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Sample records for causing griscelli syndrome

  1. Griscelli syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ariffin, H; Geikowski, A; Chin, T F; Chau, D; Arshad, A; Abu Bakar, K; Krishnan, S

    2014-08-01

    We report a case of Griscelli Syndrome (GS). Our patient initially presented with a diagnosis of haemophagocytic lymphistiocytosis (HLH). Subsequent microscopic analysis of the patient's hair follicle revealed abnormal distribution of melanosomes in the shaft, which is a hallmark for GS. Analysis of RAB27A gene in this patient revealed a homozygous mutation in exon 6, c.550C>T, p.R184X . This nonsense mutation causes premature truncation of the protein resulting in a dysfunctional RAB27A. Recognition of GS allows appropriate institution of therapy namely chemotherapy for HLH and curative haemotopoeitic stem cell transplantation. PMID:25500851

  2. Griscelli syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kumar T

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Partial albinism with immunodeficiency is a rare and fatal immunologic disorder characterized by pigmentary dilution and variable cellular immunodeficiency. It was initially described in 1978. Primary abnormalities included silvery grayish sheen to the hair, large pigment agglomerations in hair shafts and an abundance of mature melanosomes in melanocytes, with reduced pigmentation of adjacent keratinocytes. We describe a child with Griscelli syndrome who presented with hepatitis, pancytopenia and silvery hair. The diagnosis was confirmed by microscopic skin and hair examination.

  3. Griscelli Syndrome: A Case Report

    OpenAIRE

    MANSOURI NEJAD, Seyed Ebrahim; Mohammad Javad YAZDAN PANAH; Tayyebi Meibodi, Naser; ASHRAFZADEH, Farah; Beiraghi Toosi, Mehran; Akhondian, Javad; ESLAMIEH, Hossein

    2014-01-01

    How to Cite This Article: Mansouri Nejad SE, Yazdan panah MJ, Tayyebi Meibodi N, Ashrafzadeh F, Akhondian J, BeiraghiToosi M, Eslamieh H. Griscelli Syndrome: A Case Report. Iran J Child Neurol. 2014 Autumn;8(4): 72-75.ObjectiveGriscelli syndrome (GS) is a rare autosomal recessive immune deficiency disorder that presents with pigmentary dilution of the skin and hair, recurrent skin and pulmonary infections, neurologic problems, hypogammaglobulinemia, and variable cellular immunodeficiency. Thr...

  4. A novel missense mutation (G43S) in the switch I region of Rab27A causing Griscelli syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Westbroek, Wendy; Tuchman, Maya; Tinloy, Bradford;

    2008-01-01

    The autosomal recessive Griscelli syndrome type II (GSII) is caused by mutations in the RAB27A gene. Typical clinical features include immunological impairment, silver-gray scalp hair, eyelashes and eyebrows and hypomelanosis of the skin. Rabs help determine the specificity of membrane trafficking...

  5. Griscelli Syndrome: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyed Ebrahim MANSOURI NEJAD

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available How to Cite This Article: Mansouri Nejad SE, Yazdan panah MJ, Tayyebi Meibodi N, Ashrafzadeh F, Akhondian J, BeiraghiToosi M, Eslamieh H. Griscelli Syndrome: A Case Report. Iran J Child Neurol. 2014 Autumn;8(4: 72-75.ObjectiveGriscelli syndrome (GS is a rare autosomal recessive immune deficiency disorder that presents with pigmentary dilution of the skin and hair, recurrent skin and pulmonary infections, neurologic problems, hypogammaglobulinemia, and variable cellular immunodeficiency. Three mutations have been described in different phenotypes of the disease. In most of cases, GS leads to death in the first decade of life. In this article, we report a one-year-old child with type 2 GS who suffers from pigmentation disorder and hypogammaglobulinemia.ReferencesKharkar V, Pande S, Mahajan S, Dwiwedi R, Khopkar U. Griscelli syndrome: a new phenotype with circumscribed pigment loss? Dermatol Online J 2007 1;13(2:17.Sheela SR, Latha M, Susy JI. Griscelli syndrome: Rab 27a mutation. Indian Pediatrics 2004; 41:944-947.González Carretero P, Noguera Julian A, Ricart Campos S, Fortuny Guasch C, Martorell Sampol L. Griscelli-Prunieras syndrome: report of two cases. An Pediatr (Barc 2009 ; 70(2:164-7.Szczawinska-Poplonyk A, Kycler Z, Breborowicz A, Klaudel-Dreszler M, Pac M, Zegadlo-Mylik M, et al. Pulmonary lymphomatoid granulomatosis in Griscelli syndrome type 2. Viral Immunol 2011 Dec;24(6:471-3.Durmaz A, Ozkinay F, Onay H, Tombuloglu M, Atay A, Gursel O, et al. Molecular analysis and clinical findings of Griscelli syndrome patients. J Pediatr Hematol Oncol 2012 Oct;34(7:541-4.Reddy RR, Babu BM, Venkateshwaramma B, Hymavathi Ch. Silvery hair syndrome in two cousins: Chediak-Higashi syndrome vs Griscelli syndrome, with rare associations. Int J Trichology 2011; 3(2:107-11.Sahana M, Sacchidanand S, Hiremagalore R, Asha G. Silvery grey hair: clue to diagnose immunodeficiency. Int J Trichology 2012;4(2:83-5.Mahalingashetti PB, Krishnappa MH, Kalyan PS

  6. GRISCELLI SYNDROME; A CASE REPORT AND REVIEW OF THE LITERATURE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B.Sh. Shamsian MD

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract:Griscelli syndrome (GS is a rare disease first described in 1978. It is inherited in autosomal recessive pattern. This disease is characterized by partial albinism, pigmentation dilution, cellular immunodeficiency, neurological involvement & uncontrolled phases of macrophage & lymphocyte activation.We report a 5 months Old Iranian girl presenting with silver-gray hair,eyelashes and eyebrows, hepatosplenomegaly, pancytopenia, hemophagocytosis and progressive neurologic deterioration. Griscelli syndrome can be suggested according to her symptoms. The chemotherapy was not effective for her and she died due to multi organ failure.Key words:Griscelli syndrome, Hemophagocytosis, Albinism.

  7. Oral and dental findings of griscelli syndrome type 3

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    Ozlem Marti Akgun

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Griscelli syndrome (GS is a rare autosomal recessive genetic disorder characterized by variable immunodeficiency, partial albinism, abnormal accumulation of melanosomes in melanocytes, pigmentary dilution of the skin, and shiny silver-gray hair. GS has three types, with the first and second types caused by mutations in two genes being located at band 15q21: RAB27A and MYO5A. The expression of the third form of GS is restricted to the characteristic hypopigmentation of GS, and results from mutation in the gene that encodes melanophilin MLPH. It has also been shown that an identical phenotype can result from the deletion of the MYO5A F-exon. The aim of this case report is the presentation of oral and dental features and SEM images of the hair of a 12-year-old girl with GS type 3. [Arch Clin Exp Surg 2015; 4(3.000: 164-167

  8. Griscelli Syndrome Type 2; A Pediatric Case with Immunodeficiency

    OpenAIRE

    Parviz Tabatabaie; Fatemeh Mahjoub; Taher Cheraghi; Nima Parvaneh

    2007-01-01

    A 3.5 month-old girl was admitted with silvery gray hair, light  colored skin, recurrent diarrhea, chest infections, hepatosplenomegaly, episodes of pancytopenia, and hemophagocytosis in the bone marrow. Light microscopy of hair showed characteristic large and irregular clumps of melanin in the middle of hair shaft. Peripheral blood smear examination did not show giant granules in granulocytes. On the basis of these clinical and laboratory findings, Griscelli syndrome was diagnosed. The ...

  9. Griscelli syndrome type 2: A rare and fatal syndrome in a South Indian boy

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    R Rajyalakshmi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Griscelli syndrome (GS is a rare autosomal recessive disorder caused by mutation in the MYO5A (GS1, RAB27A (GS2, and MLPH (GS3 genes, characterized by a common feature, partial albinism. The common variant of three, GS type 2, in addition, shows primary immunodeficiency which leads to recurrent infections and hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis. We, herewith, describe a case of GS type 2, in a 4-year-old male child who presented with chronic and recurrent fever, lymphadenopathy, hepatosplenomegaly, and secondary neurological deterioration; highlighting the cytological and histopathological features of lymph nodes. Hair shaft examination of the child confirmed the diagnosis.

  10. Griscelli Syndrome Type 2; A Pediatric Case with Immunodeficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parviz Tabatabaie

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available A 3.5 month-old girl was admitted with silvery gray hair, light  colored skin, recurrent diarrhea, chest infections, hepatosplenomegaly, episodes of pancytopenia, and hemophagocytosis in the bone marrow. Light microscopy of hair showed characteristic large and irregular clumps of melanin in the middle of hair shaft. Peripheral blood smear examination did not show giant granules in granulocytes. On the basis of these clinical and laboratory findings, Griscelli syndrome was diagnosed. The child succumbed to infection during an accelerated phase of the disease.

  11. GRISCELLI SYNDROME; A CASE REPORT AND REVIEW OF THE LITERATURE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B.Sh. Shamsian

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available Griscelli syndrome (GS is a rare disease first described in 1978. It isinherited in autosomal recessive pattern. This disease is characterizedby partial albinism, pigmentation dilution, cellular immunodeficiency,neurological involvement & uncontrolled phases of macrophage &lymphocyte activation.We report a 5 months Old Iranian girl presenting with silver-gray hair,eyelashes and eyebrows, hepatosplenomegaly, pancytopenia,hemophagocytosis and progressive neurologic deterioration. Griscellisyndrome can be suggested according to her symptoms. Thechemotherapy was not effective for her and she died due to multiorgan failure.

  12. Griscelli syndrome: A case report of Reye′s syndrome and atopic dermatitis history

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    Kirzioglu Z

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Griscelli syndrome (GS is a rare autosomal recessive disorder that results in pigmentary dilution of the skin and the hair (silver hair, with the presence of large clumps of pigment in hair shafts, and an accumulation of melanosomes in melanocytes. Sixty cases of GS have been reported in the literature, but we could find no description of its oro-dental symptoms. Reye′s syndrome (RS is characterized by acute noninflammatory encephalopathy and renal and hepatic failure, while atopic dermatitis (AD is a skin disorder with an immunologic basis. The aim of this paper is to describe the oro-dental and physical findings in a girl who had been diagnosed with GS at 3.5 years of age; she also had AD as well as a history of RS at infancy. We discuss the possible relationship between the three syndromes.

  13. Griscelli syndrome: characterization of a new mutation and rescue of T-cytotoxic activity by retroviral transfer of RAB27A gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bizario, João C S; Feldmann, Jérôme; Castro, Fabíola A; Ménasché, Gaël; Jacob, Cristina M A; Cristofani, L; Casella, Erasmo B; Voltarelli, Júlio C; de Saint-Basile, Geneviève; Espreafico, Enilza M

    2004-07-01

    Griscelli syndrome (GS) is caused by mutations in the MYO5A (GS1), RAB27A (GS2), or MLPH (GS3) genes, all of which lead to a similar pigmentary dilution. In addition, GS1 patients show primary neurological impairment, whereas GS2 patients present immunodeficiency and periods of lymphocyte proliferation and activation, leading to their infiltration in many organs, such as the nervous system, causing secondary neurological damage. We report the diagnosis of GS2 in a 4-year-old child with haemophagocytic syndrome, immunodeficiency, and secondary neurological disorders. Typical melanosome accumulation was found in skin melanocytes and pigment clumps were observed in hair shafts. Two heterozygous mutant alleles of the RAB27A gene were found, a C-T transition (C352T) that leads to Q118stop and a G-C transversion on the exon 5 splicing donor site (G467+1C). Functional assays showed increased cellular activation and decreased cytotoxic activity of NK and CD8+ T cells, associated with defective lytic granules release. Myosin-Va expression and localization in the patient lymphocytes were also analyzed. Most importantly, we show that cytotoxic activity of the patient's CD8+ T lymphocytes can be rescued in vitro by RAB27A gene transfer mediated by a recombinant retroviral vector, a first step towards a potential treatment of the acute phase of GS2 by RAB27A transduced lymphocytes. PMID:15163896

  14. Griscelli syndrome-type 2 in twin siblings: case report and update on RAB27A human mutations and gene structure

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    I.P. Meschede

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Griscelli syndrome (GS is a rare autosomal recessive disorder caused by mutation in the MYO5A (GS1, Elejalde, RAB27A (GS2 or MLPH (GS3 genes. Typical features of all three subtypes of this disease include pigmentary dilution of the hair and skin and silvery-gray hair. Whereas the GS3 phenotype is restricted to the pigmentation dysfunction, GS1 patients also show primary neurological impairment and GS2 patients have severe immunological deficiencies that lead to recurrent infections and hemophagocytic syndrome. We report here the diagnosis of GS2 in 3-year-old twin siblings, with silvery-gray hair, immunodeficiency, hepatosplenomegaly and secondary severe neurological symptoms that culminated in multiple organ failure and death. Light microscopy examination of the hair showed large, irregular clumps of pigments characteristic of GS. A homozygous nonsense mutation, C-T transition (c.550C>T, in the coding region of the RAB27A gene, which leads to a premature stop codon and prediction of a truncated protein (R184X, was found. In patient mononuclear cells, RAB27A mRNA levels were the same as in cells from the parents, but no protein was detected. In addition to the case report, we also present an updated summary on the exon/intron organization of the human RAB27A gene, a literature review of GS2 cases, and a complete list of the human mutations currently reported in this gene. Finally, we propose a flow chart to guide the early diagnosis of the GS subtypes and Chédiak-Higashi syndrome.

  15. Treatment of the X-linked lymphoproliferative, Griscelli and Chédiak-Higashi syndromes by HLH directed therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Trottestam, Helena; Beutel, Karin; Meeths, Marie;

    2009-01-01

    be used for these syndromes. PROCEDURE: In the HLH-94/HLH-2004 treatment study registries, we evaluated all patients with GS2 (n = 5), XLP (n = 2) or CHS (n = 2) treated between 1994 and 2004. RESULTS: All patients responded to the therapy, and all are alive but one (suffering from CHS), with a mean...... follow-up of 5.6 years. All GS2, one XLP and one CHS patient underwent hematopoietic stem cell transplant. Mean follow-up post transplant was 6.0 years. Six of the seven transplanted children achieved non-active disease status at the time for SCT. Neurological sequelae were reported in all, except...

  16. Polarized light microscopy of hair shafts aids in the differential diagnosis of Chédiak-Higashi and Griscelli-Prunieras syndromes Contribuição do estudo dos cabelos com microscopia de luz polarizada ao diagnóstico diferencial das síndromes de Chédiak-Higashi and Grisceli-Prunieras

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    Neusa Y.S. Valente

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: To study and compare the appearance of hairs from patients with Chédiak-Higashi and Griscelli-Prunieras syndromes under light and polarized light microscopy. METHOD: Hairs from 2 Chédiak-Higashi and 2 Griscelli-Prunieras patients were obtained and examined under normal and polarized light microscopy. RESULTS: Under light microscopy, hairs from Chédiak-Higashi patients presented evenly distributed, regular melanin granules, larger than those seen in normal hairs. Under polarized light microscopy, shafts exhibited a bright and polychromatic refringence appearance. In contrast, hair from Griscelli-Prunieras patients, under light microscopy, exhibited bigger and irregular melanin granules, distributed mainly near the medulla. Under polarized light microscopy, shafts appeared monotonously white. CONCLUSION: Light microscopic examination of hair shafts of patients with Chédiak-Higashi or Griscelli-Prunieras syndrome reveals subtle differences that are useful in identifying both disorders, but not in distinguishing between them. We provide evidence that polarized light microscopy of hair shafts, an approach that has not been previously described, aids in differentiating between these syndromes. We propose hair study by polarized light microscopy as a helpful complementary diagnostic method for differential diagnosis between CHS and GPS, especially when the more sophisticated molecular studies are not available.OBJETIVO: Estudar e comparar o aspecto dos cabelos de portadores das síndromes de Chédiak-Higashi e Griscelli-Prunieras, tanto na microscopia óptica convencional quanto com luz polarizada. MÉTODO: Cabelos de dois doentes portadores da síndrome de Chédiak-Higashi e de dois portadores da síndrome de Griscelli-Prunieras foram obtidos e estudados tanto à microscopia convencional quanto com luz polarizada. RESULTADOS: Na microscopia óptica convencional, os cabelos dos doentes portadores da síndrome de Chédiak-Higashi mostraram

  17. What Causes Rett Syndrome?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Information Clinical Trials Resources and Publications What causes Rett syndrome? Skip sharing on social media links Share this: ... as bad for development as too little. Is Rett syndrome passed from one generation to the next? In ...

  18. What Causes Cushing's Syndrome?

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    ... in the lungs, pancreas (pronounced PAN-kree-uhs ), thyroid, or thymus How Tumors Can Cause Cushing’s Syndrome Normally, the pituitary gland ... cancerous, are mostly found in the lungs, pancreas, thyroid, and thymus. ... are more vulnerable to tumors in one or more glands that influence cortisol ...

  19. A novel missense mutation (G43S) in the switch I region of Rab27A causing Griscelli syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Westbroek, W.; Tuchman, M.; Tinloy, B.;

    2008-01-01

    steps within cells. In melanocytes, the GTP-bound form of Rab27A associates with the membranes of mature fully-pigmented melanosomes through its geranylgeranyl group. Once attached, Rab27A recruits the downstream effector Melanophilin (Mlph) and the actin-dependent motor protein Myosin Va (Myo...... GSII patient. Laser scanning confocal microscopy showed that the G43S mutation, which is located in the highly conserved switch I region of Rab27A, induces perinuclear localization of melanosomes in normal melanocytes, and fails to restore melanosomes to the actin-rich periphery in GSII melanocytes. Co...

  20. Do We Know What Causes Myelodysplastic Syndromes?

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    ... Next Topic Can myelodysplastic syndromes be prevented? Do we know what causes myelodysplastic syndromes? Some cases of ... the instructions for nearly everything our cells do. We usually look like our parents because they are ...

  1. Radiation nephritis causing nephrotic syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jennette, J.C.; Ordonez, N.G.

    1983-12-01

    Clinical symptoms of acute radiation nephritis with nephrotic syndrome developed in a fifty-six-year-old woman after abdominal radiation therapy for an astrocytoma of the spinal cord. The diagnosis of radiation nephritis was confirmed by renal biopsy. To our knowledge, this is the first documented case of radiation nephritis associated with nephrotic syndrome.

  2. Mutations in ANTXR1 Cause GAPO Syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stranecky, V.; Hoischen, A.; Hartmannova, H.; Zaki, M.S.; Chaudhary, A.; Zudaire, E.; Noskova, L.; Baresova, V.; Pristoupilova, A.; Hodanova, K.; Sovova, J.; Hulkova, H.; Piherova, L.; Hehir-Kwa, J.Y.; Silva, D. De; Senanayake, M.P.; Farrag, S.; Zeman, J.; Martasek, P.; Baxova, A.; Afifi, H.H.; Croix, B. St.; Brunner, H.G.; Temtamy, S.; Kmoch, S.

    2013-01-01

    The genetic cause of GAPO syndrome, a condition characterized by growth retardation, alopecia, pseudoanodontia, and progressive visual impairment, has not previously been identified. We studied four ethnically unrelated affected individuals and identified homozygous nonsense mutations (c.262C>T [

  3. A rare cause of Cushing's syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Folkestad, Lars; Andersen, Marianne Skovsager; Nielsen, Anne Lerberg;

    2014-01-01

    Excess glucocorticoid levels cause Cushing's syndrome (CS) and may be due to pituitary, adrenal or ectopic tumours. Adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) levels are useful in identifying adrenal tumours. In rare cases, ACTH-producing phaeochromocytomas are the cause of CS. We present two cases of ACTH...

  4. Carpal tunnel syndrome caused by cysticercosis

    OpenAIRE

    Sharma S; Sharma Nalini; Yeolekar M

    2010-01-01

    We present a case of carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) due to compression of the median nerve within the carpal tunnel, caused by cysticercosis. Nerve conduction studies revealed severe CTS. Magnetic resonance imaging suggested an inflammatory mass compressing the median nerve in carpal tunnel. The histological diagnosis was consistent with cysticercosis. The case resolved with conservative treatment. Such solitary presentation of entrapment median neuropathy as CTS caused by cysticercosis is extr...

  5. Superior mesenteric artery syndrome causing growth retardation

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    Halil İbrahim Taşcı

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Superior mesenteric artery syndrome is a rare and lifethreateningclinical condition caused by the compressionof the third portion of the duodenum between the aortaand the superior mesenteric artery’s proximal part. Thiscompression may lead to chronic intermittent, acute totalor partial obstruction. Sudden weight-loss and the relateddecrease in the fat tissue are considered to be the etiologicalreason of acute stenosis. Weight-loss accompaniedby nausea, vomiting, anorexia, epigastric pain, andbloating are the leading complaints. Barium radiographs,computerized tomography, conventional angiography,tomographic and magnetic resonance angiography areused in the diagnosis. There are medical and surgical approachesto treatment. We hereby present the case ofa patient with superior mesenteric artery syndrome withdelayed diagnosis.Key words: superior mesenteric artery syndrome, nausea-vomiting, anorexia

  6. Break-Dance: An Unusual Cause of Hammer Syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report the case of a young break-dancer presenting with hammer syndrome. This syndrome has been correlated with many professional and recreational activities but this is, to our knowledge, the first description of hammer syndrome caused by break-dancing. The etiology, diagnosis and treatment modalities of this rare syndrome are considered

  7. Mutations in ZBTB20 cause Primrose syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cordeddu, Viviana; Redeker, Bert; Stellacci, Emilia; Jongejan, Aldo; Fragale, Alessandra; Bradley, Ted E J; Anselmi, Massimiliano; Ciolfi, Andrea; Cecchetti, Serena; Muto, Valentina; Bernardini, Laura; Azage, Meron; Carvalho, Daniel R; Espay, Alberto J; Male, Alison; Molin, Anna-Maja; Posmyk, Renata; Battisti, Carla; Casertano, Alberto; Melis, Daniela; van Kampen, Antoine; Baas, Frank; Mannens, Marcel M; Bocchinfuso, Gianfranco; Stella, Lorenzo; Tartaglia, Marco; Hennekam, Raoul C

    2014-08-01

    Primrose syndrome and 3q13.31 microdeletion syndrome are clinically related disorders characterized by tall stature, macrocephaly, intellectual disability, disturbed behavior and unusual facial features, with diabetes, deafness, progressive muscle wasting and ectopic calcifications specifically occurring in the former. We report that missense mutations in ZBTB20, residing within the 3q13.31 microdeletion syndrome critical region, underlie Primrose syndrome. This finding establishes a genetic link between these disorders and delineates the impact of ZBTB20 dysregulation on development, growth and metabolism.

  8. Goldenhar syndrome: a cause of secondary immunodeficiency?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    De Golovine Serge

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Goldenhar syndrome (GS results from an aberrant development of the 1st and 2nd branchial arches. There is a wide range of clinical manifestations, the most common being microtia, hemifacial microsomia, epibulbar dermoids and vertebral malformations. We present two cases of GS and secondary immunodeficiency due to anatomical defects characteristic of this disorder. Case 1 (3-year-old female averaged 6 episodes of sinusitis and otitis media per year. Case 2 (7-year-old female also had recurrent otitis media, an episode of bacterial pneumonia, and 2 episodes of bacterial meningitis. Their immune evaluation included a complete blood count with differential, serum immunoglobulin levels and specific antibody concentrations, lymphocyte phenotyping, and mitogen and antigen responses, the results of which were all within normal ranges. Both children demonstrated major structural abnormalities of the inner and middle ear structures, retention of fluid in mastoid air cells, and chronic sinusitis by computed tomography. These two cases illustrate how a genetically-associated deviation of the middle ear cleft can cause recurrent infections and chronic inflammation of the middle ear and adjacent sinuses, even meninges, leading to a greatly reduced quality of life for the child and parents.

  9. Biliary stone causing afferent loop syndrome and pancreatitis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    André Roncon Dias; Roberto Iglesias Lopes

    2006-01-01

    We report the case of an 84-year-old female who had a partial gastrectomy with Billroth-Ⅱ anastomosis 24years ago for a benign peptic ulcer who now presented an acute pancreatitis secondary to an afferent loop syndrome. The syndrome was caused by a gallstone that migrated through a cholecystoenteric fistula. This is the first description in the literature of a biliary stone causing afferent loop syndrome.

  10. KID syndrome une cause de pachydermatologie

    OpenAIRE

    BOUDGHENE STAMBOULI, O.; BELBACHIR, A

    2012-01-01

    le KID syndrome est une dysplasie ectodermique rare,associant une erythrokeratodermie,une surdite et une keratine. Le Syndrome de Melkersson Rosenthal (SMR) (1) est une entité rare, caractérisée cliniquement par une triade (Macrochéilite, paralysie faciale périphérique, langue plicaturée) et histologiquement par la présence d’infiltrats dermiques granulomateux. Nous rapportons notre expérience sur ce syndrome où les différents traitements médicamenteux préconisés au long cou...

  11. Antisynthetase Syndrome: A Rare Cause for ILD

    OpenAIRE

    Devi, HJ Gayathri; Pasha, Md Majeed; Padmaja, Mantha Sathya; Halappa, Sujith

    2016-01-01

    Anti-Synthetase Syndrome (ASS) is a rare autoimmune disorder characterized by Interstitial Lung Disease (ILD), inflammatory myositis, fever, Raynaud’s phenomenon, mechanic’s hand, and inflammatory polyarthritis in the setting of antibodies against amino acyl-transfer RNA synthetases, with anti-Jo-1 antibody being the most common. It can sometimes present as interstitial lung disease without any other expression of the syndrome. Clinical and radiological features can be similar to atypical pne...

  12. Chronic Fatigue Syndrome: Searching for the Cause and Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eichner, Edward R.

    1989-01-01

    Chronic fatigue syndrome became known nationally in l985 with a pseudoepidemic in a Nevada resort community. Initially and erroneously linked to the Epstein-Barr virus, the cause of this puzzling syndrome and the mind-body connection are areas of controversy and research. (Author/SM)

  13. Goldenhar syndrome: a cause of secondary immunodeficiency?

    OpenAIRE

    De Golovine Serge; Wu Shuya; Hunter Jill V; Shearer William T

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Goldenhar syndrome (GS) results from an aberrant development of the 1st and 2nd branchial arches. There is a wide range of clinical manifestations, the most common being microtia, hemifacial microsomia, epibulbar dermoids and vertebral malformations. We present two cases of GS and secondary immunodeficiency due to anatomical defects characteristic of this disorder. Case 1 (3-year-old female) averaged 6 episodes of sinusitis and otitis media per year. Case 2 (7-year-old female) also h...

  14. Shoulder impingement syndrome : evaluation of the causes with MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Yong Ho; Song, In Sup; Chung, Hun Young; Yoon, Sang Jin; Kim, Yang Soo; Shim, Hyung Jin; Choi, Young Hee; Lee, Jong Beum; Lee, Yong Chul; Kim, Kun Sang [Chungang Univ. College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Yun Sun [Eulji Hospital, College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1999-12-01

    Various mechanical causes which induce shoulder impingement syndrome have been identified with the help of MRI. The aim of this study is to evaluate the incidence of such causes. A total of 54 patients with clinically confirmed shoulder impingement syndrome and a normal control group(n=20) without symptoms were included. We evaluated the incidence of hook shaped acromion, low lying acromion, downward slope of the acromion, subacromial spur, acromioclavicular joint hypertrophy, coracoacromial ligament hypertrophy, high cuff muscle bulk, and os acromiale. Among the 54 patients, the following conditions were present: acromioclavicular joint hypertrophy(n=36), coracoacromial ligament hypertrophy(n=20), subacromial spur(n=18), downward sloping of the acromion(n=16), hook shaped acromion(n=11), relatively high cuff muscle bulk(n=6), low lying acromion relative to the clavicle(n=3), and os acromiale(n=1). In the normal control group there were nine cases of acromioclavicular joint hypertrophy, nine of coracoacromial ligament hypertrophy, nine of downward sloping acromion, and three of low lying acromion, but hook shaped acromion, high cuff muscle bulk, and os acromiale were not found. Among 54 patients, the syndrome was due to five simultancous causes in one patient, four causes in two, three causes in 12, two causes in 22, and one cause in 17. Hook shaped acromion and subacromial spur are the statistically significant causes of shoulder impingement syndrome. In 69% of patients, the condition was due to more than one cause.

  15. A nonsense mutation in FMR1 causing fragile X syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grønskov, Karen; Brøndum-Nielsen, Karen; Dedic, Alma;

    2011-01-01

    Fragile X syndrome is a common cause of inherited intellectual disability. It is caused by lack of the FMR1 gene product FMRP. The most frequent cause is the expansion of a CGG repeat located in the 5'UTR of FMR1. Alleles with 200 or more repeats become hypermethylated and transcriptionally silent....... Only few patients with intragenic point mutations in FMR1 have been reported and, currently, routine analysis of patients referred for fragile X syndrome includes solely analysis for repeat expansion and methylation status. We identified a substitution in exon 2 of FMR1, c.80C>A, causing a nonsense...... mutation p.Ser27X, in a patient with classical clinical symptoms of fragile X syndrome. The mother who carried the mutation in heterozygous form presented with mild intellectual impairment. We conclude that further studies including western blot and DNA sequence analysis of the FMR1 gene should be...

  16. Restless Legs Syndrome -- Causes and Symptoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Facts Causes and Risk Factors Diagnosis and Treatment Sleepwalking Overview & Facts Symptoms & Risk Factors Diagnosis & Treatment Sleep Terrors Overview & Facts Symptoms & Risk Factors Diagnosis & Treatment Sleep Eating Disorder Overview & Facts Symptoms & Risk Factors Diagnosis & Treatment REM ...

  17. Parinaud's oculoglandular syndrome and possibly causing cortical cataract

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariana Heid Rocha Hemerly

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available According to the World Health Organization, cataract is the leading cause of blindness and visual impairment throughout the world. However, the etiology of cataracts often remains unknown. This report describes the development of cortical cataract in a patient after Parinaud's oculoglandular syndrome caused by the fungus Sporothrix schenckii.

  18. A Rare Cause of Macroscobic Hematuria: Nutcracker Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nilgün Selçuk Duru

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Nutcracker syndrome caused by compression of the left renal vein between the abdominal aorta and the superior mesenteric artery is a rare anatomo-pathological condition. The patients have symptoms such as hematuria, proteinuria, and left flank pain. In this paper, we report a 13-year-old boy who presented with macroscopic haematuria. Routine laboratory tests for the evaluation of hematuria were normal. Abdominal computed tomography revealed that the left renal vein was compressed between the aorta and the superior mesenteric artery. A diagnosis of nutcracker syndrome was established. If Nutcracker syndrome is considered in the differential diagnosis of haematuria, it is easily diagnosed by imaging techniques.

  19. An unusual cause of intraoperative acute superior vena cava syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam W Amundson

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Acute intraoperative superior vena cava (SVC syndrome is an exceedingly rare complication in the cardiac surgical population. We describe the case of a 71-year-old female undergoing multi-vessel coronary artery bypass grafting who developed acute intraoperative SVC syndrome following internal thoracic artery harvest retractor placement. Her symptoms included severe plethora, facial engorgement and scleral edema, which was associated with hypotension and severe elevation of central venous pressure. Transesophageal echocardiography was crucial in the diagnosis, management, and optimal retractor placement ensuring adequate SVC flow. Potential causes of intraoperative SVC syndrome are reviewed as well as management options.

  20. Methylene Blue Causing Serotonin Syndrome Following Cystocele Repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapadia, Kailash; Cheung, Felix; Lee, Wai; Thalappillil, Richard; Florence, F Barry; Kim, Jason

    2016-11-01

    Methylene blue is an intravenously administered agent that may potentiate serotonin syndrome. The usage of methylene blue to evaluate ureters for injuries and patency during urological surgeries is recognized as common practice. However, there is no mention of serotonin syndrome caused by methylene blue in urological literature or for urological surgery. We report the first urological case in order to raise awareness of the risk for serotonin toxicity with utilizing methylene blue. PMID:27617215

  1. Eagle Syndrome Causing Vascular Compression with Cervical Rotation: Case Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demirtaş, Hakan; Kayan, Mustafa; Koyuncuoğlu, Hasan Rıfat; Çelik, Ahmet Orhan; Kara, Mustafa; Şengeze, Nihat

    2016-01-01

    Summary Background Eagle syndrome is a condition caused by an elongated styloid process. Unilateral face, neck and ear pain, stinging pain, foreign body sensation and dysphagia can be observed with this syndrome. Rarely, the elongated styloid process may cause pain by compressing the cervical segment of the internal carotid and the surrounding sympathetic plexus, and that pain spreading along the artery can cause neurological symptoms such as vertigo and syncope. Case Report In this case report we presented a very rare eagle syndrome with neurological symptoms that occurred suddenly with cervical rotation. The symptoms disappeared as suddenly as they occurred, with the release of pressure in neutral position. We also discussed CT angiographic findings of this case. Conclusions Radiological diagnosis of the Eagle syndrome that is manifested with a wide variety of symptoms and causes diagnostic difficulties when it is not considered in the differential diagnosis is easy in patients with specific findings. CT angiography is a fast and effective examination in terms of showing compression in patients with the Eagle syndrome that is considered to be atypical and causes vascular compression. PMID:27354882

  2. [Brucellosis as a cause of hemophagocytic syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aydın, Saliha; Günal, Özgür; Taşkın, Mehmet Hakan; Atilla, Aynur; Kılıç, Süleyman Sırrı

    2015-04-01

    Hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis (HLH) is a rare syndrome of excessive inflammation and tissue destruction due to abnormal immune activation and inflammation. HLH can occur primarily due to genetic etiology, or secondarily associated with malignancies, autoimmmune diseases or infections. There are a number of reports that revealed the relationship of hemophagocytosis with brucellosis. In this report, we described a brucellosis-related HLH case. A 73-year-old male who work as farmer was admitted to our hospital with the complaints of fever continuing for 10 days, loss of appetite and back pain. Physical examination revealed right upper quadrant tenderness and hepatomegaly. Since the patient exhibited five of the diagnostic criteria for HLH (fever, hepatosplenomegaly, bicytopenia, hypertriglyceridemia and high ferritin level), he was diagnosed as secondary HLH. PCR, microscopic agglutination and indirect fluorescent antibody tests gave negative results for the diagnosis of Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever, leptospirosis and Q fever, respectively. On the other hand, Rose Bengal test for brucellosis was positive, while standard tube agglutination test (STA) was negative. The patient's serum yielded a very high positive (1/1280) result when Coombs' test was performed in terms of the possibility of blocking antibodies or prozone phenomenon. Additionally, B.melitensis was isolated from his blood culture on the sixth day. The patient was treated with doxycycline and rifampicin, and on the 10th day of antibiotic therapy the patient was discharged and recommended to complete his treatment up to 6 weeks. In conclusion, in patients with secondary HLH symptoms especially in the endemic areas, brucellosis should be considered as a predisposing infection.

  3. Intrasynovial lipoma causing trigger wrist and carpal tunnel syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imai, Shinji; Kodama, Narihito; Matsusue, Yoshitaka

    2008-01-01

    Triggering of the flexor tendon at the wrist is rare. We report a case of intrasynovial lipoma that caused a trigger wrist. As far as we know it is unique in that the intrasynovial lipoma simultaneously caused carpal tunnel syndrome. The massive tenosynovitis and adhesion of flexors tendons after the locking of the intrasynovial lipoma may have resulted from inflammation caused by attrition within the carpal tunnel.

  4. Unilateral facial paralysis caused by Ramsay Hunt syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Flávia P; Guskuma, Marcos H; Luvizuto, Eloá R; Faco, Eduardo F S; Magro-Filho, Osvaldo; Hochuli-Vieira, Eduardo

    2011-09-01

    The Ramsay Hunt syndrome is a rare disease caused by an infection of the geniculate ganglion by the varicella-zoster virus. The main clinical features of the syndrome are as follows: Bell palsy unilateral or bilateral, vesicular eruptions on the ears, ear pain, dizziness, preauricular swelling, tingling, tearing, loss of taste sensation, and nystagmus. We describe a 23-year-old white woman, who presented with facial paralysis on the left side of the face, pain, fever, ear pain, and swelling in the neck and auricular region on the left side. She received appropriate treatment with acyclovir, vitamin B complex, and CMP nucleus. After 30 days after presentation, the patient did not show any signs or symptoms of the syndrome. At follow-up at 1 year, she showed no relapse of the syndrome.

  5. A Rare Cause of Secondary Hypertension: Conn Syndrom

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samet Sayilan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Hypertension, is classified as primary (essential or secondary based on whether there is an identifiable cause. When it is determined a certain underlying cause of hypertension it is categorized as secondary hypertension. Conn%u2019s syndrome (primary hyperaldosteronism, a disorder of adrenal cortex characterized by exces aldosterone secretion, is an endocrine disorder that causes hypertension and it is seen in about 0.1% of all patients with hypertension. It can be caused by either unilateral disease (i.e. adenoma in one adrenal gland or bilateral disease (i.e. hyperplasia in both adrenal glands. Conn%u2019s syndrome secondary to bilateral adrenal adenoma, a cause of secondary hypertension, was presented in this articleas it is rarely reported in the literature.

  6. Postoperative Spinal Epidural Haematoma Causing Cauda Equina Syndrome: Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emre Delen

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Cauda equina syndrome is a neurological disorder defined by urinary and/or anal sphincter dysfunction, bilateral sciatica and bilateral motor and sensory deficits. Regarding the etiology, lumbar disc disease, spinal stenosis, tumors, haematomas, fractures, infectious diseases and ankylosing spondylitis are pathologies causing this syndrome. Spinal epidural haematomas are common amongst complications after spinal surgery. However the majority of these cases are asymptomatic, thus having little clinical importance. Symptomatic postoperative spinal epidural haematomas is a serious complication, and in order to prevent permanent neurologic deficit it requires urgent surgical intervention. This article aims to present the case of a patient with a spinal epidural haematoma after spinal stenosis surgery, causing cauda equina syndrome.

  7. Sick Building Syndrome: is mould the cause?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terr, Abba I

    2009-01-01

    Moulds are responsible for diseases in humans through the three pathogenetic mechanisms of infection, allergy, and toxicity. Fungal infection is especially a risk factor for immunodeficient patients, but it occurs in immunocompetent patients as well. Fungal allergy is manifested as bronchial asthma, hypersensitivity pneumonitis, allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis, or allergic fungal sinusitis. Mycotoxicosis is almost exclusively the result of ingestion of mould-contaminated foodstuffs. In each case there is specificity for the etiologic mould. There is controversy regarding the ability of indoor airborne mould spores to cause human disease through non-specific toxicity via the inhalation route. Pulmonary mycotoxicosis is an established, although rare, occupational disease of farmers who inhale enormous quantities of mycotoxins, endotoxins, and other toxic chemicals from contaminated silage. Other conditions attributed to indoor airborne mycotoxin are unproven. These include infantile pulmonary hemosiderosis, epistaxis, 'toxic encephalopathy', immune dysregulation and a variety of subjective complaints without objective signs of pathology such as fatigue, headache, dyspnea, gastrointestinal distress, neuromuscular and skeletal complaints, etc. Non-specific irritation from moulds via the inhalation route is also a controversial subject that remains unproven. Published studies alleging an epidemiologic causal relationship are unconvincing.

  8. The syndrome of inappropriate antidiuretic hormone: prevalence, causes and consequences.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Hannon, M J

    2010-06-01

    Hyponatraemia is the commonest electrolyte abnormality found in hospital inpatients, and is associated with a greatly increased morbidity and mortality. The syndrome of inappropriate antidiuretic hormone (SIADH) is the most frequent cause of hyponatraemia in hospital inpatients. SIADH is the clinical and biochemical manifestation of a wide range of disease processes, and every case warrants investigation of the underlying cause. In this review, we will examine the prevalence, pathophysiology, clinical characteristics and clinical consequences of hyponatraemia due to SIADH.

  9. Gluteal compartment syndrome after prostatectomy caused by incorrect positioning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heyn, Jens; Ladurner, R; Ozimek, A; Vogel, T; Hallfeldt, K K; Mussack, T

    2006-04-28

    Gluteal compartment syndrome is an uncommon and rare disease. Most reasonable causes for the development of this disease are trauma, drug induced coma, Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, sickle cell associated muscle infarction, incorrect positioning during surgical procedures and prolonged pressure in patients with altered consciousness levels. The diagnosis requires a high index of suspicion, especially in postoperative patient where sedation or peridural anaesthesia can confound the neurological examination. Early signs include gluteal tenderness, decrease in vibratory sensation during clinical examination and increasing CK in laboratory findings. We present a case of a 52 year-old patient, who developed gluteal compartment syndrome after radical prostatectomy in lithotomic position. After operation, diuresis decreased [pain in the gluteal region and both thighs. His thighs and the gluteal region were swollen. Passive stretch of the thighs caused enormous pain. The compartment pressure was 92 mmHg. Therefore, emergency fasciotomy was performed successfully. The gluteal compartment syndrome was most likely caused by elevated pressure on the gluteal muscle during operation. We suggest heightened awareness of positioning the patient on the operating table is important especially in obese patients with lengthy operating procedures. PMID:16720283

  10. Dominant de novo DSP mutations cause erythrokeratodermia-cardiomyopathy syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyden, Lynn M; Kam, Chen Y; Hernández-Martín, Angela; Zhou, Jing; Craiglow, Brittany G; Sidbury, Robert; Mathes, Erin F; Maguiness, Sheilagh M; Crumrine, Debra A; Williams, Mary L; Hu, Ronghua; Lifton, Richard P; Elias, Peter M; Green, Kathleen J; Choate, Keith A

    2016-01-15

    Disorders of keratinization (DOK) show marked genotypic and phenotypic heterogeneity. In most cases, disease is primarily cutaneous, and further clinical evaluation is therefore rarely pursued. We have identified subjects with a novel DOK featuring erythrokeratodermia and initially-asymptomatic, progressive, potentially fatal cardiomyopathy, a finding not previously associated with erythrokeratodermia. We show that de novo missense mutations clustered tightly within a single spectrin repeat of DSP cause this novel cardio-cutaneous disorder, which we term erythrokeratodermia-cardiomyopathy (EKC) syndrome. We demonstrate that DSP mutations in our EKC syndrome subjects affect localization of desmosomal proteins and connexin 43 in the skin, and result in desmosome aggregation, widening of intercellular spaces, and lipid secretory defects. DSP encodes desmoplakin, a primary component of desmosomes, intercellular adhesion junctions most abundant in the epidermis and heart. Though mutations in DSP are known to cause other disorders, our cohort features the unique clinical finding of severe whole-body erythrokeratodermia, with distinct effects on localization of desmosomal proteins and connexin 43. These findings add a severe, previously undescribed syndrome featuring erythrokeratodermia and cardiomyopathy to the spectrum of disease caused by mutation in DSP, and identify a specific region of the protein critical to the pathobiology of EKC syndrome and to DSP function in the heart and skin. PMID:26604139

  11. Cubital tunnel syndrome caused by hypertrophic burn scarring: Sonographic envisage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alparslan Bayram Carli

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available In nerve entrapment syndromes, an electrodiagnostic study during physical examination would usually suffice to assess localization of injury. However, in daily clinical practice, sometimes it may be necessary to depict the insight; in other words to use an imaging tool. From this point of view, with its manifold advantages, ultrasound (US is superior to other imaging technologies such as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI. According to a study, US increased the sensitivity of electrodiagnostic studies from 78% to 98%. By presenting a patient with cubital tunnel syndrome caused by hypertrophic scarring, we wanted to highlight the complementary role of US in nerve entrapment syndromes in confirming the entrapment, as well as the usefulness of it in the follow-up period of burn patients. [Hand Microsurg 2015; 4(2.000: 44-46

  12. [Case of prolonged recovery from serotonin syndrome caused by paroxetine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ochiai, Yusuke; Katsu, Hisatoshi; Okino, Shinji; Wakutsu, Noriyuki; Nakayama, Kazuhiko

    2003-01-01

    We report a case of serotonin syndrome in a patient being treated with paroxetine for depression. Despite prompt discontinuation of medication, his serotonin syndrome continued for 10 days before full consciousness was restored. The patient was a 48-year-old male with chief complaints of hypobulia and suicidal thoughts. He consulted as a psychiatric outpatient, and oral paroxetine 20 mg/day, etizolam 1.0 mg/day, and brotizolam 0.25 mg/day were immediately started. Upsurge of feeling and disinhibition state were noted the following day, then on treatment day 6 his condition deteriorated to substupor state and he was admitted for further treatment. On admission, change of mental condition (consciousness disturbance), perspiration, hyperreflexia, myoclonus and tremor were seen, and serotonin syndrome caused by paroxetine was suspected. Paroxetine was thus discontinued, and under intravenous drip his condition gradually improved. However, it was not until the 10th hospital day that he became fully alert. In examinations, no infectious, metabolic or organic diseases were detected. The patient's condition often improves with in 24 hours of discontinuation of the causative medication in serotonin syndrome. Symptoms continued for 10 days in this patient, however, perhaps because paroxetine was administered for 6 days before discontinuation. In addition, interaction with other medications may have occurred. Therefore, when serotonin syndrome is suspected, prompt discontinuation of the suspected causative medication, followed by close monitoring of the pharmacokinetics is warranted. PMID:15027311

  13. Prevalence and causes of back pain syndromes in children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.A. Smirnova

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We present a review of literature devoted to epidemiology, and the nosological and syndromal structure of back pain in children. The data of our own study of school-aged children with back pain are presented. The structure of back pain syndromes in 105 children has been analyzed using the medical aid appealability data. The results of a comprehensive clinical and instrumental study demonstrated that the children mostly had lumbosacral pain (52.4% of cases; neck pain was observed in 29.5% of cases; while thoracic pain syndromes were observed in 18.1% of cases. Congenital defect of the connective tissue was diagnosed in 16.19% of children; congenital abnormalities of the spine, in 15.2%; scoliosis (idiopathic and secondary, in 8.6%; and Scheuermann-Mau's disease, in 5.71%. The conclusion has been made about the high prevalence of back pain in schoolchildren. Muscular tonic syndromes were prevailing in the clinical structure in children; radicular syndromes were less frequent. Musculoskeletal disorders were the main causes of back pain. Congenital defect of the connective tissue was often observed, which was revealed as functional instability of the vertebral motor segment, spondylolisthesis due to weak ligaments, and disc protrusions. Congenital abnormalities of the spine, scoliosis, and Scheuermann-Mau' disease were observed less often. 

  14. Pancreatic solitary fibrous tumor causing ectopic adrenocorticotropic hormone syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murakami, Keigo; Nakamura, Yasuhiro; Felizola, Saulo J A; Morimoto, Ryo; Satoh, Fumitoshi; Takanami, Kentaro; Katakami, Hideki; Hirota, Seiichi; Takeda, Yoshiyu; Meguro-Horike, Makiko; Horike, Shin-Ichi; Unno, Michiaki; Sasano, Hironobu

    2016-11-15

    Solitary fibrous tumors occasionally present with hypoglycemia because of the excessive release of insulin-like growth factor II. We report the first case of pancreatic solitary fibrous tumor causing ectopic adrenocorticotropic hormone syndrome. An 82-year-old Japanese man presented with lower limb edema, uncontrolled hypertension, hypokalemia, and baseline hypercortisolism. Distal pancreatectomy was performed after the clinical diagnosis of a neuroendocrine tumor with ectopic secretion of adrenocorticotropic hormone. On histological examination, the tumor showed spindle cells in a fascicular arrangement. The diagnosis of the solitary fibrous tumor was confirmed by the identification of the NAB2-STAT6 fusion gene and positive immuno-histochemical staining for STAT6 and CD34. Using quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction, mRNA that encoded proopiomelanocortin, precursor of adrenocorticotropic hormone, was detected. Proopiomelanocortin production through the demethylation of the promoter region Domain IV was detected. Pancreatic solitary fibrous tumors represent a new cause of ectopic adrenocorticotropic hormone syndrome. PMID:27585487

  15. Food protein induced enterocolitis syndrome caused by rice beverage

    OpenAIRE

    Caminiti, Lucia; Salzano,Giuseppina; Crisafulli, Giuseppe; Porcaro, Federica; Pajno, Giovanni Battista

    2013-01-01

    Food protein-induced enterocolitis syndrome (FPIES) is an uncommon and potentially severe non IgE-mediated gastrointestinal food allergy. It is usually caused by cow’s milk or soy proteins, but may also be triggered by ingestion of solid foods. The diagnosis is made on the basis of clinical history and symptoms. Management of acute phase requires fluid resuscitation and intravenous steroids administration, but avoidance of offending foods is the only effective therapeutic option. Infant with ...

  16. Thoracic outlet syndrome: another cause for unilateral palmar hyperhidrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozdemir, Oya; Ozçakar, Levent

    2007-08-01

    One of the most important therapeutic goal in hyperhidrosis treatment is to seek for the underlying cause and to tailor the treatment accordingly. A detailed history and prompt physical examination are needed to clarify the etiological factor. In this study, we report a 34-year-old woman with a diagnosis of thoracic outlet syndrome presenting with complaints of pain, numbness, and fatigue in her left arm and ipsilateral palmar hyperhidrosis. Thus, we want to highlight a specific potential cause of secondary hyperhidrosis, which can otherwise be easily overlooked, and furthermore, which has a completely different treatment strategy. PMID:16941200

  17. Mutations in TMEM76* Cause Mucopolysaccharidosis IIIC (Sanfilippo C Syndrome)

    OpenAIRE

    Hřebíček, Martin; Mrázová, Lenka; Seyrantepe, Volkan; Durand, Stéphanie; Roslin, Nicole M.; Nosková, Lenka; Hartmannová, Hana; Ivánek, Robert; Čížková, Alena; Poupětová, Helena; Sikora, Jakub; Uřinovská, Jana; Stránecký, Viktor; Zeman, Jiří; Lepage, Pierre

    2006-01-01

    Mucopolysaccharidosis IIIC (MPS IIIC, or Sanfilippo C syndrome) is a lysosomal storage disorder caused by the inherited deficiency of the lysosomal membrane enzyme acetyl–coenzyme A:α-glucosaminide N-acetyltransferase (N-acetyltransferase), which leads to impaired degradation of heparan sulfate. We report the narrowing of the candidate region to a 2.6-cM interval between D8S1051 and D8S1831 and the identification of the transmembrane protein 76 gene (TMEM76), which encodes a 73-kDa protein wi...

  18. Proteus syndrome: A rare cause of gigantic limb

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nandini Chakrabarti

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A congenital disorder with variable manifestations, including partial gigantism of the hands and feet with hypertrophy of soles, nevi, hemihypertrophy, gynecomastia, macrocephaly and other skull abnormalities, and abdominal lipomatosis. The cause is unknown, although a genetic origin, generally of autosomal-dominant transmission, has been conjectured. Symptoms can be treated, but there is no known cure. We present the case of a young male with grotesque overgrowth of the right lower limb, splenomegaly and multiple nevi. Angiography revealed venous malformation within the limb. The findings are in conformity to the criteria for the Proteus syndrome.

  19. Unusual cause of childhood anemia: Imerslund grasbeck syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kishan Prasad Hosapatna Laxminarayana

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Imerslund Grasbeck syndrome (IGS is a rare autosomal recessive childhood disorder characterized by selective Vitamin (vit B 12 malabsorption with asymptomatic proteinuria without any structural renal pathology. The patients stay healthy for decades with life-long parenteral vit B12. We report a case of young female who presented with pancytopenia and proteinuria, evaluated in local hospitals as chronic hemolytic anemia (autoimmune cause, finally diagnosed as IGS on complete evaluation. She was treated with injectable vit B12 (1000 μg cyanocobalalmin and showed drastic recovery. IGS should be considered in patients with megaloblastic anemia not responding to oral vit B12 and associated proteinuria.

  20. Proteus syndrome: A rare cause of gigantic limb.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakrabarti, Nandini; Chattopadhyay, Chandan; Bhuban, Majhi; Pal, Salil Kumar

    2014-04-01

    A congenital disorder with variable manifestations, including partial gigantism of the hands and feet with hypertrophy of soles, nevi, hemihypertrophy, gynecomastia, macrocephaly and other skull abnormalities, and abdominal lipomatosis. The cause is unknown, although a genetic origin, generally of autosomal-dominant transmission, has been conjectured. Symptoms can be treated, but there is no known cure. We present the case of a young male with grotesque overgrowth of the right lower limb, splenomegaly and multiple nevi. Angiography revealed venous malformation within the limb. The findings are in conformity to the criteria for the Proteus syndrome. PMID:24860761

  1. Subacromial Impingement Syndrome Caused by a Voluminous Subdeltoid Lipoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean-Christophe Murray

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Subacromial impingement syndrome is a clinical diagnosis encompassing a spectrum of possible etiologies, including subacromial bursitis, rotator cuff tendinopathy, and partial- to full-thickness rotator cuff tears. This report presents an unusual case of subdeltoid lipoma causing extrinsic compression and subacromial impingement syndrome. The patient, a 60-year-old man, presented to our institution with a few years' history of nontraumatic, posteriorly localized throbbing pain in his right shoulder. Despite a well-followed 6-months physiotherapy program, the patient was still suffering from his right shoulder. The MRI scan revealed a well-circumscribed 6 cm × 2 cm × 5 cm homogenous lesion compatible with a subdeltoid intermuscular lipoma. The mass was excised en bloc, and subsequent histopathologic examination confirmed a benign lipoma. At 6-months follow-up, the patient was asymptomatic with a complete return to his activities. Based on this case and a review of the literature, a subacromial lipoma has to be included in the differential diagnosis of a subacromial impingement syndrome refractory to nonoperative treatment. Complementary imaging modalities are required only after a failed conservative management to assess the exact etiology and successfully direct the surgical treatment.

  2. CtIP Mutations Cause Seckel and Jawad Syndromes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Per Qvist

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Seckel syndrome is a recessively inherited dwarfism disorder characterized by microcephaly and a unique head profile. Genetically, it constitutes a heterogeneous condition, with several loci mapped (SCKL1-5 but only three disease genes identified: the ATR, CENPJ, and CEP152 genes that control cellular responses to DNA damage. We previously mapped a Seckel syndrome locus to chromosome 18p11.31-q11.2 (SCKL2. Here, we report two mutations in the CtIP (RBBP8 gene within this locus that result in expression of C-terminally truncated forms of CtIP. We propose that these mutations are the molecular cause of the disease observed in the previously described SCKL2 family and in an additional unrelated family diagnosed with a similar form of congenital microcephaly termed Jawad syndrome. While an exonic frameshift mutation was found in the Jawad family, the SCKL2 family carries a splicing mutation that yields a dominant-negative form of CtIP. Further characterization of cell lines derived from the SCKL2 family revealed defective DNA damage induced formation of single-stranded DNA, a critical co-factor for ATR activation. Accordingly, SCKL2 cells present a lowered apoptopic threshold and hypersensitivity to DNA damage. Notably, over-expression of a comparable truncated CtIP variant in non-Seckel cells recapitulates SCKL2 cellular phenotypes in a dose-dependent manner. This work thus identifies CtIP as a disease gene for Seckel and Jawad syndromes and defines a new type of genetic disease mechanism in which a dominant negative mutation yields a recessively inherited disorder.

  3. Sudden infant death syndrome: a possible primary cause.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, B A

    1994-01-01

    The hypothesis that poisoning by phosphines, arsines and stibines might be the primary cause of sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) was investigated. Most mattress materials contain phosphorus or antimony compounds as fire retardant additives. Mattress materials in areas affected by the warmth and perspiration of the sleeping infant were found to be naturally infected by the fungus Scopulariopsis brevicaulis which is thought to be capable of generating phosphines, arsines and stibines from materials containing phosphorus, arsenic or antimony compounds. These gases may cause anticholinesterase poisoning and cardiac failure in infants, but contributory factors include the prone sleeping position and overwrapping. In England and Wales, the progressive increase in SIDS between 1951 and 1988 seems to be related to increasing use of phosphorus and antimony compounds as fire retardents in cot mattresses.

  4. Intracranial hemorrhage revealing pseudohypoparathyroidism as a cause of fahr syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swami, Abhijit; Kar, Giridhari

    2011-01-01

    Pseudohypoparathyroidism is an infrequently encountered disease. It is one of the causes of Fahr syndrome which also is a rare clinical entity caused by multiple diseases. A 4-year-old man hospitalized for sudden onset left hemiparesis and hypertension was diagnosed to have right thalamic and midbrain hemorrhage on plain CT scan of the head which also revealed co-existent extensive intracranial calcifications involving the basal ganglia and cerebellum bilaterally. General physical examination revealed features of Albright hereditary osteodystrophy, goitre, hypertension, left hemiparesis, and signs of cerebellar dysfunction. Laboratory findings suggested hypocalcemia, hyperphosphatemia along with high TSH, low FT(4), low FT(3), and high anti-TPO antibody. Though bilateral intracranial calcifications are usually encountered as an incidental radiological finding in the CT scan of brain, in this case, the patient admitted for thalamic and midbrain hemorrhage was on investigation for associated intracranial calcification, and goitre was also found to have coexisting pseudohypoparathyroidism and autoimmune hypothyroidism.

  5. Intracranial Hemorrhage Revealing Pseudohypoparathyroidism as a Cause of Fahr Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abhijit Swami

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Pseudohypoparathyroidism is an infrequently encountered disease. It is one of the causes of Fahr syndrome which also is a rare clinical entity caused by multiple diseases. A 4-year-old man hospitalized for sudden onset left hemiparesis and hypertension was diagnosed to have right thalamic and midbrain hemorrhage on plain CT scan of the head which also revealed co-existent extensive intracranial calcifications involving the basal ganglia and cerebellum bilaterally. General physical examination revealed features of Albright hereditary osteodystrophy, goitre, hypertension, left hemiparesis, and signs of cerebellar dysfunction. Laboratory findings suggested hypocalcemia, hyperphosphatemia along with high TSH, low FT4, low FT3, and high anti-TPO antibody. Though bilateral intracranial calcifications are usually encountered as an incidental radiological finding in the CT scan of brain, in this case, the patient admitted for thalamic and midbrain hemorrhage was on investigation for associated intracranial calcification, and goitre was also found to have coexisting pseudohypoparathyroidism and autoimmune hypothyroidism.

  6. Mutations in CDK5RAP2 cause Seckel syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Karabey Kayserili, Hülya; Yiğit, G.; Brown, KE.; Pohl, E.; Caliebe, A.; Zahnleiter, D.; Rosser, E.; Bögershausen, N.; Uyguner, ZO.; Altunoğlu, U.; Nürnberg, G.; Nürnberg, P.; Rauch, A.; Li, Y.; Thiel, CT.; Wollnik, B.

    2015-01-01

    ORIGINAL ARTICLE Mutations in CDK5RAP2 cause Seckel syndrome Go¨ khan Yigit1,2,3,a, Karen E. Brown4,a, Hu¨ lya Kayserili5, Esther Pohl1,2,3, Almuth Caliebe6, Diana Zahnleiter7, Elisabeth Rosser8, Nina Bo¨ gershausen1,2,3, Zehra Oya Uyguner5, Umut Altunoglu5, Gudrun Nu¨ rnberg2,3,9, Peter Nu¨ rnberg2,3,9, Anita Rauch10, Yun Li1,2,3, Christian Thomas Thiel7 & Bernd Wollnik1,2,3 1Institute of Human Genetics, University of Cologne, Cologne, Germany 2Center for Molecular Medic...

  7. Nonpolio causes of polio-like paralytic syndromes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gear, J H

    1984-01-01

    In a study of patients with suspected poliomyelitis, but from whom poliovirus was not isolated, a variety of causes of the paralysis was found. Injury of the spinal column sometimes followed by periostitis or osteomyelitis was relatively common. Exotic causes included paralysis due to snake bite, spider bite, scorpion sting, and tick bite and schistosomiasis involving the spinal cord. Chemical poisons, such as arsenic, triorthocresyl phosphate, and organophosphorus insecticides, were responsible for paralysis affecting groups of people. Paralysis in individual patients with porphyria followed the administration of anesthesia and certain drugs. Normal clinicopathologic findings in hospital nurses with Iceland disease suggested a psychological component. The Guillain-Barré syndrome in some patients resulted from virus infection of the nerve tissue, in others it was related to a hyperreactive autoallergic state. Enterovirus infections, especially coxsackieviruses A9 and A23 (echovirus 9) and group B coxsackieviruses, frequently caused meningoencephalitis often associated with transient paralysis. Coxsackievirus A7 infection occasionally resulted in permanent paralysis. Clearly it is important to maintain surveillance of these infections.

  8. Hennekam syndrome: a rare cause of primary lymphedema

    OpenAIRE

    Elmansour, Imane; Chiheb, Soumia; Benchikhi, Hakima

    2014-01-01

    Hennekam syndrome (HS) is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by the association of lymphedema, intestinal lymphangiectasia, moderate mental retardation, and facial dysmorphism. We describe a 14-year-old girl affected with Hennekam syndrome.

  9. Tietz syndrome (hypopigmentation/deafness) caused by mutation of MITF

    OpenAIRE

    Smith, S.; Kelley, P.; Kenyon, J.; Hoover, D.

    2000-01-01

    Patients with Tietz syndrome have congenital profound deafness and generalised hypopigmentation, inherited in a fully penetrant autosomal dominant fashion. The pigmentary features and complete penetrance make this syndrome distinct among syndromes with pigmentary anomalies and deafness, which characteristically have patchy depigmentation and variable penetrance. Only one family has been reported with the exact features described in the original report of this syndrome. This family was reascer...

  10. A rare cause of acromegaly: McCune-Albright syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Erdal Bodakçi; Mazhar Müslüm Tuna; Faruk Kılınç; Zafer Pekkolay; Hikmet Soylu; Şadiye Altun Tuzcu; Alpaslan Kemal Tuzcu

    2015-01-01

    McCune-Albright syndrome is characterized by polyostatic fibrous dysplasia, brown spots on the skin (café au lait pigmentation) and autonomous endocrine hyperfunction. Early puberty and other endocrinological manifestations, such as acromegaly, gigantism and hypercortisolism are widely observed in the syndrome. Acromegaly is seen in 20% of patients. We report a case of acromegaly accompanied with this syndrome.Key words: McCune-Albright syndrome; acromegaly; fibrous dysplasia

  11. A rare cause of acromegaly: McCune-Albright syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erdal Bodakçi

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available McCune-Albright syndrome is characterized by polyostatic fibrous dysplasia, brown spots on the skin (café au lait pigmentation and autonomous endocrine hyperfunction. Early puberty and other endocrinological manifestations, such as acromegaly, gigantism and hypercortisolism are widely observed in the syndrome. Acromegaly is seen in 20% of patients. We report a case of acromegaly accompanied with this syndrome.

  12. Recessive mutations in PTHR1 cause contrasting skeletal dysplasias in Eiken and Blomstrand syndromes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Duchatelet, Sabine; Ostergaard, Elsebet; Cortes, Dina;

    2005-01-01

    Eiken syndrome is a rare autosomal recessive skeletal dysplasia. We identified a truncation mutation in the C-terminal cytoplasmic tail of the parathyroid hormone (PTH)/PTH-related peptide (PTHrP) type 1 receptor (PTHR1) gene as the cause of this syndrome. Eiken syndrome differs from Jansen...

  13. Nephrotic syndrome in hand, foot and mouth disease caused by coxsackievirus A16: a case report

    OpenAIRE

    Hong-Tao Zhou; Bing Wang; Xiao-Yan Che

    2014-01-01

    Some viruses, including certain members of the enterovirus genus, have been reported to cause nephrotic syndrome. However, no case of coxsackievirus A16 (CVA16)-related nephrotic syndrome has been reported so far. We describe a case of CVA16-related hand, foot and mouth disease presenting with nephrotic syndrome in a 3-year-old boy. This is the first report of CVA16-related nephrotic syndrome.

  14. Mitochondrial disorder caused Charles Darwin's cyclic vomiting syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Finsterer J

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Josef Finsterer,1 John Hayman21Krankenanstalt Rudolfstiftng, Vienna, Austria; 2Department of Pathology, University of Melbourne, Victoria, AustraliaBackground: Charles Darwin (CD, “father of modern biology,” suffered from multisystem illness from early adulthood. The most disabling manifestation was cyclic vomiting syndrome (CVS. This study aims at finding the possible cause of CVS in CD.Methods: A literature search using the PubMed database was carried out, and CD's complaints, as reported in his personal writings and those of his relatives, friends, colleagues, biographers, were compared with various manifestations of mitochondrial disorders (MIDs, known to cause CVS, described in the literature.Results: Organ tissues involved in CD's disease were brain, nerves, muscles, vestibular apparatus, heart, gut, and skin. Cerebral manifestations included episodic headache, visual disturbance, episodic memory loss, periodic paralysis, hysterical crying, panic attacks, and episodes of depression. Manifestations of polyneuropathy included numbness, paresthesias, increased sweating, temperature sensitivity, and arterial hypotension. Muscular manifestations included periods of exhaustion, easy fatigability, myalgia, and muscle twitching. Cardiac manifestations included episodes of palpitations and chest pain. Gastrointestinal manifestations were CVS, dental problems, abnormal seasickness, eructation, belching, and flatulence. Dermatological manifestations included painful lips, dermatitis, eczema, and facial edema. Treatments with beneficial effects to his complaints were rest, relaxation, heat, and hydrotherapy.Conclusion: CVS in CD was most likely due to a multisystem, nonsyndromic MID. This diagnosis is based upon the multisystem nature of his disease, the fact that CVS is most frequently the manifestation of a MID, the family history, the variable phenotypic expression between affected family members, the fact that symptoms were triggered by stress

  15. Coracoid syndrome: a neglected cause of anterior shoulder pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    GIGANTE, ANTONIO; BOTTEGONI, CARLO; BARBADORO, PAMELA

    2016-01-01

    Purpose the present prospective open-label study was designed to gain further insights into a condition thought to constitute a neglected but not uncommon syndrome characterized by anterior shoulder pain and tenderness to palpation over the apex of the coracoid process, not related to rotator cuff or pectoralis minor tendinopathy, long head of the biceps tendon disorders, or instability. The aim was to clarify its prevalence, clinical characteristics, differential diagnosis and response to corticosteroid injections. Methods patients with primary anterior shoulder pain precisely reproduced by deep pressure on the apex of the coracoid process were recruited. Patients with clinical or instrumental signs of other shoulder disorders were excluded. Patients were given an injection of triamcinolone acetonide 40 mg/ml 1 ml at the coracoid trigger point. They were evaluated after 15, 30 and 60 days and at 2 years using Equal Visual Analog Scale (EQ-VAS) and the Italian version of the Simple Shoulder Test (SST). Results between January 1 and December 31 2010, we treated 15 patients aged 26–66 years. The majority were women (86.67%). At 15 days, 6 (40%) patients reported complete resolution of their symptoms, while 9 (60%) complained of residual symptoms and received another injection. At 30 days, 14 (93.33%) patients were pain-free and very satisfied. At 2 years, the 14 patients who had been asymptomatic at 30 days reported that they had experienced no further pain or impaired shoulder function. The analysis of variance for repeated measures showed a significant effect of time on EQ-VAS and SST scores. Conclusions the present study documents the existence, and characteristics, of a “coracoid syndrome” characterized by anterior shoulder pain and tenderness to palpation over the apex of the coracoid process and showed that the pain is usually amenable to steroid treatment. This syndrome should be clearly distinguished from anterior shoulder pain due to other causes, in

  16. Drowning as a Cause of Death in Angelman Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishmael, Holly A.; Begleiter, Michael L.; Butler, Merlin G.

    2002-01-01

    This study reports on a 9-year-old boy previously diagnosed with Angelman syndrome who died unexpectedly by drowning in a shallow backyard wading pool. The case illustrates the fascination with water by individuals with Angelman syndrome and highlights that this fascination may lead to death. The need for supervision is stressed. (Contains 5…

  17. Raised intracranial pressure in Crouzon syndrome: incidence, causes, and management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abu-Sittah, Ghassan S; Jeelani, Owase; Dunaway, David; Hayward, Richard

    2016-04-01

    OBJECT Patients with Crouzon syndrome (CS) are at risk for developing raised intracranial pressure (ICP), which has the potential to impair both vision and neurocognitive development. For this reason, some experts recommend early prophylactic cranial vault expansion on the basis that if ICP is not currently raised, it is likely to become so. The aim of this study was to examine the justification for such a policy. This was done by analyzing the incidence, causes, and subsequent risk of recurrence in a series of patients with CS, in whom raised ICP was treated only after it had been diagnosed. METHODS This study was a retrospective review of the medical records and imaging data of patients with a clinical diagnosis of CS. RESULTS There were 49 patients in the study, of whom 30 (61.2%) developed at least 1 episode of raised ICP. First episodes occurred at an average age of 1.42 years and were attributable to craniocerebral disproportion/venous hypertension (19 patients), hydrocephalus (8 patients), and airway obstruction (3 patients). They were managed, respectively, by vault expansion, ventriculoperitoneal shunt insertion, and airway improvement. Fourteen of the 30 patients developed a second episode of raised ICP an average of 1.42 years after treatment for their initial episode, and 3 patients developed a third episode an average of 3.15 years after that. Causes of subsequent episodes of raised ICP often differed from previous episodes and required different management. Patients who were < 1 year old when the first episode was diagnosed were at increased risk of recurrence. CONCLUSIONS Although the incidence of raised ICP in CS is high, it did not occur in nearly 40% of children during the course of this study. The several possible causes of CS require different management and may vary from episode to episode. The authors recommend an expectant policy toward these children with careful clinical, ophthalmological, respiratory, and radiological monitoring for raised

  18. Food protein induced enterocolitis syndrome caused by rice beverage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caminiti, Lucia; Salzano, Giuseppina; Crisafulli, Giuseppe; Porcaro, Federica; Pajno, Giovanni Battista

    2013-05-14

    Food protein-induced enterocolitis syndrome (FPIES) is an uncommon and potentially severe non IgE-mediated gastrointestinal food allergy. It is usually caused by cow's milk or soy proteins, but may also be triggered by ingestion of solid foods. The diagnosis is made on the basis of clinical history and symptoms. Management of acute phase requires fluid resuscitation and intravenous steroids administration, but avoidance of offending foods is the only effective therapeutic option.Infant with FPIES presented to our emergency department with vomiting, watery stools, hypothension and metabolic acidosis after ingestion of rice beverage. Intravenous fluids and steroids were administered with good clinical response. Subsequently, a double blind placebo control food challenge (DBPCFC) was performed using rice beverage and hydrolyzed formula (eHF) as placebo. The "rice based formula" induced emesis, diarrhoea and lethargy. Laboratory investigations reveal an increase of absolute count of neutrophils and the presence of faecal eosinophils. The patient was treated with both intravenous hydration and steroids. According to Powell criteria, oral food challenge was considered positive and diagnosis of FPIES induced by rice beverage was made. Patient was discharged at home with the indication to avoid rice and any rice beverage as well as to reintroduce hydrolyzed formula. A case of FPIES induced by rice beverage has never been reported. The present case clearly shows that also beverage containing rice proteins can be responsible of FPIES. For this reason, the use of rice beverage as cow's milk substitute for the treatment of non IgE-mediated food allergy should be avoided.

  19. Food protein induced enterocolitis syndrome caused by rice beverage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caminiti, Lucia; Salzano, Giuseppina; Crisafulli, Giuseppe; Porcaro, Federica; Pajno, Giovanni Battista

    2013-01-01

    Food protein-induced enterocolitis syndrome (FPIES) is an uncommon and potentially severe non IgE-mediated gastrointestinal food allergy. It is usually caused by cow's milk or soy proteins, but may also be triggered by ingestion of solid foods. The diagnosis is made on the basis of clinical history and symptoms. Management of acute phase requires fluid resuscitation and intravenous steroids administration, but avoidance of offending foods is the only effective therapeutic option.Infant with FPIES presented to our emergency department with vomiting, watery stools, hypothension and metabolic acidosis after ingestion of rice beverage. Intravenous fluids and steroids were administered with good clinical response. Subsequently, a double blind placebo control food challenge (DBPCFC) was performed using rice beverage and hydrolyzed formula (eHF) as placebo. The "rice based formula" induced emesis, diarrhoea and lethargy. Laboratory investigations reveal an increase of absolute count of neutrophils and the presence of faecal eosinophils. The patient was treated with both intravenous hydration and steroids. According to Powell criteria, oral food challenge was considered positive and diagnosis of FPIES induced by rice beverage was made. Patient was discharged at home with the indication to avoid rice and any rice beverage as well as to reintroduce hydrolyzed formula. A case of FPIES induced by rice beverage has never been reported. The present case clearly shows that also beverage containing rice proteins can be responsible of FPIES. For this reason, the use of rice beverage as cow's milk substitute for the treatment of non IgE-mediated food allergy should be avoided. PMID:23672828

  20. The C342R mutation in FGFR2 causes Crouzon syndrome with elbow deformity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ke, Ronghu; Yang, Xianxian; Tianyi, Cai; Ge, Min; Lei, Jiaqi; Mu, Xiongzheng

    2015-03-01

    Crouzon syndrome is an autosomal dominant craniosynostosis syndrome caused by mutation in the fibroblast growth factor receptor 2 (FGFR-2). Numerous findings from animal studies imply a critical role for FGFRs in the regulation of skeletal development. Here, we report 2 unrelated patients with Crouzon syndrome accompanied by elbow deformity. Subsequently, we analyzed the sequence of the FGFR2 gene and found that both of the patients carried the Cys342Arg mutation. The findings suggest that the C342R mutation in FGFR2 may cause Crouzon syndrome and elbow deformity in Chinese patients. PMID:25759925

  1. Acute radiation syndrome caused by accidental radiation exposure - therapeutic principles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dörr Harald

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Fortunately radiation accidents are infrequent occurrences, but since they have the potential of large scale events like the nuclear accidents of Chernobyl and Fukushima, preparatory planning of the medical management of radiation accident victims is very important. Radiation accidents can result in different types of radiation exposure for which the diagnostic and therapeutic measures, as well as the outcomes, differ. The clinical course of acute radiation syndrome depends on the absorbed radiation dose and its distribution. Multi-organ-involvement and multi-organ-failure need be taken into account. The most vulnerable organ system to radiation exposure is the hematopoietic system. In addition to hematopoietic syndrome, radiation induced damage to the skin plays an important role in diagnostics and the treatment of radiation accident victims. The most important therapeutic principles with special reference to hematopoietic syndrome and cutaneous radiation syndrome are reviewed.

  2. A Rare Cause of Pheochromocytoma; Neurofibromatosis Type 1-Noonan Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mazhar Müslüm Tuna

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Neurofibromatosis (NF Type 1 (NF-1 is an autosomal dominant disease with a prevalence of about 1/3000. NF-1 is a neurocutaneous syndrome characterized by cafe au lait macules, neurofibroma, optic glioma, lisch nodules, and symptoms involving other systems. Noonan syndrome (NS is a clinically heterogeneous disorder predominantly characterized by dysmorphic facial features, congenital heart disease, proportionate post-natal short stature, neck abnormalities, and chest deformities. NF-NS is a very rare overlapping syndrome sharing many features of both syndromes. Coexistence of pheochromocytoma, which can be life-threatening if not treated properly, is also a very rare complication of this disorder. Here, we report a patient who was admitted with a mass in the right upper quadrant and was diagnosed with pheochromocytoma and NFNS. (The Me­di­cal Bul­le­tin of Ha­se­ki 2014; 52: 227-31

  3. Immotile cilia syndrome: a new cause of neonatal respiratory distress.

    OpenAIRE

    Whitelaw, A; Evans, A.; Corrin, B.

    1981-01-01

    Kartagener's syndrome is a condition that consists of situs inversus, bronchiectasis, and sinusitis. Some patients have respiratory symptoms that date from early infancy, and electron microscopical examination has shown that adults with this condition lack dynein arms in ciliary microtubules. It has been suggested that an inherited defect in ciliary ultrastructure, the immotile cilia, is the basis for the syndrome. We report 6 patients who presented within the first 24 hours of life with tac...

  4. Blind loop syndrome: an unusual cause of panniculitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caux, F; Halimi, C; Kevorkian, J P; Pinquier, L; Dubertret, L; Segrestaa, J M

    1997-11-01

    We describe a 52-year-old woman with panniculitis and blind loop syndrome. She had undergone a gastrectomy for peptic ulcer 4 years before. Tender erythematous nodules on her palms and soles were associated with diarrhea and weight loss. A biopsy specimen revealed septal and lobular panniculitis. A glucose hydrogen breath test was consistent with bacterial overgrowth. These results were consistent with panniculitis associated with a blind loop syndrome. Only four cases of this association have been reported previously.

  5. Microtia Reconstruction and Postsurgical Grisel’s Syndrome: A Rare Cause of Torticollis in a Child

    OpenAIRE

    Jay Ching Chieh Wang, MD; Claudia Malic, MD, FRCS (Plast); Christopher Reilly, MD, FRCSC; Cynthia Verchere, MD, FRCSC

    2014-01-01

    Summary: Grisel’s syndrome is an unusual but important cause of torticollis which may be encountered in a pediatric plastic surgery practice, where craniofacial and oropharyngeal surgeries are commonly performed. Grisel’s syndrome is characterized by painful torticollis and limited cervical rotation, and the diagnosis is confirmed via radiologic imaging. Initial management of Grisel’s syndrome is with anti-inflammatories and in some cases antibiotics. In unresolving or recurrent cases, more i...

  6. A rare cause of renal colic pain: Chilaiditi syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Murat Tuncer

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Chilaiditi syndrome, first described in 1910 by the radiologist Chilaiditi from Vienna, is the interposition of right colon between liver and right hemi diaphragm. It occurs most often in males and its incidence increases with age. It is often detected incidentally during radiological examination. It’s rarely symptomatic; symptoms can differ from mild abdominal pain to severe acute intestinal obstruction. Our case applied to emergency service with right flank pain. There was no calculus or dilatation in the urinary system at non-contrast abdominopelvic computerized tomography. Ascending colon was interposed between liver and diaphragm so that the patient was diagnosed as Chiliaditi syndrome. The patient was treated conservatively and discharged with dietary suggestions by the gastroenterology consultant. The conclusion of this report is that the Chilaiditi syndrome must be considered in differential diagnosis for patients presenting with urinary colic pain symptoms with no urinary pathology on radiologic imaging.

  7. Mutations in CDK5RAP2 cause Seckel syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Karabey Kayserili, Hülya; Yiğit, G.; Brown, KE.; Pohl, E.; Caliebe, A.; Zahnleiter, D.; Rosser, E.; Bögershausen, N.; Uyguner, ZO.; Altunoğlu, U.; Nürnberg, G.; Nürnberg, P.; Rauch, A.; Li, Y.; Thiel, CT.; Wollnik, B.

    2015-01-01

    Seckel syndrome is a heterogeneous, autosomal recessive disorder marked by prenatal proportionate short stature, severe microcephaly, intellectual disability, and characteristic facial features. Here, we describe the novel homozygous splice-site mutations c.383+1G>C and c.4005-9A>G in CDK5RAP2 in two consanguineous families with Seckel syndrome. CDK5RAP2 (CEP215) encodes a centrosomal protein which is known to be essential for centrosomal cohesion and proper spindle formation and has been sho...

  8. Systemic Multiple Aneurysms Caused by Vascular Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gui, Xinyu; Li, Fangda; Wu, Lingeer; Zheng, Yuehong

    2016-07-01

    Systemic multiple aneurysms are rare and usually associated with collagen tissue disease, such as Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (EDS) or Marfan syndrome. In the present case, we describe a 39-year-old male patient with systemic multiple aneurysms and acute intraperitoneal hemorrhage who was clinically diagnosed with vascular EDS. Coil embolization of the distal segment of the common hepatic artery was performed, which resolved the patient's symptoms. With this case presentation, we aim to increase the awareness of vascular EDS among clinicians and emphasize the extreme fragility of the arteries in patients with vascular EDS. PMID:27206743

  9. Determining the Amount, Timing and Causes of Mortality among Infants with Down Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldman, S. E.; Urbano, R. C.; Hodapp, R. M.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To examine the amount, timing and causes/correlates of infant mortality among newborns with Down syndrome. Methods: Using the Tennessee Department of Health Birth, Hospital Discharge and Death records, infants were identified who were born with Down syndrome from 1990 to 2006. Those who died during the first year were separated into…

  10. A molecular and clinical study of Larsen syndrome caused by mutations in FLNB

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bicknell, Louise S.; Farrington-Rock, Claire; Shafeghati, Yousef; Rump, Patrick; Alanay, Yasemin; Alembik, Yves; Al-Madani, Navid; Firth, Helen; Karimi-Nejad, Mohammad Hassan; Kim, Chong Ae; Leask, Kathryn; Maisenbacher, Melissa; Moran, Ellen; Pappas, John G.; Prontera, Paolo; de Ravel, Thomy; Fryns, Jean-Pierre; Sweeney, Elizabeth; Fryer, Alan; Unger, Sheila; Wilson, L. C.; Lachman, Ralph S.; Rimoin, David L.; Cohn, Daniel H.; Krakow, Deborah; Robertson, Stephen P.

    2007-01-01

    Background: Larsen syndrome is an autosomal dominant osteochondrodysplasia characterised by large-joint dislocations and craniofacial anomalies. Recently, Larsen syndrome was shown to be caused by missense mutations or small inframe deletions in FLNB, encoding the cytoskeletal protein filamin B. To

  11. Dominant missense mutations in ABCC9 cause Cantu syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Harakalova, M.; van Harssel, J.J.; Terhal, P.A.; van Lieshout, S.; Duran, K.; Renkens, I.; Amor, D.J.; Wilson, L.C.; Kirk, E.P.; Turner, C.L.; Shears, D.; Garcia-Minaur, S.; Lees, M.M.; Ross, A.; Venselaar, H.; Vriend, G.; Takanari, H.; Rook, M.B.; van der Heyden, M.A.; Asselbergs, F.W.; Breur, H.M.; Swinkels, M.E.; Scurr, I.J.; Smithson, S.F.; Knoers, N.V.; van der Smagt, J.J.; Nijman, I.J.; Kloosterman, W.P.; van Haelst, M.M.; van Haaften, G.; Cuppen, E.

    2012-01-01

    Cantu syndrome is characterized by congenital hypertrichosis, distinctive facial features, osteochondrodysplasia and cardiac defects. By using family-based exome sequencing, we identified a de novo mutation in ABCC9. Subsequently, we discovered novel dominant missense mutations in ABCC9 in 14 of the

  12. Dominant missense mutations in ABCC9 cause Cantu syndrome.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Harakalova, M.; Harssel, J.J. van; Terhal, P.A.; Lieshout, S. van; Duran, K.; Renkens, I.; Amor, D.J.; Wilson, L.C.; Kirk, E.P.; Turner, C.L.; Shears, D.; Garcia-Minaur, S.; Lees, M.M.; Ross, A.; Venselaar, H.; Vriend, G.; Takanari, H.; Rook, M.B.; Heyden, M.A. van der; Asselbergs, F.W.; Breur, H.M.; Swinkels, M.E.; Scurr, I.J.; Smithson, S.F.; Knoers, N.V.A.M.; Smagt, J.J. van der; Nijman, I.J.; Kloosterman, W.P.; Haelst, M.M. van; Haaften, G. van; Cuppen, E.

    2012-01-01

    Cantu syndrome is characterized by congenital hypertrichosis, distinctive facial features, osteochondrodysplasia and cardiac defects. By using family-based exome sequencing, we identified a de novo mutation in ABCC9. Subsequently, we discovered novel dominant missense mutations in ABCC9 in 14 of the

  13. Horner's syndrome caused by an intercostal chest drain.

    OpenAIRE

    P. Campbell; Neil, T; Wake, P. N.

    1989-01-01

    Horner's syndrome occurred in a young woman as a complication of the treatment of a traumatic pneumothorax with an intercostal drain. The nerve damage probably occurred when the lung had fully re-expanded, pressing the tip of the intercostal drain, lying at the apex of the pleural cavity, on to the sympathetic chain.

  14. A defect in dystrophin causes a novel porcine stress syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Two sibling barrows were identified in the USMARC swine herd that died from apparent symptoms of a stress syndrome after transport to a research location at 12 weeks of age. The symptoms included open-mouth breathing, skin discoloration, vocalization and loss of mobility. The original mating was rep...

  15. KIF7 mutations cause fetal hydrolethalus and acrocallosal syndromes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A. Putoux; S. Thomas; K.L.M. Coene; E.E. Davis; Y. Alanay; G. Ogur; E. Uz; D. Buzas; C. Gomes; S. Patrier; C.L. Bennett; N. Elkhartoufi; M.-H. Saint Frison; L. Rigonnot; N. Joye; S. Pruvost; G.E. Utine; K. Boduroglu; P. Nitschke; L. Fertitta; C. Thauvin-Robinet; A. Munnich; V. Cormier-Daire; R. Hennekam; E. Colin; N.A. Akarsu; C. Bole-Feysot; N. Cagnard; A. Schmitt; N. Goudin; S. Lyonnet; F. Encha-Razavi; J.P. Siffroi; M. Winey; N. Katsanis; M. Gonzales; M. Vekemans; P.L. Beales; T. Attie-Bitach

    2011-01-01

    KIF7, the human ortholog of Drosophila Costal2, is a key component of the Hedgehog signaling pathway. Here we report mutations in KIF7 in individuals with hydrolethalus and acrocallosal syndromes, two multiple malformation disorders with overlapping features that include polydactyly, brain abnormali

  16. Plummer-Vinson syndrome: an unusual cause of dysphagia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganesh, R; Janakiraman, L; Sathiyasekaran, M

    2008-06-01

    Plummer-Vinson syndrome, comprising a triad of dysphagia, iron deficiency anaemia and cricoid webs, is rarely reported in children. It is important to identify this condition not only to provide relief of symptoms by iron supplementation but also to include these children in surveillance programmes for oesophageal squamous cell carcinoma.

  17. J wave syndromes as a cause of sudden arrhythmic death

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charles Antzelevitch

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Accentuated J waves have been associated with idiopathic ventricular tachycardia and fibrillation (VT/VF for nearly three decades. Prominent J waves characterize both Brugada and early repolarization syndromes leading to their designation as J wave syndromes. An early repolarization (ER pattern, characterized by J point elevation, slurring of the terminal part of the QRS and ST segment elevation was considered to be a totally benign electrocardiographic manifestation until a decade ago. Recent casecontrol and population-based association studies have advanced evidence that an ER pattern in the inferior or infero-lateral leads is associated with increased risk for life-threatening arrhythmias, named early repolarization syndrome (ERS. ERS and Brugada syndrome (BrS share similar electrocardiogram features, clinical outcomes, risk factors as well as a common arrhythmic platform related to amplification of Ito-mediated J waves. Although BrS and ERS differ with respect to the magnitude and lead location of abnormal J wave manifestation, they are thought to represent a continuous spectrum of phenotypic expression, termed J wave syndromes. A classification scheme for ERS has been proposed: type 1, displaying an ER pattern predominantly in the lateral precordial leads, is considered to be largely benign; type 2, displaying an ER pattern predominantly in inferior or infero-lateral leads, is associated with a higher level of risk; whereas type 3, displaying an ER pattern globally in inferior, lateral and right precordial leads, is associated with the highest level of risk for development of malignant arrhythmias and is often associated with VF storms.

  18. Cervical Disc Herniation Causing Brown-Séquard's Syndrome: A Case Report and Literature Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tarush Rustagi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Brown-Séquard's syndrome (BSS is caused by hemisection or hemicompression of the cord leading to ipsilateral motor deficit and contralateral sensory loss. Cervical disc herniation has been reported to be a rare cause of Brown-Séquard's syndrome. We describe a rare case of multilevel cervical disc herniation presenting as BSS. The condition was confirmed by MRI scan. Cervical corpectomy, decompression, and fusion gave a satisfying result. Pertinent literature has been reviewed.

  19. Cervical Disc Herniation Causing Brown-Séquard's Syndrome: A Case Report and Literature Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rustagi, Tarush; Badve, Siddharth; Maniar, Hemil; Parekh, Aseem N.

    2011-01-01

    Brown-Séquard's syndrome (BSS) is caused by hemisection or hemicompression of the cord leading to ipsilateral motor deficit and contralateral sensory loss. Cervical disc herniation has been reported to be a rare cause of Brown-Séquard's syndrome. We describe a rare case of multilevel cervical disc herniation presenting as BSS. The condition was confirmed by MRI scan. Cervical corpectomy, decompression, and fusion gave a satisfying result. Pertinent literature has been reviewed. PMID:23259105

  20. Cervical Disc Herniation Causing Brown-Séquard's Syndrome: A Case Report and Literature Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rustagi, Tarush; Badve, Siddharth; Maniar, Hemil; Parekh, Aseem N

    2011-01-01

    Brown-Séquard's syndrome (BSS) is caused by hemisection or hemicompression of the cord leading to ipsilateral motor deficit and contralateral sensory loss. Cervical disc herniation has been reported to be a rare cause of Brown-Séquard's syndrome. We describe a rare case of multilevel cervical disc herniation presenting as BSS. The condition was confirmed by MRI scan. Cervical corpectomy, decompression, and fusion gave a satisfying result. Pertinent literature has been reviewed.

  1. Atypicality in presentation of neuroleptic malignant syndrome caused by olanzapine

    OpenAIRE

    Mishra Biswaranjan; Mishra Baikunthanath; Sahoo Saddichha; Arora Manu; Khess C.R.J

    2007-01-01

    Neuroleptic malignant syndrome (NMS) is the most serious of acute neurological side effects produced by antipsychotic medication, characterized by hyperthermia, rigidity, altered consciousness and autonomic dysfunction, the prevalence of which varies from 0.4-1.4%. NMS is usually seen in treatment with high potency typical antipsychotics and very rarely with atypical antipsychotics. However, NMS cases have been reported with risperidone, clozapine, olanzapine and quetiapine. The presen...

  2. Atypicality in presentation of neuroleptic malignant syndrome caused by olanzapine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mishra Biswaranjan

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Neuroleptic malignant syndrome (NMS is the most serious of acute neurological side effects produced by antipsychotic medication, characterized by hyperthermia, rigidity, altered consciousness and autonomic dysfunction, the prevalence of which varies from 0.4-1.4%. NMS is usually seen in treatment with high potency typical antipsychotics and very rarely with atypical antipsychotics. However, NMS cases have been reported with risperidone, clozapine, olanzapine and quetiapine. The presentations of NMS have often varied, and we report another atypicality in presentation of NMS due to olanzapine use.

  3. Rituximab as a possible cause of posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed Imran Siddiqi

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available A 66-year-old woman presented with new onset generalisedtonic-clonic seizures following her first dose ofchemotherapy comprising Rituximab, Cyclophosphamide,Hydroxydaunorubicin, Oncovin and Prednisolone (R-CHOP10 days earlier for non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma. On admission,computed tomography (CT scan of the cranium showed noabnormality. The CT was repeated within 48 hours as thepatient developed status epilepticus and papilledema; therepeat scan showed characteristics of posterior reversibleencephalopathy syndrome (PRES. Association of rituximabwith this condition was suspected as there was norecurrence of PRES after receiving two more cycles of CHOPwithout rituximab. Contrary to previously published casereports, this patient had a delayed clinical presentation.

  4. Gastric sarcoidosis mimicking irritable bowel syndrome-Cause not association?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    John Samuel Leeds; Mark Edward McAlindon; Eleanor Lorenz; Asha Kumari Dube; David Surendran Sanders

    2006-01-01

    Sarcoidosis is a systemic disease of unknown aetiology that may affect any organ in the body. The gastrointestinal tract however is only rarely affected outside the liver. Symptoms may be non-specific.Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a common diagnosis.The recognition of TBS is aided by the use of the Rome Ⅱ criteria - in the absence of organic disease. We describe the first case of a patient with gastric sarcoidosis who presented with IBS symptoms but subsequently responded to immunosuppressive therapy.

  5. A RARE CAUSE OF RESISTANT SEIZURES: DYKE DAVIDOFF MASSON SYNDROME

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Biswadev Basu

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT : Dyke – Davidoff – Masson Syndrome (DDMS, is a rare clinical condition characterized by clinical triad of seizures, contralateral spastic hemiplegia or hemiparesis, with or without mental retardation. Diagnosis requires presence of cerebral hemiatrophy with homolateral hypertrophy of the skull and sinuses on brain imaging. Here we report a case of DDMS in a 16 year old girl who presented with seizures and hemiparesis.MRI of her brain showed hemiatrophy involving the left cerebral hemisphere with enlargement of ipsilateral sinuses and ventricles

  6. Early repolarization syndrome: A cause of sudden cardiac death

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Abdi; Ali; Nida; Butt; Azeem; S; Sheikh

    2015-01-01

    Early repolarization syndrome(ERS), demonstrated as J-point elevation on an electrocardiograph, was formerly thought to be a benign entity, but the recent studies have demonstrated that it can be linked to a considerable risk of life- threatening arrhythmias and sudden cardiac death(SCD). Early repolarization characteristics associated with SCD include high-amplitude J-point elevation, horizontal and/or downslopping ST segments, and inferior and/or lateral leads location. The prevalence of ERS varies between 3% and 24%, depending on age, sex and J-point elevation(0.05 m V vs 0.1 m V) being the main determinants.ERS patients are sporadic and they are at a higher risk of having recurrent cardiac events. Implantable cardioverter-defibrillator implantation and isoproterenol are the suggested therapies in this set of patients. On the other hand, asymptomatic patients with ERS are common and have a better prognosis. The risk stratification in asymptomatic patients with ERS still remains a grey area. This review provides an outline of the up-to-date evidence associated with ERS and the risk of life- threatening arrhythmias. Further prospective studies are required to elucidate the mechanisms of ventricular arrhythmogenesis in patients with ERS.

  7. A defect in dystrophin causes a novel porcine stress syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nonneman Dan J

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Losses of slaughter-weight pigs due to transport stress are both welfare and economic concerns to pork producers. Historically, the HAL-1843 mutation in ryanodine receptor 1 was considered responsible for most of the losses; however, DNA testing has effectively eliminated this mutation from commercial herds. We identified two sibling barrows in the USMARC swine herd that died from apparent symptoms of a stress syndrome after transport at 12 weeks of age. The symptoms included open-mouth breathing, skin discoloration, vocalization and loss of mobility. Results We repeated the original mating along with sire-daughter matings to produce additional offspring. At 8 weeks of age, heart rate and electrocardiographs (ECG were monitored during isoflurane anesthesia challenge (3% for 3 min. Four males from the original sire-dam mating and two males from a sire-daughter mating died after one minute of anesthesia. Animals from additional litters were identified as having a stress response, sometimes resulting in death, during regular processing and weighing. Affected animals had elevated plasma creatine phosphokinase (CPK levels before and immediately after isoflurane challenge and cardiac arrhythmias. A pedigree containing 250 pigs, including 49 affected animals, was genotyped with the Illumina PorcineSNP60 Beadchip and only one chromosomal region, SSCX at 25.1-27.7 Mb over the dystrophin gene (DMD, was significantly associated with the syndrome. An arginine to tryptophan (R1958W polymorphism in exon 41 of DMD was the most significant marker associated with stress susceptibility. Immunoblots of affected heart and skeletal muscle showed a dramatic reduction of dystrophin protein and histopathology of affected hearts indicated muscle fiber degeneration. Conclusions A novel stress syndrome was characterized in pigs and the causative genetic factor most likely resides within DMD that results in less dystrophin protein and cardiac

  8. HOXA1 mutations are not a common cause of Möbius syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rankin, Jessica K; Andrews, Caroline; Chan, Wai-Man; Engle, Elizabeth C

    2010-02-01

    The HOXA1-related syndromes result from autosomal-recessive truncating mutations in the homeobox transcription factor, HOXA1. Limited horizontal gaze and sensorineural deafness are the most common features; affected individuals can also have facial weakness, mental retardation, autism, motor disabilities, central hypoventilation, carotid artery, and/or conotruncal heart defects. Möbius syndrome is also phenotypically heterogeneous, with minimal diagnostic criteria of nonprogressive facial weakness and impaired ocular abduction; mental retardation, autism, motor disabilities, additional eye movements restrictions, hearing loss, hypoventilation, and craniofacial, lingual, and limb abnormalities also occur. We asked, given the phenotypic overlap between these syndromes and the variable expressivity of both disorders, whether individuals with Möbius syndrome might harbor mutations in HOXA1. Our results suggest that HOXA1 mutations are not a common cause of sporadic Möbius syndrome in the general population. PMID:20227628

  9. Fetal alcohol syndromecauses, diagnostic criteria and prevalence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agata Horecka-Lewitowicz

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Fetal alcohol syndrome (FAS is the outcome of alcohol exposition in the prenatal period. It is irreversible. In Poland, FAS is becoming more and more common, the diagnostic tools are limited though. It is recommended to use the 4-Digit Diagnostic Code, which evaluates the 4 basic FAS symptoms: growth retardation, dysmorphic appearance, damage to the central nervous system and prenatal alcohol exposure. It has been confirmed that there is no safe amount of alcohol for a mother to drink while carrying a baby. To put it another way, only a complete lack of alcohol consumption is a guarantee that the baby will not suffer from FAS. It is necessary for society to know that even the smallest amount of alcohol is bad for the foetus. A number of people still believe that, for example, red wine is good and healthy for both the mother and child.

  10. Lynch Syndrome Caused by Germline PMS2 Mutations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ten Broeke, Sanne W; Brohet, Richard M; Tops, Carli M;

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE: The clinical consequences of PMS2 germline mutations are poorly understood compared with other Lynch-associated mismatch repair gene (MMR) mutations. The aim of this European cohort study was to define the cancer risk faced by PMS2 mutation carriers. METHODS: Data were collected from 98...... PMS2 families ascertained from family cancer clinics that included a total of 2,548 family members and 377 proven mutation carriers. To adjust for potential ascertainment bias, a modified segregation analysis model was used to calculate colorectal cancer (CRC) and endometrial cancer (EC) risks....... Standardized incidence ratios (SIRs) were calculated to estimate risks for other Lynch syndrome-associated cancers. RESULTS: The cumulative risk (CR) of CRC for male mutation carriers by age 70 years was 19%. The CR among female carriers was 11% for CRC and 12% for EC. The mean age of CRC development was 52...

  11. A Rare Cause of Mucocutaneous Pigmentation: Laugier Hunziker Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gonca Meriç

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Laugier Hunziker syndrome (LHS is a rare, acquired pigmentation disorder characterized by macular melonotic pigmentation of the oral mucous membranes and lips frequently associated with longitudinal melanonychia. LHS is known to be an entirely benign condition with no underlying systemic abnormalities or malignant predisposition. However, it is very important to make a differential diagnosis with other mucocutaneous pigmentary disorders which require detailed examination, treatment and follow up. LHS is seen very rarely and to our knowledge, approximately 100 cases have been described in the literature, to date. There are only seven cases reported from the our country, based on the literature search in PubMed and Turkish Dermatological journals, avaliable on the web. Herein we report a 54-year-old woman diagnosed as having LHS, with hyperpigmented macular lesions of the tongue, lip, buccal mucosa, gingiva and palms and soles.

  12. Intermittent hypoglossal nerve palsy caused by a calcified persistent hypoglossal artery: an uncommon neurovascular compression syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meila, Dan; Wetter, Axel; Brassel, Friedhelm; Nacimiento, Wilhelm

    2012-12-15

    Neurovascular compression is assumed to cause symptoms like trigeminal neuralgia, hemifacial spasm and vestibular paroxysmia. We present a patient with recurrent episodes of transient dysarthria due to isolated right hypoglossal nerve (HN) palsy. We describe the first case of a calcified persistent hypoglossal artery (PHA) as the putative cause of a hypoglossal neurovascular compression syndrome. Our patient received a daily low-dose medication of carbamazepine resulting in complete relief of symptoms. In conclusion, PHA is not only an anatomic variation but also a possible cause of a neurovascular compression syndrome leading to intermittent HN palsy. PMID:23020989

  13. Origins of the E. coli strain causing an outbreak of hemolytic-uremic syndrome in Germany

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasko, David A; Webster, Dale R; Sahl, Jason W;

    2011-01-01

    A large outbreak of diarrhea and the hemolytic-uremic syndrome caused by an unusual serotype of Shiga-toxin-producing Escherichia coli (O104:H4) began in Germany in May 2011. As of July 22, a large number of cases of diarrhea caused by Shiga-toxin-producing E. coli have been reported--3167 withou...

  14. Microtia Reconstruction and Postsurgical Grisel’s Syndrome: A Rare Cause of Torticollis in a Child

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jay Ching Chieh Wang, MD

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Summary: Grisel’s syndrome is an unusual but important cause of torticollis which may be encountered in a pediatric plastic surgery practice, where craniofacial and oropharyngeal surgeries are commonly performed. Grisel’s syndrome is characterized by painful torticollis and limited cervical rotation, and the diagnosis is confirmed via radiologic imaging. Initial management of Grisel’s syndrome is with anti-inflammatories and in some cases antibiotics. In unresolving or recurrent cases, more invasive treatments, such as cervical collar, halo, or surgical arthrodesis, may be considered.

  15. Neonatal Marfan syndrome caused by an exon 25 mutation of the fibrillin-1 gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elçioglu, N H; Akalin, F; Elçioglu, M; Comeglio, P; Child, A H

    2004-01-01

    Neonatal Marfan syndrome caused by an exon 25 mutation of the Fibrillin-1 gene: We describe a male infant with severe arachnodactyly, hypermobility of the fingers, flexion contractures of elbows, wrists, hips, and knees, microretrognathia, crumpled ears, rockerbottom feet, loose redundant skin, and lens dislocations. Cardiac valve insufficiency and aortic dilatation resulted in cardiac failure, decompensated with digitalisation and death occurred at the age of 4 months. This case represents the severe end of the clinical spectrum of Marfan syndrome, namely neonatal Marfan syndrome. Molecular diagnostic analyses confirmed a de novo exon 25 mutation in the FBN1 gene. PMID:15287423

  16. Laugier-hunziker syndrome: an uncommon cause of oral pigmentation and a review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montebugnoli, Lucio; Grelli, Ivana; Cervellati, Fabio; Misciali, Cosimo; Raone, Beatrice

    2010-01-01

    Laugier-Hunziker syndrome is a rare benign condition characterized by diffuse oral hyperpigmentation associated with pigmentation of the nails. The syndrome must be included in the differential diagnosis of diffuse oral pigmentation to exclude other conditions with systemic implications. We describe a 43-year-old white woman with the clinical and histological features of Laugier-Hunziker syndrome associated with toenail pigmentation. The correct clinical identification avoids the need for detailed investigations and treatment. We also review the potential causes of oral pigmentation.

  17. Laugier-Hunziker Syndrome: An Uncommon Cause of Oral Pigmentation and a Review of the Literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucio Montebugnoli

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Laugier-Hunziker syndrome is a rare benign condition characterized by diffuse oral hyperpigmentation associated with pigmentation of the nails. The syndrome must be included in the differential diagnosis of diffuse oral pigmentation to exclude other conditions with systemic implications. We describe a 43-year-old white woman with the clinical and histological features of Laugier-Hunziker syndrome associated with toenail pigmentation. The correct clinical identification avoids the need for detailed investigations and treatment. We also review the potential causes of oral pigmentation.

  18. FGFR1 mutations cause Hartsfield syndrome, the unique association of holoprosencephaly and ectrodactyly

    OpenAIRE

    Simonis, Nicolas; Migeotte, Isabelle; Lambert, Nelle; Perazzolo, Camille; de Silva, Deepthi C.; Dimitrov, Boyan; Heinrichs, Claudine; Janssens, Sandra; Kerr, Bronwyn; Mortier, Geert; Van Vliet, Guy; Lepage, Philippe; Casimir, Georges; Abramowicz, Marc; Smits, Guillaume

    2013-01-01

    Background Harstfield syndrome is the rare and unique association of holoprosencephaly (HPE) and ectrodactyly, with or without cleft lip and palate, and variable additional features. All the reported cases occurred sporadically. Although several causal genes of HPE and ectrodactyly have been identified, the genetic cause of Hartsfield syndrome remains unknown. We hypothesised that a single key developmental gene may underlie the co-occurrence of HPE and ectrodactyly. Methods We used whole exo...

  19. A recurrent TP63 mutation causing EEC3 and Rapp-Hodgkin syndromes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brueggemann, Felix B; Bartsch, Oliver

    2016-04-01

    The ectrodactyly, ectodermal dysplasia, and cleft lip/palate syndrome 3 (EEC3; OMIM #604292), the Rapp-Hodgkin syndrome (RHS), and various other syndromes are caused by mutations in the TP63 gene, which encodes a p53-like transcription factor. Here, we report on a woman aged 37 years and her daughter aged 3 years with the previously reported c.1028G>A (p.Arg343Gln) mutation in exon 8 of TP63. The mother lacked ectrodactyly, indicating a diagnosis of RHS, whereas the girl presented with all three major features (ectrodactyly, ectodermal dysplasia, clefting) and different minor features (including small and brittle nails, and recurrent conjunctivitis believed to be because of stenotic and blocked nasolacrimal ducts) of the EEC3 syndrome. The EEC and EEC-like syndromes are usually distinguished on the basis of the clinical findings; however, these syndromes show a huge variability in features because of variable expressivity and incomplete penetrance, making the correct clinical assignment difficult. In EEC3 syndrome and RHS, a clustering of mutations in the different domains of TP63 can be observed. Our findings indicate the clinical variability with TP63 mutations and underline that in the case of two syndromes being clinically possible in a patient, the final diagnosis should be assigned only after molecular diagnostics. PMID:26882220

  20. peutz-jeghers syndrome as a cause of intussusception

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Durango- Guevara Kary

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Peutz-Jeghers syndrome, also known as periorificial lentigines is adisease of autosomal dominant transmission. It is characterized by the associationof gastrointestinal polyposis and mucocutaneous pigmentation, which is evidentfrom the first years of life and may remain until adulthood. The polyps arehamartomatous and occur most frequently in the small intestine, although therearereported cases in the stomach and intestine.Case report: A 14 year old boy who is diagnosed with Peutz Jeghers consulted theemergency room at Napoleon Franco Pareja Children’s Hospital, Cartagena, Colombia.He was admitted with acute abdominal pain secondary to intussusception thatrequired surgical repair and bowel resection. Delayed diagnosis, despite having lesionsin the oral mucosa and palmar and plantar skin since early childhood.We report this case to expand the general knowledge about this disease, seekingto increase the sensitivity of the medical staff for early diagnosis, thus avoidingthe morbidity and mortality.Conclusions: The Peutz-Jeghers syndrome has been associated with an increasedrisk of intussusception as in the case presented. It is also associated with anemia andcancer. Early diagnosis of the syndrome is important in order to search for polyps, identifyand resect them helps reduce the risk of intussusception.RESUMEN:Introducción: el síndrome de Peutz-Jeghers, también conocido como lentiginosisperiorificial es una enfermedad de transmisión autosómica dominante. Se caracterizapor la asociación de poliposis gastrointestinal y pigmentación mucocutánea, la cual seevidencia desde los primeros años de vida y puede permanecer hasta la edad adulta.Los pólipos son de tipo hamartomatoso y se presentan con mayor frecuencia a niveldel intestino delgado aunque existen casos reportados en estomago e intestino grueso.Caso clínico: joven de 14 años que se le diagnostica síndrome de Peutz Jeghersal consultar al servicio de urgencias del

  1. Empty Follicle Syndrome: The Possible Cause of Occurrence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tahereh Madani

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Empty follicle syndrome (EFS, although rare, is a disappointing condition in which no oocytes are retrieved from mature follicle after ovulation induction in in vitro fertilization (IVF cycles. The aim of this study was to estimate the incidence and factors associated with EFS. Methods: All cycles resulting in EFS from May 2012 to September 2013 were retrospectively identified at a tertiary referral infertility center. Among the 3,356 cycles performed, 58 (1.7% women who underwent their first IVF cycle and had no oocyte retrieval were enrolled in the study. Three different stimulation protocols (long, antagonist, and miniflare were mainly used for induction of follicular growth. Data relating to the age, follicle stimulating hormone (FSH level, anti-Müllerain hormone (AMH level, and the number of ampules and follicles for each patient was obtained. Results: Out of 58 individuals, 10 (17.2% showed false type and 48 (82.8% showed genuine EFS. The most frequent findings in our study were diminished ovarian reserve, low anti-Müllerian hormone (AMH; ≤0.5 ng/mL, and less than four mature follicles, indicating EFS in 1.7% of the patients. Conclusion: Low serum AMH levels and a small number of follicles after ovarian stimulation is the manifestation of diminished ovarian reserve. Thus, we suggest that EFS could be a manifestation of low ovarian reserve.

  2. Capecitabine caused cardiogenic shock through induction of global takotsubo syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Y-Hassan, Shams, E-mail: shams.younis-hassan@karolinska.se; Tornvall, Per; Törnerud, Mattias; Henareh, Loghman

    2013-01-15

    5-Fluorouracil (5-FU) and its oral pro-drug capecitabine are widely used in oncology for the treatment of various solid tumours, including colorectal cancers. Cardiotoxicity to these drugs is not an uncommon adverse effect and has been reported in 1%–18% of patients. Capecitabine has been reported to trigger mid-apical Takotsubo syndrome (TS). We describe here the case of a 55-year-old man who presented with cardiogenic shock and ECG signs of ST-elevation myocardial infarction. The symptoms began 28 h after the commencement of capecitabine adjuvant therapy, following a radical right-sided hemicolectomy for low-differentiated adenocarcinoma of the caecum. Echocardiography showed severe global left ventricular dysfunction. Cardiac magnetic resonance imaging showed no signs of late gadolinium enhancement. These clinical, cardiac image study findings and the course of the disease with full recovery within one week were consistent with global TS triggered by the adjuvant therapy capecitabine and presenting with a life-threatening cardiogenic shock. Moreover, we have demonstrated the speedy dynamic of the left ventricular wall motion abnormality with global TS at presentation and basal (inverted) TS findings 4 days later on.

  3. Renal amyloidosis in leprosy, an infrequent cause of nephrotic syndrome in Europe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanz-Martín, Noelia; Samillán-Sosa, Kelly Del Rocío; De Miguel, Julio; Martínez-Miguel, Patricia

    2016-01-01

    Leprosy is a chronic infectious disease caused by Mycobacterium leprae The main clinical manifestations involve the skin and the peripheral nervous system. Several types of nephropathy have been described in leprosy. One frequent form of renal involvement is amyloidosis, especially in patients with lepromatous leprosy. In these patients, end-stage renal disease is an important contributor to morbidity and mortality. Here, we present the case of a patient with nephrotic syndrome caused by secondary amyloidosis, chronic peripheral neuropathy and a history of leprosy. The patient was correctly treated in her youth, which is the best way to avoid renal pathology, but she developed a nephrotic syndrome years later. PMID:27489069

  4. 阳虚生风论%Theory of Feng-Syndrome Caused by Yang Deficiency

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    潘远根

    2016-01-01

    The treatment of Feng-syndrome in TCM frequently focused on the wind syndromes caused by the strong hot, the hyperactivity of Yang, the Yin deficiency and the blood deficiency, but the Feng syndrome rarely deals with Yang deficiency. In this paper, we puts forward the Feng syndromes also caused by Yang deficiency and briefly discusses on it in the theory, the type of diseases and the syndrome differentiation, and then, to break down the syndrome differentiating keys with some clinical cases.%中医论风证的辨证治疗,向来仅注重火热、阳亢、阴虚、血虚等引起的风证,绝少论及阳虚动风。本文从阳虚生风的理论、病证类型、辨证要点等方面简要论述了阳虚阴盛同样引起动风证,并例举临床病例以详解辨证关键。

  5. Species determination of pine nuts in commercial samples causing pine nut syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mikkelsen, Aase Æ.; Jessen, Flemming; Ballin, Nicolai Z.

    2014-01-01

    Consumption of pine nuts from the species of Pinus armandii has been reported to cause dysgeusia, commonly known as pine mouth, or pine nut syndrome (PNS). However, the number of reports on pine nut consumptions of the different species and PNS is limited. This leaves open the possibility...

  6. High circulating ghrelin: a potential cause for hyperphagia and obesity in prader-willi syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    DelParigi, Angelo; Tschöp, Matthias; Heiman, Mark L;

    2002-01-01

    Prader-Willi syndrome (PWS) is a genetic disorder occurring in 1 of 10,000-16,000 live births and is characterized by excessive appetite with progressive massive obesity as well as short stature and mental retardation. Most patients have GH deficiency and hypogonadotropic hypogonadism. The causes...

  7. OTORHINOLARYNGOLOGIC CAUSES OF CLAUDE-BERNARD-HÖRNER SYNDROME: THREE CASES REPORT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. de la Fuente Cañibano

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The syndrome of Claude-Bernard-Hörner is caused by the sinpatical injury of thebranches ascending innervation of the stellate ganglion and the iris smooth muscle eyelid. His triad is the presence of ptosis, myosis and enoftalmos. It may be accompanied by anhidrosis, pupillary dilation heterocromía delayed in the congenital case.

  8. Clinical and radiologic review of uncommon cause of profound iron deficiency anemia: Median arcuate ligament syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gunduz, Yasemin; Asil, Kiyasrttin; Aksoy, Yakup Ersel; Ayhan, Lacin Tatli [Dept. of Radiology, Sakarya University Medical Faculty, Sakarya (Turkmenistan)

    2014-08-15

    Median arcuate ligament syndrome is an anatomic and clinical entity characterized by dynamic compression of the proximal celiac artery by the median arcuate ligament, which leads to postprandial epigastric pain, vomiting, and weight loss. These symptoms are usually nonspecific and are easily misdiagnosed as functional dyspepsia, peptic ulcer disease, or gastropathy. In this report, we presented a 72-year-old male patient with celiac artery compression syndrome causing recurrent abdominal pain associated with gastric ulcer and iron deficiency anemia. This association is relatively uncommon and therefore not well determined. In addition, we reported the CT angiography findings and three-dimensional reconstructions of this rare case.

  9. Neuroleptic Malignant Syndrome Caused by a Combination of Carbamazepine and Amitriptyline

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Bruce Janati

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A 32-year-old female, with a history of secondarily-generalized convulsive epilepsy, mental retardation, and a psychiatric illness, developed neuroleptic malignant syndrome while receiving carbamazepine and amitriptyline concurrently. We hypothesize that the addition of amitriptyline to carbamazepine caused a decrease in the serum level of carbamazepine, resulting in NMS. We conclude that combination therapy with carbamazepine and amitriptyline should be avoided in patients who are predisposed to NMS. The purpose of this paper is to warn physicians against combination therapy with carbamazepine and tricyclic antidepressants which may be conducive to neuroleptic malignant syndrome in susceptible patients.

  10. Laugier-hunziker syndrome: a rare cause of oral and acral pigmentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sachdeva, Silonie; Sachdeva, Shabina; Kapoor, Pranav

    2011-01-01

    Laugier-Hunziker syndrome (LHS) is an acquired, benign pigmentary skin condition involving oral cavity including lower lip in the form of brown black macules 1-5 mm in size, frequently associated with longitudinal melanonychia. There is no underlying systemic abnormality or malignant predisposition associated with LHS, and therefore the prognosis is good. Important differential diagnoses include Peutz Jeghers syndrome and Addison's disease among other causes of oral and acral pigmentation. Treatment is sought mainly for cosmetic reasons and Q-switched Nd-Yag laser/ Q-switched alexandrite therapy and cryosurgery have been tried with varying success.

  11. Laugier-hunziker syndrome: A rare cause of oral and acral pigmentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silonie Sachdeva

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Laugier-Hunziker syndrome (LHS is an acquired, benign pigmentary skin condition involving oral cavity including lower lip in the form of brown black macules 1-5 mm in size, frequently associated with longitudinal melanonychia. There is no underlying systemic abnormality or malignant predisposition associated with LHS, and therefore the prognosis is good. Important differential diagnoses include Peutz Jeghers syndrome and Addison′s disease among other causes of oral and acral pigmentation. Treatment is sought mainly for cosmetic reasons and Q-switched Nd-Yag laser/ Q-switched alexandrite therapy and cryosurgery have been tried with varying success.

  12. DRESS syndrome secondary to ibuprofen as a cause of hyperacute liver failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valentín Roales-Gómez

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Acute liver failure has a high mortality and its most frequent cause in Spain is viral infection. In this article, we present a case of fulminant liver failure. The failure is secondary to an idiosyncratic reaction to ibuprofen, an entity included in the DRESS syndrome. This syndrome plays a key role in the differential diagnosis of acute liver failure, since its unfortunate course often requires liver transplantation as the only useful therapeutic weapon. This case illustrates the need for an efficient coordination between hospitals as a key factor for improving the prognosis.

  13. Popliteal vascular entrapment syndrome caused by a rare anomalous slip of the lateral head of the gastrocnemius muscle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Patrick T.; Moyer, Adrian C.; Huettl, Eric A. [Mayo Clinic Scottsdale, Department of Radiology, Scottsdale (United States); Fowl, Richard J.; Stone, William M. [Mayo Clinic Scottsdale, Department of Vascular Surgery, Scottsdale (United States)

    2005-06-01

    Popliteal vascular entrapment syndrome can result in calf claudication, aneurysm formation, distal arterial emboli, or popliteal vessel thrombosis. The most commonly reported causes of this syndrome have been anomalies of the medial head of the gastrocnemius muscle as it relates to the course of the popliteal artery. We report two cases of rare anomalous slips of the lateral head of the gastrocnemius muscle causing popliteal vascular entrapment syndrome. (orig.)

  14. Budd-chiari syndrome caused by diaphragmatic hernia of the liver: a case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, Jae Min; Yoon, Jung Won; Kim, Jae Wook; Chung, Woo Kyoung; Chung, Hee Sun; Kim, Joo Hyung; Choi, Jun Ho; Kim, Seung Ho [Armed Forces Capital Hospital, Seongnam (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-01-15

    Budd-Chiari syndrome is an uncommon disorder, and it is caused by obstruction of the hepatic venous out-flow or inferior vena cava above the hepatic vein. It may result from a large number of conditions, including primary congenital obstructions of the hepatic veins or inferior vena cava by webs or bands. Secondary causes include trauma, polycythemia vera, chronic leukemia, pregnancy, tumors and use of oral contraceptives. No definitive etiologic factors have been identified in two thirds of all cases. We recently experienced a case of Budd-Chiari syndrome caused by diaphragmatic hernia in 21-year-old man. Postoperative follow up CT showed normal venous flow after reintroduction of the liver into the abdominal cavity and closure of the diaphragm defect.

  15. Neuroendocrine carcinoma of the ampulla of Vater causing ectopic adrenocorticotropic hormone-dependent Cushing's syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    KATO, AKIHISA; HAYASHI, KAZUKI; NAITOH, ITARU; SENO, KYOJI; OKADA, YUKIKO; BAN, TESSHIN; KONDO, HIROMU; NISHI, YUJI; UMEMURA, SHUICHIRO; HORI, YASUKI; NATSUME, MAKOTO; JOH, TAKASHI

    2016-01-01

    Ectopic adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) is rarely secreted by neuroendocrine tumors. Although neuroendocrine tumors may occur at any site in the gastrointestinal system, they very rarely occur in the ampulla of Vater and have a poor prognosis. The present study described the first Cushing's syndrome as a result of ectopic ACTH arising from the ampulla of Vater neuroendocrine carcinoma. A 69-year-old female was admitted with clinical features of Cushing's syndrome, confirmed biochemically by hypokalemia, and elevated levels of ACTH and cortisol. In further investigations, a tumor of the ampulla of Vater and liver metastases were detected. Pathological analysis of the biopsy confirmed a neuroendocrine carcinoma, which was immunohistochemically positive for chromogranin A, synaptophysin, cluster of differentiation 56 and ACTH. Therefore, the present study diagnosed a functional and metastatic neuroendocrine carcinoma of the ampulla of Vater with ectopic ACTH production causing Cushing's syndrome. The patient succumbed to mortality 4 months later, despite administration of combined chemotherapy with irinotecan and cisplatin. PMID:27330779

  16. Ventricular tachycardia in a Brugada syndrome patient caused by a novel deletion in SCN5A

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tfelt-Hansen, J; Jespersen, T; Hofman-Bang, J;

    2009-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to identify the molecular mechanism behind ventricular tachycardia in a patient with Brugada syndrome. Arrhythmias in patients with Brugada syndrome often occur during sleep. However, a 28-year-old man with no previously documented arrhythmia or syncope who...... experienced shortness of breath and chest pain during agitation is described. An electrocardiogram revealed monomorphic ventricular tachycardia; after he was converted to nodal rhythm, he spontaneously went into sinus rhythm, and showed classic Brugada changes with coved ST elevation in leads V(1) to V(2......-cell patch clamp experiments using human embryonic kidney 293 cells transfected with the mutated SCN5A, no current could be recorded. Hence, the results suggest that the patient suffered from haploinsufficiency of Na(v)1.5, and that this mutation was the cause of his Brugada syndrome....

  17. Molecular definition of a region of chromosome 21 that causes features of the Down syndrome phenotype

    OpenAIRE

    Korenberg, Julie R; Kawashima, Hiroko; Pulst, Stefan-M.; Ikeuchi, T; Ogasawara, N; Yamamoto, K.; Schonberg, Steven A.; West, Ruth; Allen, Leland; Magenis, Ellen; Ikawa, K; Taniguchi, N; Epstein, Charles J.

    1990-01-01

    Down syndrome (DS) is a major cause of mental retardation and heart disease. Although it is usually caused by the presence of an extra chromosome 21, a subset of the diagnostic features may be caused by the presence of only band 21q22. We now present evidence that significantly narrows the chromosomal region responsible for several of the phenotypic features of DS. We report a molecular and cytogenetic analysis of a three-generation family containing four individuals with clinical DS as manif...

  18. Mutations in GMPPB cause congenital myasthenic syndrome and bridge myasthenic disorders with dystroglycanopathies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belaya, Katsiaryna; Rodríguez Cruz, Pedro M; Liu, Wei Wei; Maxwell, Susan; McGowan, Simon; Farrugia, Maria E; Petty, Richard; Walls, Timothy J; Sedghi, Maryam; Basiri, Keivan; Yue, Wyatt W; Sarkozy, Anna; Bertoli, Marta; Pitt, Matthew; Kennett, Robin; Schaefer, Andrew; Bushby, Kate; Parton, Matt; Lochmüller, Hanns; Palace, Jacqueline; Muntoni, Francesco; Beeson, David

    2015-09-01

    Congenital myasthenic syndromes are inherited disorders that arise from impaired signal transmission at the neuromuscular junction. Mutations in at least 20 genes are known to lead to the onset of these conditions. Four of these, ALG2, ALG14, DPAGT1 and GFPT1, are involved in glycosylation. Here we identify a fifth glycosylation gene, GMPPB, where mutations cause congenital myasthenic syndrome. First, we identified recessive mutations in seven cases from five kinships defined as congenital myasthenic syndrome using decrement of compound muscle action potentials on repetitive nerve stimulation on electromyography. The mutations were present through the length of the GMPPB, and segregation, in silico analysis, exon trapping, cell transfection followed by western blots and immunostaining were used to determine pathogenicity. GMPPB congenital myasthenic syndrome cases show clinical features characteristic of congenital myasthenic syndrome subtypes that are due to defective glycosylation, with variable weakness of proximal limb muscle groups while facial and eye muscles are largely spared. However, patients with GMPPB congenital myasthenic syndrome had more prominent myopathic features that were detectable on muscle biopsies, electromyography, muscle magnetic resonance imaging, and through elevated serum creatine kinase levels. Mutations in GMPPB have recently been reported to lead to the onset of muscular dystrophy dystroglycanopathy. Analysis of four additional GMPPB-associated muscular dystrophy dystroglycanopathy cases by electromyography found that a defective neuromuscular junction component is not always present. Thus, we find mutations in GMPPB can lead to a wide spectrum of clinical features where deficit in neuromuscular transmission is the major component in a subset of cases. Clinical recognition of GMPPB-associated congenital myasthenic syndrome may be complicated by the presence of myopathic features, but correct diagnosis is important because affected

  19. Artery of Percheron Infarction as an Unusual Cause of Korsakoff's Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Yongxing; Fox, Derrick; Anand, Abhishek; Elhaj, Amal; Kapoor, Arushi; Najibi, Faranak; Kim, Han; Weir, Roger; Jayam-Trouth, Annapurni

    2015-01-01

    The Korsakoff syndrome is defined as "an abnormal mental state in which memory and learning are affected out of all proportion to other cognitive functions in an otherwise alert and responsive patient." Confabulation refers to false or erroneous memories arising, not deliberately, in the context of a neurological amnesia and is often thought of as pathognomonic of the Korsakoff syndrome. Although the exact pathophysiology is unknown, various studies have identified brain lesions in the thalami, mammillary bodies, and frontal cortex. We report a case of a 68-year-old male presenting with acute altered mental status on July 16, 2015. The neuropsychological dysfunctions included prominent Korsakoff's syndrome, which became apparent when the altered mental status resolved. Amnesia was accompanied by prominent confabulation, disorientation, and lack of insight into his own disability. Neuroradiological data indicated that the intralaminar and dorsomedial nuclei in bilateral thalami were infarcted by occlusion of the artery of Percheron. We believe that ours is one of few reported cases of Korsakoff syndrome in a patient with infarction involving the territory of the artery of Percheron. We conclude that bilateral thalamic lesions could cause Korsakoff's syndrome and the intralaminar and dorsomedial nuclei might be important structures in the pathogenesis of confabulation. PMID:26688763

  20. Artery of Percheron Infarction as an Unusual Cause of Korsakoff’s Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yongxing Zhou

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The Korsakoff syndrome is defined as “an abnormal mental state in which memory and learning are affected out of all proportion to other cognitive functions in an otherwise alert and responsive patient.” Confabulation refers to false or erroneous memories arising, not deliberately, in the context of a neurological amnesia and is often thought of as pathognomonic of the Korsakoff syndrome. Although the exact pathophysiology is unknown, various studies have identified brain lesions in the thalami, mammillary bodies, and frontal cortex. We report a case of a 68-year-old male presenting with acute altered mental status on July 16, 2015. The neuropsychological dysfunctions included prominent Korsakoff’s syndrome, which became apparent when the altered mental status resolved. Amnesia was accompanied by prominent confabulation, disorientation, and lack of insight into his own disability. Neuroradiological data indicated that the intralaminar and dorsomedial nuclei in bilateral thalami were infarcted by occlusion of the artery of Percheron. We believe that ours is one of few reported cases of Korsakoff syndrome in a patient with infarction involving the territory of the artery of Percheron. We conclude that bilateral thalamic lesions could cause Korsakoff’s syndrome and the intralaminar and dorsomedial nuclei might be important structures in the pathogenesis of confabulation.

  1. Inflammatory cause of metabolic syndrome via brain stress and NF-κB.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Dongsheng; Liu, Tiewen

    2012-02-01

    Metabolic syndrome, a network of medical disorders that greatly increase the risk for developing metabolic and cardiovascular diseases, has reached epidemic levels in many areas of today's world. Despite this alarming medicare situation, scientific understandings on the root mechanisms of metabolic syndrome are still limited, and such insufficient knowledge contributes to the relative lack of effective treatments or preventions for related diseases. Recent interdisciplinary studies from neuroendocrinology and neuroimmunology fields have revealed that overnutrition can trigger intracellular stresses to cause inflammatory changes mediated by molecules that control innate immunity. This type of nutrition-related molecular inflammation in the central nervous system, particularly in the hypothalamus, can form a common pathogenic basis for the induction of various metabolic syndrome components such as obesity, insulin resistance, and hypertension. Proinflammatory NF-κB pathway has been revealed as a key molecular system for pathologic induction of brain inflammation, which translates overnutrition and resulting intracellular stresses into central neuroendocrine and neural dysregulations of energy, glucose, and cardiovascular homeostasis, collectively leading to metabolic syndrome. This article reviews recent research advances in the neural mechanisms of metabolic syndrome and related diseases from the perspective of pathogenic induction by intracellular stresses and NF-κB pathway of the brain. PMID:22328600

  2. Refeeding syndrome as an unusual cause of anion gap metabolic acidosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singla, Manish; Perry, Alexandra; Lavery, Eric

    2012-11-01

    Refeeding syndrome is characterized by hypophosphatemia in the setting of malnutrition. It is commonly seen in patients with anorexia, alcoholism, or malignancy, and it is often a missed diagnosis. Because of the potential morbidity associated with missing the diagnosis of refeeding syndrome, it is important to monitor for this disease in any malnourished patient. We present a case of a 49-year-old male with chronic alcohol abuse who presented for alcohol detoxification and was found to have low phosphate, potassium, and magnesium on presentation, in addition to an elevated anion gap of unclear etiology. After extensive workup to evaluate the cause of his elevated anion gap and worsening of his electrolyte abnormalities despite replenishment, it was felt his symptoms were a result of refeeding syndrome. After oral intake was held and aggressive electrolyte replenishment was performed for 24 hours, the patient's anion gap closed and his electrolyte levels stabilized. This case demonstrates a unique presentation of refeeding syndrome given the patient's profound metabolic acidosis that provided a clue toward his eventual diagnosis. The standard workup for an anion gap metabolic acidosis was negative, and it was not until his refeeding syndrome had been treated that the anion gap closed.

  3. MKS1 mutations cause Joubert syndrome with agenesis of the corpus callosum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bader, Ingrid; Decker, E; Mayr, J A; Lunzer, V; Koch, J; Boltshauser, E; Sperl, W; Pietsch, P; Ertl-Wagner, B; Bolz, H; Bergmann, C; Rittinger, O

    2016-08-01

    Joubert syndrome (JS) is a clinically and genetically heterogeneous ciliopathy characterized by episodic hyperpnea and apnea, hypotonia, ataxia, cognitive impairment and ocular motor apraxia. The "molar tooth sign" is pathognomonic of this condition. Mutations in the MKS1 gene are a major cause of Meckel-Gruber syndrome (MKS), the most common form of syndromic neural tube defects, frequently resulting in perinatal lethality. We present the phenotype and genotype of a child with severe JS and agenesis of the corpus callosum (ACC). In our patient, a next generation sequencing (NGS) approach revealed the following two variants of the MKS1 gene: first, a novel missense variant [ c.240G > T (p.Trp80Cys)], which affects a residue that is evolutionarily highly conserved in mammals and ciliates; second, a 29 bp deletion in intron 15 [c.1408-35_1408-7del29], a founder mutation, which in a homozygous state constitutes the major cause of MKS in Finland. We review the MKS1-variants in all of the eleven JS patients reported to date and compare these patients to our case. To our knowledge, this is the first patient with Joubert syndrome and agenesis of the corpus callosum where a potentially causal genotype is provided. PMID:27377014

  4. Homozygosity for a novel truncating mutation confirms TBX15 deficiency as the cause of Cousin syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dikoglu, Esra; Simsek-Kiper, Pelin Ozlem; Utine, Gulen Eda; Campos-Xavier, Belinda; Boduroglu, Koray; Bonafé, Luisa; Superti-Furga, Andrea; Unger, Sheila

    2013-12-01

    Cousin syndrome, also called pelviscapular dysplasia (OMIM 260660), is characterized by short stature, craniofacial dysmorphism, and multiple skeletal anomalies. Following its description in two sibs in 1982, no new cases have been observed until the observation of two unrelated cases in 2008 who were homozygous for frameshift mutations in TBX15. We investigated an adult individual with short stature, a complex craniofacial dysmorphism, malformed and rotated ears, short neck, elbow contractures, hypoacusis, and hypoplasia of scapula and pelvis on radiographs. We identified homozygosity for a novel nonsense mutation (c.841C>T) in TBX15 predicted to cause a premature stop (p.Arg281*) with truncation of the protein. This observation confirms that Cousin syndrome is a consistent and clinically recognizable phenotype caused by loss of function of TBX15.

  5. Severe Cenani-Lenz syndrome caused by loss of LRP4 function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kariminejad, Ariana; Stollfuß, Barbara; Li, Yun; Bögershausen, Nina; Boss, Karin; Hennekam, Raoul C M; Wollnik, Bernd

    2013-06-01

    Limb patterning and growth are complex embryonic processes in which the elaborately orchestrated interplay of diverse endocrine and paracrine factors is crucial to limb integrity. LRP4 is a lipoprotein receptor known for its regulatory effects on LRP5- and LRP6-mediated Wnt signaling, a pathway that plays a pivotal role in limb development. Recessive mutations in LRP4 have been shown to cause Cenani-Lenz syndrome, which is characterized by severe limb malformations, an unusual face, and renal abnormalities. We report on a child with severe Cenani-Lenz syndrome caused by a novel homozygous nonsense mutation in LRP4. The severity of the phenotype in a patient with absent residual LRP4 function may point to a genotype-phenotype correlation.

  6. Invasive Streptococcus pneumoniae infection causing hemolytic uremic syndrome in children: Two recent cases

    OpenAIRE

    Vanderkooi, Otto G; Kellner, James D; Wade, Andrew W.; Jadavji, Tajdin; Midgley, Julian P; Louie, Thomas; Tyrrell, Gregory J.

    2003-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Streptococcus pneumoniae is an uncommon cause of hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS) with a unique pathophysiology that differs from Shiga toxin-related HUS.METHODS: Case descriptions for each patient are provided. Each strain of S pneumoniae was subjected to a pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) analysis, Shiga toxin assay and polymerase chain reaction to detect Shiga toxin genes. A review of the current literature was conducted.CASE PRESENTATIONS: Two patients with S pneumonia...

  7. Exploration of biological causes of psychological problems in polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS)

    OpenAIRE

    Barry, J. A.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) affects up to 10% of women, and is characterised by elevated testosterone (T) levels. Women with PCOS have higher scores than healthy women on a range of measures of psychological problems. Objective: To test the hypotheses that: 1/ The female fetus in a PCOS pregnancy experiences elevated T levels; 2/ T causes mood disturbance in women with PCOS. 3/ women with PCOS show more signs of mood disturbance typical of symptoms of reactive hypoglycae...

  8. Unilateral acquired Brown′s syndrome in systemic scleroderma: An unusual cause for diplopia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neelam Pawar

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Brown′s syndrome can be congenital or acquired with multiple causes. It has been described as a ocular complication in various rheumatic and nonrheumatic diseases. We describe a case of 27-year-old female patient with 5 years old history of systemic scleroderma who developed vertical diplopia, a left head tilt, and restriction of left eye on elevation in adduction. The patient responded to systemic steroids with resolution of diplopia.

  9. Spontaneous coronary artery dissection causing acute coronary syndrome in a young patient without risk factors

    OpenAIRE

    Chevli, Parag; Kelash, Fnu; Gadhvi, Pragnesh; Grandhi, Sreeram; Syed, Amer

    2014-01-01

    Spontaneous coronary artery dissection (SCAD) is a rare cause of acute myocardial infarction that is more common in younger patients (under age 50) and in women. Although the etiology is not known, some predisposing conditions to SCAD are well known and include Marfan syndrome, pregnancy and peripartum state, drug abuse, and some anatomical abnormalities of the coronary arteries such as aneurysms and severe kinking. We describe a case of SCAD in a young woman who presented with sudden onset o...

  10. Gouty wrist arthritis causing carpal tunnel syndrome--a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sikkandar, M F; Sapuan, J; Singh, R; Abdullah, S

    2012-06-01

    A 63 year old male with a history of gout and hypertension presented with carpal tunnel syndrome. He gave history of bilateral wrist pain associated with numbness over the median nerve distribution of the hand. Tinels sign and Phalens test were positive with no obvious thenar muscle wasting on examination. Tophaceous deposits in the flexor tendons and within the synovium of the wrist joint was seen during surgery and this established gout as the cause of median nerve entrapment in this patient.

  11. Reduced exercise capacity in persons with Down syndrome: cause, effect, and management

    OpenAIRE

    Mendonca, Goncalo

    2010-01-01

    Goncalo V Mendonca1, Fernando D Pereira1, Bo Fernhall21Center of Human Performance (CIPER), Faculty of Human Kinetics, Technical University of Lisbon, Lisbon, Portugal; 2Kinesiology and Community Health, University of Illinois at Urbana Champaign, Champaign, IL, USAAbstract: Persons with Down syndrome (DS) have reduced peak and submaximal exercise capacity. Because ambulation is one predictor of survival among adults with DS, a review of the current knowledge of the causes, effects, and manag...

  12. Superior cerebellar aneurysm causing subarachnoid haemorrhage in a 17-year-old with alagille syndrome.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Connell, David

    2012-04-01

    Alagille syndrome is a rare autosomal dominant condition characterised by mutation in Jagged1 gene. Intracranial aneurysms may be seen in this condition and may present as subarachnoid hemorrhage. We describe the first case of superior cerebellar aneurysm rupture causing WFNS grade 1 subarachnoid haemorrhage in a 17-year-old girl. The clinical condition and management of this rare occurrence is discussed with a review of literature.

  13. Bouveret's syndrome as an unusual cause of gastric outlet obstruction: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joshi Deepak

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract An 83 year old caucasian gentleman presented with vomiting and left sided abdominal pain. A subsequent upper GI endoscopy demonstrated a large smooth mass impacted within the duodenum. A cholecysto-duodenal fistula was discovered at laparotomy, with a large gallstone impacted in the duodenum. A diagnosis of Bouveret's syndrome was made. The management of this rare cause of gastric outlet obstruction is discussed.

  14. Ectrodactyly-ectodermal dysplasia-cleft syndrome (EEC syndrome) with a developmental delay caused by R304W mutation in the tp63 gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gawrych, Elzbieta; Bińczak-Kuleta, Agnieszka; Janiszewska-Olszowska, Joanna; Ciechanowicz, Andrzej

    2013-01-01

    Ectrodactyly-ectodermal dysplasia-cleft syndrome (EEC) results from a simultaneous developmental abnor-caused by mutations of the tp63 gene. Five mutations: 204, 227, 279, 280, and 304 account for most cases of this syndrome. A case with R304W mutation, characterized by the presence of all major (ectrodactyly, ectodermal dysplasia, cleft lip and palate) and two minor (lacrimal duct obstruction, developmental delay) clinical symptoms of the syndrome is presented. This severe case improves the existing knowledge concerning the genotype-phenotype correlations in EEC syndrome. PMID:24734328

  15. SEVERE MALARIA CAUSED BY PLASMODIUM VIVAX IN PREGNANCY MASQUERADING AS HELLP SYNDROME

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monika

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The following is a case report of a woman who presented to the hospital with severe anemia with features of HELLP syndrome and initial slide for P .vivax negative but on constan t observation and monitoring turned out to be a case of severe malaria caused by vivax species of malaria. Primigravida with 35week5day pregnancy was admitted with complaints of severe anemia and history of fever 14 days back. Init i ally 3 pint blood was transfused i/v/o severe anemia . Investigations revealed Hb - 3gm% and platelet count 30 , 000 , LFT deranged , Hemolysis in peripheral smear , smear negative for malarial parasite. HELLP syndrome was in mind and this required termination but on repeat investigations and smear vivax was positive . Her platelet count kept deteriorating despite t ransfusions till antimalarial regimen was not started. Once smear positive the fastest antimalarial artesunate regimen with clindamycin was started and after 48 hrs. her counts improved. Overall 14 pints of platelets were transfused and patient delivered u neventfully with mild PPH at platelet count of 30 , 000. Severe malaria is usually caused by p falciparum but recently reports of severe malaria caused by vivax is increasing and HELLP syndrome is an important differential diagnosis which needs to be exclud ed as management is entirely different.

  16. Discovery of a Genetic Metabolic Cause for Mauriac Syndrome in Type 1 Diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacDonald, Michael J; Hasan, Noaman M; Ansari, Israr-Ul H; Longacre, Melissa J; Kendrick, Mindy A; Stoker, Scott W

    2016-07-01

    A mechanistic cause for Mauriac syndrome, a syndrome of growth failure and delayed puberty associated with massive liver enlargement from glycogen deposition in children with poorly controlled type 1 diabetes, is unknown. We discovered a mutation in the catalytic subunit of liver glycogen phosphorylase kinase in a patient with Mauriac syndrome whose liver extended into his pelvis. Glycogen phosphorylase kinase activates glycogen phosphorylase, the enzyme that catalyzes the first step in glycogen breakdown. We show that the mutant subunit acts in a dominant manner to completely inhibit glycogen phosphorylase kinase enzyme activity and that this interferes with glycogenolysis causing increased levels of glycogen in human liver cells. It is known that even normal blood glucose levels physiologically inhibit glycogen phosphorylase to diminish glucose release from the liver when glycogenolysis is not needed. The patient's mother possessed the same mutant glycogen phosphorylase kinase subunit, but did not have diabetes or hepatomegaly. His father had childhood type 1 diabetes in poor glycemic control, but lacked the mutation and had neither hepatomegaly nor growth failure. This case proves that the effect of a mutant enzyme of glycogen metabolism can combine with hyperglycemia to directly hyperinhibit glycogen phosphorylase, in turn blocking glycogenolysis causing the massive liver in Mauriac disease. PMID:27207549

  17. An ignored cause of chronic kidney disease in children: type 2 cardiorenal syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Engin Melek; Sercan Aynaci; Bahriye Atmis; Sevcan Erdem; Nazan Ozbarlas; Aysun Karabay Bayazit

    2016-01-01

    Cardiorenal syndrome is a disorder of the heart and kidneys in which acute or chronic dysfunction in one organ may induce acute or chronic dysfunction in the other organ. It is well known that the main cause of mortality among patients with end-stage renal disease is due to cardiovascular events and a common complication in patients in acute heart failure is a decrease in renal function. However, when there are no signs and/or symptoms of chronic cardiovascular disease, cardiovascular causes ...

  18. A RARE CAUSE OF SEIZURES WITH MENTAL RETARDATION AND HEMIPARESIS-DYKE-DAVIDOFF-MASSON SYNDROME

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vipin Kumar

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Cerebral hemi-atrophy with seizures, hemiplegia and mental retardation is uncommon clinical presentation in the early childhood and adolescence. The causes are various and usually grouped into congenital and acquired types. The Dyke-Davidoff-Masson Syndrome is one of the causes of these clinical manifestations, which is usually developed secondary to brain insult. Here we report two cases with similar symptoms- one case was an adult male of 35 years with long history of seizures and the second case was a young male of 22 years with cognitive impairment, difficulty in speech and walking

  19. Stickler syndrome caused by COL2A1 mutations: genotype-phenotype correlation in a series of 100 patients

    OpenAIRE

    Mortier, Geert; Hoornaert, Kristien P; Vereecke, Inge; Dewinter, Chantal; Rosenberg, Thomas; Beemer, Frits A; Leroy, Jules G; Bendix, Laila; Björck, Erik; Bonduelle, Dr.; Boute, Odile; Cormier-Daire, Valérie; De Die-Smulders, Christine E.M.; Dieux-Coeslier, Anne; Dollfus, Hélène

    2010-01-01

    Stickler syndrome is an autosomal dominant connective tissue disorder caused by mutations in different collagen genes. The aim of our study was to define more precisely the phenotype and genotype of Stickler syndrome type 1 by investigating a large series of patients with a heterozygous mutation in COL2A1. In 188 probands with the clinical diagnosis of Stickler syndrome, the COL2A1 gene was analyzed by either a mutation scanning technique or bidirectional fluorescent DNA sequencing. The effec...

  20. Two cases of uveitis masquerade syndrome caused by bilateral intraocular large B-cell lymphoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jovanović Svetlana

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Sometimes it is not easy to clinically recognize subtle differences between intraocular lymphoma and noninfectious uveitis. The most common lymphoma subtype involving the eye is B-cell lymphoma. Case report. We presented two patients aged 59 and 58 years with infiltration of the subretinal space with a large B-cell non-Hodgkin intraocular lymphoma. The patients originally had clinically masked syndrome in the form of intermediate uveitis. As it was a corticosteroid-resistant uveitis, we focused on the possible diagnosis of neoplastic causes of this syndrome. During hospitalization, the neurological symptoms emerged and multiple subretinal changes accompanied by yellowish white patches of retinal pigment epithelium with signs of vitritis, which made us suspect the intraocular lymphoma. Endocranial magnetic resonance imaging established tumorous infiltration in the region of the left hemisphere of the cerebellum. The histopathological finding confirmed the diagnosis of large B-cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma of risk moderate degree, immunoblast - centroblast cytological type. The other patient had clinical chronic uveitis accompanied by yellowish shaped white echographic changes of the retina and localized changes in the level of the subretina. The diagnosis of lymphoma was made by brain biopsy. Conclusion. Uveitis masquerade syndrome should be considered in all patients over 40 years with idiopathic steroid-resistant uveitis. Treatment begun on time can affect the course and improve the prognosis of uveitis masquerade syndrome (UMS and systemic disease.

  1. A rare cause of Cauda equina syndrome: Epidural high grade primary non-Hodgkin lymphoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ambarish A Mathesul

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Cauda equina syndrome (CES may be caused by herniated disc, tumor, trauma, and spinal infections. However, CES due to epidural high-grade non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL is very rare. Up to our knowledge, few cases have been reported in the literature. We report a case of epidural high-grade NHL presenting as CES. A 55-year-old man presented with CES caused by extradural compression by primary NHL. The patient underwent an L4-L5 laminectomy. The operative findings were suggestive of well-demarcated epidural tumor. The final histopathological diagnosis revealed epidural high-grade NHL. NHL causing CES is rare. This report highlights the importance of keeping afresh the various causes of CES for prompt diagnosis and management.

  2. Uncommon causes of anterior knee pain: a case report of infrapatellar contracture syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellen, M I; Jackson, H B; DiBiase, S J

    1999-01-01

    The uncommon causes of anterior knee pain should always be considered in the differential diagnosis of a painful knee when treatment of common origins become ineffective. A case is presented in which the revised diagnosis of infrapatellar contracture syndrome was made after noting delayed progress in the rehabilitation of an active female patient with a presumed anterior horn medial meniscus tear and a contracted patellar tendon. The patient improved after the treatment program was augmented with closed manipulation under arthroscopy and infrapatellar injection of both corticosteroids and a local anesthetic. Infrapatellar contraction syndrome and other uncommon sources of anterior knee pain, including arthrofibrosis, Hoffa's syndrome, tibial collateral ligament bursitis, saphenous nerve palsy, isolated ganglions of the anterior cruciate ligament, slipped capital femoral epiphysis, and knee tumors, are subsequently discussed. Delayed functional advancement in a rehabilitation program requires full reassessment of the patient's diagnosis and treatment plan. Alternative diagnoses of knee pain are not always of common origins. Ample knowledge of uncommon causes of anterior knee pain is necessary to form a full differential diagnosis in patients with challenging presentations. PMID:10418845

  3. Trousseau's Syndrome Caused by Intrahepatic Cholangiocarcinoma: An Autopsy Case Report and Literature Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takashi Yuri

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available An autopsy case report of Trousseau's syndrome caused by intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma is presented, and seven previously reported cases are reviewed. A 73-year-old woman experiencing light-headedness and dementia of unknown cause for 6 months developed severe hypotonia. A hypointense lesion compatible with acute cerebral infarction was detected by magnetic resonance imaging. Abdominal computed tomography revealed an ill-defined large liver mass in the right lobe. The mass was not further investigated because of the patient's poor condition. She died of multiple organ failure, and an autopsy was conducted. Postmortem examination revealed intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma, fibrous vegetations on the mitral valves and multiple thromboemboli in the cerebrum, spleen and rectum. Trousseau's syndrome is defined as an idiopathic thromboembolism in patients with undiagnosed or concomitantly diagnosed malignancy. This syndrome is encountered frequently in patients with mucin-producing carcinomas, while the incidence in patients with intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma is uncommon. We found that tissue factor and mucin tumor marker (CA19-9, CA15-3 and CA-125 expression in cancer cells may be involved in the pathogenesis of thromboembolism. A patient with unexplained thromboembolism may have occult visceral malignancy; thus, mucin tumor markers may indicate the origin of a mucin-producing carcinoma, and postmortem examination may play an important role in revealing the hidden malignancy.

  4. Do Not Forget Nephrotic Syndrome as a Cause of Increased Requirement of Levothyroxine Replacement Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benvenga, Salvatore; Vita, Roberto; Di Bari, Flavia; Fallahi, Poupak; Antonelli, Alessandro

    2015-06-01

    Nephrotic syndrome increases L-thyroxine requirements because of urinary loss of free and protein-bound thyroid hormones. We report 2 hypothyroid patients referred to us because of high serum TSH, even though the L-thyroxine daily dose was maintained at appropriate levels or was increased. The cause of nephrotic syndrome was multiple myeloma in one patient and diabetic glomerulosclerosis in the other patient. As part of the periodic controls for diabetes, urinalysis was requested only in the second patient so that proteinuria could be detected. However, as in the first patient, facial puffiness and body weight increase were initially attributed to hypothyroidism, which was poorly compensated by L-thyroxine therapy. In the first patient, the pitting nature of the pedal edema was missed at the initial examination. An endocrinologist consulted over the phone by the practitioner hypothesized some causes of intestinal malabsorption of L-thyroxine. This diagnosis would have been accepted had the patient continued taking a known sequestrant of L-thyroxine, i.e. calcium carbonate. The diagnostic workup of patients with increasing requirements of L-thyroxine replacement therapy should not be concentrated on the digestive system alone. Careful history taking and physical examination need to be thorough. Endocrinologists should not forget nephrotic syndrome that, in turn, can be secondary to serious diseases.

  5. [Retention of urine caused by fecaloma in the course of a Guillain-Barre syndrome (author's transl)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicolle, M H; Hugues, F C; Leche, J

    Sphincteral disorders are very rarely seen in a Guillain-Barre syndrome. The authors report a case of such a syndrome in a woman, in the course of which a retention of urine appeared making diagnosis more difficult. The cause actually was mechanical.

  6. Novel mutations in EVC cause aberrant splicing in Ellis-van Creveld syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Lisong; Luo, Chunyan; Ahmed, Mairaj K; Attaie, Ali B; Ye, Xiaoqian

    2016-04-01

    Ellis-van Creveld syndrome (EvC) is a rare autosomal recessive disorder characterized by disproportionate chondrodysplasia, postaxial polydactyly, nail dystrophy, dental abnormalities and in a proportion of patients, congenital cardiac malformations. Weyers acrofacial dysostosis (Weyers) is another dominantly inherited disorder allelic to EvC syndrome but with milder phenotypes. Both disorders can result from loss-of-function mutations in either EVC or EVC2 gene, and phenotypes associated with the two gene mutations are clinically indistinguishable. We present here a clinical and molecular analysis of a Chinese family manifested specific features of EvC syndrome. Sequencing of both EVC and EVC2 identified two novel heterozygous splice site mutations c.384+5G>C in intron 3 and c.1465-1G>A in intron 10 in EVC, which were inherited from mother and father, respectively. In vitro minigene expression assay, RT-PCR and sequencing analysis demonstrated that c.384+5G>C mutation abolished normal splice site and created a new cryptic acceptor site within exon 4, whereas c.1465-1G>A mutation affected consensus splice junction site and resulted in full exon 11 skipping. These two aberrant pre-mRNA splicing processes both produced in-frame abnormal transcripts that possibly led to abolishment of important functional domains. To our knowledge, this is the first report of EVC mutations that cause EvC syndrome in Chinese population. Our data revealed that EVC splice site mutations altered splicing pattern and helped elucidate the pathogenesis of EvC syndrome.

  7. Waardenburg syndrome type 4: report of two new cases caused by SOX10 mutations in Spain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández, Raquel M; Núñez-Ramos, Raquel; Enguix-Riego, M Valle; Román-Rodríguez, Francisco José; Galán-Gómez, Enrique; Blesa-Sánchez, Emilio; Antiñolo, Guillermo; Núñez-Núñez, Ramón; Borrego, Salud

    2014-02-01

    Shah-Waardenburg syndrome or Waardenburg syndrome type 4 (WS4) is a neurocristopathy characterized by the association of deafness, depigmentation and Hirschsprung disease. Three disease-causing genes have been identified so far for WS4: EDNRB, EDN3, and SOX10. SOX10 mutations, found in 45-55% of WS4 patients, are inherited in autosomal dominant way. In addition, mutations in SOX10 are also responsible for an extended syndrome involving peripheral and central neurological phenotypes, referred to as PCWH (peripheral demyelinating neuropathy, central dysmyelinating leucodystrophy, Waardenburg syndrome, Hirschsprung disease). Such mutations are mostly private, and a high intra- and inter-familial variability exists. In this report, we present a patient with WS4 and a second with PCWH due to SOX10 mutations supporting again the genetic and phenotypic heterogeneity of these syndromes. Interestingly, the WS4 family carries an insertion of 19 nucleotides in exon 5 of SOX10, which results in distinct phenotypes along three different generations: hypopigmentation in the maternal grandmother, hearing loss in the mother, and WS4 in the proband. Since mosaicism cannot explain the three different related-WS features observed in this family, we propose as the most plausible explanation the existence of additional molecular events, acting in an additive or multiplicative fashion, in genes or regulatory regions unidentified so far. On the other hand, the PCWH case was due to a de novo deletion in exon 5 of the gene. Efforts should be devoted to unravel the mechanisms underlying the intrafamilial phenotypic variability observed in the families affected, and to identify new genes responsible for the still unsolved WS4 cases. PMID:24311220

  8. Spontaneous coronary artery dissection causing acute coronary syndrome in a young patient without risk factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parag Chevli

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Spontaneous coronary artery dissection (SCAD is a rare cause of acute myocardial infarction that is more common in younger patients (under age 50 and in women. Although the etiology is not known, some predisposing conditions to SCAD are well known and include Marfan syndrome, pregnancy and peripartum state, drug abuse, and some anatomical abnormalities of the coronary arteries such as aneurysms and severe kinking. We describe a case of SCAD in a young woman who presented with sudden onset of chest pain and was admitted for the treatment of acute coronary syndrome. The coronary angiography showed dissection of the left anterior descending artery. The patient underwent successful percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty and stent placement.

  9. Causes, consequences, and therapy of the Radiophobia syndrome; Ursachen, Folgen und Therapie des Radiophobie-Syndroms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Becker, K.

    2004-03-01

    The final storage of high-level radioactive waste, which is said to be still open while, in fact, it was solved technically a long time ago and is only being blocked for political reasons, as well as alleged technical risks of German nuclear power plants which have never been demonstrated or proven, are listed again and again as grounds for opting out of the use of nuclear power. There is hardly any doubt that one of the main causes underlying also these arguments, and thus the main reason for the insufficient public acceptance of nuclear power in Germany at the present time as a safe, inexpensive, and non-polluting source of primary energy, is the widespread fear of radiation (radiophobia). Consequently, solutions proposed for successfully managing this radiophobia must be examined. Continued scientific studies of the subject do not seem to be promising, as funds are available at present only for continuing the search for negative biological effects. Important preconditions for a change in attitude are the appropriate initiatives to be taken by the relatively small number of sufficiently independent experts of proven scientific repute. Initiatives of this kind can now be observed in numerous countries and regions in the world. It must be pointed out in this connection, as is underlined again and again by experienced experts, that risk acceptance is not a matter of factual arguments, but of emotions. Psychological and pedagogic sensitivity certainly are important elements in changing public opinion in the interest of a more realistic assessment of the radiation risk and the acceptance of nuclear power. (orig.) [German] Die angeblich noch offene, tatsaechlich aber laengst technisch geloeste und nur politisch blockierte Frage der Endlagerung hochradioaktiver Abfaelle, ebenso wie vorgebliche, tatsaechlich aber nie nachgewiesene technische Risiken der deutschen Kernkraftwerke werden immer wieder als Ausstiegsgruende fuer die Kernenergie genannt. Es bestehen kaum

  10. [Simultaneous operation of WPW syndrome combined with mitral regurgitation caused by infective endocarditis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sueda, T; Nakashima, Y; Hamanaka, Y; Ishihara, H; Matsuura, Y; Isobe, F

    1990-03-01

    A case of WPW syndrome combined with mitral regurgitation caused by infective endocarditis underwent surgical division of accessory pathway and mitral valve replacement preserving posterior leaflet simultaneously. A 56-years old woman suffered atrial fibrillation with pseudo VT and cardiac failure caused by mitral regurgitation. Electro-physiological study (EPS) revealed accessory pathway in postero-lateral wall in left atrium and atrio-fascicular pathway like James bundle in AV node. ECHO cardiography showed mitral valve prolapse and severe regurgitation. Accessory pathway was divided surgically and deep freeze coagulation was followed. Perforation of anterior leaflet and chordal rupture of posterior leaflet caused by infective endocarditis were repaired by annuloplasty (Kay and McGoon method) at first, but regurgitation retained moderately. After re-clamping of aorta, mitral valve was replaced with prosthesis (SJM 29 mm) preserving posterior leaflet. Postoperative examination revealed division of accessory pathway and no regurgitation of mitral prosthesis. PMID:2348136

  11. Mutations in STX1B, encoding a presynaptic protein, cause fever-associated epilepsy syndromes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schubert, J.; Siekierska, A.; Langlois, M.;

    2014-01-01

    Febrile seizures affect 2-4% of all children(1) and have a strong genetic component(2). Recurrent mutations in three main genes (SCN1A, SCN1B and GABRG2)(3-5) have been identified that cause febrile seizures with or without epilepsy. Here we report the identification of mutations in STX1B, encoding....... Wild-type human syntaxin-1B but not a mutated protein rescued the effects of stx1b knockdown in zebrafish. Our results thus implicate STX1B and the presynaptic release machinery in fever-associated epilepsy syndromes....

  12. De novo mutations in PLXND1 and REV3L cause Möbius syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Kayserili Karabey, Hülya; Tomas-Roca, Laura; Tsaalbi-Shtylik, Anastasia; Jansen, Jacob G.; Singh, Manvendra K.; Epstein, Jonathan A.; Altunoglu, Umut; Verzijl, Harriette; Soria, Laura; van Beusekom, Ellen; Roscioli, Tony; Iqbal, Zafar; Gilissen, Christian; Hoischen, Alexander; de Brouwer,Arjan P. M.; Erasmus, Corrie; Schubert, Dirk; Brunner, Han; Aytes, Antonio Perez; Marin, Faustino; Aroca, Pilar; Carta, Arturo; de Wind, Niels; Padberg, George W.; van Bokhoven, Hans

    2015-01-01

    ARTICLE Received 15 Nov 2014 | Accepted 17 Apr 2015 | Published 12 Jun 2015 De novo mutations in PLXND1 and REV3L cause Mo¨bius syndrome Laura Tomas-Roca1,2, Anastasia Tsaalbi-Shtylik3, Jacob G. Jansen3, Manvendra K. Singh4,5, Jonathan A. Epstein4, Umut Altunoglu6, Harriette Verzijl7, Laura Soria1, Ellen van Beusekom1, Tony Roscioli1,8, Zafar Iqbal1, Christian Gilissen1, Alexander Hoischen9, Arjan P.M. de Brouwer1, Corrie Erasmus7, Dirk Schubert10, Han Brunner1,11, Antoni...

  13. Intrauterine device infection causing concomitant streptococcal toxic shock syndrome and pelvic abscess with Actinomyces odontolyticus bacteraemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Carolyn M Yu; Noska, Amanda

    2016-01-01

    Intrauterine devices (IUDs) are rarely associated with serious infections. We report an unusual concomitant infection of group A Streptococcus (GAS) causing toxic shock syndrome and pelvic abscess with Actinomyces odontolyticus associated with an IUD in a healthy 50-year-old patient. The IUD was subsequently removed and the patient recovered on the appropriate antibiotics. This case highlights the importance of clinicians' high index of suspicion of an IUD infection and prompt removal of the infected foreign body to obtain source control. PMID:26965406

  14. SEVERE MALARIA CAUSED BY PLASMODIUM VIVAX IN PREGNANCY MASQUERADING AS HELLP SYNDROME

    OpenAIRE

    Monika; Premila; Geetika; Pranjal

    2014-01-01

    The following is a case report of a woman who presented to the hospital with severe anemia with features of HELLP syndrome and initial slide for P .vivax negative but on constan t observation and monitoring turned out to be a case of severe malaria caused by vivax species of malaria. Primigravida with 35week5day pregnancy was admitted with complaints of severe anemia and history of fever 14 days back. Init i ally 3 pint blood was transfused i/v/o s...

  15. [Stevens-Johnson syndrome plus intrahepatic cholestasis caused by clindamycin or chlorpheniramine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahagún Flores, J E; Soto Ortiz, J A; Tovar Méndez, C E; Cárdenas Ochoa, E C; Hernández Flores, G

    2009-05-15

    A 48-year-old woman was hospitalized with the diagnosis of hepatitis. She presented with symptoms of jaundice, headache, elevated bilirubin, and elevated hepatic enzymes. She related a recent episode of a bronchial infection that was treated during the previous eight days with paracetamol (500mg, 2 doses only), chlorpheniramine, betamethasone and clindamycin. After an initial clinical and laboratorial improvement, she began to complain of pruritus of the palms and soles. Thereafter, vesicles evolving to blisters developed and a deterioration of her general health ensued. Serologies for hepatitis A, B, and C viruses were negative. Intrahepatic cholestasis and Stevens Johnson Syndrome (SJS) were the final diagnosis. The association of the Stevens Johnson Syndrome and intrahepatic cholestasis simultaneously, related to adverse drug reactions, is very rare. The drugs reportedly involved are mainly antibiotics, such as ampicillin, vancomycin, amoxicillin/clavulinic acid and erythromycin. Other drugs involved are non-steroidal anti-inflamatory drugs, such as mefenamic acid, ibuprofen, and sulindac. The reactions can be minor or severe and can even cause death, an outcome that has been reported in patients of all races and ethnic groups, but appears to be more rare in patients of Latin origin. We present a discussion of this case and review the main characteristics of the Stevens Johnson Syndrome.

  16. Poland's syndrome and head-and-neck tumour: an unusual association causing a reconstruction dilemma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerlinger, Imre; Járai, Tamás; Lujber, László; Pytel, József

    2007-05-01

    Poland's syndrome is a rare congenital anomaly characterized by unilateral chest wall hypoplasia and ipsilateral hand abnormalities. The literature data suggest its sporadic nature. The prevailing theory concerning its cause is hypoplasia of the subclavian artery or its branches, which may lead to a range of developmental changes. Relationships have been demonstrated between tumours and Poland's syndrome and also between tumours and other developmental defects. The explanation may lie in abnormal homeobox and tumour suppressor genes. This paper presents the first literature report of a malignant tonsillo-lingual tumour with metastatic neck involvement in a patient with partial Poland's sequence. In consequence of the aplasia of the pectoralis major muscle, an alternative (a free radical forearm flap) to the routine head-and-neck reconstruction (pedicled pectoralis major flap) was necessitated following tumour excision and radical neck dissection. This case report surveys the diagnostic and therapeutic considerations when previously unnoticed Poland's syndrome is diagnosed in a patient with head-and-neck cancer. One year following major head-and-neck surgery, our patient is tumour-free.

  17. Molecular Diagnosis of Hemorrhagic Fever with Renal Syndrome Caused by Puumala Virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lagerqvist, Nina; Hagström, Åsa; Lundahl, Malin; Nilsson, Elin; Juremalm, Mikael; Larsson, Inger; Alm, Erik; Bucht, Göran; Ahlm, Clas; Klingström, Jonas

    2016-05-01

    Rodent-borne hantaviruses cause two severe acute diseases: hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome (HFRS) in Eurasia, and hantavirus pulmonary syndrome (HPS; also called hantavirus cardiopulmonary syndrome [HCPS]) in the Americas. Puumala virus (PUUV) is the most common causative agent of HFRS in Europe. Current routine diagnostic methods are based on serological analyses and can yield inconclusive results. Hantavirus-infected patients are viremic during the early phase of disease; therefore, detection of viral RNA genomes can be a valuable complement to existing serological methods. However, the high genomic sequence diversity of PUUV has hampered the development of molecular diagnostics, and currently no real-time reverse transcription-quantitative (RT)-PCR assay is available for routine diagnosis of HFRS. Here, we present a novel PUUV RT-PCR assay. The assay was validated for routine diagnosis of HFRS on samples collected in Sweden during the winter season from 2013 to 2014. The assay allowed detection of PUUV RNA in 98.7% of confirmed clinical HFRS samples collected within 8 days after symptomatic onset. In summary, this study shows that real-time RT-PCR can be a reliable alternative to serological tests during the early phase of HFRS. PMID:26962084

  18. Clinical study of lateral patellofemoral crush syndrome caused by military training

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    De-hui ZHANG

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Objective  To explore diagnostic method and surgical outcome of lateral patellofemoral crush syndrome caused by military training. Methods  Fifteen patients with lateral patellofemoral crush syndrome caused by military training from May 2006 to May 2008 were enrolled in this study, including 12 men (14 knees and 3 women (3 knees, aged from 22 to 43 years old with an average of 27.3 years. Randomly selected 18 healthy volunteers with similar age and gender but no knee pain symptom were selected to serve as a control group. Anteroposterior and lateral X-ray photographs of knee joint and axial photographs of the patella were taken in both groups for observing the bone architecture of the knee joint and measuring the femoral trochlear angle, patellofemoral congruence angle and patellofemoral index, and the data were compared. The 17 knee joints in patient group were treated with lateral patellar retinaculum release. Then the preoperative and postoperative pain severity was evaluated with visual analogue scale (VAS. Results  Patellofemoral congruence angle was 7.67°± 5.81° and patellofemoral index was 2.49±1.40 in patient group, while they were -2.2°±-2.71° and 1.25±0.15 in control group. The difference between two groups showed statistical significance (P < 0.05. The change in bone architecture was obvious in patient group. The preoperative pain score was 7.06±0.85, and postoperative pain score was 3.87±0.24 after 6 months and 3.01+0.17 after 1 year in patient group. The difference between preoperative pain score and postoperative pain score showed statistical significance (P < 0.05. Conclusions  Diagnosis of patellofemoral crush syndrome caused by military training requires a combination of case history, typical symptoms, objective sign and X-ray examination. Among these, X-ray examination is the fundamental auxiliary diagnostic tool for lateral patellofemoral crush syndrome, and the patellofemoral index is convenient for

  19. KCNJ10 gene mutations causing EAST syndrome (epilepsy, ataxia, sensorineural deafness, and tubulopathy) disrupt channel function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reichold, Markus; Zdebik, Anselm A.; Lieberer, Evelyn; Rapedius, Markus; Schmidt, Katharina; Bandulik, Sascha; Sterner, Christina; Tegtmeier, Ines; Penton, David; Baukrowitz, Thomas; Hulton, Sally-Anne; Witzgall, Ralph; Ben-Zeev, Bruria; Howie, Alexander J.; Kleta, Robert; Bockenhauer, Detlef; Warth, Richard

    2010-01-01

    Mutations of the KCNJ10 (Kir4.1) K+ channel underlie autosomal recessive epilepsy, ataxia, sensorineural deafness, and (a salt-wasting) renal tubulopathy (EAST) syndrome. We investigated the localization of KCNJ10 and the homologous KCNJ16 in kidney and the functional consequences of KCNJ10 mutations found in our patients with EAST syndrome. Kcnj10 and Kcnj16 were found in the basolateral membrane of mouse distal convoluted tubules, connecting tubules, and cortical collecting ducts. In the human kidney, KCNJ10 staining was additionally observed in the basolateral membrane of the cortical thick ascending limb of Henle's loop. EM of distal tubular cells of a patient with EAST syndrome showed reduced basal infoldings in this nephron segment, which likely reflects the morphological consequences of the impaired salt reabsorption capacity. When expressed in CHO and HEK293 cells, the KCNJ10 mutations R65P, G77R, and R175Q caused a marked impairment of channel function. R199X showed complete loss of function. Single-channel analysis revealed a strongly reduced mean open time. Qualitatively similar results were obtained with coexpression of KCNJ10/KCNJ16, suggesting a dominance of KCNJ10 function in native renal KCNJ10/KCNJ16 heteromers. The decrease in the current of R65P and R175Q was mainly caused by a remarkable shift of pH sensitivity to the alkaline range. In summary, EAST mutations of KCNJ10 lead to impaired channel function and structural changes in distal convoluted tubules. Intriguingly, the metabolic alkalosis present in patients carrying the R65P mutation possibly improves residual function of KCNJ10, which shows higher activity at alkaline pH. PMID:20651251

  20. Juvenile Cerebral Infarction Caused by Bow Hunter's Syndrome during Sport: Two Case Reports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kageyama, Hiroto; Yoshimura, Shinichi; Iida, Tomoko; Shirakawa, Manabu; Uchida, Kazutaka; Tomogane, Yusuke; Miyaji, Yuki

    2016-09-15

    We report two cases of juvenile cerebral infarction caused by bow hunter's syndrome (BHS) during sport. Case 1 was a 17-year-old male who developed a partial visual field defect after playing basketball. BHS was diagnosed because cervical ultrasonography demonstrated occlusion of the vertebral artery when the neck was rotated. After C1-2 posterior fixation was performed, his symptoms resolved. Case 2 was an 18-year-old male with recurrent visual disturbance after playing handball. Cerebral infarction occurred repeatedly despite antiplatelet therapy. After 3 years, vertebral artery dissection was diagnosed and stenting was performed, but his symptoms did not resolve. BHS was diagnosed when he was examined at our department. C1-2 posterior fixation was performed and his symptoms resolved. In these two cases, BHS was caused by sporting activity. For accurate diagnosis and treatment of BHS, neuroimaging with cervical rotation is mandatory. PMID:27053329

  1. A New Potential Cause in the Development of Toxic Anterior Segment Syndrome: Fibrin Glue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Selçuk Sızmaz

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: To present a potential cause for toxic anterior segment syndrome (TASS. Materials and Methods: We report 4 cases of TASS that occurred following uneventful phacoemulsification and intraocular lens implantation. Results: The 4 cases were the first consecutive 2 cases of 2 different surgery days, 5 months apart. The most prominent sign of TASS was limbus-to-limbus corneal edema. Pain and/or intraocular pressure rise were also common. All surgical and presurgical procedures were checked after the first outbreak, whereas the second outbreak required further investigation. Fibrin glue remnants from preceding pterygium surgery with conjunctival autografting were found to be the potential cause. Despite intensive corticosteroid therapy, corneal edema did not resolve in 2 patients who underwent keratoplasty. Conclusion: TASS is a sight-threatening condition which requires thorough investigation for prevention of new cases. All steps must be carefully revised. (Turk J Ophthalmol 2014; 44: 280-3

  2. BCL11A Haploinsufficiency Causes an Intellectual Disability Syndrome and Dysregulates Transcription.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dias, Cristina; Estruch, Sara B; Graham, Sarah A; McRae, Jeremy; Sawiak, Stephen J; Hurst, Jane A; Joss, Shelagh K; Holder, Susan E; Morton, Jenny E V; Turner, Claire; Thevenon, Julien; Mellul, Kelly; Sánchez-Andrade, Gabriela; Ibarra-Soria, Ximena; Deriziotis, Pelagia; Santos, Rui F; Lee, Song-Choon; Faivre, Laurence; Kleefstra, Tjitske; Liu, Pentao; Hurles, Mathew E; Fisher, Simon E; Logan, Darren W

    2016-08-01

    Intellectual disability (ID) is a common condition with considerable genetic heterogeneity. Next-generation sequencing of large cohorts has identified an increasing number of genes implicated in ID, but their roles in neurodevelopment remain largely unexplored. Here we report an ID syndrome caused by de novo heterozygous missense, nonsense, and frameshift mutations in BCL11A, encoding a transcription factor that is a putative member of the BAF swi/snf chromatin-remodeling complex. Using a comprehensive integrated approach to ID disease modeling, involving human cellular analyses coupled to mouse behavioral, neuroanatomical, and molecular phenotyping, we provide multiple lines of functional evidence for phenotypic effects. The etiological missense variants cluster in the amino-terminal region of human BCL11A, and we demonstrate that they all disrupt its localization, dimerization, and transcriptional regulatory activity, consistent with a loss of function. We show that Bcl11a haploinsufficiency in mice causes impaired cognition, abnormal social behavior, and microcephaly in accordance with the human phenotype. Furthermore, we identify shared aberrant transcriptional profiles in the cortex and hippocampus of these mouse models. Thus, our work implicates BCL11A haploinsufficiency in neurodevelopmental disorders and defines additional targets regulated by this gene, with broad relevance for our understanding of ID and related syndromes. PMID:27453576

  3. Mexiletine differentially restores the trafficking defects caused by two brugada syndrome mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreau, Adrien; Keller, Dagmar I; Huang, Hai; Fressart, Véronique; Schmied, Christian; Timour, Quadiri; Chahine, Mohamed

    2012-01-01

    The human cardiac sodium channel Na(v)1.5 encoded by the SCN5A gene plays a critical role in cardiac excitability and the propagation of action potentials. Na(v)1.5 dysfunctions due to mutations cause cardiac diseases such as the LQT3 form of long QT syndrome, conduction disorders, and Brugada syndrome (BrS). They have also recently been associated with dilated cardiomyopathy. BrS is characterized by coved ST-segment elevation on surface ECGs and lethal ventricular arrhythmias in an apparently structurally normal heart. Na(v)1.5 mutations that cause BrS result in a loss of channel function. Our aim was to functionally characterize two novel Na(v)1.5 mutations (A124D and V1378M) in BrS patients. Wild-type (WT) and mutant Na(v)1.5 channels were expressed in tsA201 cells in the presence of the β(1)-auxiliary subunit. The patch-clamp technique and immunocytochemistry approaches were used to study the mutant channels and their cellular localization. The two mutant channels displayed a dramatic reduction in current density but had normal gating properties. The reduction in current density was caused by the retention of channel proteins in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). Mutant channel retention could be partially reversed by incubating transfected cells at 25°C and by treating them with mexiletine (for V1378M but not A124D), or with curcumin or thapsigargin, two drugs that target ER resident proteins. It is likely that the clinical phenotypes observed in these two BrS patients were related to a surface expression defect caused by ER retention. PMID:22529811

  4. Mexiletine Differentially Restores the Trafficking Defects Caused by Two Brugada Syndrome Mutations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adrien eMoreau

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available The human cardiac sodium channel Nav1.5 encoded by the SCN5A gene plays a critical role in cardiac excitability and the propagation of action potentials. Nav1.5 dysfunctions due to mutations cause cardiac diseases such as the LQT3 form of long QT syndrome, conduction disorders, and Brugada syndrome (BrS. They have also recently been associated with dilated cardiomyopathy. BrS is characterized by coved ST segment elevation on surface ECGs and lethal ventricular arrhythmias in an apparently structurally normal heart. Nav1.5 mutations that cause BrS result in a loss of channel function.Our aim was to functionally characterize two novel Nav1.5 mutations (A124D and V1378M in BrS patients.Wild-type (WT and mutant Nav1.5 channels were expressed in tsA201 cells in the presence of the β1-auxiliary subunit. The patch-clamp technique and immunocytochemistry approaches were used to study the mutant channels and their cellular localization.The two mutant channels displayed a dramatic reduction in current density but had normal gating properties. The reduction in current density was caused by the retention of channel proteins in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER. Mutant channel retention could be partially reversed by incubating transfected cells at 25°C and by treating them with mexiletine (for A124D but not V1378M, or with curcumin or thapsigargin, two drugs that target ER resident proteins.It is likely that the clinical phenotypes observed in these two BrS patients were related to a surface expression defect caused by ER retention.

  5. Systemic 5-fluorouracil treatment causes a syndrome of delayed myelin destruction in the central nervous system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Han Ruolan

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cancer treatment with a variety of chemotherapeutic agents often is associated with delayed adverse neurological consequences. Despite their clinical importance, almost nothing is known about the basis for such effects. It is not even known whether the occurrence of delayed adverse effects requires exposure to multiple chemotherapeutic agents, the presence of both chemotherapeutic agents and the body's own response to cancer, prolonged damage to the blood-brain barrier, inflammation or other such changes. Nor are there any animal models that could enable the study of this important problem. Results We found that clinically relevant concentrations of 5-fluorouracil (5-FU; a widely used chemotherapeutic agent were toxic for both central nervous system (CNS progenitor cells and non-dividing oligodendrocytes in vitro and in vivo. Short-term systemic administration of 5-FU caused both acute CNS damage and a syndrome of progressively worsening delayed damage to myelinated tracts of the CNS associated with altered transcriptional regulation in oligodendrocytes and extensive myelin pathology. Functional analysis also provided the first demonstration of delayed effects of chemotherapy on the latency of impulse conduction in the auditory system, offering the possibility of non-invasive analysis of myelin damage associated with cancer treatment. Conclusions Our studies demonstrate that systemic treatment with a single chemotherapeutic agent, 5-FU, is sufficient to cause a syndrome of delayed CNS damage and provide the first animal model of delayed damage to white-matter tracts of individuals treated with systemic chemotherapy. Unlike that caused by local irradiation, the degeneration caused by 5-FU treatment did not correlate with either chronic inflammation or extensive vascular damage and appears to represent a new class of delayed degenerative damage in the CNS.

  6. TGFBR3 variation is not a common cause of Marfan-like syndrome and Loeys-Dietz-like syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Singh Krishna K

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Marfan syndrome (MFS is caused by mutations in the fibrillin-1 (FBN1 gene, and mutations in FBN1 are known to be responsible for over 90% of all MFS cases. Locus heterogeneity has also been reported and confirmed, with mutations in the receptor genes TGFBR1 and TGFBR2 identified in association with MFS-related phenotypes. It is now known that dysregulation of TGF-ß signaling is involved in MFS pathogenesis. To test the hypothesis that dysregulation of TGFBR3-associated TGF-ß signaling is implicated in MFS or related phenotype pathogenesis, we selected a cohort of 49 patients, fulfilling or nearly fulfilling the diagnostic criteria for MFS. The patients were known not to carry a mutation in the FBN1 gene (including three 5' upstream alternatively spliced exons, the TGFBR1 and TGFBR2 genes. Mutation screening for the TGFBR3 gene in these patients and in controls led to the identification of a total of ten exonic (one novel, four intronic (one novel and one 3'UTR variant in the TGFBR3 gene. Our data suggest that variations in TGFBR3 gene appear not to be associated with MFS or related phenotype.

  7. Elizabeth Warrington Prize Lecture. Seeing why they cannot see: understanding the syndrome and causes of posterior cortical atrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crutch, Sebastian J

    2014-09-01

    Posterior cortical atrophy (PCA) is a syndrome defined by focal neurodegeneration of the parietal, occipital, and occipito-temporal cortices and associated with progressive dysfunction of visual processing, praxis, numeracy and reading. The condition is most commonly caused by (and viewed as an atypical presentation of) Alzheimer's disease, although can also be caused by other degenerative diseases. The current paper examines the relationship of PCA to other degenerative syndromes, and considers what comparisons of these syndromes and disease phenotypes can tell us about underlying disease mechanisms. The focus then turns to neuropsychological investigations of the cognitive basis of symptoms which, although unusual in the broader context of a dementia clinic, are particularly characteristic of the PCA syndrome, before exploring implications for clinical management and patient and carer support. PMID:23458247

  8. Elizabeth Warrington Prize Lecture. Seeing why they cannot see: understanding the syndrome and causes of posterior cortical atrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crutch, Sebastian J

    2014-09-01

    Posterior cortical atrophy (PCA) is a syndrome defined by focal neurodegeneration of the parietal, occipital, and occipito-temporal cortices and associated with progressive dysfunction of visual processing, praxis, numeracy and reading. The condition is most commonly caused by (and viewed as an atypical presentation of) Alzheimer's disease, although can also be caused by other degenerative diseases. The current paper examines the relationship of PCA to other degenerative syndromes, and considers what comparisons of these syndromes and disease phenotypes can tell us about underlying disease mechanisms. The focus then turns to neuropsychological investigations of the cognitive basis of symptoms which, although unusual in the broader context of a dementia clinic, are particularly characteristic of the PCA syndrome, before exploring implications for clinical management and patient and carer support.

  9. Loss-of-function mutations in SOX10 cause Kallmann syndrome with deafness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pingault, Veronique; Bodereau, Virginie; Baral, Viviane; Marcos, Severine; Watanabe, Yuli; Chaoui, Asma; Fouveaut, Corinne; Leroy, Chrystel; Vérier-Mine, Odile; Francannet, Christine; Dupin-Deguine, Delphine; Archambeaud, Françoise; Kurtz, François-Joseph; Young, Jacques; Bertherat, Jérôme; Marlin, Sandrine; Goossens, Michel; Hardelin, Jean-Pierre; Dodé, Catherine; Bondurand, Nadege

    2013-05-01

    Transcription factor SOX10 plays a role in the maintenance of progenitor cell multipotency, lineage specification, and cell differentiation and is a major actor in the development of the neural crest. It has been implicated in Waardenburg syndrome (WS), a rare disorder characterized by the association between pigmentation abnormalities and deafness, but SOX10 mutations cause a variable phenotype that spreads over the initial limits of the syndrome definition. On the basis of recent findings of olfactory-bulb agenesis in WS individuals, we suspected SOX10 was also involved in Kallmann syndrome (KS). KS is defined by the association between anosmia and hypogonadotropic hypogonadism due to incomplete migration of neuroendocrine gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) cells along the olfactory, vomeronasal, and terminal nerves. Mutations in any of the nine genes identified to date account for only 30% of the KS cases. KS can be either isolated or associated with a variety of other symptoms, including deafness. This study reports SOX10 loss-of-function mutations in approximately one-third of KS individuals with deafness, indicating a substantial involvement in this clinical condition. Study of SOX10-null mutant mice revealed a developmental role of SOX10 in a subpopulation of glial cells called olfactory ensheathing cells. These mice indeed showed an almost complete absence of these cells along the olfactory nerve pathway, as well as defasciculation and misrouting of the nerve fibers, impaired migration of GnRH cells, and disorganization of the olfactory nerve layer of the olfactory bulbs. PMID:23643381

  10. Observational cohort study of ventricular arrhythmia in adults with Marfan syndrome caused by FBN1 mutations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Aydin

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Marfan syndrome is associated with ventricular arrhythmia but risk factors including FBN1 mutation characteristics require elucidation. METHODS AND RESULTS: We performed an observational cohort study of 80 consecutive adults (30 men, 50 women aged 42±15 years with Marfan syndrome caused by FBN1 mutations. We assessed ventricular arrhythmia on baseline ambulatory electrocardiography as >10 premature ventricular complexes per hour (>10 PVC/h, as ventricular couplets (Couplet, or as non-sustained ventricular tachycardia (nsVT, and during 31±18 months of follow-up as ventricular tachycardia (VT events (VTE such as sudden cardiac death (SCD, and sustained ventricular tachycardia (sVT. We identified >10 PVC/h in 28 (35%, Couplet/nsVT in 32 (40%, and VTE in 6 patients (8%, including 3 with SCD (4%. PVC>10/h, Couplet/nsVT, and VTE exhibited increased N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide serum levels(P10/h and Couplet/nsVT also related to increased indexed end-systolic LV diameters (P = .024 and P = .020, to moderate mitral valve regurgitation (P = .018 and P = .003, and to prolonged QTc intervals (P = .001 and P = .006, respectively. Moreover, VTE related to mutations in exons 24-32 (P = .021. Kaplan-Meier analysis corroborated an association of VTE with increased NT-proBNP (P<.001 and with mutations in exons 24-32 (P<.001. CONCLUSIONS: Marfan syndrome with causative FBN1 mutations is associated with an increased risk for arrhythmia, and affected persons may require life-long monitoring. Ventricular arrhythmia on electrocardiography, signs of myocardial dysfunction and mutations in exons 24-32 may be risk factors of VTE.

  11. Ectopic Cushing' syndrome caused by a neuroendocrine carcinoma of the mesentery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petersenn Stephan

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background ACTH overproduction within the pituitary gland or ectopically leads to hypercortisolism. Here, we report the first case of Cushing' syndrome caused by an ectopic ACTH-secreting neuroendocrine carcinoma of the mesentery. Moreover, diagnostic procedures and pitfalls associated with ectopic ACTH-secreting tumors are demonstrated and discussed. Case presentation A 41 year-old man presented with clinical features and biochemical tests suggestive of ectopic Cushing's syndrome. First, subtotal thyroidectomy was performed without remission of hypercortisolism, because an octreotide scan showed increased activity in the left thyroid gland and an ultrasound revealed nodules in both thyroid lobes one of which was autonomous. In addition, the patient had a 3 mm hypoenhancing lesion of the neurohypophysis and a 1 cm large adrenal tumor. Surgical removal of the pituitary lesion within the posterior lobe did not improve hypercortisolism and we continued to treat the patient with metyrapone to block cortisol production. At 18-months follow-up from initial presentation, we detected an ACTH-producing neuroendocrine carcinoma of the mesentery by using a combination of octreotide scan, computed tomography scan, and positron emission tomography. Intraoperatively, use of a gamma probe after administration of radiolabeled 111In-pentetreotide helped identify the mesenteric neuroendocrine tumor. After removal of this carcinoma, the patient improved clinically. Laboratory testing confirmed remission of hypercortisolism. An octreotide scan 7 months after surgery showed normal results. Conclusion This case underscores the diagnostic challenge in identifying an ectopic ACTH-producing tumor and the pluripotency of cells, in this case of mesenteric cells that can start producing and secreting ACTH. It thereby helps elucidate the pathogenesis of neuroendocrine tumors. This case also suggests that patients with ectopic Cushing's syndrome and an octreotide

  12. A Rare Cause of Bacteremia in a Pediatric Patient with Down Syndrome: Sphingomonas Paucimobilis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehmet Özdemir, Sevgi Pekcan, Mehmet Emin Demircili, Fatma Esenkaya Taşbent, Bahadır Feyzioğlu, Şerife Pirinç, Mahmut Baykan

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Sphingomonas paucimobilis, is a yellow-pigmented, aerobic, non fermentative, gram negative motile bacillus. S. paucimobilis which is widely found in nature and hospital environments rarely cause serious or life threatening infections. In this report, a case of hospital acquired bloodstream infection due to S. paucimobilis in a patient with Down syndrome who was on treatment for presumed pneumonia is presented.A one year-old child patient who was a known case of Down syndrome and had previously experienced cardiac surgery was hospitalized and treated for pneumonia. On the 12th day of hospitalization, blood cultures were taken because of a high body temperature. One of the blood cultures was positive for gram-negative rods. After 48 hour of incubation, the sub-cultures on blood agar medium yielded pure growth of a yellow, non-fermentative, gram-negative, rod-shaped bacterium. The microorganism was positive for oxidase, and esculin hydrolysis, while negative for urea and nitrate reduction, citrate utilisation and motility. The isolate had been identified as S. paucimobilis by using Vitek 2 system. The antibiotic susceptibility test was also performed with the same system and the strain was found to be susceptible to piperacillin-tazobactam and other antibiotics. Treatment with intravenous piperacilin-tazobactam (150 mg/kg/day was initiated. He responded well to the treatment and was discharged after 10 days. This case is reported to emphasize that S. paucimobilis should be kept in mind as a nosocomial infectious agent in patients with Down syndrome and immunosuppressive patients and the infections should be treated according to the sensitivity test results.

  13. Surfactant therapy for maternal blood aspiration: an unusual cause of neonatal respiratory distress syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Celik, Istemi Han; Demirel, Gamze; Canpolat, Fuat Emre; Erdeve, Omer; Dilmen, Ugur

    2012-10-01

    Surfactant replacement therapy is the main treatment of neonatal respiratory distress syndrome. However, surfactant therapy has been shown to be effective in the treatment of other diseases causing neonatal respiratory diseases such as pulmonary hemorrhage, meconium aspiration syndrome, pneumonia/sepsis, pulmonary edema or acute lung injury resulting a secondary surfactant deficiency (SSD). Rarely, as like as in the present patient, exogenous blood aspiration such as breast milk or formula aspiration may lead to SSD. Blood in alveolus leads to a significant biochemical and functional disturbance of the surfactant system and inhibits surfactant production. Here, the authors report a preterm infant of 33 wk gestational age with secondary surfactant deficiency due to maternal blood aspiration because of abruptio placentae. She was received two courses of beractant, a natural bovine surfactant, therapy in 24 h. She was extubated on second day and did not require oxygen on 4(th) day. To the authors' knowledge, this is the first reported case of SSD due to maternal blood aspiration treated with surfactant. In conditions such as abruptio placentae, infant should be protected from blood aspiration and if respiratory distress occurs, surfactant inhibition and need for surfactant administration should be considered. PMID:22120615

  14. Bannayan-Riley-Ruvalcaba syndrome: a cause of extreme macrocephaly and neurodevelopmental delay.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Lynch, N E

    2012-02-01

    BACKGROUND: Bannayan-Riley-Ruvalcaba syndrome (BRRS) is an autosomal dominant condition characterised by macrocephaly, developmental delay and subtle cutaneous features. BRRS results from mutations in the PTEN gene. In adults, PTEN mutations cause Cowden syndrome where, in addition to the macrocephaly, there is a higher risk of tumour development. Diagnosis of BRRS is often delayed as presentation can be variable, even within families. AIMS: To identify characteristics of this condition which might facilitate early diagnosis. Prompt diagnosis not only avoids unnecessary investigations in the child but potentially identifies heterozygote parents who are at risk of tumour development. METHODS AND RESULTS: Six children with a PTEN mutation were identified. All had extreme macrocephaly. Four parents and a male sibling were found to have a PTEN mutation on subsequent testing. Affected parents had extreme macrocephaly and a history of thyroid adenoma, or breast or skin lesions. All six children had presented to medical attention before the age of 2.5 years (3\\/6 were investigated as neonates), but the median age at diagnosis was 5 years. Four of the children had multiple investigations prior to identification of a PTEN mutation. CONCLUSION: BRRS should be considered in children with extreme macrocephaly as it is the most consistent clinical feature seen, particularly where there is a family history of macrocephaly.

  15. Nonspecific interstitial pneumonitis: a common cause of pulmonary disease in the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    During a 4.4-year period, nonspecific interstitial pneumonitis was seen in 41 of 110 (38%) patients with the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome and accounted for 32% (48/152) of all episodes of clinical pneumonitis. Diffuse alveolar damage was typically a feature of nonspecific interstitial pneumonitis, but neither lung biopsy nor bronchoalveolar lavage detected a pathogen. Of these 41 patients, 13 had no associated pulmonary tumor and had not been exposed to pulmonary toxins, whereas 28 patients had either concurrent pulmonary Kaposi sarcoma, previous experimental therapies, or a history of pneumocystis pneumonia or drug abuse. Of these 41, 23 had normal chest radiographs. The clinical features of patients with nonspecific interstitial pneumonitis were similar to those of patients with pneumocystis pneumonia, although histologic findings showed less severe alveolar damage in patients with nonspecific interstitial pneumonitis (p less than 0.001). Pathologic evaluation and clinical follow-up suggest that many clinical episodes of pneumonitis in patients with the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome are due to nonspecific interstitial pneumonitis of unknown cause

  16. Obstructive sleep apnoea in Treacher Collins syndrome: prevalence, severity and cause.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plomp, R G; Bredero-Boelhouwer, H H; Joosten, K F M; Wolvius, E B; Hoeve, H L J; Poublon, R M L; Mathijssen, I M J

    2012-06-01

    This cohort study in 35 patients (13 children) evaluates the prevalence, severity and anatomical cause of obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome (OSAS) in patients with Treacher Collins syndrome. Ambulatory polysomnography was performed cross-sectionally to determine OSAS prevalence and severity. All upper airway related surgical interventions were evaluated retrospectively. In 11 patients, sleep endoscopy, and flexible and rigid endoscopy were applied to determine the level of anatomical obstruction of the upper airway. The overall prevalence of OSAS in Treacher Collins patients was 46% (54% in children; 41% in adults). Thirty-eight upper airway related surgical interventions were performed in 17 patients. Examination of the upper airway revealed various anatomical levels of obstruction, from the nasal septum to the trachea. Most significant obstruction was found at the level of the oro/hypopharynx. OSAS in Treacher Collins patients is an important problem so all patients should be screened for OSAS by polysomnography. Endoscopy of the upper airways was helpful in determining the level of obstruction. Surgical treatment at one level will not resolve OSAS in most patients because OSAS in Treacher Collins has a multilevel origin. Non-invasive ventilation (continuous positive airway pressure or bilevel positive airway pressure) or tracheotomy should be considered as a treatment modality.

  17. Rubinstein-Taybi syndrome caused by submicroscopic deletions within 16p13. 3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Breuning, M.H.; Dauwerse, H.G.; Fugazza, G.; Saris, J.J.; Spruit, L.; Winjnen, H.; Beverstock, G.C.; Ommen, G.J.B. van (Leiden Univ. (Netherlands)); Tommerup, N. (John F. Kennedy Inst., Glostrup (Denmark) Avd. for Medisinsk Genetikk, Oslo (Norway)); Hagen, C.B. van der (John F. Kennedy Inst., Glostrup (Denmark)); Imaizumi, Kiyoshi; Kuroki, Yoshikazu (Kanagawa Children' s Medical Center, Yokohama (Japan)); Boogaard, M.J. van den; Pater, J.M. de; Hennekam, R.C.M. (Clinical Genetics Center, Utrecht (Netherlands)); Mariman, E.C.M.; Hamel, B.C.J. (University Hospital, Nijmegen (Netherlands)); Himmelbauer, H.; Frischauf, A.M. (Imperial Cancer Research Fund Laboratories, London (United Kingdom)); Stallings, R.L. (Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States))

    1993-02-01

    The Rubinstein-Taybi syndrome (RTS) is a well-defined complex of congenital malformations characterized by facial abnormalities, broad thumbs and big toes, and mental retardation. The breakpoint of two distinct reciprocal translocations occurring in patients with a clinical diagnosis of RTS was located to the same interval on chromosome 16, between the cosmids N2 and RT1, in band 16p13.3. By using two-color fluorescence in situ hybridization, the signal from RT1 was found to be missing from one chromosome 16 in 6 of 24 patients with RTS. The parents of five of these patients did not show a deletion of RT1, indicating a de novo rearrangement. RTS is caused by submicroscopic interstitial deletions within 16p13.3 in approximately 25% of the patients. The detection of microdeletions will allow the objective confirmation of the clinical diagnosis in new patients and provides an excellent tool for the isolation of the gene causally related to the syndrome. 32 refs., 2 figs.

  18. Nephrocalcinosis (Enamel Renal Syndrome) Caused by Autosomal Recessive FAM20A Mutations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaureguiberry, Graciana; De la Dure-Molla, Muriel; Parry, David; Quentric, Mickael; Himmerkus, Nina; Koike, Toshiyasu; Poulter, James; Klootwijk, Enriko; Robinette, Steven L.; Howie, Alexander J.; Patel, Vaksha; Figueres, Marie-Lucile; Stanescu, Horia C.; Issler, Naomi; Nicholson, Jeremy K.; Bockenhauer, Detlef; Laing, Christopher; Walsh, Stephen B.; McCredie, David A.; Povey, Sue; Asselin, Audrey; Picard, Arnaud; Coulomb, Aurore; Medlar, Alan J.; Bailleul-Forestier, Isabelle; Verloes, Alain; Le Caignec, Cedric; Roussey, Gwenaelle; Guiol, Julien; Isidor, Bertrand; Logan, Clare; Shore, Roger; Johnson, Colin; Inglehearn, Christopher; Al-Bahlani, Suhaila; Schmittbuhl, Matthieu; Clauss, François; Huckert, Mathilde; Laugel, Virginie; Ginglinger, Emmanuelle; Pajarola, Sandra; Spartà, Giuseppina; Bartholdi, Deborah; Rauch, Anita; Addor, Marie-Claude; Yamaguti, Paulo M.; Safatle, Heloisa P.; Acevedo, Ana Carolina; Martelli-Júnior, Hercílio; dos Santos Netos, Pedro E.; Coletta, Ricardo D.; Gruessel, Sandra; Sandmann, Carolin; Ruehmann, Denise; Langman, Craig B.; Scheinman, Steven J.; Ozdemir-Ozenen, Didem; Hart, Thomas C.; Hart, P. Suzanne; Neugebauer, Ute; Schlatter, Eberhard; Houillier, Pascal; Gahl, William A.; Vikkula, Miikka; Bloch-Zupan, Agnès; Bleich, Markus; Kitagawa, Hiroshi; Unwin, Robert J.; Mighell, Alan; Berdal, Ariane; Kleta, Robert

    2013-01-01

    Background/Aims Calcium homeostasis requires regulated cellular and interstitial systems interacting to modulate the activity and movement of this ion. Disruption of these systems in the kidney results in nephrocalcinosis and nephrolithiasis, important medical problems whose pathogenesis is incompletely understood. Methods We investigated 25 patients from 16 families with unexplained nephrocalcinosis and characteristic dental defects (amelogenesis imperfecta, gingival hyperplasia, impaired tooth eruption). To identify the causative gene, we performed genome-wide linkage analysis, exome capture, next-generation sequencing, and Sanger sequencing. Results All patients had bi-allelic FAM20A mutations segregating with the disease; 20 different mutations were identified. Conclusions This au-tosomal recessive disorder, also known as enamel renal syndrome, of FAM20A causes nephrocalcinosis and amelogenesis imperfecta. We speculate that all individuals with biallelic FAM20A mutations will eventually show nephrocalcinosis. PMID:23434854

  19. Auditory hair cell defects as potential cause for sensorineural deafness in Wolf-Hirschhorn syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohi Ahmed

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available WHSC1 is a histone methyltransferase (HMT that catalyses the addition of methyl groups to lysine 36 on histone 3. In humans, WHSC1 haploinsufficiency is associated with all known cases of Wolf-Hirschhorn syndrome (WHS. The cardinal feature of WHS is a craniofacial dysmorphism, which is accompanied by sensorineural hearing loss in 15% of individuals with WHS. Here, we show that WHSC1-deficient mice display craniofacial defects that overlap with WHS, including cochlea anomalies. Although auditory hair cells are specified normally, their stereocilia hair bundles required for sound perception fail to develop the appropriate morphology. Furthermore, the orientation and cellular organisation of cochlear hair cells and their innervation are defective. These findings identify, for the first time, the likely cause of sensorineural hearing loss in individuals with WHS.

  20. FAM20A mutations can cause enamel-renal syndrome (ERS.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shih-Kai Wang

    Full Text Available Enamel-renal syndrome (ERS is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by severe enamel hypoplasia, failed tooth eruption, intrapulpal calcifications, enlarged gingiva, and nephrocalcinosis. Recently, mutations in FAM20A were reported to cause amelogenesis imperfecta and gingival fibromatosis syndrome (AIGFS, which closely resembles ERS except for the renal calcifications. We characterized three families with AIGFS and identified, in each case, recessive FAM20A mutations: family 1 (c.992G>A; g.63853G>A; p.Gly331Asp, family 2 (c.720-2A>G; g.62232A>G; p.Gln241_Arg271del, and family 3 (c.406C>T; g.50213C>T; p.Arg136* and c.1432C>T; g.68284C>T; p.Arg478*. Significantly, a kidney ultrasound of the family 2 proband revealed nephrocalcinosis, revising the diagnosis from AIGFS to ERS. By characterizing teeth extracted from the family 3 proband, we demonstrated that FAM20A(-/- molars lacked true enamel, showed extensive crown and root resorption, hypercementosis, and partial replacement of resorbed mineral with bone or coalesced mineral spheres. Supported by the observation of severe ectopic calcifications in the kidneys of Fam20a null mice, we conclude that FAM20A, which has a kinase homology domain and localizes to the Golgi, is a putative Golgi kinase that plays a significant role in the regulation of biomineralization processes, and that mutations in FAM20A cause both AIGFS and ERS.

  1. Autosomal-Dominant Multiple Pterygium Syndrome Is Caused by Mutations in MYH3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chong, Jessica X; Burrage, Lindsay C; Beck, Anita E; Marvin, Colby T; McMillin, Margaret J; Shively, Kathryn M; Harrell, Tanya M; Buckingham, Kati J; Bacino, Carlos A; Jain, Mahim; Alanay, Yasemin; Berry, Susan A; Carey, John C; Gibbs, Richard A; Lee, Brendan H; Krakow, Deborah; Shendure, Jay; Nickerson, Deborah A; Bamshad, Michael J

    2015-05-01

    Multiple pterygium syndrome (MPS) is a phenotypically and genetically heterogeneous group of rare Mendelian conditions characterized by multiple pterygia, scoliosis, and congenital contractures of the limbs. MPS typically segregates as an autosomal-recessive disorder, but rare instances of autosomal-dominant transmission have been reported. Whereas several mutations causing recessive MPS have been identified, the genetic basis of dominant MPS remains unknown. We identified four families affected by dominantly transmitted MPS characterized by pterygia, camptodactyly of the hands, vertebral fusions, and scoliosis. Exome sequencing identified predicted protein-altering mutations in embryonic myosin heavy chain (MYH3) in three families. MYH3 mutations underlie distal arthrogryposis types 1, 2A, and 2B, but all mutations reported to date occur in the head and neck domains. In contrast, two of the mutations found to cause MPS in this study occurred in the tail domain. The phenotypic overlap among persons with MPS, coupled with physical findings distinct from other conditions caused by mutations in MYH3, suggests that the developmental mechanism underlying MPS differs from that of other conditions and/or that certain functions of embryonic myosin might be perturbed by disruption of specific residues and/or domains. Moreover, the vertebral fusions in persons with MPS, coupled with evidence of MYH3 expression in bone, suggest that embryonic myosin plays a role in skeletal development.

  2. Infectious Mimicry Complicates Diagnosis in Hemophagocytic Syndrome Caused by Anaplastic Large-Cell Lymphoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael J. Peluso

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Hemophagocytic syndrome (HPS arises secondary to genetic, rheumatologic, neoplastic, and infectious causes. We discuss a patient whose presentation was consistent with systemic infection but was discovered to have HPS of unknown etiology. The presenting symptoms, as well as unremarkable malignancy and rheumatologic workups, led to the pursuit of an infectious cause, but the patient was ultimately discovered to have an occult anaplastic large-cell lymphoma (ALCL. This case demonstrates the diagnostic challenges that result from infectious mimicry in the context of HPS—first, in distinguishing noninfectious HPS from the systemic inflammation that can result from a widespread infectious process, second, in the identification of the precipitating cause of HPS. While evidence of these challenges has been suggested by the limited literature on HPS and ALCL, our case illustrates the diagnostic dilemma that arises when tissue biopsy does not quickly reveal an etiology. It is important that all physicians be aware that HPS can mimic infection and be prepared to redirect the workup when an infectious etiology for HPS cannot be identified.

  3. Autosomal-Dominant Multiple Pterygium Syndrome Is Caused by Mutations in MYH3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chong, Jessica X.; Burrage, Lindsay C.; Beck, Anita E.; Marvin, Colby T.; McMillin, Margaret J.; Shively, Kathryn M.; Harrell, Tanya M.; Buckingham, Kati J.; Bacino, Carlos A.; Jain, Mahim; Alanay, Yasemin; Berry, Susan A.; Carey, John C.; Gibbs, Richard A.; Lee, Brendan H.; Krakow, Deborah; Shendure, Jay; Nickerson, Deborah A.; Bamshad, Michael J.; Shendure, Jay; Nickerson, Deborah A.; Abecasis, Gonçalo R.; Anderson, Peter; Blue, Elizabeth Marchani; Annable, Marcus; Browning, Brian L.; Buckingham, Kati J.; Chen, Christina; Chin, Jennifer; Chong, Jessica X.; Cooper, Gregory M.; Davis, Colleen P.; Frazar, Christopher; Harrell, Tanya M.; He, Zongxiao; Jain, Preti; Jarvik, Gail P.; Jimenez, Guillaume; Johanson, Eric; Jun, Goo; Kircher, Martin; Kolar, Tom; Krauter, Stephanie A.; Krumm, Niklas; Leal, Suzanne M.; Luksic, Daniel; Marvin, Colby T.; McMillin, Margaret J.; McGee, Sean; O’Reilly, Patrick; Paeper, Bryan; Patterson, Karynne; Perez, Marcos; Phillips, Sam W.; Pijoan, Jessica; Poel, Christa; Reinier, Frederic; Robertson, Peggy D.; Santos-Cortez, Regie; Shaffer, Tristan; Shephard, Cindy; Shively, Kathryn M.; Siegel, Deborah L.; Smith, Joshua D.; Staples, Jeffrey C.; Tabor, Holly K.; Tackett, Monica; Underwood, Jason G.; Wegener, Marc; Wang, Gao; Wheeler, Marsha M.; Yi, Qian; Bamshad, Michael J.

    2015-01-01

    Multiple pterygium syndrome (MPS) is a phenotypically and genetically heterogeneous group of rare Mendelian conditions characterized by multiple pterygia, scoliosis, and congenital contractures of the limbs. MPS typically segregates as an autosomal-recessive disorder, but rare instances of autosomal-dominant transmission have been reported. Whereas several mutations causing recessive MPS have been identified, the genetic basis of dominant MPS remains unknown. We identified four families affected by dominantly transmitted MPS characterized by pterygia, camptodactyly of the hands, vertebral fusions, and scoliosis. Exome sequencing identified predicted protein-altering mutations in embryonic myosin heavy chain (MYH3) in three families. MYH3 mutations underlie distal arthrogryposis types 1, 2A, and 2B, but all mutations reported to date occur in the head and neck domains. In contrast, two of the mutations found to cause MPS in this study occurred in the tail domain. The phenotypic overlap among persons with MPS, coupled with physical findings distinct from other conditions caused by mutations in MYH3, suggests that the developmental mechanism underlying MPS differs from that of other conditions and/or that certain functions of embryonic myosin might be perturbed by disruption of specific residues and/or domains. Moreover, the vertebral fusions in persons with MPS, coupled with evidence of MYH3 expression in bone, suggest that embryonic myosin plays a role in skeletal development. PMID:25957469

  4. Cervical neuro-muscular syndrome: discovery of a new disease group caused by abnormalities in the cervical muscles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsui, Takayoshi; Ii, Kunio; Hojo, Shuntaro; Sano, Keiji

    2012-01-01

    Our previous study of whiplash injury found that abnormalities in the cervical muscles cause autonomic dystonia. Further research has found that abnormalities in the cervical muscles cause headache, chronic fatigue syndrome, vertigo, and dizziness. We named this group of diseases cervical neuro-muscular syndrome. Patients treated within a 2-year period from April 1, 2002 to March 31, 2004 reported good outcomes in 83.8% for headache, 88.4% for vertigo and dizziness, 84.5% for chronic fatigue syndrome, 88.0% for autonomic dystonia, and 83.7% for whiplash-associated disorder. A large number of outpatients present with general malaise, including many general physical complaints without identifiable cause. We propose that treatment of the cervical muscle is effective for general malaise.

  5. Occipital horn syndrome and classical Menkes syndrome caused by deep intronic mutations, leading to the activation of ATP7A pseudo-exon

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yasmeen, Saiqa; Lund, Katrine; De Paepe, Anne;

    2014-01-01

    Menkes disease is an X-linked disorder of copper metabolism caused by mutations in the ATP7A gene. Whereas most of the patients exhibit a severe classical form, about 9% of the patients exhibit a milder form of Menkes disease. The mildest form is called occipital horn syndrome (OHS). Mutations in...

  6. Mutations in the TGF-beta repressor SKI cause Shprintzen-Goldberg syndrome with aortic aneurysm

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Doyle, A.J.; Doyle, J.J.; Bessling, S.L.; Maragh, S.; Lindsay, M.E.; Schepers, D.; Gillis, E.; Mortier, G.; Homfray, T.; Sauls, K.; Norris, R.A.; Huso, N.D.; Leahy, D.; Mohr, D.W.; Caulfield, M.J.; Scott, A.F.; Destree, A.; Hennekam, R.C.; Arn, P.H.; Curry, C.J.; Laer, L. van; McCallion, A.S.; Loeys, B.L.; Dietz, H.C.

    2012-01-01

    Elevated transforming growth factor (TGF)-beta signaling has been implicated in the pathogenesis of syndromic presentations of aortic aneurysm, including Marfan syndrome (MFS) and Loeys-Dietz syndrome (LDS). However, the location and character of many of the causal mutations in LDS intuitively imply

  7. ABCD syndrome is caused by a homozygous mutation in the EDNRB gene

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verheij, JBGM; Kunze, J; Osinga, J; van Essen, AJ; Hofstra, RMW

    2002-01-01

    ABCD syndrome is an autosomal recessive syndrome characterized by albinism, black lock, cell migration disorder of the neurocytes of the gut (Hirschsprung disease [HSCR]), and deafness. This phenotype clearly overlaps with the features of the Shah-Waardenburg syndrome, comprising sensorineural deafn

  8. Mucopolysaccharidosis VI (Maroteaux-Lamy Syndrome): Six unique arylsulfatase B gene alleles causing variable disease phenotypes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Isbrandt, D.; Arlt, G.; Figura, K. von; Peters, C.; Brooks, D.A.; Hopwood, J.J.

    1994-03-01

    Mucopolysaccharidosis type VI, or Maroteaux-Lamy syndrome, is a lysosomal storage disorder caused by a deficiency of the enzyme arylsulfatase B (ASB), also known as N-acetylgalactosamine-4-sulfatase. Multiple clinical phenotypes of this autosomal recessively inherited disease have been described. Recent isolation and characterization of the human ASB gene facilitated the analysis of molecular defects underlying the different phenotypes. Conditions for PCR amplification of the entire open reading frame from genomic DNA and for subsequent direct automated DNA sequencing of the resulting DNA fragments were established. Besides two polymorphisms described elsewhere that cause methionine-for-valine substitutions in the arylsulfatase B gene, six new mutations in six patients were detected: four point mutations resulting in amino acid substitutions, a 1-bp deletion, and a 1-bp insertion. The point mutations were two G-to-A and two T-to-C transitions. The G-to-A transitions cause an arginine-for-glycine substitution at residue 144 in a homoallelic patient with a severe disease phenotype and a tyrosine-for-cysteine substitution at residue 521 in a potentially heteroallelic patient with the severe form of the disease. The T-to-C transitions cause an arginine-for-cysteine substitution at amino acid residue 192 in a homoallelic patient with mild symptoms and a proline-for-leucine substitution at amino acid 321 in a homoallelic patient with the intermediate form. The insertion between nucleotides T1284 and G1285 resulted in a loss of the 100 C-terminal amino acids of the wild-type protein and in the deletion of nucleotide C1577 in a 39-amino-acid C-terminal extension of the ASB polypeptide. Both mutations were detected in homoallelic patients with the severe form of the disease. Expression of mutant cDNAs encoding the four amino acid substitutions and the deletion resulted in reduction of both ASB protein levels and arylsulfatase enzyme activity. 25 refs., 4 figs.

  9. Catatonia in Down syndrome; a treatable cause of regression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghaziuddin N

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Neera Ghaziuddin,1 Armin Nassiri,2 Judith H Miles3 1Department of Psychiatry, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan, 2Community Psychiatry, San Jose, California, 3Thompson Center for Autism and Neurodevelopmental Disorders and Department of Child Health, University of Missouri, Columbia, Missouri, USA Objective: The main aim of this case series report is to alert physicians to the occurrence of catatonia in Down syndrome (DS. A second aim is to stimulate the study of regression in DS and of catatonia. A subset of individuals with DS is noted to experience unexplained regression in behavior, mood, activities of daily living, motor activities, and intellectual functioning during adolescence or young adulthood. Depression, early onset Alzheimer’s, or just “the Down syndrome” are often blamed after general medical causes have been ruled out. Clinicians are generally unaware that catatonia, which can cause these symptoms, may occur in DS.Study design: Four DS adolescents who experienced regression are reported. Laboratory tests intended to rule out causes of motor and cognitive regression were within normal limits. Based on the presence of multiple motor disturbances (slowing and/or increased motor activity, grimacing, posturing, the individuals were diagnosed with unspecified catatonia and treated with anti-catatonic treatments (benzodiazepines and electroconvulsive therapy [ECT].Results: All four cases were treated with a benzodiazepine combined with ECT and recovered their baseline functioning.Conclusion: We suspect catatonia is a common cause of unexplained deterioration in adolescents and young adults with DS. Moreover, pediatricians and others who care for individuals with DS are generally unfamiliar with the catatonia diagnosis outside schizophrenia, resulting in misdiagnosis and years of morbidity. Alerting physicians to catatonia in DS is essential to prompt diagnosis, appropriate treatment, and identification of the frequency

  10. Experimental infection of bats with Geomyces destructans causes white-nose syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorch, J.M.; Meteyer, C.U.; Behr, M.J.; Boyles, J.G.; Cryan, P.M.; Hicks, A.C.; Ballmann, A.E.; Coleman, J.T.H.; Redell, D.N.; Reeder, D.M.; Blehert, D.S.

    2011-01-01

    White-nose syndrome (WNS) has caused recent catastrophic declines among multiple species of bats in eastern North America. The disease's name derives from a visually apparent white growth of the newly discovered fungus Geomyces destructans on the skin (including the muzzle) of hibernating bats. Colonization of skin by this fungus is associated with characteristic cutaneous lesions that are the only consistent pathological finding related to WNS. However, the role of G. destructans in WNS remains controversial because evidence to implicate the fungus as the primary cause of this disease is lacking. The debate is fuelled, in part, by the assumption that fungal infections in mammals are most commonly associated with immune system dysfunction. Additionally, the recent discovery that G. destructans commonly colonizes the skin of bats of Europe, where no unusual bat mortality events have been reported, has generated further speculation that the fungus is an opportunistic pathogen and that other unidentified factors are the primary cause of WNS. Here we demonstrate that exposure of healthy little brown bats (Myotis lucifugus) to pure cultures of G. destructans causes WNS. Live G. destructans was subsequently cultured from diseased bats, successfully fulfilling established criteria for the determination of G. destructans as a primary pathogen. We also confirmed that WNS can be transmitted from infected bats to healthy bats through direct contact. Our results provide the first direct evidence that G. destructans is the causal agent of WNS and that the recent emergence of WNS in North America may represent translocation of the fungus to a region with a naive population of animals. Demonstration of causality is an instrumental step in elucidating the pathogenesis and epidemiology of WNS and in guiding management actions to preserve bat populations against the novel threat posed by this devastating infectious disease. ?? 2011 Macmillan Publishers Limited. All rights reserved.

  11. Fifteen novel FBN1 mutations causing Marfan syndrome detected by heteroduplex analysis of genomic amplicons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nijbroek, G.; Sood, S.; McIntosh, I. [John Hopkins Univ. School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD (United States)] [and others

    1995-07-01

    Mutations in the gene encoding fibrillin-1 (FBN1), a component of the extracellular microfibril, cause the Marfan syndrome (MFS). This statement is supported by the observations that the classic Marfan phenotype cosegregates with intragenic and/or flanking marker alleles in all families tested and that a significant number of FBN1 mutations have been identified in affected individuals. We have now devised a method to screen the entire coding sequence and flanking splice junctions of FBN1. On completion for a panel of nine probands with classic MFS, six new mutations were identified that accounted for disease in seven (78%) of nine patients. Nine additional new mutations have been characterized in the early stages of a larger screening project. These 15 mutations were equally distributed throughout the gene and, with one exception, were specific to single families. One-third of mutations created premature termination codons, and 6 of 15 substituted residues with putative significance for calcium finding to epidermal growth factor (EGF)-like domains. Mutations causing severe and rapidly progressive disease that presents in the neonatal period can occur in a larger region of the gene than previously demonstrated, and the nature of the mutation is as important a determinant as its location, in predisposing to this phenotype. 56 refs., 5 figs., 3 tabs.

  12. Degenerative diseases of the spine. Rare and often unrecognized causes of pain syndromes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of this article is to describe rare and often unrecognized causes of spinal pain syndromes. Intervertebral disc degeneration frequently appears in early adulthood and can have a symptomatic or asymptomatic course. This article discusses incidence, pathophysiology, imaging, and pain symptomatology involved in the origin of back pain. Anulus tears are often found in asymptomatic individuals but could be implicated in lumbar pain symptomatology in correlation with the provocative discography. Transient disorders can lead to pseudarthrosis of the iliac bone and to degeneration or to a reactive hypermobility with intervertebral disc degeneration in the level above. Modic type 1 erosive osteochondrosis is characterized by bone marrow edema near the hyaline cartilage end plate, which mostly elicits severe pain and results in serious limitations in everyday activities. The most important differential diagnosis is spondylodiscitis. Schmorl's nodes can exhibit considerable surrounding bone marrow edema that can be mistaken for metastases. A combination of MRI and CT should be employed for the diagnostic work-up of fatigue fracture of the interarticular portion, which is often overlooked due to its location. Synovial cysts of the facet joints can lead to radicular symptoms. Insufficiency fracture of the sacrum is frequently mistaken for metastasis due to intense scintigraphic enhancement and its signal behavior in MRI. CT provides instructive information. Differential diagnosis should include less common causes such as anulus tears, transient disorders, activated Schmorl's nodes, synovial cysts of the facet joints, fatigue fractures of the interarticular portion of the spine and the sacrum and distinguish from metastases in particular. (orig.)

  13. Germline NLRP1 Mutations Cause Skin Inflammatory and Cancer Susceptibility Syndromes via Inflammasome Activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Franklin L; Mamaï, Ons; Sborgi, Lorenzo; Boussofara, Lobna; Hopkins, Richard; Robinson, Kim; Szeverényi, Ildikó; Takeichi, Takuya; Balaji, Reshmaa; Lau, Aristotle; Tye, Hazel; Roy, Keya; Bonnard, Carine; Ahl, Patricia J; Jones, Leigh Ann; Baker, Paul; Lacina, Lukas; Otsuka, Atsushi; Fournie, Pierre R; Malecaze, François; Lane, E Birgitte; Akiyama, Masashi; Kabashima, Kenji; Connolly, John E; Masters, Seth L; Soler, Vincent J; Omar, Salma Samir; McGrath, John A; Nedelcu, Roxana; Gribaa, Moez; Denguezli, Mohamed; Saad, Ali; Hiller, Sebastian; Reversade, Bruno

    2016-09-22

    Inflammasome complexes function as key innate immune effectors that trigger inflammation in response to pathogen- and danger-associated signals. Here, we report that germline mutations in the inflammasome sensor NLRP1 cause two overlapping skin disorders: multiple self-healing palmoplantar carcinoma (MSPC) and familial keratosis lichenoides chronica (FKLC). We find that NLRP1 is the most prominent inflammasome sensor in human skin, and all pathogenic NLRP1 mutations are gain-of-function alleles that predispose to inflammasome activation. Mechanistically, NLRP1 mutations lead to increased self-oligomerization by disrupting the PYD and LRR domains, which are essential in maintaining NLRP1 as an inactive monomer. Primary keratinocytes from patients experience spontaneous inflammasome activation and paracrine IL-1 signaling, which is sufficient to cause skin inflammation and epidermal hyperplasia. Our findings establish a group of non-fever inflammasome disorders, uncover an unexpected auto-inhibitory function for the pyrin domain, and provide the first genetic evidence linking NLRP1 to skin inflammatory syndromes and skin cancer predisposition. PMID:27662089

  14. Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome Caused by Biallelic TNXB Variants in Patients with Congenital Adrenal Hyperplasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Wuyan; Perritt, Ashley F; Morissette, Rachel; Dreiling, Jennifer L; Bohn, Markus-Frederik; Mallappa, Ashwini; Xu, Zhi; Quezado, Martha; Merke, Deborah P

    2016-09-01

    Some variants that cause autosomal-recessive congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH) also cause hypermobility type Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (EDS) due to the monoallelic presence of a chimera disrupting two flanking genes: CYP21A2, encoding 21-hydroxylase, necessary for cortisol and aldosterone biosynthesis, and TNXB, encoding tenascin-X, an extracellular matrix protein. Two types of CAH tenascin-X (CAH-X) chimeras have been described with a total deletion of CYP21A2 and characteristic TNXB variants. CAH-X CH-1 has a TNXB exon 35 120-bp deletion resulting in haploinsufficiency, and CAH-X CH-2 has a TNXB exon 40 c.12174C>G (p.Cys4058Trp) variant resulting in a dominant-negative effect. We present here three patients with biallelic CAH-X and identify a novel dominant-negative chimera termed CAH-X CH-3. Compared with monoallelic CAH-X, biallelic CAH-X results in a more severe phenotype with skin features characteristic of classical EDS. We present evidence for disrupted tenascin-X function and computational data linking the type of TNXB variant to disease severity. PMID:27297501

  15. First Report of a Single Exon Deletion in TCOF1 Causing Treacher Collins Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beygo, J; Buiting, K; Seland, S; Lüdecke, H-J; Hehr, U; Lich, C; Prager, B; Lohmann, D R; Wieczorek, D

    2012-01-01

    Treacher Collins syndrome (TCS) is a rare craniofacial disorder characterized by facial anomalies and ear defects. TCS is caused by mutations in the TCOF1 gene and follows autosomal dominant inheritance. Recently, mutations in the POLR1D and POLR1C genes have also been identified to cause TCS. However, in a subset of patients no causative mutation could be found yet. Inter- and intrafamilial phenotypic variability is high as is the variety of mainly family-specific mutations identified throughout TCOF1. No obvious correlation between pheno- and genotype could be observed. The majority of described point mutations, small insertions and deletions comprising only a few nucleotides within TCOF1 lead to a premature termination codon. We investigated a cohort of 112 patients with a tentative clinical diagnosis of TCS by multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA) to search for larger deletions not detectable with other methods used. All patients were selected after negative screening for mutations in TCOF1, POLR1D and POLR1C. In 1 patient with an unequivocal clinical diagnosis of TCS, we identified a 3.367 kb deletion. This deletion abolishes exon 3 and is the first described single exon deletion within TCOF1. On RNA level we observed loss of this exon which supposedly leads to haploinsufficiency of TREACLE, the nucleolar phosphoprotein encoded by TCOF1.

  16. Segmental basal cell naevus syndrome caused by an activating mutation in smoothened.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khamaysi, Z; Bochner, R; Indelman, M; Magal, L; Avitan-Hersh, E; Sarig, O; Sprecher, E; Bergman, R

    2016-07-01

    Aberrant sonic hedgehog signalling, mostly due to PTCH1 mutations, has been shown to play a central role in the pathogenesis of basal cell carcinoma (BCC), as well as in basal cell naevus syndrome (BCNS). Mutations in smoothened (SMO) encoding a receptor for sonic hedgehog have been reported in sporadic BCCs but not in BCNS. We report a case with multiple BCCs, pits and comedones in a segmental distribution over the upper part of the body, along with other findings compatible with BCNS. Histopathologically, there were different types of BCC. A heterozygous mutation (c.1234C>T, p.L412F) in SMO was detected in three BCCs but not in peripheral blood lymphocytes or the uninvolved skin. These were compatible with the type 1 mosaic form of BCNS. The p.L412F mutation was found experimentally to result in increased SMO transactivating activity, and the patient responded to vismodegib therapy. Activating mutations in SMO may cause BCNS. The identification of a gain-of-function mutation in SMO causing a type 1 mosaic form of BCNS further expands our understanding of the pathogenesis of BCC, with implications for the treatment of these tumours, whether sporadic or inherited. PMID:26822128

  17. Duck egg-drop syndrome caused by BYD virus, a new Tembusu-related flavivirus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jingliang Su

    Full Text Available Since April 2010, a severe outbreak of duck viral infection, with egg drop, feed uptake decline and ovary-oviduct disease, has spread around the major duck-producing regions in China. A new virus, named BYD virus, was isolated in different areas, and a similar disease was reproduced in healthy egg-producing ducks, infecting with the isolated virus. The virus was re-isolated from the affected ducks and replicated well in primary duck embryo fibroblasts and Vero cells, causing the cytopathic effect. The virus was identified as an enveloped positive-stranded RNA virus with a size of approximately 55 nm in diameter. Genomic sequencing of the isolated virus revealed that it is closely related to Tembusu virus (a mosquito-borne Ntaya group flavivirus, with 87-91% nucleotide identity of the partial E (envelope proteins to that of Tembusu virus and 72% of the entire genome coding sequence with Bagaza virus, the most closely related flavivirus with an entirely sequenced genome. Collectively our systematic studies fulfill Koch's postulates, and therefore, the causative agent of the duck egg drop syndrome occurring in China is a new flavivirus. Flavivirus is an emerging and re-emerging zoonotic pathogen and BYD virus that causes severe egg-drop, could be disastrous for the duck industry. More importantly its public health concerns should also be evaluated, and its epidemiology should be closely watched due to the zoonotic nature of flaviviruses.

  18. Novel TK2 mutations as a cause of delayed muscle maturation in mtDNA depletion syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Termglinchan, Thanes; Hisamatsu, Seito; Ohmori, Junko; Suzumura, Hiroshi; Sumitomo, Noriko; Imataka, George; Arisaka, Osamu; Murakami, Nobuyuki; Minami, Narihiro; Akihiko, Ishiyama; Sasaki, Masayuki; Goto, Yuichi; Noguchi, Satoru; Nonaka, Ikuya; Mitsuhashi, Satomi; Nishino, Ichizo

    2016-10-01

    Recessive mutations in TK2 cause a severe mitochondrial DNA depletion syndrome (MDS),(1) characterized by severe myopathy from early infancy. Recent reports have suggested a wider clinical spectrum including encephalomyopathic form.(1,2) We report a patient with infantile-onset fatal encephalomyopathy presenting with extreme muscle fiber immaturity.

  19. Lacrimal punctum occlusion in the treatment of severe keratoconjunctivitis sicca caused by Sjogren syndrome - A uniocular evaluation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mansour, Khaled; Leonhardt, Carolien J.; Kalk, Wouter W.; Bootsma, Hendrika; Bruin, Klaas J.; Blanksma, Lieuwe J.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: A controlled uniocular study to evaluate the short-term efficacy of lacrimal punctum occlusion in the treatment of severe dry eye caused by Sjogren syndrome. Methods: Uniocular punctum occlusion by punctum plug in the upper and lower puncta in 1 eye was performed in 20 patients with severe

  20. Clinical features and molecular genetic analysis of a boy with Prader-Willi syndrome caused by an imprinting defect

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schulze, A; Hansen, Claus; Baekgaard, P;

    1997-01-01

    Prader-Willi syndrome (PWS) is a neuroendocrine disorder caused by a non-functioning paternally derived gene(s) within the chromosome region 15q11-q13. Most cases result from microscopically visible deletions of paternal origin, or maternal uniparental disomy of chromosome 15. In both instances...

  1. Gingival overgrowth caused by vitamin C deficiency associated with metabolic syndrome and severe periodontal infection: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omori, Kazuhiro; Hanayama, Yoshihisa; Naruishi, Koji; Akiyama, Kentaro; Maeda, Hiroshi; Otsuka, Fumio; Takashiba, Shogo

    2014-12-01

    It has been suggested that vitamin C deficiency/scurvy is associated with gingival inflammatory changes; however, the disorder is very infrequently encountered in the modern era. Here, we report a case of extensive gingival overgrowth caused by vitamin C deficiency associated with metabolic syndrome and severe periodontal infection. PMID:25548632

  2. Gingival overgrowth caused by vitamin C deficiency associated with metabolic syndrome and severe periodontal infection: a case report

    OpenAIRE

    Omori, Kazuhiro; Hanayama, Yoshihisa; Naruishi, Koji; Akiyama, Kentaro; Maeda, Hiroshi; Otsuka, Fumio; Takashiba, Shogo

    2014-01-01

    It has been suggested that vitamin C deficiency/scurvy is associated with gingival inflammatory changes; however, the disorder is very infrequently encountered in the modern era. Here, we report a case of extensive gingival overgrowth caused by vitamin C deficiency associated with metabolic syndrome and severe periodontal infection.

  3. Protein causes hyperinsulinemia: a Chinese patient with hyperinsulinism/hyperammonaemia syndrome due to a glutamate dehydrogenase gene mutation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Shi; XIAO Xin-hua; DIAO Cheng-ming; TONG An-li; WANG Ou; QIU Zheng-qing; YU Kang; WANG Tong

    2010-01-01

    @@ Glucose is derived from three sources: intestinal absorption, glycogenolysis, and gluconeogenesis. Hypoglycemia in child is often attributed to depletion of glycogen stores. However, recently, congenital hyperinsulinism becomes an important cause of hypoglycaemia in early infancy. Mutations in the genes encoding SUR1 and KIR6.2 are the most frequent genetic causes of hyperinsulinism followed by mutations in the glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) gene which encodes hyperinsulinism/hyperammonaemia (HI/HA) syndrome.

  4. De novo nonsense mutations in ASXL1 cause Bohring-Opitz syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hoischen, Alexander; van Bon, Bregje W M; Rodríguez-Santiago, Benjamín;

    2011-01-01

    Bohring-Opitz syndrome is characterized by severe intellectual disability, distinctive facial features and multiple congenital malformations. We sequenced the exomes of three individuals with Bohring-Opitz syndrome and in each identified heterozygous de novo nonsense mutations in ASXL1, which...... is required for maintenance of both activation and silencing of Hox genes. In total, 7 out of 13 subjects with a Bohring-Opitz phenotype had de novo ASXL1 mutations, suggesting that the syndrome is genetically heterogeneous....

  5. Pearson's syndrome: a rare cause of non-immune hydrops fetalis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李澤荷; 林青雲; 李志偉; 鄺毅山; 司徒紹昌

    2003-01-01

    @@ Pearson's syndrome, or Pearson's marrow-pancreas syndrome, was first described in 1979 in four unrelated children.1 It is characterized by refractory sideroblastic anaemia with vacuolization of marrow progenitor cells, and exocrine pancreatic dysfunction. Its progressive nature, multisystem involvement and metabolic disturbances led to the subsequent identification of a unique mitochondrial DNA deletion in most affected patients.2 Despite the relentless clinical course, the majority of the patients with Pearson ' s syndrome present insidiously. Life-threatening presentation at birth is extremely rare. We report a case of Pearson ' s syndrome presenting with severe hydrops fetalis.

  6. Temperature-dependent growth of Geomyces destructans, the fungus that causes bat white-nose syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verant, Michelle L.; Boyles, Justin G.; Waldrep, William, Jr.; Wibbelt, Gudrun; Blehert, David S.

    2012-01-01

    White-nose syndrome (WNS) is an emergent disease estimated to have killed over five million North American bats. Caused by the psychrophilic fungus Geomyces destructans, WNS specifically affects bats during hibernation. We describe temperature-dependent growth performance and morphology for six independent isolates of G. destructans from North America and Europe. Thermal performance curves for all isolates displayed an intermediate peak with rapid decline in performance above the peak. Optimal temperatures for growth were between 12.5 and 15.8°C, and the upper critical temperature for growth was between 19.0 and 19.8°C. Growth rates varied across isolates, irrespective of geographic origin, and above 12°C all isolates displayed atypical morphology that may have implications for proliferation of the fungus. This study demonstrates that small variations in temperature, consistent with those inherent of bat hibernacula, affect growth performance and physiology of G. destructans, which may influence temperature-dependent progression and severity of WNS in wild bats.

  7. Germline expression of H-Ras(G12V) causes neurological deficits associated to Costello syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viosca, J; Schuhmacher, A J; Guerra, C; Barco, A

    2009-02-01

    Costello syndrome (CS) is a rare congenital disorder caused by germline activation of H-Ras oncogenes. A mouse model of CS generated by introduction of an oncogenic Gly12Val mutation in the mouse H-Ras locus using homologous recombination in embryonic stem (ES) cells has been recently described. These mice phenocopied some of the abnormalities observed in patients with CS, including facial dysmorphia and cardiomyopathies. We investigated here their neurological and behavioral phenotype. The analysis of H-Ras(G12V) mice revealed phenotypes that resembled the hyperemotivity, hypersensibility and cognitive impairments observed in children with CS. Stronger neurological deficits were found in the analysis of mice homozygous for this mutation than in the analysis of heterozygous mice, suggesting the existence of a gene dose effect. These mice represent the first mouse model for CS, offering an experimental tool to study the molecular and physiological alterations underlying the neurological manifestations of CS and to test new therapies aimed at preventing or ameliorating the cognitive and emotional impairments associated to this condition. PMID:18823404

  8. Computer vision syndrome: a review of ocular causes and potential treatments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenfield, Mark

    2011-09-01

    Computer vision syndrome (CVS) is the combination of eye and vision problems associated with the use of computers. In modern western society the use of computers for both vocational and avocational activities is almost universal. However, CVS may have a significant impact not only on visual comfort but also occupational productivity since between 64% and 90% of computer users experience visual symptoms which may include eyestrain, headaches, ocular discomfort, dry eye, diplopia and blurred vision either at near or when looking into the distance after prolonged computer use. This paper reviews the principal ocular causes for this condition, namely oculomotor anomalies and dry eye. Accommodation and vergence responses to electronic screens appear to be similar to those found when viewing printed materials, whereas the prevalence of dry eye symptoms is greater during computer operation. The latter is probably due to a decrease in blink rate and blink amplitude, as well as increased corneal exposure resulting from the monitor frequently being positioned in primary gaze. However, the efficacy of proposed treatments to reduce symptoms of CVS is unproven. A better understanding of the physiology underlying CVS is critical to allow more accurate diagnosis and treatment. This will enable practitioners to optimize visual comfort and efficiency during computer operation.

  9. Excessive heart rate response to orthostatic stress in postural tachycardia syndrome is not caused by anxiety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masuki, Shizue; Eisenach, John H; Johnson, Christopher P; Dietz, Niki M; Benrud-Larson, Lisa M; Schrage, William G; Curry, Timothy B; Sandroni, Paola; Low, Phillip A; Joyner, Michael J

    2007-03-01

    Postural tachycardia syndrome (POTS) is characterized by excessive increases in heart rate (HR) without hypotension during orthostasis. The relationship between the tachycardia and anxiety is uncertain. Therefore, we tested whether the HR response to orthostatic stress in POTS is primarily related to psychological factors. POTS patients (n = 14) and healthy controls (n = 10) underwent graded venous pooling with lower body negative pressure (LBNP) to -40 mmHg while wearing deflated antishock trousers. "Sham" venous pooling was performed by 1) trouser inflation to 5 mmHg during LBNP and 2) vacuum pump activation without LBNP. HR responses to mental stress were also measured in both groups, and a questionnaire was used to measure psychological parameters. During LBNP, HR in POTS patients increased 39 +/- 5 beats/min vs. 19 +/- 3 beats/min in control subjects at -40 mmHg (P inflation markedly blunted the HR responses in the patients (9 +/- 2 beats/min) and controls (2 +/- 1 beats/min), and there was no HR increase during vacuum application without LBNP in either group. HR responses during mental stress were not different in the patients and controls (18 +/- 2 vs. 19 +/- 1 beats/min; P > 0.6). Anxiety, somatic vigilance, and catastrophic cognitions were significantly higher in the patients (P 0.1). These results suggest that the HR response to orthostatic stress in POTS patients is not caused by anxiety but that it is a physiological response that maintains arterial pressure during venous pooling.

  10. A CHRNE frameshift mutation causes congenital myasthenic syndrome in young Jack Russell Terriers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rinz, Caitlin J; Lennon, Vanda A; James, Fiona; Thoreson, James B; Tsai, Kate L; Starr-Moss, Alison N; Humphries, H Dale; Guo, Ling T; Palmer, Anthony C; Clark, Leigh Anne; Shelton, G Diane

    2015-12-01

    Congenital myasthenic syndromes (CMSs) are a group of rare genetic disorders of the neuromuscular junction resulting in structural or functional causes of fatigable weakness that usually begins early in life. Mutations in pre-synaptic, synaptic and post-synaptic proteins have been demonstrated in human cases, with more than half involving aberrations in nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (AChR) subunits. CMS was first recognized in dogs in 1974 as an autosomal recessive trait in Jack Russell Terriers (JRTs). A deficiency of junctional AChRs was demonstrated. Here we characterize a CMS in 2 contemporary cases of JRT littermates with classic clinical and electromyographic findings, and immunochemical confirmation of an approximately 90% reduction in AChR protein content. Loci encoding the 5 AChR subunits were evaluated using microsatellite markers, and CHRNB1 and CHRNE were identified as candidate genes. Sequences of the splice sites and exons of both genes revealed a single base insertion in exon 7 of CHRNE that predicts a frameshift mutation and a premature stop codon. We further demonstrated this pathogenic mutation in CHRNE in archival tissues from unrelated JRTs studied 34 years ago.

  11. Towards a better understanding of white syndromes and their causes on Indo-Pacific coral reefs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourne, D. G.; Ainsworth, T. D.; Pollock, F. J.; Willis, B. L.

    2015-03-01

    Disease is increasingly recognized as a threat to coral reef ecosystems, particularly in the light of increasing anthropogenic disturbances that disrupt important symbiotic partnerships within the coral holobiont. White syndromes (WSs) are a prevalent group of coral diseases in the Indo-Pacific region that have been the focus of an increasing number of investigations over the past decade. Here, we summarize the current state of knowledge on WSs, advocate the use of established standardized criteria to describe disease lesions at gross and cellular levels to move the field forward, and highlight potential erroneous characterization of underlying causes that hinders ongoing progress in coral disease research. We argue for retention of the general term WSs for Indo-Pacific cases of tissue loss lacking distinguishing macroscopic signs and with unknown aetiologies, but erection of more specific names once standardized criteria are met. Recent advances in WS disease pathology, microbial ecology, physiology, ecology and environmental drivers are discussed and the need for greater application of interdisciplinary approaches is emphasized. Following recent widespread reports of WSs on coral reefs, a clear, concise perspective is needed to provide a focus for further research and avoid confusion in the study of this virulent group of diseases.

  12. MASA syndrome is caused by mutations in the neural cell adhesion gene, L1CAM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schwartz, C.E.; Wang, Y.; Schroer, R.J.; Stevenson, R.E. [Greenwood Genetic Center, SC (United States)

    1994-09-01

    The MASA syndrome is a recessive X-linked disorder characterized by Mental retardation, Adducted thumbs, Shuffling gait and Aphasia. Recently we found that MASA in one family was likely caused by a point mutation in exon 6 of the L1CAM gene. This gene has also been shown to be involved in X-linked hydrocephalus (HSAS). We have screened 60 patients with either sporadic HSAS or MASA as well as two additional families with MASA. For the screening, we initially utilized 3 cDNA probes for the L1CAM gene. In one of the MASA families, K8310, two affected males were found to have an altered BglII band. The band was present in their carrier mother but not in their normal brothers. This band was detected by the entire cDNA probe as well as the cDNA probe for 3{prime} end of the gene. Analysis of the L1CAM sequence indicated the altered BglII site is distal to the exon 28 but proximal to the punative poly A signal site. It is hypothesized that this point mutation alters the stability of the L1CAM mRNA. This is being tested using cell lines established from the two affected males.

  13. Lung Postmortem Autopsy Revealing Extramedullary Involvement in Multiple Myeloma Causing Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aurélie Ravinet

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Pulmonary involvement with multiple myeloma is rare. We report the case of a 61-year-old man with past medical history of chronic respiratory failure with emphysema, and a known multiple myeloma (Durie and Salmon stage III B and t(4;14 translocation. Six months after diagnosis and first line of treatment, he presented acute dyspnea with interstitial lung disease. Computed tomography showed severe bullous emphysema and diffuse, patchy, multifocal infiltrations bilaterally with nodular character, small bilateral pleural effusions, mediastinal lymphadenopathy, and a known lytic lesion of the 12th vertebra. He was treated with piperacillin-tazobactam, amikacin, oseltamivir, and methylprednisolone. Finally, outcome was unfavourable. Postmortem analysis revealed diffuse and nodular infracentimetric infiltration of the lung parenchyma by neoplastic plasma cells. Physicians should be aware that acute respiratory distress syndrome not responding to treatment of common causes could be a manifestation of the disease, even with negative BAL or biopsy and could be promptly treated with salvage therapy.

  14. A functional alternative splicing mutation in AIRE gene causes autoimmune polyendocrine syndrome type 1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junyu Zhang

    Full Text Available Autoimmune polyendocrine syndrome type 1 (APS-1 is a rare autosomal recessive disease defined by the presence of two of the three conditions: mucocutaneous candidiasis, hypoparathyroidism, and Addison's disease. Loss-of-function mutations of the autoimmune regulator (AIRE gene have been linked to APS-1. Here we report mutational analysis and functional characterization of an AIRE mutation in a consanguineous Chinese family with APS-1. All exons of the AIRE gene and adjacent exon-intron sequences were amplified by PCR and subsequently sequenced. We identified a homozygous missense AIRE mutation c.463G>A (p.Gly155Ser in two siblings with different clinical features of APS-1. In silico splice-site prediction and minigene analysis were carried out to study the potential pathological consequence. Minigene splicing analysis and subsequent cDNA sequencing revealed that the AIRE mutation potentially compromised the recognition of the splice donor of intron 3, causing alternative pre-mRNA splicing by intron 3 retention. Furthermore, the aberrant AIRE transcript was identified in a heterozygous carrier of the c.463G>A mutation. The aberrant intron 3-retaining transcript generated a truncated protein (p.G155fsX203 containing the first 154 AIRE amino acids and followed by 48 aberrant amino acids. Therefore, our study represents the first functional characterization of the alternatively spliced AIRE mutation that may explain the pathogenetic role in APS-1.

  15. Severe hyponatremia caused by nab-paclitaxel-induced syndrome of inappropriate antidiuretic hormone secretion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neuzillet, Cindy; Babai, Samy; Kempf, Emmanuelle; Pujol, Géraldine; Rousseau, Benoît; Le-Louët, Hervé; Christophe Tournigand

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Incidence of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is increasing. Most patients have advanced disease at diagnosis and therapeutic options in this setting are limited. Gemcitabine plus nab-paclitaxel regimen was demonstrated to increase survival compared with gemcitabine monotherapy and is therefore indicated as first-line therapy in patients with metastatic PDAC and performance status Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group (ECOG) 0-2. The safety profile of gemcitabine and nab-paclitaxel combination includes neutropenia, fatigue, and neuropathy as most common adverse events of grade 3 or higher. No case of severe hyponatremia associated with the use of nab-paclitaxel for the treatment of PDAC has been reported to date. We report the case of a 72-year-old Caucasian man with a metastatic PDAC treated with gemcitabine and nab-paclitaxel regimen, who presented with a severe hyponatremia (grade 4) caused by a documented syndrome of inappropriate antidiuretic hormone secretion (SIADH). This SIADH was attributed to nab-paclitaxel after a rigorous imputability analysis, including a rechallenge procedure with dose reduction. After dose and schedule adjustment, nab-paclitaxel was pursued without recurrence of severe hyponatremia and with maintained efficacy. Hyponatremia is a rare but potentially severe complication of nab-paclitaxel therapy that medical oncologists and gastroenterologists should be aware of. Nab-paclitaxel-induced hyponatremia is manageable upon dose and schedule adaptation, and should not contraindicate careful nab-paclitaxel reintroduction. This is of particular interest for a disease in which the therapeutic options are limited. PMID:27368013

  16. Identification and expression analysis of a novel intragenic EFNB1 mutation causing craniofrontonasal syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oscar F. Chacon-Camacho

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Craniofrontonasal syndrome (CFNS is an X-linked disorder caused by mutations in the EFNB1 gene and characterized by distinctive craniofacial and digital malformations. In contrast with most X-linked traits, female patients with CFNS display a more severe phenotype than males. In this report, the clinical, molecular and RNA expression analyses of a female subject with CFNS are described. A novel c.445_449delGAGGG deletion in exon 3 of EFNB1 was demonstrated in this patient. To assess the effect of this novel mutation at the transcript level, the expression of EFNB1 mRNA was studied by quantitative RT-PCR. To our knowledge, this is the first time that an EFNB1 transcript carrying a truncating mutation in exon 3 is demonstrated to undergo degradation by nonsense-mediated mRNA decay. Our results expand the mutational spectrum of CFNS and add to the functional consequences of truncating EFNB1 mutations.

  17. NEK1 mutations cause short-rib polydactyly syndrome type majewski.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thiel, Christian; Kessler, Kristin; Giessl, Andreas; Dimmler, Arno; Shalev, Stavit A; von der Haar, Sigrun; Zenker, Martin; Zahnleiter, Diana; Stöss, Hartmut; Beinder, Ernst; Abou Jamra, Rami; Ekici, Arif B; Schröder-Kress, Nadja; Aigner, Thomas; Kirchner, Thomas; Reis, André; Brandstätter, Johann H; Rauch, Anita

    2011-01-01

    Defects of ciliogenesis have been implicated in a wide range of human phenotypes and play a crucial role in signal transduction and cell-cycle coordination. We used homozygosity mapping in two families with autosomal-recessive short-rib polydactyly syndrome Majewski type to identify mutations in NEK1 as an underlying cause of this lethal osteochondrodysplasia. NEK1 encodes a serine/threonine kinase with proposed function in DNA double-strand repair, neuronal development, and coordination of cell-cycle-associated ciliogenesis. We found that absence of functional full-length NEK1 severely reduces cilia number and alters ciliar morphology in vivo. We further substantiate a proposed digenic diallelic inheritance of ciliopathies by the identification of heterozygous mutations in NEK1 and DYNC2H1 in an additional family. Notably, these findings not only increase the broad spectrum of ciliar disorders, but suggest a correlation between the degree of defective microtubule or centriole elongation and organization and the severity of the resulting phenotype.

  18. Acute liver failure caused by drug-induced hypersensitivity syndrome associated with hyperferritinemia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Masayuki Miyazaki; Masatake Tanaka; Akihiro Ueda; Tsuyoshi Yoshimoto; Masaki Kato; Makoto Nakamuta; Kazuhiro Kotoh; Ryoichi Takayanagi

    2011-01-01

    Drug-induced hypersensitivity syndrome (DIHS) is a se-vere reaction usually characterized by fever, rash, and multiorgan failure, occurring 2-6 wk after drug introduction.It is an immune-mediated reaction involving macrophage and T-lymphocyte activation and cytokine release. A 54-year-old woman was diagnosed with rheumatic arthritis and initiated salazosulfapyridine by mouth. About 10 d later, she had a high fever, skin rash and liver dysfunction. She was admitted to hospital and diagnosed with a drug eruption. She was treated with oral prednisolone 30 mg/d; however, she developed high fever again and her blood tests showed acute liver failure and cytopenia associated with hyperferritinemia. She was diagnosed with acute liver failure and hemophagocytosis caused by DIHS. She was transferred to the Department of Medicine and Bioregulatory Science, Kyushu University, where she was treated with arterial steroid injection therapy. Following this treatment, her liver function improved and serum ferritin immediately decreased. We hypothesized that an immune-mediated reaction in DIHS may have generated over-activation of macrophages and T-lymphocytes, followed by a cytokine storm that affected various organs. The measurement of serum ferritin might be a useful marker of the severity of DIHS.

  19. Dysfunction of intraflagellar transport-A causes hyperphagia-induced obesity and metabolic syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Damon T. Jacobs

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Primary cilia extend from the plasma membrane of most vertebrate cells and mediate signaling pathways. Ciliary dysfunction underlies ciliopathies, which are genetic syndromes that manifest multiple clinical features, including renal cystic disease and obesity. THM1 (also termed TTC21B or IFT139 encodes a component of the intraflagellar transport-A complex and mutations in THM1 have been identified in 5% of individuals with ciliopathies. Consistent with this, deletion of murine Thm1 during late embryonic development results in cystic kidney disease. Here, we report that deletion of murine Thm1 during adulthood results in obesity, diabetes, hypertension and fatty liver disease, with gender differences in susceptibility to weight gain and metabolic dysfunction. Pair-feeding of Thm1 conditional knock-out mice relative to control littermates prevented the obesity and related disorders, indicating that hyperphagia caused the obese phenotype. Thm1 ablation resulted in increased localization of adenylyl cyclase III in primary cilia that were shortened, with bulbous distal tips on neurons of the hypothalamic arcuate nucleus, an integrative center for signals that regulate feeding and activity. In pre-obese Thm1 conditional knock-out mice, expression of anorexogenic pro-opiomelanocortin (Pomc was decreased by 50% in the arcuate nucleus, which likely caused the hyperphagia. Fasting of Thm1 conditional knock-out mice did not alter Pomc nor orexogenic agouti-related neuropeptide (Agrp expression, suggesting impaired sensing of changes in peripheral signals. Together, these data indicate that the Thm1-mutant ciliary defect diminishes sensitivity to feeding signals, which alters appetite regulation and leads to hyperphagia, obesity and metabolic disease.

  20. Dysfunction of intraflagellar transport-A causes hyperphagia-induced obesity and metabolic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs, Damon T; Silva, Luciane M; Allard, Bailey A; Schonfeld, Michael P; Chatterjee, Anindita; Talbott, George C; Beier, David R; Tran, Pamela V

    2016-07-01

    Primary cilia extend from the plasma membrane of most vertebrate cells and mediate signaling pathways. Ciliary dysfunction underlies ciliopathies, which are genetic syndromes that manifest multiple clinical features, including renal cystic disease and obesity. THM1 (also termed TTC21B or IFT139) encodes a component of the intraflagellar transport-A complex and mutations in THM1 have been identified in 5% of individuals with ciliopathies. Consistent with this, deletion of murine Thm1 during late embryonic development results in cystic kidney disease. Here, we report that deletion of murine Thm1 during adulthood results in obesity, diabetes, hypertension and fatty liver disease, with gender differences in susceptibility to weight gain and metabolic dysfunction. Pair-feeding of Thm1 conditional knock-out mice relative to control littermates prevented the obesity and related disorders, indicating that hyperphagia caused the obese phenotype. Thm1 ablation resulted in increased localization of adenylyl cyclase III in primary cilia that were shortened, with bulbous distal tips on neurons of the hypothalamic arcuate nucleus, an integrative center for signals that regulate feeding and activity. In pre-obese Thm1 conditional knock-out mice, expression of anorexogenic pro-opiomelanocortin (Pomc) was decreased by 50% in the arcuate nucleus, which likely caused the hyperphagia. Fasting of Thm1 conditional knock-out mice did not alter Pomc nor orexogenic agouti-related neuropeptide (Agrp) expression, suggesting impaired sensing of changes in peripheral signals. Together, these data indicate that the Thm1-mutant ciliary defect diminishes sensitivity to feeding signals, which alters appetite regulation and leads to hyperphagia, obesity and metabolic disease. PMID:27482817

  1. What Is Down Syndrome?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... NDSS Home » Down Syndrome » What Is Down Syndrome? What Is Down Syndrome? In every cell in the ... chromosome 21 causes the characteristics of Down syndrome. What Causes Down Syndrome? Regardless of the type of ...

  2. No evidence for pathogenic variants or maternal effect of ZFP57 as the cause of Beckwith-Wiedemann Syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boonen, Susanne E; Hahnemann, Johanne M D; Mackay, Deborah;

    2012-01-01

    of the ZFP57 gene were reported in patients with transient neonatal diabetes mellitus type 1, showing hypomethylation at multiple imprinted loci, including KCNQ1OT1 DMR in some. The aim of our study was to determine whether ZFP57 alterations were a genetic cause of the hypomethylation at KCNQ1OT1 DMR......Beckwith-Wiedemann syndrome (BWS) is an overgrowth syndrome, which, in 50-60% of sporadic cases, is caused by hypomethylation of KCNQ1OT1 differentially methylated region (DMR) at chromosome 11p15.5. The underlying defect of this hypomethylation is largely unknown. Recently, recessive mutations...... in patients with BWS. We sequenced ZFP57 in 27 BWS probands and in 23 available mothers to test for a maternal effect. We identified three novel, presumably benign sequence variants in ZFP57; thus, we found no evidence for ZFP57 alterations as a major cause in sporadic BWS cases....

  3. De novo nonsense mutations in ASXL1 cause Bohring-Opitz syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hoischen, Alexander; van Bon, Bregje W M; Rodríguez-Santiago, Benjamín;

    2011-01-01

    Bohring-Opitz syndrome is characterized by severe intellectual disability, distinctive facial features and multiple congenital malformations. We sequenced the exomes of three individuals with Bohring-Opitz syndrome and in each identified heterozygous de novo nonsense mutations in ASXL1, which...

  4. Moyamoya disease associated with asymptomatic mosaic Turner syndrome: a rare cause of hemorrhagic stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manjila, Sunil; Miller, Benjamin R; Rao-Frisch, Anitha; Otvos, Balint; Mitchell, Anna; Bambakidis, Nicholas C; De Georgia, Michael A

    2014-01-01

    Moyamoya disease is a rare cerebrovascular anomaly involving the intracranial carotid arteries that can present clinically with either ischemic or hemorrhagic disease. Moyamoya syndrome, indistinguishable from moyamoya disease at presentation, is associated with multiple clinical conditions including neurofibromatosis type 1, autoimmune disease, prior radiation therapy, Down syndrome, and Turner syndrome. We present the first reported case of an adult patient with previously unrecognized mosaic Turner syndrome with acute subarachnoid and intracerebral hemorrhage as the initial manifestation of moyamoya syndrome. A 52-year-old woman was admitted with a subarachnoid hemorrhage with associated flame-shaped intracerebral hemorrhage in the left frontal lobe. Physical examination revealed short stature, pectus excavatum, small fingers, micrognathia, and mild facial dysmorphism. Cerebral angiography showed features consistent with bilateral moyamoya disease, aberrant intrathoracic vessels, and an unruptured 4-mm right superior hypophyseal aneurysm. Genetic analysis confirmed a diagnosis of mosaic Turner syndrome. Our case report is the first documented presentation of adult moyamoya syndrome with subarachnoid and intracerebral hemorrhage as the initial presentation of mosaic Turner syndrome. It illustrates the utility of genetic evaluation in patients with cerebrovascular disease and dysmorphism.

  5. Partial duplications of the ATRX gene cause the ATR-X syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thienpont, Bernard; de Ravel, Thomy; Van Esch, Hilde; Van Schoubroeck, Dominique; Moerman, Philippe; Vermeesch, Joris Robert; Fryns, Jean-Pierre; Froyen, Guy; Lacoste, Caroline; Badens, Catherine; Devriendt, Koen

    2007-10-01

    ATR-X syndrome is a rare syndromic X-linked mental retardation disorder. We report that some of the patients suspected of ATR-X carry large intragenic duplications in the ATRX gene, leading to an absence of ATRX mRNA and of the protein. These findings underscore the need for including quantitative analyses to mutation analysis of the ATRX gene.

  6. A rare cause of acute abdominal pain: Herlyn-Werner-Wunderlich syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aydin, Ramazan; Ozdemir, Ayse Zehra; Ozturk, Bahadir; Bilgici, Meltem Ceyhan; Tosun, Migraci

    2014-01-01

    Herlyn-Werner-Wunderlich (HWW) syndrome is a rare müllerian duct anomaly with uterus didelphys, unilateral obstructed hemivagina, and ipsilateral renal agenesis. Patients with this syndrome generally present after menarche with pelvic pain and mass and, rarely, primary infertility in later years. Strong suspicion and knowledge of this syndrome are mandatory for an accurate diagnosis. A 14-year-old female patient presented with acute retention of urine and abdominopelvic pain. Her condition was diagnosed with the use ultrasonography and magnetic resonance imaging as a case of HWW syndrome. She was treated with vaginal hemiseptal resection. The HWW syndrome should be considered among the differential diagnoses in girls with renal anomalies presenting with pelvic mass, symptoms of acute abdominal pain, and acute urinary retention. PMID:24378860

  7. NAA10 mutation causing a novel intellectual disability syndrome with Long QT due to N-terminal acetyltransferase impairment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casey, Jillian P.; Støve, Svein I.; McGorrian, Catherine; Galvin, Joseph; Blenski, Marina; Dunne, Aimee; Ennis, Sean; Brett, Francesca; King, Mary D.; Arnesen, Thomas; Lynch, Sally Ann

    2015-01-01

    We report two brothers from a non-consanguineous Irish family presenting with a novel syndrome characterised by intellectual disability, facial dysmorphism, scoliosis and long QT. Their mother has a milder phenotype including long QT. X-linked inheritance was suspected. Whole exome sequencing identified a novel missense variant (c.128 A > C; p.Tyr43Ser) in NAA10 (X chromosome) as the cause of the family’s disorder. Sanger sequencing confirmed that the mutation arose de novo in the carrier mother. NAA10 encodes the catalytic subunit of the major human N-terminal acetylation complex NatA. In vitro assays for the p.Tyr43Ser mutant enzyme showed a significant decrease in catalytic activity and reduced stability compared to wild-type Naa10 protein. NAA10 has previously been associated with Ogden syndrome, Lenz microphthalmia syndrome and non-syndromic developmental delay. Our findings expand the clinical spectrum of NAA10 and suggest that the proposed correlation between mutant Naa10 enzyme activity and phenotype severity is more complex than anticipated; the p.Tyr43Ser mutant enzyme has less catalytic activity than the p.Ser37Pro mutant associated with lethal Ogden syndrome but results in a milder phenotype. Importantly, we highlight the need for cardiac assessment in males and females with NAA10 variants as both patients and carriers can have long QT. PMID:26522270

  8. Takotsubo Syndrome as a Cause of False Acute Abdomen in the Early Postoperative Period After Bariatric Surgery-a Report of Two Cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viegas, Fabio; Viegas, Carla; França, Enio; Kleuser, Klaus; de Barros, Fernando

    2016-10-01

    Takotsubo syndrome, also known as broken-heart syndrome, stress-induced cardiomyopathy or transient apical ballooning syndrome, is a transient disorder characterized by segmental left ventricular failure in the absence of obstructive coronary artery disease. Most cases of Takotsubo syndrome are caused by acute stress that leads to a sudden, temporary weakening of the cardiac musculature. This stress triggers a rise in circulating catecholamine levels that results in acute ventricular dysfunction. In this report, we describe two cases of Takotsubo syndrome in the early postoperative period after bariatric surgery.

  9. Cerebral salt wasting syndrome in brain injury patients: a potential cause of hyponatremia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zafonte, R D; Mann, N R

    1997-05-01

    Hyponatremia is a common neuromedical problem seen in survivors of central nervous system injury. The etiology of this hyponatremia is often diagnosed as syndrome of inappropriate diuretic hormone (SIADH). Fluid restriction is usually the first line of treatment. However, this can exacerbate vasospasm and produce resultant ischemia. Cerebral salt wasting is a syndrome of renal sodium loss that may occur commonly after central nervous system injury, yet remains unrecognized. Treatment of cerebral salt wasting consists of hydration and salt replacement. This article uses a case report to discuss the importance of recognition of this syndrome, and treatment concerns are reviewed.

  10. Carpal tunnel syndrome caused by a giant cell tumour of the flexor tendon sheath.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meek, Marcel F; Sheikh, Zahid A; Quinton, David N

    2014-02-01

    A 76-year-old woman developed right carpal tunnel syndrome after being conservatively treated for tenosynovitis of the flexor tendons with associated mild carpal tunnel syndrome. A magnetic resonance imaging scan showed a tumour in the carpal tunnel. Re-exploration showed that the median nerve was being compressed by a giant cell tumour of the flexor tendon sheaths. Appropriate imaging is advised in patients with additional findings (such as swelling) or in patients with secondary carpal tunnel syndrome and incomplete response to conservative treatment, to exclude a space-occupying lesion.

  11. Compound heterozygous mutations in the noncoding RNU4ATAC cause Roifman Syndrome by disrupting minor intron splicing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merico, Daniele; Roifman, Maian; Braunschweig, Ulrich; Yuen, Ryan K. C.; Alexandrova, Roumiana; Bates, Andrea; Reid, Brenda; Nalpathamkalam, Thomas; Wang, Zhuozhi; Thiruvahindrapuram, Bhooma; Gray, Paul; Kakakios, Alyson; Peake, Jane; Hogarth, Stephanie; Manson, David; Buncic, Raymond; Pereira, Sergio L.; Herbrick, Jo-Anne; Blencowe, Benjamin J.; Roifman, Chaim M.; Scherer, Stephen W.

    2015-01-01

    Roifman Syndrome is a rare congenital disorder characterized by growth retardation, cognitive delay, spondyloepiphyseal dysplasia and antibody deficiency. Here we utilize whole-genome sequencing of Roifman Syndrome patients to reveal compound heterozygous rare variants that disrupt highly conserved positions of the RNU4ATAC small nuclear RNA gene, a minor spliceosome component that is essential for minor intron splicing. Targeted sequencing confirms allele segregation in six cases from four unrelated families. RNU4ATAC rare variants have been recently reported to cause microcephalic osteodysplastic primordial dwarfism, type I (MOPD1), whose phenotype is distinct from Roifman Syndrome. Strikingly, all six of the Roifman Syndrome cases have one variant that overlaps MOPD1-implicated structural elements, while the other variant overlaps a highly conserved structural element not previously implicated in disease. RNA-seq analysis confirms extensive and specific defects of minor intron splicing. Available allele frequency data suggest that recessive genetic disorders caused by RNU4ATAC rare variants may be more prevalent than previously reported. PMID:26522830

  12. A comprehensive review on experimental and clinical findings in intermediate syndrome caused by organophosphate poisoning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abdollahi, Mohammad, E-mail: mohammad.abdollahi@utoronto.ca; Karami-Mohajeri, Somayyeh

    2012-02-01

    Acute organophosphate (OP) intoxication is important because of its high morbidity and mortality and occurrence of muscular paralysis associated by inhibition of acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activity at the neuromuscular junction. Cholinergic crisis, intermediate syndrome (IMS), and OP-induced delayed neuropathy (OPIDN) are the evidences that can be observed in OP intoxication. The main cause of morbidity due to OP poisoning is IMS that occurs 24–96 h after poisoning. Mechanisms underlying the IMS are not fully known. Although the electrophysiological aspects of delayed neuropathy are best characterized, the IMS remain very little studied. The aim of this study was to revisit current knowledge related to OP and the IMS. For this purpose, a systematic review without date limitation was performed. A total of 599 relevant articles were found and reviewed. Data were categorized according to experimental and clinical studies. Occurrences of persistent AChE inhibition, electromyography changes, muscle cell injury, and oxidative stress are the most important pieces of evidence for involvement of IMS in OP toxicity. Delayed AChE inhibition, muscle necrosis, down regulation or desensitization of postsynaptic ACh receptors, failure of postsynaptic ACh release, and oxidative stress-related myopathy are involved in IMS. Toxicokinetic factors, such as a high lipid-solubility, duration of AChE inhibition and metabolite excretion, evolution of alterations on repetitive nerve stimulation (RNS), type and frequency of muscle lesions can estimate the probability of the IMS. Plasma AChE of less than 200 units is a predictor and the 30 Hz RNS decremental response could be a useful marker for the IMS.

  13. A comprehensive review on experimental and clinical findings in intermediate syndrome caused by organophosphate poisoning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Acute organophosphate (OP) intoxication is important because of its high morbidity and mortality and occurrence of muscular paralysis associated by inhibition of acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activity at the neuromuscular junction. Cholinergic crisis, intermediate syndrome (IMS), and OP-induced delayed neuropathy (OPIDN) are the evidences that can be observed in OP intoxication. The main cause of morbidity due to OP poisoning is IMS that occurs 24–96 h after poisoning. Mechanisms underlying the IMS are not fully known. Although the electrophysiological aspects of delayed neuropathy are best characterized, the IMS remain very little studied. The aim of this study was to revisit current knowledge related to OP and the IMS. For this purpose, a systematic review without date limitation was performed. A total of 599 relevant articles were found and reviewed. Data were categorized according to experimental and clinical studies. Occurrences of persistent AChE inhibition, electromyography changes, muscle cell injury, and oxidative stress are the most important pieces of evidence for involvement of IMS in OP toxicity. Delayed AChE inhibition, muscle necrosis, down regulation or desensitization of postsynaptic ACh receptors, failure of postsynaptic ACh release, and oxidative stress-related myopathy are involved in IMS. Toxicokinetic factors, such as a high lipid-solubility, duration of AChE inhibition and metabolite excretion, evolution of alterations on repetitive nerve stimulation (RNS), type and frequency of muscle lesions can estimate the probability of the IMS. Plasma AChE of less than 200 units is a predictor and the 30 Hz RNS decremental response could be a useful marker for the IMS.

  14. A frameshift mutation in the melanophilin gene causes the dilute coat colour in rabbit (Oryctolagus cuniculus) breeds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fontanesi, L; Scotti, E; Allain, D; Dall'olio, S

    2014-04-01

    In rabbit, the dilute locus is determined by a recessive mutated allele (d) that causes the dilution of both eumelanic and pheomelanic pigmentations. In mice, similar phenotypes are determined by mutations in the myosin VA, Rab27a and melanophilin (MLPH) genes. In this study, we investigated the rabbit MLPH gene and showed that a mutation in this gene appears responsible for the dilute coat colour in this species. Checkered Giant F1 families segregating for black and grey (diluted or blue) coat colour were first genotyped for a complex indel in intron 1 of the MLPH gene that was completely associated with the coat colour phenotype (θ = 0.00; LOD = 4.82). Then, we sequenced 6357 bp of the MLPH gene in 18 rabbits of different coat colours, including blue animals. A total of 165 polymorphisms were identified: 137 were in non-coding regions and 28 were in coding exons. One of them was a frameshift deletion in exon 5. Genotyping the half-sib families confirmed the complete cosegregation of this mutation with the blue coat colour. The mutation was analysed in 198 rabbits of 23 breeds. All Blue Vienna and all other blue/grey/ash rabbits in other breeds (Californian, Castor Rex, Checkered Giant, English Spot, Fairy Marburg and Fairy Pearly) were homozygous for this deletion. The identification of MLPH as the responsible gene for the dilute locus in rabbit provides a natural animal model for human Griscelli syndrome type 3 and a new mutant to study the role of this gene on pigmentation.

  15. Complex Regional Pain Syndrome Caused by Lumbar Herniated Intervertebral Disc Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Se Hee; Choi, Sang Sik; Lee, Mi Kyung; Kin, Jung Eun

    2016-07-01

    Most cases of complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS) occur after some inciting injury. There are a few cases of CRPS after an operation for disc disease. CRPS from a mild herniated intervertebral disc (HIVD) without surgical intervention is even rarer than CRPS after an operation for disc disease.A 22-year-old man was transferred to a pain clinic. He had continuously complained about back and right leg pain. He presented with a skin color change in the right lower leg, intermittent resting tremor, stiffness, and swelling in the right leg. He complained of a pulling sensation and numbness in his right buttock, posterior thigh, lateral calf, and ankle. This symptom was in accordance with L4/5 radiculopathy. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) also showed L4/5 HIVD that was central to the bilateral subarticular protrusion.He was diagnosed as having CRPS, which fits the revised International Association for the Study of Pain (IASP) criteria. He fulfilled 4 symptom categories (allodynia, temperature asymmetry and skin color change, sweating changes, decreased range of motion and motor dysfunction) and 3 of 4 sign categories (allodynia, temperature asymmetry and skin color changes, decreased range of motion and motor dysfunction). The bone scan and thermography also revealed CRPS.For the past 2 months, we have performed intensive treatments. But, he never became pain-free and walking for 5 minutes led to persistent leg pain. We decided to perform percutaneous nucleoplasty, which can directly decompress a HIVD. On the next day, he achieved dramatic symptom relief. The visual analog scale (VAS) score improved to 3, compared to the VAS score of 9 at the first visit. The skin color change, allodynia, and tremor in the right leg disappeared, and the temperature asymmetry normalized. Motor weakness of the right leg also recovered.We report an unusual case of CRPS that was caused by L4/5 HIVD without a history of trauma or surgery. It has a clear causal relationship between HIVD

  16. POMT2 mutations cause alpha-dystroglycan hypoglycosylation and Walker-Warburg syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Reeuwijk, J; Janssen, M; van den Elzen, C; de Bernabe, DBV; Sabatelli, P; Merlini, L; Boon, M; Scheffer, H; Brockington, M; Muntoni, F; Huynen, MA; Verrips, A; Walsh, CA; Barth, PG; Brunner, HG; van Bokhoven, H

    2005-01-01

    Background: Walker-Warburg syndrome (WWS) is an autosomal recessive condition characterised by congenital muscular dystrophy, structural brain defects, and eye malformations. Typical brain abnormalities are hydrocephalus, lissencephaly, agenesis of the corpus callosum, fusion of the hemispheres, cer

  17. POMT2 mutations cause alpha-dystroglycan hypoglycosylation and Walker-Warburg syndrome.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reeuwijk, J. van; Janssen, M.; Elzen, C. van der; Beltran Valero de Bernabe, D.; Sabatelli, P.; Merlini, L.; Boon, M.; Scheffer, H.; Brockington, M.; Muntoni, F.; Huynen, M.A.; Verrips, A.; Walsh, C.A.; Barth, P.G.; Brunner, H.G.; Bokhoven, J.H.L.M. van

    2005-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Walker-Warburg syndrome (WWS) is an autosomal recessive condition characterised by congenital muscular dystrophy, structural brain defects, and eye malformations. Typical brain abnormalities are hydrocephalus, lissencephaly, agenesis of the corpus callosum, fusion of the hemispheres, cer

  18. Burning mouth syndrome in Parkinson’s disease: dopamine as cure or cause?

    OpenAIRE

    Coon, Elizabeth A.; Laughlin, Ruple S.

    2012-01-01

    Burning mouth syndrome has been reported as being more common in Parkinson’s disease patients than the general population. While the pathophysiology is unclear, decreased dopamine levels and dopamine dysregulation are hypothesized to play a role. We report a patient with Parkinson’s disease who developed burning mouth syndrome with carbidopa/levodopa. Our patient had resolution of burning mouth symptoms when carbidopa/levodopa was replaced with a dopamine agonist. Based on our patient’s clini...

  19. HOXA1 mutations are not a common cause of Möbius syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Rankin, Jessica K.; Andrews, Caroline; Chan, Wai-man; Engle, Elizabeth C

    2010-01-01

    The HOXA1-related syndromes result from autosomal recessive truncating mutations in the homeobox transcription factor, HOXA1. Limited horizontal gaze and sensorineural deafness are the most common features; affected individuals can also have facial weakness, mental retardation, autism, motor disabilities, central hypoventilation, carotid artery and/or conotruncal heart defects. Möbius syndrome is also phenotypically heterogeneous, with minimal diagnostic criteria of nonprogressive facial weak...

  20. KCNJ10 gene mutations causing EAST syndrome (epilepsy, ataxia, sensorineural deafness, and tubulopathy) disrupt channel function

    OpenAIRE

    Reichold, Markus; Zdebik, Anselm A.; Lieberer, Evelyn; Rapedius, Markus; Schmidt, Katharina; Bandulik, Sascha; Sterner, Christina; Tegtmeier, Ines; Penton, David; Baukrowitz, Thomas; Hulton, Sally-Anne; Witzgall, Ralph; Ben-Zeev, Bruria; Howie, Alexander J.; Kleta, Robert

    2010-01-01

    Mutations of the KCNJ10 (Kir4.1) K+ channel underlie autosomal recessive epilepsy, ataxia, sensorineural deafness, and (a salt-wasting) renal tubulopathy (EAST) syndrome. We investigated the localization of KCNJ10 and the homologous KCNJ16 in kidney and the functional consequences of KCNJ10 mutations found in our patients with EAST syndrome. Kcnj10 and Kcnj16 were found in the basolateral membrane of mouse distal convoluted tubules, connecting tubules, and cortical collecting ducts. In the hu...

  1. Endoscopically assisted resection of a scapular osteochondroma causing snapping scapula syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Futani Hiroyuki; Fukunaga Satoru; Yoshiya Shinichi

    2007-01-01

    Abstract Background Osteochondroma is the most common benign bone tumor in the scapula. This condition might lead to snapping scapula syndrome, which is characterized by painful, audible, and/or palpable abnormal scapulothoracic motion. In the present case, this syndrome was successfully treated by use of endoscopically assisted resection of the osteochondroma. Case presentation A 41-year-old man had a tolerable pain in his scapular region over a 10 years' period. The pain developed gradually...

  2. Gain-of-function mutations in the phosphatidylserine synthase 1 (PTDSS1) gene cause Lenz-Majewski syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sousa, Sérgio B; Jenkins, Dagan; Chanudet, Estelle; Tasseva, Guergana; Ishida, Miho; Anderson, Glenn; Docker, James; Ryten, Mina; Sa, Joaquim; Saraiva, Jorge M; Barnicoat, Angela; Scott, Richard; Calder, Alistair; Wattanasirichaigoon, Duangrurdee; Chrzanowska, Krystyna; Simandlová, Martina; Van Maldergem, Lionel; Stanier, Philip; Beales, Philip L; Vance, Jean E; Moore, Gudrun E

    2014-01-01

    Lenz-Majewski syndrome (LMS) is a syndrome of intellectual disability and multiple congenital anomalies that features generalized craniotubular hyperostosis. By using whole-exome sequencing and selecting variants consistent with the predicted dominant de novo etiology of LMS, we identified causative heterozygous missense mutations in PTDSS1, which encodes phosphatidylserine synthase 1 (PSS1). PSS1 is one of two enzymes involved in the production of phosphatidylserine. Phosphatidylserine synthesis was increased in intact fibroblasts from affected individuals, and end-product inhibition of PSS1 by phosphatidylserine was markedly reduced. Therefore, these mutations cause a gain-of-function effect associated with regulatory dysfunction of PSS1. We have identified LMS as the first human disease, to our knowledge, caused by disrupted phosphatidylserine metabolism. Our results point to an unexplored link between phosphatidylserine synthesis and bone metabolism.

  3. Gain-of-function mutations in the phosphatidylserine synthase 1 (PTDSS1) gene cause Lenz-Majewski syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sousa, Sérgio B; Jenkins, Dagan; Chanudet, Estelle; Tasseva, Guergana; Ishida, Miho; Anderson, Glenn; Docker, James; Ryten, Mina; Sa, Joaquim; Saraiva, Jorge M; Barnicoat, Angela; Scott, Richard; Calder, Alistair; Wattanasirichaigoon, Duangrurdee; Chrzanowska, Krystyna; Simandlová, Martina; Van Maldergem, Lionel; Stanier, Philip; Beales, Philip L; Vance, Jean E; Moore, Gudrun E

    2014-01-01

    Lenz-Majewski syndrome (LMS) is a syndrome of intellectual disability and multiple congenital anomalies that features generalized craniotubular hyperostosis. By using whole-exome sequencing and selecting variants consistent with the predicted dominant de novo etiology of LMS, we identified causative heterozygous missense mutations in PTDSS1, which encodes phosphatidylserine synthase 1 (PSS1). PSS1 is one of two enzymes involved in the production of phosphatidylserine. Phosphatidylserine synthesis was increased in intact fibroblasts from affected individuals, and end-product inhibition of PSS1 by phosphatidylserine was markedly reduced. Therefore, these mutations cause a gain-of-function effect associated with regulatory dysfunction of PSS1. We have identified LMS as the first human disease, to our knowledge, caused by disrupted phosphatidylserine metabolism. Our results point to an unexplored link between phosphatidylserine synthesis and bone metabolism. PMID:24241535

  4. Clinical problems of colorectal cancer and endometrial cancer cases with unknown cause of tumor mismatch repair deficiency (suspected Lynch syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Buchanan DD

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Daniel D Buchanan,1,2 Christophe Rosty,1,3,4 Mark Clendenning,1 Amanda B Spurdle,5 Aung Ko Win2 1Oncogenomics Group, Genetic Epidemiology Laboratory, Department of Pathology, The University of Melbourne, Parkville, VIC, Australia; 2Centre for Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Melbourne School of Population and Global Health, The University of Melbourne, Parkville, VIC, Australia; 3Envoi Specialist Pathologists, Herston, QLD, Australia; 4School of Medicine, University of Queensland, Herston, QLD, Australia; 5Molecular Cancer Epidemiology Laboratory, Genetics and Computational Biology Division, QIMR Berghofer Medical Research Institute, Herston, QLD, AustraliaAbstract: Carriers of a germline mutation in one of the DNA mismatch repair (MMR genes have a high risk of developing numerous different cancers, predominantly colorectal cancer and endometrial cancer (known as Lynch syndrome. MMR gene mutation carriers develop tumors with MMR deficiency identified by tumor microsatellite instability or immunohistochemical loss of MMR protein expression. Tumor MMR deficiency is used to identify individuals most likely to carry an MMR gene mutation. However, MMR deficiency can also result from somatic inactivation, most commonly methylation of the MLH1 gene promoter. As tumor MMR testing of all incident colorectal and endometrial cancers (universal screening is becoming increasingly adopted, a growing clinical problem is emerging for individuals who have tumors that show MMR deficiency who are subsequently found not to carry an MMR gene mutation after genetic testing using the current diagnostic approaches (Sanger sequencing and multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification and who also show no evidence of MLH1 methylation. The inability to determine the underlying cause of tumor MMR deficiency in these "Lynch-like" or "suspected Lynch syndrome" cases has significant implications on the clinical management of these individuals and their relatives. When the

  5. Papular-purpuric "gloves and socks" syndrome caused by parvovirus B19 infection in Brazil: a case report

    OpenAIRE

    Marcos Tadashi Kakitani Toyoshima; Lilian Walsh Keller; Maria Luisa Barbosa; Edison Luiz Durigon

    2006-01-01

    Papular-purpuric "gloves and socks" syndrome (PPGSS) is a novel, rare, self-limiting dermatosis caused by human parvovirus B19. It consists of pruritic edema and erythema of the hands and feet in a gloves-and-socks distribution, and it is associated with oral lesions and fever. We present a case of PPGSS in a 22-year-old Brazilian woman. Clinical and laboratory evaluation, including serological tests, PCR and gene sequencing, confirmed the presence of human parvovirus B19.

  6. Quantitative and Sensitive Detection of GNAS Mutations Causing McCune-Albright Syndrome with Next Generation Sequencing

    OpenAIRE

    Satoshi Narumi; Kumihiro Matsuo; Tomohiro Ishii; Yusuke Tanahashi; Tomonobu Hasegawa

    2013-01-01

    Somatic activating GNAS mutations cause McCune-Albright syndrome (MAS). Owing to low mutation abundance, mutant-specific enrichment procedures, such as the peptide nucleic acid (PNA) method, are required to detect mutations in peripheral blood. Next generation sequencing (NGS) can analyze millions of PCR amplicons independently, thus it is expected to detect low-abundance GNAS mutations quantitatively. In the present study, we aimed to develop an NGS-based method to detect low-abundance somat...

  7. Epidermal expression of the truncated prelamin A causing Hutchinson–Gilford progeria syndrome: effects on keratinocytes, hair and skin

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Yuexia; Panteleyev, Andrey A.; Owens, David M.; Djabali, Karima; Stewart, Colin L.; Worman, Howard J.

    2008-01-01

    Hutchinson–Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS) is an accelerated aging disorder caused by point mutation in LMNA encoding A-type nuclear lamins. The mutations in LMNA activate a cryptic splice donor site, resulting in expression of a truncated, prenylated prelamin A called progerin. Expression of progerin leads to alterations in nuclear morphology, which may underlie pathology in HGPS. We generated transgenic mice expressing progerin in epidermis under control of a keratin 14 promoter. The mice ...

  8. Partial Oculocutaneous Albinism: Two Siblings with Features of both Hermansky Pudlak and Waardenburg's Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishaq, Mazhar; Niazi, Muhammad Khizar; Khan, Muhammad Saim; Nadeem, Yasser

    2015-04-01

    Albinism is an inherited abnormality of melanin synthesis with incidence of one per 20,000 births. Its clinical manifestations are related to the reduction or absence of pigmentation in the visual system and/or the skin and teguments. The clinical spectrum of Oculocutaneous Albinism (OCA) has four types ranging from OCA 1 - 4, of which OCA 1, A-1 is the most severe form. Partial cutaneous albinism which is a subtype of OCA is associated with systemic immunodeficiency disorders like Chediak Higashi (CHS), Griscelli (GS) and Hermansky-Pudlak (HPS) syndromes. A7 years boy was labeled initially as a case of Hermansky Pudlak syndrome at the age of 01 year. He as well as his 4 years old younger brother when examined in detail along with audiological investigations were diagnosed as a rare presentation of both Hermansky Pudlak and Waardenburg's syndrome.

  9. Silvery Hair with Speckled Dyspigmentation: Chediak-Higashi Syndrome in Three Indian Siblings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raghuveer, Chekuri; Murthy, Sambasiviah Chidambara; Mithuna, Mallur N; Suresh, Tamraparni

    2015-01-01

    Silvery hair is a common feature of Chediak-Higashi syndrome (CHS), Griscelli syndrome, and Elejalde syndrome. CHS is a rare autosomal recessive disorder characterized by partial oculocutaneous albinism, frequent pyogenic infections, and the presence of abnormal large granules in leukocytes and other granule containing cells. A 6-year-old girl had recurrent respiratory infections, speckled hypo- and hyper-pigmentation over exposed areas, and silvery hair since early childhood. Clinical features, laboratory investigations, hair microscopy, and skin biopsy findings were consistent with CHS. Her younger sisters aged 4 and 2 years had similar clinical, peripheral blood picture, and hair microscopy findings consistent with CHS. This case is reported for its rare occurrence in all the three siblings of the family, prominent pigmentary changes, and absent accelerated phase till date. Awareness, early recognition, and management of the condition may prevent the preterm morbidity associated. PMID:26622160

  10. Posterior Nutcracker Syndrome with Left Renal Vein Duplication: A Rare Cause of Haematuria in a 12-Year-Old Boy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Preza Fernandes

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The nutcracker syndrome (NCS is a rare cause of haematuria. It embraces an extended nonpathognomonic spectrum of symptoms that imply a difficult diagnosis. Ultimately it may be associated with substantial morbidity and even life-threatening events. We report a rare cause if a 12-year-old boy who presented with a history of frequent intermittent episodes of painless constant haematuria. The cystoscopy showed a bloody urine ejaculate from the left ureter meatus. The Doppler ultrasonography showed turbulent pattern of venous blood flow of the posterior renal vein branch behind the aorta. The abdominopelvic computer tomography (apCT revealed left renal vein (LRV duplication with a dilated retroaortic branch, entrapped between the aorta and the vertebral column, promoting the renal nutcracker syndrome. The patient was initially hospitalized and managed with oral iron supplements and continuous saline bladder irrigation, not requiring additional treatment. The child is currently asymptomatic, with haemoglobin value returning to normal and therefore proposed to conservative management with close followup. The authors present a case report of episodic haematuria caused by a rare entity—posterior nutcracker syndrome with renal vein duplication.

  11. Mutations in a TGF-β Ligand, TGFB3, Cause Syndromic Aortic Aneurysms and Dissections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertoli-Avella, Aida M.; Gillis, Elisabeth; Morisaki, Hiroko; Verhagen, Judith M.A.; de Graaf, Bianca M.; van de Beek, Gerarda; Gallo, Elena; Kruithof, Boudewijn P.T.; Venselaar, Hanka; Myers, Loretha A.; Laga, Steven; Doyle, Alexander J.; Oswald, Gretchen; van Cappellen, Gert W.A.; Yamanaka, Itaru; van der Helm, Robert M.; Beverloo, Berna; de Klein, Annelies; Pardo, Luba; Lammens, Martin; Evers, Christina; Devriendt, Koenraad; Dumoulein, Michiel; Timmermans, Janneke; Bruggenwirth, Hennie T.; Verheijen, Frans; Rodrigus, Inez; Baynam, Gareth; Kempers, Marlies; Saenen, Johan; Van Craenenbroeck, Emeline M.; Minatoya, Kenji; Matsukawa, Ritsu; Tsukube, Takuro; Kubo, Noriaki; Hofstra, Robert; Goumans, Marie Jose; Bekkers, Jos A.; Roos-Hesselink, Jolien W.; van de Laar, Ingrid M.B.H.; Dietz, Harry C.; Van Laer, Lut; Morisaki, Takayuki; Wessels, Marja W.; Loeys, Bart L.

    2015-01-01

    Background Aneurysms affecting the aorta are a common condition associated with high mortality as a result of aortic dissection or rupture. Investigations of the pathogenic mechanisms involved in syndromic types of thoracic aortic aneurysms, such as Marfan and Loeys-Dietz syndromes, have revealed an important contribution of disturbed transforming growth factor (TGF)-β signaling. Objectives This study sought to discover a novel gene causing syndromic aortic aneurysms in order to unravel the underlying pathogenesis. Methods We combined genome-wide linkage analysis, exome sequencing, and candidate gene Sanger sequencing in a total of 470 index cases with thoracic aortic aneurysms. Extensive cardiological examination, including physical examination, electrocardiography, and transthoracic echocardiography was performed. In adults, imaging of the entire aorta using computed tomography or magnetic resonance imaging was done. Results Here, we report on 43 patients from 11 families with syndromic presentations of aortic aneurysms caused by TGFB3 mutations. We demonstrate that TGFB3 mutations are associated with significant cardiovascular involvement, including thoracic/abdominal aortic aneurysm and dissection, and mitral valve disease. Other systemic features overlap clinically with Loeys-Dietz, Shprintzen-Goldberg, and Marfan syndromes, including cleft palate, bifid uvula, skeletal overgrowth, cervical spine instability and clubfoot deformity. In line with previous observations in aortic wall tissues of patients with mutations in effectors of TGF-β signaling (TGFBR1/2, SMAD3, and TGFB2), we confirm a paradoxical up-regulation of both canonical and noncanonical TGF-β signaling in association with up-regulation of the expression of TGF-β ligands. Conclusions Our findings emphasize the broad clinical variability associated with TGFB3 mutations and highlight the importance of early recognition of the disease because of high cardiovascular risk. PMID:25835445

  12. Vascular-type Ehlers-Danlos syndrome caused by a hitherto unknown genetic mutation: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kashizaki Fumihiro

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Vascular-type Ehlers-Danlos syndrome is an autosomal dominant disease that causes arterial spurting, intestinal perforation, uterine rupture and hemopneumothorax due to decreased production of type III collagen. The average age at death is 48 years old, and it is considered to be the most severe form of Ehlers-Danlos syndrome. We report the case of a 64-year-old Japanese woman and her 38-year-old daughter who were diagnosed with this disease. Case presentation A 64-year-old Japanese woman was referred to our hospital because of right anterior chest pain following cough and pharyngeal discomfort. Pleurisy was suspected due to the presence of right pleural effusion, so the next day she was referred to our department, where a detailed examination led to the diagnosis of hemothorax. The bleeding that caused the right hemothorax was difficult to control, so our patient was transferred to the Department of Thoracic Surgery for hemostasis control. Our patient’s personal history of uterine hemorrhage and skin ulcers, as well as the finding of skin fragility during surgery, were indicative of a weak connective tissue disease; therefore, after improvement of the hemothorax, a genetic analysis was performed. This revealed a heterozygous missense mutation in COL3A1, c.2411 G>T p.Gly804Val (exon 36. A detailed investigation conducted at a later date revealed that her daughter also had the same genetic mutation. This led to the diagnosis of vascular-type Ehlers-Danlos syndrome characterized by a new gene mutation. Conclusion We report a new genetic mutation associated with vascular-type Ehlers-Danlos syndrome. We present the clinical and imaging findings, and the disease and treatment course in this patient. We believe this information will be important in treating future cases of vascular-type Ehlers-Danlos syndrome in patients with this mutation.

  13. Hip abductor weakness is not the cause for iliotibial band syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grau, S; Krauss, I; Maiwald, C; Best, R; Horstmann, T

    2008-07-01

    Muscular deficits in the hip abductors are presumed to be a major factor in the development of Iliotibial Band Syndrome in runners. No definite relationship between muscular weakness of the hip abductors and the development of Iliotibial Band Syndrome or different ratios between hip adduction to abduction have been reported so far. Isokinetic measurements were taken from 10 healthy runners and 10 runners with Iliotibial Band Syndrome. Primary outcome variables were concentric, eccentric, and isometric peak torque of the hip abductors and adductors at 30 degrees/s, and a concentric endurance quotient at the same angle velocity. Differences in muscle strength of the hip abductors between healthy (CO) and injured runners (ITBS) were not statistically significant in any of the muscle functions tested. Both groups showed the same strength differences between hip adduction and abduction, and increased strength in hip adduction. Weakness of hip abductors does not seem to play a role in the etiology of Iliotibial Band Syndrome in runners, since dynamic and static strength measurements did not differ between groups, and differences between hip abduction and adduction were the same. Strengthening of hip abductors seems to have little effect on the prevention of Iliotibial Band Syndrome in runners.

  14. Evaluation of Presumably Disease Causing SCN1A Variants in a Cohort of Common Epilepsy Syndromes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dennis Lal

    Full Text Available The SCN1A gene, coding for the voltage-gated Na+ channel alpha subunit NaV1.1, is the clinically most relevant epilepsy gene. With the advent of high-throughput next-generation sequencing, clinical laboratories are generating an ever-increasing catalogue of SCN1A variants. Variants are more likely to be classified as pathogenic if they have already been identified previously in a patient with epilepsy. Here, we critically re-evaluate the pathogenicity of this class of variants in a cohort of patients with common epilepsy syndromes and subsequently ask whether a significant fraction of benign variants have been misclassified as pathogenic.We screened a discovery cohort of 448 patients with a broad range of common genetic epilepsies and 734 controls for previously reported SCN1A mutations that were assumed to be disease causing. We re-evaluated the evidence for pathogenicity of the identified variants using in silico predictions, segregation, original reports, available functional data and assessment of allele frequencies in healthy individuals as well as in a follow up cohort of 777 patients.We identified 8 known missense mutations, previously reported as pathogenic, in a total of 17 unrelated epilepsy patients (17/448; 3.80%. Our re-evaluation indicates that 7 out of these 8 variants (p.R27T; p.R28C; p.R542Q; p.R604H; p.T1250M; p.E1308D; p.R1928G; NP_001159435.1 are not pathogenic. Only the p.T1174S mutation may be considered as a genetic risk factor for epilepsy of small effect size based on the enrichment in patients (P = 6.60 x 10-4; OR = 0.32, fishers exact test, previous functional studies but incomplete penetrance. Thus, incorporation of previous studies in genetic counseling of SCN1A sequencing results is challenging and may produce incorrect conclusions.

  15. Multiple nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome associated with congenital orbital teratoma, caused by a PTCH1 frameshift mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, A L; Carvalho, A; Cabral, R; Carneiro, V; Gilardi, P; Duarte, C P; Puente-Prieto, J; Santos, P; Mota-Vieira, L

    2014-07-25

    Gorlin-Goltz syndrome, or nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome (NBCCS), is a rare autosomal dominant disorder caused by mutations in the PTCH1 gene and shows a high level of penetrance and variable expressivity. The syndrome is characterized by developmental abnormalities or neoplasms and is diagnosed with 2 major criteria, or with 1 major and 2 minor criteria. Here, we report a new clinical manifestation associated with this syndrome in a boy affected by NBCCS who had congenital orbital teratoma at birth. Later, at the age of 15 years, he presented with 4 major and 4 minor criteria of NBCCS, including multiple basal cell carcinoma and 2 odontogenic keratocysts of the jaw, both confirmed by histology, more than 5 palmar pits, calcification of the cerebral falx, extensive meningeal calcifications, macrocephaly, hypertelorism, frontal bosses, and kyphoscoliosis. PTCH1 mutation analysis revealed the heterozygous germline mutation c.290dupA. This mutation generated a frameshift within exon 2 and an early premature stop codon (p.Asn97LysfsX43), predicting a truncated protein with complete loss of function. Identification of this mutation is useful for genetic counseling. Although the clinical symptoms are well-known, our case contributes to the understanding of phenotypic variability in NBCCS, highlighting that PTCH1 mutations cannot be used for predicting disease burden and reinforces the need of a multidisciplinary team in the diagnosis, treatment, and follow-up of NBCCS patients.

  16. A thymic neuroendocrine tumour in a young female: a rare cause of relapsing and remitting Cushing’s syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M J Trott

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available We present a case of a young female patient with a rare cause of relapsing and remitting Cushing’s syndrome due to ectopic ACTH secretion from a thymic neuroendocrine tumour. A 34-year-old female presented with a constellation of symptoms of Cushing’s syndrome, including facial swelling, muscle weakness and cognitive impairment. We use the terms ‘relapsing and remitting’ in this case report, given the unpredictable time course of symptoms, which led to a delay of 2 years before the correct diagnosis of hypercortisolaemia. Diagnostic workup confirmed ectopic ACTH secretion, and a thymic mass was seen on mediastinal imaging. The patient subsequently underwent thymectomy with complete resolution of her symptoms. Several case series have documented the association of Cushing’s syndrome with thymic neuroendocrine tumours (NETs, although to our knowledge there are a few published cases of patients with relapsing and remitting symptoms. This case is also notable for the absence of features of the MEN-1 syndrome, along with the female gender of our patient and her history of non-smoking.

  17. Loss-of-function mutations in PTPN11 cause metachondromatosis, but not Ollier disease or Maffucci syndrome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margot E Bowen

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Metachondromatosis (MC is a rare, autosomal dominant, incompletely penetrant combined exostosis and enchondromatosis tumor syndrome. MC is clinically distinct from other multiple exostosis or multiple enchondromatosis syndromes and is unlinked to EXT1 and EXT2, the genes responsible for autosomal dominant multiple osteochondromas (MO. To identify a gene for MC, we performed linkage analysis with high-density SNP arrays in a single family, used a targeted array to capture exons and promoter sequences from the linked interval in 16 participants from 11 MC families, and sequenced the captured DNA using high-throughput parallel sequencing technologies. DNA capture and parallel sequencing identified heterozygous putative loss-of-function mutations in PTPN11 in 4 of the 11 families. Sanger sequence analysis of PTPN11 coding regions in a total of 17 MC families identified mutations in 10 of them (5 frameshift, 2 nonsense, and 3 splice-site mutations. Copy number analysis of sequencing reads from a second targeted capture that included the entire PTPN11 gene identified an additional family with a 15 kb deletion spanning exon 7 of PTPN11. Microdissected MC lesions from two patients with PTPN11 mutations demonstrated loss-of-heterozygosity for the wild-type allele. We next sequenced PTPN11 in DNA samples from 54 patients with the multiple enchondromatosis disorders Ollier disease or Maffucci syndrome, but found no coding sequence PTPN11 mutations. We conclude that heterozygous loss-of-function mutations in PTPN11 are a frequent cause of MC, that lesions in patients with MC appear to arise following a "second hit," that MC may be locus heterogeneous since 1 familial and 5 sporadically occurring cases lacked obvious disease-causing PTPN11 mutations, and that PTPN11 mutations are not a common cause of Ollier disease or Maffucci syndrome.

  18. An unusual cause of recurrent spontaneous pneumothorax: the Mounier-Kuhn syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unlu, Elif Nisa; Annakkaya, Ali Nihat; Balbay, Ege Gulec; Aydın, Leyla Yilmaz; Safcı, Sinem; Boran, Mertay; Guclu, Derya

    2016-01-01

    We present a case of 63-year-old man who was referred to the emergency department with a right-sided pneumothorax. He had a history of spontaneous pneumothorax for 2 times. The chest computed tomographic scan showed tracheobronchomegaly with an increase in the diameter of the trachea and right and left main bronchus. Fiberoptic bronchoscopy revealed enlarged trachea and both main bronchus with diverticulas. These findings are consistent with a diagnosis of Mounier-Kuhn syndrome. Mounier-Kuhn syndrome is a rare clinical and radiologic condition. It is characterized by a tracheal and bronchial dilation. Diagnosis is made by computed tomography and bronchoscopy. Mounier-Kuhn syndrome should be kept in mind in the differential diagnosis of recurrent spontaneous pneumothorax. PMID:26127019

  19. Catheter-directed Thrombolysis in Acute Superior Vena Cava Syndrome Caused by Central Venous Catheters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Jie; Kawai, Tasuo; Irani, Zubin

    2015-01-01

    Indwelling central venous catheters have been reported to increase the risk of superior venous cava (SVC) syndrome. This case report describes the development of acute SVC syndrome in a 28-year-old woman with end-stage renal disease implanted with a left-side hemodialysis reliable outflow graft and a right-side double lumen hemodialysis catheter via internal jugular veins. Her symptoms were not alleviated after catheter removal and systemic anticoagulation therapy. She was eventually treated with catheter-directed thrombolysis and a predischarge computer tomographic venogram on postthrombolytic procedure day 7 showed patent central veins and patient remained asymptomatic. This case demonstrates that catheter-directed thrombolysis can be safely employed to treat refractory catheter-induced acute SVC syndrome in end-stage renal disease patients.

  20. An unusual cause of recurrent spontaneous pneumothorax: the Mounier-Kuhn syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unlu, Elif Nisa; Annakkaya, Ali Nihat; Balbay, Ege Gulec; Aydın, Leyla Yilmaz; Safcı, Sinem; Boran, Mertay; Guclu, Derya

    2016-01-01

    We present a case of 63-year-old man who was referred to the emergency department with a right-sided pneumothorax. He had a history of spontaneous pneumothorax for 2 times. The chest computed tomographic scan showed tracheobronchomegaly with an increase in the diameter of the trachea and right and left main bronchus. Fiberoptic bronchoscopy revealed enlarged trachea and both main bronchus with diverticulas. These findings are consistent with a diagnosis of Mounier-Kuhn syndrome. Mounier-Kuhn syndrome is a rare clinical and radiologic condition. It is characterized by a tracheal and bronchial dilation. Diagnosis is made by computed tomography and bronchoscopy. Mounier-Kuhn syndrome should be kept in mind in the differential diagnosis of recurrent spontaneous pneumothorax.

  1. A genetic and molecular update on adrenocortical causes of Cushing syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lodish, Maya; Stratakis, Constantine A

    2016-05-01

    Primary adrenal Cushing syndrome is the result of cortisol hypersecretion mainly by adenomas and, rarely, by bilateral micronodular or macronodular adrenocortical hyperplasia. cAMP-dependent protein kinase A (PKA) signalling is the major activator of cortisol secretion in the adrenal cortex. Many adenomas and hyperplasias associated with primary hypercortisolism carry somatic or germline mutations in genes that encode constituents of the cAMP-PKA pathway. In this Review, we discuss Cushing syndrome and its linkage to dysregulated cAMP-PKA signalling, with a focus on genetic findings in the past few years. In addition, we discuss the presence of germline inactivating mutations in ARMC5 in patients with primary bilateral macronodular adrenocortical hyperplasia. This finding has implications for genetic counselling of affected patients; hitherto, most patients with this form of adrenal hyperplasia and Cushing syndrome were thought to have a sporadic and not a familial disorder.

  2. Edward’s syndrome: A rare cause of difficult intubation-utility of left molar approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teena Bansal

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Edward’s syndrome (trisomy 18 is an autosomal abnormality with dysmorphic face, visceral deformities and delayed mental and motor development including congenital heart disease. Challenges may arise during mask ventilation, laryngoscopy and/or intubation of the trachea due to dysmorphic face. Difficult airway cart should be kept ready. Left molar approach using a standard Macintosh blade improves the laryngoscopic view in patients with difficult midline laryngoscopy. We hereby present a case report of a 2 year old male child with Edward’s syndrome posted for evacuation and drainage of brain abscess, intubated successfully using left molar approach.

  3. A cholestatic syndrome may be a surprising cause of medical error

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Pătrășescu

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Autoimmune cholangitis defines a spectrum of cholestatic liver diseases that are characterized by inflammation of bile ducts and a reasonable response to immunosuppressive therapy. The two most common diseases associated with this term in the literature are: an overlap syndrome of primary biliary cirrhosis and autoimmune hepatitis and a form of hyper IgG4 syndrome (currently associated with autoimmune pancreatitis. Liver biopsy is mandatory for the diagnosis. There are, whatsoever, in clinical practice, many cases that do not meet current diagnostic criteria but that have a good response to corticosteroid treatment.

  4. De novo mutations in Plxnd1 and Rev3l cause mobius syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Kayserili Karabey, Hülya; Tomas-Roca, Laura; Tsaalbi-Shtylik, Anastasia; Jansen, Jacob G.; Singh, Manvendra K.; Epstein, Jonathan A.; Altunoglu, Umut; Verzijl, Harriette; Soria, Laura; van Beusekom, Ellen; Roscioli, Tony; Iqbal, Zafar; Gilissen, Christian; Hoischen, Alexander; de Brouwer,Arjan P. M.; Erasmus, Corrie; Schubert, Dirk; Brunner, Han; Aytes, Antonio Perez; Marin, Faustino; Aroca, Pilar; Carta, Arturo; de Wind, Niels; Padberg, George W.; van Bokhoven, Hans

    2015-01-01

    Mobius syndrome (MBS) is a neurological disorder that is characterized by paralysis of the facial nerves and variable other congenital anomalies. The aetiology of this syndrome has been enigmatic since the initial descriptions by von Graefe in 1880 and by Mobius in 1888, and it has been debated for decades whether MBS has a genetic or a non-genetic aetiology. Here, we report de novo mutations affecting two genes, PLXND1 and REV3L in MBS patients. PLXND1 and REV3L represent totally unrelated p...

  5. An unusual cause of spontaneous pneumothorax: the Mounier-Kuhn syndrome.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Kent, B D

    2011-05-01

    We present the case of a 54-year old woman referred to our service with an unusual presentation of an under-diagnosed condition. A life-long non-smoker, she was referred to respiratory services by our emergency department with a left sided pneumothorax, progressive dyspnoea on exertion, and recurrent chest infections. Subsequent investigation yielded findings consistent with Mounier-Kuhn syndrome (Tracheobronchomegaly), a condition characterised by marked dilatation of the proximal airways, recurrent chest infection, and consequent emphysema and bronchiectasis. Although rarely diagnosed, some degree of Mounier-Kuhn syndrome may occur in up to 1 in 500 adults.

  6. An unusual cause of spontaneous pneumothorax: the Mounier-Kuhn syndrome.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Kent, B D

    2012-02-01

    We present the case of a 54-year old woman referred to our service with an unusual presentation of an under-diagnosed condition. A life-long non-smoker, she was referred to respiratory services by our emergency department with a left sided pneumothorax, progressive dyspnoea on exertion, and recurrent chest infections. Subsequent investigation yielded findings consistent with Mounier-Kuhn syndrome (Tracheobronchomegaly), a condition characterised by marked dilatation of the proximal airways, recurrent chest infection, and consequent emphysema and bronchiectasis. Although rarely diagnosed, some degree of Mounier-Kuhn syndrome may occur in up to 1 in 500 adults.

  7. Impact of timing on surgical outcome in patients with cauda equina syndrome caused by lumbar disc herniation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bečulić, Hakija; Skomorac, Rasim; Jusić, Aldin; Alić, Fahrudin; Imamović, Melica; Mekić-Abazović, Alma; Efendić, Alma; Brkić, Harun; Denjalić, Amir

    2016-08-01

    Aim To analyze the relationship between timing of surgery and outcome in patients with cauda equina syndrome caused by lumbar disc herniation. Methods A retrospective, non-randomized clinical study included 25 consecutive patients with cauda equina syndrome (CES) caused by lumbar disc herniation. All patients were operated within 24 hours after hospitalization at the Department of Neurosurgery, Cantonal Hospital Zenica, Bosnia and Herzegovina, between January 2000 and December 2010. All patients were evaluated before surgery on the basis of complete history, neurological examination and neuroimaging evaluations using CT (computed tomography)and MRI (magnetic resonance imaging). Results Statistically significant difference between preoperative and postoperative bladder (p=0.05) and bowel (p=0.05) function was found. A significant number of patients had bladder and bowel recovery after surgery, nine (36%) and 11 (44%), respectively. Significant recovery of muscle strength was noted with complete recovery(5/5) in 12 (48%) and partial recovery in 13 (52%) patients. Complete sensory recovery was noted in 16 (64%), incomplete in four (16%), and in five (20%) patients there were no changes. Most commonly, patients with complete sensory recovery were operated within 48 hours of symptom onset. In most patients early surgery was associated with better outcome. Conclusion This research showed that early decompression correlated with better outcome. Patients with cauda equina syndrome must be cleared for surgery in optimal conditions and, if it possible within optimal timing for recovery (within 48 hours). PMID:27452326

  8. Compound heterozygous PNPLA6 mutations cause Boucher–Neuhäuser syndrome with late-onset ataxia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deik, A.; Johannes, B.; Rucker, J. C.; Sánchez, E.; Brodie, S. E.; Deegan, E.; Landy, K.; Kajiwara, Y.; Scelsa, S.; Saunders-Pullman, R.

    2014-01-01

    PNPLA6 mutations, known to be associated with the development of motor neuron phenotypes, have recently been identified in families with Boucher–Neuhäuser syndrome. Boucher–Neuhäuser is a rare autosomal recessive syndrome characterized by the co-occurrence of cerebellar ataxia, hypogonadotropic hypogonadism, and chorioretinal dystrophy. Gait ataxia in Boucher–Neuhäuser usually manifests before early adulthood, although onset in the third or fourth decade has also been reported. However, given the recent identification of PNPLA6 mutations as the cause of this condition, the determining factors of age of symptom onset still need to be established. Here, we have identified a sporadic Boucher–Neuhäuser case with late-onset gait ataxia and relatively milder retinal changes due to compound heterozygous PNPLA6 mutations. Compound heterozygosity was confirmed by cloning and sequencing the patient’s genomic DNA from coding exons 26–29. Furthermore, both mutations (one novel and one known) fell in the phospholipase esterase domain, where most pathogenic mutations seem to cluster. Taken together, we herein confirm PNPLA6 mutations as the leading cause of Boucher–Neuhäuser syndrome and suggest inquiring about a history of hypogonadism or visual changes in patients presenting with late-onset gait ataxia. We also advocate for neuroophthalmologic evaluation in suspected cases. PMID:25267340

  9. Compound heterozygous PNPLA6 mutations cause Boucher-Neuhäuser syndrome with late-onset ataxia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deik, A; Johannes, B; Rucker, J C; Sánchez, E; Brodie, S E; Deegan, E; Landy, K; Kajiwara, Y; Scelsa, S; Saunders-Pullman, R; Paisán-Ruiz, C

    2014-12-01

    PNPLA6 mutations, known to be associated with the development of motor neuron phenotypes, have recently been identified in families with Boucher-Neuhäuser syndrome. Boucher-Neuhäuser is a rare autosomal recessive syndrome characterized by the co-occurrence of cerebellar ataxia, hypogonadotropic hypogonadism, and chorioretinal dystrophy. Gait ataxia in Boucher-Neuhäuser usually manifests before early adulthood, although onset in the third or fourth decade has also been reported. However, given the recent identification of PNPLA6 mutations as the cause of this condition, the determining factors of age of symptom onset still need to be established. Here, we have identified a sporadic Boucher-Neuhäuser case with late-onset gait ataxia and relatively milder retinal changes due to compound heterozygous PNPLA6 mutations. Compound heterozygosity was confirmed by cloning and sequencing the patient's genomic DNA from coding exons 26-29. Furthermore, both mutations (one novel and one known) fell in the phospholipase esterase domain, where most pathogenic mutations seem to cluster. Taken together, we herein confirm PNPLA6 mutations as the leading cause of Boucher-Neuhäuser syndrome and suggest inquiring about a history of hypogonadism or visual changes in patients presenting with late-onset gait ataxia. We also advocate for neuroophthalmologic evaluation in suspected cases. PMID:25267340

  10. Hepatic Rupture Caused by Hemolysis, Elevated Liver Enzyme, and Low Platelet Count Syndrome: A Case Report with Computed Tomographic and Conventional Angiographic Findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Cheong Bok; Ahn, Jae Hong; Choi, Soo Jung; Lee, Jong Hyeog; Park, Man Soo; Jung, Seung Mun; Ryu, Dae Sik [Dept. of Radiology, Asan Foundation, Gangneung Asan Hospital, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Gangneung (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-03-15

    The authors recently obtained successful clinical outcome after embolization of the hepatic artery and right inferior phrenic artery in a pregnant patient with hemolysis, elevated liver enzyme, and low platelet count (HELLP) syndrome causing hepatic rupture. We report the computed tomographic and conventional angiographic findings in a case of HELLP syndrome, resulting in hepatic infarction and rupture with active bleeding.

  11. Marfan Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marfan syndrome is a disorder that affects connective tissue. Connective tissues are proteins that support skin, bones, ... fibrillin. A problem with the fibrillin gene causes Marfan syndrome. Marfan syndrome can be mild to severe, ...

  12. FBXO7 mutations cause autosomal recessive, early-onset parkinsonian-pyramidal syndrome.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fonzo, A. Di; Dekker, M.C.J.; Montagna, P.; Baruzzi, A.; Yonova, E.H.; Correia Guedes, L.; Szczerbinska, A.; Zhao, T.; Dubbel-Hulsman, L.O.; Wouters, C.H.; Graaff, E. de; Oyen, W.J.G.; Simons, E.J.; Breedveld, G.J.; Oostra, B.A.; Horstink, M.W.I.M.; Bonifati, V.

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The combination of early-onset, progressive parkinsonism with pyramidal tract signs has been known as pallido-pyramidal or parkinsonian-pyramidal syndrome since the first description by Davison in 1954. Very recently, a locus was mapped in a single family with an overlapping phenotype, a

  13. Mutations in the human TBX4 gene cause small patella syndrome.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bongers, M.H.F.; Duijf, P.H.; Beersum, S.E.C. van; Schoots, J.; Kampen, A. van; Burckhardt, A.; Hamel, B.C.J.; Losan, F.; Hoefsloot, L.H.; Yntema, H.G.; Knoers, N.V.A.M.; Bokhoven, J.H.L.M. van

    2004-01-01

    Small patella syndrome (SPS) is an autosomal-dominant skeletal dysplasia characterized by patellar aplasia or hypoplasia and by anomalies of the pelvis and feet, including disrupted ossification of the ischia and inferior pubic rami. We identified an SPS critical region of 5.6 cM on chromosome 17q22

  14. Middle aortic syndrome as a cause of heart failure in children and its management.

    OpenAIRE

    Gupta, S.; Goswami, B; Ghosh, D C; Sen Gupta, A N

    1981-01-01

    Two cases of middle aortic syndrome in children are described along with two other cases reported earlier. In childhood, this disease may present as incipient or overt cardiac failure. Surgical treatment should be undertaken based on an objective assessment of the severity of the stricture and after taking into account the future growth of the child.

  15. A frame-shift mutation of PMS2 is a widespread cause of Lynch syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clendenning, Mark; Senter, Leigha; Hampel, Heather;

    2008-01-01

    on immunohistochemical analysis. RESULTS: We have identified a frequently occurring frame-shift mutation (c.736_741del6ins11) in 12 ostensibly unrelated Lynch syndrome patients (20% of patients we have identified with a deleterious mutation in PMS2, n=61). These individuals all display the rare allele (population...

  16. Treatment of Guillain-Barré syndrome and causes and treatment of residual fatigue

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.P.J. Garssen (Marcel)

    2005-01-01

    textabstractChapter 1 is the general introduction of this thesis, in which di.erent aspects of the Guillain-Barré syndrome (GBS) are described. GBS is an acute post-infectious polyneuropathy, in which the immune system plays an important role. Insight in pathogenesis, clinical and electrophysiologic

  17. Heterozygous missense mutations in SMARCA2 cause Nicolaides-Baraitser syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Houdt, Jeroen K. J.; Nowakowska, Beata Anna; Sousa, Sergio B.; van Schaik, Barbera D. C.; Seuntjens, Eve; Avonce, Nelson; Sifrim, Alejandro; Abdul-Rahman, Omar A.; van den Boogaard, Marie-Jose H.; Bottani, Armand; Castori, Marco; Cormier-Daire, Valerie; Deardorff, Matthew A.; Filges, Isabel; Fryer, Alan; Fryns, Jean-Pierre; Gana, Simone; Garavelli, Livia; Gillessen-Kaesbach, Gabriele; Hall, Bryan D.; Horn, Denise; Huylebroeck, Danny; Klapecki, Jakub; Krajewska-Walasek, Malgorzata; Kuechler, Alma; Lines, Matthew A.; Maas, Saskia; MacDermot, Kay D.; McKee, Shane; Magee, Alex; de Man, Stella A.; Moreau, Yves; Morice-Picard, Fanny; Obersztyn, Ewa; Pilch, Jacek; Rosser, Elizabeth; Shannon, Nora; Stolte-Dijkstra, Irene; Van Dijck, Patrick; Vilain, Catheline; Vogels, Annick; Wakeling, Emma; Wieczorek, Dagmar; Wilson, Louise; Zuffardi, Orsetta; van Kampen, Antoine H. C.; Devriendt, Koenraad; Hennekam, Raoul; Vermeesch, Joris Robert

    2012-01-01

    Nicolaides-Baraitser syndrome (NBS) is characterized by sparse hair, distinctive facial morphology, distal-limb anomalies and intellectual disability. We sequenced the exomes of ten individuals with NBS and identified heterozygous variants in SMARCA2 in eight of them. Extended molecular screening id

  18. Mutations in genes encoding subunits of RNA polymerases I and III cause Treacher Collins syndrome.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dauwerse, J.G.; Dixon, J.; Seland, S.; Ruivenkamp, C.A.; Haeringen, A. van; Hoefsloot, L.H.; Peters, D.J.; Boers, A.C.; Daumer-Haas, C.; Maiwald, R.; Zweier, C.; Kerr, B.; Cobo, A.M.; Toral, J.F.; Hoogeboom, A.J.M.; Lohmann, D.R.; Hehr, U.; Dixon, M.J.; Breuning, M.H.; Wieczorek, D.

    2011-01-01

    We identified a deletion of a gene encoding a subunit of RNA polymerases I and III, POLR1D, in an individual with Treacher Collins syndrome (TCS). Subsequently, we detected 20 additional heterozygous mutations of POLR1D in 252 individuals with TCS. Furthermore, we discovered mutations in both allele

  19. Churg-Strauss syndrome involving the breast: a rare cause of eosinophilic mastitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Villalba-Nuno, Virtudes [Department of Radiology, C.A.P. II Sant Feliu, Marquesa de Castellbell, Sant Feliu de Llobregat (Spain); Sabate, Josep M.; Gomez, Antonio; Torrubia, Sofia [Department of Radiology, Hospital de Sant Pau, Barcelona (Spain); Vidaller, Antonio [Department of Internal Medicine, Hospital de Bellvitge, L' Hospitalet de Llobregat (Spain); Catala, Isabel [Department of Pathology, Hospital de Bellvitge, L' Hospitalet de Llobregat (Spain); Escobedo, Agustin [Department of Oncology, Hospital Duran i Reynals, L' Hospitalet de Llobregat (Spain)

    2002-03-01

    Churg-Strauss syndrome is a rare immunoallergic disorder that usually affects lungs, skin and nervous system. The clinical and radiological findings of Churg-Strauss disease involving the breast are reported and attention is drawn to the fact that, although uncommonly, the breast can be involved by immunological diseases. (orig.)

  20. Churg-Strauss syndrome involving the breast: a rare cause of eosinophilic mastitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Churg-Strauss syndrome is a rare immunoallergic disorder that usually affects lungs, skin and nervous system. The clinical and radiological findings of Churg-Strauss disease involving the breast are reported and attention is drawn to the fact that, although uncommonly, the breast can be involved by immunological diseases. (orig.)

  1. Ramsay Hunt Syndrome : Clinical Characterization of Progressive Myoclonus Ataxia Caused by GOSR2 Mutation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Egmond, Martje E.; Verschuuren - Bemelmans, Cornelia; Nibbeling, Esther A.; Elting, Jan Willem J.; Sival, Deborah A.; Brouwer, Oebele F.; de Vries, Jeroen J.; Kremer, Hubertus P.; Sinke, Richard J.; Tijssen, Marina A.; de Koning, Tom J.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Ramsay Hunt syndrome (progressive myoclonus ataxia) is a descriptive diagnosis characterized by myoclonus, ataxia, and infrequent seizures. Often the etiology cannot be determined. Recently, a mutation in the GOSR2 gene (c.430G>T, p.Gly144Trp) was reported in 6 patients with childhood-on

  2. A very rare cause of dyspnea with a unique presentation on a computed tomography scan of the chest: macrophage activation syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brandao-Neto, Rodrigo Antonio [Universidade de Sao Paulo (USP), SP (Brazil). Hospital das Clinicas. Clinical Emergency Dept.; Santana, Alfredo Nicodemos Cruz; Danilovic, Debora Lucia Seguro; Mendonca, Berenice Bilharinho de [Universidade de Sao Paulo (USP), SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Medicina]. E-mail: alfredonicodemos@hotmail.com; Bernardi, Fabiola Del Carlo [Universidade de Sao Paulo (USP), SP (Brazil). Hospital das Clinicas. Dept. of Pathology; Barbas, Carmen Silvia Valente [Universidade de Sao Paulo (USP), SP (Brazil). Hospital das Clinicas. Dept. of Pulmonology

    2008-02-15

    Macrophage activation syndrome is a rare and potentially life-threatening disease. It occurs due to immune dysregulation manifested as excessive macrophage proliferation, typically causing hepatosplenomegaly, pancytopenia and hepatic dysfunction. Here, we report an unusual case of macrophage activation syndrome presenting as dyspnea, as well as (reported here for the first time) high resolution computed tomography findings of an excavated nodule, diffuse ground glass opacities and consolidations (mimicking severe pneumonia or alveolar hemorrhage). The patient was successfully treated with human immunoglobulin. We recommend that macrophage activation syndrome be considered in the differential diagnosis of respiratory failure. Rapid diagnosis and treatment are essential to achieving favorable outcomes in patients with this syndrome. (author)

  3. Food Protein-Induced Enterocolitis Syndrome as a Cause for Infant Hypotension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marna Rayl Greenberg

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Infants with food protein-induced enterocolitis syndrome (FPIES may present to the emergency department (ED with vomiting and hypotension. A previously healthy, 5-month-old male presented with vomiting and hypotension 2 to 3 hours after eating squash. The patient was resuscitated with intravenous fluids, antibiotics, and admitted for presumed sepsis. No source of infection was ever found and the patient was discharged. The patient returned 8 days later with the same symptoms after eating sweet potatoes; the diagnosis of FPIES was made during this admission. Two additional ED visits occurred requiring hydration after new food exposure. FPIES should be considered in infants presenting with gastrointestinal complaints and hypotension. A dietary history, including if a new food has been introduced in the last few hours, may help facilitate earlier recognition of the syndrome. [West J Emerg Med. 2011;12(4:512–514.

  4. Successful Multimodality Endoscopic Treatment of Gastric Outlet Obstruction Caused by an Impacted Gallstone (Bouveret's Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jason N. Rogart

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Bouveret's syndrome is a rare condition of gastric outlet obstruction resulting from the migration of a gallstone through a choledochoduodenal fistula. Due to the large size of these stones and the difficult location in which they become impacted, endoscopic treatment is unsuccessful and most patients require surgery. We report the case of an elderly male who presented with nausea and hematemesis, and was found on CT scan and endoscopy to have an obstructing gallstone in his duodenal bulb. After several endoscopic sessions and the use of multiple instruments including a Holmium: YAG laser and electrohydraulic lithotripter, fragmentation and endoscopic removal of the stone were successful. We believe this to be the first case of Bouveret's syndrome successfully treated by endoscopy alone in the United States. We describe the difficulties encountered which necessitated varied and innovative therapeutic techniques.

  5. Lactose malabsorption and lactose intolerance in adults - a cause of irritable bowel syndrome?

    OpenAIRE

    Nilsson, Åke

    2001-01-01

    Gastroenterologists and general practitioners see many patients that have abdominal symptoms which are not explained when the patients are investigated for celiac disease, inflammatory bowel disease, peptic ulcer or tumours. The diagnosis is irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). Many of these patients report intolerance to certain foods including milk, and some develop symptoms after ingestion of lactose during the lactose tolerance test. In Northern European populations, lactose malabsorption is, ...

  6. Deletions at the SOX10 gene locus cause Waardenburg syndrome types 2 and 4.

    OpenAIRE

    Bondurand, Nadège; Dastot-Le Moal, Florence; Stanchina, Laure; Collot, Nathalie; Baral, Viviane; Marlin, Sandrine; Attie-Bitach, Tania; Giurgea, Irina; Skopinski, Laurent; Reardon, William; Toutain, Annick; Sarda, Pierre; Echaieb, Anis; Lackmy-Port-Lis, Marilyn; Touraine, Renaud

    2007-01-01

    International audience Waardenburg syndrome (WS) is an auditory-pigmentary disorder that exhibits varying combinations of sensorineural hearing loss and abnormal pigmentation of the hair and skin. Depending on additional symptoms, WS is classified into four subtypes, WS1-WS4. Absence of additional features characterizes WS2. The association of facial dysmorphic features defines WS1 and WS3, whereas the association with Hirschsprung disease (aganglionic megacolon) characterizes WS4, also ca...

  7. Herlyn–Werner–Wunderlich syndrome: a rare cause of pelvic pain in adolescent girls

    OpenAIRE

    Aveiro, Ana Cristina; Miranda, Victor; Cabral, António Jorge; Nunes, Sidónia; Paulo, Filomeno; Freitas, Conceição

    2011-01-01

    The Herlyn–Werner–Wunderlich syndrome is a rare congenital anomaly characterised by uterus didelphys with blind hemivagina and ipsilateral renal agenesis. It usually presents after menarche with progressive pelvic pain during menses secondary to haematocolpos. Awareness is necessary in order to diagnose and treat this disorder properly before complications occur. MRI is the preferred modality for the delineation of uterine malformation. When renal anomalies are encountered, a screening should...

  8. Two Uncommon Causes of Guillain-Barré Syndrome: Hepatitis E and Japanese Encephalitis

    OpenAIRE

    Dhrubajyoti Bandyopadhyay; Vijayan Ganesan; Cankatika Choudhury; Suvrendu Sankar Kar; Parthasarathi Karmakar; Vivek Choudhary; Prasun Banerjee; Debarati Bhar; Adrija Hajra; Manas Layek; Sabyasachi Mukhopadhyay

    2015-01-01

    We are presenting two cases of Guillain-Barré syndrome where it is preceded by hepatitis E virus (HEV) and Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV) infection, respectively. Our first case is a forty-three-year-old nondiabetic, nonhypertensive female who was initially diagnosed with acute HEV induced viral hepatitis and subsequently developed acute onset ascending quadriparesis with lower motor neuron type of bilateral facial nerve palsies and respiratory failure. Second patient was a 14-year-old you...

  9. Neuroleptic Malignant Syndrome: A Rare Cause of Fever 1 in the Emergency Department

    OpenAIRE

    Hayriye Gonullu

    2013-01-01

       Neuroleptic malignant syndrome (NMS) is a rare and life threatening complication of antipsychotic therapy. It presents with fever, altered mental status, autonomic instability and muscle rigidity. Differential diagnosis consist many conditions. NMS is a diagnosis of exclusion. NMS is in the differential diagnosis of patients presenting with fever to emergency department, where careful history and previous medication use is essential for diagnosing and treating this phenomenon.

  10. Molasses as a possible cause of an ''endocrine disruptive syndrome'' in calves

    OpenAIRE

    M.S. Masgoret; C.J. Botha; J. G. Myburgh; T.W. Naude; L. Prozesky; Naidoo, V.; J. H. van Wyk; E.J. Pool; Swan, G E

    2009-01-01

    During the mid 1990s a potentially serious, chronic syndrome was reported in well-managed beef and dairy herds from unrelated parts of South Africa. Farmers reported that it manifested as various combinations of decreased production, decreased weaning masses, apparent immune breakdown in previously immunocompetent animals, increased reproductive disorders, various mineral imbalances in non-deficient areas and goitre, noticeable as enlarged thyroid glands. The farmers associated this syn...

  11. Classical Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome Caused by a Mutation in Type I Collagen

    OpenAIRE

    Nuytinck, Lieve; Freund, Margarida; Lagae, Lieven; Pierard, Gerald E.; Hermanns-Le, Trinh; De Paepe, Anne

    2000-01-01

    Classical Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (EDS) is characterized by skin hyperelasticity, joint hypermobility, increased tendency to bruise, and abnormal scarring. Mutations in type V collagen, a regulator of type I collagen fibrillogenesis, have been shown to underlie this type of EDS. However, to date, mutations have been found in only a limited number of patients, which suggests genetic heterogeneity. In this article, we report two unrelated patients with typical features of classical EDS, includin...

  12. Neuroleptic Malignant Syndrome: A Rare Cause of Fever 1 in the Emergency Department

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hayriye Gonullu

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available    Neuroleptic malignant syndrome (NMS is a rare and life threatening complication of antipsychotic therapy. It presents with fever, altered mental status, autonomic instability and muscle rigidity. Differential diagnosis consist many conditions. NMS is a diagnosis of exclusion. NMS is in the differential diagnosis of patients presenting with fever to emergency department, where careful history and previous medication use is essential for diagnosing and treating this phenomenon.

  13. Molasses as a possible cause of an "endocrine disruptive syndrome" in calves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masgoret, M S; Botha, C J; Myburgh, J G; Naudé, T W; Prozesky, L; Naidoo, V; Van Wyk, J H; Pool, E J; Swan, G E

    2009-06-01

    During the mid 1990s a potentially serious, chronic syndrome was reported in well-managed beef and dairy herds from unrelated parts of South Africa. Farmers reported that it manifested as various combinations of decreased production, decreased weaning masses, apparent immune breakdown in previously immunocompetent animals, increased reproductive disorders, various mineral imbalances in non-deficient areas and goitre, noticeable as enlarged thyroid glands. The farmers associated this syndrome with certain batches of sugar cane molasses and molasses-based products. The syndrome was reminiscent of an "endocrine disruptive syndrome". The objective of this study was to evaluate the suspected endocrine disruptive effect of molasses included in cattle feed. Using existing in vitro assays, four batches of molasses syrup were screened for possible inclusion in a calf feeding trial. Two batches were selected for the trial. Thirty-two, 4- to 6-week-old, weaned Holstein bull calves were included in the single phase, three treatment, parallel design experiment. In two of the groups of calves, two different batches of molasses were included in their rations respectively. The control group was fed a ration to which no molasses was added, but which was balanced for energy and mineral content. The mass gain of the calves was recorded over the 6-month study period. The calves were clinically examined every week and clinical pathology parameters, immune responses and endocrine effects were regularly evaluated. Even though endocrine disrupting effects were detected with the in vitro screening assays, these could not be reproduced in the calves in the experiment. The two batches of molasses utilized in the calf feeding trial did not induce major differences in any of the parameters measured, with the exception of a lower mass gain in one of the molasses-fed groups (Group 1), which tended towards significance. The results of the study indicate that the two batches of molasses had no

  14. Treatment of Guillain-Barré syndrome and causes and treatment of residual fatigue

    OpenAIRE

    Garssen, Marcel

    2005-01-01

    textabstractChapter 1 is the general introduction of this thesis, in which di.erent aspects of the Guillain-Barré syndrome (GBS) are described. GBS is an acute post-infectious polyneuropathy, in which the immune system plays an important role. Insight in pathogenesis, clinical and electrophysiological features, functional outcome, and residual complaints is increasing. To date, fatigue is considered one of the most disabling residual symptoms, seriously a.ecting quality of life. The considera...

  15. Molasses as a possible cause of an ''endocrine disruptive syndrome'' in calves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.S. Masgoret

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available During the mid 1990s a potentially serious, chronic syndrome was reported in well-managed beef and dairy herds from unrelated parts of South Africa. Farmers reported that it manifested as various combinations of decreased production, decreased weaning masses, apparent immune breakdown in previously immunocompetent animals, increased reproductive disorders, various mineral imbalances in non-deficient areas and goitre, noticeable as enlarged thyroid glands. The farmers associated this syndrome with certain batches of sugar cane molasses and molasses-based products. The syndrome was reminiscent of an ''endocrine disruptive syndrome''. The objective of this study was to evaluate the suspected endocrine disruptive effect of molasses included in cattle feed. Using existing in vitro assays, four batches of molasses syrup were screened for possible inclusion in a calf feeding trial. Two batches were selected for the trial. Thirty-two, 4- to 6-week-old, weaned Holstein bull calves were included in the single phase, three treatment, parallel design experiment. In two of the groups of calves, two different batches of molasses were included in their rations respectively. The control group was fed a ration to which no molasses was added, but which was balanced for energy and mineral content. The mass gain of the calves was recorded over the 6-month study period. The calves were clinically examined every week and clinical pathology parameters, immune responses and endocrine effects were regularly evaluated. Even though endocrine disrupting effects were detected with the in vitro screening assays, these could not be reproduced in the calves in the experiment. The two batches of molasses utilized in the calf feeding trial did not induce major differences in any of the parameters measured, with the exception of a lower mass gain in one of the molasses-fed groups (Group 1, which tended towards significance. The results of the study indicate that the two batches

  16. Air embolism as a cause of the systemic inflammatory response syndrome: a case report

    OpenAIRE

    Kapoor, Tarun; Gutierrez, Guillermo

    2003-01-01

    We describe a case of systemic inflammatory response syndrome associated with air embolism following the removal of a central line catheter, coupled with a deep inspiratory maneuver. The presence of a patent foramen ovale allowed the passage of a clinically significant amount of air from the venous circulation to the systemic circulation. The interaction of air with the systemic arterial endothelium may have triggered the release of endothelium-derived cytokines, resulting in the physiologic ...

  17. Bertolotti's syndrome: A commonly missed cause of back pain in young patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manmohan, S; Dzulkarnain, A; Nor Azlin, Z A; Fazir, M

    2015-01-01

    Bertolotti's syndrome must be considered as a differential diagnosis for lower back pain in young people. Treatment, whether conservative or operative, is still debatable. In this paper, we report a case of a 20-year-old girl presenting with lower back pain for 8 years. We administered injection with local anaesthetic and steroid injections within the pseudo-articulation; however, the pain was relieved for 3 weeks. Surgical excision of the pseudo-articulation successfully treated her back pain and the sciatica.

  18. Bertolotti’s syndrome: A commonly missed cause of back pain in young patients

    OpenAIRE

    Manmohan, S; Dzulkarnain, A; Nor Azlin, ZA; Fazir, M

    2015-01-01

    Bertolotti’s syndrome must be considered as a differential diagnosis for lower back pain in young people. Treatment, whether conservative or operative, is still debatable. In this paper, we report a case of a 20-year-old girl presenting with lower back pain for 8 years. We administered injection with local anaesthetic and steroid injections within the pseudo-articulation; however, the pain was relieved for 3 weeks. Surgical excision of the pseudo-articulation successfully treated her back pai...

  19. Endoscopically assisted resection of a scapular osteochondroma causing snapping scapula syndrome

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    Futani Hiroyuki

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Osteochondroma is the most common benign bone tumor in the scapula. This condition might lead to snapping scapula syndrome, which is characterized by painful, audible, and/or palpable abnormal scapulothoracic motion. In the present case, this syndrome was successfully treated by use of endoscopically assisted resection of the osteochondroma. Case presentation A 41-year-old man had a tolerable pain in his scapular region over a 10 years' period. The pain developed gradually with shoulder motion, in particular with golf swing since he was aiming a professional golf player career. On physical examination, "clunking" was noted once from 90 degrees of abduction to 180 degrees of shoulder motion. A trans-scapular roentgenogram and computed tomography images revealed an osteochondroma located at the anterior and inferior aspect of the scapula. Removal of the tumor was performed by the use of endoscopically assisted resection. One portal was made at the lateral border of the scapula to introduce a 2.7-mm-diameter, 30 degrees Hopkins telescope. The tumor was resected in a piece-by-piece manner by the use of graspers through the same portal. Immediately after the operation pain relief was obtained, and the "clunking" disappeared. CT images showed complete tumor resection. The patient could start playing golf one week after the surgery. Conclusion Endoscopically assisted resection of osteochondroma of the scapula provides a feasible technique to treat snapping scapula syndrome and obtain early functional recovery with a short hospital stay and cosmetic advantage.

  20. A de novo frameshift in HNRNPK causing a Kabuki-like syndrome with nodular heterotopia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lange, L; Pagnamenta, A T; Lise, S; Clasper, S; Stewart, H; Akha, E S; Quaghebeur, G; Knight, S J L; Keays, D A; Taylor, J C; Kini, U

    2016-09-01

    Kabuki syndrome is a heterogeneous condition characterized by distinctive facial features, intellectual disability, growth retardation, skeletal abnormalities and a range of organ malformations. Although at least two major causative genes have been identified, these do not explain all cases. Here we describe a patient with a complex Kabuki-like syndrome that included nodular heterotopia, in whom testing for several single-gene disorders had proved negative. Exome sequencing uncovered a de novo c.931_932insTT variant in HNRNPK (heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein K). Although this variant was identified in March 2012, its clinical relevance could only be confirmed following the August 2015 publication of two cases with HNRNPK mutations and an overlapping phenotype that included intellectual disability, distinctive facial dysmorphism and skeletal/connective tissue abnormalities. Whilst we had attempted (unsuccessfully) to identify additional cases through existing collaborators, the two published cases were 'matched' using GeneMatcher, a web-based tool for connecting researchers and clinicians working on identical genes. Our report therefore exemplifies the importance of such online tools in clinical genetics research and the benefits of periodically reviewing cases with variants of unproven significance. Our study also suggests that loss of function variants in HNRNPK should be considered as a molecular basis for patients with Kabuki-like syndrome. PMID:26954065

  1. Fibrillin-1 mutations causing Weill-Marchesani syndrome and acromicric and geleophysic dysplasias disrupt heparan sulfate interactions.

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    Stuart A Cain

    Full Text Available The extracellular glycoprotein fibrillin-1 forms microfibrils that act as the template for elastic fibers. Most mutations in fibrillin-1 cause Marfan syndrome with severe cardiovascular and ocular symptoms, and tall stature. This is in contrast to mutations within a heparin-binding TB domain (TB5, which is downstream of the arg-gly-asp cell adhesion domain, which can cause Weill-Marchesani syndrome (WMS or Acromicric (AD and Geleophysic Dysplasias (GD. WMS is characterized by short limbs, joint stiffness and ocular defects, whilst fibrillin-1 AD and GD have severe short stature, joint defects and thickened skin. We previously showed that TB5 binds heparin. Here, we show that the corresponding region of fibrillin-2 binds heparin very poorly, highlighting a novel functional difference between the two isoforms. This finding enabled us to map heparin/heparan sulfate binding to two sites on fibrillin-1 TB5 using a mutagenesis approach. Once these sites were mapped, we were able to investigate whether disease-causing mutations in this domain disrupt binding to HS. We show that a WMS deletion mutant, and five AD and GD point mutants all have disrupted heparin binding to TB5. These data provide insights into the biology of fibrillins and the pathologies of WMS, AD and GD.

  2. Papular-purpuric "gloves and socks" syndrome caused by parvovirus B19 infection in Brazil: a case report

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    Marcos Tadashi Kakitani Toyoshima

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available Papular-purpuric "gloves and socks" syndrome (PPGSS is a novel, rare, self-limiting dermatosis caused by human parvovirus B19. It consists of pruritic edema and erythema of the hands and feet in a gloves-and-socks distribution, and it is associated with oral lesions and fever. We present a case of PPGSS in a 22-year-old Brazilian woman. Clinical and laboratory evaluation, including serological tests, PCR and gene sequencing, confirmed the presence of human parvovirus B19.

  3. Recurrent Mutations in the Basic Domain of TWIST2 Cause Ablepharon Macrostomia and Barber-Say Syndromes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchegiani, Shannon; Davis, Taylor; Tessadori, Federico; van Haaften, Gijs; Brancati, Francesco; Hoischen, Alexander; Huang, Haigen; Valkanas, Elise; Pusey, Barbara; Schanze, Denny; Venselaar, Hanka; Vulto-van Silfhout, Anneke T.; Wolfe, Lynne A.; Tifft, Cynthia J.; Zerfas, Patricia M.; Zambruno, Giovanna; Kariminejad, Ariana; Sabbagh-Kermani, Farahnaz; Lee, Janice; Tsokos, Maria G.; Lee, Chyi-Chia R.; Ferraz, Victor; da Silva, Eduarda Morgana; Stevens, Cathy A.; Roche, Nathalie; Bartsch, Oliver; Farndon, Peter; Bermejo-Sanchez, Eva; Brooks, Brian P.; Maduro, Valerie; Dallapiccola, Bruno; Ramos, Feliciano J.; Chung, Hon-Yin Brian; Le Caignec, Cédric; Martins, Fabiana; Jacyk, Witold K.; Mazzanti, Laura; Brunner, Han G.; Bakkers, Jeroen; Lin, Shuo; Malicdan, May Christine V.; Boerkoel, Cornelius F.; Gahl, William A.; de Vries, Bert B.A.; van Haelst, Mieke M.; Zenker, Martin; Markello, Thomas C.

    2015-01-01

    Ablepharon macrostomia syndrome (AMS) and Barber-Say syndrome (BSS) are rare congenital ectodermal dysplasias characterized by similar clinical features. To establish the genetic basis of AMS and BSS, we performed extensive clinical phenotyping, whole exome and candidate gene sequencing, and functional validations. We identified a recurrent de novo mutation in TWIST2 in seven independent AMS-affected families, as well as another recurrent de novo mutation affecting the same amino acid in ten independent BSS-affected families. Moreover, a genotype-phenotype correlation was observed, because the two syndromes differed based solely upon the nature of the substituting amino acid: a lysine at TWIST2 residue 75 resulted in AMS, whereas a glutamine or alanine yielded BSS. TWIST2 encodes a basic helix-loop-helix transcription factor that regulates the development of mesenchymal tissues. All identified mutations fell in the basic domain of TWIST2 and altered the DNA-binding pattern of Flag-TWIST2 in HeLa cells. Comparison of wild-type and mutant TWIST2 expressed in zebrafish identified abnormal developmental phenotypes and widespread transcriptome changes. Our results suggest that autosomal-dominant TWIST2 mutations cause AMS or BSS by inducing protean effects on the transcription factor’s DNA binding. PMID:26119818

  4. The mitochondrial DNA 10197 G > A mutation causes MELAS/Leigh overlap syndrome presenting with acute auditory agnosia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leng, Yinglin; Liu, Yuhe; Fang, Xiaojing; Li, Yao; Yu, Lei; Yuan, Yun; Wang, Zhaoxia

    2015-04-01

    Mitochondrial encephalomyopathy with lactic acidosis and stroke-like episodes/Leigh (MELAS/LS) overlap syndrome is a mitochondrial disorder subtype with clinical and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) features that are characteristic of both MELAS and Leigh syndrome (LS). Here, we report an MELAS/LS case presenting with cortical deafness and seizures. Cranial MRI revealed multiple lesions involving bilateral temporal lobes, the basal ganglia and the brainstem, which conformed to neuroimaging features of both MELAS and LS. Whole mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) sequencing and PCR-RFLP revealed a de novo heteroplasmic m.10197 G > A mutation in the NADH dehydrogenase subunit 3 gene (ND3), which was predicted to cause an alanine to threonine substitution at amino acid 47. Although the mtDNA m.10197 G > A mutation has been reported in association with LS, Leber hereditary optic neuropathy and dystonia, it has never been linked with MELAS/LS overlap syndrome. Our patient therefore expands the phenotypic spectrum of the mtDNA m.10197 G > A mutation.

  5. Hypophosphatemia as Unusual Cause of ARDS in Cushing’s Syndrome Secondary to Ectopic CRH Production. A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefania Mondello

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Hypophosphatemia is an unusual cause of acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS. We describe a hypophosphatemia-related ARDS case report of a 50-year-old woman with ACTH dependent Cushing's syndrome secondary to ectopic CRH production. The patient clinically showed hypotension tachypnea and increasing dyspnea. Laboratory data showed carbohydrate intolerance, severe hypokalemia, and hypophosphatemia. Arterial blood gases measurement revealed hypocapnia and elevation in bicarbonate values. Chest X-ray showed diffuse bilateral alveolar infiltrates similar to acute pulmonary edema and Kerley's striae. Chest CT scan evidenced diffuse ground glass opacification, bilateral patchy consolidation, and fibrosis, compatible with the recovery phase of ARDS. Clinical symptoms and laboratory examinations supported the diagnosis of ARDS. The patient was managed with supplemental potassium, octreotide, and oxygen therapy. Hypophosphatemia was managed by treating the underlying disorder. Successive surgical removal of the adrenal gland led to complete resolution of Cushing's syndrome. In conclusion, although rare and associated with specific risk factors, hypophosphatemia should be suspected in patients who develop unexplained ARDS.

  6. Deletion at chromosome 16p13. 3 as a cause of Rubinstein-Taybi syndrome: Clinical aspects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hennekam, R.C.M.; Tilanus, M.; Boogaard, M.J.H. van den (State Univ., Utrecht (Netherlands)); Hamel, B.C.J.; Voshart-van Heeren, H.; Mariman, E.C.M.; Beersum, S.E.C. van (University Hospital, Nijmegen (Netherlands)); Breuning, M.H. (Clinical Genetics Center, Rotterdam (Netherlands))

    1993-02-01

    In the accompanying paper, a chromosomal localization of the Rubinstein-Taybi syndrome by cytogenetic investigations with fluorescence in situ hybridization techniques at chromosome 16p13.3 is described. The authors investigated 19 of these patients and their parents (a) to ascertain the parental origin of the chromosome with the deletion in families where such a deletion was detected, (b) to disclose whether uniparental disomy plays a role in etiology, and (c) to compare clinical features in patients with a deletion to those in individuals in whom deletions were not detectable. Molecular studies showed a copy of chromosome 16 from each parent in all 19 patients. Uniparental disomy was also excluded for five other chromosome arms known to be imprinted in mice. None of the probes used for determining the origin of the deleted chromosome proved to be informative. The clinical features were essentially the same in patients with and without visible deletion, with a possible exception for the incidence of microcephaly, angulation of thumbs and halluces, and partial duplication of the halluces. A small deletion at 16p13.3 may be found in some patients with Rubinstein-Taybi syndrome. Cytogenetically undetectable deletions, point mutations, mosaicism, heterogeneity, or phenocopy by a nongenetic cause are the most probable explanations for the absence of cytogenetic or molecular abnormalities in other patients with Rubinstein-Taybi syndrome. 26 refs., 3 tabs., 2 figs.

  7. A RARE CASE OF GRISCELLI’S SYNDROME WITH REVIEW OF LITERATURE

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    Narayan Reddy

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Griscelli syndrome is a rare autosomal recessive disorder characterized by partial albinism and immunodeficiency. The characteristic features include silver hair due to clumped melanosomes in hair shaft. Other features include hepatospleenomegaly, hepatitis, pancytopenia and immune abnormalities. CASE REPORT: A seven years old male child presented with partial albinic features and history of recurrent respiratory tract infection. The child had fever since 2months along with hepatospleenomegaly, pancytopenia and thrombocytopenic purpura. These rare clinical manifestations were diagnosed as GS which was confirmed by bone marrow biopsy and light microscopy of hair shaft. The mean patient age of survival is 5years. As early diagnosis can improve the outcome in such cases, a finding of partial albinism should alert the diagnosis of Griscelli’s syndrome. CONCLUSION: We report a rare case of GS with characteristic manifestation surviving beyond the mean age of reported survival.

  8. Defects in the IFT-B component IFT172 cause Jeune and Mainzer-Saldino syndromes in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halbritter, Jan; Bizet, Albane A; Schmidts, Miriam; Porath, Jonathan D; Braun, Daniela A; Gee, Heon Yung; McInerney-Leo, Aideen M; Krug, Pauline; Filhol, Emilie; Davis, Erica E; Airik, Rannar; Czarnecki, Peter G; Lehman, Anna M; Trnka, Peter; Nitschké, Patrick; Bole-Feysot, Christine; Schueler, Markus; Knebelmann, Bertrand; Burtey, Stéphane; Szabó, Attila J; Tory, Kálmán; Leo, Paul J; Gardiner, Brooke; McKenzie, Fiona A; Zankl, Andreas; Brown, Matthew A; Hartley, Jane L; Maher, Eamonn R; Li, Chunmei; Leroux, Michel R; Scambler, Peter J; Zhan, Shing H; Jones, Steven J; Kayserili, Hülya; Tuysuz, Beyhan; Moorani, Khemchand N; Constantinescu, Alexandru; Krantz, Ian D; Kaplan, Bernard S; Shah, Jagesh V; Hurd, Toby W; Doherty, Dan; Katsanis, Nicholas; Duncan, Emma L; Otto, Edgar A; Beales, Philip L; Mitchison, Hannah M; Saunier, Sophie; Hildebrandt, Friedhelm

    2013-11-01

    Intraflagellar transport (IFT) depends on two evolutionarily conserved modules, subcomplexes A (IFT-A) and B (IFT-B), to drive ciliary assembly and maintenance. All six IFT-A components and their motor protein, DYNC2H1, have been linked to human skeletal ciliopathies, including asphyxiating thoracic dystrophy (ATD; also known as Jeune syndrome), Sensenbrenner syndrome, and Mainzer-Saldino syndrome (MZSDS). Conversely, the 14 subunits in the IFT-B module, with the exception of IFT80, have unknown roles in human disease. To identify additional IFT-B components defective in ciliopathies, we independently performed different mutation analyses: candidate-based sequencing of all IFT-B-encoding genes in 1,467 individuals with a nephronophthisis-related ciliopathy or whole-exome resequencing in 63 individuals with ATD. We thereby detected biallelic mutations in the IFT-B-encoding gene IFT172 in 12 families. All affected individuals displayed abnormalities of the thorax and/or long bones, as well as renal, hepatic, or retinal involvement, consistent with the diagnosis of ATD or MZSDS. Additionally, cerebellar aplasia or hypoplasia characteristic of Joubert syndrome was present in 2 out of 12 families. Fibroblasts from affected individuals showed disturbed ciliary composition, suggesting alteration of ciliary transport and signaling. Knockdown of ift172 in zebrafish recapitulated the human phenotype and demonstrated a genetic interaction between ift172 and ift80. In summary, we have identified defects in IFT172 as a cause of complex ATD and MZSDS. Our findings link the group of skeletal ciliopathies to an additional IFT-B component, IFT172, similar to what has been shown for IFT-A.

  9. Mutations in IRF6 cause Van der Woude and popliteal pterygium syndromes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kondo, Shinji; Schutte, Brian C.; Richardson, Rebecca J.; Bjork, Bryan C.; Knight, Alexandra S.; Watanabe, Yoriko; Howard, Emma; Ferreira de Lima, Renata L.L.; Daack-Hirsch, Sandra; Sander, Achim; McDonald-McGinn, Donna M.; Zackai, Elaine H.; Lammer, Edward J.; Aylsworth, Arthur S.; Ardinger, Holly H.; Lidral, Andrew C.; Pober, Barbara R.; Moreno, Lina; Arcos-Burgos, Mauricio; Valencia, Consuelo; Houdayer, Claude; Bahuau, Michel; Moretti-Ferreira, Danilo; Richieri-Costa, Antonio; Dixon, Michael J.; Murray, Jeffrey C.

    2011-01-01

    Interferon regulatory factor 6 (IRF6) belongs to a family of nine transcription factors that share a highly conserved helix–turn–helix DNA-binding domain and a less conserved protein-binding domain. Most IRFs regulate the expression of interferon-α and -β after viral infection1, but the function of IRF6 is unknown. The gene encoding IRF6 is located in the critical region for the Van der Woude syndrome (VWS; OMIM 119300) locus at chromosome 1q32–q41 (refs 2,3). The disorder is an autosomal dominant form of cleft lip and palate with lip pits4, and is the most common syndromic form of cleft lip or palate. Popliteal pterygium syndrome (PPS; OMIM 119500) is a disorder with a similar orofacial phenotype that also includes skin and genital anomalies5. Phenotypic overlap6 and linkage data7 suggest that these two disorders are allelic. We found a nonsense mutation in IRF6 in the affected twin of a pair of monozygotic twins who were discordant for VWS. Subsequently, we identified mutations in IRF6 in 45 additional unrelated families affected with VWS and distinct mutations in 13 families affected with PPS. Expression analyses showed high levels of Irf6 mRNA along the medial edge of the fusing palate, tooth buds, hair follicles, genitalia and skin. Our observations demonstrate that haploinsufficiency of IRF6 disrupts orofacial development and are consistent with dominant-negative mutations disturbing development of the skin and genitalia. PMID:12219090

  10. A new novel mutation in FBN1 causes autosomal dominant Marfan syndrome in a Chinese family

    OpenAIRE

    Dong, Jiamei; Bu, Juan; Du, Wei; Li, Yuan; Jia, Yanlei; Li, Jianchang; Meng, Xiaoli; Minghui YUAN; Peng, Xiaojuan; Zhou, Aimin; Wang, Lejin

    2012-01-01

    Purpose Screening of mutations in the fibrillin-1 (FBN1) gene in a Chinese family with autosomal dominant Marfan syndrome (MFS). Methods It has been reported that FBN1 mutations account for approximately 90% of Autosomal Dominant MFS. FBN1 mutations were analyzed in a Chinese family of 36 members including 13 MFS patients. The genomic DNAs from blood leukocytes of the patients and their relatives were isolated and the entire coding region of FBN1 was amplified by PCR. The sequence of FBN1 was...

  11. Papular-purpuric "gloves and socks" syndrome caused by parvovirus B19

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pavlović Miloš D.

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a 15-year-old boy with an acute febrile illness accompanied by purpuric and papular lesions located mostly on the dorsal areas of his hands and feet with the additional changes on his knees and elbows. Serologic studies confirmed the acute infection by parvovirus B19. Apart from mild leukocytosis there were no other abnormalities in hematologic and laboratory findings. The diagnosis of papular-purpuric "gloves and socks" syndrome (PPGSS was made. Cutaneous changes completely resolved two weeks later. Herein the patient's condition was described together with a brief overview of the PPGSS literature concerning this relatively rare viral exanthema.

  12. Skin lesions simulating blue toe syndrome caused by prolonged contact with a millipede

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    Augusto Scardazan Heeren Neto

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Venomous animals are those that, by means of a hunting and defense mechanism, are able to inject their prey with a toxic substance produced in their bodies, directly from specialized glands (e.g., tooth, sting, spur through which the poison passes. Millipedes are poisonous animals; they can be harmful to humans, and their effects usually manifest as erythematous, purpuric, and cyanotic lesions; local pain; and paresthesia. Here, we report a case of skin contact with a millipede for 6h resulting in skin lesions similar to blue toe syndrome.

  13. Life Threatening, Allopurinol-related Dress Syndrome as a Rare Cause of Fever of Unknown Origin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Civardi, Giuseppe; Zanlari, Luca; Bassi, Emanuele; Zangrandi, Adriano; Maria Cesinaro, Anna; Nosseir, Sofia; De Maria, Nicola

    2015-01-01

    Drug reaction eosinophilia with systemic symptoms (DRESS) syndrome is a potentially life threatening condition secondary to the usage of a wide type of drugs. A 38-year-old woman under allopurinol therapy for hyperuricemia was admitted in our department with fever and a diffuse cutaneous erythematous eruption. A few days after admission she developed rapidly progressive signs of acute liver and kidney failure. Subsequently, her clinical conditions shortly improved. The histologic findings obtained from skin and liver biopsies were consistent with a toxic drug reaction. The patient completely recovered and has been healthy for five years.

  14. Identification of an angiogenic factor that when mutated causes susceptibility to Klippel–Trenaunay syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Tian, Xiao-Li; Kadaba, Rajkumar; You, Sun-Ah; Liu, Mugen; TIMUR, AYSE ANIL; Yang, Lin; Chen, Qiuyun; Szafranski, Przemyslaw; Rao, Shaoqi; Wu, Ling; Housman, David E.; Dicorleto, Paul E.; Driscoll, David J.; Borrow, Julian; Wang, Qing

    2004-01-01

    Angiogenic factors are critical to the initiation of angiogenesis and maintenance of the vascular network1. Here we use human genetics as an approach to identify an angiogenic factor, VG5Q, and further define two genetic defects of VG5Q in patients with the vascular disease Klippel–Trenaunay syndrome (KTS)2,3. One mutation is chromosomal translocation t(5;11), which increases VG5Q transcription. The second is mutation E133K identified in five KTS patients, but not in 200 matched controls. VG5...

  15. Hypereosinophilic syndrome as a cause of fatal thrombosis: two case reports with histological study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujita, Kumi; Ishimaru, Hiroyasu; Hatta, Kazuhiro; Kobashi, Yoichiro

    2015-08-01

    Herein we present two cases of hypereosinophilic syndrome with a unique clinical presentation. One patient showed severe systemic thrombosis with splenic rupture and the other patient showed finger gangrene with various systemic symptoms. Both patients were examined histologically, and several characteristics were noted. First, fresh or organized thrombosis with marked eosinophilic infiltration was observed in the cavity and walls of the thrombosed vessels. Second, many eosinophils showed degranulation and were positive for eosinophilic cationic protein on immunohistological examination. Third, the structures of thrombosed vessels were well preserved, which is not observed in systemic vasculitis. These patients exhibited no neoplastic features and were treated with prednisolone with excellent therapeutic results.

  16. Auditory hair cell defects as potential cause for sensorineural deafness in Wolf-Hirschhorn syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Mohi Ahmed; Kiyoe Ura; Andrea Streit

    2015-01-01

    WHSC1 is a histone methyltransferase (HMT) that catalyses the addition of methyl groups to lysine 36 on histone 3. In humans, WHSC1 haploinsufficiency is associated with all known cases of Wolf-Hirschhorn syndrome (WHS). The cardinal feature of WHS is a craniofacial dysmorphism, which is accompanied by sensorineural hearing loss in 15% of individuals with WHS. Here, we show thatWHSC1-deficient mice display craniofacial defects that overlap with WHS, including cochlea anomalies. Although audit...

  17. Neoplasias of the scapula - rare causes of a chronic shoulder-hand syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The diseases most frequently resulting in a chronic shoulder-hand syndrome are definitely of a post-traumatic nature and are later - after a varying period - often combined with degenerative changes. The tendency to injury is enhanced by the particularly great mobility of the shoulder joint. Inflammatory changes - e.g. of bacterial, rheumatic origin - are much rarer. The authors present two patients with rare neoplastic lesions in the region of the shoulder-blade and show how the disease was identified via various differential diagnostic methods. (orig.)

  18. A Case of Femoral Arteriovenous Fistula Causing High-Output Cardiac Failure, Originally Misdiagnosed as Chronic Fatigue Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Porter

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Percutaneous arterial catheterisation is commonly undertaken for a range of diagnostic and interventional procedures. Iatrogenic femoral arteriovenous fistulas are an uncommon complication of these procedures. Most are asymptomatic and close spontaneously, but can rarely increase in size leading to the development of symptoms. We report a case of an iatrogenic femoral arteriovenous fistula, causing worsening congestive cardiac failure, in a 34-year-old marathon runner. This was originally diagnosed as chronic fatigue syndrome. Following clinical examination, duplex ultrasound, and CT angiography a significant arteriovenous fistula was confirmed. Elective open surgery was performed, leading to a dramatic and rapid improvement in symptoms. Femoral arteriovenous fistulas have the potential to cause significant haemodynamic effects and can present many years after the initial procedure. Conservative, endovascular, and open surgical management strategies are available.

  19. Improved husbandry to control an outbreak of rainbow trout fry syndrome caused by infection with Flavobacterium psychrophilum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bebak, J.A.; Welch, T.J.; Starliper, C.E.; Baya, A.M.; Garner, M.M.

    2007-01-01

    Case Description - A cohort of 35,200, 13-week-old, female rainbow trout at a fish farm was evaluated because of a 2-week history of anorexia and lethargy and a mortality rate of approximately 100 fish/d. Clinical Findings - Affected fish were lethargic and thin and had disequilibrium, bilateral exophthalmia, pale red gills and kidneys, red-tinged coelomic fluid, and pale brown livers. Some fish were differentially pigmented bilaterally. The presumptive diagnosis was bacterial or viral septicemia. The definitive diagnosis was rainbow trout fry syndrome caused by infection with Flavobacterium psychrophilum. Treatment and Outcome - A strategy for controlling the outbreak based on reducing pathogen numbers in affected tanks and reducing pathogen spread among tanks was developed. The option of treating with antimicrobial-medicated feed was discussed with the farmer, but was declined. After changes were made, mortality rate declined quickly, with no more deaths within 10 days after the initial farm visit. Clinical Relevance - Bacterial coldwater disease is the most common manifestation of infection with F psychrophilum in fingerling and adult rainbow trout. However, the organism can also cause rainbow trout fry syndrome. This condition should be included on a list of differential diagnoses for septicemia in hatchery-reared rainbow trout fry.

  20. An exon 53 frameshift mutation in CUBN abrogates cubam function and causes Imerslund-Gräsbeck syndrome in dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fyfe, John C; Hemker, Shelby L; Venta, Patrick J; Fitzgerald, Caitlin A; Outerbridge, Catherine A; Myers, Sherry L; Giger, Urs

    2013-08-01

    Cobalamin malabsorption accompanied by selective proteinuria is an autosomal recessive disorder known as Imerslund-Gräsbeck syndrome in humans and was previously described in dogs due to amnionless (AMN) mutations. The resultant vitamin B12 deficiency causes dyshematopoiesis, lethargy, failure to thrive, and life-threatening metabolic disruption in the juvenile period. We studied 3 kindreds of border collies with cobalamin malabsorption and mapped the disease locus in affected dogs to a 2.9Mb region of homozygosity on canine chromosome 2. The region included CUBN, the locus encoding cubilin, a peripheral membrane protein that in concert with AMN forms the functional intrinsic factor-cobalamin receptor expressed in ileum and a multi-ligand receptor in renal proximal tubules. Cobalamin malabsorption and proteinuria comprising CUBN ligands were demonstrated by radiolabeled cobalamin uptake studies and SDS-PAGE, respectively. CUBN mRNA and protein expression were reduced ~10 fold and ~20 fold, respectively, in both ileum and kidney of affected dogs. DNA sequencing demonstrated a single base deletion in exon 53 predicting a translational frameshift and early termination codon likely triggering nonsense mediated mRNA decay. The mutant allele segregated with the disease in the border collie kindred. The border collie disorder indicates that a CUBN mutation far C-terminal from the intrinsic factor-cobalamin binding site can abrogate receptor expression and cause Imerslund-Gräsbeck syndrome. PMID:23746554

  1. The Tourette International Collaborative Genetics (TIC Genetics) study, finding the genes causing Tourette syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dietrich, Andrea; Fernandez, Thomas V; King, Robert A;

    2015-01-01

    Tourette syndrome (TS) is a neuropsychiatric disorder characterized by recurrent motor and vocal tics, often accompanied by obsessive-compulsive disorder and/or attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder. While the evidence for a genetic contribution is strong, its exact nature has yet to be clarif......Tourette syndrome (TS) is a neuropsychiatric disorder characterized by recurrent motor and vocal tics, often accompanied by obsessive-compulsive disorder and/or attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder. While the evidence for a genetic contribution is strong, its exact nature has yet......, it is clear that large patient cohorts and open-access repositories will be essential to further advance the field. To that end, the large multicenter Tourette International Collaborative Genetics (TIC Genetics) study was established. The goal of the TIC Genetics study is to undertake a comprehensive gene...... discovery effort, focusing both on familial genetic variants with large effects within multiply affected pedigrees and on de novo mutations ascertained through the analysis of apparently simplex parent-child trios with non-familial tics. The clinical data and biomaterials (DNA, transformed cell lines, RNA...

  2. Ectrodactyly ectodermal dysplasia clefting (EEC) syndrome: a rare cause of congenital lacrimal anomalies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elmann, Solly; Hanson, Sarah A; Bunce, Christopher N; Shinder, Roman

    2015-01-01

    A 9-year-old girl with a medical history significant for ectrodactyly ectodermal dysplasia clefting (EEC) syndrome was referred for evaluation of congenital left-sided epiphora. The patient had undergone successful right external dacryocystorhinostomy at age 5 to treat congenital right-sided epiphora. On examination, several ocular anomalies were noted, including absence of the upper eyelid puncta, absence of the left inferior punctum, a left lacrimal fistula opening at the left caruncle, increased left tear lake, bilateral hypoplastic meibomian glands, mild conjunctival injection, and thin eyelid cilia and brow hair. Systemic findings included cleft lip and palate status-post repair, ectrodactyly of the hands and feet, adontia and microdontia, a pointed nose, and lightly pigmented, dry hair and skin. The patient underwent examination under anesthesia and left conjunctivodacryocystorhinostomy with insertion of a Jones tube with resolution of lacrimation postoperatively. To the authors' knowledge, this is the second report detailing management of congenital lacrimal anomalies in EEC syndrome, and the first describing management of punctal atresia with conjunctivodacryocystorhinostomy and Jones tube placement. PMID:24801258

  3. Oxidative Stress and Metabolic Syndrome: Cause or Consequence of Alzheimer's Disease?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diana Luque-Contreras

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Alzheimer’s disease (AD is a major neurodegenerative disease affecting the elderly. Clinically, it is characterized by a progressive loss of memory and cognitive function. Neuropathologically, it is characterized by the presence of extracellular β-amyloid (Aβ deposited as neuritic plaques (NP and neurofibrillary tangles (NFT made of abnormal and hyperphosphorylated tau protein. These lesions are capable of generating the neuronal damage that leads to cell death and cognitive failure through the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS. Evidence indicates the critical role of Aβ metabolism in prompting the oxidative stress observed in AD patients. However, it has also been proposed that oxidative damage precedes the onset of clinical and pathological AD symptoms, including amyloid-β deposition, neurofibrillary tangle formation, vascular malfunction, metabolic syndrome, and cognitive decline. This paper provides a brief description of the three main proteins associated with the development of the disease (Aβ, tau, and ApoE and describes their role in the generation of oxidative stress. Finally, we describe the mitochondrial alterations that are generated by Aβ and examine the relationship of vascular damage which is a potential prognostic tool of metabolic syndrome. In addition, new therapeutic approaches targeting ROS sources and metabolic support were reported.

  4. 5q14.3 deletion neurocutaneous syndrome: Contiguous gene syndrome caused by simultaneous deletion of RASA1 and MEF2C: A progressive disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilari, Rita; Agosta, Guillermo; Bacino, Carlos

    2016-03-01

    We report the case of a young girl who was presented with complex clinical symptoms caused by the deletion of contiguous genes: RASA1 and MEF2C, located on chromosome 5q14.3. Specifically, the diagnosis of her skin disorder and vascular malformations involving central nervous system is consistent with a RASopathy. The child's neurological manifestations are observed in most patients suffering from 5q14.3 by deletion or mutation of the MEF2C gene. A review of the literature allowed us to conclude that the contiguous deletion of genes RASA1 and MEF2C fulfills the criteria for the diagnosis of a Neurocutaneous syndrome as proposed by Carr et al. [2011]. We also assessed the penetrance of RASA1 and clinical manifestations of MEF2C according to the type of deletion. This child described presents the complete symptomatology of both deleted genes. We would also like to highlight the progression of the disorder.

  5. Cushing's Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cushing's syndrome is a hormonal disorder. The cause is long-term exposure to too much cortisol, a hormone ... cause your body to make too much cortisol. Cushing's syndrome is rare. Some symptoms are Upper body obesity ...

  6. An Unusual Lesser Sac Collection Causing Gastric Outlet Obstruction with Coincidental Occurrence of Leriche's Syndrome: A Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singla, Anand; Walia, Darshanjeet Singh; Kaur, Rishabhpreet

    2016-04-01

    Gastric outlet obstruction in adults is usually caused by pyloric stenosis secondary to peptic ulcer disease or malignancy. However, there are few other causes such as a foreign body and external compression due to pseudocyst pancreas. We present a rare aetiology of a large collection of pus in the lesser sac in our patient causing gastric outlet obstruction. A perforated peptic ulcer was suspected in our patient who had symptoms of sudden onset pain in epigastric region which was referred to back. This was followed by pain in upper abdomen, vomiting, constipation and fever for which patient was being managed conservatively before being referred to us. The CECT didn't show any leakage of contrast to the lesser sac making the possibility of healed perforation likely as all other causes were ruled out at the time of presentation to our hospital. The CECT scan ruled out other causes of gastric outlet obstruction with normal wall thickness of the stomach and duodenum along with normal looking liver, pancreas and no lymphadenopathy. The liver function tests and serum amylase were within normal limits. Along with this, there was another unrelated rare coincidental finding of aortoiliac occlusive disease termed as Leriche's syndrome. Ultrasound guided percutaneous drainage was done following which the patient's obstruction was relieved and patient was referred to the department of vascular surgery for the mangement of aortoiliac occlusive disease. PMID:27190892

  7. Locked-in syndrome caused by the pressure exerted by the sound gun

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayse Belin Ozer

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A 19-year-old male patient who wounded himself with a gun in the cranial region had a Glasgow coma scale of 3E. At posttraumatic day 7, locked-in syndrome was considered upon detection of vertical eye movements, meaningful winks, and quadriplegia. Apart from the classical view, computed tomography (CT and postmortem examination of the brain showed an infarct area in the cerebellum. However, vertebrobasilar artery system was normal. In this case report, we would like to present that unlike cases with ischemia, specific CT findings may not be evident in posttraumatic cases and ischemia may occur in the cerebellum as a result of the pressure exerted by a sound gun.

  8. Mutation of fibulin-1 causes a novel syndrome involving the central nervous system and connective tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohlega, Saeed; Al-Ajlan, Huda; Al-Saif, Amr

    2014-05-01

    Fibulin-1 is an extracellular matrix protein that has an important role in the structure of elastic fibers and basement membranes of various tissues. Using homozygosity mapping and exome sequencing, we discovered a missense mutation, p.(Cys397Phe), in fibulin-1 in three patients from a consanguineous family presented with a novel syndrome of syndactyly, undescended testes, delayed motor milestones, mental retardation and signs of brain atrophy. The mutation discovered segregated with the phenotype and was not found in 374 population-matched alleles. The affected cysteine is highly conserved across vertebrates and its mutation is predicted to abolish a disulfide bond that defines the tertiary structure of fibulin-1. Our findings emphasize the crucial role fibulin-1 has in development of the central nervous system and various connective tissues.

  9. A Rare Cause of Acromegaly: Short Review of McCune Albright Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yusuf Aydın

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available McCune-Albright syndrome (MAS is characterized by a triad of poly/monostotic fibrous dysplasia, café-au-lait macules, and hyperfunctioning endocrinopathies, including growth hormone (GH excess. Acromegaly, as a manifestation of endocrine hyperfunction with MAS is uncommon. We report a 34-year-old man with MAS and acromegaly, in whom surgical removal of the pituitary tumour has been technically difficult because of bone deformities. A combination of a long-acting somatostatin analogue (Sandostatin LAR and external irradiation were therefore used as treatment. Acromegaly associated with MAS is very rarely seen, and has been the subject of approximately 70 published reports. We present a case of acromegaly associated with MAS and a brief survey of relevant literature. Turk Jem 2009; 13: 13-5

  10. SHOX Haploinsufficiency as a Cause of Syndromic and Nonsyndromic Short Stature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukami, Maki; Seki, Atsuhito; Ogata, Tsutomu

    2016-04-01

    SHOX in the short arm pseudoautosomal region (PAR1) of sex chromosomes is one of the major growth genes in humans. SHOX haploinsufficiency results in idiopathic short stature and Léri-Weill dyschondrosteosis and is associated with the short stature of patients with Turner syndrome. The SHOX protein likely controls chondrocyte apoptosis by regulating multiple target genes including BNP,Fgfr3, Agc1, and Ctgf. SHOX haploinsufficiency frequently results from deletions and duplications in PAR1 involving SHOX exons and/or the cis-acting enhancers, while exonic point mutations account for a small percentage of cases. The clinical severity of SHOX haploinsufficiency reflects hormonal conditions rather than mutation types. Growth hormone treatment seems to be beneficial for cases with SHOX haploinsufficiency, although the long-term outcomes of this therapy require confirmation. Future challenges in SHOX research include elucidating its precise function in the developing limbs, identifying additional cis-acting enhancers, and determining optimal therapeutic strategies for patients.

  11. Paternal isodisomy for chromosome 2 as the cause of Crigler-Najjar type I syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petit, François M; Gajdos, Vincent; Parisot, Frédéric; Capel, Liliane; Aboura, Azzedine; Lachaux, Alain; Tachdjian, Gérard; Poüs, Christian; Labrune, Philippe

    2005-03-01

    Crigler-Najjar syndrome type I (CN-I) is a rare and severe autosomal recessive metabolic disease due to a total deficiency of bilirubin uridine diphosphate glucuronosyltransferase located on chromosome 2. We report on a child with CN-I due to a phenylalanine residue deletion inherited only from the father carrying this deletion at the heterozygous state. Cytogenetic analyses showed no deletion of the chromosomal 2q37 region. Microsatellite analysis of the child and his parents was consistent with paternal isodisomy for chromosome 2 in the child. This report demonstrates that uniparental disomy may be at the origin of very rare diseases transmitted as autosomal recessive traits and emphasizes the need for parental DNA analysis in such cases.

  12. Herlyn-Werner-Wunderlich syndrome complicated with pyocolpos: an unusual cause of postabortal sepsis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deepti Sharma

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Obstructive mullerian anomalies give rise to a spectrum of clinical presentations and are uncommon in routine gynecologic practice. The patient usually becomes symptomatic in early reproductive years. Recurrent pelvic pain, dysmenorrhoea, enlarging abdominopelvic mass and abnormal vaginal discharge are the common presenting symptoms. We describe a rare case of a mullerian anomaly getting diagnosed 13 years after attaining menarche during evaluation of postabortal sepsis. Patient presented two weeks following evacuation done for missed abortion, with acute abdominal pain, fever and foul smelling discharge per vaginum. The anomaly was identified as uterus didelphys with obstructed left hemivagina and ipsilateral renal agenesis (Herlyn-Werner-Wunderlich syndrome complicated by pyocolpos. She was successfully managed by single stage transvaginal septum resection under laparoscopic control. [Int J Reprod Contracept Obstet Gynecol 2013; 2(1.000: 88-91

  13. Von Hippel Lindau disease with metastatic pancreatic neuroendocrine tumor causing ectopic Cushing's syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatipoglu, Esra; Kepicoglu, Hasan; Rusen, Elif; Kabasakal, Levent; Gundogdu, Sadi; Kadioglu, Pinar

    2013-01-01

    We present a 39-year-old woman who was previously diagnosed with Von Hippel Lindau Disease (VHLD). She had surgery and radiotherapy for cranial hemangioblastoma (HA) 11 years ago and had unilateral adrenalectomy for pheochromocytoma in another hospital 6 month prior to her admission to our center. Moon face, buffalo hump, central obesity, progressive weight gain and menstrual irregularities persisted after adrenalectomy. Her laboratory results were consistent with ectopic Cushing's syndrome (ECS). A pancreatic solid mass with a nodule on the left lung were revealed upon computed tomography. In addition, Gallium-68 Somatostatin Receptor PET confirmed the pancreatic involvement and demonstrated additional lesions on the left lung and in the aortocaval lymphatic system on the right side, suggesting metastatic pancreatic neuroendocrine tumor (PNET). Peptide receptor radionuclide therapy (PRRT) with [177Lutetium-DOTA0,Tyr3] octreotate was performed on the patient, with no side effects observed. She was discharged from the hospital 10 days after the first cycle. PMID:23524618

  14. Suppurative dacroadenitis causing ocular sicca syndrome in classic Wegener′s granulomatosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khanna Dhanita

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Wegener′s granulomatosis (WG is a multisystem vasculitic disorder which can commonly afflict various components of the eye. Here we describe some unusual ocular manifestations of the disease in one patient. A young male with history of upper respiratory tract symptoms including epistaxis, nasal stuffiness and maxillary sinus pain presented with bilateral lacrimal gland abscess and ptosis. Lacrimal gland biopsy revealed granulomatous vasculitis. Lung cavities, positive cytoplasmic-antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies and high titers of serine proteinase-3 antibodies confirmed the diagnosis of WG. The patient developed dry eyes after a month of first presentation. There was no dryness of mouth, suggesting the absence of salivary gland involvement, and antinuclear antibodies as well as antibodies against Ro and La antigens classical of primary Sjogren′s syndrome were absent. Granulomatous vasculitis of lacrimal gland leading to abscess formation and dryness of eyes has not been described in WG and reflects the aggressive nature of inflammatory process in this disease.

  15. A very rare cause of acro-osteolysis: Hajdu-Cheney syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deprouw, Camille; Feydy, Antoine; Giraudet Le Quintrec, Janine-Sophie; Ruiz, Barbara; Kahan, André; Allanore, Yannick

    2015-12-01

    Acro-osteolysis is not uncommon and occurs in several conditions. Additional clinical and paraclinical findings and sometimes the performance of molecular tests can help to clarify the diagnosis. Here, we report the case of a 36-year-old woman who was referred to our department because of acute pain in the extremity of the left index finger. However, subsequent clinical examination also revealed short digits with pseudo-clubbing related to acro-osteolysis. Furthermore, severe osteoporosis, a moderate dysmorphic face, joint hypermobility, biological variables within normal ranges and her clinical history led us to consider the diagnosis of Hajdu-Cheney syndrome. Molecular analysis confirmed the diagnosis with the identification of a mutation in the NOTCH2 gene. The patient received bisphosphonate therapy, which resulted in some clinical and biological improvement 12 months later. PMID:26184537

  16. Dilated aortic root and severe aortic regurgitation causing dilated cardiomyopathy in classic Ehlers-Danlos syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zainal, Abir; Hamad, Mahmoud Nidal; Naqvi, Syed Yaseen

    2016-01-01

    Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (EDS) is a group of heritable disorders characterised by vast clinical heterogeneity ranging from the classic constellation of symptoms including skin hyperextensibility, joint hypermobility and skin fragility to the exceedingly critical consequences of arterial rupture and visceral perforation. We describe the case of a 65-year-old male with a history of classic EDS who reported of dyspnoea on exertion, orthopnoea, fatigue and palpitations. He was found to have dilated cardiomyopathy with an ejection fraction of 35%, aortic root dilation and severe aortic valve regurgitation. The authors intend to draw attention to the rare cardiac manifestations of this condition and the therapeutic challenges involved in managing such patients. PMID:27413024

  17. Unusual cause of shortness of breath after surgery for thoracic outlet syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schroeder, Jonathan Ryan; Kumar, Anjan; Savage, Edward; Rahaghi, Franck F

    2012-01-01

    A 31-year-old postal worker was diagnosed with bilateral thoracic outlet syndrome and scheduled for the first of two surgeries. The first procedure involved removal of the right first cervical rib, anterior and middle scalenes. On postoperative day 4, he developed shortness of breath. Chest radiograph showed a new pleural effusion on the right. Thoracentesis revealed a yellowish-red thick effusion. Based on the initial look of the fluid it was thought to be a haemorrhagic effusion with a purulent component, further testing revealed that he had developed a chylothorax. The patient was placed on a medium-chain triglyceride diet followed by chest tube drainage. After one day, the chest tube was removed due to minimal drainage, and he was discharged home the next day. Keeping this patient without food, on total parental nutrition, or pursuing surgical intervention was not necessary, as he had an excellent outcome from a very rare surgical complication. PMID:23047993

  18. A Case of Central Pontine Myelinolysis Caused by Hypophosphatemia Secondary to Refeeding Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamashita, Chikara; Shigeto, Hiroshi; Maeda, Norihisa; Torii, Takako; Ohyagi, Yasumasa; Kira, Jun-Ichi

    2015-01-01

    Central pontine myelinolysis (CPM), which was originally considered to be the result of rapid correction of chronic hyponatremia, is not necessarily accompanied by hyponatremia or drastic changes in serum sodium level. Here, we report a case of an anorexic 55-year-old male with a history of pharyngo-laryngo-esophagogastrectomy, initially hospitalized with status epilepticus. Although his consciousness gradually recovered as we were controlling his convulsion, it deteriorated again with new onset of anisocoria, and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) at this point revealed CPM. Rapid change of serum sodium or osmolarity, which is often associated with CPM, had not been apparent throughout his hospitalization. Instead, a review of the serum biochemistry test results showed that serum phosphate had drastically declined the day before the MRI first detected CPM. In this case, we suspect that hypophosphatemia induced by refeeding syndrome greatly contributed to the occurrence of CPM.

  19. A Case of Central Pontine Myelinolysis Caused by Hypophosphatemia Secondary to Refeeding Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chikara Yamashita

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Central pontine myelinolysis (CPM, which was originally considered to be the result of rapid correction of chronic hyponatremia, is not necessarily accompanied by hyponatremia or drastic changes in serum sodium level. Here, we report a case of an anorexic 55-year-old male with a history of pharyngo-laryngo-esophagogastrectomy, initially hospitalized with status epilepticus. Although his consciousness gradually recovered as we were controlling his convulsion, it deteriorated again with new onset of anisocoria, and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI at this point revealed CPM. Rapid change of serum sodium or osmolarity, which is often associated with CPM, had not been apparent throughout his hospitalization. Instead, a review of the serum biochemistry test results showed that serum phosphate had drastically declined the day before the MRI first detected CPM. In this case, we suspect that hypophosphatemia induced by refeeding syndrome greatly contributed to the occurrence of CPM.

  20. Mutations in c12orf57 cause a syndromic form of colobomatous microphthalmia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zahrani, Fatema; Aldahmesh, Mohammed A; Alshammari, Muneera J; Al-Hazzaa, Selwa A F; Alkuraya, Fowzan S

    2013-03-01

    Microphthalmia is an important developmental eye disorder. Although mutations in several genes have been linked to this condition, they only account for a minority of cases. We performed autozygome analysis and exome sequencing on a multiplex consanguineous family in which colobomatous microphthalmia is associated with profound global developmental delay, intractable seizures, and corpus callosum abnormalities, and we identified a homozygous truncating mutation in C12orf57 [c.1A>G; p.Met1?]. In a simplex case with a similar phenotype, we identified compound heterozygosity for the same mutation and another missense mutation [c.152T>A; p.Leu51Gln]. Little is known about C12orf57 but we show that it is expressed in several mouse tissues, including the eye and brain. Our data strongly implicate mutations in C12orf57 in the pathogenesis of a clinically distinct autosomal-recessive syndromic form of colobomatous microphthalmia.

  1. Mitochondrial citrate synthase crystals: novel finding in Sengers syndrome caused by acylglycerol kinase (AGK) mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siriwardena, Komudi; Mackay, Nevena; Levandovskiy, Valeriy; Blaser, Susan; Raiman, Julian; Kantor, Paul F; Ackerley, Cameron; Robinson, Brian H; Schulze, Andreas; Cameron, Jessie M

    2013-01-01

    We report on two families with Sengers syndrome and mutations in the acylglycerol kinase gene (AGK). In the first family, two brothers presented with vascular strokes, lactic acidosis, cardiomyopathy and cataracts, abnormal muscle cell histopathology and mitochondrial function. One proband had very abnormal mitochondria with citrate synthase crystals visible in electron micrographs, associated with markedly high citrate synthase activity. Exome sequencing was used to identify mutations in the AGK gene in the index patient. Targeted sequencing confirmed the same homozygous mutation (c.3G>A, p.M1I) in the brother. The second family had four affected members, of which we examined two. They also presented with similar clinical symptoms, but no strokes. Postmortem heart and skeletal muscle tissues showed low complex I, III and IV activities in the heart, but normal in the muscle. Skin fibroblasts showed elevated lactate/pyruvate ratios and low complex I+III activity. Targeted sequencing led to identification of a homozygous c.979A>T, p.K327* mutation. AGK is located in the mitochondria and phosphorylates monoacylglycerol and diacylglycerol to lysophosphatidic acid and phosphatidic acid. Disruption of these signaling molecules affects the mitochondria's response to superoxide radicals, resulting in oxidative damage to mitochondrial DNA, lipids and proteins, and stimulation of cellular detoxification pathways. High levels of manganese superoxide dismutase protein were detected in all four affected individuals, consistent with increased free radical damage. Phosphatidic acid is also involved in the synthesis of phospholipids and its loss will result in changes to the lipid composition of the inner mitochondrial membrane. These effects manifest as cataract formation in the eye, respiratory chain dysfunction and cardiac hypertrophy in heart tissue. These two pedigrees confirm that mutation of AGK is responsible for the severe neonatal presentation of Sengers syndrome. The

  2. Novel A CTG1 mutation causing autosomal dominant non-syndromic hearing impairment in a Chinese family

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Theγ-actin(ACTG1)gene is a cytoplasmic nonmuscle actin gene,which encodes a major cytoskeletal protein in the sensory hair cells of the cochlea.Mutations in ACTG1 were found to cause autosomal dominant,progressive,sensorineural hearing loss linked to the DFNA 20/26 locus on chromosome 17q25.3 in European and American families,respectively.In this study,a novel missense mutation (c.364A>G;p.I122V)co-segregated with the affected individuals in the family and did not exist in the unaffected family members and 150 unrelated normal controls.The alteration of residue I1e122 was predicted to damage its interaction with actin-binding proteins,which may cause disruption of hair cell organization and function.These findings strongly suggested that the I122V mutation in ACTG1 caused autosomal dominant non-syndromic hearing impairment in a Chinese family and expanded the spectrum of ACTG1 mutations causing hearing loss.

  3. De novo loss-of-function mutations in WAC cause a recognizable intellectual disability syndrome and learning deficits in Drosophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lugtenberg, Dorien; Reijnders, Margot R F; Fenckova, Michaela; Bijlsma, Emilia K; Bernier, Raphael; van Bon, Bregje W M; Smeets, Eric; Vulto-van Silfhout, Anneke T; Bosch, Danielle; Eichler, Evan E; Mefford, Heather C; Carvill, Gemma L; Bongers, Ernie M H F; Schuurs-Hoeijmakers, Janneke Hm; Ruivenkamp, Claudia A; Santen, Gijs W E; van den Maagdenberg, Arn M J M; Peeters-Scholte, Cacha M P C D; Kuenen, Sabine; Verstreken, Patrik; Pfundt, Rolph; Yntema, Helger G; de Vries, Petra F; Veltman, Joris A; Hoischen, Alexander; Gilissen, Christian; de Vries, Bert B A; Schenck, Annette; Kleefstra, Tjitske; Vissers, Lisenka E L M

    2016-08-01

    Recently WAC was reported as a candidate gene for intellectual disability (ID) based on the identification of a de novo mutation in an individual with severe ID. WAC regulates transcription-coupled histone H2B ubiquitination and has previously been implicated in the 10p12p11 contiguous gene deletion syndrome. In this study, we report on 10 individuals with de novo WAC mutations which we identified through routine (diagnostic) exome sequencing and targeted resequencing of WAC in 2326 individuals with unexplained ID. All but one mutation was expected to lead to a loss-of-function of WAC. Clinical evaluation of all individuals revealed phenotypic overlap for mild ID, hypotonia, behavioral problems and distinctive facial dysmorphisms, including a square-shaped face, deep set eyes, long palpebral fissures, and a broad mouth and chin. These clinical features were also previously reported in individuals with 10p12p11 microdeletion syndrome. To investigate the role of WAC in ID, we studied the importance of the Drosophila WAC orthologue (CG8949) in habituation, a non-associative learning paradigm. Neuronal knockdown of Drosophila CG8949 resulted in impaired learning, suggesting that WAC is required in neurons for normal cognitive performance. In conclusion, we defined a clinically recognizable ID syndrome, caused by de novo loss-of-function mutations in WAC. Independent functional evidence in Drosophila further supported the role of WAC in ID. On the basis of our data WAC can be added to the list of ID genes with a role in transcription regulation through histone modification. PMID:26757981

  4. Isolated and Syndromic Retinal Dystrophy Caused by Biallelic Mutations in RCBTB1, a Gene Implicated in Ubiquitination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coppieters, Frauke; Ascari, Giulia; Dannhausen, Katharina; Nikopoulos, Konstantinos; Peelman, Frank; Karlstetter, Marcus; Xu, Mingchu; Brachet, Cécile; Meunier, Isabelle; Tsilimbaris, Miltiadis K; Tsika, Chrysanthi; Blazaki, Styliani V; Vergult, Sarah; Farinelli, Pietro; Van Laethem, Thalia; Bauwens, Miriam; De Bruyne, Marieke; Chen, Rui; Langmann, Thomas; Sui, Ruifang; Meire, Françoise; Rivolta, Carlo; Hamel, Christian P; Leroy, Bart P; De Baere, Elfride

    2016-08-01

    Inherited retinal dystrophies (iRDs) are a group of genetically and clinically heterogeneous conditions resulting from mutations in over 250 genes. Here, homozygosity mapping and whole-exome sequencing (WES) in a consanguineous family revealed a homozygous missense mutation, c.973C>T (p.His325Tyr), in RCBTB1. In affected individuals, it was found to segregate with retinitis pigmentosa (RP), goiter, primary ovarian insufficiency, and mild intellectual disability. Subsequent analysis of WES data in different cohorts uncovered four additional homozygous missense mutations in five unrelated families in whom iRD segregates with or without syndromic features. Ocular phenotypes ranged from typical RP starting in the second decade to chorioretinal dystrophy with a later age of onset. The five missense mutations affect highly conserved residues either in the sixth repeat of the RCC1 domain or in the BTB1 domain. A founder haplotype was identified for mutation c.919G>A (p.Val307Met), occurring in two families of Mediterranean origin. We showed ubiquitous mRNA expression of RCBTB1 and demonstrated predominant RCBTB1 localization in human inner retina. RCBTB1 was very recently shown to be involved in ubiquitination, more specifically as a CUL3 substrate adaptor. Therefore, the effect on different components of the CUL3 and NFE2L2 (NRF2) pathway was assessed in affected individuals' lymphocytes, revealing decreased mRNA expression of NFE2L2 and several NFE2L2 target genes. In conclusion, our study puts forward mutations in RCBTB1 as a cause of autosomal-recessive non-syndromic and syndromic iRD. Finally, our data support a role for impaired ubiquitination in the pathogenetic mechanism of RCBTB1 mutations. PMID:27486781

  5. Psychological stress and 30-day all-cause hospital readmission in acute coronary syndrome patients: an observational cohort study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donald Edmondson

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Many acute coronary syndrome (ACS; myocardial infarction and unstable angina patients are rehospitalized within 30 days of discharge, and recent US health policy initiatives have tied hospital Medicare reimbursement to 30-day readmission rates. Patient-perceived psychological stress is thought to impact prognosis after ACS. A recently offered "posthospital syndrome" model of 30-day readmissions posits that the stress level at the time of the index hospitalization itself may increase 30-day risk for readmission in ACS patients. We tested whether self-reported stress in the days surrounding the ACS hospitalization was associated with increased risk for readmission within 30 days. METHODS: A mean of 8.5 days after discharge, 342 consecutively hospitalized ACS patients reported on how often they felt stress during the past two weeks. Readmission within 30 days of hospital discharge for any cause was determined by follow-up telephone calls to patients and confirmed by hospital records. RESULTS: Overall, 40 (11.7% participants were readmitted within 30 days, and 22 (6.4% reported high stress. Readmission within 30 days was more common in patients with high stress (5 admissions, 23% than in patients with low stress (35 admissions, 11%. After adjustment for demographic and clinical factors, as well as depression, high stress was associated with a 3-fold increased risk of 30-day readmission (HR = 3.21, 95% CI = 1.13, 9.10. CONCLUSIONS: Previous research has shown that stress in the days surrounding a hospitalization can mark long-term cardiovascular risk, but this is the first study to test a hypothesis of the posthospital syndrome model of early readmission. Further research is needed to confirm the association between stress and readmission risk, and to identify the processes of hospitalization that could be modified to both reduce the stress experienced and that would also be effective for reducing readmissions.

  6. Mutations in the paired domain of the human PAX3 gene cause Klein-Waardenburg syndrome (WS-III) as well as Waardenburg syndrome type I (WS-I).

    OpenAIRE

    Hoth, C F; Milunsky, A; Lipsky, N; Sheffer, R; Clarren, S K; Baldwin, C T

    1993-01-01

    Waardenburg syndrome type I (WS-I) is an autosomal dominant disorder characterized by sensorineural hearing loss, dystopia canthorum, pigmentary disturbances, and other developmental defects. Klein-Waardenburg syndrome (WS-III) is a disorder with many of the same characteristics as WS-I and includes musculoskeletal abnormalities. We have recently reported the identification and characterization of one of the first gene defects, in the human PAX3 gene, which causes WS-I. PAX3 is a DNA-binding ...

  7. Hyperactive neuroendocrine secretion causes size, feeding, and metabolic defects of C. elegans Bardet-Biedl syndrome mutants.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian H Lee

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Bardet-Biedl syndrome, BBS, is a rare autosomal recessive disorder with clinical presentations including polydactyly, retinopathy, hyperphagia, obesity, short stature, cognitive impairment, and developmental delays. Disruptions of BBS proteins in a variety of organisms impair cilia formation and function and the multi-organ defects of BBS have been attributed to deficiencies in various cilia-associated signaling pathways. In C. elegans, bbs genes are expressed exclusively in the sixty ciliated sensory neurons of these animals and bbs mutants exhibit sensory defects as well as body size, feeding, and metabolic abnormalities. Here we show that in contrast to many other cilia-defective mutants, C. elegans bbs mutants exhibit increased release of dense-core vesicles and organism-wide phenotypes associated with enhanced activities of insulin, neuropeptide, and biogenic amine signaling pathways. We show that the altered body size, feeding, and metabolic abnormalities of bbs mutants can be corrected to wild-type levels by abrogating the enhanced secretion of dense-core vesicles without concomitant correction of ciliary defects. These findings expand the role of BBS proteins to the regulation of dense-core-vesicle exocytosis and suggest that some features of Bardet-Biedl Syndrome may be caused by excessive neuroendocrine secretion.

  8. Allopurinol inappropriate use in case of asymptomatic hyperuricemic patient causes fatal Allopurinol hypersensitive syndrome: lesson to all

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arvind Kumar

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Allopurinol is used to treat hyperuricemia (HU in a patient of gout. It is also used to prevent HU in a patient of hematological malignancies who are about to undergo chemotherapy. Allopurinol is usually well-tolerated but it occasionally induces hypersensitivity reactions that manifest after few months of therapy. Cutaneous reactions are pruritic, erythematous, or maculopapular eruptions. Rarely fatal toxic epidermal necrolysis or Stevens-Johnson syndrome may occur. Transient leukopenia or leukocytosis, eosinophilia and elevated transaminases may also occur. HU is not a disease in itself. Its level is highly variable in the general population. Uric acid level is influenced by many factors such as dietary intake of proteins, hypertension, and obesity. Only very rarely patients of AHU may progress to gout and renal stones. Not much data is available that support HU alone in an asymptomatic patient in later life shows the diseases which are associated with HU. Sometimes only lifestyle changes, diet restrictions, alcohol restrictions, and treatment of underlying acquired cause may correct HU. Here, we are presenting a rare case of allopurinol hypersensitivity syndrome in an AHU patient. Our aim is to raise awareness among physicians so that they avoid using unnecessarily allopurinol in AHU patients and also titrate the dose of allopurinol in patients of renal failure. Risk-benefit ratio must be considered in these patients before starting allopurinol. [Int J Basic Clin Pharmacol 2015; 4(6.000: 1302-1304

  9. Loss-of-function mutations in TNFAIP3 leading to A20 haploinsufficiency cause an early onset autoinflammatory syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Qing; Wang, Hongying; Schwartz, Daniella M.; Stoffels, Monique; Park, Yong Hwan; Zhang, Yuan; Yang, Dan; Demirkaya, Erkan; Takeuchi, Masaki; Tsai, Wanxia Li; Lyons, Jonathan J.; Yu, Xiaomin; Ouyang, Claudia; Chen, Celeste; Chin, David T.; Zaal, Kristien; Chandrasekharappa, Settara C.; Hanson, Eric P.; Yu, Zhen; Mullikin, James C.; Hasni, Sarfaraz A.; Wertz, Ingrid; Ombrello, Amanda K.; Stone, Deborah L.; Hoffmann, Patrycja; Jones, Anne; Barham, Beverly K.; Leavis, Helen L.; van Royen-Kerkof, Annet; Sibley, Cailin; Batu, Ezgi D.; Gül, Ahmet; Siegel, Richard M.; Boehm, Manfred; Milner, Joshua D.; Ozen, Seza; Gadina, Massimo; Chae, JaeJin; Laxer, Ronald M.; Kastner, Daniel L.; Aksentijevich, Ivona

    2016-01-01

    Systemic autoinflammatory diseases are driven by abnormal activation of innate immunity1. Herein we describe a new syndrome caused by high penetrance heterozygous germline mutations in the NFκB regulatory protein TNFAIP3 (A20) in six unrelated families with early onset systemic inflammation. The syndrome resembles Behçet’s disease (BD), which is typically considered a polygenic disorder with onset in early adulthood2. A20 is a potent inhibitor of the NFκB signaling pathway3. TNFAIP3 mutant truncated proteins are likely to act by haploinsufficiency since they do not exert a dominant-negative effect in overexpression experiments. Patients’ cells show increased degradation of IκBα and nuclear translocation of NFκB p65, and increased expression of NFκB-mediated proinflammatory cytokines. A20 restricts NFκB signals via deubiquitinating (DUB) activity. In cells expressing the mutant A20 protein, there is defective removal of K63-linked ubiquitin from TRAF6, NEMO, and RIP1 after TNF stimulation. NFκB-dependent pro-inflammatory cytokines are potential therapeutic targets for these patients. PMID:26642243

  10. Heimler Syndrome Is Caused by Hypomorphic Mutations in the Peroxisome-Biogenesis Genes PEX1 and PEX6

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ratbi, Ilham; Falkenberg, Kim D.; Sommen, Manou; Al-Sheqaih, Nada; Guaoua, Soukaina; Vandeweyer, Geert; Urquhart, Jill E.; Chandler, Kate E.; Williams, Simon G.; Roberts, Neil A.; El Alloussi, Mustapha; Black, Graeme C.; Ferdinandusse, Sacha; Ramdi, Hind; Heimler, Audrey; Fryer, Alan; Lynch, Sally-Ann; Cooper, Nicola; Ong, Kai Ren; Smith, Claire E.L.; Inglehearn, Christopher F.; Mighell, Alan J.; Elcock, Claire; Poulter, James A.; Tischkowitz, Marc; Davies, Sally J.; Sefiani, Abdelaziz; Mironov, Aleksandr A.; Newman, William G.; Waterham, Hans R.; Van Camp, Guy

    2015-01-01

    Heimler syndrome (HS) is a rare recessive disorder characterized by sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL), amelogenesis imperfecta, nail abnormalities, and occasional or late-onset retinal pigmentation. We ascertained eight families affected by HS and, by using a whole-exome sequencing approach, identified biallelic mutations in PEX1 or PEX6 in six of them. Loss-of-function mutations in both genes are known causes of a spectrum of autosomal-recessive peroxisome-biogenesis disorders (PBDs), including Zellweger syndrome. PBDs are characterized by leukodystrophy, hypotonia, SNHL, retinopathy, and skeletal, craniofacial, and liver abnormalities. We demonstrate that each HS-affected family has at least one hypomorphic allele that results in extremely mild peroxisomal dysfunction. Although individuals with HS share some subtle clinical features found in PBDs, the diagnosis was not suggested by routine blood and skin fibroblast analyses used to detect PBDs. In conclusion, our findings define HS as a mild PBD, expanding the pleiotropy of mutations in PEX1 and PEX6. PMID:26387595

  11. Intrathecal baclofen withdrawal syndrome caused by low residual volume in the pump reservoir: a report of 2 cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rigoli, Gianfranco; Terrini, Giovanni; Cordioli, Zeno

    2004-12-01

    Intrathecal baclofen (ITB) is an effective treatment for spasticity caused by spinal or cerebral pathologies. Severe withdrawal symptoms can result, however, if ITB is abruptly withdrawn as a result of equipment malfunctions or human error. We describe 2 cases of severe ITB withdrawal syndrome. In the first case, the symptoms appeared 5 months after pump placement, when residual volume was 2.0 mL; in the second case, symptoms appeared 2 months after the replacement of a new pump, when residual volume was 0.9 mL. In both cases, there was no evidence of system malfunction or human error. The syndrome occurred from up to 72 hours before the scheduled refilling procedure, and the residual volume in the Medtronic SynchroMed EL pump reservoir was either at, or significantly lower than, the recommended 2 mL. These cases suggest that the SynchroMed EL pump reservoir should be refilled, to avoid potentially serious consequences, when the residual volume is not lower than 3 mL by programming the alarm to sound at a volume larger than the recommended 2 mL. PMID:15605349

  12. Follow-up after acute respiratory distress syndrome caused by influenza a (H1N1 virus infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Toufen Jr.

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: There are no reports on the long-term follow-up of patients with swine-origin influenza A virus infection that progressed to acute respiratory distress syndrome. METHODS: Four patients were prospectively followed up with pulmonary function tests and high-resolution computed tomography for six months after admission to an intensive care unit. RESULTS: Pulmonary function test results assessed two months after admission to the intensive care unit showed reduced forced vital capacity in all patients and low diffusion capacity for carbon monoxide in two patients. At six months, pulmonary function test results were available for three patients. Two patients continued to have a restrictive pattern, and none of the patients presented with abnormal diffusion capacity for carbon monoxide. All of them had a diffuse ground-glass pattern on high-resolution computed tomography that improved after six months. CONCLUSIONS: Despite the marked severity of lung disease at admission, patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome caused by swine-origin influenza A virus infection presented a late but substantial recovery over six months of follow-up.

  13. Untethering an unusual cause of kidney injury in a teenager with Down syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yen, Elizabeth; Miele, Niel F; Barone, Joseph G; Tyagi, Rachana; Weiss, Lynne S

    2014-11-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) is characterized by the acute nature and the inability of kidneys to maintain fluid homeostasis as well as adequate electrolyte and acid-base balance, resulting in an accumulation of nitrogenous waste and elevation of serum blood urea nitrogen and creatinine values. Acute kidney injury may be a single isolated event, yet oftentimes, it results from an acute chronic kidney disease. It is critical to seek out the etiology of AKI and to promptly manage the underlying chronic kidney disease to prevent comorbidities and mortality that may ensue. We described a case of a 16-year-old adolescent girl with Down syndrome who presented with AKI and electrolyte aberrance.Abdominal and renal ultrasounds demonstrated a significantly dilated bladder as well as frank hydronephrosis and hydroureter bilaterally. Foley catheter was successful in relieving the obstruction and improving her renal function. However, a magnetic resonance imaging was pursued in light of her chronic constipation and back pain, and it revealed a structural defect (tethered cord) that underlies a chronic process that was highly likely contributory to her AKI. She was managed accordingly with a guarded result and required long-term and close monitoring.

  14. [Pituitary syndrome caused by neoplasia in a 17-month-old Holstein Friesian heifer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wippermann, Wolf; Schöniger, Sandra; Gerlach, Kerstin; Schusser, Gerald Fritz; Köller, Gabor; Starke, Alexander

    2016-06-16

    A 17-month-old Holstein Friesian heifer was presented after one day with dysphagia, slight paralysis of the tongue and swelling of the eyelids. Clinical examination of the animal revealed an extended posture of the head and neck, severely increased salivation, reduced lingual tone and mandibular paralysis with complete absence of the swallowing reflex. The right eye showed a drooping eyelid, mucopurulent discharge, exposure keratitis, corneal opacity and miosis. On the left side, a moderate exophthalmos and slight mucous discharge from the nostril were observed. Neurological examination revealed the absence of multiple cranial nerve reflexes suggesting a pituitary syndrome. On X-rays, a soft-tissue opacity with sharp margins and a diameter of approximately 5 cm was seen. It was located ventral to the ethmoid bone with possible intraneurocranial origin. Rhinoscopically, a mass located distal to the ethmoid bone with an uneven, slightly reddish surface partly covered by purulent exudate was visualised. Post-mortem examination of the euthanized animal confirmed neoplasia, which ranged from the fossa hypophysialis of the corpus ossis basisphenoidalis to the ethmoid bone. Histopathologic findings matched a small, round, blue cell tumour. PMID:27172846

  15. Germline PRKACA amplification leads to Cushing syndrome caused by 3 adrenocortical pathologic phenotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carney, J Aidan; Lyssikatos, Charalampos; Lodish, Maya B; Stratakis, Constantine A

    2015-01-01

    We describe the pathology of 5 patients with germline PRKACA copy number gain and Cushing syndrome: 4 males and 1 female, aged 2 to 43 years, including a mother and son. Imaging showed normal or slightly enlarged adrenal glands in 4 patients and a unilateral mass in the fifth. Biochemically, the patients had corticotropin-independent hypercortisolism. Four underwent bilateral adrenalectomy; unilateral adrenalectomy was performed in the patient with the adrenal mass. Pathologically, 3 patients, including the 1 with the tumor (adenoma), had primary pigmented nodular adrenocortical disease with extranodular cortical atrophy and mild intracapsular and extracapsular extension of cortical cells. The other 2 patients had cortical hyperplasia and prominent capsular and extracapsular micronodular cortical hyperplasia. Immunoperoxidase staining revealed differences for synaptophysin, inhibin-A, and Ki-67 (nuclei) in the atrophic cortices (patients 1, 2, and 3) and hyperplastic cortices (patients 4 and 5) and for Ki-67 (nuclei) and vimentin in the extracortical nodules in the 2 groups of patients. β-Catenin stained the cell membrane, cytoplasm, and nuclei of the adenoma. The patients were well at follow-up (1-23 years); 24-hour urinary cortisol excretion was elevated in the patient who had unilateral adrenalectomy.

  16. SHOX Haploinsufficiency as a Cause of Syndromic and Nonsyndromic Short Stature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukami, Maki; Seki, Atsuhito; Ogata, Tsutomu

    2016-04-01

    SHOX in the short arm pseudoautosomal region (PAR1) of sex chromosomes is one of the major growth genes in humans. SHOX haploinsufficiency results in idiopathic short stature and Léri-Weill dyschondrosteosis and is associated with the short stature of patients with Turner syndrome. The SHOX protein likely controls chondrocyte apoptosis by regulating multiple target genes including BNP,Fgfr3, Agc1, and Ctgf. SHOX haploinsufficiency frequently results from deletions and duplications in PAR1 involving SHOX exons and/or the cis-acting enhancers, while exonic point mutations account for a small percentage of cases. The clinical severity of SHOX haploinsufficiency reflects hormonal conditions rather than mutation types. Growth hormone treatment seems to be beneficial for cases with SHOX haploinsufficiency, although the long-term outcomes of this therapy require confirmation. Future challenges in SHOX research include elucidating its precise function in the developing limbs, identifying additional cis-acting enhancers, and determining optimal therapeutic strategies for patients. PMID:27194967

  17. Frameshift mutation in the PTCH2 gene can cause nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujii, Katsunori; Ohashi, Hirofumi; Suzuki, Maiko; Hatsuse, Hiromi; Shiohama, Tadashi; Uchikawa, Hideki; Miyashita, Toshiyuki

    2013-12-01

    Nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome (NBCCS) is an autosomal dominant disorder characterized by developmental defects and tumorigenesis. The gene responsible for NBCCS is PTCH1, encoding a receptor for the secreted protein, sonic hedgehog. Recently, a Chinese family with NBCCS carrying a missense mutation in PTCH2, a close homolog of PTCH1, was reported. However, the pathological significance of missense mutations should be discussed cautiously. Here, we report a 13-year-old girl diagnosed with NBCCS based on multiple keratocystic odontogenic tumors and rib anomalies carrying a frameshift mutation in the PTCH2 gene (c.1172_1173delCT). Considering the deleterious nature of the frameshift mutation, our study further confirmed a causative role for the PTCH2 mutation in NBCCS. The absence of typical phenotypes in this case such as palmar/plantar pits, macrocephaly, falx calcification, hypertelorism and coarse face, together with previously reported cases, suggested that individuals with NBCCS carrying a PTCH2 mutation may have a milder phenotype than those with a PTCH1 mutation.

  18. SHOX Haploinsufficiency as a Cause of Syndromic and Nonsyndromic Short Stature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukami, Maki; Seki, Atsuhito; Ogata, Tsutomu

    2016-01-01

    SHOX in the short arm pseudoautosomal region (PAR1) of sex chromosomes is one of the major growth genes in humans. SHOX haploinsufficiency results in idiopathic short stature and Léri-Weill dyschondrosteosis and is associated with the short stature of patients with Turner syndrome. The SHOX protein likely controls chondrocyte apoptosis by regulating multiple target genes including BNP,Fgfr3, Agc1, and Ctgf. SHOX haploinsufficiency frequently results from deletions and duplications in PAR1 involving SHOX exons and/or the cis-acting enhancers, while exonic point mutations account for a small percentage of cases. The clinical severity of SHOX haploinsufficiency reflects hormonal conditions rather than mutation types. Growth hormone treatment seems to be beneficial for cases with SHOX haploinsufficiency, although the long-term outcomes of this therapy require confirmation. Future challenges in SHOX research include elucidating its precise function in the developing limbs, identifying additional cis-acting enhancers, and determining optimal therapeutic strategies for patients. PMID:27194967

  19. Duplication of the TGFBR1 gene causes features of Loeys-Dietz syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breckpot, Jeroen; Budts, Werner; De Zegher, Francis; Vermeesch, Joris R; Devriendt, Koenraad

    2010-01-01

    Loeys-Dietz syndrome (LDS; OMIM:609192) is an autosomal dominant disorder characterized by hypertelorism, bifid uvula or cleft palate, and arterial tortuosity with widespread vascular aneurysms and a high risk of aortic dissection at an early age. LDS results from mutations in the transforming growth factor beta-receptor I and II (TGFBR1 and TGFBR2) genes, altering the transmission of the subcellular TGF-β signal, mediated by increased activation of Smad2. We report on a 17-year-old boy with pubertas tarda, a bifid uvula, camptodactyly and facial dysmorphic features, suggestive of LDS. Mutation analysis of TGFBR1 and TGFBR2 was normal. By means of molecular karyotyping two previously unreported chromosomal imbalances were detected: a 120 kb deletion on chromosome 22q13.31q13.32, inherited from an unaffected parent, and a de novo 14.6 Mb duplication on chromosome 9q22.32q31.3, comprising TGFBR1. We hypothesize that copy number gain of TGFBR1 contributes to the phenotype. PMID:20813212

  20. Dominant beta-catenin mutations cause intellectual disability with recognizable syndromic features

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tucci, V.; Kleefstra, T.; Hardy, A.; Heise, I.; Maggi, S.; Willemsen, M.H.; Hilton, H.; Esapa, C.; Simon, M.; Buenavista, M.T.; McGuffin, L.J.; Vizor, L.; Dodero, L.; Tsaftaris, S.; Romero, R.; Nillesen, W.N.; Vissers, L.E.L.M.; Kempers, M.J.E.; Silfhout, A.T. van; Iqbal, Z.; Orlando, M.; Maccione, A.; Lassi, G.; Farisello, P.; Contestabile, A.; Tinarelli, F.; Nieus, T.; Raimondi, A.; Greco, B.; Cantatore, D.; Gasparini, L.; Berdondini, L.; Bifone, A.; Gozzi, A.; Wells, S.; Nolan, P.M.

    2014-01-01

    The recent identification of multiple dominant mutations in the gene encoding beta-catenin in both humans and mice has enabled exploration of the molecular and cellular basis of beta-catenin function in cognitive impairment. In humans, beta-catenin mutations that cause a spectrum of neurodevelopment

  1. Mutations in ADAR1 cause Aicardi-Goutières syndrome associated with a type I interferon signature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rice, Gillian I; Kasher, Paul R; Forte, Gabriella M A; Mannion, Niamh M; Greenwood, Sam M; Szynkiewicz, Marcin; Dickerson, Jonathan E; Bhaskar, Sanjeev S; Zampini, Massimiliano; Briggs, Tracy A; Jenkinson, Emma M; Bacino, Carlos A; Battini, Roberta; Bertini, Enrico; Brogan, Paul A; Brueton, Louise A; Carpanelli, Marialuisa; De Laet, Corinne; de Lonlay, Pascale; del Toro, Mireia; Desguerre, Isabelle; Fazzi, Elisa; Garcia-Cazorla, Angels; Heiberg, Arvid; Kawaguchi, Masakazu; Kumar, Ram; Lin, Jean-Pierre S-M; Lourenco, Charles M; Male, Alison M; Marques, Wilson; Mignot, Cyril; Olivieri, Ivana; Orcesi, Simona; Prabhakar, Prab; Rasmussen, Magnhild; Robinson, Robert A; Rozenberg, Flore; Schmidt, Johanna L; Steindl, Katharina; Tan, Tiong Y; van der Merwe, William G; Vanderver, Adeline; Vassallo, Grace; Wakeling, Emma L; Wassmer, Evangeline; Whittaker, Elizabeth; Livingston, John H; Lebon, Pierre; Suzuki, Tamio; McLaughlin, Paul J; Keegan, Liam P; O'Connell, Mary A; Lovell, Simon C; Crow, Yanick J

    2012-11-01

    Adenosine deaminases acting on RNA (ADARs) catalyze the hydrolytic deamination of adenosine to inosine in double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) and thereby potentially alter the information content and structure of cellular RNAs. Notably, although the overwhelming majority of such editing events occur in transcripts derived from Alu repeat elements, the biological function of non-coding RNA editing remains uncertain. Here, we show that mutations in ADAR1 (also known as ADAR) cause the autoimmune disorder Aicardi-Goutières syndrome (AGS). As in Adar1-null mice, the human disease state is associated with upregulation of interferon-stimulated genes, indicating a possible role for ADAR1 as a suppressor of type I interferon signaling. Considering recent insights derived from the study of other AGS-related proteins, we speculate that ADAR1 may limit the cytoplasmic accumulation of the dsRNA generated from genomic repetitive elements.

  2. Alteration of the intestinal microbiota as a cause of and a potential therapeutic option in irritable bowel syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    König, J; Brummer, R J

    2014-09-01

    The intestinal microbiota forms a complex ecosystem that is in close contact with its host and has an important impact on health. An increasing number of disorders are associated with disturbances in this ecosystem. Also patients suffering from irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) show an altered composition of their gut microbiota. IBS is a multifactorial chronic disorder characterised by various abdominal complaints and a worldwide prevalence of 10-20%. Even though its aetiology and pathophysiology are complex and not well understood, it is widely accepted that aberrations along the microbe-gut-brain axis are involved. In this review, it will be discussed how exogenous factors, e.g. antibiotics, can cause disbalance in the intestinal microbiota and thereby contribute to the development of IBS. In addition, several new IBS treatment options that aim at re-establishing a healthy, beneficial ecosystem will be described. These include antibiotics, probiotics, prebiotics and faecal transplantation. PMID:24583610

  3. Short beak and dwarfism syndrome of mule duck is caused by a distinct lineage of goose parvovirus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palya, Vilmos; Zolnai, Anna; Benyeda, Zsófia; Kovács, Edit; Kardi, Veronika; Mató, Tamás

    2009-04-01

    From the early 1970s to the present, numerous cases of short beak and dwarfism syndrome (SBDS) have been reported in mule ducks from France. The animals showed strong growth retardation with smaller beak and tarsus. It was suggested that the syndrome was caused by goose parvovirus on the basis of serological investigation, but the causative agent has not been isolated and the disease has not so far been reproduced by experimental infection. The aim of the present study was to characterize the virus strains isolated from field cases of SBDS, and to reproduce the disease experimentally. Phylogenetic analysis proved that the parvovirus isolates obtained from SBDS of mule duck belonged to a distinct lineage of goose parvovirus-related group of waterfowl parvoviruses. The authors carried out experimental infections of 1-day-old, 2-week-old and 3-week-old mule ducks by the oral route with three different parvovirus strains: strain D17/99 of goose parvovirus from Derzsy's disease, strain FM of Muscovy duck parvovirus from the parvovirus disease of Muscovy ducks, and strain D176/02 isolated from SBDS of mule duck. The symptoms of SBDS of the mule duck could only be reproduced with the mule duck isolate (strain D176/02) following 1-day-old inoculation. Infection with a genetically different strain of goose parvovirus isolated from classical Derzsy's disease (D17/99) or with the Muscovy duck parvovirus strain (FM) did not cause any clinical symptoms or pathological lesions in mule ducks.

  4. Loss of KCNJ10 protein expression abolishes endocochlear potential and causes deafness in Pendred syndrome mouse model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wall Susan M

    2004-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pendred syndrome, a common autosomal-recessive disorder characterized by congenital deafness and goiter, is caused by mutations of SLC26A4, which codes for pendrin. We investigated the relationship between pendrin and deafness using mice that have (Slc26a4+/+ or lack a complete Slc26a4 gene (Slc26a4-/-. Methods Expression of pendrin and other proteins was determined by confocal immunocytochemistry. Expression of mRNA was determined by quantitative RT-PCR. The endocochlear potential and the endolymphatic K+ concentration were measured with double-barreled microelectrodes. Currents generated by the stria marginal cells were recorded with a vibrating probe. Tissue masses were evaluated by morphometric distance measurements and pigmentation was quantified by densitometry. Results Pendrin was found in the cochlea in apical membranes of spiral prominence cells and spindle-shaped cells of stria vascularis, in outer sulcus and root cells. Endolymph volume in Slc26a4-/- mice was increased and tissue masses in areas normally occupied by type I and II fibrocytes were reduced. Slc26a4-/- mice lacked the endocochlear potential, which is generated across the basal cell barrier by the K+ channel KCNJ10 localized in intermediate cells. Stria vascularis was hyperpigmented, suggesting unalleviated free radical damage. The basal cell barrier appeared intact; intermediate cells and KCNJ10 mRNA were present but KCNJ10 protein was absent. Endolymphatic K+ concentrations were normal and membrane proteins necessary for K+ secretion were present, including the K+ channel KCNQ1 and KCNE1, Na+/2Cl-/K+ cotransporter SLC12A2 and the gap junction GJB2. Conclusions These observations demonstrate that pendrin dysfunction leads to a loss of KCNJ10 protein expression and a loss of the endocochlear potential, which may be the direct cause of deafness in Pendred syndrome.

  5. Genetic heterogeneity in Rubinstein-Taybi syndrome: mutations in both the CBP and EP300 genes cause disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roelfsema, Jeroen H; White, Stefan J; Ariyürek, Yavuz; Bartholdi, Deborah; Niedrist, Dunja; Papadia, Francesco; Bacino, Carlos A; den Dunnen, Johan T; van Ommen, Gert-Jan B; Breuning, Martijn H; Hennekam, Raoul C; Peters, Dorien J M

    2005-04-01

    CREB-binding protein and p300 function as transcriptional coactivators in the regulation of gene expression through various signal-transduction pathways. Both are potent histone acetyl transferases. A certain level of CREB-binding protein is essential for normal development, since inactivation of one allele causes Rubinstein-Taybi syndrome (RSTS). There is a direct link between loss of acetyl transferase activity and RSTS, which indicates that the disorder is caused by aberrant chromatin regulation. We screened the entire CREB-binding protein gene (CBP) for mutations in patients with RSTS by using methods that find point mutations and larger rearrangements. In 92 patients, we were able to identify a total of 36 mutations in CBP. By using multiple ligation-dependent probe amplification, we found not only several deletions but also the first reported intragenic duplication in a patient with RSTS. We extended the search for mutations to the EP300 gene and showed that mutations in EP300 also cause this disorder. These are the first mutations identified in EP300 for a congenital disorder.

  6. Epizootic ulcerative syndrome caused by Aphanomyces invadans in captive bullseye snakehead Channa marulius collected from south Florida, USA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saylor, Ryan [University of West Florida; Miller, Debra [University of Georgia; Vandersea, Mark [National Oceanic and Atmospheric Admin; Bevelhimer, Mark S [ORNL; Schofield, Pamela [U.S. Geological Survey; Bennett, Wayne [University of West Florida

    2010-02-01

    Epizootic ulcerative syndrome (EUS) caused by the oomycete Aphanomyces invadans is an invasive, opportunistic disease of both freshwater and estuarine fishes. Originally documented as the cause of mycotic granulomatosis of ornamental fishes in Japan and as the cause of EUS of fishes in southeast Asia and Australia, this pathogen is also present in estuaries and freshwater bodies of the Atlantic and gulf coasts of the USA. We describe a mass mortality event of 343 captive juvenile bullseye snakehead Channa marulius collected from freshwater canals in Miami-Dade County, Florida. Clinical signs appeared within the first 2 d of captivity and included petechiae, ulceration, erratic swimming, and inappetence. Histological examination revealed hyphae invading from the skin lesions deep into the musculature and internal organs. Species identification was confirmed using a species-specific PCR assay. Despite therapeutic attempts, 100% mortality occurred. This represents the first documented case of EUS in bullseye snakehead fish collected from waters in the USA. Future investigation of the distribution and prevalence of A. invadans within the bullseye snakehead range in south Florida may give insight into this pathogen-host system.

  7. Epizootic ulcerative syndrome caused by Aphanomyces invadans in captive bullseye snakehead Channa marulius collected from south Florida, USA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saylor, Ryan K; Miller, Debra L; Vandersea, Mark W; Bevelhimer, Mark S; Schofield, Pamela J; Bennett, Wayne A

    2010-01-25

    Epizootic ulcerative syndrome (EUS) caused by the oomycete Aphanomyces invadans is an invasive, opportunistic disease of both freshwater and estuarine fishes. Originally documented as the cause of mycotic granulomatosis of ornamental fishes in Japan and as the cause of EUS of fishes in southeast Asia and Australia, this pathogen is also present in estuaries and freshwater bodies of the Atlantic and gulf coasts of the USA. We describe a mass mortality event of 343 captive juvenile bullseye snakehead Channa marulius collected from freshwater canals in Miami-Dade County, Florida. Clinical signs appeared within the first 2 d of captivity and included petechiae, ulceration, erratic swimming, and inappetence. Histological examination revealed hyphae invading from the skin lesions deep into the musculature and internal organs. Species identification was confirmed using a species-specific PCR assay. Despite therapeutic attempts, 100% mortality occurred. This represents the first documented case of EUS in bullseye snakehead fish collected from waters in the USA. Future investigation of the distribution and prevalence of A. invadans within the bullseye snakehead range in south Florida may give insight into this pathogen-host system.

  8. GABAergic Neuron-Specific Loss of Ube3a Causes Angelman Syndrome-Like EEG Abnormalities and Enhances Seizure Susceptibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Judson, Matthew C; Wallace, Michael L; Sidorov, Michael S; Burette, Alain C; Gu, Bin; van Woerden, Geeske M; King, Ian F; Han, Ji Eun; Zylka, Mark J; Elgersma, Ype; Weinberg, Richard J; Philpot, Benjamin D

    2016-04-01

    Loss of maternal UBE3A causes Angelman syndrome (AS), a neurodevelopmental disorder associated with severe epilepsy. We previously implicated GABAergic deficits onto layer (L) 2/3 pyramidal neurons in the pathogenesis of neocortical hyperexcitability, and perhaps epilepsy, in AS model mice. Here we investigate consequences of selective Ube3a loss from either GABAergic or glutamatergic neurons, focusing on the development of hyperexcitability within L2/3 neocortex and in broader circuit and behavioral contexts. We find that GABAergic Ube3a loss causes AS-like increases in neocortical EEG delta power, enhances seizure susceptibility, and leads to presynaptic accumulation of clathrin-coated vesicles (CCVs)-all without decreasing GABAergic inhibition onto L2/3 pyramidal neurons. Conversely, glutamatergic Ube3a loss fails to yield EEG abnormalities, seizures, or associated CCV phenotypes, despite impairing tonic inhibition onto L2/3 pyramidal neurons. These results substantiate GABAergic Ube3a loss as the principal cause of circuit hyperexcitability in AS mice, lending insight into ictogenic mechanisms in AS.

  9. Exome sequencing and functional validation in zebrafish identify GTDC2 mutations as a cause of Walker-Warburg syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manzini, M Chiara; Tambunan, Dimira E; Hill, R Sean; Yu, Tim W; Maynard, Thomas M; Heinzen, Erin L; Shianna, Kevin V; Stevens, Christine R; Partlow, Jennifer N; Barry, Brenda J; Rodriguez, Jacqueline; Gupta, Vandana A; Al-Qudah, Abdel-Karim; Eyaid, Wafaa M; Friedman, Jan M; Salih, Mustafa A; Clark, Robin; Moroni, Isabella; Mora, Marina; Beggs, Alan H; Gabriel, Stacey B; Walsh, Christopher A

    2012-09-01

    Whole-exome sequencing (WES), which analyzes the coding sequence of most annotated genes in the human genome, is an ideal approach to studying fully penetrant autosomal-recessive diseases, and it has been very powerful in identifying disease-causing mutations even when enrollment of affected individuals is limited by reduced survival. In this study, we combined WES with homozygosity analysis of consanguineous pedigrees, which are informative even when a single affected individual is available, to identify genetic mutations responsible for Walker-Warburg syndrome (WWS), a genetically heterogeneous autosomal-recessive disorder that severely affects the development of the brain, eyes, and muscle. Mutations in seven genes are known to cause WWS and explain 50%-60% of cases, but multiple additional genes are expected to be mutated because unexplained cases show suggestive linkage to diverse loci. Using WES in consanguineous WWS-affected families, we found multiple deleterious mutations in GTDC2 (also known as AGO61). GTDC2's predicted role as an uncharacterized glycosyltransferase is consistent with the function of other genes that are known to be mutated in WWS and that are involved in the glycosylation of the transmembrane receptor dystroglycan. Therefore, to explore the role of GTDC2 loss of function during development, we used morpholino-mediated knockdown of its zebrafish ortholog, gtdc2. We found that gtdc2 knockdown in zebrafish replicates all WWS features (hydrocephalus, ocular defects, and muscular dystrophy), strongly suggesting that GTDC2 mutations cause WWS. PMID:22958903

  10. GABAergic Neuron-Specific Loss of Ube3a Causes Angelman Syndrome-Like EEG Abnormalities and Enhances Seizure Susceptibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Judson, Matthew C; Wallace, Michael L; Sidorov, Michael S; Burette, Alain C; Gu, Bin; van Woerden, Geeske M; King, Ian F; Han, Ji Eun; Zylka, Mark J; Elgersma, Ype; Weinberg, Richard J; Philpot, Benjamin D

    2016-04-01

    Loss of maternal UBE3A causes Angelman syndrome (AS), a neurodevelopmental disorder associated with severe epilepsy. We previously implicated GABAergic deficits onto layer (L) 2/3 pyramidal neurons in the pathogenesis of neocortical hyperexcitability, and perhaps epilepsy, in AS model mice. Here we investigate consequences of selective Ube3a loss from either GABAergic or glutamatergic neurons, focusing on the development of hyperexcitability within L2/3 neocortex and in broader circuit and behavioral contexts. We find that GABAergic Ube3a loss causes AS-like increases in neocortical EEG delta power, enhances seizure susceptibility, and leads to presynaptic accumulation of clathrin-coated vesicles (CCVs)-all without decreasing GABAergic inhibition onto L2/3 pyramidal neurons. Conversely, glutamatergic Ube3a loss fails to yield EEG abnormalities, seizures, or associated CCV phenotypes, despite impairing tonic inhibition onto L2/3 pyramidal neurons. These results substantiate GABAergic Ube3a loss as the principal cause of circuit hyperexcitability in AS mice, lending insight into ictogenic mechanisms in AS. PMID:27021170

  11. Mutations in the DNA methyltransferase gene DNMT3A cause an overgrowth syndrome with intellectual disability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tatton-Brown, Katrina; Seal, Sheila; Ruark, Elise;

    2014-01-01

    Overgrowth disorders are a heterogeneous group of conditions characterized by increased growth parameters and other variable clinical features such as intellectual disability and facial dysmorphism. To identify new causes of human overgrowth, we performed exome sequencing in ten proband...... and histone binding. Similar mutations were not present in 1,000 UK population controls (13/152 cases versus 0/1,000 controls; P intellectual disability and greater height. DNMT3A encodes a DNA methyltransferase essential for establishing...

  12. Auriculotemporal Syndrome (Frey Syndrome).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motz, Kevin M; Kim, Young J

    2016-04-01

    Frey syndrome is a common sequela of parotidectomy, and although it is not frequently manifested clinically, it can cause significant morbidity for those affected. Frey syndrome results from synkinetic autonomic reinnervation by transected postganglionic parasympathetic nerve fiber within the parotid gland to the overlying sweat glands of the skin. Many surgical techniques have been proposed to prevent the development of Frey syndrome. For those who develop clinical symptoms of Frey syndrome, objective testing can be performed with a Minor starch-iodine test. Some of the current methods to prevent and treat symptomatic Frey syndrome are reviewed. PMID:26902982

  13. Superior Orbital Fissure Syndrome and Ophthalmoplegia Caused by Varicella Zoster Virus with No Skin Eruption in a Patient Treated with Tumor Necrosis Alpha Inhibitor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Helene; Thomsen, Sidsel Thorup; Hansen, Stine Scott; Munksgaard, Signe Bruun; Lindelof, Mette

    2015-01-01

    Varicella zoster virus lies dormant in the dorsal root ganglia after symptomatic chicken pox infection, usually in childhood. If the virus reactivates in the trigeminal ganglia, it can cause varicella zoster ophthalmicus, which can have severe ocular complications. We report a case of a 73-year-old woman in severe immunosuppression due to treatment with mycophenolate mofetil, glucocorticosteroids and a tumor necrosis factor alpha inhibitor. The reactivation caused superior orbital fissure syndrome, which has only rarely been described in relation to varicella zoster virus reactivation. In our case, the syndrome was seen along with severe encephalitis. PMID:26600786

  14. Coeliac disease as the cause of resistant sideropenic anaemia in children with Down's syndrome: Case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pavlović Momčilo

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Coeliac disease (CD is a permanent intolerance of gluten, i.e. of gliadin and related proteins found in the endosperm of wheat, rye and barley. It is characterized by polygenic predisposition, autoimmune nature, predominantly asymptomatic or atypical clinical course, as well as by high prevalence in patients with Down's syndrome (DS and some other diseases. Outline of Cases. We are presenting a girl and two boys, aged 6-7 (X=6.33 years with DS and CD recognized under the feature of sideropenic anaemia resistant to oral therapy with iron. Beside mental retardation, low stature and the morphological features characteristic of DS, two patients had a congenital heart disease; one ventricular septal defect and the other atrioventricular canal. In two patients, trisomy on the 21st chromosome pair (trisomy 21 was disclosed in all cells, while one had a mosaic karyotype. All three patients had classical laboratory parameters of sideropenic anaemia: blood Hb 77-89 g/l (X=81.67, HCT 0.26-0.29% (X=0.28, MCV 69-80 fl (X=73, MCH 24.3-30 pg (X=26.77 and serum iron 2-5 μmol/L (X=4.0. Beside anaemia and in one patient a mild isolated hypertransaminasemia (AST 67 U/l, ALT 62 U/l, other indicators of CD were not registered in any of the children. In addition, in all three patients, we also detected an increased level of antibodies to tissue transglutaminase (atTG of IgA class (45-88 U/l so that we performed endoscopic enterobiopsy in order to reliably confirm the diagnosis of CD. In all three patients, the pathohistological finding of the duodenal mucosa specimen showed mild to moderate destructive enteropathy associated with high intraepithelial lymphocyte infiltration, cryptic hyperplasia and lympho-plasmocytic infiltration of the stroma. In all three patients, the treatment with a strict gluten-free diet and iron therapy applied orally for 3-4 months resulted in blood count normalization and the correction of sideropenia. Serum level of the at

  15. ARCN1 Mutations Cause a Recognizable Craniofacial Syndrome Due to COPI-Mediated Transport Defects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izumi, Kosuke; Brett, Maggie; Nishi, Eriko; Drunat, Séverine; Tan, Ee-Shien; Fujiki, Katsunori; Lebon, Sophie; Cham, Breana; Masuda, Koji; Arakawa, Michiko; Jacquinet, Adeline; Yamazumi, Yusuke; Chen, Shu-Ting; Verloes, Alain; Okada, Yuki; Katou, Yuki; Nakamura, Tomohiko; Akiyama, Tetsu; Gressens, Pierre; Foo, Roger; Passemard, Sandrine; Tan, Ene-Choo; El Ghouzzi, Vincent; Shirahige, Katsuhiko

    2016-08-01

    Cellular homeostasis is maintained by the highly organized cooperation of intracellular trafficking systems, including COPI, COPII, and clathrin complexes. COPI is a coatomer protein complex responsible for intracellular protein transport between the endoplasmic reticulum and the Golgi apparatus. The importance of such intracellular transport mechanisms is underscored by the various disorders, including skeletal disorders such as cranio-lenticulo-sutural dysplasia and osteogenesis imperfect, caused by mutations in the COPII coatomer complex. In this article, we report a clinically recognizable craniofacial disorder characterized by facial dysmorphisms, severe micrognathia, rhizomelic shortening, microcephalic dwarfism, and mild developmental delay due to loss-of-function heterozygous mutations in ARCN1, which encodes the coatomer subunit delta of COPI. ARCN1 mutant cell lines were revealed to have endoplasmic reticulum stress, suggesting the involvement of ER stress response in the pathogenesis of this disorder. Given that ARCN1 deficiency causes defective type I collagen transport, reduction of collagen secretion represents the likely mechanism underlying the skeletal phenotype that characterizes this condition. Our findings demonstrate the importance of COPI-mediated transport in human development, including skeletogenesis and brain growth. PMID:27476655

  16. [A rare cause of compartment syndrome of the forearm and hand following snake bite injury].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnecker, K

    1990-06-01

    With the intention to commit suicide a 25 year old patient was bitten by his own rattle snake. At the time of the admission the skin of the right forearm was dark, a hemorrhagic necrotizing colour, and the patient was in shock. He was immediately taken to the intensive care unit and the shock symptoms were treated there. Parasthesias in the area of the nervus medianus were also noticed. The treatment included an antiserum and the release of the tourniquet which caused a further increase of the swelling of the forearm. The lesion led to a hemorrhagic necrotizing inflammation. The surgical incision of the loge of Guyon, the carpal channel, the forearm and proximal of the lacertus fibrosus was persuaded. The circulation improved immediately and after three weeks the nerval function had recovered. The skin defect was covered 14 days after the first operation with meshgraft.

  17. De novo MEIS2 mutation causes syndromic developmental delay with persistent gastro-esophageal reflux.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujita, Atsushi; Isidor, Bertrand; Piloquet, Hugues; Corre, Pierre; Okamoto, Nobuhiko; Nakashima, Mitsuko; Tsurusaki, Yoshinori; Saitsu, Hirotomo; Miyake, Noriko; Matsumoto, Naomichi

    2016-09-01

    MEIS2 aberrations are considered to be the cause of intellectual disability, cleft palate and cardiac septal defect, as MEIS2 copy number variation is often observed with these phenotypes. To our knowledge, only one nucleotide-level change-specifically, an in-frame MEIS2 deletion-has so far been reported. Here, we report a female patient with a de novo nonsense mutation (c.611C>G, p.Ser204*) in MEIS2. She showed severe intellectual disability, moderate motor/verbal developmental delay, cleft palate, cardiac septal defect, hypermetropia, severe feeding difficulties with gastro-esophageal reflux and constipation. By reviewing this patient and previous patients with MEIS2 point mutations, we found that feeding difficulty with gastro-esophageal reflux appears to be one of the core clinical features of MEIS2 haploinsufficiency, in addition to intellectual disability, cleft palate and cardiac septal defect.

  18. Disruption of CXCR4 signaling in pharyngeal neural crest cells causes DiGeorge syndrome-like malformations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escot, Sophie; Blavet, Cédrine; Faure, Emilie; Zaffran, Stéphane; Duband, Jean-Loup; Fournier-Thibault, Claire

    2016-02-15

    DiGeorge syndrome (DGS) is a congenital disease causing cardiac outflow tract anomalies, craniofacial dysmorphogenesis, thymus hypoplasia, and mental disorders. It results from defective development of neural crest cells (NCs) that colonize the pharyngeal arches and contribute to lower jaw, neck and heart tissues. Although TBX1 has been identified as the main gene accounting for the defects observed in human patients and mouse models, the molecular mechanisms underlying DGS etiology are poorly identified. The recent demonstrations that the SDF1/CXCR4 axis is implicated in NC chemotactic guidance and impaired in cortical interneurons of mouse DGS models prompted us to search for genetic interactions between Tbx1, Sdf1 (Cxcl12) and Cxcr4 in pharyngeal NCs and to investigate the effect of altering CXCR4 signaling on the ontogeny of their derivatives, which are affected in DGS. Here, we provide evidence that Cxcr4 and Sdf1 are genetically downstream of Tbx1 during pharyngeal NC development and that reduction of CXCR4 signaling causes misrouting of pharyngeal NCs in chick and dramatic morphological alterations in the mandibular skeleton, thymus and cranial sensory ganglia. Our results therefore support the possibility of a pivotal role for the SDF1/CXCR4 axis in DGS etiology. PMID:26755698

  19. Complete androgen insensitivity syndrome caused by a deep intronic pseudoexon-activating mutation in the androgen receptor gene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Känsäkoski, Johanna; Jääskeläinen, Jarmo; Jääskeläinen, Tiina; Tommiska, Johanna; Saarinen, Lilli; Lehtonen, Rainer; Hautaniemi, Sampsa; Frilander, Mikko J.; Palvimo, Jorma J.; Toppari, Jorma; Raivio, Taneli

    2016-01-01

    Mutations in the X-linked androgen receptor (AR) gene underlie complete androgen insensitivity syndrome (CAIS), the most common cause of 46,XY sex reversal. Molecular genetic diagnosis of CAIS, however, remains uncertain in patients who show normal coding region of AR. Here, we describe a novel mechanism of AR disruption leading to CAIS in two 46,XY sisters. We analyzed whole-genome sequencing data of the patients for pathogenic variants outside the AR coding region. Patient fibroblasts from the genital area were used for AR cDNA analysis and protein quantification. Analysis of the cDNA revealed aberrant splicing of the mRNA caused by a deep intronic mutation (c.2450-118A>G) in the intron 6 of AR. The mutation creates a de novo 5′ splice site and a putative exonic splicing enhancer motif, which leads to the preferential formation of two aberrantly spliced mRNAs (predicted to include a premature stop codon). Patient fibroblasts contained no detectable AR protein. Our results show that patients with CAIS and normal AR coding region need to be examined for deep intronic mutations that can lead to pseudoexon activation. PMID:27609317

  20. Concomitant partial exon skipping by a unique missense mutation of RPS6KA3 causes Coffin-Lowry syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Labonne, Jonathan D J; Chung, Min Ji; Jones, Julie R; Anand, Priya; Wenzel, Wolfgang; Iacoboni, Daniela; Layman, Lawrence C; Kim, Hyung-Goo

    2016-01-01

    Coffin-Lowry syndrome (CLS) is an X-linked semi-dominant disorder characterized by diverse phenotypes including intellectual disability, facial and digital anomalies. Loss-of-function mutations in the Ribosomal Protein S6 Kinase Polypeptide 3 (RPS6KA3) gene have been shown to be responsible for CLS. Among the large number of mutations, however, no exonic mutation causing exon skipping has been described. Here, we report a male patient with CLS having a novel mutation at the 3' end of an exon at a splice donor junction. Interestingly, this nucleotide change causes both a novel missense mutation and partial exon skipping leading to a truncated transcript. These two transcripts were identified by cDNA sequencing of RT-PCR products. In the carrier mother, we found only wildtype transcripts suggesting skewed X-inactivation. Methylation studies confirmed X-inactivation was skewed moderately, but not completely, which is consistent with her mild phenotype. Western blot showed that the mutant RSK2 protein in the patient is expressed at similar levels relative to his mother. Protein modeling demonstrated that the missense mutation is damaging and may alter binding to ATP molecules. This is the first report of exon skipping from an exonic mutation of RPS6KA3, demonstrating that a missense mutation and concomitant disruption of normal splicing contribute to the manifestation of CLS. PMID:26297997

  1. The fungus Trichophyton redellii sp. nov. causes skin infections that resemble white-nose syndrome of hibernating bats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorch, Jeffrey M.; Minnis, Andrew M.; Meteyer, Carol U.; Redell, Jennifer A.; White, J. Paul; Kaarakka, Heather M.; Muller, Laura K.; Lindner, David L.; Verant, Michelle L.; Shearn-Bochsler, Valerie I.; Blehert, David S.

    2014-01-01

    Before the discovery of white-nose syndrome (WNS), a fungal disease caused by Pseudogymnoascus destructans, there were no reports of fungal skin infections in bats during hibernation. In 2011, bats with grossly visible fungal skin infections similar in appearance to WNS were reported from multiple sites in Wisconsin, USA, a state outside the known range of P. destructans and WNS at that time. Tape impressions or swab samples were collected from affected areas of skin from bats with these fungal infections in 2012 and analyzed by microscopy, culture, or direct DNA amplification and sequencing of the fungal internal transcribed spacer region (ITS). A psychrophilic species ofTrichophyton was isolated in culture, detected by direct DNA amplification and sequencing, and observed on tape impressions. Deoxyribonucleic acid indicative of the same fungus was also detected on three of five bat carcasses collected in 2011 and 2012 from Wisconsin, Indiana, and Texas, USA. Superficial fungal skin infections caused by Trichophyton sp. were observed in histopathology for all three bats. Sequencing of the ITS of Trichophyton sp., along with its inability to grow at 25 C, indicated that it represented a previously unknown species, described herein as Trichophyton redellii sp. nov. Genetic diversity present within T. redellii suggests it is native to North America but that it had been overlooked before enhanced efforts to study fungi associated with bats in response to the emergence of WNS.

  2. A high calorie diet causes memory loss, metabolic syndrome and oxidative stress into hippocampus and temporal cortex of rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Treviño, Samuel; Aguilar-Alonso, Patrícia; Flores Hernandez, Jose Angel; Brambila, Eduardo; Guevara, Jorge; Flores, Gonzalo; Lopez-Lopez, Gustavo; Muñoz-Arenas, Guadalupe; Morales-Medina, Julio Cesar; Toxqui, Veronica; Venegas, Berenice; Diaz, Alfonso

    2015-09-01

    A high calorie intake can induce the appearance of the metabolic syndrome (MS), which is a serious public health problem because it affects glucose levels and triglycerides in the blood. Recently, it has been suggested that MS can cause complications in the brain, since chronic hyperglycemia and insulin resistance are risk factors for triggering neuronal death by inducing a state of oxidative stress and inflammatory response that affect cognitive processes. This process, however, is not clear. In this study, we evaluated the effect of the consumption of a high-calorie diet (HCD) on both neurodegeneration and spatial memory impairment in rats. Our results demonstrated that HCD (90 day consumption) induces an alteration of the main energy metabolism markers, indicating the development of MS in rats. Moreover, an impairment of spatial memory was observed. Subsequently, the brains of these animals showed activation of an inflammatory response (increase in reactive astrocytes and interleukin1-β as well as tumor necrosis factor-α) and oxidative stress (reactive oxygen species and lipid peroxidation), causing a reduction in the number of neurons in the temporal cortex and hippocampus. Altogether, these results suggest that a HCD promotes the development of MS and contributes to the development of a neurodegenerative process and cognitive failure. In this regard, it is important to understand the relationship between MS and neuronal damage in order to prevent the onset of neurodegenerative disorders.

  3. Sporadic infantile epileptic encephalopathy caused by mutations in PCDH19 resembles Dravet syndrome but mainly affects females.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christel Depienne

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Dravet syndrome (DS is a genetically determined epileptic encephalopathy mainly caused by de novo mutations in the SCN1A gene. Since 2003, we have performed molecular analyses in a large series of patients with DS, 27% of whom were negative for mutations or rearrangements in SCN1A. In order to identify new genes responsible for the disorder in the SCN1A-negative patients, 41 probands were screened for micro-rearrangements with Illumina high-density SNP microarrays. A hemizygous deletion on chromosome Xq22.1, encompassing the PCDH19 gene, was found in one male patient. To confirm that PCDH19 is responsible for a Dravet-like syndrome, we sequenced its coding region in 73 additional SCN1A-negative patients. Nine different point mutations (four missense and five truncating mutations were identified in 11 unrelated female patients. In addition, we demonstrated that the fibroblasts of our male patient were mosaic for the PCDH19 deletion. Patients with PCDH19 and SCN1A mutations had very similar clinical features including the association of early febrile and afebrile seizures, seizures occurring in clusters, developmental and language delays, behavioural disturbances, and cognitive regression. There were, however, slight but constant differences in the evolution of the patients, including fewer polymorphic seizures (in particular rare myoclonic jerks and atypical absences in those with PCDH19 mutations. These results suggest that PCDH19 plays a major role in epileptic encephalopathies, with a clinical spectrum overlapping that of DS. This disorder mainly affects females. The identification of an affected mosaic male strongly supports the hypothesis that cellular interference is the pathogenic mechanism.

  4. Identification of Goose-Origin Parvovirus as a Cause of Newly Emerging Beak Atrophy and Dwarfism Syndrome in Ducklings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Kexiang; Ma, Xiuli; Sheng, Zizhang; Qi, Lihong; Liu, Cunxia; Wang, Dan; Huang, Bing; Li, Feng; Song, Minxun

    2016-08-01

    A recent epizootic outbreak, in China, of duck beak atrophy and dwarfism syndrome (BADS) was investigated using electron microscopic, genetic, and virological studies, which identified a parvovirus with a greater similarity to goose parvovirus (GPV) (97% protein homology) than to Muscovy duck parvovirus (MDPV) (90% protein homology). The new virus, provisionally designated GPV-QH15, was found to be antigenically more closely related to GPV than to MDPV in a virus neutralization assay. These findings were further supported by phylogenetic analysis showing that GPV-QH15 evolved from goose lineage parvoviruses, rather than from Muscovy duck- or other duck species-related parvoviruses. In all, two genetic lineages (GPV I and GPV II) were identified from the GPV samples analyzed, and GPV-QH15 was found to be closely clustered with two known goose-origin parvoviruses (GPVa2006 and GPV1995), together forming a distinctive GPV IIa sublineage. Finally, structural modeling revealed that GPV-QH15 and the closely related viruses GPVa2006 and GPV1995 possessed identical clusters of receptor-interacting amino acid residues in the VP2 protein, a major determinant of viral receptor binding and host specificity. Significantly, these three viruses differed from MDPVs and other GPVs at these positions. Taken together, these results suggest that GPV-QH15 represents a new variant of goose-origin parvovirus that currently circulates in ducklings and causes BADS, a syndrome reported previously in Europe. This new finding highlights the need for future surveillance of GPV-QH15 in poultry in order to gain a better understanding of both the evolution and the biology of this emerging parvovirus. PMID:27194692

  5. Sporadic infantile epileptic encephalopathy caused by mutations in PCDH19 resembles Dravet syndrome but mainly affects females.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Depienne, Christel; Bouteiller, Delphine; Keren, Boris; Cheuret, Emmanuel; Poirier, Karine; Trouillard, Oriane; Benyahia, Baya; Quelin, Chloé; Carpentier, Wassila; Julia, Sophie; Afenjar, Alexandra; Gautier, Agnès; Rivier, François; Meyer, Sophie; Berquin, Patrick; Hélias, Marie; Py, Isabelle; Rivera, Serge; Bahi-Buisson, Nadia; Gourfinkel-An, Isabelle; Cazeneuve, Cécile; Ruberg, Merle; Brice, Alexis; Nabbout, Rima; Leguern, Eric

    2009-02-01

    Dravet syndrome (DS) is a genetically determined epileptic encephalopathy mainly caused by de novo mutations in the SCN1A gene. Since 2003, we have performed molecular analyses in a large series of patients with DS, 27% of whom were negative for mutations or rearrangements in SCN1A. In order to identify new genes responsible for the disorder in the SCN1A-negative patients, 41 probands were screened for micro-rearrangements with Illumina high-density SNP microarrays. A hemizygous deletion on chromosome Xq22.1, encompassing the PCDH19 gene, was found in one male patient. To confirm that PCDH19 is responsible for a Dravet-like syndrome, we sequenced its coding region in 73 additional SCN1A-negative patients. Nine different point mutations (four missense and five truncating mutations) were identified in 11 unrelated female patients. In addition, we demonstrated that the fibroblasts of our male patient were mosaic for the PCDH19 deletion. Patients with PCDH19 and SCN1A mutations had very similar clinical features including the association of early febrile and afebrile seizures, seizures occurring in clusters, developmental and language delays, behavioural disturbances, and cognitive regression. There were, however, slight but constant differences in the evolution of the patients, including fewer polymorphic seizures (in particular rare myoclonic jerks and atypical absences) in those with PCDH19 mutations. These results suggest that PCDH19 plays a major role in epileptic encephalopathies, with a clinical spectrum overlapping that of DS. This disorder mainly affects females. The identification of an affected mosaic male strongly supports the hypothesis that cellular interference is the pathogenic mechanism.

  6. Cornelia de Lange syndrome caused by heterozygous deletions of chromosome 8q24: comments on the article by Pereza et al. [2012].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereza, Nina; Severinski, Srećko; Ostojić, Saša; Volk, Marija; Maver, Aleš; Dekanić, Kristina Baraba; Kapović, Miljenko; Peterlin, Borut

    2015-06-01

    In the March issue of the Journal in 2012, we reported on a girl with Langer-Giedion syndrome (LGS) phenotype and a 7.5 Mb interstitial deletion at 8q23.3q24.13, encompassing the EXT1, but not the TRPS1 gene. Recent discoveries have shown that heterozygous intragenic mutations or contiguous gene deletions including the RAD21 gene, which is located downstream of the TRPS1 gene, are the cause of Cornelia de Lange syndrome-4. Considering that the interstitial deletion in our patient included the RAD21 and 30 other RefSeq genes, we would like to suggest a revision of the diagnosis reported in our previous paper and compare our patient to other reported patients with Cornelia de Lange syndrome-4 caused by heterozygous deletions of chromosome 8q24. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:25899858

  7. Two family members with a syndrome of headache and rash caused by human parvovirus B19

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Carlos M. Pereira

    2001-02-01

    Full Text Available Human parvovirus B19 infection can cause erythema infectiosum (EI and several other clinical presentations. Central nervous system (CNS involvement is rare, and only a few reports of encephalitis and aseptic meningitis have been published. Here, we describe 2 cases of B19 infection in a family presenting different clinical features. A 30 year old female with a 7-day history of headache, malaise, myalgias, joint pains, and rash was seen. Physical examination revealed a maculopapular rash on the patient's body, and arthritis of the hands. She completely recovered in 1 week. Two days before, her 6 year old son had been admitted to a clinic with a 1-day history of fever, headache, abdominal pain and vomiting. On admission, he was alert, and physical examination revealed neck stiffness, Kerning and Brudzinski signs, and a petechial rash on his trunk and extremities. Cerebrospinal fluid analysis was normal. He completely recovered in 5 days. Acute and convalescent sera of both patients were positive for specific IgM antibody to B19. Human parvovirus B19 should be considered in the differential diagnosis of aseptic meningitis, particularly during outbreaks of erythema infectiosum. The disease may mimic meningococcemia and bacterial meningitis.

  8. Self-leveling mortar as a possible cause of symptoms associated with "sick building syndrome".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lundholm, M; Lavrell, G; Mathiasson, L

    1990-01-01

    In newly constructed houses and buildings in which self-leveling mortar containing casein has been used, residents and office employees have noted a bad odor and have complained of headache, eye and throat irritation, and tiredness. These problems were suspected to result from the degradation products emitted from the mortar. Samples obtained from dry mortar powder and from mortar in buildings where casein was used and from control buildings were found to contain microorganisms (mean of 10(2) culture forming units/g). Environmental species were predominantly found, e.g., Bacillus, Clostridium, Micrococcus, and Propionibacterium. Fungi were found occasionally; no evidence of bacterial degradation was found. Headspace and gas chromatographic-mass spectrometric analysis of air from the newly constructed houses and from hydroxide-degraded casein revealed the presence of amines in the 0.003-0.013 ppm range and the presence of ammonia and sulfhydryl compounds, all of which in low concentrations can cause the symptoms observed. These substances, however, were not detected in control buildings.

  9. Mutations in PAX3 that cause Waardenburg syndrome type I: Ten new mutations and review of the literature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baldwin, C.T.; Hoth, C.F.; Milunsky, A. [Boston Univ. School of Medicine, MA (United States)] [and others

    1995-08-28

    Waardenburg syndrome (WS) is an autosomal-dominant disorder characterized by sensorineural hearing loss, dystopia canthorum, and pigmentary disturbances, and it represents the most common form of inherited deafness in infants. WS type I is characterized by the presence of dystopia canthorum, while individuals with WS type II have normally-located canthi. WS type III is similar to WS type I but is also characterized by musculoskeletal abnormalities. Defects in the PAX3 gene, a transcription factor expressed during embryonic development, have been shown to cause WS types I and III in several families. In contrast, mutations in PAX3 do not cause WS type II, and linkage of the disease to other chromosomal regions has been demonstrated. We describe 10 additional mutations in the PAX3 gene in families with WS type I. Eight of these mutations are in the region of PAX3, where only one mutation has been previously described. These mutations, together with those previously reported, cover essentially the entire PAX3 gene and represent a wide spectrum of mutations that can cause WS type I. Thus far, all but one of the mutations are private; only one mutation has been reported in two apparently unrelated families. Our analysis thus far demonstrates little correlation between genotype and phenotype; deletions of the entire PAX3 gene result in phenotypes indistinguishable from those associated with single-base substitutions in the paired domain or homeodomain of PAX3. Moreover, two similar mutations in close proximity can result in significantly different phenotypes, WS type I in one family and WS type III in another. 47 refs., 3 figs., 5 tabs.

  10. Homozygosity mapping and whole exome sequencing reveal a novel homozygous COL18A1 mutation causing Knobloch syndrome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alireza Haghighi

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to identify the genetic basis of a chorioretinal dystrophy with high myopia of unknown origin in a child of a consanguineous marriage. The proband and ten family members of Iranian ancestry participated in this study. Linkage analysis was carried out with DNA samples of the proband and her parents by using the Human SNP Array 6.0. Whole exome sequencing (WES was performed with the patients' DNA. Specific sequence alterations within the homozygous regions identified by whole exome sequencing were verified by Sanger sequencing. Upon genetic analysis, a novel homozygous frameshift mutation was found in exon 42 of the COL18A1 gene in the patient. Both parents were heterozygous for this sequence variation. Mutations in COL18A1 are known to cause Knobloch syndrome (KS. Retrospective analysis of clinical records of the patient revealed surgical removal of a meningocele present at birth. The clinical features shown by our patient were typical of KS with the exception of chorioretinal degeneration which is a rare manifestation. This is the first case of KS reported in a family of Iranian ancestry. We identified a novel disease-causing (deletion mutation in the COL18A1 gene leading to a frameshift and premature stop codon in the last exon. The mutation was not present in SNP databases and was also not found in 192 control individuals. Its localization within the endostatin domain implicates a functional relevance of endostatin in KS. A combined approach of linkage analysis and WES led to a rapid identification of the disease-causing mutation even though the clinical description was not completely clear at the beginning.

  11. Turner Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner syndrome is a genetic disorder that affects a girl's development. The cause is a missing or incomplete ... t work properly. Other physical features typical of Turner syndrome are Short, "webbed" neck with folds of skin ...

  12. Cushing's Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Cushing's syndrome, also called hypercortisolism , is a rare endocrine disorder caused by chronic exposure of the body's tissues ... removing the tumor while minimizing the chance of endocrine deficiency or long-term ... for Cushing's Syndrome Clinical Trials ...

  13. Turner Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner syndrome is a genetic disorder that affects a girl's development. The cause is a missing or ... t work properly. Other physical features typical of Turner syndrome are Short, "webbed" neck with folds of ...

  14. Intrathecal Clonidine Pump Failure Causing Acute Withdrawal Syndrome With 'Stress-Induced' Cardiomyopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hwee Min D; Ruggoo, Varuna; Graudins, Andis

    2016-03-01

    Clonidine is a central alpha(2)-agonist antihypertensive used widely for opioid/alcohol withdrawal, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder and chronic pain management. We describe a case of clonidine withdrawal causing life-threatening hypertensive crisis and stress-induced cardiomyopathy. A 47-year-old man with chronic back pain, treated with clonidine for many years via intrathecal pump (550 mcg/24 h), presented following a collapse and complaining of sudden worsening of back pain, severe headache, diaphoresis, nausea and vomiting. A few hours prior to presentation, his subcutaneous pump malfunctioned. On presentation, vital signs included pulse 100 bpm, BP 176/103 mmHg, temperature 37.8 °C and O2 saturation 100 % (room air). Acute clonidine withdrawal with hypertensive crisis was suspected. Intravenous clonidine loading dose and a 50 mcg/h infusion were commenced. Five hours later, severe chest pain, dyspnoea, tachycardia, hypoxia, with BP 180/120 mmHg and pulmonary edema ensued. ECG showed sinus tachycardia with no ST elevation. Repeated intravenous clonidine doses were given (25 mcg every 5-10 min), with ongoing clonidine infusion to control blood pressure. Glyceryl trinitrate infusion, positive pressure ventilation and intravenous benzodiazepines were added. Bedside echocardiogram showed stress-induced cardiomyopathy pattern. Serum troponin-I was markedly elevated. His coronary angiography showed minor irregularities in the major vessels. Over the next 3 days in the ICU, drug infusions were weaned. Discharge was 12 days later on oral clonidine, metoprolol, perindopril, aspirin and oxycodone-SR. Two months later, his echocardiogram was normal. The intrathecal pump was removed. We report a case of stress-induced cardiomyopathy resulting from the sudden cessation of long-term intrathecal clonidine. This was managed by re-institution of clonidine and targeted organ-specific therapies. PMID:26370679

  15. Pre-eclampsia and the HELLP syndrome still cause maternal mortality in the Netherlands and other developed countries; can we reduce it?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Onrust, S; Santema, JG; Aarnoudse, JG

    1999-01-01

    Maternal mortality in developed countries does not seem to have decreased during the past decade, despite good prenatal care. Hypertensive disorders of pregnancy are the main cause of maternal mortality in most countries. In more than half of these cases, the HELLP syndrome is involved. In this arti

  16. The CHRNE 470del20 mutation causing congenital myasthenic syndrome in South African Brahman cattle: Prevalence, origin, and association with performance traits.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thompson, P.N.; Werf, van der J.H.J.; Heesterbeek, J.A.P.; Arendonk, van J.A.M.

    2007-01-01

    Genotyping of the South African, registered, Brahman cattle population for the 470del20 mutation in the CHRNE gene causing congenital myasthenic syndrome (CMS) was carried out in 1,453 animals. Overall prevalence of carriers was 0.97% (0.50 to 1.68%, 95% confidence interval). Carrier prevalence amon

  17. The CHRNE 470del20 mutation causing congenital myasthenic syndrome in South African Brahman cattle: Prevalence, origin, and association with performance traits

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thompson, P.N.; Werf, J.H.J. van der; Heesterbeek, J.A.P.; Arendonk, J.A.M. van

    2007-01-01

    Genotyping of the South African, registered, Brahman cattle population for the 470del20 mutation in the CHRNE gene causing congenital myasthenic syndrome (CMS) was carried out in 1,453 animals. Overall prevalence of carriers was 0.97% (0.50 to 1.68%, 95% confidence interval). Carrier prevalence amon

  18. Two clinical cases of renal syndrome caused by Dobrava/Saaremaa hantaviruses imported to the Netherlands from Poland and Belarus, 2012-2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    GeurtsvanKessel, Corine H; Goeijenbier, Marco; Verner-Carlsson, Jenny; Litjens, Eline; Bos, Willem-Jan; Pas, Suzan D; Melo, Mariana Medonça; Koopmans, Marion; Lundkvist, Åke; Reusken, Chantal B E M

    2016-01-01

    We report the rare event of two imported cases in the Netherlands presenting with renal syndrome caused by Dobrava (DOBV)/Saaremaa (SAAV) hantaviruses. DOBV/SAAV hantaviruses are not circulating in the Netherlands and their clinical manifestation is typically more severe than that of the endemic Puumala virus (PUUV). This report aims to increase awareness among healthcare professionals and diagnostic laboratories to consider different hantaviruses as a cause of renal failure. PMID:26818411

  19. A Rare Cause of Recurrent Apthous Stomatitis in a Adult Patient and an Overlooked Entity: PFAPA Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Murat Ceyhan

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available PFAPA syndrome is a recently identified clinical entity of unknown etiology characterized by recurrent episodes of abrupt onset of high fever, aphthous stomatitis, pharyngitis and cervical lymphadenopathy. The associated symptoms do not regress with antibiotic therapy. The dramatic response of symptoms to single dose corticosteroids is hallmark feature of this syndrome. PFAPA syndrome usually begins under 5 years of age and in most cases resolves spontaneously until ten years old. PFAPA syndrome is extremely rare in adults, and to our knowledge, only about 20 cases have been described to date. Although PFAPA syndrome is increasingly reported in the pediatric literature, and is a known condition for the pediatricians, most dermatologists are unfamiliar with this entity. In this report, we describe a late onset of PFAPA syndrome in a 25-year-old boy who presented to our clinic for his recurrent aphthous stomatitis and fever.

  20. Swollen hindgut syndrome (SHG of tiger shrimp Penaeus monodon (Crustacea, Malacostraca, Penaeidae post larvae: Identification of causing pathogenic bacteria and their sensitivity to some antibiotics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheikh Aftabuddin

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Swollen Hindgut syndrome (SHG of black tiger shrimp Penaeus monodon Fabricius, 1798post larvae has been reported from Bangladesh shrimp hatcheries in recent years. At present SHG is abudding problem causing significant economic loss to the shrimp hatcheries in Bangladesh. Unlike therapid mortalities associated with viral disease such as white spot syndrome and yellow head virus,progression of SHG is gradual leading to low level mortalities without affecting swimming activity. Thesign of SHG are a bloated or swollen in hind gut area, with the posterior digestive tract convolutingthrough the last abdominal segment. This syndrome tends to occur at later PL stages, typically afterPL10. Two types of Vibrio spp. were isolated from the swollen hindgut syndrome post larvae, identified asVibrio harveyi (Johnson and Shunk 1936and Vibrio alginolyticus (Miyamoto, Nakamura & Takizawa1961. Among these V. alginolyticus was dominant to V. harveyi. The bacterial isolates showed sensitiveto oxytetracycline (OTC, norfloxacin and ciprofloxacin and resistant to penicillin, ampicillin andamoxycillin. The luminous V. harveyi showed resistant to many antibiotics and susceptibility to only twodrugs. The cause of swollen hindgut syndrome (SHG was probably bacterial infections and poor waterquality, possibly heavy metal i.e. iron, the presence of toxic substances from chemical prophylactics andlow quality or diseased nauplii.

  1. Defects in the IFT-B Component IFT172 Cause Jeune and Mainzer-Saldino Syndromes in Humans

    OpenAIRE

    Halbritter, Jan; Bizet, Albane A.; Schmidts, Miriam; Porath, Jonathan D.; Braun, Daniela A.; Gee, Heon Yung; McInerney-Leo, Aideen M; Krug, Pauline; Filhol, Emilie; Davis, Erica E.; Airik, Rannar; Czarnecki, Peter G.; Lehman, Anna M; Trnka, Peter; Nitschké, Patrick

    2013-01-01

    Intraflagellar transport (IFT) depends on two evolutionarily conserved modules, subcomplexes A (IFT-A) and B (IFT-B), to drive ciliary assembly and maintenance. All six IFT-A components and their motor protein, DYNC2H1, have been linked to human skeletal ciliopathies, including asphyxiating thoracic dystrophy (ATD; also known as Jeune syndrome), Sensenbrenner syndrome, and Mainzer-Saldino syndrome (MZSDS). Conversely, the 14 subunits in the IFT-B module, with the exception of IFT80, have unkn...

  2. Structural and functional mutations of the perlecan gene cause Schwartz-Jampel syndrome, with myotonic myopathy and chondrodysplasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arikawa-Hirasawa, Eri; Le, Alexander H; Nishino, Ichizo; Nonaka, Ikuya; Ho, Nicola C; Francomano, Clair A; Govindraj, Prasanthi; Hassell, John R; Devaney, Joseph M; Spranger, Jürgen; Stevenson, Roger E; Iannaccone, Susan; Dalakas, Marinos C; Yamada, Yoshihiko

    2002-05-01

    Perlecan, a large heparan sulfate proteoglycan, is a component of the basement membrane and other extracellular matrices and has been implicated in multiple biological functions. Mutations in the perlecan gene (HSPG2) cause two classes of skeletal disorders: the relatively mild Schwartz-Jampel syndrome (SJS) and severe neonatal lethal dyssegmental dysplasia, Silverman-Handmaker type (DDSH). SJS is an autosomal recessive skeletal dysplasia characterized by varying degrees of myotonia and chondrodysplasia, and patients with SJS survive. The molecular mechanism underlying the chondrodystrophic myotonia phenotype of SJS is unknown. In the present report, we identify five different mutations that resulted in various forms of perlecan in three unrelated patients with SJS. Heterozygous mutations in two patients with SJS either produced truncated perlecan that lacked domain V or significantly reduced levels of wild-type perlecan. The third patient had a homozygous 7-kb deletion that resulted in reduced amounts of nearly full-length perlecan. Unlike DDSH, the SJS mutations result in different forms of perlecan in reduced levels that are secreted to the extracellular matrix and are likely partially functional. These findings suggest that perlecan has an important role in neuromuscular function and cartilage formation, and they define the molecular basis involved in the difference in the phenotypic severity between DDSH and SJS.

  3. Mutations Impairing GSK3-Mediated MAF Phosphorylation Cause Cataract, Deafness, Intellectual Disability, Seizures, and a Down Syndrome-like Facies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niceta, Marcello; Stellacci, Emilia; Gripp, Karen W.; Zampino, Giuseppe; Kousi, Maria; Anselmi, Massimiliano; Traversa, Alice; Ciolfi, Andrea; Stabley, Deborah; Bruselles, Alessandro; Caputo, Viviana; Cecchetti, Serena; Prudente, Sabrina; Fiorenza, Maria T.; Boitani, Carla; Philip, Nicole; Niyazov, Dmitriy; Leoni, Chiara; Nakane, Takaya; Keppler-Noreuil, Kim; Braddock, Stephen R.; Gillessen-Kaesbach, Gabriele; Palleschi, Antonio; Campeau, Philippe M.; Lee, Brendan H.L.; Pouponnot, Celio; Stella, Lorenzo; Bocchinfuso, Gianfranco; Katsanis, Nicholas; Sol-Church, Katia; Tartaglia, Marco

    2015-01-01

    Transcription factors operate in developmental processes to mediate inductive events and cell competence, and perturbation of their function or regulation can dramatically affect morphogenesis, organogenesis, and growth. We report that a narrow spectrum of amino-acid substitutions within the transactivation domain of the v-maf avian musculoaponeurotic fibrosarcoma oncogene homolog (MAF), a leucine zipper-containing transcription factor of the AP1 superfamily, profoundly affect development. Seven different de novo missense mutations involving conserved residues of the four GSK3 phosphorylation motifs were identified in eight unrelated individuals. The distinctive clinical phenotype, for which we propose the eponym Aymé-Gripp syndrome, is not limited to lens and eye defects as previously reported for MAF/Maf loss of function but includes sensorineural deafness, intellectual disability, seizures, brachycephaly, distinctive flat facial appearance, skeletal anomalies, mammary gland hypoplasia, and reduced growth. Disease-causing mutations were demonstrated to impair proper MAF phosphorylation, ubiquitination and proteasomal degradation, perturbed gene expression in primary skin fibroblasts, and induced neurodevelopmental defects in an in vivo model. Our findings nosologically and clinically delineate a previously poorly understood recognizable multisystem disorder, provide evidence for MAF governing a wider range of developmental programs than previously appreciated, and describe a novel instance of protein dosage effect severely perturbing development. PMID:25865493

  4. Tissue loss (white syndrome) in the coral Montipora capitata is a dynamic disease with multiple host responses and potential causes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Work, Thierry M.; Russell, Robin; Aeby, Greta S.

    2012-01-01

    Tissue loss diseases or white syndromes (WS) are some of the most important coral diseases because they result in significant colony mortality and morbidity, threatening dominant Acroporidae in the Caribbean and Pacific. The causes of WS remain elusive in part because few have examined affected corals at the cellular level. We studied the cellular changes associated with WS over time in a dominant Hawaiian coral, Montipora capitata, and showed that: (i) WS has rapidly progressing (acute) phases mainly associated with ciliates or slowly progressing (chronic) phases mainly associated with helminths or chimeric parasites; (ii) these phases interchanged and waxed and waned; (iii) WS could be a systemic disease associated with chimeric parasitism or a localized disease associated with helminths or ciliates; (iv) corals responded to ciliates mainly with necrosis and to helminths or chimeric parasites with wound repair; (v) mixed infections were uncommon; and (vi) other than cyanobacteria, prokaryotes associated with cell death were not seen. Recognizing potential agents associated with disease at the cellular level and the host response to those agents offers a logical deductive rationale to further explore the role of such agents in the pathogenesis of WS in M. capitata and helps explain manifestation of gross lesions. This approach has broad applicability to the study of the pathogenesis of coral diseases in the field and under experimental settings.

  5. Classifying late-onset dementia with MRI: Is arteriosclerotic brain degeneration the most common cause of Alzheimer′s syndrome?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marie Cécile Henry-Feugeas

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Marie Cécile Henry-Feugeas1, Fannie Onen2, Elisabeth Schouman Claeys11Department of Radiology, 2Department of Geriatrics, Bichat-Claude Bernard University Hospital, AP-HP, Paris, FranceAbstract: Our aim was to use early magnetic resonance imaging (MRI to investigate the causes of cognitive decline in elderly people with mild cognitive impairment (MCI. Baseline structural and flow quantification MR sequences, and clinical and neuropsychological follow-up for at least two years, were performed on 62 elderly subjects with MCI. Of these subjects, 17 progressed to dementia, and 15 of these progressed to dementia of the Alzheimer type (DAT. Conversion to clinically diagnosed DAT was related to six distinct MR profiles, including one profile suggesting severe AD (20% of these converters and five profiles suggesting severe cerebrovascular dysfunction. Two profiles suggested arteriosclerotic brain degeneration, one profile suggested severe venous windkessel dysfunction, and two suggested marked cerebral hypoperfusion associated with very low craniospinal compliance or marked brain atrophy. As compared with vascular MR type converters, AD MR type converters showed high executive and mobility predementia performances. Severe whole anteromesial temporal atrophy and predominantly left brain atrophy on visual MR analysis was only observed in AD MR type converters. In conclusion, these observations enhance the pathogenic complexity of the Alzheimer syndrome, and suggest that the role of arteriosclerotic brain degeneration in late life dementia is underestimated.Keywords: Alzheimer’s disease, mild cognitive impairment, dementia, MRI, phase contrast, atherosclerosis

  6. Identification and functional characterisation of a novel KCNJ2 mutation, Val302del, causing Andersen-Tawil syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ördög, Balázs; Hategan, Lidia; Kovács, Mária; Seprényi, György; Kohajda, Zsófia; Nagy, István; Hegedűs, Zoltán; Környei, László; Jost, Norbert; Katona, Márta; Szekeres, Miklós; Forster, Tamás; Papp, Julius Gy; Varró, András; Sepp, Róbert

    2015-07-01

    Loss-of-function mutations of the KCNJ2 gene encoding for the inward rectifier potassium channel subunit Kir2.1 cause Andersen-Tawil Syndrome (ATS), a rare genetic disorder characterised by periodic paralysis, ventricular arrhythmias, and dysmorphic features. Clinical manifestations of the disease appear to vary greatly with the nature of mutation, therefore, functional characterisation of ATS-causing mutations is of clinical importance. In this study, we describe the identification and functional analysis of a novel KCNJ2 mutation, Val302del, identified in a patient with ATS. Heterologously expressed wild type (WT) and Val302del mutant alleles showed similar subcellular distribution of the Kir2.1 protein with high intensity labelling from the membrane region, demonstrating normal membrane trafficking of the Val302del Kir2.1 variant. Cells transfected with the WT allele displayed a robust current with strong inward rectification, while no current above background was detected in cells expressing the Val302del Kir2.1 subunit. Co-transfection of CHO cells with the WT and the Val302del Kir2.1 revealed a dose-dependent inhibitory effect of the Val302del Kir2.1 mutant subunit on WT Kir2.1 currents. These observations indicate that the WT and the Val302del mutant subunits co-assemble in the cell membrane and that the mutation affects potassium conductivity and (or) gating of the WT/Val302del heteromeric Kir2.1 channels. PMID:26103554

  7. Emergence of Streptococcus pyogenes emm102 causing toxic shock syndrome in Southern Taiwan during 2005-2012.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiun-Nong Lin

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Streptococcal toxic shock syndrome (STSS is an uncommon but life-threatening disease caused by Streptococcus pyogenes. METHODS: To understand the clinical and molecular characteristics of STSS, we analyzed clinical data and explored the emm types, superantigen genes, and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis of causative S. pyogenes isolates obtained between 2005 and 2012. RESULTS: In total, 53 patients with STSS were included in this study. The median age of the patients was 57 years (range: 9-83 years, and 81.1% were male. The most prevalent underlying disease was diabetes mellitus (45.3%. Skin and soft-tissue infection accounted for 86.8% of STSS. The overall mortality rate was 32.1%. Underlying diseases had no statistical impact on mortality. A total of 19 different emm types were identified. The most prevalent emm type was emm102 (18.9%, followed by emm11 (17%, emm1 (11.3%, emm87 (9.4%, and emm89 (7.5%. There was no statistically significant association between emm type and a fatal outcome. Among the superantigen genes, speB was the most frequently detected one (92.5%, followed by smeZ (90.6%, speG (81.1%, speC (39.6%, and speF (39.6%. The majority of emm102 strains were found to have speB, speC, speG, and smeZ. The presence of speG was negatively associated with a fatal outcome (P = 0.045. CONCLUSIONS: Our surveillance revealed the emergence of uncommon emm types, particularly emm102, causing STSS in southern Taiwan. Characterization of clinical, epidemiological, and molecular characteristics of STSS will improve our understanding of this life-threatening disease.

  8. Inappropriate mediastinal baroreceptor reflex as a possible cause of sudden infant death syndrome - Is thorough burping before sleep protective?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flaig, Christian

    2007-01-01

    Despite extensive research, a link between the assumed mechanisms of death and known risk factors for sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) has not yet been established. Modifiable risk factors such as prone sleeping position, nicotine exposure and thermal stress and non-avoidable risk factors like male gender and some risky socio-economic conditions could be detected, but the etiology of SIDS remains unknown. In many SIDS cases histopathological findings suggest an involvement of vital autonomic control functions and unidentified trigger factors seem to play a role. From a hypothetical point of view, a developmental sympatheticovagal imbalance of the cardiovascular reflex control could cause a predisposition for SIDS. An assumed gastroesophageal trigger impulse is possibly developed during the first weeks of life and could lead to the infant's vagal reflex death. Air swallowed during feeding escapes through the esophagus while the infant is sleeping. The temporarily bloated esophagus exerts pressure on neighboring mediastinal baroreceptors, which is potentially misinterpreted as a rise in arterial pressure. The following cardiodepressoric baroreceptor reflex could lead to arterial hypotension, bradycardia and cardiac arrest. Sleeping in prone position may create an increased thoracic pressure on mediastinal baroreceptors, causing a more pronounced vagal reflex and an increased likelihood of SIDS. Prone position in connection with soft objects in the infant's sleeping environment potentially generates an increased oculobulbar pressure, resulting in an additional cardiodepressoric condition (Aschner-Dagnini phenomenon). From the sixth month of life onwards the sympatheticovagal balance seems to have matured sufficiently to compensate the life-threatening challenges in most infants. Insufficient postprandial burping could either create another independent modifiable risk factor or present the missing link to a common trigger mechanism for SIDS. Further investigations

  9. Recessive Inactivating Mutations in TBCK, Encoding a Rab GTPase-Activating Protein, Cause Severe Infantile Syndromic Encephalopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chong, Jessica X; Caputo, Viviana; Phelps, Ian G; Stella, Lorenzo; Worgan, Lisa; Dempsey, Jennifer C; Nguyen, Alina; Leuzzi, Vincenzo; Webster, Richard; Pizzuti, Antonio; Marvin, Colby T; Ishak, Gisele E; Ardern-Holmes, Simone; Richmond, Zara; Bamshad, Michael J; Ortiz-Gonzalez, Xilma R; Tartaglia, Marco; Chopra, Maya; Doherty, Dan

    2016-04-01

    Infantile encephalopathies are a group of clinically and biologically heterogeneous disorders for which the genetic basis remains largely unknown. Here, we report a syndromic neonatal encephalopathy characterized by profound developmental disability, severe hypotonia, seizures, diminished respiratory drive requiring mechanical ventilation, brain atrophy, dysgenesis of the corpus callosum, cerebellar vermis hypoplasia, and facial dysmorphism. Biallelic inactivating mutations in TBCK (TBC1-domain-containing kinase) were independently identified by whole-exome sequencing as the cause of this condition in four unrelated families. Matching these families was facilitated by the sharing of phenotypic profiles and WES data in a recently released web-based tool (Geno2MP) that links phenotypic information to rare variants in families with Mendelian traits. TBCK is a putative GTPase-activating protein (GAP) for small GTPases of the Rab family and has been shown to control cell growth and proliferation, actin-cytoskeleton dynamics, and mTOR signaling. Two of the three mutations (c.376C>T [p.Arg126(∗)] and c.1363A>T [p.Lys455(∗)]) are predicted to truncate the protein, and loss of the major TBCK isoform was confirmed in primary fibroblasts from one affected individual. The third mutation, c.1532G>A (p.Arg511His), alters a conserved residue within the TBC1 domain. Structural analysis implicated Arg511 as a required residue for Rab-GAP function, and in silico homology modeling predicted impaired GAP function in the corresponding mutant. These results suggest that loss of Rab-GAP activity is the underlying mechanism of disease. In contrast to other disorders caused by dysregulated mTOR signaling associated with focal or global brain overgrowth, impaired TBCK function results in progressive loss of brain volume. PMID:27040692

  10. Chronic exposure to low benzo[a]pyrene level causes neurodegenerative disease-like syndromes in zebrafish (Danio rerio).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Dongxu; Wu, Meifang; Wang, Chonggang; Wang, Yuanchuan; Zuo, Zhenghong

    2015-10-01

    Previous epidemiological and animal studies report that exposure to environmental pollutant exposure links to neurodegenerative diseases such as Parkinson's disease and Alzheimer's disease. Benzo[a]pyrene (BaP), a neurotoxic polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon, has been increasingly released into the environment during recent decades. So far, the role of BaP on the development of neurodegenerative diseases remaind unclear. This study aimed to determine whether chronic exposure to low dose BaP would cause neurodegenerative disease-like syndromes in zebrafish (Danio rerio). We exposed zebrafish, from early embryogenesis to adults, to environmentally relevant concentrations of BaP for 230 days. Our results indicated that BaP decreased the brain weight to body weight ratio, locomotor activity and cognitive ability; induced the loss of dopaminergic neurons; and resulted in neurodegeneration. In addition, obvious cell apoptosis in the brain was found. Furthermore, the neurotransmitter levels of dopamine and 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid, the mRNA levels of the genes encoding dopamine transporter, Parkinson protein 7, phosphatase and tensin-induced putative kinase 1, ubiquitin carboxy-terminal hydrolase L1, leucine-rich repeat serine/threonine kinase 2, amyloid precursor protein b, presenilin 1 and presenilin 2 were significantly down-regulated by BaP exposure. These findings suggest that chronic exposure to low dose BaP could cause the behavioral, neuropathological, neurochemical, and genetic features of neurodegenerative diseases. This study provides clues that BaP may constitute an important environmental risk factor for neurodegenerative diseases in humans. PMID:26349946

  11. Recessive Inactivating Mutations in TBCK, Encoding a Rab GTPase-Activating Protein, Cause Severe Infantile Syndromic Encephalopathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chong, Jessica X.; Caputo, Viviana; Phelps, Ian G.; Stella, Lorenzo; Worgan, Lisa; Dempsey, Jennifer C.; Nguyen, Alina; Leuzzi, Vincenzo; Webster, Richard; Pizzuti, Antonio; Marvin, Colby T.; Ishak, Gisele E.; Ardern-Holmes, Simone; Richmond, Zara; Bamshad, Michael J.; Ortiz-Gonzalez, Xilma R.; Tartaglia, Marco; Chopra, Maya; Doherty, Dan

    2016-01-01

    Infantile encephalopathies are a group of clinically and biologically heterogeneous disorders for which the genetic basis remains largely unknown. Here, we report a syndromic neonatal encephalopathy characterized by profound developmental disability, severe hypotonia, seizures, diminished respiratory drive requiring mechanical ventilation, brain atrophy, dysgenesis of the corpus callosum, cerebellar vermis hypoplasia, and facial dysmorphism. Biallelic inactivating mutations in TBCK (TBC1-domain-containing kinase) were independently identified by whole-exome sequencing as the cause of this condition in four unrelated families. Matching these families was facilitated by the sharing of phenotypic profiles and WES data in a recently released web-based tool (Geno2MP) that links phenotypic information to rare variants in families with Mendelian traits. TBCK is a putative GTPase-activating protein (GAP) for small GTPases of the Rab family and has been shown to control cell growth and proliferation, actin-cytoskeleton dynamics, and mTOR signaling. Two of the three mutations (c.376C>T [p.Arg126∗] and c.1363A>T [p.Lys455∗]) are predicted to truncate the protein, and loss of the major TBCK isoform was confirmed in primary fibroblasts from one affected individual. The third mutation, c.1532G>A (p.Arg511His), alters a conserved residue within the TBC1 domain. Structural analysis implicated Arg511 as a required residue for Rab-GAP function, and in silico homology modeling predicted impaired GAP function in the corresponding mutant. These results suggest that loss of Rab-GAP activity is the underlying mechanism of disease. In contrast to other disorders caused by dysregulated mTOR signaling associated with focal or global brain overgrowth, impaired TBCK function results in progressive loss of brain volume. PMID:27040692

  12. The frequency of a disease-causing point mutation in the gene coding for medium-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase in sudden infant death syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Banner, Jytte; Gregersen, N; Kølvraa, S;

    1993-01-01

    syndrome is still a matter of controversy. The present study investigated 120 well-defined cases of sudden infant death syndrome in order to detect the frequency of the most common disease-causing point mutation in the gene coding for medium-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase (G985) compared with the frequency...... in the general population. A highly specific polymerase chain reaction assay was applied on dried blood spots. No over-representation of homo- or heterozygosity for G985 appears to exist in such a strictly defined population, for which reason it may be more relevant to look at a broader spectrum of clinical...

  13. Homozygous FOXE3 mutations cause non-syndromic, bilateral, total sclerocornea, aphakia, microphthalmia and optic disc coloboma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buentello-Volante, Beatriz; McKibbin, Martin; Rocha-Medina, J. Alberto; Fernandez-Fuentes, Narcis; Koga-Nakamura, Wilson; Ashiq, Aruna; Khan, Kamron; Booth, Adam P.; Williams, Grange; Raashid, Yasmin; Jafri, Hussain; Rice, Aine; Inglehearn, Chris F.; Zenteno, Juan Carlos

    2010-01-01

    Purpose To investigate the genetic basis of recessively-inherited congenital, non syndromic, bilateral, total sclerocornea in two consanguineous pedigrees, one from the Punjab province of Pakistan and the other from the Tlaxcala province of Mexico. Methods Ophthalmic examinations were conducted on each family member to confirm their diagnosis and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) or ultrasonography of the eyes was performed on some family members. Genomic DNA was analyzed by homozygosity mapping using the Affymetrix 6.0 SNP array and linkage was confirmed with polymorphic microsatellite markers. Candidate genes were sequenced. Results A diagnosis of autosomal recessive sclerocornea was established for 7 members of the Pakistani and 8 members of the Mexican pedigrees. In the Pakistani family we established linkage to a region on chromosome 1p that contained Forkhead Box E3 (FOXE3), a strong candidate gene since FOXE3 mutations had previously been associated with various anterior segment abnormalities. Sequencing FOXE3 identified the previously reported nonsense mutation, c.720C>A, p.C240X, in the Pakistani pedigree and a novel missense mutation which disrupts an evolutionarily conserved residue in the forkhead domain, c.292T>C, p.Y98H, in the Mexican pedigree. Individuals with heterozygous mutations had no ocular abnormalities. MRI or ultrasonography confirmed that the patients with sclerocornea were also aphakic, had microphthalmia and some had optic disc coloboma. Conclusions This is the fourth report detailing homozygous FOXE3 mutations causing anterior segment abnormalities in human patients. Previous papers have emphasized aphakia and microphthalmia as the primary phenotype, but we find that the initial diagnosis – and perhaps the only one possible in a rural setting – is one of non-syndromic, bilateral, total sclerocornea. Dominantly inherited anterior segment defects have also been noted in association with heterozygous FOXE3 mutations. However the absence

  14. Germline mutations in DIS3L2 cause the Perlman syndrome of overgrowth and Wilms tumor susceptibility

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Astuti, Dewi; Morris, Mark R.; Cooper, Wendy N.; Staals, Raymond H. J.; Wake, Naomi C.; Fews, Graham A.; Gill, Harmeet; Gentle, Dean; Shuib, Salwati; Ricketts, Christopher J.; Cole, Trevor; van Essen, Anthonie J.; van Lingen, Richard A.; Neri, Giovanni; Opitz, John M.; Rump, Patrick; Stolte-Dijkstra, Irene; Mueller, Ferenc; Pruijn, Ger J. M.; Latif, Farida; Maher, Eamonn R.

    2012-01-01

    Perlman syndrome is a congenital overgrowth syndrome inherited in an autosomal recessive manner that is associated with Wilms tumor susceptibility. We mapped a previously unknown susceptibility locus to 2q37.1 and identified germline mutations in DIS3L2, a homolog of the Schizosaccharomyces pombe di

  15. TCM Therapeutic Strategy on Acute Lung Injury Caused by Infectious Atypical Pneumonia and Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    唐光华

    2003-01-01

    @@ Infectious atypical pneumonia (IAP) is also called severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) by WHO. In its development, around 20% of SARS can develop into the stage of acute lung injury (ALI) or acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), active and effective treatment of it constitutes the important basis for lowering mortality and reducing secondary pulmonary function impairment and pulmonary fibrosis.

  16. Recurrent Mutations in the Basic Domain of TWIST2 Cause Ablepharon Macrostomia and Barber-Say Syndromes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Marchegiani, Shannon; Davis, Taylor; Tessadori, Federico; van Haaften, Gijs; Brancati, Francesco; Hoischen, Alexander; Huang, Haigen; Valkanas, Elise; Pusey, Barbara; Schanze, Denny; Venselaar, Hanka; Vulto-van Silfhout, Anneke T; Wolfe, Lynne A; Tifft, Cynthia J; Zerfas, Patricia M; Zambruno, Giovanna; Kariminejad, Ariana; Sabbagh-Kermani, Farahnaz; Lee, Janice; Tsokos, Maria G; Lee, Chyi-Chia R; Ferraz, Victor; da Silva, Eduarda Morgana; Stevens, Cathy A; Roche, Nathalie; Bartsch, Oliver; Farndon, Peter; Bermejo-Sanchez, Eva; Brooks, Brian P; Maduro, Valerie; Dallapiccola, Bruno; Ramos, Feliciano J; Chung, Hon-Yin Brian; Le Caignec, Cédric; Martins, Fabiana; Jacyk, Witold K; Mazzanti, Laura; Brunner, Han G; Bakkers, Jeroen; Lin, Shuo; Malicdan, May Christine V; Boerkoel, Cornelius F; Gahl, William A; de Vries, Bert B A; van Haelst, Mieke M; Zenker, Martin; Markello, Thomas C

    2015-01-01

    Ablepharon macrostomia syndrome (AMS) and Barber-Say syndrome (BSS) are rare congenital ectodermal dysplasias characterized by similar clinical features. To establish the genetic basis of AMS and BSS, we performed extensive clinical phenotyping, whole exome and candidate gene sequencing, and functio

  17. CLMP is required for intestinal development, and loss-of-function mutations cause congenital short-bowel syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Der Werf, Christine S.; Wabbersen, Tara D.; Hsiao, Nai-Hua; Paredes, Joana; Etchevers, Heather C.; Kroisel, Peter M.; Tibboel, Dick; Babarit, Candice; Schreiber, Richard A.; Hoffenberg, Edward J.; Vekemans, Michel; Zeder, Sirkka L.; Ceccherini, Isabella; Lyonnet, Stanislas; Ribeiro, Ana S.; Seruca, Raquel; Meerman, Gerard J. Te; van Ijzendoorn, Sven C. D.; Shepherd, Iain T.; Verheij, Joke B. G. M.; Hofstra, Robert M. W.

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND & AIMS: Short-bowel syndrome usually results from surgical resection of the small intestine for diseases such as intestinal atresias, volvulus, and necrotizing enterocolitis. Patients with congenital short-bowel syndrome (CSBS) are born with a substantial shortening of the small intestine

  18. Loss of the BMP Antagonist, SMOC-1, Causes Ophthalmo-Acromelic (Waardenburg Anophthalmia) Syndrome in Humans and Mice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J. Rainger; E. van Beusekom; J.K. Ramsay; L. McKie; L. Al-Gazali; R. Pallotta; A. Saponari; P. Branney; M. Fisher; H. Morrison; L. Bicknell; P. Gautier; P. Perry; K. Sokhi; D. Sexton; T.M. Bardakjian; A.S. Schneider; N. Elcioglu; F. Ozkinay; R. Koenig; A. Megarbane; C.N. Semerci; A. Khan; S. Zafar; R. Hennekam; S.B. Sousa; L. Ramos; L. Garavelli; A.S. Furga; A. Wischmeijer; I.J. Jackson; G. Gillessen-Kaesbach; H.G. Brunner; D Wieczorek; H. van Bokhoven; D.R. Fitzpatrick

    2011-01-01

    Ophthalmo-acromelic syndrome (OAS), also known as Waardenburg Anophthalmia syndrome, is defined by the combination of eye malformations, most commonly bilateral anophthalmia, with post-axial oligosyndactyly. Homozygosity mapping and subsequent targeted mutation analysis of a locus on 14q24.2 identif

  19. Loss of the BMP antagonist, SMOC-1, causes Ophthalmo-acromelic (Waardenburg Anophthalmia) syndrome in humans and mice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rainger, J.; Beusekom, E. van; Ramsay, J.K.; McKie, L.; Al-Gazali, L.; Pallotta, R.; Saponari, A.; Branney, P.; Fisher, M.; Morrison, H.; Bicknell, L.; Gautier, P.; Perry, P.; Sokhi, K.; Sexton, D.; Bardakjian, T.M.; Schneider, A.S.; Elcioglu, N.; Ozkinay, F.; Koenig, R.; Megarbane, A.; Semerci, C.N.; Khan, A.; Zafar, S.; Hennekam, R.; Sousa, S.B.; Ramos, L.; Garavelli, L.; Furga, A.S.; Wischmeijer, A.; Jackson, I.J.; Gillessen-Kaesbach, G.; Brunner, H.G.; Wieczorek, D.; Bokhoven, J.H.L.M. van; FitzPatrick, D.R.

    2011-01-01

    Ophthalmo-acromelic syndrome (OAS), also known as Waardenburg Anophthalmia syndrome, is defined by the combination of eye malformations, most commonly bilateral anophthalmia, with post-axial oligosyndactyly. Homozygosity mapping and subsequent targeted mutation analysis of a locus on 14q24.2 identif

  20. A novel homozygous 10 nucleotide deletion in BBS10 causes Bardet-Biedl syndrome in a Pakistani family

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Agha, Z.; Iqbal, Z.; Azam, M.; Hoefsloot, L.H.; Bokhoven, J.H.L.M. van; Qamar, R.

    2013-01-01

    Bardet-Biedl Syndrome is a multisystem autosomal recessive disorder characterized by central obesity, polydactyly, hypogonadism, learning difficulties, rod-cone dystrophy and renal dysplasia. Bardet-Biedl Syndrome has a prevalence rate ranging from 1 in 100,000 to 1 in 160,000 births although there

  1. What Causes Down Syndrome?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... random during the formation of an egg or sperm. To date, no behavioral activity of the parents ... the extra copy of chromosome 21 through the sperm. In the remaining cases, the error occurs after ...

  2. A Rare Cause of Persistent Pulmonary Hypertension Resistant to Therapy in The Newborn: Short-Rib Polydactyly Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nihat Demir

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Short-rib polydactyly syndrome is an autosomal recessively inherited lethal skeletal dysplasia. The syndrome is characterized by marked narrow fetal thorax, short extremities, micromelia, cleft palate/lip, polydactyly, cardiac and renal abnormalities, and genital malformations. In cases with pulmonary hypoplasia, persistent pulmonary hypertension of the newborn can develop. In this paper, we present a term newborn with persistent pulmonary hypertension of the newborn, which has developed secondary to short-rib polydactyly syndrome and was resistant to therapy with inhaled nitric oxide and oral sildenafil.

  3. Genome-wide sequencing to identify the cause of hereditary cancer syndromes: with examples from familial pancreatic cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Nicholas J; Klein, Alison P

    2013-11-01

    Advances in our understanding of the human genome and next-generation technologies have facilitated the use of genome-wide sequencing to decipher the genetic basis of Mendelian disease and hereditary cancer syndromes. However, the application of genome-wide sequencing in hereditary cancer syndromes has had mixed success, in part, due to complex nature of the underlying genetic architecture. In this review we discuss the use of genome-wide sequencing in both Mendelian diseases and hereditary cancer syndromes, highlighting the potential and challenges of this approach using familial pancreatic cancer as an example. PMID:23196058

  4. Hypoplastic left heart syndrome and the nutmeg lung pattern in utero: a cause and effect relationship or prognostic indicator?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saul, David; Johnson, Ann M.; Victoria, Teresa [The Children' s Hospital of Philadelphia, Radiology Department, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Degenhardt, Karl; Rychik, Jack [The Children' s Hospital of Philadelphia, Cardiac Center and Fetal Heart Program, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Iyoob, Suzanne D.; Johnson, Mark P. [The Children' s Hospital of Philadelphia, Center for Fetal Diagnosis and Treatment, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Surrey, Lea F. [The Children' s Hospital of Philadelphia, Pathology Department, Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    2016-04-15

    Hypoplastic left heart syndrome (HLHS) is the third most common cause of critical congenital heart disease in newborns, and one of the most challenging forms to treat. Secondary pulmonary lymphangiectasia has been recognized in association with HLHS, an appearance described on fetal MRI as the ''nutmeg lung.'' To investigate the association of fetal nutmeg lung with HLHS survival. A retrospective search of the fetal MRI database was performed. The nutmeg lung pattern was defined as T2 heterogeneous signal with tubular structures radiating peripherally from the hila. Postnatal echocardiograms and charts were reviewed. Forty-four fetal MR studies met inclusion criteria, of which 4 patients (9%) had the nutmeg lung pattern and 3 of whom also had restrictive lesions. Mortality in this nutmeg lung group was 100% by 5 months of age. Of the 40 patients without nutmeg lung, mortality/orthotopic heart transplant (OHT) was 35%. Of these 40 patients without nutmeg lung, 5 had restriction on echo, 3 of whom died/had OHT before 5 months of age (60% of patients with restriction and non-nutmeg lung). There was a significantly higher incidence of restrictive lesions (P = 0.02) and mortality/OHT (P = 0.02) in patients with nutmeg lung compared to those without. The nutmeg lung MR appearance in HLHS fetuses is associated with increased mortality/OHT (100% in the first 5 months of life compared to 35% with HLHS alone). Not all patients with restrictive lesions develop nutmeg lung, and outcome is not as poor when restriction is present in isolation. Dedicated evaluation for nutmeg lung pattern on fetal MR studies may be useful to guide prognostication and aid clinicians in counseling parents of fetuses with HLHS. (orig.)

  5. A Restricted Repertoire of De Novo Mutations in ITPR1 Cause Gillespie Syndrome with Evidence for Dominant-Negative Effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McEntagart, Meriel; Williamson, Kathleen A; Rainger, Jacqueline K; Wheeler, Ann; Seawright, Anne; De Baere, Elfride; Verdin, Hannah; Bergendahl, L Therese; Quigley, Alan; Rainger, Joe; Dixit, Abhijit; Sarkar, Ajoy; López Laso, Eduardo; Sanchez-Carpintero, Rocio; Barrio, Jesus; Bitoun, Pierre; Prescott, Trine; Riise, Ruth; McKee, Shane; Cook, Jackie; McKie, Lisa; Ceulemans, Berten; Meire, Françoise; Temple, I Karen; Prieur, Fabienne; Williams, Jonathan; Clouston, Penny; Németh, Andrea H; Banka, Siddharth; Bengani, Hemant; Handley, Mark; Freyer, Elisabeth; Ross, Allyson; van Heyningen, Veronica; Marsh, Joseph A; Elmslie, Frances; FitzPatrick, David R

    2016-05-01

    Gillespie syndrome (GS) is characterized by bilateral iris hypoplasia, congenital hypotonia, non-progressive ataxia, and progressive cerebellar atrophy. Trio-based exome sequencing identified de novo mutations in ITPR1 in three unrelated individuals with GS recruited to the Deciphering Developmental Disorders study. Whole-exome or targeted sequence analysis identified plausible disease-causing ITPR1 mutations in 10/10 additional GS-affected individuals. These ultra-rare protein-altering variants affected only three residues in ITPR1: Glu2094 missense (one de novo, one co-segregating), Gly2539 missense (five de novo, one inheritance uncertain), and Lys2596 in-frame deletion (four de novo). No clinical or radiological differences were evident between individuals with different mutations. ITPR1 encodes an inositol 1,4,5-triphosphate-responsive calcium channel. The homo-tetrameric structure has been solved by cryoelectron microscopy. Using estimations of the degree of structural change induced by known recessive- and dominant-negative mutations in other disease-associated multimeric channels, we developed a generalizable computational approach to indicate the likely mutational mechanism. This analysis supports a dominant-negative mechanism for GS variants in ITPR1. In GS-derived lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCLs), the proportion of ITPR1-positive cells using immunofluorescence was significantly higher in mutant than control LCLs, consistent with an abnormality of nuclear calcium signaling feedback control. Super-resolution imaging supports the existence of an ITPR1-lined nucleoplasmic reticulum. Mice with Itpr1 heterozygous null mutations showed no major iris defects. Purkinje cells of the cerebellum appear to be the most sensitive to impaired ITPR1 function in humans. Iris hypoplasia is likely to result from either complete loss of ITPR1 activity or structure-specific disruption of multimeric interactions. PMID:27108798

  6. C-terminal mutations destabilize SIL1/BAP and can cause Marinesco-Sjögren syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howes, Jennifer; Shimizu, Yuichiro; Feige, Matthias J; Hendershot, Linda M

    2012-03-01

    Marinesco-Sjögren syndrome (MSS) is an autosomal recessive, neurodegenerative, multisystem disorder characterized by severe phenotypes developing in infancy. Recently, mutations in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-associated co-chaperone SIL1/BAP were identified to be the major cause of MSS. SIL1 acts as a nucleotide exchange factor for BiP, the ER Hsp70 orthologue, which plays an essential role in the folding and assembly of nascent polypeptide chains in the ER. SIL1 facilitates the release of BiP from unfolded protein substrates, enabling the subsequent folding and transport of the protein. Although most mutations leading to MSS result in deletion of the majority of the protein, three separate mutations have been identified that disrupt only the last five or six amino acids of the protein, which were assumed to encode a divergent ER retention motif. This study presents an in depth analysis of two of these mutants and reveals that the phenotype in the affected individuals is not likely to be due to depletion of SIL1 from the ER via secretion. Instead, our analyses show that the mutant proteins are particularly unstable and either form large aggregates in the ER or are rapidly degraded via the proteasome. In agreement with our findings, homology modeling suggests that the very C-terminal residues of SIL1 play a role in its structural integrity rather than its localization. These new insights might be a first step toward a possible pharmacological treatment of certain types of MSS by specifically stabilizing the mutant SIL1 protein.

  7. Hypoplastic left heart syndrome and the nutmeg lung pattern in utero: a cause and effect relationship or prognostic indicator?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hypoplastic left heart syndrome (HLHS) is the third most common cause of critical congenital heart disease in newborns, and one of the most challenging forms to treat. Secondary pulmonary lymphangiectasia has been recognized in association with HLHS, an appearance described on fetal MRI as the ''nutmeg lung.'' To investigate the association of fetal nutmeg lung with HLHS survival. A retrospective search of the fetal MRI database was performed. The nutmeg lung pattern was defined as T2 heterogeneous signal with tubular structures radiating peripherally from the hila. Postnatal echocardiograms and charts were reviewed. Forty-four fetal MR studies met inclusion criteria, of which 4 patients (9%) had the nutmeg lung pattern and 3 of whom also had restrictive lesions. Mortality in this nutmeg lung group was 100% by 5 months of age. Of the 40 patients without nutmeg lung, mortality/orthotopic heart transplant (OHT) was 35%. Of these 40 patients without nutmeg lung, 5 had restriction on echo, 3 of whom died/had OHT before 5 months of age (60% of patients with restriction and non-nutmeg lung). There was a significantly higher incidence of restrictive lesions (P = 0.02) and mortality/OHT (P = 0.02) in patients with nutmeg lung compared to those without. The nutmeg lung MR appearance in HLHS fetuses is associated with increased mortality/OHT (100% in the first 5 months of life compared to 35% with HLHS alone). Not all patients with restrictive lesions develop nutmeg lung, and outcome is not as poor when restriction is present in isolation. Dedicated evaluation for nutmeg lung pattern on fetal MR studies may be useful to guide prognostication and aid clinicians in counseling parents of fetuses with HLHS. (orig.)

  8. The causes of short stature in Turner syndrome%Turner综合征身材矮小原因探讨

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张莹; 陈瑞敏; 杨晓红; 林祥泉; 袁欣

    2013-01-01

    Objectives To investigate the causes of short stature in Turner syndrome (TS). Methods 86 patients were di-agnosed with TS by karyotypes from 2004 to 2013. According to the deletion types of the X chromosome short arm, growth hor-mone (GH), insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) and thyroid function, the TS patients were divided into different groups and com-parison was made among groups. Results Ht SDS in three groups with different extent of the deletion of the X chromosome short arm were (-4.39±1.08), (-3.26±1.25) and (-2.84±0.15) (P0.05). Conclusions The deletion of X chromosome short arm may cause the short stature in TS. The GH-IGF-1 axis in TS is impaired, but GHD is not related to short stature in TS.%目的:探讨先天性卵巢发育不全综合征(Turner,TS)患儿身材矮小的原因。方法回顾性分析2004年至2013年86例TS患儿,分别按患儿染色体短臂缺失类型、IGF-1降低程度、GH缺乏及甲状腺功能减退与否进行分组比较。结果 X染色体短臂缺失程度不同的三组TS患儿身高标准差分值(Ht SDS)分别为(-4.39±1.08)(、-3.26±1.25)(、-2.84±0.15),差异有统计学意义(P0.05)。结论 X染色体短臂缺失对TS患儿身材矮小起重要作用。TS患儿的GH-IGF-1轴受影响,但GH缺乏与甲状腺功能减退与患儿矮小无关。

  9. Genome-wide sequencing to identify the cause of hereditary cancer syndromes: with examples from familial pancreatic cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Roberts, Nicholas J.; Klein, Alison P.

    2012-01-01

    Advances in our understanding of the human genome and next-generation technologies have facilitated the use of genome-wide sequencing to decipher the genetic basis of Mendelian disease and hereditary cancer syndromes. The application of genome-wide sequencing in hereditary cancer syndromes has had mixed success, in part, due to complex nature of the underlying genetic architecture. In this review we discuss the use of genome-wide sequencing in both Mendelian diseases and hereditary cancer syn...

  10. Loss of the BMP Antagonist, SMOC-1, Causes Ophthalmo-Acromelic (Waardenburg Anophthalmia) Syndrome in Humans and Mice

    OpenAIRE

    Joe Rainger; Ellen van Beusekom; Jacqueline K Ramsay; Lisa McKie; Lihadh Al-Gazali; Rosanna Pallotta; Anita Saponari; Peter Branney; Malcolm Fisher; Harris Morrison; Louise Bicknell; Philippe Gautier; Paul Perry; Kishan Sokhi; David Sexton

    2011-01-01

    Ophthalmo-acromelic syndrome (OAS), also known as Waardenburg Anophthalmia syndrome, is defined by the combination of eye malformations, most commonly bilateral anophthalmia, with post-axial oligosyndactyly. Homozygosity mapping and subsequent targeted mutation analysis of a locus on 14q24.2 identified homozygous mutations in SMOC1 (SPARC-related modular calcium binding 1) in eight unrelated families. Four of these mutations are nonsense, two frame-shift, and two missense. The missense mutati...

  11. Hemichorea Hemiballism Syndrome: The First Presentation of Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus as a Rare Cause of Chorea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Mittal

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Hemichorea-hemiballism (HCHB syndrome, which is most commonly related to non-ketotic"nhyperglycemia, is a rare type of chorea. Here, we present an unusual case of HCHB syndrome who"nwas not a known case of diabetes. This case highlights the importance of recognising underlying"nnon-ketotic hyperglycemia, as control of hyperglycemia is helpful in the quick relief of symptoms.

  12. Visceral myopathy causing chronic intestinal pseudoobstruction and intestinal failure in a child with Sanjad-Sakati syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pal, Kamalesh; Moammar, Hissa; Mitra, Dilip K

    2010-02-01

    Sanjad-Sakati syndrome is a rare autosomal recessive disorder mainly occurring in the Arab Peninsula. This condition is associated with metabolic and septic complications starting in the neonatal period. Chronic intestinal pseudoobstruction owing to visceral myopathy is a rare disabling condition. We report a rare concurrence of Sanjad-Sakati syndrome and chronic intestinal pseudoobstruction in a Saudi child complicated by intestinal failure, sepsis, and early mortality. PMID:20152369

  13. Unidentified Chronic Fatigue Syndrome/myalgic encephalomyelitis (CFS/ME) is a major cause of school absence: surveillance outcomes from school-based clinics

    OpenAIRE

    Crawley, Esther M; Emond, Alan M; Sterne, Jonathan A C

    2011-01-01

    Objective To investigate the feasibility of conducting clinics for chronic fatigue syndrome/myalgic encephalomyelitis (CFS/ME) in schools. Design School-based clinical project. Participants Children aged 11–16 years were enrolled in three state secondary schools in England. Main outcome measures Number of children newly diagnosed as having CFS/ME. Methods Attendance officers identified children missing ≥20% of school in a 6-week term without a known cause, excluding those with a single episod...

  14. Posttraumatic stress due to an acute coronary syndrome increases risk of 42-month major adverse cardiac events and all-cause mortality

    OpenAIRE

    Edmondson, Donald; Rieckmann, Nina; Shaffer, Jonathan A.; Joseph E Schwartz; Burg, Matthew M.; Davidson, Karina W.; Clemow, Lynn; Shimbo, Daichi; Kronish, Ian M.

    2011-01-01

    Approximately 15% of patients with acute coronary syndromes (ACS) develop posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) due to their ACS event. We assessed whether ACS-induced PTSD symptoms increase risk for major adverse cardiac events (MACE) and all-cause mortality (ACM) in an observational cohort study of 247 patients (aged 25–93 years; 45% women) hospitalized for an ACS at one of 3 academic medical centers in New York and Connecticut between November 2003 and June 2005. Within 1 week of admission,...

  15. Analysis of Large Phenotypic Variability of EEC and SHFM4 Syndromes Caused by K193E Mutation of the TP63 Gene

    OpenAIRE

    Jianhua Wei; Yang Xue; Lian Wu; Jie Ma; Xiuli Yi; Junrui Zhang; Bin Lu; Chunying Li; Dashuang Shi; Songtao Shi; Xinghua Feng; Tao Cai

    2012-01-01

    EEC (ectrodactyly, ectodermal dysplasia, clefting; OMIM 604292) is an autosomal dominant developmental disorder resulting mainly from pathogenic mutations of the DNA-binding domain (DBD) of the TP63 gene. In this study, we showed that K193E mutation in nine affected individuals of a four-generation kindred with a large degree of phenotypic variability causes four different syndromes or TP63-related disorders: EEC, Ectrodactyly-ectodermal dysplasia (EE), isolated ectodermal dysplasia, and isol...

  16. The human Cx26-D50A and Cx26-A88V mutations causing keratitis-ichthyosis-deafness syndrome display increased hemichannel activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mhaske, Pallavi V; Levit, Noah A; Li, Leping; Wang, Hong-Zhan; Lee, Jack R; Shuja, Zunaira; Brink, Peter R; White, Thomas W

    2013-06-15

    Mutations in the human gene encoding connexin 26 (Cx26 or GJB2) cause either nonsyndromic deafness or syndromic deafness associated with skin diseases. That distinct clinical disorders can be caused by different mutations within the same gene suggests that different channel activities influence the ear and skin. Here we use three different expression systems to examine the functional characteristics of two Cx26 mutations causing either mild (Cx26-D50A) or lethal (Cx26-A88V) keratitis-ichthyosis-deafness (KID) syndrome. In either cRNA-injected Xenopus oocytes, transfected HeLa cells, or transfected primary human keratinocytes, we show that both Cx26-D50A and Cx26-A88V form active hemichannels that significantly increase membrane current flow compared with wild-type Cx26. This increased membrane current accelerated cell death in low extracellular calcium solutions and was not due to increased mutant protein expression. Elevated mutant hemichannel currents could be blocked by increased extracellular calcium concentration. These results show that these two mutations exhibit a shared gain of functional activity and support the hypothesis that increased hemichannel activity is a common feature of human Cx26 mutations responsible for KID syndrome.

  17. Sudden Cause of Cardiac Death—Be Aware of Me: A Case Report and Short Review on Brugada Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jagadeesh K. Kalavakunta

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Brugada syndrome accounts for about 4% of sudden cardiac deaths (SCD. It is characterized by an ST-segment elevation in the right precordial electrocardiogram (EKG leads. Case Presentation. We describe a 39-year-old healthy Caucasian man who was admitted to the intensive care unit after being cardioverted from ventricular fibrillation (VF arrest. His past history was significant for an episode of syncope one month prior to this presentation for which he was admitted to an outlying hospital. EKG during that admission showed ST elevations in V1 and V2 leads, a pattern similar to Type 1 Brugada. A diagnosis of Brugada syndrome was missed and the patient had a cardiac arrest a month later. We discuss a short review of Brugada syndrome and emphasize the need to look for it in patients presenting with SCD and malignant arrhythmias. Conclusion. Physicians should always consider Brugada syndrome in the differential diagnosis of ST-segment elevation in anterior precordial leads of EKG and associated VT/VF. Although more than 17 years have passed since the first case was reported, increased awareness of this syndrome is needed to identify patients with EKG changes and treat them accordingly to prevent incidence of (SCD and its deleterious complications.

  18. The nature and causes of the global water crisis: Syndromes from a meta-analysis of coupled human-water studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srinivasan, V.; Lambin, E. F.; Gorelick, S. M.; Thompson, B. H.; Rozelle, S.

    2012-10-01

    Freshwater scarcity has been cited as the major crisis of the 21st century, but it is surprisingly hard to describe the nature of the global water crisis. We conducted a meta-analysis of 22 coupled human-water system case studies, using qualitative comparison analysis (QCA) to identify water resource system outcomes and the factors that drive them. The cases exhibited different outcomes for human wellbeing that could be grouped into a six "syndromes": groundwater depletion, ecological destruction, drought-driven conflicts, unmet subsistence needs, resource capture by elite, and water reallocation to nature. For syndromes that were not successful adaptations, three characteristics gave cause for concern: (1) unsustainability—a decline in the water stock or ecosystem function that could result in a long-term steep decline in future human wellbeing; (2) vulnerability—high variability in water resource availability combined with inadequate coping capacity, leading to temporary drops in human wellbeing; (3) chronic scarcity—persistent inadequate access and hence low conditions of human wellbeing. All syndromes could be explained by a limited set of causal factors that fell into four categories: demand changes, supply changes, governance systems, and infrastructure/technology. By considering basins as members of syndrome classes and tracing common causal pathways of water crises, water resource analysts and planners might develop improved water policies aimed at reducing vulnerability, inequity, and unsustainability of freshwater systems.

  19. A novel TRPS1 gene mutation causing trichorhinophalangeal syndrome with growth hormone responsive short stature: a case report and review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merjaneh, Lina; Parks, John S; Muir, Andrew B; Fadoju, Doris

    2014-01-01

    The role of growth hormone (GH) and its therapeutic supplementation in the trichorhinophalangeal syndrome type I (TRPS I) is not well delineated. TRPS I is a rare congenital syndrome, characterized by craniofacial and skeletal malformations including short stature, sparse, thin scalp hair and lateral eyebrows, pear-shaped nose, cone shaped epiphyses and hip dysplasia. It is inherited in an autosomal dominant manner and caused by haploinsufficiency of the TRPS1 gene. We report a family (Mother and 3 of her 4 children) with a novel mutation in the TRPS1 gene. The diagnosis was suspected only after meeting all family members and comparing affected and unaffected siblings since the features of this syndrome might be subtle. The eldest sibling, who had neither GH deficiency nor insensitivity, improved his growth velocity and height SDS after 2 years of treatment with exogenous GH. No change in growth velocity was observed in the untreated siblings during this same period. This report emphasizes the importance of examining all family members when suspecting a genetic syndrome. It also demonstrates the therapeutic effect of GH treatment in TRPS I despite normal GH-IGF1 axis. A review of the literature is included to address whether TRPS I is associated with: a) GH deficiency, b) GH resistance, or c) GH-responsive short stature. More studies are needed before recommending GH treatment for TRPS I but a trial should be considered on an individual basis. PMID:25177352

  20. Narcotic Bowel Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Intolerance Malabsorption Narcotic Bowel Syndrome Radiation Therapy Injury Short Bowel Syndrome Symptoms & Causes Treatments Nutrition and Diet Managing Secondary Effects Medications Surgery Daily Living with SBS Resources SMA Syndrome Volvulus ...

  1. Waardenburg syndrome.

    OpenAIRE

    Read, A P; Newton, V E

    1997-01-01

    Auditory-pigmentary syndromes are caused by physical absence of melanocytes from the skin, hair, eyes, or the stria vascularis of the cochlea. Dominantly inherited examples with patchy depigmentation are usually labelled Waardenburg syndrome (WS). Type I WS, characterised by dystopia canthorum, is caused by loss of function mutations in the PAX3 gene. Type III WS (Klein-Waardenburg syndrome, with abnormalities of the arms) is an extreme presentation of type I; some but not all patients are ho...

  2. Mutations in the SPARC-Related Modular Calcium-Binding Protein 1 Gene, SMOC1, Cause Waardenburg Anophthalmia Syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Abouzeid, Hana; Boisset, Gaëlle; Favez, Tatiana; Youssef, Mohamed; Marzouk, Iman; Shakankiry, Nihal; Bayoumi, Nader; Descombes, Patrick; Agosti, Céline; Munier, Francis L.; Schorderet, Daniel F.

    2011-01-01

    Waardenburg anophthalmia syndrome, also known as microphthalmia with limb anomalies, ophthalmoacromelic syndrome, and anophthalmia-syndactyly, is a rare autosomal-recessive developmental disorder that has been mapped to 10p11.23. Here we show that this disease is heterogeneous by reporting on a consanguineous family, not linked to the 10p11.23 locus, whose two affected children have a homozygous mutation in SMOC1. Knockdown experiments of the zebrafish smoc1 revealed that smoc1 is important i...

  3. Adhesive arachnoiditis causing cauda equina syndrome in ankylosing spondylitis: CT and MRI demonstration of dural calcification and a dorsal dural diverticulum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bilgen, I.G.; Yunten, N.; Ustun, E.E. [Ege Univ., Dept. of Radiology, Izmir (Turkey); Oksel, F.; Gumusdis, G. [Ege Univ., Dept. of Rheumatology, Izmir (Turkey)

    1999-07-01

    We present the radiological features of a 42-years-old man with long-standing inactive ankylosing spondylitis (AS), demonstrating that arachnoiditis is a cause of a cauda equina syndrome (CES) in this disease. CT showed a dorsal arachnoid diverticulum causing scalloped erosion of the laminae, and punctate and curvilinear dural calcification. MRI revealed adhesion and convergence of the cauda equina dorsally into the arachnoid pouch, causing the dural sca to appear empty canal. To the best of our knowledge, dural calcification on CT is a new finding in AS, which may be related to the CES. Our findings support the hyopthesis that chronic adhesive arachnoiditis with subsequent loss of meningeal elasticity may be the main cause of CES in AS. (orig.)

  4. Turner Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akcan AB.

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Turner syndrome is an important cause of short stature in girls and primer amenorrhea in young women that is usually caused by loss of part or all of an X chromosome. This topic will review the clinical manifestations, diagnosis and management of Turner syndrome.

  5. Allelic mutations of KITLG, encoding KIT ligand, cause asymmetric and unilateral hearing loss and Waardenburg syndrome type 2

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zazo Seco, C. (Celia); Serrão De Castro, L. (Luciana); J.W.I. van Nierop; Morín, M. (Matías); Jhangiani, S. (Shalini); Verver, E.J.J. (Eva J.J.); M. Schraders (Margit); Maiwald, N. (Nadine); Wesdorp, M. (Mieke); H. Venselaar (Hanka); L. Spruijt (Liesbeth); Oostrik, J. (Jaap); J. Schoots (Jeroen); J. van Reeuwijk (Jeroen); Lelieveld, S.H. (Stefan H.); P.L.M. Huygen (Patrick); Insenser, M. (María); R.J. Admiraal (Ronald); Pennings, R.J.E. (Ronald J.E.); E.H. Hoefsloot (Lies); A. Arias-Vásquez (Alejandro); J. de Ligt (Joep); H.G. Yntema; Jansen, J.H. (Joop H.); D. Muzny (Donna); G. Huls (Gerwin); M.M. van Rossum; Lupski, J.R. (James R.); Moreno-Pelayo, M.A. (Miguel Angel); Kunst, H.P.M. (Henricus P.M.); H. Kremer (Hannie)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractLinkage analysis combined with whole-exome sequencing in a large family with congenital and stable non-syndromic unilateral and asymmetric hearing loss (NS-UHL/AHL) revealed a heterozygous truncating mutation, c.286-303delinsT (p.Ser96Ter), in KITLG. This mutation co-segregated with NS-U

  6. Uveitis-glaucoma-hyphema syndrome caused by posterior chamber intraocular lens--a rare complication in pediatric cataract surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Chun-Ju; Tan, Chau-Yi; Lin, Szu-Yuan; Jou, Jieh-Ren

    2008-01-01

    We report a case of postoperative uveitis-glaucome-hyphema (UGH) syndrome following pediatric cataract surgery due to posterior chamber intraocular lens (PC-IOL). Slit-lamp examination revealed the optic of PC-IOL migrated into anterior chamber. The PC-IOL explantation was performed and ocular inflammation subsided. PMID:19230361

  7. Increased protein stability of CDKN1C causes a gain-of-function phenotype in patients with IMAGe syndrome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naoki Hamajima

    Full Text Available Mutations in the proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA-binding domain of the CDKN1C gene were recently identified in patients with IMAGe syndrome. However, loss of PCNA binding and suppression of CDKN1C monoubiquitination by IMAGe-associated mutations hardly explain the reduced-growth phenotype characteristic of IMAGe syndrome. We demonstrate here that IMAGe-associated mutations in the CDKN1C gene dramatically increased the protein stability. We identified a novel heterozygous mutation, c.815T>G (p.Ile272Ser, in the CDKN1C gene in three siblings manifesting clinical symptoms associated with IMAGe syndrome and their mother (unaffected carrier. PCNA binding to CDKN1C was disrupted in the case of p.Ile272Ser, and for two other IMAGe-associated mutations, p.Asp274Asn and p.Phe276Val. Intriguingly, the IMAGe-associated mutant CDKN1C proteins were fairly stable even in the presence of cycloheximide, whereas the wild-type protein was almost completely degraded via the proteasome pathway, as shown by the lack of degradation with addition of a proteasome inhibitor, MG132. These results thus suggested that the reduced-growth phenotype of IMAGe syndrome derives from CDKN1C gain-of-function due to IMAGe-associated mutations driving increased protein stability.

  8. Respiratory chain complex I deficiency due to NDUFA12 mutations as a new cause of Leigh syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ostergaard, Elsebet; Rodenburg, Richard J; van den Brand, Mariël;

    2011-01-01

    This study investigated a girl with Leigh syndrome born to first-cousin parents of Pakistani descent with an isolated respiratory chain complex I deficiency in muscle and fibroblasts. Her early development was delayed, and from age 2 years she started losing motor abilities. Cerebral MRI showed...

  9. [Congenital long QT-syndrome: the cause of recurrent syncope and sudden death at a young age

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Akkerhuis, J.M.; Baars, H.F.; Marcelis, C.L.M.; Akkerhuis, K.M.; Wilde, A.A.M.

    2007-01-01

    Congenital long QT-syndrome (LQTS) was diagnosed in three patients. The first patient, a 10-year-old girl, presented with recurrent episodes of syncope during swimming and was diagnosed with type 1 LQTS. The second patient, a 36-year-old asymptomatic man, was accidentally diagnosed with type 2 LQTS.

  10. LRP4 Mutations Alter Wnt/beta-Catenin Signaling and Cause Limb and Kidney Malformations in Cenani-Lenz Syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Y. Li; B. Pawlik; N. Elcioglu; M. Aglan; H. Kayserili; G. Yigit; F. Percin; F. Goodman; G. Nuernberg; A. Cenani; J. Urquhart; B.D. Chung; S. Ismail; K. Amr; A.D. Aslanger; C. Becker; C. Netzer; P. Scambler; W. Eyaid; H. Hamamy; J. Clayton-Smith; R. Hennekam; P. Nuernberg; J. Herz; S.A. Temtamy; B. Wollnik

    2010-01-01

    Cenani-Lenz syndrome (CLS) is an autosomal-recessive congenital disorder affecting distal limb development. It is characterized mainly by syndactyly and/or oligodactyly and is now shown to be commonly associated with kidney anomalies. We used a homozygosity-mapping approach to map the CLS1 locus to

  11. Autosomal recessive Stickler syndrome in two families is caused by mutations in the COL9A1 gene

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    K. Nikopoulos (Konstantinos); I. Schrauwen (Isabelle); M.E.H. Simon (Marleen); R.W.J. Collin (Rob); M.A.H. Veckeneer (Marc); K. Keymolen (Kathelijn); G. van Camp (Guy); F.P.M. Cremers (Frans); L. Ingeborgh van den Born

    2011-01-01

    textabstractPurpose. To investigate COL9A1 in two families suggestive of autosomal recessive Stickler syndrome and to delineate the associated phenotype. Methods. The probands of two consanguineous autosomal recessive Stickler families were evaluated for homozygosity using SNP microarray in one and

  12. Autosomal recessive Stickler syndrome in two families is caused by mutations in the COL9A1 gene

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nikopoulos, K.; Schrauwen, I.; Simon, M.; Collin, R.W.J.; Veckeneer, M.; Keymolen, K.; Camp, G. van; Cremers, F.P.M.; Born, L.I. van den

    2011-01-01

    PURPOSE: To investigate COL9A1 in two families suggestive of autosomal recessive Stickler syndrome and to delineate the associated phenotype. METHODS: The probands of two consanguineous autosomal recessive Stickler families were evaluated for homozygosity using SNP microarray in one and haplotype an

  13. Hemolytic Uremic Syndrome in Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... KB)​​​​​ Alternate Language URL Hemolytic Uremic Syndrome in Children Page Content On this page: What is hemolytic ... spine. [ Top ] What causes hemolytic uremic syndrome in children? The most common cause of hemolytic uremic syndrome ...

  14. Epidemiological and pathogenic study on the outbreak of toxic shock syndrome and meningocephalitis caused by swine streptococcus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    唐家琪; 白薇; 朱进; 郭恒彬; 胡晓抒; 朱凤才; 刘光中

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To reveal the relationship between the biological characteristics of pathogen and the pig-to-human spread of the epidemic and infectious disease in 1998 in East China. Methods: Epidemiological survey, pathological examination of pigs and patients, and pathogen isolation were performed. Results: The disease had a character of quick onset, serious symptoms, short course and high mortality. The clinical manifestations and pathological changes of the disease were high fever, sometimes with nausea, vomiting and diarrhea, then might develop to myositis, fascitis, DIC, multiple organ failure, shock and usually died in 2-3 d. Among 25 patients, 16 manifested clinically as streptococcal toxic shock syndromes and 9 streptococcal meningiocephalitis syndrome. The mortality was 81.25% and 11.11% respectively. Pathogenic bacteria isolated from diseased pigs and patients were found to have some common characteristics in morphology, staining and biological characters. Conclusion: The pathogen isolated from the blood of patients and pigs were identified as streptococci.

  15. The pharmacology of Malo maxima jellyfish venom extract in isolated cardiovascular tissues: A probable cause of the Irukandji syndrome in Western Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ran; Wright, Christine E; Winkel, Kenneth D; Gershwin, Lisa-Ann; Angus, James A

    2011-03-25

    The in vitro cardiac and vascular pharmacology of Malo maxima, a newly described jellyfish suspected of causing Irukandji syndrome in the Broome region of Western Australia, was investigated in rat tissues. In left atria, M. maxima crude venom extract (CVE; 1-100μg/mL) caused concentration-dependent inotropic responses which were unaffected by atropine (1μM), but significantly attenuated by tetrodotoxin (TTX; 0.1μM), propranolol (1μM), Mg(2+) (6mM) or calcitonin gene-related peptide antagonist (CGRP(8-37); 1μM). CVE caused no change in right atrial rate until 100μg/mL, which elicited bradycardia. This was unaffected by atropine, TTX, propranolol or CGRP(8-37). In the presence of Mg(2+), CVE 30-100μg/mL caused tachycardia. In small mesenteric arteries CVE caused concentration-dependent contractions (pEC(50) 1.03±0.07μg/mL) that were unaffected by prazosin (0.3μM), ω-conotoxin GVIA (0.1μM) or Mg(2+) (6mM). There was a 2-fold increase in sensitivity in the presence of CGRP(8-37) (3μM). TTX (0.1μM), box jellyfish Chironex fleckeri antivenom (92.6U/mL) and benextramine (3μM) decreased sensitivity by 2.6, 1.9 and 2.1-fold, respectively. CVE-induced maximum contractions were attenuated by C. fleckeri antivenom (-22%) or benextramine (-49%). M. maxima CVE appears to activate the sympathetic, but not parasympathetic, nervous system and to stimulate sensory nerve CGRP release in left atria and resistance arteries. These effects are consistent with the catecholamine excess thought to cause Irukandji syndrome, with additional actions of CGRP release. PMID:21237252

  16. Homozygous FOXE3 mutations cause non-syndromic, bilateral, total sclerocornea, aphakia, microphthalmia and optic disc coloboma

    OpenAIRE

    Ali, Manir; Buentello-Volante, Beatriz; McKibbin, Martin; Rocha-Medina, J. Alberto; Fernandez-Fuentes, Narcis; Koga-Nakamura, Wilson; Ashiq, Aruna; Khan, Kamron; Booth, Adam P.; Williams, Grange; Raashid, Yasmin; Jafri, Hussain; Rice, Aine; Inglehearn, Chris F.; Zenteno, Juan Carlos

    2010-01-01

    Purpose To investigate the genetic basis of recessively-inherited congenital, non syndromic, bilateral, total sclerocornea in two consanguineous pedigrees, one from the Punjab province of Pakistan and the other from the Tlaxcala province of Mexico. Methods Ophthalmic examinations were conducted on each family member to confirm their diagnosis and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) or ultrasonography of the eyes was performed on some family members. Genomic DNA was analyzed by homozygosity mappi...

  17. The Tourette International Collaborative Genetics (TIC Genetics) study, finding the genes causing Tourette syndrome: objectives and methods

    OpenAIRE

    Dietrich, Andrea; Fernandez, Thomas V.; King, Robert A.; State, Matthew W.; Tischfield, Jay A.; Pieter J Hoekstra; Heiman, Gary A.; ,

    2014-01-01

    Tourette syndrome (TS) is a neuropsychiatric disorder characterized by recurrent motor and vocal tics, often accompanied by obsessive–compulsive disorder and/or attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder. While the evidence for a genetic contribution is strong, its exact nature has yet to be clarified fully. There is now mounting evidence that the genetic risks for TS include both common and rare variants and may involve complex multigenic inheritance or, in rare cases, a single major gene. Bas...

  18. The microsporidian Enterocytozoon hepatopenaei is not the cause of white feces syndrome in whiteleg shrimp Penaeus (Litopenaeus) vannamei

    OpenAIRE

    Tangprasittipap, Amornrat; Srisala, Jiraporn; Chouwdee, Saisunee; Somboon, Montagan; Chuchird, Niti; Limsuwan, Chalor; Srisuvan, Thinnarat; Flegel, Timothy W; Sritunyalucksana, Kallaya

    2013-01-01

    Background The microsporidian Enterocytozoon hepatopenaei was first described from Thailand in 2009 in farmed, indigenous giant tiger shrimp Penaeus (Penaeus) monodon. The natural reservoir for the parasite is still unknown. More recently, a microsporidian closely resembling it in morphology and tissue preference was found in Thai-farmed, exotic, whiteleg shrimp Penaeus (Litopenaeus) vannamei exhibiting white feces syndrome (WFS). Our objective was to compare the newly found pathogen with E. ...

  19. Amifostine ameliorates recognition memory defect in acute radiation syndrome caused by relatively low-dose of gamma radiation

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Hae-June; Kim, Joong-Sun; Song, Myoung-Sub; Seo, Heung-Sik; Yang, Miyoung; Kim, Jong Choon; Jo, Sung-Kee; Shin, Taekyun; Moon, Changjong; Kim, Sung-Ho

    2010-01-01

    This study examined whether amifostine (WR-2721) could attenuate memory impairment and suppress hippocampal neurogenesis in adult mice with the relatively low-dose exposure of acute radiation syndrome (ARS). These were assessed using object recognition memory test, the terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick end-labeling assay, and immunohistochemical markers of neurogenesis [Ki-67 and doublecortin (DCX)]. Amifostine treatment (214 mg/kg, i.p.) prior to irradiation significan...

  20. Gastrointestinal Endometriosis Causing Subacute Intestinal Obstruction with Gradual Development of Weight Loss and Misdiagnosed as Irritable Bowel Syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Soumekh, Amir; Nagler, Jerry

    2014-01-01

    Both endometriosis and irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) are commonly found in young women and the diagnosis of either is challenging. Alarm symptoms can exclude the diagnosis of IBS, but their onset may be insidious and often no evidence of organic disease may be found. We present a patient with a 4-year history of presumed IBS, absent gynecological symptoms, negative gastrointestinal as well as gynecological testing who developed the only alarm symptom of weight loss and was eventually found t...

  1. Occupational Rhinoconjunctivitis and Asthma Caused by Chicory and Oral Allergy Syndrome Associated With Bet v 1-Related Protein

    OpenAIRE

    Pirson, F.; Pilette, Charles; Detry, Bruno

    2009-01-01

    We report the case of a patient working in a factory producing inulin from chicory who developed rhinoconjunctivitis and asthma to the dust of dry chicory roots and oral allergy syndrome to raw fruits and vegetables. Nonspecific bronchial hyperresponsiveness was diagnosed. A provocation test with dry chicory induced acute rhinoconjunctivitis and an immediate asthmatic response with no further clinical symptoms. Skin prick test results were positive to birch pollen and fresh/dry chicory, and n...

  2. DYNC2H1 Mutations Cause Asphyxiating Thoracic Dystrophy and Short Rib-Polydactyly Syndrome, Type III

    OpenAIRE

    Dagoneau, Nathalie; Goulet, Marie; Geneviève, David; Sznajer, Yves; Martinovic, Jelena; Smithson, Sarah; Huber, Céline; Baujat, Geneviève; Flori, Elisabeth; Tecco, Laura; Cavalcanti, Denise; Delezoide, Anne-Lise; Serre, Valérie; Le Merrer, Martine; Munnich, Arnold

    2009-01-01

    Jeune asphyxiating thoracic dystrophy (ATD) is an autosomal-recessive chondrodysplasia characterized by short ribs and a narrow thorax, short long bones, inconstant polydactyly, and trident acetabular roof. ATD is closely related to the short rib polydactyly syndrome (SRP) type III, which is a more severe condition characterized by early prenatal expression and lethality and variable malformations. We first excluded IFT80 in a series of 26 fetuses and children belonging to 14 families diagnos...

  3. A Case of Ischemic Duodenitis Associated with Superior Mesenteric Artery Syndrome Caused by an Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm

    OpenAIRE

    OKUYAMA, Yusuke; Kawakami, Takumi; Ito, Haruki; Otsuka, Hirotomo; Enoki, Yasuyuki; Nishimura, Masahito; Yoshida, Norimasa; Fujimoto, Sotaro

    2011-01-01

    A 74-year-old woman was admitted to our hospital with upper abdominal pain and bloody vomiting. An abdominal aneurysm compressed the third portion of the duodenum and the second portion of duodenum was distended with thickened walls as in superior mesenteric artery syndrome. Endoscopic examination showed an edematous mucosa with hemorrhagic erosions, shallow longitudinal ulcers, and star-shaped ulcers in the duodenum. We diagnosed this case as ischemic duodenitis associated with superior mese...

  4. Distal renal tubular acidosis as a cause of osteomalacia in a patient with primary Sjögren's syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jovelić Aleksandra

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. One half of the patients with primary Sjögren’s syndrome has extraglandular manifestations, including renal involvement. The most frequent renal lesion is tubulo-interstitial nephritis, which manifests clinically as distal tubular acidosis and may result in the development of osteomalacia. Case report. In a 29 - year-old female patient, with bilateral nephrolithiasis, the diagnosis of primary Sjögren’s syndrome, tubulo-interstitial nephritis, distal renal tubular acidosis, and hypokalemia were established. She was treated for hypokalemia. Two years later she developed bone pains and muscle weakness, she wasn’t able to walk, her proximal muscles and pelvic bones were painful, with radiological signs of pelvic bones osteopenia and pubic bones fractures. The diagnosis of osteomalacia was established and the treatment started with Schol’s solution, vitamin D and calcium. In the following two months, acidosis was corrected, and the patient started walking. Conclusion. In our patient with primary Sjögren’s syndrome and interstitial nephritis, osteomalacia was a result of the long time decompensate acidosis, so the correction of acidosis, and the supplementation of vitamin D and calcium were the integral part of the therapy.

  5. Pulmonary Langerhans Histiocytosis: an uncommon cause of interstitial pneumonia in a patient with Sjögren syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González García, Andrés; Callejas Rubio, José Luis; Ríos Fernández, Raquel; Ortego Centeno, Norberto

    2016-03-01

    Sjögren syndrome is a chronic, systemic, and autoimmune disorder that targets exocrine glands by remarkable B cell hyperactivity. Eventually, it is associated with extra-glandular clinical manifestations that affect essentially any organ system, including pulmonary involvement. Interstitial lung disease is one of the most serious pulmonary complications, and the early diagnosis is essential to initiate a prompt therapy. On the other hand, Sjögren syndrome could present concomitantly with several rheumatologic diseases such as systemic lupus erythematosus or rheumatoid arthritis. Pulmonary Langerhans Histiocytosis is a rare clonal proliferative disease characterized by pulmonary involvement by cells phenotypically similar to Langerhans cells. We describe the case of a nonsmoker 62-year-old woman with Sjögren syndrome who presented concomitantly a Pulmonary Langerhans Histiocytosis mimicking a pulmonary complication of its Sjögren. Fortunately, she had a well response to corticosteroids and azathioprine regimen. The aim of the paper is to emphasize the importance of the good differential diagnosis related to the pulmonary involvement. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first description of these two entities in the literature. PMID:25894436

  6. Ten new cases further delineate the syndromic intellectual disability phenotype caused by mutations in DYRK1A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bronicki, Lucas M; Redin, Claire; Drunat, Severine; Piton, Amélie; Lyons, Michael; Passemard, Sandrine; Baumann, Clarisse; Faivre, Laurence; Thevenon, Julien; Rivière, Jean-Baptiste; Isidor, Bertrand; Gan, Grace; Francannet, Christine; Willems, Marjolaine; Gunel, Murat; Jones, Julie R; Gleeson, Joseph G; Mandel, Jean-Louis; Stevenson, Roger E; Friez, Michael J; Aylsworth, Arthur S

    2015-11-01

    The dual-specificity tyrosine-phosphorylation-regulated kinase 1A (DYRK1A) gene, located on chromosome 21q22.13 within the Down syndrome critical region, has been implicated in syndromic intellectual disability associated with Down syndrome and autism. DYRK1A has a critical role in brain growth and development primarily by regulating cell proliferation, neurogenesis, neuronal plasticity and survival. Several patients have been reported with chromosome 21 aberrations such as partial monosomy, involving multiple genes including DYRK1A. In addition, seven other individuals have been described with chromosomal rearrangements, intragenic deletions or truncating mutations that disrupt specifically DYRK1A. Most of these patients have microcephaly and all have significant intellectual disability. In the present study, we report 10 unrelated individuals with DYRK1A-associated intellectual disability (ID) who display a recurrent pattern of clinical manifestations including primary or acquired microcephaly, ID ranging from mild to severe, speech delay or absence, seizures, autism, motor delay, deep-set eyes, poor feeding and poor weight gain. We identified unique truncating and non-synonymous mutations (three nonsense, four frameshift and two missense) in DYRK1A in nine patients and a large chromosomal deletion that encompassed DYRK1A in one patient. On the basis of increasing identification of mutations in DYRK1A, we suggest that this gene be considered potentially causative in patients presenting with ID, primary or acquired microcephaly, feeding problems and absent or delayed speech with or without seizures. PMID:25920557

  7. Splicing Defect in Mitochondrial Seryl-tRNA Synthetase Gene Causes Progressive Spastic Paresis Instead of HUPRA Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linnankivi, Tarja; Neupane, Nirajan; Richter, Uwe; Isohanni, Pirjo; Tyynismaa, Henna

    2016-09-01

    Mitochondrial aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases are an important group of disease genes typically underlying either a disorder affecting an isolated tissue or a distinct syndrome. Missense mutations in the mitochondrial seryl-tRNA synthetase gene, SARS2, have been identified in HUPRA syndrome (hyperuricemia, pulmonary hypertension, renal failure in infancy, and alkalosis). We report here a homozygous splicing mutation in SARS2 in a patient with progressive spastic paresis. We show that the mutation leads to diminished levels of the synthetase in patient's fibroblasts. This has a destabilizing effect on the tRNASer(AGY) isoacceptor, but to a lesser degree than in HUPRA syndrome patients. tRNASer(UCN) is largely unaffected in both phenotypes. In conclusion, the level of tRNASer(AGY) instability may be a factor in determining tissue manifestation in patients with SARS2 mutations. This finding exemplifies the sensitivity of the nervous system to partially reduced aminoacylation, which is sufficient in other tissues to maintain respiratory chain function. PMID:27279129

  8. Non-syndromic sensorineural prelingual deafness: the importance of genetic counseling in demystifying parents' beliefs about the cause of their children's deafness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, Fidjy; Paneque, Milena; Reis, Cláudia; Venâncio, Margarida; Sequeiros, Jorge; Saraiva, Jorge

    2013-08-01

    Recent advances in molecular genetics have allowed the determination of the genetic cause of some childhood non-syndromic deafness. In Portugal only a small proportion of families are referred to a clinical genetics service in order to clarify the etiology of the deafness and to provide genetic counseling. Consequently, there are no published studies of the prior beliefs of parents about the causes of hereditary deafness of their children and their genetic knowledge after receipt of genetic counseling. In order to evaluate the impact of genetic counseling, 44 parents of 24 children with the diagnosis of non-syndromic sensorineural prelingual deafness due to mutations in the GJB2 (connexin 26), completed surveys before and after genetic counseling. Before counseling 13.6 % of the parents knew the cause of deafness; at a post-counseling setting this percentage was significantly higher, with 84.1 % of the parents accurately identifying the etiology. No significant differences were found between the answers of mothers and fathers either before or after genetic counseling. Parents' level of education was a significant factor in pre-test knowledge. After genetic counseling 95.5 % of the parents stated that the consultation had met their expectations, 70.5 % remembered correctly the inheritance pattern, and 93.2 % correctly recalled the chance of risk of deafness. These results underline the importance of genetic counseling in demystifying parents' beliefs about the etiology of their children's deafness.

  9. Disruption of a PEX1-PEX6 interaction is the most common cause of the neurologic disorders Zellweger syndrome, neonatal adrenoleukodystrophy, and infantile Refsum disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geisbrecht, B V; Collins, C S; Reuber, B E; Gould, S J

    1998-07-21

    Peroxisomal matrix protein import requires the action of two AAA ATPases, PEX1 and PEX6. Mutations in either the PEX1 or PEX6 gene are the most common cause of the lethal neurologic disorders Zellweger syndrome, neonatal adrenoleukodystrophy, and infantile Refsum disease and account for disease in 80% of all such patients. We report here that overexpression of PEX6 can suppress the phenotypes of certain PEX1-deficient cells, that overexpression of PEX1 can suppress the phenotypes of certain PEX6-deficient cells, and that these instances of suppression are allele-specific and require partial activity of the mutated gene. In addition to genetic evidence for interaction between PEX1 and PEX6, we find that the PEX1 and PEX6 proteins interact in the yeast two-hybrid assay and physically associate with one another in vitro. We previously identified a missense mutation in PEX1, G843D, which attenuates PEX1 function and is the most common cause of these diseases, present in one-third of all such patients. The G843D mutation attenuates the interaction between PEX1 and PEX6 in both the two-hybrid system and in vitro and appears to be suppressed by overexpression of PEX6. We conclude that PEX1 and PEX6 form a complex of central importance to peroxisome biogenesis and that mutations affecting this complex constitute the most common cause of the Zellweger syndrome spectrum of diseases.

  10. Os acromiale causing shoulder impingement syndrome: a case report; Os acromiale como causa de impingement del hombro: a proposito de un caso

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Romero, I.; Rodriguez, A.; Roca, M.; Garcia, Y. [Hospital Universitario Miguel Servet. Zaragoza (Spain)

    2001-07-01

    Shoulder impingement syndrome is caused by repeated mechanical trauma to the rotator cuff due to encroachment of the coracoacromial ligement; in most cases, it is a primary lesion. Os acromiale, an anatomic variant of the shoulder structures, is one of the predisposing factors for the development of this entity. We present a case of os acromiale complicated by complete rupture of the tendon of the supraspinatus muscle and luxation of the long head of the biceps tendon. We stress the importance of magnetic resonance in the study of this anatomic variant and in the detection of complications or associated lesions. (Author) 10 refs.

  11. SETD5 loss-of-function mutation as a likely cause of a familial syndromic intellectual disability with variable phenotypic expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szczałuba, Krzysztof; Brzezinska, Monika; Kot, Justyna; Rydzanicz, Małgorzata; Walczak, Anna; Stawiński, Piotr; Werner, Bożena; Płoski, Rafał

    2016-09-01

    Loss-of-function de novo mutations in the SETD5 gene, encoding a putative methyltransferase, are an important cause of moderate/severe intellectual disability as evidenced by the results of sequencing large patient cohorts. We present the first familial case of a SETD5 mutation contributing to a phenotype of congenital heart defects and dysmorphic features, with variable expression, in two siblings and their father. Interestingly, the father demonstrated only mild intellectual impairment. Family based exome sequencing combined to careful parental phenotyping may reveal a more complex clinical picture in newly recognized syndromes. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27375234

  12. SYNDROME OF INADEQUATE SECRETION OF ANTIDIURETIC HORMONE ASSOCIATED TO PULMONARY THROMBOEMBOLISM: A NON-DESCRIBED CAUSE OF HYPONATREMIA IN THE LITERATURE.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos G. Musso

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Syndrome of inadequate secretion of antidiuretic hormone (SIADH is a condition that can be associated to various sort of lung diseases.In this report we present a clinical case where a SIADH associated to pulmonary thromboembolism was documented. As long as we know, this association has not been described yet in the literature, and we hypothesized that lung cytokines released due to pulmonary necrosis could be the main stimulus to vasopressin secretion in this entity.Conclusion: Pulmonary thromboembolism should be incorporated in the list of lung causes of SIADH.

  13. Coffin-Siris syndrome with café-au-lait spots, obesity and hyperinsulinism caused by a mutation in the ARID1B gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonmez, Fatma Mujgan; Uctepe, Eyyup; Gunduz, Mehmet; Gormez, Zeliha; Erpolat, Seval; Oznur, Murat; Sagiroglu, Mahmut Samil; Demirci, Huseyin; Gunduz, Esra

    2016-08-01

    Coffin-Siris syndrome (CSS) (MIM 135900) is characterized by developmental delay, severe speech impairment, distinctive facial features, hypertrichosis, aplasia or hypoplasia of the distal phalanx or nail of the fifth digit and agenesis of the corpus callosum. Recently, it was shown that mutations in the ARID1B gene are the main cause of CSS, accounting for 76% of identified mutations. Here, we report a 15 year-old female patient who was admitted to our clinic with seizures, speech problems, dysmorphic features, bilaterally big, large thumb, café-au-lait (CAL) spots, obesity and hyperinsulinism. First, the patient was thought to have an association of neurofibromatosis and Rubinstein Taybi syndrome. Because of the large size of the NF1 gene for neurofibromatosis and CREBBP gene for Rubinstein Taybi syndrome, whole exome sequence analysis (WES) was conducted and a novel ARID1B mutation was identified. The proband WES test identified a novel heterozygous frameshift mutation c.3394_3395insTA in exon 13 of ARID1B (NM_017519.2) predicting a premature stop codon p.(Tyr1132Leufs*67). Sanger sequencing confirmed the heterozygous c.3394_3395insTA mutation in the proband and that it was not present in her parents indicating de novo mutation. Further investigation and new cases will help to understand this phenomenon better. PMID:27672547

  14. Mutations in the paired domain of the human PAX3 gene cause Klein-Waardenburg syndrome (WS-III) as well as Waardenburg syndrome type I (WS-I)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoth, C.F.; Milunsky, A.; Lipsky, N.; Baldwin, C.T. (Boston Univ. School of Medicine, MA (United States)); Sheffer, R. (Hadassah-Hebrew Univ. Medical Center, Jerusalem (Israel)); Clarren, S.K. (Univ. of Washington School of Medicine, Seattle (United States))

    1993-03-01

    Waardenburg syndrome type I (WS-I) is an autosomal dominant disorder characterized by sensorineural hearing loss, dystopia canthorum, pigmentary disturbances, and other developmental defects. Klein-Waardenburg syndrome (WS-III) is a disorder with many of the same characteristics as WS-I and includes musculoskeletal abnormalities. The authors have recently reported the identification and characterization of one of the first gene defects, in the human PAX3 gene, which causes WS-I. PAX3 is a DNA-binding protein that contains a structural motif known as the paired domain and is believed to regulate the expression of other genes. In this report they describe two new mutations, in the human PAX3 gene, that are associated with WS. One mutation was found in a family with WS-I, while the other mutation was found in a family with WS-III. Both mutations were in the highly conserved paired domain of the human PAX3 gene and are similar to other mutations that cause WS. The results indicate that mutations in the PAX3 gene can cause both WS-I and WS-III. 36 refs., 4 figs.

  15. Arachnomelia syndrome in Simmental cattle is caused by a homozygous 2-bp deletion in the molybdenum cofactor synthesis step 1 gene (MOCS1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Semmer Jördis

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Arachnomelia syndrome is an autosomal recessive inherited disease in cattle. Affected calves die around birth and show malformations of the skeleton mainly affecting the legs, the spinal column and the skull. A number of arachnomelia syndrome affected Simmental calves were recently detected by a surveillance system of anomalies with a peak of more than 120 recorded cases in the year 2006. The causative mutation was previously mapped to a 9 cM-region on bovine chromosome 23. We herein report the fine-mapping and identification of the gene causing arachnomelia syndrome in Simmental cattle. Results By using a dense set of markers, the arachnomelia syndrome linked region could be refined to 1.5 cM harbouring three protein coding genes. Comparative sequencing of these genes revealed a two-bp-deletion in the bovine MOCS1 gene resulting in a frame-shift and a premature termination codon. We genotyped affected calves and their ancestors and found that all affected were homozygous for the deletion whereas all carriers were heterozygous. Furthermore, cattle from the same population, but not directly related to known carriers mostly showed the wild type genotype. Conclusions MOCS1 encodes two proteins that are involved in the first synthesis step of molybdenum cofactor. A non functional sulfite-oxydase, one of the enzymes requiring molybdenum cofactor, leads to a similar pathology in Brown Swiss cattle. In combination the perfect association of the mutation with the phenotype and the obvious disruption of protein translation provide strong evidence for the causality of the MOCS1 mutation. Our results are the first example for an oligogenic lethal inherited disease in cattle. Furthermore, they show the potential involvement of sulfite metabolism in aberrant bone development.

  16. Mutations in NDUFB11, encoding a complex I component of the mitochondrial respiratory chain, cause microphthalmia with linear skin defects syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Rahden, Vanessa A; Fernandez-Vizarra, Erika; Alawi, Malik; Brand, Kristina; Fellmann, Florence; Horn, Denise; Zeviani, Massimo; Kutsche, Kerstin

    2015-04-01

    Microphthalmia with linear skin defects (MLS) syndrome is an X-linked male-lethal disorder also known as MIDAS (microphthalmia, dermal aplasia, and sclerocornea). Additional clinical features include neurological and cardiac abnormalities. MLS syndrome is genetically heterogeneous given that heterozygous mutations in HCCS or COX7B have been identified in MLS-affected females. Both genes encode proteins involved in the structure and function of complexes III and IV, which form the terminal segment of the mitochondrial respiratory chain (MRC). However, not all individuals with MLS syndrome carry a mutation in either HCCS or COX7B. The majority of MLS-affected females have severe skewing of X chromosome inactivation, suggesting that mutations in HCCS, COX7B, and other as-yet-unidentified X-linked gene(s) cause selective loss of cells in which the mutated X chromosome is active. By applying whole-exome sequencing and filtering for X-chromosomal variants, we identified a de novo nonsense mutation in NDUFB11 (Xp11.23) in one female individual and a heterozygous 1-bp deletion in a second individual, her asymptomatic mother, and an affected aborted fetus of the subject's mother. NDUFB11 encodes one of 30 poorly characterized supernumerary subunits of NADH:ubiquinone oxidoreductase, known as complex I (cI), the first and largest enzyme of the MRC. By shRNA-mediated NDUFB11 knockdown in HeLa cells, we demonstrate that NDUFB11 is essential for cI assembly and activity as well as cell growth and survival. These results demonstrate that X-linked genetic defects leading to the complete inactivation of complex I, III, or IV underlie MLS syndrome. Our data reveal an unexpected role of cI dysfunction in a developmental phenotype, further underscoring the existence of a group of mitochondrial diseases associated with neurocutaneous manifestations.

  17. DYRK1A haploinsufficiency causes a new recognizable syndrome with microcephaly, intellectual disability, speech impairment, and distinct facies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Jianling; Lee, Hane; Argiropoulos, Bob; Dorrani, Naghmeh; Mann, John; Martinez-Agosto, Julian A; Gomez-Ospina, Natalia; Gallant, Natalie; Bernstein, Jonathan A; Hudgins, Louanne; Slattery, Leah; Isidor, Bertrand; Le Caignec, Cédric; David, Albert; Obersztyn, Ewa; Wiśniowiecka-Kowalnik, Barbara; Fox, Michelle; Deignan, Joshua L; Vilain, Eric; Hendricks, Emily; Horton Harr, Margaret; Noon, Sarah E; Jackson, Jessi R; Wilkens, Alisha; Mirzaa, Ghayda; Salamon, Noriko; Abramson, Jeff; Zackai, Elaine H; Krantz, Ian; Innes, A Micheil; Nelson, Stanley F; Grody, Wayne W; Quintero-Rivera, Fabiola

    2015-11-01

    Dual-specificity tyrosine-(Y)-phosphorylation-regulated kinase 1 A (DYRK1A ) is a highly conserved gene located in the Down syndrome critical region. It has an important role in early development and regulation of neuronal proliferation. Microdeletions of chromosome 21q22.12q22.3 that include DYRK1A (21q22.13) are rare and only a few pathogenic single-nucleotide variants (SNVs) in the DYRK1A gene have been described, so as of yet, the landscape of DYRK1A disruptions and their associated phenotype has not been fully explored. We have identified 14 individuals with de novo heterozygous variants of DYRK1A; five with microdeletions, three with small insertions or deletions (INDELs) and six with deleterious SNVs. The analysis of our cohort and comparison with published cases reveals that phenotypes are consistent among individuals with the 21q22.12q22.3 microdeletion and those with translocation, SNVs, or INDELs within DYRK1A. All individuals shared congenital microcephaly at birth, intellectual disability, developmental delay, severe speech impairment, short stature, and distinct facial features. The severity of the microcephaly varied from -2 SD to -5 SD. Seizures, structural brain abnormalities, eye defects, ataxia/broad-based gait, intrauterine growth restriction, minor skeletal abnormalities, and feeding difficulties were present in two-thirds of all affected individuals. Our study demonstrates that haploinsufficiency of DYRK1A results in a new recognizable syndrome, which should be considered in individuals with Angelman syndrome-like features and distinct facial features. Our report represents the largest cohort of individuals with DYRK1A disruptions to date, and is the first attempt to define consistent genotype-phenotype correlations among subjects with 21q22.13 microdeletions and DYRK1A SNVs or small INDELs. PMID:25944381

  18. Sick sinus syndrome, progressive cardiac conduction disease, atrial flutter and ventricular tachycardia caused by a novel SCN5A mutation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holst, Anders G; Liang, Bo; Jespersen, Thomas;

    2010-01-01

    Mutations in the cardiac sodium channel encoded by the gene SCN5A can result in a wide array of phenotypes. We report a case of a young male with a novel SCN5A mutation (R121W) afflicted by sick sinus syndrome, progressive cardiac conduction disorder, atrial flutter and ventricular tachycardia. His...... father carried the same mutation, but had a milder phenotype, presenting with progressive cardiac conduction later in life. The mutation was found to result in a loss-of-function in the sodium current. In conclusion, the same SCN5A mutation can result in a wide array of clinical phenotypes and perhaps...

  19. Gastrointestinal Endometriosis Causing Subacute Intestinal Obstruction with Gradual Development of Weight Loss and Misdiagnosed as Irritable Bowel Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amir Soumekh

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Both endometriosis and irritable bowel syndrome (IBS are commonly found in young women and the diagnosis of either is challenging. Alarm symptoms can exclude the diagnosis of IBS, but their onset may be insidious and often no evidence of organic disease may be found. We present a patient with a 4-year history of presumed IBS, absent gynecological symptoms, negative gastrointestinal as well as gynecological testing who developed the only alarm symptom of weight loss and was eventually found to have endometriosis of the small intestine. This case illustrates the need for constant vigilance in patients with IBS.

  20. A Case of Blind Loop Syndrome Caused by Infection with Giardia duodenalis Diagnosed with Double Balloon Enteroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakagawa, Tomoo; Katsuno, Tatsuro; Mandai, Yasushi; Saito, Masaya; Yoshihama, Sayuri; Saito, Keiko; Minemura, Shoko; Maruoka, Daisuke; Matsumura, Tomoaki; Arai, Makoto; Yokosuka, Osamu

    2014-09-01

    A 75-year-old man who had undergone partial gastrectomy was referred to our hospital due to worsening leg edema, loose stools and malnutrition. Double balloon enteroscopy followed by insertion of an indwelling ileus tube was performed to investigate the microbial flora and for washing inside the blind loop. Trophozoites of Giardia were detected in the sampled fluid from the blind loop and DNA analysis disclosed an assemblage of genotype A-II of Giardia duodenalis. Treatment with oral metronidazole was effective. This case emphasizes the importance of a correct diagnosis when treating patients with blind loop syndrome in the digestive tract.