and intervertebral discs, and with spondylolysis. Reflective markers were placed directly onto the skin of 11young male amateur golfers without a previous history of back pain. Using a VICON system (Oxford Metrics, U.K.), full golf swings were monitored without a corset (WOC), with a soft corset (SC), and with a hard corset (HC), with each subject taking 3 swings. Changes in the angle between the pelvis and the thorax (maximum range of motion and angular velocity) in 3 dimensions (lumbar rotation, flexion-extension, and lateral tilt) were analyzed, as was rotation of the hip joint. Peak changes in lumbar extension and rotation occurred just after impact with the ball. The extension angle of the lumbar spine at finish was significantly lower under SC (38°) or HC (28°) than under WOC (44°) conditions (p golf swing can effectively decrease lumbar extension and rotation angles and angular velocity.Wearing lumbar corsets increased the rotational motion of the hip joint while reducing the rotation of the lumbar spine. PMID:24149729

  1. Diffusion-weighted imaging for pretreatment evaluation and prediction of treatment effect in patients undergoing CT-guided injection for lumbar disc herniation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Niu, Xiang Ke [Dept. of Radiology, Affiliated Hospital of Chengdu University, Chengdu (China); Bhetuwal, Anup; Yang, Han Feng [Schuan Key Laboratory of Medical Imaging and Dept. of Radiology, Affiliated Hospital of North Sichuan Medical College, Nanchong (China)

    2015-08-15

    To determine whether a change in apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) value could predict early response to CT-guided Oxygen-Ozone (O{sub 2}-O{sub 3}) injection therapy in patients with unilateral mono-radiculopathy due to lumbar disc herniation. A total of 52 patients with unilateral mono-radiculopathy received a single intradiscal (3 mL) and periganglionic (5 mL) injection of an O{sub 2}-O{sub 3} mixture. An ADC index of the involved side to the intact side was calculated using the following formula: pre-treatment ADC index = ([ADC involved side - ADC intact side] / ADC intact side) x 100. We analyzed the relationship between the pre-treatment Oswestry Disability Index (ODI) and the ADC index. In addition, the correlation between ODI recovery ratio and ADC index was investigated. The sensitivity and specificity of the ADC index for predicting response in O{sub 2}-O{sub 3} therapy was determined. Oswestry Disability Index and the ADC index was not significantly correlated (r = -0.125, p = 0.093). The ADC index and ODI recovery ratio was significantly correlated (r = 0.819, p < 0.001). When using 7.10 as the cut-off value, the ADC index obtained a sensitivity of 86.3% and a specificity of 82.9% for predicting successful response to therapy around the first month of follow-up. This preliminary study demonstrates that the patients with decreased ADC index tend to show poor improvement of clinical symptoms. The ADC index may be a useful indicator to predict early response to CT-guided O{sub 2}-O{sub 3} injection therapy in patients with unilateral mono-radiculopathy due to lumbar disc herniation.

  2. Diffusion-weighted imaging for pretreatment evaluation and prediction of treatment effect in patients undergoing CT-guided injection for lumbar disc herniation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To determine whether a change in apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) value could predict early response to CT-guided Oxygen-Ozone (O2-O3) injection therapy in patients with unilateral mono-radiculopathy due to lumbar disc herniation. A total of 52 patients with unilateral mono-radiculopathy received a single intradiscal (3 mL) and periganglionic (5 mL) injection of an O2-O3 mixture. An ADC index of the involved side to the intact side was calculated using the following formula: pre-treatment ADC index = ([ADC involved side - ADC intact side] / ADC intact side) x 100. We analyzed the relationship between the pre-treatment Oswestry Disability Index (ODI) and the ADC index. In addition, the correlation between ODI recovery ratio and ADC index was investigated. The sensitivity and specificity of the ADC index for predicting response in O2-O3 therapy was determined. Oswestry Disability Index and the ADC index was not significantly correlated (r = -0.125, p = 0.093). The ADC index and ODI recovery ratio was significantly correlated (r = 0.819, p < 0.001). When using 7.10 as the cut-off value, the ADC index obtained a sensitivity of 86.3% and a specificity of 82.9% for predicting successful response to therapy around the first month of follow-up. This preliminary study demonstrates that the patients with decreased ADC index tend to show poor improvement of clinical symptoms. The ADC index may be a useful indicator to predict early response to CT-guided O2-O3 injection therapy in patients with unilateral mono-radiculopathy due to lumbar disc herniation

  3. Oriental Medical Treatment of Lumbar Spinal Stenosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hae-Yeon Lee

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available Lumbar spinal stenosis results from the progressive combined narrowing of the central spinal canal, the neurorecesses, and the neuroforaminal canals. In the absence of prior surgery, tumor, or infection, the spinal canal may become narrowed by bulging or protrusion of the intervertebral disc annulus, herniation of the nucleus pulposis posteriorly, thickening of the posterior longitudinal ligament, hypertrophy of the ligamentum flavum, epidural fat deposition, spondylosis of the intervertebral disc margins, or a combination of two or more of the above factors. Patients with spinal stenosis become symptomatic when pain, motor weakness, paresthesia, or other neurologic compromise causes distress. In one case, we administrated oriental medical treatment with acupuncture treatment and herb-medicine. Oriental medical treatment showed desirable effect on lumbar spinal stenosis.

  4. Laparoscopic transabdominal extraperitoneal repair of lumbar hernia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharma A

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Lumbar hernias need to be repaired due to the risk of incarceration and strangulation. A laparoscopic intraperitoneal approach in the modified flank position causes the intraperitoneal viscera to be displaced medially away from the hernia. The creation of a wide peritoneal flap around the hernial defect helps in mobilization of the colon, increased length of margin is available for coverage of mesh and more importantly for secure fixation of the mesh under vision to the underlying fascia. Laparoscopic lumbar hernia repair by this technique is a tensionless repair that diffuses total intra-abdominal pressure on each square inch of implanted mesh. The technique follows current principles of hernia repair and appears to confer all benefits of a minimal access approach.

  5. Chemonucleolysis of lumbar disc herniation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chemonucleolysis is an advantageous alternative to surgical treatment of lumbar disc herniation. To achieve the best results the indications must be strictly observed and the procedure itself must be technically perfect. In these circumstances a rapid, non-invasive and less expensive treatment of lumbar disc herniation is possible. (orig.)

  6. Spontaneous ligamentum flavum hematoma in the lumbar spine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lumbar or sacral nerve root compression is most commonly caused by intervertebral disc degeneration and/or herniation. Less frequently, other extradural causes may be implicated, such as infection, neoplasm, epidural hematoma, or ligamentum flavum pathology. We present the case of a patient with spontaneous ligamentum flavum hematoma compressing the L4 nerve root, without antecedent trauma. Although exceedingly rare, the diagnosis of ligamentum flavum pathology in general, and that of ligamentum flavum hematoma in particular, should be considered on those rare occasions when the etiology of lumbar or sacral nerve root compressions appears enigmatic on radiological studies. Usually surgical treatment produces excellent clinical outcome. (orig.)

  7. Spontaneous ligamentum flavum hematoma in the lumbar spine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keynan, Ory; Ashkenazi, Ely; Floman, Yizhar [Israel Spine Center at Assuta Hospital, Tel Aviv (Israel); Smorgick, Yossi [Israel Spine Center at Assuta Hospital, Tel Aviv (Israel); Assaf Harofeh Medical Center, Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Zerifin (Israel); Schwartz, Allan J. [Hadassah University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Section of Neuroradiology, Jerusalem (Israel)

    2006-09-15

    Lumbar or sacral nerve root compression is most commonly caused by intervertebral disc degeneration and/or herniation. Less frequently, other extradural causes may be implicated, such as infection, neoplasm, epidural hematoma, or ligamentum flavum pathology. We present the case of a patient with spontaneous ligamentum flavum hematoma compressing the L4 nerve root, without antecedent trauma. Although exceedingly rare, the diagnosis of ligamentum flavum pathology in general, and that of ligamentum flavum hematoma in particular, should be considered on those rare occasions when the etiology of lumbar or sacral nerve root compressions appears enigmatic on radiological studies. Usually surgical treatment produces excellent clinical outcome. (orig.)

  8. Posterior epidural migration of sequestered lumbar disc fragment causing cauda equina syndrome Migración epidural posterior de fragmento de disco lumbar secuestrado que causa síndrome de cauda equina Migração epidural posterior de fragmento de disco lombar sequestrado que causa síndrome da cauda equina

    OpenAIRE

    Abolfazl Rahimizadeh; Housain Soufiani; Ava Rahimizadeh

    2013-01-01

    Posterior epidural migration (PEM) of a sequestered free lumbar disc fragment is rare. The rarity is due to presence of several anatomical restraints which restrict a free fragment to move to the posterior compartment. This unusual presentation of disc herniation appeared in the literature either as a single case report or in small series from two to six cases. Herein two new demonstrative cases will be presented with a brief review of the literature.La migración epidural (PEM) posterior Epid...

  9. LUMBAR CORSETS CAN DECREASE LUMBAR MOTION IN GOLF SWING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koji Hashimoto

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Swinging a golf club includes the rotation and extension of the lumbar spine. Golf-related low back pain has been associated with degeneration of the lumbar facet and intervertebral discs, and with spondylolysis. Reflective markers were placed directly onto the skin of 11young male amateur golfers without a previous history of back pain. Using a VICON system (Oxford Metrics, U.K., full golf swings were monitored without a corset (WOC, with a soft corset (SC, and with a hard corset (HC, with each subject taking 3 swings. Changes in the angle between the pelvis and the thorax (maximum range of motion and angular velocity in 3 dimensions (lumbar rotation, flexion-extension, and lateral tilt were analyzed, as was rotation of the hip joint. Peak changes in lumbar extension and rotation occurred just after impact with the ball. The extension angle of the lumbar spine at finish was significantly lower under SC (38° or HC (28° than under WOC (44° conditions (p < 0.05. The maximum angular velocity after impact was significantly smaller under HC (94°/sec than under SC (177°/sec and WOC (191° /sec conditions, as were the lumbar rotation angles at top and finish. In contrast, right hip rotation angles at top showed a compensatory increase under HC conditions. Wearing a lumbar corset while swinging a golf club can effectively decrease lumbar extension and rotation angles from impact until the end of the swing. These effects were significantly enhanced while wearing an HC

  10. The Shamrock lumbar plexus block

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sauter, Axel R; Ullensvang, Kyrre; Niemi, Geir;

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The Shamrock technique is a new method for ultrasound-guided lumbar plexus blockade. Data on the optimal local anaesthetic dose are not available. OBJECTIVE: The objective of this study is to estimate the effective dose of ropivacaine 0.5% for a Shamrock lumbar plexus block. DESIGN: A...... prospective dose-finding study using Dixon's up-and-down sequential method. SETTING: University Hospital Orthopaedic Anaesthesia Unit. INTERVENTION: Shamrock lumbar plexus block performance and block assessment were scheduled preoperatively. Ropivacaine 0.5% was titrated with the Dixon and Massey up......-and-down method using a stepwise change of 5 ml in each consecutive patient. Combined blocks of the femoral, the lateral femoral cutaneous and the obturator nerve were prerequisite for a successful lumbar plexus block. PATIENTS: Thirty patients scheduled for lower limb orthopaedic surgery completed the study...

  11. Reproduction of the lumbar lordosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreasen, Marianne Løgtholt; Langhoff, Lotte; Jensen, Tue Secher; Albert, Hanne B

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: This study investigates whether it is possible to reproduce the lumbar lordosis in the upright position during magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) by positioning the patient supine with straightened lower extremities and investigates intra- and interexaminer reliability of measurements of...... the lumbar lordosis on radiographs and MRI. METHODS: This was an observational study, which included an intra- and interexaminer reliability study. The lumbar lordosis was measured digitally on radiographs taken from 22 patients in an upright standing position, and 22 MRI scans of the same patients...... lying supine with straightened lower extremities. These measurements were compared statistically. Intra- and interexaminer reliability was calculated applying the Bland and Altman method. RESULTS: The lumbar lordosis in the standing position was reproduced in the straightened supine position with a...

  12. Lumbar peritoneal shunt

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yadav Yad

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available A lumbar peritoneal (LP shunt is a technique of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF diversion from the lumbar thecal sac to the peritoneal cavity. It is indicated under a large number of conditions such as communicating hydrocephalus, idiopathic intracranial hypertension, normal pressure hydrocephalus, spinal and cranial CSF leaks, pseudomeningoceles, slit ventricle syndrome, growing skull fractures which are difficult to treat by conventional methods (when dural defect extends deep in the cranial base or across venous sinuses and in recurrent cases after conventional surgery, raised intracranial pressure following chronic meningitis, persistent bulging of craniotomy site after operations for intracranial tumors or head trauma, syringomyelia and failed endoscopic third ventriculostomy with a patent stoma. In spite of the large number of indications of this shunt and being reasonably good, safe, and effective, very few reports about the LP shunt exist in the literature. This procedure did not get its due importance due to some initial negative reports. This review article is based on search on Google and PubMed. This article is aimed to review indications, complications, results, and comparison of the LP shunt with the commonly practiced ventriculoperitoneal (VP shunt. Shunt blocks, infections, CSF leaks, overdrainage and acquired Chiari malformation (ACM are some of the complications of the LP shunt. Early diagnosis of overdrainage complications and ACM as well as timely appropriate treatment especially by programmable shunts could decrease morbidity. Majority of recent reports suggest that a LP shunt is a better alternative to the VP shunt in communicating hydrocephalus. It has an advantage over the VP shunt of being completely extracranial and can be used under conditions other than hydrocephalus when the ventricles are normal sized or chinked. More publications are required to establish its usefulness in the treatment of wide variety of indications.

  13. The activL® Artificial Disc: a next-generation motion-preserving implant for chronic lumbar discogenic pain

    OpenAIRE

    Yue JJ; Garcia Jr R; Miller LE

    2016-01-01

    James J Yue,1 Rolando Garcia Jr,2 Larry E Miller3 1Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Yale School of Medicine, New Haven, CT, 2Orthopedic Care Center, Miami, FL, 3Miller Scientific Consulting, Inc., Asheville, NC, USA Abstract: Degeneration of the lumbar intervertebral discs is a leading cause of chronic low back pain in adults. Treatment options for patients with chronic lumbar discogenic pain unresponsive to conservative management include total disc replacement (TDR) or lumbar f...

  14. Radicular interdural lumbar disc herniation

    OpenAIRE

    Akhaddar, Ali; Boulahroud, Omar; Elasri, Abad; Elmostarchid, Brahim; Boucetta, Mohammed

    2009-01-01

    Intraradicular lumbar disc herniation is a rare complication of disc disease that is generally diagnosed only during surgery. The mechanism for herniated disc penetration into the intradural space is not known with certainty, but adhesion between the radicular dura and the posterior longitudinal ligament was suggested as the most important condition. The authors report the first case of an intraradicular lumbar disc herniation without subdural penetration; the disc hernia was lodged between t...

  15. [Ischemic optic neuropathy after lumbar spine surgery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bermejo-Alvarez, M A; Carpintero, M; García-Carro, G; Acebal, G; Fervienza, P; Cosío, F

    2007-12-01

    Ischemic optic neuropathy is the most common cause of visual complications after non-ophthalmic surgery. The incidence has varied in different case series, but prone-position spine surgery appears to be involved in most of the reports. We present the case of a 47-year-old woman who developed near total blindness in the left eye following lumbar spine fusion surgery involving the loss of 900 mL of blood. An ophthalmic examination including inspection of the ocular fundus, fluorescein angiography, and visual evoked potentials returned a diagnosis of retrolaminar optic neuropathy. Outcome was poor. PMID:18200998

  16. Posterior epidural migration of sequestered lumbar disc fragment causing cauda equina syndrome Migración epidural posterior de fragmento de disco lumbar secuestrado que causa síndrome de cauda equina Migração epidural posterior de fragmento de disco lombar sequestrado que causa síndrome da cauda equina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abolfazl Rahimizadeh

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Posterior epidural migration (PEM of a sequestered free lumbar disc fragment is rare. The rarity is due to presence of several anatomical restraints which restrict a free fragment to move to the posterior compartment. This unusual presentation of disc herniation appeared in the literature either as a single case report or in small series from two to six cases. Herein two new demonstrative cases will be presented with a brief review of the literature.La migración epidural (PEM posterior Epidural Migration de fragmento de disco lumbar libre secuestrado es rara. La rareza se debe a la existencia de varias restricciones anatómicas impidiendo que el fragmento libre se mueva hacia el compartimento posterior. Esa presentación no común de hernia de disco apareció en la literatura como un relato de caso único o en pequeñas series de dos a seis casos. En este artículo, se presentan dos casos nuevos demostrativos, conjuntamente con una revisión breve de la literatura.A migração epidural posterior (PEM posterior epidural migration de fragmento de disco lombar livre sequestrado é rara. A raridade deve-se à presença de várias restrições anatômicas que impedem que o fragmento livre se mova para o compartimento posterior. Essa apresentação incomum de hérnia de disco apareceu na literatura como relato de caso único ou em pequenas séries de dois a seis casos. Neste artigo, são apresentados dois novos casos demonstrativos, com uma breve revisão da literatura.

  17. CHANGES IN RADIOGRAPHIC PARAMETERS AFTER MINIMALLY INVASIVE LUMBAR INTERBODY FUSION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emiliano Vialle

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective : This study aims to evaluate changes in lumbosacral parameters after minimally invasive lumbar interbody fusion. The secondary aim was to evaluate whether interbody cage shape (crescent shaped or rectangular would influence the results. Method : Retrospective analysis of 70 patients who underwent one or two level lumbar interbody fusion through a minimally invasive posterolateral approach. This included midline preservation and unilateral facetectomy. Pre- and postoperative (three to six months postoperative radiographs were used for measuring lumbar lordosis (LL, segmental lordosis (SL at the level of interbody fusion, and sacral slope (SS. Further analyses divided the patients into Roussouly lumbar subgroups. Results : LL was significantly reduced after surgery (59o:39o, p=0.001 as well as the SS (33.8o:31.2o, p=0.05. SL did not change significantly (11.4:11.06, p=0.85. There were no significant differences when comparing patients who received crescent shaped cage (n=27 and rectangular cage (n=43. Hypolordotic patients (Roussouly types 1 and 2 had radiographic improvement in comparison to normolordotic and hyperlordotic groups (types 3 and 4. Conclusion : Minimally invasive lumbar interbody fusion caused reduction in lumbosacral parameters. Cage shape had no influence on the results.

  18. Lumbar Stenosis: A Recent Update by Review of Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Seung Yeop; Kim, Tae-Hwan; Oh, Jae Keun; Lee, Seung Jin; Park, Moon Soo

    2015-10-01

    Degeneration of the intervertebral disc results in initial relative instability, hypermobility, and hypertrophy of the facet joints, particularly at the superior articular process. This finally leads to a reduction of the spinal canal dimensions and compression of the neural elements, which can result in neurogenic intermittent claudication caused by venous congestion and arterial hypertension around nerve roots. Most patients with symptomatic lumbar stenosis had neurogenic intermittent claudication with the risk of a fall. However, although the physical findings and clinical symptoms in lumbar stenosis are not acute, the radiographic findings are comparatively severe. Magnetic resonance imaging is a noninvasive and good method for evaluation of lumbar stenosis. Though there are very few studies pertaining to the natural progression of lumbar spinal stenosis, symptoms of spinal stenosis usually respond favorably to non-operative management. In patients who fail to respond to non-operative management, surgical treatments such as decompression or decompression with spinal fusion are required. Restoration of a normal pelvic tilt after lumbar fusion correlates to a good clinical outcome. PMID:26435805

  19. Introducing new implants and imaging techniques for lumbar spinal stenosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moojen, Wouter Anton

    2014-01-01

    The main objective of this thesis is to compare bony decompression with implantation of interspinous process devices (IPDs) in patients with intermittent neurogenic claudication (INC) caused by lumbar spinal stenosis (LSS). A national survey among Dutch spine surgeons is presented about the usual ca

  20. DEVELOPMENT AND EVALUATION OF EVIDENCE BASED PRE-OPERATIVE PATIENT EDUCATION BOOKLET IN LUMBAR DISCECTOMY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manish Nagpal

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The objective of this study was to contribute towards further understanding of the preoperative educational requirement of patients by developing and evaluating suitable evidence based patient education booklet in lumbar discectomy. Summary of background data: The primary surgical intervention for lumbar radiculopathy is lumbar discectomy but its result remains variable. Patient education has been found beneficial in various surgeries and resulted in enhanced outcome of the surgery with respect to pain, disability and quality of life. Methodology: It consists of 5 Steps. 1 Literature review, informal interview and questionnaire filled by 3 surgeons, 5 physiotherapists and 5 patients were used to determine the domains of the education booklet. 2 Literature review to develop the content for the domains of the booklet and formulate a rough draft of the booklet. 3 Modification in the booklet as recommended by surgeons and therapists to develop the final booklet. 4 Evaluation of the booklet on readability ease by Flesch reading ease and by Suitability assessment of Material questionnaire filled by surgeons and therapists. 5 Pilot study on patients to take their views regarding the booklet developed. Results: The domains determined in step 1 were: Anatomy, understanding the mechanism of pain, about the surgery, complications associated with surgery and role of physiotherapy. The content was developed and modified in step 2 and 3. In step 4 Flesch reading score is 70.5 and suitability assessment of material questionnaire score- 77.3%. In step 5 patients rated the booklet easy to read and understand. Conclusion: The developed patient education booklet came out to be fairly easy to read according to flesch reading ease and of superior quality according to suitability assessment of material questionnaire and hence should be made a part of patient education.

  1. CT-guided cervical interlaminar epidural steroid injection for cervical radiculopathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To evaluate the safety and effectiveness of CT-guided cervical interlaminar epidural steroid injection for the treatment of cervical radiculopathy. Methods: CT-guided cervical interlaminar epidural steroid injection was performed in 32 patients with cervical radioculopathy, encountered during the period of Dec. 2006 to June 2008, as the patients failed to respond to the conservative treatment in 2 weeks. The clinical data and the imaging findings were retrospectively analyzed. Before and after the procedure, visual analogue scale (VAS) and Odom criteria were used to evaluate the pain of the patient. Results: Three months after the injection, improvement judged by Odom criteria was seen in 28 patients (87.5%), and the mean pain relief value of VAS was 5.88 ± 1.10. No significant difference in effective rate and in VAS score (P>0.05) was found between protrusion group and degenerative group, between the group with the course over 6 months and the group with the course below 6 months, also between the group receiving one injection and the group receiving the second injection. Conclusion: CT-guided fine needle (23 gauge) puncture epidural steroid (Decadron) 'target spot' injection is an ideal alternative for the treatment of cervical radiculopathy, especially for the patients who fails to respond to the conservative treatment. (authors)

  2. Epidural steroid injection in patients with lumbosacral radiculopathy in Abuja, Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahidjo A Kawu

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective : This prospective-controlled observational study looked at well-matched patients with spinal pain and radicular symptoms, caused by lumbar intervertebral disc herniation to compare the short-term clinical outcome of transforaminal and interlaminar epidural steroid injection (ESI in a resource challenged tertiary institution in Nigeria. Materials and Methods : 49 patients with radicular symptoms who were matched for age, symptom duration, magnetic resonance imaging findings, and pre-injection revised Oswentry Disability Index (ODI score and Visual Analogue Scale (VAS were assigned into ESI technique. The ODI and VAS score were analyzed immediately after an injection and upon follow-up (average 178.5 days, also with the need for repeated injections and surgical interventions over a 1-year follow-up interval. Result: In the transforaminal group (25 patients, there was a statistically significant improvement in the ODI scores from before the injection (ODI mean 62.4 to immediately after the injection (ODI mean 24.4, P < 0.01, and upon follow-up (ODI mean 20.8, P < 0.01. 9 patients (18.4% required 1 or 2 repeated injections, 3 (6.1% patients underwent surgery and 2 (4% patients lost to follow-up. In the interlaminar group (24 patients, there was a statistically significant improvement in the ODI scores from before the injection (ODI mean 60.7 to immediately after the injection (ODI mean 30.1, P < 0.01, but not upon follow-up (ODI mean 43.2, P = 0.09. 11 (22.4% patients required 1 or 2 repeated injection, 4 (8% patients underwent surgery and 3 (6.1% patients were lost to follow-up. There is an average of 2 fold improvement of transforaminal ESI over interlaminar ESI in a 40 point scale of ODI score on follow-up, which was statistically significant (P < 0.01. The VAS showed similar pattern with the ODI scores in the study. Conclusion : Transforaminal ESI to treat symptomatic lumbar disc herniation resulted in better short-term pain

  3. NEUROMUSCULAR CONTROL IN LUMBAR DISORDERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ville Leinonen

    2004-03-01

    Full Text Available Impaired motor and sensory functions have been associated with low back pain (LBP. This includes disturbances in a wide range of sensorimotor control e.g. sensory dysfunctions, impaired postural responses and psychomotor control. However, the physiological mechanisms, clinical relevance and characteristics of these findings in different spinal pathologies require further clarification. The purposes of this study were to investigate postural control, lumbar muscle function, movement perception and associations between these findings in healthy volunteers (n=35, patients with lumbar disc herniation (n=20 and lumbar spinal stenosis (LSS, n=26. Paraspinal muscle responses for sudden upper limb loading and muscle activation during flexion-extension movement and the lumbar endurance test were measured by surface electromyography (EMG. Postural stability was measured on a force platform during two- and one-footed standing. Lumbar movement perception was assessed in a motorised trunk rotation unit in the seated position. In addition, measurements of motor-(MEP and somatosensory evoked potentials (SEP and needle EMG examination of lumbar multifidus muscles were performed in the LSS patients. Clinical and questionnaire data were also recorded. A short latency paraspinal muscle response (~50 ms for sudden upper limb loading was observed. The latency of the response was shortened by expectation (p=0.017. The response latency for unexpected loading was similar in healthy persons and disc herniation patients but the latency was not shortened by expectation in the patients (p = 0.014. Also impaired postural control (p < 0.05 and lumbar movement perception (p = 0.012 were observed in disc herniation patients. The impaired lumbar movement perception (p=0.054 and anticipatory muscle activation (p = 0.043 tended to be restored after successful surgery but postural control had still not recovered after 3 months of follow-up. The majority of LSS patients were unable

  4. Comparative assessment of diagnostic value of electrodiagnostic methods and radiologic evaluations in patients with clinical signs of cervical radiculopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.A. Moosavi

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and purpose: Cervical radiculopathy is one of the most common diseases that must be diagnosed early and properly to prevent its serious side effects. For this purpose different paraclinical methods such as MRI, X-ray, EMG, NCV and SSEP are used. Each of these methods has its limitations and some of them are expensive or invassive. The aim of this study was to compare the electrodiagnostic and radiologic methods in diagnosis of cervical radiculopathy.Materials and Methods: In this study 36 patients (22 Female, l4 Male with complaint of cervical pain radiated to upper limbs were evaluated. The evaluation included EMG, NCV, MRI, X-ray and SSEP. Exclusion criteria were fracture dislocation and infection of bone joints or soft tissues .MRI and X-ray were performed in MRI centers of Isfahan, Sepahan and Alzahra hospital in Isfahan city. MRI was graded on severity of 1 to 3. EMG, NCV and SSEP were performed in electrodiagnostic center of Alzahra hospital by one professional technician. Results were compared with text books and analyzed by SPSS software.Results: Sensitivity of SSEP was 28.6% and specifity was 100%. Partial agreement between SSEP and MRI existed in moderate and severe cervical involvements (P = 0.005. Frequencies of abnormalities were: EMG 50%, NCV 5.6%, X-ray 33.3% and MRI 77.8%.Conclusion: This study shows that SSEP has lower value than EMG in diagnosis of cervical radiculopathy. Also in a patient with cervical radiculopathy, cervical MRI and EMG of upper limbs are necessary. SSEP abnormalities in the presence of moderate and severe MRI changes such as myelopathy, are more valuable. Therefore, SSEP in cervical radiculopathy is recommended before surgery.

  5. Idiopathic Thoracic Epidural Lipomatosis with Chest Pain

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Sang-Beom; Park, Hyung-Ki; Chang, Jae-Chil; Jin, So-Young

    2011-01-01

    Spinal epidural lipomatosis (SEL) is an overgrowth of the normally encapsulated adipose tissue in the epidural space around the spinal cord in the thoracic and lumbar spine causing compression of the neural components. Idiopathic SEL in non-obese patients is exceptional. Idiopathic SEL can result in thoracic myelopathy and lumbar radiculopathy. A thoracic radiculopathy due to idiopathic SEL has not been reported yet. We report a case of idiopathic SEL with intractable chest pain and paresthes...

  6. Influence of lumbar curvature and rotation on forward flexibility in idiopathic scoliosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feng-Chun Kao

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Lumbar spine facet joints are arranged sagittally and mainly provide forward flexibility. Rotation of the lumbar vertebral body and coronal plane deformity may influence the function of lumbar forward flexibility. We hypothesize that the more advanced axial and coronal plane deformity could cause more limitation on forward flexibility in patients with idiopathic scoliosis. Methods: Between January 2011 and August 2011, 85 patients with adolescent idiopathic scoliosis were enrolled in this study. The proximal thoracic, major thoracic, thoracolumbar/lumbar (TL/L, and lumbar (L1/L5 curves were measured by Cobb's method. Lumbar apical rotation was graded using the Nash-Moe score. Lumbar forward flexibility was measured using the sit and reach (S and R test. Statistical analysis was performed using one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA, Spearman's and Pearson's correlation coefficients. Results: The mean age was 16.1 ± 2.84 years. The mean proximal thoracic, major thoracic, TL/L, and L1/L5 curves were 17.61° ± 8.92, 25.56° ± 11.61, 26.09° ± 8.6, and 15.10° ± 7.85, respectively. The mean S and R measurement was 25.56 ± 12.33 cm. The magnitude of the TL/L and L1/L5 curves was statistically positively related to vertebral rotation (rs = 0.580 and 0.649, respectively. The correlation between the S and R test and both the TL/L and L1/L5 curves was negative (rp = –0.371 and –0.595, respectively. Besides, the S and R test also demonstrated a significant negative relationship with vertebral rotation (rs = –0.768. Conclusion: In patients with idiopathic scoliosis, spinal deformity can diminish lumbar forward flexibility. Higher lumbar curvature and rotation lead to greater restriction of lumbar flexion.

  7. Segmentalliverincarcerationthrougha recurrent incisional lumbar hernia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Nikolaos S. Salemis; Konstantinos Nisotakis; Stavros Gourgiotis; Efstathios Tsohataridis

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Lumbar hernia is a rare congenital or acquired defect of the posterior abdominal wall. The acquired type is more common and occurs mainly as an incisional defect after lfank surgery. Incarceration or strangulation of hernia contents is uncommon. METHOD: Segmental liver incarceration through a recurrent incisional lumbar defect was diagnosed in a 58 years old woman by magnetic resonance imaging. RESULTS: The patient underwent an open repair of the com-plicated hernia. An expanded polytetralfouoroethylene (e-PTFE) mesh was fashioned as a sublay prosthesis. She had an uncomplicated postoperative course. Follow-up examinations revealed no evidence of recurrence. CONCLUSIONS: Although lumbar hernia rarely results in incarceration or strangulation, early repair is necessary because of the risks of complications and the increasing dififculty in repairment as it enlarges. Surgical repair is often dififcult and challenging.

  8. Apoptosis of lumbar spinal cord neurons in cauda equina syndrome rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    Objective To explore the law of apoptosis of lumbar spinal cord neurons in cauda equina syndrome (CES). Methods Cauda equina of rats was compressed by a piece of silica gel stick. From day 1 to day 28,the lumbar spinal cord specimens were harvested and assessed by Nissl's staining and TUNEL staining. Results Compression of cauda equina caused lesion and apoptosis of neurons in lumbar spinal cord,and the extent of apoptosis reached the peak on 7th day after compression. Conclusion Apoptosis of neurons in lum...

  9. RADIOLOGICAL DIAGNOSTIC METHODS OF SOFT-TISSUE COMPONENTS IN THE SPINAL CANAL FORMING LUMBAR STENOSIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    OTABEK ABLYAZOV

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available The modern categorization defines the different forms of lumbar part spine stenosis, coming from anatomical and pathological of the principle. One of the varieties is a central lumbar stenosis. Compression of medulla spinalis occurs due to reduction of sizes of the spine central cannel caused either by osseous structure or softtissue of the spine canal. All softtissue components of the spinal canal can form stenos including defeat of intervertebral disk (the hernia of the disk. This work studies efficiency of Xray (at 33 patients and MRI (at 92 patients methods in diagnostics of the hernia of the disk that participates in forming lumbar part spine stenosis.

  10. Lumbar Intraforaminal Synovial Cyst in Young Adulthood: Case Report and Review of the Literature

    OpenAIRE

    Svetoslav K. Kalevski; Haritonov, Dimitar Georgiev; Peev, Nikolay Angelov

    2014-01-01

    Study Design Case report. Objective Lumbar juxtafacet cysts (synovial and ganglion cysts) are a rare cause of low back and radicular leg pain. Most patients with lumbar cysts are in their sixth decade of life and have significant facet joint and disk degeneration. Lumbar synovial cysts (LSCs) are extremely rare in adolescence and young adulthood, and to our knowledge, only two pediatric cases of LSC have been reported in the literature. We aim to prove the existence of LSC in adolescent patie...

  11. Minimally Invasive Lumbar Discectomy

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... the nerve, as you see in this. What causes that? How did that tear occur? Well, what ... common injuries and one of the most common causes of disability in the United States. In fact, ...

  12. H-reflex amplitude asymmetry is an earlier sign of nerve root involvement than latency in patients with S1 radiculopathy

    OpenAIRE

    Sabbahi Mohamed A; Alrowayeh Hesham N

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background Based on our clinical experience, the H-reflex amplitude asymmetry might be an earlier sign of nerve root involvement than latency in patients with S1 radiculopathy. However, no data to support this assumption are available. The purpose of this study was to review and report the electrophysiological changes in H-reflex amplitude and latency in patients with radiculopathy in order to determine if there is any evidence to support the assumption that H-reflex amplitude is an ...

  13. Sacral Insufficiency Fractures Mimicking Lumbar Spine Pathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sudhir, G; K L, Kalra; Acharya, Shankar; Chahal, Rupinder

    2016-06-01

    Sacral insufficiency fractures (SIFs) are a common cause of back pain in the elderly. SIFs mimic the symptoms of lumbar spine pathology and so are commonly missed or underdiagnosed. Here we present four cases of missed SIFs that were subsequently identified and treated. One patient was treated as mechanical lower back ache, another patient underwent root block and two patients underwent surgery for lumbar canal stenosis. None experienced relief of their symptoms after these procedures. Retrospective analysis of X-ray and magnetic resonance imaging data revealed SIFs that were confirmed by computed tomography scans. All four patients were treated for underlying osteoporosis. Two patients who underwent surgery were treated conservatively and other two were treated by sacroplasty involving injection of cement into the fracture. Sacroplasty produced immediate pain relief and early mobilization compared to the conservative group. SIFs should always be considered in the differential diagnosis of an elderly patient presenting with low back symptoms. Sacroplasty can be considered for immediate pain relief and rapid mobilization. PMID:27340538

  14. Computed Tomography of the lumbar facet joints

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Mi Ryoung; Kim, Yung Soon; Lee, Joo Hyuk; Jeon, Hae Sang; Kim, Dae Yung [Kang Nam General Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1989-08-15

    The lumbar facet disease is a frequently overlooked cause of sciatic pain, but the lumbar facet joints are well-recognized source of low back pain and radiating leg pain which can be confused with sciatica due to herniated disc. We measured the angulation of the facet joints on axial spine CT films in 149 cases which contains 41 normal group and 108 abnormal group and studied the relationship between the angulation and degeneration of the facets, the asymmetry of each sided facets and facet degeneration, the asymmetry and disc protrusion, and the asymmetry and annular bulging of the disc. The results were as follows: 1. Facet angulation in abnormal group were more sagittally oriented than the normal group. 2. The angulation of right facet was more sagittally oriented than the left in L4-5 level of abnormal group. 3. Degeneration of facet joints occur asymmetrically, and the more facet joint degenerates, the more it orients sagittally, particularly in L4-5. 4. Asymmetry in facet joint degeneration and unilateral disc protrusion of L5-SI level is greater than the normal gro0008.

  15. Clinical and Radiological Findings of Nerve Root Herniation after Discectomy of Lumbar Disc Herniation

    OpenAIRE

    Bae, Jun Seok; Pee, Yong Hun; Jang, Jee-Soo; Lee, Sang-Ho

    2012-01-01

    The authors report 2 cases of nerve root herniation after discectomy of a large lumbar disc herniation caused by an unrecognized dural tear. Patients complained of the abrupt onset of radiating pain after lumbar discectomy. Magnetic resonance imaging showed cerebrospinal fluid signal in the disc space and nerve root displacement into the disc space. Symptoms improved after the herniated nerve root was repositioned. Clinical symptoms and suggestive radiologic image findings are important for e...

  16. Lumbar Nerve Root Occupancy in the Foramen in Achondroplasia: A Morphometric Analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Modi, Hitesh N; Suh, Seung Woo; Song, Hae-Ryong; Yang, Jae Hyuk

    2008-01-01

    Lumbar stenosis is common in patients with achondroplasia because of narrowing of the neural canal. However, it is unclear what causes stenosis, narrowing of the central canal or foramina. We performed a morphometric analysis of the lumbar nerve roots and intervertebral foramen in 17 patients (170 nerve roots and foramina) with achondroplasia (eight symptomatic, nine asymptomatic) and compared the data with that from 20 (200 nerve roots and foramina) asymptomatic patients without achondroplas...

  17. RADIOLOGICAL DIAGNOSTIC METHODS OF SOFT-TISSUE COMPONENTS IN THE SPINAL CANAL FORMING LUMBAR STENOSIS

    OpenAIRE

    OTABEK ABLYAZOV

    2011-01-01

    The modern categorization defines the different forms of lumbar part spine stenosis, coming from anatomical and pathological of the principle. One of the varieties is a central lumbar stenosis. Compression of medulla spinalis occurs due to reduction of sizes of the spine central cannel caused either by osseous structure or softtissue of the spine canal. All softtissue components of the spinal canal can form stenos including defeat of intervertebral disk (the hernia of the disk). This work s...

  18. The Pitfalls in Surgical Management of Lumbar Canal Stenosis Associated with Rheumatoid Arthritis

    OpenAIRE

    Mitsuyama, Tetsuryu; Kubota, Motoo; Yuzurihara, Masahito; Mizuno, Masaki; Hashimoto, Ryo; Ando, Ryo; Okada, Yoshikazu

    2013-01-01

    There have been few clinical studies in the area of cervical spine that focused on surgery for treating degenerative lumbar disease in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). High rates of wound complications and instrumentation failure have been reported more for RA than for non-RA patients, although clinical outcomes are similar between the two groups. Lumbar canal stenosis in RA is caused not only by degeneration but also by RA-related spondylitis, which includes facet arthritis and infla...

  19. Diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging of symptomatic nerve root of patients with lumbar disk herniation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eguchi, Yawara; Ohtori, Seiji; Yamashita, Masaomi; Yamauchi, Kazuyo; Suzuki, Munetaka; Orita, Sumihisa; Kamoda, Hiroto; Arai, Gen; Ishikawa, Tetsuhiro; Miyagi, Masayuki; Ochiai, Nobuyasu; Kishida, Shunji; Inoue, Gen; Takahashi, Kazuhisa [Chiba University, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Graduate School of Medicine, Chiba (Japan); Masuda, Yoshitada; Ochi, Shigehiro; Kikawa, Takashi [Chiba University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Chiba (Japan); Toyone, Tomoaki [Teikyo University Chiba Medical Center, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Chiba (Japan); Takaso, Masashi [Kitasato University, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, School of Medicine, Sagamihara City, Kanagawa (Japan); Aoki, Yasuchika [Chiba Rosai Hospital, Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Ichihara, Chiba (Japan)

    2011-09-15

    Diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) can provide valuable structural information that may be useful for evaluating pathological changes of the lumbar nerve root. Diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance (MR) neurography has recently been introduced as an alternative way to visualize nerves, but to date, quantitative DWI and MR neurography have not been applied to evaluate the pathology of lumbar nerve roots. Our purpose was to visualize lumbar nerve roots and to analyze their morphology by MR neurography, and to measure the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) of lumbar nerve roots compressed by herniated disks using 1.5-T MR imaging. Ten consecutive patients (median age, 48.0 and range, 20-72 years) with monoradicular symptoms caused by a lumbar herniated disk and 14 healthy volunteers were studied. Regions of interests were placed on the lumbar roots at dorsal root ganglia (DRG) and distal spinal nerves on DWI to quantify mean ADC values. The spinal nerve roots were also visualized by MR neurography. In the patients, mean ADC values were significantly greater in the compressed DRG and distal spinal nerves than in intact nerves. MR neurography also showed abnormalities such as nerve swelling at and below the compression in the symptomatic nerve root. Increased ADC values were considered to be because of edema and Wallerian degeneration of compressed nerve roots. DWI is a potential tool for analysis of the pathophysiology of lumbar nerve roots compressed by herniated disks. (orig.)

  20. Diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging of symptomatic nerve root of patients with lumbar disk herniation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) can provide valuable structural information that may be useful for evaluating pathological changes of the lumbar nerve root. Diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance (MR) neurography has recently been introduced as an alternative way to visualize nerves, but to date, quantitative DWI and MR neurography have not been applied to evaluate the pathology of lumbar nerve roots. Our purpose was to visualize lumbar nerve roots and to analyze their morphology by MR neurography, and to measure the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) of lumbar nerve roots compressed by herniated disks using 1.5-T MR imaging. Ten consecutive patients (median age, 48.0 and range, 20-72 years) with monoradicular symptoms caused by a lumbar herniated disk and 14 healthy volunteers were studied. Regions of interests were placed on the lumbar roots at dorsal root ganglia (DRG) and distal spinal nerves on DWI to quantify mean ADC values. The spinal nerve roots were also visualized by MR neurography. In the patients, mean ADC values were significantly greater in the compressed DRG and distal spinal nerves than in intact nerves. MR neurography also showed abnormalities such as nerve swelling at and below the compression in the symptomatic nerve root. Increased ADC values were considered to be because of edema and Wallerian degeneration of compressed nerve roots. DWI is a potential tool for analysis of the pathophysiology of lumbar nerve roots compressed by herniated disks. (orig.)

  1. Surgical treatment in thoraco-lumbar region fractures.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge Alberto Jerez Labrada

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: thoraco-lumbar fractures may affect people at any moment of their lives, especially at their most fruitful and useful stage. Its correct diagnosis and treatment may directly influence in the posterior evolution of the patients. Objectives: to evaluate the results of the surgical treatment in thoraco-lumbar region fractures. Methods: a descriptive retrospective correlational study of series cases which included 54 patients attended due to thoraco-lumbar region fractures in the University Hospital “Dr. Gustavo Aldereguía Lima” in Cienfuegos city, Cuba from January 1999 to June 2007. Age, sex, etiology of the fracture, type and level of the fractures, associated diseases, surgical techniques used for, pre and post operatory neurological damage, usage of metilprednisolone, complications and final results were the variables taken into consideration in this study. Results: most of the patients belonged to male sex under the age of 45. The totality of the cases had type IV fracture, and a great part of them had Denis type II fracture having surgical treatment. The causes of the lesions were traffic accidents, working accidents and height falls. The most useful surgical techniques were posterior decompression, instrumentation and fusion. Surgery improved the neurological damage in almost half of sick patients with this condition. Complications were minimum and rupture of the implant was predominant. Conclusion: surgical treatment in thoraco-lumbar region fractures had satisfactory results in our milieu.

  2. Does C5 or C6 Radiculopathy Affect the Signal Intensity of the Brachial Plexus on Magnetic Resonance Neurography?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, Tae Gyu; Kim, In-Soo; Son, Eun Seok

    2016-01-01

    Patients with C5 or C6 radiculopathy complain of shoulder area pain or shoulder girdle weakness. Typical idiopathic neuralgic amyotrophy (INA) is also characterized by severe shoulder pain, followed by paresis of shoulder girdle muscles. Recent studies have demonstrated that magnetic resonance neurography (MRN) of the brachial plexus and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the shoulder in patients with INA show high signal intensity (HSI) or thickening of the brachial plexus and changes in intramuscular denervation of the shoulder girdle. We evaluated the value of brachial plexus MRN and shoulder MRI in four patients with typical C5 or C6 radiculopathy. HSI of the brachial plexus was noted in all patients and intramuscular changes were observed in two patients who had symptoms over 4 weeks. Our results suggest that HSI or thickening of the brachial plexus and changes in intramuscular denervation of the shoulder girdle on MRN and MRI may not be specific for INA. PMID:27152289

  3. Adjacent Lumbar Disc Herniation after Lumbar Short Spinal Fusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koshi Ninomiya

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A 70-year-old outpatient presented with a chief complaint of sudden left leg motor weakness and sensory disturbance. He had undergone L4/5 posterior interbody fusion with L3–5 posterior fusions for spondylolisthesis 3 years prior, and the screws were removed 1 year later. He has been followed up for 3 years, and there had been no adjacent segment problems before this presentation. Lumbar magnetic resonance imaging (MRI showed a large L2/3 disc hernia descending to the L3/4 level. Compared to the initial MRI, this hernia occurred in an “intact” disc among multilevel severely degenerated discs. Right leg paresis and bladder dysfunction appeared a few days after admission. Microscopic lumbar disc herniotomy was performed. The right leg motor weakness improved just after the operation, but the moderate left leg motor weakness and difficulty in urination persisted.

  4. Minimally Invasive Lumbar Discectomy

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... specifically whether you’re going to find a large fragment by itself and you take that out ... to the side. Sometimes they jut back. Sometimes large herniations don’t cause any symptoms, and sometimes ...

  5. Minimally Invasive Lumbar Discectomy

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... with the smallest possible incision to minimize the injury to the tissues, particularly the muscles, the skin, ... the world. It’s one of the most common injuries and one of the most common causes of ...

  6. Minimally Invasive Lumbar Discectomy

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... these extrusions. So what really causes it? Well age is definitely a part of it. Most of ... a very common problem that presents as we age, in which our canal becomes compressed like a ...

  7. Minimally Invasive Lumbar Discectomy

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... What causes that? How did that tear occur? Well, what happens is as a disc starts losing ... the operation, along with his north surgical team. Well hello everyone. Actually, as you see, we’ve ...

  8. Adjacent Segment Pathology after Lumbar Spinal Fusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jae Chul; Choi, Sung-Woo

    2015-10-01

    One of the major clinical issues encountered after lumbar spinal fusion is the development of adjacent segment pathology (ASP) caused by increased mechanical stress at adjacent segments, and resulting in various radiographic changes and clinical symptoms. This condition may require surgical intervention. The incidence of ASP varies with both the definition and methodology adopted in individual studies; various risk factors for this condition have been identified, although a significant controversy still exists regarding their significance. Motion-preserving devices have been developed, and some studies have shown their efficacy of preventing ASP. Surgeons should be aware of the risk factors of ASP when planning a surgery, and accordingly counsel their patients preoperatively. PMID:26435804

  9. Therapeutic Efficacy Observation on‘Setting F ire on the Mountain’ Manipulation by Lu Shou-yan for Cervical Radiculopathy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sun Yi-jun; Wu Yao-chi; Zhang Jun-feng; Li Yan; Wang Ying

    2014-01-01

    Objective:To observe the clinical effect of‘setting fire on the mountain’ manipulation by Lu Shou-yan for cervical radiculopathy as well as the infrared thermographic changes of the cervical area before and after treatment. Methods:A total of 120 eligible cases with cervical radiculopathy were randomly allocated into an observation group and a control group, 60 in each group. Cases in the observation group were treated with Lu Shou-yan’s ‘setting fire on the mountain’ manipulation, whereas cases in the control group were treated with even reinforcing-reducing manipulation. After two courses of treatment, the infrared thermographic changes and overall therapeutic efficacies in the two groups were compared. Results: The recovery rate and total effective rate in the observation group were 68.3%and 98.3%respectively, versus 28.3%and 81.7%in the control group, showing statistical differences in recovery rate and total effective rate (both P Conclusion:‘Setting fire on the mountain’ manipulation by Lu Shou-yan is better than even reinforcing-reducing manipulation for cervical radiculopathy.

  10. Iatrogenic left common iliac artery and vein perforation during lumbar discectomy: a fatal case.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busardò, Francesco Paolo; Frati, Paola; Carbone, Iacopo; Pugnetti, Paola; Fineschi, Vittorio

    2015-01-01

    Iatrogenic vascular injury during lumbar disk surgery, although rare, is a serious complication, and when it does occur, can be sudden and life-threatening. The risk of injury to the pelvic vessels intra-operatively can be explained by the close proximity of the retroperitoneal vessels to the vertebral column therefore causing injury to the anterior longitudinal ligament, which can give access to the retroperitoneal space. If signs of circulatory instability are noted during lumbar disk surgery, early diagnosis of vascular injury and urgent transperitoneal surgery or emergency stenting can save the patient's life. Here, is presented the case of a 52-year-old man who underwent an elective lumbar discectomy for a rightward disk herniation in the L4-L5 intervertebral space and died 12h after the operation for a hemorrhagic shock due to a severe intra-abdominal hemorrhage following iatrogenic left common iliac artery and vein perforation during lumbar discectomy. PMID:25467198

  11. Bilateral congenital lumbar hernias in a patient with central core disease--A case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazier, Joanna; Mah, Jean K; Nikolic, Ana; Wei, Xing-Chang; Samedi, Veronica; Fajardo, Carlos; Brindle, Mary; Perrier, Renee; Thomas, Mary Ann

    2016-01-01

    Congenital lumbar hernias are rare malformations caused by defects in the development of the posterior abdominal wall. A known association exists with lumbocostovertebral syndrome; however other associated anomalies, including one case with arthrogryposis, have been previously reported. We present an infant girl with bilateral congenital lumbar hernias, multiple joint contractures, decreased muscle bulk and symptoms of malignant hyperthermia. Molecular testing revealed an R4861C mutation in the ryanodine receptor 1 (RYR1) gene, known to be associated with central core disease. This is the first reported case of the co-occurrence of congenital lumbar hernias and central core disease. We hypothesize that ryanodine receptor 1 mutations may interrupt muscle differentiation and development. Further, this case suggests an expansion of the ryanodine receptor 1-related myopathy phenotype to include congenital lumbar hernias. PMID:26684984

  12. Lumbar disc arthroplasty: indications, biomechanics, types, and radiological criteria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lumbar total disc replacement (TDR) was developed to treat a painful degenerative lumbar motion segment while avoiding the disadvantages of fusion surgery, such as adjacent segment instabilities. Early clinical results with TDR have shown a significant reduction in low back pain and a significant improvement in disability scores. When compared to fusion, the results with TDR tend to be superior in the short-term follow-up and initial rehabilitation is faster. The radiological assessment is an integral part of the preoperative work-up. Plain X-rays of the lumbar spine should be complemented by flexion - extension views in order to assess residual segmental mobility. Computed tomography is used to exclude osteoarthritis of the zygapophyseal joints, Baastrup's disease (kissing spines) and other sources of low back pain. Magnetic resonance imaging is useful to exclude substantial disc protrusions; it allows for the detection of disc dehydration and bone marrow edema in the case of activated spondylochondrosis. If osteoporosis is suspected, an osteodensitometry of the lumbar spine should be performed. Postoperative plain X-rays should include antero-posterior and lateral views as well as flexion - extension views in the later postoperative course. Measurements should determine the disc space height in the lateral view, the segmental and total lumbar lordosis as well as the segmental mobility in the flexion - extension views. The ideal position of a TDR is exactly central in the ap-view and close to the dorsal border of the vertebral endplates in the lateral view. Malpositioning may cause segmental hyperlordosis and unbalanced loading of the endplates with the risk of implant subsidence and migration. (orig.)

  13. Assessment of Lumbar Lordosis and Lumbar Core Strength in Information Technology Professionals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehta, Roma Satish; Dabadghav, Rachana; Rairikar, Savita; Shayam, Ashok; Sancheti, Parag

    2016-01-01

    Study Design Observational study. Purpose To correlate lumbar lordosis and lumbar core strength in information technology (IT) professionals. Overview of Literature IT professionals have to work for long hours in a sitting position, which can affect lumbar lordosis and lumbar core strength. Methods Flexicurve was used to assess the lumbar lordosis, and pressure biofeedback was used to assess the lumbar core strength in the IT professionals. All subjects, both male and female, with and without complaint of low back pain and working for two or more years were included, and subjects with a history of spinal surgery or spinal deformity were excluded from the study. Analysis was done using Pearson's correlation. Results For the IT workers, no correlation was seen between lumbar lordosis and lumbar core strength (r=–0.04); however, a weak negative correlation was seen in IT people who complained of pain (r=–0.12), while there was no correlation of lumbar lordosis and lumbar core in IT people who had no complains of pain (r=0.007). Conclusions The study shows that there is no correlation of lumbar lordosis and lumbar core strength in IT professionals, but a weak negative correlation was seen in IT people who complained of pain. PMID:27340529

  14. Physiotherapeutic rehabilitation and lumbar fusion surgery

    OpenAIRE

    Abbott, Allan

    2010-01-01

    Over the last two decades, the economic costs and rates of lumbar fusion surgery for chronic low back pain has risen dramatically in western industrialized countries. Data from the Swedish National Spine Register suggest that 25% of patients experience unimproved pain and up to 40% are not satisfied with the outcome of lumbar fusion surgery. Thus, there is a definite need to optimize the selection and management of patients to improve lumbar fusion outcomes. Aim: To inve...

  15. Case report and review of lumbar hernia

    OpenAIRE

    Walgamage, Thilan B.; Ramesh, B. S.; Alsawafi, Yaqoob

    2014-01-01

    Lumbar hernias are uncommon and about 300 cases have been reported till date. They commonly occur due to trauma, surgery and infection. They are increasingly being reported after motor vehicle collision injuries. However, spontaneous lumbar hernias are rare and are reported infrequently. It is treated with different surgical approaches and methods. We report a case of primary spontaneous lumbar hernia which was repaired by transperitonial laparoscopic approach using Vypro (polypropylene/polyg...

  16. Laparoscopic total extraperitoneal repair of lumbar hernia

    OpenAIRE

    Lim, Man Sup; Lee, Hae Wan; Yu, Chang Hee; Yang, Dae Hyun

    2011-01-01

    Lumbar hernia is a rare surgical entity without a standard method of repair. With advancements in laparoscopic techniques, successful lumbar herniorrhaphy can be achieved by the creation of a completely extraperitoneal working space and secure fixation of a wide posterior mesh. We present a total extraperitoneal laparoendoscopic repair of lumbar hernia, which allowed for minimal invasiveness while providing excellent anatomical identification, easy mobilization of contents and wide secure mes...

  17. Laparoscopic transabdominal extraperitoneal mesh repair of lumbar hernia

    OpenAIRE

    Nam, Soon Young; Kee, Se Kook; Kim, Jae Oh

    2011-01-01

    Lumbar hernias are rare posterolateral abdominal wall defects that may be congenital or acquired. There are two types of lumbar hernia, the superior lumbar hernia through Grynfeltt triangle, and the inferior lumbar hernia through Petit triangle. Many techniques have been described for the surgical repair of lumbar hernias including primary repair, local tissue flaps, and conventional mesh repair. But these open techniques require a large skin incision. We report a case of superior lumbar hern...

  18. High sensitive C-reactive protein-Effective tool in determining postoperative recovery in lumbar disc disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tushar Narayan Rathod

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: It is common in medical practice to see patients having persistent pain and radiculopathy even after undergoing discectomy surgery. Inflammatory cytokines, such as interleukins are produced at the site of disc herniation and are now considered responsible for the pain perceived by the patient. This study has used high sensitive C-reactive protein (HSCRP assay for predicting inflammation around the nerve roots on very same principle, which has used HSCRP for predicting coronary artery diseases in current clinical practice. Thus, purpose of this study is to test whether HSCRP can stand as an objective tool to predict postoperative recovery in patients undergoing lumbar discectomy. That is, to study association between preoperative HSCRP blood level and postoperative recovery with the help of modified Oswestry Back Disability Score. Materials and Methods: A study group consisting of 50 cases of established lumbar disc disease and control group of 50 normal subjects, matched with the study group. Both the study and control groups were subjected to detailed evaluation with the help of modified Oswestry Low Back Pain Scale both pre and postoperatively at 3 months, 6 months and 1-year. The preoperative blood samples were analyzed to assess the HSCRP concentration. All the cases underwent surgery over a period of 1-year by the same surgeon. Results: The level of HSCRP in the study group was between 0.050- and 0.710 mg/dL and in the control group, 0.005-0.020 mg/dL. There was highly significant positive correlation between preoperative HSCRP level and postoperative score at P 10 points, while those with HSCRP level in the range of 0.470 ± 0.163 mg/dL, showed poor recovery (score improved < 10 points. Conclusion: HSCRP will serve as a good supplementary prognostic marker for operative decision making in borderline and troublesome cases of lumbar disc disease.

  19. Traumatic lumbar spinal subdural hematoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William E. Gordon

    2014-12-01

    Our case illustrates rapid resolution of a posttraumatic spinal SDH after treatment with oral corticosteroids. Recognition of blood products on MRI is vital to diagnosis and expedient treatment. There is agreement that prompt laminectomy with evacuation of SDH should be performed before permanent damage to the spinal cord occurs. Including our patient, 4 of 11 reported cases of thoracic or lumbar SDH resolved with conservative treatment.

  20. Traumatic lumbar spinal subdural hematoma

    OpenAIRE

    Gordon, William E.; Brent Y. Kimball; Arthur, Adam S

    2014-01-01

    Spinal subdural hematoma (SDH) is a rare and potentially life-threatening condition associated with trauma, lumbar puncture, hemorrhagic disorder, anticoagulant therapy, spinal surgery, tumor, vascular malformations, and spinal or epidural anesthesia. Traumatic SDH is even more uncommon than other forms of SDH with only 10 reported cases in the literature. Following a punch to the head and loss of consciousness, a 35-year-old man reported headaches, right-sided tinnitus, and dull ache behi...

  1. Arteriovenous fistula following lumbar laminectomy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A case of iatrogenic aortocaval fistula is presented. The fistula arose from lumbar disc surgery. Its presence was immediately suspected on ultrasound and computed tomogram, and was promptly confirmed by angiography. Ultrasound and computed tomogram also precisely define the anatomy between the aorta or its branches and the IVC or its tributaries. Sudden deterioration of the patient's condition necessitated surgical correction of the fistula before the elected date. The successful corrective operation is described

  2. Corticosteroids in Lumbar Disc Surgery

    OpenAIRE

    Lundin, Anders

    2005-01-01

    In a prospective randomised double-blind study eighty patients with MRI verified lumbar disc herniation and corresponding clinical findings underwent microscopic disc removal. The patients were peroperatively given systemic and local corticosteroids or placebo, and followed for 2 years. The hospital stay and time to return to full-time work was significantly shorter in the treatment group. Pain measured as worst pain during the last week was also lower in the corticosteroid group. The results...

  3. Sciatica caused by pseudomyxoma peritonei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Hung-Lin; Chen, Jung-Tsung; Liu, Yu-Fang; Cho, Der-Yang

    2009-01-01

    Many etiologies may cause sciatica, and intra-abdominal masses usually affect the lumbosacral plexus by local invasion or distal metastases. Lumbosacral plexopathy caused by compression of intra-abdominal tumors instead of invasion is rarely seen. A 67-year-old woman had a 3-month history of progressive neurogenic claudication, lumbago and left L5 radiculopathy with foot drop. Nocturia and progressive abdominal distension with voiding dysfunction were also noted. Imaging studies showed a huge pelvic mass with severe compression of the left lumbosacral trunk. There was no direct invasion of the lumbosacral plexus by the pelvic mass noted in the preoperative imaging studies or intraoperative findings. Bilateral ovarian borderline mucinous cystic tumor with pseudomyxoma peritonei (PMP) was diagnosed, and the sciatica was improved dramatically after subsequent abdominal debulking surgery. Although rare, neural compression caused by PMP and intra-abdominal masses needs to be considered in the differential diagnosis of sciatica. PMID:19181596

  4. Minimally Invasive Lumbar Discectomy

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... my hands as a traditional surgical instrument. It forces you to work within the diameter, so I ... causes the pain. It’s not just the mechanical force of being compressed, but it’s actually a decrease ...

  5. Minimally Invasive Lumbar Discectomy

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... of the nerve when it’s compressed and that leads to weakness and numbness and changes in reflexes, ... tissue can tear, and that’s actually what can lead to these extrusions. So what really causes it? ...

  6. Randomized clinical trial comparing lumbar percutaneous hydrodiscectomy with lumbar open microdiscectomy for the treatment of lumbar disc protrusions and herniations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandre Fogaça Cristante

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: Hydrodiscectomy is a new technique used for percutaneous spinal discectomy that employs a high-intensity stream of water for herniated disc ablation and tissue aspiration. No previous clinical study has examined the effects of percutaneous hydrodiscectomy. The aim of this study is to evaluate the outcomes of hydrodiscectomy compared to open microdiscectomy regarding pain, function, satisfaction, complications and recurrence rates. METHODS: In this randomized clinical trial, patients referred to our tertiary hospital for lumbar back pain were recruited and included in the study if they had disc protrusion or small herniation in only one level, without neurological deficits and with no resolution after six weeks of conservative treatment. One group underwent open microdiscectomy, and the other group underwent percutaneous microdiscectomy via hydrosurgery. Function was evaluated using the Oswestry Disability Index and pain was assessed using a visual analog scale. Evaluations were performed preoperatively, and then during the first week and at one, three, six and twelve months postoperatively. Personal satisfaction was verified. Clinicaltrials.gov: NCT01367860. RESULTS: During the study period, 20 patients were included in each arm and 39 completed one-year of follow-up (one patient died of unrelated causes. Both groups exhibited equal improvement on the visual analog scale and Oswestry evaluations after treatment, without any significant differences. The improvement in the lumbar visual analog scale score was not significant in the hydrodiscectomy group (p=0.138. The rates of infection, pain, recurrence and satisfaction were similar between the two groups. CONCLUSION: Percutaneous hydrodiscectomy was demonstrated to be as effective as open microdiscectomy for reducing pain. The rates of complications and recurrence of herniation were similar between groups. Patient satisfaction with the treatment was also similar between groups.

  7. Clinical Observation 0n Treatment of Cervical Spondylotic Radiculopathy with Combined Electroacupuncture Tuina and Traction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    华宇

    2009-01-01

    目的:观察电针、推拿结合牵引治疗神经根型颈椎病的临床疗效.方法:将120例患者根据初诊时间,按随机数字表随机分为治疗组60例,采用电针、推拿结合牵引治疗;对照组60例,采用电针、推拿治疗,两组均每天治疗1次,5次为1个疗程,疗程间休息2 d,治疗6个疗程后评价疗效.结果:治疗组总有效率及治愈率分别为93.3%和61.7%,对照组为78.3%和31.7%,两组总有效率、治愈率比较,差异有统计学意义.结论:电针、推拿、牵引三者结合治疗神经根型颈椎病疗效较好.%Objective:To observe the clinical effect of combined electroacupuncture,tuina and traction treating cervical spondylotic radiculopathy.Method:Depending on the orders of the patient's first visit,120 cases were randomized into a treatment group (60 cases),receiving electroacupuncture,tuina and traction treatment,and a control group (60 cases),receiving electroacupuncture and tuina treatment.The treatment was done once a day,and 5 times constitute one course of treatment.A 2-day interval is set between the courses.The therapeutic effect was evaluated after 6 courses of treatment.Result:The total effective rate and recovery rate in the treatment group were 93.3% and 61.7%,respectively,whereas that of the control group were 78.3% and 31.7%,respectively,showing a significant statistical difference.Conclusion:Combined acupuncture,tuina and traction worked well for cervical spondylotic radiculopathy.

  8. Endoscopic lumbar discectomy: Experience of first 100 cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jhala Amit

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Various modalities of treatment from standard discectomy, microdiscectomy, percutaneous discectomy, and transforaminal endoscopic discectomy have been in use for lumbar intervertebral disc prolapse. The access to spine is kept to a minimum without stripping paraspinal muscles minimizing muscle damage by posterior interlaminar endoscopic approach. The aim of this study was to evaluate technical problems, complications, and overall initial results of microendoscopic discectomy. Materials and Methods: First 100 consecutive cases aged 19-65 years operated by microendoscopic dissectomy between August 2002 - December 2005 are reported. All patients with single nerve root lesions including sequestrated or migrated and selected central disc at L4-5 and L5-S1 were included. The patients with bilateral radiculopathy were excluded. All patients had preoperative MRI and first 11 patients had postoperative MRI to check the adequacy of decompression. Diagnostic selective nerve root blocks were done in selective cases to isolate the single root lesion when MRI was inconclusive (n=7. All patients were operated by a single surgeon with the Metrx system (Medtronics. 97 were operated by 18-mm ports, and only three patients were operated by 16-mm ports. Postoperatively, all patients were mobilized as soon as the pain subsided and discharged within 24-48 h postsurgery. Patients were evaluated for technical problems, complications, and overall results by modified Macnab criteria. Patients were followed up at 2, 6, and 12 weeks. Results: The mean follow up was 12 months (range 3 months - 4 years. Open conversion was required in one patient with suspected root damage. Peroperatively single facet removal was done in 5 initial cases. Minor dural punctures occurred in seven cases and root damage in one case. The average surgical time was 70 min (range 25-210 min. Average blood loss was 20-30 ml. Technical difficulties encountered in initial 25 cases were

  9. Fluoroscopic lumbar interlaminar epidural injections in managing chronic lumbar axial or discogenic pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manchikanti L

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Laxmaiah Manchikanti,1,2 Kimberly A Cash,1 Carla D McManus,1 Vidyasagar Pampati,1 Ramsin Benyamin3,41Pain Management Center of Paducah, Paducah, KY; 2University of Louisville, Louisville, KY; 3Millennium Pain Center, Bloomington, IL; 4University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, IL, USAAbstract: Among the multiple causes of chronic low back pain, axial and discogenic pain are common. Various modalities of treatments are utilized in managing discogenic and axial low back pain including epidural injections. However, there is a paucity of evidence regarding the effectiveness, indications, and medical necessity of any treatment modality utilized for managing axial or discogenic pain, including epidural injections. In an interventional pain management practice in the US, a randomized, double-blind, active control trial was conducted. The objective was to assess the effectiveness of lumbar interlaminar epidural injections of local anesthetic with or without steroids for managing chronic low back pain of discogenic origin. However, disc herniation, radiculitis, facet joint pain, or sacroiliac joint pain were excluded. Two groups of patients were studied, with 60 patients in each group receiving either local anesthetic only or local anesthetic mixed with non-particulate betamethasone. Primary outcome measures included the pain relief-assessed by numeric rating scale of pain and functional status assessed by the, Oswestry Disability Index, Secondary outcome measurements included employment status, and opioid intake. Significant improvement or success was defined as at least a 50% decrease in pain and disability. Significant improvement was seen in 77% of the patients in Group I and 67% of the patients in Group II. In the successful groups (those with at least 3 weeks of relief with the first two procedures, the improvement was 84% in Group I and 71% in Group II. For those with chronic function-limiting low back pain refractory to conservative management

  10. Anterior herniation of lumbar disc induces persistent visceral pain:discogenic visceral pain

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TANG Yuan-zhang; Moore-Langston Shannon; LAI Guang-hui; LI Xuan-ying; LI Na; NI Jia-xiang

    2013-01-01

    Background Visceral pain is a common cause for seeking medical attention.Afferent fibers innervating viscera project to the central nervous system via sympathetic nerves.The lumbar sympathetic nerve trunk lies in front of the lumbar spine.Thus,it is possible for patients to suffer visceral pain originating from sympathetic nerve irritation induced by anterior herniation of the lumbar disc.This study aimed to evaluate lumbar discogenic visceral pain and its treatment.Methods Twelve consecutive patients with a median age of 56.4 years were enrolled for investigation between June 2012 and December 2012.These patients suffered from long-term abdominal pain unresponsive to current treatment options.Apart from obvious anterior herniation of the lumbar discs and high signal intensity anterior to the herniated disc on magnetic resonance imaging,no significant pathology was noted on gastroscopy,vascular ultrasound,or abdominal computed tomography (CT).To prove that their visceral pain originated from the anteriorly protruding disc,we evaluated whether pain was relieved by sympathetic block at the level of the anteriorly protruding disc.If the block was effective,CT-guided continuous lumbar sympathetic nerve block was finally performed.Results All patients were positive for pain relief by sympathetic block.Furthermore,the average Visual Analog Scale of visceral pain significantly improved after treatment in all patients (P <0.05).Up to 11/12 patients had satisfactory pain relief at 1 week after discharge,8/12 at 4 weeks,7/12 at 8 weeks,6/12 at 12 weeks,and 5/12 at 24 weeks.Conclusions It is important to consider the possibility of discogenic visceral pain secondary to anterior herniation of the lumbar disc when forming a differential diagnosis for seemingly idiopathic abdominal pain.Continuous lumbar sympathetic nerve block is an effective and safe therapy for patients with discogenic visceral pain.

  11. Adjacent Lumbar Disc Herniation after Lumbar Short Spinal Fusion

    OpenAIRE

    Koshi Ninomiya; Koichi Iwatsuki; Yu-ichiro Ohnishi; Toshika Ohkawa; Toshiki Yoshimine

    2014-01-01

    A 70-year-old outpatient presented with a chief complaint of sudden left leg motor weakness and sensory disturbance. He had undergone L4/5 posterior interbody fusion with L3–5 posterior fusions for spondylolisthesis 3 years prior, and the screws were removed 1 year later. He has been followed up for 3 years, and there had been no adjacent segment problems before this presentation. Lumbar magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showed a large L2/3 disc hernia descending to the L3/4 level. Compared to...

  12. Do clinical features and MRI suggest the same nerve root in acute cervical radiculopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Conradie

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available Different proposed pathophysiological mechanisms can result in variable clinical presentations of cervical radiculopathy (CR, often making it difficult to detect minor nerve root (NR conditions. This descriptive study determined (1 the level(s of  NR involvement suggested by the distribution patterns of clinical features and detected by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI and (2 the most common associations between the different variables in patients diagnosed with acute CR by a neurosurgeon. A physiotherapist blinded to the level(s of NR involvement performed a standardized interview on 21 subjects to determine the distribution patterns of pain and paraesthesia, and a neurological examination. The Fisher exact test was used to determine associations between the different variables. Only seven subjects presented clinically and radiologically with the same single-level NR involvement. Multiple- level presentations occurred which might be due to dermatomal overlapping, central sensitization or the possible involvement of two adjacent NR levels. Distribution patterns of motor weakness, pain and paraesthesia, and to a lesser extent sensory and reflex changes, have value in identifying the compressed NR level. For this sample the distri-bution patterns of radicular features identified C6 and C8 with more certainty than C7.

  13. Remote cerebellar hemorrhage after lumbar spinal surgery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cevik, Belma [Baskent University Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Fevzi Cakmak Cad. 10. sok. No: 45, Bahcelievler, Ankara 06490 (Turkey)], E-mail: belmac@baskent-ank.edu.tr; Kirbas, Ismail; Cakir, Banu; Akin, Kayihan; Teksam, Mehmet [Baskent University Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Fevzi Cakmak Cad. 10. sok. No: 45, Bahcelievler, Ankara 06490 (Turkey)

    2009-04-15

    Background: Postoperative remote cerebellar hemorrhage (RCH) as a complication of lumbar spinal surgery is an increasingly recognized clinical entity. The aim of this study was to determine the incidence of RCH after lumbar spinal surgery and to describe diagnostic imaging findings of RCH. Methods: Between October 1996 and March 2007, 2444 patients who had undergone lumbar spinal surgery were included in the study. Thirty-seven of 2444 patients were scanned by CT or MRI due to neurologic symptoms within the first 7 days of postoperative period. The data of all the patients were studied with regard to the following variables: incidence of RCH after lumbar spinal surgery, gender and age, coagulation parameters, history of previous arterial hypertension, and position of lumbar spinal surgery. Results: The retrospective study led to the identification of two patients who had RCH after lumbar spinal surgery. Of 37 patients who had neurologic symptoms, 29 patients were women and 8 patients were men. CT and MRI showed subarachnoid hemorrhage in the folia of bilateral cerebellar hemispheres in both patients with RCH. The incidence of RCH was 0.08% among patients who underwent lumbar spinal surgery. Conclusion: RCH is a rare complication of lumbar spinal surgery, self-limiting phenomenon that should not be mistaken for more ominous pathologic findings such as hemorrhagic infarction. This type of bleeding is thought to occur secondary to venous infarction, but the exact pathogenetic mechanism is unknown. CT or MRI allowed immediate diagnosis of this complication and guided conservative management.

  14. Genetic association studies in lumbar disc degeneration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eskola, Pasi J; Lemmelä, Susanna; Kjær, Per;

    2012-01-01

    Low back pain is associated with lumbar disc degeneration, which is mainly due to genetic predisposition. The objective of this study was to perform a systematic review to evaluate genetic association studies in lumbar disc degeneration as defined on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in humans....

  15. Primary lumbar hernia: A rarely encountered hernia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharada Sundaramurthy

    2016-01-01

    Conclusion: A surgeon may encounter a primary lumbar hernia perhaps once in his lifetime making it an interesting surgical challenge. Sound anatomical knowledge and adequate imaging are indispensable. Inspite of advances in minimally invasive surgery, it cannot be universally applied to patients with lumbar hernia and management requires a more tailored approach.

  16. Two cases of congenital defects within transverse processes of lumbar spine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Two cases of congenital defects of transverse processes of lumbar spine causing lumbalgia are described. The first one was produced by direct contact of the elongated processes with subsequent pseudoarthrosis. Hypertrophied processes caused stenosis around intervertebral foramen and irritated posterior neural branch in the second case. Surgical resection of the hypertrophied transverse processes has brought the cure. (author)

  17. TAHU MENGHAMBAT KEHILANGAN TULANG LUMBAR TIKUS BETINA OVARIEKTOMI [Tofu Attenuates Lumbar Bone Loss of Ovariectomized Female Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suyanto Pawiroharsono 4

    2002-12-01

    Full Text Available The objectives of this research were to examine the efeects of feed containing soybean tofu and tempeh on lumbar bone density and mass of ovariectomized female rats. Twenty four 17 weeks-old Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly assigned to four group, i.e.: (1 non-ovariectomized rats fed casein based diet (NonOvx, (2 ovariectomized rats fed casein based diet (OvxC, (3 ovariectomized rats fed diet containing soybean tofu (OvxH, and (4 ovariectomized rats fed diet containing soybean tempeh (OvxT; in three block based on their body weight. The result show that body weight gram of ovariectomized rats was greater than nonovariectomized. Ovariectomy caused atrophy of the uterus, and resulted in higher serum calcium level. The lower lumbar vertebrae density of ovariectomized rats was observed and the decrease was prevented by tofu.

  18. Hernia discal lumbar: Tratamiento conservador

    OpenAIRE

    López-Sastre Núñez, Antonio; Candau Pérez, Ernesto

    1999-01-01

    Existe una gran demanda de patología lumbar crónica y aguda que debe de tratarse conjuntamente entre el especialista en Rehabilitación y el Cirujano de columna vertebral. En este trabajo se detallan las posibilidades del tratamiento conservador antes de optar por la cirugía. Se realiza una revisión bibliográfica de los resultados conservadores del tratamiento de la lumbociática de origen discal comparando aquellos estudios publicados con validez estadística. Se detallan las modernas pautas de...

  19. Assessment of lumbar spinal canal stenosis by magnetic resonance phlebography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    There is evidence to suggest that cauda equina intermittent claudication is caused by local circulatory disturbances in the cauda equina as well as compression of the cauda equina. We evaluated the role of magnetic resonance phlebography (MRP) in identifying circulatory disturbances of the vertebral venous system in patients with lumbar spinal canal stenosis. Extensive filling defects of the anterior internal vertebral venous plexus were evident in patients with lumbar spinal canal stenosis (n=53), whereas only milder abnormalities were noted in patients with other lumber diseases (n=16) and none in normal subjects (n=13). The extent of the defect on MRP correlated with the time at which intermittent claudication appeared. In patients with lumber spinal canal stenosis, extensive defects of the internal vertebral venous plexus on MRP were noted in the neutral spine position, but the defect diminished with anterior flexion of the spine. This phenomenon correlated closely with the time at which intermittent claudication appeared. Our results highlight the importance of MRP for assessing the underlying mechanism of cauda equina intermittent claudication in patients with lumbar spinal canal stenosis and suggest that congestive venous ischemia is involved in the development of intermittent claudication in these patients. (author)

  20. Flexible Stabilisation of the Degenerative Lumbar Spine Using PEEK Rods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacques Benezech

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Posterior lumbar interbody fusion using cages, titanium rods, and pedicle screws is considered today as the gold standard of surgical treatment of lumbar degenerative disease and has produced satisfying long-term fusion rates. However this rigid material could change the physiological distribution of load at the instrumental and adjacent segments, a main cause of implant failure and adjacent segment disease, responsible for a high rate of further surgery in the following years. More recently, semirigid instrumentation systems using rods made of polyetheretherketone (PEEK have been introduced. This clinical study of 21 patients focuses on the clinical and radiological outcomes of patients with lumbar degenerative disease treated with Initial VEOS PEEK®-Optima system (Innov’Spine, France composed of rods made from PEEK-OPTIMA® polymer (Invibio Biomaterial Solutions, UK without arthrodesis. With an average follow-up of 2 years and half, the chances of reoperation were significantly reduced (4.8%, quality of life was improved (ODI = 16%, and the adjacent disc was preserved in more than 70% of cases. Based on these results, combined with the biomechanical and clinical data already published, PEEK rods systems can be considered as a safe and effective alternative solution to rigid ones.

  1. Differentiating C8–T1 Radiculopathy from Ulnar Neuropathy: A Survey of 24 Spine Surgeons

    OpenAIRE

    Stoker, Geoffrey E.; Kim, Han Jo; Riew, K. Daniel

    2013-01-01

    Study Design Questionnaire. Objective To evaluate the ability of spine surgeons to distinguish C8–T1 radiculopathies from ulnar neuropathy. Methods Twenty-four self-rated “experienced” cervical spine surgeons completed a questionnaire with the following items. (1) If the ulnar nerve is cut at the elbow, which of the following would be numb: ulnar forearm, small and ring fingers; only the ulnar forearm; only the small and ring fingers; or none of the above? (2) Which of the following muscles a...

  2. The activL® Artificial Disc: a next-generation motion-preserving implant for chronic lumbar discogenic pain

    OpenAIRE

    Miller, Larry E.

    2016-01-01

    James J Yue,1 Rolando Garcia Jr,2 Larry E Miller3 1Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Yale School of Medicine, New Haven, CT, 2Orthopedic Care Center, Miami, FL, 3Miller Scientific Consulting, Inc., Asheville, NC, USA Abstract: Degeneration of the lumbar intervertebral discs is a leading cause of chronic low back pain in adults. Treatment options for patients with chronic lumbar discogenic pain unresponsive to conservative management include total disc replacement (TDR) or ...

  3. Nursing care for patients receiving percutaneous lumbar discectomy and intradiscal electrothermal treatment for lumbar disc herniation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To summarize the nursing experience in caring patients with lumbar intervertebral disc herniation who received percutaneous lumbar discectomy (PLD) together with intradiscal electrothermal treatment (IDET) under DSA guidance. Methods: The perioperative nursing care measures carried out in 126 patients with lumbar intervertebral disc herniation who underwent PLD and IDET were retrospectively analyzed. Results: Successful treatment of PLD and IDET was accomplished in 112 cases. Under comprehensive and scientific nursing care and observation, no serious complications occurred. Conclusion: Scientific and proper nursing care is a strong guarantee for a successful surgery and a better recovery in treating lumbar intervertebral disc herniation with PLD and IDET under DSA guidance. (authors)

  4. THE EFFECT OF THE UPPER LIMB TENSION TEST IN THE MANAGEMENT OF ROM LIMITATION AND PAIN IN CERVICAL RADICULOPATHY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shah Sarfraznawaz F

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Aim and Objectives: To study the effect of the upper limb tension test in the management of limitation of range of motion and pain in patients with cervical radiculopathy compared with a control group. Intervention and Outcomes: A total of 40 patients were treated with two types of interventions. The Control group received a conservative management protocol and the Experimental group received an experimental protocol that included mobilization using the Upper Limb Tension Test in addition to the conservative protocol .The outcomes measures were flexion, extension, right side flexion and left side flexion ranges of the cervical spine and VAS score for Pain. Results: All data collected was statistically analysed on the Stat Pac 3.0. Pre and Post test values were taken for both cervical range of motion and pain for both the Control and Experimental groups. Paired ‘t’ test was used for within the group comparison. Unpaired ‘t’ test was used for between the group comparison which showed a highly significant difference in favor of the experimental group at 99.9%(P<0.001 between the ROM of Flexion, Extension, right Side Flexion and left Side Flexion of the cervical spine. Conclusion: The results of the study showed that adding neural mobilization using ULLT certainly benefits patients of cervical radiculopathy as far as the cervical range of motion and pain is considered.

  5. Spontaneous resolution of lumbar vertebral eosinophilic granuloma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bavbek, M; Atalay, B; Altinörs, N; Caner, H

    2004-02-01

    Eosinophilic granuloma (EG) is a rare disease but is more common in adults than children. It's often self-limiting. Spinal involvement is rare. It is the localized and most benign form of Langerhans' cell histiocytosis (previously known as histiocytosis X), characterised by lytic lesions in one or more bones. Spontaneous resolution of vertebral body lesions is very rare. In this case, the patient had one EG in a cervical vertebra and a similar lesion in a lumbar vertebra. This case is important because it featured a symptomatic lesion in the cervical spine accompanied by an asymptomatic lesion in a lumbar vertebra. We treated the cervical lesion by surgical fusion and followed the lumbar lesion up conservatively, with the patient in a corset. After 8 years of follow-up, control MRI showed that the lumbar lesion had spontaneously resolved. PMID:14963750

  6. Septic arthritis of a lumbar facet joint

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Septic arthritis of the posterior lumbar joints is extremely rare. The clinical picture of the unusual site of infection can easily lead to confusion with spondylo-discitis which is more common. We report a case of a 50-year-old women with Staphylococcus aureus septic arthritis of the left L5-S1 lumbar facet joint. CT scan was helpful to establish the diagnosis and to guide the percutaneous needle biopsy. (authors)

  7. Design concepts in lumbar total disc arthroplasty

    OpenAIRE

    Galbusera, Fabio; Bellini, Chiara M.; Zweig, Thomas; Ferguson, Stephen; Raimondi, Manuela T.; Lamartina, Claudio; Brayda-bruno, Marco; Fornari, Maurizio

    2008-01-01

    The implantation of lumbar disc prostheses based on different design concepts is widely accepted. This paper reviews currently available literature studies on the biomechanics of TDA in the lumbar spine, and is targeted at the evaluation of possible relationships between the aims of TDA and the geometrical, mechanical and material properties of the various available disc prostheses. Both theoretical and experimental studies were analyzed, by a PUBMED search (performed in February 2007, revise...

  8. Imaging of lumbar spinal surgery complications

    OpenAIRE

    Malhotra, Ajay; Kalra, Vivek B; Wu, Xiao; Grant, Ryan; Bronen, Richard A; Abbed, Khalid M.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Lumbar spine surgery for spinal stenosis is a frequently performed procedure and was the fastest growing type of surgery in the US from 1980 to 2000. With increasing surgical invasiveness, postoperative complications also tend to be higher. Cross-sectional imaging techniques (CT and MRI) are more sensitive than radiographs and play an increasingly important role in evaluation of patients with lumbar spine surgery. Their use in patients with metallic implants is somewhat limited by ar...

  9. Posteroanterior versus anteroposterior lumbar spine radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The posteroanterior view of the lumbar spine has important features including radiation protection and image quality; these have been studied by various investigators. Investigators have shown that sensitive tissues receive less radiation dosage in the posteroanterior view of the spine for scoliosis screening and intracranial tomography without altering the image quality. This paper emphasizes the importance of the radiation safety aspect of the posteroanterior view and shows the improvement in shape distortion in the lumbar vertebrae

  10. Posteroanterior versus anteroposterior lumbar spine radiology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsuno, M.M.; Shu, G.J. (Cleveland Chiropractic College, Los Angeles, CA (USA))

    1990-03-01

    The posteroanterior view of the lumbar spine has important features including radiation protection and image quality; these have been studied by various investigators. Investigators have shown that sensitive tissues receive less radiation dosage in the posteroanterior view of the spine for scoliosis screening and intracranial tomography without altering the image quality. This paper emphasizes the importance of the radiation safety aspect of the posteroanterior view and shows the improvement in shape distortion in the lumbar vertebrae.

  11. Bleichner’s hernia – lumbar hernia

    OpenAIRE

    Petersen, Katherine; Snikeris, Jaclyn; Hall, Timothy S.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Background: We present a case of a lumbar hernia and a review of the literature of this rare hernia type. Case Report: The case and the review will discuss the unusual presentations reported, common etiologies, the importance of early operative repair based on the high rate of incarceration and the recent recommendations regarding repair techniques. Conclusions: Lumbar hernias are rare cases, but should be pursued in diagnosis and treated aggressively because of the high rate of incar...

  12. Lumbar lordosis in osteoporosis and in osteoarthritis

    OpenAIRE

    Papadakis, Michael; Papadokostakis, Georgios; Stergiopoulos, Konstantinos; Kampanis, Nikos; Katonis, Pavlos

    2008-01-01

    The curvature of the lumbar spine and the risk of developing either osteoporosis (OP) or osteoarthritis (OA) are influenced by many common factors. The aim of this study is to determine whether lumbar lordosis is different between patients with either disease and healthy persons. A cross-sectional, blinded, controlled design was implemented. One hundred and twelve postmenopausal women were evaluated for bone mineral density as well as undergoing spinal radiography. Lordosis measurement was pe...

  13. Lumbar Disk Herniation Surgery: Outcome and Predictors

    OpenAIRE

    Sedighi, Mahsa; Haghnegahdar, Ali

    2014-01-01

    Study Design A retrospective cohort study. Objectives To determine the outcome and any differences in the clinical results of three different surgical methods for lumbar disk herniation and to assess the effect of factors that could predict the outcome of surgery. Methods We evaluated 148 patients who had operations for lumbar disk herniation from March 2006 to March 2011 using three different surgical techniques (laminectomy, microscopically assisted percutaneous nucleotomy, and spinous proc...

  14. Fractures of the thoraco-lumbar spine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lifeso, R M; Arabie, K M; Kadhi, S K

    1985-08-01

    A personal prospective study of 98 consecutive patients presenting with neurological impairment and fractures or dislocations between the 9th thoracic and 2nd lumbar vertebrae bodies. Fifty-three patients underwent Harrington instrumentation, and 45 patients were treated recumbently. Neurological improvement was much better following Harrington rods in the complete paraplegia group but there was no difference in neurological recovery between the two groups in those with incomplete paraplegia. Forty-two patients who had been stabilised with Harrington rods underwent post-operative myelography or tomography to assess the adequacy of spinal decompression. The best results were in patients with adequate neural canal decompression. In 21 cases decompression had not been adequate, usually due to a stereotyped pattern in which the postero-superior aspect of the fractured body remained in the neural canal. All 21 underwent anterior decompression at an average of five months post injury. All the incomplete anterior decompression at an average of five months post injury. All the incomplete paraplegics (nine patients) regained the ability to walk, three of the 12 complete paraplegics improved and regained the ability to walk with bilateral ankle-foot orthoses. Neurological improvement was dependent upon the adequacy of spinal cord decompression and not upon Harrington rods. per se. Harrington rods alone were not adequate to decompress the spinal canal in 50 per cent of cases. The best results after anterior decompression occurred where neural compression was caused by a minimally displaced wedge fracture distal to T12. PMID:4047711

  15. Percutaneous pedicle screw reduction and axial presacral lumbar interbody fusion for treatment of lumbosacral spondylolisthesis: A case series

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miller Larry E

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Traditional surgical management of lumbosacral spondylolisthesis is technically challenging and is associated with significant complications. The advent of minimally invasive surgical techniques offers patients treatment alternatives with lower operative morbidity risk. The combination of percutaneous pedicle screw reduction and an axial presacral approach for lumbosacral discectomy and fusion offers an alternative procedure for the surgical management of low-grade lumbosacral spondylolisthesis. Case presentation Three patients who had L5-S1 grade 2 spondylolisthesis and who presented with axial pain and lumbar radiculopathy were treated with a minimally invasive surgical technique. The patients-a 51-year-old woman and two men (ages 46 and 50-were Caucasian. Under fluoroscopic guidance, spondylolisthesis was reduced with a percutaneous pedicle screw system, resulting in interspace distraction. Then, an axial presacral approach with the AxiaLIF System (TranS1, Inc., Wilmington, NC, USA was used to perform the discectomy and anterior fixation. Once the axial rod was engaged in the L5 vertebral body, further distraction of the spinal interspace was made possible by partially loosening the pedicle screw caps, advancing the AxiaLIF rod to its final position in the vertebrae, and retightening the screw caps. The operative time ranged from 173 to 323 minutes, and blood loss was minimal (50 mL. Indirect foraminal decompression and adequate fixation were achieved in all cases. All patients were ambulatory after surgery and reported relief from pain and resolution of radicular symptoms. No perioperative complications were reported, and patients were discharged in two to three days. Fusion was demonstrated radiographically in all patients at one-year follow-up. Conclusions Percutaneous pedicle screw reduction combined with axial presacral lumbar interbody fusion offers a promising and minimally invasive alternative for the management

  16. Microsurgical excision of hematoma of the lumbar ligamentum flavum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeno, Kenichi; Kobayashi, Shigeru; Miyazaki, Tsuyoshi; Yayama, Takafumi; Baba, Hisatoshi

    2010-07-01

    Hematoma of the lumbar ligamentum flavum is a very rare cause of sciatica. A 72-year-old man presented with left-sided sciatica and paresthesia of the lateral aspect of his left foot. From CT and MRI findings, he was diagnosed as having a hematoma embedded in the ligamentum flavum, which compressed the dura mater at the L5/S1 disc level. After an adequate surgical field was obtained with a microscope and a Casper retractor, the hematoma of the ligamentum flavum could be excised via a unilateral approach and satisfactory decompression of the cauda equina and nerve roots were obtained. PMID:20537575

  17. Minimally Invasive Resection of an Extradural Far Lateral Lumbar Schwannoma with Zygapophyseal Joint Sparing: Surgical Nuances and Literature Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vítor M. Gonçalves

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Spinal schwannomas are benign nerve sheath tumors. Completely extradural schwannomas of the lumbar spine are extremely rare lesions, accounting for only 0,7–4,2% of all spinal NSTs. Standard open approaches have been used to treat these tumors, requiring extensive muscle dissection, laminectomy, radical foraminotomy, and facetectomy. In this paper the authors present the case of a minimally invasive resection of a completely extradural schwannoma. Operative technique literature review is presented. Material & Methods. A 50-year-old woman presented with progressive complains of chronic right leg pain and paresthesia. The magnetic resonance imaging revealed a giant well-encapsulated dumbbell-shaped extradural lesion at the L3-L4 level. The patient underwent a minimally invasive gross total resection of the tumor using a tubular expandable retractor system. Results. The patient had complete resolution of radiculopathy in the immediate postoperative period and she was discharged home, neurologically intact, on the second postoperative day. Postoperative MRI demonstrated no evidence of residual tumor. At latest follow-up (18 months the patient remains asymptomatic. Conclusion. Although challenging, this minimally invasive procedure is safe and effective, being an appropriate alternative, with many potential advantages, to the open approach.

  18. Chordoma of the Lumbar Spine Presenting as Sciatica and Treated with Vertebroplasty

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The lumbar spine is a less common location for chordoma. Here we describe a 44-year-old woman presenting with pain due to a L4 vertebral expansile lesion that caused significant canal stenosis and neural foraminal compromise. Vertebroplasty was performed and resulted in immediate pain relief. For patients with painful lumbar chordoma who are unwilling to undergo surgery, vertebroplasty can play a palliative role as in patients with other vertebral lesions. Treating pain and stabilizing vertebra by way of vertebroplasty in a case of chordoma has not yet been reported.

  19. Clinical evaluation and surgical decision making for patients with lumbar discogenic pain and facet syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tessitore, Enrico, E-mail: enrico.tessitore@hcuge.ch [Neurosurgical Unit, Geneva University Hospitals, Faculty of Medicine, University of Geneva (Switzerland); Molliqaj, Granit, E-mail: granitmolliqaj@gmail.com [Neurosurgical Unit, Geneva University Hospitals, Faculty of Medicine, University of Geneva (Switzerland); Schatlo, Bawarjan, E-mail: schatlo@gmail.com [Department of Neurosurgery, Georg-August University, University of Medicine Gottingen, 37075 Gottingen (Germany); Schaller, Karl, E-mail: karl.schaller@hcuge.ch [Neurosurgical Unit, Geneva University Hospitals, Faculty of Medicine, University of Geneva (Switzerland)

    2015-05-15

    In industrialized countries, more than two thirds of the population suffers from low back pain (LBP) in their lifetime. LBP associated with lumbar disc herniation, stenosis, and instability is a well-known and documented entity. On the other hand, the lumbar discogenic pain and facet syndrome are difficult to be clearly identified, and they are not always detectable by imaging. This article describes the causes of these painful syndromes, which are typically without radicular component, explains the modern diagnostic procedures, and provides guidelines for surgical decision making.

  20. Clinical evaluation and surgical decision making for patients with lumbar discogenic pain and facet syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In industrialized countries, more than two thirds of the population suffers from low back pain (LBP) in their lifetime. LBP associated with lumbar disc herniation, stenosis, and instability is a well-known and documented entity. On the other hand, the lumbar discogenic pain and facet syndrome are difficult to be clearly identified, and they are not always detectable by imaging. This article describes the causes of these painful syndromes, which are typically without radicular component, explains the modern diagnostic procedures, and provides guidelines for surgical decision making

  1. Spontaneous Regression of Herniated Lumbar Disc with New Disc Protrusion in the Adjacent Level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hakan, Tayfun; Gürcan, Serkan

    2016-01-01

    Spontaneous regression of herniated lumbar discs was reported occasionally. The mechanisms proposed for regression of disc herniation are still incomplete. This paper describes and discusses a case of spontaneous regression of herniated lumbar discs with a new disc protrusion in the adjacent level. A 41-year-old man was admitted with radiating pain and numbness in the left lower extremity with a left posterolateral disc extrusion at L5-S1 level. He was admitted to hospital with low back pain due to disc herniation caudally immigrating at L4-5 level three years ago. He refused the surgical intervention that was offered and was treated conservatively at that time. He had no neurological deficit and a history of spontaneous regression of the extruded lumbar disc; so, a conservative therapy, including bed rest, physical therapy, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, and analgesics, was advised. In conclusion, herniated lumbar disc fragments may regress spontaneously. Reports are prone to advise conservative treatment for extruded or sequestrated lumbar disc herniations. However, these patients should be followed up closely; new herniation at adjacent/different level may occur. Furthermore, it is important to know which herniated disk should be removed and which should be treated conservatively, because disc herniation may cause serious complications as muscle weakness and cauda equine syndrome. PMID:27429818

  2. Spontaneous Regression of Herniated Lumbar Disc with New Disc Protrusion in the Adjacent Level

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tayfun Hakan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Spontaneous regression of herniated lumbar discs was reported occasionally. The mechanisms proposed for regression of disc herniation are still incomplete. This paper describes and discusses a case of spontaneous regression of herniated lumbar discs with a new disc protrusion in the adjacent level. A 41-year-old man was admitted with radiating pain and numbness in the left lower extremity with a left posterolateral disc extrusion at L5-S1 level. He was admitted to hospital with low back pain due to disc herniation caudally immigrating at L4-5 level three years ago. He refused the surgical intervention that was offered and was treated conservatively at that time. He had no neurological deficit and a history of spontaneous regression of the extruded lumbar disc; so, a conservative therapy, including bed rest, physical therapy, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, and analgesics, was advised. In conclusion, herniated lumbar disc fragments may regress spontaneously. Reports are prone to advise conservative treatment for extruded or sequestrated lumbar disc herniations. However, these patients should be followed up closely; new herniation at adjacent/different level may occur. Furthermore, it is important to know which herniated disk should be removed and which should be treated conservatively, because disc herniation may cause serious complications as muscle weakness and cauda equine syndrome.

  3. Characteristics and Neurological Manifestations of Patients with Operated Lumbar Disc Herniation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amir Mohammad Bazzazi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and aim: Lumbar disk herniation is one of the most common causes of surgery in the spine with a variety of signs and symptoms. Sensory and motor deficits, as well as reflex and autonomic abnormalities may be seen. This study aimed to investigate characteristics and neurological manifestations in a series of operated cases with lumbar disc herniation. Methods: In a retrospective setting, profiles of 163 operated cases with lumbar disc herniation were reviewed. Demographics as well as preoperational sign and symptoms were extracted and evaluated. Results: There were 86 females and 77 males with a mean age of 44.85±0.91 (range: 23-78 years in the studied population. The most common involved levels were L4-L5 and L5-S1, respectively. Low back pain, radicular pain, and positive Lasegue test were documented in 98.2%, 96.9% and 77.3% of the patients, respectively. Sensory, motor and reflexive abnormalities were documented in 66.3%, 51.5% and 19.6% of the cases, respectively. Sphincter and sexual dysfunction was presented in 4.9% and 1.2%, respectively. Conclusion: Clinical and neurological signs of operated patients with lumbar disc herniation in the studied center are not far different from available reports in this regard. Keywords: Lumbar disk herniation; Signs and symptoms; Surgery 

  4. General anesthesia versus segmental thoracic or conventional lumbar spinal anesthesia for patients undergoing laparoscopic cholecystectomy

    OpenAIRE

    Yousef, Gamal T.; Lasheen, Ahmed E.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Laparoscopic cholecystectomy became the standard surgery for gallstone disease because of causing less postoperative pain, respiratory compromise and early ambulation. Objective: This study was designed to compare spinal anesthesia, (segmental thoracic or conventional lumbar) vs the gold standard general anesthesia as three anesthetic techniques for healthy patients scheduled for elective laparoscopic cholecystectomy, evaluating intraoperative parameters, postoperative recovery an...

  5. Ligamentum flavum cyst in the lumbar spine: a case report and review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taha, H; Bareksei, Y; Albanna, W; Schirmer, M

    2010-06-01

    Degenerative changes in the lumbar spine can be followed by cystic changes. Most reported intraspinal cysts are ganglion or synovial cysts. Ligamentum flavum pseudocyst, as a cystic lesion in the lumbar spine, is a rare and unusual cause of neurologic signs and symptoms and is usually seen in elderly persons (due to degenerative changes). They are preferentially located in the lower lumbar region, while cervical localization is rare. Complete removal of the cyst leads to excellent results and seems to preclude recurrence. We report the case of a right-sided ligamentum flavum cyst occurring at L3-L4 level in a 70-year-old woman, which was surgically removed with excellent postoperative results and complete resolution of symptoms. In addition, we discuss and review reports in the literature. PMID:20582448

  6. Radiographical analysis concernig the etiology of degenerative spondylolisthesis of the lumbar spine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ihara, Koichiro (Yamaguchi Univ., Ube (Japan). School of Medicine)

    1989-12-01

    The purpose of this article is to evaluate radiographically degenerative spondylolisthesis of the lumbar spine, with the main focus on the configuration of posterior elements. A comparative study between 49 cases of degenerative spondylolisthesis and 99 cases of other lumbar disorders was performed, using 13 radiographical parameters. The results clearly indicate the posterior elements of degenerative spondylolisthesis shifted horizontally and sagittally to allow slipping. This was due to the weak bony hook mechanism. Furthermore, almost all facet joints were morphologically classified as sagittal or intermediate type. Another meaningful difference was the alignment of the lumbar spine which showed an increase in both lordosis and lumbosacral angle. On the other hand, the level of Jacoby's line was almost the same in both groups. These characteristic configurations could be the cause of listhesis, although further study should be carried out to elucidate whether they are present at the non-listhetic stage. (author).

  7. Radiographical analysis concernig the etiology of degenerative spondylolisthesis of the lumbar spine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this article is to evaluate radiographically degenerative spondylolisthesis of the lumbar spine, with the main focus on the configuration of posterior elements. A comparative study between 49 cases of degenerative spondylolisthesis and 99 cases of other lumbar disorders was performed, using 13 radiographical parameters. The results clearly indicate the posterior elements of degenerative spondylolisthesis shifted horizontally and sagittally to allow slipping. This was due to the weak bony hook mechanism. Furthermore, almost all facet joints were morphologically classified as sagittal or intermediate type. Another meaningful difference was the alignment of the lumbar spine which showed an increase in both lordosis and lumbosacral angle. On the other hand, the level of Jacoby's line was almost the same in both groups. These characteristic configurations could be the cause of listhesis, although further study should be carried out to elucidate whether they are present at the non-listhetic stage. (author)

  8. Genotypic and antimicrobial characterisation of Propionibacterium acnes isolates from surgically excised lumbar disc herniations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rollason, Jess; McDowell, Andrew; Albert, Hanne B;

    2013-01-01

    The anaerobic skin commensal Propionibacterium acnes is an underestimated cause of human infections and clinical conditions. Previous studies have suggested a role for the bacterium in lumbar disc herniation and infection. To further investigate this, five biopsy samples were surgically excised...... from each of 64 patients with lumbar disc herniation. P. acnes and other bacteria were detected by anaerobic culture, followed by biochemical and PCR-based identification. In total, 24/64 (38%) patients had evidence of P. acnes in their excised herniated disc tissue. Using recA and mAb typing methods...... isolate collection (63%) suggests that the role of P. acnes in lumbar disc herniation should not be readily dismissed....

  9. Effectiveness of percutaneous laser disc decompression versus conventional open discectomy in the treatment of lumbar disc herniation; Design of a prospective randomized controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P.A. Brouwer (Patrick); W.C. Peul (Wilco); R. Brand (René); M.P. Arts (Mark); B.W. Koes (Bart); A.A. van den Berg (Annette); M.A. van Buchem (Mark)

    2009-01-01

    textabstractBackground. The usual surgical treatment of refractory sciatica caused by lumbar disc herniation, is open discectomy. Minimally invasive procedures, including percutaneous therapies under local anesthesia, are increasingly gaining attention. One of these treatments is Percutaneous Laser

  10. Spinaplasty following lumbar laminectomy for multilevel lumbar spinal stenosis to prevent iatrogenic instability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Surendra Mohan Tuli

    2011-01-01

    Conclusion: Spinaplasty following posterior decompression for multilevel lumbar canal stenosis is a simple operation, without any serious complications, retaining median structures, maintaining the tension band and the strength with least disturbance of kinematics, mobility, stability and lordosis of the lumbar spine.

  11. Lumbar facet syndrome - Lumbar facet joint injection and low back pain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The authors conducted a retrospective study lo evaluate the effectiveness of injection therapy in the lumbar zygapophysial joints with anesthetics and steroids in patients with persisting low back pain and lumbar facer syndrome. Thirty-seven patients with low back pain who reported immediate relief of their pain after controlled blocks into the facet joints between the fourth and fifth lumbar vertebrae and the fifth lumbar and first sacral vertebrae were evaluated. Outcome was evaluated using the visual analog pain scales. All outcome measures were repeated at eight days and six weeks alter controlled injection. At six-week follow-up examination 83,7% of thirty-seven patients experienced a good response to controlled blocks of the lumbar zygaphyseal (facet) joints. Good result is the pain relief of 50% or more. Fifteen patients experienced a good response with pain relief of eight points or more in the VAS

  12. Transforaminal Percutaneous Endoscopic Discectomy for Lumbar Disc Herniation in Parkinson's Disease: A Case-Control Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giovannopoulou, Eirini; Charitoudis, George; Kazakos, Konstantinos

    2016-01-01

    Study Design A case-control study. Purpose To investigate the effectiveness of transforaminal percutaneous endoscopic discectomy (TPED) in Parkinson's disease (PD). Overview of Literature Patients with PD frequently suffer from radiculopathy and low back pain. Additionally, they demonstrate higher complication rates after open spine surgery. However, the clinical outcome of minimally invasive techniques for lumbar discectomy, such as TPED, have not been established for this population. Methods Patients diagnosed with lumbar disc hernia were divided into Group A (11 patients diagnosed with PD), and Group B (10 patients as the control, non-PD group). All patients underwent TPED. Indexes of visual analogue scale (VAS) for leg pain and Oswestry disability index (ODI) were assessed right before surgery and at six weeks, three months, six months and one year post-surgery. Results At the baseline visit, groups did not differ significantly with age (p=0.724), gender (p=0.835), level of operation (p=0.407), ODI (p=0.497) and VAS (p=0.772). Parkinson's patients had higher scores in ODI at every visit, but the outcome was statistically significant only at 3 months (p=0.004) and one year (p=0.007). Similarly, VAS measurements were higher at each time point, with the difference being significant at 3 (psurgery. At the end of a year of follow up, ODI was reduced by 49.6% (±16.7) in Group A and 59.2% (±8.0) in Group B (p=0.111), translating to a 79.5% (±13.0) and 91.5% (±4.1) average improvement in daily functionality (p=0.024). VAS was reduced by 59.1 mm (±11.8) in Group A and 62.2 mm (±7.4) in Group B (p=0.485), leading to an 85.3 % (±4.0) and 91.9% (±2.6) general improvement in leg pain (psurgery.

  13. Analysis and treatment of surgical complications after percutaneous transforaminal endoscopic discectomy for treating lumbar disc herniation and lumbar intervertebral foraminal stenosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guang HAN

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective To analyze the causes of surgical complications after treatment of lumbar disc herniation (LDH and lumbar intervertebral foraminal stenosis by percutaneous transforaminal endoscopic discectomy (PTED.  Methods From December 2009 to December 2014, 286 patients with LDH (N = 201 and lumbar intervertebral foraminal stenosis (N = 85 were confirmed by X-ray, CT or MRI and treated by PTED in our hospital. Visual Analogue Scale (VAS was used to evaluate the degree of pain in each paitent before and after operation. The curative effect was evaluated by Macnab score. Surgical complications were recorded to find out the causes and methods to prevent them.  Results All cases were followed up for 3 months, and the VAS score decreased significantly compared with preoperation [1.00 (0.00, 1.05 vs 8.50 (7.75, 9.25; Z = 2.825, P = 0.050]. According to Macnab score, the rate of excellent and good functional recovery was 95.45% (273/286. Procedure-related complications included nerve injury in 8 cases (2.80%, hemorrhage at the operation site and hematoma formation around nerve root in 6 cases (2.10%, rupture of dural sac in one case (0.35%, muscle cramps in 3 cases (1.05%, surgical infection in one case (0.35%, postoperative recurrence in 4 cases (1.40%. All patients with complications were cured after symptomatic treatment. Conclusions The overall effect of percutaneous transforaminal endoscopic discectomy for treating lumbar disc herniation and lumbar intervertebral foraminal stenosis is satisfactory, which has a low incidence rate of postoperative complications. Some tips can effectively reduce the rate of surgical complications such as preoperative evaluation, precise performance, careful hemostasis, shortening the operation time and postoperatively symptomatic treatment, etc. DOI: 10.3969/j.issn.1672-6731.2016.04.007

  14. Irreductable Nonstrangulated Lumbar Hernia Mimicking Lipoma: A Case Report

    OpenAIRE

    Söğütlü, Gökhan; Bilen, Bilge Türk; Cinpolat, Özgür; Işık, Burak; Yılmaz, Mehmet; Kılınç, Hıdır

    2006-01-01

    We submit a 45 year old woman presenting irreduction of sigmoid colon within a lumbar hernia. There was no large bowel obstruction or strangulation so; this entity was misdiagnosed as lipoma. Key words: Lumbar hernia, Sigmoid colon, Strangulation, Lipoma

  15. Recurrent acute low back pain secondary to lumbar epidural calcification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Epidural calcification is a rare cause of back pain, and spontaneous epidural calcification has not been reported previously. We describe a patient with acute low back pain and signs of lumbar nerve root compression due to epidural calcification, as demonstrated by CT-scan and MRI. Radiological signs of spondylodiscitis led to a search for an infectious cause, which was negative, and her symptoms responded rapidly to NSAID treatment alone. Her symptoms recurred 18 months later, and further imaging studies again revealed epidural calcification, but with a changed distribution. Her symptoms were relieved once more by NSAID treatment alone. We propose that epidural calcification secondary to aseptic spondylodiscitis is the main cause of acute back pain in this patient. A possible mechanism may be the pro-inflammatory effects of calcium pyrophosphate or hydroxyapatite crystal deposition within the epidural space. (orig.)

  16. Isthmic lumbar spondylolisthesis with sciatica

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seventeen patients with sciatica and isthmic lumbar spondylolisthesis were studied with magnetic resonance (MR) imaging. In 13, myelography was also performed: 5 had dural sac deformation and root sleeve shortening, 2 had deformation with unilateral root sleeve shortening, one had bilateral root sleeve shortening only, and one had sac deformation only. In 4, myelography was normal. On sagittal MR examinations the neural foramen had an altered shape bilaterally with the long axis horizontal in all cases. In addition to altered shape the following was found in the 33 foramina evaluated. I: Normal nerve (n=8), II: Compressed nerve (n=16); III: Disappearance of fat, nerve not possible to identify (n=9). In patients with unilateral sciatica, the degree of foraminal stenosis correlated well with the side of symptoms. Coronal views showed the course of the nerve and pedicular kinking. Eight patients underwent decompressive surgery which revealed nerve compression by hypertrophic fibrous tissue and pedicular kinking, which correlated well with the findings on MR. Since the site of nerve compression often was peripheral to the root sleeves, myelography did not give complete information. (orig.)

  17. MR-guided lumbar sympathicolysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koenig, Claudius W.; Schott, Ulrich G.; Pereira, Philippe L.; Truebenbach, Jochen; Claussen, Claus D.; Duda, Stephan H. [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, University of Tuebingen (Germany); Schneider, Wilke [Department of Vascular Surgery, University of Tuebingen (Germany)

    2002-06-01

    The aim of this study was to demonstrate the feasibility of MR-guided lumbar sympathicolysis (LSL) in a non-selected patient population. One hundred one MR-guided LSL procedures were performed in 89 patients according to Haaga's technique using a horizontally open clinical MR system (0.2 T) and non-ferromagnetic 20-G cannulas (neurolysis, n=93; blockade, n=8). Only gradient-recalled sequences in either single or multislice mode [fast imaging with steady-state precession (FISP) and fast low-angle shot] were applied for anatomical survey and needle guiding. Bupivacaine injection was monitored with MR fluoroscopically. Fluid distribution was subsequently documented in a CT scan in 65 patients. Ninety-one LSL procedures could be successfully completed. Ten patients were not treated using MR due to patient inconvenience, severe motion artifacts (n=4 each), excessive spondylophytes, and retroperitoneal hematoma (n=1 each). One case of ureteral necrosis occurred. Motion artifacts were rated less severe in single-slice FISP sequences and in obese patients. An average of 3.48 sequence measurements were required for definitive needle placement. Average table time was 32.3 min. An MR-guided LSL is feasible and can be performed with acceptable safety and time effort. It can be recommended for repeated sympathetic blockades in younger patients to avoid cumulative irradiation associated with CT guidance. (orig.)

  18. MR-guided lumbar sympathicolysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of this study was to demonstrate the feasibility of MR-guided lumbar sympathicolysis (LSL) in a non-selected patient population. One hundred one MR-guided LSL procedures were performed in 89 patients according to Haaga's technique using a horizontally open clinical MR system (0.2 T) and non-ferromagnetic 20-G cannulas (neurolysis, n=93; blockade, n=8). Only gradient-recalled sequences in either single or multislice mode [fast imaging with steady-state precession (FISP) and fast low-angle shot] were applied for anatomical survey and needle guiding. Bupivacaine injection was monitored with MR fluoroscopically. Fluid distribution was subsequently documented in a CT scan in 65 patients. Ninety-one LSL procedures could be successfully completed. Ten patients were not treated using MR due to patient inconvenience, severe motion artifacts (n=4 each), excessive spondylophytes, and retroperitoneal hematoma (n=1 each). One case of ureteral necrosis occurred. Motion artifacts were rated less severe in single-slice FISP sequences and in obese patients. An average of 3.48 sequence measurements were required for definitive needle placement. Average table time was 32.3 min. An MR-guided LSL is feasible and can be performed with acceptable safety and time effort. It can be recommended for repeated sympathetic blockades in younger patients to avoid cumulative irradiation associated with CT guidance. (orig.)

  19. Lumbar Lordosis of Spinal Stenosis Patients during Intraoperative Prone Positioning

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Su-Keon; Lee, Seung-Hwan; Song, Kyung-Sub; Park, Byung-Moon; Lim, Sang-Youn; Jang, Geun; Lee, Beom-Seok; Moon, Seong-Hwan; Lee, Hwan-Mo

    2016-01-01

    Background To evaluate the effect of spondylolisthesis on lumbar lordosis on the OSI (Jackson; Orthopaedic Systems Inc.) frame. Restoration of lumbar lordosis is important for maintaining sagittal balance. Physiologic lumbar lordosis has to be gained by intraoperative prone positioning with a hip extension and posterior instrumentation technique. There are some debates about changing lumbar lordosis on the OSI frame after an intraoperative prone position. We evaluated the effect of spondyloli...

  20. A musculoskeletal model for the lumbar spine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christophy, Miguel; Faruk Senan, Nur Adila; Lotz, Jeffrey C; O'Reilly, Oliver M

    2012-01-01

    A new musculoskeletal model for the lumbar spine is described in this paper. This model features a rigid pelvis and sacrum, the five lumbar vertebrae, and a rigid torso consisting of a lumped thoracic spine and ribcage. The motion of the individual lumbar vertebrae was defined as a fraction of the net lumbar movement about the three rotational degrees of freedom: flexion-extension lateral bending, and axial rotation. Additionally, the eight main muscle groups of the lumbar spine were incorporated using 238 muscle fascicles with prescriptions for the parameters in the Hill-type muscle models obtained with the help of an extensive literature survey. The features of the model include the abilities to predict joint reactions, muscle forces, and muscle activation patterns. To illustrate the capabilities of the model and validate its physiological similarity, the model's predictions for the moment arms of the muscles are shown for a range of flexion-extension motions of the lower back. The model uses the OpenSim platform and is freely available on https://www.simtk.org/home/lumbarspine to other spinal researchers interested in analyzing the kinematics of the spine. The model can also be integrated with existing OpenSim models to build more comprehensive models of the human body. PMID:21318374

  1. Tractography of lumbar nerve roots: initial results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balbi, Vincent; Budzik, Jean-Francois; Thuc, Vianney le; Cotten, Anne [Hopital Roger Salengro, Service de Radiologie et d' Imagerie musculo-squelettique, Lille Cedex (France); Duhamel, Alain [Universite de Lille 2, UDSL, Lille (France); Bera-Louville, Anne [Service de Rhumatologie, Hopital Roger Salengro, Lille (France)

    2011-06-15

    The aims of this preliminary study were to demonstrate the feasibility of in vivo diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) and fibre tracking (FT) of the lumbar nerve roots, and to assess potential differences in the DTI parameters of the lumbar nerves between healthy volunteers and patients suffering from disc herniation. Nineteen patients with unilateral sciatica related to posterolateral or foraminal disc herniation and 19 healthy volunteers were enrolled in this study. DTI with tractography of the L5 or S1 nerves was performed. Mean fractional anisotropy (FA) and mean diffusivity (MD) values were calculated from tractography images. FA and MD values could be obtained from DTI-FT images in all controls and patients. The mean FA value of the compressed lumbar nerve roots was significantly lower than the FA of the contralateral nerve roots (p=0.0001) and of the nerve roots of volunteers (p=0.0001). MD was significantly higher in compressed nerve roots than in the contralateral nerve root (p=0.0002) and in the nerve roots of volunteers (p=0.04). DTI with tractography of the lumbar nerves is possible. Significant changes in diffusion parameters were found in the compressed lumbar nerves. (orig.)

  2. Outcomes of extended transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion for lumbar spondylosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talia, Adrian J; Wong, Michael L; Lau, Hui C; Kaye, Andrew H

    2015-11-01

    This study aims to assess the results of extended transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (TLIF) for a two surgeon, single institution series. In total, extended TLIF with bilateral decompression was performed in 57 patients. Pain, American Spinal Injury Association scores, patient demographics, body mass index (BMI), perioperative indices and radiographic measurements were recorded and analysed. The surgeries were performed between February 2011 and January 2014 on 38 women and 19 men. The mean patient age was 62.86 years, and the mean BMI was 30.31 kg/m(2). In 49 patients, spondylolisthesis was the primary indication. The mean intraoperative time was 284.65 min, and this decreased as the series progressed. The median length of stay was 5 days (range: 2-9). The surgical complication rate was 19.3%. Two patients died from cardiopulmonary complications. Single level TLIF was performed in 78.9% of the cohort, with L4/5 the most commonly fused level. Significant pain reduction was achieved from a mean (± standard deviation) preoperative visual analogue scale (VAS) of 8.28 ± 1.39 to 1.50 ± 1.05 at 12 months postoperatively. No patients deteriorated neurologically. Spondylolisthesis was significantly corrected from a preoperative mean of 6.82 mm to 2.80 mm postoperatively. Although there is a learning curve associated with the procedure, extended TLIF with bilateral facet joint removal and decompression appeared to be a safe and effective alternative to other fusion techniques, and our results were comparable to other published case series. The stabilisation and correction of spinal deformity reduces pain, aids neurologic recovery and improves quality of life. PMID:26358199

  3. Lumbar hernia associated with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD)

    OpenAIRE

    Xu, Tao; Zhang, Shuwei; Wang, Huaying; YU, WANJUN

    2013-01-01

    Lumbar hernias are very rare posterolateral abdominal wall hernias, and they are spontaneous in most adult patients. Here we report two cases of spontaneous lumbar hernias associated with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Some factors such as chronic cough, poor nutritional status and old age in patients with COPD would contribute to lumbar hernia.

  4. Two cases of congenital defects within transverse processes of lumbar spine; Dwa przypadki wad wrodzonych wyrostkow poprzecznych ledzwiowego odcinka kregoslupa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Malawski, S.; Sokolski, B. [Klinika Ortopedii, Centrum Medyczne Ksztalcenia Podyplomowego, Otwock (Poland)

    1993-12-31

    Two cases of congenital defects of transverse processes of lumbar spine causing lumbalgia are described. The first one was produced by direct contact of the elongated processes with subsequent pseudoarthrosis. Hypertrophied processes caused stenosis around intervertebral foramen and irritated posterior neural branch in the second case. Surgical resection of the hypertrophied transverse processes has brought the cure. (author). 4 refs, 6 figs.

  5. Inversion devices: their role in producing lumbar distraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gianakopoulos, G; Waylonis, G W; Grant, P A; Tottle, D O; Blazek, J V

    1985-02-01

    Twenty persons with chronic low back pain participated in a clinical study to evaluate the effects of gravity traction. Each subject was instructed in the use of three devices, two for inversion and one for upright suspension traction. Baseline pulse and rate blood pressure were recorded before and after traction. Periods of traction did not exceed 20 minutes. The order of use of the devices was randomized. Each participant was monitored for significant side effects and was questioned to determine which device was best tolerated, easiest to use, or caused changes in back symptoms. Lateral lumbar spine radiographs were taken with the subject in the standing position and after varying periods of inversion. Observations included the following: An average increase in blood pressure of 17.2 systolic (range 4-34) and 16.4 diastolic (range 2-50) while in the inverted position. An average decrease in heart rate of 16.4 beats per minute (range, 4-32). No significant physiologic changes of blood pressure or pulse were observed in patients using GLR suspension traction; distraction of the lower lumbar intervertebral spaces (range, 0.3 to 4.0 mm) with inverted traction in all cases; side effects including periorbital and pharyngeal petechiae (one patient), persistent headaches (three patients), persistent blurred vision (three patients), and contact lense discomfort (one patient); and improvement of low back symptoms in 13 of the 16 symptomatic patients. Although these devices make lumbar traction practical in a home setting, their use should be under medical supervision because of possible side effects. PMID:3155939

  6. Comparison of Percutaneous Endoscopic Lumbar Discectomy and Open Lumbar Surgery for Adjacent Segment Degeneration and Recurrent Disc Herniation

    OpenAIRE

    Huan-Chieh Chen; Chih-Hsun Lee; Li Wei; Tai-Ngar Lui; Tien-Jen Lin

    2015-01-01

    Objective. The goal of the present study was to examine the clinical results of percutaneous endoscopic lumbar discectomy (PELD) and open lumbar surgery for patients with adjacent segment degeneration (ASD) and recurrence of disc herniation. Methods. From December 2011 to November 2013, we collected forty-three patients who underwent repeated lumbar surgery. These patients, either received PELD (18 patients) or repeated open lumbar surgery (25 patients), due to ASD or recurrence of disc herni...

  7. Effects of lumbar stabilization exercise on functional disability and lumbar lordosis angle in patients with chronic low back pain

    OpenAIRE

    Cho, Igsoo; Jeon, Chunbae; Lee, Sangyong; Lee, Daehee; Hwangbo, Gak

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] This study examined the effects of lumbar stabilization exercises on the functional disability and lumbar lordosis angles in patients with chronic low back pain. [Subjects] The subjects were 30 patients with chronic low back pain divided into a lumbar stabilization exercise group (n = 15) and a conservative treatment group (n = 15). [Methods] The lumbar stabilization exercise and conservative treatment groups performed an exercise program and conservative physical treatment, respect...

  8. Cervical Meningomyelitis After Lumbar Epidural Steroid Injection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yujin; Kim, Joon-Sung; Kim, Ji Yeon

    2015-06-01

    Epidural steroid injections (ESI) are a common treatment for back pain management. ESI-related complications have increased with the growing number of procedures. We report a case of cervical meningomyelitis followed by multiple lumbar ESI. A 60-year-old male with diabetes mellitus presented to our hospital with severe neck pain. He had a history of multiple lumbar injections from a local pain clinic. After admission, high fever and elevated inflammatory values were detected. L-spine magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) revealed hematoma in the S1 epidural space. Antibiotic treatment began under the diagnosis of a lumbar epidural abscess. Despite the treatment, he started to complain of weakness in both lower extremities. Three days later, the weakness progressed to both upper extremities. C-spine MRI revealed cervical leptomeningeal enhancement in the medulla oblongata and cervical spinal cord. Removal of the epidural abscess was performed, but there was no neurological improvement. PMID:26161360

  9. Costs and effects in lumbar spinal fusion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Soegaard, Rikke; Christensen, Finn Bjarke; Christiansen, Terkel;

    2007-01-01

    Although cost-effectiveness is becoming the foremost evaluative criterion within health service management of spine surgery, scientific knowledge about cost-patterns and cost-effectiveness is limited. The aims of this study were (1) to establish an activity-based method for costing at the patient......) instrumented posterolateral lumbar spinal fusion, or (3) instrumented posterolateral lumbar spinal fusion + anterior intervertebral support. Analysis of costs was performed at the patient-level, from an administrator's perspective, by means of Activity-Based-Costing. Clinical effects were measured by means......-level, (2) to investigate the correlation between costs and effects, (3) to investigate the influence of selected patient characteristics on cost-effectiveness and, (4) to investigate the incremental cost-effectiveness ratio of (a) posterior instrumentation and (b) intervertebral anterior support in lumbar...

  10. Aspergillus Spondylitis involving the Cervico-Thoraco-Lumbar Spine in an Immunocompromised Patient: a Case Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aspergillosis is a rare cause of spondylitis. Moreover, early diagnosis by MR imaging and adequate treatment can prevent the serious complications of fungal infection. To our knowledge, the MR findings of multilevel aspergillus spondylitis in the cervico-thoraco-lumbar spine have not been previously described. Here, we report the MR findings of aspergillus spondylitis involving the cervical, thoracic, and lumbar spine in a liver transplant recipient. spergillosis is a rare cause of spondylitis, and early diagnosis by MR imaging and adequate treatment are essential for a good outcome. Although the MR findings of bacterial spondylitis have been fully described, the findings of aspergillus spondylitis have been rarely described, and to the best of our knowledge multilevel involvement of cervico-thoraco-lumbar spine has not been previously reported. Here, we report the MR imaging findings of aspergillus spondylitis involving the cervico-thoraco-lumbar spine in a liver transplant recipient. In conclusion, aspergillus spondylitis should be considered in the differential diagnosis of immunocompromised patients with MR findings resembling those of tuberculous spondylitis

  11. Aspergillus Spondylitis involving the Cervico-Thoraco-Lumbar Spine in an Immunocompromised Patient: a Case Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Son, Jeong-Min; Jee, Won-Hee; Jung, Chan-Kwon; Kim, Sang-Il; Ha, Kee-Yong [The Catholic University of Korea, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-10-15

    Aspergillosis is a rare cause of spondylitis. Moreover, early diagnosis by MR imaging and adequate treatment can prevent the serious complications of fungal infection. To our knowledge, the MR findings of multilevel aspergillus spondylitis in the cervico-thoraco-lumbar spine have not been previously described. Here, we report the MR findings of aspergillus spondylitis involving the cervical, thoracic, and lumbar spine in a liver transplant recipient. spergillosis is a rare cause of spondylitis, and early diagnosis by MR imaging and adequate treatment are essential for a good outcome. Although the MR findings of bacterial spondylitis have been fully described, the findings of aspergillus spondylitis have been rarely described, and to the best of our knowledge multilevel involvement of cervico-thoraco-lumbar spine has not been previously reported. Here, we report the MR imaging findings of aspergillus spondylitis involving the cervico-thoraco-lumbar spine in a liver transplant recipient. In conclusion, aspergillus spondylitis should be considered in the differential diagnosis of immunocompromised patients with MR findings resembling those of tuberculous spondylitis.

  12. Therapeutic Observation on "Green Tortoise Probing Cave" Operation plus Stuck Needle Method in Treating Transverse Process Syndrome of the Third Lumbar Vertebra

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    梁业安; 王玲玲

    2009-01-01

    @@ Transverse process syndrome of the third lumbar vertebra is a common cause of lumbago and sciatica.It is manifested by localized soreness,distention and pain on unilateral or bilateral aspect of the third lumbar transverse process.There is also fixed tenderness point at the tip of the transverse process.This condition frequently occurs in young adults who are engaged in physical work.In recent years,the author used green tortoise probing cave method and stuck needle method for treating 72 cases of transverse process syndrome of the third lumbar vertebra,it is now report as follows.

  13. Mini-open anterior lumbar interbody fusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gandhoke, Gurpreet S; Ricks, Christian; Tempel, Zachary; Zuckerbraun, Brian; Hamilton, D Kojo; Okonkwo, David O; Kanter, Adam S

    2016-07-01

    In deformity surgery, anterior lumbar interbody fusion provides excellent biomechanical support, creates a broad surface area for arthrodesis, and induces lordosis in the lower lumbar spine. Preoperative MRI, plain radiographs, and, when available, CT scan should be carefully assessed for sacral slope as it relates to pubic symphysis, position of the great vessels (especially at L4/5), disc space height, or contraindication to an anterior approach. This video demonstrates the steps in an anterior surgical procedure with minimal open exposure. The video can be found here: https://youtu.be/r3bC4_vu1hQ . PMID:27364424

  14. Return to Play After Lumbar Spine Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, Ralph W; Hsu, Wellington K

    2016-10-01

    Surgical management of lumbar spine conditions can produce excellent outcomes in athletes. Microdiscectomy for lumbar disc herniation has favorable outcomes; most athletes return to play at preoperative performance levels. Direct pars repair is successful in younger athletes, with high rates of return to play for a variety of fixation techniques. Fusion in athletes with scoliosis is a negative predictor. There are few evidence-based return to play criteria. Athletes should demonstrate full resolution of symptoms and flexibility, endurance, and strength before returning to play. Deciding when to return an athlete to sport depends on particular injury sustained, sport, and individual factors. PMID:27543402

  15. Adjacent Instability after Instrumented Lumbar Fusion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen-Jer Chen

    2003-11-01

    Full Text Available The invention of pedicle screw instrumentation has greatly improved outcomes ofspinal fusion, which has become the treatment of choice for lumbar spondylolisthesis. Asresearchers accumulate experience, both theoretical and clinical advances are continuallybeing reported. A review of the literature and the experience of the authors show that thedevelopment of adjacent instability, as in the breakdown of a neighboring unfixed motionsegment, is a common consequence of an instrumented lumbar spine. This article reviewsthe risk factors and surgical treatment of adjacent instability. The authors believe that properpreoperative planning and complete surgical procedures are imperative to prevent adjacentinstability. For those who need revision surgery, meticulous surgical techniques can achievesatisfactory results.

  16. Percutaneous fusion of lumbar facet with bone allograft

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Félix Dolorit Verdecia

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To assess the evolution of the cases treated with percutaneous facet fusion with bone allograft in lumbar facet disease. METHOD: Between 2010 and 2014, 100 patients (59 women and 41 men diagnosed with lumbar facet disease underwent surgery. RESULTS: The lumbar facet fusion with bone allograft shows good clinical results, is performed on an outpatient basis, and presents minimal complications and rapid incorporation of the patient to the activities of daily living. CONCLUSIONS: The lumbar facet fusion with bone allograft appears to be an effective treatment for lumbar facet disease.

  17. [Relationship between lumbosacral multifidus muscle and lumbar disc herniation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Wei-ye; Wang, Kuan; Yuan, Wei-an; Zhan, Hong-sheng

    2016-06-01

    As a common disease in clinical, the treatment of lumbar disc herniation (LDH) focused on local intervertebral disc, such as surgery and other interventional therapy treatment, but postoperative complications and recurrence rate has been a difficult problem in the field of profession. With the development of spine biomechanics and anatomy, researches on lumbar herniation also increased. Researchers discovered that the incidence and prognosis of LDH were inseparable with local muscle and soft tissue. As the deep paraspinal muscles, multifidus muscle plays an important role to make lumbar stability. Its abnormal function could reduce the stable of lumbar spine, and the chronic lumbar disease could also lead to multifidus muscle atrophy. PMID:27534095

  18. MRI and low back pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Backache - MRI; Low back pain - MRI; Lumbar pain - MRI; Back strain - MRI; Lumbar radiculopathy - MRI; Herniated intervertebral disk - MRI; Prolapsed intervertebral disk - MRI; Slipped disk - MRI; Ruptured ...

  19. Congenital lumbar hernia associated to lumbar costovertebral syndrome. A case report.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zoe Quintero Delgado

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available Reported the case of a born patient of color of white skin, 6 years old, of pregnancy and normal childbirth that it was valued in the Service of Surgery of the Pediatric Hospital ¨Paquito González Cueto¨ because it presented increase of volume in both lumbar regions, without another associate sintomatology. Congenital bilateral lumbar hernia associated to syndrome lumbocostovertebral, strange affection in the pediatric age.

  20. Congenital lumbar hernia associated to lumbar costovertebral syndrome. A case report.

    OpenAIRE

    Zoe Quintero Delgado; Guillermo Cortiza Orbe; Yusimy Izaguirre Martínez

    2005-01-01

    Reported the case of a born patient of color of white skin, 6 years old, of pregnancy and normal childbirth that it was valued in the Service of Surgery of the Pediatric Hospital ¨Paquito González Cueto¨ because it presented increase of volume in both lumbar regions, without another associate sintomatology. Congenital bilateral lumbar hernia associated to syndrome lumbocostovertebral, strange affection in the pediatric age.

  1. Treatment of Protrusion of the Lumbar Intervertebral Disc by Massotherapy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    程斌

    2001-01-01

    @@Clinically, there is a higher incidence of protrusion of the lumbar intervertebral disc. It can cause a terrible pain. The author has treated 66 cases by massotherapy, who were confirmatively diagnosed as having protrusion of the lumbar intervertebral disc by X-ray film and computer-aided tomography, with satisfactory results as reported in the following. Clinical Data Among the 66 cases in this series, 49 were male and 17 female, ranging in age from 26 to 59 years, averaging 36.2 years. All the patients had got lumbago and unilateral ischialgia, with the left side affected in 37 cases and the right side in 29 cases. The leg pain radiating to lateral malleolus was found in 28 cases, to dorsum of the foot in 24 cases, and to the toes in 14 cases. Intermittent claudication was present in 22 cases, numbness of the affected foot in 16 cases, pain exacerbated when coughing in 35 cases, scoliosis in 21 cases, and positive Lasegue's sign in 48 cases.

  2. Neck-specific training with a cognitive behavioural approach compared with prescribed physical activity in patients with cervical radiculopathy : a protocol of a prospective randomised clinical trial

    OpenAIRE

    Dedering, Åsa; Halvorsen, Marie; Cleland, Joshua; Svensson, Mikael; Peolsson, Anneli

    2014-01-01

    Background Patients with cervical radiculopathy often have neck- and arm pain, neurological changes, activity limitations and difficulties in returning to work. Most patients are not candidates for surgery but are often treated with different conservative approaches and may be sick-listed for long periods. The purpose of the current study is to compare the effectiveness of neck-specific training versus prescribed physical activity. Methods/Design The current protocol is a two armed interventi...

  3. Benign fibrous histiocytoma of the lumbar vertebrae

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Demiralp, Bahtiyar; Oguz, Erbil; Sehirlioglu, Ali [Gulhane Military Medical Academy, Department of Orthopedics and Traumatology, Ankara (Turkey); Kose, Ozkan [Diyarbakir Education and Research Hospital, Department of Orthopedics and Traumatology, Diyarbakir (Turkey); Ataslar Serhat Evleri, Diclekent Bulvari, Diyarbakir (Turkey); Sanal, Tuba [Gulhane Military Medical Academy, Department of Radiology, Ankara (Turkey); Ozcan, Ayhan [Gulhane Military Medical Academy, Department of Pathology, Ankara (Turkey)

    2009-02-15

    Benign fibrous histiocytoma is an extremely rare spinal tumor with ten reported cases in the literature. Benign fibrous histiocytoma constitutes a diagnostic challenge because it shares common clinical symptoms, radiological characteristics, and histological features with other benign lesions involving the spine. We present a case of benign fibrous histiocytoma of the lumbar spine and discuss its differential diagnosis and management. (orig.)

  4. Degenerative Pathways of Lumbar Motion Segments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Rikke K.; Kjaer, Per; Jensen, Tue S.;

    2016-01-01

    from the spinal MRI reports of 4,162 low back pain patients and (2) data from an MRI research protocol of 631 low back pain patients. Latent Class Analysis was used in both samples to cluster MRI findings from lumbar motion segments. Using content analysis, each cluster was then categorised into...

  5. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI): Lumbar Spine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... performed to assess the anatomy of the lumbar spine, to help plan surgery on the spine, or to monitor changes in the spine after ... For example, it can find areas of the spine where the spinal canal (which ... narrowed and might require surgery. It can assess the disks to see whether ...

  6. Surgical treatment of lumbar stenosis in achondroplasia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thomeer, RTWM; Van Dijk, JMC

    2002-01-01

    Object. The authors conducted a study to evaluate the results of a unique surgical procedure for treating primary lumbar stenosis in patients with achondroplasia, based on its distorted anatomical dimensions. Methods. A consecutive single-center series of 36 achondroplastic dwarfs with symptomatic l

  7. Iliac Arteriovenous Fistula Complicating Lumbar Laminectomy

    OpenAIRE

    Chiariello, Luigi; Marino, Benedetto; Nigri, Antonio; Macrina, Francesco; Ruvolo, Giovanni; SINATRA, RICCARDO

    1983-01-01

    An iliac arteriovenous fistula may rarely complicate lumbar laminectomy, particularly at the L4-L5 level. We present such a complication in a 45-year-old man who presented in our institution with a postlaminectomy iliac arteriovenous fistula and severe congestive heart failure. Repair of the fistulous orifice and tubular reconstruction of the iliac artery were successfully performed.

  8. A hundred years of lumbar puncture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dugacki, V

    1992-01-01

    In the years 1991 and 1992 the 100th anniversary of the announcement of the lumbar puncture method (1891) and 150th anniversary of the birth of its inventor Heinrich Irenaeus Quincke (1842) are celebrated. In the article a short review is given of the development of this method. PMID:1463808

  9. A case of inferior lumbar hernia

    OpenAIRE

    Vidhyasagar M. Sharma; Sushil D. Akruwala; Shashank Desai; Dave, Rajendra I.

    2013-01-01

    In this article we report a case of inferior lumbar hernia. The patient underwent preperitoneal meshplasty. The patient is well on follow up with no recurrence. The relevant literature has been reviewed and management discussed in brief. [Int J Res Med Sci 2013; 1(1.000): 33-35

  10. A case of inferior lumbar hernia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vidhyasagar M. Sharma

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available In this article we report a case of inferior lumbar hernia. The patient underwent preperitoneal meshplasty. The patient is well on follow up with no recurrence. The relevant literature has been reviewed and management discussed in brief. [Int J Res Med Sci 2013; 1(1.000: 33-35

  11. Termocoagulación facetaria lumbar: Experiencia en 252 pacientes Thermocoagulation of lumbar facet joints: Experience in 252 patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. E. Martínez-Suárez

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available Se presentan 252 pacientes con el diagnóstico de dolor lumbar facetario a los que se le realizó la técnica quirúrgica de termocoagulación percutánea de la faceta articular. Nuestro propósito principal fue aliviar el dolor en estos pacientes, evaluamos la eficacia de la técnica con un 74,7% de resultados quirúrgicos satisfactorios, así como la descripción de diferentes aspectos como: edad, sexo, causas y la topografía segmentaria del dolor.Two hundred fifty two patients with diagnosis of lumbar facet joint pain underwent the surgical technique of percutaneous thermocoagulation of the facet joint. Our major aim was to relief pain in those patients. We assess the effectiveness of the technique, with 74.7% of surgical success, and we also describe different aspects such as: age, sex, causes and segmentary pain topography.

  12. Lumbar MR Imaging and Reporting Epidemiology: Do Epidemiologic Data in Reports Affect Clinical Management?

    OpenAIRE

    McCullough, Brendan J.; Johnson, Germaine R.; Martin, Brook I.; Jarvik, Jeffrey G.

    2012-01-01

    Patients with low back pain or radiculopathy were significantly less likely to receive a prescription for narcotics if the patient's MR imaging report included a statement describing the prevalence of common findings in asymptomatic individuals.

  13. Physiological pattern of lumbar disc height

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose of this study is to present a new method of quantifying objectively the height of all discs in lateral radiographs of the lumbar spine and of analysing the normal craniocaudal sequence pattern of lumbar disc heights. Methods: The new parameter is the ventrally measured disc height corrected for the dependence on the angle of lordosis by normalisation to mean angles observed in the erect posture of healthy persons. To eliminate radiographic magnification, the corrected ventral height is related to the mean depth of the cranially adjoining vertebra. In this manner lumbar disc heights were objectively measured in young, mature and healthy persons (146 males and 65 females). The craniocaudal sequence pattern was analysed by mean values from all persons and by height differences of adjoining discs in each individual lumbar spine. Results: Mean normative values demonstrated an increase in disc height between L1/L2 and L4/L5 and a constant or decreasing disc height between L4/L5 and L5/S1. However, this 'physiological sequence of disc height in the statistical mean' was observed in only 36% of normal males and 55% of normal females. Conclusion: The radiological pattern of the 'physiological sequence of lumbar disc height' leads to a relevant portion of false positive pathological results especially at L4/L5. An increase of disc height from L4/L5 to L5/S1 may be normal. The recognition of decreased disc height should be based on an abrupt change in the heights of adjoining discs and not on a deviation from a craniocaudal sequence pattern. (orig.)

  14. General practitioners' willingness to request plain lumbar spine radiographic examinations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objectives: To examine general practitioners' attitudes to plain lumbar spine radiographic examinations. Design: A postal questionnaire consisting of questions on background data and doctors' opinions about plain lumbar spine radiographic examinations, as well as eight vignettes (imaginary patient cases) presenting indications for lumbar radiography, and five vignettes focusing on the doctors' willingness to request lumbar radiography on the basis of patients' age and duration of symptoms. The data were analysed according to the doctor's age, sex, workplace and the medical school of graduation. Setting: Finland. Subjects: Six hundred and fifteen randomly selected physicians working in primary health care (64% of original target group). Results: The vignettes revealed that the use of plain lumbar radiographic examination varied between 26 and 88%. Patient's age and radiation protection were the most prominent factors influencing doctors' decisions to request lumbar radiographies. Only slight differences were observed between the attitudes of male and female doctors, as well as between young and older doctors. Doctors' willingness to request lumbar radiographies increased with the patient's age in most vignettes. The duration of patients' symptoms had a dramatic effect on the doctor's decision: in all vignettes, doctors were more likely to request lumbar radiography when patient's symptoms had exceeded 4 weeks. Conclusions: General practitioners commonly use plain lumbar spine radiographic examinations, despite its limited value in the diagnosis of low back pain. Further consensus and medical education is needed to clarify the indications for plain lumbar radiographic examination

  15. A Ganglion Cyst in the Second Lumbar Intervertebral Foramen

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Sang Woo; Choi, Joon Hyuk; Kim, Min Su; Chang, Chul Hoon

    2011-01-01

    Ganglion cysts usually arise from the tendon sheaths and tissues around the joints. It is usually associated with degenerative arthritic changes in older people. Ganglion cyst in the spine is rare and there is no previous report on case that located in the intervertebral foramen and compressed dorsal root ganglion associated severe radiculopathy. A 29-year-old woman presented with severe left thigh pain and dysesthesia for a month. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed a dumbbell like mass in t...

  16. Surgical outcome of posterior lumbar interbody fusion with pedicle screw fixation for lumbar spondylolisthesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Problems of lumbar spondylolisthesis treatment are many surgical tactics, elderly patient, osteoporosis, complications and recurrence of the symptoms. PLIF (posterior lumbar interbody fusion) and PS (pedicle screw) fixation technique for lumbar spondylolisthesis provide good patient satisfaction. Good outcome has been reported by only laminectomy alone, but patient satisfaction becomes worse year after year. The role of instrumentation for lumbar spondylolisthesis is decompression of the nerve root, correction of lumbar pathologies, bony fusion and early mobilization. We show our surgical technique and long term outcome of PLIF with PS for lumbar spondylolisthesis. Three hundred and fifty cases of lumbar spondylolisthesis were operated on in Department of Neurosurgery, Fujita Health University during the period of from December 1992 to August 2008. Patient background: age 16-84 years old (mean 62.5), Gender: male 153, female 197. Follow-up period 1-180 months (mean 61.2). Degenerative: 255, Isthmic: 63, Dysplastic: 10, Fracture: 5 and scoliosis 16 cases. Surgical procedure was PS with interbody fusion cage: 331, Hybrid cage (titanium cage with hydroxyapatite) 314, PS with Cerabone: 2 and PS with autograft: 17. CT was done to evaluate bony fusion postoperatively. Post operative improvements by JOA (Japan Orthopedic Association) score is 11.4 before surgery, 24.1 (post op. within 2 years), 25.4 (post op. 2-5 years), 25.0 (post op. 5-10 years) and 22.4 (post op. 10-15 years). Significant improvements were observed in %Slip and Slip angle but no remarkable change was observed in lumbar lordotic angle by postoperative X-ray evaluation. No root injury, and systemic complication except 4 cases of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leakage during surgery. Two cases were reoperated in whom cage with autograft migration due to pseudoarthrosis. Two cases had to undergo screw and cage system removal due to infection. Two cases of adjacent level stenosis had to undergo operation 10

  17. Outcome of single level intervertebral disc prolapse treated with interlaminar lumbar discectomy by fenestration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramanagouda Biradar

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Low back pain due to lumbar disc prolapse is the major cause of morbidity throughout the world affecting mainly young adults. Different surgical techniques for lumbar discectomy are in vogue with the aim of least possible damage to other structures while dealing with the prolapsed disc. This short term prospective study was done to assess the functional outcome interlaminar fenestration discectomy. Materials and Methods: Thirty six patients with clinical symptoms and signs of single level prolapsed lumbar intervertebral disc having radiological correlation by MRI study were subjected to disc excision by interlaminar fenestration. Outcomes were measured using the visual analogue scale (VAS for back and leg pain, Roland-Morris score (RM improvement and modified Macnab criteria at 3 months, 6 months and 2 years. All quantitative data were summarised using mean and standard deviation, and qualitative data using proportions. Results: Mean (SD VAS for lower back ache and leg pain at 3 months, 6 months, and 2 years shows improvement in the overall low back pain and leg pain in patients studied. The maximum improvement in radicular pain is seen within six months after surgery and from then on not much improvement were noted. According to modified Macnab criteria outcome was good in 69.4%, fair in 22.2%, and poor in 8.3% of patients treated by fenestration surgery. Conclusion: Interlaminar lumbar discectomy by fenestration method without extensive laminectomy is effective and reliable surgical technique for treating properly selected patients with herniated lumbar disc at L4-L5 and L5-S1 levels. The results are comparable to microdiscectomy, and this may be due to the close similarity of the two procedures.

  18. REHABILITATION THERAPY VERSUS DRUG THERAPY IN PATIENTS WITH LUMBAR DISC DEGENERATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    BROSCATEAN, Emanuela-Flavia

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Lumbar disc degeneration is a disorder whose clinical manifestations are represented by episodic pain in the lumbar spine, without lumbar blockage and minor muscle contraction. Because lumbalgia caused by lumbar disc degeneration is not always very high intensity pain, the easiest to apply treatment is drug therapy. The aim of this study was to analyze the potential role of rehabilitation treatment in the recovery of patients and the prevention of complications compared to drug therapy alone. The study included 28 patients (17 women and 11 men aged between 23-60 years, assigned to two groups: 20 patients who received rehabilitation treatment (consisting of massage, kinesiotherapy, hydrokinesiotherapy, electrotherapy and medication and 8 patients who received drug treatment consisting of anti-inflammatory and analgesic drugs. The treatment duration was 10 days. For the evaluation of pain, the visual analogue scale was used, for the degree of disability, the Oswestry questionnaire, and for joint mobility and muscle strength, articular and muscular testing. At the end of treatment, the study group compared to the control group had a statistically significant result for pain (p=0.001, as well as for the Oswestry score (p=0.030. The mean age of the patients was 35.51±3.026, which shows an increased incidence among young adults. A possible connection between the development of the disease in women and age less than 45 years was also investigated, but the result was not statistically significant, p=0.22. Our data suggest the fact that rehabilitation treatment plays an important role in the reduction of pain and the improvement of the quality of life of patients with lumbar disc degeneration by decreasing the degree of disability. In the future, it can be proposed to monitor patients with lumbar disc degeneration over a longer time period in order to see the effects of kinetic rehabilitation programs in relation to the delay of chronicization. As

  19. IS LUMBAR PUNCTURE ALWAYS NECESSARY IN THE FEBRILE CHILD WITH CONVULSION?

    OpenAIRE

    MR. Salehi Omrani MD; MR. Edraki MD; M. Alizadeh MD

    2009-01-01

    ObjectiveFebrile convulsion is the most common benign convulsive disorder in children. Meningitis is one of the most important causes of fever and convulsions, diagnosed by lumbar puncture (LP), a painful and invasive procedure much debated  regarding its necessity. This study evaluates the frequency of abnormal LP findings in a group of patients, to determine whether or not unnecessary LP can be prevented without missing patients with serious problems such as meningitis.Materials& MethodsThe...

  20. Radiographic changes of lumbar spine and pelvis in chronic spinal injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shamsa Shariatpanahi

    2014-12-01

    Conclusion: The most frequent cause of chronic spinal injuries of our patients has been the injury by quiver, it seems our results may not be extended to all patients with spinal cord injury. In lumbar spine radiography of the patients, osteophytes, the quiver and psoriasis like ossifications were mostly seen. In the pelvis x-rays the most changes were hip joint narrowing, sacroiliitis and the heterotopic ossification.

  1. Lumbar disk herniation presented with cauda equina syndrome in a pregnant woman

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tayfun Hakan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Despite low back pain being common in pregnancy, cauda equina syndrome is rare. Misdiagnosis and delay in treatment may cause neurological sequelae including urinary and fecal incontinence, sexual dysfunction in patients. A case of cauda equina syndrome in a pregnant woman at 25-week gestation is presented here. The patient underwent an emergency, standard lumbar microdiscectomy under general anesthesia on prone position. Neither the patient nor the baby had any complication related to surgery.

  2. Approach and management of a giant lipoma in the left lumbar region

    OpenAIRE

    Giuseppe Andrea Ferraro; Rosa Salzillo; Francesco De Francesco; Francesco D’Andrea; Gianfranco Nicoletti

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Lipomas are the most common benign tumors of the adipose tissue and can be located in any region of the body. In most cases lipomas are small and asymptomatic, but they can at times reach considerable dimensions and, depending on their anatomic site, hinder movements, get inflamed, cause lymphedema, pain and/or a compression syndrome. Presentation of case: We here report the case of an otherwise healthy patient who came to our observation with a giant bulk in the left lumbar ...

  3. Tearing of the left iliac vessels in lumbar surgery revealed by multiphase post-mortem CT-angiography (MPMCTA).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vilariño Villaverde, Raquel; Bruguier, Christine; Zerlauth, Jean-Baptiste; De Froidmont, Sébastien; Grabherr, Silke

    2016-05-01

    Lumbar surgery is regularly applied in cases of discal hernia and acquired lumbar stenosis. In this report, we present a case of a laceration in the left common iliac artery and iliac vein during a lumbar surgery and discuss the literature concerning this kind of event. In the present case, the surgical procedure was followed by a sudden decrease in blood pressure, and the surgeon discovered an intra-abdominal haemorrhage that led to the patient's death. Postmortem investigation confirmed the intra-abdominal haemorrhage and revealed a laceration of the proximal portion of the left common iliac artery and left iliac vein. The source of bleeding could be detected especially thanks to multi-phase postmortem CT angiography (MPMCTA), which was performed prior to autopsy. We also found a haemorrhagic path through the intervertebral disc between the L4-L5 vertebrae, caused by the surgeon's instrument (pituitary rongeur). To date, a few cases have been described of iatrogenic death resulting from a tear in the iliac vessels during lumbar surgery, but not from the postmortem perspective. Such investigations have recently been modernized thanks to the introduction of forensic imaging. In particular, MPMCTA offers new possibilities in postmortem investigations and can be considered the new gold standard for investigating deaths related to medical intervention. Here we describe the first case of a death during lumbar surgery using this new method. PMID:27161923

  4. Value of CT in the evaluation of nerve root compression in the lumbar herniated disc disease: comparative study with myelography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Kun Il; Ku, Yong Woon; Sol, Chang Hyo; Kim, Byung Su [Pusan National University College of Medicine, Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    1988-04-15

    High resolution computed tomography is the most accurate diagnostic tool to define a lumbar herniated disc disease, because it provides a complete in vivo analysis of bony framework of lumbar spine as well as the supporting soft tissue structures and neural elements. The purpose of this study is to estimate the valve of CT in athe evaluation of nerve root compression caused by herniated disc disease. We analyzed 52 roots of 26 patients of single level herniated disc disease with definite evidence of bilateral or unilateral neurologic deficit who had both CT and myelography at Pusan National University Hospital from May 1983 to March, 1987. The results were as follows: 1. Sensitivity and specificity of CT is 77% and 81%, respectively in the diagnosis of nerve root compression caused by lumbar herniated disc disease. 2. Sensitivity and specificity of myelography is 77% and 81% respectively, in the diagnosis of nerve root compression caused by lumbar herniated disc disease. 3. The results of this study indicate that high resolution CT was equivalent to myelography in the diagnosis of nerve root compression caused by lumar herniated disc disease.

  5. Ergonomic lumbar risk analysis of construction workers by NIOSH method

    OpenAIRE

    Cinara Caetano Pereira; Déborah Figueiró Debiase; Joni Márcio de Farias; Kristian Madeira; Willians Cassiano Longen

    2015-01-01

    Work in construction has tasks directly connected with manual transport. One of the body segments suffering greater demand in works with these characteristics is the lumbar spine segment. The aim of this study was to analyze the level of risk of lumbar construction workers in the shipment of materials. The sample was composed of 74 construction workers. Were used as a research tool: the NIOSH method for lumbar risk verification expressed by weight limit recommended (WPR) and the lifting Index...

  6. Surgical Results of Lumbar Interbody Fusion Using Calcium Phosphate Cement

    OpenAIRE

    HIRASAWA, Motohiro; Mure, Hideo; Toi, Hiroyuki; Nagahiro, Shinji

    2014-01-01

    Clinical and radiological outcomes of lumbar interbody fusion using artificial fusion cages filled with calcium phosphate cements (CPCs) were retrospectively reviewed. Between 2002 and 2011, 25 patients underwent lumbar interbody fusion at Tokushima University Hospital, and 22 patients were enrolled in this study. Of these, 5 patients received autologous local bone grafts and 17 received CPC. Japan Orthopedic Association (JOA) score was used for clinical outcome assessments. Lumbar radiograph...

  7. Total Disc Arthroplasty for Treating Lumbar Degenerative Disc Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Mostofi, Keyvan

    2015-01-01

    Study Design Lumber disc arthroplasty is a technological advancement that has occurred in the last decade to treat lumbar degenerative disk diseases. Purpose The aim of this retrospective study was to establish the impact and outcomes of managing patients with lumbar degenerative disk disease who have been treated with lumbar total disc arthroplasty (TDA). Overview of Literature Several studies have shown promising results following this surgery. Methods We reviewed the files of 104 patients ...

  8. Microendoscopic lumbar discectomy versus open surgery: an intraoperative EMG study

    OpenAIRE

    Schick, U; Döhnert, J.; Richter, A.; König, A.; Vitzthum, H

    2001-01-01

    This study investigated electromyographic (EMG) activity as a marker of nerve root irritation during two different surgical procedures for lumbar disc herniation. Mechanically elicited EMG activity was recorded during the dynamic stages of surgery in muscle groups innervated by lumbar nerve roots. Confirmation of surgical activity was correlated with the activity of the electromyogram. Fifteen patients with lumbar disc herniations were treated via an endoscopic medial approach, and 15 patient...

  9. Angiogenesis in the degeneration of the lumbar intervertebral disc

    OpenAIRE

    David, Gh; Ciurea, AV; Iencean, SM; Mohan, A.

    2010-01-01

    The goal of the study is to show the histological and biochemical changes that indicate the angiogenesis of the intervertebral disc in lumbar intervertebral disc hernia and the existence of epidemiological correlations between these changes and the risk factors of lumbar intervertebral disc hernia, as well as the patient's quality of life (QOL). We have studied 50 patients aged between 18 and 73 years old, who have undergone lumbar intervertebral disc hernia surgery, making fibroblast growth ...

  10. Complications in lumbar spine surgery: A retrospective analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Luca Proietti; Laura Scaramuzzo; Giuseppe R Schiro; Sergio Sessa; Carlo A Logroscino

    2013-01-01

    Background: Surgical treatment of adult lumbar spinal disorders is associated with a substantial risk of intraoperative and perioperative complications. There is no clearly defined medical literature on complication in lumbar spine surgery. Purpose of the study is to retrospectively evaluate intraoperative and perioperative complications who underwent various lumbar surgical procedures and to study the possible predisposing role of advanced age in increasing this rate. Materials and Metho...

  11. Symptomatic Pneumocephalus after Lumbar Disc Surgery: a Case Report

    OpenAIRE

    Zahir Kizilay; Ali Yilmaz; Ozgur Ismailoglu

    2015-01-01

    Symptomatic pneumocephalus is frequently seen after traumatic fracture of the skull base bone. However, it has rarely been reported after spinal surgery and its mechanism has not been fully explained. In this paper, we present a 30 year old male patient who had lumbar discectomy due to a symptomatic midline lumbar disc herniation. He had developed symptomatic pneumocephalus after the lumbar disc surgery associated with application of a vacuum suction device. We present and discuss our patient...

  12. Traumatic Intradural Lumbar Disc Herniation without Bone Injury

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Hyun-Woo; Kwon, Young-Min

    2013-01-01

    Intradural lumbar disc herniation is a rare disease. According to the reports of intradural lumbar disc herniations, most cases have developed as a chronic degenerative disc diseases. Traumatic intradural lumbar disc herniations are even rarer. A 52-year-old man visited our emergency center with numbness in his left calf and ankle after falling accident. Initial impression by radiologic findings was a spinal subdural hematoma at the L1 level. A follow up image two weeks later, however, did no...

  13. Lumbar hernia misdiagnosed as a subcutaneous lipoma: a case report

    OpenAIRE

    Amelio Gianfranco; Mingolla Giuseppe

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Introduction Lumbar hernia is a rare abdominal wall defect and clinical suspicion is necessary for diagnosis. Case presentation We report the case of a 40-year-old Caucasian woman with a superior lumbar hernia (Grynfeltt hernia) initially misdiagnosed as a recurrent lipoma. The correct diagnosis was made intra-operatively and the hernia was repaired using synthetic mesh. The patient was free of recurrence at 4 months after the operation. Conclusion A lumbar or flank mass should alway...

  14. Grynfelt lumbar hernias. Presentation of a congenital case.

    OpenAIRE

    Cleopatra Cabrera Cuellar; Nilda B. Cortizo Martínez; Alina L. Díaz Dueñaz; Sergio Elías Molina Lamothe

    2006-01-01

    Lumbar hernias are uncommon and are reported rarely, they are informed only few more than 300 in literature and of them only 10 cases are congenital. The hernias that are produced through the superior lumbar space or Grynfelt-Lesshalf´s hernia, are due to the fact that they are more constant and larger they are usually more frequent than the Petit triangle. We are reporting a Newborn infant with the diagnosis of bilateral lumbar hernias and malformation of the vertebral column.

  15. Lumbar Incisional Hernia Repair After Iliac Crest Bone Graft

    OpenAIRE

    Do, Michael V.; Richardson, William S.

    2012-01-01

    The iliac crest is a common donor site for autogenous bone grafts. Among the reported complications, lumbar hernias occur infrequently with a reported incidence of 5% to 9%. Surgical repair is advocated secondary to the risk of incarceration or strangulation. Computed tomography is the diagnostic study of choice. Various transabdominal, retroperitoneal, and laparoscopic approaches have been described for the repair of lumbar hernias. We describe a case of successful lumbar incisional hernia r...

  16. Midsagittal Anatomy of Lumbar Lordosis in Adult Egyptians: MRI Study

    OpenAIRE

    Hegazy, Abdelmonem A.; Hegazy, Raafat A.

    2014-01-01

    Despite the increasing recognition of the functional and clinical importance of lumbar lordosis, little is known about its description, particularly in Egypt. At the same time, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has been introduced as a noninvasive diagnostic technique. The aim of this study was to investigate the anatomy of the lumbar lordosis using midsagittal MRIs. Normal lumbar spine MRIs obtained from 93 individuals (46 males, 47 females; 25–57 years old) were evaluated retrospectively. Th...

  17. Evaluation of a Modified POSSUM Scoring System for Predicting the Morbidity in Patients Undergoing Lumbar Surgery

    OpenAIRE

    Ying, Li; Bo, Bai; Huo-yan, Wu; Hong, Zhuang

    2013-01-01

    For most spine surgeons, operative intervention is common for the treatment of lumbar disc herniation, lumbar stenosis, lumbar fracture or lumbar spondylolisthesis. However, with the increase in lumbar surgery, the complication rate increases accordingly. Whereas the Physiological and Operative Severity Score for the enUmeration of Mortality and Morbidity (POSSUM) scoring system has been widely used to predict morbidity in various surgical fields, the application of this system in lumbar surg...

  18. Indental gynecological findings on lumbar spine MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Female genital organs are partly visible on lumbar spine MRI. Uterus and/or ovaries were partly visualized in 100 out of 227 women. The examinations were performed at a 1,5 T system. In a group of 100 patients,the abnormalities of these organs were found in 38 cases.The following diagnoses were suggested:leiomyoma in 23 cases, adenomyosis in 3, deep endometrial endometriosis in 1,endometrial carcinoma in 4, Nabothian cyst in 8, simple ovarian cyst in 1, endometrial cyst in 1, dermoid cyst in 1, ovarian cancer in 1, fluid in Douglas ' pouch in 2. Lumbar spine MRI should be interpreted using unmagnified images, including the localizer series, because of frequent incidental gynecological findings in unaware women. (author)

  19. Primary lumbar extradural hemangiosarcoma in a dog.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paek, Matthew; Glass, Eric; Kent, Marc; Clifford, Craig A; De Lahunta, Alexander

    2015-01-01

    A 9 yr old castrated male golden retriever weighing 36 kg was presented for evaluation of progressive left pelvic limb paresis and fecal and urinary incontinence. MRI demonstrated an extradural, ovoid mass compressing the lumbar spinal cord. Surgical excision of the mass was performed. Histologically, the mass was consistent with hemangiosarcoma with no involvement of the adjacent vertebrae. The dog underwent a doxorubicin-based chemotherapy protocol with the addition of oral cyclophosphamide. After completion of chemotherapy, the dog was evaluated q 4 mo for restaging. Clinicopathological evidence of primary tumor recurrence or metastatic disease was not detected for 15 mo after initial diagnosis and treatment. To the authors' knowledge, this is the first report of a primary extradural hemangiosarcoma in the lumbar vertebral column in a dog. The clinical presentation, diagnosis, treatment, and outcome are also discussed. PMID:25955146

  20. [Idiopathic Lumbar Hernia: A Case Report].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsujino, Takuya; Inamoto, Teruo; Matsunaga, Tomohisa; Uchimoto, Taizo; Saito, Kenkichi; Takai, Tomoaki; Minami, Koichiro; Takahara, Kiyoshi; Nomi, Hayahito; Azuma, Haruhito

    2015-11-01

    A 68-year-old woman, complained of an indolent lump about 60 × 70 mm in size in the left lower back. We conducted a computed tomography scan, which exhibited a hernia of Gerota'sfascia-commonly called superior lumbar hernia. In the right lateral position, the hernia contents were observed to attenuate, hence only closure of the hernial orifice was conducted by using Kugel patch, without removal of the hernia sack. Six months after the surgery, she has had no relapse of the hernia. Superior lumbar hernia, which occurs in an anatomically brittle region in the lower back, is a rare and potentially serious disease. The urologic surgeon should bear in mind this rarely seen entity. PMID:26699890