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Sample records for causing lumbar radiculopathy

  1. Lumbar disc cyst with contralateral radiculopathy

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    Kishore Tourani

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Disc cysts are uncommon intraspinal cystic lesions located in the ventrolateral epidural space. They communicate with the nucleus pulposus of the intervertebral disc and cause symptoms by radicular compression. We report a unique case of lumbar disc cyst that was associated with disc herniation and contralateral radiculopathy. A 22 year old male presented with one month history of back-ache radiating to the left leg. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI showed L3-L4 disc herniation with annular tear and cystic lesion in the extradural space anterior to the thecal sac on right side, which increased in size over a period of 3 weeks. L3 laminectomy and bilateral discectomy and cyst excision was done with partial improvement of patients symptoms.

  2. Is that lumbar disc symptomatic? Herniated lumbar disc associated with contralateral radiculopathy.

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    Abdul Jalil, Muhammad Fahmi; Lam, Miu Fei; Wang, Yi Yuen

    2014-05-07

    Herniated lumbar disc may be asymptomatic or associated with lower limb radiculopathy. Most spinal surgeons would offer surgery following a period of conservative measures if the radiological and clinical findings correlate. However, the existing dictum that lumbar radiculopathy should correlate with ipsilateral lumbar disc herniation may not be accurate as it can rarely present with contralateral sciatica. Literature regarding this phenomenon is scarce. Therefore, we report a patient with herniated lumbar disc presenting with predominantly contralateral motor weakness radiculopathy, which resolved after discectomy.

  3. Lumbar radiculopathy due to unilateral facet hypertrophy following lumbar disc hernia operation: a case report.

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    Kökeş, Fatih; Günaydin, Ahmet; Aciduman, Ahmet; Kalan, Mehmet; Koçak, Halit

    2007-10-01

    To present a radiculopathy case due to unilateral facet hypertrophy developing three years after a lumbar disc hernia operation. A fifty two-year-old female patient, who had been operated on for a left L5-S1 herniated lumbar disc three years ago, was hospitalized and re-operated with a diagnosis of unilateral facet hypertrophy. She had complaints of left leg pain and walking restrictions for the last six months. Left Straight Leg Raising test was positive at 40 degrees , left ankle dorsiflexion muscle strength was 4/5, left Extensor Hallucis Longus muscle strength was 3/5, and left Achilles reflex was hypoactive. Lumbar spinal Magnetic Resonance Imaging revealed left L5-S1 facet hypertrophy. Lumbar radiculopathy due to lumbar facet hypertrophy is a well-known neurological condition. Radicular pain develops during the late postoperative period following lumbar disc hernia operations that are often related to recurrent disc herniation or to formation of post-operative scar tissue. In addition, it can be speculated that unilateral facet hypertrophy, which may develop after a disc hernia operation, might also be one of the causes of radiculopathy.

  4. Manual therapy treatment of lumbar radiculopathy: A single case report

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    J.A. Riley

    2011-01-01

    Patients  with  lumbar  radiculopathy  are  often  managed with  manual therapy.  The  aim  of  this  single  case  study  was  to  describe  the outcome of manual therapy treatment of a patient with lumbar radiculopathy.  A 47-year-old female presented with acute, severe left buttock and postero-lateral thigh pain.  Symptom provocation occurred during lumbar flexion, coughing, sneezing, driving and prolonged sitting. her left straight leg raise neurodynamic test was limited and reproduced he...

  5. Cost of common low back pain and lumbar radiculopathy in rheumatologic consultation in Lomé.

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    Fianyo, Eyram; Oniankitan, Owonayo; Tagbor Komi, C; Kakpovi, Kodjo; Houzou, Prénam; Koffi-Tessio Viwalé, E S; Mijiyawa, Moustafa

    2017-03-01

    The cost of low back pain was the subject of few studies in black Africa. To assess the cost of common low back pain and lumbar radiculopathy in Lomé. A six months study was realised in the rheumatologic department of CHU Sylvanus Olympio. 103 consecutive patients suffering from a common low back pain or lumbar radiculopathy were included. To assess direct, indirect and non-financial costs they were questioned about their expense during the year. Financial cost of common low back pain and lumbar radiculopathy amounted to 107.2 $ US (extremes: 5.8 and 726.1 $ US). This amount, quadruple of guaranteed minimum wage, felled under two headings: direct cost (56.3 $ US; 53% of total sum), indirect cost (50.3 $ US; 47% of total sum). Non-financial cost were: disruption in daily activities (94%), impact in emotional and sexual life (59%), impact on the family's budget (69%), abandon of family's projects (58%) or of leisure (42%). In black Africa top priority is given to the fight against infectious diseases those cause an important mortality. But common low back pain and lumbar radiculopathy, those have social and economic impact, should be given more attention.

  6. Evaluation of pulsed electromagnetic field therapy in the management of patients with discogenic lumbar radiculopathy.

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    Omar, Aziza Sayed; Awadalla, Magdy Ahmed; El-Latif, Maii Abd

    2012-10-01

    This randomized clinical trial was designed to evaluate the effect of pulsed electromagnetic field therapy (PEMF) in the management of patients with discogenic lumbar radiculopathy. Forty patients suffering from lumbar radiculopathy due to lumbar disc prolapse were randomly assigned to one of two groups: a study group that included 20 patients who received PEMF therapy and a control group that included 20 patients who received placebo treatment. Both groups were evaluated at bases line and after 3 weeks by using a visual analogue scale (VAS) (0-10), somatosensory evoked potentials (SSEPs) for selected dermatomes and Modified Oswestry Low Back Pain Disability Questionnaire (OSW), and findings were compared before and after treatment. Significant differences were observed between both groups before and after application of PEMF therapy relative to VAS (P=0.024), total OSW (PPEMF therapy is an effective method for the conservative treatment of lumbar radiculopathy caused by lumbar disc prolapse. In addition to improvement of clinically observed radicular symptoms, PEMF also seems effective in reducing nerve root compression as evidenced by improvement of SSEP parameters after treatment. © 2012 The Authors International Journal of Rheumatic Diseases © 2012 Asia Pacific League of Associations for Rheumatology and Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  7. EFFECT OF MCKENZIE METHOD WITH TENS ON LUMBAR RADICULOPATHY A RANDOMIZED CONTROLLED TRIAL

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    Jay Indravadan Patel

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Lumbar radiculopathy is a disease of the spinal nerve root generally accompanied by radicular pain in dermatomal distribution and/or neurologic symptoms. The previous studies were focusing on finding the disability and pain caused due to Lumbar Radiculopathy. This study is focusing on the disability, pain, range of motion of the spine and SLR. The objective of the study is to evaluate the effectiveness of Mckenzie method with TENS on reducing symptoms and disability of Lumbar radiculopathy. Methods: In the present prospective study patients with Lumbar radicular pain due to disc herniation or prolapse at level L4, L5 & S1 were randomized into two groups – Group A and Group B. the study included 40 patients, with 20 in each group. The selection criteria was based on the following - with age group 22-55years, both sexes – male and female, with radicular pain in L4, L5 & S1 dermatomes, disabling leg pain for 6-12 weeks duration, evidence of disc herniation confirmed on MR imaging. The radicular pain was measured using the SLR test, pain was measured using the VAS scale of 0 – 100, disability was measured using the MODI and Lumbar Spine ROM was measured using the MMST. Group-A were treated with McKenzie methods with TENS and Group-B were treated with general exercise with TENS. Results: This study showed that there was a significant reduction of pain on the VAS, improvement in SLR, lumbar spine range of motion using MMST and disability using MODI for both the groups. The statistical analysis found that experimental group showed earlier control of all the outcome measures when compared to controlled group at the end of the 6th week. Conclusion: After 6 weeks of Mckenzie method with TENS intervention for 30 minutes for 5 days in week the statistical analysis concluded that the experimental group had significantly faster rates of reducing the symptoms of lumbar radiculopathy and reducing the disability due to lumbar radiculopathy.

  8. Manual therapy treatment of lumbar radiculopathy: A single case report

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    J.A. Riley

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Patients  with  lumbar  radiculopathy  are  often  managed with  manual therapy.  The  aim  of  this  single  case  study  was  to  describe  the outcome of manual therapy treatment of a patient with lumbar radiculopathy.  A 47-year-old female presented with acute, severe left buttock and postero-lateral thigh pain.  Symptom provocation occurred during lumbar flexion, coughing, sneezing, driving and prolonged sitting. her left straight leg raise neurodynamic test was limited and reproduced her pain, as did trigger points in the left lumbar and gluteal muscles. clinical neuro-conduction testing revealed weakness of the big and other toe extensors, as well as eversion and plantar flexion of the left ankle, and a diminished left ankle reflex. This indicated possible involvement of both the l5 and S1 nerve roots.   A  manual  therapy  treatment  approach including  lumbar rotation mobilisations (Maitland approach, massage, trigger point pressure release  and  Transversus  Abdominus muscle activation  was  used.   The  patient  was  symptom  free,  had  full pain-free  range  of  all  lumbar  movements,  a full  pain-free  left  straight leg  raise  neurodynamic  test  and  normal  neurological  conduction  six weeks  after  onset, following seven manual therapy treatments.  Although the results of this case report cannot be generalised, it describes the successful outcome of a patient with severe radicular pain and neurological deficits, whose signs and symptoms  had completely resolved following manual therapy treatment.

  9. Postpartum Unilateral Sacral Stress Fracture Mimicking Lumbar Radiculopathy: Case Report

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    Sinan Bağçacı

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Postpartum sacral stress fracture is a very rare clinical entity. Because of the ambiguous clinical and radiological findings, it is often diagnosed late. A case of a postpartal 25-year-old female patient presented with acute onset of low back pain radiating to the right extremity, mimicking lumbar radiculopathy. Magnetic resonance imaging of sacrum revealed a non-displaced stress fracture of the right sacral ala. The 25-hydroxy vitamine D level of the patient was very low; dual energy X-ray absorptiometry measurements were in the normal range. The patient is completely cured as a result of conservative treatment. As a result, sacrum stress fracture should be kept in mind in the presence of back pain during pregnancy and postpartum period.

  10. Optimal Duration of Conservative Management Prior to Surgery for Cervical and Lumbar Radiculopathy: A Literature Review

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    Alentado, Vincent J.; Lubelski, Daniel; Steinmetz, Michael P.; Benzel, Edward C.; Mroz, Thomas E.

    2014-01-01

    Study Design Literature review. Objective Since the 1970s, spine surgeons have commonly required 6 weeks of failed conservative treatment prior to considering surgical intervention for various spinal pathologies. It is unclear, however, if this standard has been validated in the literature. The authors review the natural history, outcomes, and cost-effectiveness studies relating to the current standard of 6 weeks of nonoperative care prior to surgery for patients with spinal pathologies. Methods A systematic Medline search from 1953 to 2013 was performed to identify natural history, outcomes, and cost-effectiveness studies relating to the optimal period of conservative management prior to surgical intervention for both cervical and lumbar radiculopathy. Demographic information, operative indications, and clinical outcomes are reviewed for each study. Results A total of 5,719 studies were identified; of these, 13 studies were selected for inclusion. Natural history studies demonstrated that 88% of patients with cervical radiculopathy and 70% of patients with lumbar radiculopathy showed improvement within 4 weeks following onset of symptoms. Outcomes and cost-effectiveness studies supported surgical intervention within 8 weeks of symptom onset for both cervical and lumbar radiculopathy. Conclusions There are limited studies supporting any optimal duration of conservative treatment prior to surgery for cervical and lumbar radiculopathy. Therefore, evidence-based conclusions cannot be made. Based on the available literature, we suggest that an optimal timing for surgery following cervical radiculopathy is within 8 weeks of onset of symptoms. A shorter period of 4 weeks may be appropriate based on natural history studies. Additionally, we found that optimal timing for surgery following lumbar radiculopathy is between 4 and 8 weeks. A prospective study is needed to explicitly identify the optimal duration of conservative therapy prior to surgery so that costs

  11. Application NO TGCH-therapy in complex treatment of postoperative lumbar localization radiculopathy

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    Salina E.A.

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the results of a survey of 50 patients to study the application of terahertz therapy of NO in the complex treatment of postoperative lumbar radiculopathy localization. Materials and methods. Using a visual analogue scale assessed the degree of regression of pain, depending on the nature of the therapy. For the diagnosis of intra-articular inflammation in the postoperative motor segment and a local mikrovaskulita determined the level of antibodies in the serum of patients to collagen and myeloperoxidase. The results suggest shortening pain and reducing the content of antibodies to MPO and collagen in patients receiving short-wave therapy. Therefore, we conclude that the use of NO therapy TGCH improves the treatment of postoperative lumbar radiculopathy localization

  12. Sciatica caused by lumbar epidural gas.

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    Belfquih, Hatim; El Mostarchid, Brahim; Akhaddar, Ali; gazzaz, Miloudi; Boucetta, Mohammed

    2014-01-01

    Gas production as a part of disc degeneration can occur but rarely causes nerve compression syndromes. The clinical features are similar to those of common sciatica. CT is very useful in the detection of epidural gas accumulation and nerve root compression. We report a case of symptomatic epidural gas accumulation originating from vacuum phenomenon in the intervertebral disc, causing lumbo-sacral radiculopathy. A 45-year-old woman suffered from sciatica for 9 months. The condition worsened in recent days. Computed tomography (CT) demonstrated intradiscal vacuum phenomenon, and accumulation of gas in the lumbar epidural space compressing the dural sac and S1 nerve root. After evacuation of the gas, her pain resolved without recurrence.

  13. Successful operative management of an upper lumbar spinal canal stenosis resulting in multilevel lower nerve root radiculopathy

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    Shearwood McClelland

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Lumbar stenosis is a common disorder, usually characterized clinically by neurogenic claudication with or without lumbar/sacral radiculopathy corresponding to the level of stenosis. We present a case of lumbar stenosis manifesting as a multilevel radiculopathy inferior to the nerve roots at the level of the stenosis. A 55-year-old gentleman presented with bilateral lower extremity pain with neurogenic claudication in an L5/S1 distribution (posterior thigh, calf, into the foot concomitant with dorsiflexion and plantarflexion weakness. Imaging revealed grade I spondylolisthesis of L3 on L4 with severe spinal canal stenosis at L3-L4, mild left L4-L5 disc herniation, no stenosis at L5-S1, and no instability. EMG revealed active and chronic L5 and S1 radiculopathy. The patient underwent bilateral L3-L4 hemilaminotomy with left L4-L5 microdiscectomy for treatment of his L3-L4 stenosis. Postoperatively, he exhibited significant improvement in dorsiflexion and plantarflexion. The L5-S1 level was not involved in the operative decompression. Patients with radiculopathy and normal imaging at the level corresponding to the radiculopathy should not be ruled out for operative intervention should they have imaging evidence of lumbar stenosis superior to the expected affected level.

  14. The use of metformin is associated with decreased lumbar radiculopathy pain

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    Taylor A

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Amber Taylor,1 Anton H Westveld,2,6 Magdalena Szkudlinska,1 Prathima Guruguri,1 Emil Annabi,3 Amol Patwardhan,3 Theodore J Price,4 Hussein N Yassine51Department of Medicine, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ, USA; 2Statistics Laboratory, Bio5 Institute, Statistics GIDP, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ, USA; 3Department of Anesthesia, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ, USA; 4Department of Pharmacology, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ, USA; 5Department of Medicine, University of Southern California, LA, CA, USA; 6Faculty of ESTeM, University of Canberra, Canberra, ACT, AustraliaAbstract: Lumbar radiculopathy pain represents a major public health problem, with few effective long-term treatments. Preclinical neuropathic and postsurgical pain studies implicate the kinase adenosine monophosphate activated kinase (AMPK as a potential pharmacological target for the treatment of chronic pain conditions. Metformin, which acts via AMPK, is a safe and clinically available drug used in the treatment of diabetes. Despite the strong preclinical rationale, the utility of metformin as a potential pain therapeutic has not yet been studied in humans. Our objective was to assess whether metformin is associated with decreased lumbar radiculopathy pain, in a retrospective chart review. We completed a retrospective chart review of patients who sought care from a university pain specialist for lumbar radiculopathy between 2008 and 2011. Patients on metformin at the time of visit to a university pain specialist were compared with patients who were not on metformin. We compared the pain outcomes in 46 patients on metformin and 94 patients not taking metformin therapy. The major finding was that metformin use was associated with a decrease in the mean of “pain now,” by −1.85 (confidence interval: −3.6 to −0.08 on a 0–10 visual analog scale, using a matched propensity scoring analysis and confirmed using a Bayesian analysis, with a significant mean decrease

  15. Development of a preoperative neuroscience educational program for patients with lumbar radiculopathy.

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    Louw, Adriaan; Butler, David S; Diener, Ina; Puentedura, Emilio J

    2013-05-01

    Postoperative rehabilitation for lumbar radiculopathy has shown little effect on reducing pain and disability. Current preoperative education programs with a focus on a biomedical approach feature procedural and anatomical information, and these too have shown little effect on postoperative outcomes. This report describes the development of an evidence-based educational program and booklet for patients undergoing lumbar surgery for radiculopathy using a recently conducted systematic review of neuroscience education for musculoskeletal pain. The previous systematic review produced evidence for neuroscience education as well as best-evidence synthesis of the content and delivery methods for neuroscience education for musculoskeletal pain. These evidence statements were extracted and developed into patient-centered messages and a booklet, which was then evaluated by peer and patient review. The neuroscience educational booklet and preoperative program convey key messages from the previous systematic review aimed at reducing fear and anxiety before surgery and assist in developing realistic expectations regarding pain after surgery. Key topics include the decision to undergo surgery, pain processing, peripheral nerve sensitization, effect of anxiety and stress on pain, surgery and the nervous system, and decreasing nerve sensitization. Feedback from the evaluations of the booklet and preoperative program was favorable from all review groups, suggesting that this proposed evidence-based neuroscience educational program may be ready for clinical application.

  16. Preoperative education for lumbar radiculopathy: A survey of US spine surgeons

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    Louw, Adriaan; Butler, David S.; Diener, Ina; Puentedura, Emilio J.

    2012-01-01

    Background We sought to determine current utilization, importance, content, and delivery methods of preoperative education by spine surgeons in the United States for patients with lumbar radiculopathy. Methods An online cross-sectional survey was used to study a random sample of spine surgeons in the United States. The Spinal Surgery Education Questionnaire (SSEQ) was developed based on previous related surveys and assessed for face and content validity by an expert panel. The SSEQ captured information on demographics, content, delivery methods, utilization, and importance of preoperative education as rated by surgeons. Descriptive statistics were used to describe the current utilization, importance, content, and delivery methods of preoperative education by spine surgeons in the United States for patients with lumbar radiculopathy. Results Of 200 surgeons, 89 (45% response rate) responded to the online survey. The majority (64.2%) provide preoperative education informally during the course of clinical consultation versus a formal preoperative education session. The mean time from the decision to undergo surgery to the date of surgery was 33.65 days. The highest rated educational topics are surgical procedure (96.3%), complications (96.3%), outcomes/expectations (93.8%), anatomy (92.6%), amount of postoperative pain expected (90.1%), and hospital stay (90.1%). Surgeons estimated spending approximately 20% of the preoperative education time specifically addressing pain. Seventy-five percent of the surgeons personally provide the education, and nearly all surgeons (96.3%) use verbal communication with the use of a spine model. Conclusions Spine surgeons believe that preoperative education is important and use a predominantly biomedical approach in preparing patients for surgery. Larger studies are needed to validate these findings. PMID:25694882

  17. An evidence-based clinical guideline for the diagnosis and treatment of lumbar disc herniation with radiculopathy.

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    Kreiner, D Scott; Hwang, Steven W; Easa, John E; Resnick, Daniel K; Baisden, Jamie L; Bess, Shay; Cho, Charles H; DePalma, Michael J; Dougherty, Paul; Fernand, Robert; Ghiselli, Gary; Hanna, Amgad S; Lamer, Tim; Lisi, Anthony J; Mazanec, Daniel J; Meagher, Richard J; Nucci, Robert C; Patel, Rakesh D; Sembrano, Jonathan N; Sharma, Anil K; Summers, Jeffrey T; Taleghani, Christopher K; Tontz, William L; Toton, John F

    2014-01-01

    The objective of the North American Spine Society's (NASS) Evidence-Based Clinical Guideline for the Diagnosis and Treatment of Lumbar Disc Herniation with Radiculopathy is to provide evidence-based recommendations to address key clinical questions surrounding the diagnosis and treatment of lumbar disc herniation with radiculopathy. The guideline is intended to reflect contemporary treatment concepts for symptomatic lumbar disc herniation with radiculopathy as reflected in the highest quality clinical literature available on this subject as of July 2011. The goals of the guideline recommendations are to assist in delivering optimum efficacious treatment and functional recovery from this spinal disorder. To provide an evidence-based educational tool to assist spine specialists in the diagnosis and treatment of lumbar disc herniation with radiculopathy. Systematic review and evidence-based clinical guideline. This guideline is a product of the Lumbar Disc Herniation with Radiculopathy Work Group of NASS' Evidence-Based Guideline Development Committee. The work group consisted of multidisciplinary spine care specialists trained in the principles of evidence-based analysis. A literature search addressing each question and using a specific search protocol was performed on English-language references found in Medline, Embase (Drugs and Pharmacology), and four additional evidence-based databases to identify articles. The relevant literature was then independently rated using the NASS-adopted standardized levels of evidence. An evidentiary table was created for each of the questions. Final recommendations to answer each clinical question were developed via work group discussion, and grades were assigned to the recommendations using standardized grades of recommendation. In the absence of Level I to IV evidence, work group consensus statements have been developed using a modified nominal group technique, and these statements are clearly identified as such in the guideline

  18. Back school or brain school for patients undergoing surgery for lumbar radiculopathy? Protocol for a randomised, controlled trial

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    Kelly Ickmans

    2016-07-01

    Discussion: This study will determine whether pain neuroscience education is worthwhile for patients undergoing surgery for lumbar radiculopathy. It is expected that participants who receive perioperative pain neuroscience education will report less pain and have improved endogenous pain modulation, lower postoperative healthcare costs and improved surgical experience. Lower pain and improved endogenous pain modulation after surgery may reduce the risk of developing postoperative chronic pain.

  19. Influence of preoperative nucleus pulposus status and radiculopathy on outcomes in mono-segmental lumbar total disc replacement: results from a nationwide registry

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    Zweig Thomas

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Currently, herniated nucleus pulposus (HNP with radiculopathy and other preconditions are regarded as relative or absolute contraindications for lumbar total disc replacement (TDR. In Switzerland it is left to the surgeon's discretion when to operate. The present study is based on the dataset of SWISSspine, a governmentally mandated health technology assessment registry. We hypothesized that preoperative nucleus pulposus status and presence or absence of radiculopathy has an influence on clinical outcomes in patients treated with mono-segmental lumbar TDR. Methods Between March 2005 and April 2009, 416 patients underwent mono-segmental lumbar TDR, which was documented in a prospective observational multicenter mode. The data collection consisted of perioperative and follow-up data (physician based and clinical outcomes (NASS, EQ-5D. Patients were divided into four groups according to their preoperative status: 1 group degenerative disc disease ("DDD": 160 patients without HNP and no radiculopathy, classic precondition for TDR; 2 group "HNP-No radiculopathy": 68 patients with HNP but without radiculopathy; 3 group "Stenosis": 73 patients without HNP but with radiculopathy, and 4 group "HNP-Radiculopathy": 132 patients with HNP and radiculopathy. The groups were compared regarding preoperative patient characteristics and pre- and postoperative VAS and EQ-5D scores using general linear modeling. Results Demographics in all four groups were comparable. Regarding the improvement of quality of life (EQ-5D there were no differences across the four groups. For the two main groups DDD and HNP-Radiculopathy no differences were found in the adjusted postoperative back- and leg pain alleviation levels, in the stenosis group back- and leg pain relief were lower. Conclusions Despite higher preoperative leg pain levels, outcomes in lumbar TDR patients with HNP and radiculopathy were similar to outcomes in patients with the classic

  20. Influence of preoperative nucleus pulposus status and radiculopathy on outcomes in mono-segmental lumbar total disc replacement: results from a nationwide registry.

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    Zweig, Thomas; Hemmeler, Christoph; Aghayev, Emin; Melloh, Markus; Etter, Christian; Röder, Christoph

    2011-12-02

    Currently, herniated nucleus pulposus (HNP) with radiculopathy and other preconditions are regarded as relative or absolute contraindications for lumbar total disc replacement (TDR). In Switzerland it is left to the surgeon's discretion when to operate. The present study is based on the dataset of SWISSspine, a governmentally mandated health technology assessment registry. We hypothesized that preoperative nucleus pulposus status and presence or absence of radiculopathy has an influence on clinical outcomes in patients treated with mono-segmental lumbar TDR. Between March 2005 and April 2009, 416 patients underwent mono-segmental lumbar TDR, which was documented in a prospective observational multicenter mode. The data collection consisted of perioperative and follow-up data (physician based) and clinical outcomes (NASS, EQ-5D).Patients were divided into four groups according to their preoperative status: 1) group degenerative disc disease ("DDD"): 160 patients without HNP and no radiculopathy, classic precondition for TDR; 2) group "HNP-No radiculopathy": 68 patients with HNP but without radiculopathy; 3) group "Stenosis": 73 patients without HNP but with radiculopathy, and 4) group "HNP-Radiculopathy": 132 patients with HNP and radiculopathy. The groups were compared regarding preoperative patient characteristics and pre- and postoperative VAS and EQ-5D scores using general linear modeling. Demographics in all four groups were comparable. Regarding the improvement of quality of life (EQ-5D) there were no differences across the four groups. For the two main groups DDD and HNP-Radiculopathy no differences were found in the adjusted postoperative back- and leg pain alleviation levels, in the stenosis group back- and leg pain relief were lower. Despite higher preoperative leg pain levels, outcomes in lumbar TDR patients with HNP and radiculopathy were similar to outcomes in patients with the classic indication; this because patients with higher preoperative leg pain

  1. Systemic Inflammatory and Th17 Immune Activation among Patients Treated for Lumbar Radiculopathy Exceeds that of Patients Treated for Persistent Postoperative Neuropathic Pain.

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    Shamji, Mohammed F; Guha, Daipayan; Paul, Darcia; Shcharinsky, Alina

    2017-09-01

    The pathophysiology of lumbar radiculopathy includes both mechanical compression and biochemical irritation of apposed neural elements. Inflammatory and immune cytokines have been implicated, induced by systemic exposure of immune-privileged intervertebral disc tissue. Surgical intervention provides improved symptoms and quality of life, but persistent postoperative neuropathic pain (PPNP) afflicts a significant fraction of patients. To compare the inflammatory and immune phenotypes among patients undergoing structural surgery for lumbar radiculopathy and spinal cord stimulation for neuropathic pain. Consecutive patients undergoing surgical intervention for lumbar radiculopathy or neuropathic pain were studied. Demographic data included age, gender, and VAS and neuropathic pain scores. Serum was evaluated for cytokine levels (IL-6, Il-17, TNF-α) and cellular content [white blood cell (WBC)/differential, lymphocyte subtypes]. The primary analysis differentiated molecular and cellular profiles between radiculopathy and neuropathic pain patients. Subgroup analysis within the surgical radiculopathy population compared those patients achieving relief of symptoms and those with PPNP. Heightened IL-6, Il-17, and TNF-α levels were observed for the lumbar radiculopathy group compared with the neuropathic pain group. This was complemented by higher WBC count and a greater fraction of Th17 lymphocytes among radiculopathy patients. In the lumbar discectomy subgroup, pain relief was seen among patients with preoperatively elevated IL-17 levels. Those patients with PPNP refractory to surgical discectomy exhibited normal cytokine levels. Differences in Th17 immune activation are seen among radiculopathy and neuropathic pain patients. These cellular and molecular profiles may be translated into biomarkers to improve patient selection for structural spine surgery. Copyright © 2017 by the Congress of Neurological Surgeons

  2. Preoperative therapeutic neuroscience education for lumbar radiculopathy: a single-case fMRI report.

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    Louw, Adriaan; Puentedura, Emilio J; Diener, Ina; Peoples, Randal R

    2015-01-01

    Therapeutic neuroscience education (TNE) has been shown to be effective in the treatment of mainly chronic musculoskeletal pain conditions. This case study aims to describe the changes in brain activation on functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) scanning, before and after the application of a newly-designed preoperative TNE program. A 30-year-old female with a current acute episode of low back pain (LBP) and radiculopathy participated in a single preoperative TNE session. She completed pre- and post-education measures including visual analog scale (VAS) for LBP and leg pain; Oswestry Disability Index (ODI); Fear Avoidance Beliefs Questionnaire (FABQ); Pain Catastrophizing Scale (PCS) and a series of Likert-scale questions regarding beliefs and attitudes to lumbar surgery (LS). After a 30-minute TNE session, ODI decreased by 10%, PCS decreased by 10 points and her beliefs and attitudes shifted positively regarding LS. Immediately following TNE straight leg raise increased by 7° and forward flexion by 8 cm. fMRI testing following TNE revealed 3 marked differences compared to pre-education scanning: (1) deactivation of the periaqueductal gray area; (2) deactivation of the cerebellum; and (3) increased activation of the motor cortex. The immediate positive fMRI, psychometric and physical movement changes may indicate a cortical mechanism of TNE for patients scheduled for LS.

  3. Influence of preoperative nucleus pulposus status and radiculopathy on outcomes in mono-segmental lumbar total disc replacement: results from a nationwide registry

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    Zweig Thomas; Hemmeler Christoph; Aghayev Emin; Melloh Markus; Etter Christian; Röder Christoph

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background Currently, herniated nucleus pulposus (HNP) with radiculopathy and other preconditions are regarded as relative or absolute contraindications for lumbar total disc replacement (TDR). In Switzerland it is left to the surgeon's discretion when to operate. The present study is based on the dataset of SWISSspine, a governmentally mandated health technology assessment registry. We hypothesized that preoperative nucleus pulposus status and presence or absence of radiculopathy ha...

  4. Value of functional myelography with both lateral bending anterior-posterior views in lumbar radiculopathy

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    Lee, Young Joon; Park, Jong Yeon; Kim, Kun Il; Sol, Chang Hyo; Kim, Byung Soo [Pusan National University College of Medicine, Pusan (Korea, Republic of)

    1993-07-15

    There are considerable discrepancies between clinical symptoms and imaging diagnosis in the localization of the responsible rediculopathy. The purpose of this study are to analyze the dynamic alteration of contrast filling of the spinal nerve sleeves during positional changes and determine how the abnormalities of nerve sleeves on lateral bending A-P views correlate with sciatica. The criteria indicating the root abnormality in functional myelography were (1) bad filling of ipsolateral root to sciatica and (2) good filling of contralateral root compared with those in neutral A-P view. Of total 77 patients, 67 had radiculopathy and 10 had no radiculopathy. In 23 (34.3%) of 67 patients with radiculopathy and 6 (60%) of 10 patients with no radiculopathy, their clinical symptoms well correlated with conventional myelographic findings. However, in 35 (52.2%) of 67 patients with radiculopathy and 6 (60%) of 10 patients with no radiculopathy, their symptoms well correlated with functional myelographic findings. This study suggest that the functional myelography using both lateral bending A-P views can be used as a complementary tool in the evaluation of the radiculopathy.

  5. Retrospective exploration of risk factors for L5 radiculopathy following lumbar floating fusion surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orita, Sumihisa; Yamagata, Masatsune; Ikeda, Yoshikazu; Nakajima, Fumitake; Aoki, Yasuchika; Nakamura, Junichi; Takahashi, Kazuhisa; Suzuki, Takane; Ohtori, Seiji

    2015-10-17

    Lumbar floating fusion occasionally causes postoperative adjacent segment disorder (ASD) at lumbosacral level, causing L5 spinal nerve disorder by L5-S1 foraminal stenosis. The disorder is considered to be one of the major outcomes of L5-S1 ASD, which has not been evaluated yet. The present study aimed to evaluate the incidence and risk factors of postoperative L5 spinal nerve disorder after lumbar interbody fusion extending to the L5 vertebra. We evaluated 125 patients with a diagnosis of spondylolisthesis who underwent floating fusion surgery with transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion with average postoperative period of 25.2 months. The patients were regarded as symptomatic with postoperative L5 spinal nerve disorder such as radicular pain/numbness in the lower limbs and/or motor dysfunction. We estimated and compared the wedging angle (frontal view) and height (lateral view) of the lumbosacral junction in pre- and postoperative plain X-ray images and the foraminal ratio (ratio of the narrower foraminal diameter to the wider diameter in the craniocaudal direction) in the preoperative magnetic resonance image. Risk factors for the incidence of L5 spinal nerve disorder were explored using multivariate logistic regression. Eight of the 125 patients (6.4%) were categorized as symptomatic, an average of 13.3 months after surgery. The wedging angle was significantly higher, and the foraminal ratio was significantly decreased in the symptomatic group (both P < 0.05) compared to the asymptomatic group. Multivariate logistic regression analysis of possible risk factors revealed that the wedging angle, foraminal ratio, and multileveled fusion were statistically significant. Higher wedging angle and lower foraminal ratio in the lumbosacral junction were significantly predictive for the incidence of L5 nerve root disorder as well as multiple-leveled fusion. These findings indicate that lumbosacral fixation should be considered for patients with these risk factors even

  6. Diagnostic imaging of the lumbar disc herniation for radiculopathy by 3D-MRI (MR-myelography)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taira, Gaku; Imakiire, Atsuhiro; Endo, Kenji [Tokyo Medical Coll. (Japan); Ichimaru, Katuji

    2002-02-01

    We have developed a new method of three-dimensional MRI (3D-MRI) which enables a stereoscopic view of the spinal cord and both sides of spinal nerve roots in one image. Anatomical study for normal subjects, the S1 angulations and length were significantly smaller than those of others. The S1 DRG was oval and was the largest. In a pathological study the use of 3D-MRI defects the signal changes following damage to the spinal nerve roots or ganglion in lumbar disc herniation. With regard to signal changes in damaged root ganglion, a good correlation between root compression and root inflammation was detected by experiments. We are currently examining the relationship between the damaged root ganglion, pain sensory disturbance. This study showed that the dorsal root ganglion plays an important role in sensory control of radiculopathy on 3D-MRI. (author)

  7. Diagnostic imaging of the lumbar disc herniation for radiculopathy by 3D-MRI (MR-myelography)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taira, Gaku; Imakiire, Atsuhiro; Endo, Kenji; Ichimaru, Katuji

    2002-01-01

    We have developed a new method of three-dimensional MRI (3D-MRI) which enables a stereoscopic view of the spinal cord and both sides of spinal nerve roots in one image. Anatomical study for normal subjects, the S1 angulations and length were significantly smaller than those of others. The S1 DRG was oval and was the largest. In a pathological study the use of 3D-MRI defects the signal changes following damage to the spinal nerve roots or ganglion in lumbar disc herniation. With regard to signal changes in damaged root ganglion, a good correlation between root compression and root inflammation was detected by experiments. We are currently examining the relationship between the damaged root ganglion, pain sensory disturbance. This study showed that the dorsal root ganglion plays an important role in sensory control of radiculopathy on 3D-MRI. (author)

  8. Oral Steroids for Acute Radiculopathy Due to a Herniated Lumbar Disk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldberg, Harley; Firtch, William; Tyburski, Mark; Pressman, Alice; Ackerson, Lynn; Hamilton, Luisa; Smith, Wayne; Carver, Ryan; Maratukulam, Annu; Won, Lawrence A.; Carragee, Eugene; Avins, Andrew L.

    2018-01-01

    prednisone group showed an adjusted mean 3.3-point (95%CI, 1.3-5.2; P = .001) greater improvement in the SF-36 PCS score at 3 weeks, no difference in the SF-36 PCS score at 52 weeks (mean, 2.5; 95%CI, −0.3 to 5.4; P = .08), no change in the SF-36MCS score at 3 weeks (mean, 2.2; 95%CI, −0.4 to 4.8; P = .10), and an adjusted 3.6-point (95%CI, 0.6-6.7; P = .02) greater improvement in the SF-36MCS score at 52 weeks. There were no differences in surgery rates at 52-week follow-up. Having 1 or more adverse events at 3-week follow-up was more common in the prednisone group than in the placebo group (49.2% vs 23.9%; P < .001). CONCLUSIONS AND RELEVANCE Among patients with acute radiculopathy due to a herniated lumbar disk, a short course of oral steroids, compared with placebo, resulted in modestly improved function and no improvement in pain. TRIAL REGISTRATION clinicaltrials.gov Identifier: NCT00668434 PMID:25988461

  9. Preoperative pain neuroscience education for lumbar radiculopathy: a multicenter randomized controlled trial with 1-year follow-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Louw, Adriaan; Diener, Ina; Landers, Merrill R; Puentedura, Emilio J

    2014-08-15

    Multicenter, randomized, controlled trial on preoperative pain neuroscience education (NE) for lumbar radiculopathy. To determine if the addition of NE to usual preoperative education would result in superior outcomes with regard to pain, function, surgical experience, and health care utilization postsurgery. One in 4 patients after lumbar surgery (LS) for radiculopathy experience persistent pain and disability, which is nonresponsive to perioperative treatments. NE focusing on the neurophysiology of pain has been shown to decrease pain and disability in populations with chronic low back pain. Eligible patients scheduled for LS for radiculopathy were randomized to receive either preoperative usual care (UC) or a combination of UC plus 1 session of NE delivered by a physical therapist (verbal one-on-one format) and a NE booklet. Sixty-seven patients completed the following outcomes prior to LS (baseline), and 1, 3, 6, and 12 months after LS: low back pain (numeric rating scale), leg pain (numeric rating scale), function (Oswestry Disability Index), various beliefs and experiences related to LS (10-item survey with Likert scale responses), and postoperative utilization of health care (utilization of health care questionnaire). At 1-year follow-up, there were no statistical differences between the experimental and control groups with regard to primary outcome measure of low back pain (P = 0.183), leg pain (P = 0.075), and function (P = 0.365). In a majority of the categories regarding surgical experience, the NE group scored significantly better: better prepared for LS (P = 0.001); preoperative session preparing them for LS (P < 0.001) and LS meeting their expectations (P = 0.021). Health care utilization post-LS also favored the NE group (P = 0.007) resulting in 45% less health care expenditure compared with the control group in the 1-year follow-up period. NE resulted in significant behavior change. Despite a similar pain and functional trajectory during the 1-year

  10. Persistent L5 lumbosacral radiculopathy caused by lumbosacral trunk schwannoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharifi, Guive; Jahanbakhshi, Amin

    2017-01-01

    Schwannomais, usually, benign tumor of nerve sheath that occurs evenly along the spinal cord. Intra-pelvic schwannoma is very rare entity that may arise from lumbosacral nerve roots or from sciatic nerve. Radicular pain of the lower limb as a presenting symptom of pelvic schwannoma is extremely rare. In the current report, the patient is presented with a right sided L5 radicular pain typical of lumbar discopathy. Interestingly, a herniated lumbar disc was noted on lumbosacral magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). In pre-operative studies a large pelvic mass was detected in the right pre-sacral area with solid and cystic components consistent with schwannoma. The patient underwent a low midline laparotomy to evacuate the retroperitoneal mass. Uniquely, we found the tumor to be arisen from lumbosacral trunk not from a root or peripheral nerve. Most cases with intra-pelvic schwannoma present so late with vague abdominal and pelvic discomfort or pain, low back pain, urinary and bowel symptoms because of compressive effect of the tumor, or incidentally following gynecologic work-ups; So, these patients are mostly referred to gynecologists and urologists. A neurosurgeon should have a high degree of suspicion to diagnose such an entity among his or her patients presented with pains typical for discopathy.

  11. Development of a PRO instrument to describe functioning among patients with lumbar radiculopathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ibsen, Charlotte; Schiøttz-Christensen, Berit; Nielsen, Claus Vinther

    Title: Development of a patient-reported outcome instrument for patients with lumbar radicular pain - STUDY PROTOCOL Objective: To develop and pilot test a patient-reported outcome (PRO) instrument based on the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF) to assess...... functioning in patients with lumbar radicular pain. Methods: The PRO will be developed with direct input from patients with lumbar radicular pain (n=10) and clinicians with extensive experience assessing and treating the population (n=10). The development of the PRO will be based on ICF Comprehensive Core Set...

  12. Anterior Transposition of Anomalous Tortuous Vertebral Artery Causing Cervical Radiculopathy: A Report of 2 Cases and Review of Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Doris D; Burkhardt, Jan-Karl; Magill, Stephen T; Lawton, Michael T

    2017-05-01

    Cervical radiculopathy secondary to compression from vertebral artery (VA) tortuosity is a rare entity. We describe successful transposition through an anterolateral approach of tortuous VA loops causing cervical radiculopathy. Two patients with cervical radiculopathy (first case at C5-6 and second case at C3-4) secondary to anomalous VA loop compression underwent anterolateral approaches to the cervical spine for decompression and VA transposition. The anterior transverse foramina were drilled to unroof the VA loop, which was dissected free from the exiting nerve root. In both cases, the affected cervical nerve root was successfully decompressed with both radiographic and clinical improvements in radiculopathy symptoms. We found 8 other cases of VA transposition via either an anterolateral approach or a posterolateral approach described in the literature. Our second case of anterolateral VA transposition at the C3-4 level is the first case at this level and the highest level reported in the literature. Decompression using an anterolateral approach with direct microvascular transposition of the VA is a safe and effective treatment of this pathology and addresses the cause of radiculopathy more directly than the posterolateral approach. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Individualized functional restoration as an adjunct to advice for lumbar disc herniation with associated radiculopathy. A preplanned subgroup analysis of a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hahne, Andrew J; Ford, Jon J; Hinman, Rana S; Richards, Matthew C; Surkitt, Luke D; Chan, Alexander Y P; Slater, Sarah L; Taylor, Nicholas F

    2017-03-01

    Physical therapy is commonly sought by people with lumbar disc herniation and associated radiculopathy. It is unclear whether physical therapy is effective for this population. To determine the effectiveness of physical therapist-delivered individualized functional restoration as an adjunct to guideline-based advice in people with lumbar disc herniation and associated radiculopathy. This is a preplanned subgroup analysis of a multicenter parallel group randomized controlled trial. The study included 54 participants with clinical features of radiculopathy (6-week to 6-month duration) and imaging showing a lumbar disc herniation. Primary outcomes were activity limitation (Oswestry Disability Index) and separate 0-10 numerical pain rating scales for leg pain and back pain. Measures were taken at baseline and at 5, 10, 26, and 52 weeks. The participants were randomly allocated to receive either individualized functional restoration incorporating advice (10 sessions) or guideline-based advice alone (2 sessions) over a 10-week period. Treatment was administered by 11 physical therapists at private clinics in Melbourne, Australia. Between-group differences for activity limitation favored the addition of individualized functional restoration to advice alone at 10 weeks (7.7, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.3-15.1) and 52 weeks (8.2, 95% CI 0.7-15.6), as well as back pain at 10 weeks (1.4, 95% CI 0.2-2.7). There were no significant differences between groups for leg pain at any follow-up. Several secondary outcomes also favored individualized functional restoration over advice. In participants with lumbar disc herniation and associated radiculopathy, an individualized functional restoration program incorporating advice led to greater reduction in activity limitation at 10- and 52-week follow-ups compared with guideline-based advice alone. Although back pain was significantly reduced at 10 weeks with individualized functional restoration, this effect was not maintained at

  14. Physical examination for lumbar radiculopathy due to disc herniation in patients with low-back pain.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Windt, D.A.W.M. van der; Simons, E.; Riphagen, I.I.; Ammendolia, C.; Verhangen, A.P.; Laslett, M.; Devillé, W.; Deyo, R.A.; Bouter, L.M.; Vet, H.C.W. de; Aertgeerts, B.

    2010-01-01

    Background: Low-back pain with leg pain (sciatica) may be caused by a herniated intervertebral disc exerting pressure on the nerve root. Most patients will respond to conservative treatment, but in carefully selected patients, surgical discectomy may provide faster relief of symptoms. Primary care

  15. Comparison of fluoroscopic Guided Transforaminal Epidural Injections of Steroid and Local Anaesthetic with Conservative Management in Patients with Chronic Lumbar Radiculopathies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehta, Nandita; Salaria, Misbah; Salaria, A Q

    2017-01-01

    Chronic lumbar radiculopathy is a common medical problem and the treatment modalities used over years have been many ranging from conservative or symptomatic management to open decompression surgery. This study was aimed at to compare two modalities of treatment, i.e., conservative and lumbar transforaminal epidural steroid injections (TFESIs). A total of 120 patients of American Society of Anesthesiology class - (a healthy patient or a patient with mild systemic disease) were randomized to two groups. Group C ( n = 60) were managed conservatively with bed rest, analgesics, and physiotherapy. Group T ( n = 60) received lumbar TFESIs with methylprednisolone 40 mg with 2 ml bupivacaine (0.5%). Measurements using visual analog scale (VAS) were taken before treatment and at various time intervals after the start of treatment. There was no statistically significant difference regarding the demographic characteristics of both groups. The VAS scores were less and statistically significant in Group T after 30 min postinjection, at the 2 nd week and after 1 month. Recovery rate of straight leg raise test was found to be 98% in those treated with TFESI. The Group T had significantly better patient satisfaction score and additionally there was drug dose intake reduction before and after the treatment. Patients treated with fluoroscopic-guided TFESI have better pain relief, quality-of-life, and less analgesic requirement than those managed conservatively.

  16. Neurological examination of the peripheral nervous system to diagnose lumbar spinal disc herniation with suspected radiculopathy: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Nezari, Nezar H; Schneiders, Anthony G; Hendrick, Paul A

    2013-06-01

    Disc herniation is a common low back pain (LBP) disorder, and several clinical test procedures are routinely employed in its diagnosis. The neurological examination that assesses sensory neuron and motor responses has historically played a role in the differential diagnosis of disc herniation, particularly when radiculopathy is suspected; however, the diagnostic ability of this examination has not been explicitly investigated. To review the scientific literature to evaluate the diagnostic accuracy of the neurological examination to detect lumbar disc herniation with suspected radiculopathy. A systematic review and meta-analysis of the literature. Six major electronic databases were searched with no date or language restrictions for relevant articles up until March 2011. All diagnostic studies investigating neurological impairments in LBP patients because of lumbar disc herniation were assessed for possible inclusion. Retrieved studies were individually evaluated and assessed for quality using the Quality Assessment of Diagnostic Accuracy Studies tool, and where appropriate, a meta-analysis was performed. A total of 14 studies that investigated three standard neurological examination components, sensory, motor, and reflexes, met the study criteria and were included. Eight distinct meta-analyses were performed that compared the findings of the neurological examination with the reference standard results from surgery, radiology (magnetic resonance imaging, computed tomography, and myelography), and radiological findings at specific lumbar levels of disc herniation. Pooled data for sensory testing demonstrated low diagnostic sensitivity for surgically (0.40) and radiologically (0.32) confirmed disc herniation, and identification of a specific level of disc herniation (0.35), with moderate specificity achieved for all the three reference standards (0.59, 0.72, and 0.64, respectively). Motor testing for paresis demonstrated similarly low pooled diagnostic sensitivities

  17. Treatment of lumbar disc herniation with radiculopathy. Clinical practice guidelines endorsed by The Polish Society of Spinal Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latka, Dariusz; Miekisiak, Grzegorz; Jarmuzek, Pawel; Lachowski, Marcin; Kaczmarczyk, Jacek

    2016-01-01

    Herniated lumbar disc (HLD) is arguably the most common spinal disorder requiring surgical intervention. Although the term is fairly straightforward, the exact pathology and thus the clinical picture and natural history may vary. Therefore, it is immensely difficult to formulate universal guidelines for surgical treatment. The aim of this paper is to organize the terminology and clear the inconsistencies in phraseology, review treatment options and gather available published evidence to address the clinical questions to create a set of clinical guidelines in relevant to the topic. Twelve queries, addressing optimal surgical treatment of the HLD have been formulated. The results, based on the literature review are described in the present work. The final product of the analysis was a set of guidelines for the surgical treatment of symptomatic HLD. Categorized into four tiers based on the level of evidence (I-III and X), they have been designed to assist in the selection of optimal, effective treatment leading to the successful outcome. The evidence based medicine (EBM) is becoming ever more popular among spinal surgeons. Unfortunately this is not always feasible. Lack of uniform guidelines and numerous conflicts of interest introduce flaws in the decision making process. The key role of experts and professional societies is to provide high value recommendation based on the most current literature. Present work contains a set of guidelines for the surgical treatment of HLD officially endorsed by the Polish Spine Surgery Society. Copyright © 2015 Polish Neurological Society. Published by Elsevier Urban & Partner Sp. z o.o. All rights reserved.

  18. Transforaminal Endoscopic Lumbar Discectomy for Lumbar Disc Herniation Causing Bilateral Symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Chunpeng; Li, Yin; Qin, Rujie; Sun, Penghao; Wang, Peng

    2017-10-01

    Transforaminal endoscopic lumbar discectomy (TELD), a minimally invasive spinal technique, has advantages over open discectomy. Unilateral TELD for disc herniation causing bilateral symptoms is challenging. In this study, we describe a percutaneous endoscopic herniotomy technique by using a unilateral approach for lumbar disc herniation with bilateral obvious symptoms. From June 2014 to October 2015, 26 patients who had back as well as bilateral leg pain and/or weakness due to lumbar disc herniation were treated by TELD with a unilateral approach. Clinical outcomes were evaluated via a visual analogue scale (VAS; 0-10), and functional status was assessed with the Oswestry Disability Index (0-100%) postoperatively and 3 and 12 months postoperatively. Surgical satisfaction rate was assessed during the final follow-up. The mean VAS for leg pain on the operative side improved from preoperative 8.39 ± 1.84 to 2.18 ± 1.26 postoperatively, 1.96 ± 0.83 at 3 months postoperatively, and 2.05 ± 1.42 at 1 year postoperatively (P disc herniation causing bilateral symptoms, through one working channel. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Physical examination for lumbar radiculopathy due to disc herniation in patients with low-back pain (Review)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Windt, D.A.W.M.; Simons, E.; Riphagen, I.I.; Ammendolia, C.; Verhagen, A.P.; Laslett, M.; Devillé, W.; Deyo, R.A.; Bouter, L.M.; de Vet, H.C.W.; Aertgeerts, B.

    2011-01-01

    Background Low-back pain with leg pain (sciatica) may be caused by a herniated intervertebral disc exerting pressure on the nerve root. Most patients will respond to conservative treatment, but in carefully selected patients, surgical discectomy may provide faster relief of symptoms. Primary care

  20. Cervical radiculopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corey, Deanna Lynn; Comeau, Douglas

    2014-07-01

    Cervical radiculopathy is the result of irritation and/or compression of nerve root as it exits the cervical spine. Pain is a common presenting symptom and may be accompanied by motor or sensory deficits in areas innervated by the affected nerve root. Diagnosis is suggested by history and corresponding physical examination findings. Confirmation is achieved with MRI. A multimodal approach to treatment helps patients improve. Medications may be used to alleviate symptoms and manage pain. Physical therapy and manipulation may improve neck discomfort. Guided corticosteroid injections and selected nerve blocks may help control nerve root pain. Most patients improve with a conservative, nonoperative treatment course. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Cervical arachnoid cyst mimicking the cause of cervical radiculopathy: A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takashi Kobayashi, MD, PhD

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available We herein present a case involving an asymptomatic cervical intradural arachnoid cyst that was suspected to be the cause of the patient's radicular pain. Magnetic resonance imaging showed a small, round intradural mass beside the cervical nerve root. An arachnoid cyst of this shape has not been previously reported. Intraoperative examination revealed that the cyst was not compressing the nerve root and was asymptomatic. Intradural spinal surgery is sometimes associated with serious complications. The knowledge that arachnoid cysts of this shape are asymptomatic can help to avoid unnecessary surgery.

  2. A Diagnostic Algorithm for Eosinophilic Granulomatosis with Polyangiitis Initially Diagnosed as Lumbar Disc Hernia or Lumbar Spinal Stenosis: Personal Experience and Review of the Literature

    OpenAIRE

    Nagata, Kosei; Yamamoto, Shinichi; Miyoshi, Kota; Sato, Masaki; Arino, Yusuke; Mikami, Yoji

    2016-01-01

    Eosinophilic granulomatosis with polyangiitis (EGPA, Churg-Strauss syndrome) is a rare systemic vasculitis and is difficult to diagnose. EGPA has a number of symptoms including peripheral dysesthesia caused by mononeuropathy multiplex, which is similar to radiculopathy due to lumbar disc hernia or lumbar spinal stenosis. Therefore, EGPA patients with mononeuropathy multiplex often visit orthopedic clinics, but orthopedic doctors and spine neurosurgeons have limited experience in diagnosing EG...

  3. Mortality Caused by Surgery for Degenerative Lumbar Spine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salmenkivi, Jyrki; Sund, Reijo; Paavola, Mika; Ruuth, Iiris; Malmivaara, Antti

    2017-07-15

    Register study. The purpose of this study was to assess the safety of lumbar spine surgery for degenerative disorders and to assess the predictive factors for mortality and causes of death. Growing numbers and relative indications of spine surgery emphasize the importance of patient safety. We assessed the incidence of mortality related to surgery, overall case fatality and factors predicting mortality in elective spinal surgery. A national database was utilized to assess patient characteristics, surgical procedures, and outcomes of degenerative spinal surgery in Finland. Patients were classified into four diagnostic categories: disc herniation, spinal stenosis, degenerative disc disease, and spondylolysis and spondylolisthesis. The mortality related to surgery and overall mortality in each diagnostic group was analyzed at 7 days, 30 days, 90 days, and 1 year after surgery. We categorized the deaths into medical errors, sequelae of surgery, surgery probably a contributing factor, and deaths not associated with surgery. Age, sex, comorbid conditions, and hospital characteristics were considered as potential risk factors for mortality. Out of 408 deaths (0.67% of total of 61,166 patients) deaths that occurred during the 1-year follow up, 49 deaths (12% of deaths, 0.08% of patients) were classified as having an association with surgery: two deaths by medical errors, 28 deaths by complications after surgery and 19 deaths related to the surgery. The surgery-related 1-year mortality was 0.08%. Age >75 years, male sex, diabetes, and hypertension showed an association with increased risk of death related to surgery. Mortality caused by elective spinal surgery is rare. Cardiovascular incidents are the most common reasons for deaths occurring soon after surgery. Consideration of expected gains and risks of surgery, prevention of unintended errors during surgery and recognition and treatment of complications once they occur are recommended. 3.

  4. Cervical radiculopathy combined with cervical myelopathy: prevalence and characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Byung-Wan; Kim, Sung-Soo; Lee, Dong-Hyun; Kim, Ji-Wan

    2017-10-01

    Patients with cervical myelopathy may experience symptoms of radiculopathy, and it is not easy to determine whether these symptoms are caused by the myelopathy itself or by a radiculopathy accompanied by root compression. Therefore, we aimed to investigate the prevalence of radiculopathy combined with cervical myelopathy and to evaluate the characteristics of cervical myelopathy with or without radiculopathy. We enrolled 127 patients with cervical myelopathy in this retrospective study and reviewed their medical records and magnetic resonance imaging findings. They were divided into two groups according to the presence of cervical radiculopathy, and their age, sex, involved spinal segment, cord signal change, surgical method, clinical status were compared, and postsurgical recovery was compared using four clinical questionnaires. The incidence and level of radiculopathy combined with myelopathy were investigated. Combined cervical radiculopathy and myelopathy was diagnosed in 66 patients (51.9%, group 1), whereas 61 patients did not have radiculopathy (group 2). There was no difference in sex, age, cord signal change, preoperative Japanese Orthopedic Association score, neck disability index, and neck visual analogue scale (VAS) between the two groups, but group 1 showed higher preoperative arm VAS score (p = 0.001). Postoperative arm and neck VAS scores were significantly improved in group 1 (p = 0.001 and 0.009). Half of the patients had combined cervical myelopathy and radiculopathy. A high preoperative arm VAS score was a characteristic of radiculopathy combined with myelopathy.

  5. A novel minimally invasive percutaneous facet augmentation device for the treatment of lumbar radiculopathy and axial back pain: technical description, surgical technique and case presentations

    OpenAIRE

    Khoo, Larry T.; Chen, Nan Fu; Armin, Sean; Stiner, Eric; Dipp, Juan; Flores, Ricardo; Palmer, Sylvain

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: to describe a new posterior minimally invasive method of facet stabilization for treatment of the degenerating lumbar motion segment. The biomechanics of this Percudyn (Interventional Spine; Irvine, CA) system are distinct from that of other interspinous dynamic stabilization systems as it acts bilaterally directly within the middle column of the spine. Based on biomechanical evalution, the paired prosthesis supports, cushions, and reinforces the facet complexes by limiting both ex...

  6. Correlation of Electromyography and Magnetic Resonance Imaging Findings in the Diagnosis of Suspected Radiculopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yıldız Arslan

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Patients with pain or numbness without motor deficits are the most common group referred to electrophysiology laboratories as suspected radiculopathy. We wanted to investigate whether electromyography (EMG was useful for this group in the diagnosis or therapy of radiculopathy. Our aim was to investigate the correlation and classification of EMG and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI findings in the diagnosis of suspected radiculopathy. METHODS: We included 74 patients with a ≥2-month history of numbness and pain in the neck and back that radiated into the arm or leg. Patients with diabetes mellitus, previous disc or spine operation, polyneuropathy, spinal cord diseases (tumor, infection or syrinxs, motor deficits, and abnormal nerve conduction studies were excluded. RESULTS: The mean age of the patients was 51.58±11.53 years. In total, 41 (55.4% patients were women and 33 (44.6% were men; 48.8% (n=36 showed cervical radiculopathy and 51.2% (n=38 exhibited lumbosacral radiculopathy. The most common MRI finding was protrusion (37.8%, and the most common EMG finding was re-innervation (59.5%. The correlation of MRI and EMG findings was significant in lumbar radiculopathy (p=0.007, but not in the cervical radiculopathy results (p=0.976. DISCUSSION AND CONCLUSION: EMG and MRI findings were compatible for lumbar radiculopathy, but not for cervical radiculopathy in mild to moderate grades.

  7. Syndrome of inappropriate antidiuretic hormone caused by continuous lumbar spinal fluid drainage after transphenoidal surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norlela, S; Azmi, K N; Khalid, B A K

    2006-01-01

    A 53-year-old acromegalic woman had cerebrospinal fluid rhinorrhoea following transphenoidal surgery for a pituitary microadenoma. A continuous lumbar spinal fluid drainage catheter was inserted and on the sixth postoperative day, she developed hyponatremia with features of syndrome of inappropriate antidiuretic hormone (SIADH) requiring hypertonic saline administration. Over-drainage is potentially hazardous and close biochemical monitoring is required. To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of SIADH caused by continuous lumbar drainage in an adult.

  8. Sciatica from a Foraminal Lumbar Root Schwannoma: Case Report and Review of Literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tarush Rustagi

    2012-01-01

    This case report describes lumbar foraminal schwannoma as an unusual cause of radiculopathy, presenting clinically as a lumbar disc prolapse. The diagnosis was confirmed on MRI scan. Patient had complete symptomatic recovery following surgical enucleation of the tumour mass from the L5 nerve root. This case report is of particular interest as it highlights the diagnostic confusion, which is bound to arise, because the clinical presentation closely mimics a lumbar PID. This often leads to delay in diagnosis and “failure of conservative treatment.”

  9. Cervical Stenosis, Myelopathy and Radiculopathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... FIND A SPECIALIST Conditions Cervical Stenosis, Myelopathy and Radiculopathy Raj Rao MD Raj Rao MD Updated 5/ ... of the spinal cord within the neck. Cervical radiculopathy refers to a loss of function in a ...

  10. A methodological approach for the biomechanical cause analysis of golf-related lumbar spine injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sim, Taeyong; Jang, Dong-Jin; Oh, Euichaul

    2014-01-01

    A new methodological approach employing mechanical work (MW) determination and relative portion of its elemental analysis was applied to investigate the biomechanical causes of golf-related lumbar spine injuries. Kinematic and kinetic parameters at the lumbar and lower limb joints were measured during downswing in 18 golfers. The MW at the lumbar joint (LJ) was smaller than at the right hip but larger than the MWs at other joints. The contribution of joint angular velocity (JAV) to MW was much greater than that of net muscle moment (NMM) at the LJ, whereas the contribution of NMM to MW was greater rather than or similar to that of JAV at other joints. Thus, the contribution of JAV to MW is likely more critical in terms of the probability of golf-related injury than that of NMM. The MW-based golf-related injury index (MWGII), proposed as the ratio of the contribution of JAV to MW to that of NMM, at the LJ (1.55) was significantly greater than those at other joints ( < 1.05). This generally corresponds to the most frequent occurrence of golf-related injuries around the lumbar spine. Therefore, both MW and MWGII should be considered when investigating the biomechanical causes of lumbar spine injuries.

  11. [A swollen, painless calf caused by neurogenic muscle (pseudo)-hypertrophy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Warrenburg, B.P.C. van de; Zwarts, M.J.; Engelen, B.G.M. van

    2003-01-01

    Neurogenic muscle (pseudo) hypertrophy of the calf was diagnosed in a 60-year-old man, who presented with chronic, painless and unilateral calf enlargement caused by a chronic S1 radiculopathy due to a lumbar disc hernia in the L5-S1 interspace. The differential diagnosis of a swelling of the calf

  12. Development of a patient-reported outcome instrument for patients with lumbar radicular pain

    OpenAIRE

    Ibsen, Charlotte; Schiøttz-Christensen, Berit; Handberg, Charlotte; Nielsen, Claus Vinther; Hørder, Mogens; Maribo, Thomas

    2017-01-01

    Background Low back pain (LBP) is the leading cause to years lived with disability. 10–20% of patients with LBP experience radicular pain (lumbar radiculopathy). Patient-reported outcomes (PROs) play an important role in advancing patient-centered health care. Although patient involvement is essential to develop valid patient-centred PRO instruments patients are not always involved. The International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF) are proposed to facilitate consist...

  13. CT- and fluoroscopy-guided percutaneous discectomy for lumbar radiculopathy related to disc herniation: a comparative prospective study comparing lateral to medial herniated discs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amoretti, Nicolas; Huwart, Laurent; Marcy, Pierre-Yves; Foti, Pauline; Hauger, Olivier; Boileau, Pascal

    2013-01-01

    To evaluate and compare two groups of patients with sciatica due to intervertebral disc herniation with no neurologic deficit. The groups consisted of patients with intervertebral disc herniation in a medial location (group 1) and those in a lateral location (group 2). A total of 200 patients were included in the study and were followed for a minimum of 6 months. In our series, we treated 80 postero-lateral herniated discs (40% of cases), 46 postero-medial herniated discs (23%), and 74 foraminal herniated discs (37%). Level L3-L4 was treated in 30 cases (15%), L4-L5 in 98 cases (49%), and L5-S1 in 72 cases (36%). The procedure was performed under dual guidance: fluoroscopic and CT. A helical probe was activated. It penetrates the herniated disc and causes the pulpous material to be mechanically evacuated through the probe. All 200 patients were followed for a minimum of 6 months. In group 1, the patients had a mean pain score of 7.9 ± 2.5 VAS units (range 6-10 units) prior to intervention. This was reduced to 3.2 ± 2.1 VAS units (range 0-10 units) at 48 h follow-up and increased to 3.9 ± 1.2 VAS units (range 0-10 VAS units) at 1 month follow-up and further reduced to 2.7 ± 1.2 units (range 0-10 VAS units) at 6 month follow-up. In group 2, the patients had a mean pain score of 8.2 ± 3.2 VAS units (range 6-10 units) prior to intervention. This was reduced to 2.8 ± 1.5 VAS units (range 0-10 units) at 48 h follow-up and decreased to 1.5 ± 0.9 VAS units (range 0-10 units) at 1 month and further reduced to 1.1 ± 0.5 VAS units (range 0-10 units) at 6 months. Our study showed that results were more satisfactory for the hernia located laterally (postero-lateral, foraminal, and extra-foraminal) as compared to the hernia located posteromedially.

  14. CT- and fluoroscopy-guided percutaneous discectomy for lumbar radiculopathy related to disc herniation: a comparative prospective study comparing lateral to medial herniated discs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amoretti, Nicolas; Huwart, Laurent; Marcy, Pierre-Yves; Foti, Pauline; Hauger, Olivier; Boileau, Pascal

    2013-01-01

    To evaluate and compare two groups of patients with sciatica due to intervertebral disc herniation with no neurologic deficit. The groups consisted of patients with intervertebral disc herniation in a medial location (group 1) and those in a lateral location (group 2). A total of 200 patients were included in the study and were followed for a minimum of 6 months. In our series, we treated 80 postero-lateral herniated discs (40% of cases), 46 postero-medial herniated discs (23%), and 74 foraminal herniated discs (37%). Level L3-L4 was treated in 30 cases (15%), L4-L5 in 98 cases (49%), and L5-S1 in 72 cases (36%). The procedure was performed under dual guidance: fluoroscopic and CT. A helical probe was activated. It penetrates the herniated disc and causes the pulpous material to be mechanically evacuated through the probe. All 200 patients were followed for a minimum of 6 months. In group 1, the patients had a mean pain score of 7.9 ± 2.5 VAS units (range 6-10 units) prior to intervention. This was reduced to 3.2 ± 2.1 VAS units (range 0-10 units) at 48 h follow-up and increased to 3.9 ± 1.2 VAS units (range 0-10 VAS units) at 1 month follow-up and further reduced to 2.7 ± 1.2 units (range 0-10 VAS units) at 6 month follow-up. In group 2, the patients had a mean pain score of 8.2 ± 3.2 VAS units (range 6-10 units) prior to intervention. This was reduced to 2.8 ± 1.5 VAS units (range 0-10 units) at 48 h follow-up and decreased to 1.5 ± 0.9 VAS units (range 0-10 units) at 1 month and further reduced to 1.1 ± 0.5 VAS units (range 0-10 units) at 6 months. Our study showed that results were more satisfactory for the hernia located laterally (postero-lateral, foraminal, and extra-foraminal) as compared to the hernia located posteromedially. (orig.)

  15. CT- and fluoroscopy-guided percutaneous discectomy for lumbar radiculopathy related to disc herniation: a comparative prospective study comparing lateral to medial herniated discs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amoretti, Nicolas; Huwart, Laurent; Marcy, Pierre-Yves [Centre Hospital-Universitaire de Nice, Department of Radiology, Hopital archet 2, Nice (France); Foti, Pauline [Centre Hospital-Universitaire de Nice, Department of Medical Statistics, Hopital archet 2, Nice (France); Hauger, Olivier [Centre Hospitalo-Universitaire de Bordeaux, Department of Radiology, Hopital Pellegrin, Bordeaux (France); Boileau, Pascal [Centre Hospital-Universitaire de Nice, Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Hopital archet 2, Nice (France)

    2013-01-15

    To evaluate and compare two groups of patients with sciatica due to intervertebral disc herniation with no neurologic deficit. The groups consisted of patients with intervertebral disc herniation in a medial location (group 1) and those in a lateral location (group 2). A total of 200 patients were included in the study and were followed for a minimum of 6 months. In our series, we treated 80 postero-lateral herniated discs (40% of cases), 46 postero-medial herniated discs (23%), and 74 foraminal herniated discs (37%). Level L3-L4 was treated in 30 cases (15%), L4-L5 in 98 cases (49%), and L5-S1 in 72 cases (36%). The procedure was performed under dual guidance: fluoroscopic and CT. A helical probe was activated. It penetrates the herniated disc and causes the pulpous material to be mechanically evacuated through the probe. All 200 patients were followed for a minimum of 6 months. In group 1, the patients had a mean pain score of 7.9 {+-} 2.5 VAS units (range 6-10 units) prior to intervention. This was reduced to 3.2 {+-} 2.1 VAS units (range 0-10 units) at 48 h follow-up and increased to 3.9 {+-} 1.2 VAS units (range 0-10 VAS units) at 1 month follow-up and further reduced to 2.7 {+-} 1.2 units (range 0-10 VAS units) at 6 month follow-up. In group 2, the patients had a mean pain score of 8.2 {+-} 3.2 VAS units (range 6-10 units) prior to intervention. This was reduced to 2.8 {+-} 1.5 VAS units (range 0-10 units) at 48 h follow-up and decreased to 1.5 {+-} 0.9 VAS units (range 0-10 units) at 1 month and further reduced to 1.1 {+-} 0.5 VAS units (range 0-10 units) at 6 months. Our study showed that results were more satisfactory for the hernia located laterally (postero-lateral, foraminal, and extra-foraminal) as compared to the hernia located posteromedially. (orig.)

  16. Impact of physical and psychosocial factors on disability caused by lumbar pain amongst fishing sector workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Romero, Beatriz; Pita-Fernández, Salvador; Carballo-Costa, Lidia

    2013-07-01

    Functional disability due to lumbar pain should be considered from the biopsychosocial model. There is inconclusive evidence as to whether the key determining factors in this form of disability are psychosocial or physical. Our aim is to identify variables that cause functional disability due to lumbar pain amongst shellfish gatherers in Galicia by means of a cross-sectional survey. Participants (N = 929) completed a self-administered, paper-based questionnaire including sociodemographic and lifestyle issues, as well as the nature of the lumbar pain, the presence of musculoskeletal pain in other regions of the body, the Roland-Morris Disability Questionnaire (RMDQ) and SF-36. Univariate examination, ROC curve and logistic regression analyses were performed. Most of these workers are women (98.7 %), with a mean age of 50.6 years. The point-prevalence of lumbar pain stands at 65.5 %. The RMDQ mean was 4.9 (SD = 4.7). In the logistic regression analysis, the variables associated with disability (RMDQ > median) were age (OR = 1.04), physical exercise (OR = 0.57), pain intensity (OR = 1.16), the number of regions of musculoskeletal pain (OR = 1.24) and mental health (SF-36) (OR = -0.95). Functional disability is determined by the physical nature of the pain and mental health attributes, although the former has a greater impact. In decreasing order of importance, functional disability is attributable to the presence of lower back pain, the number of regions of musculoskeletal pain, the intensity of that pain and age. Regular physical exercise and better mental health have a protective effect on disability.

  17. Epidural steroids in the management of chronic spinal pain and radiculopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boswell, Mark V; Hansen, Hans C; Trescot, Andrea M; Hirsch, Joshua A

    2003-07-01

    Epidural injections with or without steroids are used extensively in the management of chronic spinal pain. However, evidence is contradictory with continuing debate about the value of epidural steroid injections in chronic spinal syndromes. The objective of this systematic review is to determine the effectiveness of epidural injections in the treatment of chronic spinal pain. Data sources include relevant literature identified through searches of MEDLINE, EMBASE (Jan 1966- Mar 2003), manual searches of bibliographies of known primary and review articles, and abstracts from scientific meetings. Both randomized and non-randomized studies were included in the review based on the criteria established by the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ). Studies were excluded from the analysis if they were simply review or descriptive and failed to meet minimum criteria. The results showed that there was strong evidence to indicate effectiveness of transforaminal epidural injections in managing lumbar nerve root pain. Further, evidence was moderate for caudal epidural injections in managing lumbar radicular pain. The evidence in management of chronic neck pain, chronic low back pain, cervical radiculopathy, spinal stenosis, and post laminectomy syndrome was limited or inconclusive. In conclusion, the evidence of effectiveness of transforaminal epidural injections in managing lumbar nerve root pain was strong, whereas, effectiveness of caudal epidural injections in managing lumbar radiculopathy was moderate, while there was limited or inconclusive evidence of effectiveness of epidural injections in managing chronic spinal pain without radiculopathy, spinal stenosis, post lumbar laminectomy syndrome, and cervical radiculopathy.

  18. Coexistence of intervertebral disc herniation with intradural schwannoma in a lumbar segment: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Jianjiang; Wang, Yue; Huang, Yazeng

    2016-04-18

    Lumbar intervertebral disc herniation and spinal tumor are major pathologies that may cause back pain and radiculopathy. Neurological symptoms resulting from disc herniation and intradural spinal tumor together, however, are very rare. We report a case of lumbar disc herniation which coexists with intradural schwannoma at the same spinal level in a 67-year-old man. The patient presented with persistent low back pain, sciatica, and weakness of the lower limbs. Contrast lumbar spine magnetic resonance (MR) imaging clearly delineated an intradural lesion and an extradural herniated disc at L3/4 level. Using a single posterior approach, both pathologies were addressed. Pathological studies confirmed the intradural lesion was schwannoma. The case report highlights a rare concomitance of two symptomatic pathologies in a lumbar spine, which deserves clinical attention. Complete history, careful physical examination, and investigative measures, such as contrast MR imaging, are helpful to establish throughout diagnoses.

  19. Towards the causes of secondary post-traumatic deformations of thoracic and lumbar spine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shulga А.Е.

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the study is to analyze and systematize main causes of secondary spine deformations forming in patients who had operations due to thoracic and lumbar spine damages. Material and Methods. The analysis of poor surgical results of 155 patients previously operated due to various thoracic and lumbar spine damages has been conducted. All patients had complications associated with secondary spinal column deformations at various time after the intervention. Standard investigation included the analysis of patients' complaints, their previous history, somatic, neurological and orthopedic status. Results. The intensity of spinal column deformation was defined due to the character and level of primary trauma structurally characterized predominantly by unstable damages. However as it has been found in this research the main cause of this complicated pathology lied in the number of tactical and technical pitfalls of primary surgical treatment. Conclusion. Surgical operations due to secondary post-traumatic deformations in most cases are laborious and are accompanied by significant surgical trauma therefore systematization and analysis of the main causes of poor results of primary spine surgery may contribute to the preventive treatment of this type of pathology.

  20. Outcome of L5 radiculopathy after reduction and instrumented transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion of high-grade L5-S1 isthmic spondylolisthesis and the role of intraoperative neurophysiological monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schär, Ralph T; Sutter, Martin; Mannion, Anne F; Eggspühler, Andreas; Jeszenszky, Dezsö; Fekete, Tamas F; Kleinstück, Frank; Haschtmann, Daniel

    2017-03-01

    To evaluate the incidence and course of iatrogenic L5 radiculopathy after reduction and instrumented fusion of high-grade L5-S1 isthmic spondylolisthesis and the role of intraoperative neurophysiological monitoring (IONM). Consecutive patients treated for high-grade spondylolisthesis with IONM from 2005 to 2013 were screened for eligibility. Prospectively collected clinical and surgical data as well as radiographic outcomes were analyzed retrospectively. Patients completed the multidimensional Core Outcome Measures Index (COMI) before and at 3, 12, and 24 months after surgery. Seventeen patients were included, with a mean age of 26.3 (±9.5) years. Mean preoperative L5-S1 slip was 72% (±21%) and was reduced to 19% (±13%) postoperatively. Mean loss of reduction at last follow-up [mean 19 months (±14, range 3-48 months)] was 3% (±4.3%). Rate of new L5 radiculopathy with motor deficit (L5MD) after surgery was 29% (five patients). Four patients fully recovered after 3 months, one patient was lost to neurologic follow-up. IONM sensitivity and specificity for postoperative L5MD was 20 and 100%, respectively. COMI, back pain and leg pain scores showed significant (p spondylolisthesis is frequent. With IONM the risk of irreversible L5 radiculopathy is minimal. If IONM signal changes recover, full clinical recovery is expected within 3 months. Overall, patient-reported outcome of reduction and instrumented fusion of high-grade spondylolisthesis showed clinically important improvement.

  1. Root compression on MRI compared with clinical findings in patients with recent onset cervical radiculopathy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuijper, B.; Tans, J.T.J.; van der Kallen, B.F.; Nollet, F.; Lycklama a Nijeholt, G.J.; Visser, M.

    2011-01-01

    Objectives To evaluate the occurrence of symptomatic and asymptomatic root compression caused by herniated discs and spondylotic foraminal stenosis by MRI in patients with recent onset cervical radiculopathy. Participants 78 patients with symptoms and signs of cervical radiculopathy of less than one

  2. Transition of a herniated lumbar disc to lumbar discal cyst: A case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bansil, Rohit; Hirano, Yoshitaka; Sakuma, Hideo; Watanabe, Kazuo

    2016-01-01

    Another rare cause of lower back pain with radiculopathy is the discal cyst. It is believed to arise from degeneration of a herniated disc, although many other theories of its origin have been proposed. Here, we report a patient with lower back pain/radiculopathy attributed originally to a herniated lumbar disc, which transformed within 6 months into a discal cyst. A 42-year-old male had a magnetic resonance (MR) documented herniated lumbar disc at the L4-5 level. It was managed conservatively for 6 months, after which symptoms recurred and progressed. The follow-up MR study revealed a discal cyst at the L4-5 without residual herniated disc. Of interest, the cyst communicated with the L4-5 intervertebral disc, which was herniated under the posterior longitudinal ligament and the disc space. During surgery, the cyst was completely removed, and his symptoms/signs resolved. A discal cyst develops as pathological sequelae of a degenerated herniated disc. Although rare, these lesions must be considered among the differential diagnoses in young patients with radicular back pain. MR study clearly documents these lesions, and surgical excision of the cyst is the treatment of choice.

  3. Complex Regional Pain Syndrome Caused by Lumbar Herniated Intervertebral Disc Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Se Hee; Choi, Sang Sik; Lee, Mi Kyung; Kin, Jung Eun

    2016-07-01

    Most cases of complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS) occur after some inciting injury. There are a few cases of CRPS after an operation for disc disease. CRPS from a mild herniated intervertebral disc (HIVD) without surgical intervention is even rarer than CRPS after an operation for disc disease.A 22-year-old man was transferred to a pain clinic. He had continuously complained about back and right leg pain. He presented with a skin color change in the right lower leg, intermittent resting tremor, stiffness, and swelling in the right leg. He complained of a pulling sensation and numbness in his right buttock, posterior thigh, lateral calf, and ankle. This symptom was in accordance with L4/5 radiculopathy. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) also showed L4/5 HIVD that was central to the bilateral subarticular protrusion.He was diagnosed as having CRPS, which fits the revised International Association for the Study of Pain (IASP) criteria. He fulfilled 4 symptom categories (allodynia, temperature asymmetry and skin color change, sweating changes, decreased range of motion and motor dysfunction) and 3 of 4 sign categories (allodynia, temperature asymmetry and skin color changes, decreased range of motion and motor dysfunction). The bone scan and thermography also revealed CRPS.For the past 2 months, we have performed intensive treatments. But, he never became pain-free and walking for 5 minutes led to persistent leg pain. We decided to perform percutaneous nucleoplasty, which can directly decompress a HIVD. On the next day, he achieved dramatic symptom relief. The visual analog scale (VAS) score improved to 3, compared to the VAS score of 9 at the first visit. The skin color change, allodynia, and tremor in the right leg disappeared, and the temperature asymmetry normalized. Motor weakness of the right leg also recovered.We report an unusual case of CRPS that was caused by L4/5 HIVD without a history of trauma or surgery. It has a clear causal relationship between HIVD

  4. Myelopathy hand in cervical radiculopathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hosono, Noboru; Mukai, Yoshihiro; Takenaka, Shota; Fuji, Takeshi; Sakaura, Hironobu; Miwa, Toshitada; Makino, Takahiro

    2010-01-01

    The so-called 'myelopathy hand', or characteristic finger paralysis, often recognized in cervical compression myelopathy, has been considered a unique manifestation of cervical myelopathy. We used our original grip and release test, a 15-second test in which finger motion is captured with a digital camera, to investigate whether cervical radiculopathy has the same characteristics as myelopathy hand. Thirty patients with pure radiculopathy, id est (i.e.), who had radiating arm pain and evidence of corresponding nerve root impingement on X-ray images or MRI scans, but did not have spinal cord compression, served as the subjects. In contrast to other radiculopathies, C7 radiculopathy was manifested by a significant reduction in the number of finger motion cycles on the affected side in comparison with the unaffected side, the same as in myelopathy hand. Uncoordinated finger motion was significantly more frequent on the affected side in C6 radiculopathy than on the unaffected side. These findings contradict the conventional notion that myelopathy hand is a unique manifestation of cervical myelopathy, but some radiculopathies manifested the same kinds of finger paralysis observed in myelopathy hand. (author)

  5. Lumbar disc degeneration is an equally important risk factor as lumbar fusion for causing adjacent segment disc disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Natarajan, Raghu N; Andersson, Gunnar B J

    2017-01-01

    Treatment of degenerative spinal disorders by fusion produces abnormal mechanical conditions at mobile segments above or below the site of spinal disorders and is clinically referred to as adjacent segments disc disease (ASDD) or transition syndrome in the case of a previous surgical treatment. The aim of the current study is to understand with the help of poro-elastic finite element models how single or two level degeneration of lower lumbar levels influences motions at adjacent levels and compare the findings to motions produced by single or two level fusions when the adjacent disk has varying degree of degeneration. Validated grade-specific finite element models including varying grades of disc degeneration at lower lumbar levels with and without fusion were developed and used to determine motions at all levels of the lumbar spine due to applied moment loads. Results showed that adjacent disc motions do depend on severity of disc degeneration, number of disc degenerated or fused, and level at which degeneration or fusion occurred. Furthermore, single level degeneration and single level fusion produced similar amount of adjacent disc motions. The pattern of increase in adjacent segment motions due to disc degeneration and increase in motions at segment adjacent to fusion was similar. Based on the current study, it can be concluded that disc degeneration should also be considered as a risk factor in addition to fusion for generating adjacent disc degeneration. © 2016 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Orthop Res 35:123-130, 2017. © 2016 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Asymmetric Spondylolisthesis as the Cause of Childhood Lumbar Scoliosis—Can New Imaging Modalities Help Clarify the Relationship?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Jonathan B.; Wenger, Dennis R.

    2008-01-01

    The etiology of idiopathic scoliosis is likely genetic. Research is proceeding to identify the responsible genes. Although genetics accounts for the majority of idiopathic scoliosis, a subset of curves occur secondary to mechanical “foundation”issues at the lumbosacral junction. The most common mechanical “foundation”issue at the lumbosacral junction is spondylolisthesis. A relationship between lumbar scoliosis and spondylolisthesis has been well documented. Modern imaging studies are providing an opportunity to cast new light on this inter-relationship. First, computerized tomography (CT) studies, and now 3-D CT studies of the lumbosacral area have been performed in an attempt to further elucidate this matter. The purpose of this paper is to provide an introduction to the topic and to present images that suggest an etiologic relationship between lumbar scoliosis and spondylolisthesis with mild asymmetric spondylolisthesis proposed as the cause of the lumbar curve. PMID:19223951

  7. Lumbar spondylolysis: a review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leone, Antonio; Magarelli, Nicola; Bonomo, Lorenzo; Cianfoni, Alessandro; Cerase, Alfonso

    2011-01-01

    Spondylolysis is an osseous defect of the pars interarticularis, thought to be a developmental or acquired stress fracture secondary to chronic low-grade trauma. It is encountered most frequently in adolescents, most commonly involving the lower lumbar spine, with particularly high prevalence among athletes involved in certain sports or activities. Spondylolysis can be asymptomatic or can be a cause of spine instability, back pain, and radiculopathy. The biomechanics and pathophysiology of spondylolysis are complex and debated. Imaging is utilized to detect spondylolysis, distinguish acute and active lesions from chronic inactive non-union, help establish prognosis, guide treatment, and to assess bony healing. Radiography with satisfactory technical quality can often demonstrate a pars defect. Multislice CT with multiplanar reformats is the most accurate modality for detecting the bony defect and may also be used for assessment of osseous healing; however, as with radiographs, it is not sensitive for detection of the early edematous stress response without a fracture line and exposes the patient to ionizing radiation. Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging should be used as the primary investigation for adolescents with back pain and suspected stress reactions of the lumbar pars interarticularis. Several imaging pitfalls render MR imaging less sensitive than CT for directly visualizing the pars defects (regional degenerative changes and sclerosis). Nevertheless, the presence of bone marrow edema on fluid-sensitive images is an important early finding that may suggest stress response without a visible fracture line. Moreover, MR is the imaging modality of choice for identifying associated nerve root compression. Single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) use is limited by a high rate of false-positive and false-negative results and by considerable ionizing radiation exposure. In this article, we provide a review of the current concepts regarding spondylolysis, its

  8. Lumbar spondylolysis: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leone, Antonio; Cianfoni, Alessandro; Cerase, Alfonso; Magarelli, Nicola; Bonomo, Lorenzo

    2011-06-01

    Spondylolysis is an osseous defect of the pars interarticularis, thought to be a developmental or acquired stress fracture secondary to chronic low-grade trauma. It is encountered most frequently in adolescents, most commonly involving the lower lumbar spine, with particularly high prevalence among athletes involved in certain sports or activities. Spondylolysis can be asymptomatic or can be a cause of spine instability, back pain, and radiculopathy. The biomechanics and pathophysiology of spondylolysis are complex and debated. Imaging is utilized to detect spondylolysis, distinguish acute and active lesions from chronic inactive non-union, help establish prognosis, guide treatment, and to assess bony healing. Radiography with satisfactory technical quality can often demonstrate a pars defect. Multislice CT with multiplanar reformats is the most accurate modality for detecting the bony defect and may also be used for assessment of osseous healing; however, as with radiographs, it is not sensitive for detection of the early edematous stress response without a fracture line and exposes the patient to ionizing radiation. Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging should be used as the primary investigation for adolescents with back pain and suspected stress reactions of the lumbar pars interarticularis. Several imaging pitfalls render MR imaging less sensitive than CT for directly visualizing the pars defects (regional degenerative changes and sclerosis). Nevertheless, the presence of bone marrow edema on fluid-sensitive images is an important early finding that may suggest stress response without a visible fracture line. Moreover, MR is the imaging modality of choice for identifying associated nerve root compression. Single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) use is limited by a high rate of false-positive and false-negative results and by considerable ionizing radiation exposure. In this article, we provide a review of the current concepts regarding spondylolysis, its

  9. Lumbar spondylolysis: a review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leone, Antonio; Magarelli, Nicola; Bonomo, Lorenzo [Dept. of Bioimaging and Radiological Sciences, Catholic Univ., Rome (Italy); Cianfoni, Alessandro [Dept. of Radiology and Radiological Sciences, Medical Univ. of South Carolina, Charleston (United States); Cerase, Alfonso [General Hospital, Unit Neuroimaging and Neurointervention (NINT), Department of Neurosciences, Azienda Ospedaliera Universitaria Senese, Siena (Italy)

    2011-06-15

    Spondylolysis is an osseous defect of the pars interarticularis, thought to be a developmental or acquired stress fracture secondary to chronic low-grade trauma. It is encountered most frequently in adolescents, most commonly involving the lower lumbar spine, with particularly high prevalence among athletes involved in certain sports or activities. Spondylolysis can be asymptomatic or can be a cause of spine instability, back pain, and radiculopathy. The biomechanics and pathophysiology of spondylolysis are complex and debated. Imaging is utilized to detect spondylolysis, distinguish acute and active lesions from chronic inactive non-union, help establish prognosis, guide treatment, and to assess bony healing. Radiography with satisfactory technical quality can often demonstrate a pars defect. Multislice CT with multiplanar reformats is the most accurate modality for detecting the bony defect and may also be used for assessment of osseous healing; however, as with radiographs, it is not sensitive for detection of the early edematous stress response without a fracture line and exposes the patient to ionizing radiation. Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging should be used as the primary investigation for adolescents with back pain and suspected stress reactions of the lumbar pars interarticularis. Several imaging pitfalls render MR imaging less sensitive than CT for directly visualizing the pars defects (regional degenerative changes and sclerosis). Nevertheless, the presence of bone marrow edema on fluid-sensitive images is an important early finding that may suggest stress response without a visible fracture line. Moreover, MR is the imaging modality of choice for identifying associated nerve root compression. Single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) use is limited by a high rate of false-positive and false-negative results and by considerable ionizing radiation exposure. In this article, we provide a review of the current concepts regarding spondylolysis, its

  10. Lumbar spine spondylolysis in the adult population: using computed tomography to evaluate the possibility of adult onset lumbar spondylosis as a cause of back pain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brooks, Benjamin K.; Southam, Samuel L.; Mlady, Gary W.; Logan, Jeremy; Rosett, Matthew

    2010-01-01

    To determine if new onset of low back pain in adults could be secondary to lumbar spondylolysis by establishing the age-related prevalence in the general population by examining patients undergoing computed tomography (CT) for reasons unrelated to back pain. The records of 2,555 patients who had undergone abdominal and pelvic CT in 2008 were reviewed electronically. In order to determine a true representation of the general population, we reviewed all indications for CT, excluding patients with a primary complaint of low back pain as the primary indication for imaging. Equal numbers of patients were separated into age groups by decade to ensure an even distribution of ages for statistical analysis. Patients older than 70 years were grouped together to provide case numbers comparable to those of the other decades. Logistic regression analysis was performed to evaluate the significance of the results. Three board-certified radiologists, including two musculoskeletal fellows and a radiology resident, retrospectively evaluated CT scans for lumbar spondylolysis, including unilateral and bilateral defects. Of the 2,555 cases evaluated, there were 203 positive cases of defects of the lumbar pars interarticularis. This corresponded to an overall prevalence of 8.0%. Prevalence per decade was fairly evenly distributed and ranged from 7.0%(ages 30-39 years) to 9.2% (ages 70 years and above). Prevalence of ages 20-49 years was 7.9%, and that of ages 50 years and older was 8.0%. Male to female ratio was 1.5:1. Logistic regression showed no significant increase in spondylolysis based on age. No significant increase in the prevalence of lumbar spondylolysis was demonstrated in patients older than 20 years. This suggests that the development of symptomatic lumbar pars defects do not occur in this population and should not be considered as a rare but potentially treatable cause of new onset low back pain in adults. This study demonstrated an overall prevalence of pars defects of 8

  11. Lumbar spine spondylolysis in the adult population: using computed tomography to evaluate the possibility of adult onset lumbar spondylosis as a cause of back pain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brooks, Benjamin K.; Southam, Samuel L.; Mlady, Gary W.; Logan, Jeremy; Rosett, Matthew [University of New Mexico School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2010-07-15

    To determine if new onset of low back pain in adults could be secondary to lumbar spondylolysis by establishing the age-related prevalence in the general population by examining patients undergoing computed tomography (CT) for reasons unrelated to back pain. The records of 2,555 patients who had undergone abdominal and pelvic CT in 2008 were reviewed electronically. In order to determine a true representation of the general population, we reviewed all indications for CT, excluding patients with a primary complaint of low back pain as the primary indication for imaging. Equal numbers of patients were separated into age groups by decade to ensure an even distribution of ages for statistical analysis. Patients older than 70 years were grouped together to provide case numbers comparable to those of the other decades. Logistic regression analysis was performed to evaluate the significance of the results. Three board-certified radiologists, including two musculoskeletal fellows and a radiology resident, retrospectively evaluated CT scans for lumbar spondylolysis, including unilateral and bilateral defects. Of the 2,555 cases evaluated, there were 203 positive cases of defects of the lumbar pars interarticularis. This corresponded to an overall prevalence of 8.0%. Prevalence per decade was fairly evenly distributed and ranged from 7.0%(ages 30-39 years) to 9.2% (ages 70 years and above). Prevalence of ages 20-49 years was 7.9%, and that of ages 50 years and older was 8.0%. Male to female ratio was 1.5:1. Logistic regression showed no significant increase in spondylolysis based on age. No significant increase in the prevalence of lumbar spondylolysis was demonstrated in patients older than 20 years. This suggests that the development of symptomatic lumbar pars defects do not occur in this population and should not be considered as a rare but potentially treatable cause of new onset low back pain in adults. This study demonstrated an overall prevalence of pars defects of 8

  12. A Hydatid Cyst of the Lumbar Spine: A Rare Cause of Paraplegia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suhail Ur Rehman

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Hydatid cyst is a zoonotic disease, affecting humans and other mammals worldwide. It is caused by tapeworms of the genus Echinococcus, which is most frequently encountered in the liver and lungs. Although involvement of the central nervous system and spine is rare, it can lead to severe neurological deficits due to direct compression. Case Presentation We report a case of intradural extramedullary hydatid cyst in the lumbar region with a sudden onset, causing progressive paraplegia and areflexia over the past 20 days. After surgical removal, the cyst was sent for histopathological examination. The results showed inner laminated membranes and an outer fibrous layer, surrounded by foreign-body giant cells. The primary objective during surgery was to avoid perforation of the cyst, thereby reducing the risk of systemic dissemination and local seeding of the parasite. During the postoperative period, there was a steady improvement in the neurological deficit, and the patient was discharged with anthelmintics to prevent any distant dissemination. Conclusions An accurate and precise diagnosis is necessary when dealing with cystic pathologies.

  13. Imaging cervical myelo- and radiculopathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roth, C.; Papanagiotou, P.; Krick, C.; Reith, W.; Grunwald, I.Q.

    2006-01-01

    This article gives an overview of the diagnostic possibilities available in the diagnosis of cervical myelo- and radiculopathy. We compared conventional myelography, CTM, and MRI. Twenty-five patients with clinical evidence of cervical myelo- or radiculopathy were included. Sagittal and transverse T1-weighted (T1w) TSE and T2-weighted (T2w) TSE sequences were compared with myelography and CTM. Statistical analysis was performed using Wilcoxon's -test. Disc herniation could be depicted in CTM as well as in MRI. The extent of herniation did not differ between CTM and T1w. The extent of herniation seemed higher on T2w than on T1w (p [de

  14. [Lumbar spondylosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seichi, Atsushi

    2014-10-01

    Lumbar spondylosis is a chronic, noninflammatory disease caused by degeneration of lumbar disc and/or facet joints. The etiology of lumbar spondylosis is multifactorial. Patients with lumbar spondylosis complain of a broad variety of symptoms including discomfort in the low back lesion, whereas some of them have radiating leg pain or neurologenic intermittent claudication (lumbar spinal stenosis). The majority of patients with spondylosis and stenosis of the lumbosacral spine can be treated nonsurgically. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and COX-2 inhibitors are helpful in controlling symptoms. Prostaglandin, epidural injection, and transforaminal injection are also helpful for leg pain and intermittent claudication. Operative therapy for spinal stenosis or spondylolisthesis is reserved for patients who are totally incapacitated by their condition.

  15. High failure rate of the interspinous distraction device (X-Stop) for the treatment of lumbar spinal stenosis caused by degenerative spondylolisthesis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verhoof, O.J.W.; Bron, J.L.; Wapstra, F.H.; van Royen, B.J.

    2008-01-01

    The X-Stop interspinous distraction device has shown to be an attractive alternative to conventional surgical procedures in the treatment of symptomatic degenerative lumbar spinal stenosis. However, the effectiveness of the X-Stop in symptomatic degenerative lumbar spinal stenosis caused by

  16. Restless legs syndrome mimicking S1 radiculopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zambelis, Th; Wolgamuth, B R; Papoutsi, S N; Economou, N T

    2016-01-01

    Α case of a chronic idiopathic form of a severe type of Restless Legs Syndrome (RLS), which developed during pregnancy and persisted after this, misdiagnosed for 34 years as radiculopathy S1, is reported. In spite of the thorough clinical and laboratory investigation, in addition to constant changes of the therapeutic approach, the diagnosis of S1 radiculopathy could not be confirmed, resulting in a chronic clinical course; the latter was characterized by relapses and remissions not attributed or linked in any way to the treatment (various types of). In fact, it was due to a routine workup in a sleep clinic, where the patient was referred because of a coincident chronic insomnia (Restless Legs Syndrome is a known and important cause of insomnia/chronic insomnia), which resulted in a proper diagnosis and treatment of this case. With the use of Restless Legs Syndrome appropriate treatment (Pramipexole 0.18 mg taken at bedtime, a dopaminergic agent and Level A recommended drug for Restless Legs Syndrome) an excellent response and immediate elimination of symptoms was achieved. Restless Legs Syndrome may present with a variety of symptoms (with the most prominent shortly being reported with the acronym URGE: Urge to move the legs usually associated with unpleasant leg sensations, Rest induces symptoms, Getting active brings relief, Evening and night deteriorate symptoms); given the fact that Restless Legs Syndrome presents with a great variety and heterogeneity of symptoms (mostly pain, dysesthesia and paresthesia), which may occur in several other diseases (the so called "RLS mimics"), proper diagnosis of Restless Legs Syndrome usually fails. Restless Legs Syndrome misinterpreted as S1 radiculopathy, to the best of our knowledge, has not been reported yet in the literature. Here, case history, clinical course and common RLS mimics are presented. Different forms of Restless Legs Syndrome manifestations, which are commonly -as in this case- misinterpreted due to their

  17. Role of interleukin-17 in chondrocytes of herniated intervertebral lumbar discs

    Science.gov (United States)

    TIAN, PENG; LI, ZHI-JUN; FU, XIN; MA, XIN-LONG

    2015-01-01

    Lumbar disc herniation (LDH) is a common cause of lumbosacral radiculopathy. An autoimmune response to a herniated nucleus pulposus (NP) has been suggested to play an important role in the initiation of radiculopathy. Interleukin-17 (IL-17) is a cytokine associated with inflammation and autoimmunity. The presence of IL-17 has been studied in patients with LDH; however, extensive investigation into the expression of IL-17 in different disc pathologies of LDH has not yet been conducted. The aim of the present study was to investigate the role of neovascularization and hypertrophic chondrocytes in herniated intervertebral lumbar discs. Fifty-two intervertebral lumbar disc specimens were extracted from 46 patients with LDH and were subsequently classified as either contained or non-contained disc herniation (CDH and NCDH, respectively). The specimens were stained with hematoxylin and eosin or toluidine blue, or were immunostained with polyclonal antibodies to IL-17 using the streptavidin-peroxidase method. The neovascular tissue and staining results were graded to establish the histological differences between the two herniation types. The intervertebral discs (IVDs) obtained from patients with NCDH showed significantly more neovascularization and granulation tissue than the discs obtained from patients with CDH (Pherniated IVDs. PMID:26170916

  18. Transforaminal epidural steroid injection for lumbosacral radiculopathy: preganglionic versus conventional approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Joon Woo; Kim, Sung Hyun; Choi, Ja Young [Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)] (and others)

    2006-06-15

    The present study was undertaken to evaluate the effectiveness of transforaminal epidural steroid injection (TFESI) with using a preganglionic approach for treating lumbar radiculopathy when the nerve root compression was located at the level of the supra-adjacent intervertebral disc. The medical records of the patients who received conventional TFESI at our department from June 2003 to May 2004 were retrospectively reviewed. TFESI was performed in a total of 13 cases at the level of the exiting nerve root, in which the nerve root compression was at the level of the supra-adjacent intervertebral disc (the conventional TFESI group). Since June 2004, we have performed TFESI with using a preganglionic approach at the level of the supra-adjacent intervertebral disc (for example, at the neural foramen of L4-5 for L5 nerve root) if the nerve root compression was at the level of the supra-adjacent intervertebral disc. Using the inclusion criteria described above, 20 of these patients were also consecutively enrolled in our study (the preganglionic TFESI group). The treatment outcome was assessed using a 5-point patient satisfaction scale and by using a VAS (visual assessment scale). A successful outcome required a patient satisfaction scale score of 3(very good) or 4 (excellent), and a reduction on the VAS score of > 50% two weeks after performing TFESI. Logistic regression analysis was also performed. Of the 13 patients in the conventional TFESI group, nine showed satisfactory improvement two weeks after TFESI (69.2%). However, in the preganglionic TFESI group, 18 of the 20 patients (90%) showed satisfactory improvement, The difference between the two approaches in terms of TFESI effectiveness was of borderline significance ({rho} = 0.056; odds ratio: 10.483). We conclude that preganglionic TFESI has the better therapeutic effect on radiculopathy caused by nerve root compression at the level of the supra-adjacent disc than does conventional TFESI, and the difference

  19. Transforaminal epidural steroid injection for lumbosacral radiculopathy: preganglionic versus conventional approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Joon Woo; Kim, Sung Hyun; Choi, Ja Young

    2006-01-01

    The present study was undertaken to evaluate the effectiveness of transforaminal epidural steroid injection (TFESI) with using a preganglionic approach for treating lumbar radiculopathy when the nerve root compression was located at the level of the supra-adjacent intervertebral disc. The medical records of the patients who received conventional TFESI at our department from June 2003 to May 2004 were retrospectively reviewed. TFESI was performed in a total of 13 cases at the level of the exiting nerve root, in which the nerve root compression was at the level of the supra-adjacent intervertebral disc (the conventional TFESI group). Since June 2004, we have performed TFESI with using a preganglionic approach at the level of the supra-adjacent intervertebral disc (for example, at the neural foramen of L4-5 for L5 nerve root) if the nerve root compression was at the level of the supra-adjacent intervertebral disc. Using the inclusion criteria described above, 20 of these patients were also consecutively enrolled in our study (the preganglionic TFESI group). The treatment outcome was assessed using a 5-point patient satisfaction scale and by using a VAS (visual assessment scale). A successful outcome required a patient satisfaction scale score of 3(very good) or 4 (excellent), and a reduction on the VAS score of > 50% two weeks after performing TFESI. Logistic regression analysis was also performed. Of the 13 patients in the conventional TFESI group, nine showed satisfactory improvement two weeks after TFESI (69.2%). However, in the preganglionic TFESI group, 18 of the 20 patients (90%) showed satisfactory improvement, The difference between the two approaches in terms of TFESI effectiveness was of borderline significance (ρ = 0.056; odds ratio: 10.483). We conclude that preganglionic TFESI has the better therapeutic effect on radiculopathy caused by nerve root compression at the level of the supra-adjacent disc than does conventional TFESI, and the difference between

  20. Spine imaging after lumbar disc replacement: pitfalls and current recommendations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandén Bengt

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Most lumbar artificial discs are still composed of stainless steel alloys, which prevents adequate postoperative diagnostic imaging of the operated region when using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI. Thus patients with postoperative radicular symptoms or claudication after stainless steel implants often require alternative diagnostic procedures. Methods Possible complications of lumbar total disc replacement (TDR are reviewed from the available literature and imaging recommendations given with regard to implant type. Two illustrative cases are presented in figures. Results Access-related complications, infections, implant wear, loosening or fracture, polyethylene inlay dislodgement, facet joint hypertrophy, central stenosis, and ankylosis of the operated segment can be visualised both in titanium and stainless steel implants, but require different imaging modalities due to magnetic artifacts in MRI. Conclusion Alternative radiographic procedures should be considered when evaluating patients following TDR. Postoperative complications following lumbar TDR including spinal stenosis causing radiculopathy and implant loosening can be visualised by myelography and radionucleotide techniques as an adjunct to plain film radiographs. Even in the presence of massive stainless steel TDR implants lumbar radicular stenosis and implant loosening can be visualised if myelography and radionuclide techniques are applied.

  1. A Rare Case of Progressive Palsy of the Lower Leg Caused by a Huge Lumbar Posterior Endplate Lesion after Recurrent Disc Herniation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masatoshi Morimoto

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A lesion of the lumbar posterior endplate is sometimes identified in the spinal canal of children and adolescents; it causes symptoms similar to those of a herniated disc. However, the pathology of the endplate lesion and the pathology of the herniated disc are different. We present a rare case of a 23-year-old woman who developed progressive palsy of the lower leg caused by huge lumbar posterior endplate lesion after recurrent disc herniation.

  2. Topacheous gout as a rare cause of spinal stenosis in the lumbar region. Case report.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Kelly, Joseph

    2012-02-03

    Despite the fact that gout is a common metabolic disorder, because its involvement of the axial skeleton is rare the diagnosis is often delayed, even in patients with long-standing gout who present with neurological deficits. The authors report the case of a woman with a history of extensive gout, emphasizing the clinical, radiological, and pathological features of a lumbar spinal stenosis.

  3. [Minimally invasive approach for cervical spondylotic radiculopathy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Liang; Sun, Taicun; Huang, Yonghui

    2010-01-01

    To summarize the recent minimally invasive approach for cervical spondylotic radiculopathy (CSR). The recent literature at home and abroad concerning minimally invasive approach for CSR was reviewed and summarized. There were two techniques of minimally invasive approach for CSR at present: percutaneous puncture techniques and endoscopic techniques. The degenerate intervertebral disc was resected or nucleolysis by percutaneous puncture technique if CSR was caused by mild or moderate intervertebral disc herniations. The cervical microendoscopic discectomy and foraminotomy was an effective minimally invasive approach which could provide a clear view. The endoscopy techniques were suitable to treat CSR caused by foraminal osteophytes, lateral disc herniations, local ligamentum flavum thickening and spondylotic foraminal stenosis. The minimally invasive procedure has the advantages of simple handling, minimally invasive and low incidence of complications. But the scope of indications is relatively narrow at present.

  4. Treatment of radiculopathies: a study of efficacy and tollerability of paravertebral oxygen-ozone injections compared with pharmacological anti-inflammatory treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melchionda, D; Milillo, P; Manente, G; Stoppino, L; Macarini, L

    2012-01-01

    The study was performed to evaluate the effectiveness of lumbar paravertebral injections of a gas mixture of Oxygen and Ozone in patients with lumbar radiculopathies caused by L4-L5 or L5-S1 disk herniations compared to a pharmacological therapy based on non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. Lumbar radiculopathy caused by disc herniation is widely spread. Many therapeutic options are available before steering patients to the surgery. Low back pain and sciatica represent some of the most frequent causes of antinflammatory-analgesic drugs overuse. Recent findings have shown that medical Ozone can be used in the treatment of radicular syndrome caused by herniated intervertebral discs. Although widely spread, there are insufficient published data supporting the effectiveness of this approach in clinical practice. We studied 38 affected patients with acute L5 or S1 radicolopathy. The patients were randomly divided in two groups: A) 20 patients treated with lumbar paravertebral injections of Oxygen and Ozone; B) 18 patients treated pharmacologically with antinflammatory-analgesic drugs. All patients underwent a clinical and neurological examination at baseline (T1) and after 1 (T2), 2 (T3), 4 weeks (T4) and after 3 (T5) and 6 months (T6). An MRI and EMG examination were performed at baseline and after 6 months. The intensity of pain and the outcome of treatments were evaluated in all patients with the Visual Analogue Scale and with the Oswestry Disability Index. We found a reduction of pain and discomfort soon after one week with oxygen-ozone injections compared with pharmacological treatment, but this difference of response became statistically significant after two weeks (50 percent vs 16.6 percent) and is confirmed after 3 and 6 months, when 80 percent of patients treated with injections turned out pain free compared with half of the patients treated pharmacologically. No statistical difference were found in MRI and EMG examinations. No adverse effects were found in

  5. A case of piriformis syndrome presenting as radiculopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rammurthy Kulkarni

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Piriformis syndrome has always remained as a diagnostic dilemma because of its varied presentation. Piriformis syndrome is myofascial dysfunction syndrome which causes pain not only because of trigger points within the muscle but also due to peripheral neuritis of the sciatic nerve. The sciatic neuritis is due to compression of the nerve as it passes through the greater sciatic foramen. The symptoms of sciatic nerve entrapment caused by the piriformis syndrome can be easily mistaken for radiculopathy as the nerve entrapment causes pain which radiates down below the knee and can go up to the foot. Electromyography (EMG and nerve conduction velocity (NCV studies can help differentiating these two conditions and can eliminate the need for the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI. In this paper, we have reported a case of piriformis syndrome which mimicked S 1 radiculopathy, where diagnosis was confirmed by diagnostic piriformis injection.

  6. Lumbar interbody fusion: techniques, indications and comparison of interbody fusion options including PLIF, TLIF, MI-TLIF, OLIF/ATP, LLIF and ALIF

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phan, Kevin; Malham, Greg; Seex, Kevin; Rao, Prashanth J.

    2015-01-01

    Degenerative disc and facet joint disease of the lumbar spine is common in the ageing population, and is one of the most frequent causes of disability. Lumbar spondylosis may result in mechanical back pain, radicular and claudicant symptoms, reduced mobility and poor quality of life. Surgical interbody fusion of degenerative levels is an effective treatment option to stabilize the painful motion segment, and may provide indirect decompression of the neural elements, restore lordosis and correct deformity. The surgical options for interbody fusion of the lumbar spine include: posterior lumbar interbody fusion (PLIF), transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (TLIF), minimally invasive transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (MI-TLIF), oblique lumbar interbody fusion/anterior to psoas (OLIF/ATP), lateral lumbar interbody fusion (LLIF) and anterior lumbar interbody fusion (ALIF). The indications may include: discogenic/facetogenic low back pain, neurogenic claudication, radiculopathy due to foraminal stenosis, lumbar degenerative spinal deformity including symptomatic spondylolisthesis and degenerative scoliosis. In general, traditional posterior approaches are frequently used with acceptable fusion rates and low complication rates, however they are limited by thecal sac and nerve root retraction, along with iatrogenic injury to the paraspinal musculature and disruption of the posterior tension band. Minimally invasive (MIS) posterior approaches have evolved in an attempt to reduce approach related complications. Anterior approaches avoid the spinal canal, cauda equina and nerve roots, however have issues with approach related abdominal and vascular complications. In addition, lateral and OLIF techniques have potential risks to the lumbar plexus and psoas muscle. The present study aims firstly to comprehensively review the available literature and evidence for different lumbar interbody fusion (LIF) techniques. Secondly, we propose a set of recommendations and guidelines

  7. Cervical interlaminar epidural steroid injection for unilateral cervical radiculopathy: comparison of midline and paramedian approaches for efficacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Ji Young; Kwon, Jong Won; Yoon, Young Cheol; Lee, Jongseok

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to compare the clinical outcomes of the cervical interlaminar epidural steroid injection (CIESI) for unilateral radiculopathy by the midline or paramedian approaches and to determine the prognostic factors of CIESI. We retrospectively analyzed 182 patients who underwent CIESI from January 2009 to December 2012. Inclusion criteria were no previous spinal steroid injection, presence of a cross-sectional image, and presence of follow-up records. Exclusion criteria were patients with bilateral cervical radiculopathy and/or dominant cervical axial pain, combined peripheral neuropathy, and previous cervical spine surgery. Short-term clinical outcomes were evaluated at the first follow-up after CIESI. We compared the clinical outcomes between the midline and paramedian approaches. Possible prognostic factors for the outcome, such as age, gender, duration of radiculopathy, and cause of radiculopathy were also analyzed. Cervical interlaminar epidural steroid injections were effective in 124 of 182 patients (68.1%) at the first follow-up. There was no significant difference in the clinical outcomes of CIESI, between midline (69.6%) and paramedian (63.7%) approaches (p = 0.723). Cause of radiculopathy was the only significant factor affecting the efficacy of CIESI. Patients with disc herniation had significantly better results than patients with neural foraminal stenosis (82.9% vs. 56.0%) (p radiculopathy. The cause of the radiculopathy is significantly associated with the treatment efficacy; patients with disc herniation experience better pain relief than those with neural foraminal stenosis.

  8. [Renal angiomyolipoma rupture as a cause of lumbar pain: report of one case].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cifuentes, Melissa; Calleja, Félix; Hola, José; Daviú, Antonio; Jara, Danilo; Vallejos, Humberto

    2008-08-01

    Renal angiomyolipoma is a benign tumor formed by smooth muscle, adipose tissue and blood vessels. It is commonly found incidentally and its clinical manifestations are pain and abdominal mass or spontaneous tumor rupture with retroperitoneal bleeding. The clinical presentation of a hemorrhagic shock secondary to a retroperitoneal hematoma is uncommon. We report a 40 year-old male who presented to the emergency room with lumbar pain and deterioration of hemodynamic parameters. The CT scan showed a left renal injury associated to an expansive retroperitoneal process. The abdominal exploration, vascular control of the renal pedicle and nephrectomy allowed a successful outcome.

  9. A case of cervical radiation radiculopathy resembling motor neuron disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mitsunaga, Yoshihiro; Yoshimura, Takeo; Hara, Hideo; Yamada, Takeshi; Kira, Jun-ichi; Kobayashi, Takuro

    1998-01-01

    A 67-year-old man developed slowly progressive muscular weakness in the bilateral upper extremities (C5-7 regions) without signs of sensory deficit following the cervical radiation therapy (70.5 Gy) for right laryngeal cancer 4 years before. These clinical signs resembled those of lower motor neuron disease. MRI with gadolinium-DTPA, however, showed enhancement in the bilateral C5 and C6 anterior roots, suggesting the cervical radiculopathy due to radiotherapy. It is known that radiation to the spinal cord can lead to ''selective anterior horn cell injury''. This is the first case report of the cervical radiation radiculopathy, which, if without MRI, might be classified into selective anterior horn cell injury. Suggestion is made for the hypothesis that the spinal motoneuron loss in radiation myelopathy would be caused by retrograde degeneration due to anterior root damages. (author)

  10. A case of cervical radiation radiculopathy resembling motor neuron disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mitsunaga, Yoshihiro; Yoshimura, Takeo; Hara, Hideo; Yamada, Takeshi; Kira, Jun-ichi; Kobayashi, Takuro [Kyushu Univ., Fukuoka (Japan). Faculty of Medicine

    1998-05-01

    A 67-year-old man developed slowly progressive muscular weakness in the bilateral upper extremities (C5-7 regions) without signs of sensory deficit following the cervical radiation therapy (70.5 Gy) for right laryngeal cancer 4 years before. These clinical signs resembled those of lower motor neuron disease. MRI with gadolinium-DTPA, however, showed enhancement in the bilateral C5 and C6 anterior roots, suggesting the cervical radiculopathy due to radiotherapy. It is known that radiation to the spinal cord can lead to ``selective anterior horn cell injury``. This is the first case report of the cervical radiation radiculopathy, which, if without MRI, might be classified into selective anterior horn cell injury. Suggestion is made for the hypothesis that the spinal motoneuron loss in radiation myelopathy would be caused by retrograde degeneration due to anterior root damages. (author)

  11. Foot drop caused by lumbar degenerative disease: clinical features, prognostic factors of surgical outcome and clinical stage.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kun Liu

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this study was to analyze the clinical features and prognostic factors of surgical outcome of foot drop caused by lumbar degenerative disease and put forward the clinical stage. METHODS: We retrospectively reviewed 135 patients with foot drop due to lumbar degenerative disease. The clinical features and mechanism were analyzed. Age, sex, duration of palsy, preoperative muscle strength of tibialis anterior (TA, sensation defect of affected lower limb, affected foot, diagnosis and compressed nerve roots were recorded and compared with surgical outcome. RESULTS: Foot drop was observed in 8.1% of all inpatients of lumbar degenerative disease. L5 nerve root compression was observed in 126 of all 135 patients (93.3%. Single, double and triple roots compression was observed respectively in 43, 83, and 9 patients (31.9%, 61.5%, and 6.6%. But there was no significant relationship between preoperative muscle strength of TA and the number of compressed roots. The muscle strength of TA was improved in 113 (83.7% patients after surgery, but it reached to >=4 in only 21 (15.6% patients. Improvement of the muscle strength of TA was almost stable at the 6-month follow-up. At the last follow-up, the muscle strength of TA was 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 respectively in 28, 24, 62, 13, 8 patients. Multivariate logistic regression showed duration of palsy (p=0.0360, OR=2.543, preoperative muscle strength of TA (p=0.0064, OR=5.528 and age (p=0.0309, OR=3.208 were factors that influenced recovery following an operation. CONCLUSIONS: L5 nerve root was most frequently affected. The muscle strength of TA improved in most patients after surgery, but few patients can get a good recovery from foot drop. Patients of shorter duration of palsy, better preoperative muscle strength of TA and younger age showed a better surgical outcome.

  12. Efficacy of epidural neuroplasty versus transforaminal epidural steroid injection for the radiating pain caused by a herniated lumbar disc.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hae Jong; Rim, Byeong Cheol; Lim, Jeong-Wook; Park, Noh Kyoung; Kang, Tae-Wook; Sohn, Min Kyun; Beom, Jaewon; Kang, Sangkuk

    2013-12-01

    To compare the treatment effects of epidural neuroplasty (NP) and transforaminal epidural steroid injection (TFESI) for the radiating pain caused by herniated lumbar disc. Thirty-two patients diagnosed with herniated lumbar disc through magnetic resonance imaging or computed tomography were included in this study. Fourteen patients received an epidural NP and eighteen patients had a TFESI. The visual analogue scale (VAS) and functional rating index (FRI) were measured before the treatment, and at 2 weeks, 4 weeks and 8 weeks after the treatment. In the epidural NP group, the mean values of the VAS before the treatment, and at 2 weeks, 4 weeks and 8 weeks after the treatment were 7.00±1.52, 4.29±1.20, 2.64±0.93, 1.43±0.51 and those of FRI were 23.57±3.84, 16.50±3.48, 11.43±2.44, 7.00±2.15. In the TFESI group, the mean values of the VAS before the treatment, and at 2 weeks, 4 weeks and 8 weeks after the treatment were 7.22±2.05, 4.28±1.67, 2.56±1.04, 1.33±0.49 and those of FRI were 22.00±6.64, 16.22±5.07, 11.56±4.18, 8.06±1.89. During the follow-up period, the values of VAS and FRI within each group were significantly reduced (pherniated lumbar disc. We recommend that TFESI should be primarily applied to patients who need interventional spine treatment, because it is easier and more cost-effective than epidural NP.

  13. Nonoperative Management of Cervical Radiculopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Childress, Marc A; Becker, Blair A

    2016-05-01

    Cervical radiculopathy describes pain in one or both of the upper extremities, often in the setting of neck pain, secondary to compression or irritation of nerve roots in the cervical spine. It can be accompanied by motor, sensory, or reflex deficits and is most prevalent in persons 50 to 54 years of age. Cervical radiculopathy most often stems from degenerative disease in the cervical spine. The most common examination findings are painful neck movements and muscle spasm. Diminished deep tendon reflexes, particularly of the triceps, are the most common neurologic finding. The Spurling test, shoulder abduction test, and upper limb tension test can be used to confirm the diagnosis. Imaging is not required unless there is a history of trauma, persistent symptoms, or red flags for malignancy, myelopathy, or abscess. Electrodiagnostic testing is not needed if the diagnosis is clear, but has clinical utility when peripheral neuropathy of the upper extremity is a likely alternate diagnosis. Patients should be reassured that most cases will resolve regardless of the type of treatment. Nonoperative treatment includes physical therapy involving strengthening, stretching, and potentially traction, as well as nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, muscle relaxants, and massage. Epidural steroid injections may be helpful but have higher risks of serious complications. In patients with red flag symptoms or persistent symptoms after four to six weeks of treatment, magnetic resonance imaging can identify pathology amenable to epidural steroid injections or surgery.

  14. Percutaneous endoscopic lumbar discectomy for a huge herniated disc causing acute cauda equina syndrome: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jha, Subash C; Tonogai, Ichiro; Takata, Yoichiro; Sakai, Toshinori; Higashino, Kosaku; Matsuura, Tetsuya; Suzue, Naoto; Hamada, Daisuke; Goto, Tomohiro; Nishisho, Toshihiko; Tsutsui, Takahiko; Goda, Yuichiro; Abe, Mitsunobu; Mineta, Kazuaki; Kimura, Tetsuya; Nitta, Akihiro; Hama, Shingo; Higuchi, Tadahiro; Fukuta, Shoji; Sairyo, Koichi

    2015-01-01

    Microsurgery for lumbar disc herniation that requires surgical intervention has been well described. The methods vary from traditional open discectomy to minimally invasive techniques. All need adequate preanesthetic preparation of patients as general anesthesia is required for the procedure, and nerve monitoring is necessary to prevent iatrogenic nerve injury. Conventional surgical techniques sometimes require the removal of the corresponding lamina to assess the nerve root and herniated disc, and this may increase the risk for posterior instability of the vertebral body. Should this occur, fusion surgery may be needed, further increasing morbidity and cost. We present here a case of lumbar herniated disc fragments causing acute cauda equina syndrome that were endoscopically resected through a transforaminal approach in an awake patient under local anesthesia. Percutaneous endoscopic discectomy under local anesthesia proved to be a better alternative to open back surgery as it made immediate intervention possible, was associated with fewer perioperative complications and morbidity, minimized soft tissue damage, and allowed early rehabilitation with a better outcome and greater patient satisfaction. In addition to these advantages, percutaneous endoscopic discectomy protects other approaches that may be needed in subsequent surgeries, whether open or minimally invasive.

  15. Interobserver agreement on MRI evaluation of patients with cervical radiculopathy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuijper, B., E-mail: kuijperb@maasstadziekenhuis.n [Department of Neurology, Medical Centre Haaglanden, The Hague (Netherlands); Department of Neurology, Maasstad Hospital, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Beelen, A. [Department of Rehabilitation, Academic Medical Centre, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Kallen, B.F. van der [Department of Neurology, Medical Centre Haaglanden, The Hague (Netherlands); Department of Radiology, Medical Centre Haaglanden, The Hague (Netherlands); Nollet, F. [Department of Rehabilitation, Academic Medical Centre, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Lycklama a Nijeholt, G.J. [Department of Neurology, Medical Centre Haaglanden, The Hague (Netherlands); Department of Radiology, Medical Centre Haaglanden, The Hague (Netherlands); Visser, M. de [Department of Neurology, Academic Medical Centre, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Tans, J. Th.J. [Department of Neurology, Medical Centre Haaglanden, The Hague (Netherlands)

    2011-01-15

    Aim: To evaluate the interobserver agreement on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) evaluation of herniated discs, spondylotic neuroforaminal stenosis, and root compression in patients with recent onset cervical radiculopathy and in addition, to assess the added value of disclosure of clinical information to interobserver agreement. Materials and methods: The MRI images of 82 patients with less than 1 month of symptoms and signs of cervical radiculopathy were evaluated independently by two neuroradiologists who were unaware of clinical findings. MRI analysis was repeated after disclosure of clinical information. Interobserver agreement was calculated using kappa statistics. Results: The kappa score for evaluation of herniated discs and of spondylotic foramen stenosis was 0.59 and 0.63, respectively. A kappa score of 0.67 was found for the presence of root compression. After disclosure of clinical information kappa scores increased slightly: from 0.59 to 0.62 for the detection of herniated discs, from 0.63 to 0.66 for spondylotic foramen stenosis, and from 0.67 to 0.76 for root compression. Conclusion: Interobserver reliability of MRI evaluation in patients with cervical radiculopathy was substantial for root compression, with or without clinical information. Agreement on the cause of the compression, i.e., herniated disc or spondylotic foraminal stenosis, was lower.

  16. Interobserver agreement on MRI evaluation of patients with cervical radiculopathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuijper, B.; Beelen, A.; Kallen, B.F. van der; Nollet, F.; Lycklama a Nijeholt, G.J.; Visser, M. de; Tans, J. Th.J.

    2011-01-01

    Aim: To evaluate the interobserver agreement on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) evaluation of herniated discs, spondylotic neuroforaminal stenosis, and root compression in patients with recent onset cervical radiculopathy and in addition, to assess the added value of disclosure of clinical information to interobserver agreement. Materials and methods: The MRI images of 82 patients with less than 1 month of symptoms and signs of cervical radiculopathy were evaluated independently by two neuroradiologists who were unaware of clinical findings. MRI analysis was repeated after disclosure of clinical information. Interobserver agreement was calculated using kappa statistics. Results: The kappa score for evaluation of herniated discs and of spondylotic foramen stenosis was 0.59 and 0.63, respectively. A kappa score of 0.67 was found for the presence of root compression. After disclosure of clinical information kappa scores increased slightly: from 0.59 to 0.62 for the detection of herniated discs, from 0.63 to 0.66 for spondylotic foramen stenosis, and from 0.67 to 0.76 for root compression. Conclusion: Interobserver reliability of MRI evaluation in patients with cervical radiculopathy was substantial for root compression, with or without clinical information. Agreement on the cause of the compression, i.e., herniated disc or spondylotic foraminal stenosis, was lower.

  17. Lumbar multifidus muscle changes in unilateral lumbar disc herniation using magnetic resonance imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Altinkaya, Naime [Baskent University Medical School, Department of Radiology, Adana (Turkey); Cekinmez, Melih [Baskent University Medical School Adana, Department of Neurosurgery, Adana (Turkey)

    2016-01-15

    To assess multifidus muscle asymmetry using the cross-sectional area (CSA) and perpendicular distance of the multifidus muscle to the lamina (MLD) measurements in patients with nerve compression due to lumbosacral disc hernia. In total, 122 patients who underwent microdiscectomy for unilateral radiculopathy caused by disc herniation, diagnosed by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), were evaluated retrospectively. Posterolateral or foraminal disc herniation at only one disc level, the L3-4, L4-L5, or L5-S1 region, was confirmed using MRI. Subjects were divided by symptom duration: 1-30 days, (group A), 31-90 days (group B), and > 90 days (group C). There were 48 cases in group A, 26 in group B, and 48 in group C. In groups A, B, and C, the median MLD differed significantly between the diseased and normal sides (P < 0.05). The MLD increased on the diseased side with symptom duration by lumbar disc herniation. The diseased side MLD was 5.1, 6.7, and 7.6 mm in groups A, B, and C, respectively (P < 0.05). The cut-off values for the MLD measurements were 5.3 mm (sensitivity = 62.3 %, specificity = 55.5 %; P < 0.05). In groups A, B, and C, the median CSA of the multifidus muscle was not significantly different between the diseased and the normal side (P > 0.05). The MLD measurement correlated significantly with multifidus asymmetry in patients with lumbar disc herniation. (orig.)

  18. Lumbar multifidus muscle changes in unilateral lumbar disc herniation using magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Altinkaya, Naime; Cekinmez, Melih

    2016-01-01

    To assess multifidus muscle asymmetry using the cross-sectional area (CSA) and perpendicular distance of the multifidus muscle to the lamina (MLD) measurements in patients with nerve compression due to lumbosacral disc hernia. In total, 122 patients who underwent microdiscectomy for unilateral radiculopathy caused by disc herniation, diagnosed by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), were evaluated retrospectively. Posterolateral or foraminal disc herniation at only one disc level, the L3-4, L4-L5, or L5-S1 region, was confirmed using MRI. Subjects were divided by symptom duration: 1-30 days, (group A), 31-90 days (group B), and > 90 days (group C). There were 48 cases in group A, 26 in group B, and 48 in group C. In groups A, B, and C, the median MLD differed significantly between the diseased and normal sides (P < 0.05). The MLD increased on the diseased side with symptom duration by lumbar disc herniation. The diseased side MLD was 5.1, 6.7, and 7.6 mm in groups A, B, and C, respectively (P < 0.05). The cut-off values for the MLD measurements were 5.3 mm (sensitivity = 62.3 %, specificity = 55.5 %; P < 0.05). In groups A, B, and C, the median CSA of the multifidus muscle was not significantly different between the diseased and the normal side (P > 0.05). The MLD measurement correlated significantly with multifidus asymmetry in patients with lumbar disc herniation. (orig.)

  19. Lumbar multifidus muscle changes in unilateral lumbar disc herniation using magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altinkaya, Naime; Cekinmez, Melih

    2016-01-01

    To assess multifidus muscle asymmetry using the cross-sectional area (CSA) and perpendicular distance of the multifidus muscle to the lamina (MLD) measurements in patients with nerve compression due to lumbosacral disc hernia. In total, 122 patients who underwent microdiscectomy for unilateral radiculopathy caused by disc herniation, diagnosed by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), were evaluated retrospectively. Posterolateral or foraminal disc herniation at only one disc level, the L3-4, L4-L5, or L5-S1 region, was confirmed using MRI. Subjects were divided by symptom duration: 1-30 days, (group A), 31-90 days (group B), and > 90 days (group C). There were 48 cases in group A, 26 in group B, and 48 in group C. In groups A, B, and C, the median MLD differed significantly between the diseased and normal sides (P lumbar disc herniation. The diseased side MLD was 5.1, 6.7, and 7.6 mm in groups A, B, and C, respectively (P  0.05). The MLD measurement correlated significantly with multifidus asymmetry in patients with lumbar disc herniation.

  20. A Diagnostic Algorithm for Eosinophilic Granulomatosis with Polyangiitis Initially Diagnosed as Lumbar Disc Hernia or Lumbar Spinal Stenosis: Personal Experience and Review of the Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagata, Kosei; Yamamoto, Shinichi; Miyoshi, Kota; Sato, Masaki; Arino, Yusuke; Mikami, Yoji

    2016-08-01

    Eosinophilic granulomatosis with polyangiitis (EGPA, Churg-Strauss syndrome) is a rare systemic vasculitis and is difficult to diagnose. EGPA has a number of symptoms including peripheral dysesthesia caused by mononeuropathy multiplex, which is similar to radiculopathy due to lumbar disc hernia or lumbar spinal stenosis. Therefore, EGPA patients with mononeuropathy multiplex often visit orthopedic clinics, but orthopedic doctors and spine neurosurgeons have limited experience in diagnosing EGPA because of its rarity. We report a consecutive series of patients who were initially diagnosed as having lumbar disc hernia or lumbar spinal stenosis by at least 2 medical institutions from March 2006 to April 2013 but whose final diagnosis was EGPA. All patients had past histories of asthma or eosinophilic pneumonia, and four out of five had peripheral edema. Laboratory data showed abnormally increased eosinophil counts, and nerve conduction studies of all patients revealed axonal damage patterns. All patients recovered from paralysis to a functional level after high-dose steroid treatment. We shortened the duration of diagnosis from 49 days to one day by adopting a diagnostic algorithm after experiencing the first case.

  1. Frequencies of different peripheral nervous system pathologies among Cases of Lumbar Radicular Pain using Electrodiagnostic Studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ayaz, S.; Waheed, A.; Ali, L.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: to discover the spectrum of diagnoses on nerve conduction studies/ Electromyography in patients with lumbar radicular pain, test preponderance of the commonest pathology and correlate commonest pathology with age > 50 years, gender and unilateral involvement. Study design: A descriptive cross-sectional study of 539 patients. Place and Duration of the study: the department of Electrodiagnostic studies, Armed Forces Institute of Rehabilitation Medicine, Rawalpindi from January 2012 to December 2012. Material and methods: using non-probability consecutive sampling 539 patients referred with complaints of lumbar radicular pain were subjected to electrodiagnostic evaluation for presence of lumbosacral radiculopathy, polyneuropathy, sciatic nerve injury or a combination of these. The preponderance of commonest pathology was tested statistically. The frequencies were then related statistically to age > 50 years, gender and unilateral or bilateral involvement. Result: A total of 539 patients (age:18-85 years) were registered. 355 (66% ) were males and 261 (48.4%) patients were > 50 years. Nerve conduction studies/Electromyography findings were abnormal in 386 (77.6%) patients. The commonest diagnosis was lumbosacral radiculopathy in 65% followed by polyneuropathy with superimposed lumbosacral radiculopathy in 7%. The preponderance of lumbosacral radiculopathy was statistically found significant (p 50 years. Conclusion: Lumbosacral radiculopathy is highly expected to be found on nerve conduction studies /electromyography in patients who present with lumbar radicular pain. The lumbosacral radiculopathy is more common in individuals of age 50 years and above. (author)

  2. Transforaminal Endoscopic Surgery for Adjacent Segment Disease After Lumbar Fusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Telfeian, Albert Edward

    2017-01-01

    The natural history of degenerative disease after instrumented lumbar fusion can result in symptomatic radiculopathy at the adjacent segment. Here we describe our experience with transforaminal endoscopic decompression for the treatment of adjacent segment radiculopathy. A technique for the transforaminal endoscopic treatment of lumbar radiculopathy adjacent to instrumented lumbar fusions is presented. Prospectively, we followed a series of 9 consecutive patients operated on with lumbar radiculopathy above (5) or below (4) their instrumented fusion. Preoperative and postoperative clinical data with 2-year follow-up are presented. A consecutive series of 9 patients who underwent transforaminal endoscopic treatment for lumbar radiculopathy adjacent to an instrumented spinal fusion between 2012 and 2014 is presented. Three patients required revision to fusion at 2, 13, and 19 months postoperatively. The mean visual analogue scale score for radicular pain improved from an average pain score before surgery of 8.4 to 1.3 1 year after surgery and the mean visual analogue scale for back pain improved from an average pain score before surgery of 8.0 to 4.7 1 year after surgery (excluding the 1 patient with 2month postoperative failure). Transforaminal endoscopic surgical access to adjacent level disease pathology may be a unique approach to the treatment of adjacent segment disease because it allows for neural decompression of disc and foraminal pathology without requiring significant destabilizing bone removal. However, the 2-year failure rate presented here is 33%, which indicates that the benefit of this technique may ultimately be temporary. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Degenerative cervical radiculopathy: diagnosis and conservative treatment. A review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuijper, B.; Tans, J. Th J.; Schimsheimer, R. J.; van der Kallen, B. F. W.; Beelen, A.; Nollet, F.; de Visser, M.

    2009-01-01

    Degenerative cervical radiculopathy: clinical diagnosis and conservative treatment. A review. To provide a state-of-the-art assessment of diagnosis and non-surgical treatment of degenerative cervical radiculopathy a literature search for studies on epidemiology, diagnosis including

  4. Extension traction treatment for patients with discogenic lumbosacral radiculopathy: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moustafa, Ibrahim M; Diab, Aliaa A

    2013-01-01

    To investigate the effects of lumbar extension traction in patients with unilateral lumbosacral radiculopathy due to L5-S1 disc herniation. A randomized controlled study with six-month follow-up. University research laboratory. Sixty-four patients with confirmed unilateral lumbosacral radiculopathy due to L5-S1 disc herniation and a lumbar lordotic angle less than 39°, randomly assigned to traction or control group. The control group (n = 32) received hot packs and interferential therapy, whereas the traction group (n = 32) received lumbar extension traction in addition to hot packs and interferential therapy. Absolute rotatory angle, back and leg pain rating scale, Oswestry Disability Index, Modified Schober test, H-reflex (latency and amplitude) and intervertebral movements were measured for all patients three times (before treatment, after 10 weeks of treatment and at six-month follow-up). There was a significant difference between the traction group and the control group adjusted to baseline values at 10 weeks post treatment with respect to: absolute rotatory angle (P hot packs and interferential therapy had better effects than the control group with regard to pain, disability, H-reflex parameters and segmental intervertebral movements.

  5. Estudo clínico da eficácia do bloqueio anestésico radicular transforaminal no tratamento da radiculopatia lombar Estudio clínico de la eficacia del bloqueo anestésico radicular transforaminal en el tratamiento de la radiculopatía lumbar Clinical study on the efficacy of transforaminal radicular block in lumbar radiculopathy treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabiano Fonseca Rodrigues de Souza

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: O objetivo deste estudo é avaliar a eficácia da injeção transforaminal nos pacientes com dor radicular devido à hérnia de disco ou estenose foraminal lombar por meio de estudo prospectivo randomizado. MÉTODOS: Foram avaliados 61 pacientes com quadro de radiculopatia nos membros inferiores. Esses pacientes foram divididos em dois grupos escolhidos aleatoriamente. Desses, 32 foram submetidos à injeção de corticosteroides e 29 foram submetidos à injeção salina. O período de acompanhamento foi de 12 meses. Para avaliar os resultados aplicamos a Escala Analógica Visual de Dor (EAV e o Índice Oswestry (ODI. RESULTADOS: Houve melhora significativa da intensidade de dor (p OBJETIVO: El presente estudio tuvo como objetivo evaluar la eficacia de la inyección transforaminal en pacientes con dolor radicular, debido a la hernia discal lumbar o estenosis foraminal, mediante un estudio prospectivo y aleatorizado. MÉTODOS: Se analizó un total de 61 pacientes con cuadro de radiculopatía en miembros inferiores. Estos pacientes fueron divididos en dos grupos seleccionados al azar. De ellos, 31 fueron sometidos a inyecciones de corticoides y a 29 se les aplicaron inyecciones de suero fisiológico. El período de seguimiento fue de 12 meses. Para evaluar los resultados se les aplicó la Escala Visual Analógica del dolor (EAV y el Índice de Oswestry (ODI, sigla en inglés. RESULTADOS: Hubo una mejora significativa en la intensidad del dolor (p OBJECTIVE: To assess the efficacy of corticosteroid injections in patients with sciatica due to lumbar disc herniation or lumbar foraminal stenosis by a prospective randomized study. METHODS: There were analyzed 61 patients with sciatica due to lumbar disc degeneration. These patients were divided into two groups randomly chosen to radicular blocks with saline solution or corticosteroids. Thirty-one of these patients were submitted to corticosteroids radicular block and 29 patients were submitted

  6. Epidural steroid injection for lumbosacral radiculopathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sung, Mi Sook

    2006-01-01

    Low back pain combined with radicular pain remains as one of the most challenging musculoskeletal problems for its therapeutic management. This malady results from nerve root impingement and/or inflammation that causes neurologic symptoms in the distribution of the affected nerve root(s) Conservative treatment, percutaneous spine interventions and surgery have all been used as treatment; and the particular treatment that's chosen depends on the severity of the clinical and neurologic presentation. In 1930, Evans reported that sciatica could treated by epidural injection. The use of epidural corticosteroid injections for the treatment of axial and radicular back pain was first reported in 1953. Epidural steroid injections are currently used by many medical professionals for the treatment of lumbosacral radiculopathy. Performing 'blind' epidural steroid injection lacks target specificity that often results in incorrect delivery of medication to the lesion. Imaging-guided steroid injections are now becoming more popular despite the controversy regarding their efficacy. Many reports, including a few randomized controlled trials, have documented the clinical utility of epidural steroid injections

  7. Epidural steroid injection for lumbosacral radiculopathy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sung, Mi Sook [The Catholic University of Korea, Pucheon (Korea, Republic of)

    2006-06-15

    Low back pain combined with radicular pain remains as one of the most challenging musculoskeletal problems for its therapeutic management. This malady results from nerve root impingement and/or inflammation that causes neurologic symptoms in the distribution of the affected nerve root(s) Conservative treatment, percutaneous spine interventions and surgery have all been used as treatment; and the particular treatment that's chosen depends on the severity of the clinical and neurologic presentation. In 1930, Evans reported that sciatica could treated by epidural injection. The use of epidural corticosteroid injections for the treatment of axial and radicular back pain was first reported in 1953. Epidural steroid injections are currently used by many medical professionals for the treatment of lumbosacral radiculopathy. Performing 'blind' epidural steroid injection lacks target specificity that often results in incorrect delivery of medication to the lesion. Imaging-guided steroid injections are now becoming more popular despite the controversy regarding their efficacy. Many reports, including a few randomized controlled trials, have documented the clinical utility of epidural steroid injections.

  8. GUIDELINES FOR TREATMENT OF DEGENERATIVE LUMBAR SPONDYLOLISTHESIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    CARMEN YOSSALETH BRICEÑO-GONZÁLEZ

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Objectives: To determine the standard of treatment of degenerative lumbar spondylolisthesis in its different clinical presentations in UMAE Dr. Victorio de la Fuente Narváez. Methods: Six cases found in the literature were presented to 36 experts in spine surgery, along with treatment options, to thereby obtain a standard prescription for the treatment of degenerative lumbar spondylolisthesis. Analytical observational cross-sectional descriptive study. Results: It was found that the treatment of choice in cases of degenerative lumbar spondylolisthesis with axial symptoms is conservative. The surgical treatment of choice for both stable and unstable patients with radiculopathy and/or claudication is decompression + posterolateral graft + transpedicular instrumentation + discectomy (graft. Conclusions: We managed to define the degenerative lumbar spondylolisthesis treatment guidelines in our unit, which can serve as a basis for the development of a clinical practice guide.

  9. SACRALISATION OF LUMBAR VERTEBRAE

    OpenAIRE

    Sangeeta Wazir

    2014-01-01

    Background: Lumbar backache is a very common problem nowadays. Sacralisation of lumbar vertebrae is one of the cause for that. During routine osteology teaching a sacrum with incomplete attached lumbar 5 vertebrae is seen. Observation: Incompletely fused L 5 vertebrae with sacrum is seen. The bodies of the vertebrae are fused but the transverse process of left side is completely fused with the ala of sacrum.But on the right side is incompletely fused. Conclusion: The person ...

  10. EFFECTIVENESS OF MANUAL TRACTION AND OTHER PHYSIOTHERAPY TREATMENT IN THE MANAGEMENT OF PAINFUL CERVICAL RADICULOPATHY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kanwal Khan

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Cervical radiculopathy, generally entitle as pinching of the nerves which causes severe shooting pain which mostly pass through the shoulder. Along with it causes muscle weakness and numbness into the arm and hand. In majority of the cases, cervical radiculopathy responds well to conservative mode of treatments which incorporate physical therapy with medical management. The aim of this study is to uncover the effective and evidence based conservative treatment of cervical radiculopathy. Method: Randomized controlled trial study conducted from January 2014 to December 2014. Participants were recruited from physiotherapy OPDs of tertiary care hospitals. A total number of, 100 subjects with a ratio of 50 men and 50 women were recruited between the ages of 25 and 55 years with unilateral cervical radiculopathy. Control group received combination of conventional AROM exercises and modalities including TENS and superficial thermotherapy as a treatment while experimental group received manual cervical traction and combination of conventional AROM exercises, modalities including TENS and superficial thermotherapy. For both groups, treatment was designed for two weeks (6 sessions/ week. Improvement in symptoms was assessed by evaluation of both groups on the basis of visual analogue scale (VAS. Results: After 2 weeks of treatment, patients with neck pain showed marked decreased in pain as compared with the control group (P<.001.For pre and post level a paired sample t-test was used and the results with p-value less than 0.05 were considered as significant. Mean difference of 0.94 (VAS with a significant p-value (P<0.01 was obtained shows the respective improvements in the numeric pain scale scores. Conclusion: Manual cervical traction when used with conventional AROM exercises and modalities were effective methods for decreasing pain in cervical radiculopathy. Recent literature supports such protocols involving multiple interventions. Results

  11. Dolor lumbar por estreptoquinasa recombinante: Presentación de un caso Lumbar pain caused by recombinant streptokinase: A case presentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Julia Cigales Reyes

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available La Heberkinasa® (estreptoquinasa recombinante, es un trombolítico utilizado en el tratamiento del infarto agudo del miocardio, presentada en forma de liofilizado en bulbos estériles, de conocidos y probados efectos de reperfusión coronaria y reducción del tamaño del infarto, además de otras aplicaciones como en la trombosis venosa profunda, trombosis de acceso vascular permanente de pacientes con insuficiencia renal crónica terminal tratados por hemodiálisis periódicas, disfunción de prótesis valvulares cardíacas por trombos y en el tromboembolismo pulmonar; se asocian reacciones adversas durante el tratamiento, frecuentes y menos frecuentes, dentro de las que se encuentra el dolor lumbar. Se presenta a una paciente con el diagnóstico de un infarto agudo del miocardio, de cara diafragmática, a quien se le aplicó la trombolisis con Heberkinasa y durante esta presentó dolor lumbar agudo, intenso, que cedió con la reducción de goteo de la infusión y esta se pudo continuar sin más problemas.The Heberkinase® (recombinant streptokinase is a thrombolytic agent used in treatment of acute myocardial infarction, presented as sterile bulbs, of known and proved effects of coronary reperfusion and reduction of infarction dimension, besides of other applications e.g. the deep venous thrombosis, permanent vascular access thrombosis in patients presenting with terminal chronic renal insufficiency treated by periodical hemodialysis, dysfunction of cardiac vascular prostheses by thrombi, and in case of pulmonary thromboembolism; there are adverse reactions associated during treatment, frequent and less frequent including those of lumbar pain. Authors present a case of a woman diagnosed with acute myocardial infarction of diaphragmatic side undergoing thrombolysis with Heberkinase, and during it she had intense and acute lumbar pain improving with reduction of dripping infusion without subsequent problems.

  12. Cervical Radiculopathy: Incidence and Treatment of 1,420 Consecutive Cases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nemani, Venu M.; Piyaskulkaew, Chaiwat; Vargas, Samuel Romero; Riew, K. Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Study Design Retrospective case series. Purpose To determine the incidence of cervical radiculopathy requiring operative intervention by level and to report on the methods of treatment. Overview of Literature Cervical radiculopathy is a common cause of pain and can result in progressive neurological deficits. Although the pathology is well understood, the actual incidence of cervical radiculopathy at particular spinal levels ultimately requiring operative intervention is unknown. Methods A large consecutive series of patients operated on by a single surgeon were retrospectively analyzed. The incidence of cervical radiculopathy at each level was defined for every patient. Procedures used for operative treatment were noted. Health related quality of life (HRQL) scores were collected both pre-operatively and postoperatively. Results There were 1305 primary and 115 revision operations performed. The most common primary procedures performed were anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF, 50%) and anterior cervical corpectomy and fusion (ACCF, 28%). The most commonly affected levels were C6 (66%) and C7 (62%). Reasons for revision were pseudarthrosis (27%), clinical adjacent segment pathology (CASP, 63%), persistent radiculopathy (11%), and hardware-related (2.6%). The most common procedures performed in the revision group were posterior cervical decompression and fusion (PCDF, 42%) and ACDF (40%). The most commonly affected levels were C7 (43%) and C5 (30%). Among patients that had their index surgery at our institution, the revision rate was 6.4%. In both primary and revision cases there was a significant improvement in Neck Disability Index and visual analogue scale scores postoperatively. Postoperative HRQL scores in the revision cases were significantly worse than those in the primary cases (p cervical radiculopathy by level and operative outcomes in patients undergoing cervical decompression. The incidence of CASP was 4.2% in 3.3 years in this single

  13. Manual physical therapy, cervical traction, and strengthening exercises in patients with cervical radiculopathy: a case series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cleland, Joshua A; Whitman, Julie M; Fritz, Julie M; Palmer, Jessica A

    2005-12-01

    A case series of consecutive patients with cervical radiculopathy. A multitude of physical therapy interventions have been proposed to be effective in the management of cervical radiculopathy. However, outcome studies using consistent treatment approaches on a well-defined sample of patients are lacking. The purpose of this case series is to describe the outcomes of a consecutive series of patients presenting to physical therapy with cervical radiculopathy and managed with the use of manual physical therapy, cervical traction, and strengthening exercises. Eleven consecutive patients (mean age, 51.7 years; SD, 8.2) who presented with cervical radiculopathy on the initial examination were treated with a standardized approach, including manual physical therapy, cervical traction, and strengthening exercises of the deep neck flexors and scapulothoracic muscles. At the initial evaluation all patients completed self-report measures of pain and function, including a numeric pain rating scale (NPRS), the Neck Disability Index (NDI), and the Patient-Specific Functional Scale (PSFS). All patients again completed the outcome measures, in addition to the global rating of change (GROC), at the time of discharge from therapy and at a 6-month follow-up session Ten of the 11 patients (91%) demonstrated a clinically meaningful improvement in pain and function following a mean of 7.1 (SD, 1.5) physical therapy visits and at the 6-month follow-up. Ninety-one percent (10 of 11) of patients with cervical radiculopathy in this case series improved, as defined by the patients classifying their level of improvement as at least "quite a bit better" on the GROC. However, because a cause-and-effect relationship cannot be inferred from a case series, follow-up randomized clinical trials should be performed to further investigate the effectiveness of manual physical therapy, cervical traction, and strengthening exercises in a homogeneous group of patients with cervical radiculopathy.

  14. Combination of lumbar kyphosis, epidural lipomatosis, and perineural cyst as a cause of neurological deficit: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyakoshi, Naohisa; Shimada, Yoichi; Murai, Hajime; Suzuki, Tetsuya; Hongo, Michio; Itoi, Eiji

    2002-01-01

    We describe the rare simultaneous occurrence of epidural lipomatosis and a perineural cyst at the same level, lumbar kyphosis, osteoporotic vertebral fractures, and neurological deficits. A 75-year-old corticosteroid-dependent female farmer presented with severe low back pain, progressive lumbar kyphosis, and inability to stand because of numbness and muscle weakness of both legs. Plain radiographs displayed markedly decreased bone density, significant lumbar kyphosis, and vertebral compression fractures of L2, L3, and L4. Magnetic resonance imaging of the lumbar spine revealed a perineural cyst at the L2-3 level, extensive epidural lipomatosis, and spinal canal stenosis. Laminectomy from L3 to L5 with resection of epidural fatty tissue restored her walking ability. We postulate that the osteoporotic fractures and epidural lipomatosis were induced by corticosteroid therapy. Preexisting degenerative lumbar kyphosis of the type commonly seen in elderly farmers could have promoted osteoporotic lumbar vertebral fractures at points where bending stress had been strongly exerted. The combination of a perineural cyst and epidural lipomatosis at the same level has not been reported previously.

  15. Cervical interlaminar epidural steroid injection for unilateral cervical radiculopathy: Comparison of midline and paramedian approaches for efficacy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoon, Ji Young; Kwon, Jong Won; Yoon, Young Cheol; Lee, Jong Seok

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to compare the clinical outcomes of the cervical interlaminar epidural steroid injection (CIESI) for unilateral radiculopathy by the midline or paramedian approaches and to determine the prognostic factors of CIESI. We retrospectively analyzed 182 patients who underwent CIESI from January 2009 to December 2012. Inclusion criteria were no previous spinal steroid injection, presence of a cross-sectional image, and presence of follow-up records. Exclusion criteria were patients with bilateral cervical radiculopathy and/or dominant cervical axial pain, combined peripheral neuropathy, and previous cervical spine surgery. Short-term clinical outcomes were evaluated at the first follow-up after CIESI. We compared the clinical outcomes between the midline and paramedian approaches. Possible prognostic factors for the outcome, such as age, gender, duration of radiculopathy, and cause of radiculopathy were also analyzed. Cervical interlaminar epidural steroid injections were effective in 124 of 182 patients (68.1%) at the first follow-up. There was no significant difference in the clinical outcomes of CIESI, between midline (69.6%) and paramedian (63.7%) approaches (p = 0.723). Cause of radiculopathy was the only significant factor affecting the efficacy of CIESI. Patients with disc herniation had significantly better results than patients with neural foraminal stenosis (82.9% vs. 56.0%) (p < 0.001). There is no significant difference in treatment efficacy between the midline and paramedian approaches in CIESI, for unilateral radiculopathy. The cause of the radiculopathy is significantly associated with the treatment efficacy; patients with disc herniation experience better pain relief than those with neural foraminal stenosis.

  16. Cervical interlaminar epidural steroid injection for unilateral cervical radiculopathy: Comparison of midline and paramedian approaches for efficacy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoon, Ji Young; Kwon, Jong Won; Yoon, Young Cheol [Dept. of Radiology and Center for Imaging Science, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Jong Seok [School of Business Administration, Hallym University, Chuncheon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-06-15

    The objective of this study was to compare the clinical outcomes of the cervical interlaminar epidural steroid injection (CIESI) for unilateral radiculopathy by the midline or paramedian approaches and to determine the prognostic factors of CIESI. We retrospectively analyzed 182 patients who underwent CIESI from January 2009 to December 2012. Inclusion criteria were no previous spinal steroid injection, presence of a cross-sectional image, and presence of follow-up records. Exclusion criteria were patients with bilateral cervical radiculopathy and/or dominant cervical axial pain, combined peripheral neuropathy, and previous cervical spine surgery. Short-term clinical outcomes were evaluated at the first follow-up after CIESI. We compared the clinical outcomes between the midline and paramedian approaches. Possible prognostic factors for the outcome, such as age, gender, duration of radiculopathy, and cause of radiculopathy were also analyzed. Cervical interlaminar epidural steroid injections were effective in 124 of 182 patients (68.1%) at the first follow-up. There was no significant difference in the clinical outcomes of CIESI, between midline (69.6%) and paramedian (63.7%) approaches (p = 0.723). Cause of radiculopathy was the only significant factor affecting the efficacy of CIESI. Patients with disc herniation had significantly better results than patients with neural foraminal stenosis (82.9% vs. 56.0%) (p < 0.001). There is no significant difference in treatment efficacy between the midline and paramedian approaches in CIESI, for unilateral radiculopathy. The cause of the radiculopathy is significantly associated with the treatment efficacy; patients with disc herniation experience better pain relief than those with neural foraminal stenosis.

  17. Iliacus Abscess with Radiculopathy Mimicking Herniated Nucleus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2016-05-02

    May 2, 2016 ... radiculopathy mimicking herniated nucleus pulposus: Aadditional diagnostic value of magnetic resonance imaging. Niger J Clin Pract. 2017;20:392-3. This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons. Attribution-Non Commercial-Share Alike 3.0 License, which allows ...

  18. Arthroplasty for cervical spondylotic myelopathy: similar results to patients with only radiculopathy at 3 years' follow-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fay, Li-Yu; Huang, Wen-Cheng; Wu, Jau-Ching; Chang, Hsuan-Kan; Tsai, Tzu-Yun; Ko, Chin-Chu; Tu, Tsung-Hsi; Wu, Ching-Lan; Cheng, Henrich

    2014-09-01

    Cervical arthroplasty has been accepted as a viable option for surgical management of cervical spondylosis or degenerative disc disease (DDD). The best candidates for cervical arthroplasty are young patients who have radiculopathy caused by herniated disc with competent facet joints. However, it remains uncertain whether arthroplasty is equally effective for patients who have cervical myelopathy caused by DDD. The aim of this study was to compare the outcomes of arthroplasty for patients with cervical spondylotic myelopathy (CSM) and patients with radiculopathy without CSM. A total of 151 consecutive cases involving patients with CSM or radiculopathy caused by DDD and who underwent one- or two-level cervical arthroplasty were included in this study. Clinical outcome evaluations and radiographic studies were reviewed. Clinical outcome measurements included the Visual Analog Scale (VAS) of neck and arm pain, Japanese Orthopaedic Association (JOA) scores, and the Neck Disability Index (NDI) in every patient. For patients with CSM, Nurick scores were recorded for evaluation of cervical myelopathy. Radiographic studies included lateral dynamic radiographs and CT for detection of the formation of heterotopic ossification . Of the 151 consecutive patients with cervical DDD, 125 (82.8%; 72 patients in the myelopathy group and 53 in the radiculopathy group) had at least 24 months of clinical and radiographic follow-up. The mean duration of follow-up in these patients was 36.4 months (range 24-56 months). There was no difference in sex distribution between the 2 groups. However, the mean age of the patients in the myelopathy group was approximately 6 years greater than that of the radiculopathy group (53.1 vs 47.2 years, p radiculopathy group and 95.8% of those in the radiculopathy group retained spinal motion (no significant difference). Evaluation of CT scans showed heterotopic ossification in 34 patients (47.2%) in the myelopathy group and 25 patients (47.1%) in the

  19. Lumbar stenosis: clinical case

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro Sá

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Lumbar stenosis is an increasingly common pathological condition that is becoming more frequent with increasing mean life expectancy, with high costs for society. It has many causes, among which degenerative, neoplastic and traumatic causes stand out. Most of the patients respond well to conservative therapy. Surgical treatment is reserved for patients who present symptoms after implementation of conservative measures. Here, a case of severe stenosis of the lumbar spine at several levels, in a female patient with pathological and surgical antecedents in the lumbar spine, is presented. The patient underwent two different decompression techniques within the same operation.

  20. Long-term quality of life after posterior cervical foraminotomy for radiculopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faught, Ryan W; Church, Ephraim W; Halpern, Casey H; Balmuri, Usha; Attiah, Mark A; Stein, Sherman C; Dante, Stephen J; Welch, William C; Simeone, Frederick A

    2016-03-01

    Cervical radiculopathy may cause symptoms and loss of function that can lead to a significant reduction in health related quality of life (HRQOL). As part of a comprehensive review of long-term outcomes, we examined HRQOL in a large cohort of patients undergoing posterior cervical foraminotomy (FOR) for radiculopathy. 338 patients who underwent FOR between 1990 and 2009 participated in a telephone interview designed to measure symptomatic and functional improvements following surgery. We also administered the EQ-5D, a standardized tool for assessing HRQOL. We analyzed this data for associations between patient and treatment characteristics, improvements in symptoms and function, and HRQOL as measured by the EQ-5D. Mean follow-up was 10.0 years. The average EQ-5D at follow-up was 0.81±0.18, and improvements in pain, weakness and function as well as ability to return to work correlated with improved EQ-5D score (pcervical radiculopathy is associated with improved HRQOL at long-term follow-up. The lack of correlation between length of follow-up and HRQOL suggests that FOR is a durable treatment option. Moreover, FOR is associated with improved HRQOL whether radiculopathy is due to soft disc or osteophyte pathology. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Intradiscal corticosteroid injections in spondylotic cervical radiculopathy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fayad, Fouad; Rannou, Francois; Rahmani, Lamia; Lefevre-Colau, Marie-Martine; Nys, Alain; Poiraudeau, Serge; Ledoux, Michel; Revel, Michel [Hopital Cochin (AP-HP) Universite Paris 5, Service de Reeducation et de Readaptation de l' Appareil Locomoteur et des Pathologies du Rachis, Paris (France); Drape, Jean L.; Chevrot, Alain [Hopital Cochin (AP-HP), Department of Radiology B, Paris (France)

    2007-05-15

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate treatment outcomes with intradiscal injection of corticosteroids (IDIC) in cervical spondylotic radiculopathy. Twenty consecutive patients were treated with intradiscal injection of 25 mg of acetate of prednisolone under fluoroscopic control. All patients had previously received a nonsurgical treatment for at least 3 months without success. Outcomes were assessed 1, 3 and 6 months after IDIC. Radicular pain reduction as scored on a visual analogue scale (VAS 100-mm length) was statistically significant at 1 month (19.0{+-}28.0 mm; p=0.008), 3 months (25.2{+-}27.5 mm; p=0.002), and 6 months (24.6{+-}28.4 mm; p=0.001). In all, 40% of treated patients described at least 50% pain improvement 6 months after treatment. Four patients had complete relief of radicular pain. In conclusion, IDIC should be an alternative in the nonsurgical management of cervical spondylotic radiculopathy. (orig.)

  2. Operative Outcomes for Cervical Myelopathy and Radiculopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. G. Galbraith

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Cervical spondylotic myelopathy and radiculopathy are common disorders which can lead to significant clinical morbidity. Conservative management, such as physical therapy, cervical immobilisation, or anti-inflammatory medications, is the preferred and often only required intervention. Surgical intervention is reserved for those patients who have intractable pain or progressive neurological symptoms. The goals of surgical treatment are decompression of the spinal cord and nerve roots and deformity prevention by maintaining or supplementing spinal stability and alleviating pain. Numerous surgical techniques exist to alleviate symptoms, which are achieved through anterior, posterior, or circumferential approaches. Under most circumstances, one approach will produce optimal results. It is important that the surgical plan is tailored to address each individual's unique clinical circumstance. The objective of this paper is to analyse the major surgical treatment options for cervical myelopathy and radiculopathy focusing on outcomes and complications.

  3. The effect of cervical traction combined with neural mobilization on pain and disability in cervical radiculopathy. A case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savva, Christos; Giakas, Giannis

    2013-10-01

    Cervical radiculopathy is the result of cervical nerve root pathology that may lead to chronic pain and disability. Although manual therapy interventions including cervical traction and neural mobilization have been advocated to decrease pain and disability caused by cervical radiculopathy, their analgesic effect has been questioned due to the low quality of research evidence. The purpose of this paper is to present the effect of cervical traction combined with neural mobilization on pain and disability in a patient experiencing cervical radiculopathy. A 52-year-old woman presented with a 2 month history of neurological cervico-brachial pain and whose presentation was consistent with cervical radiculopathy. Cervical traction and a slider neural mobilization of the medial nerve were applied simultaneously to reduce the patient's pain and disability measured at baseline and at 2 and 4 weeks using the Numeric Pain Rating Scale, the Neck Disability Index and the Patient-Specific Functional Scale. Improvements in all outcome measures were noted over a period of four weeks. Scores in all outcome measures revealed that the patient's pain had almost disappeared and that she was able to perform her household chores and job tasks without difficulties and limitations. In conclusion, the findings of this study support that the application of cervical traction combined with neural mobilization can produce significant improvements in terms of pain and disability in cervical radiculopathy. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Cervical radiculopathy: epidemiology, etiology, diagnosis, and treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woods, Barrett I; Hilibrand, Alan S

    2015-06-01

    Cervical radiculopathy is a relatively common neurological disorder resulting from nerve root dysfunction, which is often due to mechanical compression; however, inflammatory cytokines released from damaged intervertebral disks can also result in symptoms. Cervical radiculopathy can often be diagnosed with a thorough history and physical examination, but an magnetic resonance imaging or computed tomographic myelogram should be used to confirm the diagnosis. Because of the ubiquity of degenerative changes found on these imaging modalities, the patient's symptoms must correlate with pathology for a successful diagnosis. In the absence of myelopathy or significant muscle weakness all patients should be treated conservatively for at least 6 weeks. Conservative treatments consist of immobilization, anti-inflammatory medications, physical therapy, cervical traction, and epidural steroid injections. Cervical radiculopathy typically is self-limiting with 75%-90% of patients achieving symptomatic improvement with nonoperative care. For patients who are persistently symptomatic despite conservative treatment, or those who have a significant functional deficit surgical treatment is appropriate. Surgical options include anterior cervical decompression and fusion, cervical disk arthroplasty, and posterior foraminotomy. Patient selection is critical to optimize outcome.

  5. Sensory axonal dysfunction in cervical radiculopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sung, Jia-Ying; Tani, Jowy; Hung, Kuo-Sheng; Lui, Tai-Ngar; Lin, Cindy Shin-Yi

    2015-06-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate changes in sensory axonal excitability in the distal nerve in patients with cervical radiculopathy. The patients were classified by the findings of cervical MRI into two subgroups: 22 patients with C6/7 root compression and 25 patients with cervical cord and root compression above/at C6/7. Patients were investigated using conventional nerve conduction studies (NCS) and nerve excitability testing. Sensory nerve excitability testing was undertaken with stimulation at the wrist and recording from digit II (dermatome C6/7). The results were compared with healthy controls. Both preoperative and postoperative tests were performed if the patient underwent surgery. Sensory axonal excitability was significantly different in both cohorts compared with healthy controls, including prolonged strength-duration time constant, reduced S2 accommodation, increased threshold electrotonus hyperpolarisation (TEh (90-100 ms)), and increased superexcitability. The changes in these excitability indices are compatible with axonal membrane hyperpolarisation. In five patients who underwent surgery, the postoperative sensory excitability was tested after 1 week, and showed significant changes in TE (TEh (90-100 ms) and TEh slope, pcervical radiculopathy. These findings suggest that the hyperpolarised pattern might be due to Na(+)-K(+) ATPase overactivation induced by proximal ischaemia, or could reflect the remyelinating process. Distal sensory axons were hyperpolarised even though there were no changes in NCS, suggesting that nerve excitability testing may be more sensitive to clinical symptoms than NCS in patients with cervical radiculopathy. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  6. Biomechanical study of percutaneous lumbar diskectomy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Yuan; Huang Xianglong; Shen Tianzhen; Hu Zhou; Hong Shuizong; Mei Haiying

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the stiffness of lumbar spine after the injury caused by percutaneous diskectomy and evaluate the efficiency of percutaneous lumbar diskectomy by biomechanical study. Methods: Four fresh lumbar specimens were used to analyse load-displacement curves in the intact lumbar spine and vertical disc-injured lumbar spine. The concepts of average flexibility coefficient (f) and standardized average flexibility coefficient (fs) were also introduced. Results: The load-displacement curves showed a good stabilization effect of the intact lumbar spine and disc-injured lumbar spine in flexion, extension, right and left bending. The decrease of anti-rotation also can be detected (P<0.05). Conclusion: In biomechanical study, percutaneous lumbar diskectomy is one of the efficiency methods to treat lumbar diac hernia

  7. Clinical and neuroimaging features vertebral radiculopathy in the combination with vertebral hemangiomas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Che-honatskaya M.L.

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available

    Aim of the study: to study the clinical and neuroimaging features of radiculopathy vertebral hemangiomas in conjunction with the vertebrae. Materials and methods. A total of 56 patients with radiculopathy vertebral hemangiomas combined with the vertebrae. Results. The patients in addition to pain, and focal neurological symptoms were observed violation of urination, and chronic venous insuffciency of lower extremities. MRI identifed three types of vertebral hem-angiomas, depending on the structural characteristics. Conclusion. The aim of the study is realized.Most hemangiomas are asymptomatic yourself. Pain and neurological symptoms caused by musculo-tonic component, the presence of disc herniation, changes in the intervertebral joints, ligaments violation. Type III meets the criteria for hemangiomas and requires aggressive surgical treatment.

  8. Postirradiation lumbosacral radiculopathy following seminoma treatment presenting as flaccid neuropathic bladder: a case report

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Raheem, Omer A

    2011-04-14

    Abstract Introduction Postirradiation lumbosacral syndrome is a radiculopathy induced by radiation injury to the spinal cord. Its usual presentation is motor deficit and or sensory loss involving the lower limbs. Visceral involvement has not been reported previously. Case presentation We describe a case of severe hypotonic bladder caused by radiation-induced spinal cord injury following treatment of stage Ι testicular seminoma in a 38-year-old Caucasian man who had undergone radical orchidectomy and prophylactic paraaortic lymph node irradiation for stage Ι seminoma. Three years later he had clinical and urodynamic findings of hypotonic bladder. The magnetic resonance imaging results suggested a radiation-induced injury. Conclusion Such an unusual presentation of the syndrome of postirradiation lumbosacral radiculopathy can impose a clinical challenge to practicing clinicians. Future studies are required to further delineate the mechanism of injury and further management plans.

  9. Postirradiation lumbosacral radiculopathy following seminoma treatment presenting as flaccid neuropathic bladder: a case report.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Raheem, Omer A

    2012-02-01

    INTRODUCTION: Postirradiation lumbosacral syndrome is a radiculopathy induced by radiation injury to the spinal cord. Its usual presentation is motor deficit and or sensory loss involving the lower limbs. Visceral involvement has not been reported previously. CASE PRESENTATION: We describe a case of severe hypotonic bladder caused by radiation-induced spinal cord injury following treatment of stage Iota testicular seminoma in a 38-year-old Caucasian man who had undergone radical orchidectomy and prophylactic paraaortic lymph node irradiation for stage Iota seminoma. Three years later he had clinical and urodynamic findings of hypotonic bladder. The magnetic resonance imaging results suggested a radiation-induced injury. CONCLUSION: Such an unusual presentation of the syndrome of postirradiation lumbosacral radiculopathy can impose a clinical challenge to practicing clinicians. Future studies are required to further delineate the mechanism of injury and further management plans.

  10. Spontaneous Regression of Lumbar Herniated Disc

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chun-Wei Chang

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Intervertebral disc herniation of the lumbar spine is a common disease presenting with low back pain and involving nerve root radiculopathy. Some neurological symptoms in the majority of patients frequently improve after a period of conservative treatment. This has been regarded as the result of a decrease of pressure exerted from the herniated disc on neighboring neurostructures and a gradual regression of inflammation. Recently, with advances in magnetic resonance imaging, many reports have demonstrated that the herniated disc has the potential for spontaneous regression. Regression coincided with the improvement of associated symptoms. However, the exact regression mechanism remains unclear. Here, we present 2 cases of lumbar intervertebral disc herniation with spontaneous regression. We review the literature and discuss the possible mechanisms, the precipitating factors of spontaneous disc regression and the proper timing of surgical intervention.

  11. Accuracy of Clinical Tests in Detecting Disk Herniation and Nerve Root Compression in Subjects With Lumbar Radicular Symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekedahl, Harald; Jönsson, Bo; Annertz, Mårten; Frobell, Richard B

    2018-04-01

    To investigate the accuracy of 3 commonly used neurodynamic tests (slump test, straight-leg raise [SLR] test, femoral neurodynamic test) and 2 clinical assessments to determine radiculopathy (radiculopathy I, 1 neurologic sign; radiculopathy II, 2 neurologic signs corresponding to 1 specific nerve root) in detecting magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings (extrusion, subarticular nerve root compression, and foraminal nerve root compression). Validity study. Secondary care. We included subjects (N=99; mean age, 58y; 54% women) referred for epidural steroid injection because of lumbar radicular symptoms who had positive clinical and MRI findings. Positive clinical findings included the slump test (n=67), SLR test (n=50), femoral neurodynamic test (n=7), radiculopathy I (n=70), and radiculopathy II (n=33). Positive MRI findings included extrusion (n=27), subarticular nerve compression (n=14), and foraminal nerve compression (n=25). Not applicable. Accuracy of clinical tests in detecting MRI findings was evaluated using sensitivity, specificity, and receiver operating characteristics analysis with area under the curve (AUC). The slump test had the highest sensitivity in detecting extrusion (.78) and subarticular nerve compression (1.00), but the respective specificity was low (.36 and .38). Radiculopathy I was most sensitive in detecting foraminal nerve compression (.80) but with low specificity (.34). Only 1 assessment had a concurrent high sensitivity and specificity (ie, radiculopathy II) in detecting subarticular nerve compression (.71 and .73, respectively). The AUC for all tests in detecting extrusion, subarticular nerve compression, and foraminal nerve compression showed ranges of .48 to .60, .63 to .82, and .33 to .57, respectively. In general, the investigated neurodynamic tests or assessments for radiculopathy lacked diagnostic accuracy. The slump test was the most sensitive test, while radiculopathy II was the most specific test. Most interestingly, no

  12. Intradiscal corticosteroid injections in spondylotic cervical radiculopathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fayad, Fouad; Rannou, Francois; Rahmani, Lamia; Lefevre-Colau, Marie-Martine; Nys, Alain; Poiraudeau, Serge; Ledoux, Michel; Revel, Michel; Drape, Jean L.; Chevrot, Alain

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate treatment outcomes with intradiscal injection of corticosteroids (IDIC) in cervical spondylotic radiculopathy. Twenty consecutive patients were treated with intradiscal injection of 25 mg of acetate of prednisolone under fluoroscopic control. All patients had previously received a nonsurgical treatment for at least 3 months without success. Outcomes were assessed 1, 3 and 6 months after IDIC. Radicular pain reduction as scored on a visual analogue scale (VAS 100-mm length) was statistically significant at 1 month (19.0±28.0 mm; p=0.008), 3 months (25.2±27.5 mm; p=0.002), and 6 months (24.6±28.4 mm; p=0.001). In all, 40% of treated patients described at least 50% pain improvement 6 months after treatment. Four patients had complete relief of radicular pain. In conclusion, IDIC should be an alternative in the nonsurgical management of cervical spondylotic radiculopathy. (orig.)

  13. MR imaging of lumbar facet joint synovial cysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Apostolaki, E.; Davies, A.M.; Evans, N. [Royal Orthopaedic Hospital, Birmingham (United Kingdom). Dept. of Radiology; Cassar-Pullicino, V.N. [Robert Jones and Agnes Hunt Orthopaedic Hospital, Oswestry (United Kingdom)

    2000-04-01

    The increasing application of magnetic resonance (MR) imaging of the spine has raised the awareness of lumbar facet synovial cysts (LFSC). This well recognised, yet uncommon condition, presents with low back pain and radiculopathy due to the presence of an extradural mass. The commonest affected level is L4/5 with a mild degenerative spondylolisthesis a frequent associated finding. MR imaging is the technique of choice to detect and diagnose a LFSC. This pictorial essay, drawing on experience of 43 cases seen in 40 patients, illustrates the spectrum of appearances that can be encountered and suggest differing causes for the variable signal characteristics exhibited. Computed tomography (CT) can be of value in some cases to aid interpretation of the MR images. In addition, CT facet arthrography by injection of air or iodinated non-ionic contrast medium may be used to confirm the diagnosis in doubtful cases as well as noting whether the patients presenting symptoms can be provoked. A comprehensive review of the existing literature is presented. (orig.)

  14. Reliability of cervical radiculopathy, its congruence between patient history and medical imaging evidence of disc herniation and its role in surgical decision.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mostofi, Keyvan; Khouzani, Reza Karimi

    2016-10-01

    The incidence of cervical disc herniation is estimated about 5.5/100,000, and they lead to surgical intervention in 26 %. Cervical disc herniation causes radiculopathy, which defines by radicular pain and sensory deficit and maybe weakness following the path of the affected nerves. Classically, cervical radiculopathy is expected to follow its specific dermatome-C4, C5, C6, C7 and C8. We investigate patients who present with discrepancy between classical radiculopathy and imaging findings in the daily practice of our profession. We reviewed the medical records of 102 patients with cervical radiculopathy, caused by cervical disc herniation. All patients had surgery. We found an apparent discrepancy between clinical and radiological findings, patients complained of radiculopathy on one side, and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scan or CT scan finding on the other side in ten patients (10.2 %). We did not found any other abnormalities in preoperative and post-operative period. All patients underwent cervical diskectomy via anterior approach. Six weeks after surgery eight patients (80 %) recovered completely, and 3 months after all ten patients (100 %) had been relieved totally. The aim of this paper is review of this medical concept and management of radiculopathy in patients with this discrepancy. As far as we know, the subject has not yet been touched in this light in medical literature. The discrepancy between clinical radiculopathy and disc herniation level on MRI or on CT scan is not rare. Management of this discrepancy requires further investigation to avoid missing diagnosis and treatment failure.

  15. What is the best way to apply the Spurling test for cervical radiculopathy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anekstein, Yoram; Blecher, Ronen; Smorgick, Yossi; Mirovsky, Yigal

    2012-09-01

    A diagnosis of cervical radiculopathy is based largely on clinical examination, including provocative testing. The most common maneuver was described in 1944 by Spurling and Scoville. Since then, several modifications of the original maneuver have been proposed to improve its value in the diagnosis of cervical radiculopathy. We assessed the ability of six known variations of the Spurling test to reproduce the complaints of patients diagnosed with cervical radiculopathy. We prospectively enrolled 67 patients presenting with cervical radicular-like symptoms and concordant radiographic findings. Each patient underwent six distinct provocative cervical spine maneuvers by two examiners, during which three parameters were recorded: (1) pain intensity (VAS score), (2) paresthesia intensity (0 - no paresthesia, 1 - mild to moderate, and 2 - severe), and (3) characteristic pain distribution (0 - no pain, 1 - neck pain only, 2 - arm pain only, 3 - pain elicited distal to the elbow). The interobserver reliability of the reported VAS score (measured by the intraclass coefficient correlation) ranged from 0.78 to 0.96 and the calculated kappa values of the categorical parameters ranged from 0.58 to 1.0 for paresthesia intensity and from 0.63 to 1.0 for pain distribution. Differences in scores elicited between the two examiners for the 67 patients were resolved by consensus. A maneuver consisting of extension, lateral bending, and axial compression resulted in the highest VAS score (mean, 7) and was associated with the most distally elicited pain on average (mean, 2.5). The highest paresthesia levels were reported after applying extension, rotation, and axial compression (mean, 1). These maneuvers, however, were the least tolerable, causing discontinuation of the examination on three occasions. Whenever cervical radiculopathy is suspected our observations suggest the staged provocative maneuvers that should be included in the physical evaluation are extension and lateral bending

  16. Interobserver agreement on MRI evaluation of patients with cervical radiculopathy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuijper, B.; Beelen, A.; van der Kallen, B. F.; Nollet, F.; Lycklama a Nijeholt, G. J.; de Visser, M.; Tans, J. Th J.

    2011-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the interobserver agreement on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) evaluation of herniated discs, spondylotic neuroforaminal stenosis, and root compression in patients with recent onset cervical radiculopathy and in addition, to assess the added value of disclosure of clinical

  17. Cervical radiculopathy: nonoperative management of neck pain and radicular symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eubanks, Jason David

    2010-01-01

    Cervical radiculopathy is a disease process marked by nerve compression from herniated disk material or arthritic bone spurs. This impingement typically produces neck and radiating arm pain or numbness, sensory deficits, or motor dysfunction in the neck and upper extremities. Magnetic resonance imaging or computed tomographic myelography can confirm neurologic compression. The overall prognosis of persons with cervical radiculopathy is favorable. Most patients improve over time with a focused, nonoperative treatment course. There is little high-quality evidence on the best nonoperative therapy for cervical radiculopathy. Cervical collars may be used for a short period of immobilization, and traction may temporarily decompress nerve impingement. Medications may help alleviate pain and neuropathic symptoms. Physical therapy and manipulation may improve neck discomfort, and selective nerve blocks target nerve root pain. Although the effectiveness of individual treatments is controversial, a multimodal approach may benefit patients with cervical radiculopathy and associated neck pain. (c) 2010 American Academy of Family Physicians.

  18. Effectiveness of manual therapy for cervical radiculopathy, a review

    OpenAIRE

    Thoomes, E. J.

    2016-01-01

    Manual therapy is often used for patients with neck pain with or without radicular symptoms. There is sparse evidence on the effectiveness in cervical radiculopathy. The aim of this study was to assess current levels of evidence on the effectiveness of manual therapy interventions for patients with cervical radiculopathy. Electronic data bases were systematically searched for clinical guidelines, reviews and randomised clinical trials (RCTs) reporting on the effectiveness of manual therapy fo...

  19. Operative Techniques for Cervical Radiculopathy and Myelopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Moran

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The surgical treatment of cervical spondylosis and resulting cervical radiculopathy or myelopathy has evolved over the past century. Surgical options for dorsal decompression of the cervical spine includes the traditional laminectomy and laminoplasty, first described in Asia in the 1970's. More recently the dorsal approch has been explored in terms of minimally invasive options including foraminotomies for nerve root descompression. Ventral decompression and fusion techniques are also described in the article, including traditional anterior cervical discectomy and fusion, strut grafting and cervical disc arthroplasty. Overall, the outcome from surgery is determined by choosing the correct surgery for the correct patient and pathology and this is what we hope to explain in this brief review.

  20. Operative techniques for cervical radiculopathy and myelopathy.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Moran, C

    2012-02-01

    The surgical treatment of cervical spondylosis and resulting cervical radiculopathy or myelopathy has evolved over the past century. Surgical options for dorsal decompression of the cervical spine includes the traditional laminectomy and laminoplasty, first described in Asia in the 1970\\'s. More recently the dorsal approch has been explored in terms of minimally invasive options including foraminotomies for nerve root descompression. Ventral decompression and fusion techniques are also described in the article, including traditional anterior cervical discectomy and fusion, strut grafting and cervical disc arthroplasty. Overall, the outcome from surgery is determined by choosing the correct surgery for the correct patient and pathology and this is what we hope to explain in this brief review.

  1. Contraction induced h reflexes in the diagnosis of cervical radiculopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodofsky, Elliot B; Campellone, Joseph V; Cohen, Stephen J; Caten, Holly N; Schindelheim, Adam M

    2015-06-01

    To determine whether Contraction Induced H Reflexes (CIHR) can accurately detect cervical radiculopathy. Comparison of CIHR results with Needle Electromyography at academic outpatient Electromyography/Nerve Conduction laboratories. Participants were all patients over 18 with a needle electromyography diagnosis of cervical radiculopathy. Patients were tested for CIHR in at least two upper extremity muscles in electromyographically proven myotomes bilaterally. Patients were requested to perform a moderate contraction while stimulus was applied proximally (elbow or Erb's point). Outcome measures included H Reflex onset latency and side-to-side latency differences. These were compared against previously established normal values. Overall, 10 of 15 patients who met criteria for cervical radiculopathy showed CIHR abnormalities (sensitivity = 67%; 95% confidence interval, 43-91). Counting each side and level separately, CIHR identified 16/27 radiculopathies (sensitivity = 59.2%; 95% confidence interval, 40.6-77.8). Contraction Induced H Reflexes identified 1 possible radiculopathy not seen on electromyography (specificity = 98%; 95% confidence interval, 95-100). Contraction induced H Reflexes have a sensitivity and specificity for cervical radiculopathy similar to the resting Gastroc-Soleus H Reflex.

  2. Cervical interlaminar epidural steroid injection for neck pain and cervical radiculopathy: effect and prognostic factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Jong Won; Lee, Joon Woo; Kim, Sung Hyun; Choi, Ja-Young; Yeom, Jin-Sup; Kim, Hyun-Jib; Kwack, Kyu-Sung; Moon, Sung Gyu; Jun, Woo Sun; Kang, Heung Sik

    2007-05-01

    To verify the usefulness of a fluoroscopy guided cervical interlaminar epidural steroid injection (CIESI) in patients with neck pain and cervical radiculopathy and to evaluate outcome predictors. We retrospectively analyzed 91 patients from July 2004 to June 2005 in whom CIESI was initially performed for neck pain and cervical radiculopathy. Therapeutic effects were evaluated 2 weeks after the administration of CIESI, and CIESI effectiveness was graded using a five-point scale, namely, whether the pain had disappeared, was much improved, slightly improved, the same, or aggravated. We also used a visual analog scale (VAS) for the clinical evaluation. According to documentation and follow-up charts, we categorized treatments as effective or ineffective. Possible outcome predictors, namely, diagnosis (spinal stenosis vs herniated disc), primary symptoms (neck pain vs radiculopathy vs both), age, gender, and duration of pain (more or less than 6 months) were also analyzed. Fisher's exact test, the chi-square test, and multiple logistic regression analysis were used for the statistical analysis. After their medical records had been reviewed, 76 patients were included in this study. Inclusion criteria were: the availability of a cross-sectional image, such as a CT scan or an MR image, and a follow-up record after injection. The medical records of 76 patients (male:female = 41 : 35) of mean age 53.1 years (range 32 years to 82 years) were reviewed. Two weeks after injection, 55 patients (72.4%) had experienced effective pain relief. Patients with herniated discs had significantly better results than patients with spinal stenosis (86.1% vs 60.0%) (P cervical radiculopathy. Multiple regression analysis showed that the only factor that was significantly associated with outcome was the cause of the pain, i.e., herniated disc or spinal stenosis. Fluoroscopy guided CIESI is a safe and effective means of treating patients with neck pain and cervical radiculopathy. The most

  3. Cervical interlaminar epidural steroid injection for neck pain and cervical radiculopathy: effect and prognostic factors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kwon, Jong Won; Lee, Joon Woo; Kim, Sung Hyun; Kwack, Kyu-Sung [Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Department of Radiology, Gyeonggi-do (Korea); Choi, Ja-Young; Moon, Sung Gyu; Jun, Woo Sun [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Seoul (Korea); Yeom, Jin-Sup [Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Gyeongi-Do (Korea); Kim, Hyun-Jib [Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Department of Neurosurgery, Gyeongi-Do (Korea); Kang, Heung Sik [Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Department of Radiology, Gyeonggi-do (Korea); Seoul National University College of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Seoul (Korea)

    2007-05-15

    To verify the usefulness of a fluoroscopy guided cervical interlaminar epidural steroid injection (CIESI) in patients with neck pain and cervical radiculopathy and to evaluate outcome predictors. We retrospectively analyzed 91 patients from July 2004 to June 2005 in whom CIESI was initially performed for neck pain and cervical radiculopathy. Therapeutic effects were evaluated 2 weeks after the administration of CIESI, and CIESI effectiveness was graded using a five-point scale, namely, whether the pain had disappeared, was much improved, slightly improved, the same, or aggravated. We also used a visual analog scale (VAS) for the clinical evaluation. According to documentation and follow-up charts, we categorized treatments as effective or ineffective. Possible outcome predictors, namely, diagnosis (spinal stenosis vs herniated disc), primary symptoms (neck pain vs radiculopathy vs both), age, gender, and duration of pain (more or less than 6 months) were also analyzed. Fisher's exact test, the chi-square test, and multiple logistic regression analysis were used for the statistical analysis. After their medical records had been reviewed, 76 patients were included in this study. Inclusion criteria were: the availability of a cross-sectional image, such as a CT scan or an MR image, and a follow-up record after injection. The medical records of 76 patients (male:female = 41: 35) of mean age 53.1 years (range 32 years to 82 years) were reviewed. Two weeks after injection, 55 patients (72.4%) had experienced effective pain relief. Patients with herniated discs had significantly better results than patients with spinal stenosis (86.1% vs 60.0%) (P < 0.05). Other non-significant predictors of an improved outcome included: a symptom duration of <6 months, a young age, and the presence of cervical radiculopathy. Multiple regression analysis showed that the only factor that was significantly associated with outcome was the cause of the pain, i.e., herniated disc or

  4. Cervical interlaminar epidural steroid injection for neck pain and cervical radiculopathy: effect and prognostic factors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kwon, Jong Won; Lee, Joon Woo; Kim, Sung Hyun; Kwack, Kyu-Sung; Choi, Ja-Young; Moon, Sung Gyu; Jun, Woo Sun; Yeom, Jin-Sup; Kim, Hyun-Jib; Kang, Heung Sik

    2007-01-01

    To verify the usefulness of a fluoroscopy guided cervical interlaminar epidural steroid injection (CIESI) in patients with neck pain and cervical radiculopathy and to evaluate outcome predictors. We retrospectively analyzed 91 patients from July 2004 to June 2005 in whom CIESI was initially performed for neck pain and cervical radiculopathy. Therapeutic effects were evaluated 2 weeks after the administration of CIESI, and CIESI effectiveness was graded using a five-point scale, namely, whether the pain had disappeared, was much improved, slightly improved, the same, or aggravated. We also used a visual analog scale (VAS) for the clinical evaluation. According to documentation and follow-up charts, we categorized treatments as effective or ineffective. Possible outcome predictors, namely, diagnosis (spinal stenosis vs herniated disc), primary symptoms (neck pain vs radiculopathy vs both), age, gender, and duration of pain (more or less than 6 months) were also analyzed. Fisher's exact test, the chi-square test, and multiple logistic regression analysis were used for the statistical analysis. After their medical records had been reviewed, 76 patients were included in this study. Inclusion criteria were: the availability of a cross-sectional image, such as a CT scan or an MR image, and a follow-up record after injection. The medical records of 76 patients (male:female = 41: 35) of mean age 53.1 years (range 32 years to 82 years) were reviewed. Two weeks after injection, 55 patients (72.4%) had experienced effective pain relief. Patients with herniated discs had significantly better results than patients with spinal stenosis (86.1% vs 60.0%) (P < 0.05). Other non-significant predictors of an improved outcome included: a symptom duration of <6 months, a young age, and the presence of cervical radiculopathy. Multiple regression analysis showed that the only factor that was significantly associated with outcome was the cause of the pain, i.e., herniated disc or spinal

  5. Use of magnetic resonance imaging to identify outcome predictors of caudal epidural steroid injections for lower lumbar radicular pain caused by a herniated disc.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cha, Sung Oh; Jang, Chul Hoon; Hong, Jin Oh; Park, Joon Sang; Park, Jung Hyun

    2014-12-01

    We used lumbar magnetic resonance image (MRI) findings to determine possible outcome predictors of a caudal epidural steroid injection (CESI) for radicular pain caused by a herniated lumbar disc (HLD). Ninety-one patients with radicular pain whose MRI indicated a HLD were enrolled between September 2010 and July 2013. The CESIs were performed using ultrasound (US). A responder was defined as having complete relief or at least a 50% reduction of pain as assessed by the visual analog scale (VAS) and functional status on the Roland Morris Disability Questionnaire (RMDQ); responder (VAS n=61, RMDQ n=51), and non-responder (VAS n=30, RMDQ n=40). MRI findings were analyzed and compared between the two groups with regard to HLD level, HLD type (protrusion or exclusion), HLD zone (central, subarticular, foraminal, and extraforaminal), HLD volume (mild, moderate, or severe), relationship between HLD and nerve root (no contact, contact, displaced, or compressed), disc height loss (none, less than half, or more than half ), and disc degeneration grade (homogeneous disc structure or inhomogeneous disc structure-clear nucleus and height of intervertebral disc). A centrally located herniated disc was more common in the responder group than that in the non-responder group. Treatment of centrally located herniated discs showed satisfactory results. (VAS p=0.025, RMDQ p=0.040). Other factors, such as HLD level, HLD type, HLD volume, relationship to nerve root, disc height loss, and disc degeneration grade, were not critical. The HLD zone was significant for pain reduction after CESI. A centrally located herniated disc was a predictor of a good clinical outcome.

  6. Acute effects of Kinesio taping on pain, disability and back extensor muscle endurance in patients with low back pain caused by magnetic resonance imaging-confirmed lumbar disc degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Nai-Jen; Chou, Willy; Hsiao, Pei-Chi; Chang, Wen-Dien; Lo, Yi-Ming

    2018-02-06

    Individuals with disc degeneration experience associated pain and disability. Considering its safety and affordability, Kinesio tape (KT) may be a viable treatment. However, most KT studies have demonstrated its effects in healthy adults and patients with nonspecific low back pain. The efficacy of KT in patients with disc degeneration is yet to be investigated. To examine the acute effects of KT on patients with lumbar disc degeneration confirmed through magnetic resonance imaging. A total of 31 eligible patients (aged 25-64 years) with low back pain caused by lumbar disc degeneration were divided into mild and moderate-to-severe pain groups. KT was applied to the painful lumbar region in a lumbar brace-like pattern for 1 day. A visual analogue scale for pain and the Oswestry disability index were analysed before and after 1 day of taping. The Biering-Sorensen test for trunk muscle endurance was performed before, immediately after, and 1 day after taping as well as immediately after tape removal. After taping, both groups showed significant pain reduction (ptape removal. KT may be adopted as an assistive aid for immediate pain reduction, particularly in lumbar disc degeneration patients with moderate-to-severe pain; however, its effects on disability and trunk muscle endurance are not clinically worthwhile. The long-term effects of KT, with or without active exercise, warrant further assessment.

  7. Study of the relationship and importance of clinical semiology, axial computed tomography and electroneuromyography in lumbar radioculopathies Estudo da relação e da importância entre a semiologia clínica, tomografia axial computadorizada e eletroneuromiografia nas radiculopatias lombares

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emílio Cezar Mamede Murade

    2002-12-01

    Full Text Available The authors evaluated forty-three patients with clinical suspect of lumbar radiculopathy caused by disk hernia, concerning to clinical semiology, computed tomography and electromyography were studied and their correlations. The clinical semiology was altered in 100,0% of the patients, the computed tomography in 90,7% and the electromyography in 88,7%. The correlation among the three exams didn´t show any prevalency among any of the possible associations. The authors emphasize the importance of clinical semiology, computed tomography and electromyography for a more accurate diagnosis of lumbar radiculopathy following by disk hernia.Os autores estudaram 43 pacientes com suspeita clínica de radiculopatia lombar, causada por hérnia de disco, relacionando os achados da semiologia clínica, tomografia axial computadorizada e eletroneuromiografia, entre si. A semiologia clínica estava alterada em 100,0% dos pacientes, a tomografia axial computadorizada em 90,7% e a eletroneuromiografia em 88,7%. A correlação entre os três exames não mostrou prevalência entre nenhuma associação. Os autores enfatizam a importância da semiologia clínica, tomografia axial computadorizada e eletroneuromiografia para maior exatidão diagnóstica das radiculopatias lombares por hérnia de disco.

  8. Clinical outcomes of percutaneous plasma disc coagulation therapy for lumbar herniated disc diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sang Hyun; Kim, Sung Chul; Cho, Ki Hong

    2012-01-01

    This is prospective study of clinical outcomes of percutaneous plasma disc coagulation Therapy (PDCT) in patients with herniated lumbar disc disease (HLD) to evaluate the safety and efficacy in its clinical application and usefulness as a reliable alternative to microscopic discectomy. Forty-six patients were enrolled in this study from April 2006 to June 2010. All patients had one-level HLD. Disc degeneration was graded on routine T2-weighted magnetic resonance Image (MRI) using the Pfirrmann's grading system and all index levels were grade 3 and grade 4. Indications for surgery were radiculopathy caused by disc protrusion with soft consistency. MRI was done at one month after the procedure in all patients to check post-PDCT change. The clinical outcomes were evaluated using Visual Analog Scales (VAS) score and MacNab's criteria. This study was approved by the Institutional Review Board of our institution. The age of the study population ranged from 16 to 59 years with a mean age of 37.2 years. There were 29 males and 17 females in this study. The mean period of clinical follow-up was 21 months. The average preoperative VAS score for radiculopathy was 7.4±1.4, while the final follow-up VAS score was 1.4±0.7 (p<0.001). In MacNab's criteria, 41 patients (89.1%) had achieved favorable improvement (excellent and good) until later follow-up. There were one patient from infection and two patients who needed to convert to open discectomy. PDCT is a safe and efficient treatment modality in a selective patient with HLD.

  9. Pattern of cervical radiculopathy as diagnosed by electrodiagnostic studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khan, O.J.; Ali, L.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To determine the pattern of cervical radiculopathy presenting to a military care set up using electro diagnostic techniques. Study Design: Descriptive cross sectional study. Place and Duration of study: The study was conducted at the Armed Forces Institute of Rehabillitation Medicine Rawalpindi from July 2012 to December 2012. Subjects and Methods: Seventy-three patients who were diagnosed as cases of cervical radiculopathy on electro diagnostic testing were included in the study. Demographics and frequency of involvement of different levels were noted. Results: Of the total 73 patients, 51 (69.9%) were males and 22 (30.1%) females, with a men age of 48.01 +- 13.5 years. Left side predominated with 46.6% involvement whereas 39.7% of the patients had right sided radiculopathy and 13.7% had bilateral involvement. The most common radiculopathy encountered in this study was C7 which affected 25 (34.2%) patients, followed by C6 affecting 17 (23.3%) patients. Radicuolpathy affecting multiple upper segments like C5, C6 and C7 were a close third presenting in 15 (20.5%) patients. C8, TI radiculopathy of the lower segments was diagnosed in 13 (17.8%) patients whereas the lest common upper limp radiculopathy was C54, present in only 3 (4.1%) patients. Conclusion: Cervical radiculopathies affecting C7 and C6 roots were the most common ones encountered in our study, similar to international data. The cervical spine allows for greater movement and therefore is more prone to such developments. The reasons why C7 and C6 roots are most affected need to be studied further. (author)

  10. Ballroom dancing and cervical radiculopathy: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsung, P A; Mulford, G J

    1998-10-01

    Dance injuries associated with cervical radiculopathy have not been described in the literature. This report describes the case of an international-style ballroom dancer who developed a cervical radiculopathy as a result of frequent lateral rotation and hyperextension of the cervical spine during dancing. The patient's symptoms and signs suggestive of a left C7 radiculopathy were confirmed and documented by both magnetic resonance imaging and electrodiagnostic testing. The patient was treated conservatively with activity modification, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, and alternative medicine approaches, including herbs and acupuncture. Her neck pain and cervical radicular symptoms declined in severity, but continued even 4 1/2 months after the onset of her symptoms. She did not wish to try steroids either through an oral or epidural route and refused surgical intervention. This case report illustrates an unconventional manner in which a left cervical radiculopathy was clinically produced. The neck motions and positions of frequent hyperextension and lateral rotation demonstrated by this ballroom dancer simulated a pattern and sequence of movements that promoted the development of signs and symptoms of a left cervical radiculopathy.

  11. The imaging of lumbar spondylolisthesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Butt, S. [Department of Radiology, Royal National Orthopaedic Hospital NHS Trust, Stanmore, Middlesex HA7 4LP (United Kingdom); Saifuddin, A. [Department of Radiology, Royal National Orthopaedic Hospital NHS Trust, Stanmore, Middlesex HA7 4LP (United Kingdom) and Institute of Orthopaedics and Musculo-Skeletal Sciences, University College, London (United Kingdom)]. E-mail: asaifuddin@aol.com

    2005-05-01

    Lumbar spondylolisthesis is a common finding on plain radiographs. The condition has a variety of causes which can be differentiated on the basis of imaging findings. As the treatment is dependent upon the type of spondylolisthesis, it is important for the radiologist to be aware of these features. We present a pictorial review of the imaging features of lumbar spondylolisthesis and explain the differentiating points between different groups of this disorder. The relative merits of the different imaging techniques in assessing lumbar spondylolisthesis are discussed.

  12. Regression of lumbar disk herniation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Yu Evzikov

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Compression of the spinal nerve root, giving rise to pain and sensory and motor disorders in the area of its innervation is the most vivid manifestation of herniated intervertebral disk. Different treatment modalities, including neurosurgery, for evolving these conditions are discussed. There has been recent evidence that spontaneous regression of disk herniation can regress. The paper describes a female patient with large lateralized disc extrusion that has caused compression of the nerve root S1, leading to obvious myotonic and radicular syndrome. Magnetic resonance imaging has shown that the clinical manifestations of discogenic radiculopathy, as well myotonic syndrome and morphological changes completely regressed 8 months later. The likely mechanism is inflammation-induced resorption of a large herniated disk fragment, which agrees with the data available in the literature. A decision to perform neurosurgery for which the patient had indications was made during her first consultation. After regression of discogenic radiculopathy, there was only moderate pain caused by musculoskeletal diseases (facet syndrome, piriformis syndrome that were successfully eliminated by minimally invasive techniques. 

  13. Multilevel Contiguous Osteoporotic Lumbar Compression Fractures: The Relationship of Scoliosis to the Development of Cascading Fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabo, Alex; Hatgis, Jesse; Granville, Michelle; Jacobson, Robert E

    2017-12-19

    Osteoporotic patients can present with either single or multiple fractures secondary to repeated falls and progressive osteoporosis. Multiple fractures often lead to additional spinal deformity and are a sign of more severe osteoporosis. In the thoracic spine, multiple fractures are associated with the development of gradual thoracic kyphosis but neurologic deficits are uncommon. In the lumbar spine, patients with multiple lumbar fractures have more constant lumbar pain, may have symptoms related to concurrent lumbar stenosis or degenerative scoliosis, and may present with radiculopathy, especially with fractures at L4 and L5. In a review of a series of patients with recurrent multiple lumbar fractures or 'cascading' fractures, it was found that all the patients were female, had severe osteoporosis, often untreated, had a previous history of multiple previous thoracic and lumbar fractures, and all had associated scoliotic spinal deformities ranging from 6 o to 50 o . It was found that if the curve progressed and the greater the degree of curvature, the more frequently subsequent multiple fractures developed, leading to recurrent acute episodes of pain. Forty percent also had additional sacral insufficiency fractures, an unusually high percentage. Biomechanically, the lumbar spine is both more mobile and supports a larger portion of the spinal load compared to the thoracic spine. The existence or worsening of a lumbar spinal deformity from degenerative lumbar scoliosis shifts the mechanical forces more to one side on already weakened osteoporotic lumbar vertebrae and sacrum, leading to an increased incidence of these fractures. Because of the chronic and uneven lower lumbar spinal load with severe vertebral osteoporosis in certain patients with repeat lumbar fractures and worsening degenerative lumbar scoliosis, there may be a rationale to add preventive vertebroplasty at adjacent vertebral endplates when treating acute recurrent lumbar fractures to decrease the

  14. Multilevel Contiguous Osteoporotic Lumbar Compression Fractures: The Relationship of Scoliosis to the Development of Cascading Fractures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabo, Alex; Hatgis, Jesse; Granville, Michelle

    2017-01-01

    Osteoporotic patients can present with either single or multiple fractures secondary to repeated falls and progressive osteoporosis. Multiple fractures often lead to additional spinal deformity and are a sign of more severe osteoporosis. In the thoracic spine, multiple fractures are associated with the development of gradual thoracic kyphosis but neurologic deficits are uncommon. In the lumbar spine, patients with multiple lumbar fractures have more constant lumbar pain, may have symptoms related to concurrent lumbar stenosis or degenerative scoliosis, and may present with radiculopathy, especially with fractures at L4 and L5. In a review of a series of patients with recurrent multiple lumbar fractures or 'cascading' fractures, it was found that all the patients were female, had severe osteoporosis, often untreated, had a previous history of multiple previous thoracic and lumbar fractures, and all had associated scoliotic spinal deformities ranging from 6o to 50o. It was found that if the curve progressed and the greater the degree of curvature, the more frequently subsequent multiple fractures developed, leading to recurrent acute episodes of pain. Forty percent also had additional sacral insufficiency fractures, an unusually high percentage. Biomechanically, the lumbar spine is both more mobile and supports a larger portion of the spinal load compared to the thoracic spine. The existence or worsening of a lumbar spinal deformity from degenerative lumbar scoliosis shifts the mechanical forces more to one side on already weakened osteoporotic lumbar vertebrae and sacrum, leading to an increased incidence of these fractures. Because of the chronic and uneven lower lumbar spinal load with severe vertebral osteoporosis in certain patients with repeat lumbar fractures and worsening degenerative lumbar scoliosis, there may be a rationale to add preventive vertebroplasty at adjacent vertebral endplates when treating acute recurrent lumbar fractures to decrease the

  15. [Discarthrosis with hyperalgic lumbar multileveled radicular syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sardaru, D; Tiţu, Gabriela; Pendefunda, L

    2012-01-01

    The problems at the level of intervertebral discs are producing dysfunctions and important functional regression at the level of lumbar column, at a stage at which the patient could remain blocked in an anterior or lateral flexion position or producing an antalgic position of scoliosis that could incapacitate the patient to perform activities of daily living. The medical rehabilitation, in such cases, must seek not only the relief of local pain through different methods of obtaining it, but also the functional reeducation of the intervertebral articulations through specific analytical mobilization in order to achieve the biomechanical harmonization of the rachis. We report the case study of a 66 year-old patient who presented to our clinic for medical consult and physical therapy when he was diagnosed with discharthrosis, hyperalgic lumbar multileveled radiculopathy at L4-L5 and L5-S1. The lumbar x-ray showed osteophytes, disc narrowing at the level of L5-S1 and inter-apophysis arthrosis. The clinical examination revealed difficulty walking with pain in the right sacroiliac articulations and right sciatic emergence with plantar paraesthesia. The patient developed pain induced scoliosis on the right side that restricted the lumbar range of motion and prevented the right flexion blocking him into an left flexion, any attempt of straightening inducing pain. The condition was treated using specific analytical lumbar mobilization for the realignment of the vertebrae complex. In this case study, we found that functional reeducation in cases of pain induced deviations of the rachis of the column should be centered on the harmonization of inadequate pressure and position of the complex intervertebral articulations.

  16. Correlation of myelographic root sleeve deformity, uncovertebral spondylosis and radiculopathy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakstad, P.; Sortland, O.; Wiberg, J.

    1985-07-01

    Myelographic root sleeve deformities, uncovertebral spondylosis and myelopathy were correlated in 56 patients. Good correlation between root sleeve deformities and uncovertebral spondylosis was found. However, in some cases with spinal canal stenosis root sleeve deformities were found without corresponding bone changes. The correlation of radiculopathy to root sleeve deformity and uncovertebral spondylosis was 62 and 67%, respectively. Radiologic changes at an adjacent root level were often seen in patients without clinically correlated radiculopathy. The myelographic changes were verified at operation in all the 46 patients operated upon.

  17. Comparison of the therapeutic effect between a transforminal along with a caudal epidural injection, as well as two-level transforaminal epidural injections ina radiculopathy patient

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hwang, Jung Han; Hwang, Cheol Mog; Cho, Young Jun; Kim, Keun Won; Kim, Young Joong; Seo, Jae Young; Lim, Seong Joo [Dept. of Diagnostic Radiology, Konyang University Hospital, Deajeon (Korea, Republic of); Kang, Byeong Seong [Dept. of Radiology, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Ulsan University Hospital, Ulsan (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-01-15

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the therapeutic effect of a transforaminal epidural steroid injection (TFESI) along with a caudal epidural steroid injection (ESI), compared to two-level TFESIs in a multi-level radiculopathy patient. A total of 895 lumbar ESIs were performed in 492 patients with multi-level radiculopathy from January 2012 to January 2015. Before injections were performed, the initial Numeric Rating Scale (NRS) score was assessed in all patients, categorized into no pain (excellent), mild (good, NRS: 1-3), moderate (fair, NRS: 4-6), and severe pain (poor, NRS: 7-10). Therapeutic effects were examined for two groups: one-level TFESI along with caudal and ESI two-level TFESIs. Patient outcomes were assessed by NRS in a serial follow-up at one, three, and six months. One TFESI along with caudal ESI was performed in 274 patients and two TFESIs for 218. For the former group with one TFESI along with caudal ESI, excellent results were shown: 219 (79.9%) patients after one month, 200 (72.9%) after three, and 193 (70.4%) after six months. In the patient group with two TFESIs (n = 218) the outcomes were also very good: 152 (69.7%) after one month, 131 (60.0%) after three months, and 123 (56.4%) patients after six months. The therapeutic effect of one TFESI along with caudal ESI was better than two TFESIs in for one, threes, and six months (p < 0.01). Transforaminal epidural steroid with caudal epidural injection is a more effective tool for lumbosacral radiculopathy than two level transforaminal injections in multi-level radiculopathy patients.

  18. Functional Outcomes of Surgery in Cervical Spondylotic Radiculopathy versus Myelopathy: A Comparative Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Omidi-Kashani

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Cervical spondylosis can cause three different categories of symptoms and signs with possible overlap in the affected patients. Aim. We aim to compare functional outcome of surgery in the patients with cervical spondylotic radiculopathy and myelopathy, regardless of their surgical type and approach. Materials and Methods. We retrospectively reviewed 140 patients with cervical spondylotic radiculopathy and myelopathy who had been operated from August 2006 to January 2011, as Group A (68 cases and Group B (72 cases, respectively. The mean age was 48.2 and 55.7 years, while the mean followup was 38.9 and 37.3 months, respectively. Functional outcome of the patients was assessed by neck disability index (NDI and patient satisfaction with surgery. Results. Only in Group A, the longer delay caused a worse surgical outcome (NDI. In addition, in Group B, there was no significant relationship between imaging signal change of the spinal cord and our surgical outcomes. Improvement in NDI and final satisfaction rate in both groups are comparable. Conclusions. Surgery was associated with an improvement in NDI in both groups (P<0.001. The functional results in both groups were similar and comparable, regarding this index and patient's satisfaction score.

  19. Acute epidural lipedema: a novel entity and potential complication of bone morphogenetic protein use in lumbar spine fusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merrick, Michael T; Hamilton, Kendall D; Russo, Scott S

    2013-10-01

    Bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs) induce osteogenesis, making them useful for decreasing time to union and increasing union rates. Although the advantages of BMP-2 as a substitute for iliac crest graft have been elucidated, less is known about the safety profile and adverse events linked to their use in spinal fusion. An accumulation of reactive edema in the epidural fat may lead to neural compression and significant morbidity after lumbar spinal fusion. Bone morphogenetic protein has never been implicated as a cause of spinal epidural lipedema. We report on a case of rapid accumulation of edematous adipose tissue in the epidural space after lumbar spine decompression and fusion with bone morphogenic protein. Case report. The patient was a 45-year-old woman with chronic back pain, worsening bilateral L5 radiculopathy, and degenerative disc disease. Surgery consisting of a one-level transpedicular decompression, transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion, and posterolateral fusion was performed using BMP-2 as an adjunct for arthrodesis. Two days postoperatively, the patient developed progressive cauda equina syndrome. Lumbar magnetic resonance imaging revealed edematous epidural fat extending above the initial laminectomy, compromising the spinal canal, and compressing the thecal sac. Emergent laminectomies at L3, L4, and L5 were performed, and intraoperative pathology revealed edematous epidural adipose tissue. The patient's cauda equina syndrome resolved after spinal decompression and the removal of epidural fat. Final cultures were negative for infection, and histology report yielded an accumulation of edematous fibroadipose tissue. We present a case of rapid accumulation of edematous adipose tissue causing cauda equina syndrome after a lumbar decompression and fusion surgery. The acute nature and extensive development of the lipedema presented in this case indicate an intense inflammatory reaction. We hypothesize that there may be a link between the use of BMP-2

  20. Assessing fear-avoidance beliefs in patients with cervical radiculopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dedering, Asa; Börjesson, Tina

    2013-12-01

    The study sought to evaluate validity and reliability of the Fear Avoidance Beliefs Questionnaire and the Tampa Scale for Kinesiophobia in patients with cervical radiculopathy. A test-retest design was used to test stability over time in 46 patients with cervical radiculopathy. Differences between patients and healthy subjects were also evaluated comparing the patients with 41 physically active and healthy subjects. The patients answered the Fear Avoidance Beliefs Questionnaire and the Tampa Scale for Kinesiophobia twice. To test for differences between the patients and the healthy subjects, the latter answered the same questionnaires once. Questionnaires about activity, personal factors and health were also used. The test-retest reliability assessed with weighted kappa was 0.68 for the Fear Avoidance Beliefs Questionnaire and 0.45 for the Tampa Scale for Kinesiophobia. Only six of the 11 single items of the Fear Avoidance Beliefs Questionnaire and none of the single items of the Tampa Scale of Kinesiophobia showed kappa coefficients exceeding 0.60 (good reliability). Patients with cervical radiculopathy rated significantly worse on the Fear Avoidance Beliefs Questionnaire and the Tampa Scale for Kinesiophobia than the healthy subjects did. The Fear Avoidance Beliefs Questionnaire may be recommended for test-retest evaluations because 'good' reliability was found. The Tampa Scale for Kinesiophobia had only 'moderate' test-retest reliability, and this should be considered when using this scale in test-retest evaluations. Both questionnaires can discriminate between patients with cervical radiculopathy and healthy subjects. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  1. fMRI in patients with lumbar disc disease: a paradigm to study patients over time

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    Sharma HA

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Harish A Sharma1, Rajarsi Gupta2, William Olivero31Robarts Imaging, University of Western Ontario, London, ON, Canada; 2University of Illinois, Urbana, IL, USA; 3Neurological Surgery, University of Illinois UC/Carle Foundation Hospital, Urbana, IL, USAAbstract: Low back pain is a common human ailment. It is estimated that over 70% of the population will experience low back pain that will require medication and/or medical attention. There are many causes for low back pain, one being herniation of the discs of the lumbar spine. Treatment options are very limited. Why patients develop chronic pain especially when there is no known organic cause or when the offending painful stimulus has been removed remains poorly understood. Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI is a technique that allows researchers to image which regions of the brain that are activated during motor, cognitive, and sensory experiences. Using fMRI to study pain has revealed new information about how the brain responds to painful stimuli and what regions of the brain are activated during pain. However, many of the paradigms used do not replicate the subject's pain or use painful stimuli in volunteers without pain. Also, following patients from their acute phase of pain to the chronic phase with serial fMRI has not been performed. In this study we developed a paradigm that would allow studying patients with low back pain and leg pain including lumbar radiculopathy to better mimic a clinical pain syndrome and to have a method of following patients with this type of pain over time.Keywords: functional magnetic resonance imaging, low back pain, pain syndrome, chronic pain

  2. Total Disc Arthroplasty for Treating Lumbar Degenerative Disc Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    Study Design Lumber disc arthroplasty is a technological advancement that has occurred in the last decade to treat lumbar degenerative disk diseases. Purpose The aim of this retrospective study was to establish the impact and outcomes of managing patients with lumbar degenerative disk disease who have been treated with lumbar total disc arthroplasty (TDA). Overview of Literature Several studies have shown promising results following this surgery. Methods We reviewed the files of 104 patients at the Department of Neurosurgery in Colmar (France) who had been operated on by lumbar spine arthroplasty (Prodisc) between April 2002 and October 2008. Results Among the 104 patients, 67 were female and 37 were male with an average age of 33.1 years. We followed the cases for a mean of 20 months. The most frequent level of discopathy was L4-L5 with 62 patients (59.6%) followed by L5-S1 level with 52 patients (50%). Eighty-three patients suffered from low back pain, 21 of which were associated with radiculopathy. The status of 82 patients improved after surgery according to the Oswestry Disability Index score, and 92 patients returned to work. Conclusions The results indicate that TDA is a good alternative treatment for lumbar spine disk disease, particularly for patients with disabling and chronic low back pain. This technique contributes to improve living conditions with correct patient selection for surgery. PMID:25705336

  3. Treatment of contained lumbar disc herniations using radiofrequency assisted micro-tubular decompression and nucleotomy: four year prospective study results.

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    Hellinger, Stefan

    2014-01-01

    Patients with radiculopathy caused by contained disc herniations are less likely to have good outcomes following discectomy surgery than patients with disc herniations that are not contained. The author presents his 4-year results from a prospective trial regarding the efficacy and safety of a tubular transforaminal radiofrequency-assisted manual decompression and annulus modulation of contained disc herniations in 58 patients. Fifty-eight patients with lumbar radiculopathy due to a contained disc herniation were enrolled in a prospective clinical study. Visual analog scores (VAS) for back pain and leg pain, quality of life assessment, Macnab criteria, and SF-12 were collected from patients before treatment, at 2-years and 4-years post-treatment. At 4 years, results were obtained from 47 (81%) of patients. Compared to mean pre- treatment assessments, mean 4-year VAS for back pain improved from 8.6 to 2.3 points, and mean VAS for leg pain improved from 7.8 to 2.3. Eighty-three percent of respondents reported that they were "satisfied" or "very satisifed" with their quality of life at 4-years as per SF-12. At 4 years, recurrence was noted in 3 (6.4%) of respondents and no complications were reported. The 2-year and 4-year study results are nearly identical, suggesting durable benefit out to 4 years. These results also suggest that in carefully selected patients with sustained contained disc herniations who have failed conservative treatments, manual decompression combined with radiofrequency-assisted decompression and annulus modulation are very likely to have good outcomes 4 years post-treatment.

  4. Clinical anatomy and 3D virtual reconstruction of the lumbar plexus with respect to lumbar surgery

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    Ding Zi-hai

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Exposure of the anterior or lateral lumbar via the retroperitoneal approach easily causes injuries to the lumbar plexus. Lumbar plexus injuries which occur during anterior or transpsoas lumbar spine exposure and placement of instruments have been reported. This study aims is to provide more anatomical data and surgical landmarks in operations concerning the lumbar plexus in order to prevent lumbar plexus injuries and to increase the possibility of safety in anterior approach lumbar surgery. Methods To study the applied anatomy related to the lumbar plexus of fifteen formaldehyde-preserved cadavers, Five sets of Virtual Human (VH data set were prepared and used in the study. Three-dimensional (3D computerized reconstructions of the lumbar plexus and their adjacent structures were conducted from the VH female data set. Results The order of lumbar nerves is regular. From the anterior view, lumbar plexus nerves are arranged from medial at L5 to lateral at L2. From the lateral view, lumbar nerves are arranged from ventral at L2 to dorsal at L5. The angle of each nerve root exiting outward to the corresponding intervertebral foramen increases from L1 to L5. The lumbar plexus nerves are observed to be in close contact with transverse processes (TP. All parts of the lumbar plexus were located by sectional anatomy in the dorsal third of the psoas muscle. Thus, access to the psoas major muscle at the ventral 2/3 region can safely prevent nerve injuries. 3D reconstruction of the lumbar plexus based on VCH data can clearly show the relationships between the lumbar plexus and the blood vessels, vertebral body, kidney, and psoas muscle. Conclusion The psoas muscle can be considered as a surgical landmark since incision at the ventral 2/3 of the region can prevent lumbar plexus injuries for procedures requiring exposure of the lateral anterior of the lumbar. The transverse process can be considered as a landmark and reference in surgical

  5. Clinical anatomy and 3D virtual reconstruction of the lumbar plexus with respect to lumbar surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background Exposure of the anterior or lateral lumbar via the retroperitoneal approach easily causes injuries to the lumbar plexus. Lumbar plexus injuries which occur during anterior or transpsoas lumbar spine exposure and placement of instruments have been reported. This study aims is to provide more anatomical data and surgical landmarks in operations concerning the lumbar plexus in order to prevent lumbar plexus injuries and to increase the possibility of safety in anterior approach lumbar surgery. Methods To study the applied anatomy related to the lumbar plexus of fifteen formaldehyde-preserved cadavers, Five sets of Virtual Human (VH) data set were prepared and used in the study. Three-dimensional (3D) computerized reconstructions of the lumbar plexus and their adjacent structures were conducted from the VH female data set. Results The order of lumbar nerves is regular. From the anterior view, lumbar plexus nerves are arranged from medial at L5 to lateral at L2. From the lateral view, lumbar nerves are arranged from ventral at L2 to dorsal at L5. The angle of each nerve root exiting outward to the corresponding intervertebral foramen increases from L1 to L5. The lumbar plexus nerves are observed to be in close contact with transverse processes (TP). All parts of the lumbar plexus were located by sectional anatomy in the dorsal third of the psoas muscle. Thus, access to the psoas major muscle at the ventral 2/3 region can safely prevent nerve injuries. 3D reconstruction of the lumbar plexus based on VCH data can clearly show the relationships between the lumbar plexus and the blood vessels, vertebral body, kidney, and psoas muscle. Conclusion The psoas muscle can be considered as a surgical landmark since incision at the ventral 2/3 of the region can prevent lumbar plexus injuries for procedures requiring exposure of the lateral anterior of the lumbar. The transverse process can be considered as a landmark and reference in surgical operations by its relative

  6. Clinical significance of the position of dorsal root ganglia in degenerative lumbar diseases. Correlation between anatomic study and imaging study with MRI

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    Seki, Masahiro; Kikuchi, Tomiichi [Fukushima Medical Coll., Matsuoka (Japan)

    1995-06-01

    In order to estimate the ralationship between the position of dorsal root ganglia (DRG) and radicular symptoms, anatomical study was done on 81 cadavers, and a clinical study with MRI was done on 20 cases of lumbar disc herniation and 20 of lumbar spondylosis with L{sub 5} radiculopathy. The position of DRG is not related to the occurrence of radicular symptoms in disc herniation, while in lumbar spondylosis proximally placed DRG are related to both of unilateral and bilateral occurrence of redicular symptoms. Unilateral occurrence of radicular symptoms is influenced by surrounding tissues of the nerve root, rather than the position of DRG. (author).

  7. Akt/PKB isoforms expression in the human lumbar herniated disc: correlation with clinical and MRI findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasku, Dritan; Soufla, Giannoula; Katonis, Pavlos; Tsarouhas, Alexandros; Vakis, Antonis; Spandidos, Demetrios A

    2011-10-01

    Intervertebral disc (IVD) degeneration suggests a complex process influenced by genetics, lifestyle and biomechanics, which accounts for the development of low back pain (LBP) and lumbar radiculopathy, a major cause of musculoskeletal disability in humans. The family of Akt/PKB kinases is a principal mediator in the signal transduction pathways, which contribute to transcriptional regulation, cell growth, proliferation, apoptosis, and survival ability. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the transcriptional profile of the AKT family genes in human herniated discs and the involvement of the PI3K-Akt signaling pathway in human IVD degeneration. Real-time PCR analysis was used to assess the mRNA expression pattern of the three Akt/PKB isoforms in 63 herniated and 10 control disc specimens. Our results showed a significant positive correlation between AKT1 and AKT3 mRNA in herniated discs suggesting a synergistic action between these isoforms in disc herniation. Interestingly, AKT2 mRNA was up-regulated in patients with acute pain during the first 12 months, indicating that AKT2 transcriptional activation may be associated with acute rather than chronic inflammation and phagocytosis. Finally, Akt1/PKB transcription presented a stepwise activation as disc herniation deteriorated. Our findings provide evidence on the transcriptional activation of the Akt/PKB pathway indicating that it is involved in lumbar disc degeneration. There is need for further studies to elucidate the exact role and down-stream signaling action of Akt/PKB isoforms in the pathogenesis of lumbar disc herniation.

  8. LUMBAR DISC HERNIATION

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    Vialle, Luis Roberto; Vialle, Emiliano Neves; Suárez Henao, Juan Esteban; Giraldo, Gustavo

    2015-01-01

    Lumbar disc herniation is the most common diagnosis among the degenerative abnormalities of the lumbar spine (affecting 2 to 3% of the population), and is the principal cause of spinal surgery among the adult population. The typical clinical picture includes initial lumbalgia, followed by progressive sciatica. The natural history of disc herniation is one of rapid resolution of the symptoms (four to six weeks). The initial treatment should be conservative, managed through medication and physiotherapy, sometimes associated with percutaneous nerve root block. Surgical treatment is indicated if pain control is unsuccessful, if there is a motor deficit greater than grade 3, if there is radicular pain associated with foraminal stenosis, or if cauda equina syndrome is present. The latter represents a medical emergency. A refined surgical technique, with removal of the extruded fragment and preservation of the ligamentum flavum, resolves the sciatic symptoms and reduces the risk of recurrence over the long term. PMID:27019834

  9. Prolonged conservative care versus early surgery in patients with sciatica caused by lumbar disc herniation : two year results of a randomised controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peul, W.C.; Hout, van den W.B.; Brand, R.; Thomeer, R.T.W.M.; Koes, B.W.

    2008-01-01

    Objectives: To evaluate the effects of early lumbar disc surgery compared with prolonged conservative care for patients with sciatica over two years of follow-up. Design: Randomised controlled trial. Setting: Nine Dutch hospitals. Participants: 283 patients with 6-12 weeks of sciatica.

  10. Prolonged conservative care versus early surgery in patients with sciatica caused by lumbar disc herniation: Two year results of a randomised controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    W.C. Peul (Wilco); W.B. van den Hout (Wilbert); R. Brand (René); R.T.W.M. Thomeer (Raph); B.W. Koes (Bart)

    2008-01-01

    textabstractObjectives: To evaluate the effects of early lumbar disc surgery compared with prolonged conservative care for patients with sciatica over two years of follow-up. Design: Randomised controlled trial. Setting: Nine Dutch hospitals. Participants: 283 patients with 6-12 weeks of sciatica.

  11. Proximal tibiofibular synostosis as a possible cause of a pseudoradicular syndrome: a case report

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Ooij, Bas; van Ooij, André; Morrenhof, J. Wim; van Dijk, C. Niek

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents a case report of persistent low back pain and suspected lumbar radiculopathy. A synostosis at the level of the proximal tibiofibular joint was diagnosed. After successful resection of the synostosis, the low back symptoms resolved completely. This is the first report of a

  12. Nursing review section of Surgical Neurology International: Part 1 lumbar disc disease.

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    Epstein, Nancy E; Hollingsworth, Renee D

    2017-01-01

    Patients with lumbar disc disease may present with low back pain, pain that radiates down to the lower extremity (radiculopathy), and leg pain that increases with ambulation (neurogenic claudication). Patients may first undergo diagnostic studies (magnetic resonance imaging, computed tomographic examinations) to determine whether there is any significant nerve root or thecal sac compression. Increasingly, patients with low back pain with/without radiculopathy are being screened by nurses rather than by neurologists or neurosurgeons/orthopedists. Recognition of the basic neurological symptoms and signs of lumbar disc disease is critical to manage and triage these patients. The neurological examination includes evaluation of the straight leg raising test (SLR/Lasegue Maneuver) and assessment of: motor function [grade 0 (no motion) to grade 5 (normal motion)], reflexes [Patellar and Achilles levels graded 0 (absent) to grade 4+ (clonus)], sensory loss (pin prick, light touch, position, and vibration), and cerebellar function (tandem gait, heel-shin, and finger-nose-finger testing). Learning to read MR and CT studies for disc herniations is critical. Nonsurgical discs include those that are minimally protruding or bulging. Alternatively, surgical disc herniations when correlated with significant neurological findings are extruded (ruptured through the annulus) or sequestrated (migrated beyond the disc space following rupture). Familiarity with symptoms, neurological signs, and radiographic presentations for patients with lumbar disc disease is critical for nurses. Here, we review the important factors nurses should know to better recognize, triage, and treat patients with lumbar disc disease.

  13. A novel minimally invasive percutaneous facet augmentation device for the treatment of lumbar radiculopathy and axial back pain: technical description, surgical technique and case presentations Un nuevo dispositivo percutáneo mínimamente invasivo de aumento facetáreo para el tratamiento de radiculopatía lumbar y dolor axial lumbar: descripción técnica, técnica quirúrgica y presentación de casos Um novo dispositivo percutâneo minimamente invasivo de aumento facetário para o tratamento da radiculopatia lombar e dor axial lombar: descrição técnica, técnica cirúrgica e apresentação de casos

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    Larry T. Khoo

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: to describe a new posterior minimally invasive method of facet stabilization for treatment of the degenerating lumbar motion segment. The biomechanics of this Percudyn (Interventional Spine; Irvine, CA system are distinct from that of other interspinous dynamic stabilization systems as it acts bilaterally directly within the middle column of the spine. Based on biomechanical evalution, the paired prosthesis supports, cushions, and reinforces the facet complexes by limiting both extension and lateral bending thereby maintaining central and foraminal volumes. METHODS: the Percudyn device consists of a pedicle anchor upon which sits a cushioning polycarbonate-urethane stabilizer that serves as a mechanically reinforcing stop between the inferior and superior articular facets. A 1.5 cm skin incision is made bilaterally over the lower pedicle of the treated segment through which a Jamshidi needle is percutaneously targeted under biplanar fluoroscopic guidance into the caudal aspect of the superior articular process directly underneath the lip of the inferior facet from the level above. Progressive onestep tubular dilation is then performed to secure a small disposable working portal. Through this access, the Percudyn stabilizers are then placed over the wire and anchored bilaterally into the inferior pedicles of the degenerated motion segment. RESULTS: three patients (ages 26-41, male with significant low back pain as well as radiculopathy with lateral recess stenosis from a large disc herniation/ ligamentum and facet hypertrophy (L4-5 and/or L5-S1 underwent a minimally invasive decompression/ discectomy and bilateral Percudyn placement at each disease level. Each patient had significant relief of both his radiculopathy and axial back pain post-operatively and was discharged home within 18 hours without sequelae. CONCLUSION: this novel technique of percutaneous posterior facet augmentation allows for safe placement of bilateral middle

  14. Low back pain associated with lumbar disc herniation: role of moderately degenerative disc and annulus fibrous tears

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Hao; Liu, Hui; Li, Zemin; Zhang, Kuibo; Wang, Jianru; Wang, Hua; Zheng, Zhaomin

    2015-01-01

    Lumbar disc herniation is one of the most common spinal degenerative disorders which may lead to low back pain (LBP) and radicular leg pain. However, it remains difficult to diagnose a degenerative herniated disc as the LBP generator in clinical practice. The purpose of this study is to explore the characteristic changes of a herniated disc causing LBP on MRI and to clarify the underlying role of inflammatory mediators and annulus fibrous (AF) tears in LBP generation associated with disc herniation. We prospectively collected intervertebral disc specimens and MRI from 57 single-segment disc herniation patients with radiculopathy. All subjects were grouped according to LBP occurrence or disc degeneration severity for the comparison of inflammatory mediators’ expression and AF tears occurrence (High Intensity Zone, HIZ, on MRI). LBP incidence under circumstances of different degeneration severity with or without HIZ was further analyzed. Both LBP incidence and Inflammatory mediators expression in moderately degenerated group was higher than mildly and severely degenerative groups. HIZ incidence was higher in moderately and severely degenerated groups. LBP incidence in the patients with both moderately degenerated discs and HIZ was 86.7%, much higher than the rest of the patient population. In conclusion, the high expression of inflammatory mediators with AF tears causes LBP associated with disc herniation. Moderately degenerative disc with HIZ is MRI morphological change of herniated disc causing LBP, which can be applied to diagnose LBP. PMID:25932092

  15. Hidden spondylolisthesis: unrecognized cause of low back pain? Prospective study about the use of dynamic projections in standing and recumbent position for the individuation of lumbar instability

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    Landi, Alessandro; Gregori, Fabrizio; Marotta, Nicola; Donnarumma, Pasquale; Delfini, Roberto [University of Rome - Policlinico Umberto I, Department of Neurology and Psychiatry, Division of Neurosurgery, Rome (Italy)

    2015-03-26

    Dynamic X-rays (DXR) are widely recognized as an effective method to detect lumbar instability (LI). They are usually performed with the patient in standing position (SDXR). In our opinion, standing position inhibits micromovements of the lumbar segment interested by the listhesis, thanks to paravertebral muscles antalgic contraction and augmented tone. We aim to demonstrate that DXR in recumbent position (RDXR), reducing the action of paravertebral muscles, can discover hypermovements not evidenced in SDXR. Between January 2011 and January 2013, we studied 200 consecutive patients with lumbar degenerative disease with MRI, SDXR, and RDXR. We aimed to find a correlation between low back or radicular pain and the presence of a spondylolisthesis not showed by the SDXR, but showed by the RDXR. We analysed 200 patients: of the 133 not pathologic in SDXR, 43 patients (32.3 %) showed an hypermovement in RDXR (p = 0.0001) without any significant correlation between hidden listhesis and age, sex, or level involved. The aim of our study is to determine whether in patients with lumbalgy without evidence of listhesis in SDXR, pain can be attributed to a faccettal syndrome or to a spondylolisthesis. Consequence of pain is augmented muscular tone of the paravertebral musculature, particularly in standing position. Augmented muscular tone tries to inhibit the pain generator, attempting to limit the slippage of the involved segment. In patients examined in RDXR, the tone of paravertebral musculature is reduced, showing the hidden spondylolisthesis. (orig.)

  16. Radiculopathy in a patient with chronic tophaceus gout: vertebral imaging

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    Joana Borges

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Spinal involvement is infrequent in chronic gout. However, some cases of back pain with radiculopathy secondary to this etiology have been reported. Case Report: 56-year old male patient, with history of arterial hypertension, hypertriglyceridemia, obesity, glucose intolerance and alcohol abuse, diagnosed with gout in his fifth decade of life. The patient was started on urate lowering therapy, with poor compliance, and evolved with sustained hyperuricemia, recurrent episodes of arthritis, and growth of gouty tophi on the elbows, wrists, hands and knees. In 2011, the patient presented with radiculopathy. When pain recurred, a Computed Tomography was performed and it showed alterations compatible with spinal tophi formation and nerve root involvement. Discussion/Conclusions: Our clinical case is another example of how gout can produce spinal inflammation and nerve damage and superimpose on previously damaged joints and how patients’ compliance to therapeutics may have an important impact on prognosis.

  17. Effect of trigger point injection on lumbosacral radiculopathy source.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saeidian, Seyed Reza; Pipelzadeh, Mohammad Reza; Rasras, Saleh; Zeinali, Masud

    2014-10-01

    Active muscular trigger points (aMTPs) presenting with radiating pain can interfere in diagnosis and treatment of patients suffering from lumbosacral radiculopathy. We aimed to diagnose and evaluate the trigger point therapy on the outcome of pain in patients with lumbosacral radiculopathy. A total of 98 patients were enrolled suffered with chronic pain andlumbosacral radiculopathy at L4-L5 and L5-S1 who were candidates of non-surgical management. All patients received conservative modalities, including bed rest, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory agents (NSAID), and physiotherapy. These treatments continued for a week. Patients were examined for the presence of trigger points in their lower extremities. Those who had trigger points were divided into 2 groups (TP and N). Patients in TP group underwent trigger point injection therapy. No further therapy was done for the N group. Pain scores and straight leg raise (SLR) test in both groups were collected and analyzed on the seventh and 10th days of the therapy. Results were analyzed by paired t test and chi-square test. Out of 98 patients, 64 had trigger points. Thirty-two patients were assigned to each group. Pain scores (Mean ± SD) in TP group was 7.12 ± 1.13 and in N group was 6.7 ± 1.16, P = 0.196. Following the treatment, pain scores were 2.4 ± 1.5 in TP group and 4.06 ± 1.76 in N group P = 0.008. SLR test became negative in all patients in TP group but only in 6 (19%) patients in N group, P = 0.001. Results show that trigger point injection therapy in patients suffering from chronic lumbosacral radiculopathy with trigger points can significantly improve their recovery, and conservative therapy may not be adequate.

  18. Differential diagnosis of cervical radiculopathy and superior pulmonary sulcus tumor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Rui; Kang, Ming-Yang; Gao, Zhong-Li; Zhao, Jian-Wu; Wang, Jin-Cheng

    2012-08-01

    The result would be disastrous if the superior pulmonary sulcus tumor (Pancoast tumor) was misdiagnosed as degenerative cervical spine diseases. The aim of this study was to investigate the differential diagnosis methods of cervical radiculopathy and superior pulmonary sulcus tumor. Clinical manifestations, physical, and radiological findings of 10 patients, whose main complaints were radiating shoulder and arm pain and later were diagnosed with superior pulmonary sulcus tumor, were reviewed and compared with those of cervical radiculopathy. Superior pulmonary sulcus tumor patients have shorter mean history and fewer complaints of neck pain or limitation of neck movement. Physical examination showed almost normal cervical spine range of motion. Spurling's neck compression test was negative in all patients. Anteroposterior cervical radiographs showed the lack of pulmonary air at the top of the affected lung in all cases and first rib encroachment in one case. The diagnosis of superior pulmonary sulcus tumor can be further confirmed by CT and MRI. By the method of combination of history, physical examination, and radiological findings, superior pulmonary sulcus tumor can be efficiently differentiated from cervical radiculopathy. Normal motion range of the cervical spine, negative Spurling's neck compression test, and the lack of pulmonary air at the top of the affected lung in anteroposterior cervical radiographs should be considered as indications for further chest radiograph examinations.

  19. [Conservative treatment of cervical radiculopathy with 5% lidocaine medicated plaster].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattozzi, I

    2015-02-01

    Cervical radiculopathy is a mixed pain syndrome characterized by neuropathic, skeletal and myofascial pain. This condition is frequently found in developed countries and is a significant source of disability and a reason for frequent medical consultation. In our Pain Therapy Centre, cervical radiculopathy is initially treated with bi-weekly cycles of mesotherapy coupled, at least 15 days later, with physiotherapy to reach the complete mobilization of cervical spine. Cervical radiculopathy is a localized neuro-pathic pain and in agreement with international guidelines, we checked if patients treated topically with 5% lidocaine medicated plaster may benefit in improving pain management and in reducing the time necessary to start physiotherapy. A retrospective study was carried out on 60 patients, of which 30 were treated with mesotherapy and 30 were treated with 5% lidocaine medicated plaster. Data for a total of 30 days observation were collected from the patient medical records. In particular, besides medical history, intensity of pain, intensity of allodynia and pain were considered. For all analyzed parameters, both treatments were effective, but patients treated with 5% lidocaine medicated plaster showed faster control of the painful symptoms, an essential condition for an earlier rehabilitative treatment.

  20. Sensory symptom profiles and co-morbidities in painful radiculopathy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Friederike Mahn

    Full Text Available Painful radiculopathies (RAD and classical neuropathic pain syndromes (painful diabetic polyneuropathy, postherpetic neuralgia show differences how the patients express their sensory perceptions. Furthermore, several clinical trials with neuropathic pain medications failed in painful radiculopathy. Epidemiological and clinical data of 2094 patients with painful radiculopathy were collected within a cross sectional survey (painDETECT to describe demographic data and co-morbidities and to detect characteristic sensory abnormalities in patients with RAD and compare them with other neuropathic pain syndromes. Common co-morbidities in neuropathic pain (depression, sleep disturbance, anxiety do not differ considerably between the three conditions. Compared to other neuropathic pain syndromes touch-evoked allodynia and thermal hyperalgesia are relatively uncommon in RAD. One distinct sensory symptom pattern (sensory profile, i.e., severe painful attacks and pressure induced pain in combination with mild spontaneous pain, mild mechanical allodynia and thermal hyperalgesia, was found to be characteristic for RAD. Despite similarities in sensory symptoms there are two important differences between RAD and other neuropathic pain disorders: (1 The paucity of mechanical allodynia and thermal hyperalgesia might be explained by the fact that the site of the nerve lesion in RAD is often located proximal to the dorsal root ganglion. (2 The distinct sensory profile found in RAD might be explained by compression-induced ectopic discharges from a dorsal root and not necessarily by nerve damage. These differences in pathogenesis might explain why medications effective in DPN and PHN failed to demonstrate efficacy in RAD.

  1. The use of metformin is associated with decreased lumbar radiculopathy pain [Erratum

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    Taylor A

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Taylor A, Westveld AH, Szkudlinska M, et al. J Pain Res. 2013;6:755–763. The notes section for Table 2 should read:Notes: Sections 1 and 2 are adapted from the short-form McGill pain questionnaire.19 Patients were asked to identify their pain with the provided scale. Melzack R. The short-form McGill Pain Questionnaire. Pain. 1987;30(2:191–197. The figure has been reproduced with permission of the International Association for the Study of Pain® (IASP. The figure may not be reproduced for any other purpose without permission.Read the original article

  2. Anterior cervical fusion versus minimally invasive posterior keyhole decompression for cervical radiculopathy

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    Richard M. Young

    2015-12-01

    Conclusion: ACDF has been demonstrated to be an effective surgical procedure in treating degenerative spine disease in patients with radiculopathy and/or myelopathy. However, in a population with isolated radiculopathy and radiological imaging confirming an anterolateral disc or osteophyte complex, the MIPKF can provide similar results without the associated risks that accompany an anterior cervical spine fusion.

  3. Three-tesla magnetic resonance neurography of the brachial plexus in cervical radiculopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, Takeshi; Sueyoshi, Takeshi; Suwazono, Shugo; Suehara, Masahito

    2015-09-01

    There have been no reports of the use of 3-Tesla magnetic resonance neurography (3T MRN) to characterize cervical radiculopathy. In particular, there are no reports of MRN of brachial plexus involvement in patients with cervical radiculopathy. We reviewed retrospectively 12 consecutive patients with cervical radiculopathy who underwent 3T MRN. The median age was 54.5 years. Eleven of 12 patients were men. The distribution of nerve-root signal abnormality was correlated with intervertebral foraminal stenosis and the presence of muscles that exhibited weakness and/or signs of denervation on electromyography. MRN abnormalities were found to extend into the distal part of the brachial plexus in 10 patients. This study demonstrates that MRN is potentially useful for diagnosis in patients with suspected cervical radiculopathy. Moreover, the finding of brachial plexus involvement on MRN may indicate a possible pathophysiological relationship between cervical radiculopathy and brachial plexopathy. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Lordosis - lumbar

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... spine. Much less common causes in children include: Achondroplasia , a disorder of bone growth that causes the ... Carson BS, Rigamonti D, Ahn ES. Achondroplasia and other dwarfisms. ... PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2011:chap 219. Mistovich RJ, Spiegel ...

  5. Effectiveness of manual therapy for cervical radiculopathy, a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thoomes, E J

    2016-01-01

    Manual therapy is often used for patients with neck pain with or without radicular symptoms. There is sparse evidence on the effectiveness in cervical radiculopathy. The aim of this study was to assess current levels of evidence on the effectiveness of manual therapy interventions for patients with cervical radiculopathy. Electronic data bases were systematically searched for clinical guidelines, reviews and randomised clinical trials (RCTs) reporting on the effectiveness of manual therapy for patients with cervical radiculopathy. Eight relevant reviews, two guidelines and two recent RCTs, that had not yet been included in either, were retrieved. The overall quality of the evidence of included studies was evaluated using the GRADE method. Most interventions were only studied in one single RCT. There is low level evidence that cervical manipulation and mobilisation as unimodal interventions are effective on pain and range of motion at the immediate follow up, but no evidence on the effectiveness of thoracic manipulation or mobilisation as unimodal interventions. There is low level evidence that a combination of spinal mobilisation and motor control exercises is more effective on pain and activity limitations than separate interventions or a wait-and-see policy. There is low level evidence of the effectiveness of cervical mobilisation with a neurodynamical intent as unimodal intervention, on the effectiveness of a multimodal intervention with neurodynamic intent on pain activity limitations and global perceived effect compared to a wait-and-see policy. There is also low level evidence that a multimodal intervention consisting of spinal and neurodynamic mobilisations and specific exercises is effective on pain in patients with CR. There is low level evidence that traction is no more effective than placebo traction.

  6. Manual therapy and segmental stabilization in the treatment of cervical radiculopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafael Souza Aquaroli

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction: Cervical radiculopathy (CR is one of the diseases that most affect the cervical spine, causing radicular symptoms in the ipsilateral limb. Conservative treatment aim recover of both mechanical and physiological functions through neural mobilization techniques, along with the activation of the deep neck flexors with cervical segmental stabilization, combining techniques of joint mobilization and manipulation, which seeks mobility improvement of crucial areas of the cervical spine. The objective of this study was to evaluate a multimodal treatment to enhance the outcomes of conservative care in patients diagnosed with CR. Methods: The sample consisted of 11 patients with CR, between 21 and 59 years old, 3 female and 8 male. It was recorded the Visual Analogue Scale (VAS for pain, the Functional Development of the Neck Pain and Disability Scale (NPDS and the goniometry during shoulder abduction. The intervention plan was composed by neural mobilization, intermittent cervical traction, pompages, stretching, myofascial inhibition techniques, manipulative techniques and cervical segmental stabilization exercises. After 12 weeks of treatment, subjects underwent a new evaluation process. Results: Before the treatment, subjects reported an average pain of 7 (± 1.48 in VAS, whose dropped to average 1.18 (± 1.99 (p < 0.01. Functional disability evaluated in NPDS was 36 (± 10.95 before treatment decreasing to 11.45 (± 9.8 (p < 0.01 after the treatment. Range of motion of the ipsilateral upper limb was restores by increasing from 9.2° (± 8.2 to 137° (± 24.4 (p < 0.01. Conclusion: The proposed treatment approach was effective, significantly improving the results of analgesia and functional disability a series of cases of patients diagnosed with cervical radiculopathy. {#}

  7. Systematic review of percutaneous adhesiolysis and management of chronic low back pain in post lumbar surgery syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epter, Richard S; Helm, Standiford; Hayek, Salim M; Benyamin, Ramsin M; Smith, Howard S; Abdi, Salahadin

    2009-01-01

    Post lumbar surgery syndrome or failed back surgery syndrome with persistent pain continues to increase over the years. The speculated causes of post lumbar laminectomy syndrome include acquired stenosis, epidural fibrosis, arachnoiditis, radiculopathy, and recurrent disc herniation. Epidural fibrosis may account for as much as 20% to 36% of all cases of failed back surgery syndrome. Percutaneous epidural adhesiolysis has been employed in interventional pain management in the treatment of chronic, refractory low back and lower extremity pain after back surgery. A systematic review of randomized trials and observational studies. To evaluate the effectiveness of percutaneous adhesiolysis in managing chronic low back and lower extremity pain due to post lumbar surgery syndrome. A comprehensive literature search was conducted utilizing electronic databases, as well as systematic reviews and cross references from 1966 through December 2008. The quality of individual articles used in this analysis was assessed by modified Cochrane review criteria for randomized trials and the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ) criteria for assessment of observational studies. Clinical relevance was evaluated using 5 questions according to the criteria recommended by the Cochrane Review Back Group. Analysis was conducted using 5 levels of evidence, ranging from Level I to III, with 3 subcategories in Level II. The primary outcome measure was pain relief (short-term relief of at least 6 months and long-term relief of more than 6 months). Secondary outcome measures were improvement in functional status, psychological status, return to work, and change in opioid intake. Of the 13 studies considered for inclusion, 3 randomized trials and 4 observational studies met the inclusion criteria for methodologic quality assessment and evidence synthesis based on methodologic quality scores of 50 or more. Evidence of percutaneous adhesiolysis in the management of chronic low back pain

  8. Iliacus abscess with radiculopathy mimicking herniated nucleus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    An iliacus abscess is an extremely rare cause of low back pain. With an iliacus abscess, the classical signs seen with a psoas abscess are frequently absent. Therefore, a timely diagnosis at the initial visit is difficult and inadequate treatment usually results in high mortality. Here, we report the case of 19-year-old man who ...

  9. Comparison of modic changes in the lumbar and cervical spine, in 3167 patients with and without spinal pain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Sheng-yun

    Full Text Available There are few comparisons of Modic changes (MCs in the lumbar and cervical spine.Compare the prevalence of MCs in the lumbar and cervical spine, and determine how MC prevalence depends on spinal pain, age, disc degeneration, spinal level, and the presence or absence of kyphosis.Retrospective clinical survey.Magnetic resonance images (MRIs were compared from five patient groups: 1. 1223 patients with low-back pain/radiculopathy only; 2. 1023 patients with neck pain/radiculopathy only; 3. 497 patients with concurrent low-back and neck symptoms; 4. 304 asymptomatic subjects with lumbar MRIs; and 5. 120 asymptomatic subjects with cervical MRIs.The prevalence of MCs was higher in those with spinal pain than in those without, both in the lumbar spine (21.0% vs 10.5% and cervical spine (8.8% vs 3.3%. Type II MCs were most common and Type III were least common in all groups. The prevalence of lumbar MCs in people with back pain was little affected by the presence of concurrent neck pain, and the same was true for the prevalence of cervical MCs in people with neck pain with or without concurrent back pain. When symptomatic patients were reclassified into two groups (back pain, neck pain, the prevalence of lumbar MCs in people with back pain was greater than that of cervical MCs in people with neck pain. The prevalence of lumbar and cervical MCs increased with age, disc degeneration, (descending spinal level, and increased kyphosis.There is a significantly higher prevalence of MCs in patients with back and neck pain. The reported association with increased kyphosis (flat back is novel.

  10. The prevalence of fibromyalgia among patients with cervical radiculopathy due to cervical disc herniation: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demir, Saliha Eroglu; Aytekin, Ebru; Karacan, Ilhan; Aydin, Teoman; Kavadar, Gülis Durmusoglu

    2014-01-01

    Cervical disc herniation (CDH) is the most common cause of cervical radiculopathy and could overlap with fibromyalgia (FM). The primary aim of the present study was to investigate the prevalences of FM and widespread pain in patients with cervical radiculopathy diagnosed as CDH in a cross-sectional study. The secondary aim was to analyze the localization of tender points (TPs) and associated symptoms in these patients comparing patients with FM. Fifty-two patients with cervical radiculopathy who carried the diagnosis of CDH and 51 patients with FM included to the study. The patients were questioned for the distribution and the duration of pain and for a group of symptoms related to FM such as headache, fatigue with a two-point scale (0 "no", 1 "yes"). The diagnosis of CDH was made with patients' clinical evaluation and radiological findings with Magnetic Resonans Imaging Study. FM was diagnosed using the American College of Rheumatology criteria. Widespread pain was defined as all of the following parameters were present: pain in the left side of the body; pain in the right side of the body; pain above the waist; pain below the waist; axial skeletal pain; and duration of pain for more than 3 months. The number of TPs were counted by digital palpation. Six female patients (11.5%) with CDH fulfilled the ACR 1990 criteria for FM. Of the patients with CDH 71.8% of TPs were located around the neck and shoulder regions, while 58.7% of TPs of the patients with FM were located around these regions. There were statistically significant differences between the patients with CDH and the patients with FM in terms of the duration of widespread pain, the number of TPs and the localization of TPs (p< 0.05). The prevalences of FM and widespread pain in patients with CDH were found as 11.5% and 78.8% respectively.

  11. A Symptomatic Spinal Extradural Arachnoid Cyst with Lumbar Disc Herniation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshinori Kadono

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Spinal epidural arachnoid cyst (EAC is a rare, usually asymptomatic condition of unknown origin, which typically involves the lower thoracic spine. We report a case of posttraumatic symptomatic EAC with lumbar disc herniation. A 22-year-old man experienced back pain and sciatica after a traffic accident. Neurological examination revealed a right L5 radiculopathy. Magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated a cystic lesion at the L3 to L5 level and an L4-5 disc herniation; computed tomography myelography showed that the right L5 root was sandwiched between the cyst and the herniation. A dural defect was identified during surgery. The cyst was excised completely and the defect was repaired. A herniation was excised beside the dural sac. Histology showed that the cyst wall consisted of collagen and meningothelial cells. Postoperatively the symptoms resolved. Lumbar spinal EACs are rare; such cysts may arise from a congenital dural crack and grow gradually. The 6 cases of symptomatic lumbar EAC reported in the literature were not associated with disc herniation or trauma. In this case, the comorbid disc herniation was involved in symptom progression. Although many EACs are asymptomatic, comorbid spinal disorders such as disc herniation or trauma can result in symptom progression.

  12. Factors that influence recurrent lumbar disc herniation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yaman, M E; Kazancı, A; Yaman, N D; Baş, F; Ayberk, G

    2017-06-01

    The most common cause of poor outcome following lumbar disc surgery is recurrent herniation. Recurrence has been noted in 5% to 15% of patients with surgically treated primary lumbar disc herniation. There have been many studies designed to determine the risk factors for recurrent lumbar disc herniation. In this study, we retrospectively analysed the influence of disc degeneration, endplate changes, surgical technique, and patient's clinical characteristics on recurrent lumbar disc herniation. Patients who underwent primary single-level L4-L5 lumbar discectomy and who were reoperated on for recurrent L4-L5 disc herniation were retrospectively reviewed. All these operations were performed between August 2004 and September 2009 at the Neurosurgery Department of Ataturk Education and Research Hospital in Ankara, Turkey. During the study period, 126 patients were reviewed, with 101 patients underwent primary single-level L4-L5 lumbar discectomy and 25 patients were reoperated on for recurrent L4-L5 disc herniation. Preoperative higher intervertebral disc height (Pdisc herniation had preoperative higher disc height and higher body mass index. Modic endplate changes had a higher tendency for recurrence of lumbar disc herniation. Well-planned and well-conducted large-scale prospective cohort studies are needed to confirm this and enable convenient treatment modalities to prevent recurrent disc pathology.

  13. Co-occurrence of lumbar spondylolysis and lumbar disc herniation with lumbosacral nerve root anomaly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yılmaz, Tevfik; Turan, Yahya; Gülşen, İsmail; Dalbayrak, Sedat

    2014-01-01

    Lumbosacral nerve root anomalies are the leading cause of lumbar surgery failures. Although co-occurrence of lumbar spondylolysis and disc herniation is common, it is very rare to observe that a nerve root anomaly accompanies these lesions. A 49-year-old male patient presented with sudden-onset right leg pain. Examinations revealed L5/S1 lumbar spondylolysis and disc herniation. At preoperative period, he was also diagnosed with lumbosacral root anomaly. Following discectomy and root decompression, stabilization was performed. The complaints of the patient diagnosed with lumbosacral root anomaly at intraoperative period were improved at postoperative period. It should be remembered that in patients with lumbar disc herniation and spondylolysis, lumbar root anomalies may coexist when clinical and neurological picture is severe. Preoperative and perioperative assessments should be made meticulously to prevent neurological injury. PMID:25210343

  14. Co-occurrence of lumbar spondylolysis and lumbar disc herniation with lumbosacral nerve root anomaly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tevfik Yilmaz

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Lumbosacral nerve root anomalies are the leading cause of lumbar surgery failures. Although co-occurrence of lumbar spondylolysis and disc herniation is common, it is very rare to observe that a nerve root anomaly accompanies these lesions. A 49-year-old male patient presented with sudden-onset right leg pain. Examinations revealed L5/S1 lumbar spondylolysis and disc herniation. At preoperative period, he was also diagnosed with lumbosacral root anomaly. Following discectomy and root decompression, stabilization was performed. The complaints of the patient diagnosed with lumbosacral root anomaly at intraoperative period were improved at postoperative period. It should be remembered that in patients with lumbar disc herniation and spondylolysis, lumbar root anomalies may coexist when clinical and neurological picture is severe. Preoperative and perioperative assessments should be made meticulously to prevent neurological injury.

  15. Mini-open transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tangviriyapaiboon, Teera

    2008-09-01

    To demonstrate the surgical technique and advantages of the mini-open transforaminal approach for lumbar interbody fusion (TLIF) combined with transpedicular screw fixation. Clinical and radiographic results were assessed to determine the clinical outcomes in twelve consecutive patients selected for minimally invasive access (mini-open technique) for TLIF in Prasat Neurological Institute. A retrospective analysis was performed on 12 patients (age range, 38-74 yr; mean, 54. 8 yr) who underwent mini-open transforaminal approach for lumbar interbody fusion (TLIF) combined with transpedicular screw fixation between September 2006 and June 2008. The titanium pedicle screws were introduced bilaterally through the 3.5 cm length, skin incisions with Spine Classics MLD- system retractor, autologous bone graft were inserted to perform TLIF in all patients. Eight patients were augmented anterior column support with titanium interbody cage, unilateral cage insertion in four patients and the others were inserted bilaterally interbody cages. Six patients presented with low back pain and associated radiculopathy, and six presented with low back pain only. Transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion was performed at L3-L4 in two patients, L4-L5 in four patients, L5-S1 in five patients, and two levels fusion in one patient. All patients were able to ambulate after spinal fusion. The patients were able to walk within 1.4 days (range 1-2 days). The hospital stay averaged 4.4 days (range 3-7 days). Periodic follow-up took place 1 to 21 months after surgery (mean, 7.4 months). The radiological fusion was archived in all nine patients who were operated on more than two months age. The other three patients who had been follow-up less than two months were probably fusion on the 1-month followed-up radiological examination. The use of mini-open technique for pedicle screw instrumentation with spinal fusion procedure provides excellent clinical results and may be an operation of choice for

  16. Cervical transforaminal epidural steroid injection for the management of cervical radiculopathy: a comparative study of particulate versus non-particulate steroids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Joon Woo; Kang, Heung Sik [Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Department of Radiology, Gyeonggi-Do (Korea); Park, Kun Woo; Yeom, Jin S. [Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Gyeonggi-Do (Korea); Chung, Sang-Ki; Kim, Ki-Jeong; Kim, Hyun-Jib [Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Department of Neurosurgery, Gyeonggi-do (Korea)

    2009-11-15

    To determine if a particulate steroid which has a risk for embolic infarct would be more effective than a non-particulate steroid for transforaminal epidural steroid injection (TFESI). The purpose of this study was (1) to compare the effect of cervical TFESI using particulate (e.g., triamcinolone) and non-particulate (e.g., dexamethasone) steroids and (2) to evaluate the effectiveness of cervical TFESI in general. From January 2006 to August 2008, 159 consecutive patients [male:female (M:F) 89:70; mean age 53 years, range 33-75 years] who underwent cervical TFESI were included in this non-randomized study. For cervical TFESI, triamcinolone was injected into 97 patients and dexamethasone into 62 patients. Short-term follow-up was conducted within 1 month. The outcome was classified as effective or ineffective. Fisher's exact test was used to analyze the difference of outcome according to the injected steroid (triamcinolone vs dexamethasone). Other possible outcome predictors, such as age, gender, duration of radiculopathy, predominant symptom, attack of radiculopathy, cause of radiculopathy, number of nerve root compression levels, previous operation, and failure of previous interlaminar epidural injection, were also analyzed. Cervical TFESI using triamcinolone (78/97, 80.4%) was slightly more effective than that using dexamethasone (43/62, 69.4%), which was not significant (P = 0.129). In general, cervical TFESIs were effective in 121 of 159 patients (76.1%) at short-term follow-up. The only significant outcome predictor was whether the patient had had a previous operation (6/13, 46/2%) or not (115/146, 78.8%) (P = 0.015). There was no significant difference between particulate or non-particulate steroid for the effect of cervical TFESI. Cervical TFESI was effective in managing cervical radiculopathy in general. (orig.)

  17. Cervical transforaminal epidural steroid injection for the management of cervical radiculopathy: a comparative study of particulate versus non-particulate steroids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Joon Woo; Kang, Heung Sik; Park, Kun Woo; Yeom, Jin S.; Chung, Sang-Ki; Kim, Ki-Jeong; Kim, Hyun-Jib

    2009-01-01

    To determine if a particulate steroid which has a risk for embolic infarct would be more effective than a non-particulate steroid for transforaminal epidural steroid injection (TFESI). The purpose of this study was (1) to compare the effect of cervical TFESI using particulate (e.g., triamcinolone) and non-particulate (e.g., dexamethasone) steroids and (2) to evaluate the effectiveness of cervical TFESI in general. From January 2006 to August 2008, 159 consecutive patients [male:female (M:F) 89:70; mean age 53 years, range 33-75 years] who underwent cervical TFESI were included in this non-randomized study. For cervical TFESI, triamcinolone was injected into 97 patients and dexamethasone into 62 patients. Short-term follow-up was conducted within 1 month. The outcome was classified as effective or ineffective. Fisher's exact test was used to analyze the difference of outcome according to the injected steroid (triamcinolone vs dexamethasone). Other possible outcome predictors, such as age, gender, duration of radiculopathy, predominant symptom, attack of radiculopathy, cause of radiculopathy, number of nerve root compression levels, previous operation, and failure of previous interlaminar epidural injection, were also analyzed. Cervical TFESI using triamcinolone (78/97, 80.4%) was slightly more effective than that using dexamethasone (43/62, 69.4%), which was not significant (P = 0.129). In general, cervical TFESIs were effective in 121 of 159 patients (76.1%) at short-term follow-up. The only significant outcome predictor was whether the patient had had a previous operation (6/13, 46/2%) or not (115/146, 78.8%) (P = 0.015). There was no significant difference between particulate or non-particulate steroid for the effect of cervical TFESI. Cervical TFESI was effective in managing cervical radiculopathy in general. (orig.)

  18. Computed tomography as the primary radiological examination of lumbar spine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ilkko, E.; Laehde, S.

    1988-10-01

    A series of 235 patients examined by lumbar CT because of sciatica or other low back disorder was studied. The need of additional examinations and correlations to surgical findings were evaluated. Inadequate information was the cause of additional examination, mostly myelography in 20 patients (8,5%). It was concluded that lumbar CT is a suitable first examination of the lumbar spine in sciatica and low back pain. The indications to complementary myelography and its benefit are discussed.

  19. Prolonged conservative treatment or 'early' surgery in sciatica caused by a lumbar disc herniation: rationale and design of a randomized trial [ISRCT 26872154

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peul, Wilco C; van Houwelingen, Hans C; van der Hout, Wilbert B; Brand, Ronald; Eekhof, Just AH; Tans, Joseph ThJ; Thomeer, Ralph TWM; Koes, Bart W

    2005-01-01

    Background The design of a randomized multicenter trial is presented on the effectiveness of a prolonged conservative treatment strategy compared with surgery in patients with persisting intense sciatica (lumbosacral radicular syndrome). Methods/design Patients presenting themselves to their general practitioner with disabling sciatica lasting less than twelve weeks are referred to the neurology outpatient department of one of the participating hospitals. After confirmation of the diagnosis and surgical indication MRI scanning is performed. If a distinct disc herniation is discerned which in addition covers the clinically expected site the patient is eligible for randomization. Depending on the outcome of the randomization scheme the patient will either be submitted to prolonged conservative care or surgery. Surgery will be carried out according to the guidelines and between six and twelve weeks after onset of complaints. The experimental therapy consists of a prolonged conservative treatment under supervision of the general practitioner, which may be followed by surgical intervention in case of persisting or progressive disability. The main primary outcome measure is the disease specific disability of daily functioning. Other primary outcome measures are perceived recovery and intensity of legpain. Secondary outcome measures encompass severity of complaints, quality of life, medical consumption, absenteeism, costs and preference. The main research question will be answered at 12 months after randomization. The total follow-up period covers two years. Discussion Evidence is lacking concerning the optimal treatment of lumbar disc induced sciatica. This pragmatic randomized trial, focusses on the 'timing' of intervention, and will contribute to the decision of the general practictioner and neurologist, regarding referral of patients for surgery. PMID:15707491

  20. Factors Associated With Work Ability in Patients Undergoing Surgery for Cervical Radiculopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Eunice; Johnston, Venerina; Wibault, Johanna; Löfgren, Håkan; Dedering, Åsa; Öberg, Birgitta; Zsigmond, Peter; Peolsson, Anneli

    2015-08-15

    Cross-sectional study. To investigate the factors associated with work ability in patients undergoing surgery for cervical radiculopathy. Surgery is a common treatment of cervical radiculopathy in people of working age. However, few studies have investigated the impact on the work ability of these patients. Patients undergoing surgery for cervical radiculopathy (n = 201) were recruited from spine centers in Sweden to complete a battery of questionnaires and physical measures the day before surgery. The associations between various individual, psychological, and work-related factors and self-reported work ability were investigated by Spearman rank correlation coefficient, multivariate linear regression, and forward stepwise regression analyses. Factors that were significant (P cervical radiculopathy. High self-efficacy was most associated with greater work ability. Consideration of these factors by surgeons preoperatively may provide optimal return to work outcomes after surgery. 3.

  1. Cervical collar or physiotherapy versus wait and see policy for recent onset cervical radiculopathy: randomised trial.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    B. Kuijper (Barbara); J.T. Tans; A. Beelen (Anita); F. Nollet (Frans); M. de Visser (Marianne)

    2009-01-01

    textabstractOBJECTIVE: To evaluate the effectiveness of treatment with collar or physiotherapy compared with a wait and see policy in recent onset cervical radiculopathy. DESIGN: Randomised controlled trial. SETTING: Neurology outpatient clinics in three Dutch hospitals. PARTICIPANTS: 205 patients

  2. Can axial pain be helpful to determine surgical level in the multilevel cervical radiculopathy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suh, Bo-Kyung; You, Ki Han; Park, Moon Soo

    2017-01-01

    Spine surgeons are required to differentiate symptomatic cervical disc herniation with asymptomatic radiographic herniation. Although the dermatomal sensory dysfunction of upper extremity is the most important clue, axial pain including cervicogenic headache and parascapular pain may be helpful to find surgical target level. However, there is no review article about the axial pain originated from cervical spondylotic radiculopathy and relieved by surgical decompression. The purpose is to review the literatures about the axial pain, which can be utilized in determining target level to be decompressed in the patients with cervical radiculopathy at multiple levels. Cervicogenic headaches of suboccipital headaches, retro-orbital pain, retro-auricular pain, or temporal pain may be associated with C2, C3, and C4 radiculopathies. The pain around scapula may be associated with C5, C6, C7, and C8 radiculopathies. However, there is insufficient evidence to make recommendations for the use in clinical practice because they did not evaluate sensitivity and specificity.

  3. Lateral lumbar disc herniation: MR imaging findings and correlation with clinical symptoms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, So Young; Park, Ji Seon; Jin, Wook; Ryu, Kyung Nam [KyungHee University Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2008-03-15

    To evaluate MRI findings of lateral lumbar disc herniations (LLDHs) and to determine whether those correlate with clinical symptoms. The study included 105 patients with LLDHs that were diagnosed by MRI. The distribution and location of the LLDHs (foraminal, extraforaminal, and foraminal and extraforaminal), the displacement of adjacent nerves, and the detection rate of LLDHs from axial and sagittal images were reviewed retrospectively by two radiologists. 36 patients were included in evaluating whether location of LLDHs and displacement of adjacent nerve correlate with radiculopathy. The distribution of the LLDHs were 3.4% at L1-2, 14.4% at L2-3, 33% at L3-4, 33% at L4-5, and 16.9% at L5-S1. The locations were foraminal in 38.6% of cases, extraforaminal in 45.4% of cases, and foraminal and extraforaminal in 16% of cases. In addition, 77.3% of the diagnosed LLDH cases displaced the adjacent nerve. The detection rates of LLDHs in the axial and sagittal images were 100% and 77.3%, respectively. In 36 patients, 47.4% had radiculopathy related to LLDHs. Location of LLDHs and displacement of adjacent nerve had no statistically significant difference between patients with or without radiculopathy. MRI is an effective method for evaluating the location of LLDHs and their influence on adjacent nerves. The axial image is more important than the sagittal image in diagnosing LLDHs. The location of LLDHs and the displacement of adjacent nerve were not found to be related to radiculopathy.

  4. Lumbosacral transitional vertebra and S1 radiculopathy: the value of coronal MR imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bezuidenhout, Abraham Fourie; Lotz, Jan Willem [Stellenbosch University, Division of Radiodiagnosis, Department of Medical Imaging and Clinical Oncology, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, Tygerberg (South Africa)

    2014-06-15

    The association of a lumbosacral transitional vertebra with accelerated degeneration of the disc above has been described. Lumbosacral transitional vertebrae have also been reported as a cause of extraforaminal entrapment of the L5 nerve root between the transverse segment of the transitional vertebra and the sacral ala optimally demonstrated by coronal MRI. The association of the lumbosacral transitional vertebra pseudoarthroses and S1 nerve root entrapment due to degenerative stenosis of the nerve root canal has never been described. We present 12 patients with lumbosacral transitional vertebrae that were referred for symptoms and signs of S1 nerve root radiculopathy in which the sagittal and axial MRI sequences failed to identify a plausible cause for the patients' S1 nerve root symptoms. A coronal T1-weighted imaging (T1WI) MRI sequence was consequently added to the investigation. The coronal T1WI MRI sequence demonstrated hypertrophic degenerative stenosis of the S1 nerve root canal at the level of the lumbosacral transitional vertebra pseudoarthrosis, with entrapment of the respective S1 nerve root in all patients. We emphasize the value of coronal T1WI MRI of the lumbosacral junction and sacrum if the cause for S1 radicular symptoms was not identified on conventional sagittal and axial MRI sequences in patients with lumbosacral transitional vertebrae. (orig.)

  5. A history of lumbar disc herniation from Hippocrates to the 1990s.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Truumees, Eeric

    2015-06-01

    In ancient times, a supernatural understanding of the syndrome of lumbar radiculopathy often involved demonic forces vexing the individual with often crippling pain. The ancient Greeks and Egyptians began to take a more naturalistic view and, critically, suspected a relationship between lumbar spinal pathology and leg symptoms. Relatively little then changed for those with sciatica until the classic works by Cotugno and Kocher arrived in the late 18th century. Early lumbar canal explorations were performed in the late 1800s and early 1900s by MacEwen, Horsley, Krause, Taylor, Dandy, and Cushing, among others. In these cases, when compressive pathologies were found and removed, the lesions typically were (mis-)identified as enchondromas or osteochondritis dissecans. To better understand the history, learn more about the first treatments of lumbar disc herniation, and evaluate the impact of the early influences on modern spine practice, searches of PubMed and Embase were performed using the search terms discectomy, medical history, lumbar spine surgery, herniated disc, herniated nucleus pulposus, sciatica, and lumbar radiculopathy. Additional sources were identified from the reference lists of the reviewed papers. Many older and ancient sources including De Ischiade Nervosa are available in English translations and were used. When full texts were not available, English abstracts were used. The first true, intentional discectomy surgery was performed by Mixter and Barr in 1932. Early on, a transdural approach was favored. In 1938, Love described the intralaminar, extradural approach. His technique, although modified with improved lighting, magnification, and retractors, remains a staple approach to disc herniations today. Other modalities such as chymopapain have been investigated. Some remain a part of the therapeutic armamentarium, whereas others have disappeared. By the 1970s, CT scanning after myelography markedly improved the clinical evaluation of patients with

  6. Operative Treatment of Cervical Spondylotic Myelopathy and Radiculopathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaminsky, SB; Clark, CR; Traynelis, VC

    2004-01-01

    Background: The natural history of cervical spondylotic myelopathy is frequently one of slow, progressive neurological deterioration. The operative treatment for patients with moderate to severe involvement is decompression of the spinal cord. Laminectomy has been a traditional approach and laminoplasty has developed as an attractive alternative. The purpose of this study was to examine and compare the outcomes of these two procedures in similar groups of patients at a five year average follow-up. Methods: A consecutive series of twenty patients who underwent open-door laminoplasty for multi-level cervical spondylotic myelopathy or radiculopathy was compared to a similar group of 22 matched patients who underwent multi-level laminectomies. Patients were similar in age, gender, number of operative levels, and length of follow-up. At the latest examination, each patient underwent a comprehensive neurological evaluation. A modification of the Nurick classification was used to assess the degree of myelopathy. Radiographs at latest follow-up were assessed for instability, and measurements of the space-available-for-the-cord and Pavlov ratio were made at involved levels. Results: Myelopathy, as determined by our modified Nurick scale, improved from a preoperative average of 2.44 to 1.48 in laminoplasty patients and from an average of 3.09 to 2.50 in laminectomy patients. Pain improved 57 percent and 8 percent in laminoplasty and laminectomy groups, respectively. Subjective neck stiffness was not significantly different based on the numbers available, although laminoplasty patients demonstrated some loss of range of motion on examination. The only variable that predicted the postoperative degree of myelopathy in both groups was the preoperative degree of myelopathy. Conclusions: Laminectomy and laminoplasty patients demonstrated improvements in gait, strength, sensation, pain, and degree of myelopathy. Laminoplasty was associated with fewer late complications. Based on

  7. MANAGEMENT OF LUMBAR SPINAL CANAL STENOSIS

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    Mukhergee G. S

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Spinal stenosis is one of the most common conditions in the elderly. It is defined as a narrowing of the spinal canal. The term stenosis is derived from the Greek word for narrow, which is “Stenos”. The first description of this condition is attributed to Antoine portal in 1803. Verbiest is credited with coining the term spinal stenosis and the associated narrowing of the spinal canal as its potential cause. [1-10] Kirkaldy–Willis subsequently described the degenerative cascade in the lumbar spine as the cause for the altered anatomy and pathophysiology in spinal stenosis. [11-15] If compression does not occur, the canal should be described as narrow but not stenotic. Some studies defined lumbar spinal stenosis as a “narrowing of the osteoligamentous vertebral canal and/or the intervertebral foramina causing compression of the thecal sac and/or the caudal nerve roots; at a single vertebral level, narrowing may affect the whole canal or part of it” (Postacchini 1983. This definition distinguished between disc herniation and stenosis. [16] . The most common type of spinal stenosis is caused by degenerative arthritis of the spine. Hypertrophy and ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament which usually are confined to the cervical spine, and diffuse idiopathic skeletal hyperostosis (DISH syndrome also may result in an acquired form of spinal stenosis. Congenital forms caused by disorders such as achondroplasia and dysplastic spondylolisthesis are much less common. Congenital spinal stenosis usually is central and is evident or imaging studies. Idiopathic congenital narrowing usually involves the anteroposterior dimension of the canal secondary to short pedicles; the patient otherwise is normal. In contrast, in achondroplasia, the canal is narrowed in the anteroposterior plane owing to shortened pedicles and in lateral dimension because of diminished interpedicular distance. Acquired forms of spinal stenosis usually are

  8. The incidence of adjacent segment disease after lumbar discectomy: A study of 751 patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bydon, Mohamad; Macki, Mohamed; Kerezoudis, Panagiotis; Sciubba, Daniel M; Wolinsky, Jean-Paul; Witham, Timothy F; Gokaslan, Ziya L; Bydon, Ali

    2017-01-01

    The objective of this study is to determine the incidence and prognostic factors of adjacent segment disease (ASD) following first-time lumbar discectomy (LD). We retrospectively reviewed all neurosurgical patients who underwent first-time LD for degenerative lumbar disease from 1990 to 2012. ASD was defined as a clinical and radiographic progression of degenerative spinal disease that required surgical decompression (with or without fusion) at the level above or below the index discectomy. Adjusted odds ratios were calculated from multivariable logistical regression controlling for sex and age, as well as postoperative sensory deficit, motor deficit, back pain, neurogenic claudication, and radiculopathy. Of the 751 patients who underwent single-level LD, the cumulative reoperation rate for degenerative spinal disease was 10.79%. The incidence of ASD requiring reoperation was 4% over 3.11years. More specifically, the incidence of adjacent level discectomy was 1.86% over 3.45years. The annualized reoperation rate for ASD was 1.35% (1.35 ASD reoperations per 100 person-years). The 63.33% incidence of cranial ASD requiring reoperation was statistically significantly higher than the 40.00% incidence of caudal ASD requiring reoperation. Following multivariable logistical regression, the strongest (and only) statistically significant predictor of ASD requiring reoperation was lower extremity radiculopathy after the index discectomy operation (OR=14.23, p<0.001). In the first series on ASD following first-time LD without fusion, the rate of reoperation for ASD was 4% and the cumulative reoperation rate 10.79%. Rostral ASD is more common than caudal ASD and lower extremity radiculopathy is the strongest predictor of ASD. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Automatic Lumbar Spondylolisthesis Measurement in CT Images.

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    Liao, Shu; Zhan, Yiqiang; Dong, Zhongxing; Yan, Ruyi; Gong, Liyan; Zhou, Xiang Sean; Salganicoff, Marcos; Fei, Jun

    2016-07-01

    Lumbar spondylolisthesis is one of the most common spinal diseases. It is caused by the anterior shift of a lumbar vertebrae relative to subjacent vertebrae. In current clinical practices, staging of spondylolisthesis is often conducted in a qualitative way. Although meyerding grading opens the door to stage spondylolisthesis in a more quantitative way, it relies on the manual measurement, which is time consuming and irreproducible. Thus, an automatic measurement algorithm becomes desirable for spondylolisthesis diagnosis and staging. However, there are two challenges. 1) Accurate detection of the most anterior and posterior points on the superior and inferior surfaces of each lumbar vertebrae. Due to the small size of the vertebrae, slight errors of detection may lead to significant measurement errors, hence, wrong disease stages. 2) Automatic localize and label each lumbar vertebrae is required to provide the semantic meaning of the measurement. It is difficult since different lumbar vertebraes have high similarity of both shape and image appearance. To resolve these challenges, a new auto measurement framework is proposed with two major contributions: First, a learning based spine labeling method that integrates both the image appearance and spine geometry information is designed to detect lumbar vertebrae. Second, a hierarchical method using both the population information from atlases and domain-specific information in the target image is proposed for most anterior and posterior points positioning. Validated on 258 CT spondylolisthesis patients, our method shows very similar results to manual measurements by radiologists and significantly increases the measurement efficiency.

  10. Effect of transforaminal epidural block for relief of chronic low back pain with radiculopathy of multiple etiologies

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    Raktim Guha

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Low back pain is one of the most common causes of chronic pain syndrome. Epidural steroids are being used for relieving mechanical causes of back pain, accompanied by signs of nerve root irritation with good results. Transforaminal epidural block at a particular level is a convenient route for steroid injection. Methods: The study was carried out on patients attending our pain clinic complaining of low back pain with radiculopathy where conservative therapy failed. Patients were divided into three groups (20 in each, allocated by random number table, 1 st one having collapsed vertebra, 2 nd one having disc protrusion following degenerative changes, 3 rd one having Grade I spondylolisthesis in lumbosacral region. Each of them received transforaminal epidural block at one level (L1/L2 with a dose of 40 mg of depot methyl prednisolone, diluted with 1 ml of 0.25% isobaric bupivacaine (to make a volume of 2 ml for each level on both sides. Initial pain response (at 1 h was assessed by visual analogue scale (VAS. Long-term pain and disability were assessed (at 1 st , 3 rd and 6 th months by using VAS score and oswestry disability index (ODI score. Results: Significant improvement in VAS and ODI score were observed in cases of collapsed vertebra and disc protrusion due to degenerative changes but in the cases of Grade I spondylolisthesis no such improvement was observed. Conclusion: Transforaminal epidural block causes significant relief of symptoms where compression of nerve roots at a particular level causing radiculopathy as in collapsed vertebra or disc protrusion, but not in spondylolisthesis.

  11. Lumbar disc excision through fenestration

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    Sangwan S

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Background : Lumbar disc herniation often causes sciatica. Many different techniques have been advocated with the aim of least possible damage to other structures while dealing with prolapsed disc surgically in the properly selected and indicated cases. Methods : Twenty six patients with clinical symptoms and signs of prolapsed lumbar intervertebral disc having radiological correlation by MRI study were subjected to disc excision by interlaminar fenestration method. Results : The assessment at follow-up showed excellent results in 17 patients, good in 6 patients, fair in 2 patients and poor in 1 patient. The mean preoperative and postoperative Visual Analogue Scores were 9.34 ±0.84 and 2.19 ±0.84 on scale of 0-10 respectively. These were statistically significant (p value< 0.001, paired t test. No significant complications were recorded. Conclusion : Procedures of interlaminar fenestration and open disc excision under direct vision offers sufficient adequate exposure for lumbar disc excision with a smaller incision, lesser morbidity, shorter convalescence, early return to work and comparable overall results in the centers where recent laser and endoscopy facilities are not available.

  12. Discopathy in lumbar spinal stenosis.

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    Kłosiński, Piotr; Gilis-Januszewska, Maciej; Serafin, Witold; Płomiński, Daniel

    2004-06-30

    Background. In a group of patients treated surgically for stenosis in the lumbar spine, we compared the pre-operative nature of the pathology of the intervertebral disc as measured by MRI to the treatment outcome. Material and methods. In 30 persons ranging in age from 39 to 68 who reported at least 60% subjective improvement in quality of life after surgery (wide decompression of the spinal canal in the lumbar segment, spondylodesis, transpedicular fixation) the character of the discopathy was evaluated by MRI. Results. In MRI studies from the study group, feature of dehydratation and protrusion of the nucleus pulposus occurred among all patients, while the most common clinical symptom was neurogenic claudication. Non-removal of intervertebral discs protruding less than 6 mm into the lumen of the spinal canal did not cause worse outcome. Conclusion. In this group of patients treated surgically for lumbar stenosis with wide decompression, the fact that a slight protrusion of the intervertebral disc (prolapse <6mm) persists after surgery, in the absence of conflict between the disc and nerve elements, has no influence on treatment outcome.

  13. Weightlifter Lumbar Physiology Health Influence Factor Analysis of Sports Medicine

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    Zhang, Xiangyang

    2015-01-01

    Chinese women's weightlifting project has been in the advanced world level, suggests that the Chinese coaches and athletes have many successful experience in the weight lifting training. Little weight lifting belongs to high-risk sports, however, to the lumbar spine injury, some young good athletes often due to lumbar trauma had to retire, and the national investment and athletes toil is regret things. This article from the perspective of sports medicine, weightlifting athletes training situation analysis and put forward Suggestions, aimed at avoiding lumbar injury, guarantee the health of athletes. In this paper, first of all to 50 professional women's weightlifting athletes doing investigation, found that 82% of the athletes suffer from lumbar disease symptoms, the reason is mainly composed of lumbar strain, intensity is too large, motion error caused by three factors. From the Angle of sports medicine and combined with the characteristics of the structure of human body skeleton athletes lumbar structural mechanics analysis, find out the lumbar force's two biggest technical movement, study, and regulate the action standard, so as to minimize lumbar force, for athletes to contribute to the health of the lumbar spine. PMID:26981162

  14. Minimally invasive lateral transpsoas interbody fusion using a stand-alone construct for the treatment of adjacent segment disease of the lumbar spine: review of the literature and report of three cases.

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    Palejwala, Sheri K; Sheen, Whitney A; Walter, Christina M; Dunn, Jack H; Baaj, Ali A

    2014-09-01

    We describe 3 patients who presented with radiographic signs and clinical symptoms of adjacent segment disease several years after undergoing L4-S1 posterior pedicle screw fusion. All patients underwent successful lateral lumbar interbody fusion (LLIF) at 1-2 levels above their previous constructs, using stand-alone cages, with complete resolution of radiculopathy and a significant improvement in low-back pain. In addition to a thorough analysis of these cases, we review the pertinent literature regarding treatment options for adjacent segment disease and the applications of the lateral lumbar interbody technique. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. [Analysis of X-ray signs of cervical spondylosis between vertebral artery type and radiculopathy].

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    Feng, Min-Shan; Gao, Jing-Hua; Zhu, Li-Guo; Ma, Zi-Long; Gao, Chun-Yu; Ding, Hong-Lei

    2015-04-01

    To improve the X-ray diagnosis of cervical spondylosis of vertebral artery type (VCS). A blinded design research. The X-ray signs both 60 patients with VCS and 60 patients with cervical spondylotic radiculopathy were collected from January 2011 to November 2012. There were 36 males and 84 females, aged from 25 to 65 years old with an average of (48.4 ± 12.3) years old. Cervical curvature, atlanto-occipital joint angle, atlanto-axial joint angle, C2/C3 joint angle and lower cervical instability condition and segmental distribution were measured and recorded by X-rays. These data were analyzed and compared between the two groups after unblended. Combined with clinical manifestations,the X-ray imaging features of VCS were further analyzed. There was significant difference in cervical curvature between two groups in anteflexion X-ray films (P cervical instability condition and segmental distribution between two groups. In VCS group, the mild and moderate dizziness was main symptom, flexion and extension activities of neck was most common cause in the dizziness; and always accompanied with headache; tenderness mostly concentrated in the upper cervical area. Both X-ray signs and clinical manifestations can prompt the abnormalities of the upper cervical structure or function in patients with VCS. Anteflexion activities of neck observed by functional position of X-ray films should be emphasized in diagnosis of VCS.

  16. Multiple lumbar transverse process stress fractures as a cause of chronic low back ache in a young fast bowler - a case report

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    Bali Kamal

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract A rare case of multilevel transverse process stress fractures as a cause of low back ache in a professional cricket player has been presented. The report discusses the possible mechanism of such an injury in a cricket player and also highlights the preventive and therapeutic aspects of management in such patients. The report also stresses upon the need for early identification of such sports related injuries to prevent long term morbidity in the athletes.

  17. EFFECTIVENESS OF NEURODYNAMICS IN COMPARISON TO MANUAL TRACTION IN THE MANAGEMENT OF CERVICAL RADICULOPATHY

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    Mamoona Anwar

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Cervical radiculopathy is a condition of pain and sensorimotor deficits due to cervical nerve root compression. The symptoms may include weakness, tingling, numbness and pain. C6, C7 nerve roots are most involved in cervical radiculopathy. Various modalities and therapeutic interventions are used and recommended for management of cervical radiculopathy including cervical collars, immobilization, manipulation, cervical traction TENS and therapeutic exercises.The aimof this study is to evaluate the efficacy of neurodynamics in comparison to manual traction in the management of cervical radiculopathy. Methods: An Interventional research was performed in the Department of Physiotherapy, Mayo hospital Lahore, Pakistan. 40 subjects aged between 18-60 years participated in the study. They were divided into two groups namely Group A and Group B with 20 subjects in each group. The duration of the study was 4 weeks with 4 sessions per week. GroupA received neurodynamics along with strengthening exercises while Group B received manual traction along with strengthening exercises. Neck Disability Index (NDI scale was used as an outcome measure andpaired sample t-test was used for statistical analysis. Results: A significant improvement was found in both neurodynamics group and manual traction group for pain and functional status with p value< 0.05. Conclusion: This study concluded that the treatment techniques, neurodynamics and manual traction were effective in alleviating the symptoms associated with cervical radiculopathy in terms of decreasing pain intensity, increasing ranges of motion and improving functional capacity.

  18. Herniated lumbar disc

    OpenAIRE

    Jordon, Jo; Konstantinou, Kika; O'Dowd, John

    2009-01-01

    Herniated lumbar disc is a displacement of disc material (nucleus pulposus or annulus fibrosis) beyond the intervertebral disc space. The highest prevalence is among people aged 30-50 years, with a male to female ratio of 2:1.

  19. Herniated lumbar disc

    OpenAIRE

    Jordan, Jo; Konstantinou, Kika; O'Dowd, John

    2011-01-01

    Herniated lumbar disc is a displacement of disc material (nucleus pulposus or annulus fibrosis) beyond the intervertebral disc space. The highest prevalence is among people aged 30 to 50 years, with a male to female ratio of 2:1.

  20. A novel minimally invasive percutaneous facet augmentation device for the treatment of lumbar radiculopathy and axial back pain: technical description, surgical technique and case presentations Un nuevo dispositivo percutáneo mínimamente invasivo de aumento facetáreo para el tratamiento de radiculopatía lumbar y dolor axial lumbar: descripción técnica, técnica quirúrgica y presentación de casos Um novo dispositivo percutâneo minimamente invasivo de aumento facetário para o tratamento da radiculopatia lombar e dor axial lombar: descrição técnica, técnica cirúrgica e apresentação de casos

    OpenAIRE

    Larry T. Khoo; Nan Fu Chen; Sean Armin; Eric Stiner; Juan Dipp; Ricardo Flores; Sylvain Palmer

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: to describe a new posterior minimally invasive method of facet stabilization for treatment of the degenerating lumbar motion segment. The biomechanics of this Percudyn (Interventional Spine; Irvine, CA) system are distinct from that of other interspinous dynamic stabilization systems as it acts bilaterally directly within the middle column of the spine. Based on biomechanical evalution, the paired prosthesis supports, cushions, and reinforces the facet complexes by limiting both ex...

  1. The application of Mechanical Diagnosis and Therapy and changes on MRI findings in a patient with cervical radiculopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spanos, G; Zounis, M; Natsika, M; May, S

    2013-12-01

    Cervical radiculopathy is an unusual presentation for patients with neck pain. Its diagnosis and management is uncertain. This case report presents an example of a patient with cervical radiculopathy who responded to Mechanical Diagnosis and Therapy, and whose MRI findings changed over time. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. The value of provocative tests in diagnosis of cervical radiculopathy

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    Majid Ghasemi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: This study was aimed at assessing the accuracy of provocative tests in diagnosis of acute or chronic Cervical Radiculopathy (CR based on an electrodiagnostic reference criterion. Materials and Methods : Shoulder Abduction Test (SAT, Spurling Test (ST, Upper Limb Tension Test (ULTT, and electromyography were done on 97 patients who referred to Electrodiagnostic center in the university hospital from January 2010 to March 2011. All of the participants had neck and radicular pain for at least 3 weeks. They were classified according to electrodiagnostic findings. Then diagnostic values of provocative tests were assessed in diagnosis of acute or chronic CR on the basis of reference criterion. Results : SAT and ST were more specific (85% compared to ULTT, while ULTT was more sensitive (60.46% in acute and 35.29% in chronic than the other two. SAT and ST had a significant accuracy for comparison between acute and chronic CR (P < 0.05. Conclusion : ULTT is suitable for screening of CR, while SAT and ST can support diagnosis. SAT and ST are good diagnostic tests for comparison between acute and chronic CR.

  3. Jingtong Granule: A Chinese Patent Medicine for Cervical Radiculopathy

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    Liguo Zhu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. This paper systematically assessed the efficacy and safety of Jingtong granule (JG for cervical radiculopathy (CR. Methods. Randomized controlled trials comparing JG with no intervention, placebo, or conventional therapies were retrieved. The trials testing JG combined with conventional therapies versus conventional therapies were also enrolled. Study selection, methodological assessment, data extraction, and analysis were conducted in accordance with the Cochrane standards. The strength of evidence was evaluated according to GRADE approach. Results. Three trials with 400 participants were included. Methodological quality was evaluated as generally low. One study found that JG showed significant difference on decreasing pain scores compared with placebo. Meta-analysis indicated that JG plus conventional analgesic exhibited a significant immediate effect on the pain scores (WMD = 1.63; 95% CI: 1.29 to 1.98; P<0.00001. Additionally, JG combined with analgesic presented beneficial immediate effect on neck disability index. However, the treatment effects of JG demonstrated in the trials were not large, and the safety of JG was unproven. Finally the evidence level was evaluated to be low. Conclusions. Our results indicated that JG showed some potential benefits for CR. Nevertheless, treatment effects are uncertain due to both the methodological concerns and the very modest reported improvements.

  4. Methamphetamine Related Radiculopathy: Case Series and Review of Literature

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    Mohsen Foroughipour

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Peripheral nervous injury and neuromuscular complications from methamphetamine abuse has not been reported. The mechanism is not yet identified. Methods: Eight patients with lower extremity weakness following methamphetamine abuse were reported during December 2009 to May 2010. Results: Patients presented with lower extremity weakness. All patients were co-abusers of methamphetamine and opioids. Other clinical manifestations comprised of distal paresthesia of the lower extremities with progression to proximal portions, with minimal sensory involvement in the distal of the lower extremities. Electrodiagnostic findings were consistent with lumbosacral Radiculopathy. Vital signs were unremarkable and all laboratory tests were within normal limits. Follow-up examination after three months showed improvement of weakness in 3 patients. Conclusion: For patients with a history of illicit drug abuse and acute neuromuscular weakness, methamphetamine or heroin toxicity should be taken into account. Hence, urine morphine and amphetamine/ methamphetamine tests should be performed and serum lead and thallium levels should be evaluated. In addition, rhabdomyolysis and myoglobinuria should be worked up.

  5. Painless motor radiculopathy of the cervical spine: clinical and radiological characteristics and long-term outcomes after operative decompression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siller, Sebastian; Kasem, Rami; Witt, Thomas-Nikolaus; Tonn, Joerg-Christian; Zausinger, Stefan

    2018-03-23

    OBJECTIVE Various neurological diseases are known to cause progressive painless paresis of the upper limbs. In this study the authors describe the previously unspecified syndrome of compression-induced painless cervical radiculopathy with predominant motor deficit and muscular atrophy, and highlight the clinical and radiological characteristics and outcomes after surgery for this rare syndrome, along with its neurological differential diagnoses. METHODS Medical records of 788 patients undergoing surgical decompression due to degenerative cervical spine diseases between 2005 and 2014 were assessed. Among those patients, 31 (3.9%, male to female ratio 4.8 to 1, mean age 60 years) presented with painless compressive cervical motor radiculopathy due to neuroforaminal stenosis without signs of myelopathy; long-term evaluation was available in 23 patients with 49 symptomatic foraminal stenoses. Clinical, imaging, and operative findings as well as the long-term course of paresis and quality of life were analyzed. RESULTS Presenting symptoms (mean duration 13.3 months) included a defining progressive flaccid radicular paresis (median grade 3/5) without any history of radiating pain (100%) and a concomitant muscular atrophy (78%); 83% of the patients were smokers and 17% patients had diabetes. Imaging revealed a predominantly anterior nerve root compression at the neuroforaminal entrance in 98% of stenoses. Thirty stenoses (11 patients) were initially decompressed via an anterior surgical approach and 19 stenoses (12 patients) via a posterior surgical approach. Overall reoperation rate due to new or recurrent stenoses was 22%, with time to reoperation shorter in smokers (p = 0.033). Independently of the surgical procedure chosen, long-term follow-up (mean 3.9 years) revealed a stable or improved paresis in 87% of the patients (median grade 4/5) and an excellent general performance and quality of life. CONCLUSIONS Painless cervical motor radiculopathy predominantly occurs

  6. Active myofascial trigger points might be more frequent in patients with cervical radiculopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sari, H; Akarirmak, U; Uludag, M

    2012-06-01

    Myofascial trigger points (MTrPs) are commonly observed in the neck, parascapular region, and upper back muscles of patients with cervical pathology. To assess the frequency of latent and active myofascial trigger point (aMTrP) in the neck and upper back muscles in patients with cervical radiculopathy and healthy subjects. Controlled clinical trials. Outpatients and controls. Two hundred and forty four patients and 122 controls The patients clinically diagnosed as cervical radiculopathy with positive Spurling's test and confirmed by MRI, were enrolled in this study. All subjects were examined for active and latent MTrP. In patients with cervical radiculopathy, an aMTrP was distinguished from a latent one when the referred pain elicited by exploration of the MTrP is recognized as familiar. The patients comprised of 128 female (52.5%) and 116 male (47.5%) patients. Mean age was 44.58(20-65 years). In 125 (51.2%) of patients with cervical radiculopathy were found an aMTrP at least one muscle from upper trapezius, multifidus, splenius capitis, levator scapulae, rhomboid major, minor and deep paraspinal muscles. Number and distribution of MTrPs in patients with 244 cervical radiculopathy and in healthy controls. aMTrPs were detected most common in levator scapula (16.3%), splenius capitis (14.7%), rhomboid minor (14.3%), upper part of trapezius (13.5%), rhomboid major (10.2%) and multifidus (8.6%) muscles. Patients with cervical radiculopathy showed latent MTrP in levator scapula (27%), splenius capitis (16.8%), rhomboid minor (24.6%), upper part of trapezius (33.2%), rhomboid major (9%) and multifidus (8.2%) muscles. There was significant difference in terms of distribution of active and latent MTrPs in patients with cervical radiculopathy (P=0.019). Number of latent MTrPs in upper trapezius muscles in patients with cervical radiculopathy was more than the expected distribution. None of the subjects of control group had aMTrP. However, healthy controls showed latent

  7. Results of arthrospine assisted percutaneous technique for lumbar discectomy

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    Mohinder Kaushal

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Avaialable minimal invasive arthro/endoscopic techniques are not compatible with 30 degree arthroscope which orthopedic surgeons uses in knee and shoulder arthroscopy. Minimally invasive “Arthrospine assisted percutaneous technique for lumbar discectomy” is an attempt to allow standard familiar microsurgical discectomy and decompression to be performed using 30° arthroscope used in knee and shoulder arthroscopy with conventional micro discectomy instruments. Materials and Methods: 150 patients suffering from lumbar disc herniations were operated between January 2004 and December 2012 by indiginously designed Arthrospine system and were evaluated retrospectively. In lumbar discectomy group, there were 85 males and 65 females aged between 18 and 72 years (mean, 38.4 years. The delay between onset of symptoms to surgery was between 3 months to 7 years. Levels operated upon included L1-L2 (n = 3, L2-L3 (n = 2, L3-L4 (n = 8, L4-L5 (n = 90, and L5-S1 (n = 47. Ninety patients had radiculopathy on right side and 60 on left side. There were 22 central, 88 paracentral, 12 contained, 3 extraforaminal, and 25 sequestrated herniations. Standard protocol of preoperative blood tests, x-ray LS Spine and pre operative MRI and pre anaesthetic evaluation for anaesthesia was done in all cases. Technique comprised localization of symptomatic level followed by percutaneous dilatation and insertion of a newly devised arthrospine system devise over a dilator through a 15 mm skin and fascial incision. Arthro/endoscopic discectomy was then carried out by 30° arthroscope and conventional disc surgery instruments. Results: Based on modified Macnab's criteria, of 150 patients operated for lumbar discectomy, 136 (90% patients had excellent to good, 12 (8% had fair, and 2 patients (1.3% had poor results. The complications observed were discitis in 3 patients (2%, dural tear in 4 patients (2.6%, and nerve root injury in 2 patients (1.3%. About 90% patients

  8. Using the modified Delphi method to establish a new Chinese clinical consensus of the treatments for cervical radiculopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zang, Lei; Fan, Ning; Hai, Yong; Lu, S B; Su, Q J; Yang, J C; Du, Peng; Gao, Y J

    2015-06-01

    Although cervical radiculopathy is very common, there is no standard treatment for this condition, with little high-level evidence available to guide the treatment choice. Thus, this study aimed to review the current data on the management of cervical radiculopathy; and, further, to establish a new Chinese clinical consensus of the treatments for cervical radiculopathy using the Delphi method. First, a systematic review of the previously established treatment guidelines and of articles related to cervical radiculopathy was conducted to establish a protocol for the clinical consensus of the treatment for cervical radiculopathy. Second, from February 2012 to June 2014, we performed a modified Delphi survey in which the current professional opinions from 30 experienced experts, representing almost all of the Chinese provinces, were gathered. Three rounds were performed, and consensus was defined as ≥70% agreement. Consensus of the treatments for cervical radiculopathy was reached on seven aspects, including the proportion of patients requiring only non-surgical therapies; the effectiveness of neck immobilization, physiotherapy, pharmacologic treatment; surgical indications; contraindications; surgery. The modified Delphi study conducted herein reached a consensus concerning several treatment issues for cervical radiculopathy. In the absence of high-level evidence, at present, these expert opinion findings will help guide health care providers to define the appropriate treatment in their regions. Items with no consensus provide excellent areas for future research.

  9. The comparison of multiple F-wave variable studies and magnetic resonance imaging examinations in the assessment of cervical radiculopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Chu-Hsu; Tsai, Yuan-Hsiung; Chang, Chia-Hao; Chen, Chien-Min; Hsu, Hung-Chih; Wu, Chun-Yen; Hong, Chang-Zern

    2013-09-01

    The aims of this study were to investigate the correlation of the findings of multiple median and ulnar F-wave variables and magnetic resonance imaging examinations in the prediction of cervical radiculopathy. The data of 68 patients who underwent both nerve conduction studies of the upper extremities and cervical spine magnetic resonance imaging within 3 mos of the nerve conduction studies were retrospectively reviewed and reinterpreted. The associations between multiple median and ulnar F-wave variables (including persistence, chronodispersion, and minimal, maximal, and mean latencies) and magnetic resonance imaging evidence of lower cervical spondylotic radiculopathy (i.e., C7, C8, and T1 radiculopathy) were investigated. Patients with lower cervical radiculopathy exhibited reduced right median F-wave persistence (P = 0.011), increased right ulnar F-wave chronodispersion (P = 0.041), and a trend toward increased left ulnar F-wave chronodispersion (P = 0.059); however, there were no other consistent significant differences in the F-wave variables between patients with and patients without magnetic resonance imaging evidence of lower cervical radiculopathy. In comparison with normal reference values established previously, the sensitivity and positive predictive value of F-wave variable abnormalities for predicting lower cervical radiculopathy were low. There was a low correlation between F-wave studies and magnetic resonance imaging examinations. The diagnostic utility of multiple F-wave variables in the prediction of cervical radiculopathy was not supported by this study.

  10. Outcomes of anterior lumbar interbody fusion surgery based on indication: a prospective study.

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    Rao, Prashanth J; Loganathan, Ajanthan; Yeung, Vivian; Mobbs, Ralph J

    2015-01-01

    There is limited information on clinical outcomes after anterior lumbar interbody fusion (ALIF) based on the indications for surgery. To compare the clinical and radiological outcomes of ALIF for each surgical indication. This prospective clinical study included 125 patients who underwent ALIF over a 2-year period. The patients were evaluated preoperatively and postoperatively. Outcome measures included the Short Form-12, Oswestry Disability Index, Visual Analog Scale, and Patient Satisfaction Index. After a mean follow-up of 20 months, the clinical condition of the patients was significantly better than their preoperative status across all indications. A total of 108 patients had a Patient Satisfaction Index score of 1 or 2, indicating a successful clinical outcome in 86%. Patients with degenerative disk disease (with and without radiculopathy), spondylolisthesis, and scoliosis had the best clinical response to ALIF, with statistically significant improvement in the Short Form-12, Oswestry Disability Index, and Visual Analog Scale. Failed posterior fusion and adjacent segment disease showed statistically significant improvement in all of these clinical outcome scores, although the mean changes in the Short Form-12 Mental Component Summary, Oswestry Disability Index, and Visual Analog Scale (back pain) were lower. The overall radiological fusion rate was 94.4%. Superior radiological outcomes (fusion >90%) were observed in patients with degenerative disk disease (with and without radiculopathy), spondylolisthesis, and failed posterior fusion, whereas in adjacent segment disease, it was 80%. ALIF is an effective treatment for degenerative disk disease (with and without radiculopathy) and spondylolisthesis. Although results were promising for scoliosis, failed posterior fusion, and adjacent segment disease, further studies are necessary to establish the effectiveness of ALIF in these conditions.

  11. An updated review of automated percutaneous mechanical lumbar discectomy for the contained herniated lumbar disc.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manchikanti, Laxmaiah; Singh, Vijay; Falco, Frank J E; Calodney, Aaron K; Onyewu, Obi; Helm, Standiford; Benyamin, Ramsin M; Hirsch, Joshua A

    2013-04-01

    Lumbar disc prolapse, protrusion, and extrusion are the most common causes of nerve root pain and surgical interventions, and yet they account for less than 5% of all low back problems. The typical rationale for traditional surgery is that it is an effort to provide more rapid relief of pain and disability. It should be noted that the majority of patients do recover with conservative management. The primary rationale for any form of surgery for disc prolapse associated with radicular pain is to relieve nerve root irritation or compression due to herniated disc material. The primary modality of treatment continues to be either open or microdiscectomy, although several alternative techniques, including automated percutaneous mechanical lumbar discectomy, have been described. There is, however, a paucity of evidence for all decompression techniques, specifically alternative techniques including automated and laser discectomy. A systematic review of the literature of automated percutaneous mechanical lumbar discectomy for the contained herniated lumbar disc. To evaluate and update the effectiveness of automated percutaneous mechanical lumbar discectomy. The available literature on automated percutaneous mechanical lumbar discectomy in managing chronic low back and lower extremity pain was reviewed. The quality assessment and clinical relevance criteria utilized were the Cochrane Musculoskeletal Review Group criteria, as utilized for interventional techniques for randomized trials, and the criteria developed by the Newcastle-Ottawa Scale criteria for observational studies.The level of evidence was classified as good, fair, and limited or poor, based on the quality of evidence scale developed by the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF). Data sources included relevant literature identified through searches of PubMed and EMBASE from 1966 to September 2012, and manual searches of the bibliographies of known primary and review articles. Pain relief was the primary

  12. Efficacy of Epidural Perineural Injection of Autologous Conditioned Serum in Unilateral Cervical Radiculopathy: A Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goni, Vijay G; Singh Jhala, Sampat; Gopinathan, Nirmal Raj; Behera, Prateek; Batra, Y K; R H H, Arjun; Guled, Uday; Vardhan, Harsha

    2015-08-15

    Prospective randomized pilot study. Evaluation of the efficacy of epidural perineural injection of autologous conditioned serum (ACS) versus methylprednisone (MPS) in unilateral cervical radiculopathy patients. Cervical radiculopathy is often treated by nonoperative and operative means. Guided injections of steroids have been used previously. We used ACS, an orthobiologic derived from patients' own blood in patients of unilateral cervical radiculopathy. Forty patients were equally allocated into ACS and MPS groups and were injected with 2.5 to 3 mL of ACS or MPS, respectively, under image guidance into the perineural area of the affected nerve root. They were followed up for 6 months with visual analogue scale for pain, neck pain disability scale in Hindi language, neck disability index, and Short Form of Health Survey-12 (SF-12). Patients who had received injections of ACS and MPS both had improvements in the scores of the evaluation tools. The improvement in the ACS patients was gradual and sustained during the entire study period whereas that in the MPS group had some deterioration over time. No major complications were noted among the 2 groups. Minor complications were noted in both the groups. ACS can be considered an equally good or better modality of nonoperative management in patients of unilateral cervical radiculopathy as MPS. The safety profile is good and the improvement seen is sustained over time. Thus, it may be offered to affected patients before offering them surgery. 2.

  13. Lack of uniform diagnostic criteria for cervical radiculopathy in conservative intervention studies: A systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E.J. Thoomes (Erik); G.G.M. Scholten-Peeters (Gwendolijne); A.J. de Boer (Alice); R.A. Olsthoorn (Remy); K. Verkerk (Karin); C.-W.C. Lin (Chung-Wei Christine); A.P. Verhagen (Arianne)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractPurpose: Cervical radiculopathy (CR) is a common diagnosis. It is unclear if intervention studies use uniform definitions and criteria for patient selection. Our objective was to assess the uniformity of diagnostic criteria and definitions used in intervention studies to select patients

  14. Divergent sensory phenotypes in nonspecific arm pain: comparisons with cervical radiculopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moloney, Niamh; Hall, Toby; Doody, Catherine

    2015-02-01

    To investigate whether distinct sensory phenotypes were identifiable in individuals with nonspecific arm pain (NSAP) and whether these differed from those in people with cervical radiculopathy. A secondary question considered whether the frequency of features of neuropathic pain, kinesiophobia, high pain ratings, hyperalgesia, and allodynia differed according to subgroups of sensory phenotypes. Cross-sectional study. Higher education institution. Forty office workers with NSAP, 17 people with cervical radiculopathy, and 40 age- and sex-matched healthy controls (N=97). Not applicable. Participants were assessed using quantitative sensory testing (QST) comprising thermal and vibration detection thresholds and thermal and pressure pain thresholds; clinical examination; and relevant questionnaires. Sensory phenotypes were identified for each individual in the patient groups using z-score transformation of the QST data. Individuals with NSAP and cervical radiculopathy present with a spectrum of sensory abnormalities; a dominant sensory phenotype was not identifiable in individuals with NSAP. No distinct pattern between clinical features and questionnaire results across sensory phenotypes was identified in either group. When considering sensory phenotypes, neither individuals with NSAP nor individuals with cervical radiculopathy should be considered homogeneous. Therefore, people with either condition may warrant different intervention approaches according to their individual sensory phenotype. Issues relating to the clinical identification of sensory hypersensitivity and the validity of QST are highlighted. Copyright © 2015 American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Lack of uniform diagnostic criteria for cervical radiculopathy in conservative intervention studies: a systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thoomes, Erik J; Scholten-Peeters, Gwendolijne G M; de Boer, Alice J; Olsthoorn, Remy A; Verkerk, Karin; Lin, Christine; Verhagen, Arianne P

    PURPOSE: Cervical radiculopathy (CR) is a common diagnosis. It is unclear if intervention studies use uniform definitions and criteria for patient selection. Our objective was to assess the uniformity of diagnostic criteria and definitions used in intervention studies to select patients with CR.

  16. Value of physical tests in diagnosing cervical radiculopathy : a systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thoomes, Erik J; van Geest, Sarita; van der Windt, Danielle A; Falla, Deborah; Verhagen, Arianne P; Koes, Bart W; Thoomes-de Graaf, Marloes; Kuijper, Barbara; Scholten-Peeters, Wendy Gm; Vleggeert-Lankamp, Carmen L

    Background context In clinical practice, the diagnosis of cervical radiculopathy is based on information from the patient history, physical examination and diagnostic imaging. Various physical tests may be performed, but their diagnostic accuracy is unknown. Purpose To summarize and update the

  17. The validity of using an electrocutaneous device for pain assessment in patients with cervical radiculopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbott, Allan; Ghasemi-Kafash, Elaheh; Dedering, Åsa

    2014-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the validity and preference for assessing pain magnitude with electrocutaneous testing (ECT) compared to the visual analogue scale (VAS) and Borg CR10 scale in men and women with cervical radiculopathy of varying sensory phenotypes. An additional purpose was to investigate ECT sensory and pain thresholds in men and women with cervical radiculopathy of varying sensory phenotypes. This is a cross-sectional study of 34 patients with cervical radiculopathy. Scatterplots and linear regression were used to investigate bivariate relationships between ECT, VAS and Borg CR10 methods of pain magnitude measurement as well as ECT sensory and pain thresholds. The use of the ECT pain magnitude matching paradigm for patients with cervical radiculopathy with normal sensory phenotype shows good linear association with arm pain VAS (R(2) = 0.39), neck pain VAS (R(2) = 0.38), arm pain Borg CR10 scale (R(2) = 0.50) and neck pain Borg CR10 scale (R(2) = 0.49) suggesting acceptable validity of the procedure. For patients with hypoesthesia and hyperesthesia sensory phenotypes, the ECT pain magnitude matching paradigm does not show adequate linear association with rating scale methods rendering the validity of the procedure as doubtful. ECT for sensory and pain threshold investigation, however, provides a method to objectively assess global sensory function in conjunction with sensory receptor specific bedside examination measures.

  18. Dimensions Underlying Measures of Disability, Personal Factors, and Health Status in Cervical Radiculopathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halvorsen, Marie; Kierkegaard, Marie; Harms-Ringdahl, Karin; Peolsson, Anneli; Dedering, Åsa

    2015-01-01

    Abstract This cross-sectional study sought to identify dimensions underlying measures of impairment, disability, personal factors, and health status in patients with cervical radiculopathy. One hundred twenty-four patients with magnetic resonance imaging-verified cervical radiculopathy, attending a neurosurgery clinic in Sweden, participated. Data from clinical tests and questionnaires on disability, personal factors, and health status were used in a principal-component analysis (PCA) with oblique rotation. The PCA supported a 3-component model including 14 variables from clinical tests and questionnaires, accounting for 73% of the cumulative percentage. The first component, pain and disability, explained 56%. The second component, health, fear-avoidance beliefs, kinesiophobia, and self-efficacy, explained 9.2%. The third component including anxiety, depression, and catastrophizing explained 7.6%. The strongest-loading variables of each dimension were “present neck pain intensity,” “fear avoidance,” and “anxiety.” The three underlying dimensions identified and labeled Pain and functioning, Health, beliefs, and kinesiophobia, and Mood state and catastrophizing captured aspects of importance for cervical radiculopathy. Since the variables “present neck pain intensity,” “fear avoidance,” and “anxiety” had the strongest loading in each of the three dimensions; it may be important to include them in a reduced multidimensional measurement set in cervical radiculopathy. PMID:26091482

  19. Cervical collar or physiotherapy versus wait and see policy for recent onset cervical radiculopathy: randomised trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuijper, Barbara; Tans, Jos Th J.; Beelen, Anita; Nollet, Frans; de Visser, Marianne

    2009-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the effectiveness of treatment with collar or physiotherapy compared with a wait and see policy in recent onset cervical radiculopathy. Design Randomised controlled trial. Setting Neurology outpatient clinics in three Dutch hospitals. Participants 205 patients with symptoms and

  20. Influence of Gluteus Maximus Inhibition on Upper Trapezius Overactivity in Chronic Mechanical Neck Pain with Radiculopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghada Mohamed Koura

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Mechanical neck pain is the most common type of neck pain and commonly to accompany with radiculopathy. Patients of neck pain exhibit greater activation of accessory muscles, (sternocleidomastoid, anterior scalene, and upper trapezius muscles and may also show changed patterns of motor control of other postural muscles as pelvic muscles for reducing activation of painful muscles of neck. Aim of the study: To determine if there is an association between gluteus maximus inhibition and overactivity of upper fibres of trapezius in patients with chronic mechanical neck pain with radiculopathy. Materials and Methods: Forty female patients participated in this study diagnosed as chronic mechanical neck pain with radiculopathy. Amplitude and onset of muscle activation were assessed by using the surface electromyography (EMG during prone hip extension test. Results: The results of this study demonstrated that there is no correlation between the amplitude of EMG activity of right and left gluteus maximus and the amplitude of EMG activity of right and left upper trapezius (P<0.05. Conclusion: It can be concluded that the overactivity of the upper trapezius muscle in patients with chronic mechanical neck pain with radiculopathy is not related to the inhibition of the gluteus maximus muscle during prone hip extension test.

  1. Traumatic Lumbar Hernia Diagnosed by Ultrasonography: A Case Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Kwang Lae; Yim, Yoon Myung; Lim, Oh Kyung; Park, Ki Deok; Choi, Chung Hwan; Lee, Ju Kang [Gachon University of Medicine and Science, Incheon (Korea, Republic of)

    2009-12-15

    Traumatic lumbar hernia describes the extrusion of intraperitoneal or extraperitoneal contents through a defect in the posterolateral abdominal wall caused by a trauma. This is a rare entity and usually diagnosed by computed tomography. A 64-year-old male received an injury on his cervical spinal cord after an accident in which he fell down. He complained of a mass on his left posterolateral back area. We diagnosed the mass as a traumatic lumbar hernia by ultrasonography and confirmed it by computed tomography. We conclude that the ultrasonography can be a useful diagnostic tool for traumatic lumbar hernia

  2. Traumatic Lumbar Hernia Diagnosed by Ultrasonography: A Case Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Kwang Lae; Yim, Yoon Myung; Lim, Oh Kyung; Park, Ki Deok; Choi, Chung Hwan; Lee, Ju Kang

    2009-01-01

    Traumatic lumbar hernia describes the extrusion of intraperitoneal or extraperitoneal contents through a defect in the posterolateral abdominal wall caused by a trauma. This is a rare entity and usually diagnosed by computed tomography. A 64-year-old male received an injury on his cervical spinal cord after an accident in which he fell down. He complained of a mass on his left posterolateral back area. We diagnosed the mass as a traumatic lumbar hernia by ultrasonography and confirmed it by computed tomography. We conclude that the ultrasonography can be a useful diagnostic tool for traumatic lumbar hernia

  3. Bilateral L5 Radiculopathy Due to Osteoporotic L1 Vertebral Fracture: A Case Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tezer, Mehmet; Ozturk, Cagatay; Erturer, Erden; Aydogan, Mehmet; Hamzaoglu, Azmi

    2006-01-01

    Background: The true incidence of osteoporotic vertebral fractures is not well defined because many osteoporotic vertebral fractures are asymptomatic. Although the true incidence of neurological compromise as a result of osteoporotic vertebral fractures is not known, it is thought to be low. In this case report, we present a case of L1 osteoporotic vertebral fracture causing bilateral L5 nerve root compression and manifestation of bilateral foot-drop. Methods: Pedicle screws were inserted in the vertebrae, 2 above and 2 below the L1 vertebra. A temporary rod was placed on the left. An L1 right hemilaminectomy via a posterior approach and a corpectomy were performed. The spinal cord was decompressed. Anterior fusion was carried out by placing titanium mesh cage into the vertebrectomy site as a strut graft via posterior approach, and posterolateral fusion with spongious allografts were added to the procedure. Results: Two years later the patient was completely symptom free and receiving medical treatment for osteoporosis, which was diagnosed as primary type. Conclusion: If a fracture is detected on the posterior wall of the vertebral body in computerized tomography (CT) examination with plain radiographs, a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) examination should be conducted in the presence of symptoms and physical findings suggestive of neurological compression. Follow-up neurological examinations should be carried out, and it should be kept in mind that most of the neurological symptoms may develop late and manifest as radiculopathy. The majority of the osteoporotic vertebral fractures can be managed conservatively with bed rest and orthosis, but cases with accompanying neurological deficit should be managed surgically using decompression and stabilization by fusion and instrumentation. PMID:17044395

  4. Lumbar Spinal Canal Stenosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... If you have lumbar spinal canal stenosis, your treatment will depend on how bad your symptoms are. If your pain is mild and you haven’t had it long, you can try an exercise program or a physical therapy program. This can strengthen your back muscles and ...

  5. Epidurography in lumbar spondylolisthesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johansen, J.G.; Hauge, O.

    1982-04-01

    Seventeen patients with lytic lumbar spondylolisthesis (Meyerding grade I-II) and radicular symptoms were examined by epidurography in addition to radiculomyelography before surgical treatment. Epidurography is considered more suitble than radiculomyelogrphy for assessing this condition because narrowing of the epidural space and compression of the nerve roots, due to osteofibrous changes at the lysis, are more consistently demonstrated.

  6. Deformation Measurement Of Lumbar Vertebra By Holographic Interferometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumoto, Toshiro; Kojima, Arata; Ogawa, Ryoukei; Iwata, Koichi; Nagata, Ryo

    1988-01-01

    The mechanical properties of normal lumbar vertebra and one with the interarticular part cut off to simulate hemi-spondylolysis were measured by the double exposure holographic interferometry. In the normal lumbar vertebra, displacement due to the load applied to the inferior articular process was greater than that of superior articular process under the same load. The interarticular part was subjected to the high stress. From these points, one of the valuable data to consider the cause of spondylolysis was obtained.

  7. Imaging and outcome in severe complications of lumbar epidural anaesthesia: report of 16 cases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chiapparini, L.; Savoiardo, M. [Department of Neuroradiology, Istituto Nazionale Neurologico, Milano (Italy); Sghirlanzoni, A.; Pareyson, D. [Department of Neurology, Istituto Nazionale Neurologico, Milano (Italy)

    2000-08-01

    We reviewed the clinical and neuroradiological features in 16 patients with serious neurological complications of lumbar epidural anaesthesia. We observed acute, transient or permanent and delayed complications. Four patients had symptoms immediately after the procedure. One patient developed a subacute flaccid paraparesis. Two other patients had infectious spondylodiscitis at lumbar puncture level. Eight patients had a delayed progressive spastic paraparesis and were found to have subarachnoid cysts and irregularities of the surface of the spinal cord consistent with arachnoiditis; six of them had an extensive, complex syrinx within the cord. One patient had a severe lumbar polyradiculopathy, and MRI showed adhesive arachnoiditis involving the cauda equina. Although epidural anaesthesia is generally considered safe, rare but severe complications, such as radiculopathy, infectious disease, myelopathy from ischemia and arachnoiditis with a syrinx may occur. The patients with arachnoiditis had a relentless progression of the disease and a poor outcome: five are confined to a wheelchair, one is bedridden. Complications of epidural anaesthesia are easily recognised when they develop immediately; their relationship to the anaesthesia may be ignored or underestimated when they appear after a delay. Awareness of the possibility of delayed complications is important. (orig.)

  8. Use of post-isometric relaxation in the chiropractic management of a 55-year-old man with cervical radiculopathy

    OpenAIRE

    Emary, Peter

    2012-01-01

    This case report chronicles the successful management of a 55-year-old patient diagnosed with cervical radiculopathy using spinal manipulative therapy and cervical paraspinal post-isometric relaxation stretches.

  9. [Rehabilitation of radiculopathy of the spine lumbosacral region complicated with herniated disc depending on the type of hernia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dovhyĭ, I L

    2012-01-01

    The article presents the results of treatment of 168 patients with radiculopathy lumbosacral spine, complicated hernias of intervertebral disc nucleus on the developed technique. The results show high efficacy of the treatment of this disease.

  10. Selective Thoracic Fusion Provides Similar Health-Related Quality of Life but Can Cause More Lumbar Disc and Facet Joint Degeneration: A Comparison of Adolescent Idiopathic Scoliosis Patients With Normal Population 10 Years After Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enercan, Meric; Kahraman, Sinan; Cobanoglu, Mutlu; Yilar, Sinan; Gokcen, Bahadir Huseyin; Karadereler, Selhan; Mutlu, Ayhan; Ulusoy, Levent Onur; Ozturk, Cagatay; Erturer, Erden; Gebes, Elif; Sanli, Tunay; Alanay, Ahmet; Hamzaoglu, Azmi

    2015-09-01

    To evaluate the long-term behavior of the lumbar curve in patients with adolescent idiopathic scoliosis treated with selective thoracic fusion and to assess the clinical and radiologic outcomes in this fusion group compared with an age- and gender-matched group. Selective thoracic fusion for the treatment of adolescent idiopathic scoliosis (AIS) preserves lumbar motion segments but leaves a residual deformity. By avoiding fusion of the lumbar spine, a greater mobility may be preserved, which may be an advantage in long-term follow-up in terms of degenerative changes in unfused segments. Group A included 25 AIS patients with mean a age of 23.8 years and a mean 11.4 years of follow-up. Group B included 30 age- and gender-matched subjects without any deformity. Preoperative, postoperative, and follow-up radiographs were reviewed. All patients had MRIs taken at the final follow-up in order to evaluate disc degeneration (DD) and facet joint degeneration (FJD) at the unfused lumbar spine. Clinical evaluation was done by using Scoliosis Research Society-22R, Oswestry Disability Index, and numerical rating scale. Sagittal and coronal balance and lowest instrumented vertebra disc angulation were stable over time. Mean grading of lumbar DD was 2.16 (2-4) in Group A and 1.86 (1-3) in Group B. Lumbar FJDs were 2.05 (1-4) in Group A and 1.60 (1-3) in Group B. There was significant difference between the two groups for DD except for the L4-L5 level (p = .26). FJD was significantly higher in the L1-L2 and L2-L3 levels (L1-L2, p = .002, L2-L3, p = .002) but not for the other levels. Outcome scores were similar without significant differences between the two groups (p > .05). Selective thoracic fusion provides satisfactory outcomes at more than 10 years of follow-up. Our study demonstrated a moderate increase in the rate of disc degeneration in the unfused segments. Facet joint degeneration was significant at the upper two levels adjacent to the lowest instrumented vertebra

  11. Development of a patient-reported outcome instrument for patients with lumbar radicular pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ibsen, Charlotte; Schiøttz-Christensen, Berit; Handberg, Charlotte

    is essential to develop valid patient-centred PRO instruments patients are not always involved. The International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF) are proposed to facilitate consistent description and measurement of LBP related disability. Purpose To involve patients with lumbar...... radiculopathy in the development of a PRO instrument based on ICF (ICF-PRO), by exploring patients' perspectives on the instrument's ability to describe functioning and provide information for the clinical decision-making process. Methods The scientific fundament for the development is ICF Core Set for LBP...... and ICF Rehabilitation Set. Items in the ICF-PRO are developed within methods and terminology of The Patient-Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System (PROMIS®). The development process contains five phases (figure 1). Results This poster presents preliminary results from phase 1-3. 89...

  12. Physical examination for lumbar radiculopathy due to disc herniation in patients with low-back pain (Protocol)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Windt, D.A.W.M.; Simons, E.; Riphagen, I.; Ammendolia, C.; Verhagen, A.P.; Laslett, M.; Devillé, W.; Aertgeerts, B.; Deyo, R.A.; Bouter, L.M.; de Vet, H.C.W.

    2008-01-01

    This is the protocol for a review and there is no abstract. The objectives are as follows: The general aim of our review is to provide information that may assist the clinician in making decisions about appropriate management in patients with low-back pain and leg pain suspected of having radicular

  13. National Clinical Guidelines for non-surgical treatment of patients with recent onset low back pain or lumbar radiculopathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stochkendahl, Mette Jensen; Kjaer, Per; Hartvigsen, Jan

    2018-01-01

    PURPOSE: To summarise recommendations about 20 non-surgical interventions for recent onset (... based on the GRADE approach. RESULTS: Sixteen recommendations were based on evidence, and four on consensus. Management of LBP and LR should include information about prognosis, warning signs, and advise to remain active. If treatment is needed, the guidelines suggest using patient education, different...... types of supervised exercise, and manual therapy. The guidelines recommend against acupuncture, routine use of imaging, targeted treatment, extraforaminal glucocorticoid injection, paracetamol, NSAIDs, and opioids. CONCLUSION: Recommendations are based on low to moderate quality evidence or on consensus...

  14. Effects of streching exercises education programme on pain and cervical spine movement function in patients with cervical radiculopathy

    OpenAIRE

    Janulevičiūtė, Augė

    2016-01-01

    Effects of Streching Exercises Education Programme on Pain and Cervical Spine Movement Function in Patients with Cervical Radiculopathy The Author: Vilnius University Bachelor of the Physiotherapy Program fourth-year student Augė Janulevičiūtė. Academic advisor: doctor Ieva Eglė Jamontaitė, Vilnius University Faculty of Medicine, Department of Physical and Sports medicine. Key words: cervical radiculopathy, neck pain, physical therapy, streching exercises, education programme. The aim of rese...

  15. Hypertrophy and pseudohypertrophy of the lower leg following chronic radiculopathy and neuropathy: imaging findings in two patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beuckeleer, L. de; Schepper, A. de [Department of Radiology, University Hospital Antwerp, Edegem (Netherlands); Vanhoenacker, F. [Department of Radiology, University Hospital Antwerp, Edegem (Netherlands)]|[Department of Radiology, AZ St. Maarten, Campus Duffel, Duffel (Belgium); Schepper, A. Jr. de [Department of Radiology, University Hospital Antwerp, Edegem (Netherlands)]|[Department of Radiology, AZ Middelheim, Antwerpen (Belgium); Seynaeve, P. [Department of Radiology, AZ Middelheim, Antwerpen (Belgium)

    1999-04-01

    Enlargement of the ipsilateral muscle compartment is an exceptional finding in patients with chronic radiculopathy, peripheral nerve injury, anterior horn cell diseases, or acquired peripheral neuropathy. We report radiographic, ultrasonographic, CT and MRI findings in a patient with chronic S1 radiculopathy and another with chronic neuropathy of the common fibular nerve (L4-S2), both presenting with painless enlargement of the calf muscles. (orig.) With 2 figs., 7 refs.

  16. [Physiotherapy in lumbar disc herniation ].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoll, T; Germann, D; Hagmann, H

    2001-08-01

    Physiotherapy is the treatment of choice in patients with symptoms caused by a lumbar disc herniation. In clinical practice a broad range of physiotherapeutic modalities has been revealed to be helpful. During the acute stage the efficacy of the McKenzie-concept, mobilisation therapies and traction has been demonstrated in randomized controlled trials with a blind assessor. In addition, pain reducing physical therapies such as cold or electrotherapy and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, analgesics and/or muscle relaxants are sensible initial accompanying treatments. The effectiveness of active physiotherapies such as training of local strength endurance of back and abdominal muscles has been proven in patients during the chronic stage. The indications for a in-patient rehabilitation programme, for surgery and the danger of developing chronic low back pain are discussed.

  17. Adjacent Segment Pathology after Lumbar Spinal Fusion

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Jae Chul; Choi, Sung-Woo

    2015-01-01

    One of the major clinical issues encountered after lumbar spinal fusion is the development of adjacent segment pathology (ASP) caused by increased mechanical stress at adjacent segments, and resulting in various radiographic changes and clinical symptoms. This condition may require surgical intervention. The incidence of ASP varies with both the definition and methodology adopted in individual studies; various risk factors for this condition have been identified, although a significant contro...

  18. Lumbar artery pseudoaneurysm and arteriovenous fistula as a complication of laparoscopic splenectomy: treatment by transcatheter embolization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maleux, G.; Wilms, G.; Vermylen, J.

    2002-01-01

    Iatrogenic injury of a lumbar artery is very rare and mostly causes retroperitoneal hemorrhage. We report a case of a lumbar artery pseudoaneurysm and a concomitant arteriovenous fistula complicating laparoscopic splenectomy and provoking renal colic-like flank pain due to mass effect on the left ureter. Definitive treatment of both vascular lesions was obtained after percutaneous transcatheter embolization of several lumbar arteries. Control computed tomography scan 3 months after embolization showed almost complete resorption of the retroperitoneal hematoma. (orig.)

  19. Lumbar artery pseudoaneurysm and arteriovenous fistula as a complication of laparoscopic splenectomy: treatment by transcatheter embolization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maleux, G.; Wilms, G. [Department of Radiology, University Hospitals, Leuven (Belgium); Vermylen, J. [Department of Internal Medicine-Vascular Diseases, University Hospitals, Leuven (Belgium)

    2002-06-01

    Iatrogenic injury of a lumbar artery is very rare and mostly causes retroperitoneal hemorrhage. We report a case of a lumbar artery pseudoaneurysm and a concomitant arteriovenous fistula complicating laparoscopic splenectomy and provoking renal colic-like flank pain due to mass effect on the left ureter. Definitive treatment of both vascular lesions was obtained after percutaneous transcatheter embolization of several lumbar arteries. Control computed tomography scan 3 months after embolization showed almost complete resorption of the retroperitoneal hematoma. (orig.)

  20. 49 CFR 572.187 - Lumbar spine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... performance requirements specified in paragraph (c) of this section. (b) Test procedure. (1) Soak the lumbar... Figure U2-A in appendix A to this subpart. Torque the lumbar hex nut (p/n 9000057) on to the lumbar cable...

  1. Computed tomography in the diagnosis of cervical disc herniation with radiculopathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Isu, Toyohiko; Iwasaki, Yoshinobu; Abe, Hiroshi; Miyasaka, Kazuo; Tashiro, Kunio

    1984-01-01

    Computed tomography (CT) is an accurate method of diagnosing cervical disc herniation in patients with radiculopathy. We evaluated 7 patients for the treatment of radiculopathy. The CT features of lateral cervical disc herniation include: (1) plain CT reveals a soft tissue mass compatible with laterally herniated disc material within the intervertebral foramen; (2) plain CT shows a soft tissue mass, which implies a fragmented disc, in the lateral recess; (3) CT with the intravenous administration of the contrast medium shows no delineation of the nerve root in the intervertebral foramen; and (4) CT metrizamide myelography demonstrates the filling defect of the root sleeve and hypertrophy of the nerve root. In those seven patients, all CT examinations were interpreted as positive for lateral disc herniation. There was a good correlation between the results of the neurologic examination and the CT findings. We wish to stress the usefulness of CT in the diagnosis of lateral cervical disc herniation. (author)

  2. Treatment of cervical radiculopathy: A review of the evolution and economics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ament, Jared D; Karnati, Tejas; Kulubya, Edwin; Kim, Kee D; Johnson, J Patrick

    2018-01-01

    The surgical treatment of cervical radiculopathy has centered around anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF). Alternatively, the posterior cervical laminoforaminotomy/microdiscectomy (PCF/PCM), which results in comparable outcomes and is more cost-effective, has been underutilized. Here, we compared the direct/indirect costs, reoperation rates, and outcome for ACDF and PCF vs. PCM using PubMed, Medline, and Embase databases. There were no significant differences between the re-operative rates of PCF/PCM (2% to 9.8%) versus ACDF (2% to 8%). Direct costs of ACDF were also significantly higher; the 1-year cost-utility analysis demonstrated that ACDF had $131,951/QALY while PCM had $79,856/QALY. PCF/PCM for radiculopathy are safe and more cost-effective vs. ACDF, and have similar clinical outcomes.

  3. Computed tomography in the diagnosis of cervical disc herniation with radiculopathy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Isu, Toyohiko; Iwasaki, Yoshinobu; Abe, Hiroshi; Miyasaka, Kazuo; Tashiro, Kunio (Hokkaido Univ., Sapporo (Japan). School of Medicine)

    1984-02-01

    Computed tomography (CT) is an accurate method of diagnosing cervical disc herniation in patients with radiculopathy. We evaluated 7 patients for the treatment of radiculopathy. The CT features of lateral cervical disc herniation include: (1) plain CT reveals a soft tissue mass compatible with laterally herniated disc material within the intervertebral foramen; (2) plain CT shows a soft tissue mass, which implies a fragmented disc, in the lateral recess; (3) CT with the intravenous administration of the contrast medium shows no delineation of the nerve root in the intervertebral foramen; and (4) CT metrizamide myelography demonstrates the filling defect of the root sleeve and hypertrophy of the nerve root. In those seven patients, all CT examinations were interpreted as positive for lateral disc herniation. There was a good correlation between the results of the neurologic examination and the CT findings. We wish to stress the usefulness of CT in the diagnosis of lateral cervical disc herniation.

  4. The evaluation of lumbar multifidus muscle function via palpation: reliability and validity of a new clinical test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hebert, Jeffrey J; Koppenhaver, Shane L; Teyhen, Deydre S; Walker, Bruce F; Fritz, Julie M

    2015-06-01

    The lumbar multifidus muscle provides an important contribution to lumbar spine stability, and the restoration of lumbar multifidus function is a frequent goal of rehabilitation. Currently, there are no reliable and valid physical examination procedures available to assess lumbar multifidus function among patients with low back pain. To examine the inter-rater reliability and concurrent validity of the multifidus lift test (MLT) to identify lumbar multifidus dysfunction among patients with low back pain. A cross-sectional analysis of reliability and concurrent validity performed in a university outpatient research facility. Thirty-two persons aged 18 to 60 years with current low back pain and a minimum modified Oswestry disability score of 20%. Study participants were excluded if they reported a history of lumbar spine surgery, lumbar radiculopathy, medical red flags, osteoporosis, or had recently been treated with spinal manipulation or trunk stabilization exercises. Concurrent measures of lumbar multifidus muscle function at the L4-L5 and L5-S1 levels were obtained with the MLT (index test) and real-time ultrasound imaging (reference standard). The inter-rater reliability of the MLT was examined by measuring the level of agreement between two blinded examiners. Concurrent validity of the MLT was investigated by comparing clinicians' judgments with real-time ultrasound imaging measures of lumbar multifidus function. Inter-rater reliability of the MLT was substantial to excellent (κ=0.75 to 0.81, p≤.01) and free from errors of bias and prevalence. When performed at L4-L5 or L5-S1, the MLT demonstrated evidence of concurrent validity through its relationship with the reference standard results at L4-L5 (rbis=0.59-0.73, p≤.01). The MLT generally failed to demonstrate a relationship with the reference standard results from the L5-S1 level. Our results provide preliminary evidence supporting the reliability and validity of the MLT to assess lumbar multifidus

  5. Usefulness of curved coronal MPR imaging for the diagnosis of cervical radiculopathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inukai, Chikage; Inukai, Takashi; Matsuo, Naoki; Goto, Hisaharu; Takagi, Teruhide; Takayasu, Masakazu; Shimizu, Ikuo

    2010-01-01

    In surgical treatment of cervical radiculopathy, localization of the responsible lesions by various imaging modalities is essential. Among them, MRI is non-invasive and plays a primary role in the assessment of spinal radicular symptoms. However, demonstration of nerve root compression is sometimes difficult by the conventional methods of MRI, such as T1 weighted (T1W) and T2 weighted (T2W) sagittal or axial images. We have applied a new technique of curved coronal multiplanar reconstruction (MPR) imaging for the diagnosis of cervical radiculopathy. Ten patients (4 male, 6 female) with ages between 31 and 79 year-old, who had clinical diagnosis of cervical radiculopathy, were included in this study. Seven patients underwent anterior key-hole foraminotomy to decompress the nerve root with successful results. All the patients had 3D MRI studies, such as true fast imaging with steady-state precession (FISP), 3DT2W sampling perfection with application optimized contrasts using different fillip angle evolution (SPACE), and 3D multi-echo data image combination (MEDIC) imagings in addition to the routine MRI (1.5 T Avanto, Siemens, Germany) with a phased array coil. The curved coronal MPR images were produced from these MRI data using a workstation. The nerve root compression was diagnosed by curved coronal MPR images in all the patients. The compression sites were compatible with those of the operative findings in 7 patients, who underwent surgical treatment. The MEDIC imagings were the most demonstrable to visualize the nerve root, while the 3D-space imagings were the next. The curved coronal MPR imaging is useful for the diagnosis of accurate localization of the compressing lesions in patients with cervical radiculopathy. (author)

  6. Directional preference following epidural steroid injection in three patients with acute cervical radiculopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desai, Mehul J; Padmanabhan, Girish; Simbasivan, Ajai; Kamanga-Sollo, Gladys G; Dharmappa, Ajay

    2013-09-01

    Cervical radiculopathy is typically characterized by neurologic symptoms that are traced to disturbances of discrete spinal nerve root(s) due to inflammatory or mechanical etiologies. Here we present three patients diagnosed with cervical radiculopathy, whose directional preference only surfaced after either a cervical transforaminal or intralaminar nerve root epidural steroid injection. This retrospective observational case series describes three men who presented with cervical radiculopathy with 7-9/10 neck pain, neck disability index (NDI) ranging between 44% and 90%, and an irreducible derangement upon McKenzie mechanical diagnosis and therapy (MMDT) evaluation. These patients demonstrated weaknesses, sensory changes, and/or decreased reflexes in the C5, C6, or C7 distributions. They each underwent a cervical transforaminal or intralaminar epidural injections at one or two levels, which uncovered their directional preference and facilitated further conservative treatment. These three patients experienced drastic improvements with each postinjection physical therapy session. They demonstrated decreased pain scores, centralization of pain, and a decreasing NDI trends throughout their treatments. They were all discharged with stable 0-3/10 pain severity after four physical therapy sessions and NDI scores of 0%. These cases suggest an interplay between inflammatory and mechanical contributors to spine-mediated pain and the treatment challenge this presents. Dissecting the components of spine pain can be challenging; however, delivery of skilled multidisciplinary care in an algorithmic fashion may be beneficial and provide the future framework for the management of cervical radiculopathy and other spine-related conditions. © 2012 The Authors Pain Practice © 2012 World Institute of Pain.

  7. Ultrasonographic cross-sectional area of spinal nerve roots in cervical radiculopathy: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Eunkuk; Yoon, Joon-Shik; Kang, Hyo Jung

    2015-02-01

    Recently, sonographic assessment has been considered an alternative method for evaluating cervical root lesions. The aim of this pilot study was to measure cross-sectional areas (CSAs) of cervical spinal nerve roots using high-resolution ultrasonography in patients with cervical radiculopathy, to compare the CSA of nerve roots between the affected and unaffected sides. Patients with a clinical diagnosis of unilateral cervical radiculopathy, who were referred to the Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation in the University General Hospital by general practitioners, were prospectively recruited. The selected nerve roots were sonographically imaged at the most proximal location possible, where they exited over the transverse processor, just distal to that point. The CSA was measured three times using the trace tool available on the ultrasonography device. The CSA of each contralateral nerve root served as a control. Twenty-four patients (9 women; mean age, 53.7 yrs) were enrolled in this study. The CSAs were measured by ultrasonography in 5 pairs of C5 roots, 12 pairs of C6 roots, and 7 pairs of C7 roots. The mean CSAs of the affected and unaffected sides were 9.74 ± 1.95 and 9.47 ± 1.95 mm, respectively (P = 0.019). Spearman rank-order correlation test showed a positive relationship between the CSA of the affected nerve root and the duration of symptoms (ρ22 = 0.467, P = 0.021).This is, to the authors' knowledge, the first comparative study to obtain the CSA of spinal nerve roots in cervical radiculopathy. Increased CSA of the affected nerve root relative to the unaffected side, as demonstrated by ultrasonography, may be useful as an additive clue for the diagnosis of cervical radiculopathy.

  8. Lumbar herniated disc: spontaneous regression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altun, Idiris; Yüksel, Kasım Zafer

    2017-01-01

    Low back pain is a frequent condition that results in substantial disability and causes admission of patients to neurosurgery clinics. To evaluate and present the therapeutic outcomes in lumbar disc hernia (LDH) patients treated by means of a conservative approach, consisting of bed rest and medical therapy. This retrospective cohort was carried out in the neurosurgery departments of hospitals in Kahramanmaraş city and 23 patients diagnosed with LDH at the levels of L3-L4, L4-L5 or L5-S1 were enrolled. The average age was 38.4 ± 8.0 and the chief complaint was low back pain and sciatica radiating to one or both lower extremities. Conservative treatment was administered. Neurological examination findings, durations of treatment and intervals until symptomatic recovery were recorded. Laségue tests and neurosensory examination revealed that mild neurological deficits existed in 16 of our patients. Previously, 5 patients had received physiotherapy and 7 patients had been on medical treatment. The number of patients with LDH at the level of L3-L4, L4-L5, and L5-S1 were 1, 13, and 9, respectively. All patients reported that they had benefit from medical treatment and bed rest, and radiologic improvement was observed simultaneously on MRI scans. The average duration until symptomatic recovery and/or regression of LDH symptoms was 13.6 ± 5.4 months (range: 5-22). It should be kept in mind that lumbar disc hernias could regress with medical treatment and rest without surgery, and there should be an awareness that these patients could recover radiologically. This condition must be taken into account during decision making for surgical intervention in LDH patients devoid of indications for emergent surgery.

  9. Minimally invasive posterior cervical discectomy for cervical radiculopathy: technique and clinical results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lidar, Zvi; Salame, Khalil

    2011-12-01

    Retrospective analysis of data of all patients treated by minimally invasive posterior discectomy for cervical radiculopathy between January 2004 and February 2008. To describe our technique and report the outcome of minimally invasive posterior cervical discectomy using the MetRx tubular retractor system and surgical microscope. Although several studies have been published on posterior minimally invasive approaches to cervical radiculopathy, most have focused on decompression of the nerve root by laminoforaminotomy only without the removal of the offending disc. The hospital charts, magnetic resonance imaging studies, and follow-up records of all the patients were reviewed. Outcome was assessed by neurological status, visual analog scale (VAS) for neck and arm pain, and by the short form-36 health survey questionnaire. Thirty-two patients were included in this study. The follow-up time was 20 to 67 months (mean, 39 mo). Muscle weakness improved in all patients; sensory deficits resolved in 21 patients and improved in 7 patients. Analysis of the mean VAS for radicular pain, VAS for neck pain, and all 8 domains of the short form-36 health survey questionnaire showed significant improvement. Complications included 1 case of incidental dural tear without postoperative cerebrospinal fluid leakage and 1 case of longstanding neck pain. Minimally invasive posterior cervical discectomy is safe and effective in the management of lateral cervical disc herniation manifested by radiculopathy. In addition to eliminating some of the disadvantages of open surgical approaches, it may also have swifter symptoms resolution compared with laminoforaminotomy without discectomy.

  10. Side effects after ambulatory lumbar iohexol myelography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sand, T.; Myhr, G.; Stovner, L.J.; Dale, L.G.; Tangerud, A.

    1989-01-01

    Side effect incidences after ambulatory (22G needle and two h bed rest) and after non-ambulatory (22 and 20G needles and 20 h bed rest) lumbar iohexol myelography have been estimated and compared. Headache incidence was significantly greater in ambulatory (50%, n=107) as compared to nonambulatory myelography (26%, n=58). Headaches in the ambulatory group tended to be of shorter duration and the difference between severe headaches in ambulatory and non-ambulatory groups was not significant. Serious adverse reactions did not occur and none of the ambulatory patients required readmission because of side effects. The headache was predominantly postural and occurred significantly earlier in the ambulatory group. Headache incidence was significantly greater after 20G needle myelography (44%, n=97) as compared to 22G needle iohexol myelography (26%, n=58). The results support the hypothesis that CSF leakage is a major cause of headache after lumbar iohexol myelography. (orig.)

  11. Oriental Medical Treatment of Lumbar Spinal Stenosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hae-Yeon Lee

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available Lumbar spinal stenosis results from the progressive combined narrowing of the central spinal canal, the neurorecesses, and the neuroforaminal canals. In the absence of prior surgery, tumor, or infection, the spinal canal may become narrowed by bulging or protrusion of the intervertebral disc annulus, herniation of the nucleus pulposis posteriorly, thickening of the posterior longitudinal ligament, hypertrophy of the ligamentum flavum, epidural fat deposition, spondylosis of the intervertebral disc margins, or a combination of two or more of the above factors. Patients with spinal stenosis become symptomatic when pain, motor weakness, paresthesia, or other neurologic compromise causes distress. In one case, we administrated oriental medical treatment with acupuncture treatment and herb-medicine. Oriental medical treatment showed desirable effect on lumbar spinal stenosis.

  12. A New Sling Technique in Cervical Radiculopathy Caused by Vertebral Artery Loop Compression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ju, Chang Il; Kim, Jeong Mok; Kim, Jong Gyu; Kim, Seok Won; Lee, Seung Myung

    2017-08-01

    A 52-year-old woman had a 20-month history of progressive radiating pain in the left arm and numbness on C7 dermatome. On physical examination, left head rotation aggravated the radiculopathic pain. For an anatomic diagnosis of the vertebral artery and nerve root, magnetic resonance angiography was performed (computed tomography angiography was not possible because of her dye allergy history). Magnetic resonance angiography showed a left vertebral artery loop entering at the C6-7 intervertebral foramen. Surgical microvascular decompression was performed by an anterior cervical approach and the loop of the artery was fixed using a sling technique. Postoperative computed tomography angiography showed that the left vertebral artery was retracted anteriorly and the C7 nerve root was decompressed in the intervertebral foramen at the left C6-7 level. The patient's radiculopathic symptoms were improved and especially the aggravated pain by left head rotation subsided dramatically. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. PARAMETRIC MODEL OF LUMBAR VERTEBRA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    CAPPETTI Nicola

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available The present work proposes the realization of a parametric/variational CAD model of a normotype lumbar vertebra, which could be used for improving the effectiveness of actual imaging techniques in informational augmentation of the orthopaedic and traumatological diagnosis. In addition it could be used for ergonomic static and dynamical analysis of the lumbar region and vertebral column.

  14. Diffusion-weighted imaging for pretreatment evaluation and prediction of treatment effect in patients undergoing CT-guided injection for lumbar disc herniation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niu, Xiang Ke; Bhetuwal, Anup; Yang, Han Feng

    2015-01-01

    To determine whether a change in apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) value could predict early response to CT-guided Oxygen-Ozone (O 2 -O 3 ) injection therapy in patients with unilateral mono-radiculopathy due to lumbar disc herniation. A total of 52 patients with unilateral mono-radiculopathy received a single intradiscal (3 mL) and periganglionic (5 mL) injection of an O 2 -O 3 mixture. An ADC index of the involved side to the intact side was calculated using the following formula: pre-treatment ADC index = ([ADC involved side - ADC intact side] / ADC intact side) x 100. We analyzed the relationship between the pre-treatment Oswestry Disability Index (ODI) and the ADC index. In addition, the correlation between ODI recovery ratio and ADC index was investigated. The sensitivity and specificity of the ADC index for predicting response in O 2 -O 3 therapy was determined. Oswestry Disability Index and the ADC index was not significantly correlated (r = -0.125, p = 0.093). The ADC index and ODI recovery ratio was significantly correlated (r = 0.819, p < 0.001). When using 7.10 as the cut-off value, the ADC index obtained a sensitivity of 86.3% and a specificity of 82.9% for predicting successful response to therapy around the first month of follow-up. This preliminary study demonstrates that the patients with decreased ADC index tend to show poor improvement of clinical symptoms. The ADC index may be a useful indicator to predict early response to CT-guided O 2 -O 3 injection therapy in patients with unilateral mono-radiculopathy due to lumbar disc herniation

  15. Diffusion-weighted imaging for pretreatment evaluation and prediction of treatment effect in patients undergoing CT-guided injection for lumbar disc herniation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Niu, Xiang Ke [Dept. of Radiology, Affiliated Hospital of Chengdu University, Chengdu (China); Bhetuwal, Anup; Yang, Han Feng [Schuan Key Laboratory of Medical Imaging and Dept. of Radiology, Affiliated Hospital of North Sichuan Medical College, Nanchong (China)

    2015-08-15

    To determine whether a change in apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) value could predict early response to CT-guided Oxygen-Ozone (O{sub 2}-O{sub 3}) injection therapy in patients with unilateral mono-radiculopathy due to lumbar disc herniation. A total of 52 patients with unilateral mono-radiculopathy received a single intradiscal (3 mL) and periganglionic (5 mL) injection of an O{sub 2}-O{sub 3} mixture. An ADC index of the involved side to the intact side was calculated using the following formula: pre-treatment ADC index = ([ADC involved side - ADC intact side] / ADC intact side) x 100. We analyzed the relationship between the pre-treatment Oswestry Disability Index (ODI) and the ADC index. In addition, the correlation between ODI recovery ratio and ADC index was investigated. The sensitivity and specificity of the ADC index for predicting response in O{sub 2}-O{sub 3} therapy was determined. Oswestry Disability Index and the ADC index was not significantly correlated (r = -0.125, p = 0.093). The ADC index and ODI recovery ratio was significantly correlated (r = 0.819, p < 0.001). When using 7.10 as the cut-off value, the ADC index obtained a sensitivity of 86.3% and a specificity of 82.9% for predicting successful response to therapy around the first month of follow-up. This preliminary study demonstrates that the patients with decreased ADC index tend to show poor improvement of clinical symptoms. The ADC index may be a useful indicator to predict early response to CT-guided O{sub 2}-O{sub 3} injection therapy in patients with unilateral mono-radiculopathy due to lumbar disc herniation.

  16. Diffusion-Weighted Imaging for Pretreatment Evaluation and Prediction of Treatment Effect in Patients Undergoing CT-Guided Injection for Lumbar Disc Herniation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niu, Xiang-Ke; Bhetuwal, Anup; Yang, Han-Feng

    2015-01-01

    To determine whether a change in apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) value could predict early response to CT-guided Oxygen-Ozone (O2-O3) injection therapy in patients with unilateral mono-radiculopathy due to lumbar disc herniation. A total of 52 patients with unilateral mono-radiculopathy received a single intradiscal (3 mL) and periganglionic (5 mL) injection of an O2-O3 mixture. An ADC index of the involved side to the intact side was calculated using the following formula: pre-treatment ADC index = ([ADC involved side - ADC intact side] / ADC intact side) × 100. We analyzed the relationship between the pre-treatment Oswestry Disability Index (ODI) and the ADC index. In addition, the correlation between ODI recovery ratio and ADC index was investigated. The sensitivity and specificity of the ADC index for predicting response in O2-O3 therapy was determined. Oswestry Disability Index and the ADC index was not significantly correlated (r = -0.125, p = 0.093). The ADC index and ODI recovery ratio was significantly correlated (r = 0.819, p lumbar disc herniation.

  17. Spondylectomy and lateral lumbar interbody fusion for thoracolumbar kyphosis in an adult with achondroplasia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyazaki, Masashi; Kanezaki, Shozo; Notani, Naoki; Ishihara, Toshinobu; Tsumura, Hiroshi

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Rationale: Fixed thoracolumbar kyphosis with spinal stenosis in adult patients with achondroplasia presents a challenging issue. We describe the first case in which spondylectomy and minimally invasive lateral access interbody arthrodesis were used for the treatment of fixed severe thoracolumbar kyphosis and lumbar spinal canal stenosis in an adult with achondroplasia. Patient concerns: A 61-year-old man with a history of achondroplastic dwarfism presented with low back pain and radiculopathy and neurogenic claudication. Diagnoses: Plain radiographs revealed a high-grade thoracolumbar kyphotic deformity with diffuse degenerative changes in the lumbar spine. The apex was located at L2, the local kyphotic angle from L1 to L3 was 105°, and the anterior area was fused from the L1 to L3 vertebrae. MRI revealed significant canal and lateral recess stenosis secondary to facet hypertrophy. Interventions: We planned a front-back correction of the anterior and posterior spinal elements. We first performed anterior release at the fused part from L1 to L3 and XLIF at L3/4 and L4/5. Next, the patient was placed in the prone position. Spondylectomy at the L2 vertebra and posterior fusion from T10 to L5 were performed. Postoperative radiographs revealed L1 to L3 kyphosis of 32°. Outcomes: No complications occurred during or after surgery. Postoperatively, the patient's low back pain and neurological claudication were resolved. No worsening of kyphosis was observed 24 months postoperatively. Lessons: Circumferential decompression of the spinal cord at the apical vertebral level and decompression of lumbar canal stenosis were necessary. Front-back correction of the anterior and posterior spinal elements via spondylectomy and lateral lumbar interbody fusion is a reasonable surgical option for thoracolumbar kyphosis and developmental canal stenosis in patients with achondroplasia. PMID:29245270

  18. Technique for Performing Lumbar Puncture in Microgravity Using Portable Radiography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lerner, David J; Parmet, Allen J; Don, Steven; Shimony, Joshua S; Goyal, Manu S

    2016-08-01

    Visual Impairment and Intracranial Pressure Syndrome (VIIP) has caused symptomatology during and after long duration missions on the International Space Station (ISS). Only indirect measurements of intracranial pressure (ICP), such as ultrasound, have been performed on ISS. Discussion and interest has happened at NASA about performing lumbar puncture (LP) in microgravity. Only the "blind" palpation approach and the ultrasound-assisted approach have been discussed. This article, as proof of concept, discusses the possibility of portable radiography to assist lumbar punctures in microgravity. An anthropomorphic radiological phantom of an adult lumbar spine was made containing a fluid-filled space in the spinal canal with a latex membrane which simulated the dural sac and cerebrospinal fluid. A portable direct-digital radiography system with wireless transmitting image receptor and screen was used to perform image-guided lumbar puncture. Using the same equipment and technique, this procedure was then performed on a cadaver for final proof of concept. Technical success was achieved in all approaches on the first try without needle redirection. There was no difference between the cadaver model and the phantom model in terms of difficulty in reaching the fluid space or visually confirming needle location. Portable radiography via proof of concept has the potential to guide lumbar puncture while minimizing volume and mass of equipment. This could be ideal for assisting in performing lumbar puncture in microgravity, as this is the standard of care on Earth for difficult or failed "blind" lumbar punctures. Lerner DJ, Parmet AJ, Don S, Shimony JS, Goyal MS. Technique for performing lumbar puncture in microgravity using portable radiography. Aerosp Med Hum Perform. 2016; 87(8):745-747.

  19. Bay11-7082 attenuates neuropathic pain via inhibition of nuclear factor-kappa B and nucleotide-binding domain-like receptor protein 3 inflammasome activation in dorsal root ganglions in a rat model of lumbar disc herniation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang AL

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Ailiang Zhang, Kun Wang, Lianghua Ding, Xinnan Bao, Xuan Wang, Xubin Qiu, Jinbo Liu Spine Surgery, Third Affiliated Hospital of Soochow University, Changzhou, People’s Republic of China Abstract: Lumbar disc herniation (LDH is an important cause of radiculopathy, but the underlying mechanisms are incompletely understood. Many studies suggested that local inflammation, rather than mechanical compression, results in radiculopathy induced by LDH. On the molecular and cellular level, nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB and nucleotide-binding domain-like receptor protein 3 (NLRP3 inflammasome have been implicated in the regulation of neuroinflammation formation and progression. In this study, the autologous nucleus pulposus (NP was implanted in the left L5 dorsal root ganglion (DRG to mimic LDH in rats. We investigated the expression of NF-κB and the components of NLRP3 inflammasome in the DRG neurons in rats. Western blotting and immunofluorescence for the related molecules, including NLRP3, apoptosis-associated speck-like protein containing caspase-1 activator domain (ASC, caspase-1, interleukin (IL-1β, IL-18, IκBα, p-IκBα, p65, p-p65, and calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP were examined. In the NP-treated group, the activations of NLRP3, ASC, caspase-1, IL-1β, IL-18, p-IκBα, and p-p65 in DRG neurons in rats were elevated at 1 day after surgery, and the peak occurred at 7 days. Treatment with Bay11-7082, an inhibitor of the actions of IKK-β, was able to inhibit expression and activation of the molecules (NLRP3, ASC, caspase-1, IL-1β, IL-18, p-IκBα, and p-p65 and relieve the pain in rats. Our study shows that NF-κB and NLRP3 inflammasome are involved in the maintenance of NP-induced pain, and that Bay11-7082 could alleviate mechanical allodynia and thermal hyperalgesia by inhibiting NF-κB and NLRP3 inflammasome activation. Keywords: pain, NLRP3, NF-κB, dorsal root ganglion, nucleus pulposus

  20. Treatment of degenerative cervical spondylosis with radiculopathy. Clinical practice guidelines endorsed by The Polish Society of Spinal Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latka, Dariusz; Miekisiak, Grzegorz; Jarmuzek, Pawel; Lachowski, Marcin; Kaczmarczyk, Jacek

    2016-01-01

    Degenerative cervical spondylosis (DCS) with radiculopathy is the most common indication for cervical spine surgery despite favorable natural history. Advances in spinal surgery in conjunction with difficulties in measuring the outcomes caused the paucity of uniform guidelines for the surgical management of DCS. The aim of this paper is to develop guidelines for surgical treatment of DCS. For this purpose the available up-to-date literature relevant on the topic was critically reviewed. Six questions regarding most important clinical questions encountered in the daily practice were formulated. They were answered based upon the systematic literature review, thus creating a set of guidelines. The guidelines were categorized into four tiers based on the level of evidence (I-III and X). They were designed to assist in the selection of optimal and effective treatment leading to the most successful outcome. The evidence based medicine (EBM) is increasingly popular among spinal surgeons. It allows making unbiased, optimal clinical decisions, eliminating the detrimental effect of numerous conflicts of interest. The key role of opinion leaders as well as professional societies is to provide guidelines for practice based on available clinical evidence. The present work contains a set of guidelines for surgical treatment of DCS officially endorsed by the Polish Spine Surgery Society. Copyright © 2015 Polish Neurological Society. Published by Elsevier Urban & Partner Sp. z o.o. All rights reserved.

  1. Headache in patients with cervical radiculopathy: a prospective study with selective nerve root blocks in 275 patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlsson, Jane Y.; Anderberg, Leif

    2006-01-01

    Since many years we routinely use diagnostic selective nerve root blocks (SNRB) at our department when evaluating patients with cervical radiculopathy. Frequently patients who also presented with headache reported that the headache disappeared when the nerve root responsible for the radicular pain was blocked with local anaesthetics. Headache has been described as a companioning symptom related to cervical radiculopathy but has never before been evaluated with SNRB performed in the lower cervical spine. For this reason we added to our routine an evaluation of the response from the SNRB on headache in patients with cervical radiculopathy. The aim was to describe the frequency of headache in patients with cervical radiculopathy and its response to a selective nerve root block of the nerve root/roots responsible for the radiculopathy. Can nerve root compression in the lower cervical spine produce headache? In this consecutive series of 275 patients with cervical radiculopathy, 161 patients reported that they also suffered from daily or recurrent headache located most often unilaterally on the same side as the radiculopathy. All patients underwent a careful clinical examination by a neurosurgeon and a MRI of the cervical spine. The significantly compressed root/roots, according to the MRI, underwent SNRB with a local anaesthetic. The effect of the nerve root block on the radiculopathy and the headache was carefully noted and evaluated by a physiotherapist using visual analogue scales (VAS) before and after the SNRB. All patients with headache had tender points in the neck/shoulder region on the affected side. Patients with headache graded significantly more limitations in daily activities and higher pain intensity in the neck/shoulder/arm than patients without headache. After selective nerve root block, 59% of the patients with headache reported 50% or more reduction of headache and of these 69% reported total relief. A significant correlation was seen between reduced

  2. Spontaneous ligamentum flavum hematoma in the lumbar spine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keynan, Ory; Ashkenazi, Ely; Floman, Yizhar [Israel Spine Center at Assuta Hospital, Tel Aviv (Israel); Smorgick, Yossi [Israel Spine Center at Assuta Hospital, Tel Aviv (Israel); Assaf Harofeh Medical Center, Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Zerifin (Israel); Schwartz, Allan J. [Hadassah University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Section of Neuroradiology, Jerusalem (Israel)

    2006-09-15

    Lumbar or sacral nerve root compression is most commonly caused by intervertebral disc degeneration and/or herniation. Less frequently, other extradural causes may be implicated, such as infection, neoplasm, epidural hematoma, or ligamentum flavum pathology. We present the case of a patient with spontaneous ligamentum flavum hematoma compressing the L4 nerve root, without antecedent trauma. Although exceedingly rare, the diagnosis of ligamentum flavum pathology in general, and that of ligamentum flavum hematoma in particular, should be considered on those rare occasions when the etiology of lumbar or sacral nerve root compressions appears enigmatic on radiological studies. Usually surgical treatment produces excellent clinical outcome. (orig.)

  3. An unexpected lumbar lesion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Beard

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This case report details an interesting case of suspected spinal bifida in an obstetric patient who presented for an elective cesarean section. A large scarred/dimpled area, surrounded by significant hair growth in the region of the lumbar spine had been missed in multiple antenatal and preoperative assessments and was recognized on the day of the surgery as the patient was being prepared for spinal anesthesia. The patient was uncertain regarding the pathology of the lesion, and all investigations relating to this had been undertaken in Pakistan where she lived as a child. General anesthesia was undertaken because magnetic resonance imaging had not been performed and tethering of the spinal cord could not be ruled out clinically. The patient suffered from significant blood loss intra and postoperatively, requiring a two unit blood transfusion. She was discharged after 5 days in the hospital. This case highlights the need for thorough examination in all obstetric patients presenting to the preoperative clinic, focusing on the airway, vascular access, and lumbar spine. Patients may not always disclose certain information due to a lack of understanding, embarrassment, forgetfulness, or language barriers. Significant aspects of their care may have been undertaken abroad and access to these notes is often limited. Preoperative detection of the lesion would have allowed further investigation and imaging of the lesion and enabled more comprehensive discussions with the patient regarding anesthetic options and risk.

  4. [Lumbar spinal angiolipoma].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isla, Alberto; Ortega Martinez, Rodrigo; Pérez López, Carlos; Gómez de la Riva, Alvaro; Mansilla, Beatriz

    2016-01-01

    Spinal angiolipomas are fairly infrequent benign tumours that are usually located in the epidural space of the thoracic column and represent 0.14% to 1.3% of all spinal tumours. Lumbar angiolipomas are extremely rare, representing only 9.6% of all spinal extradural angiolipomas. We report the case of a woman who complained of a lumbar pain of several months duration with no neurological focality and that had intensified in the last three days without her having had any injury or made a physical effort. The MR revealed an extradural mass L1-L2, on the posterior face of the medulla, decreasing the anteroposterior diameter of the canal. The patient symptoms improved after surgery. Total extirpation of the lesion is possible in most cases, and the prognosis is excellent even if the lesion is infiltrative. For this reason, excessively aggressive surgery is not necessary to obtain complete resection. Copyright © 2016 Sociedad Española de Neurocirugía. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  5. Sensory hyperalgesia is characteristic of nonspecific arm pain: a comparison with cervical radiculopathy and pain-free controls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moloney, Niamh; Hall, Toby; Doody, Catherine

    2013-11-01

    Nonspecific arm pain (NSAP) is a common clinical entity, the pathophysiological mechanisms of which are poorly understood. The purpose of this study was to investigate sensory profiles in individuals with nonspecific arm pain compared with cervical radiculopathy and pain-free controls. Forty office workers with NSAP, 17 people with cervical radiculopathy, and 40 pain-free controls were assessed by means of quantitative sensory testing (thermal and vibration detection thresholds; thermal and pressure pain thresholds), tests for neural tissue sensitivity, and questionnaires. Between-group comparisons were conducted using Kruskal-Wallis tests. An exploratory factor analysis was used to determine characteristic features in NSAP. Both patient groups demonstrated cold and pressure pain sensitivity (Pcervical radiculopathy group (Pcervical radiculopathy differ. NSAP is characterized by widespread sensitivity to thermal and pressure pain in the absence of thermal hypoaesthesia, whereas cervical radiculopathy is characterized by the presence of thermal and vibratory hypoaesthesia as well as more localized cold and pressure pain sensitivity. The identification of widespread sensory hypersensitivity in NSAP has important implications for clinical decision making.

  6. Reoperation Rates After Anterior Cervical Discectomy and Fusion for Cervical Spondylotic Radiculopathy and Myelopathy: A National Population-based Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Moon Soo; Ju, Young-Su; Moon, Seong-Hwan; Kim, Tae-Hwan; Oh, Jae Keun; Makhni, Melvin C; Riew, K Daniel

    2016-10-15

    National population-based cohort study. To compare the reoperation rates between cervical spondylotic radiculopathy and myelopathy in a national population of patients. There is an inherently low incidence of reoperation after surgery for cervical degenerative disease. Therefore, it is difficult to sufficiently power studies to detect differences between reoperation rates of different cervical diagnoses. National population-based databases provide large, longitudinally followed cohorts that may help overcome this challenge. We used the Korean Health Insurance Review and Assessment Service national database to select our study population. We included patients with the diagnosis of cervical spondylotic radiculopathy or myelopathy who underwent anterior cervical discectomy and fusion from January 2009 to June 2014. We separated patients into two groups based on diagnosis codes: cervical spondylotic radiculopathy or cervical spondylotic myelopathy. Age, sex, presence of diabetes, osteoporosis, associated comorbidities, number of operated cervical disc levels, and hospital types were considered potential confounding factors. The overall reoperation rate was 2.45%. The reoperation rate was significantly higher in patients with cervical spondylotic myelopathy than in patients with cervical radiculopathy (myelopathy: P = 0.0293, hazard ratio = 1.433, 95% confidence interval 1.037-1.981). Male sex, presence of diabetes or associated comorbidities, and hospital type were noted to be risk factors for reoperation. The reoperation rate after anterior cervical discectomy and fusion was higher for cervical spondylotic myelopathy than for cervical spondylotic radiculopathy in a national population of patients. 3.

  7. Is There an Association Between Lumbosacral Radiculopathy and Painful Gluteal Trigger Points?: A Cross-sectional Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adelmanesh, Farhad; Jalali, Ali; Jazayeri Shooshtari, Seyed Mostafa; Raissi, Gholam Reza; Ketabchi, Seyed Mehdi; Shir, Yoram

    2015-10-01

    The objective of this study was to compare the prevalence of gluteal trigger point in patients with lumbosacral radiculopathy with that in healthy volunteers. In a cross-sectional, multistage sampling method, patients with clinical, electromyographic, and magnetic resonance imaging findings consistent with lumbosacral radiculopathy were examined for the presence of gluteal trigger point. Age- and sex-matched clusters of healthy volunteers were selected as the control group. The primary outcome of the study was the presence or absence of gluteal trigger point in the gluteal region of the patients and the control group. Of 441 screened patients, 271 met all the inclusion criteria for lumbosacral radiculopathy and were included in the study. Gluteal trigger point was identified in 207 (76.4%) of the 271 patients with radiculopathy, compared with 3 (1.9%) of 152 healthy volunteers (P trigger point matched the side of painful radiculopathy in 74.6% of patients with a unilateral radicular pain. There was a significant correlation between the side of the gluteal trigger point and the side of patients' radicular pain (P trigger point, located at the painful side. Further studies are required to test the hypothesis that specific gluteal trigger point therapy could be beneficial in these patients.

  8. Cervical Radiculopathy and Carpal Tunnel Syndrome: A Prospective Determination of the Reliability, Diagnostic Accuracy, and Predictive Validity fo Commonly Used Clinical

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-09-28

    Patients with cervical radiculopathy and carpal tunnel syndrome result in significant medical and occupational costs annually. There is a need to...of diagnostic accuracy. and predictive validity of items of the clinical examination used for the diagnosis of cervical radiculopathy and carpal tunnel syndrome.

  9. Study protocol for a randomised controlled multicentre study: the Foraminotomy ACDF Cost-Effectiveness Trial (FACET) in patients with cervical radiculopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broekema, A E H; Kuijlen, J M A; Lesman-Leegte, G A T; Bartels, R H M A; van Asselt, A D I; Vroomen, P C A J; van Dijk, J M C; Reneman, M F; Soer, R; Groen, R J M

    2017-01-05

    Cervical radiculopathy due to discogenic or spondylotic stenosis of the neuroforamen can be surgically treated by an anterior discectomy with fusion (ACDF) or a posterior foraminotomy (FOR). Most surgeons prefer ACDF, although there are indications that FOR is as effective as ACDF, has a lower complication rate and is less expensive. A head-to-head comparison of the 2 surgical techniques in a randomised controlled trial has not yet been performed. The study objectives of the Foraminotomy ACDF Cost-Effectiveness Trial (FACET) study are to compare clinical outcomes, complication rates and cost-effectiveness of FOR to ACDF. The FACET study is a prospective randomised controlled trial conducted in 7 medical centres in the Netherlands. The follow-up period is 2 years. The main inclusion criterion is a radiculopathy of the C4, C5, C6 or C7 nerve root, due to a single-level isolated cervical foraminal stenosis caused by a soft disc and/or osteophytic component, requiring operative decompression. A sample size of 308 patients is required to test the hypothesis of clinical non-inferiority of FOR versus ACDF. Primary outcomes are: 'operative success', the measured decrease in radiculopathy assessed by the visual analogue scale and 'patient success', assessed by the modified Odom's criteria. Secondary outcomes are: Work Ability Index (single-item WAI), quality of life (EuroQol 5 Dimensions 5 level Survey, EQ-5D-5L), Neck Disability Index (NDI) and complications. An economic evaluation will assess cost-effectiveness. In addition, a budget impact analysis will be performed. Ethical approval was obtained from the Institutional Ethics Committee of the University Medical Center Groningen. Results of this study will be disseminated through national and international papers. The participants and relevant patient support groups will be informed about the results of the study. NTR5536, pre-results. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not

  10. Posterior epidural migration of sequestered lumbar disc fragment causing cauda equina syndrome Migración epidural posterior de fragmento de disco lumbar secuestrado que causa síndrome de cauda equina Migração epidural posterior de fragmento de disco lombar sequestrado que causa síndrome da cauda equina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abolfazl Rahimizadeh

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Posterior epidural migration (PEM of a sequestered free lumbar disc fragment is rare. The rarity is due to presence of several anatomical restraints which restrict a free fragment to move to the posterior compartment. This unusual presentation of disc herniation appeared in the literature either as a single case report or in small series from two to six cases. Herein two new demonstrative cases will be presented with a brief review of the literature.La migración epidural (PEM posterior Epidural Migration de fragmento de disco lumbar libre secuestrado es rara. La rareza se debe a la existencia de varias restricciones anatómicas impidiendo que el fragmento libre se mueva hacia el compartimento posterior. Esa presentación no común de hernia de disco apareció en la literatura como un relato de caso único o en pequeñas series de dos a seis casos. En este artículo, se presentan dos casos nuevos demostrativos, conjuntamente con una revisión breve de la literatura.A migração epidural posterior (PEM posterior epidural migration de fragmento de disco lombar livre sequestrado é rara. A raridade deve-se à presença de várias restrições anatômicas que impedem que o fragmento livre se mova para o compartimento posterior. Essa apresentação incomum de hérnia de disco apareceu na literatura como relato de caso único ou em pequenas séries de dois a seis casos. Neste artigo, são apresentados dois novos casos demonstrativos, com uma breve revisão da literatura.

  11. Clinical tests to diagnose lumbar spondylolysis and spondylolisthesis: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alqarni, Abdullah M; Schneiders, Anthony G; Cook, Chad E; Hendrick, Paul A

    2015-08-01

    The aim of this paper was to systematically review the diagnostic ability of clinical tests to detect lumbar spondylolysis and spondylolisthesis. A systematic literature search of six databases, with no language restrictions, from 1950 to 2014 was concluded on February 1, 2014. Clinical tests were required to be compared against imaging reference standards and report, or allow computation, of common diagnostic values. The systematic search yielded a total of 5164 articles with 57 retained for full-text examination, from which 4 met the full inclusion criteria for the review. Study heterogeneity precluded a meta-analysis of included studies. Fifteen different clinical tests were evaluated for their ability to diagnose lumbar spondylolisthesis and one test for its ability to diagnose lumbar spondylolysis. The one-legged hyperextension test demonstrated low to moderate sensitivity (50%-73%) and low specificity (17%-32%) to diagnose lumbar spondylolysis, while the lumbar spinous process palpation test was the optimal diagnostic test for lumbar spondylolisthesis; returning high specificity (87%-100%) and moderate to high sensitivity (60-88) values. Lumbar spondylolysis and spondylolisthesis are identifiable causes of LBP in athletes. There appears to be utility to lumbar spinous process palpation for the diagnosis of lumbar spondylolisthesis, however the one-legged hyperextension test has virtually no value in diagnosing patients with spondylolysis. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Pelvic incidence-lumbar lordosis mismatch predisposes to adjacent segment disease after lumbar spinal fusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rothenfluh, Dominique A; Mueller, Daniel A; Rothenfluh, Esin; Min, Kan

    2015-06-01

    Several risk factors and causes of adjacent segment disease have been debated; however, no quantitative relationship to spino-pelvic parameters has been established so far. A retrospective case-control study was carried out to investigate spino-pelvic alignment in patients with adjacent segment disease compared to a control group. 45 patients (ASDis) were identified that underwent revision surgery for adjacent segment disease after on average 49 months (7-125), 39 patients were selected as control group (CTRL) similar in the distribution of the matching variables, such as age, gender, preoperative degenerative changes, and numbers of segments fused with a mean follow-up of 84 months (61-142) (total n = 84). Several radiographic parameters were measured on pre- and postoperative radiographs, including lumbar lordosis measured (LL), sacral slope, pelvic incidence (PI), and tilt. Significant differences between ASDis and CTRL groups on preoperative radiographs were seen for PI (60.9 ± 10.0° vs. 51.7 ± 10.4°, p = 0.001) and LL (48.1 ± 12.5° vs. 53.8 ± 10.8°, p = 0.012). Pelvic incidence was put into relation to lumbar lordosis by calculating the difference between pelvic incidence and lumbar lordosis (∆PILL = PI-LL, ASDis 12.5 ± 16.7° vs. CTRL 3.4 ± 12.1°, p = 0.001). A cutoff value of 9.8° was determined by logistic regression and ROC analysis and patients classified into a type A (∆PILL adjacent segment disease, whereas 78.3 % of patients classified as type B alignment had revision surgery. Classification of patients into type A and B alignments yields a sensitivity for predicting adjacent segment disease of 71 %, a specificity of 81 % and an odds ratio of 10.6. In degenerative disease of the lumbar spine a high pelvic incidence with diminished lumbar lordosis seems to predispose to adjacent segment disease. Patients with such pelvic incidence-lumbar lordosis mismatch exhibit a 10-times higher risk for undergoing revision surgery than controls if

  13. Reproduction of the lumbar lordosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreasen, Marianne Løgtholt; Langhoff, Lotte; Jensen, Tue Secher

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: This study investigates whether it is possible to reproduce the lumbar lordosis in the upright position during magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) by positioning the patient supine with straightened lower extremities and investigates intra- and interexaminer reliability of measurements...... supine with straightened lower extremities. These measurements were compared statistically. Intra- and interexaminer reliability was calculated applying the Bland and Altman method. RESULTS: The lumbar lordosis in the standing position was reproduced in the straightened supine position with a median......: The findings of this study show that lumbar lordosis in the upright position can be reproduced by positioning the patient supine with straightened lower extremities....

  14. Side effects after diagnostic lumbar puncture and lumbar iohexol myelography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sand, T.; Stovner, L.J.; Salvesen, R.; Dale, L.

    1987-01-01

    A prospective, controlled study was performed to compare side effect incidences after lumbar iohexol myelography (n=97) and diagnostic lumbar puncture (n=85). No significant side effect incidence differences (iohexol vs. controls) were found regarding number of patients with any side effect (63 vs. 73%), headache (44 vs. 54%), nausea, dizziness, visual, auditory, or psychic symptoms. Early-onset headache occurred significantly more often in the iohexol group (16 vs 5%), while postural headache occurred most frequently after lumbar puncture (25 vs. 41%). These results suggest that apart from the slight early-onset headache, most side effets after lumbar iohexol myelography are related to the puncture per se, not to the contrast agent. (orig.)

  15. Percutaneous transforaminal endoscopic surgery (PTES) for symptomatic lumbar disc herniation: a surgical technique, outcome, and complications in 209 consecutive cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Yu-Tong; Cui, Zhan; Shao, Hong-Wei; Ye, Yun; Gu, Ai-Qun

    2017-02-08

    We designed an easy posterolateral transforaminal endoscopic decompression technique, termed PTES, for radiculopathy secondary to lumbar disc herniation. The purpose of the study is to describe the technique of PTES and evaluate the efficacy and safety for treatment of lumbar disc herniation including primary herniation, reherniation, intracanal herniation, and extracanal herniation and to report outcome and complications. PTES was performed to treat 209 cases of intracanal or extracanal herniations with or without extruding or sequestrated fragment, high iliac crest, scoliosis, calcification, or cauda equina syndrome including recurrent herniation after previous surgical intervention at the index level or adjacent disc herniation after decompression and fusion. Preoperative and postoperative leg pain was evaluated using the 10-point visual analog scale (VAS) and the results were determined to be excellent, good, fair, or poor according to the MacNab classification at 2-year follow-up. The patients were followed for an average of 26.3 ± 2.3 months. The VAS score of leg pain significantly dropped from 9 (6-10) before operation to 1 (0-3) (P disc herniation is an effective and safe method with simple orientation, easy puncture, reduced steps, and little X-ray exposure, which can be applied in almost all kinds of lumbar disc herniation, including L5/S1 level with high iliac crest, herniation with scoliosis or calcification, recurrent herniation, and adjacent disc herniation after decompression and fusion. The learning curve is no longer steep for surgeons.

  16. Posterolateral fusion with interbody for lumbar spondylolisthesis is associated with less repeat surgery than posterolateral fusion alone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macki, Mohamed; Bydon, Mohamad; Weingart, Robby; Sciubba, Daniel; Wolinsky, Jean-Paul; Gokaslan, Ziya L; Bydon, Ali; Witham, Timothy

    2015-11-01

    Posterior or transforaminal lumbar interbody fusions (PLIF/TLIF) may improve the outcomes in patients with lumbar spondylolisthesis. This study aims to compare outcomes after posterolateral fusion (PLF) only versus PLF with interbody fusion (PLF+PLIF/TLIF) in patients with spondylolisthesis. We retrospectively reviewed103 patients who underwent first-time instrumented lumbar fusions for degenerative or isthmic spondylolisthesis. Anterior techniques and multilevel interbody fusions were excluded. All patients were followed for at least 2 years postoperatively. Clinical outcomes including back pain, radiculopathy, weakness, sensory deficits, and loss of bowel/bladder function were ascertained from clinic notes. Radiographic measures were calculated with Tillard percentage of spondylolisthesis. Reoperation for progression of degenerative disease, a primary endpoint, was indicated for all patients with (1) persistent or new-onset neurological symptoms; and (2) radiographic imaging that correlated with clinical presentation. Of the 103 patients, 56.31% were managed with PLF and 43.69% with PLF+PLIF/TLIF. On radiographic studies, spondylolisthesis improved by a mean of 13.06% after PLF+PLIF/TLIF versus 5.67% after PLF (pspondylolisthesis. Patients with interbody fusions were less likely to undergo reoperation for degenerative disease progression compared to non-interbody fusions. However, greater listhesis correction and decreased reoperation in the PLF+PLIF/TLIF cohort should be weighed with favorable clinical outcomes in the PLF cohort. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. LUMBAR CORSETS CAN DECREASE LUMBAR MOTION IN GOLF SWING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koji Hashimoto

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Swinging a golf club includes the rotation and extension of the lumbar spine. Golf-related low back pain has been associated with degeneration of the lumbar facet and intervertebral discs, and with spondylolysis. Reflective markers were placed directly onto the skin of 11young male amateur golfers without a previous history of back pain. Using a VICON system (Oxford Metrics, U.K., full golf swings were monitored without a corset (WOC, with a soft corset (SC, and with a hard corset (HC, with each subject taking 3 swings. Changes in the angle between the pelvis and the thorax (maximum range of motion and angular velocity in 3 dimensions (lumbar rotation, flexion-extension, and lateral tilt were analyzed, as was rotation of the hip joint. Peak changes in lumbar extension and rotation occurred just after impact with the ball. The extension angle of the lumbar spine at finish was significantly lower under SC (38° or HC (28° than under WOC (44° conditions (p < 0.05. The maximum angular velocity after impact was significantly smaller under HC (94°/sec than under SC (177°/sec and WOC (191° /sec conditions, as were the lumbar rotation angles at top and finish. In contrast, right hip rotation angles at top showed a compensatory increase under HC conditions. Wearing a lumbar corset while swinging a golf club can effectively decrease lumbar extension and rotation angles from impact until the end of the swing. These effects were significantly enhanced while wearing an HC

  18. Percutaneous lumbar discectomy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xiao Chengjiang; Su Huanbin; Xu Sui; He Xiaofeng; Li Yanhao

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To probe the therapeutic effects, indications and safety of the percutaneous lumbar discectomy (PLDP). Methods: To ameliorate percutaneous punctured route based on classic PLD and modified jaw structure of pulpiform nacleus forceps, with statistic analysis of the therapeutic results of 352 cases of patient undergone PLDP and follow up ranging from 6 to 38 months retrospectively. Results: The effective ratios were excellent in 45.5%, good for 45.4% and bad in 9.1%. 44 of 352 cases with pulps prolapse were cured. No intervertebral inflammation and paradisc hematoma took place. One case complicated with cauda equina injury and 4 cases with appliances broken inside the disc. Conclusions: PLDP is effective and safe, not only adaptive to the contained disc herniation, but also for noncontained herniation. (authors)

  19. Analysis of Migration Patterns of Disk Fragments and Contributing Factors in Extruded Lumbar Disk Herniation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Son, Eun-Seok; Kim, Du Hwan; Jung, Jae Won; Lee, Donggyu

    2017-01-01

    disk materials follows some general patterns. The results of this study may help spine interventionists and surgeons choose appropriate treatments for patients who have radiculopathy associated with lumbar disk extrusions. IV. Copyright © 2017 American Academy of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Tandem keyhole foraminotomy in the treatment of cervical radiculopathy: retrospective review of 35 cases

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background There has been no report regarding the results of two-level keyhole foraminotomy. The purpose of this study was to detail clinical outcomes following consecutive two-level cervical foraminotomy (tandem keyhole foraminotomy (TKF)) in patients with radiculopathy. Methods The authors conducted a retrospective review of 35 cases involving patients treated by a single surgeon using TKF. Clinical symptoms, data of physical examinations, pathology and clinical outcomes were detailed and discussed about this surgical method. Results Patients consisted of cervical disc herniation (CDH) (19/35), cervical spondylotic radiculopathy (CSR) (13/35), and cervical spondylotic amyotrophy (CSA) (3/35). TKF was performed from C3 to C5 in 2 patients (6%), from C4 to C6 in 7 patients (20%), from C5 to C7 in 23 patients (66%), and from C6 to T1 in 3 patients (8%). The mean operative duration was 99.2 min (range, 72 to 168 min). The mean estimated blood loss was 55.8 g (range, 0 to 200 g). Radicular pain was relieved within 3 months in 88% (29/32) and in 97% (31/32) at final follow-up. Resolution of muscle weakness was recognized within 6 months after operation in all CSA cases. Sixty-six percent of patients showed a greater than 20% deficit in grip weakness on the affected side compared with the normal side. After pain was relieved, grip strength improved by more than 15%. Conclusions TKF is a safe and highly effective procedure for patients with cervical radiculopathy and does not require invasive preoperative examinations. Further investigation is required to determine the effects of consecutive facetectomy. PMID:24884935

  1. Metrizamide CT myelography in cervical myelopathy and radiculopathy: correlation with conventional myelography and surgical findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Badami, J.P.; Norman, D.; Barbaro, N.M.; Cann, C.E.; Weinstein, P.R.; Sobel, D.F.

    1985-04-01

    Conventional myelography, metrizamide computed tomographic (CT) myelography, and surgical findings were correlated in 30 patients with cervical radiculopathy and/or myelopathy. In 60% of patients, metrizamide CT myelography provided significant additional information including better characterization of the abnormality, lateralization if the conventional myelogram was indeterminate, more definitive demonstration of cord atrophy, foraminal narrowing not appreciated on myelography, and demonstration of abnormalities distal to a myelographic block. In no case was a myelographic abnormality not detected on metrizamide CT meyelography. In patients with cervical myelopathy, a cross-sectional diameter of the cord equaling less than 50% of the subarachnoid space is predictive of poor patient response to surgical intervention.

  2. Effect of different surgical methods on headache associated with cervical spondylotic myelopathy and/or radiculopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yuqing; Muheremu, Aikeremujiang; Yan, Kai; Yu, Jie; Zheng, Shan; Tian, Wei

    2015-09-23

    Anterior cervical discectomy and fusion, total disk replacement and open door laminoplasty have been widely used to treat patients with cervical spondylotic myelopathy and/or radiculopathy. In our clinical practice, many patients with cervical spondylosis also complain of headache, and wish to know if the surgical treatment for cervical spondylosis can also alleviate this symptom. Considering that there is no literature concerning this extra benefit of surgical manipulation on cervical spondylosis, we have carried out this retrospective study. Among the patients treated with anterior cervical discectomy and fusion, total disk replacement and open door laminoplasty in our institute for cervical spondylotic myelopathy and/or radiculopathy between February 2002 to March 2011, 108 of whom that have complained about headache at the same time were included in this study. Those patients were followed by 25 to 145 months. Severity of headache before the surgery and at the last follow up was recorded by VAS pain scores and compared among the patients with different surgical methods using SPSS17.0 software. One way ANOVA was used to compare VAS scores between the groups, paired sample t-tests were used to compare the differences in a group at different time points. Headache was significantly alleviated in all groups (P  0.05). No significant differences were found among the groups comparing the degree of alleviation of VAS scores before and after the surgery (P > 0.05). Considering that all the three procedures in the current study have achieved similar effect on alliviating headache in patients with cevical myelopathy, and that what they have in common was that was the decompression of spinal cord, it can be assumed that the headache associated with cervical spondylosis may be the result of compression on the spinal cord. Anterior cervical discectomy and fusion, total disk replacement and open door laminoplasty can all significantly alleviate headache in patients

  3. Metrizamide CT myelography in cervical myelopathy and radiculopathy: correlation with conventional myelography and surgical findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Badami, J.P.; Norman, D.; Barbaro, N.M.; Cann, C.E.; Weinstein, P.R.; Sobel, D.F.

    1985-01-01

    Conventional myelography, metrizamide computed tomographic (CT) myelography, and surgical findings were correlated in 30 patients with cervical radiculopathy and/or myelopathy. In 60% of patients, metrizamide CT myelography provided significant additional information including better characterization of the abnormality, lateralization if the conventional myelogram was indeterminate, more definitive demonstration of cord atrophy, foraminal narrowing not appreciated on myelography, and demonstration of abnormalities distal to a myelographic block. In no case was a myelographic abnormality not detected on metrizamide CT meyelography. In patients with cervical myelopathy, a cross-sectional diameter of the cord equaling less than 50% of the subarachnoid space is predictive of poor patient response to surgical intervention

  4. Cobb Angle Changes in Thoracic and Lumbar Spine Fractures ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The annual incidence of spinal column fracture is 350 per million populations. with Motor vehicular accident being the major single cause of spine injuries. The victims are predominantly young and male. The aim of this study to evaluate the clinical outcome of conservative treatment of closed thoracic and lumbar spine ...

  5. [Fibrinolytic activity and adhesive syndromes of the lumbar vertebral canal].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greco, F; De Palma, L; Santucci, A; Marra, R; Pagano, L; Storti, S

    1989-01-01

    The recent studies, related in medical literature, indicate a reduced activity of fibrinolysis in patients with low back-pain caused by multiple factors (lumbar disc disease, post-laminectomy, post myelography) and suggest a new pathogenetic hypothesis of this disease and new therapeutic implications. The authors conducted a research based on the study of fibrinolysis in patients affected by post-surgical lumbar adhesive syndrome, with the aim of finding, eventually, a relationship between reduced fibrinolytic activity and clinical symptoms. The results are referred and discussed.

  6. Why should we use atraumatic needles in lumbar puncture?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandro Luiz de Andrade Matas

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Diagnostic lumbar puncture is essential to the diagnosis of central nervous system infections, subarachnoid haemorrhage and others neurological diseases. Myeloradicular involvement or life-threatening adverse events due to the procedure are rare, but less severe complications are more frequent. Post-lumbar puncture headache is the most common complication, by spinal fluid leakage due to delayed closure of a dural defect. Therefore, the development of fine needles, with differentiated atraumatic bevel, has contributed to minimize that problem. These generically called atraumatic needles cause less deformation of the dura mater then the Quincke® ones. So, why don't we use these atraumatic needles?

  7. Prevention: Exercise

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Radiculopathy Herniated Lumbar Disc Herniated Cervical Disc Lumbar Degenerative Disc Disease Lumbar Spinal Stenosis Lumbar Spondylolisthesis Osteoarthritis Osteoporosis Spondylolysis ...

  8. Lumbar Nerve Root Occupancy in the Foramen in Achondroplasia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Modi, Hitesh N.; Song, Hae-Ryong; Yang, Jae Hyuk

    2008-01-01

    Lumbar stenosis is common in patients with achondroplasia because of narrowing of the neural canal. However, it is unclear what causes stenosis, narrowing of the central canal or foramina. We performed a morphometric analysis of the lumbar nerve roots and intervertebral foramen in 17 patients (170 nerve roots and foramina) with achondroplasia (eight symptomatic, nine asymptomatic) and compared the data with that from 20 (200 nerve roots and foramina) asymptomatic patients without achondroplasia presenting with low back pain without neurologic symptoms. The measurements were made on left and right parasagittal MRI scans of the lumbar spine. The foramen area and root area were reduced at all levels from L1 to L5 between the patients with achondroplasia (Groups I and II) and the nonachondroplasia group (Group III). The percentage of nerve root occupancy in the foramen between Group I and Group II as compared with the patients without achondroplasia was similar or lower. This implied the lumbar nerve root size in patients with achondroplasia was smaller than that of the normal population and thus there is no effective nerve root compression. Symptoms of lumbar stenosis in achondroplasia may be arising from the central canal secondary to degenerative disc disease rather than a true foraminal stenosis. Level of Evidence: Level I, prognostic study. See the Guidelines for Authors for a complete description of levels of evidence. PMID:18259829

  9. CHANGES IN RADIOGRAPHIC PARAMETERS AFTER MINIMALLY INVASIVE LUMBAR INTERBODY FUSION

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    Emiliano Vialle

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective : This study aims to evaluate changes in lumbosacral parameters after minimally invasive lumbar interbody fusion. The secondary aim was to evaluate whether interbody cage shape (crescent shaped or rectangular would influence the results. Method : Retrospective analysis of 70 patients who underwent one or two level lumbar interbody fusion through a minimally invasive posterolateral approach. This included midline preservation and unilateral facetectomy. Pre- and postoperative (three to six months postoperative radiographs were used for measuring lumbar lordosis (LL, segmental lordosis (SL at the level of interbody fusion, and sacral slope (SS. Further analyses divided the patients into Roussouly lumbar subgroups. Results : LL was significantly reduced after surgery (59o:39o, p=0.001 as well as the SS (33.8o:31.2o, p=0.05. SL did not change significantly (11.4:11.06, p=0.85. There were no significant differences when comparing patients who received crescent shaped cage (n=27 and rectangular cage (n=43. Hypolordotic patients (Roussouly types 1 and 2 had radiographic improvement in comparison to normolordotic and hyperlordotic groups (types 3 and 4. Conclusion : Minimally invasive lumbar interbody fusion caused reduction in lumbosacral parameters. Cage shape had no influence on the results.

  10. Conservative management of psoas haematoma following complex lumbar surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lakkol, Sandesh; Sarda, Praveen; Karpe, Prasad; Krishna, Manoj

    2014-01-01

    We report psoas hematoma communicating with extradural hematoma and compressing on lumbar nerve roots during the postoperative period in a patient who underwent L3/4 level dynamic stabilization and L4/5 and L5/S1 posterior lumbar interbody fusion. Persistent radicular symptoms occurring soon after posterior lumbar surgery are not an unknown entity. However, psoas hematoma communicating with the extradural hematoma and compressing on L4 and L5 nerve roots soon after surgery, leading to radicular symptoms has not been reported. In addition to the conservative approach in managing such cases, this case report also emphasizes the importance of clinical evaluation and utilization of necessary imaging techniques such as computed tomography (CT) scan and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scan to diagnose the cause of persistent severe radicular pain in the postoperative period. PMID:24600073

  11. Conservative management of psoas haematoma following complex lumbar surgery

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    Sandesh Lakkol

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We report psoas hematoma communicating with extradural hematoma and compressing on lumbar nerve roots during the postoperative period in a patient who underwent L3/4 level dynamic stabilization and L4/5 and L5/S1 posterior lumbar interbody fusion. Persistent radicular symptoms occurring soon after posterior lumbar surgery are not an unknown entity. However, psoas hematoma communicating with the extradural hematoma and compressing on L4 and L5 nerve roots soon after surgery, leading to radicular symptoms has not been reported. In addition to the conservative approach in managing such cases, this case report also emphasizes the importance of clinical evaluation and utilization of necessary imaging techniques such as computed tomography (CT scan and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI scan to diagnose the cause of persistent severe radicular pain in the postoperative period.

  12. CT-guided cervical interlaminar epidural steroid injection for cervical radiculopathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Wei; Wu Chungen; Wu Chaoxian; Cheng Yongde

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the safety and effectiveness of CT-guided cervical interlaminar epidural steroid injection for the treatment of cervical radiculopathy. Methods: CT-guided cervical interlaminar epidural steroid injection was performed in 32 patients with cervical radioculopathy, encountered during the period of Dec. 2006 to June 2008, as the patients failed to respond to the conservative treatment in 2 weeks. The clinical data and the imaging findings were retrospectively analyzed. Before and after the procedure, visual analogue scale (VAS) and Odom criteria were used to evaluate the pain of the patient. Results: Three months after the injection, improvement judged by Odom criteria was seen in 28 patients (87.5%), and the mean pain relief value of VAS was 5.88 ± 1.10. No significant difference in effective rate and in VAS score (P>0.05) was found between protrusion group and degenerative group, between the group with the course over 6 months and the group with the course below 6 months, also between the group receiving one injection and the group receiving the second injection. Conclusion: CT-guided fine needle (23 gauge) puncture epidural steroid (Decadron) 'target spot' injection is an ideal alternative for the treatment of cervical radiculopathy, especially for the patients who fails to respond to the conservative treatment. (authors)

  13. Cervical disc arthroplasty for the treatment of spondylotic myelopathy and radiculopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khong, Peter; Bogduk, Nikolai; Ghahreman, Ali; Davies, Mark

    2013-10-01

    The concept of cervical disc arthroplasty (CDA) for the anterior treatment of cervical pathology has existed for approximately half a decade. In this time, multiple devices have been developed for this purpose, with the ultimate aim to provide an alternative to fusion. Fifty-five patients with cervical spondylotic radiculopathy and myelopathy underwent CDA over a 5 year period. Data was collected on 46 patients, which included Visual Analogue Scale scores for neck pain and arm pain, Neck Disability Index scores, Short Form-36 v2 (SF-36) and Nurick grades for myelopathy patients. Preoperative data and data obtained at the latest clinical follow-up (median 48 months, range, 10-76 months) were analysed to assess the intermediate term efficacy of the procedure. In patients with radiculopathy, arm pain improved by 88% (p<0.001). In those presenting with myelopathy, the Nurick grades improved from a median of 1 to 0 (p<0.001). In both groups of patients, improvements in pain and neurologic deficit were accompanied by significant improvements in multiple domains of the SF-36. Using a composite system which considered neck pain, arm pain, function and myelopathy, we arrived at an overall success rate of 73%. We concluded that CDA is an effective intervention for improving neurologic deficit, arm pain and local neck symptoms that translated into improvements in physical and social functioning in the intermediate term. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Complementary and Alternative Medicine for the Management of Cervical Radiculopathy: An Overview of Systematic Reviews

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    Xu Wei

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Complementary and alternative medicine (CAM is widely applied in the clinical practice of neck pain owing to cervical radiculopathy (CR. While many systematic reviews exist in CAM to improve CR, research is distributed across population, intervention, comparison, and setting. Objective. This overview aims to summarize the characteristics and evaluate critically the evidence from systematic reviews. Methods. A comprehensive literature search was performed in the six databases without language restrictions on February 24, 2015. We had identified relevant systematic reviews that examined the subjects with neck pain due to cervical radiculopathy undergoing CAM. Two authors independently appraised the methodological quality using the revised assessment of multiple systematic reviews instrument. Results. We had included eight systematic reviews. The effectiveness and safety of acupotomy, acupuncture, Jingfukang granule, manual therapies, and cervical spine manipulation were investigated. Based on available evidence, the systematic reviews supported various forms of CAM for CR. Nevertheless, the methodological quality for most of systematic reviews was low or moderate. In addition, adverse reactions of primary studies were infrequent. Conclusions. Current systematic reviews showed potential advantages to CAM for CR. Due to the frequently poor methodological quality of primary studies, the conclusions should be treated with caution for clinical practice.

  15. Brain meningioma with initial manifestation similar to cervical radiculopathy: a case report

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    Huang YH

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Yu-Hsuan Huang,1,* Chang-Zern Hong,2,* Wei-Ting Wu,1 Kun-Ta Li,3 Li-Wei Chou1,4¹Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, China Medical University Hospital, 2Department of Physical Therapy, Hungkuang University, 3Department of Emergency Medicine, China Medical University Hospital, 4School of Chinese Medicine, College of Chinese Medicine, China Medical University, Taichung, Taiwan*These authors contributed equally to this workAbstract: Meningiomas are the most common benign brain tumors, and are characterized by slow growth and a long asymptomatic period. Once the tumor becomes symptomatic, the various presentations may be related to the location and compression of adjacent structures. Meningioma is primarily treated through surgical intervention, and thus earlier diagnosis is likely to result in better prognosis. The symptoms of the meningioma may mimic other diseases, making precise diagnosis difficult, which will then delay treatment. We report a case of brain meningioma that showed initial signs and symptoms similar to cervical radiculopathy. The symptoms extended gradually, and the ultimate diagnosis of meningioma was confirmed based on brain-image studies. After brain-tumor excision, postoperation radiotherapy, and aggressive rehabilitation, the patient was able to perform better in daily activities.Keywords: hemiplegia, menigioma, paresthesia, radiculopathy, rehabilitation

  16. Neuromuscular ultrasound imaging in low back pain patients with radiculopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frost, Lydia R; Brown, Stephen H M

    2016-02-01

    Patients suffering from chronic low back pain with associated radiculopathy (LBP-R), or sciatica, experience neuromuscular symptoms in the lower back and leg; however, research to date has focussed solely on the lower back. To expand neuromuscular research of LBP-R patients into the lower limb, using ultrasound imaging. Case control study comparing LBP-R patients to matched healthy controls. LBP-R patients with disc bulge or herniation (L3/L4 to L5/S1) resulting in unilateral radiculopathy (n = 17) and healthy matched controls (n = 17) were recruited. High-resolution ultrasound imaging was used to investigate sciatic nerve structure, as well as the quality (relative magnitude of fat/fibrosis infiltration) and contraction (muscle thickening) of associated musculature in the lower back (paraspinals) and lower limb (biceps femoris, gastrocnemius, soleus). LBP-R patients had swollen sciatic nerves (increased cross sectional area), but this was not associated with evidence of reduced lower limb muscle quality. As compared to controls, LBP-R patients demonstrated less soleus muscle thickening during submaximal contraction; however, there were no impairments in the hamstring or lower back musculature. Ultrasound imaging was an effective method to detect sciatic nerve swelling in mild to moderately affected LBP-R patients. Nerve swelling was not associated with poorer muscle quality, nor consistently impaired muscle contraction. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Lumbar spinal stenosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1985-01-01

    Spinal stenosis, which has attracted increasing attention in recent years, represents an important group of clinical and radiologic entities. Recognition and ultimate surgical management of the many abnormalities found in this group require precise preoperative delineation of the morbid anatomy. Conventional axial tomography provided the first accurate picture of the sagittal dimension, but it was limited by poor contrast resolution. Computerized tomography and ultrasound have finally provided the means for accurate measurement of midsagittal diameter and surface area. It is now possible to provide a preoperative assessment of bony and soft-tissue canal compression and to guide surgical decompression by objective anatomic measurements. True spinal stenosis of the lumbar vertebral canal is a form of compression produced by the walls of the vertebral canal. It involves the whole of the vertebral canal by exerting compression at two of its opposite surfaces. There are two types of stenosis: (1) transport stenosis, wherein the clinical manifestations are due to impeded flow of fluid, which is dependent on the available cross-sectional area of the canal surface of the stenotic structure, and (2) compressive stenosis, which includes abnormal compression of opposing surfaces only. According to these definitions, indentation on the spinal canal by disc protrusion or localized tumor is not considered true spinal stenoses. In this chapter the authors discuss only those conditions that produce true canal stenosis

  18. Endurance and fatigue characteristics in the neck muscles during sub-maximal isometric test in patients with cervical radiculopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halvorsen, Marie; Abbott, Allan; Peolsson, Anneli; Dedering, Åsa

    2014-03-01

    The aim of the study was to compare myoelectric manifestation in neck muscle endurance and fatigue characteristics during sub-maximal isometric endurance test in patients with cervical radiculopathy and asymptomatic subjects. An additional aim was to explore associations between primary neck muscle endurance, myoelectric fatigability, and self-rated levels of fatigue, pain and subjective health measurements in patients with cervical radiculopathy. Muscle fatigue in the ventral and dorsal neck muscles was assessed in patients with cervical radiculopathy and in an asymptomatic group during an isometric neck muscle endurance test in prone and supine. 46 patients and 34 asymptomatic subjects participated. Surface electromyography signals were recorded from the sternocleidomastoid, cervical paraspinal muscles and upper and middle trapezius bilaterally during the endurance test. Subjective health measurements were assessed with questionnaires. The results showed altered neck muscle endurance in several of the muscles investigated with greater negative median frequency slope, greater variability, side imbalance, lower endurance time and higher experience of fatigue among the cervical radiculopathy patients compared with healthy subjects. Endurance times were significantly lower in both prone and in supine positions between the patients compared to asymptomatic subjects. During the neck muscle endurance test, fatigues in the upper trapezius muscles during the prone test and in the sternocleidomastoid muscles during the supine test were of more importance than self-perceived pain, fatigue, disability and kinesiophobia in predicting neck muscle endurance (NME). NME testing in the primary neck muscles seems to be an important factor to take into consideration in rehabilitation.

  19. A systematic review of the diagnostic accuracy of provocative tests of the neck for diagnosing cervical radiculopathy.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rubinstein, S.M.; Pool, J.J.; van Tulder, M.W.; Riphagen, II; de Vet, H.C.W.

    2007-01-01

    Clinical provocative tests of the neck, which position the neck and arm inorder to aggravate or relieve arm symptoms, are commonly used in clinical practice in patients with a suspected cervical radiculopathy. Their diagnostic accuracy, however, has never been examined in a systematic review. A

  20. Dimensions Underlying Measures of Disability, Personal Factors, and Health Status in Cervical Radiculopathy: A Cross-Sectional Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halvorsen, Marie; Kierkegaard, Marie; Harms-Ringdahl, Karin; Peolsson, Anneli; Dedering, Åsa

    2015-06-01

    This cross-sectional study sought to identify dimensions underlying measures of impairment, disability, personal factors, and health status in patients with cervical radiculopathy. One hundred twenty-four patients with magnetic resonance imaging-verified cervical radiculopathy, attending a neurosurgery clinic in Sweden, participated. Data from clinical tests and questionnaires on disability, personal factors, and health status were used in a principal-component analysis (PCA) with oblique rotation. The PCA supported a 3-component model including 14 variables from clinical tests and questionnaires, accounting for 73% of the cumulative percentage. The first component, pain and disability, explained 56%. The second component, health, fear-avoidance beliefs, kinesiophobia, and self-efficacy, explained 9.2%. The third component including anxiety, depression, and catastrophizing explained 7.6%. The strongest-loading variables of each dimension were "present neck pain intensity," "fear avoidance," and "anxiety." The three underlying dimensions identified and labeled Pain and functioning, Health, beliefs, and kinesiophobia, and Mood state and catastrophizing captured aspects of importance for cervical radiculopathy. Since the variables "present neck pain intensity," "fear avoidance," and "anxiety" had the strongest loading in each of the three dimensions; it may be important to include them in a reduced multidimensional measurement set in cervical radiculopathy.

  1. NEUROMUSCULAR CONTROL IN LUMBAR DISORDERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ville Leinonen

    2004-03-01

    Full Text Available Impaired motor and sensory functions have been associated with low back pain (LBP. This includes disturbances in a wide range of sensorimotor control e.g. sensory dysfunctions, impaired postural responses and psychomotor control. However, the physiological mechanisms, clinical relevance and characteristics of these findings in different spinal pathologies require further clarification. The purposes of this study were to investigate postural control, lumbar muscle function, movement perception and associations between these findings in healthy volunteers (n=35, patients with lumbar disc herniation (n=20 and lumbar spinal stenosis (LSS, n=26. Paraspinal muscle responses for sudden upper limb loading and muscle activation during flexion-extension movement and the lumbar endurance test were measured by surface electromyography (EMG. Postural stability was measured on a force platform during two- and one-footed standing. Lumbar movement perception was assessed in a motorised trunk rotation unit in the seated position. In addition, measurements of motor-(MEP and somatosensory evoked potentials (SEP and needle EMG examination of lumbar multifidus muscles were performed in the LSS patients. Clinical and questionnaire data were also recorded. A short latency paraspinal muscle response (~50 ms for sudden upper limb loading was observed. The latency of the response was shortened by expectation (p=0.017. The response latency for unexpected loading was similar in healthy persons and disc herniation patients but the latency was not shortened by expectation in the patients (p = 0.014. Also impaired postural control (p < 0.05 and lumbar movement perception (p = 0.012 were observed in disc herniation patients. The impaired lumbar movement perception (p=0.054 and anticipatory muscle activation (p = 0.043 tended to be restored after successful surgery but postural control had still not recovered after 3 months of follow-up. The majority of LSS patients were unable

  2. Inter-therapist agreement in classifying patients with cervical radiculopathy and patients with non-specific neck-arm pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tampin, Brigitte; Briffa, Noelle Kathryn; Hall, Toby; Lee, Gabriel; Slater, Helen

    2012-10-01

    Identification of differences in clinical presentation and underlying pain mechanisms may assist the classification of patients with neck-arm pain which is important for the provision of targeted best evidence based management. The aim of this study was to: (i) assess the inter-examiner agreement in using specific systems to classify patients with cervical radiculopathy and patients with non-specific neck-arm pain associated with heightened nerve mechanosensitivity (NSNAP); (ii) assess the agreement between two clinical examiners and two clinical experts in classifying these patients, and (iii) assess the diagnostic accuracy of the two clinical examiners. Forty patients with unilateral neck-arm pain were examined by two clinicians and classified into (i) cervical radiculopathy, (ii) NSNAP, (iii) other. The classifications were compared to those made independently by two experts, based on a review of patients' clinical assessment notes. The experts' opinion was used as the reference criterion to assess the diagnostic accuracy of the clinical examiners in classifying each patient group. There was an 80% agreement between clinical examiners, and between experts and 70%-80% between clinical examiners and experts in classifying patients with cervical radiculopathy (kappa between 0.41 and 0.61). Agreement was 72.5%-80% in classifying patients with NSNAP (kappa between 0.43 and 0.52). Clinical examiners' diagnostic accuracy was high (radiculopathy: sensitivity 79%-84%; specificity 76%-81%; NSNAP: sensitivity 78%-100%; specificity 71%-81%). Compared to expert opinion, clinicians were able to identify patients with cervical radiculopathy and patients with NSNAP in 80% of cases, our data supporting the reliability of these classification systems. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. The reliability and construct validity of the Neck Disability Index and patient specific functional scale in patients with cervical radiculopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cleland, Joshua A; Fritz, Julie M; Whitman, Julie M; Palmer, Jessica A

    2006-03-01

    Cohort study of patients with cervical radiculopathy undergoing physical therapy. Examine the test-retest reliability, construct validity, and minimum levels of detectable and clinically important change for the Neck Disability Index (NDI) and Patient Specific Functional Scale (PSFS) in cohort of patients with cervical radiculopathy. To date, no studies have investigated the psychometric properties of the NDI or PSFS in a cohort of patients with cervical radiculopathy. Thirty-eight patients with cervical radiculopathy undergoing physical therapy completed the NDI and PSFS, and Numerical Pain Rating Scale (NPRS) at the baseline examination and at a follow-up. In addition, at follow-up, patients completed a 15-point global rating of change (GROC), which was used to dichotomize patients as improved or stable. Changes in the NDI and PSFS were then used to assess test-retest reliability, construct validity, and minimal levels of detectable and clinically important change. Test-retest reliability was moderate for the NDI (intraclass correlation coefficient [ICC] = 0.68; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.30-0.90) and high for the PSFS (ICC = 0.82; 95% CI, 0.54-0.93). The PSFS was more responsive to change than the NDI. The minimal detectable change for the NDI was 10.2 and for the PSFS 2.1. The minimally clinically important change for the NDI was 7.0 and PSFS 2.0. Our results suggest that the PSFS exhibits superior reliability, construct validity, and responsiveness in this cohort of patients with cervical radiculopathy compared with the NDI. Further research is needed to examine the ability of these measures to accurately reflect changes in individuals, as well as large samples of patients.

  4. The course and prognostic factors of symptomatic cervical disc herniation with radiculopathy: a systematic review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Jessica J; Côté, Pierre; Quesnele, Jairus J; Stern, Paula J; Mior, Silvano A

    2014-08-01

    Cervical spine disc herniation is a disabling source of cervical radiculopathy. However, little is known about its course and prognosis. Understanding the course and prognosis of symptomatic cervical disc herniation is necessary to guide patients' expectations and assist clinicians in managing patients. To describe the natural history, clinical course, and prognostic factors of symptomatic cervical disc herniations with radiculopathy. Systematic review of the literature and best evidence synthesis. A systematic search of MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL, SportsDiscus, and the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials from inception to 2013 was conducted to retrieve eligible articles. Eligible articles were critically appraised using the Scottish Intercollegiate Guidelines Network criteria. The results from articles with low risk of bias were analyzed using best evidence synthesis principles. We identified 1,221 articles. Of those, eight articles were eligible and three were accepted as having a low risk of bias. Two studies pertained to course and one study pertained to prognosis. Most patients with symptomatic cervical disc herniations with radiculopathy initially present with intense pain and moderate levels of disability. However, substantial improvements tend to occur within the first 4 to 6 months post-onset. Time to complete recovery ranged from 24 to 36 months in, approximately, 83% of patients. Patients with a workers' compensation claim appeared to have a poorer prognosis. Our best evidence synthesis describes the best available evidence on the course and prognosis of cervical disc herniations with radiculopathy. Most patients with symptomatic cervical spine disc herniation with radiculopathy recover. Possible recurrences and time to complete recovery need to be further studied. More studies are also needed to understand the prognostic factors for this condition. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Spondylectomy and lateral lumbar interbody fusion for thoracolumbar kyphosis in an adult with achondroplasia: A case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyazaki, Masashi; Kanezaki, Shozo; Notani, Naoki; Ishihara, Toshinobu; Tsumura, Hiroshi

    2017-12-01

    Fixed thoracolumbar kyphosis with spinal stenosis in adult patients with achondroplasia presents a challenging issue. We describe the first case in which spondylectomy and minimally invasive lateral access interbody arthrodesis were used for the treatment of fixed severe thoracolumbar kyphosis and lumbar spinal canal stenosis in an adult with achondroplasia. A 61-year-old man with a history of achondroplastic dwarfism presented with low back pain and radiculopathy and neurogenic claudication. Plain radiographs revealed a high-grade thoracolumbar kyphotic deformity with diffuse degenerative changes in the lumbar spine. The apex was located at L2, the local kyphotic angle from L1 to L3 was 105°, and the anterior area was fused from the L1 to L3 vertebrae. MRI revealed significant canal and lateral recess stenosis secondary to facet hypertrophy. We planned a front-back correction of the anterior and posterior spinal elements. We first performed anterior release at the fused part from L1 to L3 and XLIF at L3/4 and L4/5. Next, the patient was placed in the prone position. Spondylectomy at the L2 vertebra and posterior fusion from T10 to L5 were performed. Postoperative radiographs revealed L1 to L3 kyphosis of 32°. No complications occurred during or after surgery. Postoperatively, the patient's low back pain and neurological claudication were resolved. No worsening of kyphosis was observed 24 months postoperatively. Circumferential decompression of the spinal cord at the apical vertebral level and decompression of lumbar canal stenosis were necessary. Front-back correction of the anterior and posterior spinal elements via spondylectomy and lateral lumbar interbody fusion is a reasonable surgical option for thoracolumbar kyphosis and developmental canal stenosis in patients with achondroplasia.

  6. Percutaneous endoscopic lumbar discectomy: Results of first 100 cases

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    Kanthila Mahesha

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Lumbar disc herniation is a major cause of back pain and sciatica. The surgical management of lumbar disc prolapse has evolved from exploratory laminectomy to percutaneous endoscopic discectomy. Percutaneous endoscopic discectomy is the least invasive procedure for lumbar disc prolapse. The aim of this study was to analyze the clinical outcome, quality of life, neurologic function, and complications. Materials and Methods: One hundred patients with lumbar disc prolapse who were treated with percutaneous endoscopic discectomy from May 2012 to January 2014 were included in this retrospective study. Clinical followup was done at 1 month, 3 months, 6 months, 1 year, and at yearly interval thereafter. The outcome was assessed using modified Macnab′s criteria, visual analog scale, and Oswestry Disability Index. Results: The mean followup period was 2 years (range 18 months - 3 years. Transforaminal approach was used in 84 patients, interlaminar approach in seven patients, and combined approach in nine patients. An excellent outcome was noted in ninety patients, good outcome in six patients, fair result in two patients, and poor result in two patients. Minor complications were seen in three patients, and two patients had recurrent disc prolapse. Mean hospital stay was 1.6 days. Conclusions: Percutaneous endoscopic lumbar discectomy is a safe and effective procedure in lumbar disc prolapse. It has the advantage that it can be performed on a day care basis under local anesthesia with shorter length of hospitalization and early return to work thus improving the quality of life earlier. The low complication rate makes it the future of disc surgery. Transforaminal approach alone is sufficient in majority of cases, although 16% of cases required either percutaneous interlaminar approach or combined approach. The procedure definitely has a learning curve, but it is acceptable with adequate preparations.

  7. Diagnosis and conservative management of degenerative lumbar spondylolisthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunter, David J.

    2007-01-01

    Degenerative spondylolisthesis (DS) is a disorder that causes the slip of one vertebral body over the one below due to degenerative changes in the spine. Lumbar DS is a major cause of spinal canal stenosis and is often related to low back and leg pain. We reviewed the symptoms, prognosis and conservative treatments for symptoms associated with DS. PubMed and MEDLINE databases (1950–2007) were searched for the key words “spondylolisthesis”, “pseudospondylolisthesis”, “degenerative spondylolisthesis”, “spinal stenosis”, “lumbar spine”, “antherolisthesis”, “posterolisthesis”, “low back pain”, and “lumbar instability”. All relevant articles in English were reviewed. Pertinent secondary references were also retrieved. The prognosis of patients with DS is favorable, however, those who suffer from neurological symptoms such as intermittent claudication or vesicorectal disorder, will most probably experience neurological deterioration if they are not operated upon. Nonoperative treatment should be the initial course of action in most cases of DS, with or without neurologic symptoms. Treatment options include use of analgesics and NSAIDs to control pain; epidural steroid injections, and physical methods such as bracing and flexion strengthening exercises. An up-to-date knowledge on diagnosis and prevention of lumbar DS can assist in determination of future research goals. Additional studies are required to establish treatment protocols for the conservative treatment of DS. PMID:18026865

  8. Factors Affecting the Outcome of Surgical Versus Nonsurgical Treatment of Cervical Radiculopathy: A Randomized, Controlled Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engquist, Markus; Löfgren, Håkan; Öberg, Birgitta; Holtz, Anders; Peolsson, Anneli; Söderlund, Anne; Vavruch, Ludek; Lind, Bengt

    2015-10-15

    Prospective randomized controlled trial. To analyze factors that may influence the outcome of anterior cervical decompression and fusion (ACDF) followed by physiotherapy versus physiotherapy alone for treatment of patients with cervical radiculopathy. An understanding of patient-related factors affecting the outcome of ACDF is important for preoperative patient selection. No previous prospective, randomized study of treatment effect modifiers relating to outcome of ACDF compared with physiotherapy has been carried out. 60 patients with cervical radiculopathy were randomized to ACDF followed by physiotherapy or physiotherapy alone. Data for possible modifiers of treatment outcome at 1 year, such as sex, age, duration of pain, pain intensity, disability (Neck Disability Index, NDI), patient expectations of treatment, anxiety due to neck/arm pain, distress (Distress and Risk Assessment Method), self-efficacy (Self-Efficacy Scale) health status (EQ-5D), and magnetic resonance imaging findings were collected. A multivariate analysis was performed to find treatment effect modifiers affecting the outcome regarding arm/neck pain intensity and NDI. Factors that significantly altered the treatment effect between treatment groups in favor of surgery were: duration of neck pain less than 12 months (P = 0.007), duration of arm pain less than 12 months (P = 0.01) and female sex (P = 0.007) (outcome: arm pain), low EQ-5D index (outcome: neck pain, P = 0.02), high levels of anxiety due to neck/arm pain (outcome: neck pain, P = 0.02 and NDI, P = 0.02), low Self-Efficacy Scale score (P = 0.05), and high Distress and Risk Assessment Method score (P = 0.04) (outcome: NDI). No factors were found to be associated with better outcome with physiotherapy alone. In this prospective, randomized study of patients with cervical radiculopathy, short duration of pain, female sex, low health quality, high levels of anxiety due to neck/arm pain, low self-efficacy, and a high level of distress

  9. A lumbar body support (KBS 2000) alters lumbar muscle recruitment ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    back pain. K. L. Derman, E. w. Derman, T. D. Noakes. Objective. To determine the effects of a locally designed lumbar body support (LBS) on integrated ... surface, patients with chronic low back pain have higher. IEMG activity of the erector spinae ... It has also been shown that changes in sitting posture can alter LBP.6 The ...

  10. What's the best surgical treatment for patients with cervical radiculopathy due to single-level degenerative disease? A randomized controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Donk, R.D.; Verbeek, A.L.M.; Verhagen, W.I.; Groenewoud, H.; Hosman, A.J.F.; Bartels, R.H.M.A.

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: To investigate the efficacy of adding supplemental fusion or arthroplasty after cervical anterior discectomy for symptomatic mono-level cervical degenerative disease (radiculopathy), which has not been substantiated in controlled trials until now. METHODS: A randomized controlled trial

  11. Influence of lumbar curvature and rotation on forward flexibility in idiopathic scoliosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feng-Chun Kao

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Lumbar spine facet joints are arranged sagittally and mainly provide forward flexibility. Rotation of the lumbar vertebral body and coronal plane deformity may influence the function of lumbar forward flexibility. We hypothesize that the more advanced axial and coronal plane deformity could cause more limitation on forward flexibility in patients with idiopathic scoliosis. Methods: Between January 2011 and August 2011, 85 patients with adolescent idiopathic scoliosis were enrolled in this study. The proximal thoracic, major thoracic, thoracolumbar/lumbar (TL/L, and lumbar (L1/L5 curves were measured by Cobb's method. Lumbar apical rotation was graded using the Nash-Moe score. Lumbar forward flexibility was measured using the sit and reach (S and R test. Statistical analysis was performed using one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA, Spearman's and Pearson's correlation coefficients. Results: The mean age was 16.1 ± 2.84 years. The mean proximal thoracic, major thoracic, TL/L, and L1/L5 curves were 17.61° ± 8.92, 25.56° ± 11.61, 26.09° ± 8.6, and 15.10° ± 7.85, respectively. The mean S and R measurement was 25.56 ± 12.33 cm. The magnitude of the TL/L and L1/L5 curves was statistically positively related to vertebral rotation (rs = 0.580 and 0.649, respectively. The correlation between the S and R test and both the TL/L and L1/L5 curves was negative (rp = –0.371 and –0.595, respectively. Besides, the S and R test also demonstrated a significant negative relationship with vertebral rotation (rs = –0.768. Conclusion: In patients with idiopathic scoliosis, spinal deformity can diminish lumbar forward flexibility. Higher lumbar curvature and rotation lead to greater restriction of lumbar flexion.

  12. Caudal lumbar vertebral fractures in California Quarter Horse and Thoroughbred racehorses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collar, E M; Zavodovskaya, R; Spriet, M; Hitchens, P L; Wisner, T; Uzal, F A; Stover, S M

    2015-09-01

    To gain insight into the pathophysiology of equine lumbar vertebral fractures in racehorses. To characterise equine lumbar vertebral fractures in California racehorses. Retrospective case series and prospective case-control study. Racehorse post mortem reports and jockey injury reports were retrospectively reviewed. Vertebral specimens from 6 racehorses affected with lumbar vertebral fractures and 4 control racehorses subjected to euthanasia for nonspinal fracture were assessed using visual, radiographic, computed tomography and histological examinations. Lumbar vertebral fractures occurred in 38 Quarter Horse and 29 Thoroughbred racehorses over a 22 year period, primarily involving the 5th and/or 6th lumbar vertebrae (L5-L6; 87% of Quarter Horses and 48% of Thoroughbreds). Lumbar vertebral fractures were the third most common musculoskeletal cause of death in Quarter Horses and frequently involved a jockey injury. Lumbar vertebral specimens contained anatomical variations in the number of vertebrae, dorsal spinous processes and intertransverse articulations. Lumbar vertebral fractures examined in 6 racehorse specimens (5 Quarter Horses and one Thoroughbred) coursed obliquely in a cranioventral to caudodorsal direction across the adjacent L5-L6 vertebral endplates and intervertebral disc, although one case involved only one endplate. All cases had evidence of abnormalities on the ventral aspect of the vertebral bodies consistent with pre-existing, maladaptive pathology. Lumbar vertebral fractures occur in racehorses with pre-existing pathology at the L5-L6 vertebral junction that is likely predisposes horses to catastrophic fracture. Knowledge of these findings should encourage assessment of the lumbar vertebrae, therefore increasing detection of mild vertebral injuries and preventing catastrophic racehorse and associated jockey injuries. © 2014 EVJ Ltd.

  13. Solitary osteochondroma arising in lumbar spinous process: Case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khaled Hadhri

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Solitary osteochondromas rarely occur in the axial skeleton. Those tumors mostly arise on the posterior elements of the cervical column causing various symptoms especially when developing within the spinal canal. Exophytic lumbar variety is uncommon presenting with palpable mass or spinal deformity. We report a 20-year-old man presenting with a solid painless mass at the lower lumbar region. Radiological examinations revealed an exophytic lesion arising in the third lumbar spinous process appearing to be a solitary osteochondroma. The lesion was treated by en-bloc resection; histopathological examination confirmed the diagnosis of osteochondroma with no evidence of recurrence at the end of 2-year follow up.

  14. Pathophysiological effects of lumbar instrumentation surgery on lumbosacral nerve roots in the vertebral foramen: measurement of local pressure of intervertebral foramen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morishita, Yuichiro; Maeda, Takeshi; Ueta, Takayoshi; Naito, Masatoshi; Shiba, Keiichiro

    2014-10-01

    Measurement of local pressure of the intervertebral foramina. To evaluate the pathophysiological effects of lumbar instrumentation surgery on lumbosacral nerve roots in the vertebral foramen. The physiological states of lumbosacral nerve roots in the vertebral foramen remain controversial. From 2000 to 2012, 11 of 710 patients with L4 degenerative spondylolisthesis failed to develop postoperative radiculopathy because of intraoperative pedicle screw malposition (L5: 10, L4: 1). We prospectively evaluated the local pressure at the L4-L5 and L5-LS vertebral foramina in 18 patients with L4 degenerative spondylolisthesis. All patients underwent L4-L5 posterolateral fusion (PLF) with L3-L4-L5 laminotomy. Intraoperatively, local pressure of the intervertebral foramen was measured using a catheter pressure transducer while changing the lumbar spine posture, and the measurement was performed before and after L4-L5 PLF. The local pressures at the L4-L5 vertebral foramen were 29.74 ± 16.26 and 51.57 ± 23.18 mm Hg (before fixation), and 39.13 ± 17.69 and 41.71 ± 17.94 mm Hg (after fixation) in the lumbar spine neutral and extension postures, respectively. The local pressure before fixation increased significantly during lumbar spine extension (P vertebral foramen were 26.91 ± 18.16 and 54.36 ± 26.67 mm Hg (before fixation), and 24.82 ± 17.1 and 58.46 ± 32.78 mm Hg (after fixation) in the lumbar spine neutral and extension postures, respectively. The local pressure before and after fixation increased significantly during lumbar spine extension (P vertebral foramen did not change during lumbar extension after L4-L5 PLF, whereas the local pressure at the L5-LS vertebral foramen was significantly increased during lumbar extension after L4-L5 PLF. Our results suggested that the nerve roots caudal to the fixed segments may be exposed to higher external dynamic stresses after lumbar instrumentation surgery. 4.

  15. Lumbar discography: an update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Mark W

    2004-01-01

    and then come back to reinject more contrast into the disk in question. As radiologists, we tend to focus on the technical aspects of a procedure and the anatomic/morphologic information it provides. However, it cannot be emphasized enough that when performing lumbar discography, the assessment of the patient's pain response during the injection is the most important component of the procedure, and requires not only technical skills, but an understanding of how best to avoid some of the pitfalls that can lead to inaccurate results.

  16. The reasons for delay lumbar puncture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MH. Lotfi

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Early diagnosis of meningitis and encephalitis and prompt initiation of appropriate therapy is vital and any delay will lead to high mortality and serious and permanent morbidity. The main purpose of this study was to evaluate the management of 220 patients with suspected central nervous system (CNS infections (meningitis and encephalitis to determine the percentage of patients’ suspected CNS infection undergo lumbar puncture in acceptable time (in accordance with conventional algorithms. In this descriptive study, patients with suspected CNS infections admitted to Bu-Ali and Qods hospitals, in the period July 2013 to December 2015 were studied. Information of 220 patients was collected. Continuous variables were summarized as means ± standard deviation and categorical variables as frequencies and percentages. Lumbar puncture (LP in patients was delayed in 200 cases (91%. Most common causes of delay in performing LP were prolongation of the process of determining patient needs to puncture, satisfying patients, CT scan delay and the delay in allowing LP by neurologist. In this study, delaying LP rate was higher than other studies. It seems certain pattern in assistants’ visits for counseling. CT requests and neurologic consultation before LP performed for all adult patients.

  17. Computed Tomography of the lumbar facet joints

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Mi Ryoung; Kim, Yung Soon; Lee, Joo Hyuk; Jeon, Hae Sang; Kim, Dae Yung [Kang Nam General Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1989-08-15

    The lumbar facet disease is a frequently overlooked cause of sciatic pain, but the lumbar facet joints are well-recognized source of low back pain and radiating leg pain which can be confused with sciatica due to herniated disc. We measured the angulation of the facet joints on axial spine CT films in 149 cases which contains 41 normal group and 108 abnormal group and studied the relationship between the angulation and degeneration of the facets, the asymmetry of each sided facets and facet degeneration, the asymmetry and disc protrusion, and the asymmetry and annular bulging of the disc. The results were as follows: 1. Facet angulation in abnormal group were more sagittally oriented than the normal group. 2. The angulation of right facet was more sagittally oriented than the left in L4-5 level of abnormal group. 3. Degeneration of facet joints occur asymmetrically, and the more facet joint degenerates, the more it orients sagittally, particularly in L4-5. 4. Asymmetry in facet joint degeneration and unilateral disc protrusion of L5-SI level is greater than the normal gro0008.

  18. Repair of the spondylolysis in lumbar spine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matta Ibarra, Javier; Arrieta Maria, Victor; Torres Romero Fernando; Ramirez Cabrales, Vladimir

    2005-01-01

    The objective is to present the surgical experience in the repair of the spondylolysis in lumbar spine. Background: Spodylolysis is an important cause of low back pain in young adults and is responsible for high grade of incapacity. Classically, patients with surgical indications with Spondylolysis have been treated with vertebral arthrodesis arthrodesis, with the following functional lost of the intervened segment and biomechanical overload of the upper contiguous segment. There are not previous reports about repairing of lysis in national literature and international references in this technique are scarce. Materials and methods: Eight patients within 2002-2004 were operated, a direct repairing of the lyses by in situ, fusion and interfragmental osteosynthesis with AO 3.5 mm titanium cortical screws with autogenous bone grafts was achieved. The casuistic was analyzed depending on clinical presentation, consolidation, mobility and vitality of the disc in imaginology studies. Results: During the follow-up a firm fusion in all cases, mobility and vitality preservation of the L5-S1 intervertebral disc was detected. There was neither infection nor neurological deficit. Recommendations: Repairing of spondylolysis in lumbar column, in young symptomatic patients without or with mild lystesis (grade I) and without associated disc damage, is a safe surgical technique

  19. Lumbar spondylolysis in the adolescent athlete.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawrence, Kevin J; Elser, Tim; Stromberg, Ryan

    2016-07-01

    Spondylolysis is a common occurrence for adolescent athletes who have low back pain. The injury involves a defect in the pars interarticularis, occurring as a result of repeated hyperextension and rotation. Clinical findings might include tightness of the hip flexors and hamstrings, weakness of the abdominals and gluteals, and an excessive lordotic posture. The validity of several clinical tests were compared alongside magnetic resonance imaging, but were not able to distinguish spondylolysis from other causes of low back pain. Medical referral should be arranged so that medical imaging and diagnostic testing can be completed to insure a proper diagnosis. Initial intervention includes rest from sport, which may vary from 2 weeks to 6 months. Bracing is also used to help minimize lumbar lordosis and lumbar extension. Exercises that focus on stabilization and spine neutral position should be incorporated in physical therapy intervention. Avoiding end ranges is important while performing exercises to minimize the translational and rotational stresses on the spine. Surgical interventions have also been recommended for athletes who have had persistent low back pain for more than six months with no relief from rest and bracing. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Resource utilization for non-operative cervical radiculopathy: Management by surgeons versus non-surgeons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Sophie H; Bohl, Daniel D; Paul, Jonathan T; Rihn, Jeffrey A; Harrop, James S; Ghogawala, Zoher; Hilibrand, Alan S; Grauer, Jonathan N

    2017-07-01

    To compare the estimated resource utilization for non-operative treatment of cervical radiculopathy if managed by surgeons versus non-surgeons. A Cervical Spine Research Society-sponsored survey was administered at a national spine surgery conference to surgeons and non-surgeons, as classified above. The survey asked questions regarding resource utilization and perceived costs for the "average patient" with cervical radiculopathy managed non-operatively. Resource utilization and perceived costs were compared between surgeon and non-surgeon participants, and between private practice and academic and/or hybrid groups that combine academic and private practices. In total, 101 of the 125 conference attendees participated in the survey (return rate 80.8%, of which 60% were surgeons). Surgeon and non-surgeon estimates for duration of non-operative care did not differ (3.3 versus 4.2 months, p=0.071). Estimates also did not differ for estimated number of physical therapy visits (10.5 versus 10.5, p=0.983), cervical injections (1.4 versus 1.7, p=0.272), chiropractic visits (3.1 versus 3.7, p=0.583), or perceived days off from work (14.9 versus 16.3, p=0.816). The only difference identified was that surgeon estimates of the number of physician visits while providing non-operative care were lower than non-surgeon estimates (3.2 versus 4.0, p=0.018). In terms of estimated costs, surgeon and non-surgeon were mostly similar (only difference being that surgeon estimates for the total cost of physician visits per patient were lower than non-surgeon estimates ($382 versus $579, p=0.007). Surgeon estimates for the percent of their patients that go on to receive surgery within 6 months were higher than non-surgeon estimates (28.6% versus 18.8%, p=0.018). Similarly, surgeon estimates for the percent of their patients to go on to receive surgery within 2 years were higher than non-surgeon estimates (37.8% versus 24.8%, p=0.013). Academic/hybrid and private practice group resource

  1. Tethered spinal cord syndrome with lumbar segmental stenosis treated with XLIF

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ettore Carpineta, MD

    2017-09-01

    Conclusion: Literature review of adults TCS associated with lumbar spinal degenerative disease as lumbar canal stenosis or disc herniation, is reported. Moderate entity of traction of spinal cord may remain asymptomatic in childhood and may result in delayed neurological deficits in adult life. The stretching of conus medullaris and spinal nerves of cauda equina, reduces regional blood flow and causes neural death and fibrous tissue replacement. Sudden or progressive onset of paraparesis with spastic gait, bladder dysfunction and acute low back pain in patient with history of spinal dysraphism must be considered as possible lumbar spinal cord compression caused by low lying cord related to TCS. Surgical decompression should be performed as early as possible to ensure neurological recovery. XLIF approach seems to be safe and fast and represent an excellent surgical option to obtain spinal cord indirect decompression and lumbar interbody fusion.

  2. Chondroblastoma of the lumbar vertebra

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leung, L.Y.J.; Shu, S.J.; Chan, M.K.; Chan, C.H.S. [Dept. of Radiology and Imaging, Queen Elizabeth Hospital, Hong Kong (Hong Kong)

    2001-12-01

    Chondroblastoma of the vertebra is a very rare condition. To our knowledge fewer than 20 cases have been reported in the world literature. We report a 54-year-old man with chondroblastoma of the fifth lumbar vertebra. The clinical and radiological aspects of the tumor are discussed, emphasizing the presence of an extraosseous mass suggestive of locally aggressive behavior. (orig.)

  3. CASE REPORT Lumbar vertebra chordoma

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    vertebral column tumours. Introduction. Spinal chordomas mostly present in association with the clivus or sacrum. We report a case where it was overlooked in the differential diagnosis of vertebral col- umn tumours because it presented in the lumbar spine. Case. A 66-year-old male patient presented with a longstand-.

  4. Lumbar myelography with Omnipaque (iohexol)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lilleaas, F.; Bach-Gansmo, T.; Weber, H.

    1986-07-01

    Lumbar myelography with iohexol (Omnipaque) was performed in 103 consecutive adult patients with low back pain or sciatica. The patients were observed for 48 h with registration of possible adverse reactions. Mild or moderate transient side effects were recorded in 24 patients. No serious adverse reactions were noted, and EEG recorded in 25 patients showed no changes.

  5. The Effect of Pregabalin and Metformin on Subacute and Chronic Radiculopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Behnaz Ansari

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Radicular pain is one of the most common forms of chronic pain in the world, which has challenges about effective medical therapy. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of pregabalin (PGB and metformin (Met on subacute and chronic radiculopathy. Materials and Methods: This double-blind prospective clinical trial was performed on 71 patients with subacute and chronic cervical and lumbosacral radiculopathy. Group A was treated with PGB 75 mg daily while Group B was treated with PGB 75 mg daily and Met 500 mg daily for 3 months. Finally, the pain score in both groups was evaluated based on visual analog scale (VAS and numerical scale pain. Results: The results showed a significant reduction in VAS and pain severity in both groups but this reduction in the terms of VAS (47.79% vs. 46.48%, P = 0.125 and pain severity (47.1% vs. 39.2%, P = 0.264 was more in treated patients with PGB and Met as compared to PGB group while total pain experience (53.5% vs. 49.1%, P = 0.464 and interference with daily function (57.1% vs. 50.61%, P = 0.726 were more in patients treated with PGB alone. Conclusion: Our results showed that PGB and PGB + Met reduced pain intensity and interference with daily function while we did not observe significant differences between two groups. PGB alone would have the potentiality to become a simple and economic means to decrease radicular pain.

  6. Treatment of cervical radiculopathy by anterior cervical discectomy and cage fusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Osman A Mohamed

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Since the pioneering days of the anterior cervical approach introduced by Cloward et al. in the early 1950s, anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF has been the standard procedure for most discogenic and degenerative cervical spinal lesions. Although traditional interbody fusion using iliac bone can maintain the patency of the neuroforamen and ensure solid fusion, selection of patients, and of surgical procedure for ACDF is a continuous challenge. Aim: The aim of this study was to assess the results of cervical discectomy and fusion with cervical cages in treatment of cervical radiculopathy clinically and radiologically. Materials and Methods: Eighteen patients suffering from cervical radiculopathy were operated upon using this technique. They were 15 males and 3 females. Clinical and radiological assessment, visual analog scale (VAS for neck and arm and modified Oswestery neck disability index (NDI were done preoperatively and at 4 weeks, 3, 6, and 12 months postoperatively. Polyetheretherketone (Peek cages filled with iliac bone graft were used after cervical discectomy. The levels operated upon were C 5-6 in 16 patients and C4-5 in 2 patients. Results: Marked clinical improvement as regard arm and neck pain, and NDI was observed. The pre and post operative mean and standard deviations (SD of the various scores were as follows. VAS for pain in arm reduced from mean of 8 (SD 1.76 to mean 0.4 (SD 0.4, VAS for neck pain reduced from mean of 3.5 (SD 1.58 to mean of 0.8 (SD 0.47, and NDI from mean of 20.2 (SD 0.89 to 2.1(SD 1.05. Fusion occurred in all patients. Subjectively 79% of the patients reported marked improvement in neck pain, and 95% reported marked reduction in arm pain. Conclusion: Anterior cervical discectomy and cage fusion resulted in high fusion rate with minimal preservation of lordosis.

  7. Ultrasonography has a diagnostic value in the assessment of cervical radiculopathy: A prospective pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeuchi, Mikinobu; Wakao, Norimitsu; Hirasawa, Atsuhiko; Murotani, Kenta; Kamiya, Mitsuhiro; Osuka, Koji; Takayasu, Masakazu

    2017-08-01

    This study investigated the diagnostic accuracy of the difference in the cross-sectional areas (CSAs) of affected cervical nerve roots (NRs) for diagnosing cervical radiculopathy (CR). In total, 102 CR patients and 219 healthy volunteers were examined with ultrasound. The CSA of the cervical NR at each level was measured on the affected side and the contralateral side in CR patients by blinded ultrasonographic technicians. The difference between the CSAs of CR patients and normal volunteers and the difference in the laterality of CSA at the same affected level (ΔCSA) were calculated for each cervical level. The CSAs of the affected NRs in CR patients were significantly larger than those of the unaffected NRs in CR patients and those of the control group at the C5, C6 and C7 levels (P<0.005). ΔCSA was also significantly larger in the CR group at all levels (P<0.001). A receiver operating characteristic analysis demonstrated that the threshold values were 9.6 mm 2 (CSA) for C5NR and 15 mm 2 for both C6NR and C7NR. This study revealed that the CSAs of affected NRs were enlarged and that the laterality of the CSA (ΔCSA) was greater in CR patients than in control patients. • Cervical radiculopathy is diagnosed through ultrasonographic measurement of the CSAs. • The CSAs of affected nerve roots were significantly enlarged. • The ΔCSA in the CR group was significantly higher than in the control group. • Diagnostic CSA and ΔCSA thresholds were identified.

  8. A Rare Case of Pediatric Lumbar Spinal Ependymoma Mimicking Meningitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekuma, Ezeali Mike; Ito, Kiyoshi; Chiba, Akihiro; Hara, Yosuke; Kanaya, Kohei; Horiuchi, Tetsuyoshi; Ohaegbulam, Samuel; Hongo, Kazuhiro

    2017-04-01

    Spontaneous acute subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) from lumbar ependymoma in children is rare. We report a case of a 14-year-old boy who developed sudden radicular low back pain while playing baseball. He was initially managed conservatively in a local hospital for suspected lumbar disc herniation, but he later developed meningeal symptoms and fever before being referred to our hospital. He underwent a diagnostic lumbar puncture in the emergency department; his cerebrospinal fluid suggested an SAH. Physical examination showed meningeal signs and cauda equina features. Cerebrospinal fluid analysis was negative for bacterial meningitis. Lumbar magnetic resonance imaging revealed a mass characterized as a hemorrhagic lesion. The patient had an emergent evacuation of the mass through the posterior approach. Postoperatively, his symptoms resolved completely. The histologic diagnosis was, surprisingly, an ependymoma (World Health Organization grade II). This case is particularly interesting because of its rarity in children, and its pattern of presentation. Although bacterial or viral meningitis is the most frequent cause of meningeal features in children, SAH from a hemorrhagic spinal tumor should be considered. Ultimately, a high index of suspicion is needed for prompt diagnosis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Exacerbation of Symptoms of Lumbar Disc Herniation Complicated by a Schwannoma: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sen-Yung Liu

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Herniation of the lumbar disc is a common cause of low back pain. Conservative management with physiotherapy, such as lumbar spine traction, is usually effective. Although a schwannoma of the lumbar spine is relatively uncommon, the clinical manifestations are similar to those of lumbar disc herniation, making the diagnosis difficult. This case report describes a 51-year-old male who had suffered from low back pain for 3 years and who was diagnosed with L2/L3 lumbar disc herniation. The low back pain was well-controlled by conservative treatment and the symptoms improved progressively. Two months prior to our evaluation, however, the symptoms worsened acutely, and were accompanied by the onset of symptoms of cauda equina syndrome. A small tumor at the site of the L2/L3 disc herniation, observed incidentally during magnetic resonance imaging, was responsible for the symptoms of spinal stenosis at the lumbar region. The patient underwent laminectomy, tumor resection, and discectomy with near-complete resolution of symptoms. In patients with lumbar disc herniation that improves with conservative treatment, the recurrence of symptoms should prompt a thorough review of the medical history, physical examination, and imaging studies to establish the diagnosis and prevent delay in treatment.

  10. Diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging of symptomatic nerve root of patients with lumbar disk herniation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eguchi, Yawara; Ohtori, Seiji; Yamashita, Masaomi; Yamauchi, Kazuyo; Suzuki, Munetaka; Orita, Sumihisa; Kamoda, Hiroto; Arai, Gen; Ishikawa, Tetsuhiro; Miyagi, Masayuki; Ochiai, Nobuyasu; Kishida, Shunji; Inoue, Gen; Takahashi, Kazuhisa; Masuda, Yoshitada; Ochi, Shigehiro; Kikawa, Takashi; Toyone, Tomoaki; Takaso, Masashi; Aoki, Yasuchika

    2011-01-01

    Diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) can provide valuable structural information that may be useful for evaluating pathological changes of the lumbar nerve root. Diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance (MR) neurography has recently been introduced as an alternative way to visualize nerves, but to date, quantitative DWI and MR neurography have not been applied to evaluate the pathology of lumbar nerve roots. Our purpose was to visualize lumbar nerve roots and to analyze their morphology by MR neurography, and to measure the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) of lumbar nerve roots compressed by herniated disks using 1.5-T MR imaging. Ten consecutive patients (median age, 48.0 and range, 20-72 years) with monoradicular symptoms caused by a lumbar herniated disk and 14 healthy volunteers were studied. Regions of interests were placed on the lumbar roots at dorsal root ganglia (DRG) and distal spinal nerves on DWI to quantify mean ADC values. The spinal nerve roots were also visualized by MR neurography. In the patients, mean ADC values were significantly greater in the compressed DRG and distal spinal nerves than in intact nerves. MR neurography also showed abnormalities such as nerve swelling at and below the compression in the symptomatic nerve root. Increased ADC values were considered to be because of edema and Wallerian degeneration of compressed nerve roots. DWI is a potential tool for analysis of the pathophysiology of lumbar nerve roots compressed by herniated disks. (orig.)

  11. Greater Cervical Muscle Fat Infiltration Evaluated by Magnetic Resonance Imaging is Associated With Poor Postural Stability in Patients With Cervical Spondylotic Radiculopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitsutake, Tsubasa; Sakamoto, Maiko; Chyuda, Yuji; Oka, Shinichiro; Hirata, Hirokatsu; Matsuo, Takashi; Oishi, Tsuyoshi; Horikawa, Etsuo

    2016-01-01

    A population-based, cross-sectional study. The aim of this study was to quantitatively evaluate the relationship between static postural stability and fat infiltration within cervical multifidus muscle in patients with cervical spondylotic radiculopathy (CSR). CSR causes denervation by compression of nerve roots. This denervation is detected by fatty infiltration or results in fatty infiltration within muscles. Proprioceptive information in cervical multifidus muscle plays an important role in coordinated movement of postural stability; however, there have been few studies evaluating the relationship between postural stability and fat infiltration within cervical multifidus muscle among CSR patients. Sixteen CSR patients with C6 injuries and 25 age-matched healthy controls underwent magnetic resonance images to examine bilateral cervical multifidus muscle. For evaluation of fat within muscle, a muscle fat index (MFI) was calculated by using both measurement of cervical multifidus muscle and intermuscular fat. Participants' postural stability at upright position with eyes-opened and eyes-closed for 60 seconds was examined by a platform. Two parameters, the total length and the area of the center of pressure (COP), were used for evaluation. The CSR group showed significantly poorer postural stability than the control group (eyes-opened the total length; P cervical multifidus muscle could directly cause postural instability in static standing, even though the proprioceptive information has normal lower limbs.

  12. Adjacent Lumbar Disc Herniation after Lumbar Short Spinal Fusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koshi Ninomiya

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A 70-year-old outpatient presented with a chief complaint of sudden left leg motor weakness and sensory disturbance. He had undergone L4/5 posterior interbody fusion with L3–5 posterior fusions for spondylolisthesis 3 years prior, and the screws were removed 1 year later. He has been followed up for 3 years, and there had been no adjacent segment problems before this presentation. Lumbar magnetic resonance imaging (MRI showed a large L2/3 disc hernia descending to the L3/4 level. Compared to the initial MRI, this hernia occurred in an “intact” disc among multilevel severely degenerated discs. Right leg paresis and bladder dysfunction appeared a few days after admission. Microscopic lumbar disc herniotomy was performed. The right leg motor weakness improved just after the operation, but the moderate left leg motor weakness and difficulty in urination persisted.

  13. Adjacent Lumbar Disc Herniation after Lumbar Short Spinal Fusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwatsuki, Koichi; Ohnishi, Yu-ichiro; Yoshimine, Toshiki

    2014-01-01

    A 70-year-old outpatient presented with a chief complaint of sudden left leg motor weakness and sensory disturbance. He had undergone L4/5 posterior interbody fusion with L3–5 posterior fusions for spondylolisthesis 3 years prior, and the screws were removed 1 year later. He has been followed up for 3 years, and there had been no adjacent segment problems before this presentation. Lumbar magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showed a large L2/3 disc hernia descending to the L3/4 level. Compared to the initial MRI, this hernia occurred in an “intact” disc among multilevel severely degenerated discs. Right leg paresis and bladder dysfunction appeared a few days after admission. Microscopic lumbar disc herniotomy was performed. The right leg motor weakness improved just after the operation, but the moderate left leg motor weakness and difficulty in urination persisted. PMID:25276453

  14. Adjacent Segment Pathology after Lumbar Spinal Fusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jae Chul

    2015-01-01

    One of the major clinical issues encountered after lumbar spinal fusion is the development of adjacent segment pathology (ASP) caused by increased mechanical stress at adjacent segments, and resulting in various radiographic changes and clinical symptoms. This condition may require surgical intervention. The incidence of ASP varies with both the definition and methodology adopted in individual studies; various risk factors for this condition have been identified, although a significant controversy still exists regarding their significance. Motion-preserving devices have been developed, and some studies have shown their efficacy of preventing ASP. Surgeons should be aware of the risk factors of ASP when planning a surgery, and accordingly counsel their patients preoperatively. PMID:26435804

  15. Lumbar burner and stinger syndrome in an elderly athlete.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wegener, Veronika; Stäbler, Axel; Jansson, Volkmar; Birkenmaier, Christof; Wegener, Bernd

    2018-01-01

    Burner or stinger syndrome is a rare sports injury caused by direct or indirect trauma during high-speed or contact sports mainly in young athletes. It affects peripheral nerves, plexus trunks or spinal nerve roots, causing paralysis, paresthesia and pain. We report the case of a 57-year-old male athlete suffering from burner syndrome related to a lumbar nerve root. He presented with prolonged pain and partial paralysis of the right leg after a skewed landing during the long jump. He was initially misdiagnosed since the first magnet resonance imaging was normal whereas electromyography showed denervation. The insurance company refused to pay damage claims. Partial recovery was achieved by pain medication and physiotherapy. Burner syndrome is an injury of physically active individuals of any age and may appear in the cervical and lumbar area. MRI may be normal due to the lack of complete nerve transection, but electromyography typically shows pathologic results.

  16. A randomized controlled trial of intermittent Cervical Traction in sitting Vs. Supine position for the management of Cervical Radiculopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Rehan Ramzan; Awan, Waqar Ahmad; Rashid, Sajid; Masood, Tahir

    2017-01-01

    To compare the effectiveness of intermittent cervical Traction in sitting vs. supine position for the management of cervical radiculopathy. A randomized clinical trial was done to compare pain and disability modification of cervical radiculopathy patients by using cervical traction in sitting and supine positions. Forty patients (males and females aged between 18-60 years with chronic cervical radiculopathy) were recruited for the trial. Participants were randomized into two homogeneous groups by dice method. The Group-A (n=20) received 3-weeks of intermittent cervical traction in sitting position along with Transcutaneous Electric Nerve Stimulation (TENS) and hot pack. The Group-B (n=20) received the same treatment except the intermittent cervical traction that was applied in supine position. Participants were assessed two times: at baseline (week 0) and at the termination of rehabilitation (week 3). Neck disability index was used to collect the data before and after the treatment. The mean age of the patients was 43.15±8.99 vs. 48.80±6.89 years in Group-A vs. Group-B respectively. Mean (±S.D.) weight of the patients was 74.75±12.11 vs. 74.60±11.24 kg in Group-A vs. Group-B respectively. Mean Neck Disability Index score at start of treatment was 30.30±7.46 vs. 30.75±7.85 in Group-A and Group-B respectively. There was a significant difference in Group-A and Group-B regarding aggregate NDI score at the end of treatment (19.45±7.12 vs. 11.05±4.40; pcervical traction as compared to sitting position for the management of cervical radiculopathy comparing post interventional NDI score.

  17. Percutaneous posterior cervical fusion with the DTRAX Facet System for single-level radiculopathy: results in 60 patients.

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    McCormack, Bruce M; Bundoc, Rafael C; Ver, Mario R; Ignacio, Jose Manuel F; Berven, Sigurd H; Eyster, Edward F

    2013-03-01

    The authors present 1-year results in 60 patients with cervical radiculopathy due to spondylosis and stenosis that was treated with a bilateral percutaneous facet implant. The implant consists of a screw and washer that distracts and immobilizes the cervical facet for root decompression and fusion. Clinical and radiological results are analyzed. Between 2009 and 2011, 60 patients were treated with the DTRAX Facet System in a multicenter prospective single-arm study. All patients had symptomatic clinical radiculopathy, and conservative management had failed. The majority of patients had multilevel radiographically confirmed disease. Only patients with single-level radiculopathy confirmed by history, physical examination, and in some cases confirmatory nerve blocks were included. Patients were assessed preoperatively with Neck Disability Index, visual analog scale, quality of life questionnaire (Short Form-12 version 2), CT scans, MRI, and dynamic radiographs. Surgery was percutaneous posterior bilateral facet implants consisting of a screw and expandable washer and iliac crest bone aspirate. Patients underwent postoperative assessments at 2 weeks, 6 weeks, 3 months, 6 months, and 1 year with validated outcome questionnaires. Alterations of segmental and overall cervical lordosis, foraminal dimensions, device retention and fusion criteria were assessed for up to 1 year with CT reconstructions and radiographs. Fusion criteria were defined as bridging trabecular bone between the facets, translational motion cervical lordosis. There was a 1.6° loss of segmental lordosis at the treated level at 1 year that was significant. Foraminal width, volume, and posterior disc height was significantly increased at 6 months and returned to baseline levels at 1 year. There was no significant decrease in foraminal width and height at adjacent levels. There were no reoperations or surgery- or device-related complications, including implant failure or retained hardware. Results

  18. Lumbar degenerative spinal deformity: Surgical options of PLIF, TLIF and MI-TLIF

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    Hey Hwee Weng

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Degenerative disease of the lumbar spine is common in ageing populations. It causes disturbing back pain, radicular symptoms and lowers the quality of life. We will focus our discussion on the surgical options of posterior lumbar interbody fusion (PLIF and transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (TLIF and minimally invasive transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (MI-TLIF for lumbar degenerative spinal deformities, which include symptomatic spondylolisthesis and degenerative scoliosis. Through a description of each procedure, we hope to illustrate the potential benefits of TLIF over PLIF. In a retrospective study of 53 ALIF/PLIF patients and 111 TLIF patients we found reduced risk of vessel and nerve injury in TLIF patients due to less exposure of these structures, shortened operative time and reduced intra-operative bleeding. These advantages could be translated to shortened hospital stay, faster recovery period and earlier return to work. The disadvantages of TLIF such as incomplete intervertebral disc and vertebral end-plate removal and potential occult injury to exiting nerve root when under experienced hands are rare. Hence TLIF remains the mainstay of treatment in degenerative deformities of the lumbar spine. However, TLIF being a unilateral transforaminal approach, is unable to decompress the opposite nerve root. This may require contralateral laminotomy, which is a fairly simple procedure.The use of minimally invasive transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (MI-TLIF to treat degenerative lumbar spinal deformity is still in its early stages. Although the initial results appear promising, it remains a difficult operative procedure to master with a steep learning curve. In a recent study comparing 29 MI-TLIF patients and 29 open TLIF, MI-TLIF was associated with longer operative time, less blood loss, shorter hospital stay, with no difference in SF-36 scores at six months and two years. Whether it can replace traditional TLIF as the surgery of

  19. Epidural Steroid Injections for the Treatment of Cervical Radiculopathy in Elite Wrestlers: Case Series and Literature Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Randy; Doyle, Matthew; Sybrowsky, Christian; Rosenquist, Richard

    2012-01-01

    Background Elite wrestlers place tremendous stress through their cervical spine. These athletes are at risk for cervical trauma and may develop radiculopathy from recurrent episodes of injury. Team physicians and athletic trainers are faced with the challenge of treating these injuries in such a way as to allow the athlete to safely and expeditiously return to competition. Epidural steroid injections can be a successful complement to a conservative treatment algorithm for these complex injuries. Study Design Case Series Methods Five upper-level NCAA collegiate wrestlers who experienced symptomatic cervical radiculopathy were identified from an archival review. The majority of the athletes had MRI evidence of cervical disc disease, with corresponding subjective complaints and physical examination findings including pain and weakness that precluded continued competition. All athletes were treated conservatively with initial activity modification, strengthening, rehabilitation, NSAIDs, and, ultimately, cervical epidural steroid injections. Results All five athletes successfully returned to competition without negative clinical sequelae or need for operative intervention. The athletes demonstrated subjective improvement in their symptoms and strength, and all were able to return to a high level of competition. The cervical epidural steroid injections were found to be safe, effective, and well tolerated in all of the athletes. Conclusions Elite wrestlers with cervical radiculopathy can be effectively and safely managed with a conservative regimen that includes cervical epidural steroid injections, which may allow them to continue to compete at a high level. PMID:23576942

  20. Return to Work and Multilevel Versus Single-Level Cervical Fusion for Radiculopathy in a Workers' Compensation Setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faour, Mhamad; Anderson, Joshua T; Haas, Arnold R; Percy, Rick; Woods, Stephen T; Ahn, Uri M; Ahn, Nicholas U

    2017-01-15

    Retrospective comparative cohort study. Examine the impact of multilevel fusion on return to work (RTW) status and compare RTW status after multi- versus single-level cervical fusion for patients with work-related injury. Patients with work-related injuries in the workers' compensation systems have less favorable surgical outcomes. Cervical fusion provides a greater than 90% likelihood of relieving radiculopathy and stabilizing or improving myelopathy. However, more levels fused at index surgery are reportedly associated with poorer surgical outcomes than single-level fusion. Data was collected from the Ohio Bureau of Workers' Compensation (BWC) between 1993 and 2011. The study population included patients who underwent cervical fusion for radiculopathy. Two groups were constructed (multilevel fusion [MLF] vs. single-level fusion [SLF]). Outcomes measures evaluated were: RTW criteria, RTW cervical fusion for radiculopathy was associated with poor return to work profile after surgery. Multilevel cervical fusion was associated with lower RTW rates, less likelihood of achieving stable return to work, and higher rate of disability after surgery. 3.

  1. Intraforaminal and Extraforaminal Far lateral Lumbar Disc Herniation ( A Review of 63 Cases

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    Hamed Kheradmand

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Background:Far lateral discal herniation is an uncommon disorder and is difficult to assess by physical examination alone. This study is designed to define clinical and epidemiological findings and to establish the indications of surgical and medical treatment for FLLDH. Methods:Between 2000 and 2005, a total of 2035 patients with lumbar disc herniation underwent surgical discectomy by the authors in several neurosurgical centers in Mashhad. Among these patients, 63 (3.1% had FLLDH (42 men and 21 women.Clinically these patients had unilateral radicular pain with or without paresis. SLR   was positive in 100% of cases. Conservative therapy consisting of bed rest,nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and physiotherapy had failed. We used a combination of classical interlaminar approach and the intertransverse route through a midline approach for the treatment of our patients.Results: From 63 cases in our series, 42 were men and 21 were women.19 patients had extraforaminal and 44 had foraminal disc herniation. The most common level for far lateral discal herniation was L4-L5. Our patients had LBP in 43.6% (27 cases and positive SLR and radicular leg pain in 100% (63 cases. In all patients leg pain was relieved immediately after surgery.   Conclusion: FLLDH should be considered in all cases with lower limb radiculopathy.These patients have more severe radicular pain than patients with paracentral lumbar disc herniation.FLLDH happens more frequently at L4-L5 and L3-L4 levels.It can often be difficult to diagnose or easily overlooked on radiographic studies.In almost all cases,conservative treatment is unsuccessful and surgical treatment is recommended.

  2. Do Turkish patients with lumbar disc herniation know body mechanics?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Topcu, Sacide Yildizeli

    2017-01-01

    Most common and important cause of the low back pain is lumbar disc herniation. Patients with lumbar disc herniation face with difficulties during daily activities due to the reduction of physical functions. In order to maintain daily activities without pain and discomfort, the patients should be informed about proper positions and body mechanics. The aim of the study was to determine the knowledge and the applications of the patients with lumbar disc herniation about body mechanics. This descriptive study was conducted with 75 patients with lumbar disc herniation in Edirne, Turkey. The population consisted of 75 patients who accepted to participate in the study. In the collection of data the questionnaire, which was developed according to literature by the researcher, was used. Descriptive statistics, student t-test, variance and correlation analysis were used for assessment of the data. The significance level was accepted at 0.05. It was found that 53.3% of the patients experienced awful/very severe pain. and there were some points that the patients have enough information about; mobilisation, standing, carrying the goods, leaning back while sitting, leaning somewhere while standing, getting support from the chair when standing up, avoiding sudden position changes, changing feet frequently while standing. It was detected that a statistical relation between educational level and knowledge about body mechanics exists. This study shows that individuals with lumbar disc herniation have not enough information about body mechanics and they experienced long-term severe pain. Nurses and other health care workers have important role in explaining the importance of body mechanics to the patients and should encourage them to use that in daily life.

  3. Lower thoracic degenerative spondylithesis with concomitant lumbar spondylosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsieh, Po-Chuan; Lee, Shih-Tseng; Chen, Jyi-Feng

    2014-03-01

    . The average Nurick scale score improved from 3.75 before the operation to 2 after the operation. Lower thoracic degenerative spondylolisthesis is a rare disease, which may occur concomitantly with lumbar spondylosis and confuse clinicians. Diagnosis should be made properly, especially because symptoms/signs cannot be explained purely on the basis of the available images. Micromotion due to facet joint laxity and disc degeneration was believed as the cause of progressive myelopathy. Posterior decompression with fixation/fusion procedure was appropriate for the treatment of thoracic spondylolisthesis secondary to thoracic disc degeneration. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. TEST-RETEST RELIABILITY OF HAND GRIP STRENGTH MEASUREMENT USING A JAMAR HAND DYNAMOMETER IN PATIENTS WITH ACUTE AND CHRONIC CERVICAL RADICULOPATHY

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    Ejazi G

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: To evaluate the test-retest reliability of Jamar hand held dynamometer for measuring handgrip strength (HGS in patients with acute and chronic cervical radiculopathy and to find out the difference in measurement of the handgrip strength between acute and chronic cervical radiculopathy. Methods: A prospective, observational and non-experimental, the comparative study design was used. A sample of 72 subjects (37 women and 35 men suffering from cervical radiculopathy were divided into two groups i.e., Group A(acute and Group B(chronic, handgrip strength was measured using Jamar hand held dynamometer on two occasions by the same rater with an interval of 7-days. Data collection was based on standard guidelines of American Society of Hand Therapists. Three gripping trials (measured in Kg with patient’s arm in standardized arm position were recorded. The data was analyzed from the mean score obtained from the sample. Result: One-way Analysis of Variance(ANOVA was used to evaluate test-retest reliability and Tukey-Kramer Multiple Comparison Test used to find the difference between handgrip strength among acute and chronic Cervical radiculopathy cases. Greater P-value (>0.05 in both testing session, as well as 95% of the confidence interval, shows the reliability of the instrument and lesser p-value (0.05 in female subjects shows no significant difference in handgrip strength between the two groups. Conclusion: Excellent test-retest reliability for hand grip strength measurement was measured in patients with acute and chronic cervical radiculopathy shows that the equipment could be used as an assessment tool for this patient and significant difference exists among male handgrip strength between acute and chronic cervical radiculopathy cases whereas no difference exists among female handgrip strength between acute and chronic cervical radiculopathy cases.

  5. Radicular interdural lumbar disc herniation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boulahroud, Omar; Elasri, Abad; Elmostarchid, Brahim; Boucetta, Mohammed

    2009-01-01

    Intraradicular lumbar disc herniation is a rare complication of disc disease that is generally diagnosed only during surgery. The mechanism for herniated disc penetration into the intradural space is not known with certainty, but adhesion between the radicular dura and the posterior longitudinal ligament was suggested as the most important condition. The authors report the first case of an intraradicular lumbar disc herniation without subdural penetration; the disc hernia was lodged between the two radicular dura layers. The patient, a 34-year-old soldier, was admitted with a 12-month history of low back pain and episodic left sciatica. Neurologic examination showed a positive straight leg raising test on the left side without sensory, motor or sphincter disturbances. Spinal CT scan and MRI exploration revealed a left posterolateral osteophyte formation at the L5–S1 level with an irregular large disc herniation, which migrated superiorly. An intradural extension was suspected. A left L5 hemilaminectomy and S1 foraminotomy were performed. The exploration revealed a large fragment of disc material located between the inner and outer layers of the left S1 radicular dura. The mass was extirpated without cerebrospinal fluid outflow. The postoperative course was uneventful. Radicular interdural lumbar disc herniation should be suspected when a swollen, hard and immobile nerve root is present intraoperatively. PMID:19888608

  6. The influence of lumbar extensor muscle fatigue on lumbar-pelvic coordination during weightlifting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Boyi; Ning, Xiaopeng

    2015-01-01

    Lumbar muscle fatigue is a potential risk factor for the development of low back pain. In this study, we investigated the influence of lumbar extensor muscle fatigue on lumbar-pelvic coordination patterns during weightlifting. Each of the 15 male subjects performed five repetitions of weightlifting tasks both before and after a lumbar extensor muscle fatiguing protocol. Lumbar muscle electromyography was collected to assess fatigue. Trunk kinematics was recorded to calculate lumbar-pelvic continuous relative phase (CRP) and CRP variability. Results showed that fatigue significantly reduced the average lumbar-pelvic CRP value (from 0.33 to 0.29 rad) during weightlifting. The average CRP variability reduced from 0.17 to 0.15 rad, yet this change ws statistically not significant. Further analyses also discovered elevated spinal loading during weightlifting after the development of lumbar extensor muscle fatigue. Our results suggest that frequently experienced lumbar extensor muscle fatigue should be avoided in an occupational environment. Lumbar extensor muscle fatigue generates more in-phase lumbar-pelvic coordination patterns and elevated spinal loading during lifting. Such increase in spinal loading may indicate higher risk of back injury. Our results suggest that frequently experienced lumbar muscle fatigue should be avoided to reduce the risk of LBP.

  7. Randomized clinical trial comparing lumbar percutaneous hydrodiscectomy with lumbar open microdiscectomy for the treatment of lumbar disc protrusions and herniations

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    Alexandre Fogaça Cristante

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: Hydrodiscectomy is a new technique used for percutaneous spinal discectomy that employs a high-intensity stream of water for herniated disc ablation and tissue aspiration. No previous clinical study has examined the effects of percutaneous hydrodiscectomy. The aim of this study is to evaluate the outcomes of hydrodiscectomy compared to open microdiscectomy regarding pain, function, satisfaction, complications and recurrence rates. METHODS: In this randomized clinical trial, patients referred to our tertiary hospital for lumbar back pain were recruited and included in the study if they had disc protrusion or small herniation in only one level, without neurological deficits and with no resolution after six weeks of conservative treatment. One group underwent open microdiscectomy, and the other group underwent percutaneous microdiscectomy via hydrosurgery. Function was evaluated using the Oswestry Disability Index and pain was assessed using a visual analog scale. Evaluations were performed preoperatively, and then during the first week and at one, three, six and twelve months postoperatively. Personal satisfaction was verified. Clinicaltrials.gov: NCT01367860. RESULTS: During the study period, 20 patients were included in each arm and 39 completed one-year of follow-up (one patient died of unrelated causes. Both groups exhibited equal improvement on the visual analog scale and Oswestry evaluations after treatment, without any significant differences. The improvement in the lumbar visual analog scale score was not significant in the hydrodiscectomy group (p=0.138. The rates of infection, pain, recurrence and satisfaction were similar between the two groups. CONCLUSION: Percutaneous hydrodiscectomy was demonstrated to be as effective as open microdiscectomy for reducing pain. The rates of complications and recurrence of herniation were similar between groups. Patient satisfaction with the treatment was also similar between groups.

  8. Selective phosphodiesterase-2A inhibitor alleviates radicular inflammation and mechanical allodynia in non-compressive lumbar disc herniation rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jun-Nan; Zhao, Xue-Jun; Liu, Zhi-Hua; Zhao, Xu-Li; Sun, Tao; Fu, Zhi-Jian

    2017-07-01

    Phosphodiesterase inhibitors possess anti-inflammatory properties. In addition, some studies report that phosphodiesterase 2A (PDE2A) are highly expressed in the dorsal horn of the spinal cord. The present study aimed to investigate whether intrathecal administration of Bay 60-7550, a specific PDE2A inhibitor, could alleviate mechanical allodynia in non-compressive lumbar disc herniation (NCLDH) rats. Rat NCLDH models by autologous nucleus pulposus implantation to dorsal root ganglion were established. Vehicle or Bay 60-7550 (0.1, 1.0 mg/kg) was injected by intrathecal catheter at day 1 post-operation. The ipsilateral mechanical withdrawal thresholds were analyzed from the day before surgery to day 7 after surgery. At day 7 post-operation, the ipsilateral lumbar (L4-L6) segments of the spinal dorsal horns were removed, and tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α), interleukin-1β (IL-1β), interleukin-6 (IL-6), cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP), and cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) expressions were measured by ELISA. Furthermore, PDE2A mRNA and protein expressions in spinal cord were measured by Real-Time PCR and Western blot. Intrathecal administration of the PDE2A inhibitor Bay 60-7550, significantly attenuated mechanical allodynia, down-regulated spinal TNF-α, IL-1β and IL-6 over-expressions, increased the expression of spinal cAMP, as well as cGMP in a more remarkable manner, and decreased the spinal PDE2A expression in NCLDH rats in a dose-dependent manner. Bay 60-7550 alleviated mechanical allodynia and inflammation in NCLDH rats, which might be associated with increased cAMP and especially cGMP increase. Thus, spinal PDE2A inhibition might represent a potential analgesic strategy for radiculopathy treatment in non-compressive lumbar disc herniation.

  9. Molecular profile of major growth factors in lumbar intervertebral disc herniation: Correlation with patient clinical and epidemiological characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsarouhas, Alexandros; Soufla, Giannoula; Tsarouhas, Konstantinos; Katonis, Pavlos; Pasku, Dritan; Vakis, Antonis; Tsatsakis, Aristides M.; Spandidos, Demetrios A.

    2017-01-01

    The involvement of growth factors (GFs) in the pathogenesis of lumbar intervertebral disc (ID) herniation and the spontaneous resorption of herniated ID fragments remains only partially elucidated. A simultaneous assessment of the transcript levels of numerous GFs and their association with clinical and epidemiological profiles of human ID herniation would provide valuable insight into the biology and clinical course of the disease. In the present study, we examined simultaneously the transcript levels of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), transforming growth factor β1 (TGF-β1), basic fibroblast growth factor 2 (bFGF2), platelet derived growth factor (PDGF) isoforms and receptors, epidermal growth factor (EGF) and insulin growth factor-1 (IGF-1) in herniated and control ID specimens and investigated their correlation with the clinicopathological profiles of patients suffering from symptomatic lumbar ID herniation. GF mRNA expression levels were determined by RT-qPCR in 63 surgical specimens from lumbar herniated discs and 10 control ID specimens. Multiple positive correlations were observed between the transcript levels of the GFs examined in the ID herniation group. VEGF mRNA expression was significantly increased in the protruding compared with the extruded discs. Intense and acute pain significantly upregulated the PDGF transcript levels. Significant negative correlations were observed between the patient body mass index and the transcript levels of VEGF and PDGF receptors. Our findings support the hypothesis of the involvement of GFs in the natural history of ID herniation. GFs synergistically act in herniated IDs. Increased VEGF expression possibly induces the neovascularization process in the earliest stages of ID herniation. PDGF-C and -D play a role in the acute phase of radiculopathy in a metabolic response for tissue healing. A molecular effect, in addition to the biomechanical effect of obesity in the pathogenesis of ID herniation is also

  10. High sensitive C-reactive protein-Effective tool in determining postoperative recovery in lumbar disc disease

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    Tushar Narayan Rathod

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: It is common in medical practice to see patients having persistent pain and radiculopathy even after undergoing discectomy surgery. Inflammatory cytokines, such as interleukins are produced at the site of disc herniation and are now considered responsible for the pain perceived by the patient. This study has used high sensitive C-reactive protein (HSCRP assay for predicting inflammation around the nerve roots on very same principle, which has used HSCRP for predicting coronary artery diseases in current clinical practice. Thus, purpose of this study is to test whether HSCRP can stand as an objective tool to predict postoperative recovery in patients undergoing lumbar discectomy. That is, to study association between preoperative HSCRP blood level and postoperative recovery with the help of modified Oswestry Back Disability Score. Materials and Methods: A study group consisting of 50 cases of established lumbar disc disease and control group of 50 normal subjects, matched with the study group. Both the study and control groups were subjected to detailed evaluation with the help of modified Oswestry Low Back Pain Scale both pre and postoperatively at 3 months, 6 months and 1-year. The preoperative blood samples were analyzed to assess the HSCRP concentration. All the cases underwent surgery over a period of 1-year by the same surgeon. Results: The level of HSCRP in the study group was between 0.050- and 0.710 mg/dL and in the control group, 0.005-0.020 mg/dL. There was highly significant positive correlation between preoperative HSCRP level and postoperative score at P 10 points, while those with HSCRP level in the range of 0.470 ± 0.163 mg/dL, showed poor recovery (score improved < 10 points. Conclusion: HSCRP will serve as a good supplementary prognostic marker for operative decision making in borderline and troublesome cases of lumbar disc disease.

  11. Effects of Qishe Pill, a compound traditional Chinese herbal medicine, on cervical radiculopathy: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Xue-Jun; Sun, Yue-Li; You, Sheng-Fu; Mo, Wen; Lu, Sheng; Shi, Qi; Wang, Yong-Jun

    2013-10-07

    Neck pain is a common symptom in most patients suffering from cervical radiculopathy. However, some conservative treatments are limited by their modest effectiveness. On the other hand, surgical intervention for cervical disc disorders is indicated when symptoms are refractory to conservative treatments and neurological symptoms are progressive. Many patients use complementary and alternative medicine, including traditional Chinese medicine, to address their symptoms. The purpose of the present study is to examine the efficacy and safety of Qishe Pill, a compound traditional Chinese herbal medicine, for neck pain in patients with cervical radiculopathy. A multicenter, double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled trial to evaluate the efficacy and safety of the Qishe Pill is proposed. The study will include 240 patients from five sites across China and diagnosed with cervical radiculopathy, according to the following inclusion criteria: age 18 to 65 with pain or stiffness in the neck for at least 2 weeks (neck disability index score 25 or more) and accompanying arm pain that radiates distally from the elbow. Qualified participants will be randomly allocated into two groups: Qishe Pill group and placebo group. The prescription of the trial medications (Qishe Pill/placebo) are 3.75 g each twice a day for 28 consecutive days. The primary outcome is pain severity. Secondary outcomes are functional status, patient satisfaction, and adverse events as reported in the trial. Qishe Pill is composed of processed Radix Astragali, Muscone, Szechuan Lovage Rhizome, Radix Stephaniae Tetrandrae, Ovientvine, and Calculus Bovis Artifactus. According to modern research and preparation standards, Qishe Pill is developed to improve on the various symptoms of cervical radiculopathy, especially for neck pain. As it has a potential benefit in treating patients with neck pain, we designed a double-blind, prospective, randomized-controlled trial and would like to publish the results and

  12. Fluoroscopic lumbar interlaminar epidural injections in managing chronic lumbar axial or discogenic pain

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    Manchikanti L

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Laxmaiah Manchikanti,1,2 Kimberly A Cash,1 Carla D McManus,1 Vidyasagar Pampati,1 Ramsin Benyamin3,41Pain Management Center of Paducah, Paducah, KY; 2University of Louisville, Louisville, KY; 3Millennium Pain Center, Bloomington, IL; 4University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, IL, USAAbstract: Among the multiple causes of chronic low back pain, axial and discogenic pain are common. Various modalities of treatments are utilized in managing discogenic and axial low back pain including epidural injections. However, there is a paucity of evidence regarding the effectiveness, indications, and medical necessity of any treatment modality utilized for managing axial or discogenic pain, including epidural injections. In an interventional pain management practice in the US, a randomized, double-blind, active control trial was conducted. The objective was to assess the effectiveness of lumbar interlaminar epidural injections of local anesthetic with or without steroids for managing chronic low back pain of discogenic origin. However, disc herniation, radiculitis, facet joint pain, or sacroiliac joint pain were excluded. Two groups of patients were studied, with 60 patients in each group receiving either local anesthetic only or local anesthetic mixed with non-particulate betamethasone. Primary outcome measures included the pain relief-assessed by numeric rating scale of pain and functional status assessed by the, Oswestry Disability Index, Secondary outcome measurements included employment status, and opioid intake. Significant improvement or success was defined as at least a 50% decrease in pain and disability. Significant improvement was seen in 77% of the patients in Group I and 67% of the patients in Group II. In the successful groups (those with at least 3 weeks of relief with the first two procedures, the improvement was 84% in Group I and 71% in Group II. For those with chronic function-limiting low back pain refractory to conservative management

  13. Effectiveness of Kinesio Taping for Hand on Grip Strength and Upper Limb Function in Subjects with Cervical Radiculopathy: A Randomized Controlled Trial

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    Shruti Prabhu

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Cervical radiculopathy is common condition seen today. It is found to associate with upper limb dysfunction which in turn hinders daily activity due to muscular weakness. Grip strength is found to be reduced in cervical radiculopathy and is taken to be a good measure of upper limb function. Treatment of cervical radiculopathy is mainly concentrated over neck region and very less has been done to improve upper limb function. Kinesio taping is found to improve muscle activity and can be used to improve grip strength and function in cervical radiculopathy. Method: 32 subjects with unilateral cervical radiculopathy were randomly divided into 2 groups, experimental and conventional group (n=16. The conventional group was given intermittent cervical traction, hot moist pack, TENS and exercises and experimental group was given conventional treatment along with kinesio taping to extensor aspect of forearm. Preand post-values for grip and pinch strength and NDI and DASH were assessed and analysed. Result: There was marked improvement seen both groups, but there was significant improvement in grip and pinch strength seen in experimental group while there was improvement seen functional outcomes namely NDI and DASH. This suggests that kinesio taping does not play a role in improving grip strength but can improve upper limb function.

  14. Prevention: Exercise

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    Full Text Available ... Spasms Pinched Nerve Discitis Degenerative Conditions Bulge vs Herniation Cervical Stenosis, Myelopathy, and Radiculopathy Herniated Lumbar Disc Herniated Cervical Disc Lumbar Degenerative Disc Disease Lumbar ...

  15. Adjacent Lumbar Disc Herniation after Lumbar Short Spinal Fusion

    OpenAIRE

    Ninomiya, Koshi; Iwatsuki, Koichi; Ohnishi, Yu-ichiro; Ohkawa, Toshika; Yoshimine, Toshiki

    2014-01-01

    A 70-year-old outpatient presented with a chief complaint of sudden left leg motor weakness and sensory disturbance. He had undergone L4/5 posterior interbody fusion with L3–5 posterior fusions for spondylolisthesis 3 years prior, and the screws were removed 1 year later. He has been followed up for 3 years, and there had been no adjacent segment problems before this presentation. Lumbar magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showed a large L2/3 disc hernia descending to the L3/4 level. Compared to...

  16. Comparison between MRI and computed tomography with myelography in cervical radiculopathy diagnosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frocrain, L.; Duvauferrier, R.; De Korvin, B.; Ramee, A.; Pawlotsky, Y.

    1988-01-01

    A prospective study was undertaken to compare the accuracy of surface coil magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and computed tomography with myelography (CTM) in the determination of cervical radiculopathy with or without myelopathy. Twenty five patients underwent both imaging studies. The separately imaging diagnosis and the surgical findings were the basis of this study. The based-MRI and based-CTM predictions were not significant. MRI predicted two disc herniations that CTM did not predict. CTM predicted a combination of disk herniations and stenosis and one more lateral stenosis that MRI did not predict. Among the fourteen patients who underwent surgery, one underwent surgery only on based-MRI prediction, it was a disc herniation: one patient was operated on only on based-CTM prediction, it was a stenosis. In these operated patients, the predictive value of the both imaging modalities was not significant. In this report the diagnostic assessment of MRI and CTM was overall the same. The major advantages of MRI were its ability to display all the cervical spine, to study the disk pathology and to delineate a signal alteration within cord substance but the disadvantage was the difficulty to characterize the osteophytes made of cortical bone which did not give signal [fr

  17. Diagnostic Accuracy of the Neck Tornado Test as a New Screening Test in Cervical Radiculopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Juyeon; Park, Woo Young; Hong, Seungbae; An, Jiwon; Koh, Jae Chul; Lee, Youn-Woo; Kim, Yong Chan; Choi, Jong Bum

    2017-01-01

    The Spurling test, although a highly specific provocative test of the cervical spine in cervical radiculopathy (CR), has low to moderate sensitivity. Thus, we introduced the neck tornado test (NTT) to examine the neck and the cervical spine in CR. The aim of this study was to introduce a new provocative test, the NTT, and compare the diagnostic accuracy with a widely accepted provocative test, the Spurling test. Retrospective study. Medical records of 135 subjects with neck pain (CR, n = 67; without CR, n = 68) who had undergone cervical spine magnetic resonance imaging and been referred to the pain clinic between September 2014 and August 2015 were reviewed. Both the Spurling test and NTT were performed in all patients by expert examiners. Sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy were compared for both the Spurling test and the NTT. The sensitivity of the Spurling test and the NTT was 55.22% and 85.07% ( P < 0.0001); specificity, 98.53% and 86.76% ( P = 0.0026); accuracy, 77.04% and 85.93% ( P = 0.0423), respectively. The NTT is more sensitive with superior diagnostic accuracy for CR diagnosed by magnetic resonance imaging than the Spurling test.

  18. Comparison between MRI and computed tomography with myelography in cervical radiculopathy diagnosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frocrain, L.; Duvauferrier, R.; De Korvin, B.; Ramee, A.; Pawlotsky, Y.

    1988-02-01

    A prospective study was undertaken to compare the accuracy of surface coil magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and computed tomography with myelography (CTM) in the determination of cervical radiculopathy with or without myelopathy. Twenty five patients underwent both imaging studies. The separately imaging diagnosis and the surgical findings were the basis of this study. The based-MRI and based-CTM predictions were not significant. MRI predicted two disc herniations that CTM did not predict. CTM predicted a combination of disk herniations and stenosis and one more lateral stenosis that MRI did not predict. Among the fourteen patients who underwent surgery, one underwent surgery only on based-MRI prediction, it was a disc herniation: one patient was operated on only on based-CTM prediction, it was a stenosis. In these operated patients, the predictive value of the both imaging modalities was not significant. In this report the diagnostic assessment of MRI and CTM was overall the same. The major advantages of MRI were its ability to display all the cervical spine, to study the disk pathology and to delineate a signal alteration within cord substance but the disadvantage was the difficulty to characterize the osteophytes made of cortical bone which did not give signal.

  19. Do clinical features and MRI suggest the same nerve root in acute cervical radiculopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Conradie

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available Different proposed pathophysiological mechanisms can result in variable clinical presentations of cervical radiculopathy (CR, often making it difficult to detect minor nerve root (NR conditions. This descriptive study determined (1 the level(s of  NR involvement suggested by the distribution patterns of clinical features and detected by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI and (2 the most common associations between the different variables in patients diagnosed with acute CR by a neurosurgeon. A physiotherapist blinded to the level(s of NR involvement performed a standardized interview on 21 subjects to determine the distribution patterns of pain and paraesthesia, and a neurological examination. The Fisher exact test was used to determine associations between the different variables. Only seven subjects presented clinically and radiologically with the same single-level NR involvement. Multiple- level presentations occurred which might be due to dermatomal overlapping, central sensitization or the possible involvement of two adjacent NR levels. Distribution patterns of motor weakness, pain and paraesthesia, and to a lesser extent sensory and reflex changes, have value in identifying the compressed NR level. For this sample the distri-bution patterns of radicular features identified C6 and C8 with more certainty than C7.

  20. Function in patients with cervical radiculopathy or chronic whiplash-associated disorders compared with healthy volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peolsson, Anneli; Ludvigsson, Maria Landén; Wibault, Johanna; Dedering, Åsa; Peterson, Gunnel

    2014-05-01

    The purposes of this study were to examine whether any differences in function and health exist between patients with cervical radiculopathy (CR) due to disk disease scheduled for surgery and patients with chronic whiplash-associated disorders (WADs) and to compare measures of patients' physical function with those obtained from healthy volunteers. This is a cross-sectional study of patients with CR (n = 198) and patients with chronic WAD (n = 215). Patient data were compared with raw data previously obtained from healthy people. Physical measures included cervical active range of motion, neck muscle endurance, and hand grip strength. Self-rated measures included pain intensity (visual analog scale), neck disability (Neck Disability Index), self-efficacy (Self-Efficacy Scale), and health-related quality of life (EuroQol 5-dimensional self-classifier). Patient groups exhibited significantly lower performance than the healthy group in all physical measures (P .09). There was a general trend toward worse results in the CR group than the WAD group, with significant differences in neck active range of motion, left hand strength for women, pain intensity, Neck Disability Index, EuroQol 5-dimensional self-classifier, and Self-Efficacy Scale (P < .0001). Patients had worse values than healthy individuals in almost all physical measures. There was a trend toward worse results for CR than WAD patients. Copyright © 2014 National University of Health Sciences. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Neuroprotective Potential of Gentongping in Rat Model of Cervical Spondylotic Radiculopathy Targeting PPAR-γ Pathway

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    Wen Sun

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Cervical spondylotic radiculopathy (CSR is the most general form of spinal degenerative disease and is characterized by pain and numbness of the neck and arm. Gentongping (GTP granule, as a classical Chinese patent medicine, has been widely used in curing CSR, whereas the underlying mechanism remains unclear. Therefore, the aim of this study is to explore the pharmacological mechanisms of GTP on CSR. The rat model of CSR was induced by spinal cord injury (SCI. Our results showed that GTP could significantly alleviate spontaneous pain as well as ameliorate gait. The HE staining and Western blot results showed that GTP could increase the quantity of motoneuron and enhance the activation of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPAR-γ in the spinal cord tissues. Meanwhile, immunofluorescence staining analysis indicated that GTP could reduce the expression of TNF-α in the spinal cord tissues. Furthermore, the protein level of Bax was decreased whereas the protein levels of Bcl-2 and NF200 were increased after the GTP treatment. These findings demonstrated that GTP might modulate the PPAR-γ pathway by inhibiting the inflammatory response and apoptosis as well as by protecting the cytoskeletal integrity of the spinal cord, ultimately play a neuroprotective role in CSR.

  2. Effect of double-door laminoplasty on atypical symptoms associated with cervical spondylotic myelopathy/radiculopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yuqing; Muheremu, Aikeremujiang; Yan, Kai; Yu, Jie; Zheng, Shan; Tian, Wei

    2016-05-10

    Double-door laminoplasty is an effective method in treating patients with cervical spondylosis. Many patients with cervical spondylosis experience a set of atypical symptoms such as vertigo and tinnitus, and wish to know if the surgical treatment for cervical spondylosis can also alleviate those symptoms. The current research was carried out to investigate if atypical symptoms can be alleviated in patients who received laminoplasty for the treatment of cervical spondylosis. One hundred ninety patients who received laminoplasty to treat cervical spondylotic myelopathy/radiculopathy in our center and complained about one or more of the atypical symptoms before the surgery were followed for a mean of 61.9 months (from 39 to 87 months) after the surgery. Severity scores were retrospectively collected by follow up outpatient visits or phone interviews. The data was calculated based on patient feedback on the frequency and severity of those symptoms before the surgery and at last follow up, and were compared by paired sample t-tests. Most patients reported that the atypical symptoms such as vertigo (P cervical spondylosis. Further research is needed to explore mechanisms underlying this extra benefit of laminoplasty.

  3. Two cases of congenital defects within transverse processes of lumbar spine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malawski, S.; Sokolski, B.

    1993-01-01

    Two cases of congenital defects of transverse processes of lumbar spine causing lumbalgia are described. The first one was produced by direct contact of the elongated processes with subsequent pseudoarthrosis. Hypertrophied processes caused stenosis around intervertebral foramen and irritated posterior neural branch in the second case. Surgical resection of the hypertrophied transverse processes has brought the cure. (author)

  4. Remote cerebellar hemorrhage after lumbar spinal surgery

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    Cevik, Belma [Baskent University Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Fevzi Cakmak Cad. 10. sok. No: 45, Bahcelievler, Ankara 06490 (Turkey)], E-mail: belmac@baskent-ank.edu.tr; Kirbas, Ismail; Cakir, Banu; Akin, Kayihan; Teksam, Mehmet [Baskent University Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Fevzi Cakmak Cad. 10. sok. No: 45, Bahcelievler, Ankara 06490 (Turkey)

    2009-04-15

    Background: Postoperative remote cerebellar hemorrhage (RCH) as a complication of lumbar spinal surgery is an increasingly recognized clinical entity. The aim of this study was to determine the incidence of RCH after lumbar spinal surgery and to describe diagnostic imaging findings of RCH. Methods: Between October 1996 and March 2007, 2444 patients who had undergone lumbar spinal surgery were included in the study. Thirty-seven of 2444 patients were scanned by CT or MRI due to neurologic symptoms within the first 7 days of postoperative period. The data of all the patients were studied with regard to the following variables: incidence of RCH after lumbar spinal surgery, gender and age, coagulation parameters, history of previous arterial hypertension, and position of lumbar spinal surgery. Results: The retrospective study led to the identification of two patients who had RCH after lumbar spinal surgery. Of 37 patients who had neurologic symptoms, 29 patients were women and 8 patients were men. CT and MRI showed subarachnoid hemorrhage in the folia of bilateral cerebellar hemispheres in both patients with RCH. The incidence of RCH was 0.08% among patients who underwent lumbar spinal surgery. Conclusion: RCH is a rare complication of lumbar spinal surgery, self-limiting phenomenon that should not be mistaken for more ominous pathologic findings such as hemorrhagic infarction. This type of bleeding is thought to occur secondary to venous infarction, but the exact pathogenetic mechanism is unknown. CT or MRI allowed immediate diagnosis of this complication and guided conservative management.

  5. Genetic association studies in lumbar disc degeneration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eskola, Pasi J; Lemmelä, Susanna; Kjaer, Per

    2012-01-01

    Low back pain is associated with lumbar disc degeneration, which is mainly due to genetic predisposition. The objective of this study was to perform a systematic review to evaluate genetic association studies in lumbar disc degeneration as defined on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in humans....

  6. Three dimensional analysis of spino-pelvic alignment in individuals with acutely herniated lumbar intervertebral disc.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khallaf, Mohamed Elsayed

    2017-01-01

    Lumbar intervertebral disc herniation affects a large number of patients annually and are the most common cause of sciatica. This study was aimed at measuring the spino-pelvic alignment and its relation to the functional limitations in subjects with acutely herniated lumbar disc. Sixteen patients with acute Lumbar Disc Herniation (LDH group) and 16 healthy matched volunteers (healthy group) represented the sample of the study. The patients were recently diagnosed as lumbar disc herniation (L4-5 or L5-S1) with acute sciatica and antalgic posture using magnetic resonance imaging. Spino-pelvic alignment was measured via Rasterstereography. Functional disability among patients was assessed using Oswestry Disability Index Arabic version. Trunk inclination, trunk imbalance, pelvic obliquity, pelvic torsion, lordotic and scoliotic angles were significantly different between groups (P ≤ 0.05). A non-significant difference in kyphotic angle was found between the patients and healthy controls. There was no association between the measured postural changes and functional disabilities in patients with lumbar disc herniation (P ≤ 0.05). There are significant postural changes in patients with acutely herniated lumbar disc which has no relation to functional disability. These results support the concept of staying active during acute stage.

  7. Lumbar Disc Herniation in a Patient With Congenital Vertebral Body Anomaly: A Case Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atabey, Cem; Topuz, Ali Kivanc; Velioğlu, Murat; Demircan, Mehmet Nusret

    2014-01-01

    Lumbar disc herniation is characterized with low back and leg pain resulting from the degenerated lumbar disc compressing the spinal nerve root. The etiology of degenerative spine is related to age, smoking, microtrauma, obesity, disorders of familial collagen structure, occupational and sports-related physical activity. However, disc herniations induced by congenital lumbar vertebral anomalies are rarely seen. Vertebral fusion defect is one of the causes of congenital anomalies. The pathogenesis of embryological corpus vertebral fusion anomaly is not fully known. In this paper, a 30-year-old patient who had the complaints of low back and right leg pain after falling from a height is presented. She had right L5-S1 disc herniation that had developed on the basis of S1 vertebra corpus fusion anomaly in Lumbar computed tomography. This case has been discussed in the light of literature based on evaluations of Lumbar Computed Tomography (CT) and Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI). This case is unique in that it is the first case with development of lumbar disc herniation associated with S1 vertebral corpus fusion anomaly. Congenital malformations with unusual clinical presentation after trauma should be evaluated through advanced radiological imaging techniques. PMID:25620987

  8. Scoliosis secondary to lumbar osteoid osteoma: A case report of delayed diagnosis and literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Haiping; Niu, Xingbang; Wang, Biao; He, Simin; Hao, Dingjun

    2016-11-01

    Lumbar osteoid osteoma has a low incidence, which could easily lead to scoliosis. Scoliosis secondary to lumbar osteoid osteoma could be easily misdiagnosed when patients do not complain of obvious symptoms. We reported a case of a 9-year-old boy with back deformity that was firstly diagnosed with scoliosis at the local hospital. After prescribed with orthosis, the patient experienced aggravating pain that could not be relieved with painkillers. After he admitted to our hospital for further medical advice, he was prescribed to complete radiological examinations. Considering his radiological examination results and his medical history, correct diagnosis of lumbar osteoid osteoma was made. Surgical intervention of posterior lesion resection was conducted after diagnosis. Intra-operative frozen pathology indicated features of osteoid osteoma. As the lesion involved inferior articular process of L5, which could cause lumbar instability after lesion resection, internal fixation was conducted at L4-S1 segment, and posterolateral bone fusion was also conducted at L5-S1 segment. Three months after operation, the patient showed marked improvement of scoliosis deformity and great relief of lumbar pain. Although spine osteoid osteoma is clinically rare, it shall not be overlooked when young patients present with scoliosis first. Radiological results including computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging shall be taken carefully as reference when making diagnosis. Surgical intervention of lesion resection could well improve scoliosis and relieve lumbar pain.

  9. TAHU MENGHAMBAT KEHILANGAN TULANG LUMBAR TIKUS BETINA OVARIEKTOMI [Tofu Attenuates Lumbar Bone Loss of Ovariectomized Female Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suyanto Pawiroharsono 4

    2002-12-01

    Full Text Available The objectives of this research were to examine the efeects of feed containing soybean tofu and tempeh on lumbar bone density and mass of ovariectomized female rats. Twenty four 17 weeks-old Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly assigned to four group, i.e.: (1 non-ovariectomized rats fed casein based diet (NonOvx, (2 ovariectomized rats fed casein based diet (OvxC, (3 ovariectomized rats fed diet containing soybean tofu (OvxH, and (4 ovariectomized rats fed diet containing soybean tempeh (OvxT; in three block based on their body weight. The result show that body weight gram of ovariectomized rats was greater than nonovariectomized. Ovariectomy caused atrophy of the uterus, and resulted in higher serum calcium level. The lower lumbar vertebrae density of ovariectomized rats was observed and the decrease was prevented by tofu.

  10. Hernia discal lumbar: Tratamiento conservador

    OpenAIRE

    López-Sastre Núñez, Antonio; Candau Pérez, Ernesto

    1999-01-01

    Existe una gran demanda de patología lumbar crónica y aguda que debe de tratarse conjuntamente entre el especialista en Rehabilitación y el Cirujano de columna vertebral. En este trabajo se detallan las posibilidades del tratamiento conservador antes de optar por la cirugía. Se realiza una revisión bibliográfica de los resultados conservadores del tratamiento de la lumbociática de origen discal comparando aquellos estudios publicados con validez estadística. Se detallan las modernas pautas de...

  11. Comparison of two angles of approach for trigger point dry needling of the lumbar multifidus in human donors (cadavers).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hannah, Mary C; Cope, Janet; Palermo, Alec; Smith, Walker; Wacker, Valerie

    2016-12-01

    Descriptive comparison study. To assess the accuracy of two needle angle approaches for dry needling of the lumbar multifidus. Low back pain is a leading cause of disability around the world; the lumbar multifidus plays a vital role in low back health. Manual therapy such as dry needling can improve pain mediation and motor control activation of the lumbar multifidus. Clinicians practicing dry needling at the lumbar multifidus typically use an inferomedial approach considered non-controversial. Clinicians practicing electromyography and nerve conduction studies commonly sample the lumbar multifidus in a directly posteroanterior approach that may provide another option for dry needling technique. Four human donors were used for a total of eight needle placements-four with an inferomedial orientation and four with a posteroanterior orientation. Each needle was placed from 1 to 1.5 cm lateral to the spinous process of L4 to the depth of the lumbar lamina. Each lower lumbar spine was then dissected to determine the structures that the needle traversed and the needle's final resting place. All four inferomedial approach needles ended at the lamina of the vertebrae below. All four posterior-anterior approach needles ended in the lamina of the same level. All eight needles traversed the lumbar multifidus and ended in the lumbar lamina with little possibility of the needle entering the subarachnoid space. Thus both the inferomedial and the posteroanterior angles of approach are efficacious for clinicians to use in dry needling of the lumbar mulifidus. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Surgical and Functional Outcomes After Multilevel Cervical Fusion for Degenerative Disc Disease Compared With Fusion for Radiculopathy: A Study of Workers' Compensation Population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faour, Mhamad; Anderson, Joshua T; Haas, Arnold R; Percy, Rick; Woods, Stephen T; Ahn, Uri M; Ahn, Nicholas U

    2017-05-01

    Retrospective cohort comparative study. To evaluate presurgical and surgical factors that affect return to work (RTW) status after multilevel cervical fusion, and to compare outcomes after multilevel cervical fusion for degenerative disc disease (DDD) versus radiculopathy. Cervical fusion provides more than 90% of symptomatic relief for radiculopathy and myelopathy. However, cervical fusion for DDD without radiculopathy is considered controversial. In addition, multilevel fusion is associated with poorer surgical outcomes with increased levels fused. Data of cervical comorbidities was collected from Ohio Bureau of Workers' Compensation for subjects with work-related injuries. The study population included subjects who underwent multilevel cervical fusion. Patients with radiculopathy or DDD were identified. Multivariate logistic regression was performed to identify factors that affect RTW status. Surgical and functional outcomes were compared between groups. Stable RTW status within 3 years after multilevel cervical fusion was negatively affected by: fusion for DDD, age > 55 years, preoperative opioid use, initial psychological evaluation before surgery, injury-to-surgery > 2 years and instrumentation.DDD group had lower rate of achieving stable RTW status (P= 0.0001) and RTW within 1 year of surgery (P= 0.0003) compared with radiculopathy group. DDD patients were less likely to have a stable RTW status [odds ratio, OR = 0.63 (0.50-0.79)] or RTW within 1 year after surgery [OR = 0.65 (0.52-0.82)].DDD group had higher rate of opioid use (P= 0.001), and higher rate of disability after surgery (P= 0.002). Multiple detriments affect stable RTW status after multilevel cervical fusion including DDD. DDD without radiculopathy was associated with lower RTW rates, less likelihood to return to work, higher disability, and higher opioid use after surgery. Multilevel cervical fusion for DDD may be counterproductive. Future studies should investigate further

  13. Feasibility of Percutaneous Lumbar Discectomy Combined with Percutaneous Cementoplasty for Symptomatic Lumbar Disc Herniation with Modic Type I Endplate Changes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Qing-Hua; Lu, Ying-Ying; Sun, Xi-Qi; Wang, Tao; Wu, Chun-Gen; Li, Ming-Hua; Cheng-Ying, Sheng

    2017-05-01

    Treatment of symptomatic lumbar disc herniation with Modic type I endplate changes is complex and challenging, requiring systemic and local therapies which include conservative therapy, epidural infiltrations, percutaneous therapeutic techniques, and surgical options. The clinical management of symptomatic lumbar disc herniation involving Modic type I endplate changes is uniquely challenging because it requires alleviating pain caused by both the herniated disc and the endplate osteochondritis. Through different approaches, percutaneous lumbar discectomy (PLD) and percutaneous cementoplasty (PCP) have been introduced into clinical practice as alternatives to traditional surgical and radiotherapy treatments of symptomatic lumbar disc herniation and other spine diseases. To evaluate the feasibility of PLD and PCP for symptomatic lumbar disc herniation with Modic type I endplate changes. PLD and PCP in 7 patients with symptomatic lumbar disc herniation with Modic type I endplate changes and its clinical effects were retrospectively evaluated. This study was conducted by an interventional therapy group at a medical center in a major Chinese city. Seven consecutive patients (2 men, 5 women; median age, 74.14 ± 5.34 years; age range, 68 - 82 years) who underwent percutaneous lumbar discectomy and cementoplasty for the treatment of symptomatic lumbar disc herniation with Modic type I changes between May 2013 and August 2015 were retrospectively analyzed. The MacNab Criteria, visual analog scale (VAS), and Oswestry Disability Index (ODI) for pain were assessed before and one week, 6 months, and one year after the procedure. Furthermore, the procedure duration, hospital stay length, and complications were assessed. The VAS of the back and leg decreased from 6.14 ± 0.69 (range, 5 - 7) and 7.29 ± 0.76 (range, 6 - 8) preoperatively to 2.29 ± 1.38 (range, 1 - 5) and 2.71 ± 0.60 (range, 1 - 6) one week, 1.86 ± 0.69 (range, 1 - 3) and 2.00 ± 0.58 (range, 1 - 3) 6 months

  14. A systematic review of the diagnostic accuracy of provocative tests of the neck for diagnosing cervical radiculopathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pool, Jan J. M.; van Tulder, Maurits W.; Riphagen, Ingrid I.; de Vet, Henrica C. W.

    2006-01-01

    Clinical provocative tests of the neck, which position the neck and arm inorder to aggravate or relieve arm symptoms, are commonly used in clinical practice in patients with a suspected cervical radiculopathy. Their diagnostic accuracy, however, has never been examined in a systematic review. A comprehensive search was conducted in order to identify all possible studies fulfilling the inclusion criteria. A study was included if: (1) any provocative test of the neck for diagnosing cervical radiculopathy was identified; (2) any reference standard was used; (3) sensitivity and specificity were reported or could be (re-)calculated; and, (4) the publication was a full report. Two reviewers independently selected studies, and assessed methodological quality. Only six studies met the inclusion criteria, which evaluated five provocative tests. In general, Spurling’s test demonstrated low to moderate sensitivity and high specificity, as did traction/neck distraction, and Valsalva’s maneuver. The upper limb tension test (ULTT) demonstrated high sensitivity and low specificity, while the shoulder abduction test demonstrated low to moderate sensitivity and moderate to high specificity. Common methodological flaws included lack of an optimal reference standard, disease progression bias, spectrum bias, and review bias. Limitations include few primary studies, substantial heterogeneity, and numerous methodological flaws among the studies; therefore, a meta-analysis was not conducted. This review suggests that, when consistent with the history and other physical findings, a positive Spurling’s, traction/neck distraction, and Valsalva’s might be indicative of a cervical radiculopathy, while a negative ULTT might be used to rule it out. However, the lack of evidence precludes any firm conclusions regarding their diagnostic value, especially when used in primary care. More high quality studies are necessary in order to resolve this issue. PMID:17013656

  15. Comparison of Anterior Cervical Discectomy and Fusion versus Posterior Cervical Foraminotomy in the Treatment of Cervical Radiculopathy: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Wei-Jun; Hu, Ling; Chou, Po-Hsin; Wang, Jun-Wen; Kan, Wu-Sheng

    2016-11-01

    Controversy remains over whether anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF) or posterior cervical foraminotomy (PCF) is superior for the treatment of cervical radiculopathy. We therefore performed a systematic review including three prospective randomized controlled trails (RCT) and seven retrospective comparative studies (RCoS) by searching PubMed and EMBASE. These studies were assessed on risk of bias according to the Cochrane Handbook for Systematic Reviews of Interventions, and the quality of evidence and level of recommendation were evaluated according to the GRADE approach. Clinical outcomes, complications, reoperation rates, radiological parameters, and cost/cost-utility were evaluated. The mean complication rate was 7% in the ACDF group and 4% in the PCF group, and the mean reoperation rate was 4% in the ACDF group and 6% in the PCF group within 2 years of the initial surgery. There was a strong level of recommendation that no difference existed in clinical outcome, complication rate and reoperation rate between the ACDF and the PCF group. There was conflicting evidence that the ACDF group had better clinical outcomes than the PCF group (one study with weak level of recommendation). PCF could preserve the range of motion (ROM) of the operated segment but did not increase the ROM of the adjacent segment (weak level of recommendation). Meanwhile, the average cost or cost-utility of the PCF group was significantly lower than that of the ACDF group (weak level of recommendation). In conclusion, the PCF was just as safe and effective as the ACDF in the treatment of cervical radiculopathy. Meanwhile, PCF might have lower medical cost than ACDF and decrease the incidence of adjacent segment disease. Based on the available evidence, PCF appears to be another good surgical approach in the treatment of cervical radiculopathy. © 2016 Chinese Orthopaedic Association and John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  16. Factors associated with lumbar disc hernia recurrence after microdiscectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camino Willhuber, G; Kido, G; Mereles, M; Bassani, J; Petracchi, M; Elizondo, C; Gruenberg, M; Sola, C

    Lumbar disc hernias are a common cause of spinal surgery. Hernia recurrence is a prevalent complication. To analyse the risk factors associated with hernia recurrence in patients undergoing surgery in our institution. Lumbar microdiscectomies between 2010 and 2014 were analysed, patients with previous surgeries, extraforaminales and foraminal hernias were excluded. Patients with recurrent hernia were the case group and those who showed no recurrence were the control group. 177 patients with lumbar microdiscectomy, of whom 30 experienced recurrence (16%), and of these 27 were reoperated. Among the risk factors associated with recurrence, we observed a higher rate of disc height, higher percentage of spinal canal occupied by the hernia and presence of degenerative facet joint changes; we observed no differences in sex, body mass index or age. Previous studies show increased disc height and young patients as possible factors associated with recurrence. In our series we found that the higher rate of disc height, the percentage of spinal canal occupied by the hernia and degenerative facet joint changes were associated with hernia recurrence. Copyright © 2017 SECOT. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  17. Sacral Stress Fracture following the Bone Union of Lumbar Spondylolysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatsuro Sasaji

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available While 22 articles have reported on sacral stress fractures, it is a rare injury and its etiology is not well known. We present the case of a 16-year-old male who presented with low back pain in 2015. He was a high school soccer player with a previous history of a bilateral L5 lumbar spondylolysis in 2014. The patient refrained from soccer and wore a brace for six months. Two months after restarting soccer, he again complained of low back pain. After 1 year, a lumbar spine computed tomography revealed the bone union of the spondylolysis. At his first visit to our hospital, his general and neurological conditions were normal and laboratory data were within the normal range. Sacral coronal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI of the left sacral ala revealed an oblique lineal signal void surrounding bone marrow edema. Based on his symptoms, sports history, and MRI, he was diagnosed with a sacral stress fracture. He again refrained from soccer; his low back pain soon improved, and, after 1 year, the abnormal signal change had disappeared on sacral MRI. Recurrent low back pain case caused by a sacral stress fracture occurring after the bone union of lumbar spondylolysis is uncommon.

  18. Flexible Stabilisation of the Degenerative Lumbar Spine Using PEEK Rods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacques Benezech

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Posterior lumbar interbody fusion using cages, titanium rods, and pedicle screws is considered today as the gold standard of surgical treatment of lumbar degenerative disease and has produced satisfying long-term fusion rates. However this rigid material could change the physiological distribution of load at the instrumental and adjacent segments, a main cause of implant failure and adjacent segment disease, responsible for a high rate of further surgery in the following years. More recently, semirigid instrumentation systems using rods made of polyetheretherketone (PEEK have been introduced. This clinical study of 21 patients focuses on the clinical and radiological outcomes of patients with lumbar degenerative disease treated with Initial VEOS PEEK®-Optima system (Innov’Spine, France composed of rods made from PEEK-OPTIMA® polymer (Invibio Biomaterial Solutions, UK without arthrodesis. With an average follow-up of 2 years and half, the chances of reoperation were significantly reduced (4.8%, quality of life was improved (ODI = 16%, and the adjacent disc was preserved in more than 70% of cases. Based on these results, combined with the biomechanical and clinical data already published, PEEK rods systems can be considered as a safe and effective alternative solution to rigid ones.

  19. ISSLS PRIZE IN BASIC SCIENCE 2018: Growth differentiation factor-6 attenuated pro-inflammatory molecular changes in the rabbit anular-puncture model and degenerated disc-induced pain generation in the rat xenograft radiculopathy model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyazaki, Shingo; Diwan, Ashish D; Kato, Kenji; Cheng, Kevin; Bae, Won C; Sun, Yang; Yamada, Junichi; Muehleman, Carol; Lenz, Mary E; Inoue, Nozomu; Sah, Robert L; Kawakami, Mamoru; Masuda, Koichi

    2018-04-01

    To elucidate the effects of growth differentiation factor-6 (GDF6) on: (i) gene expression of inflammatory/pain-related molecules and structural integrity in the rabbit intervertebral disc (IVD) degeneration model, and (ii) sensory dysfunction and changes in pain-marker expression in dorsal nerve ganglia (DRGs) in the rat xenograft radiculopathy model. Forty-six adolescent rabbits received anular-puncture in two non-consecutive lumbar IVDs. Four weeks later, phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) or GDF6 (1, 10 or 100 µg) was injected into the nucleus pulposus (NP) of punctured discs and followed for 4 weeks for gene expression analysis and 12 weeks for structural analyses. For pain assessment, eight rabbits were sacrificed at 4 weeks post-injection and NP tissues of injected discs were transplanted onto L5 DRGs of 16 nude rats to examine mechanical allodynia. The rat DRGs were analyzed immunohistochemically. In GDF6-treated rabbit NPs, gene expressions of interleukin-6, tumor necrosis factor-α, vascular endothelial growth factor, prostaglandin-endoperoxide synthase 2, and nerve growth factor were significantly lower than those in the PBS group. GDF6 injections resulted in partial restoration of disc height and improvement of MRI disc degeneration grades with statistical significance in rabbit structural analyses. Allodynia induced by xenograft transplantation of rabbit degenerated NPs onto rat DRGs was significantly reduced by GDF6 injection. Staining intensities for ionized calcium-binding adaptor molecule-1 and calcitonin gene-related peptide in rat DRGs of the GDF6 group were significantly lower than those of the PBS group. GDF6 injection may change the pathological status of degenerative discs and attenuate degenerated IVD-induced pain.

  20. A systematic review of the diagnostic accuracy of provocative tests of the neck for diagnosing cervical radiculopathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rubinstein, S.M.; Pool, J.J.; van Tulder, M.W.

    2007-01-01

    or could be (re-)calculated; and, (4) the publication was a full report. Two reviewers independently selected studies, and assessed methodological quality. Only six studies met the inclusion criteria, which evaluated five provocative tests. In general, Spurling's test demonstrated low to moderate....... A comprehensive search was conducted in order to identify all possible studies fulfilling the inclusion criteria. A study was included if: (1) any provocative test of the neck for diagnosing cervical radiculopathy was identified; (2) any reference standard was used; (3) sensitivity and specificity were reported...

  1. Postoperative dysesthesia in lumbar three-column resection osteotomies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhengfeng; Wang, Honggang; Zheng, Wenjie

    2016-08-01

    Three-column lumbar spinal resection osteotomies including pedicle subtraction osteotomy (PSO), vertebral column resection (VCR), and total en bloc spondylectomy (TES) can potentially lead to dorsal root ganglion (DRG) injury which may cause postoperative dysesthesia (POD). The purpose of retrospective study was to describe the uncommon complication of POD in lumbar spinal resection osteotomies. Between January 2009 and December 2013, 64 patients were treated with lumbar three-column spinal resection osteotomies (PSO, n = 31; VCR, n = 29; TES, n = 4) in investigator group. POD was defined as dysesthetic pain or burning dysesthesia at a proper DRG innervated region, whether spontaneous or evoked. Non-steroidal antiinflammatory drugs, central none-opioid analgesic agent, neuropathic pain drugs and/or intervertebral foramen block were selectively used to treat POD. There were 5 cases of POD (5/64, 7.8 %), which consisted of 1 patient in PSO (1/31, 3.2 %), 3 patients in PVCR (3/29, 10.3 %), and 1 patient in TES (1/4, 25 %). After the treatment by drugs administration plus DRG block, all patients presented pain relief with duration from 8 to 38 days. A gradual pain moving to distal end of a proper DRG innervated region was found as the beginning of end. Although POD is a unique and rare complication and maybe misdiagnosed as nerve root injury in lumbar spinal resection osteotomies, combination drug therapy and DRG block have an effective result of pain relief. The appearance of a gradual pain moving to distal end of a proper DRG innervated region during recovering may be used as a sign for the good prognosis.

  2. Seizure-induced muscle force can caused lumbar spine fracture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mehlhorn, A T; Strohm, P C; Hausschildt, O

    2007-01-01

    of the mid-thoracic spine. We report a patient who had suffered from a tonic-clonic seizure during early morning hours. After a cracking sound the patient woke up in a state of post-ictal disorientation, loss of urine and tongue bite. He was admitted to our facilities with the suspected vertebral fracture...

  3. Bilateral spondylolysis of inferior articular processes of the fourth lumbar vertebra: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koakutsu, Tomoaki; Morozumi, Naoki; Hoshikawa, Takeshi; Ogawa, Shinji; Ishii, Yushin; Itoi, Eiji

    2012-03-01

    Lumbar spondylolysis, a well known cause of low back pain, usually affects the pars interarticularis of a lower lumbar vertebra and rarely involves the articular processes. We report a rare case of bilateral spondylolysis of inferior articular processes of L4 vertebra that caused spinal canal stenosis with a significant segmental instability at L4/5 and scoliosis. A 31-year-old male who had suffered from low back pain since he was a teenager presented with numbness of the right lower leg and scoliosis. Plain X-rays revealed bilateral spondylolysis of inferior articular processes of L4, anterolisthesis of the L4 vertebral body, and right lateral wedging of the L4/5 disc with compensatory scoliosis in the cephalad portion of the spine. MR images revealed spinal canal stenosis at the L4/5 disc level. Posterior lumbar interbody fusion of the L4/5 was performed, and his symptoms were relieved.

  4. Lumbar interspinous bursitis in active polymyalgia rheumatica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salvarani, Carlo; Barozzi, Libero; Boiardi, Luigi; Pipitone, Nicolò; Bajocchi, Gian Luigi; Macchioni, Pier Luigi; Catanoso, Mariagrazia; Pazzola, Giulia; Valentino, Massimo; De Luca, Carlo; Hunder, Gene G

    2013-01-01

    To evaluate the inflammatory involvement of lumbar interspinous bursae in patients with polymyalgia rheumatica (PMR) using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Ten consecutive, untreated new patients with PMR and pain in the shoulder and pelvic girdles were investigated. Seven patients with spondyloarthritis (4 with psoriatic spondyloarthrits, one with entheropatic spondyloarthritis, and 2 with ankylosing spondylitis) as well as 2 patients with spinal osteoarthritis and 2 patients with rheumatoid arthritis with lumbar pain served as controls. MRI of lumbar spine was performed in all PMR patients and controls. Nine patients (5 PMR patients and 4 controls) also had MRI of the thoracic spine. MRI evidence of interspinous lumbar bursitis was found in 9/10 patients with PMR and in 5/11 controls. A moderate to marked (grade ≥2 on a semiquantitative 0-3 scale) lumbar bursitis occurred significantly more frequently in patients with PMR than in control patients (60% vs. 9%, p=0.020). In most of the patients and controls lumbar bursitis was found at the L3-L5 interspaces. Only 2 patients had bursitis at a different level (one patient had widespread lumbar bursitis, and one control at L2-L4). No interspinous bursitis was demonstrated by MRI of the thoracic spine in patients and controls. Inflammation of lumbar bursae may be responsible for the low back pain reported by patients with PMR. The prominent inflammatory involvement of bursae including those of the lumbar spine supports the hypothesis that PMR may be a disorder affecting predominantly extra-articular synovial structures.

  5. Use of the Rat Grimace Scale to Evaluate Neuropathic Pain in a Model of Cervical Radiculopathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Philips, Blythe H; Weisshaar, Christine L; Winkelstein, Beth A

    2017-01-01

    Although neck and low-back pain are common sources of neuropathic pain with high societal costs, the pathophysiology of neuropathic pain is not well-defined. Traditionally, most rodent pain studies rely on evoked reflex-based testing to measure pain. However, these testing methods do not reveal spontaneous pain, particularly early after injury. The rat grimace scale (RGS) for quantifying spontaneous pain has been validated after visceral, incisional, orthopedic, and inflammatory insults but not neuropathic pain. The current study used a rat model of radiculopathy to investigate the time course of RGS, the effect of the NSAID meloxicam on RGS, and the reliability and consistency of RGS across testers. RGS values at baseline and at 3, 6, 24, and 48 h after cervical nerve root compression (NRC) that induced robust evoked pain responses were compared with those obtained after sham surgery. The RGS was also evaluated at 6 h after NRC in another set of rats that had received meloxicam treatment prior to surgery. At 6 h, NRC induced higher RGS scores (1.27 ± 0.18) than did sham surgery (0.93 ± 0.20), and scores remained above baseline for as long as 48 h. Treatment with meloxicam before NRC reduced RGS at 6 h to sham levels, which were lower than those of injury without treatment. The RGS was associated with very good interobserver reliability (intraclass correlation coefficient, 0.91) and excellent internal consistency (Cronbach α, 0.87). These findings suggest that RGS is a useful approach to identifying and monitoring acute neuropathic pain in rats. PMID:28222837

  6. Balance chiropractic therapy for cervical spondylotic radiculopathy: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Feng; Li, Wen-Xiong; Liu, Zhu; Liu, Li

    2016-10-22

    Cervical spondylosis is a very common disorder and cervical spondylotic radiculopathy (CSR) is the most common form of spinal degenerative disease. Its clinical manifestations focus on pain and numbness of the neck and arm as well as restricted movement of the neck, which greatly affect the patient's life and work. The orthopedic of traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) theory holds that the basic pathologic change in spinal degenerative diseases is the imbalance between the dynamic system and the static system of the cervical spine. Based on this theory, some Chinese physicians have developed a balance chiropractic therapy (BCT) to treat CSR, which has been clinically examined for more than 50 years to effectively cure CSR. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the therapeutic effect and safety of BCT on CSR and to investigate the mechanism by which the efficacy is achieved. We propose a multicenter, parallel-group, randomized controlled trial to evaluate the efficacy and safety of BCT for CSR. Participants aged 18 to 65 years, who are in conformity with the diagnostic criteria of CSR and whose pain score on a Visual Analog Scale (VAS) is more than 4 points and less than 8 points, will be included and randomly allocated into two groups: a treatment group and a control group. Participants in the treatment group will be treated with BCT, while the control group will receive traction therapy (TT). The primary outcome is pain severity (measured with a VAS). Secondary outcomes will include cervical curvature (measured by the Borden Index), a composite of functional status (measured by the Neck Disability Index, NDI), patient health status (evaluated by the SF-36 health survey) and adverse events (AEs) as reported in the trial. If BCT can relieve neck pain without adverse effects, it may be a novel strategy for the treatment of CSR. Furthermore, the mechanism of BCT for CSR will be partially elucidated. Clinical Trials.gov Identifier: NCT02705131 . Registered on 9

  7. Oral prednisolone in the treatment of cervical radiculopathy: A randomized placebo controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Majid Ghasemi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Steroids are commonly used in the treatment of cervical radiculopathy (CR, but there is limited information in this regard. We evaluated the efficacy of oral prednisone in the treatment of CR. Materials and Methods: This randomized, double-blinded, placebo-controlled trial was conducted on adult patients with neck/shoulder pain for at least 1 month with no alarm symptoms/sings of malignancy, infection, or severe myelopathy, and no contraindication for corticosteroid use. Patients were allocated to receive prednisolone 50 mg/day for 5 days that was tapered within the following 5 days, or placebo. All patients also received acetaminophen 325 mg three times a day and ranitidine 150 mg two times a day. Neck disability index (NDI and the verbal rating scale (VRS were used to evaluate the outcomes. Results: A total of 59 patients (31 female, mean ± SD age = 46.2 ± 9.0 years completed the study. A significant decrease was observed regarding the NDI and VAS scores from baseline to the end of study in both groups (P < 0.001. However, for both the NDI (35.7 ± 21.4 vs. 12.9 ± 10.2 and VRS (4.4 ± 2.7 vs. 1.6 ± 1.2, the amount of decrease was greater in the prednisone compared with the placebo group (P < 0.001. Based on the clinically important change in NDI, pain was improved in 75.8% (22/29 of the prednisolone and 30% (9/30 of the placebo group (P < 0.001. Conclusion: A short course of oral steroid therapy with prednisolone is highly effective in reducing pain in patients referring with uncomplicated CR. Further studies are warranted on dosing, duration, and long-term efficacy and safety of oral steroid therapy, compared with injection approach.

  8. Shi-style cervical manipulations for cervical radiculopathy: A multicenter randomized-controlled clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Xue-Jun; Yao, Min; Ye, Xiu-Lan; Wang, Ping; Zhong, Wei-Hong; Zhang, Rui-Chun; Li, Hui-Ying; Hu, Zhi-Jun; Tang, Zhan-Ying; Wang, Wei-Min; Qiao, Wei-Ping; Sun, Yue-Li; Li, Jun; Gao, Yang; Shi, Qi; Wang, Yongjun

    2017-08-01

    There is a lack of high-quality evidence supporting the use of manipulation therapy for patients with cervical radiculopathy (CR). This study aimed to evaluate the effectiveness of Shi-style cervical manipulations (SCMs) versus mechanical cervical traction (MCT) for CR. This was a randomized, open-label, controlled trial carried out at 5 hospitals in patients with CR for at least 2 weeks and neck pain. The patients received 6 treatments of SCM (n = 179) or MCT (n = 180) over 2 weeks. The primary outcome was participant-rated disability (neck disability index), measured 2 weeks after randomization. The secondary outcomes were participant-rated pain (visual analog scale) and health-related quality of life (36-Item Short Form Health Survey [SF-36]). Assessments were performed before, during, and after (2, 4, 12, and 24 weeks) intervention. After 2 weeks of treatment, the SCM group showed a greater improvement in participant-rated disability compared with the control group (P = .018). The SCM group reported less disability compared with the control group (P < .001) during the 26-week follow-up. The difference was particularly important at 6 months (mean -28.91 ± 16.43, P < .001). Significant improvements in SF-36 were noted in both groups after 2 weeks of treatment, but there were no differences between the 2 groups. SCM could be a better option than MCT for the treatment of CR-related pain and disability.

  9. Lumbar model generator: a tool for the automated generation of a parametric scalable model of the lumbar spine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavecchia, C E; Espino, D M; Moerman, K M; Tse, K M; Robinson, D; Lee, P V S; Shepherd, D E T

    2018-01-01

    Low back pain is a major cause of disability and requires the development of new devices to treat pathologies and improve prognosis following surgery. Understanding the effects of new devices on the biomechanics of the spine is crucial in the development of new effective and functional devices. The aim of this study was to develop a preliminary parametric, scalable and anatomically accurate finite-element model of the lumbar spine allowing for the evaluation of the performance of spinal devices. The principal anatomical surfaces of the lumbar spine were first identified, and then accurately fitted from a previous model supplied by S14 Implants (Bordeaux, France). Finally, the reconstructed model was defined according to 17 parameters which are used to scale the model according to patient dimensions. The developed model, available as a toolbox named the lumbar model generator, enables generating a population of models using subject-specific dimensions obtained from data scans or averaged dimensions evaluated from the correlation analysis. This toolbox allows patient-specific assessment, taking into account individual morphological variation. The models have applications in the design process of new devices, evaluating the biomechanics of the spine and helping clinicians when deciding on treatment strategies. © 2018 The Author(s).

  10. Tophaceous Gout in the Lumbar Spinal Canal Mimicking Epidural Spinal Tumor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Taeshin; Kim, Bum-Joon; Kim, Se-Hoon; Lee, Seung-Hwan

    2017-06-01

    Gout is an inflammatory arthritis characterized by deposition of monosodium urate crystals in joints. Though gout frequently involves the big toe or other extremities, it rarely occurs in the spinal canal. A 35-year-old man presented with left L5 radiculopathy. He had leg pain for 8 months and received several epidural steroid injections. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed a 1.7×1.1-cm ovoid contrast-enhancing mass, causing pressure erosion of the left L5 pedicle. Microscopic laminotomy was performed at the left L5 lamina. White chalky materials, identified at the left lateral recess of the spinal canal, were removed in a piecemeal manner. The histopathologic diagnosis was tophaceous gout. Although the patient's radiating pain did not resolve postoperatively, it was dramatically relieved with uric acid-lowering medications. If a mass effect is suspected, surgical removal of gouty tophi might aid in symptom release and definite diagnosis. Medical treatment after rheumatology consultation is crucial.

  11. Minimal Invasive Decompression for Lumbar Spinal Stenosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victor Popov

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Lumbar spinal stenosis is a common condition in elderly patients and may lead to progressive back and leg pain, muscular weakness, sensory disturbance, and/or problems with ambulation. Multiple studies suggest that surgical decompression is an effective therapy for patients with symptomatic lumbar stenosis. Although traditional lumbar decompression is a time-honored procedure, minimally invasive procedures are now available which can achieve the goals of decompression with less bleeding, smaller incisions, and quicker patient recovery. This paper will review the technique of performing ipsilateral and bilateral decompressions using a tubular retractor system and microscope.

  12. Pathological changes in the lumbar intervertebral discs among professional field hockey players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogurkowska, Małgorzata; Kawałek, Krzysztof

    2016-01-01

    Acute injuries or chronic overloading can be the cause of lower back pain. Long-term, highly-specialized training can cause the musculoskeletal system to become overloaded. Field hockey is an example of a sport which, due to the players' non-ergonomic positions, can lead to degenerative changes in the lumbar spine. The aim of this study was to evaluate the condition of the lumbar spine among 20 male players of the Polish national team in field hockey, aged between 24 and 35 years of age, and having trained in the discipline of field hockey for a period of between 14 and 26 years. CT scans were used to determine the height of vertebrae and intervertebral discs. The study showed a number of differences in lumbar discs and vertebrae that are typical results of overloading. A significant decrease in disc height was observed, as well as changes in the shape of the vertebrae, which acquired a wedge shape. Analysis of the Relative Height Coefficient showed that these changes are both severe and exacerbated by years of training. This research proves that field hockey as an active sport strongly affects the lumbar section of the spine. As a therapeutic procedure, a special regime including muscle stretching and lumbar spine stabilization exercises should be created for both advanced and beginner players.

  13. Effect of lumbar lordosis on the adjacent segment in transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion: A finite element analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Xin; Du, Lin; Xie, Youzhuan; Zhao, Jie

    2018-02-21

    Here we used a finite element (FE) analysis to investigate the biomechanical changes caused by transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (TLIF) at the L4-L5 level by lumbar lordosis (LL) degree. A lumbar FE model (L1-S5) was constructed based on computed tomography scans of a 30-year-old healthy male volunteer (pelvic incidence = 50°, LL = 52°). We investigated the influence of LL on the biomechanical behavior of the lumbar spine after TLIF in L4-L5 fusion models with 57°, 52°, 47°, and 40° LL. The LL was defined as the angle between the superior endplate of L1 and the superior endplate of S1. A 150-N vertical axial pre-load was imposed on the superior surface of L3. A 10-N·m moment was simultaneously applied on the L3 superior surface along the radial direction to simulate the four basic physiological motions of flexion, extension, lateral bending, and torsion in the numerical simulations. The range of motion (ROM) and intradiscal pressure (IDP) of L3-L4 were evaluated and compared in the simulated cases. In all motion patterns, the ROM and IDP were both increased after TLIF. In addition, the decrease in lordosis generally increased the ROM and IDP in all motion patterns. The current FE analysis indicated that decreased spinal lordosis may evoke overstress of the adjacent segment and increase the risk of the pathological development of adjacent segment degeneration (ASD); thus, ASD should be considered when planning a spinal fusion procedure. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  14. Nursing care for patients receiving percutaneous lumbar discectomy and intradiscal electrothermal treatment for lumbar disc herniation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mou Ling

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To summarize the nursing experience in caring patients with lumbar intervertebral disc herniation who received percutaneous lumbar discectomy (PLD) together with intradiscal electrothermal treatment (IDET) under DSA guidance. Methods: The perioperative nursing care measures carried out in 126 patients with lumbar intervertebral disc herniation who underwent PLD and IDET were retrospectively analyzed. Results: Successful treatment of PLD and IDET was accomplished in 112 cases. Under comprehensive and scientific nursing care and observation, no serious complications occurred. Conclusion: Scientific and proper nursing care is a strong guarantee for a successful surgery and a better recovery in treating lumbar intervertebral disc herniation with PLD and IDET under DSA guidance. (authors)

  15. [Therapeutic progress in lumbar spinal stenosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Shao-Yan; Huang, Yan-Sheng; Hao, Ding-Jun

    2017-05-25

    Along with the population aging in China, patients with lumbar spinal stenosis(LSS) caused by recessive change incessantly increase. At present, there is no adequate evidence to recommend any specific nonoperative treatment for LSS, and surgery is still an effective method. The cilincal symptoms of the patients without conservative treatment got improvement after surgery, which is the strongest evidence base. Spinal instability after simple decompression promotes the development of fusion technique, and the accelerated adjacent segment degeneration and no relief in symptoms after fusion lead to dynamic fixation technology emerge as the times require. Patients with spinal canal decompression whether need bone fusion or not is still controversial. For the past few years, the operation of simple decompression for LSS obviously decreased, whereas the decompression plus fusion surgery showed sustainable growth. Decompression complicated with fusion was more and more adopted in LSS, in order to reduce the hidden risk of spinal instability and deformity. Although decompressive operation has determinate effect, now it is still unclear if the therapeutic effect of decompression complicated with fusion is better than simple decompression. This article reviews the current studies to explore whether decompression plus bone fusion is applicable for LSS. To further explore the best choice of surgical treatment for LSS, we focused on evidence-based therapeutic options. Copyright© 2017 by the China Journal of Orthopaedics and Traumatology Press.

  16. Computed tomography in lumbar degenerative disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Isu, Toyohiko; Miyasaka, Kazuo; Abe, Satoru; Takei, Hidetoshi; Kaneda, Kiyoshi (Hokkaido Univ., Sapporo (Japan). School of Medicine)

    1984-02-01

    We reported the 18 patients which underwent surgical exploration and reviewed these CT findings. Method All CT scans were obtained on Somatom II, high resolution CT scanner, with the patient in the supine position. A lateral localizer image (Topogram) was used to select the appropriate intervertebral disk space. The slice thickness was 4 mm. Results 1) CT findings in lumbar degenerative diseases include bony canal stenosis (central canal stenosis, narrowed lateral recess), soft tissue abnormalities (herniated nucleus pulposus, bulging annulus, hypertrophy and/or ossification of ligamentum flavum, no delineation of nerve root in lateral recess), and spinal instability (spondylolisthesis, vacuum phenomenon). 2) The above three factors contribute to narrowing of spinal canal. 3) No delineation of nerve root or soft tissue replacement of epidural fat in lateral recess suggests that the nerve root may be compressed by some factors. 4) Herniated nucleus pulposus may cause nerve root compression with or without canal stenosis. Conclusion This study revealed that the CT findings correlated closely with the surgical findings and the site of nerve root compression could be determined.

  17. Clinical Evidence of Chinese Massage Therapy (Tui Na) for Cervical Radiculopathy: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shangquan; Li, Linghui

    2017-01-01

    Objective. The review is to assess the current evidence of Chinese massage therapy (Tui Na) for cervical radiculopathy. Methods. Seven databases were searched. Randomised controlled trials incorporating Tui Na alone or Tui Na combined with conventional treatment were enrolled. The authors in pairs independently assessed the risk of bias and extracted the data. Results. Five studies involving 448 patients were included. The pooled analysis from the 3 trials indicated that Tui Na alone showed a significant lowering immediate effects on pain score (SMD = −0.58; 95% CI: −0.96 to −0.21; Z = 3.08, P = 0.002) with moderate heterogeneity compared to cervical traction. The meta-analysis from 2 trials revealed significant immediate effects of Tui Na plus cervical traction in improving pain score (MD = −1.73; 95% CI: −2.01 to −1.44; Z = 11.98, P cervical traction alone. No adverse effect was reported. There was very low quality or low quality evidence to support the results. Conclusions. Tui Na alone or Tui Na plus cervical traction may be helpful to cervical radiculopathy patients, but supportive evidence seems generally weak. Future clinical studies with low risk of bias and adequate follow-up design are recommended. PMID:28303163

  18. Short- and long-term effects of exercise on neck muscle function in cervical radiculopathy: A randomized clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halvorsen, Marie; Falla, Deborah; Gizzi, Leonardo; Harms-Ringdahl, Karin; Peolsson, Anneli; Dedering, Åsa

    2016-10-05

    To compare short- and long-term changes in neck muscle endurance, electromyography measures of neck muscle activation and fatigue and ratings of fatigue and pain after neck-specific training or physical activity in people with cervical radiculopathy. Randomized clinical trial. Seventy-five patients with cervical radiculopathy. Patients underwent neck-specific training in combination with a cognitive behavioural approach or prescribed physical activity over a period of 14 weeks. Immediately after the intervention and 12 months later, surface electromyography was recorded from neck flexor and extensor muscles during neck endurance tests. Time to task failure, amplitude and median frequency of the electromyography signal, and subjective fatigue and pain ratings were analysed in 50 patients who completed at least one follow-up. A significant increase in neck flexor endurance time was observed for both groups at 14 weeks compared with baseline and this was maintained at the 12-month follow-up (p < 0.005). No change was identified for the slope of the median frequency. For the neck-specific training group, splenius capitis was less active during neck flexion at both follow-ups (p < 0.01), indicating reduced muscle co-activation. Both specific and general exercise increased neck flexor endurance, but neck-specific training only reduced co-activation of antagonist muscles during sustained neck flexion.

  19. Clinical Evidence of Chinese Massage Therapy (Tui Na for Cervical Radiculopathy: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xu Wei

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. The review is to assess the current evidence of Chinese massage therapy (Tui Na for cervical radiculopathy. Methods. Seven databases were searched. Randomised controlled trials incorporating Tui Na alone or Tui Na combined with conventional treatment were enrolled. The authors in pairs independently assessed the risk of bias and extracted the data. Results. Five studies involving 448 patients were included. The pooled analysis from the 3 trials indicated that Tui Na alone showed a significant lowering immediate effects on pain score (SMD = −0.58; 95% CI: −0.96 to −0.21; Z=3.08, P=0.002 with moderate heterogeneity compared to cervical traction. The meta-analysis from 2 trials revealed significant immediate effects of Tui Na plus cervical traction in improving pain score (MD = −1.73; 95% CI: −2.01 to −1.44; Z=11.98, P<0.00001 with no heterogeneity compared to cervical traction alone. No adverse effect was reported. There was very low quality or low quality evidence to support the results. Conclusions. Tui Na alone or Tui Na plus cervical traction may be helpful to cervical radiculopathy patients, but supportive evidence seems generally weak. Future clinical studies with low risk of bias and adequate follow-up design are recommended.

  20. Long Term Societal Costs of Anterior Discectomy and Fusion (ACDF) versus Cervical Disc Arthroplasty (CDA) for Treatment of Cervical Radiculopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghori, Ahmer; Konopka, Joseph F; Makanji, Heeren; Cha, Thomas D; Bono, Christopher M

    2016-01-01

    Current literature suggests that anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF) and cervical disc arthroplasty (CDA) have comparable clinical outcomes for the treatment of cervical radiculopathy. Given similar outcomes, an understanding of differences in long-term societal costs can help guide resource utilization. The purpose of this study was to compare the relative long-term societal costs of anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF) to cervical disc arthroplasty (CDA) for the treatment of single level cervical disc disease by considering upfront surgical costs, lost productivity, and risk of subsequent revision surgery. We completed an economic and decision analysis using a Markov model to evaluate the long-term societal costs of ACDF and CDA in a theoretical cohort of 45-65 year old patients with single level cervical disc disease who have failed nonoperative treatment. The long-term societal costs for a 45-year old patient undergoing ACDF are $31,178 while long-term costs for CDA are $24,119. Long-term costs for CDA remain less expensive throughout the modeled age range of 45 to 65 years old. Sensitivity analysis demonstrated that CDA remains less expensive than ACDF as long as annual reoperation rate remains below 10.5% annually. Based on current data, CDA has lower long-term societal costs than ACDF for patients 45-65 years old by a substantial margin. Given reported reoperation rates of 2.5% for CDA, it is the preferred treatment for cervical radiculopathy from an economic perspective.

  1. Efficacy of transforaminal epidural steroid injection versus intraforaminal or periforaminal ozone for low back pain with radiculopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jerry Joseph Joel

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available To compare the effectiveness of transforaminal epidural steroid injection (TFESI vs Periforaminal ozone in low back pain with radiculopathy. Literature search was done from MEDLINE and PUBMED sites. Observational studies in both steroid and ozone groups clearly favouring each other whereas there was a significant difference between the RCT′s in either group. 3 RCT′s out of 4 favouring ozone treatment whereas only 2 out of 8 RCT′s were in favour of epidural steroids. Comparison studies showed results more in favour of combined steroid and ozone. 2 RCT′s and 1 observational study were in favour of combined ozone and steroid whereas 2 RCT′s favoured ozone better than steroid and ozone. Currently studies have shown epidural steroids to be effective in inflammatory origin of pain as its proven by its short duration of action whereas ozone was shown to be effective in both short and long term mainly because of its anti inflammatory action which took care of the short term pain and its ability to denature the proteins of disc material and correct the underlying pathology resulting in effective long term relief. Studies have also shown cumulative effects of ozone and epidural steroids and we would recommend a careful selection of patients for ozone or steroid to increase the success rate and further studies would be needed to know their true potential in low back pain due to radiculopathy.

  2. Herniated lumbar disc: injection interventions for sciatica

    OpenAIRE

    Jordan, Joanne L; Konstantinou, Kika; O'Dowd, John

    2016-01-01

    Herniated lumbar disc is a displacement of disc material (nucleus pulposus or annulus fibrosus) beyond the intervertebral disc space. The highest prevalence is among people aged 30 to 50 years, with a male to female ratio of 2:1.

  3. Bulging Fontanelle and Need for Lumbar Puncture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Gordon Millichap

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Etiologies of bulging fontanelle and fever and clinical evidence for lumbar puncture were determined from medical records of 153 infants treated at Assaf Harofeh Medical Center, Israel.

  4. Retroperitoneoscopic lumbar sympathectomy for plantar hyperhidrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lima, Sonia O; de Santana, Vanessa R; Valido, Daisy P; de Andrade, Renata L B; Fontes, Leticia M; Leite, Victor Hugo O; Neto, José M; Santos, Jéssica M; Varjão, Lucas L; Reis, Francisco P

    2017-12-01

    The objective of this study was to assess the reduction in quality of life (QoL) caused by the persistence of primary plantar hyperhidrosis (PPH) symptoms and the level of satisfaction in PPH patients after retroperitoneoscopic lumbar sympathectomy (RLS). The efficacy, safety, and procedure of bilateral RLS in both sexes are also described in this study. This is a longitudinal study of consecutive patients who sought specific treatment from a private practitioner for severe PPH as classified on the Hyperhidrosis Disease Severity Scale (HDSS) from October 2005 to October 2014. The patients were asked to report the symptoms of PPH experienced in the immediate preoperative period and to complete a standardized QoL questionnaire developed by de Campos at least 12 months after RLS. Disease outcomes, recurrence of symptoms, and any adverse effects of surgery were evaluated after 30 days and at least 12 months after RLS. Lumbar sympathectomy was performed 116 times in 58 patients; 30 days after surgery, PPH was resolved in all patients. Three patients (5.2%) reported transient thigh neuralgia, and 19 (32.7%) reported transient paresthesia in the lower limbs. There were no reports of retrograde ejaculation. At a minimum of 12 months after RLS, 49 of the 58 patients had fully and correctly answered the follow-up questionnaire and noted a mild (HDSS 2) to moderate (HDSS 3) increase in pre-existing compensatory sweating. One patient had a PPH relapse within 6 months. Improvement in QoL due to the resolution of PPH was reported in 98% of the 49 patients. None of the operations necessitated a change in the laparotomy approach, and none of the patients died. RLS is safe and effective for the treatment of severe PPH in both sexes. There were no reports of retrograde ejaculation after resection of L3 and L4 ganglia. There was a mild to moderate increase in compensatory sweating in about half of the patients, but without any regret or dissatisfaction for having undergone the

  5. Transforaminal epidural steroid injections influence Mechanical Diagnosis and Therapy (MDT) pain response classification in candidates for lumbar herniated disc surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Helvoirt, Hans; Apeldoorn, Adri T; Knol, Dirk L; Arts, Mark P; Kamper, Steven J; van Tulder, Maurits W; Ostelo, Raymond W

    2016-04-27

    Prospective cohort study. Although lumbar radiculopathy is regarded as a specific diagnosis, the most effective treatment strategy is unclear. Commonly used treatments include transforaminal epidural steroid injections (TESIs) and Mechanical Diagnosis & Therapy (MDT), but no studies have investigated the effectiveness of this combination. MDT differentiates pain centralization (C) from non-centralization (NC), which indicates good vs. poor prognostic validity respectively. The main aims were 1) to determine changes in Mechanical Diagnosis and Therapy (MDT) pain response classifications after transforaminal epidural steroid injections (TESIs) in candidates for lumbar herniated disc surgery and 2) to evaluate differences in short and long term outcomes for patients with different pain response classifications. Candidates for lumbar herniated disc surgery were assessed with a MDT protocol and their pain response classified as centralizing or peripheralizing. For this study,only patients were eligible who showed a peripheralizing pain response at intake. All patients then received TESIs and were reassessed and classified using the MDT protocol, into groups according to pain response (resolved, centralizing, peripheralizing with less pain and peripheralising with severe pain). After receiving targeted treatment based on pain response after TESIs, ranging from advice, MDT or surgery, follow-up assessments were completed at discharge and at 12 months. The primary outcomes were disability (Roland-Morris Disability Questionnaire [RMDQ] for Sciatica), pain severity in leg (visual analogue scale [VAS], 0-100) and global perceived effect (GPE). Linear mixed-models were used to determine between-groups differences in outcome. A total of 77 patients with lumbar disc herniation and peripheralizing symptoms were included. Patients received an average of 2 (SD 0.7) TESIs. After TESIs, 17 patients (22%) were classified as peripheralizing with continuing severe pain.These patients

  6. Non-surgical relief of cervical radiculopathy through reduction of forward head posture and restoration of cervical lordosis: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wickstrom, Bret M; Oakley, Paul A; Harrison, Deed E

    2017-08-01

    [Purpose] To present a case demonstrating the relief of cervical radiculopathy following the dramatic reduction of forward head posture and restoration of the cervical lordosis by use of a multi-modal rehabilitation program incorporating cervical extension traction. [Subject and Methods] A 31-year-old male patient presented with severe cervical radiculopathy and muscle weakness as well as neck pain. The patient had limited neck range of motion, and multiple positive orthopedic tests. Radiography revealed excessive forward head posture with a cervical kyphosis. [Results] The patient received a multi-modal rehabilitation protocol including mirror image extension exercises, cervical extension traction, and spinal manipulative therapy. After forty treatments over 17 weeks, the patient reported a complete resolution of radiculopathy and significant improvement in neck pain level. Post radiography demonstrated correction of the spine and posture alignment. The patient remained well and maintained corrected posture with limited treatment one year later. [Conclusion] Our case demonstrates the relief of cervical radiculopathy resulting from the non-surgical correction of forward head posture and cervical kyphosis.

  7. Study protocol for a randomised controlled multicentre study: the Foraminotomy ACDF Cost-Effectiveness Trial (FACET) in patients with cervical radiculopathy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Broekema, A.E.; Kuijlen, J.M.; Lesman-Leegte, G.A.; Bartels, R.H.M.A.; Asselt, A.D. van; Vroomen, P.C.; Dijk, J.M.C. van; Reneman, M.F.; Soer, R.; Groen, R.J.

    2017-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Cervical radiculopathy due to discogenic or spondylotic stenosis of the neuroforamen can be surgically treated by an anterior discectomy with fusion (ACDF) or a posterior foraminotomy (FOR). Most surgeons prefer ACDF, although there are indications that FOR is as effective as ACDF, has

  8. Management of severe pain due to lumbar disk protrusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conroy, Liam

    2015-03-01

    Lumbar intervertebral disk protrusion can cause excruciating pain in severe cases, which can be exacerbated by activity such as sitting down and straining at stool. Acute sciatica due to disk rupture will improve within 1 to 3 months. The efficacy of drugs used for the management of sciatica in primary care is unclear. Severe cases can require opioid analgesia, however people taking opioids for pain relief frequently present with opioid-induced bowel dysfunction. The use of transforaminal steroid injections is a controversial issue and repeat steroid injections should be considered in light of the risk-benefit profile of the individual patient.

  9. Oblique lumbar spine radiographs: importance in young patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Libson, E.; Bloom, R.A.; Dinari, G.; Robin, G.C.

    1984-04-01

    Spondylolysis is a direct precursor of spondylolisthesis and can lead to crippling back pain. Of 1,743 patients surveyed, including 936 who were asymptomatic and 807 with back pain, 165 (including 91 who were asymptomatic and 74 with back pain) had spondylolysis, which was seen only on oblique lumbar views in 20% of cases. Because of the high false-negative rate of AP and lateral views, oblique views are essential in children and young adults. As spondylolysis is rare above L3, radiographs can be limited to L3-S1. Significantly less spondylolysis was seen in persons older than 30 with back pain usually caused by disk degeneration.

  10. Oblique lumbar spine radiographs: importance in young patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Libson, E.; Bloom, R.A.; Dinari, G.; Robin, G.C.

    1984-01-01

    Spondylolysis is a direct precursor of spondylolisthesis and can lead to crippling back pain. Of 1,743 patients surveyed, including 936 who were asymptomatic and 807 with back pain, 165 (including 91 who were asymptomatic and 74 with back pain) had spondylolysis, which was seen only on oblique lumbar views in 20% of cases. Because of the high false-negative rate of AP and lateral views, oblique views are essential in children and young adults. As spondylolysis is rare above L3, radiographs can be limited to L3-S1. Significantly less spondylolysis was seen in persons older than 30 with back pain usually caused by disk degeneration

  11. Using the cervical range of motion (CROM) device to assess head repositioning accuracy in individuals with cervical radiculopathy in comparison to neck- healthy individuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wibault, Johanna; Vaillant, Jacques; Vuillerme, Nicolas; Dedering, Åsa; Peolsson, Anneli

    2013-10-01

    This study had two purposes: to compare head repositioning accuracy (HRA) using the cervical range of motion (CROM) device between individuals with cervical radiculopathy caused by disc disease (CDD; n = 71) and neck- healthy individuals (n = 173); and to evaluate the test-retest reliability of the CROM device in individuals with CDD, and criterion validity between the CROM device and a laser in neck-healthy individuals, with quantification of measurement errors. Parameters of reliability and validity were expressed with intra- class- correlation coefficients (ICCs), and measurement errors with standard error of measurement (SEM) and Bland Altman limits of agreement. HRA (Mdn, IQR) differed significantly between individuals with CDD and neck- healthy individuals after rotation right 2.7° (6.0), 1.7° (2.7); and rotation left 2.7° (3.3), 1.3° (2.7) (p < = 0.021); 31% of individuals with CDD were classified as having impairment in HRA. The test-retest reliability of the CROM device in individuals with CDD showed ICCs of 0.79- 0.85, and SEMs of 1.4°- 2°. The criterion validity between the CROM device and the laser in neck-healthy individuals showed ICCs of 0.43- 0.91 and SEMs of 0.8°- 1.3°. The results support the use of the CROM device for quantifying HRA impairment in individuals with CDD in clinical practice; however, criterion validity between the CROM device and a laser in neck-healthy individuals was questionable. HRA impairment in individuals with CDD may be important to consider during rehabilitation and evaluated with the criterion established with the CROM device in neck-healthy individuals. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Percutaneous pedicle screw reduction and axial presacral lumbar interbody fusion for treatment of lumbosacral spondylolisthesis: A case series

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miller Larry E

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Traditional surgical management of lumbosacral spondylolisthesis is technically challenging and is associated with significant complications. The advent of minimally invasive surgical techniques offers patients treatment alternatives with lower operative morbidity risk. The combination of percutaneous pedicle screw reduction and an axial presacral approach for lumbosacral discectomy and fusion offers an alternative procedure for the surgical management of low-grade lumbosacral spondylolisthesis. Case presentation Three patients who had L5-S1 grade 2 spondylolisthesis and who presented with axial pain and lumbar radiculopathy were treated with a minimally invasive surgical technique. The patients-a 51-year-old woman and two men (ages 46 and 50-were Caucasian. Under fluoroscopic guidance, spondylolisthesis was reduced with a percutaneous pedicle screw system, resulting in interspace distraction. Then, an axial presacral approach with the AxiaLIF System (TranS1, Inc., Wilmington, NC, USA was used to perform the discectomy and anterior fixation. Once the axial rod was engaged in the L5 vertebral body, further distraction of the spinal interspace was made possible by partially loosening the pedicle screw caps, advancing the AxiaLIF rod to its final position in the vertebrae, and retightening the screw caps. The operative time ranged from 173 to 323 minutes, and blood loss was minimal (50 mL. Indirect foraminal decompression and adequate fixation were achieved in all cases. All patients were ambulatory after surgery and reported relief from pain and resolution of radicular symptoms. No perioperative complications were reported, and patients were discharged in two to three days. Fusion was demonstrated radiographically in all patients at one-year follow-up. Conclusions Percutaneous pedicle screw reduction combined with axial presacral lumbar interbody fusion offers a promising and minimally invasive alternative for the management

  13. Intra- and interobserver reproducibility of vertebral endplate signal (modic) changes in the lumbar spine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Tue Secher; Sorensen, Joan Solgaard; Kjær, Per

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The lumbar vertebral endplate is considered a potential cause of specific low back pain. However, in relation to future research, there is need for a reliable and detailed magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) protocol to be used in the evaluation of vertebral endplate signal changes. PURP...

  14. Lumbar Spine X-Ray as a Standard Investigation for all Low back ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Low back pain (LBP) has a prevalence of 84% in Africa. The commonest form of imaging is plain lumbar spine x-ray. It gives a radiation dose equivalent to 65 times a chest x-ray dose and sends one of the highest doses to the human reproductive organs. The commonest cause of LBP in Africa is degenerative ...

  15. Clinical evaluation and surgical decision making for patients with lumbar discogenic pain and facet syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tessitore, Enrico, E-mail: enrico.tessitore@hcuge.ch [Neurosurgical Unit, Geneva University Hospitals, Faculty of Medicine, University of Geneva (Switzerland); Molliqaj, Granit, E-mail: granitmolliqaj@gmail.com [Neurosurgical Unit, Geneva University Hospitals, Faculty of Medicine, University of Geneva (Switzerland); Schatlo, Bawarjan, E-mail: schatlo@gmail.com [Department of Neurosurgery, Georg-August University, University of Medicine Gottingen, 37075 Gottingen (Germany); Schaller, Karl, E-mail: karl.schaller@hcuge.ch [Neurosurgical Unit, Geneva University Hospitals, Faculty of Medicine, University of Geneva (Switzerland)

    2015-05-15

    In industrialized countries, more than two thirds of the population suffers from low back pain (LBP) in their lifetime. LBP associated with lumbar disc herniation, stenosis, and instability is a well-known and documented entity. On the other hand, the lumbar discogenic pain and facet syndrome are difficult to be clearly identified, and they are not always detectable by imaging. This article describes the causes of these painful syndromes, which are typically without radicular component, explains the modern diagnostic procedures, and provides guidelines for surgical decision making.

  16. Structured postoperative physiotherapy in patients with cervical radiculopathy: 6-month outcomes of a randomized clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wibault, Johanna; Öberg, Birgitta; Dedering, Åsa; Löfgren, Håkan; Zsigmond, Peter; Peolsson, Anneli

    2018-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Structured physiotherapy has been suggested as treatment before as well as after surgery to improve clinical outcomes in patients with cervical radiculopathy (CR), but randomized clinical trials to inform evidence-based clinical guidelines for the treatment of patients with CR after surgery are lacking. The aim of this study was to compare the results of structured postoperative physiotherapy combining neck-specific exercises with a behavioral approach to a standard postoperative approach in patients who had undergone surgery for cervical disc disease with CR at 6 months after surgery. METHODS Patients with cervical disc disease and persistent CR who were scheduled for surgery were randomized preoperatively to structured postoperative physiotherapy (n = 101) or a standard postoperative approach (n = 100). The latter included pragmatic physiotherapy in accordance with the usual Swedish postoperative care. Outcome measures included patient-reported neck disability as measured with the Neck Disability Index (NDI), intensity and frequency of neck and arm pain, global outcome of treatment, and expectation fulfillment, as well as enablement. RESULTS Patients who received structured postoperative physiotherapy reported greater expectation fulfillment (p = 0.01), and those who attended at least 50% of the treatment sessions reported less neck pain frequency (p = 0.05), greater expectation fulfillment (p = 0.001), and greater enablement (p = 0.04) compared with patients who received the standard postoperative approach. No other difference between treatment groups was found (p > 0.15). The NDI and neck and arm pain intensity were improved in both groups at 6 months after surgery (p cervical disc disease with CR. Patients who received structured postoperative physiotherapy reported higher expectation fulfillment, and many patients in the standard postoperative approach group perceived a need for additional treatments after surgery, suggesting that patients with CR

  17. Spinaplasty following lumbar laminectomy for multilevel lumbar spinal stenosis to prevent iatrogenic instability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Surendra Mohan Tuli

    2011-01-01

    Conclusion: Spinaplasty following posterior decompression for multilevel lumbar canal stenosis is a simple operation, without any serious complications, retaining median structures, maintaining the tension band and the strength with least disturbance of kinematics, mobility, stability and lordosis of the lumbar spine.

  18. Characteristics and Neurological Manifestations of Patients with Operated Lumbar Disc Herniation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amir Mohammad Bazzazi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and aim: Lumbar disk herniation is one of the most common causes of surgery in the spine with a variety of signs and symptoms. Sensory and motor deficits, as well as reflex and autonomic abnormalities may be seen. This study aimed to investigate characteristics and neurological manifestations in a series of operated cases with lumbar disc herniation. Methods: In a retrospective setting, profiles of 163 operated cases with lumbar disc herniation were reviewed. Demographics as well as preoperational sign and symptoms were extracted and evaluated. Results: There were 86 females and 77 males with a mean age of 44.85±0.91 (range: 23-78 years in the studied population. The most common involved levels were L4-L5 and L5-S1, respectively. Low back pain, radicular pain, and positive Lasegue test were documented in 98.2%, 96.9% and 77.3% of the patients, respectively. Sensory, motor and reflexive abnormalities were documented in 66.3%, 51.5% and 19.6% of the cases, respectively. Sphincter and sexual dysfunction was presented in 4.9% and 1.2%, respectively. Conclusion: Clinical and neurological signs of operated patients with lumbar disc herniation in the studied center are not far different from available reports in this regard. Keywords: Lumbar disk herniation; Signs and symptoms; Surgery

  19. Spontaneous Regression of Herniated Lumbar Disc with New Disc Protrusion in the Adjacent Level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hakan, Tayfun; Gürcan, Serkan

    2016-01-01

    Spontaneous regression of herniated lumbar discs was reported occasionally. The mechanisms proposed for regression of disc herniation are still incomplete. This paper describes and discusses a case of spontaneous regression of herniated lumbar discs with a new disc protrusion in the adjacent level. A 41-year-old man was admitted with radiating pain and numbness in the left lower extremity with a left posterolateral disc extrusion at L5-S1 level. He was admitted to hospital with low back pain due to disc herniation caudally immigrating at L4-5 level three years ago. He refused the surgical intervention that was offered and was treated conservatively at that time. He had no neurological deficit and a history of spontaneous regression of the extruded lumbar disc; so, a conservative therapy, including bed rest, physical therapy, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, and analgesics, was advised. In conclusion, herniated lumbar disc fragments may regress spontaneously. Reports are prone to advise conservative treatment for extruded or sequestrated lumbar disc herniations. However, these patients should be followed up closely; new herniation at adjacent/different level may occur. Furthermore, it is important to know which herniated disk should be removed and which should be treated conservatively, because disc herniation may cause serious complications as muscle weakness and cauda equine syndrome.

  20. The relationship between lumbar spine kinematics during gait and low-back pain in transfemoral amputees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgenroth, David C; Orendurff, Michael S; Shakir, Ali; Segal, Ava; Shofer, Jane; Czerniecki, Joseph M

    2010-08-01

    Low-back pain is an important cause of secondary disability in transfemoral amputees. The primary aim of our study is to assess the differences in lumbar spine kinematics during gait between transfemoral amputees with and without low-back pain. Lumbar spine kinematics in three planes were measured when the subjects walked in a motion analysis laboratory. Nine transfemoral amputees with low-back pain, eight transfemoral amputees without low-back pain, and six healthy, nonamputee subjects participated. The Amputee Pain and Amputee No Pain groups were essentially the same in terms of all demographic and potentially confounding variable measures. Transfemoral amputees with low-back pain showed greater transverse plane rotational excursion in their lumbar spine during walking when compared with transfemoral amputees without low-back pain (P = 0.029; effect size = 1.03). There were no significant differences in sagittal or coronal plane lumbar spine excursions during walking between these two groups. Although our study design does not allow for proving causation, increased transverse plane rotation has been associated with intervertebral disc degeneration, suggesting that increased transverse plane rotation secondary to walking with a prosthetic limb may be a causative factor in the etiology of low-back pain in transfemoral amputees. Identifying differences in lumbar motion can lead to potential preventative and therapeutic intervention strategies.

  1. FACET ORIENTATION AND TROPISM: ASSOCIATION WITH ACCELERATED DEGENERATION OF STABILIZING STRUCTURES IN LOWER LUMBAR SPINE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jelec, Vjekoslav; Turner, Rajka; Franić, Miljenko; Korušić, Anđelko; Rotim, Krešimir

    2016-03-01

    The influence of facet orientation and tropism on the process of spinal degeneration has been extensively studied during the last few decades, but there are still many controversies and conflicting results in this field of research. The biomechanical cause of accelerated degeneration of stabilizing structures in lower lumbar spine lies within the combination of several factors, but two most important ones are compressive load and more coronal facet orientation that offers less resistance against torsional loading. Axial rotation of lower lumbar spine is undoubtedly associated with higher strain in disc annulus, and enhanced range of secondary rotational movements may be even more significant for the progression of annular degeneration. Accordingly, more pronounced facet tropism could be having part in faster progression of disc degeneration in lower lumbar spine, as indicated by a number of recent studies. More sagittal facet orientation in patients with a higher facet osteoarthritis score at lower lumbar segments is very likely related to arthritic remodeling commonly seen in other synovial joints. There is also a possibility that it could be associated with the adaptation to partial loss of lumbar lordosis, as both coincide with advanced age.

  2. Effectiveness of percutaneous laser disc decompression versus conventional open discectomy in the treatment of lumbar disc herniation; Design of a prospective randomized controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P.A. Brouwer (Patrick); W.C. Peul (Wilco); R. Brand (René); M.P. Arts (Mark); B.W. Koes (Bart); A.A. van den Berg (Annette); M.A. van Buchem (Mark)

    2009-01-01

    textabstractBackground. The usual surgical treatment of refractory sciatica caused by lumbar disc herniation, is open discectomy. Minimally invasive procedures, including percutaneous therapies under local anesthesia, are increasingly gaining attention. One of these treatments is Percutaneous Laser

  3. Rehabilitation of Football Players With Lumbar Spine Injury (Part 1 of 2).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saal, J A; Johnson, E W

    1988-09-01

    In brief: Rehabilitation of football players with low back pain caused by injury is a comprehensive process. Accurate diagnosis followed by early intervention is necessary. The rehabilitation plan can be divided into two phases: the pain-control phase, discussed in this article, and the training phase, to be discussed in part 2 in a coming issue. The pain-control phase may include a variety of passive modalities, flexion or extension exercises, lumbar mobilization, traction, and selective (precise localization with precise center) injections. The author stresses the importance of understanding the anatomy and biomechanics of the lumbar spine, referred pain and potential pain generators, the stages of the degenerative process, and lumbar spine injuries when planning a rehabilitation program.

  4. Solitary osteochondroma arising in lumbar spinous process: Case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadhri, Khaled; Tebourbi, Anis; Saidi, Mehdi; Kooli, Mondher

    2016-12-01

    Solitary osteochondromas rarely occur in the axial skeleton. Those tumors mostly arise on the posterior elements of the cervical column causing various symptoms especially when developing within the spinal canal. Exophytic lumbar variety is uncommon presenting with palpable mass or spinal deformity. We report a 20-year-old man presenting with a solid painless mass at the lower lumbar region. Radiological examinations revealed an exophytic lesion arising in the third lumbar spinous process appearing to be a solitary osteochondroma. The lesion was treated by en-bloc resection; histopathological examination confirmed the diagnosis of osteochondroma with no evidence of recurrence at the end of 2-year follow up. Copyright © 2016 Turkish Association of Orthopaedics and Traumatology. Production and hosting by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Effects of the Inertia Barbell Training on Lumbar Muscle T2 relaxation time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Ming-Yun; Lu, Jian-Qiang; Ma, Zu-Chang; Lu, Jiao-Jiao; Huang, Qing; Sun, Yi-Ning; Liu, Yu

    2017-04-25

    The purpose of this study was to investigate variations in T2 relaxation time in normal human lumbar muscles caused by inertia barbell training. Thirty undergraduate healthy males (mean age=19 ± 1.2 years, weight=72 ± 10.0 kilograms, height=1.78 ± 0.1 meters) were recruited to participate in this study. Subjects were randomly assigned into 2 groups: an inertia barbell training group (IBTG) (n=15) and a normal barbell-training group (NBTG) (n=15). All subjects participated in lumbar flexion and extension muscle strength training for 1 hour per time, 3 times per week for a total of 8 weeks. The lumbar of each participant was scanned before and after the experiment using a 3.0T superconductive magnetic resonance imaging system. The T2 values measured after intervention were significantly different compared to the T2 values measured before the experiment in both the IBTG and NBTG groups (pbarbell training.

  6. [Disc alterations of lumbar spine on magnetic resonance images in asymptomatic workers].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quiroz-Moreno, Rocío; Lezama-Suárez, Gabriel; Gómez-Jiménez, Carlos

    2008-01-01

    to determine abnormal findings of the lumbar spine on magnetic resonance images in asymptomatic subjects. prospective, transverse and descriptive study, in workers of the Instituto Mexicano del Seguro Social without low back pain; they were invited to be observed with magnetic resonance images of lumbar spine. A total of 105 cases was interpreted by a radiologist, who did not know the patients' clinical conditions. 107 lumbar spine alterations studies were mixed in order to not influence in the results, and they were not included in the statistic analysis. 55 % of the cases had discal alterations, 38 % presented bulging disk and 17 % presented protrusion. Other alterations were Schmorl's nodule, osteocondrosis, espondilolistesis, and annular tears. bulging disk and discal protrusion frequency have high prevalence in magnetic resonance images in healthy individuals, so its presence in symptomatic patients is not necessarily cause of low back pain.

  7. Radiographical analysis concernig the etiology of degenerative spondylolisthesis of the lumbar spine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ihara, Koichiro (Yamaguchi Univ., Ube (Japan). School of Medicine)

    1989-12-01

    The purpose of this article is to evaluate radiographically degenerative spondylolisthesis of the lumbar spine, with the main focus on the configuration of posterior elements. A comparative study between 49 cases of degenerative spondylolisthesis and 99 cases of other lumbar disorders was performed, using 13 radiographical parameters. The results clearly indicate the posterior elements of degenerative spondylolisthesis shifted horizontally and sagittally to allow slipping. This was due to the weak bony hook mechanism. Furthermore, almost all facet joints were morphologically classified as sagittal or intermediate type. Another meaningful difference was the alignment of the lumbar spine which showed an increase in both lordosis and lumbosacral angle. On the other hand, the level of Jacoby's line was almost the same in both groups. These characteristic configurations could be the cause of listhesis, although further study should be carried out to elucidate whether they are present at the non-listhetic stage. (author).

  8. Lumbar spondylolysis: A report of four cases from two generations of a family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yurube, Takashi; Kakutani, Kenichiro; Okamoto, Koji; Manabe, Michihiko; Maeno, Koichiro; Yoshikawa, Masaho; Sha, Norihide; Kuroda, Ryosuke; Nishida, Kotaro

    2017-01-01

    Spondylolysis is a major cause of back pain in children and adolescents. The prevalence of spondylolysis depends on the sex, race, and congenital abnormality. These biases suggest hereditary predisposition as an etiology of spondylolysis. However, no conclusive evidence still exists regarding the inheritance for spondylolysis. Herein, we report rare cases with familial occurrence of lumbar spondylolysis. In two generations of a Japanese family, three brothers including identical twins complained of back pain related to sports activities. Clinical, radiographic, and computed tomographic examinations identified spondylolysis at L4 and L5 in all these boys. The father experienced long-term back pain and had spondylolisthesis at L4-L5 and healed spondylolysis at L5. The daughter and mother did not show any lumbar spondylolysis. The frequent development of spondylolysis at L4, a rarely affected segment, in four of six family members (66.7%) support that lumbar spondylolysis has an underlying genetic etiology, primarily autosomal dominant inheritance.

  9. Role of Lumbar Drainage as an Adjunct for controlling Intracranial pressure in Acute Bacterial Meningitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Gudmundsson

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This case report describes a 16-year-old girl with fulminant bacterial meningitis in whom external ventricular drainage and intense volume-targeted therapy (the Lund protocol was not sufficient to control intracranial pressure, but lumbar drainage on day 8 decreased the intracranial pressure immediately and led to a sustained low intracranial pressure level. The case is unusual and not fully understood, but the authors assume that due to inflammation and tissue reactions following aggressive infection, cerebrospinal fluid could not flow freely from the posterior fossa up to the ventricular drain. High pressure in the posterior compartment maintained the high intracranial pressure measured by the ventricular drain, and lumbar drain insertion caused an immediate fall in pressure. The lesson learned is that during an intracranial pressure crisis in a patient with open basal cisterns, a lumbar drain may be necessary because the cerebrospinal fluid space can be compartmentalized.

  10. Genotypic and antimicrobial characterisation of Propionibacterium acnes isolates from surgically excised lumbar disc herniations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rollason, Jess; McDowell, Andrew; Albert, Hanne B

    2013-01-01

    The anaerobic skin commensal Propionibacterium acnes is an underestimated cause of human infections and clinical conditions. Previous studies have suggested a role for the bacterium in lumbar disc herniation and infection. To further investigate this, five biopsy samples were surgically excised...... from each of 64 patients with lumbar disc herniation. P. acnes and other bacteria were detected by anaerobic culture, followed by biochemical and PCR-based identification. In total, 24/64 (38%) patients had evidence of P. acnes in their excised herniated disc tissue. Using recA and mAb typing methods...... isolate collection (63%) suggests that the role of P. acnes in lumbar disc herniation should not be readily dismissed....

  11. Lumbar Disk Herniation in the Spine Patient Outcomes Research Trial (SPORT): Does Educational Attainment Impact Outcome?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olson, Patrick R.; Lurie, Jon D.; Frymoyer, John; Walsh, Thomas; Zhao, Wenyan; Abdu, William A.; Weinstein, James N.

    2011-01-01

    Study Design Randomized trial with concurrent observational cohort. 1171 patients were divided into subgroups by educational attainment: high school or less, some college, and college degree or above. Objective To assess the influence of education level on outcomes for treatment of lumbar disk herniation. Summary of Background Data Educational attainment has been demonstrated to have an inverse relationship with pain perception, co-morbidities, and mortality. Methods The Spine Patient Outcomes Research Trial enrolled surgical candidates (imaging-confirmed disk herniation with at least 6 weeks of persistent signs and symptoms of radiculopathy) from 13 multidisciplinary spine clinics in 11 US states. Treatments were standard open diskectomy vs. non-operative treatment. Outcomes were changes from baseline for SF-36 bodily pain (BP) and physical function (PF) scales and the modified Oswestry Disability Index (ODI) at 6 weeks, 3 months, 6 months, and yearly through 4 years. Results Substantial improvement was seen in all patient cohorts. Surgical outcomes did not differ by level of education. For non-operative outcomes, however, higher levels of education were associated with significantly greater overall improvement over 4 years in BP (p=0.007), PF (p=0.001) and ODI (p=0.003). At 4 years a “dose-response” type relationship was shown for BP (high school or less 25.5; some college 31; college graduate or above 36.3; p= 0.004); results were similar for PF and ODI. The success of non-operative treatment in the more educated cohort resulted in an attenuation of the relative benefit of surgery. Conclusions Patients with higher educational attainment demonstrated significantly greater improvement with non-operative treatment while educational attainment was not associated with surgical outcomes. PMID:21311402

  12. Spondylolisthesis caused by extreme pedicle elongation in osteogenesis imperfecta

    OpenAIRE

    Ivo, Roland; Fuerderer, Sebastian; Eysel, Peer

    2007-01-01

    Although osteogenesis imperfecta is a well-known skeletal disorder, reports of spondylolisthesis in osteogenesis imperfecta are rare. Only very few cases of spondylolisthesis caused by elongation of lumbar pedicles have been described in the literature. Here we report three patients suffering from osteogenesis imperfecta showing a severe form of hyperlordosis caused by lumbar pedicle elongation and consecutive spondylolisthesis. Radiographs in the course of childhood and adolescence show a ra...

  13. MR-guided lumbar sympathicolysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koenig, Claudius W.; Schott, Ulrich G.; Pereira, Philippe L.; Truebenbach, Jochen; Claussen, Claus D.; Duda, Stephan H. [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, University of Tuebingen (Germany); Schneider, Wilke [Department of Vascular Surgery, University of Tuebingen (Germany)

    2002-06-01

    The aim of this study was to demonstrate the feasibility of MR-guided lumbar sympathicolysis (LSL) in a non-selected patient population. One hundred one MR-guided LSL procedures were performed in 89 patients according to Haaga's technique using a horizontally open clinical MR system (0.2 T) and non-ferromagnetic 20-G cannulas (neurolysis, n=93; blockade, n=8). Only gradient-recalled sequences in either single or multislice mode [fast imaging with steady-state precession (FISP) and fast low-angle shot] were applied for anatomical survey and needle guiding. Bupivacaine injection was monitored with MR fluoroscopically. Fluid distribution was subsequently documented in a CT scan in 65 patients. Ninety-one LSL procedures could be successfully completed. Ten patients were not treated using MR due to patient inconvenience, severe motion artifacts (n=4 each), excessive spondylophytes, and retroperitoneal hematoma (n=1 each). One case of ureteral necrosis occurred. Motion artifacts were rated less severe in single-slice FISP sequences and in obese patients. An average of 3.48 sequence measurements were required for definitive needle placement. Average table time was 32.3 min. An MR-guided LSL is feasible and can be performed with acceptable safety and time effort. It can be recommended for repeated sympathetic blockades in younger patients to avoid cumulative irradiation associated with CT guidance. (orig.)

  14. Recurrent acute low back pain secondary to lumbar epidural calcification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ziade, M.; Zufferey, P.; So, A.K.L. [Centre Hospitalier Vaudois, Service de Rhumatologie, Lausanne (Switzerland)

    2007-06-15

    Epidural calcification is a rare cause of back pain, and spontaneous epidural calcification has not been reported previously. We describe a patient with acute low back pain and signs of lumbar nerve root compression due to epidural calcification, as demonstrated by CT-scan and MRI. Radiological signs of spondylodiscitis led to a search for an infectious cause, which was negative, and her symptoms responded rapidly to NSAID treatment alone. Her symptoms recurred 18 months later, and further imaging studies again revealed epidural calcification, but with a changed distribution. Her symptoms were relieved once more by NSAID treatment alone. We propose that epidural calcification secondary to aseptic spondylodiscitis is the main cause of acute back pain in this patient. A possible mechanism may be the pro-inflammatory effects of calcium pyrophosphate or hydroxyapatite crystal deposition within the epidural space. (orig.)

  15. Clinical findings and electrodiagnostic testing in 108 consecutive cases of lumbosacral radiculopathy due to herniated disc.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mondelli, M; Aretini, A; Arrigucci, U; Ginanneschi, F; Greco, G; Sicurelli, F

    2013-10-01

    This prospective study aim to examine whether clinical findings and electrodiagnostic testing (EDX) in patients with lumbosacral monoradiculopathy due to herniated disc (HD) differ as a function of root involvement level (L5 vs. S1) and HD zone (paramedian vs. intraforaminal). All patients with L4, L5 or S1 monoradiculopathy were prospectively enrolled at four electromyography (EMG) labs over a 2-year period. The diagnosis was based on a congruence between patient history and MRI evidence of HD. We compared the sensitivities of clinical findings and EDX with respect to both root involvement level and HD zone. Multivariate logistic regression was performed in order to verify the association between abnormal EMG, clinical, and neuroradiological findings. One hundred and eight patients (mean age 47.7 years, 55% men) were consecutively enrolled. Sensory loss in the painful dermatome was the most frequent finding at physical examination (56% of cases). EMG was abnormal in at least one muscle supplied by femoral and sciatic nerves in 45 cases (42%). Inclusion of paraspinal muscles increased sensitivity to only 49% and that of proximal muscles was useless. Motor and sensory neurography was seldom abnormal. The most frequent motor neurographic abnormalities were a delay of F-wave minimum latency and decrease in the compound muscle action potential amplitude from extensor digitorum brevis and abductor hallucis in L5 and S1 radiculopathies, respectively. Sensory neurography was usually normal, the amplitude of sensory nerve action potential was seldom reduced when HD injured dorsal root ganglion or postganglionic root fibres. Multivariate logistic regression analysis showed that EMG abnormalities could be predicted by myotomal muscular weakness, abnormal deep reflexes, and paraesthesiae. The only clinical and electrophysiological differences with respect to root involvement level concerned deep reflexes and motor neurography of deep peroneal and tibial nerves. Only some EDX

  16. Ultrasound-guided fluoroscopic-verified lumbar transforaminal epidural injection: A clinical evaluation of technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dinesh Kumar Sahu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Fluoroscope guidance method is the gold standard for performing lumbar transforaminal epidural steroid injections (TFESIs, but it is not devoid of adverse effects such as exposure to radiation and need to wear heavy lead aprons. Ultrasound (US-guided techniques are being evaluated recently but methodological acceptability and reproducibility remain unknown. So after reviewing literatures, studing the us scan of lumber region, we have performed these injection safely and methodologial manner and describing in this study. Duration of Study: The duration of this study was six months, from May 01, 2016, to November 31, 2016. Study Design: This was a prospective, open-label, clinical, pilot study. Materials and Methods: A total of twenty patients with low back pain and radiculopathy were enrolled in this study. A US-guided novel technique was used to perform TFESI. A needle was placed under the guidance of US, and then verified with fluoroscope for dye spread. Then, predecided mixture of drugs were injected. Patients were monitored for number of attempts for localization of transforaminal space, number of adjustment, time taken for needle insertion in transforaminal space, radiation dosage, if the cortex of bone touched by the needle, and whether any complication occurred. Results: The number of attempts for localization of transforaminal space in 85% was one and two in 15% of the patients, number of adjustment per attempt was 5.3, and the average time taken for TFESI in patients in one-attempt group was 973 ± 93 s and 1506 ± 65 s in two-attempt group. Average exposure time of fluoroscope per person was 17.5 ± 2.5 s only. Bone was contacted in 75% of cases and no complications were noted. Conclusion: Lumbar TFESI can be safely and effectively performed under US guidance but fluoroscopic confirmation is required to rule out intravascular and intrathecal spread of the contrast at this stage. However, US guidance has reduced radiation

  17. Transforaminal Percutaneous Endoscopic Discectomy for Lumbar Disc Herniation in Parkinson's Disease: A Case-Control Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapetanakis, Stylianos; Giovannopoulou, Eirini; Charitoudis, George; Kazakos, Konstantinos

    2016-08-01

    A case-control study. To investigate the effectiveness of transforaminal percutaneous endoscopic discectomy (TPED) in Parkinson's disease (PD). Patients with PD frequently suffer from radiculopathy and low back pain. Additionally, they demonstrate higher complication rates after open spine surgery. However, the clinical outcome of minimally invasive techniques for lumbar discectomy, such as TPED, have not been established for this population. Patients diagnosed with lumbar disc hernia were divided into Group A (11 patients diagnosed with PD), and Group B (10 patients as the control, non-PD group). All patients underwent TPED. Indexes of visual analogue scale (VAS) for leg pain and Oswestry disability index (ODI) were assessed right before surgery and at six weeks, three months, six months and one year post-surgery. At the baseline visit, groups did not differ significantly with age (p=0.724), gender (p=0.835), level of operation (p=0.407), ODI (p=0.497) and VAS (p=0.772). Parkinson's patients had higher scores in ODI at every visit, but the outcome was statistically significant only at 3 months (p=0.004) and one year (p=0.007). Similarly, VAS measurements were higher at each time point, with the difference being significant at 3 (p<0.001), 6 (0.021), and 12 (p<0.001) months after surgery. At the end of a year of follow up, ODI was reduced by 49.6% (±16.7) in Group A and 59.2% (±8.0) in Group B (p=0.111), translating to a 79.5% (±13.0) and 91.5% (±4.1) average improvement in daily functionality (p=0.024). VAS was reduced by 59.1 mm (±11.8) in Group A and 62.2 mm (±7.4) in Group B (p=0.485), leading to an 85.3 % (±4.0) and 91.9% (±2.6) general improvement in leg pain (p<0.001). Our data indicate that TPED led to satisfactory improvement in leg pain and daily living in PD patients a year after surgery.

  18. [Imaging study of lumbar intervertebral disc herniation and asymptomatic lumbar intervertebral disc herniation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Qing-yang; Yang, Cun-rui; Yu, Lang-tao

    2009-04-01

    Using regional assignment to forked method to study lumbar intervertebral disc hemiation (bugle, hernia, prolapse) dependablity and reason of lumbar intervertebral disc herniation and asymptomatic lumbar intervertebral disc herniation. From March 2005 to October 2006, 120 patients of match condition from orthopaedics dept and rehabilitative dept of the Boai hospital of Longyan were studied. All patients were equally divided into two groups according to whether or not accompany with symptom of lumbar intervertebral disc herniation. There was not statistical difference in sex, age, course of disease, segment of intervertebral disc between two groups. Sixty patients of symptomatic lumbar intervertebral disc herniation were equally divided into three groups according to (bugle, hernia, prolapse) image on CT. Sixty patients of asymptomatic lumbar intervertebral disc herniation were equally divided into three groups according to (bugle, hernia, prolapse) image on CT. The age was 20-59 years old with an average of 38.5 years. Using regional assignment to give a mark respectively for every group. The sagittal diameter index (SI), anterior diastema of flaval ligaments, the width of superior outlet of latero-crypt, anteroposterior diameter of dura sac were respectively measured by sliding caliper. CT value and protrusible areas were respectively evaluated by computer tomography. Adopting mean value to measure three times. (1) There were not statistical difference in SI, CT value, hernia areas, anteroposterior diameter of dura sac between two groups (symptomatic lumbar intervertebral disc herniation and asymptomatic lumbar intervertebral disc herniation). There were statistical difference in the width of superior outlet of latero-crypt, anterior diastema of flaval ligaments between two groups (symptomatic lumbar intervertebral disc herniation and asymptomatic lumbar intervertebral disc herniation). (2) There were statistical difference in protrusible type,protrusible segment

  19. Analysis and treatment of surgical complications after percutaneous transforaminal endoscopic discectomy for treating lumbar disc herniation and lumbar intervertebral foraminal stenosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guang HAN

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective To analyze the causes of surgical complications after treatment of lumbar disc herniation (LDH and lumbar intervertebral foraminal stenosis by percutaneous transforaminal endoscopic discectomy (PTED.  Methods From December 2009 to December 2014, 286 patients with LDH (N = 201 and lumbar intervertebral foraminal stenosis (N = 85 were confirmed by X-ray, CT or MRI and treated by PTED in our hospital. Visual Analogue Scale (VAS was used to evaluate the degree of pain in each paitent before and after operation. The curative effect was evaluated by Macnab score. Surgical complications were recorded to find out the causes and methods to prevent them.  Results All cases were followed up for 3 months, and the VAS score decreased significantly compared with preoperation [1.00 (0.00, 1.05 vs 8.50 (7.75, 9.25; Z = 2.825, P = 0.050]. According to Macnab score, the rate of excellent and good functional recovery was 95.45% (273/286. Procedure-related complications included nerve injury in 8 cases (2.80%, hemorrhage at the operation site and hematoma formation around nerve root in 6 cases (2.10%, rupture of dural sac in one case (0.35%, muscle cramps in 3 cases (1.05%, surgical infection in one case (0.35%, postoperative recurrence in 4 cases (1.40%. All patients with complications were cured after symptomatic treatment. Conclusions The overall effect of percutaneous transforaminal endoscopic discectomy for treating lumbar disc herniation and lumbar intervertebral foraminal stenosis is satisfactory, which has a low incidence rate of postoperative complications. Some tips can effectively reduce the rate of surgical complications such as preoperative evaluation, precise performance, careful hemostasis, shortening the operation time and postoperatively symptomatic treatment, etc. DOI: 10.3969/j.issn.1672-6731.2016.04.007

  20. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI): Lumbar Spine (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Safe Videos for Educators Search English Español Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI): Lumbar Spine KidsHealth / For Parents / Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI): Lumbar Spine What's in this article? ...

  1. Tractography of lumbar nerve roots: initial results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balbi, Vincent; Budzik, Jean-Francois; Thuc, Vianney le; Cotten, Anne [Hopital Roger Salengro, Service de Radiologie et d' Imagerie musculo-squelettique, Lille Cedex (France); Duhamel, Alain [Universite de Lille 2, UDSL, Lille (France); Bera-Louville, Anne [Service de Rhumatologie, Hopital Roger Salengro, Lille (France)

    2011-06-15

    The aims of this preliminary study were to demonstrate the feasibility of in vivo diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) and fibre tracking (FT) of the lumbar nerve roots, and to assess potential differences in the DTI parameters of the lumbar nerves between healthy volunteers and patients suffering from disc herniation. Nineteen patients with unilateral sciatica related to posterolateral or foraminal disc herniation and 19 healthy volunteers were enrolled in this study. DTI with tractography of the L5 or S1 nerves was performed. Mean fractional anisotropy (FA) and mean diffusivity (MD) values were calculated from tractography images. FA and MD values could be obtained from DTI-FT images in all controls and patients. The mean FA value of the compressed lumbar nerve roots was significantly lower than the FA of the contralateral nerve roots (p=0.0001) and of the nerve roots of volunteers (p=0.0001). MD was significantly higher in compressed nerve roots than in the contralateral nerve root (p=0.0002) and in the nerve roots of volunteers (p=0.04). DTI with tractography of the lumbar nerves is possible. Significant changes in diffusion parameters were found in the compressed lumbar nerves. (orig.)

  2. The shape of the human lumbar vertebral canal

    OpenAIRE

    Zarzur,Edmundo

    1996-01-01

    Literature on the anatomy of the human vertebral column characterizes the shape of the lumbar vertebral canal as triangular. The purpose of the present study was to determine the precise shape of the lumbar vertebral canal. Ten lumbar vertebral columns of adult male cadavers were dissected. Two transverse sections were performed in the third lumbar vertebra. One section was performed at the level of the lower border of the ligamenta flava, and the other section was performed at the level of t...

  3. National clinical guidelines for non-surgical treatment of patients with recent onset neck pain or cervical radiculopathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjær, Per; Kongsted, Alice; Hartvigsen, Jan

    2017-01-01

    PURPOSE: To summarise recommendations about 21 selected non-surgical interventions for recent onset (<12 weeks) non-specific neck pain (NP) and cervical radiculopathy (CR) based on two guidelines from the Danish Health Authority. METHODS: Two multidisciplinary working groups formulated recommenda......PURPOSE: To summarise recommendations about 21 selected non-surgical interventions for recent onset (... recommendations based on the GRADE approach. RESULTS: Twelve recommendations were based on evidence and nine on consensus. Management should include information about prognosis, warning signs, and advise to remain active. For treatment, guidelines suggest different types of supervised exercise and manual therapy......; combinations of exercise and manual therapy before medicine for NP; acupuncture for NP but not CR; traction for CR; and oral NSAID (oral or topical) and Tramadol after careful consideration for NP and CR. CONCLUSION: Recommendations are based on low-quality evidence or on consensus, but are well aligned...

  4. Enlargement of lumbar spinal canal in lumbar degenerative spondylolisthesis. Evaluation with three-dimensional computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kunishi, Yoshihiko

    2003-01-01

    A number of clinical studies have demonstrated that enlargement of the lumbar spinal canal is one of the effective surgical procedures for the treatment of the lumbar degenerative spondylolisthesis and provides a good result. In the present study, we have evaluated the long-term outcome of the enlargement of the lumbar canal without fusion in thirty eight patients with lumbar degenerative spondylolisthesis using three-dimensional computed tomography (3D-CT) The improvement rate was excellent in 80% of the patients (mean improvement ratio, 83%) according to the Japanese Orthopedic Association scoring system. We found that the sufficient enlargement of the canal was obtained by the surgery and maintained for a long period of time. The results from 3D-CT suggested that a round shape was maintained in the canal after the surgery because of pressures of the dura mater against to the bony canal. None of patients showed lumbar instability. In conclusion, enlargement of lumbar canal without fusion is useful for the treatment of lumbar degenerative spondylolisthesis, and the enlarged canal has been maintained for a long period of time after the surgery. The results demonstrated the clinical utility of 3D-CT to evaluate the preoperative and postoperative shape of the spine. (author)

  5. [Treatment of degenerative lumbar spondylolisthesis by transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion with microendoscopic surgery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Wei; Li, Li-Jun; Tan, Jun

    2010-04-01

    To investigate the effect of treating degenerative lumbar spondylolisthesis by transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion with microendoscopic surgery. From Jan. 2006 to Jan. 2009, one hundred fifty patients who underwent transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion with microendoscopic surgery were analyzed retrospectively. The diagnosis was degenerative lumbar spondylolisthesis in 84 cases of grade I, and 66 cases of grade II. There were 88 males and 62 females. Preoperatively, at 1 week and 3 months postoperatively, the pain was evaluated with visual analogue scale (VAS) scoring system and therapeutic effect was observed with modified Prolo scoring system. In complications, dural tear happened in 3 cases, biological glues were used for dural tear sealing and neither cerebrospinal fluid leak was found. One case suffered from intervertebral Infection and muscle weakness of foot was found in one case, either was cured after symptomatic treatment. Operative time averaged 160 minutes (120-280 min). Estimated blood loss averaged 210 ml (100-450 ml). The postoperative follow-up ranged from 6 to 36 months (averaged 15.2 months). Preoperatively,at 1 week and 3 months postoperatively, VAS scores were respectively 7.9 +/- 2.1, 2.2 +/- 0.6, 3.2 +/- 1.1 (P surgery transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion technique is indicated for lumbar vertebral instability, localized intervertebral disc disorder and lumbar spondylolisthesis with stenotic nerve root or tube below grade II. This technique has advantages of minimal invasion and early functional recovery.

  6. OPERATIVE TREATMENT FOR DEGENERATIVE LUMBAR SPINAL STENOSIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samo K. Fokter

    2002-11-01

    Full Text Available Background. Degenerative lumbar spinal stenosis (DLSS is a common cause of low back and leg pain in the elderly. Conservative treatment seldom results in sustained improvement.Methods. Fifty-six patients (33 women, 23 men older than 50 years (mean 67 years, range 51 to 82 years and with no prior low back surgery were treated from 1993 to 1999 for clinical and radiologic evidence of DLSS. The goal of this study was to describe the results of decompressive laminectomy with or without fusion in terms of reoperation, severity of back pain, leg pain and patient satisfaction. Answers to Swiss spinal stenosis questionnaires completed before surgery and one to five years afterwards were evaluated. Seven patients (12.5% with degenerative spondylolisthesis, scoliosis and/or more radical facetectomies received fusion.Results. Of the 56 patients in the original cohort, two were deceased and two had undergone reoperation by follow-up. Forty-eight patients answered questionnaires. Average duration of follow-up was 2.5 years. More than 70 percent of the respondents had no or only mild back or buttock pain at follow-up and more than 60 percent were able to walk more than 500 m. Added fusion reduced the incidence of low back pain and pain frequency, and increased walking distance (ANOVA.Conclusions. Eighty-one percent of patients were satisfied with the results of surgery and 87.5% would choose to have the operation again if they had the choice. Decompressive laminectomy for DLSS yields best results if instrumented fusion is included in the procedure.

  7. Two cases of congenital defects within transverse processes of lumbar spine; Dwa przypadki wad wrodzonych wyrostkow poprzecznych ledzwiowego odcinka kregoslupa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Malawski, S.; Sokolski, B. [Klinika Ortopedii, Centrum Medyczne Ksztalcenia Podyplomowego, Otwock (Poland)

    1993-12-31

    Two cases of congenital defects of transverse processes of lumbar spine causing lumbalgia are described. The first one was produced by direct contact of the elongated processes with subsequent pseudoarthrosis. Hypertrophied processes caused stenosis around intervertebral foramen and irritated posterior neural branch in the second case. Surgical resection of the hypertrophied transverse processes has brought the cure. (author). 4 refs, 6 figs.

  8. Minimally invasive oxygen-ozone therapy for lumbar disk herniation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andreula, Cosma F; Simonetti, Luigi; De Santis, Fabio; Agati, Raffaele; Ricci, Renata; Leonardi, Marco

    2003-05-01

    Oxygen-ozone therapy is a minimally invasive treatment for lumbar disk herniation that exploits the biochemical properties of a gas mixture of oxygen and ozone. We assessed the therapeutic outcome of oxygen-ozone therapy and compared the outcome of administering medical ozone alone with the outcome of medical ozone followed by injection of a corticosteroid and an anesthetic at the same session. Six hundred patients were treated with a single session of oxygen-ozone therapy. All presented with clinical signs of lumbar disk nerve root compression, with CT and/or MR evidence of contained disk herniation. Three hundred patients (group A) received an intradiscal (4 mL) and periganglionic (8 mL) injection of an oxygen-ozone mixture at an ozone concentration of 27 micro g/mL. The other 300 patients (group B) received, in addition, a periganglionic injection of corticosteroid and anesthetic. Therapeutic outcome was assessed 6 months after treatment by using a modified MacNab method. Results were evaluated by two observers blinded to patient distribution within the two groups. A satisfactory therapeutic outcome was obtained in both groups. In group A, treatment was a success (excellent or good outcome) in 70.3% and deemed a failure (poor outcome or recourse to surgery) in the remaining 29.7%. In group B, treatment was a success in 78.3% and deemed a failure in the remaining 21.7%. The difference in outcome between the two groups was statistically significant (P ozone and periganglionic injection of steroids has a cumulative effect that enhances the overall outcome of treatment for pain caused by disk herniation. Oxygen-ozone therapy is a useful treatment for lumbar disk herniation that has failed to respond to conservative management.

  9. Cervical radiculopathy: study protocol of a randomised clinical trial evaluating the effect of mobilisations and exercises targeting the opening of intervertebral foramen [NCT01500044].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langevin, Pierre; Roy, Jean-Sébastien; Desmeules, François

    2012-01-31

    Cervical radiculopathy is a common form of neck pain and has been shown to lead to severe disability. Clinical rehabilitation approaches for cervical radiculopathies commonly include exercise and manual therapy interventions targeting the opening of intervertebral foramen, but evidence regarding their effectiveness is scarce. The primary objective of this randomised clinical trial is to compare, in terms of pain and disability, a rehabilitation program targeting the opening of intervertebral foramen to a conventional rehabilitation program, for patients presenting acute or subacute cervical radiculopathies. The hypothesis is that the rehabilitation program targeting the opening of intervertebral foramen will be significantly more effective in reducing pain and disability than the conventional rehabilitation program. This study is a double-blind (participants and evaluators blinded) randomised clinical trial that will allow the comparison of patients with a cervical radiculopathy randomly assigned to one of two groups: one group will receive a 4-week rehabilitation program targeting the opening of intervertebral foramen, and the second group will receive a 4-week conventional rehabilitation program. Thirty-six subjects with cervical radiculopathy will be recruited from participating medical and physiotherapy clinics and will be evaluated at baseline, at the end of the 4-week program and four weeks following the end of the program. The primary outcome measure will be the validated Neck Disability Index questionnaire. Secondary outcome measures will include the short version of the Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder and Hand questionnaire, a numerical pain rating scale, cervicothoracic mobility and patients' perceived global rating of change. During the 4-week rehabilitation program, each participant will take part in eight physiotherapy treatment sessions (2 session/week) and will perform a home exercise program. A mixed-model, 2-way ANOVA will be used to analyze the

  10. Cervical radiculopathy: Study protocol of a randomised clinical trial evaluating the effect of mobilisations and exercises targeting the opening of intervertebral foramen [NCT01500044

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Langevin Pierre

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cervical radiculopathy is a common form of neck pain and has been shown to lead to severe disability. Clinical rehabilitation approaches for cervical radiculopathies commonly include exercise and manual therapy interventions targeting the opening of intervertebral foramen, but evidence regarding their effectiveness is scarce. The primary objective of this randomised clinical trial is to compare, in terms of pain and disability, a rehabilitation program targeting the opening of intervertebral foramen to a conventional rehabilitation program, for patients presenting acute or subacute cervical radiculopathies. The hypothesis is that the rehabilitation program targeting the opening of intervertebral foramen will be significantly more effective in reducing pain and disability than the conventional rehabilitation program. Methods/Design This study is a double-blind (participants and evaluators blinded randomised clinical trial that will allow the comparison of patients with a cervical radiculopathy randomly assigned to one of two groups: one group will receive a 4-week rehabilitation program targeting the opening of intervertebral foramen, and the second group will receive a 4-week conventional rehabilitation program. Thirty-six subjects with cervical radiculopathy will be recruited from participating medical and physiotherapy clinics and will be evaluated at baseline, at the end of the 4-week program and four weeks following the end of the program. The primary outcome measure will be the validated Neck Disability Index questionnaire. Secondary outcome measures will include the short version of the Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder and Hand questionnaire, a numerical pain rating scale, cervicothoracic mobility and patients' perceived global rating of change. During the 4-week rehabilitation program, each participant will take part in eight physiotherapy treatment sessions (2 session/week and will perform a home exercise program. A

  11. 49 CFR 572.85 - Lumbar spine flexure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Lumbar spine flexure. 572.85 Section 572.85... Lumbar spine flexure. (a) When subjected to continuously applied force in accordance with paragraph (b) of this section, the lumbar spine assembly shall flex by an amount that permits the thoracic spine to...

  12. Lumbar posture and muscular activity while sitting during office work.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mörl, Falk; Bradl, Ingo

    2013-04-01

    Field study, cross-sectional study to measure the posture and sEMG of the lumbar spine during office work for a better understanding of the lumbar spine within such conditions. There is high incidence of low back pain in office workers. Currently there is little information about lumbar posture and the activity of lumbar muscles during extended office work. Thirteen volunteers were examined for around 2h of their normal office work. Typical tasks were documented and synchronised to a portable long term measuring device for sEMG and posture examination. The correlation of lumbar spine posture and sEMG was tested statistically. The majority of time spent in office work was sedentary (82%). Only 5% of the measured time was undertaken in erect body position (standing or walking). The sEMG of the lumbar muscles under investigation was task dependent. A strong relation to lumbar spine posture was found within each task. The more the lumbar spine was flexed, the less there was activation of lumbar muscles (P sitting postures. Because of very low activation of lumbar muscles while sitting, the load is transmitted by passive structures like ligaments and intervertebral discs. Due to the viscoelasticity of passive structures and low activation of lumbar muscles, the lumbar spine may incline into de-conditioning. This may be a reason for low back pain. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Lumbar plexus and psoas major muscle: not always as expected

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kirchmair, Lukas; Lirk, Philipp; Colvin, Joshua; Mitterschiffthaler, Gottfried; Moriggl, Bernhard

    2008-01-01

    Conflicting definitions concerning the exact location of the lumbar plexus have been proposed. The present study was carried out to detect anatomical variants regarding the topographical relation between the lumbar plexus and the psoas major muscle as well as lumbar plexus anatomy at the L4-L5

  14. Costs and effects in lumbar spinal fusion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Soegaard, Rikke; Christensen, Finn Bjarke; Christiansen, Terkel

    2007-01-01

    consecutive patients with chronic low back pain, who were surgically treated from January 2001 through January 2003, was followed until 2 years postoperatively. Operations took place at University Hospital of Aarhus and all patients had either (1) non-instrumented posterolateral lumbar spinal fusion, (2......) instrumented posterolateral lumbar spinal fusion, or (3) instrumented posterolateral lumbar spinal fusion + anterior intervertebral support. Analysis of costs was performed at the patient-level, from an administrator's perspective, by means of Activity-Based-Costing. Clinical effects were measured by means...... of the Dallas Pain Questionnaire and the Low Back Pain Rating Scale at baseline and 2 years postoperatively. Regression models were used to reveal determinants for costs and effects. Costs and effects were analyzed as a net-benefit measure to reveal determinants for cost-effectiveness, and finally, adjusted...

  15. Side effects after lumbar iohexol myelography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sand, T.; Stovner, L.J.; Myhr, G.; Dale, L.G.

    1990-01-01

    Side effects of iohexol lumbar myelography have been analyzed with respect to the influence of the type of radiological abnormality, sex and age in a group of 200 patients. Headache, postural headache, nausea and back/leg pain were significantly more frequent in patients without definite radiological abnormalities. Postural headache, nausea, dizziness and mental symptoms were more frequent in women, while headache, postural headache, nausea, dizziness, minor mental symptoms (i.e. anxiety or depression) and pain became less frequent with age. This pattern is similar to that reported after lumbar puncture. Young women without definite clinical signs of nerve root lesions probably have the greatest risk of experiencing side effects after iohexol lumbar myelography. (orig.)

  16. Congenital lumbar vertebrae agenesis in a lamb.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farajli Abbasi, Mohammad; Shojaei, Bahador; Azari, Omid

    2017-01-01

    Congenital agenesis of lumbar vertebrae was diagnosed in a day-old female lamb based on radiology and clinical examinations. There was no neurological deficit in hindlimb and forelimb associated with standing disability. Radiography of the abdominal region revealed absence of lumbar vertebrae. Necropsy confirmed clinical and radiographic results. No other anomaly or agenesis was seen macroscopically in the abdominal and thoracic regions as well as vertebral column. Partial absence of vertebral column has been reported in human and different animal species, as an independent occurrence or associated with other organs anomalies. The latter has been designated as caudal regression syndrome. Vertebral agenesis may arise from irregularity in the differentiation of somites to the sclerotome or sclerotome to the vertebral primordium. Most of the previously reported cases of agenesis were related to the lumbosacral region, lonely or along with other visceral absences. This case was the first report of congenital agenesis of lumbar vertebrae in a lamb.

  17. Imaging of thoracic and lumbar spinal extradural arachnoid cysts: report of two cases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rimmelin, A.; Clouet, P.L.; Salatino, S.; Kehrli, P.; Maitrot, D.; Stephan, M.; Dietemann, J.L.

    1997-01-01

    Extradural arachnoid cysts are uncommon expanding lesions in the spinal canal which may communicate with the subarachnoid space. Usually in the lower thoracic spine, they may cause symptoms by compressing the spinal cord or nerve roots. We report cases of thoracic and lumbar arachnoid cysts studied by cystography, myelography, CT and MRI. These techniques showed extradural cystic lesions containing cerebrospinal fluid, with variable communication with the subarachnoid space, causing anterior displacement and flattening of the spinal cord. (orig.)

  18. Clinical study of bilateral decompression via vertebral lamina fenestration for lumbar interbody fusion in the treatment of lower lumbar instability

    OpenAIRE

    GUO, SHUGUANG; SUN, JUNYING; TANG, GENLIN

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to observe the clinical effects of bilateral decompression via vertebral lamina fenestration for lumbar interbody fusion in the treatment of lower lumbar instability. The 48 patients comprised 27 males and 21 females, aged 47?72 years. Three cases had first and second degree lumbar spondylolisthesis and all received bilateral vertebral lamina fenestration for posterior lumbar interbody fusion (PLIF) using a threaded fusion cage (TFC), which maintains the three-column...