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Sample records for causing gastroenteritis presents

  1. [Noroviruses: leading cause of gastroenteritis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delacour, H; Dubrous, P; Koeck, J L

    2010-04-01

    Although noroviruses were the first viral agents to be linked to gastrointestinal disease, they were long considered a secondary cause far behind rotaviruses. Development of molecular-based diagnostic techniques has provided clearer insight into the epidemiological impact of noroviruses that are now recognized not only as the leading cause of non-bacterial gastroenteritis outbreaks but also as an important cause of sporadic gastroenteritis in both children and adults. Norovirus infection is generally characterized by mild acute vomiting and diarrhea usually lasting for only a few days, but it can lead to more severe and potentially life-threatening symptoms in high-risk groups such as young children, elderly, and immunodeficient persons. It has been demonstrated that they are present in tropical countries. Molecular epidemiological studies have documented the great genetic diversity of noroviruses with regular emergence of variants. Since no vaccine is available, prevention on norovirus infection depends mainly on strict personal and community hygiene measures.

  2. An Atypical Case of Eosinophilic Gastroenteritis Presenting as Hypovolemic Shock.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martillo, Miguel; Abed, Jean; Herman, Michael; Abed, Elie; Shi, Wenjing; Munot, Khushboo; Mankal, Pavan Kumar; Gurunathan, Rajan; Ionescu, Gabriel; Kotler, Donald P

    2015-01-01

    Eosinophilic gastroenteritis is an uncommon condition characterized by focal or diffuse infiltration of eosinophils in the gastrointestinal tract in the absence of secondary causes. The pathogenesis of this condition is not well understood and its clinical presentation depends on the segment and layer of the gastrointestinal tract affected. The definition of eosinophilic gastroenteritis may be difficult, as the normal ranges of eosinophil numbers in normal and abnormal gastric and intestinal mucosa are not standardized. We present the case of a 59-year-old male who came to the hospital with hypovolemic shock and lethargy secondary to severe diarrhea. Laboratory analysis was significant for peripheral eosinophilia, and pathology from both the duodenum and colon showed marked eosinophilic infiltration.

  3. An Atypical Case of Eosinophilic Gastroenteritis Presenting as Hypovolemic Shock

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miguel Martillo

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Eosinophilic gastroenteritis is an uncommon condition characterized by focal or diffuse infiltration of eosinophils in the gastrointestinal tract in the absence of secondary causes. The pathogenesis of this condition is not well understood and its clinical presentation depends on the segment and layer of the gastrointestinal tract affected. The definition of eosinophilic gastroenteritis may be difficult, as the normal ranges of eosinophil numbers in normal and abnormal gastric and intestinal mucosa are not standardized. We present the case of a 59-year-old male who came to the hospital with hypovolemic shock and lethargy secondary to severe diarrhea. Laboratory analysis was significant for peripheral eosinophilia, and pathology from both the duodenum and colon showed marked eosinophilic infiltration.

  4. Human rotavirus group a serotypes causing gastroenteritis in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Rotavirus remains a leading cause of acute gastroenteritis in children worldwide with an estimated 2000 deaths each day in developing countries. Due to HIV/AIDS scourge in Kenya, it is possible that rotavirus-related gastroenteritis has been aggravated in adults. The Global Alliance for Immunizations has ...

  5. Eosinophilic Gastroenteritis Presenting as Intestinal Obstruction - A Case Series

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amita Krishnappa

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Eosinophilic Gastroenteritis is a rare disease characterized by infiltration of the gastrointestinal tract by an increased number of eosinophils as compared to the normal. The anatomic location and intensity of the infiltrate decides the varied clinical symptomatology with which these patients present. The present report deals with four cases, all presenting with clinical signs of intestinal obstruction A laparotomy performed revealed a stricture in the first case, superficial ulcers and adhesions in the second case, an ileocaecal mass in the third case and volvulus formation in the fourth case. Eosinophilic gastroenteritis was confirmed on histopathology in all the four cases. All the four patients experienced relief of symptoms after resection. It is essential to diagnose the disease to differentiate it from other conditions presenting as intestinal obstruction. The cases are presented because of the rarity of occurrence and presentation. Relevant literature has been reviewed.

  6. A Systematic Approach to Elucidate Causes of Gastroenteritis Outbreaks of Suspected Viral Etiology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S. Svraka-Latifovic (Sanela)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractThe main objective of this thesis was to investigate the etiology of outbreaks of viral gastroenteritis that remained without diagnosis after testing for common viral pathogens causing gastroenteritis, e.g. noroviruses, rotaviruses, sapoviruses, adenoviruses, and astroviruses. No

  7. Eosinophilic Gastroenteritis as a Rare Cause of Recurrent Epigastric Pain

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    Mohammad Taghi Safari

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Eosinophilic gastroenteritis (EGE is a rare inflammatory disorder of gastrointestinal tract characterized by eosinophilic infiltration of the bowel wall. It can mimic many gastrointestinal disorders due to its wide spectrum of presentations. Diagnose is mostly based on excluding other disorders and a high suspicion. Here we report a case of 26 year old man with a history of sever epigastric pain followed by nausea, vomiting since a few days before admission with final diagnosis of EGE.

  8. A Gastroenteritis Outbreak Caused by Noroviruses in Greece

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    Yiannis Alamanos

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available In June 2006, an outbreak alert regarding cases of acute gastroenteritis in a region in North Eastern Greece (population 100,882 inhabitants, triggered investigations to guide control measures. The outbreak started the first days of June, and peaked in July. A descriptive epidemiological study, a virological characterization of the viral agent identified from cases as well as a phylogenetic analysis was performed. From June 5 to September 3, 2006 (weeks 23–44, 1,640 cases of gastroenteritis (45.2% male and 54.8% female, aged 3 months to 89 years were reported. The overall attack rate for the period was 16.3 cases/1,000 inhabitants. About 57% of cases observed were under the age of 15 years. Αnalysis of faecal samples identified Norovirus GII strains. Fifteen different Norovirus GII strains were recorded, presenting a homology of 94.8% (86–97% to GII strains obtained from GenBank. The long duration of the outbreak suggests an important role of person-to-person transmission, while the emergence of the outbreak was possibly due to contaminated potable water, although no viruses were detected in any tested water samples. This outbreak underscores the need for a national surveillance system for acute non-bacterial gastroenteritis outbreaks.

  9. Ascites in a Young Woman: A Rare Presentation of Eosinophilic Gastroenteritis

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    Carina Santos

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Eosinophilic gastroenteritis (EGE is a rare idiopathic disease that can affect one or more organs of the digestive tract. It has an estimated incidence of 1–20 cases per 100,000 patients. Klein et al. classified EGE into 3 subtypes: predominant mucosal, muscular, or subserosal. Clinical Case. We report a case of a 32-year-old woman, who presented with diffuse abdominal pain, nausea, postprandial infarction, diarrhea, and moderate ascites of three-week evolution. The rest of physical examination did not show alterations. The past medical history was unremarkable. Laboratory test results revealed peripheral blood eosinophilia. Abdominal CT scan revealed diffuse and concentric parietal thickening of the distal 2/3 of esophagus, moderate volume ascites, and small bowel wall thickening and distension on the left quadrants. The paracentesis revealed 93.3% of eosinophils. The colon biopsies evidenced an increase in the number of eosinophils. Secondary causes of eosinophilia were excluded. The patient was treated with oral prednisolone 40 mg/day with immediate clinical and analytical improvement. Conclusion. Eosinophilic gastroenteritis is a rare condition with a nonspecific and highly variable clinical presentation, which requires a high level of clinical suspicion. It is a diagnosis of exclusion. Secondary causes of eosinophilia such as intestinal tuberculosis, parasitosis, and malignant neoplasms should be excluded.

  10. Gastroenteritis: First Aid

    Science.gov (United States)

    First aid Gastroenteritis: First aid Gastroenteritis: First aid By Mayo Clinic Staff Gastroenteritis is an inflammation of your stomach and intestines. Common causes are: Viruses. Food or water contaminated by ...

  11. Hematemesis as Initial Presentation in a 10-Week-Old Infant with Eosinophilic Gastroenteritis

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    Varun Shetty

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Eosinophilic gastroenteritis is a rare condition characterized by eosinophilic inflammation in the gastrointestinal tract resulting in a variety of gastrointestinal symptoms. There is currently a dearth of information on this topic in the pediatric literature, as very few cases have been reported. In this report, we present a case of eosinophilic gastroenteritis in a 10-week-old patient with initial presenting symptom of hematemesis. To our knowledge, this is the youngest case reported in the literature and is unique in its initial presentation.

  12. [Recurrent epidemics of gastroenteritis caused by norovirus GI.3 in a small hotel].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soini, Jani; Hemminki, Kaisa; Pirnes, Aija; Roivainen, Merja; Al-Hello, Haider; Maunula, Leena; Kauppinen, Ari; Miettinen, Likka; Smit, Pieter W; Huusko, Sari; Toikkanen, Salla; Rimhanen-Finne, Ruska

    2016-01-01

    Recurrent cases of gastroenteritis occurred in a small hotel. The causative agent of disease could not be detected. The cause and the source of the disease were established through epidemiological investigations and laboratory diagnosis. The causative agent of the disease was norovirus GI.3. Norovirus GI was detected in the water from the well and on surfaces at the hotel. Both epidemiological investigations and laboratory diagnostics are needed in resolving epidemics. Continuous development of laboratory methods is important.

  13. Viruses Causing Gastroenteritis: The Known, The New and Those Beyond

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oude Munnink, Bas B.; van der Hoek, Lia

    2016-01-01

    The list of recently discovered gastrointestinal viruses is expanding rapidly. Whether these agents are actually involved in a disease such as diarrhea is the essential question, yet difficult to answer. In this review a summary of all viruses found in diarrhea is presented, together with the

  14. A food-borne outbreak of gastroenteritis caused by norovirus GII in a university located in Xiamen City, China

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    Zhinan Guo

    2014-11-01

    Conclusions: The outbreak of gastroenteritis was caused mainly by bread products contaminated with norovirus GII. A food handler with an asymptomatic norovirus GII infection was the possible source of infection.

  15. [Waterborne outbreak of gastroenteritis caused by Norovirus transmitted through drinking water].

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    Godoy, P; Nuín, C; Alsedà, M; Llovet, T; Mazana, R; Domínguez, A

    2006-10-01

    The aim of this study was to conduct an investigation into an outbreak of waterborne disease caused by Norovirus due to the consumption of contaminated drinking water. The first week after the school summer holidays we detected an outbreak of gastroenteritis at a school in Borges Blanques (Lleida, Spain). A retrospective cohort study was carried out to investigate: water consumption and food (six items). We assessed RNA Norovirus by RT-PCR in 6 stool samples. The risk of gastroenteritis was assessed by applying adjusted risk ratio (RRa) analysis at 95% confidence intervals (CI). The overall attack rate was 45% (96/213). The main symptoms were: abdominal pain, 88.4% (84/95); nausea, 65.9% (62/94), and vomiting, 64.6% (62/96). The consumption of school drinking water was statistically associated with the disease (RRa: 2.8; 95% CI: 1.3-6.2). The school water tank was dirty, but this drinking water was qualified as potable. Six stool samples gave positive results for Norovirus. Norovirus caused this waterborne outbreak of gastroenteritis transmitted through treated drinking water. It should be obligatory to regularly clean school drinking water deposit tanks, especially after the summer holidays.

  16. A Waterborne Gastroenteritis Outbreak Caused by Norovirus GII.17 in a Hotel, Hebei, China, December 2014.

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    Qin, Meng; Dong, Xiao-Gen; Jing, Yan-Yan; Wei, Xiu-Xia; Wang, Zhao-E; Feng, Hui-Ru; Yu, Hong; Li, Jin-Song; Li, Jie

    2016-09-01

    Norovirus (NoV) is responsible for an estimated 90 % of all epidemic nonbacterial outbreaks of gastroenteritis worldwide. Waterborne outbreaks of NoV are commonly reported. A novel GII.17 NoV strain emerged as a major cause of gastroenteritis outbreaks in China during the winter of 2014/2015. During this time, an outbreak of gastroenteritis occurred at a hotel in a ski park in Hebei Province, China. Epidemiological investigations indicated that one water well, which had only recently been in use, was the probable source. GII.17 NoV was detected by real-time reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction from samples taken from cases, from concentrated water samples from water well, and from the nearby sewage settling tank. Nucleotide sequences of NoV extracted from clinical and water specimens were genetically identical and had 99 % homology with Beijing/CHN/2015. All epidemiological data indicated that GII.17 NoV was responsible for this outbreak. This is the first reported laboratory-confirmed waterborne outbreak caused by GII.17 NoV genotype in China. Strengthening management of well drinking water and systematica monitoring of NoV is essential for preventing future outbreaks.

  17. Biochemical characterization of a catalase from Vibrio vulnificus, a pathogen that causes gastroenteritis.

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    Pei, Jihua; Wang, Haijun; Wu, Limin; Xia, Shenglong; Xu, Changlong; Zheng, Bo; Li, Tianya; Jiang, Yi

    2017-01-01

    Vibrio vulnificus is a virulent human pathogen causing gastroenteritis and possibly life threatening septicemia in patients. Most V. vulnificus are catalase positive and can deactivate peroxides, thus allowing them to survive within the host. In the study presented here, a catalase from V. vulnificus (CAT-Vv) was purified to homogeneity after expression in Escherichia coli. The kinetics and function of CAT-Vv were examined. CAT-Vv catalyzed the reduction of H 2 O 2 at an optimal pH of 7.5 and temperature of 35°C. The V max and K m values were 65.8±1.2 U/mg and 10.5±0.7 mM for H 2 O 2 , respectively. Mutational analysis suggests that amino acids involved in heme binding play a key role in the catalysis. Quantitative reverse transcription-PCR revealed that in V. vulnificus, transcription of CAT-Vv was upregulated by low salinity, heat, and oxidative stresses. This research gives new clues to help inhibit the growth of, and infection by V. vulnificus.

  18. Infectious Gastroenteritis and the Need for Strict Contact Precaution Procedures in Adults Presenting in the Emergency Department

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skyum, Florence; Andersen, Vibeke; Chen, Ming

    2018-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Acute infectious gastroenteritis requires contact precautions to prevent spreading. On acute admission the cause of diarrhoea is unknown, so the decision of whom to isolate has to be made on clinical information with a risk of inexpedient use of contact precautions. AIM: The aims...... of the study were to investigate how often gastroenteritis occurs, and thus the isolation indication has to be assessed, in Danish emergency departments, and how often patients have to remain on contact precaution according to the results of the faecal samples. METHODS: This Danish register based retrospective......: Among 66,885 acute admissions 4.3% patients had at least one feature of gastroenteritis: admission with a chief complaint of diarrhoea (1.6%); faecal sample microbiology examination (2.8%); discharged with a gastroenteritis diagnosis (1.7%). 19% of those who had a faecal sample tested were norovirus...

  19. Nosocomial outbreak of neonatal gastroenteritis caused by a new serotype 4, subtype 4B human rotavirus.

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    Gerna, G; Forster, J; Parea, M; Sarasini, A; Di Matteo, A; Baldanti, F; Langosch, B; Schmidt, S; Battaglia, M

    1990-07-01

    A nosocomial outbreak of rotavirus gastroenteritis involving 52 newborns occurred between June and September 1988 at the University Children's Hospital of Freiburg, Federal Republic of Germany. Stools from 27 representative patients were examined for rotavirus serotypes, using a monoclonal antibody-based enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The electropherotype was also examined by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of genomic RNA. As many as 18 patients were found to be infected by serotype 4, subtype 4B strain, and in all of them the same electropherotype was detected. Although rotavirus from the remaining nine patients could not be typed, the electropherotype in four was identical to that of the serotype 4, subtype 4B strain. Thus, most of the patients in the outbreak were infected by the same rotavirus strain. Retrospective epidemiological studies showed that the 4B strain began to circulate at the hospital in January 1988, whereas only rotavirus serotypes 1, 3, and 4A were detected in 1985-1987. The primary case of the outbreak was presumably a newborn with acute gastroenteritis, admitted to the hospital from a small maternity unit in the same urban area. During the outbreak, 12 of 44 healthy newborns in the nurseries of the Children's Hospital and other maternity hospitals were found to be asymptomatic rotavirus carriers, and in three of the newborns the same 4B strain was detected. This is the first reported outbreak caused by a serotype 4, subtype 4B strain.

  20. Importance of rotavirus as a cause of gastroenteritis in Jordan: a hospital based study.

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    Khuri-Bulos, Najwa; Al Khatib, Mohammad

    2006-01-01

    Rotavirus is recognized to be a very important cause of GE in younger children in both developed as well as developing countries, but causes most of the mortality and morbidity in the latter. The recent introduction of a rotavirus vaccine in some parts of the world makes it necessary for us to determine the impact of this organism in our population with the aim of determining the need for the vaccine. In order to determine this, a study was conducted at the JUH and 3 other private hospitals. At the JUH, 64/256 (25%) of children with GE had rotavirus in 1995. The proportions of cases attributed to rotavirus in the other 3 y were 70/199 (35.2%), 69/279 (24.7%) and 76/294 (25.8%) for 2002, 2003 and 2004, respectively. The cumulative proportion of cases attributable to rotavirus gastroenteritis in all the y was 27.14%. With regard to the 3 private hospitals, rotavirus accounted for 38/225 (16.9%), 140/664 (21%) and 668/1496 (44.6%) at the Khalidy, Jordan and Islamic hospitals, respectively. It is concluded that rotavirus is a significant cause of GE in Jordanian children regardless of their social background, and attempt at controlling this infection may be warranted.

  1. Unusual presentations of eosinophilic gastroenteritis: Case series and review of literature

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Rafiq A Sheikh; Thomas P Prindiville; R Erick Pecha; Boris H Ruebner

    2009-01-01

    Eosinophilic gastroenteritis (EG) is an uncommon disease characterized by focal or diffuse eosinophilic infiltration of the gastrointestinal tract, and is usually associated with dyspepsia, diarrhea and peripheral eosinophilia. Diffuse gastrointestinal tract and colonic involvement are uncommon. The endoscopic appearance may vary from normal to mucosal nodularity and ulceration. Gastrointestinal obstruction is unusual and is associated with predominantly muscular disease. We present five unusual cases of EG associated with gastric outlet and duodenal obstruction. Two cases presented with acute pancreatitis and one had a history of pancreatitis. Four cases responded well to medical therapy and one had recurrent gastric outlet obstruction that required surgery. Four out of the five cases had endoscopic and histological evidence of esophagitis and two had colitis. Two patients had ascites. These cases reaffirm that EG is a disorder with protean manifestations and may involve the entire gastrointestinal tract. Gastric outlet and/or small bowel obstruction is an important though uncommon presentation of EG. It may also present as esophagitis, gastritis with polypoid lesions, ulcers or erosions, colitis and pancreatitis and may mimic malignancy.

  2. Waterborne gastroenteritis outbreak at a scouting camp caused by two norovirus genogroups: GI and GII.

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    ter Waarbeek, Henriëtte L G; Dukers-Muijrers, Nicole H T M; Vennema, Harry; Hoebe, Christian J P A

    2010-03-01

    A cross-border gastroenteritis outbreak at a scouting camp was associated with drinking water from a farmer's well. A retrospective cohort study was performed to identify size and source of the outbreak, as well as other characteristics. Epidemiological investigation included standardized questionnaires about sex, age, risk exposures, illness and family members. Stool and water (100mL) samples were analyzed for bacteria, viruses and parasites. Questionnaires were returned by 84 scouts (response rate 82%), mean age of 13 years. The primary attack rate was 85% (diarrhoea and/or vomiting). Drinking water was the strongest independent risk factor showing a dose-response effect with 50%, 75%, 75%, 93% and 96% case prevalence for 0, 1, 2-3, 4-5 and >5 glasses consumed, respectively. Norovirus (GI.2 Southampton and GII.7 Leeds) was detected in 51 stool specimens (75%) from ill scouts. Water analysis showed fecal contamination, but no norovirus. The secondary attack rate was 20%. This remarkable outbreak was caused by a point-source infection with two genogroups of noroviruses most likely transmitted by drinking water from a well. Finding a dose-response relationship was striking. Specific measures to reduce the risk of waterborne diseases, outbreak investigation and a good international public health network are important.

  3. [Outbreak of gastroenteritis caused by Campylobacter jejuni transmitted through drinking water].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godoy, Pere; Artigues, Antoni; Nuín, Carmen; Aramburu, Jesús; Pérez, Montse; Domínguez, Angela; Salleras, Lluís

    2002-11-23

    The aim of this study was to conduct a clinical-epidemiological and microbiological investigation into an outbreak of waterborne disease caused by Campylobacter jejuni due to the consumption of drinking water. A historical cohort study was carried out among 237 residents of Torres de Segre (Lleida, Spain) who were selected using a systematic sample. We conducted a telephone interview about water consumption, symptoms and the onset of disease. We investigated samples of drinking water and stools from 14 patients. The risk associated with each water source was assessed by applying relative risk (RR) analysis at 95% confidence (CI) intervals. The overall attack rate was 18.3% (43/237). The symptoms were: diarrhoea, 93.0% (18/43); abdominal pain, 80.9% (34/42); nausea; 56,1% (23/41); vomits, 42.9% (18/42), and fever, 11.9% (5/42). Only 5.8% of patients contact with his physician. The consumption of drinking water was statistically associated with the disease (RR = 3.0; 95% CI, 1.7-5.3), while the consumption of bottled water (RR = 0.6; 95% CI 0.3-1.0) and water from other villages (RR = 0.3; 95% CI, 0.1-1.1) were a protection factor. The day of outbreak notification we did not detect any residual chlorine in the drinking water: it was qualified as no potable and we isolated Campylobacter jejuni in 8 samples stools. This research highlights the potential importance of waterborne outbreaks of gastroenteritis due to Campylobacter jejuni transmitted through untreated drinking water and suggests to need systematic controls over drinking water and the proper register of their results.

  4. Clinical Presentation of Acute Gastroenteritis in Children With Functional Abdominal Pain Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saps, Miguel; Mintjens, Stijn; Pusatcioglu, Cenk K; Cohen, Daniel M; Sternberg, Petra

    2017-08-01

    Visceral hypersensitivity and abnormal coping are common in children with functional abdominal pain disorders (FAPDs). Thus, it would be expected that children with visceral hypersensitivity would report more pain if their gut is acutely inflamed. The aim of the study was to compare clinical symptoms and somatization of children with and without FAPDs at time of an episode of acute gastroenteritis. Seventy children with acute gastroenteritis and their parents completed the Rome III Diagnostic Questionnaire for Pediatric Functional GI Disorders and the Children's Somatization Inventory. Twenty-one percent of children were diagnosed with an FAPD. Children with FAPDs showed significantly more nongastrointestinal somatic symptoms than children without FAPDs. There were no significant differences in abdominal pain, nausea, vomiting, or school absenteeism between both groups at time of consultation.

  5. [Nosocomial rotavirus gastroenteritis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marinosci, A; Doit, C; Koehl, B; Belhacel, K; Mariani Kurkdjian, P; Melki, I; Renaud, A; Lemaitre, C; Ammar Khodja, N; Blachier, A; Bonacorsi, S; Faye, A; Lorrot, M

    2016-11-01

    Rotavirus is the most common cause of gastroenteritis in children requiring hospitalization. It is a very resistant and contagious virus causing nosocomial gastroenteritis. In France, the vaccine against rotavirus has been available since 2006, but the vaccine is not recommended for infant vaccination. The aim of this retrospective study was to describe nosocomial rotavirus gastroenteritis (NRGE) and to assess its impact on children hospitalized in the General Pediatrics Department of Robert-Debré Hospital (Paris) between 1 January 2009 and 31 December 2013. We analyzed the demographic characteristics of children (age, term birth, underlying diseases) and the severity of the NRGE (oral or intravenous hydration), and assessed whether these children could benefit from vaccination against rotavirus. One hundred thirty-six children presented nosocomial rotavirus infection, with an incidence of 2.5 NRGE per 1000 days of hospitalization. The incidence of NRGE was stable between 2009 and 2013 despite the introduction of specific hygiene measures. The average age of the children was 7 months (range: 0.5-111 months). Most often NRGE occurred in children hospitalized for respiratory diseases (65% of cases) and requiring prolonged hospitalization (median: 18 days). One-third of children were born premature (25%). Hydration was oral in 80 patients (59%), by intravenous infusion in 18 patients (13%), and intraosseous in one patient. Half of the patients were aged less than 5 months and could benefit from the protection afforded by vaccination. NRGE are common. Rotavirus mass vaccination should have a positive impact on the incidence of NRGE by reducing the number of children hospitalized for gastroenteritis, therefore indirectly reducing the number of hospital cross-infections of hospitalized children who are too young to be vaccinated. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  6. High Rates of All-cause and Gastroenteritis-related Hospitalization Morbidity and Mortality among HIV-exposed Indian Infants

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    Tripathy Srikanth

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background HIV-infected and HIV-exposed, uninfected infants experience a high burden of infectious morbidity and mortality. Hospitalization is an important metric for morbidity and is associated with high mortality, yet, little is known about rates and causes of hospitalization among these infants in the first 12 months of life. Methods Using data from a prevention of mother-to-child transmission (PMTCT trial (India SWEN, where HIV-exposed breastfed infants were given extended nevirapine, we measured 12-month infant all-cause and cause-specific hospitalization rates and hospitalization risk factors. Results Among 737 HIV-exposed Indian infants, 93 (13% were HIV-infected, 15 (16% were on HAART, and 260 (35% were hospitalized 381 times by 12 months of life. Fifty-six percent of the hospitalizations were attributed to infections; gastroenteritis was most common accounting for 31% of infectious hospitalizations. Gastrointestinal-related hospitalizations steadily increased over time, peaking around 9 months. The 12-month all-cause hospitalization, gastroenteritis-related hospitalization, and in-hospital mortality rates were 906/1000 PY, 229/1000 PY, and 35/1000 PY respectively among HIV-infected infants and 497/1000 PY, 107/1000 PY, and 3/1000 PY respectively among HIV-exposed, uninfected infants. Advanced maternal age, infant HIV infection, gestational age, and male sex were associated with higher all-cause hospitalization risk while shorter duration of breastfeeding and abrupt weaning were associated with gastroenteritis-related hospitalization. Conclusions HIV-exposed Indian infants experience high rates of all-cause and infectious hospitalization (particularly gastroenteritis and in-hospital mortality. HIV-infected infants are nearly 2-fold more likely to experience hospitalization and 10-fold more likely to die compared to HIV-exposed, uninfected infants. The combination of scaling up HIV PMTCT programs and implementing proven health

  7. Outbreak of acute gastroenteritis of unknown etiology caused by contaminated drinking water in a rural village in Austria, August 2006.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meusburger, Stefan; Reichart, Sandra; Kapfer, Sabine; Schableger, Karl; Fretz, Rainer; Allerberger, Franz

    2007-01-01

    In August 2006 a physician from a rural village reported an outbreak of acute gastroenteritis. An investigation was undertaken in order to determine the magnitude of the outbreak, the source of infection and to prevent further disease. This is the first published outbreak of acute gastroenteritis caused by contaminated drinking water in Austria. For descriptive epidemiology, the investigators had to rely on voluntary cooperation from physicians and patients, data collected by a police officer and data on sick leave reported by physicians to the health insurance system. Microbiological testing of water samples indicated that this cluster was caused by fecal contamination of untreated drinking water. Age and sex distributions were available for 146 of 160 cases: ages ranged from 5 to 91 years (median 45) and 81 cases (55.5%) were female. Stool samples from 14 patients were sent for microbiological analysis: all tested negative for Salmonella, Campylobacter, Shigella and Yersinia enterocolitica. Specimens were not tested for viruses, parasites or enteropathogenic Escherichia coli. In this outbreak no identification was made of pathogenic microorganisms in stool samples from affected patients, despite the occurrence of fecal indicator organisms in samples of drinking water. In outbreaks of gastroenteritis, medical practitioners should encourage microbiological testing beyond the limited routine program. Public health officers must be made aware that the spectrum of routine laboratory tests on stool specimens does not cover the wide array of pathogens capable of causing waterborne outbreaks. The springs serving the affected village originate in a mountainous area of karst formations, and heavy falls of rain that occurred at the beginning of the outbreak may explain introduction of fecal bacteria. In view of the unsolved problem of possible future contamination of springs in karst areas, the water department of this district authority has issued an order requesting

  8. Severe Rotavirus gastroenteritis in a patient with infant leukemia

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    Hatice Uygun

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Rotavirus is the most common cause of severe gastroenteritis in infants and young children. Reports about the clinical relevance of rotavirus in immunocompromised children are rare. We herein presented a case of life-threatening Rotavirus gastroenteritis in an infant with acute myeloblastic leukemia which could be prevented by recently recommended Rotavirus vaccination.

  9. [An outbreak of gastroenteritis caused by poisonous Boletus mushroom in Sichuan, China, 2012].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Ya-jun; Yuan, Wei; Liu, Lun-guang; Zhang, Li-jie; Shi, Guo-qing; Wang, Qi-xing

    2012-12-01

    To identify the source of infection and risk factors and to provide control measures regarding an outbreak of gastroenteritis involving 30 villagers. Who attended the same wedding party held on March 5(th), 2012, a survey was carried out. Case was defined as having onset of vomiting, nausea, stomachache or diarrhea among the attendees of a wedding party. We randomly selected and interviewed 140 from 470 attendees on their symptoms and food exposures at the wedding. We compared food-specific attack rates (AR) for gastroenteritis in a retrospective cohort study. The leftover foods were tested for Salmonella, Shigella, and Staphylococcus aureus. The leftover Boletus mushrooms were examined and species determined by the Kunming Institute of Botany, Chinese Academy of Sciences. Of the 140 attendees 61% (85) developed gastroenteritis. Case-attendees had vomiting (94%), nausea (89%), stomachache (53%), and diarrhea (51%). The AR among attendees who ate Boletus mushroom was 69% (81/118), compared to 18% (4/22) of those who did not (RR = 3.8, 95%CI: 1.5 - 9.2). When comparing the ARs between the attendees on consumption of other foods, data did not show statistically significant differences. Among the 7 species of Boletus identified from the leftover mushrooms, 3 (B. venenatus, B. sinicus and B. magnificus) were toxic. Store keepers bought dried or fresh mushrooms from local villagers who had picked up them from the mountains. Salmonella, Shigella, and Staphylococcus aureus tests on those leftover food showed negative results. Poisonous Boletus mushroom contributed to this outbreak. We recommended that education should be targeted on mushroom-pickers regarding how to recognize the poisonous mushrooms. Regulations and laws should also be developed to facilitate the necessary process.

  10. An Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm, Intramural Thrombus and Moderate Leak in an Asian Man Presenting with Acute Gastroenteritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdalla Khalil

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Missing a leaking abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA is common in medical practice because few at-risk patients have a history of AAA and many have an unusual presentation. Background: AAA is less common among Asians than white Caucasians of the same age. Our patient had no significant risk factors apart from age and sex and had an unusual presentation. Patient and Methods: A 67-year-old Asian man presented to the emergency room (ER with a 1-day history of nausea, vomiting, diarrhoea, fever and abdominal pain. He was febrile, dehydrated. and had marked tenderness at the right iliac fossa. Laboratory findings suggested bacterial gastroenteritis but this did not explain the localized tenderness at the right iliac fossa. Result and Discussion: A CT scan of the abdomen revealed an AAA arising above the origins of the renal arteries, an intramural thrombus, a retroperitoneal haematoma and a leak extending to the right iliac fossa. The patient was transferred to another hospital and underwent exploratory laparotomy, surgical repair of the aneurysm, and aortobi-iliac grafting with removal of the thrombus. The patient was discharged in good shape 3 weeks after surgery. Without the CT scan of the abdomen, the AAA could have been missed and the patient treated for severe gastroenteritis.

  11. [Gastroenteritis outbreak associated with water consumption, possibly caused by Norwalk or Norwalk-like virus].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chover Lara, J L; Pastor Vicente, S; Roig Sena, J; Roselló Pérez, M; Salvo Samanes, C; Castellanos Martínez, I

    1995-01-01

    It is described an acute gastroenteritis outbreak of probable hydric transmission in Ontinyent (Valencia). It was declared on the 31st of January, 1992 and affected 3541 people according to the declaration done by the sanitary services who attended the patients. The clinical situation was characterized by the presence of profuse and watery diarrhoea, nausea, vomiting, abdominal pain and fever or febricula. A preliminary study of the cases has been done, the information being treated with the classical method of descriptive epidemiology and a later study of the transversal observation type by means of a telephone inquiry. The results show that this outbreak affected approximately to a 30% of the population, and show the relation between consumption of water from the municipal water system and the outbreak, as well as the existence of a control population not affected for receiving a different water supply. Once rejected the bacterial origin for the results of the copro-cultivation done the analysis of the clinical and epidemiological characteristics of the outbreak, show a total agreement with the criteria described by Kaplan to characterize acute gastroenteritis outbreaks because of Norwalk-like virus.

  12. Outbreak of febrile gastroenteritis caused by Listeria monocytogenes 1/2a in sliced cold beef ham, Italy, May 2016

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maurella, Cristiana; Gallina, Silvia; Ru, Giuseppe; Adriano, Daniela; Bellio, Alberto; Bianchi, Daniela Manila; Chiavacci, Laura; Crescio, Maria Ines; Croce, Margherita; D'Errico, Valeria; Dupont, Maria Franca; Marra, Alessandro; Natangelo, Ubaldo; Pomilio, Francesco; Romano, Angelo; Stanzione, Stefano; Zaccaria, Teresa; Zuccon, Fabio; Caramelli, Maria; Decastelli, Lucia

    2018-01-01

    In May 2016, two separate clusters of febrile gastroenteritis caused by Listeria monocytogenes were detected by the local health authority in Piedmont, in northern Italy. We carried out epidemiological, microbiological and traceback investigations to identify the source. The people affected were students and staff members from two different schools in two different villages located in the Province of Turin; five of them were hospitalised. The epidemiological investigation identified a cooked beef ham served at the school canteens as the source of the food-borne outbreak. L. monocytogenes was isolated from the food, the stools of the hospitalised pupils and the environment of the factory producing the cooked beef ham. All isolates except one were serotype 1/2a, shared an indistinguishable PFGE pattern and were 100% identical by whole genome sequencing (WGS). By combining a classical epidemiological approach with both molecular subtyping and WGS techniques, we were able to identify and confirm a Listeria gastroenteritis outbreak associated with consumption of sliced cold beef ham. PMID:29536831

  13. An outbreak of gastroenteritis caused by Salmonella enterica serotype Enteritidis traced to cream cakes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kee Tai Goh

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: This paper describes the epidemiological, microbiological and environmental investigations conducted during an outbreak of Salmonella gastroenteritis in Singapore.Methods: A case-control study was undertaken to identify the vehicle of transmission. Microbiological testing was performed on faecal, food and environmental samples. Isolates of Salmonella were further characterized by phage typing and ribotyping.Results: There were 216 gastroenteritis cases reported from 20 November to 4 December 2007. The causative agent was identified as Salmonella enterica subspecies enterica serotype Enteritidis for 14 out of 20 cases tested. The vehicle of transmission was traced to cream cakes produced by a bakery and sold at its retail outlets (P < 0.001, OR = 143.00, 95% Cl = 27.23–759.10. More than two-thirds of the 40 Salmonella strains isolated from hospitalized cases, food samples and asymptomatic food handlers were of phage type 1; the others reacted but did not conform to any phage type. The phage types correlated well with their unique antibiograms. The ribotype patterns of 22 selected isolates tested were highly similar, indicating genetic relatedness. The dendrogram of the strains from the outbreak showed distinct clustering and correlation compared to the non-outbreak strains, confirming a common source of infection.Discussion: The cream cakes were likely contaminated by one of the ingredients used in the icing. Cross-contamination down the production line and subsequent storage of cakes at ambient temperatures for a prolonged period before consumption could have resulted in the outbreak.

  14. Socio-demographic, Clinical and Laboratory Features of Rotavirus Gastroenteritis in Children Treated in Pediatric Clinic

    OpenAIRE

    Azemi, Mehmedali; Berisha, Majlinda; Ismaili-Jaha, Vlora; Kolgeci, Selim; Avdiu, Muharrem; Jakupi, Xhevat; Hoxha, Rina; Hoxha-Kamberi, Teuta

    2013-01-01

    Aim: The aim of work was presentation of several socio-demographic, clinical and laboratory characteristics of gastroenteritis caused by rotavirus. The examinees and methods: The examinees were children under the age of five years treated at the Pediatric Clinic due to acute gastroenteritis caused by rotavirus. Rotavirus is isolated by method chromatographic immunoassay by Cer Test Biotec. Results: From the total number of patients (850) suffering from acute gastroenteritis, feces test on bac...

  15. Species C Rotaviruses in Children with Diarrhea in India, 2010-2013: A Potentially Neglected Cause of Acute Gastroenteritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhat, Sudipta; Kattoor, Jobin Jose; Malik, Yashpal Singh; Sircar, Shubhankar; Deol, Pallavi; Rawat, Vinita; Rakholia, Ritu; Ghosh, Souvik; Vlasova, Anastasia N; Nadia, Touil; Dhama, Kuldeep; Kobayashi, Nobumichi

    2018-02-17

    All over the world, children and adults are severely affected by acute gastroenteritis, caused by one of the emerging enteric pathogens, rotavirus C (RVC). At present, no extensive surveillance program is running for RVC in India, and its prevalence is largely unknown except cases of local outbreaks. Here, we intended to detect the presence of RVC in diarrheic children visiting or admitted to hospitals in Haldwani (state of Uttarakhand, India), a city located in the foothills of the Himalayas. During 2010-2013, we screened 119 samples for RVC by an RVC VP6 gene-specific RT-PCR. Of these, 38 (31.93%) were found positive, which is higher than the incidence rates reported so far from India. The phylogenetic analysis of the derived nucleotide sequences from one of the human RVC (HuRVC) isolates, designated as HuRVC/H28/2013/India, showed that the study isolate belongs to genotype I2, P2 and E2 for RVC structural genes 6 and 4 (VP6, and VP4) and non-structural gene 4 (NSP4), respectively. Furthermore, the VP6 gene of HuRVC/H28/2013/India shows the highest similarity to a recently-reported human-like porcine RVC (PoRVC/ASM140/2013/India, KT932963) from India suggesting zoonotic transmission. We also report a full-length NSP4 gene sequence of human RVC from India. Under the One-health platforms there is a need to launch combined human and animal RVC surveillance programs for a better understanding of the epidemiology of RVC infections and for implementing control strategies. Reoviridae , possess 11 double-stranded segments of RNA that encode six structural viral proteins (VP1, VP2, VP3, VP4, VP6, VP7) and five/six non-structural proteins (NSP1-NSP5/6) [7]. Based on the antigenic properties of the major inner capsid protein (VP6), RVs are subdivided into eight well-characterized species (A-H) and two putative species viz. I and J [8-10]. Humans and other mammalian species are affected by species A, B, C and H rotaviruses and birds by species D, F and G, and species E has

  16. The coronavirus transmissible gastroenteritis virus causes infection after receptor-mediated endocytosis and acid-dependent fusion with an intracellular compartment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Gert Helge; Delmas, B; Besnardeau, L

    1998-01-01

    Aminopeptidase N is a species-specific receptor for transmissible gastroenteritis virus (TGEV), which infects piglets, and for the 229E virus, which infects humans. It is not known whether these coronaviruses are endocytosed before fusion with a membrane of the target cell, causing a productive...

  17. The incidence of gastroenteritis diagnosis among sick dogs presented to the Onderstepoort Veterinary Academic Hospital correlated with meteorological data : research communication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.S. Shakespeare

    1999-07-01

    Full Text Available The number of sick dogs diagnosed with and without gastroenteritis presented to the Onderstepoort Veterinary Academic Hospital situated north of Pretoria is reported from counts extracted from the records of the Outpatients clinic for 6 years, 1988 to 1993. The average percentage of sick dogs diagnosed with gastroenteritis was 11.51 % and the average percentage of sick dogs that were admitted to the parvovirus isolation hospital ward was 2.8 %. A strong correlation exists between the number of dogs admitted to the parvovirus ward and average monthly wind speed and inverse humidity values.

  18. Bacterial gastroenteritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Nelson Textbook of Pediatrics . 20th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier; 2016:chap 340. Craig SA. Gastroenteritis. In: Marx ... Concepts and Clinical Practice . 8th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2014:chap 94. Mody RK, Griffin PM. ...

  19. Lack of nonspecific protection against all-cause nonrotavirus gastroenteritis by vaccination with orally administered rotavirus vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grant, Lindsay; Watt, James; Moulton, Lawrence; Weatherholtz, Robert; Reid, Raymond; Santosham, Mathuram; O'Brien, Katherine

    2013-06-01

    Acute gastroenteritis (AGE) is recognized as a global, common threat to child survival, especially in developing countries. Rotavirus, in particular, has been implicated as a leading cause of severe AGE; however, there are numerous other pathogens that also cause AGE. Several studies have demonstrated that oral vaccination against rotavirus has generated the unanticipated benefit of protecting against AGE caused by nonrotavirus pathogens. Safety and efficacy of the pentavalent bovine-human reassortant rotavirus vaccine were studied in multiple populations, including children of the Navajo and White Mountain Apache tribes in the southwestern United States. Stool specimens were collected from children with AGE and tested for rotavirus using an enzyme immunoassay. Analyses were conducted to detect the presence or absence of a vaccine effect on incidence, severity, and duration of AGE in which rotavirus was not detected. The majority of AGE (N = 558: 472 nonrotavirus vs 86 rotavirus) occurred between August 2002 and March 2004 among children ranging from ages 4 to 23 months. The incidence of nonrotavirus AGE was similar by vaccine groups with an incidence rate ratio of 1.07 (incidence rate ratio = vaccinated/unvaccinated, 95% confidence interval 0.89-1.29). The hazards of first, second, third, or any AGE in which rotavirus was not detected differed little by vaccination status (P > 0.05). Duration of symptoms and severity of nonrotavirus AGE were similar by vaccine group. There was no vaccine effect on frequency or severity of nonrotavirus AGE.

  20. Impact of rotavirus vaccination on rotavirus and all-cause gastroenteritis in peri-urban Kenyan children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wandera, Ernest Apondi; Mohammad, Shah; Bundi, Martin; Komoto, Satoshi; Nyangao, James; Kathiiko, Cyrus; Odoyo, Erick; Miring'u, Gabriel; Taniguchi, Koki; Ichinose, Yoshio

    2017-09-12

    A monovalent rotavirus vaccine (RV1) was introduced into the National Immunization Program in Kenya in July 2014. We examined the impact of the vaccine on hospitalization for all-cause acute gastroenteritis (AGE) and rotavirus-specific AGE and strain distribution at a large referral hospital which serves a predominantly peri-urban population in Central Kenya. Data on rotavirus AGE and strain distribution were derived from ongoing hospital-based AGE surveillance. Hospital administrative data were used to compare trends in all-cause AGE. Pre-vaccine (July 2009-June 2014) and post-vaccine (July 2014-June 2016) periods were compared for changes in hospitalization for all-cause AGE and rotavirus AGE and strain distribution. Following the vaccine introduction, the proportion of children aged rotavirus declined by 30% (95% CI: 19-45%) in the first year and 64% (95% CI: 49-77%) in the second year. Reductions in rotavirus positivity were most pronounced among the vaccine-eligible group (rotavirus and all-cause AGE were reduced substantially. There was an increased detection of G2P[4], G3P[6] and G3P[8], which coincided temporally with the timing of the vaccine introduction. Thus, introducing the rotavirus vaccine into the routine immunization program in Kenya has resulted in a notable decline in rotavirus and all-cause AGE hospitalizations in Central Kenya. This provides early evidence for public health policy makers in Kenya to support the sustained use of the rotavirus vaccine in routine immunizations. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Esophageal involvement in eosinophilic gastroenteritis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matzinger, M A; Daneman, A

    1983-02-01

    The radiologic appearance of esophageal involvement due to eosinophilic gastroenteritis in a 15-year-old boy is presented. The lower two thirds of the esophagus was narrowed and the peristalsis diminished. The mucosa appeared smooth. This is the fourth reported case of esophageal involvement in eosinophilic gastroenteritis.

  2. A comparison between PCR and Immunochromatography assay (ICA in diagnosis of hemorrhagic gastroenteritis caused by Canine parvovirus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vakili , N.

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Canine parvovirus type 2 (CPV-2 is one of the most common viruses responsible for acute hemorrhagic enteritis in dogs. A rapid and accurate diagnosis of CPV-2 infection is especially important in kennels in order to isolate infected dogs. The aim of the present study was to compare two laboratory tests i.e., Polymerase Change Reaction (PCR and Immunochromatography assay (ICA most commonly used for the diagnosis of canine parvovirus infection in companion dogs. Fecal samples were collected from fifty five dogs (50=hemorrhagic diarrheic and 5= healthy between 2011 and 2012 in Ahvaz district, southwest of Iran. The studied dogs were divided into two age groups (6 months, four different breeds (Terriers, German shepherds, Doberman pinschers and Mixed and based on environment into two groups (open and close also. All samples were tested by ICA and PCR methods and the results were analyzed by using Kappa test, Mc Nemar and Chi-square analysis. ICA and PCR were able to detect CPV-2 antigen or nucleic acid in 33 and 50 of the hemorrhagic diarrheic samples, respectively. Samples of healthy dogs were negative by both tests. Although sensitivity of ICA compared with PCR method was determined to be 66% (PCR more sensitive than ICA, nevertheless statistical analysis showed that the difference between two techniques were not significant (P>0.05. Kappa test was obtained 0.38 between two techniques. CBC showed that most infected dogs had leucopenia, lymphopenia and neutropenia also (82%; 41 out of 50 samples.Obtained results of this survey showed that accurate standardization of laboratory tests is required to provide veterinarian with an effective tool for a precise etiological diagnosis of hemorrhagic gastroenteritis due to CPV infection. Although Immunochromatography is a simple and quick method for screening of fecal samples of dogs suspected of CPV infection, but PCR is more sensitive and reliable than ICA. Moreover, the subtypes of the virus determined by

  3. Brachyspira Species and Gastroenteritis in Humans

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Westerman, L.J.; Boer, de R.F.; Roelfsema, J.H.; Friesema, I.H.M.; Kortbeek, L.M.; Wagenaar, J.A.; Bonten, M.J.M.; Kusters, J.G.

    2013-01-01

    Brachyspira species have been implicated as a potential cause of gastroenteritis in humans; this is, however, controversial. In 733 gastroenteritis cases and 464 controls, we found 29 samples positive for Brachyspira species (2.3% of cases and 2.6% of controls; P = 0.77). Brachyspira species were

  4. Brachyspira Species and Gastroenteritis in Humans

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Westerman, L J; de Boer, R F; Roelfsema, J H; Friesema, I H M; Kortbeek, L M; Wagenaar, J A; Bonten, M J M; Kusters, J G

    Brachyspira species have been implicated as a potential cause of gastroenteritis in humans; this is, however, controversial. In 733 gastroenteritis cases and 464 controls, we found 29 samples positive for Brachyspira species (2.3% of cases and 2.6% of controls; P = 0.77). Brachyspira species were

  5. Human Noroviruses and Sporadic Gastroenteritis

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    In this podcast, Dan Rutz speaks with Dr. Manish Patel, a medical officer with the Division of Viral Diseases at CDC, about an article in August 2008 issue of Emerging Infectious Diseases reporting on nororviruses. Dr. Patel reviewed 235 studies and identified 31 original studies about noroviruses. Norovirus is the leading cause of epidemic gastroenteritis.

  6. Human rotavirus group a serotypes causing gastroenteritis in children less than 5 years and HIV-infected adults in Viwandani slum, Nairobi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raini, S K; Nyangao, J; Kombich, J; Sang, C; Gikonyo, J; Ongus, J R; Odari, E O

    2015-01-01

    Rotavirus remains a leading cause of acute gastroenteritis in children worldwide with an estimated 2000 deaths each day in developing countries. Due to HIV/AIDS scourge in Kenya, it is possible that rotavirus-related gastroenteritis has been aggravated in adults. The Global Alliance for Immunizations has ranked rotavirus infection a priority for vaccine, and, to ensure its success, there is a need to document the local strain(s) circulating in different regions. A cross-sectional study was conducted to document human rotavirus group A serotypes in children below 5 years and HIV-infected adults in Viwandani slum in Nairobi, Kenya. A total of 260 (128 from children and 132 from HIV infected adults) fecal specimen samples were analyzed from August 2012 to July 2013. Screening for rotavirus was done by antigen based enzyme immune-sorbent assay (ELISA), Polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (PAGE) was used to detect rotavirus electropherotypes and finally genotyping was done by RT-PCR using genotype-specific primer sets targeting VP4 and VP7 genes. Rotavirus was detected in 23% and 8% of children and adult, respectively. Prevalence was high in children of 48 years. Long electropherotypes accounted for 80% and 60% while short electropherotypes accounted for 20% and 40% in children and adult, respectively. The common globally distributed strains, G1 and G3, accounted for 60% detections while the unusual G9 strain accounted for 80% infection in adults. G1P[8] was the common genotypic combination in children, accounting for 40% infection, whereas G9 [P8] accounted for 60% of the infections in adults. This study shows the existence of strain diversity between rotavirus circulating in children and adults within this study group. It further shows that as currently constituted, the 2 vaccines recommended for rotavirus would cover the circulating strain in Viwandani slum. Finally, there is a need for continuous rotavirus strain surveillance in children and a further focus on HIV

  7. Human Noroviruses and Sporadic Gastroenteritis

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2008-08-05

    In this podcast, Dan Rutz speaks with Dr. Manish Patel, a medical officer with the Division of Viral Diseases at CDC, about an article in August 2008 issue of Emerging Infectious Diseases reporting on nororviruses. Dr. Patel reviewed 235 studies and identified 31 original studies about noroviruses. Norovirus is the leading cause of epidemic gastroenteritis.  Created: 8/5/2008 by Emerging Infectious Diseases.   Date Released: 7/30/2008.

  8. Randomised controlled trial of Lactobacillus rhamnosus (LGG) versus placebo in children presenting to the emergency department with acute gastroenteritis: the PECARN probiotic study protocol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnadower, David; Tarr, Phillip I; Charles, Casper T; Gorelick, Marc H; Dean, Michael J; O’Connell, Karen J; Mahajan, Prashant; Chun, Thomas H; Bhatt, Seema R; Roskind, Cindy G; Powell, Elizabeth C; Rogers, Alexander J; Vance, Cheryl; Sapien, Robert E; Gao, Feng; Freedman, Stephen B

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Acute gastroenteritis (AGE) is a common and burdensome condition that affects millions of children worldwide each year. Currently available strategies are limited to symptomatic management, treatment and prevention of dehydration and infection control; no disease-modifying interventions exist. Probiotics, defined as live microorganisms beneficial to the host, have shown promise in improving AGE outcomes, but existing studies have sufficient limitations such that the use of probiotics cannot currently be recommended with confidence. Here we present the methods of a large, rigorous, randomised, double-blind placebo-controlled study to assess the effectiveness and side effect profile of Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG (LGG) (ATCC 53103) in children with AGE. Methods and analysis The study is being conducted in 10 US paediatric emergency departments (EDs) within the federally funded Pediatric Emergency Care Applied Research Network, in accordance with current SPIRIT and CONSORT statement recommendations. We will randomise 970 children presenting to participating EDs with AGE to either 5 days of treatment with LGG (1010colony-forming unit twice a day) or placebo between July 2014 to December 2017. The main outcome is the occurrence of moderate-to-severe disease over time, as defined by the Modified Vesikari Scale. We also record adverse events and side effects related to the intervention. We will conduct intention-to-treat analyses and use an enrichment design to restore the statistical power in case the presence of a subpopulation with a substantially low treatment effect is identified. Ethics and dissemination Institutional review board approval has been obtained at all sites, and data and material use agreements have been established between the participating sites. The results of the trial will be published in peer-reviewed journals. A deidentified public data set will be made available after the completion of all study procedures. Trial registration number

  9. Incidence of Norovirus and Other Viral Pathogens That Cause Acute Gastroenteritis (AGE among Kaiser Permanente Member Populations in the United States, 2012-2013.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scott P Grytdal

    Full Text Available Noroviruses and other viral pathogens are increasingly recognized as frequent causes of acute gastroenteritis (AGE. However, few laboratory-based data are available on the incidence of AGE caused by viral pathogens in the U.S. This study examined stool specimens submitted for routine clinical diagnostics from patients enrolled in Kaiser Permanente (KP health plans in metro Portland, OR, and the Maryland, District of Columbia, and northern Virginia geographic areas to estimate the incidence of viral enteropathogens in these populations. Over a one-year study period, participating laboratories randomly selected stools submitted for routine clinical diagnostics for inclusion in the study along with accompanying demographic and clinical data. Selected stools were tested for norovirus, rotavirus, sapovirus, and astrovirus using standardized real-time RT-PCR protocols. Each KP site provided administrative data which were used in conjunction with previously published data on healthcare utilization to extrapolate pathogen detection rates into population-based incidence rates. A total of 1,099 specimens collected during August 2012 to September 2013 were included. Mean age of patients providing stool specimens was 46 years (range: 0-98 years. Noroviruses were the most common viral pathogen identified among patients with AGE (n = 63 specimens, 6% of specimens tested. In addition, 22 (2% of specimens were positive for rotavirus; 19 (2% were positive for sapovirus; and 7 (1% were positive for astrovirus. Incidence of norovirus-associated outpatient visits was 5.6 per 1,000 person-years; incidence of norovirus disease in the community was estimated to be 69.5 per 1,000 person-years. Norovirus incidence was highest among children 65 years (outpatient incidence = 7.8 per 1,000 person-years; community incidence = 75.8 per 1,000 person-years. Outpatient incidence rates of rotavirus, sapovirus, and astrovirus were 2.0, 1.6, 0.6 per 1,000 person

  10. Salmonella Typhimurium gastroenteritis leading to chronic prosthetic vascular graft infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cullinan, Milo; Clarke, Michael; Dallman, Tim; Peart, Steven; Wilson, Deborah; Weiand, Daniel

    2017-08-01

    Introduction. It is estimated up to 6 % of prosthetic vascular grafts become infected. Staphylococcus aureus is predominant in early infection and coagulase-negative staphylococci are predominant in late infections. Enterobacteriaceae cause 14-40 % of prosthetic vascular graft infections. This is, to our knowledge the first reported case of Salmonella gastroenteritis causing chronic prosthetic vascular graft infection (PVGI). Case presentation. A 57 years old lady presented with signs and symptoms of prosthetic vascular graft infection. Three years earlier, she had undergone a prosthetic axillo-femoral bypass graft for critical limb ischaemia. The infected prosthetic vascular graft was removed and Salmonella Typhimurium was isolated on culture. In the intervening period, Salmonella Typhimurium was isolated from a faecal specimen, collected during an episode of acute gastroenteritis. Whole-genome sequencing (WGS) showed that the respective Salmonella Typhimurium isolates differed by only a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP). Salmonella Typhimurium was not isolated on culture of a faecal specimen collected five days following cessation of antimicrobial therapy. Six months after removal of the prosthetic graft, the patient remains under follow-up for her peripheral vascular disease, which currently requires no further surgical intervention. Conclusion. This case has clear implications for the management of chronic PVGI. It is vital to collect high-quality surgical specimens for microbiological analysis and empirical choices of antibiotics are unlikely to cover all potential pathogens. It may also be prudent to enquire about a history of acute gastroenteritis when assessing patients presenting with chronic PVGI.

  11. Diffuse eosinophilic gastroenteritis with antral obstruction: a case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moon, Sung Hee; Kim, Young Bok; Lee, Koung Hee

    2000-01-01

    Eosinophilic gastroenteritis is a rare disease characterized by tissue eosinophilia that can involve different layers of the gut wall and cause various gastrointestinal symptoms. We describe the UGI and CT findings of a case of diffuse eosinophilic gastroenteritis with tumor-like antral obstruction due to thickening of the submucosa and muscle layer in a 21-year-old male. (author)

  12. Diffuse eosinophilic gastroenteritis with antral obstruction: a case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moon, Sung Hee; Kim, Young Bok; Lee, Koung Hee [National Police Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2000-02-01

    Eosinophilic gastroenteritis is a rare disease characterized by tissue eosinophilia that can involve different layers of the gut wall and cause various gastrointestinal symptoms. We describe the UGI and CT findings of a case of diffuse eosinophilic gastroenteritis with tumor-like antral obstruction due to thickening of the submucosa and muscle layer in a 21-year-old male. (author)

  13. Effect of ionizing and non ionizing radiation on Protozoan and Parasites Ova causing gastroenteritis presents in sewage sludge wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shamma, M.; Al-Adawi, M.A.; Sharabi, N.

    2005-06-01

    The efficacy of Adra wastewater treatment plant for removing of parasitic eggs and other pathogens was various as the results of this work showed many eggs detected on and numeration referenced methods were applied for liquid and dried sledges. Helminths eggs viability was determined by aid of methods and techniques which depend on the morphological parameters, studying the motility incubation and applying the vital staining. The protozoa viability was studied by using vital staining, but applying culture techniques on specific composed media did not give any results. The disinfection results for ascaris eggs, protozoa and amoeba oocysts irradiated by 6 KGy of gamma (Co 6 0) which was sufficient to kill all types of such parasites. In conflict the UV radiation was able to motivate the division of the ascaris eggs embryo nations. Also, the viability of the Giardia and Entamoeba oocysts not affected. Therefor the UV technique couldn't be the alternative technology of ionizing radiation. (author)

  14. Effect of ionizing and non ionizing radiation on Protozoan and Parasites Ova causing gastroenteritis presents in sewage sludge wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shamma, M.; Al-Adawi, M.A.; Sharabi, N.

    2006-01-01

    Helminths eggs viability was determined by aid of methods and techniques which depend on the morphological parameters, studying the motility incubation and applying the vital staining. The protozoa viability was studied by using many vital staining, but applying culture techniques on specific composed media did not give any results. The disinfection results showed that for ascaris eggs, protozoa and amoeba oocysts irradiated by 6 KGy of gamma (Co 6 0) which was sufficient to kill all types of such parasites. On the contrary, conflict the UV radiation was able to motivate the ascaris eggs embryonations. Also, the viability of the Giardia and Entamoeba oocysts were not affected. In the light of the current experiments, it is possible to conclude that using the UV technique instead of the ionizing radiation for killing the helminths eggs and protozoa is not usable. (Authors)

  15. Incidence of Norovirus and Other Viral Pathogens That Cause Acute Gastroenteritis (AGE) among Kaiser Permanente Member Populations in the United States, 2012-2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grytdal, Scott P; DeBess, Emilio; Lee, Lore E; Blythe, David; Ryan, Patricia; Biggs, Christianne; Cameron, Miriam; Schmidt, Mark; Parashar, Umesh D; Hall, Aron J

    2016-01-01

    Noroviruses and other viral pathogens are increasingly recognized as frequent causes of acute gastroenteritis (AGE). However, few laboratory-based data are available on the incidence of AGE caused by viral pathogens in the U.S. This study examined stool specimens submitted for routine clinical diagnostics from patients enrolled in Kaiser Permanente (KP) health plans in metro Portland, OR, and the Maryland, District of Columbia, and northern Virginia geographic areas to estimate the incidence of viral enteropathogens in these populations. Over a one-year study period, participating laboratories randomly selected stools submitted for routine clinical diagnostics for inclusion in the study along with accompanying demographic and clinical data. Selected stools were tested for norovirus, rotavirus, sapovirus, and astrovirus using standardized real-time RT-PCR protocols. Each KP site provided administrative data which were used in conjunction with previously published data on healthcare utilization to extrapolate pathogen detection rates into population-based incidence rates. A total of 1,099 specimens collected during August 2012 to September 2013 were included. Mean age of patients providing stool specimens was 46 years (range: 0-98 years). Noroviruses were the most common viral pathogen identified among patients with AGE (n = 63 specimens, 6% of specimens tested). In addition, 22 (2%) of specimens were positive for rotavirus; 19 (2%) were positive for sapovirus; and 7 (1%) were positive for astrovirus. Incidence of norovirus-associated outpatient visits was 5.6 per 1,000 person-years; incidence of norovirus disease in the community was estimated to be 69.5 per 1,000 person-years. Norovirus incidence was highest among children age (outpatient incidence = 25.6 per 1,000 person-years; community incidence = 152.2 per 1,000 person-years), followed by older adults aged >65 years (outpatient incidence = 7.8 per 1,000 person-years; community incidence = 75.8 per 1,000 person

  16. Incidence of Norovirus and Other Viral Pathogens That Cause Acute Gastroenteritis (AGE) among Kaiser Permanente Member Populations in the United States, 2012–2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grytdal, Scott P.; Biggs, Christianne; Cameron, Miriam; Schmidt, Mark; Parashar, Umesh D.; Hall, Aron J.

    2016-01-01

    Noroviruses and other viral pathogens are increasingly recognized as frequent causes of acute gastroenteritis (AGE). However, few laboratory-based data are available on the incidence of AGE caused by viral pathogens in the U.S. This study examined stool specimens submitted for routine clinical diagnostics from patients enrolled in Kaiser Permanente (KP) health plans in metro Portland, OR, and the Maryland, District of Columbia, and northern Virginia geographic areas to estimate the incidence of viral enteropathogens in these populations. Over a one-year study period, participating laboratories randomly selected stools submitted for routine clinical diagnostics for inclusion in the study along with accompanying demographic and clinical data. Selected stools were tested for norovirus, rotavirus, sapovirus, and astrovirus using standardized real-time RT-PCR protocols. Each KP site provided administrative data which were used in conjunction with previously published data on healthcare utilization to extrapolate pathogen detection rates into population-based incidence rates. A total of 1,099 specimens collected during August 2012 to September 2013 were included. Mean age of patients providing stool specimens was 46 years (range: 0–98 years). Noroviruses were the most common viral pathogen identified among patients with AGE (n = 63 specimens, 6% of specimens tested). In addition, 22 (2%) of specimens were positive for rotavirus; 19 (2%) were positive for sapovirus; and 7 (1%) were positive for astrovirus. Incidence of norovirus-associated outpatient visits was 5.6 per 1,000 person-years; incidence of norovirus disease in the community was estimated to be 69.5 per 1,000 person-years. Norovirus incidence was highest among children incidence = 25.6 per 1,000 person-years; community incidence = 152.2 per 1,000 person-years), followed by older adults aged >65 years (outpatient incidence = 7.8 per 1,000 person-years; community incidence = 75.8 per 1,000 person

  17. Acute gastroenteritis: from guidelines to real life

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chung M Chow

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Chung M Chow1, Alexander KC Leung2, Kam L Hon11Department of Paediatrics, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong Special Administrative Region, PR China; 2Department of Pediatrics, The University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta, CanadaAbstract: Acute gastroenteritis is a very common disease. It causes significant mortality in developing countries and significant economic burden to developed countries. Viruses are ­responsible for approximately 70% of episodes of acute gastroenteritis in children and rotavirus is one of the best studied of these viruses. Oral rehydration therapy is as effective as i­ntravenous therapy in treating mild to moderate dehydration in acute gastroenteritis and is strongly r­ecommended as the first line therapy. However, the oral rehydration solution is described as an underused simple solution. Vomiting is one of the main reasons to explain the underuse of oral rehydration therapy. Antiemetics are not routinely recommended in treating acute gastroenteritis, though they are still commonly prescribed. Ondansetron is one of the best studied antiemetics and its role in enhancing the compliance of oral rehydration therapy and decreasing the rate of hospitalization has been proved recently. The guidelines regarding the recommendation on antiemetics have been changed according to the evidence of these recent studies.Keywords: gastroenteritis, vomiting, antiemetic, ondansetron, rotavirus, oral rehydration therapy, intravenous therapy, guideline

  18. Radiographic and pathologic observations of eosinophilic gastroenteritis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jung, Lae Won [Busan Nationa University College of Medicine, Busan (Korea, Republic of); Hong, Sook Hee; Lee, Jung Dal [Busan Gospel Hospital, Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    1974-10-15

    This report presents two cases with eosinophilic gastroenteritis in detail. The radiographic and pathologic features of eosinophilic gastroenteritis are summarized with emphasis on the differential diagnostic features. Radiographic eosinophilic gastritis should be differentiated from gastric carcinoma and lymphoma, and eosinophilic enteritis from intestinal tuberculosis and intussusception of the small bowel in Korea where these entities are prevent. Eosinophilic gastroenteritis is pathologically characterized by diffuse infiltration of the submucosa and muscle coats with eosinophilic in conjunction with hypertrophy of individual muscle fibers. This leads to thickening of the gastrointestinal wall resulting in narrowing and obstruction of the lumen. Eosinophilic venulitis is another characteristic feature which is helpful for differentiation this entity from a parasitic infection.

  19. Radiographic and pathologic observations of eosinophilic gastroenteritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jung, Lae Won; Hong, Sook Hee; Lee, Jung Dal

    1974-01-01

    This report presents two cases with eosinophilic gastroenteritis in detail. The radiographic and pathologic features of eosinophilic gastroenteritis are summarized with emphasis on the differential diagnostic features. Radiographic eosinophilic gastritis should be differentiated from gastric carcinoma and lymphoma, and eosinophilic enteritis from intestinal tuberculosis and intussusception of the small bowel in Korea where these entities are prevent. Eosinophilic gastroenteritis is pathologically characterized by diffuse infiltration of the submucosa and muscle coats with eosinophilic in conjunction with hypertrophy of individual muscle fibers. This leads to thickening of the gastrointestinal wall resulting in narrowing and obstruction of the lumen. Eosinophilic venulitis is another characteristic feature which is helpful for differentiation this entity from a parasitic infection

  20. Polymyositis-like syndrome caused by hypothyroidism, presenting as camptocormia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Ji Min; Song, Eun Joo; Seo, Jae Seok; Nam, Eon Jeong; Kang, Young Mo

    2009-01-01

    Polymyositis-like syndrome characterized by proximal muscle weakness and elevation of muscle enzymes may be a presenting manifestation of hypothyroidism. Camptocormia, which can be caused by myopathy of the paraspinal muscles, is an involuntary truncal flexion of the thoracolumbar spine while standing or walking. Among various neuromuscular disorders, hypothyroidism has not been reported in the literature as a cause of camptocormia. This is the first report of polymyositis-like syndrome with camptocormia caused by hypothyroidism.

  1. Epidemiological investigation of a food-borne gastroenteritis outbreak caused by Norwalk-like virus in 30 day-care centres.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Götz, Hannelore; de Jong, Birgitta; Lindbäck, Johan; Parment, Per Arne; Hedlund, Kjell Olof; Torvén, Maria; Ekdahl, Karl

    2002-01-01

    In March 1999, an outbreak of gastroenteritis occurred affecting 30 day-care centres served by the same caterer. A retrospective cohort study was performed in 13 randomly selected day-care centres to determine the source and mode of transmission. Electron microscopy and PCR were used to verify the diagnosis. The overall attack rate (AR) was 37% (195/524): 30% in children and 62% in adults. Modified by the age of the patient, eating pumpkin salad served on 1 March was associated with becoming an early case (odds ratio = 3.9; 95% confidence interval 1.8-8.8). No significant association was found between food consumption and becoming a late case. The primary food-borne AR was 27% and the secondary AR was 14%. The same genotype of Norwalk-like virus was found in 5 cases and in 1 ill and 1 asymptomatic food-handler. Contamination by 1 of the food-handlers seems the most likely route of spread of the virus and underlines the importance of strict hygienic routines.

  2. Non Obstetric Causes and Presentation of Acute Abdomen among the Pregnant Women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haque, Monoarul; Kamal, Farah; Chowdhury, Shahanaz; Uzzaman, Monir; Aziz, Itrat

    2014-09-01

    To identify the non-obstetric causes and presentation of acute abdomen among pregnant women. This was a cross sectional hospital-based study among 128 pregnant women by face to face interview using a semi-structured questionnaire. This study was conducted at the Gynecology & Obstetric Ward of 250 Bed General Hospital, Noakhali, Bangladesh, from January to August 2013. Data were analyzed by a software package used for statistical analysis (SPSS) version 11.5 (SPSS, Inc., Chicago, IL, USA). Mean age of participants was 25±4 years. Our findings showed that 81% were Muslim, 67% were lower middle income group, as well as 47% completed primary level of education. The results revealed that 28% had biliary ascariasis, 24% had peptic ulcer disease and 10% had lower urinary tract infection. We also found that 6% had acute pyelonephritis, 6% had acute gastroenteritis, 6% had acute cholecystitis, 6% had acute appendicitis, 2% had acute pancreatitis, 3% had choledocolithiasis, 2% had ovarian solid mass, 2% had twisted ovarian cyst, 4% had renal colic, and 1% had renal calculus. In non-obstetrical presentation of acute abdomen, the study found that 84% of respondents complained their pain lasting more than 24 hours. Besides, half of respondents felt pain in epigastrium and right hypochondrium. Cramping, prickling and aching type of pain were more, while 66% suffered from continuous pain. Our results also showed that 73% did not explain any aggravating factor and relieving factor, and the rest said food, fasting state and position change aggravated pain as well as relieved pain. The study concludes that precise diagnosis of the acute abdomen in pregnant women by continual updating of abdominal assessment knowledge, and clinical skills is necessary in the management of abdominal pain in obstetric settings.

  3. Epidemiology of Acute Gastroenteritis Outbreaks Caused by Human Calicivirus (Norovirus and Sapovirus in Catalonia: A Two Year Prospective Study, 2010-2011.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nuria Torner

    Full Text Available The epidemiology of cases of acute gastroenteritis (AGE of viral etiology is a relevant public health issue. Due to underreporting, the study of outbreaks is an accepted approach to investigate their epidemiology. The objective of this study was to investigate the epidemiological characteristics of AGE outbreaks due to norovirus (NoV and sapovirus (SV in Catalonia.Prospective study of AGE outbreaks of possible viral etiology notified during two years in Catalonia. NoV and SV were detected by real time reverse transcription polymerase (RT-PCR.A total of 101 outbreaks were registered affecting a total of 2756 persons and 12 hospitalizations (hospitalization rate: 0.8x1,000,000 persons-year; 49.5% of outbreaks were foodborne, 45.5% person to person and 5% waterborne. The distribution of outbreaks according to the setting showed a predominance of catering services (39.6%, nursing homes and long term care facilities (26.8% and schools (11.9%. The median number of cases per outbreak was 17 (range 2-191. The total Incidence rate (IR was 18.3 per 100,000 persons-years (95%CI: 17.6-19.0. The highest IR was in persons aged ≥65 years (43.6x100,000 (95% CI: 41.0-46.2 (p<0.001. A total of 1065 samples were analyzed with a positivity rate of 60.8%. 98% of positive samples were NoV (GII 56.3%; GI 4.2%; GII+GI 4.2%; non- typable 33.0%. SV was identified in two person-to-person transmission outbreaks in children.These results confirm the relevance of viral AGE outbreaks, both foodborne and person-to-person, especially in institutionalized persons. SV should be taken into account when investigating viral AGE outbreaks.

  4. Epidemiology of Acute Gastroenteritis Outbreaks Caused by Human Calicivirus (Norovirus and Sapovirus) in Catalonia: A Two Year Prospective Study, 2010-2011

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez, Ana; Moreno, Antonio; Camps, Neus

    2016-01-01

    Background The epidemiology of cases of acute gastroenteritis (AGE) of viral etiology is a relevant public health issue. Due to underreporting, the study of outbreaks is an accepted approach to investigate their epidemiology. The objective of this study was to investigate the epidemiological characteristics of AGE outbreaks due to norovirus (NoV) and sapovirus (SV) in Catalonia. Material and Methods Prospective study of AGE outbreaks of possible viral etiology notified during two years in Catalonia. NoV and SV were detected by real time reverse transcription polymerase (RT-PCR). Results A total of 101 outbreaks were registered affecting a total of 2756 persons and 12 hospitalizations (hospitalization rate: 0.8x1,000,000 persons-year); 49.5% of outbreaks were foodborne, 45.5% person to person and 5% waterborne. The distribution of outbreaks according to the setting showed a predominance of catering services (39.6%), nursing homes and long term care facilities (26.8%) and schools (11.9%). The median number of cases per outbreak was 17 (range 2–191). The total Incidence rate (IR) was 18.3 per 100,000 persons-years (95%CI: 17.6–19.0). The highest IR was in persons aged ≥65 years (43.6x100,000 (95% CI: 41.0–46.2)) (p<0.001). A total of 1065 samples were analyzed with a positivity rate of 60.8%. 98% of positive samples were NoV (GII 56.3%; GI 4.2%; GII+GI 4.2%; non- typable 33.0%). SV was identified in two person-to-person transmission outbreaks in children. Conclusions These results confirm the relevance of viral AGE outbreaks, both foodborne and person-to-person, especially in institutionalized persons. SV should be taken into account when investigating viral AGE outbreaks. PMID:27120472

  5. Comedy Collider presents: No cause for conCERN

    CERN Multimedia

    Traczyk, Piotr

    2014-01-01

    Comedy Collider presents: No cause for conCERN was the highly anticipated follow up to LHComedy: CERN After Dark, starring an entirely new ensemble of comedy talent. Time: 13th June 2014, 19:30 for 20:00 Location: Globe of Science and Innovation, CERN, Geneva, Switzerland

  6. Multiple enteropathogenic viruses in a gastroenteritis outbreak in a military exercise of the Portuguese Army.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopes-João, António; Costa, Inês; Mesquita, João R; Oleastro, Mónica; Penha-Gonçalves, Carlos; Nascimento, Maria S J

    2015-07-01

    Gastroenteritis is one of the most common infectious diseases in the military populations and can diminish operational effectiveness and impede force readiness. The present study investigates the cause and the source of an acute gastroenteritis outbreak that occurred during a military exercise of the Portuguese Army, in February 2013. A retrospective investigation was performed and stool samples, food items and water were screened for common foodborne bacteria and viruses, namely Norovirus GI, Norovirus GII, Astrovirus, Rotavirus, Adenovirus and Sapovirus. From the total of 160 soldiers that participated in the military exercise 20 developed gastroenteritis (attack rate of 12.5%). Symptoms were predominantly vomiting (n=17, 85%) and diarrhoea (n=9, 45%). The first cases occurred 24-48h after drinking water from the creek, the plausible origin of the outbreak. The epidemic peak was registered 2 days after and the last cases 6 days after, upon returning to base. No pathogenic bacteria were found in stools however virological analysis revealed the presence of multiple enteropathogenic viruses, namely Norovirus GI (GI.3), Norovirus GII (GII.4 New Orleans 2009), Astrovirus and Sapovirus, as single or co-infections. Food and water samples were not tested for the presence of viruses due to exhaustion of samples on bacteriological analysis. To the best of our knowledge this is the first report of a viral gastroenteritis outbreak among military personnel in the Portuguese Army. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Prospective study of the burden of rotavirus gastroenteritis in Danish children and their families

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hoffmann, Thomas; Iturriza, Miren; Faaborg-Andersen, Jens

    2011-01-01

    This was the first study to characterize the total burden of rotavirus gastroenteritis (RVGE) at both hospital and general physician (GP) clinics in Denmark, and also the first to confirm rotavirus (RV) as the leading cause of acute gastroenteritis (GE) among children......This was the first study to characterize the total burden of rotavirus gastroenteritis (RVGE) at both hospital and general physician (GP) clinics in Denmark, and also the first to confirm rotavirus (RV) as the leading cause of acute gastroenteritis (GE) among children...

  8. Svaer hyperkaliaemi ved gastroenteritis hos kolektomeret patient

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Lasse Bremholm; Winkel, Rasmus; Hansen, Erik Feldager

    2010-01-01

    Severe hyperkalemia is a life-threatening condition that causes primarily cardiac and muscular dysfunction with potentially fatal consequences. This case report describes a case of severe hyperkalemia (9,1 mmol/l) caused by acute prerenal failure due to dehydration. The severe dehydration was cau...... was caused by a combination of reduced fluid intake due to gastroenteritis and a hampered capacity for intestinal fluid absorption, due to previous colectomy. The patient developed classic signs of hyperkalemia with electrocardiogram changes and muscular dysfunction....

  9. ABO blood grouping in Egyptian children with rotavirus gastroenteritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hala Gouda Elnady

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction : Rotavirus gastroenteritis is an important public health problem all over the world, causing a notable economic burden in both developing and developed countries. Aim: To explore the relationship between blood group typing, rotavirus gastroenteritis, and its severity in Egyptian children. Material and methods: A cross sectional case control study was conducted on 231 cases of acute gastroenteritis attending the outpatient clinic of Al-Zahraa University Hospital. Full history taking, clinical examination, and clinical data collection were done. Blood samples were collected for an ABO grouping. Stool samples were tested for viral gastroenteritis agents. Results : Rota positive cases of GE were significantly more prevalent among cases with blood group A (p < 0.05 and significantly less among cases with blood group B (p < 0.05. The rate of hospitalisation was highly significantly greater among cases with group A (p < 0.005, and significantly lower among cases with group AB and O (p < 0.05. As regards the degree of dehydration, moderate and severe cases were highly significant in groups A and O (p < 0.005. Rota-positive gastroenteritis showed significant positive correlations with indicators of severity such as hospitalisation, degree of dehydration, and duration of fever (p < 0.005. Conclusions : Blood group A is highly associated with paediatric rotavirus gastroenteritis. This could highlight an important risk factor, which could play a significant role for the pathogenesis of rotavirus gastroenteritis and severity as well. Furthermore, more intervention care could be needed for blood group A paediatric patients, if gastroenteritis especially rotavirus affect this group to avoid comorbidities.

  10. An Uncommon Cause of Hiccups: Sarcoidosis Presenting Solely as Hiccups

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lien-Fu Lin

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Common causes of hiccups are over-distension of the stomach, a sudden change in gastrointestinal temperature, excessive alcohol and tobacco ingestion, and sudden excitement or emotional changes. Common presenting symptoms of sarcoidosis include cough, dyspnea, and chest pain. It is very rare for a sarcoidosis patient to present with hiccups. A 48-year-old man presented with hiccups of 2 weeks' duration. He denied having headaches, earache, cough, abdominal pain, fever, or body weight loss history. On physical examination, he had no peripheral lymphadenopathies in the neck, axilla and inguinal regions, no organomegaly in the abdomen and no skin abnormalities. A neurological examination showed normal findings. Laboratory investigations revealed a normal complete blood count, liver function, renal function, serum calcium, and tumor markers. Transabdominal ultrasound was negative, and panendoscopy revealed a small healing duodenal ulcer. Chest radiography showed an enlarged right lung hilum, while computed tomography showed enlargement of multiple mediastinal lymph nodes. Endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine-needle aspiration with a 22-gauge needle and trucut biopsy with a 19-gauge needle (quick-core biopsy needle were performed, and cytology, cell block and histology revealed non-caseating granuloma, with negative tuberculous and fungus cultures. Mediastinal lymph node due to sarcoidosis can be a rare cause of hiccups.

  11. Persistent organic dyspepsia of infrequent cause. Case presentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodriguez, Roberto; Medina, Juan Fernando; Roberto Olivares, Carlos

    2008-01-01

    For the Rome III consensus criteria, the dyspepsia is defined as any pain or discomfort located in the central part of the superior abdomen and that it can be associated to a sensation of fullness, satiety precocious distension, burps, nauseas and vomits that can improve or to worsen with the foods, begun in the last 6 months and with present symptoms once a week in the 3 previous months. The dyspepsia this incorporated one for two big groups: the organic one and the functional one and it can be secondary to local or systemic alterations. Considered that between the 60 and 70% of the dyspeptic they are functional and that a 30 to 40% are of organic origin. The gastritis, ulcerates peptic either gastric or duodenal, the cancer and some medications, they are the frequently implied organic factors. The incidence of the dyspepsia for systemic alterations is not very well-known and its appearance is variable. We present a case that was derived to the gastroenterology service to present a dyspepsia related with Helycobacter pylori that persisted after the eradication of the infection, evidencing after the clinical study and paraclinic a symptomatic hypercalcaemia secondary to primary hyperparathyroidism (HPTP) like cause of their gastrointestinal square; and next the revision of the pathology will be made in mention and of its gastrointestinal component.

  12. Another cause for conductive hearing loss with present acoustic reflexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebert, Charles S; Zanation, Adam M; Buchman, Craig A

    2008-11-01

    There are numerous potential causes of conductive hearing loss (HL). It is important to obtain a thorough history and perform a complete examination, including audiometric testing and radiographic evaluation when necessary. In this report, we present a patient with an intact tympanic membrane, no history of ear disease or trauma who as an adult developed progressive, conductive HL because of an anomalous course of a dehiscent facial nerve. In the patient with a conductive HL and at least partially intact reflexes, superior semicircular canal dehiscence, fracture of the stapes superstructure proximal to the tendon, other third window phenomena, and now dehiscence of the facial nerve resulting in decreased mobility of the ossicular chain must be considered.

  13. Clinical and epidemiological characteristics in hospitalized young children with acute gastroenteritis in southern Taiwan: According to major pathogens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ning Chung

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Acute gastroenteritis (AGE can be caused by a wide array of pathogens, including bacteria, viruses, and parasites. A prospective study to investigate the epidemiology and clinical presentation in young children hospitalized with AGE was conducted in a medical center in southern Taiwan. Methods: Patients aged less than 5 years who was hospitalized due to AGE in National Cheng Kung University Hospital were enrolled from July 2014 to June 2016. The demographic information, clinical features and laboratory data were collected by chart reviews, and stool samples were sent to Centers of Disease Control, Taiwan (Taiwan CDC for a panel of pathogen identification consisting of two viruses, nine bacteria, and five parasites. Results: Totally 441 patients were enrolled in this study. Salmonella spp. was the leading cause of disease (21.8%, followed by norovirus (17.0%, Clostridium difficile (9.5%, and rotavirus (9.3%. Norovirus identification rate was the highest among patients less than 6 months of age, while Salmonella was highest among patients between 2 and 3 years old. Patients with Salmonella infection frequently presented with fever, lethargy, bloody stool, and elevated serum level of C-reactive protein (CRP; norovirus and rotavirus infection frequently presented with vomiting. Salmonella gastroenteritis also resulted in longer hospitalization and more frequent antibiotics administration. C. difficile could be isolated from both gastroenteritis patients and control children. Conclusion: Salmonella spp. was the most common pathogen of AGE in hospitalized children in southern Taiwan during 2014–2016, followed by norovirus and rotavirus. Further monitoring of epidemiology characteristics among cardinal pathogens of pediatric gastroenteritis is necessary. Keywords: Acute gastroenteritis, Children, Epidemiology, Taiwan

  14. The Etiology and Pathogenesis of Viral Gastroenteritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-07-31

    with subsequent seroconversion or susceptibility to illness in a naturally occurring outbreak of Norwalk virus gastroenteritis among American teen ... anorexia , myalgia and malaise. It can be severe, indeed fatal, in the elderly, infant, debilitated or malnourished pa- tient. Viral gastroenteritis

  15. Common causes of red eye presenting at an ophthalmic clinic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Redness of the eye is a common ophthalmic symptom. The problem causing redness could arise from within or outside the globe. These range from cases of simple inflammation following itching and minor trauma for example, to severe cases like orbital cellulitis and tumours. Patients may not even be aware of ...

  16. Management strategies in the treatment of neonatal and pediatric gastroenteritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ciccarelli S

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Simona Ciccarelli,1 Ilaria Stolfi,1 Giuseppe Caramia2 1Neonatal Intensive Care Unit, Sapienza University of Rome, Rome, Italy; 2Division of Neonatology and Pediatrics, Maternal and Child Hospital "G. Salesi", Ancona, Italy Abstract: Acute gastroenteritis, characterized by the onset of diarrhea with or without vomiting, continues to be a major cause of morbidity and mortality in children in mostly resource-constrained nations. Although generally a mild and self-limiting disease, gastroenteritis is one of the most common causes of hospitalization and is associated with a substantial disease burden. Worldwide, up to 40% of children aged less than 5 years with diarrhea are hospitalized with rotavirus. Also, some microorganisms have been found predominantly in resource-constrained nations, including Shigella spp, Vibrio cholerae, and the protozoan infections. Prevention remains essential, and the rotavirus vaccines have demonstrated good safety and efficacy profiles in large clinical trials. Because dehydration is the major complication associated with gastroenteritis, appropriate fluid management (oral or intravenous is an effective and safe strategy for rehydration. Continuation of breastfeeding is strongly recommended. New treatments such as antiemetics (ondansetron, some antidiarrheal agents (racecadotril, and chemotherapeutic agents are often proposed, but not yet universally recommended. Probiotics, also known as “food supplement,” seem to improve intestinal microbial balance, reducing the duration and the severity of acute infectious diarrhea. The European Society for Paediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition and the European Society of Paediatric Infectious Diseases guidelines make a stronger recommendation for the use of probiotics for the management of acute gastroenteritis, particularly those with documented efficacy such as Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG, Lactobacillus reuteri, and Saccharomyces boulardii. To date, the

  17. Gastroenteritis outbreaks on cruise ships

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mouchtouri, Varvara A; Verykouki, Eleni; Zamfir, Dumitru

    2017-01-01

    When an increased number of acute gastroenteritis (AG) cases is detected among tourists staying at the same accommodation, outbreak management plans must be activated in a timely manner to prevent large outbreaks. Syndromic surveillance data collected between 1 January 2010 and 31 December 2013...

  18. Proton pump inhibitors and gastroenteritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hassing, Robert-Jan; Verbon, Annelies; Visser, Herman de; Hofman, Albert; Stricker, Bruno H.

    2016-01-01

    An association between proton pump inhibitor (PPI) therapy and bacterial gastroenteritis has been suggested as well as contradicted. The aim of this study was to examine the association between the use of PPIs and occurrence of bacterial gastroenteritis in the prospective Rotterdam Study. The Rotterdam Study is a population-based cohort study among 14,926 subjects aged 45 years and older with up to 24 years of follow-up. Analyses were performed with a generalized estimating equations method in participants who handed-in a diagnostic stool sample. Furthermore, a nested case–control analysis was performed using the total cohort as a reference group. A bacterial microorganism was isolated in 125 samples, whereas 1174 samples were culture negative. In the generalized estimating equations analysis, we found that participants with a bacterial gastroenteritis were more likely than controls to be current users of PPIs (adjusted OR 1.94; 95 % CI 1.15–3.25). Different sensitivity analyses did not change this result. A considerably higher effect was observed (adjusted OR 6.14; 95 % CI 3.81–9.91), using the total cohort as a reference in a nested case–control analysis. Current PPI therapy is associated with an increased risk of bacterial gastroenteritis. However, by reducing the risk of selection and information bias in our study design, we demonstrated that the effect is lower than previously assumed.

  19. Brote de gastroenteritis por el consumo de agua de suministro público causado por Shigella sonnei Waterborne outbreak of Shigella sonnei caused by consumption of public supply water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pere Godoy

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Objetivos: Investigar un brote de gastroenteritis que afectó a la población de València d'Àneu (Lleida. Métodos: Estudio de cohortes sobre el consumo de agua de la red, de agua embotellada y de agua de manantiales. La cohorte se elaboró mediante contacto telefónico con todos los números privados del municipio. Se encuestó al 58,3% de la población censada (105/180 sobre diferentes consumos de agua, número de vasos consumidos diariamente y sintomatología. Se tomaron muestras de agua de la red municipal y de heces de diez enfermos. La implicación de cada agua consumida se estudió con el riesgo relativo (RR y su intervalo de confianza del 95% (IC95%. Resultados: La tasa de ataque global fue del 64,8% (68/105. La curva epidémica fue concordante con una exposición de 6 días. Resultó implicado el consumo de agua de suministro público (RR=4,2; IC95%: 1,5-11,9. Además, se constató una relación dosis-respuesta (χ²=34,1; p Objective: To investigate a waterborne outbreak in the population of València d'Àneu (Lleida, Spain. Methods: A cohort study of consumption of mains water, bottled water and spring water was carried out. The sample was obtained by telephone contact with all private numbers in the municipality. We surveyed 58.3% of the population census (105/180 for water consumption, number of glasses drunk daily and symptoms. The water supply in the municipal system was sampled, and the presence of Enterobacteriaceae in the stool samples of 10 patients was determined. The association of each type of water was studied with estimation of relative risks (RR and 95% confidence intervals (95% CI. Results: The overall attack rate was 64.8% (68/105. The epidemic curve was consistent with an exposure of 6 days. Consumption of public supply water was associated with gastroenteritis (RR=4.2, 95% CI: 1.5-11.9. In addition, a dose-response relationship was found (χ²=34.1; p <0.001. There was a higher risk of illness in consumers of 2

  20. Campylobacter concisus and Acute Gastroenteritis in Children: Lack of Association.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tilmanne, Anne; Martiny, Delphine; Hallin, Marie; Cornelius, Angela; Wautier, Magali; Quach, Caroline; Lepage, Philippe; Vandenberg, Olivier

    2018-03-29

    The role of Campylobacter concisus as a cause of acute gastroenteritis (AGE) remains to be demonstrated. This prospective study includes 184 cases and 176 controls. It shows no evidence that C. concisus plays a role in AGE. Considering the very low prevalence in cases and controls, if there is an etiological link, it would be moderate and difficult to demonstrate.

  1. Outbreaks of gastroenteritis linked to lettuce, Denmark, January 2010

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ethelberg, S.; Lisby, M.; Bottiger, B.

    2010-01-01

    At least 11 linked outbreaks of gastroenteritis with a total of 260 cases have occurred in Denmark in mid January 2010. Investigations showed that the outbreaks were caused by norovirus of several genotypes and by enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli. Lettuce of the lollo bionda type grown in France...

  2. THE PRESENT COLLAPSE OF ROMANIAN HIGHER EDUCATION. CAUSES AND EFFECTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    GABRIELA DUMBRAVĂ

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The paper corroborates statistical data of economic and social nature in an attempt to outline the national and European context within which the Romanian educational system has constantly degraded over the past years. At the same time, the study exceeds the limits of a simple identification of causes and analyzes the collapse of higher education both as an ultimate consequence of governmental oblivion towards national education, and from the perspective of its devastating boomerang effect on the Romanian economy and on the society at large.

  3. Causes and outcomes of emergency presentation of rectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Comber, Harry; Sharp, Linda; de Camargo Cancela, Marianna; Haase, Trutz; Johnson, Howard; Pratschke, Jonathan

    2016-09-01

    Emergency presentation of rectal cancer carries a relatively poor prognosis, but the roles and interactions of causative factors remain unclear. We describe an innovative statistical approach which distinguishes between direct and indirect effects of a number of contextual, patient and tumour factors on emergency presentation and outcome of rectal cancer. All patients diagnosed with rectal cancer in Ireland 2004-2008 were included. Registry information, linked to hospital discharge data, provided data on patient demographics, comorbidity and health insurance; population density and deprivation of area of residence; tumour type, site, grade and stage; treatment type and optimality; and emergency presentation and hospital caseload. Data were modelled using a structural equation model with a discrete-time survival outcome, allowing us to estimate direct and mediated effects of the above factors on hazard, and their inter-relationships. Two thousand seven hundred and fifty patients were included in the analysis. Around 12% had emergency presentations, which increased hazard by 80%. Affluence, private patient status and being married reduced hazard indirectly by reducing emergency presentation. Older patients had more emergency presentations, while married patients, private patients or those living in less deprived areas had fewer than expected. Patients presenting as an emergency were less likely to receive optimal treatment or to have this in a high caseload hospital. Apart from stage, emergency admission was the strongest determinant of poor survival. The factors contributing to emergency admission in this study are similar to those associated with diagnostic delay. The socio-economic gradient found suggests that patient education and earlier access to endoscopic investigation for public patients could reduce emergency presentation. © 2016 UICC.

  4. Unusual presentation of firework injury causing intraoral burns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patel Chintan

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Fireworks are commonly used in celebrate festive occasions. We present a case of an unusual presentation of intraoral firework injury, which is a very rare case. A fifteen year old boy kept four explosive papercaps wrapped in a small polythene bags in between his left molars and crushed them. This resulted in a contused lacerated wound over the left buccal mucosa. Patient was treated conservatively with maintenance of intraoral hygiene, antibiotics, proteolytic enzymes and analgesics. It took 18 days for complete healing of the wound.

  5. Esophageal stricture causes and pattern of presentation at Ibn Sina ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Dysphagia was the commonest presenting symptom. Malignant and benign strictures were located at different site of the esophagus. In males postsclerotherapy was more common especially in the young, while peptic stricture was common in elderly. In females peptic stricture and esophageal webs were common in young ...

  6. Choriocarcinoma as cause of pulmonary embolism: Presentation of a case

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Medina Gonzalez, Maria Elena; Rodriguez Reyna, Juan Carlos; Nip Fabero, Olga J

    2009-01-01

    This is the case of a 21 years old, black, female patient admitted at the Teaching Territorial Hospital of Cardenas 'Dr Julio M Aristegui Villamil' presenting breathlessness, dry cough, without expectoration, no fever and affection of the general status. She died a week after the admission in a picture of arrhythmia . The conclusion of the necropsy was pulmonary thromboembolism of tumor origin (choriocarcinoma) in both pulmonary arteries

  7. [Nasogastric rehydration for treating children with gastroenteritis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rébeillé-Borgella, B; Barbier, C; Moussaoui, R; Faisant, A; Michard-Lenoir, A-P; Rubio, A

    2017-06-01

    When oral rehydration is not feasible, enteral rehydration via the nasogastric route has been the ESPGHAN recommended method of rehydration since 2008, rather than intravenous rehydration (IVR), for children with acute gastroenteritis. However, these recommendations are rarely followed in France. Since 2011, in case of failure of oral rehydration, enteral rehydration has been used as a first-line therapy in the Children's Emergency Department at the Grenoble-Alpes University Hospital. The aims of the study were to compare the length of the hospital stay, the duration of initial rehydration, and the incidence of complications and failure with the use of enteral nasogastric versus intravenous rehydration. This study compared two cohorts of children (rehydration via the oral route. The first group (winter 2010-2011) was managed according to the previous protocol (intravenous rehydration). The second group (winter 2011-2012) was managed according the new protocol (nasogastric tube rehydration [NGR]). The rest of the gastroenteritis management was identical in both groups. A total of 132 children were included, 65 were treated with nasogastric tube rehydration (NGR) and 67 with intravenous rehydration. There was a significant reduction in the duration of hospitalization in the post-emergency unit in the NGR group: 23.6h vs 40.1h (Prehydration was also significantly reduced (10.5h vs 22.0h). There was no significant difference regarding serious adverse events. However, the NGR group presented more mild adverse events (22 vs 7, Prehydration reduces the duration of rehydration and the length of the hospital stay without increasing the incidence of serious adverse events for dehydrated children hospitalized for acute gastroenteritis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  8. Paediatric chest wall trauma causing delayed presentation of ventricular arrhythmia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tegethoff, Angela M; Raney, Emerald; Mendelson, Jenny; Minckler, Michael R

    2017-07-24

    This report describes a paediatric patient presenting with haemodynamically stable non-sustained ventricular tachycardia 1 day after minor blunt chest trauma. Initial laboratory studies, chest X-ray and echocardiography were normal; however, cardiac MRI revealed precordial haematoma, myocardial contusion and small pericardial effusion. Throughout her hospital course, she remained asymptomatic aside from frequent couplets and triplets of premature ventricular contractions. Ectopy was controlled with oral verapamil. This case highlights how significant cardiac injury may be missed with standard diagnostic algorithms. © BMJ Publishing Group Ltd (unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  9. CMV - gastroenteritis/colitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... may include: Drugs to prevent or reduce diarrhea Painkillers (analgesics) Nutritional supplements or nutrition given through a ... used to fight the virus may cause side effects. The type of side effect depends on the ...

  10. The impact of rotavirus gastroenteritis on the family

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kelly Claudia M

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Rotavirus is the leading cause of severe diarrhea in young children and causes substantial morbidity and mortality. Although the clinical aspects have been well described, little information is available regarding the emotional, social, and economic impact of rotavirus gastroenteritis on the family of a sick child. The objectives of this study were to: 1 assess the family impact of rotavirus gastroenteritis through qualitative interviews with parents; 2 compare the clinical severity of rotavirus-positive and negative gastroenteritis; 3 test a questionnaire asking parents to rank the importance of various factors associated with a case of rotavirus gastroenteritis. Methods The study enrolled parents and children (2–36 months of age brought to one of the study sites (outpatient clinic or ER if the child experienced ≥ 3 watery or looser-than normal stools and/or forceful vomiting within any 24-hour period within the prior 3 days. The clinical severity of each child's illness was rated using a clinical scoring system and stool samples were tested for rotavirus antigen. Parents of rotavirus-positive children were invited to participate in focus group or individual interviews and subsequently completed a questionnaire regarding the impact of their child's illness. Results Of 62 enrolled children, 43 stool samples were collected and 63% tested positive for rotavirus. Illness was more severe in children with rotavirus-positive compared to rotavirus-negative gastroenteritis (92% vs. 37.5% rated as moderate/severe. Seventeen parents of rotavirus-positive children participated in the interviews and completed the written questionnaire. Parents were frightened by the severity of vomiting and diarrhea associated with rotavirus gastroenteritis, and noted that family life was impacted in several ways including loss of sleep, missed work, and an inability to complete normal household tasks. They expressed frustration at the lack of a

  11. Impact of community-acquired paediatric rotavirus gastroenteritis on family life: data from the REVEAL study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van der Wielen, Marie; Giaquinto, Carlo; Gothefors, Leif; Huelsse, Christel; Huet, Frédéric; Littmann, Martina; Maxwell, Melanie; Talayero, José M P; Todd, Peter; Vila, Miguel T; Cantarutti, Luigi; Van Damme, Pierre

    2010-03-15

    Rotavirus is the leading cause of acute gastroenteritis (AGE) and the most frequent cause of severe diarrhoea in children aged less than 5 years. Although the epidemiology of rotavirus gastroenteritis (RVGE) is well documented, there are few data on the impact of RVGE on the families of affected children. Data associated with the burden of RVGE, including number of working days lost, levels of parental stress, the need for alternative childcare arrangements and additional nappies used, were extracted from questionnaires completed by parents of children participating in a prospective, multicentre, observational study (Rotavirus gastroenteritis Epidemiology and Viral types in Europe Accounting for Losses in public health and society, REVEAL), conducted during 2004-2005 in selected areas of Belgium, France, Germany, Italy, Spain, Sweden, and the United Kingdom to estimate the incidence of RVGE in children aged less than 5 years seeking medical care as a result of AGE. 1102 children with RVGE were included in the present analysis. The proportion of RVGE cases that required at least one parent or other person to be absent from work was 39%-91% in the hospital setting, 44%-64% in the emergency department, and 20%-64% in primary care. Self-reported levels of parental stress were generally high (mean stress levels, > or = 5 on a 10-point visual analogue scale). Additional childcare arrangements were required in up to 21% of RVGE episodes. The mean number of nappies used per day during RVGE episodes was approximately double that used when the child was not ill. Paediatric RVGE cases cause disruption to families and parental stress. The burden of RVGE on children and their families could be substantially reduced by routine rotavirus vaccination of infants.

  12. Impact of community-acquired paediatric rotavirus gastroenteritis on family life: data from the REVEAL study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Talayero José MP

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Rotavirus is the leading cause of acute gastroenteritis (AGE and the most frequent cause of severe diarrhoea in children aged less than 5 years. Although the epidemiology of rotavirus gastroenteritis (RVGE is well documented, there are few data on the impact of RVGE on the families of affected children. Methods Data associated with the burden of RVGE, including number of working days lost, levels of parental stress, the need for alternative childcare arrangements and additional nappies used, were extracted from questionnaires completed by parents of children participating in a prospective, multicentre, observational study (Rotavirus gastroenteritis Epidemiology and Viral types in Europe Accounting for Losses in public health and society, REVEAL, conducted during 2004-2005 in selected areas of Belgium, France, Germany, Italy, Spain, Sweden, and the United Kingdom to estimate the incidence of RVGE in children aged less than 5 years seeking medical care as a result of AGE. Results 1102 children with RVGE were included in the present analysis. The proportion of RVGE cases that required at least one parent or other person to be absent from work was 39%-91% in the hospital setting, 44%-64% in the emergency department, and 20%-64% in primary care. Self-reported levels of parental stress were generally high (mean stress levels, ≥ 5 on a 10-point visual analogue scale. Additional childcare arrangements were required in up to 21% of RVGE episodes. The mean number of nappies used per day during RVGE episodes was approximately double that used when the child was not ill. Conclusions Paediatric RVGE cases cause disruption to families and parental stress. The burden of RVGE on children and their families could be substantially reduced by routine rotavirus vaccination of infants.

  13. Socio-demographic, Clinical and Laboratory Features of Rotavirus Gastroenteritis in Children Treated in Pediatric Clinic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azemi, Mehmedali; Berisha, Majlinda; Ismaili-Jaha, Vlora; Kolgeci, Selim; Avdiu, Muharrem; Jakupi, Xhevat; Hoxha, Rina; Hoxha-Kamberi, Teuta

    2013-01-01

    Aim: The aim of work was presentation of several socio-demographic, clinical and laboratory characteristics of gastroenteritis caused by rotavirus. The examinees and methods: The examinees were children under the age of five years treated at the Pediatric Clinic due to acute gastroenteritis caused by rotavirus. Rotavirus is isolated by method chromatographic immunoassay by Cer Test Biotec. Results: From the total number of patients (850) suffering from acute gastroenteritis, feces test on bacteria, viruses. protozoa and fungi was positive in 425 (49.76%) cases. From this number the test on bacteria was positive in 248 (58.62%) cases, on viruses it was positive in 165 (39.0%), on protozoa in 9 (2.12%) cases and on fungi only one case. Rotavirus was the most frequent one in viral test, it was isolated in 142 (86.06%) cases, adenoviruses were found in 9 (5.45%) cases and noroviruses in only one case. The same feces sample that contained rotavirus and adenoviruses were isolated in five cases, whereas rotavirus with bacteria was isolated in the same feces sample in five cases. The biggest number of cases 62 (43.66%) were of the age 6-12 months, whereas the smallest number 10 (7.04%) cases were of the age 37-60 months. There were 76 (53.52%) of cases of male gender, from rural areas there were 81 (57.04%) cases and there were 58 (40.80%) cases during the summer period. Among the clinical symptoms the most prominent were diarrhea, vomiting, high temperature, whereas the different degree of dehydration were present in all cases (the most common one was moderate dehydration). The most frequent one was isonatremic dehydration in 91 (64.08%) cases, less frequent one was hypernatremic dehydration in 14 (9.85%) cases. The majority of cases (97.89%) had lower blood pH values, whereas 67 (47.17%) cases had pH values that varied from 7.16 -7.20 (curve peak), normal values were registered in only 3 (2.11%) cases. Urea values were increased in 45 (31.07%) cases (the maximum value

  14. Shewanella algae in acute gastroenteritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Dey

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Shewanella algae is an emerging bacteria rarely implicated as a human pathogen. Previously reported cases of S. algae have mainly been associated with direct contact with seawater. Here we report the isolation of S. algae as the sole etiological agent from a patient suffering from acute gastroenteritis with bloody diarrhoea. The bacterium was identified by automated identification system and 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis. Our report highlights the importance of looking for the relatively rare aetiological agents in clinical samples that does not yield common pathogens. It also underscores the usefulness of automated systems in identification of rare pathogens.

  15. Viral etiology and incidence of acute gastroenteritis in young children attending day-care centers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosenfeldt, Vibeke; Vesikari, Timo; Pang, Xiao-Li

    2005-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The purpose of the study was to investigate the frequency, morbidity and cause of acute gastroenteritis in children attending day-care centers in Denmark. METHODS: Children with acute diarrhea (> or =2 consecutive loose stools in 24 hours, with duration of ... 19 day-care centers, were included. Gastroenteritis viruses, group A rotavirus, sapoviruses, noroviruses and astroviruses were detected with reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction assays. In addition, stool specimens were cultured for bacterial pathogens. Children who were brought...

  16. Enterobiliary Fistula as a Complication of Eosinophilic Gastroenteritis: a Case Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Han Myun; Woo, Ji Young [Kangnam Sacred Heart Hospital, Hallym University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2008-06-15

    Eosinophilic gastroenteritis is an uncommon disease with variable clinical features characterized by eosinophilic infiltration. Clinical manifestations range from non-specific gastrointestinal complaints such as nausea, vomiting, crampy abdominal pain, and diarrhea to specific findings such as malabsorption, protein loosing enteropathy, luminal obstruction, eosinophilic ascites and effusion. We report here on a case of eosinophilic gastroenteritis causing enterobiliary fistula which is an extremely unusual complication

  17. Enterobiliary Fistula as a Complication of Eosinophilic Gastroenteritis: a Case Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Han Myun; Woo, Ji Young

    2008-01-01

    Eosinophilic gastroenteritis is an uncommon disease with variable clinical features characterized by eosinophilic infiltration. Clinical manifestations range from non-specific gastrointestinal complaints such as nausea, vomiting, crampy abdominal pain, and diarrhea to specific findings such as malabsorption, protein loosing enteropathy, luminal obstruction, eosinophilic ascites and effusion. We report here on a case of eosinophilic gastroenteritis causing enterobiliary fistula which is an extremely unusual complication

  18. Gastroenteritis in sentinel general practices, the Netherlands.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wit, M.A.S. de; Koopmans, M.P.G.; Kortbeek, L.M.; Leeuwen, N.J. van; Bartelds, A.I.M.; Duynhoven, Y.T.H.P. van

    2001-01-01

    From 1996 to 1999, the incidence of gastroenteritis in general practices and the role of a broad range of pathogens in the Netherlands were studied. All patients with gastroenteritis who had visited a general practitioner were reported. All patients who had visited a general practitioner for

  19. Development of rhabdomyolysis in a child after norovirus gastroenteritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishio, Tomohiro; Yonetani, Ryoko; Ito, Eisuke; Yoneta, Makiko; Maruo, Yoshihiro; Yoshida, Tokiko; Sugimoto, Tohru

    2016-11-04

    In children, the most significant cause of rhabdomyolysis or muscle breakdown is viral infection. However, there are no reports that norovirus, a gastroenteric virus that commonly infects children, specifically causes rhabdomyolysis. Here, we report the first pediatric case of norovirus-associated rhabdomyolysis. The patient, a 2-year-old boy with fever, diarrhea, and vomiting, was referred to our hospital with dysstasia and transaminitis. He was diagnosed with rhabdomyolysis. Additionally, norovirus genogroup GII was detected from stool samples by real-time quantitative reverse transcription Polymerase Chain Reaction, and thereafter, the norovirus GII.4 variant was identified. However, the association between rhabdomyolysis and the isolated norovirus variant was not clarified. After treatment the patient recovered without renal failure or disseminated intravascular coagulation. Rhabdomyolysis is a disease for which there is a need for early detection and treatment. If abnormal posture or muscle weakness is observed during the course of gastroenteritis, blood and urinary tests should be performed to rule out rhabdomyolysis.

  20. Group A rotavirus genotypes in hospital-acquired gastroenteritis in Italy, 2012-14.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ianiro, G; Delogu, R; Fiore, L; Monini, M; Ruggeri, F M

    2017-07-01

    Group A rotaviruses (RVA) are the leading cause of acute gastroenteritis (AGE) in young (aged rotavirus are presently known, most RVA infections in humans worldwide are related to five major G/P combinations: G1P[8], G2P[4], G3P[8], G4P[8], and G9P[8]. To provide the hospitals of the Italian surveillance network with update information on RVA AGE. During RVA gastroenteritis surveillance in Italy in 2012-14, a total of 2341 RVA-positive faecal samples were collected from children hospitalized with AGE, and RVA strains were genotyped following standard EuroRotaNet protocols. Most strains analysed belonged to the five major human genotypes and 118 out of 2341 (5.0%) were reported to be hospital-acquired. Comparison of the distributions of the RVA genotypes circulating in the community or associated with nosocomial infections showed a different distribution of genotypes circulating inside the hospital wards, with respect to those observed in the community. G1P[8] and G9P[8] RVA strains were detected frequently, whereas G12P[8] caused a single large nosocomial outbreak. The information from this study will be useful to implement guidelines for preventing RVA AGE and optimizing the management of patients in hospital wards. Copyright © 2017 The Healthcare Infection Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Molecular Diagnosis Of Human Boca virus Gastroenteritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kassem, N.N.; Kamel, E.M.; Ismail, G.A.; Emam, E.K.; Saber, S.M.; EL Ashry, M.A.

    2012-01-01

    The idea that human boca virus (HBoV) infection possibly plays a role in gastroenteritis has been suggested because of the frequent manifestation of gastrointestinal symptoms. The purpose of this study was to investigate the role of HBoV In children with gastroenteritis. We studied the etiologic agents in 100 fecal samples in children suffered from acute gastroenteritis. Bacterial etiological agents were dtected by conventional bacteriological culture, and viral etiologic agents were detected by rotavirus latex agglutination and conventional PCR for HBoV and enteric adenovirus. Enteropathogenic E-Coli (EPEC) was detected in 4% of cases. Rotatavirus, enteric adenovirus and co infection between rotavirus and adenovirus were detected in 14%, 6% and 2% respectively. Human boca virus was detected in 1% of cases without associated respiratory symptoms or co infection with other pathogen which suggests its role in children gastroenteritis

  2. ROTAVIRUS INFECTION. HOW TO REALLY PROTECT CHILDREN FROM SEVERE GASTROENTERITIS?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. A. Grechukha

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available According to the statistics of the recent 5 years, the share of rotavirus gastroenterites is 44-47% of all acute intestinal infections in children under 5 years of age in the Russian Federation. Up to 5% of mortality rate in children under 5 years of age is connected with rotavirus gastroenteritis. Rotavirus gastroenteritis takes an especially severe course in children of 6-24 months of age. The only reliable method of preventing this infection is vaccination. The authors present information on the rotavirus strains dominant in Russia and abroad, efficacy and safety of immunization with a pentavalent vaccine and the recommended schemes of its administration. This vaccine is registered in the Russian Federation; it is to be first used in the nearest future.

  3. Unexpectedly high burden of rotavirus gastroenteritis in very young infants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reilly Megan

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The highest incidence of rotavirus gastroenteritis has generally been reported in children 6-24 months of age. Young infants are thought to be partially protected by maternal antibodies acquired transplacentally or via breast milk. The purpose of our study was to assess the age distribution of children with confirmed community-acquired rotavirus gastroenteritis presenting to an urban referral hospital. Methods Children presenting to The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia with acute gastroenteritis have been monitored for the presence of rotavirus antigen in the stool by ELISA (followed by genotyping if ELISA-positive since the 1994-95 epidemic season. Results Over the last 12 rotavirus seasons prior to the introduction of the pentavalent rotavirus vaccine in 2006, stool specimens from 1646 patients tested positive for community-acquired rotavirus infection. Gender or age was not recorded in 6 and 5 cases, respectively. Overall, 58% of the cases occurred in boys. G1 was the predominant VP7 serotype, accounting for 72% of cases. The median (IQR age was 11 (5-21 months. A total of 790 (48% cases occurred in children outside the commonly quoted peak age range, with 27% in infants 24 months of age. A total of 220 (13% cases occurred during the first 3 months of life, and the highest number of episodes per month of age [97 (6%] was observed during the second month of life. Conclusions The incidence of community-acquired rotavirus gastroenteritis monitored over 12 seasons in the prevaccine era at a major university hospital was nearly constant for each month of age during the first year of life, revealing an unexpectedly high incidence of symptomatic rotavirus disease in infants

  4. Etiology and Risk Factors of Acute Gastroenteritis in a Taipei Emergency Department: Clinical Features for Bacterial Gastroenteritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Chao-Chih; Ji, Dar-Der; Wu, Fang-Tzy; Mu, Jung-Jung; Yang, Ji-Rong; Jiang, Donald Dah-Shyong; Lin, Wen-Yun; Chen, Wei-Ting; Yen, Muh-Yong; Wu, Ho-Sheng; Chen, Tony Hsiu-Hsi

    2016-01-01

    Background The causative pathogen is rarely identified in the emergency department (ED), since the results of cultures are usually unavailable. As a result, antimicrobial treatment may be overused. The aim of our study was to investigate the pathogens, risk factors of acute gastroenteritis, and predictors of acute bacterial gastroenteritis in the ED. Methods We conducted a matched case-control study of 627 stool samples and 612 matched pairs. Results Viruses (41.3%) were the leading cause of gastroenteritis, with noroviruses (32.2%) being the most prevalent, followed by bacteria (26.8%) and Giardia lamblia (12.4%). Taking antacids (adjusted odds ratio [aOR] 4.10; 95% confidence interval [CI], 2.57–6.53), household members/classmates with gastroenteritis (aOR 4.69; 95% CI, 2.76–7.96), attending a banquet (aOR 2.29; 95% CI, 1.64–3.20), dining out (aOR 1.70; 95% CI, 1.13–2.54), and eating raw oysters (aOR 3.10; 95% CI, 1.61–5.94) were highly associated with gastroenteritis. Elders (aOR 1.04; 05% CI, 1.02–1.05), those with CRP >10 mg/L (aOR 2.04; 95% CI, 1.15–3.62), or those who were positive for fecal leukocytes (aOR 2.04; 95% CI, 1.15–3.62) or fecal occult blood (aOR 1.97; 95% CI, 1.03–3.77) were more likely to be hospitalized in ED. In addition, presence of fecal leukocytes (time ratio [TR] 1.22; 95% CI, 1.06–1.41), abdominal pain (TR 1.20; 95% CI, 1.07–1.41), and frequency of vomiting (TR 0.79; 95% CI, 0.64–0.98) were significantly associated with the duration of acute gastroenteritis. Presence of fecal leukocytes (aOR 2.08; 95% CI, 1.42–3.05), winter season (aOR 0.45; 95% CI, 0.28–0.74), frequency of diarrhea (aOR 1.69; 95% CI, 1.01–2.83), and eating shrimp or crab (aOR 1.53; 95% CI, 1.05–2.23) were highly associated with bacterial gastroenteritis. The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve of the final model was 0.68 (95% CI, 0.55–0.63). Conclusions Acute bacterial gastroenteritis was highly associated with season

  5. Community-Acquired Rotavirus Gastroenteritis Compared with Adenovirus and Norovirus Gastroenteritis in Italian Children: A Pedianet Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Donà

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Rotavirus (RV is the commonest pathogen in the hospital and primary care settings, followed by Adenovirus (AV and Norovirus (NV. Only few studies that assess the burden of RV gastroenteritis at the community level have been carried out. Objectives. To estimate incidence, disease characteristics, seasonal distribution, and working days lost by parents of RV, AV, and NV gastroenteritis leading to a family pediatrician (FP visit among children < 5 years. Methods. 12-month, observational, prospective, FP-based study has been carried out using Pedianet database. Results. RVGE incidence was 1.04 per 100 person-years with the highest incidence in the first 2 years of life. Incidences of AVGEs (1.74 and NVGEs (1.51 were slightly higher with similar characteristics regarding age distribution and symptoms. Risk of hospitalisation, access to emergency room (ER, and workdays lost from parents were not significantly different in RVGEs compared to the other viral infections. Conclusions. Features of RVGE in terms of hospitalisation length and indirect cost are lower than those reported in previous studies. Results of the present study reflect the large variability of data present in the literature. This observation underlines the utility of primary care networks for AGE surveillance and further studies on community-acquired gastroenteritis in children.

  6. Septic arthritis and subsequent fatal septic shock caused by Vibrio vulnificus infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Emamifar, Amir; Asmussen Andreasen, Rikke; Andersen, Nanna Skaarup

    2015-01-01

    Vibrio vulnificus is a rare but potential fatal bacterium that can cause severe infections. Wound infections, primary sepsis and gastroenteritis are the most common clinical features. Septic arthritis caused by V. vulnificus is an atypical presentation that has been reported in only two case...

  7. [Practical lessons from the risk management of an outbreak of acute gastroenteritis in a public school].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morillo-García, Aurea; Sillero-Sánchez, Rocío; Aldana-Espinal, Josefa María; Nieto-Cervera, Pilar

    2005-01-01

    We present our reflections on the management of an acute gastroenteritis outbreak in a public school, which caused a public health crisis, and the conclusions drawn from this experience. The methodology of strengths, weaknesses, opportunities, and threats (SWOT) analysis was used. This article describes the epidemiology of the incident and the policy decisions made, but focuses on operational aspects of outbreak management. The experience of the outbreak control team, liaison with other organizations, and data management are discussed. The difficulties encountered by the outbreak team related to delay in declaring in the outbreak, lack of training in some of the entities involved, and incorrect use of the surveillance circuits. Current protocols and specific action plans for the management of outbreaks should be improved through self-evaluation and updating of resources and knowledge.

  8. Serum bicarbonate and dehydration severity in gastroenteritis

    OpenAIRE

    Narchi, H.

    1998-01-01

    The concentration of bicarbonate was measured in serum samples from 106 children with gastroenteritis and dehydration. A concentration less than 22 mmol/l was more common in children with severe dehydration, but the magnitude of bicarbonate reduction was not significantly different with increasing degrees of dehydration. Doctors should not rely on the serum bicarbonate concentration when assessing fluid deficit.



  9. Pediatric gastroenteritis in the emergency department: Practice evaluation in Belgium, France, The Netherlands and Switzerland

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    I. Pelc (Isidore); S. Redant (Sébastien); S. Julliand (Sébastien); X. Llor; M. Lorrot (Mathie); R. Oostenbrink (Rianne); V. Gajdos (Vincent); F. Angoulvant (François)

    2014-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Based on European recommendations of ESPGHAN/ESPID from 2008, first line therapy for dehydration caused by acute gastroenteritis (AGE) is oral rehydration solution (ORS). In case of oral route failure, nasogastric tube enteral rehydration is as efficient as intra-venous

  10. Additional value of typing Noroviruses in gastroenteritis outbreaks in Amsterdam, The Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koek, A. G.; Bovée, L. P. M. J.; van den Hoek, J. A. R.; Bos, A. J.; Bruisten, S. M.

    2006-01-01

    In Amsterdam, 17 of the 55 gastroenteritis (GI) outbreaks reported from January 2002 to May 2003 were confirmed to be caused by noroviruses (NV). In this study, we describe the molecular epidemiology of a group of nine outbreaks associated with a catering firm and two outbreaks, 5 months apart, in

  11. An outbreak of norovirus-associated acute gastroenteritis associated with contaminated barrelled water in many schools in Zhejiang, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheng, Minyang; Song, Jianqiang; He, Fan; Qiu, Yinwei; Wu, Haocheng; Lu, Qinbao; Feng, Yan; Lin, Junfen; Chen, Enfu; Chai, Chengliang

    2017-01-01

    Objectives More than 900 students and teachers at many schools in Jiaxing city developed acute gastroenteritis in February 2014. An immediate epidemiological investigation was conducted to identify the pathogen, infection sources and route of transmission. Methods The probable cases and confirmed cases were defined as students or teachers with diarrhoea or vomiting present since the term began in February 2014. An active search was conducted for undiagnosed cases among students and teachers. Details such as demographic characteristics, gastrointestinal symptoms, and drinking water preference and frequency were collected via a uniform epidemiological questionnaire. A case-control study was implemented, and odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals were calculated. Rectal swabs from several patients, food handlers and barrelled water factory workers, as well as water and food samples, were collected to test for potential bacteria and viruses. Results A total of 924 cases fit the definition of the probable case, including 8 cases of laboratory-confirmed norovirus infection at 13 schools in Jiaxing city between February 12 and February 21, 2014. The case-control study demonstrated that barrelled water was a risk factor (OR: 20.15, 95% CI: 2.59–156.76) and that bottled water and boiled barrelled water were protective factors (OR: 0.31, 95% CI: 0.13–0.70, and OR: 0.36, 95% CI: 0.16–0.77). A total of 11 rectal samples and 8 barrelled water samples were detected as norovirus-positive, and the genotypes of viral strains were the same (GII). The norovirus that contaminated the barrelled water largely came from the asymptomatic workers. Conclusions This acute gastroenteritis outbreak was caused by barrelled water contaminated by norovirus. The outbreak was controlled after stopping the supply of barrelled water. The barrelled water supply in China represents a potential source of acute gastroenteritis outbreaks due to the lack of surveillance and supervision

  12. Noroviruses associated with acute gastroenteritis in a children's day care facility in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gallimore C.I.

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Noroviruses (Norwalk-like viruses are an important cause of gastroenteritis worldwide. They are the most common cause of outbreaks of gastroenteritis in the adult population and occur in nursing homes for the elderly, geriatric wards, medical wards, and in hotel and restaurant settings. Food-borne outbreaks have also occurred following consumption of contaminated oysters. This study describes the application of a reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR assay using random primers (PdN6 and specific Ni and E3 primers, directed at a small region of the RNA-dependent RNA polymerase-coding region of the norovirus genome, and DNA sequencing for the detection and preliminary characterisation of noroviruses in outbreaks of gastroenteritis in children in Brazil. The outbreak samples were collected from children <5 years of age at the Bertha Lutz children's day care facility at Oswaldo Cruz Foundation (Fiocruz, Rio de Janeiro, that occurred between 1996 and 1998, where no pathogen had been identified. At the Bertha Lutz day care center facility, only Fiocruz's employee children are provided for, and they come from different social, economic and cultural backgrounds. Three distinct genogroup II strains were detected in three outbreaks in 1997/98 and were most closely related to genotypes GII-3 (Mexico virus and GII-4 (Grimsby virus, both of which have been detected in paediatric and adult outbreaks of gastroenteritis worldwide.

  13. Celiac disease causing severe osteomalacia: an association still present in Morocco!

    OpenAIRE

    Tahiri, Latifa; Azzouzi, Hamida; Squalli, Ghita; Abourazzak, Fatimazahra; Harzy, Taoufik

    2014-01-01

    Celiac disease (CD), a malabsorption syndrome caused by hypersensitivity to gliadin fraction of gluten. CD can manifest with classic symptoms; however, significant myopathy and multiple fractures are rarely the predominant presentation of untreated celiac disease. Osteomalacia complicating celiac disease had become more and more rare. We describe here a case of osteomalacia secondary to a longstanding untreated celiac disease. This patient complained about progressive bone and muscular pain, ...

  14. Unusual Presentation of Recurrent Pyogenic Bilateral Psoas Abscess Causing Bilateral Pulmonary Embolism by Iliac Vein Compression

    OpenAIRE

    Ijaz, Mohsin; Sakam, Sailaja; Ashraf, Umair; Marquez, Jose Gomez

    2015-01-01

    Patient: Male, 47 Final Diagnosis: Bilateral psoas abscess • acute lower extremity deep vein thrombosis • bilateral pulmonary embolism Symptoms: Progressive left leg swelling • productive cough with whitish sputum • right flank pain Medication: Antibiotics and anticoagulation Clinical Procedure: CT-guided percutaneous drain placement Specialty: Internal Medicine/Critical Care Objective: Unusual presentation Background: Psoas abscesses are a known cause of back pain, but they have not been rep...

  15. Drug hypersensitivity caused by alteration of the MHC-presented self-peptide repertoire

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ostrov, David A; Grant, Barry J; Pompeu, Yuri A

    2012-01-01

    cells, thus causing the equivalent of an alloreactive T-cell response. Indeed, we identified specific self-peptides that are presented only in the presence of abacavir and that were recognized by T cells of hypersensitive patients. The assays that we have established can be applied to test additional...... unclear. Here we show that abacavir can bind within the F pocket of the peptide-binding groove of HLA-B*57:01, thereby altering its specificity. This provides an explanation for HLA-linked idiosyncratic adverse drug reactions, namely that drugs can alter the repertoire of self-peptides presented to T...

  16. Full thickness burn caused by exposure to giant hogweed: delayed presentation, histological features and surgical management.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Chan, Jeffrey C Y

    2012-02-01

    We report the case of a 10-year-old boy with a full thickness chemical burn on his right pretibial area due to phytophotodermatitis (PPD) following contact with giant hogweed (Heracleum mantegazzianum). Although cutaneous burns due to plants are a well-established cause of chemical burn, previous reports described partial thickness burns that healed with conservative measures. This patient presented to our unit two weeks after the initial injury with an established full thickness burn. Debridement and split thickness skin grafting was required. We presented the histological features of the debrided skin specimen and discussed potential factors leading to this unexpected full thickness injury.

  17. Prevalence of group a rotavirus, enteric adenovirus, norovirus and astrovirus infections among children with acute gastroenteritis in al-qassim, saudi arabia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meqdam, M.M.

    2007-01-01

    To investigate the prevalence of Rotavirus, Adenovirus, Norovirus, and Astrovirus among Saudi children with gastroenteritis. This study was conducted at the Department of Medical Laboratories, Qassim University during the winter seasons of the years 2004 and 2005. A total of 284 diarrhoeal fecal specimens collected from children were tested for the gastroenteritis causing viruses using enzyme immunoassay. Of the 284 specimens, 142 (50%) were found to be positive for viruses causing gastroenteritis. Rotavirus (66.2%) was the most frequently detected, followed by adenovirus (15.5%), norovirus and astrovirus each with 9.2%. All of rotavirus detected belonged to group A. Eight specimens were found positive by two viruses. The introduction of simple and rapid tests for diagnosis of viruses causing gastroenteritis in our pediatric hospitals will improve patient care by reducing unnecessary treatments and hospital stay for patients. (author)

  18. Clinical dehydration and glomerular filtration rate in acute paediatric gastroenteritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milani, Gregorio P; Fossali, Emilio F; Perri, Alessandra; Vettori, Arianna; Grillo, Paolo; Agostoni, Carlo

    2013-08-01

    To evaluate changes in glomerular filtration rate in acute gastroenteritis. The correlation between two clinical diagnostic scales and glomerular filtration rate has been investigated in 113 children with acute gastroenteritis in a paediatric emergency setting. A significant reduction of GFR was found in 10% children less than, and 5% children higher than, 2 years of age with acute gastroenteritis. The differences observed as for risk of renal hypoperfusion suggests to consider the age of children as an important determinant to consider the dehydration status in acute gastroenteritis. ©2013 Foundation Acta Paediatrica. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Prevalence of rotavirus in children hospitalized with acute gastroenteritis in Imam Sajjad Hospital of Yasuj, 2011

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P Khodadadi

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background & Aim: Rotavirus infection is the most common cause of dehydrating and gastroenteritis among children worldwide. . The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of rotavirus in children hospitalized with acute gastroenteritis in Imam Sajjad Hospital of Yasuj. Methods: This cross sectional – descriptive study was done on 184 stool samples of children younger than 7 years of age hospitalized at Imam Sajjad hospital of Yasuj in 2011 due to acute gastroenteritis. All samples were routinely analyzed for detection of rotavirus by Enzyme Immunoassay (EIA test. Data was analyzed by SPSS version 16, Chi-square test and Fisher's exact test. Results: Of the 184 samples analyzed, 52(28.26% were positive.The Results showed significant relationship between the seasonal distribution and virus detection (p=0/001. The highest incidence of rotavirus was seen in autumn with frequency of (48.08% and the lowest in spring (5.77%. Conclusions: According to high prevalence of rotavirus infection, continual surveillance is necessary to provide useful data for formulating effective vaccines and perform diarrhea prevention programs. Key words: Rotavirus, Gastroenteritis, Prevalence, Elisa

  20. A community-based gastroenteritis outbreak after Typhoon Haiyan, Leyte, Philippines, 2013

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ray Justin Ventura

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Three weeks after Typhoon Haiyan, an increasing number of acute gastroenteritis cases were reported in Kananga, Leyte, an area where evacuated residents had returned home two days after the disaster. An outbreak investigation was conducted to identify the source and risk factors associated with the increase of gastroenteritis. Methods: A case was defined as any person in Kananga who developed acute diarrhoea (≥ 3 times/24 hours and any of the following symptoms: fever, nausea, vomiting or abdominal pain from 11 November 2013 to 10 December 2013. Active case finding was conducted by reviewing medical records, and a case-control study was conducted. Rectal swabs and water samples were tested for bacteriological examination. Results: One hundred and five cases were identified. Multivariate analysis revealed that consumption of untreated drinking-water was associated with illness (adjusted odds ratio: 18.2. Both rectal swabs and municipal water samples tested positive for Aeromonas hydrophila. On inspection of the municipal water system, breaks in the distribution pipes were found with some submerged in river water. Conclusion: This acute gastroenteritis outbreak was most likely caused by Aeromonas hydrophila and transmitted through a contaminated water source. This study highlights that areas less damaged by a disaster that do not require ongoing evacuation centres can still have acute gastroenteritis outbreaks. All affected areas should be monitored during a disaster response, not just those with evacuation centres. Boiling or chlorinating of water should also be recommended for all areas affected by disaster.

  1. Pancreatic Calculus Causing Biliary Obstruction: Endoscopic Therapy for a Rare Initial Presentation of Chronic Pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shetty, Anurag J; Pai, C Ganesh; Shetty, Shiran; Balaraju, Girisha

    2015-09-01

    Biliary obstruction in chronic calcific pancreatitis (CCP) is often caused by inflammatory or fibrotic strictures of the bile duct, carcinoma of head of pancreas or less commonly by compression from pseudocysts. Pancreatic calculi causing ampullary obstruction and leading to obstructive jaundice is extremely rare. The medical records of all patients with CCP or biliary obstruction who underwent endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) over 4 years between 2010-2014 at Kasturba Medical College, Manipal were analyzed. Five patients of CCP with impacted pancreatic calculi at the ampulla demonstrated during ERCP were identified. All 5 presented with biliary obstruction and were incidentally detected to have CCP when evaluated for the same; 3 patients had features of cholangitis. All the patients were managed successfully by endoscopic papillotomy and extraction of pancreatic calculi from the ampulla with resolution of biliary obstruction. Pancreatic calculus causing ampullary obstruction, though very rare, should be considered as a possibility in patients with CCP complicated by biliary obstruction. Endoscopic therapy is affective in the resolution of biliary obstruction in such patients.

  2. Review of epidemiology, clinical presentation, diagnosis, and treatment of common primary psychiatric causes of cutaneous disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krooks, J A; Weatherall, A G; Holland, P J

    2018-06-01

    Approximately half of all patients presenting to dermatologists exhibit signs and symptoms of psychiatric conditions that are either primary or secondary to cutaneous disease. Because patients typically resist psychiatric consult, dermatologists often are on the front line in evaluating and treating these patients. Accordingly, distinguishing the specific underlying or resulting psychiatric condition is essential for effective treatment. The etiology, epidemiology, clinical presentation, diagnosis, and first-line treatment of specific primary psychiatric causes of dermatologic conditions, including delusional infestation, Morgellons syndrome, olfactory reference syndrome, body dysmorphic disorder, excoriation disorder, trichotillomania, and dermatitis artefacta are discussed here, followed by a discussion of the recommended treatment approach with an overview of the different first-line therapies discussed in this review, specifically cognitive behavioral therapy, atypical antipsychotics, selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors, and tricyclic antidepressants. Included is a guide for dermatologists to use while prescribing these medications.

  3. Presentation of common cause failures in fault tree structure of Krsko PSA : an historical overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vrbanic, I.; Kosutic, I.; Vukovic, I.; Simic, Z.

    2003-01-01

    Failure of multiple components due to a common cause represents one of the most important issues in evaluation of system reliability or unavailability. The frequency of such events has relatively low expectancy, when compared to random failures, which affect individual components. However, in many cases the consequence is a direct loss of safety system or mitigative safety function. For this reason, the modeling of a common cause failure (CCF) and its presentation in fault tree structure is of the uttermost importance in probabilistic safety analyses (PSA). During the past decade, PSA model of Krsko NPP has undergone many small changes and a couple of major ones in fulfilling its basic purpose, which was serving as a tool for providing an appropriate information on the risk associated with actual plant design and operation. All changes to Krsko PSA model were undertaken in order to make it a better tool and / or to make it represent the plant in more accurate manner. The paper provides an overview of changes in CCF modeling in the fault tree structure from the initial PSA model development till present. (author)

  4. Plasma water as a diagnostic tool in the assessment of dehydration in children with acute gastroenteritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plaisier, Annemarie; Maingay-de Groof, Femke; Mast-Harwig, Roechama; Kalkman, Patricia M J; Wulkan, Remi W; Verwers, Renee; Neele, Marjolein; Hop, Wim C J; Groeneweg, Michael

    2010-07-01

    Acute gastroenteritis is common in childhood. The estimation of the degree of dehydration is essential for management of acute gastroenteritis. Plasma water was assessed as a diagnostic tool in children with acute gastroenteritis and dehydration admitted to hospital. In a prospective cohort study, 101 patients presenting at the emergency department with dehydration were included. Clinical assessment, routine laboratory tests, and plasma water measurement were performed. Plasma water was measured as a percentage of water content using dry weight method. During admission, patients were rehydrated in 12 h. Weight gain at the end of the rehydration period and 2 weeks thereafter was used to determine the percentage of weight loss as a gold standard for the severity of dehydration. Clinical assessment of dehydration was not significantly associated with the percentage of weight loss. Blood urea nitrogen (r = 0.3, p = 0.03), base excess (r =-0.31, p = 0.03), and serum bicarbonate (r = 0.32, p = 0.02) were significantly correlated with the percentage of weight loss. Plasma water did not correlate with the percentage of weight loss. On the basis of the presented data, plasma water should not be used as a diagnostic tool in the assessment of dehydration in children with acute gastroenteritis.

  5. Household catastrophic healthcare expenditure and impoverishment due to rotavirus gastroenteritis requiring hospitalization in Malaysia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tharani Loganathan

    Full Text Available While healthcare costs for rotavirus gastroenteritis requiring hospitalization may be burdensome on households in Malaysia, exploration on the distribution and catastrophic impact of these expenses on households are lacking.We assessed the economic burden, levels and distribution of catastrophic healthcare expenditure, the poverty impact on households and inequities related to healthcare payments for acute gastroenteritis requiring hospitalization in Malaysia.A two-year prospective, hospital-based study was conducted from 2008 to 2010 in an urban (Kuala Lumpur and rural (Kuala Terengganu setting in Malaysia. All children under the age of 5 years admitted for acute gastroenteritis were included. Patients were screened for rotavirus and information on healthcare expenditure was obtained.Of the 658 stool samples collected at both centers, 248 (38% were positive for rotavirus. Direct and indirect costs incurred were significantly higher in Kuala Lumpur compared with Kuala Terengganu (US$222 Vs. US$45; p<0.001. The mean direct and indirect costs for rotavirus gastroenteritis consisted 20% of monthly household income in Kuala Lumpur, as compared with only 5% in Kuala Terengganu. Direct medical costs paid out-of-pocket caused 141 (33% households in Kuala Lumpur to experience catastrophic expenditure and 11 (3% households to incur poverty. However in Kuala Terengganu, only one household (0.5% experienced catastrophic healthcare expenditure and none were impoverished. The lowest income quintile in Kuala Lumpur was more likely to experience catastrophic payments compared to the highest quintile (87% vs 8%. The concentration index for out-of-pocket healthcare payments was closer to zero at Kuala Lumpur (0.03 than at Kuala Terengganu (0.24.While urban households were wealthier, healthcare expenditure due to gastroenteritis had more catastrophic and poverty impact on the urban poor. Universal rotavirus vaccination would reduce both disease burden and health

  6. Unusual Presentation of Hydatidosis - Neck Lump Causing Costo-Vertebral Erosion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alam, Mehtab; Hasan, Syed-Abrar; Hashmi, Shahab-Farkhund

    2016-09-01

    Hydatid disease caused by larval stage of Echinococcus has been recognized endemically in many countries. Liver and lungs are the most commonly affected organs. Involvement of the head and neck region is rare and bony erosion due to hydatidosis is even rarer. We report a case of a 17-year-old girl from a poor socio-economic background who presented with a right sided supraclavicular lump, which after surgical excision and histopathological examination was diagnosed as hydatid cyst of neck. Because of its rarity in the neck region, primary diagnosis of hydatid cyst is overlooked and usually not included in the differential diagnosis of cystic neck swellings. A high index of suspicion is necessary to diagnose hydatid disease in an unusual location even in endemic areas.

  7. Epidermoid cyst causing hemifacial spasm epidermoid cyst in cerebellopontine angle presenting with hemifacial spasm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Murat Alemdar

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Hemifacial Spasm (HS occurs idiopathically or secondary to the lesions compressing the root exit zone of the facial nerve symptomatically. Symptomatic HS is generally due to vascular compression. We report on a 23-year-old male with right sided HS for a month. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI of the brain revealed a well-demarcated epidermoid cyst in the right cerebellopontine cistern. It was hypointense on T1-weighted imaging, hyperintense on T2-weighted imaging without contrast enhancement, hyperintense on DWI, and slightly hypointense on ADC relative to the brain. Although it caused shifting of the pons and medulla to the left side and compression of the right cerebellar peduncles and fourth ventricle, the sole symptom of the patient was HS. Clinicians are advised to request MRI/scan for brainstem lesions from the patients with HS. Epidermoid cysts in cerebellopontine cistern may present with HS as the sole symptom.

  8. Celiac disease causing severe osteomalacia: an association still present in Morocco!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tahiri, Latifa; Azzouzi, Hamida; Squalli, Ghita; Abourazzak, Fatimazahra; Harzy, Taoufik

    2014-01-01

    Celiac disease (CD), a malabsorption syndrome caused by hypersensitivity to gliadin fraction of gluten. CD can manifest with classic symptoms; however, significant myopathy and multiple fractures are rarely the predominant presentation of untreated celiac disease. Osteomalacia complicating celiac disease had become more and more rare. We describe here a case of osteomalacia secondary to a longstanding untreated celiac disease. This patient complained about progressive bone and muscular pain, weakness, fractures and skeletal deformities. Radiological and laboratory findings were all in favor of severe osteomalacia. Improvement of patient's weakness and laboratory abnormalities was obvious after treatment with gluten free diet, vitamin D, calcium and iron. This case affirms that chronic untreated celiac disease, can lead to an important bone loss and irreversible complications like skeletal deformities.

  9. DIAGNOSTICS AND THERAPY IN CHILDREN'S ACUTE GASTROENTERITIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.D. Bakradze

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The work aimed at studying a series of diagnostic aspects and determination of the possible treatment of children with acute gastroenetrites according to the protocol based on international recommendations and standards. The study involved 130 children, of whom in 71 patients the presence of rotavirus antigen in coprofilters was checked via latex particle agglutination method. In 85% rotavirus infection was confirmed. It was shown that the majority of cases fall on November to may. Infant and early children are the most susceptible to rotavirus gastroenteritis. The analysis of therapy results showed that antibioticsfree treatment of watery diarrhea patients worked well, and prescription of antibacterial therapy for the concomitant bacterial infection does not influence the time of gastroenteritis reduction. The results of dehydration therapy show that oral rehydration is not always effective for the 2nd stage dehydration, especially with late treatment. However, the time of recovery (diarrhea reduction does not depend on the type of rehydration or symptomatic therapy. A diagnostic algorithm that helps use the minimum diagnostic methods in stationary conditions and at the same time provides the optimum scope of therapeutic intervention was worked out.Key words: rotavirus infection, children, rehydration, antibacterial therapy.

  10. Group A rotavirus gastroenteritis: post-vaccine era, genotypes and zoonotic transmission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luchs, Adriana; Timenetsky, Maria do Carmo Sampaio Tavares

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT This article provides a review of immunity, diagnosis, and clinical aspects of rotavirus disease. It also informs about the changes in epidemiology of diarrheal disease and genetic diversity of circulating group A rotavirus strains following the introduction of vaccines. Group A rotavirus is the major pathogen causing gastroenteritis in animals. Its segmented RNA genome can lead to the emergence of new or unusual strains in human populations via interspecies transmission and/or reassortment events. PMID:27462899

  11. Causes of endogenous uveitis in cats presented to referral clinics in North Carolina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jinks, Maggie R; English, Robert V; Gilger, Brian C

    2016-07-01

    To investigate the causes of endogenous uveitis in cats presenting to referral ophthalmology clinics in North Carolina. Medical records of cats diagnosed with endogenous uveitis at North Carolina State University's College of Veterinary Medicine (NCSU-CVM) or Animal Eye Care Associates of Cary, NC between 2003 and 2015 were reviewed. Inclusion criteria were cats that had complete diagnostic workups, including clinical, clinicopathological, serological, and histopathological data, as well as imaging modalities. Serology was consistently completed for feline leukemia virus (FeLV), feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV), feline coronavirus (FCoV), Toxoplasma gondii, and Bartonella spp. One hundred and twenty cats met the inclusion criteria. Seroprevalence of FeLV (2.7%), FIV (7.3%), FCoV (34.7%), T. gondii (23.7%), and Bartonella spp. (43.2%) was observed, with a combined seroprevalence of 59.2%. Nineteen cats (15.8%) were diagnosed with feline infectious peritonitis (FIP) based on clinical, hematological, serological, histopathological, and necropsy findings. The average age of all cases was 7.62 years, while the average age of cats diagnosed with FIP was 1.82 years. Neoplasia was diagnosed in six cats (5.0%). No underlying etiology was found in 49 cats (40.8%). Both idiopathic and neoplastic causes of uveitis were less prevalent than previously reported in studies, while seropositivity was higher than previously reported for the study area. This may be due to improved diagnostic capabilities or that cats with infectious disease were more likely to be referred. Because of the high prevalence of FIP, young cats with uveitis should be evaluated for hyperglobulinemia and FCoV serology should be performed as minimal diagnostics. © 2015 American College of Veterinary Ophthalmologists.

  12. Anaphylactoid Purpura Manifested after Acute Gastroenteritis with Severe Dehydration in an 8-Year-Old Male Child: A Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thakkar, Umang G; Vanikar, Aruna V; Trivedi, Hargovind L

    2015-12-01

    Anaphylactoid purpura, also known as Henoch-Schönleinpurpura (HSP), is an IgA-mediated vasculitis that tends to be a benign disease of childhood. Up to 50% of cases are preceded by an upper tract respiratory infection caused by group-A beta-hemolytic streptococcus and present with the common tetrad of abdominal pain, arthritis, purpuric rash, and renal involvement. The majority of patients recover completely. Here we document a rare case of anaphylactoid purpura which manifested with skin lesions in the form of palpable purpura following about of acute gastroenteritis with severe dehydration; it was treated with a short regimen of steroid therapy, which resulted in the complete remission of the disease. We conclude that prompt diagnosis and multidisciplinary intervention will lead to appropriate management-consisting of the installation of early short-course steroid therapy and thus, prevent further complications and the recurrence of the disease.

  13. Contributions of past and present human generations to committed warming caused by carbon dioxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedlingstein, Pierre; Solomon, Susan

    2005-08-02

    We developed a highly simplified approach to estimate the contributions of the past and present human generations to the increase of atmospheric CO(2) and associated global average temperature increases. For each human generation of adopted 25-year length, we use simplified emission test cases to estimate the committed warming passed to successive children, grandchildren, and later generations. We estimate that the last and the current generation contributed approximately two thirds of the present-day CO(2)-induced warming. Because of the long time scale required for removal of CO(2) from the atmosphere as well as the time delays characteristic of physical responses of the climate system, global mean temperatures are expected to increase by several tenths of a degree for at least the next 20 years even if CO(2) emissions were immediately cut to zero; that is, there is a commitment to additional CO(2)-induced warming even in the absence of emissions. If the rate of increase of CO(2) emissions were to continue up to 2025 and then were cut to zero, a temperature increase of approximately 1.3 degrees C compared to preindustrial conditions would still occur in 2100, whereas a constant-CO(2)-emissions scenario after 2025 would more than double the 2100 warming. These calculations illustrate the manner in which each generation inherits substantial climate change caused by CO(2) emissions that occurred previously, particularly those of their parents, and shows that current CO(2) emissions will contribute significantly to the climate change of future generations.

  14. Presentations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2007-01-01

    The presented materials consist of presentations of international workshop which held in Warsaw from 4 to 5 October 2007. Main subject of the meeting was progress in manufacturing as well as research program development for neutron detector which is planned to be placed at GANIL laboratory and will be used in nuclear spectroscopy research

  15. Long-term patency of experimental magnetic compression gastroenteric anastomoses achieved with covered stents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cope, C; Ginsberg, G G

    2001-06-01

    Our aim was to evaluate the efficacy of a prototype "YO-YO"-shaped covered stent for keeping experimental magnetic compression gastroenteric fistulas patent for 6 months. Magnets were introduced perorally with endoscopic and fluoroscopic guidance and were mated across the gastric and jejunal walls of 5 dogs. After a mean of 5.5 days a 12-mm diameter YO-YO stent was placed perorally in the resulting fistula. The gastroenteric anastomosis (GEA) with stent was observed endoscopically and gastrographically at 1- to 2-month intervals. There was no morbidity and there were no significant weight changes. The GEA was widely patent at necropsy at 6 months (n = 4); partial membrane separation occurred at 5 months in the fifth dog. There was minor breakage of the stent prongs in 2 animals. Peroral creation of a stented magnetic compression GEA is safe and provides long-term patency. This technique may be potentially useful for managing gastric outlet obstruction caused by malignancy.

  16. Epidemiology and genotype analysis of sapovirus associated with gastroenteritis outbreaks in Alberta, Canada: 2004-2007.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pang, Xiaoli L; Lee, Bonita E; Tyrrell, Gregory J; Preiksaitis, Jutta K

    2009-02-15

    This study describes the epidemiology and circulating strains of sapovirus associated with gastroenteritis outbreaks in Alberta, Canada, from 2004 to 2007. Sapovirus was an important cause of gastroenteritis outbreaks, accounting for 43 (17.6%) of 244 outbreaks in which all samples tested were negative for norovirus. All 4 human sapovirus genotypes, GI, GII, GIV, and GV, were found in samples during these outbreaks. The greatest amount of sapovirus-associated outbreak activity occurred in 2007, after the emergence of genotype GIV in December 2006. The majority of sapovirus-associated outbreaks in Alberta during this period (27 [62.8%] of 43) occurred in hospitals, community long-term care facilities, and senior lodges. Adults>65 years of age were the age group most commonly affected.

  17. Norwalk virus gastroenteritis following raw oyster consumption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunn, R A; Janowski, H T; Lieb, S; Prather, E C; Greenberg, H B

    1982-03-01

    In January, 1980, six out of 13 persons (46%) attending a party in a small northwest Florida town near the Gulf of Mexico became ill with Norwalk virus gastroenteritis after eating raw oysters. Symptoms experienced by the ill persons were principally nausea (100%), vomiting (83%) and diarrhea (50%) and were of brief duration. The symptom complex and epidemiology of Norwalk virus infection closely resemble the gastrointestinal illness commonly referred to as the 24-hour intestinal flu or "stomach flu." Norwalk virus infection was identified in this outbreak by application of a recently developed sensitive and specific serologic radioimmunoassay. Oysters from the incriminated batch had fecal coliform levels above recommended standards; however, recent studies of oyster-harvesting waters have shown only a weak correlation between fecal coliforms and the presence of enteric viruses. Further studies are needed to determine whether modifications of monitoring modalities for oyster-harvesting waters are needed.

  18. AFSC/NMML: Known human-caused marine mammal injury and mortalities from 2007 to present

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS) is required under the MMPA to estimate the annual human-caused mortality and serious injury of marine mammal stocks by...

  19. Biochemical and biophysical characterization of the transmissible gastroenteritis coronavirus fusion core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ma Guangpeng; Feng Youjun; Gao Feng; Wang Jinzi; Liu Cheng; Li Yijing

    2005-01-01

    Transmissible gastroenteritis coronavirus (TGEV) is one of the most destructive agents, responsible for the enteric infections that are lethal for suckling piglets, causing enormous economic loss to the porcine fostering industry every year. Although it has been known that TGEV spiker protein is essential for the viral entry for many years, the detail knowledge of the TGEV fusion protein core is still very limited. Here, we report that TGEV fusion core (HR1-SGGRGG-HR2), in vitro expressed in GST prokaryotic expression system, shares the typical properties of the trimer of coiled-coil heterodimer (six α-helix bundle), which has been confirmed by a combined series of biochemical and biophysical evidences including size exclusion chromatography (gel-filtration), chemical crossing, and circular diagram. The 3D homologous structure model presents its most likely structure, extremely similar to those of the coronaviruses documented. Taken together, TGEV spiker protein belongs to the class I fusion protein, characterized by the existence of two heptad-repeat (HR) regions, HR1 and HR2, and the present knowledge about the truncated TGEV fusion protein core may facilitate in the design of the small molecule or polypeptide drugs targeting the membrane fusion between TGEV and its host

  20. Presentations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2007-01-01

    The PARIS meeting held in Cracow, Poland from 14 to 15 May 2007. The main subjects discussed during this meeting were the status of international project dedicated to gamma spectroscopy research. The scientific research program includes investigations of giant dipole resonance, probe of hot nuclei induced in heavy reactions, Jacobi shape transitions, isospin mixing and nuclear multifragmentation. The mentioned programme needs Rand D development such as new scintillations materials as lanthanum chlorides and bromides as well as new photo detection sensors as avalanche photodiodes - such subjects are also subjects of discussion. Additionally results of computerized simulations of scintillation detectors properties by means of GEANT- 4 code are presented

  1. Eosinophilic Gastroenteritis: Case Report and Review in Search for Diagnostic Key Points

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guillermo López-Medina

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Eosinophilic gastroenteritis is considered an uncommon disease with a low incidence rate that remains as a diagnostic challenge for the clinician, in spite of the fact that seventy years have passed since its original description. Hereby we present the case of a 29-year-old male without history of allergies who was evaluated for unspecific gastrointestinal symptoms, without relevant findings on physical examination and presenting an initial complete blood count (CBC with severe eosinophilia. The patient was evaluated and the diagnosis of eosinophilic gastroenteritis was confirmed by histopathological findings. The relevance of the case resides in highlighting the lack of guidelines or consensus for histological diagnosis being virtually the only one available. To a similar extent, treatment evidence is based on case series with a reasonable number of patients and case reports.

  2. Eosinophilic Gastroenteritis: Case Report and Review in Search for Diagnostic Key Points

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Medina, Guillermo; Gallo, Manuel; Prado, Alejandro; Vicuña-Honorato, Iliana; Castillo Díaz de León, Roxana

    2015-01-01

    Eosinophilic gastroenteritis is considered an uncommon disease with a low incidence rate that remains as a diagnostic challenge for the clinician, in spite of the fact that seventy years have passed since its original description. Hereby we present the case of a 29-year-old male without history of allergies who was evaluated for unspecific gastrointestinal symptoms, without relevant findings on physical examination and presenting an initial complete blood count (CBC) with severe eosinophilia. The patient was evaluated and the diagnosis of eosinophilic gastroenteritis was confirmed by histopathological findings. The relevance of the case resides in highlighting the lack of guidelines or consensus for histological diagnosis being virtually the only one available. To a similar extent, treatment evidence is based on case series with a reasonable number of patients and case reports. PMID:26075112

  3. Acute gastroenteritis: evidence-based management of pediatric patients [digest].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brady, KeriAnne; Pade, Kathryn H

    2018-02-01

    Although most cases of acute gastroenteritis require minimal medical intervention, severe dehydration and hypoglycemia may develop in cases of prolonged vomiting and diarrhea. The mainstay of treatment for mild-to-moderately dehydrated patients with acute gastroenteritis should be oral rehydration solution. Antiemetics allow for improved tolerance of oral rehydration solution, and, when used appropriately, can decrease the need for intravenous fluids and hospitalization. This issue reviews the common etiologies of acute gastroenteritis, discusses more-severe conditions that should be considered in the differential diagnosis, and provides evidence-based recommendations for management of acute gastroenteritis in patients with mild-to-moderate dehydration, severe dehydration, and hypoglycemia. [Points & Pearls is a digest of Pediatric Emergency Medicine Practice].

  4. [Gastroenteritis due to Plesiomonas shigelloides--rare cases in the Western world].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knebel, U; Sloot, N; Eikenberg, M; Borsdorf, H; Höffler, U; Riemann, J F

    2001-02-15

    Plesiomonas shigelloides is a common pathogen in tropical regions, whereas it is rarely isolated in temperate climates. It is most often found in surface water and fish. During the last 10 years it was found to cause gastroenteritis 6 times in Ludwigshafen. Not all of these patients reported a trip to foreign countries. A 54-year-old male patient was hospitalized after a trip to Malaysia with strong greenish watery diarrhea and chills. On physical examination we saw a dehydrated patient in severely reduced general condition. The stool frequency was 30/d. The laboratory examinations only showed elevated parameters of inflammation. Plesiomonas shigelloides was cultivated in the stool cultures. With appropriate substitution of fluid and electrolytes, and antidiarrheal therapy the patient resumed a normal diet without any complications. Three days later his bowel movements were normal and his general condition was greatly improved. We withheld antibiotic therapy because of the noncomplicated course of illness. In Germany infections with Plesiomonas shigelloides are rare, an increase is observed because of increasing tourism to tropical regions. The course of infection is sometimes asymptomatic, but usually patients develop an acute gastroenteritis. Especially immunocompromised patients can show serious courses of infection. Plesiomonas shigelloides should be included in the differential diagnosis of acute gastroenteritis after journeys to tropical regions. Some of our patients, however, denied traveling to tropical regions. They also denied consuming seafood, which indicates a risk of infection in Germany. Still an infection with Plesiomonas shigelloides seems to be rare in northern European countries.

  5. Impact of a Hurricane Shelter Viral Gastroenteritis Outbreak on a Responding Medical Team.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaither, Joshua B; Page, Rianne; Prather, Caren; Paavola, Fred; Garrett, Andrew L

    2015-08-01

    Introduction In late October of 2012, Hurricane Sandy struck the northeast United States and shelters were established throughout the impacted region. Numerous cases of infectious viral gastroenteritis occurred in several of these shelters. Such outbreaks are common and have been well described in the past. Early monitoring for, and recognition of, the outbreak allowed for implementation of aggressive infection control measures. However, these measures required intensive medical response team involvement. Little is known about how such outbreaks affect the medical teams responding to the incident. Hypothesis/Problem Describe the impact of an infectious viral gastroenteritis outbreak within a single shelter on a responding medical team. The number of individuals staying in the single shelter each night (as determined by shelter staff) and the number of patients treated for symptoms of viral gastroenteritis were recorded each day. On return from deployment, members of a single responding medical team were surveyed to determine how many team members became ill during, or immediately following, their deployment. The shelter population peaked on November 5, 2012 with 811 individuals sleeping in the shelter. The first patients presented to the shelter clinic with symptoms of viral gastroenteritis on November 4, 2012, and the last case was seen on November 21, 2012. A total of 64 patients were treated for nausea, vomiting, or diarrhea over the 17-day period. A post-deployment survey was sent to 66 deployed medical team members and 45 completed the survey. Twelve (26.7%) of the team members who responded to the survey experienced symptoms of probable viral gastroenteritis. Team members reported onset of symptoms during deployment as well as after returning home. Symptoms started on days 4-8, 8-14, on the trip home, and after returning home in four, four, two, and two team members, respectively. Medical teams providing shelter care during viral gastroenteritis outbreaks are

  6. Presentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo Vicente

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available In the present edition of Significação – Scientific Journal for Audiovisual Culture and in the others to follow something new is brought: the presence of thematic dossiers which are to be organized by invited scholars. The appointed subject for the very first one of them was Radio and the invited scholar, Eduardo Vicente, professor at the Graduate Course in Audiovisual and at the Postgraduate Program in Audiovisual Media and Processes of the School of Communication and Arts of the University of São Paulo (ECA-USP. Entitled Radio Beyond Borders the dossier gathers six articles and the intention of reuniting works on the perspectives of usage of such media as much as on the new possibilities of aesthetical experimenting being build up for it, especially considering the new digital technologies and technological convergences. It also intends to present works with original theoretical approach and original reflections able to reset the way we look at what is today already a centennial media. Having broadened the meaning of “beyond borders”, four foreign authors were invited to join the dossier. This is the first time they are being published in this country and so, in all cases, the articles where either written or translated into Portuguese.The dossier begins with “Radio is dead…Long live to the sound”, which is the transcription of a thought provoking lecture given by Armand Balsebre (Autonomous University of Barcelona – one of the most influential authors in the world on the Radio study field. It addresses the challenges such media is to face so that it can become “a new sound media, in the context of a new soundscape or sound-sphere, for the new listeners”. Andrew Dubber (Birmingham City University regarding the challenges posed by a Digital Era argues for a theoretical approach in radio studies which can consider a Media Ecology. The author understands the form and discourse of radio as a negotiation of affordances and

  7. Pancreatic hyperamylasemia during acute gastroenteritis: incidence and clinical relevance

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    Pignattari Elena

    2001-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Many case reports of acute pancreatitis have been reported but, up to now, pancreatic abnormalities during acute gastroenteritis have not been studied prospectively. Objectives To evaluate the incidence and the clinical significance of hyperamylasemia in 507 consecutive adult patients with acute gastroenteritis. Methods The clinical significance of hyperamylasemia, related predisposing factors and severity of gastroenteritis were assessed. Results Hyperamylasemia was detected in 10.2 % of patients studied. Although amylasemia was found over four times the normal values in three cases, the clinical features of acute pancreatitis were recorded in only one case (0.1%. Hyperamylasemia was more likely (17% where a microorganism could be identified in the stools (p Salmonella spp. and in particular S. enteritidis, was the microorganism most frequently associated with hyperamylasemia [17/84 (20.2 % and 10/45 (22.2%, respectively], followed by Rotavirus, Clostridium difficile and Campylobacter spp. Patients with hyperamylasemia had more severe gastroenteritis with an increased incidence of fever (80 % vs 50.6 %, O.R. 3.0; P Conclusions Hyperamylasemia is relatively frequent, and is associated with severe gastroenteritis. However, acute pancreatitis in the setting of acute gastroenteritis, is a rare event.

  8. Herramientas para afrontar las situaciones de crisis en un brote de gastroenteritis aguda en un colegio público Practical lessons from the risk management of an outbreak of acute gastroenteritis in a public school

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Áurea Morillo-García

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available En este trabajo describimos las reflexiones y conclusiones extraídas del análisis de un brote de gastroenteritis en un centro escolar, que ocasionó una crisis de salud pública. El análisis realizado tuvo como base la metodología de las matrices de "debilidades, amenazas, fortalezas y oportunidades" (DAFO. Se describe la epidemiología de los sucesos y decisiones tomadas, basadas en aspectos operativos durante una situación de crisis. Incluye la experiencia del equipo responsable del brote, las relaciones con otras entidades y la gestión de la información. Las dificultades encontradas por el equipo coordinador consistieron en el retraso de la declaración, la falta de formación de algunas entidades implicadas y el mal uso de los circuitos establecidos. Es necesario un entrenamiento específico en los actuales protocolos de manejo de crisis y fomentar la mejora continua de los circuitos de coordinación mediante la autoevaluación y actualización de conocimientos y recursos.We present our reflections on the management of an acute gastroenteritis outbreak in a public school, which caused a public health crisis, and the conclusions drawn from this experience. The methodology of strengths, weaknesses, opportunities, and threats (SWOT analysis was used. This article describes the epidemiology of the incident and the policy decisions made, but focuses on operational aspects of outbreak management. The experience of the outbreak control team, liaison with other organizations, and data management are discussed. The difficulties encountered by the outbreak team related to delay in declaring in the outbreak, lack of training in some of the entities involved, and incorrect use of the surveillance circuits. Current protocols and specific action plans for the management of outbreaks should be improved through self-evaluation and updating of resources and knowledge.

  9. Antro-duodenal tuberculosis causing gastric outlet obstruction--a rare presentation of a protean disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gheorghe, Liana; Băncilă, Ion; Gheorghe, Cristian; Herlea, Vlad; Vasilescu, Cătălin; Aposteanu, Gabriela

    2002-06-01

    Gastroduodenal tuberculosis is a rare location of abdominal tuberculosis. It usually occurs secondary to pulmonary tuberculosis. We report a case of a 63-year-old woman admitted to the referral center for symptoms of upper gastrointestinal obstruction caused by ulcerohypertrophic antroduodenal tuberculosis. The lesion was misdiagnosed as malignancy at endoscopy. Even at surgery, the lesion was considered gastric cancer and imposed an oncologic resection. The diagnosis was established in the presence of giant-cell granulomas with caseating necrosis in the surgical resected specimens. In our case, the rare gastroduodenal location of abdominal tuberculosis occurred as primary tuberculosis, in the absence of other identifiable locations.

  10. Masquerading bundle branch block as a presenting manifestation of complete atrioventricular block that caused syncope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiao, Zhenyu; Tian, Ying; Yang, Xinchun; Liu, Xingpeng

    2017-10-01

    A 59-year-old male patient was admitted with the main complaints of stuffiness and shortness of breath. An ECG from precordial leads on admission showed masquerading bundle branch block. Syncope frequently occurred after admission. During syncope episodes, ECG telemetry showed that the syncope was caused by intermittent complete atrioventricular block, with the longest RR interval lasting for 4.36 s. At the gap of syncope, ECG showed complete right bundle branch block accompanied by alternation of left anterior fascicular block and left posterior fascicular block. The patient was implanted with a dual-chamber permanent pacemaker. Follow-up of 9 months showed no reoccurrence of syncope.

  11. CARBOHYDRATE MALABSORPTION SYNDROME IN CHILDREN WITH VIRAL GASTROENTERITIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. R. Meskina

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Enteric viruses (mainly rotaviruses are the most common cause of infectious diarrhea in infants. One  of the  pathophysiologic mechanisms in rotaviral gastroenteritis is the  reduction of the  surface  activity of enterocyte disaccharidases  and  osmotic  diarrhea. Aim: To determine the clinical significance of metabolic activity of intestinal microbiota in the formation of the osmotic component of viral diarrhea in children of various ages. Materials and methods: The study involved 139 children aged  from 1 month  to 14 years admitted to the hospital in the first 24 to 72 hours of moderate-degree  viral gastroenteritis.  Rotaviral infection was the most prevalent  (90%. Viral etiology was confirmed  by the  reaction  of indirect hemagglutination and multiplex real-time PCR (in feces. Total carbohydrate content in the feces was measured and fecal microflora was investigated by two methods: bacteriological and gas liquid chromatography with the determination of short-chain fatty acids. Results: The mean carbohydrate content in the feces of children below 1.5 years of age was higher than  that  in older children (p = 0.014. There was an inverse correlation between the concentration of rotaviral antigens  and carbohydrate   contents (r = -0,43, p < 0.05 and the production of acetic and propionic acids (R = -0,35, p < 0.01. The carbohydrate content in acute stage of the disease was linearly associated with time to normalization of the stool (r = +0,47, p < 0.01. Previous acute  respiratory or intestinal  infections within 2 months (odds ratio [OR], 14.10; 95% confidence interval [CI] 3.86–51.53, previous  hospitalizations  (OR = 14.17; 95% CI 2.74–74.32 and  past  history of intestinal dysfunction (OR 5.68; 95% CI 1.67–19.76 were predictive of severe  carbohydrate malabsorption in children below 1.5 years of age. Conclusion: The lack of microbiota functional activity (assessed by production of short

  12. Efficacy of pentavalent rotavirus vaccine against severe rotavirus gastroenteritis in infants in developing countries in sub-Saharan Africa: a randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armah, George E; Sow, Samba O; Breiman, Robert F; Dallas, Michael J; Tapia, Milagritos D; Feikin, Daniel R; Binka, Fred N; Steele, A Duncan; Laserson, Kayla F; Ansah, Nana A; Levine, Myron M; Lewis, Kristen; Coia, Michele L; Attah-Poku, Margaret; Ojwando, Joel; Rivers, Stephen B; Victor, John C; Nyambane, Geoffrey; Hodgson, Abraham; Schödel, Florian; Ciarlet, Max; Neuzil, Kathleen M

    2010-08-21

    Rotavirus gastroenteritis causes many deaths in infants in sub-Saharan Africa. Because rotavirus vaccines have proven effective in developed countries but had not been tested in developing countries, we assessed efficacy of a pentavalent rotavirus vaccine against severe disease in Ghana, Kenya, and Mali between April, 2007, and March, 2009. In our multicentre, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial, undertaken in rural areas of Ghana and Kenya and an urban area of Mali, we randomly assigned infants aged 4-12 weeks without symptoms of gastrointestinal disorders in a 1:1 ratio to receive three oral doses of pentavalent rotavirus vaccine 2 mL or placebo at around 6 weeks, 10 weeks, and 14 weeks of age. Infants with HIV infection were not excluded. Randomisation was done by computer-generated randomisation sequence in blocks of six. We obtained data for gastrointestinal symptoms from parents on presentation to health-care facilities and clinical data were obtained prospectively by clinicians. The primary endpoint was severe rotavirus gastroenteritis (Vesikari score >or=11), detected by enzyme immunoassay, arising 14 days or more after the third dose of placebo or vaccine to end of study (March 31, 2009; around 21 months of age). Analysis was per protocol; infants who received scheduled doses of vaccine or placebo without intervening laboratory-confirmed naturally occurring rotavirus disease earlier than 14 days after the third dose and had complete clinical and laboratory results were included in the analysis. This study is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT00362648. 5468 infants were randomly assigned to receive pentavalent rotavirus vaccine (n=2733) or placebo (n=2735). 2357 infants assigned to vaccine and 2348 assigned to placebo were included in the per-protocol analysis. 79 cases of severe rotavirus gastroenteritis were reported in 2610.6 person-years in the vaccine group, compared with 129 cases in 2585.9 person-years in the placebo group, resulting

  13. Gastroenteric tube feeding: Techniques, problems and solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blumenstein, Irina; Shastri, Yogesh M; Stein, Jürgen

    2014-01-01

    Gastroenteric tube feeding plays a major role in the management of patients with poor voluntary intake, chronic neurological or mechanical dysphagia or gut dysfunction, and patients who are critically ill. However, despite the benefits and widespread use of enteral tube feeding, some patients experience complications. This review aims to discuss and compare current knowledge regarding the clinical application of enteral tube feeding, together with associated complications and special aspects. We conducted an extensive literature search on PubMed, Embase and Medline using index terms relating to enteral access, enteral feeding/nutrition, tube feeding, percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy/jejunostomy, endoscopic nasoenteric tube, nasogastric tube, and refeeding syndrome. The literature showed common routes of enteral access to include nasoenteral tube, gastrostomy and jejunostomy, while complications fall into four major categories: mechanical, e.g., tube blockage or removal; gastrointestinal, e.g., diarrhea; infectious e.g., aspiration pneumonia, tube site infection; and metabolic, e.g., refeeding syndrome, hyperglycemia. Although the type and frequency of complications arising from tube feeding vary considerably according to the chosen access route, gastrointestinal complications are without doubt the most common. Complications associated with enteral tube feeding can be reduced by careful observance of guidelines, including those related to food composition, administration rate, portion size, food temperature and patient supervision. PMID:25024606

  14. A rare presentation of atypical demyelination: tumefactive multiple sclerosis causing Gerstmann’s syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background Tumefactive demyelinating lesions are a rare manifestation of multiple sclerosis (MS). Differential diagnosis of such space occupying lesions may not be straightforward and sometimes necessitate brain biopsy. Impaired cognition is the second most common clinical manifestation of tumefactive MS; however complex cognitive syndromes are unusual. Case presentation We report the case of a 30 year old woman who presented with Gerstmann’s syndrome. MRI revealed a large heterogeneous contrast enhancing lesion in the left cerebral hemisphere. Intravenous corticosteroids did not stop disease progression. A tumour or cerebral lymphoma was suspected, however brain biopsy confirmed inflammatory demyelination. Following diagnosis of tumefactive MS treatment with natalizumab effectively suppressed disease activity. Conclusions The case highlights the need for clinicians, radiologists and surgeons to appreciate the heterogeneous presentation of tumefactive MS. Early brain biopsy facilitates rapid diagnosis and management. Treatment with natalizumab may be useful in cases of tumefactive demyelination where additional evidence supports a diagnosis of relapsing MS. PMID:24694183

  15. [Campylobacter and Salmonella acute gastroenteritis: epidemiology and health care utilization].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sala Farré, Maria Rosa; Osorio Sánchez, Dimelza; Arias Varela, Cesar; Simó Sanahuja, Maria; Recasens Recasens, Assumpta; Pérez Jové, Josefa

    2015-10-05

    In Catalonia the current surveillance systems do not allow to know the true incidence or the health care utilization of acute gastroenteritis (AGE) caused by Campylobacter and Salmonella infections. The aim of this study is to analyze these characteristics. Descriptive study of Campylobacter and Salmonella infections reported in 2002 and 2012 in Catalonia, Spain. We included cases isolated and reported by the laboratory to a regional Surveillance Unit. The estimated incidence of Salmonella and Campylobacter AGE decreased by almost 50% and 20% respectively in 2012. Children between one and 4 years old were the most affected in both years. Significant differences in the clinical characteristics and disease duration were observed between Campylobacter and Salmonella. Visits to the Emergency Department and hospitalization rates were 63.7% and 15%, being more frequent among salmonellosis cases. The estimated incidence of Campylobacter and Salmonella infections has decreased, however rates are still important, as well as it is the health care utilization in both diseases. Current surveillance systems need appropriateness improvements to reach a better control of these infections. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  16. The Control of Rotavirus Gastroenteritis in The United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glass, Roger I.; Parashar, Umesh; Patel, Manish; Tate, Jacqueline; Jiang, Baoming; Gentsch, Jon

    2012-01-01

    Since 2006, two new vaccines have been licensed to prevent rotavirus, the cause of 20% to 50% of severe acute gastroenteritis in young children worldwide. These vaccines have been implemented in national immunization programs in about 30 high- and middle-income countries, including the United States, and vaccine use has led to substantial decreases in diarrhea-related health care visits. In addition to reductions in diarrhea burden in vaccinated children, decreases have been observed in older, unvaccinated age groups in many settings, suggesting indirect benefits (i.e., herd immunity) from vaccination. Although the efficacy of these oral rotavirus vaccines is expectedly lower in developing countries in Asia and Africa, the public health benefits of vaccination in these settings, where more than 90% of the estimated 453,000 annual deaths from rotavirus occur, are likely to be substantial. Efforts continue to develop alternative rotavirus vaccines that could have a better efficacy and safety profile and may be less expensive. PMID:23303967

  17. Visual field defect as a presenting sign for hemorrhagic stroke caused by sildenafil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehdizadeh Morteza

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Herein, we describe the presenting symptoms, history, ophthalmic examination, visual fields and brain magnetic resonance imaging of a patient who developed left homonymous hemianopia due to right occipital lobe hemorrhage after ingestion of sildenafil citrate (Novagra Forte. To the best of our knowledge, association of homonymous hemianopia with sildenafil usage has not been reported before.

  18. Causes of delayed presentation of acute appendicitis and its impact on morbidity and mortality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Asad, S.; Ahmed, A.; Ahmad, S.; Ali, S.; Ahmed, S.; Ghaffar, S.; Khattak, I.U.D.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Acute appendicitis is one of the commonest abdominal emergencies and appendectomy. is one of the commonest emergency procedures performed all over the world. The study was done with an objective to evaluate the different causative factors for delayed presentation of appendicitis. Method: This cross-sectional study was carried out in the Surgical C unit, at Ayub Teaching Hospital, Abbottabad, Pakistan from 20th June 2013 to 19th June 2014. A total of 130 patients presented with appendicitis in OPDs or emergency department. Detailed history, general physical and systemic examination especially abdominal examination was done along with investigations. Results: It was found that 23.08 percentage of complicated appendicitis presentation is due to missed diagnosis by physicians, 30.77 percentage is due to missed diagnosis by non-doctors, 23.08 percentage is due to conservative management at DHQ hospitals by surgeons, and 23.08 percentage presented late because of self-medication at home. Conclusion: All patients with pain Right iliac fossa, there should be suspected of appendicitis. Proper workup should be done to exclude it. If kept on conservative management then regular monitoring of vitals with laboratory investigations should be done. (author)

  19. A rare cause of hypercalcemia presenting with high parathormone levels: Familial hypocalciuric hypercalcemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Okan Bakiner

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Familial Hypocalciuric Hypercalcemia is a generally benign disorder caused by heterozygous inactivating mutations in the Calcium-Sensing-Receptor gene resulting in altered calcium metabolism. It should be considered in differential diagnosis of primary hyperparathyroidism. Our case whom was diagnosed as toxic nodular goitre and primary hyperparathyroidism and suggested surgical treatment in another clinical center was evaluated in our out-patient clinic. Furosemid treatment which may affect calcium metabolism was stopped and medical therapy for hyperthyroidism was given. During follow-up the patient was considered as familial hypocalciuric hypercalcemia because of mild hypercalcemia, borderline elevated parathormone levels and significantly decreased daily urinary calcium excretion. The diagnosis was confirmed with the determination of similar laboratory findings for calcium metabolism in her children. In conclusion, evaluating the calcium metabolism after correcting the other factors and keeping familial hypocalciuric hypercalcemia in mind while diagnostic approach to hypercalcemia and differentially diagnosis of primary hyperparathyroidism may prevent unnecessary surgery. [Cukurova Med J 2013; 38(4.000: 765-769

  20. Rare acquired hemostatic disorders as a cause of prolonged bleeding – presentation of two case reports

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Polona Novak

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUNDPatient’s anamnesis is of primary importance in determining hemostatic disorders. Based on anamnestic data, a clinician may decide for further laboratory tests. We must consider an acquired bleeding disorder in a patient with unusual, unexpected and prolonged bleeding episodes. In this article we will describe two rare acquired hemostatic disordes.TWO CASE REPORTSOur first patient had prolonged bleeding after a pacemaker implantation. We diagnosed him with acquired von Willebrand syndrome. Further on, the patient required a planned surgical procedure. In our second case we describe a patient with unusual and excessive skin bruising and prolonged bleeding after teeth extractions. He was diagnosed with acquired hemophilia.CONCLUSIONIn the assessment of a patient with a potential acquired bleeding disorder we must first rule out the most common causes, such as iatrogenic ones. But, because of high morbidity and mortality rates, we must also be aware of some rare acquired bleeding disorders. In case of uncertainty, we should consult with a hematologist.

  1. The impact of childhood acute rotavirus gastroenteritis on the parents’ quality of life: prospective observational study in European primary care medical practices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Domingo Javier

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Rotavirus (RV is the commonest cause of acute gastroenteritis in infants and young children worldwide. A Quality of Life study was conducted in primary care in three European countries as part of a larger epidemiological study (SPRIK to investigate the impact of paediatric rotavirus gastroenteritis (RVGE on affected children and their parents. Methods A self-administered questionnaire was linguistically validated in Spanish, Italian and Polish. The questionnaire was included in an observational multicentre prospective study of 302 children aged Results Questionnaire responses showed that acute RVGE in a child adversely affects the parents’ daily life as well as the child. Parents of children with RVGE experience worry, distress and impact on their daily activities. RVGE of greater clinical severity (assessed by the Vesikari scale was associated with higher parental worries due to symptoms and greater changes in the child’s behaviour, and a trend to higher impact on parents’ daily activities and higher parental distress, together with a higher score on the symptom severity scale of the questionnaire. Conclusions Parents of a child with acute RVGE presenting to primary care experience worry, distress and disruptions to daily life as a result of the child’s illness. Prevention of this disease through prophylactic vaccination will improve the daily lives of parents and children.

  2. Canine parvovirus type 2c identified from an outbreak of severe gastroenteritis in a litter in Sweden

    OpenAIRE

    Sutton, David; Vinberg, Carina; Gustafsson, Agneta; Pearce, Jacqueline; Greenwood, Neil

    2013-01-01

    A litter of recently-vaccinated puppies in Sweden experienced signs of severe haemorrhagic gastroenteritis. Canine parvovirus (CPV) was suspected as the cause of this outbreak on the basis of the clinical signs and the presence of parvoviral antigen in the faeces from one of the affected pups - confirmed using a commercial in-clinic faecal antigen ELISA test kit. A concern was raised about whether the vaccine (which contained a live, attenuated strain of CPV) could have caused the disease and...

  3. An unusual cause of orthopnoea-hashimoto's thyroiditis presenting as bilateral diaphragmatic palsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N.K. Thulaseedharan, MBBS, MD(General Medicine

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available We report a case of 36 yr old male without any comorbidities, who presented with a history of gradually progressive dyspnoea and orthopnoea for 6 months. Physical examination revealed bradycardia, paradoxical respiration suggestive of bilateral diaphragmatic palsy. Fluoroscopy demonstrated the presence of bilateral diaphragmatic paralysis. Etiological work up showed evidence of autoimmune hypothyroidism due to hashimoto's thyroiditis. Other possibilities were ruled out with appropriate tests. He was started on thyroxine and showed symptomatic improvement.

  4. Tackling causes and costs of ED presentation for American football injuries: a population-level study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smart, Blair J; Haring, R Sterling; Asemota, Anthony O; Scott, John W; Canner, Joseph K; Nejim, Besma J; George, Benjamin P; Alsulaim, Hatim; Kirsch, Thomas D; Schneider, Eric B

    2016-07-01

    American tackle football is the most popular high-energy impact sport in the United States, with approximately 9 million participants competing annually. Previous epidemiologic studies of football-related injuries have generally focused on specific geographic areas or pediatric age groups. Our study sought to examine patient characteristics and outcomes, including hospital charges, among athletes presenting for emergency department (ED) treatment of football-related injury across all age groups in a large nationally representative data set. Patients presenting for ED treatment of injuries sustained playing American tackle football (identified using International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision, Clinical Modification code E007.0) from 2010 to 2011 were studied in the Nationwide Emergency Department Sample. Patient-specific injuries were identified using the primary International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision, Clinical Modification diagnosis code and categorized by type and anatomical region. Standard descriptive methods examined patient demographics, diagnosis categories, and ED and inpatient outcomes and charges. During the study period 397363 football players presented for ED treatment, 95.8% of whom were male. Sprains/strains (25.6%), limb fractures (20.7%), and head injuries (including traumatic brain injury; 17.5%) represented the most presenting injuries. Overall, 97.9% of patients underwent routine ED discharge with 1.1% admitted directly and fewer than 11 patients in the 2-year study period dying prior to discharge. The proportion of admitted patients who required surgical interventions was 15.7%, of which 89.9% were orthopedic, 4.7% neurologic, and 2.6% abdominal. Among individuals admitted to inpatient care, mean hospital length of stay was 2.4days (95% confidence interval, 2.2-2.6) and 95.6% underwent routine discharge home. The mean total charge for all patients was $1941 (95% confidence interval, $1890-$1992) with substantial

  5. A case of bacteremia caused by Campylobacter fetus: an unusual presentation in an infant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alnimr AM

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Amani M Alnimr Department of Microbiology, King Fahad University Hospital, College of Medicine, University of Dammam, Saudi Arabia Abstract: Bacteremia due to Campylobacter spp. is rarely reported, and Campylobacter fetus is the species most commonly exhibiting vascular tropism, as occurred in this case report describing the diagnosis of C. fetus bacteremia in an infant presenting with respiratory tract infection. A 5-month-old baby, with undiagnosed failure to thrive, presented to the acute care service with a high fever and respiratory symptoms of 2 days duration. The initial clinical and laboratory diagnosis suggested bacteremia, but there was difficulty with recovery and identification of the organism from blood. Subsequent laboratory testing confirmed C. fetus as the etiological agent. Campylobacter isolated from blood culture bottles may give atypical laboratory features, rendering its identification challenging. Thus, such an infrequent species might be underestimated in frequency, and it should be considered in diagnostic laboratories, when a gram-negative organism with atypical findings is encountered in respiratory samples or blood culture bottles. Keywords: microbiology, vascular tropism, blood stream infection

  6. [Bile duct cysts; an unusual cause of jaundice in paediatrics. Presentation of a case series].

    Science.gov (United States)

    López Ruiz, Rocío; Aguilera Alonso, David; Muñoz Aguilar, Gemma; Fonseca Martín, Rosa

    2016-01-01

    Cysts of the bile duct or choledochal cysts are rare diseases in our area. The aetiology is unknown, with the most accepted hypothesis being a pancreatobiliary maljunction anomaly. To analyse the clinical data, diagnosis and treatment of a number of patients with choledochal cyst, as well as presenting an update on this condition. A retrospective descriptive study was performed on paediatric patients diagnosed with choledochal cyst in the last 20 years in a tertiary hospital. A total of 4 choledochal cyst cases in childhood, predominantly female, are pre- sented. The most frequent reason for consultation was vomiting, and presenting with jaundice and choluria in all cases. Patients with choledochal cyst were classified as type I in 3 cases, and one case of type IVa. In all cases surgical treatment was performed; any patient had complications to date. Cysts of the bile ducts have a low prevalence. The treatment of choice is surgical, requiring close monitoring due to the risk of cholangiocarcinoma. Copyright © 2015 Sociedad Chilena de Pediatría. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  7. Temporal distribution of gastroenteritis viruses in Ouagadougou, Burkina Faso: seasonality of rotavirus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nafissatou Ouedraogo

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Acute gastroenteritis is one of the most common diseases among children and adults, and continues to cause a major problem of public health in Burkina Faso. The temporal pattern of rotavirus, norovirus, sapovirus, astrovirus, adenovirus and Aichivirus A was studied by examining prevalence of gastroenteritis viruses in association with meteorological variables in Ouagadougou, Burkina Faso. Methods Stool samples from 263 children under 5 years of age and 170 older children patients, adolescent and adults with gastroenteritis were collected in Ouagadougou, Burkina Faso from November 2011 to September 2012. Enteric viruses were detected using real-time or end-point (RT- PCR. Temperature, humidity and monthly rainfall were recorded from the National Meteorological Direction. Categorical data were compared by Chi-square tests and the effect of weather variables and monthly prevalence were analyzed using Pearson Correlation Coefficient test. Results The prevalence of rotavirus infections was significantly higher in the dry season (Season S1 compared to the wet season (season S2 (p = 0.03 among the population of children under 5 years of age. No statistically significant difference was observed regarding other gastroenteritis viruses comparing the dry season and the wet season. Positive cases of rotavirus, norovirus, adenovirus and sapovirus in children under 5 years of age were correlated with temperature (r = −0.68, p = 0.01; r = −0.74, p < 0.001; r = −0.68, p = 0.01; r = −0.65, p = 0.02, respectively and only rotavirus, adenovirus and astrovirus were correlated with relative humidity (r = −0.61, p = 0.04; r = −0.54, p = 0.08; r = −0.51, p = 0.1 respectively. No correlation was observed with rainfall. In older children, adolescent and adults patients, rotavirus and norovirus correlated with relative humidity (r = −0.58, p = 0.05; r = 0.54, p

  8. Laryngeal giant cell tumour presenting as a tongue base lesion causing severe dysphagia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohd Razi M. Saud, MBBS

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available الملخص: أورام الخلايا العملاقة هي آفات حميدة وغير مألوفة تظهر في الحنجرة. قد يصاب المريض بصعوبة في البلع، وبحة في الصوت وتورم في الجهة الأمامية من الرقبة. أورام الخلايا العملاقة هي نادرة للغاية، وهناك حالات قليلة في الأدبيات المنشورة. نعرض لحالة إمرأة مسنة قدمت بصعوبة شديدة في البلع، وورم في قاعدة اللسان. أظهرت نتيجة الورم بأنه ورم الخلايا العملاقة في الحنجرة وتم علاجه بنجاح باستخدام المعالجة الكيميائية. Abstract: Giant cell tumours are benign lesions that are uncommonly found in the larynx. Patients with these tumours may present with dysphagia, hoarseness and anterior neck swelling. Giant cell tumours are extremely rare and only a few cases have been reported. We present a case of an elderly woman who presented with severe dysphagia and a mass at the base of her tongue. The mass was found to be a laryngeal giant cell tumour and was successfully treated with chemotherapy. الكلمات المفتاحية: أورام الخلايا العملاقة, الحنجرة, صعوبة البلع, دينوسوماب, المعالجة الكيميائية, Keywords: Chemotherapy, Denosumab, Dysphagia, Giant cell tumour, Larynx

  9. Climate effect of ozone changes caused by present and future air traffic

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ponater, M.; Sausen, R.; Feneberg, B. [DLR Deutsches Zentrum fuer Luft- und Raumfahrt e.V., Wessling (Germany). Inst. fuer Physik der Atmosphaere; Roeckner, E. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Meteorologie, Hamburg (Germany)

    1998-08-01

    The potential of aircraft-induced ozone changes to significantly enhance the climate impact of air traffic due to CO{sub 2}-emissions is investigated by means of simulations with an atmospheric general circulation model, coupled to a mixed layer ocean model. Results from several numerical experiments are presented, based on ozone increase patterns for 1992 aviation and on a future scenario for the year 2015. The climate signal is statistically significant for both time slices. Its strength is of comparable magnitude to that arising from aircraft CO{sub 2} emissions, thus meaning a nonnegligible contribution to the total effect. There are indications of a characteristic signature of the aircraft ozone related temperature response pattern, distinctly different from that typically associated with the increase of a well-mixed greenhouse gas. Likewise, the climate sensitivity to nonuniform ozone changes including a strong concentration perturbation at the tropopause appears to he higher than the climate sensitivity to uniform changes of a greenhouse gas. In a hierarchy of experiments based on an aircraft-related ozone perturbation with fixed structure (but increasing amplitude), the climate signal depends in a nonlinear way from the radiative forcing. (orig.) 44 refs.

  10. Stresshyperglykaemi hos et barn med svaer akut gastroenteritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjerre, Jesper V.

    2002-01-01

    A case of a two years and ten months old girl with severe acute gastroenteritis, dehydration, and hyperglycaemia is described. Transient hyperglycaemia is a common clinical finding in children under stress. We discuss the distinction between hyperglycaemia as a prediabetic state and that as a phy......A case of a two years and ten months old girl with severe acute gastroenteritis, dehydration, and hyperglycaemia is described. Transient hyperglycaemia is a common clinical finding in children under stress. We discuss the distinction between hyperglycaemia as a prediabetic state...

  11. Aortic dissection presenting with secondary pulmonary hypertension caused by compression of the pulmonary artery by dissecting hematoma: a case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Dong Hun; Ryu, Sang Wan; Choi, Yong Sun; Ahn, Byoung Hee

    2004-01-01

    The rupture of an acute dissection of the ascending aorta into the space surrounding the pulmonary artery is an uncommon occurrence. No previous cases of transient pulmonary hypertension caused by a hematoma surrounding the pulmonary artery have been documented in the literature. Herein, we report a case of acute aortic dissection presenting as secondary pulmonary hypertension

  12. Prevalence and Red Flags Regarding Specified Causes of Back Pain in Older Adults Presenting in General Practice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Enthoven, Wendy T. M.; Geuze, Judith; Scheele, Jantine; Bierma-Zeinstra, Sita M. A.; Bueving, Herman J.; Bohnen, Arthur M.; Peul, Wilco C.; van Tulder, Maurits W.; Berger, Marjolein Y.; Koes, Bart W.; Luijsterburg, Pim A. J.

    BACKGROUND: In a small proportion of patients experiencing unspecified back pain a specified underlying pathology is present. OBJECTIVE: To identify the prevalence of physician-specified causes of back pain and to assess associations between red flags and vertebral fractures, as diagnosed by the

  13. Stent placement of gastroenteric anastomoses formed by magnetic compression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cope, C; Clark, T W; Ginsberg, G; Habecker, P

    1999-01-01

    To evaluate the use of stents for prolonging the patency of gastroenteric anastomoses (GEA) induced by magnet compression. Rare earth magnets were inserted perorally and serially in 15 dogs so as to mate across the gastric and jejunal walls. After magnet excretion, the resulting GEA was identified endoscopically, dilated (n = 1), and stented with bare (n = 2) or partially covered (n = 6) flared 10-mm or 12-mm Z stents. The GEA was followed at 2-4-week intervals for patency; malfunctioning shunts were irrigated, or dilated with angioplasty balloons. Gross and histologic examination of the anastomotic tissues was performed in 14 animals. Magnet pairs were excreted in 5-7 days. Of the 19 magnet placements in 15 animals, stent placement was not possible because of early GEA closure (n = 6), failure to locate (n = 2), pancreatic abscess (n = 1), and magnet perforation with peritonitis (n = 1). Estimated duration of GEA patency was 19 days after balloon dilation, 40-64 days with bare Z stents, and 58-147 days (mean, 90 days) with partially covered Z stents. Shunt function was commonly hindered by bezoars. Stent narrowing or occlusion was caused by tissue overgrowth through bare stents (n = 2), between covered stent struts and through partially detached membrane (n = 2). Serious morbidity (n = 2) was due to malpositioned magnets across the pancreas in one animal and gastric perforation in the other. One dog was euthanized because of unsuspected kidney infection. Partially covered stents significantly extend the anatomic patency rate of magnetic GEA to 7 weeks or more. Functional patency is frequently impaired by bezoars. Ongoing improvements in covered stent design should provide longer-term GEA patency.

  14. Detection of Acute Gastroenteritis Agents By Molecular Methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Şafak Göktaş

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Gastroenteritis is the most important cause of morbidity and mortality in all age groups all over the world. Multiplex PCR tests give sensitive and specific results in the investigation of bacterial, viral, parasitic agents. In this study, it was aimed to determine the agents of the stool specimens of patients with acute diarrhea by multiplex PCR. Materials and Methods: Stool sample taken from 471 patients sent to Istanbul Gelişim Laboratories between January 1, 2015 and September 30, 2016 was included in the study. All stool samples were processed according to manufacturer’s instructions with GastroFinder SMART 18 FAST multiplex PCR test (Pathofinder, Holland. 18 different gastrointestinal pathogens were diagnosed in one study. Results: Of the 471 patients stool sample included in the study. The agent was negative in 241 (51.2%, while the agent was isolated in 230 (48.8%. 190 (82% had a single pathogen, 40 had two or more pathogens. Of the 190 samples detected with single agent, 149 (31.6% were bacterial, 26 (5.5% were parasitic and 15 (3.1% were viral agents. Of the 149 bacterial agents, 108 (23% was detected as Salmonella spp, 14 (6% as EHEC, 8 (3.5% as Clostridium difficile toxin A / B, 8 (3.5% as Campylobacter spp., 7 (3% Aeromonas spp., 2 (0.8% Yersinia enterocolitica, 2 (0.8% Enterotoxigenic E. coli (ETEC. Of 26 parasitic agents, 18 (7.8% was detected as Giardia lamblia, 6 (2.6% as Dientamoeba fragilis and 2 (0.8% as Cryptosporidium spp. Conclusion: Identification of enteric pathogens by multiplex PCR will avoids the use of unnecessary antibiotic treatments

  15. Diagnosis and indications for low-intensity laser therapy of the pathology of the oral cavity mucosa of patients with hematologic and gastroenteric diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunin, Anatoly A.; Minakov, E. V.; Sutscenko, A. V.; Vornovsky, V. A.; Dunaeva, S. V.; Stepanov, Nicolay N.; Shumilovitch, Bogdan R.

    1996-11-01

    In the recent years low intensity laser irradiation is made use of in stomatology with the view of treating numerous diseases of the oral cavity mucosa and parodontium. The oral cavity mucosa lesions caused by the internal organs diseases, especially those of blood and the gastroenteric tract, constitute a particular group. Such diseases are usually manifested by an inflammation, erosions, ulcers, hemorrhages. An abundant microflora of the oral cavity and diminished immunity of the patients contribute to the possibility of septicaemia development. Laser therapy of the oral cavity mucosa lesions according to strictly defined indications promotes rapid healing of ulcers, arresting the oral cavity mucosa inflammation, providing a reduction in bleeding and presents a safe prophylactic means of stomatogenic sepsis.

  16. Perforated duodenal ulcer: an unusual complication of gastroenteritis.

    OpenAIRE

    Wilson, J M; Darby, C R

    1990-01-01

    A 7 year old boy was admitted to hospital with gastroenteritis, which was complicated by an acute perforated duodenal ulcer. After oversewing of the perforation he made an uncomplicated recovery. Peptic ulceration is under-diagnosed in childhood and this leads to delay in diagnosis and appropriate management. Ulceration is associated with severe illness and viral infections, but perforation is rare.

  17. How to Predict Oral Rehydration Failure in Children With Gastroenteritis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D.H.F. Geurts (Dorien); E.W. Steyerberg (Ewout); H.A. Moll (Henriëtte); R. Oostenbrink (Rianne)

    2017-01-01

    textabstractOBJECTIVES:: Oral rehydration is the standard in most current guidelines for young children with acute gastroenteritis (AGE). Failure of oral rehydration can complicate the disease course, leading to morbidity due to severe dehydration. We aimed to identify prognostic factors of oral

  18. The role of Campylobacter jejuni cytolethal distending toxin in gastroenteritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, Ninell P; Schiellerup, Peter; Boisen, Nadia

    2011-01-01

    The role of Campylobacter jejuni cytolethal distending toxin (CDT) on clinical outcome after gastroenteritis was investigated. Clinical data, blood serum samples, and Campylobacter spp. isolated, from each of 30 patients were collected over a period of 6 months. The CDT encoding genes, cdt...

  19. Rotavirus vaccine effectiveness in preventing hospitalizations due to gastroenteritis: a descriptive epidemiological study from Germany.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pietsch, C; Liebert, U G

    2018-04-10

    Rotavirus infections are common causes of infant hospitalization. The present study examined the effectiveness of anti-rotavirus vaccination in preventing rotavirus-related hospitalizations in Germany, following its state and nationwide introductions in 2008 and 2013, respectively. During 15 consecutive seasons 9557 stool samples of hospitalized children of 5 years and younger with acute gastroenteritis were screened for rotavirus A. Rotavirus G and P genotypes were assessed after vaccine introduction. Vaccine effectiveness was determined by comparison of rotavirus incidence in pre-vaccine and post-vaccine cohorts. The herd effect was calculated as the difference between the observed reduction of rotavirus-related hospitalizations and the expected direct vaccine effect. The number of rotavirus-related hospitalizations declined after vaccine introduction. Approximately 26% (503/1955) of prevented cases could be attributed to the herd effect. Human rotaviruses of genotypes G3P[8], G1P[8], G9P[8], G4P[8], G2P[4] and G12P[8] were most frequent. Uncommon genotypes remained rare. The direct, indirect, total and overall vaccine effectiveness was 86% (95% confidence interval (CI) 83.2-89.1%), 48% (95% CI 42.8-52.6%), 93% (95% CI 91.3-94.3%) and 69% (95% CI 66.5-72.0%), respectively. There was no significant difference in vaccine-type or in genotype-specific vaccine effectiveness. Anti-rotavirus vaccination efficiently reduced rotavirus-related hospitalizations in Germany in the past decade. The vaccines analysed in this article provide a broadly heterologous and long-lasting protection. The herd effect substantially contributed to the observed drop in the number of incidences of severe rotavirus infections. Presumably, constant high vaccine coverage will lead to a continued upward trend in the overall vaccine efficiency. Copyright © 2018 European Society of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Prospective evaluation of indirect costs due to acute rotavirus gastroenteritis in Spain: the ROTACOST study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouzón-Alejandro, Marta; Redondo-Collazo, Lorenzo; Sánchez-Lastres, Juan Manuel; Martinón-Torres, Nazareth; Martinón-Sánchez, José María; Martinón-Torres, Federico

    2011-09-14

    The effect of rotavirus in developed countries is mainly economic. This study aimed to assess the indirect costs induced by rotavirus acute gastroenteritis (RVAGE) in Spain. A prospective observational study was conducted from October 2008 to June 2009. It included 682 children up to 5 years of age with acute gastroenteritis (AGE) who attended primary care (n = 18) and emergency room/hospital settings (n = 10), covering the regions of Galicia and Asturias (North-west Spain). All non-medical expenses incurred throughout the episode were recorded in detail using personal interviews and telephone contact. Among the 682 enrolled children, 207 (30.4%) were rotavirus positive and 170 (25%) had received at least one dose of rotavirus vaccine. The mean (standard deviation) indirect cost caused by an episode of AGE was estimated at 135.17 (182.70) Euros. Costs were 1.74-fold higher when AGE was caused by rotavirus compared with other etiologies: 192.7 (219.8) Euros vs. 111.6 (163.5) Euros (p purchase of material. Patients with RVAGE were admitted to hospital more frequently than those with other etiologies (47.8% vs 14%, p decision-making process of the eventual inclusion of rotavirus vaccine in the national immunization schedule of well developed countries.

  1. Prospective evaluation of indirect costs due to acute rotavirus gastroenteritis in Spain: the ROTACOST study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sánchez-Lastres Juan

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The effect of rotavirus in developed countries is mainly economic. This study aimed to assess the indirect costs induced by rotavirus acute gastroenteritis (RVAGE in Spain. Methods A prospective observational study was conducted from October 2008 to June 2009. It included 682 children up to 5 years of age with acute gastroenteritis (AGE who attended primary care (n = 18 and emergency room/hospital settings (n = 10, covering the regions of Galicia and Asturias (North-west Spain. All non-medical expenses incurred throughout the episode were recorded in detail using personal interviews and telephone contact. Results Among the 682 enrolled children, 207 (30.4% were rotavirus positive and 170 (25% had received at least one dose of rotavirus vaccine. The mean (standard deviation indirect cost caused by an episode of AGE was estimated at 135.17 (182.70 Euros. Costs were 1.74-fold higher when AGE was caused by rotavirus compared with other etiologies: 192.7 (219.8 Euros vs. 111.6 (163.5 Euros (p Conclusions Rotavirus generates a significant indirect economic burden. Our data should be considered in the decision-making process of the eventual inclusion of rotavirus vaccine in the national immunization schedule of well developed countries.

  2. Transmesocolic double gastro-enteric fistulas due to ingestion of 28 magnets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adrian Surd

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Accidental ingestion of magnetic foreign bodies has become more common due to increased availability of objects and toys with magnetic elements. The majority of them traverse the gastrointestinal system spontaneously without complication. However, ingestion of multiple magnets may require surgical resolution. Magnet ingestion usually does not cause serious complications, but in case of multiple magnet ingestion or ingestion of magnet and a metal object, it could cause intestinal obstruction, fistula formation or even perforation. Case report: We report case of a transmesocolic double gastro-enteric fistula formation following ingestion of 28 small magnets in a 17 months old boy. No history of foreign body ingestion could be obtained from parents therefore the patient was treated conservatively in a pediatric clinic for vomiting, dehydration, upper respiratory tract infection and suspicion of upper digestive tract bleeding. After 48 h he was sent in our clinic for surgical evaluation. Intraoperatively double transmesocolic gastro-enteric fistula was found. After separation of de gastric and enteral walls, resection of gastric wall and intestinal segment containing the two perforations was performed, followed by gastric suture in two layers and entero-enteric anastomosis. A total of 28 magnets were removed from the stomach and small intestine. Conclusion: Single magnet ingestion is treated as non-magnetic foreign body. Multiple magnet ingestion should be closely monitored and surgical approach could be the best option to prevent or to cure its complications. Keywords: Ingestion, Magnetic foreign body, Multiple magnets, Intestinal fistula, Children

  3. Congenital nasal pyriform aperture stenosis as a cause of respiratory distress in newborns: presentation diagnosed by menas of CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wichoff, A.; Perez-Candela, V.; Romera, C.; Lopez-Morales, L.

    2002-01-01

    Congenital nasal pyriform aperture stenosis (CNPAS) is a rare cause of newborn airway obstruction. It can be clinically indistinguishable from choanal atresia, which is much more frequent. CT confirms the diagnosis by revealing in detail the anatomical alterations underlying this anomaly. These might or might not occur in association with other alterations. We present 4 cases of CNPAS, all of which presented respiratory distress and clinical symptoms similar to those of choanal atresia in newborn children. The premature diagnosis and a conventional treatment of tube placement in order to keep the airway open, until the pyriform aperture grows large enough to permit normal breathing, resulted in recovery of the patients. (Author) 12 refs

  4. Oral administration of Bifidobacterium bifidum G9-1 alleviates rotavirus gastroenteritis through regulation of intestinal homeostasis by inducing mucosal protective factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawahara, Tomohiro; Makizaki, Yutaka; Oikawa, Yosuke; Tanaka, Yoshiki; Maeda, Ayako; Shimakawa, Masaki; Komoto, Satoshi; Moriguchi, Kyoko; Ohno, Hiroshi; Taniguchi, Koki

    2017-01-01

    Human rotavirus (RV) infection is a leading cause of dehydrating diarrhea in infants and young children worldwide. Since therapeutic approaches to RV gastroenteritis are limited to alleviation of dehydration with oral rehydration solutions, more direct approaches to palliate symptoms of RV gastroenteritis are required. Treatments with probiotics have been increasingly recognized as alternative safe and low cost treatments for moderate infectious diarrhea. In this study, Bifidobacterium bifidum G9-1 (BBG9-1), which has been used as an intestinal drug for several decades, was shown to have a remarkable protective effect against RV gastroenteritis in a suckling mice model. As well as prophylactic oral administration of BBG9-1 from 2 days before RV infection, therapeutic oral administration of BBG9-1 from 1 day after RV infection significantly alleviated RV-induced diarrhea. Therapeutic administration of BBG9-1 reduced various types of damage in the small intestine, such as epithelial vacuolization and villous shortening, and significantly diminished the infectious RV titer in mixtures of cecal contents and feces. It was also shown that therapeutic administration of BBG9-1 significantly increased the number of acidic mucin-positive goblet cells and the gene expression of mucosal protective factors including MUC2, MUC3, MUC4, TGFβ1 and TFF3 in the small intestine. This led to alleviation of low gut permeability shown as decreased gene expression levels of occludin, claudin-1 and villin-1 after RV infection. Furthermore, in the small intestine, therapeutic administration of BBG9-1 significantly palliated the decreased gene expression of SGLT-1, which plays an important role in water absorption. In the large intestine, administered BBG9-1 was shown to replicate to assimilate undigested nutrients, resulting in normalization of the abnormally high osmotic pressure. These results suggested that water malabsorption caused by RV infection was alleviated in mice administered

  5. Oral administration of Bifidobacterium bifidum G9-1 alleviates rotavirus gastroenteritis through regulation of intestinal homeostasis by inducing mucosal protective factors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomohiro Kawahara

    Full Text Available Human rotavirus (RV infection is a leading cause of dehydrating diarrhea in infants and young children worldwide. Since therapeutic approaches to RV gastroenteritis are limited to alleviation of dehydration with oral rehydration solutions, more direct approaches to palliate symptoms of RV gastroenteritis are required. Treatments with probiotics have been increasingly recognized as alternative safe and low cost treatments for moderate infectious diarrhea. In this study, Bifidobacterium bifidum G9-1 (BBG9-1, which has been used as an intestinal drug for several decades, was shown to have a remarkable protective effect against RV gastroenteritis in a suckling mice model. As well as prophylactic oral administration of BBG9-1 from 2 days before RV infection, therapeutic oral administration of BBG9-1 from 1 day after RV infection significantly alleviated RV-induced diarrhea. Therapeutic administration of BBG9-1 reduced various types of damage in the small intestine, such as epithelial vacuolization and villous shortening, and significantly diminished the infectious RV titer in mixtures of cecal contents and feces. It was also shown that therapeutic administration of BBG9-1 significantly increased the number of acidic mucin-positive goblet cells and the gene expression of mucosal protective factors including MUC2, MUC3, MUC4, TGFβ1 and TFF3 in the small intestine. This led to alleviation of low gut permeability shown as decreased gene expression levels of occludin, claudin-1 and villin-1 after RV infection. Furthermore, in the small intestine, therapeutic administration of BBG9-1 significantly palliated the decreased gene expression of SGLT-1, which plays an important role in water absorption. In the large intestine, administered BBG9-1 was shown to replicate to assimilate undigested nutrients, resulting in normalization of the abnormally high osmotic pressure. These results suggested that water malabsorption caused by RV infection was alleviated in

  6. Acute enteritis or gastroenteritis in young dogs as a predisposing factor for intestinal intussusception: a retrospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rallis, T S; Papazoglou, L G; Adamama-Moraitou, K K; Prassinos, N N

    2000-10-01

    Various types of intestinal intussusception were diagnosed in 29 of 220 young dogs with acute enteritis or gastroenteritis, due to canine parvovirus (85 cases) or presumably to other infectious agents, inflammation or less common hypermotility and metabolic derangements (135 cases). As the other causes of the disease were excluded, acute enteritis or gastroenteritis was considered to be the most likely predisposing factor for the intestinal intussusception. The most common type of intussusception was found to be the ileocolic. Of the 21 dogs that underwent surgical resection and anastomosis of the intestine, 18 dogs recovered completely and three died due to complications. The high survival rate was due to the effective pre-operative, surgical and post-operative therapy.

  7. Hospitalizations due to rotavirus gastroenteritis in Catalonia, Spain, 2003-2008

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background Rotavirus is the most common cause of severe gastroenteritis among young children in Spain and worldwide. We evaluated hospitalizations due to community and hospital-acquired rotavirus gastroenteritis (RVGE) and estimated related costs in children under 5 years old in Catalonia, Spain. Results We analyzed hospital discharge data from the Catalan Health Services regarding hospital admissions coded as infectious gastroenteritis in children under 5 for the period 2003-2008. In order to estimate admission incidence, we used population estimates for each study year published by the Statistic Institut of Catalonia (Idescat). The costs associated with hospital admissions due to rotavirus diarrhea were estimated for the same years. A decision tree model was used to estimate the threshold cost of rotavirus vaccine to achieve cost savings from the healthcare system perspective in Catalonia. From 2003 through 2008, 10655 children under 5 years old were admitted with infectious gastroenteritis (IGE). Twenty-two percent of these admissions were coded as RVGE, yielding an estimated average annual incidence of 104 RVGE hospitalizations per 100000 children in Catalonia. Eighty seven percent of admissions for RVGE occurred during December through March. The mean hospital stay was 3.7 days, 0.6 days longer than for other IGE. An additional 892 cases of presumed nosocomial RVGE were detected, yielding an incidence of 2.5 cases per 1000 child admissions. Total rotavirus hospitalization costs due to community acquired RVGE for the years 2003 and 2008 were 431,593 and 809,224 €, respectively. According to the estimated incidence and hospitalization costs, immunization would result in health system cost savings if the cost of the vaccine was 1.93 € or less. At a vaccine cost of 187 € the incremental cost per hospitalization prevented is 195,388 € (CI 95% 159,300; 238,400). Conclusions The burden of hospitalizations attributable to rotavirus appeared to be lower in

  8. Everything that wheezes… Late presentation of an aspirated foreign body as a cause of near fatal respiratory distress

    OpenAIRE

    L. Hindle*

    2013-01-01

    Aspirated foreign bodies are a common cause of mortality in children. They can be difficult to diagnose if the aspiration is not witnessed or if the object is not radiopaque, as this case illustrates. Case report: A 4 year old boy with a history of previous TB presented with respiratory distress after a week of fever and cough. No history of choking or foreign body was elicited. On examination the child was distressed, hypoxic and febrile. On auscultation bilateral coarse crackles and an e...

  9. Outbreak of viral gastroenteritis due to drinking water contaminated by Norwalk-like viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kukkula, M; Maunula, L; Silvennoinen, E; von Bonsdorff, C H

    1999-12-01

    Heinävesi, a Finnish municipality with a population of 4860 inhabitants, had an outbreak of gastroenteritis in March 1998. On the basis of an epidemiologic survey, an estimated 1700-3000 cases of acute gastroenteritis occurred during the outbreak. Municipal water consumption was found to be associated with illness (risk ratio [RR]=3.5, 95% confidence interval, 3.11>RR>3.96). Norwalk-like virus (NLV) genogroup II (GGII) was identified in untreated water, treated water, and 4 tap water samples by use of reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. This was the first time NLVs had been detected in municipal tap water. Fifteen of 27 patient stool samples had NLV GGII, with an identical amplification product to that found in the water samples, indicating that the outbreak was caused by this virus. In some patients, NLV genogroup I was also encountered. This virus, however, could not be detected in the water samples. Inadequate chlorination contributed to the survival of the virus in the water.

  10. A large common-source outbreak of norovirus gastroenteritis in a hotel in Singapore, 2012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raj, P; Tay, J; Ang, L W; Tien, W S; Thu, M; Lee, P; Pang, Q Y; Tang, Y L; Lee, K Y; Maurer-Stroh, S; Gunalan, V; Cutter, J; Goh, K T

    2017-02-01

    An outbreak of gastroenteritis affected 453 attendees (attack rate 28·5%) of six separate events held at a hotel in Singapore. Active case detection, case-control studies, hygiene inspections and microbial analysis of food, environmental and stool samples were conducted to determine the aetiology of the outbreak and the modes of transmission. The only commonality was the food, crockery and cutlery provided and/or handled by the hotel's Chinese banquet kitchen. Stool specimens from 34 cases and 15 food handlers were positive for norovirus genogroup II. The putative index case was one of eight norovirus-positive food handlers who had worked while they were symptomatic. Several food samples and remnants tested positive for Escherichia coli or high faecal coliforms, aerobic plate counts and/or total coliforms, indicating poor food hygiene. This large common-source outbreak of norovirus gastroenteritis was caused by the consumption of contaminated food and/or contact with contaminated crockery or cutlery provided or handled by the hotel's Chinese banquet kitchen.

  11. Modulation of rotavirus severe gastroenteritis by the combination of probiotics and prebiotics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez-Ochoa, Guadalupe; Flores-Mendoza, Lilian K; Icedo-Garcia, Ramona; Gomez-Flores, Ricardo; Tamez-Guerra, Patricia

    2017-09-01

    Annual mortality rates due to infectious diarrhea are about 2.2 million; children are the most vulnerable age group to severe gastroenteritis, representing group A rotaviruses as the main cause of disease. One of the main factors of rotavirus pathogenesis is the NSP4 protein, which has been characterized as a viral toxin involved in triggering several cellular responses leading to diarrhea. Furthermore, the rotavirus protein NSP1 has been associated with interferon production inhibition by inducing the degradation of interferon regulatory factors IRF3, IRF5, and IRF7. On the other hand, probiotics such as Bifidobacterium and Lactobacillus species in combination with prebiotics such as inulin, HMO, scGOS, lcFOS have been associated with improved generalized antiviral response and anti-rotavirus effect by the reduction of rotavirus infectivity and viral shedding, decreased expression of NSP4 and increased levels of specific anti-rotavirus IgAs. Moreover, these probiotics and prebiotics have been related to shorter duration and severity of rotavirus diarrhea, to the prevention of infection and reduced incidence of reinfections. In this review we will discuss in detail about the rotavirus pathogenesis and immunity, and how probiotics such as Lactobacillus and Bifidobacterium species in combination with prebiotics have been associated with the prevention or modulation of rotavirus severe gastroenteritis.

  12. A Rare Cause of Acute Kidney Injury in a Female Patient with Breast Cancer Presenting as Renal Colic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roxana Jurubita

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Renal infarction is a rare cause of acute kidney injury which could lead to permanent loss of renal function. A prompt diagnosis is necessary in order to achieve a successful revascularization of the occluded artery. Given the rarity of the disease and the paucity of the reported cases in the previous literature a high index of suspicion must be maintained not only in the classical cardiac sources of systemic emboli (atrial fibrillation, dilated cardiomyopathy, or endocarditis, but also in the situations when a hypercoagulable state is presumed. The unspecific presenting symptoms often mask the true etiology of the patient’s complaints. We present here a rare case of renal infarction that occurred in the setting of a hypercoagulable state, in a female patient with a history of breast cancer and documented hepatic metastases.

  13. Are Salmonella-Induced Gastroenteritis Neglected in Developing Countries? Feedback from Microbiological Investigations in N'Djamena Hospitals, Chad.

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    Djim-Adjim Tabo

    Full Text Available Salmonella is considered to be one of the main pathogens causing human gastroenteritis worldwide. Looking for Salmonella in Africa in patients suffering from gastroenteritis is rather unusual, and the use of antibiotics is not subject to any regulation. This study intends for stressing the possible prominent importance of Salmonella in digestive diseases in Africa as well as identifying antimicrobial resistance of Salmonella isolates from faeces samples of human origin. All samples were collected from five N'Djamena hospitals, from patients suffering from diarrhoea. The collecting was undertaken over two periods of six months each: from August 2010 to January 2011 and from September 2011 to February 2012. Salmonella isolates were obtained by standard cultivation and serotyping methods. A total of 43 Salmonella isolates were identified, belonging to 21 different serovars. The most prevalent serovar was Salmonella Stanleyville (n = 7, followed by S. Anatum (n = 4 and S. Kottbus (n = 3. The other serovars were under-represented. The majority of these isolates were susceptible to all antibiotics tested (CLSI Standards, except two S. Enteritidis isolates that exhibited resistance to fluoroquinolones. The different serovars and antibiotic resistance profiles that were observed highlight the substantial diversity of Salmonella in N'Djamena, Chad. Roughly, one out of ten patients who consulted for gastroenteritis was shedding Salmonella spp. and none of them would have been diagnosed outside the context of this research program. This study may encourage local clinicians to explore more often salmonellosis suspicion in their daily practice.

  14. A large community outbreak of gastroenteritis associated with consumption of drinking water contaminated by river water, Belgium, 2010.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braeye, T; DE Schrijver, K; Wollants, E; van Ranst, M; Verhaegen, J

    2015-03-01

    SUMMARY On 6 December 2010 a fire in Hemiksem, Belgium, was extinguished by the fire brigade with both river water and tap water. Local physicians were asked to report all cases of gastroenteritis. We conducted a retrospective cohort study among 1000 randomly selected households. We performed a statistical and geospatial analysis. Human stool samples, tap water and river water were tested for pathogens. Of the 1185 persons living in the 528 responding households, 222 (18·7%) reported symptoms of gastroenteritis during the time period 6-13 December. Drinking tap water was significantly associated with an increased risk for gastroenteritis (relative risk 3·67, 95% confidence interval 2·86-4·70) as was place of residence. Campylobacter sp. (2/56), norovirus GI and GII (11/56), rotavirus (1/56) and Giardia lamblia (3/56) were detected in stool samples. Tap water samples tested positive for faecal indicator bacteria and protozoa. The results support the hypothesis that a point-source contamination of the tap water with river water was the cause of the multi-pathogen waterborne outbreak.

  15. MANAGEMENT OF ACUTE GASTROENTERITIS IN CHILDREN: WHAT IS NEW?

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    I. N. Zakharova

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available High prevalence of acute enteric infections in children, the majority of which affects infants, determines the necessity of development of modern recommendation on diagnostics and treatment of such conditions. The authors show data on etiology of enteric infections and results of various Russian and international research on efficacy of treatment of acute gastroenteritis, including information about sorbents, probiotics, antiemetic agents and antibacterial drugs usage. Recommendations on treatment of acute gastroenteritis are based on the modern protocol of the European Society of Pediatric Gastroenterologists, Hepatologists and Nutritionists (ESPGHAN, which was published in 2008. According to these recommendations, oral rehydration is one of the main components of treatment, decreasing children’s mortality rates. However due to the absence of the effect of this measure on the intestinal peristalsis, duration of the diarrhea and concomitant symptoms (abdominal pain and distension, additional therapy is necessary. In Russia combinations of enterosorbents and probiotics are used in order to relieve such conditions.

  16. An outbreak of Salmonella gastroenteritis in an urban jail.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alcabes, P; O'Sullivan, B; Nadal, E; Mouzon, M

    1988-12-01

    An outbreak of gastroenteritis in New York City's largest jail involved 145 cases over a two-month period. The outbreak was unusual in that two Salmonella strains (serogroups B and D) were involved. Management of the outbreak involved screening kitchen workers by culture of stool samples, and education regarding personal hygiene. Obstacles to investigation and management of the outbreak arose out of the special nature of the jail environment; these included jurisdictional problems and high turnover of the inmate population.

  17. A Study Of Hospitalised Cases Of Acute Gastroenteritis Admitted In Civil Hospital, Ahmedabad During The Epidemic Of 1988.

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    Kumar P

    1990-01-01

    Full Text Available An epidemic of gastroenteritis occurred between July and November 1988 in Ahmedabad City. The epidemic originated from Saijpur Bocha locality of the city and thereafter several new foci also development. The city has a number of Government and Municipal Corporation run hospitals as well as private treatment centers where these cases were treated. The Corporation also took measures to control this epidemic. The present study analysis the cases of gastroenteritis (2008 and cholera (112 admitted to the Civil Hospital during this period. The cases occurred in all age groups and both sexes. However, when compared with hospital records of previous non- epidemic years, more cases were found in the adult population and the case fatality rate was low during this epidemic. The study details the various control measures taken by the Municipal Corporation.

  18. Viral gastroenteritis in daily pediatric practice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kracmarova, R.; Plisek, S.

    2011-01-01

    Diarrhoeal disease is one of the most common causes of an acute examination and hospitalisation of a child. Portion of a viral etiology of intestinal diseases is increasing in connection with an improvement of social and economical conditions. The most common viral agents are rotaviruses, caliciviruses, adenoviruses and astroviruses, but also other viruses cause an intestinal disease. The most severe clinical course is expected from the rotaviral and noroviral infection. The dehydratation, which could be less or more severe, often complicated the infection. The treatment is symptomatic. The most important role for the prevention of rotavirus disease is played by the vaccination. (author)

  19. Socio-demographic, Epidemiological and Environmental Determinants of Acute Gastroenteritis in Western India

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    Mihir Prafulbhai Rupani

    2016-03-01

    Conclusions: Socio-demographic factors (higher socio-economic status, epidemiological correlates (change in taste of water, another family member been affected with acute gastroenteritis and eating outside food and environmental determinants (waste disposal in a common dump and waste accumulation around house significantly determines the occurrence of cases of acute gastroenteritis. Keywords: case-control studies;diarrhea; epidemiologic determinants; gastroenteritis; social determinants of health. | PubMed

  20. Effect of non-stationary climate on infectious gastroenteritis transmission in Japan

    OpenAIRE

    Onozuka, Daisuke

    2014-01-01

    Local weather factors are widely considered to influence the transmission of infectious gastroenteritis. Few studies, however, have examined the non-stationary relationships between global climatic factors and transmission of infectious gastroenteritis. We analyzed monthly data for cases of infectious gastroenteritis in Fukuoka, Japan from 2000 to 2012 using cross-wavelet coherency analysis to assess the pattern of associations between indices for the Indian Ocean Dipole (IOD) and El Niño Sou...

  1. Panhypopituitarism presenting as life-threatening heart failure caused by an inherited microdeletion in 1q25 including LHX4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filges, Isabel; Bischof-Renner, Andrea; Röthlisberger, Benno; Potthoff, Christian; Glanzmann, René; Günthard, Joëlle; Schneider, Jacques; Huber, Andreas R; Zumsteg, Urs; Miny, Peter; Szinnai, Gabor

    2012-02-01

    Clinical presentation of hypopituitarism in the neonate may be variable, ranging from absent to severe nonspecific symptoms and may be life-threatening in patients with adrenocorticotropic hormone deficiency. The LIM homeobox gene 4 (LHX4) transcription factor regulates early embryonic development of the anterior pituitary gland. Autosomal dominant mutations in LHX4 cause congenital hypopituitarism with variable combined pituitary hormone deficiency (CPHD). We report on a neonate with unexplained heart failure and minor physical anomalies, suggesting a midline defect. She was diagnosed with complete CPHD. Cardiac function was rescued by replacement with hydrocortisone and thyroxine; hypoglycaemia stopped under growth hormone therapy. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed a dysgenetic pituitary gland suggesting an early developmental defect. Array comparative genomic hybridization showed a maternally inherited 1.5-megabase microdeletion in 1q25.2q25.3, including the LHX4 gene. Haploinsufficiency of LHX4 likely explains the predominant pituitary phenotype in the proposita and we suggest variable intrafamilial penetrance of the inherited microdeletion. To the best of our knowledge, we are the first to report on heart failure as a rare nonspecific symptom of treatable CPHD in the newborn. Variably penetrant pituitary insufficiency, including this severe and atypical presentation, can be correlated with LHX4 insufficiency and highlights the role of LHX4 for pituitary development.

  2. Present vertical movements in Central and Northern Italy from GPS data: Possible role of natural and anthropogenic causes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cenni, N.; Viti, M.; Baldi, P.; Mantovani, E.; Bacchetti, M.; Vannucchi, A.

    2013-11-01

    Insights into the present vertical kinematic pattern in Central and Northern Italy are gained by the analysis of GPS data acquired by a network of 262 permanent stations, working over various time intervals since 2001. Uplift is observed in the Alps (up to 5 mm/yr) and Apennines (1-2 mm/yr), whereas subsidence is recognized in the southern Venetian Plain (2-4 mm/yr) and the eastern Po Valley, where the highest rates are observed (up to 9 mm/yr between Reggio Emilia and Rimini). On the other hand, the western part of the Po Valley presents very low vertical rates. The boundary between subsiding and not subsiding Po Valley nearly corresponds to the Giudicarie tectonic discontinuity. It is argued that the different kinematic patterns of the eastern and western Padanian sectors may also be related to the underthrusting of the eastern domain beneath the western one. Some considerations are then reported on how the various causes of vertical movements (tectonic and sedimentological processes) may contribute to the observed kinematics.

  3. Gastroenteritis: a waterborne outbreak affecting 1600 people in a small Danish town.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laursen, E; Mygind, O; Rasmussen, B; Rønne, T

    1994-10-01

    To examine (i) the extent of illness caused by contamination of a waterworks with waste water due to overflow, and its correlation with precipitation; (ii) the potential secondary spread; (iii) economic losses due to sick leave. A historical follow up study with structured postal questionnaires. A small community on the outskirts of greater Copenhagen at the end of 1991 and the beginning of 1992. The main study group comprised all 703 households supplied by the waterworks (response rate: 89% of households). There was a control group of 200 randomly chosen households in neighbouring communities with a different water supply source (response rate: 64% of households). A day care group of all 149 children (response rate: 78%) and 30 teachers (response rate: 83%) who lived in central Copenhagen, but spent the day in four day care centres supplied by the waterworks, and members of their household was also studied. Altogether 1455 people (88% of respondents in the main study group) reported having had symptoms of gastroenteritis, particularly diarrhoea (83%) and vomiting (55%). In the control group, 10% had had symptoms of gastroenteritis. The onset of episodes with diarrhoea correlated well with precipitation (Spearman's correlation coefficient: 0.75; p = 0.0002). The secondary attack rate in household contacts was 12%. No pathogens were found. Affected people stayed home from work for a total of 1658 days. The cost of loss of production because of sick leave amounted to 1,600,000 Danish kroner (180,000 pounds). The outbreak caused extensive illness correlated with precipitation, showed secondary spread, and was associated with major economic losses. Increased awareness among local physicians and waterworks personnel of the possibility of contamination of the water could have led to earlier intervention and reduced the extent of illness. Outbreaks are often caused by several factors, many of a technical nature, which in this case acted together. It is recommended that

  4. Molecular Epidemiology of Viral Gastroenteritis in Hajj pilgrimage

    KAUST Repository

    Padron Regalado, Eriko

    2014-05-01

    Hajj is the annual gathering of Islam practitioners in Mecca, Saudi Arabia. During the event, gastrointestinal infections are usually experienced and outbreaks have always been a concern; nevertheless, a deep and integrative study of the etiological agents has never been carried out. Here, I describe for the first time the epidemiology of pathogenic enteric viruses during Hajj 2011, 2012 and 2013. The focus of this study was the common enteric viruses Astrovirus, Norovirus, Rotavirus and Adenovirus. An enzyme Immunoassay established their presence in 14.9%, 15.0% and 6.6% of the reported cases of acute diarrhea for 2011, 2012 and 2013, respectively. For the three years of study, Astrovirus accounted for the majority of the viral infections. To our knowledge, this is the first time an epidemiological study depicts Astrovirus as the main viral agent of gastroenteritis in a mass gathering event. Hajj is rich in strains of Astrovirus, Norovirus and Rotavirus. A first screening by RT-PCR resulted in ten different genotypes. Strains HAstV 2, HAstV 1 and HAstV 5 were identified for Astrovirus. GI.6, GII.3, GII.4 and GII.1 were described for Norovirus and G1P[8], G4P[8] and G3P[8] were found for Rotavirus. The majority of the Astrovirus isolates could not be genotyped suggesting the presence of a new variant(s). Cases like this encourage the use of metagenomics (and nextgeneration sequencing) as a state-of-the-art technology in clinical diagnosis. A sample containing Adenovirus particles is being used to standardize a process for detection directly from stool samples and results will be obtained in the near future. The overall findings of the present study support the concept of Hajj as a unique mass gathering event that potentiates the transmission of infectious diseases. The finding of Norovirus GII.4 Sydney, a variant originated from Australia, suggests that Hajj is a receptor of infectious diseases worldwide. This work is part of the Hajj project, a collaborative

  5. Diabetes insipidus as the first symptom caused by lung cancer metastasis to the pituitary glands: Clinical presentations, diagnosis, and management

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    J F Mao

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background : Central diabetes insipidus (CDI, secondary to pituitary metastatic lesions, is uncommon; however, lung and breast cancer are the commonest malignancies to have metastases to the pituitary. Early management of systemic chemotherapy and pituitary irradiation might improve the prognosis of patients. Aims : To investigate the clinical features, diagnosis, and management of CDI caused by lung cancer metastasis to the pituitary glands. Materials and Methods : We retrospectively reviewed 10 patients who had CDI as their first symptom before their lung cancers were diagnosed. Their clinical presentations, anterior pituitary gland function, sellar magnetic resonance imaging (MRI, management, and prognosis were described. Settings and Design : This retrospective cross-sectional clinical study was conducted in a medical college hospital. Results : The patient′s mean age was 58.6±7.8 years. Diabetes insipidus was the main complaint when they were referred to our hospital. MRI revealed specific dumbbell-shaped masses in the sella turcica in five patients. In seven patients whose hormones were measured, the levels of hormones from adenohypophysis were abnormally low in six patients. The main treatments included surgery, systemic chemotherapy, and sellar irradiation. Although nine patients had poor prognoses, one patient has survived for more than 3 years, suggesting benefit from early diagnosis and treatment. Conclusions : New-onset CDI might be the only symptom presented by the patients with pituitary metastasis (PM from lung cancer. Dumbbell-shaped sellar masses in MRI are prone to the diagnosis of PM. A thorough examination for primary cancer should be carried out in these aged and elderly patients.

  6. The mitochondrial DNA 10197 G > A mutation causes MELAS/Leigh overlap syndrome presenting with acute auditory agnosia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leng, Yinglin; Liu, Yuhe; Fang, Xiaojing; Li, Yao; Yu, Lei; Yuan, Yun; Wang, Zhaoxia

    2015-04-01

    Mitochondrial encephalomyopathy with lactic acidosis and stroke-like episodes/Leigh (MELAS/LS) overlap syndrome is a mitochondrial disorder subtype with clinical and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) features that are characteristic of both MELAS and Leigh syndrome (LS). Here, we report an MELAS/LS case presenting with cortical deafness and seizures. Cranial MRI revealed multiple lesions involving bilateral temporal lobes, the basal ganglia and the brainstem, which conformed to neuroimaging features of both MELAS and LS. Whole mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) sequencing and PCR-RFLP revealed a de novo heteroplasmic m.10197 G > A mutation in the NADH dehydrogenase subunit 3 gene (ND3), which was predicted to cause an alanine to threonine substitution at amino acid 47. Although the mtDNA m.10197 G > A mutation has been reported in association with LS, Leber hereditary optic neuropathy and dystonia, it has never been linked with MELAS/LS overlap syndrome. Our patient therefore expands the phenotypic spectrum of the mtDNA m.10197 G > A mutation.

  7. Burden of rotavirus gastroenteritis in the Middle Eastern and North African pediatric population

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    Duan Yinghui

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Rotavirus gastroenteritis (RVGE is the most common cause of severe childhood diarrhea worldwide. Objectives were to estimate the burden of RVGE among children less than five years old in the Middle East (Bahrain, Iran, Iraq, Israel, Jordan, Kuwait, Oman, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, Syria, UAE, Yemen, North Africa (Algeria, Egypt, Libya, Morocco, Tunisia and Turkey. Methods A comprehensive literature search was conducted in major databases on the epidemiology and burden of rotavirus among children less than five years old between 1999 and 2009. Data from each country was extracted and compared. Results The search identified 43 studies. RVGE was identified in 16-61% of all cases of acute gastroenteritis, with a peak in the winter. RVGE-related hospitalization rates ranged from 14% to 45%, compared to 14%-28% for non-RVGE. Annually, RVGE caused up to 112 fatalities per 100,000 in certain countries in the region. Hospitalization costs ranged from $1.8 to $4.6 million annually, depending on the country. The most recent literature available showed that G1P[8] was the most prevalent genotype combination in 8 countries (range 23%-56%. G2P[4] was most prevalent in 4 countries (26%-48%. G9P[8] and G4P[8] were also frequently detected. Conclusions RVGE is a common disease associated with significant morbidity, mortality, and economic burden. Given the variety and diverse rotavirus types in the region, use of a vaccine with broad and consistent serotype coverage would be important to help decrease the burden of RVGE in the Middle East and North Africa.

  8. Burden of rotavirus gastroenteritis in the Middle Eastern and North African pediatric population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khoury, Hanane; Ogilvie, Isla; El Khoury, Antoine C; Duan, Yinghui; Goetghebeur, Mireille M

    2011-01-07

    Rotavirus gastroenteritis (RVGE) is the most common cause of severe childhood diarrhea worldwide. Objectives were to estimate the burden of RVGE among children less than five years old in the Middle East (Bahrain, Iran, Iraq, Israel, Jordan, Kuwait, Oman, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, Syria, UAE, Yemen), North Africa (Algeria, Egypt, Libya, Morocco, Tunisia) and Turkey. A comprehensive literature search was conducted in major databases on the epidemiology and burden of rotavirus among children less than five years old between 1999 and 2009. Data from each country was extracted and compared. The search identified 43 studies. RVGE was identified in 16-61% of all cases of acute gastroenteritis, with a peak in the winter. RVGE-related hospitalization rates ranged from 14% to 45%, compared to 14%-28% for non-RVGE. Annually, RVGE caused up to 112 fatalities per 100,000 in certain countries in the region. Hospitalization costs ranged from $1.8 to $4.6 million annually, depending on the country. The most recent literature available showed that G1P[8] was the most prevalent genotype combination in 8 countries (range 23%-56%). G2P[4] was most prevalent in 4 countries (26%-48%). G9P[8] and G4P[8] were also frequently detected. RVGE is a common disease associated with significant morbidity, mortality, and economic burden. Given the variety and diverse rotavirus types in the region, use of a vaccine with broad and consistent serotype coverage would be important to help decrease the burden of RVGE in the Middle East and North Africa.

  9. Outbreak of rotavirus gastroenteritis with high mortality, Nicaragua, 2005 Brote de gastroenteritis por rotavirus con alta mortalidad, Nicaragua, 2005

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    Juan José Amador

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: We investigated a nationwide outbreak of severe rotavirus gastroenteritis in Nicaragua in children under 5 years old, leading to many consultations, hospitalizations, and deaths. We questioned whether a vaccine might have prevented these illnesses and deaths, sought to identify risk factors for death, and developed a clinical profile of children hospitalized with diarrhea. METHODS: We conducted a case-control study to determine whether children who died had access to routine immunizations, a proxy predicting access to a rotavirus vaccine. We identified risk factors for death among children who died in the outbreak compared with surviving age-matched controls with diarrhea. We collected stools, clinical data, and immunization data on children hospitalized for diarrhea to test for rotavirus, develop the profile, and forecast future access to a rotavirus vaccine. RESULTS: The outbreak from February to April 2005 caused 47 470 consultations and 52 deaths. Approximately 80% of cases and controls and 60% of children hospitalized with diarrhea had access to routine immunizations and would likely have had access to a rotavirus vaccine. With a vaccine efficacy of 85%, up to 51% of severe rotavirus cases and up to 68% of deaths could have been prevented if a rotavirus vaccine were available as part of routine child-hood immunizations. Study of 35 case-control pairs indicated that severe illnesses, malnutrition, and care by traditional healers were risk factors for death. Rotavirus was found in 42% of samples from hospitalized children and was associated with severe disease and dehydration. CONCLUSIONS: The impact of the seasonal outbreaks of rotavirus disease could be diminished with a rotavirus vaccine, improvements in oral rehydration programs, and training of traditional healers in the proper management of children with acute diarrhea.OBJETIVOS: Se investigó un brote nacional de gastroenteritis grave por rotavirus en niños menores de 5 a

  10. [Waterborne outbreak of gastroenteritis transmitted through the public water supply].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godoy, P; Borrull, C; Palà, M; Caubet, I; Bach, P; Nuín, C; Espinet, L; Torres, J; Mirada, G

    2003-01-01

    The chlorination of public water supplies has led researchers to largely discard drinking water as a potential source of gastroenteritis outbreaks. The aim of this study was to investigate an outbreak of waterborne disease associated with drinking water from public supplies. A historical cohort study was carried out following notification of a gastroenteritis outbreak in Baqueira (Valle de Arán, Spain). We used systematic sampling to select 87 individuals staying at hotels and 67 staying in apartments in the target area. Information was gathered on four factors (consumption of water from the public water supply, sandwiches, water and food in the ski resorts) as well as on symptoms. We assessed residual chlorine in drinking water, analyzed samples of drinking water, and studied stool cultures from 4 patients. The risk associated with each water source and food type was assessed by means of relative risk (RR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI). The overall attack rate was 51.0% (76/149). The main symptoms were diarrhea 87.5%, abdominal pain 80.0%, nausea 50.7%, vomiting 30.3%, and fever 27.0%. The only factor associated with a statistically significant risk of disease was consumption of drinking water (RR = 11.0; 95% CI, 1.6-74.7). No residual chlorine was detected in the drinking water, which was judged acceptable. A problem associated with the location of the chlorinator was observed and corrected. We also recommended an increase in chlorine levels, which was followed by a reduction in the number of cases. The results of stool cultures of the four patients were negative for enterobacteria. This study highlights the potential importance of waterborne outbreaks of gastroenteritis transmitted through drinking water considered acceptable and suggests the need to improve microbiological research into these outbreaks (viruses and protozoa detection).

  11. Brote de gastroenteritis por agua potable de suministro público Waterborne outbreak of gastroenteritis transmitted through the public water supply

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    P. Godoy

    2003-06-01

    Full Text Available Introducción: La potabilidad del agua induce a descartar el posible origen hídrico de los brotes. El objetivo fue investigar un brote de gastroenteritis por agua potable de suministro público. Métodos: Después de la notificación de un brote de gastroenteritis en el municipio de Baqueira (Valle de Arán se diseñó un estudio epidemiológico de cohortes retrospectivo. Mediante un muestreo sistemático se eligió a 87 personas hospedadas en los hoteles y a 62 alojadas en diferentes apartamentos. Se recogió información sobre 4 factores (consumo de agua de la red, bocadillos, agua y alimentos en las pistas de esquí y presencia de síntomas. Se determinó la existencia de cloro, se analizó el agua de la red y se realizó un coprocultivo a 4 enfermos. La implicación de cada factor se determinó con el riesgo relativo (RR y su intervalo de confianza (IC del 95%. Resultados: La incidencia de gastroenteritis fue del 51,0% (76/149. Los porcentajes de los síntomas fueron los siguientes: fiebre, 27,0%; diarrea, 87,5%; náuseas, 50,7%; vómitos, 30,3%, y dolor abdominal, 80,0%. El único factor que presentó un riesgo estadísticamente significativo fue el consumo de agua de la red (RR = 11,0; IC del 95%, 1,6-74,7. La calificación sanitaria del agua fue de potabilidad. Se observó un defecto de situación del clorador en el depósito, que fue corregido. Se recomendó incrementar aún más las concentraciones de cloro, lo cual se acompañó de una disminución de los casos. Los coprocultivos de los 4 enfermos fueron negativos para las enterobacterias investigadas. Conclusiones: El estudio demuestra la posibilidad de presentación de brotes hídricos por agua cualificada como potable y sugiere la necesidad de mejorar la investigación microbiológica (determinación de protozoos y virus en este tipo de brotes.Introduction: The chlorination of public water supplies has led researchers to largely discard drinking water as a potential source of

  12. Secondary efficacy endpoints of the pentavalent rotavirus vaccine against gastroenteritis in sub-Saharan Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tapia, Milagritos D; Armah, George; Breiman, Robert F; Dallas, Michael J; Lewis, Kristen D C; Sow, Samba O; Rivers, Stephen B; Levine, Myron M; Laserson, Kayla F; Feikin, Daniel R; Victor, John C; Ciarlet, Max; Neuzil, Kathleen M; Steele, A Duncan

    2012-04-27

    The efficacy of the pentavalent rotavirus vaccine (PRV), RotaTeq(®), was evaluated in a double-blind, placebo-controlled, multicenter Phase III clinical trial conducted (April 2007-March 2009) in 3 low-income countries in Africa: Ghana, Kenya, and Mali. In total, 5468 infants were randomized 1:1 to receive 3 doses of PRV/placebo at approximately 6, 10, and 14 weeks of age; concomitant administration with routine EPI vaccines, including OPV, was allowed. HIV-infected infants were not excluded. The primary endpoint, vaccine efficacy (VE) against severe-rotavirus gastroenteritis (RVGE), as measured by Vesikari scoring system (VSS, score ≥11), from ≥14 days following Dose 3 through a follow-up period of nearly 2 years in the combined 3 African countries, and secondary endpoints by total follow-up period have been previously reported. In this study, we report post hoc subgroup analyses on secondary endpoints of public health importance. VE against RVGE of any severity was 49.2% (95%CI: 29.9, 63.5) through the first year of life and 30.5% (95%CI: 16.7, 42.2) through the complete follow-up period. VE against severe-gastroenteritis of any etiology was 21.5% (95%CI: vaccine-contained G and P types (G1-G4, P1A[8]), (ii) non-vaccine G types (G8, G9, G10), and (iii) non-vaccine P types (P1B[4], P2A[6]) was 34.0% (95%CI:11.2, 51.2), 81.8% (95%CI:16.5, 98.0) and 40.7% (95%CI:8.4, 62.1), respectively. There was a trend towards higher VE with higher disease severity, although in some cases the numbers were small. In African countries with high under-5 mortality rates, PRV significantly reduced RVGE through nearly 2 years of follow-up; more modest reductions were observed against gastroenteritis of any etiology. PRV provides protection against severe-RVGE caused by diverse rotavirus genotypes, including those not contained in the vaccine. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. An epidemiological perspective on gastroenteritis in child day care centers : Assessment of impact and risk

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Enserink, R.

    2014-01-01

    The impact of gastroenteritis related to Dutch DCCs is substantial, particularly among the very young attendees. Attending a DCC roughly doubles a child’s probability of experiencing an episode of gastroenteritis that requires a visit to a general practitioner or hospital. A child might experience a

  14. Efficacy of a pentavalent human-bovine reassortant rotavirus vaccine against rotavirus gastroenteritis among American Indian children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grant, Lindsay R; Watt, James P; Weatherholtz, Robert C; Moulton, Lawrence H; Reid, Raymond; Santosham, Mathuram; O'Brien, Katherine L

    2012-02-01

    Before the widespread use of rotavirus vaccines, rotavirus was a leading cause of gastroenteritis among children. Navajo and White Mountain Apache children suffer a disproportionate burden of severe rotavirus disease compared with the general U.S. population. We enrolled Navajo and White Mountain Apache infants in a multicenter, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial of pentavalent human-bovine reassortant rotavirus vaccine (PRV). Subjects received 3 doses of vaccine or placebo at 4 to 10 week intervals, with the first dose given between 6 and 12 weeks of age. Gastroenteritis episodes were identified by active surveillance. Disease severity was determined by a standardized scoring system. There were 509 and 494 randomized children who received vaccine and placebo, respectively. Among placebo recipients, the incidence of rotavirus gastroenteritis was 34.2 episodes/100 child-years (95% confidence interval [95% CI]: 25.8-38.9) versus 8.1 episodes/100 child-years (95% CI: 5.4-12.5) in the vaccine group. The percentage of rotavirus episodes caused by serotypes G1, G2, and G3 was 72.3%, 23.4%, and 2.1%, respectively. There were no severe rotavirus episodes among vaccinees and 4 among placebo recipients. PRV was 77.1% (95% CI: 59.7-87.6), 89.5% (95% CI: 65.9-97.9), and 82.9% (95% CI: 61.1-93.6) effective against G1-G4 rotavirus disease, severe and moderate rotavirus disease combined, and outpatient visits for rotavirus disease, respectively. The risk of adverse events was similar for the vaccine and placebo groups. PRV was highly effective in preventing rotavirus disease and related health care utilization in these American Indian infants. Vaccine efficacy and immunogenicity were similar to the overall study population enrolled in the multicenter trial.

  15. Evaluation of neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin in pediatric patients with acute rotavirus gastroenteritis and dehydration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Çelik, Tanju; Altekin, Emel; İşgüder, Rana; Kenesari, Yasin; Duman, Murat; Arslan, Nur

    2013-09-03

    Dehydration caused by acute rotavirus gastroenteritis is a frequent finding in pediatric patients. The most important treatment modality in these patients is recognising and treating dehydration, electrolyte imbalance and acute kidney injury. Neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin (NGAL) is used widely as a biomarker for the diagnosis of acute or chronic renal injury in numerous clinical studies. It is recognized as an early marker of acute renal failure before the elevation of routine biochemical tests such as creatinine. The aim of this study is to investigate the plasma and urine NGAL concentrations in mildly or moderately dehydrated patients with acute rotavirus gastroenteritis. A total of 30 patients (13 girls, mean age 62.5 ± 46.2 months) with diarrhea and mild/moderate dehydration and 35 healthy controls (17 girls, mean age 81.1 ± 41.8 months) were enrolled in the study. Plasma and urine NGAL levels of the two groups were compared. The mean age, gender and serum creatinine levels of the patients and healthy controls were similar. The mean plasma and urine NGAL levels of the patients were significantly higher than controls (plasma: 118.6 ± 81.2 vs. 66.5 ± 11.3, p = 0.001 and urine: 17.7 ± 17.5 vs. 10.6 ± 7.9, p = 0.035, respectively). Mildly or moderately dehydrated children have higher plasma and urine NGAL levels compared to control subjects. Plasma and/or urine NGAL levels can be used for the early prediction of renal impairment in children with mild or moderate dehydration.

  16. Detection of rotavirus and other enteropathogens in children hospitalized with acute gastroenteritis in Havana, Cuba.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribas, María de Los Angeles; Tejero, Yahisel; Cordero, Yanislet; de Los Angeles León, María; Rodriguez, Misladys; Perez-Lastre, Jorge; Triana, Thelma; Guerra, Mabel; Ayllón, Lucía; Escalante, Gladys; Hadad, Jorge

    2015-08-01

    The aim of the study was to diagnose infections with rotavirus and other enteric pathogens in children under five years old with acute gastroenteritis and to identify the most common epidemiological and clinical characteristics of these pathogens. The study was conducted using 110 stool samples from the same number of children under five years old who were inpatients at three paediatric hospitals in Havana, Cuba, between October and December 2011. The samples were tested for rotavirus and other enteric pathogens using traditional and molecular microbiological methods. Pathogens were detected in 85 (77.3 %) of the children. Rotavirus was the most commonly found, appearing in 54.5 % of the children, followed by bacteria (29 %) and parasites (10.9 %). Other viral pathogens detected included adenovirus (6.4 %) and astrovirus (3.6 %). In rotavirus-positives cases, at least one other pathogen was detected, usually a bacterium (26.6 %). More than three episodes of watery diarrhea in 24 hours were observed in 78.3 % of the cases. Dehydration was found in 30 (50 %) rotavirus-positive children, of whom seven (11.6 %) were transferred to an intensive care unit due to complications of metabolic acidosis. Rotavirus was most commonly observed among children under 12 months old (65 %). The highest incidence of infection occurred in children who were under the care of a relative at home (78.3 %), had not been breastfed (65 %), or had been breastfed for less than six months (28.3 %). The genotype combinations most frequently found were G9P8 (28.3 %) and G1P8 (10 %). This study demonstrates the presence of rotavirus and other enteric pathogens as causes of gastroenteritis in hospitalized infants and young children in Cuba.

  17. Brote de gastroenteritis por agua potable de suministro público

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    Godoy P.

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Introducción: La potabilidad del agua induce a descartar el posible origen hídrico de los brotes. El objetivo fue investigar un brote de gastroenteritis por agua potable de suministro público. Métodos: Después de la notificación de un brote de gastroenteritis en el municipio de Baqueira (Valle de Arán se diseñó un estudio epidemiológico de cohortes retrospectivo. Mediante un muestreo sistemático se eligió a 87 personas hospedadas en los hoteles y a 62 alojadas en diferentes apartamentos. Se recogió información sobre 4 factores (consumo de agua de la red, bocadillos, agua y alimentos en las pistas de esquí y presencia de síntomas. Se determinó la existencia de cloro, se analizó el agua de la red y se realizó un coprocultivo a 4 enfermos. La implicación de cada factor se determinó con el riesgo relativo (RR y su intervalo de confianza (IC del 95%. Resultados: La incidencia de gastroenteritis fue del 51,0% (76/149. Los porcentajes de los síntomas fueron los siguientes: fiebre, 27,0%; diarrea, 87,5%; náuseas, 50,7%; vómitos, 30,3%, y dolor abdominal, 80,0%. El único factor que presentó un riesgo estadísticamente significativo fue el consumo de agua de la red (RR = 11,0; IC del 95%, 1,6-74,7. La calificación sanitaria del agua fue de potabilidad. Se observó un defecto de situación del clorador en el depósito, que fue corregido. Se recomendó incrementar aún más las concentraciones de cloro, lo cual se acompañó de una disminución de los casos. Los coprocultivos de los 4 enfermos fueron negativos para las enterobacterias investigadas. Conclusiones: El estudio demuestra la posibilidad de presentación de brotes hídricos por agua cualificada como potable y sugiere la necesidad de mejorar la investigación microbiológica (determinación de protozoos y virus en este tipo de brotes.

  18. Salmonella Gastroenteritis Due to Rhabdomyolysis and Acute Renal Failure with Acute Pancreatitis Case Report

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    Şenay Canikli Adıgüzel

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available In this study, we are reporting a case of acute pancreatitis, acute renal failure (ARF and rhabdomyolysis which are rare serious complications of the Salmonella gastroenteritis. A patient presented as an emergency with fever, abdominal pain, and ARF complexion was operated urgently by ileus pre-diagnosis. There was not surgical pathology detected during the operation. However, Salmonella paratyphi A in feces of patient with high levels of amylase, lipase, and creatinine were reported during intensive care unit (ICU admission. The patient was diagnosed with acute pancreatitis due to Salmonella infection. During ICU stay, the levels of amylase and lipase were reduced and the kidney functions improved without hemodialysis. On the 7th day, patient was transferred to the general surgical service.

  19. HYPERGLYCEMIA IN GRADE III AND GRADE IV MALNUTRITION WITH DEHYDRATING GASTROENTERITIS

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    Mallesh

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE OF THE STUDY: To study the incidence of hyperglycemia in grade III AND IV malnutrition with no signs and some signs of dehydration. SETTING: Tertiary care center located in north Karnataka. DESIGN: Prospective observational study involving 21 children. METHODS: All the children with grade III and grade IV malnutrition presenting with diarrhea of less than 14 days duration, having no signs to some signs of dehydration. RESULTS: Hyperglycemia was observed in three of 21 children hypoglycemia was observed in six children. CONCLUSION: Although hypoglycemia is common finding in moderate and severely malnourished children with dehydrating gastroenteritis, hyperglycemia should also be suspected and treated. Long term follow up of these children is needed involving larger number of people in multicenter studies.

  20. Efficacy of human rotavirus vaccine against severe gastroenteritis in Malawian children in the first two years of life: a randomized, double-blind, placebo controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunliffe, Nigel A; Witte, Desiree; Ngwira, Bagrey M; Todd, Stacy; Bostock, Nancy J; Turner, Ann M; Chimpeni, Philips; Victor, John C; Steele, A Duncan; Bouckenooghe, Alain; Neuzil, Kathleen M

    2012-04-27

    Rotavirus gastroenteritis is a major cause of morbidity and mortality among African infants and young children. A phase III, placebo-controlled, multi-centre clinical trial of a live, oral G1P[8] human rotavirus vaccine (RIX4414) undertaken in Malawi and South Africa significantly reduced the incidence of severe rotavirus gastroenteritis in the first year of life. We now report on vaccine efficacy in the Malawi cohort of children who were followed into the second year of life. A total of 1773 healthy infants were enrolled in Blantyre, Malawi into three groups. Two groups received three doses of RIX4414 or placebo at age 6, 10, and 14 weeks and the third group received placebo at 6 weeks and RIX4414 at age 10 and 14 weeks. Subjects were followed by weekly home visits for episodes of gastroenteritis until 1 year of age, and were then re-consented for further follow-up to 18-24 months of age. Severity of gastroenteritis episodes was graded according to the Vesikari scoring system. Seroconversion for anti-rotavirus IgA was determined on a subset of children by using ELISA on pre- and post-vaccine blood samples. Rotavirus VP7 (G) and VP4 (P) genotypes were determined by RT-PCR. A total of 70/1030 (6.8%, 95% CI 5.3-8.5) subjects in the pooled (2 dose plus 3 dose) RIX4414 group compared with 53/483 (11.0%, 8.3-14.1) subjects in the placebo group developed severe rotavirus gastroenteritis in the entire follow-up period (vaccine efficacy 38.1% (9.8-57.3)). The point estimate of efficacy in the second year of life (17.6%; -59.2 to 56.0) was lower than in the first year of life (49.4%; 19.2-68.3). There were non-significant trends towards a higher efficacy in the second year of life among children who received the three-dose schedule compared with the two-dose schedule, and a higher anti-rotavirus IgA seroresponse rate in the three-dose RIX4414 group. Rotavirus strains detected included genotype G12 (31%); G9 (23%); and G8 (18%); only 18% of strains belonged to the G1P[8

  1. Effect of non-stationary climate on infectious gastroenteritis transmission in Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onozuka, Daisuke

    2014-06-01

    Local weather factors are widely considered to influence the transmission of infectious gastroenteritis. Few studies, however, have examined the non-stationary relationships between global climatic factors and transmission of infectious gastroenteritis. We analyzed monthly data for cases of infectious gastroenteritis in Fukuoka, Japan from 2000 to 2012 using cross-wavelet coherency analysis to assess the pattern of associations between indices for the Indian Ocean Dipole (IOD) and El Niño Southern Oscillation (ENSO). Infectious gastroenteritis cases were non-stationary and significantly associated with the IOD and ENSO (Multivariate ENSO Index [MEI], Niño 1 + 2, Niño 3, Niño 4, and Niño 3.4) for a period of approximately 1 to 2 years. This association was non-stationary and appeared to have a major influence on the synchrony of infectious gastroenteritis transmission. Our results suggest that non-stationary patterns of association between global climate factors and incidence of infectious gastroenteritis should be considered when developing early warning systems for epidemics of infectious gastroenteritis.

  2. The management of children with gastroenteritis and dehydration in the emergency department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colletti, James E; Brown, Kathleen M; Sharieff, Ghazala Q; Barata, Isabel A; Ishimine, Paul

    2010-06-01

    Acute gastroenteritis is characterized by diarrhea, which may be accompanied by nausea, vomiting, fever, and abdominal pain. To review the evidence on the assessment of dehydration, methods of rehydration, and the utility of antiemetics in the child presenting with acute gastroenteritis. The evidence suggests that the three most useful predictors of 5% or more dehydration are abnormal capillary refill, abnormal skin turgor, and abnormal respiratory pattern. Studies are conflicting on whether blood urea nitrogen (BUN) or BUN/creatinine ratio correlates with dehydration, but several studies found that low serum bicarbonate combined with certain clinical parameters predicts dehydration. In most studies, oral or nasogastric rehydration with an oral rehydration solution was equally efficacious as intravenous (i.v.) rehydration. Many experts discourage the routine use of antiemetics in young children. However, children receiving ondensetron are less likely to vomit, have greater oral intake, and are less likely to be treated by intravenous rehydration. Mean length of Emergency Department (ED) stay is also less, and very few serious side effects have been reported. In the ED, dehydration is evaluated by synthesizing the historical and physical examination, and obtaining laboratory data points in select patients. No single laboratory value has been found to be accurate in predicting the degree of dehydration and this is not routinely recommended. The evidence suggests that the majority of children with mild to moderate dehydration can be treated successfully with oral rehydration therapy. Ondansetron (orally or intravenously) may be effective in decreasing the rate of vomiting, improving the success rate of oral hydration, preventing the need for i.v. hydration, and preventing the need for hospital admission in those receiving i.v. hydration. Copyright 2010. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  3. Intravenous dextrose for children with gastroenteritis and dehydration: a double-blind randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levy, Jason A; Bachur, Richard G; Monuteaux, Michael C; Waltzman, Mark

    2013-03-01

    We seek to determine whether an initial intravenous bolus of 5% dextrose in normal saline solution compared with normal saline solution will lead to a lower proportion of hospitalized patients and a greater reduction in serum ketone levels in children with gastroenteritis and dehydration. We enrolled children aged 6 months to 6 years in a double-blind, randomized controlled trial of patients presenting to a pediatric emergency department. Subjects were randomized to receive a 20 mL/kg infusion of either 5% dextrose in normal saline solution or normal saline solution. Serum ketone levels were measured before and at 1- and 2-hour intervals after the initial study fluid bolus administration. Primary outcome was the proportion of children hospitalized. Secondary outcome was change in serum ketone levels over time. One hundred eighty-eight children were enrolled. The proportion of children hospitalized did not differ between groups (35% in the 5% dextrose in normal saline solution group versus 44% in the normal saline solution group; risk difference 9%; 95% confidence interval [CI] -5% to 22%). Compared with children who received normal saline solution, those who received 5% dextrose in normal saline solution had a greater reduction in mean serum ketone levels at both 1 hour (mean Δ 1.2 versus 0.1 mmol/L; mean difference 1.1 mmol/L; 95% CI 0.4 to 1.9 mmol/L) and 2 hours (mean Δ 1.9 versus 0.3 mmol/L; mean difference 1.6 mmol/L; 95% CI 0.9 to 2.3 mmol/L). Administration of a dextrose-containing bolus compared with normal saline did not lead to a lower rate of hospitalization for children with gastroenteritis and dehydration. There was, however, a greater reduction in serum ketone levels in patients who received 5% dextrose in normal saline solution. Copyright © 2012. Published by Mosby, Inc.

  4. Pseudotumor from Metal-on-Metal Total Hip Arthroplasty Causing Unilateral Leg Edema: Case Presentation and Literature Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caleb W. Grote

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Metal-on-metal (MoM total hip arthroplasty (THA can be associated with adverse metal reactions, including pseudotumors. This case report describes a 58-year-old female with an MoM THA-related pseudotumor that caused unilateral leg edema from compression of her external iliac vein. After thorough preoperative workup to rule out infection and deep vein thrombosis and consultation with a vascular surgeon, the patient underwent revision THA and excision of her pseudotumor. She had complete resolution of her swelling at 4 years after surgery. Review of all available case reports for this rare complication revealed that almost all patients were female. All patients underwent revision THA, with resolution of their symptoms. Literature review demonstrates that women are disproportionally affected by complications associated with MoM THA. We recommend close monitoring of patients with MoM THA, particularly women, for development of adverse metal reactions.

  5. Oral versus intravenous rehydration therapy in severe gastroenteritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharifi, J; Ghavami, F; Nowrouzi, Z; Fouladvand, B; Malek, M; Rezaeian, M; Emami, M

    1985-01-01

    A controlled, randomised trial comparing the results of oral rehydration therapy with those of intravenous fluid treatment in 470 children with severe gastroenteritis was undertaken. The oral rehydration therapy was divided into two phases--a rehydration phase that used high sodium isotonic fluid at 40 ml/kg per hour and a maintenance phase using low sodium isotonic fluid (sodium 40, potassium 30, bicarbonate 25, chloride 45, and dextrose 130 mmol/l). The results indicate that oral rehydration treatment, used according to this protocol, is successful in treating severe diarrhoea and dehydration, and has considerable advantages over intravenous fluid therapy in reducing complications associated with the treatment of hypernatraemia, in promoting rapid correction of hypokalaemia and acidosis, in decreasing the duration of diarrhoea, and in promoting a greater weight gain at hospital discharge. PMID:3901934

  6. Epidemiology of Classic and Novel Human Astrovirus: Gastroenteritis and Beyond

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diem-Lan Vu

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Since they were identified in 1975, human astroviruses have been considered one of the most important agents of viral acute gastroenteritis in children. However, highly divergent astroviruses infecting humans have been recently discovered and associated with extra-intestinal infections. The report of cases of fatal meningitis and encephalitis, especially in immunocompromised individuals, has broadened their disease spectrum. Although zoonotic transmission among animal and human astroviruses has not been clearly recognized, the genetic similarity between some human and animal viruses makes it likely to occur. This review provides an update on the epidemiology of both classic and novel human astroviruses, and a comprehensive view on confirmed or potential association between astrovirus and human disease.

  7. Additional value of typing Noroviruses in gastroenteritis outbreaks in Amsterdam, The Netherlands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koek, A G; Bovée, L P M J; van den Hoek, J A R; Bos, A J; Bruisten, S M

    2006-02-01

    In Amsterdam, 17 of the 55 gastroenteritis (GI) outbreaks reported from January 2002 to May 2003 were confirmed to be caused by noroviruses (NV). In this study, we describe the molecular epidemiology of a group of nine outbreaks associated with a catering firm and two outbreaks, 5 months apart, in an Amsterdam hospital. All outbreaks were typed to confirm their linkage, and the hospital-related cases were studied to see if the two outbreaks were caused by one persisting NV strain or by a reintroduction after 5 months. For the outbreaks associated with the catering firm one NV genogroup I strain was found which was identical in sequence among customers and employees of the caterer. This was not the strain that predominantly circulated in 2002/2003 in and around Amsterdam, which was the NV genogroup II4 "new variant" (GgII4nv) strain. In the Amsterdam hospital, the two outbreaks were caused by this predominant GgII4nv type, and we argue that NV was most likely reintroduced in the second outbreak from the Amsterdam community.

  8. Evaluation of Urinary Tract Infection in Children With Gastroenteritis

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    Soleimani

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Background Urinary tract infection (UTI is the second most common bacterial infection in infancy and childhood with peaking in infancy and toilet training. Objectives The current study aimed to investigate UTI in patients with diarrhea. Patients and Methods This case-control study was conducted on 200 participants, 100 were patients with acute gastroenteritis and the other 100 were controls who referred to the clinic for routine checkup. UTI was defined as two positive urine cultures with > 105 cfu/mL. If white blood cells were more than 10/mm3 in un-centrifuged urine it would be considered pyuria and more than one microorganism in 10 oil immersion fields as bacteriuria. Analysis was conducted using SPSS ver. 16 with application of chi-square test and 0.05 as significant levels. Results The distribution of these 200 children were 115 (57.5% and 85 (42.5% for females and males respectively. The gender and age distribution in case and control groups showed non-significant association. In urine culture it was observed that 27 individuals were positive and there were seven healthy children. The number of children with positive urine culture was higher than that of their counterparts significantly (P = 0.0001. Relationship between urine culture and age groups showed that the number of participants with positive urine culture was higher in children with age of two months to two years but it was not significant (P = 0.54. Conclusions It was demonstrated that, considerable percentage of UTI existed in the gastroenteritis diseases. Early treatment of UTI in patients would reduce UTI complications.

  9. Failure of cooking to prevent shellfish-associated viral gastroenteritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonnell, S; Kirkland, K B; Hlady, W G; Aristeguieta, C; Hopkins, R S; Monroe, S S; Glass, R I

    1997-01-13

    In January 1995, Florida experienced the largest outbreak of oyster-associated gastroenteritis ever reported. We interviewed both the cohort of persons from 38 gatherings where illness was reported and a sample of harvesters and harvest-area residents. Oysters were traced by means of tags and dealer records, and water quality measures in harvest areas were reviewed. We examined stool specimens for small round structured viruses by means of electron microscopy and amplification of RNA by reverse-transcriptase polymerase chain reaction. We also tested serum specimens for antibodies to Norwalk virus. Of 223 oyster eaters, 58% (129/223) became ill, compared with 3% (2/76) of non-oyster eaters (relative risk, 22; 95% confidence interval, 5.6-87.0). Most oyster eaters (67% [149/223]) ate only cooked (grilled, stewed, or fried) oysters. Oyster eaters who reported eating only thoroughly cooked oysters were as likely to become ill as those who ate raw oysters (relative risk, 0.68; 95% confidence interval, 0.45-1.0; P = .1). In 29 clusters, implicated oysters were from Apalachicola Bay, Florida. A community outbreak occurred in 2 bayside communities before the oyster harvest, leading to an increase in the reportedly common practice of overboard dumping of feces. Small round structured viruses were identified in the stool specimens of 2 harvest-area residents and 9 persons from 8 clusters. Results of water quality tests for fecal coliforms were within acceptable limits. This large outbreak of gastroenteritis associated with oysters may have resulted from overboard dumping of feces during a community outbreak of diarrheal illness. Our findings of acceptable water quality measures for fecal contamination and the lack of appreciable protective effect from cooking leave the consumer with no assurance of safety.

  10. Everything that wheezes… Late presentation of an aspirated foreign body as a cause of near fatal respiratory distress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Hindle*

    2013-12-01

    Discussion: This case illustrates the difficulty doctors may have when there is delayed presentation or unwitnessed aspiration of a foreign body. History, clinical symptoms and the X-ray findings may provide clues but are not diagnostic. In cases where a FB aspiration is suspected, bronchoscopy is both diagnostic and potentially curative.

  11. Unique presentation of LHON/MELAS overlap syndrome caused by m.13046T>C in MTND5.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolarova, Hana; Liskova, Petra; Tesarova, Marketa; Kucerova Vidrova, Vendula; Forgac, Martin; Zamecnik, Josef; Hansikova, Hana; Honzik, Tomas

    2016-12-01

    Leber hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) and mitochondrial encephalopathy, myopathy, lactic acidosis and stroke-like episodes (MELAS) syndromes are mitochondrially inherited disorders characterized by acute visual failure and variable multiorgan system presentation, respectively. A 12-year-old girl with otherwise unremarkable medical history presented with abrupt, painless loss of vision. Over the next few months, she developed moderate sensorineural hearing loss, vertigo, migraines, anhedonia and thyroiditis. Ocular examination confirmed bilateral optic nerve atrophy. Metabolic workup documented elevated cerebrospinal fluid lactate. Initial genetic analyses excluded the three most common LHON mutations. Subsequently, Sanger sequencing of the entire mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) genome was performed. Whole mtDNA sequencing revealed a pathogenic heteroplasmic mutation m.13046T>C in MTND5 encoding the ND5 subunit of complex I. This particular variant has previously been described in a single case report of MELAS/Leigh syndrome (subacute necrotizing encephalopathy). Based on the constellation of clinical symptoms in our patient, we diagnose the condition as LHON/MELAS overlap syndrome. We describe a unique presentation of LHON/MELAS overlap syndrome resulting from a m.13046T>C mutation in a 12-year-old girl. In patients with sudden vision loss in which three of the most prevalent LHON mitochondrial mutations have been ruled out, molecular genetic examination should be extended to other mtDNA-encoded subunits of MTND5 complex I. Furthermore, atypical clinical presentations must be considered, even in well-described phenotypes.

  12. Inclusion Body Myositis: A Case Presenting with Respiratory Failure and Autopsy Findings Leading to the Hypothesis of a Paraneoplastic Cause.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dardis, Christopher; Antezana, Ariel; Tanji, Kurenai; Maccabee, Paul J

    2017-06-23

    BACKGROUND Sporadic inclusion body myositis (IBM) is the most common acquired myopathy seen in adults aged over 50 years, with a prevalence estimated at between 1 and 70 per million. Weakness of the diaphragm with loss of vital capacity is almost universal in IBM. This is almost always asymptomatic. When respiratory complications occur, they are most often due to aspiration. Respiratory failure due to diaphragmatic weakness is exceptionally rare, particularly as the presenting symptom of the disease. It is not currently considered to be a paraneoplastic syndrome. CASE REPORT Our patient presented with hypercarbic respiratory failure. This is the first such reported case without signs of weakness elsewhere of which we are aware. We suspected IBM based on her history of progressive weakness and findings on electromyography. There was a delay of 5 years in obtaining biopsy for confirmation, during which she presented with recurrent episodes of respiratory failure despite using non-invasive ventilation. An autopsy revealed the presence of papillary thyroid carcinoma with spread to local lymph nodes. On the basis that these co-morbidities are unlikely to have occurred by chance (we estimate 1×10-17), we hypothesize that IBM may be a paraneoplastic condition. We acknowledge that proof would require demonstrating a pathogenic antibody. CONCLUSIONS IBM should be considered in older patients (age >45) presenting with otherwise unexplained respiratory failure. A workup for possible malignancy in this setting appears reasonable.

  13. Epidemiological and clinical features of rotavirus among children younger than 5 years of age hospitalized with acute gastroenteritis in Northern Italy

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    Montrasio Giovanni

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Rotavirus is the major cause of acute gastroenteritis and severe dehydrating diarrhea in young children. Methods To estimate the proportion of hospital admissions for rotavirus acute gastroenteritis and identify the circulating G and P genotypes among children under five years of age, we conducted a prospective observational study from January to December 2008, recruiting children consecutively admitted to six hospitals in Milan and nearby towns in northern Italy. Typing was done on stool samples by reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction amplification. Results Of the 521 stool samples from children with acute gastroenteritis, 34.9% (95%CI, 30.8 to 39.2% were rotavirus-positive. Two thirds (67.6% were under two years of age, and 13.2% were under six months. The predominant G type was G1 (40.7%, followed by G9 (22.5%, G2 (13.2%, G3 (5.5%, G4 (3.8% and G10 (1.6%. Twenty-one (11.7% mixed-G infections were identified: G1+G10 (8.8%; G1+G9 (1.6%; and G2+G10 (1.2%. Only P[8] (67.6% and P[4] (12.6% types were P genotyped. The predominant single G/P combination was G1P[8] (39.7%, followed by G9P[8] (25.3%, G2P[4] (14.3%, and G3P[8] (4.1%. All G-mixed types combined with P[8]. Conclusions These findings show an high prevalence of rotavirus infections among children admitted to hospital for acute gastroenteritis caused by different rotavirus strains circulating in the area studied.

  14. Laparoscopic management of ovarian dysgerminoma presenting with acute abdomen caused by adnexal torsion in a 17-year-old girl.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeda, Akihiro; Mori, Masahiko; Sakai, Kotaro; Mitsui, Takashi; Nakamura, Hiromi

    2009-02-01

    Ovarian dysgerminoma cases very rarely present with acute abdomen due to adnexal torsion and the successful laparoscopic management of such a case has not been reported previously. A 17-year-old sexually inactive high school girl presenting with acute abdomen was referred to our emergency department. Transabdominal ultrasonography showed the presence of homogeneous tumor in the lower abdomen. Emergency laparoscopic surgery was performed and left ovarian tumor with adnexal torsion was identified. Left salpingo-oophorectomy was performed carefully to avoid damaging the tumor capsule and the excised tissue was removed after retrieval in an endobag. The histopathological diagnosis was pure ovarian dysgerminoma. The postoperative course was uneventful. Laparoscopic management with careful postoperative follow-up to monitor recurrence could be a treatment option in a young girl with dysgerminoma, if the disease condition is detected in the early stage.

  15. An Empirical Investigation of the Causes and Consequences of Card-Not-Present Fraud, Its Impact and Solution

    OpenAIRE

    Aguoru, Kingsley Chibuzor

    2015-01-01

    The boom of electronic commerce technologies in recent years has drastically increased the demand for an effective electronic method to pay or be paid. The currently predominant method is online card payment, in which the cardholder is not present at the point of sale. However this method is accompanied by huge vulnerabilities and also serves as a low-risk avenue for fraudsters to steal card details with the intent to defraud online merchants. These merchants are those who mostly bear the ove...

  16. Hemi chorea hemiballism syndrome: the first presentation of type 2 diabetes mellitus as a rare cause of chorea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mittal, P.

    2011-01-01

    Hemi chorea-hemiballism syndrome, which is most commonly related to non-ketotic hyperglycemia, is a rare type of chorea. Here, we present an unusual case of Hemi chorea-hemiballism syndrome who was not a known case of diabetes. This case highlights the importance of recognising underlying non-ketotic hyperglycemia, as control of hyperglycemia is helpful in the quick relief of symptoms.

  17. Molecular characterization of norovirus GII.17 detected in healthy adult, intussusception patient, and acute gastroenteritis children in Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khamrin, Pattara; Kumthip, Kattareeya; Yodmeeklin, Arpaporn; Supadej, Kanittapon; Ukarapol, Nuthapong; Thongprachum, Aksara; Okitsu, Shoko; Hayakawa, Satoshi; Ushijima, Hiroshi; Maneekarn, Niwat

    2016-10-01

    Noroviruses (NoVs) have been recognized as a leading cause of sporadic cases and outbreaks of acute gastroenteritis in all age groups. During the surveillance of NoVs in Chiang Mai, Thailand, four cases of the novel GII.17 NoVs were sporadically detected by RT-PCR in 2014-2015. The first case of GII.17 was detected in a healthy adult who worked for a restaurant. The second case was found in a pediatric patient who admitted to the hospital with intussusception. The third and fourth cases were found in acute gastroenteritis children. Phylogenetic analysis clearly demonstrated that GII.17 NoVs detected in this study were genetically closely related with the novel GII.17 Kawasaki reference strains. These four GII.17 NoV positive specimens were also tested by two immunochromatographic test kits in order to evaluate the sensitivity for GII.17 NoV detection. The viral loads in those specimens were determined by real-time RT-PCR. The sensitivity of GII.17 NoV detection varies by individual test kits and also depending on the amount of the viruses contained in the fecal specimens. In summary, our study reported the detection of novel GII.17 NoVs in a wide range of subjects with and without diarrhea. Therefore, continued comprehensive screening and genetic molecular characterization of NoV strains circulating in this area need to be further investigated. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Immune responses induced by recombinant Bacillus subtilis expressing the spike protein of transmissible gastroenteritis virus in pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mou, Chunxiao; Zhu, Liqi; Xing, Xianping; Lin, Jian; Yang, Qian

    2016-07-01

    Transmissible gastroenteritis (TGE) causes severe diarrhea in suckling piglets, results in enormous economic loss in swine-producing areas of the world. To develop an effective, safe, and convenient vaccine for the prevention of TGE, we have constructed a recombinant Bacillus subtilis strain (B. subtilis CotGSG) displaying the transmissible gastroenteritis virus (TGEV) spike (S) protein and discussed its immune function to intestinal submucosal dendritic cells (DCs). Our results showed that the recombinant B. subtilis had the ability to recruit more DCs to sample B. subtilis CotGSG, migrate to MLNs, and induce immune responses. Immunized piglets with B. subtilis CotGSG could significantly elevate the specific SIgA titers in feces, IgG titers and neutralizing antibodies in serum. Collectively, our results suggested that recombinant B. subtilis CotGSG expressing the TGEV S protein could effectively induce immune responses via DCs, and provided a perspective on potential novel strategy and approach that may be applicable to the development of the next generation of TGEV vaccines. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Parental views on childhood vaccination against viral gastroenteritis-a qualitative interview study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lugg, Fiona V; Butler, Christopher C; Evans, Meirion R; Wood, Fiona; Francis, Nick A

    2015-08-01

    Gastroenteritis (GE) causes significant morbidity, especially in young children. A vaccine against rotavirus, a common cause of viral GE (vGE), was added to the childhood immunization schedule in the UK in July 2013 and further related vaccines are under development. To explore parents' beliefs about vGE and their attitudes towards vaccinating. Qualitative interview study with parents of children who had recently experienced an episode of GE. Twenty-eight semi-structured interviews were conducted over the phone with parents. Interviews were audio-recorded, transcribed and analysed using standard thematic approaches. Parents varied in their perception of the threat posed by GE, and parents who did not perceive GE as serious were less enthusiastic about vaccines. Other parents were supportive of vaccines in general and considered benefits to their child, their family and the wider community. Many parents said that they lacked knowledge about efficacy and effectiveness of GE vaccines but their underlying belief about the seriousness of illness motivated their attitudes. Acceptability of GE vaccines to parents could be improved by providing more information on both the burden of illness and the impact of rotavirus vaccine in other comparable countries. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  20. Intestinal perforation in a two-year-old child with eosinophilic gastroenteritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Agertoft, A; Husby, S; Høst, A

    1991-01-01

    A two-year-old boy underwent a laparatomy for an intestinal perforation due to eosinophilic gastroenteritis. He had marked peripheral blood eosinophilia and a small duodenal biopsy showed heavy eosinophilic infiltration in the mucosa. After 1 1/2 year on a restricted diet, a control duodenal biopsy...... showed only slight eosinophilia. Perforation of the small intestine is a rare but serious complication in eosinophilic gastroenteritis....

  1. Management of acute gastroenteritis in healthy children in Lebanon - A national survey

    OpenAIRE

    Alameddine, Aouni; Mourad, Sawsan; Rifai, Nahida

    2010-01-01

    Background: Acute gastroenteritis remains a common condition among infants and children throughout the world. In 1996, The American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) revised its recommendations for the treatment of infants and children with acute gastroenteritis. Aim: The purpose of this survey was to determine how closely current treatment among Lebanese pediatricians compares with the AAP recommendations and to determine the impact of such management on the healthcare system. Patients and Methods...

  2. Invaginated meckel's diverticulum: A rare cause of small intestine intussusception in adults

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rana, N. A.; Rathore, M. O.; Khan, M. U.

    2013-01-01

    Intussusception is commonly seen in infants. It is occasionally found in adults usually due to carcinomas, colonic diverticuli, polyps and rarely Meckel's diverticulum. An adult male presented with upper abdominal pain, nausea, anorexia and loose stools. The initial investigative workup was unremarkable and patient responded to treatment given for acute gastroenteritis. After 3 days, the pain recurred in right iliac fossa with rebound tenderness and leukocytosis. Surgery was performed with provisional diagnoses of acute appendicitis and/or acute Meckel's diverticulitis. Per-operative findings revealed invaginated Meckel's diverticulum causing non-obstructing intussusception. (author)

  3. Intravenous rehydration for gastroenteritis: how long does it really take?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bender, Brenda J; Ozuah, Philip O

    2004-04-01

    For treatment of mild to moderate dehydration arising from viral gastroenteritis, the American Academy of Pediatrics recommends oral rehydration therapy over a 4-hour period. However, oral rehydration therapy remains largely underused by emergency physicians. Studies suggest that a major barrier is a perception that the time requirement for oral rehydration therapy is too long relative to intravenous (IV) hydration. : To test the hypothesis that children who receive IV hydration for gastroenteritis spend significantly less than 4 hours in the emergency department (ED). A prospective case series involving a consecutive sample of 549 children treated with IV hydration for mild to moderate dehydration at an urban pediatric ED. Treatment time was defined as period elapsed between when a physician placed a patient in an ED room and when he/she discharged the patient. We excluded time spent in the waiting room before seeing a physician. Using a standardized procedure, we collected data in September/October 2000 (fall), November 2000 to January 2001 (winter), and April/May 2001 (spring). To provide a measure of average pass-through time at this ED, we also collected data on all patients treated during consecutive 7-day periods in the fall (n = 502), winter (n = 776), and spring (n = 653). We performed univariate analysis of continuous variables using t tests for independent samples. 549 subjects received IV treatment for dehydration; of whom 55% were female, and mean age was 9.7 years. Treatment time for patients undergoing IV hydration exceeded 4 hours (mean = 5.4 +/- 2.4 hours; median = 5.0 hours). Mean time for IV treatment of dehydration was significantly longer than the mean time for treating other patients (5.4 vs. 1.2 hours, P Pediatrics for oral rehydration. The data did not support the perception by emergency physicians that children treated with IV hydration spend significantly less time than 4 hours in the ED. These findings have implications for addressing one

  4. Gastroenteritis attributable to rotavirus in hospitalized Saudi Arabian children in the period 2007–2008

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalil, Mohamed; Azhar, Esam; Kao, Moujahed; Al-Kaiedi, Noura; Alhani, Hatim; Al Olayan, Ibrahim; Pawinski, Robert; Gopala, Kusuma; Kandeil, Walid; Anis, Sameh; Van Doorn, Leen Jan; DeAntonio, Rodrigo

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Rotavirus (RV) is a leading cause of severe gastroenteritis (GE) in children across the world. As there is a lack of epidemiological data for RV gastroenteritis (RVGE) in Saudi Arabia, this hospital-based study was designed to estimate the disease burden of RVGE and assess the prevalent RV types in Saudi children younger than 5 years of age. Patients and methods Children hospitalized for acute GE were enrolled at four pediatric referral hospitals in Saudi Arabia. The study was conducted from February 2007 to March 2008 and used the World Health Organization’s generic protocol for RVGE surveillance. The Vesikari severity scale was used to assess the severity of RVGE. Stool samples were tested for RV using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Samples were further typed by reverse transcriptase–polymerase chain reaction and hybridization assay for determining the G and P types. Results A total of 1,007 children were enrolled; the final analysis included 970 children, of whom 395 were RV positive, 568 were RV negative, and seven had unknown RV status. The proportion of RVGE among GE hospitalizations was 40.7% (95% confidence interval: 37.6–43.9). The highest percentage of RVGE hospitalizations (83.1%) was seen in children younger than 2 years of age. The highest proportion of RV among GE hospitalizations was in June 2007 with 57.1%. The most common RV types detected were G1P[8] (49.3%), G1G9P[8] (13.2%), and G9P[8] (9.6%). Before hospitalization, severe GE episodes occurred in 88.1% RV-positive and 79.6% RV-negative children. Overall, 94% children had recovered by the time they were discharged. Two children (one RV positive and one RV negative) died due to GE complications. Conclusion RVGE is responsible for a high proportion of hospitalizations in Saudi children younger than 5 years of age. Routine RV vaccination has therefore been introduced into the national immunization program and may help reduce the morbidity, mortality, and disease burden

  5. How to Predict Oral Rehydration Failure in Children With Gastroenteritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geurts, Dorien; Steyerberg, Ewout W; Moll, Henriëtte; Oostenbrink, Rianne

    2017-11-01

    Oral rehydration is the standard in most current guidelines for young children with acute gastroenteritis (AGE). Failure of oral rehydration can complicate the disease course, leading to morbidity due to severe dehydration. We aimed to identify prognostic factors of oral rehydration failure in children with AGE. A prospective, observational study was performed at the Emergency department, Erasmus Medical Centre, Rotterdam, The Netherlands, 2010-2012, including 802 previously healthy children, ages 1 month to 5 years with AGE. Failure of oral rehydration was defined by secondary rehydration by a nasogastric tube, or hospitalization or revisit for dehydration within 72 hours after initial emergency department visit. We observed 167 (21%) failures of oral rehydration in a population of 802 children with AGE (median 1.03 years old, interquartile range 0.4-2.1; 60% boys). In multivariate logistic regression analysis, independent predictors for failure of oral rehydration were a higher Manchester Triage System urgency level, abnormal capillary refill time, and a higher clinical dehydration scale score. Early recognition of young children with AGE at risk of failure of oral rehydration therapy is important, as emphasized by the 21% therapy failure in our population. Associated with oral rehydration failure are higher Manchester Triage System urgency level, abnormal capillary refill time, and a higher clinical dehydration scale score.

  6. Clinical research of benign infantile convulsions with mild gastroenteritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei-bing LI

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Cases of benign infantile convulsions with mild gastroenteritis (BICE treated in our hospital from 2008 to 2012 were analyzed retrospectively. Among the 65 cases of convulsions with acute diarrhea, there were 18 cases of BICE, 15 cases of febrile seizures, 13 cases of epilepsy, 6 cases of viral encephalitis, 6 cases of hyponatremia encephalopathy, 3 cases of hypernatremia encephalopathy, 2 cases of toxic encephalopathy, and 2 cases of hypocalcemia convulsion. The convulsion occurred mostly during the first 2 d of the illness and was in a generalized tonic or tonic-clonic form. Positive rotavirus antigens in the BICE patients were detected in 83.33% (15/18. Phenobarbital was administered after the first convulsion (5-10 mg/kg, and diazepam was given intravenously in case of recurrence (0.10-0.30 mg/kg. BICE occurs frequently in infantile and controlling relapse is the main purpose. The prognosis is good. doi: 10.3969/j.issn.1672-6731.2014.03.019

  7. Uric acid and dehydration in children with gastroenteritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuge, Rie; Morikawa, Yoshihiko; Hasegawa, Yukihiro

    2017-11-01

    Clinical assessment of dehydration in children with acute gastroenteritis (AGE) is crucial for treatment. The gold standard for assessment is acute weight loss. Dehydration severity, as determined by weight loss, significantly correlates with serum urea nitrogen (UN) in children with AGE. The disadvantage of using serum UN as a marker of dehydration severity, however, is that the level can be affected by nutrition. Serum uric acid (UA) theoretically could serve as an alternative in this regard, but there have been no reports on the direct relationship between serum UA and weight loss. The aim of this study was therefore to assess the relationship between serum UA and weight loss in patients with AGE. This was a prospective observational study of children 1-71 months of age admitted to Tokyo Metropolitan Children's Medical Center with AGE between 1 December 2010 and 31 March 2015. Patients with symptoms of AGE ≥ 8 days, chronic disease, or incomplete data were excluded from the study. Pre-post-rehydration weight change was used as an alternative, gold standard marker for the assessment of dehydration severity. The study participants consisted of 97 children. Serum UA correlated significantly with weight change, and increased significantly along with dehydration severity. Serum UA can be considered as an adjunct to the clinical assessment of dehydration in children with AGE. © 2017 Japan Pediatric Society.

  8. Pediatric acute gastroenteritis: understanding caregivers' experiences and information needs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albrecht, Lauren; Hartling, Lisa; Scott, Shannon D

    2017-05-01

    Pediatric acute gastroenteritis (AGE) is a common condition with high health care utilization, persistent practice variation, and substantial family burden. An initial approach to resolve these issues is to understand the patient/caregiver experience of this illness. The objective of this study was to describe caregivers' experiences of pediatric AGE and identify their information needs, preferences, and priorities. A qualitative, descriptive study was conducted. Caregivers of a child with AGE were recruited for this study in the pediatric emergency department (ED) at a tertiary hospital in a major urban centre. Individual interviews were conducted (n=15), and a thematic analysis of interview transcripts was completed using a hybrid inductive/deductive approach. Five major themes were identified and described: 1) caregiver management strategies; 2) reasons for going to the ED; 3) treatment and management of AGE in the ED; 4) caregivers' information needs; and 5) additional factors influencing caregivers' experiences and decision-making. A number of subthemes within each major theme were identified and described. This qualitative descriptive study has identified caregiver information needs, preferences, and priorities regarding pediatric AGE. This study also identified inconsistencies in the treatment and management of pediatric AGE at home and in the ED that influence health care utilization and patient outcomes related to pediatric AGE.

  9. An outbreak of febrile gastroenteritis associated with corn contaminated by Listeria monocytogenes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aureli, P; Fiorucci, G C; Caroli, D; Marchiaro, G; Novara, O; Leone, L; Salmaso, S

    2000-04-27

    On May 21, 1997, numerous cases of febrile gastrointestinal illness were reported among the students and staff of two primary schools in northern Italy, all of whom had eaten at cafeterias served by the same caterer. We interviewed people who ate at the cafeterias about symptoms and foods consumed on May 20. There were no samples of foods left at the cafeterias, but we tested routine samples taken on May 20 by the caterer and environmental specimens at the catering plant. The hospitalized patients were tested for common enteropathogens and toxins. Of the 2189 persons interviewed (82 percent of those exposed), 1566 (72 percent) reported symptoms; of these, 292 (19 percent) were hospitalized. Among samples obtained from hospitalized patients, all but two of the stool specimens and all blood specimens were negative for common enteropathogens. Listeria monocytogenes was isolated from one blood specimen and from 123 of the 141 stool specimens. Consumption of a cold salad of corn and tuna was associated with the development of symptoms (relative risk, 6.19; 95 percent confidence interval, 4.81 to 7.98; Pcaterer's sample of the salad and from environmental specimens collected from the catering plant. All listeria isolates were serotype 4b and were found to be identical on DNA analysis. Experimental contamination of sterile samples of the implicated foods showed that L. monocytogenes grew on corn when kept for at least 10 hours at 25 degrees C. Food-borne infection with L. monocytogenes can cause febrile illness with gastroenteritis in immunocompetent persons.

  10. An extensive gastroenteritis outbreak after drinking-water contamination by sewage effluent, Finland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laine, J; Huovinen, E; Virtanen, M J; Snellman, M; Lumio, J; Ruutu, P; Kujansuu, E; Vuento, R; Pitkänen, T; Miettinen, I; Herrala, J; Lepistö, O; Antonen, J; Helenius, J; Hänninen, M-L; Maunula, L; Mustonen, J; Kuusi, M

    2011-07-01

    An inappropriate cross-connection between sewage- and drinking-water pipelines contaminated tap water in a Finnish town, resulting in an extensive waterborne gastroenteritis outbreak in this developed country. According to a database and a line-list, altogether 1222 subjects sought medical care as a result of this exposure. Seven pathogens were found in patient samples of those who sought treatment. To establish the true disease burden from this exposure, we undertook a population-based questionnaire investigation with a control population, infrequently used to study waterborne outbreaks. The study covered three areas, contaminated and uncontaminated parts of the town and a control town. An estimated 8453 residents fell ill during the outbreak, the excess number of illnesses being 6501. Attack rates were 53% [95% confidence interval (CI) 49.5-56.4] in the contaminated area, 15.6% (95% CI 13.1-18.5) in the uncontaminated area and 6.5% (95% CI 4.8-8.8) in the control population. Using a control population allowed us to differentiate baseline morbidity from the observed morbidity caused by the water contamination, thus enabling a more accurate estimate of the disease burden of this outbreak.

  11. Rotavirus gastroenteritis in children in 4 regions in Brazil: a hospital-based surveillance study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munford, Veridiana; Gilio, Alfredo Elias; de Souza, Eloisa Correa; Cardoso, Debora Morais; Cardoso, Divina das Dores de Paula; Borges, Ana Maria Tavares; Costa, Paulo Sergio Sucasas da; Melgaço, Irene Angela Melo; Rosa, Humberto; Carvalho, Paulo Roberto Antonacci; Goldani, Marcelo Zubaran; Moreira, Edson Duarte; Santana, Ciria; El Khoury, Antoine; Ikedo, Fabio; Rácz, Maria Lucia

    2009-11-01

    Rotavirus is a major cause of gastroenteritis in children. Knowledge of rotavirus genotypes is important for vaccination strategies. During 2005-2006, rotavirus surveillance studies were conducted in São Paulo, Salvador, Goiânia, and Porto Alegre, Brazil. Stool samples were collected from children <5 years of age who had diarrhea and were screened by the Rotaclone Enzyme Immunoassay for the presence of rotavirus. Confirmed rotavirus-positive samples were characterized for P and G genotypes by reverse-transcriptase polymerase chain reaction. A total of 510 stool samples were collected. Of these, 221 (43.3%) were positive for rotavirus. Overall, G9 was the predominant G type, followed by G2, and G1; P[4] and P[8] were the predominant P types. The most frequent G/P genotype combination detected was G2P[4], followed by G9P[8], G9P[4], and G1P[8]. G2P[4] was the predominant type in Goiânia and Salvador; G9P[8] and G1P[8] were predominant in São Paulo and Porto Alegre, respectively. The prevalence, seasonality, and genotype distribution of rotavirus infection varied in different regions in Brazil. With immunization programs, continuous monitoring of rotavirus types is important to detect novel and emerging strains.

  12. Viral Etiologies of Acute Dehydrating Gastroenteritis in Pakistani Children: Confounding Role of Parechoviruses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Masroor Alam

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Despite substantial interventions in the understanding and case management of acute gastroenteritis, diarrheal diseases are still responsible for a notable amount of childhood deaths. Although the rotavirus is known to cause a considerable burden of pediatric diarrheal cases, the roles of other viruses remain undefined for the Pakistani population. This study was based on tertiary care hospital surveillance, from January 2009 to December 2010, including the detection of rotavirus, norovirus, astrovirus, and human parechovirus in children under the age of five using serological or molecular assays. Rotavirus, human parechovirus, norovirus, and astrovirus were detected in 66%, 21%, 19.5%, and 8.5% subjects, respectively. Human parechovirus genotypes, determined through analysis of VP1 gene sequences, showed a great diversity among co-circulating strains. Eighty percent of hospitalized children had dual or multiple viral infections, while 98% parechovirus positive cases were co-infected with rotavirus. The remarkable diversity of viruses associated with the childhood diarrhea in Pakistan calls for large-scale epidemiological surveys, coupled with case control studies, to ascertain their role in clinical manifestations. In addition, these findings also highlight the need for the implementation of up-to-date health interventions, such as the inclusion of a rotavirus vaccine in routine immunization programs for the improvement of quality in child health care.

  13. Group A rotavirus gastroenteritis: post-vaccine era, genotypes and zoonotic transmission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luchs, Adriana; Timenetsky, Maria do Carmo Sampaio Tavares

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACTThis article provides a review of immunity, diagnosis, and clinical aspects of rotavirus disease. It also informs about the changes in epidemiology of diarrheal disease and genetic diversity of circulating group A rotavirus strains following the introduction of vaccines. Group A rotavirus is the major pathogen causing gastroenteritis in animals. Its segmented RNA genome can lead to the emergence of new or unusual strains in human populations via interspecies transmission and/or reassortment events.RESUMOEste artigo fornece uma revisão sobre imunidade, diagnóstico e aspectos clínicos da doença causada por rotavírus. Também aponta as principais mudanças no perfil epidemiológico da doença diarreica e na diversidade genética das cepas circulantes de rotavírus do grupo A, após a introdução vacinal. O rotavírus do grupo A é o principal patógeno associado à gastroenterite em animais. Seu genoma RNA segmentado pode levar ao surgimento de cepas novas ou incomuns na população humana, por meio de transmissão entre espécies e eventos de rearranjo.

  14. Regulation of ROS in transmissible gastroenteritis virus-activated apoptotic signaling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ding, Li [College of Veterinary Medicine, Northwest A and F University, Yangling, Shaanxi 712100 (China); College of Life Sciences, Hainan Normal University, Haikou, Hainan 571158 (China); Zhao, Xiaomin; Huang, Yong; Du, Qian; Dong, Feng; Zhang, Hongling; Song, Xiangjun; Zhang, Wenlong [College of Veterinary Medicine, Northwest A and F University, Yangling, Shaanxi 712100 (China); Tong, Dewen, E-mail: dwtong@nwsuaf.edu.cn [College of Veterinary Medicine, Northwest A and F University, Yangling, Shaanxi 712100 (China)

    2013-12-06

    Highlights: •TGEV infection induced ROS accumulation. •ROS accumulation is involved in TGEV-induced mitochondrial integrity impairment. •ROS is associated with p53 activation and apoptosis occurrence in TGEV-infected cells. -- Abstract: Transmissible gastroenteritis virus (TGEV), an enteropathogenic coronavirus, causes severe lethal watery diarrhea and dehydration in piglets. Previous studies indicate that TGEV infection induces cell apoptosis in host cells. In this study, we investigated the roles and regulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in TGEV-activated apoptotic signaling. The results showed that TGEV infection induced ROS accumulation, whereas UV-irradiated TGEV did not promote ROS accumulation. In addition, TGEV infection lowered mitochondrial transmembrane potential in PK-15 cell line, which could be inhibited by ROS scavengers, pyrrolidinedithiocarbamic (PDTC) and N-acetyl-L-cysteine (NAC). Furthermore, the two scavengers significantly inhibited the activation of p38 MAPK and p53 and further blocked apoptosis occurrence through suppressing the TGEV-induced Bcl-2 reduction, Bax redistribution, cytochrome c release and caspase-3 activation. These results suggest that oxidative stress pathway might be a key element in TGEV-induced apoptosis and TGEV pathogenesis.

  15. Effectiveness of a multifactorial handwashing program to reduce school absenteeism due to acute gastroenteritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azor-Martínez, Ernestina; Cobos-Carrascosa, Elena; Gimenez-Sanchez, Francisco; Martínez-López, Jose Miguel; Garrido-Fernández, Pablo; Santisteban-Martínez, Joaquin; Seijas-Vazquez, Maria Luisa; Campos-Fernandez, Maria Amparo; Bonillo-Perales, Antonio

    2014-02-01

    Acute gastroenteritis (AGE) is one of the most common diseases among children and an important cause of school absenteeism. The aim of this study was to assess the effectiveness of a handwashing program using hand sanitizers for the prevention of school absenteeism due to AGE. A randomized, controlled and open study of a sample of 1341 children between 4 and 12 years of age, attending 5 state schools in Almería (Spain), with an 8-month follow up (academic year). The experimental group (EG) washed their hands with soap and water, complementing this with the use of a hand sanitizer, and the control group (CG) followed the usual handwashing procedure. Absenteeism rates due GI were compared between the 2 groups through the multivariate Poisson regression analysis. Percent days absent in both groups were compared with a Z-test. 446 cases of school absenteeism due to AGE were registered. The school children from the EG had a 36% lower risk of absenteeism due to AGE (IRR: 0.64, 95% confidence interval: 0.52-0.78) and a decrease in absenteeism of 0.13 episodes/child/academic year (0.27 of EG vs 0.40 CG/episodes/child/academic year, P absenteeism cases due to AGE.

  16. Intractable Postoperative Wounds Caused by Self-Inflicted Trauma in a Patient with Cutaneous Munchausen Syndrome Presenting as a Pyoderma Gangrenosum-Like Lesion

    OpenAIRE

    Inui, Keiko; Hanafusa, Takaaki; Namiki, Takeshi; Ueno, Makiko; Igawa, Ken; Yokozeki, Hiroo

    2016-01-01

    A 50-year-old Japanese woman consulted the emergency department of our hospital for bleeding due to an intractable postoperative wound on the lower abdomen; the postoperative wound was owing to a laparoscopic cholecystectomy performed 1 year previously for acute cholecystitis. She presented with a painful ulcer on her right lower abdomen. She also presented with multiple scars, skin grafts on the extremities, and a missing left lower leg, the causes for all of which were unexplained. The resu...

  17. Ibuprofen-associated acute kidney injury in dehydrated children with acute gastroenteritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balestracci, Alejandro; Ezquer, Mauricio; Elmo, María Eugenia; Molini, Andrea; Thorel, Claudia; Torrents, Milagros; Toledo, Ismael

    2015-10-01

    Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) induce acute kidney injury (AKI) in volume-depleted patients; however the prevalence of this complication is likely underestimated. We assessed the impact of ibuprofen exposure on renal function among dehydrated children with acute gastroenteritis (AGE) to further characterize NSAID-associated AKI. Over a 1-year period dehydrated children with AGE (n = 105) were prospectively enrolled and grouped as cases, presenting with AKI (n = 46) or controls, not presenting with AKI (n = 59). AKI was defined by pediatric RIFLE (pRIFLE) criteria. Among the children enrolled in the study, AKI prevalence was 44 %, and 34 (54 %) of the 63 patients who received ibuprofen developed renal impairment. Relative to the controls, children presenting with AKI were younger (median age 0.66 vs. 1.74 years; p dehydration, ibuprofen exposure remained an independent risk factor for AKI (p dehydrated children with AGE. Drug exposure increased the risk for developing AKI by more than twofold, independent of the magnitude of the dehydration.

  18. Clinical presentation of acute gastroenteritis in children with functional gastrointestinal disorders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Saps, Miguel; Mintjens, Stijn; Pusatcioglu, Cenk K.; Cohen, Daniel M.; Sternberg, Petra

    2017-01-01

    Visceral hypersensitivity (VH) and abnormal coping are common in children with functional abdominal pain disorders (FAPDs). Thus, it would be expected that children with VH would report more pain if their gut is acutely inflamed. Aims- Compare clinical symptoms and somatization of children with and

  19. Myonecrosis in the leg caused by Salmonella enteritidis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørring, S; Kolmos, H J; Klareskov, B

    1994-01-01

    Five weeks after an episode of gastroenteritis, a 65-year-old diabetic male developed an extensive myonecrosis, with gas production in the left leg caused by Salmonella enteritidis. The patient was treated with surgical revision and antibiotics. To our knowledge, this is the first case of myonecr......Five weeks after an episode of gastroenteritis, a 65-year-old diabetic male developed an extensive myonecrosis, with gas production in the left leg caused by Salmonella enteritidis. The patient was treated with surgical revision and antibiotics. To our knowledge, this is the first case...

  20. Canine parvovirus type 2c identified from an outbreak of severe gastroenteritis in a litter in Sweden

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    A litter of recently-vaccinated puppies in Sweden experienced signs of severe haemorrhagic gastroenteritis. Canine parvovirus (CPV) was suspected as the cause of this outbreak on the basis of the clinical signs and the presence of parvoviral antigen in the faeces from one of the affected pups - confirmed using a commercial in-clinic faecal antigen ELISA test kit. A concern was raised about whether the vaccine (which contained a live, attenuated strain of CPV) could have caused the disease and so further faecal samples from the affected pups were submitted for laboratory virus isolation and identification. On cell culture, two out of four faecal samples were found to be virus-positive. This was confirmed as being canine parvovirus by immuno-staining with CPV specific monoclonal antibody. The virus was then tested using a series of PCR probes designed to confirm the identity of CPV and to distinguish the unique vaccine strain from field virus. This confirmed that the virus was indeed CPV but that it was not vaccine strain. The virus was then typed by sequencing the 426 amino acid region of the capsid gene which revealed this to be a type 2c virus. Since its emergence in the late 1970s, canine parvovirus 2 (CPV2) has spread worldwide and is recognised as an important canine pathogen in all countries. The original CPV2 rapidly evolved into two antigenic variants, CPV2a and CPV2b, which progressively replaced the original CPV2. More recently a new antigenic variant, CPV2c, has appeared. To date this variant has been identified in many countries worldwide but there have been no reports yet of its presence in any Scandinavian countries. This case report therefore represents the first published evidence of the involvement of CPV2c in a severe outbreak of typical haemorrhagic gastroenteritis in a susceptible litter of pups in Scandinavia. PMID:24016358

  1. Canine parvovirus type 2c identified from an outbreak of severe gastroenteritis in a litter in Sweden.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutton, David; Vinberg, Carina; Gustafsson, Agneta; Pearce, Jacqueline; Greenwood, Neil

    2013-09-10

    A litter of recently-vaccinated puppies in Sweden experienced signs of severe haemorrhagic gastroenteritis. Canine parvovirus (CPV) was suspected as the cause of this outbreak on the basis of the clinical signs and the presence of parvoviral antigen in the faeces from one of the affected pups - confirmed using a commercial in-clinic faecal antigen ELISA test kit. A concern was raised about whether the vaccine (which contained a live, attenuated strain of CPV) could have caused the disease and so further faecal samples from the affected pups were submitted for laboratory virus isolation and identification.On cell culture, two out of four faecal samples were found to be virus-positive. This was confirmed as being canine parvovirus by immuno-staining with CPV specific monoclonal antibody. The virus was then tested using a series of PCR probes designed to confirm the identity of CPV and to distinguish the unique vaccine strain from field virus. This confirmed that the virus was indeed CPV but that it was not vaccine strain. The virus was then typed by sequencing the 426 amino acid region of the capsid gene which revealed this to be a type 2c virus.Since its emergence in the late 1970s, canine parvovirus 2 (CPV2) has spread worldwide and is recognised as an important canine pathogen in all countries. The original CPV2 rapidly evolved into two antigenic variants, CPV2a and CPV2b, which progressively replaced the original CPV2. More recently a new antigenic variant, CPV2c, has appeared. To date this variant has been identified in many countries worldwide but there have been no reports yet of its presence in any Scandinavian countries. This case report therefore represents the first published evidence of the involvement of CPV2c in a severe outbreak of typical haemorrhagic gastroenteritis in a susceptible litter of pups in Scandinavia.

  2. Prevention of rotavirus gastroenteritis in infants and children: rotavirus vaccine safety, efficacy, and potential impact of vaccines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aruna Chandran

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Aruna Chandran1, Sean Fitzwater1, Anjie Zhen2, Mathuram Santosham11Department of International Health, Division of Health Systems, 2Department of Molecular Microbiology and Immunology, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, MD, USAAbstract: Rotavirus infection is the most common cause of severe gastroenteritis globally, with greater than 86% of deaths occurring in low-income and middle-income countries. There are two rotavirus vaccines currently licensed in the United States and prequalified by the World Health Organization. RV1 is a monovalent attenuated human rotavirus strain, given orally in two doses. RV5 is a pentavalent human-bovine reassortant rotavirus vaccine, given orally in three doses. A third rotavirus vaccine, LLV, is a lamb rotavirus strain given orally as a single dose, which is currently available only in China. RV1 and RV5 have been shown to be highly efficacious in developed countries, and initial results from trials in Africa and Asia are promising as well. At least three other vaccines are in development, which are being developed by manufacturers of developing countries. Further studies are needed to clarify issues including administration of oral rotavirus vaccines with breastfeeding and other oral vaccines, and alterations in dosing schedule. Using new data on global diarrheal burden, rotavirus is estimated to cause 390,000 deaths in children younger than 5 years. Should rotavirus vaccines be introduced in the routine immunization programs of all countries, a potential of 170,000 deaths could be prevented annually. The largest impact on mortality would be seen in low-income and middle-income countries, despite poor immunization coverage and lower efficacy. Therefore, international efforts are needed to ensure that rotavirus vaccines reach the populations with highest burden of rotavirus disease.Keywords: vaccination, mortality, rotavirus, gastroenteritis

  3. SIADH and partial hypopituitarism in a patient with intravascular large B-cell lymphoma: a rare cause of a common presentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akhtar, Simeen; Cheesman, Edmund; Jude, Edward B

    2013-01-01

    Hyponatraemia is a very common electrolyte abnormality with varied presenting features depending on the underlying cause. The authors report the case of a 75-year-old, previously fit, gentleman who presented with weight loss, lethargy and blackouts. He required four admissions to the hospital over an 8-month period. Investigations revealed persistent hyponatraemia consistent with a diagnosis of syndrome of inappropriate antidiuretic hormone secretion, macrocytic anaemia and partial hypopituitarism. Unfortunately, all other investigations that were performed failed to identify the underlying cause and a diagnosis of intravascular large B-cell lymphoma was only confirmed following postmortem studies. The authors recommend that endocrinologists should be involved at the outset in the management of patients with persistent hyponatraemia and that intravascular large B-cell lymphoma should be considered in the differential diagnosis of hyponatraemia. PMID:23362070

  4. Functional Validation of an Alpha-Actinin-4 Mutation as a Potential Cause of an Aggressive Presentation of Adolescent Focal Segmental Glomerulosclerosis: Implications for Genetic Testing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Di Feng

    Full Text Available Genetic testing in the clinic and research lab is becoming more routinely used to identify rare genetic variants. However, attributing these rare variants as the cause of disease in an individual patient remains challenging. Here, we report a patient who presented with nephrotic syndrome and focal segmental glomerulosclerosis (FSGS with collapsing features at age 14. Despite treatment, her kidney disease progressed to end-stage within a year of diagnosis. Through genetic testing, an Y265H variant with unknown clinical significance in alpha-actinin-4 gene (ACTN4 was identified. This variant has not been seen previously in FSGS patients nor is it present in genetic databases. Her clinical presentation is different from previous descriptions of ACTN4 mediated FSGS, which is characterized by sub-nephrotic proteinuria and slow progression to end stage kidney disease. We performed in vitro and cellular assays to characterize this novel ACTN4 variant before attributing causation. We found that ACTN4 with either Y265H or K255E (a known disease-causing mutation increased the actin bundling activity of ACTN4 in vitro, was associated with the formation of intracellular aggregates, and increased podocyte contractile force. Despite the absence of a familial pattern of inheritance, these similar biological changes caused by the Y265H and K255E amino acid substitutions suggest that this new variant is potentially the cause of FSGS in this patient. Our studies highlight that functional validation in complement with genetic testing may be required to confirm the etiology of rare disease, especially in the setting of unusual clinical presentations.

  5. Efficacy and safety of an oral live attenuated human rotavirus vaccine against rotavirus gastroenteritis during the first 2 years of life in Latin American infants: a randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled phase III study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linhares, Alexandre C; Velázquez, F Raúl; Pérez-Schael, Irene; Sáez-Llorens, Xavier; Abate, Hector; Espinoza, Felix; López, Pío; Macías-Parra, Mercedes; Ortega-Barría, Eduardo; Rivera-Medina, Doris Maribel; Rivera, Luis; Pavía-Ruz, Noris; Nuñez, Ernesto; Damaso, Silvia; Ruiz-Palacios, Guillermo M; De Vos, Béatrice; O'Ryan, Miguel; Gillard, Paul; Bouckenooghe, Alain

    2008-04-05

    Peak incidence of rotavirus gastroenteritis is seen in infants between 6 and 24 months of age. We therefore aimed to assess the 2-year efficacy and safety of an oral live attenuated human rotavirus vaccine for prevention of severe gastroenteritis in infants. 15 183 healthy infants aged 6-13 weeks from ten Latin American countries randomly assigned in a 1 to 1 ratio to receive two oral doses of RIX4414 or placebo at about 2 and 4 months of age in a double-blind, placebo-controlled phase III study were followed up until about 2 years of age. Primary endpoint was vaccine efficacy from 2 weeks after dose two until 1 year of age. Treatment allocation was concealed from investigators and parents of participating infants. Efficacy follow-up for gastroenteritis episodes was undertaken from 2 weeks after dose two until about 2 years of age. Analysis was according to protocol. This study is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT00140673 (eTrack444563-023). 897 infants were excluded from the according-to-protocol analysis. Fewer cases (protavirus gastroenteritis were recorded for the combined 2-year period in the RIX4414 group (32 [0.4%] of 7205; 95% CI 0.3-0.6) than in the placebo group (161 [2.3%] of 7081; 1.9-2.6), resulting in a vaccine efficacy of 80.5% (71.3-87.1) to 82.1% (64.6-91.9) against wild-type G1, 77.5% (64.7-86.2) against pooled non-G1 strains, and 80.5% (67.9-88.8) against pooled non-G1 P[8] strains. Vaccine efficacy for hospital admission for rotavirus gastroenteritis was 83.0% (73.1-89.7) and for admission for diarrhoea of any cause was 39.3% (29.1-48.1). No cases of intussusception were reported during the second year of follow-up. Two doses of RIX4414 were effective against severe rotavirus gastroenteritis during the first 2 years of life in a Latin American setting. Inclusion of RIX4414 in routine paediatric immunisations should reduce the burden of rotavirus gastroenteritis worldwide.

  6. Allergic Mastocytic Gastroenteritis and Colitis: An Unexplained Etiology in Chronic Abdominal Pain and Gastrointestinal Dysmotility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Akhavein M

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abdominal pain, bloating, early satiety, and changes in bowel habits are common presenting symptoms in individuals with functional GI disorders. Emerging data suggests that these symptoms may be associated with mast cell excess and/or mast cell instability in the GI tract. The aim of this retrospective study was to evaluate the contribution of mast cells to the aforementioned symptoms in individuals with a history of atopic disease. A retrospective chart review of individuals seen in a university GI practice was conducted and twenty-four subjects were identified. The majority had abdominal pain, early satiety, and nocturnal awakening. 66.7% and 37.5% had a history of environmental and/or food allergy. Solid gastric emptying was increased as were the mean number of mast cells reported on biopsies from the stomach, small bowel, and colon (>37/hpf by CD117 staining. Mean whole blood histamine levels were uniformly elevated. This study suggests that in individuals with these characteristics, consideration should be given to staining their gastrointestinal biopsies for mast cells as this may provide them with relatively non-toxic but highly targeted treatment options. Allergic gastroenteritis and colitis may represent a third type of GI mast cell disorder along with mast cell activation syndrome and mastocytic enterocolitis.

  7. Detection of poliovirus infection in children with acute gastroenteritis in Chiang Mai, Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumthip, Kattareeya; Khamrin, Pattara; Maneekarn, Niwat

    2017-05-01

    Poliovirus (PV) is typically transmitted by the fecal-oral route, which means that the risk of infection and virus distribution could be achieved by exposure to the virus contaminated in food and water. The aim of this study was to determine the occurrence of PV strains by detecting the virus in pediatric patients who admitted to the hospitals with diarrhea in Chiang Mai, Thailand during 2010-2015. By applying a reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction and nucleotide sequencing analysis of 1,300 stool specimens collected from pediatric patients, PVs were detected at 0.61% (8 out of 1,300 specimens). Among eight PV positive samples, mixed infection with norovirus or human bocavirus was detected in one each out of eight cases. All PV strains detected in this study were characterized further by phylogenetic analysis of 343 bp of the 5' UTR and 315 bp of the partial VP1 sequences. The results revealed that eight PV strains detected in the present study two of each were PV1 and PV2, and four were PV3 serotypes of the Sabin vaccine strains. The data demonstrated the presence of PV1, PV2, and PV3 Sabin vaccine strains in children with acute gastroenteritis in Chiang Mai, Thailand. J. Med. Virol. 89:775-781, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Eosinophilic gastroenteritis with Splendore-Hoeppli material in the ferret (Mustela putorius furo).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, J G; Palley, L S; Rose, R

    1992-01-01

    Eosinophilic gastroenteritis, focal or diffuse with eosinophilic infiltrations of the stomach or intestine, has been described in human beings, cats, dogs, and horses. In this paper, we describe infiltration of the gastrointestinal tract with eosinophils accompanied by a circulating eosinophilia in six ferrets (Mustela putorius furo). Clinical signs included chronic weight loss, anorexia, and diarrhea. The small intestines from five ferrets had diffuse infiltrates of eosinophils. This resulted in focal or multifocal loss of the muscular tunic in three ferrets. Two of these ferrets also had eosinophilic gastritis. Eosinophilic granulomas with Splendore-Hoeppli material were present in mesenteric lymph nodes in four ferrets. Two ferrets had multiple organ involvement; one had eosinophilic granulomas in the liver, mesentery, and choroid plexus as well as moderate parapancreatic segmental arteritis with infiltration of eosinophils and mural thrombosis. The second ferret had, in addition to moderate diffuse gastric and small intestinal eosinophilic mucosal infiltrations, interstitial eosinophilic pulmonary infiltrates. Examination of all tissues failed to reveal an infectious agent.

  9. Prevalence and antimicrobial susceptibility of Salmonella and Shigella spp. among children with gastroenteritis in an Iranian referral hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahmoudi, Shima; Pourakbari, Babak; Moradzadeh, Mina; Eshaghi, Hamid; Ramezani, Amitis; Haghi Ashtiani, Mohammad Taghi; Keshavarz Valian, Sepideh; Mamishi, Setareh

    2017-08-01

    Gastroenteritis is one of the leading cause of illnesses through the world, especially in developing countries.Salmonella and Shigella infections are considered as the main public health problems in children. The aim of this study was to detect the prevalence and antimicrobial susceptibility of Salmonella and Shigella spp. among children with gastroenteritis in an Iranian referral hospital. During April 2013 to April 2014, all medical records of children with gastroenteritis admitted to a pediatric medical center were evaluated. Positive stool cultures of children were evaluated and frequency of Salmonella and Shigella spp. and their antimicrobial susceptibility were detected. In this study, 676 patients with the mean age of 24.94 months were enrolled. Eighty-eight (42%) Salmonella spp., 85 (40%) Shigella spp., 33 (16%) E. coli and 5(2%) candida albicans were isolated from 211 positive stool cultures. Among 85 Shigella spp. isolates, S. sonnei, S. flexneri and other Shigella spp. were isolated from 39 (46%) isolates, 36(42%) and 10(12%), respectively. Among 88 isolated Salmonella spp., 36 (41%) isolates were Salmonella Serogroup D, 26 (30%) were Salmonella Serogroup B, 20 (23%) isolates were Salmonella Serogroup C and 6 (7%) were other Salmonella spp. isolates. Thirty-eight percent of Salmonella serogroup B were resistant to nalidixic acid, while higher frequency of nalidixic acid resistant was found in Salmonella serogroup C and Salmonella serogroup D. The higher frequency of ampicillin resistant was found in Shigella spp. than Salmonella spp. High frequency of cefotaxime resistant was seen in S. sonei and S. flexneri (77% and 56%, respectively), whereas more than 90% of Salmonella serogroup B, C and D were susceptible to this antibiotic. In conclusion, Shigella and Salmonella serogroups can be considered as important etiological agents of acute diarrhea in children. Since the prevalence of antibiotic resistance is increasing in recent years in Iran, further

  10. Foodborne gastroenteritis outbreak in an Austrian healthcare facility caused by asymptomatic, norovirus-excreting kitchen staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmid, D; Kuo, H-W; Hell, M; Kasper, S; Lederer, I; Mikula, C; Springer, B; Allerberger, F

    2011-03-01

    An outbreak of norovirus GGII.4 2006b affected an Austrian 600-bed healthcare facility from 15 to 27 March 2009. A total of 204 patients, residents and staff fitted the outbreak case definition; 17 (8.3%) were laboratory-confirmed. Foodborne origin was suspected in the 114 patient and resident cases with onset 15-18 March. A case-cohort study was performed to test the hypothesis that consumption of dishes offered on 14, 15 and 16 March (risk days) was associated with increased risk of infection. Data on food exposure of 62% (317/510) of the patient and resident cohort were available for a simultaneous retrospective cohort study. The case-cohort analysis revealed that consumption of sliced cold sausage offered on 15 March [odds ratio (OR): 3.98; 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.18-14.1], a meat dish with salad (adjusted OR: 2.2; 95% CI: 1.19-4.08) and a rolled spinach pancake (adjusted OR: 2.17; 95% CI: 1.27-3.71) on 16 March were independent risk factors. It is likely that one of the five asymptomatic excretors among the kitchen staff on duty on the risk days was the source of food contamination. The case-cohort study design was found to be a valid alternative to the retrospective cohort study design for the investigation of a suspected foodborne outbreak in a large cohort. Copyright © 2010 The Hospital Infection Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Gastroenteritis Caused by the Cryptosporidium Hedgehog Genotype in an Immunocompetent Man

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kváč, Martin; Saková, K.; Květoňová, Dana; Kicia, M.; Wesolowska, M.; McEvoy, J.; Sak, Bohumil

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 52, č. 1 (2014), s. 347-349 ISSN 0095-1137 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LH11061 Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : humans * cattle * parvum Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 3.993, year: 2014

  12. Household catastrophic healthcare expenditure and impoverishment due to rotavirus gastroenteritis requiring hospitalization in Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loganathan, Tharani; Lee, Way-Seah; Lee, Kok-Foo; Jit, Mark; Ng, Chiu-Wan

    2015-01-01

    While healthcare costs for rotavirus gastroenteritis requiring hospitalization may be burdensome on households in Malaysia, exploration on the distribution and catastrophic impact of these expenses on households are lacking. We assessed the economic burden, levels and distribution of catastrophic healthcare expenditure, the poverty impact on households and inequities related to healthcare payments for acute gastroenteritis requiring hospitalization in Malaysia. A two-year prospective, hospital-based study was conducted from 2008 to 2010 in an urban (Kuala Lumpur) and rural (Kuala Terengganu) setting in Malaysia. All children under the age of 5 years admitted for acute gastroenteritis were included. Patients were screened for rotavirus and information on healthcare expenditure was obtained. Of the 658 stool samples collected at both centers, 248 (38%) were positive for rotavirus. Direct and indirect costs incurred were significantly higher in Kuala Lumpur compared with Kuala Terengganu (US$222 Vs. US$45; pMalaysia.

  13. The incidence and clinical presentation of infantile rotavirus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objectives. An effective vaccine is needed to protect against severe rotavirus disease, an important cause of gastroenteritis. Since there are no data on the incidence and antigenic diversity of rotavirus infection in Sierra Leone, we studied its epidemiology to enable an effective vaccine strategy to be designed. Methods.

  14. Bolus fluid therapy and sodium homeostasis in paediatric gastroenteritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freedman, Stephen B; Geary, Denis F

    2013-03-01

    The study aims to assess the risk of developing hyponatraemia when large-volume bolus fluid rehydration therapy is administered. We conducted a prospective randomised study in a tertiary-care centre emergency department. Participants included children with gastroenteritis and dehydration requiring intravenous rehydration. They were randomised to receive 60 mL/kg (large) or 20 mL/kg (standard) 0.9% saline bolus followed by maintenance 0.9% saline for 3 h. Biochemical tests were performed at baseline and 4 h. The primary outcome measure was the development of hyponatraemia at 4 h. Secondary outcome measures were (i) change in sodium relative to baseline value; (ii) magnitude of decrease among those who experienced a decrease; (iii) risk of hypernatraemia; (iv) correlations between urine parameters and hyponatraemia; and (v) fluid overload. Eighty-four of 224 (38%) participants were hyponatraemic at baseline. At 4 h, 22% (48/217) had a dysnatraemia, and similar numbers of children were hyponatraemic in both groups: large (23% (26/112)) versus standard (21% (22/105)) (P = 0.69). Among initially hyponatraemic children, 63% (30/48) who received large-volume rehydration and 44% (15/34) of those administered standard rehydration were isonatraemic at 4 h (P = 0.10). Overall, children who received 60 mL/kg experienced a larger mean increase (1.6 ± 2.4 mEq/L vs. 0.9 ± 2.2 mEq/L; P = 0.04) and were less likely to experience a sodium decrease of ≥2 mEq/L (8/112 vs. 17/105; P = 0.04) than those administered 20 mL/kg. Large-volume bolus rehydration therapy with 0.9% saline is safe. It does not promote the development of hyponatraemia over the short term, but hastens the resolution of baseline hyponatraemia. © 2013 The Authors. Journal of Paediatrics and Child Health © 2013 Paediatrics and Child Health Division (Royal Australasian College of Physicians).

  15. Cryptosporidium spp. and rotavirus gastroenteritis and change of incidence after rotavirus vaccination among children in Raparin Pediatrics Hospital, Erbil, Iraq

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sally S. Azeez

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: Watery diarrhea is the most common medical problem among infants and young children, caused by different microbial etiology including Cryptosporidium spp. and rotavirus, which are usually misdiagnosed in conventional stool test. This study aimed to investigate the incidence of Cryptosporidium and rotavirus gastroenteritis among children in Erbil as well as evaluate the efficacy of rotavirus vaccination procedure applied in Erbil.Methods: Fecal specimens were collected from 400 children (boys and girls, aged one month to five years old, who attended Raparin Pediatrics Hospital in Erbil complaining from diarrhea, between January to August 2014. Modified Ziehl Neelsen technique and nested PCR were used for detection of cryptosporidiosis while rotavirus infection was detected by rapid CerTest.Results: Rate of detection of cryptosporidiosis was remarkably higher using PCR than Ziehl-Neelsen stain (0% versus 6%, and the infection was slightly higher among boys (6.25% vs 5.55% and children ≤2 years (11.7%. The peak of infection reached during spring season (March and April (9.5%. The detection rate of rotavirus was 32.0%, which was slightly higher among males (34.4% vs 30.0% and in children between one to three years old (39.3%. The highest detection rate (38.6% was recorded during winter season (January and February. The infection was significantly higher among non-vaccinated children (65.9% vs 14.1%; p<0.05.Conclusion: The incidence of cryptosporidiosis is declining. However, rotavirus gastroenteritis was relatively high among young children in Erbil. Rotateq vaccine significantly reduced the incidence of rotavirus infection.

  16. Delayed allergic dermatitis presenting as a keloid-like reaction caused by sting from an Indo-Pacific Portuguese man-o'-war (Physalia utriculus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guevara, B E K; Dayrit, J F; Haddad, V

    2017-03-01

    Cnidarian envenomations are common occurrences in the tropics that can affect holidaymakers. The cutaneous reactions are classified as immediate or delayed types. Delayed allergic reactions are persistently recurring dermatitis, which can occur within 1-4 weeks from the initial sting, and may last for several months. Hypertrophic scar-like or keloid-like reactions are rare, and are believed to be a type IV hypersensitivity reaction to sequestered antigens from stinging filaments. We report an unusual case of delayed allergic dermatitis with keloid-like presentation caused by Physalia utriculus. © 2017 British Association of Dermatologists.

  17. A very rare cause of dyspnea with a unique presentation on a computed tomography scan of the chest: macrophage activation syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brandao-Neto, Rodrigo Antonio; Santana, Alfredo Nicodemos Cruz; Danilovic, Debora Lucia Seguro; Mendonca, Berenice Bilharinho de; Bernardi, Fabiola Del Carlo; Barbas, Carmen Silvia Valente

    2008-01-01

    Macrophage activation syndrome is a rare and potentially life-threatening disease. It occurs due to immune dysregulation manifested as excessive macrophage proliferation, typically causing hepatosplenomegaly, pancytopenia and hepatic dysfunction. Here, we report an unusual case of macrophage activation syndrome presenting as dyspnea, as well as (reported here for the first time) high resolution computed tomography findings of an excavated nodule, diffuse ground glass opacities and consolidations (mimicking severe pneumonia or alveolar hemorrhage). The patient was successfully treated with human immunoglobulin. We recommend that macrophage activation syndrome be considered in the differential diagnosis of respiratory failure. Rapid diagnosis and treatment are essential to achieving favorable outcomes in patients with this syndrome. (author)

  18. Decreased Urinary Sodium-to-urinary Creatinine Ratio Identifies Sodium Depletion in Pediatric Acute Gastroenteritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinz-Erian, P; Akdar, Z; Haerter, B; Waldegger, S; Giner, T; Scholl-Bürgi, S; Mueller, T

    2016-01-01

    In acute gastroenteritis (AG) fecal losses may cause depletion of sodium (NaD) which may not be recognized because of normal plasma Na (pNa) concentrations. We studied the incidence of this state of normonatremic sodium depletion (NNaD) and the suitability of the urinary Na/urinary creatinine ratio (uNa/uCr) for diagnosing NNaD. 16 AG- and 16 healthy control children aged 0.8-15.0 years. Prospective cross sectional pilot study. Measurements of Na, K and creatinine in plasma (p) and urine (u). Calculation of uNa/uCr Ratio, fractional excretion of Na (FENa) and uNa/uK ratio as the hitherto best known parameters of prerenal Na depletion, respectively. pNa concentrations were normal in 15/16 AG patients (93.8%) with only one subnormal value of 133 mmol/L, and a mean value of 137.9±2.3 mmol/L not different from the normal control group (139.4±2.2 mmol/L). Also, mean uNa concentrations and uNa/uK ratios did not differ between both groups. However, uNa/uCr ratios were below normal in 13/16 AG children (81.3%) but normal in all healthy controls with a significantly lower mean value in the AG group (12.6±8.8 vs. 31.2±8.3 mmol/mmol; phigh correlation coefficient of r=0.9333. The majority of AG patients was found to have NNaD as determined by uNa/uCr and FENa. Calculation of uNa/uCr may be useful for diagnosing NNaD in AG. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  19. An outbreak of foodborne norovirus gastroenteritis linked to a restaurant in Melbourne, Australia, 2014

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shaun P. Coutts

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: In May 2014 an outbreak of norovirus occurred among patrons of a restaurant in Melbourne, Australia. Investigations were conducted to identify the infectious agent, mode of transmission and source of illness, and to implement controls to prevent further transmission. Methods: A retrospective case-control study was conducted to test the hypothesis that food served at the restaurant between 9 and 15 May 2014 was the vehicle for infection. A structured questionnaire was used to collect demographic, illness and food exposure data from study participants. To ascertain whether any food handlers had experienced gastroenteritis symptoms and were a possible source of infection, investigators contacted and interviewed staff who had worked at the restaurant between 9 and 16 May 2014. Results: Forty-six cases (including 16 laboratory-confirmed cases of norovirus and 49 controls were interviewed and enrolled in the study. Results of the analysis revealed a statistically significant association with illness and consumption of grain salad (OR: 21.6, 95% CI: 1.8–252.7, p = 0.015 and beetroot dip (OR: 22.4, 95% CI: 1.9–267.0, p = 0.014. An interviewed staff member who reported an onset of acute gastrointestinal illness on 12 May 2014 had prepared salads on the day of onset and the previous two days. Discussion: The outbreak was likely caused by person-to-food-to-person transmission. The outbreak emphasizes the importance of the exclusion of symptomatic food handlers and strict hand hygiene practices in the food service industry to prevent contamination of ready-to-eat foods and the kitchen environment.

  20. Waterborne outbreak of gastroenteritis: effects on sick leaves and cost of lost workdays.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaana I Halonen

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: In 2007, part of a drinking water distribution system was accidentally contaminated with waste water effluent causing a gastroenteritis outbreak in a Finnish town. We examined the acute and cumulative effects of this incidence on sick leaves among public sector employees residing in the clean and contaminated areas, and the additional costs of lost workdays due to the incidence. METHODS: Daily information on sick leaves of 1789 Finnish Public Sector Study participants was obtained from employers' registers. Global Positioning System-coordinates were used for linking participants to the clean and contaminated areas. Prevalence ratios (PR for weekly sickness absences were calculated using binomial regression analysis. Calculations for the costs were based on prior studies. RESULTS: Among those living in the contaminated areas, the prevalence of participants on sick leave was 3.54 (95% confidence interval (CI 2.97-4.22 times higher on the week following the incidence compared to the reference period. Those living and working in the clean area were basically not affected, the corresponding PR for sick leaves was 1.12, 95% CI 0.73-1.73. No cumulative effects on sick leaves were observed among the exposed. The estimated additional costs of lost workdays due to the incidence were 1.8-2.1 million euros. CONCLUSIONS: The prevalence of sickness absences among public sector employees residing in affected areas increased shortly after drinking water distribution system was contaminated, but no long-term effects were observed. The estimated costs of lost workdays were remarkable, thus, the cost-benefits of better monitoring systems for the water distribution systems should be evaluated.

  1. Not without cause

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burdette, Dara L.; Yarbrough, Melanie L.; Orth, Kim

    2009-01-01

    Vibrio parahaemolyticus (V. parahaemolyticus) is a gram-negative halophillic bacterium that causes worldwide seafood-borne gastroenteritis. The prevalence of V. parahaemolyticus in the environment and incidence of infection have been linked to rising water temperatures caused by global warming. Among its virulence factors, V. parahaemolyticus harbors two type III secretion systems (T3SS). Recently, we have shown that T3SS1 induces rapid cellular death that initiates with acute autophagy, as measured by LC3 lipidation and accumulation of early autophagosomal vesicles. While not the first characterized pathogen to usurp autophagy, this is the first example of an extracellular pathogen that exploits this pathway for its own benefit. Here we discuss possible roles for the induction of autophagy during infection and discuss how V. parahaemolyticus-induced autophagy provides insight into key regulatory steps that govern the decision between apoptosis and autophagy. PMID:19011375

  2. Introduction of an Oral Fluid Challenge Protocol in the Management of Children with Acute Gastroenteritis: A Regional Hospital Experience.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Umana, E

    2018-06-01

    Oral rehydration therapy (ORT) remains the ideal first line therapy for acute gastroenteritis (AGE). Our aim was to assess the impact of introducing an Oral Fluid Challenge (OFC) protocol on outcomes such as intravenous fluid use and documentation in our institution. A single centre study with data collected retrospectively pre-implementation (April 2015) of the OFC protocol and post implementation (April 2016). Consecutive sampling of the first 55 patients presenting with GE like symptoms and underwent OFC were recruited. One hundred and ten patients were included in this study with 55 patients per cycle. The rates of IVF use decreased from 22% (12) in cycle one to 18% (10) in cycle two. There was an improvement in documentation by 26% (14) for level of dehydration and 52% (31) for OFC volume from cycle one to two. Overall, the addition of the OFC protocol to the management of patients with uncomplicated AGE would help streamline and improve care.

  3. Sialic Acid Binding Properties of Soluble Coronavirus Spike (S1 Proteins: Differences between Infectious Bronchitis Virus and Transmissible Gastroenteritis Virus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christine Winter

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The spike proteins of a number of coronaviruses are able to bind to sialic acids present on the cell surface. The importance of this sialic acid binding ability during infection is, however, quite different. We compared the spike protein of transmissible gastroenteritis virus (TGEV and the spike protein of infectious bronchitis virus (IBV. Whereas sialic acid is the only receptor determinant known so far for IBV, TGEV requires interaction with its receptor aminopeptidase N to initiate infection of cells. Binding tests with soluble spike proteins carrying an IgG Fc-tag revealed pronounced differences between these two viral proteins. Binding of the IBV spike protein to host cells was in all experiments sialic acid dependent, whereas the soluble TGEV spike showed binding to APN but had no detectable sialic acid binding activity. Our results underline the different ways in which binding to sialoglycoconjugates is mediated by coronavirus spike proteins.

  4. Large armored bridging over fractured vertebra with intraspinal tumor mimicking bony mass caused by migrated fragments of burst cervical vertebra presenting with severe cervical myelopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satyarthee Guru Dutta

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Vertebral body may get displaced anterior or posteror with elements of rotation. However, burst cervical spine vertebral fracture may migrate anteriorly and posteriorly simultaneously. However anterior displaced fragment forming armor like mass is very rare. Similarly, the posteriorly propelled fragments migrating caudally and posterolaterally producing a large osseous mass inside spinal canal mimicking bony tumour causing severe cervical canal stenosis and presenting with marked myelopathy is extremely rare. To the best knowledge of authors, association of such traumatic dual pathology represents first of its kind in western literature, who was neglected early medical advice and presenting with marked compressive cervical myelopathy. She underwent successful surgical decompression with gradual recovery of spastic limb weakness and recovery of sensation. Authors also highlights the importance of early resuscitation and adequate maintainace of mean arterial pressure following acute spinal cord injury. Pertinent literature is briefly reviewed.

  5. Efficacy of human rotavirus vaccine against severe gastroenteritis in Malawian children in the first two years of life: a randomised, double-blind, placebo controlled trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunliffe, Nigel A; Witte, Desiree; Ngwira, Bagrey M; Todd, Stacy; Bostock, Nancy J; Turner, Ann M; Chimpeni, Philips; Victor, John C; Steele, A Duncan; Bouckenooghe, Alain; Neuzil, Kathleen M

    2014-01-01

    Rotavirus gastroenteritis is a major cause of morbidity and mortality among African infants and young children. A phase III, placebo-controlled, multi-centre clinical trial of a live, oral G1P[8] human rotavirus vaccine (RIX4414) undertaken in Malawi and South Africa significantly reduced the incidence of severe rotavirus gastroenteritis in the first year of life. We now report on vaccine efficacy in the Malawi cohort of children who were followed into the second year of life. A total of 1,773 healthy infants were enrolled in Blantyre, Malawi into three groups. Two groups received three doses of RIX4414 or placebo at age 6, 10, and 14 weeks and the third group received placebo at 6 weeks and RIX4414 at age 10 and 14 weeks. Subjects were followed by weekly home visits for episodes of gastroenteritis until 1 year of age, and were then re-consented for further follow-up to 18-24 months of age. Severity of gastroenteritis episodes was graded according to the Vesikari scoring system. Seroconversion for anti-rotavirus IgA was determined on a subset of children by using ELISA on pre- and post-vaccine blood samples. Rotavirus VP7 (G) and VP4 (P) genotypes were determined by RT-PCR. A total of 70/1030 (6.8%, 95% CI 5.3 - 8.5) subjects in the pooled (2 dose plus 3 dose) RIX4414 group compared with 53/483 (11.0%, 8.3 – 14.1) subjects in the placebo group developed severe rotavirus gastroenteritis in the entire follow-up period (Vaccine Efficacy 38.1% (9.8 – 57.3). The point estimate of efficacy in the second year of life (17.6%; −59.2 – 56.0) was lower than in the first year of life (49.4%; 19.2 – 68.3). There were non-significant trends towards a higher efficacy in the second year of life among children who received the three-dose schedule compared with the two-dose schedule, and a higher anti-rotavirus IgA seroresponse rate in the three-dose RIX4414 group. Rotavirus strains detected included genotype G12 (31%); G9 (23%); and G8 (18%); only 18% of strains belonged

  6. Sensor, a population-based cohort study on gastroenteritis in the Netherlands: incidence and etiology.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wit, M.A.S. de; Koopmans, M.P.G.; Kortbeek, L.M.; Wannet, W.J.B.; Vinje, J; Leusden, F. van; Bartelds, A.I.M.; Duynhoven, Y.T.H.P. van

    2001-01-01

    A prospective population-based cohort study with a nested case- control study was conducted to estimate the incidence of gastroenteritis and the associated pathogens in the general Dutch population. Follow-up of two consecutive cohorts was performed by weekly reporting cards from december 1998 to

  7. Clinical information on admission is insufficient to determine the appropriate isolation regimen for acute gastroenteritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skyum, Florence; Abed, Osama Karim; Backer Mogensen, Christian

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: The number of admissions for acute gastroenteritis (GE) is increasing. The majority of patients pass through a single high-flow emergency department (ED) area which increases the risk of spreading GE. The aim of this study was to determine the frequency and aetiology of GE for acutely...

  8. An outbreak of gastroenteritis due to Escherichia coli 0142 H6 in a neonatal department

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gerards, L. J.; Hennekam, R. C.; von Dijk, W. C.; Roord, J. J.; Fleer, A.

    1984-01-01

    An outbreak of gastroenteritis due to Escherichia coli 0142 H6 in a neonatal ward is described. The epidemic affected 16 of 24 infants (infection-rate 66 per cent), of whom one died due to necrotizing enterocolitis. Administration of antibiotics was of limited value in treatment or in eradicating E.

  9. The successful medical management of severe duodenal strictures secondary to eosinophilic gastroenteritis in an infant

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tan, H. L.; Sithasanan, N.; Foley, P.; Davidson, G. P.

    2003-01-01

    Eosinophilic gastroenteritis is an uncommon condition of unknown etiology that has only been relatively recently reported. Its clinical manifestations range from a mild disease to more severe forms resembling Crohn's disease. Enteric strictures are a rare but recognized complication of this

  10. The Comparition of the Efficacy of Two Different Probiotics in Rotavirus Gastroenteritis in Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Özlem Erdoğan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. The aim of the study is to compare the clinical effectiveness of the probiotics—Saccharomyces boulardii and Bifidobacterium lactis—in children who had been diagnosed with rotavirus gastroenteritis. Materials and methods. Seventy five patients aged between 5 months–5 years diagnosed as rotavirus gastroenteritis were included in the study. The patients diagnosed as rotavirus gastroenteritis by latex agglutination test in stool were divided into 3 groups of twenty-five patients each: First group was given oral rehydration therapy and rapid refeeding with a normal diet with Saccharomyces boulardii (spp. I-745, second group was given oral rehydration therapy and rapid refeeding with a normal diet with Bifidobacterium lactis (spp. B94, culture number:∘118529 and third group received only oral rehydration therapy and rapid refeeding with a normal diet. Results. The duration of diarrhea was shorter in the group given oral rehydration therapy and rapid refeeding with a normal diet with Bifidobacterium lactis and Saccharomyces boulardii than the group given only oral rehydration therapy and rapid refeeding with a normal diet. Conclusion. Bifidobacterium lactis has a complemental role in the treatment of rotavirus gatroenteritis and other probiotics may also have a beneficial effect in rotavirus gastroenteritis compared with the therapy included only oral rehydration therapy and rapid refeeding with a normal diet.

  11. Rotavirus vaccine and health-care utilization for rotavirus gastroenteritis in Tsu City, Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamiya, Hajime; Suga, Shigeru; Nagao, Mizuho; Ichimi, Ryoji; Fujisawa, Takao; Umemoto, Masakazu; Tanaka, Takaaki; Ito, Hiroaki; Tanaka, Shigeki; Ido, Masaru; Taniguchi, Koki; Ihara, Toshiaki; Nakano, Takashi

    2016-01-01

    Background Rotavirus vaccines were introduced in Japan in November 2011. We evaluated the subsequent reduction of the health-care burden of rotavirus gastroenteritis. Methods We conducted active surveillance for rotavirus gastroenteritis among children under 5 years old before and after the vaccine introduction. We surveyed hospitalization rates for rotavirus gastroenteritis in children in Tsu City, Mie Prefecture, Japan, from 2007 to 2015 and surveyed the number of outpatient visits at a Tsu City clinic from 2010 to 2015. Stool samples were obtained for rotavirus testing and genotype investigation. We assessed rotavirus vaccine coverage for infants living in Tsu City. Results In the pre-vaccine years (2007–2011), hospitalization rates for rotavirus gastroenteritis in children under 5 years old were 5.5, 4.3, 3.1 and 3.9 cases per 1000 person-years, respectively. In the post-vaccine years (2011–2015), the rates were 3.0, 3.5, 0.8 and 0.6 cases per 1000 person-years, respectively. The hospitalization rate decreased significantly in the 2013–2014 and 2014–2015 seasons compared to the average of the seasons before vaccine introduction (P rotavirus infection was 66. In the post-vaccine years (2011–2015), the numbers for each season was 23, 23, 7 and 5, respectively. The most dominant rotavirus genotype shifted from G3P[8] to G1P[8] and to G2P[4]. The coverage of one dose of rotavirus vaccine in Tsu City was 56.5% in 2014. Conclusion After the vaccine introduction, the hospitalization rates and outpatient visits for rotavirus gastroenteritis greatly decreased. PMID:28246579

  12. Impairment of different protein domains causes variable clinical presentation within Pitt-Hopkins syndrome and suggests intragenic molecular syndromology of TCF4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bedeschi, Maria Francesca; Marangi, Giuseppe; Calvello, Maria Rosaria; Ricciardi, Stefania; Leone, Francesca Pia Chiara; Baccarin, Marco; Guerneri, Silvana; Orteschi, Daniela; Murdolo, Marina; Lattante, Serena; Frangella, Silvia; Keena, Beth; Harr, Margaret H; Zackai, Elaine; Zollino, Marcella

    2017-11-01

    Pitt-Hopkins syndrome is a neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by severe intellectual disability and a distinctive facial gestalt. It is caused by haploinsufficiency of the TCF4 gene. The TCF4 protein has different functional domains, with the NLS (nuclear localization signal) domain coded by exons 7-8 and the bHLH (basic Helix-Loop-Helix) domain coded by exon 18. Several alternatively spliced TCF4 variants have been described, allowing for translation of variable protein isoforms. Typical PTHS patients have impairment of at least the bHLH domain. To which extent impairment of the remaining domains contributes to the final phenotype is not clear. There is recent evidence that certain loss-of-function variants disrupting TCF4 are associated with mild ID, but not with typical PTHS. We describe a frameshift-causing partial gene deletion encompassing exons 4-6 of TCF4 in an adult patient with mild ID and nonspecific facial dysmorphisms but without the typical features of PTHS, and a c.520C > T nonsense variant within exon 8 in a child presenting with a severe phenotype largely mimicking PTHS, but lacking the typical facial dysmorphism. Investigation on mRNA, along with literature review, led us to suggest a preliminary phenotypic map of loss-of-function variants affecting TCF4. An intragenic phenotypic map of loss-of-function variants in TCF4 is suggested here for the first time: variants within exons 1-4 and exons 4-6 give rise to a recurrent phenotype with mild ID not in the spectrum of Pitt-Hopkins syndrome (biallelic preservation of both the NLS and bHLH domains); variants within exons 7-8 cause a severe phenotype resembling PTHS but in absence of the typical facial dysmorphism (impairment limited to the NLS domain); variants within exons 9-19 cause typical Pitt-Hopkins syndrome (impairment of at least the bHLH domain). Understanding the TCF4 molecular syndromology can allow for proper nosology in the current era of whole genomic investigations. Copyright

  13. Peritonitis infecciosa felina, gastroenteritis y colangiohepatitis parasitaria (platinosomiasis) con colangiocarcinoma hepático: estudio clínico y anatomopatológico de tres casos

    OpenAIRE

    Vale Echeto, Oswaldo E.; Madrigal, Karina; Admadé, María; Vale Oviedo, Oswaldo R.; Moreno, Alejandro; Simoes, David

    2009-01-01

    La Peritonitis Infecciosa Felina (PIF) es una enfermedad viral sistémica producida por un coronavirus (ARN) que ocurre con frecuencia en los felinos domésticos. Este proceso patológico ha sido referido en el felino doméstico y relacionado concurrentemente con otras enfermedades virales tales como la panleucopenia felina, leucemia felina y enteritis por coronavirus. En el presente trabajo se reportan los hallazgos clínicos y anatomopatológicos de tres casos de PIF, asociados a gastroenteritis ...

  14. An atypical rotavirus detected in a child with gastroenteritis in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. G. Pereira

    1983-09-01

    Full Text Available Particles morphologically identical to rotaviruses were found in the faeces of a nine week-old child with gastroenteritis. Analysis of the viral RNA genome by polyacrylamine gel electrophoresis revealed 10 bands (probably 11 segments some of wich differed in migration rate from those of the great majority of rotaviruses infecting man and other animal hosts. The virus was not detected by a highly sensitive enzyme immunoassay (ELISA and therefore probably lacked the crossreactive antigen(s shared by the majority rotaviruses. This was the only strain with such behaviour among 230 rotaviruses of human origin examined in this laboratory since 1979. The implications of the existence of non-crossreactive rotaviruses are discussed.Partículas morfologicamente idênticas a rotavirus foram encontradas nas fezes de uma criança de dois meses com gastroenterite. Análise do genoma viral por eletroforese em gel de poliacrilamida revelou 10 faixas (provavelmente 11 segmentos de RNA, algumas das quais diferem em velocidade de migração das observadas na grande maioria de rotavirus de hospedeiros humanos e de diversas espécies de animais. O vírus não foi revelado por um ensaio imuno-enzimático de alta sensibilidade, o que sugere a ausência do antígeno de grupo que da reações cruzadas entre a maioria dos rotavirus. O vírus descrito no presente trabalho foi o único com tal comportamento entre 230 amostras analisadas por nós desde 1979. A relevância de existência de rotavirus não relacionados antigenicamente a outros membros do grupo é discutida.

  15. Odontoma compuesto como causa de retención dentaria: Presentación de un caso Compound odontoma as a cause of dental retention: A case presentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Carlos Quintana Díaz

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Se presenta el caso de un paciente masculino de 10 años de edad con presencia de retención dentaria del incisivo central superior derecho causado por la presencia de un odontoma compuesto, cuyo diagnóstico se corrobora clínica e histológicamente. El defecto óseo residual a la enucleación de dicho tumor fue rellenado con hidroxiapatita porosa del tipo HAP- 200 y el diente fue llevado a su posición en la arcada dentaria con la ayuda de aparatología ortodóncica. Con este tipo de tratamiento quirúrgico-ortodóncico se logró en el paciente un resultado estético y funcional muy bueno. Se corrobora que este tipo de lesión es una de las causas locales de retención dentaria.The case of a male patient aged 10-years with dental retention of right superior central incisor caused by a compound odontoma was presented in this paper. The diagnosis of this odontoma was confirmed clinically and histologically. The residual osseous defect after enucleation of such tumor was filled with HAP-200 type porous hydroxiapatite and the tooth was taken back to its position in dental archade with orthodontic implements. Thanks to this kind of surgical/orthodontic treatment, it was possible to reach a very good functional aesthetic result in this patient. It was confirmed that this type of lesion is one of the local causes of dental retention.

  16. Septicemia caused by Vibrio parahemolyticus: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, G J; Young, T; Peng, M Y; Chang, F Y; Chou, M Y

    1993-11-01

    Vibrio parahemolyticus is a halophilic marine vibrio commonly associated with outbreaks of acute gastroenteritis which also sometimes causes serious wound infection. It is an uncommon cause of septicemia. A few reports suggest that patients with chronic liver disease and leukemia are more susceptible. A case of liver cirrhosis with septicemia caused by this organism is discussed. The patient's condition rapidly deteriorated, and he died 12 hours after admission.

  17. Intractable Postoperative Wounds Caused by Self-Inflicted Trauma in a Patient with Cutaneous Munchausen Syndrome Presenting as a Pyoderma Gangrenosum-Like Lesion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keiko Inui

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available A 50-year-old Japanese woman consulted the emergency department of our hospital for bleeding due to an intractable postoperative wound on the lower abdomen; the postoperative wound was owing to a laparoscopic cholecystectomy performed 1 year previously for acute cholecystitis. She presented with a painful ulcer on her right lower abdomen. She also presented with multiple scars, skin grafts on the extremities, and a missing left lower leg, the causes for all of which were unexplained. The results of her blood test were normal, except for the hemoglobin level. Histology of the skin biopsy specimen from the ulcer did not show any specific findings. The previous surgeon who had performed the laparoscopic cholecystectomy revealed that surgical wound dehiscence had occurred during her admission. After a body restraint had been applied, the ulcer improved. Medical records indicated that she had been admitted to the department of plastic surgery at our hospital for skin grafting of a leg ulcer. During that admission, she refused to consult with the department of psychiatry, although the staff suspected mental disorders. Therefore, we diagnosed her with cutaneous Munchausen syndrome. After vacuum-assisted closure (VAC therapy had been performed to prevent her from traumatizing the ulcer again, it rapidly became granulated and reepithelialized. Munchausen syndrome is characterized by feigning physical symptoms to seek attention. Patients self-inflict numerous lesions, keep getting admitted to different hospitals, and feign acute illness, usually spectacular diseases. VAC therapy may be effective for preventing patients with cutaneous Munchausen syndrome from traumatizing their wounds.

  18. Intractable Postoperative Wounds Caused by Self-Inflicted Trauma in a Patient with Cutaneous Munchausen Syndrome Presenting as a Pyoderma Gangrenosum-Like Lesion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inui, Keiko; Hanafusa, Takaaki; Namiki, Takeshi; Ueno, Makiko; Igawa, Ken; Yokozeki, Hiroo

    2016-01-01

    A 50-year-old Japanese woman consulted the emergency department of our hospital for bleeding due to an intractable postoperative wound on the lower abdomen; the postoperative wound was owing to a laparoscopic cholecystectomy performed 1 year previously for acute cholecystitis. She presented with a painful ulcer on her right lower abdomen. She also presented with multiple scars, skin grafts on the extremities, and a missing left lower leg, the causes for all of which were unexplained. The results of her blood test were normal, except for the hemoglobin level. Histology of the skin biopsy specimen from the ulcer did not show any specific findings. The previous surgeon who had performed the laparoscopic cholecystectomy revealed that surgical wound dehiscence had occurred during her admission. After a body restraint had been applied, the ulcer improved. Medical records indicated that she had been admitted to the department of plastic surgery at our hospital for skin grafting of a leg ulcer. During that admission, she refused to consult with the department of psychiatry, al-though the staff suspected mental disorders. Therefore, we diagnosed her with cutaneous Munchausen syndrome. After vacuum-assisted closure (VAC) therapy had been performed to prevent her from traumatizing the ulcer again, it rapidly became granulated and reepithelialized. Munchausen syndrome is characterized by feigning physical symptoms to seek attention. Patients self-inflict numerous lesions, keep getting admitted to different hospitals, and feign acute illness, usually spectacular diseases. VAC therapy may be effective for preventing patients with cutaneous Munchausen syndrome from traumatizing their wounds.

  19. Penetrating chest trauma caused by a blank cartridge actuated rubber ball projectile: case presentation and ballistic investigation of an uncommon weapon type.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frank, Matthias; Peters, Dieter; Klemm, Wolfram; Grossjohann, Rico; Ekkernkamp, Axel; Bockholdt, Britta; Seifert, Julia

    2017-09-01

    Recently, an increasing number of an uncommon weapon type based on a caliber 6-mm Flobert blank cartridge actuated revolver which discharges 10-mm-diameter rubber ball projectiles has been confiscated by police authorities following criminal offenses. A recent trauma case presenting with a penetrating chest injury occasioned an investigation into the basic ballistic parameters of this type of weapon. Kinetic energy E of the test projectiles was calculated between 5.8 and 12.5 J. Energy density ED of the test projectiles was close to or higher than the threshold energy density of human skin. It can be concluded that penetrating skin injuries due to free-flying rubber ball projectiles discharged at close range cannot be ruled out. However, in case of a contact shot, the main injury potential of this weapon type must be attributed to the high energy density of the muzzle gas jet which may, similar to well-known gas or alarm weapons, cause life-threatening or even lethal injuries.

  20. Meningitis Caused by Toscana Virus Is Associated with Strong Antiviral Response in the CNS and Altered Frequency of Blood Antigen-Presenting Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefania Varani

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Toscana virus (TOSV is a Phlebotomus-transmitted RNA virus and a frequent cause of human meningitis and meningoencephalitis in Southern Europe during the summer season. While evidence for TOSV-related central nervous system (CNS cases is increasing, little is known about the host defenses against TOSV. We evaluated innate immune response to TOSV by analyzing frequency and activation of blood antigen-presenting cells (APCs and cytokine levels in plasma and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF from patients with TOSV neuroinvasive infection and controls. An altered frequency of different blood APC subsets was observed in TOSV-infected patients, with signs of monocytic deactivation. Nevertheless, a proper or even increased responsiveness of toll-like receptor 3 and 7/8 was observed in blood APCs of these patients as compared to healthy controls. Systemic levels of cytokines remained low in TOSV-infected patients, while levels of anti-inflammatory and antiviral mediators were significantly higher in CSF from TOSV-infected patients as compared to patients with other infectious and noninfectious neurological diseases. Thus, the early host response to TOSV appears effective for viral clearance, by proper response to TLR3 and TLR7/8 agonists in peripheral blood and by a strong and selective antiviral and anti-inflammatory response in the CNS.

  1. A large outbreak of gastroenteritis associated with a small round structured virus among schoolchildren and teachers in Japan.

    OpenAIRE

    Kobayashi, S.; Morishita, T.; Yamashita, T.; Sakae, K.; Nishio, O.; Miyake, T.; Ishihara, Y.; Isomura, S.

    1991-01-01

    In March 1989 a large outbreak of acute gastroenteritis occurred simultaneously among schoolchildren and teachers at nine elementary schools in Toyota City, Japan. Illness was observed in 3236 (41.5%) of 7801 schoolchildren and 117 (39.4%) of 297 teachers. The main clinical symptoms were diarrhoea, vomiting, nausea and abdominal pain. Gastroenteritis was significantly associated with the consumption of school lunch served by one particular lunch preparation centre. One food handler at the cen...

  2. The viewpoints of chemical air pollution caused by traffic subsystems and presented by the example of emission measurements of trucks' exhaust gases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kolaric, D. [Vocational College of Traffic and Transport Maribor (Slovenia)

    2011-07-01

    For a long time, experts have been emphasizing that we are in an era in which dangerous climatic changes are getting more and more notable. We have been witnessing large climatic changes caused by greenhouse gases for several years. The use of different ways of transport has a bad influence on the environment in which we daily live and work, and on human health and nature, too. For that reason, we cannot treat the safety of the transportation means only through the technical impeccability of the devices which make possible direct execution of particular technological phases in different traffic subsystems. Ecological impacts of particular traffic subsystems are very complex, and have a long-term impact on our everyday existence. Despite this we still do not devote enough attention to this. We have been aware that traffic, especially road and air traffic, is one of the largest sources of emissions of harmful exhaust gases of combustion engines and particles into the environment. The environmental impact of traffic is especially large due to greenhouse gases, which are part of exhaust gases being produced by internal combustion engines. In addition to that, there are many more toxic components in exhausted gases. For effective reduction of harmful emissions in transport, a wide spectrum of analysis and measurements must be carried out. In 2007, the first realistic freight vehicle measurements in the Republic of Slovenia were published. The TRAENVIA project precisely evaluated some types of transportation emissions, especially on long freight distances and reached some comprehensive goals: measure and compare real emissions caused by different transport means in real terms of traffic flow, to evaluate the influence of those emissions on the environment and air quality, to evaluate the contribution of the transport sector in urban areas to air pollution, to evaluate the influence on the air quality for several means of transport, to evaluate potential possibilities and

  3. Clinical and laboratory assessment of dehydration severity in children with acute gastroenteritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parkin, Patricia C; Macarthur, Colin; Khambalia, Amina; Goldman, Ran D; Friedman, Jeremy N

    2010-03-01

    To evaluate clinical and laboratory assessment of dehydration severity in children, 1 to 36 months, with acute gastroenteritis. Clinical and laboratory measures and weight change following rehydration were collected for enrolled children. Pediatric emergency department. Likelihood ratio (LR+) and 95% confidence interval (CI): for a clinical score of 0, the LR+ was 2.2 (95% CI = 0.9-5.3); for a clinical score of 1 to 4, the LR+ was 1.3 (95% CI = 0.90-1.74); for a clinical score of 5 to 8, the LR+ was 5.2 (95% CI = 2.2-12.8); for a venous pH Dehydration Scale and laboratory measures into clinical decision-making algorithms to assess dehydration severity in children with acute gastroenteritis.

  4. Identification of group B rotavirus as an etiological agent in the gastroenteritis outbreak in Maharashtra, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshi, Madhuri S; Ganorkar, Nital N; Ranshing, Sujata S; Basu, Atanu; Chavan, Nutan A; Gopalkrishna, Varanasi

    2017-12-01

    Acute gastroenteritis outbreak occurred at Pargaon, Maharashtra, India in 1789 cases with an attack rate of 32.5% between November to December 2015. The stool specimens (n = 32) were investigated for different enteric viral agents using conventional methods. Transmission electron microscopy and RNA polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis respectively identified morphologically distinct rotavirus particles in 28% and RNA migration pattern of Group B Rotavirus (GBR) in 72% of the specimens. Reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction and nucleotide sequencing confirmed presence of GBR in 97% of the samples analyzed. The predominance of GBR infections and absence or insignificant presence of other agents confirmed GBR as an etiological agent of the gastroenteritis outbreak occurred in Maharashtra, India. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Discriminatory potential of C-reactive protein, cytokines, and fecal markers in infectious gastroenteritis in adults.

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    Weh, Julia; Antoni, Christoph; Weiß, Christel; Findeisen, Peter; Ebert, Matthias; Böcker, Ulrich

    2013-09-01

    This study evaluates potential markers in blood and stools for their ability to distinguish bacterial from viral gastroenteritis. A total of 108 patients were prospectively recruited, of which 27 showed bacterial, 30 viral, and 51 no detectable pathogen, respectively. Cytokines, C-reactive protein (CRP), and white blood cells as well as the 2 fecal markers lactoferrin and calprotectin were determined. Statistics comprised Kruskal-Wallis test and U test in addition to an assessment of receiver operating characteristic. Interferon γ (IFNγ) levels were significantly increased in the viral group compared to the bacterial and nonspecific group. For the bacterial group, both fecal markers lactoferrin and calprotectin as well as CRP were significantly higher in comparison to the other 2 groups. To differentiate between bacterial and viral gastroenteritis, CRP, serum IFNγ, and the fecal proteins lactoferrin and calprotectin may be useful. A corresponding algorithm should be evaluated prospectively. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Iatrogenic Dysnatremias in Children with Acute Gastroenteritis in High-Income Countries: A Systematic Review

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    Silviu Grisaru

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundAcute gastroenteritis (AGE causing dehydration with or without dysnatremias is a common childhood health challenge. While it is accepted that oral rehydration therapy is preferred, clinical factors or parent and healthcare provider preferences may lead to intravenous rehydration (IVR. Isotonic solutions are increasingly recommended in most scenarios requiring IVR. Nevertheless, children with AGE, having ongoing losses of water and electrolytes, represent a unique population.ObjectivesTo evaluate the association between acquired dysnatremias and IVR in children with AGE.MethodsA systematic search of MEDLINE database was conducted through September 14, 2016. Observational studies and clinical trials conducted in high-income countries were included. The Grades of Recommendation, Assessment, Development, and Evaluation approach was used to evaluate the overall quality of evidence for each outcome.Results603 papers were identified of which 6 were included (3 randomized controlled trials and 3 observational studies. Pooling of patient data was not possible due to significantly different interventions or exposures. Single studies results demonstrated that within 24 h, administration of isotonic saline was not associated with a significant decline in serum sodium while hypotonic solutions (0.2–0.45% saline were associated, in one study, with mean serum sodium declines from 1.3 mEq/L (139.2, SD 2.9–137.9, SD 2.5 in 133 young infants (aged 1–28 months, to 5.7 (SD 3.1 mEq/L in a subgroup of 18 older children (age mean 5.8, SD 2.7 years. Both isotonic and hypotonic saline were shown to be associated with improvement of baseline hyponatremia in different studies. Baseline hypernatremia was corrected within 4–24 h in 81/83 (99.6% children using hypotonic saline IVR.ConclusionThere is a paucity of publications assessing the risk for acquired dysnatremias associated with IVR in children with AGE. Current high-quality evidence

  7. Epidemiology and genetic diversity of rotavirus strains in children with acute gastroenteritis in Lahore, Pakistan.

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    Muhammad Masroor Alam

    Full Text Available Pakistan harbors high disease burden of gastro-enteric infections with majority of these caused by rotavirus. Unfortunately, lack of proper surveillance programs and laboratory facilities have resulted in scarcity of available data on rotavirus associated disease burden and epidemiological information in the country. We investigated 1306 stool samples collected over two years (2008-2009 from hospitalized children under 5 years of age for the presence of rotavirus strains and its genotypic diversity in Lahore. The prevalence rate during 2008 and 2009 was found to be 34% (n = 447 out of 1306. No significant difference was found between different age groups positive for rotavirus (p>0.05. A subset of EIA positive samples was further screened for rotavirus RNA through RT-PCR and 44 (49.43% samples, out of total 89 EIA positive samples, were found positive. G and P type prevalence was found as follows: G1P [4] = 3(6.81%; G1P [6] = 9(20.45%; G1P [8] = 1(2.27%; G2P [4] = 21(47.72%; G2P [8] = 1(2.27%; G9P [4] = 1(2.27%; G9P [6] = 1(2.27% and G9P [8] = 7(15.90%. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that the VP7 and VP4 sequences clustered closely with the previously detected strains in the country as well as Belgian rotaviruses. Antigenic characterization was performed by analyzing major epitopes in the immunodominant VP7 and VP4 gene segments. Although the neutralization conferring motifs were found variable between the Pakistani strains and the two recommended vaccines strains (Rotarix™ and RotaTeq™, we validate the use of rotavirus vaccine in Pakistan based on the proven and recognized vaccine efficacy across the globe. Our findings constitute the first report on rotavirus' genotype diversity, their phylogenetic relatedness and epidemiology during the pre-vaccination era in Lahore, Pakistan and support the immediate introduction of rotavirus vaccine in the routine immunization program of the country.

  8. Waterborne Outbreak of Norwalk-Like Virus Gastroenteritis at a Tourist Resort, Italy

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    Boccia, Della; Tozzi, Alberto Eugenio; Cotter, Benvon; Rizzo, Caterina; Russo, Teresa; Buttinelli, Gabriele; Caprioli, Alfredo; Marziano, Maria Luisa; Ruggeri, Franco Maria

    2002-01-01

    In July 2000, an outbreak of gastroenteritis occurred at a tourist resort in the Gulf of Taranto in southern Italy. Illness in 344 people, 69 of whom were staff members, met the case definition. Norwalk-like virus (NLV) was found in 22 of 28 stool specimens tested. The source of illness was likely contaminated drinking water, as environmental inspection identified a breakdown in the resort water system and tap water samples were contaminated with fecal bacteria. Attack rates were increased (5...

  9. Rapid Intravenous Rehydration Therapy in Children With Acute Gastroenteritis: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toaimah, Fatihi Hassan Soliman; Mohammad, Hala Mohammad Fathi

    2016-02-01

    Rapid intravenous (IV) rehydration is commonly used for the management of pediatric gastroenteritis in the emergency department. The current practice shows wide variation in the volume and rate of rapid IV hydration. The aim of this review was to assess the efficacy of rapid IV rehydration compared with standard method in children with gastroenteritis. MEDLINE (1946-2014), EMBASE (1974-2014), and CENTRAL via the Cochrane Library (Issue 8, 2014) were systematically searched to identify eligible studies. Inclusion criteria were randomized controlled trials of rapid IV rehydration in children with gastroenteritis. A total of 1513 articles were retrieved, and our inclusion criteria were met by 3 studies, with a total of 464 participants. The percentage of children who were successfully rehydrated and tolerated oral fluids at 2 to 4 hours after starting IV fluid therapy ranged from 69% to 100% in both rapid IV rehydration and standard method. Time to discharge ranged from 2 to 6 hours (rapid rehydration) versus 2 to 5 hours (standard rehydration). Emergency department revisits ranged from 3% to 16% (rapid rehydration) versus 5% to 14% (standard). Summarized results suggested that rapid IV rehydration may be associated with longer time-to-discharge and higher readmission rates. The new evidence fails to demonstrate superiority of large-volume (60 mL/kg/h) over standard (20 mL/kg/h) IV rehydration. Standard volume IV rehydration for 1 to 4 hours followed by oral hydration or maintenance IV fluids seems sufficient for most children with gastroenteritis requiring IV fluid administration. However, more evidence is needed to establish an optimal IV rehydration regimen.

  10. Identification of co-infection by rotavirus and parvovirus in dogs with gastroenteritis in Mexico

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    Ariadna Flores Ortega

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT This is the first report on circulating canine rotavirus in Mexico. Fifty samples from dogs with gastroenteritis were analyzed used polymerase chain reaction and reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction in order to identify parvovirus and rotavirus, respectively; 7% of dogs were infected with rotavirus exclusively, while 14% were co-infected with both rotavirus and parvovirus; clinical signs in co-infected dogs were more severe.

  11. Use of bedside ultrasound to assess degree of dehydration in children with gastroenteritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Lei; Hsiao, Allen; Langhan, Melissa; Riera, Antonio; Santucci, Karen A

    2010-10-01

    Prospectively identifying children with significant dehydration from gastroenteritis is difficult in acute care settings. Previous work by our group has shown that bedside ultrasound (US) measurement of the inferior vena cava (IVC) and the aorta (Ao) diameter ratio is correlated with intravascular volume. This study was designed to validate the use of this method in the prospective identification of children with dehydration by investigating whether the IVC/Ao ratio correlated with dehydration in children with acute gastroenteritis. Another objective was to investigate the interrater reliability of the IVC/Ao measurements. A prospective observational study was carried out in a pediatric emergency department (PED) between November 2007 and June 2009. Children with acute gastroenteritis were enrolled as subjects. A pair of investigators obtained transverse images of the IVC and Ao using bedside US. The ratio of IVC and Ao diameters (IVC/Ao) was calculated. Subjects were asked to return after resolution of symptoms. The difference between the convalescent weight and ill weight was used to calculate the degree of dehydration. Greater than or equal to 5% difference was judged to be significant. Linear regression was performed with dehydration as the dependent variable and the IVC/Ao as the independent variable. Pearson's correlation coefficient was calculated to assess the degree of agreement between observers. A total of 112 subjects were enrolled. Seventy-one subjects (63%) completed follow-up. Twenty-eight subjects (39%) had significant dehydration. The linear regression model resulted in an R² value of 0.21 (p dehydration. Forty-eight paired measurements of IVC/Ao ratios were made. The Pearson correlation coefficient was 0.76.   In this pilot study the ratio of IVC to Ao diameters, as measured by bedside US, was a marginally accurate measurement of acute weight loss in children with dehydration from gastroenteritis. The technique demonstrated good interrater

  12. Value of point-of-care ketones in assessing dehydration and acidosis in children with gastroenteritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levy, Jason A; Waltzman, Mark; Monuteaux, Michael C; Bachur, Richard G

    2013-11-01

    Children with gastroenteritis often develop dehydration with metabolic acidosis. Serum ketones are frequently elevated in this population. The goal was to determine the relationship between initial serum ketone concentration and both the degree of dehydration and the magnitude of acidosis. This was a secondary analysis of a prospective trial of crystalloid administration for rapid rehydration. Children 6 months to 6 years of age with gastroenteritis and dehydration were enrolled. A point-of-care serum ketone (beta-hydroxybutyrate) concentration was obtained at the time of study enrollment. The relationship between initial serum ketone concentration and a prospectively assigned and previously validated clinical dehydration score, and serum bicarbonate concentration, was analyzed. A total of 188 patients were enrolled. The median serum ketone concentration was elevated at 3.1 mmol/L (interquartile range [IQR] = 1.2 to 4.6 mmol/L), and the median dehydration score was consistent with moderate dehydration. A significant positive relationship was found between serum ketone concentration and the clinical dehydration score (Spearman's rho = 0.22, p = 0.003). Patients with moderate dehydration had a higher median serum ketone concentration than those with mild dehydration (3.6 mmol/L vs. 1.4 mmol/L, p = 0.007). Additionally, the serum ketone concentration was inversely correlated with serum bicarbonate concentration (ρ = -0.26, p Children with gastroenteritis and dehydration have elevated serum ketone concentrations that correlate with both degree of dehydration and magnitude of metabolic acidosis. Point-of-care serum ketone measurement may be a useful tool to inform management decisions at the point of triage or in the initial evaluation of children with gastroenteritis and dehydration. © 2013 by the Society for Academic Emergency Medicine.

  13. Identification of co-infection by rotavirus and parvovirus in dogs with gastroenteritis in Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortega, Ariadna Flores; Martínez-Castañeda, José Simón; Bautista-Gómez, Linda G; Muñoz, Raúl Fajardo; Hernández, Israel Quijano

    This is the first report on circulating canine rotavirus in Mexico. Fifty samples from dogs with gastroenteritis were analyzed used polymerase chain reaction and reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction in order to identify parvovirus and rotavirus, respectively; 7% of dogs were infected with rotavirus exclusively, while 14% were co-infected with both rotavirus and parvovirus; clinical signs in co-infected dogs were more severe. Copyright © 2017 Sociedade Brasileira de Microbiologia. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  14. ENTERIC ADENOVIRUS INFECTION IN INFANTS AND YOUNG CHILDREN WITH ACUTE GASTROENTERITIS IN TEHRAN

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    F. Jam-Afzon S. Modarres

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Adenoviruses are one of the most important etiological agents of serious gastroenteritis among infants and young children. Fecal specimens from patients with an acute gastroenteritis were evaluated for the presence of adenovirus (Ad40, 41 from April 2002 to February 2004. During the study, 1052 samples were collected from children under the age of 5 years in six educational and therapeutic pediatric centers. The specimens were tested for adenovirus (Ad40, 41 by EIA technique in the Virology Department of Pasteur Institute of Iran. Adenoviruses (Ad40, 41 were detected from 27(2.6% samples, but were not detected in 150 samples of healthy control group. In this study the highest rate of adenovirus was found in children aged 6 to 12 months (40.7%, but the male to female ratio inpatients was approximately equal. Adenovirus (Ad40, 41 infections peaked in the winter as 48.1% was detected from December to March. There were a statistically significant difference between age and infection (P < 0.001, also between season with adenovirus (Ad40, 41 infection (P = 0.005. Breast-feeding had a protective action against adenovirus (Ad40, 41 infection. This study revealed that enteric adenovirus (Ad40, 41 is an etiological agent of acute gastroenteritis among children in Tehran.

  15. Comparative Study of Campylobacter spp. Isolated from Children With Gastroenteritis in Bahonar Hospital, Karaj, Using PCR and RFLP

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    Arefeh Abdi

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: Campylobacter species are responsible for the majority of cases of food-borne gastroenteritis. The sources of the disease outbreaks are often contaminated water or milk, and consumption of undercooked poultry product is the main cause of sporadic campylobacteriosis cases. Objectives: The aims of this study were to determine the prevalence of Campylobacter gastroenteritis in children and to differentiate the interfering species using polymerase chain reaction (PCR and restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP methods at the Bahonar hospital in Karaj, Iran. Patients and Methods: A total of 150 stool samples were collected from children under 10 years old during the summer of 2014. PCR was performed using genus- and species-specific primers and RFLP was done using AluI and TasI enzymes. Results: The results showed the amplification of 400 and 491 bp segments and Campylobacter contamination in 30 (20% samples; 5 out of 30 Campylobacter positive samples (16.66% were identified as C. jejuni, 20 (66.66% as C. coli, 3 (10% as C. jejuni and C. coli (mixed infection, and 2 (6.66% were identified as non-jejuni, non-coli Campylobacter using the PCR method. Following the evaluation of RFLP results, 7 positive samples (23.33% showed the electrophoretic pattern of C. jejuni, 21 (70% showed the electrophoretic pattern of C. coli, and 2 (6.6% showed both of the patterns and mixed contamination with jejuni and coli species. The results of digestion with TasI did not show any C. lari or C. upsaliensis patterns. Conclusions: The results of this study showed high percentage of Campylobacter contamination in the tested stool samples. The other surprising finding was the high rate of Campylobacter coli positive samples; the difference between the results of PCR using species-specific primers (hipo and asp and the RFLP method (electrophoretic patterns in some of the positive samples confirms the hypothesis of variations in nucleotide sequences of the

  16. Epidemiological features and genetic characterization of virus strains in rotavirus associated gastroenteritis in children of Odisha in Eastern India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohanty, Eileena; Dwibedi, Bhagirathi; Kar, S K; Acharya, A S

    2017-09-01

    We have studied the clinical characteristics, severity and seasonality of rotavirus infection and prevalent genotypes in 652 non-rota vaccinated children in Odisha in eastern India. P genotypes were analysed for their association with host blood group antigens. P type of the virus is determined by the VP8* gene, and specific recognition of A - type of Histo - blood group antigen by P[14]VP8* has been reported. VP4, VP7 and VP6 genes of commonly identified G1P[8] strain were compared with genes of the same strain isolated from other parts of India, elsewhere and strains used for Rotarix and Rotateq vaccines. In 54.75% of children with gastroenteritis, rota virus was found. 9.65% of children had moderate, 78.07% severe, and 12.28% very severe disease as assessed using the Vesikari scoring system. The incidence of infection was highest during winter months. There was no association between any blood group and specific P genotypes. G1P[8] was the commonest cause of gastroenteritis, followed by G1P[11], G3P[8], G9P[8], G2P[4], G2P[6], G9P[4], G9P[11] and G1P[6]. Predominant G genotypes identified were G1 (72.9%), G9 (10.81%), G2 (8.10%) and G3 (8.10%). Sequence analysis of the VP7 gene, placed the G1P[8] strain in lineage 1 and of VP6 gene placed nine G1P[8] strains in subgroup II and one in subgroup I. The VP7 gene segment of two Odisha G1P[8] strains were found to cluster relatively close to the VP7 sequences of Rotarix vaccine. Antigenic differences were found with vaccine strains. Ten G1P[8] strains sequenced for the VP4 gene had 91-93% nucleotide and 92-96% amino acid identity with Rotateq vaccine P[8]). Rotarix vaccine VP4 had 89-91% nucleotide and 90-92% amino acid identity. Our findings indicate genetic variability of rotavirus strains circulating in the region and are significant, given the introduction of rota vaccination in the State. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Brote por Salmonella enteritidis en trabajadores de un hospital An outbreak of Salmonella gastroenteritis among hospital workers

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    Ma. Eugenia Chávez-de la Peña

    2001-06-01

    : http://www.insp.mx/salud/index.htmlObjective. To describe and identify the causes of an outbreak of Salmonella enteritidis gastroenteritis that took place in June 1998, among tertiary care hospital workers, in Mexico City. Material and methods. Cases were hospital workers who developed diarrhea or fever associated with gastrointestinal symptoms, after a meal at the hospital's dining room on June eight; controls were asymptomatic employees who also ate at the hospital's dining room on the same day. A food questionnaire was applied, and stool samples were obtained from all study subjects, including kitchen personnel. Blood cultures were practiced for febrile patients. Odds ratios with 95% confidence intervals (95% CI and the chi-squared were used for statistical analysis. Statistical significance was set at phttp://www.insp.mx/salud/index.html

  18. Management of acute gastroenteritis in healthy children in Lebanon - A national survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alameddine, Aouni; Mourad, Sawsan; Rifai, Nahida

    2010-11-01

    Acute gastroenteritis remains a common condition among infants and children throughout the world. In 1996, The American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) revised its recommendations for the treatment of infants and children with acute gastroenteritis. The purpose of this survey was to determine how closely current treatment among Lebanese pediatricians compares with the AAP recommendations and to determine the impact of such management on the healthcare system. The outline of the study was based on a telephone questionnaire that addressed the management of healthy infants and children below five years of age with acute gastroenteritis complicated by mild to moderate dehydration. In addition, the costs of medical treatment and requested laboratory studies were calculated. A total of 238 pediatricians completed the questionnaire. Most pediatricians prescribed Oral Rehydration Solutions (ORS) for rehydration (92.4%), advised breastfeeding during acute gastroenteritis (81.5%), and avoided parenteral rehydration for mild to moderate dehydration (89.1%). In addition to ORS, oral fluids such as soda, juices, and rice water were allowed for rehydration by 43.7% of pediatricians. Thirty-one percent of pediatricians delayed re-feeding for more than 6 hours after initiation of rehydration. Only 32.8% of pediatricians kept their patients on regular full-strength formulas, and only 21.8% permitted full-calorie meals for their patients. 75.4% of pediatricians did not order any laboratory studies in cases of mild dehydration and 50.4% did not order any laboratory studies for moderate dehydration. Stool analysis and culture were ordered by almost half of the pediatricians surveyed. Seventy-seven percent prescribed anti-emetics, 61% prescribed probiotics, 26.3% prescribed antibiotics systematically and local antiseptic agents, 16.9% prescribed zinc supplements, and 11% percent prescribed antidiarrheal agents. Pediatricians in Lebanon are aware of the importance of ORS and the positive

  19. Prevalence of human cosavirus and saffold virus with an emergence of saffold virus genotype 6 in patients hospitalized with acute gastroenteritis in Chiang Mai, Thailand, 2014-2016.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menage, Lucy; Yodmeeklin, Arpaporn; Khamrin, Pattara; Kumthip, Kattareeya; Maneekarn, Niwat

    2017-09-01

    Human cosavirus and saffold virus are both newly discovered members of the Picornaviridae family. It has been suggested that these viruses may be the causative agents of acute gastroenteritis. In this study, 1093 stool samples collected from patients with acute gastroenteritis between January 2014 and December 2016, were screened for cosavirus and saffold virus using reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. The viral genotypes were then established via nucleotide sequencing. Here, cosavirus was detected in 16 of 1093 stool samples (1.5%) and saffold virus was detected in 18 of 1093 stool samples (1.6%). The saffold virus genotypes 1 (16.7%), 2 (50%) and 6 (33.3%), and the cosavirus genetic groups A (87.5%), C (6.25%) and D (6.25%), were all identified across the three-year study period. Interestingly, saffold virus genotype 6 has now been detected for the first time in Thailand. The present study provides the prevalence of cosavirus and saffold virus with the emergence of saffold virus genotype 6 in Thailand. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Development of a multiplex real-time PCR assay for detection of human enteric viruses other than norovirus using samples collected from gastroenteritis patients in Fukui Prefecture, Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kowada, Kazuaki; Takeuchi, Kenji; Hirano, Eiko; Toho, Miho; Sada, Kiyonao

    2018-01-01

    There are many varieties of gastroenteritis viruses, of which norovirus (NoV) accounts for over 90% of the viral food poisoning incidents in Japan. However, protocols for rapidly identifying other gastroenteritis viruses need to be established to investigate NoV-negative cases intensively. In this study, a multiplex real-time PCR assay targeting rotavirus A, rotavirus C, sapovirus, astrovirus, adenovirus, and enterovirus was developed using stool samples collected from gastroenteritis patients between 2010 and 2013 in Fukui Prefecture, Japan. Of the 126 samples collected sporadically from pediatric patients with suspected infectious gastroenteritis, 51 were positive for non-NoV target viruses, whereas 27 were positive for NoV, showing a high prevalence of non-NoV viruses in pediatric patients. In contrast, testing in 382 samples of 58 gastroenteritis outbreaks showed that non-NoV viruses were detected in 13 samples, with NoV in 267. Of the 267 NoV-positive patients, only two were co-infected with non-NoV target viruses, suggesting that testing for non-NoV gastroenteritis viruses in NoV-positive samples was mostly unnecessary in outbreak investigations. Given these results, multiplex real-time PCR testing for non-NoV gastroenteritis viruses, conducted separately from NoV testing, may be helpful to deal with two types of epidemiological investigations, regular surveillance of infectious gastroenteritis and urgent testing when gastroenteritis outbreaks occur. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Investigation of Stilbenoids as Potential Therapeutic Agents for Rotavirus Gastroenteritis

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    Judith M. Ball

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Rotavirus (RV infections cause severe diarrhea in infants and young children worldwide. Vaccines are available but cost prohibitive for many countries and only reduce severe symptoms. Vaccinated infants continue to shed infectious particles, and studies show decreased efficacy of the RV vaccines in tropical and subtropical countries where they are needed most. Continuing surveillance for new RV strains, assessment of vaccine efficacy, and development of cost effective antiviral drugs remain an important aspect of RV studies. This study was to determine the efficacy of antioxidant and anti-inflammatory stilbenoids to inhibit RV replication. Peanut (A. hypogaea hairy root cultures were induced to produce stilbenoids, which were purified by high performance countercurrent chromatography (HPCCC and analyzed by HPLC. HT29.f8 cells were infected with RV in the presence stilbenoids. Cell viability counts showed no cytotoxic effects on HT29.f8 cells. Viral infectivity titers were calculated and comparatively assessed to determine the effects of stilbenoid treatments. Two stilbenoids, trans-arachidin-1 and trans-arachidin-3, show a significant decrease in RV infectivity titers. Western blot analyses performed on the infected cell lysates complemented the infectivity titrations and indicated a significant decrease in viral replication. These studies show the therapeutic potential of the stilbenoids against RV replication.

  2. Sudden death as presenting symptom caused by cardiac primary multicentric left ventricle rhabdomyoma, in an 11-month-old baby. An immunohistochemical study

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    Neri Margherita

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract This case report describes a sudden cardiac death in an apparent healthy 11-month-old infant caused by a multifocal cardiac rhabdomyoma. Parents reported that a few days before the child had fallen to the ground getting a little superficial injury to the scalp. The authors hypothesize that it may have been a transient loss of consciousness episode caused by the cardiac tumour. After the gross examination, histological investigation supported by immunohistochemical analysis using antibody anti- Myoglobin, Actin, Vimentin, Desmin, CD34, S-100, Ki-67 was carried out for the diagnosis. Death was attributed to a multifocal cardiac rhabdomyoma, a benign tumour of striated muscle, which has been completely asymptomatic. In particular, one mass filled the entire posterior wall of the left ventricle. The insidious development of benign cardiac tumours also in infants and children is outlined, focusing on the responsible mechanisms of sudden death in such cases and providing a reference for additional study on these subjects. Virtual slides The virtual slide(s for this article can be found here: http://www.diagnosticpathology.diagnomx.eu/vs/7163626988365078

  3. Aetiology of acute paediatric gastroenteritis in Bulgaria during summer months: prevalence of viral infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mladenova, Zornitsa; Steyer, Andrej; Steyer, Adela Fratnik; Ganesh, Balasubramanian; Petrov, Petar; Tchervenjakova, Tanja; Iturriza-Gomara, Miren

    2015-03-01

    Paediatric acute gastroenteritis is a global public health problem. Comprehensive laboratory investigation for viral, bacterial and parasitic agents is helpful for improving management of acute gastroenteritis in health care settings and for monitoring and controlling the spread of these infections. Our study aimed to investigate the role of various pathogens in infantile diarrhoea in Bulgaria outside the classical winter epidemics of rotavirus and norovirus. Stool samples from 115 hospitalized children aged 0-3 years collected during summer months were tested for presence of 14 infectious agents - group A rotavirus, astrovirus, Giardia, Cryptosporidium and Entamoeba using ELISAs; norovirus by real-time RT-PCR; picobirnavirus and sapovirus by RT-PCR; adenovirus using PCR, and Salmonella, Shigella, Escherichia coli, Yersinia and Campylobacter using standard bacterial cultures. Infectious origin was established in a total of 92 cases and 23 samples remained negative. A single pathogen was found in 67 stools, of which rotaviruses were the most prevalent (56.7 %), followed by noroviruses (19.4 %), enteric adenoviruses (7.5 %), astroviruses (6.0 %), bacteria and parasites (4.5 % each) and sapoviruses (1.4 %). Rotavirus predominant genotypes were G4P[8] (46.3 %) and G2P[4] (21.4 %); for astroviruses, type 1a was the most common, while the GII.4/2006b variant was the most prevalent among noroviruses. Bacteria were observed in five cases, with Salmonella sp. as the most prevalent, while parasites were found in ten stool samples, with Giardia intestinalis in five cases. The results demonstrated high morbidity associated with viral infections and that rotavirus and norovirus remain the most common pathogens associated with severe gastroenteritis during summer months in Bulgaria, a country with a temperate climate, and significant molecular diversity among circulating virus strains. © 2015 The Authors.

  4. Validation of the clinical dehydration scale for children with acute gastroenteritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldman, Ran D; Friedman, Jeremy N; Parkin, Patricia C

    2008-09-01

    We previously created a clinical dehydration scale. Our objective was to validate the clinical dehydration scale with a new cohort of patients with acute gastroenteritis who were assessed in a tertiary emergency department in a developed country. A prospective observational study was performed in an emergency department at a large pediatric tertiary center in Canada. Children 1 month to 5 years of age with symptoms of acute gastroenteritis who were assessed in the emergency department were enrolled consecutively during a 4-month period. The main outcome measures were length of stay, proportion of children receiving intravenous fluid rehydration, and proportions of children with abnormal serum pH values or bicarbonate levels. A total of 205 children were enrolled, with a mean age of 22.4 +/- 14.9 months; 103 (50%) were male. The distribution of severity categories was as follows: no dehydration (score of 0), n = 117 (57%); some dehydration (score of 1-4), n = 83 (41%); moderate/severe dehydration (score of 5-8), n = 5 (2%). The 3 dehydration categories were significantly different with respect to the validation hypotheses (length of stay, mean +/- SD: none, 245 +/- 181 minutes; some, 397 +/- 302 minutes; moderate/severe, 501 +/- 389 minutes; treatment with intravenous fluids: none, n =17, 15%; some, n = 41, 49%; moderate/severe, n = 4, 80%; number of vomiting episodes in the 7 days before the emergency department visit: none, 8.4 +/- 7.7 episodes; some, 13 +/- 10.7 episodes; moderate/severe, 30.2 +/- 14.8 episodes). The clinical dehydration scale and the 3 severity categories were valid for a prospectively enrolled cohort of patients who were assessed in our tertiary emergency department. The scoring system was valuable in predicting a longer length of stay and the need for intravenous fluid rehydration for children with symptoms of acute gastroenteritis.

  5. Diversity in the Enteric Viruses Detected in Outbreaks of Gastroenteritis from Mumbai, Western India

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    Renu Bhardwaj

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Faecal specimens collected from two outbreaks of acute gastroenteritis that occurred in southern Mumbai, India in March and October, 2006 were tested for seven different enteric viruses. Among the 218 specimens tested, 95 (43.6% were positive, 73 (76.8% for a single virus and 22 (23.2% for multiple viruses. Single viral infections in both, March and October showed predominance of enterovirus (EV, 33.3% and 40% and rotavirus A (RVA, 33.3% and 25%. The other viruses detected in these months were norovirus (NoV, 12.1% and 10%, rotavirus B (RVB, 12.1% and 10%, enteric adenovirus (AdV, 6.1% and 7.5%, Aichivirus (AiV, 3% and 7.5% and human astrovirus (HAstV, 3% and 0%. Mixed viral infections were largely represented by two viruses (84.6% and 88.9%, a small proportion showed presence of three (7.7% and 11% and four (7.7% and 0% viruses in the two outbreaks. Genotyping of the viruses revealed predominance of RVA G2P[4], RVB G2 (Indian Bangladeshi lineage, NoV GII.4, AdV-40, HAstV-8 and AiV B types. VP1/2A junction region based genotyping showed presence of 11 different serotypes of EVs. Although no virus was detected in the tested water samples, examination of both water and sewage pipelines in gastroenteritis affected localities indicated leakages and possibility of contamination of drinking water with sewage water. Coexistence of multiple enteric viruses during the two outbreaks of gastroenteritis emphasizes the need to expand such investigations to other parts of India.

  6. Diversity in the enteric viruses detected in outbreaks of gastroenteritis from Mumbai, Western India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chitambar, Shobha; Gopalkrishna, Varanasi; Chhabra, Preeti; Patil, Pooja; Verma, Harsha; Lahon, Anismrita; Arora, Ritu; Tatte, Vaishali; Ranshing, Sujata; Dhale, Ganesh; Kolhapure, Rajendra; Tikute, Sanjay; Kulkarni, Jagannath; Bhardwaj, Renu; Akarte, Sulbha; Pawar, Sashikant

    2012-03-01

    Faecal specimens collected from two outbreaks of acute gastroenteritis that occurred in southern Mumbai, India in March and October, 2006 were tested for seven different enteric viruses. Among the 218 specimens tested, 95 (43.6%) were positive, 73 (76.8%) for a single virus and 22 (23.2%) for multiple viruses. Single viral infections in both, March and October showed predominance of enterovirus (EV, 33.3% and 40%) and rotavirus A (RVA, 33.3% and 25%). The other viruses detected in these months were norovirus (NoV, 12.1% and 10%), rotavirus B (RVB, 12.1% and 10%), enteric adenovirus (AdV, 6.1% and 7.5%), Aichivirus (AiV, 3% and 7.5%) and human astrovirus (HAstV, 3% and 0%). Mixed viral infections were largely represented by two viruses (84.6% and 88.9%), a small proportion showed presence of three (7.7% and 11%) and four (7.7% and 0%) viruses in the two outbreaks. Genotyping of the viruses revealed predominance of RVA G2P[4], RVB G2 (Indian Bangladeshi lineage), NoV GII.4, AdV-40, HAstV-8 and AiV B types. VP1/2A junction region based genotyping showed presence of 11 different serotypes of EVs. Although no virus was detected in the tested water samples, examination of both water and sewage pipelines in gastroenteritis affected localities indicated leakages and possibility of contamination of drinking water with sewage water. Coexistence of multiple enteric viruses during the two outbreaks of gastroenteritis emphasizes the need to expand such investigations to other parts of India.

  7. Major anthropogenic causes for and outcomes of wild animal presentation to a wildlife clinic in East Tennessee, USA, 2000-2011.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashley N Schenk

    Full Text Available To determine the reasons for presentation and outcome of wildlife cases in East Tennessee, a retrospective analysis was performed using 14,303 records from cases presented to the wildlife clinic of the University of Tennessee Veterinary Teaching Hospital between 2000 and 2011. The cases were first categorized into amphibian/non-avian reptile, mammal, or avian and then classified into groups based on the primary admitting/presenting sign. There are a variety of reasons animals were presented to the clinic, and some were directly or indirectly anthropogenic in origin, including cat related, dog related, hit by automobile, and other human encounters leading to trauma; of the cases reviewed, 4,443 (31.1% presented for one of these 4 reasons. Overall case fatality risk in regard to these 4 admitting/presenting signs was 0.519 for the amphibian/non-avian reptile cases, 0.675 for mammal cases, and 0.687 for avian cases. This study confirms the importance of monitoring wildlife morbidity and mortality and of focusing efforts to reduce the anthropogenic threat on native habitats and resident wildlife populations.

  8. Brote de gastroenteritis por virus Norwalk en una residencia de ancianos de Granada

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    Almagro Nievas Diego

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Fundamento: Los brotes de gastroenteritis aguda de origen vírico son actualmente uno de los problemas de salud que más están afectando a las personas residentes en instituciones de la tercera edad. El objetivo del estudio es investigar las causas del origen y transmisión de un brote de gastroenteritis aguda por virus Norwal-Like. Método: En una residencia de ancianos con 141 residentes y 71 trabajadores expuestos, se investigó la relación entre un brote de gastroenteritis aguda y distintas variables: características personales, de lugar, fecha de inicio de los síntomas, clínica de la enfermedad y factores causales (alimentos y agua de consumo. Se realizó un estudio descriptivo, tabla de contingencia y test de hipótesis 2, diseño de casos y controles con el calculo de Odds Ratio cruda y posteriormente ajustada (IC al 95% utilizando regresión logística. Resultados: No se observaron diferencias significativas en las variables de características personales y de lugar. La tasa de ataque en los residentes fue del 30,1% y en trabajadores fue del 21,12%. En el calculo de la Odds Ratio ajustada sólo tuvo valores de relación causal la mousse de nata (Odds Ratio ajustada=4,66; IC-95% 1,15-18,91; p=0,031. Se remitieron 10 muestras de heces de enfermos para su análisis, no detectándose ninguna bacteria patógena, pero si se aisló en 3 de ellas virus Norwal-Like. Conclusiones: El hallazgo de la mousse de nata como posible responsable del brote supone una primicia en la presencia de virus Norwalk, pero este resultado está sujeto a limitaciones, como el posible sesgo de clasificación por no recuerdo de consumo de alimentos. Aún así, supone un elemento a tener en cuenta en el control de gastroenteritis agudas por virus.

  9. Pediatric Rotavirus Gastroenteritis: A 2 year Analysis to Understand Current Prevalence in Mumbai

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    Vidya Nerurkar

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Many studies have established the high prevalence of paediatric Rotavirus gastroenteritis in India. The importance of rapid diagnosis of rotavirus infection has also been stressed upon, to initiate prompt rehydration therapy and prevent unnecessary use of antibiotics .We undertook a retrospective analysis of 327 paediatric stool specimens to understand the current prevalence and seasonal distribution of cases in Mumbai and its surrounding areas. Overall Rotavirus positivity rate was 37.9 %, with peak positivity in winter seasons. Infections were more common upto 2 years of age. Incidence of bacterial and parasitic coinfections was low.

  10. Emergence and clonal dissemination of Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis causing salmonellosis in Mauritius

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Issack, Mohammad I.; Hendriksen, Rene S.; Hyytiae-Trees, Eija

    2014-01-01

    or closely related to blood and exudate isolates, indicating that, besides gastroenteritis, the same strain caused invasive infections. Control of S. Enteritidis by poultry breeders would lower the financial burden associated with morbidity in humans caused by this organism in Mauritius....

  11. Very Early Presentation of Extrahepatic Portal Vein Obstruction Causing Portal Hypertension in an Infant: Uncertainties in the Management and Therapeutic Limitations

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    Parisá Khodayar-Pardo

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Extrahepatic portal vein obstruction, although rare in children, is a significant cause of portal hypertension (PHT leading to life-threatening gastrointestinal bleeding in the pediatric age group. PHT may also lead to other complications such as hyperesplenism, cholangyopathy, ascites, and even hepatopulmonary syndrome and portopulmonary hypertension that may require organ transplantation. Herein we report the case of an asymptomatic 11-month-old infant wherein a hepatomegaly and cavernous transformation of the portal vein was detected by liver ultrasound. Neither signs of thrombosis in arteriovenous system, nor affectation of biliary tract were identified in the magnetic resonance imaging study. A significant enlargement of the caudate lobe of the liver was reported. No risk factors were detected. The differential diagnosis performed was extensive. Inherited thrombophilia and storage disorders were especially considered. Liver biopsy was normal. Upper gastrointestinal esophagogastroduodenoscopy detected two small varicose cords on the distal third of the esophagus. Finding a cavernous transformation of the portal vein with evidence of collateral circulation in such an early age is a challenging condition for professionals, since PHT may lead to severe complications during childhood and can compromise growth and development. Evidence-based guidelines for the management of PHT in adults have been published. However, follow-up and treatment of pediatric patients have not yet been standardized. Moreover, management of PHT in infants faces particular difficulties such as technical restrictions that could hinder their treatment.

  12. Community incidence of pathogen-specific gastroenteritis: reconstructing the surveillance pyramid for seven pathogens in seven European Union member states

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haagsma, J. A.; Geenen, P. L.; Ethelberg, S.

    2013-01-01

    By building reconstruction models for a case of gastroenteritis in the general population moving through different steps of the surveillance pyramid we estimated that millions of illnesses occur annually in the European population, leading to thousands of hospitalizations. We used data on the hea......By building reconstruction models for a case of gastroenteritis in the general population moving through different steps of the surveillance pyramid we estimated that millions of illnesses occur annually in the European population, leading to thousands of hospitalizations. We used data...

  13. Advanced Prostate Cancer Presenting as Hemolytic Uremic Syndrome

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    R. Ramos

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS is characterized by endothelial dysfunction, consumption thrombocytopenia, microangiopathic hemolytic anemia, and acute renal failure. HUS generally has a dismal prognosis, except when associated with gastroenteritis caused by verotoxin-producing bacteria. Cancer associated HUS is uncommon, and there are only scarce reports on prostate cancer presenting with HUS. Case Presentation. A 72-year-old man presented to the emergency department with oliguria, hematuria, and hematemesis. Clinical evaluation revealed acute renal failure, hemolysis, normal blood-clotting studies, and prostate-specific antigen value of 1000 ng/mL. The patient was started on hemodialysis, ultrafiltration with plasma exchange, and androgen blockade with bicalutamide and completely recovered from HUS. The authors review the 14 published cases on this association. Conclusion. The association of HUS and prostate cancer occurs more frequently in patients with high-grade, clinically advanced prostate cancer. When readily recognized and appropriately treated, HUS does not seem to worsen prognosis in prostate cancer patients.

  14. Hepatitis B virus induces IL-23 production in antigen presenting cells and causes liver damage via the IL-23/IL-17 axis.

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    Qinghong Wang

    Full Text Available IL-23 regulates myriad processes in the innate and adaptive immune systems, and is a critical mediator of the proinflammatory effects exerted by Th17 cells in many diseases. In this study, we investigated whether and how hepatitis B virus (HBV causes liver damage directly through the IL-23 signaling pathway. In biopsied liver tissues from HBV-infected patients, expression of both IL-23 and IL-23R was remarkably elevated. In vivo observations also indicated that the main sources of IL-23 were myeloid dendritic cells (mDCs and macrophages. Analysis of in vitro differentiated immature DCs and macrophages isolated from healthy donors revealed that the HBV surface antigen (HBsAg efficiently induces IL-23 secretion in a mannose receptor (MR-dependent manner. Culture with an endosomal acidification inhibitor and the dynamin inhibitor showed that, upon binding to the MR, the HBsAg is taken up by mDCs and macrophages through an endocytosis mechanism. In contrast, although the HBV core antigen (HBcAg can also stimulate IL-23 secretion from mDCs, the process was MR- and endocytosis-independent. In addition, IL-23 was shown to be indispensible for HBsAg-stimulated differentiation of naïve CD4(+ T cells into Th17 cells, which were determined to be the primary source of IL-17 in HBV-infected livers. The cognate receptor, IL-17R, was found to exist on the hepatic stellate cells and mDCs, both of which might represent the potential target cells of IL-17 in hepatitis B disease. These data provide novel insights into a yet unrecognized mechanism of HBV-induced hepatitis, by which increases in IL-23 expression, through an MR/endocytosis-dependent or -independent manner, produce liver damage through the IL-23/IL-17 axis.

  15. Multiplex Real-Time PCR Assay Targeting Eight Parasites Customized to the Korean Population: Potential Use for Detection in Diarrheal Stool Samples from Gastroenteritis Patients.

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    Eun Jeong Won

    Full Text Available Intestinal parasitic diseases occur worldwide and can cause diarrhea or gastroenteritis; however, their diagnosis is quite difficult, especially in low-endemism countries. We developed a multiplex real-time PCR assay for detection of eight intestinal parasites and prospectively evaluated it for patients with gastroenteritis. The assay targeted Cryptosporidium parvum, Giardia lamblia, Entamoeba histolytica, Blastocystis hominis, Dientamoeba fragilis, Clonorchis sinensis, Metagonimus yokogawai, and Gymnophalloides seoi. Performance characteristics were evaluated based on recovery after DNA extraction, analytical sensitivity, specificity, reproducibility, cross-reactivity, and interference characteristics. Clinical performance was validated against microscopy on 123 diarrheal samples. The assay demonstrated strong correlations between DNA concentrations and Ct values (R2, 0.9924-0.9998, and had a high PCR efficiency (83.3%-109.5%. Polymerase chain reactions detected as few as 10-30 copies of genomic DNA, and coefficient of variance was 0-7%. There was no cross-reactivity to the other 54 microorganisms tested. Interference occurred only in presence of high concentrations of erythrocytes or leukocytes. This assay had a higher correct identification rate (100.0% vs. 90.2% and lower incorrect ID rate (0.0% vs. 9.8% when compared to microscopy. Overall, this assay showed a higher sensitivity (100.0%; 95% confidence interval [CI] of 80.5-100.0 than microscopy (29.4%; 95% CI 10.31-55.96, and the specificity levels were comparable for both methods (100.0%; 95% CI 96.58-100.0. This newly developed multiplex real-time PCR assay offers a potential use for detecting intestinal parasitic pathogens customized to the Korean population.

  16. Burden of paediatric Rotavirus Gastroenteritis (RVGE and potential benefits of a universal Rotavirus vaccination programme with a pentavalent vaccine in Spain

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    Diez-Domingo Javier

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Rotavirus is the most common cause of gastroenteritis in young children worldwide. The aim of the study was to assess the health outcomes and the economic impact of a universal rotavirus vaccination programme with RotaTeq, the pentavalent rotavirus vaccine, versus no vaccination programme in Spain. Methods A birth cohort was followed up to the age of 5 using a cohort model. Epidemiological parameters were taken from the REVEAL study (a prospective epidemiological study conducted in Spain, 2004-2005 and from the literature. Direct and indirect costs were assessed from the national healthcare payer and societal perspectives by combining health care resource utilisation collected in REVEAL study and unit costs from official sources. RotaTeq per protocol efficacy data was taken from a large worldwide rotavirus clinical trial (70,000 children. Health outcomes included home care cases, General Practioner (GP/Paediatrician, emergency department visits, hospitalisations and nosocomial infections. Results The model estimates that the introduction of a universal rotavirus vaccination programme with RotaTeq (90% coverage rate would reduce the rotavirus gastroenteritis (RVGE burden by 75% in Spain; 53,692 home care cases, 35,187 GP/Paediatrician visits, 34,287 emergency department visits, 10,987 hospitalisations and 2,053 nosocomial infections would be avoided. The introduction of RotaTeq would avoid about 76% of RVGE-related costs from both perspectives: €22 million from the national health system perspective and €38 million from the societal perspective. Conclusions A rotavirus vaccination programme with RotaTeq would reduce significantly the important medical and economic burden of RVGE in Spain.

  17. Diapers in war zones: ethnomedical factors in acute childhood gastroenteritis in Peshawar, Pakistan.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saira H Zaidi

    Full Text Available This article considers ethnomedical knowledge and practices among parents related to contraction of acute gastroenteritis among children in Peshawar, Pakistan. Research methods included analysis of the Emergency Pediatric Services' admission register, a structured interview administered to 47 parents of patients seen in the Khyber Medical College Teaching Hospital, semi-structured interviews of 12 staff, and four home visits among families with children treated at the hospital. The use of native research assistants and participant observation contributed to the reliability of the findings, though the ethnographic, home-visit sample is small. Our research indicated that infection rates are exacerbated in homes through two culturally salient practices and one socioeconomic condition. Various misconceptions propagate the recurrence or perserverance of acute gastroenteritis including assumptions about teething leading to poor knowledge of disease etiology, rehydration solutions leading to increased severity of disease, and diaper usage leading to the spread of disease. In our Discussion, we suggest how hospital structures of authority and gender hierarchy may impact hospital interactions, the flow of information, and its respective importance to the patient's parents leading to possible propagation of disease. These ethnographic data offer a relatively brief but targeted course of action to improve the effectiveness of prevention and treatment efforts.

  18. Nationwide variation in the effects of temperature on infectious gastroenteritis incidence in Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onozuka, Daisuke; Hagihara, Akihito

    2015-08-01

    Although several studies have investigated the effects of temperature on the incidence of infectious gastrointestinal disease in a single city or region, few have investigated variations in this association using nationwide data. We obtained weekly data, gathered between 2000 and 2012, pertaining to infectious gastroenteritis cases and weather variability in all 47 Japanese prefectures. A two-stage analysis was used to assess the nonlinear and delayed relationship between temperature and morbidity. In the first stage, a Poisson regression allowing for overdispersion in a distributed lag nonlinear model was used to estimate the prefecture-specific effects of temperature on morbidity. In the second stage, a multivariate meta-analysis was applied to pool estimates at the national level. The pooled overall relative risk (RR) was highest in the 59.9th percentile of temperature (RR, 1.08; 95% CI: 1.01, 1.15). Meta-analysis results also indicated that the estimated pooled RR at lower temperatures (25th percentile) began immediately but did not persist, whereas an identical estimate at a higher temperature (75th percentile) was delayed but persisted for several weeks. Our results suggest that public health strategies aimed at controlling temperature-related infectious gastroenteritis may be more effective when tailored according to region-specific weather conditions.

  19. Rapid Intravenous Rehydration to Correct Dehydration and Resolve Vomiting in Children with Acute Gastroenteritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anoush AZARFAR

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available SUMMARY: Objectives: The objective of this study is to evaluate the effect of rapid intravenous rehydration to resolve vomiting in children with acute gastroenteritis. Methods: This randomized control trial was conducted in the pediatric emergency department in a tertiary care center in Tabriz, North-West of Iran. The study participants' were 150 children with acute gastroenteritis and vomiting who were moderately dehydrated, had not responded to oral rehydration therapy and without any electrolyte abnormalities. 20–30 cc/kg of a crystalloid solution was given intravenously over 2 hours and the control group was admitted in the emergency department (ED for a standard 24 hour hydration. Effectiveness of rapid intravenous rehydration in the resolution of vomiting in children with acute gastroenteritis was evaluated. Results: In 63 children of the intervention group (out of 75 vomiting was resolved after rapid IV rehydration and they were discharged. Among them, 12 that did not tolerate oral fluids were admitted. In the control group, 62 patients' vomiting was resolved in the first 4 hours after admission, and there was no significant difference between the two groups regarding resolution of vomiting. Conclusions: Rapid intravenous rehydration in children with moderate dehydration and vomiting due to gastroenteritis is effective in reducing admission rates in the ED. ÖZET: Amaç: Bu çalışmanın amacı, akut gastroenteritli çocuklarda, hızlı intravenöz rehidratasyon tedavisinin kusma üzerine etkisini değerlendirmektir. Gereç ve Yöntem: Bu randomize kontrollü çalışma İran'ın Kuzeybatısındaki Tebriz ilinde üçüncü basamak çocuk acil servisinde gerçekleştirildi. Çalışmaya orta derecede dehidrate, elektrolit anormalliği olmayan ve oral rehidrasyon tedavisine yanıt vermemiş akut gastroenteritli 150 çocuk katıldı. İki saat içinde intravenöz yolla 20–30 cc/kg kristaloid çözelti verildi ve kontrol grubu standart

  20. A study on environmental pollution caused by radioactive substances and its countermeasure techniques. Part 2. Present situation of radioactive pollution and decontamination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nozaki, Atsuo; Kakuma, Takayuki; Narita, Yasunori; Yoshino, Hiroshi

    2012-01-01

    In present research, in order to clarify the actual condition of contamination, the radioactive concentration of the soil and the plant in Koriyama city was measured. It turned out that the radioactive concentration of soil or plants were heavily polluted by caesium-134 and 137, and iodine-131 was already disappeared by its lifetime. Especially, cesium-134 + 137 was ranged 3400 Bq/kg at the surface of soil in garden, however, it was remarkably decreased in the deeper point at 10 cm and ranged 23 Bq/kg, and we cannot detect the cesium at 15 cm. It is necessary for people in Fukushima to decontaminate for reducing radioactivity level. And it turned out that the evergreen plants have been polluted at high radioactive concentration and decontamination by cutting down the plant was decreased by 14% average. Most of radioactive material is removed by removing soils. (author)

  1. Outbreak investigation in two groups of coach passengers with gastroenteritis returning from Germany to the Netherlands in February 2009.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Visser, H; Verhoef, L; Schop, W; Götz, H M

    2010-07-15

    In February 2009, an outbreak of 38 cases of gastroenteritis occurred among the participants of two Dutch coach trips (A and B) who visited the same hotel in Germany. We initiated an outbreak investigation to determine possible risk of food-borne infection. A retrospective cohort study was performed among 87 passengers using a self-administered questionnaire. The response rate was 75 of 87 (86%). Mean age was 65 years. Cases were defined as participants of the two coach trips who had diarrhoea and/or vomiting at least once within 24 hours in the period between 7 and 14 February 2009. We distinguished early and late cases, with symptoms starting within or after 72 hours of arrival in the hotel. Overall attack-rate was 38 of 75 (51%). Microbiological investigation was performed on stool samples of two passengers from Coach A and two passengers from Coach B. Identical norovirus genotype II.4 sequences were detected in all four samples. Univariate analysis revealed a potential risk for early cases from juice consumption , which was most clearly seen for Coach B on day of arrival (juice at lunch: relative risk (RR): 3.9, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.3-11.7; juice at dinner: RR: 5.5, 95% CI: 1.6-18.1). A dose-response relationship was found. This outbreak was probably caused by using the taps of juice served in large containers with a tap for self-service, due to environmental contamination through person-to-person transmission. Still the role of either contaminated juice or contact with contaminated juice cannot be ruled out.

  2. Diseases causing acute renal failure in a tertiary care hospital

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khan, G.; Hussain, K.; Rehman, A.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: This study was done to evaluate frequency of acute renal failure ( ARF ), its causes and out come of the patients. Study Design: Descriptive analytic study Place and Duration of Study: March to Dec 2007 at Combined Military Hospital Lahore. Patients and Methods: All patients, admitted in different wards of the hospital, who developed acute renal failure (doubling of serum creatinine measured on two occasions 12 hours apart), were included in this study. Results: A total of 39 patients were included in the study. Males were 19 (48.71%) and 20 (51.28%) were female. Mean age of patients was 40.2 years (SD=18.0). The major cause was acute Gastroenteritis seen in 23 (58.97%) cases. Others developed ARF due to, Abruptio Placentae 5 (12.82%), Postoperative 5 (12.82%), Eclampsia 3 (7.69%) and Drug induced 3 (7.69%) . Oliguric phase developed in 28 (71.79%) patients and lasted for 8.45 +- 4.16 days. Of these 17 (60.71%) patients had acute gastroenteritis. Conclusion: Gastroenteritis is the most common and important cause of ARF though gynaecological and surgical etiologies must be kept in mind. It is evident that the gynaecological and surgical patients need critical peri-partum and peri-operative monitoring to prevent development of ARF. Early institution of therapy will prevent subsequent morbidity associated with this disease. (author)

  3. A Comparative Study of Clinical Presentation and Risk Factors for Adverse Outcome in Patients Hospitalised with Acute Respiratory Disease Due to MERS Coronavirus or Other Causes.

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    Musa A Garbati

    Full Text Available Middle East Respiratory syndrome (MERS first emerged in Saudi Arabia in 2012 and remains a global health concern. The objective of this study was to compare the clinical features and risk factors for adverse outcome in patients with RT-PCR confirmed MERS and in those with acute respiratory disease who were MERS-CoV negative, presenting to the King Fahad Medical City (KFMC in Riyadh between October 2012 and May 2014. The demographics, clinical and laboratory characteristics and clinical outcomes of patients with RT-PCR confirmed MERS-CoV infection was compared with those testing negative MERS-CoV PCR. Health care workers (HCW with MERS were compared with MERS patients who were not health care workers. One hundred and fifty nine patients were eligible for inclusion. Forty eight tested positive for MERS CoV, 44 (92% being hospital acquired infections and 23 were HCW. There were 111 MERS-CoV negative patients with acute respiratory illnesses included in this study as "negative controls". Patient with confirmed MERS-CoV infection were not clinically distinguishable from those with negative MERS-CoV RT-PCR results although diarrhoea was commoner in MERS patients. A high level of suspicion in initiating laboratory tests for MERS-CoV is therefore indicated. Variables associated with adverse outcome were older age and diabetes as a co-morbid illness. Interestingly, co-morbid illnesses other than diabetes were not significantly associated with poor outcome. Health care workers with MERS had a markedly better clinical outcome compared to non HCW MERS patients.

  4. Attitudes and beliefs of Australian adults on reality television cooking programmes and celebrity chefs. Is there cause for concern? Descriptive analysis presented from a consumer survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villani, A M; Egan, T; Keogh, J B; Clifton, P M

    2015-08-01

    There is evidence suggesting that the nutritional content of recipes promoted by celebrity chefs or television cooking programmes contradict healthy eating guidelines. This study aims to investigate people's attitudes and beliefs about popular television cooking programmes and celebrity chefs. Males and females who watch television cooking programmes were recruited to participate in a self-administered online questionnaire (22-items) which included multiple-choice and rank order questions. A total of n = 207 participants undertook the questionnaire with fully completed questionnaires available for n = 150 participants (Males, n = 22; Females, n = 128; aged 38.4 ± 14 years). The majority of respondents watch ≤30 minutes of television cooking programming per day (total responses, n = 153/207; 74%) with almost three-quarters (total responses, n = 130/175; 74%) having attempted a recipe. New cooking ideas (total responses, n = 81/175; 46%) and entertainment (total responses, n = 64/175; 36.5%) were the two main reasons participants gave for watching these programmes. Significantly more respondents believed recipes use excessive amounts of unhealthy fat, sugar or salt (unhealthy: 24%; healthy: 7%; P cooking programmes and celebrity chefs are unlikely to impact habitual dietary intake; rather, vicarious viewing and entertainment appear important factors relating to why people watch these programmes. However results generated from the present study are descriptive and subjective and further investigation into the impact of television cooking programmes and celebrity chefs on behavioural change requires attention. Further investigation including a systematic investigation into the dietary quality of recipes promoted by celebrity chefs against national healthy eating benchmarks is also warranted. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Viral Gastroenteritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... still have diarrhea. Most experts do not recommend fasting or following a restricted diet. Clinical Trials The National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK) and other components of the National Institutes of Health (NIH) conduct and support research into many diseases ...

  6. Permeability of the small intestine to [51Cr]EDTA in children with acute gastroenteritis or eczema

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Forget, P.; Sodoyez-Goffaux, F.; Zappitelli, A.

    1985-01-01

    Increased gut permeability to macromolecules is thought to be an important factor in the development of food hypersensitivity. The latter can develop in the course of acute gastroenteritis and could play a role in infantile eczema. The authors studied gut permeability in 10 normal adults, 11 control children, 7 children with acute gastroenteritis, and 8 patients with infantile eczema, making use of [ 51 Cr]EDTA as probe molecule. [ 51 Cr]EDTA was given orally (50-100 microCi); 24-h urinary excretion of [ 51 Cr]EDTA was measured and expressed as a percentage of the oral dose. Mean and standard error were 2.35 +/- 0.24, 2.51 +/- 0.21, 9.96 +/- 3.44, and 10.90 +/- 2.05 in normal adults, control children, and gastroenteritis and eczema patients, respectively. Differences between controls and either gastroenteritis (p less than 0.001) or eczema (p less than 0.001) patients are significant. The results support the hypothesis that increased gut permeability could play a role in food hypersensitivity

  7. Efficacy of intravenous ondansetron to prevent vomiting episodes in acute gastroenteritis: a randomized, double blind, and controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanguansak Rerksuppaphol

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Acute gastroenteritis is one of the most common infectious diseases of childhood. Its symptoms are vomiting, diarrhea, and dehydration. In the emergency ward, intravenous rather than oral rehydration is usually preferred because of the high likelihood of emesis. Treatments to reduce emesis are of value in improving the rehydration procedure. Our study is a double-blind randomized trial and proposes the use of ondansetron as an anti-emetic drug to treat children with acute gastroenteritis. Seventy-four in-patients, aged 3 months to 15 years, were enrolled and randomly assigned to an ondansetron or placebo group. Inclusion criteria were the diagnosis of acute gastroenteritis and the absence of other diseases or allergies to drugs. A single bolus (0.15 mg/kg of ondansetron was injected intravenously; normal 0.9% saline solution was used as a placebo. This treatment induced vomiting cessation in the ondansetron group significantly in comparison to the placebo group. The length of the hospital stay and the oral rehydration fluid volume were similar in the two groups and no adverse effects were noticed. Thus, safety, low cost, and overall bene­fit of ondansetron treatment suggests that this drug can be administered successfully to children with acute gastroenteritis.

  8. Guidelines on acute gastroenteritis in children: A critical appraisal of their quality and applicability in primary care

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J. van den Berg (José); M.Y. Berger (Marjolein)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Reasons for poor guideline adherence in acute gastroenteritis (AGE) in children in high-income countries are unclear, but may be due to inconsistency between guideline recommendations, lack of evidence, and lack of generalizability of the recommendations to general practice.

  9. Implementation of clinical decision support in young children with acute gastroenteritis: a randomized controlled trial at the emergency department

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D.H.F. Geurts (Dorien); E. De Vos-Kerkhof (Evelien); S. Polinder (Suzanne); E.W. Steyerberg (Ewout); J. van der Lei (Johan); H.A. Moll (Henriëtte); R. Oostenbrink (Rianne)

    2017-01-01

    textabstractAcute gastroenteritis (AGE) is one of the most frequent reasons for young children to visit emergency departments (EDs). We aimed to evaluate (1) feasibility of a nurse-guided clinical decision support system for rehydration treatment in children with AGE and (2) the impact on

  10. BROTE DE GASTROENTERITIS POR VIRUS NORWALK EN UNA RESIDENCIA DE ANCIANOS DE GRANADA

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    Diego Almagro Nievas

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available vírico son actualmente uno de los problemas de salud que más están afectando a las personas residentes en instituciones de la tercera edad. El objetivo del estudio es investigar las causas del origen y transmisión de un brote de gastroenteritis aguda por virus Norwal- Like. Método: En una residencia de ancianos con 141 residentes y 71 trabajadores expuestos, se investigó la relación entre un brote de gastroenteritis aguda y distintas variables: características personales, de lugar, fecha de inicio de los síntomas, clínica de la enfermedad y factores causales (alimentos y agua de consumo. Se realizó un estudio descriptivo, tabla de contingencia y test de hipótesis 2, diseño de casos y controles con el calculo de Odds Ratio cruda y posteriormente ajustada (IC al 95% utilizando regresión logística. Resultados: No se observaron diferencias significativas en las variables de características personales y de lugar. La tasa de ataque en los residentes fue del 30,1% y en trabajadores fue del 21,12%. En el calculo de la Odds Ratio ajustada sólo tuvo valores de relación causal la mousse de nata (Odds Ratio ajustada=4,66; IC-95% 1,15- 18,91; p=0,031. Se remitieron 10 muestras de heces de enfermos para su análisis, no detectándose ninguna bacteria patógena, pero si se aisló en 3 de ellas virus Norwal-Like. Conclusiones: El hallazgo de la mousse de nata como posible responsable del brote supone una primicia en la presencia de virus Norwalk, pero este resultado está sujeto a limitaciones, como el posible sesgo de clasificación por no recuerdo de consumo de alimentos. Aún así, supone un elemento a tener en cuenta en el control de gastroenteritis agudas por virus.

  11. External validation of the clinical dehydration scale for children with acute gastroenteritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, Benoit; Gravel, Jocelyn; Goldman, Ran D; Friedman, Jeremy N; Parkin, Patricia C

    2010-06-01

    The objective was to validate the clinical dehydration scale (CDS) for children with gastroenteritis in a different pediatric emergency department (ED) from where it was initially derived and validated. A prospective cohort study was performed in a tertiary care pediatric ED over a 1-year period. A sample of triage nurses were trained in applying the CDS. The CDS consists of four clinical characteristics (general appearance, eyes, mucous membranes, and tears), each of which are scored 0, 1, or 2 for a total score of 0 to 8, with 0 representing no dehydration; 1 to 4, some dehydration; and 5 to 8, moderate/severe dehydration. Children 1 month to 5 years of age with vomiting and/or diarrhea who had the CDS documented at triage and a final diagnosis of gastroenteritis, gastritis, or enteritis were enrolled. Exclusion criteria included a chronic disease, treatment with intravenous (IV) rehydration within the previous 24 hours, visit to the ED for the same illness in the 7 days prior to arrival, and diarrhea of more than 10 days' duration. The primary outcome was the length of stay (LOS) in the ED from the time of seeing a physician to discharge, analyzed with a Kruskal-Wallis test. From April 2008 to March 2009, 150 patients with a mean (+/-SD) age of 22 (+/-14) months (range = 4 months to 4 years) were enrolled. Fifty-six patients had no dehydration, 74 had some dehydration, and 20 had moderate/severe dehydration. The median LOS in the ED after being seen by a physician was significantly longer as children appeared more dehydrated according to the CDS: 54 minutes (interquartile range [IQR] = 26-175 minutes), 128 minutes (IQR = 25-334 minutes), and 425 minutes (IQR = 218-673 minutes) for the no, some, and moderate/severe dehydration groups, respectively (p children with gastroenteritis in a different pediatric center than the original one where it was developed. It is a good predictor of LOS in the ED after being seen by a physician. (c) 2010 by the Society for

  12. The Usefulness of Clinical and Laboratory Parameters for Predicting Severity of Dehydration in Children with Acute Gastroenteritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoxha, Teuta Faik; Azemi, Mehmedali; Avdiu, Muharrem; Ismaili-jaha, Vlora; Grajqevci, Violeta; Petrela, Ela

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Background: An accurate assessment of the degree of dehydration in infants and children is important for proper decision-making and treatment. This emphasizes the need for laboratory tests to improve the accuracy of clinical assessment of dehydration. The aim of this study was to assess the relationship between clinical and laboratory parameters in the assessment of dehydration. Methods: We evaluated prospectively 200 children aged 1 month to 5 years who presented with diarrhea, vomiting or both. Dehydration assessment was done following a known clinical scheme. Results: We enrolled in the study 200 children (57.5% were male). The mean age was 15.62±9.03 months, with more than half those studied being under 24 months old. Overall, 46.5% (93) had mild dehydration, 34% (68) had moderate dehydration, 5.5% (11) had severe dehydration whereas, 14% (28) had no dehydration. Patients historical clinical variables in all dehydration groups did not differ significantly regarding age, sex, fever, frequency of vomiting, duration of diarrhea and vomiting, while there was a trend toward severe dehydration in children with more frequent diarrhea (p=0.004). Serum urea and creatinine cannot discriminate between mild and moderate dehydration but they showed a good specificity for severe dehydration of 99% and 100% respectively. Serum bicarbonates and base excess decreased significantly with a degree of dehydration and can discriminate between all dehydration groups (P<0.001). Conclusion: Blood gases were useful to diagnose the degree of dehydration status among children presenting with acute gastroenteritis. Serum urea and creatinine were the most specific tests for severe dehydration diagnosis. Historical clinical patterns apart from frequency of diarrhea did not correlate with dehydration status. Further studies are needed to validate our results. PMID:25568559

  13. Comparative efficacy of crystalloid and colloid-crystalloid combination for the management of hemorrhagic gastroenteritis in dogs

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    Chandreyee Sen

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Aim: In the present study, a therapeutic trial was conducted to assess comparative efficacy of crystalloid plus colloid and crystalloid intravenous infusions alone as fluid therapy in dogs suffering from hemorrhagic gastroenteritis (HGE. Materials and Methods: 20 dogs manifesting HGE, presented at Teaching Veterinary Clinical Services Complex, Ludhiana, Punjab, were selected randomly for the trial. All of them were observed to suffer from moderate dehydration on clinical examination. Crystalloids 5% DNS and RL were used in combination with polygelin 3.5% colloidal solution in the first group (Combination I and in the second group, the afore-said crystalloids (Combination II were used, both groups consisting of 10 cases each. Antibiotics and symptomatic treatment were same for all the 20 cases. The outcome of both treatment groups was evaluated on hemato-biochemical parameters, before and after administration of the therapies and compared statistically within and between the two groups. Hemato-biochemical parameters of eight clinically healthy animals were considered as control for comparison. Result: On hemato-biochemical examination, significant alterations were observed in leucogram, platelet and serum globulin concentration after the treatment in the first group as compared to before treatment values. In the second group, mean hemoglobin varied significantly after the treatment. After therapies were administered, significant difference in serum globulin level and albumin: Globulin was found in between the treatment groups (Combination I and Combination II. Clinical recovery was faster in the first group than the second group of animals. Conclusion: On hemodynamic and laboratory data, efficacies of both the fluid therapies were equivocal. Colloidal solutions may hasten recovery in small animals suffering from gastrointestinal crisis.

  14. Changes in the epidemiology of gastroenteritis in a paediatric short stay unit following the introduction of rotavirus immunisation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akikusa, Jonathan D; Hopper, Sandy M; Kelly, Julian J; Kirkwood, Carl D; Buttery, Jim P

    2013-02-01

    Acute gastroenteritis (AGE) has been a significant component of the clinical load in the short stay unit (SSU) at the Royal Children's Hospital (RCH) since its establishment in 2004. Since the introduction of routine rotavirus immunisation in Australia in 2007 there has been a clinical impression of a substantial reduction in AGE managed in the SSU. This study aimed to examine changes in the epidemiology of AGE in the SSU, and RCH overall, between 2005 and 2009 and explore whether this reflects a change specifically in AGE due to rotavirus. Discharge coding data for AGE from all inpatient wards, the SSU and emergency department (ED) at the RCH were examined. Stool virology results for the same period were analysed. Since 2007 there has been a 58% reduction in AGE admissions to the SSU. The median age of patients admitted to the RCH with rotaviral enteritis has increased from 1.3 years to 3.8 years. Presentations to the ED for AGE have fallen from 53 to 34 cases per 1000 attendances between 2004 and 2009, and admission rates from the ED have fallen from 23 to 13% of AGE presentations. Detection rates of rotavirus fell from 13.1 to 6.7% between 2005 and 2009. A marked decrease in AGE-related clinical activity and reduction in rotavirus detection at the RCH has occurred since the introduction of routine rotavirus immunisation in Australia. This has significant resource planning implications for units based on short stay models of care. © 2013 The Authors. Journal of Paediatrics and Child Health © 2013 Paediatrics and Child Health Division (Royal Australasian College of Physicians).

  15. Guidelines on acute gastroenteritis in children: a critical appraisal of their quality and applicability in primary care

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    van den Berg José

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Reasons for poor guideline adherence in acute gastroenteritis (AGE in children in high-income countries are unclear, but may be due to inconsistency between guideline recommendations, lack of evidence, and lack of generalizability of the recommendations to general practice. The aim of this study was to assess the quality of international guidelines on AGE in children and investigate the generalizability of the recommendations to general practice. Methods Guidelines were retrieved from websites of professional medical organisations and websites of institutes involved in guideline development. In addition, a systematic search of the literature was performed. Articles were selected if they were a guideline, consensus statement or care protocol. Results Eight guidelines met the inclusion criteria, the quality of the guidelines varied. 242 recommendations on diagnosis and management were found, of which 138 (57% were based on evidence. There is a large variety in the classification of symptoms to different categories of dehydration. No signs are generalizable to general practice. It is consistently recommended to use hypo-osmolar ORS, however, the recommendations on ORS-dosage are not evidence based and are inconsistent. One of 14 evidence based recommendations on therapy of AGE is based on outpatient research and is therefore generalizable to general practice. Conclusions The present study shows considerable variation in the quality of guidelines on AGE in children, as well as inconsistencies between the recommendations. It remains unclear how to asses the extent of dehydration and determine the preferred treatment or referral of a young child with AGE presenting in general practice.

  16. The usefulness of clinical and laboratory parameters for predicting severity of dehydration in children with acute gastroenteritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoxha, Teuta Faik; Azemi, Mehmedali; Avdiu, Muharrem; Ismaili-Jaha, Vlora; Grajqevci, Violeta; Petrela, Ela

    2014-10-01

    An accurate assessment of the degree of dehydration in infants and children is important for proper decision-making and treatment. This emphasizes the need for laboratory tests to improve the accuracy of clinical assessment of dehydration. The aim of this study was to assess the relationship between clinical and laboratory parameters in the assessment of dehydration. We evaluated prospectively 200 children aged 1 month to 5 years who presented with diarrhea, vomiting or both. Dehydration assessment was done following a known clinical scheme. We enrolled in the study 200 children (57.5% were male). The mean age was 15.62±9.03 months, with more than half those studied being under 24 months old. Overall, 46.5% (93) had mild dehydration, 34% (68) had moderate dehydration, 5.5% (11) had severe dehydration whereas, 14% (28) had no dehydration. Patients historical clinical variables in all dehydration groups did not differ significantly regarding age, sex, fever, frequency of vomiting, duration of diarrhea and vomiting, while there was a trend toward severe dehydration in children with more frequent diarrhea (p=0.004). Serum urea and creatinine cannot discriminate between mild and moderate dehydration but they showed a good specificity for severe dehydration of 99% and 100% respectively. Serum bicarbonates and base excess decreased significantly with a degree of dehydration and can discriminate between all dehydration groups (Pdehydration status among children presenting with acute gastroenteritis. Serum urea and creatinine were the most specific tests for severe dehydration diagnosis. Historical clinical patterns apart from frequency of diarrhea did not correlate with dehydration status. Further studies are needed to validate our results.

  17. Genetic Relatedness Among Shiga Toxin-Producing Escherichia coli Isolated Along the Animal Food Supply Chain and in Gastroenteritis Cases in Qatar Using Multilocus Sequence Typing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palanisamy, Srikanth; Chang, YuChen; Scaria, Joy; Penha Filho, Rafael Antonio Casarin; Peters, Kenlyn E; Doiphode, Sanjay H; Sultan, Ali; Mohammed, Hussni O

    2017-06-01

    Pathogenic Escherichia coli has been listed among the most important bacteria associated with foodborne illnesses around the world. We investigated the genetic relatedness among Shiga toxin-producing E. coli (STEC) isolated along the animal food supply chain and from humans diagnosed with gastroenteritis in Qatar. Samples were collected from different sources along the food supply chain and from patients admitted to the hospital with complaints of gastroenteritis. All samples were screened for the presence of E. coli O157:H7 and non-O157 STEC using a combination of bacterial enrichment and molecular detection techniques. A proportional sampling approach was used to select positive samples from each source for further multilocus sequence typing (MLST) analysis. Seven housekeeping genes described for STEC were amplified by polymerase chain reaction, sequenced, and analyzed by MLST. Isolates were characterized by allele composition, sequence type (ST) and assessed for epidemiologic relationship within and among different sources. Nei's genetic distance was calculated at the allele level between sample pools in each site downstream. E. coli O157:H7 occurred at a higher rate in slaughterhouse and retail samples than at the farm or in humans in our sampling. The ST171, an ST common to enterotoxigenic E. coli and atypical enteropathogenic E. coli, was the most common ST (15%) in the food supply chain. None of the genetic distances among the different sources was statistically significant. Enterohemorrhagic E. coli pathogenic strains are present along the supply chain at different levels and with varying relatedness. Clinical isolates were the most diverse, as expected, considering the polyclonal diversity in the human microbiota. The high occurrence of these food adulterants among the farm products suggests that implementation of sanitary measures at that level might reduce the risk of human exposure.

  18. Small round structured virus associated with an outbreak of acute gastroenteritis in Chiba, Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasuga, K; Tokieda, M; Ohtawara, M; Utagawa, E; Yamazaki, S

    1990-08-01

    In an outbreak of acute gastroenteritis which originated in a restaurant in Chiba, Japan, in December, 1987, small round structured virus (SRSV) particles were observed by electron microscopy in 14 of 16 stool specimens from patients. The particles were 30 to 35 nm in diameter, possessed amorphous surface structure surrounded by fine projections and had a buoyant density of 1.36 to 1.37 g/ml in cesium chloride. Serological responses to the SRSV were found by immune electron microscopy and Western blot (WB) assay in paired sera of 12 of 19 patients. Furthermore, WB analysis revealed that the antibody against SRSV was cross-reactive to other SRSV, Tokyo 86/510.

  19. Effectiveness of granisetron in controlling pediatric gastroenteritis-related vomiting after discharge from the ED.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qazi, Khajista; BinSalleeh, Hashim M; Shah, Ubaid H; AlGhamedi, Najwa; Tamim, Hani; Mubasher, Mohamed; Alrasheed, Faris; Alkanhal, Abdulrahman; AlTamimi, Saleh A

    2014-09-01

    The objective of the study is to determine the efficacy of oral granisetron (a long-acting 5-HT3 receptor antagonist) in stopping vomiting subsequent to discharge from emergency department (ED), in 6-month-old to 8-year-old patients with gastroenteritis-related vomiting and dehydration, who had failed an initial trial of oral rehydration (ORT). Eligible patients were offered ORT on a slowly advancing schedule. Patients who tolerated the initial ORT were discharged home. Patients who vomited were randomized to receive either 40 μg/kg of granisetron or placebo, and ORT was resumed. Patients who tolerated the postrandomization ORT were discharged home with another dose of the study drug. Parents were contacted by telephone every 24 hours until complete resolution of symptoms. The primary outcome was the proportion of patients with vomiting at 24 hours. Of the 900 eligible patients, 537 (60%) tolerated the initial ORT and were discharged home. Of the patients who vomited during the initial ORT, 165 were included in the final study sample (placebo, n = 82; granisetron, n = 83). There was no statistically significant difference in the proportion of patients with vomiting at 24 hours (granisetron, n = 38; placebo, n = 45; odds ratio, 0.64; 95% confidence interval, 0.34-1.19; P = .16). A similar trend in the proportion of patients with vomiting was noted for the entire follow-up period (granisetron, n = 43; placebo, n = 47; odds ratio, 0.73; P = .33; 95% confidence interval, 0.39-1.36). Granisetron was not effective in controlling gastroenteritis-related vomiting subsequent to discharge from ED. It did not change the expected course of the illness. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Detection and characterisation of novel bocavirus (genus Bocaparvovirus and gastroenteritis viruses from asymptomatic pigs in Ireland

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    Lynda Gunn

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Livestock animals have been the assumed source of several human epidemics in recent years, for example, influenza H1N1, rotavirus G8/G9, and MERS-CoV. Surveillance of novel viruses in animals is essential to evaluate the risk to human and animal health and to determine any economic impact, for example, failure to thrive. There is a paucity of data regarding detection and characterisation of gastroenteritis viruses, particularly novel viruses, in porcines in Ireland. Recently, a number of small novel porcine DNA viruses have emerged globally, for example, torque teno sus virus, porcine bocavirus, and parvoviruses 2 & 4, and little is known about the biology and potential pathogenicity of these viruses. Bocaparvovirus is a genetically distinct group of viruses which has been recently detected in humans and animals. Methods: In this study, the presence of gastroenteritis viruses (rotavirus A, porcine circovirus, adenovirus, and porcine bocavirus was investigated in a selection of archived faecal samples from asymptomatic piglets from a commercial farm in Ireland. A total of 104 specimens were pooled and screened using conventional molecular techniques (PCR and RT-PCR, a subset of specimens (n=44 were then examined individually. Viral diversity was then investigated using statistical and phylogenetic techniques. Results: Initial screening showed a high prevalence of PBoV in this farm, with the formation of three distinct groups in phylogenetic analysis. Other viruses were also investigated in this study with the first report of PCV, PAdV and lineage I G5 RVA in Ireland. Some specimens contained >1 virus, with statistical analysis indicating a strong correlation for mixed infections of PBoV and PAdV on this farm. Conclusion: Investigating the diversity of circulating enteric viruses on Irish porcine farms is important to improve the prophylactic tools available and to facilitate the early detection of changes in circulating viruses.

  1. Epidemiologic Association Between FUT2 Secretor Status and Severe Rotavirus Gastroenteritis in Children in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Payne, Daniel C.; Currier, Rebecca L.; Staat, Mary A.; Sahni, Leila C.; Selvarangan, Rangaraj; Halasa, Natasha B.; Englund, Janet A.; Weinberg, Geoffrey A.; Boom, Julie A.; Szilagyi, Peter G.; Klein, Eileen J.; Chappell, James; Harrison, Christopher J.; Davidson, Barbara S.; Mijatovic-Rustempasic, Slavica; Moffatt, Mary D.; McNeal, Monica; Wikswo, Mary; Bowen, Michael D.; Morrow, Ardythe L.; Parashar, Umesh D.

    2016-01-01

    IMPORTANCE A genetic polymorphism affecting FUT2 secretor status in approximately one-quarter of humans of European descent affects the expression of histo-blood group antigens on the mucosal epithelia of human respiratory, genitourinary, and digestive tracts. These histo-blood group antigens serve as host receptor sites necessary for attachment and infection of some pathogens, including norovirus. OBJECTIVE We investigated whether an association exists between FUT2 secretor status and laboratory-confirmed rotavirus infections in US children. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS Multicenter case-control observational study involving active surveillance at 6 US pediatric medical institutions in the inpatient and emergency department clinical settings. We enrolled 1564 children younger than 5 years with acute gastroenteritis (diarrhea and/or vomiting) and 818 healthy controls frequency matched by age and month, from December 1, 2011, through March 31, 2013. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES Paired fecal-saliva specimens were tested for rotavirus and for secretor status. Comparisons were made between rotavirus test–positive cases and healthy controls stratified by ethnicity and vaccination status. Adjusted multivariable analyses assessed the preventive association of secretor status against severe rotavirus gastroenteritis. RESULTS One (0.5%) of 189 rotavirus test–positive cases was a nonsecretor, compared with 188 (23%) of 818 healthy control participants (P < .001). Healthy control participants of Hispanic ethnicity were significantly less likely to be nonsecretors (13%) compared with healthy children who were not of Hispanic ethnicity (25%) (P < .001). After controlling for vaccination and other factors, children with the nonsecretor FUT2 polymorphism appeared statistically protected (98% [95% CI, 84%–100%]) against severe rotavirus gastroenteritis. CONCLUSIONS AND RELEVANCE Severe rotavirus gastroenteritis was virtually absent among US children who had a genetic

  2. Persistent Transmissible Gastroenteritis Virus Infection Enhances Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli K88 Adhesion by Promoting Epithelial-Mesenchymal Transition in Intestinal Epithelial Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Lu; Dai, Lei; Yu, Qinghua; Yang, Qian

    2017-11-01

    Transmissible gastroenteritis virus (TGEV) is a coronavirus characterized by diarrhea and high morbidity rates, and the mortality rate is 100% in piglets less than 2 weeks old. Pigs infected with TGEV often suffer secondary infection by other pathogens, which aggravates the severity of diarrhea, but the mechanisms remain unknown. Here, we hypothesized that persistent TGEV infection stimulates the epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT), and thus enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) can more easily adhere to generating cells. Intestinal epithelial cells are the primary targets of TGEV and ETEC infections. We found that TGEV can persistently infect porcine intestinal columnar epithelial cells (IPEC-J2) and cause EMT, consistent with multiple changes in key cell characteristics. Infected cells display fibroblast-like shapes; exhibit increases in levels of mesenchymal markers with a corresponding loss of epithelial markers; have enhanced expression levels of interleukin-1β (IL-1β), IL-6, IL-8, transforming growth factor β (TGF-β), and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) mRNAs; and demonstrate increases in migratory and invasive behaviors. Additional experiments showed that the activation of the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K)/Akt and extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) signaling pathways via TGF-β is critical for the TGEV-mediated EMT process. Cellular uptake is also modified in cells that have undergone EMT. TGEV-infected cells have higher levels of integrin α5 and fibronectin and exhibit enhanced ETEC K88 adhesion. Reversal of EMT reduces ETEC K88 adhesion and inhibits the expression of integrin α5 and fibronectin. Overall, these results suggest that TGEV infection induces EMT in IPEC-J2 cells, increasing the adhesion of ETEC K88 in the intestine and facilitating dual infection. IMPORTANCE Transmissible gastroenteritis virus (TGEV) causes pig diarrhea and is often followed by secondary infection by other pathogens. In this study, we showed

  3. Rotavirus specific plasma secretory immunoglobulin in children with acute gastroenteritis and children vaccinated with an attenuated human rotavirus vaccine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrera, Daniel; Vásquez, Camilo; Corthésy, Blaise; Franco, Manuel A; Angel, Juana

    2013-01-01

    Rotavirus (RV)–specific secretory immunoglobulin (RV-SIg) has been previously detected in serum of naturally RV infected children and shown to reflect the intestinal Ig immune response. Total plasma SIgA and plasma RV-SIg were evaluated by ELISA in children with gastroenteritis due or not due to RV infection and in 50 children vaccinated with the attenuated RIX4414 human RV vaccine and 62 placebo recipients. RV-SIg was only detected in children with evidence of previous RV infection or with acute RV gastroenteritis. Vaccinees had higher RV-SIg titers than placebo recipients and RV-SIg titers increased after the second vaccine dose. RV-SIg measured after the second dose correlated with protection when vaccinees and placebo recipients were analyzed jointly. RV-SIg may serve as a valuable correlate of protection for RV vaccines. PMID:23839157

  4. Oral ondansetron versus domperidone for symptomatic treatment of vomiting during acute gastroenteritis in children: multicentre randomized controlled trial

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    Urbino Antonio

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Vomiting in children with acute gastroenteritis (AG is not only a direct cause of fluid loss but it is also a major factor of failure of oral rehydration therapy (ORT. Physicians who provide care to paediatric patients in the emergency department (ED usually prescribe intravenous fluid therapy (IVT for mild or moderate dehydration when vomiting is the major symptom. Thus, effective symptomatic treatment of vomiting would lead to an important reduction in the use of IVT and, consequently, of the duration of hospital stay and of frequency of hospital admission. Available evidence on symptomatic treatment of vomiting shows the efficacy of the most recently registered molecule (ondansetron but a proper evaluation of antiemetics drugs largely used in clinical practice, such as domperidone, is lacking. Objectives To compare the efficacy of ondansetron and domperidone for the symptomatic treatment of vomiting in children with AG who have failed ORT. Methods/Design Multicentre, double-blind randomized controlled trial conducted in paediatric EDs. Children aged from 1 to 6 years who vomiting, with a presumptive clinical diagnosis of AG, and without severe dehydration will be included. After the failure of a initial ORS administration in ED, eligible children will be randomized to receive: 1 ondansetron syrup (0,15 mg/Kg of body weight; 2 domperidone syrup (0,5 mg/Kg of body weight; 3 placebo. The main study outcome will be the percentage of patients needing nasogastric or IVT after symptomatic oral treatment failure, defined as vomiting or fluid refusal after a second attempt of ORT. Data relative to study outcomes will be collected at 30 minute intervals for a minimum of 6 hours. A telephone follow up call will be made 48 hours after discharge. A total number of 540 children (i.e. 180 patients in each arm will be enrolled. Discussion The trial results would provide evidence on the efficacy of domperidone, which is largely used in

  5. Outbreak of SRSV gastroenteritis at an international conference traced to food handled by a post-symptomatic caterer.

    OpenAIRE

    Patterson, T.; Hutchings, P.; Palmer, S.

    1993-01-01

    In an outbreak of small round structured virus (SRSV) gastroenteritis at an international AIDS conference 67 people were ill with diarrhoea or vomiting, one requiring admission to hospital. Epidemiological investigations demonstrated that the vehicle of infection was food prepared by a foodhandler who was recovering from a mild gastrointestinal illness. The food most strongly associated with illness, coronation chicken, was prepared by the food handler on the second day after symptoms ceased....

  6. The Hidden Health and Economic Burden of Rotavirus Gastroenteritis in Malaysia: An Estimation Using Multiple Data Sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loganathan, Tharani; Ng, Chiu-Wan; Lee, Way-Seah; Jit, Mark

    2016-06-01

    Rotavirus gastroenteritis (RVGE) results in substantial mortality and morbidity worldwide. However, an accurate estimation of the health and economic burden of RVGE in Malaysia covering public, private and home treatment is lacking. Data from multiple sources were used to estimate diarrheal mortality and morbidity according to health service utilization. The proportion of this burden attributable to rotavirus was estimated from a community-based study and a meta-analysis we conducted of primary hospital-based studies. Rotavirus incidence was determined by multiplying acute gastroenteritis incidence with estimates of the proportion of gastroenteritis attributable to rotavirus. The economic burden of rotavirus disease was estimated from the health systems and societal perspective. Annually, rotavirus results in 27 deaths, 31,000 hospitalizations, 41,000 outpatient visits and 145,000 episodes of home-treated gastroenteritis in Malaysia. We estimate an annual rotavirus incidence of 1 death per 100,000 children and 12 hospitalizations, 16 outpatient clinic visits and 57 home-treated episodes per 1000 children under-5 years. Annually, RVGE is estimated to cost US$ 34 million to the healthcare provider and US$ 50 million to society. Productivity loss contributes almost a third of costs to society. Publicly, privately and home-treated episodes consist of 52%, 27% and 21%, respectively, of the total societal costs. RVGE represents a considerable health and economic burden in Malaysia. Much of the burden lies in privately or home-treated episodes and is poorly captured in previous studies. This study provides vital information for future evaluation of cost-effectiveness, which are necessary for policy-making regarding universal vaccination.

  7. Outbreak of gastroenteritis in Tibetan transit school, dharamshala, Himachal Pradesh, India, 2006

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    Gupta Surender

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: On 28 th June, 2006, 55 cases of the gastroenteritis were reported among the hostellers of the Tibetan Transit School, Dharamshala. We investigated the outbreak to identify the source, propose control and preventive measures. Materials and Methods: We defined a case of the gastroenteritis as the occurrence of more than three smelly loose motions between 28 th June to 2 nd July, 2006 among some sections of the resident hostellers. We determined age and sex specific attack rate. We hypothesized it as a food borne beef meat outbreak. We conducted the case control study and collected the information about the food items consumed inside and outside the hostel at dinner using the standardized questionnaire. We calculated floor wise incidences of four hostels, odds ratios and attributable fractions. We interviewed food handlers. We lifted the seven rectal stool, four water and three samples from floor, kitchen and meat chopper room for culture and sensitivity. Results: 116 cases patients of 802 hostellers met the case definition. The maximum attack rate (16% was in the youngest group (15-20yrs and nil in staff and 31-40 years age group with 5 overall attack rate as 14%. Sex specific attack rate was more (18% in females. The floor wise incidences of the case patients were the highest in 2nd and 3rd floors, occupied by the youngest group. The median age was 20 yrs (Range 17-40 yrs. The most common symptoms were watery diarrhea (71/116, 61% and bloody diarrhea-(45/116, 39%; abdominal pains- (87/116, 75%. Of the six food/water items examined, the food specific attack rate was highly statistically significant in the beef meat eaters (82% with PAF 71%, and Odds Ratio 19.19 (95% C.I. as 9.3-140. The food handlers & their cooking conditions in the kitchen were unhygienic. The food was not available for testing. Escherichia coli were detected in the samples from rectal stools, kitchen and meat chopper room. No fatality was reported. Conclusion

  8. Prevalence of adenovirus and rotavirus infection in immunocompromised patients with acute gastroenteritis in Portugal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribeiro, Joana; Ferreira, Delfim; Arrabalde, Célia; Almeida, Sandra; Baldaque, Inês; Sousa, Hugo

    2015-11-12

    To characterize the prevalence of rotavirus (RV) and adenovirus (AdV) infections in immunocompromised patients with acute gastroenteritis. The presence of RV and AdV (serotypes 40 and 41) was evaluated in 509 stool samples obtained between January 2009 and December 2010 from 200 immunocompromised patients (83 females and 117 males; median age 21 years old, range 0-72. The diagnosis of infection was performed as a routine procedure and the presence of RV and AdV (serotypes 40 and 41) was determined by immunochromatography using the RIDA(®) Quick Rota-Adeno-Kombi kit (r-Biopharm, Darmstadt, Germany). The data analysis and description of seasonal frequencies were performed using computer software IBM(®) SPSS(®) (Statistical Package for Social Sciences) Statistics version 20.0 for Mac. The frequencies of infection were compared into different age and gender groups by χ(2) test. The study revealed 12.4% AdV positive samples and 0.8% RV positive samples, which correspond to a prevalence of 6.5% and 1.5%, respectively. AdV was more frequent between October 2009 and April 2010, while RV was identified in April 2010 and July 2010. The stool analysis revealed that from the 509 samples, 63 (12.4%) were positive for AdV and 4 (0.8%) positive for RV, which by resuming the information of each patient, lead to an overall prevalence of AdV and RV of 6.5% (13/200 patients) and 1.5% (3/200 patients), respectively. The stratification of the analysis regarding age groups showed a tendency to an increased prevalence of infection in paediatric patients between 0-10 years old. Considering the seasonal distribution of these infections, our study revealed that AdV infection was more frequent between October 2009 and April 2010, while RV infection was characterized by two distinct peaks (April 2010 and July 2010). The overall prevalence of AdV and RV infection in immunocompromised patients with acute gastroenteritis was 8% and AdV was the most prevalent agent.

  9. General practitioner practices in requesting laboratory tests for patients with gastroenteritis in the Netherlands, 2001–2002

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    Koopmans Marion PG

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The objective of this study was to estimate the (selective proportion of patients consulting their GP for an episode of gastroenteritis for whom laboratory tests were requested. In addition adherence of GPs to the guidelines for diagnostic test regime was ascertained. Methods Data were collected from a GP network in the Netherlands. Information was also collected on the reason for requesting the test, test specifications, and test results. Results For 12% of the GP patients with gastroenteritis, a stool sample was requested and tested for enteric pathogens. In most patients, the duration, followed by severity of complaints or a visit to a specific, high-risk country were reported as reasons to request laboratory diagnostics. Tests were requested most often in summer months and in February. Campylobacter (requested for 87% of the tests, Salmonella (84%, Shigella (78% and Yersinia (56% were most frequently included in the stool tests. Campylobacter was detected most often in patients. Conclusion Test requests did not always comply with existing knowledge of the etiology of gastroenteritis in GP patients and were not always consistent with the Dutch GP guidelines. Therefore, the data of this study can be used to develop educational approaches for GP's as well as for revision of the guidelines.

  10. Multistate outbreak of Norwalk-like virus gastroenteritis associated with a common caterer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, A D; Garrett, V D; Sobel, J; Monroe, S S; Fankhauser, R L; Schwab, K J; Bresee, J S; Mead, P S; Higgins, C; Campana, J; Glass, R I

    2001-12-01

    In February 2000, an outbreak of gastroenteritis occurred among employees of a car dealership in New York. The same meal was also supplied to 52 dealerships nationwide, and 13 states reported illness at dealerships where the banquet was served. A retrospective cohort study was conducted to identify risk factors associated with the illness. Stool samples were collected to detect Norwalk-like virus, and sera were drawn and tested for immunoglobulin A antibodies to the outbreak strain. By univariate analysis, illness was significantly associated with consumption of any of four salads served at the banquet (relative risk = 3.8, 95% confidence interval: 2.5, 5.6). Norwalk-like virus was detected by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction assay in 32 of 59 stool samples from eight states. Nucleotide sequences of a 213-base pair fragment from 16 stool specimens collected from cases in eight states were identical, confirming a common source outbreak. Two of 15 workers at caterer A had elevated immunoglobulin A titers to an antigenically related Norwalk-like virus strain. This study highlights the value of molecular techniques to complement classic epidemiologic methods in outbreak investigations and underscores the critical role of food handlers in the spread of foodborne disease associated with Norwalk-like virus.

  11. Large multistate outbreak of norovirus gastroenteritis associated with frozen strawberries, Germany, 2012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernard, H; Faber, M; Wilking, H; Haller, S; Höhle, M; Schielke, A; Ducomble, T; Siffczyk, C; Merbecks, S S; Fricke, G; Hamouda, O; Stark, K; Werber, D

    2014-02-27

    From 20 September through 5 October 2012, the largest recorded food-borne outbreak in Germany occurred. Norovirus was identified as the causative agent. We conducted four analytical epidemiological studies, two case–control studies and two surveys (in total 150 cases) in secondary schools in three different federal states. Overall, 390 institutions in five federal states reported nearly 11,000 cases of gastroenteritis. They were predominantly schools and childcare facilities and were supplied almost exclusively by one large catering company. The analytical epidemiological studies consistently identified dishes containing strawberries as the most likely vehicle, with estimated odds ratios ranging from 2.6 to 45.4. The dishes had been prepared in different regional kitchens of the catering company and were served in the schools two days before the peaks of the respective outbreaks. All affected institutions had received strawberries of one lot, imported frozen from China. The outbreak vehicle was identified within a week, which led to a timely recall and prevented more than half of the lot from reaching the consumer. This outbreak exemplifies the risk of large outbreaks in the era of global food trade. It underlines the importance of timely surveillance and epidemiological outbreak investigations for food safety.

  12. Infection and cross-infection in a Paediatric Gastro-enteritis unit

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    Jean Bowen Jones

    1989-09-01

    Full Text Available A two month study to investigate the incidence o f nosocomial infection was conducted in a paediatric gastroenteritis ward o f a black academic hospital. Enteric pathogens were identified on admission in 61 (47,2% o f 129 patients; 56 bacterial and 25 viral. Six per cent o f patients had a combination o f bacterial and viral pathogens. Enteric pathogens most frequently identified on admission were Campylobacter jejuni in 22%, Rotavirus in 19,3%, EPEC in 10,8% and Shigella spp. in 6,9% patients. Twenty six (20% patients had more than 1 enteric pathogen. The nosocomial infection rate was recorded at 17,1%. EPEC occurred most commonly in 5,3% patients, Salmonella typhimurium in 4,6% and Shigella spp. in 2,3%. Nosocomial infections increased the mean length o f hospital stay from 7,2- 20,2 days. Contributory factors to the spread o f nosocomial infection were the unsatisfactory methods o f bathing patients and giving naso-gastric feeds.

  13. Prevalence of enteropathogens and their antibiotic sensitivity pattern in puppies with hemorrhagic gastroenteritis

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    A. Kokila Priya

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Aim: Hemorrhagic gastroenteritis (HGE ranging from mild to severe forms is commonly encountered in puppies. The aim of the study was to identify the prevalence of common enteropathogens and the antibiotic sensitivity pattern in puppies reported with HGE. Materials and Methods: The canine HGE activity index, with little modification, was adopted to identify Grade III/ severely affected puppies below 6 months of age. Fecal polymerase chain reaction (PCR assay was employed to screen and compare the enteropathogens in puppies with hemorrhagic diarrhea and healthy control. Results: Canine parvovirus 2b was identified in 90.3% of the diarrheic and 10% of the non-diarrheic healthy puppies. Clostridium difficile was identified in all the diarrheic puppies and in 80% of the healthy puppies. Among the diarrheic puppies, 17.7% were positive for Clostridium perfringens enterotoxin, 9.7% were positive for C. perfringens alpha toxin, 6.4% were positive for Escherichia coli shiga toxin, 6.4% were positive for E. coli enterotoxin (LT, and 3.2% were positive for canine distemper virus. Whereas, none of the healthy puppies were positive for these bacteria and toxins. Fecal antibiotic sensitivity test pattern revealed gentamicin to be sensitive in 95% of the cases, azithromycin in 50%, enrofloxacin in 25%, cefotaxime in 20%, and tetracycline in 5% of the cases. Conclusion: Parvoviral enteritis is predominant among puppies. Yet, bacteria and their toxins also play an important role in HGE. Gentamicin has higher sensitivity against the enteropathogens associated with the condition.

  14. Small, round-structured viruses (SRSVs) associated with acute gastroenteritis outbreaks in Gifu, Japan.

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    Kawamoto, H; Hasegawa, S; Sawatari, S; Miwa, C; Morita, O; Hosokawa, T; Tanaka, H

    1993-01-01

    Two outbreaks of non-bacterial gastroenteritis occurred in Gifu prefecture in January 1989 and in January 1991. Both outbreaks were closely related to the consumption of raw oysters, and showed similar clinical features. Small, round-structured virus particles were found in patient stools in both outbreaks by electron microscopy. The role of these particles as the causative agents of the outbreaks were strongly suggested by immune electron microscopy and/or western-blotting immunoassay. When compared with SRSV-9 (Tokyo/SRSV/86-510) reported previously (Hayashi et al, J. Clin. Microbiol., 27: 1728-1733, 1989), it was found that these viral particles were antigenically similar to SRSV-9, and had a major structural protein of 63 kilodaltons (kDa). Further, the prevalence of this agent in Gifu area was examined by western blot antibody assay using 67 serum samples collected from the inhabitants in 1991. The results indicated the circulation of the same or antigenically similar agent in this area.

  15. Absence of E protein arrests transmissible gastroenteritis coronavirus maturation in the secretory pathway

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ortego, Javier; Ceriani, Juan E.; Patino, Cristina; Plana, Juan; Enjuanes, Luis

    2007-01-01

    A recombinant transmissible gastroenteritis coronavirus (rTGEV) in which E gene was deleted (rTGEV-ΔE) has been engineered. This deletion mutant only grows in cells expressing E protein (E + cells) indicating that E was an essential gene for TGEV replication. Electron microscopy studies of rTGEV-ΔE infected BHK-pAPN-E - cells showed that only immature intracellular virions were assembled. These virions were non-infectious and not secreted to the extracellular medium in BHK-pAPN-E - cells. RNA and protein composition analysis by RNase-gold and immunoelectron microscopy showed that rTGEV-ΔE virions contained RNA and also all the structural TGEV proteins, except the deleted E protein. Nevertheless, full virion maturation was blocked. Studies of the rTGEV-ΔE subcellular localization by confocal and immunoelectron microscopy in infected E - cells showed that in the absence of E protein virus trafficking was arrested in the intermediate compartment. Therefore, the absence of E protein in TGEV resulted in two actions, a blockade of virus trafficking in the membranes of the secretory pathway, and prevention of full virus maturation

  16. Human health implications of norovirus acute gastroenteritis as a result of hydric pollution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delgadillo Espinoza, Brenda; Moreira Segura, Cristian; Araya Rodriguez, Freddy

    2011-01-01

    An investigation, in Ciudad Quesada of Costa Rica, has been carried out to explore and characterize the outbreak of acute gastroenteritis in the area. Surveillance data and medical records of the patients were analyzed to develop a descriptive study between July 8 and July 14, 2010 in the canton of San Carlos. A fact sheet was applied to obtain information from patients. ELISA test was performed to the stool samples to detect the presence of enteropathogens. Water samples were analyzed for bacteria and fecal coliform in the distribution system. A total of 352 cases were confirmed in the studied region. The most frequent symptoms among confirmed cases were: diarrhea (94,2%), nausea (92,7%) and vomiting (91,7%). The average age of patients is 29 years (15,8%) and (50,8%) has been female. The age group that has been most affected are infants of 1-4 years (attack rate 18,2/1,000 population). The area that has been most affected is the central area of Ciudad Quesada. In five out of six stool tests has been possible to isolate the norovirus. In water Escherichia coli has been witnessed by what has been suggested that the norovirus has been transmitted by water contaminated with fecal matter. Water quality monitoring has been recommended and promote the use of potable water as well as the sensitization of rural communities about hygiene and disease prevention. (author) [es

  17. Estimating healthcare costs of acute gastroenteritis and human campylobacteriosis in Switzerland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmutz, C; Mäusezahl, D; Bless, P J; Hatz, C; Schwenkglenks, M; Urbinello, D

    2017-03-01

    Rising numbers of campylobacteriosis case notifications in Switzerland resulted in an increased attention to acute gastroenteritis (AG) in general. Patients with a laboratory-confirmed Campylobacter infection perceive their disease as severe and around 15% of these patients are hospitalized. This study aimed at estimating healthcare costs due to AG and campylobacteriosis in Switzerland. We used official health statistics, data from different studies and expert opinion for estimating individual treatment costs for patients with different illness severity and for extrapolating overall costs due to AG and campylobacteriosis. We estimated that total Swiss healthcare costs resulting from these diseases amount to €29-45 million annually. Data suggest that patients with AG consulting a physician without a stool diagnostic test account for €9·0-24·2 million, patients with a negative stool test result for Campylobacter spp. for €12·3 million, patients testing positive for Campylobacter spp. for €1·8 million and hospitalized campylobacteriosis patients for €6·5 million/year. Healthcare costs of campylobacteriosis are high and most likely increasing in Switzerland considering that campylobacteriosis case notifications steadily increased in the past decade. Costs and potential cost savings for the healthcare system should be considered when designing sectorial and cross-sectorial interventions to reduce the burden of human campylobacteriosis in Switzerland.

  18. Outbreak of small round structured virus gastroenteritis arose after kitchen assistant vomited.

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    Patterson, W; Haswell, P; Fryers, P T; Green, J

    1997-06-27

    A wedding reception at a North Yorkshire hotel was followed by an explosive outbreak of gastroenteritis. The attack rate among the 111 guests was 50% and vomiting was a predominant feature. The results of laboratory and epidemiological investigations were consistent with a common source outbreak of small round structured virus (SRSV) infection genotype II. The source of the outbreak was traced to a kitchen assistant who suddenly became ill on the eve of the reception and vomited into a sink used for preparing vegetables. The sink was cleaned with a chlorine based disinfectant and used the next morning to prepare a potato salad, subsequently identified as the vehicle of infection in a cohort study of guests (odds ratio 3.21; CI 1.78-5.78, p = 0.0001). No other food was associated with illness. The outbreak provides further supporting evidence of the importance of vomiting in the transmission of SRSV infection, highlights the virulence of this group of viruses, and indicates their relative resistance to environmental disinfection and decontamination. It also highlights the need for the adequate training of catering staff and the implementation and enforcement of food hygiene regulations.

  19. Detection of antibodies to transmissible gastroenteritis virus of swine by modified autoradiographic test

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stepanek, J; Hampl, J; Franz, J; Mensik, P; Skrobak, F [Vyzkumny Ustav Veterinarniho Lekarstvi, Brno-Medlanky (Czechoslovakia)

    1982-08-01

    A modified method of autoradiographic determination of virus antibodies of gastroenteritis of swine was developed. It is based on the actual reaction between antigen bound in cells of the infected cell cultures and antibodies in tested sera, which is visualized by rabbit antibodies labelled with /sup 125/I (/sup 125/I RaSw IgG antibody) to porcine IgG, on a sensitive radiograph and evaluated by darkening at the point of positive immunological reaction. Specificity of the test and mutual comparability and reproducibility of the results were confirmed by examining the known positive and negative sera and by a comparison with the results of the virus-neutralization test. Of the 36 examined porcine blood sera, antibodies were only proved autoradiographically in the samples positive also by virus-neutralization. In experimentally infected pigs, the same dynamics of antibody production was recorded by the two tests. They were, however, demonstrated autoradiographically the eighth day after infection, while by virus neutralization test as late as 14th day. Their level increased gradually till 35th day after infection.

  20. Comparison of 2 Assays for Diagnosing Rotavirus and Evaluating Vaccine Effectiveness in Children with Gastroenteritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mijatovic-Rustempasic, Slavica; Tam, Ka Ian; Lyde, Freda C.; Payne, Daniel C.; Szilagyi, Peter; Edwards, Kathryn; Staat, Mary Allen; Weinberg, Geoffrey A.; Hall, Caroline B.; Chappell, James; McNeal, Monica; Gentsch, Jon R.; Bowen, Michael D.; Parashar, Umesh D.

    2013-01-01

    We compared rotavirus detection rates in children with acute gastroenteritis (AGE) and in healthy controls using enzyme immunoassays (EIAs) and semiquantitative real-time reverse transcription PCR (qRT-PCR). We calculated rotavirus vaccine effectiveness using different laboratory-based case definitions to determine which best identified the proportion of disease that was vaccine preventable. Of 648 AGE patients, 158 (24%) were EIA positive, and 157 were also qRT-PCR positive. An additional 65 (10%) were qRT-PCR positive but EIA negative. Of 500 healthy controls, 1 was EIA positive and 24 (5%) were qRT-PCR positive. Rotavirus vaccine was highly effective (84% [95% CI 71%–91%]) in EIA-positive children but offered no significant protection (14% [95% CI −105% to 64%]) in EIA-negative children for whom virus was detected by qRT-PCR alone. Children with rotavirus detected by qRT-PCR but not by EIA were not protected by vaccination, suggesting that rotavirus detected by qRT-PCR alone might not be causally associated with AGE in all patients. PMID:23876518

  1. An outbreak of Norwalk-like viral gastroenteritis in a frequently penalized food service operation: a case for mandatory training of food handlers in safety and hygiene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kassa, H

    2001-12-01

    In 1999, in Toledo, Ohio, an outbreak of gastroenteritis occurred among people who had attended a Christmas dinner banquet and had eaten food prepared by a local caterer. Overall, 93 of the 137 attendees (67.9 percent) reported illness. Eight sought medical care, and one was hospitalized. Case-control studies revealed that the illness was associated with eating tossed salad (odds ratio [OR] = 2.5, 95 percent confidence interval [CI] = 1.02-6.26). Eleven of 12 stool specimens that were taken from ill people tested positive for a Norwalk-like virus (NLV) but were negative for E. coli O157:H7, Salmonella, and Shigella. The primary source of the outbreak was not determined, but an infected food handler may have played a role in the transmission of the virus. The catering facility had been cited frequently for food safety and hygiene violations. None of the personnel or food handlers at this facility had been appropriately trained in safe food-handling practices, nor had the personnel at another local caterer that had prepared food items suspected of causing a multistate outbreak of NLVs. In Toledo, food service operations with trained personnel/food handlers received better inspection reports than food service operations without trained personnel and were less likely to contribute to foodborne outbreaks. Training of personnel and food handlers may be important for preventing outbreaks.

  2. Clinical management of parasitic gastroenteritis (PGE concurrent with moderate pneumonia in a goat: a clinical veterinary case report

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    Faez Firdaus Abdullah Jesse

    2017-09-01

    Materials and methods: The Jamnapari cross goat aged two years and weighing 40 Kg was presented to the Universiti Veterinary Hospital, Universiti Putra Malaysia with the history of diarrhea and depression. The goat was examined physically. Blood and fecal samples were collected for complete blood count, serum biochemistry analysis and parasitological examination. Standard treatment plan was applied for the correction of the the problem. Results: Physical examination findings revealed the goat was in poor body condition, dull and depressed. Wet and dry fecal traces were observed around the groin region. The temperature was slightly elevated (39.5°C, the heart rate was increased (160 b/min while other parameters were within normal range. Upon auscultation of the thoracic region, moderate crackle lung sound was determined. Visual observation of the nasal cavity indicated a bilateral mucopurulent nasal discharge. The hemogram result revealed evidence of a normocytic normochromic anemia, leukocytosis, neutrophilia with left shift and monocytosis. Serum biochemistry revealed increases in gamma-glutamyl transferase (GGT, sodium, chloride, creatine kinase (CK, and hyperglobulinemia. Fecal examination revealed increased in Strongyle egg count of about 2,700 eggs per gram of feces using the Modified Mcmaster technique. From the history, physical examination and laboratory findings the goat was diagnosed with clinical parasitic gastroenteritis (PGE concurrent with moderate pneumonia infection. The therapeutic plan for this case were 45 mL of kaolin-pectin (30 mL/Kg body weight orally SID for 3 days as anti-diarrhea, 12 mL Levamisole (12 mg/Kg bwt was administered orally once as anthelminthic, fluid therapy was instituted using 1.5 L of Lactated Ringers’ solution once via intravenously. Trimethoprim-Sulfamethoxazole (1 mL/16 Kg bwt was administered intramuscularly SID for 3 days. Conclusion: Follow up examination of the goat a week post treatment indicated a good prognosis

  3. Outbreak of foodborne gastroenteritis in a senior high school in South-eastern Ghana: a retrospective cohort study

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    Donne K. Ameme

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background On 4th February 2015, a group of Senior High School students from Fanteakwa district presented to the emergency unit of the district hospital with complaints of abdominal pain, vomiting and diarrhoea. All the students had eaten from a specific food vendor and had neither eaten any other common meal that day nor the previous day. A foodborne disease outbreak was suspected. We investigated to verify the outbreak, determine its magnitude, identify the source and implement control measures. Methods A retrospective cohort study was conducted. We reviewed medical records and interviewed patrons of the food vendor. We collected data on age, sex, signs and symptoms, date of illness onset, date of admission, date of discharge, treatments given and outcome. A case of foodborne disease was any person in the school with abdominal pain, vomiting and or diarrhoea from 4th to 11th February 2015 and had eaten from the food vendor. We conducted active case search to identify more cases. We conducted environmental assessment and collected clinical and food samples for laboratory testing. Descriptive and inferential statistical analyses were performed using Stata 12.0. Results A total of 68 cases were recorded giving overall attack rate of 35.79 % (68/190 with no death. Of these, 51.47 % (35/68 were males. Mean age of case-patients was 17.8 (standard deviation +/-1.62. The index case, a 17-year-old female student ate from the food vendor on 4th February at 9:00 am and fell ill at 3:40 pm later that day. Compared to those who ate other food items, students who drank water from container at the canteen were more likely to develop foodborne disease at statistically significant levels [RR = 2.6, 95 % CI = (2.11–3.15]. Clostridium perfringens (C. perfringens and Salmonella species (Salmonella spp were isolated from water and stew respectively. Clinical features of case-patients were compatible with both organisms. Conclusion A

  4. Rapid versus standard intravenous rehydration in paediatric gastroenteritis: pragmatic blinded randomised clinical trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parkin, Patricia C; Willan, Andrew R; Schuh, Suzanne

    2011-01-01

    Objective To determine if rapid rather than standard intravenous rehydration results in improved hydration and clinical outcomes when administered to children with gastroenteritis. Design Single centre, two arm, parallel randomised pragmatic controlled trial. Blocked randomisation stratified by site. Participants, caregivers, outcome assessors, investigators, and statisticians were blinded to the treatment assignment. Setting Paediatric emergency department in a tertiary care centre in Toronto, Canada. Participants 226 children aged 3 months to 11 years; complete follow-up was obtained on 223 (99%). Eligible children were aged over 90 days, had a diagnosis of dehydration secondary to gastroenteritis, had not responded to oral rehydration, and had been prescribed intravenous rehydration. Children were excluded if they weighed less than 5 kg or more than 33 kg, required fluid restriction, had a suspected surgical condition, or had an insurmountable language barrier. Children were also excluded if they had a history of a chronic systemic disease, abdominal surgery, bilious or bloody vomit, hypotension, or hypoglycaemia or hyperglycaemia. Interventions Rapid (60 mL/kg) or standard (20 mL/kg) rehydration with 0.9% saline over an hour; subsequent fluids administered according to protocol. Main outcome measures Primary outcome: clinical rehydration, assessed with a validated scale, two hours after the start of treatment. Secondary outcomes: prolonged treatment, mean clinical dehydration scores over the four hour study period, time to discharge, repeat visits to emergency department, adequate oral intake, and physician’s comfort with discharge. Data from all randomised patients were included in an intention to treat analysis. Results 114 patients were randomised to rapid rehydration and 112 to standard. One child was withdrawn because of severe hyponatraemia at baseline. There was no evidence of a difference between the rapid and standard rehydration groups in the

  5. The sialic acid binding activity of the S protein facilitates infection by porcine transmissible gastroenteritis coronavirus

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    Enjuanes Luis

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Transmissible gastroenteritis virus (TGEV has a sialic acid binding activity that is believed to be important for enteropathogenicity, but that has so far appeared to be dispensable for infection of cultured cells. The aims of this study were to determine the effect of sialic acid binding for the infection of cultured cells under unfavorable conditions, and comparison of TGEV strains and mutants, as well as the avian coronavirus IBV concerning their dependence on the sialic acid binding activity. Methods The infectivity of different viruses was analyzed by a plaque assay after adsorption times of 5, 20, and 60 min. Prior to infection, cultured cells were either treated with neuraminidase to deplete sialic acids from the cell surface, or mock-treated. In a second approach, pre-treatment of the virus with porcine intestinal mucin was performed, followed by the plaque assay after a 5 min adsorption time. A student's t-test was used to verify the significance of the results. Results Desialylation of cells only had a minor effect on the infection by TGEV strain Purdue 46 when an adsorption period of 60 min was allowed for initiation of infection. However, when the adsorption time was reduced to 5 min the infectivity on desialylated cells decreased by more than 60%. A TGEV PUR46 mutant (HAD3 deficient in sialic acid binding showed a 77% lower titer than the parental virus after a 5 min adsorption time. After an adsorption time of 60 min the titer of HAD3 was 58% lower than that of TGEV PUR46. Another TGEV strain, TGEV Miller, and IBV Beaudette showed a reduction in infectivity after neuraminidase treatment of the cultured cells irrespective of the virion adsorption time. Conclusions Our results suggest that the sialic acid binding activity facilitates the infection by TGEV under unfavorable environmental conditions. The dependence on the sialic acid binding activity for an efficient infection differs in the analyzed TGEV strains.

  6. Bacillus subtilis and surfactin inhibit the transmissible gastroenteritis virus from entering the intestinal epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaoqing; Hu, Weiwei; Zhu, Liqi; Yang, Qian

    2017-04-28

    Intestinal epithelial cells are the targets for transmissible gastroenteritis (TGE) virus (TGEV) infection. It is urgent to develop a novel candidate against TGEV entry. Bacillus subtilis is a probiotic with excellent anti-microorganism properties and one of its secretions, surfactin, has been regarded as a versatile weapon for most plant pathogens, especially for the enveloped virus. We demonstrate for the first time that B. subtilis OKB105 and its surfactin can effectively inhibit one animal coronavirus, TGEV, entering the intestinal porcine epithelial cell line (IPEC-J2). Then, several different experiments were performed to seek the might mechanisms. The plaque assays showed that surfactant could reduce the plaque generation of TGEV in a dose-dependent manner. Meanwhile, after incubation with TGEV for 1.5 h, B. subtilis could attach TGEV particles to their surface so that the number of virus to bind to the host cells was declined. Furthermore, our data showed that the inhibition of B. subtilis was closely related to the competition with TGEV for the viral entry receptors, including epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and aminopeptidase N (APN) protein. In addition, Western blotting and apoptosis analysis indicated that B. subtilis could enhance the resistance of IPEC-J2 cells by up-regulating the expression of toll-like receptor (TLR)-6 and reducing the percentage of apoptotic cells. Taken together, our results suggest that B. subtilis OKB105 and its surfactin can antagonize TGEV entry in vitro and may serve as promising new candidates for TGEV prevention. © 2017 The Author(s).

  7. Yogurt for treating acute gastroenteritis in children: Systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patro-Gołąb, Bernadeta; Shamir, Raanan; Szajewska, Hania

    2015-10-01

    In May 2014, the updated guidelines for the management of acute gastroenteritis (AGE) were published. The use of yogurt in the nutritional management of AGE was not addressed, although it is frequently used in many countries for this purpose. We aimed to systematically evaluate the efficacy of yogurt consumption for the management of AGE in children. In this systematic review, a number of databases, including MEDLINE, EMBASE, and the Cochrane Library, with no language restrictions, were searched up to July 2014 for randomized controlled trials (RCTs) evaluating the effect of yogurt consumption in children with AGE. The risk of bias was assessed using the Cochrane risk of bias tool. Four RCTs (n = 448) that were generally low in methodological quality, all performed in hospital setting, were included. Compared with placebo/no intervention, yogurt consumption had no significant effect on stool volume. The data on the effect of yogurt consumption on the duration of diarrhea and stool frequency were not consistent. The chance of treatment success (or failure) was similar in both groups. Compared with placebo, the duration of hospitalization was shorter in children who received yogurt, but the difference was of a borderline significance. Total weight gain increased for those treated with yogurt. The consumption of yogurt had a positive effect on weight gain, but no consistent effect on AGE outcomes in hospitalized children. Given the limited data and the methodological limitations of the included trials, the evidence should be viewed with caution. The effect of yogurt consumption in the ambulatory setting is unknown. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd and European Society for Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism. All rights reserved.

  8. Intravenous rehydration of malnourished children with acute gastroenteritis and severe dehydration: A systematic review.

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    Houston, Kirsty A; Gibb, Jack G; Maitland, Kathryn

    2017-01-01

    Background: Rehydration strategies in children with severe acute malnutrition (SAM) and severe dehydration are extremely cautious. The World Health Organization (WHO) SAM guidelines advise strongly against intravenous fluids unless the child is shocked or severely dehydrated and unable to tolerate oral fluids. Otherwise, guidelines recommend oral or nasogastric rehydration using low sodium oral rehydration solutions. There is limited evidence to support these recommendations. Methods: We conducted a systematic review of randomised controlled trials (RCTs) and observational studies on 15 th June 2017 comparing different strategies of rehydration therapy in children with acute gastroenteritis and severe dehydration, specifically relating to intravenous rehydration, using standard search terms. Two authors assessed papers for inclusion. The primary endpoint was evidence of fluid overload. Results: Four studies were identified, all published in English, including 883 children, all of which were conducted in low resource settings. Two were randomised controlled trials and two observational cohort studies, one incorporated assessment of myocardial and haemodynamic function. There was no evidence of fluid overload or other fluid-related adverse events, including children managed on more liberal rehydration protocols. Mortality was high overall, and particularly in children with shock managed on WHO recommendations (day-28 mortality 82%). There was no difference in safety outcomes when different rates of intravenous rehydration were compared. Conclusions: The current 'strong recommendations' for conservative rehydration of children with SAM are not based on emerging evidence. We found no clinical trials providing a direct assessment of the current WHO guidelines, and those that were available suggested that these children have a high mortality and remain fluid depleted on current therapy. Recent studies have reported no evidence of fluid overload or heart failure with more

  9. Estimates of economic burden of providing inpatient care in childhood rotavirus gastroenteritis from Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Way Seah; Poo, Muhammad Izzuddin; Nagaraj, Shyamala

    2007-12-01

    To estimate the cost of an episode of inpatient care and the economic burden of hospitalisation for childhood rotavirus gastroenteritis (GE) in Malaysia. A 12-month prospective, hospital-based study on children less than 14 years of age with rotavirus GE, admitted to University of Malaya Medical Centre, Kuala Lumpur, was conducted in 2002. Data on human resource expenditure, costs of investigations, treatment and consumables were collected. Published estimates on rotavirus disease incidence in Malaysia were searched. Economic burden of hospital care for rotavirus GE in Malaysia was estimated by multiplying the cost of each episode of hospital admission for rotavirus GE with national rotavirus incidence in Malaysia. In 2002, the per capita health expenditure by Malaysian Government was US$71.47. Rotavirus was positive in 85 (22%) of the 393 patients with acute GE admitted during the study period. The median cost of providing inpatient care for an episode of rotavirus GE was US$211.91 (range US$68.50-880.60). The estimated average cases of children hospitalised for rotavirus GE in Malaysia (1999-2000) was 8571 annually. The financial burden of providing inpatient care for rotavirus GE in Malaysian children was estimated to be US$1.8 million (range US$0.6 million-7.5 million) annually. The cost of providing inpatient care for childhood rotavirus GE in Malaysia was estimated to be US$1.8 million annually. The financial burden of rotavirus disease would be higher if cost of outpatient visits, non-medical and societal costs are included.

  10. Proteome profile of swine testicular cells infected with porcine transmissible gastroenteritis coronavirus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruili Ma

    Full Text Available The interactions occurring between a virus and a host cell during a viral infection are complex. The purpose of this paper was to analyze altered cellular protein levels in porcine transmissible gastroenteritis coronavirus (TGEV-infected swine testicular (ST cells in order to determine potential virus-host interactions. A proteomic approach using isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantitation (iTRAQ-coupled two-dimensional liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry identification was conducted on the TGEV-infected ST cells. The results showed that the 4-plex iTRAQ-based quantitative approach identified 4,112 proteins, 146 of which showed significant changes in expression 48 h after infection. At 64 h post infection, 219 of these proteins showed significant change, further indicating that a larger number of proteomic changes appear to occur during the later stages of infection. Gene ontology analysis of the altered proteins showed enrichment in multiple biological processes, including cell adhesion, response to stress, generation of precursor metabolites and energy, cell motility, protein complex assembly, growth, developmental maturation, immune system process, extracellular matrix organization, locomotion, cell-cell signaling, neurological system process, and cell junction organization. Changes in the expression levels of transforming growth factor beta 1 (TGF-β1, caspase-8, and heat shock protein 90 alpha (HSP90α were also verified by western blot analysis. To our knowledge, this study is the first time the response profile of ST host cells following TGEV infection has been analyzed using iTRAQ technology, and our description of the late proteomic changes that are occurring after the time of vigorous viral production are novel. Therefore, this study provides a solid foundation for further investigation, and will likely help us to better understand the mechanisms of TGEV infection and pathogenesis.

  11. A novel imaging technique to measure capillary-refill time: improving diagnostic accuracy for dehydration in young children with gastroenteritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shavit, Itai; Brant, Rollin; Nijssen-Jordan, Cheri; Galbraith, Roger; Johnson, David W

    2006-12-01

    Assessment of dehydration in young children currently depends on clinical judgment, which is relatively inaccurate. By using digital videography, we developed a way to assess capillary-refill time more objectively. Our goal was to determine whether digitally measured capillary-refill time assesses the presence of significant dehydration (> or = 5%) in young children with gastroenteritis more accurately than conventional capillary refill and overall clinical assessment. We prospectively enrolled children with gastroenteritis, 1 month to 5 years of age, who were evaluated in a tertiary-care pediatric emergency department and judged by a triage nurse to be at least mildly dehydrated. Before any treatment, we measured the weight and digitally measured capillary-refill time of these children. Pediatric emergency physicians determined capillary-refill time by using conventional methods and degree of dehydration by overall clinical assessment by using a 7-point Likert scale. Postillness weight gain was used to estimate fluid deficit; beginning 48 hours after assessment, children were reweighed every 24 hours until 2 sequential weights differed by no more than 2%. We compared the accuracy of digitally measured capillary-refill time with conventional capillary refill and overall clinical assessment by determining sensitivities, specificities, likelihood ratios, and area under the receiver operator characteristic curves. A total of 83 patients were enrolled and had complete follow-up; 13 of these patients had significant dehydration (> or = 5% of body weight). The area under the receiver operator characteristic curves for digitally measured capillary-refill time and overall clinical assessment relative to fluid deficit ( or = 5%) were 0.99 and 0.88, respectively. Positive likelihood ratios were 11.7 for digitally measured capillary-refill time, 4.5 for conventional capillary refill, and 4.1 for overall clinical assessment. Results of this prospective cohort study suggest

  12. An Assessment of Hazards Caused by Electromagnetic Interaction on Humans Present near Short-Wave Physiotherapeutic Devices of Various Types Including Hazards for Users of Electronic Active Implantable Medical Devices (AIMD

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    Jolanta Karpowicz

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Leakage of electromagnetic fields (EMF from short-wave radiofrequency physiotherapeutic diathermies (SWDs may cause health and safety hazards affecting unintentionally exposed workers (W or general public (GP members (assisting patient exposed during treatment or presenting there for other reasons. Increasing use of electronic active implantable medical devices (AIMDs, by patients, attendants, and workers, needs attention because dysfunctions of these devices may be caused by electromagnetic interactions. EMF emitted by 12 SWDs (with capacitive or inductive applicators were assessed following international guidelines on protection against EMF exposure (International Commission on Nonionizing Radiation Protection for GP and W, new European directive 2013/35/EU for W, European Recommendation for GP, and European Standard EN 50527-1 for AIMD users. Direct EMF hazards for humans near inductive applicators were identified at a distance not exceeding 45 cm for W or 62 cm for GP, but for AIMD users up to 90 cm (twice longer than that for W and 50% longer than that for GP because EMF is pulsed modulated. Near capacitive applicators emitting continuous wave, the corresponding distances were: 120 cm for W or 150 cm for both—GP or AIMD users. This assessment does not cover patients who undergo SWD treatment (but it is usually recommended for AIMD users to be careful with EMF treatment.

  13. Outbreak of SRSV gastroenteritis at an international conference traced to food handled by a post-symptomatic caterer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patterson, T; Hutchings, P; Palmer, S

    1993-08-01

    In an outbreak of small round structured virus (SRSV) gastroenteritis at an international AIDS conference 67 people were ill with diarrhoea or vomiting, one requiring admission to hospital. Epidemiological investigations demonstrated that the vehicle of infection was food prepared by a foodhandler who was recovering from a mild gastrointestinal illness. The food most strongly associated with illness, coronation chicken, was prepared by the food handler on the second day after symptoms ceased. The investigation confirms the view that foodhandlers may contaminate food with SRSVs after cessation of symptoms and should remain off work until at least 48 h after recovery.

  14. The percentage of nosocomial-related out of total hospitalizations for rotavirus gastroenteritis and its association with hand hygiene compliance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waisbourd-Zinman, Orith; Ben-Ziony, Shiri; Solter, Ester; Chodick, Gabriel; Ashkenazi, Shai; Livni, Gilat

    2011-03-01

    Because the absolute numbers of both community-acquired and nosocomial rotavirus gastroenteritis (RVGE) vary, we studied the percentage of hospitalizations for RVGE that were transmitted nosocomially as an indicator of in-hospital acquisition of the infection. In a 4-year prospective study, the percentage of nosocomial RVGE declined steadily, from 20.3% in 2003 to 12.7% in 2006 (P = .001). Concomitantly, the rate of compliance with hand hygiene increased from 33.7% to 49% (P = .012), with a significant (P Infection Control and Epidemiology, Inc. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Autosomal dominant anhidrotic ectodermal dysplasia with immunodeficiency caused by a novel NFKBIA mutation, p.Ser36Tyr, presents with mild ectodermal dysplasia and non-infectious systemic inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshioka, Takakazu; Nishikomori, Ryuta; Hara, Junichi; Okada, Keiko; Hashii, Yoshiko; Okafuji, Ikuo; Nodomi, Seishiro; Kawai, Tomoki; Izawa, Kazushi; Ohnishi, Hidenori; Yasumi, Takahiro; Nakahata, Tatsutoshi; Heike, Toshio

    2013-10-01

    Anhidrotic ectodermal dysplasia with immunodeficiency (EDA-ID) is characterized by hypohidrosis, dental abnormalities, sparse hair, and immunodeficiency. Autosomal dominant (AD)-EDA-ID, caused by a heterozygous mutation within NFKBIA, is very rare and its clinical features remain largely unknown. This study describes a patient with AD-EDA-ID harboring a novel NFKBIA mutation who presented with mild EDA and non-infectious systemic inflammation. The clinical presentation of an AD-EDA-ID patient was described and immunological, genetic, and biochemical analyses were performed, with a focus on nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) activation. The patient presented with symptoms of mild EDA-ID, namely sparse hair and hypohidrosis, although a skin biopsy confirmed the presence of sweat glands. There were no dental abnormalities. The patient also suffered from non-infectious inflammation, which responded to systemic corticosteroid therapy; however, the patient remained ill. Immunological analyses revealed reduced Toll-like receptor/IL-1 (TLR/IL-1) and tumor necrosis factor (TNF) receptor family responses to various stimuli. Genetic analysis identified a de novo heterozygous missense mutation, p.Ser36Tyr, in NFKBIA, resulting in defective NFKBIA degradation and impaired NF-κB activation. The patient was diagnosed with AD-EDA-ID and underwent hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. Engraftment was successful, with few signs of acute graft versus host disease. However, the patient suffered hemolytic anemia and thrombocytopenia, and died from a brain hemorrhage due to intractable thrombocytopenia. AD-EDA-ID patients can present with mild ectodermal dysplasia and non-infectious inflammation, rather than with recurrent infections. Also, hematopoietic stem cell transplantation for AD-EDA-ID is still a clinical challenge.

  16. Post-earthquake outbreak of rotavirus gastroenteritis in Kashmir (India): an epidemiological analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karmakar, Somenath; Rathore, Abhilakh Singh; Kadri, Syed Manzoor; Dutt, Som; Khare, Shashi; Lal, Shiv

    2008-10-01

    An earthquake struck Kashmir on 8 October 2005. A central team of public health specialists was sent to Kashmir to assess the public health measures required following the earthquake, and to assist in institution of public health measures. Epidemiological and environmental investigation in Tangdar block (Kupwara district) and Uri Tehsil (Baramula district). Visits to villages affected by the earthquake, rehabilitation camps and health care, examination of cases with acute diarrhoeal disease (ADD), environmental observations, collection of clinical samples from ADD cases and environmental samples from drinking water sources, and laboratory methods. In total, 1783 cases of ADD were reported between 14 October and 17 December 2005 in Tangdar (population 65000). The overall attack rate was 20% in children under 4 years of age. Twelve cases of ADD with loose motions without blood were studied, and 11 rectal swabs and one stool sample were processed. No bacterial enteropathogens could be isolated, but three of the 12 samples yielded rotavirus antigen on enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Twelve of 13 (92.3%) water samples, collected from various stream or tap water (source: spring/stream) sources, were unsatisfactory (P=0.001) using the H(2)S strip method compared with other sources (well/mineral water). All eight water sources in Tangdar block were unsatisfactory, indicated by blackening of H(2)S filter paper strips. Following the earthquake, drinking stream water or tap water without boiling or chlorination may have led to a common source water-borne outbreak of rotavirus gastroenteritis. Other contributing factors were: overcrowding; poor sanitation; open-air defaecation; poor hygiene; and living in makeshift camps near streams. Person-to-person transmission may also have contributed to perpetuation of the outbreak. Following the establishment of medical camps and information, education and communication regarding the need to drink boiled water and follow safer

  17. An outbreak of norovirus gastroenteritis associated with asymptomatic food handlers in Kinmen, Taiwan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meng-Yu Chen

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In February 2015 an outbreak of gastroenteritis occurred in a distillery in Kinmen, Taiwan. At least 450 affected employees developed the symptoms of diarrhea and vomiting after attending a lunch banquet on 6 February. Epidemiological, laboratory and environmental investigations were conducted to identify the agent and source of this outbreak. Methods A case–control study was carried out among lunch attendees from the distillery. Using a semi-structured questionnaire, food and beverage consumption in the lunch banquet was assessed, as well as demographic and clinical data of the exposed people. An outbreak case was defined as a diner who developed at least three following symptoms: diarrhea, vomiting, abdominal pain, nausea, chills and/or weakness in the 72 h following the lunch. Controls were defined as lunch attendees who did not have any of the above symptoms. Rectal swabs or stool samples of the symptomatic exposed diners and food handlers as well as food and environmental samples were collected to test potential bacteria and viruses. Norovirus was detected by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction and sequence analysis. An environmental assessment, including environmental inspection of the restaurant and a review of work practices of food workers, was undertaken. Results Of 363 respondents with complete data, 169 met the case definition and 111 met the control definition. Consumption of pork liver in cold appetizers (adjusted odd ratio (aOR 3.23; 95 % confidence interval (CI: 1.26–8.30 and lamb chops (aOR: 3.98, 95 % CI: 1.74–9.11 were each associated with increased risk of illness. No cases but two asymptomatic food handlers who prepared or cooked the implicated foods tested positive for norovirus genotype I.6. Food and environmental samples were negative for any bacteria. Environmental assessment indicated that hand washing facilities were not properly accessible to food handlers. Inappropriate

  18. Magnitude, distribution, and estimated level of underreporting of acute gastroenteritis in Jamaica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fletcher, Stephanie M; Lewis-Fuller, Eva; Williams, Hank; Miller, Zahra; Scarlett, Henroy P; Cooper, Collin; Gordon-Johnson, Kelly-Ann; Vickers, Ivan; Shaw, Karen; Wellington, Iyanna; Thame, Jennifer; Pérez, Enrique; Indar, Lisa

    2013-12-01

    Jamaica is the third largest island in the Caribbean. The epidemiology of acute gastroenteritis (AGE) is important to Jamaica, particularly in the areas of health, tourism, and because of the potential impact on the local workforce and the economy. Data collected by the National Surveillance Unit on the prevalence of AGE transmitted by food are not accurate. To determine the true magnitude, risk factors, and the extent of underreporting of AGE in Jamaica, we conducted a cross-sectional, population-based retrospective survey during the periods of 21 February-7 March and 14-27 June 2009, corresponding to high- and low-AGE season respectively. Of the total 1,920 persons selected randomly by a multistage cluster-sampling process, 1,264 responded (response rate 65.8%). Trained interviewers administered a standardized, validated questionnaire during face-to-face interviews. The overall prevalence of self-reported AGE was 4.0% (95% CI 2.9-5.1) at a rate of 0.5 episodes/per person-year. The highest monthly prevalence of AGE (14.6%) was found among the 1-4 year(s) age-group and the lowest (2.1%) among the 25-44 years age-group. Of the 18 cases (36%) who sought medical care, 11% were hospitalized, 33% were treated with antibiotics, and 66.7% received oral rehydration fluids. Only 2 cases who sought medical care reportedly submitted stool specimens. The mean duration of diarrhoea was 3.1 days, which resulted in a mean loss of 4 productive days, with over half of the cases requiring someone to care for them. The burden of syndromic AGE for 2009 was extrapolated to be 122,711 cases, showing an underreporting factor of 58.9. For every laboratory-confirmed AGE case, it was estimated that 383 more cases were occurring in the population. This research confirms that the prevalence of AGE is underreported in Jamaica and not being adequately detected by the current surveillance system. The components of the integrated surveillance system for AGE in Jamaica, particularly the laboratory

  19. The diagnostic accuracy of Clinical Dehydration Scale in identifying dehydration in children with acute gastroenteritis: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falszewska, Anna; Dziechciarz, Piotr; Szajewska, Hania

    2014-10-01

    To systematically update diagnostic accuracy of the Clinical Dehydration Scale (CDS) in clinical recognition of dehydration in children with acute gastroenteritis. Six databases were searched for diagnostic accuracy studies in which population were children aged 1 to 36 months with acute gastroenteritis; index test was the CDS; and reference test was post-illness weight gain. Three studies involving 360 children were included. Limited evidence showed that in high-income countries the CDS provides strong diagnostic accuracy for ruling in moderate and severe (>6%) dehydration (positive likelihood ratio 5.2-6.6), but has limited value for ruling it out (negative likelihood ratio 0.4-0.55). In low-income countries, the CDS has limited value either for ruling moderate or severe dehydration in or out. In both settings, the CDS had limited value for ruling in or out dehydration dehydration 3% to 6%. The CDS can help assess moderate to severe dehydration in high-income settings. Given the limited data, the evidence should be viewed with caution. © The Author(s) 2014.

  20. An outbreak of gastroenteritis associated with astrovirus serotype 1 in a day care center, in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    AMV Silva

    2001-11-01

    Full Text Available Between June 4th and June 20th1996 rotavirus, adenovirus, and astrovirus (HAstrV were investigated in fecal samples from 27 children under three years old with acute diarrhea, attending the Bertha Lutz day care center, in Rio de Janeiro. All fecal samples were analyzed by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (PAGE, reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR, enzyme immunoassays (EIA, and electron microscopy (EM. Nine of them (33% showed positive results for HAstrV by at least one of the employed methodologies. Eight were positive by RT-PCR and EIA, and six by EM. All positive samples were inoculated onto HT-29 (human colon adenocarcinoma cultured cells for HAstrV isolation and seven were positive after three passages. The sequencing analysis of eight RT-PCR products (449 bp from gene that codifies VP2 protein, showed a total nucleotide identity among them and 98% with HAstrV-1 (strain Oxford type 1. This is the first report of a gastroenteritis outbreak associated with HAstrv-1 in a day care center in Rio de Janeiro and it reinforces the importance of this virus in association with infantile acute gastroenteritis.

  1. Evaluation of RIDA®GENE norovirus GI/GII real time RT-PCR using stool specimens collected from children and adults with acute gastroenteritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanwar, N; Hassan, F; Barclay, L; Langley, C; Vinjé, J; Bryant, P W; George, K St; Mosher, L; Matthews-Greer, J M; Rocha, M A; Beenhouwer, D O; Harrison, C J; Moffatt, M; Shastri, N; Selvarangan, R

    2018-04-10

    Norovirus is the leading cause of epidemic and sporadic acute gastroenteritis (AGE) in the United States. Widespread prevalence necessitates implementation of accurate norovirus detection assays in clinical diagnostic laboratories. To evaluate RIDA ® GENE norovirus GI/GII real-time RT-PCR assay (RGN RT-PCR) using stool samples from patients with sporadic AGE. Patients between 14 days to 101 years of age with symptoms of AGE were enrolled prospectively at four sites across the United States during 2014-2015. Stool specimens were screened for the presence of norovirus RNA by the RGN RT-PCR assay. Results were compared with a reference method that included conventional RT-PCR and sequencing of a partial region of the 5'end of the norovirus ORF2 gene. A total of 259 (36.0%) of 719 specimens tested positive for norovirus by the reference method. The RGN RT-PCR assay detected norovirus in 244 (94%) of these 259 norovirus positive specimens. The sensitivity and specificity (95% confidence interval) of the RGN RT-PCR assay for detecting norovirus genogroup (G) I was 82.8% (63.5-93.5) and 99.1% (98.0-99.6) and for GII was 94.8% (90.8-97.2) and 98.6% (96.9-99.4), respectively. Seven specimens tested positive by the RGN-RT PCR that were negative by the reference method. The fifteen false negative samples were typed as GII.4 Sydney, GII.13, GI.3, GI.5, GI.2, GII.1, and GII.3 in the reference method. The RGN RT-PCR assay had a high sensitivity and specificity for the detection of norovirus in stool specimens from patients with sporadic AGE. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  2. Delivery presentations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pregnancy - delivery presentation; Labor - delivery presentation; Occiput posterior; Occiput anterior; Brow presentation ... The mother can walk, rock, and try different delivery positions during labor to help encourage the baby ...

  3. Impacto de la introducción de la vacuna contra el rotavirus en la hospitalización por gastroenteritis aguda grave en el Hospital del Niño de la Ciudad de Panamá Impact of rotavirus vaccine introduction on hospital admissions for severe acute gastroenteritis at the Children's Hospital in Panama City

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javier Nieto Guevara

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVOS: Determinar si la introducción de la vacunación infantil contra el rotavirus en Panamá permitió reducir la tasa de hospitalización por gastroenteritis en niños menores de 5 años. MÉTODOS: Estudio observacional de corte transversal en dos períodos: del 1 de enero al 31 de agosto de 2005 (antes de la introducción de la vacunación contra el rotavirus y del 1 de enero al 31 de agosto de 2007 (un año después de la introducción. Se estudiaron todos los niños y niñas entre 2 meses y 5 años de edad hospitalizados con diagnóstico de gastroenteritis aguda grave en la sala de corta estancia de gastroenteritis del Hospital del Niño, en Ciudad de Panamá, Panamá. Las variables fueron: número de episodios de gastroenteritis, número de casos hospitalizados por gastroenteritis aguda grave, días de hospitalización y uso de antibióticos, según dos grupos de edad (de 2 meses a 1 año y de más de 1 año a 5 años. Se calculó el riesgo relativo (RR con intervalos de confianza de 95% (IC95% y un nivel de significación P OBJECTIVES: To determine if infant rotavirus vaccination in Panama has reduced the rate of hospital admission for gastroenteritis among children under 5 years of age. METHODS: An observational, cross-sectional study of two time periods: 1 January-31 August 2005 (prior to initiating rotavirus vaccination and 1 January-31 August 2007 (one year after introducing rotavirus vaccination. All the children from 2 months-5 years of age admitted with a diagnosis of acute gastroenteritis to the short-stay gastroenteritis area of the Children's Hospital in Panama City, Panama, were studied. The variables were: number of gastroenteritis episodes; number of cases admitted for severe acute gastroenteritis; number of days hospitalized; and antibiotics treatment for each of the two age groups (2 months-1 year and >1-5 years. The relative risk (RR was calculated with a 95% confidence interval (95%CI and a significance level of P

  4. Coronavirus infection in mink (Mustela vison). Serological evidence of infection with a coronavirus related to transmissible gastroenteritis virus and porcine epidemic diarrhea virus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Have, P; Moving, V; Svansson, V

    1992-01-01

    Antibodies to a transmissible gastroenteritis virus (TGEV)-related coronavirus have been demonstrated in mink sera by indirect immunofluorescence, peroxidase-linked antibody assays and immunoblotting. This is the first serological evidence of a specific coronavirus infection in mink. The putative...

  5. Positive /sup 67/Ga-citrate scintigraphy: Vertebral, satellite lymph node and gallbladder foci in a case of gastroenteritis with salmonella

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Popa, N; Lens, E; Dubois, J L; Blase, F

    1982-03-01

    We report a case of salmonella gastroenteritis with recurrent fever and sepsis, slight transient lumbar pain and positive /sup 67/Ga-citrate scintigraphy. The /sup 67/Ga scan made a major contribution to the positive diagnosis of a subclinical spondylodiscite and to the correct treatment leading to the disappearance of the infectious foci.

  6. The incidence and genetic variability of Small Round-Structured Viruses (SRSV) in outbreaks of gastroenteritis in 1996 in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vinje J; Altena SA; Lodder WJ; Koopmans MPG; LIO; MGB

    1997-01-01

    Small round-structured viruses (SRSV), ook wel Norwalk-achtige virussen genoemd, zijn belangrijke verwekkers van explosies van gastroenteritis. De detectie van deze groep genetisch uiterst variabele virussen is door de recente ontwikkeling van een generische RT-PCR test sterk vereenvoudigd. Om de

  7. Guidelines on acute gastroenteritis in children : a critical appraisal of their quality and applicability in primary care Epidemiology and research methodology in primary care

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Berg, Jose; Berger, Marjolein Y.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Reasons for poor guideline adherence in acute gastroenteritis (AGE) in children in high-income countries are unclear, but may be due to inconsistency between guideline recommendations, lack of evidence, and lack of generalizability of the recommendations to general practice. The aim of

  8. Implantation of modified Y-shaped self-expandable stent for the treatment of stenosis of gastroenteric stoma: preliminary results in five cases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu Gang; Si Jiangtao; Han Xinwei; Jiao Dechao; Ding Pengxu; Fu Mingti; Li Zhen; Ma Ji

    2010-01-01

    Objective To investigate the feasibility and therapeutic effect of stenting therapy by using modified Y-shaped self-expandable metal stent for the stenosis of gastroenteric stoma. Methods: According to the particular anatomic structures and the pathological features of the narrowed gastroenteric stoma,the authors designed a modified Y-shaped self-expandable metal stent. Under the fluoroscopic guidance, implantation of modified Y-shaped self-expandable metal stent was performed in 5 patients with narrowed gastroenteric stoma. The technical safety and the clinical results were evaluated. Results: The modified Y-shaped self-expandable metal stent was successfully implanted with one procedure in all five patients. After the implantation the symptoms such as nausea, vomiting, abdominal distension were promptly relieved, and the patients' living quality was markedly improved. Conclusion: The stenting therapy with modified Y-shaped self-expandable metal stent can rapidly relieve the stenosis of gastroenteric stoma once for all. The technique is feasible and the short-term effect is reliable, therefore, it is worth popularizing this therapy in clinical practice. (authors)

  9. Biennial pattern of rotavirus gastroenteritis in the Netherlands and a shifting age distribution following a low rotavirus season, 2010-2016.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verberk, J.D.M.; Pijnacker, R.; Bruijning-Verhagen, P.; Franz, E.; Vennema, H.; Hooiveld, M.; Hahné, S.J.M.; Melker, H.E. de

    2017-01-01

    A hyper-endemic rotavirus season was expected after a low-endemic 2014 season in the Netherlands. Rotavirus detections were however similar in 2015 and lower in 2016 compared with 2010-2013. Gastroenteritis consultations rates were also similar in 2015, but the age-distribution shifted to older

  10. Cell vacuolation caused by Vibrio cholerae hemolysin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Figueroa-Arredondo, P; Heuser, J E; Akopyants, N S; Morisaki, J H; Giono-Cerezo, S; Enríquez-Rincón, F; Berg, D E

    2001-03-01

    Non-O1 strains of Vibrio cholerae implicated in gastroenteritis and diarrhea generally lack virulence determinants such as cholera toxin that are characteristic of epidemic strains; the factors that contribute to their virulence are not understood. Here we report that at least one-third of diarrhea-associated nonepidemic V. cholerae strains from Mexico cause vacuolation of cultured Vero cells. Detailed analyses indicated that this vacuolation was related to that caused by aerolysin, a pore-forming toxin of Aeromonas; it involved primarily the endoplasmic reticulum at early times (approximately 1 to 4 h after exposure), and resulted in formation of large, acidic, endosome-like multivesicular vacuoles (probably autophagosomes) only at late times (approximately 16 h). In contrast to vacuolation caused by Helicobacter pylori VacA protein, that induced by V. cholerae was exacerbated by agents that block vacuolar proton pumping but not by endosome-targeted weak bases. It caused centripetal redistribution of endosomes, reflecting cytoplasmic alkalinization. The gene for V. cholerae vacuolating activity was cloned and was found to correspond to hlyA, the structural gene for hemolysin. HlyA protein is a pore-forming toxin that causes ion leakage and, ultimately, eukaryotic cell lysis. Thus, a distinct form of cell vacuolation precedes cytolysis at low doses of hemolysin. We propose that this vacuolation, in itself, contributes to the virulence of V. cholerae strains, perhaps by perturbing intracellular membrane trafficking or ion exchange in target cells and thereby affecting local intestinal inflammatory or other defense responses.

  11. Agreement between gastrointestinal panel testing and standard microbiology methods for detecting pathogens in suspected infectious gastroenteritis: Test evaluation and meta-analysis in the absence of a reference standard.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freeman, Karoline; Tsertsvadze, Alexander; Taylor-Phillips, Sian; McCarthy, Noel; Mistry, Hema; Manuel, Rohini; Mason, James

    2017-01-01

    Multiplex gastrointestinal pathogen panel (GPP) tests simultaneously identify bacterial, viral and parasitic pathogens from the stool samples of patients with suspected infectious gastroenteritis presenting in hospital or the community. We undertook a systematic review to compare the accuracy of GPP tests with standard microbiology techniques. Searches in Medline, Embase, Web of Science and the Cochrane library were undertaken from inception to January 2016. Eligible studies compared GPP tests with standard microbiology techniques in patients with suspected gastroenteritis. Quality assessment of included studies used tailored QUADAS-2. In the absence of a reference standard we analysed test performance taking GPP tests and standard microbiology techniques in turn as the benchmark test, using random effects meta-analysis of proportions. No study provided an adequate reference standard with which to compare the test accuracy of GPP and conventional tests. Ten studies informed a meta-analysis of positive and negative agreement. Positive agreement across all pathogens was 0.93 (95% CI 0.90 to 0.96) when conventional methods were the benchmark and 0.68 (95% CI: 0.58 to 0.77) when GPP provided the benchmark. Negative agreement was high in both instances due to the high proportion of negative cases. GPP testing produced a greater number of pathogen-positive findings than conventional testing. It is unclear whether these additional 'positives' are clinically important. GPP testing has the potential to simplify testing and accelerate reporting when compared to conventional microbiology methods. However the impact of GPP testing upon the management, treatment and outcome of patients is poorly understood and further studies are needed to evaluate the health economic impact of GPP testing compared with standard methods. The review protocol is registered with PROSPERO as CRD42016033320.

  12. Variations in status of preparation of personal protective equipment for preventing norovirus gastroenteritis in long-term care facilities for the elderly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujiki, Saori; Ishizaki, Tatsuro; Nakayama, Takeo

    2017-12-01

    Residents of long-term care facilities are highly susceptible to norovirus gastroenteritis, and each facility is concerned about the need to implement norovirus infection control. Among control measures, personal protective equipment (PPE), such as disposable gloves and masks, plays a major role in reducing infectious spread. However, the preparation status of PPE in facilities before infection outbreaks has not been reported. The aim was to clarify the implementation status of preventive measures for norovirus gastroenteritis and the cost of preparing the necessary PPE in long-term care facilities. A questionnaire survey of facilities affiliated with the Kyoto Prefecture and Osaka Prefecture branches of the Japan Association of Geriatric Health Services Facilities was conducted. The survey items were the characteristics of the facility, whether preventive measures had been implemented for norovirus gastroenteritis from October through the following March in both 2009 and 2010, and the quantities and unit prices of PPE prepared for preventive measures. Twenty-six (11.2%) of 232 surveyed facilities (as of August 2011) answered the survey. Among them, 24 (92.3%) in 2009 and 25 (96.2%) in 2010 reported having implemented preventive measures for norovirus gastroenteritis, while 21 facilities (80.8%) in 2009 and 22 facilities (84.6%) in 2010 had prepared PPE. The median total cost for preparing the PPE needed for the preventive measures was US $2601 (range US $221-9192) in 2009 and US $3904 (range US $305-6427) in 2010. Although the results need careful interpretation because of the low response rate, most of the surveyed long-term care facilities had implemented preventive measures for norovirus gastroenteritis. However, the cost of preparing the PPE needed for the preventive measures varied among the facilities. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  13. Mushroom poisoning in children: clinical presentation and outcome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jan, M.A.; Khan, Z.; Siddiqui, T.S.

    2008-01-01

    A variable clinical picture characterizes mushroom poisoning. The Amatoxin, the main toxic component of these fungi, are responsible for gastrointestinal symptoms as well as hepatic and renal failure. As acute gastroenteritis is extremely common in our set up, so every patient presenting with these symptoms is treated as gastroenteritis of viral aetiology. The authors present the clinical picture of the phalloid syndrome, its treatment and immediate outcome. All children age less than 16 years admitted in Saidu Hospital Swat from January to December 2006 with mushroom poisoning were included in the study. Patients with doubtful history or with associated illness were not included. The diagnosis was based on the clinical picture of the patient, history and the laboratory data. In addition to maintenance of fluid and electrolyte balance and treating sepsis, oral Silymarin and intravenous penicillin was started. Liver function tests, renal functions tests, serum electrolytes and coagulation profile was done in all the patients. The severity of poisoning was graded according to hepatic transaminase elevations and prolongation of prothrombin time. Of the 18 patients, fifteen were above five years of age. Female were twice in number. Fifteen patients developed hepatic failure and three patients developed renal failure. Thirteen patients expired. To start timely management, Mushroom poisoning should be considered in the differential diagnosis in patients presenting with food poisoning particularly coming in groups. Delay in diagnosis is associated with high mortality. (author)

  14. Community incidence of pathogen-specific gastroenteritis: reconstructing the surveillance pyramid for seven pathogens in seven European Union member states.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haagsma, J A; Geenen, P L; Ethelberg, S; Fetsch, A; Hansdotter, F; Jansen, A; Korsgaard, H; O'Brien, S J; Scavia, G; Spitznagel, H; Stefanoff, P; Tam, C C; Havelaar, A H

    2013-08-01

    By building reconstruction models for a case of gastroenteritis in the general population moving through different steps of the surveillance pyramid we estimated that millions of illnesses occur annually in the European population, leading to thousands of hospitalizations. We used data on the healthcare system in seven European Union member states in relation to pathogen characteristics that influence healthcare seeking. Data on healthcare usage were obtained by harmonized cross-sectional surveys. The degree of under-diagnosis and underreporting varied by pathogen and country. Overall, underreporting and under-diagnosis were estimated to be lowest for Germany and Sweden, followed by Denmark, The Netherlands, UK, Italy and Poland. Across all countries, the incidence rate was highest for Campylobacter spp. and Salmonella spp. Incidence estimates resulting from the pyramid reconstruction approach are adjusted for biases due to different surveillance systems and are therefore a better basis for international comparisons than reported data.

  15. Year-round prevalence of norovirus in the environment of catering companies without a recently reported outbreak of gastroenteritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boxman, Ingeborg L A; Verhoef, Linda; Dijkman, Remco; Hägele, Geke; Te Loeke, Nathalie A J M; Koopmans, Marion

    2011-05-01

    Food handlers play an important role in the transmission of norovirus (NoV) in food-borne outbreaks of gastroenteritis (GE). In a year-round prevalence study, the prevalence of NoV in catering companies without recently reported outbreaks of GE was investigated and compared to the observed prevalence in catering companies with recently reported outbreaks. Swab samples were collected from surfaces in the kitchens and (staff) bathrooms in 832 randomly chosen companies and analyzed for the presence of NoV RNA. In total, 42 (1.7%) out of 2,496 environmental swabs from 35 (4.2%) catering companies tested positive. In contrast, NoV was detected in 147 (39.7%) of the 370 samples for 44 (61.1%) of the 72 establishments associated with outbreaks of gastroenteritis. NoV-positive swabs were more frequently found in winter, in specific types of companies (elderly homes and lunchrooms), and in establishments with separate bathrooms for staff. We found a borderline association with population density but no relation to the number of employees. Sequence analysis showed that environmental strains were interspersed with strains found in outbreaks of illness in humans. Thus, the presence of NoV in catering companies seemed to mirror the presence in the population but was strongly increased when associated with food-borne GE. Swabs may therefore serve as a valuable tool in outbreak investigations for the identification of the causative agent, although results should be interpreted with care, taking into account all other epidemiological data.

  16. Implementation of clinical decision support in young children with acute gastroenteritis: a randomized controlled trial at the emergency department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geurts, Dorien; de Vos-Kerkhof, Evelien; Polinder, Suzanne; Steyerberg, Ewout; van der Lei, Johan; Moll, Henriëtte; Oostenbrink, Rianne

    2017-02-01

    Acute gastroenteritis (AGE) is one of the most frequent reasons for young children to visit emergency departments (EDs). We aimed to evaluate (1) feasibility of a nurse-guided clinical decision support system for rehydration treatment in children with AGE and (2) the impact on diagnostics, treatment, and costs compared with usual care by attending physician. A randomized controlled trial was performed in 222 children, aged 1 month to 5 years at the ED of the Erasmus MC-Sophia Children's hospital in The Netherlands ( 2010-2012). Outcome included (1) feasibility, measured by compliance of the nurses, and (2) length of stay (LOS) at the ED, the number of diagnostic tests, treatment, follow-up, and costs. Due to failure of post-ED weight measurement, we could not evaluate weight difference as measure for dehydration. Patient characteristics were comparable between the intervention (N = 113) and the usual care group (N = 109). Implementation of the clinical decision support system proved a high compliance rate. The standardized use of oral ORS (oral rehydration solution) significantly increased from 52 to 65%(RR2.2, 95%CI 1.09-4.31 p children with AGE showed high compliance and increase standardized use of ORS, without differences in other outcome measures. What is Known: • Acute gastroenteritis is one of the most frequently encountered problems in pediatric emergency departments. • Guidelines advocate standardized oral treatment in children with mild to moderate dehydration, but appear to be applied infrequently in clinical practice. What is New: • Implementation of a nurse-guided clinical decision support system on treatment of AGE in young children showed good feasibility, resulting in a more standardized ORS use in children with mild to moderate dehydration, compared to usual care. • Given the challenges to perform research in emergency care setting, the ED should be experienced and adequately equipped, especially during peak times.

  17. Using external magnet guidance and endoscopically placed magnets to create suture-free gastro-enteral anastomoses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myers, Christopher; Yellen, Benjamin; Evans, John; DeMaria, Eric; Pryor, Aurora

    2010-05-01

    To facilitate endolumenal and natural orifice procedures, this study evaluated a novel technique using external and endoscopically placed magnets to create suture-free gastroenteral anastomoses. Seven anesthetized adult swine underwent endoscopic placement of magnets into the small bowel and stomach. Using external magnets, the endoscopically placed internal magnets were brought into opposition under endoscopic view. After 1-2 weeks, the pigs were killed and analyzed. At laparotomy and under sterile conditions, peritoneal cultures were obtained. The anastomoses were evaluated endoscopically and tested using an air insufflation test. Finally, the anastomoses were resected and evaluated microscopically. The average operative time for endoscopic placement of the magnets was 34.3 +/- 14.8 min. Successful placement and creation of anastomoses occurred in six of the pigs. One pig did not form an anastomosis because the magnets were too large to pass through the pylorus at the time of attempted magnet placement. Six swine experienced uncomplicated postoperative courses. One pig's postoperative course involved constipation for several days, requiring additional fluids and fiber supplementation. The findings at endoscopy showed that the magnets were adhered to the anastomosis, which were easily freed, or within the stomach. The air insufflation test results were negative for all the pigs. At laparotomy, there was no evidence of infection, abscess, or leak, but two peritoneal culture results were positive with scant growth of Staphylococcus aureus and coagulase-negative staphylococcus, presumably contaminants. Microscopically, the anastomoses illustrated granulation and fibrous connective tissue without evidence of infection or leak. Endoscopically placed magnets with external magnet guidance is a feasible and novel approach to creating patent gastroenteral anastomoses without abdominal incisions or sutures.

  18. Economic costs of outbreaks of acute viral gastroenteritis due to norovirus in Catalonia (Spain), 2010-2011.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navas, Encarna; Torner, Nuria; Broner, Sonia; Godoy, Pere; Martínez, Ana; Bartolomé, Rosa; Domínguez, Angela

    2015-10-01

    To determine the direct and indirect costs of outbreaks of acute viral gastroenteritis (AVG) due to norovirus in closed institutions (hospitals, social health centers or nursing homes) and the community in Catalonia in 2010-11. Information on outbreaks were gathered from the reports made by epidemiological surveillance units. Direct costs (medical visits, hospital stays, drug treatment, sample processing, transport, diagnostic tests, monitoring and control of the outbreaks investigated) and indirect costs (lost productivity due to work absenteeism, caregivers time and working hours lost due to medical visits) were calculated. Twenty-seven outbreaks affecting 816 people in closed institutions and 74 outbreaks affecting 1,940 people in the community were detected. The direct and indirect costs of outbreaks were € 131,997.36 (€ 4,888.79 per outbreak) in closed institutions and € 260,557.16 (€ 3,521.04 per outbreak) in community outbreaks. The cost per case was € 161.76 in outbreaks in closed institutions and € 134.31 in community outbreaks. The main costs were surveillance unit monitoring (€ 116,652.93), laboratory diagnoses (€ 119,950.95), transport of samples (€ 69,970.90), medical visits (€ 25,250.50) and hospitalization (€ 13,400.00). The cost of outbreaks of acute viral gastroenteritis due to norovirus obtained in this study was influenced by the number of people affected and the severity of the outbreak, which determined hospitalizations and work absenteeism. Urgent reporting of outbreaks would allow the implementation of control measures that could reduce the numbers affected and the duration of the illness and thus the costs derived from them.

  19. Lecture Presentations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2007-01-01

    The Heavy-Ion Collisions in the LHC workshop held in Cracow from 18 to 18 May 2007. The main subject of the workshop was to present the newest results of research provided at CERN LHC collider. Additionally some theoretical models and methods used for presented data analysis were discussed

  20. CATCHY PRESENTATIONS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eriksen, Kaare; Tollestrup, Christian; Ovesen, Nis

    2011-01-01

    An important competence for designers is the ability to communicate and present ideas and proposals for customers, partners, investors and colleagues. The Pecha Kucha principle, developed by Astrid Klein and Mark Dytham, has become a widely used and easy format for the presentation of new concepts...

  1. Full genome analysis of rotavirus G9P[8] strains identified in acute gastroenteritis cases reveals genetic diversity: Pune, western India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tatte, Vaishali S; Chaphekar, Deepa; Gopalkrishna, Varanasi

    2017-08-01

    Group A rotaviruses (RVA) are the major enteric etiological agents of severe acute gastroenteritis among children globally. As G9 RVA now represents as one of the major human RVA genotypes, studies on full genome of this particular genotype are being carried out worldwide. So far, no such studies on G9P[8] RVAs have been reported from Pune, western part of India. Keeping in view of this, the study was undertaken to understand the degree of genetic diversity of the commonly circulating G9P[8] RVA strains. Rotavirus surveillance studies carried out earlier during the years 2009-2011 showed increase in the prevalence of G9P[8] RVAs. Representative G9P[8] RVA strains from the years 2009, 2010, and 2011 were selected for the study. In general, all the G9 RVA strains showed clustering in the globally circulating sublineage of the VP7 gene and showed nucleotide/amino acid identities of 96.8-99.7%/96.9-99.8% with global G9 RV strains. Full genome analysis, of all three RVAs in this study indicated Wa-like genotype constellation G9-P[8]-I1-R1-C1-M1-A1-N1-T1-E1-H1. Within the strains nucleotide/amino acid divergence of 0.1-3.4%/0.0-4.1% was noted in all the RVA structural and non-structural genes. In conclusion, the present study highlights intra-genotypic variations throughout the RVA genome. The study further emphasizes the need for surveillance and analysis of the whole genomic constellation of the commonly circulating RVA strains of other regions in the country for understanding to a greater degree of the impact of rotavirus vaccination recently introduced in India. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Association of serum anti-rotavirus immunoglobulin A antibody seropositivity and protection against severe rotavirus gastroenteritis: analysis of clinical trials of human rotavirus vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheuvart, Brigitte; Neuzil, Kathleen M; Steele, A Duncan; Cunliffe, Nigel; Madhi, Shabir A; Karkada, Naveen; Han, Htay Htay; Vinals, Carla

    2014-01-01

    Clinical trials of the human rotavirus vaccine Rotarix™ (RV1) have demonstrated significant reductions in severe rotavirus gastroenteritis (RVGE) in children worldwide. However, no correlate of vaccine efficacy (VE) has yet been established. This paper presents 2 analyses which aimed to investigate whether serum anti-RV IgA measured by ELISA 1 or 2 mo post-vaccination can serve as a correlate of efficacy against RVGE: (1) In a large Phase III efficacy trial (Rota-037), the Prentice criteria for surrogate endpoints was applied to anti-RV IgA seropositivity 1 mo post-vaccination. These criteria determine whether a significant vaccine group effect can be predicted from the surrogate, namely seropositivity (anti-RV IgA concentration>20 U/mL); (2) Among other GSK-sponsored RV1 VE studies, 8 studies which assessed immunogenicity at 1 or 2 mo post-vaccination in all or a sub-cohort of enrolled subjects and had at least 10 RVGE episodes were included in a meta-analysis to measure the regression between clinical VE and VE predicted from immunogenicity (VE1). In Rota-037, anti-RV IgA seropositivity post-vaccination was associated with a lower incidence of any or severe RVGE, however, the proportion of vaccine group effect explained by seropositivity was only 43.6% and 32.7% respectively. This low proportion was due to the vaccine group effect observed in seronegative subjects. In the meta-analysis, the slope of the regression between clinical VE and VE1 was statistically significant. These two independent analyses support the hypothesis that post-vaccination anti-RV IgA seropositivity (antibody concentration ≥20 U/mL) may serve as a useful correlate of efficacy in clinical trials of RV1 vaccines.

  3. Workshop presentations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanden, Per-Olof; Edland, Anne; Reiersen, Craig; Mullins, Peter; Ingemarsson, Karl-Fredrik; Bouchard, Andre; Watts, Germaine; Johnstone, John; Hollnagel, Erik; Ramberg, Patric; Reiman, Teemu

    2009-01-01

    An important part of the workshop was a series of invited presentations. The presentations were intended to both provide the participants with an understanding of various organisational approaches and activities as well as to stimulate the exchange of ideas during the small group discussion sessions. The presentation subjects ranged from current organisational regulations and licensee activities to new organisational research and the benefits of viewing organisations from a different perspective. There were more than a dozen invited presentations. The initial set of presentations gave the participants an overview of the background, structure, and aims of the workshop. This included a short presentation on the results from the regulatory responses to the pre-workshop survey. Representatives from four countries (Sweden, Canada, Finland, and the United Kingdom) expanded upon their survey responses with detailed presentations on both regulatory and licensee safety-related organisational activities in their countries. There were also presentations on new research concerning how to evaluate safety critical organisations and on a resilience engineering perspective to safety critical organisations. Below is the list of the presentations, the slides of which being available in Appendix 2: 1 - Workshop Welcome (Per-Olof Sanden); 2 - CSNI Working Group on Human and Organisational Factors (Craig Reiersen); 3 - Regulatory expectations on justification of suitability of licensee organisational structures, resources and competencies (Anne Edland); 4 - Justifying the suitability of licensee organisational structures, resources and competencies (Karl-Fredrik Ingemarsson); 5 - Nuclear Organisational Suitability in Canada (Andre Bouchard); 6 - Designing and Resourcing for Safety and Effectiveness (Germaine Watts); 7 - Organisational Suitability - What do you need and how do you know that you've got it? (Craig Reiersen); 8 - Suitability of Organisations - UK Regulator's View (Peter

  4. CERN presentations

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2011-01-01

    Presentation by CERN (10 minutes each) Rolf Landua - Education and Outreach Salvatore Mele - Open Access Jean-Yves Le Meur - Digital Library in Africa Francois Fluckiger - Open Source/Standards (tbc) Tim Smith - Open Data for Science Tullio Basiglia - tbc

  5. Delivery presentations

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... has entered the pelvis. If the presenting part lies above the ischial spines, the station is reported ... M. is also a founding member of Hi-Ethics and subscribes to the principles of the Health ...

  6. Information Presentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holden, K.L.; Boyer, J.L.; Sandor, A.; Thompson, S.G.; McCann, R.S.; Begault, D.R.; Adelstein, B.D.; Beutter, B.R.; Stone, L.S.

    2009-01-01

    The goal of the Information Presentation Directed Research Project (DRP) is to address design questions related to the presentation of information to the crew. The major areas of work, or subtasks, within this DRP are: 1) Displays, 2) Controls, 3) Electronic Procedures and Fault Management, and 4) Human Performance Modeling. This DRP is a collaborative effort between researchers at Johnson Space Center and Ames Research Center.

  7. Voting Present

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James Lo

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available During his time as a state senator in Illinois, Barack Obama voted “Present” 129 times, a deliberate act of nonvoting that subsequently became an important campaign issue during the 2008 presidential elections. In this article, I examine the use of Present votes in the Illinois state senate. I find evidence that Present votes can largely be characterized as protest votes used as a legislative tool by the minority party. Incorporating information from Present votes into a Bayesian polytomous item-response model, I find that this information increases the efficiency of ideal point estimates by approximately 35%. There is little evidence of significant moderation by Obama when Present votes are accounted for, though my results suggest that Obama’s voting record may have moderated significantly before his subsequent election to the U.S. Senate. My results also suggest that because legislative nonvoting may occur for a variety of reasons, naive inclusion of nonvoting behavior into vote choice models may lead to biased results.

  8. Lecture Presentations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2008-01-01

    The Symposium on Physics of Elementary Interactions in the LHC Era held in Warsaw from 21 to 22 April 2008. The main subject of the workshop was to present the progress in CERN LHC collider project. Additionally some satellite activities in field of education, knowledge and technology transfer in the frame of CERN - Poland cooperation were shown

  9. Presentation Technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Froejmark, M.

    1992-10-01

    The report presents a wide, easily understandable description of presentation technique and man-machine communication. General fundamentals for the man-machine interface are illustrated, and the factors that affect the interface are described. A model is presented for describing the operators work situation, based on three different levels in the operators behaviour. The operator reacts routinely in the face of simple, known problems, and reacts in accordance with predetermined plans in the face of more complex, recognizable problems. Deep fundamental knowledge is necessary for truly complex questions. Today's technical status and future development have been studied. In the future, the operator interface will be based on standard software. Functions such as zooming, integration of video pictures, and sound reproduction will become common. Video walls may be expected to come into use in situations in which several persons simultaneously need access to the same information. A summary of the fundamental rules for the design of good picture ergonomics and design requirements for control rooms are included in the report. In conclusion, the report describes a presentation technique within the Distribution Automation and Demand Side Management area and analyses the know-how requirements within Vattenfall. If different systems are integrated, such as geographical information systems and operation monitoring systems, strict demands are made on the expertise of the users for achieving a user-friendly technique which is matched to the needs of the human being. (3 figs.)

  10. Technical presentation

    CERN Document Server

    FI Department

    2008-01-01

    RADIOSPARES, the leading catalogue distributor of components (electronic, electrical, automation, etc.) and industrial supplies will be at CERN on Friday 3 October 2008 (Main Building, Room B, from 9.00 a.m. to 3.00 p.m.) to introduce its new 2008/2009 catalogue. This will be the opportunity for us to present our complete range of products in more detail: 400 000 part numbers available on our web site (Radiospares France, RS International, extended range of components from other manufacturers); our new services: quotations, search for products not included in the catalogue, SBP products (Small Batch Production: packaging in quantities adapted to customers’ requirements); partnership with our focus manufacturers; demonstration of the on-line purchasing tool implemented on our web site in conjunction with CERN. RADIOSPARES will be accompanied by representatives of FLUKE and TYCO ELECTRONICS, who will make presentations, demonstrate materials and answer any technical questio...

  11. Technical presentation

    CERN Document Server

    FP Department

    2009-01-01

    07 April 2009 Technical presentation by Leuze Electronics: 14.00 – 15.00, Main Building, Room 61-1-017 (Room A) Photoelectric sensors, data identification and transmission systems, image processing systems. We at Leuze Electronics are "the sensor people": we have been specialising in optoelectronic sensors and safety technology for accident prevention for over 40 years. Our dedicated staff are all highly customer oriented. Customers of Leuze Electronics can always rely on one thing – on us! •\tFounded in 1963 •\t740 employees •\t115 MEUR turnover •\t20 subsidiaries •\t3 production facilities in southern Germany Product groups: •\tPhotoelectric sensors •\tIdentification and measurements •\tSafety devices

  12. Human parechovirus genotypes -10, -13 and -15 in Pakistani children with acute dehydrating gastroenteritis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Masroor Alam

    Full Text Available Human parechoviruses are known to cause asymptomatic to severe clinical illness predominantly respiratory and gastroenetric infections. Despite their global prevalence, epidemiological studies have not been performed in Pakistan. In this study, we retrospectively analyzed 110 fecal specimen and found 26 (24% positive for viral RNA with HPeV-10 (n = 3, 23%, HPeV-13 (n = 4, 31% and HPeV-15 (n = 6, 46% genotypes. Clinical features of patients with different HPeV genotypes were compared. All HPeV positive children were aged ≤4 years (mean 13.92 months. The male-to-female ratio was 1: 1.17 (46.2 vs 53.8% with significant association (p = .031 to HPeV infectivity. HPeV-10 and -13 were found during summer while HPeV-15 was only detected during late winter season. Disease symptoms were more severe in children infected with HPeV-10 and -13 as compared to HPeV-15. Fever and vomiting were observed in 100% cases of HPeV-10 and -13 while only 17% patients of HPeV-15 had these complaints. Phylogenetic analyses showed that HPeV-10, -13 and -15 strains found in this study have 9-13%, 16.8% and 21.8% nucleotide divergence respectively from the prototype strains and were clustered to distinct genetic lineages. This is the first report of HPeV-15 infection in humans although first identified in rhesus macaques. The arginine-glycine-aspartic acid (RGD motif present at the C-terminal of VP1 responsible for the viral attachment to cellular integrins was not found in all of these strains. In conclusion, these findings enhance our knowledge related to the epidemiology and genetic diversity of the HPeV in Pakistan and support the need for continued laboratory based surveillance programs especially in infants and neonatal clinical settings. Further, the parechovirus pathogenesis, cross-species transmission and disease reservoirs must be ascertained to adopt better prevention measures.

  13. Burden, duration and costs of hospital bed closures due to acute gastroenteritis in England per winter, 2010/11-2015/16.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandmann, F G; Jit, M; Robotham, J V; Deeny, S R

    2017-09-01

    Bed closures due to acute gastroenteritis put hospitals under pressure each winter. In England, the National Health Service (NHS) has monitored the winter situation for all acute trusts since 2010/11. To estimate the burden, duration and costs of hospital bed closures due to acute gastroenteritis in winter. A retrospective analysis of routinely collected time-series data of bed closures due to diarrhoea and vomiting was conducted for the winters 2010/11 to 2015/16. Two key issues were addressed by imputing non-randomly missing values at provider level, and filtering observations to a range of dates recorded in all six winters. The lowest and highest values imputed were taken to represent the best- and worst-case scenarios. Bed-days were costed using NHS reference costs, and potential staff absence costs were based on previous studies. In the best-to-worst case, a median of 88,000-113,000 beds were closed due to gastroenteritis each winter. Of these, 19.6-20.4% were unoccupied. On average, 80% of providers were affected, and had closed beds for a median of 15-21 days each winter. Hospital costs of closed beds were £5.7-£7.5 million, which increased to £6.9-£10.0 million when including staff absence costs due to illness. The median number of hospital beds closed due to acute gastroenteritis per winter was equivalent to all general and acute hospital beds in England being unavailable for a median of 0.88-1.12 days. Costs for hospitals are high but vary with closures each winter. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  14. Gastroenteritis Aggressive Versus Slow Treatment For Rehydration (GASTRO). A pilot rehydration study for severe dehydration: WHO plan C versus slower rehydration

    OpenAIRE

    Houston, Kirsty A.; Gibb, Jack G.; Mpoya, Ayub; Obonyo, Nchafatso; Olupot-Olupot, Peter; Nakuya, Margeret; Evans, Jennifer A; George, Elizabeth C; Gibb, Diana M; Maitland, Kathryn

    2017-01-01

    Background: The World Health Organization (WHO) rehydration management guidelines (Plan C) for children with acute gastroenteritis (AGE) and severe dehydration are widely practiced in resource-poor settings, yet have never been formally evaluated in a clinical trial. A recent audit of outcome of AGE at Kilifi County Hospital, Kenya noted that 10% of children required high dependency care (20% mortality) and a number developed fluid-related complications. The fluid resuscitation trial, FEAST, ...

  15. Presentation to the symposium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goodhead, D.

    1997-01-01

    A novel theory, the Second Event theory, advanced by Chris Busby, suggested that certain man-made radioisotopes could bypass cellular genetic repair mechanisms and cause cancer at very low dose. The present paper, after some introductory comments on the effects of particle tracks on cells, goes on to present the author's own perception of this Second Event theory. (UK)

  16. Infantile Hemophagocytic Lymphohistiocytosis in a Case of Chediak-Higashi Syndrome Caused by a Mutation in the LYST/CHS1 Gene Presenting With Delayed Umbilical Cord Detachment and Diarrhea

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Christian; Agergaard, Charlotte N; Jakobsen, Marianne A

    2015-01-01

    A 2-month-old female infant, born to consanguineous parents, presented with infections in skin and upper respiratory tract. She was notable for delayed umbilical cord detachment, partial albinism, and neurological irritability. Giant granules were present in white blood cells. The intracellular...... in this severe phenotype of Chediak-Higashi syndrome was probably induced by rotaviral infection. Interestingly, the intracellular perforin content in CD8 T cells seems to correlate to the immune activation state of the patient. Late separation of the umbilical cord in concordance with clinical symptoms should...

  17. Effect of Helicobacter pylori Infection on Symptoms of Gastroenteritis Due to Enteropathogenic Escherichia coli in Adults

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chang, Alicia Hsin-Ming; Haggerty, Thomas Dean; de Martel, Catherine; Leung, Cynthia Wai-Mun; Parsonnet, Julie

    Helicobacter pylori can cause hypochlorhydria in some hosts and predispose to diarrheal infections. We tested the hypothesis that chronic H. pylori infection increases the risk of diarrheal illness due to an acid-sensitive organism: enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (EPEC). After testing healthy

  18. Situação atual das estatísticas oficiais relativas à mortalidade por causas externas Present situation of official statistics related to death from external causes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Helena P. de Mello Jorge

    1990-06-01

    to all kinds of accidents and violence of 550 children of less than 15 years of age, resident in the municipality of S. Paulo, State of S. Paulo, Brazil, which occurred during 1985. The project sought to correlate the existing data of the files of the Institute of Legal Medicine (IML with those of SEADE Foundation (official statistics and then compare them with the investigator opinion (this latter based on all the additional information available with a view to: analysing the reliability of the official statistics concerning the main cause of death; and discovering the possible deficiency in the transcription of the IML information to the SEADE Foundation in relation to the same cause. The results are as follows: existing IML information stands quite dose to the interviewer's opinion (71.54% when working at the level of the categories of the International Classification of Diseases (ICD-9, reaching 84.77% of agreement when grouping level is considered; in relation to the interviewer's opinion, official statistics proved to be more reliable when analysed at the grouping level than that at the 3rd digit (67.13% and 24.05%, respectively; comparison between IML and SEADE Foundation data shows only 40% of agreement concerning the ICD-9 categories, reaching 75% when grouping data are analysed. These figures corroborate the proposed hypothesis that the IML, though having files with highly-detailed information, does not transfer them to the SEADE Foundation, thus diminishing the reliability of the official statistics when the details of each cause of death are considered. Better liaison between the two institutions is suggested with a view to achieving statistics of better quality with regard to death from external causes.

  19. Impact on Health-Related Quality of Life in Adults with Eosinophilic Gastritis and Gastroenteritis: A Qualitative Assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bedell, Alyse; Taft, Tiffany; Craven, Meredith R; Guadagnoli, Livia; Hirano, Ikuo; Gonsalves, Nirmala

    2018-05-01

    Eosinophilic gastritis (EG) and eosinophilic gastroenteritis (EGE) are chronic immune-mediated conditions of the digestive tract, which affect the stomach only, or the stomach and small intestines, respectively. Though these disorders are uncommon, they are being increasingly recognized and diagnosed. While health-related quality of life (HRQOL) has been evaluated in other eosinophilic gastrointestinal diseases, this study is the first to describe HRQOL impacts unique to EG/EGE. This study aims to qualitatively describe experiences of adults diagnosed with EG and EGE. We aim to identify impacts on HRQOL in this population in order to inform clinical care and assessment. Seven patients diagnosed with EG or EGE participated in semi-structured interviews assessing common domains of HRQOL. Four distinct themes emerged from qualitative analyses, which represent impacts to HRQOL: the psychological impact of the diagnosis, impact on social relationships, financial impact, and impact on the body. These generally improved over time and with effective treatment. This study demonstrated that patients with EG/EGE experience impacts to HRQOL, some of which differ from HRQOL of other eosinophilic gastrointestinal diseases. These results support the development of a disease-specific measure, or adaptation of an existing measure, to assess HRQOL in EG/EGE.

  20. Etiología y manejo de la gastroenteritis aguda infecciosa en niños y adultos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Yalda Lucero, DRA

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available La Gastroenteritis Aguda (GEA infecciosa es una patología frecuente y de alto impacto, especialmente en niños menores de cinco años y adultos mayores. En nuestro medio, la causa más frecuente es viral (rotavirus y norovirus seguido de Salmonella, Shigella, E.coli diarreogénicas y Campylobacter. Habitualmente son cuadros autolimitados que no requieren estudio de laboratorio específico y cuyo manejo debe centrarse en la reposición hidro-electrolítica de acuerdo al grado de deshidratación. Existe evidencia sobre beneficio sintomático del uso de probióticos (Lactobacillus GG y S.boulardii; racecadotrilo en cuanto a la diarrea; y ondasetrón para los vómitos. En caso de sospecha de agente invasor (bacteria o parásito debe realizarse un estudio etiológico e iniciar terapia antimicrobiana de acuerdo al microorganismo identificado. La prevención de contagio mediante medidas de saneamiento y adecuada manipulación de agua y alimentos es fundamental. Actualmente se dispone de vacunas efectivas contra algunos de los agentes involucrados (ej. rotavirus, que deben recomendarse en grupos de riesgo.

  1. Widespread environmental contamination with Norwalk-like viruses (NLV) detected in a prolonged hotel outbreak of gastroenteritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheesbrough, J S; Green, J; Gallimore, C I; Wright, P A; Brown, D W

    2000-08-01

    A protracted outbreak of Norwalk-like virus (NLV)-associated gastroenteritis occurred in a large hotel in North-West England between January and May 1996. We investigated the pattern of environmental contamination with NLV in the hotel during and after the outbreak. In the ninth week, 144 environmental swabs taken from around the hotel were tested for NLV by nested RT-PCR. The sites were categorized according to the likelihood of direct contamination with vomit/faeces. The highest proportion of positive samples were detected in directly contaminated carpets, but amplicons were detected in sites above 1.5 m which are unlikely to have been contaminated directly. The trend in positivity of different sites paralleled the diminishing likelihood of direct contamination. A second environmental investigation of the same sites 5 months after the outbreak had finished were all negative by RT-PCR. This study demonstrates for the first time the extent of environmental contamination that may occur during a large NLV outbreak.

  2. The Impact of E-Learning on Adherence to Guidelines for Acute Gastroenteritis: A Single-Arm Intervention Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicastro, Emanuele; Lo Vecchio, Andrea; Liguoro, Ilaria; Chmielewska, Anna; De Bruyn, Caroline; Dolinsek, Jernej; Doroshina, Elena; Fessatou, Smaragdi; Pop, Tudor Lucian; Prell, Christine; Tabbers, Merit Monique; Tavares, Marta; Urenden-Elicin, Pinar; Bruzzese, Dario; Zakharova, Irina; Sandhu, Bhupinder; Guarino, Alfredo

    2015-01-01

    Objective E-learning is a candidate tool for clinical practice guidelines (CPG) implementation due to its versatility, universal access and low costs. We aimed to assess the impact of a five-module e-learning course about CPG for acute gastroenteritis (AGE) on physicians’ knowledge and clinical practice. Study design This work was conceived as a pre/post single-arm intervention study. Physicians from 11 European countries registered for the online course. Personal data, pre- and post-course questionnaires and clinical data about 3 to 5 children with AGE managed by each physician before and after the course were collected. Primary outcome measures included the proportion of participants fully adherent to CPG and number of patients managed with full adherence. Results Among the 149 physicians who signed up for the e-learning course, 59 took the course and reported on their case management of 519 children E-learning is effective in increasing knowledge and improving clinical practice in paediatric AGE and is an effective tool for implementing clinical practice guidelines. PMID:26148301

  3. Molecular characterization of group A rotaviruses detected in children with gastroenteritis in Ireland in 2006-2009.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Cashman, O

    2012-02-01

    SUMMARYCommunity and hospital-acquired cases of human rotavirus are responsible for millions of gastroenteritis cases in children worldwide, chiefly in developing countries, and vaccines are now available. During surveillance activity for human rotavirus infections in Ireland, between 2006 and 2009, a total of 420 rotavirus strains were collected and analysed. Upon either PCR genotyping and sequence analysis, a variety of VP7 (G1-G4 and G9) and VP4 (P[4], P[6], P[8] and P[9]) genotypes were detected. Strains G1P[8] were found to be predominant throughout the period 2006-2008, with slight fluctuations seen in the very limited samples available in 2008-2009. Upon either PCR genotyping and sequence analysis of selected strains, the G1, G3 and G9 viruses were found to contain E1 (Wa-like) NSP4 and I1 VP6 genotypes, while the analysed G2 strains possessed E2 NSP4 and I2 VP6 genotypes, a genetic make-up which is highly conserved in the major human rotavirus genogroups Wa- and Kun-like, respectively. Upon sequence analysis of the most common VP4 genotype, P[8], at least two distinct lineages were identified, both unrelated to P[8] Irish rotaviruses circulating in previous years, and more closely related to recent European humans rotaviruses. Moreover, sequence analysis of the VP7 of G1 rotaviruses revealed the onset of a G1 variant, previously unseen in the Irish population.

  4. Effect of Dilute Apple Juice and Preferred Fluids vs Electrolyte Maintenance Solution on Treatment Failure Among Children With Mild Gastroenteritis: A Randomized Clinical Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freedman, Stephen B; Willan, Andrew R; Boutis, Kathy; Schuh, Suzanne

    2016-05-10

    Gastroenteritis is a common pediatric illness. Electrolyte maintenance solution is recommended to treat and prevent dehydration. Its advantage in minimally dehydrated children is unproven. To determine if oral hydration with dilute apple juice/preferred fluids is noninferior to electrolyte maintenance solution in children with mild gastroenteritis. Randomized, single-blind noninferiority trial conducted between the months of October and April during the years 2010 to 2015 in a tertiary care pediatric emergency department in Toronto, Ontario, Canada. Study participants were children aged 6 to 60 months with gastroenteritis and minimal dehydration. Participants were randomly assigned to receive color-matched half-strength apple juice/preferred fluids (n=323) or apple-flavored electrolyte maintenance solution (n=324). Oral rehydration therapy followed institutional protocols. After discharge, the half-strength apple juice/preferred fluids group was administered fluids as desired; the electrolyte maintenance solution group replaced losses with electrolyte maintenance solution. The primary outcome was a composite of treatment failure defined by any of the following occurring within 7 days of enrollment: intravenous rehydration, hospitalization, subsequent unscheduled physician encounter, protracted symptoms, crossover, and 3% or more weight loss or significant dehydration at in-person follow-up. Secondary outcomes included intravenous rehydration, hospitalization, and frequency of diarrhea and vomiting. The noninferiority margin was defined as a difference between groups of 7.5% for the primary outcome and was assessed with a 1-sided α=.025. If noninferiority was established, a 1-sided test for superiority was conducted. Among 647 randomized children (mean age, 28.3 months; 331 boys [51.1%]; 441 (68.2%) without evidence of dehydration), 644 (99.5%) completed follow-up. Children who were administered dilute apple juice experienced treatment failure less often than those

  5. Gastroenteritis Aggressive Versus Slow Treatment For Rehydration (GASTRO). A pilot rehydration study for severe dehydration: WHO plan C versus slower rehydration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houston, Kirsty A.; Gibb, Jack G.; Mpoya, Ayub; Obonyo, Nchafatso; Olupot-Olupot, Peter; Nakuya, Margeret; Evans, Jennifer A; George, Elizabeth C; Gibb, Diana M; Maitland, Kathryn

    2017-01-01

    Background: The World Health Organization (WHO) rehydration management guidelines (Plan C) for children with acute gastroenteritis (AGE) and severe dehydration are widely practiced in resource-poor settings, yet have never been formally evaluated in a clinical trial. A recent audit of outcome of AGE at Kilifi County Hospital, Kenya noted that 10% of children required high dependency care (20% mortality) and a number developed fluid-related complications. The fluid resuscitation trial, FEAST, conducted in African children with severe febrile illness, demonstrated higher mortality with fluid bolus therapy and raised concerns regarding the safety of rapid intravenous rehydration therapy. Those findings warrant a detailed physiological study of children’s responses to rehydration therapy incorporating quantification of myocardial performance and haemodynamic changes.  Methods: GASTRO is a multi-centre, unblinded Phase II randomised controlled trial of 120 children aged 2 months to 12 years admitted to hospital with severe dehydration secondary to AGE. Children with severe malnutrition, chronic diarrhoea and congenital/rheumatic heart disease are excluded. Children will be enrolled over 18 months in 3 centres in Kenya and Uganda and followed until 7 days post-discharge. The trial will randomise children 1:1 to standard rapid rehydration using Ringers Lactate  (WHO plan ‘C’ – 100mls/kg over 3-6 hours according to age, plus additional 0.9% saline boluses for children presenting in shock) or to a slower rehydration regimen (100mls/kg given over 8 hours and without the addition of fluid boluses). Enrolment started in November 2016 and is on-going. Primary outcome is frequency of adverse events, particularly related to cardiovascular compromise and neurological sequelae.  Secondary outcomes focus on clinical, biochemical, and physiological measures related to assessment of severity of dehydration, and response to treatment by intravenous rehydration. Discussion

  6. Gastroenteritis Aggressive Versus Slow Treatment For Rehydration (GASTRO. A pilot rehydration study for severe dehydration: WHO plan C versus slower rehydration [version 1; referees: 2 approved

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kirsty A. Houston

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: The World Health Organization (WHO rehydration management guidelines (Plan C for children with acute gastroenteritis (AGE and severe dehydration are widely practiced in resource-poor settings, yet have never been formally evaluated in a clinical trial. A recent audit of outcome of AGE at Kilifi County Hospital, Kenya noted that 10% of children required high dependency care (20% mortality and a number developed fluid-related complications. The fluid resuscitation trial, FEAST, conducted in African children with severe febrile illness, demonstrated higher mortality with fluid bolus therapy and raised concerns regarding the safety of rapid intravenous rehydration therapy. Those findings warrant a detailed physiological study of children’s responses to rehydration therapy incorporating quantification of myocardial performance and haemodynamic changes.    Methods: GASTRO is a multi-centre, unblinded Phase II randomised controlled trial of 120 children aged 2 months to 12 years admitted to hospital with severe dehydration secondary to AGE. Children with severe malnutrition, chronic diarrhoea and congenital/rheumatic heart disease are excluded. Children will be enrolled over 18 months in 3 centres in Kenya and Uganda and followed until 7 days post-discharge. The trial will randomise children 1:1 to standard rapid rehydration using Ringers Lactate  (WHO plan ‘C’ – 100mls/kg over 3-6 hours according to age, plus additional 0.9% saline boluses for children presenting in shock or to a slower rehydration regimen (100mls/kg given over 8 hours and without the addition of fluid boluses. Enrolment started in November 2016 and is on-going. Primary outcome is frequency of adverse events, particularly related to cardiovascular compromise and neurological sequelae.  Secondary outcomes focus on clinical, biochemical, and physiological measures related to assessment of severity of dehydration, and response to treatment by intravenous

  7. Vaccines for viral and bacterial pathogens causing acute gastroenteritis: Part II: Vaccines for Shigella, Salmonella, enterotoxigenic E. coli (ETEC) enterohemorragic E. coli (EHEC) and Campylobacter jejuni

    Science.gov (United States)

    O’Ryan, Miguel; Vidal, Roberto; del Canto, Felipe; Carlos Salazar, Juan; Montero, David

    2015-01-01

    In Part II we discuss the following bacterial pathogens: Shigella, Salmonella (non-typhoidal), diarrheogenic E. coli (enterotoxigenic and enterohemorragic) and Campylobacter jejuni. In contrast to the enteric viruses and Vibrio cholerae discussed in Part I of this series, for the bacterial pathogens described here there is only one licensed vaccine, developed primarily for Vibrio cholerae and which provides moderate protection against enterotoxigenic E. coli (ETEC) (Dukoral®), as well as a few additional candidates in advanced stages of development for ETEC and one candidate for Shigella spp. Numerous vaccine candidates in earlier stages of development are discussed. PMID:25715096

  8. Cell Vacuolation Caused by Vibrio cholerae Hemolysin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Figueroa-Arredondo, Paula; Heuser, John E.; Akopyants, Natalia S.; Morisaki, J. Hiroshi; Giono-Cerezo, Silvia; Enríquez-Rincón, Fernando; Berg, Douglas E.

    2001-01-01

    Non-O1 strains of Vibrio cholerae implicated in gastroenteritis and diarrhea generally lack virulence determinants such as cholera toxin that are characteristic of epidemic strains; the factors that contribute to their virulence are not understood. Here we report that at least one-third of diarrhea-associated nonepidemic V. cholerae strains from Mexico cause vacuolation of cultured Vero cells. Detailed analyses indicated that this vacuolation was related to that caused by aerolysin, a pore-forming toxin of Aeromonas; it involved primarily the endoplasmic reticulum at early times (∼1 to 4 h after exposure), and resulted in formation of large, acidic, endosome-like multivesicular vacuoles (probably autophagosomes) only at late times (∼16 h). In contrast to vacuolation caused by Helicobacter pylori VacA protein, that induced by V. cholerae was exacerbated by agents that block vacuolar proton pumping but not by endosome-targeted weak bases. It caused centripetal redistribution of endosomes, reflecting cytoplasmic alkalinization. The gene for V. cholerae vacuolating activity was cloned and was found to correspond to hlyA, the structural gene for hemolysin. HlyA protein is a pore-forming toxin that causes ion leakage and, ultimately, eukaryotic cell lysis. Thus, a distinct form of cell vacuolation precedes cytolysis at low doses of hemolysin. We propose that this vacuolation, in itself, contributes to the virulence of V. cholerae strains, perhaps by perturbing intracellular membrane trafficking or ion exchange in target cells and thereby affecting local intestinal inflammatory or other defense responses. PMID:11179335

  9. Surgical Approach, Findings, and Eight-Year Follow-Up in a Twenty-Nine Year Old Female With Freeman-Sheldon Syndrome Presenting With Blepharophimosis Causing Near-Complete Visual Obstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Portillo, Augusto L; Poling, Mikaela I; McCormick, Rodger J

    2016-07-01

    The authors describe the surgical approach, findings, and 8-year follow-up in a 29-year-old woman, with severe Freeman-Sheldon syndrome, presenting with congenital blepharophimosis of both upper eyelids resulting in near-complete functional visual obstruction. To avoid possible Freeman-Sheldon syndrome-associated complications of malignant hyperthermia, difficult vascular access, and challenging endotracheal intubation, the surgery was completed under local anesthesia without sedation, and anatomical and functional correction was immediate and remained stable at 8-year follow-up. Unlike many congenital craniofacial syndromes, which frequently involve life-long impairments, important implications exist for plastic surgeons to facilitate opportunities for patients to overcome functional limitations.

  10. Genetic Separation of Listeria monocytogenes Causing Central Nervous System Infections in Animals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisandra Aguilar-Bultet

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Listeria monocytogenes is a foodborne pathogen that causes abortion, septicemia, gastroenteritis and central nervous system (CNS infections in ruminants and humans. L. monocytogenes strains mainly belong to two distinct phylogenetic groups, named lineages I and II. In general, clinical cases in humans and animals, in particular CNS infections, are caused by lineage I strains, while most of the environmental and food strains belong to lineage II. Little is known about why lineage I is more virulent than lineage II, even though various molecular factors and mechanisms associated with pathogenesis are known. In this study, we have used a variety of whole genome sequence analyses and comparative genomic tools in order to find characteristics that distinguish lineage I from lineage II strains and CNS infection strains from non-CNS strains. We analyzed 225 strains and identified single nucleotide variants between lineages I and II, as well as differences in the gene content. Using a novel approach based on Reads Per Kilobase per Million Mapped (RPKM, we identified 167 genes predominantly absent in lineage II but present in lineage I. These genes are mostly encoding for membrane-associated proteins. Additionally, we found 77 genes that are largely absent in the non-CNS associated strains, while 39 genes are especially lacking in our defined “non-clinical” group. Based on the RPKM analysis and the metadata linked to the L. monocytogenes strains, we identified 6 genes potentially associated with CNS cases, which include a transcriptional regulator, an ABC transporter and a non-coding RNA. Although there is not a clear separation between pathogenic and non-pathogenic strains based on phylogenetic lineages, the presence of the genes identified in our study reveals potential pathogenesis traits in ruminant L. monocytogenes strains. Ultimately, the differences that we have found in our study will help steer future studies in understanding the virulence

  11. Genetic Separation of Listeria monocytogenes Causing Central Nervous System Infections in Animals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguilar-Bultet, Lisandra; Nicholson, Pamela; Rychener, Lorenz; Dreyer, Margaux; Gözel, Bulent; Origgi, Francesco C.; Oevermann, Anna; Frey, Joachim; Falquet, Laurent

    2018-01-01

    Listeria monocytogenes is a foodborne pathogen that causes abortion, septicemia, gastroenteritis and central nervous system (CNS) infections in ruminants and humans. L. monocytogenes strains mainly belong to two distinct phylogenetic groups, named lineages I and II. In general, clinical cases in humans and animals, in particular CNS infections, are caused by lineage I strains, while most of the environmental and food strains belong to lineage II. Little is known about why lineage I is more virulent than lineage II, even though various molecular factors and mechanisms associated with pathogenesis are known. In this study, we have used a variety of whole genome sequence analyses and comparative genomic tools in order to find characteristics that distinguish lineage I from lineage II strains and CNS infection strains from non-CNS strains. We analyzed 225 strains and identified single nucleotide variants between lineages I and II, as well as differences in the gene content. Using a novel approach based on Reads Per Kilobase per Million Mapped (RPKM), we identified 167 genes predominantly absent in lineage II but present in lineage I. These genes are mostly encoding for membrane-associated proteins. Additionally, we found 77 genes that are largely absent in the non-CNS associated strains, while 39 genes are especially lacking in our defined “non-clinical” group. Based on the RPKM analysis and the metadata linked to the L. monocytogenes strains, we identified 6 genes potentially associated with CNS cases, which include a transcriptional regulator, an ABC transporter and a non-coding RNA. Although there is not a clear separation between pathogenic and non-pathogenic strains based on phylogenetic lineages, the presence of the genes identified in our study reveals potential pathogenesis traits in ruminant L. monocytogenes strains. Ultimately, the differences that we have found in our study will help steer future studies in understanding the virulence mechanisms of the

  12. Norovirus prevalence in ‘pathogen negative’ gastroenteritis in children from periurban areas in Lima, Peru

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivera, Fulton P.; Ochoa, Theresa J.; Ruiz, Joaquim; Medina, Anicia M.; Ecker, Lucie; Mercado, Erik; Gil, Ana I.; Huicho, Luis; Lanata, Claudio F.

    2011-01-01

    Summary Norovirus was detected in 17.4% of 224 diarrhoeal samples from children younger than 24 months of age in Lima, in whom all common pathogens had been excluded (pathogen negative). Norovirus was identified more frequently in children older than 12 months of age than in younger children (34% vs 8%, P<0.001). Among norovirus-positive samples, genogroup II was the predominant group (92%). Compared with rotavirus, norovirus episodes tended to be of shorter duration and less severe. The role of norovirus as a cause of diarrhoea and the ascertainment of its severity in developing countries needs further confirmation by future epidemiological studies. PMID:21962615

  13. [Food borne outbreak caused by the well water contaminated norovirus].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tokutake, Yumi; Kobayashi, Masato; Akiyama, Miho; Aiki, Chikako; Nishio, Osamu

    2006-05-01

    In May 2004, 65 people from 18 groups of visitors to guesthouse (a traditional Japanese guesthouse) in the Nagano Prefecture, Japan developed acute gastroenteritis. Although these cases originally attributed to food poisoning, based on epidemiological and dietary surveys, there was nothing that is associated as a cause food. The same wall water was used throughout the guesthouse except in the kitchen, so testing was conducted on this water. Lordsdale variant strain of Norovirus was detected from both of the well water and the feces of patients and staff. The well supplying to the guesthouse was only 10 meters deep and fecal coliform group was also detected in the well water from the guesthouse. This suggested that the water source was contaminated by human feces.

  14. Oral and intestinal mucositis - causes and possible treatments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duncan, M; Grant, G

    2003-11-01

    Chemotherapy and radiotherapy, whilst highly effective in the treatment of neoplasia, can also cause damage to healthy tissue. In particular, the alimentary tract may be badly affected. Severe inflammation, lesioning and ulceration can occur. Patients may experience intense pain, nausea and gastro-enteritis. They are also highly susceptible to infection. The disorder (mucositis) is a dose-limiting toxicity of therapy and affects around 500 000 patients world-wide annually. Oral and intestinal mucositis is multi-factorial in nature. The disruption or loss of rapidly dividing epithelial progenitor cells is a trigger for the onset of the disorder. However, the actual dysfunction that manifests and its severity and duration are greatly influenced by changes in other cell populations, immune responses and the effects of oral/gut flora. This complexity has hampered the development of effective palliative or preventative measures. Recent studies have concentrated on the use of bioactive/growth factors, hormones or interleukins to modify epithelial metabolism and reduce the susceptibility of the tract to mucositis. Some of these treatments appear to have considerable potential and are at present under clinical evaluation. This overview deals with the cellular changes and host responses that may lead to the development of mucositis of the oral cavity and gastrointestinal tract, and the potential of existing and novel palliative measures to limit or prevent the disorder. Presently available treatments do not prevent mucositis, but can limit its severity if used in combination. Poor oral health and existing epithelial damage predispose patients to mucositis. The elimination of dental problems or the minimization of existing damage to the alimentary tract, prior to the commencement of therapy, lowers their susceptibility. Measures that reduce the flora of the tract, before therapy, can also be helpful. Increased production of free radicals and the induction of inflammation are

  15. Unusual initial abdominal presentations of invasive meningococcal disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guiddir, Tamazoust; Gros, Marion; Hong, Eva; Terrade, Aude; Denizon, Mélanie; Deghmane, Ala-Eddine; Taha, Muhamed-Kheir

    2018-03-28

    Invasive meningococcal disease (IMD) is recognized as septicemia and/or meningitis. However, early symptoms may vary and are frequently nonspecific. Early abdominal presentations have been increasingly described. We aimed to explore a large cohort of patients with initial abdominal presentations for association with particular meningococcal strains. Confirmed IMD cases in France between 1991-2016 were screened for the presence within the 24 hours before diagnosis of at least one of the following criteria (1) abdominal pain, (2) gastro-enteritis with diarrhea and vomiting, (3) diarrhea only. Whole genome sequencing was performed on all cultured isolates. We identified 105 cases (median age 19 years) of early abdominal presentations with a sharp increase since 2014. Early abdominal pain alone was the most frequent symptom (n=67, 64%), followed by gastro-enteritis (n=26, 25%) and diarrhea alone (n=12, 11%). Twenty patients (20%) had abdominal surgery. A higher case fatality rate (24%) was observed in these cases compared to 10.4% in all IMD in France (p=0.007) with high levels of inflammation markers in the blood. Isolates of group W were significantly more predominant in these cases compared to all IMD. Most of these isolates belonged to clonal complex ST-11 (cc11) of the sublineages of the South American-UK strain. Abdominal presentations are frequently provoked by hyperinvasive isolates of meningococci. Delay in the management of these cases and the virulence of the isolates may explain the high fatality rate. Rapid recognition is a key element to improve their management.

  16. 期货公司风险管理现状、诱因与稀释策略%Present Situation, Cause and Dilution Strategy onRisk Management of Futures Companies

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陆岷峰; 沈黎怡

    2017-01-01

    作为沟通市场与投资者之间的桥梁,期货公司在开展业务活动的同时面临着较多风险,包括市场行情波动风险、投资者信用风险以及由内部从业人员道德素质引发的操作风险等.高效的风险管控是公司保证可持续经营以及进一步创新转型的前提,当前外部监管环境还存在一定不足,监管主体权责不明确,但总体趋向优化.而期货公司内部风控机制依旧存在较大的缺陷,治理结构不完善、风控手段单一、缺乏风险量化评估工具等因素严重影响期货公司正常运营.因此,一方面我国应设立独立的期货监管部门,在法律层面明确其监管职责,以此加强行业监管;另一方面,从期货公司自身层面出发,应积极建立长效的风险管控机制、完善公司治理结构、合理调整公司业务架构并强化对内部从业人员的管理.%As the bridge between the market and investors,futures companies have faced considerable risks when conducting business activities,such as market risk,investor credit risk and internal practitioners operating risk.Efficient risk control is the premise of futures company to maintain sustainable management and further innovation and development.At present,there are still some deficiencies in the external regulatory environment of futures company risk management,such as the desperation of the authority and responsibility,but it tends to be optimized.Deficiencies still exit in internal risk control mechanism of futures company,because the inadequate corporate governance,the single mode of risk management,the lack of risk assessment tool seriously affect the normal operation of futures company.Therefore,we should set up an independent futures regulatory authority to strengthen supervision at the legal level,then establish long-term risk supervision mechanism,improve the corporate governance structure,adjust the business structure and strengthen the internal staff management on the

  17. Rotavirus Gastroenteritis is Associated with Increased Morbidity and Mortality in Children with Inherited Metabolic Disorders

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Smith, A

    2017-04-01

    Rotavirus is the leading cause of infantile diarrhoea worldwide in children <5 years1. Although mortality rates are low in Ireland, certain populations are more susceptible to the associated morbidity and mortality of infection. A retrospective chart review of 14 patients with confirmed IMDs who were admitted to Temple Street Children’s Hospital between 2010 to 2015 with rotavirus infection were compared with 14 randomly selected age matched controls. The median length of stay was 7 days (SD25.3) in IMD patients versus 1.5 days (SD 2.1) in the controls. IV fluids were required on average for 4.5 days (range 0-17) in IMD patients versus 0.63 days (range 0-3) in controls. This report highlights the increased morbidity of rotavirus infection in patients with IMD compared to healthy children. This vulnerable population are likely to benefit from the recent introduction of the rotavirus oral vaccination in October 2016.

  18. Epidemiology of bacterial toxin-mediated foodborne gastroenteritis outbreaks in Australia, 2001 to 2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    May, Fiona J; Polkinghorne, Benjamin G; Fearnley, Emily J

    2016-12-24

    Bacterial toxin-mediated foodborne outbreaks, such as those caused by Clostridium perfringens, Staphylococcus aureus and Bacillus cereus, are an important and preventable cause of morbidity and mortality. Due to the short incubation period and duration of illness, these outbreaks are often under-reported. This is the first study to describe the epidemiology of bacterial toxin-mediated outbreaks in Australia. Using data collected between 2001 and 2013, we identify high risk groups and risk factors to inform prevention measures. Descriptive analyses of confirmed bacterial toxin-mediated outbreaks between 2001 and 2013 were undertaken using data extracted from the OzFoodNet Outbreak Register, a database of all outbreaks of gastrointestinal disease investigated by public health authorities in Australia. A total of 107 laboratory confirmed bacterial toxin-mediated outbreaks were reported between 2001 and 2013, affecting 2,219 people, including 47 hospitalisations and 13 deaths. Twelve deaths occurred in residents of aged care facilities. Clostridium perfringens was the most commonly reported aetiological agent (81 outbreaks, 76%). The most commonly reported food preparation settings were commercial food preparation services (51 outbreaks, 48%) and aged care facilities (42 outbreaks, 39%). Bacterial toxin outbreaks were rarely associated with food preparation in the home (2 outbreaks, 2%). In all outbreaks, the primary factor contributing to the outbreak was inadequate temperature control of the food. Public health efforts aimed at improving storage and handling practices for pre-cooked and re-heated foods, especially in commercial food preparation services and aged care facilities, could help to reduce the magnitude of bacterial toxin outbreaks.

  19. Outbreaks of Acute Gastroenteritis Transmitted by Person-to-Person Contact, Environmental Contamination, and Unknown Modes of Transmission--United States, 2009-2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wikswo, Mary E; Kambhampati, Anita; Shioda, Kayoko; Walsh, Kelly A; Bowen, Anna; Hall, Aron J

    2015-12-11

    Acute gastroenteritis (AGE) is a major cause of illness in the United States, with an estimated 179 million episodes annually. AGE outbreaks propagated through direct person-to-person contact, contaminated environmental surfaces, and unknown modes of transmission were not systematically captured at the national level before 2009 and thus were not well characterized. 2009-2013. The National Outbreak Reporting System (NORS) is a voluntary national reporting system that supports reporting of all waterborne and foodborne disease outbreaks and all AGE outbreaks resulting from transmission by contact with contaminated environmental sources, infected persons or animals, or unknown modes. Local, state, and territorial public health agencies within the 50 U.S. states, the District of Columbia (DC), five U.S. territories, and three Freely Associated States report outbreaks to CDC via NORS using a standard online data entry system. A total of 10,756 AGE outbreaks occurred during 2009-2013, for which the primary mode of transmission occurred through person-to-person contact, environmental contamination, and unknown modes of transmission. NORS received reports from public health agencies in 50 U.S. states, DC, and Puerto Rico. These outbreaks resulted in 356,532 reported illnesses, 5,394 hospitalizations, and 459 deaths. The median outbreak reporting rate for all sites in a given year increased from 2.7 outbreaks per million population in 2009 to 11.8 outbreaks in 2013. The etiology was unknown in 31% (N = 3,326) of outbreaks. Of the 7,430 outbreaks with a suspected or confirmed etiology reported, norovirus was the most common, reported in 6,223 (84%) of these outbreaks. Other reported suspected or confirmed etiologies included Shigella (n = 332) and Salmonella (n = 320). Outbreaks were more frequent during the winter, with 5,716 (53%) outbreaks occurring during December-February, and 70% of the 7,001 outbreaks with a reported setting of exposure occurred in long

  20. Comparative efficacy of different schemes for the therapy of rotavirus gastroenteritis in children. Case–control study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. V. Khaliullina

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective research: compare the efficacy of different types of therapy for rotavirus gastroenteritis in children.Materials and methods. A study was carried out, the design of which corresponded to the case–control type. The main group is children hospitalized in a hospital with laboratory confirmed rotavirus infection (35 cases, who were prescribed a modern regimen of therapy that included a low-carbohydrate diet, rehydration with low osmolar oral solutions, dioctahedral smectite, probiotic containing Saccharomyces boulardii. For each child of the main group was selected another patient (control, the corresponding sex, age, the period from the onset of the disease to admission to hospital, and the degree of dehydration. Patients of the control group (n=35 were assigned a traditional «old» therapy regimen, including a diet corresponding to Table No. 4 in Pevznur, oral rehydration solutions with osmolality of 282 mOsm/l, anthibacterial therapy (ceftriaxone, dioctahedral smectite and pancreatin at age-dependent doses. The duration of the observation was 5 days. Results: By the 5th day of treatment, the normalization of the stool was recorded in 91.4% [95% CI 82.1–100.7], 32/35 in the main group and 71.4% [95% CI 56.5–86.3], 25/35 children in the control (p <0.05, OR 4.27 [95% CI 1.06–17.2]. The timing of relief of excess meteorism also had statistically significant differences and was shorter in patients receiving a «new» therapy regimen (OR 2.8 [95% CI 1.01–8]. The positive effect of the proposed scheme was also observed when assessing the duration of dehydration symptoms and the timing of hospitalization.Conclusions: The conducted study case–control showed the advantage of modern schemes of therapy of rotavirus infections in children.

  1. Estimating rotavirus gastroenteritis hospitalisations by using hospital episode statistics before and after the introduction of rotavirus vaccine in Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayasinghe, Sanjay; Macartney, Kristine

    2013-01-30

    Hospital discharge records and laboratory data have shown a substantial early impact from the rotavirus vaccination program that commenced in 2007 in Australia. However, these assessments are affected by the validity and reliability of hospital discharge coding and stool testing to measure the true incidence of hospitalised disease. The aim of this study was to assess the validity of these data sources for disease estimation, both before and after, vaccine introduction. All hospitalisations at a major paediatric centre in children aged <5 years from 2000 to 2009 containing acute gastroenteritis (AGE) ICD 10 AM diagnosis codes were linked to hospital laboratory stool testing data. The validity of the rotavirus-specific diagnosis code (A08.0) and the incidence of hospitalisations attributable to rotavirus by both direct estimation and with adjustments for non-testing and miscoding were calculated for pre- and post-vaccination periods. A laboratory record of stool testing was available for 36% of all AGE hospitalisations (n=4948) the rotavirus code had high specificity (98.4%; 95% CI, 97.5-99.1%) and positive predictive value (96.8%; 94.8-98.3%), and modest sensitivity (61.6%; 58-65.1%). Of all rotavirus test positive hospitalisations only a third had a rotavirus code. The estimated annual average number of rotavirus hospitalisations, following adjustment for non-testing and miscoding was 5- and 6-fold higher than identified, respectively, from testing and coding alone. Direct and adjusted estimates yielded similar percentage reductions in annual average rotavirus hospitalisations of over 65%. Due to the limited use of stool testing and poor sensitivity of the rotavirus-specific diagnosis code routine hospital discharge and laboratory data substantially underestimate the true incidence of rotavirus hospitalisations and absolute vaccine impact. However, this data can still be used to monitor vaccine impact as the effects of miscoding and under-testing appear to be

  2. Lactobacillus GG (LGG) and smectite versus LGG alone for acute gastroenteritis: a double-blind, randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pieścik-Lech, Małgorzata; Urbańska, Magdalena; Szajewska, Hania

    2013-02-01

    Diarrhea treatment with either Lactobacillus GG (LGG) or smectite as an adjuvant to standard rehydration therapy has proven efficacy. In countries where both LGG and smectite are available, concomitant use is frequently practiced. We investigated whether LGG plus smectite is superior to LGG alone in the management of children with acute gastroenteritis (AGE). A double-blind, placebo-controlled, randomized trial was performed. Children aged 4 to 60 months with AGE received LGG 6 × 10(9) colony forming units/day plus randomly either smectite (3 g) or placebo as an adjuvant to the standard rehydration therapy. Of the 88 children randomized, 81 (92 %) were available for intention-to-treat analysis. The duration of diarrhea in the LGG/smectite group (n = 44) compared with the LGG/placebo group (n = 37) was similar (P = 0.43). There were no significant differences between the study groups for the secondary outcomes, with three exceptions. On day 4, in the LGG/placebo group compared to the LGG/smectite group, there was significantly reduced stool frequency (P = 0.03). While there was a significant (P = 0.05) difference in stool consistency on the Bristol Stool Form Scale on day 4, it was not of clinical relevance. Finally, in the LGG/smectite group compared to the LGG/placebo group, there was a significantly shorter duration of intravenous therapy after randomization (P = 0.02). No adverse events were observed in the study groups. LGG plus smectite and LGG alone are equally effective for treating young children with AGE. Combined use of the two interventions is not justified.

  3. Intravenous rehydration of malnourished children with acute gastroenteritis and severe dehydration: A systematic review [version 1; referees: 2 approved

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kirsty A. Houston

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Rehydration strategies in children with severe acute malnutrition (SAM and severe dehydration are extremely cautious. The World Health Organization (WHO SAM guidelines advise strongly against intravenous fluids unless the child is shocked or severely dehydrated and unable to tolerate oral fluids. Otherwise, guidelines recommend oral or nasogastric rehydration using low sodium oral rehydration solutions. There is limited evidence to support these recommendations. Methods: We conducted a systematic review of randomised controlled trials (RCTs and observational studies on 15th June 2017 comparing different strategies of rehydration therapy in children with acute gastroenteritis and severe dehydration, specifically relating to intravenous rehydration, using standard search terms. Two authors assessed papers for inclusion. The primary endpoint was evidence of fluid overload. Results: Four studies were identified, all published in English, including 883 children, all of which were conducted in low resource settings. Two were randomised controlled trials and two observational cohort studies, one incorporated assessment of myocardial and haemodynamic function. There was no evidence of fluid overload or other fluid-related adverse events, including children managed on more liberal rehydration protocols. Mortality was high overall, and particularly in children with shock managed on WHO recommendations (day-28 mortality 82%. There was no difference in safety outcomes when different rates of intravenous rehydration were compared. Conclusions: The current ‘strong recommendations’ for conservative rehydration of children with SAM are not based on emerging evidence. We found no clinical trials providing a direct assessment of the current WHO guidelines, and those that were available suggested that these children have a high mortality and remain fluid depleted on current therapy. Recent studies have reported no evidence of fluid overload or

  4. Water borne epidemic of gastroenteritis in Ghallour sub-centre of Jawalamukhi block, Kangra District, Himachal Pradesh, India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Surender Nikhil Gupta

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: On August 31, 2014, eighty cases of the gastroenteritis were reported in Ghallour sub-center area. We investigated the outbreak to identify the source, propose control, and preventive measures. Materials and Methods: We defined a case as occurrence of three or more watery stools with or without vomiting, w.e.f January 27, till February 2, 2014 in residents of Ghallour sub-center area of Jawalamukhi block. We hypothesized it as a water borne outbreak. We determined age and sex specific attack rate. We collected information about personal history on age, sex, residence, and date of onset of symptom from case patient and established line list. We collected nine stool samples/rectal swabs from the cases; three pre and four post chlorination water samples and sent them for microbiological testing. We mapped water supply pipelines of the area and reviewed the water chlorination record. Results: We identified 390 cases in 16 villages under the sub center. The overall attack rate was 8% with a range of 1.3% to 36%. The cases patients were reported from all age groups and both the genders with the youngest student; 1-year old to the oldest one as 88 years. Two-third of the cases reported vomiting with some complaining of pain abdomen. Villages like Jathman, Khattni, Rajol Patta, Kohara has 100% case patients of loose motions while villages like Dhroli, (100%, Sasan (63% and Ghallour (50%, etc., have combined symptoms of loose motions and vomiting. No fatality was reported. Escherichia coli was detected in the samples from water samples. Records of chlorination were not properly maintained. Conclusion / Recommendation: The outbreak was associated due to contamination of water at the source in Jolly Khad. Regular treatment of the water needs to be done right at the source before being lifted.

  5. Estimating the Hospital Burden of Norovirus-Associated Gastroenteritis in England and its Opportunity Costs for Non-Admitted Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandmann, Frank G; Shallcross, Laura; Adams, Natalie; Allen, David J; Coen, Pietro G; Jeanes, Annette; Kozlakidis, Zisis; Larkin, Lesley; Wurie, Fatima; Robotham, Julie V; Jit, Mark; Deeny, Sarah R

    2018-02-26

    Norovirus places a substantial burden on healthcare systems, arising from infected patients, disease outbreaks, beds kept unoccupied for infection control, and staff absences due to infection. In settings with high rates of bed occupancy, opportunity costs arise from patients who cannot be admitted due to beds being unavailable. With several treatments and vaccines against norovirus in development, quantifying the expected economic burden is timely. The number of inpatients with norovirus-associated gastroenteritis in England were modelled using infectious and non-infectious gastrointestinal Hospital Episode Statistics codes and laboratory reports of gastrointestinal pathogens collected at Public Health England. The excess length of stay from norovirus was estimated with a multi-state model and local outbreak data. Unoccupied bed-days and staff absences were estimated from national outbreak surveillance. The burden was valued conventionally using accounting expenditures and wages, which we contrasted to the opportunity costs from forgone patients using a novel methodology. Between July 2013 and June 2016, 17.7% (95%-confidence interval: 15.6%‒21.6%) of primary and 23.8% (20.6%‒29.9%) of secondary gastrointestinal diagnoses were norovirus-attributable. Annually, the estimated median 290,000 (interquartile range: 282,000‒297,000) occupied and unoccupied bed-days used for norovirus displaced 57,800 patients. Conventional costs for the National Health Service reached £107.6 million; the economic burden approximated to £297.7 million and a loss of 6,300 quality-adjusted life years annually. In England, norovirus is now the second-largest contributor of the gastrointestinal hospital burden. With the projected impact being greater than previously estimated, improved capture of relevant opportunity costs seems imperative for diseases like norovirus.

  6. Meta-analysis: Lactobacillus reuteri strain DSM 17938 (and the original strain ATCC 55730) for treating acute gastroenteritis in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szajewska, H; Urbańska, M; Chmielewska, A; Weizman, Z; Shamir, R

    2014-09-01

    Lactobacillus reuteri ATCC 55730 has been shown to provide a moderate clinical effect in the treatment of acute gastroenteritis (AGE) in children. However, as the L. reuteri ATCC 55730 strain was found to carry potentially transferable resistance traits for tetracycline and lincomycin, it was replaced by a new strain, L. reuteri DSM 17938, without unwanted plasmid-borne antibiotic resistance. Bioequivalence of the two strains has been suggested. We aimed to systematically evaluate data on the effectiveness of L. reuteri DSM 17938 and the original strain, L. reuteri ATCC 55730, in the treatment of AGE in children. The Cochrane Library, MEDLINE, and EMBASE databases, reference lists, and abstract books of major scientific meetings were searched in August 2013, with no language restrictions, for relevant randomised controlled trials (RCTs). Two RCTs (n=196) that evaluated L. reuteri DSM 17938 and three RCTs (n=156) that evaluated L. reuteri ATCC 55730, which involved hospitalised children aged 3 to 60 months, met the inclusion criteria. Compared with placebo or no treatment, DSM 17938 significantly reduced the duration of diarrhoea (mean difference -32 h, 95% confidence interval (CI): -41 to -24) and increased the chance of cure on day 3 (relative risk: 3.5, 95% CI: 1.2 to 10.8, random effects model). Similar results were obtained with the original strain, L. reuteri ATCC 55730. In conclusion, in hospitalised children, use of both strains of L. reuteri reduced the duration of diarrhoea, and more children were cured within 3 days. Data from outpatients and countryspecific cost-effectiveness analyses are needed. Given the limited data and the methodological limitations of the included trials, the evidence should be viewed with caution.

  7. Incidence of rotavirus gastroenteritis by age in African, Asian and European children: Relevance for timing of rotavirus vaccination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steele, A. Duncan; Madhi, Shabir A.; Cunliffe, Nigel A.; Vesikari, Timo; Phua, Kong Boo; Lim, Fong Seng; Nelson, E. Anthony S.; Lau, Yu-Lung; Huang, Li-Min; Karkada, Naveen; Debrus, Serge; Han, Htay Htay; Benninghoff, Bernd

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Variability in rotavirus gastroenteritis (RVGE) epidemiology can influence the optimal vaccination schedule. We evaluated regional trends in the age of RVGE episodes in low- to middle- versus high-income countries in three continents. We undertook a post-hoc analysis based on efficacy trials of a human rotavirus vaccine (HRV; Rotarix™, GSK Vaccines), in which 1348, 1641, and 5250 healthy infants received a placebo in Europe (NCT00140686), Africa (NCT00241644), and Asia (NCT00197210, NCT00329745). Incidence of any/severe RVGE by age at onset was evaluated by active surveillance over the first two years of life. Severity of RVGE episodes was assessed using the Vesikari-scale. The incidence of any RVGE in Africa was higher than in Europe during the first year of life (≤2.78% vs. ≤2.03% per month), but much lower during the second one (≤0.86% versus ≤2.00% per month). The incidence of severe RVGE in Africa was slightly lower than in Europe during the first year of life. Nevertheless, temporal profiles for the incidence of severe RVGE in Africa and Europe during the first (≤1.00% and ≤1.23% per month) and second (≤0.53% and ≤1.13% per month) years of life were similar to those of any RVGE. Any/severe RVGE incidences peaked at younger ages in Africa vs. Europe. In high-income Asian regions, severe RVGE incidence (≤0.31% per month) remained low during the study. The burden of any RVGE was higher earlier in life in children from low- to middle- compared with high-income countries. Differing rotavirus vaccine schedules are likely warranted to maximize protection in different settings. PMID:27260009

  8. Laboratory monitoring of bacterial gastroenteric pathogens Salmonella and Shigella in Shanghai, China 2006-2012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, J; Wang, F; Jin, H; Hu, J; Yuan, Z; Shi, W; Yang, X; Meng, J; Xu, X

    2015-02-01

    In 2006 we initiated an enhanced laboratory-based surveillance of Salmonella and Shigella infections in Shanghai, China. A total of 4483 Salmonella and 2226 Shigella isolates were recovered from stool specimens by 2012. In 80 identified Salmonella serovars, Enteritidis (34·5%) and Typhimurium (26·2%) were the most common. Shigella (S.) sonnei accounted for 63·9% of human Shigella infections over the same time period, and replaced S. flexneri to become the primary cause of shigellosis since 2010. Overall, a high level of antimicrobial resistance was observed in Salmonella and Shigella, particularly to nalidixic acid, ampicillin, and tetracycline. Ciprofloxacin resistance was common in Salmonella Typhimurium (21·0%) and S. flexneri (37·6%). The cephalosporin resistance in both pathogens also increased over the years, ranging from 3·4% to 7·0% in Salmonella, and from 10·4% to 28·6% in Shigella. Resistance to multiple antimicrobials was also identified in a large number of the isolates. This study provides insight into the distribution of Salmonella and Shigella in diarrhoeal diseases.

  9. [Clinical analysis on an outbreak of SRSV-gastroenteritis with 644 patients emerged in Shizuoka Prefecture].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, N; Sugieda, M; Miyamoto, H

    1999-04-01

    Small round structured viruses (SRSV) are the major cause of acute non-bacterial enterogastritis and have a characteristic of breaking out with mass victims as food poisoning. The outbreak usually occurs among school children from school lunches in Japan. A case in adults is relatively rare. The SRSV food poisoning with 644 adult victims carried through lunch box broke out, which may be the biggest number in adult cases in the world. This is the report describing its outlines, analytical result of clinical symptoms and fecal microbial examination. The average latent period was 37 hours, the time was mostly (47%) between 24-36 hours. The most emerged symptom was diarrhea and followed nausea, abdominal pain, vomiting and high fever. The older patients showed a higher rate of diarrhea and fewer one of nausea and fever. 15 patients complained of eye symptom. This number should not be neglected. It may be a characteristic of the disease. SRSV detection test with PT-PCR method of feces was done on 36 patients and 24 patients were positive. The most sensitive primer was Yuri/nested/22F/R. In Japan, lunch-service has become a industry advancing monopolization and wide areazation. SRSV make easily contamination to food, therefore if mass victim food-poisoning occurs, this should be considered initially.

  10. Leech as a cause of abnormal vaginal bleeding: Presentation of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    JOURNAL OF ERITREAN MEDICAL ASSOCIATION JEMA. 59. Introduction ... days, menstrual cycle of <21 days and total menstrual ... were being used as a means of blood letting, a practice ... normal vital signs and a slightly pale conjunctiva.

  11. Acromegaly presented as a cause of laryngeal dyspnea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saussez, S; Mahillon, V; Chantrain, G; Thill, M P; Lequeux, T

    2007-12-01

    Acromegalic patients can develop obstructive sleep apnea syndrome or upper airflow obstruction. The development of dyspnea is unusual and the fixation of both vocal cords is exceptional. We report the case of a patient with bilateral vocal cord paralysis. Fiberoptic laryngoscopy and computed tomography (CT) of the neck showed a supra-glottic stenosis due to a swelling of the soft tissue. A tracheostomy was first performed. Thereafter, micro-laryngoscopy using laser vaporisation of the supra-glottic soft tissue was attempted but failed to remove the tracheostomy canula. Finally, blood tests and cerebral MRI revealed an acromegaly. The patient underwent a trans-sphenoidal resection of the pituitary adenoma. Fifteen months later, fiberoptic laryngoscopy showed bilateral restoration of vocal cord mobility and the tracheostomy canula was successfully removed after 18 months. Vocal cord fixation is probably due to hypopharyngeal and laryngeal soft tissue swelling and can be reversible after successful treatment of the adenoma.

  12. Present day sea level changes: observation and causes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lombard, A.

    2005-11-01

    Whereas sea level has changed little over the last 2000 years, it has risen at a rate of about 2 mm/year during the 20. century. This unexpected sea level rise has been attributed to the anthropogenic global warming, recorded over several decades. Sea level variations have been measured globally and precisely for about 12 years due to satellite altimeter missions Topex/Poseidon and Jason-1. These observations indicate a global mean sea level rise of about 3 mm/year since 1993, a value significantly larger than observed during previous decades. Recent observations have allowed us to quantify the various climatic factors contributing to observed sea level change: thermal expansion of sea water due to ocean warming, melting of mountain glaciers and ice sheets, and changes in the land water reservoirs. A water budget based on these new observations allows us to partly explain the observed sea level rise. In particular, we show that the thermal expansion explains only 25% of the secular sea level rise as recorded by tide-gauges over the last 50 years, while it contributes about 50% of sea level rise observed over the last decade. Meanwhile, recent studies show that glacier and ice sheet melting could contribute the equivalent of 1 mm/year in sea level rise over the last decade. In addition, the high regional variability of sea level trends revealed by satellite altimetry is mainly due to thermal expansion. There is also an important decadal spatio-temporal variability in the ocean thermal expansion over the last 50 years, which seems to be controlled by natural climate fluctuations. We question for the first time the link between the decadal fluctuations in the ocean thermal expansion and in the land reservoirs, and indeed their climatic contribution to sea level change. Finally a preliminary analysis of GRACE spatial gravimetric observations over the oceans allows us to estimate the seasonal variations in mean sea level due to ocean water mass balance variations. (author)

  13. Present day sea level changes: observations and climatic causes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lombard, A.

    2007-01-01

    After a few thousand years of relative stability, sea level has risen of about 20 cm since the beginning of the 20. century. It currently rises at an average rate of about 3 mm/yr in response to global warming. About half of this rate is directly attributed to thermal expansion of sea water due to ocean warming, while the other half is mainly due to the melting of mountain glaciers and ice sheets. Satellite observations show that sea level rise is highly non-uniform. (author)

  14. Lymphangioma causing duodenal obstruction in adult, rare presentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prashant W Khade

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A submucosal lymphangioma is a rare pathology in the alimentary tract. It is a benign entity of the lymphatic system. A duodenal lymphangioma is extremely rare and has an unknown etiology. Clinical and laboratory findings are nonspecific, and they are incidentally found by endoscopy and their treatment is surgical excision. Small lesions are often asymptomatic. Recently, the authors experienced a 62-year-old man, who had a duodenal lymphangioma, showing gastric outlet obstruction symptoms. A multidetector computed tomography abdomen study revealed a single submucosal cystic lesion in second part of duodenum. The lesion was successfully excised after Whipple′s procedure. Histopathology confirmed the diagnosis of lymphangioma.

  15. Performance of Clinical Signs in the Diagnosis of Dehydration in Children with Acute Gastroenteritis

    OpenAIRE

    Hoxha, Teuta; Xhelili, Luan; Azemi, Mehmedali; Avdiu, Muharrem; Ismaili-Jaha, Vlora; Efendija-Beqa, Urata; Grajcevci-Uka, Violeta

    2015-01-01

    Background: Acute evaluation and treatment of children presenting with dehydration represent one of the most common situation in the pediatric emergency department. To identify dehydration in infants and children before treatment, a number of symptoms and clinical signs have been evaluated. The aim of the study was to describe the performance of clinical signs in detecting dehydration in children. Methods: Two hundred children aged 1 month to 5 year were involved in our prospective study. The...

  16. Causes of mortality and associated modifiable health care factors for children (< 5-years admitted at Onandjokwe Hospital, Namibia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johnface F. Mdala

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Many countries, especially those from sub-Saharan Africa, are unlikely to reach the Millennium Development Goal for under-5 mortality reduction by 2015. This study aimed to identify the causes of mortality and associated modifiable health care factors for under-5year-old children admitted to Onandjokwe Hospital, Namibia. Method: A descriptive retrospective review of the medical records of all children under fiveyears who died in the hospital for the period of 12 months during 2013, using two differentstructured questionnaires targeting perinatal deaths and post-perinatal deaths respectively. Results: The top five causes of 125 perinatal deaths were prematurity 22 (17.6%, birth asphyxia 19 (15.2%, congenital anomalies 16 (12.8%, unknown 13 (10.4% and abruptio placenta 11 (8.8%. The top five causes of 60 post-perinatal deaths were bacterial pneumonia 21 (35%, gastroenteritis 12 (20%, severe malnutrition 6 (10%, septicaemia 6 (10%, and tuberculosis 4 (6.7%. Sixty-nine (55% perinatal deaths and 42 (70% post-perinatal deaths were potentially avoidable. The modifiable factors were: late presentation to a health care facility, antenatal clinics not screening for danger signs, long distance referral, district hospitals not providing emergency obstetric care, poor monitoring of labour and admitted children in the wards, lack of screening for malnutrition, failure to repeat an HIV test in pregnant women in the third trimesteror during breastfeeding, and a lack of review of the urgent results of critically ill children. Conclusion: A significant number of deaths in children under 5-years of age could be avoided by paying attention to the modifiable factors identified in this study.

  17. Performance of Clinical Signs in the Diagnosis of Dehydration in Children with Acute Gastroenteritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoxha, Teuta; Xhelili, Luan; Azemi, Mehmedali; Avdiu, Muharrem; Ismaili-Jaha, Vlora; Efendija-Beqa, Urata; Grajcevci-Uka, Violeta

    2015-01-01

    Background: Acute evaluation and treatment of children presenting with dehydration represent one of the most common situation in the pediatric emergency department. To identify dehydration in infants and children before treatment, a number of symptoms and clinical signs have been evaluated. The aim of the study was to describe the performance of clinical signs in detecting dehydration in children. Methods: Two hundred children aged 1 month to 5 year were involved in our prospective study. The clinical assessment consisted of the ten clinical signs of dehydration, including those recommended by WHO (World Health Organization), heart rate, and capillary refill time. Results: Two hundred patients with diarrhea were enrolled in the study. The mean age was 15.62±9.03 months and 57.5% were male. Of these 121 had a fluid deficit of 10%) the median was 9 (p<0.0001, Kruskal-Wallis test). Using stepwise linear regression and a p value of <0.05 for entry into the model, a four-variable model including sunken eyes, skin elasticity, week radial pulse, and general appearance was derived. Conclusion: None of the 10 findings studied, is sufficiently accurate to be used in isolation. When considered together, sunken eyes, decreased skin turgor, weak pulse and general appearance provide the best explanatory power of the physical signs considered. PMID:25870468

  18. Performance of clinical signs in the diagnosis of dehydration in children with acute gastroenteritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoxha, Teuta; Xhelili, Luan; Azemi, Mehmedali; Avdiu, Muharrem; Ismaili-Jaha, Vlora; Efendija-Beqa, Urata; Grajcevci-Uka, Violeta

    2015-02-01

    Acute evaluation and treatment of children presenting with dehydration represent one of the most common situation in the pediatric emergency department. To identify dehydration in infants and children before treatment, a number of symptoms and clinical signs have been evaluated. The aim of the study was to describe the performance of clinical signs in detecting dehydration in children. Two hundred children aged 1 month to 5 year were involved in our prospective study. The clinical assessment consisted of the ten clinical signs of dehydration, including those recommended by WHO (World Health Organization), heart rate, and capillary refill time. Two hundred patients with diarrhea were enrolled in the study. The mean age was 15.62±9.03 months and 57.5% were male. Of these 121 had a fluid deficit of dehydration were found to have the following respective gains in percent weight at the end of illness: 2.44±0.3, 6.05± 1.01 and, 10.66± 0.28, respectively. All clinical signs were found more frequently with increasing amounts of dehydration(pdehydration (deficit dehydration (deficit 5% to 9%) was 6.5 and among those with severe dehydration (deficit >10%) the median was 9 (p<0.0001, Kruskal-Wallis test). Using stepwise linear regression and a p value of <0.05 for entry into the model, a four-variable model including sunken eyes, skin elasticity, week radial pulse, and general appearance was derived. None of the 10 findings studied, is sufficiently accurate to be used in isolation. When considered together, sunken eyes, decreased skin turgor, weak pulse and general appearance provide the best explanatory power of the physical signs considered.

  19. Norovirus outbreak caused by a new septic system in a dolomite aquifer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borchardt, M. A.; Bradbury, K.R.; Alexander, E.C.; Kolberg, R.J.; Alexander, S.C.; Archer, John R.; Braatz, L.A.; Forest, B.M.; Green, J.A.; Spencer, S. K.

    2011-01-01

    Septic systems that are built in compliance with regulations are generally not expected to be the cause of groundwater borne disease outbreaks, especially in areas with thick vadose zones. However, this case study demonstrates that a disease outbreak can occur in such a setting and outlines the combination of epidemiological, microbiological, and hydrogeological methods used to confirm the source of the outbreak. In early June 2007, 229 patrons and employees of a new restaurant in northeastern Wisconsin were affected by acute gastroenteritis; 6 people were hospitalized. Epidemiological case-control analysis indicated that drinking the restaurant's well water was associated with illness (odds ratio = 3.2, 95% confidence interval = 0.9 to 11.4, P = 0.06). Microbiological analysis (quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction) measured 50 genomic copies per liter of norovirus genogroup I in the well water. Nucleotide sequencing determined the genotype as GI.2 and further showed the identical virus was present in patrons' stool specimens and in the septic tank. Tracer tests using dyes injected at two points in the septic system showed that effluent was traveling from the tanks (through a leaking fitting) and infiltration field to the well in 6 and 15 d, respectively. The restaurant septic system and well (85-m deep, in a fractured dolomite aquifer) both conformed to state building codes. The early arrival of dye in the well, which was 188 m from the septic field and located beneath a 35-m thick vadose zone, demonstrates that in highly vulnerable hydrogeological settings, compliance with regulations may not provide adequate protection from fecal pathogens.

  20. Efficacy of Lactobacillus Reuteri DSM 17938 for the Treatment of Acute Gastroenteritis in Children: Protocol of a Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szymański, Henryk; Szajewska, Hania

    2017-08-23

    Acute gastroenteritis (AGE) is one of the most common diseases among children. Oral rehydration therapy is the key treatment. However, despite proven efficacy, it remains underused. This is because oral rehydration solution neither reduces the frequency of bowel movements and fluid loss nor shortens the duration of illness. Hence, there is interest in adjunctive treatments. According to the 2014 guidelines developed by the European Society for Paediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition, the use of the following probiotics may be considered in the management of children with AGE in addition to rehydration therapy: Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG (low quality of evidence; strong recommendation) and Saccharomyces boulardii (low quality of evidence; strong recommendation). Less compelling evidence is available for Lactobacillus reuteri DSM 17938 (very low quality of evidence; weak recommendation). Considering that evidence on L reuteri remains limited, the goal of the study is to assess the effectiveness of L reuteri DSM 17938 in the treatment of AGE in children. Children vaccinated and not vaccinated against rotavirus will be evaluated separately. This will be a double-blind, placebo-controlled, randomized trial. Children between 1 and 60 months of age with AGE, defined as a change in stool consistency to loose or liquid form (according to the Bristol Stool Form scale or Amsterdam Stool Form scale) and/or an increase in the frequency of evacuations (typically ≥3 in 24 h) lasting for no longer than 5 days, will be recruited. A total of 72 children will receive either L reuteri DSM 17938 at a dose of 2×10 8 colony-forming units twice daily or matching placebo for 5 consecutive days. A similar sample size for rotavirus vaccinated and nonvaccinated children is planned. The primary outcome measure is the duration of diarrhea. Two separate studies and reports for rotavirus vaccinated and nonvaccinated children are planned. The recruitment started in January 2017

  1. Epidemiology of Human Parechovirus Type1 in Clinical Samples from Children with Gastroenteritis Using RT-PCR

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    Dabirmanesh B

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objectives: Human parechovirus type-1 (HPeV-1 is a genus of picornaviridea with a single stranded positive sense RNA genome. In general it seems to be responsible for more gastrointestinal and respiratory syndromes and less responsible for central nervous system (CNS symptoms. Since there is no accurate information about diagnosis and epidemiology of HPeV-1 in Iran and it is very important to distinguish between viral and bacterial diarrhea to decrease the unnecessary use of antibiotics, this study aimed at rapid detection and epidemiology of HPeV-1 in stool samples from children with gastroenteritis using specific RT-PCR. Methods: Viral RNA was isolated from 472 stool samples from children (under 4 years old with diarrhea; CDNA was prepared and amplified using specific primers from 5′untranslated region (5′ UTR of HPeV-1 genome by nested RT-PCR. Amplified DNA product was electrophoresed on 1% agarose gel and a single band of 265 bp was obtained. Data were analyzed by SPSS software. We also performed a comparison between the cell culture (Vero and RT-PCR method for HPeV1 detection.Results: Out of 472 samples examined during two years, 112 samples were HpeV-1 positive (23.7%. The results showed that the prevalence of this virus was in children under one year (6-12 months old with diarrhea (p=0.036 in spring and autumn (p<0.001. Boys had more positive cases than the girls (p<0.001. Out of 20 samples which were found positive by HPeV1 RT-PCR only three of them showed CPE on Vero Cells after a week.Conclusion: The results revealed that RT-PCR is a more practical and sensitive technique for HPeV-1 detection directly from clinical samples, which is valuable for epidemiology. Also, the rapid detection of HPeV1 by RT-PCR can decrease both the unnecessary use of antibiotics and the costs in clinical practice

  2. Epidemiology of Human Parechovirus Type1 in Clinical Samples from Children with Gastroenteritis Using RT-PCR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F Ghazi

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available

    Background and Objectives: Human parechovirus type-1 (HPeV-1 is a genus of picornaviridea with a single stranded positive sense RNA genome. In general it seems to be responsible for more gastrointestinal and respiratory syndromes and less responsible for central nervous system (CNS symptoms. Since there is no accurate information about diagnosis and epidemiology of HPeV-1 in Iran and it is very important to distinguish between viral and bacterial diarrhea to decrease the unnecessary use of antibiotics, this study aimed at rapid detection and epidemiology of HPeV-1 in stool samples from children with gastroenteritis using specific RT-PCR.

     

    Methods: Viral RNA was isolated from 472 stool samples from children (under 4 years old with diarrhea; CDNA was prepared and amplified using specific primers from 5untranslated region (5 UTR of HPeV-1 genome by nested RT-PCR. Amplified DNA product was electrophoresed on 1% agarose gel and a single band of 265 bp was obtained. Data were analyzed by SPSS software. We also performed a comparison between the cell culture (Vero and RT-PCR method for HPeV1 detection.

     

    Results: Out of 472 samples examined during two years, 112 samples were HpeV-1 positive (23.7%. The results showed that the prevalence of this virus was in children under one year (6-12 months old with diarrhea (p=0.036 in spring and autumn (p<0.001. Boys had more positive cases than the girls (p<0.001. Out of 20 samples which were found positive by HPeV1 RT-PCR only three of them showed CPE on Vero Cells after a week.

     

    Conclusion: The results revealed that RT-PCR is a more practical and sensitive technique for HPeV-1 detection directly from clinical samples, which is valuable for epidemiology. Also, the rapid

  3. Rapid intravenous rehydration of children with acute gastroenteritis and dehydration: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iro, M A; Sell, T; Brown, N; Maitland, K

    2018-02-09

    The World Health Organization (WHO) recommends rapid intravenous rehydration, using fluid volumes of 70-100mls/kg over 3-6 h, with some of the initial volume given rapidly as initial fluid boluses to treat hypovolaemic shock for children with acute gastroenteritis (AGE) and severe dehydration. The evidence supporting the safety and efficacy of rapid versus slower rehydration remains uncertain. We conducted a systematic review of randomised controlled trials (RCTs) on 11th of May 2017 comparing different rates of intravenous fluid therapy in children with AGE and moderate or severe dehydration, using standard search terms. Two authors independently assessed trial quality and extracted data. Non-RCTs and non-English articles were excluded. The primary endpoint was mortality and secondary endpoints included adverse events (safety) and treatment efficacy. Of the 1390 studies initially identified, 18 were assessed for eligibility. Of these, 3 studies (n = 464) fulfilled a priori criteria for inclusion; most studied children with moderate dehydration and none were conducted in resource-poor settings. Volumes and rates of fluid replacement varied from 20 to 60 ml/kg given over 1-2 h (fast) versus 2-4 h (slow). There was substantial heterogeneity in methodology between the studies with only one adjudicated to be of high quality. There were no deaths in any study. Safety endpoints only identified oedema (n = 6) and dysnatraemia (n = 2). Pooled analysis showed no significant difference between the rapid and slow intravenous rehydration groups for the proportion of treatment failures (N = 468): pooled RR 1.30 (95% CI: 0.87, 1.93) and the readmission rates (N = 439): pooled RR 1.39 (95% CI: 0.68, 2.85). Despite wide implementation of WHO Plan C guideline for severe AGE, we found no clinical evaluation in resource-limited settings, and only limited evaluation of the rate and volume of rehydration in other parts of the world. Recent concerns over

  4. Multiple outbreaks of gastroenteritis that were associated with 16 funerals and a unique caterer and spanned 6 days, 2011, Québec, Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaulin, Colette; Nguon, Soulyvane; Leblanc, Marie-Andree; Ramsay, Danielle; Roy, Sophie

    2013-09-01

    In January 2011, multiple acute gastroenteritis outbreaks that spanned many days and were related to attendance at funerals were reported to public health units in Quebec. An epidemiological investigation was initiated to identify the source of the contamination and to explain the extent of the contamination over time. Thirty-one cohorts of individuals attended different funerals held between 14 and 19 January. All attendees were served a cold buffet made by the same caterer. Of these 31 cohorts, 16 (with a total of about 800 people) contained individuals who reported being ill after the funeral. Symptoms were mainly diarrhea (89 to 94% of individuals), vomiting (63 to 90%,) and fever (26 to 39%), with a median incubation period of 29 to 33 h and a median duration of symptoms of 24 to 33 h, suggesting norovirus-like infection. Among the 16 cohorts, 3 were selected for cohort studies. Among those three cohorts, the mean illness rate was 68%. Associations were found between those who fell ill and those who had consumed pasta salad (relative risk [RR] = 2.4; P = 0.0022) and ham sandwiches (RR = 1.8; P = 0.0096). No food handlers reported being sick. No stool samples were provided by individuals who became ill. Environmental and food samples were all negative for causative agents. Although the causative agent was not clearly identified, this investigation raised many concerns about the importance of preventing foodborne transmission of viral gastroenteritis and generated some recommendations for management of similar outbreaks.

  5. BROTES DE GASTROENTERITIS AGUDA VÍRICA EN RESIDENCIAS DE ANCIANOS. SISTEMA DE DETECCIÓN POR UMBRAL DE PREVALENCIA (SIDUP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan B Bellido-Blasco

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Se describen las intervenciones llevadas a cabo en una unidad de epidemiología local, durante varios años, relacionadas con la epidemiología de la gastroenteritis por norovirus en residencias de ancianos de Castellón. Desde varios brotes acaecidos en un mismo geriátrico, hasta el estudio de los casos esporádicos que determinan la situación endémica en varias residencias. Este trabajo se centra en el análisis de esa situación endémica de síntomas digestivos en periodos de silencio epidémico y la propuesta de un método sencillo para detectar el inicio de brotes de GEA de transmisión progresiva (persona- persona que hemos denominado Sistema de Detección por Umbral de Prevalencia (SiDUP. Se discute el espectro epidemiológico de la gastroenteritis por norovirus en estas instituciones para personas mayores.

  6. Viral Gastroenteritis (Stomach Flu)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of dehydration include excessive thirst, dry mouth, deep yellow urine or little or no urine, and severe weakness, dizziness or lightheadedness You notice blood in your bowel movements You have a fever above 104 F (40 C) For infants and ...

  7. Viral gastroenteritis (stomach flu)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... provider will look for signs of dehydration , including: Dry or sticky mouth Lethargy or coma (severe dehydration) Low blood pressure Low or no urine output, concentrated urine that looks dark yellow Sunken soft spots (fontanelles) on the top of an infant's head ...

  8. Trichinosis - case presentation

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    Rajko Saletinger

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Trichinosis is a widespread zoonosis acquired by ingestion of undercooked meat infected with the larvae of Trichinella parasites. The disease has variable clinical manifestations ranging from asymptomatic to fatal. Majority of infections is caused by Trichinella spiralis, although there are some cases caused by other species. The dramatic decline of trichinosis reflects changes in industrial practices and increased public awareness. The majority of human cases are now associated with wild game meat and noncommercial pork. The case of previously healthy, young man with trichinosis is presented. The disease was determined with serologic testing and cured with albendazole. The source of infection has not been determined.Conclusions: In patients with fever, mialgias and eosinophilia infection with tissue nematodes should always be taken in consideration. In those who have recently consumed raw or undercooked pork and wild game meat we should think about trichinosis. The disease is rare in Slovenia.

  9. Congenital nasal pyriform aperture stenosis as a cause of respiratory distress in newborns: presentation diagnosed by menas of CT; Estenosis congenita de la abertura piriforme nasal como causa de distress respiratorio en el recien nacido: aportacion de cuatro casos diagnosticados mediante TC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wichoff, A.; Perez-Candela, V.; Romera, C.; Lopez-Morales, L. [Hospital Universitario Materno-Infantil de Canarias. Las Palmas de Gran Canarias. (Spain)

    2002-07-01

    Congenital nasal pyriform aperture stenosis (CNPAS) is a rare cause of newborn airway obstruction. It can be clinically indistinguishable from choanal atresia, which is much more frequent. CT confirms the diagnosis by revealing in detail the anatomical alterations underlying this anomaly. These might or might not occur in association with other alterations. We present 4 cases of CNPAS, all of which presented respiratory distress and clinical symptoms similar to those of choanal atresia in newborn children. The premature diagnosis and a conventional treatment of tube placement in order to keep the airway open, until the pyriform aperture grows large enough to permit normal breathing, resulted in recovery of the patients. (Author) 12 refs.

  10. Performance of a Mobile Phone App-Based Participatory Syndromic Surveillance System for Acute Febrile Illness and Acute Gastroenteritis in Rural Guatemala.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olson, Daniel; Lamb, Molly; Lopez, Maria Renee; Colborn, Kathryn; Paniagua-Avila, Alejandra; Zacarias, Alma; Zambrano-Perilla, Ricardo; Rodríguez-Castro, Sergio Ricardo; Cordon-Rosales, Celia; Asturias, Edwin Jose

    2017-11-09

    With their increasing availability in resource-limited settings, mobile phones may provide an important tool for participatory syndromic surveillance, in which users provide symptom data directly into a centralized database. We studied the performance of a mobile phone app-based participatory syndromic surveillance system for collecting syndromic data (acute febrile illness and acute gastroenteritis) to detect dengue virus and norovirus on a cohort of children living in a low-resource and rural area of Guatemala. Randomized households were provided with a mobile phone and asked to submit weekly reports using a symptom diary app (Vigilant-e). Participants reporting acute febrile illness or acute gastroenteritis answered additional questions using a decision-tree algorithm and were subsequently visited at home by a study nurse who performed a second interview and collected samples for dengue virus if confirmed acute febrile illness and norovirus if acute gastroenteritis. We analyzed risk factors associated with decreased self-reporting of syndromic data using the Vigilant-e app and evaluated strategies to improve self-reporting. We also assessed agreement between self-report and nurse-collected data obtained during home visits. From April 2015 to June 2016, 469 children in 207 households provided 471 person-years of observation. Mean weekly symptom reporting rate was 78% (range 58%-89%). Households with a poor (mobile phones for text messaging at study enrollment (61%, 35/57 vs 76.7%, 115/150; RR 0.6, 95% CI 0.4-0.9), and were less likely to access care at the local public clinic (35%, 20/57 vs 67.3%, 101/150; RR 0.4, 95% CI 0.2-0.6). Parents of female enrolled participants were more likely to have low response rate (57.1%, 84/147 vs 43.8%, 141/322; RR 1.4, 95% CI 1.1-1.9). Several external factors (cellular tower collapse, contentious elections) were associated with periods of decreased reporting. Poor response rate (mobile phone app-based participatory syndromic

  11. A comparative analysis of methylome profiles of Campylobacter jejuni sheep abortion isolate and gastroenteric strains using PacBio data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathy T Mou

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Campylobacter jejuni is a leading cause of human gastrointestinal disease and small ruminant abortions in the United States. The recent emergence of a highly virulent, tetracycline-resistant C. jejuni subsp. jejuni sheep abortion clone (clone SA in the United States, and that strain’s association with human disease, has resulted in a heightened awareness of the zoonotic potential of this organism. Pacific Biosciences’ Single Molecule, Real-Time sequencing technology was used to explore the variation in the genome-wide methylation patterns of the abortifacient clone SA (IA3902 and phenotypically distinct gastrointestinal-specific C. jejuni strains (NCTC 11168 and 81-176. Several notable differences were discovered that distinguished the methylome of IA3902 from that of 11168 and 81-176: identification of motifs novel to IA3902, genome-specific hypo- and hypermethylated regions, strain level variability in genes methylated, and differences in the types of methylation motifs present in each strain. These observations suggest a possible role of methylation in the contrasting disease presentations of these three C. jejuni strains. In addition, the methylation profiles between IA3902 and a luxS mutant were explored to determine if variations in methylation patterns could be identified that might explain the role of LuxS-dependent methyl recycling in IA3902 abortifacient potential.

  12. Vulvovaginitis: causes and management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierce, A M; Hart, C A

    1992-01-01

    Over a period of 33 months in a paediatric accident and emergency department, the clinical pattern and possible causes of vulvovaginitis were studied prospectively in 200 girls presenting with genital discharge, irritation, pain, or redness. The major causes were poor hygiene and threadworms. The suspicion of sexual abuse arose in a few girls but no organisms of sexually transmitted disease were found. Urinary symptoms were common but only 20 patients had a significant bacteriuria and 40 had sterile pyuria. Specific skin problems occurred in 28 cases. Simple measures to improve hygiene and treatment of threadworms gave effective relief. Genital irritation caused urinary symptoms with no clinical evidence of infection, and it is advised that antibiotic treatment should await urine culture. Specific skin problems require help from a dermatologist. The possibility of sexual abuse must be considered especially if the vulvovaginitis is persistent or recurrent after adequate treatment. PMID:1580682

  13. Atypical Presentations of Tularemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odegaard, Karah; Boersma, Beth; Keegan, James

    2017-05-01

    Francisella tularensis is a gram-negative coccobacillus that causes a condition commonly referred to as tularemia. There has been a dramatic increase in tularemia cases reported in South Dakota, many of which were challenging to diagnose due to atypical clinical manifestations. We describe an interesting case of pneumonic tularemia and summarize six similar cases, several of which presented with lung nodules suggestive of malignancy. According to the literature, this is only the third outbreak of pneumonic tularemia reported in the U.S. We believe it is important for clinicians to be aware of the increased incidence of tularemia in the area and to be vigilant in the diagnosis and management of these atypically presenting cases. Copyright© South Dakota State Medical Association.

  14. Hypertension presenting early in pregnancy

    OpenAIRE

    Melvin, Audrey; Kinsley, Brendan

    2015-01-01

    Key Clinical Message Paraganglioma in pregnancy is an exceedingly rare and potentially life?threatening diagnosis. It is important that the clinicians consider secondary causes when women present with hypertension in early pregnancy.

  15. Relationships between milk mid-IR predicted gastro-enteric methane production and the technical and financial performance of commercial dairy herds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delhez, P; Wyzen, B; Dalcq, A-C; Colinet, F G; Reding, E; Vanlierde, A; Dehareng, F; Gengler, N; Soyeurt, H

    2017-12-22

    Considering economic and environmental issues is important in ensuring the sustainability of dairy farms. The objective of this study was to investigate univariate relationships between lactating dairy cow gastro-enteric methane (CH4) production predicted from milk mid-IR (MIR) spectra and technico-economic variables by the use of large scale and on-farm data. A total of 525 697 individual CH4 predictions from milk MIR spectra (MIR-CH4 (g/day)) of milk samples collected on 206 farms during the Walloon milk recording scheme were used to create a MIR-CH4 prediction for each herd and year (HYMIR-CH4). These predictions were merged with dairy herd accounting data. This allowed a simultaneous study of HYMIR-CH4 and 42 technical and economic variables for 1024 herd and year records from 2007 to 2014. Pearson correlation coefficients (r) were used to assess significant relationships (P<0.05). Low HYMIR-CH4 was significantly associated with, amongst others, lower fat and protein corrected milk (FPCM) yield (r=0.18), lower milk fat and protein content (r=0.38 and 0.33, respectively), lower quantity of milk produced from forages (r=0.12) and suboptimal reproduction and health performance (e.g. longer calving interval (r=-0.21) and higher culling rate (r=-0.15)). Concerning economic results, low HYMIR-CH4 was significantly associated with lower gross margin per cow (r=0.19) and per litre FPCM (r=0.09). To conclude, this study suggested that low lactating dairy cow gastro-enteric CH4 production tended to be associated with more extensive or suboptimal management practices, which could lead to lower profitability. The observed low correlations suggest complex interactions between variables due to the use of on-farm data with large variability in technical and management practices.

  16. The Presence of Norovirus and Adenovirus on Environmental Surfaces in Relation to the Hygienic Level in Food Service Operations Associated with a Suspected Gastroenteritis Outbreak.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maunula, Leena; Rönnqvist, M; Åberg, R; Lunden, J; Nevas, M

    2017-09-01

    Norovirus (NoV) gastroenteritis outbreaks appear frequently in food service operations (FSOs), such as in restaurants and canteens. In this study the presence of NoV and adenovirus (AdV) genomes was investigated on the surfaces of premises, especially in kitchens, of 30 FSOs where foodborne gastroenteritis outbreaks were suspected. The objective was to establish a possible association between the presence of virus genomes on surfaces and a visual hygienic status of the FSOs. NoV genome was found in 11 and AdV genome in 8 out of 30 FSOs. In total, 291 swabs were taken, of which 8.9% contained NoV and 5.8% AdV genome. The presence of NoV genomes on the surfaces was not found to associate with lower hygiene level of the premises when based on visual inspection; most (7/9) of the FSOs with NoV contamination on surfaces and a completed evaluation form had a good hygiene level (the best category). Restaurants had a significantly lower proportion of NoV-positive swabs compared to other FSOs (canteens, cafeteria, schools etc.) taken together (p = 0.00014). The presence of a designated break room for the workers was found to be significantly more common in AdV-negative kitchens (p = 0.046). Our findings suggest that swabbing is necessary for revealing viral contamination of surfaces and emphasis of hygiene inspections should be on the food handling procedures, and the education of food workers on virus transmission.

  17. Hypothalamic demyelination causing panhypopituitarism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dixon-Douglas, Julia; Burgess, John; Dreyer, Michael

    2018-05-01

    Hypothalamic involvement in multiple sclerosis (MS) and neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorder (NMOSD) is rare and endocrinopathies involving the hypothalamic-pituitary axis in patients with demyelinating conditions have rarely been reported. We present two cases of MS/NMOSD with associated hypothalamic-pituitary involvement and subsequent hypopituitarism, including the first report of a patient with hypothalamic demyelination causing panhypopituitarism. Differential diagnoses, including alemtuzumab-related and primary pituitary pathology are discussed. © 2018 Royal Australasian College of Physicians.

  18. Anaerobic Digestion Foaming Causes

    OpenAIRE

    Ganidi, Nafsika

    2008-01-01

    Anaerobic digestion foaming has been encountered in several sewage treatment plants in the UK. Foaming has raised major concerns for the water utilities due to significant impacts on process efficiency and operational costs. Several foaming causes have been suggested over the past few years by researchers. However, the supporting experimental information is limited and in some cases site specific. The present report aimed to provide a better understanding of the anaerobic di...

  19. [An epidemiological investigation on a food-born outbreak of noroviru caused by Sydney 2012 G II.4 strain].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Wen-Feng; Xie, Hua-Ping; Liu, Yu-Fei; Yuan, Jun; Xiao, Xin-Cai; Ding, Peng