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Sample records for causing invasive infections

  1. Successful treatment of an invasive fungal infection caused by Talaromyces sp. with voriconazole

    OpenAIRE

    Uluhan Sili; Huseyin Bilgin; Rikesh Masania; Emel Eryuksel; Nuri Cagatay Cimsit; Gulcicek Ayranci; Malcolm Richardson; Volkan Korten

    2015-01-01

    Invasive fungal infections (IFI) are on the rise due to increasing numbers of immunosuppressed and critically ill patients. A malignant-looking pulmonary nodule in an immunosuppressed patient may indeed be caused by a fungal organism. We report a patient, who was eventually diagnosed with an IFI caused by an agent of hyalohyphomycosis, Talaromyces sp. determined via molecular methods and succesfully treated with voriconazole.

  2. Increased cytotoxicity and streptolysin O activity in group G streptococcal strains causing invasive tissue infections

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Siemens, Nikolai; Kittang, Bård R; Chakrakodi, Bhavya;

    2015-01-01

    Streptococcus dysgalactiae subsp. equisimilis (SDSE) has emerged as an important cause of severe skin and soft tissue infections, but little is known of the pathogenic mechanisms underlying tissue pathology. Patient samples and a collection of invasive and non-invasive group G SDSE strains (n = 69......) were analyzed with respect to virulence factor expression and cytotoxic or inflammatory effects on human cells and 3D skin tissue models. SDSE strains efficiently infected the 3D-skin model and severe tissue pathology, inflammatory responses and altered production of host structural framework proteins...

  3. Successful treatment of an invasive fungal infection caused by Talaromyces sp. with voriconazole

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uluhan Sili

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Invasive fungal infections (IFI are on the rise due to increasing numbers of immunosuppressed and critically ill patients. A malignant-looking pulmonary nodule in an immunosuppressed patient may indeed be caused by a fungal organism. We report a patient, who was eventually diagnosed with an IFI caused by an agent of hyalohyphomycosis, Talaromyces sp. determined via molecular methods and succesfully treated with voriconazole.

  4. Geographic distribution of Staphylococcus aureus causing invasive infections in Europe: a molecular-epidemiological analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hajo Grundmann

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Staphylococcus aureus is one of the most important human pathogens and methicillin-resistant variants (MRSAs are a major cause of hospital and community-acquired infection. We aimed to map the geographic distribution of the dominant clones that cause invasive infections in Europe. METHODS AND FINDINGS: In each country, staphylococcal reference laboratories secured the participation of a sufficient number of hospital laboratories to achieve national geo-demographic representation. Participating laboratories collected successive methicillin-susceptible (MSSA and MRSA isolates from patients with invasive S. aureus infection using an agreed protocol. All isolates were sent to the respective national reference laboratories and characterised by quality-controlled sequence typing of the variable region of the staphylococcal spa gene (spa typing, and data were uploaded to a central database. Relevant genetic and phenotypic information was assembled for interactive interrogation by a purpose-built Web-based mapping application. Between September 2006 and February 2007, 357 laboratories serving 450 hospitals in 26 countries collected 2,890 MSSA and MRSA isolates from patients with invasive S. aureus infection. A wide geographical distribution of spa types was found with some prevalent in all European countries. MSSA were more diverse than MRSA. Genetic diversity of MRSA differed considerably between countries with dominant MRSA spa types forming distinctive geographical clusters. We provide evidence that a network approach consisting of decentralised typing and visualisation of aggregated data using an interactive mapping tool can provide important information on the dynamics of MRSA populations such as early signalling of emerging strains, cross border spread, and importation by travel. CONCLUSIONS: In contrast to MSSA, MRSA spa types have a predominantly regional distribution in Europe. This finding is indicative of the selection and spread

  5. Reduced Susceptibility to Penicillin among Pneumococci Causing Invasive Infection in Children - Canada, 1991-1998

    OpenAIRE

    Scheifele, David; Halperin, Scott; Pelletier, Louise; Talbot, James; Lovgren, Marguerite; Vaudry, Wendy; Jadavji, Taj; Law, Barbara; MacDonald, Noni; Gold, Ron; Wang, Elaine; Mills, Elaine; LeBel, Marc; Déry, Pierre; Morris, Rob

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine, over time, the rate and serotypes of pneumococci with reduced penicillin susceptibility obtained from children with invasive infection.DESIGN: Active, hospital-based, multicentre surveillance spanning from 1991 to 1998.SETTING: Eleven Canadian tertiary care paediatric facilities located from coast to coast.POPULATION STUDIED: 1847 children with invasive pneumococcal infection whose isolates (from a normally sterile site) were available for serotyping and standardized ...

  6. Lon Protease Activity Causes Down-Regulation of Salmonella Pathogenicity Island 1 Invasion Gene Expression after Infection of Epithelial Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Boddicker, Jennifer D.; Jones, Bradley D.

    2004-01-01

    Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium causes self-limiting gastroenteritis in humans and a typhoid-like disease in mice that serves as a model for typhoid infections in humans. A critical step in Salmonella pathogenesis is the invasion of enterocytes and M cells of the small intestine via expression of a type III secretion system, encoded on Salmonella pathogenicity island 1 (SPI-1), that secretes effector proteins into host cells, leading to engulfment of the bacteria within large membrane...

  7. Protein rib: a novel group B streptococcal cell surface protein that confers protective immunity and is expressed by most strains causing invasive infections

    OpenAIRE

    1993-01-01

    The group B Streptococcus, an important cause of invasive infections in the neonate, is classified into four major serotypes (Ia, Ib, II, and III) based on the structure of the polysaccharide capsule. Since the capsule is a known virulence factor, it has been extensively studied, in particular in type III strains, which cause the majority of invasive infections. Two cell surface proteins, alpha and beta, have also been studied in detail since they confer protective immunity, but these protein...

  8. Community-Associated Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus Lacking PVL, as a Cause of Severe Invasive Infection Treated with Linezolid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catarina Gouveia

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Community-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (CA-MRSA is an emerging public health problem worldwide. Severe invasive infections have been described, mostly associated with the presence of Panton-Valentine leukocidin (PVL. In Portugal limited information exists regarding CA-MRSA infections. In this study we describe the case of a previously healthy 12-year-old female, sport athlete, who presented to the hospital with acetabulofemoral septic arthritis, myositis, fasciitis, acetabulum osteomyelitis, and pneumonia. The MRSA isolated from blood and synovial fluid was PVL negative and staphylococcal enterotoxin type P (SEP and type L (SEL positive, with a vancomycin MIC of 1.0 mg/L and resistant to clindamycin and ciprofloxacin. The patient was submitted to multiple surgical drainages and started on vancomycin, rifampicin, and gentamycin. Due to persistence of fever and no microbiological clearance, linezolid was started with improvement. This is one of the few reported cases of severe invasive infection caused by CA-MRSA in Portugal, which was successfully treated with linezolid. In spite of the severity of infection, the MRSA isolate did not produce PVL.

  9. Invasive Streptococcus pneumoniae infection causing hemolytic uremic syndrome in children: Two recent cases

    OpenAIRE

    Vanderkooi, Otto G; Kellner, James D; Wade, Andrew W.; Jadavji, Tajdin; Midgley, Julian P; Louie, Thomas; Tyrrell, Gregory J.

    2003-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Streptococcus pneumoniae is an uncommon cause of hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS) with a unique pathophysiology that differs from Shiga toxin-related HUS.METHODS: Case descriptions for each patient are provided. Each strain of S pneumoniae was subjected to a pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) analysis, Shiga toxin assay and polymerase chain reaction to detect Shiga toxin genes. A review of the current literature was conducted.CASE PRESENTATIONS: Two patients with S pneumonia...

  10. Fusarium solani causing quasi-invasive infection of the foot in an immunocompetent middle-aged man from South India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohan H Kudur

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Fusarium solani is commonly found in soil, and it is associated with infections in immunocompromised individuals. Fusaroium solani causing infection in immunocompetent adult male is rare and usually overlooked. We report a case of mycetoma caused by Fusariom solani in an immunocompetent adult male from South India.

  11. Trends in invasive fungal infections, with emphasis on invasive aspergillosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Erjavec, Z.; Kluin-Nelemans, H.; Verweij, P. E.

    2009-01-01

    P>Patterns of invasive fungal infections are changing in many ways. Although yeast infections appear to have reached a stable incidence, the number of infections as a result of Aspergillus species appears to be increasing. Especially for mould infection, the diagnosis remains difficult and the detec

  12. Minimally invasive treatment of infected pancreatic necrosis

    OpenAIRE

    Wroński, Marek; Cebulski, Włodzimierz; Słodkowski, Maciej; Krasnodębski, Ireneusz W.

    2014-01-01

    Infected pancreatic necrosis is a challenging complication that worsens prognosis in acute pancreatitis. For years, open necrosectomy has been the mainstay treatment option in infected pancreatic necrosis, although surgical debridement still results in high morbidity and mortality rates. Recently, many reports on minimally invasive treatment in infected pancreatic necrosis have been published. This paper presents a review of minimally invasive techniques and attempts to define their role in t...

  13. Invasive Infections with Nontyphoidal Salmonella in Sub-Saharan Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahon, Barbara E; Fields, Patricia I

    2016-06-01

    Invasive nontyphoidal Salmonella (NTS) infections in Africa cause an enormous burden of illness. These infections are often devastating, with mortality estimated at 20%, even with appropriate antimicrobial therapy. Two major groups-young children and HIV-infected adults-suffer the great majority of these infections. In children, younger age itself, as well as malaria, malnutrition, and HIV infection, are prominent risk factors. In adults, HIV infection is by far the most important risk factor. The most common serotypes in invasive infections are Salmonella enterica serotypes Typhimurium and Enteritidis. In recent years, a specific strain of Salmonella Typhimurium, multilocus sequence type 313, has caused epidemics of invasive disease. Little is known about risk factors for exposure to NTS, making the design of rational interventions to decrease exposure difficult. Antimicrobial therapy is critically important for treatment of invasive NTS infections. Thus, the emergence and spread of resistance to agents commonly used for treatment of invasive NTS infection, now including third-generation cephalosporins, is an ominous development. Already, many invasive NTS infections are essentially untreatable in many health care facilities in sub-Saharan Africa. Several candidate vaccines are in early development and, if safe and effective, could be promising. Interventions to prevent exposure to NTS (e.g., improved sanitation), to prevent the occurrence of disease if exposure does occur (e.g., vaccination, malaria control), and to prevent severe disease and death in those who become ill (e.g., preserving antimicrobial effectiveness) are all important in reducing the toll of invasive NTS disease in sub-Saharan Africa. PMID:27337467

  14. Spectrum and risk factors for invasive candidiasis and non-Candida fungal infections after liver transplantation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHI Shao-hua; LU An-wei; SHEN Yan; JIA Chang-ku; WANG Wei-lin; XIE Hai-yang; ZHANG Min; LIANG Ting-bo; ZHENG Shu-sen

    2008-01-01

    Background Invasive fungal infections are an important cause of posttransplant mortality in solid-organ recipients.The current trend is that the incidence of invasive candidiasis decreases significantly and invasive aspergillosis occurs later in the liver posttransplant recipients.The understanding of epidemiology and its evolving trends in the particular locality is beneficial to prophylactic and empiric treatment for transplant recipients.Methods A retrospective analysis was made of recorded data on the epidemiology,risk factors,and mortality of jnvasive fungal infections in 352 liver transplant recipients.Results Forty-two(11.9%)patients suffered from Invasive fungal infection.Candida species infections(53.3%)were the most common,followed by Aspergillus species(40.0%).There were 21 patients with a superficial fungal infection.The median time to onset of first invasive fungal infection was 13 days,first invasive Candida infection 9 days,and first invasive Aspergillus infection 21 days.Fifteen deaths were related to invasive fungal infection,10 to Aspergillus infection,and 5 to Candida infection.Invasive Candida species infections were associated with encephalopathy(P=0.009)and postoperative bacterial infection(P=0.0003)as demonstrated by multivariate analysis.Three independent risk factors of invasive Aspergillus infection were posttransplant laparotomy(P=0.004),renal dysfunction(P=0.005)and hemodialysis (P=0.001).Conclusions The leading etiologic species of invasive fungal infections are Candida and Aspergillus,which frequently occur in the first posttransplant month.EncephalOpathy and postoperative bacterial infection predispose to invasive Candida infection.POsttransDlant laparotomy and poor perioperative clinical status contribute to invasive Aspergillus infection.More studies are needed to determine the effect of prophylactic antifungal therapy in high risk Patients.

  15. Hepatic safety of itraconazole intravenous solution in treatment of invasive fungal infection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    朱利平

    2006-01-01

    Objective To investigate the hepatic safety of itraconazole intravenous solution in the treatment of invasive fungal infection. Methods Forty-nine patients with invasive fungal infection, such as pneumonia, meningitis, endocarditis, and blood stream infection, caused by Aspergillus spp. Cryptococcus neoformans, Candida spp. Penicillium marneffei,and Prototheca wiekerhamii, 50 of which had underlying diseases, including hepatic disea-

  16. Invasive Disease Caused by Nontypeable Haemophilus Influenzae

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2015-11-12

    Dr. Elizabeth Briere discusses Nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae which causes a variety of infections in children and adults.  Created: 11/12/2015 by National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases (NCEZID).   Date Released: 11/17/2015.

  17. Combination Treatment of Invasive Fungal Infections

    OpenAIRE

    Pranab K Mukherjee; Sheehan, Daniel J.; Hitchcock, Christopher A.; Ghannoum, Mahmoud A.

    2005-01-01

    The persistence of high morbidity and mortality from systemic fungal infections despite the availability of novel antifungals points to the need for effective treatment strategies. Treatment of invasive fungal infections is often hampered by drug toxicity, tolerability, and specificity issues, and added complications often arise due to the lack of diagnostic tests and to treatment complexities. Combination therapy has been suggested as a possible approach to improve treatment outcome. In this...

  18. Invasive Group A Streptococcal Infection

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2011-06-13

    In this podcast, CDC's Dr. Chris Van Beneden discusses the dangers of group A strep infections.  Created: 6/13/2011 by National Center for Emerging Zoonotic and Infectious Diseases (NCEZID).   Date Released: 6/13/2011.

  19. Invasive facial fungal infections: Orofacial soft-tissue infiltration in immunocompromised patients

    OpenAIRE

    Jun, Peter; Russell, Matthew; El-Sayed, Ivan; Dillon, William; Glastonbury, Christine

    2015-01-01

    Invasive facial fungal infections affect the orofacial soft tissues in immunocompromised patients and can cause significant morbidity and mortality. Primary infection occurs from direct inoculation of the skin surface, while secondary infection occurs from extension from an adjacent sinonasal process. The imaging features of secondary infection are similar to acute fulminant invasive fungal sinusitis with infiltration of the orofacial soft tissues in combination with sinonasal disease. Howeve...

  20. [Invasive yeast infections in severely burned patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renau, Ana Isabel; García-Vidal, Carolina; Salavert, Miguel

    2016-01-01

    Currently, there are few studies on candidaemia in the severely burned patient. These patients share the same risk factors for invasive fungal infections as other critically ill patients, but have certain characteristics that make them particularly susceptible. These include the loss of skin barrier due to extensive burns, fungal colonisation of the latter, and the use of hydrotherapy or other topical therapies (occasionally with antimicrobials). In addition, the increased survival rate achieved in recent decades in critically burned patients due to the advances in treatment has led to the increase of invasive Candida infections. This explains the growing interest in making an earlier and more accurate diagnosis, as well as more effective treatments to reduce morbidity and mortality of candidaemia in severe burned patients. A review is presented on all aspects of the burned patient, including the predisposition and risk factors for invasive candidiasis, pathogenesis of candidaemia, underlying immunodeficiency, local epidemiology and antifungal susceptibility, evolution and prognostic factors, as well as other non-Candida yeast infections. Finally, we include specific data on our local experience in the management of candidaemia in severe burned patients, which may serve to quantify the problem, place it in context, and offer a realistic perspective. PMID:27395025

  1. Contamination during production of heater-cooler units by Mycobacterium chimaera potential cause for invasive cardiovascular infections: results of an outbreak investigation in Germany, April 2015 to February 2016.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haller, Sebastian; Höller, Christiane; Jacobshagen, Anja; Hamouda, Osamah; Abu Sin, Muna; Monnet, Dominique L; Plachouras, Diamantis; Eckmanns, Tim

    2016-04-28

    Invasive infections with Mycobacterium chimaera were reported in patients with previous open chest surgery and exposure to contaminated heater-cooler units (HCUs). We present results of the surveillance of clinical cases and of contaminated HCUs as well as environmental investigations in Germany up until February 2016. Clinical infections occurred in five male German cases over 50 years of age (range 53-80). Cases had been exposed to HCUs from one single manufacturer during open chest surgery up to five years prior to onset of symptoms. During environmental investigations, M. chimaera was detected in samples from used HCUs from three different countries and samples from new HCUs as well as in the environment at the manufacturing site of one manufacturer in Germany. Our investigation suggests that at least some of the M. chimaera infections may have been caused by contamination of HCUs at manufacturing site. We recommend that until sustainable measures for safe use of HCUs in operation theatres are implemented, users continue to adhere to instructions for use of HCUs and Field Safety Notices issued by the manufacturer, implement local monitoring for bacterial contamination and continuously check the websites of national and European authorities for current recommendations for the safe operation of HCUs. PMID:27168588

  2. Community-Based Outbreaks in Vulnerable Populations of Invasive Infections Caused by Streptococcus pneumoniae Serotypes 5 and 8 in Calgary, Canada

    OpenAIRE

    Otto G Vanderkooi; Church, Deirdre L.; MacDonald, Judy; Zucol, Franziska; Kellner, James D

    2011-01-01

    Background Outbreaks of invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD) typically occur within institutions. Beginning in 2005, we detected an increase in serotype (ST) 5 and ST8 IPD cases, predominantly in homeless persons living in an open community. Methodology/Principal Findings CASPER (Calgary Area S. pneumoniae Epidemiology Research) surveillance study of all IPD (sterile site isolates) in our region (pop ∼1,100,000). Interviews and chart reviews of all cases and all isolates phenotypically analyze...

  3. Voriconazole in the management of nosocomial invasive fungal infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pemán, Javier; Salavert, Miguel; Cantón, Emilia; Jarque, Isidro; Romá, Eva; Zaragoza, Rafael; Viudes, Angel; Gobernado, Miguel

    2006-06-01

    Voriconazole is a new triazole developed for the treatment of life-threatening fungal infections. The drug is available for both oral and intravenous administration; the oral formulation has excellent bioavailability. The side-effect profile of voriconazole presents an acceptable safety and tolerability spectrum: transient visual disturbances, liver enzyme abnormalities, and skin rashes are the most frequently reported side effects but rarely lead to discontinuation. The potential for drug-drug interactions is high, because of its extensive hepatic metabolism. Careful attention to dosage is required, and serum levels and the effects of interacting drugs should be monitored. Review of 25 470 isolates of yeasts and 3216 isolates of filamentous fungi showed voriconazole to have broad-spectrum activity against pathogenic yeasts including intrinsically fluconazole-resistant isolates such as Candida krusei, dimorphic fungi, and opportunistic moulds like Aspergillus spp, amphotericin-B-resistant Aspergillus terreus, Fusarium spp, and Scedosporium apiospermum. It displays excellent clinical efficacy in patients with fluconazole-resistant and -susceptible Candida infections, invasive bone and central nervous system aspergillosis, and various refractory fungal infections. Voriconazole has been approved by the US Food and Drug Administration and by the European Medicines Agency for the treatment of invasive aspergillosis, serious infections caused by Fusarium and S. apiospermum, fluconazole-resistant invasive Candida infections, and candidemia in nonneutropenic patients. PMID:18360588

  4. Invasive Mold Infections in Solid Organ Transplant Recipients

    OpenAIRE

    Yoann Crabol; Olivier Lortholary

    2014-01-01

    Invasive mold infections represent an increasing source of morbidity and mortality in solid organ transplant recipients. Whereas there is a large literature regarding invasive molds infections in hematopoietic stem cell transplants, data in solid organ transplants are scarcer. In this comprehensive review, we focused on invasive mold infection in the specific population of solid organ transplant. We highlighted epidemiology and specific risk factors for these infections and we assessed the ma...

  5. Nosocomial infections caused by staphylococci.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deplano, A; Struelens, M J

    1998-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus and coagulase-negative species of staphylococci (CNS), particularly S epidermidis, are among the most frequently isolated bacteria from patients with nosocomial infection. Conventional methods used in the clinical microbiology laboratory for identification, susceptibility testing, and epidemiologic typing of staphylococci have several limitations Identification to species level is often limited to S. aureus, based on ability to produce coagulase, thermostable nuclease, and clumping factor. However, several newly-described species of staphylococci may express some of these characters, whereas atypical strains of S. aureus do not, leading to misidentification (1,2). Furthermore, among the 17 species of staphylococci currently recognized to be indigenous to humans, the potential of S. lugdunensis to cause serious infections is being increasingly recognized (1,2) Therefore, further speciation of CNS is clinically relevant. Distinction of true CNS infection from specimen contamination by skin flora can be addressed by demonstrating the repeated isolation of the same clone from multiple specimens, e g., blood cultures (1). Currently available, rapid biochemical test systems enable identification of staphylococci to species level with 60-90% accuracy (1). Antimicrobial susceptibility pattern, the only routinely available strain marker, is not reliable for clonal delmeation because of phenotypic variation among clonally derived isolates (1). PMID:21390761

  6. HUMAN INVASIVE DERMATOPHYTIC DISEASE IS CAUSED BY INBORN ERRORS OF CARD9

    OpenAIRE

    Lanternier, F.; Pathan, S.; Vincent, Q.; L. Liu; Cypowij, S.; Prando, C; Migaud, M.; TAIBI, L.; Ammar-Khodja, A.; Stambouli, O.; Boudghene; Guellil, B.; Jacobs, F.; Goffard, J.C; Shepers, K.

    2012-01-01

    Dermatophytic disease is an invasive, sometimes life-threatening, fungal infection caused by dermatophytes, in which there is extensive cutaneous and subcutaneous tissue involvement, frequent dissemination to the lymph nodes and occasionally to the central nervous system. This condition, which is different from banal superficial dermatophyte infection (dermatophytosis), has mostly been reported in North African consanguineous multiplex families, strongly suggesting a Mendelian genetic etiolog...

  7. Isavuconazole in the treatment of invasive aspergillosis and mucormycosis infections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donnelley, Monica A; Zhu, Elizabeth S; Thompson, George R

    2016-01-01

    We have a limited arsenal with which to treat invasive fungal infections caused by Aspergillus and Mucorales. The morbidity and mortality for both pathogens remains high. A triazole antifungal, isavuconazole, was recently granted approval by the US Food and Drug Administration and the European Medicines Agency for the treatment of invasive aspergillosis and mucormycosis. A randomized double-blind comparison trial for the treatment of invasive aspergillosis found isavuconazole noninferior to voriconazole. A separate, open-label study evaluating the efficacy of isavuconazole in the treatment of mucormycosis found comparable response rates to amphotericin B and posaconazole treated historical controls. The prodrug isavuconazonium sulfate is commercially available in both an oral and intravenous formulation and is generally well tolerated. Isavuconazole’s broad spectrum of activity, limited side effect profile, and favorable pharmacokinetics will likely solidify its place in therapy. PMID:27330318

  8. Guideline for diagnosis, prophylaxis and treatment of invasive fungal infection post burn injury in China 2013

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gaoxing Luo

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Invasive fungal infection is one of the major complication of severe burns which can induce local or systemic inflammatory response and cause serious substantial damage to the patient. The incidence of fungal infection for burn victims is increasing dramatically during recent years. This guideline, organized by Chinese Society of Burn Surgeons, aims to standardize the diagnosis, prevention and treatment of burn invasive fungal infection. It can be used as one of the tools for treatment of major burn patients.

  9. Pathological and therapeutic significance of cellular invasion by Proteus mirabilis in an enterocystoplasty infection stone model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R.B. Mathoera (Rejiv); D.J. Kok (Dirk); C.M. Verduin (Cees); R.J.M. Nijman (Rien)

    2002-01-01

    textabstractProteus mirabilis infection often leads to stone formation. We evaluated how bacterium-mucin adhesion, invasion, and intracellular crystal formation are related to antibiotic sensitivity and may cause frequent stone formation in enterocystoplasties. Five intestinal (Cac

  10. Community-based outbreaks in vulnerable populations of invasive infections caused by Streptococcus pneumoniae serotypes 5 and 8 in Calgary, Canada.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Otto G Vanderkooi

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Outbreaks of invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD typically occur within institutions. Beginning in 2005, we detected an increase in serotype (ST 5 and ST8 IPD cases, predominantly in homeless persons living in an open community. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: CASPER (Calgary Area S. pneumoniae Epidemiology Research surveillance study of all IPD (sterile site isolates in our region (pop ~1,100,000. Interviews and chart reviews of all cases and all isolates phenotypically analyzed and selected isolated tested by multi-locus sequence typing (MLST. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: During 2005-2007, 162 cases of ST5 IPD and 45 cases of ST8 IPD were identified. The isolates demonstrated phenotypic and genotypic clonality. The ST5 isolates were sequence type (ST 289 and demonstrated intermediate susceptibility to TMP-SMX. The ST8 isolates were predominantly ST1268, with a susceptible antimicrobial susceptibility profile. Individuals with ST5 IPD were more likely to be middle aged (OR 2.6, homeless (OR 4.4, using illicit drugs(OR 4.8, and asthmatic(OR 2.6. Those with ST8 were more likely to be male (OR 4.4, homeless (OR 2.6, aboriginal (OR7.3, and a current smoker (OR 2.5. Overlapping outbreaks of ST5 and ST8 IPD occurred in an open community in Calgary, Canada and homelessness was a predominant risk factor. Homelessness represents a unique community in which pneumococcal outbreaks can occur.

  11. Infections caused by rare mold fungi in hematology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. I. Kalinina

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Worldwide distribution of mold fungi and their extremely danger for immune compromise patients makes this issue one of the unsolved problems in modern oncology. Three cases of rare fungal infections in children with hematological malignancies are described. In the first case infection caused by Acremonium spp. in AML patients was controlled after voriconazole therapy and granulocytes recovery. The second patients with aplastic anemia died as a result of invasive fungal infection caused by Fusarium spp. despite of combined antifungal therapy and granulocytes transfusions. In the third case diagnosis of Mucor mycosis was made only at autopsy

  12. Heterogeneity of pneumococcal phase variants in invasive human infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramirez M

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Streptococcus pneumoniae can be carried asymptomatically in the nasopharynx of its human host but can also cause a wide range of infections. A role for pneumococcal phase variants in the different lifestyles of this bacterium has been suggested but no systematic survey of the colony phenotypes of isolates associated with human infections has been undertaken. Results We report the colony opacity phenotypes of a genetically diverse set of 304 invasive isolates representing 10 serotypes. Over half of the isolates (52% presented the opaque phenotype whereas transparent variants accounted for only 26% of the total. However, the frequency of recovery of each phase variant was not uniform, while serotypes 1, 4, 12B and 23F presented the opaque phenotype more frequently than expected by chance, serotypes 3 and 14 where less frequently associated with this phenotype. Conclusion The opaque phenotype was the most frequent phenotype found among invasive isolates. An unexpected and equally important finding is the variability of the dominant opacity phenotype found among serotypes. This observation highlights the heterogeneity of opacity phenotypes in invasive isolates and lends further support to the proposal that other factors, in addition to the site of isolation, determine the opacity phenotype of a given isolate. The association between serotype and colonial opacity could help explain epidemiological differences observed among pneumococcal serotypes such as a higher invasive disease potential.

  13. Rapid Emergence of emm84 among Invasive Streptococcus pyogenes Infections in Finland▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siljander, Tuula; Lyytikäinen, Outi; Vähäkuopus, Susanna; Säilä, Petrus; Jalava, Jari; Vuopio-Varkila, Jaana

    2009-01-01

    From 2005 to 2007, in Finland, the incidence of invasive Streptococcus pyogenes disease increased sharply, partly due to the uncommon emm84 gene becoming more prevalent from 2006 onwards. The overall case fatality rate of infections caused by strains carrying emm84 was not significantly different than that of infections caused by other types (7% versus 10%, respectively; P = 0.50). PMID:19073871

  14. Rapid emergence of emm84 among invasive Streptococcus pyogenes infections in Finland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siljander, Tuula; Lyytikäinen, Outi; Vähäkuopus, Susanna; Säilä, Petrus; Jalava, Jari; Vuopio-Varkila, Jaana

    2009-02-01

    From 2005 to 2007, in Finland, the incidence of invasive Streptococcus pyogenes disease increased sharply, partly due to the uncommon emm84 gene becoming more prevalent from 2006 onwards. The overall case fatality rate of infections caused by strains carrying emm84 was not significantly different than that of infections caused by other types (7% versus 10%, respectively; P = 0.50). PMID:19073871

  15. Co-infection of invasive pulmonary aspergillosis and cutaneous Fusarium infection in a patient with pyoderma gangrenosum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nasrin Amirrajab

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We report an unusual case of co-infection of invasive pulmonary aspergillosis (IPA and fusarial skin infection in a patient with classic pyoderma gangrenosum with unknown causes, which were previously controlled with oral prednisolone, cyclosporine. The diagnosis was made on direct microscopy and culture of endobronchial washing, bronchoalveolar lavage and skin lesion biopsy. The treatment failed, and the patient expired 12 days following hospitalization. This report highlights the rarity of coexistence of IPA and a chronic fusarial skin infection and thereby reinforcing the physician′s attention toward the possibility of invasive fungal infection in the immunosuppressed patients.

  16. Invasive fungal infections in patients with chronic granulomatous disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Henriet, S.S.V.; Verweij, P.E.; Holland, S.M.; Warris, A.

    2013-01-01

    Invasive fungal infections are a major threat for chronic granulomatous disease (CGD) patients. The present study provides a comprehensive overview of published invasive fungal infections in the CGD host through an extensive review of epidemiological, clinical, diagnostic and therapeutic data. In ad

  17. Isavuconazole in the treatment of invasive aspergillosis and mucormycosis infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donnelley MA

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Monica A Donnelley,1,2 Elizabeth S Zhu,1 George R Thompson 3rd3 1Department of Inpatient Pharmacy, University of California – Davis, Sacramento, 2Department of Clinical Sciences, Touro University College of Pharmacy, Vallejo, 3Department of Medicine, Division of Infectious Diseases, University of California – Davis, Davis, CA, USAAbstract: We have a limited arsenal with which to treat invasive fungal infections caused by Aspergillus and Mucorales. The morbidity and mortality for both pathogens remains high. A triazole antifungal, isavuconazole, was recently granted approval by the US Food and Drug Administration and the European Medicines Agency for the treatment of invasive aspergillosis and mucormycosis. A randomized double-blind comparison trial for the treatment of invasive aspergillosis found isavuconazole noninferior to voriconazole. A separate, open-label study evaluating the efficacy of isavuconazole in the treatment of mucormycosis found comparable response rates to amphotericin B and posaconazole treated historical controls. The prodrug isavuconazonium sulfate is commercially available in both an oral and intravenous formulation and is generally well tolerated. Isavuconazole’s broad spectrum of activity, limited side effect profile, and favorable pharmacokinetics will likely solidify its place in therapy. Keywords: isavuconazonium, antifungal, zygomycosis, mucor, mould infection, pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics, clinical efficacy, therapy, new agent

  18. Immunotherapy of invasive fungal infection in hematopoietic stem cell transplant recipients

    OpenAIRE

    Lehrnbecher, Thomas; Schmidt, Stanislaw; Tramsen, Lars; Klingebiel, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Despite the availability of new antifungal compounds, invasive fungal infection remains a significant cause of morbidity and mortality in children and adults undergoing allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). Allogeneic HSCT recipients suffer from a long lasting defect of different arms of the immune system, which increases the risk for and deteriorates the prognosis of invasive fungal infections. In turn, advances in understanding these immune deficits have resulted in pro...

  19. The Roles of Epidemiologists, Laboratorians, and Public Health Agencies in Preventing Invasive Cronobacter Infection

    OpenAIRE

    Jason, Janine

    2015-01-01

    Background Cronobacter can cause severe, invasive infection in very young infants. These bacteria can also colonize or cause insignificant infections in immunocompromised, elderly, and/or hospitalized adults. Methods This editorial review highlights key points addressed in the Frontiers Research Topic on Cronobacter, discusses the clinical presentation and epidemiology of Cronobacter infections, and examines the responses of public health agencies to this problem. Results C...

  20. Serious infection caused by group C streptococci.

    OpenAIRE

    Ghoneim, A T; Cooke, E M

    1980-01-01

    Group C streptococci commonly cause infection in animals but only occasionally give rise to severe infection in man. We report here three cases of serious human infection due to this organism and discuss its pathogenicity in relation to the clinical manifestations of the disease.

  1. Systemic Staphylococcus aureus infection mediated by Candida albicans hyphal invasion of mucosal tissue

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    L.M. Schlecht; B.M. Peters; B.P. Krom; J.A. Freiberg; G.M. Hänsch; S.G. Filler; M.A. Jabra-Rizk; M.E. Shirtliff

    2015-01-01

    Candida albicans and Staphylococcus aureus are often co-isolated in cases of biofilm-associated infections. C. albicans can cause systemic disease through morphological switch from the rounded yeast to the invasive hyphal form. Alternatively, systemic S. aureus infections arise from seeding through

  2. Novel Clones of Streptococcus pneumoniae Causing Invasive Disease in Malaysia

    OpenAIRE

    Johanna M Jefferies; Mohd Yasim Mohd Yusof; Shamala Devi Sekaran; Clarke, Stuart C.

    2014-01-01

    Although Streptococcus pneumoniae is a leading cause of childhood disease in South East Asia, little has previously been reported regarding the epidemiology of invasive pneumococcal disease in Malaysia and very few studies have explored pneumococcal epidemiology using multilocus sequence typing (MLST). Here we describe serotype, multilocus sequence type (ST), and penicillin susceptibility of thirty pneumococcal invasive disease isolates received by the University of Malaya Medical Centre betw...

  3. Case report: Infective endocarditis caused by Brevundimonas vesicularis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Tun-Chieh

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There are few reports in the literature of invasive infection caused by Brevundimonas vesicularis in patients without immunosuppression or other predisposing factors. The choice of antimicrobial therapy for bacteremia caused by the pathogen requires more case experience to be determined. Case presentation The case of a 40-year-old previously healthy man with subacute endocarditis proposed to be contributed from an occult dental abscess is described. The infection was found to be caused by B. vesicularis on blood culture results. The patient recovered without sequelae after treatment with ceftriaxone followed by subsequent ciprofloxacin therapy owing to an allergic reaction to ceftriaxone and treatment failure with ampicillin/sulbactam. Conclusion To our knowledge, this is the first report of B. vesicularis as a cause of infective endocarditis. According to an overview of the literature and our experience, we suggest that third-generation cephalosporins, piperacillin/tazobactam, and ciprofloxacin are effective in treating invasive B. vesicularis infections, while the efficacy of ampicillin-sulbactam needs further evaluation.

  4. [Two cases of invasive Haemophilus influenzae type f infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, J.D.; Lind, J.W.; Bruun, B.

    2009-01-01

    Two cases of invasive Haemophilus influenzae type f infection are presented: a three-week-old boy with meningitis and a 62-year-old woman with arthritis and bacteremia. Since 1993 vaccination against H. influenzae type b (Hib) has been offered to Danish children. The result has been a remarkable...... decrease in invasive Hib disease. However, physicians need to be aware of the existence of non-type b invasive H. influenzae disease Udgivelsesdato: 2009/1/19...

  5. Ceftaroline Fosamil Use in 2 Pediatric Patients With Invasive Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus Infections

    OpenAIRE

    Williams, Amanda W.; Newman, Patrick M; Ocheltree, Sara; Beaty, Rachel; Hassoun, Ali

    2015-01-01

    Community-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (CA-MRSA) is one of the most common pathogens causing pediatric infections including skin and soft tissue infections, pyogenic arthritis, osteomyelitis, and septic shock. For decades, patients were treated with antibiotics such as vancomycin and clindamycin, but there is an increasing incidence of resistance to these traditional therapies. We describe 2 cases of patients with CA-MRSA invasive infections with bacteremia who exper...

  6. Invasive Candida Infections in the ICU: Diagnosis and Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hankovszky Péter

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Invasive fungal infections have become a serious problem in the critically ill. One of the main reasons is the development of an immunocompromised condition. The most frequently found pathogens are Candida species. In order to provide adequate treatment, understanding this potentially life-threatening infection is mandatory. The aim of this summary is to view Candida infections from a different perspective and to give an overview on epidemiology, the range of pathophysiology from colonization to the invasive infections, and its impact on mortality. New therapeutic options will also be discussed and how these relate to current guidelines. Finally, the key issue of the choice of antifungal agents will be evaluated.

  7. Pharmacoeconomics of voriconazole in the management of invasive fungal infections

    OpenAIRE

    Al-Badriyeh, D.; Heng, S.C.; Neoh, C.F.; Slavin, M.; Stewart, K; Kong, D.C.M.

    2010-01-01

    The incidence of invasive fungal infection has risen in recent years with the introduction of more intensive chemotherapy regimens and the advent of stem cell and solid-organ transplants. In patients undergoing chemotherapy, mortality rates ranging from 50 to 90% have been associated with documented invasive fungal infection. Voriconazole is a second-generation triazole, which is a synthesized derivative of fluconazole. It was first approved for marketing in the USA in 2002. Voriconazole has ...

  8. Invasive pneumococcal infection despite 7-valent conjugated vaccine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebastien Joye

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Despite good cover with 7-valent vaccination, invasive pneumococcal infections may still be misdiagnosed and may lead to lifethreatening situations or death in young children. New serotypes are emerging and, therefore, clinicians must keep a high level of suspicion in young children regardless of their vaccination status. We report three cases of invasive pneumococcal infection due to new serotypes not covered by the 7-valent conjugated vaccine, two of which led children to death.

  9. Invasive filamentous fungal infections associated with renal transplant tourism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shoham, S; Hinestrosa, F; Moore, J; O'Donnell, S; Ruiz, M; Light, J

    2010-08-01

    'Transplant tourism,' the practice of traveling abroad to acquire an organ, has emerged as an issue in kidney transplantation. We treated a patient who developed invasive aspergillosis of the allograft vascular anastomosis after receiving a kidney transplant in Pakistan, prompting us to review the literature of invasive mycoses among commercial organ transplant recipients. We reviewed all published cases of infections in solid organ transplant recipients who bought their organs abroad and analyzed these reports for invasive fungal infections. Including the new case reported here, 19 cases of invasive fungal infections post commercial kidney transplant occurring in 17 patients were analyzed. Infecting organisms were Aspergillus species (12/19; 63%), Zygomycetes (5/19; 26%), and other fungi (2/19; 5%). Invasive mold infections were present at the transplanted graft in 6/17 patients (35%) with graft loss or death in 13/17 (76%) of patients and overall mortality (10/17) 59%. Invasive fungal infections, frequently originating at the graft site, have emerged as a devastating complication of commercial renal transplant and are associated with high rates of graft loss and death. PMID:20163566

  10. Group B streptococcus neonatal invasive infections, France 2007-2012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joubrel, C; Tazi, A; Six, A; Dmytruk, N; Touak, G; Bidet, P; Raymond, J; Trieu Cuot, P; Fouet, A; Kernéis, S; Poyart, C

    2015-10-01

    Streptococcus agalactiae (group B streptococcus (GBS)) is the leading cause of invasive infections among newborns in industrialized countries, with two described syndromes: early-onset disease (EOD) and late-onset disease (LOD). Since the introduction in many countries of intrapartum antibioprophylaxis (IAP), the incidence of EOD has dramatically decreased, whereas that of LOD remains unchanged. We describe the clinical and bacteriological characteristics of 438 GBS neonatal invasive infections notified to the French National Reference Centre for Streptococci in France from 2007 to 2012. Clinical data were retrieved from hospitalization reports or questionnaires. Capsular type, assignment to the hypervirulent clonal complex (CC)17 and antibiotic susceptibility profiles were determined. One hundred and seventy-four (39.7%) and 264 (60.3%) isolates were responsible for EOD, including death in utero, and LOD, respectively. EOD was associated with bacteraemia (n = 103, 61%) and LOD with meningitis (n = 145, 55%). EOD was mainly due to capsular polysaccharide (CPS) III isolates (n = 99, 57%) and CPS Ia isolates (n = 40, 23%), and CPS III isolates were responsible for 80% (n = 211) of LOD cases. CC17 accounted for 80% (n = 121) of CPS III isolates responsible for meningitis (n = 151; total cases of meningitis, 188). Bad outcome risk factors were low gestational age and low birthweight. LOD represents almost 60% of cases of neonatal GBS disease in France and other countries in which IAP has been implemented. This observation reinforces the need to develop new prevention strategies targeting CC17, which is predominant in GBS neonatal infections. PMID:26055414

  11. Co-infection of invasive pulmonary aspergillosis and cutaneous Fusarium infection in a patient with pyoderma gangrenosum

    OpenAIRE

    AMIRRAJAB, Nasrin; Aliyali, Masoud; Mayahi, Sabah; Najafi, Narges; Abdi, Ruhollah; Nourbakhsh, Omid; SHOKOHI, Tahereh

    2015-01-01

    We report an unusual case of co-infection of invasive pulmonary aspergillosis (IPA) and fusarial skin infection in a patient with classic pyoderma gangrenosum with unknown causes, which were previously controlled with oral prednisolone, cyclosporine. The diagnosis was made on direct microscopy and culture of endobronchial washing, bronchoalveolar lavage and skin lesion biopsy. The treatment failed, and the patient expired 12 days following hospitalization. This report highlights the rarity of...

  12. Nasal Septal Perforation Caused by Invasive Fungal Sinusitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wai-Tin Kuo

    2002-11-01

    Full Text Available Nasal septal perforation presents a distinct challenge to otorhinolaryngologists, and is aproblem for patients. Although it has a variety of causes, previous septal surgery is the mostcommon reason. We present a 57-year-old woman who had recurrent chronic sinusitis. Aleft nasal mass was noted and excised via endoscopic sinus surgery. Invasive aspergillosissinusitis was proven both grossly and histopathologically, and a nasal septal perforation wasalso noted during the operation. Although there has been only a single other case presentedby Siberry in 1997, we postulate that perforation of the nasal septum as with the casedescribed herein is a rare complication of invasive fungal sinusitis.

  13. Incidence and Risk Factors for Invasive Pneumococcal Disease in HIV-infected and non-HIV infected Individuals Before and After the Introduction of Combination Antiretroviral Therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harboe, Zitta Barrella; Larsen, Mette Vang; Ladelund, Steen;

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND:  Invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD) is an important cause of morbidity among HIV-infected individuals. We described incidence and risk factors for IPD in HIV-infected and uninfected individuals. METHODS:  Nationwide population-based cohort study of HIV-infected adults treated at all...

  14. Posaconazole in the management of refractory invasive fungal infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefan Langner

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Stefan Langner, Philipp B Staber, Peter NeumeisterDivision of Hematology, Department of Internal Medicine, Medical University of Graz, AustriaAbstract: The rising incidence of invasive fungal infections due to the expanding population of immunocompromised hosts and the increasing prevalence of fungal resistance has led to the need for novel antifungal agents. Posaconazole, a new member of the triazole class has demonstrated in vitro activity against a broad spectrum of fungi and clinical activity against various fungal pathogens, including Aspergillus spp., Candida spp., zygomycetes, and Fusarium spp. To date, posaconazole has been approved for prophylaxis of invasive fungal infections in stem cell transplant recipients with acute graft versus host disease (GVHD and neutropenic patients receiving intensive induction chemotherapy for acute myelogenous leukemia and myelodysplastic syndrome. In addition, it has been licensed for use in oropharyngeal candidiasis and for salvage therapy in invasive aspergillosis, fusariosis, coccidioidomycosis, chromoblastomycosis, and mycetoma. Posaconazole is the only azole with activity against zygomycetes and other difficult-to-treat fungi, representing a potential treatment option for refractory invasive mycosis. This article reviews available preclinical and clinical data of posaconazole, focusing on its role in the teatment of refractory invasive fungal infections.Keywords: posaconazole, refractory invasive fungal infections, salvage therapy

  15. Novel clones of Streptococcus pneumoniae causing invasive disease in Malaysia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johanna M Jefferies

    Full Text Available Although Streptococcus pneumoniae is a leading cause of childhood disease in South East Asia, little has previously been reported regarding the epidemiology of invasive pneumococcal disease in Malaysia and very few studies have explored pneumococcal epidemiology using multilocus sequence typing (MLST. Here we describe serotype, multilocus sequence type (ST, and penicillin susceptibility of thirty pneumococcal invasive disease isolates received by the University of Malaya Medical Centre between February 2000 and January 2007 and relate this to the serotypes included in current pneumococcal conjugate vaccines. A high level of diversity was observed; fourteen serotypes and 26 sequence types (ST, (11 of which were not previously described were detected from 30 isolates. Penicillin non-susceptible pneumococci accounted for 33% of isolates. The extent of molecular heterogeneity within carried and disease-causing Malaysian pneumococci remains unknown. Larger surveillance and epidemiological studies are now required in this region to provide robust evidence on which to base future vaccine policy.

  16. Congenital Blindness and Visual Impairment Cause Infection or Non Infection

    OpenAIRE

    Mirjana A. Janicijevic-Petrovic; Tatjana S. Sarenac-Vulovic; Katarina M. Janicijevic; Dragan I. Vujic; Dejan D. Vulovic

    2013-01-01

    Conflict of interest: none declared. Introduction Authors are from reference documentation to archive at Organization of Federation of blind and visually impaired in central Serbia (Kragujevac), by retrograde analysis, of 2007-2012, comprehend two groups by etiology–clinical characteristics of congenital blindness and visually impaired, caused infection or non infection example. Aim to analyze relationship between infectious and non infectious of congenital blindness and visually impaired in ...

  17. Coccidian infection causes oxidative damage in greenfinches.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tuul Sepp

    Full Text Available The main tenet of immunoecology is that individual variation in immune responsiveness is caused by the costs of immune responses to the hosts. Oxidative damage resulting from the excessive production of reactive oxygen species during immune response is hypothesized to form one of such costs. We tested this hypothesis in experimental coccidian infection model in greenfinches Carduelis chloris. Administration of isosporan coccidians to experimental birds did not affect indices of antioxidant protection (TAC and OXY, plasma triglyceride and carotenoid levels or body mass, indicating that pathological consequences of infection were generally mild. Infected birds had on average 8% higher levels of plasma malondialdehyde (MDA, a toxic end-product of lipid peroxidation than un-infected birds. The birds that had highest MDA levels subsequent to experimental infection experienced the highest decrease in infection intensity. This observation is consistent with the idea that oxidative stress is a causative agent in the control of coccidiosis and supports the concept of oxidative costs of immune responses and parasite resistance. The finding that oxidative damage accompanies even the mild infection with a common parasite highlights the relevance of oxidative stress biology for the immunoecological research.

  18. Aspergillus niger: an unusual cause of invasive pulmonary aspergillosis

    OpenAIRE

    Person, A. K.; Chudgar, S. M.; Norton, B. L.; Tong, B. C.; Stout, J E

    2010-01-01

    Infections due to Aspergillus species cause significant morbidity and mortality. Most are attributed to Aspergillus fumigatus, followed by Aspergillus flavus and Aspergillus terreus. Aspergillus niger is a mould that is rarely reported as a cause of pneumonia. A 72-year-old female with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and temporal arteritis being treated with steroids long term presented with haemoptysis and pleuritic chest pain. Chest radiography revealed areas of heterogeneous consolid...

  19. Infection and disease: cause and cure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrington, C Simon; Douek, Daniel C

    2006-01-01

    Much can be learnt about the mechanisms by which micro-organisms cause disease from the ways that they interact with cells and tissues. This issue of The Journal of Pathology contains articles that address the roles that cell and tissue biology and pathology are playing in the elucidation of these mechanisms. A review of variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease is followed by a discussion of severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS). Two articles on human papillomavirus (HPV) infection address the association between viral infection and neoplasia, as do reviews on viruses and lymphoma/leukaemia, and Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (human herpesvirus 8, HHV8). The section on viral disease concludes with an article on morbilliviruses. The intracellular effects of bacteria are addressed in a review of Listeria infection and a further review outlines recent advances in our knowledge of syphilis. Reviews on Helicobacter and gastric neoplasia, innate defences against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) infection, and the function of granulomas in tuberculosis also address aspects of tissue responses to bacterial infection. Following a review of the function of immunoglobulin A in defence against infection, a group of articles considers vaccination and gene therapy approaches, the latter involving consideration of both viral and bacterial strategies. The reviews assembled here bridge several gaps: between microbiology and cellular pathology; between host and infecting organism; and between disease and therapy. It is clear that cell and tissue pathology approaches are of value in all of these spheres, providing cell and tissue relevance to microbiological and immunological observations. PMID:16362991

  20. Invasive fungal infection (IFI) in two pediatric patients with acute leukemia. Case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    At present over 70% of children with malignancies can be successfully cured although this is achieved at the cost of increased incidence of major complications. Fungal infections account for some 10% of all infections and, in severely immunosuppressed patients, they are still the cause of a high mortality rate (50-95%). As a result the prevention and treatment of adverse effects of antineoplastic therapy is of the most importance and can be a factor determining the success of such treatment. This paper contains two case reports of adolescent female patients diagnosed with acute leukemia who developed invasive fungal infections (IFI) in the course of intensive chemotherapy. (authors)

  1. Case report: Infective endocarditis caused by Brevundimonas vesicularis

    OpenAIRE

    Chen Tun-Chieh; Chen Yen-Hsu; Yang Mei-Li; Lin Wei-Ru; Lin Chun-Yu; Lu Po-Liang

    2006-01-01

    Abstract Background There are few reports in the literature of invasive infection caused by Brevundimonas vesicularis in patients without immunosuppression or other predisposing factors. The choice of antimicrobial therapy for bacteremia caused by the pathogen requires more case experience to be determined. Case presentation The case of a 40-year-old previously healthy man with subacute endocarditis proposed to be contributed from an occult dental abscess is described. The infection was found...

  2. Diseases caused by enterovirus 71 infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ta-Chung; Guo, How-Ran; Su, Huey-Jen Jenny; Yang, Yi-Ching; Chang, Hsiao-Ling; Chen, Kow-Tong

    2009-10-01

    The purpose of this review was to explore the epidemiology, pathogenesis, virology, and management of enterovirus 71 (EV71) infection. Published literature was surveyed by Medline using the keyword "EV71." The reported incidence of cases of hand-foot-mouth disease/herpangina varied from year to year; seasonal variations in incidence were observed, with a peak in incidence during the summer season. Most cases of hand-foot-mouth disease/herpangina hospitalized for complications occurred in children less than 5 years old. The brainstem was the most likely major target of EV71 infection. Different enteroviruses cocirculate in the community annually. The emergence of the EV71 epidemic in the Asia Pacific region has been associated with the circulation of 5 genetic lineages (genotypes B3, B4, C1, C2, C4) that appear to be undergoing rapid evolutionary changes. The relationship between the gene structure of the EV71 virus and the factors that ensure its survival, ease of transmission, and evasion of immunity is still unclear. EV71 central nervous system involvement causes serious clinical illness, death, and long-term neurologic and psychiatric disorders in young children. EV71 infection has emerged as an important public health problem. Vaccine development is recommended for the prevention of EV71 infection in the future. PMID:20118685

  3. Role of isavuconazole in the treatment of invasive fungal infections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Dustin T; Dimondi, V Paul; Johnson, Steven W; Jones, Travis M; Drew, Richard H

    2016-01-01

    Despite recent advances in both diagnosis and prevention, the incidence of invasive fungal infections continues to rise. Available antifungal agents to treat invasive fungal infections include polyenes, triazoles, and echinocandins. Unfortunately, individual agents within each class may be limited by spectrum of activity, resistance, lack of oral formulations, significant adverse event profiles, substantial drug–drug interactions, and/or variable pharmacokinetic profiles. Isavuconazole, a second-generation triazole, was approved by the US Food and Drug Administration in March 2015 and the European Medicines Agency in July 2015 for the treatment of adults with invasive aspergillosis (IA) or mucormycosis. Similar to amphotericin B and posaconazole, isavuconazole exhibits a broad spectrum of in vitro activity against yeasts, dimorphic fungi, and molds. Isavuconazole is available in both oral and intravenous formulations, exhibits a favorable safety profile (notably the absence of QTc prolongation), and reduced drug–drug interactions (relative to voriconazole). Phase 3 studies have evaluated the efficacy of isavuconazole in the management of IA, mucormycosis, and invasive candidiasis. Based on the results of these studies, isavuconazole appears to be a viable treatment option for patients with IA as well as those patients with mucormycosis who are not able to tolerate or fail amphotericin B or posaconazole therapy. In contrast, evidence of isavuconazole for invasive candidiasis (relative to comparator agents such as echinocandins) is not as robust. Therefore, isavuconazole use for invasive candidiasis may initially be reserved as a step-down oral option in those patients who cannot receive other azoles due to tolerability or spectrum of activity limitations. Post-marketing surveillance of isavuconazole will be important to better understand the safety and efficacy of this agent, as well as to better define the need for isavuconazole serum concentration monitoring.

  4. Epidemiology of invasive Streptococcus pneumoniae infections in adults in Finland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sankilampi, U.; Herva, E.; Haikala, R.; Liimatainen, O.; Renkonen, O. V.; Leinonen, M.

    1997-01-01

    Laboratory-based surveillance of invasive pneumococcal infections in adults in Finland from 1983 to 1992 identified 862 episodes of pneumococcal bacteraemia and 97 episodes of meningitis. The overall incidence of invasive pneumococcal infections was 9.1 per 100,000 for all adults per year, but 27.1, 35.8, and 44.5 per 100,000 in those aged 65 years or over, 75 years or over, and 85 years or over, respectively. Most (99.7%) of the pneumococcal strains were sensitive to penicillin. Ninety-five percent of the strains belonged to serogroups/types present in the 23-valent pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine. Group/type distribution was different in patients aged 16-64 years compared to those 65 years or over (P < 0.001), in bacteraemia compared to meningitis (P < 0.001), and in the years 1983-7 compared to 1988-92 (P < 0.05). PMID:9042030

  5. Diagnosis of invasive fungal infections in immunocompromised children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dornbusch, H J; Groll, A; Walsh, T J

    2010-09-01

    Early recognition and rapid initiation of effective treatment is a prerequisite for successful management of children with invasive fungal infections. The increasing diversity of fungal pathogens in high-risk patients, the differences in the antifungal spectra of available agents and the increasing rates of resistance call for identification of the infecting isolate at the species level and for information on drug resistance, in order to provide state-of-the-art patient care. Microscopy and culture of appropriate specimens remain the reference standard for mycological diagnosis, despite difficulties in obtaining appropriate and/or sufficient specimens, long durations of culture and false-negative results. Modern imaging studies and detection of circulating fungal cell wall components and DNA in blood and other body fluids or in affected tissues may improve the laboratory diagnosis of invasive mycoses. PMID:20678175

  6. Epidemiology of Invasive Fungal Infections in Latin America

    OpenAIRE

    Sifuentes-Osornio, Jose; Corzo-León, Dora E.; Ponce-de-León, L. Alfredo

    2012-01-01

    The pathogenic role of invasive fungal infections (IFIs) has increased during the past two decades in Latin America and worldwide, and the number of patients at risk has risen dramatically. Working habits and leisure activities have also been a focus of attention by public health officials, as endemic mycoses have provoked a number of outbreaks. An extensive search of medical literature from Latin America suggests that the incidence of IFIs from both endemic and opportunistic fungi has increa...

  7. Antibody responses in patients with invasive Staphylococcus aureus infections

    OpenAIRE

    Jacobsson, G; Colque-Navarro, P.; Gustafsson, E.; Andersson, R.; Möllby, R

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Correlation between antibody response and clinical outcome in Staphylococcus aureus bacteremia has yielded conflicting results. Immunization schedules have failed in clinical trials. Is the humoral response toward S. aureus of protective nature? A prospective study was performed in patients with invasive S. aureus (ISA) infections during the period 2003?2005. The antibody levels were determined at the beginning and at the end of treatment and one month later (n?=?96, n?=?7...

  8. Risk factors for invasive fungal infections in liver transplant recipients

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIAO Yong; Thomas Hartmann; AO Jun-hong; YANG Rong-ya

    2012-01-01

    To the editor:Invasive fungal infections (IFIs) are significant complications in liver transplant recipients, which are associated with high morbidity/mortality and higher healthcare costs.The incidence of IFIs is mainly influenced by the patients'clinical condition,the level of immune suppression,surgical factors,and the technical complexity of the surgery.We read with great interest the research article by Shi et al.1 Although they have reached a high curative ratio with their "experiential" therapy based on their previous clinical experience,they did not provide us with detailed,definite criteria for identifying suspected patients and allowing for their early "experiential" treatment.Updated,standardized guidelines from the Invasive Fungal Infections Cooperative Group in Europe and the Mycoses Study Group in the United States provide definitions of patients,who are eligible for enrollment in clinical trials.The "Probable" and "Possible" IFIs were defined based on specific host factors,clinical manifestations of fungal infection and mycological findings.The current diagnostic methods for fungal infections lack sensitivity and specificity,so understanding the risk factors associated with fungal infections in liver transplant recipients may improve identification of high-risk patients and guide appropriate initiation of early antifungal treatment.

  9. The Climate change caused by the land-plants invasion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Hir, G.; Godderis, Y.; Meyer-Berthaud, B.; Donnadieu, Y.; Ramstein, G.

    2009-04-01

    Land-plants invaded continents during the Mid-Paleozoic. Their spreading and diversification have been compared to the Cambrian explosion in terms of intensity and importance in the Earth life history. If prior studies were focused on the roots system development and its weathering impact, here we used a coupled climate/carbon/vegetation model to investigate impacts of their colonization on surface climate. The simulated climate predicts a significant CO2 drawdown due to an enhanced hydrological cycle which is paradoxically associated with a very small temperature change. Indeed the greenhouse reduction linked to CO2 is counter-acted by a large warming provided by the surface albedo reduction caused by the appearance of an extended plant-cover. If the CO2 is consensually assumed as the main driver of the Phanerozoic climate, this paper demonstrates that, during the land-plants invasion, the soil properties modifications have supplanted the carbon as the primary factor governing the climate.

  10. Simultaneous Chronic Invasive Fungal Infection and Tracheal Fungus Ball Mimicking Cancer in an Immunocompetent Patient

    Science.gov (United States)

    Çetinkaya, Erdoğan; Gül, Şule; Mert, Ali; Boyacı, Hilal; Çam, Ertan; Dincer, H. Erhan

    2016-01-01

    Fungal infections of the lung are uncommon and mainly affect people with immune deficiency. There are crucial problems in the diagnosis and treatment of this condition. Invasive pulmonary aspergillosis and candidiasis are the most common opportunistic fungal infections. Aspergillus species (spp.) are saprophytes molds that exist in nature as spores and rarely cause disease in immunocompetent individuals. In patients with immune deficiency or chronic lung disease, such as cavitary lung disease or bronchiectasis, Aspergillus may cause a variety of aspergillosis infections. Here we present a case of a 57-year-old patient without immunodeficiency or chronic lung disease who was diagnosed with endotracheal fungus ball and chronic fungal infection, possibly due to Aspergillus. Bronchoscopic examination showed a paralyzed right vocal cord and vegetating mass that was yellow in color, at the posterior wall of tracheal lumen. After 3 months, both the parenchymal and tracheal lesions were completely resolved. PMID:27418930

  11. Difficult diagnosis of invasive fungal infection predominantly involving the lower gastrointestinal tract in acute lymphoblastic leukaemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gulhadiye Avcu

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Invasive fungal infections are most commonly seen in immunocompromised patients and usually affect the respiratory system. Gastrointestinal system involvement of mucormycosis and invasive aspergillosis is rarely reported in childhood. Here we describe a 5 year old boy with acute lymphoblastic leukaemia who developed invasive fungal infection particularly affecting the lower gastrointestinal system to emphasise the difficulties in diagnosis and management of invasive fungal infections in immunocompromised patients.

  12. Difficult diagnosis of invasive fungal infection predominantly involving the lower gastrointestinal tract in acute lymphoblastic leukaemia

    OpenAIRE

    Avcu, Gulhadiye; Karapinar, Deniz Yilmaz; Yazici, Pinar; Duyu, Muhterem; Polat, Suleyha Hilmioglu; Atabay, Berna; Doganavsargil, Basak; Karapinar, Bulent

    2016-01-01

    Invasive fungal infections are most commonly seen in immunocompromised patients and usually affect the respiratory system. Gastrointestinal system involvement of mucormycosis and invasive aspergillosis is rarely reported in childhood. Here we describe a 5 year old boy with acute lymphoblastic leukaemia who developed invasive fungal infection particularly affecting the lower gastrointestinal system to emphasise the difficulties in diagnosis and management of invasive fungal infections in immun...

  13. Pathological and therapeutic significance of cellular invasion by Proteus mirabilis in an enterocystoplasty infection stone model

    OpenAIRE

    Mathoera, Rejiv; Kok, Dirk; Verduin, Cees; Nijman, Rien

    2002-01-01

    textabstractProteus mirabilis infection often leads to stone formation. We evaluated how bacterium-mucin adhesion, invasion, and intracellular crystal formation are related to antibiotic sensitivity and may cause frequent stone formation in enterocystoplasties. Five intestinal (Caco-2, HT29, HT29-18N2, HT29-FU, and HT29-MTX) and one ureter cell line (SV-HUC-1) were incubated in artificial urine with five Proteus mirabilis strains. Fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS), laser scanning mic...

  14. Pathological and Therapeutic Significance of Cellular Invasion by Proteus mirabilis in an Enterocystoplasty Infection Stone Model

    OpenAIRE

    2002-01-01

    Proteus mirabilis infection often leads to stone formation. We evaluated how bacterium-mucin adhesion, invasion, and intracellular crystal formation are related to antibiotic sensitivity and may cause frequent stone formation in enterocystoplasties. Five intestinal (Caco-2, HT29, HT29-18N2, HT29-FU, and HT29-MTX) and one ureter cell line (SV-HUC-1) were incubated in artificial urine with five Proteus mirabilis strains. Fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS), laser scanning microscopy, and...

  15. Chronic and Invasive Fungal Infections in a Family with CARD9 Deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alves de Medeiros, Ana Karina; Lodewick, Evelyn; Bogaert, Delfien J A; Haerynck, Filomeen; Van Daele, Sabine; Lambrecht, Bart; Bosma, Sara; Vanderdonckt, Laure; Lortholary, Olivier; Migaud, Mélanie; Casanova, Jean-Laurent; Puel, Anne; Lanternier, Fanny; Lambert, Jo; Brochez, Lieve; Dullaers, Melissa

    2016-04-01

    Chronic mucocutaneous or invasive fungal infections are generally the result of primary or secondary immune dysfunction. Patients with autosomal recessive CARD9 mutations are also predisposed to recurrent mucocutaneous and invasive fungal infections with Candida spp., dermatophytes (e.g., Trichophyton spp.) and phaeohyphomycetes (Exophiala spp., Phialophora verrucosa). We study a consanguineous family of Turkish origin in which three members present with distinct clinical phenotypes of chronic mucocutaneous and invasive fungal infections, ranging from chronic mucocutaneous candidiasis (CMC) in one patient, treatment-resistant cutaneous dermatophytosis and deep dermatophytosis in a second patient, to CMC with Candida encephalitis and endocrinopathy in a third patient. Two patients consented to genetic testing and were found to have a previously reported homozygous R70W CARD9 mutation. Circulating IL-17 and IL-22 producing T cells were decreased as was IL-6 and granulocyte/macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) secretion upon stimulation with Candida albicans. Patients with recurrent fungal infections in the absence of known immunodeficiencies should be analyzed for CARD9 gene mutations as the cause of fungal infection predisposition. PMID:26961233

  16. Loss of reproductive output caused by an invasive species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tremblay, Maude E M; Morris, Todd J; Ackerman, Josef D

    2016-04-01

    We investigated whether Neogobius melanostomus, an invader of biodiversity 'hot-spots' in the Laurentian Great Lakes region, facilitates or inhibits unionid mussel recruitment by serving as a host or sink for their parasitic larvae (glochidia). Infestation and metamorphosis rates of four mussel species with at-risk (conservation) status (Epioblasma torulosa rangiana, Epioblasma triquetra, Lampsilis fasciola and Villosa iris) and one common species (Actinonaias ligamentina) on N. melanostomus were compared with rates on known primary and marginal hosts in the laboratory. All species successfully infested N. melanostomus, but only E. triquetra, V. iris and A. ligamentina successfully metamorphosed into juveniles, albeit at very low rates well below those seen on even the marginal hosts. Neogobius melanostomus collected from areas of unionid occurrence in the Grand and Sydenham rivers (Ontario, Canada) exhibited glochidial infection rates of 39.4% and 5.1%, respectively, with up to 30 glochidia representing as many as six unionid species per fish. A mathematical model suggests that N. melanostomus serve more as a sink for glochidia than as a host for unionids, thereby limiting recruitment success. This represents a novel method by which an invasive species affects a native species. PMID:27152202

  17. Host growth can cause invasive spread of crops by soilborne pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leclerc, Melen; Doré, Thierry; Gilligan, Christopher A; Lucas, Philippe; Filipe, João A N

    2013-01-01

    Invasive soilborne plant pathogens cause substantial damage to crops and natural populations, but our understanding of how to prevent their epidemics or reduce their damage is limited. A key and experimentally-tested concept in the epidemiology of soilborne plant diseases is that of a threshold spacing between hosts below which epidemics (invasive spread) can occur. We extend this paradigm by examining how plant-root growth may alter the conditions for occurrence of soilborne pathogen epidemics in plant populations. We hypothesise that host-root growth can 1) increase the probability of pathogen transmission between neighbouring plants and, consequently, 2) decrease the threshold spacing for epidemics to occur. We predict that, in systems initially below their threshold conditions, root growth can trigger soilborne pathogen epidemics through a switch from non-invasive to invasive behaviour, while in systems above threshold conditions root growth can enhance epidemic development. As an example pathosystem, we studied the fungus Rhizoctonia solani on sugar beet in field experiments. To address hypothesis 1, we recorded infections within inoculum-donor and host-recipient pairs of plants with differing spacing. We translated these observations into the individual-level concept of pathozone, a host-centred form of dispersal kernel. To test hypothesis 2 and our prediction, we used the pathozone to parameterise a stochastic model of pathogen spread in a host population, contrasting scenarios of spread with and without host growth. Our results support our hypotheses and prediction. We suggest that practitioners of agriculture and arboriculture account for root system expansion in order to reduce the risk of soilborne-disease epidemics. We discuss changes in crop design, including increasing plant spacing and using crop mixtures, for boosting crop resilience to invasion and damage by soilborne pathogens. We speculate that the disease-induced root growth observed in some

  18. Host growth can cause invasive spread of crops by soilborne pathogens.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melen Leclerc

    Full Text Available Invasive soilborne plant pathogens cause substantial damage to crops and natural populations, but our understanding of how to prevent their epidemics or reduce their damage is limited. A key and experimentally-tested concept in the epidemiology of soilborne plant diseases is that of a threshold spacing between hosts below which epidemics (invasive spread can occur. We extend this paradigm by examining how plant-root growth may alter the conditions for occurrence of soilborne pathogen epidemics in plant populations. We hypothesise that host-root growth can 1 increase the probability of pathogen transmission between neighbouring plants and, consequently, 2 decrease the threshold spacing for epidemics to occur. We predict that, in systems initially below their threshold conditions, root growth can trigger soilborne pathogen epidemics through a switch from non-invasive to invasive behaviour, while in systems above threshold conditions root growth can enhance epidemic development. As an example pathosystem, we studied the fungus Rhizoctonia solani on sugar beet in field experiments. To address hypothesis 1, we recorded infections within inoculum-donor and host-recipient pairs of plants with differing spacing. We translated these observations into the individual-level concept of pathozone, a host-centred form of dispersal kernel. To test hypothesis 2 and our prediction, we used the pathozone to parameterise a stochastic model of pathogen spread in a host population, contrasting scenarios of spread with and without host growth. Our results support our hypotheses and prediction. We suggest that practitioners of agriculture and arboriculture account for root system expansion in order to reduce the risk of soilborne-disease epidemics. We discuss changes in crop design, including increasing plant spacing and using crop mixtures, for boosting crop resilience to invasion and damage by soilborne pathogens. We speculate that the disease-induced root growth

  19. Role of isavuconazole in the treatment of invasive fungal infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wilson DT

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Dustin T Wilson,1,2 V Paul Dimondi,1,3 Steven W Johnson,1,4 Travis M Jones,1 Richard H Drew1,5 1Department of Pharmacy Practice, Campbell University College of Pharmacy & Health Sciences, Buies Creek, NC, USA; 2Department of Pharmacy, Duke University Hospital, Durham, NC, USA; 3Department of Pharmacy, Durham VA Medical Center, Durham, NC, USA; 4Department of Pharmacy, Forsyth Medical Center, Winston-Salem, NC, USA; 5Division of Infectious Diseases, Duke University Hospital, Durham, NC, USA Abstract: Despite recent advances in both diagnosis and prevention, the incidence of invasive fungal infections continues to rise. Available antifungal agents to treat invasive fungal infections include polyenes, triazoles, and echinocandins. Unfortunately, individual agents within each class may be limited by spectrum of activity, resistance, lack of oral formulations, significant adverse event profiles, substantial drug–drug interactions, and/or variable pharmacokinetic profiles. Isavuconazole, a second-generation triazole, was approved by the US Food and Drug Administration in March 2015 and the European Medicines Agency in July 2015 for the treatment of adults with invasive aspergillosis (IA or mucormycosis. Similar to amphotericin B and posaconazole, isavuconazole exhibits a broad spectrum of in vitro activity against yeasts, dimorphic fungi, and molds. Isavuconazole is available in both oral and intravenous formulations, exhibits a favorable safety profile (notably the absence of QTc prolongation, and reduced drug–drug interactions (relative to voriconazole. Phase 3 studies have evaluated the efficacy of isavuconazole in the management of IA, mucormycosis, and invasive candidiasis. Based on the results of these studies, isavuconazole appears to be a viable treatment option for patients with IA as well as those patients with mucormycosis who are not able to tolerate or fail amphotericin B or posaconazole therapy. In contrast, evidence of

  20. Epidemiology and management of invasive fungal infections in immunocompromised hosts

    OpenAIRE

    Leenders, Alexander

    1999-01-01

    textabstractFungal infections in man usually are divided into three categories based upon their major pathophysiological characteristics: superficial and cutaneous, subcutaneous and, systemic infections. The last category consists of two separate entities. First there are the so called "endemic mycoses" caused by dimorphic fungi including Coccidioides immiiis, Paracoccidioides brasiliensis, Histoplasma capsula tum and Blastomyces dermatitidis which occur in patients who live in, or have trave...

  1. Invasive mole: a rare cause of postmenopausal bleeding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mamour Guèye

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Gestational trophoblastic disease (GTD describes a number of gynaecological tumours that originate in the trophoblast layer, including hydatidiform mole (complete or partial, placental site trophoblastic tumour, choriocarcinoma and invasive mole. Invasive moles are responsible of most cases of localized gestational trophoblastic neoplasia (GTN. Invasive mole is a condition where a molar pregnancy, such as a partial hydatidiform mole or complete hydatidiform mole, invades the wall of the uterus. It is an extremely rare condition. As GTN is not considered in the differential diagnosis of postmenopausal uterine malignancies, its preoperative diagnosis is challenging. We report a case of invasive hydatidiform mole in a postmenopausal woman discovered in a context of postmenopausal bleeding. She underwent hysterectomy and followed up till her beta hCG levels were within normal limits. The patient is in complete remission in the first postoperative year. [Int J Reprod Contracept Obstet Gynecol 2013; 2(3.000: 451-453

  2. Invasive Fusobacterium necrophorum infections and Lemièrre's syndrome: the role of thrombophilia and EBV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holm, K; Svensson, P J; Rasmussen, M

    2015-11-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to describe the clinical spectrum of invasive Fusobacterium necrophorum infections and Lemièrre's syndrome, to examine the role of underlying thrombophilia and concomitant mononucleosis in Lemièrre's syndrome, and to describe thromboembolic complications. Patients with invasive F. necrophorum infections were identified either prospectively or retrospectively through the regional database of clinical microbiology from 2000 to 2015. Patient records were reviewed and blood samples from patients with Lemièrre's syndrome were collected for Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) serology and screening for thrombophilia. Of the 65 patients included, 33 had Lemièrre's syndrome. Of the remaining 32 patients, other infections of the respiratory tract and abdominal or urogenital infections were most common. Patients with Lemièrre's syndrome or other tonsillar infections were younger than patients from the other groups. For Lemièrre's syndrome, the 26 patients with severe sepsis on admittance had longer duration of symptoms. Three of five patients who developed distant manifestations had more than 14 days of symptoms. Jugular vein thrombosis was verified in 14 patients, two of whom developed serious complications. Three of 26 patients tested had factor V Leiden mutation, corresponding to the background prevalence. One of 22 patients tested had a concomitant EBV infection. This study confirms earlier studies of the clinical spectrum caused by F. necrophorum. For Lemièrre's syndrome, the study adds to the knowledge on thromboembolic outcome, demonstrating that jugular vein thrombosis may cause severe complications. The time to treatment seems to be important for the risk of severe disease. In this study, concomitant EBV infection or underlying thrombophilia was uncommon. PMID:26272176

  3. Invasive pulmonary aspergillosis caused by Aspergillus versicolor in a patient on mechanical ventilation

    OpenAIRE

    MV Pravin Charles; M Ravishankar; Easow, Joshy M; Noyal Mariya Joseph

    2011-01-01

    Aspergillus spp. often colonise the respiratory tract of critically ill patients in intensive care units and subsequently cause invasive disease. The risk of developing invasive disease is more in immunocompromised patients. Here we report a case of fatal invasive pulmonary aspergillosis caused by Aspergillus versicolor in a post-operative patient on mechanical ventilation, who did not respond to intravenous itraconazole. We then discuss the challenges involved in the accurate diagnosis of th...

  4. Serious invasive Saffold virus infections in children, 2009

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Alex Christian Yde; Böttiger, Blenda; Banner, Jytte;

    2012-01-01

    The first human virus in the genus Cardiovirus was described in 2007 and named Saffold virus (SAFV). Cardioviruses can cause severe infections of the myocardium and central nervous system in animals, but SAFV has not yet been convincingly associated with disease in humans. To study a possible ass...

  5. An invasive primary thymoma: a rare cause of intrapulmonary mass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Primary intrapulmonary thymomas are extremely rare tumors and could be mistaken for a variety of benign and malignant epithelial or mesenchymal lesions. A case of a primary invasive intrapulmonary thymoma manifested with massive hemoptysis is presented. CT demonstrated a mass with specks of calcification, located within the upper lobe of the right lung. The lesion showed heterogeneous enhancement with areas of cystic and necrotic degeneration and hemorrhagic foci. CT differential diagnosis included the possibility of invasive thymoma, which was confirmed by surgery and histopathology. Though a rare entity, intrapulmonary thymoma, because of its potentially invasive and malignant nature, should be included in the radiological differential diagnosis of intrapulmonary masses. This is important, since it can determine further management. (author)

  6. Ceftaroline Fosamil Use in 2 Pediatric Patients With Invasive Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus Infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Amanda W; Newman, Patrick M; Ocheltree, Sara; Beaty, Rachel; Hassoun, Ali

    2015-01-01

    Community-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (CA-MRSA) is one of the most common pathogens causing pediatric infections including skin and soft tissue infections, pyogenic arthritis, osteomyelitis, and septic shock. For decades, patients were treated with antibiotics such as vancomycin and clindamycin, but there is an increasing incidence of resistance to these traditional therapies. We describe 2 cases of patients with CA-MRSA invasive infections with bacteremia who experienced vancomycin therapy failure but who were successfully treated with ceftaroline fosamil. Case 1 involves an 8-year-old Hispanic male who was diagnosed with CA-MRSA bacteremia, thigh abscess, and osteomyelitis. The patient was admitted to the pediatric intensive care unit in septic shock. Case 2 involves an 8-year-old Caucasian male who was diagnosed with CA-MRSA sepsis, right arm abscess, and osteomyelitis. We were able to successfully treat both patients with CA-MRSA sepsis and invasive infection-who failed vancomycin therapy-with ceftaroline fosamil with no adverse efiects. Despite the positive outcome in both pediatric patients, clinical trials with ceftaroline fosamil are needed to further support its use in pediatric patients. PMID:26766937

  7. The optimum timing to wean invasive ventilation for patients with AECOPD or COPD with pulmonary infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Song YL

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Yuanlin Song,1 Rongchang Chen,2 Qingyuan Zhan,3 Shujing Chen,1 Zujin Luo,4 Jiaxian Ou,1 Chen Wang3 1Department of Pulmonary Medicine, Zhongshan Hospital, Fudan University, Shanghai, 2Guangzhou Institute of Respiratory Disease, Guangzhou, 3Department of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine, Beijing China-Japan Friendship Hospital, 4Department of Pulmonary Medicine, Chaoyang Hospital, Beijing, People’s Republic of China Abstract: COPD is characterized by a progressive decline in lung function and mental and physical comorbidities. It is a significant burden worldwide due to its growing prevalence, comorbidities, and mortality. Complication by bronchial-pulmonary infection causes 50%–90% of acute exacerbations of COPD (AECOPD, which may lead to the aggregation of COPD symptoms and the development of acute respiratory failure. Non-invasive or invasive ventilation (IV is usually implemented to treat acute respiratory failure. However, ventilatory support (mainly IV should be discarded as soon as possible to prevent the onset of time-dependent complications. To withdraw IV, an optimum timing has to be selected based on weaning assessment and spontaneous breathing trial or replacement of IV by non-IV at pulmonary infection control window. The former method is more suitable for patients with AECOPD without significant bronchial-pulmonary infection while the latter method is more suitable for patients with AECOPD with acute significant bronchial-pulmonary infection. Keywords: mechanical ventilation, weaning, spontaneous breathing trial, pulmonary control window, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

  8. The optimum timing to wean invasive ventilation for patients with AECOPD or COPD with pulmonary infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Yuanlin; Chen, Rongchang; Zhan, Qingyuan; Chen, Shujing; Luo, Zujin; Ou, Jiaxian; Wang, Chen

    2016-01-01

    COPD is characterized by a progressive decline in lung function and mental and physical comorbidities. It is a significant burden worldwide due to its growing prevalence, comorbidities, and mortality. Complication by bronchial-pulmonary infection causes 50%–90% of acute exacerbations of COPD (AECOPD), which may lead to the aggregation of COPD symptoms and the development of acute respiratory failure. Non-invasive or invasive ventilation (IV) is usually implemented to treat acute respiratory failure. However, ventilatory support (mainly IV) should be discarded as soon as possible to prevent the onset of time-dependent complications. To withdraw IV, an optimum timing has to be selected based on weaning assessment and spontaneous breathing trial or replacement of IV by non-IV at pulmonary infection control window. The former method is more suitable for patients with AECOPD without significant bronchial-pulmonary infection while the latter method is more suitable for patients with AECOPD with acute significant bronchial-pulmonary infection. PMID:27042042

  9. Brucella canis causing infection in an HIV-infected patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucero, Nidia E; Maldonado, Patricia I; Kaufman, Sara; Escobar, Gabriela I; Boeri, Eduardo; Jacob, Néstor R

    2010-06-01

    From the blood culture of an HIV-positive patient with a febrile syndrome (CD4 count 385 cells/microL and viral load nondetectable), Brucella canis was isolated. The patient was presumptively infected from his dogs, which tested positive, and showed good outcome after the therapy with doxycycline-ciprofloxacin, and the HIV infection would seem not to have been influenced by brucellosis. To our knowledge, no other case of B. canis in the setting of HIV infection has been reported in the literature, and the emerging zoonotic potential of the disease in urban areas should be considered. PMID:19725766

  10. An unusual cause for recurrent chest infections.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Lobo, Ronstan

    2012-10-01

    We present a case of an elderly non-smoking gentleman who, since 2005, had been admitted multiple times for recurrent episodes of shortness of breath, wheeze, cough and sputum. The patient was treated as exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and\\/or lower respiratory tract infections. Bronchoscopy was done which revealed multiple hard nodules in the trachea and bronchi with posterior tracheal wall sparing. Biopsies confirmed this as tracheopathia osteochondroplastica (TO). He had increasing frequency of admission due to methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus and pseudomonas infections, which failed to clear despite intravenous, prolonged oral and nebulised antibiotics. The patient developed increasing respiratory distress and respiratory failure. The patient died peacefully in 2012. This case report highlights the typical pathological and radiological findings of TO and the pitfalls of misdiagnosing patients with recurrent chest infections as COPD.

  11. Choroidal Melanoma Causing Contralateral Amaurosis via Orbital Invasion

    OpenAIRE

    Melis Palamar Onay; Ayşe Yağcı; Taner Akalın

    2011-01-01

    To report a case of tumor invasion into the ipsilateral orbit/optic chiasm and into the contralateral optic nerve. A 51- year-old male who declared removal of his left eye ten years ago elsewhere, attended to our clinic for swelling of the left eyelids and pain. He was ophthalmologically and radiologically evaluated. A hyperpigmented mass was detected at the socket conjunctiva of the patient whose eyelids were swollen and hyperemic. Anterior and posterior segments of the right eye...

  12. Invasive alien predator causes rapid declines of native European ladybirds

    OpenAIRE

    Roy, Helen E; Adriaens, Tim; Isaac, Nick J. B.; Kenis, Marc; Onkelinx, Thierry; Martin, Gilles San; Brown, Peter M. J.; Hautier, Louis; Poland, Remy; Roy, David B.; Comont, Richard; Eschen, René; Frost, Robert; Zindel, Renate; Vlaenderen, Johan Van

    2012-01-01

    Aim  Invasive alien species (IAS) are recognized as major drivers of biodiversity loss, but few causal relationships between IAS and species declines have been documented. In this study, we compare the distribution (Belgium and Britain) and abundance (Belgium, Britain and Switzerland) of formerly common and widespread native ladybirds before and after the arrival of Harmonia axyridis, a globally rapidly expanding IAS.Location  EuropeMethods  We used generalized linear mixed-effects models (GL...

  13. Unilateral hydronephrosis caused by invasive mole: a case report

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Hai-Yan; Wu, Wei; Zhu, Jin

    2013-01-01

    Invasive mole belongs to gestational trophoblastic neoplasm, which is a highly curable group of pregnancy-related tumors. However, approximately 20% of gestational trophoblastic tumors will be resistant to or relapsed after initial chemotherapy. These resistant and relapsed lesions will require salvage chemotherapy with or without surgery. It is still unclear which regimens are the most effective and least toxic. Here, we report a case of unilateral hydronephrosis presenting 1 week after a hi...

  14. Successful treatment of invasive burn wound infection with sepsis in patients with major burns

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Objective To investigate the clinical characteristics of invasive bum wound infection with sepsis in patients with major burns and to summarize the successful expenences in the treatment of such patients. Methods Eight patients with major bums, complicated by invesive bum wound infection and sepsis were consecutively admitted to our hospital from September 1997 to October 1998. Among them, 6 patients developed multiple organ dysfunction syndrome (MODS) and 2 developed septic shock. The plasma concentrations of IL-6,IL-8,TNFα and lypopolysaccharibe (LPS) were assayed before and after surgical intervention, as well as when the patient' s vital signs became stable. Results The patients' conditions usually deterieorated abruptly when extensive invasive bum wound infection emerged. While multi-microbial infection was usually found, Pseudomonas aeruginosa was the predominant bactena isolated from the subeschar tissue. The plasma concentrations of IL-6, IL-8, TNFα and LPS before surgical intervention wore significantly higher than those after surgical intervention (P<0.05).The lowest levels of the inflammatory mediators were abserved when the patients'conditions became stable,and the values were significantly lower than those before surgical intervention ( P<0.001). Conclusion Since the main cause of burn wound sepsis is the presence of a large area of infected bum wound, they should be excised and covered as early as possible. LPS and pro-inflammatory mediators play an important role in the pathogenesis of burn sepsis. Athough favorable results should be attributed to compmhessive treatment, we believe that early, aggressive and thorough surgical excision of infected burn wounds, followed by sound and complete coverage of the area, play a crucial role.

  15. Invasive alien predator causes rapid declines of native European ladybirds

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Roy, H. E.; Adriaens, T.; Isaac, N. J. B.; Kenis, M.; Onkelinx, T.; San Martin, G.; Brown, P. M. J.; Hautier, L.; Poland, R.; Roy, D. B.; Comont, R.; Eschen, R.; Frost, R.; Zindel, R.; Van Vlaenderen, J.; Nedvěd, Oldřich; Ravn, H. P.; Grégoire, J.-C.; de Biseau, J.-C.; Maes, D.

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 18, č. 7 (2012), s. 717-725. ISSN 1366-9516 Grant ostatní: MZe ČR(CZ) QH82047; Swiss Federal Office for the Environment(SE) F232-0377; project ALARM(BE) GOCE-CT-2003-506675 Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : biological control * biological invasions * citizen science Subject RIV: EH - Ecology, Behaviour Impact factor: 6.122, year: 2012 http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/j.1472-4642.2012.00883.x/pdf

  16. Imipenem resistance in nonfermenters causing nosocomial urinary tract infections.

    OpenAIRE

    Taneja N; Maharwal S; Sharma Meera

    2003-01-01

    Nonfermenting gram-negative bacilli (nonfermenters) have emerged as important nosocomial pathogens causing opportunistic infections in immunocompromised hosts. These organisms show high level of resistance to b-lactam agents, fluoroquinolones and aminoglycosides. Imipenem is a carbapenem antibiotic, which can be very useful for treatment of infections caused by nonfermenters. Eighty-five nonfermenters causing nosocomial UTI were tested for MIC to imipenem by agar dilution method. Resistance t...

  17. Clinical manifestations of CNS infections caused by enterovirus type 71

    OpenAIRE

    Cheol Soon Choi; Yun Jung Choi; Ui Yoon Choi; Ji Whan Han; Dae Chul Jeong; Hyun Hee Kim; Jong Hyun Kim; Jin Han Kang

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: Enterovirus 71, one of the enteroviruses that are responsible for both hand-foot-and-mouth disease and herpangina, can cause neural injury. During periods of endemic spread of hand-foot-andmouth disease caused by enterovirus 71, CNS infections are also frequently diagnosed and may lead to increased complications from neural injury, as well as death. We present the results of our epidemiologic research on the clinical manifestations of children with CNS infections caused by enteroviru...

  18. Do Native Parasitic Plants Cause More Damage to Exotic Invasive Hosts Than Native Non-Invasive Hosts? An Implication for Biocontrol

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Junmin; Jin, Zexin; Wenjing SONG

    2012-01-01

    Field studies have shown that native, parasitic plants grow vigorously on invasive plants and can cause more damage to invasive plants than native plants. However, no empirical test has been conducted and the mechanism is still unknown. We conducted a completely randomized greenhouse experiment using 3 congeneric pairs of exotic, invasive and native, non-invasive herbaceous plant species to quantify the damage caused by parasitic plants to hosts and its correlation with the hosts' growth rate...

  19. Extracellular matrix formation enhances the ability of Streptococcus pneumoniae to cause invasive disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia Trappetti

    Full Text Available During infection, pneumococci exist mainly in sessile biofilms rather than in planktonic form, except during sepsis. However, relatively little is known about how biofilms contribute to pneumococcal pathogenesis. Here, we carried out a biofilm assay on opaque and transparent variants of a clinical serotype 19F strain WCH159. After 4 days incubation, scanning electron microscopy revealed that opaque biofilm bacteria produced an extracellular matrix, whereas the transparent variant did not. The opaque biofilm-derived bacteria translocated from the nasopharynx to the lungs and brain of mice, and showed 100-fold greater in vitro adherence to A549 cells than transparent bacteria. Microarray analysis of planktonic and sessile bacteria from transparent and opaque variants showed differential gene expression in two operons: the lic operon, which is involved in choline uptake, and in the two-component system, ciaRH. Mutants of these genes did not form an extracellular matrix, could not translocate from the nasopharynx to the lungs or the brain, and adhered poorly to A549 cells. We conclude that only the opaque phenotype is able to form extracellular matrix, and that the lic operon and ciaRH contribute to this process. We propose that during infection, extracellular matrix formation enhances the ability of pneumococci to cause invasive disease.

  20. Invasive alien predator causes rapid declines of native European ladybirds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Roy, Helen E.; Adriaens, Tim; Isaac, Nick J.B.;

    2012-01-01

    Aim Invasive alien species (IAS) are recognized as major drivers of biodiversity loss, but few causal relationships between IAS and species declines have been documented. In this study, we compare the distribution (Belgium and Britain) and abundance (Belgium, Britain and Switzerland) of formerly...... common and widespread native ladybirds before and after the arrival of Harmonia axyridis, a globally rapidly expanding IAS. Location Europe Methods We used generalized linear mixed-effects models (GLMMs) to assess the distribution trends of eight conspicuous and historically widespread and common species...... surveys of deciduous trees in Belgium, Britain and Switzerland. Results Five (Belgium) and seven (Britain) of eight species studied show substantial declines attributable to the arrival of H. axyridis. Indeed, the two-spot ladybird, Adalia bipunctata, declined by 30% (Belgium) and 44% (Britain) over 5...

  1. Infections caused by Salmonella: epidemiological investigation in Rho Hospital

    OpenAIRE

    Giovanna Miseferi; Gabriella Candelieri; Marina Re; Mario Cavalleri; Michele Ognissanti; Viviana Peluso

    2010-01-01

    Infections caused by Salmonella account for a considerable part of the infective pathology, which keeps on a steady level due to the changes in the food production and preservation methods and to the frequent international trips leading to food toxic infections. Therefore, they represent an important sanitary problem both for clinicians and the Public Health Service. The study has provided significant information about the epidemiological situation in our local health unit. In the biennium Ma...

  2. A false case of infection caused by Dicrocoelium dendriticum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cinzia Rossi

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available We describe a false case of infection caused by Dicrocoelium dendriticum, a cosmopolite trematode that can infect human bile ducts but tends to live in cattle or other grazing mammals. Our aim is to stress the relevance of adequate diagnostic methods and of exact medical history in order to detect any possible clinical case.

  3. First Case of Bloodstream Infection Caused by Rhodococcus erythropolis▿

    OpenAIRE

    Baba, Hisashi; Nada, Toshi; Ohkusu, Kiyofumi; Ezaki, Takayuki; Hasegawa, Yoshinori; PATERSON, DAVID L.

    2009-01-01

    We describe the first case of bloodstream infection caused by Rhodococcus erythropolis. The identification was performed using 16S rRNA sequencing. This case illustrates that non-equi Rhodococcus infections may be underdiagnosed due to difficulties in identification in the routine clinical microbiology laboratory.

  4. Infective endocarditis caused by Streptococcus tigurinus-like organisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peuchant, O; Wirth, G; Tixier, R; Dijos, M; Camou, F; Greib, C; Mégraud, F; Ménard, A

    2016-09-01

    Streptococcus species are important causes of infective endocarditis but species identification remains challenging. We report two cases of infective endocarditis due to Streptococcus tigurinus-like organisms, which were first identified by 16S ribosomal RNA gene sequence analysis and subsequently confirmed using phylogeny based on the analysis of the shetA gene encoding exfoliative toxin. PMID:27408744

  5. Asymptomatic urinary tract infection caused by Shigella sonnei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekwall, E; Ljungh, A; Selander, B

    1984-01-01

    The first case of asymptomatic urinary tract infection caused by Shigella sonnei in a patient, a 74-yr-old man, who was not a faecal carrier and had no history of dysentery is reported. Treatment with pivmecillinam 400 mg 3 times daily for 14 days was instituted and the bacteria were eradicated. The time and source of infection is unknown. PMID:6364325

  6. Ventriculoperitoneal Shunt Infection Caused by Actinomyces neuii subsp. neuii▿

    OpenAIRE

    Watkins, Richard R.; Anthony, Kathy; Schroder, Suzanne; Hall, Gerri S.

    2008-01-01

    Actinomyces neuii subsp. neuii is a rare isolate in clinical specimens. The organism was previously designated CDC coryneform group 1 and was renamed in 1994. A case of a ventriculoperitoneal shunt infection caused by this organism is described.

  7. Identification by PCR of Non-typhoidal Salmonella enterica Serovars Associated with Invasive Infections among Febrile Patients in Mali

    OpenAIRE

    Tennant, Sharon M.; Diallo, Souleymane; Levy, Haim; Livio, Sofie; Sow, Samba O.; Tapia, Milagritos; Fields, Patricia I.; Mikoleit, Matthew; Tamboura, Boubou; Kotloff, Karen L.; Nataro, James P; Galen, James E.; Levine, Myron M.

    2010-01-01

    Background In sub-Saharan Africa, non-typhoidal Salmonella (NTS) are emerging as a prominent cause of invasive disease (bacteremia and focal infections such as meningitis) in infants and young children. Importantly, including data from Mali, three serovars, Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium, Salmonella Enteritidis and Salmonella Dublin, account for the majority of non-typhoidal Salmonella isolated from these patients. Methods We have extended a previously developed series of polymerase ...

  8. Itraconazole for secondary prophylaxis of invasive fungal infection in patients undergoing chemotherapy and stem cell transplantation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    施继敏

    2013-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the efficacy and safety of itraconazole for secondary prophylaxis of previous proven or probable invasive fungal infection (IFI) in patients undergoing chemotherapy or allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) in agranulocytosis state.

  9. Clinical and epidemiological aspects of invasive Streptococcus pyogenes infections in Denmark during 2003 and 2004

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Luca-Harari, B.; Linden, M. van der; Staum-Kattoft, M.;

    2008-01-01

    Active surveillance of invasive group A streptococcal (GAS) infections was conducted in Denmark during 2003 and 2004 as a part of the Strep-EURO initiative. The main objective was to improve understanding of the epidemiology of invasive GAS disease in Denmark. During the 2 years, 278 cases were r...

  10. Increase in invasive Streptococcus pyogenes and Streptococcus pneumoniae infections in England, December 2010 to January 2011.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zakikhany, K; Degail, M A; Lamagni, T; Waight, P; Guy, R; Zhao, H; Efstratiou, A; Pebody, R; George, R; Ramsay, M

    2011-01-01

    Increases in invasive Streptococcus pyogenes and S. pneumoniae above the seasonally expected levels are currently being seen in England. Preliminary analyses suggest that the high level of influenza activity seen this winter may be contributing to an increased risk of concurrent invasive bacterial and influenza infections in children and young adults. PMID:21315057

  11. Avirulent strains of Toxoplasma gondii infect macrophages by active invasion from the phagosome

    OpenAIRE

    Zhao, Yanlin; Marple, Andrew H.; Ferguson, David J. P.; Bzik, David J.; Yap, George S.

    2014-01-01

    The classical active penetration model for Toxoplasma invasion was established in studies of infection of nonphagocytic host cells by virulent strains of the parasite. Here, we show that avirulent Toxoplasma parasites use a noncanonical invasion pathway when infecting macrophages. Instead of active penetration at cell surface, avirulent Toxoplasma parasites are initially phagocytosed by macrophages and, subsequently, form a parasite vacuole from a phagosomal compartment. This phagosome to vac...

  12. Inherited CARD9 Deficiency in 2 Unrelated Patients With Invasive Exophiala Infection

    OpenAIRE

    Lanternier, Fanny; Barbati, Elisa; Meinzer, Ulrich; Liu, Luyan; Pedergnana, Vincent; Migaud, Mélanie; Héritier, Sébastien; Chomton, Maryline; Frémond, Marie-Louise; Gonzales, Emmanuel; Galeotti, Caroline; Romana, Serge; Jacquemin, Emmanuel; Angoulvant, Adela; Bidault, Valeska

    2014-01-01

    Background. Exophiala species are mostly responsible for skin infections. Invasive Exophiala dermatitidis disease is a rare and frequently fatal infection, with 42 cases reported. About half of these cases had no known risk factors. Similarly, invasive Exophiala spinifera disease is extremely rare, with only 3 cases reported, all in patients with no known immunodeficiency. Autosomal recessive CARD9 deficiency has recently been reported in otherwise healthy patients with severe fungal diseases...

  13. Clinical practice guidelines for the management of invasive Candida infections in adults in the Middle East region: Expert panel recommendations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alothman, Adel F; Al-Musawi, Tariq; Al-Abdely, Hail M; Salman, Jameela Al; Almaslamani, Muna; Yared, Nadine; Butt, Adeel A; Raghubir, Nirvana; Morsi, Waleed El; Al Thaqafi, Abdulhakeem O

    2014-02-01

    Invasive Candida infections contribute to significant morbidity and mortality in patients with healthcare-associated infections. They represent a major burden on the public health system, and are challenging to diagnose and treat. A multidisciplinary expert panel critically reviewed available evidence to provide consensus recommendations for the management of invasive Candida infections in the Middle East. Based on diagnosis, recommendations were provided for the management of Candida infections in non-neutropenic and neutropenic patients. Polyenes (amphotericin B-deoxycholate [AmB-d] and lipid formulations amphotericin B [LFAmB]), triazoles (fluconazole, itraconazole and voriconazole), echinocandins (caspofungin, anidulafungin, and micafungin) and flucytosine are the recommended categories of antifungal agents for treatment of Candida infections. Echinocandins are preferred for treatment of proven and suspected Candida infections, especially in critically ill patients or those with previous exposure to azoles. Recommendations were also provided for infections caused by specific Candida species as well as management of different disease conditions. The experts highlighted that the guidelines should be used along with clinical judgment. Given the paucity of published data from the region, research in the form of randomized clinical trials should be given priority. PMID:24035607

  14. Host Growth Can Cause Invasive Spread of Crops by Soilborne Pathogens

    OpenAIRE

    Leclerc, Melen; Doré, Thierry; Gilligan, Christopher A.; Lucas, Philippe; Filipe, Joao A. N.

    2013-01-01

    Invasive soilborne plant pathogens cause substantial damage to crops and natural populations, but our understanding of how to prevent their epidemics or reduce their damage is limited. A key and experimentally-tested concept in the epidemiology of soilborne plant diseases is that of a threshold spacing between hosts below which epidemics (invasive spread) can occur. We extend this paradigm by examining how plant-root growth may alter the conditions for occurrence of soilborne pathogen epidemi...

  15. Infections caused by Acinetobacter baumannii in recipients of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khalid Ahmed Al-Anazi

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Acinetobacter baumannii (A. baumannii is a Gram-negative, strictly aerobic, non-fermentative coccobacillus which is widely distributed in nature. Recently, it has emerged as a major cause of health care-associated infections in addition to its capacity to cause community acquired infections. Risk factors for A. baumannii infections and bacteremia in recipients of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation include: severe underlying illness such as hematological malignancy, prolonged use of broad-spectrum antibiotics, invasive instrumentation such as central venous catheters or endotracheal intubation, colonization of respiratory, gastrointestinal or urinary tracts in addition to severe immunosuppression caused by using corticosteroids for treating graft versus host disease. The organism causes a wide spectrum of clinical manifestations, but serious complications such as bacteremia, septic shock, ventilator-associated pneumonia, extensive soft tissue necrosis and rapidly progressive systemic infections that ultimately lead to multiorgan failure and death are prone to occur in severely immunocompromised hosts. The organism is usually resistant to many antimicrobials including penicillins, cephalosporins, trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole, almost all flouroquinolones and most of the aminoglycosides. The recently increasing resistance to carbapenems, colistin and polymyxins is alarming. Additionally, there are geographic variations in the resistance patterns and several globally and regionally resistant strains have already been described. Successful management of A.baumannii infections depends upon appropriate utilization of antibiotics and strict application of preventive and infection control measures. In uncomplicated infections, the use of a single active beta-lactam may be justified, while definitive treatment of complicated infections in critically ill individuals may require drug combinations such as colistin and rifampicin or colistin and

  16. Invasive Bacillus cereus Infection in a Renal Transplant Patient: A Case Report and Review

    OpenAIRE

    Susan John; John Neary; Lee, Christine H

    2012-01-01

    Bacillus cereus is a common cause of gastrointestinal diseases. The majority of individuals with B cereus-related food poisoning recover without any specific treatment. It can, however, rarely cause invasive disease in immunocompromised patients.

  17. Invasive Bacillus cereus infection in a renal transplant patient: A case report and review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    John, Susan; Neary, John; Lee, Christine H

    2012-01-01

    Bacillus cereus is a common cause of gastrointestinal diseases. The majority of individuals with B cereus-related food poisoning recover without any specific treatment. It can, however, rarely cause invasive disease in immunocompromised patients. PMID:24294281

  18. Schistosoma mansoni: a rare cause of tubal infection

    OpenAIRE

    CA Faria; JCJ Conceição; TF Valadares; Rodrigues, B; L Carneiro

    2010-01-01

    S. haematobium is an important cause of urinary schistosomiasis, and symptomatic female genital infection is a common gynecological finding in areas where S. haematobium is prevalent. On the other hand, genital manifestations of intestinal schistosomas as S. mansoni are not frequent or are misdiagnosed. A case of a 40-year-old woman with abnormal uterine bleeding and asymptomatic tubal infection by S. mansoni identified in histological examination is presented.

  19. Combined pericarditis and pneumonia caused by Legionella infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svendsen, Jesper Hastrup; Jønsson, V; Niebuhr, U

    1987-01-01

    During a one year period acute pericarditis was diagnosed in 16 consecutive patients without acute infarction or malignancy. In two of these patients with both pericarditis and pneumonia Legionella infection was present. One case was caused by Legionella longbeachae and the other by both Legionella...... longbeachae and Legionella jordanis. When pericarditis is associated with pneumonia Legionella infection should be sought so that effective treatment with erythromycin may be started early....

  20. Invasive fungal infection and impaired neutrophil killing in human CARD9 deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drewniak, Agata; Gazendam, Roel P; Tool, Anton T J; van Houdt, Michel; Jansen, Machiel H; van Hamme, John L; van Leeuwen, Ester M M; Roos, Dirk; Scalais, Emmanuel; de Beaufort, Carine; Janssen, Hans; van den Berg, Timo K; Kuijpers, Taco W

    2013-03-28

    Caspase recruitment domain-containing protein 9 (CARD9) is an adaptor molecule in the cytosol of myeloid cells, required for induction of T-helper cells producing interleukin-17 (Th17 cells) and important in antifungal immunity. In a patient suffering from Candida dubliniensis meningoencephalitis, mutations in the CARD9 gene were found to result in the loss of protein expression. Apart from the reduced numbers of CD4(+) Th17 lymphocytes, we identified a lack of monocyte-derived cytokines in response to Candida strains. Importantly, CARD9-deficient neutrophils showed a selective Candida albicans killing defect with abnormal ultrastructural phagolysosomes and outgrowth of hyphae. The neutrophil killing defect was independent of the generation of reactive oxygen species by the reduced NAD phosphate oxidase system. Taken together, this demonstrates that human CARD9 deficiency results in selective defect in the host defense against invasive fungal infection, caused by an impaired phagocyte killing. PMID:23335372

  1. Chronic hepatitis caused by persistent parvovirus B19 infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mogensen Trine H

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Human infection with parvovirus B19 may lead to a diverse spectrum of clinical manifestations, including benign erythema infectiosum in children, transient aplastic crisis in patients with haemolytic anaemia, and congenital hydrops foetalis. These different diseases represent direct consequences of the ability of parvovirus B19 to target the erythroid cell lineage. However, accumulating evidence suggests that this virus can also infect other cell types resulting in diverse clinical manifestations, of which the pathogenesis remains to be fully elucidated. This has prompted important questions regarding the tropism of the virus and its possible involvement in a broad range of infectious and autoimmune medical conditions. Case Presentation Here, we present an unusual case of persistent parvovirus B19 infection as a cause of chronic hepatitis. This patient had persistent parvovirus B19 viraemia over a period of more than four years and displayed signs of chronic hepatitis evidenced by fluctuating elevated levels of ALAT and a liver biopsy demonstrating chronic hepatitis. Other known causes of hepatitis and liver damage were excluded. In addition, the patient was evaluated for immunodeficiency, since she had lymphopenia both prior to and following clearance of parvovirus B19 infection. Conclusions In this case report, we describe the current knowledge on the natural history and pathogenesis of parvovirus B19 infection, and discuss the existing evidence of parvovirus B19 as a cause of acute and chronic hepatitis. We suggest that parvovirus B19 was the direct cause of this patient's chronic hepatitis, and that she had an idiopathic lymphopenia, which may have predisposed her to persistent infection, rather than bone marrow depression secondary to infection. In addition, we propose that her liver involvement may have represented a viral reservoir. Finally, we suggest that clinicians should be aware of parvovirus B19 as an unusual

  2. Human cytomegalovirus infection inhibits CXCL12- mediated migration and invasion of human extravillous cytotrophoblasts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Warner Jessica A

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background During the first trimester of pregnancy, a series of tightly regulated interactions govern the formation of a highly invasive population of fetal-derived extravillous cytotrophoblasts (EVT. Successful pregnancy is dependent on efficient invasion of the uterine wall and maternal spiral arteries by EVT. Dysregulated trophoblast invasion is associated with intrauterine growth restriction, birth defects, spontaneous abortion and preeclampsia. A number of soluble growth factors, cytokines, and chemokines modulate this process, fine-tuning the temporal and spatial aspects of cytotrophoblast invasion. In particular, the CXCL12/CXCR4 axis has been shown to specifically modulate cytotrophoblast differentiation, invasion, and survival throughout early pregnancy. Infection with human cytomegalovirus (HCMV has been associated with impaired differentiation of cytotrophoblasts down the invasive pathway, specifically dysregulating the response to mitogens including epidermal growth factor (EGF and hepatocyte growth factor (HGF. In this study, the effect of HCMV infection on the CXCL12-mediated migration and invasion of the EVT cell line SGHPL-4 was investigated. Results Infection with HCMV significantly decreased secretion of CXCL12 by SGHPL-4 cells, and induced a striking perinuclear accumulation of the chemokine. HCMV infection significantly increased mRNA and total cell surface expression of the two known receptors for CXCL12: CXCR4 and CXCR7. Functionally, HCMV-infected SGHPL-4 cells were unable to migrate or invade in response to a gradient of soluble CXCL12 in transwell assays. Conclusions Collectively, these studies demonstrate that HCMV impairs EVT migration and invasion induced by CXCL12. As HCMV has the ability to inhibit EVT migration and invasion through dysregulation of other relevant signaling pathways, it is likely that the virus affects multiple signaling pathways to impair placentation and contribute to some of the

  3. Staphylococcus lugdunensis: novel organism causing cochlear implant infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samina Bhumbra

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available A majority of cochlear implant infections are caused by Staphylococcus aureus or Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Reported here is a pediatric patient with a cochlear implant infection caused by methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus lugdunensis, a coagulase-negative Staphylococcus that has only recently been determined to be clinically relevant (1988. Unlike other coagulase-negative Staphylococcus, it is more aggressive, carrying a greater potential for tissue destruction. In pediatrics, the organism is uncommon, poorly described, and generally pan-susceptible. Described herein is the presentation and management of this unusual organism in a pediatric setting.

  4. Kaposi's Sarcoma-Associated Herpesvirus Infection Promotes Invasion of Primary Human Umbilical Vein Endothelial Cells by Inducing Matrix Metalloproteinases▿

    OpenAIRE

    Qian, Li-Wu; Xie, Jianping; Ye, Fengchun; Gao, Shou-Jiang

    2007-01-01

    Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) play important roles in cancer invasion, angiogenesis, and inflammatory infiltration. Kaposi's sarcoma is a highly disseminated angiogenic tumor of proliferative endothelial cells linked to infection by Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV). In this study, we showed that KSHV infection increased the invasiveness of primary human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) in a Matrigel-based cell invasion assay. KSHV-induced cell invasion was abolished b...

  5. Necrotizing lung infection caused by the protozoan Balantidium coli

    OpenAIRE

    Sharma, Sat; Harding, Godfrey

    2003-01-01

    Balantidium coli, a ciliated protozoan, is well known to cause intestinal infection in humans. Extraintestinal spread to the peritoneal cavity and genitourinary tract has rarely been reported. There have also been a few cases of lung involvement from this parasite. A case of B coli causing a thick-walled right upper lobe cavity in an organic farmer who had contact with aerosolized pig manure is reported. Bronchoalveolar lavage fluid examined for ova and parasite revealed trophozoites of B col...

  6. Salmonella Infections Caused by Reptiles and Amphibians in Childcare Centers

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2013-02-07

    Dr. Neil Vora, an EIS Officer at CDC, discusses his article about Salmonella infections in childcare centers caused by reptiles and amphibians.  Created: 2/7/2013 by National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases (NCEZID).   Date Released: 2/7/2013.

  7. Biotic Homogenization Caused by the Invasion of Solidago canadensis in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Guo-qi; ZHANG Chao-bin; MA Ling; QIANG Sheng; John A Silander; Li Li Qi

    2013-01-01

    Although studies argue that invasive species can cause biotic differentiation, some cases show that biological invasions actually decrease biodiversity through biotic homogenization. The concept of biotic homogenization through the invasion of a certain serious invasive plant species merit more studies. Hence, we used field surveys to quantitatively compare invasive populations of Solidago canadensis (SC) in China with the control sites (adjacent sites to SC present sites yet without the species) and SC native populations in the USA. We found that plant communities in SC invaded habitats shared similarities with those in SC native ranges. Bray-Curtis similarity clearly showed that the composition of plant communities in SC invaded habitats were similar to those in SC native ranges. Both in the native and introduced range, plant communities with SC present were characterized by SC being dominant, significantly lower species richness,α-diversity andβ-diversity, as well as a decrease in the correlation coefficient between geographic distance and floristic similarities. SC favors fertile and moist loam habitat, while it dominated in various habitats in China, where more than 20 different dominants should have occurred. In conclusion, serious invasive species can quickly remodel and homogenize diverse communities by dominating them.

  8. Invasive candidiasis: from mycobiome to infection, therapy, and prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lagunes, L; Rello, J

    2016-08-01

    Candida spp. are commonly found in humans, colonizing most healthy individuals. A high prevalence of invasive candidiasis has been reported in recent years. Here, we assess the relation between Candida spp. as part of the human mycobiome, the host defense mechanisms, and the pathophysiology of invasive disease in critically ill patients. Many hypotheses have been proposed to explain the different immune responses to the process where Candida goes through healthy mycobiome to colonization to invasion; the involvement of other microbiota inhabitants, changes in temperature, low nitrogen levels, and the caspase system activation have been described. Patients admitted to an intensive care unit (ICU) are at the highest risk for invasive candidiasis, mostly due to the severity of their disease, immune-suppressive states, prolonged length of stay, broad-spectrum antibiotics, septic shock, and Candida colonization. The first approach should be using predictive scores as screening, followed by the determination of biomarkers (when available), and, in the near future, probably immune-genomics and analysis of the clinical background in order to initiate prompt and correct treatment. Regarding treatment, the initiation with an echinocandin is strongly recommended in critically ill patients. In conclusion, prompt treatment and adequate source control in the more severe patients remains the ultimate goal, as well as restoration of a healthy microbiota. PMID:27146877

  9. Imipenem resistance in nonfermenters causing nosocomial urinary tract infections.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taneja N

    2003-07-01

    Full Text Available Nonfermenting gram-negative bacilli (nonfermenters have emerged as important nosocomial pathogens causing opportunistic infections in immunocompromised hosts. These organisms show high level of resistance to b-lactam agents, fluoroquinolones and aminoglycosides. Imipenem is a carbapenem antibiotic, which can be very useful for treatment of infections caused by nonfermenters. Eighty-five nonfermenters causing nosocomial UTI were tested for MIC to imipenem by agar dilution method. Resistance to other antimicrobial agents was compared between imipenem sensitive (S and resistance (R groups. Overall 36.4% of nonfermenters were resistant to imipenem. Forty two percent of P. aeruginosa and 18.5% of Acinetobacter baumanii were imipenem resistant. Other nonfermenters showed variable resistance, resistance in Alcaligenes spp. being very high. More than 70% of the nonfermenters were resistant to ceftazidime, gentamicin and ciprofloxacin. Piperacillin and amikacin had the best in vitro susceptibility. No significant difference was found in the antibiotic susceptibility profile among imipenem sensitive (S or resistant (R strains.

  10. [Bacterial infection as a cause of infertility in humans].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sleha, Radek; Boštíková, Vanda; Salavec, Miloslav; Mosio, Petra; Kusáková, Eva; Kukla, Rudolf; Mazurová, Jaroslava; Spliňo, Miroslav

    2013-04-01

    Microorganisms which are present in the human urogenital tract may be involved in the development of inflammatory changes negatively affecting the genitals in both men and women. Pathological conditions due to inflammatory alterations may result in complete loss of fertility. Infections of the urogenital tract are responsible for 15% of all cases of infertility in couples. Negative impact on the human reproduction is mainly caused by direct damage to the genital tract mucosa by metabolic products of microorganisms or by induction of pro-inflammatory responses of the body. Another mechanism is indirect impact of microorganisms on the genital function. Moreover, the effect of bacteria on spermatogenesis and semen quality is important in men. Infections mainly caused by Chlamydia trachomatis or Neisseria gonorrhoeae represent the greatest risk in terms of permanent consequences for human reproduction. As for other sexually transmitted disorders, such as infections caused by Gardnerella vaginalis, urogenital mycoplasmas or ureaplasmas, the link between infection and infertility has been intensively researched. PMID:23768092

  11. Destruction of the hepatocyte junction by intercellular invasion of Leptospira causes jaundice in a hamster model of Weil's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyahara, Satoshi; Saito, Mitsumasa; Kanemaru, Takaaki; Villanueva, Sharon Y A M; Gloriani, Nina G; Yoshida, Shin-ichi

    2014-08-01

    Weil's disease, the most severe form of leptospirosis, is characterized by jaundice, haemorrhage and renal failure. The mechanisms of jaundice caused by pathogenic Leptospira remain unclear. We therefore aimed to elucidate the mechanisms by integrating histopathological changes with serum biochemical abnormalities during the development of jaundice in a hamster model of Weil's disease. In this work, we obtained three-dimensional images of infected hamster livers using scanning electron microscope together with freeze-cracking and cross-cutting methods for sample preparation. The images displayed the corkscrew-shaped bacteria, which infiltrated the Disse's space, migrated between hepatocytes, detached the intercellular junctions and disrupted the bile canaliculi. Destruction of bile canaliculi coincided with the elevation of conjugated bilirubin, aspartate transaminase and alkaline phosphatase levels in serum, whereas serum alanine transaminase and γ-glutamyl transpeptidase levels increased slightly, but not significantly. We also found in ex vivo experiments that pathogenic, but not non-pathogenic leptospires, tend to adhere to the perijunctional region of hepatocyte couplets isolated from hamsters and initiate invasion of the intercellular junction within 1 h after co-incubation. Our results suggest that pathogenic leptospires invade the intercellular junctions of host hepatocytes, and this invasion contributes in the disruption of the junction. Subsequently, bile leaks from bile canaliculi and jaundice occurs immediately. Our findings revealed not only a novel pathogenicity of leptospires, but also a novel mechanism of jaundice induced by bacterial infection. PMID:24945433

  12. An unusual cause of prosthetic joint infection: Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bilgül Mete

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Mycobacterium tuberculosis is a rare cause of prosthetic joint infection. Early diagnosis is critical for a good treatment response.Here, we report a case of prosthetic joint infection due to M.tuberculosis. A32-year old woman was admitted toour clinic for fever and drainage of right hip with prosthesis. After several interventions, she was diagnosed as prostheticinfection due to M.tuberculosis. Although the diagnosis was delayed because of the difficulties to yield M.tuberculosis,the outcome was good with medical therapy for 12-month and staged exchange of prosthesis.Approach to diagnosis must involve the histopathological examination of the tissue, mycobacterial cultures and acidfaststaining and when repeated cultures and examination of histological samples from infected joints are negative,tuberculosis should be kept in mind in the differential diagnosis of prosthetic joint infection. While the treatment modalitiesvary in English literature, it is clear that treatment must involve both medical and surgical approaches. J MicrobiolInfect Dis 2012; 2(2: 72-75Key words: Prosthetic joint, infection, tuberculosis

  13. Polymicrobial infective endocarditis caused by Neisseria sicca and Haemophilus parainfluenzae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikoloz Koshkelashvili

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Infective endocarditis is a common clinical problem in industrialized countries. Risk factors include abnormal cardiac valves, a history of endocarditis, intracardiac devices, prosthetic valves and intravenous drug use. We report a case of polymicrobial infective endocarditis in a 33 year-old female with a history chronic heroin use caused by Neisseria sicca and Haemophilus parainfluenzae. We believe the patient was exposed to these microbes by cleansing her skin with saliva prior to injection. Pairing a detailed history with the consideration of atypical agents is crucial in the proper diagnosis and management of endocarditis in patients with high-risk injection behaviors.

  14. Polymicrobial infective endocarditis caused by Neisseria sicca and Haemophilus parainfluenzae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koshkelashvili, Nikoloz; Shah, Mahek; Codolosa, J Nicolas; Climaco, Antonette

    2016-01-01

    Infective endocarditis is a common clinical problem in industrialized countries. Risk factors include abnormal cardiac valves, a history of endocarditis, intracardiac devices, prosthetic valves and intravenous drug use. We report a case of polymicrobial infective endocarditis in a 33 year-old female with a history chronic heroin use caused by Neisseria sicca and Haemophilus parainfluenzae. We believe the patient was exposed to these microbes by cleansing her skin with saliva prior to injection. Pairing a detailed history with the consideration of atypical agents is crucial in the proper diagnosis and management of endocarditis in patients with high-risk injection behaviors. PMID:27051571

  15. Invasive aspergillosis causing small bowel infarction in a patient of carcinoma breast undergoing chemotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jain Vinod

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To report a 45 year old lady presenting with proximal jejunal gangrene due to invasive Aspergillosis. The patient was undergoing adjuvant chemotherapy for advance carcinoma of breast (Stage IV. Methods The patient was referred to our surgical emergency for acute abdominal symptoms for 6 hours. Histopathology revealed bowel wall necrosis and vascular invasion by Aspergillus Fumigatus. Postoperative recovery was uneventful and the patient received Amphotericin-B (1 mg/kg/day for invasive aspergillosis. Invasive pulmonary aspergillosis was confirmed by isolating Aspergillus Fumigatus from bronchoalveolar lavage and by a positive circulating galactomannan test (ELISA Assay. Results Detailed history revealed dry cough and two episodes of haemoptesis for 2 weeks. Haemogram and counts revealed anemia and neutropenia. Plain X – ray of the abdomen showed multiple air fluid levels and ultrasound of the abdomen revealed distended bowel loops. On exploration small bowel was found to be gangrenous. The patient was successfully managed by supportive treatment and conventional intravenous Amphotericin-B for 2 weeks. The lady was discharged one week after completion of antifungal therapy and one month later she underwent toilet mastectomy. The lady came to follow up for 1 year and she is currently under hormone therapy. Conclusion With the emergence of new and powerful immunosuppressive, anticancer drugs and potent antibiotics the survival of transplant and critically ill patients has remarkably increased but it has shown a significant rise in the incidence of invasive opportunistic fungal infections. We conclude hat the diagnosis of invasive gastrointestinal aspergillosis may be considered in a neutropenic patient with acute abdominal symptoms.

  16. Molecular diagnostics of swine infection caused by Mycoplasma suis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Potkonjak Aleksandar

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The presence of two types of haemoplasm can be established in the swine population. Pathogenic haemoplasm, named Mycoplasma suis (previously called Eperythrozoon suis is the cause of swine eperythrozoonosis or swine ichtheroanaemia. The cause of this disease can also infect humans. The disease has spread all over the world. The most frequent form is latent infection of swine caused by M. suis. The disease is clinically manifest following action by the stress factor. The acute course of the disease is characterized by the occurrence of a febrile condition and ichtheroanaemia. The disease is usually diagnosed based on an epizootiological poll, a clinical examination, and a microscopic examination of a blood smear stained most often according to Giemsa. Contemporary methods of molecular biology have been developed, such as PCR, which are more sensitive and specific in making a diagnosis of swine infection caused by M. suis. In these investigations, the presence of M. suis on pig farms in the Republic of Serbia has been determined using the PCR test. .

  17. Anidulafungin in the treatment of invasive fungal infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathryn Sabol

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Kathryn Sabol, Tawanda GumboUniversity of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX, USAAbstract: More antifungal agents have reached clinical use in the past two decades than at any other time. The echinocandins have been a welcome addition to this group, with the latest being anidulafungin. There are several lines of evidence to support anidulafungin’s role as primary therapy for the treatment of invasive candidiasis in non-neutropenic patients, and as alternative therapy to fluconazole in patients with esophageal candidiasis with azole intolerance or triazole-resistant Candida. Pharmacokinetic–pharmacodynamic studies in animals have demonstrated superior efficacy, defined as maximal microbial kill, when compared to fluconazole, regardless of the fluconazole susceptibility of the Candida species. These studies, as well as dose-effect studies in patients, also support the currently recommended dose of anidulafungin. A well designed randomized controlled trial has demonstrated anidulafungin’s efficacy in patients with invasive candidiasis. In this paper, we argue that anidulafungin may be preferable to fluconazole for the treatment of candidemia. However, as of yet, the difference between anidulafungin and the other two licensed echinocandins as first-line therapy for invasive candidiasis is unclear. On the other hand, there is insufficient evidence as of yet to support first-line use of anidulafungin in patients with neutropenia or aspergillosis.Keywords: anidulafungin, pharmacokinetics-pharmacodynamics, efficacy, candidiasis

  18. Invasive Salmonella dublin Infections Associated With Drinking Raw Milk

    OpenAIRE

    Fierer, Joshua

    1983-01-01

    Salmonella dublin is a serotype of Salmonella that is host-adapted to cattle and rarely infects people. In one year (1980-1981) we diagnosed five cases of salmonellosis due to S dublin at the Veterans Administration Medical Center, San Diego. Four patients had positive blood cultures and one died. A sixth patient, diagnosed in 1978, had a mycotic aortic aneurysm but survived. Compared with nine patients who had Salmonella infections due to other serotypes, the S dublin patients were older, ha...

  19. [Invasive Pasteurella multocida infections: Two clinical cases and literature review].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smíšková, Dita; Džupová, Olga

    2015-06-01

    Pasteurella multocida is a common commensal of the gastrointestinal and respiratory tracts of animals, especially cats and dogs. It is transmitted to humans through contact with animals. Bite wound infection is the most common clinical manifestation. Systemic infections are unusual and mainly affect immunocompromised individuals. The article presents two cases of Pasteurella infection. Wound infection in a 75-year-old female following a bite from her pet cat was associated with bacteremia. The disease course was favorable with the initial clindamycin treatment despite in vitro resistance. The other patient was a 62-year-old female diagnosed with acute bacterial meningitis with multiple brain abscesses and transient expressive aphasia. She reported frequent contacts with pets and domestic animals without a recent bite. Hematogenous dissemination of the infection was suspected. Because of poor therapeutic response, cefotaxime was switched to chloramphenicol which was later switched to a combination of cefotaxime with ciprofloxacin due to anemia. Following 6 weeks of intravenous antibiotic therapy and another 10 weeks of oral ciprofloxacin therapy, magnetic resonance imaging showed normal results and the neurological defect resolved. Epidemiological, clinical and therapeutic aspects of Pasteurella infection are discussed and literature is reviewed. PMID:26312375

  20. Juxtarenal Modular Aortic Stent Graft Infection Caused by Staphylococcus aureus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Róbert Novotný

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. We are presenting a case report of an infected modular abdominal stent graft. Case Presentation. A 67-year-old male patient three years after Cook’s modular abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA graft implantation for juxtarenal AAA with an implantation of a stent extension into the right common iliac artery for type Ib endoleak. The patient was admitted into our center in severe condition with suspected retroperitoneal bleeding. Computed tomography angiography (CTAG confirmed retroperitoneal bleeding in the right common iliac artery. An urgent surgical revision was indicated; destructed arterial wall around the stent extension in the right common iliac artery was discovered. Due to the severe state of health of the patient, a resection of the infected stent and affected arterial wall was performed, followed by an iliac-femoral crossover bypass. The patient was transported to the intensive care unit with hepatic and renal failure, with maximal catecholamine support. Combined antibiotic treatment was started. The patient died five hours after the procedure. The cause of death was multiorgan failure caused by sepsis. Hemocultures and perioperative microbiological cultures showed the infection agent to be Staphylococcus aureus methicillin sensitive. Conclusion. Stent graft infection is a rare complication. Treatment is associated with high mortality and morbidity.

  1. Typhoid fever as a cause of opportunistic infection: case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tumminia Salvatore

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Typhoid fever is a systemic infection caused by the bacterium Salmonella enterica subspecies enterica serotype typhi, which is acquired by ingestion of contaminated food and water. Each year the disease affects at least 16 million persons world-wide, most of whom reside in the developing countries of Southeast Asia and Africa. In Italy the disease is uncommon with a greater number of cases in Southern regions than in Northern ones. Case presentation We report on a 57-year-old Sri-Lankan male affected by typhoid fever, the onset of which was accompanied by oropharyngeal candidiasis. This clinical sign was due to a transient cell-mediated immunity depression (CD4+ cell count was 130 cells/mm3 probably caused by Salmonella typhi infection. Human immunodeficiency virus infection was ruled out. Diagnosis of typhoid fever was made by the isolation of Salmonella typhi from two consecutive blood cultures. The patient recovered after a ten days therapy with ciprofloxacin and his CD4+ cell count improved gradually until normalization within 3 weeks. Conclusion Our patient is the first reported case of typhoid fever associated with oropharyngeal candidiasis. This finding suggests a close correlation between Salmonella typhi infection and transitory immunodepression.

  2. Efficacy and safety of micafungin for invasive candida infections:a meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Qian; LIN Mao-hu; CHEN Meng-li; LIU Zhe-yuan; CHAI Dong; WANG Rui

    2012-01-01

    Background Invasive fungal infections such as candidiasis and mold infections cause significant morbidity and mortality in seriously ill patients.Micafungin is an echinocandin antifungal agent with potent activity against most species of Candida and Aspergillus.We did this meta-analysis to clarify whether micafungin offers superior efficacy and safety compared with other antifungal agent for treating infections associated with invasive candidiasis.Methods We did a meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials to examine whether micafungin has superior efficacy and safety compared with other antifungal agents recommended by the treatment guidelines for fungal infection.Seven trials involving 2913 patients were included in this analysis.Odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) were calculated.Results Micafungin was associated with significantly better treatment success compared with the comparator antifungal agents (modified intention to treat,2851 patients; random-effects model,OR 1.20,95% CI 1.00-1.45,P=0.0487).In addition,micafungin was more effective than the comparators for antifungal prophylaxis of neutropenic patients undergoing hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (OR 1.47,95% CI 1.08-2.00,P=0.01).Although there was no significant difference between the compared regimens in terms of the incidence of adverse drug effects (OR 0.94,95% CI 0.77-1.11),fewer patients treated with micafungin withdrew from the studies because of adverse events (OR 0.64,95% CI 0.44-0.94).Conclusions Micafungin has a good safety and tolerability profile,with an efficacy at least comparable to the other antifungal agents.Micafungin offers advantages over other agents for antifungal prophylaxis.Micafungin offers an appropriate alternative for antifungal prophylaxis rather than the treatment of invasive candida infections.

  3. Clinical manifestations of CNS infections caused by enterovirus type 71

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    Cheol Soon Choi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Enterovirus 71, one of the enteroviruses that are responsible for both hand-foot-and-mouth disease and herpangina, can cause neural injury. During periods of endemic spread of hand-foot-andmouth disease caused by enterovirus 71, CNS infections are also frequently diagnosed and may lead to increased complications from neural injury, as well as death. We present the results of our epidemiologic research on the clinical manifestations of children with CNS infections caused by enterovirus 71. Methods: The study group consisted of 42 patients admitted for CNS infection by enterovirus 71 between April 2009 and October 2009 at the Department of Pediatrics of 5 major hospitals affiliated with the Catholic University of Korea. We retrospectively reviewed initial symptoms and laboratory findings on admission, the specimen from which enterovirus 71 was isolated, fever duration, admission period, treatment and progress, and complications. We compared aseptic meningitis patients with encephalitis patients. Results: Of the 42 patients (23 men, 19 women, hand-foot-and-mouth disease was most prevalent (n=39, followed by herpangina (n=3, upon initial clinical diagnosis. Among the 42 patients, 15 (35.7% were classified as severe, while 27 (64.3% were classified as mild. Factors such as age, fever duration, presence of seizure, and use of intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG were statistically different between the 2 groups. Conclusion: Our results indicate that patients with severe infection caused by enterovirus 71 tended to be less than 3 years old, presented with at least 3 days of fever as well as seizure activity, and received IVIG treatment.

  4. Cucumispora ornata n. sp. (Fungi: Microsporidia) infecting invasive 1 ‘demon shrimp’

    OpenAIRE

    Bojko, J; A. Dunn; Stebbing, PD; Ross, SH; Kerr, RC; Stentiford, GD

    2015-01-01

    Dikerogammarus haemobaphes, the ‘demon shrimp’, is an amphipod native to the Ponto-Caspian region. This species invaded the UK in 2012 and has become widely established. Dikerogammarus haemobaphes has the potential to introduce non-native pathogens into the UK, creating a potential threat to native fauna. This study describes a novel species of microsporidian parasite infecting 72.8% of invasive D. haemobaphes located in the River Trent, UK. The microsporidium infection was systemic throughou...

  5. Comparative phosphoproteomics reveals components of host cell invasion and post-transcriptional regulation during Francisella infection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakayasu, Ernesto S.; Tempel, Rebecca; Cambronne, Xiaolu A.; Petyuk, Vladislav A.; Jones, Marcus B.; Gritsenko, Marina A.; Monroe, Matthew E.; Yang, Feng; Smith, Richard D.; Adkins, Joshua N.; Heffron, Fred

    2013-09-22

    Francisella tularensis is a facultative intracellular bacterium that causes the deadly disease tularemia. Most evidence suggests that Francisella is not well recognized by the innate immune system that normally leads to cytokine expression and cell death. In previous work, we identified new bacterial factors that were hyper-cytotoxic to macrophages. Four of the identified hyper-cytotoxic strains (lpcC, manB, manC and kdtA) had an impaired lipopolysaccharide (LPS) synthesis and produced an exposed lipid A lacking the O-antigen. These mutants were not only hyper-cytotoxic but also were phagocytosed at much higher rates compared to the wild type parent strain. To elucidate the cellular signaling underlying this enhanced phagocytosis and cell death, we performed a large-scale comparative phosphoproteomic analysis of cells infected with wild-type and delta-lpcC F. novicida. Our data suggest that not only actin but also intermediate filaments and microtubules are important for F. novicida entry into the host cells. In addition, we observed differential phosphorylation of tristetraprolin (TTP), a key component of the mRNA-degrading machinery that controls the expression of a variety of genes including many cytokines. Infection with the delta-lpcC mutant induced the hyper-phosphorylation and inhibition of TTP, leading to the production of cytokines such as IL-1beta and TNF-alpha which may kill the host cells by triggering apoptosis. Together, our data provide new insights for Francisella invasion and a post-transcriptional mechanism that prevents the expression of host immune response factors that controls infection by this pathogen.

  6. Adult-onset Invasive Haemophilus influenzae Type f Caused by Acute Lower Leg Cellulitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Usui, Yuko; Kakuta, Risako; Araki, Makoto; Sato, Taigo; Gu, Yoshiaki; Yano, Hisakazu; Taniuchi, Norihide

    2016-01-01

    In Japan, routine Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib) vaccination began in 2013. Thus, similar to other countries, a strain shift is expected in the near future. We experienced a case of H. influenzae type f (Hif) bacteremia in a 66-year-old man. The primary focus of the infection was the soft tissue of the left lower leg, which is an extremely rare origin in adults. Subsequently, we conducted multilocus sequence typing and identified the strain as sequence type 124, which is the most common invasive strain of Hif worldwide. This case may mark the beginning of an Hif strain shift in Japan. PMID:27374690

  7. Non-invasive localization of urinary tract infection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    New methods to localize the source of bacteriuria were evaluated in monkeys with experimental urinary tract infection. A high level of diagnostic accuracy was obtained with the combined study of antibody-coated urinary bacteria by immunofluorescence, 131I hippuran scintiphotos in the hydropenic state and 67gallium citrate scintiphotos. Unique patterns were found, which differentiate cystitis, ureteritis, pyelonephritis and renal or perinephric abscesses

  8. Diagnosis of Infections Caused by Pathogenic Free-Living Amoebae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruno da Rocha-Azevedo

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Naegleria fowleri, Acanthamoeba spp., Balamuthia mandrillaris, and Sappinia sp. are pathogenic free-living amoebae. N. fowleri causes Primary Amoebic Meningoencephalitis, a rapidly fatal disease of the central nervous system, while Acanthamoeba spp. and B. mandrillaris cause chronic granulomatous encephalitis. Acanthamoeba spp. also can cause cutaneous lesions and Amoebic Keratitis, a sight-threatening infection of the cornea that is associated with contact lens use or corneal trauma. Sappinia pedata has been identified as the cause of a nonlethal case of amoebic encephalitis. In view of the potential health consequences due to infection with these amoebae, rapid diagnosis is critical for early treatment. Microscopic examination and culture of biopsy specimens, cerebral spinal fluid (CSF, and corneal scrapings have been used in the clinical laboratory. For amoebic keratitis, confocal microscopy has been used to successfully identify amoebae in corneal tissue. More recently, conventional and real-time PCR assays have been developed that are sensitive and specific for the amoebae. In addition, multiplex PCR assays are available for the rapid identification of these pathogens in biopsy tissue, CSF, and corneal specimens.

  9. Invasive group A streptococcal infection concurrent with 2009 H1N1 influenza.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jean, Cynthia; Louie, Janice K; Glaser, Carol A; Harriman, Kathleen; Hacker, Jill K; Aranki, Faisal; Bancroft, Elizabeth; Farley, Susan; Ginsberg, Michele; Hernandez, Lisa B; Sallenave, Catherine S; Radner, Allen B

    2010-05-15

    We describe 10 patients with 2009 H1N1 influenza and concurrent invasive group A streptococcal infection with marked associated morbidity and mortality. Seven patients required intensive care, 8 required mechanical ventilation, and 7 died. Five of the patients, including 4 of the fatalities, were previously healthy. PMID:20377405

  10. Approaches to management of invasive fungal infections in patients with hematologic malignancies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forrest, Graeme N; Walsh, Thomas J

    2004-10-01

    Invasive fungal infections have become increasingly common in patients with hematologic malignancies, especially in those at high risk with prolonged neutropenia and graft versus host disease after allogeneic stem cell transplantation, and are associated with significant morbidity, mortality, and cost. New diagnostic techniques and therapeutic agents have emerged recently to assist in the management of these infections. The galactomannan assay in association with routine clinical and radiologic screening may assist in the early diagnosis of invasive aspergillosis such that therapy may be initiated early. Also, several new antifungal agents have become available, allowing the practitioner more options in the prevention and treatment of fungal infections. New antifungal agents such as the lipid amphotericin B products, voriconazole, and the echinocandins appear to be safer to use than conventional amphotericin B. Voriconazole also has shown superiority to conventional amphotericin B in the treatment of invasive aspergillosis, and its well absorbed oral formulation makes it an excellent treatment to complete therapy as an outpatient. All these therapeutic options allow physicians to tailor antifungal therapy to the individual patient based on response and toxicity to prevent or treat invasive fungal infections. There are several new antifungal agents in development, and future studies will evaluate combination therapies to determine safety and efficacy. PMID:18628154

  11. Parasitic anemone infects the invasive ctenophore Mnemiopsis leidyi in the North East Atlantic

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Selander, Erik; Møller, Lene Friis; Sundberg, Per;

    2010-01-01

    We report of the first finding of parasitic sea anemone larvae infecting the invasive ctenophore Mnemiopsis leidyi in the North East Atlantic. Parasitic anemone larvae are common in the native habitat of Mnemiopsis, but have not previously been reported from any of the locations where Mnemiopsis...

  12. Denmark14-230 Clone as an Increasing Cause of Pneumococcal Infection in Portugal within a Background of Diverse Serotype 19A Lineages▿

    OpenAIRE

    Aguiar, Sandra I; Pinto, Francisco R.; Nunes, Sónia; Serrano, Isa; Melo-Cristino, José; Sá-Leão, Raquel; Ramirez, Mário; de Lencastre, Hermínia

    2009-01-01

    Pneumococci of serotype 19A are increasingly found to be the cause of infection in various geographic regions. We have characterized the serotype 19A isolates (n = 288) found among pneumococci responsible for infections (n = 1,925) and pneumococci recovered from asymptomatic carriers (n = 1,973) in Portugal between 2001 and 2006. We show that despite the existence of serotype 19A clones that have a greater potential to cause invasive disease or an enhanced colonization capacity, the lineage t...

  13. Invasive Aspergillus fumigatus infection after Plasmodium falciparum malaria in an immuno-competent host: Case report and review of literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stremmel Wolfgang

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Invasive fungal infection is rarely reported in association with malaria, even though malaria-associated inhibition of phagocyte function is a well-known condition. Invasive aspergillosis is frequently found in severely immuno-compromised patients but not in healthy individuals. Here, a case of pulmonary invasive aspergillosis in a previously healthy patient with severe P. falciparum malaria is presented, who was successfully treated with voriconazol and caspofungin. This is the first survival of malaria-associated invasive aspergillosis.

  14. Infections caused by Salmonella: epidemiological investigation in Rho Hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giovanna Miseferi

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Infections caused by Salmonella account for a considerable part of the infective pathology, which keeps on a steady level due to the changes in the food production and preservation methods and to the frequent international trips leading to food toxic infections. Therefore, they represent an important sanitary problem both for clinicians and the Public Health Service. The study has provided significant information about the epidemiological situation in our local health unit. In the biennium May 2007- May 2009 59 strains were isolated, with a remarkably frequent isolation of the S.typhimurrium serotype (21 strains, definitely more frequent than the S.enteritidis serotype (10 strains, in line with the data of our area and of the whole of Italy in the years 2000-2004. Moreover it should be noted that we isolated 14 strains of the S.O.4,5:i:-serotype, which stands out as an emerging serotype, 1 strain of S.typhi, whose last typification in our area was in 1997, and 2 strains of S.choleraesuis in blood, which causes serious bacteremia.

  15. Case of invasive nontypable Haemophilus influenzae respiratory tract infection with a large quantity of neutrophil extracellular traps in sputum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamaguchi S

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Shigeto Hamaguchi,1,* Masafumi Seki,1,* Norihisa Yamamoto,1 Tomoya Hirose,2 Naoya Matsumoto,2 Taro Irisawa,2 Ryosuke Takegawa,2 Takeshi Shimazu,2 Kazunori Tomono11Division of Infection Control and Prevention, 2Department of Traumatology and Acute Critical Medicine, Osaka University Graduate School of Medicine, Osaka, Japan *These authors contributed equally to this workAbstract: Haemophilus influenzae type b was once the most common cause of invasive H. influenzae infection, but the incidence of this disease has decreased markedly with introduction of conjugate vaccines to prevent the disease. In contrast, the incidence of invasive infection caused by nontypable H. influenzae has increased in the US and in European countries. Neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs are fibrous structures released extracellularly from activated neutrophils during inflammation, including in pneumonia, and rapidly trap and kill pathogens as a first line of immunological defense. However, their function and pathological role have not been fully investigated. Here, we report a case of fatal nontypable H. influenzae infection with severe pneumonia and bacteremia in an adult found to have a vast amount of NETs in his sputum. The patient had a two-day history of common cold-like symptoms and was taken to the emergency room as a cardiopulmonary arrest. He recovered temporarily, but died soon afterwards, although appropriate antibiotic therapy and general management had been instituted. Massive lobular pneumonia and sepsis due to nontypable H. influenzae was found, in spite of H. influenzae type b vaccine being available. His sputum showed numerous bacteria phagocytosed by neutrophils, and immunohistological staining indicated a number of NETs containing DNA, histone H3, and neutrophil elastase. This case highlights an association between formation of NETs and severe respiratory and septic infection. An increase in severe nontypable H. influenzae disease can be expected as a

  16. Invasive fungal infections in endogenous Cushing’s syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafael Selbach Scheffel

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Cushing’s syndrome is a condition characterized by elevated cortisol levels that can result from either augmented endogenous production or exogenous administration of corticosteroids. The predisposition to fungal infections among patients with hypercortisolemia has been noted since Cushing’s original description of the disease. We describe here a patient with endo-genous Cushing’s syndrome secondary to an adrenocortical carcinoma, who developed concomitant disseminated cryptococcosis and candidiasis in the course of his disease.

  17. Voriconazole in the management of nosocomial invasive fungal infections

    OpenAIRE

    Pemán, Javier; Salavert, Miguel; Cantón, Emilia; Jarque, Isidro; Romá, Eva; Zaragoza, Rafael; Viudes, Ángel; Gobernado, Miguel

    2006-01-01

    Voriconazole is a new triazole developed for the treatment of life-threatening fungal infections. The drug is available for both oral and intravenous administration; the oral formulation has excellent bioavailability. The side-effect profile of voriconazole presents an acceptable safety and tolerability spectrum: transient visual disturbances, liver enzyme abnormalities, and skin rashes are the most frequently reported side effects but rarely lead to discontinuation. The potential for drug–dr...

  18. A PULMONARY INFECTION CAUSED BY MYCOBACTERIUM PEREGRINUM– A CASE REPORT.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatina T. Todorova

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Mycobacterium peregrinum is a member of the group of rapidly growing Nontuberculous Mycobacteria (NTM. It can be found in high frequency in natural and laboratory environments and is considered to be uncommonrare pathogen for both immunocompetent and immunosuppressed individuals. Currently, pulmonary infections caused by Mycobacterium peregrinum are unusual and diagnosed only in limited number of cases. Here, we present a clinical case of elderly man (72 years with 1 month history of non-specific respiratory symptomatic. The patient was without underlying immunosuppressive condition or lung disease. Chest X-ray demonstrated persistent pleural effusion, opacities and cavitations in the right lobe. One of the sputum culturesgrewa rapidly growing mycobacterium and the isolated strain was found to be Mycobacterium peregrinumas identified by molecular genetic detection (PCR and DNA strip technology. To our knowledge, this is the third case in the world to report Mycobacterium peregrinumas a possible causative agent of pulmonary infection.

  19. TUBERCULOSIS INFECTION MIGHT INCREASE THE RISK OF INVASIVE CANDIDIASIS IN AN IMMUNOCOMPETENT PATIENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao-Hua CHEN

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Deep Candida infections commonly occur in immunosuppressed patients. A rare case of a multiple deep organ infection with Candida albicans and spinal tuberculosis was reported in a healthy young man. The 19-year-old man complained of month-long fever and lower back pain. He also had a history of scalded mouth syndrome. Coinfection with Mycobacterium tuberculosis and Candida albicans was diagnosed using the culture of aspirates from different regions. Symptoms improved considerably after antifungal and antituberculous therapy. This case illustrates that infection with tuberculosis might impair the host's immune system and increase the risk of invasive candidiasis in an immunocompetent patient.

  20. Invasive intracerebral fungal infection in a leukaemic patient.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Brien, Deirdre

    2012-06-01

    Intracerebral abscesses secondary to Zygomycosis are potentially fatal. A 12-year-old girl with acute promyelocytic leukaemia was successfully treated for intracerebral abscess caused by Zygomycosis with complete surgical excision and combination antifungal therapy.

  1. Anthrax lethal toxin disrupts intestinal barrier function and causes systemic infections with enteric bacteria.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Sun

    Full Text Available A variety of intestinal pathogens have virulence factors that target mitogen activated protein kinase (MAPK signaling pathways, including Bacillus anthracis. Anthrax lethal toxin (LT has specific proteolytic activity against the upstream regulators of MAPKs, the MAPK kinases (MKKs. Using a murine model of intoxication, we show that LT causes the dose-dependent disruption of intestinal epithelial integrity, characterized by mucosal erosion, ulceration, and bleeding. This pathology correlates with an LT-dependent blockade of intestinal crypt cell proliferation, accompanied by marked apoptosis in the villus tips. C57BL/6J mice treated with intravenous LT nearly uniformly develop systemic infections with commensal enteric organisms within 72 hours of administration. LT-dependent intestinal pathology depends upon its proteolytic activity and is partially attenuated by co-administration of broad spectrum antibiotics, indicating that it is both a cause and an effect of infection. These findings indicate that targeting of MAPK signaling pathways by anthrax LT compromises the structural integrity of the mucosal layer, serving to undermine the effectiveness of the intestinal barrier. Combined with the well-described immunosuppressive effects of LT, this disruption of the intestinal barrier provides a potential mechanism for host invasion via the enteric route, a common portal of entry during the natural infection cycle of Bacillus anthracis.

  2. Invasion of non-native grasses causes a drop in soil carbon storage in California grasslands

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koteen, Laura E; Harte, John [Energy and Resources Group, 310 Barrows Hall, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Baldocchi, Dennis D, E-mail: lkoteen@berkeley.edu [Department of Environmental Science, Policy and Management, 137 Mulford Hall, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States)

    2011-10-15

    Vegetation change can affect the magnitude and direction of global climate change via its effect on carbon cycling among plants, the soil and the atmosphere. The invasion of non-native plants is a major cause of land cover change, of biodiversity loss, and of other changes in ecosystem structure and function. In California, annual grasses from Mediterranean Europe have nearly displaced native perennial grasses across the coastal hillsides and terraces of the state. Our study examines the impact of this invasion on carbon cycling and storage at two sites in northern coastal California. The results suggest that annual grass invasion has caused an average drop in soil carbon storage of 40 Mg/ha in the top half meter of soil, although additional mechanisms may also contribute to soil carbon losses. We attribute the reduction in soil carbon storage to low rates of net primary production in non-native annuals relative to perennial grasses, a shift in rooting depth and water use to primarily shallow sources, and soil respiratory losses in non-native grass soils that exceed production rates. These results indicate that even seemingly subtle land cover changes can significantly impact ecosystem functions in general, and carbon storage in particular.

  3. Invasion of non-native grasses causes a drop in soil carbon storage in California grasslands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vegetation change can affect the magnitude and direction of global climate change via its effect on carbon cycling among plants, the soil and the atmosphere. The invasion of non-native plants is a major cause of land cover change, of biodiversity loss, and of other changes in ecosystem structure and function. In California, annual grasses from Mediterranean Europe have nearly displaced native perennial grasses across the coastal hillsides and terraces of the state. Our study examines the impact of this invasion on carbon cycling and storage at two sites in northern coastal California. The results suggest that annual grass invasion has caused an average drop in soil carbon storage of 40 Mg/ha in the top half meter of soil, although additional mechanisms may also contribute to soil carbon losses. We attribute the reduction in soil carbon storage to low rates of net primary production in non-native annuals relative to perennial grasses, a shift in rooting depth and water use to primarily shallow sources, and soil respiratory losses in non-native grass soils that exceed production rates. These results indicate that even seemingly subtle land cover changes can significantly impact ecosystem functions in general, and carbon storage in particular.

  4. Reno-invasive fungal infection presenting as acute renal failure: Importance of renal biopsy for early diagnosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Priyadarshi Ranjan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Renal zygomycosis, caused by invasive fungi, is a rare and potentially fatal infec-tion. The patient usually presents with non-specific symptoms and renal failure. A 34-year-old male non-diabetic and without any predisposing factors for systemic fungal infection presented to the emergency department with diffuse abdominal pain, high-grade fever and acute renal failure with a serum creatinine of 6.5. A computed tomography showed bilateral diffuse globular nephromegaly. A urine smear for fungal examination showed right angle branching hyphae and kidney biopsy showed fungal hyphae within the glomeruli, tubules and interstitium. Although radiological investigations can give us a clue, the definitive diagnosis can only be made by kidney biopsy. A high index of suspicion and timely diagnosis is important for a proper management.

  5. Virulence factors of Streptococcus pyogenes strains from women in peri-labor with invasive infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golińska, E; van der Linden, M; Więcek, G; Mikołajczyk, D; Machul, A; Samet, A; Piórkowska, A; Dorycka, M; Heczko, P B; Strus, M

    2016-05-01

    Invasive group A streptococcal (GAS) infections constitute an important epidemiological problem. Many cases occur in women during the postnatal period. The objective of this study was to evaluate the presence of the genes responsible for production of iron-chelating protein (perR) and superantigens (speA, speB, speC, speF, speG, speH, speI, speJ, speK, speL, speM, smeZ, and ssa) in S. pyogenes strains isolated from invasive infections in women after delivery. Furthermore, this study sought to verify whether S. pyogenes strains show special phenotypic and genotypic (sla, spy1325) characteristics that may play a decisive role in adherence to the genital tract epithelium. Moreover, the emm-types and antibiotic susceptibility were determined. We tested 30 invasive S. pyogenes strains isolated from postpartum invasive infection and 37 GAS control strains isolated from the genital tracts of asymptomatic multiparous women. The majority of the tested strains were shown to express two types of emm genes (1 and 28), though emm -12, -28, -75 and -89 were uniquely expressed in the group of strains isolated from invasive infections. A significantly higher prevalence of perR in the strains from puerperal fever was shown. Significant differences were also found between the two groups with respect to the incidence of the genes related to adherence; GAS strains originating from women with sepsis/puerperal fever showed presence of these genes less frequently than those of the control group. Although differences in frequencies of the gene coding for various superantigens were noted between the compared groups of GAS strains, they were not significant. PMID:26873375

  6. Case of Cytomegalovirus Infection Causing Isolated Oculomotor Nerve Palsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Halil Sen

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The third cranial nerve is called the oculomotor nerve. The pathology is revealed by limitation of eye movement inward-up-down, mydriasis, loss of light reflex and ptosis. Oculomotor nerve pathologies are frequently seen in neurology practice and are situations that may be very difficult for differential diagnosis. Differential diagnosis first involves disqualifying intracranial etiologies by imaging because these intracranial etiologies may be situations that can result in death and should be primarily evaluated. If intracranial events are ruled out, generally rarer etiologic reasons with generally difficult differentiation should be researched. Viral infections are among the rare etiological reasons causing 3rd cranial nerve involvement. Our case was a 71-year old female with etiological research due to 3rd cranial nerve palsy. The patient with diabetes-linked immune deficiency was found to have cranial nerve involvement developed secondary to cytomegalovirus (CMV infection. We report this case as 3rd cranial nerve involvement is rarely observed developing linked to CMV infection.

  7. Erythema caused by a localised skin infection with Arthrobacter mysorens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chakraborty Trinad

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Skin erythemas of unknown origin are a frequent reason for consulting the general practitioner or dermatologist. Case presentation Here we report a case of an erythema resembling the erythema migrans manifestation of Lyme disease, but with atypical symptoms like persistent pruritus. The patient had no history of a recent tick-bite but displayed a positive serology for an advanced stage of Lyme borreliosis, which stood in contrast to the clinical manifestation of erythema migrans as a symptom of early Lyme disease. Three skin swabs and soil samples, collected in the area where the patient possibly acquired the infection, were examined by bacterial and fungal culture methods. Microorganisms were identified by using 16 S rRNA gene sequencing and bioinformatics. The patient and soil isolates were compared by employing RAPD analysis. The serum samples of the patient were examined by immunoblotting. Arthrobacter mysorens, a soil bacterium, was isolated from the collected skin and soil samples. The identity of both isolates was determined by molecular fingerprinting methods. A. mysorens was proven to be causative for the erythema by direct isolation from the affected skin and a positive serology, thus explaining the atypical appearance of the erythema compared to erythema migrans caused by Borrelia infection. Conclusions Infections with A.mysorens might be underreported and microbiological diagnostic techniques should be applied in cases of patients with unclear erythemas, resembling erythema migrans, without a history of tick bites.

  8. Invasive Aspergillus infections in hospitalized patients with chronic lung disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wessolossky M

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Mireya Wessolossky,1 Verna L Welch,2 Ajanta Sen,1 Tara M Babu,1 David R Luke21Division of Infectious Diseases, University of Massachusetts Medical School, Worcester, MA, USA; 2Medical Affairs, Pfizer Inc, Collegeville, PA, USABackground: Although invasive pulmonary aspergillosis (IPA is more prevalent in immunocompromised patients, critical care clinicians need to be aware of the occurrence of IPA in the nontraditional host, such as a patient with chronic lung disease. The purpose of this study was to describe the IPA patient with chronic lung disease and compare the data with that of immunocompromised patients.Methods: The records of 351 patients with Aspergillus were evaluated in this single-center, retrospective study for evidence and outcomes of IPA. The outcomes of 57 patients with chronic lung disease and 56 immunocompromised patients were compared. Patients with chronic lung disease were defined by one of the following descriptive terms: emphysema, asthma, idiopathic lung disease, bronchitis, bronchiectasis, sarcoid, or pulmonary leukostasis.Results: Baseline demographics were similar between the two groups. Patients with chronic lung disease were primarily defined by emphysema (61% and asthma (18%, and immunocompromised patients primarily had malignancies (27% and bone marrow transplants (14%. A higher proportion of patients with chronic lung disease had a diagnosis of IPA by bronchoalveolar lavage versus the immunocompromised group (P < 0.03. The major risk factors for IPA were found to be steroid use in the chronic lung disease group and neutropenia and prior surgical procedures in the immunocompromised group. Overall, 53% and 69% of chronic lung disease and immunocompromised patients were cured (P = 0.14; 55% of chronic lung patients and 47% of immunocompromised patients survived one month (P = 0.75.Conclusion: Nontraditional patients with IPA, such as those with chronic lung disease, have outcomes and mortality similar to that in the

  9. Evolution of Acute Infections and the Invasion-Persistence Trade-Off

    OpenAIRE

    King, Aaron A.; Shrestha, Sourya; Harvill, Eric T.; Bjørnstad, Ottar N.

    2009-01-01

    We seek to understand the conditions favoring the evolution of acute, highly transmissible infections. Most work on the life-history evolution of pathogens has focused on the transmission-virulence trade-off. Here we focus on a distinct trade-off that operates, even among avirulent pathogens, between a pathogen’s speed of invasion and its ability to persist in a finite host population. Other authors have shown how this invasion-persistence trade-off can lead to intermediate pathogen attack ra...

  10. Invasive Fungal Infections Acquired from Contaminated Food or Nutritional Supplements: A Review of the Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benedict, Kaitlin; Chiller, Tom M; Mody, Rajal K

    2016-07-01

    Fungi are an integral part of the natural environment and, therefore, play many roles in relation to food: some fungi are used in food production, some are food sources themselves, and some are agents of food spoilage. Some fungi that contaminate food can also be harmful to human health. The harmful but noninfectious health consequences of mycotoxins have been well-characterized, but the extent to which fungi in food pose a risk for invasive infections is unknown. We conducted a literature review to identify cases of invasive fungal infections (IFIs) believed to have resulted from ingestion or inhalation of food, beverages, or dietary supplements (excluding Saccharomyces infections). We identified 11 publications describing cases or small outbreaks of IFIs related to foods or beverages and three describing IFIs related to dietary supplements. These food-associated IFIs were predominantly mold infections, and the few yeast infections were associated with dairy products. Suspected foodborne IFIs appear to be rare, but are increasingly described in the electronically searchable literature. They are associated with a variety of foods, are due to a variety of fungal pathogens, and primarily occur in persons with immunosuppressive conditions or other predisposing factors. Various guidelines for high-risk patients recommend avoidance of certain food products that may contain high levels of fungi, but further work is needed to evaluate the effectiveness of these restrictive diets in preventing fungal infections. The relationships between food spoilage, food insecurity, and IFI risk are another area that may warrant further exploration. PMID:27074753

  11. Reduction in incidence of invasive fungal infection in patients receiving allogeneic stem cell transplantation using combined diagnostic-driven approach and itraconazole oral solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tzadok, Roie; Shapira, Michael Y; Moses, Allon E; Or, Reuven; Block, Colin; Strahilevitz, Jacob

    2015-12-01

    Invasive fungal infections are an important cause of morbidity and mortality after allogeneic haematopoietic stem cell transplantation. We evaluated, in our allogeneic stem cell transplant patients, the effect on the incidence of invasive fungal infection during neutropenia of a strategy combining a diagnostic-driven approach with chemoprophylaxis during higher risk periods of graft vs. host disease and prolonged neutropenia, using itraconazole oral solution with parenteral voriconazole bridging. One hundred and thirty patients admitted for allogeneic stem cell transplantation within two predefined 20 month periods were included in the study. Data for all patients were collected prospectively. Implementation of the protocol resulted in the administration of more prophylactic antifungals to more patients. Following implementation, there was a non-significant decrease in the overall number of invasive fungal infections (IFI) [11 of 65 patients (17.2%) vs. 4 of 65 patients (6.2%, P = 0.051)], as well as in the occurrence of invasive mould infections [8 of 65 patients (12.5%) vs. 2 of 65 patients (3.1%, P = 0.054)]. Survival rates at three and 6 months were not significantly affected. A combined diagnostic-driven approach and antifungal prophylaxis with oral itraconazole and an intravenous voriconazole bridging protocol, was associated with a reduced, albeit non-statistically significant, number of IFI in our medical centre. PMID:26429354

  12. Relationship between the Expression of Telomerase and Human Papillomavirus Infection in Invasive Uterine Cervical Carcinoma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SIMA Ni; CAI Liping; ZHU Yuanfang; WANG Wei; WANG Shixuan; MA Ding

    2007-01-01

    Telomerase activity was examined in invasive cervical carcinoma to assess whether it is activated during cervical malignant transformation and to look for its possible association with human papillomavirus (HPV) infection. Histologically confirmed invasive cervical carcinomas and benign cervices were assayed for telomerase activity by using a modified telomere repeat amplification protocol (TRAP). The same cases were subjected to polymerase chain reaction (PCR) detection of HPV by using consensus primers and type-specific (HPV types 16 and 18) primers. Telomerase activity was detected in 40 of 45 (88.9%) invasive cervical carcinomas and 2 (all chronic cervicitis) of 50 (4%) benign cervical lesions. HPV was detected in 36 (24 HPV-16 and 4 HPV-18 cases) of 45 (80%) invasive cervical carcinomas and 20 (11 HPV-16 and 1 HPV-18 cases) of 50 (40%) benign cervical changes. There was a significant correlation between the expression of telomerase with histological grade (φ=0.44, P<0.005), but no correlation was found between telomerase expression and HPV-18 (P>0.05). Although larger sample studies are needed, there seems to be a clear association between telomerase upregulation and HPV status, mainly HPV-16 infection.

  13. Metalloproteases of infective Ancylostoma hookworm larvae and their possible functions in tissue invasion and ecdysis.

    OpenAIRE

    Hotez, P; HAGGERTY, J; Hawdon, J.; Milstone, L; Gamble, H R; Schad, G.; Richards, F

    1990-01-01

    To infect their hosts, hookworm larvae must exsheath and migrate through connective tissue. A modified in vitro skin chamber was used to show that the human hookworm Ancylostoma duodenale and the zoonotic canine hookworm Ancylostoma caninum penetrate epidermis, basement membrane, and dermis in similar ways. These similarities in tissue invasion properties reflect the observed biochemical similarities in parasite protease composition. The larvae of both species contain protease activity that i...

  14. Role of Antifungal Susceptibility Testing in Non-Aspergillus Invasive Mold Infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamoth, Frédéric; Damonti, Lauro; Alexander, Barbara D

    2016-06-01

    No clinical breakpoints are available to delineate antifungal drug efficacy in non-Aspergillus invasive mold infections (NAIMIs). In this analysis of 39 NAIMI episodes, the MIC of the first-line antifungal drug was the most important predictor of therapeutic response. For amphotericin B, an MIC of ≤0.5 μg/ml was significantly associated with better 6-week outcomes. PMID:27008871

  15. Wolbachia in European Populations of the Invasive Pest Drosophila suzukii: Regional Variation in Infection Frequencies

    OpenAIRE

    Cattel, Julien; Kaur, Rupinder; Gibert, Patricia; Martinez, Julien; Fraimout, Antoine; Jiggins, Francis; Andrieux, Thibault; Siozios, Stefanos; Anfora, Gianfranco; Miller, Wolfgang; Rota-Stabelli, Omar; Mouton, Laurence

    2016-01-01

    The invasive pest Drosophila suzukii is characterized by a specific fresh-fruit targeting behavior and has quickly become a menace for the fruit economy of newly infested North American and European regions. D. suzukii carries a strain of the endosymbiotic bacterium Wolbachia, named wSuz, which has a low infection frequency and no reproductive manipulation capabilities in American populations of D. suzukii. To further understand the nature of wSuz biology and assess its utility as a tool for ...

  16. The iron link between malaria and invasive non-typhoid Salmonella infections

    OpenAIRE

    van Santen, Susanne; de Mast, Quirijn; Swinkels, Dorine W.; van der Ven, André J. A. M.

    2013-01-01

    Epidemiological studies have demonstrated an association between malaria and invasive non-typhoid Salmonella (NTS) infections, especially in children. We explore the role of iron as a possible co-factor in this association. Malarial disease, among others, is associated with enhanced erythrophagocytosis and inflammation, which increases the iron content of macrophages and thereby also the survival of Salmonellae spp within macrophages. Whether iron supplementation programs augment the risk of ...

  17. Diagnosis of Invasive Pneumococcal Infection by Serotype-Specific Urinary Antigen Detection

    OpenAIRE

    Leeming, John P.; Cartwright, Keith; Morris, Rhonwen; Martin, Siobhan A.; Smith, Michael D.

    2005-01-01

    Widespread use of conjugate pneumococcal polysaccharide-protein vaccines may alter the spectrum of pneumococci producing invasive disease. Novel sensitive diagnostic methods would be valuable for monitoring the epidemiology of pneumococcal disease within populations and vaccine recipients. Ideally, these methods should allow determination of the serotype of the infecting clone. Serotype-specific enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISA) for 13 capsular polysaccharides (types 1, 3, 4, 5, 6A, ...

  18. Stability of the wMel Wolbachia Infection following invasion into Aedes aegypti populations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ary A Hoffmann

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The wMel infection of Drosophila melanogaster was successfully transferred into Aedes aegypti mosquitoes where it has the potential to suppress dengue and other arboviruses. The infection was subsequently spread into two natural populations at Yorkeys Knob and Gordonvale near Cairns, Queensland in 2011. Here we report on the stability of the infection following introduction and we characterize factors influencing the ongoing dynamics of the infection in these two populations. While the Wolbachia infection always remained high and near fixation in both locations, there was a persistent low frequency of uninfected mosquitoes. These uninfected mosquitoes showed weak spatial structure at both release sites although there was some clustering around two areas in Gordonvale. Infected females from both locations showed perfect maternal transmission consistent with patterns previously established pre-release in laboratory tests. After >2 years under field conditions, the infection continued to show complete cytoplasmic incompatibility across multiple gonotrophic cycles but persistent deleterious fitness effects, suggesting that host effects were stable over time. These results point to the stability of Wolbachia infections and their impact on hosts following local invasion, and also highlight the continued persistence of uninfected individuals at a low frequency most likely due to immigration.

  19. Prevention of invasive fungal infections in immunocompromised patients: the role of delayed-release posaconazole

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soysal A

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Ahmet SoysalDivision of Pediatric Infectious Diseases, Department of Pediatrics, Faculty of Medicine, Marmara University, Istanbul, TurkeyAbstract: Posaconazole is a triazole antifungal agent that has broad-spectrum activity against many yeasts and filamentous fungi, including Candida species, Cryptococcus neoformans, Aspergillus species, and Zygomycetes. This drug has been approved for the prevention of invasive fungal infections in patients with neutropenia and for the treatment of invasive fungal infections in hematopoietic stem cell transplant recipients with graft-versus-host disease. Studies on the clinical efficacy, safety, tolerability, and cost-effectiveness of posaconazole therapy were performed using the oral suspension form of the drug. Pharmacokinetic studies have found that the oral suspension form of posaconazole has problemeatic bioavailability: its absorption is affected by concomitant medication and food. This article discusses the pharmacokinetic properties of the newly developed posaconazole delayed-release tablet formulation and reviews the efficacy, safety, and cost-effectiveness of both the oral suspension and the new tablet formulation. In conclusion, the posaconazole tablet formulation has better systemic bioavailability, thereby enabling once-daily administration and better absorption in the presence of concomitant medication and food. However, well-designed clinical studies are needed to evaluate the use of the tablet formulation in real-life settings.Keywords: posaconazole delayed-release tablet, prophylaxis, invasive fungal infections

  20. Epidemic of Postsurgical Infections Caused by Mycobacterium massiliense▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duarte, Rafael Silva; Lourenço, Maria Cristina Silva; Fonseca, Leila de Souza; Leão, Sylvia Cardoso; Amorim, Efigenia de Lourdes T.; Rocha, Ingrid L. L.; Coelho, Fabrice Santana; Viana-Niero, Cristina; Gomes, Karen Machado; da Silva, Marlei Gomes; de Oliveira Lorena, Nádia Suely; Pitombo, Marcos Bettini; Ferreira, Rosa M. C.; de Oliveira Garcia, Márcio Henrique; de Oliveira, Gisele Pinto; Lupi, Otilia; Vilaça, Bruno Rios; Serradas, Lúcia Rodrigues; Chebabo, Alberto; Marques, Elizabeth Andrade; Teixeira, Lúcia Martins; Dalcolmo, Margareth; Senna, Simone Gonçalves; Sampaio, Jorge Luiz Mello

    2009-01-01

    An epidemic of infections after video-assisted surgery (1,051 possible cases) caused by rapidly growing mycobacteria (RGM) and involving 63 hospitals in the state of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, occurred between August 2006 and July 2007. One hundred ninety-seven cases were confirmed by positive acid-fast staining and/or culture techniques. Thirty-eight hospitals had cases confirmed by mycobacterial culture, with a total of 148 available isolates recovered from 146 patients. Most (n = 144; 97.2%) isolates presented a PRA-hsp65 restriction pattern suggestive of Mycobacterium bolletii or Mycobacterium massiliense. Seventy-four of these isolates were further identified by hsp65 or rpoB partial sequencing, confirming the species identification as M. massiliense. Epidemic isolates showed susceptibility to amikacin (MIC at which 90% of the tested isolates are inhibited [MIC90], 8 μg/ml) and clarithromycin (MIC90, 0.25 μg/ml) but resistance to ciprofloxacin (MIC90, ≥32 μg/ml), cefoxitin (MIC90, 128 μg/ml), and doxycycline (MIC90, ≥64 μg/ml). Representative epidemic M. massiliense isolates that were randomly selected, including at least one isolate from each hospital where confirmed cases were detected, belonged to a single clone, as indicated by the analysis of pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) patterns. They also had the same PFGE pattern as that previously observed in two outbreaks that occurred in other Brazilian cities; we designated this clone BRA100. All five BRA100 M. massiliense isolates tested presented consistent tolerance to 2% glutaraldehyde. This is the largest epidemic of postsurgical infections caused by RGM reported in the literature to date in Brazil. PMID:19403765

  1. Emergence of unusual species of enterococci causing infections, South India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rao Sambasiva R

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Enterococci tend to be one of the leading causes of nosocomial infections, with E. faecalis and E. faecium accounting up to 90% of the clinical isolates. Nevertheless, the incidence of other species of enterococci from clinical sources shows an alarming increase with the properties of intrinsic resistance to several antibiotics including beta-lactams and glycopeptides. Thus proper identification of enterococci to species level is quintessential for management and prevention of these bacteria in any healthcare facility. Hence this work was undertaken to study the prevalence of unusual species of enterococci causing human infections, in a tertiary care hospital in South India. Methods The study was conducted in a tertiary care hospital in South India from July 2001 to June 2003. Isolates of enterococci were collected from various clinical specimens and speciated using extensive phenotypic and physiological tests. Antimicrobial susceptibility testing were performed and interpreted as per NCCLS guidelines. Whole cell protein (WCP fingerprinting of enterococci were done for species validation by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE and analyzed computationally. Results Our study showed the prevalence of unusual (non-faecalis and non-faecium enterococci and atypical (biochemical variant species of enterococci as 19% (46 isolates and 5% (12 isolates respectively. The 7 unusual species (46 isolates isolated and confirmed by phenotypic characterization includes: 15 E. gallinarum (6.2%, 10 E. avium (4.1%, 6 E. raffinosus (2.5%, 6 E. hirae (2.5%, 4 E. mundtii (1.7%, 3 E. casseliflavus-including the two atypical isolates (1.2% and 2 E. durans (0.8%. The 12 atypical enterococcal species (5% that showed aberrant sugar reactions in conventional phenotyping were confirmed as E. faecalis, E. faecium and E. casseliflavus respectively by WCP fingerprinting. The antimicrobial susceptibility testing depicted the

  2. The Inflammatory Kinase MAP4K4 Promotes Reactivation of Kaposi's Sarcoma Herpesvirus and Enhances the Invasiveness of Infected Endothelial Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Haas, Darya A.; Kiran Bala; Guntram Büsche; Magdalena Weidner-Glunde; Susann Santag; Semra Kati; Silvia Gramolelli; Modester Damas; Oliver Dittrich-Breiholz; Michael Kracht; Jessica Rückert; Zoltan Varga; György Keri; Schulz, Thomas F.

    2013-01-01

    Kaposi's sarcoma (KS) is a mesenchymal tumour, which is caused by Kaposi's sarcoma herpesvirus (KSHV) and develops under inflammatory conditions. KSHV-infected endothelial spindle cells, the neoplastic cells in KS, show increased invasiveness, attributed to the elevated expression of metalloproteinases (MMPs) and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2). The majority of these spindle cells harbour latent KSHV genomes, while a minority undergoes lytic reactivation with subsequent production of new virions and...

  3. Non invasive real-time monitoring of bacterial infection & therapeutic effect of anti-microbials in five mouse models

    OpenAIRE

    Barman, Tarani Kanta; Rao, Madhvi; Bhati, Ashish; Kishore, Krishna; Shukla, Gunjan; Kumar, Manoj; Mathur, Tarun; Pandya, Manisha; Dilip J. Upadhyay

    2011-01-01

    Background & objectives: In vivo imaging system has contributed significantly to the understanding of bacterial infection and efficacy of drugs in animal model. We report five rapid, reproducible, and non invasive murine pulmonary infection, skin and soft tissue infection, sepsis, and meningitis models using Xenogen bioluminescent strains and specialized in vivo imaging system (IVIS). Methods: The progression of bacterial infection in different target organs was evaluated by the photon intens...

  4. Serotype distribution of Streptococcus pneumoniae causing invasive disease in the Republic of Ireland.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Vickers, I

    2011-05-01

    The 7-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV7) was included in the routine infant immunization schedule in Ireland in September 2008. We determined the serotype of 977 S. pneumoniae isolates causing invasive disease between 2000-2002 and 2007-2008, assessed for the presence of the recently described serotype 6C and determined the susceptibility of isolates during 2007-2008 to penicillin and cefotaxime. Serotype 14 was the most common serotype during both periods and 7·7% of isolates previously typed as serotype 6A were serotype 6C. During 2000-2002 and 2007-2008, PCV7 could potentially have prevented 85% and 74% of invasive pneumococcal disease in the target population (i.e. children aged <2 years), respectively. The level of penicillin non-susceptibility was 17% in 2007-2008. Ongoing surveillance of serotypes is required to determine the impact of PCV7 in the Irish population and to assess the potential of new vaccines with expanded valency.

  5. Prevention and treatment of invasive fungal infection in preterm infants%早产儿侵袭性真菌感染的预防和治疗

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨传忠; 朱小瑜

    2013-01-01

    Invasive fungal infection is an important cause of mortality and morbidity in preterm infants.Extremely preterm and extremely low birth weight infants are at highest risk because of the intensive and invasive nature of the care that these infants receive.How to prevent and treat the invasive fungal infection in preterm infants has become a new hot spot in the neonatologists.This review focused the progress on treatment and prevention of invasive fungal infections in preterm infants.%新生儿,特别是早产儿是侵袭性真菌感染的高危人群,造成早产儿相关疾病的发病率和病死率的增加,如何预防和治疗侵袭性真菌感染,减少其对早产儿的损伤,成为新生儿科医生关注的热点.本文主要对早产儿侵袭性真菌感染的预防和治疗作重点阐述.

  6. Helicobacter pylori virulence factors in duodenal ulceration: A primary cause or a secondary infection causing chronicity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Frank I Tovey; Michael Hobsley; John Holton

    2006-01-01

    Reports from countries with a high prevalence of Helicobacter pylori (H pylori) infection do not show a proportionately high prevalence of duodenal ulceration,suggesting the possibility that H pylori cannot be a primary cause of duodenal ulceration. It has been mooted that this discrepancy might be explained by variations in the prevalence of virulence factors in different populations. The aim of this paper is to determine whether the published literature gives support to this possibility. The relevant literature was reviewed and analyzed separately for countries with a high and low prevalence of H pylori infection and virulence factors. Although virulent strains of H pylori were significantly more often present in patients with duodenal ulcer than without the disease in countries with a low prevalence of H pyloriinfection in the population, there was no difference in the prevalence of virulence factors between duodenal ulcer, non- ulcer dyspepsia or normal subjects in many countries, where the prevalence of both H pylori infection and of virulence factors was high.In these countries, the presence of virulence factors was not predictive the clinical outcome. To explain the association between virulence factors and duodenal ulcer in countries where H pylori prevalence is low,only two papers were found that give little support to the usual model proposed, namely that organisms with the virulence factors are more likely than those without them to initiate a duodenal ulcer. We offer an alternative hypothesis that suggests virulence factors are more likely to interfere with the healing of a previously produced ulcer. The presence of virulence factors only correlates with the prevalence of duodenal ulcer in countries where the prevalence of H pylori is low. There is very little evidence that virulence factors initiate duodenal ulceration, but they may be related to failure of the ulcer to heal.

  7. Serotypes of Streptococcus pneumoniae causing major pneumococcal infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu. V. Lobzin

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available First in Russia prospective non-interventional hospital-based study on Streptococcus pneumoniae serotypes causing meningitis and acute otitis media (AOM in children and community-acquired pneumonia (CAP in children and adults, as well as serotype coverage by pneumococcal conjugate vaccines (PCV’s of different composition has been conducted. Serotypes 19F, 14 and serogroup 6 are the leading in meningitis; serotype coverage is 70,6% for PCV7, and 76,5% – for PCV10 and PCV13. Among S. pneumoniae serotypes causing AOM 19F, 3, 23F and serogroup 6 have been the most prevalent in Saint Petersburg. PCV7 and PCV10 provide equal serotypes coverage in AOM – 63,2% among children 0–2 years old, and 32,5% among children 5–17 years old. PCV13 covers up to 79% of serotypes in infants. In CAP PCV7 and PCV10 provide 57,1% serotype coverage in children and 56,1% – in adults. Serotype coverage in CAP for PCV13 has been 14,3% and 34,5% higher for children and adults, correspondingly. Obtained data supports PCV inclusion in children immunization program in Saint Petersburg, whereas PCV13 provides the broadest serotype coverage. In the course PCV’s implementation continued pneumococcal infection surveillance is advisable.

  8. Intra-cellular Staphylococcus aureus alone causes infection in vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T Hamza

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Chronic and recurrent bone infections occur frequently but have not been explained. Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus is often found among chronic and recurrent infections and may be responsible for such infections. One possible reason is that S. aureus can internalize and survive within host cells and by doing so, S. aureus can evade both host defense mechanisms and most conventional antibiotic treatments. In this study, we hypothesized that intra-cellular S. aureus could induce infections in vivo. Osteoblasts were infected with S. aureus and, after eliminating extra-cellular S. aureus, inoculated into an open fracture rat model. Bacterial cultures and radiographic observations at post-operative day 21 confirmed local bone infections in animals inoculated with intra-cellular S. aureus within osteoblasts alone. We present direct in vivo evidence that intra-cellular S. aureus could be sufficient to induce bone infection in animals; we found that intra-cellular S. aureus inoculation of as low as 102 colony forming units could induce severe bone infections. Our data may suggest that intra-cellular S. aureus can “hide” in host cells during symptom-free periods and, under certain conditions, they may escape and lead to infection recurrence. Intra-cellular S. aureus therefore could play an important role in the pathogenesis of S. aureus infections, especially those chronic and recurrent infections in which disease episodes may be separated by weeks, months, or even years.

  9. Non-invasive diagnosis of H pylori infection: Evaluation of serological tests with and without current infection marker CIM

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the performance of commercially available immunochromatographic (ICT) and immunoblot tests covering the current infection marker CIM and conventional ELISA for the diagnosis of Hpylori infection in adult dyspeptic patients. METHODS: Consecutive non-treated dyspeptic patients undergoing diagnostic endoscopy were tested for H pylori infection by culture, rapid urease test, and histology of gastric biopsy specimens. Serum from 61 H pylori infected and 21 non-infected patients were tested for anti-H pylori IgG antibodies by commercial ELISA (Accu Bind TM ELISA, Monobind, USA), ICT(Assure(R) H pylori Rapid Test, Genelabs Diagnostics, Singapore),and immunoblot (Helico Blot 2.1,Genelabs Diagnostics, Singapore) assays. ICT and immunoblot kits cover CIN among other parameters and their performance with and without CIM was evaluated separately. RESULTS: Sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV),negative predictive value (NPV),and accuracy of ELISA were 96.7%,42.8%,83.1%,81.8%,and 82.9%,of ICT were 90.1%,80.9%,93.2%,73.9%,and 87.8%,of ICE with CIM were 88.5%,90.4%,96.4%,73.0%,and 89.0%,of immunoblot were 98.3%,80.9%,93.7%,94.4%,and 93.9%,and of immunoblot with CIM were 98.3%,90.4%,96.7%,95.0%,and 96.3%,respectively.CONCLUSION:Immunoblot with CIM had the best performance. ICE with CIM was found to be more specific and accurate than the conventional ELISA and may be useful for non-invasive diagnosis of H pylori infection.

  10. Invasive Candida Infections and the Harm From Antibacterial Drugs in Critically Ill Patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jens Ulrik Stæhr; Hein, Lars; Lundgren, Bettina;

    2015-01-01

    infection was more frequent in the high exposure arm (6.2%; 27/437) than in standard exposure arm (3.3%; 14/424) (hazard ratio = 1.9; 95% CI, 1.0-3.6; p = 0.05). Ciprofloxacin used at study entry independently predicted invasive Candida infection (adjusted hazard ratio = 2.1 [1.1-4.1]); the risk gradually...... increased with duration of ciprofloxacin therapy: six of 384 in patients not exposed (1.6%), eight of 212 (3.8%) when used for 1-2 days (hazard ratio = 2.5; 95% CI, 0.9-7.3), and 31 of 493 (6.3%) when used for 3 days (hazard ratio = 3.8; 95% CI, 1.6-9.3; p = 0.002). Patients with any ciprofloxacin......-containing antibiotic regimen the first 3 days in the trial had a higher risk of invasive Candida infection than did patients on any antibiotic regimen not containing ciprofloxacin (unadjusted hazard ratio = 3.7; 95% CI, 1.6-8.7; p = 0.003; adjusted hazard ratio, 3.4; 95% CI, 1.4-8.0; p = 0.006). CONCLUSIONS: High...

  11. Invasive Fungal Infections in Patients with Hematologic Malignancies (Aurora Project: Lights and Shadows During 18-Months Surveillance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giorgina Specchia

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this multicenter prospective study was to evaluate the incidence of invasive fungal infections (IFIs in adult and pediatric patients with hematologic malignancies, involving nine nosocomial facilities in Southern Italy over a period of 18 months. Furthermore, results of an environmental microbial surveillance routinely carried out in some of the enrolled hospitals are reported. A total of 589 onco-hematological patients were enrolled and 27 IFIs were documented. The main infections were caused by yeasts, more than filamentous fungi (overall incidence of 2.7% and 1.9%, respectively. The yeasts were mainly represented by Candida spp. (87.5%, all isolated by blood cultures; C. parapsilosis was the most common species. Among mould infections, the most frequent site was the lung, with regard to aspergillosis (81.8%. In six of the 10 patients with suspected aspergillosis, the diagnosis was made by the detection of galactomannan and (1,3-β-d-glucan antigens. The microbiological surveillance carried out on 156 air, 312 water and 312 surface samples revealed low environmental contamination: Alternaria alternata was the only fungus isolated from two surface samples. Our data, especially the low occurrence of filamentous fungi, suggest a particular local epidemiology. Further studies are needed to confirm this microbiological trend in onco-hematological patients in Southern Italy, the results of which might be helpful to improve the management of these patients.

  12. 早产儿侵袭性真菌感染的防治%Diagnosis. treatment and prevention of invasive fungal infection in preterm infants

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李秋平; 封志纯

    2011-01-01

    侵袭性真菌感染是早产儿致死和致残的重要原因,近年来,国内相关报道日益增多.该文对早产儿侵袭性真菌感染的国内外发生现状及诊断、治疗和预防方面的进展作一简要介绍.%lnvasive fungal infection is one of the main causes of death and disability in premature infants. In re cent years, there is an increasing number of reports related to invasive fungal infections in China. This review described the progress in epidemiology, diagnosis, treatment and prevention of invasive fungal infeetians in preterm infants. (J Clin Pediatr ,2011,29( 9 ) :801-806)

  13. First Cases of Cutaneous Leishmaniasis Caused by Leishmania (Viannia) naiffi Infection in Surinam

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P.P.A.M. van Thiel; T. van Gool; P.A. Kager; A. Bart

    2010-01-01

    Cutaneous leishmaniasis in Surinam is generally caused by infection by Leishmania guyanensis. We report three cases of infection with Leishmania (Viannia) naiffi, a Leishmania species not described from Surinam before. Treatment with pentamidine proved to be effective

  14. Congenital cytomegalovirus infection: a cause of renal dysplasia?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Maren; Hecht, Jonathan L; Boyd, Theonia; Rosen, Seymour

    2007-01-01

    Cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection is one of the most frequently encountered viral infections of the fetus and induces a wide range of histologic and clinical manifestations. Congenital abnormalities are typically restricted to the central nervous system despite evidence of CMV inclusions occurring in most epithelial cells. Although tissue injury and even glomerulonephritis have been observed in congenital CMV infections, renal multicystic dysplasia has not been reported. Herein, we describe a case of unilateral renal dysplasia in a 19-week fetus with concurrent CMV infection. We believe the present case to be the first description of a virus apparently inducing renal multicystic dysplasia. PMID:17638423

  15. Improving Diagnosis and Treatment of Staphylococcus aureus Infections : Experimental Studies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S. van den Berg (Sanne)

    2015-01-01

    markdownabstract__Abstract__ Staphylococcus aureus is an opportunistic pathogen that causes a variety of infections, ranging from mild skin infections like furuncles and impetigo, to severe, lifethreatening infections including endocarditis, osteomyelitis and pneumonia. Invasive infections are freq

  16. Nosema spp. infections cause no energetic stress in tolerant honeybees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurze, Christoph; Mayack, Christopher; Hirche, Frank; Stangl, Gabriele I; Le Conte, Yves; Kryger, Per; Moritz, Robin F A

    2016-06-01

    Host-pathogen coevolution leads to reciprocal adaptations, allowing pathogens to increase host exploitation or hosts to minimise costs of infection. As pathogen resistance is often associated with considerable costs, tolerance may be an evolutionary alternative. Here, we examined the effect of two closely related and highly host dependent intracellular gut pathogens, Nosema apis and Nosema ceranae, on the energetic state in Nosema tolerant and sensitive honeybees facing the infection. We quantified the three major haemolymph carbohydrates fructose, glucose, and trehalose using high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) as a measure for host energetic state. Trehalose levels in the haemolymph were negatively associated with N. apis infection intensity and with N. ceranae infection regardless of the infection intensity in sensitive honeybees. Nevertheless, there was no such association in Nosema spp. infected tolerant honeybees. These findings suggest that energy availability in tolerant honeybees was not compromised by the infection. This result obtained at the individual level may also have implications at the colony level where workers in spite of a Nosema infection can still perform as well as healthy bees, maintaining colony efficiency and productivity. PMID:26976406

  17. Invasion Genes Are Not Required for Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhimurium To Breach the Intestinal Epithelium: Evidence That Salmonella Pathogenicity Island 1 Has Alternative Functions during Infection

    OpenAIRE

    Murray, Rose Ann; Lee, Catherine A.

    2000-01-01

    Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium invasion genes are necessary for bacterial invasion of intestinal epithelial cells and are thought to allow salmonellae to enter and cross the intestinal epithelium during infection. Many invasion genes are encoded on Salmonella pathogenicity island 1 (SPI1), and their expression is activated by HilA, a transcription factor also encoded on SPI1. We have studied the role of Salmonella invasion genes during infection of mice following intragastric inocula...

  18. Invasive cranial mycosis our experiences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tapas Kumbhkar

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Fungi can cause serious cranial infections in immunocompromised and diabetic patients. Common pathogens mainly include Aspergillus and Mucor. These organisms cause tissue invasion and destruction of adjacent structures (e.g. orbit, ethmoid, sphenoid, maxillary & cavernous sinuses. Mortality and morbidity rate is high despite combined surgical, antifungal and antidiabetic treatment. We present our experience of six cases with such infection.

  19. Quantitative non-invasive intracellular imaging of Plasmodium falciparum infected human erythrocytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edward, Kert; Farahi, Faramarz

    2014-05-01

    Malaria is a virulent pathological condition which results in over a million annual deaths. The parasitic agent Plasmodium falciparum has been extensively studied in connection with this epidemic but much remains unknown about its development inside the red blood cell host. Optical and fluorescence imaging are among the two most common procedures for investigating infected erythrocytes but both require the introduction of exogenous contrast agents. In this letter, we present a procedure for the non-invasive in situ imaging of malaria infected red blood cells. The procedure is based on the utilization of simultaneously acquired quantitative phase and independent topography data to extract intracellular information. Our method allows for the identification of the developmental stages of the parasite and facilitates in situ analysis of the morphological changes associated with the progression of this disease. This information may assist in the development of efficacious treatment therapies for this condition.

  20. Quantitative non-invasive intracellular imaging of Plasmodium falciparum infected human erythrocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malaria is a virulent pathological condition which results in over a million annual deaths. The parasitic agent Plasmodium falciparum has been extensively studied in connection with this epidemic but much remains unknown about its development inside the red blood cell host. Optical and fluorescence imaging are among the two most common procedures for investigating infected erythrocytes but both require the introduction of exogenous contrast agents. In this letter, we present a procedure for the non-invasive in situ imaging of malaria infected red blood cells. The procedure is based on the utilization of simultaneously acquired quantitative phase and independent topography data to extract intracellular information. Our method allows for the identification of the developmental stages of the parasite and facilitates in situ analysis of the morphological changes associated with the progression of this disease. This information may assist in the development of efficacious treatment therapies for this condition. (letters)

  1. Avirulent strains of Toxoplasma gondii infect macrophages by active invasion from the phagosome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yanlin; Marple, Andrew H; Ferguson, David J P; Bzik, David J; Yap, George S

    2014-04-29

    Unlike most intracellular pathogens that gain access into host cells through endocytic pathways, Toxoplasma gondii initiates infection at the cell surface by active penetration through a moving junction and subsequent formation of a parasitophorous vacuole. Here, we describe a noncanonical pathway for T. gondii infection of macrophages, in which parasites are initially internalized through phagocytosis, and then actively invade from within a phagosomal compartment to form a parasitophorous vacuole. This phagosome to vacuole invasion (PTVI) pathway may represent an intermediary link between the endocytic and the penetrative routes for host cell entry by intracellular pathogens. The PTVI pathway is preferentially used by avirulent strains of T. gondii and confers an infectious advantage over virulent strains for macrophage tropism. PMID:24733931

  2. Cucumispora ornata n. sp. (Fungi: Microsporidia) infecting invasive 'demon shrimp' (Dikerogammarus haemobaphes) in the United Kingdom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bojko, Jamie; Dunn, Alison M; Stebbing, Paul D; Ross, Stuart H; Kerr, Rose C; Stentiford, Grant D

    2015-06-01

    Dikerogammarus haemobaphes, the 'demon shrimp', is an amphipod native to the Ponto-Caspian region. This species invaded the UK in 2012 and has become widely established. Dikerogammarus haemobaphes has the potential to introduce non-native pathogens into the UK, creating a potential threat to native fauna. This study describes a novel species of microsporidian parasite infecting 72.8% of invasive D. haemobaphes located in the River Trent, UK. The microsporidium infection was systemic throughout the host; mainly targeting the sarcolemma of muscle tissues. Electron microscopy revealed this parasite to be diplokaryotic and have 7-9 turns of the polar filament. The microsporidium is placed into the 'Cucumispora' genus based on host histopathology, fine detail parasite ultrastructure, a highly similar life-cycle and SSU rDNA sequence phylogeny. Using this data this novel microsporidian species is named Cucumispora ornata, where 'ornata' refers to the external beading present on the mature spore stage of this organism. Alongside a taxonomic discussion, the presence of a novel Cucumispora sp. in the United Kingdom is discussed and related to the potential control of invasive Dikerogammarus spp. in the UK and the health of native species which may come into contact with this parasite. PMID:25929755

  3. Invasive Fungal Infections in the ICU: How to Approach, How to Treat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisabeth Paramythiotou

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Invasive fungal infections are a growing problem in critically ill patients and are associated with increased morbidity and mortality. Most of them are due to Candida species, especially Candida albicans. Invasive candidiasis includes candidaemia, disseminated candidiasis with deep organ involvement and chronic disseminated candidiasis. During the last decades rare pathogenic fungi, such as Aspergillus species, Zygomycetes, Fusarium species and Scedosporium have also emerged. Timely diagnosis and proper treatment are of paramount importance for a favorable outcome. Besides blood cultures, several laboratory tests have been developed in the hope of facilitating an earlier detection of infection. The antifungal armamentarium has also been expanded allowing a treatment choice tailored to individual patients’ needs. The physician can choose among the old class of polyenes, the older and newer azoles and the echinocandins. Factors related to patient’s clinical situation and present co-morbidities, local epidemiology data and purpose of treatment (prophylactic, pre-emptive, empiric or definitive should be taken into account for the appropriate choice of antifungal agent.

  4. Necrotizing Soft Tissue Infection Caused by Spilled Gallstones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandit, Narendra; Kumar, Hemanth; Verma, GR

    2016-01-01

    We report a case of a 57-year-old woman who presented with a necrotizing soft tissue infection of the right anterior abdominal wall, 1 year after open cholecystectomy for gallbladder perforation. Surgical exploration revealed pigmented gallstones along with pus in the abdominal wall and gallbladder fossa. Intraoperative spillage of gallstones is common during both open and laparoscopic cholecystectomy, but, in rare cases, can lead to serious complications including necrotizing infection of the abdominal wall. PMID:27144208

  5. Ocular infection caused by Psychrobacter immobilis acquired in the hospital.

    OpenAIRE

    Gini, G A

    1990-01-01

    The name Psychrobacter immobilis recently has been proposed for a group of chiefly psychrotrophic, aerobic, gram-negative, nonmotile, oxidase-positive coccobacilli commonly found associated with fish, processed meat, and poultry products. This article reports an ocular infection in a 12-day-old newborn who acquired the infection in the hospital, probably because of frequent manipulations in a closed aerated incubator. Also, this report intends to alert microbiologists to opportunistic infecti...

  6. [The impact of nematode invasions on the pattern of Cryptosporidium parvum infection in wild rodents].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuliś-Małkowska, Karolina

    2007-01-01

    Fragmentation of the environment by natural barriers (lakes, mountain ranges) and human activities (towns, major roads, agriculture) can lead to isolated subpopulations of hosts. The study was carried out in Mazury Lake District in North-East of Poland, the region rich in forests, lakes, rivers and canals, which are able to create passable such barriers. Population of bank voles (Myodes glareolus) and yellow-necked mice (Apodemus flavicollis)--dominant woodland rodents--showed local differences in helminth communities in fragmented forest habitat. The sites were chosen on the basis of the similarity of their habitat structure and type, and isolation from one another. The impact of nematode (Heligmosomoididae) infections on co-occurrence and dynamic of Cryptosporidium parvum infection was studied in both rodent species Myodes glareolus (n=781) and Apodemusflavicollis (n=302) from three different habitats. Presented results clearly revealed that natural nematode invasion could facilitate the presence of chronic infections of Cryptosporidium parvum in wild rodent populations. Also, the intrinsic (host sex and year) as well as extrinsic (season and year of study) factors have obvious effect on dynamics of infections with both groups of parasites. However, there are also some evidences that steroids hormones associated with stress and reproduction may mediate trade-offs between physiology and immune function and can affect co-occurrence of both groups of parasites. PMID:18075159

  7. New perspectives on the gastrointestinal mode of transmission in invasive Listeria monocytogenes infection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schlech, W.F. III

    1984-01-01

    The route or mechanism of transmission of Listeria monocytogenes from its rural veterinary reservoir to newborn and older human populations has been obscure. Anecdotal reports of milk-borne infection from cows with Listeria mastitis have been published, but intensive investigations of small outbreaks of L. monocytogenes infections in humans have not supported a gastrointestinal mode of infection. Several recent studies, however, strongly suggest this possibility, and case-control studies of epidemic listeriosis in the Canadian Maritime provinces in 1981 documented an association between ingestion of uncooked vegetables and the development of illness (p = 0.02). In that study, coleslaw from a regional producer which was distributed throughout the Maritimes was considered to be the vehicle of transmission. Cabbage, the raw product in the production of coleslaw, was contaminated at a farm prior to arrival at the plant. Contamination occurred through fertilization with raw manure from a flock of sheep known to harbor L. monocytogenes. Therefore, an indirect link was established between Listeria monocytogenes infection of sheep on a cabbage farm and subsequent development of invasive listeriosis in humans. This study supports findings from other epidemiologic studies of human listeriosis and is consistent with results of investigations into the mode of transmission of natural and laboratory-acquired listeriosis in animals. 34 references.

  8. Pharmacokinetics and safety of posaconazole delayed-release tablets for invasive fungal infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wiederhold NP

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Nathan P Wiederhold Departments of Pathology and Medicine/Infectious Diseases, University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, South Texas Reference Laboratories, San Antonio, TX, USA Abstract: Posaconazole is a broad-spectrum triazole antifungal agent with potent activity against various pathogenic fungi, including yeast and moulds. Clinical studies have demonstrated that this agent is efficacious as prophylaxis against invasive fungal infections in patients at high risk, and may also be useful as salvage therapy against invasive aspergillosis and mucormycosis. However, the bioavailability of posaconazole following administration by oral suspension, which was the only formulation clinically available for many years, is highly variable and negatively influenced by several factors. Because of this, many patients had subtherapeutic or undetectable posaconazole levels when the oral suspension was used. To overcome this limitation, a delayed-release tablet was developed and is now available for clinical use. Hot-melt extrusion technology is used to combine a pH-sensitive polymer with posaconazole to produce a formulation that releases the drug in the elevated pH of the intestine where absorption occurs rather than in the low-pH environment of the stomach. This results in enhanced bioavailability and increased posaconazole exposure. Studies in healthy volunteers have demonstrated significantly higher and more consistent exposures with the tablet formulation compared to the oral suspension. In addition, pharmacokinetic parameters following administration of the tablets were not significantly affected by medications that raise gastric pH or increase gastric motility, and the tablets could also be administered without regard to food. Similar results have also been found in patients at high risk for invasive fungal infections who have received posaconazole tablets. The tablet formulation also appears to be well tolerated to date, although data

  9. Pharmacokinetics and safety of posaconazole delayed-release tablets for invasive fungal infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiederhold, Nathan P

    2016-01-01

    Posaconazole is a broad-spectrum triazole antifungal agent with potent activity against various pathogenic fungi, including yeast and moulds. Clinical studies have demonstrated that this agent is efficacious as prophylaxis against invasive fungal infections in patients at high risk, and may also be useful as salvage therapy against invasive aspergillosis and mucormycosis. However, the bioavailability of posaconazole following administration by oral suspension, which was the only formulation clinically available for many years, is highly variable and negatively influenced by several factors. Because of this, many patients had subtherapeutic or undetectable posaconazole levels when the oral suspension was used. To overcome this limitation, a delayed-release tablet was developed and is now available for clinical use. Hot-melt extrusion technology is used to combine a pH-sensitive polymer with posaconazole to produce a formulation that releases the drug in the elevated pH of the intestine where absorption occurs rather than in the low-pH environment of the stomach. This results in enhanced bioavailability and increased posaconazole exposure. Studies in healthy volunteers have demonstrated significantly higher and more consistent exposures with the tablet formulation compared to the oral suspension. In addition, pharmacokinetic parameters following administration of the tablets were not significantly affected by medications that raise gastric pH or increase gastric motility, and the tablets could also be administered without regard to food. Similar results have also been found in patients at high risk for invasive fungal infections who have received posaconazole tablets. The tablet formulation also appears to be well tolerated to date, although data regarding clinical efficacy are needed. PMID:26730212

  10. Fitness of wAlbB Wolbachia Infection in Aedes aegypti: Parameter Estimates in an Outcrossed Background and Potential for Population Invasion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Axford, Jason K; Ross, Perran A; Yeap, Heng Lin; Callahan, Ashley G; Hoffmann, Ary A

    2016-03-01

    Wolbachia endosymbionts are potentially useful tools for suppressing disease transmission by Aedes aegypti mosquitoes because Wolbachia can interfere with the transmission of dengue and other viruses as well as causing deleterious effects on their mosquito hosts. Most recent research has focused on the wMel infection, but other infections also influence viral transmission and may spread in natural populations. Here, we focus on the wAlbB infection in an Australian outbred background and show that this infection has many features that facilitate its invasion into natural populations including strong cytoplasmic incompatibility, a lack of effect on larval development, an equivalent mating success to uninfected males and perfect maternal transmission fidelity. On the other hand, the infection has deleterious effects when eggs are held in a dried state, falling between wMel and the more virulent wMelPop Wolbachia strains. The impact of this infection on lifespan also appears to be intermediate, consistent with the observation that this infection has a titer in adults between wMel and wMelPop. Population cage experiments indicate that the wAlbB infection establishes in cages when introduced at a frequency of 22%, suggesting that this strain could be successfully introduced into populations and subsequently persist and spread. PMID:26711515

  11. Clonal Structure and Characterization of Staphylococcus aureus Strains from Invasive Infections in Paediatric Patients from South Poland: Association between Age, spa Types, Clonal Complexes, and Genetic Markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilczyszyn, Weronika M; Sabat, Artur J; Akkerboom, Viktoria; Szkarlat, Anna; Klepacka, Joanna; Sowa-Sierant, Iwona; Wasik, Barbara; Kosecka-Strojek, Maja; Buda, Aneta; Miedzobrodzki, Jacek; Friedrich, Alexander W

    2016-01-01

    The aim of current study was to examine clonal structure and genetic profile of invasive Staphylococcus aureus isolates recovered from infants and children treated at the Jagiellonian University Children's Hospital of Krakow, Poland. The 107 invasive S. aureus isolates, collected between February 2012 and August 2014, were analysed retrospectively. Antimicrobial susceptibility testing, spa typing and DNA microarray analysis were performed to determine clonal distribution, diversity and gene content in regard to patients characteristics. In total, 107 isolates were recovered from 88 patients with clinical symptoms of invasive bacterial infection. The final set of 92 non-duplicate samples included 38 MRSA isolates. Additionally, a set of 54 S. aureus isolates collected during epidemiological screening was genotyped and analysed. There were 72 healthcare-associated (HCA) and 20 community-onset (CO) infection events caused by 33 and 5 MRSA isolates, respectively. The majority of isolates were affiliated with the major European clonal complexes CC5 (t003, spa-CC 002), CC45 (spa-CC 015), CC7 or CC15 (t084, t091, spa-CC 084). Two epidemic clones (CC5-MRSA-II or CC45-MRSA-IV) dominated among MRSA isolates, while MSSA population contained 15 different CCs. The epidemiological screening isolates belonged to similar genetic lineages as those collected from invasive infection cases. The HCA infection events, spa types t003, t2642 or CC5 were significantly associated with infections occurring in neonates and children under 5 years of age. Moreover, carriage of several genetic markers, including erm(A), sea (N315), egc-cluster, chp was significantly higher in isolates obtained from children in this age group. The spa types t091 and t008 were underrepresented among patients aged 5 years or younger, whereas spa type t008, CC8 and presence of splE was associated with infection in children aged 10 years or older. The HCA-MRSA strains were most frequently found in children under 5

  12. Systems biology analysis of Brucella infected Peyer's patch reveals rapid invasion with modest transient perturbations of the host transcriptome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos A Rossetti

    Full Text Available Brucella melitensis causes the most severe and acute symptoms of all Brucella species in human beings and infects hosts primarily through the oral route. The epithelium covering domed villi of jejunal-ileal Peyer's patches is an important site of entry for several pathogens, including Brucella. Here, we use the calf ligated ileal loop model to study temporal in vivo Brucella-infected host molecular and morphological responses. Our results document Brucella bacteremia occurring within 30 min after intraluminal inoculation of the ileum without histopathologic traces of lesions. Based on a system biology Dynamic Bayesian Network modeling approach (DBN of microarray data, a very early transient perturbation of the host enteric transcriptome was associated with the initial host response to Brucella contact that is rapidly averted allowing invasion and dissemination. A detailed analysis revealed active expression of Syndecan 2, Integrin alpha L and Integrin beta 2 genes, which may favor initial Brucella adhesion. Also, two intestinal barrier-related pathways (Tight Junction and Trefoil Factors Initiated Mucosal Healing were significantly repressed in the early stage of infection, suggesting subversion of mucosal epithelial barrier function to facilitate Brucella transepithelial migration. Simultaneously, the strong activation of the innate immune response pathways would suggest that the host mounts an appropriate protective immune response; however, the expression of the two key genes that encode innate immunity anti-Brucella cytokines such as TNF-α and IL12p40 were not significantly changed throughout the study. Furthermore, the defective expression of Toll-Like Receptor Signaling pathways may partially explain the lack of proinflammatory cytokine production and consequently the absence of morphologically detectable inflammation at the site of infection. Cumulatively, our results indicate that the in vivo pathogenesis of the early infectious process

  13. Intravenous inoculation of a bat-associated rabies virus causes lethal encephalopathy in mice through invasion of the brain via neurosecretory hypothalamic fibers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirjam A R Preuss

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available The majority of rabies virus (RV infections are caused by bites or scratches from rabid carnivores or bats. Usually, RV utilizes the retrograde transport within the neuronal network to spread from the infection site to the central nervous system (CNS where it replicates in neuronal somata and infects other neurons via trans-synaptic spread. We speculate that in addition to the neuronal transport of the virus, hematogenous spread from the site of infection directly to the brain after accidental spill over into the vascular system might represent an alternative way for RV to invade the CNS. So far, it is unknown whether hematogenous spread has any relevance in RV pathogenesis. To determine whether certain RV variants might have the capacity to invade the CNS from the periphery via hematogenous spread, we infected mice either intramuscularly (i.m. or intravenously (i.v. with the dog-associated RV DOG4 or the silver-haired bat-associated RV SB. In addition to monitoring the progression of clinical signs of rabies we used immunohistochemistry and quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR to follow the spread of the virus from the infection site to the brain. In contrast to i.m. infection where both variants caused a lethal encephalopathy, only i.v. infection with SB resulted in the development of a lethal infection. While qRT-PCR did not reveal major differences in virus loads in spinal cord or brain at different times after i.m. or i.v. infection of SB, immunohistochemical analysis showed that only i.v. administered SB directly infected the forebrain. The earliest affected regions were those hypothalamic nuclei, which are connected by neurosecretory fibers to the circumventricular organs neurohypophysis and median eminence. Our data suggest that hematogenous spread of SB can lead to a fatal encephalopathy through direct retrograde invasion of the CNS at the neurovascular interface of the hypothalamus-hypophysis system

  14. [Nosocomial infections associated to invasive devices in the intensive care units of a national hospital of Lima, Peru].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chincha, Omayra; Cornelio, Elia; Valverde, Violeta; Acevedo, Mónica

    2013-01-01

    In order to describe the incidence of nosocomial infections associated to invasive devices in intensive care units (UCI) of the National Hospital Cayetano Heredia, a retrospective observational study was conducted using the data from the Office of Epidemiology and Environmental Health from 2010 to 2012. A total number of 222 nosocomial infections were reported; the general medicine UCI reported the highest incidence of pneumonia cases associated to a mechanical ventilator in 1000 days of use of the device (28.6); infection of the blood stream associated to central venous catheter (11.9), and infection of the urinary tract associated to a catheter (8,1). The main infectious agents isolated were Pseudomona sp. (32.3%) in the emergency UCI, negative Staphylococcus coagulasa (36%) in the general medicine UCI and Candida sp (69.2%) in the Surgery UCI. The rates of infections associated to invasive devices were high as in other national hospitals with limited resources and infrastructure. PMID:24448938

  15. ETS2 and Twist1 promote invasiveness of Helicobacter pylori-infected gastric cancer cells by inducing Siah2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Lopamudra; Kokate, Shrikant Babanrao; Rath, Suvasmita; Rout, Niranjan; Singh, Shivaram Prasad; Crowe, Sheila Eileen; Mukhopadhyay, Asish K; Bhattacharyya, Asima

    2016-06-01

    Helicobacter pylori infection is one of the most potent factors leading to gastric carcinogenesis. The seven in absentia homologue (Siah2) is an E3 ubiquitin ligase which has been implicated in various cancers but its role in H. pylori-mediated gastric carcinogenesis has not been established. We investigated the involvement of Siah2 in gastric cancer metastasis which was assessed by invasiveness and migration of H. pylori-infected gastric epithelial cancer cells. Cultured gastric cancer cells (GCCs) MKN45, AGS and Kato III showed significantly induced expression of Siah2, increased invasiveness and migration after being challenged with the pathogen. Siah2-expressing stable cells showed increased invasiveness and migration after H. pylori infection. Siah2 was transcriptionally activated by E26 transformation-specific sequence 2 (ETS2)- and Twist-related protein 1 (Twist1) induced in H. pylori-infected gastric epithelial cells. These transcription factors dose-dependently enhanced the aggressiveness of infected GCCs. Our data suggested that H. pylori-infected GCCs gained cell motility and invasiveness through Siah2 induction. As gastric cancer biopsy samples also showed highly induced expression of ETS2, Twist1 and Siah2 compared with noncancerous gastric tissue, we surmise that ETS2- and Twist1-mediated Siah2 up-regulation has potential diagnostic and prognostic significance and could be targeted for therapeutic purpose. PMID:27048589

  16. Characterization of erythromycin-resistant Streptococcus pneumoniae isolates causing invasive diseases in Chinese children

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MA Xiang; YAO Kai-hu; XIE Gui-lin; ZHENG YUE-jie; WANG Chuan-qing; SHANG Yun-xiao; WANG Hui-yun

    2013-01-01

    Background Erythromycin-resistant Streptococcus pneumoniae isolates that causing invasive pneumococcal diseases (IPD) in Chinese children remain uncharacterized.This study aims to identify the resistance genes associated with erythromycin resistance and to determine the genetic relationships of IPD isolates in Chinese children.Methods A total of 171 S.pneumoniae strains were isolated from 11 medical centers in China from 2006 to 2008.All the isolates were characterized via serotyping and antibiotic susceptibility determination.The erythromycin-resistant isolates were further characterized via ermB and mefA gene detection,multi-locus sequence typing analysis,and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis.Results A total of 164 (95.9%) isolates showed resistance to erythromycin,of which 162 strains with high high-level resistance (MIC ≥ 256 μg/ml).A total of 104 (63.4%) isolates carry the ermB gene alone,whereas 59 (36.0%) harbor both ermB and mefA genes.Of the 59 strains,54 were of serotypes 19A and 19F and were identified as highly clonal and related to the Taiwan19F-14 clone.Conclusions The erythromycin resistance rate in IPD isolates is significantly high and is predominantly mediated by the ermB gene.Isolates that carry both ermB and mefA genes are predominantly of serotypes 19A and 19F.

  17. The climate change caused by the land plant invasion in the Devonian

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Hir, Guillaume; Donnadieu, Yannick; Goddéris, Yves; Meyer-Berthaud, Brigitte; Ramstein, Gilles; Blakey, Ronald C.

    2011-10-01

    Land plants invaded continents during the Mid-Paleozoic. Their spreading and diversification have been compared to the Cambrian explosion in terms of intensity and impact on the diversification of life on Earth. Whereas prior studies were focused on the evolution of the root system and its weathering contribution, here we used a coupled climate/carbon/vegetation model to investigate the biophysical impacts of plant colonization on the surface climate through changes in continental albedo, roughness, thermal properties, and potential evaporation. From the Early to the Late Devonian, our model simulates a significant atmospheric CO 2 drop from 6300 to 2100 ppmv that is due to an increase in the consumption of CO 2 though continental silicate weathering. The continental drift and the climatic changes promoted by land plants explain this trend. The simulated CO 2 drawdown is paradoxically associated with unchanged temperatures. We show here that the CO 2 drop is counteracted by a large warming resulting from the surface albedo reduction caused by the appearance of an extended plant-cover. If CO 2 is consensually assumed as the main driver of the Phanerozoic climate, this paper demonstrates that, during land-plant invasion, the modifications of soil properties could have played in the opposite direction of the carbon dioxide fall, hence maintaining warm temperatures during part of the Devonian.

  18. Soft Tissue Infection Caused by a Novel Pigmented, Rapidly Growing Mycobacterium Species

    OpenAIRE

    Turenne, Christine Y.; Suchak, Amar A.; Wolfe, Joyce N.; Kabani, Amin; Nicolle, Lindsay E.

    2003-01-01

    Molecular techniques are playing an important role in the diagnosis of nontuberculous mycobacterial infections. This case report describes a chronic soft tissue infection in an immunocompetent patient caused by a previously undescribed pigmented, rapidly growing Mycobacterium species, emphasizing the importance of clinical suspicion and effective laboratory techniques in the diagnosis and treatment of infection.

  19. Invasive Haemophilus influenzae infections in Germany: impact of non-type b serotypes in the post-vaccine era

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milde-Busch Astrid

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib vaccination led to a significant decrease in invasive bacterial infections in children. The aim of this study was to assess a potential shift to more non-type b invasive infections in a population with high Hib vaccination coverage and to compare the burden of suffering between children with Hib, capsulated non-b and non-capsulated Hi infections. Methods Cases with confirmed invasive Hi infections were ascertained through two independent nationwide active surveillance systems in 1998–2005. Information on possible predisposing conditions and clinical information was available from 2001 onwards. Results The total number of reported non-type b Hi cases varied between 10 cases in 1998, 27 in 2000 and 14 in 2005. In each year, non-capsulated serotypes outnumbered capsulated non-type b ones. 192 cases were detected in 2001–2005, more than one half was non-type b and 88% of the non-type b cases were non-capsulated. For cases with Hib/capsulated non-type b infections the most common clinical presentation was meningitis (67% each; 89%/78% had no potential predisposing condition, 75%/72% completely recovered from disease and 6% (each died. In contrast, meningitis was diagnosed in 34% of the non-capsulated Hi infections, septicaemia in 28% and pneumonia 21%; 62% had no potential predisposing condition, 83% completely recovered and 3% died. Conclusion There was no increase in non-type b Hi invasive infections during 8 years of active surveillance in Germany. Invasive disease due to non-type b Hi is not confined to children with risk factors. In patients with capsulated non-type b Hi infections the proportion of meningitis cases is similar to Hib, but double as high as in non-capsulated Hi.

  20. Burkholderia Pseudomallei Causing Bone and Joint Infections: A Clinical Update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raja, Nadeem Sajjad; Scarsbrook, Christine

    2016-03-01

    Burkholderia pseudomallei (B. pseudomallei), a causative agent of an emerging infectious disease melioidosis, is endemic in the tropical regions of the world. Due to increased international travel, the infection is now also seen outside of the tropics. The majority of patients with identified risk factors such as diabetes mellitus, heavy alcohol use, malignancy, chronic lung and kidney disease, corticosteroid use, thalassemia, rheumatic heart disease, systemic lupus erythematosus and cardiac failure acquire this organism through percutaneous inoculation or inhalation. The clinical manifestations are variable, ranging from localized abscess formation to septicemia. Melioidotic bone and joint infections are rarely reported but are an established entity. The knee joint is the most commonly affected joint in melioidosis, followed by the ankle, hip and shoulder joints. Melioidosis should be in the differential diagnosis of bone and joint infections in residents or returning travelers from the endemic area. Melioidosis diagnosis is missed in many parts of the world due to the lack of awareness of this infection and limited laboratory training and diagnostic techniques. It also mimics other diseases such as tuberculosis. Delay in the diagnosis, or the initiation of appropriate and effective treatment against melioidosis, could worsen the outcome. Initial therapy with ceftazidime, or carbapenem with or without cotrimoxazole is recommended, followed by the oral eradication therapy (based on the antimicrobial susceptibility) with amoxicillin/clavulanic acid or cotrimoxazole. Surgical intervention remains important. This paper reviews current literature on the epidemiology, clinical features, diagnosis, and management of melioidotic bone and joint infections. PMID:26728713

  1. First Report of a Leaf Spot Caused by Alternaria brassicae on the Invasive Weed Lepidium draba in North America

    Science.gov (United States)

    A second leaf spot disease on the perennial invasive weed white top, aka hoary cress, was found in a stand of white top in south central Montana. The plant pathogen causing the lesions was identified as the fungus Alternaria brassicae. It was isolated, purified grown on a V-8 agar growth medium and ...

  2. How Polyomaviruses Exploit the ERAD Machinery to Cause Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dupzyk, Allison; Tsai, Billy

    2016-01-01

    To infect cells, polyomavirus (PyV) traffics from the cell surface to the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) where it hijacks elements of the ER-associated degradation (ERAD) machinery to penetrate the ER membrane and reach the cytosol. From the cytosol, the virus transports to the nucleus, enabling transcription and replication of the viral genome that leads to lytic infection or cellular transformation. How PyV exploits the ERAD machinery to cross the ER membrane and access the cytosol, a decisive infection step, remains enigmatic. However, recent studies have slowly unraveled many aspects of this process. These emerging insights should advance our efforts to develop more effective therapies against PyV-induced human diseases. PMID:27589785

  3. Klebsiella pneumoniae Infection: A Virulent Cause of Visual Loss

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wai Cheong Soon

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Bacterial endophthalmitis is endogenous in 2-6% of cases and is frequently misdiagnosed initially. Klebsiella pneumoniae is being increasingly recognised as an aggressive causative organism, and it is particularly prevalent in Asian populations. We describe the case of a 71-year-old female of Southeast Asian origin with type 2 diabetes mellitus who presented with visual loss secondary to bacterial endophthalmitis and concomitant cerebral abscesses. Imaging revealed the probable primary source of infection to be a liver abscess. She developed retinal detachment and subsequently underwent an evisceration of her right eye. A Klebsiella spp. was identified from the eye tissue by 16S rRNA amplification. Klebsiella pneumoniae endophthalmitis has a characteristic disease phenotype and a particularly aggressive course with poor visual outcomes observed in most cases. This case highlights the risks of metastatic infection including bacterial endophthalmitis in association with Klebsiella infection.

  4. Dengue viral infections as a cause of encephalopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malavige G

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to determine the clinical characteristics and poor prognostic factors associated with high mortality in dengue encephalopathy. Fifteen patients with confirmed dengue infections, who developed encephalopathy, were recruited from two tertiary care hospitals in Colombo, Sri Lanka. Among the factors that contributed to encephalopathy were: Acute liver failure (73%, electrolyte imbalances (80% and shock (40%. Five (33.3% patients developed seizures. Disseminated intravascular coagulation was seen in five (33.3%. Secondary bacterial infections were observed in 8 (53.3% of our patients. The overall mortality rate was 47%.

  5. Fatal Wound Infection Caused by Chromobacterium violaceum in Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam▿

    OpenAIRE

    Baker, Stephen; Campbell, James I.; Stabler, Richard; Nguyen, Hoang V. M.; To, Diep S.; Dung V. Nguyen; Farrar, Jeremy

    2008-01-01

    Chromobacterium violaceum is a proteobacterium found in soil and water in tropical regions which rarely causes infection in humans. Here, we report a fatal bacteremia caused by Chromobacterium violaceum in Vietnam. We describe a number of clinical, microbiological, and molecular aspects associated with this bacterial infection.

  6. Destructive Knee Joint Infection Caused by Peptostreptococcus micros: Importance of Early Microbiological Diagnosis

    OpenAIRE

    Riesbeck, Kristian; Sanzén, Lennart

    1999-01-01

    Peptostreptococcus micros is a commensal of the oral cavity and the genitourinary tract that rarely causes serious infections. A case of a destructive knee joint infection with rapid progress caused by P. micros is presented. The significance of the microbiological findings was initially not acknowledged, which contributed to a nonsuccessful clinical outcome.

  7. Septic arthritis and subsequent fatal septic shock caused by Vibrio vulnificus infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Emamifar, Amir; Asmussen Andreasen, Rikke; Andersen, Nanna Skaarup;

    2015-01-01

    Vibrio vulnificus is a rare but potential fatal bacterium that can cause severe infections. Wound infections, primary sepsis and gastroenteritis are the most common clinical features. Septic arthritis caused by V. vulnificus is an atypical presentation that has been reported in only two case...

  8. Acute-on-chronic liver failure due to bacterial infection in liver cirrhosis: causes and management

    OpenAIRE

    Han, Tao

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial infection is a common complication in patients with liver cirrhosis, and acute-on-chronic liver failure due to bacterial infection has become a serious clinical problem. There are still many problems in the research on the pathogenesis and management of bacterial infection in liver cirrhosis, such as insidious onset, difficult early diagnosis, and increased multi-drug resistant bacteria. This article reviews the research progress in the causes and management of bacterial infection i...

  9. Brevibacterium otitidis: an elusive cause of neurosurgical infection.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Fe Talento, Alida

    2013-03-01

    Coryneform bacteria are usually considered as non-pathogenic when isolated from clinical specimens. We present a case of Brevibacterium otitidis neurosurgical infection in an immunocompetent patient, and highlight the difficulty with identification and interpretation of antimicrobial susceptibility results for this unusual pathogen.

  10. Urinary Tract Infection Caused by a Capnophilic Proteus mirabilis Strain

    OpenAIRE

    Trapman, Maryse; van Ingen, Jakko; Keijman, Jeroen; Swanink, Caroline M.

    2015-01-01

    From a urine sample from a patient with a urinary tract infection, a carbon dioxide-dependent Proteus mirabilis strain was isolated. It is important to perform urine cultures in 5% carbon dioxide and an anaerobic atmosphere if bacteria prominent in Gram stains do not grow on routine media in ambient air.

  11. Urinary Tract Infection Caused by a Capnophilic Proteus mirabilis Strain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Trapman, M.; Ingen, J. van; Keijman, J.; Swanink, C.M.A.

    2015-01-01

    From a urine sample from a patient with a urinary tract infection, a carbon dioxide-dependent Proteus mirabilis strain was isolated. It is important to perform urine cultures in 5% carbon dioxide and an anaerobic atmosphere if bacteria prominent in Gram stains do not grow on routine media in ambient

  12. Depth at which Rhizoctonia solani causes infection fo sugar beet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhizoctonia solani (Kuhn) is the causal agent of Rhizoctonia root rot of sugar beet (Beta vulgaris L.). Typically, Rhizoctonia root rot symptoms appear to be initiated on the plant at the soil line. Recently, sugar beet plants were observed with Rhizoctonia root rot infections close to the root ti...

  13. Identification by PCR of non-typhoidal Salmonella enterica serovars associated with invasive infections among febrile patients in Mali.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharon M Tennant

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: In sub-Saharan Africa, non-typhoidal Salmonella (NTS are emerging as a prominent cause of invasive disease (bacteremia and focal infections such as meningitis in infants and young children. Importantly, including data from Mali, three serovars, Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium, Salmonella Enteritidis and Salmonella Dublin, account for the majority of non-typhoidal Salmonella isolated from these patients. METHODS: We have extended a previously developed series of polymerase chain reactions (PCRs based on O serogrouping and H typing to identify Salmonella Typhimurium and variants (mostly I 4,[5],12:i:-, Salmonella Enteritidis and Salmonella Dublin. We also designed primers to detect Salmonella Stanleyville, a serovar found in West Africa. Another PCR was used to differentiate diphasic Salmonella Typhimurium and monophasic Salmonella Typhimurium from other O serogroup B, H:i serovars. We used these PCRs to blind-test 327 Salmonella serogroup B and D isolates that were obtained from the blood cultures of febrile patients in Bamako, Mali. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We have shown that when used in conjunction with our previously described O-serogrouping PCR, our PCRs are 100% sensitive and specific in identifying Salmonella Typhimurium and variants, Salmonella Enteritidis, Salmonella Dublin and Salmonella Stanleyville. When we attempted to differentiate 171 Salmonella Typhimurium (I 4,[ 5],12:i:1,2 strains from 52 monophasic Salmonella Typhimurium (I 4,[5],12:i:- strains, we were able to correctly identify 170 of the Salmonella Typhimurium and 51 of the Salmonella I 4,[5],12:i:- strains. CONCLUSION: We have described a simple yet effective PCR method to support surveillance of the incidence of invasive disease caused by NTS in developing countries.

  14. Invasive Non-typhoidal Salmonella Infections in Asia: Clinical Observations, Disease Outcome and Dominant Serovars from an Infectious Disease Hospital in Vietnam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phu Huong Lan, Nguyen; Le Thi Phuong, Tu; Nguyen Huu, Hien; Thuy, Le; Mather, Alison E; Park, Se Eun; Marks, Florian; Thwaites, Guy E; Van Vinh Chau, Nguyen; Thompson, Corinne N; Baker, Stephen

    2016-08-01

    Invasive non-typhoidal Salmonella (iNTS) infections are now a well-described cause of morbidity and mortality in children and HIV-infected adults in sub-Saharan Africa. In contrast, the epidemiology and clinical manifestations of iNTS disease in Asia are not well documented. We retrospectively identified >100 cases of iNTS infections in an infectious disease hospital in Southern Vietnam between 2008 and 2013. Clinical records were accessed to evaluate demographic and clinical factors associated with iNTS infection and to identify risk factors associated with death. Multi-locus sequence typing and antimicrobial susceptibility testing was performed on all organisms. Of 102 iNTS patients, 71% were HIV-infected, >90% were adults, 71% were male and 33% reported intravenous drug use. Twenty-six/92 (28%) patients with a known outcome died; HIV infection was significantly associated with death (p = 0.039). S. Enteritidis (Sequence Types (ST)11) (48%, 43/89) and S. Typhimurium (ST19, 34 and 1544) (26%, 23/89) were the most commonly identified serovars; S. Typhimurium was significantly more common in HIV-infected individuals (p = 0.003). Isolates from HIV-infected patients were more likely to exhibit reduced susceptibility against trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole than HIV-negative patients (p = 0.037). We conclude that iNTS disease is a severe infection in Vietnam with a high mortality rate. As in sub-Saharan Africa, HIV infection was a risk factor for death, with the majority of the burden in this population found in HIV-infected adult men. PMID:27513951

  15. Susceptibility trends including emergence of linezolid resistance among coagulase-negative staphylococci and meticillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus from invasive infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Decousser, Jean-Winoc; Desroches, Marine; Bourgeois-Nicolaos, Nadège; Potier, Julien; Jehl, François; Lina, Gérard; Cattoir, Vincent; Vandenesh, François; Doucet-Populaire, Florence

    2015-12-01

    Multiresistance in staphylococci constitutes a major challenge for the antimicrobial chemotherapy of invasive infections such as bacteraemia or bone and joint infections (BJIs). A nationwide prospective study was performed to detect antimicrobial resistance trends among staphylococci causing invasive infections. Between October 2011 and February 2012, 367 meticillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and 695 coagulase-negative staphylococci (CoNS) were collected from 37 French hospitals, mainly from bacteraemia (59.9%) and osteoarticular infections (29.0%). Minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) were determined by broth microdilution, and specific screening and confirmation tests were performed to detect heterogeneous vancomycin-intermediate S. aureus (hVISA). Staphylococcal isolates exhibiting a linezolid MIC>4 mg/L were further characterised to determinate their clonal relationships and the mechanism of resistance. MRSA exhibited additional resistances, including levofloxacin (82% associated resistance), gentamicin (13.6%), fusidic acid (13.6%) and rifampicin (6.5%), compromising oral step-down therapy in BJIs. Only two hVISA strains (0.5%) were identified. Among the CoNS, mainly Staphylococcus epidermidis (506/695; 72.8%), resistance to first- and second-line agents was more common. Linezolid resistance was identified in 10 CoNS (1.4%). The most frequent linezolid resistance mechanism was the G2576T mutation in 23S rDNA (9/10). For the first time in France, the cfr gene was found in five related sequence type 2 (ST2) S. epidermidis from two different hospitals, in association with ribosomal RNA and L3 ribosomal protein mutations. These national data must be considered when selecting empirical treatment for invasive staphylococcal infections. Moreover, the emergence and spread of linezolid-resistant CoNS carrying the cfr gene is of concern. PMID:26453147

  16. Unexplained exertional dyspnea caused by low ventricular filling pressures: results from clinical invasive cardiopulmonary exercise testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oldham, William M; Lewis, Gregory D; Opotowsky, Alexander R; Waxman, Aaron B; Systrom, David M

    2016-03-01

    To determine whether low ventricular filling pressures are a clinically relevant etiology of unexplained dyspnea on exertion, a database of 619 consecutive, clinically indicated invasive cardiopulmonary exercise tests (iCPETs) was reviewed to identify patients with low maximum aerobic capacity (V̇o2max) due to inadequate peak cardiac output (Qtmax) with normal biventricular ejection fractions and without pulmonary hypertension (impaired: n = 49, V̇o2max = 53% predicted [interquartile range (IQR): 47%-64%], Qtmax = 72% predicted [62%-76%]). These were compared to patients with a normal exercise response (normal: n = 28, V̇o2max = 86% predicted [84%-97%], Qtmax = 108% predicted [97%-115%]). Before exercise, all patients received up to 2 L of intravenous normal saline to target an upright pulmonary capillary wedge pressure (PCWP) of ≥5 mmHg. Despite this treatment, biventricular filling pressures at peak exercise were lower in the impaired group than in the normal group (right atrial pressure [RAP]: 6 [IQR: 5-8] vs. 9 [7-10] mmHg, P = 0.004; PCWP: 12 [10-16] vs. 17 [14-19] mmHg, P volume (SV) augmentation with exercise (+13 ± 10 [standard deviation (SD)] vs. +18 ± 10 mL/m(2), P = 0.014). A review of hemodynamic data from 23 patients with low RAP on an initial iCPET who underwent a second iCPET after saline infusion (2.0 ± 0.5 L) demonstrated that 16 of 23 patients responded with increases in Qtmax ([+24% predicted [IQR: 14%-34%]), V̇o2max (+10% predicted [7%-12%]), and maximum SV (+26% ± 17% [SD]). These data suggest that inadequate ventricular filling related to low venous pressure is a clinically relevant cause of exercise intolerance. PMID:27162614

  17. Burkholderia Pseudomallei Causing Bone and Joint Infections: A Clinical Update

    OpenAIRE

    Raja, Nadeem Sajjad; Scarsbrook, Christine

    2016-01-01

    Burkholderia pseudomallei (B. pseudomallei), a causative agent of an emerging infectious disease melioidosis, is endemic in the tropical regions of the world. Due to increased international travel, the infection is now also seen outside of the tropics. The majority of patients with identified risk factors such as diabetes mellitus, heavy alcohol use, malignancy, chronic lung and kidney disease, corticosteroid use, thalassemia, rheumatic heart disease, systemic lupus erythematosus and cardiac ...

  18. Profile of isavuconazole and its potential in the treatment of severe invasive fungal infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Falci DR

    2013-10-01

    isavuconazole in the current antifungal armamentarium.Keywords: isavuconazole, invasive fungal infections, antifungals, triazoles, Aspergillus

  19. Spontaneous Bacterial Peritonitis Caused by Infection with Listeria monocytogenes

    OpenAIRE

    Tablang, Michael Vincent F.

    2008-01-01

    Spontaneous bacterial peritonitis is a severe and life-threatening complication in patients with ascites caused by advanced liver disease. The organisms most commonly involved are coliform bacteria and third-generation cephalosporins are the empiric antibiotics of choice. This is an uncommon case of spontaneous bacterial peritonitis caused by Listeria monocytogenes in a female patient with liver cirrhosis from autoimmune hepatitis. She did not improve with ceftriaxone and her course was compl...

  20. Fulminant hepatic failure caused by Salmonella paratyphi A infection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fahmi Yousef Khan; Ahmed A Kamha; Ibrahim Y Alomary

    2006-01-01

    We report a case of fulminant hepatic failure associated with Salmonella paratyphi A infection, in a 29-yearold patient who was admitted to the intensive care unit (TCU) with fever of two days, headache and vomiting followed by behavioural changes and disorientation. On examination, the patient appeared acutely ill, agitated, confused, and deeply jaundiced. Temperature 38.5℃,pulse 92/min, blood pressure 130/89 mmHg. Both samples of blood grew S. paratyphi A, which was sensitive to ceftriaxone and ciprofioxacin. Ceftriaxon was administered with high-dose dexamethasone. Two weeks after treatment with ceftriaxon, the patient was discharged in satisfactory condition.

  1. Non-invasive index of liver fibrosis induced by alcohol, thioacetamide and schistosomal infection in mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    El-Beltagy Doha M

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Non invasive approaches will likely be increasing utilized to assess liver fibrosis. This work provides a new non invasive index to predict liver fibrosis induced in mice. Methods Fibrosis was generated by thioacetamide (TAA, chronic intake of ethanol, or infection with S. mansoni in 240 mice. Both progression and regression of fibrosis (after treatment with silymarin and/or praziquantel were monitored. The following methods were employed: (i The METAVIR system was utilized to grade and stage liver inflammation and fibosis; (ii Determination of hepatic hydroxyproline and collagen; and (iii Derivation of a new hepatic fibrosis index from the induced changes, and its prospective validation in a group of 70 mice. Results The index is composed of 4 serum variable including total proteins, γ-GT, bilirubin and reduced glutathione (GSH, measured in diseased, treated and normal mice. These parameters were highly correlated with both the histological stage and the grade. They were combined in a logarithmic formula, which non-invasively scores the severity of liver fibrosis through a range (0 to 2, starting with healthy liver (corresponding to stage 0 to advanced fibrosis (corresponding stage 3.Receiver operating characteristic curves (ROC for the accuracy of the index to predict the histological stages demonstrated that the areas under the curve (AUC were 0.954, 0.979 and 0.99 for index values corresponding to histological stages 1, 2 and 3, respectively. Also, the index was correlated with stage and grade, (0.947 and 0.859, respectively. The cut off values that cover the range between stages 0-1, 1-2 and 2-3 are 0.4, 1.12 and 1.79, respectively. The results in the validation group confirmed the accuracy of the test. The AUROC was 0.869 and there was good correlation with the stage of fibrosis and grade of inflammation. Conclusion The index fulfils the basic criteria of non-invasive marker of liver fibrosis since it is liver

  2. Regional Aggressive Root Resorption Caused by Neuronal Virus Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Inger Kjær

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available During orthodontic treatment, root resorption can occur unexplainably. No clear distinction has been made between resorption located within specific regions and resorption occurring generally in the dentition. The purpose is to present cases with idiopathic (of unknown origin root resorption occurring regionally. Two cases of female patients, 26 and 28 years old, referred with aggressive root resorption were investigated clinically and radiographically. Anamnestic information revealed severe virus diseases during childhood, meningitis in one case and whooping cough in the other. One of the patients was treated with dental implants. Virus spreading along nerve paths is a possible explanation for the unexpected resorptions. In both cases, the resorptions began cervically. The extent of the resorption processes in the dentition followed the virus infected nerve paths and the resorption process stopped when reaching regions that were innervated differently and not infected by virus. In one case, histological examination revealed multinuclear dentinoclasts. The pattern of resorption in the two cases indicates that innervation is a factor, which under normal conditions may protect the root surface against resorption. Therefore, the normal nerve pattern is important for diagnostics and for predicting the course of severe unexpected root resorption.

  3. Necrotizing Fasciitis Caused by Inconspicuous Infection of Aeromonas hydrophila in an Immunocompromised Host

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuo-Chun Liao

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available We present a case of serious necrotizing fasciitis due to Aeromonas hydrophila without a suggestive history of routes of pathogen invasion in a 60-year-old male. Despite prompt broad-spectrum antibiotic and extensive surgical therapies, the patient died within 72 hours following initial presentation. Our experience suggests clinicians be highly alert to the disease when an immunocompromised patient featured fulminant soft-tissue infection in the endemic area.

  4. Wolbachia in European Populations of the Invasive Pest Drosophila suzukii: Regional Variation in Infection Frequencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cattel, Julien; Kaur, Rupinder; Gibert, Patricia; Martinez, Julien; Fraimout, Antoine; Jiggins, Francis; Andrieux, Thibault; Siozios, Stefanos; Anfora, Gianfranco; Miller, Wolfgang; Rota-Stabelli, Omar; Mouton, Laurence

    2016-01-01

    The invasive pest Drosophila suzukii is characterized by a specific fresh-fruit targeting behavior and has quickly become a menace for the fruit economy of newly infested North American and European regions. D. suzukii carries a strain of the endosymbiotic bacterium Wolbachia, named wSuz, which has a low infection frequency and no reproductive manipulation capabilities in American populations of D. suzukii. To further understand the nature of wSuz biology and assess its utility as a tool for controlling this pest's populations, we investigated the prevalence of Wolbachia in 23 European D. suzukii populations, and compared our results with those available in American populations. Our data showed a highly variable infection frequency with a mean prevalence of 46%, which is significantly higher than the 17% found in American populations. Based on Multilocus Sequence Typing analysis, a single wSuz strain was diagnosed in all European populations of D. suzukii. In agreement with American data, we found no evidence of cytoplasmic incompatibility induced by wSuz. These findings raise two questions: a) why Wolbachia is maintained in field populations of D. suzukii and b) what are the selective forces responsible for the variation in prevalence within populations, particularly between European and American continents? Our results provide new insights into the D. suzukii-Wolbachia association and highlight regional variations that await further investigation and that should be taken into account for using Wolbachia-based pest management programs. PMID:26809119

  5. Wolbachia in European Populations of the Invasive Pest Drosophila suzukii: Regional Variation in Infection Frequencies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julien Cattel

    Full Text Available The invasive pest Drosophila suzukii is characterized by a specific fresh-fruit targeting behavior and has quickly become a menace for the fruit economy of newly infested North American and European regions. D. suzukii carries a strain of the endosymbiotic bacterium Wolbachia, named wSuz, which has a low infection frequency and no reproductive manipulation capabilities in American populations of D. suzukii. To further understand the nature of wSuz biology and assess its utility as a tool for controlling this pest's populations, we investigated the prevalence of Wolbachia in 23 European D. suzukii populations, and compared our results with those available in American populations. Our data showed a highly variable infection frequency with a mean prevalence of 46%, which is significantly higher than the 17% found in American populations. Based on Multilocus Sequence Typing analysis, a single wSuz strain was diagnosed in all European populations of D. suzukii. In agreement with American data, we found no evidence of cytoplasmic incompatibility induced by wSuz. These findings raise two questions: a why Wolbachia is maintained in field populations of D. suzukii and b what are the selective forces responsible for the variation in prevalence within populations, particularly between European and American continents? Our results provide new insights into the D. suzukii-Wolbachia association and highlight regional variations that await further investigation and that should be taken into account for using Wolbachia-based pest management programs.

  6. Infected bronchogenic cyst causing dysphagia and retrosternal pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søndergaard, Eva Bjerre; Pedersen, Jesper Holst; Kleive, Dyre Berg

    2013-01-01

    and fever. Subsequent X-ray and computerised tomography scan showed a bronchogenic cyst. The patient underwent subacute thoracotomy where a bronchogenic cyst filled with pus was located and excised. Bronchogenic cysts can be a rare cause of retrosternal pain. Please cite this paper as: Søndergaard EB...

  7. Cryptosporidium infection in infancy as a cause of malnutrition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mølbak, Kare; Andersen, M; Aaby, Peter; Højlyng, Niels; Jakobsen, M; Sodemann, Morten; da Silva, A P

    1997-01-01

    Cryptosporidium parvum causes persistent diarrhea in young children in developing countries. To determine the interaction between nutritional status and cryptosporidiosis, an open cohort of 1064 children younger than 3 y of age was followed for 1441 child-years by weekly diarrhea recall visits. A...

  8. Central nervous system infections caused by varicella-zoster virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chamizo, Francisco J; Gilarranz, Raúl; Hernández, Melisa; Ramos, Diana; Pena, María José

    2016-08-01

    We carried out a clinical and epidemiological study of adult patients with varicella-zoster virus central nervous system infection diagnosed by PCR in cerebrospinal fluid. Twenty-six patients were included. Twelve (46.2 %) patients were diagnosed with meningitis and fourteen (53.8 %) with meningoencephalitis. Twelve (46.2 %) had cranial nerves involvement (mainly the facial (VII) and vestibulocochlear (VIII) nerves), six (23.1 %) had cerebellar involvement, fourteen (53.8 %) had rash, and four (15.4 %) developed Ramsay Hunt syndrome. Three (11.5 %) patients had sequelae. Length of stay was significantly lower in patients diagnosed with meningitis and treatment with acyclovir was more frequent in patients diagnosed with meningoencephalitis. We believe routine detection of varicella-zoster virus, regardless of the presence of rash, is important because the patient may benefit from a different clinical management. PMID:26769041

  9. Aerococcus urinae, a rare cause of infective endocarditis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melnick, Stephen; Nazir, Salik; Hingorani, Rittu; Wexler, Philip

    2016-01-01

    We present the case of an elderly male who was initially seen in our hospital for a urinary tract infection that was treated with oral ciprofloxacin. He was admitted 2 weeks later with altered mental status and fever, and was found to have bacteraemia with Aerococcus urinae Owing to altered mental status a brain MRI was performed which showed evidence of embolic stroke. Following this, a transesophageal echocardiogram showed severe mitral regurgitation and a vegetation >1 cm involving the mitral valve with associated destruction of posterior valve leaflets. The patient was started on antibiotics intravenous penicillin G and intravenous gentamicin for a total duration of 6 weeks. He underwent mitral valve replacement on day 4 of hospitalisation. The postoperative course was complicated by ventilator-dependent respiratory failure, requiring tracheostomy and eventual transfer to a skilled nursing facility. Unfortunately, he died after 2 weeks of stay at the facility. PMID:27440847

  10. Detection of fetal mutations causing hemoglobinopathies by non-invasive prenatal diagnosis from maternal plasma

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    E D′Souza

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Prenatal diagnosis of hemoglobinopathies enables couples at risk to have a healthy child. Currently used fetal sampling procedures are invasive with some risk of miscarriage. A non-invasive approach to obtain fetal deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA for diagnosis would eliminate this risk. Aim: To develop and evaluate a non-invasive prenatal diagnostic approach for hemoglobinopathies using cell-free fetal DNA circulating in the maternal plasma. Settings and Design: Couples referred to us for prenatal diagnosis of hemoglobinopathies where the maternal and paternal mutations were different were included in the study. Materials and Methods: Maternal peripheral blood was collected at different periods of gestation before the invasive fetal sampling procedure was done. The blood was centrifuged to isolate the plasma and prepare DNA. A size separation approach was used to isolate fetal DNA. Nested polymerase chain reaction (PCR-based protocols were developed for detection of the presence or absence of the paternal mutation. Results and Conclusions: There were 30 couples where the parental mutations were different. Of these, in 14 cases the paternal mutation was absent and in 16 cases it was present in the fetus. Using cell-free fetal DNA from maternal plasma, the absence of the paternal mutation was accurately determined in 12 of the 14 cases and the presence of the paternal mutation was correctly identified in 12 of the 16 cases. Thus, this non-invasive approach gave comparable results to those obtained by the conventional invasive fetal sampling methods in 24 cases giving an accuracy of 80.0%. Although the nested PCR approach enabled amplification of small quantities of cell-free DNA from maternal plasma at different periods of gestation after size separation to eliminate the more abundant maternal DNA, an accurate diagnosis of the presence or absence of the paternal mutation in the fetus was not possible in all cases to make it clinically

  11. Spontaneous Bacterial Peritonitis Caused by Infection with Listeria monocytogenes

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    Michael Vincent F. Tablang

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Spontaneous bacterial peritonitis is a severe and life-threatening complication in patients with ascites caused by advanced liver disease. The organisms most commonly involved are coliform bacteria and third-generation cephalosporins are the empiric antibiotics of choice. This is an uncommon case of spontaneous bacterial peritonitis caused by Listeria monocytogenes in a female patient with liver cirrhosis from autoimmune hepatitis. She did not improve with ceftriaxone and her course was complicated by hepatic encephalopathy, seizures and multi-organ failure. This case emphasizes that a high index of suspicion should be maintained for timely diagnosis and treatment. Listerial peritonitis should be suspected in patients with end-stage liver disease and inadequate response to conventional antibiotics within 48–72 h. Ampicillin/sulbactam should be initiated while awaiting results of ascitic fluid or blood culture.

  12. [Molecular features of beta-hemolytic streptococci isolated from blood in adult invasive infection and the clinical background factors].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asami, Ryoko; Okada, Keisuke; Chiba, Naoko; Ubukata, Kimiko; Takahashi, Takashi

    2010-05-01

    We studied the relationship between features of beta-hemolytic streptococci (n = 45) isolated from blood in adult invasive infection and the clinical background factors observed from January 2001 through August at a hospital for the elderly. The meanage of subjects having invasive streptococcal infection with 22 invasive Streptococcus dysgalactiae subspecies equisimilis (SDSE) strains, 2 S. pyogenes isolates, and 21 S. agalactiae (GBS) was 80 years, and 85.7% and 86.4% had underly diseases in the GBS and SDSE infections. SDSE-infected were mainly emergency woman outpatients and GBS infected were mainly man inpatients. The clinical syndrome involved pneumonia, urosepsis, and cellulitis. GBS mortality was 14.3% and SDSE mortality 27.3%. Compared to survivors, nonsurvivors had more thrombocytopenia and marked serum C-reactive protein elevation when blood culture were performed. No difference was seen in white blood cell count between bath groups. Our observations suggest that blood culture should be obtained before antimicrobials administration in elderly individuals with underlying illness who are seen at the emergency department and have laboratory blood data suggestive of infectious disease. PMID:20560419

  13. Women's views about management and cause of urinary tract infection: qualitative interview study

    OpenAIRE

    Leydon, G M; Turner, S.; Smith, Helen; Little, P.

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To explore the views of women with urinary tract infection on the acceptability of different strategies for managing the infection, including delayed use of antibiotics, and the cause of infection. DESIGN: Qualitative interview study with semistructured one to one interviews within a randomised controlled trial of different management strategies. Analysis drew on some of the principles of constant comparison to generate key themes grounded in reported experiences and und...

  14. Infection in the Nasal Tip Caused by Acellular Dermal Matrix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kun Hee

    2015-12-01

    A 19-year-old female patient visited our clinic for rhinoplasty. She complained about her low take-off point, which was apparent in profile view, and wanted slight tip projection. She refused additional cartilage harvesting from ears or ribs but consented to the use of homologous tissue, including acellular dermal matrix, for her dorsum and tip. Septoturbinoplasty was performed, and only a very small amount of septal cartilage could be harvested. It was used as both the columellar strut and the alar rim graft. Nasal dorsum and tip were augmented with acellular dermal matrix. Three months postoperatively, she experienced a few episodes of edema and redness on her nasal tip, followed by pus exudation from the nasal skin. Six months postoperatively, she underwent revision rhinoplasty for removal of inflamed grafts, and onlay tip graft with homologous rib cartilage was performed. Nasal dorsum or tip grafts are an integral part of Asian rhinoplasty. Autogenous tissue is the gold standard for grafting materials. However, the limited availability of autogenous tissue and the preference of patients and surgeons for artificial surgical implants make Asian rhinoplasty challenging. Unavailability of autogenous cartilage and patient refusal of artificial implants led to the use of acellular dermal matrix (ADM) in the nasal dorsum and tip for this case. This is the first report of postoperative complication because of infection rather than absorption after ADM use. PMID:26894006

  15. Recurrent Osteomyelitis Caused by Infection with Different Bacterial Strains without Obvious Source of Reinfection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uçkay, Ilker; Assal, Mathieu; Legout, Laurence; Rohner, Peter; Stern, Richard; Lew, Daniel; Hoffmeyer, Pierre; Bernard, Louis

    2006-01-01

    Recurrence of osteomyelitis by the same bacterial strain is well known. We report three patients with a second episode of osteomyelitis at the same site caused by different strains of bacteria from the original. Formerly infected and altered bone surface might present a region of diminished resistance for a new infection. PMID:16517930

  16. Recurrent Osteomyelitis Caused by Infection with Different Bacterial Strains without Obvious Source of Reinfection

    OpenAIRE

    Uckay, Ilker; Assal, Mathieu; Legout, Laurence; Rohner, Peter; Stern, Richard; Lew, Daniel Pablo; Hoffmeyer, Pierre; Bernard, Louis

    2006-01-01

    Recurrence of osteomyelitis by the same bacterial strain is well known. We report three patients with a second episode of osteomyelitis at the same site caused by different strains of bacteria from the original. Formerly infected and altered bone surface might present a region of diminished resistance for a new infection.

  17. Recurrent osteomyelitis caused by infection with different bacterial strains without obvious source of reinfection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uçkay, Ilker; Assal, Mathieu; Legout, Laurence; Rohner, Peter; Stern, Richard; Lew, Daniel; Hoffmeyer, Pierre; Bernard, Louis

    2006-03-01

    Recurrence of osteomyelitis by the same bacterial strain is well known. We report three patients with a second episode of osteomyelitis at the same site caused by different strains of bacteria from the original. Formerly infected and altered bone surface might present a region of diminished resistance for a new infection. PMID:16517930

  18. A new non-invasive approach based on polyhexamethylene biguanide increases the regression rate of HPV infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gentile Antonio

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background HPV infection is a worldwide problem strictly linked to the development of cervical cancer. Persistence of the infection is one of the main factors responsible for the invasive progression and women diagnosed with intraepithelial squamous lesions are referred for further assessment and surgical treatments which are prone to complications. Despite this, there are several reports on the spontaneous regression of the infection. This study was carried out to evaluate the effectiveness of a long term polyhexamethylene biguanide (PHMB-based local treatment in improving the viral clearance, reducing the time exposure to the infection and avoiding the complications associated with the invasive treatments currently available. Method 100 women diagnosed with HPV infection were randomly assigned to receive six months of treatment with a PHMB-based gynecological solution (Monogin®, Lo.Li. Pharma, Rome - Italy or to remain untreated for the same period of time. Results A greater number of patients, who received the treatment were cleared of the infection at the two time points of the study (three and six months compared to that of the control group. A significant difference in the regression rate (90% Monogin group vs 70% control group was observed at the end of the study highlighting the time-dependent ability of PHMB to interact with the infection progression. Conclusions The topic treatment with PHMB is a preliminary safe and promising approach for patients with detected HPV infection increasing the chance of clearance and avoiding the use of invasive treatments when not strictly necessary. Trial registration ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier NCT01571141

  19. Invasion Assays and Genomotyping to Investigate Differences in Virulence of Campylobacter spp. Isolates from Iceland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campylobacter spp. are the leading cause of human gastroenteritis worldwide. Epithelial cell invasion is thought to be essential for Campylobacter spp. infection. Previous invasion studies with intestinal epithelial cells revealed that the ability of different Campylobacter jejuni isolates to inva...

  20. Respiratory viral infections in infants:causes, clinical symptoms, virology, and immunology

    OpenAIRE

    Tregoning, John S; Schwarze, Jürgen

    2010-01-01

    In global terms, respiratory viral infection is a major cause of morbidity and mortality. Infancy, in particular, is a time of increased disease susceptibility and severity. Early-life viral infection causes acute illness and can be associated with the development of wheezing and asthma in later life. The most commonly detected viruses are respiratory syncytial virus (RSV), rhinovirus (RV), and influenza virus. In this review we explore the complete picture from epidemiology and virology to c...

  1. Treatment of invasive fungal infections in high-risk haematological patients: what have we learnt in the past 10 years?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vallejo, Carlos; Vázquez, Lourdes; Cabrera Martín, José Rafael; Carreras, Enric; García Rodríguez, Julio; Ruiz Camps, Isabel; Fortún, Jesús; Mensa, Josep; Barberán, José

    2013-12-01

    Invasive fungal infection (IFI) caused by filamentous fungi remains a very severe infectious complication in patients with onco-haematological diseases. Last advances in the diagnostic and therapeutic fields, today we know that their contributions are limited. Something similar can be said of clinical trials especially in relation to some changes in the characteristics of the host. The development of promising diagnostic techniques and the relative expansion in the number of antifungal agents has been associated with diversification of therapeutic strategies (prophylaxis with extended-spectrum azoles and preemptive antifungal treatment). However, the low sensitivity of AGA testing in some circumstances, and the potential delay in starting treatment due to logistic reasons, has been reflected by a greater mortality in certain type of patients and a significant increase in the days of treatment. All these circumstances has once again focus attention to the empirical approach as a central strategy in high-risk patients. The objective of this article is to review the clinical experience in the treatment of IFI in onco-haematological patients according to data published in the literature in the last decade and to present a set of recommendations. PMID:24399355

  2. Varicella zoster virus infection causing urinary retention in a child with HIV infection

    OpenAIRE

    G S Wessels; C. F. Heyns

    2012-01-01

    An 11-year-old boy receiving antiretroviral therapy for HIV infection and antibacterial therapy for pulmonary tuberculosis presented with urinary retention due to varicella zoster virus infection involving the sacral nerves, confirmed on serological testing. The perineum over dermatomes S2 - S4 on the left was involved with a vesicular and superficially erosive rash. A transurethral catheter was inserted and the patient was treated with acyclovir (300 mg 6-hourly for 5 days). At follow-up 4 w...

  3. Intrauterine device infection causing concomitant streptococcal toxic shock syndrome and pelvic abscess with Actinomyces odontolyticus bacteraemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Carolyn M Yu; Noska, Amanda

    2016-01-01

    Intrauterine devices (IUDs) are rarely associated with serious infections. We report an unusual concomitant infection of group A Streptococcus (GAS) causing toxic shock syndrome and pelvic abscess with Actinomyces odontolyticus associated with an IUD in a healthy 50-year-old patient. The IUD was subsequently removed and the patient recovered on the appropriate antibiotics. This case highlights the importance of clinicians' high index of suspicion of an IUD infection and prompt removal of the infected foreign body to obtain source control. PMID:26965406

  4. Low-grade infection after a total knee arthroplasty caused by Actinomyces naeslundii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hedke, J; Skripitz, R; Ellenrieder, M; Frickmann, H; Köller, T; Podbielski, A; Mittelmeier, W

    2012-08-01

    Here, we present a case of an 85-year-old woman with a low-grade-infection caused by Actinomyces naeslundii after total-knee arthroplasty (TKA) followed by septic loosening. Actinomyces naeslundii was cultured from a tissue sample from the knee joint capsule/synovial tissue obtained after the initial TKA. A review of the literature revealed two cases of periprosthetic infection and another three cases of arthritis due to Actinomyces naeslundii. So far, no standard treatment for periprosthetic infections caused by Actinomyces species has been established. PMID:22556326

  5. Unexplained exertional dyspnea caused by low ventricular filling pressures: results from clinical invasive cardiopulmonary exercise testing

    OpenAIRE

    Oldham, William M.; Lewis, Gregory D.; Opotowsky, Alexander R.; Waxman, Aaron B.; Systrom, David M.

    2016-01-01

    To determine whether low ventricular filling pressures are a clinically relevant etiology of unexplained dyspnea on exertion, a database of 619 consecutive, clinically indicated invasive cardiopulmonary exercise tests (iCPETs) was reviewed to identify patients with low maximum aerobic capacity (V̇o2max) due to inadequate peak cardiac output (Qtmax) with normal biventricular ejection fractions and without pulmonary hypertension (impaired: n = 49, V̇o2max = 53% predicted [interquartile range (I...

  6. Invasion strategies in clonal aquatic plants: are phenotypic differences caused by phenotypic plasticity or local adaptation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riis, Tenna; Lambertini, Carla; Olesen, Birgit; Clayton, John S.; Brix, Hans; Sorrell, Brian K.

    2010-01-01

    Background and Aims The successful spread of invasive plants in new environments is often linked to multiple introductions and a diverse gene pool that facilitates local adaptation to variable environmental conditions. For clonal plants, however, phenotypic plasticity may be equally important. Here the primary adaptive strategy in three non-native, clonally reproducing macrophytes (Egeria densa, Elodea canadensis and Lagarosiphon major) in New Zealand freshwaters were examined and an attempt was made to link observed differences in plant morphology to local variation in habitat conditions. Methods Field populations with a large phenotypic variety were sampled in a range of lakes and streams with different chemical and physical properties. The phenotypic plasticity of the species before and after cultivation was studied in a common garden growth experiment, and the genetic diversity of these same populations was also quantified. Key Results For all three species, greater variation in plant characteristics was found before they were grown in standardized conditions. Moreover, field populations displayed remarkably little genetic variation and there was little interaction between habitat conditions and plant morphological characteristics. Conclusions The results indicate that at the current stage of spread into New Zealand, the primary adaptive strategy of these three invasive macrophytes is phenotypic plasticity. However, while limited, the possibility that genetic diversity between populations may facilitate ecotypic differentiation in the future cannot be excluded. These results thus indicate that invasive clonal aquatic plants adapt to new introduced areas by phenotypic plasticity. Inorganic carbon, nitrogen and phosphorous were important in controlling plant size of E. canadensis and L. major, but no other relationships between plant characteristics and habitat conditions were apparent. This implies that within-species differences in plant size can be explained

  7. Human Cytomegalovirus Infection of Tumor Cells Downregulates NCAM (CD56: A Novel Mechanism for Virus-Induced Tumor Invasiveness'

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    Roman A. Blaheta

    2004-07-01

    Full Text Available Pathologic data indicate that human cytomegalovirus (HCMV infection might be associated with the pathogenesis of several human malignancies. However, no definitive evidence of a causal link between HCMV infection and cancer dissemination has been established to date. This study describes the modulation of the invasive behavior of NCAM-expressing tumor cell lines by HCMV. Neuroblastoma (NB cells, persistently infected with the HCMV strain AD169 (UKF-NB-4AD169 and MHH-NB-11AD169, were added to endothelial cell monolayers and adhesion and penetration kinetics were measured. The 140- and 180-kDa isoforms of the adhesion receptor NCAM were evaluated by flow cytometry, Western blot, and reverse transcriptionpolymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR. The relevance of NCAM for tumor cell binding was proven by treating NB with NCAM antisense oligonucleotides or NCAM transfection. HCMV infection profoundly increased the number of adherent and penetrated NB, compared to controls. Surface expression of NCAM was significantly lower on UKF-NB-4AD169 and MHH-NB-11AD169, compared to mock-infected cells. Western-blot and RT-PCR demonstrated reduced protein and RNA levels of the 140- and 180-kDa isoform. An inverse correlation between NCAM expression and adhesion capacity of NB has been shown by antisense and transfection experiments. We conclude that HCMV infection leads to downregulation of NCAM receptors, which is associated with enhanced tumor cell invasiveness.

  8. Fungal infections as a contributing cause of death: An autopsy study

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    Megha S Uppin

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: With the continuing rise in the number of immunocompromised patients, the incidence of invasive mycoses has increased. Various studies have reported the trends of fungal infections in autopsies. Because of limitations in antemortem clinical diagnosis owing to lack of sensitive diagnostic tools, information regarding frequency and pathogenesis of fungal infections is largely dependent on autopsy studies. Aim: To study the prevalence of fungal infections at autopsy spanning a period of 20 years and to document recent trends, prevalence of various fungi over decades along with underlying predisposing factors and pathological findings. Settings and Design: Retrospective study. Materials and Methods:All autopsies between 1988 and 2007 were reviewed and all cases showing fungal infections were analyzed. The clinical details and demographic data were retrieved from medical records. Representative sections from all organs were stained with hematoxylin and eosin stain and special stains including Gomori′s silver methenamine (GMS and per-iodic acid Schiff (PAS. Culture details were noted, wherever available. Results: A total of 401 autopsies were performed during the study period. Fungal infections were identified in 35 (8.7% of these cases. Leukemia was the commonest risk factor. The commonest pathogen in the present study was Aspergillus sp. The commonest single organ involved was brain (n = 18. Culture positivity was seen in 23.8% cases. Conclusion: The study highlights various predisposing factors and organisms in autopsy series. Existing diagnostic modalities are not sensitive to ensure antemortem diagnosis of fungal infections.

  9. [Large-scale questionnaire surveillance concerning invasive infections with group C and G streptococci].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ubukata, Kimiko; Sunaoshi, Katsuhiko; Kobayashi, Reiko; Okuzumi, Katsuko

    2006-09-01

    A large-scale questionnaire surveillance was conducted regarding the onset of invasive infections with beta-hemolytic group C (GCS) and group G (GGS) streptococci from clinical specimens that are normally aseptic and the backgrounds of these cases. The surveillance period of the questionnaire was 8 months from January to August 2005. Completed questionnaires were received from the clinical laboratories of 193 medical institutions. One hundred two clinical laboratories (52.8%) had isolated these beta-hemolytic streptococci. Of all the isolates, GCS and GGS accounted for 25 and 216 cases, respectively, or a ratio of almost 1:10. Isolates from blood cultures accounted for half the number of all isolates, followed by isolates from atretic pus or joint fluid. The isolates gradually became more prevalent from patients in their 40s, and peaked in patients in their 70s. The most prevalent disorder, described in 184 cases, was suppurative disease followed by (in descending order), bacteremia, sepsis, arthritis purulenta and cellulitis. A small number of patients had developed with streptococcal toxic shock syndrome, empyema or meningitis. Most of the patients had an underlying disease, such as diabetes mellitus, malignancy or cerebrovascular disease (in descending order). We conclude from the above findings that background factors in patients as well as identification of the pathogen should be made public when GCS or GGS is isolated from normally aseptic clinical specimens. PMID:17073260

  10. New Tricks from an Old Cow: Infective Endocarditis Caused by Streptococcus dysgalactiae subsp. dysgalactiae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordal, Stina; Glambek, Marte; Oppegaard, Oddvar

    2014-01-01

    We present a case of infective endocarditis caused by Streptococcus dysgalactiae subsp. dysgalactiae, a major cause of bovine mastitis and previously thought to be an animal-restricted pathogen. The patient reported no direct contact with animals, and the clinical course was severe and complicated. PMID:25472489

  11. Vasoconstriction in horses caused by endophyte-infected tall fescue seed is detected with Doppler ultrasonography

    Science.gov (United States)

    The hypotheses that endophyte (Neotyphodium coenophialum)-infected tall fescue (TF) seed causes vasoconstriction in horses in vivo and that ground seed would cause more pronounced vasoconstriction than whole seed were tested. Ten horses each received 1 of 3 treatments: endophyte-free ground (E–G; n ...

  12. Clinical data and CT findings of pulmonary infection caused by different pathogens after kidney transplantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: The overall objective was to review clinical data and CT findings of pulmonary infection caused by different pathogens after kidney transplantation in an attempt to help early clinical qualitative diagnosis. Materials and methods: 446 cases of clinically confirmed pulmonary infection after kidney transplantation in recent 10 years were evaluated with respect to the time of occurrence and 89 cases with complete CT data and pathogenic diagnosis were further analyzed for pathogen types and CT manifestations. Statistical analysis was performed using Fisher's exact test. Results: Pulmonary infection reached the peak in 3 months after transplantation. Bacterial infection and mixed infection were predominant between 1 and 6 months. And most tuberculosis occurred after one year. Bacterial (38.2%) and mixed infections (38.2%) were the common types. The next was fungal infection, tuberculosis and viral infection (10.1%, 7.9% and 5.6%, respectively). CT manifestations of pulmonary infections after kidney transplantation were diverse and complex, lacking characteristic signs. Conclusion: More than 3/4 of pulmonary infections after kidney transplantation can be attributed to bacteria and mixed pathogens. The combination of time course, clinical data and CT manifestations plays an important role in the early clinical qualitative diagnosis.

  13. [Infected chorionic hematoma as a cause of infection in the 2nd trimester].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weigel, M; Friese, K; Schmitt, W; Strittmatter, H J; Melchert, F

    1992-12-01

    Superinfected subchorionic haematomas are a rare septic focus in the 2nd trimenon. Symptoms being unspecific, the diagnosis has to be made by exclusion, in most cases. As the changes of a successful treatment of the manifest infection is poor, antibiotic prophylaxis as well as close laboratory controls and early antibiotic therapy should be discussed after sonographic diagnosis of an intrauterine haematoma. Two of our three patients reported on having suffered a miscarriage; only one pregnancy could be maintained after spontaneous depletion of the infected haemorrhage. PMID:1490559

  14. Varicella zoster virus infection causing urinary retention in a child with HIV infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G S Wessels

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available An 11-year-old boy receiving antiretroviral therapy for HIV infection and antibacterial therapy for pulmonary tuberculosis presented with urinary retention due to varicella zoster virus infection involving the sacral nerves, confirmed on serological testing. The perineum over dermatomes S2 - S4 on the left was involved with a vesicular and superficially erosive rash. A transurethral catheter was inserted and the patient was treated with acyclovir (300 mg 6-hourly for 5 days. At follow-up 4 weeks later, the perineal skin lesions had healed, the catheter was removed and the patient was able to pass urine.

  15. Association between polymorphisms in the csrRS two-component regulatory system and invasive group A streptococcal infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, J-N; Chang, L-L; Lai, C-H; Lin, H-H; Chen, Y-H

    2014-05-01

    The csrRS two-component regulatory system is an important element in the pathogenesis of group A Streptococcus (GAS). The main goal of this study is to understand the association between csrRS polymorphisms and GAS infection. We sequenced the csrRS genes from 172 clinical isolates, including 81 invasive and 91 noninvasive isolates, and then employed phylogenetic analyses to determine the consequences of the csrRS polymorphisms. In total, 13 and 26 polymorphic loci were detected in the csrR and csrS genes, respectively. These polymorphisms constituted 14 csrR and 25 csrS alleles, producing two CsrR and seven CsrS variants, respectively. Three invasive isolates contained an indel in csrS, but no indel was identified in csrR. The frequency and distribution of polymorphisms in csrR and csrS was significantly different between the invasive and noninvasive infection isolates (p CsrR, only one noninvasive isolate was identified to have a V29I mutation. The amino acid substitutions in CsrS included S32P (0.6 %), E265G (0.6 %), E265K (0.6 %), I332V (1.7 %), and N498K (82.6 %). Isolates with an N498K single mutation were more likely to be associated with invasive infections (p csrR and csrS were under purifying selection. The fixation index suggested a moderate evolutionary differentiation of the csrR and csrS alleles between invasive and noninvasive isolates. The identification of these genetic differences within the csrRS loci will provide a better understanding of the pathogenesis of GAS. PMID:24158687

  16. Incidence, Causes, and Impact of In-Hospital Infections After Transcatheter Aortic Valve Implantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tirado-Conte, Gabriela; Freitas-Ferraz, Afonso B; Nombela-Franco, Luis; Jimenez-Quevedo, Pilar; Biagioni, Corina; Cuadrado, Ana; Nuñez-Gil, Ivan; Salinas, Pablo; Gonzalo, Nieves; Ferrera, Carlos; Vivas, David; Higueras, Javier; Viana-Tejedor, Ana; Perez-Vizcayno, Maria Jose; Vilacosta, Isidre; Escaned, Javier; Fernandez-Ortiz, Antonio; Macaya, Carlos

    2016-08-01

    In-hospital infections (IHI) are one of the most common and serious problems after invasive procedures. Transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) is an increasingly used alternative to surgery in patients with severe symptomatic aortic stenosis. The aim of this study was to determine the incidence, origin, risk factors, and clinical outcomes of IHI after TAVI. A total of 303 consecutive patients with severe aortic stenosis who underwent transfemoral TAVI were included and followed during a median time of 21 months. We examined the occurrence, types, origin, and timing of infections during hospital stay as well as short- and long-term clinical outcomes according to the occurrence of IHI. A total of 51 patients (17%; 62 infectious episodes) experienced IHI after TAVI. Respiratory and urinary tract infections were the most frequent type of infections (44% and 34%, respectively), followed by surgical site infection (8%) and bloodstream infection (5%). Positive cultures were obtained in 74% of the samples, of which 65% were gram-negative bacilli. Modifiable factors such as bleeding (p = 0.005) and length of coronary care unit stay (p <0.001) were independently associated with an increased infection risk. Patients with IHI had a longer hospital stay (14 vs 6 days, p <0.001), an increased mortality (hazard ratio 2.48, 95% CI 1.45 to 4.23) and readmission rate (hazard ratio 2.0, 95% CI 1.27 to 3.14) during the follow-up. In conclusion, IHI is a frequent complication after TAVI with a significant impact on short- and long-term clinical outcomes. The most important risk factors associated with the development of this complication were modifiable periprocedural aspects. These results underline the importance to implement specific preventive strategies to reduce in-hospital-acquired infections after TAVI. PMID:27296559

  17. Experimental infection of snakes with Ophidiomyces ophiodiicola causes pathological changes that typify snake fungal disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorch, Jeffrey M.; Lankton, Julia S.; Werner, Katrien; Falendysz, Elizabeth A.; McCurley, Kevin; Blehert, David S.

    2015-01-01

    Snake fungal disease (SFD) is an emerging skin infection of wild snakes in eastern North America. The fungus Ophidiomyces ophiodiicola is frequently associated with the skin lesions that are characteristic of SFD, but a causal relationship between the fungus and the disease has not been established. We experimentally infected captive-bred corn snakes (Pantherophis guttatus) in the laboratory with pure cultures of O. ophiodiicola. All snakes in the infected group (n = 8) developed gross and microscopic lesions identical to those observed in wild snakes with SFD; snakes in the control group (n = 7) did not develop skin infections. Furthermore, the same strain of O. ophiodiicola used to inoculate snakes was recovered from lesions of all animals in the infected group, but no fungi were isolated from individuals in the control group. Monitoring progression of lesions throughout the experiment captured a range of presentations of SFD that have been described in wild snakes. The host response to the infection included marked recruitment of granulocytes to sites of fungal invasion, increased frequency of molting, and abnormal behaviors, such as anorexia and resting in conspicuous areas of enclosures. While these responses may help snakes to fight infection, they could also impact host fitness and may contribute to mortality in wild snakes with chronic O. ophiodiicola infection. This work provides a basis for understanding the pathogenicity of O. ophiodiicola and the ecology of SFD by using a model system that incorporates a host species that is easy to procure and maintain in the laboratory.

  18. INVASIVE CANDIDA INFECTIONS IN PATIENTS WITH HAEMATOLOGICAL MALIGNANCIES AND HEMATOPOIETIC STEM CELL TRANSPLANT RECIPIENTS: CURRENT EPIDEMIOLOGY AND THERAPEUTIC OPTIONS.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Corrado Girmenia

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available In the last decades, the global epidemiological impact of invasive candidiasis (IC in patients with hematologic malignancies (HM and in hematopoietic stem cell transplant (HSCT recipients has decreased and the incidence of invasive aspergillosis  exceeded that of Candida infections. The use of prevention strategies, first of all antifungal prophylaxis with triazoles,  contributed to the reduction of IC in these populations as demonstrated by several  epidemiological studies. However, relatively little is known about the current epidemiological patterns of IC in HM and HSCT populations, because recent epidemiological data almost exclusively derive from retrospective experiences and few prospective data are available. Several prospective, controlled studies in the prophylaxis of invasive fungal diseases have been conducted in both the HM and HSCT setting. On the contrary, most of the prospective controlled trials that demonstrated the efficacy of the antifungal drugs echinocandins and voriconazole in the treatment of candidemia and invasive candidiasis mainly involved  patients with underlying conditions other than HM or  HSCT.  For these reasons, international guidelines provided specific indications for the prophylaxis strategies in HM and HSCT patients, whereas the  recommendations on therapy of documented Candida infections are based on the results observed in the general population and should be considered with caution.

  19. The Relationship Between Invasive Nontyphoidal Salmonella Disease, Other Bacterial Bloodstream Infections, and Malaria in Sub-Saharan Africa.

    OpenAIRE

    Park, Se Eun; Pak, Gi Deok; Aaby, Peter; Adu-Sarkodie, Yaw; Ali, Mohammad; Aseffa, Abraham; Biggs, Holly M.; Bjerregaard-andersen, Morten; Breiman, Robert F.; Crump, John A.; Cruz Espinoza, Ligia Maria; Eltayeb, Muna Ahmed; Gasmelseed, Nagla; Julian T Hertz; Im, Justin

    2016-01-01

    Country-specific studies in Africa have indicated that Plasmodium falciparum is associated with invasive nontyphoidal Salmonella (iNTS) disease. We conducted a multicenter study in 13 sites in Burkina Faso, Ethiopia, Ghana, Guinea-Bissau, Kenya, Madagascar, Senegal, South Africa, Sudan, and Tanzania to investigate the relationship between the occurrence of iNTS disease, other systemic bacterial infections, and malaria. Febrile patients received a blood culture and a malaria test. Isolated bac...

  20. The effect of extensive excision of burn wound with invasive infection on hypermetabolism in burn patients with sepsis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    柴家科; 盛志勇; 刁力

    2000-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the effect of extensive excision of invasive burn wound infection on hypermetabolic response in burn patients with sepsis. Methods:Eight patients with major burn, complicated by invasive burn wound infection and sepsis were consecutively admitted to our hospital from September 1997 to October 1998. REEs were monitored by means of Cardiorespiratory Diagnostic System (Medical Graphics Corporation, USA) at patients bedside. Plasma concentration of IL-6、IL-8、TNF-α and LPS were assayed before and after surgical intervention and at the time when the patients' vital signs became stable. Correlation analysis between REEs and IL-6、IL-8、TNF-α、LPS was respectively made. Results: A total of 8 patients were treated and all of them survived. Values of REE before surgical intervention were significantly higher than those after surgical intervention(P<0.01), and when patients vital signs became stable the values were significantly lower compared with that after surgical intervention(P<0.01). The plasma concentrations of IL-6、 IL-8、TNF-α and LPS after excision of invasive burn wound infection were significantly lower than those before surgical intervention (P<0.05). The lowest levels of these inflammatory mediators were observed when the conditions of patients became stable, and the values were significantly lower compared with those before surgical intervention (P<0. 001). There was a significant positive correlation between REE level and respective values of plasma IL-6、 IL-8、 TNF-α、 LPS(P <0.01). Conclusions: It is deemed that the extensive excision of invasively infected burn wound in patients with major burn should be performed as early as possible to reduce an increased release of inflammatory mediators, and to control the hypermetabolic response during sepsis.

  1. Promotion of cancer cell invasiveness and metastasis emergence caused by olfactory receptor stimulation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guenhaël Sanz

    Full Text Available Olfactory receptors (ORs are expressed in the olfactory epithelium, where they detect odorants, but also in other tissues with additional functions. Some ORs are even overexpressed in tumor cells. In this study, we identified ORs expressed in enterochromaffin tumor cells by RT-PCR, showing that single cells can co-express several ORs. Some of the receptors identified were already reported in other tumors, but they are orphan (without known ligand, as it is the case for most of the hundreds of human ORs. Thus, genes coding for human ORs with known ligands were transfected into these cells, expressing functional heterologous ORs. The in vitro stimulation of these cells by the corresponding OR odorant agonists promoted cell invasion of collagen gels. Using LNCaP prostate cancer cells, the stimulation of the PSGR (Prostate Specific G protein-coupled Receptor, an endogenously overexpressed OR, by β-ionone, its odorant agonist, resulted in the same phenotypic change. We also showed the involvement of a PI3 kinase γ dependent signaling pathway in this promotion of tumor cell invasiveness triggered by OR stimulation. Finally, after subcutaneous inoculation of LNCaP cells into NSG immunodeficient mice, the in vivo stimulation of these cells by the PSGR agonist β-ionone significantly enhanced metastasis emergence and spreading.

  2. Transformation of Sexually Transmitted Infection-Causing Serovars of Chlamydia trachomatis Using Blasticidin for Selection

    OpenAIRE

    Honglei Ding; Siqi Gong; Yingxin Tian; Zhangsheng Yang; Robert Brunham; Guangming Zhong

    2013-01-01

    Plasmid-free Chlamydia trachomatis serovar L2 organisms have been transformed with chlamydial plasmid-based shuttle vectors pGFP::SW2 and pBRCT using β-lactamase as a selectable marker. However, the recommendation of amoxicillin, a β-lactam antibiotics, as one of the choices for treating pregnant women with cervicitis due to C. trachomatis infection has made the existing shuttle vectors unsuitable for transforming sexually transmitted infection (STI)-causing serovars of C. trachomatis. Thus, ...

  3. Stricture caused by a plastic vascular clip used during an operation of minimally invasive esophagectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wójcik, Janusz; Grodzki, Tomasz; Kubisa, Bartosz; Pieróg, Jaroslaw

    2011-10-01

    This article describes the case of a 62-year-old female who had had minimally invasive esophagectomy (Ivor-Lewis) for squamous cell carcinoma of the distal third of the esophagus. The anastomotic stenosis was accompanied by solid food dysphagia and the presence of a foreign body in the esophagus. The foreign body was fixed to the esophageal wall and could not be removed endoscopically. The patient was reoperated on through a 8 cm right thoracotomy. The anastomosis was reached via a gastrotomy, and the large-size plastic vascular clip was removed. The clip was primarily used to close the transsected azygos vein, it was then incorporated into the esophageal anastomotic region and subsequently partially protruded into the lumen of the gastrointestinal tract. After removal of the clip, backward dilatation of the anastomosis was performed by Savary-Gilliard dilators, with restoration of its proper diameter. PMID:21798890

  4. Curcumin and its promise as an anticancer drug: An analysis of its anticancer and antifungal effects in cancer and associated complications from invasive fungal infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jin; He, Zheng-Min; Wang, Feng-Ling; Zhang, Zheng-Sheng; Liu, Xiu-zhen; Zhai, Dan-Dan; Chen, Wei-Dong

    2016-02-01

    Invasive fungal infections (IFI) are important complications of cancer, and they have become a major cause of morbidity and mortality in cancer patients. Effective anti-infection therapy is necessary to inhibit significant deterioration from these infections. However, they are difficult to treat, and increasing antifungal drug resistance often leads to a relapse. Curcumin, a natural component that is isolated from the rhizome of Curcuma longa plants, has attracted great interest among many scientists studying solid cancers over the last half century. Interestingly, curcumin provides an ideal alternative to current therapies because of its relatively safe profile, even at high doses. To date, curcumin's potent antifungal activity against different strains of Candida, Cryptococcus, Aspergillus, Trichosporon and Paracoccidioides have been reported, indicating that curcumin anticancer drugs may also possess an antifungal role, helping cancer patients to resist IFI complications. The aim of this review is to discuss curcumin's dual pharmacological activities regarding its applications as a natural anticancer and antifungal agent. These dual pharmacological activities are expected to lead to clinical trials and to improve infection survival among cancer patients. PMID:26723514

  5. Economic Evaluation of Posaconazole Versus Standard Azole Therapy as Prophylaxis against Invasive Fungal Infections in Patients with Prolonged Neutropenia in Canada

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amir A Tahami Monfared

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Posaconazole prophylaxis in high-risk neutropenic patients prevents invasive fungal infection (IFI. An economic model was used to assess the cost effectiveness of posaconazole from a Canadian health care system perspective.

  6. Isolation of invasive Plasmodium yoelii merozoites with a long half-life to evaluate invasion dynamics and potential invasion inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mutungi, Joe Kimanthi; Yahata, Kazuhide; Sakaguchi, Miako; Kaneko, Osamu

    2015-11-01

    Malaria symptoms and pathogenesis are caused by blood stage parasite burdens of Plasmodium spp., for which invasion of red blood cells (RBCs) by merozoites is essential. Successful targeting by either drugs or vaccines directed against the whole merozoite or its antigens during its transient extracellular status would contribute to malaria control by impeding RBC invasion. To understand merozoite invasion biology and mechanisms, it is desired to obtain merozoites that retain their invasion activity in vitro. Accordingly, methods have been developed to isolate invasive Plasmodium knowlesi and Plasmodium falciparum merozoites. Rodent malaria parasite models offer ease in laboratory maintenance and experimental genetic modifications; however, no methods have been reported regarding isolation of high numbers of invasive rodent malaria merozoites. In this study, Plasmodium yoelii-infected RBCs were obtained from infected mice, and mature schizont-infected RBCs enriched via Histodenz™ density gradients. Merozoites retaining invasion activity were then isolated by passing the preparations through a filter membrane. RBC-invaded parasites developed to mature stages in vitro in a synchronous manner. Isolated merozoites were evaluated for retention of invasion activity following storage at different temperatures prior to incubation with uninfected mouse RBCs. Isolated merozoites retained their invasion activity 4h after isolation at 10 or 15 °C, whereas their invasion activity reduced to 0-10% within 30 min when incubated on ice or at 37 °C prior to RBC invasion assay. Images of merozoites at successive steps during RBC invasion were captured by light and transmission electron microscopy. Synthetic peptides derived from the amino acid sequence of the P. yoelii invasion protein RON2 efficiently inhibited RBC invasion. The developed method to isolate and keep invasive P. yoelii merozoites for up to 4h is a powerful tool to study the RBC invasion biology of this parasite

  7. Transplacental Human Herpesvirus 6 (HHV-6) Congenital Infection Caused by Maternal Chromosomally Integrated Virus

    OpenAIRE

    Hall, Caroline Breese; Caserta, Mary T.; Schnabel, Kenneth C.; Shelley, Lynne M.; Carnahan, Jennifer A.; Marino, Andrea S.; Yoo, Christina; Lofthus, Geraldine K.

    2010-01-01

    Congenital HHV-6 infection results from germline passage of chromosomally-integrated HHV-6 (CI-HHV-6) and from transplacental passage of maternal HHV-6 infection (TP-HHV-6). We aimed to determine if CI-HHV-6 could replicate and cause TP-HHV-6 infection. HHV-6 DNA, variant type, and viral loads were determined on samples (cord blood, peripheral blood, saliva, urine, hair) from 6 infants with TP-HHV-6 and on their parents’ hair. No fathers, but all mothers of TP-HHV-6 infants had CI-HHV-6, and ...

  8. CT features of liver abscesses caused by the fasciola hepatica infection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To study CT features of liver abscesses caused by the fasciola hepatica infection, and discuss its pathologic basis. Methods: CT images of 15 Patients were collected. All patients underwent both unenhanced and biphasic enhanced CT scanning, then its CT performances were analyzed. Results: round and nodular lesions were observed in 15 cases, branching and stripping lesions like dilated bile duct in 9 cases. The density of lesions was inhomogeneous, and the lesions were multifocal and multiform. The liver abscesses caused by the fasciola hepatica infection had no 'rim sign' or 'target' sign, Liver abscesses were less than 3.0 cm in diameter, and the dilation of the bile duct were not observed. Conclusion: Liver abscessed caused by the fasciola hepatica infection have characteristic CT features. Combined with clinical examination and laboratory test, the reliability of diagnosis will be considerably increased. (authors)

  9. Behavioral changes in mice caused by Toxoplasma gondii invasion of brain

    OpenAIRE

    Gatkowska, Justyna; Wieczorek, Marek; Dziadek, Bozena; Dzitko, Katarzyna; Dlugonska, Henryka

    2012-01-01

    Toxoplasma gondii, a protozoan parasite, is capable of infecting a broad range of intermediate warm-blooded hosts including humans. The parasite undergoes sexual reproduction resulting in genetic variability only in the intestine of the definitive host (a member of the cat family). The parasite seems to be capable of altering the natural behavior of the host to favor its transmission in the environment. The aim of this study was to evaluate the number of parasite cysts formed in the hippocamp...

  10. Three Epidemics of Invasive Multidrug-Resistant Salmonella Bloodstream Infection in Blantyre, Malawi, 1998–2014

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feasey, Nicholas A.; Masesa, Clemens; Jassi, Chikondi; Faragher, E. Brian; Mallewa, Jane; Mallewa, Macpherson; MacLennan, Calman A.; Msefula, Chisomo; Heyderman, Robert S.; Gordon, Melita A.

    2015-01-01

    Background. The Malawi Liverpool Wellcome Trust Clinical Research Programme (MLW) has routinely collected specimens for blood culture from febrile patients, and cerebrospinal fluid from patients with suspected meningitis, presenting to Queen Elizabeth Central Hospital (QECH), Blantyre, Malawi, since 1998. Methods. We present bloodstream infection (BSI) and meningitis surveillance data from 1998 to 2014. Automated blood culture, manual speciation, serotyping, and antimicrobial susceptibility testing were performed at MLW. Population data for minimum-incidence estimates in urban Blantyre were drawn from published estimates. Results. Between 1998 and 2014, 167 028 blood cultures were taken from adult and pediatric medical patients presenting to QECH; Salmonella Typhi was isolated on 2054 occasions (1.2%) and nontyphoidal Salmonella (NTS) serovars were isolated 10 139 times (6.1%), of which 8017 (79.1%) were Salmonella Typhimurium and 1608 (15.8%) were Salmonella Enteritidis. There were 392 cases of NTS meningitis and 9 cases of Salmonella Typhi meningitis. There have been 3 epidemics of Salmonella BSI in Blantyre; Salmonella Enteritidis from 1999 to 2002, Salmonella Typhimurium from 2002 to 2008, and Salmonella Typhi, which began in 2011 and was ongoing in 2014. Multidrug resistance has emerged in all 3 serovars and is seen in the overwhelming majority of isolates, while resistance to third-generation cephalosporins and fluoroquinolones is currently uncommon but has been identified. Conclusions. Invasive Salmonella disease in Malawi is dynamic and not clearly attributable to a single risk factor, although all 3 epidemics were associated with multidrug resistance. To inform nonvaccine and vaccine interventions, reservoirs of disease and modes of transmission require further investigation. PMID:26449953

  11. Respiratory virus infection and risk of invasive meningococcal disease in central Ontario, Canada.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashleigh R Tuite

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: In temperate climates, invasive meningococcal disease (IMD incidence tends to coincide with or closely follow peak incidence of influenza virus infection; at a seasonal level, increased influenza activity frequently correlates with increased seasonal risk of IMD. METHODS: We evaluated 240 cases of IMD reported in central Ontario, Canada, from 2000 to 2006. Associations between environmental and virological (influenza A, influenza B and respiratory syncytial virus (RSV exposures and IMD incidence were evaluated using negative binomial regression models controlling for seasonal oscillation. Acute effects of weekly respiratory virus activity on IMD risk were evaluated using a matched-period case-crossover design with random directionality of control selection. Effects were estimated using conditional logistic regression. RESULTS: Multivariable negative binomial regression identified elevated IMD risk with increasing influenza A activity (per 100 case increase, incidence rate ratio = 1.18, 95% confidence interval (CI: 1.06, 1.31. In case-crossover models, increasing weekly influenza A activity was associated with an acute increase in the risk of IMD (per 100 case increase, odds ratio (OR  = 2.03, 95% CI: 1.28 to 3.23. Increasing weekly RSV activity was associated with increased risk of IMD after adjusting for RSV activity in the previous 3 weeks (per 100 case increase, OR = 4.31, 95% CI: 1.14, 16.32. No change in disease risk was seen with increasing influenza B activity. CONCLUSIONS: We have identified an acute effect of influenza A and RSV activity on IMD risk. If confirmed, these finding suggest that influenza vaccination may have the indirect benefit of reducing IMD risk.

  12. Epidemiology, outcome and emm types of invasive group A streptococcal infections in Finland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siljander, T; Lyytikäinen, O; Vähäkuopus, S; Snellman, M; Jalava, J; Vuopio, J

    2010-10-01

    In 2006, Finnish nationwide surveillance showed an increase of invasive group A streptococcal (iGAS) disease and clinicians were alarmed by severe disease manifestations, prompting the investigation of recent trends and outcome for iGAS. A case of iGAS was defined as Streptococcus pyogenes isolated from blood or cerebrospinal fluid. Cases during 1998-2007 and isolates during 2004-2007 were included. Case-patients' 7-day outcome was available for 2004-2007. Isolates were emm typed. A total of 1,318 cases of iGAS were identified. The average annual incidence was 2.5/100,000 population. The rate was higher in males than females in persons aged 45-64 years, but lower in persons aged 25-34 years. The annual incidence was highest in 2007 (3.9/100,000). Occasional peaks occurred during midwinter and midsummer. The most common emm types were 28 (21%), 1 (16%), 84 (10%), 75 (7%) and 89 (6%). During 2004-2007, emm1 replaced emm28 as the most predominant type. The overall case fatality was 8%. Cases with emm1 were associated with high case fatality (14% vs. 8% in other types; p < 0.02); that of emm28 infections was 2% (p < 0.01). Changes in emm type prevalence influenced incidence and case fatality. Differences in age- and sex-specific incidence and seasonal patterns suggest variations in predisposing factors and underlying conditions. PMID:20563620

  13. Caspofungin versus liposomal amphotericin B for treatment of invasive fungal infections or febrile neutropenia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhang Jinyu; Gong Yizhen; Wang Ke; Kong Jinliang; Chen Yiqiang

    2014-01-01

    Background Nowadays,there are published trials in regards to the comparison of caspofungin with liposomal amphotericin B (L-AmB).However,these studies have a modest sample size and convey inconclusive results.The aim of this study was to review the efficacy and safety of caspofungin for the treatment of invasive fungal infections (IFIs),compared with L-AmB.Methods Electronic databases (up to July 31,2013) PubMed and Embase databases,the Cochrane Library,and Google Scholar were searched to identify relevant trials of caspofungin and L-AmB.Analyses of efficacy and adverse outcomes were performed by relative risks (RRs) and 95% confidence intervals (C/s).Heterogeneity was assessed by x2-test and the/2-statistic.Results Three trials were included in this meta-analysis with 1249 modified intention-to-treat (MITT) patients.The results showed that caspofungin produced equal efficacy in favorable overall response (RR=1.02,95% Cl 0.88-1.18; P=0.81) and mortality rate (RR=1.53,95% Cl 0.38-6.27,P=0.55),safer in clinical adverse events (RR=0.20,95% Cl 0.08-0.54; P=0.001),laboratory adverse events (RR=0.69,95% Cl 0.57-0.84; P=0.0002),and discontinuation rate (RR=0.26,95% Cl 0.08-0.83,P=0.02),compared with L-AmB in the treatment of patients with IFls.Conclusion Based on the results of this meta-analysis,it would appear that caspofungin was measured to have equal efficacy in clinical outcomes and safer in terms of adverse events.

  14. Catheter-related bacteraemia and infective endocarditis caused by Kocuria species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, C C; Wang, J Y; Lin, S H; Tan, C K; Wang, C Y; Liao, C H; Chou, C H; Huang, Y T; Lin, H I; Hsueh, P R

    2011-02-01

    We describe five patients with positive blood culture for Kocuria species. Three patients had catheter-related bacteraemia and one had infective endocarditis caused by Kocuria kristinae, and one had a K. marina isolate, which was considered to be a contaminant. Identification of the isolates was further confirmed by 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis. In conclusion, Kocuria species are an unusual cause of infection in immunocompromised patients. Accurate identification with molecular methods is imperative for the diagnosis of these unusual pathogens. PMID:20218989

  15. Infections caused by Stenotrophomonas maltophilia in recipients of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    KhalidAhmedAl-Anazi

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Stenotrophomonas maltophilia (S. maltophilia is a globally emerging Gram-negative bacillus that is widely spread in environment and hospital equipment. Recently, the incidence of infections caused by this organism has increased, particularly in patients with hematological malignancy and in recipients of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation having neutropenia, mucositis, diarrhea, central venous catheters or graft versus host disease and receiving intensive cytotoxic chemotherapy, immunosuppressive therapy or broad-spectrum antibiotics. The spectrum of infections in hematopoietic stem cell transplantation recipients includes: pneumonia, urinary tract and surgical site infection, peritonitis, bacteremia, septic shock and infection of indwelling medical devices. The organism exhibits intrinsic resistance to many classes of antibiotics including carbapenems, aminoglycosides, most of the third generation cephalosporins and other β-lactams. Despite the increasingly reported drug resistance, trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole is still the drug of choice However, the organism is still susceptible to: ticarcillin-clavulanic acid, tigecycline, fluoroquinolones, polymyxin-B and rifampicin. Genetic factors play a significant role not only in evolution of drug resistance but also in virulence of the organism. The outcome of patients having S. maltophilia infections can be improved by: using various combinations of novel therapeutic agents and aerosolized aminoglycosides or colistin, prompt administration of in-vitro active antibiotics, removal of possible sources of infection such as infected indwelling intravacular catheters and application of strict infection control measures.

  16. Invasiveness of Serotypes and Clones of Streptococcus pneumoniae among Children in Finland

    OpenAIRE

    William P Hanage; Kaijalainen, Tarja H.; Ritva K Syrjänen; Auranen, Kari; Leinonen, Maija; Mäkelä, P. Helena; Brian G. Spratt

    2005-01-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae (the pneumococcus) causes diseases from otitis media to life-threatening invasive infection. The species is extremely antigenically and clonally diverse. We wished to determine odds ratios (ORs) for serotypes and clones of S. pneumoniae that cause invasive disease in Finland. A total of 224 isolates of S. pneumoniae from cases of invasive disease in children

  17. A non-invasive stress assay shows that tadpole populations infected with Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis have elevated corticosterone levels

    OpenAIRE

    Gabor, Caitlin R.; Fisher, Matthew C; Bosch, Jaime

    2013-01-01

    Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis (Bd) is a fungus that causes the disease chytridiomycosis and is associated with widespread amphibian declines. Populations vary in their susceptibility to Bd infections, and the virulence of the infecting lineage can also vary. Both of these factors may manifest as a differential physiological stress response. In addition, variation in disease susceptibility across amphibian populations may be influenced by immunosuppression caused by chronic stress imposed by ...

  18. Clinical presentation of infective endocarditis caused by different groups of non-beta haemolytic streptococci.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nilson, B; Olaison, L; Rasmussen, M

    2016-02-01

    Streptococci are common causes of infective endocarditis (IE) and matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) has provided a practical tool for their species determination. We aimed to investigate if particular groups of non-beta heamolytic streptococci were associated with IE or to specific presentations thereof. The Swedish Registry of Infective Endocarditis was used to identify cases of IE caused by streptococci and a local database to identify cases of streptococcal bacteremia. The bacteria were grouped using MALDI-TOF MS and the clinical characteristics of IE caused by different groups were compared. We identified a group of 201 streptococcal IE isolates: 18 isolates belonged to the anginosus, 19 to the bovis, 140 to the mitis, 17 to the mutans, and seven to the salivarius groups. The mitis and mutans groups were significantly more common and the anginosus group less common among IE cases as compared to all cause bacteremia. Patients infected with the bovis group isolates were older, had more cardiac devices, and had more commonly prosthetic valve IE compared to IE caused by streptococci of the other groups. Twenty-one percent of patients needed surgery, and in-hospital mortality was 8% with no significant differences between the groups. Grouping of non-beta haemolytic streptococci using MALDI-TOF MS can provide a basis for decision-making in streptococcal bacteremia. IE caused by bovis group isolates have clinical characteristics distinguishing them from IE caused by other groups of Streptococcus. PMID:26610338

  19. Heat shock cognate protein 70 contributes to Brucella invasion into trophoblast giant cells that cause infectious abortion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Furuoka Hidefumi

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The cell tropism of Brucella abortus, a causative agent of brucellosis and facultative intracellular pathogen, in the placenta is thought to be a key event of infectious abortion, although the molecular mechanism for this is largely unknown. There is a higher degree of bacterial colonization in the placenta than in other organs and many bacteria are detected in trophoblast giant (TG cells in the placenta. In the present study, we investigated mechanism of B. abortus invasion into TG cells. Results We observed internalization and intracellular growth of B. abortus in cultured TG cells. A monoclonal antibody that inhibits bacterial internalization was isolated and this reacted with heat shock cognate protein 70 (Hsc70. Depletion and over expression of Hsc70 in TG cells inhibited and promoted bacterial internalization, respectively. IFN-γ receptor was expressed in TG cells and IFN-γ treatment enhanced the uptake of bacteria by TG cells. Administering the anti-Hsc70 antibody to pregnant mice served to prevent infectious abortion. Conclusion B. abortus infection of TG cells in placenta is mediated by Hsc70, and that such infection leads to infectious abortion.

  20. Variant mannose-binding lectin alleles are not associated with susceptibility to or outcome of invasive pneumococcal infection in randomly included patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kronborg, Gitte; Madsen, Hans O; Pedersen, Svend S;

    2002-01-01

    Invasive pneumococcal disease is a serious infection that primarily affects very young children and elderly or immunocompromised individuals but also affects previously healthy people. Variant mannose-binding lectin (MBL) alleles are associated with recurrent infections and may be a risk factor for...... pneumococcal infections. To assess the influence of MBL genotypes on the course and outcome of invasive pneumococcal disease, clinical data for 141 adult patients were collected prospectively and their genotypes were determined. All patients included had positive blood cultures for Streptococcus pneumoniae....... The distribution of variant MBL alleles related to low MBL serum concentrations was similar among the patients and healthy individuals, and MBL genotype was not associated with infection outcome. Thus, in a random adult population with invasive pneumococcal infection, MBL does not seem to play a role...

  1. Loss of Wolbachia infection during colonisation in the invasive Argentine ant Linepithema humile

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reuter, M.; Pedersen, Jes Søe; Keller, L.

    2005-01-01

    the phylogenies of Wolbachia and its arthropod hosts indicate that infection is frequently lost, but the causes of symbiont extinction have so far remained elusive. Here, we report data showing that colonisation of new habitats is a possible mechanism leading to the loss of infection. The presence and...... loss of infection associated with colonisation of new habitats may result from drift (founder effect) or altered selection pressures in the new habitat. Furthermore, a molecular phylogeny based on sequences of the Wolbachia wsp gene indicates that L. humile has been infected by a single strain...

  2. Pediatric invasive pneumococcal disease caused by vaccine serotypes following the introduction of conjugate vaccination in Denmark.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zitta B Harboe

    Full Text Available A seven-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV7 was introduced in the Danish childhood immunization program (2+1 schedule in October 2007, followed by PCV13 starting from April 2010. The nationwide incidence of IPD among children younger than 5 years nearly halved after the introduction of PCV7 in the program, mainly due to a decline in IPD caused by PCV7-serotypes. We report the results from a nationwide population-based cohort study of laboratory confirmed IPD cases in children younger than 5 years during October 1, 2007 to December 31, 2010 and describe the characteristics of children suspected to present with a vaccine failure. The period between April 19 and December 31, 2010 was considered a PCV7/PCV13 transitional period, where both vaccines were offered. We identified 45 episodes of IPD caused by a PCV7 serotype (23% of the total number and 105 (55% caused by one of the 6 additional serotypes in PCV13. Ten children had received at least one PCV7 dose before the onset of IPD caused by a PCV7 serotype. Seven children were considered to be incompletely vaccinated before IPD, but only three cases fulfilled the criteria of vaccine failure (caused by serotypes 14, 19F and 23F. One case of vaccine failure was observed in a severely immunosuppressed child following three PCV7 doses, and two cases were observed in immunocompetent children following two infant doses before they were eligible for their booster. None of the IPD cases caused by the additional PCV13 serotypes had been vaccinated by PCV13 and there were therefore no PCV13-vaccine failures in the first 8-months after PCV13 introduction in Denmark.

  3. Preterm labor and neonatal sepsis caused by intrauterine Helicobacter cinaedi infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maki, Yohei; Furukawa, Seishi; Kodama, Yuki; Sumiyoshi, Kaeko; Kino, Emi; Sameshima, Hiroshi

    2016-06-01

    Helicobacter cinaedi is a rare pathogen but known to cause bacteremia, cellulitis and enterocolitis. Recently, cases of involving various organs are increasingly reported such as endocarditis, meningitis, and kidney cyst infection. We report a case of intrauterine H. cinaedi infection leading preterm birth and neonatal sepsis. A 29-year-old pregnant women who was no underlying disease hospitalized due to threatened preterm labor at 22 weeks of gestation. Clinical findings showed uterine tenderness, fever, leukocytosis and elevated C-reactive protein. H. cinaedi was isolated from amniotic fluid obtained by transabdominal amniocentesis. We diagnosed as intrauterine H. cinaedi infection and administered intravenous ampicillin followed by oxytocin to terminate pregnancy. A live 446 g male infant was delivered. The patient was no signs of infection throughout postpartum course and discharged on post-delivery day 5. The neonate was admitted in neonatal intensive care unit and administered ampicillin and amikacin. H. cinaedi was isolated from umbilical cord blood culture. He has no signs of infection on day 5 but died from uncontrollable hyperglycemia and ketoacidosis on 15 days of age. H. cinaedi can cause intrauterine infection during pregnancy and lead preterm labor and neonatal sepsis. PMID:26806147

  4. HIV Infection and the Epidemiology of Invasive Pneumococcal Disease (IPD in South African Adults and Older Children Prior to the Introduction of a Pneumococcal Conjugate Vaccine (PCV.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susan Meiring

    Full Text Available Streptococcus pneumoniae is the commonest cause of bacteremic pneumonia among HIV-infected persons. As more countries with high HIV prevalence are implementing infant pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV programs, we aimed to describe the baseline clinical characteristics of adult invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD in the pre-PCV era in South Africa in order to interpret potential indirect effects following vaccine use.National, active, laboratory-based surveillance for IPD was conducted in South Africa from 1 January 2003 through 31 December 2008. At 25 enhanced surveillance (ES hospital sites, clinical data, including HIV serostatus, were collected from IPD patients ≥ 5 years of age. We compared the clinical characteristics of individuals with IPD in those HIV-infected and -uninfected using multivariable analysis. PCV was introduced into the routine South African Expanded Program on Immunization (EPI in 2009.In South Africa, from 2003-2008, 17 604 cases of IPD occurred amongst persons ≥ 5 years of age, with an average incidence of 7 cases per 100 000 person-years. Against a national HIV-prevalence of 18%, 89% (4190/4734 of IPD patients from ES sites were HIV-infected. IPD incidence in HIV-infected individuals is 43 times higher than in HIV-uninfected persons (52 per 100 000 vs. 1.2 per 100 000, with a peak in the HIV-infected elderly population of 237 per 100 000 persons. Most HIV-infected individuals presented with bacteremia (74%, 3 091/4 190. HIV-uninfected individuals were older; and had more chronic conditions (excluding HIV than HIV-infected persons (39% (210/544 vs. 19% (790/4190, p<0.001. During the pre-PCV immunization era in South Africa, 71% of serotypes amongst HIV-infected persons were covered by PCV13 vs. 73% amongst HIV-uninfected persons, p = 0.4, OR 0.9 (CI 0.7-1.1.Seventy to eighty-five percent of adult IPD in the pre-PCV era were vaccine serotypes and 93% of cases had recognized risk factors (including HIV-infection for

  5. EICU侵袭性真菌感染临床特点及病原学分析%Clinical characteristics and etiology of invasive fungal infections in EICU

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王树云; 路薇薇

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To study the clinical characteristics of invasive fungal infections in patients in emergency intensive care unit (EICU). METHODS A total of 106 patients with severe invasive fungal infections who enrolled in EICU from Jan 2009 to Dec 2010 were retrospectively investigated and analyzed. RESULTS Totally 117 strains of fungi were isolated from 106 patients with fungal infections, among which there were 72 strains (61. 5%) of Candida albicans and 45 (38. 5%) strains of non-C albicans; the main infection sites were respiratory tract, urinary tract and blood; the predisposing factors for the fungal infections included the irrational use of antibiotics, long-term use of hormones, central venous catheterization, mechanical ventilation and indwelling catheter; the difference in the mortality between the patients with C. albicans infections and non-C. albicans infections was statistically significant (P< 0. 01). CONCLUSION C. albicans is the most common pathogens causing fungal infections in EICU, the predominant infection site is respiratory tract; unreasonable use of antibiotics, long-term use of hormones, central venous catheterization, mechanical ventilation and indwelling catheters are recognized as high risk factors. Non-C. albicans infection is the main cause of death among the patients with fungal infections.%目的 探讨急诊重症监护病房(EICU)重症患者真菌感染的临床特点.方法 对2009年1月-2010年12月入住医院EICU的106例侵袭性真菌感染重症患者,进行回顾性调查分析.结果 106例真菌感染患者中分离菌株117株,白色假丝酵母菌72株占61.5%,非白色假丝酵母菌45株占38.5%,主要感染部位为呼吸道、泌尿道及血液为主,其主要诱因为不合理使用抗菌药物、长期使用激素、中心静脉置管、人工机械通气及留置导尿管等,非白色假丝酵母菌与白色假丝酵母菌感染死亡率比较,差异有统计学意义(P<0.01).结论 EICU重症患者真菌感

  6. Emerging trends in epidemiology and management of infections caused by carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martirosov, Dmitriy M; Lodise, Thomas P

    2016-06-01

    The recent emergence and spread of infections caused by carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae (CRE) are concerning because carbapenems have represented a last line of defense against resistant strains of gram-negative pathogens. Existing therapies against CRE include tigecycline, the recently approved drug ceftazidime-avibactam, and older drugs not widely used in recent years, such as colistin, fosfomycin, and aminoglycosides. Best practices for use of the available drugs are not well defined. New therapeutic options with activity against CRE offer the opportunity to enhance our current approach to managing patients with infections due to CRE. The purpose of this report is to review the evolving epidemiology and treatment of infections due to CRE. As part of the treatment overview, this manuscript will discuss supportive data for antibiotics currently being used in the treatment of infections due to CRE, as well as those recently approved and in late-stage development. PMID:27033631

  7. Rhinosinusitis and disseminated cutaneous infection caused by Mycobacterium chelonae in an immunocompromised patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enomoto, Yasunori; Oba, Misao; Ishii, Norihisa; Nakanaga, Kazue; Yagi, Yuki; Hasegawa, Hirotsugu; Ozawa, Yuichi; Matsui, Takashi; Yokomura, Koshi; Suda, Takafumi

    2015-09-01

    Mycobacterium chelonae frequently involves the skin, and the disseminated form can be observed in immunocompromised patients. In contrast, rhinosinusitis caused by the bacterium is a rare manifestation, which occurs independently of immune status. We report here a rare case of M. chelonae infection presenting as both disseminated cutaneous infection and rhinosinusitis in an immunocompromised patient. He had received systemic corticosteroids for 11 months due to cryptogenic organizing pneumonia. Before admission, he sustained injuries to his left arm and hand; those injuries succumbed to an infection that would subsequently spread to his other limbs, face, and even nasal cavities. This valuable case suggests that disseminated cutaneous infection by M. chelonae could spread to other organs. PMID:26025682

  8. Solitary Candida albicans Infection Causing Fournier Gangrene and Review of Fungal Etiologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perkins, Tiffany A; Bieniek, Jared M; Sumfest, Joel M

    2014-01-01

    Polymicrobial bacterial infections are commonly found in cases of Fournier gangrene (FG), although fungal growth may occur occasionally. Solitary fungal organisms causing FG have rarely been reported. The authors describe a case of an elderly man with a history of diabetes who presented with a necrotizing scrotal and perineal soft tissue infection. He underwent emergent surgical debridement with findings of diffuse urethral stricture disease and urinary extravasation requiring suprapubic tube placement. Candida albicans was found to be the single causative organism on culture, and the patient recovered well following antifungal treatment. Fungal infections should be considered as rare causes of necrotizing fasciitis and antifungal treatment considered in at-risk immunodeficient individuals. PMID:25009452

  9. Soft tissue infections caused by marine bacterial pathogens: epidemiology, diagnosis, and management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finkelstein, Renato; Oren, Ilana

    2011-10-01

    Skin and soft tissue infections (SSTIs) are one of the most common infection syndromes and may be caused by a large number of microorganisms. Some principles of aquatic injuries are different than those of land-based trauma. Wounds sustained in marine environment are exposed to a milieu of bacteria rarely encountered in different settings. These include Vibrio spp., Aeromonas spp., Shewanella spp., Erysipelothrix rhusiopathiae, Mycobacterium marinum, Streptococcus iniae, and other microbes. Failure to recognize and treat these uncommon pathogens in a timely manner may result in significant morbidity or death. These infections are frequently contracted as a result of recreational swimming, fishing injuries, or seafood handling. The spectrum of manifestations is wide, varying from cases of mild cellulitis, to severe life-threatening necrotizing fasciitis requiring radical surgery, to sepsis and death. This review will focus on the epidemiology, clinical manifestations, and treatment of SSTIs caused by the most important marine pathogens. PMID:21785929

  10. Infection caused by Nocardia farcinica mimicking pulmonary metastasis in an adolescent girl.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babayigit, Arzu; Olmez, Duygu; Sozmen, Sule C; Makay, Balahan; Uzuner, Nevin; Karaman, Ozkan; Anal, Ozden; Gulay, Zeynep

    2010-03-01

    Nocardia farcinica infections are rare and potentially life threatening. Herein, we describe a case of pulmonary nocardiosis caused by N. farcinica. This 13-year-old girl admitted with 1-year history of cough, intermittent fever, and recurrent hemoptysis. She was examined for multiple pulmonary nodules mimicking pulmonary metastasis that were detected with chest radiography and computed tomography of the thorax. Eventually, N. farcinica was yielded in culture of sputum and aspiration material of pulmonary nodules. No predisposing factor could be shown for Nocardia infection. Although infections caused by N. farcinica have tendency to disseminate, and are mostly resistant to antibiotics, the patient was successfully treated with prolonged intravenous antibiotic therapy followed with oral amoxicillin-clavulanate. PMID:20216281

  11. Experimental evolution can unravel the complex causes of natural selection in clinical infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brockhurst, Michael A

    2015-06-01

    It is increasingly clear that rapid evolutionary dynamics are an important process in microbial ecology. Experimental evolution, wherein microbial evolution is observed in real-time, has revealed many instances of appreciable evolutionary change occurring on very short timescales of a few days or weeks in response to a variety of biotic and abiotic selection pressures. From clinical infections, including the chronic bacterial lung infections associated with cystic fibrosis that form a focus of my research, there is now abundant evidence suggesting that rapid evolution by infecting microbes contributes to host adaptation, treatment failure and worsening patient prognosis. However, disentangling the drivers of natural selection in complex infection environments is extremely challenging and limits our understanding of the selective pressures acting upon microbes in infections. Controlled evolution experiments can make a vital contribution to this by determining the causal links between predicted drivers of natural selection and the evolutionary responses of microbes. Integration of experimental evolution into studies of clinical infections is a key next step towards a better understanding of the causes and consequences of rapid microbial evolution in infections, and discovering how these evolutionary processes might be influenced to improve patient health.A video of this Prize Lecture, presented at the Society for General Microbiology Annual Conference 2015, can be viewed via this link: Michael A. Brockhurst https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=N1bodVSl27E. PMID:25957311

  12. Infection and disease progress of motile Aeromonas septicemia caused by virulent Aeromonas hydrophila in channel catfish

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motile Aeromonas septicemia (MAS), caused by virulent clonal isolates of Aeromonas hydrophila (vAh), is emerging as a major disease in channel catfish (Ictalurus punctatus) aquaculture in the Southeastern United States. Predisposing conditions leading to vAh infection in catfish were however largely...

  13. Wound infection caused by Lichtheimia ramosa due to a car accident

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bibashi, Evangelia; de Hoog, G Sybren; Pavlidis, Theodoros E; Symeonidis, Nikolaos; Sakantamis, Athanasios; Walther, Grit

    2012-01-01

    A 32-year-old immunocompetent man sustained severe traumas contaminated with organic material due to a car accident. An infection caused by Lichtheimia ramosa at the site of contamination was early diagnosed and cured by multiple surgical debridement and daily cleansing with antiseptic solution only

  14. Wound infection caused by Lichtheimia ramosa due to a car accident

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E. Bibashi; G.S. de Hoog; T.E. Pavlidis; N. Symeonidis; A. Sakantamis; G. Walther

    2013-01-01

    A 32-year-old immunocompetent man sustained severe traumas contaminated with organic material due to a car accident. An infection caused by Lichtheimia ramosa at the site of contamination was early diagnosed and cured by multiple surgical debridement and daily cleansing with antiseptic solution only

  15. Cutaneous infection caused by Ulocladium chartarum in a heart transplant recipient: case report and review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durán, María Teresa; Del Pozo, Jesús; Yebra, María Teresa; Crespo, María Generosa; Paniagua, María Jesús; Cabezón, María Angeles; Guarro, Josep

    2003-01-01

    A cutaneous mycoses caused by Ulocladium chartarum in a heart transplant recipient is reported. The infection cleared after complete surgical excision and 6 months of oral itraconazole therapy. In vitro activity of amphotericin B, fluconazole, itraconazole, voriconazole, ravuconazole and terbinafine against the clinical isolate is shown. PMID:12816160

  16. THE MODERN CONCEPTIONS ABOUT IMMUNOPATHOGENESIS OF INFECTION CAUSED BY THE EPSTEIN–BARR VIRUS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. V. Goreiko

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract. The current review summarizes modern data about structural and functional organization of the Epstein–Barr virus (EBV and stages of its reproduction. The information concerning immune pathogenesis and clinical features of infection caused by EBV and EBV-associated diseases is presented in the article.

  17. Characteristics of Escherichia coli causing persistence or relapse of urinary tract infections

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ejrnæs, Karen; Stegger, Marc; Reisner, Andreas;

    2011-01-01

    pivmecillinam and aimed to identify associations between the presence of 29 virulence factor genes (VFGs), phylogenetic groups and biofilm formation and the course of infection during follow-up visits at 8-10 and 35-49 days post-inclusion, respectively. E. coli causing persistence or relapse were more often of...

  18. Epidemic Keratoconjunctivitis-Causing Adenoviruses Induce MUC16 Ectodomain Release To Infect Ocular Surface Epithelial Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menon, Balaraj B; Zhou, Xiaohong; Spurr-Michaud, Sandra; Rajaiya, Jaya; Chodosh, James; Gipson, Ilene K

    2016-01-01

    Human adenoviruses (HAdV), species D in particular (HAdV-D), are frequently associated with epidemic keratoconjunctivitis (EKC). Although the infection originates at the ocular surface epithelium, the mechanisms by which HAdV-Ds bypass the membrane-associated mucin (MAM)-rich glycocalyx of the ocular surface epithelium to trigger infection and inflammation remain unknown. Here, we report that an EKC-causing adenovirus (HAdV-D37), but not a non-EKC-causing one (HAdV-D19p), induces ectodomain release of MUC16-a MAM with barrier functions at the ocular surface-from cultured human corneal and conjunctival epithelial cells. HAdV-D37, but not HAdV-D19p, is also found to decrease the glycocalyx barrier function of corneal epithelial cells, as determined by rose bengal dye penetrance assays. Furthermore, results from quantitative PCR (qPCR) amplification of viral genomic DNA using primers specific to a conserved region of the E1B gene show that, in comparison to infection by HAdV-D19p, infection by HAdV-D37 is significantly increased in corneal epithelial cells. Collectively, these results point to a MUC16 ectodomain release-dependent mechanism utilized by the EKC-causing HAdV-D37 to initiate infection at the ocular surface. These findings are important in terms of understanding the pathogenesis of adenoviral keratoconjunctivitis. Similar MAM ectodomain release mechanisms may be prevalent across other mucosal epithelia in the body (e.g., the airway epithelium) that are prone to adenoviral infection. IMPORTANCE Human adenoviruses (HAdVs) are double-stranded DNA viruses that cause infections across all mucosal tissues in the body. At the ocular surface, HAdVs cause keratoconjunctivitis (E. Ford, K. E. Nelson, and D. Warren, Epidemiol Rev 9:244-261, 1987, and C. M. Robinson, D. Seto, M. S. Jones, D. W. Dyer, and J. Chodosh, Infect Genet Evol 11:1208-1217, 2011, doi:10.1016/j.meegid.2011.04.031)-a highly contagious infection that accounts for nearly 60% of conjunctivitis cases

  19. Predominant and common cause of urinary tract infection(s) in sukkur city

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To examine and evaluate the predominant and common etiologic agent(s) of urinary tract infection (UTI) in Sukkur city and to determine their current antibiotic susceptibility/resistance trends. Nine hundred sixty six patients out of 1430 abnormal urine reports (showing significant abnormalities such as protein, pus, red cells) were asked to give second sample. The urine samples were examined by both urine test strip (Combur 10 Test, Roche) and microscopically (wet preparation) followed by culture and sensitivity. The culture sensitivity was done on urine samples of which bacterial numbers were estimated as more than 105CFU. The study was conducted at Safeway Diagnostic and Research Laboratory Sukkur and the Department of Microbiology, Shah Abdul Latif University Khairpur, Sindh from March 2001 to March 2003. Eight hundred fifty-two (88.2%) showed Escherichia spp followed by Klebsiella spp (6.9%) and proteus spp (4.9%). These showed 95%, 90%, 90% sensitivity to ofloxacin respectively. Ninety percent isolates of Escherichia spp, Proteus spp and Klebsiella spp were sensitive to ciprofloxacin. Escherichia spp was found to be major uropathogen and ofloxacin and ciprofloxacin were effective antibiotics against these strains isolated from UTI patients of Sukkur city. (author)

  20. A mouse model for studying viscerotropic disease caused by yellow fever virus infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathryn C Meier

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Mosquito-borne yellow fever virus (YFV causes highly lethal, viscerotropic disease in humans and non-human primates. Despite the availability of efficacious live-attenuated vaccine strains, 17D-204 and 17DD, derived by serial passage of pathogenic YFV strain Asibi, YFV continues to pose a significant threat to human health. Neither the disease caused by wild-type YFV, nor the molecular determinants of vaccine attenuation and immunogenicity, have been well characterized, in large part due to the lack of a small animal model for viscerotropic YFV infection. Here, we describe a small animal model for wild-type YFV that manifests clinical disease representative of that seen in primates without adaptation of the virus to the host, which was required for the current hamster YF model. Investigation of the role of type I interferon (IFN-alpha/beta in protection of mice from viscerotropic YFV infection revealed that mice deficient in the IFN-alpha/beta receptor (A129 or the STAT1 signaling molecule (STAT129 were highly susceptible to infection and disease, succumbing within 6-7 days. Importantly, these animals developed viscerotropic disease reminiscent of human YF, instead of the encephalitic signs typically observed in mice. Rapid viremic dissemination and extensive replication in visceral organs, spleen and liver, was associated with severe pathologies in these tissues and dramatically elevated MCP-1 and IL-6 levels, suggestive of a cytokine storm. In striking contrast, infection of A129 and STAT129 mice with the 17D-204 vaccine virus was subclinical, similar to immunization in humans. Although, like wild-type YFV, 17D-204 virus amplified within regional lymph nodes and seeded a serum viremia in A129 mice, infection of visceral organs was rarely established and rapidly cleared, possibly by type II IFN-dependent mechanisms. The ability to establish systemic infection and cause viscerotropic disease in A129 mice correlated with infectivity for A129

  1. INVASIVE CANDIDA INFECTIONS IN PATIENTS WITH HAEMATOLOGICAL MALIGNANCIES AND HEMATOPOIETIC STEM CELL TRANSPLANT RECIPIENTS: CURRENT EPIDEMIOLOGY AND THERAPEUTIC OPTIONS.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erica Finolezzi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available

    In the last decades, the global epidemiological impact of invasive candidiasis (IC in patients with hematologic malignancies (HM and in hematopoietic stem cell transplant (HSCT recipients has decreased and the incidence of invasive aspergillosis  exceeded that of Candida infections. The use of prevention strategies, first of all antifungal prophylaxis with triazoles,  contributed to the reduction of IC in these populations as demonstrated by several  epidemiological studies. However, relatively little is known about the current epidemiological patterns of IC in HM and HSCT populations, because recent epidemiological data almost exclusively derive from retrospective experiences and few prospective data are available. Several prospective, controlled studies in the prophylaxis of invasive fungal diseases have been conducted in both the HM and HSCT setting. On the contrary, most of the prospective controlled trials that demonstrated the efficacy of the antifungal drugs echinocandins and voriconazole in the treatment of candidemia and invasive candidiasis mainly involved  patients with underlying conditions other than HM or  HSCT.  For these reasons, international guidelines provided specific indications for the prophylaxis strategies in HM and HSCT patients, whereas the  recommendations on therapy of documented Candida infections are based on the results observed in the general population and should be considered with caution.

  2. Necrotizing Encephalitis Caused by Disseminated Aspergillus Infection after Orthotopic Liver Transplantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis E. Barrera-Herrera

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Liver transplantation is the only available treatment for some patients with end-stage liver disease. Despite reduction in mortality rates due to advances related to surgical techniques, intensive medical management and immunosuppressive therapy, invasive fungal infections remain a serious complication in orthotopic liver transplantation. We report the case of an 18-year-old male diagnosed with autoimmune cirrhosis in 2009 who was assessed and listed for liver transplantation for massive variceal hemorrhage. One year after listing a successful orthotopic liver transplantation was performed. Uneventful early recovery was achieved; however, he developed pulmonary and neurological Aspergillus infection 23 and 40 days after surgery, respectively. Antibiotic therapy with voriconazole and amphotericin was started early, with no major response. Neuroimaging revealed multiple right frontal and right parietal lesions with perilesional edema; surgical management of the brain abscesses was performed. A biopsy with periodic acid-Schiff and Gomori stains revealed areas with mycotic microorganisms morphologically consistent with Aspergillus, later confirmed by culture. The patient developed necrotizing encephalitis secondary to aspergillosis and died. Necrotizing encephalitis as a clinical presentation of Aspergillus infection in an orthotopic liver transplant is not common, and even with adequate management, early diagnosis and prompt antifungal treatment, mortality rates remain high.

  3. Key Points Concerning Amyloid Infectivity and Prion-Like Neuronal Invasion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espargaró, Alba; Busquets, Maria Antònia; Estelrich, Joan; Sabate, Raimon

    2016-01-01

    Amyloid aggregation has been related to an increasing number of human illnesses, from Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s diseases (AD/PD) to Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease. Commonly, only prions have been considered as infectious agents with a high capacity of propagation. However, recent publications have shown that many amyloid proteins, including amyloid β-peptide, α-synuclein (α-syn) and tau protein, also propagate in a “prion-like” manner. Meanwhile, no link between propagation of pathological proteins and neurotoxicity has been demonstrated. The extremely low infectivity under natural conditions of most non-prion amyloids is far below the capacity to spread exhibited by prions. Nonetheless, it is important to elucidate the key factors that cause non-prion amyloids to become infectious agents. In recent years, important advances in our understanding of the amyloid processes of amyloid-like proteins and unrelated prions (i.e., yeast and fungal prions) have yielded essential information that can shed light on the prion phenomenon in mammals and humans. As shown in this review, recent evidence suggests that there are key factors that could dramatically modulate the prion capacity of proteins in the amyloid conformation. The concentration of nuclei, the presence of oligomers, and the toxicity, resistance and localization of these aggregates could all be key factors affecting their spread. In short, those factors that favor the high concentration of extracellular nuclei or oligomers, characterized by small size, with a low toxicity could dramatically increase prion propensity; whereas low concentrations of highly toxic intracellular amyloids, with a large size, would effectively prevent infectivity. PMID:27147962

  4. Key points concerning amyloid infectivity and prion-like neuronal invasion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alba eEspargaró

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Amyloid aggregation has been related to an increasing number of human illnesses, from Alzheimer and Parkinson’s diseases to Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease. Traditionally only prions have been considered as infectious agents with a high capacity of propagation. Although recent publications have showed that many amyloid proteins, including amyloid β-peptide, α-synuclein and tau protein, also propagate in a prion-like manner, the link between propagation of pathological proteins and neurotoxicity has not been evidenced. The extremely low infectivity in natural conditions of the most of non-prion amyloids is far from the spreading capacity displayed by the prions. However, it is important to elucidate the key factors that cause non-prion amyloids become infectious agents. In recent years, important advances in the understanding of the amyloid processes of amyloid-like proteins and unrelated prions (i.e., yeast and fungal prions have yielded essential information that can be applied to shed light on the prion phenomenon in mammals and humans. As shown in this review, recent evidences suggest that there are key factors that could dramatically modulate the prion capacity of proteins in the amyloid conformation. The concentration of nuclei, the presence of oligomers, and the toxicity, resistance and localization of these aggregates could be key factors affecting their spreading. In short, those factors that favor the high concentration of extracellular nuclei or oligomers, characterized by a small size, with a low toxicity could dramatically increase prion propensity; whereas low concentrations of highly toxic intracellular amyloids, with a large size, would prevent infectivity.

  5. [Simultaneous operation of WPW syndrome combined with mitral regurgitation caused by infective endocarditis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sueda, T; Nakashima, Y; Hamanaka, Y; Ishihara, H; Matsuura, Y; Isobe, F

    1990-03-01

    A case of WPW syndrome combined with mitral regurgitation caused by infective endocarditis underwent surgical division of accessory pathway and mitral valve replacement preserving posterior leaflet simultaneously. A 56-years old woman suffered atrial fibrillation with pseudo VT and cardiac failure caused by mitral regurgitation. Electro-physiological study (EPS) revealed accessory pathway in postero-lateral wall in left atrium and atrio-fascicular pathway like James bundle in AV node. ECHO cardiography showed mitral valve prolapse and severe regurgitation. Accessory pathway was divided surgically and deep freeze coagulation was followed. Perforation of anterior leaflet and chordal rupture of posterior leaflet caused by infective endocarditis were repaired by annuloplasty (Kay and McGoon method) at first, but regurgitation retained moderately. After re-clamping of aorta, mitral valve was replaced with prosthesis (SJM 29 mm) preserving posterior leaflet. Postoperative examination revealed division of accessory pathway and no regurgitation of mitral prosthesis. PMID:2348136

  6. [Tropical ophthalmology : Intraocular inflammation caused by "new" infectious pathogens and travel-related infections].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pleyer, U; Klauß, V; Wilking, H; Nentwich, M M

    2016-01-01

    A number of "new" (emerging) infections that can also cause inflammatory eye changes are appearing and becoming increasingly important. In the past, diseases such as chikungunya, dengue fever or West Nile virus infections were endemic in tropical regions, but are now expanding worldwide and causing significant morbidity and even mortality. "Globalization" and human migration are important factors leading to the import of these infections. Climate changes are probably even more important. Increasing temperatures provide suitable conditions for new vectors, and may lead to autochthonous transmission of infectious pathogens. Diagnosis of these diseases requires not only careful assessment of medical and travel history, but also the application of specific laboratory diagnostic tests. A broad spectrum of ocular involvement has been reported, with frequent posterior segment involvement. Emerging infections should therefore be considered in the differential diagnosis of retinitis, chorioretinitis, retinal vasculitis and optic neuropathy in a patient living in or traveling back from an endemic area. Since these infections are often vector (insect) borne and effective treatments are almost uniformly lacking, prevention is at least as important as prompt diagnosis and initiation of supportive care. Here, we focus on Chikungunya, Dengue fever, Ebola fever, the West Nile virus and Rickettsioses, which frequently demonstrate ocular involvement. PMID:26649438

  7. Bioeconomic modeling of lactational antimicrobial treatment of new bovine subclinical intramammary infections caused by contagious pathogens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Van den Borne, B. H. P.; Hisham Beshara Halasa, Tariq; Van Schaik, G.;

    2010-01-01

    This study determined the direct and indirect epidemiologic and economic effects of lactational treatment of new bovine subclinical intramammary infections (IMI) caused by contagious pathogens using an existing bioeconomic model. The dynamic and stochastic model simulated the dynamics of Staphylo......This study determined the direct and indirect epidemiologic and economic effects of lactational treatment of new bovine subclinical intramammary infections (IMI) caused by contagious pathogens using an existing bioeconomic model. The dynamic and stochastic model simulated the dynamics of...... Staphylococcus aureus, Streptococcus uberis, Streptococcus dysgalactiae, and Escherichia coli during lactation and the dry period in a 100-cow dairy herd during 1 quota year. Input parameters on cure were obtained from recent Dutch field data. The costs of clinical IMI, subclinical IMI, and intervention were...... calculated into the combined total annual net costs of IMI per herd. The cost effectiveness of 4 scenarios with lactational intervention was determined; scenarios included no intervention, treatment after 1 mo of infection, treatment after 2 mo of infection, and treatment after 1 mo of infection and culling...

  8. Serotypes and Clonal Diversity of Streptococcus pneumoniae Causing Invasive Disease in the Era of PCV13 in Catalonia, Spain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eva Del Amo

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to study the serotypes and clonal diversity of pneumococci causing invasive pneumococcal disease in Catalonia, Spain, in the era of 13-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV13. In our region, this vaccine is only available in the private market and it is estimated a PCV13 vaccine coverage around 55% in children. A total of 1551 pneumococcal invasive isolates received between 2010 and 2013 in the Molecular Microbiology Department at Hospital Sant Joan de Déu, Barcelona, were included. Fifty-two serotypes and 249 clonal types-defined by MLST-were identified. The most common serotypes were serotype 1 (n = 182; 11.7%, 3 (n = 145; 9.3%, 19A (n = 137; 8.8% and 7F (n = 122; 7.9%. Serotype 14 was the third most frequent serotype in children < 2 years (15 of 159 isolates. PCV7 serotypes maintained their proportion along the period of study, 16.6% in 2010 to 13.4% in 2013, whereas there was a significant proportional decrease in PCV13 serotypes, 65.3% in 2010 to 48.9% in 2013 (p<0.01. This decrease was mainly attributable to serotypes 19A and 7F. Serotype 12F achieved the third position in 2013 (n = 22, 6.4%. The most frequent clonal types found were ST306 (n = 154, 9.9%, ST191 (n = 111, 7.2%, ST989 (n = 85, 5.5% and ST180 (n = 80, 5.2%. Despite their decrease, PCV13 serotypes continue to be a major cause of disease in Spain. These results emphasize the need for complete PCV13 vaccination.

  9. Trematode infection causes malformations and population effects in a declining New Zealand fish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, David W; Thomas, Harriet; Thieltges, David W; Poulin, Robert; Tompkins, Daniel M

    2010-03-01

    1. Animal malformations engender wide public and scientific concern because of associated environmental health risks. This is highlighted by increased incidence of limb malformations in amphibians associated with trematode infections and disturbance. Malformations may signal new emerging disease threats, but whether the phenomenon is broadly applicable across taxa, or has population-scale impacts, is unknown. 2. Malformations are widely reported in fish and, until now, have been attributed mainly to contaminants. We tested whether the trematode Telogaster opisthorchis caused severe malformations, leading to population effects, in Galaxias anomalus, a threatened New Zealand freshwater fish. 3. Experimental infection of larval fish caused increasing spinal malformation and mortality with infection intensity that closely matched field patterns. Field malformation frequency peaked in January (65%), before declining sharply in February (25%) and remaining low thereafter. 4. The peak occurred during a 'critical window' of larval development, with the decline coincident with a population crash, indicating that malformation was causing mortality in the field. 5. The occurrence of such critical developmental windows may explain why this mechanism of population impact has been overlooked. With global environmental stressors predicted to enhance trematode infections, our results show that parasite-induced malformation, and its population-scale impacts, could be more widespread than previously considered. PMID:19886894

  10. [Pathologic-anatomical changes in newborn goats caused by an intrauterine Schmallenberg virus infection].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Henrik; Eskens, Ulrich; Nesseler, Anne; Riesse, Karin; Kaim, Ute; Volmer, Renate; Hamann, Hans-Peter; Sauerwald, Claudia; Wehrend, Axel

    2014-01-01

    A complex of various malformations in newborns was observed to an increased extent in sheep farms in the 2011/2012 lambing season. An intrauterine Schmallenberg virus (SBV) infection was identified as the cause of these malformations. To date, a detailed pathological description of the deformity complex has only been given for bovine and ovine newborns.The aim of this study was therefore to provide a description of pathologic-anatomical congenital malformations in goat kids caused by intrauterine SBV infection. To this end, pathologic-anatomical and molecular biological investigations by PCR were carried out on 37 goat kids and 457 lambs from 238 sheep and goat farms in order to carry out an interspecies comparison. Of the 37 goat kids dissected, it was possible to identify a SBV infection in twelve animals (32.4%) by RT-PCR. In nine animals (24.3%) displaying pathological-anatomical malformations SBV could not be detected by PCR. The following malformations were observed: athrogryposis, deformation of spinal column, torticollis, asymmetry of the skull, brachygnathia inferior, cerebellar hypoplasia, cerebellar aplasia and internal hydrocephalus. Arthogryposis was the most common malformation, both in animals with positive PCR results and those with negative PCR results. This study documents congenital malformations caused by an intrauterine SBV infection for the first time on a large number of newborn goats. PMID:24693655

  11. Complete Atrioventricular Block Complicating Mitral Infective Endocarditis Caused by Streptococcus Agalactiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arai, Masaru; Nagashima, Koichi; Kato, Mahoto; Akutsu, Naotaka; Hayase, Misa; Ogura, Kanako; Iwasawa, Yukino; Aizawa, Yoshihiro; Saito, Yuki; Okumura, Yasuo; Nishimaki, Haruna; Masuda, Shinobu; Hirayama, Astushi

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Infective endocarditis (IE) involving the mitral valve can but rarely lead to complete atrioventricular block (CAVB). CASE REPORT A 74-year-old man with a history of infective endocarditis caused by Streptococcus gordonii (S. gordonii) presented to our emergency room with fever and loss of appetite, which had lasted for 5 days. On admission, results of serologic tests pointed to severe infection. Electrocardiography showed normal sinus rhythm with first-degree atrioventricular block and incomplete right bundle branch block, and transthoracic echocardiography and transesophageal echocardiography revealed severe mitral regurgitation caused by posterior leaflet perforation and 2 vegetations (5 mm and 6 mm) on the tricuspid valve. The patient was initially treated with ceftriaxone and gentamycin because blood and cutaneous ulcer cultures yielded S. agalactiae. On hospital day 2, however, sudden CAVB requiring transvenous pacing occurred, and the patient's heart failure and infection worsened. Although an emergent surgery is strongly recommended, even in patients with uncontrolled heart failure or infection, surgery was not performed because of the Child-Pugh class B liver cirrhosis. Despite intensive therapy, the patient's condition further deteriorated, and he died on hospital day 16. On postmortem examination, a 2×1-cm vegetation was seen on the perforated posterior mitral leaflet, and the infection had extended to the interventricular septum. Histologic examination revealed extensive necrosis of the AV node. CONCLUSIONS This rare case of CAVB resulting from S. agalactiae IE points to the fact that in monitoring patients with IE involving the mitral valve, clinicians should be aware of the potential for perivalvular extension of the infection, which can lead to fatal heart block. PMID:27604147

  12. Evaluation of Hepatotoxicity with Off-Label Oral-Treatment Doses of Voriconazole for Invasive Fungal Infections

    OpenAIRE

    Gorski, Elizabeth; Esterly, John S.; Postelnick, Michael; Trifilio, Steven; Fotis, Michael; Scheetz, Marc H.

    2010-01-01

    The approved treatment dose of intravenous voriconazole is a weight-based dose of 4 mg/kg of body weight twice daily; the approved oral dosing is fixed at 200 mg twice daily. In our institution, patients frequently receive oral high-dose voriconazole at 4 mg/kg twice daily. It is unknown if higher doses are associated with increased hepatotoxicity. A retrospective cohort study of patients treated with oral voriconazole for presumed invasive fungal infection for ≥7 days was completed. Patients...

  13. MICROBIOLOGICAL PROFILE OF BILE IN CHOLELITHIASIS AND THEIR IMPLICATION IN CAUSING POST OPERATIVE WOUND INFECTIONS

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    Shahi

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Cholecystitis is a common indication for major abdominal surgeries. It may occur with or without obstruction of common bile duct. Obstruction leads to secondary bacterial infection of bile. Bactibilia is an important predisposing factor for post-operative complications. Hence, this study was designed to determine the prevalence of bacteria in bile samples of cholecystitis patients and to correlate bactibilia and post-operative wound infection. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Bile samples collected intra-operatively were subjected to gram stain, culture, and antibiotic sensitivity testing. The patients were followed-up for post-operative complications. If post-operative wound infection was found, cultures were done and correlated with bacteria isolated from bile samples. RESULTS: Bactibilia was found in 43/100 (43% of patients. Polymicrobial flora was found in 7% of bile samples. Escherichia coli, citrobacter, Klebsiella pneumoniae and pseudomonas were the predominant organisms isolated. Post-operative wound infection was found in ten (10% patients who had bactibilia. Amikacin, gentamicin, ceftriaxone sulbatum, pipracillin tazobactum, imipenem were among most effective in prophylactic regimen. CONCLUSION: The organisms responsible for bactibilia were found to cause post-operative infections in the same patient warranting the use of prophylactic antibiotics in every patient undergoing cholecystectomy. All patients undergoing cholecystectomy should receive prophylactic antibiotic to prevent post-operative wound infections.

  14. Mortality by causes in HIV-infected adults: comparison with the general population

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    Floristan Yugo

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We compared mortality by cause of death in HIV-infected adults in the era of combined antiretroviral therapy with mortality in the general population in the same age and sex groups. Methods Mortality by cause of death was analyzed for the period 1999-2006 in the cohort of persons aged 20-59 years diagnosed with HIV infection and residing in Navarre (Spain. This was compared with mortality from the same causes in the general population of the same age and sex using standardized mortality ratios (SMR. Results There were 210 deaths among 1145 persons diagnosed with HIV (29.5 per 1000 person-years. About 50% of these deaths were from AIDS. Persons diagnosed with HIV infection had exceeded all-cause mortality (SMR 14.0, 95% CI 12.2 to 16.1 and non-AIDS mortality (SMR 6.9, 5.7 to 8.5. The analysis showed excess mortality from hepatic disease (SMR 69.0, 48.1 to 78.6, drug overdose or addiction (SMR 46.0, 29.2 to 69.0, suicide (SMR 9.6, 3.8 to 19.7, cancer (SMR 3.2, 1.8 to 5.1 and cardiovascular disease (SMR 3.1, 1.3 to 6.1. Mortality in HIV-infected intravenous drug users did not change significantly between the periods 1999-2002 and 2003-2006, but it declined by 56% in non-injecting drug users (P = 0.007. Conclusions Persons with HIV infection continue to have considerable excess mortality despite the availability of effective antiretroviral treatments. However, excess mortality in the HIV patients has declined since these treatments were introduced, especially in persons without a history of intravenous drug use.

  15. Microbiological diagnosis of infections caused by Campylobacter jejuni and Campylobacter coli in humans

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    Natalia Rokosz

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Campylobacter jejuni and Campylobacter coli are Gram-negative, microaerophilic bacteria which are worldwide in distribution, causing a zoonotic disease in humans called campylobacteriosis. These infections are mainly caused by eating contaminated food products, most often improperly prepared poultry meat. Campylobacteriosis usually takes the form of gastroenteritis, or inflammation of the intestines, and the characteristic symptoms are watery-mucous diarrhea often with the presence of blood in stool, nausea, vomiting, abdominal pain and fever. The epidemiological data suggest that in Europe, as well as in North America, bacteria of the genus Campylobacter, especially C. jejuni and C. coli, are the most commonly isolated pathogens in infections of the gastrointestinal tract in humans. Epidemiological data indicate that these organisms are a much more common cause of acute diarrhea, mostly in young children, than Salmonella and Yersinia. The lack of specific symptoms makes the diagnosis of campylobacteriosis necessary to carry out specialized microbiological diagnostics. Because so far these studies are performed in our country only in a few laboratories, the overwhelming number of cases of campylobacteriosis are not recorded in Polish epidemiological statistics. The purpose of this paper is to discuss issues related to the microbiological diagnosis of infections caused by C. jejuni and C. coli. It also describes the basic epidemiological and clinical data, as well as current treatment of campylobacteriosis.

  16. Antibiotic therapeutic options for infections caused by drug-resistant Gram-positive cocci.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banwan, K; Senok, A C; Rotimi, V O

    2009-01-01

    Serious infections caused by Gram-positive bacteria are currently difficult to treat because many of these pathogens are now resistant to standard antimicrobial agents. As a result of the emergence and spread of multidrug-resistant Gram-positive pathogens, new antimicrobial agents are urgently needed for clinical use. In recent years, there has been an increase in the number of drugs that have activity against these Gram-positive pathogens. Daptomycin, tigecycline, linezolid, quinupristin/dalfopristin and dalbavancin are five antimicrobial agents that are useful for the treatment of infections due to drug-resistant Gram-positive cocci. This review focuses on their mechanism of action, pharmacokinetics, spectrum of activity, clinical effectiveness, drug interaction and safety. These antimicrobial agents provide the clinician with additional treatment options among the limited therapies for resistant Gram-positive bacterial infection. PMID:20701863

  17. Trichostrongylus colubriformis: Possible Most Common Cause of Human Infection in Mazandaran Province, North of Iran.

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    Shirzad Gholami

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Infection with Trichostrongylus spp. is common among human and herbivorous in most parts of Iran, especially in southern and northern areas. The aim of present study was to identify Trichostrongylus spp. among human population using excreted egg specimens, by the molecular method, in Mazandaran Province, northern Iran.Overall, 33 positive fecal specimens were randomly sampled and examined. PCR amplification of ITS2-rDNA region was performed on the isolated egg and then a restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP profile was considered to discriminate of Trichostrongylus spp.A total of 33 positive fecal specimens, 29(78.9%, 4(12.1% were found T. colubriformis and T. axei respectively. Our data appear the molecular evidence of both human T. colubriformis and T. axei infections in North of Iran.T. colubriformis was the probable most common zoonotic species causing human trichostrongylosis infection in the area.

  18. Nonencapsulated Streptococcus pneumoniae causes otitis media during single-species infection and during polymicrobial infection with nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murrah, Kyle A; Pang, Bing; Richardson, Stephen; Perez, Antonia; Reimche, Jennifer; King, Lauren; Wren, John; Swords, W Edward

    2015-07-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae strains lacking capsular polysaccharide have been increasingly reported in carriage and disease contexts. Since most cases of otitis media involve more than one bacterial species, we aimed to determine the capacity of a nonencapsulated S. pneumoniae clinical isolate to induce disease in the context of a single-species infection and as a polymicrobial infection with nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae. Using the chinchilla model of otitis media, we found that nonencapsulated S. pneumoniae colonizes the nasopharynx following intranasal inoculation, but does not readily ascend into the middle ear. However, when we inoculated nonencapsulated S. pneumoniae directly into the middle ear, the bacteria persisted for two weeks post-inoculation and induced symptoms consistent with chronic otitis media. During coinfection with nontypeable H. influenzae, both species persisted for one week and induced polymicrobial otitis media. We also observed that nontypeable H. influenzae conferred passive protection from killing by amoxicillin upon S. pneumoniae from within polymicrobial biofilms in vitro. Therefore, based on these results, we conclude that nonencapsulated pneumococci are a potential causative agent of chronic/recurrent otitis media, and can also cause mutualistic infection with other opportunists, which could complicate treatment outcomes. PMID:26014114

  19. Etiologic Aspect of Sarcoidosis as an Allergic Endogenous Infection Caused by Propionibacterium acnes

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    Yoshinobu Eishi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Sarcoidosis is a systemic granulomatous disease of unknown etiology. Propionibacterium acnes is the only microorganism that has been isolated from sarcoid lesions. Many P. acnes have been detected in sarcoid lymph nodes using quantitative PCR and in sarcoid granulomas by in situ hybridization. P. acnes trigger factor protein causes a cellular immune response only in sarcoid patients and induces pulmonary granulomas in mice sensitized with the protein and adjuvant, but only those with latent P. acnes infection in their lungs. Eradication of P. acnes by antibiotics prevents the development of granulomas in this experimental model. Although P. acnes is the most common commensal bacterium in the lungs and lymph nodes, P. acnes-specific antibody detected the bacterium within sarcoid granulomas of these organs. P. acnes can cause latent infection in the lung and lymph node and persist in a cell-wall-deficient form. The dormant form is activated endogenously under certain conditions and proliferates at the site of latent infection. In patients with P. acnes hypersensitivity, granulomatous inflammation is triggered by intracellular proliferation of the bacterium. Proliferating bacteria may escape granulomatous isolation, spreading to other organs. Latent P. acnes infection in systemic organs can be reactivated by another triggering event, leading to systemic sarcoidosis.

  20. Colonization and organ invasion in chicks experimentally infected with Dermanyssus gallinae contaminated by Salmonella Enteritidis

    OpenAIRE

    Valiente Moro, Claire; Fravalo, Philippe; Amelot, Michel; Chauve, Claude; Salvat, Gilles; Zenner, Lionel

    2007-01-01

    Abstract The poultry red mite, Dermanyssus gallinae is the most important and common ectoparasite of laying hens in Europe. This haematophagous mite has been experimentally demonstrated to be a vector of Salmonella Enteritidis by acquiring bacteria through the blood meal or cuticular contact. We have evaluated another route of infection by orally inoculating chicks with mites previously infected by S. Enteritidis. Two methods of infecting the mites were tested: mites contaminated b...

  1. Arteriovenous graft infection caused by Candida glabrata: A case report and literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Hung-Ling; Lin, Chun-Yu; Chang, Ya-Ting; Chen, Yen-Hsu; Wu, Wei-Tsung; Lu, Po-Liang

    2016-04-01

    The infection rate of arteriovenous (AV) grafts is high, but fungal etiology is rare. Only five cases of graft infection due to Candida albicans (C. albicans) or C. tropicalis have been described in the literature. Herein, we report the first case of AV graft infection caused by C. glabrata. A 60-year-old woman on maintenance hemodialysis for end-stage renal disease was admitted because of intermittent fever, for 10 days. Upon physical examination, tenderness over the AV graft site was noticed. Blood culture yielded C. glabrata and her clinical symptoms improved after she was treated with micafungin for 1 month. However, C. glabrata candidemia reoccurred 5 weeks later. Cure was achieved after removal of the AV graft and anidulafungin treatment. Pus was observed in the removed graft, from which C. glabrata was isolated. The outcome of our case and patients from the literature review suggest that removal of the infected graft is important for treatment success of AV graft Candida infection. PMID:23838263

  2. Debilitating Chronic Diarrhea Caused by Generalized Gastrointestinal Cytomegalovirus Infection in an Immunocompetent Adult

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emmanouil Telakis

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Gastrointestinal cytomegalovirus (CMV infection is a common opportunistic infection in immunocompromised patients, especially patients with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome and transplant recipients. In contrast, CMV infection of the gastrointestinal tract is rare in immunocompetent individuals. We report a case of severe, protracted, and debilitating diarrhea caused by generalized CMV infection of the gastrointestinal tract in an elderly woman with no apparent immunosuppression. An extensive diagnostic investigation demonstrated CMV-associated disease affecting both the upper and lower gastrointestinal tracts (esophagus, small intestine, and colon. Such extensive simultaneous involvement of the alimentary tract in an immunocompetent patient is rare and presents a diagnostic and therapeutic challenge. The diagnosis was based on a combination of endoscopic, histopathological, serological, and polymerase chain reaction analysis findings and our patient was successfully treated with intravenous ganciclovir. Our case demonstrates that gastrointestinal CMV infection should be considered in the differential diagnosis of severe chronic diarrhea in immunocompetent patients and that antiviral treatment may be justified in this setting.

  3. West Nile virus infection causes endocytosis of a specific subset of tight junction membrane proteins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zaikun Xu

    Full Text Available West Nile virus (WNV is a blood-borne pathogen that causes systemic infections and serious neurological disease in human and animals. The most common route of infection is mosquito bites and therefore, the virus must cross a number of polarized cell layers to gain access to organ tissue and the central nervous system. Resistance to trans-cellular movement of macromolecules between epithelial and endothelial cells is mediated by tight junction complexes. While a number of recent studies have documented that WNV infection negatively impacts the barrier function of tight junctions, the intracellular mechanism by which this occurs is poorly understood. In the present study, we report that endocytosis of a subset of tight junction membrane proteins including claudin-1 and JAM-1 occurs in WNV infected epithelial and endothelial cells. This process, which ultimately results in lysosomal degradation of the proteins, is dependent on the GTPase dynamin and microtubule-based transport. Finally, infection of polarized cells with the related flavivirus, Dengue virus-2, did not result in significant loss of tight junction membrane proteins. These results suggest that neurotropic flaviviruses such as WNV modulate the host cell environment differently than hemorrhagic flaviviruses and thus may have implications for understanding the molecular basis for neuroinvasion.

  4. Chronic kidney disease of uncertain etiology in Sri Lanka: Are leptospirosis and Hantaviral infection likely causes?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gamage, Chandika Damesh; Sarathkumara, Yomani Dilukshi

    2016-06-01

    Chronic kidney disease of uncertain etiology (CKDu) has been a severe burden and a public health crisis in Sri Lanka over the past two decades. Many studies have established hypotheses to identify potential risk factors although causative agents, risk factors and etiology of this disease are still uncertain. Several studies have postulated that fungal and bacterial nephrotoxins are a possible etiological factor; however, the precise link between hypothesized risk factors and the pathogenesis of chronic kidney disease has yet to be proven in prior studies. Leptospirosis and Hantavirus infections are important zoonotic diseases that are naturally maintained and transmitted via infected rodent populations and which present similar clinical and epidemiological features. Both infections are known to be a cause of acute kidney damage that can proceed into chronic renal failure. Several studies have reported presence of both infections in Sri Lanka. Therefore, we hypothesized that pathogenic Leptospira or Hantavirus are possible causative agents of acute kidney damage which eventually progresses to chronic kidney disease in Sri Lanka. The proposed hypothesis will be evaluated by means of an observational study design. Past infection will be assessed by a cross-sectional study to detect the presence of IgG antibodies with further confirmatory testing among chronic kidney disease patients and individuals from the community in selected endemic areas compared to low prevalence areas. Identification of possible risk factors for these infections will be followed by a case-control study and causality will be further determined with a cohort study. If the current hypothesis is true, affected communities will be subjected for medical interventions related to the disease for patient management while considering supportive therapies. Furthermore and possibly enhance their preventive and control measures to improve vector control to decrease the risk of infection. PMID:27142134

  5. Multiorgan fungal infection caused by Microsporum canis in a green iguana (Iguana iguana).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Tae-Ho; Kim, Eun-Ju; Choi, Ul Soo

    2014-06-01

    Multiple organ invasion by keratinophilic fungi in the green iguana (Iguana iguana) has not been previously reported. In this case, a 1-yr-old female green iguana presented with a nodular, darkly discolored skin lesion surrounded by necrosis in the right ventral abdominal region. A cytologic examination of the fine needle aspiration of the lesion revealed an exuberant proliferation of fibroblasts, macrophages, and multinucleated cells along with frequent filamentous structures consistent with hyphal elements. The necropsy revealed diffuse infiltration of the liver, lung, and cardiac apex with white nodules. A histopathologic examination of the lesions also confirmed a fungal infection associated with granulomatous inflammation. Rapid polymerase chain reaction (PCR) analysis of the chitin synthase 1 gene was conducted for rapid direct detection, and inter-simple sequence repeat fingerprinting was conducted to classify the infectious origin. The PCR analysis definitively demonstrated representative Microsporum canis fungus. The present report is the first case of disseminated M. canis infection with multiorgan involvement in a green iguana. PMID:25000705

  6. Infections caused by Gram-positive bacteria: a review of the global challenge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodford, Neil; Livermore, David M

    2009-09-01

    Infections caused by multidrug-resistant Gram-positive bacteria represent a major public health burden, not just in terms of morbidity and mortality, but also in terms of increased expenditure on patient management and implementation of infection control measures. Staphylococcus aureus and Enterococcus spp. are established pathogens in the hospital environment, and their frequent multidrug resistance complicates therapy. The archetypal hospital "superbug", methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA), regularly attracts mass-media interest and, in many countries, there is political pressure to reduce MRSA infection rates, with some progress now being made in the United Kingdom and the United States. To compound these established problems, we have witnessed the emergence and spread of virulent clones of MRSA in the community, and of Clostridium difficile in hospitals. Multidrug-resistant Streptococcus pneumoniae clones are major community pathogens in many parts of the world, but are now being challenged by new conjugate vaccines. Using combinations of molecular epidemiological tools, which characterize the resistant isolates and their resistance determinants, scientists can track highly successful bacterial strains at local, national, and international levels. These methods have provided new insights into the evolution of key pathogens, and this information may aid the design of control strategies and vaccines. In addition, the development of new antimicrobials including oxazolidinones, lipopeptides, glycylcyclines, ketolides, and new generations of fluoroquinolones, antistaphylococcal b-lactams, and glycopeptides must remain a high priority for the continued effective treatment of infections caused by resistant strains. So far, resistance to these newer agents is identified rarely in surveillance programs, but occasional reports of resistance causing therapeutic failure (e.g., with linezolid, daptomycin, telithromycin, or newer fluoroquinolones) give cause for concern

  7. Helicobacter pylori: the primary cause of duodenal ulceration or a secondary infection?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    M Hobsley; Fl Tovey

    2001-01-01

    @@INTRODUCTION It is generally accepted that Helicobacter pylori ( H.pylori) infection has a role in duodenal ulceration .Eradicaton of H .pylori accelerates healing compared with placebo in the absence of control of gastric secretion and reduces ulcer recurrence .There is increasing evidence ,however ,that is may not be the primary cause of duodenal ulceration ,but that is may be a secondary factor in a nnmber of cases .This possibility is supported by four sets of observations : 1 Geographical distribution:

  8. Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus infection causes modulation of inflammatory and immune response genes in mouse brain

    OpenAIRE

    Puri Raj K; Bhattacharya Bhaskar; Sharma Anuj; Maheshwari Radha K

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Background Neurovirulent Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus (VEEV) causes lethal encephalitis in equines and is transmitted to humans by mosquitoes. VEEV is highly infectious when transmitted by aerosol and has been developed as a bio-warfare agent, making it an important pathogen to study from a military and civilian standpoint. Molecular mechanisms of VEE pathogenesis are poorly understood. To study these, the gene expression profile of VEEV infected mouse brains was investigated...

  9. The erratic antibiotic susceptibility patterns of bacterial pathogens causing urinary tract infections

    OpenAIRE

    Ahmed, Iftkhar; Sajed, Muhammad; Sultan, Aneesa; MURTAZA, Iram; Yousaf, Sohail; Maqsood, Bushra; Vanhara, Petr; Anees, Mariam

    2015-01-01

    Increasing trend of antibiotic resistance and expression of Extended Spectrum Beta Lactamases (ESBLs) are serious threats for public health as they render the treatment ineffective. Present study was designed to elucidate the antibiotic-susceptibility patterns of ESBL and non-ESBL producing E. coli and K. pneumoniae causing urinary tract infections so that the ineffective antibiotics could be removed from the line of treatment. The bacterial isolates obtained from the urine of patients visiti...

  10. Entomological and ecological index for risk of infection causing lyme disease in territory of Vojvodina, Serbia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Potkonjak Aleksandar

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In Europe, of all the vector transmitted diseases, the occurrence of lyme disease is the one most often registered, and the most significant vector Borrelia burgdorferi is the tick Ixodes ricinus. Both humans and animals contract lyme disease. The risk of the occurrence of lyme disease is in correlation with potential exposure to tick bites and depends on the density of the tick population in the endemic area, the percentage of ticks infected with the cause of lyme disease, the duration and the nature of the activity of the susceptible population in a certain area. The objective of these investigations was to determine the entomological and the ecological risk index, as well as to assess the risk of transmission of the cause of lyme disease in the territory of Vojvodina Province in the Republic of Serbia. Ticks were collected at 12 locations in the South Bačka District of Vojvodina. A total of 1400 ticks were identified up to the level of species. After establishing the infection of ticks with the cause of lyme disease, the entomological and the ecological index was determined for the given regions using microscopic examination in a dark field. Two species of ticks aere identified in this geographic region (Ixodes ricinus and Dermacentor marginatus. Examining I. ricinus, the prevalence of infection B. burgdorferi was established, ranging up to 33.1%. The ecological risk index indicates that there is a potential risk of humans and animals becoming infected at 8 localities. It was determined for 3 localities that there is a definite actual risk of the transferrence of causes of lyme disease.

  11. Evaluation of Antimicrobial Susceptibility of Enterobacteriaceae Causing Urinary Tract Infections in Africa

    OpenAIRE

    Tansarli, Giannoula S.; Athanasiou, Stavros; Falagas, Matthew E.

    2013-01-01

    Our objective was to evaluate the antimicrobial susceptibility of Enterobacteriaceae causing urinary tract infections (UTIs) in adults in Africa. The PubMed database was systematically searched to identify relevant studies published after 2000. Google, World Health Organization, and African Field Epidemiology networks were also searched. Twenty-eight studies, accounting for 381,899 urine isolates from 14 African countries, met the inclusion criteria. Escherichia coli, Klebsiella spp., and Pro...

  12. Tigecycline treatment of infection caused by KPC-producing Escherichia coli in a pediatric patient

    OpenAIRE

    Du, Xiaoxing; Fu, Ying; YU, Yunsong

    2013-01-01

    Tigecycline shows great antimicrobial activity against both Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria, and has been considered to be an appropriate choice in controlling infection caused by multi-drug resistant (MDR) pathogens, such as carbapenemase-producing Enterobacteriaceae (CPE). Although many clinical trials evaluate the efficacy and safety of tigecycline on adults, rare reports recommend tigecycline to treat pediatric patient. In this study, we presented a clinical case with tigecycline...

  13. Acute transverse myelitis caused by Coxsackie virus B4 infection: a case report.

    OpenAIRE

    Ku, B; Lee, K.

    1998-01-01

    Acute transverse myelitis is a rare clinical manifestation of Coxsackie virus infection which cause acute and progressive debilitating illness associated with loss of spinal cord function in the affected patients. A 62 year-old female developed symptoms of rapidly progressive paraplegia with sensory loss. On spinal MRI, T2 sagittal image showed increased signal intensity with cord swelling at T11-L2 level and 8 folds or greater rise of Coxsackie virus B4 neutralizing antibody titers was obser...

  14. Typing of Candida isolates from patients with invasive infection and concomitant colonization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brillowska-Dabrowska, A.; Bergmann, O.; Jensen, Irene Møller;

    2010-01-01

    We investigated the relationship between colonizing and invasive isolates from patients with candidaemia. Molecular typing was performed using random amplification of polymorphic DNA (RAPD) and multilocus sequence typing (MLST). We found MLST to be sufficient for typing Candida isolates, and that...

  15. Molecular tests to detect human papillomavirus infection in patients with cervical dysplasia and invasive cervical cancer in Saudi Arabia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sait KH

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Khalid H Sait1, Faten S Gazzaz21Obstetrics and Gynecology Department, 2Medical Virology Department, Faculty of Medicine, King Abdulaziz University, Jeddah, Saudi ArabiaPurpose: The aim of this study was to determine the actual human papillomavirus (HPV subtype that presents in cervical dysplasia and invasive carcinoma in the Saudi population, and the feasibility of using Hybrid Capture 2 technique (HC2 on biopsy specimens to detect certain HPV subtypes.Patients and methods: A prospective study was conducted from March 2007 to December 2008. The subjects studied were women with a mean age of 48.18 years, who attended the hospital for cervical biopsy due to the suspected diagnosis of cervical dysplasia or an invasive disease, based on previous suspicious Pap smear. HPV DNA hybridization by HC2 was performed on the cervical biopsies of these patients, to detect HPV infection.Results: During the period of this study, 45 patients had cervical biopsies taken for HPV testing. Seven patients had a negative HC2 result and were found to have no cervical dysplasia on the final pathology review. Seventeen cases with cervical dysplasia and 21 patients with invasive disease were presented; the mean age was 48 years. HC2 testing for HPV were found to be positive in patients with cervical dysplasia, invasive carcinoma, and all in 5 (29.4%, 13 (61.9% and 18 (47.4%, respectively. The sensitivity of the test is 47% and specificity is 100%.Conclusion: The use of molecular detection of HPV DNA by HC2 in biopsy is feasible and effective. These results confirm the finding that HPV contributes to the etiology of cervical cancer in Muslim society.Keywords: HPV, subtyping, cervical neoplasia

  16. First report of Westerdykella dispersa as a cause of an angioinvasive fungal infection in a neutropenic host.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sue, Paul K; Gurda, Grzegorz T; Lee, Richard; Watkins, Tonya; Green, Rachel; Memon, Warda; Milstone, Aaron M; Zelazny, Adrian M; Fahle, Gary A; Pham, Thu Anh; Gibas, Connie F; Sutton, Deanna A; Wickes, Brian L; Wiederhold, Nathan P; Zhang, Sean X

    2014-12-01

    Angioinvasive fungal infections (AFIs) are an important cause of morbidity and mortality among immunocompromised patients. However, clinicomicrobiological characteristics and treatment of many AFI agents remain poorly defined. We report the first human case of infection with Westerdykella dispersa, an emergent cause of AFI, which was successfully treated in a neutropenic pediatric patient. PMID:25232159

  17. Hamster-Adapted Sin Nombre Virus Causes Disseminated Infection and Efficiently Replicates in Pulmonary Endothelial Cells without Signs of Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Safronetz, David; Prescott, Joseph; Haddock, Elaine; Scott, Dana P.; Feldmann, Heinz; Ebihara, Hideki

    2013-01-01

    To date, a laboratory animal model for the study of Sin Nombre virus (SNV) infection or associated disease has not been described. Unlike infection with Andes virus, which causes lethal hantavirus pulmonary syndrome (HPS)-like disease in hamsters, SNV infection is short-lived, with no viremia and little dissemination. Here we investigated the effect of passaging SNV in hamsters. We found that a host-adapted SNV achieves prolonged and disseminated infection in hamsters, including efficient rep...

  18. Transcriptome profiling of the rice blast fungus during invasive plant infection and in vitro stresses

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    Dean Ralph A

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Rice blast is the most threatening disease to cultivated rice. Magnaporthe oryzae, its causal agent, is likely to encounter environmental challenges during invasive growth in its host plants that require shifts in gene expression to establish a compatible interaction. Here, we tested the hypothesis that gene expression patterns during in planta invasive growth are similar to in vitro stress conditions, such as nutrient limitation, temperature up shift and oxidative stress, and determined which condition most closely mimicked that of in planta invasive growth. Gene expression data were collected from these in vitro experiments and compared to fungal gene expression during the invasive growth phase at 72 hours post-inoculation in compatible interactions on two grass hosts, rice and barley. Results We identified 4,973 genes that were differentially expressed in at least one of the in planta and in vitro stress conditions when compared to fungal mycelia grown in complete medium, which was used as reference. From those genes, 1,909 showed similar expression patterns between at least one of the in vitro stresses and rice and/or barley. Hierarchical clustering of these 1,909 genes showed three major clusters in which in planta conditions closely grouped with the nutrient starvation conditions. Out of these 1,909 genes, 55 genes and 129 genes were induced and repressed in all treatments, respectively. Functional categorization of the 55 induced genes revealed that most were either related to carbon metabolism, membrane proteins, or were involved in oxidoreduction reactions. The 129 repressed genes showed putative roles in vesicle trafficking, signal transduction, nitrogen metabolism, or molecular transport. Conclusions These findings suggest that M. oryzae is likely primarily coping with nutrient-limited environments at the invasive growth stage 72 hours post-inoculation, and not with oxidative or temperature stresses.

  19. Infection dynamics in frog populations with different histories of decline caused by a deadly disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sapsford, Sarah J; Voordouw, Maarten J; Alford, Ross A; Schwarzkopf, Lin

    2015-12-01

    Pathogens can drive host population dynamics. Chytridiomycosis is a fungal disease of amphibians that is caused by the fungus Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis (Bd). This pathogen has caused declines and extinctions in some host species whereas other host species coexist with Bd without suffering declines. In the early 1990s, Bd extirpated populations of the endangered common mistfrog, Litoria rheocola, at high-elevation sites, while populations of the species persisted at low-elevation sites. Today, populations have reappeared at many high-elevation sites where they presently co-exist with the fungus. We conducted a capture-mark-recapture (CMR) study of six populations of L. rheocola over 1 year, at high and low elevations. We used multistate CMR models to determine which factors (Bd infection status, site type, and season) influenced rates of frog survival, recapture, infection, and recovery from infection. We observed Bd-induced mortality of individual frogs, but did not find any significant effect of Bd infection on the survival rate of L. rheocola at the population level. Survival and recapture rates depended on site type and season. Infection rate was highest in winter when temperatures were favourable for pathogen growth, and differed among site types. The recovery rate was high (75.7-85.8%) across seasons, and did not differ among site types. The coexistence of L. rheocola with Bd suggests that (1) frog populations are becoming resistant to the fungus, (2) Bd may have evolved lower virulence, or (3) current environmental conditions may be inhibiting outbreaks of the fatal disease. PMID:26293680

  20. Reassessment of the Role of Rapid Antigen Detection Tests in Diagnosis of Invasive Group A Streptococcal Infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gazzano, Vincent; Berger, Anne; Benito, Yvonne; Freydiere, Anne-Marie; Tristan, Anne; Boisset, Sandrine; Carricajo, Anne; Poyart, Claire; Vandenesch, François; Descours, Ghislaine

    2016-04-01

    Rapid antigen detection tests (RADTs) for group A streptococci (GAS) are widely used for diagnosing acute pharyngitis, which has led to a considerable reduction in antibiotic prescriptions over the past decade. Beyond this intended use, their reassessment on invasive samples may be relevant in the management of life-threatening GAS infections. To this end, we evaluated the performances of three RADTs, culture, GAS PCR, and 16S rRNA gene PCR assays, and compared them with a composite gold standard (GAS-PCR assay and/or culture) for the diagnosis of severe GAS infection. A total of 192 specimens from deep-tissue (mostly normally sterile) sites enriched for 75 GAS-positive samples were enrolled in the study. The three evaluated RADTs showed sensitivities ranging from 88.0% to 94.7% versus 98.7% for GAS PCR, 84% for 16S rRNA gene PCR, and 77.3% for culture. The sensitivities of the ImmunoCardSTAT! Strep A test (Meridian Bioscience) and the NADAL Strep A strip (Nal Von Minden) were similar to that of GAS PCR (P= 0.25 and 0.03, respectively) and higher than that of culture (P= 0.001 and 0.006, respectively), whereas the SD Bioline Strep A test strip (Standard Diagnostics) showed a performance similar to that of culture (P= 0.02). The three RADTs detected 10 distinctemmtypes, including a predominance ofemm1 (33.3%),emm89 (10.6%), andemm12 (7.6%). No false-positive results were observed, leading to a specificity of 100% for all the evaluated RADTs. The GAS RADTs turned out to be sensitive, specific, and easy-to-use tools that may aid in the management of invasive GAS infections in 24/7 point-of-care laboratories by enabling early diagnosis and focused therapy. PMID:26818671

  1. Mycobacterium marinum causes a latent infection that can be reactivated by gamma irradiation in adult zebrafish.

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    Mataleena Parikka

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The mechanisms leading to latency and reactivation of human tuberculosis are still unclear, mainly due to the lack of standardized animal models for latent mycobacterial infection. In this longitudinal study of the progression of a mycobacterial disease in adult zebrafish, we show that an experimental intraperitoneal infection with a low dose (≈ 35 bacteria of Mycobacterium marinum, results in the development of a latent disease in most individuals. The infection is characterized by limited mortality (25%, stable bacterial loads 4 weeks following infection and constant numbers of highly organized granulomas in few target organs. The majority of bacteria are dormant during a latent mycobacterial infection in zebrafish, and can be activated by resuscitation promoting factor ex vivo. In 5-10% of tuberculosis cases in humans, the disease is reactivated usually as a consequence of immune suppression. In our model, we are able to show that reactivation can be efficiently induced in infected zebrafish by γ-irradiation that transiently depletes granulo/monocyte and lymphocyte pools, as determined by flow cytometry. This immunosuppression causes reactivation of the dormant mycobacterial population and a rapid outgrowth of bacteria, leading to 88% mortality in four weeks. In this study, the adult zebrafish presents itself as a unique non-mammalian vertebrate model for studying the development of latency, regulation of mycobacterial dormancy, as well as reactivation of latent or subclinical tuberculosis. The possibilities for screening for host and pathogen factors affecting the disease progression, and identifying novel therapeutic agents and vaccine targets make this established model especially attractive.

  2. Risk for infection by Lyme disease cause in green surfaces maintenance workers in Belgrade

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krstić Milena

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. Lyme disease (LD is a cosmopolitan disease from the group of zoonoses that in humans can affect skins, joints, heart and/or nervous system. Research conducted in endemic areas, shows not only that the population, which lives or works in tick habitats, is in a high risk for getting infected by LD cause, but also that every enviroment itself is specific in regard to both vectors and B. burgdorferi species. In our enviroment, research of seropositivity to B. burgdorferi in persons exposed to vectors of LD have not been conducted. The aim of this study was to determine whether there was a higher risk for getting B. burgdorferi infection in the fieldworks of JKP "Zelenilo Beograd" than in other persons. Methods. Risk for getting LD in the fieldworkers of JKP "Zelenilo Beograd" (park-maintanance company was determined according to seropositivity, the number and infection rate of LD vectors, and entomological risk index (ERI value. Serum samples of 34 fieldworkers of JKP "Zelenilo Beograd", and 35 persons of the control group, were tested for the presence of specific IgM and IgG anti-B. burgdorferi antibodies by using ELISA test. In the research localities, the number of ticks was estimated by using the flag hours method, and tick infection rate was determined by dark field microscopy, with magnification rate of 400×. The data were analyzed statistically using χ2 test, and Pearson's correlation analysis. Results. Out of 34 fieldworkes serum samples, 8 (23.5% were positive on anti-B. burgdorferi antibody presence, while in the control group only one (2.9% sample was positive (p < 0,05. Seropositivity rate varied from 0-66.6% among localities. Flag hours value among the localities ranged from 8.2-29.9, and tick infection rate ranged from 10.8- 22.3%. ERI value was 0.03-0.15. Correlation between flag hour rate and seropositivity, tick infection rate and seropositivity, and also ERI and seropositivity was established. Conclusion

  3. Zika Virus Infection during Pregnancy in Mice Causes Placental Damage and Fetal Demise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miner, Jonathan J; Cao, Bin; Govero, Jennifer; Smith, Amber M; Fernandez, Estefania; Cabrera, Omar H; Garber, Charise; Noll, Michelle; Klein, Robyn S; Noguchi, Kevin K; Mysorekar, Indira U; Diamond, Michael S

    2016-05-19

    Zika virus (ZIKV) infection in pregnant women causes intrauterine growth restriction, spontaneous abortion, and microcephaly. Here, we describe two mouse models of placental and fetal disease associated with in utero transmission of ZIKV. Female mice lacking type I interferon signaling (Ifnar1(-/-)) crossed to wild-type (WT) males produced heterozygous fetuses resembling the immune status of human fetuses. Maternal inoculation at embryonic day 6.5 (E6.5) or E7.5 resulted in fetal demise that was associated with ZIKV infection of the placenta and fetal brain. We identified ZIKV within trophoblasts of the maternal and fetal placenta, consistent with a trans-placental infection route. Antibody blockade of Ifnar1 signaling in WT pregnant mice enhanced ZIKV trans-placental infection although it did not result in fetal death. These models will facilitate the study of ZIKV pathogenesis, in utero transmission, and testing of therapies and vaccines to prevent congenital malformations. PMID:27180225

  4. Pancreatitis caused by Clostridium perfringens infection with extensive retropneumoperitoneum; Pancreatitis por Clostridium perfringens con retroneumoperitoneo extenso

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Merchante, E.; Garcia, F. J.; Perez, H.; Marquez, J. L. [Hospital Universitario Virgen del Rocio. Sevilla (Spain)

    2001-07-01

    We present a case of primary emphysematous pancreatitis caused by Clostridium perfringens infection (also Known as spontaneous pancreatic gas gangrene) in a 66-year-old man with diabetes and a history of recurrent pancreatitis. One notable feature is the absence of a focal distribution, which is seen on radiological studies to be accompanied by extensive retropneumoperitoneum, with dissemination of the gas toward the mesenteric root and pelvic extra peritoneal spaces. This wide diffusion is aided by the C. perfringens toxins and the pancreatic enzymes released, leading to a fulminate course, an elevated rate of early mortality among the cases reviewed. The early diagnosis of this disease is fundamental, enabling aggressive medical treatment and emergency surgery. Diabetes is a known risk factor for anaerobic infection, including C. perfringens, as in the case of emphysematous cholecystitis. A diseased pancreas or pancreatic duct facilitates the development of infections since it eliminates poorly the microorganisms that reach it from the duodenum. Gas gangrene secondary to necrosis-related super infection or pancreatic collections is uncommon, and spontaneous or primary cases are exceptionally are. (Author) 13 refs.

  5. Transformation of sexually transmitted infection-causing serovars of chlamydia trachomatis using Blasticidin for selection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Honglei Ding

    Full Text Available Plasmid-free Chlamydia trachomatis serovar L2 organisms have been transformed with chlamydial plasmid-based shuttle vectors pGFP::SW2 and pBRCT using β-lactamase as a selectable marker. However, the recommendation of amoxicillin, a β-lactam antibiotics, as one of the choices for treating pregnant women with cervicitis due to C. trachomatis infection has made the existing shuttle vectors unsuitable for transforming sexually transmitted infection (STI-causing serovars of C. trachomatis. Thus, in the current study, we modified the pGFP::SW2 plasmid by fusing a blasticidin S deaminase gene to the GFP gene to establish blasticidin resistance as a selectable marker and replacing the β-lactamase gene with the Sh ble gene to eliminate the penicillin resistance. The new vector termed pGFPBSD/Z::SW2 was used for transforming plasmid-free C. trachomatis serovar D organisms. Using blasticidin for selection, stable transformants were obtained. The GFP-BSD fusion protein was detected in cultures infected with the pGFPBSD/Z::SW2-trasnformed serovar D organisms. The transformation restored the plasmid property to the plasmid-free serovar D organisms. Thus, we have successfully modified the pGFP::SW2 transformation system for studying the biology and pathogenesis of other STI-causing serovars of C. trachomatis.

  6. Acute respiratory infection as a cause of non-malarial febrile illness in African children.

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    Florida Muro

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The replacement of “presumptive treatment for malaria” by “test before treat” strategies for the management of febrile illness is raising awareness of the importance of knowing more about the causes of illness in children who are suspected to have malaria but return a negative parasitological test. The most common cause of non-malarial febrile illness (NMFI in African children is respiratory tract infection. Whilst the bacterial causes of NMFI are well known, the increasing use of sensitive techniques such as polymerase chain reaction (PCR tests is revealing large numbers of viruses that are potential respiratory pathogens. However, many of these organisms are commonly present in the respiratory tract of healthy children so causality and risk factors for pneumonia remain poorly understood. Infection with a combination of viral and bacterial pathogens is increasingly recognised as important in the pathogenesis of pneumonia. Similarly, blood stream infections with organisms typically grown by aerobic culture are well known but a growing number of organisms that can be identified only by PCR, viral culture, or serology are now recognised to be common pathogens in African children. The high mortality of hospitalised children on the first or second day of admission suggests that, unless results are rapidly available, diagnostic tests to identify specific causes of illness will still be of limited use in guiding the potentially life‑saving decisions relating to initial treatment of children admitted to district hospitals in Africa with severe febrile illness and a negative test for malaria. Malaria control and the introduction of vaccines against Haemophilus influenzae type b and pneumococcal disease are contributing to improved child survival in Africa. However, increased parasitological testing for malaria is associated with increased use of antibiotics to which resistance is already high.

  7. Central Nervous System Viral Invasion and Inflammation During Acute HIV Infection

    OpenAIRE

    Valcour, V.; Chalermchai, T; Sailasuta, N; Marovich, M; Lerdlum, S; Suttichom, D; Suwanwela, NC; Jagodzinski, L.; Michael, N.; Spudich, S; van Griensven, F.; Souza, M.; Kim, J; Ananworanich, J.

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Understanding the earliest central nervous system (CNS) events during human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection is crucial to knowledge of neuropathogenesis, but these have not previously been described in humans. METHODS: Twenty individuals who had acute HIV infection (Fiebig stages I-IV), with average 15 days after exposure, underwent clinical neurological, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), magnetic resonance imaging, and magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) characterization. RESUL...

  8. The Arabidopsis thaliana homeobox gene ATHB12 is involved in symptom development caused by geminivirus infection.

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    Jungan Park

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Geminiviruses are single-stranded DNA viruses that infect a number of monocotyledonous and dicotyledonous plants. Arabidopsis is susceptible to infection with the Curtovirus, Beet severe curly top virus (BSCTV. Infection of Arabidopsis with BSCTV causes severe symptoms characterized by stunting, leaf curling, and the development of abnormal inflorescence and root structures. BSCTV-induced symptom development requires the virus-encoded C4 protein which is thought to interact with specific plant-host proteins and disrupt signaling pathways important for controlling cell division and development. Very little is known about the specific plant regulatory factors that participate in BSCTV-induced symptom development. This study was conducted to identify specific transcription factors that are induced by BSCTV infection. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Arabidopsis plants were inoculated with BSCTV and the induction of specific transcription factors was monitored using quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction assays. We found that the ATHB12 and ATHB7 genes, members of the homeodomain-leucine zipper family of transcription factors previously shown to be induced by abscisic acid and water stress, are induced in symptomatic tissues of Arabidopsis inoculated with BSCTV. ATHB12 expression is correlated with an array of morphological abnormalities including leaf curling, stunting, and callus-like structures in infected Arabidopsis. Inoculation of plants with a BSCTV mutant with a defective c4 gene failed to induce ATHB12. Transgenic plants expressing the BSCTV C4 gene exhibited increased ATHB12 expression whereas BSCTV-infected ATHB12 knock-down plants developed milder symptoms and had lower ATHB12 expression compared to the wild-type plants. Reporter gene studies demonstrated that the ATHB12 promoter was responsive to BSCTV infection and the highest expression levels were observed in symptomatic tissues where cell cycle genes also were

  9. Erythromycin resistance caused by erm(A) subclass erm(TR) in a Danish invasive pneumococcal isolate: Are erm(A) pneumococcal isolates overlooked?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lambertsen, L.; Ekelund, K.; Hansen, D.S.;

    2008-01-01

    Erm(A) is rarely reported as erythromycin resistance determinant in pneumococci. One invasive erm(A) isolate was initially tested intermediate erythromycin resistant using E-test. However, upon re-testing it was resistant, thus close to the breakpoint value. This may be a reason why erm(A) only...... rarely is reported to cause resistance in pneumococci Udgivelsesdato: 2008...

  10. Causes of mortality among tuberculosis and HIV co-infected patients in Chiang Rai, Northern Thailand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kantipong P

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Pacharee Kantipong,1 Kuniko Murakami,2 Saiyud Moolphate,3 Myo Nyein Aung,4,5 Norio Yamada21Chiang Rai Prachanukroh Hospital, Thailand; 2Japan Research Institute of Tuberculosis, Japan Anti-Tuberculosis Association, Tokyo, Japan; 3TB/HIV Research Project, Chiang Rai, Thailand; 4Department of Public Health, Graduate School of Medicine, Juntendo University, Tokyo, Japan; 5Department of Epidemiology, University of Public Health, Yangon, MyanmarBackground: The case fatality rate in patients with tuberculosis (TB associated with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV has been particularly high in Chiang Rai, Northern Thailand. It was almost 50% before the introduction of antiretroviral therapy in the last decade, and was still at 28% in 2008, despite expanding access to antiretroviral therapy. Reviewing the causes of death may lead to further understanding of the timeline and natural history of TB-HIV coinfection, and in so doing help to devise an effective prevention strategy in Chiang Rai. In this study, we aimed to investigate the distribution of confirmed causes of death in patients coinfected with TB and HIV in Chiang Rai, describe the causes of such deaths along the timeline of TB treatment, and identify predictors of each cause of death.Methods: In this retrospective study, we reviewed the causes of death for 331 patients who died of TB-HIV coinfection at Chiang Rai Prachanukroh Hospital from 2005 to 2008. Causes of death were confirmed by reviewing medical records, vital registration, and the TB register in the province, as well as obtaining reconfirmation by two experienced HIV physicians.Results: The confirmed causes of death were TB (39%, acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS-related opportunistic infections other than TB (AOI (29%, and other systemic diseases which were neither TB nor AIDS-related opportunistic infections (nonTB-nonAOI (16%. The definitive cause could not be confirmed in the remaining 16% of deaths. After starting the TB

  11. [Mycobacterium marinum. A rare cause of infection of the skin and joints].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byg, K E; Milman, N; Clausen, P P; Radulescu, B

    1997-09-01

    Mycobacterium marinum is a rare cause of disseminated infection in man. The case report describes an 80-year-old woman, who had been treated with oral corticosteroids for bronchial asthma for 40 years, and in the same period had been swimming daily in swimming pools. At the first admission, the symptoms and clinical findings were interpreted as seronegative rheumatoid arthritis. After eight years of disease with recurrent infections of the skin, periarticular tissues and joints in the hands and one elbow, a biopsy specimen from an abscess showed granulomatous inflammation and acid fast bacilli. Culture for mycobacteria grew M. marinum. There was a severe, destructive monoarthritis in the right second metacarpophalangeal joint. The patient recovered completely on treatment with clarithromycin and doxycycline. PMID:9304271

  12. Mechanism and consequences of invasion of endothelial cells by Staphylococcus aureus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sinha, Bhanu; Herrmann, Mathias

    2005-01-01

    It has become clear that Staphylococcus aureus is a facultative intracellular microorganism. Adherence and invasion are a prerequisite for endovascular infections caused by S. aureus, such as infective endocarditis. These phenomena may also be involved in the pathogenesis of invasive and metastatic

  13. Diagnosis and management of invasive candidiasis in the ICU: an updated approach to an old enemy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calandra, Thierry; Roberts, Jason A; Antonelli, Massimo; Bassetti, Matteo; Vincent, Jean-Louis

    2016-01-01

    Invasive fungal infections, particularly those caused by Candida species, are not uncommon in critically ill patients and are associated with considerable morbidity and mortality. Diagnosis and management of these infections can be challenging. In this review, we will briefly discuss recent epidemiological data on invasive candidiasis and current diagnostic approaches before concentrating on antifungal treatments. PMID:27230564

  14. Global metabolomic profiling of acute myocarditis caused by Trypanosoma cruzi infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Núria Gironès

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Chagas disease is caused by Trypanosoma cruzi infection, being cardiomyopathy the more frequent manifestation. New chemotherapeutic drugs are needed but there are no good biomarkers for monitoring treatment efficacy. There is growing evidence linking immune response and metabolism in inflammatory processes and specifically in Chagas disease. Thus, some metabolites are able to enhance and/or inhibit the immune response. Metabolite levels found in the host during an ongoing infection could provide valuable information on the pathogenesis and/or identify deregulated metabolic pathway that can be potential candidates for treatment and being potential specific biomarkers of the disease. To gain more insight into those aspects in Chagas disease, we performed an unprecedented metabolomic analysis in heart and plasma of mice infected with T. cruzi. Many metabolic pathways were profoundly affected by T. cruzi infection, such as glucose uptake, sorbitol pathway, fatty acid and phospholipid synthesis that were increased in heart tissue but decreased in plasma. Tricarboxylic acid cycle was decreased in heart tissue and plasma whereas reactive oxygen species production and uric acid formation were also deeply increased in infected hearts suggesting a stressful condition in the heart. While specific metabolites allantoin, kynurenine and p-cresol sulfate, resulting from nucleotide, tryptophan and phenylalanine/tyrosine metabolism, respectively, were increased in heart tissue and also in plasma. These results provide new valuable information on the pathogenesis of acute Chagas disease, unravel several new metabolic pathways susceptible of clinical management and identify metabolites useful as potential specific biomarkers for monitoring treatment and clinical severity in patients.

  15. Vaccines against Infections Caused by Salmonella, Shigella, and Pathogenic Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guzman, Carlos A; Borsutzky, Stefan; Favre, Didier; Dietrich, Guido

    2004-12-01

    Infectious diseases represent one of the most common causes of death worldwide, with the enteropathogenic bacteria Salmonella and Shigella and pathogenic Escherichia coli being among the most detrimental. Currently, vaccination represents the preferred method of preventing such infections. For stimulating the adaptive immune response, immunizations are frequently based on formulations which include inactivated whole-cell vaccines, live attenuated vaccines, or subunit vaccines. These can be administered via a parenteral or mucosal route, the latter having the advantage that it most closely mimics the actual course of infection. In addition to the type of vaccine and method of application, important consideration needs to be paid to safety, efficacy, and cost, which are often major bottlenecks in the successful implementation of vaccines. In this chapter we take a limited look at the history surrounding vaccinations involving Salmonella, Shigella, and pathogenic E. coli. Salmonella infections, which can lead to typhoid fever, are becoming increasing difficult to treat with antibiotics due to multi-drug-resistant strains. At present, the parenteral Vi-based subunit vaccines and the live attenuated oral vaccine Ty21a have proven to be the vaccines of choice, with high levels of protective efficacy and limited side effects. Shigella infections are responsible for the diarrheal disease shigellosis. Various live and nonliving mucosal and parenteral vaccines have been tested, with the most promising candidates evolving around those that stimulate the production of O-antigen-specific antibodies. Pathogenic Escherichia coli infections can lead to severe diseases due to the bacterium's production of several specific toxins. Vaccines against this bacterium target its toxins, as well as surface-exposed antigens, all of which have been found to be effective as immunogens. PMID:26443352

  16. Postoperative Expansion is not a Primary Cause of Infection in Immediate Breast Reconstruction with Tissue Expanders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avraham, Tomer; Weichman, Katie E; Wilson, Stelios; Weinstein, Andrew; Haddock, Nicholas T; Szpalski, Caroline; Choi, Mihye; Karp, Nolan S

    2015-01-01

    Perioperative infection is the most common and dreaded complication associated with tissue expander (TE) breast reconstruction. Historically, the expansion period was thought to be the time of greatest hazard to the implant. However, recent institutional observations suggest infectious complications occur prior to expansion. This investigation, therefore, was conducted to determine the timing of infectious complications associated with two-stage TE breast reconstructions. Following IRB approval, a retrospective review of all consecutive two-stage immediate TE breast reconstructions at a single institution from November 2007 to November 2011 was conducted. Reconstructions were then divided into two cohorts: those suffering infectious complications and those that did not. Infectious complications including minor cellulitis, major cellulitis, abscess drainage, and explantation were identified. Various operative and patient variables were evaluated in comparison. Eight hundred ninety immediate two-stage TE breast reconstructions met inclusion criteria. Patients suffering infection were older (55.4 years versus 49.3 years; p acellular dermal matrix (ADM; 72.5% versus 54.9%; p = 0.001), and greater initial TE fill (448.6 mL versus 404.7 mL; p = 0.0078). The average time to developing of infectious symptoms was 29.6 days (range 9-142 days), with 94.6% (n = 87) of infections prior to the start of expansion. Perioperative infections in immediate two-stage TE to implant breast reconstructions are significant and occur mostly prior to the start of expansion. Thus, challenging the conventional wisdom that instrumentation during expander filling as the primary cause of implant infections. Possible etiologic factors include greater age, therapeutic mastectomy versus prophylactic mastectomy, larger initial TE fill, and the use of ADM. PMID:26132336

  17. Causes of liver disease and its outcome in HIV-infected individuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shamanna, Suryanarayana Bettadpura; Naik, Ramavath Raghu Ramulu; Hamide, Abdoul

    2016-07-01

    Liver disease in HIV-infected patients has remained unaddressed in India. This study describes the causes of liver disease in HIV-infected patients and short-term outcome in them. Designed as a prospective observational study, it was conducted at Jawaharlal Institute of Postgraduate Medical Education and Research between September 2011 and March 2013. All consecutive HIV patients (>13 years) attending the antiretroviral therapy clinic or admitted in the Medicine Department were screened, and patients with liver disease or with either HBsAg or anti-HCV antibody positivity were included in the study. Of the 198 patients screened, 51 (26 %) had either abnormal liver function test or had HBsAg or anti-HCV positivity. The median age of the patients was 40 years and 82 % were males. The median CD4 count was 123 cells/mm(3). Eighteen (35 %) of them had alcoholic liver disease. Six patients had probable hepatic involvement due to tuberculosis. Ten patients had antituberculosis drug-induced hepatotoxicity. One patient had acute hepatitis B and seven patients had chronic hepatitis B. The cause could not be established in 10 patients (20 %). After a median period of 8 months of follow up, 23 patients had improved, 19 patients (37 %) had died, and six patients had been lost to follow up. Of the patients who had died, 11 patients (58 %) had tuberculosis, and 6 patients (30 %) had decompensated alcoholic liver disease. In conclusion, liver disease in HIV-infected patients was associated with high mortality. Alcohol abuse, tuberculosis, and antituberculosis drugs were the major causes. PMID:27435618

  18. Profile of isavuconazole and its potential in the treatment of severe invasive fungal infections

    OpenAIRE

    Falci DR; Pasqualotto AC

    2013-01-01

    Diego R Falci,1,2 Alessandro C Pasqualotto2,31Hospital Nossa Senhora da Conceição, Porto Alegre, Brazil; 2Universidade Federal de Ciências da Saúde de Porto Alegre, Porto Alegre, Brazil; 3Santa Casa de Misericórdia de Porto Alegre, Porto Alegre, BrazilAbstract: The triazole class of antifungal drugs comprises first-line agents for the treatment of several invasive fungal diseases. Isavuconazole is a novel broad-spectrum triazole agent. Here we summarize its c...

  19. Mechanism of Trypanosoma cruzi Placenta Invasion and Infection: The Use of Human Chorionic Villi Explants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo E. Fretes

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Congenital Chagas disease, a neglected tropical disease, endemic in Latin America, is associated with premature labor and miscarriage. During vertical transmission the parasite Trypanosoma cruzi (T. cruzi crosses the placental barrier. However, the exact mechanism of the placental infection remains unclear. We review the congenital transmission of T. cruzi, particularly the role of possible local placental factors that contribute to the vertical transmission of the parasite. Additionally, we analyze the different methods available for studying the congenital transmission of the parasite. In that context, the ex vivo infection with T. cruzi trypomastigotes of human placental chorionic villi constitutes an excellent tool for studying parasite infection strategies as well as possible local antiparasitic mechanisms.

  20. An unusual case of acute transverse myelitis caused by HSV-1 infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Figueroa, Danisha; Isache, Carmen; Sands, Michael; Guzman, Nilmarie

    2016-01-01

    Transverse myelitis is a neurological disorder of the spinal cord that can have a variety of etiologies. Herpes simplex virus (HSV) infection has been described as one of the causes, most commonly HSV type 2. We report here a case of an 18 year old male who presented with weakness that started in his upper extremities and rapidly evolved to quadriplegia. Magnetic resonance imaging of spine was consistent with transverse myelitis. HSV type 1 PCR testing on cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) was positive. He was started on acyclovir and steroids, but despite therapy, patient did not recover motor function. PMID:27419072

  1. Invasive Community-Acquired Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus in a Japanese Girl with Disseminating Multiple Organ Infection: A Case Report and Review of Japanese Pediatric Cases

    OpenAIRE

    Ryuta Yonezawa; Tsukasa Kuwana; Kengo Kawamura; Yasuji Inamo

    2015-01-01

    Pediatric invasive community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (CA-MRSA) infection is very serious and occasionally fatal. This infectious disease is still a relatively rare and unfamiliar infectious disease in Japan. We report a positive outcome in a 23-month-old Japanese girl with meningitis, osteomyelitis, fasciitis, necrotizing pneumonia, urinary tract infection, and bacteremia due to CA-MRSA treated with linezolid. PCR testing of the CA-MRSA strain was positive for PVL...

  2. Current strategies against invasive fungal infections in patients with aplastic anemia, strong power and weak weapon, a case report and review of literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zekavat, Omid Reza; Amanati, Ali; Saleh, Fazl; Abdolkarimi, Babak; Fathpour, Gholamreza; Badiee, Parisa; Geramizadeh, Bita

    2016-03-01

    We report an 18 year old boy with Aplastic anemia complicated by serious fungal rhinosinusitis. Despite prompt treatment and early repeated surgical debridements, he died after about more than 6 weeks of hard challenges with fungal infections. Current strategies against invasive fungal infections (IFIs) in patients with Aplastic anemia may be inadequate for the management of serious complications. Antifungal prophylaxis is highly recommended in pre-transplant period for severe form of Aplastic anemia. PMID:27047751

  3. Repression of Flagella Is a Common Trait in Field Isolates of Salmonella enterica Serovar Dublin and Is Associated with Invasive Human Infections

    OpenAIRE

    Yim, Lucía; Sasías, Sebastián; Martínez, Arací; Betancor, Laura; Estevez, Verónica; Scavone, Paola; Bielli, Alejandro; Sirok, Alfredo; Chabalgoity, José Alejandro

    2014-01-01

    The nontyphoidal Salmonella enterica serovar Dublin is adapted to cattle but infrequently infects humans, very often resulting in invasive infections with high levels of morbidity and mortality. A Salmonella-induced intestinal acute inflammatory response is postulated as a mechanism to prevent bacterial dissemination to systemic sites. In S. enterica serovar Typhimurium, flagella contribute to this response by providing motility and FliC-mediated activation of pattern recognition receptors. I...

  4. Bacterial characteristics of importance for recurrent urinary tract infections caused by Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ejrnæs, Karen

    2011-04-01

    Urinary tract infections (UTIs) are among the most common bacterial infectious diseases encountered in clinical practice and account for significant morbidity and high medical costs. Escherichia coli is the most predominant pathogen causing 80-90% of community-acquired UTIs and 30-50% of nosocomially-acquired UTIs. Recurrent UTIs (RUTIs) are reported in 25% of women within 6 months of an acute UTI episode and pose a major problem. The aim of the present thesis was to look for bacterial characteristics of importance for recurrence of UTI caused by E. coli. The thesis is based on three papers. The study is based on E. coli from 236 Swedish women with community-acquired symptomatic lower UTI from a large study of 1162 patients treated with one of three different dosing regimens of pivmecillinam or placebo. The women were evaluated clinically and bacteriologically at the initial visit and at two scheduled follow-up visits. According to pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) and culture results all primary infecting E. coli (initial isolates, pretherapy) were assigned into whether the initial infection was followed by cure, persistence, reinfection or relapse during follow-up. The prevalence of virulence factor genes (VFGs), phylogenetic groups, biofilm formation, plasmids and resistance to antimicrobials among primary infecting E. coli causing persistence or relapse at the follow-up visits were compared with the prevalence of these among E. coli followed by cure or reinfection. Previous studies of RUTI using phenotypically based typing methods or less specific DNA based typing methods have concluded, that RUTIs are mainly attributable to reinfection with new strains. However, applying PFGE showed that 77% of RUTIs were caused by a relapse with the primary infecting E. coli (Paper I). This may support the recent observation that E. coli can invade and replicate within the murine bladder forming biofilm-like intracellular bacterial communities (IBCs) and establish

  5. “Infectobesity: viral infections (especially with human adenovirus-36: Ad-36) may be a cause of obesity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ginneken, van V.J.T.; Sitnyakowsky, L.; Jeffery, J.E.

    2009-01-01

    In recent years viral infections have been recognized as possible cause of obesity, alongside the traditionally recognized causes (genetic inheritance, and behaviour/environmental causes such as diet exercise, cultural practices and stress). Although four viruses have been reported to induce obesity

  6. Memory Th1 Cells Are Protective in Invasive Staphylococcus aureus Infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aisling F Brown

    Full Text Available Mechanisms of protective immunity to Staphylococcus aureus infection in humans remain elusive. While the importance of cellular immunity has been shown in mice, T cell responses in humans have not been characterised. Using a murine model of recurrent S. aureus peritonitis, we demonstrated that prior exposure to S. aureus enhanced IFNγ responses upon subsequent infection, while adoptive transfer of S. aureus antigen-specific Th1 cells was protective in naïve mice. Translating these findings, we found that S. aureus antigen-specific Th1 cells were also significantly expanded during human S. aureus bloodstream infection (BSI. These Th1 cells were CD45RO+, indicative of a memory phenotype. Thus, exposure to S. aureus induces memory Th1 cells in mice and humans, identifying Th1 cells as potential S. aureus vaccine targets. Consequently, we developed a model vaccine comprising staphylococcal clumping factor A, which we demonstrate to be an effective human T cell antigen, combined with the Th1-driving adjuvant CpG. This novel Th1-inducing vaccine conferred significant protection during S. aureus infection in mice. This study notably advances our understanding of S. aureus cellular immunity, and demonstrates for the first time that a correlate of S. aureus protective immunity identified in mice may be relevant in humans.

  7. Memory Th1 Cells Are Protective in Invasive Staphylococcus aureus Infection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.F. Brown (Aisling F.); A.G. Murphy (Alison G.); S.J. Lalor (Stephen J.); J.M. Leech (John M.); K.M. O’Keeffe (Kate M.); M. Mac Aogáin (Micheál); D.P. O’Halloran (Dara P.); K.A. Lacey (Keenan A.); M. Tavakol (Mehri); C.H. Hearnden (Claire H.); D. Fitzgerald-Hughes (Deirdre); H. Humphreys (Hilary); J.P. Fennell (Jérôme P.); W.J.B. van Wamel (Willem); T.J. Foster (Timothy J.); J.A. Geoghegan (Joan A.); E.C. Lavelle (Ed C.); T.R. Rogers (Thomas R.); R.M. McLoughlin (Rachel M.)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractMechanisms of protective immunity to Staphylococcus aureus infection in humans remain elusive. While the importance of cellular immunity has been shown in mice, T cell responses in humans have not been characterised. Using a murine model of recurrent S. aureus peritonitis, we demonstrate

  8. Memory Th1 Cells Are Protective in Invasive Staphylococcus aureus Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Aisling F; Murphy, Alison G; Lalor, Stephen J; Leech, John M; O'Keeffe, Kate M; Mac Aogáin, Micheál; O'Halloran, Dara P; Lacey, Keenan A; Tavakol, Mehri; Hearnden, Claire H; Fitzgerald-Hughes, Deirdre; Humphreys, Hilary; Fennell, Jérôme P; van Wamel, Willem J; Foster, Timothy J; Geoghegan, Joan A; Lavelle, Ed C; Rogers, Thomas R; McLoughlin, Rachel M

    2015-01-01

    Mechanisms of protective immunity to Staphylococcus aureus infection in humans remain elusive. While the importance of cellular immunity has been shown in mice, T cell responses in humans have not been characterised. Using a murine model of recurrent S. aureus peritonitis, we demonstrated that prior exposure to S. aureus enhanced IFNγ responses upon subsequent infection, while adoptive transfer of S. aureus antigen-specific Th1 cells was protective in naïve mice. Translating these findings, we found that S. aureus antigen-specific Th1 cells were also significantly expanded during human S. aureus bloodstream infection (BSI). These Th1 cells were CD45RO+, indicative of a memory phenotype. Thus, exposure to S. aureus induces memory Th1 cells in mice and humans, identifying Th1 cells as potential S. aureus vaccine targets. Consequently, we developed a model vaccine comprising staphylococcal clumping factor A, which we demonstrate to be an effective human T cell antigen, combined with the Th1-driving adjuvant CpG. This novel Th1-inducing vaccine conferred significant protection during S. aureus infection in mice. This study notably advances our understanding of S. aureus cellular immunity, and demonstrates for the first time that a correlate of S. aureus protective immunity identified in mice may be relevant in humans. PMID:26539822

  9. Inhibition of quorum sensing regulated biofilm formation in Serratia marcescens causing nosocomial infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakkiyaraj, Dhamodharan; Sivasankar, Chandran; Pandian, Shunmugiah Karutha

    2012-05-01

    Serratia marcescens is an opportunistic pathogen causing severe urinary tract infections in hospitalized individuals. Infections of S. marcescens are of great concern because of its increasing resistance towards conventional antibiotics. Quorum sensing (QS)-a cell to cell communication-system of S. marcescens acts as a global regulator of almost all the virulence factors and majorly its biofilm formation. Since, the QS system of S. marcescens directly accords to its pathogenesis, targeting QS system will provide an improved strategy to combat drug resistant pathogens. In the present study, QS system of S. marcescens has been used as target and its inhibition has been studied upon exposure to bioactives from coral associated bacteria (CAB). This study also emphasises the potential of CAB in producing bioactive agents with anti-QS and antibiofilm properties. Two CAB isolates CAB 23 and 41 have shown to inhibit biofilm formation and the production of QS dependent virulence factors like prodigiosin, protease, lipase and swarming motility. The study, on the whole explicates the potential of QS system as a target to treat drug resistant bacterial infections. PMID:22487181

  10. Oak forest exploitation and black-locust invasion caused severe shifts in epiphytic lichen communities in Northern Italy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nascimbene, Juri; Marini, Lorenzo

    2010-10-15

    In the last two centuries, native European oak forests have undergone a dramatic decline related to increasing human pressure for agriculture and urbanization. Oak forests were either completely eradicated and transformed into agricultural landscapes or replaced by second-growth formations. Intensive forest management and the replacement of native forests with production forests or arable lands are recognized amongst the main threats to many lichens in Europe. In this study, we used historical information on the epiphytic lichen biota which was hosted in a native oak-dominated forest of Northern Italy to identify shifts of lichen communities due to the changes in land use which occurred during the last two centuries. We also compared the epiphytic lichen communities inhabiting remnant oak forests with those found in the habitats that have replaced native forests: black-locust forests and agrarian landscapes. Almost all the species sampled during the 19th century are now extinct. The loss of native habitat and the subsequent invasion by black locust were probably the most influential factors which affected the composition of lichen communities, causing the local extinction of most of the species historically recorded. Despite the fact that oak remnants host only a few species which were historically recorded, and that they currently are the lichen poorest habitat in the study region, they host lichen assemblages differing from those of black-locust forests and agrarian stands. In these habitats lichen assemblages are mainly composed of species adapted to well-lit, dry conditions and tolerating air pollution and eutrophication. This pattern is likely to be common also in other lowland and hilly regions throughout Northern Italy where oak forests are targeted among the habitats of conservation concern at the European level. For this reason, a national strategy for biodiversity conservation and monitoring of lowlands forests should provide the framework for local

  11. Experimental infection of bats with Geomyces destructans causes white-nose syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorch, J.M.; Meteyer, C.U.; Behr, M.J.; Boyles, J.G.; Cryan, P.M.; Hicks, A.C.; Ballmann, A.E.; Coleman, J.T.H.; Redell, D.N.; Reeder, D.M.; Blehert, D.S.

    2011-01-01

    White-nose syndrome (WNS) has caused recent catastrophic declines among multiple species of bats in eastern North America. The disease's name derives from a visually apparent white growth of the newly discovered fungus Geomyces destructans on the skin (including the muzzle) of hibernating bats. Colonization of skin by this fungus is associated with characteristic cutaneous lesions that are the only consistent pathological finding related to WNS. However, the role of G. destructans in WNS remains controversial because evidence to implicate the fungus as the primary cause of this disease is lacking. The debate is fuelled, in part, by the assumption that fungal infections in mammals are most commonly associated with immune system dysfunction. Additionally, the recent discovery that G. destructans commonly colonizes the skin of bats of Europe, where no unusual bat mortality events have been reported, has generated further speculation that the fungus is an opportunistic pathogen and that other unidentified factors are the primary cause of WNS. Here we demonstrate that exposure of healthy little brown bats (Myotis lucifugus) to pure cultures of G. destructans causes WNS. Live G. destructans was subsequently cultured from diseased bats, successfully fulfilling established criteria for the determination of G. destructans as a primary pathogen. We also confirmed that WNS can be transmitted from infected bats to healthy bats through direct contact. Our results provide the first direct evidence that G. destructans is the causal agent of WNS and that the recent emergence of WNS in North America may represent translocation of the fungus to a region with a naive population of animals. Demonstration of causality is an instrumental step in elucidating the pathogenesis and epidemiology of WNS and in guiding management actions to preserve bat populations against the novel threat posed by this devastating infectious disease. ?? 2011 Macmillan Publishers Limited. All rights reserved.

  12. The Probiotic Escherichia coli Nissle 1917 Reduces Pathogen Invasion and Modulates Cytokine Expression in Caco-2 Cells Infected with Crohn's Disease-Associated E. coli LF82 ▿

    OpenAIRE

    Huebner, Claudia; Ding, Yaoyao; Petermann, Ivonne; Knapp, Christoph; Ferguson, Lynnette R.

    2011-01-01

    Increased numbers of adherent invasive Escherichia coli (AIEC) have been found in Crohn's disease (CD) patients. In this report, we investigate the potential of the probiotic Escherichia coli Nissle 1917 (EcN) to reduce features associated with AIEC pathogenicity in an already established infection with AIEC reference strain LF82.

  13. Clinical and microbiologic aspects of serious infections caused by Staphylococcus epidermidis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuazon, C U; Miller, H

    1983-01-01

    10 patients with serious infections caused by Staphylococcus epidermidis (8 cases of endocarditis in non-prosthetic valves, 1 was complicated by osteomyelitis, 1 case of osteomyelitis, and 1 case of septicemia) are described. Clinical and microbiologic features were evaluated including antibiotic sensitivity and synergy studies, phage typing and biotyping. Endocarditis tended to affect the elderly population and the clinical manifestations were quite similar to those caused by Streptococcus viridans. Both patients with osteomyelitis had involvement of the cervical spine with excellent response to antibiotic therapy. The only patient with septicemia acquired via hyperalimentation had delayed clearance of the bacteremia but ultimately responded to intravenous antibiotics. Rifampicin was the most effective of all antibiotics tested. All isolates were sensitive to penicillinase-resistant penicillins and cephalosporins and over half were sensitive to penicillin. Full synergistic activity was demonstrated with cephalothin and nafcillin in combination with rifampicin, and rifampicin-vancomycin was partially synergistic against the majority of the strains. Five of 8 available isolates were non-phage typeable and no definite pattern was established for various types of infections. Four of the 8 isolates were classified as biotype SIIa, 2 biotype SIIc and 2 biotype SVh. PMID:6361977

  14. Clostridium difficile infection caused by the epidemic BI/NAP1/027 strain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Connor, Jennifer R; Johnson, Stuart; Gerding, Dale N

    2009-05-01

    Rates and severity of Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) in hospitals in North America and Europe have increased since 2000 and correlate with dissemination of an epidemic strain characterized by higher than usual toxin A and B production, the presence of a third toxin, binary toxin, and high-level resistance to fluoroquinolone antibiotics. The strain, which is restriction endonuclease analysis group BI, pulse-field gel electrophoresis type NAP1, and polymerase chain reaction ribotype 027, is designated BI/NAP1/027. How this strain has become so widely distributed geographically and produces such severe CDI is the subject of active investigation. The deletion at position 117 of the tcdC gene, a repressor of toxin A and B production, is one possible contributor to increased levels of the toxins. The role of binary toxin is unknown. Recent isolates of BI/NAP1/027 were found to be resistant to fluoroquinolones, which is likely to contribute to the dissemination of this strain. Other virulence factors such as increased sporulation and surface layer protein adherence are also under investigation. Infections caused by this organism are particularly frequent among elderly hospitalized patients, in whom the attributable 30-day mortality is greater than 5%. Major risk factors for BI/NAP1/027 infection include advanced age, hospitalization, and exposure to specific antimicrobials, especially fluoroquinolones and cephalosporins. When CDI is severe, vancomycin treatment is more effective than metronidazole; for mild disease either agent can be used. Control of hospital outbreaks caused by BI/NAP1/027 is difficult but possible through a combination of barrier precautions, environmental cleaning, and antimicrobial stewardship. PMID:19457419

  15. Prevalence and susceptibility patterns of bacteria causing respiratory tract infections in North Waziristan, Pakistan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Said Nasir; Ullah, Bait; Basit, Abdul; Begum, Asia; Tabassum, Anum; Zafar, Shaista; Saleha, Shamim

    2016-03-01

    Respiratory tract infections (RTIs) are the most common infectious diseases in humans and are the major cause of mortality and morbidity in Pakistan. These infections are the leading causes of consultations in primary care in Pakistan. Therefore, this study was aimed at determining bacterial pathogens of respiratory tract infections and the susceptibility patterns of bacterial isolates to antibiotics. The study was conducted between February, 2013 and March, 2014 in North Waziristan region of Pakistan. Sputum specimens were collected aseptically from 227 patients and cultured on the appropriate bacteriological media. Bacterial isolates were identified by biochemical tests and their antibiotics susceptibility patterns were determined by standard methods. Out of 227, various species of bacteria were isolated from 152 (75%) specimens. The prevalence of bacteria species isolated were as follows Pseudomonas aeruginosa (42.8%), Streptococcus pneumoniae (26.7%), Corynebacterium diphtheria (10.6%), Staphylococcus aureus (5.9%), Proteus vulgaris (4.6%), Micrococcus species (3.3%), Klebsiella pneumoniae (2.6%) and Bacillus species (2.6%). The susceptibility patterns varied among bacterial species depending on the antibiotics. For the susceptibility test 11 commercially available antibiotics against bacterial isolates were used. The results revealed that generally the bacterial isolates were susceptible to gentamicin (80.9%), meropenem (75 %), ceftazidime (62.5%), cefotaxime (57.9%) and ceftriazone (57.9%) and resistant to penicillin (84.9%) and doxycycline (78.9%). The antibiotics gentamicin (100%) meropenem (100%), ceftriaxone (58.5%), ciprofloxacin (60%) trimethoprim (60%), ceftazidime (66.2%) and cefotaxime (64.6%) were observed effective against the P. aeruginosa isolates. The findings of our study provide significant information for empiric therapy of patients with RTIs in North Waziristan region of Pakistan. PMID:27113300

  16. Diagnostic challenge: bilateral infected lumbar facet cysts - a rare cause of acute lumbar spinal stenosis and back pain

    OpenAIRE

    Yoon S Timothy; Bui Tuan L; Freedman Brett A

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Symptomatic synovial lumbar facet cysts are a relatively rare cause of radiculopathy and spinal stenosis. This case and brief review of the literature, details a patient who presented with acutely symptomatic bilateral spontaneously infected synovial facet (L4/5) cysts. This report highlights diagnostic clues for identifying infection of a facet cyst.

  17. Diagnostic challenge: bilateral infected lumbar facet cysts - a rare cause of acute lumbar spinal stenosis and back pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoon S Timothy

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Symptomatic synovial lumbar facet cysts are a relatively rare cause of radiculopathy and spinal stenosis. This case and brief review of the literature, details a patient who presented with acutely symptomatic bilateral spontaneously infected synovial facet (L4/5 cysts. This report highlights diagnostic clues for identifying infection of a facet cyst.

  18. 9 CFR 311.16 - Carcasses so infected that consumption of the meat may cause food poisoning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... OTHERWISE ADULTERATED CARCASSES AND PARTS § 311.16 Carcasses so infected that consumption of the meat may... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Carcasses so infected that consumption of the meat may cause food poisoning. 311.16 Section 311.16 Animals and Animal Products FOOD...

  19. Changes in lymphocyte and macrophage subsets due to morphine and ethanol treatment during a retrovirus infection causing murine AIDS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Watson, R.R.; Prabhala, R.H.; Darban, H.R.; Yahya, M.D.; Smith, T.L.

    1988-01-01

    The number of lymphocytes of various subsets were not significantly changed by the ethanol exposure except those showing activation markers which were reduced. The percentage of peripheral blood cells showing markers for macrophage functions and their activation were significantly reduced after binge use of ethanol. Ethanol retarded suppression of cells by retroviral infection. However by 25 weeks of infection there was a 8.6% survival in the ethanol fed mice infected with retrovirus which was much less than virally infected controls. Morphine treatment also increased the percentage of cells with markers for macrophages and activated macrophages in virally infected mice, while suppressing them in uninfected mice. The second and third morphine injection series suppressed lymphocyte T-helper and T-suppressor cells, but not total T cells. However, suppression by morphine was significantly less during retroviral disease than suppression caused by the virus only. At 25 weeks of infection 44.8% of morphine treated, infected mice survived.

  20. Profile of isavuconazole and its potential in the treatment of severe invasive fungal infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falci, Diego R; Pasqualotto, Alessandro C

    2013-01-01

    The triazole class of antifungal drugs comprises first-line agents for the treatment of several invasive fungal diseases. Isavuconazole is a novel broad-spectrum triazole agent. Here we summarize its characteristics and compare it with the currently available antifungal agents. Isavuconazole is administered as a prodrug, and it is water soluble. Oral and intravenous formulations are available. Its intravenous formulation does not contain cyclodextrin, which is an advantage over voriconazole, considering the potential for nephrotoxicity of cyclodextrin. As with other azoles, isavuconazole requires a loading dose. Due to its prolonged half-life, a once-a-day regimen is possible. Considering that isavuconazole shares the same mechanism of action with the other triazoles, cross-resistance is an important concern in the class. Tolerability and safety profiles are favorable, and no serious adverse events have been consistently reported. Significant interactions with drugs metabolized by cytochrome P450 are expected to occur, especially with substrates and inducers of the CYP3A4 enzyme. Isavuconazole has in vitro activity against most medically important fungi, including species of Candida, Aspergillus, and Cryptococcus. It has some activity against the agents of mucormycosis. Clinical data regarding isavuconazole remain limited because ongoing trials have not yet been completed or published. Isavuconazole has the potential to become first-line therapy for invasive aspergillosis. It also has the potential for use in the context of antifungal prophylaxis, salvage therapy, or in combination regimens. Results of clinical trials are ultimately expected in order to adequately position isavuconazole in the current antifungal armamentarium. PMID:24187505

  1. Effects of phosphate supplementation on Pseudomonas aeruginosa invasive behavior in burn wound infections: A simple approach to a big problem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammadi-Samani, Soliman; Kouroshfard, Shahriyar; Azarpira, Negar

    2016-03-01

    This study was designed to investigate the effect of inorganic phosphate supplementation on invasive behavior of Pseudomonas aeruginosa in burn wound infections. An emulsion-based lotion containing sodium dihydrogen phosphate was formulated and then 50 female Sprague-Dawley rats with burn wounds were used to assess the effect of phosphate supplementation on swarming motility of P. aeruginosa. On the second day after burn, four groups of rats were inoculated with P. aeruginosa and one group was left as negative control. The treatment was started on day 3 and the animals were followed up for 4 weeks. Significant improvement in wound healing was observed in the phosphate-receiving group after the 4-week follow-up, compared to the negative control, positive control, and silver sulfadiazine-receiving groups. Histopathological assessment of the tissue samples also indicated the healing process in phosphate-enriched lotion receiving group. The results showed that inorganic phosphate supplementation results in alteration of the virulence behavior of P. aeruginosa and improvement in the wound healing process. In conclusion, phosphate supplementation would be a rational strategy in the eradication of P. aeruginosa wound infection. PMID:26787129

  2. Serum antibodies against Staphylococcus aureus antigens in healthy individuals and patients with invasive infections

    OpenAIRE

    Colque-Navarro, Patricia

    2010-01-01

    The present work aims to study the antibody responses against Staphylococcus aureus in health and in deep infections and is composed of six papers. We developed a sandwich enzyme immuno assay (EIA) with a detection limit for alpha-toxin at nanograms levels. This method is applicable to measure alpha-toxin in culture supernatants and in human fluids. The assay is simple, reproducible and performed within 6 hours. We determined the presence of alpha-toxin in serum samples ...

  3. Infection of an invasive frog Eleutherodactylus coqui by the chytrid fungus Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis in Hawaii

    OpenAIRE

    Beard, Karen H.; O'Neill, Eric M.

    2005-01-01

    The chytrid fungus Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis has contributed to declines and extinctions of amphibians worldwide. B. dendrobatidis is known to infect the frog Eleutherodactylus coqui in its native Puerto Rico. E. coqui was accidentally introduced into Hawaii in the late 1980s, where there are now hundreds of populations. B. dendrobatidis was being considered as a biological control agent for E. coqui because there are no native amphibians in Hawaii. Using a DNA-based assay, we tested 382...

  4. Three Epidemics of Invasive Multidrug-Resistant Salmonella Bloodstream Infection in Blantyre, Malawi, 1998–2014

    OpenAIRE

    Feasey, Nicholas A.; Masesa, Clemens; Jassi, Chikondi; Faragher, E. Brian; Mallewa, Jane; Mallewa, Macpherson; MacLennan, Calman A.; Msefula, Chisomo; Robert S Heyderman; Gordon, Melita A.

    2015-01-01

    Background.  The Malawi Liverpool Wellcome Trust Clinical Research Programme (MLW) has routinely collected specimens for blood culture from febrile patients, and cerebrospinal fluid from patients with suspected meningitis, presenting to Queen Elizabeth Central Hospital (QECH), Blantyre, Malawi, since 1998. Methods.  We present bloodstream infection (BSI) and meningitis surveillance data from 1998 to 2014. Automated blood culture, manual speciation, serotyping, and antimicrobial susceptibility...

  5. Implementation of minimally invasive and objective humane endpoints in the study of murine Plasmodium infections

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dellavalle, B; Kirchhoff, J; Maretty, L;

    2014-01-01

    versus infrared thermometry: cervical dislocation: Pearson R = 0·99, R 2 = 0·98, slope = 1·01, y-intercept = 0·55; ECM: 0·99, 0·98, 1·06, -2·4; and SMA: 0·98, 0·97, 1·14, -5·6. Implementation of the 30 °C endpoint captured all lethal infections. However, some animals with BT below 30 °C were not deemed...

  6. Profile of infective microorganisms causing ventilator-associated pneumonia: A clinical study from resource limited intensive care unit

    OpenAIRE

    Bhaskar Thakuria; Preetinder Singh; Sanjay Agrawal; Veena Asthana

    2013-01-01

    Background: Ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP) is the most common cause of hospital acquired infection and death among patients admitted in ICU. Microorganisms responsible for VAP vary from place to place. Gram-negative bacteria (GNB) have emerged as a major group of pathogen causing VAP and over the years carbapenem group of antibiotics has emerged as one of the important antibiotics used in the critically ill patients. There have been reports of increased occurrence of infection by carba...

  7. Invasive Community-Acquired Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus in a Japanese Girl with Disseminating Multiple Organ Infection: A Case Report and Review of Japanese Pediatric Cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryuta Yonezawa

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Pediatric invasive community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (CA-MRSA infection is very serious and occasionally fatal. This infectious disease is still a relatively rare and unfamiliar infectious disease in Japan. We report a positive outcome in a 23-month-old Japanese girl with meningitis, osteomyelitis, fasciitis, necrotizing pneumonia, urinary tract infection, and bacteremia due to CA-MRSA treated with linezolid. PCR testing of the CA-MRSA strain was positive for PVL and staphylococcal enterotoxin b and negative for ACME. SCC mec was type IVa. This case underscores the selection of effective combinations of antimicrobial agents for its treatment. We need to be aware of invasive CA-MRSA infection, which rapidly progresses with a serious clinical course, because the incidence of the disease may be increasing in Japan.

  8. Biochar as a biosecurity tool for the management of invasive and/or infected plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harries, Philip J. E.; Fielding, J. James; Alayne Street-Perrott, F.; Doerr, Stefan H.; Brackenbury, Sion

    2014-05-01

    Control of invasive alien/native plants and diseased trees is often achieved using labour-intensive mechanical methods, incurring high costs and significant carbon debt. Disposal of cleared biomass may be heavily regulated. The commonly used method, burning, wastes a potentially valuable resource. Biochar may offer a safe, cost-effective solution to the problem of disposal. Large areas of Wales are covered by bracken (Pteridium aquilinum) (37x103 ha) or invasive Rhododendron ponticum (area not yet quantified). Clearance of these plants is often necessary for agriculture or maintenance of biodiversity (bracken), or to curb the rapid dispersal of the fungus-like pathogen Phytophthora ramorum from rhododendron (the principal host) into commercial timber stands, notably Japanese larch (Larix kaempferi). In addition, ash dieback (the fungal disease Hymenoscyphus pseudoalbidus aka Chalara fraxinea) is now spreading aggressively in common ash trees (Fraxinus excelsior) in the UK. Pilot-scale experiments are being conducted using a BiGchar 1000 mobile, fast pyrolysis -gasification unit, focussing on chipped rhododendron, Japanese larch and common ash feedstocks. Preliminary results of these experiments will be presented. The biochars produced are being subjected to a range of physical and chemical analyses. Levels of micro- and macro-nutrients retained from the original feedstocks are being evaluated. Organic and inorganic contaminants are also being compared with those in the respective feedstocks. Biochar produced from R. ponticum comprised C 63.7-85.9%, H 0.4-0.8%, N 0.4-0.8%, S 0.27-1.79% and O 4.1-27.4%, with most of the mineral nutrients being retained from the original feedstock, especially Mn. Larch biochar comprised C 84.1-91.7%, H 1.8-3.1%, N 0.3-0.8%, S 0.42-0.69% and O 4.1-10.7%. Heavy-metal concentrations were below recommended limits (International Biochar Initiative, 2012), although R. ponticum growing on highly acidified soils showed some tendency to bio

  9. Green tea as an effective antimicrobial for urinary tract infections caused by Escherichia coli

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wanda eReygaert

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Urinary tract infections (UTIs are a very most common type of infection worldwide, and result in billions of dollars in medical care costs. Escherichia coli is the infective agent for 80%-90% of all UTIs. Green tea, derived from leaves of the Camellia sinensis plant has been shown to have various potential health benefits (e.g. cardiovascular disease and cancer. The major beneficial components of green tea have been characterized, and are now known to be polyphenolic catechins. The main catechins in green tea are (--epicatechin-3-gallate (ECG, (--epigallocatechin (EGC, (--epicatechin (EC, and (--epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG. EGCG and EGC have been shown to have antimicrobial effects, but only EGC has been shown to be excreted in urine. Isolates of E. coli from urinary tract infections collected between 2007-2008 were characterized for antimicrobial resistance to standard drugs. Then 80 of these isolates, representing a wide spectrum of antimicrobial susceptibility patterns, were selected for testing using an extract of green tea.Results: The concentrations of green tea extract tested were 0, 2.5, 3.0, 3.5, and 4.0 mg/ml. All of the strains tested, except one, had MICs of ≤4.0 mg/ml, with 40% of the isolates having an MIC of ≤2.5 mg/ml, 36% of the isolates having an MIC of ≤3.0 mg/ml, 18% of the isolates having an MIC of ≤3.5 mg/ml, and 5% of the isolates having an MIC of ≤4.0 mg/ml. Two control strains varied in susceptibility, one having an MIC of ≤2.5 mg/ml, another having an MIC of ≤3.5 mg/ml, and the third having an MIC of ≤4.0 mg/ml.Conclusion: Since EGC has been shown to have antimicrobial effects on E. coli, and EGC has been shown to be excreted in the urine in a high enough concentration to potentially be effective as an antimicrobial; these MIC results suggest that ingesting green tea could have potential antimicrobial effects on urinary tract infections caused by E. coli.

  10. Helicobacter pylori (H.p. Infection: A possible cause of Chronic Idiopathic Urticaria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amer Abu El ­ Enin*, Abd El-Wahab Fathe** Mohamed Khedr

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Chronic idiopathic urticaria (CIU is one of the most frequent skin diseases with an incidence ranging from 1.2% to 23% , however its causes remains unknown in the vast majority of cases. A possible relationship between chronic urticaria and Helicobacter pylori (H.p. has been recently suggested. The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of Helicobacter pylori(H.P. infection in patients with C.I.U. and to investigates the effectiveness of eradication therapy of (H.p. infection on this skin disease. 100 patients (40 males and 60 females with C.I.U as well as 45 apparently healthy (age, sex, matched controls were enrolled in this study underwent serological testing for H.pylori infection with the 13C ­urea test as well as by specific IgG antibodies against the H. pylori (ELISA technique. Positive patients were treated with, Omeprazole ­ Clarithromycin + Amoxicillin for 10 days. Eradication and clinical course were followed up two months after the treatment in comparison to the negative cases as a control group. The clinical evaluation and follow up were demonstrated as worse,. same, less and disappearance of flares. In our results there was significant difference in the sero prevalence of H.pylori infection between idiopathic chronic urticaria patients and healthy subjects. H.pylori was detected in 75% of patients and 20% of controls. Out of 75 patients treated , only 24 showed complete remission of their urticaria after successfully eradicating H.pylori infection ,the others only having some improvement in their symptoms. The mean lgG titer was 86.8 + 42.4 among patients group, where it was 16.+ 42.8 among the control group (p< 0.05 . After treating the positive patients with appropriate antibiotics for 10 days there are a significant decrease of H.P. specific lgG as compared to the negative cases and also bacterium eradication is associated with a remission of urticarial symptoms. as compared to the negative cases. In conclusion

  11. Catheter-related infections caused by Pseudomonas aeruginosa: virulence factors involved and their relationships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olejnickova, Katerina; Hola, Veronika; Ruzicka, Filip

    2014-11-01

    The nosocomial pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa is equipped with a large arsenal of cell-associated and secreted virulence factors which enhance its invasive potential. The complex relationships among virulence determinants have hitherto not been fully elucidated. In the present study, 175 catheter-related isolates were observed for the presence of selected virulence factors, namely extracellular enzymes and siderophore production, biofilm formation, resistance to antibiotics, and motility. A high percentage of the strains produced most of the tested virulence factors. A positive correlation was identified between the production of several exoproducts, and also between the formation of both types of biofilm. An opposite trend was observed between the two types of biofilm and the production of siderophores. Whereas the relationship between the submerged biofilm production (i.e. the biofilm formed on the solid surface below the water level) and the siderophore secretion was negative, the production of air-liquid interface (A-L) biofilm (i.e. the biofilm floating on the surface of the cultivation medium) and the siderophore secretion were positively correlated. All correlations were statistically significant at the level P = 0.05 with the correlation coefficient γ ≥ 0.50. Our results suggest that: (1) the co-production of the lytic enzymes and siderophores can play an important role in the pathogenesis of the catheter-related infections and should be taken into account when the virulence potential is assessed; (2) biofilm-positive strains are capable of forming both submerged and non-attached A-L biofilms; and (3) the different micro-environment in the submerged biofilm and A-L biofilm layers have opposite consequences for the production of other virulence factors. PMID:24842562

  12. Effects of genotypic and phenotypic variation on establishment are important for conservation, invasion, and infection biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forsman, Anders

    2014-01-01

    There is abundant evidence that the probability of successful establishment in novel environments increases with number of individuals in founder groups and with number of repeated introductions. Theory posits that the genotypic and phenotypic variation among individuals should also be important, but few studies have examined whether founder diversity influences establishment independent of propagule pressure, nor whether the effect is model or context dependent. I summarize the results of 18 experimental studies and report on a metaanalysis that provides strong evidence that higher levels of genotypic and phenotypic diversity in founder groups increase establishment success in plants and animals. The effect of diversity is stronger in experiments carried out under natural conditions in the wild than under seminatural or standardized laboratory conditions. The realization that genetic and phenotypic variation is key to successful establishment may improve the outcome of reintroduction and translocation programs used to vitalize or restore declining and extinct populations. Founder diversity may also improve the ability of invasive species to establish and subsequently spread in environments outside of their native community, and enhance the ability of pathogens and parasites to colonize and invade the environment constituted by their hosts. It is argued that exchange of ideas, methodological approaches, and insights of the role of diversity for establishment in different contexts may further our knowledge, vitalize future research, and improve management plans in different disciplines. PMID:24367109

  13. Using MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry as a rapid and accurate diagnostic tool in infective endocarditis: a case report of a patient with mitral valve infective endocarditis caused by Abiotrophia defectiva

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holler, Jon Gitz; Pedersen, Line; Calum, Henrik;

    2011-01-01

    A case of infective endocarditis caused by Abiotrophia defectiva is presented. The use of MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry as a rapid and accurate diagnostic tool in infective endocarditis is discussed.......A case of infective endocarditis caused by Abiotrophia defectiva is presented. The use of MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry as a rapid and accurate diagnostic tool in infective endocarditis is discussed....

  14. Comparison of diagnostic accuracy of non invasive tests for helicobacter pylori infection in children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To compare urea breath and stool antigen in children, with histological diagnosis for Helicobacter pylori (H.pylori) infection. Children between 3 and 15 years of age reporting in pediatric outpatient department with upper gastrointestinal symptoms were included. All the participating children underwent an upper gastrointestinal endoscopy and 3 tests namely: histopathological identification of H. pylori (the traditional gold standard), urea breath test and stool antigen test were carried out on each child. The sensitivity, specificity, and positive predictive values were calculated for each noninvasive test used in the study. A total of 54 patients completed the study with a mean age of 8.2 years. On histological examination, 72% (39) were positive for H. pylori infection. On gross endoscopic examination, only 9 patients had signs of gastritis as compared to 39 histological positives. The sensitivity, specificity and positive predictive value of stool antigen test were: 77%, 73% and 89% respectively whereas the same for urea breath test were: 79%, 80% and 91% respectively. Both the noninvasive tests were found to be sensitive and specific as compared with histological identification, for the diagnosis of H. pylori in our pediatric population. The accuracy of urea breath test was better than the stool antigen test but later was easier to perform and could fulfill the criteria for a rapid bedside diagnostic test. (author)

  15. Caspofungin versus fluconazole as prophylaxis of invasive fungal infection in high-risk liver transplantation recipients: A propensity score analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fortún, Jesús; Muriel, Alfonso; Martín-Dávila, Pilar; Montejo, Miguel; Len, Oscar; Torre-Cisneros, Julian; Carratalá, Jordi; Muñoz, Patricia; Fariñas, Carmen; Moreno, Asunción; Fresco, Gema; Goikoetxea, Josune; Gavaldá, Joan; Pozo, Juan Carlos; Bodro, Marta; Vena, Antonio; Casafont, Fernando; Cervera, Carlos; Silva, José Tiago; Aguado, José M

    2016-04-01

    Targeted prophylaxis has proven to be an efficient strategy in liver transplantation recipients (LTRs). The aim of this study was to compare the effectiveness and safety of caspofungin with that of fluconazole in high-risk (HR) LTRs. Caspofungin and fluconazole were compared in a multicenter, retrospective, cohort study in HR-LTRs in Spain. Outcomes were assessed at 180 days after transplantation. A propensity score approach was applied. During the study period (2005-2012), we analyzed 195 HR-LTRs from 9 hospitals. By type of prophylaxis, 97 patients received caspofungin and 98 received fluconazole. Of a total of 17 (8.7%) global invasive fungal infections (IFIs), breakthrough IFIs accounted for 11 (5.6%) and invasive aspergillosis (IA) accounted for 6 (3.1%). By univariate analysis, no differences were observed in the prevention of global IFIs. However, caspofungin was associated with a significant reduction in the rate of breakthrough IFIs (2.1% versus 9.2%, P = 0.04). In patients requiring dialysis (n = 62), caspofungin significantly reduced the frequency of breakthrough IFIs (P = 0.03). The propensity score analysis confirmed a significant reduction in the frequency of IA in patients receiving caspofungin (absolute risk reduction, 0.06; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.001-0.11; P = 0.044). Linear regression analysis revealed a significant decrease in blood alanine aminotransferase levels and a significant increase in bilirubin levels after administration of caspofungin. Caspofungin and fluconazole have similar efficacy for the prevention of global IFIs in HR-LTRs in this observational, multicenter cohort study. However, caspofungin was associated with a significant reduction of breakthrough IFIs and, after adjusting for confounders, caspofungin was associated with a lower rate of IA. This benefit is probably more favorable in patients on dialysis. Caspofungin is safe in HR-LTRs, although bilirubin levels may be increased. PMID:26709146

  16. Expression of arthritis-causing HLA-B27 on Hela cells promotes induction of c-fos in response to in vitro invasion by Salmonella typhimurium.

    OpenAIRE

    Ikawa, T; Ikeda, M; Yamaguchi, A; Tsai, W.C.; Tamura, N; Seta, N; Trucksess, M; Raybourne, R B; Yu, D T

    1998-01-01

    HLA-B27 confers a very strong genetic predisposition to development of a reactive arthritis after infection by bacteria such as Salmonella typhimurium. This study examines the role of HLA-B27 in the initiation of the earliest host activities after exposure to Salmonella, namely activation of the immediate early genes in the epithelial cells. Our major finding is that in Hela cells, the expression of c-fos was induced by Salmonella invasion only when the cells expressed the transfected HLA-B27...

  17. Oxidative Stress Predicts All-Cause Mortality in HIV-Infected Patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mar Masiá

    Full Text Available We aimed to assess whether oxidative stress is a predictor of mortality in HIV-infected patients.We conducted a nested case-control study in CoRIS, a contemporary, multicentre cohort of HIV-infected patients, antiretroviral-naïve at entry, launched in 2004. Cases were patients who died with available stored plasma samples collected. Two age and sex-matched controls for each case were selected. We measured F2-isoprostanes (F2-IsoPs and malondialdehyde (MDA plasma levels in the first blood sample obtained after cohort engagement.54 cases and 93 controls were included. Median F2-IsoPs and MDA levels were significantly higher in cases than in controls. When adjustment was performed for age, HIV-transmission category, CD4 cell count and HIV viral load at cohort entry, and subclinical inflammation measured with highly-sensitive C-reactive protein (hsCRP, the association of F2-IsoPs with mortality remained significant (adjusted OR per 1 log10 increase, 2.34 [1.23-4.47], P = 0.009. The association of MDA with mortality was attenuated after adjustment: adjusted OR (95% CI per 1 log10 increase, 2.05 [0.91-4.59], P = 0.080. Median hsCRP was also higher in cases, and it also proved to be an independent predictor of mortality in the adjusted analysis: OR (95% CI per 1 log10 increase, 1.39 (1.01-1.91, P = 0.043; and OR (95% CI per 1 log10 increase, 1.46 (1.07-1.99, P = 0.014, respectively, when adjustment included F2-IsoPs and MDA.Oxidative stress is a predictor of all-cause mortality in HIV-infected patients. For plasma F2-IsoPs, this association is independent of HIV-related factors and subclinical inflammation.

  18. Update on infections caused by Stenotrophomonas maltophilia with particular attention to resistance mechanisms and therapeutic options.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Ya-Ting; Lin, Chun-Yu; Chen, Yen-Hsu; Hsueh, Po-Ren

    2015-01-01

    Stenotrophomonas maltophilia is a Gram-negative, biofilm-forming bacterium. Although generally regarded as an organism of low virulence, S. maltophilia is an emerging multi-drug resistant opportunistic pathogen in hospital and community settings, especially among immunocompromised hosts. Risk factors associated with S. maltophilia infection include underlying malignancy, cystic fibrosis, corticosteroid or immunosuppressant therapy, the presence of an indwelling central venous catheter and exposure to broad spectrum antibiotics. In this review, we provide a synthesis of information on current global trends in S. maltophilia pathogenicity as well as updated information on the molecular mechanisms contributing to its resistance to an array of antimicrobial agents. The prevalence of S. maltophilia infection in the general population increased from 0.8-1.4% during 1997-2003 to 1.3-1.68% during 2007-2012. The most important molecular mechanisms contributing to its resistance to antibiotics include β-lactamase production, the expression of Qnr genes, and the presence of class 1 integrons and efflux pumps. Trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole (TMP/SMX) is the antimicrobial drug of choice. Although a few studies have reported increased resistance to TMP/SMX, the majority of studies worldwide show that S. maltophilia continues to be highly susceptible. Drugs with historically good susceptibility results include ceftazidime, ticarcillin-clavulanate, and fluoroquinolones; however, a number of studies show an alarming trend in resistance to those agents. Tetracyclines such as tigecycline, minocycline, and doxycycline are also effective agents and consistently display good activity against S. maltophilia in various geographic regions and across different time periods. Combination therapies, novel agents, and aerosolized forms of antimicrobial drugs are currently being tested for their ability to treat infections caused by this multi-drug resistant organism. PMID:26388847

  19. Plasma Soluble CD163 Level Independently Predicts All-Cause Mortality in HIV-1-Infected Individuals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen, Troels Bygum; Ertner, Gideon; Petersen, Janne;

    2016-01-01

    .35 [95% CI, 1.13-1.63], respectively). CONCLUSIONS:  Plasma sCD163 was an independent marker of all-cause mortality in a cohort of HIV-infected individuals, suggesting that monocyte/macrophage activation may play a role in HIV pathogenesis and be a target of intervention....... immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV). METHODS:  Plasma sCD163 levels were measured in 933 HIV-infected individuals. Hazard ratios (HRs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) associated with mortality were computed by Cox proportional hazards regression. RESULTS:  At baseline, 86% were receiving antiretroviral...... treatment, 73% had plasma a HIV RNA level of <50 copies/mL, and the median CD4(+) T-cell count was 503 cells/µL. During 10.5 years of follow-up, 167 (17.9%) died. Plasma sCD163 levels were higher in nonsurvivors than in survivors (4.92 mg/L [interquartile range {IQR}, 3.29-8.65 mg/L] vs 3.16 mg/L [IQR, 2...

  20. Pathogens Causing Blood Stream Infections and their Drug Susceptibility Profile in Immunocompromised Patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To determine the types of pathogens causing blood stream infections and their drug susceptibility profile in immunocompromised patients. Study Design: Cross-sectional, observational study. Place and Duration of Study: Department of Microbiology, Armed Forces Institute of Pathology, Rawalpindi, from January to September 2012. Methodology: Blood culture bottles received from immunocompromised patients were dealt by two methods, brain heart infusion (BHI) broth based manual method and automated BACTEC system. The samples yielding positive growth from either of two methods were further analyzed. The identification of isolates was done with the help of biochemical reactions and rapid tests. Antimicrobial susceptibility of the isolates was carried out as per recommendations of Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI). Results: Out of the 938 blood culture specimens received from immunocompromised patients, 188 (20%) yielded positive growth. Out of these, 89 (47.3%) isolates were Gram positive and Gram negative each, while 10 (5.3%) isolates were fungi (Candida spp.). In case of Gram positive isolates, 75 (84.3%) were Staphylococcus spp. and 51 (67%) were Methicillin resistant. Amongst Gram negative group 49 (55.1%) isolates were of enterobacteriaceae family, while 40 (44.9%) were non-lactose fermenters (NLF). In vitro antimicrobial susceptibility of Staphylococci revealed 100% susceptibility to vancomycin and linezolid. The enterobacteriaceae isolates had better susceptibility against amikacin 85.7% compared to tigecycline 61.2% and imipenem 59.2%. For NLF, the in vitro efficacy of aminoglycosides was 72.5%. Conclusion: The frequency of Gram positive and Gram negative organisms causing blood stream infections in immunocompromised patients was equal. Vancomycin in case of Gram positive and amikacin for Gram negative organisms revealed better in vitro efficacy as compared to other antibiotics. (author)

  1. Posaconazole: A New Agent for the Prevention and Management of Severe, Refractory or Invasive Fungal Infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea V Page

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Posaconazole is the newest antifungal agent to be approved for use in Canada. With excellent in vitro activity against a broad spectrum of yeasts and filamentous fungi, as well as having a well-tolerated oral formulation, posaconazole offers many potential advantages. Of particular interest are its seemingly lower potential for cross-resistance with other azoles and its activity (unique among oral antifungal agents against the zygomycetes. As the incidence of both common and uncommon fungal infections increases commensurate with the growing population of immunocompromised individuals, posaconazole may ultimately become an important therapeutic option. The present article reviews the in vitro and in vivo data describing its activity, and focuses on both the proven and the potential clinical applications of this new triazole agent.

  2. First report of a root and crown disease of the invasive weed Lepidium draba caused by Phoma macrostoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    The exotic rangeland perennial Lepidium draba occurs as a noxious weed in 22 states, mostly in the western U. S. Because chemical control measures against this invasive perennial have not achieved satisfactory results, biological control is being pursued. While inventories of arthropods that feed on...

  3. Fetal infection from rubeovirus or cytomegalovirus: correlation among maternal serological profiles, invasive diagnostic procedures, and long-term follow-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noia, G; Masini, L; De Santis, M; Scavo, M; Pomini, F; Grillo, R; Cattani, P; Ranno, O; Caruso, A; Mancuso, S

    1998-01-01

    Different variables influence the possibility that maternal viral infection may be transmitted to the fetus, although not all fetal infections result in fetal "illness" with consequent fetopathy. As concerns the fetus, prenatal diagnosis includes invasive techniques necessary for fetal tissue sampling. These techniques carry some risks. The fetal infectious risk, as determined by maternal clinico-serological profile and according to sonographic investigation, always should be weighed against the risks and benefits of invasive diagnostic procedures. The present study re-elaborates the criteria necessary for defining fetal risk as related to the maternal serological profile. In the 26 mothers with rubeola infection, the incidence of fetal mortality was 7.7%. Fetal prognosis worsens with the precocity of eruption. In these cases the esantema is the most reliable prognostic element as an indication to perform the invasive procedure. In the 15 patients with cytomegalovirus infection, no fetal or postnatal losses occurred. Morbidity occurred in 13.3% of cases, and the two ill fetuses were classified in the same risk group. In this group of patients, the maternal serological profile is a significant predictor of fetal morbidity. PMID:9502669

  4. Is Helicobacter pylori Infection the Primary Cause of Duodenal Ulceration or a Secondary Factor? A Review of the Evidence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vikram Kate

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori has a role in the multifactorial etiology of peptic ulcer disease. A link between H. pylori infection and duodenal ulcer disease is now established. Other contributing factors and their interaction with the organism may initiate the ulcerative process. The fact that eradication of H. pylori infection leads to a long-term cure in the majority of duodenal ulcer patients and the fact that the prevalence of infection is higher in ulcer patients than in the normal population are cogent arguments in favor of it being the primary cause of the ulceration. Against this concept there are issues that need explanation such as the reason why only a minority of infected persons develop duodenal ulceration when infection with H. pylori is widespread. There is evidence that H. pylori infection has been prevalent for several centuries, yet duodenal ulceration became common at the beginning of the twentieth century. The prevalence of duodenal ulceration is not higher in countries with a high prevalence of H. pylori infection. This paper debate puts forth the point of view of two groups of workers in this field whether H. pylori infection is the primary cause of duodenal ulcer disease or a secondary factor.

  5. Mammalian cell invasion and intracellular trafficking by Trypanosoma cruzi infective forms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renato A. Mortara

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available Trypanosoma cruzi, the etiological agent of Chagas’ disease, occurs as different strains or isolates that may be grouped in two major phylogenetic lineages: T. cruzi I, associated with the sylvatic cycle and T. cruzi II, linked to the human disease. In the mammalian host the parasite has to invade cells and many studies implicated the flagellated trypomastigotes in this process. Several parasite surface components and some of host cell receptors with which they interact have been identified. Our work focused on how amastigotes, usually found growing in the cytoplasm, can invade mammalian cells with infectivities comparable to that of trypomastigotes. We found differences in cellular responses induced by amastigotes and trypomastigotes regarding cytoskeletal components and actin-rich projections. Extracellularly generated amastigotes of T. cruzi I strains may display greater infectivity than metacyclic trypomastigotes towards cultured cell lines as well as target cells that have modified expression of different classes of cellular components. Cultured host cells harboring the bacterium Coxiella burnetii allowed us to gain new insights into the trafficking properties of the different infective forms of T. cruzi, disclosing unexpected requirements for the parasite to transit between the parasitophorous vacuole to its final destination in the host cell cytoplasm.O agente etiológico da doença de Chagas, Trypanosoma cruzi, ocorre como cepas ou isolados que podem ser agrupados em duas grandes linhagens filogenéticas: T. cruzi I associada ao ciclo silvestre e T. cruzi II ligada à doençahumana. No hospedeiro mamífero o parasita tem que invadir células, e vários estudos relacionam as formas flageladas tripomastigotas neste processo. Diferentes componentes de superfície dos parasitas e alguns dos respectivos receptores foram identificados. Em nosso trabalho temos procurado compreender como amastigotas, que normalmente são encontrados crescendo

  6. Economic evaluation of a preemptive treatment strategy for invasive fungal infection in neutropenic patients with hematological diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimura, S-I; Murata, T; Akahoshi, Y; Nakano, H; Ugai, T; Wada, H; Yamasaki, R; Ishihara, Y; Kawamura, K; Sakamoto, K; Ashizawa, M; Sato, M; Terasako-Saito, K; Nakasone, H; Kikuchi, M; Yamazaki, R; Kako, S; Kanda, J; Tanihara, A; Nishida, J; Kanda, Y

    2015-05-01

    We compared the expected medical costs of empirical and preemptive treatment strategies for invasive fungal infection in neutropenic patients with hematological diseases. Based on the results of two clinical trials with different backgrounds reported by Oshima et al. [J Antimicrob Chemother 60(2):350-355; Oshima study] and Cordonnier et al. [Clin Infect Dis 48(8):1042-1051; PREVERT study], we developed a decision tree model that represented the outcomes of empirical and preemptive treatment strategies, and estimated the expected medical costs of medications and examinations in the two strategies. We assumed that micafungin was started in the empirical group at 5 days after fever had developed, while voriconazole was started in the preemptive group only when certain criteria, such as positive test results of imaging studies and/or serum markers, were fulfilled. When we used an incidence of positive test results of 6.7 % based on the Oshima study, the expected medical costs of the empirical and preemptive groups were 288,198 and 150,280 yen, respectively. Even in the case of the PREVERT study, in which the incidence of positive test results was 32.9 %, the expected medical costs in the empirical and preemptive groups were 291,871 and 284,944 yen, respectively. A sensitivity analysis indicated that the expected medical costs in the preemptive group would exceed those in the empirical group when the incidence of positive test results in the former was over 34.4 %. These results suggest that a preemptive treatment strategy can be expected to reduce medical costs compared with empirical therapy in most clinical settings. PMID:25577175

  7. Bacterial pathogens implicated in causing urinary tract infection (uti and their antimicrobial susceptibility pattern in Ethiopia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Theodros Getachew

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Urinary Tract Infection (UTI is one of the most common infectious disease ranking next to upper respiratory tract infection is the cause of morbidity and mortality in human. They are mostly caused by bacteria. However, studies conducted in Ethiopia are few and are not extensive. Therefore, studying bacterial pathogens causing UTI and their drug susceptibility patterns is of a highest priority. Material & Methods: A total of 3228 urine samples were collected from 2004 to 2009. Fresh midstream urine samples were aseptically collected in sterile containers. Each sample was cultured onto 5% sheep blood agar and CLED agar plates using a calibrated loop, delivering 1ul of the sample. This was incubated at 37° C aerobically overnight. Bacterial isolates were identified using standard biochemical tests and antimicrobial susceptibility pattern was determined using the Kirby ¿ Bauer¿s disk diffusion method followed CLSI guidelines. Result & discussion: From a total of 3228 urine samples significant bacterial growth was obtained from 651 samples. The gram positive and negative bacteria accounted 17.7 % and 80.2% respectively, the rest 2.2 % are yeasts. The majority 475(72.9 of the isolates were from women while the remaining 176 (27.1 were from men. A wide spectrum of uropathogens was isolated, of which 359 (55.1 % were Escherichia coli, 107 (16.4 % Klebsiella species, 66 (10.1 % streptococcus species, 49(7.5% staphylococcus species, 14 (2.2 % citrobacter species, 14 (2.2 % candida species, 13 (2 % enterobacter species, 11 (1.7 % pseudomonas and the rest 2.8% are 5 proteus species, 5 salmonella species, 4 acinetobacter species and 4 M. morganii. Resistance rate to Gram-negative bacilli were 96 % to amoxicilline-clavulanic acid, 66.9 % to tetracycline, 61.4 % to ampicillin, 64.7 % to trimethoprimsulfamethoxazole, 37.6 % to chloramphenicol, 34 % to norfloxacine and 22.4 % to ceftriaxone. Among Gram-positive, 45.1 % were resistant to

  8. Acute respiratory infection and bacteraemia as causes of non-malarial febrile illness in African children: a narrative review.

    OpenAIRE

    Florida Muro; Rita Reyburn; Hugh Reyburn

    2015-01-01

    The replacement of “presumptive treatment for malaria” by “test before treat” strategies for the management of febrile illness is raising awareness of the importance of knowing more about the causes of illness in children who are suspected to have malaria but return a negative parasitological test. The most common cause of non-malarial febrile illness (NMFI) in African children is respiratory tract infection. Whilst the bacterial causes of NMFI are well known, the increasing use of sensitive ...

  9. Invasive fungal infections in AML/MDS patients treated with azacitidine: a risk worth considering antifungal prophylaxis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pomares, Helena; Arnan, Montserrat; Sánchez-Ortega, Isabel; Sureda, Anna; Duarte, Rafael F

    2016-08-01

    The aim of this study is to analyse the risk of invasive fungal infection (IFI) and the need for antifungal prophylaxis in patients with acute myeloid leukaemia and myelodysplastic syndromes (AML/MDS) treated with azacitidine. We retrospectively analysed the incidence of IFI according to EORTC-MSG criteria in 121 consecutive AML/MDS patients receiving 948 azacitidine courses (median 5, range 1-43) between June 2007 and June 2015. Four cases of IFI (two possible, one probable aspergillosis and one proven candidemia) occurred in this series. The incidence rate of proven/probable IFI was 0.21% per treatment cycle and 1.6% per patient treated for the whole series, and 0.73% per treatment cycle and 4.1% per patient treated in those with severe neutropenia. Two patients died from IFI, leading to an IFI-attributable mortality rate of 1.65% per patient and 0.21% per treatment cycle. The numbers needed to treat with prophylaxis to prevent one case of IFI are 238 azacitidine cycles or 30 patients throughout their whole treatment course, and 137 azacitidine cycles or 24 patients among those with severe neutropenia. AML/MDS patients treated with azacitidine, including those with severe prolonged neutropenia, have a very low risk of IFI which does not justify the use of antifungal prophylaxis. PMID:27027972

  10. Risk Factors for Invasive Mold Infections and Implications for Choice of Prophylaxis after Allogeneic Stem Cell Transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blennow, Ola; Remberger, Mats; Törlén, Johan; Szakos, Attila; Ljungman, Per; Mattsson, Jonas

    2016-09-01

    Invasive mold infections (IMIs) are major complications after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) with high mortality. We retrospectively investigated incidence and risk factors for IMI after 797 HSCTs in a center with high autopsy frequency, trying to identify patient groups that would potentially benefit from mold-active prophylaxis. The cumulative 1-year incidence of IMI was 2.1% in patients aged 21 to 40, 7.1% in patients aged 41 to 60, and 16.4% in patients > 60 years of age (P  60). Risk factors for a new IMI in multivariate analysis were older age, grades II to IV acute graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) (risk hazard, 4.1; 95% CI, 1.9 to 8.8; P  40 years of age (P < .001). To conclude, older age is an important risk factor for developing IMIs, and patients < 40 years of age with grade II acute GVHD do not appear to need mold-active prophylaxis unless receiving prolonged treatment with corticosteroids. PMID:27311967

  11. Genetic susceptibility to Candida infections

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smeekens, S.P.; Veerdonk, F.L. van de; Kullberg, B.J.; Netea, M.G.

    2013-01-01

    Candida spp. are medically important fungi causing severe mucosal and life-threatening invasive infections, especially in immunocompromised hosts. However, not all individuals at risk develop Candida infections, and it is believed that genetic variation plays an important role in host susceptibility

  12. CASE-CONTROL STUDY FOR HOSPITAL INFECTIONS CAUSED BY GRAM-NEGATIVE BACILLI IN EMERGENCY INTENSIVE CARE UNIT

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    伍育旗; 余旻; 单红卫; 钱民; 张新黎; 吕晓玲; 程群霞; 杨兴易

    2013-01-01

    <正>Objective To evaluate the potential patient factors associated with hospital infections caused by gram-negative bacilli in Emergency Intensive Care Unit(EICU).Methods A total of 146 patients with hospital infections were investigated.The method of retrospective case-control study and multivariable logistic regression analysis were adopted.Results Univariate analysis revealed relationship among numerous patient factors,and multivariate analysis revealed four factors to be associated independently with hospital infections caused by gram-negative bacilli:mechanical ventilation,corticoid use, length of stay,and coma.Conclusion The comprehensive preventive measures should be taken to deal with the risk factor of hospital infections in EICU.

  13. Challenges in measuring complications and death due to invasive Salmonella infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qamar, Farah Naz; Azmatullah, Asma; Bhutta, Zulfiqar A

    2015-06-19

    Despite the highest burden of Typhoid fever in children globally, exact estimates of morbidity and mortality are lacking due to scarcity of published data. Despite a high prevalence and a socioeconomic burden in developing countries, published data with morbidity and mortality figures are limited especially Africa and South American regions. Data from the community is insufficient and most case fatality estimates are extrapolations from hospital based studies that do not cover all geographical regions, and include cases which may or not be culture confirmed, MDR resistant or sensitive cases, or from mixed populations of age (adults and children). Complications of typhoid such as intestinal perforation, bone marrow suppression, and encephalopathy are dependent on MDR/Fluoroquinolone resistant Salmonella infection, comorbidities such as malnutrition, and health-care access. Data is again insufficient to estimate the true burden of Typhoid Fever in different regions and groups of populations. Although there has been a rapid decline in cases in developed countries with the advent of improved sanitization, timely and easy access to health care and laboratories, this is still not the case in the developing countries where Typhoid deaths are still occurring. The way forward is to develop rapid and cost effective point of care diagnostic tests, put in place validated clinical algorithms for suspected clinical cases, and design prospective, and community based studies in different groups, implement maintenance of electronic health records in large public sector hospitals and regions to identify populations that will benefit most from the implementation of vaccine. Policies on public health education and typhoid vaccine may help to reduce morbidity and mortality due to the disease. PMID:25921727

  14. Enhanced Biofilm Formation and Increased Resistance to Antimicrobial Agents and Bacterial Invasion Are Caused by Synergistic Interactions in Multispecies Biofilms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Burmølle, Mette; Webb, J.S.; Rao, D.;

    2006-01-01

    Most biofilms in their natural environments are likely to consist of consortia of species that influence each other in synergistic and antagonistic manners. However, few reports specifically address interactions within multispecies biofilms. In this study, 17 epiphytic bacterial strains, isolated...... specific interactions. In summary, our data strongly indicate that synergistic effects promote biofilm biomass and resistance of the biofilm to antimicrobial agents and bacterial invasion in multispecies biofilms.......Most biofilms in their natural environments are likely to consist of consortia of species that influence each other in synergistic and antagonistic manners. However, few reports specifically address interactions within multispecies biofilms. In this study, 17 epiphytic bacterial strains, isolated......-species biofilms resisted invasion to a greater extent than did the biofilms formed by the single species. Replacement of each strain by its cell-free culture supernatant suggested that synergy was dependent both on species-specific physical interactions between cells and on extracellular secreted factors or less...

  15. Massive Intrabile Duct Invasion Caused by a Fatal Progression of Colonic Adenocarcinoma: Abdominal Computed Tomography Findings and Cholangiography Correlation

    OpenAIRE

    Rodriguez-Pascual, Jesus; Abbitt, Michael Tyler B; Fernádez, Marisol; Camuñez, Fernando; Pérez-Rodríguez, Francisco José

    2016-01-01

    In this report, we present an unusual case of jaundice in a patient with advanced colorectal cancer due to intraductal tumour invasion of the intra- and extrahepatic biliary tree. This complication proved to be fatal despite aggressive therapeutic management. A correct diagnosis of this type of involvement was achieved by a combination of diagnostic and therapeutic cholangiography. Despite adequate biliary decompression, the patient died from liver failure and biliary sepsis.

  16. Association between invasive cancer of the cervix and HIV-1 infection in Tanzania: the need for dual screening

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ngoma Twalib

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cancer of the cervix is the second commonest malignancy in females worldwide and is the leading malignancy among women in Tanzania. Cancer of the cervix has been strongly associated with Human Papilloma Virus (HPV which is a sexually transmitted disease. However, the role of HIV-1 in the aetiology of cancer of the cervix is less clear. Studies suggest that HPV and HIV-1 infection are synergistic and therefore their dual occurrence may fuel increased incidence of cancer of the cervix and AIDS. We therefore conducted a study to determine the association between cancer of the cervix and HIV-1. Methods The study was carried out in Ocean Road Cancer Institute, Dar-es-salaam, Tanzania between January and March 2007. A hospital-based case control design was used to study 138 cases and 138 controls. The cases were consenting women 18 years and above with histologically confirmed squamous cell carcinoma of the cervix, while the controls were consenting non-cancer adult women attendants or visitors. The participants were counselled and tested for HIV-1 and interviewed to assess risk factors for cancer of the cervix and HIV-1. Estimation of risk was done by computing odds ratios and confidence intervals. Confounding and interaction between the factors were assessed using logistic regression. Results HIV-1 prevalence was much higher among the cases (21.0% than among the controls (11.6%. In logistic regression, HIV-1 was associated with cancer of the cervix (OR = 2.9, 95% CI = 1.4–5.9. Among the cases the mean age was lower for HIV-1 infected (44.3 years than HIV-1 uninfected women (54 years, p = 0.0001. Conclusion HIV-1 infection is associated with invasive cancer of the cervix. Resource-constrained countries with a high burden of HIV-1 and cervical cancer should adopt a high-risk approach that targets HIV-1 positive women for screening of cervical cancer initially by utilizing HIV/AIDS resources.

  17. Pulmonary infections caused by non-tuberculous mycobacteria−single centre experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adžić-Vukičević Tatjana N.

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Non-tuberculosis mycobacteria are environmental organisms found in soil and water worldwide, and an infection caused by non-tuberculosis mycobacteria is less frequently found than the one associated with Mycobacterium tuberculosis. This study was designed to evaluate data relating to non-tuberculosis mycobacteria in patients with clinical importance. Material and Methods. Of 12 patients (pts admitted to the Department of Pulmonology, Clinical Centre of Serbia in Belgrade during 2010- 2011, seven (58.33% were men and five (41.67% were women. Bacteriological and radiographic findings, co−morbidity, treatment management and outcome were evaluated from medical records. Results. Using GenoType® Mycobacterium CM/AS (Hain Lifescience assays for identification of isolated cultures of NTM M.xenopi was found in six (50% pts, M.avium complex in two (16.67% pts, M.kansasii and M.xenopi in one (8.33%, M. gordone, M.abscessus and M.peregrinum in one (8.33% patient each. Cavitary lesions were most frequently determined on high resolution computed tomography in five (41.67% pts, followed with consolidation in two (16.67% pts, cavitation with fibronodular lesions and bronchiectasis in one (8.33% patient each. Comorbidities were noticed in nine (75% pts, with chronic obstructive pulmonary diseases most frequently found in six (50% pts. According to American Thoracic Society definition and criteria, treatment was administered in nine (75% pts. Conclusion. In order to find the right treatment, it is important to identify non-tuberculosis mycobacteria lung infection by culture methods, at least two positive, accompanied with high resolution computed tomography changes.

  18. Microstructural changes of cows’ uterus in an infection caused by Haemophilus somnus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danka Šťastná

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The reproductive form of Haemophilic infection caused by a microorganism Histophilus somni (Haemophilus somnus is in our conditions practically unknown and undiscovered disease of cow reproductive organs. The aim of this work was based on experimental work to provide a comprehensive view on the patho-histological and submicroscopic changes in the uterus of 60 cows, serological positive, crossbreeds Slovenske strakate x Holstein, aged 3.5 . 4.5 years, serological positive, which were up to 90 days after the parturition sterile. After the hormonal control of the oestrus cycle (PGF2ƒż-Oestrophan SPOFA the cows were inseminated and the non-gravid cows later killed. The reproductive organs of killed animals were pathologically . anatomically dissected with following histological and sub-microscopic study of uterus and cervix tissue. At the beginning of the experiment no clinical changes of the reproductive organs of group 1 animals with the titer of antibodies 1:25-100 were diagnosed and in group 3 with the titer 1:25. At an examination before killing were examined endometritis (EM of grade II. and vaginitis with vestibulitis in these groups. At the rest of animals appeared in every level of the titer of antibodies of EM II. and EM III. EM I. were not clinically diagnosed. Dissecting examination determined EM catarrhalis and cervicis catarrhalis in all groups. The histological examination pointed to EM catarrhalis chronica, EM interstitialis chronica, EM fibrousis and cervicis catarrhalis chronica. The leucocytes gained from a uterus lavage were in a comparison with stroma leucocytes mostly polynuclear (neutrophils and in smaller amount small forms of lymfocytes. At long-term sterility of cows, because of possible H. somnus infection, we regard as priority the serodiagnostics at which is taken into consideration any level of the titer of antibodies.

  19. Successful treatment of periprosthetic joint infection caused by Granulicatella para-adiacens with prosthesis retention: a case report

    OpenAIRE

    Renz, Nora; Chevaux, Fabienne; Borens, Olivier; Trampuz, Andrej

    2016-01-01

    Background Granulicatella and Abiotrophia spp. are difficult to detect due to their complex nutritional requirements. Infections with these organisms are associated with high treatment failure rates. We report the first implant-associated infection caused by Granulicatella para-adiacens, which was cured with anti-microbial treatment consisting of anti-biofilm-active rifampin and debridement, exchange of mobile parts and retention of the prosthesis. Case presentation Patient with a history of ...

  20. Oral Amoxicillin-Clavulanic Acid Treatment in Urinary Tract Infections Caused by Extended-Spectrum Beta-Lactamase–Producing Organisms

    OpenAIRE

    Beytur, Ali; Yakupogullari, Yusuf; Oguz, Fatih; Otlu, Baris; Kaysadu, Halim

    2014-01-01

    Background: Extended-spectrum β-lactamases (ESBLs) are increasing problems. The involvement of ESBL-producing organisms is associated with higher rates of carbapenem usage in urinary tract infections (UTIs). Though some strains are susceptible to amoxicillin-clavulanic acid (AMC) in vitro, there is very less data about the consequences of AMC usage for such infections. Objectives: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the clinical and microbiological outcomes of AMC treatment in UTIs caus...

  1. Nalidixic acid resistant Salmonella paratyphi A causing urinary tract infection in a patient with nephrolithiasis: case report

    OpenAIRE

    Sarika Jain; Shamma Arora; Rumpa Saha; Kaur, Iqbal R.

    2011-01-01

    Salmonella urinary tract infections (UTIs) are unusual and occur most often in infants and those over 60 years. S. paratyphi has been reported extremely rarely as a cause of UTI. Recovery of S. typhi is also rare from urine and can occur following a recent episode of typhoid fever, or in chronic carrier states involving the urinary system, and occasionally following localized UTI due to S. typhi. Studies have reported 0.07% of urinary tract infections diagnosed in 15 year duration...

  2. Variant of X-Linked Chronic Granulomatous Disease Revealed by a Severe Burkholderia cepacia Invasive Infection in an Infant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saul Oswaldo Lugo Reyes

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Chronic granulomatous disease (CGD is a primary immunodeficiency characterized by increased susceptibility to bacteria and fungi since early in life, caused by mutations in any of the five genes coding for protein subunits in NADPH oxidase. X-linked variant CGD can be missed during routine evaluation or present later in life due to hypomorphic mutations and a residual superoxide production. The case of a 10-month-old boy who died of pneumonia is reported. The isolation of Burkholderia cepacia from his lung, together with a marginally low nitroblue tetrazolium reduction assay (NBT, made us suspect and pursue the molecular diagnosis of CGD. A postmortem genetic analysis finally demonstrated CGD caused by a hypomorphic missense mutation with normal gp91phox expression. In a patient being investigated for unusually severe or recurrent infection, a high index of suspicion of immunodeficiency must be maintained.

  3. Clinical analysis on neonatal invasive fungal infections%新生儿侵袭性真菌感染临床分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    宋娟; 尚利宏; 董慧芳

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To analyze clinical features of neonatal invasive fungal infections ,so as to provide a reason-able basis for reasonable diagnosis and treatment .METHODS A total of 76 patients with neonatal invasive fungal infection during Apr .2012 to Apr .2013 were selected .Pathogens of invasive fungal infections ,influencing factors and clinical features were observed and analyzed ,and the outcomes in the laboratory were recorded . RESULTS All the 76 cases of invasive fungal infections were due to Candida albicans .There were 62 cases of premature children with invasive fungal infections ,accounting for 81 .6% ,including 21 very low birth weight infants ,and 9 extremely low birth weight infants .CONCLUSION The primary pathogen of neonatal invasive fungal infections was C .albicans .The occurrence of invasive fungal infections is closely related to children's body status ,primary disease and complications .To regulate the application of antibiotics ,master indications of respira-tor ,and early transit to enteral nutrition are effective measures to prevent neonatal invasive fungal infections .%目的:研究分析新生儿侵袭性真菌感染的临床特征,为合理的诊治提供参考依据。方法选取2012年4月-2013年4月共76例侵袭性真菌感染新生儿的病例,观察并分析侵袭性真菌感染的病原菌、影响因素以及临床表现特征,并记录试验室的转归情况。结果76例新生儿侵袭性真菌感染均为假丝酵母菌属感染,侵袭性真菌感染早产儿62例占81.6%,其中极低出生体质量儿21例,超低出生体质量儿9例。结论新生儿侵袭性真菌感染的病原菌主要是假丝酵母菌属感染,侵袭性真菌感染的发生,与患儿的机体状态、原发病以及并发症有密切的联系;规范抗菌药物的应用、掌握呼吸机应用指征以及尽早过渡至肠内营养等,均是预防新生儿侵袭性真菌感染的有效措施。

  4. 侵袭性肺部真菌感染危险因素分析%Investigation of risk factors of 120 cases of invasive pulmonary fungal infections

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵娜; 陈虹; 陶娟

    2012-01-01

    目的 探讨分析医院住院病人侵袭性肺部真菌感染的危险因素.方法 采用病例回顾性研究,系统阅读并分析120例病人肺部真菌感染的资料.对真菌感染组和非真菌感染组的临床特点进行比较,然后对有统计学意义的可能危险因素进行多因素Logistic回归分析,找出呼吸道真菌感染的主要危险因素.结果 真菌感染组的平均住院时间、平均使用广谱抗生素时间均长于非真菌感染组;真菌感染组糖皮质激素、体内保留导管、有创机械通气使用率均高于非真菌感染组;真菌感染组恶性肿瘤、肺结核患病率均高于非真菌感染组;真菌感染组的白蛋白及血红蛋白水平均低于非真菌感染组.再经多因素Logistic回归分析显示,长期使用广谱抗生素、糖皮质激素、低蛋白血症、有创机械通气,恶性肿瘤,肺结核是真菌感染的独立危险因素.结论 长期使用广谱抗生素、糖皮质激素、低蛋白血症、有创机械通气、恶性肿瘤、肺结核是真菌感染的独立危险因素.有效控制相关患病危险因素,可能是防治呼吸道真菌感染的关键.%Objective To study the risk factors of the invasive pulmonary fungal infections. Methods Using the method of the case-control study, reading and analyzing the information of pulmonary fungal infection. To compare the clinical features between the fungal infection group and non-fungal infection group, then there is the possibility of significant risk factors for multivariate Logistic regression analysis to identify the major risk factors of respiratory fungal infection. Results The average length of stay and the average time of using broad-spectrum antibiotics of fungal infection group were longer than those of non-fungal infection groupi glucocorticoid hormones, the body retained catheters, invasive mechanical ventilation utilization rates of fungal infection group were higher than those of non-fungal infection

  5. Impact of heterophil granulocyte depletion caused by 5-fluorouracil on infectious bursal disease virus infection in specific pathogen free chickens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kabell, Susanne; Igyarto, Botond-Zoltan; Magyar, Attila; Hajdu, Zoltan; Biro, Eva; Bisgaard, Magne; Olah, Imre

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the influence of the cytostatic drug, 5-fluorouracil (5-FU), which causes depletion of heterophil granulocytes, on clinical symptoms and histological lesions during the progress of infectious bursal disease virus ( IBDV) infection in chickens. The aim...... were inoculated with the classical IBDV strain F52/70. Bursae of Fabricius were sampled at fixed intervals, and the progress of the infection was monitored by various histological techniques and reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). We found correlation between histological...... observations and RT-PCR results. In the 5-FU pretreated chickens, IBDV caused only mild clinical symptoms, even though histological alterations similar to alterations caused by IBDV were still observed. The 5-FU pretreatment resulted in severe heterophil granulocyte depletion by days 2 and 3 after infection...

  6. Molecular characterization of Staphylococcus aureus isolates causing skin and soft tissue infections (SSTIs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Xue-qing

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Staphylococcus aureus, particularly methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA, is an important cause of pyogenic skin and soft tissue infections (SSTIs. The aim of present study is to investigate the molecular characteristic of Staphylococcus aureus isolates isolated from the pus samples from the patients with purulent skin and soft tissue infections in Wenzhou, China. Methods Between December 2002 and June 2008, a total of 111 nonduplicate S. aureus isolates were collected from the pus samples of the patients with SSTIs in a teaching hospital in Wenzhou, China. All the tested isolates were confirmed as S. aureus using a Staph SPA agglutination kit, Gram's stain and a Vitek-60 microbiology analyzer. The homology among the tested isolates was determined by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE. Multilocus sequence typing (MLST was used to determine the sequence types (STs of the selected isolates. The genotypes of SCCmec were determined by a multiplex PCR in the MRSA isolates. Panton-Valentine leukocidin (PVL genes and mecA were also determined by another multiplex PCR. Results Among the 111 S. aureus isolates, 48 and 63 isolates were community-acquired and hospital-acquired respectively. Sixty isolates were confirmed as MRSA harboring mecA detected by PCR. A total of 32 PFGE clonal types were obtained by PFGE, with 10 predominant patterns (types A to J. Twenty-five different STs including ST398 and three novel STs were found among 51 selected isolates. The main STs were ST239, ST1018, ST59, ST7 and ST88. Of 60 MRSA isolates, SCCmec II, III, IV and SCCmec V were found in three, 50, three and two isolates, respectively. The positive rates of PVL genes in overall isolates, HA-isolates, CA-isolates, MRSA isolates and MSSA isolates were 23.4% (26/111, 20.6% (13/63, 27.1% (13/48, 21.7% (13/60 and 25.5% (13/51, respectively. Eight (33.3%, 8/24 of 24 CA-MRSA isolates and 5 (13.9%, 5/36 of 36 HA-MRSA isolates were positive for PVL genes

  7. [Microbiological approach to a possible infective endocarditis case caused by Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gürcan, Şaban; Ünlü, Selahattin; Kuloğlu, Figen; Karadenizli, Aynur; Kuşkucu, Mert Ahmet

    2016-04-01

    Aggregatibacter (Actinobacillus) actinomycetemcomitans, a small, gram-negative coccobacillus that grows slow and fastidious, is generally colonized in the oral cavity. It is a rarely seen bacterium because of the difficulty of isolation but it can be a causative agent for dental infections and infective endocarditis (IE) particularly in the persons having prosthetic heart valves. In this report, a possible IE case caused by A.actinomycetemcomitans in a patient with aortic valve replacement has been presented. A 36-year-old man has admitted to Trakya University Hospital, Health Center for Medical Research and Practice, with the complaints of chills, malaise, intermittent fever, severe arthralgia and weight loss (20 kg). During his follow-up period, the blood cultures that were obtained three week intervals yielded the identical gram-negative coccobacilli morphology. The patient was then diagnosed as possible IE on the basis of having one major (growth of the typical microorganisms that may cause IE in two different blood cultures) and two minor (presence of prosthetic valve and high fever) criterias. The isolate could not be identified with conventional methods, while it was identified as Francisella tularensis with VITEK 2 (bioMerieux, France) system. Hence this identification was not confirmed by real-time Taqman polymerase chain reaction, so MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry was used to identify this bacteria. In the first run of the study, the isolate was named as Shigella dysenteriae initially, however when it was retested the next day it was identified as A.actinomycetemcomitans. In order to enlighten these conflicting results, 16S and 23S ribosomal DNA sequence analysis was performed, and consequently the bacterium was identified as A.actinomycetemcomitans. Doxycycline (2 x 100 mg po, 20 days) and streptomycin (2 x 10 mg/kg im, 10 days) therapy were initiated, considering the initial suspicious identification (F.tularensis), and on the fifth day of therapy the

  8. Hyaluronidase from infective Ancylostoma hookworm larvae and its possible function as a virulence factor in tissue invasion and in cutaneous larva migrans.

    OpenAIRE

    Hotez, P. J.; Narasimhan, S; HAGGERTY, J; Milstone, L; Bhopale, V; Schad, G A; Richards, F F

    1992-01-01

    During skin penetration, infective hookworm larvae encounter hyaluronic acid as they migrate between epidermal keratinocytes and through the ground substance of the dermis. A hyaluronidase would facilitate passage through the epidermis and dermis during larval invasion. Zoonotic hookworm larvae of the genus Ancylostoma were shown to contain a hyaluronidase activity that migrated on modified sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) hyaluronic acid gels with an appar...

  9. Comparison of Three Distinct Prophylactic Agents Against Invasive Fungal Infections in Patients Undergoing Haplo-identical Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation and Post-transplant Cyclophosphamide

    OpenAIRE

    El-Cheikh, Jean; Crocchiolo, Roberto; Vai, Andrea; Furst, Sabine; Bramanti, Stefania; Sarina, Barbara; Granata, Angela; Faucher, Catherine; Mohty, Bilal; Harbi, Samia; Bouabdallah, Reda; Vey, Norbert; Santoro, Armando; Chabannon, Christian; Castagna, Luca

    2015-01-01

    Over the past decade, invasive fungal infections (IFIs) have remained an important problem in patients undergoing allogeneic haematopoietic stem cell transplantation (Allo-HSCT). The optimal approach for prophylactic antifungal therapy has yet to bedetermined. We conducted a retrospective analysis, comparing the safety and efficacy of micafungin 50mg/day vs. fluconazole 400mg/day vs. itraconazole 200mg/day as prophylaxis for adult patients with various haematological diseases receiving haploi...

  10. Effectiveness of 7-Valent Pneumococcal Conjugate Vaccine Against Invasive Pneumococcal Disease in HIV-Infected and -Uninfected Children in South Africa: A Matched Case-Control Study

    OpenAIRE

    Fortuin-de Smit, Melony; Madhi, Shabir A.; O'Brien, Katherine L.; Zell, Elizabeth R; Whitney, Cynthia G.; Moore, David; Verwey, Charl; Varughese, Sheeba; Archary, Moherndran; Naby, Fathima; Dawood, Khathija; Naidoo, Ramola; Elliott, Gene; Hallbauer, Ute; Eley, Brian

    2014-01-01

    Background.  South Africa introduced 7-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV7) in April 2009 using a 2 + 1 schedule (6 and 14 weeks and 9 months). We estimated the effectiveness of ≥2 PCV7 doses against invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD) in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)–infected and -uninfected children. Methods.  IPD (pneumococcus identified from a normally sterile site) cases were identified through national laboratory-based surveillance. Specimens were serotyped by Quellung or p...

  11. 101 Cases of Clinical analysis of invasive fungal infections on Hematology%恶性血液病侵袭性真菌感染101例

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    关建民; 桑艳芳; 徐华

    2015-01-01

    Objective To explore the clinical situation of invasive fungal infections merge Hematology.Methods Reviewing analysis of clinical material blood word 101 example malignant nosohemia merge invasive fungal infections. Results Separating the infection spot by the respiratory tract primarily, occupies 57.80%, the fungus type for the white rayon saccharomycetes host, occupies 34.65%. Conclusion Must take in the hospital the fungal infections, through strengthens the fungus the examination and the analysis to prevents with the control courtyard in the fungal infections, the instruction clinical reasonable medication has the important meaning.%目的 探讨恶性血液病合并侵袭性真菌感染的情况.方法 回顾101例恶性血液病合并侵袭性真菌感染患者的临床资料.结果 分离到真菌株,感染部位以呼吸道为主,占57.80%;真菌种类以白色念珠菌为主,占34.65%.结论 应当高度重视恶性血液病合并侵袭性真菌感染,通过加强对真菌的检测和分析对指导临床预防性和经验性治疗有重要意义.

  12. 金黄色葡萄球菌医院感染的临床分析%Clinical Analysis of Nosocomial Infection Caused by Staphylococcus Aureus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨榕源; 叶小玲

    2015-01-01

    目的:分析由金黄色葡萄球菌导致的医院感染的临床特点和耐药特征。方法分析导致该院67例患者发生医院感染的危险因素及耐药特点,采用全自动细菌鉴定仪对分离的金黄色葡萄球菌菌株进行鉴定,采用纸片扩散法(K-B法)进行药物敏感性试验。结果67例医院感染患者共分离出75株金黄色葡萄球菌,其中包括61株耐甲氧西林金黄色葡萄球菌和14株甲氧西林敏感金黄色葡萄球菌。耐甲氧西林金黄色葡萄球菌的耐药性明显高于甲氧西林敏感金黄色葡萄球菌(P<0.05)。67例患者均存在严重的基础疾病,其中59例患者临床治疗接受过侵入性操作,发生感染的部位主要为肺部。结论金黄色葡萄球菌医院感染的发病群体主要为病情严重,接受过侵入性操作治疗的患者,感染部位主要为肺部,耐甲氧西林金黄色葡萄球菌对对数抗菌药物具有高耐药性。%Objective To analyze the clinical characteristics of nosocomial infections caused by Staphylococcus aureus and the resistance characteristics of Staphylococcus aureus.Methods The resistance characteristics of Staphylococcus aureus and the risk factors that caused the nosocomial infections in 67 patients of our hospital were analyzed. The automated bacterial identification system was used to identify separated Staphylococcus aureus strains. Drug sensitivity test was conducted by disk diffusion technique (K-B method).Results 75 Staphylococcus aureus were separated from 67 patients with nosocomial infections, including 61 methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus and 14 methicillin-sensitive Staphylococcus aureus. Resistance of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus was significantly higher than that of methicillin-sensitive Staphylococcus aureus (P <0.05). Underlying diseases were found in 67 patients , among them, 59 patients with Pulmonary infection had received invasive operation during clinical

  13. An unusual infection of cervicofacial area caused by dental pathology: flesh-eating syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozdinc, Serife; Unlu, Ebru; Oruc, Oya; User, Nese Nur; Karakaya, Zeynep

    2015-10-01

    Necrotizing fasciitis (NF) of the cervicofacial area is highly rare, but physicians should be familiar with the presentation of this situation owing to the suddenness of its beginning, the rapidness of its spread, and ending with high mortality and morbidity. In this article, 5 patients with NF admitted to emergency department with dental pathology history were discussed with a review of the literature. The purpose of this case series is to raise awareness about NF of the cervicofacial area caused by dental pathologies. Five patients admitted to our emergency department between January 2012 and March 2015 and diagnosed as having cervicofacial NF were identified. All patients had dental pathologies. The parameters of the study were patients' age, sex, complaints, self- and family histories, physical examinations' findings, routine laboratory-computed tomographic findings, treatment, and complications. Two of the patients were older than 70 years. One of the patients was healthy but he lost time because of an inappropriate treatment. These 3 patients died. The remaining patients were discharged at the end of the prolonged and intensive treatment. Necrotizing fasciitis should always be remembered in the diagnosis of the infection of the cervicofacial area. Because of difficulty in its diagnosis, a delay in the treatment may result in a horrific outcome. PMID:26298055

  14. Outcome of Severe Dengue Viral Infection-caused Acute Liver Failure in Thai Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laoprasopwattana, Kamolwish; Jundee, Puthachat; Pruekprasert, Pornpimol; Geater, Alan

    2016-06-01

    To determine clinical course and outcomes of liver functions in children with dengue viral infection-caused acute liver failure (ALF), the records of patients aged dengue hemorrhagic fever grade II, III and IV, respectively. Multiorgan failure including respiratory failure, massive bleeding and acute kidney injury occurred in 80.0%, 96.0% and 84.0% of the ALF cases, respectively, with an overall fatality rate of 68.3%. Aspartate aminotransferase (AST) and alanine aminotransferase (ALT) levels were highest on the day that the patient developed ALF. Lactate dehydrogenase levels had positive correlations with AST (r = 0.95) and ALT (r = 0.87) (all p < 0.01). The median (interquartile range) days before the AST and ALT levels returned to lower than 200 U/L after the ALF were 10.5 (8.8, 12.8) and 10.5 (7.8, 14.0) days, respectively. PMID:26851434

  15. Randomized Trial of Micafungin for the Prevention of Invasive Fungal Infection in High-Risk Liver Transplant Recipients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saliba, Faouzi; Pascher, Andreas; Cointault, Olivier; Laterre, Pierre-François; Cervera, Carlos; De Waele, Jan J.; Cillo, Umberto; Langer, Róbert M.; Lugano, Manuela; Göran-Ericzon, Bo; Phillips, Stephen; Tweddle, Lorraine; Karas, Andreas; Brown, Malcolm; Fischer, Lutz; Pratschke, Johann; Decruyenaere, Johan; De Waele, Jan J.; Laterre, Pierre-François; Moreno, Christophe; Michielsen, Peter; Cointault, Olivier; Fischer, Lutz; Neuhaus, Peter; Pascher, Andreas; Schemmer, Peter; Cervera, Carlos; Varo, Evaristo; Montejo, Miguel; Bouza, Emilio; Blanes, Marino; De La Torre, Julián; Fortun, Jesus; Saliba, Faouzi; Rostaing, Lionel; Paugam-Burtz, Catherine; Eyraud, Daniel; Shah, Tahir; Heaton, Nigel; Langer, Róbert M.; McCormick, Aiden; Cillo, Umberto; Salizzoni, Mauro; Lugano, Manuela; De Gasperi, Andrea; Tomé, Luís; Daniel, Jorge; Popescu, Irinel; Moysyuk, Yan G.; Chzhao, Alexey V.; Zagaynov, Vladimir E.; Ericzon, Bo-Göran

    2015-01-01

    Background. Invasive fungal infection (IFI) following liver transplant is associated with significant morbidity and mortality. Antifungal prophylaxis is rational for liver transplant patients at high IFI risk. Methods. In this open-label, noninferiority study, patients were randomized 1:1 to receive intravenous micafungin 100 mg or center-specific standard care (fluconazole, liposomal amphotericin B, or caspofungin) posttransplant. The primary endpoint was clinical success (absence of a proven/probable IFI and no need for additional antifungals) at end of prophylaxis (EOP). Noninferiority (10% margin) of micafungin vs standard care was assessed in the per protocol and full analysis sets. Safety assessments included adverse events and liver and kidney function tests. Results. The full analysis set comprised 344 patients (172 micafungin; 172 standard care). Mean age was 51.2 years; 48.0% had a Model for End-Stage Liver Disease score ≥20. At EOP (mean treatment duration, 17 days), clinical success was 98.6% for micafungin and 99.3% for standard care (Δ standard care – micafungin [95% confidence interval], 0.7% [−2.7% to 4.4%]) in the per protocol set and 96.5% and 93.6%, respectively (−2.9% [−8.0% to 1.9%]), in the full analysis set. Incidences of drug-related adverse events for micafungin and standard care were 11.6% and 16.3%, leading to discontinuation in 6.4% and 11.6% of cases, respectively. At EOP, liver function tests were similar but creatinine clearance was higher in micafungin- vs standard care–treated patients. Conclusions. Micafungin was noninferior to standard care as antifungal prophylaxis in liver transplant patients at high risk for IFI. Adverse event profiles and liver function at EOP were similar, although kidney function was better with micafungin. Clinical Trials Registration. NCT01058174. PMID:25520332

  16. Invasive fungal infection in patients receiving chemotherapy for hematological malignancy: a multicenter, prospective, observational study in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yuqian; Huang, He; Chen, Jing; Li, Jianyong; Ma, Jun; Li, Juan; Liang, Yingmin; Wang, Jianmin; Li, Yan; Yu, Kang; Hu, Jianda; Jin, Jie; Wang, Chun; Wu, Depei; Xiao, Yang; Huang, Xiaojun

    2015-02-01

    This stud y examined the epidemiology, risk factors, management, and outcome of invasive fungal infection (IFI) in patients receiving chemotherapy for hematological malignancy in China. IFI risk factors were analyzed using univariate analysis and multivariate logistic regression. In total, 4,192 patients receiving 4,889 chemotherapy courses were enrolled [mean age 40.7 years, 58.4% male, 16.9% children (NHL, 26.3%), and acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL, 20.2%). Severe neutropenia (absolute neutrophil count [ANC] <500/mm(3)) occurred after one third (1,633/4,889, 33.4%) of chemotherapy courses. Incidence of proven/probable IFI was 2.1% per chemotherapy course and higher in patients with myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS, 4.94%), acute hyperleukocytic leukemia (AHL, 4.76%), AML (3.83%), or induction chemotherapy. Risk factors included ANC <500/mm(3) [odds ratio (OR) 3.60], AML or MDS (OR 1.97), induction chemotherapy (OR 2.58), previous IFI (OR 3.08), and being male (OR 1.74). Antifungal agents, prescribed in one quarter (1,211/4,889, 24.8%) of chemotherapy courses, included primary/secondary prophylaxis (n = 827, 16.9%) and/or treatment (n = 655, 13.4%; 86.9 % triazoles), which was empirical (84.3%), pre-emptive (8.6%), or targeted (7.1%). Overall mortality following each chemotherapy course (1.5%) increased in proven/probable (11.7%) and possible IFI (8.2%). In summary, IFI was more common in MDS, AHL, AML, or induction chemotherapy, and substantially increased mortality. Neutropenic patients receiving induction chemotherapy for AML or MDS and those with previous IFI were at particular risk. Antifungal prophylaxis showed an independent protective effect but was not commonly used, even in high-risk patients. By contrast, empiric antifungals were widely used. PMID:25293517

  17. Nalidixic acid resistant Salmonella paratyphi A causing urinary tract infection in a patient with nephrolithiasis: case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarika Jain

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Salmonella urinary tract infections (UTIs are unusual and occur most often in infants and those over 60 years. S. paratyphi has been reported extremely rarely as a cause of UTI. Recovery of S. typhi is also rare from urine and can occur following a recent episode of typhoid fever, or in chronic carrier states involving the urinary system, and occasionally following localized UTI due to S. typhi. Studies have reported 0.07% of urinary tract infections diagnosed in 15 year duration to be due to nontyphoidal salmonella (NTS and 0.24% of organisms cultured from urine were NTS. NTS species isolated from urine include S. enteritidis, S. typhimurium, S. heidelberg, S. infantis, S. newport. Cases of other unusual extra-intestinal infections caused by S. paratyphi A include fulminant hepatic failure, primary septic arthritis of the hip and pleural effusion. Because of its extreme rarity as a uropathogen, and importance of administering appropriate antimicrobial for treating urinary tract infection caused by nalidixic acid resistant and fl uoroquinolone sensitive Salmonella paratyphi A , we report such an infection from India in an elderly man with renal and ureteric stones.

  18. Ventriculoperitoneal shunt-related infections caused by Staphylococcus epidermidis: pathogenesis and implications for treatment.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Stevens, Niall T

    2012-12-01

    The insertion of medical devices, such as intraventricular shunts, is often complicated by infection leading to ventriculitis. Frequently, such infections result from colonisation and subsequent biofilm formation on the surfaces of the shunts by Staphylococcus epidermidis. The pathogenesis of neurosurgical shunt-related infection is complex with interactions between the pathogen, the device and the unique local immunological environment of the central nervous system (CNS). An ability to form biofilm, the main virulence determinant of Staphylococcus epidermidis, facilitates protection of the organism from the host defences while still initiating an immunological response. The presence of the blood brain barrier (BBB) and the biofilm itself also complicates treatment, which presents many challenges when managing shunt infections. A greater understanding of the interplay between S. epidermidis and the CNS could potentially improve the diagnosis, treatment and management of such infections. This review describes the pathogenesis, treatment and implications of S. epidermidis ventriculoperitoneal shunt-related infections, concentrating on recent research and the implications for treatment.

  19. Intra-pleural colistin methanesulfonate therapy for pleural infection caused by carbapenem-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii: a successful case report

    OpenAIRE

    Muhammad Asim Rana; Basheer Abd El Rahaman; Ahmed Fouad Mady; Mohammed Al Odat; Abdurehman Al Harthy; Omar El Sayed Ramadan; Shehzad Ahmad Mumtaz; Omrani, Ali S

    2014-01-01

    Infections caused by carbapenem-resistant, Gram-negative bacteria are an increasing clinical challenge, since the antimicrobial treatment options are often limited to colistin methanesulfonate. No data are available regarding the pharmacokinetics of colistin in pleural fluid. We report the case of a 92-year old man with ventilator-associated pneumonia and pleurisy caused by Acinetobacter baumannii and Escherichia coli, which were both multidrug-resistant. After an unsuccessful treatment with ...

  20. Impact of the introduction of an automated microbiologic system on the clinical outcomes of bloodstream infections caused by Enterobacteriaceae strains

    OpenAIRE

    Luciana Azevedo Callefi; Eduardo Alexandrino Servolo Medeiros; Guilherme Henrique Campos Furtado

    2013-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Enterobacteriaceae strains are a leading cause of bloodstream infections (BSI). The aim of this study is to assess differences in clinical outcomes of patients with BSI caused by Enterobacteriaceae strains before and after introduction of an automated microbiologic system by the microbiology laboratory. METHODS: We conducted a retrospective cohort study aimed to evaluate the impact of the introduction of an automated microbiologic system (Phoenix(tm)...

  1. Topical “Soft Candle” Applications for Infected Diabetic Foot Wounds: A Cause for Concern?

    OpenAIRE

    Cawich, Shamir O; Harnarayan, Patrick; Islam, Shariful; Nahmorah J., Bobb; Budhooram, Steve; Ramsewak, Shivaa; Ramdass, Michael J.; Naraynsingh, Vijay

    2014-01-01

    Aims: There is a cultural barrier to early medical intervention for diabetic foot infections in Trinidad & Tobago, stemming from the strong cultural belief in “soft candle” as effective treatment. We carried out a case-control study to evaluate the outcomes of “soft candle” to treat diabetic foot infections. Methods: All consecutive patients admitted with diabetic foot infections were interviewed to collect data on: demographics, medical history, unhealthy lifestyle markers (exposure to risk ...

  2. Infections Caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis in Recipients of Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation

    OpenAIRE

    KhalidAhmedAl-Anazi; ASMAMAL-JASSER; KhalidAlsaleh

    2014-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M. tuberculosis) infections are uncommon in recipients of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. These infections are 10–40 times commoner in recipients of stem cell transplantation than in the general population but they are 10 times less in stem cell transplantation recipients compared to solid organ transplant recipients. The incidence of M. tuberculosis infections in recipients of allogeneic stem cell transplantation ranges between

  3. STUDIES OF LYMPHOCYTE SUBSETS IN PATIENTS WITH A MIXED INFECTION CAUSED BY THE VIRUSES FROM HERPESVIRIDAE FAMILY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. I. Dolgikh

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Present work deals with specific immunologic changes that are typical to various types of mixed infection caused by viruses from Herpesviridae family during their activation phase. These changes include increased amounts of CD3+/CD25+ lymphocytes and CD3+/CD4+ cells, decreased levels of CD3+/CD95+ cells, increased contents of natural killer cells, altered interrelations between the immune system parameters. Involvement of cytomegalovirus or Epstein-Barr virus (EBV in the mixed infection is associated with some special changes of the lymphocyte subsets. I.e., a co-infection with herpes virus simplex (HSV type 1/2 and cytomegalovirus is characterized by increased amounts of activated T-lymphocytes and T-helper cells, whereas mixed HSV/EBV infection is accompanied by sharp reduction in CD3+/CD95+ lymphocytes.

  4. Assessment of microbiological air quality in hemato-oncology units and its relationship with the occurrence of invasive fungal infections: an integrative review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mayra Goncalves Menegueti

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Worldwide aging of the human population has promoted an increase in the incidence of neoplasia, including hematological cancers, which render patients particularly vulnerable to invasive fungal infections. For this reason, air filtration in hemato-oncology units has been recommended. However, scarce literature has assessed the impact of microbiological air quality on the occurrence of fungal infections in this population. We performed an integrative review of studies in the MEDLINE database that were published between January 1980 and October 2012, using the following combinations of keywords: air × quality × HEPA, air × quality × hematology, and airborne fungal infections. The search yielded only 13 articles, suggesting that high-efficiency filtering of the ambient air in hemato-oncology units can prevent the incidence of invasive fungal infections. However, no randomized clinical trial was found to confirm this suggestion. Currently, there is no consensus about the maximum allowable count of fungi in the air, which complicates filtration monitoring, including filter maintenance and replacement, and needs to be addressed in future studies.

  5. Extraintestinal Infections Caused by Non-toxigenic Vibrio cholerae non-O1/non-O139

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chowdhury, Goutam; Joshi, Sangeeta; Bhattacharya, Sanjay; Sekar, Uma; Birajdar, Balaji; Bhattacharyya, Arpita; Shinoda, Sumio; Ramamurthy, Thandavarayan

    2016-01-01

    Vibrio cholerae is an aerobic, sucrose fermentative Gram-negative bacterium that generally prevails in the environment. Pathogenic V. cholerae is well-known as causative agent of acute diarrhea. Apart from enteric infections, V. cholerae may also cause other diseases. However, their role in causing extraintestinal infections is not fully known as it needs proper identification and evaluation. Four cases of extraintestinal infections due to V. cholerae non-O1/non-O139 have been investigated. The isolates were screened for phenotypic and genetic characteristics with reference to their major virulence genes. Serologically distinct isolates harbored rtx, msh, and hly but lacked enteric toxin encoding genes that are generally present in toxigenic V. cholerae. Timely detection of this organism can prevent fatalities in hospital settings. The underlying virulence potential of V. cholerae needs appropriate testing and intervention. PMID:26904017

  6. Gingival overgrowth caused by vitamin C deficiency associated with metabolic syndrome and severe periodontal infection: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omori, Kazuhiro; Hanayama, Yoshihisa; Naruishi, Koji; Akiyama, Kentaro; Maeda, Hiroshi; Otsuka, Fumio; Takashiba, Shogo

    2014-12-01

    It has been suggested that vitamin C deficiency/scurvy is associated with gingival inflammatory changes; however, the disorder is very infrequently encountered in the modern era. Here, we report a case of extensive gingival overgrowth caused by vitamin C deficiency associated with metabolic syndrome and severe periodontal infection. PMID:25548632

  7. Gingival overgrowth caused by vitamin C deficiency associated with metabolic syndrome and severe periodontal infection: a case report

    OpenAIRE

    Omori, Kazuhiro; Hanayama, Yoshihisa; Naruishi, Koji; Akiyama, Kentaro; Maeda, Hiroshi; Otsuka, Fumio; Takashiba, Shogo

    2014-01-01

    It has been suggested that vitamin C deficiency/scurvy is associated with gingival inflammatory changes; however, the disorder is very infrequently encountered in the modern era. Here, we report a case of extensive gingival overgrowth caused by vitamin C deficiency associated with metabolic syndrome and severe periodontal infection.

  8. The erratic antibiotic susceptibility patterns of bacterial pathogens causing urinary tract infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Iftkhar; Sajed, Muhammad; Sultan, Aneesa; Murtaza, Iram; Yousaf, Sohail; Maqsood, Bushra; Vanhara, Petr; Anees, Mariam

    2015-01-01

    Increasing trend of antibiotic resistance and expression of Extended Spectrum Beta Lactamases (ESBLs) are serious threats for public health as they render the treatment ineffective. Present study was designed to elucidate the antibiotic-susceptibility patterns of ESBL and non-ESBL producing E. coli and K. pneumoniae causing urinary tract infections so that the ineffective antibiotics could be removed from the line of treatment. The bacterial isolates obtained from the urine of patients visiting a tertiary health care facility were cultured for strain identification using API20E. Antimicrobial susceptibility and ESBL detection were done by Kirby-bauer diffusion technique. Almost 53.4 % isolates of E. coli and 24.5 % isolates of K. pneumoniae were found to be ESBL producers. The ESBL producing bacteria were found to be more resistant towards various antibiotics. The most effective drugs against E. coli ESBL isolates were imipenem (99.54 %), ampicillin-sulbactam (97.48 %), piperacillin-tazobactam (96.86 %), fosfomycin (94.51 %), amikacin (92.26 %) and nitrofurantoin (90.68 %). The most effective drugs against K. pneumoniae ESBL isolates were imipenem (97.62 %), piperacillin-tazobactam (95.35 %), ampicillin-sulbactam (90.48 %) and amikacin (88.37 %). The antibiotics having the highest resistance, particularly by the ESBL producers were amoxicillin clavulanic acid, sulphamethoxalzole/ trimethoprim, cefuroxime, cefpirome, ceftriaxone and ciprofloxacin. Most of the isolates showed multi drug resistance (MDR). High frequency of ESBL producing E. coli and K. pneumoniae were observed as compared to previous data. Penicillins, cephalosporins and some representatives of fluoroquinolones were least effective against the common UTIs and are recommended to be removed from the line of treatment. PMID:26648826

  9. Investigation of the antibiotic susceptibility patterns of pathogens causing nosocomial infections

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of this study is to determine the resistance patterns of bacteria causing nosocomial infections. The outcome of this resistance was followed for 3 years. This study was carried out during 2000 to 2002 at a university hospital in Turkey. The resistance patterns of 570 bacteria (390 Gram-negative, 180 Gram-positive) against meropenem, imipenem, ceftazidime, cefotaxime, cefepime, piperacillin/tazobactam, ciprofloxacin and tobramycin were investigated using the E-test. Extended-spectrum beta-lactamase (ESBL) production was determined using ceftazidime and ceftazidime/clavulanic acid E-test strips. Meropenem was the most effective antibiotic against Gram-negative organisms (89.0%); this was followed by imipenem (87.2%) and piperacillin/tazobactam (66.4%). The most active antibiotic against Gram-positive bacteria was imipenem (87.2%) and this was followed by piperacillin/tazobactam (81.7%) and meropenem (77.8%). The rates of production of ESBL by Escherichia coli were 20.9%, Klebsiella pneumoniae 50% and Serratia marcescens were 46.7%. Extended-spectrum beta-lactamase production increased each year (21.7%, 22.1% and 45.5%). All of the ESBL producing isolates were sensitive to meropenem and 98.5% sensitive to imipenem. AmpC beta-lactamase was produced by 20.9% of the Enterobacter species spp, Citrobacter spp. and Serratia marcescens. All of these were sensitive to meropenem and 77.8% to imipenem and ciprofloxacin. Multi-drug resistance rates in Acinetobacter spp were 45.4% and 37.7% in Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates. As in the entire world, resistance to antibiotics is a serious problem in our country. Solving of this problem depends primarily on prevention of the development of resistance. (author)

  10. A case of catheter-related bloodstream infection caused by Mycobacterium phocaicum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simkins, Jacques; Rosenblatt, Joseph D

    2013-05-01

    We present a patient with double hit Burkitt's like lymphoma who developed a catheter-related bloodstream infection due to Mycobacterium phocaicum that was identified by rpoB gene sequencing. His infection resolved with 7 weeks of antibiotics and port-a-cath removal. PMID:23537787

  11. Upsurge of infections caused by Salmonella Concord among Ethiopian adoptees in Denmark, 2009

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hendriksen, Rene S.; Kjelsø, C; Torpdahl, M;

    2010-01-01

    Multidrug-resistant (MDR) Salmonella Concord has been associated with adoptees from Ethiopia. In 2009, Denmark saw an increase in MDR S. Concord infections among Ethiopian adoptees.......Multidrug-resistant (MDR) Salmonella Concord has been associated with adoptees from Ethiopia. In 2009, Denmark saw an increase in MDR S. Concord infections among Ethiopian adoptees....

  12. Orientia, rickettsia, and leptospira pathogens as causes of CNS infections in Laos

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dittrich, Sabine; Rattanavong, Sayaphet; Lee, Sue J;

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Scrub typhus (caused by Orientia tsutsugamushi), murine typhus (caused by Rickettsia typhi), and leptospirosis are common causes of febrile illness in Asia; meningitis and meningoencephalitis are severe complications. However, scarce data exist for the burden of these pathogens in...

  13. Pilus phase variation switches gonococcal adherence to invasion by caveolin-1-dependent host cell signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faulstich, Michaela; Böttcher, Jan-Peter; Meyer, Thomas F; Fraunholz, Martin; Rudel, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Many pathogenic bacteria cause local infections but occasionally invade into the blood stream, often with fatal outcome. Very little is known about the mechanism underlying the switch from local to invasive infection. In the case of Neisseria gonorrhoeae, phase variable type 4 pili (T4P) stabilize local infection by mediating microcolony formation and inducing anti-invasive signals. Outer membrane porin PorB(IA), in contrast, is associated with disseminated infection and facilitates the efficient invasion of gonococci into host cells. Here we demonstrate that loss of pili by natural pilus phase variation is a prerequisite for the transition from local to invasive infection. Unexpectedly, both T4P-mediated inhibition of invasion and PorB(IA)-triggered invasion utilize membrane rafts and signaling pathways that depend on caveolin-1-Y14 phosphorylation (Cav1-pY14). We identified p85 regulatory subunit of PI3 kinase (PI3K) and phospholipase Cγ1 as new, exclusive and essential interaction partners for Cav1-pY14 in the course of PorBIA-induced invasion. Active PI3K induces the uptake of gonococci via a new invasion pathway involving protein kinase D1. Our data describe a novel route of bacterial entry into epithelial cells and offer the first mechanistic insight into the switch from local to invasive gonococcal infection. PMID:23717204

  14. Pilus phase variation switches gonococcal adherence to invasion by caveolin-1-dependent host cell signaling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michaela Faulstich

    Full Text Available Many pathogenic bacteria cause local infections but occasionally invade into the blood stream, often with fatal outcome. Very little is known about the mechanism underlying the switch from local to invasive infection. In the case of Neisseria gonorrhoeae, phase variable type 4 pili (T4P stabilize local infection by mediating microcolony formation and inducing anti-invasive signals. Outer membrane porin PorB(IA, in contrast, is associated with disseminated infection and facilitates the efficient invasion of gonococci into host cells. Here we demonstrate that loss of pili by natural pilus phase variation is a prerequisite for the transition from local to invasive infection. Unexpectedly, both T4P-mediated inhibition of invasion and PorB(IA-triggered invasion utilize membrane rafts and signaling pathways that depend on caveolin-1-Y14 phosphorylation (Cav1-pY14. We identified p85 regulatory subunit of PI3 kinase (PI3K and phospholipase Cγ1 as new, exclusive and essential interaction partners for Cav1-pY14 in the course of PorBIA-induced invasion. Active PI3K induces the uptake of gonococci via a new invasion pathway involving protein kinase D1. Our data describe a novel route of bacterial entry into epithelial cells and offer the first mechanistic insight into the switch from local to invasive gonococcal infection.

  15. Genetic susceptibility to Candida infections

    OpenAIRE

    Smeekens, S P; Veerdonk, F.L. van de; Kullberg, B J; Netea, M.G.

    2013-01-01

    Candida spp. are medically important fungi causing severe mucosal and life-threatening invasive infections, especially in immunocompromised hosts. However, not all individuals at risk develop Candida infections, and it is believed that genetic variation plays an important role in host susceptibility. On the one hand, severe fungal infections are associated with monogenic primary immunodeficiencies such as defects in STAT1, STAT3 or CARD9, recently discovered as novel clinical entities. On the...

  16. Orbital Apex Syndrome Caused by Invasive Aspergillosis as an Adverse Effect of Systemic Chemotherapy for Metastatic Colorectal Cancer: a Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyamoto, Yuji; Sakamoto, Yasuo; Ohuchi, Mayuko; Tokunaga, Ryuma; Shigaki, Hironobu; Kurashige, Junji; Iwatsuki, Masaaki; Baba, Yoshifumi; Yoshida, Naoya; Watanabe, Masayuki; Baba, Hideo

    2016-02-01

    Continuous therapy with cytotoxic drugs suppresses humoral immune function and may result in local infection. We present a case of orbital apex syndrome caused by Aspergillus infection during chemotherapy for metastatic colorectal cancer. A 74-year-old man with colorectal liver metastases under long-term continuous systemic chemotherapy presented with painful, progressive orbital apex syndrome. Magnetic resonance imaging disclosed a small enhancing lesion around the right ethmoid sinus. We initially diagnosed colorectal cancer metastasis and he underwent biopsy via the endoscopic endonasal transethmoid approach. However, pathological examination of the cultured specimen revealed Aspergillus fumigatus. The patient was treated with voriconazole and the orbital apex syndrome resolved after 1 month. Orbital aspergillosis is a life-threatening disease and should be listed as a differential diagnosis of uncommon local infections during continuous chemotherapy. PMID:26851046

  17. Subinhibitory concentrations of antibiotics affect stress and virulence gene expression in Listeria monocytogenes and cause enhanced stress sensitivity but do not affect Caco‐2 cell invasion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen, Gitte Maegaard; Holch, Anne; Gram, Lone

    2012-01-01

    Antibiotics can act as signal molecules and affect bacterial gene expression, physiology and virulence. The purpose of this study was to determine whether subinhibitory antibiotic concentrations alter gene expression and physiology of Listeria monocytogenes. Using an agar‐based screening assay with...... promoter fusions, 14 of 16 antibiotics induced or repressed expression of one or more stress and/or virulence genes. Despite ampicillin‐induced up‐regulation of PinlA‐lacZ expression, Caco‐2 cell invasion was not affected. Subinhibitory concentrations of ampicillin and tetracycline caused up‐ and down......‐regulation of stress response genes, respectively, but both antibiotics caused increased sensitivity to acid stress. Six combinations of gene‐antibiotic were quantified in broth cultures and five of the six resulted in the same expression pattern as the agar‐based assay. Antibiotics affect virulence and...

  18. A spectrum of clinical manifestations caused by host immune responses against Epstein-Barr virus infections.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iwatsuki K

    2004-08-01

    Full Text Available Epstein-Barr virus (EBV, or human herpesvirus 4 (HHV-4, infects the vast majority of adults worldwide, and establishes both nonproductive (latent and productive (lytic infections. Host immune responses directed against both the lytic and latent cycle-associated EBV antigens induce a diversity of clinical symptoms in patients with chronic active EBV infections who usually contain an oligoclonal pool of EBV-infected lymphocyte subsets in their blood. Episomal EBV genes in the latent infection utilize an array of evasion strategies from host immune responses: the minimized expression of EBV antigens targeted by host cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs, the down-regulation of cell adhesion molecule expression, and the release of virokines to inhibit the host CTLs. The oncogenic role of latent EBV infection is not yet fully understood, but latent membrane proteins (LMPs expressed during the latency cycle have essential biological properties leading to cellular gene expression and immortalization, and EBV-encoded gene products such as viral interleukin-10 (vIL-10 and bcl-2 homologue function to survive the EBV-infected cells. The subsequent oncogenic DNA damage may lead to the development of neoplasms. EBV-associated NK/T cell lymphoproliferative disorders are prevalent in Asia, but quite rare in Western countries. The genetic immunological background, therefore, is closely linked to the development of EBV-associated neoplasms.

  19. Laboratory diagnosis, clinical management and infection control of the infections caused by extensively drug-resistant Gram-negative bacilli: a Chinese consensus statement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guan, X; He, L; Hu, B; Hu, J; Huang, X; Lai, G; Li, Y; Liu, Y; Ni, Y; Qiu, H; Shao, Z; Shi, Y; Wang, M; Wang, R; Wu, D; Xie, C; Xu, Y; Yang, F; Yu, K; Yu, Y; Zhang, J; Zhuo, C

    2016-03-01

    Extensively drug-resistant (XDR) Gram-negative bacilli (GNB) are defined as bacterial isolates susceptible to two or fewer antimicrobial categories. XDR-GNB mainly occur in Enterobacteriaceae, Acinetobacter baumannii, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Stenotrophomonas maltophilia. The prevalence of XDR-GNB is on the rise in China and in other countries, and it poses a major public health threat as a result of the lack of adequate therapeutic options. A group of Chinese clinical experts, microbiologists and pharmacologists came together to discuss and draft a consensus on the laboratory diagnosis, clinical management and infection control of XDR-GNB infections. Lists of antimicrobial categories proposed for antimicrobial susceptibility testing were created according to documents from the Clinical Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI), the European Committee on Antimicrobial Susceptibility Testing (EUCAST) and the United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA). Multiple risk factors of XDR-GNB infections are analyzed, with long-term exposure to extended-spectrum antimicrobials being the most important one. Combination therapeutic regimens are summarized for treatment of XDR-GNB infections caused by different bacteria based on limited clinical studies and/or laboratory data. Most frequently used antimicrobials used for the combination therapies include aminoglycosides, carbapenems, colistin, fosfomycin and tigecycline. Strict infection control measures including hand hygiene, contact isolation, active screening, environmental surface disinfections, decolonization and restrictive antibiotic stewardship are recommended to curb the XDR-GNB spread. PMID:26627340

  20. Pharmacologic options for CNS infections caused by resistant Gram-positive organisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peppard, William J; Johnston, Carolyn J; Urmanski, Angela M

    2008-02-01

    Infectious disease continues to evolve, presenting new and challenging clinical situations for practitioners. Specific to device-related and neurosurgical-related CNS infections, Gram-positive organisms are of growing concern. Current Infection Disease Society of America guidelines for the treatment of CNS infections offer little direction after conventional therapy, consisting of vancomycin, has failed or the patient has demonstrated intolerance. A review of literature evaluating alternative therapies, specifically linezolid, quinupristin/dalfopristin, daptomycin and tigecycline, will be presented. Interpretations of these data are offered followed by a brief presentation of future therapies, including ortavancin, telavancin, dalbavancin, ceftobiprole and iclaprim, all of which possess potent Gram-positive activity. PMID:18251666

  1. Mycobacterium ulcerans infection as a cause of chronic diarrhea in an AIDS patient: A case report

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jin-Gook Huh; Myoung-Don Oh; You-Sun Kim; Jong-Sung Lee; Tae-Yeob Jeong; Soo-Hyung Ryu; Jung-Hwan Lee; Jeong-Seop Moon; Yun-Kyung Kang; Myung-Shup Shim

    2008-01-01

    Chronic diarrhea is one of the most frequent gastro-intestinal manifestations in acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS).Protozoa and nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) are opportunistic pathogens that can easily infect these patients.Among the NTM,Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC) is the most frequently observed pathogen in HIV-infected patients.However,NTMs other than MAC have not been reported as a gastrointestinal pathogen as yet.We present a case of chronic diarrhea in an AIDS patient in whom Mycobacterium ulcerans and cryptosporidium co-infection is evidenced from colonic tissue.

  2. The Current Status of the Disease Caused by Enterovirus 71 Infections: Epidemiology, Pathogenesis, Molecular Epidemiology, and Vaccine Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Ping-Chin; Chen, Shou-Chien; Chen, Kow-Tong

    2016-01-01

    Enterovirus 71 (EV71) infections have a major public health impact in the Asia-Pacific region. We reviewed the epidemiology, pathogenesis, and molecular epidemiology of EV71 infection as well as EV71 vaccine development. Previous studies were found using the search terms "enterovirus 71" and "epidemiology" or "pathogenesis" or "molecular epidemiology" or "vaccine" in Medline and PubMed. Articles that were not published in the English language, manuscripts without an abstract, and opinion articles were excluded from the review. The reported epidemiology of cases caused by EV71 infection varied from country to country; seasonal variations in incidence were observed. Most cases of EV71 infection that resulted in hospitalization for complications occurred in children less than five years old. The brainstem was the most likely major target of EV71 infection. The emergence of the EV71 epidemic in the Asia-Pacific region has been associated with the circulation of different genetic lineages (genotypes B3, B4, C1, C2, and C4) that appear to be undergoing rapid evolutionary changes. The relationship between the gene structure of the EV71 virus and the factors that ensure its survival, circulation, and evasion of immunity is still unknown. EV71 infection has emerged as an important global public health problem. Vaccine development, including the development of inactivated whole-virus live attenuated, subviral particles, and DNA vaccines, has been progressing. PMID:27618078

  3. Enhancement of invasiveness of Yersinia enterocolitica and Escherichia coli in HEp-2 cells by centrifugation.

    OpenAIRE

    Vesikari, T; Bromirska, J; Mäki, M

    1982-01-01

    Centrifugation enhanced the infectivity of invasive Escherichia coli and Yersinia enterocolitica for HEp-2 cells. Noninvasive bacteria were not endocytosed after centrifugation. The centrifugation procedure may increase the sensitivity of testing for bacterial invasiveness in cell culture without causing false-positive results.

  4. Wounding of Arabidopsis leaves causes a powerful but transient protection against Botrytis infection

    OpenAIRE

    Chassot, Céline; Buchala, Antony; Schoonbeek, Henk-jan; Métraux, Jean-Pierre; Lamotte, Olivier

    2008-01-01

    Physical injury inflicted on living tissue makes it vulnerable to invasion by pathogens. Wounding of Arabidopsis thaliana leaves, however, does not conform to this concept and leads to immunity to Botrytis cinerea, the causal agent of grey mould. In wounded leaves, hyphal growth was strongly inhibited compared to unwounded controls. Wound-induced resistance was not associated with salicylic acid-, jasmonic acid- or ethylene-dependent defence responses. The phytoalexin camalexin was found to b...

  5. First fatal case of CNS infection caused by Enterovirus A in Brazil

    OpenAIRE

    Oliveira, D B; Machado, G; Almeida, G.M.F.; P. C. P. Ferreira; C.A. Bonjardim; G. de Souza Trindade; Abrahão, J.S.; E.G. Kroon

    2015-01-01

    We describe what is to our knowledge the first fatal case of central nervous system Enterovirus infection in Brazil. Molecular and phylogenetic characterization revealed that Enterovirus A was the aetiologic agent of this case.

  6. Radiculoplexopathy with conduction block caused by acute Epstein-Barr virus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vucic, Steve; Palmer, William; Cros, Didier

    2005-02-01

    The authors report a case of cervicobrachial radiculoplexopathy with proximal conduction block (CB), associated with acute Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection. The patient presented with pain, paresthesias, and monomelic weakness in the left C7-8, and T1 myotomes. The illness was monophasic with rapid recovery. Neurophysiologic studies demonstrated CB in the proximal left median and ulnar nerve segments. The authors conclude that this syndrome resulted from a postinfectious process following acute EBV infection. PMID:15699388

  7. ACTINOMYCES NAESLUNDII, A PREVIOUSLY UNDOCUMENTED CAUSE OF INFECTIVE ENDOCARDITIS; WITH LITERARY REVIEW

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Loren Garrison Morgan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Actinomycotic endocarditis is a rare disease with only 18 documented cases to date. Most of these cases are sub-acute or chronic infections and usually lack the stigmata of classic endocarditis. This article reviews the details of previously published reports of endocarditis due to various species of actinomyces, along with consensus opinion on diagnosis and treatment. We also present our unique case of Actinomyces naeslundii infective endocarditis, the first case ever attributed to this organism in medical literature.

  8. ACTINOMYCES NAESLUNDII, A PREVIOUSLY UNDOCUMENTED CAUSE OF INFECTIVE ENDOCARDITIS; WITH LITERARY REVIEW

    OpenAIRE

    Loren Garrison Morgan; Ashley L. Davis; Paul Poommipanit; Yasir Ahmed

    2014-01-01

    Actinomycotic endocarditis is a rare disease with only 18 documented cases to date. Most of these cases are sub-acute or chronic infections and usually lack the stigmata of classic endocarditis. This article reviews the details of previously published reports of endocarditis due to various species of actinomyces, along with consensus opinion on diagnosis and treatment. We also present our unique case of Actinomyces naeslundii infective endocarditis, the first case ever attributed to this orga...

  9. INVASIVE AMOEBIASIS COMPLICATING IFLAMMATORY BOWEL DISEASE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ziglam H

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTIONAmoebiasis, which is caused by the intestinal protozoan Entamoeba histolytica, is a ubiquitous parasitic infection affecting approximately 10% of the world’s population and causing more deaths every year (100,000 deaths than any other parasitic infection, with the exception of malaria and schistosomiasis [1–3]. Most individuals with an E. histolytica infection are asymptomatic, but some develop severe invasive disease, such as amoebic colitis. Other manifestations, such as pulmonary, cardiac or brain involvement, are rare. Intestinal amoebiasis can probably also present as a chronic, non-dysenteric syndrome of diarrhoea, weight loss, and abdominal pain that can last for years and mimic inflammatory bowel disease. Fulminant colitis with bowel necrosis leading to perforation and peritonitis occurs in only about 0.5% of cases, but it is associated with a mortality rate of more than 40%. Patients with invasive amoebiasis living in the United Kingdom and other developed countries generally acquire the infection in another country in which the pathogenic species is endemic. Areas that have high rates of amoebic infection include India, Africa, Mexico and parts of Central and South America. Infection with pathogenic E. histolytica is not a common cause of travelers’ diarrhoea, and gastrointestinal infection is uncommon in travelers who have spent less than one month in endemic areas.

  10. Intersubspecific recombination in Xylella fastidiosa Strains native to the United States: infection of novel hosts associated with an unsuccessful invasion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunney, Leonard; Hopkins, Donald L; Morano, Lisa D; Russell, Stephanie E; Stouthamer, Richard

    2014-02-01

    The bacterial pathogen Xylella fastidiosa infects xylem and causes disease in many plant species in the Americas. Different subspecies of this bacterium and different genotypes within subspecies infect different plant hosts, but the genetics of host adaptation are unknown. Here we examined the hypothesis that the introduction of novel genetic variation via intersubspecific homologous recombination (IHR) facilitates host shifts. We investigated IHR in 33 X. fastidiosa subsp. multiplex isolates previously identified as recombinant based on 8 loci (7 multilocus sequence typing [MLST] loci plus 1 locus). We found significant evidence of introgression from X. fastidiosa subsp. fastidiosa in 4 of the loci and, using published data, evidence of IHR in 6 of 9 additional loci. Our data showed that IHR regions in 2 of the 4 loci were inconsistent (12 mismatches) with X. fastidiosa subsp. fastidiosa alleles found in the United States but consistent with alleles from Central America. The other two loci were consistent with alleles from both regions. We propose that the recombinant forms all originated via genomewide recombination of one X. fastidiosa subsp. multiplex ancestor with one X. fastidiosa subsp. fastidiosa donor from Central America that was introduced into the United States but subsequently disappeared. Using all of the available data, 5 plant hosts of the recombinant types were identified, 3 of which also supported non-IHR X. fastidiosa subsp. multiplex, but 2 were unique to recombinant types from blueberry (7 isolates from Georgia, 3 from Florida); and blackberry (1 each from Florida and North Carolina), strongly supporting the hypothesis that IHR facilitated a host shift to blueberry and possibly blackberry. PMID:24296499

  11. A non-fatal case of invasive zygomycete (Lichtheimia corymbifera) infection in an allogeneic haematopoietic cell transplant recipient

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eickhardt, Steffen; Braendstrup, Peter; Clasen-Linde, Erik; Jensen, Karl E; Alhede, Morten; Bjarnsholt, Thomas; Høiby, Niels; Vindeløv, Lars; Moser, Claus

    2013-01-01

    Post-transplant infections in allogeneic haematopoietic cell transplant (allo-HCT) recipients often have severe consequences. This is especially the case when dealing with zygomycete infections where the result is often fatal. A major problem when dealing with zygomycete infections is the need for...... an accurate and fast diagnosis as the phylum is highly resistant towards the conventional antifungals. We herein describe a non-fatal case of Lichtheimia corymbifera infection in an allo-HCT recipient....

  12. Evaluation of Human Body Fluids for the Diagnosis of Fungal Infections

    OpenAIRE

    Parisa Badiee

    2013-01-01

    Invasive fungal infections are a major cause of morbidity and mortality in immunocompromised patients. Because the etiologic agents of these infections are abundant in nature, their isolation from biopsy material or sterile body fluids is needed to document infection. This review evaluates and discusses different human body fluids used to diagnose fungal infections.

  13. 心血管病住院患者肺部感染的原因分析%Causes of pulmonary infections in hospitalized patients with cardiovascular diseases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄小媚

    2013-01-01

    underlying diseases,use of a variety of antibiotics,long-term use of antibiotics,invasive operation,and long hospitalization duration were the main risk factors of the pulmonary infections in the hospitalized patients with cardiovascular diseases(P<0.01).A total of 68 strains of pathogens were isolated from 64 cases of patients with the pulmonary infections,including 45 (66.18%) strains of gram-positive bacteria,21 (30.88%) strains of gram-negative bacteria,and 2 (2.94%)strains of fungi;the Klebsiella pneumoniae,Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Acinetobacter baumannii were the predominant species of gram-negative bacteria,accounting for 25.00%,17.65%,and 11.76%,respectively;the Staphylococcus aureus,Staphylococcus epidermidis,and Streptococcus hemolytic were dominant among the gram-positive bacteria,accounting for 11.76%,7.35%,and 4.41 %,respectively;the Candida albicans was the most common species of fungi,accounting for 2.94 %.CONCLUSION The advanced age,complication of multiple underlying diseases,use of a variety of antibiotics,long-term use of antibiotics,invasive operation,and long hospitalization duration are the main causes of the pulmonary infections in the hospitalized patients with cardiovascular diseases.The gram-negative bacteria are the main pathogens causing infections.It is necessary to take interventions to the high risk factors so as to reduce the incidence of nosocomial infections.

  14. Liver damage caused by hepatitis C viral infection and ethyl alcohol consumption

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kostić Velimir

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. Hepatitis C virus infection (HCV is a complex disease, most commonly chronicle (80-85%. The aim of this research was to determinate the level of the liver damage in the patients cansed by HCV in conjunction with consuming ethyl alcohol. Methods. The research included 15 patients with chronic HCV infection supported by the misuse of ethyl alcohol, as well. The diagnosis of C infection hepatitis was proved using the ELISA test and PCR method. Results. The results of the study showed the liver damage by both HCV infection and ethyl alcohol, which was verified by the presence of biochemical changes and patohystological processing of the patients (liver biopsy and prosection. Patohystological changes were at the level of liver cirrhosis and carcinoma (2 patients. There was a signficant difference between the two subgroups (p < 0.001 regarding the examined values γ-GT, PLT and PTV. The basic therapeutic procedure was to introduce this category of patients into alcohol abstinence, and, in a few patients, to apply the antivirus therapy, as well. Conclusion. Based on the number of the examined patients (n = 15, we could conclude that a prolonged ethyl alcohol misuse with the presence of HCV infection was in a correlation with the liver disease progression.

  15. Laguna Negra Virus Infection Causes Hantavirus Pulmonary Syndrome in Turkish Hamsters (Mesocricetus brandti).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardcastle, K; Scott, D; Safronetz, D; Brining, D L; Ebihara, H; Feldmann, H; LaCasse, R A

    2016-01-01

    Laguna Negra virus (LNV) is a New World hantavirus associated with severe and often fatal cardiopulmonary disease in humans, known as hantavirus pulmonary syndrome (HPS). Five hamster species were evaluated for clinical and serologic responses following inoculation with 4 hantaviruses. Of the 5 hamster species, only Turkish hamsters infected with LNV demonstrated signs consistent with HPS and a fatality rate of 43%. Clinical manifestations in infected animals that succumbed to disease included severe and rapid onset of dyspnea, weight loss, leukopenia, and reduced thrombocyte numbers as compared to uninfected controls. Histopathologic examination revealed lung lesions that resemble the hallmarks of HPS in humans, including interstitial pneumonia and pulmonary edema, as well as generalized infection of endothelial cells and macrophages in major organ tissues. Histologic lesions corresponded to the presence of viral antigen in affected tissues. To date, there have been no small animal models available to study LNV infection and pathogenesis. The Turkish hamster model of LNV infection may be important in the study of LNV-induced HPS pathogenesis and development of disease treatment and prevention strategies. PMID:25722219

  16. Neutrophils Produce Interleukin 17A (IL-17A) in a Dectin-1- and IL-23-Dependent Manner during Invasive Fungal Infection

    OpenAIRE

    Werner, Jessica L.; Gessner, Melissa A.; Lilly, Lauren M.; Nelson, Michael P.; Metz, Allison E.; Horn, Dawn; Dunaway, Chad W; Deshane, Jessy; Chaplin, David D.; Weaver, Casey T.; Brown, Gordon D.; Steele, Chad

    2011-01-01

    We have previously reported that compromised interleukin 17A (IL-17A) production in the lungs increased susceptibility to infection with the invasive fungal pathogen Aspergillus fumigatus. Here we have shown that culturing lung cells from A. fumigatus-challenged mice ex vivo demonstrated Dectin-1-dependent IL-17A production. In this system, neutralization of IL-23 but not IL-6, IL-1β, or IL-18 resulted in attenuated IL-17A production. Il23 mRNA expression was found to be lower in lung cells f...

  17. Chytrid fungus Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis has nonamphibian hosts and releases chemicals that cause pathology in the absence of infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMahon, Taegan A; Brannelly, Laura A; Chatfield, Matthew W H; Johnson, Pieter T J; Joseph, Maxwell B; McKenzie, Valerie J; Richards-Zawacki, Corinne L; Venesky, Matthew D; Rohr, Jason R

    2013-01-01

    Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis, a pathogenic chytrid fungus implicated in worldwide amphibian declines, is considered an amphibian specialist. Identification of nonamphibian hosts could help explain the virulence, heterogeneous distribution, variable rates of spread, and persistence of B. dendrobatidis in freshwater ecosystems even after amphibian extirpations. Here, we test whether mosquitofish (Gambusia holbrooki) and crayfish (Procambarus spp. and Orconectes virilis), which are syntopic with many amphibian species, are possible hosts for B. dendrobatidis. Field surveys in Louisiana and Colorado revealed that zoosporangia occur within crayfish gastrointestinal tracts, that B. dendrobatidis prevalence in crayfish was up to 29%, and that crayfish presence in Colorado wetlands was a positive predictor of B. dendrobatidis infections in cooccurring amphibians. In experiments, crayfish, but not mosquitofish, became infected with B. dendrobatidis, maintained the infection for at least 12 wk, and transmitted B. dendrobatidis to amphibians. Exposure to water that previously held B. dendrobatidis also caused significant crayfish mortality and gill recession. These results indicate that there are nonamphibian hosts for B. dendrobatidis and suggest that B. dendrobatidis releases a chemical that can cause host pathology, even in the absence of infection. Managing these biological reservoirs for B. dendrobatidis and identifying this chemical might provide new hope for imperiled amphibians. PMID:23248288

  18. The fungus Trichophyton redellii sp. nov. causes skin infections that resemble white-nose syndrome of hibernating bats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorch, Jeffrey M.; Minnis, Andrew M.; Meteyer, Carol U.; Redell, Jennifer A.; White, J. Paul; Kaarakka, Heather M.; Muller, Laura K.; Lindner, David L.; Verant, Michelle L.; Shearn-Bochsler, Valerie I.; Blehert, David S.

    2014-01-01

    Before the discovery of white-nose syndrome (WNS), a fungal disease caused by Pseudogymnoascus destructans, there were no reports of fungal skin infections in bats during hibernation. In 2011, bats with grossly visible fungal skin infections similar in appearance to WNS were reported from multiple sites in Wisconsin, USA, a state outside the known range of P. destructans and WNS at that time. Tape impressions or swab samples were collected from affected areas of skin from bats with these fungal infections in 2012 and analyzed by microscopy, culture, or direct DNA amplification and sequencing of the fungal internal transcribed spacer region (ITS). A psychrophilic species ofTrichophyton was isolated in culture, detected by direct DNA amplification and sequencing, and observed on tape impressions. Deoxyribonucleic acid indicative of the same fungus was also detected on three of five bat carcasses collected in 2011 and 2012 from Wisconsin, Indiana, and Texas, USA. Superficial fungal skin infections caused by Trichophyton sp. were observed in histopathology for all three bats. Sequencing of the ITS of Trichophyton sp., along with its inability to grow at 25 C, indicated that it represented a previously unknown species, described herein as Trichophyton redellii sp. nov. Genetic diversity present within T. redellii suggests it is native to North America but that it had been overlooked before enhanced efforts to study fungi associated with bats in response to the emergence of WNS.

  19. Mural folliculitis and alopecia caused by infection with goat-associated malignant catarrhal fever virus in two sika deer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crawford, Timothy B; Li, Hong; Rosenburg, Stuart R; Norhausen, Robert W; Garner, Michael M

    2002-09-15

    Two sika deer from a zoo in Florida were examined because of chronic hair loss and skin lesions. No common causes of alopecia were identified in either deer. One deer was treated with prednisone, but the condition worsened when the dosage was decreased. Both deer were euthanatized after several months because of continued disease. The predominant histologic lesion in skin specimens was granulomatous mural folliculitis. Serologic testing and sequencing of fragments produced with a consensus polymerase chain reaction assay indicated that both deer were infected with caprine herpesvirus-2, a newly recognized member of the malignant catarrhal fever group of viruses. Disease in these deer was substantially different from that typically seen following infection with ovine herpesvirus-2, the sheep-associated malignant catarrhal fever virus. Findings in these deer establish the pathogenicity of caprine herpesvirus-2 in sika deer and illustrate the ability of this group of complex herpesviruses to cause a wide variety of clinical abnormalities in diverse species. PMID:12322924

  20. A rare case of primary EBV infection causing acute acalculous cholecystitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonia Shah

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Primary Epstein–Barr Virus (EBV infection in children is common and frequently asymptomatic. While symptomatic patients typically present with features of infectious mononucleosis, a rare complication of primary EBV is acute acalculous cholecystitis. A 6 year old previously healthy boy presented with 6 days of low-grade fevers, non-bloody non-bilious vomiting, and periumbilical pain. Based on clinical, laboratory, and radiographic evidence, the patient was diagnosed with acute acalculous cholecystitis due to a primary EBV infection. The patient improved with supportive therapy and remained asymptomatic at follow-up. Overall, clinicians should consider EBV infection in the setting of multi-organ disease and blood dyscrasia. Furthermore, while the pathogenesis of EBV cholecystitis is still unclear, it is important to note that these patients may improve with supportive treatment and do not require surgical intervention.