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Sample records for causing griscelli syndrome

  1. Griscelli syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kumar T

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Partial albinism with immunodeficiency is a rare and fatal immunologic disorder characterized by pigmentary dilution and variable cellular immunodeficiency. It was initially described in 1978. Primary abnormalities included silvery grayish sheen to the hair, large pigment agglomerations in hair shafts and an abundance of mature melanosomes in melanocytes, with reduced pigmentation of adjacent keratinocytes. We describe a child with Griscelli syndrome who presented with hepatitis, pancytopenia and silvery hair. The diagnosis was confirmed by microscopic skin and hair examination.

  2. Griscelli syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emanuel, Patrick O; Sternberg, Lauren J; Phelps, Robert G

    2007-01-01

    The dermatology staff was called to evaluate abnormal hair on a 22-month-old Hispanic girl whose parents were first cousins. Her medical history was significant for leptomeningitis with subsequent neurologic devastation, gastroesophageal reflux disease, and recurrent respiratory infections. Her hospital course was complicated by sepsis, liver dysfunction, pan-cytopenia, and disseminated intravascular coagulation. She had developed normally for the first year of life. At 13 months she became progressively lethargic and developed floppy muscle tone; a delay in mental and motor milestones was recognized. Results of a metabolic workup were negative. On examination she was noted to have generalized excessively fair skin when compared with her parents. She had silver-gray hair (Figure 1) and white eyebrows and body hair. Her maternal grandfather and granduncles had silver hair since childhood, but were without health problems. A maternal family member was said to have light skin. The presumed diagnosis before pathologic examination was Chediak-Higashi syndrome. Hematoxylin and eosin stain tests revealed prominent melanocytes in the basal layer of the epidermis. The melanocytes were large and distended with a large volume of melanin (Figure 2). The adjacent keratinocytes were completely devoid of melanin. Application of Masson-Fontana ammoniac silver stain highlighted prominent melanocytic melanin and a relative paucity of melanin in the adjacent keratinocytes (Figure 3). Microscopic examination of her hair revealed clumps of melanin of various sizes and shapes irregularly distributed throughout the hair shaft. Ultrastructural examination of the epidermis showed the melanocytes were distended by an accumulation of large stage IV mature melanosomes. Peripheral blood smear failed to show abnormal granules, even after repeated examination. Based on the clinical features and the pathologic findings, a diagnosis of Griscelli syndrome type 2 was made.

  3. Griscelli syndrome type-3

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bela J Shah

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Griscelli syndrome (GS is a rare autosomal recessive multisystem disorder of pigmentary dilution of skin, silver gray hair, variable immunodeficiency, neurological impairment, and abnormal accumulation of melanosomes in melanocytes. GS type 3 is characterized by hypomelanosis with no immunological and neurological manifestation. Prognosis is very good in type 3 GS and usually require no active intervention, as opposed to type 1 and 2 where early diagnosis and treatment plays a crucial role in patient's survival. The characteristic phenotypic appearance, especially the pigment dilution of the patient's hair, is emphasized here.

  4. Genetics Home Reference: Griscelli syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Tezcan I, Ersoy F, Houdusse A, Fischer A, de Saint Basile G. Griscelli syndrome restricted to hypopigmentation results from a melanophilin defect ( ... N, Bianchi D, Fischer A, Le Deist F, de Saint Basile G. Mutations in RAB27A ... syndrome associated with haemophagocytic syndrome. Nat Genet. 2000 Jun; ...

  5. A novel missense mutation (G43S) in the switch I region of Rab27A causing Griscelli Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westbroek, Wendy; Tuchman, Maya; Tinloy, Bradford; De Wever, Olivier; Vilboux, Thierry; Hertz, Jens M.; Hasle, Henrik; Heilmann, Carsten; Helip-Wooley, Amanda; Kleta, Robert; Gahl, William A.

    2008-01-01

    The autosomal recessive Griscelli syndrome type II (GSII) is caused by mutations in the RAB27A gene. Typical clinical features include immunological impairment, silver-gray scalp hair, eyelashes and eyebrows, and hypomelanosis of the skin. Rabs help determine the specificity of membrane trafficking steps within cells. In melanocytes, the GTP-bound form of Rab27A associates with the membranes of mature fully-pigmented melanosomes through its geranylgeranyl group. Once attached, Rab27A recruits the downstream effector Melanophilin (Mlph) and the actin-dependent motor protein Myosin Va (MyoVa). The molecular Rab27A/Mlph/MyoVA tripartite complex, which links melanosomes to the peripheral actin network, is required to achieve melanosome transfer to surrounding keratinocytes in the epidermis. Here we report a novel homozygous missense mutation c.127G>A, p.G43S in exon 2 of the RAB27A gene of an Afghani GSII patient. Laser scanning confocal microscopy showed that the G43S mutation, which is located in the highly conserved switch I region of Rab27A, induces perinuclear localization of melanosomes in normal melanocytes, and fails to restore melanosomes to the actin-rich periphery in GSII melanocytes. Co-immunoprecipitation studies showed that Rab27A(G43S) fails to interact with its effector Melanophilin, indicating that the Switch I region functions in the recruitment of Rab effector proteins. PMID:18397837

  6. Griscelli syndrome type 2 – A case report and clinical approach to silver blonde hair

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sana Durrani

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Griscelli syndrome type 2 is a rare autosomal recessive disease caused by mutations in the RAB27A gene. It is characterized by pigmentary dilution of the skin and hair causing silvery gray hair, hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis and characteristic light microscopy findings in scalp hair shaft seen as large irregular clumps of pigment as opposed to the evenly distributed pigment along the hair shaft without any clumps. We describe a boy with classic features of Griscelli syndrome type 2 from Pakistan in whom a homozygous mutation in the RAB27A gene was identified that showed a single base substitution (c.598C>T predicted to cause premature protein termination (p.Arg200∗. We also present a clinical approach to silver blonde hair differentiating between the Griscelli syndrome types 1, 2 and 3, Chediak Hegashi Syndrome and Elejalde Syndrome.

  7. Clinical presentation of Griscelli syndrome type 2 and spectrum of RAB27A mutations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meeths, Marie; Bryceson, Yenan T; Rudd, Eva

    2010-01-01

    Griscelli syndrome type 2 (GS2) is an autosomal-recessive immunodeficiency caused by mutations in RAB27A, clinically characterized by partial albinism and haemophagocytic lymphohistocytosis (HLH). We evaluated the frequency of RAB27A mutations in 21 unrelated patients with haemophagocytic syndrom...

  8. Oral and dental findings of griscelli syndrome type 3

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    Ozlem Marti Akgun

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Griscelli syndrome (GS is a rare autosomal recessive genetic disorder characterized by variable immunodeficiency, partial albinism, abnormal accumulation of melanosomes in melanocytes, pigmentary dilution of the skin, and shiny silver-gray hair. GS has three types, with the first and second types caused by mutations in two genes being located at band 15q21: RAB27A and MYO5A. The expression of the third form of GS is restricted to the characteristic hypopigmentation of GS, and results from mutation in the gene that encodes melanophilin MLPH. It has also been shown that an identical phenotype can result from the deletion of the MYO5A F-exon. The aim of this case report is the presentation of oral and dental features and SEM images of the hair of a 12-year-old girl with GS type 3. [Arch Clin Exp Surg 2015; 4(3.000: 164-167

  9. Griscelli syndrome type 2: A rare and fatal syndrome in a South Indian boy

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    R Rajyalakshmi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Griscelli syndrome (GS is a rare autosomal recessive disorder caused by mutation in the MYO5A (GS1, RAB27A (GS2, and MLPH (GS3 genes, characterized by a common feature, partial albinism. The common variant of three, GS type 2, in addition, shows primary immunodeficiency which leads to recurrent infections and hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis. We, herewith, describe a case of GS type 2, in a 4-year-old male child who presented with chronic and recurrent fever, lymphadenopathy, hepatosplenomegaly, and secondary neurological deterioration; highlighting the cytological and histopathological features of lymph nodes. Hair shaft examination of the child confirmed the diagnosis.

  10. Clinical presentation of Griscelli syndrome type 2 and spectrum of RAB27A mutations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meeths, Marie; Bryceson, Yenan T; Rudd, Eva

    2010-01-01

    Griscelli syndrome type 2 (GS2) is an autosomal-recessive immunodeficiency caused by mutations in RAB27A, clinically characterized by partial albinism and haemophagocytic lymphohistocytosis (HLH). We evaluated the frequency of RAB27A mutations in 21 unrelated patients with haemophagocytic syndromes...... without mutations in familial HLH (FHL) causing genes or an established diagnosis of GS2. In addition, we report three patients with known GS2. Moreover, neurological involvement and RAB27A mutations in previously published patients with genetically verified GS2 are reviewed....

  11. Silvery hair syndrome in two cousins: Chediak-Higashi syndrome vs Griscelli syndrome, with rare associations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, R Raghunatha; Babu, Balaji M; Venkateshwaramma, B; Hymavathi, Ch

    2011-07-01

    Silvery hair is a rare clinical manifestation which is a common presentation in a group of rare syndromes which usually present in the pediatric age group together termed as "silvery hair syndrome," consisting of Chediak-Higashi syndrome (CHS), Griscelli syndrome (GS), and Elejalde disease. CHS is a rare autosomal recessive disorder. It is characterized by mild pigment dilution (partial oculocutaneous albinism), silvery blond hair, severe phagocytic immunodeficiency, bleeding tendencies, recurrent pyogenic infections, progressive sensory or motor neurological defects. GS is also a rare autosomal recessive disorder characterized by reduced skin pigmentation, often regarded as partial albinism and silvery grey hair combined with immunodeficiency. To make correct diagnosis and to differentiate between CHS and GS, it requires light microscopic examination of skin and hair shafts, immunological and peripheral blood smear evaluation. They have been reported to be associated with some common clinical association as a part of the syndrome due to pigmentary delusion, neurological dysfunction, and severe life-threatening infections due to neutrophil phagocytosis dysfunction. There are reports of few rare associations and varied presentations and variable mean survival age. We report two cases with common presentation of silvery hair but varied systemic and clinical manifestations and survival in two cousin brothers from the same family.

  12. Griscelli syndrome: A case report of Reye′s syndrome and atopic dermatitis history

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    Kirzioglu Z

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Griscelli syndrome (GS is a rare autosomal recessive disorder that results in pigmentary dilution of the skin and the hair (silver hair, with the presence of large clumps of pigment in hair shafts, and an accumulation of melanosomes in melanocytes. Sixty cases of GS have been reported in the literature, but we could find no description of its oro-dental symptoms. Reye′s syndrome (RS is characterized by acute noninflammatory encephalopathy and renal and hepatic failure, while atopic dermatitis (AD is a skin disorder with an immunologic basis. The aim of this paper is to describe the oro-dental and physical findings in a girl who had been diagnosed with GS at 3.5 years of age; she also had AD as well as a history of RS at infancy. We discuss the possible relationship between the three syndromes.

  13. Treatment of the X-linked lymphoproliferative, Griscelli and Chédiak-Higashi syndromes by HLH directed therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Trottestam, Helena; Beutel, Karin; Meeths, Marie

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Griscelli syndrome type 2 (GS2), the X-linked lymphoproliferative (XLP) and the Chédiak-Higashi (CHS) syndromes are diseases that all may develop hemophagocytic syndromes. We wanted to investigate whether the treatment protocols for hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis (HLH) can also...

  14. Premature birth, respiratory distress, intracerebral hemorrhage, and silvery-gray hair: differential diagnosis of the 3 types of Griscelli syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Idrissi, Eman; ElGhazali, Geyhad; Alzahrani, Mofarah; Ménasché, Gaël; Pachlopnik Schmid, Jana; Basile, Geneviève de Saint

    2010-08-01

    A preterm neonate, born to consanguineous parents, presented with respiratory distress, intracerebral hemorrhage, and a silvery-gray sheen of the hair and eyelashes. Griscelli syndrome (GS) type 3 was diagnosed after the detection of a novel homozygous mutation of the melanophilin gene. Thus, only the hypopigmentation, but not the patient's other clinical features, were attributable to this form of GS. Differential diagnosis of the various forms of GS must be performed as early as possible as GS2 is associated with a life threatening but curable immune disorder.

  15. Neuroimaging abnormalities in Griscelli's disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sarper, Nazan; Akansel, Guer; Aydogan, Metin; Gedikbasi, Demet; Babaoglu, Kadir; Goekalp, Ayse Sevim

    2002-01-01

    Griscelli's disease is a rare autosomal recessive immunodeficiency syndrome. We report a 7-1/2-month-old white girl who presented with this syndrome, but initially without neurological abnormalities. Initial CT of the brain was normal. Despite haematological remission with chemotherapy, she developed neurological symptoms, progressing to coma. At this time, CT showed areas of coarse calcification in the globi pallidi, left parietal white matter and left brachium pontis. Hypodense areas were present in the genu and posterior limb of the internal capsule on the right side, as well as posterior aspects of both thalami, together with minimal generalised atrophy. MRI revealed areas of increased T2 signal and a focal area of abnormal enhancement in the subcortical white matter. Griscelli's disease should be added to the list of acquired neuroimaging abnormalities in infants. (orig.)

  16. Griscelli syndrome-type 2 in twin siblings: case report and update on RAB27A human mutations and gene structure

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    I.P. Meschede

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Griscelli syndrome (GS is a rare autosomal recessive disorder caused by mutation in the MYO5A (GS1, Elejalde, RAB27A (GS2 or MLPH (GS3 genes. Typical features of all three subtypes of this disease include pigmentary dilution of the hair and skin and silvery-gray hair. Whereas the GS3 phenotype is restricted to the pigmentation dysfunction, GS1 patients also show primary neurological impairment and GS2 patients have severe immunological deficiencies that lead to recurrent infections and hemophagocytic syndrome. We report here the diagnosis of GS2 in 3-year-old twin siblings, with silvery-gray hair, immunodeficiency, hepatosplenomegaly and secondary severe neurological symptoms that culminated in multiple organ failure and death. Light microscopy examination of the hair showed large, irregular clumps of pigments characteristic of GS. A homozygous nonsense mutation, C-T transition (c.550C>T, in the coding region of the RAB27A gene, which leads to a premature stop codon and prediction of a truncated protein (R184X, was found. In patient mononuclear cells, RAB27A mRNA levels were the same as in cells from the parents, but no protein was detected. In addition to the case report, we also present an updated summary on the exon/intron organization of the human RAB27A gene, a literature review of GS2 cases, and a complete list of the human mutations currently reported in this gene. Finally, we propose a flow chart to guide the early diagnosis of the GS subtypes and Chédiak-Higashi syndrome.

  17. Polarized light microscopy of hair shafts aids in the differential diagnosis of Chédiak-Higashi and Griscelli-Prunieras syndromes Contribuição do estudo dos cabelos com microscopia de luz polarizada ao diagnóstico diferencial das síndromes de Chédiak-Higashi and Grisceli-Prunieras

    OpenAIRE

    Neusa Y.S. Valente; Maria Cecilia M.R. Machado; Paula Boggio; Ana Cristina F. Alves; Fabiane N. Bergonse; Erasmo Casella; Dewton Moraes Vasconcelos; Anete S. Grumach; Zilda N.P. de Oliveira

    2006-01-01

    PURPOSE: To study and compare the appearance of hairs from patients with Chédiak-Higashi and Griscelli-Prunieras syndromes under light and polarized light microscopy. METHOD: Hairs from 2 Chédiak-Higashi and 2 Griscelli-Prunieras patients were obtained and examined under normal and polarized light microscopy. RESULTS: Under light microscopy, hairs from Chédiak-Higashi patients presented evenly distributed, regular melanin granules, larger than those seen in normal hairs. Under polarized light...

  18. What Causes Down Syndrome?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... it? Share Facebook Twitter Pinterest Email Print What causes Down syndrome? Down syndrome is caused by a random error ... The Down Syndrome Registry . Chromosomal Changes That Can Cause Down Syndrome Research shows that three types of chromosomal changes ...

  19. Neuroimaging abnormalities in Griscelli's disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sarper, Nazan [Caferaga mah, Dr. Sakir Pasa sok, 7/4 Huzur Apt., 81300 Kadikoey-Istanbul (Turkey); Department of Paediatrics, Kocaeli University Faculty of Medicine, Kocaeli (Turkey); Akansel, Guer [Department of Radiodiagnosis, Kocaeli University Faculty of Medicine, Kocaeli (Turkey); Aydogan, Metin; Gedikbasi, Demet; Babaoglu, Kadir; Goekalp, Ayse Sevim [Department of Paediatrics, Kocaeli University Faculty of Medicine, Kocaeli (Turkey)

    2002-12-01

    Griscelli's disease is a rare autosomal recessive immunodeficiency syndrome. We report a 7-1/2-month-old white girl who presented with this syndrome, but initially without neurological abnormalities. Initial CT of the brain was normal. Despite haematological remission with chemotherapy, she developed neurological symptoms, progressing to coma. At this time, CT showed areas of coarse calcification in the globi pallidi, left parietal white matter and left brachium pontis. Hypodense areas were present in the genu and posterior limb of the internal capsule on the right side, as well as posterior aspects of both thalami, together with minimal generalised atrophy. MRI revealed areas of increased T2 signal and a focal area of abnormal enhancement in the subcortical white matter. Griscelli's disease should be added to the list of acquired neuroimaging abnormalities in infants. (orig.)

  20. What Causes Rett Syndrome?

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    ... it? Share Facebook Twitter Pinterest Email Print What causes Rett syndrome? Most cases of Rett syndrome are ... in the MECP2 gene represent the most prevalent causes of Rett syndrome. The development and severity of ...

  1. Polarized light microscopy of hair shafts aids in the differential diagnosis of Chédiak-Higashi and Griscelli-Prunieras syndromes Contribuição do estudo dos cabelos com microscopia de luz polarizada ao diagnóstico diferencial das síndromes de Chédiak-Higashi and Grisceli-Prunieras

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neusa Y.S. Valente

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: To study and compare the appearance of hairs from patients with Chédiak-Higashi and Griscelli-Prunieras syndromes under light and polarized light microscopy. METHOD: Hairs from 2 Chédiak-Higashi and 2 Griscelli-Prunieras patients were obtained and examined under normal and polarized light microscopy. RESULTS: Under light microscopy, hairs from Chédiak-Higashi patients presented evenly distributed, regular melanin granules, larger than those seen in normal hairs. Under polarized light microscopy, shafts exhibited a bright and polychromatic refringence appearance. In contrast, hair from Griscelli-Prunieras patients, under light microscopy, exhibited bigger and irregular melanin granules, distributed mainly near the medulla. Under polarized light microscopy, shafts appeared monotonously white. CONCLUSION: Light microscopic examination of hair shafts of patients with Chédiak-Higashi or Griscelli-Prunieras syndrome reveals subtle differences that are useful in identifying both disorders, but not in distinguishing between them. We provide evidence that polarized light microscopy of hair shafts, an approach that has not been previously described, aids in differentiating between these syndromes. We propose hair study by polarized light microscopy as a helpful complementary diagnostic method for differential diagnosis between CHS and GPS, especially when the more sophisticated molecular studies are not available.OBJETIVO: Estudar e comparar o aspecto dos cabelos de portadores das síndromes de Chédiak-Higashi e Griscelli-Prunieras, tanto na microscopia óptica convencional quanto com luz polarizada. MÉTODO: Cabelos de dois doentes portadores da síndrome de Chédiak-Higashi e de dois portadores da síndrome de Griscelli-Prunieras foram obtidos e estudados tanto à microscopia convencional quanto com luz polarizada. RESULTADOS: Na microscopia óptica convencional, os cabelos dos doentes portadores da síndrome de Chédiak-Higashi mostraram

  2. A novel missense mutation (G43S) in the switch I region of Rab27A causing Griscelli syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Westbroek, W.; Tuchman, M.; Tinloy, B.

    2008-01-01

    Va). The molecular Rab27A/Mlph/MyoVA tripartite complex, which links melanosomes to the peripheral actin network, is required to achieve melanosome transfer to surrounding keratinocytes in the epidermis. Here we report a novel homozygous missense mutation c.127G>A, p.G43S in exon 2 of the RAB27A gene of an Afghani...... steps within cells. In melanocytes, the GTP-bound form of Rab27A associates with the membranes of mature fully-pigmented melanosomes through its geranylgeranyl group. Once attached, Rab27A recruits the downstream effector Melanophilin (Mlph) and the actin-dependent motor protein Myosin Va (Myo...... GSII patient. Laser scanning confocal microscopy showed that the G43S mutation, which is located in the highly conserved switch I region of Rab27A, induces perinuclear localization of melanosomes in normal melanocytes, and fails to restore melanosomes to the actin-rich periphery in GSII melanocytes. Co...

  3. A novel missense mutation (G43S) in the switch I region of Rab27A causing Griscelli syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Westbroek, W.; Tuchman, M.; Tinloy, B.

    2008-01-01

    steps within cells. In melanocytes, the GTP-bound form of Rab27A associates with the membranes of mature fully-pigmented melanosomes through its geranylgeranyl group. Once attached, Rab27A recruits the downstream effector Melanophilin (Mlph) and the actin-dependent motor protein Myosin Va (Myo...

  4. What Causes Rett Syndrome?

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    ... Español NICHD Theme Browse AZTopics Browse A-Z Adrenal Gland Disorders Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) Down Syndrome Endometriosis Learning ... Funding Opportunities & Notices Health A to Z List Adrenal Gland Disorders About NICHD Research Information Find a Study More ...

  5. What Causes Cushing's Syndrome?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... it causes has been given its own name, Cushing disease. Pituitary adenomas account for 70% (in adults) to ... is sometimes called ectopic (pronounced ek-TOP-ik ) Cushing disease and accounts for about 15% of non-medicine- ...

  6. Hepatopulmonary syndrome causing severe hypoxaemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lyngsøe, Bente Kjær; Andersen, Mette Winther; Eriksen, Jan

    2014-01-01

    Dyspnoea is a common complaint in patients with chronic liver disease. Hepatopulmonary syndrome (HPS) is an important cause to be aware of in the setting of liver disease, dyspnoea and hypoxaemia. HPS causes microvascular dilatation, angiogenesis and arteriovenous bypassing. The patients suffer...

  7. Unusual causes of Cushing's syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vassiliadi, Dimitra; Tsagarakis, Stylianos

    2007-11-01

    Although in the majority of the patients with Cushing's syndrome (CS), hypercortisolism is due to ACTH hypersecretion by a pituitary tumour or to ectopic ACTH secretion from an extrapituitary neoplastic lesion or to autonomous cortisol secretion by an adrenal tumour, in occasional patients a much rarer entity may be the cause of the syndrome. Herein, we attempted to summarise and categorise these unusual causes according to their presumed aetiology. To this end, we performed a comprehensive computer-based search for unusual or rare causes of CS. The following unusual forms of CS were identified: (i) ACTH hyperesecretion due to ectopic corticotroph adenomas in the parasellar region or the neurohypophysis, or as part of double adenomas, or gangliocytomas; (ii) ACTH hypersecretion due to ectopic CRH or CRH-like peptide secretion by various neoplasms; (iii) ACTH-independent cortisol hypersecretion from ectopic or bilateral adrenal adenomas; (iv) glucocorticoid hypersensitivity; (v) iatrogenic, due to megestrol administration or to ritonavir and fluticasone co-administration. Such unusual presentations of CS illustrate why Cushing's syndrome represents one of the most puzzling endocrine syndromes.

  8. Sjogren's Syndrome: Can It Cause Recurrent UTIs?

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    ... tract infections. Is there any evidence that Sjogren's syndrome causes recurrent UTIs? Answers from April Chang-Miller, M.D. No, but Sjogren's syndrome can cause symptoms that you might mistake for a urinary ...

  9. Radiation nephritis causing nephrotic syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jennette, J.C.; Ordonez, N.G.

    1983-12-01

    Clinical symptoms of acute radiation nephritis with nephrotic syndrome developed in a fifty-six-year-old woman after abdominal radiation therapy for an astrocytoma of the spinal cord. The diagnosis of radiation nephritis was confirmed by renal biopsy. To our knowledge, this is the first documented case of radiation nephritis associated with nephrotic syndrome.

  10. Triple X Syndrome: Symptoms and Causes

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    ... help determine the cause and suggest appropriate action. Causes Although triple X syndrome is genetic, it's usually not inherited — it's due to a random genetic error. Normally, people have 46 chromosomes in each cell, ...

  11. Germline KRAS mutations cause Noonan syndrome.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schubbert, S.; Zenker, M.; Rowe, S.L.; Boll, S.; Klein, C.; Bollag, G.; Burgt, I. van der; Musante, L.; Kalscheuer, V.M.M.; Wehner, L.E.; Nguyen, H.; West, B.; Zhang, K.Y.; Sistermans, E.A.; Rauch, A.; Niemeyer, C.M.; Shannon, K.; Kratz, C.P.

    2006-01-01

    Noonan syndrome (MIM 163950) is characterized by short stature, facial dysmorphism and cardiac defects. Heterozygous mutations in PTPN11, which encodes SHP-2, cause approximately 50% of cases of Noonan syndrome. The SHP-2 phosphatase relays signals from activated receptor complexes to downstream

  12. Mutations in ANTXR1 Cause GAPO Syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stranecky, V.; Hoischen, A.; Hartmannova, H.; Zaki, M.S.; Chaudhary, A.; Zudaire, E.; Noskova, L.; Baresova, V.; Pristoupilova, A.; Hodanova, K.; Sovova, J.; Hulkova, H.; Piherova, L.; Hehir-Kwa, J.Y.; Silva, D. De; Senanayake, M.P.; Farrag, S.; Zeman, J.; Martasek, P.; Baxova, A.; Afifi, H.H.; Croix, B. St.; Brunner, H.G.; Temtamy, S.; Kmoch, S.

    2013-01-01

    The genetic cause of GAPO syndrome, a condition characterized by growth retardation, alopecia, pseudoanodontia, and progressive visual impairment, has not previously been identified. We studied four ethnically unrelated affected individuals and identified homozygous nonsense mutations (c.262C>T

  13. Noonan Syndrome: Symptoms and Causes

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... in inadequate nutrition and poor weight gain. Growth hormone levels may be insufficient. The growth spurt that's usually seen during the teenage years may be delayed. But because this disorder causes bone maturity to be delayed, growth sometimes continues into ...

  14. A rare cause of Cushing's syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Folkestad, Lars; Andersen, Marianne Skovsager; Nielsen, Anne Lerberg

    2014-01-01

    Excess glucocorticoid levels cause Cushing's syndrome (CS) and may be due to pituitary, adrenal or ectopic tumours. Adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) levels are useful in identifying adrenal tumours. In rare cases, ACTH-producing phaeochromocytomas are the cause of CS. We present two cases of ACTH...

  15. Centurion Syndrome: A Rare Cause of Epiphora

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emrah Mat

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Centurion syndrome is a rare medial canthal tendon insertion anomaly that causes epiphora in young adults. The purpose of the current study is to describe the clinical signs and outcome of surgery in a 18-year-old male patient with Centurion syndrome. Ophthalmic examination revealed bilateral loss of lid globe apposition medially, with anterior displacement of the lacrimal puncta out of the tear lake and a prominent nasal bridge. The patient, whose findings were consistent with Centurion syndrome, underwent bilateral medial canthal tendon release and medial tarsoconjunctival resection. Tearing was completely resolved after surgery. Anterior medial canthal tendon release with medial conjunctivoplasty is an effective surgical approach in patients with Centurion syndrome. (Turk J Ophthalmol 2012; 42: 243-5

  16. Infectious Causes of Right Middle Lobe Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rashid, Aatif; Nanjappa, Sowmya; Greene, John N

    2017-01-01

    Right middle lobe (RML) syndrome is defined as recurrent or chronic obstruction or infection of the middle lobe of the right lung. Nonobstructive causes of middle lobe syndrome include inflammatory processes and defects in the bronchial anatomy and collateral ventilation. We report on 2 case patients with RML syndrome, one due to infection with Mycobacterium avium complex followed by M asiaticum infection and the other due to allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis. A history of atopy, asthma, or chronic obstructive pulmonary disease has been reported in up to one-half of those with RML. The diagnosis can be made by plain radiography, computed tomography, and bronchoscopy. Medical treatment consists of bronchodilators, mucolytics, and antimicrobials. Patients whose disease is unresponsive to treatment and those with obstructive RML syndrome can be offered surgical treatment.

  17. Superior mesenteric artery syndrome causing growth retardation

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    Halil İbrahim Taşcı

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Superior mesenteric artery syndrome is a rare and lifethreateningclinical condition caused by the compressionof the third portion of the duodenum between the aortaand the superior mesenteric artery’s proximal part. Thiscompression may lead to chronic intermittent, acute totalor partial obstruction. Sudden weight-loss and the relateddecrease in the fat tissue are considered to be the etiologicalreason of acute stenosis. Weight-loss accompaniedby nausea, vomiting, anorexia, epigastric pain, andbloating are the leading complaints. Barium radiographs,computerized tomography, conventional angiography,tomographic and magnetic resonance angiography areused in the diagnosis. There are medical and surgical approachesto treatment. We hereby present the case ofa patient with superior mesenteric artery syndrome withdelayed diagnosis.Key words: superior mesenteric artery syndrome, nausea-vomiting, anorexia

  18. Hemolytic Uremic Syndrome Caused by Enteroviral Infection

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    Ming-Dar Lee

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available A 4-year-old boy presented with enteroviral infection complicated with atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome (aHUS. Enterovirus RNA was detected by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR of both blood and kidney biopsy specimens. A survey of the complement system did not reveal a specific complement defect. Supportive therapy with blood components transfusion, plasma therapy, and immunosuppressants was administered, however, renal function did not recover. The results of this report demonstrate that the enterovirus is the cause of aHUS.

  19. Subacromial lipoma causing shoulder impingement syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sucuoglu, Hamza; Akgun, Kenan

    2017-01-01

    Subacromial lipoma represents a rare cause of subacromial impingement syndrome (SIS). A 49-year-old male patient presented to clinic with progressive right shoulder pain and limited movement, ongoing for approximately 1 month. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) revealed a lesion, compatible with lipoma, extending through subacromial space and pressing on supraspinatus muscle. After histopathological verification of lipoma, mass was excised. Postoperatively, patient completed 1 month physical therapy and rehabilitation program. Patient was free of pain at 4-month follow-up. Subacromial lipoma should be included in differential diagnosis of SIS for patients unresponsive to conservative treatment; MRI is very useful to determine precise etiology and inform surgical treatment.

  20. Piriformis syndrome: a cause of nondiscogenic sciatica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cass, Shane P

    2015-01-01

    Piriformis syndrome is a nondiscogenic cause of sciatica from compression of the sciatic nerve through or around the piriformis muscle. Patients typically have sciatica, buttocks pain, and worse pain with sitting. They usually have normal neurological examination results and negative straight leg raising test results. Flexion, adduction, and internal rotation of the hip, Freiberg sign, Pace sign, and direct palpation of the piriformis cause pain and may reproduce symptoms. Imaging and neurodiagnostic studies are typically normal and are used to rule out other etiologies for sciatica. Conservative treatment, including medication and physiotherapy, is usually helpful for the majority of patients. For recalcitrant cases, corticosteroid and botulinum toxin injections may be attempted. Ultrasound and other imaging modalities likely improve accuracy of injections. Piriformis tenotomy and decompression of the sciatic nerve can be done for those who do not respond.

  1. Red man syndrome caused by vancomycin powder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagahama, Yasunori; VanBeek, Marta J; Greenlee, Jeremy D W

    2018-04-01

    Red man syndrome (RMS) is a well-known hypersensitivity reaction caused by intravenous administration of vancomycin, with symptoms ranging from flushing, erythematous rash, pruritus, mild to profound hypotension, and even cardiac arrest. RMS has not previously been described from local application of vancomycin powder in a surgical wound, a technique increasingly utilized for infection prophylaxis in many surgical disciplines including neurosurgery. We describe the first reported case of RMS as a result of local intra-wound application of vancomycin powder for infection prophylaxis. A 73-year-old male with a history of Parkinson's disease underwent 2-stage deep brain stimulation implantation surgeries. Vancomycin powder was applied locally in the surgical wounds for infection prophylaxis during both of the surgeries. The patient developed a well-demarcated, geometric erythematous pruritic rash following the second surgery that was clinically diagnosed as RMS and resolved without sequelae. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. An Unusual Cause of Thoracic Outlet Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zampieri, Davide; Marulli, Giuseppe; Mammana, Marco; Calabrese, Francesca; Schiavon, Marco; Rea, Federico

    2016-12-01

    Thoracic outlet syndrome (TOS) is a condition arising from compression of the subclavian vessels and/or brachial plexus. Many factors or diseases may cause compression of the neurovascular bundle at the thoracic outlet. We describe the case of a 41-year-old woman with TOS who presented with vascular venous symptoms. Chest computed tomography (CT) scan showed a cystic mass at the level of cervico-thoracic junction, located between the left subclavian artery and vein, which appeared compressed. The cystic mass was removed through a cervical approach and it was found to be a cyst arising from the thoracic duct compressing and anteriorly dislocating the left subclavian vein. After surgery symptoms promptly disappeared. Copyright © 2016 Australian and New Zealand Society of Cardiac and Thoracic Surgeons (ANZSCTS) and the Cardiac Society of Australia and New Zealand (CSANZ). Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Hyperthyroidism caused by acquired immune deficiency syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, J-J; Zhou, J-J; Yuan, X-L; Li, C-Y; Sheng, H; Su, B; Sheng, C-J; Qu, S; Li, H

    2014-01-01

    Acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) is an immune deficiency disease. The etiology of hyperthyroidism, which can also be immune-related, is usually divided into six classical categories, including hypophyseal, hypothalamic, thyroid, neoplastic, autoimmune and inflammatory hyperthyroidism. Hyperthyroidism is a rare complication of highly active antimicrobial therapy (HAART) for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). Hyperthyroidism caused directly by AIDS has not been previously reported. A 29-year-old man who complained of dyspnea and asthenia for 1 month, recurrent fever for more than 20 days, and breathlessness for 1 week was admitted to our hospital. The thyroid function test showed that the level of free thyroxine (FT4) was higher than normal and that the level of thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) was below normal. He was diagnosed with hyperthyroidism. Additional investigations revealed a low serum albumin level and chest infection, along with diffuse lung fibrosis. Within 1 month, he experienced significant weight loss, no hand tremors, intolerance of heat, and perspiration proneness. We recommended an HIV examination; subsequently, AIDS was diagnosed based on the laboratory parameters. This is the first reported case of hyperthyroidism caused by AIDS. AIDS may cause hyperthyroidism by immunization regulation with complex, atypical, and easily ignored symptoms. Although hyperthyroidism is rare in patients with AIDS, clinicians should be aware of this potential interaction and should carefully monitor thyroid function in HIV-positive patients.

  4. Autoimmune Lymphoproliferative Syndrome: A Rare Cause of Disappearing HDL Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Swetha Sriram

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The term disappearing HDL syndrome refers to development of severe high density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C deficiency in noncritically ill patients with previously normal HDL-C and triglyceride levels. Autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome (ALPS is a disorder of the immune system due to an inability to regulate lymphocyte homeostasis resulting in lymphadenopathy and hepatosplenomegaly. We describe a 17-year-old boy who was evaluated in the lipid clinic for history of undetectable or low HDL-C and low density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C levels. Past medical history was significant for ALPS IA diagnosed at 10 years of age when he presented with bilateral cervical adenopathy. He was known to have a missense mutation in one allele of the FAS protein extracellular domain consistent with ALPS type 1A. HDL-C and LDL-C levels had been undetectable on multiple occasions, though lipids had not been measured prior to the diagnosis of ALPS. He had been receiving sirolimus for immunosuppression. The HDL-C and LDL-C levels correlated with disease activity and improved to normal levels during times when the activity of ALPS was controlled. This case highlights the importance of considering ALPS as a cause of low HDL-C and LDL-C levels in a child with evidence of lymphoproliferation.

  5. Azithromycin Causes a Novel Proarrhythmic Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Zhenjiang; Prinsen, Joseph K; Bersell, Kevin R; Shen, Wangzhen; Yermalitskaya, Liudmila; Sidorova, Tatiana; Luis, Paula B; Hall, Lynn; Zhang, Wei; Du, Liping; Milne, Ginger; Tucker, Patrick; George, Alfred L; Campbell, Courtney M; Pickett, Robert A; Shaffer, Christian M; Chopra, Nagesh; Yang, Tao; Knollmann, Bjorn C; Roden, Dan M; Murray, Katherine T

    2017-04-01

    The widely used macrolide antibiotic azithromycin increases risk of cardiovascular and sudden cardiac death, although the underlying mechanisms are unclear. Case reports, including the one we document here, demonstrate that azithromycin can cause rapid, polymorphic ventricular tachycardia in the absence of QT prolongation, indicating a novel proarrhythmic syndrome. We investigated the electrophysiological effects of azithromycin in vivo and in vitro using mice, cardiomyocytes, and human ion channels heterologously expressed in human embryonic kidney (HEK 293) and Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells. In conscious telemetered mice, acute intraperitoneal and oral administration of azithromycin caused effects consistent with multi-ion channel block, with significant sinus slowing and increased PR, QRS, QT, and QTc intervals, as seen with azithromycin overdose. Similarly, in HL-1 cardiomyocytes, the drug slowed sinus automaticity, reduced phase 0 upstroke slope, and prolonged action potential duration. Acute exposure to azithromycin reduced peak SCN5A currents in HEK cells (IC 50 =110±3 μmol/L) and Na + current in mouse ventricular myocytes. However, with chronic (24 hour) exposure, azithromycin caused a ≈2-fold increase in both peak and late SCN5A currents, with findings confirmed for I Na in cardiomyocytes. Mild block occurred for K + currents representing I Kr (CHO cells expressing hERG; IC 50 =219±21 μmol/L) and I Ks (CHO cells expressing KCNQ1+KCNE1; IC 50 =184±12 μmol/L), whereas azithromycin suppressed L-type Ca ++ currents (rabbit ventricular myocytes, IC 50 =66.5±4 μmol/L) and I K1 (HEK cells expressing Kir2.1, IC 50 =44±3 μmol/L). Chronic exposure to azithromycin increases cardiac Na + current to promote intracellular Na + loading, providing a potential mechanistic basis for the novel form of proarrhythmia seen with this macrolide antibiotic. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  6. Goldenhar syndrome: a cause of secondary immunodeficiency?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    De Golovine Serge

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Goldenhar syndrome (GS results from an aberrant development of the 1st and 2nd branchial arches. There is a wide range of clinical manifestations, the most common being microtia, hemifacial microsomia, epibulbar dermoids and vertebral malformations. We present two cases of GS and secondary immunodeficiency due to anatomical defects characteristic of this disorder. Case 1 (3-year-old female averaged 6 episodes of sinusitis and otitis media per year. Case 2 (7-year-old female also had recurrent otitis media, an episode of bacterial pneumonia, and 2 episodes of bacterial meningitis. Their immune evaluation included a complete blood count with differential, serum immunoglobulin levels and specific antibody concentrations, lymphocyte phenotyping, and mitogen and antigen responses, the results of which were all within normal ranges. Both children demonstrated major structural abnormalities of the inner and middle ear structures, retention of fluid in mastoid air cells, and chronic sinusitis by computed tomography. These two cases illustrate how a genetically-associated deviation of the middle ear cleft can cause recurrent infections and chronic inflammation of the middle ear and adjacent sinuses, even meninges, leading to a greatly reduced quality of life for the child and parents.

  7. What Causes Prader-Willi Syndrome?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this section supported. About 65% to 75% of Prader-Willi syndrome cases result from the loss of function of several ... from each parent. In 20% to 30% of Prader-Willi syndrome cases, the child has two chromosome 15s from the ...

  8. Triple X Syndrome: Symptoms and Causes

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... girls and women with triple X syndrome have intelligence in the normal range, but possibly slightly lower ... school, social and relationship problems Anxiety and other emotional problems, such as attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) ...

  9. Isolated Horner's syndrome caused by intraoral gunshot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toledano, R; Corres, J; Culebras, A; Riva, E; Masjuán, J

    2006-12-01

    A 45-year-old man developed Horner's syndrome after sustaining an intraoral gunshot in a suicide attempt. Examination did not show any major vascular injury or other neurological symptoms. Radiograph of the skull and helical computed tomography angiography of the brain and neck detected a bullet embedded in the interior of the left internal carotid artery (ICA) sheath. Surgical examination showed an intact left ICA. Horner's syndrome resulting from intraoral trauma rarely presents as an isolated sign and is generally associated with carotid injuries. It may herald a life-threatening artery injury and needs urgent investigation.

  10. Unusual cause of lower extremity wounds: Cobb syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abtahi-Naeini, Bahareh; Saffaei, Ali; Pourazizi, Mohsen

    2016-10-01

    Cobb syndrome (Cutaneomeningospinal Angiomatosis) is a rare segmental neurocutaneous syndrome associated with metameric cutaneous and spinal cord arteriovenous malformations (AVMs). In this syndrome, capillary malformation or angiokeratoma-like lesions are formed in a dermatomal distribution, with an AVM in the corresponding segment of the spinal cord. The spinal cord lesions can cause neurological disorder and paraplegia, which typically develop during young adulthood. We report a 32-year-old male with the Cobb syndrome associated with lower extremity painful wounds and acute-onset paraplegia due to metameric vascular malformations. © 2015 Medicalhelplines.com Inc and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Epidural tumour (calcified fibroma) as cause of a 'Cervical Syndrome'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Piotrowski, W.P.

    1983-01-01

    A calcified fibroma caused a so called cervical syndrome not responding to medical treatment. In the computerized tomography a compression of the cervical spinal cord could be demonstrated. From this the indication for the operation was given. (Author)

  12. A restricted spectrum of NRAS mutations causes Noonan syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cirstea, Ion C.; Kutsche, Kerstin; Dvorsky, Radovan; Gremer, Lothar; Carta, Claudio; Horn, Denise; Roberts, Amy E.; Lepri, Francesca; Merbitz-Zahradnik, Torsten; Koenig, Rainer; Kratz, Christian P.; Pantaleoni, Francesca; Dentici, Maria L.; Joshi, Victoria A.; Kucherlapati, Raju S.; Mazzanti, Laura; Mundlos, Stefan; Patton, Michael A.; Silengo, Margherita Cirillo; Rossi, Cesare; Zampino, Giuseppe; Digilio, Cristina; Stuppia, Liborio; Seemanova, Eva; Pennacchio, Len A.; Gelb, Bruce D.; Dallapiccola, Bruno; Wittinghofer, Alfred; Ahmadian, Mohammad R.; Tartaglia, Marco; Zenker, Martin

    Noonan syndrome, a developmental disorder characterized by congenital heart defects, reduced growth, facial dysmorphism and variable cognitive deficits, is caused by constitutional dysregulation of the RAS-MAPK signaling pathway. Here we report that germline NRAS mutations conferring enhanced

  13. Restless Legs Syndrome -- Causes and Symptoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... miles): 10 25 50 Share: Essentials in Sleep Insomnia Overview & Facts Symptoms & Causes Diagnosis & Self Tests Treatment Sleep Apnea Overview & Facts ... Self Test & Diagnosis Treatment Snoring Overview and Facts Causes and Symptoms Self Tests & ... Insomnia Short Sleeper Hypersomnias Narcolepsy Insufficient ...

  14. [Twiddler's syndrome as the cause of pacemaker electrode displacement].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grønbech, Keea Treu; Hansen, Michael Gilså

    2013-04-08

    Twiddler's syndrome is a rare cause of pacemaker electrode displacement. The displacement is caused by the patient's manipulation with the pacemaker, so the electrode is retracted. We describe a case of a 79-year-old overweight woman with a known psychiatric anamnesis, who was admitted twice with twiddler's syndrome. Age and overweight are known risk factors for twiddler's syndrome; and in this case the patient's psychiatric habitus was probably an additional risk factor. Before performing a pacemaker implantation it is important to take the patient's risk factors into account, and thus consider submuscular implantation.

  15. Shoulder impingement syndrome : evaluation of the causes with MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Yong Ho; Song, In Sup; Chung, Hun Young; Yoon, Sang Jin; Kim, Yang Soo; Shim, Hyung Jin; Choi, Young Hee; Lee, Jong Beum; Lee, Yong Chul; Kim, Kun Sang [Chungang Univ. College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Yun Sun [Eulji Hospital, College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1999-12-01

    Various mechanical causes which induce shoulder impingement syndrome have been identified with the help of MRI. The aim of this study is to evaluate the incidence of such causes. A total of 54 patients with clinically confirmed shoulder impingement syndrome and a normal control group(n=20) without symptoms were included. We evaluated the incidence of hook shaped acromion, low lying acromion, downward slope of the acromion, subacromial spur, acromioclavicular joint hypertrophy, coracoacromial ligament hypertrophy, high cuff muscle bulk, and os acromiale. Among the 54 patients, the following conditions were present: acromioclavicular joint hypertrophy(n=36), coracoacromial ligament hypertrophy(n=20), subacromial spur(n=18), downward sloping of the acromion(n=16), hook shaped acromion(n=11), relatively high cuff muscle bulk(n=6), low lying acromion relative to the clavicle(n=3), and os acromiale(n=1). In the normal control group there were nine cases of acromioclavicular joint hypertrophy, nine of coracoacromial ligament hypertrophy, nine of downward sloping acromion, and three of low lying acromion, but hook shaped acromion, high cuff muscle bulk, and os acromiale were not found. Among 54 patients, the syndrome was due to five simultancous causes in one patient, four causes in two, three causes in 12, two causes in 22, and one cause in 17. Hook shaped acromion and subacromial spur are the statistically significant causes of shoulder impingement syndrome. In 69% of patients, the condition was due to more than one cause.

  16. Shoulder impingement syndrome : evaluation of the causes with MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Yong Ho; Song, In Sup; Chung, Hun Young; Yoon, Sang Jin; Kim, Yang Soo; Shim, Hyung Jin; Choi, Young Hee; Lee, Jong Beum; Lee, Yong Chul; Kim, Kun Sang; Choi, Yun Sun

    1999-01-01

    Various mechanical causes which induce shoulder impingement syndrome have been identified with the help of MRI. The aim of this study is to evaluate the incidence of such causes. A total of 54 patients with clinically confirmed shoulder impingement syndrome and a normal control group(n=20) without symptoms were included. We evaluated the incidence of hook shaped acromion, low lying acromion, downward slope of the acromion, subacromial spur, acromioclavicular joint hypertrophy, coracoacromial ligament hypertrophy, high cuff muscle bulk, and os acromiale. Among the 54 patients, the following conditions were present: acromioclavicular joint hypertrophy(n=36), coracoacromial ligament hypertrophy(n=20), subacromial spur(n=18), downward sloping of the acromion(n=16), hook shaped acromion(n=11), relatively high cuff muscle bulk(n=6), low lying acromion relative to the clavicle(n=3), and os acromiale(n=1). In the normal control group there were nine cases of acromioclavicular joint hypertrophy, nine of coracoacromial ligament hypertrophy, nine of downward sloping acromion, and three of low lying acromion, but hook shaped acromion, high cuff muscle bulk, and os acromiale were not found. Among 54 patients, the syndrome was due to five simultancous causes in one patient, four causes in two, three causes in 12, two causes in 22, and one cause in 17. Hook shaped acromion and subacromial spur are the statistically significant causes of shoulder impingement syndrome. In 69% of patients, the condition was due to more than one cause

  17. [Lyell syndrome and Stevens-Johnson syndrome caused by lamotrigine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bocquet, H; Farmer, M; Bressieux, J M; Barzegar, C; Jullien, M; Soto, B; Roujeau, J C; Revuz, J

    1999-01-01

    Lamotrigine is a new anticonvulsant belonging to the triazine family. Several cases of Stevens-Johnson syndrome (SJS) and toxic epidermal necrolysis (TEN) have been described in patients taking this drug. We report 2 cases in children attending the same hospital. Two children, aged 9 and 13 years, developed SJS and TEN respectively, 3 and 28 days after lamotrigine was added to their usual anticonvulsant regimen. In both cases, outcome was favorable despite major decline in psychomotor capacity in one. In the first case, chronological attributability was plausible for lamotrigine and doubtful for sodium valproate, clonazepam and hydrocortisone. In the second case, chronological attributability was probable for amoxicillin, plausible for lamotrigine and doubtful for sodium valproate, but the numerous previous absorptions of amoxicillin made lamotrigine more suspect. The risk of Steven-Johnson syndrome and toxic epidermal necrolysis is high with lamotrigine with an estimated frequency of 1/1000. This risk is probably higher than with other anticonvulsants. Associating lamotrigine with sodium valproate increases the frequency of adverse skin reactions.

  18. Black widow spider envenomation, a rare cause of Horner's syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strowd, Roy E; Scott, Blake; Walker, Francis O

    2012-06-01

    Horner's syndrome involves a triad of eyelid ptosis, miosis, and facial anhidrosis that results from disruption of the oculosympathetic pathway. Acquired Horner's syndrome is associated with a variety of medical conditions including Pancoast tumor and carotid dissection. We report the unique case of a 47-year-old man presenting with Horner's syndrome 4 weeks after black widow spider envenomation. Workup did not reveal any alternative explanatory etiology. We hypothesize that late sequelae of black widow spider envenomation secondary to autonomic nerve injury or retrograde axonal transport after mechanical inoculation may have led to an acquired defect in the oculosympathetic pathway resulting in a Horner's syndrome. This case introduces a rare cause of Horner's syndrome and highlights the importance of environmental exposures in the evaluation of these patients. Copyright © 2012 Wilderness Medical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. A nonsense mutation in FMR1 causing fragile X syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grønskov, Karen; Brøndum-Nielsen, Karen; Dedic, Alma

    2011-01-01

    Fragile X syndrome is a common cause of inherited intellectual disability. It is caused by lack of the FMR1 gene product FMRP. The most frequent cause is the expansion of a CGG repeat located in the 5'UTR of FMR1. Alleles with 200 or more repeats become hypermethylated and transcriptionally silent....... Only few patients with intragenic point mutations in FMR1 have been reported and, currently, routine analysis of patients referred for fragile X syndrome includes solely analysis for repeat expansion and methylation status. We identified a substitution in exon 2 of FMR1, c.80C>A, causing a nonsense...... mutation p.Ser27X, in a patient with classical clinical symptoms of fragile X syndrome. The mother who carried the mutation in heterozygous form presented with mild intellectual impairment. We conclude that further studies including western blot and DNA sequence analysis of the FMR1 gene should...

  20. Parinaud's oculoglandular syndrome and possibly causing cortical cataract

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariana Heid Rocha Hemerly

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available According to the World Health Organization, cataract is the leading cause of blindness and visual impairment throughout the world. However, the etiology of cataracts often remains unknown. This report describes the development of cortical cataract in a patient after Parinaud's oculoglandular syndrome caused by the fungus Sporothrix schenckii.

  1. Giant lipoma: an unusual cause of carpal tunnel syndrome | Jalan ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Carpal tunnel syndrome, in its idiopathic form, is an extremely common entrapment neuropathy in the clinical practice however secondary compressive causes are rare. Among secondary causes, tumors are even rarer. Although lipomas are the most common soft tissue tumor in the body, <5% of the benign tumors of the ...

  2. Tourette Syndrome (TS): Risk Factors and Causes

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... having TS. The causes of TS and other tic disorders are not well understood. Although the risk factors ... Psychiatry. 2017; 74(7): 740-746. Related Links Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) Child Development Positive Parenting Tips A-Z ...

  3. Causes, effects and therapy of radiophobie syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Becker, K.

    2005-01-01

    The basic symptoms and causes of the origination of radiophobie in Germany and other developed countries are considered. The economic and ecological consequences of the ideological antinuclear politics and the struggle against NPP are analyzed. The measures on overcoming radiophobie among population of developed countries are proposed. The particular attention for this problem solving is given to the position of mass media [ru

  4. Genetic, chromosomal, and syndromic causes of neural tube defects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seidahmed, Mohammed Z.; Abdelbasit, Omer B.; Shaheed, Meeralebbae M.; Alhussein, Khalid A.; Miqdad, Abeer M.; Samadi, Abdulmohsen S.; Khalil, Mohammed I.; Al-Mardawi, Elham; Salih, Mustafa A.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To ascertain the incidence, and describe the various forms of neural tube defects (NTDs) due to genetic, chromosomal, and syndromic causes. Methods: We carried out a retrospective analysis of data retrieved from the medical records of newborn infants admitted to the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit with NTDs and their mothers spanning 14 years (1996-2009) at the Security Forces Hospital, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. The cases were ascertained by a perinatologist, neonatologist, geneticist, radiologist, and neurologist. The literature was reviewed via a MEDLINE search. Only liveborn babies were included. Permission from the Educational Committee at the Security Forces Hospital was obtained prior to the collection of data. Results: Out of 103 infants with NTDs admitted during this period, 20 (19.4%) were found to have an underlying genetic syndromic, chromosomal and/or other anomalies. There were 5 cases of Meckel-Gruber syndrome, 2 Joubert syndrome, one Waardenburg syndrome, one Walker-Warburg syndrome, 2 chromosomal disorders, 2 caudal regression, one amniotic band disruption sequence, one associated with omphalocele, one with diaphragmatic hernia, and 4 with multiple congenital anomalies. Conclusions: There is a high rate of underlying genetic syndromic and/or chromosomal causes of NTDs in the Saudi Arabian population due to the high consanguinity rate. Identification of such association can lead to more accurate provisions of genetic counseling to the family including preimplantation genetic diagnosis or early termination of pregnancies associated with lethal conditions. PMID:25551112

  5. Eagle Syndrome Causing Vascular Compression with Cervical Rotation: Case Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Demirtaş, Hakan; Kayan, Mustafa; Koyuncuoğlu, Hasan Rıfat; Çelik, Ahmet Orhan; Kara, Mustafa; Şengeze, Nihat

    2016-01-01

    Eagle syndrome is a condition caused by an elongated styloid process. Unilateral face, neck and ear pain, stinging pain, foreign body sensation and dysphagia can be observed with this syndrome. Rarely, the elongated styloid process may cause pain by compressing the cervical segment of the internal carotid and the surrounding sympathetic plexus, and that pain spreading along the artery can cause neurological symptoms such as vertigo and syncope. In this case report we presented a very rare eagle syndrome with neurological symptoms that occurred suddenly with cervical rotation. The symptoms disappeared as suddenly as they occurred, with the release of pressure in neutral position. We also discussed CT angiographic findings of this case. Radiological diagnosis of the Eagle syndrome that is manifested with a wide variety of symptoms and causes diagnostic difficulties when it is not considered in the differential diagnosis is easy in patients with specific findings. CT angiography is a fast and effective examination in terms of showing compression in patients with the Eagle syndrome that is considered to be atypical and causes vascular compression

  6. Iatrogenic Cushing’s syndrome caused by intranasal steroid use

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dursun, Fatma; Kirmizibekmez, Heves

    2017-01-01

    Cushing’s syndrome (CS) is common after oral steroid use and has also been reported following topical or inhaled use, but it is extremely uncommon after intranasal administration. This is the case of a 6-year-old child who developed Cushing’s syndrome after intranasal application of dexamethasone sodium phosphate for a period of 6 months. Pediatricians and other clinical practitioners should be aware that high-dose and long-term nasal steroid administration may cause iatrogenic Cushing’s syndrome characterized by complications of glucocorticoid excess as well as serious and even life-threatening complications of adrenal insufficiency. PMID:28752153

  7. Iatrogenic Cushing's syndrome caused by intranasal steroid use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dursun, Fatma; Kirmizibekmez, Heves

    2017-01-01

    Cushing's syndrome (CS) is common after oral steroid use and has also been reported following topical or inhaled use, but it is extremely uncommon after intranasal administration. This is the case of a 6-year-old child who developed Cushing's syndrome after intranasal application of dexamethasone sodium phosphate for a period of 6 months. Pediatricians and other clinical practitioners should be aware that high-dose and long-term nasal steroid administration may cause iatrogenic Cushing's syndrome characterized by complications of glucocorticoid excess as well as serious and even life-threatening complications of adrenal insufficiency.

  8. Subacromial osteochondroma: A rare cause of impingement syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Çıtlak, Atilla; Akgün, Ulaş; Bulut, Tugrul; Aslan, Cihan; Mete, Berna Dirim; Şener, Muhittin

    2015-01-01

    Subacromial impingement syndrome is one of the most common disorders of shoulder. Scapula is a very rare site for osteochondromas, and osteochondromas arising under the acromion cause impingement syndrome. We presented 34-year old female patient with subacromial impingement syndrome secondary to osteochondroma. She had received conservative treatment several times in other clinics. The osteochondroma causing impingement was not diagnosed. Physical examination of the right shoulder revealed 90° flexion, 70° abduction, 20° external rotation and internal rotation to sacrum. X-ray, CT and MRI of the shoulder was obtained. Osteochondroma of the acromion (35×33×25mm) causing impingement was detected. The osteochondroma of acromion compressed, displaced and ruptured the supraspinatus tendon. Also an osseous prominence of glenoid was detected during shoulder arthroscopy, and it was removed arthroscopically. The giant osteochondroma of acromion could not remove arthroscopically due to the size of the lesion, and it was removed totally through a mini open approach. Histopathological examination confirmed the diagnosis of osteochondroma. Scapular, clavicular and humeral osteochondromas cause impingement syndrome. Osteochondroma should be treated with total excision. Recurrences can be seen due to insufficient removal of osteochondromas. We think that, total excision is important to prevent recurrence. Subacromial osteochondroma is a very rare cause of impingement syndrome, and if it isn't diagnosed early it limits shoulder movements, causes severe shoulder impingement and rotator cuff tear. The diagnosis of subacromial osteochondroma should be considered in any patient with shoulder impingement syndrome and good functional results can be expected following total excision. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  9. High thoracic ossification of ligamentum flavum causing partial Horner syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Dong Ha; Lee, Su Hun; Lee, Jun Seok; Song, Geun Sung; Son, Dong Wuk

    2018-02-28

    We report a case of high thoracic ossification of the ligamentum flavum (OLF) causing a partial Horner's syndrome. A 57-year-old man developed a walking disorder, as well as right-sided miosis and anhidrosis. Magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated a spinal cord compressing T2-T3 OLF. The patient improved after surgery.

  10. Mutations in RNF216 do not cause 4H syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wolf, N.I.; Bernard, G.

    2015-01-01

    We comment on the recent publication by Ganos et al. [1] classifying a patient with non-specific white matter abnormalities, cerebellar atrophy, hypogonadotropic hypogonadism and absent lower median incisors as 4H syndrome. He had mutations in RNF216. Mutations in this gene cause Gordon-Holmes

  11. Acute coronary syndrome caused by anomalous origin of the right ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Acute coronary syndrome caused by anomalous origin of the right coronary artery from the left sinus of Valsalva. AS Assiri. Abstract. No Abstract. West African Journal of Medicine Vol. 24(3) 2005: 278-279. Full Text: EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT · DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT.

  12. A Rare Cause of Obstructive Sleep Apnea Syndrome: Retropharyngeal Lipoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Okan Dilek

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Lipoma is the most common benign mesenchymal neoplasm. About 16% of lipomas arise in the head and neck region, especially in the posterior neck. Large lipomas that originate from the retropharyngeal space may cause dyspnea, dysphagia, and snoring and occasionally may lead to obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS. Herein, we report a 45-year-old male patient with OSAS caused by a giant retropharyngeal lipoma with emphasis on CT findings.

  13. The syndrome of inappropriate antidiuretic hormone: prevalence, causes and consequences.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Hannon, M J

    2010-06-01

    Hyponatraemia is the commonest electrolyte abnormality found in hospital inpatients, and is associated with a greatly increased morbidity and mortality. The syndrome of inappropriate antidiuretic hormone (SIADH) is the most frequent cause of hyponatraemia in hospital inpatients. SIADH is the clinical and biochemical manifestation of a wide range of disease processes, and every case warrants investigation of the underlying cause. In this review, we will examine the prevalence, pathophysiology, clinical characteristics and clinical consequences of hyponatraemia due to SIADH.

  14. Trismus Pseudocamptodactyly Syndrome: A Sporadic Cause of Trismus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prathima Sreenivasan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Trismus pseudocamptodactyly syndrome is a very rare autosomal dominant inherited disorder characterized by the inability to completely open the mouth (trismus and the presence of abnormally short tendon units causing the fingers to curve (camptodactyly. Early diagnosis and management of this condition is important to prevent facial deformities in the patient. Reporting such a case is important as case reports are one of the sources of data for calculating the prevalence of rare diseases. Here, we report a case of trismus pseudocamptodactyly syndrome in an eight-year-old boy with a brief review of the literature.

  15. Cushing's syndrome caused by use of synthetic ocular steroid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Üstyol, A; Kökali, F; Duru, N; Duman, M A; Elevli, M

    2017-12-01

    Cases of Cushing's syndrome (CS) following ocular steroid use have been reported in recent years, albeit rarely. We report a case of iatrogenic CS in a child induced by fluorometholone-containing eyedrops. Our patient was referred to our endocrinology clinic due to rapid weight gain. His history revealed that 1.5 months previously he had been started on fluorometholone eyedrops. To the best of our knowledge, no cases of CS have been reported following ocular fluorometholone use. Although eyedrops containing potent glucocorticoids may lead to CS, fluorometholone, a relatively less potent steroid, may also cause the syndrome, as in our case. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Single Gene and Syndromic Causes of Obesity: Illustrative Examples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butler, Merlin G

    2016-01-01

    Obesity is a significant health problem in westernized societies, particularly in the United States where it has reached epidemic proportions in both adults and children. The prevalence of childhood obesity has doubled in the past 30 years. The causation is complex with multiple sources, including an obesity promoting environment with plentiful highly dense food sources and overall decreased physical activity noted for much of the general population, but genetic factors clearly play a role. Advances in genetic technology using candidate gene approaches, genome-wide association studies, structural and expression microarrays, and next generation sequencing have led to the discovery of hundreds of genes recognized as contributing to obesity. Polygenic and monogenic causes of obesity are now recognized including dozens of examples of syndromic obesity with Prader-Willi syndrome, as a classical example and recognized as the most common known cause of life-threatening obesity. Genetic factors playing a role in the causation of obesity will be discussed along with the growing evidence of single genes and the continuum between monogenic and polygenic obesity. The clinical and genetic aspects of four classical but rare obesity-related syndromes (ie, Prader-Willi, Alström, fragile X, and Albright hereditary osteodystrophy) will be described and illustrated in this review of single gene and syndromic causes of obesity. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Dominant de novo DSP mutations cause erythrokeratodermia-cardiomyopathy syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyden, Lynn M; Kam, Chen Y; Hernández-Martín, Angela; Zhou, Jing; Craiglow, Brittany G; Sidbury, Robert; Mathes, Erin F; Maguiness, Sheilagh M; Crumrine, Debra A; Williams, Mary L; Hu, Ronghua; Lifton, Richard P; Elias, Peter M; Green, Kathleen J; Choate, Keith A

    2016-01-15

    Disorders of keratinization (DOK) show marked genotypic and phenotypic heterogeneity. In most cases, disease is primarily cutaneous, and further clinical evaluation is therefore rarely pursued. We have identified subjects with a novel DOK featuring erythrokeratodermia and initially-asymptomatic, progressive, potentially fatal cardiomyopathy, a finding not previously associated with erythrokeratodermia. We show that de novo missense mutations clustered tightly within a single spectrin repeat of DSP cause this novel cardio-cutaneous disorder, which we term erythrokeratodermia-cardiomyopathy (EKC) syndrome. We demonstrate that DSP mutations in our EKC syndrome subjects affect localization of desmosomal proteins and connexin 43 in the skin, and result in desmosome aggregation, widening of intercellular spaces, and lipid secretory defects. DSP encodes desmoplakin, a primary component of desmosomes, intercellular adhesion junctions most abundant in the epidermis and heart. Though mutations in DSP are known to cause other disorders, our cohort features the unique clinical finding of severe whole-body erythrokeratodermia, with distinct effects on localization of desmosomal proteins and connexin 43. These findings add a severe, previously undescribed syndrome featuring erythrokeratodermia and cardiomyopathy to the spectrum of disease caused by mutation in DSP, and identify a specific region of the protein critical to the pathobiology of EKC syndrome and to DSP function in the heart and skin. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  18. Prevalence and causes of back pain syndromes in children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.A. Smirnova

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We present a review of literature devoted to epidemiology, and the nosological and syndromal structure of back pain in children. The data of our own study of school-aged children with back pain are presented. The structure of back pain syndromes in 105 children has been analyzed using the medical aid appealability data. The results of a comprehensive clinical and instrumental study demonstrated that the children mostly had lumbosacral pain (52.4% of cases; neck pain was observed in 29.5% of cases; while thoracic pain syndromes were observed in 18.1% of cases. Congenital defect of the connective tissue was diagnosed in 16.19% of children; congenital abnormalities of the spine, in 15.2%; scoliosis (idiopathic and secondary, in 8.6%; and Scheuermann-Mau's disease, in 5.71%. The conclusion has been made about the high prevalence of back pain in schoolchildren. Muscular tonic syndromes were prevailing in the clinical structure in children; radicular syndromes were less frequent. Musculoskeletal disorders were the main causes of back pain. Congenital defect of the connective tissue was often observed, which was revealed as functional instability of the vertebral motor segment, spondylolisthesis due to weak ligaments, and disc protrusions. Congenital abnormalities of the spine, scoliosis, and Scheuermann-Mau' disease were observed less often. 

  19. Another cause of vaccine encephalopathy: a case of Angelman syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novy, Jan; Catarino, Claudia B; Chinthapalli, Krishna; Smith, Shelagh M; Clayton-Smith, Jill; Hennekam, Raoul C M; Hammond, Peter; Sisodiya, Sanjay M

    2012-05-01

    Dravet syndrome has been found recently as an important underlying condition in cases of alleged vaccine encephalopathy after pertussis vaccination, where vaccination seemed to have precipitated the occurrence of the disease without modifying the long-term course. We report on a patient diagnosed with Angelman syndrome in her fifth decade, in whom the intellectual disability and epilepsy had been assumed to be caused by a vaccine encephalopathy following smallpox vaccination. Clinical features of Angelman syndrome had faded away. The history of the present patient suggests that genetic conditions other than Dravet syndrome can be associated with an alleged vaccine encephalopathy. A history of vaccine encephalopathy is rare among patients with learning disability and refractory epilepsy (1.4% in our cohort), but it should lead to consideration of a comprehensive genetic work-up if Dravet syndrome is excluded. The early history of the patient, when available, should guide the investigations. Medico-legal aspects are also discussed. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  20. [A rare cause of oral pain: The pterygoid hamulus syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bandini, M; Corre, P; Huet, P; Khonsari, R H

    2015-12-01

    Pterygoid hamulus syndrome (PHS) is a rare cause of orofacial and oropharyngeal pain. PHS can be associated with a hamulus hypertrophy or with a bursitis of the palatosalpingeus but it has not always an anatomic cause. A 36-year-old woman was seen for a constant posterior palatal pain spreading towards oropharynx, increasing during swallowing and lasting for more than 6 months. Physical examination showed an erythema of the soft palate, medially to the hamulus. Hamulus palpation was painful and revealed hamulus hypertrophia on both sides. A bilateral PHS was evocated. This observation is typical of a PHS. We propose a review of the literature of this little-known syndrome. Treatment is initially conservative (corticosteroids) but surgery can be proposed in case of morphological anomalies of the hamulus. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  1. Trismus Pseudocamptodactyly Syndrome: A Sporadic Cause of Trismus

    OpenAIRE

    Sreenivasan, Prathima; Peedikayil, Faizal C.; Raj, Sumal V.; Meundi, Manasa Anand

    2013-01-01

    Trismus pseudocamptodactyly syndrome is a very rare autosomal dominant inherited disorder characterized by the inability to completely open the mouth (trismus) and the presence of abnormally short tendon units causing the fingers to curve (camptodactyly). Early diagnosis and management of this condition is important to prevent facial deformities in the patient. Reporting such a case is important as case reports are one of the sources of data for calculating the prevalence of rare diseases. He...

  2. Past and current cause-specific mortality in Eisenmenger syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hjortshøj, Cristel M Sørensen; Kempny, Aleksander; Jensen, Annette Schophuus

    2017-01-01

    Aims: Eisenmenger syndrome (ES) is associated with considerable morbidity and mortality. Therapeutic strategies have changed during the 2000s in conjunction with an emphasis on specialist follow-up. The aim of this study was to determine the cause-specific mortality in ES and evaluate any relevant...... changes between 1977 and 2015. Methods and results: This is a retrospective, descriptive multicentre study. A total of 1546 patients (mean age 38.7 ± 15.4 years; 36% male) from 13 countries were included. Cause-specific mortality was examined before and after July 2006, 'early' and 'late', respectively....... Over a median follow-up of 6.1 years (interquartile range 2.1-21.5 years) 558 deaths were recorded; cause-specific mortality was identified in 411 (74%) cases. Leading causes of death were heart failure (34%), infection (26%), sudden cardiac death (10%), thromboembolism (8%), haemorrhage (7%), and peri...

  3. Bladder distension as a cause of abdominal compartment syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yasir, M.; Hoda, M.Q.

    2018-01-01

    Abdominal compartment syndrome (ACS) is increasingly identified in critically ill patient and its harmful effects are well documented. The disparity among the pressure, volume in abdominal cavity and its contents, results in ACS. The actual incidence of ACS is not known. However, it has been observed predominantly in patients with severe blunt and penetrating abdominal trauma, ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysms, retro- and intra-peritoneal hemorrhage, pneumoperitoneum, neoplasm, pancreatitis, ascites and multiple bone fracture. We present a case of 40-year female who underwent emergency cesarean section and developed abdominal compartment syndrome due to urinary bladder distension secondary to blockade of urinary catheter with blood clots. This is a very unusual cause of ACS. (author)

  4. Frontal mucocele with intracranial extension causing frontal lobe syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weidmayer, Sara

    2015-06-01

    Mucoceles are mucus-containing cysts that form in paranasal sinuses; although mucoceles themselves are benign, this case report highlights the extensive damage they can cause as their expansion may lead to bony erosion and extension of the mucocele into the orbit and cranium; it also presents a rarely reported instance of frontal sinus mucocele leading to frontal lobe syndrome. A thorough discussion and review of mucoceles is included. A 68-year-old white man presented with intermittent diplopia and a pressure sensation in the right eye. He had a history of chronic sinusitis and had had endoscopic sinus surgery 5 years prior. A maxillofacial computed tomography scan revealed a large right frontal sinus mucocele, which had caused erosion along the medial wall of the right orbit and the outer and inner tables of the right frontal sinus. The mucocele had protruded both into the right orbit and intracranially, causing mass effect on the frontal lobe, which led to frontal lobe syndrome. The patient was successfully treated with endoscopic right ethmoidectomy, radial frontal sinusotomy, marsupialization of the mucocele, and transcutaneous irrigation. Paranasal sinus mucoceles may expand and lead to bony erosion and can become very invasive in surrounding structures such as the orbit and cranium. This case not only exhibits a very rare presentation of frontal sinus mucocele with intracranial extension and frontal lobe mass effect causing a frontal lobe syndrome but also demonstrates many of the ocular and visual complications commonly associated with paranasal sinus mucoceles. Early identification and surgical intervention is vital for preventing and reducing morbidity associated with invasive mucoceles, and the patient must be followed regularly to monitor for recurrence.

  5. Proteus syndrome: A rare cause of gigantic limb

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nandini Chakrabarti

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A congenital disorder with variable manifestations, including partial gigantism of the hands and feet with hypertrophy of soles, nevi, hemihypertrophy, gynecomastia, macrocephaly and other skull abnormalities, and abdominal lipomatosis. The cause is unknown, although a genetic origin, generally of autosomal-dominant transmission, has been conjectured. Symptoms can be treated, but there is no known cure. We present the case of a young male with grotesque overgrowth of the right lower limb, splenomegaly and multiple nevi. Angiography revealed venous malformation within the limb. The findings are in conformity to the criteria for the Proteus syndrome.

  6. Os acromiale causing shoulder impingement syndrome: a case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Romero, I.; Rodriguez, A.; Roca, M.; Garcia, Y.

    2001-01-01

    Shoulder impingement syndrome is caused by repeated mechanical trauma to the rotator cuff due to encroachment of the coracoacromial ligament; in most cases, it is a primary lesion. Os acromiale, an anatomic variant of the shoulder structures, is one of the predisposing factors for the development of this entity. We present a case of os acromiale complicated by complete rupture of the tendon of the supraspinatus muscle and luxation of the long head of the biceps tendon. We stress the importance of magnetic resonance in the study of this anatomic variant and in the detection of complications or associated lesions. (Author) 10 refs

  7. Proteus syndrome: A rare cause of gigantic limb.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakrabarti, Nandini; Chattopadhyay, Chandan; Bhuban, Majhi; Pal, Salil Kumar

    2014-04-01

    A congenital disorder with variable manifestations, including partial gigantism of the hands and feet with hypertrophy of soles, nevi, hemihypertrophy, gynecomastia, macrocephaly and other skull abnormalities, and abdominal lipomatosis. The cause is unknown, although a genetic origin, generally of autosomal-dominant transmission, has been conjectured. Symptoms can be treated, but there is no known cure. We present the case of a young male with grotesque overgrowth of the right lower limb, splenomegaly and multiple nevi. Angiography revealed venous malformation within the limb. The findings are in conformity to the criteria for the Proteus syndrome.

  8. Subacromial Impingement Syndrome Caused by a Voluminous Subdeltoid Lipoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean-Christophe Murray

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Subacromial impingement syndrome is a clinical diagnosis encompassing a spectrum of possible etiologies, including subacromial bursitis, rotator cuff tendinopathy, and partial- to full-thickness rotator cuff tears. This report presents an unusual case of subdeltoid lipoma causing extrinsic compression and subacromial impingement syndrome. The patient, a 60-year-old man, presented to our institution with a few years' history of nontraumatic, posteriorly localized throbbing pain in his right shoulder. Despite a well-followed 6-months physiotherapy program, the patient was still suffering from his right shoulder. The MRI scan revealed a well-circumscribed 6 cm × 2 cm × 5 cm homogenous lesion compatible with a subdeltoid intermuscular lipoma. The mass was excised en bloc, and subsequent histopathologic examination confirmed a benign lipoma. At 6-months follow-up, the patient was asymptomatic with a complete return to his activities. Based on this case and a review of the literature, a subacromial lipoma has to be included in the differential diagnosis of a subacromial impingement syndrome refractory to nonoperative treatment. Complementary imaging modalities are required only after a failed conservative management to assess the exact etiology and successfully direct the surgical treatment.

  9. CtIP Mutations Cause Seckel and Jawad Syndromes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Per Qvist

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Seckel syndrome is a recessively inherited dwarfism disorder characterized by microcephaly and a unique head profile. Genetically, it constitutes a heterogeneous condition, with several loci mapped (SCKL1-5 but only three disease genes identified: the ATR, CENPJ, and CEP152 genes that control cellular responses to DNA damage. We previously mapped a Seckel syndrome locus to chromosome 18p11.31-q11.2 (SCKL2. Here, we report two mutations in the CtIP (RBBP8 gene within this locus that result in expression of C-terminally truncated forms of CtIP. We propose that these mutations are the molecular cause of the disease observed in the previously described SCKL2 family and in an additional unrelated family diagnosed with a similar form of congenital microcephaly termed Jawad syndrome. While an exonic frameshift mutation was found in the Jawad family, the SCKL2 family carries a splicing mutation that yields a dominant-negative form of CtIP. Further characterization of cell lines derived from the SCKL2 family revealed defective DNA damage induced formation of single-stranded DNA, a critical co-factor for ATR activation. Accordingly, SCKL2 cells present a lowered apoptopic threshold and hypersensitivity to DNA damage. Notably, over-expression of a comparable truncated CtIP variant in non-Seckel cells recapitulates SCKL2 cellular phenotypes in a dose-dependent manner. This work thus identifies CtIP as a disease gene for Seckel and Jawad syndromes and defines a new type of genetic disease mechanism in which a dominant negative mutation yields a recessively inherited disorder.

  10. Multiple sclerosis as a cause of the acute vestibular syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pula, J H; Newman-Toker, D E; Kattah, J C

    2013-06-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) causes dizziness and vertigo. Reports suggest responsible lesions are often in the intra-pontine 8th nerve fascicle. We sought to determine frequency and clinical features of demyelinating acute vestibular syndrome (AVS). This is a prospective observational study (1999-2011). Consecutive AVS patients (vertigo, nystagmus, nausea/vomiting, head-motion intolerance, unsteady gait) with a risk for central localization underwent structured bedside examination and neuroimaging. When applicable, we identified MS based on clinical, imaging, and laboratory features. Of 170 AVS presentations, 4% (n = 7) were due to demyelinating disease. Five had an acute MS plaque likely responsible for the clinical syndrome. Lesion location varied-1 medulla; 1 inferior cerebellar peduncle; 1 middle cerebellar peduncle; 1 posterior pontine tegmentum; 1 in the intrapontine 8th nerve fascicle; 1 superior cerebellar peduncle; 1 midbrain. Only two had a lesion in or near the intra-pontine 8th nerve fascicle. Three were first presentations (i.e., clinically isolated demyelinating syndrome), while the others were known MS. All had central oculomotor signs. In two patients, the only central sign was a normal horizontal head impulse test (h-HIT) of vestibular function. All patients improved with steroid therapy. Demyelinating disease was an uncommon cause of AVS in our series. Symptomatic lesions were not restricted to the 8th nerve fascicle. Five patients had relatively obvious oculomotor signs, making differentiation from vestibular neuritis straightforward. Two patients had unidirectional, horizontal nystagmus that followed Alexander's law and was suppressed with fixation (true pseudoneuritis). The presence of a normal h-HIT in these suggested central localization.

  11. Lemierre's syndrome; a rare cause of septic arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olivier, James B; Al-Hourani, Khalid; Bolland, Benjamin

    2017-05-12

    Lemierre's syndrome is a rare condition characterised by pharyngitis leading to septic thrombophlebitis of the internal jugular vein. Complications include pulmonary septic emboli, septic arthritis and disseminated intravascular coagulation. The authors present a case of a healthy woman aged 25 years with septic arthritis of the shoulder due to this unusual cause. This diagnosis was made via a combination of clinical, radiological and microbiological findings. It was successfully treated via surgical and antimicrobial interventions. The patient made a good recovery with minimal associated morbidity or loss of function. This case highlights the importance for awareness and high index of suspicion for rarer causes of septic arthritis in young healthy adults as early appropriate intervention maximises prognosis. © BMJ Publishing Group Ltd (unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  12. Hypokalemia causing rhabdomyolysis in a patient with short bowel syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balhara, Kamna S; Highet, Bridget; Omron, Rodney

    2015-04-01

    Rhabdomyolysis, usually in the setting of trauma or drug use, is frequently seen in the emergency setting, and often leads to hyperkalemia at presentation. Hypokalemia, however, is a potentially underrecognized cause of rhabdomyolysis. We present a case of rhabdomyolysis likely due to hypokalemia in the setting of short bowel syndrome. WHY SHOULD AN EMERGENCY PHYSICIAN BE AWARE OF THIS?: Although less common, hypokalemia can be a significant cause of rhabdomyolysis via its effects on muscle. This scenario should be considered in the differential diagnosis of patients at risk for hypokalemia who present with weakness. Rapid recognition of this relationship and rapid correction of hypokalemia may prove very important in preventing the deleterious effects of rhabdomyolysis. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Main causes of hospitalization in people with Angelman syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domínguez-Berjón, M Felícitas; Zoni, Ana Clara; Esteban-Vasallo, María D; Sendra-Gutiérrez, Juan Manuel; Astray-Mochales, Jenaro

    2017-09-04

    The objective was to describe the main causes of hospitalization in people with Angelman syndrome (AS). Population-based cross-sectional study in the Community of Madrid (CM), Spain. The information source for AS cases was the information system for rare diseases in the CM. Variables related to hospitalization, for the period 2006-2014, were the following: number of episodes, outcome, main cause, length of stay and type of admission. Main causes of hospitalization were described by age group and sex. The most frequent causes of hospitalization were the following: oral-dental care (28.9%), seizures (19.6%), orthopaedic problems (14.4%) and acute respiratory disorders (12.4%). The percentage of hospitalizations was higher for oral-dental care in women and for orthopaedic problems in men (p-value <.05). Hospitalizations for an acute respiratory disorder were higher in adults (p-value <.05). Some differences in the causes of hospitalization of people with AS were observed by sex and age. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Catatonia in Down syndrome; a treatable cause of regression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghaziuddin, Neera; Nassiri, Armin; Miles, Judith H

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The main aim of this case series report is to alert physicians to the occurrence of catatonia in Down syndrome (DS). A second aim is to stimulate the study of regression in DS and of catatonia. A subset of individuals with DS is noted to experience unexplained regression in behavior, mood, activities of daily living, motor activities, and intellectual functioning during adolescence or young adulthood. Depression, early onset Alzheimer’s, or just “the Down syndrome” are often blamed after general medical causes have been ruled out. Clinicians are generally unaware that catatonia, which can cause these symptoms, may occur in DS. Study design: Four DS adolescents who experienced regression are reported. Laboratory tests intended to rule out causes of motor and cognitive regression were within normal limits. Based on the presence of multiple motor disturbances (slowing and/or increased motor activity, grimacing, posturing), the individuals were diagnosed with unspecified catatonia and treated with anti-catatonic treatments (benzodiazepines and electroconvulsive therapy [ECT]). Results: All four cases were treated with a benzodiazepine combined with ECT and recovered their baseline functioning. Conclusion: We suspect catatonia is a common cause of unexplained deterioration in adolescents and young adults with DS. Moreover, pediatricians and others who care for individuals with DS are generally unfamiliar with the catatonia diagnosis outside schizophrenia, resulting in misdiagnosis and years of morbidity. Alerting physicians to catatonia in DS is essential to prompt diagnosis, appropriate treatment, and identification of the frequency and course of this disorder. PMID:25897230

  15. The Mirizzi syndrome: an uncommon cause of obstructive jaundice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marco, S.F.; Piqueras, R.M.; Jornet, J.; Gil, S.; Ambit, S.; Cervera, J.

    1997-01-01

    The Mirizzi syndromes involves obstruction of the common hepatic duct by a gallstone impacted in the bladder neck or in the cystic duct. It is accompanied by and inflammatory reaction that usually produces a biliary fistula. On rare occasions, this disorder can lead to obstructive jaundice. We reviewed nine cases of Mirizzi syndrome, comparing the findings according to different imaging techniques. All the patients underwent ultrasound study, three were assessed by computerized tomography (CT) and three by transhepatic cholangiography (THC). In eight patients, the diagnosis was confirmed intraoperatively: the remaining patient was diagnosed on the basis of the clinical evidence of obstructive jaundice, ultrasound and THC. In eight patients, ultrasound disclosed dilation of the intrahepatic bile duct. Scleroatrophic bladder with a large stone in the infundibular zone was observed in five cases, and numerous small calculi were found in the remaining four patients, two of whom presented thickening of the bladder walls: the walls were normal in the other two. Pneumobilia was observed one case. CT revealed dilation of the intrahepatic bile duct in all three cases in which it was performed. A cavity containing a calculus was observed in one case and pneumobilia in another. THC disclosed dilation of the intrahepatic bile duct and a lateral filling defect in the common hepatic duct in all three patients in whom it was performed. Two patients were found to have cholecystocholedochal fistulas. The Mirizzi syndrome should be suspected when a scleroatrophic gallbladder or gallstones compress the common hepatic duct, causing proximal, but not distal, bile duct dilation. In these case, THC should be carried out to confirm the diagnosis and determine whether or not a fistula is present since the surgical treatment varies depending on the existence of fistulas and their location. (Author) 15 refs

  16. Past and current cause-specific mortality in Eisenmenger syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hjortshøj, Cristel M Sørensen; Kempny, Aleksander; Jensen, Annette Schophuus; Sørensen, Keld; Nagy, Edit; Dellborg, Mikael; Johansson, Bengt; Rudiene, Virginija; Hong, Gu; Opotowsky, Alexander R; Budts, Werner; Mulder, Barbara J; Tomkiewicz-Pajak, Lidia; D'Alto, Michele; Prokšelj, Katja; Diller, Gerhard-Paul; Dimopoulos, Konstantinos; Estensen, Mette-Elise; Holmstrøm, Henrik; Turanlahti, Maila; Thilén, Ulf; Gatzoulis, Michael A; Søndergaard, Lars

    2017-07-07

    Eisenmenger syndrome (ES) is associated with considerable morbidity and mortality. Therapeutic strategies have changed during the 2000s in conjunction with an emphasis on specialist follow-up. The aim of this study was to determine the cause-specific mortality in ES and evaluate any relevant changes between 1977 and 2015. This is a retrospective, descriptive multicentre study. A total of 1546 patients (mean age 38.7 ± 15.4 years; 36% male) from 13 countries were included. Cause-specific mortality was examined before and after July 2006, 'early' and 'late', respectively. Over a median follow-up of 6.1 years (interquartile range 2.1-21.5 years) 558 deaths were recorded; cause-specific mortality was identified in 411 (74%) cases. Leading causes of death were heart failure (34%), infection (26%), sudden cardiac death (10%), thromboembolism (8%), haemorrhage (7%), and peri-procedural (7%). Heart failure deaths increased in the 'late' relative to the 'early' era (P = 0.032), whereas death from thromboembolic events and death in relation to cardiac and non-cardiac procedures decreased (P = 0.014, P = 0.014, P = 0.004, respectively). There was an increase in longevity in the 'late' vs. 'early' era (median survival 52.3 vs. 35.2 years, P cause mortality including cardiac remains high. Patients from the 'late' era, however, die later and from chronic rather than acute cardiac causes, primarily heart failure, whereas peri-procedural and deaths due to haemoptysis have become less common. Lifelong vigilance in tertiary centres and further research for ES are clearly needed. Published on behalf of the European Society of Cardiology. All rights reserved. © The Author 2017. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  17. Ortner’s syndrome: Cardiovocal syndrome caused by aortic arch ps

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adil H. Al Kindi

    2016-10-01

    Ortner’s syndrome describes vocal changes caused by cardiovascular pathology. It should be included in the differential diagnosis of patients with cardiovascular risk factors presenting with hoarseness. This case demonstrates the use of endovascular stents to treat the causative pathology with resolution of symptoms. In expert hands, it represents low risk, minimally invasive therapeutic strategy with excellent early results in patients who are high risk for open procedure.

  18. GNB3 overexpression causes obesity and metabolic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozdemir, Alev Cagla; Wynn, Grace M; Vester, Aimee; Weitzmann, M Neale; Neigh, Gretchen N; Srinivasan, Shanthi; Rudd, M Katharine

    2017-01-01

    The G-protein beta subunit 3 (GNB3) gene has been implicated in obesity risk; however, the molecular mechanism of GNB3-related disease is unknown. GNB3 duplication is responsible for a syndromic form of childhood obesity, and an activating DNA sequence variant (C825T) in GNB3 is also associated with obesity. To test the hypothesis that GNB3 overexpression causes obesity, we created bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) transgenic mice that carry an extra copy of the human GNB3 risk allele. Here we show that GNB3-T/+ mice have increased adiposity, but not greater food intake or a defect in satiety. GNB3-T/+ mice have elevated fasting plasma glucose, insulin, and C-peptide, as well as glucose intolerance, indicating type 2 diabetes. Fasting plasma leptin, triglycerides, cholesterol and phospholipids are elevated, suggesting metabolic syndrome. Based on a battery of behavioral tests, GNB3-T/+ mice did not exhibit anxiety- or depressive-like phenotypes. GNB3-T/+ and wild-type animals have similar activity levels and heat production; however, GNB3-T/+ mice exhibit dysregulation of acute thermogenesis. Finally, Ucp1 expression is significantly lower in white adipose tissue (WAT) in GNB3-T/+ mice, suggestive of WAT remodeling that could lead to impaired cellular thermogenesis. Taken together, our study provides the first functional link between GNB3 and obesity, and presents insight into novel pathways that could be applied to combat obesity and type 2 diabetes.

  19. GNB3 overexpression causes obesity and metabolic syndrome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alev Cagla Ozdemir

    Full Text Available The G-protein beta subunit 3 (GNB3 gene has been implicated in obesity risk; however, the molecular mechanism of GNB3-related disease is unknown. GNB3 duplication is responsible for a syndromic form of childhood obesity, and an activating DNA sequence variant (C825T in GNB3 is also associated with obesity. To test the hypothesis that GNB3 overexpression causes obesity, we created bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC transgenic mice that carry an extra copy of the human GNB3 risk allele. Here we show that GNB3-T/+ mice have increased adiposity, but not greater food intake or a defect in satiety. GNB3-T/+ mice have elevated fasting plasma glucose, insulin, and C-peptide, as well as glucose intolerance, indicating type 2 diabetes. Fasting plasma leptin, triglycerides, cholesterol and phospholipids are elevated, suggesting metabolic syndrome. Based on a battery of behavioral tests, GNB3-T/+ mice did not exhibit anxiety- or depressive-like phenotypes. GNB3-T/+ and wild-type animals have similar activity levels and heat production; however, GNB3-T/+ mice exhibit dysregulation of acute thermogenesis. Finally, Ucp1 expression is significantly lower in white adipose tissue (WAT in GNB3-T/+ mice, suggestive of WAT remodeling that could lead to impaired cellular thermogenesis. Taken together, our study provides the first functional link between GNB3 and obesity, and presents insight into novel pathways that could be applied to combat obesity and type 2 diabetes.

  20. Is fructose malabsorption a cause of irritable bowel syndrome?

    Science.gov (United States)

    DiNicolantonio, James J; Lucan, Sean C

    2015-09-01

    Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS) is a condition that may be marked by abdominal pain, bloating, fullness, indigestion, belching, constipation and/or diarrhea. IBS symptoms can result from malabsorption of fructose. Fructose is a monosaccharide found naturally in small quantities in fruits and some vegetables, and in much larger quantities in industrially manufactured sweets with added sugars (e.g. sucrose and high fructose corn syrup). Fructose malabsorption leads to osmotic diarrhea as well as gas and bloating due to fermentation in the colon. A low-fructose diet has been found to improve IBS symptoms in some patients. This paper discusses the prevalence of fructose malabsorption and considers fructose ingestion as a possible cause of--and fructose restriction as a possible dietary treatment for--IBS. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. De novo SOX11 mutations cause Coffin-Siris syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsurusaki, Yoshinori; Koshimizu, Eriko; Ohashi, Hirofumi; Phadke, Shubha; Kou, Ikuyo; Shiina, Masaaki; Suzuki, Toshifumi; Okamoto, Nobuhiko; Imamura, Shintaro; Yamashita, Michiaki; Watanabe, Satoshi; Yoshiura, Koh-ichiro; Kodera, Hirofumi; Miyatake, Satoko; Nakashima, Mitsuko; Saitsu, Hirotomo; Ogata, Kazuhiro; Ikegawa, Shiro; Miyake, Noriko; Matsumoto, Naomichi

    2014-06-02

    Coffin-Siris syndrome (CSS) is a congenital disorder characterized by growth deficiency, intellectual disability, microcephaly, characteristic facial features and hypoplastic nails of the fifth fingers and/or toes. We previously identified mutations in five genes encoding subunits of the BAF complex, in 55% of CSS patients. Here we perform whole-exome sequencing in additional CSS patients, identifying de novo SOX11 mutations in two patients with a mild CSS phenotype. sox11a/b knockdown in zebrafish causes brain abnormalities, potentially explaining the brain phenotype of CSS. SOX11 is the downstream transcriptional factor of the PAX6-BAF complex, highlighting the importance of the BAF complex and SOX11 transcriptional network in brain development.

  2. A rare cause of acromegaly: McCune-Albright syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erdal Bodakçi

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available McCune-Albright syndrome is characterized by polyostatic fibrous dysplasia, brown spots on the skin (café au lait pigmentation and autonomous endocrine hyperfunction. Early puberty and other endocrinological manifestations, such as acromegaly, gigantism and hypercortisolism are widely observed in the syndrome. Acromegaly is seen in 20% of patients. We report a case of acromegaly accompanied with this syndrome.

  3. The superior vena cava syndrome caused by malignant disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eren, Suat; Karaman, Adem; Okur, Adnan

    2006-01-01

    Objective: The superior vena cava (SVC) obstruction by malignant diseases is either by direct invasion and compression or by tumour thrombus of the SVC. Whatever is its cause, obstruction of the SVC causes elevated pressure in the veins draining into the SVC and increased or reversed blood flow through collateral vessels. Severity of the syndrome depends on the collateral vascular system development. Therefore, imaging of the collateral veins with variable location and connection is important in determining the extension and management of the disease. Our aims are to describe collateral vessels of the superior vena cava syndrome (SVCS) related with the malignant diseases and to assess the ability of multi-detector row CT with multiplanar and 3D volume rendering techniques in determining and describing collateral circulations. Materials and methods: We present CT angiography findings of seven patients with small cell carcinoma of the lung (n = 2), squamous cell carcinoma of the lung (n = 3), Hodgkin disease of the thorax (n = 1), and squamous cell carcinoma of the oesophagus (n = 1). The patients received contrast-enhanced CT scans of the chest and abdomen on a multi-detector row CT during breath holding at suspended inspiration. Results: CT images revealed the cause and level of the SVC obstruction in all patients with axial and multiplanar reconstructed images. The SVC showed total obstruction in five patients and partial obstruction in two patients. The most common experienced collateral vessels were azygos vein (6), intercostal veins (6), mediastinal veins (6), paravertebral veins (5), hemiazygos vein (5), thoracoepigastric vein (5), internal mammary vein (5), thoracoacromioclavicular venous plexus (5), and anterior chest wall veins (5). While one case showed the portal-systemic shunt, V. cordis media and sinus coronarius with phrenic veins were enlarged in two cases, and the left adrenal vein was enlarged in a patient. In one case, the azygos vein with reversed

  4. Spinal metastasis of occult lung carcinoma causing cauda equina syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotil, Kadir; Kilinc, Bekir Mahmut; Bilge, Turgay

    2007-04-01

    Cauda equina syndrome (CES) may be caused by tumor, herniated disc, trauma and spinal infections. However, CES due to occult lung cancer has not been reported in the literature. A 50-year-old man presented with a subacute CES caused by an intradural metastasis of an adenocarcinoma of the lung to the lumbosacral cauda fibers. His lumbosacral magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), showed a well-demarcated, intradural extramedullary mass lesion resembling a neurinoma at the L4/5 level. The patient underwent an L4-L5 laminectomy. The operative findings were also suggestive of neurinoma with involvement of three nerve roots, and a well-demarcated tumor without infiltration into the subarachnoid space. Although the findings of the operation were suggestive of neurinoma, final pathological diagnosis revealed metastatic carcinoma. Immunohistochemistry revealed clear cell adenocarcinoma metastasis. Chest X-ray and high resolution contrasted pulmonary computed tomography were normal. Positron emission tomography (PET) showed a lung mass, at the left apex. The patient was treated with chemotherapy and post-operative spinal radiotherapy was also performed. The CES resolved after the operation and the patient was followed up for 2 years with no recurrence. MRI of intradural cauda equina metastasis may be similar to that of intradural nerve sheath tumor. Surgery and postoperative radiotherapy may be effective for the treatment of CES due to lung carcinoma. Definitive diagnosis is by histopathological examination with immunohistochemistry. If the primary cancer cannot be detected by conventional radiological techniques, PET may be helpful.

  5. Pituitary stalk interruption syndrome: cause, clinical manifestations, diagnosis, and management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voutetakis, Antonis; Sertedaki, Amalia; Dacou-Voutetakis, Catherine

    2016-08-01

    Pituitary stalk interruption syndrome (PSIS) is characterized by a thin or absent pituitary stalk, hypoplasia of the adenohypophysis, and ectopic neurohypophysis. PSIS manifestations include a wide spectrum of clinical phenotypes and pituitary hormone deficiencies of variable degree and timing of onset. In this review, recent advances with respect to the cause of PSIS, clinical characteristics leading to earlier diagnosis, and management are outlined. Diagnosis of PSIS is often delayed probably because clinical findings such as neonatal hypoglycemia, cholestasis, and/or micropenis as well as decreasing growth velocity are not appropriately and timely validated. Recently, molecular defects in various genes have been associated with PSIS albeit in a small number of cases. These findings suggest that PSIS belongs to the spectrum of holoprosencephaly-related defects. Phenotype-genotype discordance and the existence of asymptomatic carriers of a given molecular aberration indicate that penetrance may be modified favorably or unfavorably by the presence of other genetic and/or environmental factors. PSIS constitutes an antenatal anatomical defect. Neonatal hypoglycemia, cholestasis, and/or micropenis with or without growth deficit should raise the possibility of combined pituitary hormone deficiency, a life-threatening condition in cases of coexisting cortisol deficiency. It is important to search for molecular defects in all PSIS cases, as precise identification of the cause is a prerequisite for genetic counseling.

  6. De Novo Mutations in EBF3 Cause a Neurodevelopmental Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sleven, Hannah; Welsh, Seth J; Yu, Jing; Churchill, Mair E A; Wright, Caroline F; Henderson, Alex; Horvath, Rita; Rankin, Julia; Vogt, Julie; Magee, Alex; McConnell, Vivienne; Green, Andrew; King, Mary D; Cox, Helen; Armstrong, Linlea; Lehman, Anna; Nelson, Tanya N; Williams, Jonathan; Clouston, Penny; Hagman, James; Németh, Andrea H

    2017-01-05

    Early B cell factor 3 (EBF3) is an atypical transcription factor that is thought to influence the laminar formation of the cerebral cortex. Here, we report that de novo mutations in EBF3 cause a complex neurodevelopmental syndrome. The mutations were identified in two large-scale sequencing projects: the UK Deciphering Developmental Disorders (DDD) study and the Canadian Clinical Assessment of the Utility of Sequencing and Evaluation as a Service (CAUSES) study. The core phenotype includes moderate to severe intellectual disability, and many individuals exhibit cerebellar ataxia, subtle facial dysmorphism, strabismus, and vesicoureteric reflux, suggesting that EBF3 has a widespread developmental role. Pathogenic de novo variants identified in EBF3 include multiple loss-of-function and missense mutations. Structural modeling suggested that the missense mutations affect DNA binding. Functional analysis of mutant proteins with missense substitutions revealed reduced transcriptional activities and abilities to form heterodimers with wild-type EBF3. We conclude that EBF3, a transcription factor previously unknown to be associated with human disease, is important for brain and other organ development and warrants further investigation. Copyright © 2017 American Society of Human Genetics. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Recessive mutations in PTHR1 cause contrasting skeletal dysplasias in Eiken and Blomstrand syndromes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Duchatelet, Sabine; Ostergaard, Elsebet; Cortes, Dina

    2005-01-01

    Eiken syndrome is a rare autosomal recessive skeletal dysplasia. We identified a truncation mutation in the C-terminal cytoplasmic tail of the parathyroid hormone (PTH)/PTH-related peptide (PTHrP) type 1 receptor (PTHR1) gene as the cause of this syndrome. Eiken syndrome differs from Jansen...

  8. [POEMS syndrome as a rare cause of bilateral optic disc edema].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birkenbach, A; Kühlhorn, F; Grube, M; Helbig, H; Gamulescu, M A

    2017-03-01

    The POEMS syndrome (polyneuropathy, organomegaly, endocrinopathy, monoclonal protein, skin changes) is a rare paraneoplastic syndrome based on a clonal plasma cell disorder. Optic disc edema (ODE) is a frequent ocular sign in POEMS syndrome. The cause of the ODE has not yet been entirely clarified. This article reports the case of a 62-year-old male suffering from POEMS syndrome with a bilateral ODE.

  9. [Intrathoracic goiter as a cause of superior vena cava syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cichoń, S; Barczyński, M; Rogula, T

    1998-01-01

    Between 1984 and 1997 year 4985 patients underwent surgical treatment due to various thyroid gland diseases, among them were 28 (0.6%) patients with intrathoracic goitre, but only in one case (0.002%) the signs of superior vena cava syndrome (SVCS) were observed: oedema and lividity of the face, enlargement of jugular veins and superior limbs' veins. In addition the patient manifested subsequently growing dyspnoea, dysphagia and hoarseness. In diagnose essential were X-ray examination of the chest (widening of mediastinal shadow), X-ray examination of the trachea (dislocation and compression of the trachea), X-ray of esophagus with contrast (compression from the outside), ultrasonography of thyroid gland. Intraoperatively, after it was confirmed that the SVCS was caused by compression of the intrathoracic right lobe of thyroid gland, the oblong sternotomy was performed to provide the proper surgical access for subtotal thyroidectomy. The weight of resected tissues of thyroid gland was 1036 g. In histopathological examination the diagnosis of multinodular toxic goitre was confirmed.

  10. Vestibular dehiscence syndrome caused by a labyrinthine congenital cholesteatoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiorino, Francesco; Pizzini, Francesca B; Mattellini, Barbara; Barbieri, Franco

    2015-02-01

    A 40-year-old man presented with conductive hearing loss and pressure- and sound-related vestibular symptoms. Computed tomography and diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging revealed the presence of a cholesteatoma involving the vestibular labyrinth. The patient underwent a canal-wall-up tympanoplasty, which revealed evidence of a disruption of the vestibular labyrinth and a wide dehiscence of the vestibule, which was immediately resurfaced. At the 2-month follow-up, the patient's pressure- and sound-related vestibular symptoms had disappeared. Pure-tone audiometry showed a reduction in the air-bone gap with a slight deterioration of bone conduction and an improvement in the air-conduction threshold. Fistulization of the otic capsule produces a "third window," which can lead to a dehiscence syndrome. One possible cause is a cholesteatoma of the middle ear or petrous bone. When the vestibule is invaded by a cholesteatoma, hearing is almost invariably lost, either pre- or postoperatively. However, in our case, wide opening of the vestibule resulted in hearing preservation.

  11. Mitochondrial disorder caused Charles Darwin's cyclic vomiting syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Finsterer J

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Josef Finsterer,1 John Hayman21Krankenanstalt Rudolfstiftng, Vienna, Austria; 2Department of Pathology, University of Melbourne, Victoria, AustraliaBackground: Charles Darwin (CD, “father of modern biology,” suffered from multisystem illness from early adulthood. The most disabling manifestation was cyclic vomiting syndrome (CVS. This study aims at finding the possible cause of CVS in CD.Methods: A literature search using the PubMed database was carried out, and CD's complaints, as reported in his personal writings and those of his relatives, friends, colleagues, biographers, were compared with various manifestations of mitochondrial disorders (MIDs, known to cause CVS, described in the literature.Results: Organ tissues involved in CD's disease were brain, nerves, muscles, vestibular apparatus, heart, gut, and skin. Cerebral manifestations included episodic headache, visual disturbance, episodic memory loss, periodic paralysis, hysterical crying, panic attacks, and episodes of depression. Manifestations of polyneuropathy included numbness, paresthesias, increased sweating, temperature sensitivity, and arterial hypotension. Muscular manifestations included periods of exhaustion, easy fatigability, myalgia, and muscle twitching. Cardiac manifestations included episodes of palpitations and chest pain. Gastrointestinal manifestations were CVS, dental problems, abnormal seasickness, eructation, belching, and flatulence. Dermatological manifestations included painful lips, dermatitis, eczema, and facial edema. Treatments with beneficial effects to his complaints were rest, relaxation, heat, and hydrotherapy.Conclusion: CVS in CD was most likely due to a multisystem, nonsyndromic MID. This diagnosis is based upon the multisystem nature of his disease, the fact that CVS is most frequently the manifestation of a MID, the family history, the variable phenotypic expression between affected family members, the fact that symptoms were triggered by stress

  12. Kearns-Sayre's syndrome developing in a boy who survived Pearson's syndrome caused by mitochondrial DNA deletion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    H.J. Simonsz (Huib); K.E. Bärlocher; A. Rötig

    1992-01-01

    textabstractDocumenta Ophthalmologica 1992, Volume 82, Issue 1-2, pp 73-79 Kearns-Sayre's syndrome developing in a boy who survived Pearson's syndrome caused by mitochondrial DNA deletion Dr H. J. Simonsz, K. Bärlocher, A. Rötig … show all 3 hide » Download PDF (2,322 KB) Abstract A 7-year-old

  13. Superior mesenteric artery syndrome: an uncommon cause of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    However, these symptoms are uncommonly produced by superior mesenteric artery (SMA) syndrome. SMA syndrome is triggered when there is narrowing of the mesenteric angle and shortening of the aortomesenteric distance. We report a case of 42‑year‑old female who presented with features of gastric outlet obstruction ...

  14. Rapunzel Syndrome: a rare cause of acute small bowel obstruction ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The Rapunzel syndrome is a very rare condition where trichobezoar has extended up to the small bowel. Here we are reporting a rare case of Rapunzel syndrome in an adolescent girl with history of trichophagia who presented with small bowel obstruction. Patient underwent exploratory laparotomy and bezoar was ...

  15. Drowning as a Cause of Death in Angelman Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishmael, Holly A.; Begleiter, Michael L.; Butler, Merlin G.

    2002-01-01

    This study reports on a 9-year-old boy previously diagnosed with Angelman syndrome who died unexpectedly by drowning in a shallow backyard wading pool. The case illustrates the fascination with water by individuals with Angelman syndrome and highlights that this fascination may lead to death. The need for supervision is stressed. (Contains 5…

  16. Labial adhesions caused by Stevens–Johnson syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jung Mi Byun

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Vulvovaginal sequelae in Stevens–Johnson syndrome have been widely described in published literature, however, there is no consensus regarding effective preventive treatments. Labial minora synechiae as sequelae of Stevens–Johnson syndrome are rare, but can reduce patients' quality of life as a result of dysuria, urinary tract infection, and sexual dysfunction. Occasionally, sequelae can induce adenosis, and subsequently result in malignancy. Therefore, biopsy of the affected tissue in Stevens–Johnson syndrome patients with genital involvement should be considered after the acute phase has been resolved. Here, we report Stevens–Johnson syndrome with labial involvement in a 24-year-old woman who was treated with labial adhesiolysis. We recommend genital examination for all women with Stevens–Johnson syndrome to diagnose genital disease and avoid urinary tract infections and other sexual complications.

  17. Streptococcal toxic shock syndrome caused by Streptococcus suis serotype 2.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiaqi Tang

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Streptococcus suis serotype 2 (S. suis 2, SS2 is a major zoonotic pathogen that causes only sporadic cases of meningitis and sepsis in humans. Most if not all cases of Streptococcal toxic shock syndrome (STSS that have been well-documented to date were associated with the non-SS2 group A streptococcus (GAS. However, a recent large-scale outbreak of SS2 in Sichuan Province, China, appeared to be caused by more invasive deep-tissue infection with STSS, characterized by acute high fever, vascular collapse, hypotension, shock, and multiple organ failure. METHODS AND FINDINGS: We investigated this outbreak of SS2 infections in both human and pigs, which took place from July to August, 2005, through clinical observation and laboratory experiments. Clinical and pathological characterization of the human patients revealed the hallmarks of typical STSS, which to date had only been associated with GAS infection. Retrospectively, we found that this outbreak was very similar to an earlier outbreak in Jiangsu Province, China, in 1998. We isolated and analyzed 37 bacterial strains from human specimens and eight from pig specimens of the recent outbreak, as well as three human isolates and two pig isolates from the 1998 outbreak we had kept in our laboratory. The bacterial isolates were examined using light microscopy observation, pig infection experiments, multiplex-PCR assay, as well as restriction fragment length polymorphisms (RFLP and multiple sequence alignment analyses. Multiple lines of evidence confirmed that highly virulent strains of SS2 were the causative agents of both outbreaks. CONCLUSIONS: We report, to our knowledge for the first time, two outbreaks of STSS caused by SS2, a non-GAS streptococcus. The 2005 outbreak was associated with 38 deaths out of 204 documented human cases; the 1998 outbreak with 14 deaths out of 25 reported human cases. Most of the fatal cases were characterized by STSS; some of them by meningitis or severe

  18. Food protein induced enterocolitis syndrome caused by rice beverage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caminiti, Lucia; Salzano, Giuseppina; Crisafulli, Giuseppe; Porcaro, Federica; Pajno, Giovanni Battista

    2013-05-14

    Food protein-induced enterocolitis syndrome (FPIES) is an uncommon and potentially severe non IgE-mediated gastrointestinal food allergy. It is usually caused by cow's milk or soy proteins, but may also be triggered by ingestion of solid foods. The diagnosis is made on the basis of clinical history and symptoms. Management of acute phase requires fluid resuscitation and intravenous steroids administration, but avoidance of offending foods is the only effective therapeutic option.Infant with FPIES presented to our emergency department with vomiting, watery stools, hypothension and metabolic acidosis after ingestion of rice beverage. Intravenous fluids and steroids were administered with good clinical response. Subsequently, a double blind placebo control food challenge (DBPCFC) was performed using rice beverage and hydrolyzed formula (eHF) as placebo. The "rice based formula" induced emesis, diarrhoea and lethargy. Laboratory investigations reveal an increase of absolute count of neutrophils and the presence of faecal eosinophils. The patient was treated with both intravenous hydration and steroids. According to Powell criteria, oral food challenge was considered positive and diagnosis of FPIES induced by rice beverage was made. Patient was discharged at home with the indication to avoid rice and any rice beverage as well as to reintroduce hydrolyzed formula. A case of FPIES induced by rice beverage has never been reported. The present case clearly shows that also beverage containing rice proteins can be responsible of FPIES. For this reason, the use of rice beverage as cow's milk substitute for the treatment of non IgE-mediated food allergy should be avoided.

  19. Characteristics of radiation syndromes caused by nonuniform irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Avetisov, G.M.; Darenskaya, N.G.; Zajtseva, R.N.

    1975-01-01

    The quantitative characteristics of the development of hemopoietic, intestinal and oral syndromes were studied on male rats subjected to uniform, general non-uniform and partial (head, adbomen, anterior and posterior abdomen sections, and hind part of body) X-raying (180-250 kV, 60-200 R/min). The hemopoietic syndrome resulted in death at uniform irradiation intensities of 400-700R; with screening of the abdominal cavity, irradiation was increased to 850 R. The dosages for intestinal and oral syndromes at partial irradiation of the abdominal cavity and head were equal to 1,150-1,500 and 1,400-1,800 R, respectively

  20. A rare cause of polyhydramnios: Neu-Laxova syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martín, Alicia; Eguiluz, Idoya; Barber, Miguel A; Medina, Norberto; Plasencia, Walter; García-Alix, Alfredo; García-Hernández, José A

    2006-07-01

    Neu-Laxova syndrome is a rare group of congenital malformations including intrauterine growth retardation (IUGR), microcephaly, central nervous system alterations, facial abnormalities, ichthyosis, limb abnormalities, generalized edema, polyhydramnios, and perinatal death. Thirty cases have been identified since the publication of the first two cases and only five of them had a prenatal diagnosis. The earliest diagnosis in a published case was at week 32 of gestation. This study illustrates that the detection of the syndrome during the second trimester of gestation is possible, with emphasis on the detection of the early appearance of polyhydramnios and the association of the syndrome with the Arabic ethnic group.

  1. STXBP1 mutations cause not only Ohtahara syndrome but also West syndrome--result of Japanese cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otsuka, Motoko; Oguni, Hirokazu; Liang, Jao-Shwann; Ikeda, Hiroko; Imai, Katsumi; Hirasawa, Kyoko; Imai, Kaoru; Tachikawa, Emiko; Shimojima, Keiko; Osawa, Makiko; Yamamoto, Toshiyuki

    2010-12-01

    We performed STXBP1 mutation analyses in 86 patients with various types of epilepsies, including 10 patients with OS, 43 with West syndrome, 2 with Lennox-Gastaut syndrome, 12 with symptomatic generalized epilepsy, 14 with symptomatic partial epilepsy, and 5 with other undetermined types of epilepsy. In all patients, the etiology was unknown, but ARX and CDKL5 mutations were negative in all cases. All coding exons of STXBP1 were analyzed by direct-sequencing. Two de novo nucleotide alterations of STXBP1 were identified in two patients with Ohtahara and West syndrome, respectively. No de novo or deleterious mutations in STXBP1 were found in the remaining 84 patients with various types of symptomatic epilepsies. This is the first case report showing that STXBP1 mutations caused West syndrome from the onset of epilepsy. STXBP1 analysis should be considered as an etiology of symptomatic West syndrome without explainable cause. Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2010 International League Against Epilepsy.

  2. Lack of the mitochondrial protein acylglycerol kinase causes Sengers syndrome.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mayr, J.A.; Haack, T.B.; Graf, E.; Zimmermann, F.A.; Wieland, T.; Haberberger, B.; Superti-Furga, A.; Kirschner, J.; Steinmann, B.; Baumgartner, M.R.; Moroni, I.; Lamantea, E.; Zeviani, M.; Rodenburg, R.J.T.; Smeitink, J.; Strom, T.M.; Meitinger, T.; Sperl, W.; Prokisch, H.

    2012-01-01

    Exome sequencing of an individual with congenital cataracts, hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, skeletal myopathy, and lactic acidosis, all typical symptoms of Sengers syndrome, discovered two nonsense mutations in the gene encoding mitochondrial acylglycerol kinase (AGK). Mutation screening of AGK in

  3. GITELMAN SYNDROME AS A RARE CAUSE OF HYPOKALEMIA - CASE REPORT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zorica Dimitrijević

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Gitelman syndrome is a rare autosomal recessive tubulopathy leading to hypokalemia, metabolic alkalosis, hypomagnesemia, hypocalciuria and low-to-normal blood pressure. Clinical signs are mostly secondary to chronic hypokalemia and include dizziness, fatigue, constipation and weakness. Patients can also present with muscle cramps, tetany and convulsions due to severe metabolic alkalosis or hypomagnesemia. Therefore, early recognition and treatment are important. Diagnosis of Gitelman syndrome is usually made incidentally during adolescence or early adulthood based on clinical and biochemical findings. In this paper we report a case of a young women with classic Gitelman syndrome. Treatment included magnesium and potassium salts and potassium saving diuretics. In general, the long-term prognosis of Gitelman syndrome is excellent. However, the severity of fatigue may seriously hamper some patients in their daily activities.

  4. A Rare Cause of Pheochromocytoma; Neurofibromatosis Type 1-Noonan Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mazhar Müslüm Tuna

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Neurofibromatosis (NF Type 1 (NF-1 is an autosomal dominant disease with a prevalence of about 1/3000. NF-1 is a neurocutaneous syndrome characterized by cafe au lait macules, neurofibroma, optic glioma, lisch nodules, and symptoms involving other systems. Noonan syndrome (NS is a clinically heterogeneous disorder predominantly characterized by dysmorphic facial features, congenital heart disease, proportionate post-natal short stature, neck abnormalities, and chest deformities. NF-NS is a very rare overlapping syndrome sharing many features of both syndromes. Coexistence of pheochromocytoma, which can be life-threatening if not treated properly, is also a very rare complication of this disorder. Here, we report a patient who was admitted with a mass in the right upper quadrant and was diagnosed with pheochromocytoma and NFNS. (The Me­di­cal Bul­le­tin of Ha­se­ki 2014; 52: 227-31

  5. Acute radiation syndrome caused by accidental radiation exposure - therapeutic principles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dörr Harald

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Fortunately radiation accidents are infrequent occurrences, but since they have the potential of large scale events like the nuclear accidents of Chernobyl and Fukushima, preparatory planning of the medical management of radiation accident victims is very important. Radiation accidents can result in different types of radiation exposure for which the diagnostic and therapeutic measures, as well as the outcomes, differ. The clinical course of acute radiation syndrome depends on the absorbed radiation dose and its distribution. Multi-organ-involvement and multi-organ-failure need be taken into account. The most vulnerable organ system to radiation exposure is the hematopoietic system. In addition to hematopoietic syndrome, radiation induced damage to the skin plays an important role in diagnostics and the treatment of radiation accident victims. The most important therapeutic principles with special reference to hematopoietic syndrome and cutaneous radiation syndrome are reviewed.

  6. [Platypnea-orthodeoxia syndrome: a rare cause of severe hypoxemia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deroux, A; Chidlovskii, E; Bosc, C; Pison, C; Couturier, P

    2014-10-01

    The platypnea-orthodeoxia syndrome (PO) includes: (i) a dyspnea increasing with orthostatism and decreasing in supine position, (ii) wide positional range in arterial oxygen saturation with tachycardia, (iii) and hypoxemia refractory to oxygen therapy. This syndrome is usually related to a cardiac right-left shunt, and rarely to a pulmonary shunt. We report a case of a patient presenting with a post-lung infection dyspnea associated with severe hypoxemia and shunt effect at blood gas. Contrast-enhanced CT-scan showed no pulmonary embolism. PO syndrome was suspected given the transcutaneous blood oxygen saturation variation from 90% in supine position to 60% in standing position, tachycardia, and absence of response to the intensive oxygen therapy. This syndrome should be known by physicians as a possible differential diagnose for refractory dyspnea to oxygen since effective treatment is available. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  7. A Rare Cause of Congenital Hypotonia: Walker Warburg Syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Cigdem Sivrice

    2014-01-01

    Walker-Warburg syndrome (WWS) is an autosomal recessive rare muscle disease which characterized by type 2 lissencephaly, cerebellar abnormalities, and congenital muscular dystrophy of the retinal abnormalities. In this article, we described a patient who born from 1st degree consanguineous marriage mother and father and admitted to our hospital suction weakness and had been diagnosed Walker- Warburg syndrome with physical examination and laboratory tests as a result of severe hypotonia, atypi...

  8. Antenatal Bartter syndrome: a rare cause of unexplained severe polyhydramnios.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhat, Y R; Vinayaka, G; Vani, R; Prashanth, K A; Sreelakshmi, K

    2011-01-01

    A woman presented with polyhydramnios at 22 weeks of gestation with a structurally normal fetus and placenta. Biochemical analysis of amniotic fluid detected a very high level of chloride (582 mmol/L), which led to the diagnosis of Bartter syndrome. With serial amniocentesis and indomethacin therapy, the pregnancy continued to 36 weeks. Neonatal and subsequent investigations further supported the diagnosis of Bartter syndrome. The infant was well at birth and now, at 5 months of age, is gaining weight normally on indomethacin.

  9. Abdominal Cocoon Syndrome: a Rare Cause for Recurrent Abdominal Pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fursevich, Dzmitry; Burt, Jeremy

    2017-07-01

    Abdominal cocoon syndrome, or sclerosing peritonitis, is a rare condition characterized by encasement of small bowel loops by a thick fibrous scar. It most commonly presents as nonspecific vague chronic abdominal pain and weight loss, and is difficult to recognize clinically until the patient develops symptoms of bowel obstruction. We present a case of abdominal cocoon syndrome in a 65-year-old female and describe its clinical, imaging, and pathologic features.

  10. [WT1 mutation as a cause of progressive nephropathy in Frasier syndrome--case report].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wasilewska, Anna; Zoch-Zwierz, Walentyna; Tenderenda, Edyta; Rybi-Szumińska, Agnieszka; Kołodziejczyk, Zbigniew

    2009-06-01

    Frasier syndrome is an uncommon genetic disorder featuring progressive glomerulopathy, male pseudohermaphroditism and gonadal dysgenesis. It is caused by mutations in intron 9 of the WT1 gene. Because of its rarity there is limited literature available on the diagnosis and treatment of this syndrome. The aim of the study was to present the clinicopathological findings and molecular analysis of phenotypically female adolescent presenting with severe proteinuria and primary amenorrhea. The significance of early recognition of Frasier syndrome and its differentiation from Denys-Drash syndrome was discussed. WT1 mutation analysis should be routinely done in females with steroid-resistant nephritic syndrome.

  11. Late Onset Cobalamin Disorder and Hemolytic Uremic Syndrome: A Rare Cause of Nephrotic Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gianluigi Ardissino

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS is an unrare and severe thrombotic microangiopathy (TMA caused by several pathogenetic mechanisms among which Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli infections and complement dysregulation are the most common. However, very rarely and particularly in neonates and infants, disorders of cobalamin metabolism (CblC can present with or be complicated by TMA. Herein we describe a case of atypical HUS (aHUS related to CblC disease which first presented in a previously healthy boy at age of 13.6 years. The clinical picture was initially dominated by nephrotic range proteinuria and severe hypertension followed by renal failure. The specific treatment with high dose of hydroxycobalamin rapidly obtained the remission of TMA and the complete recovery of renal function. We conclude that plasma homocysteine and methionine determinations together with urine organic acid analysis should be included in the diagnostic work-up of any patient with TMA and/or nephrotic syndrome regardless of age.

  12. Confirmation that RIPK4 mutations cause not only Bartsocas-Papas syndrome but also CHAND syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busa, Tiffany; Jeraiby, Mohammed; Clémenson, Alix; Manouvrier, Sylvie; Granados, Viviana; Philip, Nicole; Touraine, Renaud

    2017-11-01

    CHAND syndrome is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by curly hair, ankyloblepharon, and nail dysplasia. Only few patients were reported to date. A homozygous RIPK4 mutation was recently identified by homozygosity mapping and whole exome sequencing in three patients from an expanded consanguineous kindred with a clinical diagnosis of CHAND syndrome. RIPK4 was previously known to be implicated in Bartsocas-Papas syndrome, the autosomal recessive form of popliteal pterygium syndrome. We report here two cases of RIPK4 homozygous mutations in a fetus with severe Bartsocas-Papas syndrome and a patient with CHAND syndrome. The patient with CHAND syndrome harbored the same mutation as the one identified in the family previously reported. We thus confirm the implication of RIPK4 gene in CHAND syndrome in addition to Bartsocas-Papas syndrome and discuss genotype/phenotype correlations. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Unexplained cyanosis caused by hepatopulmonary syndrome in a girl with APECED syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Celmeli, Fatih; Kocabas, Abdullah; Isik, Ishak A; Parlak, Mesut; Kisand, Kai; Ceylaner, Serdar; Turkkahraman, Doga

    2017-03-01

    Autoimmune polyendocrinopathy, candidiasis and ectodermal dystrophy (APECED) is a rare but devastating primary immunodeficiency disease caused by loss-of-function mutations in autoimmune regulator (AIRE) gene on chromosome 21q22.3. The clinical spectrum of the disease is characterized by a wide heterogeneity because of autoimmune reactions toward different endocrine and non-endocrine organs. Here, we report a 17-year-old Turkish girl diagnosed with APECED at 9 years in whom a novel homozygote mutation in AIRE gene p.R15H (c.44G>A) was found. In the clinical course of the patient, chronic liver disease due to autoimmune hepatitis has evolved resulting in hepatopulmonary syndrome (HPS) which has not been reported before in patients with APECED.

  14. A Rare Cause for Cervical Pain: Eagle's Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Politi, Massimo; Toro, Corrado; Tenani, Giulia

    2009-01-01

    Patients with pharyngodynia and neck pain symptoms can lead to an extensive differential diagnosis. Eagle's syndrome must be taken in account. Eagle defined "stylalgia" as an autonomous entity related to abnormal length of the styloid process or to mineralization of the stylohyoid ligament complex. The stylohyoid complex derives from Reichert's cartilage of the second branchial arch. The styloyd process is an elongated conical projection of the temporal bone that lies anteriorly to the mastoid process. The incidence of Eagle's syndrome varies among population. Usually asymptomatic, it occurs in adult patients. It is characterized by pharyngodynia localized in the tonsillar fossa and sometimes accompanied by disphagia, odynophagia, foreign body sensation, and temporary voice changes. In some cases, the stylohyoid apparatus compresses the internal and/or the external carotid arteries and their perivascular sympathetic fibers, resulting in a persistent pain irradiating in the carotid territory. The pathogenesis of the syndrome is still under discussion.

  15. A Rare Cause of Congenital Hypotonia: Walker Warburg Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cigdem Sivrice

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Walker-Warburg syndrome (WWS is an autosomal recessive rare muscle disease which characterized by type 2 lissencephaly, cerebellar abnormalities, and congenital muscular dystrophy of the retinal abnormalities. In this article, we described a patient who born from 1st degree consanguineous marriage mother and father and admitted to our hospital suction weakness and had been diagnosed Walker- Warburg syndrome with physical examination and laboratory tests as a result of severe hypotonia, atypical facial appearance, accompanying eye and brain abnormalities are very high serum creatine phosphokinase levels and wanted to draw attention to this rare muscle disease in the differential diagnosis of hypotonic infants.

  16. Systemic Multiple Aneurysms Caused by Vascular Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gui, Xinyu; Li, Fangda; Wu, Lingeer; Zheng, Yuehong

    2016-07-01

    Systemic multiple aneurysms are rare and usually associated with collagen tissue disease, such as Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (EDS) or Marfan syndrome. In the present case, we describe a 39-year-old male patient with systemic multiple aneurysms and acute intraperitoneal hemorrhage who was clinically diagnosed with vascular EDS. Coil embolization of the distal segment of the common hepatic artery was performed, which resolved the patient's symptoms. With this case presentation, we aim to increase the awareness of vascular EDS among clinicians and emphasize the extreme fragility of the arteries in patients with vascular EDS. © The Author(s) 2016.

  17. Toxigenic and metabolic causes of ketosis and ketoacidotic syndromes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cartwright, Martina M; Hajja, Waddah; Al-Khatib, Sofian; Hazeghazam, Maryam; Sreedhar, Dharmashree; Li, Rebecca Na; Wong-McKinstry, Edna; Carlson, Richard W

    2012-10-01

    Ketoacidotic syndromes are frequently encountered in acute care medicine. This article focuses on ketosis and ketoacidotic syndromes associated with intoxications, alcohol abuse, starvation, and certain dietary supplements as well as inborn errors of metabolism. Although all of these various processes are characterized by the accumulation of ketone bodies and metabolic acidosis, there are differences in the mechanisms, clinical presentations, and principles of therapy for these heterogeneous disorders. Pathophysiologic mechanisms that account for these disorders are presented, as well as guidance regarding identification and management. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. A Rare Cause for Cervical Pain: Eagle's Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Massimo Politi

    2009-01-01

    The stylohyoid complex derives from Reichert's cartilage of the second branchial arch. The styloyd process is an elongated conical projection of the temporal bone that lies anteriorly to the mastoid process. The incidence of Eagle's syndrome varies among population. Usually asymptomatic, it occurs in adult patients. It is characterized by pharyngodynia localized in the tonsillar fossa and sometimes accompanied by disphagia, odynophagia, foreign body sensation, and temporary voice changes. In some cases, the stylohyoid apparatus compresses the internal and/or the external carotid arteries and their perivascular sympathetic fibers, resulting in a persistent pain irradiating in the carotid territory. The pathogenesis of the syndrome is still under discussion.

  19. A black adrenocortical adenoma causing Cushing's syndrome not imaged by radiocholesterol scintigraphy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reschini, E.; Baldini, M.; Cantalamessa, L.

    1990-01-01

    In a 33-year-old female patient with left adrenal tumour and Cushing's syndrome, adrenocortical scintigraphy with radiocholesterol did not image the tumour nor the suppressed contralateral gland. Histology showed a black adrenocortical adenoma composed only of compact cells; there was no evidence of malignancy. This demonstrates that non-visualization of the adrenal glands in a patient with Cushing's syndrome is not invariably due to adrenal carcinoma. The literature on black adrenal adenomas causing Cushing's syndrome is reviewed. (orig.)

  20. Mutations in a TGF-β Ligand, TGFB3, Cause Syndromic Aortic Aneurysms and Dissections

    OpenAIRE

    Bertoli Avella, Aida; Gillis, Elisabeth; Morisaki, Hiroko; Verhagen, Judith; Graaf, Bianca; Van De Beek, Gerarda; Gallo, Elena; Kruithof, Boudewijn; Venselaar, Hanka; Myers, Loretha; Laga, Steven; Doyle, Alexander; Oswald, Gretchen; Cappellen, Gert; Yamanaka, Itaru

    2015-01-01

    markdownabstractBACKGROUND Aneurysms affecting the aorta are a common condition associated with high mortality as a result of aortic dissection or rupture. Investigations of the pathogenic mechanisms involved in syndromic types of thoracic aortic aneurysms, such as Marfan and Loeys-Dietz syndromes, have revealed an important contribution of disturbed transforming growth factor (TGF)-b signaling. OBJECTIVES This study sought to discover a novel gene causing syndromic aortic aneurysms in order ...

  1. Mounier-Kuhn syndrome: a rare cause of bronchial dilation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Celik, Burcin; Bilgin, Salih; Yuksel, Canan

    2011-01-01

    Mounier-Kuhn syndrome, or tracheobronchomegaly, is a rare clinical and radiologic condition characterized by marked tracheobronchial dilation and recurrent lower respiratory tract infections. Diagnosis is typically accomplished with the use of computed tomography and bronchoscopy, as well as pulmonary function testing. Patients may be asymptomatic; however, symptoms can range from minimal with preserved lung function to severe respiratory failure. Therapy, if any, is supportive but minimal. Surgery rarely has a place in the treatment of Mounier-Kuhn syndrome.Herein, we report the case of a 58-year-old man with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease who had a chronic cough, increased sputum production, and chest pain. Thoracic computed tomography showed tracheal dilation (diameter, 34 mm) and multiple diverticula in the posterior region of the trachea. Fiberoptic bronchoscopy revealed enlarged main bronchi, the dilated trachea, and prominent tracheal diverticula. Pulmonary function testing disclosed impaired respiratory function. Histopathologic examination of biopsy specimens from the bronchi and the tracheal wall supported the diagnosis of Mounier-Kuhn syndrome. The patient was released from the hospital and his condition was monitored for 2 years, during which time he developed no lower respiratory tract infections.Regardless of radiologic findings that suggest recurrent lower respiratory tract infection, we recommend that Mounier-Kuhn syndrome be considered in the differential diagnosis.

  2. Dominant missense mutations in ABCC9 cause Cantu syndrome.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Harakalova, M.; Harssel, J.J. van; Terhal, P.A.; Lieshout, S. van; Duran, K.; Renkens, I.; Amor, D.J.; Wilson, L.C.; Kirk, E.P.; Turner, C.L.; Shears, D.; Garcia-Minaur, S.; Lees, M.M.; Ross, A.; Venselaar, H.; Vriend, G.; Takanari, H.; Rook, M.B.; Heyden, M.A. van der; Asselbergs, F.W.; Breur, H.M.; Swinkels, M.E.; Scurr, I.J.; Smithson, S.F.; Knoers, N.V.A.M.; Smagt, J.J. van der; Nijman, IJ; Kloosterman, W.P.; Haelst, M.M. van; Haaften, G. van; Cuppen, E.

    2012-01-01

    Cantu syndrome is characterized by congenital hypertrichosis, distinctive facial features, osteochondrodysplasia and cardiac defects. By using family-based exome sequencing, we identified a de novo mutation in ABCC9. Subsequently, we discovered novel dominant missense mutations in ABCC9 in 14 of the

  3. Cantu syndrome is caused by mutations in ABCC9

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Bon, B.W.; Gilissen, C.F.H.A.; Grange, D.K.; Hennekam, R.C.; Kayserili, H.; Engels, H.; Reutter, H.; Ostergaard, J.R.; Morava, E.; Tsiakas, K.; Isidor, B.; Le Merrer, M.; Eser, M.; Wieskamp, N.; de Vries, P.; Steehouwer, M.; Veltman, J.A.; Robertson, S.P.; Brunner, H.G.; Vries, L.B.A. de; Hoischen, A.

    2012-01-01

    Cantu syndrome is a rare disorder characterized by congenital hypertrichosis, neonatal macrosomia, a distinct osteochondrodysplasia, and cardiomegaly. Using an exome-sequencing approach applied to one proband-parent trio and three unrelated single cases, we identified heterozygous mutations in ABCC9

  4. Dominant missense mutations in ABCC9 cause Cantu syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Harakalova, M.; van Harssel, J.J.; Terhal, P.A.; van Lieshout, S.; Duran, K.; Renkens, I.; Amor, D.J.; Wilson, L.C.; Kirk, E.P.; Turner, C.L.; Shears, D.; Garcia-Minaur, S.; Lees, M.M.; Ross, A.; Venselaar, H.; Vriend, G.; Takanari, H.; Rook, M.B.; van der Heyden, M.A.; Asselbergs, F.W.; Breur, H.M.; Swinkels, M.E.; Scurr, I.J.; Smithson, S.F.; Knoers, N.V.; van der Smagt, J.J.; Nijman, I.J.; Kloosterman, W.P.; van Haelst, M.M.; van Haaften, G.; Cuppen, E.

    2012-01-01

    Cantu syndrome is characterized by congenital hypertrichosis, distinctive facial features, osteochondrodysplasia and cardiac defects. By using family-based exome sequencing, we identified a de novo mutation in ABCC9. Subsequently, we discovered novel dominant missense mutations in ABCC9 in 14 of the

  5. Cantu Syndrome Is Caused by Mutations in ABCC9

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Bon, Bregje W. M.; Gilissen, Christian; Grange, Dorothy K.; Hennekam, Raoul C. M.; Kayserili, Hülya; Engels, Hartmut; Reutter, Heiko; Ostergaard, John R.; Morava, Eva; Tsiakas, Konstantinos; Isidor, Bertrand; Le Merrer, Martine; Eser, Metin; Wieskamp, Nienke; de Vries, Petra; Steehouwer, Marloes; Veltman, Joris A.; Robertson, Stephen P.; Brunner, Han G.; de Vries, Bert B. A.; Hoischen, Alexander

    2012-01-01

    Cantu syndrome is a rare disorder characterized by congenital hypertrichosis, neonatal macrosomia, a distinct osteochondrodysplasia, and cardiomegaly. Using an exome-sequencing approach applied to one proband-parent trio and three unrelated single cases, we identified heterozygous mutations in ABCC9

  6. A defect in dystrophin causes a novel porcine stress syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Two sibling barrows were identified in the USMARC swine herd that died from apparent symptoms of a stress syndrome after transport to a research location at 12 weeks of age. The symptoms included open-mouth breathing, skin discoloration, vocalization and loss of mobility. The original mating was rep...

  7. Superior Mesenteric Artery Syndrome: An Uncommon Cause of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    19, Anupam Society, Jetalpur Road,. Vadodara ‑ 390 007, Gujarat, India. E‑mail: digishdr@gmail.com. Introduction. Superior mesenteric artery (SMA) syndrome was first described in 1861 by Von Rokitansky but remained an unknown entity until 1927 when Wilkie published the first comprehensive series of 75 patients.

  8. Malformation syndromes caused by disorders of cholesterol synthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porter, Forbes D.; Herman, Gail E.

    2011-01-01

    Cholesterol homeostasis is critical for normal growth and development. In addition to being a major membrane lipid, cholesterol has multiple biological functions. These roles include being a precursor molecule for the synthesis of steroid hormones, neuroactive steroids, oxysterols, and bile acids. Cholesterol is also essential for the proper maturation and signaling of hedgehog proteins, and thus cholesterol is critical for embryonic development. After birth, most tissues can obtain cholesterol from either endogenous synthesis or exogenous dietary sources, but prior to birth, the human fetal tissues are dependent on endogenous synthesis. Due to the blood-brain barrier, brain tissue cannot utilize dietary or peripherally produced cholesterol. Generally, inborn errors of cholesterol synthesis lead to both a deficiency of cholesterol and increased levels of potentially bioactive or toxic precursor sterols. Over the past couple of decades, a number of human malformation syndromes have been shown to be due to inborn errors of cholesterol synthesis. Herein, we will review clinical and basic science aspects of Smith-Lemli-Opitz syndrome, desmosterolosis, lathosterolosis, HEM dysplasia, X-linked dominant chondrodysplasia punctata, Congenital Hemidysplasia with Ichthyosiform erythroderma and Limb Defects Syndrome, sterol-C-4 methyloxidase-like deficiency, and Antley-Bixler syndrome. PMID:20929975

  9. Case Report: Gitelman Syndrome as a Cause of Psychomotor ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Introduction: Gitelman syndrome (GS) is a very rare autosomal recessive tubulopathy due to loss-of-function or mutation in solute carrier family12, member 3 gene (SLC12A3 gene) encoding thiazide-sensitive NaCl co-transporter in the distal convoluted tubule, leading to hypokalemia, metabolic alkalosis, hypomagnesemia, ...

  10. Another cause of vaccine encephalopathy: A case of Angelman syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Novy, Jan; Catarino, Claudia B.; Chinthapalli, Krishna; Smith, Shelagh M.; Clayton-Smith, Jill; Hennekam, Raoul C. M.; Hammond, Peter; Sisodiya, Sanjay M.

    2012-01-01

    Dravet syndrome has been found recently as an important underlying condition in cases of alleged vaccine encephalopathy after pertussis vaccination, where vaccination seemed to have precipitated the occurrence of the disease without modifying the long-term course. We report on a patient diagnosed

  11. Blue rubber bleb naevus syndrome: A rare cause of gastrointestinal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Blue rubber bleb naevus syndrome (BRBNS) is characterised by vascular malformations of the skin and gastrointestinal tract. We present the rare case of BRBNS in an African child. She presented with large-volume gastrointestinal bleeding and was managed by on-table colonoscopic identification and surgical excision, ...

  12. Audiometric Characteristics of a Dutch Family with a New Mutation in GATA3 Causing HDR Syndrome.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beelen, E. van; Leijendeckers, J.M.; Admiraal, R.J.C.; Huygen, P.L.M.; Hoefsloot, L.H.; Pennings, R.J.E.; Snik, A.F.M.; Kunst, H.P.M.

    2014-01-01

    We present the case of a Dutch family with a new mutation (c523_528dup) in GATA3 causing HDR syndrome. HDR syndrome is characterised by hypoparathyroidism, deafness and renal defects. In this study, we describe the audiometric characteristics of 5 patients from this family. Their hearing impairment

  13. Torsion as a contributing cause of the anti-elevation syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kushner, B J

    2001-06-01

    The anti-elevation syndrome is an adverse outcome of anterior transposition of the inferior oblique muscle. The presumed cause is an excessive anti-elevating force vector that occurs with attempted elevation in abduction. This causes apparent overaction of the contralateral inferior oblique muscle due to fixation duress. It has been suggested that excessive residual extorsion may help explain this phenomenon. Fundus photographs to assess torsion were evaluated by masked observers in 18 patients who had undergone anterior transposition of the inferior oblique muscle. Eight of the patients were found to have the anti-elevation syndrome and 10 were not. Patients with the anti-elevation syndrome had more extorsion (mean, 16.6 degrees +/- 3.4 degrees ) than the patients who did not have the anti-elevation syndrome (mean, 8.8 degrees +/- 2.3 degrees ). This difference was significant (P extorsion after they subsequently developed the anti-elevation syndrome. Two patients who had the anti-elevation syndrome showed a marked decrease in fundus extorsion after the anti-elevation syndrome was surgically eliminated by converting the anterior transposition to a simple recession. The presence of substantial extorsion may contribute to the cause of the anti-elevation syndrome after inferior oblique muscle anterior transposition. Lateral placement of the posterior (lateral) corner of the inferior oblique muscle at the time of surgery may cause substantial extorsion after surgery.

  14. Causes of the "I Can Understand English but I Can't Speak" Syndrome in Turkey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coskun, Abdullah

    2016-01-01

    The saying "I can understand English but I can't speak" is so commonly used by Turkish people that it would be fair to state that not being able to speak English has almost become a syndrome in society. This study delves into the causes of this syndrome. In two state high schools, 293 high school students filled out a questionnaire…

  15. Determining the Amount, Timing and Causes of Mortality among Infants with Down Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldman, S. E.; Urbano, R. C.; Hodapp, R. M.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To examine the amount, timing and causes/correlates of infant mortality among newborns with Down syndrome. Methods: Using the Tennessee Department of Health Birth, Hospital Discharge and Death records, infants were identified who were born with Down syndrome from 1990 to 2006. Those who died during the first year were separated into…

  16. A Rare Cause of Abdominal Mass: Rapunzel Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feyzullah Uçmak

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Bezoar is a condition in which foods or fibers that are not absorbed in the gastrointestinal system usually accumu­late in the stomach. It usually develops in persons with gastrointestinal motility disorders, anatomic changes or psychiatric disorders. Trichobezoar is the accumulation of hair in the gastric chamber among people with psychi­atric disorders such as trichotillomania and trichophagia. Rapunzel syndrome, however, is a rare form of trichobe­zoar extending from the stomach to the small intestine. In this paper, we present a rare case of 15-year old girl diagnosed with Rapunzel syndrome on admission due to abdominal pain and abdominal mass. J Clin Exp Invest 2016; 7 (1: 87-90

  17. Review and update of mutations causing Waardenburg syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pingault, Véronique; Ente, Dorothée; Dastot-Le Moal, Florence; Goossens, Michel; Marlin, Sandrine; Bondurand, Nadège

    2010-04-01

    Waardenburg syndrome (WS) is characterized by the association of pigmentation abnormalities, including depigmented patches of the skin and hair, vivid blue eyes or heterochromia irides, and sensorineural hearing loss. However, other features such as dystopia canthorum, musculoskeletal abnormalities of the limbs, Hirschsprung disease, or neurological defects are found in subsets of patients and used for the clinical classification of WS. Six genes are involved in this syndrome: PAX3 (encoding the paired box 3 transcription factor), MITF (microphthalmia-associated transcription factor), EDN3 (endothelin 3), EDNRB (endothelin receptor type B), SOX10 (encoding the Sry bOX10 transcription factor), and SNAI2 (snail homolog 2), with different frequencies. In this review we provide an update on all WS genes and set up mutation databases, summarize molecular and functional data available for each of them, and discuss the applications in diagnostics and genetic counseling. (c) 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  18. Prader-Willi Syndrome: Causes, Characteristics, Interventions, Long-Term Consequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otto, Tracy L.; Barber, William H.

    1992-01-01

    An overview of Prader-Willi syndrome, the most common form of dysmorphic genetic obesity associated with mental retardation, is presented, with an emphasis on associated causes, characteristics, diagnosis and counseling, intervention, and long-term consequences. (Author/DB)

  19. Is Fructose Malabsorption a Cause of Irritable Bowel Syndrome?

    OpenAIRE

    DiNicolantonio, James J.; Lucan, Sean C.

    2015-01-01

    Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS) is a condition that may be marked by abdominal pain, bloating, fullness, indigestion, belching, constipation and/or diarrhea. IBS symptoms can result from malabsorption of fructose. Fructose is a monosaccharide found naturally in small quantities in fruits and some vegetables, and in much larger quantities in industrially manufactured sweeteners and a dded sugars (e.g. sucrose and high fructose corn syrup). Fructose malabsorption leads to osmotic diarrhea as wel...

  20. Uric Acid as a Cause of the Metabolic Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Christopher; Lanaspa, Miguel A; Jensen, Thomas; Tolan, Dean R; Sánchez-Lozada, L Gabriela; Johnson, Richard J

    2018-01-01

    Hyperuricemia is common in subjects with obesity, metabolic syndrome, and type 2 diabetes. For many years, hyperuricemia was attributed to the effects of insulin resistance to reduce urinary excretion of uric acid, and it was believed that uric acid may not have any causal role in the metabolic syndrome. However, in recent years, hyperuricemia has been found to independently predict the development of diabetes. Experimental studies have also shown that hyperuricemia may mediate insulin resistance, fatty liver, and dyslipidemia in both fructose-dependent and fructose-independent models of metabolic syndrome. The mechanism for uric acid-induced insulin resistance appears to be mediated by the development of mitochondrial oxidative stress and impairment of insulin-dependent stimulation of nitric oxide in endothelial cells. Pilot studies in humans have reported a potential benefit of lowering serum uric acid on insulin resistance. Large clinical trials are recommended. If uric acid is shown to be a mediator of incident type 2 diabetes in humans, then lowering serum uric acid would represent a simple and inexpensive way to help prevent the development of diabetes and to slow the epidemic. © 2018 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  1. A Lemierre syndrome variant caused by Klebsiella pneumoniae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yih-Jeng Tsai

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Lemierre syndrome is an extremely rare disease characterized by oropharyngeal infection, septicemia, internal jugular vein thrombosis, and skip lesions. The most common causative pathogen is Fusobacterium necrophorum. We reported a 45-year-old woman who presented with left neck painful swelling and septicemia. Magnetic resonance imaging of the head and neck demonstrated venous thrombosis extending from the left internal jugular vein to the sigmoid sinus. During admission we discovered that the patient had uncontrolled diabetes mellitus. We also found a metastatic lesion through chest radiography. Klebsiella pneumoniae was cultivated from both blood samples and pus from deep neck spaces. Surgical drainage, early and adequate antibiotic treatment, anticoagulation, and strict control of blood glucose led to the patient's complete recovery. Because Lemierre syndrome is a forgotten disease in the era of antibiotics, awareness of the signs and symptoms of this disease is important because of its associated high mortality rate. This case illustrated that the presence of K pneumoniae can lead to Lemierre syndrome.

  2. Diencephalic syndrome: a rare cause of failure to thrive.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tosur, Mustafa; Tomsa, Anca; Paul, David L

    2017-07-06

    Timely diagnosis of diencephalic syndrome is not often the case for patients presenting with failure to thrive (FTT) because of its rarity and lack of specific symptoms. Herein, we report two cases of diencephalic syndrome (2-year-old girl and 10-month-old boy) presenting with severe emaciation. Both patients had histories of poor weight gain for months despite having good appetites prior to diagnosis. Initial work-up did not reveal the diagnosis. Horizontal nystagmus was noted in both patients: by a neurologist in the first patient and by a family member in the second patient. MRI of the brain showed large suprasellar mass and pilocytic astrocytoma was confirmed by pathology in each case. The patients were started on appropriate chemotherapy with interval improvements in weight gain. These cases illustrate the importance of cranial imaging and consideration of diencephalic syndrome for children presenting with FTT despite normal or increased caloric intake. © BMJ Publishing Group Ltd (unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  3. Cervical Disc Herniation Causing Brown-Séquard's Syndrome: A Case Report and Literature Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tarush Rustagi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Brown-Séquard's syndrome (BSS is caused by hemisection or hemicompression of the cord leading to ipsilateral motor deficit and contralateral sensory loss. Cervical disc herniation has been reported to be a rare cause of Brown-Séquard's syndrome. We describe a rare case of multilevel cervical disc herniation presenting as BSS. The condition was confirmed by MRI scan. Cervical corpectomy, decompression, and fusion gave a satisfying result. Pertinent literature has been reviewed.

  4. Trigger wrist and carpal tunnel syndrome caused by hand intramuscular intrasynovial angiofibrolipoma: A rare case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Turan C Dulgeroglu

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Trigger wrist is a clinical entity characterized by triggering or the crackling of the wrist. Here, a case is reported of intrasynovial angiofibrolipoma that caused trigger wrist and carpal tunnel syndrome. This is the only case report where trigger wrist and carpal tunnel syndrome caused by the intrasynovial angiofibrolipoma were developed simultaneously. it is believed that that adhesive tenosynovitis developing in the tendons may have contributed to the triggering and carpal tunnel syndrome in the wrist as a result of inflammation occuring as a consequence of intrasynovial angiofibrolipoma. [Hand Microsurg 2016; 5(2.000: 107-109

  5. An unusual cause of the quadrilateral space impingement syndrome by a bone spike.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amin, Mohammed F; Berst, Matthew; el-Khoury, George Y

    2006-12-01

    The quadrilateral space impingement syndrome is a clinical syndrome resulting from compression of the axillary nerve and the posterior circumflex humeral artery, with subsequent focal atrophy of the teres minor, with or without involvement of portions of the deltoid muscle. This entity has many etiologies. We are reporting a case of this syndrome caused by a bone spike from a malunited old scapular fracture following a motor vehicle accident. The bone spike impinged on the axillary nerve as it passes through the quadrilateral space, causing focal atrophy of the teres minor muscle. The abnormality was well demonstrated by MD-CT.

  6. An unusual cause of the quadrilateral space impingement syndrome by a bone spike

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amin, Mohammed F.; Berst, Matthew; El-Khoury, George Y. [University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics, Radiology, Iowa City, IO (United States)

    2006-12-15

    The quadrilateral space impingement syndrome is a clinical syndrome resulting from compression of the axillary nerve and the posterior circumflex humeral artery, with subsequent focal atrophy of the teres minor, with or without involvement of portions of the deltoid muscle. This entity has many etiologies. We are reporting a case of this syndrome caused by a bone spike from a malunited old scapular fracture following a motor vehicle accident. The bone spike impinged on the axillary nerve as it passes through the quadrilateral space, causing focal atrophy of the teres minor muscle. The abnormality was well demonstrated by MD-CT. (orig.)

  7. [Meigs' syndrome caused by bilateral ovarian fibroma mimicking ovarian cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Torres, D A; Díaz-Murillo, R; Kazlauskas, S; de Santiago, J; Zapardiel, I

    2016-02-01

    We report the case of a 55-year-old patient who pre- sented a pelvic mass, ascites and elevated serum CA125. Suspecting a malignant process she underwent surgery and a total hysterectomy with bilateral salpigo-oforectomy was performed. Pathologic report revealed a bilateral ovarian fibroma and non-tumoral ascites. The presence of elevated serum CA125 levels in a postmenopausal woman with a pelvic mass and ascites suggest an ovarian malignant disease. However, in case of Meigs'syndrome, all symptoms will diappear after removal of the pelvic tumor, so a fast surgical management of the patients is mandatory.

  8. [Bartter syndrome--a rare cause of severe polyhydramnios].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Media, Jean; Hoseth, Gerd Eva

    2006-12-11

    We report a case of a 25-year-old woman, gravida II, Para I, in pregnancy week 26 + 4 with severe polyhydramnios. The amniotic fluid index was about 39. Type 2 scanning showed a large urinary bladder only. Treated in pregnancy with repeated aminodrinage, total 21 litres. In week 33 + 5, a Caesarean section was performed. A girl with Apgar score 10/1, 0/10 was born, weight 1,804 grammes. Immediately after birth the child developed polyuria with diuresis, about 8-10 ml/kg/hour, electrolyte disturbance, and vomiting, treated with Losec, Gaviscon, indometacin, and Vioxx. The diagnosis was Bartter syndrome.

  9. Venous Thoracic Outlet Syndrome as a Cause of Intractable Migraines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chahwala, Veer; Tashiro, Jun; Li, Xiaoyi; Baqai, Atif; Rey, Jorge; Robinson, Handel R

    2017-02-01

    Thoracic outlet syndrome (TOS) refers to the compression of the neurovascular bundle within the thoracic outlet. Cases are classified by primary etiology-arterial, neurogenic, or venous. In addition to the typical symptoms of arm swelling and paresthesias, headaches have been reported as a potential symptom of TOS. In this report, we describe a patient with debilitating migraines, which were consistently preceded by unilateral arm swelling. Resolution of symptoms occurred only after thoracic outlet decompression. Patients with migraines and concomitant swelling and/or paresthesias, especially related to provocative arm maneuvers, should be considered a possible atypical presentation of TOS and evaluated in more detail. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Good's syndrome: an uncommon cause of therapy-resistant diarrhoea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Disselhorst, M J; Dickhoff, C; Alhan, C

    2016-08-01

    Diarrhoea is a common symptom for which the aetiology will be straightforward in many cases. However, when a common aetiology is not found, the wide variety of other options can feel like finding a needle in a haystack. In this case report, we describe a patient who was referred to our centre with therapy-resistant, secretory diarrhoea, which was the presenting symptom of Good's syndrome, a rare form of adult-onset immunodeficiency associated with thymoma. The conclusions from this case report give direction for 'finding the needle' and contribute to a focused approach to patients who present with therapyresistant diarrhoea.

  11. [Rapunzel syndrome as a cause of obstruction and intestinal perforation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rojas, Patricia Guzmán; Paredes, Eduar Bravo; Reto, Catherina Pichilingue

    2016-06-01

    The following is a case report involving a 16 year old female with trichotillomania as an antecedent. This patient presented to the Emergency Room with a chief complaint of early satiety and persistent abdominal pain for the past 3 months. However, recently her abdominal pain has worsened and it is now complicated by nausea and vomiting. The physical exam was notable for epigastric pain on deep palpation. The biochemical analysis and abdominal ultrasound were otherwise unremarkable. An esophagogastroduodenoscopy was subsequently performed where a trichobezoar was discovered. It extended from the gastric fundus to the third portion of the duodenum. A surgical extraction of the trichobezoar was then performed. The trichobezoar was found to be 130 cm in length and 8 cm wide at its most cephalad aspect. It is important to note that they also found five mall perforations throughout the duodenum and jejunum. The patient was discharged with outpatient follow up with psychiatry. In this report we describe the case of a patient with Rapunzel syndrome that was complicated by small bowel perforation and we provide a review of the salient literature concerning this syndrome and its associated complications.

  12. [The large vestibular aqueduct syndrome: a cause of neurosensory dysacusia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camargo da Silva, Daniela Polo; Montovani, Jair Cortez; Oliveira, Danielle Tavares; Fioravanti, Marisa Portes; Tamashiro, Ivanira Ayako

    2008-01-01

    the large vestibular aqueduct syndrome (LVAS) is characterized by the enlargement of the vestibular aqueduct associated with sensorioneural hearing loss. The level of hearing loss varies and may be fluctuant, progressive or sudden. Vestibular symptoms may be present. The diagnosis is reached by imaging methods. To report an LVAS case. a female infant was submitted to a computerized tomography of the ears and to audiologic tests. enlargement of the vestibular aqueduct of more than 1.5mm and sensorioneural hearing loss in the right ear were observed. with an early hearing evaluation it is possible to diagnose hearing loss, even in children were this loss is unilateral. Although the literature indicates that the diagnosis of LVAS occurs at a later age, in this case the etiologic diagnosis was enabled by computerized tomography.

  13. Fetal alcohol syndromecauses, diagnostic criteria and prevalence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agata Horecka-Lewitowicz

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Fetal alcohol syndrome (FAS is the outcome of alcohol exposition in the prenatal period. It is irreversible. In Poland, FAS is becoming more and more common, the diagnostic tools are limited though. It is recommended to use the 4-Digit Diagnostic Code, which evaluates the 4 basic FAS symptoms: growth retardation, dysmorphic appearance, damage to the central nervous system and prenatal alcohol exposure. It has been confirmed that there is no safe amount of alcohol for a mother to drink while carrying a baby. To put it another way, only a complete lack of alcohol consumption is a guarantee that the baby will not suffer from FAS. It is necessary for society to know that even the smallest amount of alcohol is bad for the foetus. A number of people still believe that, for example, red wine is good and healthy for both the mother and child.

  14. An unusual cause of an inferior vena cava syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Regoort, M.; Reekers, J. A.; Kromhout, J. G.

    1989-01-01

    Two patients are presented with an occlusion of the infrarenal vena cava caused by a vena cava aneurysm. This rare congenital vena caval anomaly may mimic retroperitoneal lymphadenopathy, especially on CT- imaging without contrast enhancement

  15. Kounis Syndrome Caused by Chronic Autoimmune Urticaria: A Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erxun, Kang; Wei, Liu; Shuying, Qi

    2016-01-01

    Coincidental occurrence of acute coronary syndrome with symptoms associated with an allergic reaction is called Kounis syndrome (KS). Although KS has been recognized for several years and has been reported in many documents, KS induced by chronic autoimmune urticaria (CAU), to the authors' knowledge, has not been reported. The patient was a 31-year-old woman who suffered from chronic urticaria for nearly 3 years. Her urticaria became more serious 1 week before this visit and was accompanied by repeated attacks of cardiac symptoms. Autologous serum skin test and serum anti-high affinity immunoglobulin E receptor antibody test were positive for CAU. Her coronary artery pathological changes were confirmed by electrocardiogram (ECG), cardiac troponin T (cTnT) value, and angiocardiography. The patient was diagnosed with KS. After being treated with cetirizine, glucocorticoids, and azathioprine, the patient did not relapse during the first year of follow-up. WHY SHOULD AN EMERGENCY PHYSICIAN BE AWARE OF THIS?: When seeing a patient with intermittent exacerbations of chronic urticaria accompanied by repeated attacks of cardiac symptoms, emergency physicians should consider the diagnosis of KS. It is important to monitor changes in the ECG and cTnT value. Angiocardiography is necessary to eliminate myocardial infarction or unstable angina. Second-generation antihistamines and glucocorticoids are effective in the treatment of CAU and also alleviate coronary spasm. Another important consideration for the emergency physician is the fact that some first-generation antihistamines have the side effect of ventricular tachycardia or fibrillation, so it is better not to use these drugs to treat urticaria if KS is suspected. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Nephrotic syndrome: a rare cause of acute coronary syndrome in a child

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khan, J.A.; Shamsi, F.

    2012-01-01

    Patients with nephrotic syndrome are at risk of developing thrombosis in both veins and arteries. Various manifestations in different organs have been reported. Thrombi in heart seen, associated with multi organ thrombosis have been reported on autopsy earlier, but only once in a living patient with nephrotic syndrome. Here, we report a 13 years old boy with steroid-resistant nephrotic syndrome, who developed an asymptomatic but potentially hazardous large intracardiac thrombus. The child developed nephrotic syndrome at the age of 9 years and had multiple recurrences. At the age of 13 years, he developed myocardial infarction (MI) due to embolism from a large intracardiac thrombus. Later on, he was treated with heparin and warfarin anticoagulation. (author)

  17. Le Syndrome de Denys-Drash, une Cause Rare de Syndrome ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Résumé Le syndrome de Denys-Drash (DD) est une affection génétique rare due `a la mutation du g`ene WT1, impliqué dans la morphogen`ese des organes génitaux externes et du rein. Il associe un syndrome néphrotique congénital et une ambiguıté sexuelle. Les premiers signes surviennent d`es les 3 premiers mois de ...

  18. Electrical Storm or Naxos Syndrome in an Adult Causing Recurrent Syncope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maqbool, Muhammad Furrakh; Sajid, Muhammad; Noeman, Ahmed

    2017-04-01

    Among the rare and well-known causes of sudden cardiac death by malignant arrthymias is a condition called arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy. It commonly presents with right ventricular dilatation, dysfunction and ventricular tachycardia of left bundle branch morphology due to fibro-fatty infiltration of right ventricle in second to fifth decade of life, making it an unrecognized and important cause of sudden cardiac death. Two rare variants of arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy are Carvajal syndrome and Naxos syndrome. Both variants have systemic manifestations. Being a rare variant of arrhythmogenic right ventricular dysplasia, Naxos syndrome was initially described in the families of the Greek island of Naxos. It is a recessive disorder with cardio-cutaneous manifestations characterized by arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy, palmoplantar keratoderma and wooly hair. We report a rare case of Naxos syndrome in an adult patient presented with recurrent episodes of palpitation and syncope.

  19. Diagnosis of autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome caused by FAS deficiency in adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambotte, Olivier; Neven, Bénédicte; Galicier, Lionel; Magerus-Chatinet, Aude; Schleinitz, Nicolas; Hermine, Olivier; Meyts, Isabelle; Picard, Capucine; Godeau, Bertrand; Fischer, Alain; Rieux-Laucat, Frédéric

    2013-01-01

    A diagnosis of autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome caused by FAS deficiency during adulthood is unusual. We analyzed 17 cases of autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome caused by FAS deficiency diagnosed during adulthood in French reference centers for hereditary immunodeficiencies and for immune cytopenias. Twelve of the 17 patients had developed their first symptoms during childhood. The diagnosis of autoimmune lymphopro-liferative syndrome had been delayed for a variety of reasons, including unusual clinical manifestations, late referral to a reference center, and the occurrence of somatic FAS mutations. The 5 other patients presented their first symptoms after the age of 16 years. In these patients, three germline heterozygous FAS mutations were predicted to be associated with haploinsufficiency and a somatic event on the second FAS allele was observed in 2 cases. Autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome may well be diagnosed in adulthood. The occurrence of additional genetic events may account for the delayed disease onset. PMID:22983577

  20. An uncommon cause of hypoglycemia: insulin autoimmune syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savas-Erdeve, Senay; Yılmaz Agladioglu, Sebahat; Onder, Asan; Peltek Kendirci, Havva Nur; Bas, Veysel Nijat; Sagsak, Elif; Cetinkaya, Semra; Aycan, Zehra

    2014-01-01

    Insulin autoimmune syndrome (IAS) is a condition characterized by hypoglycemia associated with the presence of autoantibodies to insulin in patients who have not been injected with insulin. A female patient (aged 16 years and 3 months) presented with the complaint of being overweight. Physical examination revealed a body weight of 78.2 kg (+2.6 SD) and a height of 167 cm (+0.73 SD). While the patient's fasting blood glucose level was found to be 40 mg/dl, blood ketone was negative and the serum insulin level was determined as 379 mIU/ml. The patient was diagnosed with hyperinsulinemic hypoglycemia. Abdominal ultrasound, pancreas MRI and endoscopic ultrasound were normal. The daily blood glucose profile revealed postprandial hyperglycemia and reactive hypoglycemia in addition to fasting hypoglycemia. The results of anti-insulin antibody measurements were as high as 41.8% (normal range 0-7%). A 1,600-calorie diet containing 40% carbohydrate and divided into 6 meals a day was given to the patient. Simple sugars were excluded from the diet. Hypoglycemic episodes were not observed, but during 2 years of observation, serum levels of insulin and anti-insulin antibodies remained elevated. In all hyperinsulinemic hypoglycemia cases, IAS should be considered in the differential diagnosis and insulin antibody measurements should be carried out. © 2014 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  1. Inferior cerebellar peduncular lesion causes a distinct vestibular syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, J-H; Seo, J-D; Choi, Y R; Kim, M-J; Kim, H-J; Kim, J S; Choi, K-D

    2015-07-01

    The inferior cerebellar peduncle (ICP) contains various fibres to and from the cerebellum relating to the integration of the proprioceptive and vestibular functions. However, the full clinical features of isolated unilateral ICP lesions have not been defined in humans. Eight consecutive patients with isolated unilateral ICP lesions at the pontine level (six with stroke, one with multiple sclerosis and one with brainstem encephalitis) received bedside neurological and neuro-otological evaluations and underwent laboratory tests including measurements of the subjective visual vertical (SVV) and ocular torsion, bithermal caloric tests and pure tone audiometry. All patients developed isolated acute vestibular syndrome (AVS) with ipsilesional spontaneous nystagmus (n = 7) and contralesional ocular tilt reaction (OTR) and/or SVV tilt (n = 7). In view of the normal head impulse test in all patients and skew deviation in one, our patients met the criteria for AVS from central lesions. Five patients showed a directional dissociation between the OTR/SVV tilt and body lateropulsion that fell to the lesion side whilst the OTR/SVVtilt was contraversive. A unilateral ICP lesion at the pontine level leads to the development of isolated AVS. However, a negative head impulse test and directional dissociation between OTR/SVV tilt and body lateropulsion may distinguish lesions involving unilateral ICP at the pontine level from those affecting other vestibular structures. © 2015 EAN.

  2. Myelodysplastic Syndromes (MDS) and autoimmune disorders (AD): cause or consequence?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braun, Thorsten; Fenaux, Pierre

    2013-12-01

    Myelodysplastic Syndromes (MDS) and Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia (CMML) are frequently associated with clinical manifestations of autoimmune disorders (AD) and inflammatory response of the immune system. AD accompanying MDS and CMML include vasculitis, seronegative polyarthritis and neutrophilic dermatosis. Rare AD including relapsing polychondritis is strongly associated with MDS as in a high proportion of those patients MDS is diagnosed during disease course. Antinuclear antibodies (ANA) are frequently found among MDS patients without clinical manifestation of AD. In a subset of patients, MDS and resulting cytopenias appear to be the consequence of auto reactive immunologic activity and may respond to immunosuppressive treatment (IST). Increased release of inflammatory cytokines like tumor necrosis factor-(TNF)-α and interferon (IF)-γ triggers apoptosis of myeloid precursor cells leading to cytopenias. Impaired function of immune cells including cytotoxic, regulatory (Treg), helper (Th17) T cells and NK cells also appears to predict response to IST, outcome and occurrence of AD. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Haemolytic Uraemic Syndrome: An Unusual Cause of Jaundice ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    HUS should be considered in patients presenting with jaundice to the emergency room in the setting of the above mentioned triad. Case Report: This case report is about a 41 year old lady who presented with jaundice, thrombocytopenia, anemia and renal failure. In the course of investigating the cause of her symptoms, ...

  4. NIH Researchers Find Potential Genetic Cause of Cushing Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the CABLES1 gene are a novel cause of Cushing’s disease. Endocrine-Related Cancer 2017; doi: 10.1530/ERC-17-0131 ### This page last reviewed on June 20, 2017 Institute/Center Eunice Kennedy ... 20892 U.S. Department of Health and Human Services Back to Top

  5. Serotonin syndrome caused by fentanyl and methadone in a burn injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hillman, Ashley D; Witenko, Corey J; Sultan, Said M; Gala, Gary

    2015-01-01

    Serotonin syndrome is a syndrome identified by a triad of altered mental status, neuromuscular overactivity, and autonomic instability caused by the overstimulation of serotonin in the central nervous system and periphery. Serotonin syndrome may be provoked with the addition or increase in serotonergic agents such as selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors, serotonin norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors, tricyclic antidepressants, and monoamine oxidase inhibitors as well as other agents with serotonergic properties. Some narcotics, including fentanyl and methadone, have these properties and may be associated with the development of serotonin syndrome when used in conjunction with other agents. Currently, there are no identified case reports of narcotics as the sole agent causing serotonin syndrome. This report provides a brief overview of serotonin syndrome, particularly with cases involving administration of narcotics such as fentanyl and methadone. The case described is the first report associated with fentanyl and methadone without the coadministration of other serotonergic agents, and a possible drug interaction with voriconazole is discussed. This raises awareness of using multiple serotonergic narcotics and the potential precipitation of serotonin syndrome. © 2014 Pharmacotherapy Publications, Inc.

  6. Germinal mosaicism of PAX3 mutation caused Waardenburg syndrome type I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Kaitian; Zhan, Yuan; Wu, Xuan; Zong, Ling; Jiang, Hongyan

    2018-01-01

    Waardenburg syndrome mutations are most often recurrent or de novo. The rate of familial recurrence is low and families with several affected children are extremely rare. In this study, we aimed to clarify the underlying hereditary cause of Waardenburg syndrome type I in two siblings in a Chinese family, with a mother affected by prelingual mild hearing loss and a father who was negative for clinical symptoms of Waardenburg syndrome and had a normal hearing threshold. Complete characteristic features of the family members were recorded and genetic sequencing and parent-child relationship analyses were performed. The two probands were found to share double mutations in the PAX3/GJB2 genes that caused concurrent hearing loss in Waardenburg syndrome type I. Their mother carried the GJB2 c.109G > A homozygous mutation; however, neither the novel PAX3 c.592delG mutation, nor the Waardenburg syndrome phenotype, was observed in either parent. These previously unreported digenic mutations in PAX3/GJB2 resulted in deafness associated with Waardenburg syndrome type I in this family. To our knowledge, this is the first report describing germinal mosaicism in Waardenburg syndrome. This concept is important because it complicates genetic counseling of this family regarding the risk of recurrence of the mutations in subsequent pregnancies. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. [Numb chin syndrome caused by biphosphonates-induced osteonecrosis of the jaw].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sierra-Hidalgo, F; de Pablo-Fernández, E; Correas-Callero, E; Villarejo-Galende, A

    Numb chin syndrome is caused by a mental or inferior alveolar nerve neuropathy. Traumatic and infectious injuries are the most frequent causes of the syndrome but, if an evident cause does not exist, a neoplastic etiology must be investigated. Other causes of the numb chin syndrome are rare. A 73-year-old woman had had a diagnosis of metastatic breast cancer and was been treated with zoledronic acid. She attended because of hypoesthesia and dysesthesia of the chin congruent with mental nerve distribution. A computed tomography of the jaw showed an osteolytic lesion with central bone sequestration, so biphosphonate-induced osteonecrosis of the jaw was diagnosed. After zoledronic acid was withdrawn, clinical neuropathy and imaging findings remained stable. Biphosphonates-induced osteonecrosis of the jaw is a recently described condition. It has been rarely reported as a cause for numb chin syndrome. In the future, osteonecrosis of the jaw must be considered in the differential diagnosis of this syndrome in cancer patients treated with biphosphonates.

  8. Evidence of staphylococcal toxic shock syndrome caused by MRSA in a mother-newborn pair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rostad, Christina A; Philipsborn, Rebecca Pass; Berkowitz, Frank E

    2015-04-01

    A neonate and his mother presented with fever and erythroderma. The mother met full diagnostic criteria for staphylococcal toxic shock syndrome, whereas the neonate lacked hypotension and multiorgan dysfunction. A wound culture from the neonate's circumcision site grew methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus containing the tst gene. This provides evidence of the first reported case of toxic shock syndrome caused by methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus in a mother-newborn pair.

  9. Neonatal Marfan syndrome caused by an exon 25 mutation of the fibrillin-1 gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elçioglu, N H; Akalin, F; Elçioglu, M; Comeglio, P; Child, A H

    2004-01-01

    Neonatal Marfan syndrome caused by an exon 25 mutation of the Fibrillin-1 gene: We describe a male infant with severe arachnodactyly, hypermobility of the fingers, flexion contractures of elbows, wrists, hips, and knees, microretrognathia, crumpled ears, rockerbottom feet, loose redundant skin, and lens dislocations. Cardiac valve insufficiency and aortic dilatation resulted in cardiac failure, decompensated with digitalisation and death occurred at the age of 4 months. This case represents the severe end of the clinical spectrum of Marfan syndrome, namely neonatal Marfan syndrome. Molecular diagnostic analyses confirmed a de novo exon 25 mutation in the FBN1 gene.

  10. Opalski syndrome caused by vertebral artery compression of the lateral surface of the medulla oblongata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dembo, Tomohisa; Tanahashi, Norio

    2013-01-01

    A 55-year-old man presented with vertigo, nystagmus, and gait ataxia followed by left hemiparesis (Opalski syndrome). T2-weighted magnetic resonance imaging revealed vascular compression of the left lateral side of the medulla oblongata by the left vertebral artery. On diffusion tensor imaging, the level of fractional anisotropy (FA) in the left corticospinal fibers caudal to the pyramidal decussation was lower than that observed in the right corticospinal fibers. Opalski syndrome caused by vascular compression is very rare. This is the first reported case of Opalski syndrome that was imaged on FA.

  11. Ventricular tachycardia in a Brugada syndrome patient caused by a novel deletion in SCN5A

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tfelt-Hansen, J; Jespersen, T; Hofman-Bang, J

    2009-01-01

    -cell patch clamp experiments using human embryonic kidney 293 cells transfected with the mutated SCN5A, no current could be recorded. Hence, the results suggest that the patient suffered from haploinsufficiency of Na(v)1.5, and that this mutation was the cause of his Brugada syndrome.......The aim of the present study was to identify the molecular mechanism behind ventricular tachycardia in a patient with Brugada syndrome. Arrhythmias in patients with Brugada syndrome often occur during sleep. However, a 28-year-old man with no previously documented arrhythmia or syncope who...

  12. Kearns-Sayre's syndrome developing in a boy who survived Pearson's syndrome caused by mitochondrial DNA deletion

    OpenAIRE

    Simonsz, Huib; Bärlocher, K.E.; Rötig, A.

    1992-01-01

    textabstractDocumenta Ophthalmologica 1992, Volume 82, Issue 1-2, pp 73-79 Kearns-Sayre's syndrome developing in a boy who survived Pearson's syndrome caused by mitochondrial DNA deletion Dr H. J. Simonsz, K. Bärlocher, A. Rötig … show all 3 hide » Download PDF (2,322 KB) Abstract A 7-year-old boy presented with bilateral ptosis and atypical retinitis pigmentosa. Before age two, he had had an Fe-refractory anemia, with neutropenia and thrombopenia. Just prior to the ophthalmic examination, th...

  13. Inactivation of Bardet-Biedl syndrome genes causes kidney defects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Deng-Fu; Beyer, Andreas M.; Yang, Baoli; Nishimura, Darryl Y.; Sheffield, Val C.

    2011-01-01

    Bardet-Biedl syndrome (BBS) is a rare hereditary autosomal recessive disease associated with several features including obesity, hypertension, and renal abnormalities. The underlying mechanisms of renal defects associated with BBS remain poorly defined. We examined the histological, molecular, and functional renal changes in BBS mouse models that have features of the human disorder. Interestingly, obese hypertensive Bbs4−/− mice exhibited inflammatory infiltration and renal cysts, whereas the obese normotensive Bbs2−/− mice had only minor inflammatory infiltration. Accordingly, the expression level of inducible nitric oxide synthase was elevated in the kidney of both BBS mice with a more marked increase in Bbs4−/− mice. In contrast, endothelial nitric oxide synthase expression was decreased in Bbs4−/−, but not Bbs2−/−, mice. Similarly, the expression levels of transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 and 4 channels as well as β- and γ-subunits of epithelial Na channel were significantly reduced only in the kidney of Bbs4−/− mice. Metabolic studies revealed changes in urine output and urinary concentrations of creatinine, blood urea nitrogen, sodium, and potassium with a more pronounced effect in Bbs4−/− mice. Finally, we found that calorie restriction which prevented obesity in BBS mice reversed the morphological and molecular changes found in Bbs2−/− and Bbs4−/− mice, indicating the kidney abnormalities associated with BBS are obesity related. These findings extend our understanding of the function of BBS proteins and emphasize the importance of these proteins in renal physiology. PMID:21106857

  14. Lack of testicular seipin causes teratozoospermia syndrome in men

    OpenAIRE

    Jiang, Min; Gao, Mingming; Wu, Chaoming; He, Hui; Guo, Xuejiang; Zhou, Zuomin; Yang, Hongyuan; Xiao, Xinhua; Liu, George; Sha, Jiahao

    2014-01-01

    The relationship between body fat and male reproduction is clearly seen when excess fat compromises fertility; however, potential consequences of adipose tissue paucity on fertility are unclear. We report that lack of seipin, a transmembrane protein localizing to the endoplasmic reticulum, causes both paucity of adipose tissue and male sterility. Human patients and mouse models lacking seipin in germ cells produce severely abnormal sperm because of impaired lipid distribution during sperm mat...

  15. Proteus syndrome: A rare cause of gigantic limb

    OpenAIRE

    Chakrabarti, Nandini; Chattopadhyay, Chandan; Bhuban, Majhi; Pal, Salil Kumar

    2014-01-01

    A congenital disorder with variable manifestations, including partial gigantism of the hands and feet with hypertrophy of soles, nevi, hemihypertrophy, gynecomastia, macrocephaly and other skull abnormalities, and abdominal lipomatosis. The cause is unknown, although a genetic origin, generally of autosomal-dominant transmission, has been conjectured. Symptoms can be treated, but there is no known cure. We present the case of a young male with grotesque overgrowth of the right lower limb, spl...

  16. Molecular Basis of DFNB73: Mutations of BSND Can Cause Nonsyndromic Deafness or Bartter Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riazuddin, Saima; Anwar, Saima; Fischer, Martin; Ahmed, Zubair M.; Khan, Shahid Y.; Janssen, Audrey G.H.; Zafar, Ahmad U.; Scholl, Ute; Husnain, Tayyab; Belyantseva, Inna A.; Friedman, Penelope L.; Riazuddin, Sheikh; Friedman, Thomas B.; Fahlke, Christoph

    2009-01-01

    BSND encodes barttin, an accessory subunit of renal and inner ear chloride channels. To date, all mutations of BSND have been shown to cause Bartter syndrome type IV, characterized by significant renal abnormalities and deafness. We identified a BSND mutation (p.I12T) in four kindreds segregating nonsyndromic deafness linked to a 4.04-cM interval on chromosome 1p32.3. The functional consequences of p.I12T differ from BSND mutations that cause renal failure and deafness in Bartter syndrome type IV. p.I12T leaves chloride channel function unaffected and only interferes with chaperone function of barttin in intracellular trafficking. This study provides functional data implicating a hypomorphic allele of BSND as a cause of apparent nonsyndromic deafness. We demonstrate that BSND mutations with different functional consequences are the basis for either syndromic or nonsyndromic deafness. PMID:19646679

  17. A novel ICK mutation causes ciliary disruption and lethal endocrine-cerebro-osteodysplasia syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oud, Machteld M; Bonnard, Carine; Mans, Dorus A; Altunoglu, Umut; Tohari, Sumanty; Ng, Alvin Yu Jin; Eskin, Ascia; Lee, Hane; Rupar, C Anthony; de Wagenaar, Nathalie P; Wu, Ka Man; Lahiry, Piya; Pazour, Gregory J; Nelson, Stanley F; Hegele, Robert A; Roepman, Ronald; Kayserili, Hülya; Venkatesh, Byrappa; Siu, Victoria M; Reversade, Bruno; Arts, Heleen H

    2016-01-01

    Endocrine-cerebro-osteodysplasia (ECO) syndrome [MIM:612651] caused by a recessive mutation (p.R272Q) in Intestinal cell kinase (ICK) shows significant clinical overlap with ciliary disorders. Similarities are strongest between ECO syndrome, the Majewski and Mohr-Majewski short-rib thoracic dysplasia (SRTD) with polydactyly syndromes, and hydrolethalus syndrome. In this study, we present a novel homozygous ICK mutation in a fetus with ECO syndrome and compare the effect of this mutation with the previously reported ICK variant on ciliogenesis and cilium morphology. Through homozygosity mapping and whole-exome sequencing, we identified a second variant (c.358G > T; p.G120C) in ICK in a Turkish fetus presenting with ECO syndrome. In vitro studies of wild-type and mutant mRFP-ICK (p.G120C and p.R272Q) revealed that, in contrast to the wild-type protein that localizes along the ciliary axoneme and/or is present in the ciliary base, mutant proteins rather enrich in the ciliary tip. In addition, immunocytochemistry revealed a decreased number of cilia in ICK p.R272Q-affected cells. Through identification of a novel ICK mutation, we confirm that disruption of ICK causes ECO syndrome, which clinically overlaps with the spectrum of ciliopathies. Expression of ICK-mutated proteins result in an abnormal ciliary localization compared to wild-type protein. Primary fibroblasts derived from an individual with ECO syndrome display ciliogenesis defects. In aggregate, our findings are consistent with recent reports that show that ICK regulates ciliary biology in vitro and in mice, confirming that ECO syndrome is a severe ciliopathy.

  18. [Orbital compartment syndrome. The most frequent cause of blindness following facial trauma].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klenk, Gusztáv; Katona, József; Kenderfi, Gábor; Lestyán, János; Gombos, Katalin; Hirschberg, Andor

    2017-09-01

    Although orbital compartment syndrome is a rare condition, it is still the most common cause of blindness following simple or complicated facial fractures. Its pathomechanism is similar to the compartment syndrome in the limb. Little extra fluid (blood, oedema, brain, foreign body) in a non-space yielding space results with increasingly higher pressures within a short period of time. Unless urgent surgical intervention is performed the blocked circulation of the central retinal artery will result irreversible ophthalmic nerve damage and blindness. Aim, material and method: A retrospective analysis of ten years, 2007-2017, in our hospital among those patients referred to us with facial-head trauma combined with blindness. 571 patients had fractures involving the orbit. 23 patients become blind from different reasons. The most common cause was orbital compartment syndrome in 17 patients; all had retrobulbar haematomas as well. 6 patients with retrobulbar haematoma did not develop compartment syndrome. Compartment syndrome was found among patient with extensive and minimal fractures such as with large and minimal haematomas. Early lateral canthotomy and decompression saved 7 patients from blindness. We can not predict and do not know why some patients develop orbital compartment syndrome. Compartment syndrome seems independent from fracture mechanism, comminution, dislocation, amount of orbital bleeding. All patients are in potential risk with midface fractures. We have a high suspicion that orbital compartment syndrome has been somehow missed out in the recommended textbooks of our medical universities and in the postgraduate trainings. Thus compartment syndrome is not recognized. Teaching, training and early surgical decompression is the only solution to save the blind eye. Orv Hetil. 2017; 158(36): 1410-1420.

  19. Le Syndrome de Denys-Drash, une Cause Rare de Syndrome ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Le syndrome de Denys-Drash (DD) est une affection génétique rare due à la mutation du gène WT1, impliqué dans la morphogenèse des organes génitaux externes et du rein. Il associe un syndrome néphrotique congénital et une ambiguïté sexuelle. Les premiers signes surviennent dès les 3 premiers mois de vie sous ...

  20. Fanconi's syndrome and subsequent progressive renal failure caused by a Chinese herb containing aristolochic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sangho; Lee, Taewon; Lee, Byungcheol; Choi, Hyuckjai; Yang, Munho; Ihm, Chun-Gyoo; Kim, Myungjae

    2004-06-01

    Chinese herb nephropathy contains a variety of clinical features of progressive renal failure (indicated by studies conducted in Belgium) to the variant type of Fanconi's syndrome. Fanconi's syndrome has mostly been reported in Asian countries, and is characterized by proximal tubular dysfunction and slower progression to end-stage renal disease (ESRD); it also often revealed a reversible clinical course. We describe a 43-year-old woman who presented with polyuria and polydipsia caused by Fanconi's syndrome. The cause of Fanconi's syndrome was not identified because the patient denied the intake of the Chinese herbal mixture at first. Fanconi's syndrome seemed to be reversible in its early stage, but it rapidly progressed to renal failure after 3 months, despite the interruption of Chinese mixture use. A renal biopsy revealed typical findings of aristolochic acid-induced nephropathy. Aristolochic acids were also detected in the Chinese herbs that were consumed. This case highlights the variety of the clinical spectrum of aristolochic acid induced nephropathy (AAN). We emphasize that AAN should be suspected in all patients with Fanconi's syndrome, even if patients deny the intake of any Chinese herbal preparation.

  1. [Auto-immune disorders as a possible cause of neuropsychiatric syndromes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez-Martinez, P; Molenaar, P C; Losen, M; Hoffmann, C; Stevens, J; de Witte, L D; van Amelsvoort, T; van Os, J; Rutten, B P F

    2015-01-01

    Changes that occur in the behaviour of voltage-gated ion channels and ligand-gated receptor channels due to gene mutations or auto-immune attack are the cause of channelopathies in the central and peripheral nervous system. Although the relation between molecular channel defects and clinical symptoms has been explained in the case of many neuromuscular channelopathies, the pathophysiology of auto-immunity in neuropsychiatric syndromes is still unclear. To review recent findings regarding neuronal auto-immune reactions in severe neuropsychiatric syndromes. Using PubMed, we consulted the literature published between 1990 and August 2014 relating to the occurrence of auto-immune antibodies in severe and persistent neuropsychiatric syndromes. Auto-antibodies have only limited access to the central nervous system, but if they do enter the system they can, in some cases, cause disease. We discuss recent findings regarding the occurrence of auto-antibodies against ligand-activated receptor channels and potassium channels in neuropsychiatric and neurological syndromes, including schizophrenia and limbic encephalitis. Although the occurrence of several auto-antibodies in schizophrenia has been confirmed, there is still no proof of a causal relationship in the syndrome. We still have no evidence of the prevalence of auto-immunity in neuropsychiatric syndromes. The discovery that an antibody against an ion channel is associated with some neuropsychiatric disorders may mean that in future it will be possible to treat patients by means of immunosuppression, which could lead to an improvement in a patient's cognitive abilities.

  2. Passenger lymphocyte syndrome: a forgotten cause of postliver transplant jaundice and anemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peck, Joshua R; Elkhammas, Elmahdi A; Li, Feng; Stanich, Peter P; Latchana, Nicholas; Black, Sylvester; Michaels, Anthony

    2015-04-01

    A 48-year-old man with cirrhosis secondary to nonalcoholic steatohepatitis and chronic hepatitis C infection underwent a successful orthotopic liver transplant from a B+ donor without intraoperative complications. His postoperative course was complicated by hemolytic anemia, and he was ultimately diagnosed as having passenger lymphocyte syndrome. Passenger lymphocyte syndrome is a complication of both solid-organ and stem cell transplants. It is caused by donor B lymphocyte production of antibodies causing a primary or secondary immune response to recipient erythrocytes. Most commonly, it is in the setting of minor ABO mismatches, such as with a group B liver transplanted into a group AB recipient. Typically, passenger lymphocyte syndrome presents as a mild, self-limiting hemolytic anemia. Laboratory findings are consistent with other forms of hemolytic anemia including decreased hemoglobin and haptoglobin, elevated reticulocyte count, and indirect hyperbilirubinemia There is no definitive treatment for passenger lymphocyte syndrome or strong evidence to favor a particular treatment regimen. Passenger lymphocyte syndrome has been successfully treated with supportive care and blood transfusions matched to the liver donor. It is prudent that physicians caring for patients who receive ABO mismatched organs have a high index of clinical suspicion for passenger lymphocyte syndrome during the early postoperative period when posttransplant patients present with jaundice and anemia.

  3. A de novo missense mutation of FGFR2 causes facial dysplasia syndrome in Holstein cattle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Agerholm, Jørgen Steen; McEvoy, Fintan; Heegaard, Steffen

    2017-01-01

    Background Surveillance for bovine genetic diseases in Denmark identified a hitherto unreported congenital syndrome occurring among progeny of a Holstein sire used for artificial breeding. A genetic aetiology due to a dominant inheritance with incomplete penetrance or a mosaic germline mutation...... was suspected as all recorded cases were progeny of the same sire. Detailed investigations were performed to characterize the syndrome and to reveal its cause. Results Seven malformed calves were submitted examination. All cases shared a common morphology with the most striking lesions being severe facial...... dysplasia and complete prolapse of the eyes. Consequently the syndrome was named facial dysplasia syndrome (FDS). Furthermore, extensive brain malformations, including microencephaly, hydrocephalus, lobation of the cerebral hemispheres and compression of the brain were present. Subsequent data analysis...

  4. Deregulation of Fas ligand expression as a novel cause of autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome-like disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nabhani, Schafiq; Ginzel, Sebastian; Miskin, Hagit; Revel-Vilk, Shoshana; Harlev, Dan; Fleckenstein, Bernhard; Hönscheid, Andrea; Oommen, Prasad T; Kuhlen, Michaela; Thiele, Ralf; Laws, Hans-Jürgen; Borkhardt, Arndt; Stepensky, Polina; Fischer, Ute

    2015-09-01

    Autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome is frequently caused by mutations in genes involved in the Fas death receptor pathway, but for 20-30% of patients the genetic defect is unknown. We observed that treatment of healthy T cells with interleukin-12 induces upregulation of Fas ligand and Fas ligand-dependent apoptosis. Consistently, interleukin-12 could not induce apoptosis in Fas ligand-deficient T cells from patients with autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome. We hypothesized that defects in the interleukin-12 signaling pathway may cause a similar phenotype as that caused by mutations of the Fas ligand gene. To test this, we analyzed 20 patients with autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome of unknown cause by whole-exome sequencing. We identified a homozygous nonsense mutation (c.698G>A, p.R212*) in the interleukin-12/interleukin-23 receptor-component IL12RB1 in one of these patients. The mutation led to IL12RB1 protein truncation and loss of cell surface expression. Interleukin-12 and -23 signaling was completely abrogated as demonstrated by deficient STAT4 phosphorylation and interferon γ production. Interleukin-12-mediated expression of membrane-bound and soluble Fas ligand was lacking and basal expression was much lower than in healthy controls. The patient presented with the classical symptoms of autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome: chronic non-malignant, non-infectious lymphadenopathy, splenomegaly, hepatomegaly, elevated numbers of double-negative T cells, autoimmune cytopenias, and increased levels of vitamin B12 and interleukin-10. Sanger sequencing and whole-exome sequencing excluded the presence of germline or somatic mutations in genes known to be associated with the autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome. Our data suggest that deficient regulation of Fas ligand expression by regulators such as the interleukin-12 signaling pathway may be an alternative cause of autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome-like disease. Copyright© Ferrata Storti

  5. Causes, consequences, and therapy of the Radiophobia syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Becker, K.

    2004-01-01

    The final storage of high-level radioactive waste, which is said to be still open while, in fact, it was solved technically a long time ago and is only being blocked for political reasons, as well as alleged technical risks of German nuclear power plants which have never been demonstrated or proven, are listed again and again as grounds for opting out of the use of nuclear power. There is hardly any doubt that one of the main causes underlying also these arguments, and thus the main reason for the insufficient public acceptance of nuclear power in Germany at the present time as a safe, inexpensive, and non-polluting source of primary energy, is the widespread fear of radiation (radiophobia). Consequently, solutions proposed for successfully managing this radiophobia must be examined. Continued scientific studies of the subject do not seem to be promising, as funds are available at present only for continuing the search for negative biological effects. Important preconditions for a change in attitude are the appropriate initiatives to be taken by the relatively small number of sufficiently independent experts of proven scientific repute. Initiatives of this kind can now be observed in numerous countries and regions in the world. It must be pointed out in this connection, as is underlined again and again by experienced experts, that risk acceptance is not a matter of factual arguments, but of emotions. Psychological and pedagogic sensitivity certainly are important elements in changing public opinion in the interest of a more realistic assessment of the radiation risk and the acceptance of nuclear power. (orig.) [de

  6. [Webino syndrome caused by meningovascular syphilis. A rare entity with an unexpected cause].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez Calvo de Mora, M; Rodríguez Moreno, G; España Contreras, M

    2014-05-01

    The patient is a 57-year-old obese and hypertensive male. His chief complaints were double vision and dizziness, with mild exodeviation in both eyes in primary gaze position in the ocular motility examination, but more predominant in the left eye. The exotropia was noticeably more evident on the attempted upgaze. On horizontal gaze, the abducting eye deviated fully, but the adducting eye did not cross the midline. Nystagmus in the abducting eye and convergence impairment were found. Pupil size and testing were normal. Ataxia and areflexia were also present. Bilateral internuclear ophthalmoplegia was suspected and imaging and laboratory tests were performed. The CAT scan showed a right occipital hypo-attenuated lesion. In the MRI scan, a mesencephalic subacute ischemic lesion was found, involving the medial rectus sub-nuclei. Blood and cerebrospinal fluid test for syphilis were positive. Bilateral internuclear ophthalmoplegia is a very uncommon -and difficult to diagnose- condition. In the reported case the lesion involved the medial rectus sub-nuclei. This fact could explain the exotropia in the primary gaze position, and supports that is not possible to exclude the involvement of the medial rectus sub-nuclei in the webino syndrome. The rapid identification of the pathology contributed to the better prognosis of the patient. Copyright © 2012 Sociedad Española de Oftalmología. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  7. Functional Study of Ectodysplasin-A Mutations Causing Non-Syndromic Tooth Agenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yang; Liu, Haochen; Zhao, Hongshan; Zhang, Guozhong; Snead, Malcolm L.; Han, Dong; Feng, Hailan

    2016-01-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated that ectodysplasin-A (EDA) mutations are associated with non-syndromic tooth agenesis. Indeed, we were the first to report three novel EDA mutations (A259E, R289C and R334H) in sporadic non-syndromic tooth agenesis. We studied the mechanism linking EDA mutations and non-syndromic tooth agenesis in human embryonic kidney 293T cells and mouse ameloblast-derived LS8 cells transfected with mutant isoforms of EDA. The receptor binding capability of the mutant EDA1 protein was impaired in comparison to wild-type EDA1. Although the non-syndromic tooth agenesis-causing EDA1 mutants possessed residual binding capability, the transcriptional activation of the receptor’s downstream target, nuclear factor κB (NF-κB), was compromised. We also analyzed the changes of selected genes in other signaling pathways, such as WNT and BMP, after EDA mutation. We found that non-syndromic tooth agenesis-causing EDA1 mutant proteins upregulate BMP4 (bone morphogenetic protein 4) mRNA expression and downregulate WNT10A and WNT10B (wingless-type MMTV integration site family member 10A and 10B) mRNA expression. Our results indicated that non-syndromic tooth agenesis causing EDA mutations (A259E, R289C and R334H) were loss-of-function, and suggested that EDA may regulate the expression of WNT10A, WNT10B and BMP4 via NF-κB during tooth development. The results from our study may help to understand the molecular mechanism linking specific EDA mutations with non-syndromic tooth agenesis. PMID:27144394

  8. Guillain Barre syndrome: the leading cause of acute flaccid paralysis in Hazara division.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anis-ur-Rehman; Idris, Muhammad; Elahi, Manzoor; Jamshed; Arif, Adeel

    2007-01-01

    Acute flaccid paralysis (AFP) can be caused by a number of conditions. A common preventable cause is poliomyelitis which is still being reported in Pakistan, Guillain Barre Syndrome (GBS), also known as Acute Inflammatory Demyelinating Polyneuropathy, is another common cause of acute flaccid paralysis. It is important to recognize GBS in childhood as parents consider all acute flaccid paralysis to be due to poliomyelitis. The present study was designed to know the frequency of different causes of acute flaccid paralysis in Hazara division. This is a retrospective analysis of cases of acute flaccid paralysis reported from various districts of Hazara division during the period January 2003 to December 2004. Acute flaccid paralysis was diagnosed clinically through history and clinical examination. The underlying cause of acute flaccid paralysis was investigated by appropriate laboratory tests, such as serum electrolytes, cerebrospinal fluid analysis, electromyogram, nerve conduction study and stool culture for polio virus and other enteroviruses. Diagnosis of Poliomyelitis was confirmed by stool testing for poliovirus. 74 patients presented with AFP during the study period. 36 were male and 38 were female. Guillain Barre syndrome and enteroviral encephalopathy were the two leading causes of acute flaccid paralysis. Majority of the cases were reported from Mansehra district. Children of age groups 12 to 24 months and > 96 months constituted the majority (20% each). Guillian Barre syndrome was the leading cause of acute flaccid paralysis reported from various parts of Hazara division.

  9. Origins of the E. coli strain causing an outbreak of hemolytic-uremic syndrome in Germany

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasko, David A; Webster, Dale R; Sahl, Jason W

    2011-01-01

    A large outbreak of diarrhea and the hemolytic-uremic syndrome caused by an unusual serotype of Shiga-toxin-producing Escherichia coli (O104:H4) began in Germany in May 2011. As of July 22, a large number of cases of diarrhea caused by Shiga-toxin-producing E. coli have been reported--3167 without...... the hemolytic-uremic syndrome (16 deaths) and 908 with the hemolytic-uremic syndrome (34 deaths)--indicating that this strain is notably more virulent than most of the Shiga-toxin-producing E. coli strains. Preliminary genetic characterization of the outbreak strain suggested that, unlike most of these strains......, it should be classified within the enteroaggregative pathotype of E. coli....

  10. Dyke-Davidoff-Masson Syndrome. An unusual cause of status epilepticus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zawar, Ifrah; Khan, Ashfa A; Sultan, Tipu; Rathore, Ahsan W

    2015-10-01

    The Dyke-Davidoff-Masson Syndrome (DDMS) results from an insult to the growing brain in utero or early infancy, which lead to loss of neurons compromising the growth of the brain. Clinical presentation includes seizures, hemiparesis, facial asymmetry, and learning disability. Radiological findings include cerebral atrophy on one side. Here, we present a case with status epilepticus who had underlying DDMS. It is a rare syndrome and uncommon cause for status epilepticus. Infections of CNS, hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy, intracranial bleed, trauma, congenital vascular malformations are the common causes of this syndrome. Diagnosis is established after clinical history, examination, and MRI. Intractable seizures can be controlled with appropriate anticonvulsants. Subsequently, these children may require physiotherapy, speech therapy, and occupational therapy in addition to the anticonvulsant medication. Outcome is better if the seizures are controlled.

  11. A frame-shift mutation of PMS2 is a widespread cause of Lynch syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clendenning, Mark; Senter, Leigha; Hampel, Heather

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: When compared to the other mismatch repair genes involved in Lynch syndrome, the identification of mutations within PMS2 has been limited (syndrome cases...... are caused by PMS2. This disparity is primarily due to complications in the study of this gene caused by interference from pseudogene sequences. METHODS: Using a recently developed method for detecting PMS2 specific mutations, we have screened 99 patients who are likely candidates for PMS2 mutations based...... on immunohistochemical analysis. RESULTS: We have identified a frequently occurring frame-shift mutation (c.736_741del6ins11) in 12 ostensibly unrelated Lynch syndrome patients (20% of patients we have identified with a deleterious mutation in PMS2, n=61). These individuals all display the rare allele (population...

  12. Exome Sequencing Fails to Identify the Genetic Cause of Aicardi Syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Caroline; Striano, Pasquale; Sorte, Hanne Sørmo

    2016-01-01

    Aicardi syndrome (AS) is a well-characterized neurodevelopmental disorder with an unknown etiology. In this study, we performed whole-exome sequencing in 11 female patients with the diagnosis of AS, in order to identify the disease-causing gene. In particular, we focused on detecting variants in ...

  13. Phenotype and genotype in 52 patients with Rubinstein-Taybi syndrome caused by EP300 mutations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fergelot, Patricia; van Belzen, Martine; van Gils, Julien; Afenjar, Alexandra; Armour, Christine M.; Arveiler, Benoit; Beets, Lex; Burglen, Lydie; Busa, Tiffany; Collet, Marie; Deforges, Julie; de Vries, Bert B. A.; Dominguez Garrido, Elena; Dorison, Nathalie; Dupont, Juliette; Francannet, Christine; Garciá-Minaúr, Sixto; Gabau Vila, Elisabeth; Gebre-Medhin, Samuel; Gener Querol, Blanca; Geneviève, David; Gérard, Marion; Gervasini, Cristina Giovanna; Goldenberg, Alice; Josifova, Dragana; Lachlan, Katherine; Maas, Saskia; Maranda, Bruno; Moilanen, Jukka S.; Nordgren, Ann; Parent, Philippe; Rankin, Julia; Reardon, Willie; Rio, Marlène; Roume, Joëlle; Shaw, Adam; Smigiel, Robert; Sojo, Amaia; Solomon, Benjamin; Stembalska, Agnieszka; Stumpel, Constance; Suarez, Francisco; Terhal, Paulien; Thomas, Simon; Touraine, Renaud; Verloes, Alain; Vincent-Delorme, Catherine; Wincent, Josephine; Peters, Dorien J. M.; Bartsch, Oliver; Larizza, Lidia; Lacombe, Didier; Hennekam, Raoul C.

    2016-01-01

    Rubinstein-Taybi syndrome (RSTS) is a developmental disorder characterized by a typical face and distal limbs abnormalities, intellectual disability, and a vast number of other features. Two genes are known to cause RSTS, CREBBP in 60% and EP300 in 8-10% of clinically diagnosed cases. Both paralogs

  14. Autoimmune hemolytic anemia, as part of Evans' syndrome, caused by cold reactive IgG autoantibodies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jaarsma, AS; Muis, N; DeGraaf, SSN

    1996-01-01

    We describe a boy with Evans' syndrome, consisting of immune thrombocytopenic purpura at age 2 and autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA) at age 4. AIHA was caused by cold Ige autoantibodies. This is unusual because AIHA is generally associated with either warm IgG antibodies or cold IgM antibodies.

  15. Recurrent spontaneous pneumothoraces and bullous emphysema. A novel mutation causing Birt-Hogg-Dube syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burkett, Andrew; Coffey, Niamh; Tomiak, Eva; Voduc, Nha

    2016-01-01

    Birt-Hogg-Dube syndrome (BHDS) is a rare form of classically cystic lung disease that may present with spontaneous pneumothorax. The associated skin manifestations (fibrofolliculomas) are not always present. This article describes a case of spontaneous pneumothorax secondary to bullous emphysema in an otherwise healthy gentleman caused by a novel mutation in the folliculin (FLCN) gene.

  16. High circulating ghrelin: a potential cause for hyperphagia and obesity in prader-willi syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    DelParigi, Angelo; Tschöp, Matthias; Heiman, Mark L

    2002-01-01

    Prader-Willi syndrome (PWS) is a genetic disorder occurring in 1 of 10,000-16,000 live births and is characterized by excessive appetite with progressive massive obesity as well as short stature and mental retardation. Most patients have GH deficiency and hypogonadotropic hypogonadism. The causes...

  17. BCL11A Haploinsufficiency Causes an Intellectual Disability Syndrome and Dysregulates Transcription

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dias, C.; Estruch, S.B.; Graham, S.A.; McRae, J.; Sawiak, S.J.; Hurst, J.A.; Joss, S.K.; Holder, S.E.; Morton, J.E.; Turner, C.; Thevenon, J.; Mellul, K.; Sanchez-Andrade, G.; Ibarra-Soria, X.; Deriziotis, P.; Santos, R.F.; Lee, S.C.; Faivre, L.; Kleefstra, T.; Liu, P.; Hurles, M.E.; Fisher, S.E.; Logan, D.W.

    2016-01-01

    Intellectual disability (ID) is a common condition with considerable genetic heterogeneity. Next-generation sequencing of large cohorts has identified an increasing number of genes implicated in ID, but their roles in neurodevelopment remain largely unexplored. Here we report an ID syndrome caused

  18. Streptococcal Toxic Shock Syndrome Caused by Group G Streptococcus, United Kingdom

    OpenAIRE

    Baxter, Melissa; Morgan, Marina

    2017-01-01

    We describe successful management of 3 patients with streptococcal toxic shock syndrome (STSS) attributable to group G Streptococcus infection. This small series supports recognition of group G Streptococcus in the etiology of STSS. We propose intravenous immunoglobulin be used in treatment as it is for STSS caused by group A Streptococcus.

  19. Extreme sensitivity to ultraviolet light in the fungal pathogen causing white-nose syndrome of bats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jonathan M. Palmer; Kevin P. Drees; Jeffrey T. Foster; Daniel L. Lindner

    2018-01-01

    Bat white-nose syndrome (WNS), caused by the fungal pathogen Pseudogymnoascus destructans, has decimated North American hibernating bats since its emergence in 2006. Here, we utilize comparative genomics to examine the evolutionary history of this pathogen in comparison to six closely related nonpathogenic species....

  20. Diarrhea, Urosepsis and Hemolytic Uremic Syndrome Caused by the Same Heteropathogenic Escherichia coli Strain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ang, C. Wim; Bouts, Antonia H. M.; Rossen, John W. A.; van der Kuip, Martijn; van Heerde, Marc; Bökenkamp, Arend

    2016-01-01

    We describe an 8-month-old girl with diarrhea, urosepsis and hemolytic uremic syndrome caused by Escherichia coli. Typing of cultured E. coli strains from urine and blood revealed the presence of virulence factors from multiple pathotypes of E. coli. This case exemplifies the genome plasticity of E.

  1. Gastric invagination in adults as a rare cause of constitutional syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dávila Arias, Cristina; Milena Muñoz, Ana; Valero González, María Ángeles; Céspedes Mas, Mariano

    2017-02-01

    This article describes and illustrates the case of an adult patient with clinical symptoms of constitutional syndrome, postprandial discomfort and a mass in the left lateral abdominal region caused by a gastric intussusception with a fundal adenoma as the head of the invagination. The intussusception was diagnosed by MRI (magnetic resonance imaging).

  2. Species determination of pine nuts in commercial samples causing pine nut syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mikkelsen, Aase Æ.; Jessen, Flemming; Ballin, Nicolai Z.

    2014-01-01

    Consumption of pine nuts from the species of Pinus armandii has been reported to cause dysgeusia, commonly known as pine mouth, or pine nut syndrome (PNS). However, the number of reports on pine nut consumptions of the different species and PNS is limited. This leaves open the possibility...

  3. Glucose ingestion causes cardiac repolarization disturbances in type 1 long QT syndrome patients and healthy subjects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hyltén-Cavallius, Louise; Iepsen, Eva W; Christiansen, Michael

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Both hypoglycemia and severe hyperglycemia constitute known risk factors for cardiac repolarization changes potentially leading to malignant arrhythmias. Patients with loss of function mutations in KCNQ1 are characterized by long QT syndrome (LQTS) and may be at increased risk...... by ingestion of 75-g glucose caused cardiac repolarization disturbances that were more severe in KCNQ1 LQTS patients compared with control subjects....

  4. First Report of a Single Exon Deletion in TCOF1 Causing Treacher Collins Syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Beygo, J.; Buiting, K.; Seland, S.; Lüdecke, H.-J.; Hehr, U.; Lich, C.; Prager, B.; Lohmann, D.R.; Wieczorek, D.

    2012-01-01

    Treacher Collins syndrome (TCS) is a rare craniofacial disorder characterized by facial anomalies and ear defects. TCS is caused by mutations in the TCOF1 gene and follows autosomal dominant inheritance. Recently, mutations in the POLR1D and POLR1C genes have also been identified to cause TCS. However, in a subset of patients no causative mutation could be found yet. Inter- and intrafamilial phenotypic variability is high as is the variety of mainly family-specific mutations identified throug...

  5. Parotid Sebaceous Carcinoma in Patient with Muir Torre Syndrome, Caused by MSH2 Mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neelakantan, Iyer Vishwas; Di Palma, Silvana; Smith, C E T; McCoombe, A

    2016-09-01

    Sebaceous carcinoma of parotid gland are extremely rare with only 29 cases reported so far. The development of parotid sebaceous carcinoma in association with mutation in the mismatch repair gene that causes Muir Torre Syndrome (MTS), a subset of Lynch Syndrome, is still unclear. This study describes such a case and reviews the literature to see if an association between parotid sebaceous carcinoma and multiple visceral malignancies seen in Lynch Syndrome has ever been described. MTS represents a small subset of the Hereditary Non Polyposis Colorectal Carcinoma family, thought to be a subtype of Lynch Syndrome, where patients are prone to develop multiple visceral cancers involving gastrointestinal and genitourinary tract along with sebaceous and non-sebaceous tumours of the skin. MTS is a rare hereditary, autosomal dominant cancer syndrome caused by Microsatellite Instability and defect in DNA mismatch repair protein. The germline mutation involves mostly hMSH2 and hMLH1 genes. In MTS the skin of the head and neck area with the periocular region in particular, is affected but sebaceous carcinomas of the parotid associated with visceral malignancies has not yet been reported in literature. Here we report an index case of sebaceous carcinoma of parotid gland in a patient with MTS.

  6. Fowler's syndrome--a cause of unexplained urinary retention in young women?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osman, Nadir I; Chapple, Christopher R

    2014-02-01

    Urinary retention in women is an uncommon and poorly understood condition. In 1986, Fowler and colleagues described a syndrome in young women with unexplained urinary retention associated with polycystic ovary syndrome. The underlying abnormality was a poorly relaxing external urethral sphincter that when studied using concentric needle electromyography showed a distinct abnormal pattern suggesting direct spread of impulses between muscle fibres. These findings were subsequently reproduced by other researchers and in larger patient cohorts, but remain the subject of much debate. A poorly relaxing sphincter is thought to cause increased urethral afferent activity, which inhibits bladder afferent signalling leading to poor bladder sensation and detrusor underactivity. Most studies of Fowler's syndrome are limited due to small cohorts with no control group and a lack of videourodynamic data. Whether Fowler's syndrome represents a distinct cause of urinary retention or results from a maladaptive behaviour and is similar to dysfunctional voiding is unclear. Application of sacral neuromodulation in patients diagnosed with Fowler's syndrome can restore normal voiding, in the absence of any effective pharmacotherapy or surgical treatment.

  7. Renal function and metabolic syndrome components on cardiovascular and all-cause mortality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chien, Kuo-Liong; Hsu, Hsiu-Ching; Lee, Yuan-Teh; Chen, Ming-Fong

    2008-04-01

    Impaired renal function and metabolic syndrome have been associated with risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD). We investigated their roles in CVD and all-cause death among ethnic Chinese population. We followed up a cohort of 11429 men and 7472 women aged 20 years and older for an average 4.9 years (median: 3.5, inter-quartile range: 2.7-7.9) from the tertiary hospital health check-up population. CVD death rates increased when the quintiles of each variable progressed. Metabolic syndrome was a significant predictor for CVD death, with relative risk of up to 4.68. In the multivariate adjusted model that included metabolic syndrome, quintiles of serum creatinine concentrations, estimated glomerular filtration rate (GFR), and uric acids were significantly associated CVD death, with the highest relative risk of creatinine concentration (11.22, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 2.43-51.7, P for trend: creatinine concentrations and estimated GFR had the higher areas under ROC curves of CVD death (0.76, 95% CI: 0.71-0.80 for creatinine and 0.76, 95% CI: 0.72-0.81 for estimated GFR). The two marker models showed that metabolic syndrome and impaired renal function had the most significant roles in predicting CVD deaths; the multivariate relative risk was 30.6 (95% CI: 3.7-254, P: 0.002) in participants with the highest creatinine and presence of metabolic syndrome compared with those with the lowest and absence of metabolic syndrome. Impaired renal function and metabolic syndrome are important risk factors for CVD and all-cause deaths among ethnic Chinese.

  8. Causes of Death in Prader-Willi Syndrome: Prader-Willi Syndrome Association (USA) 40-Year Mortality Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butler, Merlin G.; Manzardo, Ann M.; Heinemann, Janalee; Loker, Carolyn; Loker, James

    2016-01-01

    Background Prader-Willi syndrome (PWS) is a rare complex neurodevelopmental genetic disorder that is associated with hyperphagia and morbid obesity in humans leading to a shortened life expectancy. This report summarizes the primary causes of death and evaluates mortality trends in a large cohort of individuals with PWS. Methods PWSA (USA) mortality syndrome-specific database of death reports was collected through a cursory bereavement program for PWSA(USA) families using a brief survey created in 1999. Causes of death were descriptively characterized and statistically examined using Cox Proportional Hazards. Results A total of 486 deaths were reported (263 males, 217 females, 6 unknown) between 1973 and 2015 with mean age of 29.5 ± 16 years (2mo–67yrs), 70% occurring in adulthood. Respiratory failure was the most common cause accounting for 31% of all deaths. Males were at increased risk for presumed hyperphagia-related accidents/injuries compared to females and cardiopulmonary factors. PWS maternal disomy 15 genetic subtype showed an increased risk of death from cardiopulmonary factors compared to the deletion subtype. Conclusions These findings highlight the heightened vulnerability towards obesity and hyperphagia-related mortality in PWS. Future research is needed to address critical vulnerabilities such as gender and genetic subtype in the cause of death in PWS. PMID:27854358

  9. Hypertensive Cerebral Hemorrhage in a Patient with Turner Syndrome Caused by Deletion in the Short Arm of the X Chromosome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hori, Yusuke S; Ohkura, Takahiro; Ebisudani, Yuki; Umakoshi, Michiari; Ishi, Masato; Oda, Kazunori; Aoi, Mizuho; Inoue, Takushi; Furujo, Mahoko; Tanaka, Hiroyuki; Fukuhara, Toru

    2017-12-23

    Turner syndrome is a chromosomal disorder usually caused by complete deletion of an X chromosome, with deletion in the short arm of the X chromosome being a rare cause of the condition. Patients with Turner syndrome commonly develop hypertension, and associated vascular complications such as aortic dissection or cerebral hemorrhage have been reported. Cerebral hemorrhage in Turner syndrome is a rare complication, and only a few reports have been published. In these reports, all patients have XO karyotypes or a mosaic type as the cause of Turner syndrome, while no other Turner syndrome types have been documented. In this report, we present for the first time a patient with Turner syndrome caused by deletion in the short arm of the X chromosome who experienced hypertensive hemorrhage as a late complication. © 2017 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  10. Clinical and radiologic review of uncommon cause of profound iron deficiency anemia: Median arcuate ligament syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gunduz, Yasemin; Asil, Kiyasrttin; Aksoy, Yakup Ersel; Ayhan, Lacin Tatli

    2014-01-01

    Median arcuate ligament syndrome is an anatomic and clinical entity characterized by dynamic compression of the proximal celiac artery by the median arcuate ligament, which leads to postprandial epigastric pain, vomiting, and weight loss. These symptoms are usually nonspecific and are easily misdiagnosed as functional dyspepsia, peptic ulcer disease, or gastropathy. In this report, we presented a 72-year-old male patient with celiac artery compression syndrome causing recurrent abdominal pain associated with gastric ulcer and iron deficiency anemia. This association is relatively uncommon and therefore not well determined. In addition, we reported the CT angiography findings and three-dimensional reconstructions of this rare case.

  11. Ischiofemoral Impingement and Hamstring Syndrome as Causes of Posterior Hip Pain: Where Do We Go Next?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Hal David; Khoury, Anthony; Schröder, Ricardo; Palmer, Ian James

    2016-07-01

    Recent advances in understanding hip joint anatomy and biomechanics have contributed to improvement of diagnosis and treatment decisions for distal causes of deep gluteal syndrome (DGS). Ischiofemoral impingement and hamstrings syndrome are sources of posterior hip pain that can simulate symptoms of DGS. The combination of a comprehensive history and physical examination with imaging and ancillary testing are critical for diagnosis. Six key physical examination tests are described to differentiate distal versus proximal sources of extrapelvic posterior hip pain. Outcomes depend on patient compliance and the understanding of the entire anatomy, biomechanics, clinical presentation, and open versus endoscopic treatment options. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Neuroleptic Malignant Syndrome Caused by a Combination of Carbamazepine and Amitriptyline

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Bruce Janati

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A 32-year-old female, with a history of secondarily-generalized convulsive epilepsy, mental retardation, and a psychiatric illness, developed neuroleptic malignant syndrome while receiving carbamazepine and amitriptyline concurrently. We hypothesize that the addition of amitriptyline to carbamazepine caused a decrease in the serum level of carbamazepine, resulting in NMS. We conclude that combination therapy with carbamazepine and amitriptyline should be avoided in patients who are predisposed to NMS. The purpose of this paper is to warn physicians against combination therapy with carbamazepine and tricyclic antidepressants which may be conducive to neuroleptic malignant syndrome in susceptible patients.

  13. Clinical and radiologic review of uncommon cause of profound iron deficiency anemia: Median arcuate ligament syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gunduz, Yasemin; Asil, Kiyasrttin; Aksoy, Yakup Ersel; Ayhan, Lacin Tatli [Dept. of Radiology, Sakarya University Medical Faculty, Sakarya (Turkmenistan)

    2014-08-15

    Median arcuate ligament syndrome is an anatomic and clinical entity characterized by dynamic compression of the proximal celiac artery by the median arcuate ligament, which leads to postprandial epigastric pain, vomiting, and weight loss. These symptoms are usually nonspecific and are easily misdiagnosed as functional dyspepsia, peptic ulcer disease, or gastropathy. In this report, we presented a 72-year-old male patient with celiac artery compression syndrome causing recurrent abdominal pain associated with gastric ulcer and iron deficiency anemia. This association is relatively uncommon and therefore not well determined. In addition, we reported the CT angiography findings and three-dimensional reconstructions of this rare case.

  14. Thrombosed persistent median artery causing carpal tunnel syndrome associated with bifurcated median nerve: A case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salter, M.; Sinha, N. R.; Szmigielski, W.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Carpal tunnel syndrome is a sporadically occurring abnormality due to compression of median nerve. It is exceedingly rare for it to be caused by thrombosis of persistent median artery. Case Report: A forty two year old female was referred for ultrasound examination due to ongoing wrist pain, not relived by pain killers and mild paraesthesia on the radial side of the hand. High resolution ultrasound and Doppler revealed a thrombosed persistent median artery and associated bifurcated median nerve. The thrombus resolved on treatment with anticoagulants. Conclusions: Ultrasound examination of the wrist when done for patients with carpal tunnel syndrome should preferably include looking for persistent median artery and its patency. (authors)

  15. Clinical and radiologic review of uncommon cause of profound iron deficiency anemia: median arcuate ligament syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunduz, Yasemin; Asil, Kıyasettin; Aksoy, Yakup Ersel; Tatlı Ayhan, Laçin

    2014-01-01

    Median arcuate ligament syndrome is an anatomic and clinical entity characterized by dynamic compression of the proximal celiac artery by the median arcuate ligament, which leads to postprandial epigastric pain, vomiting, and weight loss. These symptoms are usually nonspecific and are easily misdiagnosed as functional dyspepsia, peptic ulcer disease, or gastropathy. In this report, we presented a 72-year-old male patient with celiac artery compression syndrome causing recurrent abdominal pain associated with gastric ulcer and iron deficiency anemia. This association is relatively uncommon and therefore not well determined. In addition, we reported the CT angiography findings and three-dimensional reconstructions of this rare case.

  16. A genetic cause of Alzheimer disease: mechanistic insights from Down syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiseman, Frances K.; Al-Janabi, Tamara; Hardy, John; Karmiloff-Smith, Annette; Nizetic, Dean; Tybulewicz, Victor L. J.; Fisher, Elizabeth M. C.; Strydom, André

    2015-01-01

    Down syndrome, which arises in individuals carrying an extra copy of chromosome 21, is associated with a greatly increased risk of early-onset Alzheimer disease. It is thought that this risk is conferred by the presence of three copies of the gene encoding amyloid precursor protein (APP) — an Alzheimer disease risk factor — although the possession of extra copies of other chromosome 21 genes may also play a part. Further study of the mechanisms underlying the development of Alzheimer disease in people with Down syndrome could provide insights into the mechanisms that cause dementia in the general population. PMID:26243569

  17. DRESS syndrome secondary to ibuprofen as a cause of hyperacute liver failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valentín Roales-Gómez

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Acute liver failure has a high mortality and its most frequent cause in Spain is viral infection. In this article, we present a case of fulminant liver failure. The failure is secondary to an idiosyncratic reaction to ibuprofen, an entity included in the DRESS syndrome. This syndrome plays a key role in the differential diagnosis of acute liver failure, since its unfortunate course often requires liver transplantation as the only useful therapeutic weapon. This case illustrates the need for an efficient coordination between hospitals as a key factor for improving the prognosis.

  18. [The Mallory-Weiss syndrome as an unrecognized cause of death].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Micić, J; Nikolić, S; Savić, S

    2001-01-01

    Longitudinal tears in the esophagus at the esophageogastric junction are termed Mallory-Weiss syndrome. They are encountered most commonly in alcoholics, attributed to episodes of excessive vomiting. These lacerations could be the cause of massive and severe external and/or internal fatal bleeding. Bleeding from upper gastrointestinal parts could be caused by this syndrome, as well as by ulcers, inflammations, esophageal varices, tumours, blunt abdominal injuries, etc. Such unclear deaths could be of interest to law authorities because they are suspicious, sudden and/or obscure. In daily forensic medical practice, this syndrome is relatively rare, and therefore it, it should be recognized. In this paper, the authors present the case of a single male, aged 54, a chronic drinker, who was found dead in his flat. During the previous day, he was observed medically in the Trauma Centre in Belgrade for nonspecific gastrointestinal symptoms (nausea, vomiting and diarrhea). The mucous tears of esophageogastric junction had been established by autopsy, as well as the massive internal gastrointestinal bleeding. On the basis of autopsy and microscopic findings, clinical data and circumstances, the established cause of natural death was fatal exsanguination from esophageogastric mucous tears due to Mallory-Weiss syndrome.

  19. Budd-chiari syndrome caused by diaphragmatic hernia of the liver: a case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, Jae Min; Yoon, Jung Won; Kim, Jae Wook; Chung, Woo Kyoung; Chung, Hee Sun; Kim, Joo Hyung; Choi, Jun Ho; Kim, Seung Ho [Armed Forces Capital Hospital, Seongnam (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-01-15

    Budd-Chiari syndrome is an uncommon disorder, and it is caused by obstruction of the hepatic venous out-flow or inferior vena cava above the hepatic vein. It may result from a large number of conditions, including primary congenital obstructions of the hepatic veins or inferior vena cava by webs or bands. Secondary causes include trauma, polycythemia vera, chronic leukemia, pregnancy, tumors and use of oral contraceptives. No definitive etiologic factors have been identified in two thirds of all cases. We recently experienced a case of Budd-Chiari syndrome caused by diaphragmatic hernia in 21-year-old man. Postoperative follow up CT showed normal venous flow after reintroduction of the liver into the abdominal cavity and closure of the diaphragm defect.

  20. Popliteal vascular entrapment syndrome caused by a rare anomalous slip of the lateral head of the gastrocnemius muscle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Patrick T.; Moyer, Adrian C.; Huettl, Eric A. [Mayo Clinic Scottsdale, Department of Radiology, Scottsdale (United States); Fowl, Richard J.; Stone, William M. [Mayo Clinic Scottsdale, Department of Vascular Surgery, Scottsdale (United States)

    2005-06-01

    Popliteal vascular entrapment syndrome can result in calf claudication, aneurysm formation, distal arterial emboli, or popliteal vessel thrombosis. The most commonly reported causes of this syndrome have been anomalies of the medial head of the gastrocnemius muscle as it relates to the course of the popliteal artery. We report two cases of rare anomalous slips of the lateral head of the gastrocnemius muscle causing popliteal vascular entrapment syndrome. (orig.)

  1. Joubert syndrome: neuroimaging findings in 110 patients in correlation with cognitive function and genetic cause.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poretti, Andrea; Snow, Joseph; Summers, Angela C; Tekes, Aylin; Huisman, Thierry A G M; Aygun, Nafi; Carson, Kathryn A; Doherty, Dan; Parisi, Melissa A; Toro, Camilo; Yildirimli, Deniz; Vemulapalli, Meghana; Mullikin, Jim C; Cullinane, Andrew R; Vilboux, Thierry; Gahl, William A; Gunay-Aygun, Meral

    2017-08-01

    Joubert syndrome is a clinically and genetically heterogeneous ciliopathy. Neuroimaging findings have not been systematically evaluated in a large cohort of patients with Joubert syndrome in correlation with molecular genetic cause and cognitive function. Brain MRI of 110 patients with Joubert syndrome was included in this study. A comprehensive evaluation of brain MRI studies for infratentorial and supratentorial morphological abnormalities was performed. Genetic cause was identified by whole-exome sequencing, and cognitive functions were assessed with age-appropriate neurocognitive tests in a subset of patients. The cerebellar hemispheres were enlarged in 18% of the patients, mimicking macrocerebellum. The posterior fossa was enlarged in 42% of the patients, resembling Dandy-Walker malformation. Abnormalities of the brainstem, such as protuberance at the ventral contour of the midbrain, were present in 66% of the patients. Abnormalities of the supratentorial brain were present in approximately one-third of the patients, most commonly malrotation of the hippocampi. Mild ventriculomegaly, which typically did not require shunting, was present in 23% of the patients. No correlation between neuroimaging findings and molecular genetic cause was apparent. A novel predictor of outcome was identified; the more severe the degree of vermis hypoplasia, the worse the neurodevelopmental outcome was. The spectrum of neuroimaging findings in Joubert syndrome is wide. Neuroimaging does not predict the genetic cause, but may predict the neurodevelopmental outcome. A high degree of vermis hypoplasia correlates with worse neurodevelopmental outcome. This finding is important for prognostic counselling in Joubert syndrome. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  2. The distal fascicle of the anterior inferior tibiofibular ligament as a cause of tibiotalar impingement syndrome: a current concepts review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Bekerom, Michel P. J.; Raven, Eric E. J.

    2007-01-01

    Impingement syndromes of the ankle involve either osseous or soft tissue impingement and can be anterior, anterolateral, or posterior. Ankle impingement syndromes are painful conditions caused by the friction of joint tissues, which are both the cause and the effect of altered joint biomechanics.

  3. Hepatitis E as a Cause of Acute Jaundice Syndrome in Northern Uganda, 2010–2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerbi, Gemechu B.; Williams, Roxanne; Bakamutumaho, Barnabas; Liu, Stephen; Downing, Robert; Drobeniuc, Jan; Kamili, Saleem; Xu, Fujie; Holmberg, Scott D.; Teshale, Eyasu H.

    2015-01-01

    Hepatitis E virus (HEV) is a common cause of acute viral hepatitis in developing countries; however, its contribution to acute jaundice syndrome is not well-described. A large outbreak of hepatitis E occurred in northern Uganda from 2007 to 2009. In response to this outbreak, acute jaundice syndrome surveillance was established in 10 district healthcare facilities to determine the proportion of cases attributable to hepatitis E. Of 347 acute jaundice syndrome cases reported, the majority (42%) had hepatitis E followed by hepatitis B (14%), malaria (10%), hepatitis C (5%), and other/unknown (29%). Of hepatitis E cases, 72% occurred in Kaboong district, and 68% of these cases occurred between May and August of 2011. Residence in Kaabong district was independently associated with hepatitis E (adjusted odds ratio = 13; 95% confidence interval = 7–24). The findings from this surveillance show that an outbreak and sporadic transmission of hepatitis E occur in northern Uganda. PMID:25448237

  4. Case report: severe bradycardia, a reversible cause of "Cardio-Renal-Cerebral Syndrome".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aoun, Mabel; Tabbah, Randa

    2016-10-26

    Cardio-Renal Syndromes were first classified in 2008 and divided into five subtypes. The type 1 Cardio-Renal Syndrome (CRS) is characterized by acute decompensation of heart failure leading to acute kidney injury (AKI). Bradyarrhythmia was not mentioned in the classification as a cause for low cardiac output (CO) in type 1 CRS. Besides, CRS was not previously associated with central nervous system (CNS) injury despite the fact that cardiac, renal and neurological diseases can coexist. We report the case of a 93-year old diabetic man who presented for obnubilation. He had a slow atrial fibrillation, was not hypotensive and was not taking any beta-blocker. He developed, simultaneously, during his hospitalization, severe bradycardia (Syndrome"-was successfully treated with permanent pacemaker implantation.

  5. Inflammatory cause of metabolic syndrome via brain stress and NF-κB

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Dongsheng; Liu, Tiewen

    2012-01-01

    Metabolic syndrome, a network of medical disorders that greatly increase the risk for developing metabolic and cardiovascular diseases, has reached epidemic levels in many areas of today's world. Despite this alarming medicare situation, scientific understandings on the root mechanisms of metabolic syndrome are still limited, and such insufficient knowledge contributes to the relative lack of effective treatments or preventions for related diseases. Recent interdisciplinary studies from neuroendocrinology and neuroimmunology fields have revealed that overnutrition can trigger intracellular stresses to cause inflammatory changes mediated by molecules that control innate immunity. This type of nutrition-related molecular inflammation in the central nervous system, particularly in the hypothalamus, can form a common pathogenic basis for the induction of various metabolic syndrome components such as obesity, insulin resistance, and hypertension. Proinflammatory NF-κB pathway has been revealed as a key molecular system for pathologic induction of brain inflammation, which translates overnutrition and resulting intracellular stresses into central neuroendocrine and neural dysregulations of energy, glucose, and cardiovascular homeostasis, collectively leading to metabolic syndrome. This article reviews recent research advances in the neural mechanisms of metabolic syndrome and related diseases from the perspective of pathogenic induction by intracellular stresses and NF-κB pathway of the brain. PMID:22328600

  6. Artery of Percheron Infarction as an Unusual Cause of Korsakoff’s Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yongxing Zhou

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The Korsakoff syndrome is defined as “an abnormal mental state in which memory and learning are affected out of all proportion to other cognitive functions in an otherwise alert and responsive patient.” Confabulation refers to false or erroneous memories arising, not deliberately, in the context of a neurological amnesia and is often thought of as pathognomonic of the Korsakoff syndrome. Although the exact pathophysiology is unknown, various studies have identified brain lesions in the thalami, mammillary bodies, and frontal cortex. We report a case of a 68-year-old male presenting with acute altered mental status on July 16, 2015. The neuropsychological dysfunctions included prominent Korsakoff’s syndrome, which became apparent when the altered mental status resolved. Amnesia was accompanied by prominent confabulation, disorientation, and lack of insight into his own disability. Neuroradiological data indicated that the intralaminar and dorsomedial nuclei in bilateral thalami were infarcted by occlusion of the artery of Percheron. We believe that ours is one of few reported cases of Korsakoff syndrome in a patient with infarction involving the territory of the artery of Percheron. We conclude that bilateral thalamic lesions could cause Korsakoff’s syndrome and the intralaminar and dorsomedial nuclei might be important structures in the pathogenesis of confabulation.

  7. Refeeding syndrome as an unusual cause of anion gap metabolic acidosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singla, Manish; Perry, Alexandra; Lavery, Eric

    2012-11-01

    Refeeding syndrome is characterized by hypophosphatemia in the setting of malnutrition. It is commonly seen in patients with anorexia, alcoholism, or malignancy, and it is often a missed diagnosis. Because of the potential morbidity associated with missing the diagnosis of refeeding syndrome, it is important to monitor for this disease in any malnourished patient. We present a case of a 49-year-old male with chronic alcohol abuse who presented for alcohol detoxification and was found to have low phosphate, potassium, and magnesium on presentation, in addition to an elevated anion gap of unclear etiology. After extensive workup to evaluate the cause of his elevated anion gap and worsening of his electrolyte abnormalities despite replenishment, it was felt his symptoms were a result of refeeding syndrome. After oral intake was held and aggressive electrolyte replenishment was performed for 24 hours, the patient's anion gap closed and his electrolyte levels stabilized. This case demonstrates a unique presentation of refeeding syndrome given the patient's profound metabolic acidosis that provided a clue toward his eventual diagnosis. The standard workup for an anion gap metabolic acidosis was negative, and it was not until his refeeding syndrome had been treated that the anion gap closed.

  8. Diencephalic syndrome: a frequently neglected cause of failure to thrive in infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Ahlee; Moon, Jin Soo; Yang, Hye Ran; Chang, Ju Young; Ko, Jae Sung; Seo, Jeong Kee

    2015-01-01

    Diencephalic syndrome is an uncommon cause of failure to thrive in early childhood that is associated with central nervous system neoplasms in the hypothalamic-optic chiasmatic region. It is characterized by complex signs and symptoms related to hypothalamic dysfunction; such nonspecific clinical features may delay diagnosis of the brain tumor. In this study, we analyzed a series of cases in order to define characteristic features of diencephalic syndrome. We performed a retrospective study of 8 patients with diencephalic syndrome (age, 5-38 months). All cases had presented to Seoul National University Children's Hospital between 1995 and 2013, with the chief complaint of poor weight gain. Diencephalic syndrome with central nervous system (CNS) neoplasm was identified in 8 patients. The mean age at which symptoms were noted was 18±10.5 months, and diagnosis after symptom onset was made at the mean age of 11±9.7 months. The mean z score was -3.15±1.14 for weight, -0.12±1.05 for height, 1.01±1.58 for head circumference, and -1.76±1.97 for weight-for-height. Clinical features included failure to thrive (n=8), hydrocephalus (n=5), recurrent vomiting (n=5), strabismus (n=2), developmental delay (n=2), hyperactivity (n=1), nystagmus (n=1), and diarrhea (n=1). On follow-up evaluation, 3 patients showed improvement and remained in stable remission, 2 patients were still receiving chemotherapy, and 3 patients were discharged for palliative care. Diencephalic syndrome is a rare cause of failure to thrive, and diagnosis is frequently delayed. Thus, it is important to consider the possibility of a CNS neoplasm as a cause of failure to thrive and to ensure early diagnosis.

  9. MKS1 mutations cause Joubert syndrome with agenesis of the corpus callosum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bader, Ingrid; Decker, E; Mayr, J A; Lunzer, V; Koch, J; Boltshauser, E; Sperl, W; Pietsch, P; Ertl-Wagner, B; Bolz, H; Bergmann, C; Rittinger, O

    2016-08-01

    Joubert syndrome (JS) is a clinically and genetically heterogeneous ciliopathy characterized by episodic hyperpnea and apnea, hypotonia, ataxia, cognitive impairment and ocular motor apraxia. The "molar tooth sign" is pathognomonic of this condition. Mutations in the MKS1 gene are a major cause of Meckel-Gruber syndrome (MKS), the most common form of syndromic neural tube defects, frequently resulting in perinatal lethality. We present the phenotype and genotype of a child with severe JS and agenesis of the corpus callosum (ACC). In our patient, a next generation sequencing (NGS) approach revealed the following two variants of the MKS1 gene: first, a novel missense variant [ c.240G > T (p.Trp80Cys)], which affects a residue that is evolutionarily highly conserved in mammals and ciliates; second, a 29 bp deletion in intron 15 [c.1408-35_1408-7del29], a founder mutation, which in a homozygous state constitutes the major cause of MKS in Finland. We review the MKS1-variants in all of the eleven JS patients reported to date and compare these patients to our case. To our knowledge, this is the first patient with Joubert syndrome and agenesis of the corpus callosum where a potentially causal genotype is provided. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  10. Non-syndromic posterior lenticonus a cause of childhood cataract: evidence for X-linked inheritance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell-Eggitt, I M

    2000-12-01

    When an X-linked pedigree of posterior lenticonus with cataract was identified further evidence for X-linked inheritance of this condition was sought. Forty-three cases of posterior lenticonus were identified from a database of 354 children with cataract. Two children with the X-linked syndromes of Lowe and Nance-Horan and 3 children with Fanconi syndrome have been excluded from further analysis. None of the children was deaf. None of the non-syndromic cases had microcornea. There were 38 cases of non-syndromic posterior lenticonus (approximately 11%). There were 15 children from 13 pedigrees and 23 apparently sporadic cases. Of the 106 cases on the database with unilateral cataract 15 had posterior lenticonus (approximately 14%). Eleven of 13 pedigrees were compatible with X-linked inheritance or autosomal dominant inheritance with variable expression. However, in 2 pedigrees there was father to son transmission. Posterior lenticonus is a common cause of unilateral infantile cataract, but is thought to be a rare cause of bilateral cataracts. This study suggests that posterior lenticonus is responsible for a significant proportion of childhood cataracts (approximately 14% of unilateral and approximately 9% of bilateral cases). Posterior lenticonus is generally thought to occur as a sporadic condition. This study demonstrates that there is a family history of early-onset cataract in a significant number of bilateral cases (approximately 58%).

  11. c.376G>A mutation in WFS1 gene causes Wolfram syndrome without deafness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safarpour Lima, Behnam; Ghaedi, Hamid; Daftarian, Narsis; Ahmadieh, Hamid; Jamshidi, Javad; Khorrami, Mehdi; Noroozi, Rezvan; Sohrabifar, Nasim; Assarzadegan, Farhad; Hesami, Omid; Taghavi, Shaghayegh; Ahmadifard, Azadeh; Atakhorrami, Minoo; Rahimi-Aliabadi, Simin; Shahmohammadibeni, Neda; Alehabib, Elham; Andarva, Monavvar; Darvish, Hossein; Emamalizadeh, Babak

    2016-02-01

    Wolfram syndrome is one of the rare autosomal recessive, progressive, neurodegenerative disorders, characterized by diabetes mellitus and optic atrophy. Several other features are observed in patients including deafness, ataxia, and peripheral neuropathy. A gene called WFS1 is identified on chromosome 4p, responsible for Wolfram syndrome. We investigated a family consisted of parents and 8 children, which 5 of them have been diagnosed for Wolfram syndrome. WFS1 gene in all family members was sequenced for causative mutations. A mutation (c.376G>A, p.A126T) was found in all affected members in homozygous state and in both parents in heterozygous state. The bioinformatics analysis showed the deleterious effects of this nucleotide change on the structure and function of the protein product. As all of the patients in the family showed the homozygote mutation, and parents were both heterozygote, this mutation is probably the cause of the disease. We identified this mutation in homozygous state for the first time as Wolfram syndrome causation. We also showed that this mutation probably doesn't cause deafness in affected individuals. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  12. ANKRD11 variants cause variable clinical features associated with KBG syndrome and Coffin–Siris-like syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyatake, Satoko; Okamoto, Nobuhiko; Stark, Zornitza; Nabetani, Makoto; Tsurusaki, Yoshinori; Nakashima, Mitsuko; Miyake, Noriko; Mizuguchi, Takeshi; Ohtake, Akira; Saitsu, Hirotomo; Matsumoto, Naomichi

    2017-01-01

    KBG syndrome (KBGS) is an autosomal dominant multiple congenital anomaly-intellectual disability syndrome, characterized by developmental delay with neurological involvements, macrodontia of the upper central incisors, characteristic facial dysmorphism and skeletal anomalies. Variants in ANKRD11 cause KBGS. We present five individuals from four families with ANKRD11 variants identified by whole-exome sequencing. Four of the five were clinically affected, and their diagnoses were varied. One was typical KBGS, two were Coffin–Siris syndrome-like (CSS), and one was intellectual disability with infantile spasms. One individual showed extremely mild phenotype. All individuals fulfilled the proposed diagnostic criteria for KBGS. Phenotypic features overlap between KBGS and CSS to some extent, and characteristic dental and fifth finger/toe findings can indicate differential diagnosis. These findings indicate that patients with ANKRD11 variants occupy a wide spectrum of intellectual disability, including clinically normal individuals. This is the first report highlighting the clinical overlap between KBGS and CSS and supporting the recently proposed clinical concept, in which transcriptional machineries are disrupted. PMID:28250421

  13. ANKRD11 variants cause variable clinical features associated with KBG syndrome and Coffin-Siris-like syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyatake, Satoko; Okamoto, Nobuhiko; Stark, Zornitza; Nabetani, Makoto; Tsurusaki, Yoshinori; Nakashima, Mitsuko; Miyake, Noriko; Mizuguchi, Takeshi; Ohtake, Akira; Saitsu, Hirotomo; Matsumoto, Naomichi

    2017-08-01

    KBG syndrome (KBGS) is an autosomal dominant multiple congenital anomaly-intellectual disability syndrome, characterized by developmental delay with neurological involvements, macrodontia of the upper central incisors, characteristic facial dysmorphism and skeletal anomalies. Variants in ANKRD11 cause KBGS. We present five individuals from four families with ANKRD11 variants identified by whole-exome sequencing. Four of the five were clinically affected, and their diagnoses were varied. One was typical KBGS, two were Coffin-Siris syndrome-like (CSS), and one was intellectual disability with infantile spasms. One individual showed extremely mild phenotype. All individuals fulfilled the proposed diagnostic criteria for KBGS. Phenotypic features overlap between KBGS and CSS to some extent, and characteristic dental and fifth finger/toe findings can indicate differential diagnosis. These findings indicate that patients with ANKRD11 variants occupy a wide spectrum of intellectual disability, including clinically normal individuals. This is the first report highlighting the clinical overlap between KBGS and CSS and supporting the recently proposed clinical concept, in which transcriptional machineries are disrupted.

  14. Metabolic syndrome and insulin resistance: underlying causes and modification by exercise training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Christian K; Hevener, Andrea L; Barnard, R James

    2013-01-01

    Metabolic syndrome (MS) is a collection of cardiometabolic risk factors that includes obesity, insulin resistance, hypertension, and dyslipidemia. Although there has been significant debate regarding the criteria and concept of the syndrome, this clustering of risk factors is unequivocally linked to an increased risk of developing type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease. Regardless of the true definition, based on current population estimates, nearly 100 million have MS. It is often characterized by insulin resistance, which some have suggested is a major underpinning link between physical inactivity and MS. The purpose of this review is to: (i) provide an overview of the history, causes and clinical aspects of MS, (ii) review the molecular mechanisms of insulin action and the causes of insulin resistance, and (iii) discuss the epidemiological and intervention data on the effects of exercise on MS and insulin sensitivity.

  15. Metabolic Syndrome and Insulin Resistance: Underlying Causes and Modification by Exercise Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Christian K.; Hevener, Andrea L.; Barnard, R. James

    2014-01-01

    Metabolic syndrome (MS) is a collection of cardiometabolic risk factors that includes obesity, insulin resistance, hypertension, and dyslipidemia. Although there has been significant debate regarding the criteria and concept of the syndrome, this clustering of risk factors is unequivocally linked to an increased risk of developing type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease. Regardless of the true definition, based on current population estimates, nearly 100 million have MS. It is often characterized by insulin resistance, which some have suggested is a major underpinning link between physical inactivity and MS. The purpose of this review is to: (i) provide an overview of the history, causes and clinical aspects of MS, (ii) review the molecular mechanisms of insulin action and the causes of insulin resistance, and (iii) discuss the epidemiological and intervention data on the effects of exercise on MS and insulin sensitivity. PMID:23720280

  16. Cri du chat syndrome and primary ciliary dyskinesia: a common genetic cause on chromosome 5p.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shapiro, Adam J; Weck, Karen E; Chao, Kay C; Rosenfeld, Margaret; Nygren, Anders O H; Knowles, Michael R; Leigh, Margaret W; Zariwala, Maimoona A

    2014-10-01

    Cri du chat syndrome (CdCS) and primary ciliary dyskinesia (PCD) are rare diseases that present with frequent respiratory symptoms. PCD can be caused by hemizygous DNAH5 mutation in combination with a 5p segmental deletion attributable to CdCS on the opposite chromosome. Chronic oto-sino-pulmonary symptoms or organ laterality defects in CdCS should prompt an evaluation for PCD. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. [Metastasis to the temporal bone may cause acute peripheral vestibular syndrome and impaired hearing].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grubbe Gregersen, Kristine; Hansen, Søren

    2013-05-27

    Metastasis to the petrous apex of the temporal bone may cause acute peripheral vestibular syndrome and impaired hearing or be asymptomatic. Contrast computed tomography should be performed to exclude pathology in the temporal bone in patients with vestibulocochlear deficit, a history of cancer and no findings on cerebral magnetic resonance imaging. We describe a case of a 61-year-old man with metastatic prostatic carcinoma to the temporal bone.

  18. Lemmel’s Syndrome: A Rare Cause of Obstructive Jaundice Secondary to Periampullary Diverticulum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Babar Ahmad Khan

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available In 1934 Lemmel was the first to report the presence of juxtapapillary diverticula and hepatocholangiopancreatic disease, excluding cholelithiasis. Obstructive jaundice caused by periampullary duodenal diverticulum (PAD in absence of choledocholithiasis or tumor is known as Lemmel syndrome. A patient with an extraluminal duodenal diverticulum presenting with obstructive jaundice and pancreatitis is presented in this case. Although initially managed conservatively, the patient had recurrence of symptoms after 2 months but then had successful surgical resection of the duodenal diverticulum.

  19. Syndrome of inappropriate antidiuretic hormone caused by continuous lumbar spinal fluid drainage after transphenoidal surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norlela, S; Azmi, K N; Khalid, B A K

    2006-01-01

    A 53-year-old acromegalic woman had cerebrospinal fluid rhinorrhoea following transphenoidal surgery for a pituitary microadenoma. A continuous lumbar spinal fluid drainage catheter was inserted and on the sixth postoperative day, she developed hyponatremia with features of syndrome of inappropriate antidiuretic hormone (SIADH) requiring hypertonic saline administration. Over-drainage is potentially hazardous and close biochemical monitoring is required. To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of SIADH caused by continuous lumbar drainage in an adult.

  20. A Clinical Study of Hemorrhagic Fever with Renal Syndrome Caused by Seoul Virus Infection

    OpenAIRE

    Park, Seung Chull; Pyo, Heui Jung; Soe, Jae Bung; Lee, Myung Seok; Kim, Young Hoon; Byun, Kwan Soo; Kang, Kyung Ho; Kim, Min Ja; Kim, Jun Suck; Lee, Ho Wang; Lee, Yong Ju; Lee, Pyung Woo; Seong, In Wha; Baek, Luck Ju

    1989-01-01

    The clinical findings of 29 patients with hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome (HFRS) caused by Seoul virus were evaluated and compared with the previously reported clinical findings of classic Korean hemorrhagic fever (KHF). The diagnoses of these patients were made by hemagglutination inhibition test. The results were as follows: The disease occurred predominantly in males with a high incidence in the third and fourth decades of life. The highest incidence of the disease occurred in Octobe...

  1. Superior cerebellar aneurysm causing subarachnoid haemorrhage in a 17-year-old with alagille syndrome.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Connell, David

    2012-04-01

    Alagille syndrome is a rare autosomal dominant condition characterised by mutation in Jagged1 gene. Intracranial aneurysms may be seen in this condition and may present as subarachnoid hemorrhage. We describe the first case of superior cerebellar aneurysm rupture causing WFNS grade 1 subarachnoid haemorrhage in a 17-year-old girl. The clinical condition and management of this rare occurrence is discussed with a review of literature.

  2. [Mallory-Weiss syndrome as the cause of sudden, unexpected death].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Türk, Elisabeth E; Anders, Sven; Tsokos, Michael

    2002-01-01

    The Mallory-Weiss-syndrome is an upper gastrointestinal haemorrhage due to longitudinal mucosal lacerations in the oesophagogastric junction. The mucosal lacerations occur as a sequel of vomiting or any other increase in intraabdominal pressure and account for up to 15% of all upper gastrointestinal bleedings. If death is due to a bleeding Mallory-Weiss-tear, however, massive blood stains on the corpse and around it frequently give rise to the suspicion of an unnatural cause of death. For this reason, autopsy is usually indispensable to elucidate the circumstances in which death occurred. The authors carried out a retrospective analysis of 5958 autopsies performed between 1997 and 2001 at the Institute of Legal Medicine, University of Hamburg, in order to identify all cases of Mallory-Weiss-syndrome as cause of sudden, unexpected death. The results (9 cases, amounting to 0.15% of all autopsies) suggest that Mallory-Weiss-syndrome is probably much more common as a cause of sudden death than previously described. Regarding epidemiological aspects, men clearly predominate; the average age was 48 years. It should also be stressed that in 8 of the 9 cases there was a previous history of chronic alcohol abuse.

  3. Discovery of a Genetic Metabolic Cause for Mauriac Syndrome in Type 1 Diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacDonald, Michael J; Hasan, Noaman M; Ansari, Israr-Ul H; Longacre, Melissa J; Kendrick, Mindy A; Stoker, Scott W

    2016-07-01

    A mechanistic cause for Mauriac syndrome, a syndrome of growth failure and delayed puberty associated with massive liver enlargement from glycogen deposition in children with poorly controlled type 1 diabetes, is unknown. We discovered a mutation in the catalytic subunit of liver glycogen phosphorylase kinase in a patient with Mauriac syndrome whose liver extended into his pelvis. Glycogen phosphorylase kinase activates glycogen phosphorylase, the enzyme that catalyzes the first step in glycogen breakdown. We show that the mutant subunit acts in a dominant manner to completely inhibit glycogen phosphorylase kinase enzyme activity and that this interferes with glycogenolysis causing increased levels of glycogen in human liver cells. It is known that even normal blood glucose levels physiologically inhibit glycogen phosphorylase to diminish glucose release from the liver when glycogenolysis is not needed. The patient's mother possessed the same mutant glycogen phosphorylase kinase subunit, but did not have diabetes or hepatomegaly. His father had childhood type 1 diabetes in poor glycemic control, but lacked the mutation and had neither hepatomegaly nor growth failure. This case proves that the effect of a mutant enzyme of glycogen metabolism can combine with hyperglycemia to directly hyperinhibit glycogen phosphorylase, in turn blocking glycogenolysis causing the massive liver in Mauriac disease. © 2016 by the American Diabetes Association. Readers may use this article as long as the work is properly cited, the use is educational and not for profit, and the work is not altered.

  4. Mutations in a TGF-β ligand, TGFB3, cause syndromic aortic aneurysms and dissections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertoli-Avella, Aida M; Gillis, Elisabeth; Morisaki, Hiroko; Verhagen, Judith M A; de Graaf, Bianca M; van de Beek, Gerarda; Gallo, Elena; Kruithof, Boudewijn P T; Venselaar, Hanka; Myers, Loretha A; Laga, Steven; Doyle, Alexander J; Oswald, Gretchen; van Cappellen, Gert W A; Yamanaka, Itaru; van der Helm, Robert M; Beverloo, Berna; de Klein, Annelies; Pardo, Luba; Lammens, Martin; Evers, Christina; Devriendt, Koenraad; Dumoulein, Michiel; Timmermans, Janneke; Bruggenwirth, Hennie T; Verheijen, Frans; Rodrigus, Inez; Baynam, Gareth; Kempers, Marlies; Saenen, Johan; Van Craenenbroeck, Emeline M; Minatoya, Kenji; Matsukawa, Ritsu; Tsukube, Takuro; Kubo, Noriaki; Hofstra, Robert; Goumans, Marie Jose; Bekkers, Jos A; Roos-Hesselink, Jolien W; van de Laar, Ingrid M B H; Dietz, Harry C; Van Laer, Lut; Morisaki, Takayuki; Wessels, Marja W; Loeys, Bart L

    2015-04-07

    Aneurysms affecting the aorta are a common condition associated with high mortality as a result of aortic dissection or rupture. Investigations of the pathogenic mechanisms involved in syndromic types of thoracic aortic aneurysms, such as Marfan and Loeys-Dietz syndromes, have revealed an important contribution of disturbed transforming growth factor (TGF)-β signaling. This study sought to discover a novel gene causing syndromic aortic aneurysms in order to unravel the underlying pathogenesis. We combined genome-wide linkage analysis, exome sequencing, and candidate gene Sanger sequencing in a total of 470 index cases with thoracic aortic aneurysms. Extensive cardiological examination, including physical examination, electrocardiography, and transthoracic echocardiography was performed. In adults, imaging of the entire aorta using computed tomography or magnetic resonance imaging was done. Here, we report on 43 patients from 11 families with syndromic presentations of aortic aneurysms caused by TGFB3 mutations. We demonstrate that TGFB3 mutations are associated with significant cardiovascular involvement, including thoracic/abdominal aortic aneurysm and dissection, and mitral valve disease. Other systemic features overlap clinically with Loeys-Dietz, Shprintzen-Goldberg, and Marfan syndromes, including cleft palate, bifid uvula, skeletal overgrowth, cervical spine instability and clubfoot deformity. In line with previous observations in aortic wall tissues of patients with mutations in effectors of TGF-β signaling (TGFBR1/2, SMAD3, and TGFB2), we confirm a paradoxical up-regulation of both canonical and noncanonical TGF-β signaling in association with up-regulation of the expression of TGF-β ligands. Our findings emphasize the broad clinical variability associated with TGFB3 mutations and highlight the importance of early recognition of the disease because of high cardiovascular risk. Copyright © 2015 American College of Cardiology Foundation. Published by

  5. Fulminant Necrotizing Fasciitis and Toxic Shock Syndrome Caused by Streptococcus agalactiae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emin UYSAL

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Necrotizing fasciitis is a rare and life-threatening soft tissue infection that spreads rapidly and involves the skin, subcutaneous tissue, fascia, and muscle layer. The treatment is possible by initiating appropriate antibiotherapy for the clinically suspected cause and by performing surgical intervention quickly and aggressively. However, it should be known that necrotizing fasciitis is a disease that is difficult to manage despite all interventions, effective treatment protocols, and patient care. This article presents the case of a 60-year-old patient with diabetes mellitus who died of toxic shock syndrome with fulminant necrotizing fasciitis caused by Streptococcus agalactiae.

  6. Medial abrasion syndrome: a neglected cause of knee pain in middle and old age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyu, Shaw-Ruey; Lee, Ching-Chih; Hsu, Chia-Chen

    2015-04-01

    Knee pain is a prevailing health problem of middle and old age. Medial plica-related medial abrasion syndrome (MAS), although a well-known cause of knee pain in younger individuals, has rarely been investigated in older individuals. This prospective study was conducted to investigate the prevalence and clinical manifestations of this syndrome as a cause of knee pain in middle and old age. The outcomes of arthroscopic treatment for this syndrome were also evaluated.A total of 232 knees of 169 patients >40 years of age (41-82, median: 63 years old) suffering from chronic knee pain were analyzed. The clinical diagnosis, predisposing factors, presenting symptoms, and physical signs were investigated. The sensitivity and specificity of each parameter of the clinical presentation for the diagnosis of MAS were evaluated after confirmation by arthroscopy. For patients with MAS, the roentgenographic and arthroscopic manifestations were investigated, and arthroscopic medial release (AMR) was performed. The outcomes were evaluated by the changes in the pain domain of the Knee Society scoring system and by patient satisfaction. The prevalence of medial plica was 95%, and osteoarthritis (OA) was the most common clinical diagnosis. Symptoms of pain and crepitus in motion and local tenderness during physical examination were the most sensitive parameters for the diagnosis. A history of a single knee injury combined with local tenderness and a palpable band found during physical examination were the most specific parameters for the diagnosis. The majority of patients suffering from this syndrome were successfully treated using AMR, yielding a satisfaction rate of 85.5% after a minimum of 3 years.MAS is a common cause of knee pain in middle and old age and can be effectively treated by AMR. Its concomitance with OA warrants further investigation.

  7. Spinal intradural hydatid cyst causing arachnoiditis: A rare etiology of cauda equina syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suyash Singh

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This study aims to focus on a rare presentation of spinal hydatid cyst as cauda equine syndrome and misdiagnosed as intradural extramedullary (IDEM benign lesion on magnetic resonance imaging. In this article, we report a case of spinal hydatid cyst masquerading as IDEM tumor, and intraoperatively, we accidently find clumped granuloma with severe arachnoiditis and hydatid cyst in lumber region, which was present as bilateral S1 radiculopathy with cauda equina syndrome. An 11 year old boy who presented with symptoms and signs of cauda equina syndrome and planned for surgical excision. His radiological impression was IDEM possibly neurofibroma. To our surprise, we found multiple intradural cystic lesions with arachnoiditis. Dissecting in plane cyst was flushed out, and surgical cavity was irrigated with 3% saline. Postoperatively histopathology and serum tests confirmed the diagnosis of hydatid cyst. Hydatid disease is rare cause of cauda equine syndrome which can be miss diagnosed on radiological investigations. A high index of suspicion should be kept especially in a young patient from the Indian subcontinent.

  8. Two cases of uveitis masquerade syndrome caused by bilateral intraocular large B-cell lymphoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jovanović Svetlana

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Sometimes it is not easy to clinically recognize subtle differences between intraocular lymphoma and noninfectious uveitis. The most common lymphoma subtype involving the eye is B-cell lymphoma. Case report. We presented two patients aged 59 and 58 years with infiltration of the subretinal space with a large B-cell non-Hodgkin intraocular lymphoma. The patients originally had clinically masked syndrome in the form of intermediate uveitis. As it was a corticosteroid-resistant uveitis, we focused on the possible diagnosis of neoplastic causes of this syndrome. During hospitalization, the neurological symptoms emerged and multiple subretinal changes accompanied by yellowish white patches of retinal pigment epithelium with signs of vitritis, which made us suspect the intraocular lymphoma. Endocranial magnetic resonance imaging established tumorous infiltration in the region of the left hemisphere of the cerebellum. The histopathological finding confirmed the diagnosis of large B-cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma of risk moderate degree, immunoblast - centroblast cytological type. The other patient had clinical chronic uveitis accompanied by yellowish shaped white echographic changes of the retina and localized changes in the level of the subretina. The diagnosis of lymphoma was made by brain biopsy. Conclusion. Uveitis masquerade syndrome should be considered in all patients over 40 years with idiopathic steroid-resistant uveitis. Treatment begun on time can affect the course and improve the prognosis of uveitis masquerade syndrome (UMS and systemic disease.

  9. Multiple causes of apnea in 1p36 deletion syndrome include seizures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanabar, Gorande; Boyd, Stewart; Schugal, Anna; Bhate, Sanjay

    2012-06-01

    Apneic episodes have not previously been described in children with 1p36 deletion syndrome with seizures. Having encountered one such patient, we reviewed our experience of breathing difficulties in this syndrome, with particular attention to evidence of ictal apnea. We describe four children with 1p36 deletion syndrome, seizures and apneic episodes. Retrospective analysis of clinical features, seizure semiology and video-EEG data. All patients showed characteristic craniofacial features, mental retardation, and diffuse hypotonia and apnea. Seizure semiology included focal motor, ± secondary generalized tonic clonic and tonic events. All had histories of status epilepticus; three showed clustering of their habitual seizures. Assessment of apnea was complicated by the presence of multiple other potential causes including obesity, reflux, respiratory, and cardiac problems Epileptic apneas were confirmed in one child by video-telemetry. In three other children, an epileptic basis for apneas was inferred from their clinical histories and treatment response supported by EEG findings. In three children, epileptiform discharges occurred over fronto-centro-temporal regions. Epileptic apnea is a feature of 1p36 deletion syndrome, though episodic apnea is multifactorial in these children, and may need repeated re-appraisal. Copyright © 2012 British Epilepsy Association. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. A novel NHS mutation causes Nance-Horan Syndrome in a Chinese family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Qi; Li, Yunping; Kousar, Rizwana; Guo, Hui; Peng, Fenglan; Zheng, Yu; Yang, Xiaohua; Long, Zhigao; Tian, Runyi; Xia, Kun; Lin, Haiying; Pan, Qian

    2017-01-07

    Nance-Horan Syndrome (NHS) (OMIM: 302350) is a rare X-linked developmental disorder characterized by bilateral congenital cataracts, with occasional dental anomalies, characteristic dysmorphic features, brachymetacarpia and mental retardation. Carrier females exhibit similar manifestations that are less severe than in affected males. Here, we report a four-generation Chinese family with multiple affected individuals presenting Nance-Horan Syndrome. Whole-exome sequencing combined with RT-PCR and Sanger sequencing was used to search for a genetic cause underlying the disease phenotype. Whole-exome sequencing identified in all affected individuals of the family a novel donor splicing site mutation (NM_198270: c.1045 + 2T > A) in intron 4 of the gene NHS, which maps to chromosome Xp22.13. The identified mutation results in an RNA processing defect causing a 416-nucleotide addition to exon 4 of the mRNA transcript, likely producing a truncated NHS protein. The donor splicing site mutation NM_198270: c.1045 + 2T > A of the NHS gene is the causative mutation in this Nance-Horan Syndrome family. This research broadens the spectrum of NHS gene mutations, contributing to our understanding of the molecular genetics of NHS.

  11. Homozygous and compound-heterozygous mutations in TGDS cause Catel-Manzke syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehmke, Nadja; Caliebe, Almuth; Koenig, Rainer; Kant, Sarina G; Stark, Zornitza; Cormier-Daire, Valérie; Wieczorek, Dagmar; Gillessen-Kaesbach, Gabriele; Hoff, Kirstin; Kawalia, Amit; Thiele, Holger; Altmüller, Janine; Fischer-Zirnsak, Björn; Knaus, Alexej; Zhu, Na; Heinrich, Verena; Huber, Celine; Harabula, Izabela; Spielmann, Malte; Horn, Denise; Kornak, Uwe; Hecht, Jochen; Krawitz, Peter M; Nürnberg, Peter; Siebert, Reiner; Manzke, Hermann; Mundlos, Stefan

    2014-12-04

    Catel-Manzke syndrome is characterized by Pierre Robin sequence and a unique form of bilateral hyperphalangy causing a clinodactyly of the index finger. We describe the identification of homozygous and compound heterozygous mutations in TGDS in seven unrelated individuals with typical Catel-Manzke syndrome by exome sequencing. Six different TGDS mutations were detected: c.892A>G (p.Asn298Asp), c.270_271del (p.Lys91Asnfs(∗)22), c.298G>T (p.Ala100Ser), c.294T>G (p.Phe98Leu), c.269A>G (p.Glu90Gly), and c.700T>C (p.Tyr234His), all predicted to be disease causing. By using haplotype reconstruction we showed that the mutation c.298G>T is probably a founder mutation. Due to the spectrum of the amino acid changes, we suggest that loss of function in TGDS is the underlying mechanism of Catel-Manzke syndrome. TGDS (dTDP-D-glucose 4,6-dehydrogenase) is a conserved protein belonging to the SDR family and probably plays a role in nucleotide sugar metabolism. Copyright © 2014 The American Society of Human Genetics. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Hepatopulmonary syndrome is a frequent cause of dyspnea in the short telomere disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorgy, Amany I; Jonassaint, Naudia L; Stanley, Susan E; Koteish, Ayman; DeZern, Amy E; Walter, Jolan E; Sopha, Sabrina C; Hamilton, James P; Hoover-Fong, Julie; Chen, Allen R; Anders, Robert A; Kamel, Ihab R; Armanios, Mary

    2015-10-01

    Telomere syndromes have their most common manifestation in idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis and emphysema. The short telomere defect in these patients may manifest systemically as bone marrow failure and liver disease. We sought to understand the causes of dyspnea in telomerase and telomere gene mutation carriers who have no parenchymal lung disease. Clinical and pathologic data were reviewed as part of a Johns Hopkins-based natural history study of short telomere syndromes including dyskeratosis congenita. Hepatopulmonary syndrome (HPS) was diagnosed in nine of 42 cases (21%). Their age at presentation was significantly younger than that of cases initially presenting with pulmonary fibrosis and emphysema (median, 25 years vs 55 years; P time to death or liver transplantation was 6 years (range, 4-10 years; n = 6). In cases that underwent liver transplantation, dyspnea and hypoxia improved, but pulmonary fibrosis subsequently developed. This report identifies HPS as a frequent cause of dyspnea in telomerase and telomere gene mutation carriers. While it usually precedes the development of parenchymal lung disease, HPS may also co-occur with pulmonary fibrosis and emphysema. Recognizing this genetic diagnosis is critical for management, especially in the lung and liver transplantation setting.

  13. Cardiovocal Syndrome: A rare cause of hoarseness in a patient with a history of pulmonary tuberculosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rakul Nambiar

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Hoarseness is a common clinical condition with underlying causes which can vary from reversible and benign to life-threatening and malignant. Cardiovocal syndrome may cause hoarseness secondary to left recurrent laryngeal nerve palsy when the recurrent laryngeal nerve is mechanically affected due to enlarged cardiovascular structures. We report a 28-year-old male who presented to the Government Medical College, Thiruvananthapuram, India, in 2013 with hoarseness. He had undergone irregular treatment for pulmonary tuberculosis (TB two years previously. Fiber-optic laryngoscopy indicated left vocal cord palsy and a computed tomography scan of the chest revealed features of pulmonary hypertension with extensive enlargement of the pulmonary arteries. An echocardiogram confirmed severe pulmonary arterial hypertension with severe tricuspid regurgitation. He was diagnosed with left recurrent laryngeal palsy secondary to cardiovocal syndrome. Although reports exist of recurrent laryngeal palsy in TB, this case appears to be the first to report cardiovocal syndrome in a patient treated for pulmonary TB.

  14. Trousseau's Syndrome Caused by Intrahepatic Cholangiocarcinoma: An Autopsy Case Report and Literature Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takashi Yuri

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available An autopsy case report of Trousseau's syndrome caused by intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma is presented, and seven previously reported cases are reviewed. A 73-year-old woman experiencing light-headedness and dementia of unknown cause for 6 months developed severe hypotonia. A hypointense lesion compatible with acute cerebral infarction was detected by magnetic resonance imaging. Abdominal computed tomography revealed an ill-defined large liver mass in the right lobe. The mass was not further investigated because of the patient's poor condition. She died of multiple organ failure, and an autopsy was conducted. Postmortem examination revealed intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma, fibrous vegetations on the mitral valves and multiple thromboemboli in the cerebrum, spleen and rectum. Trousseau's syndrome is defined as an idiopathic thromboembolism in patients with undiagnosed or concomitantly diagnosed malignancy. This syndrome is encountered frequently in patients with mucin-producing carcinomas, while the incidence in patients with intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma is uncommon. We found that tissue factor and mucin tumor marker (CA19-9, CA15-3 and CA-125 expression in cancer cells may be involved in the pathogenesis of thromboembolism. A patient with unexplained thromboembolism may have occult visceral malignancy; thus, mucin tumor markers may indicate the origin of a mucin-producing carcinoma, and postmortem examination may play an important role in revealing the hidden malignancy.

  15. Supine hypotensive syndrome as the probable cause of both maternal and fetal death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De-Giorgio, Fabio; Grassi, Vincenzo M; Vetrugno, Giuseppe; d'Aloja, Ernesto; Pascali, Vincenzo L; Arena, Vincenzo

    2012-11-01

    Supine hypotensive syndrome is characterized by severe supine hypotension in late pregnancy, whose clinical presentation ranges from minimal cardiovascular alterations to severe shock, resulting from inferior vena cava compression by gravid uterus. We report a case of a 41-year-old 39-week-pregnant woman found dead supine. Autopsy revealed the following: cyanosis of the limbs; congestion of the jugular and subclavian veins; abundant abdominal subcutaneous fatty tissue; uterus displacing intestine and diaphragm; collapsed inferior vena cava; both femoral veins dilated and filled with blood; edematous and congested lungs; and placenta 790 g, fetus 3475 g, amniotic fluid 800 cm(3). The diagnosis of supine hypotensive syndrome as the probable cause of death is supported by the position of the body and autopsy findings. This syndrome can be considered as the first stage of the physio-pathological mechanism that led to death in the case presented herein and should be considered by pathologists as a cause of sudden death. © 2012 American Academy of Forensic Sciences.

  16. Dunbar syndrome as an unusual cause of exercise-induced retrosternal pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karavelioğlu, Yusuf; Kalçık, Macit; Sarak, Taner

    2015-07-01

    The median arcuate ligament is a fibrous band connecting the left and right diaphragmatic crura across the aortic hiatus at the level of the T12/L1 vertebral bodies. The low insertion point of this ligament causes significant stenosis of the proximal portion of the coeliac artery in a small group of patients, and contributes to ischemic symptoms known as coeliac artery compression syndrome (CACS). It is also referred to as median arcuate ligament syndrome or Dunbar syndrome. Symptoms include especially postprandial epigastric or retrosternal pain, weight loss, nausea, vomiting, diarrhea and reduced appetite. In severe cases, exercise related abdominal pain may be caused by steal phenomenon, whereby blood is shunted to the skin and relevant muscles during exercise. Computed tomographic angiography and mesenteric angiography are the gold standard diagnostic modalities to confirm diagnosis of CACS. Surgical therapy with release of the median arcuate ligament usually is the primary treatment of choice. Here, we present a 46-year-old male CACS patient with postprandial and especially exercise-induced retrosternal pain radiating to the epigastric region, which may be misperceived as a coronary symptom.

  17. Novel mutations in EVC cause aberrant splicing in Ellis-van Creveld syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Lisong; Luo, Chunyan; Ahmed, Mairaj K; Attaie, Ali B; Ye, Xiaoqian

    2016-04-01

    Ellis-van Creveld syndrome (EvC) is a rare autosomal recessive disorder characterized by disproportionate chondrodysplasia, postaxial polydactyly, nail dystrophy, dental abnormalities and in a proportion of patients, congenital cardiac malformations. Weyers acrofacial dysostosis (Weyers) is another dominantly inherited disorder allelic to EvC syndrome but with milder phenotypes. Both disorders can result from loss-of-function mutations in either EVC or EVC2 gene, and phenotypes associated with the two gene mutations are clinically indistinguishable. We present here a clinical and molecular analysis of a Chinese family manifested specific features of EvC syndrome. Sequencing of both EVC and EVC2 identified two novel heterozygous splice site mutations c.384+5G>C in intron 3 and c.1465-1G>A in intron 10 in EVC, which were inherited from mother and father, respectively. In vitro minigene expression assay, RT-PCR and sequencing analysis demonstrated that c.384+5G>C mutation abolished normal splice site and created a new cryptic acceptor site within exon 4, whereas c.1465-1G>A mutation affected consensus splice junction site and resulted in full exon 11 skipping. These two aberrant pre-mRNA splicing processes both produced in-frame abnormal transcripts that possibly led to abolishment of important functional domains. To our knowledge, this is the first report of EVC mutations that cause EvC syndrome in Chinese population. Our data revealed that EVC splice site mutations altered splicing pattern and helped elucidate the pathogenesis of EvC syndrome.

  18. SMARCE1, a rare cause of Coffin-Siris Syndrome: Clinical description of three additional cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zarate, Yuri A; Bhoj, Elizabeth; Kaylor, Julie; Li, Dong; Tsurusaki, Yoshinori; Miyake, Noriko; Matsumoto, Naomichi; Phadke, Shubha; Escobar, Luis; Irani, Afifa; Hakonarson, Hakon; Schrier Vergano, Samantha A

    2016-08-01

    Coffin-Siris syndrome (CSS, MIM 135900), is a well-described, multiple congenital anomaly syndrome characterized by coarse facial features, hypertrichosis, sparse scalp hair, and hypo/aplastic digital nails and phalanges, typically of the 5th digits. Mutations in the BAF (SWI/SNF)-complex subunits (SMARCA4, SMARCE1, SMARCB1, SMARCA2, ARID1B, and ARID1A) have been shown to cause not only CSS, but also related disorders including Nicolaides-Baraitser (MIM 601358) syndrome and ARID1B-intellectual disability syndrome (MIM 614562). At least 200 individuals with CSS have been found to have a mutation in the BAF pathway. However, to date, only three individuals with CSS have been reported to have pathogenic variants in SMARCE1. We report here three additional individuals with clinical features consistent with CSS and alterations in SMARCE1, one of which is novel. The probands all exhibited dysmorphic facial features, moderate developmental and cognitive delay, poor growth, and hypoplastic digital nails/phalanges, including digits not typically affected in the other genes associated with CSS. Two of the three probands had a variety of different organ system anomalies, including cardiac disease, genitourinary abnormalities, feeding difficulties, and vision abnormalities. The 3rd proband has not had further investigative studies. Although an increasing number of individuals are being diagnosed with disorders in the BAF pathway, SMARCE1 is the least common of these genes. This report doubles the number of probands with these mutations, and allows for better phenotypic information of this rare syndrome. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. SMARCE1, a Rare Cause of Coffin–Siris Syndrome: Clinical Description of Three Additional Cases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zarate, Yuri A.; Bhoj, Elizabeth; Kaylor, Julie; Li, Dong; Tsurusaki, Yoshinori; Miyake, Noriko; Matsumoto, Naomichi; Phadke, Shubha; Escobar, Luis; Irani, Afifa; Hakonarson, Hakon; Schrier Vergano, Samantha A.

    2018-01-01

    Coffin–Siris syndrome (CSS, MIM 135900), is a well-described, multiple congenital anomaly syndrome characterized by coarse facial features, hypertrichosis, sparse scalp hair, and hypo/aplastic digital nails and phalanges, typically of the 5th digits. Mutations in the BAF (SWI/SNF)-complex subunits (SMARCA4, SMARCE1, SMARCB1, SMARCA2, ARID1B, and ARID1A) have been shown to cause not only CSS, but also related disorders including Nicolaides–Baraitser (MIM 601358) syndrome and ARID1B-intellectual disability syndrome (MIM 614562).At least 200 individuals with CSS have been found to have a mutation in the BAF pathway. However, to date, only three individuals with CSS have been reported to have pathogenic variants in SMARCE1. We report here three additional individuals with clinical features consistent with CSS and alterations in SMARCE1, one of which is novel. The probands all exhibited dysmorphic facial features, moderate developmental and cognitive delay, poor growth, and hypoplastic digital nails/phalanges, including digits not typically affected in the other genes associated with CSS. Two of the three probands had a variety of different organ system anomalies, including cardiac disease, genitourinary abnormalities, feeding difficulties, and vision abnormalities. The 3rd proband has not had further investigative studies. Although an increasing number of individuals are being diagnosed with disorders in the BAF pathway, SMARCE1 is the least common of these genes. This report doubles the number of probands with these mutations, and allows for better phenotypic information of this rare syndrome. PMID:27264197

  20. Waardenburg syndrome type 4: report of two new cases caused by SOX10 mutations in Spain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández, Raquel M; Núñez-Ramos, Raquel; Enguix-Riego, M Valle; Román-Rodríguez, Francisco José; Galán-Gómez, Enrique; Blesa-Sánchez, Emilio; Antiñolo, Guillermo; Núñez-Núñez, Ramón; Borrego, Salud

    2014-02-01

    Shah-Waardenburg syndrome or Waardenburg syndrome type 4 (WS4) is a neurocristopathy characterized by the association of deafness, depigmentation and Hirschsprung disease. Three disease-causing genes have been identified so far for WS4: EDNRB, EDN3, and SOX10. SOX10 mutations, found in 45-55% of WS4 patients, are inherited in autosomal dominant way. In addition, mutations in SOX10 are also responsible for an extended syndrome involving peripheral and central neurological phenotypes, referred to as PCWH (peripheral demyelinating neuropathy, central dysmyelinating leucodystrophy, Waardenburg syndrome, Hirschsprung disease). Such mutations are mostly private, and a high intra- and inter-familial variability exists. In this report, we present a patient with WS4 and a second with PCWH due to SOX10 mutations supporting again the genetic and phenotypic heterogeneity of these syndromes. Interestingly, the WS4 family carries an insertion of 19 nucleotides in exon 5 of SOX10, which results in distinct phenotypes along three different generations: hypopigmentation in the maternal grandmother, hearing loss in the mother, and WS4 in the proband. Since mosaicism cannot explain the three different related-WS features observed in this family, we propose as the most plausible explanation the existence of additional molecular events, acting in an additive or multiplicative fashion, in genes or regulatory regions unidentified so far. On the other hand, the PCWH case was due to a de novo deletion in exon 5 of the gene. Efforts should be devoted to unravel the mechanisms underlying the intrafamilial phenotypic variability observed in the families affected, and to identify new genes responsible for the still unsolved WS4 cases. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Stickler syndrome caused by COL2A1 mutations: genotype-phenotype correlation in a series of 100 patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hoornaert, Kristien P; Vereecke, Inge; Dewinter, Chantal

    2010-01-01

    Stickler syndrome is an autosomal dominant connective tissue disorder caused by mutations in different collagen genes. The aim of our study was to define more precisely the phenotype and genotype of Stickler syndrome type 1 by investigating a large series of patients with a heterozygous mutation...

  2. Dystonia-Deafness Syndrome Caused by a beta-Actin Gene Mutation and Response to Deep Brain Stimulation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eggink, Hendriekje; van Egmond, Martje E.; Verschuuren - Bemelmans, Corien C.; Schonherr, Marleen C.; de Koning, Tom J.; Oterdoom, D. L. Marinus; van Dijk, J. Marc C.; Tijssen, Marina A. J.

    Introduction: Dystonia-deafness syndrome is a distinct clinical presentation within the dystonia-spectrum. Although several genetic and acquired causes have been reported, etiology remains unknown in the majority of patients. Objectives: To describe two patients with dystonia-deafness syndrome due

  3. Stickler syndrome caused by COL2A1 mutations: genotype-phenotype correlation in a series of 100 patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hoornaert, Kristien P; Vereecke, Inge; Dewinter, Chantal

    2010-01-01

    Stickler syndrome is an autosomal dominant connective tissue disorder caused by mutations in different collagen genes. The aim of our study was to define more precisely the phenotype and genotype of Stickler syndrome type 1 by investigating a large series of patients with a heterozygous mutation ...

  4. Spontaneous coronary artery dissection causing acute coronary syndrome in a young patient without risk factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parag Chevli

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Spontaneous coronary artery dissection (SCAD is a rare cause of acute myocardial infarction that is more common in younger patients (under age 50 and in women. Although the etiology is not known, some predisposing conditions to SCAD are well known and include Marfan syndrome, pregnancy and peripartum state, drug abuse, and some anatomical abnormalities of the coronary arteries such as aneurysms and severe kinking. We describe a case of SCAD in a young woman who presented with sudden onset of chest pain and was admitted for the treatment of acute coronary syndrome. The coronary angiography showed dissection of the left anterior descending artery. The patient underwent successful percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty and stent placement.

  5. Docetaxel induced Lyell′s syndrome: A rare life threatening cause of dermatitis medicamentosas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Faheem Arshad

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Lyell′s syndrome or toxic epidermal necrolysis (TEN is a life threatening complication mostly caused by medications, characterized by desquamative lesions of the skin and mucous membranes with 30 percent or more epidermal involvement along with mucus membrane. We report a rare case of toxic epidermal necrolysis following administration of docetaxel, a semi-synthetic taxane. A female diagnosed as having metastatic breast carcinoma received chemotherapy in form of docetaxel after being exposed to adjuvant chemotherapy, developed severe involvement of skin and mucus membrane. Diagnosis of TEN was made and she was managed with steroids, antibiotics, intravenous fluids and antiseptic dressings. Common toxicities reported with this drug include myelosuppression, alopecia, nail damage, erythema multiforme major and neuropathy. We believe this is the first case report of Lyell′s syndrome following docetaxel. Main aim of this case is to make physicians aware of the severe skin reactions with docetaxel, measures to avoid them, early recognition and prompt treatment.

  6. A single base-pair deletion in the WFS1 gene causes Wolfram syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitt, Katherine; James, Chela; Kochar, Inderpal S; Kapoor, Akshay; Jain, Shilpi; Hussain, Khalid; Bennett, Kate

    2011-01-01

    Wolfram syndrome is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder also known as DIDMOAD (diabetes insipidus, diabetes mellitus, optic atrophy and deafness). The majority of cases are caused by mutations in the WFS1 gene. WFS1 is located at 4p16.1 and encodes wolframin, a transmembrane endoplasmic reticulum (ER) protein involved in the negative regulation of ER stress signalling. To date, over 120 WFS1 mutations have been described. In this study, we report a consanguineous family with three siblings affected by Wolfram syndrome. A homozygous single base pair deletion (c.877delC, L293fsX303) was found in the WFS1 gene in all three affected siblings.

  7. Mutations in Three Genes Encoding Proteins Involved in Hair Shaft Formation Cause Uncombable Hair Syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ü Basmanav, F Buket; Cau, Laura; Tafazzoli, Aylar

    2016-01-01

    Uncombable hair syndrome (UHS), also known as "spun glass hair syndrome," "pili trianguli et canaliculi," or "cheveux incoiffables" is a rare anomaly of the hair shaft that occurs in children and improves with age. UHS is characterized by dry, frizzy, spangly, and often fair hair that is resistant...... in the majority of UHS case subjects. The two enzymes PADI3 and TGM3, responsible for posttranslational protein modifications, and their target structural protein TCHH are all involved in hair shaft formation. Elucidation of the molecular outcomes of the disease-causing mutations by cell culture experiments...... and tridimensional protein models demonstrated clear differences in the structural organization and activity of mutant and wild-type proteins. Scanning electron microscopy observations revealed morphological alterations in hair coat of Padi3 knockout mice. All together, these findings elucidate the molecular genetic...

  8. De novo SHANK3 mutation causes Rett syndrome-like phenotype in a female patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hara, Munetsugu; Ohba, Chihiro; Yamashita, Yushiro; Saitsu, Hirotomo; Matsumoto, Naomichi; Matsuishi, Toyojiro

    2015-07-01

    Rett syndrome (RTT) is a neurodevelopmental disorder predominantly affecting females. Females with the MECP2 mutations exhibit a broad spectrum of clinical manifestations ranging from classical Rett syndrome to asymptomatic carriers. Mutations of genes encoding cyclin-dependent kinase-like 5 (CDKL5) and forkhead box G1 (FOXG1) are also found in early onset RTT variants. Here, we present the first report of a female patient with RTT-like phenotype caused by SHANK3 (SH3 and multiple ankylin repeat domain 3) mutation, indicating that the clinical spectrum of SHANK3 mutations may extend to RTT-like phenotype in addition to (severe) developmental delay, absence of expressive speech, autistic behaviors and intellectual disability. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Classic Bartter syndrome: a rare cause of failure to thrive in a child.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vieira, Helena; Mendes, Leonor; Mendes, Patricia; da Silva, José Esteves

    2012-06-28

    Bartter syndrome is a group of rare autosomal-recessive disorders caused by a defect in distal tubule transport of sodium and chloride. Blood gases and plasma electrolytes raise suspicion of this diagnosis and the definitive diagnosis is made by genetic study. Early treatment improves prognosis. The authors present the case of an 11-month-old child with early failure to thrive and severe regurgitation. Blood gases revealed hypochloraemic metabolic alkalosis, hyponatraemia and hypokalaemia. Blood pressure was normal and polyuria was documented. She began therapy with potassium chloride supplementation and indomethacin. There was clinical improvement and plasma potassium and bicarbonate normalised. The molecular study confirmed it was the classic form of Bartter syndrome. Despite being rare in clinical practice, which may lead to unnecessary medical investigation and diagnosis delay, in a child with failure to thrive, hypochloraemic metabolic alkalosis and hypokalaemia, this diagnosis must be considered.

  10. The subclavius posticus muscle: an unusual cause of thoracic outlet syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smayra, T; Nabhane, L; Tabet, G; Menassa-Moussa, L; Hachem, K; Haddad-Zebouni, S

    2014-09-01

    We present the case of a 30-year-old female, complaining of thoracic outlet compression symptoms caused by a supernumerary muscle, the subclavius posticus, accompanied by a caudally inserted middle scalenus muscle on the second rib. This rare anatomic variant was clearly shown on CT angiography and MRI images and surgical treatment was successful. As first described by Rosenmuller in 1800, subclavius posticus is a supernumerary muscle originating from the cranial surface of the sternal end of the first rib, running laterodorsally beneath the clavicle, and inserting into the superior border of the scapula. Its role in thoracic outlet syndrome has been seldom demonstrated in living patients nor described in imaging, although it is theoretically easily recognizable on modern imaging modalities. It should be taken into account during workout of patients with thoracic outlet syndrome, since it can be potentially treated.

  11. Sticky platelet syndrome: an important cause of life-threatening thrombotic complications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubisz, Peter; Stanciakova, Lucia; Stasko, Jan; Dobrotova, Miroslava; Skerenova, Maria; Ivankova, Jela; Holly, Pavol

    2016-01-01

    Sticky platelet syndrome (SPS) is a prothrombotic thrombocytopathy with familial occurrence, characterized by hyperaggregability of platelets in response to adenosine diphosphate (ADP), epinephrine (EPI) or both. The syndrome has been identified in approximately 21% of unexplained arterial thrombotic episodes, regarded to be the most common thrombophilia in arterial thrombosis and 13.2% of unexplained venous thromboembolism (VTE). The relatively young age at the first manifestation, relation to fertility and pregnancy, seriousness of the symptoms, easy and effective management of the disorder indicate to the necessity to take it into account in the differential diagnosis of the underlying cause of the thrombotic event. As the various localizations of the thrombosis in SPS have been reported, its management often requires a multidisciplinary approach. This review deals with the clinical aspects of thrombophilia, its etiopathogenesis, diagnosis as well as novel advances in the treatment and outlines the challenges for the further research.

  12. A common cause of sudden and thunderclap headaches: reversible cerebral vasoconstriction syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Yu-Chen; Kuo, Kuei-Hong; Lai, Tzu-Hsien

    2014-03-01

    Thunderclap headache (TCH) is a sudden headache (SH) with accepted criteria of severe intensity and onset to peak within one minute. It is a well-known presentation for subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) but most patients with TCH or SH run a benign course without identifiable causes. Reversible cerebral vasoconstriction syndrome (RCVS), a recently recognized syndrome characterized by recurrent TCH attacks, has been proposed to account for most of these patients. We recruited consecutive patients presenting with SH at our headache clinic. Computed tomography and/or magnetic resonance imaging with angiography were performed to exclude structural causes and to identify vasoconstriction. Catheter angiography and lumbar puncture were performed with patients consent. Reversibility of vasoconstriction was confirmed by follow-up study. From July 2010 to June 2013, 31 patients with SH were recruited. Twenty-four (72.7%) of these SH patients exhibited headache fulfilling the TCH criteria. The diagnosis of RCVS was confirmed in 14 (45.2%) of patients with SH and 11 (45.8%) of patients with TCH. Other diagnoses were as follows: primary headaches (SH: 41.9%, TCH: 45.8%) and other secondary causes (SH: 12.9%, TCH: 8.3%). Compared with non-RCVS patients, patients with RCVS were older (50.8 ± 9.3 years vs. 40.8 ± 10.0 years, P = 0.006) and less likely to experience short headache duration of syndrome is a common cause of SH and TCH. Considering the potential mortality and morbidity of RCVS, systemic examination of cerebral vessels should be performed in these patients.

  13. Glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI) anchor deficiency caused by mutations in PIGW is associated with West syndrome and hyperphosphatasia with mental retardation syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiyonobu, Tomohiro; Inoue, Norimitsu; Morimoto, Masafumi; Kinoshita, Taroh; Murakami, Yoshiko

    2014-03-01

    Glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI) is a glycolipid that anchors 150 or more kinds of proteins to the human cell surface. There are at least 26 genes involved in the biosynthesis and remodelling of GPI anchored proteins (GPI-APs). Recently, inherited GPI deficiencies (IGDs) were reported which cause intellectual disability often accompanied by epilepsy, coarse facial features and multiple anomalies that vary in severity depending upon the degree of defect and/or step in the pathway of affected gene. A patient born to non-consanguineous parents developed intractable seizures with typical hypsarrhythmic pattern in electroencephalography, and was diagnosed as having West syndrome. Because the patient showed severe developmental delay with dysmorphic facial features and hyperphosphatasia, characteristics often seen in IGDs, the patient was tested for GPI deficiency. The patient had decreased surface expression of GPI-APs on blood granulocytes and was identified to be compound heterozygous for NM_178517:c.211A>C and c.499A>G mutations in PIGW by targeted sequencing. Here we describe the first patient with deficiency of PIGW, which is involved in the addition of the acyl-chain to inositol in an early step of GPI biosynthesis. Therefore, IGD should be considered in West syndrome and flow cytometric analysis of blood cells is effective in screening IGD.

  14. Mutation in filamin A causes periventricular heterotopia, developmental regression, and West syndrome in males.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masruha, Marcelo R; Caboclo, Luis O S F; Carrete, Henrique; Cendes, Iscia L; Rodrigues, Murilo G; Garzon, Eliana; Yacubian, Elza M T; Sakamoto, Américo C; Sheen, Volney; Harney, Megan; Neal, Jason; Hill, R Sean; Bodell, Adria; Walsh, Christopher; Vilanova, Luiz C P

    2006-01-01

    Familial periventricular heterotopia (PH) represents a disorder of neuronal migration resulting in multiple gray-matter nodules along the lateral ventricular walls. Prior studies have shown that mutations in the filamin A (FLNA) gene can cause PH through an X-linked dominant pattern. Heterozygotic female patients usually remain asymptomatic until the second or third decade of life, when they may have predominantly focal seizures, whereas hemizygotic male fetuses typically die in utero. Recent studies have also reported mutations in FLNA in male patients with PH who are cognitively normal. We describe PH in three male siblings with PH due to FLNA, severe developmental regression, and West syndrome. The study includes the three affected brothers and their parents. Video-EEG recordings and magnetic resonance image (MRI) scanning were performed on all individuals. Mutations for FLNA were detected by using polymerase chain reaction (PCR) on genomic DNA followed by single-stranded conformational polymorphism (SSCP) analysis or sequencing. Two of the siblings are monozygotic twins, and all had West syndrome with hypsarrhythmia on EEG. MRI of the brain revealed periventricular nodules of cerebral gray-matter intensity, typical for PH. Mutational analyses demonstrated a cytosine-to-thymidine missense mutation (c. C1286T), resulting in a threonine-to-methionine amino acid substitution in exon 9 of the FLNA gene. The association between PH and West syndrome, to our knowledge, has not been previously reported. Males with PH have been known to harbor FLNA mutations, although uniformly, they either show early lethality or survive and have a normal intellect. The current studies show that FLNA mutations can cause periventricular heterotopia, developmental regression, and West syndrome in male patients, suggesting that this type of FLNA mutation may contribute to severe neurologic deficits.

  15. Intracranial hemorrhage due to intracranial hypertension caused by the superior vena cava syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bartek, Jiri; Abedi-Valugerdi, Golbarg; Liska, Jan

    2013-01-01

    We report a patient with intracranial hemorrhage secondary to venous hypertension as a result of a giant aortic pseudoaneurysm that compressed the superior vena cava and caused obstruction of the venous return from the brain. To our knowledge, this is the first patient reported to have an intracr......We report a patient with intracranial hemorrhage secondary to venous hypertension as a result of a giant aortic pseudoaneurysm that compressed the superior vena cava and caused obstruction of the venous return from the brain. To our knowledge, this is the first patient reported to have...... an intracranial hemorrhage secondary to a superior vena cava syndrome. The condition appears to be caused by a reversible transient rise in intracranial pressure, as a result of compression of the venous return from the brain. Treatment consisted of surgery for the aortic pseudoaneurysm, which led...... to normalization of the intracranial pressure and resorption of the intracranial hemorrhage....

  16. [Spontaneous coronary artery dissection: An exceptional cause of acute coronary syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, H; Ekou, A; N'Djessan, J J; Zoumenou, A; Angoran, I; N'Guetta, R

    2018-02-01

    Spontaneous coronary artery dissection (SCAD) is an uncommon cause of acute coronary syndrome (ACS) or sudden death, which typically affects young women. We reported two cases of black Africans patients, aged 56 and 52 years old, who presented to Abidjan Heart Institute for ACS. Coronary angiography showed spontaneous dissection of the right coronary artery in the first case, and dissection of the distal left anterior descending artery in the second. A conservative approach was preferred. Both patients received antiplatelet agents, beta-blockers, angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors and statins, with a favorable in-hospital course. These cases highlight SCAD as a possible cause of ACS. Implementation of interventional cardiology in Sub-Saharan Africa will help identify this uncommon cause of ACS. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  17. Stickler syndrome caused by COL2A1 mutations: genotype-phenotype correlation in a series of 100 patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hoornaert, Kristien P; Vereecke, Inge; Dewinter, Chantal

    2010-01-01

    Stickler syndrome is an autosomal dominant connective tissue disorder caused by mutations in different collagen genes. The aim of our study was to define more precisely the phenotype and genotype of Stickler syndrome type 1 by investigating a large series of patients with a heterozygous mutation...... in COL2A1. In 188 probands with the clinical diagnosis of Stickler syndrome, the COL2A1 gene was analyzed by either a mutation scanning technique or bidirectional fluorescent DNA sequencing. The effect of splice site alterations was investigated by analyzing mRNA. Multiplex ligation...... with Stickler syndrome....

  18. Subacute peripheral and optic neuropathy syndrome with no evidence of a toxic or nutritional cause.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, D; Riordan-Eva, P; Paterson, R W; Hadden, R D M

    2013-08-01

    The syndrome of subacute simultaneous peripheral neuropathy and bilateral optic neuropathy is known to occur in tropical countries, probably due to malnutrition or toxicity, but not often seen in developed countries. We report seven patients in London who were not malnourished or alcoholic, and in whom no clear cause was found. We retrospectively reviewed the case notes and arranged some further investigations. All patients developed peripheral and bilateral optic neuropathy within 6 months. Patients were aged 30-52, and all of Jamaican birth and race but lived in the UK. Most had subacute, painful ataxic sensory axonal neuropathy or neuronopathy, some with myelopathy. Nerve conduction studies revealed minor demyelinating features in two cases. The optic neuropathy was symmetrical, subacute and monophasic, usually with marked reduction in visual acuity. CSF protein concentration was usually elevated but other laboratory investigations were normal. Patients showed only modest improvement at follow-up. These patients share a common clinical and electrophysiological phenotype, age, ethnicity and elevated CSF protein, but otherwise normal laboratory investigations. The syndrome is a cause of significant morbidity in young people. The cause remains uncertain despite thorough investigation. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Surfactant for acute respiratory distress syndrome caused by near drowning in a newborn.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fettah, Nurdan; Dilli, Dilek; Beken, Serdar; Zenciroglu, Aysegul; Okumuş, Nurullah

    2014-03-01

    Near drowning is the term for survival after suffocation caused by submersion in water or another fluid. Pulmonary insufficiency may develop insidiously or suddenly because of near drowning. We want to present a newborn case of acute respiratory distress syndrome caused by near drowning. A 26-day-old boy was brought to the emergency department because of severe respiratory distress. Two hours before admission, the baby suddenly slipped out his mother's hands and fell in the bathtub full of water while bathing. After initial resuscitation, he was transferred to the neonatal intensive care unit for mechanical ventilation. PaO2/FIO2 ratio was 97, with SaO2 of 84%. Bilateral heterogeneous densities were seen on his chest x-ray film. The baby was considered to have acute respiratory distress syndrome. Antibiotics were given to prevent infection. Because conventional therapy failed to improve oxygenation, a single dose of surfactant was tested via an intubation cannula. Four hours later, poractant alfa (Curosurf) administered repeatedly at the same dosage because of hypoxemia (PaO2/FIO2 ratio, 124; SaO2, 88%). Oxygen saturation was increased to more than 90% in 24 hours, which was maintained for 3 days when we were able to wean him from mechanical ventilation. After 7 days, the x-ray film showed considerable clearing of shadows. He was discharged home on the 15th day after full recovery. This case report describes a rapid and persistent improvement after 2 doses of surfactant in acute respiratory distress syndrome with severe oxygenation failure caused by near drowning in a newborn.

  20. Fanconi syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Toni-Fanconi syndrome ... Fanconi syndrome can be caused by faulty genes, or it may result later in life due to kidney damage. Sometimes the cause of Fanconi syndrome is unknown. Common causes of Fanconi syndrome in ...

  1. Diagnosis and management of intersection syndrome as a cause of overuse wrist pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatterjee, Robin; Vyas, Jay

    2016-09-28

    Wrist pain due to repetitive motion or overuse is a common presentation in primary care. This case reports the rare condition of intersection syndrome as the cause of the wrist pain in an amateur tennis player. This is a non-infectious, inflammatory process that occurs where tendons in the first extensor compartment intersect the tendons in the second extensor compartment. Suitable history and examination provided the diagnosis, which was confirmed by MRI. Management consisted of early involvement of the multidisciplinary team, patient education, workplace and sporting adaptations, rest, analgesia, reduction of load, protection and immobilisation of the affected joint followed by a period of rehabilitation. 2016 BMJ Publishing Group Ltd.

  2. Hypothenar hammer syndrome: caused by a muscle anomaly? A case report with review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estermann, Lea; Ducommun, Pascal; Steurer-Dober, Isabelle; Hug, Urs

    2018-05-01

    The hypothenar hammer syndrome (HHS) is a rare entity of secondary Raynaud's phenomenon. The blunt hypothenar trauma causes a lesion of the vessel wall with a consecutive thrombosis or aneurysm of the ulnar artery at the Guyon's canal. Different risk factors are discussed such as nicotine abuse, or a muscle anomaly in the Guyon's canal. To date, there are five case reports published about muscle anomalies and HHS. We present a case of a 51-year-old shipbuilder with a unilateral HHS on his right dominant hand with a bilateral muscle anomaly. We successfully treated the patient by resection of the aneurysm without a resection of the atypical muscle.

  3. A novel nonsense mutation in the WFS1 gene causes the Wolfram syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noorian, Shahab; Savad, Shahram; Mohammadi, Davood Shah

    2016-05-01

    Wolfram syndrome is a rare autosomal recessive neurodegenerative disorder, which is mostly caused by mutations in the WFS1 gene. The WFS1 gene product, which is called wolframin, is thought to regulate the function of endoplasmic reticulum. The endoplasmic reticulum has a critical role in protein folding and material transportation within the cell or to the surface of the cell. Identification of new mutations in WFS1 gene will unravel the molecular pathology of WS. The aim of this case report study is to describe a novel mutation in exon 4 of the WFS1 gene (c.330C>A) in a 9-year-old boy with WS.

  4. Hepatitis E as a cause of acute jaundice syndrome in northern Uganda, 2010-2012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerbi, Gemechu B; Williams, Roxanne; Bakamutumaho, Barnabas; Liu, Stephen; Downing, Robert; Drobeniuc, Jan; Kamili, Saleem; Xu, Fujie; Holmberg, Scott D; Teshale, Eyasu H

    2015-02-01

    Hepatitis E virus (HEV) is a common cause of acute viral hepatitis in developing countries; however, its contribution to acute jaundice syndrome is not well-described. A large outbreak of hepatitis E occurred in northern Uganda from 2007 to 2009. In response to this outbreak, acute jaundice syndrome surveillance was established in 10 district healthcare facilities to determine the proportion of cases attributable to hepatitis E. Of 347 acute jaundice syndrome cases reported, the majority (42%) had hepatitis E followed by hepatitis B (14%), malaria (10%), hepatitis C (5%), and other/unknown (29%). Of hepatitis E cases, 72% occurred in Kaboong district, and 68% of these cases occurred between May and August of 2011. Residence in Kaabong district was independently associated with hepatitis E (adjusted odds ratio = 13; 95% confidence interval = 7-24). The findings from this surveillance show that an outbreak and sporadic transmission of hepatitis E occur in northern Uganda. © The American Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene.

  5. Disorder in the serotonergic system due to tryptophan hydroxylation impairment: a cause of hypothalamic syndrome?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schott, D A; Nicolai, J; de Vries, J E; Keularts, I M L W; Rubio-Gozalbo, M E; Gerver, W J M

    2010-01-01

    The hypothalamus regulates basic homeostasis such as appetite, circadian rhythm, autonomic and pituitary functions. Dysregulation in these functions results in the hypothalamic syndrome, a rare disorder of various origins. Since serotonin (5-HT) modulates most of the above-mentioned homeostasis, a defect in the serotonergic system can possibly participate in this syndrome. We describe a girl suffering from hypothalamic syndrome with a decreased concentration of 5-hydroxytryptophan (5-HTP) and a normal level of tryptophan in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) suggesting a functional defect in tryptophan hydroxylase (TPH). TPH is a rate-limiting enzyme in the synthesis of the neurotransmitter 5-HT. Therapeutic intervention with 5-HTP, carbidopa and a specific serotonin reuptake inhibitor significantly improved her clinical symptoms and caused biochemical normalisation of neurotransmitters. The girl described had the typical symptoms of a hypothalamic disorder and a defective serotonergic metabolism, a relationship which has not been reported before. Therapeutic interventions to restore 5-HT metabolism resulted in clinical improvement. We suggest that investigation of 5-HT metabolism in CSF of patients with this rare disorder is included in the aetiological work-up.

  6. Novel partial duplication of EYA1 causes branchiootic syndrome in a large Brazilian family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dantas, Vitor G L; Freitas, Erika L; Della-Rosa, Valter A; Lezirovitz, Karina; de Moraes, Ana Maria S M; Ramos, Silvia B; Oiticica, Jeanne; Alves, Leandro U; Pearson, Peter L; Rosenberg, Carla; Mingroni-Netto, Regina C

    2015-01-01

    To identify novel genetic causes of syndromic hearing loss in Brazil. To map a candidate chromosomal region through linkage studies in an extensive Brazilian family and identify novel pathogenic variants using sequencing and array-CGH. Brazilian pedigree with individuals affected by BO syndrome characterized by deafness and malformations of outer, middle and inner ear, auricular and cervical fistulae, but no renal abnormalities. Whole genome microarray-SNP scanning on samples of 11 affected individuals detected a multipoint Lod score of 2.6 in the EYA1 gene region (chromosome 8). Sequencing of EYA1 in affected patients did not reveal pathogenic mutations. However, oligonucleotide-array-CGH detected a duplication of 71.8Kb involving exons 4 to 10 of EYA1 (heterozygous state). Real-time-PCR confirmed the duplication in fourteen of fifteen affected individuals and absence in 13 unaffected individuals. The exception involved a consanguineous parentage and was assumed to involve a different genetic mechanism. Our findings implicate this EYA1 partial duplication segregating with BO phenotype in a Brazilian pedigree and is the first description of a large duplication leading to the BOR/BO syndrome.

  7. Rules for distinguishing toxicants that cause type I and type II narcosis syndromes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veith, G D; Broderius, S J

    1990-01-01

    Narcosis is a nonspecific reversible state of arrested activity of protoplasmic structures caused by a wide variety of organic chemicals. The vast majority of industrial organic chemicals can be characterized by a baseline structure-toxicity relationship as developed for diverse aquatic organisms, using only the n-octanol/water partition coefficient as a descriptor. There are, however, many apparent narcotic chemicals that are more toxic than baseline narcosis predicts. Some of these chemicals have been distinguished as polar narcotics. Joint toxic theory and isobole diagrams were used to show that chemicals strictly additive with phenol were generally more toxic than predicted by narcosis I models and characterized by a different mode of action called narcosis II syndrome. This type of toxicity is exemplified by certain amides, amines, phenols, and nitrogen heterocycles. Evidence is provided that suggests that narcosis II syndrome may result from the presence of a strong hydrogen bonding group on the molecule, and narcosis I syndrome results from hydrophobic bonding of the chemical to enzymes and/or membranes. This shift in toxic action is apparently indistinguishable for narcotic chemicals with log P greater than about 2.7. General rules for selecting the appropriate models are proposed. PMID:2269227

  8. Audiometric characteristics of a dutch family with a new mutation in GATA3 causing HDR syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Beelen, E; Leijendeckers, J M; Admiraal, R J C; Huygen, P L M; Hoefsloot, L H; Pennings, R J E; Snik, A F M; Kunst, H P M

    2014-01-01

    We present the case of a Dutch family with a new mutation (c523_528dup) in GATA3 causing HDR syndrome. HDR syndrome is characterised by hypoparathyroidism, deafness and renal defects. In this study, we describe the audiometric characteristics of 5 patients from this family. Their hearing impairment was congenital, bilateral and symmetric. Audiograms showed mild-to-moderate hearing impairment with a flat audiogram configuration. Higher frequencies tended to be affected more strongly. Cross-sectional analyses showed no progression, and a mean audiogram was established. Psychophysical measurements in 3 HDR patients - including speech reception in noise, loudness scaling, gap detection and difference limen for frequency - were obtained to assess hearing function in greater detail. Overall, the results of the psychophysical measurements indicated characteristics of outer hair cell loss. CT scanning showed no anomalies in 3 of the HDR patients. Although 2 patients displayed vestibular symptoms, no anomalies in the vestibular system were found by vestibulo-ocular examination. Our results are in agreement with the theory that outer hair cell malfunctioning can play a major role in HDR syndrome.

  9. Stevens-Johnson syndrome caused by a health drink (Eberu) containing ophiopogonis tuber.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mochitomi, Y; Inoue, A; Kawabata, H; Ishida, S; Kanzaki, T

    1998-10-01

    Stevens-Johnson syndrome is considered to be a severe type of erythema exsudativum multiforme. It is characterized by erythema with bullous and eroded lesions of skin and mucous membranes. We report a case of Steven-Johnson syndrome following consumption of a health drink containing ophiopogonis tuber. A 66-year-old female took an O.T.C. health drink for fever. The next morning, she noted erythema and swelling of her face, neck, and chest. She started to develop bullous and eroded lesions on the skin of her entire body and the mucous membranes of her oral cavity, conjunctiva, and cornea, and she became feverish. She had high degrees of corneal erosion and liver dysfunction. Skin biopsy showed diffuse necrosis of the epidermis. After admission to the hospital, steroid pulse therapy (1000 mg/day of methylprednisolone sodium succinate) was continued for 5 days. The health drink induced a positive drug lymphocyte stimulation test (DLST) and patch test. A challenge test was done with a one hundredth dose, and it was positive. We did patch tests with all components of the drink and found that Mai-Meu-Dong-Tang (ophiopogonis) alone was positive at 72 hours. There is no previous report of Stevens-Johnson syndrome caused by a health drink or Mai-Meu-Dong-Tang. Even though it is a health drink, we should be aware of the possibility of a severe reaction.

  10. The first Korean patient with Potocki-Shaffer syndrome: a rare cause of multiple exostoses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sohn, Young Bae; Yim, Shin-Young; Cho, Eun-Hae; Kim, Ok-Hwa

    2015-02-01

    Potocki-Shaffer syndrome (PSS, OMIM #601224) is a rare contiguous gene deletion syndrome caused by haploinsufficiency of genes located on the 11p11.2p12. Affected individuals have a number of characteristic features including multiple exostoses, biparietal foramina, abnormalities of genitourinary system, hypotonia, developmental delay, and intellectual disability. We report here on the first Korean case of an 8-yr-old boy with PSS diagnosed by high resolution microarray. Initial evaluation was done at age 6 months because of a history of developmental delay, hypotonia, and dysmorphic face. Coronal craniosynostosis and enlarged parietal foramina were found on skull radiographs. At age 6 yr, he had severe global developmental delay. Multiple exostoses of long bones were detected during a radiological check-up. Based on the clinical and radiological features, PSS was highly suspected. Subsequently, chromosomal microarray analysis identified an 8.6 Mb deletion at 11p11.2 [arr 11p12p11.2 (Chr11:39,204,770-47,791,278)×1]. The patient continued rehabilitation therapy for profound developmental delay. The progression of multiple exostosis has being monitored. This case confirms and extends data on the genetic basis of PSS. In clinical and radiologic aspect, a patient with multiple exostoses accompanying with syndromic features, including craniofacial abnormalities and mental retardation, the diagnosis of PSS should be considered.

  11. Abdominal cocoon syndrome is a rare cause of mechanical intestinal obstructions: a report of two cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solmaz, Ali; Tokoçin, Merve; Arıcı, Sinan; Yiğitbaş, Hakan; Yavuz, Erkan; Gülçiçek, Osman Bilgin; Erçetin, Candaş; Çelebi, Fatih

    2015-02-11

    Abdominal cocoon syndrome is also known in the literature as sclerosing peritonitis or sclerosing encapsulating peritonitis. It is characterized by total or partial encapsulation of abdominal viscera by a fibrous membrane. It has been reported mainly in adolescent women and the majority of the cases are of unknown etiology. Preoperative diagnosis is difficult and is usually established during laparotomy. We present 2 cases of acute mechanical intestinal obstruction caused by sclerosing encapsulating peritonitis. Two male patients, ages 30 and 47, were admitted to our emergency department for mechanical intestinal obstruction. They were treated surgically and were diagnosed with abdominal cocoon syndrome. If abdominal cocoon syndrome is diagnosed pre-operatively and acute abdomen symptoms are not observed, surgery is unnecessary. If surgery is inevitable, membrane resection and bridotomy must be performed, as in our 2 cases. If resection is going to be performed, primary anastomosis is not recommended. Iatrogenic injuries that happened during the operation should not be immediately repaired, because creation of the stoma from the proximal part of the injury is recommended.

  12. A de novo missense mutation of FGFR2 causes facial dysplasia syndrome in Holstein cattle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agerholm, Jørgen S; McEvoy, Fintan J; Heegaard, Steffen; Charlier, Carole; Jagannathan, Vidhya; Drögemüller, Cord

    2017-08-02

    Surveillance for bovine genetic diseases in Denmark identified a hitherto unreported congenital syndrome occurring among progeny of a Holstein sire used for artificial breeding. A genetic aetiology due to a dominant inheritance with incomplete penetrance or a mosaic germline mutation was suspected as all recorded cases were progeny of the same sire. Detailed investigations were performed to characterize the syndrome and to reveal its cause. Seven malformed calves were submitted examination. All cases shared a common morphology with the most striking lesions being severe facial dysplasia and complete prolapse of the eyes. Consequently the syndrome was named facial dysplasia syndrome (FDS). Furthermore, extensive brain malformations, including microencephaly, hydrocephalus, lobation of the cerebral hemispheres and compression of the brain were present. Subsequent data analysis of progeny of the sire revealed that around 0.5% of his offspring suffered from FDS. High density single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) genotyping data of the seven cases and their parents were used to map the defect in the bovine genome. Significant genetic linkage was obtained for three regions, including chromosome 26 where whole genome sequencing of a case-parent trio revealed two de novo variants perfectly associated with the disease: an intronic SNP in the DMBT1 gene and a single non-synonymous variant in the FGFR2 gene. This FGFR2 missense variant (c.927G>T) affects a gene encoding a member of the fibroblast growth factor receptor family, where amino acid sequence is highly conserved between members and across species. It is predicted to change an evolutionary conserved tryptophan into a cysteine residue (p.Trp309Cys). Both variant alleles were proven to result from de novo mutation events in the germline of the sire. FDS is a novel genetic disorder of Holstein cattle. Mutations in the human FGFR2 gene are associated with various dominant inherited craniofacial dysostosis syndromes. Given

  13. [Early diagnosis and treatment of compartment syndrome caused by landslides:a report of 20 cases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Hong-Bo; Peng, Zi-Lai; Liu, Xu-Bang; Chen, Lian

    2012-01-01

    To summarize early diagnosis and treatment methods of 20 patients with compartment syndrome caused by landslides during coal mine accidents in order to improve the level of diagnosis and treatment of compartment syndrome and reduce disability. From September 2006 to April 2010,20 patients with compartment syndrome were treated with the methods of early decompression, systemic support. All the patients were male with an average age of 42 years (ranged, 23 to 54). All the patients with high tension limb swelling, pain, referred pain passive positive; 5 extremities feeling diminish or disappear and the distal blood vessel beat were normal or weakened or disappeared; myoglobinuria, hyperkalemia, serum urea nitrogen and creatinine increased in 5 cases and oliguria in occurred 1 case. The function of affected limbs was observed according to disability ratings. Three cases complicated with infection of affected limb and 6 cases occurred with renal function insufficiency. Total recovery was in 16 cases, basically recovery in 3, amputation in 1 case. All patients were followed up for 6-15 months with an average of 12 months. The ability to work according to national standard identification--Employee work-related injuries and occupational disability rating classification (GB/T16180-2006) to assess, grade 5 was in 1 case, grade 8 in 2 cases, grade 10 in 1 case, no grade in 16 cases. Arteriopalmus of dorsalis pedis weaken and vanished can not be regard as an evidence in early diagnosis of compartment syndrome. Early diagnosis and decompression, systemic support and treatment is the key in reducing disability.

  14. Clinical study of lateral patellofemoral crush syndrome caused by military training

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    De-hui ZHANG

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Objective  To explore diagnostic method and surgical outcome of lateral patellofemoral crush syndrome caused by military training. Methods  Fifteen patients with lateral patellofemoral crush syndrome caused by military training from May 2006 to May 2008 were enrolled in this study, including 12 men (14 knees and 3 women (3 knees, aged from 22 to 43 years old with an average of 27.3 years. Randomly selected 18 healthy volunteers with similar age and gender but no knee pain symptom were selected to serve as a control group. Anteroposterior and lateral X-ray photographs of knee joint and axial photographs of the patella were taken in both groups for observing the bone architecture of the knee joint and measuring the femoral trochlear angle, patellofemoral congruence angle and patellofemoral index, and the data were compared. The 17 knee joints in patient group were treated with lateral patellar retinaculum release. Then the preoperative and postoperative pain severity was evaluated with visual analogue scale (VAS. Results  Patellofemoral congruence angle was 7.67°± 5.81° and patellofemoral index was 2.49±1.40 in patient group, while they were -2.2°±-2.71° and 1.25±0.15 in control group. The difference between two groups showed statistical significance (P < 0.05. The change in bone architecture was obvious in patient group. The preoperative pain score was 7.06±0.85, and postoperative pain score was 3.87±0.24 after 6 months and 3.01+0.17 after 1 year in patient group. The difference between preoperative pain score and postoperative pain score showed statistical significance (P < 0.05. Conclusions  Diagnosis of patellofemoral crush syndrome caused by military training requires a combination of case history, typical symptoms, objective sign and X-ray examination. Among these, X-ray examination is the fundamental auxiliary diagnostic tool for lateral patellofemoral crush syndrome, and the patellofemoral index is convenient for

  15. Selenium-75-cholesterol imaging and computed tomography of the adrenal glands in differentiating the cause of Cushing's syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, J.L.; Smith, J.A.; Mervis, B.; Roman, T.

    1983-01-01

    Measurement of 75 Se-cholesterol (Scintadren) uptake and computed tomography (CT) of the adrenal glands were compared as a means of differentiating the cause of Cushing's syndrome in 11 patients over a 2-year period. Quantitative Scintadren imaging differentiated adrenocorticotrophic hormone (ACTH)-dependent disease from local adrenocortical lesions as the cause of Cushing's syndrome in all the patients studied. CT of the adrenal glands rapidly and accurately detected the adrenal mass lesions in 2 cases and was effective in documenting bilateral hyperplasia due to ectopic ACTH-dependent disease. However, in entopic ACTH (pituitary)-dependent disease the adrenal glands were of normal thickness in all but 2 patients, who had bilateral hyperplasia. Scintadren imaging and CT are useful non-invasive procedures for differentiating local adrenal disease from ACTH-dependent disease as the cause of Cushing's syndrome and should be the initial investigations once a firm clinical and biochemical diagnosis of Cushing's syndrome has been made

  16. Inhaled fluticasone causes iatrogenic cushing's syndrome in patients treated with Ritonavir.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahlab-Guri, Keren; Asher, Ilan; Gradstein, Serge; Zung, Amnon; Radian-Sade, Sara; Elbirt, Daniel; Sthoeger, Zev

    2011-10-01

    Ritonavir, a protease inhibitor (PI), is commonly used in the treatment of HIV-1 infection. It is a potent inhibitor of the hepatic cytochrome P450 superfamily. Therefore, its usage with other PI medications leads to significant increases in the levels of the latter PI, which allows a reduction in pill burden. Intranasal and inhaled corticosteroids are widely used for the treatment of allergic rhinitis and asthma. Inhaled steroids do not usually lead to systemic adverse events, since their plasma concentrations are quite low due to extensive first-pass metabolism and clearance by CYP3A4. However, the coadministration of Ritonavir with inhaled (or intranasal) corticosteroids may result in an increase in the plasma corticosteroid levels due to the potent CYP3A4 inhibition by Ritonavir. This may cause Cushing's syndrome (laboratory and clinical) with adrenal suppression. Plasma cortisol and urinary-free cortisol levels were determined using immunoassays. In the Synacthen test, plasma cortisol levels were measured at time 0 as well as at times 60, 120, and 150 minutes following an intramuscular injection of 0.25 mg Synacthen. We present here three HIV-1 female patients aged 12, 55 and 65 years who developed iatrogenic Cushing's syndrome with adrenal suppression following the coadministration of Ritonavir and inhaled Fluticasone, both at the standard recommended doses. The coadministration of Ritonavir and Fluticasone at the recommended doses caused, in our three patients, iatrogenic Cushing's syndrome with adrenal suppression. We suggest that this adverse event is underdiagnosed and high clinical suspicion is needed for early diagnosis and prenention of Addisonian crises. Thus, Fluticasone treatment should be avoided in patients who are treated with Ritonavir. Alternative therapeutic options for asthma control such as oral Montelukast or bronchodilators alone should be considered.

  17. Mutations in STX1B, encoding a presynaptic protein, cause fever-associated epilepsy syndromes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schubert, J.; Siekierska, A.; Langlois, M.

    2014-01-01

    Febrile seizures affect 2-4% of all children(1) and have a strong genetic component(2). Recurrent mutations in three main genes (SCN1A, SCN1B and GABRG2)(3-5) have been identified that cause febrile seizures with or without epilepsy. Here we report the identification of mutations in STX1B, encoding...... syntaxin-1B(6), that are associated with both febrile seizures and epilepsy. Whole-exome sequencing in independent large pedigrees(7,8) identified cosegregating STX1B mutations predicted to cause an early truncation or an in-frame insertion or deletion. Three additional nonsense or missense mutations....... Wild-type human syntaxin-1B but not a mutated protein rescued the effects of stx1b knockdown in zebrafish. Our results thus implicate STX1B and the presynaptic release machinery in fever-associated epilepsy syndromes....

  18. Ritonavir and epidural triamcinolone as a cause of iatrogenic Cushing's syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albert, Nicole E; Kazi, Saifullah; Santoro, Jerome; Dougherty, Rebecca

    2012-07-01

    Ritonavir is a protease inhibitor (PI) frequently prescribed with highly active antiretroviral therapy. It functions to boost the effectiveness of other PIs as a result of blocking their breakdown by the cytochrome P450 (3A4) pathway. Through this same mechanism, ritonavir has been shown to cause iatrogenic Cushing's syndrome (ICS) in patients using inhaled fluticasone. In addition, a small number of recent cases suggest that ritonavir may also cause this disorder by prolonging the duration of injected corticosteroids, such as triamcinolone. This case report presents a human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) patient taking ritonavir with ICS and secondary adrenal insufficiency, presumably due to systemic absorption and decreased metabolism of an epidural triamcinolone injection. To the authors knowledge, there have only been 4 previously reported cases describing ritonavir-potentiating ICS after receiving a corticosteroid epidural. This provides further proof that caution should be taken with nonparenteral use of triamcinolone in HIV patients on PIs.

  19. Disrupted auto-regulation of the spliceosomal gene SNRPB causes cerebro–costo–mandibular syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynch, Danielle C.; Revil, Timothée; Schwartzentruber, Jeremy; Bhoj, Elizabeth J.; Innes, A. Micheil; Lamont, Ryan E.; Lemire, Edmond G.; Chodirker, Bernard N.; Taylor, Juliet P.; Zackai, Elaine H.; McLeod, D. Ross; Kirk, Edwin P.; Hoover-Fong, Julie; Fleming, Leah; Savarirayan, Ravi; Boycott, Kym; MacKenzie, Alex; Brudno, Michael; Bulman, Dennis; Dyment, David; Majewski, Jacek; Jerome-Majewska, Loydie A.; Parboosingh, Jillian S.; Bernier, Francois P.

    2014-01-01

    Elucidating the function of highly conserved regulatory sequences is a significant challenge in genomics today. Certain intragenic highly conserved elements have been associated with regulating levels of core components of the spliceosome and alternative splicing of downstream genes. Here we identify mutations in one such element, a regulatory alternative exon of SNRPB as the cause of cerebro–costo–mandibular syndrome. This exon contains a premature termination codon that triggers nonsense-mediated mRNA decay when included in the transcript. These mutations cause increased inclusion of the alternative exon and decreased overall expression of SNRPB. We provide evidence for the functional importance of this conserved intragenic element in the regulation of alternative splicing and development, and suggest that the evolution of such a regulatory mechanism has contributed to the complexity of mammalian development. PMID:25047197

  20. Disrupted auto-regulation of the spliceosomal gene SNRPB causes cerebro-costo-mandibular syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynch, Danielle C; Revil, Timothée; Schwartzentruber, Jeremy; Bhoj, Elizabeth J; Innes, A Micheil; Lamont, Ryan E; Lemire, Edmond G; Chodirker, Bernard N; Taylor, Juliet P; Zackai, Elaine H; McLeod, D Ross; Kirk, Edwin P; Hoover-Fong, Julie; Fleming, Leah; Savarirayan, Ravi; Majewski, Jacek; Jerome-Majewska, Loydie A; Parboosingh, Jillian S; Bernier, Francois P

    2014-07-22

    Elucidating the function of highly conserved regulatory sequences is a significant challenge in genomics today. Certain intragenic highly conserved elements have been associated with regulating levels of core components of the spliceosome and alternative splicing of downstream genes. Here we identify mutations in one such element, a regulatory alternative exon of SNRPB as the cause of cerebro-costo-mandibular syndrome. This exon contains a premature termination codon that triggers nonsense-mediated mRNA decay when included in the transcript. These mutations cause increased inclusion of the alternative exon and decreased overall expression of SNRPB. We provide evidence for the functional importance of this conserved intragenic element in the regulation of alternative splicing and development, and suggest that the evolution of such a regulatory mechanism has contributed to the complexity of mammalian development.

  1. Clinical, genetic and imaging findings identify new causes for corpus callosum development syndromes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Timothy J.; Sherr, Elliott H.; Barkovich, A. James

    2014-01-01

    The corpus callosum is the largest fibre tract in the brain, connecting the two cerebral hemispheres, and thereby facilitating the integration of motor and sensory information from the two sides of the body as well as influencing higher cognition associated with executive function, social interaction and language. Agenesis of the corpus callosum is a common brain malformation that can occur either in isolation or in association with congenital syndromes. Understanding the causes of this condition will help improve our knowledge of the critical brain developmental mechanisms required for wiring the brain and provide potential avenues for therapies for callosal agenesis or related neurodevelopmental disorders. Improved genetic studies combined with mouse models and neuroimaging have rapidly expanded the diverse collection of copy number variations and single gene mutations associated with callosal agenesis. At the same time, advances in our understanding of the developmental mechanisms involved in corpus callosum formation have provided insights into the possible causes of these disorders. This review provides the first comprehensive classification of the clinical and genetic features of syndromes associated with callosal agenesis, and provides a genetic and developmental framework for the interpretation of future research that will guide the next advances in the field. PMID:24477430

  2. Mutations in plasmalemma vesicle-associated protein cause severe syndromic protein-losing enteropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broekaert, Ilse Julia; Becker, Kerstin; Gottschalk, Ingo; Körber, Friederike; Dötsch, Jörg; Thiele, Holger; Altmüller, Janine; Nürnberg, Peter; Hünseler, Christoph; Cirak, Sebahattin

    2018-04-16

    Protein-losing enteropathy (PLE) is characterised by gastrointestinal protein leakage due to loss of mucosal integrity or lymphatic abnormalities. PLE can manifest as congenital diarrhoea and should be differentiated from other congenital diarrhoeal disorders. Primary PLEs are genetically heterogeneous and the underlying genetic defects are currently emerging. We report an infant with fatal PLE for whom we aimed to uncover the underlying pathogenic mutation. We performed whole exome sequencing (WES) for the index patient. Variants were classified based on the American College of Medical Genetics and Genomics guidelines. WES results and our detailed clinical description of the patient were compared with the literature. We discovered a novel homozygous stop mutation (c.988C>T, p.Q330*) in the Plasmalemma Vesicle-Associated Protein ( PLVAP ) gene in a newborn with fatal PLE, facial dysmorphism, and renal, ocular and cardiac anomalies. The Q330* mutation is predicted to result in complete loss of PLVAP protein expression leading to deletion of the diaphragms of endothelial fenestrae, resulting in plasma protein extravasation and PLE. Recently, another single homozygous stop mutation in PLVAP causing lethal PLE in an infant was reported. Our findings validate PLVAP mutations as a cause of syndromic PLE. Prenatal anomalies, severe PLE and syndromic features may guide the diagnosis of this rare disease. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2018. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  3. Primary Neuroendocrine Carcinoma of Thymus Caused Cushing Syndrome: 
Surgical Treatment and Prognosis Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li LI

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Background and objective Primary neuroendocrine carcinoma of thymus (pNECT is a rare thymic neoplasm. Some pNECTs could produce an adrenocorticotropic hormone and cause Cushing syndrome (CS. The aim os this study is to discuss the diagnostic technique and surgical management of pNECT-caused CS and analyze prognosis factors to improve the clinical experience of the disease. Methods The outcome of surgery and follow-up of 14 cases (eight males and six females of pNECT-caused CS were retrospectively analyzed from November 1987 to June 2013. Result The median age of the patients was 29, and the median duration of the disease was four months (1 month-44 months. All cases exhibited clinical evidence for the diagnosis of CS, and thoracic computed tomography (CT was used to detect thymic tumors. Surgical treatment significantly decreased the concentration of both serum cortisol and adrenocorticotropic hormone (P<0.01 but caused one death in the perioperative period. With multidisciplinary therapy, the median survival was 38 months. Conclusion pNECT-caused CS is a rare disease with aggressive characteristics and unclear prognosis. Early diagnosis and therapy is a challenge for clinicians. Thoracic CT is important for disease location and preoperative evaluation and should be routinely applied to all CS patients to allow early surgery and improved prognosis.

  4. Optical Coherence Tomography Guidance in Management of Acute Coronary Syndrome Caused by Plaque Erosion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Haibo; Kubo, Takashi; Akasaka, Takashi; Yu, Bo

    2018-01-25

    For several decades, most physicians have believed that acute coronary syndrome (ACS) is caused by coronary thrombosis resulting from rupture of vulnerable plaque characterized by a thin fibrous cap overlying a large necrotic core and massive inflammatory cell infiltration. However, nearly one-third of ACS cases are caused by plaque erosion characterized by intact fibrous cap, less or absent necrotic core, less inflammation, and large lumen. Because of the limitations of current imaging modalities, including angiography and intravascular ultrasound, the importance of plaque erosion as a cause of acute coronary events is less well known. Optical coherence tomography (OCT) as an emerging modality with extremely high resolution is the only intravascular imaging modality available for identification of plaque erosion in vivo, which provides new insight into the mechanism of ACS. More importantly, the introduction of OCT to clinical practice enables us to differentiate the patients with ACS caused by plaque erosion from those caused by plaque rupture, thereby providing precise and personalized therapy based on the different underlying mechanisms. We systematically review the morphological characteristics of plaque erosion identified by OCT and its implications for the management of ACS.

  5. Systemic 5-fluorouracil treatment causes a syndrome of delayed myelin destruction in the central nervous system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Han Ruolan

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cancer treatment with a variety of chemotherapeutic agents often is associated with delayed adverse neurological consequences. Despite their clinical importance, almost nothing is known about the basis for such effects. It is not even known whether the occurrence of delayed adverse effects requires exposure to multiple chemotherapeutic agents, the presence of both chemotherapeutic agents and the body's own response to cancer, prolonged damage to the blood-brain barrier, inflammation or other such changes. Nor are there any animal models that could enable the study of this important problem. Results We found that clinically relevant concentrations of 5-fluorouracil (5-FU; a widely used chemotherapeutic agent were toxic for both central nervous system (CNS progenitor cells and non-dividing oligodendrocytes in vitro and in vivo. Short-term systemic administration of 5-FU caused both acute CNS damage and a syndrome of progressively worsening delayed damage to myelinated tracts of the CNS associated with altered transcriptional regulation in oligodendrocytes and extensive myelin pathology. Functional analysis also provided the first demonstration of delayed effects of chemotherapy on the latency of impulse conduction in the auditory system, offering the possibility of non-invasive analysis of myelin damage associated with cancer treatment. Conclusions Our studies demonstrate that systemic treatment with a single chemotherapeutic agent, 5-FU, is sufficient to cause a syndrome of delayed CNS damage and provide the first animal model of delayed damage to white-matter tracts of individuals treated with systemic chemotherapy. Unlike that caused by local irradiation, the degeneration caused by 5-FU treatment did not correlate with either chronic inflammation or extensive vascular damage and appears to represent a new class of delayed degenerative damage in the CNS.

  6. Rapid detection of monogenic causes of childhood-onset steroid-resistant nephrotic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lovric, Svjetlana; Fang, Humphrey; Vega-Warner, Virginia; Sadowski, Carolin E; Gee, Heon Yung; Halbritter, Jan; Ashraf, Shazia; Saisawat, Pawaree; Soliman, Neveen A; Kari, Jameela A; Otto, Edgar A; Hildebrandt, Friedhelm

    2014-06-06

    In steroid-resistant nephrotic syndrome (SRNS), >21 single-gene causes are known. However, mutation analysis of all known SRNS genes is time and cost intensive. This report describes a new high-throughput method of mutation analysis using a PCR-based microfluidic technology that allows rapid simultaneous mutation analysis of 21 single-gene causes of SRNS in a large number of individuals. This study screened individuals with SRNS; samples were submitted for mutation analysis from international sources between 1996 and 2012. For proof of principle, a pilot cohort of 48 individuals who harbored known mutations in known SRNS genes was evaluated. After improvements to the method, 48 individuals with an unknown cause of SRNS were then examined in a subsequent diagnostic study. The analysis included 16 recessive SRNS genes and 5 dominant SRNS genes. A 10-fold primer multiplexing was applied, allowing PCR-based amplification of 474 amplicons in 21 genes for 48 DNA samples simultaneously. Forty-eight individuals were indexed in a barcode PCR, and high-throughput sequencing was performed. All disease-causing variants were confirmed via Sanger sequencing. The pilot study identified the genetic cause of disease in 42 of 48 (87.5%) of the affected individuals. The diagnostic study detected the genetic cause of disease in 16 of 48 (33%) of the affected individuals with a previously unknown cause of SRNS. Seven novel disease-causing mutations in PLCE1 (n=5), NPHS1 (n=1), and LAMB2 (n=1) were identified in childhood-onset SRNS cases. Copyright © 2014 by the American Society of Nephrology.

  7. Frailty syndrome and all-cause mortality in demented patients: the Italian Longitudinal Study on Aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solfrizzi, Vincenzo; Scafato, Emanuele; Frisardi, Vincenza; Sancarlo, Daniele; Seripa, Davide; Logroscino, Giancarlo; Baldereschi, Marzia; Crepaldi, Gaetano; Di Carlo, Antonio; Galluzzo, Lucia; Gandin, Claudia; Inzitari, Domenico; Maggi, Stefania; Pilotto, Alberto; Panza, Francesco

    2012-04-01

    Cognition has already been considered as a component of frailty, and it has been demonstrated that it is associated with adverse health outcomes. We estimated the prevalence of frailty syndrome in an Italian older population and its predictive role on all-cause mortality and disability in nondemented subjects and in demented patients. We evaluated 2,581 individuals recruited from the Italian Longitudinal Study on Aging, a population-based sample of 5,632 subjects, aged 65-84 years old. Participants received identical baseline evaluation at the 1st survey (1992-1993) and were followed at 2nd (1995-1996) and 3rd survey (2000-2001). A phenotype of frailty according to partially modified measurement of Cardiovascular Health Study criteria was operationalized. The overall prevalence of frailty syndrome in this population-based study was 7.6% (95% confidence interval (CI) 6.55-8.57). Frail individuals noncomorbid or nondisable were 9.1% and 39.3%, respectively, confirming an overlap but not concordance in the co-occurrence among these conditions. Frailty was associated with a significantly increased risk of all-cause mortality over a 3-year follow-up (hazard ratio (HR) 1.98, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.52-2.60) and over a 7-year follow-up (HR 1.74, 95% CI 1.44-2.16), but with significant increased risk of disability only over a 3-year follow-up (HR 1.32, 95% CI 1.06-1.86 over a 3-year follow-up and HR 1.16, 95% CI 0.88-1.56 over a 7-year follow-up). Frail demented patients were at higher risk of all-cause mortality over 3- (HR 3.33, 95% CI 1.28-8.29) and 7-year follow-up periods (HR 1.89, 95% CI 1.10-3.44), but not of disability. Frailty syndrome was a short-term predictor of disability in nondemented older subjects and short- and long-term predictor of all-cause mortality in nondemented and demented patients.

  8. Abdominal compartment syndrome caused by ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm in vena cava

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Filipović Aleksandar

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Abdominal compartment syndrome (ACS is a rapid increase in intra-abdominal pressure associated with multi-organs dysfunction. It is caused mostly by abdominal bleeding und massive volume compensation. Case report. We reported a 76-year-old patient admitted to the hospital with aortic abdominal aneurysm, 13.7 cm in diameter, ruptured in vena cava, which caused intraabdominal hypertension, the liver and kidney dysfunction, as well as circulation, respiration and metabolic disorders. Intraabdominal pressure was measured by bladder manometry. Central venous pressure and systemic arterial pressure were monitored continuously. Clinical signs were thrill and typical abdominal bruit. Aorto-caval fistula was diagnosed by the use of contrast computerized tomography. Caval endoaneurysmatic suture and aortobiiliac bypass with 18 × 9 mm Dacron prothesis were performed. Haemodynamic changes were mostly corrected during the surgery. The complete correction of haemodynamics, liver, kidney, respiration and metabolic changes was established in the next few weeks. Conclusion. The ACS was caused by rupture of abdominal aortic aneurysm in vena cava followed by edema of the abdominal organs, retroperitoneum, abdominal wall and ascites. Caval endoaneurysmatic suture and aortobiiliac bypass with 18 × 9 mm Dacron prothesis solved aortocaval fistula as well as all the organs and metabolic dysfunctions caused by ACS.

  9. Mutations in Three Genes Encoding Proteins Involved in Hair Shaft Formation Cause Uncombable Hair Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ü Basmanav, F Buket; Cau, Laura; Tafazzoli, Aylar; Méchin, Marie-Claire; Wolf, Sabrina; Romano, Maria Teresa; Valentin, Frederic; Wiegmann, Henning; Huchenq, Anne; Kandil, Rima; Garcia Bartels, Natalie; Kilic, Arzu; George, Susannah; Ralser, Damian J; Bergner, Stefan; Ferguson, David J P; Oprisoreanu, Ana-Maria; Wehner, Maria; Thiele, Holger; Altmüller, Janine; Nürnberg, Peter; Swan, Daniel; Houniet, Darren; Büchner, Aline; Weibel, Lisa; Wagner, Nicola; Grimalt, Ramon; Bygum, Anette; Serre, Guy; Blume-Peytavi, Ulrike; Sprecher, Eli; Schoch, Susanne; Oji, Vinzenz; Hamm, Henning; Farrant, Paul; Simon, Michel; Betz, Regina C

    2016-12-01

    Uncombable hair syndrome (UHS), also known as "spun glass hair syndrome," "pili trianguli et canaliculi," or "cheveux incoiffables" is a rare anomaly of the hair shaft that occurs in children and improves with age. UHS is characterized by dry, frizzy, spangly, and often fair hair that is resistant to being combed flat. Until now, both simplex and familial UHS-affected case subjects with autosomal-dominant as well as -recessive inheritance have been reported. However, none of these case subjects were linked to a molecular genetic cause. Here, we report the identification of UHS-causative mutations located in the three genes PADI3 (peptidylarginine deiminase 3), TGM3 (transglutaminase 3), and TCHH (trichohyalin) in a total of 11 children. All of these individuals carry homozygous or compound heterozygous mutations in one of these three genes, indicating an autosomal-recessive inheritance pattern in the majority of UHS case subjects. The two enzymes PADI3 and TGM3, responsible for posttranslational protein modifications, and their target structural protein TCHH are all involved in hair shaft formation. Elucidation of the molecular outcomes of the disease-causing mutations by cell culture experiments and tridimensional protein models demonstrated clear differences in the structural organization and activity of mutant and wild-type proteins. Scanning electron microscopy observations revealed morphological alterations in hair coat of Padi3 knockout mice. All together, these findings elucidate the molecular genetic causes of UHS and shed light on its pathophysiology and hair physiology in general. Copyright © 2016 American Society of Human Genetics. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Síndrome oculoglandular de Parinaud causada por esporotricose Parinaud's oculoglandular syndrome caused by Sporotrichosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandre Sampaio de Abreu Ribeiro

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available A síndrome oculoglandular de Parinaud é uma doença ocular rara causada por diferentes agentes etiológicos, entre eles bactérias, vírus e fungos. É caracterizada por uma conjuntivite granulomatosa, acompanhada de linfadenopatia pré-auricular adjacente e pode trazer sequelas caso não seja prontamente tratada. Neste artigo é relatado o caso de uma jovem técnica de enfermagem e estudante de medicina veterinária apresentando a síndrome oculoglandular de Parinaud causada pelo fungo Sporothrix schenkii após contaminação com gatos infectados. Sua apresentação clínica e evolução desfavorável até o correto diagnóstico etiológico e instituição do tratamento específico, ressaltam a importância da investigação laboratorial em casos de evolução atípica da doença.Parinaud's oculoglandular syndrome is a rare eye disease caused by different pathogens, including bacteria, viruses and fungi. It is characterized by a granulomatous conjunctivitis with adjacent preauricular lympha-denopathy and can cause sequelae if not promptly treated. We report a case of a young nurse assistant and veterinary student showing Parinaud's oculoglandular syndrome caused by the fungus Sporothrix schenkii after contamination with infected cats. Its clinical presentation and negative outcome until the correct ethiological diagnosis, in addition to specific treatment, emphasize the importance of laboratory investigations in cases of atypical development of the disease.

  11. The pacemaker-twiddler's syndrome: an infrequent cause of pacemaker failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salahuddin, Mohammad; Cader, Fathima Aaysha; Nasrin, Sahela; Chowdhury, Mashhud Zia

    2016-01-20

    The pacemaker-twiddler's syndrome is an uncommon cause of pacemaker malfunction. It occurs due to unintentional or deliberate manipulation of the pacemaker pulse generator within its skin pocket by the patient. This causes coiling of the lead and its dislodgement, resulting in failure of ventricular pacing. More commonly reported among elderly females with impaired cognition, the phenomenon usually occurs in the first year following pacemaker implantation. Treatment involves repositioning of the dislodged leads and suture fixation of the lead and pulse generator within its pocket. An 87 year old Bangladeshi lady who underwent a single chamber ventricular pacemaker (VVI mode: i.e. ventricle paced, ventricle sensed, inhibitory mode) implantation with the indication of complete heart block, and presented to us again 7 weeks later, with syncopal attacks. She admitted to repeatedly manipulating the pacemaker generator in her left pectoral region. Physical examination revealed a heart rate of 42 beats/minute, blood pressure 140/80 mmHg and bilateral crackles on lung auscultation. She had no cognitive deficit. An immediate electrocardiogram showed complete heart block with pacemaker spikes and failure to capture. Chest X-ray showed coiled and retracted right ventricular lead and rotated pulse generator. An emergent temporary pace maker was set at a rate of 60 beats per minute. Subsequently, she underwent successful lead repositioning with strong counselling to avoid further twiddling. Twiddler's syndrome should be considered as a cause of pacemaker failure in elderly patients presenting with bradyarrythmias following pacemaker implantation. Chest X-ray and electrocardiograms are simple and easily-available first line investigations for its diagnosis. Lead repositioning is required, however proper patient education and counselling against further manipulation is paramount to long-term management.

  12. Intracerebral hemorrhage associated with Sneddon's syndrome: is ischemia-related angiogenesis the cause? Case report and review of the literature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aquino Gondim, F. de A.; Leacock, R.O.; Subrammanian, T.A.; Cruz-Flores, S.

    2003-01-01

    Sneddon's syndrome is characterized by livedo reticularis and multiple ischemic infarcts often associated with antiphospholipid antibodies. Intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) is unusual in Sneddon's syndrome and has not been reported as the presenting complaint. We report a 38-year-old woman with a history of two miscarriages, Raynaud's phenomenon and livedo reticularis who presented acutely with ICH. Angiography showed prominent leptomeningeal and transdural anastomoses (pseudoangiomatosis). Anticardiolipin antibodies were positive. A right frontal brain biopsy failed to reveal vasculitis and a skin biopsy was nonspecific. MRI showed residual intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH), diffuse atrophy, multiple small white matter infarcts and leptomeningeal enhancement. This is the first report of Sneddon's syndrome presenting with an ICH. It shares features with the Divry-van Bogaert syndrome. We discuss the cause of the pseudoangiomatosis pattern and its role in the genesis of the hemorrhage and suggest that cerebral angiography should be done in every patient with Sneddon's syndrome, as it could impact therapy. (orig.)

  13. Observational cohort study of ventricular arrhythmia in adults with Marfan syndrome caused by FBN1 mutations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Aydin

    Full Text Available Marfan syndrome is associated with ventricular arrhythmia but risk factors including FBN1 mutation characteristics require elucidation.We performed an observational cohort study of 80 consecutive adults (30 men, 50 women aged 42±15 years with Marfan syndrome caused by FBN1 mutations. We assessed ventricular arrhythmia on baseline ambulatory electrocardiography as >10 premature ventricular complexes per hour (>10 PVC/h, as ventricular couplets (Couplet, or as non-sustained ventricular tachycardia (nsVT, and during 31±18 months of follow-up as ventricular tachycardia (VT events (VTE such as sudden cardiac death (SCD, and sustained ventricular tachycardia (sVT. We identified >10 PVC/h in 28 (35%, Couplet/nsVT in 32 (40%, and VTE in 6 patients (8%, including 3 with SCD (4%. PVC>10/h, Couplet/nsVT, and VTE exhibited increased N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide serum levels(P10/h and Couplet/nsVT also related to increased indexed end-systolic LV diameters (P = .024 and P = .020, to moderate mitral valve regurgitation (P = .018 and P = .003, and to prolonged QTc intervals (P = .001 and P = .006, respectively. Moreover, VTE related to mutations in exons 24-32 (P = .021. Kaplan-Meier analysis corroborated an association of VTE with increased NT-proBNP (P<.001 and with mutations in exons 24-32 (P<.001.Marfan syndrome with causative FBN1 mutations is associated with an increased risk for arrhythmia, and affected persons may require life-long monitoring. Ventricular arrhythmia on electrocardiography, signs of myocardial dysfunction and mutations in exons 24-32 may be risk factors of VTE.

  14. Loss-of-function mutations in SOX10 cause Kallmann syndrome with deafness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pingault, Veronique; Bodereau, Virginie; Baral, Viviane; Marcos, Severine; Watanabe, Yuli; Chaoui, Asma; Fouveaut, Corinne; Leroy, Chrystel; Vérier-Mine, Odile; Francannet, Christine; Dupin-Deguine, Delphine; Archambeaud, Françoise; Kurtz, François-Joseph; Young, Jacques; Bertherat, Jérôme; Marlin, Sandrine; Goossens, Michel; Hardelin, Jean-Pierre; Dodé, Catherine; Bondurand, Nadege

    2013-05-02

    Transcription factor SOX10 plays a role in the maintenance of progenitor cell multipotency, lineage specification, and cell differentiation and is a major actor in the development of the neural crest. It has been implicated in Waardenburg syndrome (WS), a rare disorder characterized by the association between pigmentation abnormalities and deafness, but SOX10 mutations cause a variable phenotype that spreads over the initial limits of the syndrome definition. On the basis of recent findings of olfactory-bulb agenesis in WS individuals, we suspected SOX10 was also involved in Kallmann syndrome (KS). KS is defined by the association between anosmia and hypogonadotropic hypogonadism due to incomplete migration of neuroendocrine gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) cells along the olfactory, vomeronasal, and terminal nerves. Mutations in any of the nine genes identified to date account for only 30% of the KS cases. KS can be either isolated or associated with a variety of other symptoms, including deafness. This study reports SOX10 loss-of-function mutations in approximately one-third of KS individuals with deafness, indicating a substantial involvement in this clinical condition. Study of SOX10-null mutant mice revealed a developmental role of SOX10 in a subpopulation of glial cells called olfactory ensheathing cells. These mice indeed showed an almost complete absence of these cells along the olfactory nerve pathway, as well as defasciculation and misrouting of the nerve fibers, impaired migration of GnRH cells, and disorganization of the olfactory nerve layer of the olfactory bulbs. Copyright © 2013 The American Society of Human Genetics. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Blue toe syndrome treated with sympathectomy in a patient with acute renal failure caused by cholesterol embolization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Min-Gang Kim

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Blue toe syndrome is the most frequent manifestation of tissue ischemia caused by cholesterol embolization (CE, which can lead to amputation of affected lower extremities, if severe. However, any effective treatment is lacking. We experienced a case of spontaneously presenting blue toe syndrome and concomitant acute renal failure in a patient with multiple atherosclerotic risk factors. CE was confirmed by renal biopsy. Despite medical treatment including prostaglandin therapy and narcotics, the toe lesion progressed to gangrene with worsening ischemic pain. Therefore, we performed lumbar sympathectomy, which provided dramatic pain relief as well as an adequate blood flow to the ischemic lower extremities, resulting in healing of the gangrenous lesion and avoiding toe amputation. This is the first reported case of a patient with intractable ischemic toe syndrome caused by CE that was treated successfully by sympathectomy. Our observations suggest that sympathectomy may be beneficial in some patients with CE-associated blue toe syndrome.

  16. Novel association of neurofibromatosis type 1-causing mutations in families with neurofibromatosis-Noonan syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekvall, Sara; Sjörs, Kerstin; Jonzon, Anders; Vihinen, Mauno; Annerén, Göran; Bondeson, Marie-Louise

    2014-03-01

    Neurofibromatosis-Noonan syndrome (NFNS) is a rare condition with clinical features of both neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) and Noonan syndrome (NS). All three syndromes belong to the RASopathies, which are caused by dysregulation of the RAS-MAPK pathway. The major gene involved in NFNS is NF1, but co-occurring NF1 and PTPN11 mutations in NFNS have been reported. Knowledge about possible involvement of additional RASopathy-associated genes in NFNS is, however, very limited. We present a comprehensive clinical and molecular analysis of eight affected individuals from three unrelated families displaying features of NF1 and NFNS. The genetic etiology of the clinical phenotypes was investigated by mutation analysis, including NF1, PTPN11, SOS1, KRAS, NRAS, BRAF, RAF1, SHOC2, SPRED1, MAP2K1, MAP2K2, and CBL. All three families harbored a heterozygous NF1 variant, where the first family had a missense variant, c.5425C>T;p.R1809C, the second family a recurrent 4bp-deletion, c.6789_6792delTTAC;p.Y2264Tfs*6, and the third family a splice-site variant, c.2991-1G>A, resulting in skipping of exon 18 and an in-frame deletion of 41 amino acids. These NF1 variants have all previously been reported in NF1 patients. Surprisingly, both c.6789_6792delTTAC and c.2991-1G>A are frequently associated with NF1, but association to NFNS has, to our knowledge, not previously been reported. Our results support the notion that NFNS represents a variant of NF1, genetically distinct from NS, and is caused by mutations in NF1, some of which also cause classical NF1. Due to phenotypic overlap between NFNS and NS, we propose screening for NF1 mutations in NS patients, preferentially when café-au-lait spots are present. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Association of metabolic syndrome and its components with all-cause and cardiovascular mortality in the elderly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ju, Sang-Yhun; Lee, June-Young; Kim, Do-Hoon

    2017-01-01

    Abstract There is increasing evidence regarding the relationship between metabolic syndrome and mortality. However, previous research examining metabolic syndrome and mortality in older populations has produced mixed results. In addition, there is a clear need to identify and manage individual components of metabolic syndrome to decrease cardiovascular disease (CVD) mortality. In this meta-analysis, we searched the MEDLINE databases using PubMed, Cochrane Library, and EMBASE databases. Based on 20 prospective cohort studies, metabolic syndrome was associated with a higher risk of all-cause mortality [relative risk (RR), 1.23; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.15–1.32; I2 = 55.9%] and CVD mortality (RR, 1.24; 95% CI, 1.11–1.39; I2 = 58.1%). The risk estimates of all-cause mortality for single components of metabolic syndrome were significant for higher values of waist circumference or body mass index (RR, 0.94; 95% CI, 0.88–1.00), higher values of blood glucose (RR, 1.19; 95% CI, 1.05–1.34), and lower values of high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol (RR, 1.11; 95% CI, 1.02–1.21). In the elderly population, metabolic syndrome was associated with an increased risk of all-cause and CVD mortality. Among the individual components of metabolic syndrome, increased blood glucose and HDL cholesterol levels were significantly associated with increased mortality. However, older obese or overweight individuals may have a decreased mortality risk. Thus, the findings of the current meta-analysis raise questions about the utility of the definition of metabolic syndrome in predicting all-cause mortality and CVD mortality in the elderly population. PMID:29137039

  18. A connexin 26 mutation causes a syndrome of sensorineural hearing loss and palmoplantar hyperkeratosis (MIM 148350)

    OpenAIRE

    Heathcote, K.; Syrris, P.; Carter, N.; Patton, M.

    2000-01-01

    We report a missense mutation in the connexin 26 gene (GJB2) in a family with an autosomal dominant syndrome of hearing loss and hyperkeratosis. The affected family members have high frequency, slowly progressive, bilateral, sensorineural hearing loss and palmoplantar hyperkeratosis. The mutation causes an amino acid substitution (G59A), which may disrupt a reverse turn in the first extracellular loop of connexin 26. Connexin 26 mutations have been reported in syndromes of deafness and palmop...

  19. Current status of prenatal diagnosis in Cuba: causes of low prevalence of Down syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Méndez-Rosado, L A; Hechavarría-Estenoz, D; de la Torre, M E; Pimentel-Benitez, H; Hernández-Gil, J; Perez, B; Barrios-Martínez, A; Morales-Rodriguez, E; Soriano-Torres, M; Garcia, M; Suarez-Mayedo, U; Cedeño-Aparicio, N; Blanco, I; Díaz-Véliz, P; Vidal-Hernández, B; Mitjans-Torres, M; Miñoso, S; Alvarez-Espinosa, D; Reyes-Hernández, E; Angulo-Cebada, E; Torres-Palacios, M; Lozano-Lezcano, L; Lima-Rodriguez, U; Mayeta, M; Noblet, M; Benítez, Y; Lardoeyt-Ferrer, R; Yosela-Martin, S; Carbonell, P; Pérez-Ramos, M; de León, N; Perez, M; Carbonell, J

    2014-11-01

    To analyze trends in cytogenetic prenatal diagnosis in Cuba and to analyze possible causes leading to a low Down syndrome prevalence in a country where the triple test is not available. An analysis of the Cuban program in prenatal cytogenetic diagnosis from 1984 to 2012 was conducted. Results are described, with particular emphasis on indications, abnormal results, types of invasive procedures, and terminations of pregnancy. Cytogenetic prenatal diagnostic analyses (n = 75,095) were conducted; maternal age was the indication for 77.9% of the amniocenteses and chorionic villus samplings. The detection rate of chromosomally abnormal pregnancies was 2.3% for maternal age and increased to 8-9% for other indications. When a chromosomal abnormality was identified, 88.5% terminated the pregnancy. In 2002, the live birth prevalence of Down syndrome was 8.4 per 10,000 live births, and in 2012, 7 per 10,000. Prenatal diagnosis in Cuba has contributed to a significant reduction in chromosomal aberrations. The impact increased because of the demographic trends of the population, the high index of terminations of pregnancy, and the establishment of a network of cytogenetic laboratories throughout Cuba. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  20. Surfactant therapy for maternal blood aspiration: an unusual cause of neonatal respiratory distress syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Celik, Istemi Han; Demirel, Gamze; Canpolat, Fuat Emre; Erdeve, Omer; Dilmen, Ugur

    2012-10-01

    Surfactant replacement therapy is the main treatment of neonatal respiratory distress syndrome. However, surfactant therapy has been shown to be effective in the treatment of other diseases causing neonatal respiratory diseases such as pulmonary hemorrhage, meconium aspiration syndrome, pneumonia/sepsis, pulmonary edema or acute lung injury resulting a secondary surfactant deficiency (SSD). Rarely, as like as in the present patient, exogenous blood aspiration such as breast milk or formula aspiration may lead to SSD. Blood in alveolus leads to a significant biochemical and functional disturbance of the surfactant system and inhibits surfactant production. Here, the authors report a preterm infant of 33 wk gestational age with secondary surfactant deficiency due to maternal blood aspiration because of abruptio placentae. She was received two courses of beractant, a natural bovine surfactant, therapy in 24 h. She was extubated on second day and did not require oxygen on 4(th) day. To the authors' knowledge, this is the first reported case of SSD due to maternal blood aspiration treated with surfactant. In conditions such as abruptio placentae, infant should be protected from blood aspiration and if respiratory distress occurs, surfactant inhibition and need for surfactant administration should be considered.

  1. Bannayan-Riley-Ruvalcaba syndrome: a cause of extreme macrocephaly and neurodevelopmental delay.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Lynch, N E

    2012-02-01

    BACKGROUND: Bannayan-Riley-Ruvalcaba syndrome (BRRS) is an autosomal dominant condition characterised by macrocephaly, developmental delay and subtle cutaneous features. BRRS results from mutations in the PTEN gene. In adults, PTEN mutations cause Cowden syndrome where, in addition to the macrocephaly, there is a higher risk of tumour development. Diagnosis of BRRS is often delayed as presentation can be variable, even within families. AIMS: To identify characteristics of this condition which might facilitate early diagnosis. Prompt diagnosis not only avoids unnecessary investigations in the child but potentially identifies heterozygote parents who are at risk of tumour development. METHODS AND RESULTS: Six children with a PTEN mutation were identified. All had extreme macrocephaly. Four parents and a male sibling were found to have a PTEN mutation on subsequent testing. Affected parents had extreme macrocephaly and a history of thyroid adenoma, or breast or skin lesions. All six children had presented to medical attention before the age of 2.5 years (3\\/6 were investigated as neonates), but the median age at diagnosis was 5 years. Four of the children had multiple investigations prior to identification of a PTEN mutation. CONCLUSION: BRRS should be considered in children with extreme macrocephaly as it is the most consistent clinical feature seen, particularly where there is a family history of macrocephaly.

  2. Nonspecific interstitial pneumonitis: a common cause of pulmonary disease in the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suffredini, A.F.; Ognibene, F.P.; Lack, E.E.

    1987-01-01

    During a 4.4-year period, nonspecific interstitial pneumonitis was seen in 41 of 110 (38%) patients with the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome and accounted for 32% (48/152) of all episodes of clinical pneumonitis. Diffuse alveolar damage was typically a feature of nonspecific interstitial pneumonitis, but neither lung biopsy nor bronchoalveolar lavage detected a pathogen. Of these 41 patients, 13 had no associated pulmonary tumor and had not been exposed to pulmonary toxins, whereas 28 patients had either concurrent pulmonary Kaposi sarcoma, previous experimental therapies, or a history of pneumocystis pneumonia or drug abuse. Of these 41, 23 had normal chest radiographs. The clinical features of patients with nonspecific interstitial pneumonitis were similar to those of patients with pneumocystis pneumonia, although histologic findings showed less severe alveolar damage in patients with nonspecific interstitial pneumonitis (p less than 0.001). Pathologic evaluation and clinical follow-up suggest that many clinical episodes of pneumonitis in patients with the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome are due to nonspecific interstitial pneumonitis of unknown cause

  3. SNORD116 deletions cause Prader-Willi syndrome with a mild phenotype and macrocephaly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fontana, P; Grasso, M; Acquaviva, F; Gennaro, E; Galli, M L; Falco, M; Scarano, F; Scarano, G; Lonardo, F

    2017-10-01

    Prader-Willi syndrome is a complex condition caused by lack of expression of imprinted genes in the paternally derived region of chromosome 15 (15q11q13). A small number of patients with Prader-Willi phenotype have been discovered to have narrow deletions, not encompassing the whole critical region, but only the SNORD116 cluster, which includes genes codifying for small nucleolar RNAs. This kind of deletion usually is not detected by the classic DNA methylation analysis test. We present the case of a male patient with a mild Prader-Willi phenotype and a small deletion including SNORD116, diagnosed by methylation-sensitive multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA. The patient showed neonatal hypotonia, hyperphagia, obesity, central hypogonadism, hypothyroidism, strabismus. Stature and intellectual development are within the normal range. The presence of macrocephaly, observed in other cases of SNORD116 deletions as well, is uncommon for the classic phenotype of the syndrome. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Stent Implantation for Superior Vena Cava Syndrome of Malignant Cause.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Büstgens, Felix A; Loose, Reinhard; Ficker, Joachim H; Wucherer, Michael; Uder, Michael; Adamus, Ralf

    2017-05-01

    Purpose  The purpose of this paper is the retrospective analysis of endovascular therapy for the treatment of superior vena cava syndrome (SVCS) of malignant cause. This study focuses on the effectiveness of the therapy regarding the duration of remission, symptom control and practicability. Materials and Methods  From January 2003 to November 2012, therapeutic implantation of one or more stents was performed in 141 patients suffering from SVCS. The medical history was retrospectively researched using digitalized patient files. If those were incomplete, secondary research was conducted using the cancer registry of the General Hospital Nuremberg, the cancer registry of the tumor center at Friedrich-Alexander-University Erlangen-Nuremberg (FAU) or information given by physicians in private practice. This data was collected using Microsoft Office Excel ® and statistically analyzed using IBM SPSS Statistics 22 ® . Results  168 stents were implanted in 141 patients (median age: 64.6 years; range: 36 - 84), 86 being male and 55 being female. In 121 patients, SVCS was caused by lung cancer (85.8 %), in 9 patients by mediastinal metastasis of an extrathoracic carcinoma (6.4 %), in 3 patients by mesothelioma of the pleura (2.1 %) and in 1 patient by Hodgkin's disease (0.7 %). There was no histological diagnosis in 7 cases (4.9 %). The primary intervention was successful in 138 patients (97.9 %). Immediate thrombosis in the stent occurred in the remaining 3 cases. Recurrence of SVCS was observed in 22 patients (15.6 %), including 5 early and 17 late occlusions. Stent dislocation or breakage was not observed. As expected, the survival after implantation was poor. The median survival was 101 days, and the median occlusion-free survival was 80 days. Conclusion  The symptomatic therapy of SVCS with endovascular stents is effective and safe. Despite effective symptom control and a low rate of recurrence, the patients' prognosis is poor. Key

  5. Pediatric Hereditary Angioedema as a Cause of Acute Compartment Syndrome of the Hand and Forearm: A Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venditto, Chelsea; Jager, Zachary; LoGiudice, John; Matloub, Hani

    2017-05-01

    Compartment syndrome of the upper extremity is a surgical emergency that, when left untreated, can have dire consequences. Its causes are numerous, one of which is the uncommon entity hereditary angioedema, an autosomal dominant disease resulting in edema in a variety of potential locations, including the extremities. This is only the second time hereditary angioedema has been mentioned in the literature as a cause of compartment syndrome. We present a case of hereditary angioedema leading to hand and forearm compartment syndrome in a 13-year-old pediatric patient. Diagnosis of hereditary angioedema was made by our Rheumatology colleagues with physical exam and a thorough history, and confirmed by laboratory studies. Our patient presented with compartment syndrome of the hand and forearm and underwent hand and volar forearm fasciotomies. She was subsequently worked up for hereditary angioedema with laboratory results confirming the diagnosis. She was discharged after a 5-day hospitalization with prophylactic C1-inhibitor therapy. Hereditary angioedema is a rare but known cause of compartment syndrome of the upper extremity, and must be considered when patients present with compartment syndrome of unknown etiology. This disease can be diagnosed by laboratory studies and symptoms can be controlled with medical therapy.

  6. Lemierre's Syndrome - A rare cause of disseminated sepsis requiring multi-organ support.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rae, John; Misselbrook, Katie

    2017-11-01

    Lemierre's syndrome is a rare complication of acute pharyngitis characterised by septicaemia with infective thrombophlebitis of the internal jugular vein, most commonly due to Fusobacterium necrophorum . It characteristically affects healthy young adults causing persistent pyrexia and systemic sepsis presenting several days after an initial pharyngitis. Septic emboli seed via the bloodstream to distant sites including the lung, joints, skin, liver, spleen and brain. Prolonged antimicrobial therapy is required and admission to intensive care common. This once rare condition is increasing in incidence but awareness amongst clinicians is low. We present a classic case in a young man who developed multi-organ failure requiring intensive care support and describe the epidemiology, pathophysiology, microbiology, clinical features and management of the disease.

  7. Cervical spondylotic myelopathy caused by violent motor tics in a child with Tourette syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ko, Da-Young; Kim, Seung-Ki; Chae, Jong-Hee; Wang, Kyu-Chang; Phi, Ji Hoon

    2013-02-01

    We report a case of a 9-year-old boy with Tourette syndrome (TS) who developed progressive quadriparesis that was more severe in the upper extremities. He had experienced frequent and violent motor tics consisting of hyperflexion and hyperextension for years. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) revealed a focal high-signal intensity cord lesion and adjacent cervical spondylotic changes. Initially, the patient was observed for several months because of diagnostic uncertainty; his neurological status had improved and later worsened again. Anterior cervical discectomy of C3-4 and fusion immediately followed by posterior fixation were performed. After surgery, the neck collar was applied for 6 months. His neurological signs and symptoms improved dramatically. TS with violent neck motion may cause cervical spondylotic myelopathy at an early age. The optimal management is still unclear and attempts to control tics should be paramount. Circumferential fusion with neck bracing represents a viable treatment option.

  8. Waardenburg syndrome: a rare cause of inherited neuropathy due to SOX10 mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogdanova-Mihaylova, Petya; Alexander, Michael D; Murphy, Raymond P J; Murphy, Sinéad M

    2017-09-01

    Waardenburg syndrome (WS) is a rare disorder comprising sensorineural deafness and pigmentation abnormalities. Four distinct subtypes are defined based on the presence or absence of additional symptoms. Mutations in six genes have been described in WS. SOX10 mutations are usually associated with a more severe phenotype of WS with peripheral demyelinating neuropathy, central dysmyelinating leukodystrophy, and Hirschsprung disease. Here we report a 32-year-old man with a novel heterozygous missense variant in SOX10 gene, who presented with congenital deafness, Hirschsprung disease, iris heterochromia, foot deformity, and intermediate conduction velocity length-dependent sensorimotor neuropathy. This case highlights that the presence of other non-neuropathic features in a patient with presumed hereditary neuropathy should alert the clinician to possible atypical rare causes. © 2017 Peripheral Nerve Society.

  9. Auditory hair cell defects as potential cause for sensorineural deafness in Wolf-Hirschhorn syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohi Ahmed

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available WHSC1 is a histone methyltransferase (HMT that catalyses the addition of methyl groups to lysine 36 on histone 3. In humans, WHSC1 haploinsufficiency is associated with all known cases of Wolf-Hirschhorn syndrome (WHS. The cardinal feature of WHS is a craniofacial dysmorphism, which is accompanied by sensorineural hearing loss in 15% of individuals with WHS. Here, we show that WHSC1-deficient mice display craniofacial defects that overlap with WHS, including cochlea anomalies. Although auditory hair cells are specified normally, their stereocilia hair bundles required for sound perception fail to develop the appropriate morphology. Furthermore, the orientation and cellular organisation of cochlear hair cells and their innervation are defective. These findings identify, for the first time, the likely cause of sensorineural hearing loss in individuals with WHS.

  10. Auditory hair cell defects as potential cause for sensorineural deafness in Wolf-Hirschhorn syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Mohi; Ura, Kiyoe; Streit, Andrea

    2015-09-01

    WHSC1 is a histone methyltransferase (HMT) that catalyses the addition of methyl groups to lysine 36 on histone 3. In humans, WHSC1 haploinsufficiency is associated with all known cases of Wolf-Hirschhorn syndrome (WHS). The cardinal feature of WHS is a craniofacial dysmorphism, which is accompanied by sensorineural hearing loss in 15% of individuals with WHS. Here, we show that WHSC1-deficient mice display craniofacial defects that overlap with WHS, including cochlea anomalies. Although auditory hair cells are specified normally, their stereocilia hair bundles required for sound perception fail to develop the appropriate morphology. Furthermore, the orientation and cellular organisation of cochlear hair cells and their innervation are defective. These findings identify, for the first time, the likely cause of sensorineural hearing loss in individuals with WHS. © 2015. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  11. Why does meconium cause meconium aspiration syndrome? Current concepts of MAS pathophysiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Ierland, Y; de Beaufort, A J

    2009-10-01

    One in every 7 pregnancies ends with meconium-stained amniotic fluid and approximately 5% of these infants develop the meconium aspiration syndrome (MAS). MAS is a severe disease of the (mainly) term neonate, characterized by respiratory distress, pulmonary inflammation, persistent pulmonary hypertension and chronic hypoxia. The pathophysiology of MAS is multifactorial and complex. In this article, we discuss the mechanical and chemical effects of meconium on a newborn's airway, meconium-induced inflammation, mediated by proinflammatory cytokines and chemokines, the complement system and the proinflammatory enzyme phospholipase A2. Furthermore, we focus on MAS-related apoptotic cell death, causing severe acute lung injury due to damage and detachment of lung airway and alveolar cells. Finally, risk factors for MAS development to identify those newborns that develop MAS and those who do not are discussed.

  12. Xeroderma Pigmentosum/De Sanctis-Cacchione Syndrome: Unusual Cause of Ataxia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Fekete

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Xeroderma pigmentosum (XP is a rare autosomal recessive disorder of DNA repair, with a prevalence of 1 in 1 million. It may also be a cause of neurological symptoms including sensorineural hearing loss, peripheral neuropathy, ataxia, and chorea. Severe neurological symptoms including mental retardation, short stature, and hypogonadism invoke De Sanctis-Cacchione syndrome (DCS. Case Report: The patient was a 55-year-old woman with a history of mental retardation who developed chorea at age 32 and ataxia at age 37. She had numerous facial scars from 10 prior basal cell carcinoma excisions as well as diminished deep tendon reflexes, bilateral hearing loss, dysphagia, and skin freckling. Brain MRI revealed severe cortical, cerebellar, and brainstem atrophy. Supportive treatment and prevention of further damage from UV light is the mainstay of treatment in XP and DCS. Conclusion: XP and related disorders should be considered in the setting of neurological disorder and multiple cutaneous cancers.

  13. Prepatellar Friction Syndrome: a common cause of knee pain in the elite cyclist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Claes, Tom; Claes, Steven; De Roeck, Jeoffrey; Claes, Toon

    2015-12-01

    Although anterior knee pain is extremely common in high-level road cyclists, the exact etiology still remains unclear. A group of 28 professional male elite cyclists diagnosed with Prepatellar Friction Syndrome (PPFS) were retrospectively reviewed with specific attention for the typical history, clinical findings and treatment modalities. A traumatic onset of the complaints was reported by 10 athletes, while the complaints were caused by chronic overuse in the remaining 18 subjects. Conservative treatment delivered poor results and all cases were eventually treated surgically. Surgery confirmed macroscopic damage to at least one prepatellar fascial layer in all patients, after which partial fasciectomy was performed through a mini incision. PPFS is a new clinical entity of the triple-layered prepatellar fascial structures. Correct diagnosis is critical and based on the typical history and clinical findings. Partial prepatellar fasciectomy is the treatment of choice in order to regain the pre-injury performance level.

  14. An R1632C variant in the SCN5A gene causing Brugada syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Molina, Esperanza; Sabater-Molina, María; Muñoz, Carmen; Ruiz-Espejo, Francisco; Gimeno, Juan R

    2016-06-01

    Brugada syndrome (BS) is an electrical disease, inherited in an autosomal dominant manner. BS is caused by mutations in up to 13 different genes. SCN5A is the gene most frequently mutated in BS, although this presents an incomplete penetrance. The present case study investigated the SCN5A gene in a family exhibiting BS. Direct sequencing of the SCN5A gene was performed to identify mutations and a familial investigation was performed. A novel variant was identified in the voltage‑sensing domain of the SCN5A protein. This familial investigation revealed one novel asymptomatic carrier in the family. Genetic investigations are useful to classify individuals who require more frequent clinical monitoring and to stratify the risk of developing the disease.

  15. Infectious Mimicry Complicates Diagnosis in Hemophagocytic Syndrome Caused by Anaplastic Large-Cell Lymphoma

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    Michael J. Peluso

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Hemophagocytic syndrome (HPS arises secondary to genetic, rheumatologic, neoplastic, and infectious causes. We discuss a patient whose presentation was consistent with systemic infection but was discovered to have HPS of unknown etiology. The presenting symptoms, as well as unremarkable malignancy and rheumatologic workups, led to the pursuit of an infectious cause, but the patient was ultimately discovered to have an occult anaplastic large-cell lymphoma (ALCL. This case demonstrates the diagnostic challenges that result from infectious mimicry in the context of HPS—first, in distinguishing noninfectious HPS from the systemic inflammation that can result from a widespread infectious process, second, in the identification of the precipitating cause of HPS. While evidence of these challenges has been suggested by the limited literature on HPS and ALCL, our case illustrates the diagnostic dilemma that arises when tissue biopsy does not quickly reveal an etiology. It is important that all physicians be aware that HPS can mimic infection and be prepared to redirect the workup when an infectious etiology for HPS cannot be identified.

  16. [Primary Neuroendocrine Carcinoma of Thymus Caused Cushing Syndrome: Surgical Treatment and Prognosis Analysis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Li; Chen, Yeye; Li, Shanqing; Liu, Hongsheng; Huang, Cheng; Qin, Yingzhi

    2015-07-01

    Primary neuroendocrine carcinoma of thymus (pNECT) is a rare thymic neoplasm. Some pNECTs could produce an adrenocorticotropic hormone and cause Cushing syndrome (CS). The aim os this study is to discuss the diagnostic technique and surgical management of pNECT-caused CS and analyze prognosis factors to improve the clinical experience of the disease. The outcome of surgery and follow-up of 14 cases (eight males and six females) of pNECT-caused CS were retrospectively analyzed from November 1987 to June 2013. The median age of the patients was 29, and the median duration of the disease was four months (1 month-44 months). All cases exhibited clinical evidence for the diagnosis of CS, and thoracic computed tomography (CT) was used to detect thymic tumors. Surgical treatment significantly decreased the concentration of both serum cortisol and adrenocorticotropic hormone (Pdisease with aggressive characteristics and unclear prognosis. Early diagnosis and therapy is a challenge for clinicians. Thoracic CT is important for disease location and preoperative evaluation and should be routinely applied to all CS patients to allow early surgery and improved prognosis.

  17. A novel STXBP1 mutation causes typical Rett syndrome in a Japanese girl.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuge, Kotaro; Iwama, Kazuhiro; Yonee, Chihiro; Matsufuji, Mayumi; Sano, Nozomi; Saikusa, Tomoko; Yae, Yukako; Yamashita, Yushiro; Mizuguchi, Takeshi; Matsumoto, Naomichi; Matsuishi, Toyojiro

    2018-03-12

    Rett syndrome (RTT) is a neurodevelopmental disorder mostly caused by mutations in Methyl-CpG-binding protein 2 (MECP2); however, mutations in various other genes may lead to RTT-like phenotypes. Here, we report the first case of a Japanese girl with RTT caused by a novel syntaxin-binding protein 1 (STXBP1) frameshift mutation (c.60delG, p.Lys21Argfs*16). She showed epilepsy at one year of age, regression of acquired psychomotor abilities thereafter, and exhibited stereotypic hand and limb movements at 3 years of age. Her epilepsy onset was earlier than is typical for RTT patients. However, she fully met the 2010 diagnostic criteria of typical RTT. STXBP1 mutations cause early infantile epileptic encephalopathy (EIEE), various intractable epilepsies, and neurodevelopmental disorders. However, the case described here presented a unique clinical presentation of typical RTT without EIEE and a novel STXBP1 mutation. Copyright © 2018 The Japanese Society of Child Neurology. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. FAM20A mutations can cause enamel-renal syndrome (ERS.

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    Shih-Kai Wang

    Full Text Available Enamel-renal syndrome (ERS is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by severe enamel hypoplasia, failed tooth eruption, intrapulpal calcifications, enlarged gingiva, and nephrocalcinosis. Recently, mutations in FAM20A were reported to cause amelogenesis imperfecta and gingival fibromatosis syndrome (AIGFS, which closely resembles ERS except for the renal calcifications. We characterized three families with AIGFS and identified, in each case, recessive FAM20A mutations: family 1 (c.992G>A; g.63853G>A; p.Gly331Asp, family 2 (c.720-2A>G; g.62232A>G; p.Gln241_Arg271del, and family 3 (c.406C>T; g.50213C>T; p.Arg136* and c.1432C>T; g.68284C>T; p.Arg478*. Significantly, a kidney ultrasound of the family 2 proband revealed nephrocalcinosis, revising the diagnosis from AIGFS to ERS. By characterizing teeth extracted from the family 3 proband, we demonstrated that FAM20A(-/- molars lacked true enamel, showed extensive crown and root resorption, hypercementosis, and partial replacement of resorbed mineral with bone or coalesced mineral spheres. Supported by the observation of severe ectopic calcifications in the kidneys of Fam20a null mice, we conclude that FAM20A, which has a kinase homology domain and localizes to the Golgi, is a putative Golgi kinase that plays a significant role in the regulation of biomineralization processes, and that mutations in FAM20A cause both AIGFS and ERS.

  19. FAM20A Mutations Can Cause Enamel-Renal Syndrome (ERS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shih-Kai; Aref, Parissa; Hu, Yuanyuan; Milkovich, Rachel N.; Simmer, James P.; El-Khateeb, Mohammad; Daggag, Hinda; Baqain, Zaid H.; Hu, Jan C-C.

    2013-01-01

    Enamel-renal syndrome (ERS) is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by severe enamel hypoplasia, failed tooth eruption, intrapulpal calcifications, enlarged gingiva, and nephrocalcinosis. Recently, mutations in FAM20A were reported to cause amelogenesis imperfecta and gingival fibromatosis syndrome (AIGFS), which closely resembles ERS except for the renal calcifications. We characterized three families with AIGFS and identified, in each case, recessive FAM20A mutations: family 1 (c.992G>A; g.63853G>A; p.Gly331Asp), family 2 (c.720-2A>G; g.62232A>G; p.Gln241_Arg271del), and family 3 (c.406C>T; g.50213C>T; p.Arg136* and c.1432C>T; g.68284C>T; p.Arg478*). Significantly, a kidney ultrasound of the family 2 proband revealed nephrocalcinosis, revising the diagnosis from AIGFS to ERS. By characterizing teeth extracted from the family 3 proband, we demonstrated that FAM20A −/− molars lacked true enamel, showed extensive crown and root resorption, hypercementosis, and partial replacement of resorbed mineral with bone or coalesced mineral spheres. Supported by the observation of severe ectopic calcifications in the kidneys of Fam20a null mice, we conclude that FAM20A, which has a kinase homology domain and localizes to the Golgi, is a putative Golgi kinase that plays a significant role in the regulation of biomineralization processes, and that mutations in FAM20A cause both AIGFS and ERS. PMID:23468644

  20. The molecular basis of variable phenotypic severity among common missense mutations causing Rett syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Kyla; Selfridge, Jim; Lagger, Sabine; Connelly, John; De Sousa, Dina; Kerr, Alastair; Webb, Shaun; Guy, Jacky; Merusi, Cara; Koerner, Martha V; Bird, Adrian

    2016-02-01

    Rett syndrome is caused by mutations in the X-linked MECP2 gene, which encodes a chromosomal protein that binds to methylated DNA. Mouse models mirror the human disorder and therefore allow investigation of phenotypes at a molecular level. We describe an Mecp2 allelic series representing the three most common missense Rett syndrome (RTT) mutations, including first reports of Mecp2[R133C] and Mecp2[T158M] knock-in mice, in addition to Mecp2[R306C] mutant mice. Together these three alleles comprise ∼25% of all RTT mutations in humans, but they vary significantly in average severity. This spectrum is mimicked in the mouse models; R133C being least severe, T158M most severe and R306C of intermediate severity. Both R133C and T158M mutations cause compound phenotypes at the molecular level, combining compromised DNA binding with reduced stability, the destabilizing effect of T158M being more severe. Our findings contradict the hypothesis that the R133C mutation exclusively abolishes binding to hydroxymethylated DNA, as interactions with DNA containing methyl-CG, methyl-CA and hydroxymethyl-CA are all reduced in vivo. We find that MeCP2[T158M] is significantly less stable than MeCP2[R133C], which may account for the divergent clinical impact of the mutations. Overall, this allelic series recapitulates human RTT severity, reveals compound molecular aetiologies and provides a valuable resource in the search for personalized therapeutic interventions. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press.

  1. Recessive mutations in EPG5 cause Vici syndrome, a multisystem disorder with defective autophagy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cullup, Thomas; Kho, Ay Lin; Dionisi-Vici, Carlo; Brandmeier, Birgit; Smith, Frances; Urry, Zoe; Simpson, Michael A.; Yau, Shu; Bertini, Enrico; McClelland, Verity; Al-Owain, Mohammed; Koelker, Stefan; Koerner, Christian; Hoffmann, Georg F.; Wijburg, Frits A.; ten Hoedt, Amber E.; Rogers, R. Curtis; Manchester, David; Miyata, Rie; Hayashi, Masaharu; Said, Elizabeth; Soler, Doriette; Kroisel, Peter M.; Windpassinger, Christian; Filloux, Francis M.; Al-Kaabi, Salwa; Hertecant, Jozef; del Campo, Miguel; Buk, Stefan; Bodi, Istvan; Goebel, Hans-Hilmar; Sewry, Caroline A.; Abbs, Stephen; Mohammed, Shehla; Josifova, Dragana; Gautel, Mathias; Jungbluth, Heinz

    2013-01-01

    Vici syndrome is a recessively inherited multisystem disorder characterized by callosal agenesis, cataracts, cardiomyopathy, combined immunodeficiency and hypopigmentation. To investigate the molecular basis of Vici syndrome, we carried out exome and Sanger sequence analysis in a cohort of 18

  2. Catatonia in Down syndrome; a treatable cause of regression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghaziuddin N

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Neera Ghaziuddin,1 Armin Nassiri,2 Judith H Miles3 1Department of Psychiatry, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan, 2Community Psychiatry, San Jose, California, 3Thompson Center for Autism and Neurodevelopmental Disorders and Department of Child Health, University of Missouri, Columbia, Missouri, USA Objective: The main aim of this case series report is to alert physicians to the occurrence of catatonia in Down syndrome (DS. A second aim is to stimulate the study of regression in DS and of catatonia. A subset of individuals with DS is noted to experience unexplained regression in behavior, mood, activities of daily living, motor activities, and intellectual functioning during adolescence or young adulthood. Depression, early onset Alzheimer’s, or just “the Down syndrome” are often blamed after general medical causes have been ruled out. Clinicians are generally unaware that catatonia, which can cause these symptoms, may occur in DS.Study design: Four DS adolescents who experienced regression are reported. Laboratory tests intended to rule out causes of motor and cognitive regression were within normal limits. Based on the presence of multiple motor disturbances (slowing and/or increased motor activity, grimacing, posturing, the individuals were diagnosed with unspecified catatonia and treated with anti-catatonic treatments (benzodiazepines and electroconvulsive therapy [ECT].Results: All four cases were treated with a benzodiazepine combined with ECT and recovered their baseline functioning.Conclusion: We suspect catatonia is a common cause of unexplained deterioration in adolescents and young adults with DS. Moreover, pediatricians and others who care for individuals with DS are generally unfamiliar with the catatonia diagnosis outside schizophrenia, resulting in misdiagnosis and years of morbidity. Alerting physicians to catatonia in DS is essential to prompt diagnosis, appropriate treatment, and identification of the frequency

  3. Experimental infection of bats with Geomyces destructans causes white-nose syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorch, J.M.; Meteyer, C.U.; Behr, M.J.; Boyles, J.G.; Cryan, P.M.; Hicks, A.C.; Ballmann, A.E.; Coleman, J.T.H.; Redell, D.N.; Reeder, D.M.; Blehert, D.S.

    2011-01-01

    White-nose syndrome (WNS) has caused recent catastrophic declines among multiple species of bats in eastern North America. The disease's name derives from a visually apparent white growth of the newly discovered fungus Geomyces destructans on the skin (including the muzzle) of hibernating bats. Colonization of skin by this fungus is associated with characteristic cutaneous lesions that are the only consistent pathological finding related to WNS. However, the role of G. destructans in WNS remains controversial because evidence to implicate the fungus as the primary cause of this disease is lacking. The debate is fuelled, in part, by the assumption that fungal infections in mammals are most commonly associated with immune system dysfunction. Additionally, the recent discovery that G. destructans commonly colonizes the skin of bats of Europe, where no unusual bat mortality events have been reported, has generated further speculation that the fungus is an opportunistic pathogen and that other unidentified factors are the primary cause of WNS. Here we demonstrate that exposure of healthy little brown bats (Myotis lucifugus) to pure cultures of G. destructans causes WNS. Live G. destructans was subsequently cultured from diseased bats, successfully fulfilling established criteria for the determination of G. destructans as a primary pathogen. We also confirmed that WNS can be transmitted from infected bats to healthy bats through direct contact. Our results provide the first direct evidence that G. destructans is the causal agent of WNS and that the recent emergence of WNS in North America may represent translocation of the fungus to a region with a naive population of animals. Demonstration of causality is an instrumental step in elucidating the pathogenesis and epidemiology of WNS and in guiding management actions to preserve bat populations against the novel threat posed by this devastating infectious disease. ?? 2011 Macmillan Publishers Limited. All rights reserved.

  4. Mutations in the TGF-beta repressor SKI cause Shprintzen-Goldberg syndrome with aortic aneurysm

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Doyle, Alexander J.; Doyle, Jefferson J.; Bessling, Seneca L.; Maragh, Samantha; Lindsay, Mark E.; Schepers, Dorien; Gillis, Elisabeth; Mortier, Geert; Homfray, Tessa; Sauls, Kimberly; Norris, Russell A.; Huso, Nicholas D.; Leahy, Dan; Mohr, David W.; Caulfield, Mark J.; Scott, Alan F.; Destrée, Anne; Hennekam, Raoul C.; Arn, Pamela H.; Curry, Cynthia J.; van Laer, Lut; McCallion, Andrew S.; Loeys, Bart L.; Dietz, Harry C.

    2012-01-01

    Elevated transforming growth factor (TGF)-beta signaling has been implicated in the pathogenesis of syndromic presentations of aortic aneurysm, including Marfan syndrome (MFS) and Loeys-Dietz syndrome (LDS)(1-4). However, the location and character of many of the causal mutations in LDS intuitively

  5. ABCD syndrome is caused by a homozygous mutation in the EDNRB gene

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verheij, JBGM; Kunze, J; Osinga, J; van Essen, AJ; Hofstra, RMW

    2002-01-01

    ABCD syndrome is an autosomal recessive syndrome characterized by albinism, black lock, cell migration disorder of the neurocytes of the gut (Hirschsprung disease [HSCR]), and deafness. This phenotype clearly overlaps with the features of the Shah-Waardenburg syndrome, comprising sensorineural

  6. Heterozygous germline mutations in the p53 homolog p63 are the cause of EEC syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Celli, J; Duijf, P; Hamel, BCJ; Bamshad, M; Kramer, B; Smits, APT; Newbury-Ecob, R; Hennekam, RCM; Van Buggenhout, G; van Haeringen, B; Woods, CG; van Essen, AJ; de Waal, R; Vriend, G; Haber, DA; Yang, A; McKeon, F; Brunner, HG; van Bokhoven, H

    1999-01-01

    EEC syndrome is an autosomal dominant disorder characterized by ectrodactyly, ectodermal dysplasia, and facial clefts. We have mapped the genetic defect in several EEC syndrome families to a region of chromosome 3q27 previously implicated in the EEC-like disorder, limb mammary syndrome (LMS).

  7. Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome Caused by Biallelic TNXB Variants in Patients with Congenital Adrenal Hyperplasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Wuyan; Perritt, Ashley F; Morissette, Rachel; Dreiling, Jennifer L; Bohn, Markus-Frederik; Mallappa, Ashwini; Xu, Zhi; Quezado, Martha; Merke, Deborah P

    2016-09-01

    Some variants that cause autosomal-recessive congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH) also cause hypermobility type Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (EDS) due to the monoallelic presence of a chimera disrupting two flanking genes: CYP21A2, encoding 21-hydroxylase, necessary for cortisol and aldosterone biosynthesis, and TNXB, encoding tenascin-X, an extracellular matrix protein. Two types of CAH tenascin-X (CAH-X) chimeras have been described with a total deletion of CYP21A2 and characteristic TNXB variants. CAH-X CH-1 has a TNXB exon 35 120-bp deletion resulting in haploinsufficiency, and CAH-X CH-2 has a TNXB exon 40 c.12174C>G (p.Cys4058Trp) variant resulting in a dominant-negative effect. We present here three patients with biallelic CAH-X and identify a novel dominant-negative chimera termed CAH-X CH-3. Compared with monoallelic CAH-X, biallelic CAH-X results in a more severe phenotype with skin features characteristic of classical EDS. We present evidence for disrupted tenascin-X function and computational data linking the type of TNXB variant to disease severity. © 2016 WILEY PERIODICALS, INC.

  8. Fifteen novel FBN1 mutations causing Marfan syndrome detected by heteroduplex analysis of genomic amplicons

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    Nijbroek, G.; Sood, S.; McIntosh, I. [John Hopkins Univ. School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD (United States)] [and others

    1995-07-01

    Mutations in the gene encoding fibrillin-1 (FBN1), a component of the extracellular microfibril, cause the Marfan syndrome (MFS). This statement is supported by the observations that the classic Marfan phenotype cosegregates with intragenic and/or flanking marker alleles in all families tested and that a significant number of FBN1 mutations have been identified in affected individuals. We have now devised a method to screen the entire coding sequence and flanking splice junctions of FBN1. On completion for a panel of nine probands with classic MFS, six new mutations were identified that accounted for disease in seven (78%) of nine patients. Nine additional new mutations have been characterized in the early stages of a larger screening project. These 15 mutations were equally distributed throughout the gene and, with one exception, were specific to single families. One-third of mutations created premature termination codons, and 6 of 15 substituted residues with putative significance for calcium finding to epidermal growth factor (EGF)-like domains. Mutations causing severe and rapidly progressive disease that presents in the neonatal period can occur in a larger region of the gene than previously demonstrated, and the nature of the mutation is as important a determinant as its location, in predisposing to this phenotype. 56 refs., 5 figs., 3 tabs.

  9. First Report of a Single Exon Deletion in TCOF1 Causing Treacher Collins Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beygo, J; Buiting, K; Seland, S; Lüdecke, H-J; Hehr, U; Lich, C; Prager, B; Lohmann, D R; Wieczorek, D

    2012-01-01

    Treacher Collins syndrome (TCS) is a rare craniofacial disorder characterized by facial anomalies and ear defects. TCS is caused by mutations in the TCOF1 gene and follows autosomal dominant inheritance. Recently, mutations in the POLR1D and POLR1C genes have also been identified to cause TCS. However, in a subset of patients no causative mutation could be found yet. Inter- and intrafamilial phenotypic variability is high as is the variety of mainly family-specific mutations identified throughout TCOF1. No obvious correlation between pheno- and genotype could be observed. The majority of described point mutations, small insertions and deletions comprising only a few nucleotides within TCOF1 lead to a premature termination codon. We investigated a cohort of 112 patients with a tentative clinical diagnosis of TCS by multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA) to search for larger deletions not detectable with other methods used. All patients were selected after negative screening for mutations in TCOF1, POLR1D and POLR1C. In 1 patient with an unequivocal clinical diagnosis of TCS, we identified a 3.367 kb deletion. This deletion abolishes exon 3 and is the first described single exon deletion within TCOF1. On RNA level we observed loss of this exon which supposedly leads to haploinsufficiency of TREACLE, the nucleolar phosphoprotein encoded by TCOF1.

  10. Duck egg-drop syndrome caused by BYD virus, a new Tembusu-related flavivirus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jingliang Su

    Full Text Available Since April 2010, a severe outbreak of duck viral infection, with egg drop, feed uptake decline and ovary-oviduct disease, has spread around the major duck-producing regions in China. A new virus, named BYD virus, was isolated in different areas, and a similar disease was reproduced in healthy egg-producing ducks, infecting with the isolated virus. The virus was re-isolated from the affected ducks and replicated well in primary duck embryo fibroblasts and Vero cells, causing the cytopathic effect. The virus was identified as an enveloped positive-stranded RNA virus with a size of approximately 55 nm in diameter. Genomic sequencing of the isolated virus revealed that it is closely related to Tembusu virus (a mosquito-borne Ntaya group flavivirus, with 87-91% nucleotide identity of the partial E (envelope proteins to that of Tembusu virus and 72% of the entire genome coding sequence with Bagaza virus, the most closely related flavivirus with an entirely sequenced genome. Collectively our systematic studies fulfill Koch's postulates, and therefore, the causative agent of the duck egg drop syndrome occurring in China is a new flavivirus. Flavivirus is an emerging and re-emerging zoonotic pathogen and BYD virus that causes severe egg-drop, could be disastrous for the duck industry. More importantly its public health concerns should also be evaluated, and its epidemiology should be closely watched due to the zoonotic nature of flaviviruses.

  11. A new mutation in the gene encoding mitochondrial seryl-tRNA synthetase as a cause of HUPRA syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivera, Henry; Martín-Hernández, Elena; Delmiro, Aitor; García-Silva, María Teresa; Quijada-Fraile, Pilar; Muley, Rafael; Arenas, Joaquín; Martín, Miguel A; Martínez-Azorín, Francisco

    2013-09-13

    HUPRA syndrome is a rare mitochondrial disease characterized by hyperuricemia, pulmonary hypertension, renal failure in infancy and alkalosis. This syndrome was previously described in three patients with a homozygous mutation c.1169A > G (p.D390G) in SARS2, encoding the mitochondrial seryl-tRNA synthetase. Here we report the clinical and genetic findings in a girl and her brother. Both patients were clinically diagnosed with the HUPRA syndrome. Analysis of the pedigree identified a new homozygous mutation c.1205G > A (p.R402H) in SARS2 gene. This mutation is very rare in the population and it is located at the C-terminal globular domain of the homodimeric enzyme very close to p.D390G. Several data support that p.R402H mutation in SARS2 is a new cause of HUPRA syndrome.

  12. Malignant perinatal variant of long-QT syndrome caused by a profoundly dysfunctional cardiac sodium channel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Dao W; Crotti, Lia; Shimizu, Wataru; Pedrazzini, Matteo; Cantu, Francesco; De Filippo, Paolo; Kishiki, Kanako; Miyazaki, Aya; Ikeda, Tomoaki; Schwartz, Peter J; George, Alfred L

    2008-12-01

    Inherited cardiac arrhythmia susceptibility contributes to sudden death during infancy and may contribute to perinatal and neonatal mortality, but the molecular basis of this risk and the relationship to genetic disorders presenting later in life is unclear. We studied the functional and pharmacological properties of a novel de novo cardiac sodium channel gene (SCN5A) mutation associated with an extremely severe perinatal presentation of long-QT syndrome in unrelated probands of different ethnicity. Two subjects exhibiting severe fetal and perinatal ventricular arrhythmias were screened for SCN5A mutations, and the functional properties of a novel missense mutation (G1631D) were determined by whole-cell patch clamp recording. In vitro electrophysiological studies revealed a profound defect in sodium channel function characterized by approximately 10-fold slowing of inactivation, increased persistent current, slowing of recovery from inactivation, and depolarized voltage dependence of activation and inactivation. Single-channel recordings demonstrated increased frequency of late openings, prolonged mean open time, and increased latency to first opening for the mutant. Subjects carrying this mutation responded clinically to the combination of mexiletine with propranolol and survived. Pharmacologically, the mutant exhibited 2-fold greater tonic and use-dependent mexiletine block than wild-type channels. The mutant also exhibited enhanced tonic (2.4-fold) and use-dependent block ( approximately 5-fold) by propranolol, and we observed additive effects of the 2 drugs on the mutant. Our study demonstrates the molecular basis for a malignant perinatal presentation of long-QT syndrome, illustrates novel functional and pharmacological properties of SCN5A-G1631D, which caused the disorder, and reveals therapeutic benefits of propranolol block of mutant sodium channels in this setting.

  13. A Marfan syndrome-like phenotype caused by a neocentromeric supernumerary ring chromosome 15.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quinonez, Shane C; Gelehrter, Thomas D; Uhlmann, Wendy R

    2017-01-01

    Small supernumerary marker chromosomes (sSMC) are abnormal chromosomes that cannot be characterized by standard banding cytogenetic techniques. A minority of sSMC contain a neocentromere, which is an ectopic centromere lacking the characteristic alpha-satellite DNA. The phenotypic manifestations of sSMC and neocentromeric sSMC are variable and range from severe intellectual disability and multiple congenital anomalies to a normal phenotype. Here we report a patient with a diagnosis of Marfan syndrome and infertility found to have an abnormal karyotype consisting of a chromosome 15 deletion and a ring-type sSMC likely stabilized by a neocentromere derived via a mechanism initially described by Barbara McClintock in 1938. Analysis of the sSMC identified that it contained the deleted chromosome 15 material and also one copy of FBN1, the gene responsible for Marfan syndrome. We propose that the patient's diagnosis arose from disruption of the FBN1 allele on the sSMC. To date, a total of 29 patients have been reported with an sSMC derived from a chromosomal deletion. We review these cases with a specific focus on the resultant phenotypes and note significant difference between this class of sSMC and other types of sSMC. Through this review we also identified a patient with a clinical diagnosis of neurofibromatosis type 1 who lacked a family history of the condition but was found to have a chromosome 17-derived sSMC that likely contained NF1 and caused the patient's disorder. We also review the genetic counseling implications and recommendations for a patient or family harboring an sSMC. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Recessive inheritance of population-specific intronic LINE-1 insertion causes a rotor syndrome phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kagawa, Tatehiro; Oka, Akira; Kobayashi, Yoshinao; Hiasa, Yoichi; Kitamura, Tsuneo; Sakugawa, Hiroshi; Adachi, Yukihiko; Anzai, Kazuya; Tsuruya, Kota; Arase, Yoshitaka; Hirose, Shunji; Shiraishi, Koichi; Shiina, Takashi; Sato, Tadayuki; Wang, Ting; Tanaka, Masayuki; Hayashi, Hideki; Kawabe, Noboru; Robinson, Peter N; Zemojtel, Tomasz; Mine, Tetsuya

    2015-03-01

    Sequences of long-interspersed elements (LINE-1, L1) make up ∼17% of the human genome. De novo insertions of retrotransposition-active L1s can result in genetic diseases. It has been recently shown that the homozygous inactivation of two adjacent genes SLCO1B1 and SLCO1B3 encoding organic anion transporting polypeptides OATP1B1 and OATP1B3 causes a benign recessive disease presenting with conjugated hyperbilirubinemia, Rotor syndrome. Here, we examined SLCO1B1 and SLCO1B3 genes in six Japanese diagnosed with Rotor syndrome on the basis of laboratory data and laparoscopy. All six Japanese patients were homozygous for the c.1738C>T nonsense mutation in SLCO1B1 and homozygous for the insertion of a ∼6.1-kbp L1 retrotransposon in intron 5 of SLCO1B3, which altogether make up a Japanese-specific haplotype. RNA analysis revealed that the L1 insertion induced deleterious splicing resulting in SLCO1B3 transcripts lacking exon 5 or exons 5-7 and containing premature stop codons. The expression of OATP1B1 and OATP1B3 proteins was not detected in liver tissues. This is the first documented case of a population-specific polymorphic intronic L1 transposon insertion contributing to molecular etiology of recessive genetic disease. Since L1 activity in human genomes is currently seen as a major source of individual genetic variation, further investigations are warranted to determine whether this phenomenon results in other autosomal-recessive diseases. © 2014 WILEY PERIODICALS, INC.

  15. Missense mutations in the WD40 domain of AHI1 cause non-syndromic retinitis pigmentosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Thanh-Minh T; Hull, Sarah; Roepman, Ronald; van den Born, L Ingeborgh; Oud, Machteld M; de Vrieze, Erik; Hetterschijt, Lisette; Letteboer, Stef J F; van Beersum, Sylvia E C; Blokland, Ellen A; Yntema, Helger G; Cremers, Frans P M; van der Zwaag, Paul A; Arno, Gavin; van Wijk, Erwin; Webster, Andrew R; Haer-Wigman, Lonneke

    2017-09-01

    Recent findings suggesting that Abelson helper integration site 1 ( AHI1 ) is involved in non-syndromic retinal disease have been debated, as the functional significance of identified missense variants was uncertain. We assessed whether AHI1 variants cause non-syndromic retinitis pigmentosa (RP). Exome sequencing was performed in three probands with RP. The effects of the identified missense variants in AHI1 were predicted by three-dimensional structure homology modelling. Ciliary parameters were evaluated in patient's fibroblasts, and recombinant mutant proteins were expressed in ciliated retinal pigmented epithelium cells. In the three patients with RP, three sets of compound heterozygous variants were detected in AHI1 (c.2174G>A; p.Trp725* and c.2258A>T; p.Asp753Val, c.660delC; p.Ser221Glnfs*10 and c.2090C>T; p.Pro697Leu, c.2087A>G; p.His696Arg and c.2429C>T; p.Pro810Leu). All four missense variants were present in the conserved WD40 domain of Jouberin, the ciliary protein encoded by AHI1 , with variable predicted implications for the domain structure. No significant changes in the percentage of ciliated cells, nor in cilium length or intraflagellar transport were detected. However, expression of mutant recombinant Jouberin in ciliated cells showed a significantly decreased enrichment at the ciliary base. This report confirms that mutations in AHI1 can underlie autosomal recessive RP. Moreover, it structurally and functionally validates the effect of the RP-associated AHI1 variants on protein function, thus proposing a new genotype-phenotype correlation for AHI1 mutation associated retinal ciliopathies. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  16. Mutations in EXTL3 Cause Neuro-immuno-skeletal Dysplasia Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oud, Machteld M; Tuijnenburg, Paul; Hempel, Maja; van Vlies, Naomi; Ren, Zemin; Ferdinandusse, Sacha; Jansen, Machiel H; Santer, René; Johannsen, Jessika; Bacchelli, Chiara; Alders, Marielle; Li, Rui; Davies, Rosalind; Dupuis, Lucie; Cale, Catherine M; Wanders, Ronald J A; Pals, Steven T; Ocaka, Louise; James, Chela; Müller, Ingo; Lehmberg, Kai; Strom, Tim; Engels, Hartmut; Williams, Hywel J; Beales, Phil; Roepman, Ronald; Dias, Patricia; Brunner, Han G; Cobben, Jan-Maarten; Hall, Christine; Hartley, Taila; Le Quesne Stabej, Polona; Mendoza-Londono, Roberto; Davies, E Graham; de Sousa, Sérgio B; Lessel, Davor; Arts, Heleen H; Kuijpers, Taco W

    2017-02-02

    EXTL3 regulates the biosynthesis of heparan sulfate (HS), important for both skeletal development and hematopoiesis, through the formation of HS proteoglycans (HSPGs). By whole-exome sequencing, we identified homozygous missense mutations c.1382C>T, c.1537C>T, c.1970A>G, and c.2008T>G in EXTL3 in nine affected individuals from five unrelated families. Notably, we found the identical homozygous missense mutation c.1382C>T (p.Pro461Leu) in four affected individuals from two unrelated families. Affected individuals presented with variable skeletal abnormalities and neurodevelopmental defects. Severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) with a complete absence of T cells was observed in three families. EXTL3 was most abundant in hematopoietic stem cells and early progenitor T cells, which is in line with a SCID phenotype at the level of early T cell development in the thymus. To provide further support for the hypothesis that mutations in EXTL3 cause a neuro-immuno-skeletal dysplasia syndrome, and to gain insight into the pathogenesis of the disorder, we analyzed the localization of EXTL3 in fibroblasts derived from affected individuals and determined glycosaminoglycan concentrations in these cells as well as in urine and blood. We observed abnormal glycosaminoglycan concentrations and increased concentrations of the non-sulfated chondroitin disaccharide D0a0 and the disaccharide D0a4 in serum and urine of all analyzed affected individuals. In summary, we show that biallelic mutations in EXTL3 disturb glycosaminoglycan synthesis and thus lead to a recognizable syndrome characterized by variable expression of skeletal, neurological, and immunological abnormalities. Copyright © 2017 American Society of Human Genetics. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Biallelic SUN5 Mutations Cause Autosomal-Recessive Acephalic Spermatozoa Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Fuxi; Wang, Fengsong; Yang, Xiaoyu; Zhang, Jingjing; Wu, Huan; Zhang, Zhou; Zhang, Zhiguo; He, Xiaojin; Zhou, Ping; Wei, Zhaolian; Gecz, Jozef; Cao, Yunxia

    2016-10-06

    Acephalic spermatozoa syndrome is a rare and severe form of teratozoospermia characterized by a predominance of headless spermatozoa in the ejaculate. Family clustering and consanguinity suggest a genetic origin; however, causative mutations have yet to be identified. We performed whole-exome sequencing in two unrelated infertile men and subsequent variant filtering identified one homozygous (c.824C>T [p.Thr275Met]) and one compound heterozygous (c.1006C>T [p.Arg356Cys] and c.485T>A [p.Met162Lys]) SUN5 (also named TSARG4) variants. Sanger sequencing of SUN5 in 15 additional unrelated infertile men revealed four compound heterozygous (c.381delA [p.Val128Serfs ∗ 7] and c.824C>T [p.Thr275Met]; c.381delA [p.Val128Serfs ∗ 7] and c.781G>A [p.Val261Met]; c.216G>A [p.Trp72 ∗ ] and c.1043A>T [p.Asn348Ile]; c.425+1G>A/c.1043A>T [p.Asn348Ile]) and two homozygous (c.851C>G [p.Ser284 ∗ ]; c.350G>A [p.Gly114Arg]) variants in six individuals. These 10 SUN5 variants were found in 8 of 17 unrelated men, explaining the genetic defect in 47.06% of the affected individuals in our cohort. These variants were absent in 100 fertile population-matched control individuals. SUN5 variants lead to absent, significantly reduced, or truncated SUN5, and certain variants altered SUN5 distribution in the head-tail junction of the sperm. In summary, these results demonstrate that biallelic SUN5 mutations cause male infertility due to autosomal-recessive acephalic spermatozoa syndrome. Copyright © 2016 American Society of Human Genetics. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Larva migrans syndrome caused by Toxocara and Ascaris roundworm infections in Japanese patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, A; Hombu, A; Wang, Z; Maruyama, H

    2016-09-01

    Larva migrans syndrome (LMS) caused by Toxocara and Ascaris roundworms is generally believed to be more common in children, while a report from Japan suggests that it is more common in adults. We conducted a large-scale retrospective study to confirm these findings and to clarify what caused the difference between Japan and other countries, to reveal overlooked aspects of this disease. The clinical information of 911 cases which we diagnosed as Toxocara or Ascaris LMS during 2001 and 2015 was analysed. Information used included age, sex, address (city or county), chief complaint, present history, dietary history, overseas travelling history, medical imaging findings and laboratory data (white blood cell count, peripheral blood eosinophil number and total IgE). The sex ratio of the disease was 2.37 (male/female = 641/270). The number of patients not younger than 20 years old were 97.8 and 95.1 % among males and females, respectively. Major disease types were visceral, ocular, neural and asymptomatic. The visceral type was more prevalent in older patients, while younger patients were more vulnerable to ocular symptoms. More than two-thirds of the patients whose dietary habits were recorded had a history of ingesting raw or undercooked animal meat. LMS caused by Toxocara or Ascaris is primarily a disease of adult males in Japan, who probably acquired infections by eating raw or undercooked animal meat/liver. Healthcare specialists should draw public attention to the risk of raw or undercooked animal meat in Europe as well.

  19. [Application of continuous renal replacement therapy in the treatment of myonephropathic metabolic syndrome caused by acute lower extremity ischemia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Jianping; Wang, Tengke; Zhang, Jinglan

    2014-09-16

    To summarize the experiences of using continuous renal replacement therapy in the treatment of myonephropathic metabolic syndrome caused by acute lower limb ischemia. Retrospective study of patients diagnosed acute lower limb ischemia with surgical treatment between January 2008 and December 2013, among which 22 patients with myonephropathic metabolic syndrome received continuous renal replacement therapy. Summarize the change tendency of myoglobin, urine volume and serum creatinine levels during treatment and analysis the condition changes and prognosis of the patients. Among them, 2 patients were amputated and two died after surgery. The major causes of death were acute renal failure, metabolic acidosis, circulation failure and liver failure, etc. Myoglobin was significantly higher at Day 1 after surgery than that was before surgery (P metabolic syndrome, early targeted continuous renal replacement therapy may decrease the serum concentrations of myoglobin and CK, improve urine volume, maintain homeostasis, prevent renal function deterioration and improve the prognosis of patients. And it is highly recommended.

  20. Gain-of-function mutations in the calcium channel CACNA1C (Cav1.2) cause non-syndromic long-QT but not Timothy syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wemhöner, Konstantin; Friedrich, Corinna; Stallmeyer, Birgit; Coffey, Alison J; Grace, Andrew; Zumhagen, Sven; Seebohm, Guiscard; Ortiz-Bonnin, Beatriz; Rinné, Susanne; Sachse, Frank B; Schulze-Bahr, Eric; Decher, Niels

    2015-03-01

    Gain-of-function mutations in CACNA1C, encoding the L-type Ca(2+) channel Cav1.2, cause Timothy syndrome (TS), a multi-systemic disorder with dysmorphic features, long-QT syndrome (LQTS) and autism spectrum disorders. TS patients have heterozygous mutations (G402S and G406R) located in the alternatively spliced exon 8, causing a gain-of-function by reduced voltage-dependence of inactivation. Screening 540 unrelated patients with non-syndromic forms of LQTS, we identified six functional relevant CACNA1C mutations in different regions of the channel. All these mutations caused a gain-of-function combining different mechanisms, including changes in current amplitude, rate of inactivation and voltage-dependence of activation or inactivation, similar as in TS. Computer simulations support the theory that the novel CACNA1C mutations prolong action potential duration. We conclude that genotype-negative LQTS patients should be investigated for mutations in CACNA1C, as a gain-of-function in Cav1.2 is likely to cause LQTS and only specific and rare mutations, i.e. in exon 8, cause the multi-systemic TS. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome Caused by Influenza B Virus Infection in a Patient with Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvio A. Ñamendys-Silva

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Influenza B virus infections are less common than infections caused by influenza A virus in critically ill patients, but similar mortality rates have been observed for both influenza types. Pneumonia caused by influenza B virus is uncommon and has been reported in pediatric patients and previously healthy adults. Critically ill patients with pneumonia caused by influenza virus may develop acute respiratory distress syndrome. We describe the clinical course of a critically ill patient with diffuse large B-cell lymphoma nongerminal center B-cell phenotype who developed acute respiratory distress syndrome caused by influenza B virus infection. This paper emphasizes the need to suspect influenza B virus infection in critically ill immunocompromised patients with progressive deterioration of cardiopulmonary function despite treatment with antibiotics. Early initiation of neuraminidase inhibitor and the implementation of guidelines for management of severe sepsis and septic shock should be considered.

  2. Whole-Genome Characterization and Strain Comparison of VT2f-Producing Escherichia coli Causing Hemolytic Uremic Syndrome.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Grande, Laura; Michelacci, Valeria; Bondì, Roslen; Gigliucci, Federica; Franz, Eelco; Badouei, Mahdi Askari; Schlager, Sabine; Minelli, Fabio; Tozzoli, Rosangela; Caprioli, Alfredo; Morabito, Stefano

    2016-01-01

    Verotoxigenic Escherichia coli infections in humans cause disease ranging from uncomplicated intestinal illnesses to bloody diarrhea and systemic sequelae, such as hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS). Previous research indicated that pigeons may be a reservoir for a population of verotoxigenic E. coli

  3. Mutations in two nonhomologous genes in a head-to-head configuration cause Ellis-van Creveld syndrome.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ruiz-Perez, V.L.; Tompson, S.W.; Blair, H.J.; Espinoza-Valdez, C.; Lapunzina, P.; Silva, E.O.; Hamel, B.C.J.; Gibbs, J.L.; Young, I.D.; Wright, M.J.; Goodship, J.A.

    2003-01-01

    Ellis-van Creveld syndrome (EvC) is an autosomal recessive skeletal dysplasia. Elsewhere, we described mutations in EVC in patients with this condition (Ruiz-Perez et al. 2000). We now report that mutations in EVC2 also cause EvC. These two genes lie in a head-to-head configuration that is conserved

  4. Further delineation of an entity caused by CREBBP and EP300 mutations but not resembling Rubinstein-Taybi syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Menke, Leonie A.; Gardeitchik, Thatjana; Hammond, Peter; Heimdal, Ketil R.; Houge, Gunnar; Hufnagel, Sophia B.; Ji, Jianling; Johansson, Stefan; Kant, Sarina G.; Kinning, Esther; Leon, Eyby L.; Newbury-Ecob, Ruth; Paolacci, Stefano; Pfundt, Rolph; Ragge, Nicola K.; Rinne, Tuula; Ruivenkamp, Claudia; Saitta, Sulagna C.; Sun, Yu; Tartaglia, Marco; Terhal, Paulien A.; van Essen, Anthony J.; Vigeland, Magnus D.; Xiao, Bing; Hennekam, Raoul C.

    2018-01-01

    In 2016, we described that missense variants in parts of exons 30 and 31 of CREBBP can cause a phenotype that differs from Rubinstein-Taybi syndrome (RSTS). Here we report on another 11 patients with variants in this region of CREBBP (between bp 5,128 and 5,614) and two with variants in the

  5. De novo CCND2 mutations leading to stabilization of cyclin D2 cause megalencephaly-polymicrogyria-polydactyly-hydrocephalus syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    G.M. Mirzaa (Ghayda); D.A. Parry (David); N.K. Fry; K.A. Giamanco (Kristin); J.A. Schwartzentruber (Jeremy); M. Vanstone (Megan); C.V. Logan (Clare); N. Roberts (Nicola); C.A. Johnson (Colin); S. Singh (Shawn); S.S. Kholmanskikh (Stanislav); C. Adams (Carissa); R.D. Hodge (Rebecca); R.F. Hevner (Robert); D.T. Bonthron (David); K.P.J. Braun (Kees P.); L. Faivre (Laurence); J.-B. Riviere; C. St-Onge (Christina); K.W. Gripp (Karen); G.M.S. Mancini (Grazia); K. Pang (Ki); E. Sweeney (Elizabeth); H. van Esch (Hilde); N.E. Verbeek (Nienke); D. Wieczorek (Dagmar); M. Steinraths (Michelle); J. Majewski (Jacek); K.M. Boycott (Kym); D.T. Pilz (Daniela); M.E. Ross (M Elizabeth); W.B. Dobyns (William); E. Sheridan (Eamonn); J. Friedman; S. Michaud; F. Bernier (Francois); M. Brudno (M.); B. Fernandez (B.); A. Knoppers (Annelies); J. Samuels (Jonathan); S.W. Scherer (Stephen)

    2014-01-01

    textabstractActivating mutations in genes encoding phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K)-AKT pathway components cause megalencephaly-polymicrogyria-polydactyly- hydrocephalus syndrome (MPPH, OMIM 603387). Here we report that individuals with MPPH lacking upstream PI3K-AKT pathway mutations carry de

  6. Molecular characterization of a heterothallic mating system in Pseudogymnoascus destructans, the fungus causing white-nose syndrome of bats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jonathan M. Palmer; Alena Kubatova; Alena. Novakova; Andrew M. Minnis; Miroslav Kolarik; Daniel L. Lindner

    2014-01-01

    White-nose syndrome (WNS) of bats has devastated bat populations in eastern North America since its discovery in 2006. WNS, caused by the fungus Pseudogymnoascus destructans, has spread quickly in North America and has become one of the most severe wildlife epidemics of our time. While P. destructans is spreading rapidly in North...

  7. Syncope in Brugada syndrome: prevalence, clinical significance, and clues from history taking to distinguish arrhythmic from nonarrhythmic causes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Olde Nordkamp, Louise R. A.; Vink, Arja S.; Wilde, Arthur A. M.; de Lange, Freek J.; de Jong, Jonas S. S. G.; Wieling, Wouter; van Dijk, Nynke; Tan, Hanno L.

    2015-01-01

    Syncope in Brugada syndrome (BrS) patients is a sign of increased risk for sudden cardiac death and usually is ascribed to cardiac arrhythmias. However, syncope often occurs in the general population, mostly from nonarrhythmic causes (eg, reflex syncope). The purpose of this study was to distinguish

  8. A frame-shift mutation of PMS2 is a widespread cause of Lynch syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clendenning, Mark; Senter, Leigha; Hampel, Heather

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: When compared to the other mismatch repair genes involved in Lynch syndrome, the identification of mutations within PMS2 has been limited (... are caused by PMS2. This disparity is primarily due to complications in the study of this gene caused by interference from pseudogene sequences. METHODS: Using a recently developed method for detecting PMS2 specific mutations, we have screened 99 patients who are likely candidates for PMS2 mutations based...

  9. Loss-of-activity-mutation in the cardiac chloride-bicarbonate exchanger AE3 causes short QT syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thorsen, Kasper; Dam, Vibeke S.; Kjaer-Sorensen, Kasper

    2017-01-01

    Patients with short QT syndrome (SQTS) may present with syncope, ventricular fibrillation or sudden cardiac death. Six SQTS susceptibility genes, encoding cation channels, explain ... unrelated families with SQTS. The mutation causes reduced surface expression of AE3 and reduced membrane bicarbonate transport. Slc4a3 knockdown in zebrafish causes increased cardiac pHi, short QTc, and reduced systolic duration, which is rescued by wildtype but not mutated SLC4A3. Mechanistic analyses...

  10. [Ballantyne syndrome caused by materno-fetal Parvovirus B19 infection: about two cases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desvignes, F; Bourdel, N; Laurichesse-Delmas, H; Savary, D; Gallot, D

    2011-05-01

    Ballantyne's syndrome also known as Mirror syndrome is the association of fetal hydrops and maternal hydric retention. The maternal condition is often misdiagnosed as preeclampsia. We report two cases of Ballantyne syndrome associated with materno-fetal Parvovirus B19 infection. In the first case, the syndrome occurred at 26GW in a context of premature rupture of membranes. Parents and medical staff opted for termination of pregnancy because of the poor fetal prognosis. Maternal symptoms regressed after delivery. In the second case, the patient presented a Ballantyne's syndrome at 25GW. Intrauterine transfusions reversed symptomatology. Fetal hydrops of any etiology can be associated with this syndrome. Specific treatment of the fetus can avoid maternal complication allowing continuation of the pregnancy. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  11. Recessive mutations in EPG5 cause Vici syndrome, a multisystem disorder with defective autophagy

    OpenAIRE

    Cullup, Thomas; Kho, Ay L.; Dionisi-Vici, Carlo; Brandmeier, Birgit; Smith, Frances; Urry, Zoe; Simpson, Michael A.; Yau, Shu; Bertini, Enrico; McClelland, Verity; Al-Owain, Mohammed; Koelker, Stefan; Koerner, Christian; Hoffmann, Georg F.; Wijburg, Frits A.

    2012-01-01

    Vici syndrome is a recessively inherited multisystem disorder characterized by callosal agenesis, cataracts, cardiomyopathy, combined immunodeficiency and hypopigmentation. To investigate the molecular basis of Vici syndrome, we carried out exome and Sanger sequence analysis in a cohort of 18 patients. We identified recessive mutations in EPG5 (previously KIAA1632), indicating a causative role in Vici syndrome. EPG5 is the human homologue of the metazoan-specific autophagy gene epg-5, encodin...

  12. Proteus syndrome: a rare cause of hemihypertrophy and macrodactyly on bone scanning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshi, U; van der Sluijs, J A; Teule, G J J; Pijpers, R

    2005-09-01

    Proteus syndrome is a rare, sporadic genetic disorder characterized by overgrowth of multiple different tissues in a mosaic pattern. It is associated with connective tissue nevi, epidermal nevi, disproportionate overgrowth of multiple tissues, vascular malformations, characteristic tumors, and specific facial anomalies. Joseph Merrick, popularly known as the Elephant Man, is now believed to have suffered from Proteus syndrome. A case of Proteus syndrome and associated findings on bone scintigraphy are presented.

  13. De novo nonsense mutations in ASXL1 cause Bohring-Opitz syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hoischen, Alexander; van Bon, Bregje W M; Rodríguez-Santiago, Benjamín

    2011-01-01

    Bohring-Opitz syndrome is characterized by severe intellectual disability, distinctive facial features and multiple congenital malformations. We sequenced the exomes of three individuals with Bohring-Opitz syndrome and in each identified heterozygous de novo nonsense mutations in ASXL1, which...... is required for maintenance of both activation and silencing of Hox genes. In total, 7 out of 13 subjects with a Bohring-Opitz phenotype had de novo ASXL1 mutations, suggesting that the syndrome is genetically heterogeneous....

  14. A rare cause of severe rectal bleeding: solitary rectal ulcer syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urganc, Nafiye; Kalyoncu, Derya; Usta, Merve; Eken, Kamile Gulcin

    2014-10-01

    Solitary rectal ulcer syndrome is a rare benign disorder in children which often goes unrecognized or easily misdiagnosed with other common diseases. It usually presents with rectal bleeding, constipation, mucous discharge, prolonged straining, tenesmus, and lower abdominal pain. The rectal bleeding varies from a little fresh blood to severe hemorrhage that requires blood transfusion. We report herein a pediatric case of solitary rectal ulcer syndrome who admitted to pediatric emergency department with severe rectal bleeding for reminding this rare syndrome.

  15. Myelination Delay and Allan-Herndon-Dudley Syndrome Caused by a Novel Mutation in the SLC16A2 Gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    La Piana, Roberta; Vanasse, Michel; Brais, Bernard; Bernard, Genevieve

    2015-09-01

    Allan-Herndon-Dudley syndrome is an X-linked disease caused by mutations in the solute carrier family 16 member 2 (SLC16A2) gene. As SLC16A2 encodes the monocarboxylate transporter 8 (MCT8), a thyroid hormone transporter, patients with Allan-Herndon-Dudley syndrome present a specific altered thyroid hormone profile. Allan-Herndon-Dudley syndrome has been associated with myelination delay on the brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of affected subjects. We report a patient with Allan-Herndon-Dudley syndrome characterized by developmental delay, hypotonia, and delayed myelination caused by a novel SLC16A2 mutation (p.L291R). The thyroid hormones profile in our patient was atypical for Allan-Herndon-Dudley syndrome. The follow-up examinations showed that the progression of the myelination was not accompanied by a clinical improvement. Our paper suggests that SLC16A2 mutations should be investigated in patients with myelination delay even when the thyroid function is not conclusively altered. © The Author(s) 2014.

  16. Constitutional SAMD9L mutations cause familial myelodysplastic syndrome and transient monosomy 7

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pastor, Victor B; Sahoo, Sushree; Boklan, Jessica

    2017-01-01

    Familial myelodysplastic syndromes arise from haploinsufficiency of genes involved in hematopoiesis and are primarily associated with early-onset disease. Here we describe a familial syndrome in 7 patients from 4 unrelated pedigrees presenting with myelodisplastic syndrome and loss of chromosome 7...... patients, pointing to the notion that myelodisplasia with monosomy 7 can be a sole manifestation of SAMD9L disease. Collectively, our results define a new subtype of familial myelodisplastic syndrome and provide an explanation for the phenomenon of transient monosomy 7. www.clinicaltrials.gov; #NCT00047268....

  17. Growth without growth hormone in combined pituitary hormone deficiency caused by pituitary stalk interruption syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sang Soo Lee

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Growth hormone (GH is an essential element for normal growth. However, reports of normal growth without GH have been made in patients who have undergone brain surgery for craniopharyngioma. Normal growth without GH can be explained by hyperinsulinemia, hyperprolactinemia, elevated leptin levels, and GH variants; however, its exact mechanism has not been elucidated yet. We diagnosed a female patient aged 13 with combined pituitary hormone deficiency (CPHD caused by pituitary stalk interruption syndrome (PSIS. The patient has experienced recurrent hypoglycemic seizures since birth, but reached the height of 160 cm at the age of 13, showing normal growth. She grew another 8 cm for 3 years after the diagnosis, and she reached her final adult height of 168 cm which was greater than the midparental height, at the age of 16. The patient's blood GH and insulin-like growth factor-I levels were consistently subnormal, although her insulin levels were normal. Her physical examination conducted at the age of 15 showed truncal obesity, dyslipidemia, and osteoporosis, which are metabolic features of GH deficiency (GHD. Herein, we report a case in which a PSIS-induced CPHD patient attained her final height above mid parental height despite a severe GHD.

  18. MASA syndrome is caused by mutations in the neural cell adhesion gene, L1CAM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schwartz, C.E.; Wang, Y.; Schroer, R.J.; Stevenson, R.E. [Greenwood Genetic Center, SC (United States)

    1994-09-01

    The MASA syndrome is a recessive X-linked disorder characterized by Mental retardation, Adducted thumbs, Shuffling gait and Aphasia. Recently we found that MASA in one family was likely caused by a point mutation in exon 6 of the L1CAM gene. This gene has also been shown to be involved in X-linked hydrocephalus (HSAS). We have screened 60 patients with either sporadic HSAS or MASA as well as two additional families with MASA. For the screening, we initially utilized 3 cDNA probes for the L1CAM gene. In one of the MASA families, K8310, two affected males were found to have an altered BglII band. The band was present in their carrier mother but not in their normal brothers. This band was detected by the entire cDNA probe as well as the cDNA probe for 3{prime} end of the gene. Analysis of the L1CAM sequence indicated the altered BglII site is distal to the exon 28 but proximal to the punative poly A signal site. It is hypothesized that this point mutation alters the stability of the L1CAM mRNA. This is being tested using cell lines established from the two affected males.

  19. Non-Obstructive Middle Lobe Syndrome: An Unusual Cause of Recurrent Pneumonia in an Elderly Woman

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    João Rua

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available An 84-year-old woman had five episodes of pneumonia in 4 months. Despite extensive comorbidities and advanced age, her health status was good and the recurrence seemed unjustified. Exhaustive background investigation revealed 14 episodes of right-sided pneumonias during the 3 previous years and an inconclusive investigation with CT of the thorax and bronchofibroscopy, despite some fibrotic and atelectasic alterations in the right middle lobe. A new right-sided x-ray showed a wedge-shaped density extending anteriorly and inferiorly from the hilum, and CT of the thorax revealed aggravated middle lobe abnormalities with thickening of the bronchial wall and segment atelectasis, without any visible airway obstruction. After extensive work-up had excluded other causes of recurrent pneumonia and immunodeficiency, a non-obstructive middle lobe syndrome (MLS was deemed responsible for the repeated episodes of pneumonia. MLS is characterised by chronic hypoventilation and atelectasis of the middle lobe, facilitating secretion accumulation, chronic inflammation and repeated infection. After treatment with bronchodilators and immunostimulants was initiated, the patient experienced no recurrences for several months.

  20. Exome Sequencing Fails to Identify the Genetic Cause of Aicardi Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lund, Caroline; Striano, Pasquale; Sorte, Hanne Sørmo; Parisi, Pasquale; Iacomino, Michele; Sheng, Ying; Vigeland, Magnus D; Øye, Anne-Marte; Møller, Rikke Steensbjerre; Selmer, Kaja K; Zara, Federico

    2016-09-01

    Aicardi syndrome (AS) is a well-characterized neurodevelopmental disorder with an unknown etiology. In this study, we performed whole-exome sequencing in 11 female patients with the diagnosis of AS, in order to identify the disease-causing gene. In particular, we focused on detecting variants in the X chromosome, including the analysis of variants with a low number of sequencing reads, in case of somatic mosaicism. For 2 of the patients, we also sequenced the exome of the parents to search for de novo mutations. We did not identify any genetic variants likely to be damaging. Only one single missense variant was identified by the de novo analyses of the 2 trios, and this was considered benign. The failure to identify a disease gene in this study may be due to technical limitations of our study design, including the possibility that the genetic aberration leading to AS is situated in a non-exonic region or that the mutation is somatic and not detectable by our approach. Alternatively, it is possible that AS is genetically heterogeneous and that 11 patients are not sufficient to reveal the causative genes. Future studies of AS should consider designs where also non-exonic regions are explored and apply a sequencing depth so that also low-grade somatic mosaicism can be detected.

  1. A functional alternative splicing mutation in AIRE gene causes autoimmune polyendocrine syndrome type 1.

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    Junyu Zhang

    Full Text Available Autoimmune polyendocrine syndrome type 1 (APS-1 is a rare autosomal recessive disease defined by the presence of two of the three conditions: mucocutaneous candidiasis, hypoparathyroidism, and Addison's disease. Loss-of-function mutations of the autoimmune regulator (AIRE gene have been linked to APS-1. Here we report mutational analysis and functional characterization of an AIRE mutation in a consanguineous Chinese family with APS-1. All exons of the AIRE gene and adjacent exon-intron sequences were amplified by PCR and subsequently sequenced. We identified a homozygous missense AIRE mutation c.463G>A (p.Gly155Ser in two siblings with different clinical features of APS-1. In silico splice-site prediction and minigene analysis were carried out to study the potential pathological consequence. Minigene splicing analysis and subsequent cDNA sequencing revealed that the AIRE mutation potentially compromised the recognition of the splice donor of intron 3, causing alternative pre-mRNA splicing by intron 3 retention. Furthermore, the aberrant AIRE transcript was identified in a heterozygous carrier of the c.463G>A mutation. The aberrant intron 3-retaining transcript generated a truncated protein (p.G155fsX203 containing the first 154 AIRE amino acids and followed by 48 aberrant amino acids. Therefore, our study represents the first functional characterization of the alternatively spliced AIRE mutation that may explain the pathogenetic role in APS-1.

  2. Stevens–Johnson syndrome/toxic epidermal necrolysis caused by cefadroxil in a cat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberta Sartori

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Case summary A 5-year-old, spayed female, indoor-only domestic shorthair cat was referred with an acute history of multifocal cutaneous and mucocutaneous erosive-ulcerative lesions and skin detachment. The lesions occurred on the seventh day of therapy with cefadroxil. Erosive-ulcerative and occasionally crusted lesions were apparent on the medial and lateral canthus of both eyes, ventral neck, abdomen, perivulvar region, periungual skin and medial aspect of the front and hindlimbs. Diffuse and severe exfoliation was present on the dorsum and tail base and in both external ear canals. The cat was also dehydrated, tachycardic and febrile. Histopathological examination revealed extensive epidermal ulceration, interface dermatitis with vacuolar degeneration, apoptosis at multiple epidermal levels and basal, suprabasal and spinous dermoepidermal detachment. The histopathological diagnosis was consistent with Stevens–Johnson syndrome/toxic epidermal necrolysis (SJS/TEN. The recently reported Algorithm of Drug Causality in Epidermal Necrolysis (ALDEN, currently used in human medicine, was applied and a score of +6 was calculated; this supported the view that SJS/TEN in this cat was very likely to be associated with cefadroxil administration. Relevance and novel information This clinical communication reports cefadroxil as a very probable cause of SJS/TEN in a cat; the ALDEN was applied in this case and supported diagnosis.

  3. Chronic Pain Syndrome Caused by a Bird's Nest Filter: First Case Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Basheer, Mamoun Ahmad; Hamilton, Mark; Holdaway, Chris

    2008-01-01

    AimTo report the first case of a Bird's Nest IVC filter causing a chronic pain syndrome lasting 13 years through IVC wall penetration and subsequent break off of one of the filter struts.Materials and ResultsA 43-year-old female presented with a 13-year history of abdominal pain following uneventful insertion of a Bird's Nest vena cava filter through a right internal jugular percutanous approach. A year following the procedure, CT scan revealed one arm of the filter to be outside IVC borders. Nine years from the date of insertion the nature of the pain changed acutely following a five feet jump to more localized RUQ pain worse with twisting movements. A CT scan showed the strut to have pierced the IVC wall and penetrated the Unicate process of pancreas. Plain x-rays taken at different times in February 2006 showed one of the struts to be free floating in the peritoneal cavity. The floating strut was removed surgically from the wall of the Ileum. Postoperative recovery was uneventful and the patient was discharged pain free three days later.ConclusionChronic pain is an added complication of BNF devices. Although rare, it further emphasizes the need for long-term follow up of patients with IVC filters.

  4. Autosomal recessive mutations in THOC6 cause intellectual disability: syndrome delineation requiring forward and reverse phenotyping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amos, J S; Huang, L; Thevenon, J; Kariminedjad, A; Beaulieu, C L; Masurel-Paulet, A; Najmabadi, H; Fattahi, Z; Beheshtian, M; Tonekaboni, S H; Tang, S; Helbig, K L; Alcaraz, W; Rivière, J-B; Faivre, L; Innes, A M; Lebel, R R; Boycott, K M

    2017-01-01

    THOC6 is a part of the THO complex, which is involved in coordinating mRNA processing with export. The THO complex interacts with additional components to form the larger TREX complex (transcription export complex). Previously, a homozygous missense mutation in THOC6 in the Hutterite population was reported in association with syndromic intellectual disability. Using exome sequencing, we identified three unrelated patients with bi-allelic mutations in THOC6 associated with intellectual disability and additional clinical features. Two of the patients were compound heterozygous for a stop and a missense mutation, and the third was homozygous for a missense mutation; the missense mutations were predicted to be pathogenic by in silico analysis and modeling. Clinical features of the three newly identified patients and those previously reported are reviewed; intellectual disability is moderate to severe, and malformations are variable including renal and heart defects, cleft palate, microcephaly, and corpus callosum dysgenesis. Facial features are variable and include tall forehead, short upslanting palpebral fissures +/- deep set eyes, and a long nose with overhanging columella. These subtle facial features render the diagnosis difficult to make in isolation with certainty. Our results expand the mutational and clinical spectrum of this rare disease, confirm that THOC6 is an intellectual disability causing gene, while providing insight into the importance of the THO complex in neurodevelopment. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Marfan syndrome--a diagnostic challenge caused by phenotypic and genetic heterogeneity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumgartner, C; Mátyás, G; Steinmann, B; Baumgartner, D

    2005-01-01

    Marfan syndrome (MFS) is an autosomal dominant inherited connective tissue disorder caused by mutations in the fibrillin-1 (FBN1) gene with variable clinical manifestations in the cardiovascular, musculoskeletal and ocular systems. Data of moleculor genetic analysis and a catalogue of clinical manifestations including aortic elastic parameters were mined in order to (i) assess aortic abnormality before and during medical treatment, and to (ii) identify novel correlations between the genotype and phenotype of the disease using hierarchical cluster analysis and logistic regression analysis. A score measure describing the similarity between a patient's clinical symptoms and a characteristic phenotype class was introduced. A probabilistic model for monitoring the loss of aortic elasticity was built on merely aortic parameters of 34 patients with classic MFS and 43 control subjects showing a sensitivity of 82% and a specificity of 96%. The clinical phenotypes of 100 individuals with classical or suspected MFS were clustered yielding four different phenotypic expressions. The highest correlation was found between FBN1 missense mutations, which manifested as ectopia lentis, skeletal major and skin minor criteria, and two out of four clustered phenotypes. The probability of the presence of a missense mutation in both phenotype classes is approximately 70%. Monitoring of aortic elastic properties during medical treatment may serve as additional criterion to indicate elective surgical interventions. Genotype-phenotype correlation may contribute to anticipate the clinical consequences of specific FBN1 mutations more comprehensively and may be helpful to identify MFS patients at risk at on early stage of disease.

  6. Double crush syndrome caused by cervical spondylosis and vertebral artery loop.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rho, Young Joon; Choe, Woo Jin

    2017-05-15

    The purpose of this article is to report a successful treatment experience in a rare case of simultaneous cervical nerve root compression by spondylotic cervical foraminal stenosis and a vertebral artery loop. 51-year-old man presented with a 4-year history of left-sided cervical pain radiating to the left shoulder with progressive exacerbation of weakness on left shoulder girdle muscles for 7 months. The patient had no history of trauma. The patient's CT and MRI revealed impingement of the left C6 cervical nerve root by a tortuous vertebral artery loop and also by narrowed left C5-6 cervical foramen that had undergone spondylotic changes. The patient underwent left C5-6 hemilaminectomy, facetectomy and C5-6 fusion. The procedures were uneventful, and the patient recovered with complete resolution of symptoms. The patient continued to be asymptomatic at a 2-year follow-up examination, and the muscle mass of his left girdle returned normal. This report illustrates the first phenomenon of a double crush syndrome caused by vertebral artery loop and cervical spondylotic changes. When patients with cervical spondylosis present with unexplainably severe pain and weakness, additional underlying pathologies should be considered when making differential diagnoses. The investigation planning should involve electromyography, computed tomography angiography, and magnetic resonance imaging.

  7. Characterization of a novel founder MSH6 mutation causing Lynch syndrome in the French Canadian population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castellsagué, E; Liu, J; Volenik, A; Giroux, S; Gagné, R; Maranda, B; Roussel-Jobin, A; Latreille, J; Laframboise, R; Palma, L; Kasprzak, L; Marcus, V A; Breguet, M; Nolet, S; El-Haffaf, Z; Australie, K; Gologan, A; Aleynikova, O; Oros-Klein, K; Greenwood, C; Mes-Masson, A M; Provencher, D; Tischkowitz, M; Chong, G; Rousseau, F; Foulkes, W D

    2015-06-01

    We identified an MSH6 mutation (c.10C>T, p.Gln4*) causing Lynch syndrome (LS) in 11 French Canadian (FC) families from the Canadian province of Quebec. We aimed to investigate the molecular and clinical implications of this mutation among FC carriers and to assess its putative founder origin. We studied 11 probands and 27 family members. Additionally 6433 newborns, 187 colorectal cancer (CRC) cases, 381 endometrial cancer (EC) cases and 179 additional controls, all of them from Quebec, were used. Found in approximately 1 of 400 newborns, the mutation is one of the most common LS mutations described. We have found that this mutation confers a greater risk for EC than for CRC, both in the 11 studied families and in the unselected cases: EC [odds ratio (OR) = 7.5, p French settlers. Application of the results of this study could significantly improve the molecular testing and clinical management of LS families in Quebec. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Functional Cathepsin C mutations cause different Papillon-Lefèvre syndrome phenotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noack, Barbara; Görgens, Heike; Schacher, Beate; Puklo, Magda; Eickholz, Peter; Hoffmann, Thomas; Schackert, Hans Konrad

    2008-04-01

    The autosomal-recessive Papillon-Lefèvre syndrome (PLS) is characterized by severe aggressive periodontitis, combined with palmoplantar hyperkeratosis, and is caused by mutations in the Cathepsin C (CTSC) gene. This study aimed to identify CTSC mutations in different PLS phenotypes, including atypical forms and isolated pre-pubertal aggressive periodontitis (PAP). Thirteen families with different phenotypes were analysed by direct sequencing of the entire coding region and the regulatory regions of CTSC. The function of novel mutations was tested with enzyme activity measurements. In 11 of 13 families, 12 different pathogenic CTSC mutations were found in 10 typical PLS patients, three atypical cases and one PAP patient. Out of four novel mutations, three result in protein truncation and are thus considered to be pathogenic. The homozygous c.854C>T nucleotide exchange (p.P285L) was associated with an almost complete loss of enzyme activity. The observed phenotypic heterogeneity could not be associated with specific genotypes. The phenotypic variability of the PLS associated with an identical genetic background may reflect the influence of additional genetic or environmental factors on disease characteristics. CTSC mutation analyses should be considered for differential diagnosis in all children suffering from severe aggressive periodontitis.

  9. Hepatic sinusoidal obstruction syndrome caused by herbal medicine: CT and MRI features

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou, Hua; Lou, Hai Yan; Wang, Yi Xiang J.; Xu, Xiao Jun; Zhang, Min Ming

    2014-01-01

    To describe the CT and MRI features of hepatic sinusoidal obstruction syndrome (HSOS) caused by herbal medicine Gynura segetum. The CT and MRI features of 16 consecutive Gynura segetum induced HSOS cases (12 men, 4 women) were analyzed. Eight patients had CT; three patients had MRI, and the remaining five patients had both CT and MRI examinations. Based on their clinical presentations and outcomes, the patients were classified into three categories: mild, moderate, and severe. The severity of the disease was also evaluated radiologically based on the abnormal hepatic patchy enhancement in post-contrast CT or MRI images. Ascites, patchy liver enhancement, and main right hepatic vein narrowing or occlusion were present in all 16 cases. Hepatomegaly and gallbladder wall thickening were present in 14 cases (87.5%, 14/16). Periportal high intensity on T2-weighted images was present in 6 cases (75%, 6/8). Normal liver parenchymal enhancement surrounding the main hepatic vein forming a clover-like sign was observed in 4 cases (25%, 4/16). The extent of patchy liver enhancement was statistically associated with clinical severity classification (kappa = 0.565). Ascites, patchy liver enhancement, and the main hepatic veins narrowing were the most frequent signs of herbal medicine induced HSOS. The grade of abnormal patchy liver enhancement was associated with the clinical severity.

  10. Hepatic sinusoidal obstruction syndrome caused by herbal medicine: CT and MRI features

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, Hua; Lou, Hai Yan [Dept. of Radiology, The First Affiliated Hospital, Zhejiang University School of Medicine, Hangzhou (China); Wang, Yi Xiang J. [Dept. of Radiology, The First Affiliated Hospital, Zhejiang University School of Medicine, Hangzhou (China); Xu, Xiao Jun; Zhang, Min Ming [Dept. of Radiology, The Second Affiliated Hospital, Zhejiang University School of Medicine, Hangzhou (China)

    2014-04-15

    To describe the CT and MRI features of hepatic sinusoidal obstruction syndrome (HSOS) caused by herbal medicine Gynura segetum. The CT and MRI features of 16 consecutive Gynura segetum induced HSOS cases (12 men, 4 women) were analyzed. Eight patients had CT; three patients had MRI, and the remaining five patients had both CT and MRI examinations. Based on their clinical presentations and outcomes, the patients were classified into three categories: mild, moderate, and severe. The severity of the disease was also evaluated radiologically based on the abnormal hepatic patchy enhancement in post-contrast CT or MRI images. Ascites, patchy liver enhancement, and main right hepatic vein narrowing or occlusion were present in all 16 cases. Hepatomegaly and gallbladder wall thickening were present in 14 cases (87.5%, 14/16). Periportal high intensity on T2-weighted images was present in 6 cases (75%, 6/8). Normal liver parenchymal enhancement surrounding the main hepatic vein forming a clover-like sign was observed in 4 cases (25%, 4/16). The extent of patchy liver enhancement was statistically associated with clinical severity classification (kappa = 0.565). Ascites, patchy liver enhancement, and the main hepatic veins narrowing were the most frequent signs of herbal medicine induced HSOS. The grade of abnormal patchy liver enhancement was associated with the clinical severity.

  11. Temperature-dependent growth of Geomyces destructans, the fungus that causes bat white-nose syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verant, Michelle L.; Boyles, Justin G.; Waldrep, William; Wibbelt, Gudrun; Blehert, David S.

    2012-01-01

    White-nose syndrome (WNS) is an emergent disease estimated to have killed over five million North American bats. Caused by the psychrophilic fungus Geomyces destructans, WNS specifically affects bats during hibernation. We describe temperature-dependent growth performance and morphology for six independent isolates of G. destructans from North America and Europe. Thermal performance curves for all isolates displayed an intermediate peak with rapid decline in performance above the peak. Optimal temperatures for growth were between 12.5 and 15.8°C, and the upper critical temperature for growth was between 19.0 and 19.8°C. Growth rates varied across isolates, irrespective of geographic origin, and above 12°C all isolates displayed atypical morphology that may have implications for proliferation of the fungus. This study demonstrates that small variations in temperature, consistent with those inherent of bat hibernacula, affect growth performance and physiology of G. destructans, which may influence temperature-dependent progression and severity of WNS in wild bats.

  12. Molecular pathogenesis of Spondylocheirodysplastic Ehlers-Danlos syndrome caused by mutant ZIP13 proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bin, Bum-Ho; Hojyo, Shintaro; Hosaka, Toshiaki; Bhin, Jinhyuk; Kano, Hiroki; Miyai, Tomohiro; Ikeda, Mariko; Kimura-Someya, Tomomi; Shirouzu, Mikako; Cho, Eun-Gyung; Fukue, Kazuhisa; Kambe, Taiho; Ohashi, Wakana; Kim, Kyu-Han; Seo, Juyeon; Choi, Dong-Hwa; Nam, Yeon-Ju; Hwang, Daehee; Fukunaka, Ayako; Fujitani, Yoshio; Yokoyama, Shigeyuki; Superti-Furga, Andrea; Ikegawa, Shiro; Lee, Tae Ryong; Fukada, Toshiyuki

    2014-01-01

    The zinc transporter protein ZIP13 plays critical roles in bone, tooth, and connective tissue development, and its dysfunction is responsible for the spondylocheirodysplastic form of Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (SCD-EDS, OMIM 612350). Here, we report the molecular pathogenic mechanism of SCD-EDS caused by two different mutant ZIP13 proteins found in human patients: ZIP13G64D, in which Gly at amino acid position 64 is replaced by Asp, and ZIP13ΔFLA, which contains a deletion of Phe-Leu-Ala. We demonstrated that both the ZIP13G64D and ZIP13ΔFLA protein levels are decreased by degradation via the valosin-containing protein (VCP)-linked ubiquitin proteasome pathway. The inhibition of degradation pathways rescued the protein expression levels, resulting in improved intracellular Zn homeostasis. Our findings uncover the pathogenic mechanisms elicited by mutant ZIP13 proteins. Further elucidation of these degradation processes may lead to novel therapeutic targets for SCD-EDS. PMID:25007800

  13. Multiple organ dysfunction: a delayed envenomation syndrome caused by tentacle extract from the jellyfish Cyanea capillata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Beilei; Zhang, Lin; Zheng, Jiemin; Wang, Qianqian; Wang, Tao; Lu, Jia; Wen, Xiaojuan; Zhang, Bo; Liu, Guoyan; Zhang, Wei; Xiao, Liang; Zhang, Liming

    2013-01-01

    The delayed jellyfish envenomation syndrome (DJES) with serious multiple organ dysfunction or systemic damages, generally developed 2 h after jellyfish stings, deserves special attention for it is very meaningful to the clinical interventions. To set up a DJES model as well as to obtain more details about its process, an integrative approach, including clinical chemistry, pathology and immunohistochemistry, was conducted to simultaneously monitor the effects of tentacle extract (TE) from the jellyfish Cyanea capillata on the vital target organs (heart, lung, liver and kidney). Our results showed that the TE from C. capillata could induce diverse toxic effects on these organs, among which the liver and kidney injuries seemed to be more serious than cardiopulmonary injuries and might be the leading causes of death in rats with DJES. In summary, we have established a DJES model with multiple organ dysfunction, which could facilitate the research on its underlying mechanism as well as the development of specific prevention or therapy strategies against jellyfish envenomation. The application of this model suggested that the possible mechanism of DJES might be attributed to the synergy of cytotoxicity, vasoconstriction effect and other specific target organ toxicities of jellyfish venom. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Computer vision syndrome: a review of ocular causes and potential treatments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenfield, Mark

    2011-09-01

    Computer vision syndrome (CVS) is the combination of eye and vision problems associated with the use of computers. In modern western society the use of computers for both vocational and avocational activities is almost universal. However, CVS may have a significant impact not only on visual comfort but also occupational productivity since between 64% and 90% of computer users experience visual symptoms which may include eyestrain, headaches, ocular discomfort, dry eye, diplopia and blurred vision either at near or when looking into the distance after prolonged computer use. This paper reviews the principal ocular causes for this condition, namely oculomotor anomalies and dry eye. Accommodation and vergence responses to electronic screens appear to be similar to those found when viewing printed materials, whereas the prevalence of dry eye symptoms is greater during computer operation. The latter is probably due to a decrease in blink rate and blink amplitude, as well as increased corneal exposure resulting from the monitor frequently being positioned in primary gaze. However, the efficacy of proposed treatments to reduce symptoms of CVS is unproven. A better understanding of the physiology underlying CVS is critical to allow more accurate diagnosis and treatment. This will enable practitioners to optimize visual comfort and efficiency during computer operation. Ophthalmic & Physiological Optics © 2011 The College of Optometrists.

  15. Mutations in SNRPB, encoding components of the core splicing machinery, cause cerebro-costo-mandibular syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bacrot, Séverine; Doyard, Mathilde; Huber, Céline; Alibeu, Olivier; Feldhahn, Niklas; Lehalle, Daphné; Lacombe, Didier; Marlin, Sandrine; Nitschke, Patrick; Petit, Florence; Vazquez, Marie-Paule; Munnich, Arnold; Cormier-Daire, Valérie

    2015-02-01

    Cerebro-costo-mandibular syndrome (CCMS) is a developmental disorder characterized by the association of Pierre Robin sequence and posterior rib defects. Exome sequencing and Sanger sequencing in five unrelated CCMS patients revealed five heterozygous variants in the small nuclear ribonucleoprotein polypeptides B and B1 (SNRPB) gene. This gene includes three transcripts, namely transcripts 1 and 2, encoding components of the core spliceosomal machinery (SmB' and SmB) and transcript 3 undergoing nonsense-mediated mRNA decay. All variants were located in the premature termination codon (PTC)-introducing alternative exon of transcript 3. Quantitative RT-PCR analysis revealed a significant increase in transcript 3 levels in leukocytes of CCMS individuals compared to controls. We conclude that CCMS is due to heterozygous mutations in SNRPB, enhancing inclusion of a SNRPB PTC-introducing alternative exon, and show that this developmental disease is caused by defects in the splicing machinery. Our finding confirms the report of SNRPB mutations in CCMS patients by Lynch et al. (2014) and further extends the clinical and molecular observations. © 2014 WILEY PERIODICALS, INC.

  16. Towards a better understanding of white syndromes and their causes on Indo-Pacific coral reefs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourne, D. G.; Ainsworth, T. D.; Pollock, F. J.; Willis, B. L.

    2015-03-01

    Disease is increasingly recognized as a threat to coral reef ecosystems, particularly in the light of increasing anthropogenic disturbances that disrupt important symbiotic partnerships within the coral holobiont. White syndromes (WSs) are a prevalent group of coral diseases in the Indo-Pacific region that have been the focus of an increasing number of investigations over the past decade. Here, we summarize the current state of knowledge on WSs, advocate the use of established standardized criteria to describe disease lesions at gross and cellular levels to move the field forward, and highlight potential erroneous characterization of underlying causes that hinders ongoing progress in coral disease research. We argue for retention of the general term WSs for Indo-Pacific cases of tissue loss lacking distinguishing macroscopic signs and with unknown aetiologies, but erection of more specific names once standardized criteria are met. Recent advances in WS disease pathology, microbial ecology, physiology, ecology and environmental drivers are discussed and the need for greater application of interdisciplinary approaches is emphasized. Following recent widespread reports of WSs on coral reefs, a clear, concise perspective is needed to provide a focus for further research and avoid confusion in the study of this virulent group of diseases.

  17. An investigation of enzymatic detergents as a potential cause of toxic anterior segment syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leder, Henry A; Goodkin, Margot; Buchen, Shelley Y; Calogero, Don; Hilmantel, Gene; Hitchins, Victoria M; Eydelman, Malvina B

    2012-07-01

    To investigate whether enzymatic detergents used in cleaning ophthalmic surgical instruments can cause toxic anterior segment syndrome (TASS)-like responses in a rabbit model. Randomized, investigator-masked, controlled experimental animal study. Thirty-five New Zealand white rabbits. The rabbit eyes were randomized into 7 treatment groups to receive intracameral injection of 1 of 3 different doses of Medline Dual Detergent or Enzol Detergent, or sterile limulus amoebocyte lysate reagent water as a control. The eyes were evaluated for anterior segment inflammation at baseline and at 1, 3, 6, 24, 48, and 72 hours after treatment by slit-lamp biomicroscopy. Anterior chamber (AC) inflammation, including cells, flare, fibrin, and iris injection; time course of inflammation; and residual detergent levels in luminated instruments. Moderate to marked injection of the iris vessels was seen as early as 1 hour after treatment with the enzymatic detergents in 41 of 60 eyes, with the response being more severe in the Enzol Detergent-exposed eyes. Severe iris hemorrhages were accompanied by blood in the AC in 13 eyes, which usually persisted through 72 hours, with an associated increase in AC cell and flare. Corneal haze was present in 52 of 56 eyes 1 hour after treatment, but was mild and resolved within 24 hours in all but the Enzol 4.5%-exposed eyes. Median AC cell and flare peaked at 6 hours and resolved by 48 hours. Enzymatic detergents caused a severe but unusual response from the iris when injected intracamerally into rabbit eyes. This response has not been reported in humans with TASS. The time course of inflammation was faster (peak at 6 hours) and resolved more quickly (within 48 hours) than TASS. Simulated cleaning and extraction studies indicate that the level of residual detergent to which a patient could be exposed is significantly less than the lowest dose used in this study. Because that low dose caused no significant observations other than injection of the

  18. Mutations in DDX58, which Encodes RIG-I, Cause Atypical Singleton-Merten Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Mi-Ae; Kim, Eun Kyoung; Now, Hesung; Nguyen, Nhung T.H.; Kim, Woo-Jong; Yoo, Joo-Yeon; Lee, Jinhyuk; Jeong, Yun-Mi; Kim, Cheol-Hee; Kim, Ok-Hwa; Sohn, Seongsoo; Nam, Seong-Hyeuk; Hong, Yoojin; Lee, Yong Seok; Chang, Sung-A; Jang, Shin Yi; Kim, Jong-Won; Lee, Myung-Shik; Lim, So Young; Sung, Ki-Sun; Park, Ki-Tae; Kim, Byoung Joon; Lee, Joo-Heung; Kim, Duk-Kyung; Kee, Changwon; Ki, Chang-Seok

    2015-01-01

    Singleton-Merten syndrome (SMS) is an autosomal-dominant multi-system disorder characterized by dental dysplasia, aortic calcification, skeletal abnormalities, glaucoma, psoriasis, and other conditions. Despite an apparent autosomal-dominant pattern of inheritance, the genetic background of SMS and information about its phenotypic heterogeneity remain unknown. Recently, we found a family affected by glaucoma, aortic calcification, and skeletal abnormalities. Unlike subjects with classic SMS, affected individuals showed normal dentition, suggesting atypical SMS. To identify genetic causes of the disease, we performed exome sequencing in this family and identified a variant (c.1118A>C [p.Glu373Ala]) of DDX58, whose protein product is also known as RIG-I. Further analysis of DDX58 in 100 individuals with congenital glaucoma identified another variant (c.803G>T [p.Cys268Phe]) in a family who harbored neither dental anomalies nor aortic calcification but who suffered from glaucoma and skeletal abnormalities. Cys268 and Glu373 residues of DDX58 belong to ATP-binding motifs I and II, respectively, and these residues are predicted to be located closer to the ADP and RNA molecules than other nonpathogenic missense variants by protein structure analysis. Functional assays revealed that DDX58 alterations confer constitutive activation and thus lead to increased interferon (IFN) activity and IFN-stimulated gene expression. In addition, when we transduced primary human trabecular meshwork cells with c.803G>T (p.Cys268Phe) and c.1118A>C (p.Glu373Ala) mutants, cytopathic effects and a significant decrease in cell number were observed. Taken together, our results demonstrate that DDX58 mutations cause atypical SMS manifesting with variable expression of glaucoma, aortic calcification, and skeletal abnormalities without dental anomalies. PMID:25620203

  19. Clinical Characteristics and Prognosis of Pulmonary Embolism Caused by Economy Class Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abellás, María; Menéndez, Ana; Morillo, Raquel; Jara-Palomares, Luis; Barrios, Deisy; Nieto, Rosa; Barbero, Esther; Corres, Jesús; Ruiz-Artacho, Pedro; Jiménez, David

    2017-09-01

    Clinical presentation and short-term prognosis of patients with travel-associated acute pulmonary embolism (PE) (i.e., economy class syndrome [ECS]) is not well understood. In this retrospective cohort study of patients with acute PE identified from a single center registry, we assessed the clinical presentation and the association between ECS and the outcomes of all-cause mortality, PE-related mortality, nonfatal venous thromboembolism and nonfatal major bleeding rates through 30days after initiation of PE treatment. Of the 2,333 patients with acute symptomatic PE, 124 (5.3%; 95% confidence interval, 4.4-6.3%) had ECS. Patients with ECS were younger and had fewer comorbid diseases (recent bleeding, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, congestive heart failure), but they presented with more signs of clinical severity (syncope [48% vs. 14%; P<.001], tachycardia [37% vs. 21%; P<.001], right ventricular dysfunction [31% vs. 19%; P<.01] and myocardial injury [57% vs. 28%; P<.001]) compared to those without ECS. Regression analyses showed a significantly lower risk of all-cause mortality for patients with ECS compared to patients without ECS (1.6% vs. 9.6%; P<.01). We did not detect a difference in PE-related mortality at 30days between those with and those without ECS (0.8% vs. 3.1%; P=.18). PE patients with ECS are younger and have fewer comorbid diseases compared to those without ECS. Though they present with more signs of clinical severity, their short-term prognosis is excellent. Copyright © 2017 SEPAR. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  20. Phenotype and genotype in 52 patients with Rubinstein-Taybi syndrome caused by EP300 mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fergelot, Patricia; Van Belzen, Martine; Van Gils, Julien; Afenjar, Alexandra; Armour, Christine M; Arveiler, Benoit; Beets, Lex; Burglen, Lydie; Busa, Tiffany; Collet, Marie; Deforges, Julie; de Vries, Bert B A; Dominguez Garrido, Elena; Dorison, Nathalie; Dupont, Juliette; Francannet, Christine; Garciá-Minaúr, Sixto; Gabau Vila, Elisabeth; Gebre-Medhin, Samuel; Gener Querol, Blanca; Geneviève, David; Gérard, Marion; Gervasini, Cristina Giovanna; Goldenberg, Alice; Josifova, Dragana; Lachlan, Katherine; Maas, Saskia; Maranda, Bruno; Moilanen, Jukka S; Nordgren, Ann; Parent, Philippe; Rankin, Julia; Reardon, Willie; Rio, Marlène; Roume, Joëlle; Shaw, Adam; Smigiel, Robert; Sojo, Amaia; Solomon, Benjamin; Stembalska, Agnieszka; Stumpel, Constance; Suarez, Francisco; Terhal, Paulien; Thomas, Simon; Touraine, Renaud; Verloes, Alain; Vincent-Delorme, Catherine; Wincent, Josephine; Peters, Dorien J M; Bartsch, Oliver; Larizza, Lidia; Lacombe, Didier; Hennekam, Raoul C

    2016-12-01

    Rubinstein-Taybi syndrome (RSTS) is a developmental disorder characterized by a typical face and distal limbs abnormalities, intellectual disability, and a vast number of other features. Two genes are known to cause RSTS, CREBBP in 60% and EP300 in 8-10% of clinically diagnosed cases. Both paralogs act in chromatin remodeling and encode for transcriptional co-activators interacting with >400 proteins. Up to now 26 individuals with an EP300 mutation have been published. Here, we describe the phenotype and genotype of 42 unpublished RSTS patients carrying EP300 mutations and intragenic deletions and offer an update on another 10 patients. We compare the data to 308 individuals with CREBBP mutations. We demonstrate that EP300 mutations cause a phenotype that typically resembles the classical RSTS phenotype due to CREBBP mutations to a great extent, although most facial signs are less marked with the exception of a low-hanging columella. The limb anomalies are more similar to those in CREBBP mutated individuals except for angulation of thumbs and halluces which is very uncommon in EP300 mutated individuals. The intellectual disability is variable but typically less marked whereas the microcephaly is more common. All types of mutations occur but truncating mutations and small rearrangements are most common (86%). Missense mutations in the HAT domain are associated with a classical RSTS phenotype but otherwise no genotype-phenotype correlation is detected. Pre-eclampsia occurs in 12/52 mothers of EP300 mutated individuals versus in 2/59 mothers of CREBBP mutated individuals, making pregnancy with an EP300 mutated fetus the strongest known predictor for pre-eclampsia. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Disruption of a Ciliary B9 Protein Complex Causes Meckel Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dowdle, William E.; Robinson, Jon F.; Kneist, Andreas; Sirerol-Piquer, M. Salomé; Frints, Suzanna G.M.; Corbit, Kevin C.; Zaghloul, Norran A.; van Lijnschoten, Gesina; Mulders, Leon; Verver, Dideke E.; Zerres, Klaus; Reed, Randall R.; Attié-Bitach, Tania; Johnson, Colin A.; García-Verdugo, José Manuel; Katsanis, Nicholas; Bergmann, Carsten; Reiter, Jeremy F.

    2011-01-01

    Nearly every ciliated organism possesses three B9 domain-containing proteins: MKS1, B9D1, and B9D2. Mutations in human MKS1 cause Meckel syndrome (MKS), a severe ciliopathy characterized by occipital encephalocele, liver ductal plate malformations, polydactyly, and kidney cysts. Mouse mutations in either Mks1 or B9d2 compromise ciliogenesis and result in phenotypes similar to those of MKS. Given the importance of these two B9 proteins to ciliogenesis, we examined the role of the third B9 protein, B9d1. Mice lacking B9d1 displayed polydactyly, kidney cysts, ductal plate malformations, and abnormal patterning of the neural tube, concomitant with compromised ciliogenesis, ciliary protein localization, and Hedgehog (Hh) signal transduction. These data prompted us to screen MKS patients for mutations in B9D1 and B9D2. We identified a homozygous c.301A>C (p.Ser101Arg) B9D2 mutation that segregates with MKS, affects an evolutionarily conserved residue, and is absent from controls. Unlike wild-type B9D2 mRNA, the p.Ser101Arg mutation failed to rescue zebrafish phenotypes induced by the suppression of b9d2. With coimmunoprecipitation and mass spectrometric analyses, we found that Mks1, B9d1, and B9d2 interact physically, but that the p.Ser101Arg mutation abrogates the ability of B9d2 to interact with Mks1, further suggesting that the mutation compromises B9d2 function. Our data indicate that B9d1 is required for normal Hh signaling, ciliogenesis, and ciliary protein localization and that B9d1 and B9d2 are essential components of a B9 protein complex, disruption of which causes MKS. PMID:21763481

  2. Dysfunction of intraflagellar transport-A causes hyperphagia-induced obesity and metabolic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs, Damon T; Silva, Luciane M; Allard, Bailey A; Schonfeld, Michael P; Chatterjee, Anindita; Talbott, George C; Beier, David R; Tran, Pamela V

    2016-07-01

    Primary cilia extend from the plasma membrane of most vertebrate cells and mediate signaling pathways. Ciliary dysfunction underlies ciliopathies, which are genetic syndromes that manifest multiple clinical features, including renal cystic disease and obesity. THM1 (also termed TTC21B or IFT139) encodes a component of the intraflagellar transport-A complex and mutations in THM1 have been identified in 5% of individuals with ciliopathies. Consistent with this, deletion of murine Thm1 during late embryonic development results in cystic kidney disease. Here, we report that deletion of murine Thm1 during adulthood results in obesity, diabetes, hypertension and fatty liver disease, with gender differences in susceptibility to weight gain and metabolic dysfunction. Pair-feeding of Thm1 conditional knock-out mice relative to control littermates prevented the obesity and related disorders, indicating that hyperphagia caused the obese phenotype. Thm1 ablation resulted in increased localization of adenylyl cyclase III in primary cilia that were shortened, with bulbous distal tips on neurons of the hypothalamic arcuate nucleus, an integrative center for signals that regulate feeding and activity. In pre-obese Thm1 conditional knock-out mice, expression of anorexogenic pro-opiomelanocortin (Pomc) was decreased by 50% in the arcuate nucleus, which likely caused the hyperphagia. Fasting of Thm1 conditional knock-out mice did not alter Pomc nor orexogenic agouti-related neuropeptide (Agrp) expression, suggesting impaired sensing of changes in peripheral signals. Together, these data indicate that the Thm1-mutant ciliary defect diminishes sensitivity to feeding signals, which alters appetite regulation and leads to hyperphagia, obesity and metabolic disease. © 2016. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  3. The genome sequence of the fungal pathogen Fusarium virguliforme that causes sudden death syndrome in soybean.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Subodh K Srivastava

    Full Text Available Fusarium virguliforme causes sudden death syndrome (SDS of soybean, a disease of serious concern throughout most of the soybean producing regions of the world. Despite the global importance, little is known about the pathogenesis mechanisms of F. virguliforme. Thus, we applied Next-Generation DNA Sequencing to reveal the draft F. virguliforme genome sequence and identified putative pathogenicity genes to facilitate discovering the mechanisms used by the pathogen to cause this disease.We have generated the draft genome sequence of F. virguliforme by conducting whole-genome shotgun sequencing on a 454 GS-FLX Titanium sequencer. Initially, single-end reads of a 400-bp shotgun library were assembled using the PCAP program. Paired end sequences from 3 and 20 Kb DNA fragments and approximately 100 Kb inserts of 1,400 BAC clones were used to generate the assembled genome. The assembled genome sequence was 51 Mb. The N50 scaffold number was 11 with an N50 Scaffold length of 1,263 Kb. The AUGUSTUS gene prediction program predicted 14,845 putative genes, which were annotated with Pfam and GO databases. Gene distributions were uniform in all but one of the major scaffolds. Phylogenic analyses revealed that F. virguliforme was closely related to the pea pathogen, Nectria haematococca. Of the 14,845 F. virguliforme genes, 11,043 were conserved among five Fusarium species: F. virguliforme, F. graminearum, F. verticillioides, F. oxysporum and N. haematococca; and 1,332 F. virguliforme-specific genes, which may include pathogenicity genes. Additionally, searches for candidate F. virguliforme pathogenicity genes using gene sequences of the pathogen-host interaction database identified 358 genes.The F. virguliforme genome sequence and putative pathogenicity genes presented here will facilitate identification of pathogenicity mechanisms involved in SDS development. Together, these resources will expedite our efforts towards discovering pathogenicity mechanisms in

  4. Homozygous indel mutation in CDH11 as the probable cause of Elsahy-Waters syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taskiran, Ekim Z; Karaosmanoglu, Beren; Koşukcu, Can; Doğan, Özlem A; Taylan-Şekeroğlu, Hande; Şimşek-Kiper, Pelin Ö; Utine, Eda G; Boduroğlu, Koray; Alikaşifoğlu, Mehmet

    2017-12-01

    Two sisters from a consanguineous couple were seen in genetics department for facial dysmorphic features and glaucoma. They both had broad foreheads, hypertelorism, megalocorneas, thick eyebrows with synophrys, flat malar regions, broad and bulbous noses, and mild prognathism. Both had glaucoma, younger one also had cataracts and phthisis bulbi. Other findings included bilateral partial cutaneous syndactyly of 2nd and 3rd fingers, history of impacted teeth with dentigerous cyst in the elder one, and intellectual disability (mild and borderline). The sisters were considered to have Elsahy-Waters syndrome. In order to elucidate the underlying molecular cause, sisters and their healthy parents were genotyped by SNP arrays, followed by homozygosity mapping. Homozygous regions were further analyzed by exome sequencing in one affected individual. A homozygous indel variant segregating with the condition was detected in CDH11 (c.1116_1117delinsGATCATCAG, p.(Ile372MetfsTer9)), which was then validated by using Sanger sequencing. CDH11 encodes cadherin 11 (osteo-cadherin) that regulates cell-cell adhesion, cell polarization and migration, as well as osteogenic differentiation. Further experiments revealed that CDH11 expression was decreased in patient-derived fibroblasts as compared to the heterozygous parent and another healthy donor. Immunostaining showed absence of the protein expression in patient fibroblasts. In addition, cell proliferation rate was slow and osteogenic differentiation potential was delayed. We consider that this study reveals loss-of-function mutations in CDH11 as a probable cause of this phenotype. Next generation sequencing in further patients would both prove this gene as causative, and finely delineate this clinical spectrum further contributing in identification of other possibly involved gene(s). © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. A Turkish family with Sjögren-Larsson syndrome caused by a novel ALDH3A2 mutation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Faruk Incecik

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Sjögren-Larsson syndrome (SLS is an inherited neurocutaneous disorder caused by mutations in the aldehyde dehydrogenase family 3 member A2 (ALDH3A2 gene that encodes fatty aldehyde dehydrogenase. Affected patients display ichthyosis, mental retardation, and spastic diplegia. More than 70 mutations in ALDH3A2 have been discovered in SLS patients. We diagnosed two brothers age of 12 and 20 years with characteristic features of this rare syndrome. Magnetic resonance imaging showed demyelinating disease in both of them. We described a novel homozygous, c. 835 T > A (p.Y279N mutation in exon 6 in two patients.

  6. Isolated NIPBL missense mutations that cause Cornelia de Lange syndrome alter MAU2 interaction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Braunholz, Diana; Hullings, Melanie; Gil-Rodríguez, María Concepcion; Fincher, Christopher T.; Mallozzi, Mark B.; Loy, Elizabeth; Albrecht, Melanie; Kaur, Maninder; Limon, Janusz; Rampuria, Abhinav; Clark, Dinah; Kline, Antonie; Dalski, Andreas; Eckhold, Juliane; Tzschach, Andreas; Hennekam, Raoul; Gillessen-Kaesbach, Gabriele; Wierzba, Jolanta; Krantz, Ian D.; Deardorff, Matthew A.; Kaiser, Frank J.

    2012-01-01

    Cornelia de Lange syndrome (CdLS; or Brachmann-de Lange syndrome) is a dominantly inherited congenital malformation disorder with features that include characteristic facies, cognitive delays, growth retardation and limb anomalies. Mutations in nearly 60% of CdLS patients have been identified in

  7. De novo nonsense mutations in ASXL1 cause Bohring-Opitz syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hoischen, Alexander; van Bon, Bregje W M; Rodríguez-Santiago, Benjamín

    2011-01-01

    Bohring-Opitz syndrome is characterized by severe intellectual disability, distinctive facial features and multiple congenital malformations. We sequenced the exomes of three individuals with Bohring-Opitz syndrome and in each identified heterozygous de novo nonsense mutations in ASXL1, which...

  8. A Novel MAPT Mutation Causing Corticobasal Syndrome Led by Progressive Apraxia of Speech.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, Charles R; Guerreiro, Rita; Thust, Steffi; Fletcher, Phillip; Rohrer, Jonathan D; Fox, Nick C

    2015-01-01

    The authors describe a case of corticobasal syndrome led by progressive apraxia of speech, associated with a novel mutation in exon 10 of the MAPT gene. Genetic bases for progressive apraxia of speech and corticobasal syndrome are only rarely described, and have not been described in conjunction.

  9. A new mutation causing autosomal dominant periodic fever syndrome in a Danish family

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weyhreter, Heike; Schwartz, Marianne; Kristensen, Tim D

    2003-01-01

    We describe four members in a family of 8 individuals over 3 generations with the autosomal dominant inherited periodic fever syndrome tumor necrosis factor receptor-associated periodic syndrome (TRAPS). The patients had recurrent episodes of fever, abdominal pain, arthritis, and rash. We examined...

  10. Moyamoya disease associated with asymptomatic mosaic Turner syndrome: a rare cause of hemorrhagic stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manjila, Sunil; Miller, Benjamin R; Rao-Frisch, Anitha; Otvos, Balint; Mitchell, Anna; Bambakidis, Nicholas C; De Georgia, Michael A

    2014-01-01

    Moyamoya disease is a rare cerebrovascular anomaly involving the intracranial carotid arteries that can present clinically with either ischemic or hemorrhagic disease. Moyamoya syndrome, indistinguishable from moyamoya disease at presentation, is associated with multiple clinical conditions including neurofibromatosis type 1, autoimmune disease, prior radiation therapy, Down syndrome, and Turner syndrome. We present the first reported case of an adult patient with previously unrecognized mosaic Turner syndrome with acute subarachnoid and intracerebral hemorrhage as the initial manifestation of moyamoya syndrome. A 52-year-old woman was admitted with a subarachnoid hemorrhage with associated flame-shaped intracerebral hemorrhage in the left frontal lobe. Physical examination revealed short stature, pectus excavatum, small fingers, micrognathia, and mild facial dysmorphism. Cerebral angiography showed features consistent with bilateral moyamoya disease, aberrant intrathoracic vessels, and an unruptured 4-mm right superior hypophyseal aneurysm. Genetic analysis confirmed a diagnosis of mosaic Turner syndrome. Our case report is the first documented presentation of adult moyamoya syndrome with subarachnoid and intracerebral hemorrhage as the initial presentation of mosaic Turner syndrome. It illustrates the utility of genetic evaluation in patients with cerebrovascular disease and dysmorphism. Copyright © 2014 National Stroke Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Noonan syndrome gain-of-function mutations in NRAS cause zebrafish gastrulation defects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Runtuwene, V.J.; van Eekelen, M.J.L.; Overvoorde, J.; Rehmann, H.; Yntema, H.G.; Nillesen, W.M.; van Haeringen, A.; van der Burgt, I.; Burgering, B.; den Hertog, J.

    2011-01-01

    Noonan syndrome is a relatively common developmental disorder that is characterized by reduced growth, wide-set eyes and congenital heart defects. Noonan syndrome is associated with dysregulation of the Ras-mitogen-activated-protein-kinase (MAPK) signaling pathway. Recently, two mutations in NRAS

  12. Mutations in a TGF-β Ligand, TGFB3, Cause Syndromic Aortic Aneurysms and Dissections

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.M. Bertoli Avella (Aida); E. Gillis (Elisabeth); H. Morisaki (Hiroko); J.M.A. Verhagen (Judith ); B.M. de Graaf (Bianca); G. Van De Beek (Gerarda); E. Gallo (Elena); B.P.T. Kruithof (Boudewijn); H. Venselaar (Hanka); L.A. Myers (Loretha); S. Laga (Steven); A.J. Doyle (Alexander); G. Oswald (Gretchen); W.A. van Cappellen (Gert); I. Yamanaka (Itaru); R.M. van der Helm (Robert); H.B. Beverloo (Berna); J.E.M.M. de Klein (Annelies); L.M. Pardo (Luba); M. Lammens (Martin); C. Evers (Christina); K. Devriendt (Koenraad); M. Dumoulein (Michiel); J.M. Timmermans (Janneke); H.T. Brüggenwirth (Hennie); F.W. Verheijen (Frans); I. Rodrigus (Inez); G. Baynam (Gareth); M.J.E. Kempers (Marlies); J. Saenen (Johan); E.M. Van Craenenbroeck (Emeline); K. Minatoya (Kenji); R. Matsukawa (Ritsu); T. Tsukube (Takuro); N. Kubo (Noriaki); R.M.W. Hofstra (Robert); M.-J. Goumans (Marie-José); J.A. Bekkers (Jos); J.W. Roos-Hesselink (Jolien); I.M.B.H. van de Laar (Ingrid); H.C. Dietz (Harry ); L. van Laer (Lut); T. Morisaki (Takayuki); M.W. Wessels (Marja); B.L. Loeys (Bart)

    2015-01-01

    markdownabstractBACKGROUND Aneurysms affecting the aorta are a common condition associated with high mortality as a result of aortic dissection or rupture. Investigations of the pathogenic mechanisms involved in syndromic types of thoracic aortic aneurysms, such as Marfan and Loeys-Dietz syndromes,

  13. Mutations in a TGF-beta ligand, TGFB3, cause syndromic aortic aneurysms and dissections

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bertoli-Avella, A.M.; Gillis, E.; Morisaki, H.; Verhagen, J.M.A.; Graaf, B.M. de; Beek, G. van de; Gallo, E.; Kruithof, B.P.; Venselaar, H.; Myers, L.A.; Laga, S.; Doyle, A.J.; Oswald, G.; Cappellen, G.W. van; Yamanaka, I.; Helm, R.M. van der; Beverloo, B.; Klein, A.; Pardo, L.; Lammens, M.; Evers, C.; Devriendt, K.; Dumoulein, M.; Timmermans, J.; Bruggenwirth, H.T.; Verheijen, F.; Rodrigus, I.; Baynam, G.; Kempers, M.; Saenen, J.; Craenenbroeck, E.M. Van; Minatoya, K.; Matsukawa, R.; Tsukube, T.; Kubo, N.; Hofstra, R.; Goumans, M.J.; Bekkers, J.A.; Roos-Hesselink, J.W.; Laar, I.M. van de; Dietz, H.C.; Laer, L. Van; Morisaki, T.; Wessels, M.W.; Loeys, B.L.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Aneurysms affecting the aorta are a common condition associated with high mortality as a result of aortic dissection or rupture. Investigations of the pathogenic mechanisms involved in syndromic types of thoracic aortic aneurysms, such as Marfan and Loeys-Dietz syndromes, have revealed

  14. No evidence for pathogenic variants or maternal effect of ZFP57 as the cause of Beckwith-Wiedemann Syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boonen, Susanne E; Hahnemann, Johanne M D; Mackay, Deborah

    2012-01-01

    in patients with BWS. We sequenced ZFP57 in 27 BWS probands and in 23 available mothers to test for a maternal effect. We identified three novel, presumably benign sequence variants in ZFP57; thus, we found no evidence for ZFP57 alterations as a major cause in sporadic BWS cases.......Beckwith-Wiedemann syndrome (BWS) is an overgrowth syndrome, which, in 50-60% of sporadic cases, is caused by hypomethylation of KCNQ1OT1 differentially methylated region (DMR) at chromosome 11p15.5. The underlying defect of this hypomethylation is largely unknown. Recently, recessive mutations...... of the ZFP57 gene were reported in patients with transient neonatal diabetes mellitus type 1, showing hypomethylation at multiple imprinted loci, including KCNQ1OT1 DMR in some. The aim of our study was to determine whether ZFP57 alterations were a genetic cause of the hypomethylation at KCNQ1OT1 DMR...

  15. Pearson marrow-pancreas syndrome with worsening cardiac function caused by pleiotropic rearrangement of mitochondrial DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krauch, Gabriele; Wilichowski, Ekkehard; Schmidt, Klaus G; Mayatepek, Ertan

    2002-06-01

    Pearson marrow-pancreas syndrome is a usually fatal disorder that involves the hematopoietic system, exocrine pancreas, liver, kidneys, and often presents clinically with failure to thrive. We report a 5-year-old patient who developed, in addition to the typical features of Pearson syndrome, worsening cardiac function, mainly affecting the left ventricle. The latter finding is particularly interesting because cardiac involvement has not yet been regarded as a major feature of Pearson syndrome. The diagnosis was proved by the finding of so far undescribed pleioplasmatic rearrangement of mitochondrial (mt)DNA (loss of 5,630 bp, 70% deleted and duplicated mtDNA) in blood cells. Our report demonstrates that patients with Pearson syndrome may also have impaired cardiac function. Thus, Pearson syndrome should be considered in the differential diagnosis of patients with left ventricular dysfunction of unknown origin and other clinical findings suggestive of a mitochondrial disease. Copyright 2002 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  16. A rare cause of acute abdominal pain: Herlyn-Werner-Wunderlich syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aydin, Ramazan; Ozdemir, Ayse Zehra; Ozturk, Bahadir; Bilgici, Meltem Ceyhan; Tosun, Migraci

    2014-01-01

    Herlyn-Werner-Wunderlich (HWW) syndrome is a rare müllerian duct anomaly with uterus didelphys, unilateral obstructed hemivagina, and ipsilateral renal agenesis. Patients with this syndrome generally present after menarche with pelvic pain and mass and, rarely, primary infertility in later years. Strong suspicion and knowledge of this syndrome are mandatory for an accurate diagnosis. A 14-year-old female patient presented with acute retention of urine and abdominopelvic pain. Her condition was diagnosed with the use ultrasonography and magnetic resonance imaging as a case of HWW syndrome. She was treated with vaginal hemiseptal resection. The HWW syndrome should be considered among the differential diagnoses in girls with renal anomalies presenting with pelvic mass, symptoms of acute abdominal pain, and acute urinary retention.

  17. Enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli as causes of hemolytic uremic syndrome in the Czech Republic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marejková, Monika; Bláhová, Květa; Janda, Jan; Fruth, Angelika; Petráš, Petr

    2013-01-01

    Enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC) cause diarrhea-associated hemolytic uremic syndrome (D+ HUS) worldwide, but no systematic study of EHEC as the causative agents of HUS was performed in the Czech Republic. We analyzed stools of all patients with D+ HUS in the Czech Republic between 1998 and 2012 for evidence of EHEC infection. We determined virulence profiles, phenotypes, antimicrobial susceptibilities and phylogeny of the EHEC isolates. Virulence loci were identified using PCR, phenotypes and antimicrobial susceptibilities were determined using standard procedures, and phylogeny was assessed using multilocus sequence typing. During the 15-year period, EHEC were isolated from stools of 39 (69.4%) of 56 patients. The strains belonged to serotypes [fliC types] O157:H7/NM[fliC(H7)] (50% of which were sorbitol-fermenting; SF), O26:H11/NM[fliC(H11)], O55:NM[fliC(H7)], O111:NM[fliC(H8)], O145:H28[fliC(H28)], O172:NM[fliC(H25)], and Orough:NM[fliC(H250]. O26:H11/NM[fliC(H11)] was the most common serotype associated with HUS (41% isolates). Five stx genotypes were identified, the most frequent being stx(2a) (71.1% isolates). Most strains contained EHEC-hlyA encoding EHEC hemolysin, and a subset (all SF O157:NM and one O157:H7) harbored cdt-V encoding cytolethal distending toxin. espPα encoding serine protease EspPα was found in EHEC O157:H7, O26:H11/NM, and O145:H28, whereas O172:NM and Orough:NM strains contained espPγ. All isolates contained eae encoding adhesin intimin, which belonged to subtypes β (O26), γ (O55, O145, O157), γ2/θ (O111), and ε (O172, Orough). Loci encoding other adhesins (efa1, lpfA(O26), lpfA(O157OI-141), lpfA(O157OI-154), iha) were usually associated with particular serotypes. Phylogenetic analysis demonstrated nine sequence types (STs) which correlated with serotypes. Of these, two STs (ST660 and ST1595) were not found in HUS-associated EHEC before. EHEC strains, including O157:H7 and non-O157:H7, are frequent causes of D+ HUS in the

  18. Enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli as Causes of Hemolytic Uremic Syndrome in the Czech Republic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marejková, Monika; Bláhová, Květa; Janda, Jan; Fruth, Angelika; Petráš, Petr

    2013-01-01

    Background Enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC) cause diarrhea-associated hemolytic uremic syndrome (D+ HUS) worldwide, but no systematic study of EHEC as the causative agents of HUS was performed in the Czech Republic. We analyzed stools of all patients with D+ HUS in the Czech Republic between 1998 and 2012 for evidence of EHEC infection. We determined virulence profiles, phenotypes, antimicrobial susceptibilities and phylogeny of the EHEC isolates. Methodology/Principal Findings Virulence loci were identified using PCR, phenotypes and antimicrobial susceptibilities were determined using standard procedures, and phylogeny was assessed using multilocus sequence typing. During the 15-year period, EHEC were isolated from stools of 39 (69.4%) of 56 patients. The strains belonged to serotypes [fliC types] O157:H7/NM[fliCH7] (50% of which were sorbitol-fermenting; SF), O26:H11/NM[fliCH11], O55:NM[fliCH7], O111:NM[fliCH8], O145:H28[fliCH28], O172:NM[fliCH25], and Orough:NM[fliCH25]. O26:H11/NM[fliCH11] was the most common serotype associated with HUS (41% isolates). Five stx genotypes were identified, the most frequent being stx2a (71.1% isolates). Most strains contained EHEC-hlyA encoding EHEC hemolysin, and a subset (all SF O157:NM and one O157:H7) harbored cdt-V encoding cytolethal distending toxin. espPα encoding serine protease EspPα was found in EHEC O157:H7, O26:H11/NM, and O145:H28, whereas O172:NM and Orough:NM strains contained espPγ. All isolates contained eae encoding adhesin intimin, which belonged to subtypes β (O26), γ (O55, O145, O157), γ2/θ (O111), and ε (O172, Orough). Loci encoding other adhesins (efa1, lpfAO26, lpfAO157OI-141, lpfAO157OI-154, iha) were usually associated with particular serotypes. Phylogenetic analysis demonstrated nine sequence types (STs) which correlated with serotypes. Of these, two STs (ST660 and ST1595) were not found in HUS-associated EHEC before. Conclusions/Significance EHEC strains, including O157:H7 and non

  19. Antiphospholipid Syndrome with Antiβ2glicoprotein-1 Antibodies as the Cause of Recurrent Tibial Vein Thrombosis in SAPHO syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Przepiera-Będzak, Hanna; Brzosko, Marek

    2016-12-01

    thrombosis in this syndrome, but the patient with multiple venous thrombosis presented in his case report was negative for aCL antibodies; however, he was not tested for anti-β2G-1 antibodies. There was a paper demonstrating increased level of aCL antibodies in 5 of 12 patients with SAPHO syndrome (11). In our observations of 17 patients with SAPHO syndrome, only 1 had increased level of aCL antibodies without symptoms of thrombosis (12). That patient was negative for aCL antibodies, aPT antibodies, aPS antibodies, and antiphosphatidylserine antibodies, but she was positive twice for anti-β2G-1 antibodies. The presence of anti-β2G-1antibodies may be caused by an infectious agent, but in our case bacteria culture of the discharge from pustules was negative. One year after the first episode of deep vein thrombosis, our patient met the criteria of antiphospholipid syndrome. We conclude that antiphospholipid syndrome, especially the presence of anti-β2G-1 antibodies, could be the cause of increased risk of vein thrombosis in SAPHO syndrome.

  20. Is disomic homozygosity at the APECED locus the cause of increased autoimmunity in Down's syndrome?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shield, J.; Wadsworth, E.; Hassold, T.; Judis, L. A.; Jacobs, P.

    1999-01-01

    AIMS—To examine the age of onset of insulin dependent diabetes mellitus (IDDM) in children with Down's syndrome compared with non-trisomic individuals, and to assess whether differences might be related to disomic homozygosity at the autoimmune polyglandular disease type 1 (APECED) gene locus.
METHODS—Children with Down's syndrome and IDDM were identified through the Down's syndrome association newsletter and from paediatricians. DNA was extracted from mouthbrush preparations provided by the parents and patients using standard techniques. Mapping techniques were then used to identify areas of reduction to homozygosity, including a marker that overlaps the locus for APECED. The frequency of disomic homozygosity for all markers (n = 18) was compared with a control group of 99 patients with Down's syndrome and their parents. The families also answered a questionnaire concerning diabetes and related autoimmune conditions in the family. Details were compared with the British Paediatric Surveillance Group 1988diabetes study.
RESULTS—Children with Down's syndrome and IDDM were diagnosed significantly earlier than the general population (6.7 v 8.0 years) with a far higher proportion diagnosed in the first 2 years of life (22% v 7%). There was no evidence of increased disomic homozygosity in the region of the APECED locus in Down's syndrome patients with IDDM compared with simple Down's syndrome.
CONCLUSIONS—The natural history of IDDM in Down's syndrome is different from that of the general population. Although children with Down's syndrome have features similar to cases of APECED, disomic homozygosity in this region does not explain the predilection for autoimmune disease.

 PMID:10490523

  1. A Novel Homozygous Mutation in FOXC1 Causes Axenfeld Rieger Syndrome with Congenital Glaucoma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shazia Micheal

    Full Text Available Anterior segment dysgenesis (ASD disorders are a group of clinically and genetically heterogeneous phenotypes in which frequently cornea, iris, and lens are affected. This study aimed to identify novel mutations in PAX6, PITX2 and FOXC1 in families with anterior segment dysgenesis disorders.We studied 14 Pakistani and one Mexican family with Axenfeld Rieger syndrome (ARS; n = 10 or aniridia (n = 5. All affected and unaffected family members underwent full ophthalmologic and general examinations. Total genomic DNA was isolated from peripheral blood. PCR and Sanger sequencing were performed for the exons and intron-exon boundaries of the FOXC1, PAX6, and PITX2 genes.Mutations were identified in five of the 15 probands; four variants were novel and one variant was described previously. A novel de novo variant (c.225C>A; p.Tyr75* was identified in the PAX6 gene in two unrelated probands with aniridia. In addition, a known variant (c.649C>T; p.Arg217* in PAX6 segregated in a family with aniridia. In the FOXC1 gene, a novel heterozygous variant (c.454T>C; p.Trp152Arg segregated with the disease in a Mexican family with ARS. A novel homozygous variant (c.92_100del; p.Ala31_Ala33del in the FOXC1 gene segregated in a Pakistani family with ARS and congenital glaucoma.Our study expands the mutation spectrum of the PAX6 and FOXC1 genes in individuals with anterior segment dysgenesis disorders. In addition, our study suggests that FOXC1 mutations, besides typical autosomal dominant ARS, can also cause ARS with congenital glaucoma through an autosomal recessive inheritance pattern. Our results thus expand the disease spectrum of FOXC1, and may lead to a better understanding of the role of FOXC1 in development.

  2. Obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome as a cause of road traffic accidents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguiar, M; Valença, J; Felizardo, M; Caeiro, F; Moreira, S; Staats, R; Bugalho de Almeida, A A

    2009-01-01

    Several studies have demonstrated that obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome (OSAS) patients have a higher rate of road traffic accidents. Our study aimed to analyse any differences in OSAS patients between those who reported having had road traffic accidents and/or near misses and those who did not. We studied 163 patients with OSAS (apnoea- hypopnoea index (AHI)>10/h) diagnosed using nocturnal polysomnography (NPSG), all drivers, 18.4% of whom drove for a living. Patients were asked at their first clinical interview to self-report road traffic accidents and/or near misses over the past 3 years which had been caused by abnormal daytime drowsiness. This allowed patients to be divided into two groups, those who had had road traffic accidents and/or near misses and those who had not. Both were compared as to age, body mass index (BMI), Epworth Sleepiness Scale (ESS), daytime PaO2 and PaCO2, Functional Outcomes of Sleep Questionnaire (FOSQ) test and NPSG data. This latter was total sleep time (TTS), sleep efficiency, sleep stages, arousal index (ARI), AHI, minimal and average SaO2, % of time with SaO2 TDAH) (T test). Group I (no road traffic accidents) No=89 patients; group II (road traffic accidents) No=74 patients. Age (years) was 57.6+/-11.8 vs. 54.7+/-10.9 (ns); male gender, 75% vs. 78.4%; ESS, 12.3+/-5.4 vs. 17.6+/-4.3 (pTDAH (minutes), 98.5+/-63.7 vs. 133.3+/-83.2 (p=0,005). In our experience patients who had road traffic accidents and/or near misses had a more severe OSAS, with higher AHI, excessive daytime sleepiness and lower quality of life.

  3. Evaluation of Presumably Disease Causing SCN1A Variants in a Cohort of Common Epilepsy Syndromes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lal, Dennis; Reinthaler, Eva M; Dejanovic, Borislav; May, Patrick; Thiele, Holger; Lehesjoki, Anna-Elina; Schwarz, Günter; Riesch, Erik; Ikram, M Arfan; van Duijn, Cornelia M; Uitterlinden, Andre G; Hofman, Albert; Steinböck, Hannelore; Gruber-Sedlmayr, Ursula; Neophytou, Birgit; Zara, Federico; Hahn, Andreas; Gormley, Padhraig; Becker, Felicitas; Weber, Yvonne G; Cilio, Maria Roberta; Kunz, Wolfram S; Krause, Roland; Zimprich, Fritz; Lemke, Johannes R; Nürnberg, Peter; Sander, Thomas; Lerche, Holger; Neubauer, Bernd A

    2016-01-01

    The SCN1A gene, coding for the voltage-gated Na+ channel alpha subunit NaV1.1, is the clinically most relevant epilepsy gene. With the advent of high-throughput next-generation sequencing, clinical laboratories are generating an ever-increasing catalogue of SCN1A variants. Variants are more likely to be classified as pathogenic if they have already been identified previously in a patient with epilepsy. Here, we critically re-evaluate the pathogenicity of this class of variants in a cohort of patients with common epilepsy syndromes and subsequently ask whether a significant fraction of benign variants have been misclassified as pathogenic. We screened a discovery cohort of 448 patients with a broad range of common genetic epilepsies and 734 controls for previously reported SCN1A mutations that were assumed to be disease causing. We re-evaluated the evidence for pathogenicity of the identified variants using in silico predictions, segregation, original reports, available functional data and assessment of allele frequencies in healthy individuals as well as in a follow up cohort of 777 patients. We identified 8 known missense mutations, previously reported as pathogenic, in a total of 17 unrelated epilepsy patients (17/448; 3.80%). Our re-evaluation indicates that 7 out of these 8 variants (p.R27T; p.R28C; p.R542Q; p.R604H; p.T1250M; p.E1308D; p.R1928G; NP_001159435.1) are not pathogenic. Only the p.T1174S mutation may be considered as a genetic risk factor for epilepsy of small effect size based on the enrichment in patients (P = 6.60 x 10-4; OR = 0.32, fishers exact test), previous functional studies but incomplete penetrance. Thus, incorporation of previous studies in genetic counseling of SCN1A sequencing results is challenging and may produce incorrect conclusions.

  4. A comprehensive review on experimental and clinical findings in intermediate syndrome caused by organophosphate poisoning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abdollahi, Mohammad, E-mail: mohammad.abdollahi@utoronto.ca; Karami-Mohajeri, Somayyeh

    2012-02-01

    Acute organophosphate (OP) intoxication is important because of its high morbidity and mortality and occurrence of muscular paralysis associated by inhibition of acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activity at the neuromuscular junction. Cholinergic crisis, intermediate syndrome (IMS), and OP-induced delayed neuropathy (OPIDN) are the evidences that can be observed in OP intoxication. The main cause of morbidity due to OP poisoning is IMS that occurs 24–96 h after poisoning. Mechanisms underlying the IMS are not fully known. Although the electrophysiological aspects of delayed neuropathy are best characterized, the IMS remain very little studied. The aim of this study was to revisit current knowledge related to OP and the IMS. For this purpose, a systematic review without date limitation was performed. A total of 599 relevant articles were found and reviewed. Data were categorized according to experimental and clinical studies. Occurrences of persistent AChE inhibition, electromyography changes, muscle cell injury, and oxidative stress are the most important pieces of evidence for involvement of IMS in OP toxicity. Delayed AChE inhibition, muscle necrosis, down regulation or desensitization of postsynaptic ACh receptors, failure of postsynaptic ACh release, and oxidative stress-related myopathy are involved in IMS. Toxicokinetic factors, such as a high lipid-solubility, duration of AChE inhibition and metabolite excretion, evolution of alterations on repetitive nerve stimulation (RNS), type and frequency of muscle lesions can estimate the probability of the IMS. Plasma AChE of less than 200 units is a predictor and the 30 Hz RNS decremental response could be a useful marker for the IMS.

  5. Oral glycotoxins are a modifiable cause of dementia and the metabolic syndrome in mice and humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Weijing; Uribarri, Jaime; Zhu, Li; Chen, Xue; Swamy, Shobha; Zhao, Zhengshan; Grosjean, Fabrizio; Simonaro, Calogera; Kuchel, George A; Schnaider-Beeri, Michal; Woodward, Mark; Striker, Gary E; Vlassara, Helen

    2014-04-01

    Age-associated dementia and Alzheimer's disease (AD) are currently epidemic. Neither their cause nor connection to the metabolic syndrome (MS) is clear. Suppression of deacetylase survival factor sirtuin 1 (SIRT1), a key host defense, is a central feature of AD. Age-related MS and diabetes are also causally associated with suppressed SIRT1 partly due to oxidant glycotoxins [advanced glycation end products (AGEs)]. Changes in the modern diet include excessive nutrient-bound AGEs, such as neurotoxic methyl-glyoxal derivatives (MG). To determine whether dietary AGEs promote AD, we evaluated WT mice pair-fed three diets throughout life: low-AGE (MG(-)), MG-supplemented low-AGE (MG(+)), and regular (Reg) chow. Older MG(+)-fed mice, similar to old Reg controls, developed MS, increased brain amyloid-β42, deposits of AGEs, gliosis, and cognitive deficits, accompanied by suppressed SIRT1, nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase, AGE receptor 1, and PPARγ. These changes were not due to aging or caloric intake, as neither these changes nor the MS were present in age-matched, pair-fed MG(-) mice. The mouse data were enhanced by significant temporal correlations between high circulating AGEs and impaired cognition, as well as insulin sensitivity in older humans, in whom dietary and serum MG levels strongly and inversely associated with SIRT1 gene expression. The data identify a specific AGE (MG) as a modifiable risk factor for AD and MS, possibly acting via suppressed SIRT1 and other host defenses, to promote chronic oxidant stress and inflammation. Because SIRT1 deficiency in humans is both preventable and reversible by AGE reduction, a therapeutic strategy that includes AGE reduction may offer a new strategy to combat the epidemics of AD and MS.

  6. Novel PAX3 mutations causing Waardenburg syndrome type 1 in Tunisian patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trabelsi, Mediha; Nouira, Malek; Maazoul, Faouzi; Kraoua, Lilia; Meddeb, Rim; Ouertani, Ines; Chelly, Imen; Benoit, Valérie; Besbes, Ghazi; Mrad, Ridha

    2017-12-01

    Waardenburg syndrome (WS) is an auditory-pigmentary disease characterized by a clinical and genetic variability. WS is classified into four types depending on the presence or absence of additional symptoms: WS1, WS2, WS3 and WS4. Type 1 and 3 are mostly caused by PAX3 mutations, while type 2 and type 4 are genetically heterogeneous. The aims of this study are to confirm the diagnostic of WS1 by the sequencing of PAX3 gene and to evaluate the genotype phenotype correlation. A clinical classification was established for 14 patients WS, as proposed by the Waardenburg Consortium, and noted a predominance of type 1 and type 2 with 6 patients WS1, 7 patients WS2 and 1 patient WS3. A significant inter and intra-familial clinical heterogeneity was also observed. A sequencing of PAX3 gene in the 6 patients WS1 confirmed the diagnosis in 4 of them by revealing three novel mutations that modify two functional domains of the protein: the c.942delC; the c.933_936dupTTAC and the c.164delTCCGCCACA. These three variations are most likely responsible for the phenotype, however their pathogenic effects need to be confirmed by functional studies. The MLPA analysis of the 2 patients who were sequence negative for PAX3 gene revealed, in one of them, a heterozygous deletion of exons 5 to 9 confirming the WS1 diagnosis. Both clinical and molecular approaches led to the conclusion that there is a lack of genotype-phenotype correlation in WS1, an element that must be taken into account in genetic counseling. The absence of PAX3 mutation in one patient WS1 highlights the fact that the clinical classification is sometimes insufficient to distinguish WS1 from other types WS hence the interest of sequencing the other WS genes in this patient. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Transdermal rotigotine causes impulse control disorders in patients with restless legs syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schreglmann, S R; Gantenbein, A R; Eisele, G; Baumann, C R

    2012-02-01

    Dopaminergic drugs are the mainstay of treatment for restless legs syndrome (RLS). We analyzed the frequency and clinical characteristics of impulse control disorders (ICD) in patients with RLS on transdermal rotigotine treatment. Retrospective case series at a university movement disorder clinic (n = 28, 17 women). Symptoms of ICD were assessed via detailed history taking and scoring with the Zurich Screening Questionnaire for ICD (ZICD) prior to and after initiation of treatment. None of the patients had a history of ICD prior to treatment. Baseline mean scores for patients who did (8.0 ± 2.5) and did not (6.2 ± 2.7) develop ICD under treatment did not differ. Six male patients (21%) developed various symptoms of ICD (mean ZICD scores 20.7 ± 10.2) on rotigotine treatment (mean dose: 3.8 mg/d), including binge eating, hypersexuality, compulsive shopping, pathological gambling, and punding, equaling a prevalence rate of 21%. Also in the non-ICD group, ZICD scores increased (7.5 ± 2.8). This is the first report of ICD in patients treated with transdermal rotigotine for RLS. In contrast to literature, even low doses of rotigotine (mean 3.8 mg/d) can cause ICD. Therefore every prescribing physician should be aware that ICD may emerge in both RLS and PD patients on any dopaminergic treatment, and should actively ask for such symptoms. The ZICD questionnaire not only replicated the findings of detailed history taking but also showed an increased tendency towards impulsive behaviour in subjects that did not develop ICD. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Mutations in C5ORF42 cause Joubert syndrome in the French Canadian population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srour, Myriam; Schwartzentruber, Jeremy; Hamdan, Fadi F; Ospina, Luis H; Patry, Lysanne; Labuda, Damian; Massicotte, Christine; Dobrzeniecka, Sylvia; Capo-Chichi, José-Mario; Papillon-Cavanagh, Simon; Samuels, Mark E; Boycott, Kym M; Shevell, Michael I; Laframboise, Rachel; Désilets, Valérie; Maranda, Bruno; Rouleau, Guy A; Majewski, Jacek; Michaud, Jacques L

    2012-04-06

    Joubert syndrome (JBTS) is an autosomal-recessive disorder characterized by a distinctive mid-hindbrain malformation, developmental delay with hypotonia, ocular-motor apraxia, and breathing abnormalities. Although JBTS was first described more than 40 years ago in French Canadian siblings, the causal mutations have not yet been identified in this family nor in most French Canadian individuals subsequently described. We ascertained a cluster of 16 JBTS-affected individuals from 11 families living in the Lower St. Lawrence region. SNP genotyping excluded the presence of a common homozygous mutation that would explain the clustering of these individuals. Exome sequencing performed on 15 subjects showed that nine affected individuals from seven families (including the original JBTS family) carried rare compound-heterozygous mutations in C5ORF42. Two missense variants (c.4006C>T [p.Arg1336Trp] and c.4690G>A [p.Ala1564Thr]) and a splicing mutation (c.7400+1G>A), which causes exon skipping, were found in multiple subjects that were not known to be related, whereas three other truncating mutations (c.6407del [p.Pro2136Hisfs*31], c.4804C>T [p.Arg1602*], and c.7477C>T [p.Arg2493*]) were identified in single individuals. None of the unaffected first-degree relatives were compound heterozygous for these mutations. Moreover, none of the six putative mutations were detected among 477 French Canadian controls. Our data suggest that mutations in C5ORF42 explain a large portion of French Canadian individuals with JBTS. Copyright © 2012 The American Society of Human Genetics. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Mutations in the Chromatin Regulator Gene BRPF1 Cause Syndromic Intellectual Disability and Deficient Histone Acetylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Kezhi; Rousseau, Justine; Littlejohn, Rebecca Okashah; Kiss, Courtney; Lehman, Anna; Rosenfeld, Jill A; Stumpel, Constance T R; Stegmann, Alexander P A; Robak, Laurie; Scaglia, Fernando; Nguyen, Thi Tuyet Mai; Fu, He; Ajeawung, Norbert F; Camurri, Maria Vittoria; Li, Lin; Gardham, Alice; Panis, Bianca; Almannai, Mohammed; Sacoto, Maria J Guillen; Baskin, Berivan; Ruivenkamp, Claudia; Xia, Fan; Bi, Weimin; Cho, Megan T; Potjer, Thomas P; Santen, Gijs W E; Parker, Michael J; Canham, Natalie; McKinnon, Margaret; Potocki, Lorraine; MacKenzie, Jennifer J; Roeder, Elizabeth R; Campeau, Philippe M; Yang, Xiang-Jiao

    2017-01-05

    Identification of over 500 epigenetic regulators in humans raises an interesting question regarding how chromatin dysregulation contributes to different diseases. Bromodomain and PHD finger-containing protein 1 (BRPF1) is a multivalent chromatin regulator possessing three histone-binding domains, one non-specific DNA-binding module, and several motifs for interacting with and activating three lysine acetyltransferases. Genetic analyses of fish brpf1 and mouse Brpf1 have uncovered an important role in skeletal, hematopoietic, and brain development, but it remains unclear how BRPF1 is linked to human development and disease. Here, we describe an intellectual disability disorder in ten individuals with inherited or de novo monoallelic BRPF1 mutations. Symptoms include infantile hypotonia, global developmental delay, intellectual disability, expressive language impairment, and facial dysmorphisms. Central nervous system and spinal abnormalities are also seen in some individuals. These clinical features overlap with but are not identical to those reported for persons with KAT6A or KAT6B mutations, suggesting that BRPF1 targets these two acetyltransferases and additional partners in humans. Functional assays showed that the resulting BRPF1 variants are pathogenic and impair acetylation of histone H3 at lysine 23, an abundant but poorly characterized epigenetic mark. We also found a similar deficiency in different lines of Brpf1-knockout mice. These data indicate that aberrations in the chromatin regulator gene BRPF1 cause histone H3 acetylation deficiency and a previously unrecognized intellectual disability syndrome. Copyright © 2017 American Society of Human Genetics. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Identification of novel genetic causes of Rett syndrome-like phenotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopes, Fátima; Barbosa, Mafalda; Ameur, Adam; Soares, Gabriela; de Sá, Joaquim; Dias, Ana Isabel; Oliveira, Guiomar; Cabral, Pedro; Temudo, Teresa; Calado, Eulália; Cruz, Isabel Fineza; Vieira, José Pedro; Oliveira, Renata; Esteves, Sofia; Sauer, Sascha; Jonasson, Inger; Syvänen, Ann-Christine; Gyllensten, Ulf; Pinto, Dalila; Maciel, Patrícia

    2016-03-01

    The aim of this work was to identify new genetic causes of Rett-like phenotypes using array comparative genomic hybridisation and a whole exome sequencing approach. We studied a cohort of 19 Portuguese patients (16 girls, 3 boys) with a clinical presentation significantly overlapping Rett syndrome (RTT). Genetic analysis included filtering of the single nucleotide variants and indels with preference for de novo, homozygous/compound heterozygous, or maternally inherited X linked variants. Examination by MRI and muscle biopsies was also performed. Pathogenic genomic imbalances were found in two patients (10.5%): an 18q21.2 deletion encompassing four exons of the TCF4 gene and a mosaic UPD of chromosome 3. Variants in genes previously implicated in neurodevelopmental disorders (NDD) were identified in six patients (32%): de novo variants in EEF1A2, STXBP1 and ZNF238 were found in three patients, maternally inherited X linked variants in SLC35A2, ZFX and SHROOM4 were detected in two male patients and one homozygous variant in EIF2B2 was detected in one patient. Variants were also detected in five novel NDD candidate genes (26%): we identified de novo variants in the RHOBTB2, SMARCA1 and GABBR2 genes; a homozygous variant in EIF4G1; compound heterozygous variant in HTT. Network analysis reveals that these genes interact by means of protein interactions with each other and with the known RTT genes. These findings expand the phenotypical spectrum of previously known NDD genes to encompass RTT-like clinical presentations and identify new candidate genes for RTT-like phenotypes. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  11. Mutations of the catalytic subunit of RAB3GAP cause Warburg Micro syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aligianis, Irene A; Johnson, Colin A; Gissen, Paul

    2005-01-01

    Warburg Micro syndrome (WARBM1) is a severe autosomal recessive disorder characterized by developmental abnormalities of the eye and central nervous system and by microgenitalia. We identified homozygous inactivating mutations in RAB3GAP, encoding RAB3 GTPase activating protein, a key regulator o...... of the Rab3 pathway implicated in exocytic release of neurotransmitters and hormones, in 12 families with Micro syndrome. We hypothesize that the underlying pathogenesis of Micro syndrome is a failure of exocytic release of ocular and neurodevelopmental trophic factors....

  12. Metabolic syndrome in Russian adults: associated factors and mortality from cardiovascular diseases and all causes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grjibovski Andrej M

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Metabolic syndrome (MetS is a cluster of four major obesity-related risk factors for cardiovascular disease (CVD. Russia has one of the highest CVD mortality in the world, but its association with MetS remains unknown. Also little is known about factors associated with MetS and its components in Russia. Methods Data on 3555 adults aged 18-90 years were collected in a cross-sectional study in 2000. MetS was defined by the International Diabetes Federation (IDF and National Cholesterol Education Program (NCEP criteria. Sex-specific associations between the IDF-defined MetS, its components, and life-style, socio-economic factors and laboratory indicators, were analysed using multivariable Poisson regression. Vital status of the study participants was identified by July 2009. Sex-specific associations between MetS and stroke, Coronary Heart Disease (CHD, CVD and all-cause death, were studied by Poisson regression adjusted for age, smoking, alcohol and history of CVDs. Results After adjustment for all studied factors except BMI, age, serum GGT, C-reactive protein and AST-to-ALT ratio were associated with MetS in both genders. Additionally, MetS was associated with sedentary lifestyle in women and with smoking in men. In the same regression model drinking alcohol 2-4 times a month and consumption of five or more alcohol units at one occasion in men, and drinking alcohol 5 times or more a month in women were inversely associated with MetS. After a 9-year follow-up, MetS was associated with higher risk of death from stroke (RR = 3.76, 95% CI:1.35-10.46 and from either stroke or myocardial infarction (MI, RR = 2.87, 95% CI:1.32-6.23 in men. No associations between MetS and any of the studied causes of death were observed in women. Conclusion Factors associated with MetS in both genders were age, GGT, C-reactive protein, and AST-to-ALT ratio. Moderate frequency of alcohol consumption and binge drinking in men and higher leisure time

  13. Complex Regional Pain Syndrome Caused by Lumbar Herniated Intervertebral Disc Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Se Hee; Choi, Sang Sik; Lee, Mi Kyung; Kin, Jung Eun

    2016-07-01

    Most cases of complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS) occur after some inciting injury. There are a few cases of CRPS after an operation for disc disease. CRPS from a mild herniated intervertebral disc (HIVD) without surgical intervention is even rarer than CRPS after an operation for disc disease.A 22-year-old man was transferred to a pain clinic. He had continuously complained about back and right leg pain. He presented with a skin color change in the right lower leg, intermittent resting tremor, stiffness, and swelling in the right leg. He complained of a pulling sensation and numbness in his right buttock, posterior thigh, lateral calf, and ankle. This symptom was in accordance with L4/5 radiculopathy. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) also showed L4/5 HIVD that was central to the bilateral subarticular protrusion.He was diagnosed as having CRPS, which fits the revised International Association for the Study of Pain (IASP) criteria. He fulfilled 4 symptom categories (allodynia, temperature asymmetry and skin color change, sweating changes, decreased range of motion and motor dysfunction) and 3 of 4 sign categories (allodynia, temperature asymmetry and skin color changes, decreased range of motion and motor dysfunction). The bone scan and thermography also revealed CRPS.For the past 2 months, we have performed intensive treatments. But, he never became pain-free and walking for 5 minutes led to persistent leg pain. We decided to perform percutaneous nucleoplasty, which can directly decompress a HIVD. On the next day, he achieved dramatic symptom relief. The visual analog scale (VAS) score improved to 3, compared to the VAS score of 9 at the first visit. The skin color change, allodynia, and tremor in the right leg disappeared, and the temperature asymmetry normalized. Motor weakness of the right leg also recovered.We report an unusual case of CRPS that was caused by L4/5 HIVD without a history of trauma or surgery. It has a clear causal relationship between HIVD

  14. Lennox-Gastaut syndrome of unknown cause: phenotypic characteristics of patients in the Epilepsy Phenome/Genome Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Widdess-Walsh, Peter; Dlugos, Dennis; Fahlstrom, Robyn; Joshi, Sucheta; Shellhaas, Renée; Boro, Alex; Sullivan, Joseph; Geller, Eric

    2013-11-01

    Lennox-Gastaut syndrome (LGS) is a devastating childhood-onset epilepsy syndrome. The cause is unknown in 25% of cases. Little has been described about the specific clinical or electroencephalography (EEG) features of LGS of unknown or genetic cause (LGS(u)). The Epilepsy Phenome/Genome Project (EPGP) aims to characterize LGS(u) by phenotypic analysis of patients with LGS(u) and their parents. One hundred thirty-five patients with LGS with no known etiology and their parents were enrolled from 19 EPGP centers in the United States and Australia. Clinical data from medical records, standardized questionnaires, imaging, and EEG were collected with use of online informatics systems developed for EPGP. LGS(u) in the EPGP cohort had a broad range of onset of epilepsy from 1 to 13 years, was male predominant (p syndrome. LGS(u) has distinctive characteristics including a broad age range of onset, male predominance, and often normal development prior to the onset of seizures. Cognitive achievements such as completion of secondary school were possible in half of adult patients. Our phenotypic description of LGS(u) coupled with future genetic studies will advance our understanding of this epilepsy syndrome. Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2013 International League Against Epilepsy.

  15. POMT2 mutations cause alpha-dystroglycan hypoglycosylation and Walker-Warburg syndrome.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reeuwijk, J. van; Janssen, M.; Elzen, C. van der; Beltran Valero de Bernabe, D.; Sabatelli, P.; Merlini, L.; Boon, M.; Scheffer, H.; Brockington, M.; Muntoni, F.; Huynen, M.A.; Verrips, A.; Walsh, C.A.; Barth, P.G.; Brunner, H.G.; Bokhoven, J.H.L.M. van

    2005-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Walker-Warburg syndrome (WWS) is an autosomal recessive condition characterised by congenital muscular dystrophy, structural brain defects, and eye malformations. Typical brain abnormalities are hydrocephalus, lissencephaly, agenesis of the corpus callosum, fusion of the hemispheres,

  16. POMT2 mutations cause alpha-dystroglycan hypoglycosylation and Walker-Warburg syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Reeuwijk, J.; Janssen, M.; van den Elzen, C.; Beltran-Valero de Bernabé, D.; Sabatelli, P.; Merlini, L.; Boon, M.; Scheffer, H.; Brockington, M.; Muntoni, F.; Huynen, M. A.; Verrips, A.; Walsh, C. A.; Barth, P. G.; Brunner, H. G.; van Bokhoven, H.

    2005-01-01

    Walker-Warburg syndrome (WWS) is an autosomal recessive condition characterised by congenital muscular dystrophy, structural brain defects, and eye malformations. Typical brain abnormalities are hydrocephalus, lissencephaly, agenesis of the corpus callosum, fusion of the hemispheres, cerebellar

  17. POMT2 mutations cause alpha-dystroglycan hypoglycosylation and Walker-Warburg syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Reeuwijk, J; Janssen, M; van den Elzen, C; de Bernabe, DBV; Sabatelli, P; Merlini, L; Boon, M; Scheffer, H; Brockington, M; Muntoni, F; Huynen, MA; Verrips, A; Walsh, CA; Barth, PG; Brunner, HG; van Bokhoven, H

    2005-01-01

    Background: Walker-Warburg syndrome (WWS) is an autosomal recessive condition characterised by congenital muscular dystrophy, structural brain defects, and eye malformations. Typical brain abnormalities are hydrocephalus, lissencephaly, agenesis of the corpus callosum, fusion of the hemispheres,

  18. Proteus syndrome: a rare cause of hemihypertrophy and macrodactyly on bone scanning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Joshi, U.; van der Sluijs, J.A.; Teule, G.J.; Pijpers, R.

    2005-01-01

    Proteus syndrome is a rare, sporadic genetic disorder characterized by overgrowth of multiple different tissues in a mosaic pattern. It is associated with connective tissue nevi, epidermal nevi, disproportionate overgrowth of multiple tissues, vascular malformations, characteristic tumors, and

  19. Cantú Syndrome Is Caused by Mutations in ABCC9

    OpenAIRE

    van Bon, Bregje W.M.; Gilissen, Christian; Grange, Dorothy K.; Hennekam, Raoul C.M.; Kayserili, Hülya; Engels, Hartmut; Reutter, Heiko; Ostergaard, John R.; Morava, Eva; Tsiakas, Konstantinos; Isidor, Bertrand; Le Merrer, Martine; Eser, Metin; Wieskamp, Nienke; de Vries, Petra

    2012-01-01

    Cantú syndrome is a rare disorder characterized by congenital hypertrichosis, neonatal macrosomia, a distinct osteochondrodysplasia, and cardiomegaly. Using an exome-sequencing approach applied to one proband-parent trio and three unrelated single cases, we identified heterozygous mutations in ABCC9 in all probands. With the inclusion of the remaining cohort of ten individuals with Cantú syndrome, a total of eleven mutations in ABCC9 were found. The de novo occurrence in all six simplex cases...

  20. A novel NHS mutation causes Nance-Horan Syndrome in a Chinese family

    OpenAIRE

    Tian, Qi; Li, Yunping; Kousar, Rizwana; Guo, Hui; Peng, Fenglan; Zheng, Yu; Yang, Xiaohua; Long, Zhigao; Tian, Runyi; Xia, Kun; Lin, Haiying; Pan, Qian

    2017-01-01

    Background Nance-Horan Syndrome (NHS) (OMIM: 302350) is a rare X-linked developmental disorder characterized by bilateral congenital cataracts, with occasional dental anomalies, characteristic dysmorphic features, brachymetacarpia and mental retardation. Carrier females exhibit similar manifestations that are less severe than in affected males. Methods Here, we report a four-generation Chinese family with multiple affected individuals presenting Nance-Horan Syndrome. Whole-exome sequencing co...

  1. Causalgic form of postphlebitic syndrome. A variety of reflex sympathetic dystrophy caused by acute deep thrombophlebitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massell, T B

    1988-01-01

    The causalgic form of the postphlebitic syndrome or reflex sympathetic dystrophy resulting from acute deep thrombophlebitis is a relatively uncommon and, unfortunately, frequently unrecognized form of the postphlebitic syndrome. The usual signs of venous insufficiency are minimal, but severe burning pain is characteristic, usually increased by dependency. The diagnosis is confirmed by phlebography and the response to a lumbar sympathetic block. A lumbar sympathectomy produces permanent pain relief. PMID:3176488

  2. OHVIRA syndrome: rare cause of chronic vaginal discharge in an unmarried female.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nigam, Aruna; Raghunandan, Chitra; Yadav, Reena; Tomer, Shaili; Anand, Rama

    2011-09-01

    Chronic vaginal discharge in adolescent and young females, not responding to antibiotics, can pose a diagnostic dilemma for many gynecologists and general practitioners. Uterus didelphys with obstructed hemivagina and ipsilateral renal agenesis (OHVIRA syndrome) is a rare congenital anomaly. We present a case of a 22-year-old unmarried female with this syndrome presenting with chronic purulent vaginal discharge. The uniqueness about the case is its much delayed presentation. © 2011 The Authors. Congenital Anomalies © 2011 Japanese Teratology Society.

  3. Clinical problems of colorectal cancer and endometrial cancer cases with unknown cause of tumor mismatch repair deficiency (suspected Lynch syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Buchanan DD

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Daniel D Buchanan,1,2 Christophe Rosty,1,3,4 Mark Clendenning,1 Amanda B Spurdle,5 Aung Ko Win2 1Oncogenomics Group, Genetic Epidemiology Laboratory, Department of Pathology, The University of Melbourne, Parkville, VIC, Australia; 2Centre for Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Melbourne School of Population and Global Health, The University of Melbourne, Parkville, VIC, Australia; 3Envoi Specialist Pathologists, Herston, QLD, Australia; 4School of Medicine, University of Queensland, Herston, QLD, Australia; 5Molecular Cancer Epidemiology Laboratory, Genetics and Computational Biology Division, QIMR Berghofer Medical Research Institute, Herston, QLD, AustraliaAbstract: Carriers of a germline mutation in one of the DNA mismatch repair (MMR genes have a high risk of developing numerous different cancers, predominantly colorectal cancer and endometrial cancer (known as Lynch syndrome. MMR gene mutation carriers develop tumors with MMR deficiency identified by tumor microsatellite instability or immunohistochemical loss of MMR protein expression. Tumor MMR deficiency is used to identify individuals most likely to carry an MMR gene mutation. However, MMR deficiency can also result from somatic inactivation, most commonly methylation of the MLH1 gene promoter. As tumor MMR testing of all incident colorectal and endometrial cancers (universal screening is becoming increasingly adopted, a growing clinical problem is emerging for individuals who have tumors that show MMR deficiency who are subsequently found not to carry an MMR gene mutation after genetic testing using the current diagnostic approaches (Sanger sequencing and multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification and who also show no evidence of MLH1 methylation. The inability to determine the underlying cause of tumor MMR deficiency in these "Lynch-like" or "suspected Lynch syndrome" cases has significant implications on the clinical management of these individuals and their relatives. When the

  4. Mutations in CHD7 in patients with CHARGE syndrome cause T-B + natural killer cell + severe combined immune deficiency and may cause Omenn-like syndrome.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gennery, A.R.; Slatter, M.A.; Rice, J.; Hoefsloot, L.H.; Barge, D.; McLean-Tooke, A.; Montgomery, T.; Goodship, J.A.; Burt, A.D.; Flood, T.J.; Abinun, M.; Cant, A.J.; Johnson, D.

    2008-01-01

    More than 11 genetic causes of severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) have been identified, affecting development and/or function of T lymphocytes, and sometimes B lymphocytes and natural killer (NK) cells. Deletion of 22q11.2 is associated with immunodeficiency, although less than 1% of cases are

  5. Treacher Collins syndrome with craniosynostosis, choanal atresia, and esophageal regurgitation caused by a novel nonsense mutation in TCOF1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horiuchi, Katsumi; Ariga, Tadashi; Fujioka, Hirotaka; Kawashima, Kunihiro; Yamamoto, Yuhei; Igawa, Hiroharu; Sakiyama, Yukio; Sugihara, Tsuneki

    2004-07-15

    Treacher Collins syndrome (TCS) is caused by mutations in TCOF1 of the nonsense, small deletion, and small insertion types, which most likely result in haploinsufficiency. We report a novel de novo nonsense mutation 2731C --> T, resulting in Arg911Stop, which truncates the protein. Our patient had the classic findings of TCS, but with documented craniosynostosis, choanal atresia, and esophageal regurgitation. Copyright 2004 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  6. PROTOCOL FOR THE EVALUATION AND FUNCTIONAL RE-EDUCATION OF THE LUMBARSACRAL PAIN SYNDROME WITH A MUSCULAR-LIGAMENT CAUSE

    OpenAIRE

    Călina Mirela-Lucia; Rusu Ligia; Elena Taina Avramescu; Denisa Enescu-Bieru; Eugenia Rosulescu; Dragomir Mihai

    2009-01-01

    The current paper aims to evaluate the lumbar-sacral algo-functional syndromes with a muscular-ligament cause and to establish a staged program for its functional recovery which would also prevent reoccurrences and/ or complications, these being relatively frequent and with important functional implications [1]. These ailments,specific to patients who are at an active age have a particular social impact, important morbidity and can be easily mistaken for more serious lumbar-sacral ailments, t...

  7. Posterior Nutcracker Syndrome with Left Renal Vein Duplication: A Rare Cause of Haematuria in a 12-Year-Old Boy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Preza Fernandes

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The nutcracker syndrome (NCS is a rare cause of haematuria. It embraces an extended nonpathognomonic spectrum of symptoms that imply a difficult diagnosis. Ultimately it may be associated with substantial morbidity and even life-threatening events. We report a rare cause if a 12-year-old boy who presented with a history of frequent intermittent episodes of painless constant haematuria. The cystoscopy showed a bloody urine ejaculate from the left ureter meatus. The Doppler ultrasonography showed turbulent pattern of venous blood flow of the posterior renal vein branch behind the aorta. The abdominopelvic computer tomography (apCT revealed left renal vein (LRV duplication with a dilated retroaortic branch, entrapped between the aorta and the vertebral column, promoting the renal nutcracker syndrome. The patient was initially hospitalized and managed with oral iron supplements and continuous saline bladder irrigation, not requiring additional treatment. The child is currently asymptomatic, with haemoglobin value returning to normal and therefore proposed to conservative management with close followup. The authors present a case report of episodic haematuria caused by a rare entity—posterior nutcracker syndrome with renal vein duplication.

  8. PROTOCOL FOR THE EVALUATION AND FUNCTIONAL RE-EDUCATION OF THE LUMBARSACRAL PAIN SYNDROME WITH A MUSCULAR-LIGAMENT CAUSE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Călina Mirela-Lucia

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available The current paper aims to evaluate the lumbar-sacral algo-functional syndromes with a muscular-ligament cause and to establish a staged program for its functional recovery which would also prevent reoccurrences and/ or complications, these being relatively frequent and with important functional implications [1]. These ailments,specific to patients who are at an active age have a particular social impact, important morbidity and can be easily mistaken for more serious lumbar-sacral ailments, thus leading to disproportionately serious, but inefficient for thereal cause, treatments [4].The study was made over a period of 6 months, on 18 patients with lumbar-sacral syndrome with a muscularligament cause, diagnosed as a result of clinical and paraclinic evaluation, an alternative etiology of the syndrome being excluded. The patients were integrated into a functional re-education programme which included drug therapy (anti-inflammatory +/- relaxant medication, physically-kinetically supported (thermal-kinetic-massage therapy, staged into 2 weeks, one and 3-6 months intervals, respectively. The results obtained emphasise the improvement in the clinical parameters form one stage to the other, in the third stage of the programme reaching asemi-complete (over 90% recovery of the affected areas, compared to the initial stages.

  9. Arteriovenous malformation of the thyroid gland as a very rare cause of mechanical neck syndrome: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Černá, Monika; Třeška, Vladislav; Krčma, Michal; Daum, Ondřej; Šlauf, František

    2015-02-02

    Vascular malformations of the thyroid gland represent a very rare, often accidentally diagnosed, disease that in the case of eufunctional goitre may be the cause of mechanical neck syndrome. The authors present here the complex differential-diagnosis and treatment approach and stress the importance of histopathology for determining the final diagnosis. Using various imaging methods (ultrasound, multidetector computed tomography of the neck), the cause of breathing difficulties in a 64-year-old old man from the Czech Republic with normal thyroid gland function was found to be an arteriovenous malformation of the left lobe of his thyroid gland, 80 × 70 × 55 mm in size, reaching retrosternally between the major arteries branching from his aortic arch and displacing his trachea 10mm to the right. In preparation for surgery, he underwent a radio-interventional procedure with embolisation of the arteries supplying the left lobe. This was followed by a lobectomy on the left via a partial sternotomy. The definitive histology result confirmed that the arteriovenous malformation was the benign cause of the mechanical neck syndrome. The case report presented here extends the differential diagnostic options in cases of mechanical neck syndrome. It describes a very rare disease of the thyroid gland, which prior to surgery may arouse suspicion of malignancy. It stresses the importance of close team cooperation between the endocrinologist, interventional radiologist and surgeon within the framework of preoperative diagnosis as well as preparation for surgery. Determination of the definitive histopathological diagnosis requires a pathologist experienced in such issues.

  10. "Candy cane syndrome:" an underappreciated cause of abdominal pain and nausea after Roux-en-Y gastric bypass surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aryaie, Amir H; Fayezizadeh, Mojtaba; Wen, Yuxiang; Alshehri, Mohammed; Abbas, Mujjahid; Khaitan, Leena

    2017-09-01

    "Candy cane" syndrome (a blind afferent Roux limb at the gastrojejunostomy) has been implicated as a cause of abdominal pain, nausea, and emesis after Roux-n-Y gastric bypass (RYGB) but remains poorly described. To report that "candy cane" syndrome is real and can be treated effectively with revisional bariatric surgery SETTING: All patients underwent "candy cane" resection at University Hospitals of Cleveland. All patients who underwent resection of the "candy cane" between January 2011 and July 2015 were included. All had preoperative workup to identify "candy cane" syndrome. Demographic data; pre-, peri-, and postoperative symptoms; data regarding hospitalization; and postoperative weight loss were assessed through retrospective chart review. Data were analyzed using Student's t test and χ 2 analysis where appropriate. Nineteen patients had resection of the "candy cane" (94% female, mean age 50±11 yr), within 3 to 11 years after initial RYGB. Primary presenting symptoms were epigastric abdominal pain (68%) and nausea/vomiting (32%), particularly with fibrous foods and meats. On upper gastrointestinal study and endoscopy, the afferent blind limb was the most direct outlet from the gastrojejunostomy. Only patients with these preoperative findings were deemed to have "candy cane" syndrome. Eighteen (94%) cases were completed laparoscopically. Length of the "candy cane" ranged from 3 to 22 cm. Median length of stay was 1 day. After resection, 18 (94%) patients had complete resolution of their symptoms (PCandy cane" syndrome is a real phenomenon that can be managed safely with excellent outcomes with resection of the blind afferent limb. A thorough diagnostic workup is paramount to proper identification of this syndrome. Surgeons should minimize the size of the blind afferent loop left at the time of initial RYGB. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Bariatric Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Vascular-type Ehlers-Danlos syndrome caused by a hitherto unknown genetic mutation: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kashizaki Fumihiro

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Vascular-type Ehlers-Danlos syndrome is an autosomal dominant disease that causes arterial spurting, intestinal perforation, uterine rupture and hemopneumothorax due to decreased production of type III collagen. The average age at death is 48 years old, and it is considered to be the most severe form of Ehlers-Danlos syndrome. We report the case of a 64-year-old Japanese woman and her 38-year-old daughter who were diagnosed with this disease. Case presentation A 64-year-old Japanese woman was referred to our hospital because of right anterior chest pain following cough and pharyngeal discomfort. Pleurisy was suspected due to the presence of right pleural effusion, so the next day she was referred to our department, where a detailed examination led to the diagnosis of hemothorax. The bleeding that caused the right hemothorax was difficult to control, so our patient was transferred to the Department of Thoracic Surgery for hemostasis control. Our patient’s personal history of uterine hemorrhage and skin ulcers, as well as the finding of skin fragility during surgery, were indicative of a weak connective tissue disease; therefore, after improvement of the hemothorax, a genetic analysis was performed. This revealed a heterozygous missense mutation in COL3A1, c.2411 G>T p.Gly804Val (exon 36. A detailed investigation conducted at a later date revealed that her daughter also had the same genetic mutation. This led to the diagnosis of vascular-type Ehlers-Danlos syndrome characterized by a new gene mutation. Conclusion We report a new genetic mutation associated with vascular-type Ehlers-Danlos syndrome. We present the clinical and imaging findings, and the disease and treatment course in this patient. We believe this information will be important in treating future cases of vascular-type Ehlers-Danlos syndrome in patients with this mutation.

  12. Mutations in a TGF-β Ligand, TGFB3, Cause Syndromic Aortic Aneurysms and Dissections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertoli-Avella, Aida M.; Gillis, Elisabeth; Morisaki, Hiroko; Verhagen, Judith M.A.; de Graaf, Bianca M.; van de Beek, Gerarda; Gallo, Elena; Kruithof, Boudewijn P.T.; Venselaar, Hanka; Myers, Loretha A.; Laga, Steven; Doyle, Alexander J.; Oswald, Gretchen; van Cappellen, Gert W.A.; Yamanaka, Itaru; van der Helm, Robert M.; Beverloo, Berna; de Klein, Annelies; Pardo, Luba; Lammens, Martin; Evers, Christina; Devriendt, Koenraad; Dumoulein, Michiel; Timmermans, Janneke; Bruggenwirth, Hennie T.; Verheijen, Frans; Rodrigus, Inez; Baynam, Gareth; Kempers, Marlies; Saenen, Johan; Van Craenenbroeck, Emeline M.; Minatoya, Kenji; Matsukawa, Ritsu; Tsukube, Takuro; Kubo, Noriaki; Hofstra, Robert; Goumans, Marie Jose; Bekkers, Jos A.; Roos-Hesselink, Jolien W.; van de Laar, Ingrid M.B.H.; Dietz, Harry C.; Van Laer, Lut; Morisaki, Takayuki; Wessels, Marja W.; Loeys, Bart L.

    2015-01-01

    Background Aneurysms affecting the aorta are a common condition associated with high mortality as a result of aortic dissection or rupture. Investigations of the pathogenic mechanisms involved in syndromic types of thoracic aortic aneurysms, such as Marfan and Loeys-Dietz syndromes, have revealed an important contribution of disturbed transforming growth factor (TGF)-β signaling. Objectives This study sought to discover a novel gene causing syndromic aortic aneurysms in order to unravel the underlying pathogenesis. Methods We combined genome-wide linkage analysis, exome sequencing, and candidate gene Sanger sequencing in a total of 470 index cases with thoracic aortic aneurysms. Extensive cardiological examination, including physical examination, electrocardiography, and transthoracic echocardiography was performed. In adults, imaging of the entire aorta using computed tomography or magnetic resonance imaging was done. Results Here, we report on 43 patients from 11 families with syndromic presentations of aortic aneurysms caused by TGFB3 mutations. We demonstrate that TGFB3 mutations are associated with significant cardiovascular involvement, including thoracic/abdominal aortic aneurysm and dissection, and mitral valve disease. Other systemic features overlap clinically with Loeys-Dietz, Shprintzen-Goldberg, and Marfan syndromes, including cleft palate, bifid uvula, skeletal overgrowth, cervical spine instability and clubfoot deformity. In line with previous observations in aortic wall tissues of patients with mutations in effectors of TGF-β signaling (TGFBR1/2, SMAD3, and TGFB2), we confirm a paradoxical up-regulation of both canonical and noncanonical TGF-β signaling in association with up-regulation of the expression of TGF-β ligands. Conclusions Our findings emphasize the broad clinical variability associated with TGFB3 mutations and highlight the importance of early recognition of the disease because of high cardiovascular risk. PMID:25835445

  13. Mutations in SWI/SNF chromatin remodeling complex gene ARID1B cause Coffin-Siris syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santen, Gijs W E; Aten, Emmelien; Sun, Yu; Almomani, Rowida; Gilissen, Christian; Nielsen, Maartje; Kant, Sarina G; Snoeck, Irina N; Peeters, Els A J; Hilhorst-Hofstee, Yvonne; Wessels, Marja W; den Hollander, Nicolette S; Ruivenkamp, Claudia A L; van Ommen, Gert-Jan B; Breuning, Martijn H; den Dunnen, Johan T; van Haeringen, Arie; Kriek, Marjolein

    2012-03-18

    We identified de novo truncating mutations in ARID1B in three individuals with Coffin-Siris syndrome (CSS) by exome sequencing. Array-based copy-number variation (CNV) analysis in 2,000 individuals with intellectual disability revealed deletions encompassing ARID1B in 3 subjects with phenotypes partially overlapping that of CSS. Taken together with published data, these results indicate that haploinsufficiency of the ARID1B gene, which encodes an epigenetic modifier of chromatin structure, is an important cause of CSS and is potentially a common cause of intellectual disability and speech impairment.

  14. Evaluation of Presumably Disease Causing SCN1A Variants in a Cohort of Common Epilepsy Syndromes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dennis Lal

    Full Text Available The SCN1A gene, coding for the voltage-gated Na+ channel alpha subunit NaV1.1, is the clinically most relevant epilepsy gene. With the advent of high-throughput next-generation sequencing, clinical laboratories are generating an ever-increasing catalogue of SCN1A variants. Variants are more likely to be classified as pathogenic if they have already been identified previously in a patient with epilepsy. Here, we critically re-evaluate the pathogenicity of this class of variants in a cohort of patients with common epilepsy syndromes and subsequently ask whether a significant fraction of benign variants have been misclassified as pathogenic.We screened a discovery cohort of 448 patients with a broad range of common genetic epilepsies and 734 controls for previously reported SCN1A mutations that were assumed to be disease causing. We re-evaluated the evidence for pathogenicity of the identified variants using in silico predictions, segregation, original reports, available functional data and assessment of allele frequencies in healthy individuals as well as in a follow up cohort of 777 patients.We identified 8 known missense mutations, previously reported as pathogenic, in a total of 17 unrelated epilepsy patients (17/448; 3.80%. Our re-evaluation indicates that 7 out of these 8 variants (p.R27T; p.R28C; p.R542Q; p.R604H; p.T1250M; p.E1308D; p.R1928G; NP_001159435.1 are not pathogenic. Only the p.T1174S mutation may be considered as a genetic risk factor for epilepsy of small effect size based on the enrichment in patients (P = 6.60 x 10-4; OR = 0.32, fishers exact test, previous functional studies but incomplete penetrance. Thus, incorporation of previous studies in genetic counseling of SCN1A sequencing results is challenging and may produce incorrect conclusions.

  15. Pulmonary endothelial activation caused by extracellular histones contributes to neutrophil activation in acute respiratory distress syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yanlin; Guan, Li; Yu, Jie; Zhao, Zanmei; Mao, Lijun; Li, Shuqiang; Zhao, Jinyuan

    2016-11-21

    During the acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), neutrophils play a central role in the pathogenesis, and their activation requires interaction with the endothelium. Extracellular histones have been recognized as pivotal inflammatory mediators. This study was to investigate the role of pulmonary endothelial activation during the extracellular histone-induced inflammatory response in ARDS. ARDS was induced in male C57BL/6 mice by intravenous injection with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) or exogenous histones. Concurrent with LPS administration, anti-histone H4 antibody (anti-H4) or non-specific IgG was administered to study the role of extracellular histones. The circulating von Willebrand factor (vWF) and soluble thrombomodulin (sTM) were measured with ELISA kits at the preset time points. Myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity in lung tissue was measured with a MPO detection kit. The translocation of P-selectin and neutrophil infiltration were measured by immunohistochemical detection. For in vitro studies, histone H4 in the supernatant of mouse lung vascular endothelial cells (MLVECs) was measured by Western blot. The binding of extracellular histones with endothelial membrane was examined by confocal laser microscopy. Endothelial P-selectin translocation was measured by cell surface ELISA. Adhesion of neutrophils to MLVECs was assessed with a color video digital camera. The results showed that during LPS-induced ARDS extracellular histones caused endothelial and neutrophil activation, as seen by P-selectin translocation, release of vWF, an increase of circulating sTM, lung neutrophil infiltration and increased MPO activity. Extracellular histones directly bound and activated MLVECs in a dose-dependent manner. On the contrary, the direct stimulatory effect of exogenous histones on neutrophils was very limited, as measured by neutrophil adhesion and MPO activity. With the contribution of activated endothelium, extracellular histones could effectively activating

  16. Upper Extremity Compartment Syndrome in a Patient with Acute Gout Attack but without Trauma or Other Typical Causes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John G. Skedros

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available We report the case of a 30-year-old Polynesian male with a severe gout flare of multiple joints and simultaneous acute compartment syndrome (ACS of his right forearm and hand without trauma or other typical causes. He had a long history of gout flares, but none were known to be associated with compartment syndrome. He also had concurrent infections in his right elbow joint and olecranon bursa. A few days prior to this episode of ACS, high pain and swelling occurred in his right upper extremity after a minimal workout with light weights. A similar episode occurred seven months prior and was attributed to a gout flare. Unlike past flares that resolved with colchicine and/or anti-inflammatory medications, his current upper extremity pain/swelling worsened and became severe. Hand and forearm fasciotomies were performed. Workup included general medicine, rheumatology and infectious disease consultations, myriad blood tests, and imaging studies including Doppler ultrasound and CT angiography. Additional clinical history suggested that he had previously unrecognized recurrent exertional compartment syndrome that led to the episode of ACS reported here. Chronic exertional compartment syndrome (CECS presents a difficult diagnosis when presented with multiple symptoms concurrently. This case provides an example of one such diagnosis.

  17. Multiple nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome associated with congenital orbital teratoma, caused by a PTCH1 frameshift mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, A L; Carvalho, A; Cabral, R; Carneiro, V; Gilardi, P; Duarte, C P; Puente-Prieto, J; Santos, P; Mota-Vieira, L

    2014-07-25

    Gorlin-Goltz syndrome, or nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome (NBCCS), is a rare autosomal dominant disorder caused by mutations in the PTCH1 gene and shows a high level of penetrance and variable expressivity. The syndrome is characterized by developmental abnormalities or neoplasms and is diagnosed with 2 major criteria, or with 1 major and 2 minor criteria. Here, we report a new clinical manifestation associated with this syndrome in a boy affected by NBCCS who had congenital orbital teratoma at birth. Later, at the age of 15 years, he presented with 4 major and 4 minor criteria of NBCCS, including multiple basal cell carcinoma and 2 odontogenic keratocysts of the jaw, both confirmed by histology, more than 5 palmar pits, calcification of the cerebral falx, extensive meningeal calcifications, macrocephaly, hypertelorism, frontal bosses, and kyphoscoliosis. PTCH1 mutation analysis revealed the heterozygous germline mutation c.290dupA. This mutation generated a frameshift within exon 2 and an early premature stop codon (p.Asn97LysfsX43), predicting a truncated protein with complete loss of function. Identification of this mutation is useful for genetic counseling. Although the clinical symptoms are well-known, our case contributes to the understanding of phenotypic variability in NBCCS, highlighting that PTCH1 mutations cannot be used for predicting disease burden and reinforces the need of a multidisciplinary team in the diagnosis, treatment, and follow-up of NBCCS patients.

  18. Staphylococcal scalded skin syndrome in a premature newborn caused by methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus: case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreas Hörner

    Full Text Available CONTEXT: Staphylococcal scalded skin syndrome is an exfoliative skin disease. Reports of this syndrome in newborns caused by methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus are rare but, when present, rapid diagnosis and treatment is required in order to decrease morbidity and mortality. CASE REPORT: A premature newly born girl weighing 1,520 g, born with a gestational age of 29 weeks and 4 days, developed staphylococcal scalded skin syndrome on the fifth day of life. Cultures on blood samples collected on the first and fourth days were negative, but Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Enterococcus sp. (vancomycin-sensitive developed in blood cultures performed on the day of death (seventh day, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Serratia marcescens were identified in cultures on nasopharyngeal, buttock and abdominal secretions. In addition to these two Gram-negative bacilli, methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus was isolated in a culture on the umbilical stump (seventh day. The diagnosis of staphylococcal scalded skin syndrome was based on clinical criteria.

  19. A thymic neuroendocrine tumour in a young female: a rare cause of relapsing and remitting Cushing’s syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M J Trott

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available We present a case of a young female patient with a rare cause of relapsing and remitting Cushing’s syndrome due to ectopic ACTH secretion from a thymic neuroendocrine tumour. A 34-year-old female presented with a constellation of symptoms of Cushing’s syndrome, including facial swelling, muscle weakness and cognitive impairment. We use the terms ‘relapsing and remitting’ in this case report, given the unpredictable time course of symptoms, which led to a delay of 2 years before the correct diagnosis of hypercortisolaemia. Diagnostic workup confirmed ectopic ACTH secretion, and a thymic mass was seen on mediastinal imaging. The patient subsequently underwent thymectomy with complete resolution of her symptoms. Several case series have documented the association of Cushing’s syndrome with thymic neuroendocrine tumours (NETs, although to our knowledge there are a few published cases of patients with relapsing and remitting symptoms. This case is also notable for the absence of features of the MEN-1 syndrome, along with the female gender of our patient and her history of non-smoking.

  20. Decreased tonic inhibition in cerebellar granule cells causes motor dysfunction in a mouse model of Angelman syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egawa, Kiyoshi; Kitagawa, Kyoko; Inoue, Koichi; Takayama, Masakazu; Takayama, Chitoshi; Saitoh, Shinji; Kishino, Tatsuya; Kitagawa, Masatoshi; Fukuda, Atsuo

    2012-12-05

    Angelman syndrome is a neurodevelopmental disorder caused by loss of function of the UBE3A gene encoding a ubiquitin E3 ligase. Motor dysfunction is a characteristic feature of Angelman syndrome, but neither the mechanisms of action nor effective therapeutic strategies have yet been elucidated. We report that tonic inhibition is specifically decreased in cerebellar granule cells of Ube3a-deficient mice, a model of Angelman syndrome. As a mechanism underlying this decrease in tonic inhibition, we show that Ube3a controls degradation of γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) transporter 1 (GAT1) and that deficiency of Ube3a induces a surplus of GAT1 that results in a decrease in GABA concentrations in the extrasynaptic space. Administering low doses of 4,5,6,7-tetrahydroisothiazolo-[5,4-c]pyridin-3-ol (THIP), a selective extrasynaptic GABA(A) receptor agonist, improves the abnormal firing properties of a population of Purkinje cells in cerebellar brain slices and reduces cerebellar ataxia in Ube3a-deficient mice in vivo. These results suggest that pharmacologically increasing tonic inhibition may be a useful strategy for alleviating motor dysfunction in Angelman syndrome.

  1. Mapping and exome sequencing identifies a mutation in the IARS gene as the cause of hereditary perinatal weak calf syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirano, Takashi; Kobayashi, Naohiko; Matsuhashi, Tamako; Watanabe, Daisaku; Watanabe, Toshio; Takasuga, Akiko; Sugimoto, Mayumi; Sugimoto, Yoshikazu

    2013-01-01

    We identified an IARS (isoleucyl-tRNA synthetase) c.235G>C (p.Val79Leu) substitution as the causative mutation for neonatal weakness with intrauterine growth retardation (perinatal weak calf syndrome). In Japanese Black cattle, the syndrome was frequently found in calves sired by Bull A. Hence, we employed homozygosity mapping and linkage analysis. In order to identify the perinatal weak calf syndrome locus in a 4.04-Mb region of BTA 8, we analysed a paternal half-sibling family with a BovineSNP50 BeadChip and microsatellites. In this critical region, we performed exome sequencing to identify a causative mutation. Three variants were detected as possible candidates for causative mutations that were predicted to disrupt the protein function, including a G>C (p.Val79Leu) mutation in IARS c.235. The IARS c.235G>C mutation was not a homozygous risk allele in the 36 healthy offspring of Bull A. Moreover, the IARS Val79 residue and its flanking regions were evolutionarily and highly conserved. The IARS mutant (Leu79) had decreased aminoacylation activity. Additionally, the homozygous mutation was not found in any of 1526 healthy cattle. Therefore, we concluded that the IARS c.235G>C mutation was the cause of hereditary perinatal weak calf syndrome.

  2. Mutations in Three Genes Encoding Proteins Involved in Hair Shaft Formation Cause Uncombable Hair Syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Ü Basmanav, F Buket; Cau, Laura; Tafazzoli, Aylar; Méchin, Marie-Claire; Wolf, Sabrina; Romano, Maria Teresa; Valentin, Frederic; Wiegmann, Henning; Huchenq, Anne; Kandil, Rima; Garcia Bartels, Natalie; Kilic, Arzu; George, Susannah; Ralser, Damian J; Bergner, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    Uncombable hair syndrome (UHS), also known as ���spun glass hair syndrome,��� ���pili trianguli et canaliculi,��� or ���cheveux incoiffables��� is a rare anomaly of the hair shaft that occurs in children and improves with age. UHS is characterized by dry, frizzy, spangly, and often fair hair that is resistant to being combed flat. Until now, both simplex and familial UHS-affected case subjects with autosomal-dominant as well as -recessive inheritance have been reported. However, none of these...

  3. An unusual cause of spontaneous pneumothorax: the Mounier-Kuhn syndrome.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Kent, B D

    2011-05-01

    We present the case of a 54-year old woman referred to our service with an unusual presentation of an under-diagnosed condition. A life-long non-smoker, she was referred to respiratory services by our emergency department with a left sided pneumothorax, progressive dyspnoea on exertion, and recurrent chest infections. Subsequent investigation yielded findings consistent with Mounier-Kuhn syndrome (Tracheobronchomegaly), a condition characterised by marked dilatation of the proximal airways, recurrent chest infection, and consequent emphysema and bronchiectasis. Although rarely diagnosed, some degree of Mounier-Kuhn syndrome may occur in up to 1 in 500 adults.

  4. Mutations affecting components of the SWI/SNF complex cause Coffin-Siris syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsurusaki, Yoshinori; Okamoto, Nobuhiko; Ohashi, Hirofumi; Kosho, Tomoki; Imai, Yoko; Hibi-Ko, Yumiko; Kaname, Tadashi; Naritomi, Kenji; Kawame, Hiroshi; Wakui, Keiko; Fukushima, Yoshimitsu; Homma, Tomomi; Kato, Mitsuhiro; Hiraki, Yoko; Yamagata, Takanori; Yano, Shoji; Mizuno, Seiji; Sakazume, Satoru; Ishii, Takuma; Nagai, Toshiro; Shiina, Masaaki; Ogata, Kazuhiro; Ohta, Tohru; Niikawa, Norio; Miyatake, Satoko; Okada, Ippei; Mizuguchi, Takeshi; Doi, Hiroshi; Saitsu, Hirotomo; Miyake, Noriko; Matsumoto, Naomichi

    2012-03-18

    By exome sequencing, we found de novo SMARCB1 mutations in two of five individuals with typical Coffin-Siris syndrome (CSS), a rare autosomal dominant anomaly syndrome. As SMARCB1 encodes a subunit of the SWItch/Sucrose NonFermenting (SWI/SNF) complex, we screened 15 other genes encoding subunits of this complex in 23 individuals with CSS. Twenty affected individuals (87%) each had a germline mutation in one of six SWI/SNF subunit genes, including SMARCB1, SMARCA4, SMARCA2, SMARCE1, ARID1A and ARID1B.

  5. An unusual cause of spontaneous pneumothorax: the Mounier-Kuhn syndrome.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Kent, B D

    2012-02-01

    We present the case of a 54-year old woman referred to our service with an unusual presentation of an under-diagnosed condition. A life-long non-smoker, she was referred to respiratory services by our emergency department with a left sided pneumothorax, progressive dyspnoea on exertion, and recurrent chest infections. Subsequent investigation yielded findings consistent with Mounier-Kuhn syndrome (Tracheobronchomegaly), a condition characterised by marked dilatation of the proximal airways, recurrent chest infection, and consequent emphysema and bronchiectasis. Although rarely diagnosed, some degree of Mounier-Kuhn syndrome may occur in up to 1 in 500 adults.

  6. Aneurysmal Bone Cyst Arising from the First Rib: A Rare Cause of Thoracic Outlet Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medina, Manuel; Paul, Subroto

    2016-12-01

    Aneurysmal bone cyst is a rare benign cystic bone lesion with an incidence of only 0.14 per 100,000 individuals and most commonly affects the metaphyses of long bones, spine, and pelvis. We present a very rare case of a 17-year-old boy with a rapidly expanding aneurysmal bone cyst arising from the first rib, resulting in neurogenic thoracic outlet syndrome secondary to its compression of the brachial plexus. The patient's symptoms resolved after en bloc resection. To our knowledge there have been no other reports in the literature of thoracic outlet syndrome due to aneurysmal bone cyst arising from the first rib.

  7. Heterozygous missense mutations in SMARCA2 cause Nicolaides-Baraitser syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Houdt, Jeroen K. J.; Nowakowska, Beata Anna; Sousa, Sérgio B.; van Schaik, Barbera D. C.; Seuntjens, Eve; Avonce, Nelson; Sifrim, Alejandro; Abdul-Rahman, Omar A.; van den Boogaard, Marie-José H.; Bottani, Armand; Castori, Marco; Cormier-Daire, Valérie; Deardorff, Matthew A.; Filges, Isabel; Fryer, Alan; Fryns, Jean-Pierre; Gana, Simone; Garavelli, Livia; Gillessen-Kaesbach, Gabriele; Hall, Bryan D.; Horn, Denise; Huylebroeck, Danny; Klapecki, Jakub; Krajewska-Walasek, Malgorzata; Kuechler, Alma; Lines, Matthew A.; Maas, Saskia; Macdermot, Kay D.; McKee, Shane; Magee, Alex; de Man, Stella A.; Moreau, Yves; Morice-Picard, Fanny; Obersztyn, Ewa; Pilch, Jacek; Rosser, Elizabeth; Shannon, Nora; Stolte-Dijkstra, Irene; van Dijck, Patrick; Vilain, Catheline; Vogels, Annick; Wakeling, Emma; Wieczorek, Dagmar; Wilson, Louise; Zuffardi, Orsetta; van Kampen, Antoine H. C.; Devriendt, Koenraad; Hennekam, Raoul; Vermeesch, Joris Robert

    2012-01-01

    Nicolaides-Baraitser syndrome (NBS) is characterized by sparse hair, distinctive facial morphology, distal-limb anomalies and intellectual disability. We sequenced the exomes of ten individuals with NBS and identified heterozygous variants in SMARCA2 in eight of them. Extended molecular screening

  8. Heterozygous missense mutations in SMARCA2 cause Nicolaides-Baraitser syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Houdt, Jeroen K. J.; Nowakowska, Beata Anna; Sousa, Sergio B.; van Schaik, Barbera D. C.; Seuntjens, Eve; Avonce, Nelson; Sifrim, Alejandro; Abdul-Rahman, Omar A.; van den Boogaard, Marie-Jose H.; Bottani, Armand; Castori, Marco; Cormier-Daire, Valerie; Deardorff, Matthew A.; Filges, Isabel; Fryer, Alan; Fryns, Jean-Pierre; Gana, Simone; Garavelli, Livia; Gillessen-Kaesbach, Gabriele; Hall, Bryan D.; Horn, Denise; Huylebroeck, Danny; Klapecki, Jakub; Krajewska-Walasek, Malgorzata; Kuechler, Alma; Lines, Matthew A.; Maas, Saskia; MacDermot, Kay D.; McKee, Shane; Magee, Alex; de Man, Stella A.; Moreau, Yves; Morice-Picard, Fanny; Obersztyn, Ewa; Pilch, Jacek; Rosser, Elizabeth; Shannon, Nora; Stolte-Dijkstra, Irene; Van Dijck, Patrick; Vilain, Catheline; Vogels, Annick; Wakeling, Emma; Wieczorek, Dagmar; Wilson, Louise; Zuffardi, Orsetta; van Kampen, Antoine H. C.; Devriendt, Koenraad; Hennekam, Raoul; Vermeesch, Joris Robert

    Nicolaides-Baraitser syndrome (NBS) is characterized by sparse hair, distinctive facial morphology, distal-limb anomalies and intellectual disability. We sequenced the exomes of ten individuals with NBS and identified heterozygous variants in SMARCA2 in eight of them. Extended molecular screening

  9. Nail patella syndrome: a rare cause of renal failure in a young adult ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Nail Patella Syndrome (NPS) is a rare hereditary disease affecting multiple systems with predominant involvement of Kidney, Bones and Nails and Eyes. We report a case of NPS which presented as renal failure in a 22 year old male. The patient was admitted with decreased urine output and features of fluid overload and ...

  10. Giant pseudomeningocele causing urinary obstruction in a patient with Marfan syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stone, Jeremy G; Bergmann, Liisa L; Takamori, Ryan; Donovan, Daniel J

    2015-07-01

    Defective collagen biosynthesis in Marfan syndrome predisposes to dural defects such as dural ectasia, meningocele, and pseudomeningocele; thus, an increased index of suspicion for these conditions should be present in the clinical setting of Marfan syndrome. The authors describe a young woman with Marfan syndrome who was being treated with anticoagulants for a prosthetic heart valve and who presented with a spontaneous retroperitoneal hemorrhage requiring surgical evacuation. No CSF leak was encountered at surgery, but she developed progressively more severe positional headaches over the following year. She then experienced the sudden onset of acute urinary obstruction, at which time CT revealed a 17 × 15 × 13-cm presacral pseudomeningocele communicating with the thecal sac through a sacral bone defect. An anterior surgical approach was used for drainage of the pseudomeningocele as well as for primary closure of the dural defect with a bovine pericardial patch and autologous subcutaneous fat graft. After a short period of lumbar subarachnoid drainage of the CSF, the patient was able to resume normal activity without recurrent symptoms. To the authors' knowledge, such a pseudomeningocele in a patient with Marfan syndrome has been reported only twice, and this case features the largest pseudomeningocele to date. They also review the pertinent literature regarding presentation, diagnosis, and management of these lesions.

  11. Rubinstein-Taybi syndrome caused by submicroscopic deletions within 16p13.3

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Breuning, M. H.; Dauwerse, H. G.; Fugazza, G.; Saris, J. J.; Spruit, L.; Wijnen, H.; Tommerup, N.; van der Hagen, C. B.; Imaizumi, K.; Kuroki, Y.; van den Boogaard, M. J.; de Pater, J. M.; Mariman, E. C.; Hamel, B. C.; Himmelbauer, H.; Frischauf, A. M.; Stallings, R.; Beverstock, G. C.; van Ommen, G. J.; Hennekam, R. C.

    1993-01-01

    The Rubinstein-Taybi syndrome (RTS) is a well-defined complex of congenital malformations characterized by facial abnormalities, broad thumbs and big toes, and mental retardation. The breakpoint of two distinct reciprocal translocations occurring in patients with a clinical diagnosis of RTS was

  12. Arts syndrome is caused by loss-of-function mutations in PRPS1

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Brouwer, Arjan P. M.; Williams, Kelly L.; Duley, John A.; van Kuilenburg, Andre B. P.; Nabuurs, Sander B.; Egmont-Petersen, Michael; Lugtenberg, Dorien; Zoetekouw, Lida; Banning, Martijn J. G.; Roeffen, Melissa; Hamel, Ben C. J.; Weaving, Linda; Ouvrier, Robert A.; Donald, Jennifer A.; Wevers, Ron A.; Christodoulou, John; van Bokhoven, Hans

    2007-01-01

    Arts syndrome is an X-linked disorder characterized by mental retardation, early-onset hypotonia, ataxia, delayed motor development, hearing impairment, and optic atrophy. Linkage analysis in a Dutch family and an Australian family suggested that the candidate gene maps to Xq22.1-q24.

  13. Treatment of Guillain-Barré syndrome and causes and treatment of residual fatigue

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.P.J. Garssen (Marcel)

    2005-01-01

    textabstractChapter 1 is the general introduction of this thesis, in which di.erent aspects of the Guillain-Barré syndrome (GBS) are described. GBS is an acute post-infectious polyneuropathy, in which the immune system plays an important role. Insight in pathogenesis, clinical and

  14. Churg-Strauss syndrome involving the breast: a rare cause of eosinophilic mastitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Villalba-Nuno, Virtudes; Sabate, Josep M.; Gomez, Antonio; Torrubia, Sofia; Vidaller, Antonio; Catala, Isabel; Escobedo, Agustin

    2002-01-01

    Churg-Strauss syndrome is a rare immunoallergic disorder that usually affects lungs, skin and nervous system. The clinical and radiological findings of Churg-Strauss disease involving the breast are reported and attention is drawn to the fact that, although uncommonly, the breast can be involved by immunological diseases. (orig.)

  15. Rapid onset of severe twin-twin transfusion syndrome caused by placental venous thrombosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nikkels, PGJ; van Gemert, MJC; Sollie-Szarynska, KM; Molendijk, H; Timmer, B; Machin, GA

    2002-01-01

    We report a case of rapid onset of severe twin-twin transfusion syndrome (TTTS) at 25 weeks gestation in a monochorionic twin pregnancy that was uneventful before that time. Thrombosis of a main venous branch draining several arteriovenous (AV) anastomoses to the donor changed the previous

  16. Churg-Strauss syndrome involving the breast: a rare cause of eosinophilic mastitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Villalba-Nuno, Virtudes [Department of Radiology, C.A.P. II Sant Feliu, Marquesa de Castellbell, Sant Feliu de Llobregat (Spain); Sabate, Josep M.; Gomez, Antonio; Torrubia, Sofia [Department of Radiology, Hospital de Sant Pau, Barcelona (Spain); Vidaller, Antonio [Department of Internal Medicine, Hospital de Bellvitge, L' Hospitalet de Llobregat (Spain); Catala, Isabel [Department of Pathology, Hospital de Bellvitge, L' Hospitalet de Llobregat (Spain); Escobedo, Agustin [Department of Oncology, Hospital Duran i Reynals, L' Hospitalet de Llobregat (Spain)

    2002-03-01

    Churg-Strauss syndrome is a rare immunoallergic disorder that usually affects lungs, skin and nervous system. The clinical and radiological findings of Churg-Strauss disease involving the breast are reported and attention is drawn to the fact that, although uncommonly, the breast can be involved by immunological diseases. (orig.)

  17. Middle aortic syndrome as a cause of heart failure in children and its management.

    OpenAIRE

    Gupta, S; Goswami, B; Ghosh, D C; Sen Gupta, A N

    1981-01-01

    Two cases of middle aortic syndrome in children are described along with two other cases reported earlier. In childhood, this disease may present as incipient or overt cardiac failure. Surgical treatment should be undertaken based on an objective assessment of the severity of the stricture and after taking into account the future growth of the child.

  18. Yunis-Varón syndrome caused by biallelic VAC14 mutations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lines, Matthew A.; Ito, Yoko; Kernohan, Kristin D.; Mears, Wendy; Hurteau-Miller, Julie; Venkateswaran, Sunita; Ward, Leanne; Khatchadourian, Karine; McClintock, Jeff; Bhola, Priya; Campeau, Philippe M.; Boycott, Kym M.; Michaud, Jean; van Kuilenburg, André Bp; Ferdinandusse, Sacha; Dyment, David A.

    2017-01-01

    Yunis-Varón syndrome (YVS) is an autosomal recessive disorder comprising skeletal anomalies, dysmorphism, global developmental delay and intracytoplasmic vacuolation in brain and other tissues. All hitherto-reported pathogenic variants affect FIG4, a lipid phosphatase involved in

  19. VRAM steal syndrome - a unique cause of flap necrosis in chest wall reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, S; Pantelide, N; Iyer, S

    2018-03-01

    The pedicled vertical rectus abdominis myocutaneous (VRAM) flap is a robust flap, which is considered to be a 'workhorse' regional option for chest wall reconstruction. We describe a previously unreported complication of partial flap loss due to 'steal syndrome', whereby arterial supply was diverted away from the flap due to dialysis from an ipsilateral arteriovenous fistula.

  20. DOES GROWTH-HORMONE TREATMENT OF PATIENTS WITH TURNERS SYNDROME CAUSE AN ABNORMAL BODY SHAPE

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    GERVER, WJM; DRAYER, NM; VANES, A

    The effect of human growth hormone on the body shape of 51 patients with Turner's syndrome (aged 6-19 years) was evaluated. Biosynthetic growth hormone was given in a dose of 24 IU/m2 body surface/week for two years. Karyotype analysis on peripheral blood was performed. Patients older than 12 years